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Sample records for juvenile hormone regulates

  1. Regulation of the juvenile hormone titre in the Colorado potato beetle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, S.J.

    1978-01-01

    Three main topics were investigated in regulation of the titre of juvenile hormone in haemolymph of the Colorado potato beetle ( Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say): enzymic breakdown of the hormone; binding and protection of the hormone by carrier proteins; the synthetic capacity of

  2. Evolution of Ecdysis and Metamorphosis in Arthropods: The Rise of Regulation of Juvenile Hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Sam P S; Huang, Juan; Bendena, William G; Tobe, Stephen S; Hui, Jerome H L

    2015-11-01

    Arthropods are the most successful group of animals, and are found in diverse habitats; they account for more than 80% of described animal species. A rigid exoskeleton is a common feature that is shared across the different groups of arthropods. The exoskeleton offers protection and is shed between developmental stages via a unique evolutionarily conserved process known as molting/ecdysis. Molting is triggered by steroid hormones, the ecdysteroids, and the regulation of their biosynthesis has long been proposed as a contributor to the success of arthropods during evolution. Nevertheless, how novelties arose that contributed to the diversifications of arthropods remain unclear. Juvenile hormones (JHs) are sequiterpenoids that were thought to be unique to insects, modulating the timing of metamorphosis in conjunction with the actions of ecdysteroids. Here, we revisit the old question of "the role that the sesquiterpenoids play in arthropod evolution" with a focus on the neglected non-insect arthropods. We hypothesize that the sesquiterpenoid, methyl farnesoate (MF), had already established regulatory functions in the last common ancestor of arthropods, and the difference in the regulation of biosynthesis and degradation of sesquiterpenoids, such as MF and JH, was another major driving force in the successful radiation of insects. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. TGF-β signaling in insects regulates metamorphosis via juvenile hormone biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Yoshiyasu; Tomonari, Sayuri; Matsuoka, Yuji; Watanabe, Takahito; Miyawaki, Katsuyuki; Bando, Tetsuya; Tomioka, Kenji; Ohuchi, Hideyo; Noji, Sumihare; Mito, Taro

    2016-05-17

    Although butterflies undergo a dramatic morphological transformation from larva to adult via a pupal stage (holometamorphosis), crickets undergo a metamorphosis from nymph to adult without formation of a pupa (hemimetamorphosis). Despite these differences, both processes are regulated by common mechanisms that involve 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and juvenile hormone (JH). JH regulates many aspects of insect physiology, such as development, reproduction, diapause, and metamorphosis. Consequently, strict regulation of JH levels is crucial throughout an insect's life cycle. However, it remains unclear how JH synthesis is regulated. Here, we report that in the corpora allata of the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus, Myoglianin (Gb'Myo), a homolog of Drosophila Myoglianin/vertebrate GDF8/11, is involved in the down-regulation of JH production by suppressing the expression of a gene encoding JH acid O-methyltransferase, Gb'jhamt In contrast, JH production is up-regulated by Decapentaplegic (Gb'Dpp) and Glass-bottom boat/60A (Gb'Gbb) signaling that occurs as part of the transcriptional activation of Gb'jhamt Gb'Myo defines the nature of each developmental transition by regulating JH titer and the interactions between JH and 20E. When Gb'myo expression is suppressed, the activation of Gb'jhamt expression and secretion of 20E induce molting, thereby leading to the next instar before the last nymphal instar. Conversely, high Gb'myo expression induces metamorphosis during the last nymphal instar through the cessation of JH synthesis. Gb'myo also regulates final insect size. Because Myo/GDF8/11 and Dpp/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)2/4-Gbb/BMP5-8 are conserved in both invertebrates and vertebrates, the present findings provide common regulatory mechanisms for endocrine control of animal development.

  4. Regulation of renal NaPi-2 expression and tubular phosphate reabsorption by growth hormone in the juvenile rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woda, Craig B; Halaihel, Nabil; Wilson, Paul V; Haramati, Aviad; Levi, Moshe; Mulroney, Susan E

    2004-07-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is an important factor in the developmental adaptation to enhance P(i) reabsorption; however, the nephron sites and mechanisms by which GH regulates renal P(i) uptake remain unclear and are the focus of the present study. Micropuncture experiments were performed after acute thyroparathyroidectomy in the presence and absence of parathyroid hormone (PTH) in adult (14- to 17-wk old), juvenile (4-wk old), and GH-suppressed juvenile male rats. While the phosphaturic effect of PTH was blunted in the juvenile rat compared with the adult, suppression of GH in the juvenile restored fractional P(i) excretion to adult levels. In the presence or absence of PTH, GH suppression in the juvenile rat caused a significant increase in the fractional P(i) delivery to the late proximal convoluted (PCT) and early distal tubule, so that delivery was not different from that in adults. These data were confirmed by P(i) uptake studies into brush-border membrane (BBM) vesicles. Immunofluorescence studies indicate increased BBM type IIa NaP(i) cotransporter (NaPi-2) expression in the juvenile compared with adult rat, and GH suppression reduced NaPi-2 expression to levels observed in the adult. GH replacement in the [N-acetyl-Tyr(1)-d-Arg(2)]-GRF-(1-29)-NH(2)-treated juveniles restored high NaPi-2 expression and P(i) uptake. Together, these novel results demonstrate that the presence of GH in the juvenile animal is crucial for the early developmental upregulation of BBM NaPi-2 and, most importantly, describe the enhanced P(i) reabsorption along the PCT and proximal straight nephron segments in the juvenile rat.

  5. Juvenile hormone III, hydroprene and a juvenogen as soldier caste differentiation regulators in three Reticulitermes species: potential of juvenile hormone analogues in termite control

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrdý, Ivan; Kuldová, Jelena; Hanus, Robert; Wimmer, Zdeněk

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 9 (2006), s. 848-854 ISSN 1526-498X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IBS4055104 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : termites * juvenile hormone Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.428, year: 2006

  6. TOR Pathway-Mediated Juvenile Hormone Synthesis Regulates Nutrient-Dependent Female Reproduction in Nilaparvata lugens (Stål).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kai; Chen, Xia; Liu, Wen-Ting; Zhou, Qiang

    2016-03-28

    The "target of rapamycin" (TOR) nutritional signaling pathway and juvenile hormone (JH) regulation of vitellogenesis has been known for a long time. However, the interplay between these two pathways regulating vitellogenin (Vg) expression remains obscure. Here, we first demonstrated the key role of amino acids (AAs) in activation of Vg synthesis and egg development in Nilaparvata lugens using chemically defined artificial diets. AAs induced the expression of TOR and S6K (S6 kinase), whereas RNAi-mediated silencing of these two TOR pathway genes and rapamycin application strongly inhibited the AAs-induced Vg synthesis. Furthermore, knockdown of Rheb (Ras homologue enriched in brain), TOR, S6K and application of rapamycin resulted in a dramatic reduction in the mRNA levels of jmtN (juvenile hormone acid methyltransferase, JHAMT). Application of JH III on the RNAi (Rheb and TOR) and rapamycin-treated females partially rescued the Vg expression. Conversely, knockdown of either jmtN or met (methoprene-tolerant, JH receptor) and application of JH III had no effects on mRNA levels of Rheb, TOR and S6K and phosphorylation of S6K. In summary, our results demonstrate that the TOR pathway induces JH biosynthesis that in turn regulates AAs-mediated Vg synthesis in N. lugens.

  7. Juvenile hormone prevents 20-hydroxyecdysone-induced metamorphosis by regulating the phosphorylation of a newly identified broad protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Mei-Juan; Liu, Wen; Pei, Xu-Yang; Li, Xiang-Ru; He, Hong-Juan; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2014-09-19

    The steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) initiates insect molting and metamorphosis. By contrast, juvenile hormone (JH) prevents metamorphosis. However, the mechanism by which JH inhibits metamorphosis remains unclear. In this study, we propose that JH induces the phosphorylation of Broad isoform Z7 (BrZ7), a newly identified protein, to inhibit 20E-mediated metamorphosis in the lepidopteran insect Helicoverpa armigera. The knockdown of BrZ7 in larvae inhibited metamorphosis by repressing the expression of the 20E response gene. BrZ7 was weakly expressed and phosphorylated during larval growth but highly expressed and non-phosphorylated during metamorphosis. JH regulated the rapid phosphorylation of BrZ7 via a G-protein-coupled receptor-, phospholipase C-, and protein kinase C-triggered pathway. The phosphorylated BrZ7 bound to the 5'-regulatory region of calponin to regulate its expression in the JH pathway. Exogenous JH induced BrZ7 phosphorylation to prevent metamorphosis by suppressing 20E-related gene transcription. JH promoted non-phosphorylated calponin interacting with ultraspiracle protein to activate the JH pathway and antagonize the 20E pathway. This study reveals one of the possible mechanisms by which JH counteracts 20E-regulated metamorphosis by inducing the phosphorylation of BrZ7. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Juvenile Hormone Prevents 20-Hydroxyecdysone-induced Metamorphosis by Regulating the Phosphorylation of a Newly Identified Broad Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Mei-Juan; Liu, Wen; Pei, Xu-Yang; Li, Xiang-Ru; He, Hong-Juan; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2014-01-01

    The steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) initiates insect molting and metamorphosis. By contrast, juvenile hormone (JH) prevents metamorphosis. However, the mechanism by which JH inhibits metamorphosis remains unclear. In this study, we propose that JH induces the phosphorylation of Broad isoform Z7 (BrZ7), a newly identified protein, to inhibit 20E-mediated metamorphosis in the lepidopteran insect Helicoverpa armigera. The knockdown of BrZ7 in larvae inhibited metamorphosis by repressing the expression of the 20E response gene. BrZ7 was weakly expressed and phosphorylated during larval growth but highly expressed and non-phosphorylated during metamorphosis. JH regulated the rapid phosphorylation of BrZ7 via a G-protein-coupled receptor-, phospholipase C-, and protein kinase C-triggered pathway. The phosphorylated BrZ7 bound to the 5′-regulatory region of calponin to regulate its expression in the JH pathway. Exogenous JH induced BrZ7 phosphorylation to prevent metamorphosis by suppressing 20E-related gene transcription. JH promoted non-phosphorylated calponin interacting with ultraspiracle protein to activate the JH pathway and antagonize the 20E pathway. This study reveals one of the possible mechanisms by which JH counteracts 20E-regulated metamorphosis by inducing the phosphorylation of BrZ7. PMID:25096576

  9. MiR-2 family regulates insect metamorphosis by controlling the juvenile hormone signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Jesus; Montañez, Raúl; Belles, Xavier

    2015-03-24

    In 2009 we reported that depletion of Dicer-1, the enzyme that catalyzes the final step of miRNA biosynthesis, prevents metamorphosis in Blattella germanica. However, the precise regulatory roles of miRNAs in the process have remained elusive. In the present work, we have observed that Dicer-1 depletion results in an increase of mRNA levels of Krüppel homolog 1 (Kr-h1), a juvenile hormone-dependent transcription factor that represses metamorphosis, and that depletion of Kr-h1 expression in Dicer-1 knockdown individuals rescues metamorphosis. We have also found that the 3'UTR of Kr-h1 mRNA contains a functional binding site for miR-2 family miRNAs (for miR-2, miR-13a, and miR-13b). These data suggest that metamorphosis impairment caused by Dicer-1 and miRNA depletion is due to a deregulation of Kr-h1 expression and that this deregulation is derived from a deficiency of miR-2 miRNAs. We corroborated this by treating the last nymphal instar of B. germanica with an miR-2 inhibitor, which impaired metamorphosis, and by treating Dicer-1-depleted individuals with an miR-2 mimic to allow nymphal-to-adult metamorphosis to proceed. Taken together, the data indicate that miR-2 miRNAs scavenge Kr-h1 transcripts when the transition from nymph to adult should be taking place, thus crucially contributing to the correct culmination of metamorphosis.

  10. The FOXO transcription factor controls insect growth and development by regulating juvenile hormone degradation in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Baosheng; Huang, Yuping; Xu, Jun; Shiotsuki, Takahiro; Bai, Hua; Palli, Subba Reddy; Huang, Yongping; Tan, Anjiang

    2017-07-14

    Forkhead box O (FOXO) functions as the terminal transcription factor of the insulin signaling pathway and regulates multiple physiological processes in many organisms, including lifespan in insects. However, how FOXO interacts with hormone signaling to modulate insect growth and development is largely unknown. Here, using the transgene-based CRISPR/Cas9 system, we generated and characterized mutants of the silkworm Bombyx mori FOXO ( BmFOXO ) to elucidate its physiological functions during development of this lepidopteran insect. The BmFOXO mutant (FOXO-M) exhibited growth delays from the first larval stage and showed precocious metamorphosis, pupating at the end of the fourth instar (trimolter) rather than at the end of the fifth instar as in the wild-type (WT) animals. However, different from previous reports on precocious metamorphosis caused by juvenile hormone (JH) deficiency in silkworm mutants, the total developmental time of the larval period in the FOXO-M was comparable with that of the WT. Exogenous application of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) or of the JH analog rescued the trimolter phenotype. RNA-seq and gene expression analyses indicated that genes involved in JH degradation but not in JH biosynthesis were up-regulated in the FOXO-M compared with the WT animals. Moreover, we identified several FOXO-binding sites in the promoter of genes coding for JH-degradation enzymes. These results suggest that FOXO regulates JH degradation rather than its biosynthesis, which further modulates hormone homeostasis to control growth and development in B. mori In conclusion, we have uncovered a pivotal role for FOXO in regulating JH signaling to control insect development. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Conifer Diterpene Resin Acids Disrupt Juvenile Hormone-Mediated Endocrine Regulation in the Indian Meal Moth Plodia interpunctella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun-Woo; Yun, Chan-Seok; Jeon, Jun Hyoung; Kim, Ji-Ae; Park, Doo-Sang; Ryu, Hyung Won; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Song, Hyuk-Hwan; Shin, Yunhee; Jung, Chan Sik; Shin, Sang Woon

    2017-07-01

    Diterpene resin acids (DRAs) are important components of oleoresin and greatly contribute to the defense strategies of conifers against herbivorous insects. In the present study, we determined that DRAs function as insect juvenile hormone (JH) antagonists that interfere with the juvenile hormone-mediated binding of the JH receptor Methoprene-tolerant (Met) and steroid receptor coactivator (SRC). Using a yeast two-hybrid system transformed with Met and SRC from the Indian meal moth Plodia interpunctella, we tested the interfering activity of 3704 plant extracts against JH III-mediated Met-SRC binding. Plant extracts from conifers, especially members of the Pinaceae, exhibited strong interfering activity, and four active interfering DRAs (7α-dehydroabietic acid, 7-oxodehydroabietic acid, dehydroabietic acid, and sandaracopimaric acid) were isolated from roots of the Japanese pine Pinus densiflora. The four isolated DRAs, along with abietic acid, disrupted the juvenile hormone-mediated binding of P. interpunctella Met and SRC, although only 7-oxodehydroabietic acid disrupted larval development. These results demonstrate that DRAs may play a defensive role against herbivorous insects via insect endocrine-disrupting activity.

  12. Molecular basis of juvenile hormone signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jindra, Marek; Bellés, X.; Shinoda, T.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, Oct 09 (2015), s. 39-46 ISSN 2214-5745 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-23681S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : juvenile hormone * JH receptor * Drosophila melanogaster Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.719, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214574515001297

  13. A mutation in the receptor Methoprene-tolerant alters juvenile hormone response in insects and crustaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Toyota, Kenji; Hirakawa, Ikumi; Ogino, Yukiko; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Oda, Shigeto; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Miura, Toru; Colbourne, John K; Iguchi, Taisen

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile hormone is an essential regulator of major developmental and life history events in arthropods. Most of the insects use juvenile hormone III as the innate juvenile hormone ligand. By contrast, crustaceans use methyl farnesoate. Despite this difference that is tied to their deep evolutionary divergence, the process of this ligand transition is unknown. Here we show that a single amino-acid substitution in the receptor Methoprene-tolerant has an important role during evolution of the arthropod juvenile hormone pathway. Microcrustacea Daphnia pulex and D. magna share a juvenile hormone signal transduction pathway with insects, involving Methoprene-tolerant and steroid receptor coactivator proteins that form a heterodimer in response to various juvenoids. Juvenile hormone-binding pockets of the orthologous genes differ by only two amino acids, yet a single substitution within Daphnia Met enhances the receptor's responsiveness to juvenile hormone III. These results indicate that this mutation within an ancestral insect lineage contributed to the evolution of a juvenile hormone III receptor system.

  14. ISOLATION OF JUVENILE HORMONES ESTERASE AND ITS PARTIAL CDNA CLONE FROM THE BEETLE, TENEBRIO MOLITOR. (R825433)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile hormone esterase (JHE) plays an essential role in insect development. It is partially responsible for the clearance of juvenile hormone (JH) which regulates various aspects of insect development and reproduction. Because of its role in regulating JH titer, this enzyme...

  15. NMR assignments of juvenile hormone binding protein in complex with JH III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Rintaro; Tase, Akira; Fujimoto, Zui; Shiotsuki, Takahiro; Yamazaki, Toshimasa

    2009-06-01

    A hemolymph juvenile hormone binding protein (JHBP) shuttles hydrophobic JH, a key hormone in regulation of the insect life cycle, from the site of the JH biosynthesis to the cells of target organs. We report complete NMR chemical shift assignments of Bombyx mori JHBP in the JH III-bound state.

  16. Green tea proanthocyanidins cause impairment of hormone-regulated larval development and reproductive fitness via repression of juvenile hormone acid methyltransferase, insulin-like peptide and cytochrome P450 genes in Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson M Muema

    Full Text Available Successful optimization of plant-derived compounds into control of nuisance insects would benefit from scientifically validated targets. However, the close association between the genotypic responses and physiological toxicity effects mediated by these compounds remains underexplored. In this study, we evaluated the sublethal dose effects of proanthocyanidins (PAs sourced from green tea (Camellia sinensis on life history traits of Anopheles gambiae (sensu stricto mosquitoes with an aim to unravel the probable molecular targets. Based on the induced phenotypic effects, genes selected for study targeted juvenile hormone (JH biosynthesis, signal transduction, oxidative stress response and xenobiotic detoxification in addition to vitellogenesis in females. Our findings suggest that chronic exposure of larval stages (L3/L4 to sublethal dose of 5 ppm dramatically extended larval developmental period for up to 12 days, slowed down pupation rates, induced abnormal larval-pupal intermediates and caused 100% inhibition of adult emergence. Further, females exhibited significant interference of fecundity and egg hatchability relative to controls (p < 0.001. Using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR, our findings show that PA-treated larvae exhibited significant repression of AgamJHAMT (p < 0.001, AgamILP1 (p < 0.001 and AgamCYP6M2 (p < 0.001 with up-regulation of Hsp70 (p < 0.001. Females exposed as larvae demonstrated down-regulation of AgamVg (p = 0.03, AgamILP1 (p = 0.009, AgamCYP6M2 (p = 0.05 and AgamJHAMT (p = 0.02. Our findings support that C. sinensis proanthocyanidins affect important vectorial capacity components such as mosquito survival rates and reproductive fitness thus could be potentially used for controlling populations of malaria vectors.

  17. Differential Juvenile Hormone Variations in Scale Insect Extreme Sexual Dimorphism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Mifom Vea

    Full Text Available Scale insects have evolved extreme sexual dimorphism, as demonstrated by sedentary juvenile-like females and ephemeral winged males. This dimorphism is established during the post-embryonic development; however, the underlying regulatory mechanisms have not yet been examined. We herein assessed the role of juvenile hormone (JH on the diverging developmental pathways occurring in the male and female Japanese mealybug Planococcus kraunhiae (Kuwana. We provide, for the first time, detailed gene expression profiles related to JH signaling in scale insects. Prior to adult emergence, the transcript levels of JH acid O-methyltransferase, encoding a rate-limiting enzyme in JH biosynthesis, were higher in males than in females, suggesting that JH levels are higher in males. Furthermore, male quiescent pupal-like stages were associated with higher transcript levels of the JH receptor gene, Methoprene-tolerant and its co-activator taiman, as well as the JH early-response genes, Krüppel homolog 1 and broad. The exposure of male juveniles to an ectopic JH mimic prolonged the expression of Krüppel homolog 1 and broad, and delayed adult emergence by producing a supernumeral pupal stage. We propose that male wing development is first induced by up-regulated JH signaling compared to female expression pattern, but a decrease at the end of the prepupal stage is necessary for adult emergence, as evidenced by the JH mimic treatments. Furthermore, wing development seems linked to JH titers as JHM treatments on the pupal stage led to wing deformation. The female pedomorphic appearance was not reflected by the maintenance of high levels of JH. The results in this study suggest that differential variations in JH signaling may be responsible for sex-specific and radically different modes of metamorphosis.

  18. Synthesis and binding affinity of an iodinated juvenile hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prestwich, G.D.; Eng, W.S.; Robles, S.; Vogt, R.G.; Wisniewski, J.R.; Wawrzenczyk, C.

    1988-01-25

    The synthesis of the first iodinated juvenile hormone (JH) in enantiomerically enriched form is reported. This chiral compound, 12-iodo-JH I, has an iodine atom replacing a methyl group of the natural insect juvenile hormone, JH I, which is important in regulating morphogenesis and reproduction in the Lepidoptera. The unlabeled compound shows approximately 10% of the relative binding affinity for the larval hemolymph JH binding protein (JHBP) of Manduca sexta, which specifically binds natural /sup 3/H-10R,11S-JH I (labeled at 58 Ci/mmol) with a KD of 8 X 10(-8) M. It is also approximately one-tenth as biologically active as JH I in the black Manduca and epidermal commitment assays. The 12-hydroxy and 12-oxo compounds are poor competitors and are also biologically inactive. The radioiodinated (/sup 125/I)12-iodo-JH I can be prepared in low yield at greater than 2500 Ci/mmol by nucleophilic displacement using no-carrier-added /sup 125/I-labeled sodium iodide in acetone; however, synthesis using sodium iodide carrier to give the approximately 50 Ci/mmol radioiodinated ligand proceeds in higher radiochemical yield with fewer by-products and provides a radioligand which is more readily handled in binding assays. The KD of (/sup 125/I)12-iodo-JH I was determined for hemolymph JHBP of three insects: M. sexta, 795 nM; Galleria mellonella, 47 nM; Locusta migratoria, 77 nM. The selectivity of 12-iodo-JH I for the 32-kDa JHBP of M. sexta was demonstrated by direct autoradiography of a native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gel of larval hemolymph incubated with the radioiodinated ligand. Thus, the in vitro and in vivo activity of 12-iodo-JH I indicate that it can serve as an important new gamma-emitting probe in the search for JH receptor proteins in target tissues.

  19. Insect juvenile hormone: from "status quo" to high society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hartfelder

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile hormone (JH exerts pleiotropic functions during insect life cycles. The regulation of JH biosynthesis by neuropeptides and biogenic amines, as well as the transport of JH by specific binding proteins is now well understood. In contrast, comprehending its mode of action on target organs is still hampered by the difficulties in isolating specific receptors. In concert with ecdysteroids, JH orchestrates molting and metamorphosis, and its modulatory function in molting processes has gained it the attribute "status quo" hormone. Whereas the metamorphic role of JH appears to have been widely conserved, its role in reproduction has been subject to many modifications. In many species, JH stimulates vitellogenin synthesis and uptake. In mosquitoes, however, this function has been transferred to ecdysteroids, and JH primes the ecdysteroid response of developing follicles. As reproduction includes a variety of specific behaviors, including migration and diapause, JH has come to function as a master regulator in insect reproduction. The peak of pleiotropy was definitely reached in insects exhibiting facultative polymorphisms. In wing-dimorphic crickets, differential activation of JH esterase determines wing length. The evolution of sociality in Isoptera and Hymenoptera has also extensively relied on JH. In primitively social wasps and bumble bees, JH integrates dominance position with reproductive status. In highly social insects, such as the honey bee, JH has lost its gonadotropic role and now regulates division of labor in the worker caste. Its metamorphic role has been extensively explored in the morphological differentiation of queens and workers, and in the generation of worker polymorphism, such as observed in ants.

  20. Growth hormone producing prolactinoma in juvenile cystinosis: a simple coincidence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besouw, M.; Levtchenko, E.N.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Noordam, C.

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile cystinosis was diagnosed in a patient who presented with severe headache attacks and photophobia. Treatment with oral cysteamine and topical cysteamine eye drops was started. One-and-a-half years later, he developed unilateral gynecomastia and elevated prolactin and growth hormone levels. A

  1. Development of radiolabeling method for natural juvenile hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, Takashi; Shiotsuki, Takahiro; Kotaki, Toyomi

    2000-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a new assay method for accurate determination of juvenile hormone (JH) using radioisotope. A new measuring method for JH was designed based on the principle of molecular competition. Namely, JH-binding protein in the insect was used to form a selective binding to JH. At first, corpus allatum was cultured in a medium containing 3 H or 14 C epoxyfarnesyldiazoacetate (EFDA), which is a photoaffinity labeling reagent and JH binding protein (JHBP) was purified using 3 H or 14 C labeled EFDA. Since several kinds of JH homologues different in the molecular structure have been known, it was needed to establish each labeling method appropriate to those homologues. Then, an assay method for micro-quantitative measurement of JH was established utilizing the competition between labeled natural JH and JHBP. Thus, the authors succeeded in the overexpression of the blood JHBA of kind of tabaco moth, H.virescens and also in cloning and overexpression of JHBP in the silk worm. It was confirmed that these JHBPs specifically bind to 3 H labeled JH3, leading to stable supply of blood JHBP. Thus, accurate assay for JH concentration became possible by the use of the labeled JH with natural configuration and the blood JHBP. In the course of this study, several findings were obtained as follows: The JHBP of a sting bug was different from the previously reported ones. The regulation of JH synthesis in the corpus allatum was closely related to the control of diapause in several insects. The JHBP isolated from the cytosol of silk gland was a new protein in respect of amino acid sequence. (M.N.)

  2. Development of radiolabeling method for natural juvenile hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuda, Takashi; Shiotsuki, Takahiro; Kotaki, Toyomi [National Inst. of Sericultural and Entomological Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-02-01

    This study aimed to develop a new assay method for accurate determination of juvenile hormone (JH) using radioisotope. A new measuring method for JH was designed based on the principle of molecular competition. Namely, JH-binding protein in the insect was used to form a selective binding to JH. At first, corpus allatum was cultured in a medium containing {sup 3}H or {sup 14}C epoxyfarnesyldiazoacetate (EFDA), which is a photoaffinity labeling reagent and JH binding protein (JHBP) was purified using {sup 3}H or {sup 14}C labeled EFDA. Since several kinds of JH homologues different in the molecular structure have been known, it was needed to establish each labeling method appropriate to those homologues. Then, an assay method for micro-quantitative measurement of JH was established utilizing the competition between labeled natural JH and JHBP. Thus, the authors succeeded in the overexpression of the blood JHBA of kind of tabaco moth, H.virescens and also in cloning and overexpression of JHBP in the silk worm. It was confirmed that these JHBPs specifically bind to {sup 3}H labeled JH3, leading to stable supply of blood JHBP. Thus, accurate assay for JH concentration became possible by the use of the labeled JH with natural configuration and the blood JHBP. In the course of this study, several findings were obtained as follows: The JHBP of a sting bug was different from the previously reported ones. The regulation of JH synthesis in the corpus allatum was closely related to the control of diapause in several insects. The JHBP isolated from the cytosol of silk gland was a new protein in respect of amino acid sequence. (M.N.)

  3. Aspergillus nidulans Synthesize Insect Juvenile Hormones upon Expression of a Heterologous Regulatory Protein and in Response to Grazing by Drosophila melanogaster Larvae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Thrane; Klejnstrup, Marie Louise; Rohlfs, Marko

    2013-01-01

    , indicating that fungal secondary metabolites remain an underexplored resource of bioactive molecules. In this study, we combine heterologous expression of regulatory proteins in Aspergillus nidulans with systematic variation of growth conditions and observe induced synthesis of insect juvenile hormone......-III and methyl farnesoate. Both compounds are sesquiterpenes belonging to the juvenile hormone class. Juvenile hormones regulate developmental and metabolic processes in insects and crustaceans, but have not previously been reported as fungal metabolites. We found that feeding by Drosophila melanogaster larvae...

  4. Insect hormones: more than 50-years after the discovery of insect juvenile hormobne analogues (JHA, juvenoids)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sláma, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 4 (2013), s. 257-333 ISSN 1874-9828 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : juvenile hormone (JH) * activation neurohormone (AH) pseudojuvenile effects * terpenoid juvenoids Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  5. THE INFLUENCE OF INSECT JUVENILE HORMONE AGONISTTS ON METAMORPHOSIS AND REPRODUCTION IN ESTUARINE CRUSTACEANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative developmental and reproductive studies were performed on several species of estuarine crustaceans in response to three juvenile hormone agonists (JHAs) (methoprene, fenoxycarb, and pyriproxyfen). Larval development of the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, was greater ...

  6. Development of radio-labeling method for natural juvenile hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Keiji; Shiozuki, Takahiro; Kotaki, Toyomi

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new method for quantitative determination of juvenile hormone (JH) based on the principle for radioimmuno assay. Using JH-binding protein (JHBP), the discrimination of the L-form of JH from D-form not occurring naturally was attempted to establish a measuring method for JH. First, the corpus allatum, the JH-producing endocrine organ was cultured and both L-form JH and 3 H or 14 C-labelled JH could be obtained easily. There are several homologs of JH and it is necessary to establish the respective labelling methods for the homologues. Since different species of insects produce JH with its specific structure, each homologue could be produced by selecting an appropriate species. The capacity of JH production was compared among five insects. The biosynthetic ability by the corpus allatum from migratory locust was highest among them and 1 μg of labelled JH type 3 could be obtained from the culture with about 50 corpus allata for 3 hrs. Since other materials than JH were also released into the culture medium, establishment of the effective method for isolation and purification of JH is necessary to use it for bioassay. (M.N.)

  7. Depletion of juvenile hormone esterase extends larval growth in Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongjie; Liu, Xiaojing; Shiotsuki, Takahiro; Wang, Zhisheng; Xu, Xia; Huang, Yongping; Li, Muwang; Li, Kai; Tan, Anjiang

    2017-02-01

    Two major hormones, juvenile hormone (JH) and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), regulate insect growth and development according to their precisely coordinated titres, which are controlled by both biosynthesis and degradation pathways. Juvenile hormone esterase (JHE) is the primary JH-specific degradation enzyme that plays a key role in regulating JH titers, along with JH epoxide hydrolase (JHEH) and JH diol kinase (JHDK). In the current study, a loss-of-function analysis of JHE in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, was performed by targeted gene disruption using the transgenic CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/RNA-guided Cas9 nucleases) system. Depletion of B. mori JHE (BmJHE) resulted in the extension of larval stages, especially the penultimate and ultimate larval stages, without deleterious effects to silkworm physiology. The expression of JHEH and JHDK was upregulated in mutant animals, indicating the existence of complementary routes in the JH metabolism pathway in which inactivation of one enzyme will activate other enzymes. RNA-Seq analysis of mutant animals revealed that genes involved in protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum and in amino acid metabolism were affected by BmJHE depletion. Depletion of JHE and subsequent delayed JH metabolism activated genes in the TOR pathway, which are ultimately responsible for extending larval growth. The transgenic Cas9 system used in the current study provides a promising approach for analysing the actions of JH, especially in nondrosophilid insects. Furthermore, prolonging larval stages produced larger larvae and cocoons, which is greatly beneficial to silk production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Starvation increases insulin sensitivity and reduces juvenile hormone synthesis in mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meritxell Perez-Hedo

    Full Text Available The interactions between the insulin signaling pathway (ISP and juvenile hormone (JH controlling reproductive trade-offs are well documented in insects. JH and insulin regulate reproductive output in mosquitoes; both hormones are involved in a complex regulatory network, in which they influence each other and in which the mosquito's nutritional status is a crucial determinant of the network's output. Previous studies reported that the insulin-TOR (target of rapamacyn signaling pathway is involved in the nutritional regulation of JH synthesis in female mosquitoes. The present studies further investigate the regulatory circuitry that controls both JH synthesis and reproductive output in response to nutrient availability.We used a combination of diet restriction, RNA interference (RNAi and insulin treatments to modify insulin signaling and study the cross-talk between insulin and JH in response to starvation. JH synthesis was analyzed using a newly developed assay utilizing fluorescent tags.Our results reveal that starvation decreased JH synthesis via a decrease in insulin signaling in the corpora allata (CA. Paradoxically, starvation-induced up regulation of insulin receptor transcripts and therefore "primed" the gland to respond rapidly to increases in insulin levels. During this response to starvation the synthetic potential of the CA remained unaffected, and the gland rapidly and efficiently responded to insulin stimulation by increasing JH synthesis to rates similar to those of CA from non-starved females.

  9. A mosquito hemolymph odorant-binding protein family member specifically binds juvenile hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il Hwan; Pham, Van; Jablonka, Willy; Goodman, Walter G.; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Andersen, John F.

    2017-07-27

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a key regulator of insect development and reproduction. In adult mosquitoes, it is essential for maturation of the ovary and normal male reproductive behavior, but how JH distribution and activity is regulated after secretion is unclear. Here, we report a new type of specific JH-binding protein, given the name mosquito juvenile hormone-binding protein (mJHBP), which circulates in the hemolymph of pupal and adult Aedes aegypti males and females. mJHBP is a member of the odorant-binding protein (OBP) family, and orthologs are present in the genomes of Aedes, Culex, and Anopheles mosquito species. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that mJHBP specifically binds JH II and JH III but not eicosanoids or JH derivatives. mJHBP was crystallized in the presence of JH III and found to have a double OBP domain structure reminiscent of salivary “long” D7 proteins of mosquitoes. We observed that a single JH III molecule is contained in the N-terminal domain binding pocket that is closed in an apparent conformational change by a C-terminal domain-derived α-helix. The electron density for the ligand indicated a high occupancy of the natural 10R enantiomer of JH III. Of note, mJHBP is structurally unrelated to hemolymph JHBP from lepidopteran insects. A low level of expression of mJHBP in Ae. aegypti larvae suggests that it is primarily active during the adult stage where it could potentially influence the effects of JH on egg development, mating behavior, feeding, or other processes.

  10. A mosquito hemolymph odorant-binding protein family member specifically binds juvenile hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Il Hwan; Pham, Van; Jablonka, Willy; Goodman, Walter G; Ribeiro, José M C; Andersen, John F

    2017-09-15

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a key regulator of insect development and reproduction. In adult mosquitoes, it is essential for maturation of the ovary and normal male reproductive behavior, but how JH distribution and activity is regulated after secretion is unclear. Here, we report a new type of specific JH-binding protein, given the name mosquito juvenile hormone-binding protein (mJHBP), which circulates in the hemolymph of pupal and adult Aedes aegypti males and females. mJHBP is a member of the odorant-binding protein (OBP) family, and orthologs are present in the genomes of Aedes , Culex , and Anopheles mosquito species. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that mJHBP specifically binds JH II and JH III but not eicosanoids or JH derivatives. mJHBP was crystallized in the presence of JH III and found to have a double OBP domain structure reminiscent of salivary "long" D7 proteins of mosquitoes. We observed that a single JH III molecule is contained in the N-terminal domain binding pocket that is closed in an apparent conformational change by a C-terminal domain-derived α-helix. The electron density for the ligand indicated a high occupancy of the natural 10 R enantiomer of JH III. Of note, mJHBP is structurally unrelated to hemolymph JHBP from lepidopteran insects. A low level of expression of mJHBP in Ae. aegypti larvae suggests that it is primarily active during the adult stage where it could potentially influence the effects of JH on egg development, mating behavior, feeding, or other processes.

  11. Network identification of hormonal regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Vis

    Full Text Available Relations among hormone serum concentrations are complex and depend on various factors, including gender, age, body mass index, diurnal rhythms and secretion stochastics. Therefore, endocrine deviations from healthy homeostasis are not easily detected or understood. A generic method is presented for detecting regulatory relations between hormones. This is demonstrated with a cohort of obese women, who underwent blood sampling at 10 minute intervals for 24-hours. The cohort was treated with bromocriptine in an attempt to clarify how hormone relations change by treatment. The detected regulatory relations are summarized in a network graph and treatment-induced changes in the relations are determined. The proposed method identifies many relations, including well-known ones. Ultimately, the method provides ways to improve the description and understanding of normal hormonal relations and deviations caused by disease or treatment.

  12. Knockout silkworms reveal a dispensable role for juvenile hormones in holometabolous life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daimon, Takaaki; Uchibori, Miwa; Nakao, Hajime; Sezutsu, Hideki; Shinoda, Tetsuro

    2015-08-04

    Insect juvenile hormones (JHs) prevent precocious metamorphosis and allow larvae to undergo multiple rounds of status quo molts. However, the roles of JHs during the embryonic and very early larval stages have not been fully understood. We generated and characterized knockout silkworms (Bombyx mori) with null mutations in JH biosynthesis or JH receptor genes using genome-editing tools. We found that embryonic growth and morphogenesis are largely independent of JHs in Bombyx and that, even in the absence of JHs or JH signaling, pupal characters are not formed in first- or second-instar larvae, and precocious metamorphosis is induced after the second instar at the earliest. We also show by mosaic analysis that a pupal specifier gene broad, which is dramatically up-regulated in the late stage of the last larval instar, is essential for pupal commitment in the epidermis. Importantly, the mRNA expression level of broad, which is thought to be repressed by JHs, remained at very low basal levels during the early larval instars of JH-deficient or JH signaling-deficient knockouts. Therefore, our study suggests that the long-accepted paradigm that JHs maintain the juvenile status throughout larval life should be revised because the larval status can be maintained by a JH-independent mechanism in very early larval instars. We propose that the lack of competence for metamorphosis during the early larval stages may result from the absence of an unidentified broad-inducing factor, i.e., a competence factor.

  13. Network identification of hormonal regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, D.J.; Westerhuis, J.A.; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Roelfsema, F.; Greef, J. van der; Hendriks, M.M.W.B.; Smilde, A.K.

    2014-01-01

    Relations among hormone serum concentrations are complex and depend on various factors, including gender, age, body mass index, diurnal rhythms and secretion stochastics. Therefore, endocrine deviations from healthy homeostasis are not easily detected or understood. A generic method is presented for

  14. Importance of juvenile hormone signaling arises with competence of insect larvae to metamorphose

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smýkal, Vlastimil; Daimon, T.; Kayukawa, T.; Takaki, Keiko; Shinoda, T.; Jindra, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 390, č. 2 (2014), s. 221-230 ISSN 0012-1606 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500960906 Grant - others:Marie Curie Fellowship Award(CZ) GA 276569; Japan Society for the Promotion of Science(JP) 25252059 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : insect metamorphosis * hormonal signaling * juvenile hormone Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.547, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0012160614001419

  15. Cardiovascular, hormonal and metabolic responses to graded exercise in juvenile diabetics with and without autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Galbo, H; Christensen, N J

    1980-01-01

    Thirteen juvenile diabetics were studied in order to determine if decreased beat-to-beat variation during deep respiration, indicating abnormal autonomic nerve function, imply that cardiovascular, hormonal and metabolic responses are impaired. Patients with decreased beat-to-beat variation had to...... to be more heavily stressed during exercise to reach a certain heart rate or catecholamine level. The relation between other metabolic and hormonal response is discussed....

  16. Cuticle deposition in imaginal disks: effects of juvenile hormone and fat body in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlander, H; Tomblin, C

    1972-08-04

    Wing disks from the last larval instar of the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner), were successfully cultured in modified Grace's medium. 20-Hydroxyecdysone induced cuticle deposition in these disks in vitro. This response was enhanced by treating the medium with larval fat body and was inhibited by application of juvenile hormone.

  17. Juvenile hormone esterase activity in the pupating and diapausing larvae of Sesamia nonagrioides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schafellner, Ch.; Eizaguirre, M.; López, C.; Sehnal, František

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 5 (2008), s. 916-921 ISSN 0022-1910 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA522/06/1591 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : diapuase * ecdysteroids * juvenile hormone Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.155, year: 2008

  18. Molecular determinants of juvenile hormone action as revealed by 3D QSAR analysis in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denisa Liszeková

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postembryonic development, including metamorphosis, of many animals is under control of hormones. In Drosophila and other insects these developmental transitions are regulated by the coordinate action of two principal hormones, the steroid ecdysone and the sesquiterpenoid juvenile hormone (JH. While the mode of ecdysone action is relatively well understood, the molecular mode of JH action remains elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To gain more insights into the molecular mechanism of JH action, we have tested the biological activity of 86 structurally diverse JH agonists in Drosophila melanogaster. The results were evaluated using 3D QSAR analyses involving CoMFA and CoMSIA procedures. Using this approach we have generated both computer-aided and species-specific pharmacophore fingerprints of JH and its agonists, which revealed that the most active compounds must possess an electronegative atom (oxygen or nitrogen at both ends of the molecule. When either of these electronegative atoms are replaced by carbon or the distance between them is shorter than 11.5 A or longer than 13.5 A, their biological activity is dramatically decreased. The presence of an electron-deficient moiety in the middle of the JH agonist is also essential for high activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The information from 3D QSAR provides guidelines and mechanistic scope for identification of steric and electrostatic properties as well as donor and acceptor hydrogen-bonding that are important features of the ligand-binding cavity of a JH target protein. In order to refine the pharmacophore analysis and evaluate the outcomes of the CoMFA and CoMSIA study we used pseudoreceptor modeling software PrGen to generate a putative binding site surrogate that is composed of eight amino acid residues corresponding to the defined molecular interactions.

  19. Gonadotropic and physiological functions of juvenile hormone in Bumblebee (Bombus terrestris workers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagai Shpigler

    Full Text Available The evolution of advanced sociality in bees is associated with apparent modifications in juvenile hormone (JH signaling. By contrast to most insects in which JH is a gonadotropin regulating female fertility, in the highly eusocial honey bee (Apis mellifera JH has lost its gonadotrophic function in adult females, and instead regulates age-related division of labor among worker bees. In order to shed light on the evolution of JH signaling in bees we performed allatectomy and replacement therapies to manipulate JH levels in workers of the "primitively eusocial" bumblebee Bombus terrestris. Allatectomized worker bees showed remarkable reduction in ovarian development, egg laying, Vitellogenin and Krüppel homolog 1 fat body transcript levels, hemolymph Vitellogenin protein abundance, wax secretion, and egg-cell construction. These effects were reverted, at least partially, by treating allatectomized bees with JH-III, the natural JH of bees. Allatectomy also affected the amount of ester component in Dufour's gland secretion, which is thought to convey a social signal relating to worker fertility. These findings provide a strong support for the hypothesis that in contrast to honey bees, JH is a gonadotropin in bumblebees and lend credence to the hypothesis that the evolution of advanced eusociality in honey bees was associated with major modifications in JH signaling.

  20. Juvenile hormone levels reflect social opportunities in the facultatively eusocial sweat bee Megalopta genalis (Hymenoptera: Halictidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam R; Kapheim, Karen M; Pérez-Ortega, Betzi; Brent, Colin S; Wcislo, William T

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of eusociality is hypothesized to have involved de-coupling parental care from reproduction mediated by changes in endocrine regulation. While data for obligately eusocial insects are consistent with this hypothesis, we lack information from species representative of the transition from solitary reproduction to eusociality. Here we report the first evidence for a link between endocrine processes and social behavior in a facultatively eusocial bee, Megalopta genalis (Halictidae). Using females that varied in social, reproductive, and ecological context, we measured juvenile hormone (JH), a major regulator of colony caste dynamics in other eusocial species. JH was low at adult emergence, but elevated after 10 days in all nesting females. Females reared in cages with ad lib nutrition, however, did not elevate JH levels after 10 days. All reproductive females had significantly more JH than all age-matched non-reproductive females, suggesting a gonadotropic function. Among females in established nests, JH was higher in queens than workers and solitary reproductives, suggesting a role for JH in social dominance. A lack of significant differences in JH between solitary reproductives and non-reproductive workers suggests that JH content reflects more than reproductive status. Our data support the hypothesis that endocrine modifications are involved in the evolutionary decoupling of reproductive and somatic effort in social insects. These are the first measurements of JH in a solitary-nesting hymenopteran, and the first to compare eusocial and solitary nesting individuals of the same species. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Common and distinct roles of juvenile hormone signaling genes in metamorphosis of holometabolous and hemimetabolous insects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora Konopova

    Full Text Available Insect larvae metamorphose to winged and reproductive adults either directly (hemimetaboly or through an intermediary pupal stage (holometaboly. In either case juvenile hormone (JH prevents metamorphosis until a larva has attained an appropriate phase of development. In holometabolous insects, JH acts through its putative receptor Methoprene-tolerant (Met to regulate Krüppel-homolog 1 (Kr-h1 and Broad-Complex (BR-C genes. While Met and Kr-h1 prevent precocious metamorphosis in pre-final larval instars, BR-C specifies the pupal stage. How JH signaling operates in hemimetabolous insects is poorly understood. Here, we compare the function of Met, Kr-h1 and BR-C genes in the two types of insects. Using systemic RNAi in the hemimetabolous true bug, Pyrrhocoris apterus, we show that Met conveys the JH signal to prevent premature metamorphosis by maintaining high expression of Kr-h1. Knockdown of either Met or Kr-h1 (but not of BR-C in penultimate-instar Pyrrhocoris larvae causes precocious development of adult color pattern, wings and genitalia. A natural fall of Kr-h1 expression in the last larval instar normally permits adult development, and treatment with an exogenous JH mimic methoprene at this time requires both Met and Kr-h1 to block the adult program and induce an extra larval instar. Met and Kr-h1 therefore serve as JH-dependent repressors of deleterious precocious metamorphic changes in both hemimetabolous and holometabolous juveniles, whereas BR-C has been recruited for a new role in specifying the holometabolous pupa. These results show that despite considerable evolutionary distance, insects with diverse developmental strategies employ a common-core JH signaling pathway to commit to adult morphogenesis.

  2. [Hormone regulation of male fertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, J G

    1975-01-01

    An innocuous, sure, reversible means of male fertility control which does not disturb the libido is being sought. 20 healthy volunteers from ages 20 to 36 participated, using a 2nd form of protection when necessary. 10 received implants of 60 mg testosterone equally divided into 3 tubes, and began oral ingestion of 100 mg weekly, divided into daily doses, of R2323 (13-ethyl-17-hydroxy-gonen 4,9,11, trien-3-one) until the sperm became ineffective. Then oral doses were given according to personal requirements from 50 to 25 mg. The 2nd series of 10 received no testosterone implants, but followed the same scheme for oral ingestion. All patients but 1 reduced their sperm count and 80% were low enough to consider the sperm inactive. For those who used the hormone treatment as the only protection against pregnancy, no pregnancy occurred. Of the 1st group, 2 had excessive weight gain, 3 felt their libido reduced, and 1 had pain in the nipples and 1 had pain in the hepatic region. Recuperation of normal sperm characteristics was slow, especially motility and vitality. The spermogram is so altered during treatment that any accidental pregnancy could result in a defective egg and serious complications. It should definitely be avoided.

  3. The Gut Hormones in Appetite Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Suzuki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has received much attention worldwide in association with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancer. At present, bariatric surgery is the only effective treatment for obesity in which long-term weight loss is achieved in patients. By contrast, pharmacological interventions for obesity are usually followed by weight regain. Although the exact mechanisms of long-term weight loss following bariatric surgery are yet to be fully elucidated, several gut hormones have been implicated. Gut hormones play a critical role in relaying signals of nutritional and energy status from the gut to the central nervous system, in order to regulate food intake. Cholecystokinin, peptide YY, pancreatic polypeptide, glucagon-like peptide-1, and oxyntomodulin act through distinct yet synergistic mechanisms to suppress appetite, whereas ghrelin stimulates food intake. Here, we discuss the role of gut hormones in the regulation of food intake and body weight.

  4. HORMONAL REGULATION OF SELENIUM ACCUMULATION BY PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Golubkina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormonal regulation is considered to be a unique mechanism controlling growth and development of living organism. The review discusses the correlations between pant hormonal status of non-accumulators and hyper-accumulators of Se with the accumulation levels of this microelement. The phenomenon of stimulation and redistribution of selenium as a result of phytohormone treatment, the peculiarities of phytohormones effect among different species and cultivars, and influence of plant sexualization on selenium accumulation are described in article. Data of hormonal regulation of selenium level for spinach, garlic, perennial onion, Brassica chinenesis and Valeriana officialis are presented in the review.

  5. Broad-Complex acts downstream of Met in juvenile hormone signaling to coordinate primitive holometabolan metamorphosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konopová, Barbora; Jindra, Marek

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 135, č. 3 (2008), s. 559-568 ISSN 0950-1991 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/1032; GA AV ČR IAA5007305; GA MŠk LC07032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : metamorphosis * juvenile hormone * broad-complex Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.812, year: 2008

  6. Steroidal compounds as carriers of juvenile hormone bioanalogues applicable in environmentally safe insect pest control

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurček, Ondřej; Wimmer, Zdeněk; Bennettová, Blanka; Kuldová, Jelena; Hrdý, Ivan; Drašar, P.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 37, Suppl. 1 (2007), A131-A132 ISSN 1738-2297. [International Congress of Insect Biotechnology and Industry. 19.08.2007-24.08.2007, Daegu] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06024 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : juvenile hormone bioanalogues * juvenoid * juvenogen Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  7. Common and distinct roles of juvenile hormone signaling genes in metamorphosis of holometabolous and hemimetabolous insect

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konopová, Barbora; Smýkal, V.; Jindra, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 12 (2011), e28728 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/1032; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H058; GA AV ČR IAA500960906 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : juvenile hormone Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.092, year: 2011

  8. Differential gene expression in response to juvenile hormone analog treatment in the damp-wood termite Hodotermopsis sjostedti (Isoptera, Archotermopsidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornette, Richard; Hayashi, Yoshinobu; Koshikawa, Shigeyuki; Miura, Toru

    2013-04-01

    Termite societies are characterized by a highly organized division of labor among conspicuous castes, groups of individuals with various morphological specializations. Termite caste differentiation is under control of juvenile hormone (JH), but the molecular mechanism underlying the response to JH and early events triggering caste differentiation are still poorly understood. In order to profile candidate gene expression during early soldier caste differentiation of the damp-wood termite, Hodotermopsis sjostedti, we treated pseudergates (workers) with a juvenile hormone analog (JHA) to induce soldier caste differentiation. We then used Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization to create two cDNA libraries enriched for transcripts that were either up- or downregulated at 24h after treatment. Finally, we used quantitative PCR to confirm temporal expression patterns. Hexamerins represent a large proportion of the genes upregulated following JHA treatment and have an expression pattern that shows roughly an inverse correlation to intrinsic JH titers. This data is consistent with the role of a JH "sink", which was demonstrated for hexamerins in another termite, Reticulitermes flavipes. A putative nuclear protein was also upregulated a few hours after JHA treatment, which suggests a role in the early response to JH and subsequent regulation of transcriptional events associated with soldier caste differentiation. Some digestive enzymes, such as endogenous beta-endoglucanase and chymotrypsin, as well as a protein associated to digestion were identified among genes downregulated after JHA treatment. This suggests that JH may directly influence the pseudergate-specific digestive system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hormonal regulation of lipid metabolism in developing coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheridan, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Lipid metabolism in juvenile coho salmon is characterized, and adaptive changes in lipid mobilization are described in relation to development and hormonal influences. The rates of lipogenesis and lipolysis were determined in selected tissues of juvenile salmon during the period of seawater preadaptive development (smoltification). Neutral lipid (sterol) and fatty acid synthesis in the liver and mesenteric fat was measured by tritium incorporation. Fatty acid synthesis in the liver and mesenteric fat decreased by 88% and 81%, respectively, between late February (parr) and early June (smolt). To assess the role of hormones in smoltification-associated lipid depletion, growth hormone, prolactin, thyroxin and cortisol were administered in vivo early in development (parr) to determine if any of these factors could initiate the metabolic responses normally seen later in development (smolt). Growth hormone stimulated lipid mobilization from coho salmon parr. Prolactin strongly stimulated lipid mobilization in coho parr. Thyroxin and cortisol also stimulated lipid mobilization for coho salmon parr. The direct effect of hormones was studied by in vitro pH-stat incubation of liver slices. These data suggest that norepinephrine stimulates fatty acid release via β-adrenergic pathways. Somatostatin and its partial analogue from the fish caudal neurosecretory system, urotensin II, also affect lipid mobilization. These results establish the presence of hormone-sensitive lipase in salmon liver and suggest that the regulation of lipid metabolism in salmon involves both long-acting and short-acting hormonal agents

  10. Juvenile hormone and insulin suppress lipolysis between periods of lactation during tsetse fly pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Aaron A; Benoit, Joshua B; Michalkova, Veronika; Mireji, Paul; Attardo, Geoffrey M; Moulton, John K; Wilson, Thomas G; Aksoy, Serap

    2013-06-15

    Tsetse flies are viviparous insects that nurture a single intrauterine progeny per gonotrophic cycle. The developing larva is nourished by the lipid-rich, milk-like secretions from a modified female accessory gland (milk gland). An essential feature of the lactation process involves lipid mobilization for incorporation into the milk. In this study, we examined roles for juvenile hormone (JH) and insulin/IGF-like (IIS) signaling pathways during tsetse pregnancy. In particular, we examined the roles for these pathways in regulating lipid homeostasis during transitions between non-lactating (dry) and lactating periods. The dry period occurs over the course of oogenesis and embryogenesis, while the lactation period spans intrauterine larvigenesis. Genes involved in the JH and IIS pathways were upregulated during dry periods, correlating with lipid accumulation between bouts of lactation. RNAi suppression of Forkhead Box Sub Group O (FOXO) expression impaired lipolysis during tsetse lactation and reduced fecundity. Similar reduction of the JH receptor Methoprene tolerant (Met), but not its paralog germ cell expressed (gce), reduced lipid accumulation during dry periods, indicating functional divergence between Met and gce during tsetse reproduction. Reduced lipid levels following Met knockdown led to impaired fecundity due to inadequate fat reserves at the initiation of milk production. Both the application of the JH analog (JHA) methoprene and injection of insulin into lactating females increased stored lipids by suppressing lipolysis and reduced transcripts of lactation-specific genes, leading to elevated rates of larval abortion. To our knowledge, this study is the first to address the molecular physiology of JH and IIS in a viviparous insect, and specifically to provide a role for JH signaling through Met in the regulation of lipid metabolism during insect lactation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Regulation of Thyroid Hormone Bioactivity in Health and Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P. Peeters (Robin)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractTThyroid hormone plays an essential role in a variety of metabolic processes in the human body. Examples are the effects of thyroid hormone on metabolism and on the heart. The production of thyroid hormone by the thyroid is regulated by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) via the TSH

  12. A new look at the nature insect juvenile hormone with particular reference to studies carried out in the Czehc Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sláma, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 4 (2015), s. 567-590 ISSN 1210-5759 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Insects * activation hormone (AH) * juvenile hormone (JH) Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.975, year: 2014 http://www.eje.cz/pdfs/eje/2015/04/01.pdf

  13. The POU Factor Ventral Veins Lacking/Drifter Directs the Timing of Metamorphosis through Ecdysteroid and Juvenile Hormone Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaieb, Leila; Koyama, Takashi; Sarwar, Prioty; Mirth, Christen K.; Smith, Wendy A.; Suzuki, Yuichiro

    2014-01-01

    Although endocrine changes are known to modulate the timing of major developmental transitions, the genetic mechanisms underlying these changes remain poorly understood. In insects, two developmental hormones, juvenile hormone (JH) and ecdysteroids, are coordinated with each other to induce developmental changes associated with metamorphosis. However, the regulation underlying the coordination of JH and ecdysteroid synthesis remains elusive. Here, we examined the function of a homolog of the vertebrate POU domain protein, Ventral veins lacking (Vvl)/Drifter, in regulating both of these hormonal pathways in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Tenebrionidae). RNA interference-mediated silencing of vvl expression led to both precocious metamorphosis and inhibition of molting in the larva. Ectopic application of a JH analog on vvl knockdown larvae delayed the onset of metamorphosis and led to a prolonged larval stage, indicating that Vvl acts upstream of JH signaling. Accordingly, vvl knockdown also reduced the expression of a JH biosynthesis gene, JH acid methyltransferase 3 (jhamt3). In addition, ecdysone titer and the expression of the ecdysone response gene, hormone receptor 3 (HR3), were reduced in vvl knockdown larvae. The expression of the ecdysone biosynthesis gene phantom (phm) and spook (spo) were reduced in vvl knockdown larvae in the anterior and posterior halves, respectively, indicating that Vvl might influence ecdysone biosynthesis in both the prothoracic gland and additional endocrine sources. Injection of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) into vvl knockdown larvae could restore the expression of HR3 although molting was never restored. These findings suggest that Vvl coordinates both JH and ecdysteroid biosynthesis as well as molting behavior to influence molting and the timing of metamorphosis. Thus, in both vertebrates and insects, POU factors modulate the production of major neuroendocrine regulators during sexual maturation. PMID:24945490

  14. Molecular mechanism underlying juvenile hormone-mediated repression of precocious larval-adult metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayukawa, Takumi; Jouraku, Akiya; Ito, Yuka; Shinoda, Tetsuro

    2017-01-31

    Juvenile hormone (JH) represses precocious metamorphosis of larval to pupal and adult transitions in holometabolous insects. The early JH-inducible gene Krüppel homolog 1 (Kr-h1) plays a key role in the repression of metamorphosis as a mediator of JH action. Previous studies demonstrated that Kr-h1 inhibits precocious larval-pupal transition in immature larva via direct transcriptional repression of the pupal specifier Broad-Complex (BR-C). JH was recently reported to repress the adult specifier gene Ecdysone-induced protein 93F (E93); however, its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here, we found that JH suppressed ecdysone-inducible E93 expression in the epidermis of the silkworm Bombyx mori and in a B. mori cell line. Reporter assays in the cell line revealed that the JH-dependent suppression was mediated by Kr-h1. Genome-wide ChIP-seq analysis identified a consensus Kr-h1 binding site (KBS, 14 bp) located in the E93 promoter region, and EMSA confirmed that Kr-h1 directly binds to the KBS. Moreover, we identified a C-terminal conserved domain in Kr-h1 essential for the transcriptional repression of E93 Based on these results, we propose a mechanism in which JH-inducible Kr-h1 directly binds to the KBS site upstream of the E93 locus to repress its transcription in a cell-autonomous manner, thereby preventing larva from bypassing the pupal stage and progressing to precocious adult development. These findings help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms regulating the metamorphic genetic network, including the functional significance of Kr-h1, BR-C, and E93 in holometabolous insect metamorphosis.

  15. Hormonal Regulation of Mammary Gland Development and Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xian, Wa; Rosen, Jeffrey M

    2004-01-01

    Our laboratory is interested in studying the mechanisms by which lactogenic hormones regulate Beta-casein gene expression and how alterations in the levels of these hormones may function in the growth...

  16. Juvenile hormone-binding proteins of Melanoplus bivittatus identified by EFDA photoaffinity labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winder, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    Proteins that bind juvenile hormone in the hemolymph and fat body of the grasshopper, Melanoplus bivittatus were identified by photoaffinity labeling with radiolabeled epoxyfarnesyl diazoacetate ( 3 H-EFDA), and were characterized by electrophoretic analysis. A protocol was developed which allowed detection of 3 H-EFDA that was covalently linked to proteins upon exposure to ultraviolet light at 254 nm. Quantification of protein-linked 3 H-EFDA by liquid scintillation spectrometry took advantage of the differential solubility of unlinked 3 H-EFDA in toluene alone, and of the protein-linked 3 H-EFDA in toluene plus the detergent, Triton X-100. Competition between EFDA and juvenile hormone (JH) for binding to JH-specific binding sites was measured by hydroxyapatite protein binding assays in the presence of radiolabeled JH or EFDA and competing non-radiolabeled hormone. The protein-linked EFDA was detected on fluorograms of SDS or nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels (PAGE), and by liquid scintillation spectrometry of membranes to which the proteins had been electrophoretically transferred. Proteins which specifically bound JH were identified by photolabeling proteins in the presence and absence of nonlabeled JH-III

  17. Effects of juvenile hormone (JH) analog insecticides on larval development and JH esterase activity in two spodopterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sheikh, El-Sayed A; Kamita, Shizuo G; Hammock, Bruce D

    2016-03-01

    Juvenile hormone analog (JHA) insecticides are biological and structural mimics of JH, a key insect developmental hormone. Toxic and anti-developmental effects of the JHA insecticides methoprene, fenoxycarb, and pyriproxyfen were investigated on the larval and pupal stages of Spodoptera littoralis and Spodoptera frugiperda. Bioassays showed that fenoxycarb has the highest toxicity and fastest speed of kill in 2nd instar S. littoralis. All three JHAs affected the development of 6th instar (i.e., final instar) and pupal S. frugiperda. JH esterase (JHE) is a critical enzyme that helps to regulate JH levels during insect development. JHE activity in the last instar S. littoralis and S. frugiperda was 11 and 23 nmol min(-1) ml(-1) hemolymph, respectively. Methoprene and pyriproxyfen showed poor inhibition of JHE activity from these insects, whereas fenoxycarb showed stronger inhibition. The inhibitory activity of fenoxycarb, however, was more than 1000-fold lower than that of OTFP, a highly potent inhibitor of JHEs. Surprisingly, topical application of methoprene, fenoxycarb or pyriproxyfen on 6th instars of S. littoralis and S. frugiperda prevented the dramatic reduction in JHE activity that was found in control insects. Our findings suggest that JHAs may function as JH agonists that play a disruptive role or a hormonal replacement role in S. littoralis and S. frugiperda. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of juvenile hormone analogue on ecdysis prevention induced by precocene in Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera: Reduviidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia de Azambuja

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available Precocene II, added to the meal of fourth-instar larvae of Rhodnius prolixus (25 mug/ml of blood, induced an in crease in the duration of the molting cycle. This effect was related to the decrease of both the nuclear area of the prothoracic gland cells and the mitotic activity in epidermal cellS. juvenile hormone analogue applied topically (60 mug/insect together with Precocene II treatment avoided atrophy of the prothoracic glands and induced a higher number of epidermal mitosis accelerating the time of subsequent ecdysis. A possible relationship between juvenile hormone and production of ecdysone is discussed.Adicionado ao sangue alimentar na dose de 25 mug/ml o precoceno II causou um aumento no período de intermuda em ninfas de 4o. estadio de Rhodnius prolixus. Este atraso da muda foi relacionado com a diminuição da área dos núcleos das celulas das glandulas protoracicas e com a queda da atividade mitotica das células da epiderme do inseto. Um análogo de hormônio juvenil aplicado topicamente (60 mug/inseto junto com o tratamento oral com precoceno II preveniu a atrofia das glândulas protorácicas e induziu um aumento no número de mitoses nas células da epiderme, diminuindo o período de intermuda nestes insetos.A possivel relação entre a ação do hormônio juvenil e a producao de ecdisona pelas glândulas protorácicas e discutida.

  19. Analysis of hormone-dependent pathology in female patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Anisimova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the characteristics of manifestations of hormonal abnormalities in women with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME and to comparatively analyze identified syndromes.Patients and methods. Hormonal disorders were analyzed in 48 reproductive-aged women with JME, who had received antiepileptic drug (AED mono- and bitherapy during one or more years.Results. 66.7% of the patients were found to have ovarian hormonal dysfunction manifesting itself as the development of polycystic ovary syndrome, hypogonadism, isolated hyperandrogenism, and hypoprogesteronemia. Clinically detected syndromes frequently appeared as menstrual irregularity in 29% of the patients. Comparative analysis of hormone-dependent syndromes showed that there were no differences in the clinical features of JME, but the earliest age at onset in isolated hyperandrogenism, and no patients with menstrual irregularity in the presence of isolated hypoprogesteronemia. The use of different AEDs had no impact on the incidence of hormonal abnormalities, which requires further investigation and its inclusion of a greater number of patients receiving various AEDs. 

  20. Hormonal receptors and vascular endothelial growth factor in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: immunohistochemical and tissue microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuofu; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Huan; Wang, Dehui; Hu, Li; Liu, Quan; Sun, Xicai

    2015-01-01

    This work demonstrated that juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas (JNAs) express high levels of hormone receptors and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) compared with normal nasal mucosa. The interaction between hormone receptors and VEGF may be involved in the initiation and growth of JNA. JNA is a rare benign tumor that occurs almost exclusively in male adolescents. Although generally regarded as a hormone-dependent tumor, this has not been proven in previous studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of hormone receptors in JNA and the relationship with clinical characteristics. Standard immunohistochemical microarray analysis was performed on 70 JNA samples and 10 turbinate tissue samples. Specific antibodies for androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor-α (ER-α), estrogen receptor-β (ER-β), progesterone receptor (PR), and VEGF were examined, and the relationships of receptor expression with age, tumor stage, and bleeding were evaluated. RESULTS showed that JNA expressed ER-α (92.9%), ER-β (91.4%), AR (65.7%), PR (12.8%), and VEGF (95.7%) at different levels. High level of VEGF was linked to elevated ER-α and ER-β. There was no significant relationship between hormonal receptors and age at diagnosis, tumor stage or bleeding. However, overexpression of ER-α was found to be an indicator of poor prognosis (p = 0.031).

  1. Performance of Nile tilapia juvenile fed diet containing different dosages ofrecombinant common carpgrowth hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian Hardiantho

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The studywas conductedtodetermine thedose of recombinant common carp growth hormone (rCcGH supplemented in the commercial diet that generates the best performanceonbodyweight, biomass, andfeed conversion rate of juvenile tilapia.The dose of rCcGH administered was10, 20, and30mg/kg of commercial feed, andnorGH supplementation as control. Eachtreatment was designed in triplicates. Juveniles at average bodylengthof about2cm(average body weight of 0.7 g were reared in a density of25fish/m2, for three weeks in hapa net at a size of 2×2×1 m3. Fish were fed diet containing rCcGH twicea week with an interval ofthreedays. The juvenile were fed with the rCcGH supplemented diet three times daily at satiation. The results showedthat average body weight andbiomass of fish treated by rCcGH with the doses of 20 and 30 mg/kg feed was higher (p<0.05 than that of 10 mg/kg and control. In addition, feed conversionrate of 20 and 30 mg/kg feed treatments was lower (p<0.05 than that of 10 mg/kg and control. RT-PCR analysisshowedthat expression level of IGF-1 gene in juvenile liver was increased in parallel with the increasing of rCcGH dosages supplemented in diet.This suggestedthatIGF-1 plays an important rolein the induction ofgrowth,andfeed conversionefficiencyof tilapiafed diet containing rCcGH. The bestperformance of juvenile can be obtainedby feeding with diet containingrCcGH20‒30mg/kgof feed. Keywords: rCcGH, IGF-I, recombinant growthhormone,performance, Nile tilapia.

  2. The role of low levels of juvenile hormone Esterase in the metamorphosis of Manduca sexta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Browder

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available The activity of juvenile hormone esterase (JHE in feeding fifth instar larvae of Manduca sexta increases gradually with larval weight and rises to a peak after larvae pass the critical weight when juvenile hormone secretion ceases. Starvation of larvae of Manduca sexta (L. that had exceeded the critical weight inhibited peak levels of JHE, but did not delay entry into the wandering stage when larvae leave the plant in search of a pupation site. This suggests that peak levels of JHE may not be essential for the normal timing of metamorphosis. Starved larvae pupated normally, indicating the peak of JHE was not necessary for a morphologically normal pupation. Treatments of larvae with the selective JHE inhibitor O-ethyl-S-phenyl phosphoramidothiolate (EPPAT that began immediately after larvae achieved the critical weight (6.0 to 6.5 grams for our strain of Manduca delayed entry into the wandering stage. By contrast, EPPAT treatment of larvae at weights above 8.0g had no effect on the subsequent timing of the onset of wandering. Therefore, although the normal timing of the onset of wandering does not require peak levels of JHE, it requires low to moderate levels of JHE to be present until larvae reach a weight of about 8.0g.

  3. Sex Determination in Bees. IV. Genetic Control of Juvenile Hormone Production in MELIPONA QUADRIFASCIATA (Apidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Warwick Estevam; Akahira, Yukio; Camargo, Conceição A.

    1975-01-01

    Cell number and volume of corpora allata was determined for 8 phases of development, the first prepupal stage to adults 30 days old, in the social Apidae Melipona quadrifasciata. In the second prepupal stage a strong correlation was found between cell number and body weight ( r=0.651**), and cell number and corpora allata volume in prepupal stage (r=0.535*), which indicates that juvenile hormone has a definite role in caste determination in Melipona. The distribution of the volume of corpus allatum suggest a 3:1 segregation between bees with high volume of corpora allata against low and medium volume. This implies that genes xa and xb code for an enzyme that directly participates in juvenile hormone production. It was also concluded that the number of cells in the second prepupal stage is more important than the weight of the prepupa for caste determination. A scheme summarizing the genic control of sex and caste determination in Melipona bees in the prepupal phase is given. PMID:1213273

  4. Effects of PBDE-47 on thyroid and steroid hormone status in juvenile turbot (Schophtalamus maximus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenssen, G.; Tyrhaug, I.B.; Sormo, E.G. [Dept. of Biology, Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Andersen, O.K. [Rogaland Research Akvamiljo, Mekjarvik (Norway)

    2004-09-15

    Many of the brominated flame retardant (BFR) chemicals, and particularly polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), has become of increasing concern to scientists over the past decade. Many of the PBDEs are persistent and lipophilic and have been shown to bioaccumulate. The levels of PBDEs in biota seem to be increasing, and several trends, including in humans, indicate that this increase may be rapid1. In general, BFRs have a low acute toxicity, but there is concern about their long-term toxic effects. Exposure studies have revealed a range of subtle biochemical, cellular and physiological effects following low-dose exposure, and many BFRs have been reported to have endocrine disruptive properties. Thus, there is concern about their potential to affect organisms and populations. Thyroid hormones (THs) play an important role in organism's development, metabolism, growth and behavior. Polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs) including BFRs may affect the thyroid system through several mechanisms. They may directly affect the thyroid gland function, the peripheral metabolism of THs and/or the binding of THs to plasma transport proteins. Effects of PHAHs on TH homeostasis have been documented in a number of species, including fish. Du to its persistence against degradation PBDE-47 is among the most abundant PBDE congener in biota, and there is a great concern about its ecotoxicological effects on organisms and populations. The aim of the present study was to examine if PBDE-47 may affect levels of circulating steroid and thyroid hormones in juvenile turbot (Scophtalamus maximus). The turbot is a benthic living flatfish that can be exposed to PHAHs via the sediment living organisms. Thus, plasma levels of T, E, and the thyroid hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) were determined in juvenile turbot that had been continuously exposed to PBDE-47 via water for 3 weeks.

  5. STIMULASI PERTUMBUHAN JUVENIL ABALON, Haliotis squamata DENGAN PEMBERIAN HORMON REKOMBINAN IKAN rElGH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitriyah Husnul Khotimah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Masalah yang paling utama dalam budidaya abalon tropis adalah pertumbuhan yang lambat. Penggunaan rElGH (recombinant giant grouper, Epinephelus lanceolatus growth hormone untuk menstimulasi pertumbuhan beberapa spesies ikan sudah dilakukan. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menguji akselerasi pertumbuhan juvenil abalon tropis, Haliotis squamata setelah diberi perlakuan perendaman hormon rekombinan ikan kerapu kertang, Epinephelus lanceolatus pada frekuensi yang berbeda. Ada empat perlakuan frekuensi perendaman rElGH yaitu 4, 9, 16 kali, dan tanpa perendaman (kontrol. Masing-masing perlakuan diulang tiga kali. Perendaman dilakukan selama tiga jam, dengan interval waktu empat hari. Kepadatan abalon tropis 100 ekor/L air laut yang mengandung 30 mg rElGH. Wadah untuk perendaman berupa beaker glass yang dilengkapi dengan aerasi. Penelitian dilakukan selama tujuh bulan. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa abalon tropis yang direndam rElGH dengan frekuensi empat kali menghasilkan pertumbuhan bobot tubuh dan panjang cangkang tertinggi dan berbeda nyata dengan perlakuan lainnya (P<0,05. Sintasan abalon tropis yang diberi perlakuan perendaman hormon rElGH lebih tinggi dibandingkan perlakuan kontrol. The most crucial problem in tropical abalone aquaculture is the slow growth of the species. Studies investigating the use of rElGH (recombinant giant grouper, Epinephelus lanceolatus growth hormone for promoting growth have been performed in various species. This research aimed to examine the growth acceleration of tropical abalone, Haliotis squamata juvenile after being treated in different immersion frequencies of recombinant giant grouper, Epinephelus lanceolatus growth hormone (rElGH. There were four treatments of rElGH immersion frequency: 4, 9, 16 times and without rElGH immersion (control. Each treatment was performed in triplicates. Immersion was performed for 3 hours, at 4-day intervals and a density of 100 tropical abalones in 1 L seawater containing 30

  6. Juvenile hormone-dopamine systems for the promotion of flight activity in males of the large carpenter bee Xylocopa appendiculata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Ken; Nagao, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    The reproductive roles of dopamine and dopamine regulation systems are known in social hymenopterans, but the knowledge on the regulation systems in solitary species is still needed. To test the possibility that juvenile hormone (JH) and brain dopamine interact to trigger territorial flight behavior in males of a solitary bee species, the effects on biogenic amines of JH analog treatments and behavioral assays with dopamine injections in males of the large carpenter bee Xylocopa appendiculata were quantified. Brain dopamine levels were significantly higher in methoprene-treated males than in control males 4 days after treatment, but were not significantly different after 7 days. Brain octopamine and serotonin levels did not differ between methoprene-treated and control males at 4 and 7 days after treatment. Injection of dopamine caused significantly higher locomotor activities and a shorter duration for flight initiation in experimental versus control males. These results suggest that brain dopamine can be regulated by JH and enhances flight activities in males. The JH-dopamine system in males of this solitary bee species is similar to that of males of the highly eusocial honeybee Apis mellifera.

  7. Juvenile hormone biosynthesis gene expression in the corpora allata of honey bee (Apis mellifera L. female castes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Durvalina Bomtorin

    Full Text Available Juvenile hormone (JH controls key events in the honey bee life cycle, viz. caste development and age polyethism. We quantified transcript abundance of 24 genes involved in the JH biosynthetic pathway in the corpora allata-corpora cardiaca (CA-CC complex. The expression of six of these genes showing relatively high transcript abundance was contrasted with CA size, hemolymph JH titer, as well as JH degradation rates and JH esterase (jhe transcript levels. Gene expression did not match the contrasting JH titers in queen and worker fourth instar larvae, but jhe transcript abundance and JH degradation rates were significantly lower in queen larvae. Consequently, transcriptional control of JHE is of importance in regulating larval JH titers and caste development. In contrast, the same analyses applied to adult worker bees allowed us inferring that the high JH levels in foragers are due to increased JH synthesis. Upon RNAi-mediated silencing of the methyl farnesoate epoxidase gene (mfe encoding the enzyme that catalyzes methyl farnesoate-to-JH conversion, the JH titer was decreased, thus corroborating that JH titer regulation in adult honey bees depends on this final JH biosynthesis step. The molecular pathway differences underlying JH titer regulation in larval caste development versus adult age polyethism lead us to propose that mfe and jhe genes be assayed when addressing questions on the role(s of JH in social evolution.

  8. Juvenile hormone biosynthesis gene expression in the corpora allata of honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) female castes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomtorin, Ana Durvalina; Mackert, Aline; Rosa, Gustavo Conrado Couto; Moda, Livia Maria; Martins, Juliana Ramos; Bitondi, Márcia Maria Gentile; Hartfelder, Klaus; Simões, Zilá Luz Paulino

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) controls key events in the honey bee life cycle, viz. caste development and age polyethism. We quantified transcript abundance of 24 genes involved in the JH biosynthetic pathway in the corpora allata-corpora cardiaca (CA-CC) complex. The expression of six of these genes showing relatively high transcript abundance was contrasted with CA size, hemolymph JH titer, as well as JH degradation rates and JH esterase (jhe) transcript levels. Gene expression did not match the contrasting JH titers in queen and worker fourth instar larvae, but jhe transcript abundance and JH degradation rates were significantly lower in queen larvae. Consequently, transcriptional control of JHE is of importance in regulating larval JH titers and caste development. In contrast, the same analyses applied to adult worker bees allowed us inferring that the high JH levels in foragers are due to increased JH synthesis. Upon RNAi-mediated silencing of the methyl farnesoate epoxidase gene (mfe) encoding the enzyme that catalyzes methyl farnesoate-to-JH conversion, the JH titer was decreased, thus corroborating that JH titer regulation in adult honey bees depends on this final JH biosynthesis step. The molecular pathway differences underlying JH titer regulation in larval caste development versus adult age polyethism lead us to propose that mfe and jhe genes be assayed when addressing questions on the role(s) of JH in social evolution.

  9. Genetic evidence for function of the bHLH-PAS protein Gce/Met as a juvenile hormone receptor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jindra, Marek; Uhlířová, M.; Charles, J.-P.; Smýkal, V.; Hill, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 7 (2015), e1005394 ISSN 1553-7404 Grant - others:Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship Award(CZ) 276569 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : juvenile hormone Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.661, year: 2015 http://journals.plos.org/plosgenetics/article?id=10.1371/journal.pgen.1005394

  10. Age-dependent plasticity of sex pheromone response in the moth, Agrotis ipsilon: combined effects of octopamine and juvenile hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarriault, David; Barrozo, Romina B; de Carvalho Pinto, Carlos J

    2009-01-01

    Male moths use sex pheromones to find their mating partners. In the moth, Agrotis ipsilon, the behavioral response and the neuron sensitivity within the primary olfactory centre, the antennal lobe (AL), to sex pheromone increase with age and juvenile hormone (JH) biosynthesis. By manipulating...

  11. Aromatic hexamerin subunit from adult female cockroaches (Blaberus discoidalis) : Molecular cloning, suppression by juvenile hormone, and evolutionary perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamroz, RC; Beintema, JJ; Stam, WT; Bradfield, JY

    In an effort to identify several polypeptides that are strongly suppressed by juvenile hormone (JH) in fat body of adult female Blaberus discoidalis cockroaches, we have cloned a cDNA representing a polypeptide member of the hexamerin family of arthropod serum proteins. The deduced primary

  12. Regulation of gut hormone secretion. Studies using isolated perfused intestines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Berit; Holst, Jens Juul.

    2016-01-01

    hormones is highly increased after gastric bypass operations, which have turned out to be an effective therapy of not only obesity but also type 2 diabetes. These effects are likely to be due, at least in part, to increases in the secretion of these gut hormones (except GIP). Therefore, stimulation...... of the endogenous hormone represents an appealing therapeutic strategy, which has spurred an interest in understanding the regulation of gut hormone secretion and a search for particularly GLP-1 and PYY secretagogues. The secretion of the gut hormones is stimulated by oral intake of nutrients often including...

  13. Thyroid hormone is required for hypothalamic neurons regulating cardiovascular functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mittag, J.; Lyons, D.J.; Sällström, J.; Vujoviv, M.; Dudazy-Gralla, S.; Warner, A.; Wallis, K.; Alkemade, A.; Nordström, K.; Monyer, H.; Broberger, C.; Arner, A.; Vennström, B.

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is well known for its profound direct effects on cardiovascular function and metabolism. Recent evidence, however, suggests that the hormone also regulates these systems indirectly through the central nervous system. While some of the molecular mechanisms underlying the hormone’s

  14. Precocious metamorphosis in the juvenile hormone-deficient mutant of the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Daimon

    Full Text Available Insect molting and metamorphosis are intricately governed by two hormones, ecdysteroids and juvenile hormones (JHs. JHs prevent precocious metamorphosis and allow the larva to undergo multiple rounds of molting until it attains the proper size for metamorphosis. In the silkworm, Bombyx mori, several "moltinism" mutations have been identified that exhibit variations in the number of larval molts; however, none of them have been characterized molecularly. Here we report the identification and characterization of the gene responsible for the dimolting (mod mutant that undergoes precocious metamorphosis with fewer larval-larval molts. We show that the mod mutation results in complete loss of JHs in the larval hemolymph and that the mutant phenotype can be rescued by topical application of a JH analog. We performed positional cloning of mod and found a null mutation in the cytochrome P450 gene CYP15C1 in the mod allele. We also demonstrated that CYP15C1 is specifically expressed in the corpus allatum, an endocrine organ that synthesizes and secretes JHs. Furthermore, a biochemical experiment showed that CYP15C1 epoxidizes farnesoic acid to JH acid in a highly stereospecific manner. Precocious metamorphosis of mod larvae was rescued when the wild-type allele of CYP15C1 was expressed in transgenic mod larvae using the GAL4/UAS system. Our data therefore reveal that CYP15C1 is the gene responsible for the mod mutation and is essential for JH biosynthesis. Remarkably, precocious larval-pupal transition in mod larvae does not occur in the first or second instar, suggesting that authentic epoxidized JHs are not essential in very young larvae of B. mori. Our identification of a JH-deficient mutant in this model insect will lead to a greater understanding of the molecular basis of the hormonal control of development and metamorphosis.

  15. Regulation of abiotic and biotic stress responses by plant hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosskinsky, Dominik Kilian; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas Georg

    2016-01-01

    Plant hormones (phytohormones) are signal molecules produced within the plant, and occur in very low concentrations. In the present chapter, the current knowledge on the regulation of biotic and biotic stress responses by plant hormones is summarized with special focus on the novel insights...... into the complex hormonal crosstalk of classical growth stimulating plant hormones within the naturally occurring biotic and abiotic multistress environment of higher plants. The MAPK- and phytohormone-cascades which comprise a multitude of single molecules on different signalling levels, as well as interactions...

  16. Interference of a synthetic C18 juvenile hormone with mammalian cells in vitro, I. Effects on growth and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska, Z M; Laskowska-Bozek, H; Jastreboff, P

    1978-01-01

    Some of structural and functional analogs of juvenile hormones are now under field examinations as growth inhibitors of some pest-insect populations. So far however very little is known about the possible interference of these compounds with mammalian cells or organisms. In this research the interference of a synthetic preparation of the insect C18 juvenile hormone with mouse embryo fibroblasts (ME-cells) and mouse cells of an established line (L-cells) was studied. Aliquots of juvenile hormone solution or those of the solvent (DMSO plus ethanol, 9:1) were included into the culture medium and after defined times of contact the cells were tested for their morphology, pattern of growth, proliferation rate and viability. The data for the parameters under examination were evaluated by means of the analysis of variance and checked by the Tuckey test. The sensitivity of ME-cells and L-cells to the agent tested was compared by means of the analysis of variance of the data for mitotic indices of these cells and by evaluation of the number of dead cells in cultures under the particular conditions of the experiments. The main findings can be summarized as follows: 1. Cells of both types are evidently more sensitive to juvenile hormone than to the solvent. 2. ME-cells are more sensitive to both agents than are L-cells. 3. The concentrations of the hormone in the medium required to evoked the cytocidal effect on the mouse cells similarly as those affecting some insect non-target cells were far above concentrations found in insect blood, but they were of the same order of magnitude as those used in physiological experiments with insect organs in vitro.

  17. Wolbachia-induced paternal defect in Drosophila is likely by interaction with the juvenile hormone pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen; Wang, Jia-Lin; Zheng, Ya; Xiong, En-Juan; Li, Jing-Jing; Yuan, Lin-Ling; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Yu-Feng

    2014-06-01

    Wolbachia are endosymbionts that infect many insect species. They can manipulate the host's reproduction to increase their own maternal transmission. Cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) is one such manipulation, which is expressed as embryonic lethality when Wolbachia-infected males mate with uninfected females. However, matings between males and females carrying the same Wolbachia strain result in viable progeny. The molecular mechanisms of CI are currently not clear. We have previously reported that the gene Juvenile hormone-inducible protein 26 (JhI-26) exhibited the highest upregulation in the 3rd instar larval testes of Drosophila melanogaster when infected by Wolbachia. This is reminiscent of an interaction between Wolbachia and juvenile hormone (JH) pathway in flies. Considering that Jhamt gene encodes JH acid methyltransferase, a key regulatory enzyme of JH biosynthesis, and that methoprene-tolerant (Met) has been regarded as the best JH receptor candidate, we first compared the expression of Jhamt and Met between Wolbachia-infected and uninfected fly testes to investigate whether Wolbachia infection influence the JH signaling pathway. We found that the expressions of Jhamt and Met were significantly increased in the presence of Wolbachia, suggesting an interaction of Wolbachia with the JH signaling pathway. Then, we found that overexpression of JhI-26 in Wolbachia-free transgenic male flies caused paternal-effect lethality that mimics the defects associated with CI. JhI-26 overexpressing males resulted in significantly decrease in hatch rate. Surprisingly, Wolbachia-infected females could rescue the egg hatch. In addition, we showed that overexpression of JhI-26 caused upregulation of the male accessory gland protein (Acp) gene CG10433, but not vice versa. This result suggests that JhI-26 may function at the upstream of CG10433. Likewise, overexpression of CG10433 also resulted in paternal-effect lethality. Both JhI-26 and CG10433 overexpressing males

  18. Environmental effects on hormonal regulation of testicular descent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toppari, J; Virtanen, H E; Skakkebaek, N E

    2006-01-01

    cause some cases of undescended testis. Similarly, androgen insensitivity or androgen deficiency can cause cryptorchidism. Estrogens have been shown to down regulate INSL3 and thereby cause maldescent. Thus, a reduced androgen-estrogen ratio may disturb testicular descent. Environmental effects changing......Regulation of testicular descent is hormonally regulated, but the reasons for maldescent remain unknown in most cases. The main regulatory hormones are Leydig cell-derived testosterone and insulin-like factor 3 (INSL3). Luteinizing hormone (LH) stimulates the secretion of these hormones...... hypothesize that an exposure to a mixture of chemicals with anti-androgenic or estrogenic properties (either their own activity or their effect on androgen-estrogen ratio) may be involved in cryptorchidism....

  19. Modelling synergistic effects of appetite regulating hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Julie Berg; Ritz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We briefly reviewed one definition of dose addition, which is applicable within the framework of generalized linear models. We established how this definition of dose addition corresponds to effect addition in case only two doses per compound are considered for evaluating synergistic effects. The....... The link between definitions was exemplified for an appetite study where two appetite hormones were studied....

  20. Control of larval-pupal-adult molt in the moth Sesamia nonagrioides by juvenile hormone and ecdysteroids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pérez-Hedo, M.; Goodman, W. G.; Schafellner, Ch.; Martini, A.; Sehnal, František; Eizaguirre, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 5 (2011), s. 602-607 ISSN 0022-1910 Grant - others:MOBITAG project, EU program FP7-REGPOT-2008-1(CZ) 229518; Spanish R+D Agency (CICYT)(ES) AGL2005-06485 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Sesamia nonagrioides * juvenile hormone * ecdysteroids Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.236, year: 2011

  1. Binding specificity of the juvenile hormone carrier protein from the hemolymph of the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta Johannson (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, R C; Reich, M F; Dunn, P E; Law, J H; Katzenellnbogen, J A

    1977-05-17

    A series of analogues of insect juvenile hormone (four geometric isomers of methyl epoxyfarnesenate, several para-substituted epoxygeranyl phenyl ethers, and epoxyfarnesol and its acetate and haloacetate derivatives) was prepared to investigate the binding specificity of the hemolymph juvenile hormone binding protein from the tobacco hornworm Manduct sexta. The relative binding affinities were determined by a competition assay against radiolabeled methyl (E,E)-3,11-dimethyl-7-ethyl-cis-10,11-epoxytrideca-2,6-dienoate (JH I). The ratio of dissociation constants was estimated by plotting competitor data according to a linear transformation of the dissociation equations describing competition of two ligands for a binding protein. The importance of the geometry of the sesquiterpene hydrocarbon chain is indicated by the fact that the binding affinity is decreased as Z (cis) double bonds are substituted for E (trans) double bonds in the methyl epoxyfarnesenate series; the unepoxidized analogues do not bind. A carboxylic ester function is important although its orientation can be reversed, as indicated by the good binding of epoxyfarnesyl acetate. In the monoterpene series, methyl epoxygeranoate shows no affinity for the binding protein, but substitution of a phenyl or p-carbomethoxyphenyl ether for the ester function imparts a low, but significant affinity. These data taken together with earlier results indicate that the binding site for juvenile hormone in the hemolymph binding protein is characterized by a sterically defined hydrophobic region with polar sites that recognize the epoxide and the ester functions.

  2. Improved strength of silk fibers in Bombyx mori trimolters induced by an anti-juvenile hormone compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kaiyu; Dong, Zhaoming; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Dandan; Tang, Muya; Zhang, Xiaolu; Xia, Qingyou; Zhao, Ping

    2018-05-01

    Bombyx mori silk fibers with thin diameters have advantages of lightness and crease-resistance. Many studies have used anti-juvenile hormones to induce trimolters in order to generate thin silk; however, there has been comparatively little analysis of the morphology, structure and mechanical properties of trimolter silk. This study induced two kinds of trimolters by appling topically anti-juvenile hormones and obtained thin diameter silk. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), FTIR analysis, tensile mechanical testing, chitin staining were used to reveal that the morphology, conformation and mechanical property of the trimolter silk. Cocoon of trimolters were highly densely packed by thinner fibers and thus had small apertures. We found that the conformation of trimolter silk fibroin changed and formed more β-sheet structures. In addition, analysis of mechanical parameters yielded a higher Young's modulus and strength in trimolter silk than in the control. By chitin staining of silk gland, we postulated that the mechanical properties of trimolters' silk was enhanced greatly during to the structural changes of silk gland. We induced trimolters by anti-juvenile hormones and the resulting cocoons were more closely packed and had smaller silk fiber diameters. We found that the conformation of trimolters silk fibroin had a higher content of β-sheet structures and better mechanical properties. Our study revealed the structures and mechanical properties of trimolter silk, and provided a valuable reference to improve silk quality by influencing molting in silkworms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Neuropeptides affecting the transfer of juvenile hormones from males to females during mating in Spodoptera frugiperda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanien, Intisar T E; Grötzner, Manuela; Meyering-Vos, Martina; Hoffmann, Klaus H

    2014-07-01

    In the polyandric moth, Spodopterafrugiperda, juvenile hormone (JH) is transferred from the male accessory reproductive glands (AG) to the female bursa copulatrix (BC) during copulation (see Hassanien et al., 2014). Here we used the RNA interference technique to study the role of allatoregulating neuropeptides in controlling the synthesis and transfer of JH during mating. Knockdown of S. frugiperda allatostatin C (Spofr-AS type C) in freshly emerged males leads to an accumulation of JH in the AG beyond that in the control and mating results in a higher transport of JH I and JH II into the female BC. Knockdown of S. frugiperda allatotropin 2 (Spofr-AT2) significantly reduces the amount of JH in the AG as well as its transfer into the female BC during copulation. Knockdown of S. frugiperda allatostatin A (Spofr-AS type A) and S. frugiperda allatotropin (Spofr-AT; Hassanien et al., 2014) only slightly affects the accumulation of JH in the AG and its transfer from the male to the female. We conclude that Spofr-AS type C and Spofr-AT2 act as true allatostatin and true allatotropin, respectively, on the synthesis of JH I and JH II in the male AG. Moreover, both peptides seem to control the synthesis of JH III in the corpora allata of adult males and its release into the hemolymph. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of juvenile hormone on Polistes wasp fertility varies with cooperative behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbetts, Elizabeth A; Sheehan, Michael J

    2012-04-01

    Social insects provide good models for studying how and why the mechanisms that underlie reproduction vary, as there is dramatic reproductive plasticity within and between species. Here, we test how the effect of juvenile hormone (JH) on fertility covaries with cooperative behavior in workers and nest-founding queens in the primitively eusocial wasp Polistes metricus. P. metricus foundresses and workers appear morphologically similar and both are capable of reproduction, though there is variation in the extent of social cooperation and the probability of reproduction across castes. Do the endocrine mechanisms that mediate reproduction co-vary with cooperative behavior? We found dramatic differences in the effect of JH on fertility across castes. In non-cooperative nest-founding queens, all individuals responded to JH by increasing their fertility. However, in cooperative workers, the effect of JH on fertility varies with body weight; large workers increase their fertility in response to JH while small workers do not. The variation in JH response may be an adaptation to facilitate resource allocation based on the probability of independent reproduction. This work contrasts with previous studies in closely related Polistes dominulus paper wasps, in which both foundresses and workers form cooperative associations and both castes show similar, condition-dependent JH response. The variation in JH responsiveness within and between species suggests that endocrine responsiveness and the factors influencing caste differentiation are surprisingly evolutionarily labile. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of growth hormone treatment on growth in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, D; Bechtold, S

    2009-11-01

    Several therapeutic trials have been conducted over the past decade to evaluate the role of exogenous growth hormone (GH) as a means of correcting the growth deficiency seen in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Early studies showed the benefit of GH treatment with respect to final height in patients with JIA. Of 13 patients receiving GH, 84% (11 patients) achieved a final height within their target range compared with only 22% (4 of 18 patients) of untreated patients. There are, however, factors that may limit the statural gains achieved with GH therapy including severe inflammation, severe statural deficiency at GH therapy initiation, long disease duration and delayed puberty. Data on the efficacy of GH replacement therapy in children with JIA and factors that influence the statural growth response will be reviewed. Results from therapeutic trials show that treatment with GH can decrease the statural deficit that occurs during the active phase of JIA, producing an adult height that is close to the genetically determined target height. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Juvenile hormone reveals mosaic developmental programs in the metamorphosing optic lobe of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn M. Riddiford

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of the adult optic lobe (OL of Drosophila melanogaster is directed by a wave of ingrowth of the photoreceptors over a 2-day period at the outset of metamorphosis, which is accompanied by the appearance of the pupal-specific transcription factor Broad-Z3 (Br-Z3 and expression of early drivers in OL neurons. During this time, there are pulses of ecdysteroids that time the metamorphic events. At the outset, the transient appearance of juvenile hormone (JH prevents precocious development of the OL caused by the ecdysteroid peak that initiates pupariation, but the artificial maintenance of JH after this time misdirects subsequent development. Axon ingrowth, Br-Z3 appearance and the expression of early drivers were unaffected, but aspects of later development such as the dendritic expansion of the lamina monopolar neurons and the expression of late drivers were suppressed. This effect of the exogenous JH mimic (JHM pyriproxifen is lost by 24 h after pupariation. Part of this effect of JHM is due to its suppression of the appearance of ecdysone receptor EcR-B1 that occurs after pupation and during early adult development.

  7. Effect of juvenile hormone on short-term olfactory memory in young honeybees (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleszka, R; Helliwell, P

    2001-11-01

    Reliable retention of olfactory learning following a 1-trial classical conditioning of the proboscis extension reflex (PER) is not achieved in honeybees until they are 6-7 days old. Here we show that treatment of newly emerged honeybees with juvenile hormone (JH) has a profound effect on the maturation of short-term olfactory memory. JH-treated individuals display excellent short-term (1 h) memory of associative learning at times as early as 3 days of age and perform consistently better than untreated bees for at least the first week of their lives. By contrast, the retention of long-term (24 h) memory following a 3-trial conditioning of the PER is not significantly improved in JH-treated bees. Our study also shows that experience and (or) chemosensory activation are not essential to improve learning performance in olfactory tasks. The lack of accelerated development of long-term retention of olfactory memories in JH-treated honeybees is discussed in the context of neural circuits suspected to mediate memory formation and retrieval in the honeybee brain. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  8. Breast Milk Hormones and Regulation of Glucose Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Savino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence suggests that a complex relationship exists between the central nervous system and peripheral organs involved in energy homeostasis. It consists in the balance between food intake and energy expenditure and includes the regulation of nutrient levels in storage organs, as well as in blood, in particular blood glucose. Therefore, food intake, energy expenditure, and glucose homeostasis are strictly connected to each other. Several hormones, such as leptin, adiponectin, resistin, and ghrelin, are involved in this complex regulation. These hormones play a role in the regulation of glucose metabolism and are involved in the development of obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Recently, their presence in breast milk has been detected, suggesting that they may be involved in the regulation of growth in early infancy and could influence the programming of energy balance later in life. This paper focuses on hormones present in breast milk and their role in glucose homeostasis.

  9. Negative regulation of parathyroid hormone-related protein expression by steroid hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajitani, Takashi; Tamamori-Adachi, Mimi; Okinaga, Hiroko; Chikamori, Minoru; Iizuka, Masayoshi; Okazaki, Tomoki

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Steroid hormones repress expression of PTHrP in the cell lines where the corresponding nuclear receptors are expressed. → Nuclear receptors are required for suppression of PTHrP expression by steroid hormones, except for androgen receptor. → Androgen-induced suppression of PTHrP expression appears to be mediated by estrogen receptor. -- Abstract: Elevated parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is responsible for humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM), which is of clinical significance in treatment of terminal patients with malignancies. Steroid hormones were known to cause suppression of PTHrP expression. However, detailed studies linking multiple steroid hormones to PTHrP expression are lacking. Here we studied PTHrP expression in response to steroid hormones in four cell lines with excessive PTHrP production. Our study established that steroid hormones negatively regulate PTHrP expression. Vitamin D receptor, estrogen receptor α, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, were required for repression of PTHrP expression by the cognate ligands. A notable exception was the androgen receptor, which was dispensable for suppression of PTHrP expression in androgen-treated cells. We propose a pathway(s) involving nuclear receptors to suppress PTHrP expression.

  10. PCBs and DDT in the serum of juvenile California sea lions: associations with vitamins A and E and thyroid hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debier, Cathy; Ylitalo, Gina M.; Weise, Michael; Gulland, Frances; Costa, Daniel P.; Le Boeuf, Burney J.; Tillesse, Tanguy de; Larondelle, Yvan

    2005-01-01

    Top-trophic predators like California sea lions bioaccumulate high levels of persistent fat-soluble pollutants that may provoke physiological impairments such as endocrine or vitamins A and E disruption. We measured circulating levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in 12 healthy juvenile California sea lions captured on An-tilde o Nuevo Island, California, in 2002. We investigated the relationship between the contamination by PCBs and DDT and the circulating levels of vitamins A and E and thyroid hormones (thyroxine, T4 and triiodothyronine, T3). Serum concentrations of total PCBs (ΣPCBs) and total DDT were 14 ± 9 mg/kg and 28 ± 19 mg/kg lipid weight, respectively. PCB toxic equivalents (ΣPCB TEQs) were 320 ± 170 ng/kg lipid weight. Concentrations of ΣPCBs and ΣPCB TEQs in serum lipids were negatively correlated (p 0.1). As juvenile California sea lions are useful sentinels of coastal contamination, the high levels encountered in their serum is cause for concern about the ecosystem health of the area. - Results show high levels of organochlorine contaminants in juvenile California sea lions and a link between vitamin A, thyroid hormones and PCB exposure

  11. Effects of the use of growth hormone in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan Bazuco Frittoli

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA often have impaired growth and short stature. There is evidence that the therapeutic use of growth hormone (GH is useful and safe in these patients. Objective: To analyze the effects of GH use in patients with JIA. Method: A systematic review of the literature over the last 18 years in Medline and Embase databases. The criteria were analyzed independently by the researchers. We used the following keywords: "growth hormone", "arthritis, juvenile", "arthritis, rheumatoid", "child" and "adolescent". Results: Among the 192 identified articles, 20 corresponded to the inclusion criteria. Seventeen longitudinal studies and 3 case reports were found. Most studies analyzed observed increased growth, muscle mass and bone mass using GH. Adverse effects observed were glucose intolerance, diabetes, bone deformities, osteonecrosis, reactivation of the disease and low final height. Conclusion: The majority of studies reported positive effects after the therapeutic use of GH, but some variability in response to treatment was observed. The combination of growth hormone with other drugs seems to be a good option.

  12. The role of juvenile hormone in immune function and pheromone production trade-offs: a test of the immunocompetence handicap principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantala, Markus J; Vainikka, Anssi; Kortet, Raine

    2003-01-01

    The immunocompetence handicap hypothesis postulates that secondary sexual traits are honest signals of mate quality because the hormones (e.g. testosterone) needed to develop secondary sexual traits have immunosuppressive effects. The best support for predictions arising from the immunocompetence handicap hypothesis so far comes from studies of insects, although they lack male-specific hormones such as testosterone. In our previous studies, we found that female mealworm beetles prefer pheromones of immunocompetent males. Here, we tested how juvenile hormone (JH) affects male investment in secondary sexual characteristics and immune functions in the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor. We injected male mealworm beetles with JH (type III) and found that injection increased the attractiveness of male pheromones but simultaneously suppressed immune functions (phenoloxidase activity and encapsulation). Our results suggest that JH, which is involved in the control of reproduction and morphogenesis, also plays a central role in the regulation of a trade-off between the immune system and sexual advertisement in insects. Thus, the results reflect a general mechanism by which the immunocompetence handicap hypothesis may work in insects. PMID:14613612

  13. Estrogens regulate the hepatic effects of growth hormone, a hormonal interplay with multiple fates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Pérez, Leandro; Guerra, Borja; Díaz-Chico, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    The liver responds to estrogens and growth hormone (GH) which are critical regulators of body growth, gender-related hepatic functions, and intermediate metabolism. The effects of estrogens on liver can be direct, through the direct actions of hepatic ER, or indirect, which include the crosstalk...

  14. Direct Regulation of Mitochondrial RNA Synthesis by Thyroid Hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enríquez, José A.; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Garrido-Pérez, Nuria; López-Pérez, Manuel J.; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Montoya, Julio

    1999-01-01

    We have analyzed the influence of in vivo treatment and in vitro addition of thyroid hormone on in organello mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) transcription and, in parallel, on the in organello footprinting patterns at the mtDNA regions involved in the regulation of transcription. We found that thyroid hormone modulates mitochondrial RNA levels and the mRNA/rRNA ratio by influencing the transcriptional rate. In addition, we found conspicuous differences between the mtDNA dimethyl sulfate footprinting patterns of mitochondria derived from euthyroid and hypothyroid rats at the transcription initiation sites but not at the mitochondrial transcription termination factor (mTERF) binding region. Furthermore, direct addition of thyroid hormone to the incubation medium of mitochondria isolated from hypothyroid rats restored the mRNA/rRNA ratio found in euthyroid rats as well as the mtDNA footprinting patterns at the transcription initiation area. Therefore, we conclude that the regulatory effect of thyroid hormone on mitochondrial transcription is partially exerted by a direct influence of the hormone on the mitochondrial transcription machinery. Particularly, the influence on the mRNA/rRNA ratio is achieved by selective modulation of the alternative H-strand transcription initiation sites and does not require the previous activation of nuclear genes. These results provide the first functional demonstration that regulatory signals, such as thyroid hormone, that modify the expression of nuclear genes can also act as primary signals for the transcriptional apparatus of mitochondria. PMID:9858589

  15. Efeitos da aplicação tópica de hormônio juvenil sobre o desenvolvimento dos ovários de larvas de operárias de Apis mellifera Linnaeus (Hymenoptera, Apidae Effect of topic application of juvenile hormone on the ovarian development of worker larvae of Apis mellifera Linnaeus (Hymenoptera, Apidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Fernando Antonialli-Junior

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A influência do hormônio juvenil sobre o desenvolvimento do ovário de larvas de operárias de Apis mellifera foi analisada levando em conta a determinação trófica das castas, segundo a qual a alimentação larval é controlada pelas operárias de maneira a promover uma diferenciação de castas controlada pela produção e disponibilidade desse hormônio. A hipótese testada é que a ação do hormônio juvenil seja capaz de proteger ou prevenir a degeneração nos ovários das larvas de operárias. Foi feita aplicação tópica de 1 ml de hormônio dissolvido em hexano na concentração de 1 mg/ml do segundo até o quinto dia de vida larval, e a morfologia dos ovários avaliada nos dias subseqüentes à aplicação até ao sexto dia de vida larval. Como controles foram utilizadas larvas nas quais se aplicou 1 ml de hexano e larvas que não receberam nenhum tratamento. Constatou-se que o efeito do hormônio juvenil varia conforme a idade larval em que é aplicado e que este efeito foi maior quando a aplicação foi feita no terceiro dia de vida larval.The influence of juvenile hormone (JH on the ovarian development of worker larvae of Apis mellifera was analyzed, taking into account the trophic determination of the castes. The workers control the larval feeding in order to promote caste differentiation, which is regulated by the production and availability of this hormone. The hypothesis tested was that the action of juvenile hormone is capable of protecting or preventing the degeneration of the ovaries in worker larvae. A preparation of 1 ml of juvenile hormone dissolved in hexane at a concentration of 1 mg/ml was applied topically to 2- to 5-day-old larvae. The morphology of the ovaries was evaluated on the days following the application, until the larvae were 6 days old. The controls consisted of larvae to which 1 ml of hexane was applied, and larvae that received no treatment. The effect of juvenile hormone varied according to the age

  16. Bemisia tabaci females from the Mediterranean (Q) species detect and avoid laying eggs in the presence of pyriproxyfen, a juvenile hormone analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshitzky, Pnina; Morin, Shai

    2014-10-01

    Pyriproxyfen, a juvenile hormone analogue, disrupts embryogenesis, metamorphosis and adult formation in Bemisia tabaci, but does not directly affect adult females. The effect of pyriproxyfen on egg-laying preference and performance of B. tabaci females and the influence of resistance to pyriproxyfen on these reproductive behaviours were studied. Choice experiments utilising cotton plants treated and not treated with pyriproxyfen revealed a significant preference for egg laying on non-treated plants both by resistant and susceptible females. No-choice assays indicated a reduction of ∼60% in the number of eggs laid on pyriproxyfen-treated plants by both resistant and susceptible females. The reduction in oviposition on treated plants was not accompanied with reduced expression of the vitellogenin gene or a delay in oocyte maturation, but significant accumulation of mature oocytes in the ovaries was observed, and could be reversed by transferring the females to non-treated plants. Pyriproxyfen caused reduced oviposition and enhanced mature oocyte accumulation in pyriproxyfen-resistant and pyriproxyfen-susceptible females. These findings can be explained by two alternative mechanisms: pyriproxyfen-regulated physiological arrest of oviposition, involving hormonal regulation of myotrophic factors, or the hierarchy-threshold behavioural theory of host choice, in which pyriproxyfen-treated plants are defined as low-quality hosts. Aspects of application are discussed. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Current insights into hormonal regulation of microspore embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona eŻur

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth regulator (PGR crosstalk and interaction with the plant’s genotype and environmental factors play a crucial role in microspore embryogenesis (ME, controlling microspore-derived embryo differentiation and development as well as haploid/doubled haploid plant regeneration. The complexity of the PGR network which could exist at the level of biosynthesis, distribution, gene expression or signaling pathways, renders the creation of an integrated model of ME-control crosstalk impossible at present. However, the analysis of the published data together with the results received recently with the use of modern analytical techniques brings new insights into hormonal regulation of this process. This review presents a short historical overview of the most important milestones in the recognition of hormonal requirements for effective ME in the most important crop plant species and complements it with new concepts that evolved over the last decade of ME studies.

  18. Circadian regulation of hormone signaling and plant physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamian, Hagop S; Harmer, Stacey L

    2016-08-01

    The survival and reproduction of plants depend on their ability to cope with a wide range of daily and seasonal environmental fluctuations during their life cycle. Phytohormones are plant growth regulators that are involved in almost every aspect of growth and development as well as plant adaptation to myriad abiotic and biotic conditions. The circadian clock, an endogenous and cell-autonomous biological timekeeper that produces rhythmic outputs with close to 24-h rhythms, provides an adaptive advantage by synchronizing plant physiological and metabolic processes to the external environment. The circadian clock regulates phytohormone biosynthesis and signaling pathways to generate daily rhythms in hormone activity that fine-tune a range of plant processes, enhancing adaptation to local conditions. This review explores our current understanding of the interplay between the circadian clock and hormone signaling pathways.

  19. Effects of the juvenile hormone analogue methoprene on rate of behavioural development, foraging performance and navigation in honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lun-Hsien; Barron, Andrew B; Cheng, Ken

    2015-06-01

    Worker honey bees change roles as they age as part of a hormonally regulated process of behavioural development that ends with a specialised foraging phase. The rate of behavioural development is highly plastic and responsive to changes in colony condition such that forager losses, disease or nutritional stresses accelerate behavioural development and cause an early onset of foraging in workers. It is not clear to what degree the behavioural development of workers can be accelerated without there being a cost in terms of reduced foraging performance. Here, we compared the foraging performance of bees induced to accelerate their behavioural development by treatment with the juvenile hormone analogue methoprene with that of controls that developed at a normal rate. Methoprene treatment accelerated the onset of both flight and foraging behaviour in workers, but it also reduced foraging span, the total time spent foraging and the number of completed foraging trips. Methoprene treatment did not alter performance in a short-range navigation task, however. These data indicate a limitation to the physiological plasticity of bees, and a trade off between forager performance and the speed at which bees begin foraging. Chronic stressors will be expected to reduce the mean age of the foraging force, and therefore also reduce the efficiency of the foraging force. This interaction may explain why honey bee colonies react to sustained stressors with non-linear population decline. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Juvenile hormone counteracts the bHLH-PAS transcription factors MET and GCE to prevent caspase-dependent programmed cell death in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Sheng, Zhentao; Liu, Hanhan; Wen, Di; He, Qianyu; Wang, Sheng; Shao, Wei; Jiang, Rong-Jing; An, Shiheng; Sun, Yaning; Bendena, William G; Wang, Jian; Gilbert, Lawrence I; Wilson, Thomas G; Song, Qisheng; Li, Sheng

    2009-06-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) regulates many developmental and physiological events in insects, but its molecular mechanism remains conjectural. Here we report that genetic ablation of the corpus allatum cells of the Drosophila ring gland (the JH source) resulted in JH deficiency, pupal lethality and precocious and enhanced programmed cell death (PCD) of the larval fat body. In the fat body of the JH-deficient animals, Dronc and Drice, two caspase genes that are crucial for PCD induced by the molting hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), were significantly upregulated. These results demonstrated that JH antagonizes 20E-induced PCD by restricting the mRNA levels of Dronc and Drice. The antagonizing effect of JH on 20E-induced PCD in the fat body was further confirmed in the JH-deficient animals by 20E treatment and RNA interference of the 20E receptor EcR. Moreover, MET and GCE, the bHLH-PAS transcription factors involved in JH action, were shown to induce PCD by upregulating Dronc and Drice. In the Met- and gce-deficient animals, Dronc and Drice were downregulated, whereas in the Met-overexpression fat body, Dronc and Drice were significantly upregulated leading to precocious and enhanced PCD, and this upregulation could be suppressed by application of the JH agonist methoprene. For the first time, we demonstrate that JH counteracts MET and GCE to prevent caspase-dependent PCD in controlling fat body remodeling and larval-pupal metamorphosis in Drosophila.

  1. Tissue specific regulation of lipogenesis by thyroid hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blennemann, B.; Freake, H. (Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs (United States))

    1990-02-26

    Thyroid hormone stimulates long chain fatty acid synthesis in rat liver by increasing the amounts of key lipogenic enzymes. Sparse and conflicting data exist concerning its action on this pathway in other tissues. The authors recently showed that, in contrast to liver, hypothyroidism stimulates lipogenesis in brown adipose tissue and have now systematically examined the effects of thyroid state on fatty acid synthesis in other rat tissues. Lipogenesis was assessed by tritiated water incorporation. Euthyroid hepatic fatty acid synthesis (16.6um H/g/h) was reduced to 30% in hypothyroid rats and increased 3 fold in hyperthyroidism. Lipogenesis was detected in euthyroid kidney and heart and these levels were also stimulated by thyroid hormone treatment. Brown adipose tissue was unique in showing increased lipogenesis in the hypothyroid state. Hyperthyroid levels were not different from euthyroid. Effects in white adipose tissue were small and inconsistent. Brain, skin and lung were all lipogenically active, but did not respond to changes in thyroid state. Low but detectable levels of fatty acid synthesis were measured in muscle, which also were non-responsive. A wide spectrum of responses to thyroid hormone are seen in different rat tissues and thus the pathway of long chain fatty acid synthesis would appear to be an excellent model for examining the tissue specific regulation of gene expression by thyroid hormone.

  2. Tissue specific regulation of lipogenesis by thyroid hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blennemann, B.; Freake, H.

    1990-01-01

    Thyroid hormone stimulates long chain fatty acid synthesis in rat liver by increasing the amounts of key lipogenic enzymes. Sparse and conflicting data exist concerning its action on this pathway in other tissues. The authors recently showed that, in contrast to liver, hypothyroidism stimulates lipogenesis in brown adipose tissue and have now systematically examined the effects of thyroid state on fatty acid synthesis in other rat tissues. Lipogenesis was assessed by tritiated water incorporation. Euthyroid hepatic fatty acid synthesis (16.6um H/g/h) was reduced to 30% in hypothyroid rats and increased 3 fold in hyperthyroidism. Lipogenesis was detected in euthyroid kidney and heart and these levels were also stimulated by thyroid hormone treatment. Brown adipose tissue was unique in showing increased lipogenesis in the hypothyroid state. Hyperthyroid levels were not different from euthyroid. Effects in white adipose tissue were small and inconsistent. Brain, skin and lung were all lipogenically active, but did not respond to changes in thyroid state. Low but detectable levels of fatty acid synthesis were measured in muscle, which also were non-responsive. A wide spectrum of responses to thyroid hormone are seen in different rat tissues and thus the pathway of long chain fatty acid synthesis would appear to be an excellent model for examining the tissue specific regulation of gene expression by thyroid hormone

  3. Chemical regulators of plant hormones and their applications in basic research and agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kai; Asami, Tadao

    2018-04-20

    Plant hormones are small molecules that play versatile roles in regulating plant growth, development, and responses to the environment. Classic methodologies, including genetics, analytic chemistry, biochemistry, and molecular biology, have contributed to the progress in plant hormone studies. In addition, chemical regulators of plant hormone functions have been important in such studies. Today, synthetic chemicals, including plant growth regulators, are used to study and manipulate biological systems, collectively referred to as chemical biology. Here, we summarize the available chemical regulators and their contributions to plant hormone studies. We also pose questions that remain to be addressed in plant hormone studies and that might be solved with the help of chemical regulators.

  4. DNA methylation affects the lifespan of honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) workers - Evidence for a regulatory module that involves vitellogenin expression but is independent of juvenile hormone function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso-Júnior, Carlos A M; Guidugli-Lazzarini, Karina R; Hartfelder, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    The canonic regulatory module for lifespan of honey bee (Apis mellifera) workers involves a mutual repressor relationship between juvenile hormone (JH) and vitellogenin (Vg). Compared to vertebrates, however, little is known about a possible role of epigenetic factors. The full genomic repertoire of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) makes the honey bee an attractive emergent model for studying the role of epigenetics in the aging process of invertebrates, and especially so in social insects. We first quantified the transcript levels of the four DNMTs encoding genes in the head thorax and abdomens of workers of different age, showing that dnmt1a and dnmt3 expression is up-regulated in abdomens of old workers, whereas dnmt1b and dnmt2 are down-regulated in heads of old workers. Pharmacological genome demethylation by RG108 treatment caused an increase in worker lifespan. Next, we showed that the genomic DNA methylation status indirectly affects vitellogenin gene expression both in vitro and in vivo in young workers, and that this occurs independent of caloric restriction or JH levels, suggesting that a non-canonical circuitry may be acting in parallel with the JH/Vg module to regulate the adult life cycle of honey bee workers. Our data provide evidence that epigenetic factors play a role in regulatory networks associated with complex life history traits of a social insect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hormone profile in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus with previous or current amenorrhea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, Clovis A.; Deen, Maria E. J.; Febronio, Marilia V.; Oliveira, Sheila K.; Terreri, Maria T.; Sacchetti, Silvana B.; Sztajnbok, Flavio R.; Marini, Roberto; Quintero, Maria V.; Bica, Blanca E.; Pereira, Rosa M.; Bonfa, Eloisa; Ferriani, Virginia P.; Robazzi, Teresa C.; Magalhaes, Claudia S.; Hilario, Maria O.

    To identify the underlying mechanism of amenorrhea in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) patients, thirty-five (11.7%) JSLE patients with current or previous amenorrhea were consecutively selected among the 298 post-menarche patients followed in 12 Brazilian pediatric rheumatology centers.

  6. VARIATION IN GROWTH, LIPID CLASS AND FATTY ACID COMPOSITION OF THE MUD CRAB, RHITHROPANOPEUS HARRISII (GOULD) DURING LARVAL DEVELOPMENT FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO AN INSECT JUVENILE HORMONE ANALOG (FENOXYCARB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examines the effects of fenoxycarb?, an insect juvenile hormone analog, on larval growth, and lipid class and fatty acid composition in first crabs of the mud crab Rhithropanopeus harrisii reared through total larval development in nominal water concentrations from 1 ...

  7. Larval feeding substrate and species significantly influence the effect of juvenile hormone analog on sexual development/performance in four tropical tephritid flies

    Science.gov (United States)

    The juvenile hormone analog methoprene reduces the amount of time it takes laboratory-reared Anastrepha suspensa (Caribbean fruit fly) males to reach sexual maturity by almost half. Here, we examined if methoprene exerted a similar effect on four other species of Anastrepha (A. ludens, A. obliqua, ...

  8. The role of thyroid hormones in regulating of fatty acid spectrum of brain lipids: ontogenetic aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodynskiy A.G.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In experiments on rats of three age groups the role of thyroid hormones in the regulation of fatty acid spectrum of cortical and hippocampus lipids was studied. It was found that on the background of decreased thyroid status content of polyunsaturated fractions of free fatty acids, significantly changed depending on the age of the animals. In particular, in juvenile rats hypothyroidism was accompanied by a decrease almost twice the number of pentacodan acid decreased lipids viscosity in neurocortex. In old rats reduce of pentacodan acid in the cortex (38% was supplemented by significant (77% decrease in linoleic and linolenic acids. Unlike the two age groups deficiency of thyroid hormones in young animals caused accumulation of free polyunsatarated fatty acids (C18: 2.3 in the cerebral cortex by 74%, which may be associated with a decrease of this fraction in fatty acid spectrum of lipids and increase of viscosity properties of the membranes. These restruc­turing may be associated with modulation of synaptic transmission of specific neurotransmitter systems in the brain.

  9. Sex Hormones and Their Receptors Regulate Liver Energy Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minqian Shen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver is one of the most essential organs involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Hepatic steatosis, a major manifestation of metabolic syndrome, is associated with imbalance between lipid formation and breakdown, glucose production and catabolism, and cholesterol synthesis and secretion. Epidemiological studies show sex difference in the prevalence in fatty liver disease and suggest that sex hormones may play vital roles in regulating hepatic steatosis. In this review, we summarize current literature and discuss the role of estrogens and androgens and the mechanisms through which estrogen receptors and androgen receptors regulate lipid and glucose metabolism in the liver. In females, estradiol regulates liver metabolism via estrogen receptors by decreasing lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis, and fatty acid uptake, while enhancing lipolysis, cholesterol secretion, and glucose catabolism. In males, testosterone works via androgen receptors to increase insulin receptor expression and glycogen synthesis, decrease glucose uptake and lipogenesis, and promote cholesterol storage in the liver. These recent integrated concepts suggest that sex hormone receptors could be potential promising targets for the prevention of hepatic steatosis.

  10. Juvenile Hormone Analogues, Methoprene and Fenoxycarb Dose-Dependently Enhance Certain Enzyme Activities in the Silkworm Bombyx Mori (L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rajeswara Rao

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Use of Juvenile Hormone Analogues (JHA in sericulture practices has been shown to boost good cocoon yield; their effect has been determined to be dose-dependent. We studied the impact of low doses of JHA compounds such as methoprene and fenoxycarb on selected key enzymatic activities of the silkworm Bombyx mori. Methoprene and fenoxycarb at doses of 1.0 μg and 3.0fg/larvae/48 hours showed enhancement of the 5th instar B. mori larval muscle and silkgland protease, aspartate aminotransaminase (AAT and alanine aminotransaminase (ALAT, adenosine triphosphate synthase (ATPase and cytochrome-c-oxidase (CCO activity levels, indicating an upsurge in the overall oxidative metabolism of the B.mori larval tissues.

  11. Regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons by glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Alison V.; Moenter, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    Reproduction is influenced by energy balance, but the physiological pathways mediating their relationship have not been fully elucidated. As the central regulators of fertility, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons integrate numerous physiological signals, including metabolic cues. Circulating glucose levels regulate GnRH release and may in part mediate the effects of negative energy balance on fertility. Existing evidence suggests that neural pathways originating in the hindbrain, as well as in the hypothalamic feeding nuclei, transmit information concerning glucose availability to GnRH neurons. Here we review recent evidence suggesting that GnRH neurons may directly sense changes in glucose availability by a mechanism involving adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). These findings expand our understanding of how metabolic signaling in the brain regulates reproduction. PMID:21855365

  12. GROWTH RESPONSE OF CLOWN LOACH (Chromobotia macracanthus Bleeker 1852 JUVENILES IMMERSED IN WATER CONTAINING RECOMBINANT GROWTH HORMONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep Permana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The main problem in the culture of clown loach (Chromobotia macracanthus is the slow growth rate, which takes about six months to reach its market size (two inches total body length. Slow growth eventually cause a long production time and increase the production costs. An alternative solution can be proposed in order to enhance the growth is by using recombinant growth hormone. The aim of this study was to determine the immersion dose of recombinant Epinephelus lanceolatus growth hormone (rElGH which can generate the highest growth in clown loach. Larvae at seven day after hatching were hyperosmotic treated with NaCl 2.0% for one minute, then immersed for one hour in water containing 0.3% NaCl, 0.01% bovine serum albumin (BSA, and different doses of rElGH, namely: 0.12 (treatment A, 1.2 (B, 12 (C, and 120 mg/L (D. As control, fish were immersed in water without rElGH and NaCl (control-1, water containing 0.3% NaCl and 0.01% BSA (control-2, and 0.3% NaCl water (control-3. Each treatment was replicated three times. The results showed that clown loach juveniles in treatment B, C, and D had longer total body length (P0.05. In addition, the percentage of large size juveniles increased approximately 5% in treatment B, almost the same as in the medium size, while the small size were decrease compared to the control-1. Thus, the best immersion dose of rElGH was 1.2 mg/L water.

  13. Effect of juvenile hormone and serotonin (5-HT) on mixis induction of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis Muller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo; Hagiwara; Snell

    2000-09-05

    Juvenile hormone (JH) and serotonin (5-HT) were previously shown to enhance mictic (sexual) female production of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis in batch cultures. To explore the basis of these effects, experiments were conducted on isolated individuals. JH treatment of maternal rotifers with 5 and 50 µgml(-1) (18.8 and 187.7 µM) resulted in significantly higher (P<0.05) mictic female production in the second (F(2)) and third (F(3)) generations. JH treatment was effective even at a lower food concentration of 7x10(5) cellsml(-1), but it was not effective when free ammonia was added at 2.4 and 3.1 µgml(-1). Mictic female production was not increased with exposure to 5-HT up to 50 µgml(-1) (129.1 µM) concentrations. When food level was reduced to 7x10(5) cellsml(-1), however, 5-HT-treated rotifers produced significantly (P<0.05) more mictic females than the control, particularly in F(3) generation. Mictic female production of 5-HT-treated rotifers did not differ from that of the control with or without free ammonia, but the intrinsic rate of natural increase (r) of 5-HT-treated rotifers at 3.1 µgml(-1) free ammonia was significantly higher than the control. These results show that juvenile hormone increases mictic female production under optimum and sub-optimum food levels, whereas 5-HT increases both mictic female production at low food level and population growth rate at high free ammonia concentrations. These compounds could be used to manage rotifer cultures and probe the mechanisms controlling the rotifer life cycle as it switches to mictic reproduction.

  14. Hormonal regulation of floret closure of rice (Oryza sativa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Youming; Zeng, Xiaochun

    2018-01-01

    Plant hormones play important roles in regulating every aspect of growth, development, and metabolism of plants. We are interested in understanding hormonal regulation of floret opening and closure in plants. This is a particularly important problem for hybrid rice because regulation of flowering time is vitally important in hybrid rice seed production. However, little was known about the effects of plant hormones on rice flowering. We have shown that jasmonate and methyl jasmonate play significant roles in promoting rice floret opening. In this study, we investigated the effects of auxins including indole-3-acidic acid (IAA), indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), 1-naphthalene-acetic acid (NAA), 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) and 3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid (DIC) and abscisic acid (ABA) on floret closure of four fertile and three sterile varieties of rice. The results from field studies in three growing seasons in 2013–2015 showed that the percentages of closed florets were significantly lower in plants treated with IAA, IBA, 2,4-D, DIC and NAA and that the durations of floret opening were significantly longer in plants treated with the same auxins. The auxins exhibited time- and concentration-dependant effects on floret closure. ABA displayed opposite effects of auxins because it increased the percentages of floret closure and decreased the length of floret opening of rice varieties. The degree of auxin-inhibiting and ABA-promoting effects on floret closure was varied somewhat but not significantly different among the rice varieties. Endogenous IAA levels were the highest in florets collected shortly before opening followed by a sharp decline in florets with maximal angles of opening and a significant jump of IAA levels shortly after floret closure in both fertile and sterile rice plants. ABA levels showed an opposite trend in the same samples. Our results showed that auxins delayed but ABA promoted the closure of rice floret regardless of the varieties

  15. Hormonal regulation of floret closure of rice (Oryza sativa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youming Huang

    Full Text Available Plant hormones play important roles in regulating every aspect of growth, development, and metabolism of plants. We are interested in understanding hormonal regulation of floret opening and closure in plants. This is a particularly important problem for hybrid rice because regulation of flowering time is vitally important in hybrid rice seed production. However, little was known about the effects of plant hormones on rice flowering. We have shown that jasmonate and methyl jasmonate play significant roles in promoting rice floret opening. In this study, we investigated the effects of auxins including indole-3-acidic acid (IAA, indole-3-butyric acid (IBA, 1-naphthalene-acetic acid (NAA, 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D and 3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid (DIC and abscisic acid (ABA on floret closure of four fertile and three sterile varieties of rice. The results from field studies in three growing seasons in 2013-2015 showed that the percentages of closed florets were significantly lower in plants treated with IAA, IBA, 2,4-D, DIC and NAA and that the durations of floret opening were significantly longer in plants treated with the same auxins. The auxins exhibited time- and concentration-dependant effects on floret closure. ABA displayed opposite effects of auxins because it increased the percentages of floret closure and decreased the length of floret opening of rice varieties. The degree of auxin-inhibiting and ABA-promoting effects on floret closure was varied somewhat but not significantly different among the rice varieties. Endogenous IAA levels were the highest in florets collected shortly before opening followed by a sharp decline in florets with maximal angles of opening and a significant jump of IAA levels shortly after floret closure in both fertile and sterile rice plants. ABA levels showed an opposite trend in the same samples. Our results showed that auxins delayed but ABA promoted the closure of rice floret regardless of

  16. Neurohypophysial Hormones Regulate Amphibious Behaviour in the Mudskipper Goby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Nishiyama, Yudai; Ikeda, Aoi; Takahashi, Hideya; Hyodo, Susumu; Kagawa, Nao; Sakamoto, Hirotaka

    2015-01-01

    The neurohypophysial hormones, arginine vasotocin and isotocin, regulate both hydromineral balance and social behaviors in fish. In the amphibious mudskipper, Periophthalmus modestus, we previously found arginine-vasotocin-specific regulation of aggressive behavior, including migration of the submissive subordinate into water. This migration also implies the need for adaptation to dehydration. Here, we examined the effects of arginine vasotocin and isotocin administration on the amphibious behavior of individual mudskippers in vivo. The mudskippers remained in the water for an increased period of time after 1-8 h of intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection with 500 pg/g arginine vasotocin or isotocin. The 'frequency of migration' was decreased after ICV injection of arginine vasotocin or isotocin, reflecting a tendency to remain in the water. ICV injections of isotocin receptor antagonist with arginine vasotocin or isotocin inhibited all of these hormonal effects. In animals kept out of water, mRNA expression of brain arginine vasotocin and isotocin precursors increased 3- and 1.5-fold, respectively. Given the relatively wide distribution of arginine vasotocin fibres throughout the mudskipper brain, induction of arginine vasotocin and isotocin under terrestrial conditions may be involved also in the preference for an aquatic habitat as ligands for brain isotocin receptors.

  17. Neurohypophysial Hormones Regulate Amphibious Behaviour in the Mudskipper Goby.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Sakamoto

    Full Text Available The neurohypophysial hormones, arginine vasotocin and isotocin, regulate both hydromineral balance and social behaviors in fish. In the amphibious mudskipper, Periophthalmus modestus, we previously found arginine-vasotocin-specific regulation of aggressive behavior, including migration of the submissive subordinate into water. This migration also implies the need for adaptation to dehydration. Here, we examined the effects of arginine vasotocin and isotocin administration on the amphibious behavior of individual mudskippers in vivo. The mudskippers remained in the water for an increased period of time after 1-8 h of intracerebroventricular (ICV injection with 500 pg/g arginine vasotocin or isotocin. The 'frequency of migration' was decreased after ICV injection of arginine vasotocin or isotocin, reflecting a tendency to remain in the water. ICV injections of isotocin receptor antagonist with arginine vasotocin or isotocin inhibited all of these hormonal effects. In animals kept out of water, mRNA expression of brain arginine vasotocin and isotocin precursors increased 3- and 1.5-fold, respectively. Given the relatively wide distribution of arginine vasotocin fibres throughout the mudskipper brain, induction of arginine vasotocin and isotocin under terrestrial conditions may be involved also in the preference for an aquatic habitat as ligands for brain isotocin receptors.

  18. Gustatory perception and fat body energy metabolism are jointly affected by vitellogenin and juvenile hormone in honey bees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Honey bees (Apis mellifera provide a system for studying social and food-related behavior. A caste of workers performs age-related tasks: young bees (nurses usually feed the brood and other adult bees inside the nest, while older bees (foragers forage outside for pollen, a protein/lipid source, or nectar, a carbohydrate source. The workers' transition from nursing to foraging and their foraging preferences correlate with differences in gustatory perception, metabolic gene expression, and endocrine physiology including the endocrine factors vitellogenin (Vg and juvenile hormone (JH. However, the understanding of connections among social behavior, energy metabolism, and endocrine factors is incomplete. We used RNA interference (RNAi to perturb the gene network of Vg and JH to learn more about these connections through effects on gustation, gene transcripts, and physiology. The RNAi perturbation was achieved by single and double knockdown of the genes ultraspiracle (usp and vg, which encode a putative JH receptor and Vg, respectively. The double knockdown enhanced gustatory perception and elevated hemolymph glucose, trehalose, and JH. We also observed transcriptional responses in insulin like peptide 1 (ilp1, the adipokinetic hormone receptor (AKHR, and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG, or "foraging gene" Amfor. Our study demonstrates that the Vg-JH regulatory module controls changes in carbohydrate metabolism, but not lipid metabolism, when worker bees shift from nursing to foraging. The module is also placed upstream of ilp1, AKHR, and PKG for the first time. As insulin, adipokinetic hormone (AKH, and PKG pathways influence metabolism and gustation in many animals, we propose that honey bees have conserved pathways in carbohydrate metabolism and conserved connections between energy metabolism and gustatory perception. Thus, perhaps the bee can make general contributions to the understanding of food-related behavior and metabolic disorders.

  19. Gustatory perception and fat body energy metabolism are jointly affected by vitellogenin and juvenile hormone in honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Brent, Colin S; Fennern, Erin; Amdam, Gro V

    2012-06-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) provide a system for studying social and food-related behavior. A caste of workers performs age-related tasks: young bees (nurses) usually feed the brood and other adult bees inside the nest, while older bees (foragers) forage outside for pollen, a protein/lipid source, or nectar, a carbohydrate source. The workers' transition from nursing to foraging and their foraging preferences correlate with differences in gustatory perception, metabolic gene expression, and endocrine physiology including the endocrine factors vitellogenin (Vg) and juvenile hormone (JH). However, the understanding of connections among social behavior, energy metabolism, and endocrine factors is incomplete. We used RNA interference (RNAi) to perturb the gene network of Vg and JH to learn more about these connections through effects on gustation, gene transcripts, and physiology. The RNAi perturbation was achieved by single and double knockdown of the genes ultraspiracle (usp) and vg, which encode a putative JH receptor and Vg, respectively. The double knockdown enhanced gustatory perception and elevated hemolymph glucose, trehalose, and JH. We also observed transcriptional responses in insulin like peptide 1 (ilp1), the adipokinetic hormone receptor (AKHR), and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG, or "foraging gene" Amfor). Our study demonstrates that the Vg-JH regulatory module controls changes in carbohydrate metabolism, but not lipid metabolism, when worker bees shift from nursing to foraging. The module is also placed upstream of ilp1, AKHR, and PKG for the first time. As insulin, adipokinetic hormone (AKH), and PKG pathways influence metabolism and gustation in many animals, we propose that honey bees have conserved pathways in carbohydrate metabolism and conserved connections between energy metabolism and gustatory perception. Thus, perhaps the bee can make general contributions to the understanding of food-related behavior and metabolic disorders.

  20. Transcriptional regulation by nonclassical action of thyroid hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moeller Lars C

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thyroid hormone (TH is essential for normal development, growth and metabolism. Its effects were thought to be principally mediated through triiodothyronine (T3, acting as a ligand for the nuclear TH receptors (TRs α and β residing on thyroid hormone response elements (TREs in the promoter of TH target genes. In this classical model of TH action, T3 binding to TRs leads to recruitment of basal transcription factors and increased transcription of TH responsive genes. Recently, the concept of TH action on gene expression has become more diverse and now includes nonclassical actions of T3 and T4: T3 has been shown to activate PI3K via the TRs, which ultimately increases transcription of certain genes, e.g. HIF-1α. Additionally, both T3 and thyroxine (T4 can bind to a membrane integrin, αvβ3, which leads to activation of the PI3K and MAPK signal transduction pathways and finally also increases gene transcription, e.g. of the FGF2 gene. Therefore, these initially nongenomic, nonclassical actions seem to serve as additional interfaces for transcriptional regulation by TH. Aim of this perspective is to summarize the genes that are currently known to be induced by nonclassical TH action and the mechanisms involved.

  1. Thyroid hormones regulate selenoprotein expression and selenium status in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Mittag

    Full Text Available Impaired expression of selenium-containing proteins leads to perturbed thyroid hormone (TH levels, indicating the central importance of selenium for TH homeostasis. Moreover, critically ill patients with declining serum selenium develop a syndrome of low circulating TH and a central downregulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. This prompted us to test the reciprocal effect, i.e., if TH status would also regulate selenoprotein expression and selenium levels. To investigate the TH dependency of selenium metabolism, we analyzed mice expressing a mutant TH receptor α1 (TRα1+m that confers a receptor-mediated hypothyroidism. Serum selenium was reduced in these animals, which was a direct consequence of the mutant TRα1 and not related to their metabolic alterations. Accordingly, hyperthyroidism, genetically caused by the inactivation of TRβ or by oral TH treatment of adult mice, increased serum selenium levels in TRα1+m and controls, thus demonstrating a novel and specific role for TRα1 in selenium metabolism. Furthermore, TH affected the mRNA levels for several enzymes involved in selenoprotein biosynthesis as well as serum selenoprotein P concentrations and the expression of other antioxidative selenoproteins. Taken together, our results show that TH positively affects the serum selenium status and regulates the expression of several selenoproteins. This demonstrates that selenium and TH metabolism are interconnected through a feed-forward regulation, which can in part explain the rapid parallel downregulation of both systems in critical illness.

  2. Cyp26b1 within the growth plate regulates bone growth in juvenile mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minegishi, Yoshiki; Sakai, Yasuo; Yahara, Yasuhito; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Hosokawa, Ko; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Retinoic acid and Cyp26b1 were oppositely localized in growth plate cartilage. • Cyp26b1 deletion in chondrocytes decreased bone growth in juvenile mice. • Cyp26b1 deletion reduced chondrocyte proliferation and growth plate height. • Vitamin A-depletion partially reversed growth plate abnormalities caused by Cyp26b1 deficiency. • Cyp26b1 regulates bone growth by controlling chondrocyte proliferation. - Abstract: Retinoic acid (RA) is an active metabolite of vitamin A and plays important roles in embryonic development. CYP26 enzymes degrade RA and have specific expression patterns that produce a RA gradient, which regulates the patterning of various structures in the embryo. However, it has not been addressed whether a RA gradient also exists and functions in organs after birth. We found localized RA activities in the diaphyseal portion of the growth plate cartilage were associated with the specific expression of Cyp26b1 in the epiphyseal portion in juvenile mice. To disturb the distribution of RA, we generated mice lacking Cyp26b1 specifically in chondrocytes (Cyp26b1 Δchon cKO). These mice showed reduced skeletal growth in the juvenile stage. Additionally, their growth plate cartilage showed decreased proliferation rates of proliferative chondrocytes, which was associated with a reduced height in the zone of proliferative chondrocytes, and closed focally by four weeks of age, while wild-type mouse growth plates never closed. Feeding the Cyp26b1 cKO mice a vitamin A-deficient diet partially reversed these abnormalities of the growth plate cartilage. These results collectively suggest that Cyp26b1 in the growth plate regulates the proliferation rates of chondrocytes and is responsible for the normal function of the growth plate and growing bones in juvenile mice, probably by limiting the RA distribution in the growth plate proliferating zone

  3. Cyp26b1 within the growth plate regulates bone growth in juvenile mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minegishi, Yoshiki [Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, 53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Fukui Hospital, 23-3 Matsuokashimoaizuki, Eiheiji-cho, Yoshida-gun, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Department of Plastic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sakai, Yasuo [Department of Plastic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Plastic Surgery, Bellland General Hospital, 500-3 Higashiyama Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8247 (Japan); Yahara, Yasuhito [Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, 53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Akiyama, Haruhiko [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagito, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Hideki [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Hosokawa, Ko [Department of Plastic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Tsumaki, Noriyuki, E-mail: ntsumaki@cira.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, 53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Retinoic acid and Cyp26b1 were oppositely localized in growth plate cartilage. • Cyp26b1 deletion in chondrocytes decreased bone growth in juvenile mice. • Cyp26b1 deletion reduced chondrocyte proliferation and growth plate height. • Vitamin A-depletion partially reversed growth plate abnormalities caused by Cyp26b1 deficiency. • Cyp26b1 regulates bone growth by controlling chondrocyte proliferation. - Abstract: Retinoic acid (RA) is an active metabolite of vitamin A and plays important roles in embryonic development. CYP26 enzymes degrade RA and have specific expression patterns that produce a RA gradient, which regulates the patterning of various structures in the embryo. However, it has not been addressed whether a RA gradient also exists and functions in organs after birth. We found localized RA activities in the diaphyseal portion of the growth plate cartilage were associated with the specific expression of Cyp26b1 in the epiphyseal portion in juvenile mice. To disturb the distribution of RA, we generated mice lacking Cyp26b1 specifically in chondrocytes (Cyp26b1{sup Δchon} cKO). These mice showed reduced skeletal growth in the juvenile stage. Additionally, their growth plate cartilage showed decreased proliferation rates of proliferative chondrocytes, which was associated with a reduced height in the zone of proliferative chondrocytes, and closed focally by four weeks of age, while wild-type mouse growth plates never closed. Feeding the Cyp26b1 cKO mice a vitamin A-deficient diet partially reversed these abnormalities of the growth plate cartilage. These results collectively suggest that Cyp26b1 in the growth plate regulates the proliferation rates of chondrocytes and is responsible for the normal function of the growth plate and growing bones in juvenile mice, probably by limiting the RA distribution in the growth plate proliferating zone.

  4. ALTERED HISTOLOGY OF THE THYMUS AND SPLEEN IN CONTAMINANT-EXPOSED JUVENILE AMERICAN ALLIGATORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphological difference in spleen and thymus are closely related to functional immune differences. Hormonal regulation of the immune system has been demonstrated in reptilian splenic and thymic tissue. Spleens and thymus were obtained from juvenile alligators at two reference si...

  5. Growth failure, somatomedin and growth hormone levels in juvenile diabetes mellitus--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, H

    1979-06-01

    Growth hormone (hGH) responsiveness to exercise and somatomedin C (SmC) activity were measured in ten children with insulin-deficient diabetes mellitus. Four of the ten children showed a significant degree of growth retardation. Normal SmC activity was found in association with elevated hGH levels. The hypothesis that growth-retarded diabetics have a failure of Sm production despite high hGH levels (analogous to malnutrition and Laron dwarfism) was not substantiated by this study. Chronic deficiency of insulin, itself a somatomedin, may play a major role in diabetic growth failure.

  6. New synthesis of a stereoisomeric mixture of methyl 12-trishomofarnesoate, a juvenile hormone mimic useful in sericulture by increasing silk production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    A mixture of (E,Z)-isomers of methyl 12-trishomofarnesoate (methyl 3,7,11-trimethyl-2,6,10-pentadecatrienoate), a juvenile hormone mimic, was synthesized in nine steps (32.6% overall yield) by starting from only four commercially available materials: 2-hexanone, vinylmagnesium bromide, methyl acetoacetate and trimethyl phosphonoacetate. The mimic is useful in increasing the yield of silk by elongating the larval period of the silkworm, Bombyx mori (L.).

  7. comparative studies on pyriproxyfen and fenoxycarb as juvenile hormones applied separately or combined with gamma radiation for controlling the mediterranean fruit fly, ceratitis capitata (Wied)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadel, A.M.; Othman, K.S.A.

    1998-01-01

    Comparative studies on pyriproxyfen and fenoxycarb as juvenile hormones applied separately or combined with gamma radiation were carried out for controlling ceratitis capitata. Lc 50's of the two juvenile hormones, pyriproxfen and fenoxycarb, were determined against ceratitis capitata in treated diet by continuous contact of eggs and larvae using various concentrations. The Lc 50 were 32 and 140 ppm for pyriproxyfen and fenoxycarb, respectively. The resulting pupae were gamma irradiated with 90 Gy. Larval and pupal durations were insignificantly affected, pupation and adult emergence were significantly affected while adult survival was insignificantly affected when applying the two JH's. Applying pyriproxyfen alone insignificantly increased egg hatch at the concentrations used (12.5 and 25 ppm) while when fenoxycarb was applied alone egg hatch was significantly decreased at the concentration used (100 ppm). Applying both juvenile hormones each combined with gamma radiation significantly reduced egg hatch. Male mating competitiveness was significantly increased when applying pyriproxyfen at the concentration 25 Ppm. Results indicated that pyriproxyfen was more effective than fenoxycarb against the mediterranean fruit fly ceratitis capitata.1 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Dynamics of body composition and bone in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis treated with growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, Susanne; Ripperger, Peter; Dalla Pozza, Robert; Roth, Johannes; Häfner, Renate; Michels, Hartmut; Schwarz, Hans Peter

    2010-01-01

    GH has a positive impact on growth, bone, and muscle development. The objectives of this study were to demonstrate the effects of GH treatment on regional body composition and bone geometry at final height in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In this longitudinal study, parameters of bone mineral density and geometry as well as muscle and fat cross-sectional area (CSA) in the nondominant forearm were recorded using peripheral quantitative computed tomography at yearly intervals until final height in 12 patients (seven females) receiving GH treatment. Data at final height were compared with 13 patients (nine females) with JIA not treated with GH. Patients were treated with GH for a mean of 5.35 +/- 0.7 yr. Correcting for height, total bone CSA (+0.89 +/- 0.5 sd) and muscle CSA (+1.14 +/- 0.6 sd) increased significantly and normalized at final height. Compared with JIA patients without GH at final height, there was a significantly higher muscle CSA and a lower fat CSA in GH-treated patients. Additionally, in relation to total bone CSA, there was significantly more cortical and less marrow CSA in boys with GH treatment. During GH treatment, there was a significant increase and normalization of total bone and muscle CSA at final height. In accordance with an anabolic effect of GH, fat mass stabilized at the lower limit of healthy children. At final height, cortical and marrow CSA, relative to total bone CSA, were normalized in GH-treated patients.

  9. Effect of an insect juvenile hormone analogue, Fenoxycarb on development and oxygen uptake by larval lobsters Homarus gammarus (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Katie E; Wells, Colin; Spicer, John I

    2009-04-01

    Little attention has been focused on the effect of anthropogenic compounds that disrupt the endocrine systems in crustaceans. Consequently, this study investigated the effects of the juvenile hormone analogue (JHA), Fenoxycarb on selected physiological and developmental processes of the zoeal stages in the European lobster, Homarus gammarus. Chronic exposure to Fenoxycarb (50microg L(-1)) resulted in a significant (p < 0.05) reduction in moult frequency and size at moult. Fenoxycarb exposure extended zoeal duration between zoea I to II (p<0.05) and resulted in total inhibition of the moult from zoea II to III. Significantly greater rates of O2 uptake were observed in Fenoxycarb-exposed larvae in comparison with controls (p<0.05). All rates of O2 uptake decreased significantly between 7 and 12d of exposure (p<0.05). At 12d, exposure to the solvent control no longer influenced rates of O2 uptake, but it was not possible to attribute increased O2 uptake to Fenoxycarb exposure directly, as treated individuals did not moult beyond zoea III. The low exposure concentrations of Fenoxycarb, comparable to those used in plant protection, resulted in endocrine disrupted responses in H. gammarus (albeit with little clear, demonstrable effect on metabolism) a finding that could have important ecological and commercial implications.

  10. Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  11. Toxicokinetics of tetrabromoethylcyclohexane (TBECH) in juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta) and effects on plasma sex hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemmill, Bonnie; Pleskach, Kerri; Peters, Lisa; Palace, Vince; Wautier, Kerry; Park, Brad; Darling, Colin; Rosenberg, Bruno; McCrindle, Robert; Tomy, Gregg T.

    2011-01-01

    Technical 1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2 dibromoethyl)cyclohexane or tetrabromoethylcyclohexane (TBECH) used primarily as an additive flame retardant in polystyrene foams, contains two diastereoisomers, α- and β- present in equimolar amounts. At temperatures in excess of 125 o C, isomerization to two other isoforms, δ- and γ- is possible. The recent detection of TBECH in the environment and studies suggesting that isomers are androgenic prompted us to examine the toxicokinetics and biochemical effects of one of the isomers, β-, in a controlled laboratory environment. Juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta) were exposed to three different amounts of the β-isomer (low, medium and high) via the food followed by a period in which they were exposed to unfortified food. A fourth group of fish was exposed to unfortified food for the duration of the experiment. On days 0, 7, 14, 21, 35, 49, 56, 63, 77, 91, 105, and 133, eight fish from each treatment group were euthanized and liver, plasma, lower jaw (i.e., thyroid tissue) and gonad were collected and the remaining tissue ('whole-fish') was retained. β-Isomer content was measured in whole-fish and in liver while estradiol (E2), 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) and testosterone (T) were measured in plasma. Based on liver and gonad somatic indices, no apparent effects on liver or gonad development in fish from any of the treatment groups were observed. The bioaccumulation of β-isomer was similar in fish from all treatment groups with steady-state occurring before the end of the uptake phase. Depuration of the β-isomer from fish obeyed first order kinetics and there were no statistically significant differences in the depuration half life (t 1/2 ) among the treatment groups: 22.5 ± 10.4 (low), 13.5 ± 5.9 (med) and 13.8 ± 2.2 (high) days. Steady-state biomagnification factors were much smaller than 1 for fish in all treatment groups. Debrominated metabolites were not detected in composite liver or whole-fish extracts and there was no

  12. Toxicokinetics of tetrabromoethylcyclohexane (TBECH) in juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta) and effects on plasma sex hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemmill, Bonnie [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Arctic Aquatic Research Division, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N6 (Canada); Department of Environment and Geography, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Pleskach, Kerri [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Arctic Aquatic Research Division, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N6 (Canada); Peters, Lisa [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Arctic Aquatic Research Division, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N6 (Canada); Department of Environment and Geography, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Palace, Vince [Department of Environment and Geography, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Environmental Science Division, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N6 (Canada); Wautier, Kerry; Park, Brad [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Environmental Science Division, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N6 (Canada); Darling, Colin; Rosenberg, Bruno [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Arctic Aquatic Research Division, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N6 (Canada); McCrindle, Robert [Wellington Laboratories Incorporated, Research Division, Guelph, ON N1G 3M5 (Canada); Tomy, Gregg T., E-mail: gregg.tomy@dfo-mpo.gc.ca [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Arctic Aquatic Research Division, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N6 (Canada); Department of Environment and Geography, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2011-01-25

    Technical 1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2 dibromoethyl)cyclohexane or tetrabromoethylcyclohexane (TBECH) used primarily as an additive flame retardant in polystyrene foams, contains two diastereoisomers, {alpha}- and {beta}- present in equimolar amounts. At temperatures in excess of 125 {sup o}C, isomerization to two other isoforms, {delta}- and {gamma}- is possible. The recent detection of TBECH in the environment and studies suggesting that isomers are androgenic prompted us to examine the toxicokinetics and biochemical effects of one of the isomers, {beta}-, in a controlled laboratory environment. Juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta) were exposed to three different amounts of the {beta}-isomer (low, medium and high) via the food followed by a period in which they were exposed to unfortified food. A fourth group of fish was exposed to unfortified food for the duration of the experiment. On days 0, 7, 14, 21, 35, 49, 56, 63, 77, 91, 105, and 133, eight fish from each treatment group were euthanized and liver, plasma, lower jaw (i.e., thyroid tissue) and gonad were collected and the remaining tissue ('whole-fish') was retained. {beta}-Isomer content was measured in whole-fish and in liver while estradiol (E2), 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) and testosterone (T) were measured in plasma. Based on liver and gonad somatic indices, no apparent effects on liver or gonad development in fish from any of the treatment groups were observed. The bioaccumulation of {beta}-isomer was similar in fish from all treatment groups with steady-state occurring before the end of the uptake phase. Depuration of the {beta}-isomer from fish obeyed first order kinetics and there were no statistically significant differences in the depuration half life (t{sub 1/2}) among the treatment groups: 22.5 {+-} 10.4 (low), 13.5 {+-} 5.9 (med) and 13.8 {+-} 2.2 (high) days. Steady-state biomagnification factors were much smaller than 1 for fish in all treatment groups. Debrominated metabolites were not

  13. Juvenile hormone resistance gene Methoprene-tolerant controls entry into metamorphosis in the beetle Tribolium castaneum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konopová, Barbora; Jindra, Marek

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 104, - (2007), s. 10488-10493 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5007305; GA MŠk LC07032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : insect metamorphosis * postembryonic development * endocryne regulation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.598, year: 2007

  14. Juvenile hormone titres reflect social opportunities in the facultatively eusocial bee Megalopta genalis (Hymenoptera:Halictidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The evolution of eusociality is hypothesized to have involved de-coupling parental care from reproduction mediated by changes in endocrine regulation. While data for obligately eusocial insects are consistent with this hypothesis, we lack information from species representative of the transition fro...

  15. Thyroid hormones regulate skeletal muscle regeneration after acute injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Anna Lúcia R C; Albuquerque, João Paulo C; Matos, Marina S; Fortunato, Rodrigo S; Carvalho, Denise P; Rosenthal, Doris; da Costa, Vânia Maria Corrêa

    2015-02-01

    We evaluated the effects of hypo- and hyperthyroid statuses during the initial phase of skeletal muscle regeneration in rats. To induce hypo- or hyperthyroidism, adult male Wistar rats were treated with methimazole (0.03%) or T4 (10 μg/100 g), respectively, for 10 days. Three days before sacrifice, a crush injury was produced in the solear muscles of one half of the animals, while the other half remained intact. T3, T4, TSH, and leptin serum levels were not affected by the injury. Serum T3 and T4 levels were significantly increased in hyperthyroid and hyper-injury animals. Hypothyroidism was confirmed by the significant increase in serum TSH levels in hypothyroid and hypo-injury animals. Injury increased cell infiltration and macrophage accumulation especially in hyperthyroid animals. Both type 2 and type 3 deiodinases were induced by lesion, and the opposite occurred with the type 1 isoform, at least in the control and hyperthyroid groups. Injury increased both MyoD and myogenin expression in all the studied groups, but only MyoD expression was increased by thyroidal status only at the protein level. We conclude that thyroid hormones modulate skeletal muscle regeneration possibly by regulating the inflammatory process, as well as MyoD and myogenin expression in the injured tissue.

  16. Hypermetabolic Conversion of Plant Oil into Water: Endothermic Biochemical Process Stimulated by Juvenile Hormone in the European Firebug, L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Sláma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The physiological and biochemical mechanisms that enable insects to feed on dry food to secure enough water for larval growth were investigated. The study was carried out with a plethora of physiological methods, ranging from the simple volumetric determination of O 2 consumption and water intake to more advanced methods such as scanning microrespirography and thermovision imaging of insect's body temperature. The experiments were done on the European firebug, Pyrrhocoris apterus , which feeds exclusively on dry linden seeds. In order to survive, it needs to drink water or suck a sap from plants occasionally. It was found that the young larval instars compensate the occasional water deficiency by the increased production of metabolic water. The juvenile hormone (JH-dependent production of metabolic water, which was previously found in other species consuming dry food, was achieved in P. apterus by total metabolic combustion of the dietary lipid (neutral seed oil. The water-producing, hypermetabolic larvae were heated from inside by endothermic energy released from the uncoupling of oxidation from oxidative phosphorylation. The “warm”, hypermetabolic larvae burning the dietary oil into CO 2 and water showed the increased rates of respiratory metabolism. Microrespirographic recording of these larvae revealed the ratio of the respiratory quotient (RQ, CO 2 /O 2 of 0.7, which indicated the breakdown of a pure triglyceride. The warm hypermetabolic larvae could be easily spotted and distinguished from the “cold” larvae on the screen of a thermovision camera. The last instar larvae lacking the JH were always only cold. They metabolized a carbohydrate substrate exclusively (RQ = 1.0, while the dietary lipid was stored in the fat body. In comparison with the hypermetabolic larvae of some other species fed on dry food, which exhibited the highest rates of O 2 consumption ever recorded in a living organism (10–20 mL O 2 /g per hour, the metabolic

  17. Comparative ovarian microarray analysis of juvenile hormone-responsive genes in water flea Daphnia magna: potential targets for toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Kenji; Williams, Timothy D; Sato, Tomomi; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Iguchi, Taisen

    2017-03-01

    The freshwater zooplankton Daphnia magna has been extensively employed in chemical toxicity tests such as OECD Test Guidelines 202 and 211. Previously, it has been demonstrated that the treatment of juvenile hormones (JHs) or their analogues to female daphnids can induce male offspring production. Based on this finding, a rapid screening method for detection of chemicals with JH-activity was recently developed using adult D. magna. This screening system determines whether a chemical has JH-activity by investigating the male offspring inducibility. Although this is an efficient high-throughput short-term screening system, much remains to be discovered about JH-responsive pathways in the ovary, and whether different JH-activators act via the same mechanism. JH-responsive genes in the ovary including developing oocytes are still largely undescribed. Here, we conducted comparative microarray analyses using ovaries from Daphnia magna treated with fenoxycarb (Fx; artificial JH agonist) or methyl farnesoate (MF; a putative innate JH in daphnids) to elucidate responses to JH agonists in the ovary, including developing oocytes, at a JH-sensitive period for male sex determination. We demonstrate that induction of hemoglobin genes is a well-conserved response to JH even in the ovary, and a potential adverse effect of JH agonist is suppression of vitellogenin gene expression, that might cause reduction of offspring number. This is the first report demonstrating different transcriptomics profiles from MF and an artificial JH agonist in D. magna ovary, improving understanding the tissue-specific mode-of-action of JH. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. BACULOVIRUS REPLICATION ALTERS HORMONE-REGULATED HOST DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The baculovirus Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus interferes with insect larval development by altering the host's hormonal system. The level of haemolymph ecdysteroids, the insect moulting hormone, was found to be higher in virus-infected larvae than in uninfected cont...

  19. Physiological Regulation of Gut Peptide Hormone (PYY) Levels by Age, Sex, Hormonal and Nutritional Status in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebashy, M.I.A.; Mazen, G.M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Peptide YY hormone (PYY) was recently appreciated as an important gut hormonal regulator of appetite. PYY is produced by the gut and released into the circulation after food intake and is found to decrease appetite. The main form of PYY, both stored and circulated, is PYY(3-36), the N-terminal truncated form of the full length peptide so, peripheral injections of PYY(3-36) in rats inhibit food intake in experimental animals as well as in lean and obese human subjects. Also, this hormone has been suggested to be an attractive therapeutic option for obesity. PYY levels are influenced by age and the highest hormone level is achieved in early postnatal life (day 30) and is decreased thereafter. PYY levels were also dependent on thyroid hormone status and being decreased in hyperthyroid rats. The PYY levels observed in acute and chronic food restricted rats indicated that, in situations of decreased energy intake, the lower PYY levels could serve to regulate central pathways and facilitate food intake. Contrary, in pregnant rats, PYY levels were enhanced at late gestation. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of age, sex, thyroid status, pregnancy and food restriction on PYY levels in rats. The underling mechanisms through which PYY levels alternated as a result of sex, age, pregnancy, thyroidal and nutritional status were discussed in the light of recent research outcomes

  20. Interrelation of hormonal regulation parameters and metabolic processes in children from the families with radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenjev, M.M.; Kashkalda, D.A.; Borisko, G.O.; Cherevatova, S.Kh.; Bondarenko, V.A.; Kalmikova, N.V.; Spyivak, T.V.

    2010-01-01

    Interrelations of the indices of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant system with hormone level were investigated in teenagers born from the parents who participated in Chornobyl accident clean-up. Multiple inter-systemic relations indicating participation of hormonal regulation mechanisms in promotion of redox processes were revealed. In girls from the families of Chornobyl accident clean-up participants, LP and AOP processes dependent significantly on the level of steroid hormones. In boys, the relations with thyroid system dominated.

  1. Multiplex Immunoassay Profiling of Hormones Involved in Metabolic Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Laurie; Guest, Paul C

    2018-01-01

    Multiplex immunoassays are used for rapid profiling of biomarker proteins and small molecules in biological fluids. The advantages over single immunoassays include lower sample consumption, cost, and labor. This chapter details a protocol to develop a 5-plex assay for glucagon-like peptide 1, growth hormone, insulin, leptin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone on the Luminex ® platform. The results of the analysis of insulin in normal control subjects are given due to the important role of this hormone in nutritional programming diseases.

  2. Induction of a hypothyroid state during juvenile development delays pubertal reactivation of the neuroendocrine system governing luteinising hormone secretion in the male rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, D R; Bhat, G K; Stah, C D; Pohl, C R; Plant, T M

    2006-09-01

    The present study aimed to determine the influence of thyroid status on the timing of the pubertal resurgence in gonadotrophin-releasing hormone pulse generator activity [tracked by circulating luteinising hormone (LH) levels] in male rhesus monkeys. Six juvenile monkeys were orchidectomised and then treated with the antithyroid drug, methimazole, from 15-19 months until 36 months of age, at which time thyroxine (T(4)) replacement was initiated. Four additional agonadal monkeys served as controls. Blood samples were drawn weekly for hormonal assessments. Body weight, crown-rump length and bone age were monitored at regular intervals. By 8 weeks of methimazole treatment, plasma T(4) had fallen sharply, and the decline was associated with a plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone increase. In controls, plasma LH levels remained undetectable until the pubertal rise occurred at 29.3 +/- 0.2 months of age. This developmental event occurred in only half of the methimazole-treated animals before 36 months of age when T(4) replacement was initiated. The hypothyroid state was associated with a profound arrest of growth and bone maturation, but increased body mass indices and plasma leptin levels. T(4) replacement in methimazole-treated monkeys was associated with the pubertal rise in LH in the remaining three animals and accelerated somatic development in all six animals. Although pubertal resurgence in LH secretion occurred at a later chronological age in methimazole-treated animals compared to controls, bone age, crown-rump length and body weight at that time did not differ between groups. There were no long-term differences in plasma prolactin between groups. We conclude that juvenile hypothyroidism in male primates causes a marked delay in the pubertal resurgence of LH secretion, probably occasioned at the hypothalamic level. Whether this effect is meditated by an action of thyroid hormone directly on the hypothalamus or indirectly as a result of the concomitant deficit in

  3. Up-regulation of corticotropin releasing hormone is associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in psoriasis and ... Methods: Psoriasis and normal skin biopsy samples were obtained from three psoriatic and ... established in literature that stress signals such.

  4. Total pubertal growth in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis treated with growth hormone: analysis of a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, S; Beyerlein, A; Ripperger, P; Roeb, J; Dalla Pozza, R; Häfner, R; Haas, J P; Schmidt, H

    2012-10-01

    Growth failure is a permanent sequelae in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The aim of the study was to compare pubertal growth in control and growth hormone (GH) treated JIA subjects. 64 children with JIA at a mean age of 10.38 ± 2.80 years were enrolled and followed until final height (measured in standard deviation (SD) scores). 39 children (20 m) received GH therapy and 24 (9 m) served as controls. GH dose was 0.33 mg/kg/week. Linear regression analysis was performed to identify factors influencing total pubertal growth. Mean total pubertal growth was 21.1 ± 1.3 cm (mean ± SD) in GH treated JIA patients and 13.8 ± 1.5 cm in controls. Final height was significantly higher with GH treatment (-1.67 ± 1.20 SD) compared to controls (-3.20 ± 1.84 SD). Linear regression model identified age at onset of puberty (ß=-4.2,CI: -5.9, -2.6 in controls and ß=-2.3,CI: -3.6, -1.1 in GH treated) as the main factor for total pubertal growth. Final height SDS was determined by the difference to target height at onset of puberty (ß=-0.59;CI: -0.80, -0.37 in controls and ß=-0.30,CI: -0.52, -0.08 in GH treated), age at onset of puberty (ß=0.47;CI:0.02,0.93 in controls and 0.23;CI: -0.00,0.46 in GH treated) and height gain during puberty (ß=0.13;CI:0.05,0.21 in controls and ß=0.11;CI:0.07,0.16 in GH treated). Total pubertal growth in JIA patients treated with GH was increased by a factor of 1.5 greater in comparison to controls leading to a significantly better final height. To maximize final height GH treatment should be initiated early to reduce the height deficit at onset of puberty. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A regulator of G Protein signaling, RGS3, inhibits gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH-stimulated luteinizing hormone (LH secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musgrove Lois C

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Luteinizing hormone secreted by the anterior pituitary gland regulates gonadal function. Luteinizing hormone secretion is regulated both by alterations in gonadotrope responsiveness to hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone and by alterations in gonadotropin releasing hormone secretion. The mechanisms that determine gonadotrope responsiveness are unknown but may involve regulators of G protein signaling (RGSs. These proteins act by antagonizing or abbreviating interaction of Gα proteins with effectors such as phospholipase Cβ. Previously, we reported that gonadotropin releasing hormone-stimulated second messenger inositol trisphosphate production was inhibited when RGS3 and gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor cDNAs were co-transfected into the COS cell line. Here, we present evidence for RGS3 inhibition of gonadotropin releasing hormone-induced luteinizing hormone secretion from cultured rat pituitary cells. Results A truncated version of RGS3 (RGS3T = RGS3 314–519 inhibited gonadotropin releasing hormone-stimulated inositol trisphosphate production more potently than did RSG3 in gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor-bearing COS cells. An RSG3/glutathione-S-transferase fusion protein bound more 35S-Gqα than any other member of the G protein family tested. Adenoviral-mediated RGS3 gene transfer in pituitary gonadotropes inhibited gonadotropin releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion in a dose-related fashion. Adeno-RGS3 also inhibited gonadotropin releasing hormone stimulated 3H-inositol phosphate accumulation, consistent with a molecular site of action at the Gqα protein. Conclusions RGS3 inhibits gonadotropin releasing hormone-stimulated second messenger production (inositol trisphosphate as well as luteinizing hormone secretion from rat pituitary gonadotropes apparently by binding and suppressing the transduction properties of Gqα protein function. A version of RGS3 that is amino

  6. Spatial distribution of limited resources and local density regulation in juvenile Atlantic salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finstad, Anders G; Einum, Sigurd; Ugedal, Ola; Forseth, Torbjørn

    2009-01-01

    1. Spatial heterogeneity of resources may influence competition among individuals and thus have a fundamental role in shaping population dynamics and carrying capacity. In the present study, we identify shelter opportunities as a limiting resource for juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). Experimental and field studies are combined in order to demonstrate how the spatial distribution of shelters may influence population dynamics on both within and among population scales. 2. In closed experimental streams, fish performance scaled negatively with decreasing shelter availability and increasing densities. In contrast, the fish in open stream channels dispersed according to shelter availability and performance of fish remaining in the streams did not depend on initial density or shelters. 3. The field study confirmed that spatial variation in densities of 1-year-old juveniles was governed both by initial recruit density and shelter availability. Strength of density-dependent population regulation, measured as carrying capacity, increased with decreasing number of shelters. 4. Nine rivers were surveyed for spatial variation in shelter availability and increased shelter heterogeneity tended to decrease maximum observed population size (measured using catch statistics of adult salmon as a proxy). 5. Our studies highlight the importance of small-scale within-population spatial structure in population dynamics and demonstrate that not only the absolute amount of limiting resources but also their spatial arrangement can be an important factor influencing population carrying capacity.

  7. Juvenile angiofibromer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Anne Daugaard; Jakobsen, John; Nepper-Rasmussen, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    Juvenile angiofibroma is a rare, benign, rich vascular tumor, and approximately one new case is diagnosed in Denmark each year. It sits in the foramen sphenopalatinum and occurs in boys from 14 to 25 years of age. The most frequent initial symptoms are nasal obstruction and epistaxis. Through...... the years, the treatment of juvenile angiofibroma has included many methods, including surgical excision, electrocoagulation, interstitial or external radiation therapy, cryosurgery, hormone administration and chemotherapy. Radiation, chemotherapy and surgery have proven to be the most effective treatments...

  8. Hormonal regulation of AMPA receptor trafficking and memory formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmen J Krugers

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Humans and rodents retain memories for stressful events very well. The facilitated retention of these memories is normally very useful. However, in susceptible individuals a variety of pathological conditions may develop in which memories related to stressful events remain inappropriately present, such as in post-traumatic stress disorder. The memory enhancing effects of stress are mediated by hormones, such as norepinephrine and glucocorticoids which are released during stressful experiences. Here we review recently identified molecular mechanisms that underlie the effects of stress hormones on synaptic efficacy and learning and memory. We discuss AMPA receptors as major target for stress hormones and describe a model in which norepinephrine and glucocorticoids are able to strengthen and prolong different phases of stressful memories.

  9. Dependence of calcium on thyroid hormone for the regulation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    concentration by mobilizing intracellular Ca2+. The mobilization of intracellular Ca2+in the absence of transmembrane Ca2+influx has been accepted as evidence for a cell-surface Ca2+ - receptor. The possible role of thyroid hormone in the ...

  10. Hormones & growth regulators can be useful to foresters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert G., Jr. Snow

    1959-01-01

    Trees, like other plants, contain many natural chemicals of the sort that we call hormones. Research is gradually revealing that, in the behavior of a tree, these chemicals may be almost as important as the basic influences of heredity and environment.

  11. Up-regulation of corticotropin releasing hormone is associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in psoriasis and normal skin biopsy samples, and to correlate the expression of CRH with the expression of CRHBP and inflammatory cytokines IL-8 and IL-33. Methods: Psoriasis and normal skin biopsy samples were obtained from three ...

  12. A whole genome screening and RNA interference identify a juvenile hormone esterase-like gene of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaojun; Kumar, Sunil; Kim, Eunjin; Kim, Yonggyun

    2015-09-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) plays a crucial role in preventing precocious metamorphosis and stimulating reproduction. Thus, its hemolymph titer should be under a tight control. As a negative controller, juvenile hormone esterase (JHE) performs a rapid breakdown of residual JH in the hemolymph during last instar to induce a larval-to-pupal metamorphosis. A whole genome of the diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella, has been annotated and proposed 11 JHE candidates. Sequence analysis using conserved motifs commonly found in other JHEs proposed a putative JHE (Px004817). Px004817 (64.61 kDa, pI=5.28) exhibited a characteristic JHE expression pattern by showing high peak at the early last instar, at which JHE enzyme activity was also at a maximal level. RNA interference of Px004817 reduced JHE activity and interrupted pupal development with a significant increase of larval period. This study identifies Px004817 as a JHE-like gene of P. xylostella. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Growth Response and Feed Utilization of Giant Gourami (Osphronemus goramy Juvenile Feeding Different Protein Levels of the Diets Supplemented with Recombinant Growth Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DARMAWAN SETIA BUDI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of dietary supplementation with recombinant growth hormone (rGH on the growth and dietary utility of juvenile giant gourami. The rGH was mixed with chicken egg yolk and sprayed on to artificial feed with different protein levels (34, 28, and 21%; isoenergy. Each treatment group of gourami was paired with a control group that received feed of the same protein level, but without rGH supplementation. Juvenile of giant gourami (weight 15.83 ± 0.13 g were fed diets containing rGH, to apparent satiation, 2 times a week. Fish were reared from less than 2 months old for 42 days in 100 L glass aquaria at an initial density of 10 fish per aquarium. At the end of this period, the biomass and daily growth rate (SGR of the fish were measured and the feed conversion ratio calculated and compared. Our data showed that fish fed rGH-supplemented diets experienced higher growth than fish in the control groups and showed that fish with higher protein diets experienced higher growth than the groups with less protein diets. The group with the highest biomass gain, SGR, and lowest feed conversion ratio (FCR was the group fed a 34% protein diet supplemented with rGH. Furthermore, biomass gain, SGR, and FCR in the rGH treatment group with a 28% protein diet matched the measurements of the non-rGH control group receiving a 34% protein diet (P > 0.05. We conclude that giant juvenile gourami given feed supplemented with recombinant growth hormone will experience increased growth and dietary utility compared with gourami given the same feed without supplementation.

  14. Hormonal regulation of wheat growth during hydroponic culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherell, Donald

    1988-01-01

    Hormonal control of root growth has been explored as one means to alleviate the crowding of plant root systems experienced in prototype hydroponic biomass production chambers being developed by the CELSS Breadboard Project. Four plant hormones, or their chemical analogs, which have been reported to selectively inhibit root growth, were tested by adding them to the nutrient solutions on day 10 of a 25 day growth test using spring wheat in hydroponic cultures. Growth and morphological changes is both shoot and root systems were evaluated. In no case was it possible to inhibit root growth without a comparable inhibition of shoot growth. It was concluded that this approach is unlikely to prove useful for wheat.

  15. Hormonal regulation of phosphatidylcholine synthesis by reversible modulation of cytidylyltransferase.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, K L; Gutierrez, G; Martin, A

    1988-01-01

    The effect of both lipolytic and antilipolytic hormones on the turnover of phosphatidylcholine in freshly isolated rat adipocytes was investigated. Treatment of adipocytes with agonists such as glucagon or isoprenaline that stimulate lipolysis through a cyclic AMP-dependent mechanism caused an increase in the incorporation of [Me-3H]choline into phosphatidylcholine. Pulse-chase studies indicated that the stimulation was due to an increase in the conversion of choline into phosphatidylcholine,...

  16. Stress Hormones and their Regulation in a Captive Dolphin Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    out-of- water stress protocol. The observed response to the stress protocol was similar to that of ACTH administrations (see Parent Project for...CD, Booth R, Wasser S, Cotte L, Jensen E, Crocker D, Houser D (2013). The progestin megestrol acetate suppresses the HPA axis in bottlenose dolphin...Kellar, N.M., Cockrem, J., Romano, T., Booth, R.K. and Wasser , S.K. (2015) Natural variation in stress hormones, comparisons across matrices, and

  17. Thyroid Hormones Are Transport Substrates and Transcriptional Regulators of Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide 2B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, Henriette E; Ferreira, Celio; Schaefer, Anima M; Oufir, Mouhssin; Seibert, Isabell; Hamburger, Matthias; Tirona, Rommel G

    2018-07-01

    Levothyroxine replacement therapy forms the cornerstone of hypothyroidism management. Variability in levothyroxine oral absorption may contribute to the well-recognized large interpatient differences in required dose. Moreover, levothyroxine-drug pharmacokinetic interactions are thought to be caused by altered oral bioavailability. Interestingly, little is known regarding the mechanisms contributing to levothyroxine absorption in the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we aimed to determine whether the intestinal drug uptake transporter organic anion transporting polypeptide 2B1 (OATP2B1) may be involved in facilitating intestinal absorption of thyroid hormones. We also explored whether thyroid hormones regulate OATP2B1 gene expression. In cultured Madin-Darby Canine Kidney II/OATP2B1 cells and in OATP2B1-transfected Caco-2 cells, thyroid hormones were found to inhibit OATP2B1-mediated uptake of estrone-3-sulfate. Competitive counter-flow experiments evaluating the influence on the cellular accumulation of estrone-3-sulfate in the steady state indicated that thyroid hormones were substrates of OATP2B1. Additional evidence that thyroid hormones were OATP2B1 substrates was provided by OATP2B1-dependent stimulation of thyroid hormone receptor activation in cell-based reporter assays. Bidirectional transport studies in intestinal Caco-2 cells showed net absorptive flux of thyroid hormones, which was attenuated by the presence of the OATP2B1 inhibitor, atorvastatin. In intestinal Caco-2 and LS180 cells, but not in liver Huh-7 or HepG2 cells, OATP2B1 expression was induced by treatment with thyroid hormones. Reporter gene assays revealed thyroid hormone receptor α -mediated transactivation of the SLCO2B1 1b and the SLCO2B1 1e promoters. We conclude that thyroid hormones are substrates and transcriptional regulators of OATP2B1. These insights provide a potential mechanistic basis for oral levothyroxine dose variability and drug interactions. Copyright © 2018 by The American

  18. Involvement of the oxytocin system in the nucleus accumbens in the regulation of juvenile social novelty-seeking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caroline J W; Mogavero, Jazmin N; Tulimieri, Maxwell T; Veenema, Alexa H

    2017-07-01

    Exploration of novel environments, stimuli, and conspecifics is highly adaptive during the juvenile period, as individuals transition from immaturity to adulthood. We recently showed that juvenile rats prefer to interact with a novel individual over a familiar cage mate. However, the neural mechanisms underlying this juvenile social novelty-seeking behavior remain largely unknown. One potential candidate is the oxytocin (OXT) system, given its involvement in various motivated social behaviors. Here, we show that administration of the specific oxytocin receptor antagonist desGly-NH 2 ,d(CH 2 ) 5 -[Tyr(Me) 2 ,Thr 4 ]OVT reduces social novelty seeking-behavior in juvenile male rats when injected into the nucleus accumbens (10ng/0.5μl/side). The same drug dose was ineffective at altering social novelty-seeking behavior when administered into the lateral septum or basolateral amygdala. These results are the first to suggest the involvement of the OXT system in the nucleus accumbens in the regulation of juvenile social novelty-seeking behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of treatment of the fat body trophocytes of Melipona quadrifasciata anthidioides nurse workers and virgin queens in culture by juvenile hormone III and ecdysterone (20-HE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes-De-Oliveira, Vagner Tadeu; Berger, Bruno; Poiani, Silvana Beani; Paulino Simões, Zilá Luz; Da Cruz-Landim, Carminda

    2013-01-01

    The fat body (FB) consists of two types of cells: throphocytes and oenocytes. Throphocytes are related to intermediary metabolism storing lipids, carbohydrates, and proteins while oenocytes play role in the lipids and lipoproteins production. The vitellogenin is the precursor of egg yolk (vitelline) and is synthesized on FB. The aim of this work was to analyze the effects of hormones acting in bee reproduction, as juvenile hormone (JH) and ecdisteroids (20 HE) on FB cells, where vitellogenin is synthesized. For the study were chose nurse workers that in Melipona quadrifasciata anthidioides present activated ovaries and produce eggs, and virgin queens whose ovaries are not yet activated, presenting only previtellogenic follicles. FB trophocytes from these classes of bees were cultivated in media containing different amounts of JH and 20-HE. The effects on trophocytes cytoplasm reserves of lipids, proteins, and activity of acid phosphatase were compared by observing preparations from cultured FB, treated and control, by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that the hormones effects are related to the bee's caste and functional ovary stage. The role of acid phosphatase on mobilization of the trophocyte reserves was also determined. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Impact of Growth Hormone on Regulation of Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troike, Katie M; Henry, Brooke E; Jensen, Elizabeth A; Young, Jonathan A; List, Edward O; Kopchick, John J; Berryman, Darlene E

    2017-06-18

    Increasing prevalence of obesity and obesity-related conditions worldwide has necessitated a more thorough understanding of adipose tissue (AT) and expanded the scope of research in this field. AT is now understood to be far more complex and dynamic than previously thought, which has also fueled research to reevaluate how hormones, such as growth hormone (GH), alter the tissue. In this review, we will introduce properties of AT important for understanding how GH alters the tissue, such as anatomical location of depots and adipokine output. We will provide an overview of GH structure and function and define several human conditions and cognate mouse lines with extremes in GH action that have helped shape our understanding of GH and AT. A detailed discussion of the GH/AT relationship will be included that addresses adipokine production, immune cell populations, lipid metabolism, senescence, differentiation, and fibrosis, as well as brown AT and beiging of white AT. A brief overview of how GH levels are altered in an obese state, and the efficacy of GH as a therapeutic option to manage obesity will be given. As we will reveal, the effects of GH on AT are numerous, dynamic and depot-dependent. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:819-840, 2017. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. BDNF and glucocorticoids regulate corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) homeostasis in the hypothalamus

    OpenAIRE

    Jeanneteau, Freddy D.; Lambert, W. Marcus; Ismaili, Naima; Bath, Kevin G.; Lee, Francis S.; Garabedian, Michael J.; Chao, Moses V.

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis is critical for adaptation to environmental changes. The principle regulator of the HPA axis is corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH), which is made in the parventricular nucleus and is an important target of negative feedback by glucocorticoids. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate CRH are not fully understood. Disruption of normal HPA axis activity is a major risk factor of neuropsychiatric disorders in which decreased ...

  2. A juvenile hormone analogue with potential for termite control: laboratory tests with .I.Reticulitermes santonensis, Reticulitermes flaviceps./I. and .I.Coptotermes formosanus./I. (Isopt., Rhinotermitidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrdý, Ivan; Kuldová, Jelena; Wimmer, Zdeněk

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 125, - (2001), s. 403-411 ISSN 0931-2048 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/97/0126 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : juvenile hormone analogue Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.354, year: 2001

  3. DYNAMIC BEHAVIOR OF A DELAY-DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION MODEL FOR THE HORMONAL REGULATION OF THE MENSTRUAL CYCLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    During the menstrual cycle, pituitary hormones stimulate the growth and development of ovarian follicles and the release of an ovum to be fertilized. The ovarian follicles secrete hormones during the cycle that regulate the production of the pituitary hormones creating positi...

  4. Mini-review: regulation of the renal NaCl cotransporter by hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Vega, Lorena; Gamba, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    The renal thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter, NCC, is the major pathway for salt reabsorption in the distal convoluted tubule. The activity of this cotransporter is critical for regulation of several physiological variables such as blood pressure, serum potassium, acid base metabolism, and urinary calcium excretion. Therefore, it is not surprising that numerous hormone-signaling pathways regulate NCC activity to maintain homeostasis. In this review, we will provide an overview of the most recent evidence on NCC modulation by aldosterone, angiotensin II, vasopressin, glucocorticoids, insulin, norepinephrine, estradiol, progesterone, prolactin, and parathyroid hormone. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Hormonal regulation of gluconeogenic gene transcription in the liver

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    and in various nutritional states such as high protein diets and fasting ... Glucose levels in the circulation are regulated by the liver, the metabolic centre which produces glucose ..... AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) under energy stress blocks.

  6. The essence of insect metamorphosis and aging: electrical rewiring of cells driven by the principles of juvenile hormone-dependent Ca(2+)-homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Loof, Arnold; De Haes, Wouter; Janssen, Tom; Schoofs, Liliane

    2014-04-01

    In holometabolous insects the fall to zero of the titer of Juvenile Hormone ends its still poorly understood "status quo" mode of action in larvae. Concurrently it initiates metamorphosis of which the programmed cell death of all internal tissues that actively secrete proteins, such as the fat body, midgut, salivary glands, prothoracic glands, etc. is the most drastic aspect. These tissues have a very well developed rough endoplasmic reticulum, a known storage site of intracellular Ca(2+). A persistent high [Ca(2+)]i is toxic, lethal and causal to apoptosis. Metamorphosis becomes a logical phenomenon if analyzed from: (1) the causal link between calcium toxicity and apoptosis; (2) the largely overlooked fact that at least some isoforms of Ca(2+)-ATPases have a binding site for farnesol-like endogenous sesquiterpenoids (FRS). The Ca(2+)-ATPase blocker thapsigargin, like JH a sesquiterpenoid derivative, illustrates how absence of JH might work. The Ca(2+)-homeostasis system is concurrently extremely well conserved in evolution and highly variable, enabling tissue-, developmental-, and species specificity. As long as JH succeeds in keeping [Ca(2+)]i low by keeping the Ca(2+)-ATPases pumping, it acts as "the status quo" hormone. When it disappears, its various inhibitory effects are lifted. The electrical wiring system of cells, in particular in the regenerating tissues, is subject to change during metamorphosis. The possibility is discussed that in vertebrates an endogenous farnesol-like sesquiterpenoid, probably farnesol itself, acts as a functional, but hitherto completely overlooked Juvenile anti-aging "Inbrome", a novel concept in signaling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Regulation of aortic extracellular matrix synthesis via noradrenergic system and angiotensin II in juvenile rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dab, Houcine; Hachani, Rafik; Dhaouadi, Nedra; Sakly, Mohsen; Hodroj, Wassim; Randon, Jacques; Bricca, Giampiero; Kacem, Kamel

    2012-10-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis regulation by sympathetic nervous system (SNS) or angiotensin II (ANG II) was widely reported, but interaction between the two systems on ECM synthesis needs further investigation. We tested implication of SNS and ANG II on ECM synthesis in juvenile rat aorta. Sympathectomy with guanethidine (50 mg/kg, subcutaneous) and blockade of the ANG II AT1 receptors (AT1R) blocker with losartan (20 mg/kg/day in drinking water) were performed alone or in combination in rats. mRNA and protein synthesis of collagen and elastin were examined by Q-RT-PCR and immunoblotting. Collagen type I and III mRNA were increased respectively by 62 and 43% after sympathectomy and decreased respectively by 31 and 60% after AT1R blockade. Combined treatment increased collagen type III by 36% but not collagen type I. The same tendency of collagen expression was observed at mRNA and protein levels after the three treatments. mRNA and protein level of elastin was decreased respectively by 63 and 39% and increased by 158 and 15% after losartan treatment. Combined treatment abrogates changes induced by single treatments. The two systems act as antagonists on ECM expression in the aorta and combined inhibition of the two systems prevents imbalance of mRNA and protein level of collagen I and elastin induced by single treatment. Combined inhibition of the two systems prevents deposit or excessive reduction of ECM and can more prevent cardiovascular disorders.

  8. Interplay between Insulin Signaling, Juvenile Hormone and Vitellogenin Regulates Maternal Effects on Polyphenism in Ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyphenism is the phenomenon where alternative phenotypes are produced by a single genotype in response to environmental cues. An extreme case is found in social insects, where reproductive queens and sterile workers that greatly differ in morphology and behavior can arise from a single genotype. T...

  9. Hormonal regulation of phosphatidylcholine synthesis by reversible modulation of cytidylyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, K L; Gutierrez, G; Martin, A

    1988-01-01

    The effect of both lipolytic and antilipolytic hormones on the turnover of phosphatidylcholine in freshly isolated rat adipocytes was investigated. Treatment of adipocytes with agonists such as glucagon or isoprenaline that stimulate lipolysis through a cyclic AMP-dependent mechanism caused an increase in the incorporation of [Me-3H]choline into phosphatidylcholine. Pulse-chase studies indicated that the stimulation was due to an increase in the conversion of choline into phosphatidylcholine, which was both time- and dose-dependent. The stimulatory effect of isoprenaline was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by oxytocin or insulin. Oxytocin inhibited the incorporation of [Me-3H]choline into phosphatidylcholine in both the presence and the absence of isoprenaline, whereas in the absence of isoprenaline insulin increased the incorporation of [Me-3H]choline into phosphatidylcholine. The effects of isoprenaline, oxytocin and insulin on the incorporation of [3H]choline into phosphatidylcholine were paralleled by changes in the activity of CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase. PMID:2849424

  10. Regulation of extrarenal potassium homeostasis by adrenal hormones in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bia, M J; Tyler, K A; DeFronzo, R A

    1982-06-01

    The effect of chronic (7-10 days) adrenal insufficiency on extrarenal potassium tolerance was examined by infusing potassium into rats after acute nephrectomy. The increment in plasma potassium concentration was significantly higher in glucocorticoid-replaced adrenalectomized rats versus controls (max delta PK 3.59 +/-0.11 vs. 2.93 +/- 0.08 meq/liter; P less than 0.001). The impairment in extrarenal potassium tolerance in adrenalectomized rats could not be attributed to acidemia, hypotension, changes in plasma insulin or glucose concentration, or potassium retention prior to study. Acute replacement with aldosterone resulted in significant improvement in the rise in plasma potassium after KCl (max delta PK 3.18 +/- 0.06 meq/liter; P less than 0.005 compared with aldosterone-deficient adrenalectomized rats but higher than in controls, P less than 0.02). If given on a chronic basis, aldosterone replacement led to a complete correction of the defect (max delta PK = 2.89 +/- 0.08 meq/liter). Acute epinephrine replacement in adrenalectomized rats also returned potassium tolerance to normal (max delta PK = 3.02 +/- 0.10 meq/liter). The results demonstrate that extrarenal potassium tolerance is impaired in chronic adrenal insufficiency and suggest that both aldosterone and epinephrine deficiency may contribute to the defect, since replacement with either hormone returns potassium tolerance toward normal. Accordingly, both aldosterone and epinephrine have important extrarenal mechanisms of action.

  11. Hormonal regulation of Na -K -ATPase in cultured epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.P.; Jones, D.; Wiesmann, W.P.

    1986-08-01

    Aldosterone and insulin stimulate Na transport through mechanisms involving protein synthesis. Na -K -ATPase has been implicated in the action of both hormones. The authors examined the effect of aldosterone and insulin on Na -K -ATPase in epithelial cells in culture derived from toad urinary bladder (TB6C) and toad kidney (A6). Aldosterone, but not insulin, increases short-circuit current (I/sub sc/) in TB6C cells. Aldosterone increases Na -K -(TSP)ATPase activity after 18 h of incubation, but no effect can be seen at 3 and 6 h. Amiloride, which inhibits aldosterone-induced increases in I/sub sc/, has no effect on either basal or aldosterone stimulated enzyme activity. Both aldosterone and insulin increase I/sub sc/ in A6 cells and when added together are synergistic. Aldosterone stimulates enzyme activity in A6 cells, but insulin alone has no effect. However, aldosterone and insulin together stimulate enzyme activity more than aldosterone alone. It appears that stimulation of Na -K -ATPase activity is involved in aldosterone action in both cell lines but does not appear to be due to increased Na entry, since enhanced enzyme activity is not inhibited by amiloride. In contrast, insulin alone has no direct effect on Na -K -ATPase, although the increased enzyme activity following both agents in combination may explain their synergism on I/sub sc/.

  12. Estrogens regulate the hepatic effects of Growth Hormone, a hormonal interplay with multiple fates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro eFernandez-Perez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The liver responds to estrogens and GH which are critical regulators of body growth, gender-related hepatic functions, and intermediate metabolism. The effects of estrogens on liver can be direct, through the direct actions of hepatic ER, or indirect, which include the crosstalk with endocrine, metabolic, and sex-differentiated functions of GH. Most previous studies have been focused on the influence of estrogens on pituitary GH secretion, which has a great impact on hepatic transcriptional regulation. However, there is strong evidence that estrogens can influence the GH-regulated endocrine and metabolic functions in the human liver by acting at the level of GHR-STAT5 signaling pathway. This cross-talk is relevant because the widespread exposition of estrogen or estrogen-related compounds in human. Therefore, GH or estrogen signaling deficiency as well as the influence of estrogens on GH biology can cause a dramatic impact in liver physiology during mammalian development and in adulthood. In this review, we will summarize the current status of the influence of estrogen on GH actions in liver. A better understanding of estrogen-GH interplay in liver will lead to improved therapy of children with growth disorders and of adults with GH deficiency.

  13. Thyroid Hormone Regulates the Expression of the Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Pathway in the Embryonic and Adult Mammalian Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Desouza, Lynette A.; Sathanoori, Malini; Kapoor, Richa; Rajadhyaksha, Neha; Gonzalez, Luis E.; Kottmann, Andreas H.; Tole, Shubha; Vaidya, Vidita A.

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is important for development and plasticity in the immature and adult mammalian brain. Several thyroid hormone-responsive genes are regulated during specific developmental time windows, with relatively few influenced across the lifespan. We provide novel evidence that thyroid hormone regulates expression of the key developmental morphogen sonic hedgehog (Shh), and its coreceptors patched (Ptc) and smoothened (Smo), in the early embryonic and adult forebrain. Maternal hypo- and...

  14. Growth Hormone Receptor Signaling Pathways and its Negative Regulation by SOCS2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández Pérez, Leandro; Flores-Morales, Amilcar; Guerra, Borja

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a critical regulator of linear body growth during childhood but continues to have important metabolic actions throughout life. The GH receptor (GHR) is ubiquitously expressed, and deficiency of GHR signaling causes a dramatic impact on normal physiology during somatic devel...

  15. APPLICATIONS OF A MODEL FOR THE HORMONAL REGULATION OF THE MENSTRUAL CYCLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    APPLICATIONS OF A MODEL FOR THE HORMONAL REGULATION OF THE MENSTRUAL CYCLE. Leona H. Clark1, Paul M. Schlosser2, and James F. Selgrade3. 1US Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, Research Triangle Park, NC; 2CIIT, Research Triangle Park, NC; 3North Carolina State Un...

  16. Hormonal regulation of alveolarization: structure-function correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godinez Marye H

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dexamethasone (Dex limits and all-trans-retinoic acid (RA promotes alveolarization. While structural changes resulting from such hormonal exposures are known, their functional consequences are unclear. Methods Neonatal rats were treated with Dex and/or RA during the first two weeks of life or were given RA after previous exposure to Dex. Morphology was assessed by light microscopy and radial alveolar counts. Function was evaluated by plethysmography at d13, pressure volume curves at d30, and exercise swim testing and arterial blood gases at both d15 and d30. Results Dex-treated animals had simplified lung architecture without secondary septation. Animals given RA alone had smaller, more numerous alveoli. Concomitant treatment with Dex + RA prevented the Dex-induced changes in septation. While the results of exposure to Dex + RA were sustained, the effects of RA alone were reversed two weeks after treatment was stopped. At d13, Dex-treated animals had increased lung volume, respiratory rate, tidal volume, and minute ventilation. On d15, both RA- and Dex-treated animals had hypercarbia and low arterial pH. By d30, the RA-treated animals resolved this respiratory acidosis, but Dex-treated animals continued to demonstrate blood gas and lung volume abnormalities. Concomitant RA treatment improved respiratory acidosis, but failed to normalize Dex-induced changes in pulmonary function and lung volumes. No differences in exercise tolerance were noted at either d15 or d30. RA treatment after the period of alveolarization also corrected the effects of earlier Dex exposure, but the structural changes due to RA alone were again lost two weeks after treatment. Conclusion We conclude that both RA- and corticosteroid-treatments are associated with respiratory acidosis at d15. While RA alone-induced changes in structure andrespiratory function are reversed, Dex-treated animals continue to demonstrate increased respiratory rate, minute

  17. Neuromedin s as novel putative regulator of luteinizing hormone secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigo, E; Roa, J; López, M; Castellano, J M; Fernandez-Fernandez, R; Navarro, V M; Pineda, R; Aguilar, E; Diéguez, C; Pinilla, L; Tena-Sempere, M

    2007-02-01

    Neuromedin S (NMS), a 36 amino acid peptide structurally related to neuromedin U, was recently identified in rat brain as ligand for the G protein-coupled receptor FM4/TGR-1, also termed neuromedin U receptor type-2 (NMU2R). Central expression of NMS appears restricted to the suprachiasmatic nucleus, and NMS has been involved in the regulation of dark-light rhythms and suppression of food intake. Reproduction is known to be tightly regulated by metabolic and photoperiodic cues. Yet the potential contribution of NMS to the control of reproductive axis remains unexplored. We report herein analyses of hypothalamic expression of NMS and NMU2R genes, as well as LH responses to NMS, in different developmental and functional states of the female rat. Expression of NMS and NMU2R genes was detected at the hypothalamus along postnatal development, with significant fluctuations of their relative levels (maximum at prepubertal stage and adulthood). In adult females, hypothalamic expression of NMS (which was confined to suprachiasmatic nucleus) and NMU2R significantly varied during the estrous cycle (maximum at proestrus) and was lowered after ovariectomy and enhanced after progesterone supplementation. Central administration of NMS evoked modest LH secretory responses in pubertal and cyclic females at diestrus, whereas exaggerated LH secretory bursts were elicited by NMS at estrus and after short-term fasting. Conversely, NMS significantly decreased elevated LH concentrations of ovariectomized rats. In summary, we provide herein novel evidence for the ability of NMS to modulate LH secretion in the female rat. Moreover, hypothalamic expression of NMS and NMU2R genes appeared dependent on the functional state of the female reproductive axis. Our data are the first to disclose the potential implication of NMS in the regulation of gonadotropic axis, a function that may contribute to the integration of circadian rhythms, energy balance, and reproduction.

  18. Dietary contaminant exposure affects plasma testosterone, but not thyroid hormones, vitamin A, and vitamin E, in male juvenile arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallanger, Ingeborg G; Jørgensen, Even H; Fuglei, Eva; Ahlstrøm, Øystein; Muir, Derek C G; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro

    2012-01-01

    Levels of persistent organic pollutants (POP), such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), are high in many Arctic top predators, including the Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus). The aim of this study was to examine possible endocrine-disruptive effects of dietary POP exposure in male juvenile Arctic foxes in a controlled exposure experiment. The study was conducted using domesticated farmed blue foxes (Vulpes lagopus) as a model species. Two groups of newly weaned male foxes received a diet supplemented with either minke whale (Baleneoptera acutorostrata) blubber that was naturally contaminated with POP (exposed group, n = 5 or 21), or pork (Sus scrofa) fat (control group, n = 5 or 21). When the foxes were 6 mo old and had received the 2 diets for approximately 4 mo (147 d), effects of the dietary exposure to POP on plasma concentrations of testosterone (T), thyroid hormones (TH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), retinol (vitamin A), and tocopherol (viramin E) were examined. At sampling, the total body concentrations of 104 PCB congeners were 0.1 ± 0.03 μg/g lipid weight (l.w.; n = 5 [mean ± standard deviation]) and 1.5 ± 0.17 μg/g l.w. (n = 5) in the control and exposed groups, respectively. Plasma testosterone concentrations in the exposed male foxes were significantly lower than in the control males, being approximately 25% of that in the exposed foxes. There were no between-treatment differences for TH, TSH, retinol, or tocopherol. The results suggest that the high POP levels experienced by costal populations of Arctic foxes, such as in Svalbard and Iceland, may result in delayed masculine maturation during adolescence. Sex hormone disruption during puberty may thus have lifetime consequences on all aspects of reproductive function in adult male foxes.

  19. Hypothalamic carnitine metabolism integrates nutrient and hormonal feedback to regulate energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Romana; Reichenbach, Alex; Andrews, Zane B

    2015-12-15

    The maintenance of energy homeostasis requires the hypothalamic integration of nutrient feedback cues, such as glucose, fatty acids, amino acids, and metabolic hormones such as insulin, leptin and ghrelin. Although hypothalamic neurons are critical to maintain energy homeostasis research efforts have focused on feedback mechanisms in isolation, such as glucose alone, fatty acids alone or single hormones. However this seems rather too simplistic considering the range of nutrient and endocrine changes associated with different metabolic states, such as starvation (negative energy balance) or diet-induced obesity (positive energy balance). In order to understand how neurons integrate multiple nutrient or hormonal signals, we need to identify and examine potential intracellular convergence points or common molecular targets that have the ability to sense glucose, fatty acids, amino acids and hormones. In this review, we focus on the role of carnitine metabolism in neurons regulating energy homeostasis. Hypothalamic carnitine metabolism represents a novel means for neurons to facilitate and control both nutrient and hormonal feedback. In terms of nutrient regulation, carnitine metabolism regulates hypothalamic fatty acid sensing through the actions of CPT1 and has an underappreciated role in glucose sensing since carnitine metabolism also buffers mitochondrial matrix levels of acetyl-CoA, an allosteric inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase and hence glucose metabolism. Studies also show that hypothalamic CPT1 activity also controls hormonal feedback. We hypothesis that hypothalamic carnitine metabolism represents a key molecular target that can concurrently integrate nutrient and hormonal information, which is critical to maintain energy homeostasis. We also suggest this is relevant to broader neuroendocrine research as it predicts that hormonal signaling in the brain varies depending on current nutrient status. Indeed, the metabolic action of ghrelin, leptin or insulin

  20. The unique cysteine knot regulates the pleotropic hormone leptin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellinor Haglund

    Full Text Available Leptin plays a key role in regulating energy intake/expenditure, metabolism and hypertension. It folds into a four-helix bundle that binds to the extracellular receptor to initiate signaling. Our work on leptin revealed a hidden complexity in the formation of a previously un-described, cysteine-knotted topology in leptin. We hypothesized that this unique topology could offer new mechanisms in regulating the protein activity. A combination of in silico simulation and in vitro experiments was used to probe the role of the knotted topology introduced by the disulphide-bridge on leptin folding and function. Our results surprisingly show that the free energy landscape is conserved between knotted and unknotted protein, however the additional complexity added by the knot formation is structurally important. Native state analyses led to the discovery that the disulphide-bond plays an important role in receptor binding and thus mediate biological activity by local motions on distal receptor-binding sites, far removed from the disulphide-bridge. Thus, the disulphide-bridge appears to function as a point of tension that allows dissipation of stress at a distance in leptin.

  1. Hormonal regulation of colour change in eyes of a cryptic fish

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    Helen Nilsson Sköld

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Colour change of the skin in lower vertebrates such as fish has been a subject of great scientific and public interest. However, colour change also takes place in eyes of fish and while an increasing amount of data indicates its importance in behaviour, very little is known about its regulation. Here, we report that both eye and skin coloration change in response to white to black background adaptation in live sand goby Pomatoschistus minutes, a bentic marine fish. Through in vitro experiments, we show that noradrenaline and melanocyte concentrating hormone (MCH treatments cause aggregation of pigment organelles in the eye chromatophores. Daylight had no aggregating effect. Combining forskolin to elevate intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP with MCH resulted in complete pigment dispersal and darkening of the eyes, whereas combining prolactin, adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH or melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH with MCH resulted in more yellow and red eyes. ACTH and MSH also induced dispersal in the melanophores, resulting in overall darker eyes. By comparing analysis of eyes, skin and peritoneum, we conclude that the regulation pattern is similar between these different tissues in this species which is relevant for the cryptic life strategy of this species. With the exception of ACTH which resulted in most prominent melanophore pigment dispersal in the eyes, all other treatments provided similar results between tissue types. To our knowledge, this is the first study that has directly analysed hormonal regulation of physiological colour change in eyes of fish.

  2. Hormone response element binding proteins: novel regulators of vitamin D and estrogen signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, Thomas S; Hewison, Martin; Adams, John S

    2011-03-01

    Insights from vitamin D-resistant New World primates and their human homologues as models of natural and pathological insensitivity to sterol/steroid action have uncovered a family of novel intracellular vitamin D and estrogen regulatory proteins involved in hormone action. The proteins, known as "vitamin D or estrogen response element-binding proteins", behave as potent cis-acting, transdominant regulators to inhibit steroid receptor binding to DNA response elements and is responsible for vitamin D and estrogen resistances. This set of interactors belongs to the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) family of previously known pre-mRNA-interacting proteins. This review provides new insights into the mechanism by which these novel regulators of signaling and metabolism can act to regulate responses to vitamin D and estrogen. In addition the review also describes other molecules that are known to influence nuclear receptor signaling through interaction with hormone response elements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evidence of a bigenomic regulation of mitochondrial gene expression by thyroid hormone during rat brain development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Pathak, Amrita; Mohan, Vishwa; Babu, Satish; Pal, Amit; Khare, Drirh; Godbole, Madan M.

    2010-01-01

    Hypothyroidism during early mammalian brain development is associated with decreased expression of various mitochondrial encoded genes along with evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. However, in-spite of the similarities between neurological disorders caused by perinatal hypothyroidism and those caused by various genetic mitochondrial defects we still do not know as to how thyroid hormone (TH) regulates mitochondrial transcription during development and whether this regulation by TH is nuclear mediated or through mitochondrial TH receptors? We here in rat cerebellum show that hypothyroidism causes reduction in expression of nuclear encoded genes controlling mitochondrial biogenesis like PGC-1α, NRF-1α and Tfam. Also, we for the first time demonstrate a mitochondrial localization of thyroid hormone receptor (mTR) isoform in developing brain capable of binding a TH response element (DR2) present in D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA. These results thus indicate an integrated nuclear-mitochondrial cross talk in regulation of mitochondrial transcription by TH during brain development.

  4. Evidence of a bigenomic regulation of mitochondrial gene expression by thyroid hormone during rat brain development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Pathak, Amrita; Mohan, Vishwa; Babu, Satish; Pal, Amit; Khare, Drirh [Department of Endocrinology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow 226014 (India); Godbole, Madan M., E-mail: madangodbole@yahoo.co.in [Department of Endocrinology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow 226014 (India)

    2010-07-02

    Hypothyroidism during early mammalian brain development is associated with decreased expression of various mitochondrial encoded genes along with evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. However, in-spite of the similarities between neurological disorders caused by perinatal hypothyroidism and those caused by various genetic mitochondrial defects we still do not know as to how thyroid hormone (TH) regulates mitochondrial transcription during development and whether this regulation by TH is nuclear mediated or through mitochondrial TH receptors? We here in rat cerebellum show that hypothyroidism causes reduction in expression of nuclear encoded genes controlling mitochondrial biogenesis like PGC-1{alpha}, NRF-1{alpha} and Tfam. Also, we for the first time demonstrate a mitochondrial localization of thyroid hormone receptor (mTR) isoform in developing brain capable of binding a TH response element (DR2) present in D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA. These results thus indicate an integrated nuclear-mitochondrial cross talk in regulation of mitochondrial transcription by TH during brain development.

  5. Expression of neuropeptide W in rat stomach mucosa: regulation by nutritional status, glucocorticoids and thyroid hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminos, Jorge E; Bravo, Susana B; García-Rendueles, María E R; Ruth González, C; Garcés, Maria F; Cepeda, Libia A; Lage, Ricardo; Suárez, Miguel A; López, Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos

    2008-02-07

    Neuropeptide W (NPW) is a recently identified neuropeptide that binds to G-protein-coupled receptor 7 (GPR7) and 8 (GPR8). In rodent brain, NPW mRNA is confined to specific nuclei in hypothalamus, midbrain and brainstem. Expression of NPW mRNA has also been confirmed in peripheral organs such as stomach. Several reports suggested that brain NPW is implicated in the regulation of energy and hormonal homeostasis, namely the adrenal and thyroid axes; however the precise physiological role and regulation of peripheral NPW remains unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of nutritional status on the regulation of NPW in stomach mucosa. Our results show that in this tissue, NPW mRNA and protein expression is negatively regulated by fasting and food restriction, in all the models we studied: males, females and pregnant females. Next, we examined the effect of glucocorticoids and thyroid hormones on NPW mRNA expression in the stomach mucosa. Our data showed that NPW expression is decreased in this tissue after glucocorticoid treatment or hyperthyroidism. Conversely, hypothyroidism induces a marked increase in the expression of NPW in rat stomach. Overall, these data indicate that stomach NPW is regulated by nutritional and hormonal status.

  6. Hormonal regulation and developmental role of Krüppel homolog 1, a repressor of metamorphosis, in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayukawa, Takumi; Murata, Mika; Kobayashi, Isao; Muramatsu, Daisuke; Okada, Chieko; Uchino, Keiro; Sezutsu, Hideki; Kiuchi, Makoto; Tamura, Toshiki; Hiruma, Kiyoshi; Ishikawa, Yukio; Shinoda, Tetsuro

    2014-04-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) has an ability to repress the precocious metamorphosis of insects during their larval development. Krüppel homolog 1 (Kr-h1) is an early JH-inducible gene that mediates this action of JH; however, the fine hormonal regulation of Kr-h1 and the molecular mechanism underlying its antimetamorphic effect are little understood. In this study, we attempted to elucidate the hormonal regulation and developmental role of Kr-h1. We found that the expression of Kr-h1 in the epidermis of penultimate-instar larvae of the silkworm Bombyx mori was induced by JH secreted by the corpora allata (CA), whereas the CA were not involved in the transient induction of Kr-h1 at the prepupal stage. Tissue culture experiments suggested that the transient peak of Kr-h1 at the prepupal stage is likely to be induced cooperatively by JH derived from gland(s) other than the CA and the prepupal surge of ecdysteroid, although involvement of unknown factor(s) could not be ruled out. To elucidate the developmental role of Kr-h1, we generated transgenic silkworms overexpressing Kr-h1. The transgenic silkworms grew normally until the spinning stage, but their development was arrested at the prepupal stage. The transgenic silkworms from which the CA were removed in the penultimate instar did not undergo precocious pupation or larval-larval molt but fell into prepupal arrest. This result demonstrated that Kr-h1 is indeed involved in the repression of metamorphosis but that Kr-h1 alone is incapable of implementing normal larval molt. Moreover, the expression profiles and hormonal responses of early ecdysone-inducible genes (E74, E75, and Broad) in transgenic silkworms suggested that Kr-h1 is not involved in the JH-dependent modulation of these genes, which is associated with the control of metamorphosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Metabolic regulation of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerry D. Cohen

    2009-11-01

    The phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, auxin) is important for many aspects of plant growth, development and responses to the environment yet the routes to is biosynthesis and mechanisms for regulation of IAA levels remain important research questions. A critical issue concerning the biosynthesis if IAA in plants is that redundant pathways for IAA biosynthesis exist in plants. We showed that these redundant pathways and their relative contribution to net IAA production are under both developmental and environmental control. We worked on three fundamental problems related to how plants get their IAA: 1) An in vitro biochemical approach was used to define the tryptophan dependent pathway to IAA using maize endosperm, where relatively large amounts of IAA are produced over a short developmental period. Both a stable isotope dilution and a protein MS approach were used to identify intermediates and enzymes in the reactions. 2) We developed an in vitro system for analysis of tryptophan-independent IAA biosynthesis in maize seedlings and we used a metabolite profiling approach to isolate intermediates in this reaction. 3) Arabidopsis contains a small family of genes that encode potential indolepyruvate decarboxylase enzymes. We cloned these genes and studied plants that are mutant in these genes and that over-express each member in the family in terms of the level and route of IAA biosynthesis. Together, these allowed further development of a comprehensive picture of the pathways and regulatory components that are involved in IAA homeostasis in higher plants.

  8. Hormonal regulation of hepatic glycogenolysis in the carp, Cyprinus carpio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens, P.A.; Lowrey, P.

    1987-01-01

    Carp (Cyprinus carpio) liver maintained normal glycogen content and enzyme complement for several days in organ culture. Epinephrine-stimulated glycogenolysis, phosphorylase activation, and cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner with EC 50 s of 100, 100, and 500 nM, respectively. These actions were blocked by the β-adrenergic antagonist, propranolol, but not by the α-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine. Glycogenolysis and tissue cAMP were uninfluenced by 10 -6 M arginine vasotocin, arginine vasopressin, lysine vasotocin, lysine vasopressin, mesotocin, or oxytocin, but were slightly increased by 10 -5 M isotocin and slightly decreased by 10 -6 M angiotensin II. [ 125 I]-iodocyanopindolol (ICP), a β-adrenergic ligand, bound to isolated carp liver membranes with a K/sub D/ of 83 pM. Maximum binding of 45 fmol/mg protein was at 600 pM. Propranolol, isoprenaline, epinephrine, phenylephrine, norepinephrine, and phenoxybenzamine displaced ICP with K/sub D/s of 100 nM, 2, 20, 20, 60, and 200 μM, respectively. The α-adrenergic antagonists, yohimbine and prazosin, showed no specific binding. These data provide evidence that catecholamines act via β-adrenergic receptors in carp liver and that α-adrenergic receptors are not present. Vasoactive peptides play no significant role in regulation of carp liver glycogenolysis

  9. The interaction between strigolactones and other plant hormones in the regulation of plant development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi eCheng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant hormones are small molecules derived from various metabolic pathways and are important regulators of plant development. The most recently discovered phytohormone class comprises the carotenoid-derived strigolactones (SLs. For a long time these compounds were only known to be secreted into the rhizosphere where they act as signalling compounds, but now we know they are also active as endogenous plant hormones and they have been in the spotlight ever since. The initial discovery that SLs are involved in the inhibition of axillary bud outgrowth, initiated a multitude of other studies showing that SLs also play a role in defining root architecture, secondary growth, hypocotyl elongation and seed germination, mostly in interaction with other hormones. Their coordinated action enables the plant to respond in an appropriate manner to environmental factors such as temperature, shading, day length and nutrient availability. Here, we will review the current knowledge on the crosstalk between SLs and other plant hormones – such as auxin, cytokinin, abscisic acid, ethylene and gibberellins - during different physiological processes. We will furthermore take a bird’s eye view of how this hormonal crosstalk enables plants to respond to their ever changing environments.

  10. Regucalcin expression in bovine tissues and its regulation by sex steroid hormones in accessory sex glands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Starvaggi Cucuzza

    Full Text Available Regucalcin (RGN is a mammalian Ca2+-binding protein that plays an important role in intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. Recently, RGN has been identified as a target gene for sex steroid hormones in the prostate glands and testis of rats and humans, but no studies have focused on RGN expression in bovine tissues. Thus, in the present study, we examined RGN mRNA and protein expression in the different tissues and organs of veal calves and beef cattle. Moreover, we investigated whether RGN expression is controlled through sex steroid hormones in bovine target tissues, namely the bulbo-urethral and prostate glands and the testis. Sex steroid hormones are still illegally used in bovine husbandry to increase muscle mass. The screening of the regulation and function of anabolic sex steroids via modified gene expression levels in various tissues represents a new approach for the detection of illicit drug treatments. Herein, we used quantitative PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry analyses to demonstrate RGN mRNA and protein expression in bovine tissues. In addition, estrogen administration down-regulated RGN gene expression in the accessory sex glands of veal calves and beef cattle, while androgen treatment reduced RGN gene expression only in the testis. The confirmation of the regulation of RGN gene expression through sex steroid hormones might facilitate the potential detection of hormone abuse in bovine husbandry. Particularly, the specific response in the testis suggests that this tissue is ideal for the detection of illicit androgen administration in veal calves and beef cattle.

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of juvenile hormone acid methyltransferase in the honey bee, Apis mellifera, and its differential expression during caste differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng Li

    Full Text Available Juvenile hormone acid methyltransferase (JHAMT is an enzyme involved in one of the final steps of juvenile hormone biosynthesis in insects. It transfers a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM to the carboxyl group of either farnesoic acid (FA or JH acid (JHA. Several genes coding for JHAMT have been cloned and characterized from insects from different orders, and they have been shown to play critical roles in metamorphosis and reproduction. However, the significance of JHAMT in Hymenopteran insects is unknown. We used RACE amplification method to clone JHAMT cDNA from the honey bee, Apis mellifera (AmJHAMT. The full length cDNA of AmJHAMT that we cloned is 1253bp long and encodes a 278-aa protein that shares 32-36% identity with known JHAMTs. A SAM-binding motif, conserved in the SAM-dependent methyltransferase (SAM-MT superfamily, is present in AmJHAMT. Its secondary structure also contains a typical SAM-MT fold. Most of the active sites bound with SAM and substrates (JHA or FA are conserved in AmJHAMT as in other JHAMT orthologs. Phylogenetic analysis clustered AmJHAMT with the other orthologs from Hymenoptera to form a major clade in the phylogenetic tree. Purified recombinant AmJHAMT protein expressed in E. coli was used to produce polyclonal antibodies and to verify the identity of AmJHAMT by immunoblotting and mass spectrometry. Quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting analyses revealed that queen larvae contained significantly higher levels of AmJHAMT mRNA and protein than worker larvae during the periods of caste development. The temporal profiles of both AmJHAMT mRNA and protein in queens and workers showed a similar pattern as the JH biosynthesis. These results suggest that the gene that we cloned codes for a functional JHAMT that catalyzes the final reactions of JH biosynthesis in honey bees. In addition, AmJHAMT may play an important role in honey bee caste differentiation.

  12. Dancing with Hormones: A Current Perspective of Nitrate Signaling and Regulation in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peizhu Guan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In nature and agriculture, nitrate availability is a main environmental cue for plant growth, development and stress responses. Nitrate signaling and regulation are hence at the center of communications between plant intrinsic programs and the environment. It is also well known that endogenous phytohormones play numerous critical roles in integrating extrinsic cues and intrinsic responses, regulating and refining almost all aspects of plant growth, development and stress responses. Therefore, interaction between nitrate and phytohormones, such as auxins, cytokinins, abscisic acid, gibberellins, and ethylene, is prevalent. The growing evidence indicates that biosynthesis, de-conjugation, transport, and signaling of hormones are partly controlled by nitrate signaling. Recent advances with nitrate signaling and transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis give rise to new paradigms. Given the comprehensive nitrate transport, sensing, signaling and regulations at the level of the cell and organism, nitrate itself is a local and long-distance signal molecule, conveying N status at the whole-plant level. A direct molecular link between nitrate signaling and cell cycle progression was revealed with TEOSINTE BRANCHED1/CYCLOIDEA/PROLIFERATING CELL FACTOR1-20 (TCP20 – NIN-LIKE PROTEIN 6/7 (NLP6/7 regulatory nexus. NLPs are key regulators of nitrogen responses in plants. TCPs function as the main regulators of plant morphology and architecture, with the emerging role as integrators of plant developmental responses to the environment. By analogy with auxin being proposed as a plant morphogen, nitrate may be an environmental morphogen. The morphogen-gradient-dependent and cell-autonomous mechanisms of nitrate signaling and regulation are an integral part of cell growth and cell identification. This is especially true in root meristem growth that is regulated by intertwined nitrate, phytohormones, and glucose-TOR signaling pathways. Furthermore, the nitrate

  13. Specific DNA-binding proteins and DNA sequences involved in steroid hormone regulation of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spelsberg, T.; Hora, J.; Horton, M.; Goldberger, A.; Littlefield, B.; Seelke, R.; Toyoda, H.

    1987-01-01

    Steroid hormones circulate in the blood and are taken by target cells via complexes with intracellular binding proteins termed receptors, that are hormone and tissue specific. Each receptor binds it specific steroid with very high affinity, having an equilibrium dissociation constant (K/sub d/) in the range of 10 -9 to 10 -10 M. Once bound by their specific steroid hormones, the steroid receptors undergo a conformational change which allows them to bind with high affinity to sites on chromatin, termed nuclear acceptor sites. There are estimated 5,000 to 10,000 of these sites expressed with an equal number not expressed (''masked'') in intact chromatin. The result of the binding to nuclear acceptor sites is an alteration of gene transcription or, in some cases, gene expression as measured by the changing levels of specific RNAs and proteins in that target tissue. Each steroid regulates specific effects on the RNA and protein profiles. The chronology of the above mechanism of action after injection of radiolabelled steroid as is follows: Steroid-receptor complex formation (1 minute), nuclear acceptor sites (2 minutes), effects on RNA synthesis (10 to 30 minutes), and finally the changing protein profiles via changes in protein synthesis and protein turnover (1 to 6 hours). Thus steroid receptors represent one of the first identified intracellular gene regulation proteins. The receptor molecules themselves are regulated by the presence or absence of the steroid molecule

  14. The relationship between polyamines and hormones in the regulation of wheat grain filling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    Full Text Available The grain weight of wheat is strongly influenced by filling. Polyamines (PA are involved in regulating plant growth. However, the effects of PA on wheat grain filling and its mechanism of action are unclear. The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between PAs and hormones in the regulation of wheat grain filling. Three PAs, spermidine (Spd, spermine (Spm, and putrescine (Put, were exogenously applied, and the grain filling characteristics and changes in endogenous PA and hormones, i.e., indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, zeatin (Z + zeatin riboside (ZR, abscisic acid (ABA, ethylene (ETH and gibberellin 1+4 (GAs, were quantified during wheat grain filling. Exogenous applications of Spd and Spm significantly increased the grain filling rate and weight, but exogenous Put had no significant effects on these measures. Exogenous Spd and Spm significantly increased the endogenous Spd, Spm, Z+ZR, ABA, and IAA contents and significantly decreased ETH evolution in grains. The endogenous Spd, Spm and Z+ZR contents were positively and significantly correlated with the grain filling rate and weight of wheat, and the endogenous ETH evolution was negatively and significantly correlated with the wheat grain filling rate and weight. Based upon these results, we concluded that PAs were involved in the balance of hormones that regulated the grain filling of wheat.

  15. The Relationship between Polyamines and Hormones in the Regulation of Wheat Grain Filling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Gu, Dandan; Wu, Wei; Wen, Xiaoxia; Liao, Yuncheng

    2013-01-01

    The grain weight of wheat is strongly influenced by filling. Polyamines (PA) are involved in regulating plant growth. However, the effects of PA on wheat grain filling and its mechanism of action are unclear. The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between PAs and hormones in the regulation of wheat grain filling. Three PAs, spermidine (Spd), spermine (Spm), and putrescine (Put), were exogenously applied, and the grain filling characteristics and changes in endogenous PA and hormones, i.e., indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), zeatin (Z) + zeatin riboside (ZR), abscisic acid (ABA), ethylene (ETH) and gibberellin 1+4 (GAs), were quantified during wheat grain filling. Exogenous applications of Spd and Spm significantly increased the grain filling rate and weight, but exogenous Put had no significant effects on these measures. Exogenous Spd and Spm significantly increased the endogenous Spd, Spm, Z+ZR, ABA, and IAA contents and significantly decreased ETH evolution in grains. The endogenous Spd, Spm and Z+ZR contents were positively and significantly correlated with the grain filling rate and weight of wheat, and the endogenous ETH evolution was negatively and significantly correlated with the wheat grain filling rate and weight. Based upon these results, we concluded that PAs were involved in the balance of hormones that regulated the grain filling of wheat. PMID:24205154

  16. Barhl1 is directly regulated by thyroid hormone in the developing cerebellum of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Hongyan, E-mail: hongyan_dong@hc-sc.gc.ca [Hazard Identification Division, Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, 50 Columbine Driveway, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0K9 (Canada); Yauk, Carole L. [Mechanistic Studies Division, Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, 50 Columbine Driveway, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0K9 (Canada); Wade, Michael G. [Hazard Identification Division, Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, 50 Columbine Driveway, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0K9 (Canada)

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thyroid hormone receptor binds to the promoter region of Barhl1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Barhl1 expression in cerebellum is negatively regulated by thyroid hormone. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Negative regulation of Barhl1 by thyroid hormone was confirmed in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thyroid hormone may play a role in normal brain development through transcriptional control of Barhl1. -- Abstract: Thyroid hormones (THs) are essential for the brain development. Despite considerable effort, few genes directly regulated by THs have been identified. In this study, we investigate the effects of THs on the regulation of Barhl1, a transcription factor that regulates sensorineural development. Using DNA microarray combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-chip), we identified a TR{beta} binding site in the promoter of Barhl1. The binding was further confirmed by ChIP-PCR. The site is located approximately 755 bp upstream of the transcription start site. Reporter vectors containing the binding site or mutated fragments were transfected into GH3 cells. T3 treatment decreased the transcriptional activity of the wild fragment but not the mutant. Two 28 bp oligonucleotides containing sequences that resemble known TH response elements (TREs) were derived from this binding site and DNA-protein interaction was performed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Binding analysis in a nuclear extract containing TR{beta} revealed that one of these fragments bound TR{beta}. This complex was shifted with the addition of anti-TR{beta} antibody. We investigated Barhl1 expression in animal models and TH-treated cultured cells. Both long term treatment with 6-propyl-2-thiouracil and short-term treatment with 0.05% methimazole/1% sodium perchlorate (both treatments render mice hypothyroid) resulted in up-regulation of Barhl1. TH supplementation of hypothyroid mice caused a decrease in the expression of Barhl1

  17. Barhl1 is directly regulated by thyroid hormone in the developing cerebellum of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Hongyan; Yauk, Carole L.; Wade, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Thyroid hormone receptor binds to the promoter region of Barhl1. ► Barhl1 expression in cerebellum is negatively regulated by thyroid hormone. ► Negative regulation of Barhl1 by thyroid hormone was confirmed in vitro. ► Thyroid hormone may play a role in normal brain development through transcriptional control of Barhl1. -- Abstract: Thyroid hormones (THs) are essential for the brain development. Despite considerable effort, few genes directly regulated by THs have been identified. In this study, we investigate the effects of THs on the regulation of Barhl1, a transcription factor that regulates sensorineural development. Using DNA microarray combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-chip), we identified a TRβ binding site in the promoter of Barhl1. The binding was further confirmed by ChIP-PCR. The site is located approximately 755 bp upstream of the transcription start site. Reporter vectors containing the binding site or mutated fragments were transfected into GH3 cells. T3 treatment decreased the transcriptional activity of the wild fragment but not the mutant. Two 28 bp oligonucleotides containing sequences that resemble known TH response elements (TREs) were derived from this binding site and DNA–protein interaction was performed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Binding analysis in a nuclear extract containing TRβ revealed that one of these fragments bound TRβ. This complex was shifted with the addition of anti-TRβ antibody. We investigated Barhl1 expression in animal models and TH-treated cultured cells. Both long term treatment with 6-propyl-2-thiouracil and short-term treatment with 0.05% methimazole/1% sodium perchlorate (both treatments render mice hypothyroid) resulted in up-regulation of Barhl1. TH supplementation of hypothyroid mice caused a decrease in the expression of Barhl1 compared to control animals. Similarly, the expression of Barhl1 in cultured GH3 decreased with the addition of T3. Given

  18. Methyl farnesoate epoxidase (mfe) gene expression and juvenile hormone titers in the life cycle of a highly eusocial stingless bee, Melipona scutellaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso-Júnior, Carlos Antônio Mendes; Silva, Renato Pereira; Borges, Naiara Araújo; de Carvalho, Washington João; Walter, S Leal; Simões, Zilá Luz Paulino; Bitondi, Marcia Maria Gentile; Ueira Vieira, Carlos; Bonetti, Ana Maria; Hartfelder, Klaus

    2017-08-01

    In social insects, juvenile hormone (JH) has acquired novel functions related to caste determination and division of labor among workers, and this is best evidenced in the honey bee. In contrast to honey bees, stingless bees are a much more diverse group of highly eusocial bees, and the genus Melipona has long called special attention due to a proposed genetic mechanism of caste determination. Here, we examined methyl farnesoate epoxidase (mfe) gene expression, encoding an enzyme relevant for the final step in JH biosynthesis, and measured the hemolymph JH titers for all life cycle stages of Melipona scutellaris queens and workers. We confirmed that mfe is exclusively expressed in the corpora allata. The JH titer is high in the second larval instar, drops in the third, and rises again as the larvae enter metamorphosis. During the pupal stage, mfe expression is initialy elevated, but then gradually drops to low levels before adult emergence. No variation was, however, seen in the JH titer. In adult virgin queens, mfe expression and the JH titer are significantly elevated, possibly associated with their reproductive potential. For workers we found that JH titers are lower in foragers than in nurse bees, while mfe expression did not differ. Stingless bees are, thus, distinct from honey bee workers, suggesting that they have maintained the ancestral gonadotropic function for JH. Hence, the physiological circuitries underlying a highly eusocial life style may be variable, even within a monophyletic clade such as the corbiculate bees. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative metabolism of branched-chain amino acids to precursors of juvenile hormone biogenesis in corpora allata of lepidopterous versus nonlepidopterous insects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brindle, P.A.; Schooley, D.A.; Tsai, L.W.; Baker, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    Comparative studies were performed on the role of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) in juvenile hormone (JH) biosynthesis using several lepidopterous and nonlepidopterous insects. Corpora cardiaca-corpora allata complexes (CC-CA, the corpora allata being the organ of JH biogenesis) were maintained in culture medium containing a uniformly 14 C-labeled BCAA, together with [methyl- 3 H]methionine as mass marker for JH quantification. BCAA catabolism was quantified by directly analyzing the medium for the presence of 14 C-labeled propionate and/or acetate, while JHs were extracted, purified by liquid chromatography, and subjected to double-label liquid scintillation counting. Our results indicate that active BCAA catabolism occurs within the CC-CA of lepidopterans, and this efficiently provides propionyl-CoA (from isoleucine or valine) for the biosynthesis of the ethyl branches of JH I and II. Acetyl-CoA, formed from isoleucine or leucine catabolism, is also utilized by lepidopteran CC-CA for biosynthesizing JH III and the acetate-derived portions of the ethyl-branched JHs. In contrast, CC-CA of nonlepidopterans fail to catabolize BCAA. Consequently, exogenous isoleucine or leucine does not serve as a carbon source for the biosynthesis of JH III by these glands, and no propionyl-CoA is produced for genesis of ethyl-branched JHs. This is the first observation of a tissue-specific metabolic difference which in part explains why these novel homosesquiterpenoids exist in lepidopterans, but not in nonlepidopterans

  20. Nutrition-dependent fertility response to juvenile hormone in non-social Euodynerus foraminatus wasps and the evolutionary origin of sociality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbetts, Elizabeth A; Mettler, Alexander; Donajkowski, Kellie

    2013-03-01

    The reproductive ground plan hypothesis (RGPH) proposes that the ovarian cycle in solitary insects provides the basis for social evolution, so similar mechanisms are predicted to influence reproductive plasticity in social and solitary species. Specifically, reproductive plasticity in social species originated via modification of nutrition-dependent fertility response to juvenile hormone (JH) in solitary insects. Testing this prediction requires information about the factors that influence fertility in non-social relatives of the eusocial hymenoptera. However, no previous studies have examined how JH or nutritional condition influence fertility in Eumenines, the non-social group most closely related to social wasps. Here, we find support for the RGPH, as JH increases Euodynerus foraminatus fertility. Fertility is also condition-dependent, as heavy E. foraminatus are more fertile than light E. foraminatus. In addition, we measure the factors associated with mating success in E. foraminatus, finding that multiple factors influence mating success, including male weight, male mating experience, and female age. There is also higher variance in male than female reproductive success, suggesting that males may experience substantial sexual selection in this species. Overall, the relationships between JH, body weight, and fertility in E. foraminatus support the RGPH for the origin of sociality by demonstrating that there are strong parallels in the mechanisms that mediate fertility of social and non-social wasps. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of methoprene, a juvenile hormone analog, on survival of various developmental stages, adult emergence, reproduction and behavior of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brar, Gurpreet S; Meyer, Wendy; Stelinski, Lukasz L

    2015-12-01

    The Asian citrus citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, transmits a bacterium that causes huanglongbing in citrus. Frequent and repeated use of neurotoxic insecticides against D. citri has resulted in the development of insecticide resistance. We evaluated the effects of the juvenile hormone analog methoprene on egg hatch, nymphal development, adult emergence, reproduction and behavior of D. citri. Methoprene significantly reduced the viability of eggs that were between 0 and 4 days old. Egg hatch of 0-48-h-old and 49-96-h-old eggs was 8 and 9%, respectively, when treated with 320 µg mL(-1) of methoprene. Methoprene caused significant mortality of first-, third- and fifth-instar D. citri nymphs and reduced adult emergence as compared with controls. Methoprene caused less than 5% adult emergence when first- and third-instar stages were treated, respectively, and less than 40% adult emergence when fifth instars were treated. Reduced fertility of females was observed when they emerged from methoprene-treated fifth instars. Methoprene was effective in reducing egg hatch, suppressing nymphal development and decreasing adult emergence of D. citri under laboratory conditions. Treatment of fifth instars reduced the fertility of females. Methoprene might be a possible tool for integrated management of D. citri. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Aliskiren toxicity in juvenile rats is determined by ontogenic regulation of intestinal P-glycoprotein expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Peter; Beckman, David; McLean, Lee Anne; Yan, Jing-He

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile rat toxicity studies with the direct renin inhibitor aliskiren were initiated to support treatment in the pediatric population. In Study 1, aliskiren was administered orally to juvenile rats at doses of 0, 30, 100 or 300 mg/kg/day with repeated dosing from postpartum day (PPD) 8 to PPD 35/36. In-life, clinical pathology, anatomic pathology, and toxicokinetics evaluations were performed. In Study 2, single oral doses of aliskiren (0, 100 or 300 mg/kg) were given to 14-, 21-, 24-, 28-, 31- or 36-day-old rats; in-life data and toxicokinetics were evaluated. Study 3 was a single dose (3 mg/kg i.v.) pharmacokinetic study in juvenile rats on PPD 8, 14, 21 and 28. In Study 4, naïve rats were used to investigate ontogenic changes of the multidrug-resistant protein 1 (MDR1) and the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) mRNA in several organs. Oral administration of aliskiren at 100 and 300 mg/kg caused unexpected mortality and severe morbidity in 8-day-old rats. Aliskiren plasma and tissue concentrations were increased in rats aged 21 days and younger. Expression of MDR1 and OATP mRNA in the intestine, liver and brain was significantly lower in very young rats. In conclusion, severe toxicity and increased exposure in very young rats after oral administration of aliskiren are considered to be the result of immature drug transporter systems. Immaturity of MDR1 in enterocytes appears to be the most important mechanism responsible for the high exposure. - Highlights: • Aliskiren was orally administered to juvenile rats. • Unexpected severe toxicity and acute mortality occurred in rats aged 8 days. • Toxicity was associated with increased aliskiren plasma and tissue exposure. • Developmental changes of exposure correlated with ontogeny of transporters. • Immaturity of MDR1 in enterocytes causes increased exposure in very young rats

  3. Aliskiren toxicity in juvenile rats is determined by ontogenic regulation of intestinal P-glycoprotein expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Peter, E-mail: peterk.hoffmann@novartis.com [Preclinical Safety, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, East Hanover, NJ (United States); Beckman, David; McLean, Lee Anne [Preclinical Safety, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, East Hanover, NJ (United States); Yan, Jing-He [Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, East Hanover, NJ (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Juvenile rat toxicity studies with the direct renin inhibitor aliskiren were initiated to support treatment in the pediatric population. In Study 1, aliskiren was administered orally to juvenile rats at doses of 0, 30, 100 or 300 mg/kg/day with repeated dosing from postpartum day (PPD) 8 to PPD 35/36. In-life, clinical pathology, anatomic pathology, and toxicokinetics evaluations were performed. In Study 2, single oral doses of aliskiren (0, 100 or 300 mg/kg) were given to 14-, 21-, 24-, 28-, 31- or 36-day-old rats; in-life data and toxicokinetics were evaluated. Study 3 was a single dose (3 mg/kg i.v.) pharmacokinetic study in juvenile rats on PPD 8, 14, 21 and 28. In Study 4, naïve rats were used to investigate ontogenic changes of the multidrug-resistant protein 1 (MDR1) and the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) mRNA in several organs. Oral administration of aliskiren at 100 and 300 mg/kg caused unexpected mortality and severe morbidity in 8-day-old rats. Aliskiren plasma and tissue concentrations were increased in rats aged 21 days and younger. Expression of MDR1 and OATP mRNA in the intestine, liver and brain was significantly lower in very young rats. In conclusion, severe toxicity and increased exposure in very young rats after oral administration of aliskiren are considered to be the result of immature drug transporter systems. Immaturity of MDR1 in enterocytes appears to be the most important mechanism responsible for the high exposure. - Highlights: • Aliskiren was orally administered to juvenile rats. • Unexpected severe toxicity and acute mortality occurred in rats aged 8 days. • Toxicity was associated with increased aliskiren plasma and tissue exposure. • Developmental changes of exposure correlated with ontogeny of transporters. • Immaturity of MDR1 in enterocytes causes increased exposure in very young rats.

  4. Molecular and Genetic Analysis of Hormone-Regulated Differential Cell Elongation in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecker, Joseph R.

    2002-12-03

    The authors have utilized the response of Arabidopsis seedlings to the plant hormone ethylene to identify new genes involved in the regulation of ethylene biosynthesis, perception, signal transduction and differential cell growth. In building a genetic framework for the action of these genes, they developed a molecular model that has facilitated the understanding of the molecular requirements of ethylene for cell elongation processes. The ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis appears to be primarily linear and is defined by the genes: ETR1, ETR2, ERS1, ERS2, EIN4, CTR1, EIN2, EIN3, EIN5 EIN6, and EIN. Downstream branches identified by the HLS1, EIR1, and AUX1 genes involve interactions with other hormonal (auxin) signals in the process of differential cell elongation in the hypocotyl hook. Cloning and characterization of HLS1 and three HLS1-LIKE genes in the laboratory has been supported under this award. HLS1 is required for differential elongation of cells in the hypocotyl and may act in the establishment of hormone gradients. Also during the award period, they have identified and begun preliminary characterization of two genes that genetically act upstream of the ethylene receptors. ETO1 and RAN1 encode negative regulators of ethylene biosynthesis and signaling respectively. Progress on the analysis of these genes along with HOOKLESS1 is described.

  5. Molecular and Genetic Analysis of Hormone-Regulated Differential Cell Elongation in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecker, Joseph R.

    2005-09-15

    We have utilized the response of Arabidopsis seedlings to the plant hormone ethylene to identify new genes involved in the regulation of ethylene biosynthesis, perception, signal transduction and differential cell growth. In building a genetic framework for the action of these genes, we have developed a molecular model that has facilitated our understanding of the molecular requirements of ethylene for cell elongation processes. The ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis appears to be primarily linear and is defined by the genes: ETR1, ETR2, ERS1, ERS2, EIN4, CTR1, EIN2, EIN3, EIN5, EIN6, and EIN. Downstream branches identified by the HLS1, EIR1, and AUX1 genes involve interactions with other hormonal (auxin) signals in the process of differential cell elongation in the hypocotyl hook. Cloning and characterization of HLS1 (and three HLL genes) and ETO1 (and ETOL genes) in my laboratory has been supported under this award. HLS1 is required for differential elongation of cells in the hypocotyl and may act in the establishment of hormone gradients. Also during the previous period, we have identified and characterized a gene that genetically acts upstream of the ethylene receptors. ETO1 encodes negative regulators of ethylene biosynthesis.

  6. Endogenous ovarian hormones affect mitochondrial efficiency in cerebral endothelium via distinct regulation of PGC-1 isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Martin F; Zhao, Yuanzi; Duckles, Sue P; Krause, Diana N

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria support the energy-intensive functions of brain endothelium but also produce damaging-free radicals that lead to disease. Previously, we found that estrogen treatment protects cerebrovascular mitochondria, increasing capacity for ATP production while decreasing reactive oxygen species (ROS). To determine whether these effects occur specifically in endothelium in vivo and also explore underlying transcriptional mechanisms, we studied freshly isolated brain endothelial preparations from intact and ovariectomized female mice. This preparation reflects physiologic influences of circulating hormones, hemodynamic forces, and cell-cell interactions of the neurovascular unit. Loss of ovarian hormones affected endothelial expression of the key mitochondrial regulator family, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1 (PGC-1), but in a unique way. Ovariectomy increased endothelial PGC-1α mRNA but decreased PGC-1β mRNA. The change in PGC-1β correlated with decreased mRNA for crucial downstream mitochondrial regulators, nuclear respiratory factor 1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A, as well as for ATP synthase and ROS protection enzymes, glutamate-cysteine ligase and manganese superoxide dismutase. Ovariectomy also decreased mitochondrial biogenesis (mitochondrial/nuclear DNA ratio). These results indicate ovarian hormones normally act through a distinctive regulatory pathway involving PGC-1β to support cerebral endothelial mitochondrial content and guide mitochondrial function to favor ATP coupling and ROS protection.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of regulation of growth hormone gene expression in cultured rat pituitary cells by thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaffe, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    In cultured GC cells, a rat pituitary tumor cell line, growth hormone [GH] is induced in a synergistic fashion by physiologic concentrations of thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones. Abundant evidence indicates that these hormones mediate this response via their specific receptors. The purpose of this thesis is to explore the mechanisms by which these hormones affect GH production. When poly (A) + RNA was isolated from cells grown both with and without hormones and translated in a cell-free wheat germ system, the preGH translation products were shown to be proportional to immunoassayable GH production under all combinations of hormonal milieux, indicating that changes in GH production is modulated at a pretranslational level. A cDNA library was constructed from poly (A) + RNA and one clone containing GH cDNA sequences was isolated. This was used to confirm the above results by Northern dot blot analysis. This probe was also used to assess hormonal effects on GH mRNA half-life and synthetic rates as well as GH gene transcription rates in isolated nuclei. Using a pulse-chase protocol in which cellular RNA was labeled in vivo with [ 3 H]uridine, and quantitating [ 3 H]GHmRNA directly by hybridization to GH cDNA bound to nitrocellulose filters, GHmRNA was found to have a half-life of approximately 50 hours, and was not significantly altered by the presence of inducing hormones

  8. Gene expression of placental hormones regulating energy balance in small for gestational age neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struwe, Ellen; Berzl, Gabriele M; Schild, Ralf L; Dötsch, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction is associated with an increased risk for metabolic and cardiovascular disease in later life. To further elucidate mechanisms that might be involved in the process of prenatal programming, we measured the adipokines leptin, resistin, and adiponectin and the GH-releasing hormone ghrelin in the placenta of small for gestational age (SGA) neonates. The control group included 24 placentas of appropriate for gestational age (AGA) newborns, in the study group were 16 placentas of SGA neonates. Gene expression of leptin, resistin, adiponectin, and ghrelin was examined. For hormones showing alterations in gene regulation placental protein expression was measured by Western blot. Placental mRNA expression of leptin was significantly increased in SGA placentas (p=0.0035, related to beta-actin). Protein concentration was increased, as well. There were no differences in placental resistin, adiponectin, or ghrelin gene expressions between SGA neonates and controls. Leptin was the only hormone to demonstrate a significant inverse correlation with birth weight (r=-0.44, p=0.01). Adiponectin correlated significantly with leptin (r=0.53, p=0.0023) and ghrelin (r=0.50, p=0.0045). Placental leptin gene expression and protein concentration showed the expected increase in the SGA group. Leptin was inversely correlated with birth weight. Positive correlation of adiponectin with leptin and ghrelin expression suggests an interaction between these hormones in the placenta. However, the unchanged expression of resistin, adiponectin, and ghrelin in SGA placentas and the absence of correlation with birth weight cast doubt whether these hormones produced in the placenta play a key role in fetal programming.

  9. Thyroid hormone regulation of adult intestinal stem cells: Implications on intestinal development and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guihong; Roediger, Julia; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2016-12-01

    Organ-specific adult stem cells are essential for organ homeostasis, tissue repair and regeneration. The formation of such stem cells often takes place during postembryonic development, a period around birth in mammals when plasma thyroid hormone concentration is high. The life-long self-renewal of the intestinal epithelium has made mammalian intestine a valuable model to study the function and regulation and adult stem cells. On the other hand, much less is known about how the adult intestinal stem cells are formed during vertebrate development. Here, we will review some recent progresses on this subject, focusing mainly on the formation of the adult intestine during Xenopus metamorphosis. We will discuss the role of thyroid hormone signaling pathway in the process and potential molecular conservations between amphibians and mammals as well as the implications in organ homeostasis and human diseases.

  10. Repeated, Intermittent Social Defeat across the Entire Juvenile Period Resulted in Behavioral, Physiological, Hormonal, Immunological, and Neurochemical Alterations in Young Adult Male Golden Hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei-Chun; Liu, Ching-Yi; Lai, Wen-Sung

    2016-01-01

    The developing brain is vulnerable to social defeat during the juvenile period. As complements of human studies, animal models of social defeat provide a straightforward approach to investigating the functional and neurobiological consequences of social defeats. Taking advantage of agonist behavior and social defeat in male golden hamster, a set of 6 experiments was conducted to investigate the consequences at multiple levels in young adulthood resulting from repeated, intermittent social defeats or “social threats” across the entire juvenile period. Male hamsters at postnatal day 28 (P28) were randomly assigned to either the social defeat, “social threat”, or arena control group, and they correspondingly received a series of nine social interaction trials (i.e., either social defeat, “social threat”, or arena control conditions) from P33 to P66. At the behavioral level (Experiment 1), we found that repeated social defeats (but not “social threats”) significantly impacted locomotor activity in the familiar context and social interaction in the familiar/unfamiliar social contexts. At the physiological and hormonal levels (Experiments 2 and 3), repeated social defeat significantly enhanced the cortisol and norepinephrine concentrations in blood. Enlargement of the spleen was also found in the social defeat and “social threat” groups. At the immunological level (Experiment 4), the social defeat group showed lower levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the hypothalamus and hippocampus but higher concentration of IL-6 in the striatum compared to the other two groups. At the neurochemical level (Experiment 5), the socially defeated hamsters mainly displayed reductions of dopamine, dopamine metabolites, and 5-HT levels in the striatum and decreased level of 5-HT in the hippocampus. In Experiment 6, an increase in the spine density of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons was specifically observed in the “social threat” group. Collectively, our

  11. Grass Carp Follisatin: Molecular Cloning, Functional Characterization, Dopamine D1 Regulation at Pituitary Level, and Implication in Growth Hormone Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger S. K. Fung

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Activin is involved in pituitary hormone regulation and its pituitary actions can be nullified by local production of its binding protein follistatin. In our recent study with grass carp, local release of growth hormone (GH was shown to induce activin expression at pituitary level, which in turn could exert an intrapituitary feedback to inhibit GH synthesis and secretion. To further examine the activin/follistatin system in the carp pituitary, grass carp follistatin was cloned and confirmed to be single-copy gene widely expressed at tissue level. At the pituitary level, follistatin signals could be located in carp somatotrophs, gonadotrophs, and lactotrophs. Functional expression also revealed that carp follistatin was effective in neutralizing activin’s action in stimulating target promoter with activin-responsive elements. In grass carp pituitary cells, follistatin co-treatment was found to revert activin inhibition on GH mRNA expression. Meanwhile, follistatin mRNA levels could be up-regulated by local production of activin but the opposite was true for dopaminergic activation with dopamine (DA or its agonist apomorphine. Since GH stimulation by DA via pituitary D1 receptor is well-documented in fish models, the receptor specificity for follistatin regulation by DA was also investigated. Using a pharmacological approach, the inhibitory effect of DA on follistatin gene expression was confirmed to be mediated by pituitary D1 but not D2 receptor. Furthermore, activation of D1 receptor by the D1-specific agonist SKF77434 was also effective in blocking follistatin mRNA expression induced by activin and GH treatment both in carp pituitary cells as well as in carp somatotrophs enriched by density gradient centrifugation. These results, as a whole, suggest that activin can interact with dopaminergic input from the hypothalamus to regulate follistatin expression in carp pituitary, which may contribute to GH regulation by activin/follistatin system

  12. Progressive effects of silver nanoparticles on hormonal regulation of reproduction in male rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dziendzikowska, K.; Krawczyńska, A.; Oczkowski, M.; Królikowski, T.; Brzóska, K.; Lankoff, A.; Dziendzikowski, M.; Stępkowski, T.; Kruszewski, M.

    2016-01-01

    The growing use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in various applications, including consumer, agriculture and medicine products, has raised many concerns about the potential risks of nanoparticles (NPs) to human health and the environment. An increasing body of evidence suggests that AgNPs may have adverse effects of humans, thus the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of AgNPs on the male reproductive system. Silver particles (20 nm AgNPs (groups Ag I and Ag II) and 200 nm Ag sub-micron particles (SPs) (group Ag III)) were administered intravenously to male Wistar rats at a dose of 5 (groups Ag I and Ag III) or 10 (group Ag II) mg/kg of body weight. The biological material was sampled 24 h, 7 days and 28 days after injection. The obtained results revealed that the AgNPs had altered the luteinising hormone concentration in the plasma and the sex hormone concentration in the plasma and testes. Plasma and intratesticular levels of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone were significantly decreased both 7 and 28 days after treatment. No change in the prolactin and sex hormone-binding globulin concentration was observed. Exposure of the animals to AgNPs resulted in a considerable decrease in 5α-reductase type 1 and the aromatase protein level in the testis. Additionally, expression analysis of genes involved in steroidogenesis and the steroids metabolism revealed significant down-regulation of Star, Cyp11a1, Hsd3b1, Hsd17b3 and Srd5a1 mRNAs in AgNPs/AgSPs-exposed animals. The present study demonstrates the potential adverse effect on the hormonal regulation of the male reproductive function following AgNP/AgSP administration, in particular alterations of the sex steroid balance and expression of genes involved in steroidogenesis and the steroids metabolism. - Highlights: • Assessment of the toxic effects of AgNPs/AgSPs on the regulation of male reproductive function • AgNP −/AgSP-induced alterations of sex steroid status in male Wistar rats.

  13. Progressive effects of silver nanoparticles on hormonal regulation of reproduction in male rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dziendzikowska, K., E-mail: k.dziendzikowska@gmail.com [Division of Nutrition Physiology, Department of Dietetics, Faculty of Human Nutrition and Consumer Science, Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Nowoursynowska 159C, 02-776 Warsaw (Poland); Krawczyńska, A. [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, The Kielanowski Institute of Animal Physiology and Nutrition, Polish Academy of Sciences, Instytucka 3, 05-110 Jabłonna (Poland); Oczkowski, M.; Królikowski, T. [Division of Nutrition Physiology, Department of Dietetics, Faculty of Human Nutrition and Consumer Science, Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Nowoursynowska 159C, 02-776 Warsaw (Poland); Brzóska, K. [Centre for Radiobiology and Biological Dosimetry, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw (Poland); Lankoff, A. [Centre for Radiobiology and Biological Dosimetry, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw (Poland); Department of Radiobiology and Immunology, Institute of Biology, Jan Kochanowski University, Świetokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Dziendzikowski, M. [Airworthiness Division, Air Force Institute of Technology, Ks. Boleslawa 6, 01-494 Warsaw (Poland); Stępkowski, T. [Centre for Radiobiology and Biological Dosimetry, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw (Poland); Kruszewski, M. [Department of Medical Biology and Translational Research, Faculty of Medicine, University of Information Technology and Management, Sucharskiego 2, 35-225 Rzeszów (Poland); Department of Molecular Biology and Translational Research, Institute of Rural Health, Jaczewskiego 2, 20-090 Lublin (Poland); and others

    2016-12-15

    The growing use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in various applications, including consumer, agriculture and medicine products, has raised many concerns about the potential risks of nanoparticles (NPs) to human health and the environment. An increasing body of evidence suggests that AgNPs may have adverse effects of humans, thus the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of AgNPs on the male reproductive system. Silver particles (20 nm AgNPs (groups Ag I and Ag II) and 200 nm Ag sub-micron particles (SPs) (group Ag III)) were administered intravenously to male Wistar rats at a dose of 5 (groups Ag I and Ag III) or 10 (group Ag II) mg/kg of body weight. The biological material was sampled 24 h, 7 days and 28 days after injection. The obtained results revealed that the AgNPs had altered the luteinising hormone concentration in the plasma and the sex hormone concentration in the plasma and testes. Plasma and intratesticular levels of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone were significantly decreased both 7 and 28 days after treatment. No change in the prolactin and sex hormone-binding globulin concentration was observed. Exposure of the animals to AgNPs resulted in a considerable decrease in 5α-reductase type 1 and the aromatase protein level in the testis. Additionally, expression analysis of genes involved in steroidogenesis and the steroids metabolism revealed significant down-regulation of Star, Cyp11a1, Hsd3b1, Hsd17b3 and Srd5a1 mRNAs in AgNPs/AgSPs-exposed animals. The present study demonstrates the potential adverse effect on the hormonal regulation of the male reproductive function following AgNP/AgSP administration, in particular alterations of the sex steroid balance and expression of genes involved in steroidogenesis and the steroids metabolism. - Highlights: • Assessment of the toxic effects of AgNPs/AgSPs on the regulation of male reproductive function • AgNP −/AgSP-induced alterations of sex steroid status in male Wistar rats.

  14. Hypermetabolic Conversion of Plant Oil into Water: Endothermic Biochemical Process Stimulated by Juvenile Hormone in the European Firebug, Pyrrhocoris apterus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sláma, Karel; Lukáš, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The physiological and biochemical mechanisms that enable insects to feed on dry food to secure enough water for larval growth were investigated. The study was carried out with a plethora of physiological methods, ranging from the simple volumetric determination of O 2 consumption and water intake to more advanced methods such as scanning microrespirography and thermovision imaging of insect's body temperature. The experiments were done on the European firebug, Pyrrhocoris apterus , which feeds exclusively on dry linden seeds. In order to survive, it needs to drink water or suck a sap from plants occasionally. It was found that the young larval instars compensate the occasional water deficiency by the increased production of metabolic water. The juvenile hormone (JH)-dependent production of metabolic water, which was previously found in other species consuming dry food, was achieved in P. apterus by total metabolic combustion of the dietary lipid (neutral seed oil). The water-producing, hypermetabolic larvae were heated from inside by endothermic energy released from the uncoupling of oxidation from oxidative phosphorylation. The "warm", hypermetabolic larvae burning the dietary oil into CO 2 and water showed the increased rates of respiratory metabolism. Microrespirographic recording of these larvae revealed the ratio of the respiratory quotient (RQ, CO 2 /O 2 ) of 0.7, which indicated the breakdown of a pure triglyceride. The warm hypermetabolic larvae could be easily spotted and distinguished from the "cold" larvae on the screen of a thermovision camera. The last instar larvae lacking the JH were always only cold. They metabolized a carbohydrate substrate exclusively (RQ = 1.0), while the dietary lipid was stored in the fat body. In comparison with the hypermetabolic larvae of some other species fed on dry food, which exhibited the highest rates of O 2 consumption ever recorded in a living organism (10-20 mL O 2 /g per hour), the metabolic difference between the

  15. Interplay of oxytocin, vasopressin, and sex hormones in the regulation of social recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor, Christopher S; Phan, Anna; Clipperton-Allen, Amy E; Kavaliers, Martin; Choleris, Elena

    2012-02-01

    Social Recognition is a fundamental skill that forms the basis of behaviors essential to the proper functioning of pair or group living in most social species. We review here various neurobiological and genetic studies that point to an interplay of oxytocin (OT), arginine-vasopressin (AVP), and the gonadal hormones, estrogens and testosterone, in the mediation of social recognition. Results of a number of studies have shown that OT and its actions at the medial amygdala seem to be essential for social recognition in both sexes. Estrogens facilitate social recognition, possibly by regulating OT production in the hypothalamus and the OT receptors at the medial amygdala. Estrogens also affect social recognition on a rapid time scale, likely through nongenomic actions. The mechanisms of these rapid effects are currently unknown but available evidence points at the hippocampus as the possible site of action. Male rodents seem to be more dependent on AVP acting at the level of the lateral septum for social recognition than female rodents. Results of various studies suggest that testosterone and its metabolites (including estradiol) influence social recognition in males primarily through the AVP V1a receptor. Overall, it appears that gonadal hormone modulation of OT and AVP regulates and fine tunes social recognition and those behaviors that depend upon it (e.g., social bonds, social hierarchies) in a sex specific manner. This points at an important role for these neuroendocrine systems in the regulation of the sex differences that are evident in social behavior and of sociality as a whole.

  16. Specific regulation of thermosensitive lipid droplet fusion by a nuclear hormone receptor pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiwei; Li, Qi; Kong, Yuanyuan; Wu, Shuang; Cui, Qingpo; Zhang, Mingming; Zhang, Shaobing O

    2017-08-15

    Nuclear receptors play important roles in regulating fat metabolism and energy production in humans. The regulatory functions and endogenous ligands of many nuclear receptors are still unidentified, however. Here, we report that CYP-37A1 (ortholog of human cytochrome P450 CYP4V2), EMB-8 (ortholog of human P450 oxidoreductase POR), and DAF-12 (homolog of human nuclear receptors VDR/LXR) constitute a hormone synthesis and nuclear receptor pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans This pathway specifically regulates the thermosensitive fusion of fat-storing lipid droplets. CYP-37A1, together with EMB-8, synthesizes a lipophilic hormone not identical to Δ7-dafachronic acid, which represses the fusion-promoting function of DAF-12. CYP-37A1 also negatively regulates thermotolerance and lifespan at high temperature in a DAF-12-dependent manner. Human CYP4V2 can substitute for CYP-37A1 in C. elegans This finding suggests the existence of a conserved CYP4V2-POR-nuclear receptor pathway that functions in converting multilocular lipid droplets to unilocular ones in human cells; misregulation of this pathway may lead to pathogenic fat storage.

  17. Comparative metabolism of branched-chain amino acids to precursors of juvenile hormone biogenesis in corpora allata of lepidopterous versus nonlepidopterous insects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brindle, P.A.; Schooley, D.A.; Tsai, L.W.; Baker, F.C.

    1988-08-05

    Comparative studies were performed on the role of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) in juvenile hormone (JH) biosynthesis using several lepidopterous and nonlepidopterous insects. Corpora cardiaca-corpora allata complexes (CC-CA, the corpora allata being the organ of JH biogenesis) were maintained in culture medium containing a uniformly /sup 14/C-labeled BCAA, together with (methyl-/sup 3/H)methionine as mass marker for JH quantification. BCAA catabolism was quantified by directly analyzing the medium for the presence of /sup 14/C-labeled propionate and/or acetate, while JHs were extracted, purified by liquid chromatography, and subjected to double-label liquid scintillation counting. Our results indicate that active BCAA catabolism occurs within the CC-CA of lepidopterans, and this efficiently provides propionyl-CoA (from isoleucine or valine) for the biosynthesis of the ethyl branches of JH I and II. Acetyl-CoA, formed from isoleucine or leucine catabolism, is also utilized by lepidopteran CC-CA for biosynthesizing JH III and the acetate-derived portions of the ethyl-branched JHs. In contrast, CC-CA of nonlepidopterans fail to catabolize BCAA. Consequently, exogenous isoleucine or leucine does not serve as a carbon source for the biosynthesis of JH III by these glands, and no propionyl-CoA is produced for genesis of ethyl-branched JHs. This is the first observation of a tissue-specific metabolic difference which in part explains why these novel homosesquiterpenoids exist in lepidopterans, but not in nonlepidopterans.

  18. Effects of sex steroid hormones, thyroid hormone levels, and insulin regulation on thyrotoxic periodic paralysis in Chinese men

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wang; Changsheng, Chen; Jiangfang, Fu; Bin, Gao; Nanyan, Zhang; Xiaomiao, Li; Deqiang, Li; Ying, Xing; Wensong, Zai; Qiuhe, Ji

    2010-01-01

    Our study is to determine the expression of thyroid hormone, sex hormone, insulin, and C-peptide in Chinese male patients with thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP). This study covered 102 patients with hyperthyroidism from Xijing Hospital. According to whether occurrence of TPP or not, patients were divided into two groups (those that were hyperthyroid with and without TPP) that were, matched with age, blood pressure, urea, and creatinine. We found the body mass index (BMI) in patients with TP...

  19. The role of gut hormones and the hypothalamus in appetite regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Simpson, Katherine A; Minnion, James S; Shillito, Joyceline C; Bloom, Stephen R

    2010-01-01

    The World Health Organisation has estimated that by 2015 approximately 2.3 billion adults will be overweight and more than 700 million obese. Obesity is associated with an increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular events, stroke and cancer. The hypothalamus is a crucial region for integrating signals from central and peripheral pathways and plays a major role in appetite regulation. In addition, there are reciprocal connections with the brainstem and higher cortical centres. In the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, there are two major neuronal populations which stimulate or inhibit food intake and influence energy homeostasis. Within the brainstem, the dorsal vagal complex plays a role in the interpretation and relaying of peripheral signals. Gut hormones act peripherally to modulate digestion and absorption of nutrients. However, they also act as neurotransmitters within the central nervous system to control food intake. Peptide YY, pancreatic polypeptide, glucagon-like peptide-1 and oxyntomodulin suppress appetite, whilst ghrelin increases appetite through afferent vagal fibres to the caudal brainstem or directly to the hypothalamus. A better understanding of the role of these gut hormones may offer the opportunity to develop successful treatments for obesity. Here we review the current understanding of the role of gut hormones and the hypothalamus on food intake and body weight control.

  20. Juvenile angiofibroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasal tumor; Angiofibroma - juvenile; Benign nasal tumor; Juvenile nasal angiofibroma; JNA ... Juvenile angiofibroma is not very common. It is most often found in adolescent boys. The tumor contains many blood ...

  1. Steroid hormone regulation of EMP2 expression and localization in the endometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Carmen J

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tetraspan protein epithelial membrane protein-2 (EMP2, which mediates surface display of diverse proteins, is required for endometrial competence in blastocyst implantation, and is uniquely correlated with poor survival from endometrial adenocarcinoma tumors. Because EMP2 is differentially expressed in the various stages of the murine and human estrous cycle, we tested the hypothesis that the steroid hormones progesterone and estrogen influence EMP2 expression and localization. Methods Frozen human proliferative and secretory endometrium were collected and analyzed for EMP2 expression using SDS-PAGE/Western blot analysis. The response of EMP2 to progesterone and estradiol was determined using a combination of real-time PCR, SDS-PAGE/Western blot analysis, and confocal immunofluorescence in the human endometrial carcinoma cell line RL95-2. To confirm the in vitro results, ovariectomized mice were treated with progesterone or estradiol, and EMP2 expression was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Results Within normal human endometrium, EMP2 expression is upregulated in the secretory phase relative to the proliferative phase. To understand the role of steroid hormones on EMP2 expression, we utilized RL95-2 cells, which express both estrogen and progesterone receptors. In RL95-2 cells, both estradiol and progesterone induced EMP2 mRNA expression, but only progesterone induced EMP2 protein expression. To compare steroid hormone regulation of EMP2 between humans and mice, we analyzed EMP2 expression in ovarectomized mice. Similar to results observed in humans, progesterone upregulated endometrial EMP2 expression and induced EMP2 translocation to the plasma membrane. Estradiol did not promote translocation to the cell surface, but moderately induced EMP2 expression in cytoplasmic compartments in vivo. Conclusion These findings suggest that targeting of EMP2 to specific locations under the influence of these steroid hormones may

  2. Energy homeostasis and appetite regulating hormones as predictors of weight loss in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Rebecca L; Wood, Lisa G; Collins, Clare E; Morgan, Philip J; Callister, Robin

    2016-06-01

    Sex differences in weight loss are often seen despite using the same weight loss program. There has been relatively little investigation of physiological influences on weight loss success in males and females, such as energy homeostasis and appetite regulating hormones. The aims were to 1) characterise baseline plasma leptin, ghrelin and adiponectin concentrations in overweight and obese males and females, and 2) determine whether baseline concentrations of these hormones predict weight loss in males and females. Subjects were overweight or obese (BMI 25-40 kg/m(2)) adults aged 18-60 years. Weight was measured at baseline, and after three and six months participation in a weight loss program. Baseline concentrations of leptin, adiponectin and ghrelin were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). An independent t-test or non-parametric equivalent was used to determine any differences between sex. Linear regression determined whether baseline hormone concentrations were predictors of six-month weight change. Females had significantly higher baseline concentrations of leptin, adiponectin and unacylated ghrelin as well as ratios of leptin:adiponectin and leptin:ghrelin. The ratio of acylated:unacylated ghrelin was significantly higher in males. In males and females, a higher baseline concentration of unacylated ghrelin predicted greater weight loss at six months. Additionally in females, higher baseline total ghrelin predicted greater weight loss and a higher ratio of leptin:ghrelin predicted weight gain at six months. A higher pre-weight-loss plasma concentration of unacylated ghrelin is a modest predictor of weight loss success in males and females, while a higher leptin:ghrelin ratio is a predictor of weight loss failure in females. Further investigation is required into what combinations and concentrations of these hormones are optimal for weight loss success. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of metabolic regulation on microvascular permeability to small and large molecules in short-term juvenile diabetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parving, H H; Noer, Ivan; Deckert, Toke

    1976-01-01

    injected 125I-labelled human serum albumin; GFR was measured on the forearm by straingauge plethysmography and CDS for 51Cr-EDTA clearance; CFC was measured on the forearm by straingauge plethysmography and CDC, for 51Cr-EDTA was determined in the jyperaemic anterio tibial muscle by the local clearance......The microvascular permeability to small and large molecules was studied during good and poor metabolic regulation in ten short duration juvenile diabetics. The following variables were measured; daily urinary albumin and beta2-microglobulin-excretion rates, whole body transcapillary escape rate...... of albumin (TER), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), capillary filtration coefficient (CFC), and capillary diffusion capacity (CDC). The urinary albumin and beta2-microglobulin concentration were measured by sensitive radioimmunoassays; TER was detemined from the initial disappearance of intravenously...

  4. Hypothalamic roles of mTOR complex I: Integration of nutrient and hormone signals to regulate energy homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammalian or mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) senses nutrient, energy, and hormone signals to regulate metabolism and energy homeostasis. mTOR activity in the hypothalamus, which is associated with changes in energy status, plays a critical role in the regulation of food intake and body weight...

  5. Studies on the mechanism of quinone action on hormonal regulation of metabolism in the rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, E.Y.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanism of quinone actions in liver cell metabolism had been investigated using menadione as a model compound. Previous reports suggested that quinones and free radicals could produce perturbations in cellular calcium homeostasis. Since calcium plays an important role in the regulation of cellular metabolic processes, then regulation of cytosolic calcium concentrations, and thus of cellular metabolism, by calcium-mobilizing hormones such as phenylephrine and vasopressin could possibly be modified by quinones such as menadione. Methods used to approach this hypothesis included the assay for activation of glycogen phosphorylase, an indirect index of calcium mobilization; the determination of calcium mobilization with 45 Ca efflux exchange and with fluorescent calcium indicator fura-2; and the measurement of phosphatidylinositides, an important link in the membrane-associated receptor-mediated signal transduction mechanism

  6. Opposite effect of phencyclidine on activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) in juvenile and adult limbic rat brain regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Hansen, Henrik H; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2010-01-01

    -regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) and parvalbumin mRNA expression in juvenile and adult rats. Arc is a marker for excitatory neurotransmission. Parvalbumin is a marker for GABAergic neurotransmission, known to be reduced in postmortem brains of schizophrenics. PCP reduced parvalbumin mRNA expression...

  7. Action of the schistosomotic spleen in male mices on the regulation of thyroid hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves, S.R.S.; Silva, I.M.S.; Pereira, S.S.L.; Lima Filho, G.L.; Catanho, M.T.J.A.; Neves, E.S.; Silveira, M.F.G.

    1997-01-01

    For the purpose to study the action of the schistosomotic spleen on the regulation of TSH, T4 and albumin levels in serum, spleens from adults mice infected by Schistosoma mansoni were homogeneized, centrifuged and cromatographed in a column of Sephadex G-100, resulting in two proteans fractions (I and II). The biologic activity was determinated through the administration of the fractions by intraperitoneal way (IP), in male mice aged 27-30 days, in a period of three following days. Five days after the last administration, the animals were sacrified and their blood was collected for obtainment of serum and determination of TSH, T4 and albumin levels. Obtained results showed that the albumin levels no change when compared to control and that fraction I infected change the TSH and T4 levels, but the fraction II infected no change this levels. These results suggest that spleens from mice infected by S. mansoni have a factor that modifies the hormonal regulation in level hypophysial and the synthesis of thyroid hormones (T4), changing the basal metabolism. The seric levels of TSH and T4 were determined by radioimmunoassay using I-125. (author). 12 refs., 1 tab

  8. Regulation of pituitary hormones and cell proliferation by components of the extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Paez-Pereda

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix is a three-dimensional network of proteins, glycosaminoglycans and other macromolecules. It has a structural support function as well as a role in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. The extracellular matrix conveys signals through membrane receptors called integrins and plays an important role in pituitary physiology and tumorigenesis. There is a differential expression of extracellular matrix components and integrins during the pituitary development in the embryo and during tumorigenesis in the adult. Different extracellular matrix components regulate adrenocorticotropin at the level of the proopiomelanocortin gene transcription. The extracellular matrix also controls the proliferation of adrenocorticotropin-secreting tumor cells. On the other hand, laminin regulates the production of prolactin. Laminin has a dynamic pattern of expression during prolactinoma development with lower levels in the early pituitary hyperplasia and a strong reduction in fully grown prolactinomas. Therefore, the expression of extracellular matrix components plays a role in pituitary tumorigenesis. On the other hand, the remodeling of the extracellular matrix affects pituitary cell proliferation. Matrix metalloproteinase activity is very high in all types of human pituitary adenomas. Matrix metalloproteinase secreted by pituitary cells can release growth factors from the extracellular matrix that, in turn, control pituitary cell proliferation and hormone secretion. In summary, the differential expression of extracellular matrix components, integrins and matrix metalloproteinase contributes to the control of pituitary hormone production and cell proliferation during tumorigenesis.

  9. BIOCHEMICAL MARKERS OF BONE RESORPTION AND HORMONAL REGULATION OF BONE METABOLISM FOLLOWING LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Buzulina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Comparative evaluation of two biochemical markers of bone resorption and hormonal regulation of bone metabolism in liver recipients. Methods and results. Bоne densitometry of L2–L4 and neck of femur, serum level of some hormones (PTH, vitamin D3, estradiol, testosterone regulating osteoclastogenesis as well as com- parative analyses of two bone resorption markers β-crosslaps and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase type 5b (TRAP-5b were fulfilled in patients after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT. In 1 month after OLT bone density reduction of L2–L4 and neck of femur; decrease of vitamin D3, estradiol in women, testosterone in men and increase levels of bone resorption markers were observed. In 1 and 2 years after OLT the rise of bone density, increased levels of PTH, estradiol, testosterone and decreased β-crosslaps levels were revealed, while vitamin D3 and TRAP-5b levels remained stable. Conclusion. TRAP-5b was found to be a more speciffic marker of bone resorption, independent from collagen metabolism in liver. Osteoporosis defined in long-term period after OLT was associated with higher TRAP-5b and revialed in women with low estradiol level. 

  10. BDNF and glucocorticoids regulate corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) homeostasis in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanneteau, Freddy D; Lambert, W Marcus; Ismaili, Naima; Bath, Kevin G; Lee, Francis S; Garabedian, Michael J; Chao, Moses V

    2012-01-24

    Regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is critical for adaptation to environmental changes. The principle regulator of the HPA axis is corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH), which is made in the parventricular nucleus and is an important target of negative feedback by glucocorticoids. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate CRH are not fully understood. Disruption of normal HPA axis activity is a major risk factor of neuropsychiatric disorders in which decreased expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) has been documented. To investigate the role of the GR in CRH neurons, we have targeted the deletion of the GR, specifically in the parventricular nucleus. Impairment of GR function in the parventricular nucleus resulted in an enhancement of CRH expression and an up-regulation of hypothalamic levels of BDNF and disinhibition of the HPA axis. BDNF is a stress and activity-dependent factor involved in many activities modulated by the HPA axis. Significantly, ectopic expression of BDNF in vivo increased CRH, whereas reduced expression of BDNF, or its receptor TrkB, decreased CRH expression and normal HPA functions. We find the differential regulation of CRH relies upon the cAMP response-element binding protein coactivator CRTC2, which serves as a switch for BDNF and glucocorticoids to direct the expression of CRH.

  11. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Regulates Expression of the DNA Damage Repair Gene, Fanconi anemia A, in Pituitary Gonadotroph Cells1

    OpenAIRE

    Larder, Rachel; Chang, Lynda; Clinton, Michael; Brown, Pamela

    2004-01-01

    Gonadal function is critically dependant on regulated secretion of the gonadotropin hormones from anterior pituitary gonadotroph cells. Gonadotropin biosynthesis and release is triggered by the binding of hypothalamic GnRH to GnRH receptor expressed on the gonadotroph cell surface. The repertoire of regulatory molecules involved in this process are still being defined. We used the mouse LβT2 gonadotroph cell line, which expresses both gonadotropin hormones, as a model to investigate GnRH regu...

  12. Differential regulation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and Na+,K+ -ATPase in gills of striped bass, Morone saxatilis: effect of salinity and hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Steffen; Jensen, Lars Nørholm; Tipsmark, Christian Kølbaek

    2007-01-01

    -regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 was stimulated by EGF but not affected by IGF-I. This study is the first to report a branchial EGF response and to demonstrate a functional ERK 1/2 pathway in the teleost gill. In conclusion, CFTR and Na(+),K(+) -ATPase are differentially regulated by salinity and hormones in gills...

  13. Changes of hormones regulating electrolyte metabolism after space flight and hypokinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, L.; Fickova, M.; Lichardus, B.; Kvetnansky, R.; Carrey, R. M.; Grigoriev, A.; Popova, I. A.; Tigranian, R. A.; Noskov, V. B.

    The changes of hormones in plasma involved in the body fluid regulation were studied in human subjects during and after space flights in relation to redistribution of body fluids in the state of weightlessness. Since hypokinesia was used as a model for simulation of some effects of the stay in microgravity the plasma hormone levels in rats exposed to hypokinesia were also investigated. Plasma aldosterone values showed great individual variations during the first inflight days, the increased levels were observed with prolongation of space flights. The important elevation was found in the recovery period, however it was interesting to note, that in some cosmonauts with repeated exposure to space flight, the postflight plasma aldosterone levels were not elevated. The urine excretion of aldosterone was increased inflight, however in postflight period the decrease or increase were found in the first 1-5 days. The increase of plasma renin activity was observed in flight and postflight period. The rats were exposed to hypokinesia (forced restriction of motor activity) for 1, 7 and 60 days and urine was collected during last 24 hours. The animals were sacrificed and the concentration of electrolytes and of levels of corticosterone aldosteron (A), ANF and plasma-renin activity (PRA) were determined in plasma. In urine excretion of sodium and potassium were estimated. An important increase of plasma renin activity and aldosterone concentration was found after short-term hypokinesia (1 day). These hormonal values appear to decrease with time (7 days) and are not significantly different from controls after long-term hypokinesia (60 days). A decrease of values ANF in plasma was observed after 1 and 7 days hypokinesia. After prolonged hypokinesia a decrease of sodium plasma concentration was observed. The excretion of sodium in urine was higher in long-term hypokinetic animals. There were no significant changes of plasma potassium levels in rats exposed to hypokinesia, however

  14. Bile acids are important direct and indirect regulators of the secretion of appetite- and metabolism-regulating hormones from the gut and pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich; Albrechtsen, Nicolai Jacob Wewer; Larsen, Olav

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Bile acids (BAs) facilitate fat absorption and may play a role in glucose and metabolism regulation, stimulating the secretion of gut hormones. The relative importance and mechanisms involved in BA-stimulated secretion of appetite and metabolism regulating hormones from the gut...... and pancreas is not well described and was the purpose of this study. METHODS: The effects of bile acids on the secretion of gut and pancreatic hormones was studied in rats and compared to the most well described nutritional secretagogue: glucose. The molecular mechanisms that underlie the secretion...... was studied by isolated perfused rat and mouse small intestine and pancreas preparations and supported by immunohistochemistry, expression analysis, and pharmacological studies. RESULTS: Bile acids robustly stimulate secretion of not only the incretin hormones, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP...

  15. TBLR1 regulates the expression of nuclear hormone receptor co-repressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Stuart

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription is regulated by a complex interaction of activators and repressors. The effectors of repression are large multimeric complexes which contain both the repressor proteins that bind to transcription factors and a number of co-repressors that actually mediate transcriptional silencing either by inhibiting the basal transcription machinery or by recruiting chromatin-modifying enzymes. Results TBLR1 [GenBank: NM024665] is a co-repressor of nuclear hormone transcription factors. A single highly conserved gene encodes a small family of protein molecules. Different isoforms are produced by differential exon utilization. Although the ORF of the predominant form contains only 1545 bp, the human gene occupies ~200 kb of genomic DNA on chromosome 3q and contains 16 exons. The genomic sequence overlaps with the putative DC42 [GenBank: NM030921] locus. The murine homologue is structurally similar and is also located on Chromosome 3. TBLR1 is closely related (79% homology at the mRNA level to TBL1X and TBL1Y, which are located on Chromosomes X and Y. The expression of TBLR1 overlaps but is distinct from that of TBL1. An alternatively spliced form of TBLR1 has been demonstrated in human material and it too has an unique pattern of expression. TBLR1 and the homologous genes interact with proteins that regulate the nuclear hormone receptor family of transcription factors. In resting cells TBLR1 is primarily cytoplasmic but after perturbation the protein translocates to the nucleus. TBLR1 co-precipitates with SMRT, a co-repressor of nuclear hormone receptors, and co-precipitates in complexes immunoprecipitated by antiserum to HDAC3. Cells engineered to over express either TBLR1 or N- and C-terminal deletion variants, have elevated levels of endogenous N-CoR. Co-transfection of TBLR1 and SMRT results in increased expression of SMRT. This co-repressor undergoes ubiquitin-mediated degradation and we suggest that the stabilization of

  16. Hypothalamic regulation of thyroid-stimulating hormone and prolactin release : the role of thyrotrophin-releasing hormone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A.C. van Haasteren (Goedele)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThyrotrophin-releasing-hormone (TRH), a tripeptide, is produced by hypothalamic neurons and transported along their axons to the median eminence (ME). From there it is released at nerve terminals into hypophyseal portal blood. It is then transported to the anterior pituitary gland where

  17. Hormonal regulation of aquaporin 3: opposing actions of prolactin and cortisol in tilapia gill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breves, Jason P; Inokuchi, Mayu; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Seale, Andre P; Hunt, Bethany L; Watanabe, Soichi; Lerner, Darren T; Kaneko, Toyoji; Grau, E Gordon

    2016-09-01

    Aquaporins (Aqps) are expressed within key osmoregulatory tissues where they mediate the movement of water and selected solutes across cell membranes. We leveraged the functional plasticity of Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) gill epithelium to examine how Aqp3, an aquaglyceroporin, is regulated in response to osmoregulatory demands. Particular attention was paid to the actions of critical osmoregulatory hormones, namely, prolactin (Prl), growth hormone and cortisol. Branchial aqp3 mRNA levels were modulated following changes in environmental salinity, with enhanced aqp3 mRNA expression upon transfer from seawater to freshwater (FW). Accordingly, extensive Aqp3 immunoreactivity was localized to cell membranes of branchial epithelium in FW-acclimated animals. Upon transferring hypophysectomized tilapia to FW, we identified that a pituitary factor(s) is required for Aqp3 expression in FW. Replacement with ovine Prl (oPrl) was sufficient to stimulate Aqp3 expression in hypophysectomized animals held in FW, an effect blocked by coinjection with cortisol. Both oPrl and native tilapia Prls (tPrl177 and tPrl188) stimulated aqp3 in incubated gill filaments in a concentration-related manner. Consistent with in vivo responses, coincubation with cortisol blocked oPrl-stimulated aqp3 expression in vitro Our data indicate that Prl and cortisol act directly upon branchial epithelium to regulate Aqp3 in tilapia. Thus, within the context of the diverse actions of Prl on hydromineral balance in vertebrates, we define a new role for Prl as a regulator of Aqp expression. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  18. Action of specific thyroid hormone receptor α(1) and β(1) antagonists in the central and peripheral regulation of thyroid hormone metabolism in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beeren, Hermina C; Kwakkel, Joan; Ackermans, Mariëtte T; Wiersinga, Wilmar M; Fliers, Eric; Boelen, Anita

    2012-12-01

    The iodine-containing drug amiodarone (Amio) and its noniodine containing analogue dronedarone (Dron) are potent antiarrhythmic drugs. Previous in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that the major metabolite of Amio, desethylamiodarone, acts as a thyroid hormone receptor (TR) α(1) and β(1) antagonist, whereas the major metabolite of Dron debutyldronedarone acts as a selective TRα(1) antagonist. In the present study, Amio and Dron were used as tools to discriminate between TRα(1) or TRβ(1) regulated genes in central and peripheral thyroid hormone metabolism. Three groups of male rats received either Amio, Dron, or vehicle by daily intragastric administration for 2 weeks. We assessed the effects of treatment on triiodothyronine (T(3)) and thyroxine (T(4)) plasma and tissue concentrations, deiodinase type 1, 2, and 3 mRNA expressions and activities, and thyroid hormone transporters monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), monocarboxylate transporter 10 (MCT10), and organic anion transporter 1C1 (OATP1C1). Amio treatment decreased serum T(3), while serum T(4) and thyrotropin (TSH) increased compared to Dron-treated and control rats. At the central level of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, Amio treatment decreased hypothalamic thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) expression, while increasing pituitary TSHβ and MCT10 mRNA expression. Amio decreased the pituitary D2 activity. By contrast, Dron treatment resulted in decreased hypothalamic TRH mRNA expression only. Upon Amio treatment, liver T(3) concentration decreased substantially compared to Dron and control rats (50%, p<0.01), but liver T(4) concentration was unaffected. In addition, liver D1, mRNA, and activity decreased, while the D3 activity and mRNA increased. Liver MCT8, MCT10, and OATP1C1 mRNA expression were similar between groups. Our results suggest an important role for TRα1 in the regulation of hypothalamic TRH mRNA expression, whereas TRβ plays a dominant role in pituitary and liver thyroid

  19. Novel NAD+-Farnesal Dehydrogenase from Polygonum minus Leaves. Purification and Characterization of Enzyme in Juvenile Hormone III Biosynthetic Pathway in Plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad-Faris Seman-Kamarulzaman

    Full Text Available Juvenile Hormone III is of great concern due to negative effects on major developmental and reproductive maturation in insect pests. Thus, the elucidation of enzymes involved JH III biosynthetic pathway has become increasing important in recent years. One of the enzymes in the JH III biosynthetic pathway that remains to be isolated and characterized is farnesal dehydrogenase, an enzyme responsible to catalyze the oxidation of farnesal into farnesoic acid. A novel NAD+-farnesal dehydrogenase of Polygonum minus was purified (315-fold to apparent homogeneity in five chromatographic steps. The purification procedures included Gigacap S-Toyopearl 650M, Gigacap Q-Toyopearl 650M, and AF-Blue Toyopearl 650ML, followed by TSK Gel G3000SW chromatographies. The enzyme, with isoelectric point of 6.6 is a monomeric enzyme with a molecular mass of 70 kDa. The enzyme was relatively active at 40°C, but was rapidly inactivated above 45°C. The optimal temperature and pH of the enzyme were found to be 35°C and 9.5, respectively. The enzyme activity was inhibited by sulfhydryl agent, chelating agent, and metal ion. The enzyme was highly specific for farnesal and NAD+. Other terpene aldehydes such as trans- cinnamaldehyde, citral and α- methyl cinnamaldehyde were also oxidized but in lower activity. The Km values for farnesal, citral, trans- cinnamaldehyde, α- methyl cinnamaldehyde and NAD+ were 0.13, 0.69, 0.86, 1.28 and 0.31 mM, respectively. The putative P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase that's highly specific towards farnesal but not to aliphatic aldehydes substrates suggested that the enzyme is significantly different from other aldehyde dehydrogenases that have been reported. The MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS spectrometry further identified two peptides that share similarity to those of previously reported aldehyde dehydrogenases. In conclusion, the P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase may represent a novel plant farnesal dehydrogenase that exhibits distinctive substrate

  20. EFFECT OF ACUTE STRESS ON PLASMA CONCENTRATIONS OF SEX AND STRESS HORMONES IN JUVENILE ALLIGATORS LIVING IN CONTROL AND CONTAMINATED LAKES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental contaminants can act as stressors, inducing elevated circulating concentrations of stress hormones such as corticosterone and cortisol. Development in contaminated eggs has been reported to modify circulating sex steroid hormone concentrations in alligators (Alligat...

  1. miR-1338-5p Modulates Growth Hormone Secretion and Glucose Utilization by Regulating ghitm in Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia (GIFT, Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Jun; Bao, Jing Wen; Li, Hong Xia; Chen, De Ju; He, Jie; Tao, Yi Fan; Xu, Pao

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, non-coding small RNA molecules about 22 nt in length, which could regulate the expressions of target genes and participate in growth and development of organisms. Genetically improved farmed tilapia (GIFT, Oreochromis niloticus ) is an important economic freshwater species in China and the growth performance is one of the main breeding indicators. Growth hormone inducible transmembrane protein ( ghitm ) plays an important role in growth and development of both mammals and invertebrates; however, little studies have been reported on fish. Our previous experiments indicated that miR-1338-5p expression may be negatively correlated with ghitm expression. In this study, we firstly used qRT-PCR and northern blot to verify the expression of miR-1338-5p and ghitm , and determined the binding site of miR-1338-5p in the ghitm 3'-untranslated region (UTR) by luciferase reporter assay. Secondly, juveniles GIFT injected with miR-1338-5p antagomir were used to analyze the regulatory function of the miR-1338-5p- ghitm pair in vivo . The results showed that the ghitm 3'-UTR was complementary to the 5' 2-8-nt site of miR-1338-5p. Inhibition of miR-1338-5p promoted ghitm expression in the pituitary and liver of GIFT. ghitm could interfere in the growth hormone (Gh)-growth hormone receptor (Ghr)-insulin-like growth factor (Igf) signaling pathway by competing with the ghr1 for combination with Gh, and then reduce the growth of GIFT. Moreover, the reduction of Gh in serum may regulate insulin secretion and result in the increasing sugar and fat storage in serum and liver. Our results suggest that miR-1338-5p participates in the growth and development of GIFT through the regulation of ghitm , which provides theoretical support for the study of the fish growth mechanism.

  2. Hormonal and metabolic regulation of tomato fruit sink activity and yield under salinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albacete, Alfonso; Cantero-Navarro, Elena; Balibrea, María E.

    2014-01-01

    Salinization of water and soil has a negative impact on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) productivity by reducing growth of sink organs and by inducing senescence in source leaves. It has been hypothesized that yield stability implies the maintenance or increase of sink activity in the reproductive...... structures, thus contributing to the transport of assimilates from the source leaves through changes in sucrolytic enzymes and their regulation by phytohormones. In this study, classical and functional physiological approaches have been integrated to study the influence of metabolic and hormonal factors...... sucrolytic activities (mainly cwInv and sucrose synthase), sink strength, and fruit weight, whereas the ethylene-releasing compound ethephon had a negative effect in equivalent non-stressed fruits. Fruit yield was increased by both the constitutive expression of CIN1 in the fruits (up to 4-fold) or IPT...

  3. Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) expression and regulation in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langfort, J; Ploug, T; Ihlemann, J

    1998-01-01

    Because the enzymatic regulation of muscle triglyceride metabolism is poorly understood we explored the character and activation of neutral lipase in muscle. Western blotting of isolated rat muscle fibers demonstrated expression of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL). In incubated soleus muscle...... epinephrine increased neutral lipase activity by beta-adrenergic mechanisms involving cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). The increase was paralleled by an increase in glycogen phosphorylase activity and could be abolished by antiserum against HSL. Electrical stimulation caused a transient increase...... in activity of both neutral lipase and glycogen phosphorylase. The increase in lipase activity during contractions was not influenced by sympathectomy or propranolol. Training diminished the epinephrine induced lipase activation in muscle but enhanced the activation as well as the overall concentration...

  4. A Drosophila Genome-Wide Screen Identifies Regulators of Steroid Hormone Production and Developmental Timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas Danielsen, E.; E. Møller, Morten; Yamanaka, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormones control important developmental processes and are linked to many diseases. To systematically identify genes and pathways required for steroid production, we performed a Drosophila genome-wide in vivo RNAi screen and identified 1,906 genes with potential roles in steroidogenesis...... and developmental timing. Here, we use our screen as a resource to identify mechanisms regulating intracellular levels of cholesterol, a substrate for steroidogenesis. We identify a conserved fatty acid elongase that underlies a mechanism that adjusts cholesterol trafficking and steroidogenesis with nutrition...... and developmental programs. In addition, we demonstrate the existence of an autophagosomal cholesterol mobilization mechanism and show that activation of this system rescues Niemann-Pick type C1 deficiency that causes a disorder characterized by cholesterol accumulation. These cholesterol-trafficking mechanisms...

  5. Regulation of feeding behavior and psychomotor activity by corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH in fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouhei eMatsuda

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH is a hypothalamic neuropeptide belonging to a family of neuropeptides that includes urocortins, urotensin I and sauvagine in vertebrates. CRH and urocortin act as anorexigenic factors for satiety regulation in fish. In a goldfish model, intracerebroventricular (ICV administration of CRH has been shown to affect not only food intake, but also locomotor and psychomotor activities. In particular, CRH elicits anxiety-like behavior as an anxiogenic neuropeptide in goldfish, as is the case in rodents. This paper reviews current knowledge of CRH and its related peptides derived from studies of teleost fish, as representative non-mammals, focusing particularly on the role of the CRH system, and examines its significance from a comparative viewpoint.

  6. Isotocin Regulates Growth Hormone but Not Prolactin Release From the Pituitary of Ricefield Eels

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    Wei Yang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The neurohypophyseal hormone oxytocin (Oxt has been shown to stimulate prolactin (Prl synthesis and release from the adenohypophysis in rats. However, little is known about the functional roles of Oxt-like neuropeptides in the adenohypophysis of non-mammalian vertebrates. In this study, cDNAs encoding ricefield eel oxytocin-like receptors (Oxtlr, namely isotocin (Ist receptor 1 (Istr1 and 2 (Istr2, were isolated and specific antisera were generated, respectively. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis detected the presence of both Istr1 and Istr2 in the brain and pituitary, but differential expression in some peripheral tissues, including the liver and kidney, where only Istr1 was detected. In the pituitary, immunoreactive Istr1 and Istr2 were differentially distributed, with the former mainly in adenohypophyseal cell layers adjacent to the neurohypophysis, whereas the latter in peripheral areas of the adenohypophysis. Double immunofluorescent images showed that immunostaining of Istr1, but not Istr2 was localized to growth hormone (Gh cells, but neither of them was expressed in Prl cells. Ist inhibited Gh release in primary pituitary cells of ricefield eels and increased Gh contents in the pituitary gland of ricefield eels at 6 h after in vivo administration. Ist inhibition of Gh release is probably mediated by cAMP, PKC/DAG, and IP3/Ca2+ pathways. In contrast, Ist did not affect either prl gene expression or Prl contents in primary pituitary cells. Results of this study demonstrated that Ist may not be involved in the regulation of Prl, but inhibit Gh release via Istr1 rather than Istr2 in ricefield eels, and provided evidence for the direct regulation of Gh cells by oxytocin-like neuropeptides in the pituitary of non-mammalian vertebrates.

  7. Isotocin Regulates Growth Hormone but Not Prolactin Release From the Pituitary of Ricefield Eels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Zhang, Ning; Shi, Boyang; Zhang, Shen; Zhang, Lihong; Zhang, Weimin

    2018-01-01

    The neurohypophyseal hormone oxytocin (Oxt) has been shown to stimulate prolactin (Prl) synthesis and release from the adenohypophysis in rats. However, little is known about the functional roles of Oxt-like neuropeptides in the adenohypophysis of non-mammalian vertebrates. In this study, cDNAs encoding ricefield eel oxytocin-like receptors (Oxtlr), namely isotocin (Ist) receptor 1 (Istr1) and 2 (Istr2), were isolated and specific antisera were generated, respectively. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis detected the presence of both Istr1 and Istr2 in the brain and pituitary, but differential expression in some peripheral tissues, including the liver and kidney, where only Istr1 was detected. In the pituitary, immunoreactive Istr1 and Istr2 were differentially distributed, with the former mainly in adenohypophyseal cell layers adjacent to the neurohypophysis, whereas the latter in peripheral areas of the adenohypophysis. Double immunofluorescent images showed that immunostaining of Istr1, but not Istr2 was localized to growth hormone (Gh) cells, but neither of them was expressed in Prl cells. Ist inhibited Gh release in primary pituitary cells of ricefield eels and increased Gh contents in the pituitary gland of ricefield eels at 6 h after in vivo administration. Ist inhibition of Gh release is probably mediated by cAMP, PKC/DAG, and IP3/Ca2+ pathways. In contrast, Ist did not affect either prl gene expression or Prl contents in primary pituitary cells. Results of this study demonstrated that Ist may not be involved in the regulation of Prl, but inhibit Gh release via Istr1 rather than Istr2 in ricefield eels, and provided evidence for the direct regulation of Gh cells by oxytocin-like neuropeptides in the pituitary of non-mammalian vertebrates.

  8. New avenues for regulation of lipid metabolism by thyroid hormones and analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senese, Rosalba; Lasala, Pasquale; Leanza, Cristina; de Lange, Pieter

    2014-01-01

    Weight loss due to negative energy balance is a goal in counteracting obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The thyroid is known to be an important regulator of energy metabolism through the action of thyroid hormones (THs). The classic, active TH, 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) acts predominantly by binding to nuclear receptors termed TH receptors (TRs), that recognize TH response elements (TREs) on the DNA, and so regulate transcription. T3 also acts through "non-genomic" pathways that do not necessarily involve TRs. Lipid-lowering therapies have been suggested to have potential benefits, however, the establishment of comprehensive therapeutic strategies is still awaited. One drawback of using T3 in counteracting obesity has been the occurrence of heart rhythm disturbances. These are mediated through one TR, termed TRα. The end of the previous century saw the exploration of TH mimetics that specifically bind to TR beta in order to prevent cardiac disturbances, and TH derivatives such as 3,5-diiodo-L-thyronine (T2), that possess interesting biological activities. Several TH derivatives and functional analogs have low affinity for the TRs, and are suggested to act predominantly through non-genomic pathways. All this has opened new perspectives in thyroid physiology and TH derivative usage as anti-obesity therapies. This review addresses the pros and cons of these compounds, in light of their effects on energy balance regulation and on lipid/cholesterol metabolism.

  9. New Avenues for Regulation of Lipid Metabolism by Thyroid Hormones and Analogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalba eSenese

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Weight loss due to negative energy balance is a goal in counteracting obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The thyroid is known to be an important regulator of energy metabolism through the action of thyroid hormones (THs. The classic, active TH, 3,5,3’-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3 acts predominantly by binding to nuclear receptors termed TH receptors (TRs, that recognize TH response elements (TREs on the DNA, and so regulate transcription. T3 also acts through non-genomic pathways that do not necessarily involve TRs. Lipid-lowering therapies have been suggested to have potential benefits, however, the establishment of comprehensive therapeutic strategies is still awaited. One drawback of using T3 in counteracting obesity has been the occurrence of heart rhythm disturbances. These are mediated through one TR, termed TR alpha. The end of the previous century saw the exploration of TH mimetics that specifically bind to TR beta in order to prevent cardiac disturbances, and TH derivatives such as 3,5-diiodo-L-thyronine (T2, that possess interesting biological activities. Several TH derivatives and functional analogs have low affinity for the TRs, and are suggested to act predominantly through non-genomic pathways. All this has opened new perspectives in thyroid physiology and TH derivative usage as anti-obesity therapies. This review addresses the pros and cons of these compounds, in light of their effects on energy balance regulation and on lipid/cholesterol metabolism.

  10. A role of melanin-concentrating hormone producing neurons in the central regulation of paradoxical sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salin Paul

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptidergic neurons containing the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH and the hypocretins (or orexins are intermingled in the zona incerta, perifornical nucleus and lateral hypothalamic area. Both types of neurons have been implicated in the integrated regulation of energy homeostasis and body weight. Hypocretin neurons have also been involved in sleep-wake regulation and narcolepsy. We therefore sought to determine whether hypocretin and MCH neurons express Fos in association with enhanced paradoxical sleep (PS or REM sleep during the rebound following PS deprivation. Next, we compared the effect of MCH and NaCl intracerebroventricular (ICV administrations on sleep stage quantities to further determine whether MCH neurons play an active role in PS regulation. Results Here we show that the MCH but not the hypocretin neurons are strongly active during PS, evidenced through combined hypocretin, MCH, and Fos immunostainings in three groups of rats (PS Control, PS Deprived and PS Recovery rats. Further, we show that ICV administration of MCH induces a dose-dependant increase in PS (up to 200% and slow wave sleep (up to 70% quantities. Conclusion These results indicate that MCH is a powerful hypnogenic factor. MCH neurons might play a key role in the state of PS via their widespread projections in the central nervous system.

  11. L-tyrosine and L-DOPA as hormone-like regulators of melanocytes functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominski, Andrzej; Zmijewski, Michal; Pawelek, John

    2011-01-01

    Summary Evidence reveals that L-tyrosine and L-DOPA, besides serving as substrates and intermediates of melanogenesis, are also bioregulatory agents acting not only as inducers and positive regulators of melanogenesis but also as regulators of other cellular functions. These can be mediated through action on specific receptors or through non-receptor mediated mechanisms. The substrate induced (L-tyrosine and/or L-DOPA) melanogenic pathway would autoregulate itself as well as it would regulate the melanocyte functions through activity of its structural or regulatory proteins and through intermediates of melanogenesis and melanin itself. Dissection of regulatory and autoregulatory elements of this process may elucidate how substrate induced autoregulatory pathways have evolved from prokaryotic or simple eukaryotic organisms to complex systems in vertebrates. This could substantiate older theory proposing that receptors for amino-acid derived hormones arose from the receptors for those amino acids, and that nuclear receptors evolved from primitive intracellular receptors binding nutritional factors or metabolic intermediates. PMID:21834848

  12. Growth hormone regulation of metabolic gene expression in muscle: a microarray study in hypopituitary men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Klara; Leung, Kin-Chuen; Kaplan, Warren; Gardiner-Garden, Margaret; Gibney, James; Ho, Ken K Y

    2007-07-01

    Muscle is a target of growth hormone (GH) action and a major contributor to whole body metabolism. Little is known about how GH regulates metabolic processes in muscle or the extent to which muscle contributes to changes in whole body substrate metabolism during GH treatment. To identify GH-responsive genes that regulate substrate metabolism in muscle, we studied six hypopituitary men who underwent whole body metabolic measurement and skeletal muscle biopsies before and after 2 wk of GH treatment (0.5 mg/day). Transcript profiles of four subjects were analyzed using Affymetrix GeneChips. Serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and procollagens I and III were measured by RIA. GH increased serum IGF-I and procollagens I and III, enhanced whole body lipid oxidation, reduced carbohydrate oxidation, and stimulated protein synthesis. It induced gene expression of IGF-I and collagens in muscle. GH reduced expression of several enzymes regulating lipid oxidation and energy production. It reduced calpain 3, increased ribosomal protein L38 expression, and displayed mixed effects on genes encoding myofibrillar proteins. It increased expression of circadian gene CLOCK, and reduced that of PERIOD. In summary, GH exerted concordant effects on muscle expression and blood levels of IGF-I and collagens. It induced changes in genes regulating protein metabolism in parallel with a whole body anabolic effect. The discordance between muscle gene expression profiles and metabolic responses suggests that muscle is unlikely to contribute to GH-induced stimulation of whole body energy and lipid metabolism. GH may regulate circadian function in skeletal muscle by modulating circadian gene expression with possible metabolic consequences.

  13. Adrenal Gland Microenvironment and Its Involvement in the Regulation of Stress-induced Hormone Secretion during Sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Kanczkowski

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Survival of all living organisms depends on maintenance of a steady state of homeostasis, which process relies on its ability to react and adapt to various physical and emotional threats. The defense against stress is executed by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the sympathetic-adrenal medullary system. Adrenal gland is a major effector organ of stress system. During stress adrenal gland rapidly respond with increased secretion of glucocorticoids and catecholamines into circulation, which hormones, in turn, affect metabolism, to provide acutely energy, vasculature to increase blood pressure and the immune system to prevent it from extensive activation. Sepsis resulting from microbial infections is a sustained and extreme example of stress situation. In many critical ill patients levels of both corticotropin-releasing hormone and adrenocorticotropin, two major regulators of adrenal hormone production, are suppressed. Levels of glucocorticoids however, remain normal or are elevated in these patients, suggesting a shift from central to local intraadrenal regulation of adrenal stress response. Among many mechanisms potentially involved in this process, reduced glucocorticoid metabolism and local intraadrenal activation of hormone production mediated by adrenocortical and chromaffin cell interactions, the adrenal vascular system and the immune-adrenal crosstalk play a key role. Consequently, any impairment in function of these systems, can ultimately affect adrenal stress response. The purpose of this mini review is to present and discuss recent advances in our understanding of the adrenal gland microenvironment, and its role in regulation of stress-induced hormone secretion.

  14. Exercise training during normobaric hypoxic confinement does not alter hormonal appetite regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadej Debevec

    Full Text Available Both exposure to hypoxia and exercise training have the potential to modulate appetite and induce beneficial metabolic adaptations. The purpose of this study was to determine whether daily moderate exercise training performed during a 10-day exposure to normobaric hypoxia alters hormonal appetite regulation and augments metabolic health.Fourteen healthy, male participants underwent a 10-day hypoxic confinement at ∼ 4000 m simulated altitude (FIO2 = 0.139 ± 0.003% either combined with daily moderate intensity exercise (Exercise group; N = 8, Age = 25.8 ± 2.4 yrs, BMI = 22.9 ± 1.2 kg · m(-2 or without any exercise (Sedentary group; N = 6 Age = 24.8 ± 3.1 yrs, BMI = 22.3 ± 2.5 kg · m(-2. A meal tolerance test was performed before (Pre and after the confinement (Post to quantify fasting and postp randial concentrations of selected appetite-related hormones and metabolic risk markers. 13C-Glucose was dissolved in the test meal and 13CO2 determined in breath samples. Perceived appetite ratings were obtained throughout the meal tolerance tests.While body mass decreased in both groups (-1.4 kg; p = 0.01 following the confinement, whole body fat mass was only reduced in the Exercise group (-1.5 kg; p = 0.01. At Post, postprandial serum insulin was reduced in the Sedentary group (-49%; p = 0.01 and postprandial plasma glucose in the Exercise group (-19%; p = 0.03. Fasting serum total cholesterol levels were reduced (-12%; p = 0.01 at Post in the Exercise group only, secondary to low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction (-16%; p = 0.01. No differences between groups or testing periods were noted in fasting and/or postprandial concentrations of total ghrelin, peptide YY, and glucagon-like peptide-1, leptin, adiponectin, expired 13CO2 as well as perceived appetite ratings (p>0.05.These findings suggest that performing daily moderate intensity exercise training during continuous hypoxic exposure does not alter hormonal appetite regulation but

  15. Exercise training during normobaric hypoxic confinement does not alter hormonal appetite regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debevec, Tadej; Simpson, Elizabeth J; Macdonald, Ian A; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2014-01-01

    Both exposure to hypoxia and exercise training have the potential to modulate appetite and induce beneficial metabolic adaptations. The purpose of this study was to determine whether daily moderate exercise training performed during a 10-day exposure to normobaric hypoxia alters hormonal appetite regulation and augments metabolic health. Fourteen healthy, male participants underwent a 10-day hypoxic confinement at ∼ 4000 m simulated altitude (FIO2 = 0.139 ± 0.003%) either combined with daily moderate intensity exercise (Exercise group; N = 8, Age = 25.8 ± 2.4 yrs, BMI = 22.9 ± 1.2 kg · m(-2)) or without any exercise (Sedentary group; N = 6 Age = 24.8 ± 3.1 yrs, BMI = 22.3 ± 2.5 kg · m(-2)). A meal tolerance test was performed before (Pre) and after the confinement (Post) to quantify fasting and postp randial concentrations of selected appetite-related hormones and metabolic risk markers. 13C-Glucose was dissolved in the test meal and 13CO2 determined in breath samples. Perceived appetite ratings were obtained throughout the meal tolerance tests. While body mass decreased in both groups (-1.4 kg; p = 0.01) following the confinement, whole body fat mass was only reduced in the Exercise group (-1.5 kg; p = 0.01). At Post, postprandial serum insulin was reduced in the Sedentary group (-49%; p = 0.01) and postprandial plasma glucose in the Exercise group (-19%; p = 0.03). Fasting serum total cholesterol levels were reduced (-12%; p = 0.01) at Post in the Exercise group only, secondary to low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction (-16%; p = 0.01). No differences between groups or testing periods were noted in fasting and/or postprandial concentrations of total ghrelin, peptide YY, and glucagon-like peptide-1, leptin, adiponectin, expired 13CO2 as well as perceived appetite ratings (p>0.05). These findings suggest that performing daily moderate intensity exercise training during continuous hypoxic exposure does not alter hormonal appetite regulation but can

  16. Dopamine-regulated adrenocorticotropic hormone secretion in lactating rats: functional plasticity of melanotropes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oláh, Márk; Fehér, Pálma; Ihm, Zsófia; Bácskay, Ildikó; Kiss, Timea; Freeman, Marc E; Nagy, Gyorgy M; Vecsernyés, Miklós

    2009-01-01

    Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) is processed to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and beta-lipotropin in corticotropes of the anterior lobe, and to alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and beta-endorphin in melanotropes of the intermediate lobe (IL) of the pituitary gland. While ACTH secretion is predominantly under the stimulatory influence of the hypothalamic factors, hormone secretion of the IL is tonically inhibited by neuroendocrine dopamine (NEDA) neurons. Lobe-specific POMC processing is not absolute. For example, D(2) type DA receptor (D2R)-deficient mice have elevated plasma ACTH levels, although it is known that corticotropes do not express D2R(s). Moreover, observations that suckling does not influence alpha-MSH release, while it induces an increase in plasma ACTH is unexplained. The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of the NEDA system in the regulation of ACTH secretion and the participation of the IL in ACTH production in lactating rats. Untreated and estradiol (E(2))-substituted ovariectomized (OVX) females were also studied. The concentration of ACTH in the IL was higher in lactating rats than in OVX rats, while the opposite change in alpha-MSH level of the IL was observed. DA levels in the IL and the neural lobe were lower in lactating rats than in OVX rats. Suckling-induced ACTH response was eliminated by pretreatment with the DA receptor agonist, bromocriptine (BRC). Inhibition of DA biosynthesis by alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (alphaMpT) and blockade of D2R by domperidone (DOM) elevated plasma ACTH levels, but did not influence plasma alpha-MSH levels in lactating rats. The same drugs had opposite effects in OVX and OVX + E(2) animals. In lactating mothers, BRC was able to block ACTH responses induced by both alphaMpT and DOM. Surgical denervation of the IL elevated basal plasma levels of ACTH. Taken together, these data indicate that melanotropes synthesize ACTH during lactation and its release from these cells is

  17. Thyroid hormone regulates the expression of the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway in the embryonic and adult Mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desouza, Lynette A; Sathanoori, Malini; Kapoor, Richa; Rajadhyaksha, Neha; Gonzalez, Luis E; Kottmann, Andreas H; Tole, Shubha; Vaidya, Vidita A

    2011-05-01

    Thyroid hormone is important for development and plasticity in the immature and adult mammalian brain. Several thyroid hormone-responsive genes are regulated during specific developmental time windows, with relatively few influenced across the lifespan. We provide novel evidence that thyroid hormone regulates expression of the key developmental morphogen sonic hedgehog (Shh), and its coreceptors patched (Ptc) and smoothened (Smo), in the early embryonic and adult forebrain. Maternal hypo- and hyperthyroidism bidirectionally influenced Shh mRNA in embryonic forebrain signaling centers at stages before fetal thyroid hormone synthesis. Further, Smo and Ptc expression were significantly decreased in the forebrain of embryos derived from hypothyroid dams. Adult-onset thyroid hormone perturbations also regulated expression of the Shh pathway bidirectionally, with a significant induction of Shh, Ptc, and Smo after hyperthyroidism and a decline in Smo expression in the hypothyroid brain. Short-term T₃ administration resulted in a significant induction of cortical Shh mRNA expression and also enhanced reporter gene expression in Shh(+/LacZ) mice. Further, acute T₃ treatment of cortical neuronal cultures resulted in a rapid and significant increase in Shh mRNA, suggesting direct effects. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays performed on adult neocortex indicated enhanced histone acetylation at the Shh promoter after acute T₃ administration, providing further support that Shh is a thyroid hormone-responsive gene. Our results indicate that maternal and adult-onset perturbations of euthyroid status cause robust and region-specific changes in the Shh pathway in the embryonic and adult forebrain, implicating Shh as a possible mechanistic link for specific neurodevelopmental effects of thyroid hormone.

  18. Bile acids are important direct and indirect regulators of the secretion of appetite- and metabolism-regulating hormones from the gut and pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich; Albrechtsen, Nicolai Jacob Wewer; Larsen, Olav

    2018-01-01

    ), and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), but also glucagon and insulin in vivo, to levels comparable to those resulting from glucose stimulation. The mechanisms of GLP-1, neurotensin, and peptide YY (PYY) secretion was secondary to intestinal absorption and depended on activation of basolateral membrane Takeda G......OBJECTIVE: Bile acids (BAs) facilitate fat absorption and may play a role in glucose and metabolism regulation, stimulating the secretion of gut hormones. The relative importance and mechanisms involved in BA-stimulated secretion of appetite and metabolism regulating hormones from the gut...... and pancreas is not well described and was the purpose of this study. METHODS: The effects of bile acids on the secretion of gut and pancreatic hormones was studied in rats and compared to the most well described nutritional secretagogue: glucose. The molecular mechanisms that underlie the secretion...

  19. Thyroid hormone regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor levels in mouse mammary glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vonderhaar, B.K.; Tang, E.; Lyster, R.R.; Nascimento, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    The specific binding of iodinated epidermal growth factor ([ 125 I]iodo-EGF) to membranes prepared from the mammary glands and spontaneous breast tumors of euthyroid and hypothyroid mice was measured in order to determine whether thyroid hormones regulate the EGF receptor levels in vivo. Membranes from hypothyroid mammary glands of mice at various developmental ages bound 50-65% less EGF than those of age-matched euthyroid controls. Treatment of hypothyroid mice with L-T4 before killing restored binding to the euthyroid control level. Spontaneous breast tumors arising in hypothyroid mice also bound 30-40% less EGF than tumors from euthyroid animals even after in vitro desaturation of the membranes of endogenous growth factors with 3 M MgCl2 treatment. The decrease in binding in hypothyroid membranes was due to a decrease in the number of binding sites, not to a change in affinity of the growth factor for its receptor, as determined by Scatchard analysis of the binding data. Both euthyroid and hypothyroid membranes bound EGF primarily to a single class of high affinity sites [dissociation constant (Kd) = 0.7-1.8 nM]. Euthyroid membranes bound 28.4 +/- (SE) 0.6 fmol/mg protein, whereas hypothyroid membranes bound 15.5 +/- 1.0 fmol/mg protein. These data indicate that EGF receptor levels in normal mammary glands and spontaneous breast tumors in mice are subject to regulation by thyroid status

  20. Adrenal clocks and the role of adrenal hormones in the regulation of circadian physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leliavski, Alexei; Dumbell, Rebecca; Ott, Volker; Oster, Henrik

    2015-02-01

    The mammalian circadian timing system consists of a master pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and subordinate clocks that disseminate time information to various central and peripheral tissues. While the function of the SCN in circadian rhythm regulation has been extensively studied, we still have limited understanding of how peripheral tissue clock function contributes to the regulation of physiological processes. The adrenal gland plays a special role in this context as adrenal hormones show strong circadian secretion rhythms affecting downstream physiological processes. At the same time, they have been shown to affect clock gene expression in various other tissues, thus mediating systemic entrainment to external zeitgebers and promoting internal circadian alignment. In this review, we discuss the function of circadian clocks in the adrenal gland, how they are reset by the SCN and may further relay time-of-day information to other tissues. Focusing on glucocorticoids, we conclude by outlining the impact of adrenal rhythm disruption on neuropsychiatric, metabolic, immune, and malignant disorders. © 2014 The Author(s).

  1. Neurons Containing Orexin or Melanin Concentrating Hormone Reciprocally Regulate Wake and Sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roda Rani eKonadhode

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable amount of data on arousal neurons whereas there is a paucity of knowledge regarding neurons that make us fall asleep. Indeed, current network models of sleep-wake regulation list many arousal neuronal populations compared to only one sleep group located in the preoptic area. There are neurons outside the preoptic area that are active during sleep, but they have never been selectively manipulated. Indeed, none of the sleep-active neurons have been selectively stimulated. To close this knowledge gap we used optogenetics to selectively manipulate neurons containing melanin concentrating hormone (MCH. The MCH neurons are located in the posterior hypothalamus intermingled with the orexin arousal neurons. Our data indicated that optogenetic stimulation of MCH neurons in wildtype mice (J Neuroscience, 2013 robustly increased both non-REM and REM sleep. MCH neuron stimulation increased sleep during the animal’s normal active period, which is compelling evidence that stimulation of MCH neurons has a powerful effect in counteracting the strong arousal signal from all of the arousal neurons. The MCH neurons represent the only group of sleep-active neurons that when selectively stimulated induce sleep. From a translational perspective this is potentially useful in sleep disorders, such as insomnia, where sleep needs to be triggered against a strong arousal drive. Our studies indicate that the MCH neurons belong within an overall model of sleep-wake regulation.

  2. Negative regulation of human parathyroid hormone gene promoter by vitamin D3 through nuclear factor Y

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeaeskelaeinen, T.; Huhtakangas, J.; Maeenpaeae, P.H.

    2005-01-01

    The negative regulation of the human parathyroid hormone (PTH) gene by biologically active vitamin D 3 (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 ; 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 ) was studied in rat pituitary GH4C1 cells, which express factors needed for the negative regulation. We report here that NF-Y binds to sequences downstream of the site previously reported to bind the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Additional binding sites for NF-Y reside in the near vicinity and were shown to be important for full activity of the PTH gene promoter. VDR and NF-Y were shown to exhibit mutually exclusive binding to the VDRE region. According to our results, sequestration of binding partners for NF-Y by VDR also affects transcription through a NF-Y consensus binding element in GH4C1 but not in ROS17/2.8 cells. These results indicate that 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 may affect transcription of the human PTH gene both by competitive binding of VDR and NF-Y, and by modulating transcriptional activity of NF-Y

  3. Differential regulation of thyrotropin subunit apoprotein and carbohydrate biosynthesis by thyroid hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, T.; Weintraub, B.D.

    1985-01-01

    The regulation of TSH apoprotein and carbohydrate biosynthesis by thyroid hormone was studied by incubating pituitaries from normal and hypothyroid (3 weeks post-thyroidectomy) rats in medium containing [ 14 C]alanine and [ 3 H] glucosamine. After 6 h, samples were sequentially treated with anti-TSH beta to precipitate TSH and free TSH beta, anti-LH beta to clear the sample of LH and free LH beta, then anti-LH alpha to precipitate free alpha-subunit. Total proteins were acid precipitated. All precipitates were subjected to electrophoresis on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels, which were then sliced and assayed by scintillation spectrometry. In hypothyroid pituitaries plus medium, [ 14 C]alanine incorporation in combined and free beta-subunits was 26 times normal and considerably greater than the 3.4-fold increase seen in total protein; combined and free alpha-subunits showed no specific increase in apoprotein synthesis. [ 3 H]Glucosamine incorporation in combined alpha- and beta-subunits in hypothyroid samples was 13 and 21 times normal, respectively, and was greater than the 1.9-fold increase in total protein; free alpha-subunit showed no specific increase in carbohydrate synthesis. The glucosamine to alanine ratio, reflecting relative glycosylation of newly synthesized molecules, was increased in hypothyroidism for combined alpha-subunits, but not for combined beta-subunits, free alpha-subunits, or total proteins. In summary, short term hypothyroidism selectively stimulated TSH beta apoprotein synthesis and carbohydrate synthesis of combined alpha- and beta-subunits. Hypothyroidism also increased the relative glycosylation of combined alpha-subunit. Thus, thyroid hormone deficiency appears to alter the rate-limiting step in TSH assembly (i.e. beta-subunit synthesis) as well as the carbohydrate structure of TSH, which may play important roles in its biological function

  4. Regulation of the corpora allata in male larvae of the cockroach Diploptera punctata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulson, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of corpora allata was studied in final instar males of Diploptera punctata. The glands were manipulated in vivo and removed to determine the effect by in vitro radiochemical assay for juvenile hormone synthesis. Corpora allata were also treated with putative regulatory factors in vitro. During the final stadium the corpora allata were inhibited both by nerves and by humoral factors. Neural inhibition was shown by an increase in juvenile hormone synthesis following denervation of the corpora allata. This operation elicited an extra larval instar. Humoral inhibition was shown by the decline in juvenile hormone synthesis of adult female corpora allata following transplantation into final instar larval hosts, and conversely the increase in juvenile hormone synthesis by larval corpora allata following implantation into adult females. Humoral inhibition was prevented by decapitation of larvae prior to the head critical period for molting and restored by implantation of a larval brain, showing that the brain is the source of this inhibition

  5. Effects of chronic exposure to tributyltin on tissue-specific cytochrome P450 1 regulation in juvenile common carp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Hua; Zhong, Li-Qiao; Mu, Wei-Na; Wu, Yan-Hua

    2016-01-01

    1. The purpose of this study was to compare tributyltin (TBT)-induced cytochrome P450 1 (CYP450 1) regulation in liver, gills and muscle of juvenile common carp (Cyprinus carpio). 2. Fish were exposed to sublethal concentrations of TBT (75, 0.75 and 7.5 μg/L) for 60 days. CYP450 1A was measured at the enzyme activity level as 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, as well as the mRNA expression of CYP450 1 family genes (CYP1A, CYP1B, CYP1C1 and CYP1C2) in fish tissues. 3. Based on the results, the liver displayed the highest absolute levels of EROD activity, both under nonexposed and exposed conditions. Additional, EROD activities and CYP1A gene levels showed a good correlation in all three organs. According to the mRNA expression of CYP450 1 family genes, it suggested that CYP1A was to accommodate most EROD activity in fish, but other CYP450 forms also involved in this proceeding. 4. Overall, the study revealed both similarities and differences in the concentration-dependent CYP450 1 responses of the three target organs, which could provide useful information to better understand the mechanisms of TBT-induced bio-toxicity.

  6. Altered dopaminergic regulation of the dorsal striatum is able to induce tic-like movements in juvenile rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Francesca; Boeckers, Tobias; Schulze, Ulrike

    2018-01-01

    Motor tics are sudden, repetitive, involuntary movements representing the hallmark behaviors of the neurodevelopmental disease Tourette’s syndrome (TS). The primary cause of TS remains unclear. The initial observation that dopaminergic antagonists alleviate tics led to the development of a dopaminergic theory of TS etiology which is supported by post mortem and in vivo studies indicating that non-physiological activation of the striatum could generate tics. The striatum controls movement execution through the balanced activity of dopamine receptor D1 and D2-expressing medium spiny neurons of the direct and indirect pathway, respectively. Different neurotransmitters can activate or repress striatal activity and among them, dopamine plays a major role. In this study we introduced a chronic dopaminergic alteration in juvenile rats, in order to modify the delicate balance between direct and indirect pathway. This manipulation was done in the dorsal striatum, that had been associated with tic-like movements generation in animal models. The results were movements resembling tics, which were categorized and scored according to a newly developed rating scale and were reduced by clonidine and riluzole treatment. Finally, post mortem analyses revealed altered RNA expression of dopaminergic receptors D1 and D2, suggesting an imbalanced dopaminergic regulation of medium spiny neuron activity as being causally related to the observed phenotype. PMID:29698507

  7. Adipokine zinc-α2-glycoprotein regulated by growth hormone and linked to insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaz, Miroslav; Ukropcova, Barbara; Kurdiova, Timea; Gajdosechova, Lucia; Vlcek, Miroslav; Janakova, Zuzana; Fedeles, Jozef; Pura, Mikulas; Gasperikova, Daniela; Smith, Steven R; Tkacova, Ruzena; Klimes, Iwar; Payer, Juraj; Wolfrum, Christian; Ukropec, Jozef

    2015-02-01

    Hypertrophic obesity is associated with impaired insulin sensitivity and lipid-mobilizing activity of zinc-α2-glycoprotein. Adipose tissue (AT) of growth hormone (GH) -deficient patients is characterized by extreme adipocyte hypertrophy due to defects in AT lipid metabolism. It was hypothesized that zinc-α2-glycoprotein is regulated by GH and mediates some of its beneficial effects in AT. AT from patients with GH deficiency and individuals with obesity-related GH deficit was obtained before and after 5-year and 24-month GH supplementation therapy. GH action was tested in primary human adipocytes. Relationships of GH and zinc-α2-glycoprotein with adipocyte size and insulin sensitivity were evaluated in nondiabetic patients with noncancerous cachexia and hypertrophic obesity. AT in GH-deficient adults displayed a substantial reduction of zinc-α2-glycoprotein. GH therapy normalized AT zinc-α2-glycoprotein. Obesity-related relative GH deficit was associated with almost 80% reduction of zinc-α2-glycoprotein mRNA in AT. GH increased zinc-α2-glycoprotein mRNA in both AT of obese men and primary human adipocytes. Interdependence of GH and zinc-α2-glycoprotein in regulating AT morphology and metabolic phenotype was evident from their relationship with adipocyte size and AT-specific and whole-body insulin sensitivity. The results demonstrate that GH is involved in regulation of AT zinc-α2-glycoprotein; however, the molecular mechanism linking GH and zinc-α2-glycoprotein in AT is yet unknown. © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  8. Regulation of hepatic level of fatty-acid-binding protein by hormones and clofibric acid in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, S; Kawashima, Y; Hirose, A; Kozuka, H

    1994-01-01

    Regulation of the hepatic level of fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP) by hormones and p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid (clofibric acid) was studied. The hepatic level of FABP, measured as the oleic acid-binding capacity of the cytosolic FABP fraction, was decreased in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. The level of FABP was markedly increased in adrenalectomized rats, and the elevation was prevented by the administration of dexamethasone. Hypothyroidism decreased the level of FABP and hyperthyroidism increased it. A high correlation between the incorporation of [14C]oleic acid in vivo into hepatic triacylglycerol and the level of FABP was found for normal, diabetic and adrenalectomized rats. The level of FABP was increased by administration of clofibric acid to rats in any altered hormonal states, as was microsomal 1-acylglycerophosphocholine (1-acyl-GPC) acyltransferase, a peroxisome-proliferator-responsive parameter. These results suggest that the hepatic level of FABP is under regulation by multiple hormones and that clofibric acid induces FABP and 1-acyl-GPC acyltransferase by a mechanism which may be distinct from that by which hormones regulate the level of FABP. PMID:8110197

  9. Thyroid hormone regulates muscle function during cold acclimation in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Alexander G; Seebacher, Frank

    2013-09-15

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is a universal regulator of growth, development and metabolism during cold exposure in mammals. In zebrafish (Danio rerio), TH regulates locomotor performance and metabolism during cold acclimation. The influence of TH on locomotor performance may be via its effect on metabolism or, as has been shown in mammals, by modulating muscle phenotypes. Our aim was to determine whether TH influences muscle phenotypes in zebrafish, and whether this could explain changes in swimming capacity in response to thermal acclimation. We used propylthiouracil and iopanoic acid to induce hypothyroidism in zebrafish over a 3-week acclimation period to either 18 or 28°C. To verify that physiological changes following hypothyroid treatment were in fact due to the action of TH, we supplemented hypothyroid fish with 3,5-diiodothryronine (T2) or 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3). Cold-acclimated fish had significantly greater sustained swimming performance (Ucrit) but not burst speed. Greater Ucrit was accompanied by increased tail beat frequency, but there was no change in tail beat amplitude. Hypothyroidism significantly decreased Ucrit and burst performance, as well as tail beat frequency and SERCA activity in cold-acclimated fish. However, myofibrillar ATPase activity increased in cold-acclimated hypothyroid fish. Hypothyroid treatment also decreased mRNA concentrations of myosin heavy chain fast isoforms and SERCA 1 isoform in cold-acclimated fish. SERCA 1 mRNA increased in warm-acclimated hypothyroid fish, and SERCA 3 mRNA decreased in both cold- and warm-acclimated hypothyroid fish. Supplementation with either T2 or T3 restored Ucrit, burst speed, tail beat frequency, SERCA activity and myosin heavy chain and SERCA 1 and 3 mRNA levels of hypothyroid fish back to control levels. We show that in addition to regulating development and metabolism in vertebrates, TH also regulates muscle physiology in ways that affect locomotor performance in fish. We suggest that the

  10. A new approach to feed frequency studies and protein intake regulation in juvenile pirarucu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattos, Bruno O DE; Nascimento, Eduardo C T; Santos, Aline A; Barreto, Kayck A; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco J; Fortes-Silva, Rodrigo

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate pirarucu's (Arapaima gigas) ability to trigger a self-feeding system to regulate protein intake between two standard diets that contained 39% and 49% of crude protein. The same system allowed the evaluation of daily feeding and locomotor activity rhythms. Eighteen fish (654.44±26.85g) were distributed into six 250 L tanks (3 fish/tank). Fish had free access to both diets (39% vs. 49% protein) by feeders (2 per tank), adapted to be activated by fish themselves. This system was connected to a computer system. After an adaptation period, fish learned to activate feeders and the mean food intake recorded was 2.14% of their body weight on a daily basis. Fish showed feeding (72.48%) and locomotor (72.49%) activity predominantly during the daytime, and daily variations of choice between diets, but fixed a protein intake feeding target at 44.53%. These results should be considered when discussing feeding behavior, feeding schedules and diet intake regulations.

  11. A new approach to feed frequency studies and protein intake regulation in juvenile pirarucu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRUNO O. DE MATTOS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to investigate pirarucu's (Arapaima gigas ability to trigger a self-feeding system to regulate protein intake between two standard diets that contained 39% and 49% of crude protein. The same system allowed the evaluation of daily feeding and locomotor activity rhythms. Eighteen fish (654.44±26.85g were distributed into six 250 L tanks (3 fish/tank. Fish had free access to both diets (39% vs. 49% protein by feeders (2 per tank, adapted to be activated by fish themselves. This system was connected to a computer system. After an adaptation period, fish learned to activate feeders and the mean food intake recorded was 2.14% of their body weight on a daily basis. Fish showed feeding (72.48% and locomotor (72.49% activity predominantly during the daytime, and daily variations of choice between diets, but fixed a protein intake feeding target at 44.53%. These results should be considered when discussing feeding behavior, feeding schedules and diet intake regulations.

  12. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Regulates Expression of the DNA Damage Repair Gene, Fanconi anemia A, in Pituitary Gonadotroph Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larder, Rachel; Chang, Lynda; Clinton, Michael; Brown, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    Gonadal function is critically dependant on regulated secretion of the gonadotropin hormones from anterior pituitary gonadotroph cells. Gonadotropin biosynthesis and release is triggered by the binding of hypothalamic GnRH to GnRH receptor expressed on the gonadotroph cell surface. The repertoire of regulatory molecules involved in this process are still being defined. We used the mouse LβT2 gonadotroph cell line, which expresses both gonadotropin hormones, as a model to investigate GnRH regulation of gene expression and differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to identify and isolate hormonally induced changes. This approach identified Fanconi anemia a (Fanca), a gene implicated in DNA damage repair, as a differentially expressed transcript. Mutations in Fanca account for the majority of cases of Fanconi anemia (FA), a recessively inherited disease identified by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, infertility, and cancer susceptibility. We confirmed expression and hormonal regulation of Fanca mRNA by quantitative RT-PCR, which showed that GnRH induced a rapid, transient increase in Fanca mRNA. Fanca protein was also acutely upregulated after GnRH treatment of LβT2 cells. In addition, Fanca gene expression was confined to mature pituitary gonadotrophs and adult mouse pituitary and was not expressed in the immature αT3-1 gonadotroph cell line. Thus, this study extends the expression profile of Fanca into a highly specialized endocrine cell and demonstrates hormonal regulation of expression of the Fanca locus. We suggest that this regulatory mechanism may have a crucial role in the GnRH-response mechanism of mature gonadotrophs and perhaps the etiology of FA. PMID:15128600

  13. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone regulates expression of the DNA damage repair gene, Fanconi anemia A, in pituitary gonadotroph cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larder, Rachel; Chang, Lynda; Clinton, Michael; Brown, Pamela

    2004-09-01

    Gonadal function is critically dependant on regulated secretion of the gonadotropin hormones from anterior pituitary gonadotroph cells. Gonadotropin biosynthesis and release is triggered by the binding of hypothalamic GnRH to GnRH receptor expressed on the gonadotroph cell surface. The repertoire of regulatory molecules involved in this process are still being defined. We used the mouse L beta T2 gonadotroph cell line, which expresses both gonadotropin hormones, as a model to investigate GnRH regulation of gene expression and differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to identify and isolate hormonally induced changes. This approach identified Fanconi anemia a (Fanca), a gene implicated in DNA damage repair, as a differentially expressed transcript. Mutations in Fanca account for the majority of cases of Fanconi anemia (FA), a recessively inherited disease identified by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, infertility, and cancer susceptibility. We confirmed expression and hormonal regulation of Fanca mRNA by quantitative RT-PCR, which showed that GnRH induced a rapid, transient increase in Fanca mRNA. Fanca protein was also acutely upregulated after GnRH treatment of L beta T2 cells. In addition, Fanca gene expression was confined to mature pituitary gonadotrophs and adult mouse pituitary and was not expressed in the immature alpha T3-1 gonadotroph cell line. Thus, this study extends the expression profile of Fanca into a highly specialized endocrine cell and demonstrates hormonal regulation of expression of the Fanca locus. We suggest that this regulatory mechanism may have a crucial role in the GnRH-response mechanism of mature gonadotrophs and perhaps the etiology of FA.

  14. Recent Advances in Thyroid Hormone Regulation: Toward a New Paradigm for Optimal Diagnosis and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Rudolf Hoermann; John E. M. Midgley; Rolf Larisch; Johannes W. Dietrich; Johannes W. Dietrich; Johannes W. Dietrich

    2017-01-01

    In thyroid health, the pituitary hormone thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) raises glandular thyroid hormone production to a physiological level and enhances formation and conversion of T4 to the biologically more active T3. Overstimulation is limited by negative feedback control. In equilibrium defining the euthyroid state, the relationship between TSH and FT4 expresses clusters of genetically determined, interlocked TSH–FT4 pairs, which invalidates their statistical correlation within the eu...

  15. Effects of different modes of exercise on appetite and appetite-regulating hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Hiroshi; Mineta, Mayuko; Asaka, Meiko; Miyashita, Masashi; Numao, Shigeharu; Gando, Yuko; Ando, Takafumi; Sakamoto, Shizuo; Higuchi, Mitsuru

    2013-07-01

    The present study determined the changes in appetite and appetite-regulating gut hormones during and following bouts of both rope skipping exercise (weight-bearing) and bicycle ergometer exercise (non-weight-bearing). After a 12-h fast, 15 young men (mean ± SD, age 24.4 ± 1.7 yrs, maximal oxygen uptake 47.0 ± 6.5 mL/kg/min) participated in three 160 min trials: (1) rope skipping exercise (295 ± 40 kcal, 3 sets × 10 min with 5-min interval, then rested for 120 min); (2) bicycle ergometer exercise (288 ± 36 kcal, 3 sets × 10 min with 5-min interval, then rested for 120 min); (3) control (rested for 160 min). Ratings of perceived hunger and acylated ghrelin were suppressed and total peptide YY (PYY) were increased during and immediately after exercise in both exercise trials, but glucagon liked peptide-1 was not changed. Furthermore, suppressed hunger during rope skipping exercise was greater than that during bicycle ergometer exercise, but there were no differences in acylated ghrelin and total PYY. These results indicate that weight-bearing exercise has a greater exercise-induced appetite suppressive effect compared with non-weight-bearing exercise, and both forms of exercise lowered acylated ghrelin and increased total PYY, but the changes did not differ significantly between exercise modes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Regulation of the growth hormone (GH) receptor and GH-binding protein mRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaji, Hidesuke; Ohashi, Shin-Ichirou; Abe, Hiromi; Chihara, Kazuo [Kobe Univ. School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    In fasting rats, a transient increase in growth hormone-binding protein (GHBP) mRNA levels was observed after 1 day, in muscle, heart, and liver, but not in fat tissues. The liver GH receptor (GHR) mRNA level was significantly increased after 1 day (but not after 5 days) of bovine GH (bGH) treatment in fed rats. Both the liver GHR mRNA level and the net increment of plasma IGF-I markedly decreased after 5 days of bGH administration in fasting rats. These findings suggest that GHR and GHBP mRNAs in the liver are expressed in a different way and that the expression of GHBP mRNA is regulated differently between tissues, at least in rats. The results also suggest that refractoriness to GH in a sustained fasting state might be beneficial in preventing anabolic effects of GH. In humans, GHR mRNA in lymphocytes, from subjects with either GH-deficiency or acromegaly, could be detected by the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction method. In one patient with partial GH insensitivity, a heterozygous missense mutation (P561T) was identified in the cytoplasmic domain of GHR. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Regulation of connexin26 and connexin43 expression in rat endometrium by ovarian steroid hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grümmer, R; Chwalisz, K; Mulholland, J; Traub, O; Winterhager, E

    1994-12-01

    A distinct spatial and temporal pattern of connexin26 and connexin43 (cx26 and cx43) expression was observed in the rat endometrium in response to embryo implantation; however, connexin expression was suppressed during the preimplantation period. Pseudopregnant rats did not show connexin mRNA, while artificial decidualization induced by a scratch led to a strong expression of cx26 and cx43 in the endometrium of these animals. In order to examine the regulatory effects of ovarian steroid hormones on connexin expression, ovariectomized rats were treated with progesterone (P) and/or estradiol-17 beta (E2). Untreated, ovariectomized animals expressed mRNA for cx43, but not for cx26. Endometrial expression of mRNA for both connexins was strongly enhanced by E2 treatment; immunolabeling revealed protein for cx26 in the uterine luminal epithelial cells and for cx43 in the uterine stromal cells. P treatment, either alone or in combination with E2, suppressed expression of connexin mRNA. P suppression in the presence of E2 was reversible when P was withdrawn. When administered on Days 0-2 of pregnancy, the antiprogestin onapristone inhibited the effect of P and gave rise to strong expression of both connexin transcripts. These results demonstrate that expression of cx26 and cx43 in the rat uterine endometrium is differentially regulated by E2 and P during early pregnancy.

  18. Hormonal regulation of the growth of leaves and inflorescence stalk in Muscari armeniacum Leichtl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Saniewski

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available It is known that chilling of Muscari bulbs is necessary for the growth of the inflorescence stalk and flowering, but not for the growth of leaves. Gibberellic acid (GA accelerated stem growth and flowering in chilled Muscari bulbs. In the present experiment it was shown that in unchilled derooted Muscari bulbs the growth of leaves, but not the growth of the inflorescence stalk, was observed when bulbs were stored in water, GA at a concentration of 50 and 100 mg/L, benzyladenine (BA at a concentration of 25 and 50 mg/L, or a mixture of GA+BA (50+25 mg/L, but abscisic acid (ABA at a concentration of 10 mg/L greatly inhibited the growth of leaves. In chilled derooted Muscari bulbs the growth of leaves and inflorescence stalk was observed when bulbs were stored in water or GA, but BA and GA+BA treatments totally inhibited the growth of the inflorescence stalk without an effect on the growth of leaves. These results clearly showed that the growth of leaves and inflorescence stalk in Muscari bulbs are controlled by plant growth regulators in different ways. ABA totally inhibited the growth of leaves and inflorescence stalk in chilled derooted Muscari bulbs. It was shown that after the excision of the inflorescence bud in cultivated chilled Muscari bulbs, the inflorescence stalk died, but application of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA 0.5% in the place of the removed inflorescence bud induced the growth of the inflorescence stalk. IAA applied under the inflorescence bud inhibited the development of flowers (flower-bud blasting and induced the growth of the inflorescence stalk below the treatment site. These results are discussed with reference to hormonal regulation of stem (stalk growth in tulip, narcissus, hyacinth, and Hippeastrum.

  19. Hormonal changes in spring barley after triazine herbicide treatment and its mixtures of regulators of polyamine biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Trebichalský

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants adapt to abiotic stress by undergoing diverse biochemical and physiological changes that involve hormone-dependent signalling pathways. The effects of regulators of polyamine biosynthesis can be mimicked by exogenous chemical regulators such as herbicide safeners, which not only enhance stress tolerance but also confer hormetic benefits such as increased vigor and yield. The phytohormones, abscisic acid (ABA and auxin (IAA play key roles in regulating stress responses in plants. Two years pot trials at Slovak University of agriculture Nitra were carried out with analyses of contents of plant hormones in spring barley grain of variety Kompakt: indolyl-acetic acid (IAA and abscisic acid (ABA, after exposing of tested plants to herbicide stress, as well as the possible decrease of these stress factors with application of regulators of polyamine synthesis was evaluated. At 1st year in spring barley grain after application of solo triazine herbicide treatment in dose 0,5 L.ha-1 an increase of all analyzed plant hormones was observed and contrary, at 2nd year there was the decrease of their contents. From our work there is an obvious influence of herbicide stress induced by application of certain dose of triazine herbicide at 1st year. Expect of the variant with mixture of triazine herbicide (in amount of 0,5 L.ha-1 and 29,6 g.ha-1 DAB, at this year all by us applied regulators of polyamine synthesis reduced the level of both plant hormones. Higher affect of stress caused by enhanced content of soluble macroelements in soil where the plants of barley were grown was observed next year. Soil with increased contents of macronutrients (mg.kg-1: N30.7 + P108.3 + K261.5 + Mg604.2 had reducing effect on contents of plant hormones in barley grain at variant treated with solo triazine herbicide (in dose at 0,5 L.ha-1 in comparison to control variant. The mixtures of regulators of polyamine synthesis reduced the contents of IAA only in comparison to

  20. Liver X receptor β controls thyroid hormone feedback in the brain and regulates browning of subcutaneous white adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yifei; Wu, Wanfu; Dai, Yubing; Maneix, Laure; Huang, Bo; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2015-11-10

    The recent discovery of browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) has raised great research interest because of its significant potential in counteracting obesity and type 2 diabetes. Browning is the result of the induction in WAT of a newly discovered type of adipocyte, the beige cell. When mice are exposed to cold or several kinds of hormones or treatments with chemicals, specific depots of WAT undergo a browning process, characterized by highly activated mitochondria and increased heat production and energy expenditure. However, the mechanisms underlying browning are still poorly understood. Liver X receptors (LXRs) are one class of nuclear receptors, which play a vital role in regulating cholesterol, triglyceride, and glucose metabolism. Following our previous finding that LXRs serve as repressors of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) in classic brown adipose tissue in female mice, we found that LXRs, especially LXRβ, also repress the browning process of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) in male rodents fed a normal diet. Depletion of LXRs activated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-releasing hormone (TRH)-positive neurons in the paraventricular nucleus area of the hypothalamus and thus stimulated secretion of TSH from the pituitary. Consequently, production of thyroid hormones in the thyroid gland and circulating thyroid hormone level were increased. Moreover, the activity of thyroid signaling in SAT was markedly increased. Together, our findings have uncovered the basis of increased energy expenditure in male LXR knockout mice and provided support for targeting LXRs in treatment of obesity.

  1. Pituitary Gonadotropins, Prolactin and Growth Hormone Differentially Regulate AQP1 Expression in the Porcine Ovarian Follicular Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz T. Skowronski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present in vitro study analyzed whether the hormones that affect the ovarian follicular steroidogenesis process also participate in the regulation of AQP1 mRNA and protein expression. Granulosa (Gc and theca cells (Tc of medium and large porcine ovarian follicles were exposed to follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, prolactin (PRL and growth hormone (GH for 24 h in separated cells and co-cultures of these cells. Real-time PCR, Western blotting, immunofluorescence and volumetric analysis were then performed. Gonadotropins, PRL and GH had a stimulatory impact on AQP1 mRNA and protein expression in Gc and Tc of medium and large ovarian cells. Moreover, swelling assays, in response to a hypotonic environment, demonstrated the functional presence of AQPs in porcine Gc and Tc. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that AQP1 protein was mainly localized in the perinuclear region of the cytoplasm, endosomes and cell membranes of Gc and Tc from medium and large follicles. It seems possible that AQP1 present in Gc and Tc cells may be implicated not only in the regulation of water homeostasis required for follicle development but also in cell proliferation and migration.

  2. Human ketone body production and utilization studied using tracer techniques: Regulation by free fatty acids, insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, U.; Lustenberger, M.; Mueller-Brand, J.G.; Gerber, P.P.; Stauffacher, W.

    1989-05-01

    Ketone body concentrations fluctuate markedly during physiological and pathological conditions. Tracer techniques have been developed in recent years to study production, utilization, and the metabolic clearance rate of ketone bodies. This review describes data on the roles of insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones in the regulation of ketone body kinetics. The data indicate that insulin lowers ketone body concentrations by three independent mechanisms: first, it inhibits lipolysis, and thus lowers free fatty acid availability for ketogenesis; second, it restrains ketone body production within the liver; third, it enhances peripheral ketone body utilization. To assess these effects in humans in vivo, experimental models were developed to study insulin effects with controlled concentrations of free fatty acids, insulin, glucagon, and ketone bodies. Presently available data also support an important role of catecholamines in increasing ketone body concentrations. Evidence was presented that norepinephrine increases ketogenesis not only by stimulating lipolysis, and thus releasing free fatty acids, but also by increasing intrahepatic ketogenesis. Thyroid hormone availability was associated with lipolysis and ketogenesis. Ketone body concentrations after an overnight fast were only modestly elevated in hyperthyroidism resulting from increased peripheral ketone body clearance. There was a significant correlation between serum triiodothyronine levels and the ketone body metabolic clearance rate. Thus, ketone body homeostasis in human subjects resulted from the interaction of hormones such as insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones regulating lipolysis, intrahepatic ketogenesis, and peripheral ketone body utilization. 58 references.

  3. Human ketone body production and utilization studied using tracer techniques: Regulation by free fatty acids, insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, U.; Lustenberger, M.; Mueller-Brand, J.G.; Gerber, P.P.; Stauffacher, W.

    1989-01-01

    Ketone body concentrations fluctuate markedly during physiological and pathological conditions. Tracer techniques have been developed in recent years to study production, utilization, and the metabolic clearance rate of ketone bodies. This review describes data on the roles of insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones in the regulation of ketone body kinetics. The data indicate that insulin lowers ketone body concentrations by three independent mechanisms: first, it inhibits lipolysis, and thus lowers free fatty acid availability for ketogenesis; second, it restrains ketone body production within the liver; third, it enhances peripheral ketone body utilization. To assess these effects in humans in vivo, experimental models were developed to study insulin effects with controlled concentrations of free fatty acids, insulin, glucagon, and ketone bodies. Presently available data also support an important role of catecholamines in increasing ketone body concentrations. Evidence was presented that norepinephrine increases ketogenesis not only by stimulating lipolysis, and thus releasing free fatty acids, but also by increasing intrahepatic ketogenesis. Thyroid hormone availability was associated with lipolysis and ketogenesis. Ketone body concentrations after an overnight fast were only modestly elevated in hyperthyroidism resulting from increased peripheral ketone body clearance. There was a significant correlation between serum triiodothyronine levels and the ketone body metabolic clearance rate. Thus, ketone body homeostasis in human subjects resulted from the interaction of hormones such as insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones regulating lipolysis, intrahepatic ketogenesis, and peripheral ketone body utilization. 58 references

  4. Gibberellin hormone signal perception: down-regulating DELLA repressors of plant growth and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    The gibberellin (GA) hormone signal is perceived by a receptor with homology to hormone sensitive lipases, GID1 (GA-INSENSITIVE DWARF1). This leads to GA-stimulated responses including stem elongation, seed germination, and the transition to flowering. GA-binding enables GID1 to interact with and ...

  5. Photoperiod regulates growth of male accessory glands through juvenile hormone signaling in the linden bug, Pyrrhocoris apterus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urbanová, Veronika; Bazalová, Olga; Vaněčková, Hana; Doležel, David

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 70, March 01 (2016), s. 184-190 ISSN 0965-1748 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH14029; GA ČR GC14-32654J; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Grant - others:European Union program FP7/2007-20013(CZ) 316304 Program:FP7 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : diapause * methoprene-tolerant * bHLH-PAS Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.756, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0965174816300030

  6. Radioimmunoassay of hormones for clinical trials of fertility regulating agents in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The need for accurate hormonal assay is emphasized, and becomes more urgent as hormones, in addition to their conventional medical use are being increasinly used for family planning purposes, particularly in developing countries. Readily available facilities and laboratories for the assay of hormone strength are therefore required, and also for the standardization of methods and techniques for such assays. Radioimmunology appears and excellent tool for this. Analytical techniques in actual use and techniques of potential future use are considered. Techniques for assessing hormone strength, potenty and doses are outlined. Criteria are developed, required for establishing a calibration and standardization laboratory for hormone strength. These criteria include a discussion of the necessary staff, location of such a facility and the material and equipment needed. Help from consultants, staff training, and the growth in sample analysis and corresponding financial aspects are discussed. Finally, the problems are reviewed of creating national laboratories which can be developed as services available for certain geographical regions

  7. Mammary gland-specific nuclear factor activity is positively regulated by lactogenic hormones and negatively by milk stasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt-Ney, M; Happ, B; Hofer, P; Hynes, N E; Groner, B

    1992-12-01

    The mammary gland-specific nuclear factor (MGF) is a crucial contributor to the regulation of transcription from the beta-casein gene promoter. The beta-casein gene encodes a major milk protein, which is expressed in mammary epithelial cells during lactation and can be induced by lactogenic hormones in the clonal mammary epithelial cell line HC11. We have investigated the specific DNA-binding activity of MGF in mammary epithelial cells in vivo and in vitro. Comparison of MGF in HC11 cells and mammary gland cells from lactating mice revealed molecules with identical DNA-binding properties. Bandshift and UV cross-linking experiments indicated that MGF in HC11 cells has a higher mol wt than MGF found in mice. Little MGF activity was detected in nuclear extracts from HC11 cells cultured in the absence of lactogenic hormones. Lactogenic hormone treatment of HC11 cells led to a strong induction of MGF activity. The induction of MGF activity as well as utilization of the beta-casein promoter were suppressed when epidermal growth factor was present in the tissue culture medium simultaneously with the lactogenic hormones. In lactating animals, MGF activity is regulated by suckling, milk stasis, and systemic hormone signals. The mammary glands from maximally lactating animals, 16 days postpartum, contain drastically reduced MGF activity after removal of the pups for only 8 h. The down-regulation of MGF by pup withdrawal was slower in early lactation, 6 days postpartum. We also investigated the relative contributions of local signals, generated by milk stasis, and systemic hormone signals to the regulation of MGF activity. The access to one row of mammary glands of lactating mothers was denied to the pups for 24 h. High levels of MGF were found in the accessible mammary glands, and intermediate levels of MGF were found in the inaccessible glands of the same mouse. Very low MGF levels were detected when the pups were removed from the dams for 24 h. We conclude that systemic as

  8. Thyroid Hormone Receptor Beta in the Ventromedial Hypothalamus Is Essential for the Physiological Regulation of Food Intake and Body Weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saira Hameed

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The obesity epidemic is a significant global health issue. Improved understanding of the mechanisms that regulate appetite and body weight will provide the rationale for the design of anti-obesity therapies. Thyroid hormones play a key role in metabolic homeostasis through their interaction with thyroid hormone receptors (TRs, which function as ligand-inducible transcription factors. The TR-beta isoform (TRβ is expressed in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH, a brain area important for control of energy homeostasis. Here, we report that selective knockdown of TRβ in the VMH of adult mice results in severe obesity due to hyperphagia and reduced energy expenditure. The observed increase in body weight is of a similar magnitude to murine models of the most extreme forms of monogenic obesity. These data identify TRβ in the VMH as a major physiological regulator of food intake and energy homeostasis.

  9. Cross-regulation of signaling pathways: An example of nuclear hormone receptors and the canonical Wnt pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beildeck, Marcy E. [Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, 3970 Reservoir Road, NW, Washington, DC 20057 (United States); Gelmann, Edward P. [Columbia University, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Byers, Stephen W., E-mail: byerss@georgetown.edu [Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, 3970 Reservoir Road, NW, Washington, DC 20057 (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Predicting the potential physiological outcome(s) of any given molecular pathway is complex because of cross-talk with other pathways. This is particularly evident in the case of the nuclear hormone receptor and canonical Wnt pathways, which regulate cell growth and proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and metastatic potential in numerous tissues. These pathways are known to intersect at many levels: in the intracellular space, at the membrane, in the cytoplasm, and within the nucleus. The outcomes of these interactions are important in the control of stem cell differentiation and maintenance, feedback loops, and regulating oncogenic potential. The aim of this review is to demonstrate the importance of considering pathway cross-talk when predicting functional outcomes of signaling, using nuclear hormone receptor/canonical Wnt pathway cross-talk as an example.

  10. Cross-regulation of signaling pathways: An example of nuclear hormone receptors and the canonical Wnt pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beildeck, Marcy E.; Gelmann, Edward P.; Byers, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    Predicting the potential physiological outcome(s) of any given molecular pathway is complex because of cross-talk with other pathways. This is particularly evident in the case of the nuclear hormone receptor and canonical Wnt pathways, which regulate cell growth and proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and metastatic potential in numerous tissues. These pathways are known to intersect at many levels: in the intracellular space, at the membrane, in the cytoplasm, and within the nucleus. The outcomes of these interactions are important in the control of stem cell differentiation and maintenance, feedback loops, and regulating oncogenic potential. The aim of this review is to demonstrate the importance of considering pathway cross-talk when predicting functional outcomes of signaling, using nuclear hormone receptor/canonical Wnt pathway cross-talk as an example.

  11. Vinclozolin Exposure in Utero Induces Postpubertal Prostatitis and Reduces Sperm Production via a Reversible Hormone-Regulated Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Cowin, Prue A.; Gold, Elspeth; Aleksova, Jasna; O'Bryan, Moira K.; Foster, Paul M. D.; Scott, Hamish S.; Risbridger, Gail P.

    2010-01-01

    Vinclozolin is an endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC) that binds with high affinity to the androgen receptor (AR) and blocks the action of gonadal hormones on male reproductive organs. An alternative mechanism of action of Vinclozolin involves transgenerational effects on the male reproductive tract. We previously reported in utero Vinclozolin exposure-induced prostatitis (prostate inflammation) in postpubertal rats concurrent with down-regulation of AR and increased nuclear factor-κB activat...

  12. Abscisic acid regulates root growth under osmotic stress conditions via an interacting hormonal network with cytokinin, ethylene and auxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, James H; Topping, Jennifer F; Liu, Junli; Lindsey, Keith

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the mechanisms regulating root development under drought conditions is an important question for plant biology and world agriculture. We examine the effect of osmotic stress on abscisic acid (ABA), cytokinin and ethylene responses and how they mediate auxin transport, distribution and root growth through effects on PIN proteins. We integrate experimental data to construct hormonal crosstalk networks to formulate a systems view of root growth regulation by multiple hormones. Experimental analysis shows: that ABA-dependent and ABA-independent stress responses increase under osmotic stress, but cytokinin responses are only slightly reduced; inhibition of root growth under osmotic stress does not require ethylene signalling, but auxin can rescue root growth and meristem size; osmotic stress modulates auxin transporter levels and localization, reducing root auxin concentrations; PIN1 levels are reduced under stress in an ABA-dependent manner, overriding ethylene effects; and the interplay among ABA, ethylene, cytokinin and auxin is tissue-specific, as evidenced by differential responses of PIN1 and PIN2 to osmotic stress. Combining experimental analysis with network construction reveals that ABA regulates root growth under osmotic stress conditions via an interacting hormonal network with cytokinin, ethylene and auxin. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. An integrated mechanism of pediatric pseudotumor cerebri syndrome: evidence of bioenergetic and hormonal regulation of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Claire A; Kwon, Young Joon; Liu, Grant T; McCormack, Shana E

    2015-02-01

    Pseudotumor cerebri syndrome (PTCS) is defined by the presence of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) in the setting of normal brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Headache, vision changes, and papilledema are common presenting features. Up to 10% of appropriately treated patients may experience permanent visual loss. The mechanism(s) underlying PTCS is unknown. PTCS occurs in association with a variety of conditions, including kidney disease, obesity, and adrenal insufficiency, suggesting endocrine and/or metabolic derangements may occur. Recent studies suggest that fluid and electrolyte balance in renal epithelia is regulated by a complex interaction of metabolic and hormonal factors; these cells share many of the same features as the choroid plexus cells in the central nervous system (CNS) responsible for regulation of CSF dynamics. Thus, we posit that similar factors may influence CSF dynamics in both types of fluid-sensitive tissues. Specifically, we hypothesize that, in patients with PTCS, mitochondrial metabolites (glutamate, succinate) and steroid hormones (cortisol, aldosterone) regulate CSF production and/or absorption. In this integrated mechanism review, we consider the clinical and molecular evidence for each metabolite and hormone in turn. We illustrate how related intracellular signaling cascades may converge in the choroid plexus, drawing on evidence from functionally similar tissues.

  14. Hypothalamic roles of mTOR complex I: integration of nutrient and hormone signals to regulate energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fang; Xu, Yong; Liu, Feng

    2016-06-01

    Mammalian or mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) senses nutrient, energy, and hormone signals to regulate metabolism and energy homeostasis. mTOR activity in the hypothalamus, which is associated with changes in energy status, plays a critical role in the regulation of food intake and body weight. mTOR integrates signals from a variety of "energy balancing" hormones such as leptin, insulin, and ghrelin, although its action varies in response to these distinct hormonal stimuli as well as across different neuronal populations. In this review, we summarize and highlight recent findings regarding the functional roles of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in the hypothalamus specifically in its regulation of body weight, energy expenditure, and glucose/lipid homeostasis. Understanding the role and underlying mechanisms behind mTOR-related signaling in the brain will undoubtedly pave new avenues for future therapeutics and interventions that can combat obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Effect of high sugar intake on glucose transporter and weight regulating hormones in mice and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Ritze

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Sugar consumption has increased dramatically over the last decades in Western societies. Especially the intake of sugar-sweetened beverages seems to be a major risk for the development of obesity. Thus, we compared liquid versus solid high-sugar diets with regard to dietary intake, intestinal uptake and metabolic parameters in mice and partly in humans. METHODS: Five iso-caloric diets, enriched with liquid (in water 30% vol/vol or solid (in diet 65% g/g fructose or sucrose or a control diet were fed for eight weeks to C57bl/6 mice. Sugar, liquid and caloric intake, small intestinal sugar transporters (GLUT2/5 and weight regulating hormone mRNA expression, as well as hepatic fat accumulation were measured. In obese versus lean humans that underwent either bariatric surgery or small bowel resection, we analyzed small intestinal GLUT2, GLUT5, and cholecystokinin expression. RESULTS: In mice, the liquid high-sucrose diet caused an enhancement of total caloric intake compared to the solid high-sucrose diet and the control diet. In addition, the liquid high-sucrose diet increased expression of GLUT2, GLUT5, and cholecystokinin expression in the ileum (P<0.001. Enhanced liver triglyceride accumulation was observed in mice being fed the liquid high-sucrose or -fructose, and the solid high-sucrose diet compared to controls. In obese, GLUT2 and GLUT5 mRNA expression was enhanced in comparison to lean individuals. CONCLUSIONS: We show that the form of sugar intake (liquid versus solid is presumably more important than the type of sugar, with regard to feeding behavior, intestinal sugar uptake and liver fat accumulation in mice. Interestingly, in obese individuals, an intestinal sugar transporter modulation also occurred when compared to lean individuals.

  16. Thyroid hormone regulation of Sirtuin 1 expression and implications to integrated responses in fasted mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Aline; de Souza, Luana Lopes; Oliveira, Lorraine Soares; Faustino, Larissa Costa; Santiago, Letícia Aragão; Bloise, Flavia Fonseca; Ortiga-Carvalho, Tania Maria; Almeida, Norma Aparecida Dos Santos; Pazos-Moura, Carmen Cabanelas

    2013-02-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, has been connected to beneficial effects elicited by calorie restriction. Physiological adaptation to starvation requires higher activity of SIRT1 and also the suppression of thyroid hormone (TH) action to achieve energy conservation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that those two events are correlated and that TH may be a regulator of SIRT1 expression. Forty-eight-hour fasting mice exhibited reduced serum TH and increased SIRT1 protein content in liver and brown adipose tissue (BAT), and physiological thyroxine replacement prevented or attenuated the increment of SIRT1 in liver and BAT of fasted mice. Hypothyroid mice exhibited increased liver SIRT1 protein, while hyperthyroid ones showed decreased SIRT1 in liver and BAT. In the liver, decreased protein is accompanied by reduced SIRT1 activity and no alteration in its mRNA. Hyperthyroid and hypothyroid mice exhibited increases and decreases in food intake and body weight gain respectively. Food-restricted hyperthyroid animals (pair-fed to euthyroid group) exhibited liver and BAT SIRT1 protein levels intermediary between euthyroid and hyperthyroid mice fed ad libitum. Mice with TH resistance at the liver presented increased hepatic SIRT1 protein and activity, with no alteration in Sirt1 mRNA. These results suggest that TH decreases SIRT1 protein, directly and indirectly, via food ingestion control and, in the liver, this reduction involves TRβ. The SIRT1 reduction induced by TH has important implication to integrated metabolic responses to fasting, as the increase in SIRT1 protein requires the fasting-associated suppression of TH serum levels.

  17. Are separable aromatase systems involved in hormonal regulation of the male brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchison, J.B.; Schumacher, M.; Steimer, T.; Gahr, M.

    1990-01-01

    In vitro study of testosterone (T) metabolism shows that formation of estradiol-17 beta (E2) is regionally specific within the preoptic area (POA) of the male ring dove. The POA is known to be involved in the formation of E2 required for specific components of male sexual behavior. Two sub-areas of high aromatase activity, anterior (aPOA) and posterior preoptic (pPOA) areas, have been identified. Aromatase activity is higher in aPOA than in pPOA. The aromatase activity within the aPOA is also more sensitive to the inductive effects of low circulating T, derived from subcutaneous silastic implants, than the enzyme activity in pPOA. Kinetic analysis of preoptic fractions indicates that a similar high-affinity enzyme occurs in both areas (apparent Km less than 14 nM), but the Vmax of aPOA enzyme activity is higher than pPOA. Cells containing estrogen receptors (ER) are localized in areas of high aromatase activity. There is overlap between immunostained cells in the aPOA and in samples containing inducible aromatase activity measured in vitro. Within the aPOA there is a higher density of ER cells in the nucleus preopticus medialis. The pPOA area also contains ER, notably in the nucleus interstitialis, but at a lower density. We conclude that the hormonal regulation of the male preoptic-anterior hypothalamic region, which is a target for the behavioral action of T, involves at least two inducible aromatase systems with associated estrogen receptor cells

  18. Let-7 and MicroRNA-148 Regulate Parathyroid Hormone Levels in Secondary Hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilo, Vitali; Mor-Yosef Levi, Irit; Abel, Roy; Mihailović, Aleksandra; Wasserman, Gilad; Naveh-Many, Tally; Ben-Dov, Iddo Z

    2017-08-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism commonly complicates CKD and associates with morbidity and mortality. We profiled microRNA (miRNA) in parathyroid glands from experimental hyperparathyroidism models and patients receiving dialysis and studied the function of specific miRNAs. miRNA deep-sequencing showed that human and rodent parathyroids share similar profiles. Parathyroids from uremic and normal rats segregated on the basis of their miRNA expression profiles, and a similar finding was observed in humans. We identified parathyroid miRNAs that were dysregulated in experimental hyperparathyroidism, including miR-29, miR-21, miR-148, miR-30, and miR-141 (upregulated); and miR-10, miR-125, and miR-25 (downregulated). Inhibition of the abundant let-7 family increased parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion in normal and uremic rats, as well as in mouse parathyroid organ cultures. Conversely, inhibition of the upregulated miR-148 family prevented the increase in serum PTH level in uremic rats and decreased levels of secreted PTH in parathyroid cultures. The evolutionary conservation of abundant miRNAs in normal parathyroid glands and the regulation of these miRNAs in secondary hyperparathyroidism indicates their importance for parathyroid function and the development of hyperparathyroidism. Specifically, let-7 and miR-148 antagonism modified PTH secretion in vivo and in vitro , implying roles for these specific miRNAs. These findings may be utilized for therapeutic interventions aimed at altering PTH expression in diseases such as osteoporosis and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  19. Regulation of fatty acid composition and lipid storage by thyroid hormone in mouse liver

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Xuan; Hou, Sarina; Zhang, Duo; Xia, Hongfeng; Wang, Yu-Cheng; Jiang, Jingjing; Yin, Huiyong; Ying, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Background Thyroid hormones (THs) are potent hormones modulating liver lipid homeostasis. The perturbation of lipid homeostasis is a hallmark of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a very common liver disorder. It was reported that NAFLD patients were associated with higher incidence of hypothyroidism. However, whether abnormal thyroid function contributes to the pathogenesis of NAFLD remains unclear. Results We used in vivo models to investigate the influence of hypothyroidism and TH ...

  20. Diet-Induced Growth Is Regulated via Acquired Leptin Resistance and Engages a Pomc-Somatostatin-Growth Hormone Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko Löhr

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Anorexigenic pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc/alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (αMSH neurons of the hypothalamic melanocortin system function as key regulators of energy homeostasis, also controlling somatic growth across different species. However, the mechanisms of melanocortin-dependent growth control still remain ill-defined. Here, we reveal a thus-far-unrecognized structural and functional connection between Pomc neurons and the somatotropic hypothalamo-pituitary axis. Excessive feeding of larval zebrafish causes leptin resistance and reduced levels of the hypothalamic satiety mediator pomca. In turn, this leads to reduced activation of hypophysiotropic somatostatin (Sst-neurons that express the melanocortin receptor Mc4r, elevated growth hormone (GH expression in the pituitary, and enhanced somatic growth. Mc4r expression and αMSH responsiveness are conserved in Sst-expressing hypothalamic neurons of mice. Thus, acquired leptin resistance and attenuation of pomca transcription in response to excessive caloric intake may represent an ancient mechanism to promote somatic growth when food resources are plentiful. : The melanocortin system controls energy homeostasis and somatic growth, but the underlying mechanisms are elusive. Löhr et al. identify a functional neural circuit in which Pomc neurons stimulate hypothalamic somatostatin neurons, thereby inhibiting hypophyseal growth hormone production. Excessive feeding and acquired leptin resistance attenuate this pathway, allowing faster somatic growth when food resources are rich. Keywords: Pomc neuron, somatostatin neuron, somatic growth, growth hormone, melanocortin system, high-fat diet, obesity, leptin resistance, zebrafish, mouse

  1. A FEEDBACK MODEL FOR TESTICULAR-PITUITARY AXIS HORMONE KINETICS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE REGULATION OF THE PROSTATE IN ADULT MALE RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The testicular-hypothalamic-pituitary axis regulates male reproductive system functions. A model describing the kinetics and dynamics of testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and luteinizing hormone (LH) was developed based on a model by Barton and Anderson (1997). The mode...

  2. The endogenous plant hormones and ratios regulate sugar and dry matter accumulation in Jerusalem artichoke in salt-soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingling; Shao, Tianyun; Yang, Hui; Chen, Manxia; Gao, Xiumei; Long, Xiaohua; Shao, Hongbo; Liu, Zhaopu; Rengel, Zed

    2017-02-01

    The changes in content of endogenous hormones in stolons and tubers of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) regulate tuber growth, but the specific knowledge about the importance of balance among the endogenous hormones is lacking. Two varieties of Jerusalem artichoke (NY-1 and QY-2) were tested for the endogenous zeatin (ZT), auxins (IAA), gibberellins (GA 3 ) and abscisic acid (ABA) in regulating sugar and dry matter accumulation in tubers. The dry matter content and sugar accumulation in tubers were correlated positively with endogenous ZT and negatively with GA 3 content and GA 3 /ABA and IAA/ABA content ratios. Throughout the tuber formation, ZT content was higher in NY-1 than QY-2 tubers, whereas ABA content was higher in QY-2 than NY-1 tubers. The content ratios GA 3 /ABA and IAA/ABA were greater in NY-1 than QY-2 before tuber initiation, but QY-2 surpassed NY-1 during the tuber growth stage. The GA 3 /ABA and IAA/ABA content ratios declined during tuber growth. The results suggested that a dynamic balance of endogenous hormones played an important role in tuber development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  4. [Role of the Periaqueductal Gray Matter of the Midbrain in Regulation of Somatic Pain Sensitivity During Stress: Participation of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor and Glucocorticoid Hormones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarushkina, N I; Filaretova, L P

    2015-01-01

    Periaqueductal gray matter of the midbrain (PAGM) plays a crucial role in the regulation of pain sensitivity under stress, involving in the stress-induced analgesia. A key hormonal system of adaptation under stress is the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis. HPA axis's hormones, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and glucocorticoids, are involved in stress-induced analgesia. Exogenous hormones of the HPA axis, similarly to the hormones produced under stress, may cause an analgesic effect. CRF-induced analgesia may be provided by glucocorticoid hormones. CRF and glucocorticoids-induced effects on somatic pain sensitivity may be mediated by PAGM. The aim of the review was to analyze the data of literature on the role of PAGM in the regulation of somatic pain sensitivity under stress and in providing of CRF and glucocorticoid-induced analgesia.

  5. Hormonal regulation of epithelial organization in a three-dimensional breast tissue culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speroni, Lucia; Whitt, Gregory S; Xylas, Joanna; Quinn, Kyle P; Jondeau-Cabaton, Adeline; Barnes, Clifford; Georgakoudi, Irene; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of hormone target breast cells in the 1970's resulted in suitable models for the study of hormone control of cell proliferation and gene expression using two-dimensional (2D) cultures. However, to study mammogenesis and breast tumor development in vitro, cells must be able to organize in three-dimensional (3D) structures like in the tissue. We now report the development of a hormone-sensitive 3D culture model for the study of mammogenesis and neoplastic development. Hormone-sensitive T47D breast cancer cells respond to estradiol in a dose-dependent manner by forming complex epithelial structures. Treatment with the synthetic progestagen promegestone, in the presence of estradiol, results in flat epithelial structures that display cytoplasmic projections, a phenomenon reported to precede side-branching. Additionally, as in the mammary gland, treatment with prolactin in the presence of estradiol induces budding structures. These changes in epithelial organization are accompanied by collagen remodeling. Collagen is the major acellular component of the breast stroma and an important player in tumor development and progression. Quantitative analysis of second harmonic generation of collagen fibers revealed that collagen density was more variable surrounding budding and irregularly shaped structures when compared to more regular structures; suggesting that fiber organization in the former is more anisotropic than in the latter. In sum, this new 3D model recapitulates morphogenetic events modulated by mammogenic hormones in the breast, and is suitable for the evaluation of therapeutic agents.

  6. Altered drug metabolism during pregnancy: hormonal regulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2010-06-01

    Medication use during pregnancy is prevalent, but pharmacokinetic information of most drugs used during pregnancy is lacking in spite of known effects of pregnancy on drug disposition. Accurate pharmacokinetic information is essential for optimal drug therapy in mother and fetus. Thus, understanding how pregnancy influences drug disposition is important for better prediction of pharmacokinetic changes of drugs in pregnant women. Pregnancy is known to affect hepatic drug metabolism, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Physiological changes accompanying pregnancy are probably responsible for the reported alteration in drug metabolism during pregnancy. These include elevated concentrations of various hormones such as estrogen, progesterone, placental growth hormones and prolactin. This review covers how these hormones influence expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), thus potentially responsible for altered drug metabolism during pregnancy. The reader will gain a greater understanding of the altered drug metabolism in pregnant women and the regulatory effects of pregnancy hormones on expression of DMEs. In-depth studies in hormonal regulatory mechanisms as well as confirmatory studies in pregnant women are warranted for systematic understanding and prediction of the changes in hepatic drug metabolism during pregnancy.

  7. Change of body height is regulated by thyroid hormone during metamorphosis in flatfishes and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juan; Ke, Zhonghe; Xia, Jianhong; He, Fang; Bao, Baolong

    2016-09-15

    Flatfishes with more body height after metamorphosis should be better adapted to a benthic lifestyle. In this study, we quantified the changes in body height during metamorphosis in two flatfish species, Paralichthys olivaceus and Platichthys stellatus. The specific pattern of cell proliferation along the dorsal and ventral edge of the body to allow fast growth along the dorsal/ventral axis might be related to the change of body height. Thyroid hormone (T4 and T3) and its receptors showed distribution or gene expression patterns similar to those seen for the cell proliferation. 2-Mercapto-1-methylimidazole, an inhibitor of endogenous thyroid hormone synthesis, inhibited cell proliferation and decreased body height, suggesting that the change in body shape was dependent on the local concentration of thyroid hormone to induce cell proliferation. In addition, after treatment with 2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole, zebrafish larvae were also shown to develop a slimmer body shape. These findings enrich our knowledge of the role of thyroid hormone during flatfish metamorphosis, and the role of thyroid hormone during the change of body height during post-hatching development should help us to understand better the biology of metamorphosis in fishes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Gene expression of thyrotropin- and corticotrophin-releasing hormones is regulated by environmental salinity in the euryhaline teleost Sparus aurata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Jarabo, Ignacio; Martos-Sitcha, J A; Barragán-Méndez, C; Martínez-Rodríguez, G; Mancera, J M; Arjona, F J

    2018-04-01

    In euryhaline teleosts, the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid and hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal axes (HPT and HPI, respectively) are regulated in response to environmental stimuli such as salinity changes. However, the molecular players participating in this physiological process in the gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata), a species of high value for aquaculture, are still not identified and/or fully characterized in terms of gene expression regulation. In this sense, this study identifies and isolates the thyrotropin-releasing hormone (trh) mRNA sequence from S. aurata, encoding prepro-Trh, the putative factor initiating the HPT cascade. In addition, the regulation of trh expression and of key brain genes in the HPI axis, i.e., corticotrophin-releasing hormone (crh) and corticotrophin-releasing hormone-binding protein (crhbp), was studied when the osmoregulatory status of S. aurata was challenged by exposure to different salinities. The deduced amino acid structure of trh showed 65-81% identity with its teleostean orthologs. Analysis of the tissue distribution of gene expression showed that trh mRNA is, though ubiquitously expressed, mainly found in brain. Subsequently, regulation of gene expression of trh, crh, and crhbp was characterized in fish acclimated to 5-, 15-, 40-, and 55-ppt salinities. In this regard, the brain gene expression pattern of trh mRNA was similar to that found for the crh gene, showing an upregulation of gene expression in seabream acclimated to the highest salinity tested. Conversely, crhbp did not change in any of the groups tested. Our results suggest that Trh and Crh play an important role in the acclimation of S. aurata to hypersaline environments.

  9. Ecdysteroids regulate the levels of Molt-Inhibiting Hormone (MIH expression in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirinart Techa

    Full Text Available Arthropod molt is coordinated through the interplay between ecdysteroids and neuropeptide hormones. In crustaceans, changes in the activity of Y-organs during the molt cycle have been regulated by molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH and crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH. Little has been known of the mode of direct effects of ecdysteroids on the levels of MIH and CHH in the eyestalk ganglia during the molt cycle. This study focused on a putative feedback of ecdysteroids on the expression levels of MIH transcripts using in vitro incubation study with ecdysteroids and in vivo RNAi in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. Our results show a specific expression of ecdysone receptor (EcR in which EcR1 is the major isoform in eyestalk ganglia. The initial elevation of MIH expression at the early premolt stages is replicated by in vitro incubations of eyestalk ganglia with ecdysteroids that mimic the intrinsic conditions of D0 stage: the concentration (75 ng/ml and composition (ponasterone A and 20-hydroxyecdysone at a 3:1 (w:w ratio. Additionally, multiple injections of EcR1-dsRNA reduce MIH expression by 67%, compared to the controls. Our data provide evidence on a putative feedback mechanism of hormonal regulation during molting cycle, specifically how the molt cycle is repeated during the life cycle of crustaceans. The elevated concentrations of ecdysteroids at early premolt stage may act positively on the levels of MIH expression in the eyestalk ganglia. Subsequently, the increased MIH titers in the hemolymph at postmolt would inhibit the synthesis and release of ecdysteroids by Y-organs, resulting in re-setting the subsequent molt cycle.

  10. Ecdysteroids regulate the levels of Molt-Inhibiting Hormone (MIH) expression in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techa, Sirinart; Chung, J Sook

    2015-01-01

    Arthropod molt is coordinated through the interplay between ecdysteroids and neuropeptide hormones. In crustaceans, changes in the activity of Y-organs during the molt cycle have been regulated by molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) and crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH). Little has been known of the mode of direct effects of ecdysteroids on the levels of MIH and CHH in the eyestalk ganglia during the molt cycle. This study focused on a putative feedback of ecdysteroids on the expression levels of MIH transcripts using in vitro incubation study with ecdysteroids and in vivo RNAi in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. Our results show a specific expression of ecdysone receptor (EcR) in which EcR1 is the major isoform in eyestalk ganglia. The initial elevation of MIH expression at the early premolt stages is replicated by in vitro incubations of eyestalk ganglia with ecdysteroids that mimic the intrinsic conditions of D0 stage: the concentration (75 ng/ml) and composition (ponasterone A and 20-hydroxyecdysone at a 3:1 (w:w) ratio). Additionally, multiple injections of EcR1-dsRNA reduce MIH expression by 67%, compared to the controls. Our data provide evidence on a putative feedback mechanism of hormonal regulation during molting cycle, specifically how the molt cycle is repeated during the life cycle of crustaceans. The elevated concentrations of ecdysteroids at early premolt stage may act positively on the levels of MIH expression in the eyestalk ganglia. Subsequently, the increased MIH titers in the hemolymph at postmolt would inhibit the synthesis and release of ecdysteroids by Y-organs, resulting in re-setting the subsequent molt cycle.

  11. Alcohol intake and its effect on some appetite-regulating hormones in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calissendorff, Jan; Gustafsson, Thomas; Holst, Jens Juul

    2012-01-01

    and methods. Ten participants were investigated on four occasions. On one alcohol was ingested; on another alcohol was given after pretreatment with sucralfate; on a third water was ingested; and on a fourth sucralfate was ingested followed by water. Serum hormones and ethanol concentrations were determined......Background. Alcohol stimulates appetite. Ghrelin, obestatin, glucagon-like peptide 1 and leptin are putative mediators. Objective. We studied whether alcohol ingestion affects serum levels of these peripheral hormones, and if gastroprotective sucralfate prevents such an effect. Materials....... Results. The ghrelin and leptin levels fell after ingestion of alcohol, whereas the obestatin and GLP-1 levels remained unchanged. Sucralfate did not affect any of the basal four hormone levels, nor the ghrelin or leptin responses to alcohol. Conclusions. An appetite-stimulating effect of alcohol...

  12. p35 regulates the CRM1-dependent nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of nuclear hormone receptor coregulator-interacting factor 1 (NIF-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Su Zhao

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase, which plays critical roles in a wide spectrum of neuronal functions including neuronal survival, neurite outgrowth, and synapse development and plasticity. Cdk5 activity is controlled by its specific activators: p35 or p39. While knockout studies reveal that Cdk5/p35 is critical for neuronal migration during early brain development, functions of Cdk5/p35 have been unraveled through the identification of the interacting proteins of p35, most of which are Cdk5/p35 substrates. However, it remains unclear whether p35 can regulate neuronal functions independent of Cdk5 activity. Here, we report that a nuclear protein, nuclear hormone receptor coregulator (NRC-interacting factor 1 (NIF-1, is a new interacting partner of p35. Interestingly, p35 regulates the functions of NIF-1 independent of Cdk5 activity. NIF-1 was initially discovered as a transcriptional regulator that enhances the transcriptional activity of nuclear hormone receptors. Our results show that p35 interacts with NIF-1 and regulates its nucleocytoplasmic trafficking via the nuclear export pathway. Furthermore, we identified a nuclear export signal on p35; mutation of this site or blockade of the CRM1/exportin-dependent nuclear export pathway resulted in the nuclear accumulation of p35. Intriguingly, blocking the nuclear export of p35 attenuated the nuclear accumulation of NIF-1. These findings reveal a new p35-dependent mechanism in transcriptional regulation that involves the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription regulators.

  13. p35 regulates the CRM1-dependent nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of nuclear hormone receptor coregulator-interacting factor 1 (NIF-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao-Su; Fu, Wing-Yu; Chien, Winnie W Y; Li, Zhen; Fu, Amy K Y; Ip, Nancy Y

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase, which plays critical roles in a wide spectrum of neuronal functions including neuronal survival, neurite outgrowth, and synapse development and plasticity. Cdk5 activity is controlled by its specific activators: p35 or p39. While knockout studies reveal that Cdk5/p35 is critical for neuronal migration during early brain development, functions of Cdk5/p35 have been unraveled through the identification of the interacting proteins of p35, most of which are Cdk5/p35 substrates. However, it remains unclear whether p35 can regulate neuronal functions independent of Cdk5 activity. Here, we report that a nuclear protein, nuclear hormone receptor coregulator (NRC)-interacting factor 1 (NIF-1), is a new interacting partner of p35. Interestingly, p35 regulates the functions of NIF-1 independent of Cdk5 activity. NIF-1 was initially discovered as a transcriptional regulator that enhances the transcriptional activity of nuclear hormone receptors. Our results show that p35 interacts with NIF-1 and regulates its nucleocytoplasmic trafficking via the nuclear export pathway. Furthermore, we identified a nuclear export signal on p35; mutation of this site or blockade of the CRM1/exportin-dependent nuclear export pathway resulted in the nuclear accumulation of p35. Intriguingly, blocking the nuclear export of p35 attenuated the nuclear accumulation of NIF-1. These findings reveal a new p35-dependent mechanism in transcriptional regulation that involves the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription regulators.

  14. Cellular localization of steroid hormone-regulated proteins during sexual development in achlya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunt, S.A.; Silver, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    In the fungus Achlya ambisexualis sexual development in the male strain E87 is controlled by the steroid hormone antheridiol. To investigate the effects of antheridiol on the synthesis and/or accumulation of specific cellular proteins we have analyzed [ 35 S]methionine-labeled proteins from control and hormone-treated cells using both one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) PAGE. The addition of the hormone antheridiol to vegetatively growing cells of Achlya E87 was found to result in changes in the synthesis and/or accumulation of at least 16 specific proteins, which could be localized to the cytoplasmic, nuclear or cell was/cell membrane fractions. The most prominent changes observed in the hormone-treated cells included the appearance in the cytoplasmic fraction of labeled proteins at 28.4 and 24.3kD which were not detectable in control cells, and a significant enrichment in the labeling of a 24.3kD protein in the cell wall/cell membrane fraction. Quantitative changes in the [ 35 S]methionine labeling of several other proteins were noted in all three cell fractions

  15. Studies on the regulation of anuran metamorphosis by thyroid hormones and prolactin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, L.B.

    1985-01-01

    Resorption of the tail of the anuran larva during metamorphosis is induced by the thyroid hormones. In contrast, the pituitary hormone prolactin favors growth of the tail fin and inhibits resorption. The present investigations were designed to explore the mechanisms by which the thyroid hormones and prolactin bring about their cellular effects. Incubation of explants of tail fin with derivatives of cAMP was shown to inhibit T 4 -induced resorption of explants in a manner similar to that of prolactin. Likewise, inhibition of phosphodiesterases also inhibited resorption. Prolactin, however, failed to alter the levels of cAMP in cultured explants of tail fin. Although cAMP antagonizes the resorptive effects of T 4 , prolactin apparently does not act by elevating cellular levels of that cyclic nucleotide. Newly synthesized proteins from explants of tail fin were examined by isotopical labeling followed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and fluorography. Incorporation of 35 S-methionine into four proteins was increased within 8 to 48 hours after exposure of explants to T 4 . Three of the same proteins appeared to be synthesized more rapidly in explants of fin from tadpoles at metamorphic climax than in fin from tadpoles of premetamorphic stages. These results indicate that treatment of explants with T 4 or elevation of endogenous levels of thyroid hormones during spontaneous metamorphosis increased the relative rates of synthesis of several proteins. Those proteins are potentially involved in initiating the effects of T 4 which lead to cell death and resorption of the tail

  16. Juvenile Firesetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Brittany; Freeman, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile firesetting is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Male gender, substance use, history of maltreatment, interest in fire, and psychiatric illness are commonly reported risk factors. Interventions that have been shown to be effective in juveniles who set fires include cognitive behavior therapy and educational interventions, whereas satiation has not been shown to be an effective intervention. Forensic assessments can assist the legal community in adjudicating youth with effective interventions. Future studies should focus on consistent assessment and outcome measures to create more evidence for directing evaluation and treatment of juvenile firesetters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Vasopressin regulates social recognition in juvenile and adult rats of both sexes, but in sex- and age-specific ways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenema, A H; Bredewold, R; De Vries, G J

    2012-01-01

    In adult male rats, vasopressin (AVP) facilitates social recognition via activation of V1a receptors within the lateral septum. Much less is known about how AVP affects social recognition in adult females or in juvenile animals of either sex. We found that administration of the specific V1a receptor antagonist d(CH(2))(5)[Tyr(Me)(2)]AVP into the lateral septum of adult rats impaired, whereas AVP extended, social discrimination in both sexes. In juveniles, however, we detected a sex difference, such that males but not females showed social discrimination. Interestingly, administration of the V1a receptor antagonist to juveniles (either intracerebroventricularly or locally in the lateral septum) did not prevent social discrimination, but instead significantly decreased the investigation of a novel as opposed to a familiar animal in both sexes, with stronger effects in males. V1a receptors were found to be abundantly expressed in the lateral septum with higher binding density in females than in males. These findings demonstrate that activation of V1a receptors in the lateral septum is important for social recognition in both sexes, and that the roles of septal V1a receptors in social recognition change during development. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential regulation of kiss1 expression by melatonin and gonadal hormones in male and female Syrian hamsters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansel, L; Bolborea, M; Bentsen, A H

    2010-01-01

    In seasonal breeders, reproduction is synchronized to seasons by day length via the pineal hormone melatonin. Recently, we have demonstrated that Kiss1, a key activator of the reproductive function, is down-regulated in sexually inactive hamsters maintained in inhibitory short days (SDs). In rode......In seasonal breeders, reproduction is synchronized to seasons by day length via the pineal hormone melatonin. Recently, we have demonstrated that Kiss1, a key activator of the reproductive function, is down-regulated in sexually inactive hamsters maintained in inhibitory short days (SDs......). In rodents, Kiss1 is expressed in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) and in the arcuate nucleus (ARC). Because both the duration of the nocturnal peak of melatonin and circulating sex steroid levels vary with photoperiod, the aim of this study was to determine whether melatonin and sex steroids...... differentially regulate Kiss1 expression in the ARC and the AVPV. Kiss1 expression was examined by in situ hybridization in both male and female hamsters kept in various experimental conditions, and we observed that 1) SD exposure markedly reduced Kiss1 expression in the ARC and AVPV of male and female hamsters...

  19. Effect of exercise on photoperiod-regulated hypothalamic gene expression and peripheral hormones in the seasonal Dwarf Hamster Phodopus sungorus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Petri

    Full Text Available The Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus is a seasonal mammal responding to the annual cycle in photoperiod with anticipatory physiological adaptations. This includes a reduction in food intake and body weight during the autumn in anticipation of seasonally reduced food availability. In the laboratory, short-day induction of body weight loss can be reversed or prevented by voluntary exercise undertaken when a running wheel is introduced into the home cage. The mechanism by which exercise prevents or reverses body weight reduction is unknown, but one hypothesis is a reversal of short-day photoperiod induced gene expression changes in the hypothalamus that underpin body weight regulation. Alternatively, we postulate an exercise-related anabolic effect involving the growth hormone axis. To test these hypotheses we established photoperiod-running wheel experiments of 8 to 16 weeks duration assessing body weight, food intake, organ mass, lean and fat mass by magnetic resonance, circulating hormones FGF21 and insulin and hypothalamic gene expression. In response to running wheel activity, short-day housed hamsters increased body weight. Compared to short-day housed sedentary hamsters the body weight increase was accompanied by higher food intake, maintenance of tissue mass of key organs such as the liver, maintenance of lean and fat mass and hormonal profiles indicative of long day housed hamsters but there was no overall reversal of hypothalamic gene expression regulated by photoperiod. Therefore the mechanism by which activity induces body weight gain is likely to act largely independently of photoperiod regulated gene expression in the hypothalamus.

  20. Corticotropin-releasing hormone and mast cells in the regulation of mucosal barrier function in the human colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallon, Conny; Söderholm, Johan D

    2009-05-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is an important neuro-endocrine mediator of the stress response. Local effects of CRH in the intestinal mucosa have become evident in recent years. We showed that CRH activates CRH receptor subtypes R1 and R2 on subepithelial mast cells, thereby inducing increased transcellular uptake of protein antigens in human colonic biopsies in Ussing chambers. Ongoing studies also implicate local cholinergic signaling in regulation of macromolecular permeability in the human colon. Since increased uptake of antigenic molecules is associated with mucosal inflammation, our findings may have implications for understanding stress-related intestinal disorders.

  1. [Hormones and osteoporosis update. Regulation of bone remodeling by neuropeptides and neurotransmitters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Shu

    2009-07-01

    From the discovery of the regulation of bone remodelling by leptin, much attention has been focused on neurogenic control of bone remodelling. Various hypothalamic neuropeptides, which are involved in appetite regulation, are now revealed to be important regulators of bone remodelling. More recently, neurotransmitters, such as serotonin or catecholamines, are proven to be bone remodelling regulators.

  2. Juvenile Prostitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csapo, Marg

    1986-01-01

    Recent research and Canadian government committee reports concerning juvenile prostitution are reviewed. Proposals are made in the realms of law and social policy; and existing programs are described. (DB)

  3. Extending juvenility in grasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaeppler, Shawn; de Leon Gatti, Natalia; Foerster, Jillian

    2017-04-11

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for modulating the juvenile to adult developmental growth transition in plants, such as grasses (e.g. maize). In particular, the invention provides methods for enhancing agronomic properties in plants by modulating expression of GRMZM2G362718, GRMZM2G096016, or homologs thereof. Modulation of expression of one or more additional genes which affect juvenile to adult developmental growth transition such as Glossy15 or Cg1, in conjunction with such modulation of expression is also contemplated. Nucleic acid constructs for down-regulation of GRMZM2G362718 and/or GRMZM2G096016 are also contemplated, as are transgenic plants and products produced there from, that demonstrate altered, such as extended juvenile growth, and display associated phenotypes such as enhanced yield, improved digestibility, and increased disease resistance. Plants described herein may be used, for example, as improved forage or feed crops or in biofuel production.

  4. Recent Advances in Thyroid Hormone Regulation: Toward a New Paradigm for Optimal Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoermann, Rudolf; Midgley, John E. M.; Larisch, Rolf; Dietrich, Johannes W.

    2017-01-01

    In thyroid health, the pituitary hormone thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) raises glandular thyroid hormone production to a physiological level and enhances formation and conversion of T4 to the biologically more active T3. Overstimulation is limited by negative feedback control. In equilibrium defining the euthyroid state, the relationship between TSH and FT4 expresses clusters of genetically determined, interlocked TSH–FT4 pairs, which invalidates their statistical correlation within the euthyroid range. Appropriate reactions to internal or external challenges are defined by unique solutions and homeostatic equilibria. Permissible variations in an individual are much more closely constrained than over a population. Current diagnostic definitions of subclinical thyroid dysfunction are laboratory based, and do not concur with treatment recommendations. An appropriate TSH level is a homeostatic concept that cannot be reduced to a fixed range consideration. The control mode may shift from feedback to tracking where TSH becomes positively, rather than inversely related with FT4. This is obvious in pituitary disease and severe non-thyroid illness, but extends to other prevalent conditions including aging, obesity, and levothyroxine (LT4) treatment. Treatment targets must both be individualized and respect altered equilibria on LT4. To avoid amalgamation bias, clinically meaningful stratification is required in epidemiological studies. In conclusion, pituitary TSH cannot be readily interpreted as a sensitive mirror image of thyroid function because the negative TSH–FT4 correlation is frequently broken, even inverted, by common conditions. The interrelationships between TSH and thyroid hormones and the interlocking elements of the control system are individual, dynamic, and adaptive. This demands a paradigm shift of its diagnostic use. PMID:29375474

  5. Recent Advances in Thyroid Hormone Regulation: Toward a New Paradigm for Optimal Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Hoermann

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In thyroid health, the pituitary hormone thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH raises glandular thyroid hormone production to a physiological level and enhances formation and conversion of T4 to the biologically more active T3. Overstimulation is limited by negative feedback control. In equilibrium defining the euthyroid state, the relationship between TSH and FT4 expresses clusters of genetically determined, interlocked TSH–FT4 pairs, which invalidates their statistical correlation within the euthyroid range. Appropriate reactions to internal or external challenges are defined by unique solutions and homeostatic equilibria. Permissible variations in an individual are much more closely constrained than over a population. Current diagnostic definitions of subclinical thyroid dysfunction are laboratory based, and do not concur with treatment recommendations. An appropriate TSH level is a homeostatic concept that cannot be reduced to a fixed range consideration. The control mode may shift from feedback to tracking where TSH becomes positively, rather than inversely related with FT4. This is obvious in pituitary disease and severe non-thyroid illness, but extends to other prevalent conditions including aging, obesity, and levothyroxine (LT4 treatment. Treatment targets must both be individualized and respect altered equilibria on LT4. To avoid amalgamation bias, clinically meaningful stratification is required in epidemiological studies. In conclusion, pituitary TSH cannot be readily interpreted as a sensitive mirror image of thyroid function because the negative TSH–FT4 correlation is frequently broken, even inverted, by common conditions. The interrelationships between TSH and thyroid hormones and the interlocking elements of the control system are individual, dynamic, and adaptive. This demands a paradigm shift of its diagnostic use.

  6. Hormonal contraception and regulation of menstruation: a study of young women's attitudes towards 'having a period'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Victoria Louise; Hoggart, Lesley

    2015-07-01

    Irregular bleeding is one of the most common side effects of hormonal contraception and a key reason for the discontinuation of hormonal methods. A qualitative study in which 12 young women volunteered to be interviewed in depth, along with six focus group discussions (23 participants). The study had two main research objectives: to document and investigate what young women think and feel about menstruation and contraception, and to explore young women's preferences regarding the intersection of contraceptives and bleeding patterns. Although participants held a broad view that menstruation can be an inconvenience, they did ascribe positive values to having a regular bleed. Bleeding was seen as a signifier of non-pregnancy and also an innate part of being a woman. A preference for a 'natural' menstruating body was a strong theme, and the idea of selecting a hormonal contraceptive that might stop the bleeding was not overly popular, unless the young woman suffered with painful natural menstruation. Contraceptives that mimicked the menstrual cycle were acceptable to most, suggesting that cyclic bleeding still holds a symbolic function for women. When counselling young women about the effect of different contraceptive modalities on their bleeding, practitioners should explore how the women feel about their bleeding, including how they might feel if their bleeding stopped or if they experienced erratic bleeding patterns. Practitioners also need to recognise the subjective understanding of the 'natural body' as held by some women, and in these cases to support them in their seeking out of non-hormonal methods of contraception. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Developmental and hormonal regulation of fiber quality in two natural-colored cotton cultivars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiang; HU Da-peng; LI Yuan; CHEN Yuan; Eltayib H.M.A.Abidallha; DONG Zhao-di; CHEN De-hua; ZHANG Lei

    2017-01-01

    Cotton cultivars with brown (Xiangcaimian 2),green (Wanmian 39) and white (Sumian 9) fiber were investigated to study fiber developmental characteristics of natural-colored cotton and the effect of hormones on fiber quality at different stages after anthesis.Fiber lengths of both natural-colored cottons were lower than the white-fibered control,with brown-flbered cotton longer than green.Fiber strength,micronaire and maturation of natural-colored cotton were also lower than the control.The shorter fiber of the green cultivar was due to slower growth during 10 to 30 days post-anthesis (DPA).Likewise,the lower fiber strength,micronaire and maturation of natured-colored cotton were also due to slower growth during this pivotal stage.Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) content at 10 DPA,and abscisic acid (ABA) content at 30 to 40 DPA were lower in the fibers of the natural-colored than that of the white-flbered cotton.After applying 20 mg L-1 gibberellic acid (GA3),the IAA content at 20 DPA in the brown and green-fibered cottons increased by 51.07 and 64.33%,fiber ABA content increased by 38.96 and 24.40%,and fiber length increased by 8.13 and 13.96%,respectively.Fiber strength,micronaire and maturation were also enhanced at boll opening stage.Those results suggest that the level of endogenous hormones affect fiber quality.Application of external hormones can increase hormone content in natural-colored cotton fiber,improving its quality.

  8. Hormonal regulation of response to oxidative stress in insects - an update

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodrík, Dalibor; Bednářová, Andrea; Zemanová, Milada; Krishnan, N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 10 (2015), s. 25788-25816 E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-07172S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : adipokinetic hormones (AKH) * AKH gene * anti-oxidative mechanisms Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.257, year: 2015 http://www.mdpi.com/1422-0067/16/10/25788

  9. Salt tolerance and regulation of gas exchange and hormonal homeostasis by auxin-priming in wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Iqbal

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to assess the regulatory effects of auxin-priming on gas exchange and hormonal homeostasis in spring wheat subjected to saline conditions. Seeds of MH-97 (salt-intolerant and Inqlab-91 (salt-tolerant cultivars were subjected to 11 priming treatments (three hormones x three concentrations + two controls and evaluated under saline (15 dS m-1 and nonsaline (2.84 dS m-1 conditions. The priming treatments consisted of: 5.71, 8.56, and 11.42 × 10-4 mol L-1 indoleacetic acid; 4.92, 7.38, and 9.84 × 10-4 mol L-1 indolebutyric acid; 4.89, 7.34, and 9.79 × 10-4 mol L-1 tryptophan; and a control with hydroprimed seeds. A negative control with nonprimed seeds was also evaluated. All priming agents diminished the effects of salinity on endogenous abscisic acid concentration in the salt-intolerant cultivar. Grain yield was positively correlated with net CO2 assimilation rate and endogenous indoleacetic acid concentration, and it was negatively correlated with abscisic acid and free polyamine concentrations. In general, the priming treatment with tryptophan at 4.89 × 10-4 mol L-1 was the most effective in minimizing yield losses and reductions in net CO2 assimilation rate, under salt stress conditions. Hormonal homeostasis increases net CO2 assimilation rate and confers tolerance to salinity on spring wheat.

  10. Regulation of ODC activity in the thymus and liver of rats by adrenal hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahner, S L; Prahlad, K V; Mitchell, J L

    1986-01-01

    The activity of L-ornithine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.17, ODC) has become a useful indicator of hormone responsiveness. Various regimens of dexamethasone, aldosterone and epinephrine, alone or in combination, were administered to adrenalectomized rats either in acute or chronic doses. In addition, adrenalectomized rats, which were chronically treated with aldosterone and epinephrine, were given a single injection of 50 micrograms dexamethasone and sacrificed at various time intervals after hormone treatment. Hepatic and thymic ODC activity was measured. The expected dexamethasone effect, an increase in hepatic and a decrease in thymic ODC, was observed. This study also revealed that aldosterone induced similar responses in these tissues. Epinephrine had the opposite effect since chronic administration of dexamethasone or aldosterone with epinephrine resulted in control levels of ODC. Furthermore, when aldosterone and epinephrine were chronically administered to adrenalectomized rats, to study the acute effects of dexamethasone on rat thymus and liver, the time course of the response in each tissue was found to be distinct. The influence of the adrenal gland on rat thymus and liver is not restricted only to glucocorticoids, but may also involve other hormones which it secretes.

  11. Vitamin D hormone regulates serotonin synthesis. Part 1: relevance for autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Rhonda P; Ames, Bruce N

    2014-06-01

    Serotonin and vitamin D have been proposed to play a role in autism; however, no causal mechanism has been established. Here, we present evidence that vitamin D hormone (calcitriol) activates the transcription of the serotonin-synthesizing gene tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) in the brain at a vitamin D response element (VDRE) and represses the transcription of TPH1 in tissues outside the blood-brain barrier at a distinct VDRE. The proposed mechanism explains 4 major characteristics associated with autism: the low concentrations of serotonin in the brain and its elevated concentrations in tissues outside the blood-brain barrier; the low concentrations of the vitamin D hormone precursor 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D3]; the high male prevalence of autism; and the presence of maternal antibodies against fetal brain tissue. Two peptide hormones, oxytocin and vasopressin, are also associated with autism and genes encoding the oxytocin-neurophysin I preproprotein, the oxytocin receptor, and the arginine vasopressin receptor contain VDREs for activation. Supplementation with vitamin D and tryptophan is a practical and affordable solution to help prevent autism and possibly ameliorate some symptoms of the disorder. © FASEB.

  12. Exogenous thyroid hormones regulate the activity of citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase in warm- but not cold-acclimated lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Megan A.; Regish, Amy M.; McCormick, Stephen; Manzon, Richard G.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal acclimation is known to elicit metabolic adjustments in ectotherms, but the cellular mechanisms and endocrine control of these shifts have not been fully elucidated. Here we examined the relationship between thermal acclimation, thyroid hormones and oxidative metabolism in juvenile lake whitefish. Impacts of thermal acclimation above (19 °C) or below (8 °C) the thermal optimum (13 °C) and exposure to exogenous thyroid hormone (60 µg T4/g body weight) were assessed by quantifying citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase activities in liver, red muscle, white muscle and heart. Warm acclimation decreased citrate synthase activity in liver and elevated both citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase activities in red muscle. In contrast, induction of hyperthyroidism in warm-acclimated fish stimulated a significant increase in liver citrate synthase and heart cytochrome c oxidase activities, and a decrease in the activity of both enzymes in red muscle. No change in citrate synthase or cytochrome c oxidase activities was observed following cold acclimation in either the presence or absence of exogenous thyroid hormones. Collectively, our results indicate that thyroid hormones influence the activity of oxidative enzymes more strongly in warm-acclimated than in cold-acclimated lake whitefish, and they may play a role in mediating metabolic adjustments observed during thermal acclimation.

  13. Exogenous thyroid hormones regulate the activity of citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase in warm- but not cold-acclimated lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Megan A; Regish, Amy M; McCormick, Stephen D; Manzon, Richard G

    2017-06-01

    Thermal acclimation is known to elicit metabolic adjustments in ectotherms, but the cellular mechanisms and endocrine control of these shifts have not been fully elucidated. Here we examined the relationship between thermal acclimation, thyroid hormones and oxidative metabolism in juvenile lake whitefish. Impacts of thermal acclimation above (19°C) or below (8°C) the thermal optimum (13°C) and exposure to exogenous thyroid hormone (60µg T 4 /g body weight) were assessed by quantifying citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase activities in liver, red muscle, white muscle and heart. Warm acclimation decreased citrate synthase activity in liver and elevated both citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase activities in red muscle. In contrast, induction of hyperthyroidism in warm-acclimated fish stimulated a significant increase in liver citrate synthase and heart cytochrome c oxidase activities, and a decrease in the activity of both enzymes in red muscle. No change in citrate synthase or cytochrome c oxidase activities was observed following cold acclimation in either the presence or absence of exogenous thyroid hormones. Collectively, our results indicate that thyroid hormones influence the activity of oxidative enzymes more strongly in warm-acclimated than in cold-acclimated lake whitefish, and they may play a role in mediating metabolic adjustments observed during thermal acclimation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The nuclear receptor corepressor has organizational effects within the developing amygdala on juvenile social play and anxiety-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, Heather M; Kolodkin, Mira H; Bychowski, Meaghan E; Auger, Catherine J; Auger, Anthony P

    2010-03-01

    Nuclear receptor function on DNA is regulated by the balanced recruitment of coregulatory complexes. Recruited proteins that increase gene expression are called coactivators, and those that decrease gene expression are called corepressors. Little is known about the role of corepressors, such as nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR), on the organization of behavior. We used real-time PCR to show that NCoR mRNA levels are sexually dimorphic, that females express higher levels of NCoR mRNA within the developing amygdala and hypothalamus, and that NCoR mRNA levels are reduced by estradiol treatment. To investigate the functional role of NCoR on juvenile social behavior, we infused small interfering RNA targeted against NCoR within the developing rat amygdala and assessed the enduring impact on juvenile social play behavior, sociability, and anxiety-like behavior. As expected, control males exhibited higher levels of juvenile social play than control females. Reducing NCoR expression during development further increased juvenile play in males only. Interestingly, decreased NCoR expression within the developing amygdala had lasting effects on increasing juvenile anxiety-like behavior in males and females. These data suggest that the corepressor NCoR functions to blunt sex differences in juvenile play behavior, a sexually dimorphic and hormone-dependent behavior, and appears critical for appropriate anxiety-like behavior in juvenile males and females.

  15. Regulation of mouse hepatic CYP2D9 mRNA expression by growth and adrenal hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarukamjorn, Kanokwan; Sakuma, Tsutomu; Jaruchotikamol, Atika; Oguro, Miki; Nemoto, Nobuo

    2006-02-01

    The constitutive expression of CYP2D9 is sexually dimorphic, namely, strong in males, but diminutive in females. Repetition of mimic growth hormone (GH) secretion pattern impressively returned the mRNA expression level to that in intact mice: the GH secretion pattern's regulation of CYP2D9 mRNA expression has been predominantly disrupted by exogenous GH-administration. The extensive decline of CYP2D9 mRNA expression becoming a sexually non-specific P450 in 9-week-old male mice exposed as neonates to monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) suggested that the male GH secretion pattern is a key to the regulation of male-specific CYP2D9 mRNA expression in adult mice. Dexamethasone (Dex) showed possibility to induce CYP2D9 mRNA expression in adult MSG-neonatally treated mice of either sex. However, the antagonism was observed by co-administration of Dex and GH in the males. Dex-administration in adrenalectomized mice significantly elevated CYP2D9 mRNA expression levels. These findings suggest that an adrenal hormone participates in the regulatory mechanism of CYP2D9 mRNA expression in association with GH.

  16. Quantitative determination of juvenile hormone III and 20-hydroxyecdysone in queen larvae and drone pupae of Apis mellifera by ultrasonic-assisted extraction and liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jinhui; Qi, Yitao; Hou, Yali; Zhao, Jing; Li, Yi; Xue, Xiaofeng; Wu, Liming; Zhang, Jinzhen; Chen, Fang

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, a method for the rapid and sensitive analysis of juvenile hormone III (JH III) and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) in queen larvae and drone pupae samples was presented. Ultrasound-assisted extraction provided a significant shortening of the leaching time for the extraction of JH III and 20E and satisfactory sensitivity as compared to the conventional shake extraction procedure. After extraction, determination was carried out by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) operating in electrospray ionization positive ion mode via multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) without any clean-up step prior to analysis. A linear gradient consisting of (A) water containing 0.1% formic acid and (B) acetonitrile containing 0.1% formic acid, and a ZORBAX SB-Aq column (100 mm × 2.1 mm, 3.5 μm) were employed to obtain the best resolution of the target analytes. The method was validated for linearity, limit of quantification, recovery, matrix effects, precision and stability. Drone pupae samples were found to contain 20E at concentrations of 18.0 ± 0.1 ng/g (mean ± SD) and JH III was detected at concentrations of 0.20 ± 0.06 ng/g (mean ± SD) in queen larvae samples. This validated method provided some practical information for the actual content of JH III and 20E in queen larvae and drone pupae samples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Down-regulation of ABCG2, a urate exporter, by parathyroid hormone enhances urate accumulation in secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Ryusei; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ikegami, Komei; Enoki, Yuki; Imafuku, Tadashi; Sakaguchi, Yoshiaki; Murata, Michiya; Nishida, Kento; Miyamura, Shigeyuki; Ishima, Yu; Tanaka, Motoko; Matsushita, Kazutaka; Komaba, Hirotaka; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2017-03-01

    Hyperuricemia occurs with increasing frequency among patients with hyperparathyroidism. However, the molecular mechanism by which the serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) affects serum urate levels remains unknown. This was studied in uremic rats with secondary hyperparathyroidism where serum urate levels were found to be increased and urate excretion in the intestine and kidney decreased, presumably due to down-regulation of the expression of the urate exporter ABCG2 in intestinal and renal epithelial membranes. These effects were prevented by administration of the calcimimetic cinacalcet, a PTH suppressor, suggesting that PTH may down-regulate ABCG2 expression. This was directly tested in intestinal Caco-2 cells where the expression of ABCG2 on the plasma membrane was down-regulated by PTH (1-34) while its mRNA level remained unchanged. Interestingly, an inactive PTH derivative (13-34) had no effect, suggesting that a posttranscriptional regulatory system acts through the PTH receptor to regulate ABCG2 plasma membrane expression. As found in an animal study, additional clinical investigations showed that treatment with cinacalcet resulted in significant reductions in serum urate levels together with decreases in PTH levels in patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism undergoing dialysis. Thus, PTH down-regulates ABCG2 expression on the plasma membrane to suppress intestinal and renal urate excretion, and the effects of PTH can be prevented by cinacalcet treatment. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Let-7b regulates the expression of the growth hormone receptor gene in deletion-type dwarf chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shumao; Li, Hongmei; Mu, Heping; Luo, Wen; Li, Ying; Jia, Xinzheng; Wang, Sibing; Jia, Xiaolu; Nie, Qinghua; Li, Yugu; Zhang, Xiquan

    2012-07-10

    A deletion mutation in the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene results in the inhibition of skeletal muscle growth and fat deposition in dwarf chickens. We used microarray techniques to determine microRNA (miRNA) and mRNA expression profiles of GHR in the skeletal muscles of 14-day-old embryos as well as 7-week-old deletion-type dwarf and normal-type chickens. Our aim was to elucidate the miRNA regulation of GHR expression with respect to growth inhibition and fat deposition. At the same developmental stages, different expression profiles in skeletal muscles of dwarf and normal chickens occurred for four miRNAs (miR-1623, miR-181b, let-7b, and miR-128). At different developmental stages, there was a significant difference in the expression profiles of a greater number of miRNAs. Eleven miRNAs were up-regulated and 18 down-regulated in the 7-week-old dwarf chickens when compared with profiles in 14-day-old embryos. In 7-week-old normal chickens, seven miRNAs were up-regulated and nine down-regulated compared with those in 14-day-old embryos. In skeletal muscles, 22 genes were up-regulated and 33 down-regulated in 14-day-old embryos compared with 7-week-old dwarf chickens. Sixty-five mRNAs were up-regulated and 108 down-regulated in 14-day-old embryos as compared with 7-week-old normal chickens. Thirty-four differentially expressed miRNAs were grouped into 18 categories based on overlapping seed and target sequences. Only let-7b was found to be complementary to its target in the 3' untranslated region of GHR, and was able to inhibit its expression. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reactions indicated there were three main signaling pathways regulating skeletal muscle growth and fat deposition of chickens. These were influenced by let-7b-regulated GHR. Suppression of the cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) gene was found to be involved in the signaling pathway of adipocytokines. There is a critical miRNA, let-7b

  19. Lipid-induced thermogenesis is up-regulated by the first cold-water immersions in juvenile penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teulier, Loïc; Rey, Benjamin; Tornos, Jérémy; Le Coadic, Marion; Monternier, Pierre-Axel; Bourguignon, Aurore; Dolmazon, Virginie; Romestaing, Caroline; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Duchamp, Claude; Roussel, Damien

    2016-07-01

    The passage from shore to marine life is a critical step in the development of juvenile penguins and is characterized by a fuel selection towards lipid oxidation concomitant to an enhancement of lipid-induced thermogenesis. However, mechanisms of such thermogenic improvement at fledging remain undefined. We used two different groups of pre-fledging king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) to investigate the specific contribution of cold exposure during water immersion to lipid metabolism. Terrestrial penguins that had never been immersed in cold water were compared with experimentally cold-water immersed juveniles. Experimentally immersed penguins underwent ten successive immersions at approximately 9-10 °C for 5 h over 3 weeks. We evaluated adaptive thermogenesis by measuring body temperature, metabolic rate and shivering activity in fully immersed penguins exposed to water temperatures ranging from 12 to 29 °C. Both never-immersed and experimentally immersed penguins were able to maintain their homeothermy in cold water, exhibiting similar thermogenic activity. In vivo, perfusion of lipid emulsion at thermoneutrality induced a twofold larger calorigenic response in experimentally immersed than in never-immersed birds. In vitro, the respiratory rates and the oxidative phosphorylation efficiency of isolated muscle mitochondria were not improved with cold-water immersions. The present study shows that acclimation to cold water only partially reproduced the fuel selection towards lipid oxidation that characterizes penguin acclimatization to marine life.

  20. Sevoflurane-induced down-regulation of hippocampal oxytocin and arginine vasopressin impairs juvenile social behavioral abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi-Bin; Yang, Xiao-Yu; Yuan, Bao-Long; Niu, Li-Jun; Zhou, Xue; Huang, Wen-Qi; Feng, Xia; Zhou, Li-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Cumulative evidence indicates that early childhood anesthesia can alter a child's future behavioral performance. Animal researchers have found that sevoflurane, the most commonly used anesthetic for children, can produce damage in the neonatal brains of rodents. To further investigate this phenomenon, we focused on the influence of sevoflurane anesthesia on the development of juvenile social behavioral abilities and the pro-social proteins oxytocin (OT) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) in the neonatal hippocampus. A single 6-h sevoflurane exposure for postnatal day 5 mice resulted in decreased OT and AVP messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in the hippocampus. OT and AVP proteins became sparsely distributed in the dorsal hippocampus after the exposure to sevoflurane. Compared with the air-treated group, mice in the sevoflurane-treated group showed signs of impairment in social recognition memory formation and social discrimination ability. Sevoflurane anesthesia reduces OT and AVP activities in the neonatal hippocampus and impairs social recognition memory formation and social discrimination ability in juvenile mice.

  1. Roles of sex hormones on the regulation of leptin secretion in pregnant golden hamster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cheng; Yang Liguo

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of sex hormones on the secretion of leptin and the causative factor of the gestational leptin spike in the golden hamster. Methods: Three months old female golden hamster were used as animal model. As a source of high level estradiol and progesterone, silicane rubber tubes impregnates with estradiol and progesterone were prepared and their bioactivity were determined. Antisera against estradiol and progesterone were prepared and activity tested to be used, for the elimination of the effects of endogenous hormones on leptin secretion in the subsequent experiments. Biological activity of the antiserum was determined by evaluating effects of these antisera on the weight of uterus or ovary. Groups of pregnant animals were ovariectomied during day 11 of pregnancy to explore the effect of the gonad on the secretion of leptin. Groups of virgin animals were ovariectomied and the silicone rubber tubes containing estradiol and progesterone were implanted to determine the effect of high-level estradiol and progesterone on the secretion of leptin in vivo. Results: Plasma concentration of leptin decreased and the gestational leptin profile disappeared with absence of the secretion spike on day 12 after ovariectomy on the day 11 of pregnancy. Injections of antiserum against estradiol or progesterone had no significant effect on the plasma concentration of leptin. Leptin level significantly decreased after ovariectomy in the virgin golden hamsters (p < 0.05). Implantation of silicone rubber tubes of estradiol or progesterone after ovariectomy could not restore leptin levels, but implantation of tubes containing both estradiol and progesterone could prevent the decrease of leptin levels. Conclusion: Our results suggested that sex hormones had important regulatory effect on the secretion of leptin. Estradiol plus progesterone had stimulatory effects on the secretion of leptin in vivo. High estradiol and progesterone levels during pregnancy was

  2. Effects of prenatal dexamethasone treatment on physical growth, pituitary-adrenal hormones, and performance of motor, motivational, and cognitive tasks in juvenile and adolescent common marmoset monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Jonas; Knapman, Alana; Zürcher, Nicole R; Pilloud, Sonia; Maier, Claudia; Diaz-Heijtz, Rochellys; Forssberg, Hans; Dettling, Andrea; Feldon, Joram; Pryce, Christopher R

    2008-12-01

    Synthetic glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone (DEX) are commonly used to prevent respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants, but there is emerging evidence of subsequent neurobehavioral abnormalities (e.g. problems with inattention/hyperactivity). In the present study, we exposed pregnant common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus, primates) to daily repeated DEX (5 mg/kg by mouth) during either early (d 42-48) or late (d 90-96) pregnancy (gestation period of 144 days). Relative to control, and with a longitudinal design, we investigated DEX effects in offspring in terms of physical growth, plasma ACTH and cortisol titers, social and maintenance behaviors, skilled motor reaching, motivation for palatable reward, and learning between infancy and adolescence. Early DEX resulted in reduced sociability in infants and increased motivation for palatable reward in adolescents. Late DEX resulted in a mild transient increase in knee-heel length in infants and enhanced reversal learning of stimulus-reward association in adolescents. There was no effect of either early or late DEX on basal plasma ACTH or cortisol titers. Both treatments resulted in impaired skilled motor reaching in juveniles, which attenuated in early DEX but persisted in late DEX across test sessions. The increased palatable-reward motivation and decreased social motivation observed in early DEX subjects provide experimental support for the clinical reports that prenatal glucocorticoid treatment impairs social development and predisposes to metabolic syndrome. These novel primate findings indicate that fetal glucocorticoid overexposure can lead to abnormal development of motor, affective, and cognitive behaviors. Importantly, the outcome is highly dependent upon the timing of glucocorticoid overexposure.

  3. Role of pulmonary diseases and physical condition in the regulation of vasoactive hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietanen, E; Marniemi, J; Liippo, K; Seppänen, A; Hartiala, J; Viinamäki, O

    1988-12-01

    Lungs have many non-respiratory metabolic functions, of which some take place in the capillary endothelium, while others are in parenchymal lung tissue. We have studied the role of the lungs in the metabolism of vasoactive and some other hormones by comparing patients who have undergone lung resection to those having various obstructive or fibrotic lung diseases. We have also compared these groups with persons in good physical health. The data suggested that lung resection patients had low angiotensin II levels in plasma but the response of angiotensin II to exercise was normal. Also adrenalin concentration was low in the lung resection group while dopamine did not show any significant difference between the groups. When hormone levels were correlated to the exercise data, renin levels were especially related to physical condition. Serum post-exercise renin values were inversely related to the uneven distribution of lung perfusion, possibly thus reflecting the diminished pulmonary vascularization. A negative association was found between angiotensin II and diffusion capacity. Thus, the angiotensin II levels may preferably be controlled by the non-circulatory functions of the lungs.

  4. Steroid hormones as regulators of the proliferative activity of normal and neoplastic intestinal epithelial cells (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutton, P J; Barkla, D H

    1988-01-01

    Glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors are present in normal epithelial cells of both the small and large intestine and there have also been contentious reports of androgen, oestrogen and progesterone receptors in the epithelium of the normal large intestine. The majority of reports suggest that stimulation of the intestinal glucocorticoid receptors results in increased proliferation of epithelial cells in the small bowel, as does stimulation of androgen receptors and possibly mineralocorticoid receptors. The proliferative response of the normal intestine to oestrogens is difficult to evaluate and that to progestigens appears not to have been reported. Epidemiological studies reveal a higher incidence of bowel cancer in premenopausal women than in men of the same age and yet there is a lower incidence of these tumors in women of higher parity. These findings have been atributted to a variety of non-epithelial gender characteristic such as differences in bile metabolism, colonic bacterial and fecal transit times. In experimental animals, androgens have also been shown to influence carcinogenesis and this could well be attributed to changes in food intake etc. However, many studies have now revealed steroid hormone receptors on colorectal tumor cells and thus a direct effect of the steroid hormones on the epithelium during and after malignant transformation must now be considered.

  5. Developmental Regulation of Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone Gene Expression by the MSX and DLX Homeodomain Protein Families*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givens, Marjory L.; Rave-Harel, Naama; Goonewardena, Vinodha D.; Kurotani, Reiko; Berdy, Sara E.; Swan, Christo H.; Rubenstein, John L. R.; Robert, Benoit; Mellon, Pamela L.

    2010-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the central regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, controlling sexual maturation and fertility in diverse species from fish to humans. GnRH gene expression is limited to a discrete population of neurons that migrate through the nasal region into the hypothalamus during embryonic development. The GnRH regulatory region contains four conserved homeodomain binding sites (ATTA) that are essential for basal promoter activity and cell-specific expression of the GnRH gene. MSX and DLX are members of the Antennapedia class of non-Hox homeodomain transcription factors that regulate gene expression and influence development of the craniofacial structures and anterior forebrain. Here, we report that expression patterns of the Msx and Dlx families of homeodomain transcription factors largely coincide with the migratory route of GnRH neurons and co-express with GnRH in neurons during embryonic development. In addition, MSX and DLX family members bind directly to the ATTA consensus sequences and regulate transcriptional activity of the GnRH promoter. Finally, mice lacking MSX1 or DLX1 and 2 show altered numbers of GnRH-expressing cells in regions where these factors likely function. These findings strongly support a role for MSX and DLX in contributing to spatiotemporal regulation of GnRH transcription during development. PMID:15743757

  6. Developmental regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene expression by the MSX and DLX homeodomain protein families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givens, Marjory L; Rave-Harel, Naama; Goonewardena, Vinodha D; Kurotani, Reiko; Berdy, Sara E; Swan, Christo H; Rubenstein, John L R; Robert, Benoit; Mellon, Pamela L

    2005-05-13

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the central regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, controlling sexual maturation and fertility in diverse species from fish to humans. GnRH gene expression is limited to a discrete population of neurons that migrate through the nasal region into the hypothalamus during embryonic development. The GnRH regulatory region contains four conserved homeodomain binding sites (ATTA) that are essential for basal promoter activity and cell-specific expression of the GnRH gene. MSX and DLX are members of the Antennapedia class of non-Hox homeodomain transcription factors that regulate gene expression and influence development of the craniofacial structures and anterior forebrain. Here, we report that expression patterns of the Msx and Dlx families of homeodomain transcription factors largely coincide with the migratory route of GnRH neurons and co-express with GnRH in neurons during embryonic development. In addition, MSX and DLX family members bind directly to the ATTA consensus sequences and regulate transcriptional activity of the GnRH promoter. Finally, mice lacking MSX1 or DLX1 and 2 show altered numbers of GnRH-expressing cells in regions where these factors likely function. These findings strongly support a role for MSX and DLX in contributing to spatiotemporal regulation of GnRH transcription during development.

  7. Correlation of hormonal and cytokines regulation in case of autoimmune thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria V. Zdor

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Studied immune aspects of the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT, which occupies the first place among human autoimmune pathologies. Treatment of the disease is based on thyroid hormones (TH replacement therapy. TH are today considered to be super antigens in autoimmune inflammation of the thyroid gland. Aims. On the basis of complex assessment of hormonal and immunological markers (TSH, TH, Treg, the Th1-, Th2-, Th17-marker cytokines with a research of possible interrelations of their indicators at patients with various clinical options of a current of AIT initially and against the background of replacement therapy of TH to define differences in functional activity of various types of immunocompetent cages depending on weight of inflammatory process for forecasting of a further clinical current of AIT, optimization of protocols of therapy and timely correction of strategy of treatment. Methods. In a prospective study, patients with AIT were evaluated for serum levels of cytokines and their receptors before initiating TH replacement therapy and on treatment by means of the ELISA modern methods with immuneсhemiluminescence and electroсhemiluminescence ways of detection. Results. Patients suffering from AIT showed an excess production of Th1-, Th2-, Th17- and Tregs marker cytokines with a deficiency of TGF-β1, closely connected with autoimmune hypothyroidism severity. Under pressure of TH therapy the indices of most cytokines decreased or improved, with the exception of IL-6, IL-8, IL-2, IFN-g, TNF-α. The greatest variations from the normal range were recorded in the complicated hypothyroidism. Conclusions. High serum TNF-α level in the onset of the disease is an important marker for the unfavourable AIT course and a predictor of hormone replacement therapy in case of its subclinical course. Safety indexes of functional thyroid epithelium are systemic levels of IL-8 and IL-22, their dynamic reduction in blood serum is an

  8. The effect of eight weeks endurance training and high-fat diet on appetite-regulating hormones in rat plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouhollah Haghshenas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Consumption of high-fat foods is one of the major causes of obesity. Physical exercise is a strategy used to counteract obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of eight weeks endurance training and high-fat diet (HFD on appetite-regulating hormones in rat plasma. Materials and Methods:Twenty eight male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: Control group with standard diet (CSD, endurance training with a standard diet (ESD, control group with high-fat diet (CHFD and endurance training with high-fat diet (EHFD. Twenty-four hr after the last training session, the blood samples were obtained and analyzed for hormones levels. Results: The significant increased weight gain and food intake and decreased plasma nesfatin-1 and PYY3-36 levels were observed in CHFD group, while exercise under the HFD antagonized these effects. There were no significant changes in ghrelin, insulin and leptin levels in different groups. Conclusion: These results suggest that exercise can prevent fattening effect of HFD. Probably, performing exercise makes a reduction of food intake and weight gain in rat via the increase in nesfatin-1 and PYY levels. However, further studies are necessary to understand the exact mechanisms involved in this field.

  9. A Review of Weight Control Strategies and Their Effects on the Regulation of Hormonal Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil A. Schwarz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The estimated prevalence of obesity in the USA is 72.5 million adults with costs attributed to obesity more than 147 billion dollars per year. Though caloric restriction has been used extensively in weight control studies, short-term success has been difficult to achieve, with long-term success of weight control being even more elusive. Therefore, novel approaches are needed to control the rates of obesity that are occurring globally. The purpose of this paper is to provide a synopsis of how exercise, sleep, psychological stress, and meal frequency and composition affect levels of ghrelin, cortisol, insulin GLP-1, and leptin and weight control. We will provide information regarding how hormones respond to various lifestyle factors which may affect appetite control, hunger, satiety, and weight control.

  10. Estradiol and luteinizing hormone regulate recognition memory following subchronic phencyclidine: Evidence for hippocampal GABA action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Alexander J; Schaler, Ari W; Fried, Jenny; Paine, Tracie A; Thornton, Janice E

    2018-05-01

    The cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia are poorly understood and difficult to treat. Estrogens may mitigate these symptoms via unknown mechanisms. To examine these mechanisms, we tested whether increasing estradiol (E) or decreasing luteinizing hormone (LH) could mitigate short-term episodic memory loss in a phencyclidine (PCP) model of schizophrenia. We then assessed whether changes in cortical or hippocampal GABA may underlie these effects. Female rats were ovariectomized and injected subchronically with PCP. To modulate E and LH, animals received estradiol capsules or Antide injections. Short-term episodic memory was assessed using the novel object recognition task (NORT). Brain expression of GAD67 was analyzed via western blot, and parvalbumin-containing cells were counted using immunohistochemistry. Some rats received hippocampal infusions of a GABA A agonist, GABA A antagonist, or GAD inhibitor before behavioral testing. We found that PCP reduced hippocampal GAD67 and abolished recognition memory. Antide restored hippocampal GAD67 and rescued recognition memory in PCP-treated animals. Estradiol prevented PCP's amnesic effect in NORT but failed to restore hippocampal GAD67. PCP did not cause significant differences in number of parvalbumin-expressing cells or cortical expression of GAD67. Hippocampal infusions of a GABA A agonist restored recognition memory in PCP-treated rats. Blocking hippocampal GAD or GABA A receptors in ovx animals reproduced recognition memory loss similar to PCP and inhibited estradiol's protection of recognition memory in PCP-treated animals. In summary, decreasing LH or increasing E can lessen short-term episodic memory loss, as measured by novel object recognition, in a PCP model of schizophrenia. Alterations in hippocampal GABA may contribute to both PCP's effects on recognition memory and the hormones' ability to prevent or reverse them. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Regulation of steroid hormones and energy status with cysteamine and its effect on spermatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yandi; Zhao, Yong; Yu, Shuai; Feng, Yanni; Zhang, Hongfu; Kou, Xin; Chu, Meiqiang; Cui, Liantao; Li, Lan; Zhang, Pengfei; Shen, Wei; Min, Lingjiang

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well known that cysteamine is a potent chemical for treating many diseases including cystinosis and it has many adverse effects, the effect of cysteamine on spermatogenesis is as yet unknown. Therefore the objective of this investigation was to explore the effects of cysteamine on spermatogenesis and the underlying mechanisms. Sheep were treated with vehicle control, 10 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg cysteamine for six months. After that, the semen samples were collected to determine the spermatozoa motility by computer-assisted sperm assay method. Blood samples were collected to detect the levels of hormones and the activity of enzymes. Spermatozoa and testis samples were collected to study the mechanism of cysteamine's actions. It was found that the effects of cysteamine on spermatogenesis were dose dependent. A low dose (10 mg/kg) cysteamine treatment increased ovine spermatozoa motility; however, a higher dose (20 mg/kg) decreased both spermatozoa concentration and motility. This decrease might be due to a reduction in steroid hormone production by the testis, a reduction in energy in the testis and spermatozoa, a disruption in the blood-testis barrier, or a breakdown in the vital signaling pathways involved in spermatogenesis. The inhibitory effects of cysteamine on sheep spermatogenesis may be used to model its effects on young male patients with cystinosis or other diseases that are treated with this drug. Further studies on spermatogenesis that focus on patients treated with cysteamine during the peripubertal stage are warranted. - Highlights: • Dose dependent effects of cysteamine on spermatogenesis • A low dose (10 mg/kg) increased spermatozoa motility. • A higher dose (20 mg/kg) decreased both concentration and motility of spermatozoa. • Disruption in the blood-testis barrier caused reduction in concentration and motility.

  12. Do the interactions between glucocorticoids and sex hormones regulate the development of the Metabolic Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marià eAlemany

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome is basically a maturity-onset disease. Typically, its manifestations begin to flourish years after the initial dietary or environmental aggression began. Since most hormonal, metabolic or defense responses are practically immediate, the procrastinated response don't seem justified. Only in childhood, the damages of the metabolic syndrome appear with minimal delay. Sex affects the incidence of the metabolic syndrome, but this is more an effect of timing than absolute gender differences, females holding better than males up to menopause, when the differences between sexes tend to disappear. The metabolic syndrome is related to an immune response, countered by a permanent increase in glucocorticoids, which keep the immune system at bay but also induce insulin resistance, alter the lipid metabolism, favor fat deposition, mobilize protein and decrease androgen synthesis. Androgens limit the operation of glucocorticoids, which is also partly blocked by estrogens, since they decrease inflammation (which enhances glucocorticoid release. These facts suggest that the appearance of the metabolic syndrome symptoms depends on the strength (i.e. levels of androgens and estrogens. The predominance of glucocorticoids and the full manifestation of the syndrome in men are favored by decreased androgen activity. Low androgens can be found in infancy, maturity, advanced age, or because of their inhibition by glucocorticoids (inflammation, stress, medical treatment. Estrogens decrease inflammation and reduce the glucocorticoid response. Low estrogen (infancy, menopause again allow the predominance of glucocorticoids and the manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. It is postulated that the equilibrium between sex hormones and glucocorticoids may be a critical element in the timing of the manifestation of metabolic syndrome-related pathologies.

  13. Regulation of steroid hormones and energy status with cysteamine and its effect on spermatogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yandi [College of Animal Science and Technology, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao 266109 (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Reproduction and Germplasm Enhancement, Universities of Shandong, Qingdao 266109 (China); Zhao, Yong [Key Laboratory of Animal Reproduction and Germplasm Enhancement, Universities of Shandong, Qingdao 266109 (China); College of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao 266109 (China); Yu, Shuai; Feng, Yanni [College of Animal Science and Technology, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao 266109 (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Reproduction and Germplasm Enhancement, Universities of Shandong, Qingdao 266109 (China); Zhang, Hongfu [State Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition, Institute of Animal Sciences, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing (China); Kou, Xin [Shouguang Hongde Farmer Co., Weifang 262700 (China); Chu, Meiqiang; Cui, Liantao; Li, Lan [College of Animal Science and Technology, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao 266109 (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Reproduction and Germplasm Enhancement, Universities of Shandong, Qingdao 266109 (China); Zhang, Pengfei [College of Animal Science and Technology, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao 266109 (China); College of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao 266109 (China); Shen, Wei [College of Animal Science and Technology, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao 266109 (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Reproduction and Germplasm Enhancement, Universities of Shandong, Qingdao 266109 (China); Min, Lingjiang, E-mail: mlj020963@hotmail.com [College of Animal Science and Technology, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao 266109 (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Reproduction and Germplasm Enhancement, Universities of Shandong, Qingdao 266109 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Although it is well known that cysteamine is a potent chemical for treating many diseases including cystinosis and it has many adverse effects, the effect of cysteamine on spermatogenesis is as yet unknown. Therefore the objective of this investigation was to explore the effects of cysteamine on spermatogenesis and the underlying mechanisms. Sheep were treated with vehicle control, 10 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg cysteamine for six months. After that, the semen samples were collected to determine the spermatozoa motility by computer-assisted sperm assay method. Blood samples were collected to detect the levels of hormones and the activity of enzymes. Spermatozoa and testis samples were collected to study the mechanism of cysteamine's actions. It was found that the effects of cysteamine on spermatogenesis were dose dependent. A low dose (10 mg/kg) cysteamine treatment increased ovine spermatozoa motility; however, a higher dose (20 mg/kg) decreased both spermatozoa concentration and motility. This decrease might be due to a reduction in steroid hormone production by the testis, a reduction in energy in the testis and spermatozoa, a disruption in the blood-testis barrier, or a breakdown in the vital signaling pathways involved in spermatogenesis. The inhibitory effects of cysteamine on sheep spermatogenesis may be used to model its effects on young male patients with cystinosis or other diseases that are treated with this drug. Further studies on spermatogenesis that focus on patients treated with cysteamine during the peripubertal stage are warranted. - Highlights: • Dose dependent effects of cysteamine on spermatogenesis • A low dose (10 mg/kg) increased spermatozoa motility. • A higher dose (20 mg/kg) decreased both concentration and motility of spermatozoa. • Disruption in the blood-testis barrier caused reduction in concentration and motility.

  14. Detailed characterisation of STC-1 cells and the pGIP/Neo sub-clone suggests the incretin hormones are translationally regulated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Anna L; Pan, Xiaobei; Marco-Ramell, Anna; Meharg, Caroline; Green, Brian D

    2017-10-01

    STC-1 is a heterogeneous plurihormonal cell line producing several prominent gut peptide hormones. pGIP/Neo is a genetically selected sub-clone of STC-1 with augmented levels of glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP). Morphometric parameters, hormone concentrations, mRNA transcripts, hormone immunocytochemistry and nutrient utilisation/production of these two cell lines were compared. Proglucagon-derived peptides (Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and - 2(GLP-2)) were lower in sub-clone cells than progenitor cells. High Content Analysis found altered intracellular GLP-1, GIP, cholecystokinin (CCK) and peptide YY (PYY) levels and differing hormone co-localisation. The proportion pGIP/Neo cells containing GIP immunoreactivity (82%) was greater than STC-1 (65%), as were the proportion with 'GIP only', 'GLP-1+GIP' or 'GIP+PYY' immunoreactivity. Most surprisingly mRNA transcripts of the proglucagon and GIP genes were inversely correlated to the levels of their translated peptides. This strongly suggests that proglucagon and GIP are encoded on 'translationally regulated genes' - a characteristic possessed by other endocrine hormones. Metabolomic profiling revealed differences in cellular nutrient utilisation/production and that under normal culture conditions both cell lines exhibit signs of overflow metabolism. These studies provide an insight into the metabolism and properties of these valuable cells, suggesting for the first time that incretin hormone genes are translationally regulated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Juvenile hormone biosynthesis and secretion by the female Corpora allata of the larval gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.) utilizing in vitro organ culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    Junvenile hormone synthesis and secretion in the female larval gypsy moth was investigated. In vitro culturing methods were developed including: incubating 2 pair of CC-CA gland complexes in 50 ul of osmotically balanced Grace's insect medium containing 1 uCi 3 H-methyl-methionine for 6 hr. JH homologues were identified and quantified using TLC and HPLC. In vitro methods were employed to investigate trends of JH secretion in 4th and ultimate female larval instar CA. Fourth instar CA produced JH peaks of 0.15 pmole/pr/hr between days 2 and 3, but the rate declined to half by day 4. Ultimate instar larvae began secreting 0.48 pmole/pr/hr, but by day 10, had decreased JH output to negligible levels which continued until pupation. Effects upon in vitro JH secretion produced by precocene II and caffeine were examined. Feulgen staining techniques revealed an equal number of cells (30) in 4th and last instar CA. Last instar Ca were 3 times larger than 4th in volume but their actual in vitro JH secretion at peak levels was only 20% greater. In vitro methods demonstrated that JH secretory trends differ in younger versus mature larval instars. Glandular volume increased in last instars but JH secretion was only 20% greater than in 4th's when compared on the basis of volume. Precocene II elicited a negative response on in vivo JH secretion at levels 10 times less than caffeine. Caffeine was judged not to significantly alter JH secretion

  16. The hormone prolactin is a novel, endogenous trophic factor able to regulate reactive glia and to limit retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Edith; Thebault, Stéphanie; Baeza-Cruz, German; Arredondo Zamarripa, David; Adán, Norma; Quintanar-Stéphano, Andrés; Condés-Lara, Miguel; Rojas-Piloni, Gerardo; Binart, Nadine; Martínez de la Escalera, Gonzalo; Clapp, Carmen

    2014-01-29

    Retinal degeneration is characterized by the progressive destruction of retinal cells, causing the deterioration and eventual loss of vision. We explored whether the hormone prolactin provides trophic support to retinal cells, thus protecting the retina from degenerative pressure. Inducing hyperprolactinemia limited photoreceptor apoptosis, gliosis, and changes in neurotrophin expression, and it preserved the photoresponse in the phototoxicity model of retinal degeneration, in which continuous exposure of rats to bright light leads to retinal cell death and retinal dysfunction. In this model, the expression levels of prolactin receptors in the retina were upregulated. Moreover, retinas from prolactin receptor-deficient mice exhibited photoresponsive dysfunction and gliosis that correlated with decreased levels of retinal bFGF, GDNF, and BDNF. Collectively, these data unveiled prolactin as a retinal trophic factor that may regulate glial-neuronal cell interactions and is a potential therapeutic molecule against retinal degeneration.

  17. Dietary thylakoids suppress blood glucose and modulate appetite-regulating hormones in pigs exposed to oral glucose tolerance test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montelius, Caroline; Szwiec, Katarzyna; Kardas, Marek

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Dietary chloroplast thylakoids have previously been found to reduce food intake and body weight in animal models, and to change metabolic profiles in humans in mixed-food meal studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the modulatory effects of thylakoids on glucose...... metabolism and appetite-regulating hormones during an oral glucose tolerance test in pigs fed a high fat diet. METHODS: Six pigs were fed a high fat diet (36 energy% fat) for one month before oral glucose tolerance test (1 g/kg d-glucose) was performed. The experiment was designed as a cross-over study......, either with or without addition of 0.5 g/kg body weight of thylakoid powder. RESULTS: The supplementation of thylakoids to the oral glucose tolerance test resulted in decreased blood glucose concentrations during the first hour, increased plasma cholecystokinin concentrations during the first two hours...

  18. Hormonal regulation of steroid receptor coactivator-1 mRNA in the male and female green anole brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerver, H N; Wade, J

    2015-03-01

    Green anole lizards are seasonal breeders, with male sexual behaviour primarily regulated by an annual increase in testosterone. Morphological, biochemical and behavioural changes associated with reproduction are activated by testosterone, generally with a greater effect in the breeding season (BS) than in the nonbreeding season (NBS). The present study investigates the possibility that differences in a steroid receptor coactivator may regulate this seasonal difference in responsiveness to testosterone. In situ hybridisation was used to examine the expression of steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) in the brains of gonadally intact male and female green anoles across breeding states. A second experiment examined gonadectomised animals with and without testosterone treatment. Gonadally intact males had more SRC-1 expressing cells in the preoptic area and larger volumes of this region as defined by these cells than females. Main effects of both sex and season (males > females and BS > NBS) were present in cell number and volume of the ventromedial hypothalamus. An interaction between sex and season suggested that high expression in BS males was driving these effects. In hormone-manipulated animals, testosterone treatment increased both the number of SRC-1 expressing cells in and volumes of the preoptic area and amygdala. These results suggest that testosterone selectively regulates SRC-1, and that this coactivator may play a role in facilitating reproductive behaviours across both sexes. However, changes in SRC-1 expression are not likely responsible for the seasonal change in responsiveness to testosterone. © 2014 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  19. Comparative metabolomics reveals endogenous ligands of DAF-12, a nuclear hormone receptor regulating C. elegans development and lifespan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanti, Parag; Bose, Neelanjan; Bethke, Axel; Judkins, Joshua C.; Wollam, Joshua; Dumas, Kathleen J.; Zimmerman, Anna M.; Campbell, Sydney L.; Hu, Patrick J.; Antebi, Adam; Schroeder, Frank C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Small-molecule ligands of nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) govern the transcriptional regulation of metazoan development, cell differentiation, and metabolism. However, the physiological ligands of many NHRs remain poorly characterized primarily due to lack of robust analytical techniques. Using comparative metabolomics, we identified endogenous steroids that act as ligands of the C. elegans NHR, DAF-12, a vitamin-D and liver-X receptor homolog regulating larval development, fat metabolism, and lifespan. The identified molecules feature unexpected chemical modifications and include only one of two DAF-12 ligands reported earlier, necessitating a revision of previously proposed ligand biosynthetic pathways. We further show that ligand profiles are regulated by a complex enzymatic network including the Rieske oxygenase DAF-36, the short-chain dehydrogenase DHS-16, and the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, HSD-1. Our results demonstrate the advantages of comparative metabolomics over traditional candidate-based approaches and provide a blueprint for the identification of ligands for other C. elegans and mammalian NHRs. PMID:24411940

  20. Thyroid hormone coordinately regulates Na sup + -K sup + -ATPase. alpha. - and. beta. -subunit mRNA levels in kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonough, A.A.; Brown, T.A.; Horowitz, B.; Chiu, R.; Schlotterbeck, J.; Bowen, J.; Schmitt, C.A. (Univ. of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (USA))

    1988-02-01

    Synthesis of the sodium pump, Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase, is regulated by thyroid hormone in responsive tissues. The purpose of this study was to determine if triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) regulates the concentration of the mRNAs coding for the two enzyme subunits, {alpha} and {beta}, and the time course of the response. A single dose of T{sub 3} was administered to hypothyroid rats that were killed at various times after injection. In the kidney cortexes of the T{sub 3}-injected animals, as well as hypothyroid and euthyroid rats, {alpha}- and {beta}-mRNA concentrations were measured by dot blot using cDNAs corresponding to the two mRNAs; {alpha}-subunit abundance was measured by Western blot using antibodies to the enzyme, and Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase activity was measured enzymatically. {alpha}- and {beta}-mRNAs increased coordinately to 1.6-fold over hypothyroid levels by 12 h after T{sub 3}. The authors conclude that T{sub 3} regulates Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase synthesis and activity by coordinately increasing the mRNAs of both the {alpha}- and {beta}-subunits of the enzyme.

  1. Leptin Regulation of Gonadotrope Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptors As a Metabolic Checkpoint and Gateway to Reproductive Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela K. Odle

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The adipokine leptin signals the body’s nutritional status to the brain, and particularly, the hypothalamus. However, leptin receptors (LEPRs can be found all throughout the body and brain, including the pituitary. It is known that leptin is permissive for reproduction, and mice that cannot produce leptin (Lep/Lep are infertile. Many studies have pinpointed leptin’s regulation of reproduction to the hypothalamus. However, LEPRs exist at all levels of the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis. We have previously shown that deleting the signaling portion of the LEPR specifically in gonadotropes impairs fertility in female mice. Our recent studies have targeted this regulation to the control of gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR expression. The hypotheses presented here are twofold: (1 cyclic regulation of pituitary GnRHR levels sets up a target metabolic checkpoint for control of the reproductive axis and (2 multiple checkpoints are required for the metabolic signaling that regulates the reproductive axis. Here, we emphasize and explore the relationship between the hypothalamus and the pituitary with regard to the regulation of GnRHR. The original data we present strengthen these hypotheses and build on our previous studies. We show that we can cause infertility in 70% of female mice by deleting all isoforms of LEPR specifically in gonadotropes. Our findings implicate activin subunit (InhBa mRNA as a potential leptin target in gonadotropes. We further show gonadotrope-specific upregulation of GnRHR protein (but not mRNA levels following leptin stimulation. In order to try and understand this post-transcriptional regulation, we tested candidate miRNAs (identified with in silico analysis that may be binding the Gnrhr mRNA. We show significant upregulation of one of these miRNAs in our gonadotrope-Lepr-null females. The evidence provided here, combined with our previous work, lay the foundation for metabolically regulated post

  2. Thyroid hormone negatively regulates CDX2 and SOAT2 mRNA expression via induction of miRNA-181d in hepatic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Chui Sun; Sinha, Rohit Anthony [Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disorders, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, 8, College Road, Singapore 169857 (Singapore); Ota, Sho; Katsuki, Masahito [Department of Molecular Endocrinology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Yen, Paul Michael, E-mail: paul.yen@duke-nus.edu.sg [Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disorders, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, 8, College Road, Singapore 169857 (Singapore)

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Thyroid hormone induces miR-181d expression in human hepatic cells and mouse livers. •Thyroid hormone downregulates CDX2 and SOAT2 (or ACAT2) via miR-181d. •miR-181d reduces cholesterol output from human hepatic cells. -- Abstract: Thyroid hormones (THs) regulate transcription of many metabolic genes in the liver through its nuclear receptors (TRs). Although the molecular mechanisms for positive regulation of hepatic genes by TH are well understood, much less is known about TH-mediated negative regulation. Recently, several nuclear hormone receptors were shown to downregulate gene expression via miRNAs. To further examine the potential role of miRNAs in TH-mediated negative regulation, we used a miRNA microarray to identify miRNAs that were directly regulated by TH in a human hepatic cell line. In our screen, we discovered that miRNA-181d is a novel hepatic miRNA that was regulated by TH in hepatic cell culture and in vivo. Furthermore, we identified and characterized two novel TH-regulated target genes that were downstream of miR-181d signaling: caudal type homeobox 2 (CDX2) and sterol O-acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2 or ACAT2). CDX2, a known positive regulator of hepatocyte differentiation, was regulated by miR-181d and directly activated SOAT2 gene expression. Since SOAT2 is an enzyme that generates cholesteryl esters that are packaged into lipoproteins, our results suggest miR-181d plays a significant role in the negative regulation of key metabolic genes by TH in the liver.

  3. Blood borne hormones in a cross-talk between peripheral and brain mechanisms regulating blood pressure, the role of circumventricular organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufnal, Marcin; Skrzypecki, Janusz

    2014-04-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that blood borne hormones modulate brain mechanisms regulating blood pressure. This appears to be mediated by the circumventricular organs which are located in the walls of the brain ventricular system and lack the blood-brain barrier. Recent evidence shows that neurons of the circumventricular organs express receptors for the majority of cardiovascular hormones. Intracerebroventricular infusions of hormones and their antagonists is one approach to evaluate the influence of blood borne hormones on the neural mechanisms regulating arterial blood pressure. Interestingly, there is no clear correlation between peripheral and central effects of cardiovascular hormones. For example, angiotensin II increases blood pressure acting peripherally and centrally, whereas peripherally acting pressor catecholamines decrease blood pressure when infused intracerebroventricularly. The physiological role of such dual hemodynamic responses has not yet been clarified. In the paper we review studies on hemodynamic effects of catecholamines, neuropeptide Y, angiotensin II, aldosterone, natriuretic peptides, endothelins, histamine and bradykinin in the context of their role in a cross-talk between peripheral and brain mechanisms involved in the regulation of arterial blood pressure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Necdin, a Prader-Willi syndrome candidate gene, regulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nichol L G; Wevrick, Rachel; Mellon, Pamela L

    2009-01-15

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a complex genetic disorder characterized by hyperphagia, obesity and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, all highly suggestive of hypothalamic dysfunction. The NDN gene, encoding the MAGE family protein, necdin, maps to the PWS chromosome region and is highly expressed in mature hypothalamic neurons. Adult mice lacking necdin have reduced numbers of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, but the mechanism for this reduction is unknown. Herein, we show that, although necdin is not expressed in an immature, migratory GnRH neuronal cell line (GN11), high levels are present in a mature GnRH neuronal cell line (GT1-7). Furthermore, overexpression of necdin activates GnRH transcription through cis elements bound by the homeodomain repressor Msx that are located in the enhancer and promoter of the GnRH gene, and knock-down of necdin expression reduces GnRH gene expression. In fact, overexpression of Necdin relieves Msx repression of GnRH transcription through these elements and necdin co-immunoprecipitates with Msx from GnRH neuronal cells, indicating that necdin may activate GnRH gene expression by preventing repression of GnRH gene expression by Msx. Finally, necdin is necessary for generation of the full complement of GnRH neurons during mouse development and extension of GnRH axons to the median eminence. Together, these results indicate that lack of necdin during development likely contributes to the hypogonadotrophic hypogonadal phenotype in individuals with PWS.

  5. Necdin, a Prader–Willi syndrome candidate gene, regulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons during development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nichol L.G.; Wevrick, Rachel; Mellon, Pamela L.

    2009-01-01

    Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS) is a complex genetic disorder characterized by hyperphagia, obesity and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, all highly suggestive of hypothalamic dysfunction. The NDN gene, encoding the MAGE family protein, necdin, maps to the PWS chromosome region and is highly expressed in mature hypothalamic neurons. Adult mice lacking necdin have reduced numbers of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, but the mechanism for this reduction is unknown. Herein, we show that, although necdin is not expressed in an immature, migratory GnRH neuronal cell line (GN11), high levels are present in a mature GnRH neuronal cell line (GT1-7). Furthermore, overexpression of necdin activates GnRH transcription through cis elements bound by the homeodomain repressor Msx that are located in the enhancer and promoter of the GnRH gene, and knock-down of necdin expression reduces GnRH gene expression. In fact, overexpression of Necdin relieves Msx repression of GnRH transcription through these elements and necdin co-immunoprecipitates with Msx from GnRH neuronal cells, indicating that necdin may activate GnRH gene expression by preventing repression of GnRH gene expression by Msx. Finally, necdin is necessary for generation of the full complement of GnRH neurons during mouse development and extension of GnRH axons to the median eminence. Together, these results indicate that lack of necdin during development likely contributes to the hypogonadotrophic hypogonadal phenotype in individuals with PWS. PMID:18930956

  6. Hormonal regulation of Na+-K+-ATPase in cultured epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.P.; Jones, D.; Wiesmann, W.P.

    1986-01-01

    Aldosterone and insulin stimulate Na + transport through mechanisms involving protein synthesis. Na + -K + -ATPase has been implicated in the action of both hormones. The authors examined the effect of aldosterone and insulin on Na + -K + -ATPase in epithelial cells in culture derived from toad urinary bladder (TB6C) and toad kidney (A6). Aldosterone, but not insulin, increases short-circuit current (I/sub sc/) in TB6C cells. Aldosterone increases Na + -K + -[ 32 P]ATPase activity after 18 h of incubation, but no effect can be seen at 3 and 6 h. Amiloride, which inhibits aldosterone-induced increases in I/sub sc/, has no effect on either basal or aldosterone stimulated enzyme activity. Both aldosterone and insulin increase I/sub sc/ in A6 cells and when added together are synergistic. Aldosterone stimulates enzyme activity in A6 cells, but insulin alone has no effect. However, aldosterone and insulin together stimulate enzyme activity more than aldosterone alone. It appears that stimulation of Na + -K + -ATPase activity is involved in aldosterone action in both cell lines but does not appear to be due to increased Na + entry, since enhanced enzyme activity is not inhibited by amiloride. In contrast, insulin alone has no direct effect on Na + -K + -ATPase, although the increased enzyme activity following both agents in combination may explain their synergism on I/sub sc/

  7. Effect of aerobic exercise on hunger feelings and satiety regulating hormones in obese teenage girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Wagner L; Balagopal, P Babu; Lofrano-Prado, Mara C; Oyama, Lila M; Tenório, Thiago Ricardo; Botero, João Paulo; Hill, James O

    2014-11-01

    Exercise is implicated in modifying subsequent energy intake (EI) through alterations in hunger and/or satiety hormones. Our aim was to examine the effects of aerobic exercise on hunger, satiety regulatory peptides, and EI in obese adolescents. Nine obese girls (age: 13-18 years old, BMI: 33.74 ± 4.04 kg/m2) participated in this randomized controlled crossover study. Each participant randomly underwent 2 experimental protocols: control (seated for 150 min) and exercise (exercised for 30 min on a treadmill performed at ventilatory threshold [VT] intensity and then remained seated for 120 min). Leptin, peptide YY(3-36) (PYY(3-36)), and subjective hunger were measured at baseline as well as 30 min and 150 min, followed by 24-hr EI measurement. Exercise session resulted in an acute increase in PYY(3-36) (p hunger scores. The control session increased hunger scores (p < .01) and decreased circulating leptin levels (p = .03). There was a strong effect size for carbohydrate intake (d = 2.14) and a modest effect size for protein intake (d = 0.61) after the exercise compared with the control session. Exercise performed at VT intensity in this study appears to provoke a state of transient anorexia in obese girls. These changes may be linked to an increase in circulating PYY3-36 and maintenance of leptin levels.

  8. The role of thyroid hormone calorigenesis in the redox regulation of gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PATRICIA VARELA

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone (TH; 3,3',5-triiodothyronine, T3 is required for the normal function of most tissues, with major effects on 0(2 consumption and metabolic rate. These are due to transcriptional activation of respiratory genes through the interaction of T3-liganded TH receptors with TH response elements or the activation of intermediate factors, with the consequent higher production of reactive 0(2 species (ROS and antioxidant depletion. T3-induced oxidative stress in the liver triggers the redox upregulation of the expression of cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-á [TNF-á], interleukin-10, enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase, manganese superoxide dismutase, and anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2, via a cascade initiated by TNF-á produced by Kupffer cells, involving inhibitor of κB phosphorylation and nuclear factor-κB activation. Thus, TH calorigenesis triggers an expression pattern that may represent an adaptive mechanism to re-establish redox homeostasis and promote cell survival under conditions of ROS toxicity secondary to TH-induced oxidative stress. Mechanisms of expression of respiratory and redox-sensitive genes may be functionally integrated, which could be of importance to understand the complexities of TH action and the outcome of thyroid gland dysfunction

  9. Class IIa histone deacetylases are hormone-activated regulators of FOXO and mammalian glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaylova, Maria M; Vasquez, Debbie S; Ravnskjaer, Kim; Denechaud, Pierre-Damien; Yu, Ruth T; Alvarez, Jacqueline G; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M; Montminy, Marc; Shaw, Reuben J

    2011-05-13

    Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) are signal-dependent modulators of transcription with established roles in muscle differentiation and neuronal survival. We show here that in liver, class IIa HDACs (HDAC4, 5, and 7) are phosphorylated and excluded from the nucleus by AMPK family kinases. In response to the fasting hormone glucagon, class IIa HDACs are rapidly dephosphorylated and translocated to the nucleus where they associate with the promoters of gluconeogenic enzymes such as G6Pase. In turn, HDAC4/5 recruit HDAC3, which results in the acute transcriptional induction of these genes via deacetylation and activation of FOXO family transcription factors. Loss of class IIa HDACs in murine liver results in inhibition of FOXO target genes and lowers blood glucose, resulting in increased glycogen storage. Finally, suppression of class IIa HDACs in mouse models of type 2 diabetes ameliorates hyperglycemia, suggesting that inhibitors of class I/II HDACs may be potential therapeutics for metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dynamic regulation of NMDAR function in the adult brain by the stress hormone corticosterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiu Chung eTse

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Stress and corticosteroids dynamically modulate the expression of synaptic plasticity at glutamatergic synapses in the developed brain. Together with alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptors (AMPAR, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR are critical mediators of synaptic function and are essential for the induction of many forms of synaptic plasticity. Regulation of NMDAR function by cortisol/corticosterone (CORT may be fundamental to the effects of stress on synaptic plasticity. Recent reports of the efficacy of NMDAR antagonists in treating certain stress-associated psychopathologies further highlight the importance of understanding the regulation of NMDAR function by CORT. Knowledge of how corticosteroids regulate NMDAR function within the adult brain is relatively sparse, perhaps due to a common belief that NMDAR function is relatively stable in the adult brain. We review recent results from our laboratory and others demonstrating dynamic regulation of NMDAR function by CORT in the adult brain. In addition, we consider the issue of how differences in the early life environment may program differential sensitivity to modulation of NMDAR function by CORT and how this may influence synaptic function during stress. Findings from these studies demonstrate that NMDAR function in the adult hippocampus remains sensitive to even brief exposures to CORT and that the capacity for modulation of NMDAR may be programmed, in part, by the early life environment. Modulation of NMDAR function may contribute to dynamic regulation of synaptic plasticity and adaptation in the face of stress, however enhanced NMDAR function may be implicated in mechanisms of stress related psychopathologies including depression.

  11. Oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1 expression in human breast and prostate cancer cases, and its regulation by sex steroid hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Jorge Maia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1 is an interferon-induced protein characterised by its capacity to catalyse the synthesis of 2ʹ-5ʹ-linked oligomers of adenosine from adenosine triphosphate (2-5A. The 2-5A binds to a latent Ribonuclease L (RNase L, which subsequently dimerises into its active form and may play an important role in the control of cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. Previously, our research group identified OAS1 as a differentially-expressed gene in breast and prostate cancer cell lines when compared to normal cells. This study evaluates: i the expression of OAS1 in human breast and prostate cancer specimens; and ii the effect of sex steroid hormones in regulating the expression of OAS1 in breast (MCF-7 and prostate (LNCaP cancer cell lines. The obtained results showed that OAS1 expression was down-regulated in human infiltrative ductal carcinoma of breast, adenocarcinoma of prostate, and benign prostate hyperplasia, both at mRNA and protein level. In addition, OAS1 expression was negatively correlated with the progression of breast and prostate cancer. With regards to the regulation of OAS1 gene, it was demonstrated that 17β-estradiol (E2 down-regulates OAS1 gene in MCF-7 cell lines, an effect that seems to be dependent on the activation of oestrogen receptor (ER. On the other hand, 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT treatment showed no effect on the expression of OAS1 in LNCaP cell lines. The lower levels of OAS1 in breast and prostate cancer cases indicated that the OAS1/RNaseL apoptotic pathway may be compromised in breast and prostate tumours. Moreover, the present findings suggested that this effect may be enhanced by oestrogen in ER-positive breast cancers.

  12. Crosstalk between thyroid hormone receptor and liver X receptor in the regulation of selective Alzheimer's disease indicator-1 gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emi Ishida

    Full Text Available Selective Alzheimer's disease (AD indicator 1 (Seladin-1 has been identified as a gene down-regulated in the degenerated lesions of AD brain. Up-regulation of Seladin-1 reduces the accumulation of β-amyloid and neuronal death. Thyroid hormone (TH exerts an important effect on the development and maintenance of central nervous systems. In the current study, we demonstrated that Seladin-1 gene and protein expression in the forebrain was increased in thyrotoxic mice compared with that of euthyroid mice. However, unexpectedly, no significant decrease in the gene and protein expression was observed in hypothyroid mice. Interestingly, an agonist of liver X receptor (LXR, TO901317 (TO administration in vivo increased Seladin-1 gene and protein expression in the mouse forebrain only in a hypothyroid state and in the presence of mutant TR-β, suggesting that LXR-α would compensate for TR-β function to maintain Seladin-1 gene expression in hypothyroidism and resistance to TH. TH activated the mouse Seladin-1 gene promoter (-1936/+21 bp and site 2 including canonical TH response element (TRE half-site in the region between -159 and -154 bp is responsible for the positive regulation. RXR-α/TR-β heterodimerization was identified on site 2 by gel-shift assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed the recruitment of TR-β to site 2 and the recruitment was increased upon TH administration. On the other hand, LXR-α utilizes a distinct region from site 2 (-120 to -102 bp to activate the mouse Seladin-1 gene promoter. Taking these findings together, we concluded that TH up-regulates Seladin-1 gene expression at the transcriptional level and LXR-α maintains the gene expression.

  13. Identification of phenylalanine 346 in the rat growth hormone receptor as being critical for ligand-mediated internalization and down-regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allevato, G; Billestrup, N; Goujon, L

    1995-01-01

    The functional significance of growth hormone (GH) receptor (GHR) internalization is unknown; therefore, we have analyzed domains and individual amino acids in the cytoplasmic region of the rat GHR required for ligand-mediated receptor internalization, receptor down-regulation, and transcriptiona...

  14. Involvement of phospholipase C and intracellular calcium signaling in the gonadotropin-releasing hormone regulation of prolactin release from lactotrophs of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tipsmark, Christian Kølbæk; Weber, G M; Strom, C N

    2005-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a potent stimulator of prolactin (PRL) secretion in various vertebrates including the tilapia, Oreochromis mossambicus. The mechanism by which GnRH regulates lactotroph cell function is poorly understood. Using the advantageous characteristics of the teleost...

  15. Regulation of IL-17 family members by adrenal hormones during experimental sepsis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmann, Markus; Meta, Fabien; Ruemmler, Robert; Haggadone, Mikel D; Sarma, J Vidya; Zetoune, Firas S; Ward, Peter A

    2013-04-01

    Severe sepsis is a life-threatening disease that causes major morbidity and mortality. Catecholamines and glucocorticoids often have been used for the treatment of sepsis. Several recent studies have suggested a potential role of IL-17 during the development and progression of sepsis in small animal models. In this study, the cross-talk of catecholamines and glucocorticoids with members of the IL-17 family was investigated during sepsis in C57BL/6 mice. The concentrations in plasma of IL-17A, IL-17F, and the IL-17AF heterodimer all were increased greatly in mice after endotoxemia or cecal ligation and puncture as compared with sham mice. Surprisingly, when compared with IL-17A (487 pg/mL), the concentrations of IL-17F (2361 pg/mL) and the heterodimer, IL-17AF (5116 pg/mL), were much higher 12 hours after endotoxemia. After surgical removal of the adrenal glands, mice had much higher mortality after endotoxemia or cecal ligation and puncture. The absence of endogenous adrenal gland hormones (cortical and medullary) was associated with 3- to 10-fold higher concentrations of IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-17AF, and IL-23. The addition of adrenaline, noradrenaline, hydrocortisone, or dexamethasone to lipopolysaccharide-activated peritoneal macrophages dose-dependently suppressed the expression and release of IL-17s. The production of IL-17s required activation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase, which was antagonized by both catecholamines and glucocorticoids. These data provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of immune modulation by catecholamines and glucocorticoids during acute inflammation. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Regulation of Id2 expression in EL4 T lymphoma cells overexpressing growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigent, Douglas A

    2009-01-01

    In previous studies, we have shown that overexpression of growth hormone (GH) in cells of the immune system upregulates proteins involved in cell growth and protects from apoptosis. Here, we report that overexpression of GH in EL4 T lymphoma cells (GHo) also significantly increased levels of the inhibitor of differentiation-2 (Id2). The increase in Id2 was suggested in both Id2 promoter luciferase assays and by Western analysis for Id2 protein. To identify the regulatory elements that mediate transcriptional activation by GH in the Id2 promoter, promoter deletion analysis was performed. Deletion analysis revealed that transactivation involved a 301-132bp region upstream to the Id2 transcriptional start site. The pattern in the human GHo Jurkat T lymphoma cell line paralleled that found in the mouse GHo EL4 T lymphoma cell line. Significantly less Id2 was detected in the nucleus of GHo EL4 T lymphoma cells compared to vector alone controls. Although serum increased the levels of Id2 in control vector alone cells, no difference was found in the total levels of Id2 in GHo EL4 T lymphoma cells treated with or without serum. The increase in Id2 expression in GHo EL4 T lymphoma cells measured by Id2 promoter luciferase expression and Western blot analysis was blocked by the overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of STAT5. The results suggest that in EL4 T lymphoma cells overexpressing GH, there is an upregulation of Id2 protein that appears to involve STAT protein activity.

  17. Schizothorax prenanti corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH): molecular cloning, tissue expression, and the function of feeding regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Zhou, Chaowei; Yuan, Dengyue; Lin, Fangjun; Chen, Hu; Wu, Hongwei; Wei, Rongbin; Xin, Zhiming; Liu, Ju; Gao, Yundi; Li, Zhiqiong

    2014-10-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a potent mediator of endocrine, autonomic, behavioral, and immune responses to stress. For a better understanding of the structure and function of the CRH gene and to study its effect on feeding regulation in cyprinid fish, the cDNA of the CRH gene from the brain of Schizothorax prenanti was cloned and sequenced. The full-length CRH cDNA consisted of 1,046 bp with an open reading frame of 489 bp encoding a protein of 162 amino acids. Real-time quantitative PCR analyses revealed that CRH was widely expressed in central and peripheral tissues. In particular, high expression level of CRH was detected in brain. Furthermore, CRH mRNA expression was examined in different brain regions, especially high in hypothalamus. In addition, there was no significant change in CRH mRNA expression in fed group compared with the fasted group in the S. prenanti hypothalamus during short-term fasting. However, CRH gene expression presented significant decrease in the hypothalamus in fasted group compared with the fed group (P < 0.05) on day 7; thereafter, re-feeding could lead to a significant increase in CRH mRNA expression in fasted group on day 9. The results suggest that the CRH may play a critical role in feeding regulation in S. prenanti.

  18. Genotype-temperature interaction in the regulation of development, growth, and morphometrics in wild-type, and growth-hormone transgenic coho salmon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mare Lõhmus

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The neuroendocrine system is an important modulator of phenotype, directing cellular genetic responses to external cues such as temperature. Behavioural and physiological processes in poikilothermic organisms (e.g. most fishes, are particularly influenced by surrounding temperatures.By comparing the development and growth of two genotypes of coho salmon (wild-type and transgenic with greatly enhanced growth hormone production at six different temperatures, ranging between 8 degrees and 18 degrees C, we observed a genotype-temperature interaction and possible trend in directed neuroendocrine selection. Differences in growth patterns of the two genotypes were compared by using mathematical models, and morphometric analyses of juvenile salmon were performed to detect differences in body shape. The maximum hatching and alevin survival rates of both genotypes occurred at 12 degrees C. At lower temperatures, eggs containing embryos with enhanced GH production hatched after a shorter incubation period than wild-type eggs, but this difference was not apparent at and above 16 degrees C. GH transgenesis led to lower body weights at the time when the yolk sack was completely absorbed compared to the wild genotype. The growth of juvenile GH-enhanced salmon was to a greater extent stimulated by higher temperatures than the growth of the wild-type. Increased GH production significantly influenced the shape of the salmon growth curves.Growth hormone overexpression by transgenesis is able to stimulate the growth of coho salmon over a wide range of temperatures. Temperature was found to affect growth rate, survival, and body morphology between GH transgenic and wild genotype coho salmon, and differential responses to temperature observed between the genotypes suggests they would experience different selective forces should they ever enter natural ecosystems. Thus, GH transgenic fish would be expected to differentially respond and adapt to shifts in environmental

  19. Regulation of caste differentiation in the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goewie, E.A.

    1978-01-01

    The nutritional environment of honey-bee larvae affects the juvenile hormone (JH) titre of larval haemolymph and tissues. In this investigation the mechanism for the regulation of caste differentiation has been studied.

    Chemo- and mechanoreceptors are found on larval mouthparts.

  20. Action of Specific Thyroid Hormone Receptor alpha(1) and beta(1) Antagonists in the Central and Peripheral Regulation of Thyroid Hormone Metabolism in the Rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beeren, Hermina C.; Kwakkel, Joan; Ackermans, Mariëtte T.; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.; Fliers, Eric; Boelen, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Background: The iodine-containing drug amiodarone (Amio) and its noniodine containing analogue dronedarone (Dron) are potent antiarrhythmic drugs. Previous in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that the major metabolite of Amio, desethylamiodarone, acts as a thyroid hormone receptor (TR) alpha(1)

  1. Status of calcium regulating hormonal systems in delayed period in persons exposed to occupational exposure of low doses of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dospolova, Zh.G.; Abylaev, Zh.A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose of study is consideration of endocrine system participation in development of calcium exchange disorders in persons exposed to action of low dose radiation . By radio- immune method in blood serum of 150 liquidators of Chernobyl accident consequences the concentration the following hormones were determined: parathormone, T 3 , T 4 , TSH, cortisol, ACTH, testosteron, insulin. Content of these hormones have been studied in according to following radiation factors: value of absorbed doses of external irradiation, degree of radioactive contamination of zone and exposition duration. It was determined, that basically dishormone disorders development have been concerned with parathormone, cortisol, hormones of thyroid axis, and in some cases to ACTH and insulin. Liquidators' frequencies of normal and changed concentration of calcium regulating hormones are sited in tabular form. It was established, that examined persons in result hormone disorders have of decrease functions of pituitary glands (76.78 %), pancreas (55 %), thyroid gland (24.31 %) and sex glands (19.23 %) and simultaneously cases of increase functions of parathyroid gland (58.2 %), adrenal glands (52.32 %) and adeno-pituitary glands (17.39). It is concluded, that inter hormonal correlation disorders are accompanying with morphologic and functional futures of secretory activity changes

  2. C/EBPβ Mediates Growth Hormone-Regulated Expression of Multiple Target Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Tracy X.; Lin, Grace; LaPensee, Christopher R.; Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Rathore, Maanjot; Streeter, Cale; Piwien-Pilipuk, Graciela; Lanning, Nathan; Jin, Hui; Carter-Su, Christin; Qin, Zhaohui S.

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of c-Fos transcription by GH is mediated by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ). This study examines the role of C/EBPβ in mediating GH activation of other early response genes, including Cyr61, Btg2, Socs3, Zfp36, and Socs1. C/EBPβ depletion using short hairpin RNA impaired responsiveness of these genes to GH, as seen for c-Fos. Rescue with wild-type C/EBPβ led to GH-dependent recruitment of the coactivator p300 to the c-Fos promoter. In contrast, rescue with C/EBPβ mutated at the ERK phosphorylation site at T188 failed to induce GH-dependent recruitment of p300, indicating that ERK-mediated phosphorylation of C/EBPβ at T188 is required for GH-induced recruitment of p300 to c-Fos. GH also induced the occupancy of phosphorylated C/EBPβ and p300 on Cyr61, Btg2, and Socs3 at predicted C/EBP-cAMP response element-binding protein motifs in their promoters. Consistent with a role for ERKs in GH-induced expression of these genes, treatment with U0126 to block ERK phosphorylation inhibited their GH-induced expression. In contrast, GH-dependent expression of Zfp36 and Socs1 was not inhibited by U0126. Thus, induction of multiple early response genes by GH in 3T3-F442A cells is mediated by C/EBPβ. A subset of these genes is regulated similarly to c-Fos, through a mechanism involving GH-stimulated ERK 1/2 activation, phosphorylation of C/EBPβ, and recruitment of p300. Overall, these studies suggest that C/EBPβ, like the signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins, regulates multiple genes in response to GH. PMID:21292824

  3. Is 24,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol a calcium-regulating hormone in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanis, J.A.; Cundy, T.; Bartlett, M.; Smith, R.; Heynen, G.; Warner, G.T.; Russell, R.G.G.

    1978-01-01

    Small doses (1 to 10 μg daily) of 24,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (24,25-(OH) 2 D 3 ), a renal metabolite of vitamin D of uncertain function, increased intestinal absorption of calcium in normal people and in patients with various disorders of mineral metabolism, including anephric subjects. In five of six patients studied, calcium balance increased, but, unlike 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, 24,25-(OH) 2 D 3 did not increase plasma or urinary calcium concentrations. These results suggest that 24,25-(OH) 2 D 3 may be an important regulator of skeletal metabolism in man with potential value as a therapeutic agent. (author)

  4. What Is Juvenile Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Initiative Breadcrumb Home Health Topics English Español Juvenile Arthritis Basics In-Depth Download Download EPUB Download PDF What is it? Points To Remember About Juvenile Arthritis Juvenile arthritis is the term used to describe ...

  5. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve 5 or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  6. Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) expression and regulation by epinephrine and exercise in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, Thorkil; Stallknecht, Bente Merete; Donsmark, Morten

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Triacylglycerol (TG) is stored in lipid droplets in the cytoplasm of skeletal muscle. The energy content of the TG depot is higher than the energy content of the muscle glycogen depot. The enzymatic regulation of intracellular TG hydrolysis in skeletal muscle has not been elucidated...... in the presence of an anti-HSL antibody. The effect of epinephrine could be blocked by propanolol and mimicked by incubation of a crude supernatant from control muscle with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The effect of contractions was transient as TO activity declined to basal levels...... and contractions were partially additive. In rats training increased epinephrine-stimulated TO activity and HSL concentration in adipose tissue but not in muscle. In humans, at the end of 60 min of exercise muscle, TO activity was increased in healthy, but not in adrenalectomized, subjects. In conclusion, HSL...

  7. Regulation of tumour necrosis factor production by adrenal hormones in vivo: insights into the antiinflammatory activity of rolipram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettipher, E R; Labasi, J M; Salter, E D; Stam, E J; Cheng, J B; Griffiths, R J

    1996-04-01

    1. The role of adrenal hormones in the regulation of the systemic and local production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF alpha) was examined in male Balb/c mice. 2. Intraperitoneal injection of 0.3 mg E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0111:B4) led to high levels of circulating TNF alpha without stimulating TNF alpha production in the peritoneal cavity. Systemic production of TNF alpha in response to LPS was increased in adrenalectomized animals and in normal animals treated with the beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, propranolol. The glucocorticoid antagonist, RU 486, did not modify systemic TNF alpha production. These results indicate that systemic TNF alpha production is regulated by adrenaline but not by corticosterone. 3. When mice were primed with thioglycollate, TNF alpha was produced in the peritoneal cavity in response to low dose LPS (1 micrograms). The levels of TNF alpha in the peritoneal cavity were not enhanced by adrenalectomy or by treatment with either propranolol or RU 486, indicating local production of TNF alpha in the peritoneal cavity is not regulated by adrenaline or corticosterone. 4. The phosphodiesterase type IV (PDE-IV) inhibitor, rolipram, inhibited both the systemic production of TNF alpha in response to high dose endotoxin (ED50 = 1.3 mg kg-1) and the local production of TNF alpha in the peritoneal cavity in response to low dose endotoxin (ED50 = 9.1 mg kg-1). In adrenalectomized mice there was a slight reduction in the ability of rolipram to inhibit the systemic production of TNF alpha (ED50 = 3.3 mg kg-1) while the ability of rolipram to inhibit the local production of TNF alpha in the peritoneal cavity was virtually abolished (24% inhibition at 30 mg kg-1). The glucocorticoid antagonist, RU 486, also reduced the ability of rolipram to inhibit local TNF alpha production while propranolol was without effect. 5. Systemic treatment with rolipram increased the plasma concentrations of corticosterone in normal mice but not in adrenalectomized mice

  8. Genetic and Hormonal Regulation of Chlorophyll Degradation during Maturation of Seeds with Green Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolikova, Galina; Dolgikh, Elena; Vikhnina, Maria; Frolov, Andrej; Medvedev, Sergei

    2017-09-16

    The embryos of some angiosperms (usually referred to as chloroembryos) contain chlorophylls during the whole period of embryogenesis. Developing embryos have photochemically active chloroplasts and are able to produce assimilates, further converted in reserve biopolymers, whereas at the late steps of embryogenesis, seeds undergo dehydration, degradation of chlorophylls, transformation of chloroplast in storage plastids, and enter the dormancy period. However, in some seeds, the process of chlorophyll degradation remains incomplete. These residual chlorophylls compromise the quality of seed material in terms of viability, nutritional value, and shelf life, and represent a serious challenge for breeders and farmers. The mechanisms of chlorophyll degradation during seed maturation are still not completely understood, and only during the recent decades the main pathways and corresponding enzymes could be characterized. Among the identified players, the enzymes of pheophorbide a oxygenase pathway and the proteins encoded by STAY GREEN ( SGR ) genes are the principle ones. On the biochemical level, abscisic acid (ABA) is the main regulator of seed chlorophyll degradation, mediating activity of corresponding catabolic enzymes on the transcriptional level. In general, a deep insight in the mechanisms of chlorophyll degradation is required to develop the approaches for production of chlorophyll-free high quality seeds.

  9. Regulation of extracellular matrix vesicles via rapid responses to steroid hormones during endochondral bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmussen, Niels; Lin, Zhao; McClure, Michael J; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D

    2017-12-09

    Endochondral bone formation is a precise and highly ordered process whose exact regulatory framework is still being elucidated. Multiple regulatory pathways are known to be involved. In some cases, regulation impacts gene expression, resulting in changes in chondrocyte phenotypic expression and extracellular matrix synthesis. Rapid regulatory mechanisms are also involved, resulting in release of enzymes, factors and micro RNAs stored in extracellular matrisomes called matrix vesicles. Vitamin D metabolites modulate endochondral development via both genomic and rapid membrane-associated signaling pathways. 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1α,25(OH) 2 D 3 ] acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and a membrane associated receptor, protein disulfide isomerase A3 (PDIA3). 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [24R,25(OH) 2 D 3 ] affects primarily chondrocytes in the resting zone (RC) of the growth plate, whereas 1α,25(OH) 2 D 3 affects cells in the prehypertrophic and upper hypertrophic cell zones (GC). This includes genomically directing the cells to produce matrix vesicles with zone specific characteristics. In addition, vitamin D metabolites produced by the cells interact directly with the matrix vesicle membrane via rapid signal transduction pathways, modulating their activity in the matrix. The matrix vesicle payload is able to rapidly impact the extracellular matrix via matrix processing enzymes as well as providing a feedback mechanism to the cells themselves via the contained micro RNAs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Genetic and Hormonal Regulation of Chlorophyll Degradation during Maturation of Seeds with Green Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Smolikova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The embryos of some angiosperms (usually referred to as chloroembryos contain chlorophylls during the whole period of embryogenesis. Developing embryos have photochemically active chloroplasts and are able to produce assimilates, further converted in reserve biopolymers, whereas at the late steps of embryogenesis, seeds undergo dehydration, degradation of chlorophylls, transformation of chloroplast in storage plastids, and enter the dormancy period. However, in some seeds, the process of chlorophyll degradation remains incomplete. These residual chlorophylls compromise the quality of seed material in terms of viability, nutritional value, and shelf life, and represent a serious challenge for breeders and farmers. The mechanisms of chlorophyll degradation during seed maturation are still not completely understood, and only during the recent decades the main pathways and corresponding enzymes could be characterized. Among the identified players, the enzymes of pheophorbide a oxygenase pathway and the proteins encoded by STAY GREEN (SGR genes are the principle ones. On the biochemical level, abscisic acid (ABA is the main regulator of seed chlorophyll degradation, mediating activity of corresponding catabolic enzymes on the transcriptional level. In general, a deep insight in the mechanisms of chlorophyll degradation is required to develop the approaches for production of chlorophyll-free high quality seeds.

  11. Down-regulation of E-cadherin and catenins in human pituitary growth hormone-producing adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Toshiaki; Rong, Qian Zhi; Kagawa, Noriko; Yamada, Shozo

    2004-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-producing pituitary adenomas can be ultrastructurally divided into two major types: densely granulated and sparsely granulated. The latter type of adenoma characteristically exhibits globular accumulations of cytokeratin filaments known as fibrous bodies, which are immunohistochemically identifiable as juxtanuclear dot-like immunoreactivity. We hypothesize that the formation of fibrous body might be related to dysfunction of adhesion molecules, because of the functional relationship between intermediate filaments and the cadherin-catenin complex and frequent observation of loss of cohesiveness of the adenoma cells. Our recent immunohistochemical study showed that expression of E-cadherin and its undercoat proteins, alpha-, beta- and gamma-catenin, in GH cell adenomas with prominent fibrous bodies was significantly reduced compared with GH cell adenomas without fibrous bodies and the normal adenohypophysial cells. Although no mutation of exon 3 of the beta-catenin gene was found in any GH cell adenomas with fibrous bodies, methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that the E-cadherin promoter region was methylated in 37.5% of these adenomas, two of which displayed total methylation, but not in GH cell adenomas without fibrous bodies. We conclude that the decreased expression of the E-cadherin-catenin complex and methylation of the E-cadherin gene promoter region are events associated with the formation of fibrous bodies in GH cell adenomas. It remains to be clarified to explain the mechanism by which down-regulation of adhesion molecules is involved in the abnormal assembly of intermediate filaments.

  12. Molecular characterization of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) in Schizothorax prenanti: cloning, tissue distribution and role in food intake regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Yuan, Dengyue; Zhou, Chaowei; Lin, Fangjun; Wei, Rongbin; Chen, Hu; Wu, Hongwei; Xin, Zhiming; Liu, Ju; Gao, Yundi; Chen, Defang; Yang, Shiyong; Wang, Yan; Pu, Yundan; Li, Zhiqiong

    2016-06-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a crucial neuropeptide involved in various biological functions in both mammals and fish. In this study, the full-length MCH cDNA was obtained from Schizothorax prenanti by rapid amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction. The full-length MCH cDNA contained 589 nucleotides including an open reading frame of 375 nucleotides encoding 256 amino acids. MCH mRNA was highly expressed in the brain by real-time quantitative PCR analysis. Within the brain, expression of MCH mRNA was preponderantly detected in the hypothalamus. In addition, the MCH mRNA expression in the S. prenanti hypothalamus of fed group was significantly decreased compared with the fasted group at 1 and 3 h post-feeding, respectively. Furthermore, the MCH gene expression presented significant increase in the hypothalamus of fasted group compared with the fed group during long-term fasting. After re-feeding, there was a dramatic decrease in MCH mRNA expression in the hypothalamus of S. prenanti. The results indicate that the expression of MCH is affected by feeding status. Taken together, our results suggest that MCH may be involved in food intake regulation in S. prenanti.

  13. Neuropeptide receptors NPR-1 and NPR-2 regulate Caenorhabditis elegans avoidance response to the plant stress hormone methyl salicylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jintao; Xu, Zhaofa; Tan, Zhiping; Zhang, Zhuohua; Ma, Long

    2015-02-01

    Methyl salicylate (MeSa) is a stress hormone released by plants under attack by pathogens or herbivores . MeSa has been shown to attract predatory insects of herbivores and repel pests. The molecules and neurons underlying animal response to MeSa are not known. Here we found that the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits a strong avoidance response to MeSa, which requires the activities of two closely related neuropeptide receptors NPR-1 and NPR-2. Molecular analyses suggest that NPR-1 expressed in the RMG inter/motor neurons is required for MeSa avoidance. An NPR-1 ligand FLP-18 is also required. Using a rescuing npr-2 promoter to drive a GFP transgene, we identified that NPR-2 is expressed in multiple sensory and interneurons. Genetic rescue experiments suggest that NPR-2 expressed in the AIZ interneurons is required for MeSa avoidance. We also provide evidence that the AWB sensory neurons might act upstream of RMGs and AIZs to detect MeSa. Our results suggest that NPR-2 has an important role in regulating animal behavior and that NPR-1 and NPR-2 act on distinct interneurons to affect C. elegans avoidance response to MeSa. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  14. Secretory activity and endocrine regulation of male accessory glands in the blood-sucking bug Panstrongylus megistus (Hemiptera: Reduviidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lêda Regis

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available The epithelial cells of Panstrongylus megistus male accessory glands (MAG present ultrastructural characteristics of a secretory cell. Their secretory products are accumulated in the lumen of the four MAG lobes. During the first 8 days of adult life a strong secretion activity occurs, accumulating enough material to produce the first spermatophore. Cerebral neurosecretions as well as juvenile hormone are both involved in MAG secretory activity regulation. Juvenile hormone seems to be the responsible for the stimulation of most protein synthesis in male accessory glands. Cerebral neurosecretion seems to be necessary to stimulate juvenile hormone production and release by the corpus allatum. Furthermore, neurosecretion is required for some polypeptides synthesis by MAG. Although topic application of precocene II to adult males does not reproduce the same effects on MAG as does allatectomy, this compound causes strong reduction on male reproductive capacity.

  15. Adipocyte Versus Pituitary Leptin in the Regulation of Pituitary Hormones: Somatotropes Develop Normally in the Absence of Circulating Leptin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odle, Angela K.; Haney, Anessa; Allensworth-James, Melody; Akhter, Noor

    2014-01-01

    Leptin is a cytokine produced by white fat cells, skeletal muscle, the placenta, and the pituitary gland among other tissues. Best known for its role in regulating appetite and energy expenditure, leptin is produced largely by and in proportion to white fat cells. Leptin is also important to the maintenance and function of the GH cells of the pituitary. This was shown when the deletion of leptin receptors on somatotropes caused decreased numbers of GH cells, decreased circulating GH, and adult-onset obesity. To determine the source of leptin most vital to GH cells and other pituitary cell types, we compared two different leptin knockout models with Cre-lox technology. The global Lep-null model is like the ob/ob mouse, whereby only the entire exon 3 is deleted. The selective adipocyte-Lep-null model lacks adipocyte leptin but retains pituitary leptin, allowing us to investigate the pituitary as a potential source of circulating leptin. Male and female mice lacking adipocyte leptin (Adipocyte-lep-null) did not produce any detectable circulating leptin and were infertile, suggesting that the pituitary does not contribute to serum levels. In the presence of only pituitary leptin, however, these same mutants were able to maintain somatotrope numbers and GH mRNA levels. Serum GH trended low, but values were not significant. However, hypothalamic GHRH mRNA was significantly reduced in these animals. Other serum hormone and pituitary mRNA differences were observed, some of which varied from previous results reported in ob/ob animals. Whereas pituitary leptin is capable of maintaining somatotrope numbers and GH mRNA production, the decreased hypothalamic GHRH mRNA and low (but not significant) serum GH levels indicate an important role for adipocyte leptin in the regulation of GH secretion in the mouse. Thus, normal GH secretion may require the coordinated actions of both adipocyte and pituitary leptin. PMID:25116704

  16. Hormonal regulation of Na+/K+-dependent ATPase activity and pump function in corneal endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatou, Shin

    2011-10-01

    Na- and K-dependent ATPase (Na,K-ATPase) in the basolateral membrane of corneal endothelial cells plays an important role in the pump function of the corneal endothelium. We investigated the role of dexamethasone in the regulation of Na,K-ATPase activity and pump function in these cells. Mouse corneal endothelial cells were exposed to dexamethasone or insulin. ATPase activity was evaluated by spectrophotometric measurement, and pump function was measured using an Ussing chamber. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry were performed to measure the expression of the Na,K-ATPase α1-subunit. Dexamethasone increased Na,K-ATPase activity and the pump function of endothelial cells. Western blot analysis indicated that dexamethasone increased the expression of the Na,K-ATPase α1-subunit but decreased the ratio of active to inactive Na,K-ATPase α1-subunit. Insulin increased Na,K-ATPase activity and pump function of cultured corneal endothelial cells. These effects were transient and blocked by protein kinase C inhibitors and inhibitors of protein phosphatases 1 (PP1) and 2A (PP2A). Western blot analysis indicated that insulin decreased the amount of inactive Na,K-ATPase α1-subunit, but the expression of total Na,K-ATPase α1-subunit was unchanged. Immunocytochemistry showed that insulin increased cell surface expression of the Na,K-ATPase α1-subunit. Our results suggest that dexamethasone and insulin stimulate Na,K-ATPase activity in mouse corneal endothelial cells. The effect of dexamethasone activation in these cells was mediated by Na,K-ATPase synthesis and an increased enzymatic activity because of dephosphorylation of Na,K-ATPase α1-subunits. The effect of insulin is mediated by the protein kinase C, PP1, and/or PP2A pathways.

  17. Regulation of an H-ras-related transcript by parathyroid hormone in rat osteosarcoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D. K.; Weaver, W. R.; Clohisy, J. C.; Brakenhoff, K. D.; Kahn, A. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1992-01-01

    The rat osteosarcoma cell line UMR 106-01 is a commonly used model system for the study of osteoblast function. However, it also expresses a phenotype characteristic of transformed cells. To test whether the latter could be accounted for by aberrant oncogene expression, we probed Northern blots of UMR and other osteoblastic cells with a panel of oncogene probes. These blots, when probed with a cDNA specific for v-H-ras, revealed a 7.0-kilobase (kb) H-ras-related transcript (designated HRRT) in UMR 106-01 cells that was not expressed in other osteoblastic cells. Osteoblast-enriched calvarial cells expressed the typical 1.1-kb H-ras mRNA, which was absent in UMR cells. Additionally, Western blots of lysates of UMR cells documented the presence of three proteins immunologically related to H-rasp21. To determine whether HRRT represented a recombinant retrovirus product, Northern blots were probed with a cDNA specific for the highly conserved gag-pol region of Moloney murine leukemia virus. These blots showed parallel cross-reactivity with an apparently identical transcript of 7.0 kb. The 7.0-kb transcripts detected by both v-H-ras and gag-pol probes declined to the same extent after treatment with concentrations of PTH known to inhibit proliferation of these cells. PTH regulated the abundance of HRRT in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with greatest repression of the transcript after 8 h of treatment with 10(-8) M PTH. The decrease in HRRT could not be completely accounted for by changes in transcriptional activity, as determined by nuclear run-on assays.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  18. An alternative look at insects hormones

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sláma, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 3 (2015), s. 188-204 ISSN 2325-081X Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : juvenile hormone * ecdysteroidal vitamin D6 * corpus allatum hormone Subject RIV: ED - Physiology http://blaypublishers.com/2015/10/31/leb-33-2015/

  19. Gonadotropin Inhibitory Hormone Down-Regulates the Brain-Pituitary Reproductive Axis of Male European Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paullada-Salmerón, José A; Cowan, Mairi; Aliaga-Guerrero, María; Morano, Francesca; Zanuy, Silvia; Muñoz-Cueto, José A

    2016-06-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) inhibits gonadotropin synthesis and release from the pituitary of birds and mammals. However, the physiological role of orthologous GnIH peptides on the reproductive axis of fish is still uncertain, and their actions on the main neuroendocrine systems controlling reproduction (i.e., GnRHs, kisspeptins) have received little attention. In a recent study performed in the European sea bass, we cloned a cDNA encoding a precursor polypeptide that contained C-terminal MPMRFamide (sbGnIH-1) and MPQRFamide (sbGnIH-2) peptide sequences, developed a specific antiserum against sbGnIH-2, and characterized its central and pituitary GnIH projections in this species. In this study, we analyzed the effects of intracerebroventricular injection of sbGnIH-1 and sbGnIH-2 on brain and pituitary expression of reproductive hormone genes (gnrh1, gnrh2, gnrh3, kiss1, kiss2, gnih, lhbeta, fshbeta), and their receptors (gnrhr II-1a, gnrhr II-2b, kiss1r, kiss2r, and gnihr) as well as on plasma Fsh and Lh levels. In addition, we determined the effects of GnIH on pituitary somatotropin (Gh) expression. The results obtained revealed the inhibitory role of sbGnIH-2 on brain gnrh2, kiss1, kiss2, kiss1r, gnih, and gnihr transcripts and on pituitary fshbeta, lhbeta, gh, and gnrhr-II-1a expression, whereas sbGnIH-1 only down-regulated brain gnrh1 expression. However, at different doses, central administration of both sbGnIH-1 and sbGnIH-2 decreased Lh plasma levels. Our work represents the first study reporting the effects of centrally administered GnIH in fish and provides evidence of the differential actions of sbGnIH-1 and sbGnIH-2 on the reproductive axis of sea bass, the main inhibitory role being exerted by the sbGnIH-2 peptide. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  20. Neurotrophins and their receptors in the rat pituitary gland: regulation of BDNF and trkB mRNA levels by adrenal hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononen, J; Soinila, S; Persson, H; Honkaniemi, J; Hökfelt, T; Pelto-Huikko, M

    1994-12-01

    We studied the expression of messenger ribonucleic acids (mRNAs) for neurotrophins and neurotrophin receptors in the rat pituitary gland and examined the influence of adrenal hormones on their mRNA levels, using in situ hybridization and Northern blot analysis. The only neurotrophin present at detectable levels in the pituitary was brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which was observed in the anterior and intermediate lobes. Several transcripts of the putative receptor for BDNF, trkB, were present in the anterior and posterior lobes of the pituitary. A low amount of trkC mRNA was found in both the anterior and the intermediate lobe. Dexamethasone treatment decreased both BDNF and trkB mRNA levels in the anterior lobe of the pituitary. Adrenalectomy had no effect on trkB expression, but it decreased BDNF mRNA levels in comparison to the control animals. This effect could not be reversed by dexamethasone substitution, suggesting that BDNF, mRNA levels may be regulated not only by glucocorticoids but also by other adrenal hormones. These results demonstrate that BDNF, trkB and trkC are expressed in the pituitary gland and that glucocorticoids and possibly other adrenal hormones may modulate pituitary functions by regulating the expression of neurotrophic factors and their receptors. Whether BDNF acts as a secreted hormone, a trophic factor, or has autocrine/paracrine functions within the pituitary through its receptor, trkB, remains to be studied.

  1. Sex Steroid Hormones Matter for Learning and Memory: Estrogenic Regulation of Hippocampal Function Inmale and Female Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Karyn M.; Kim, Jaekyoon; Tuscher, Jennifer J.; Fortress, Ashley M.

    2015-01-01

    Ample evidence has demonstrated that sex steroid hormones, such as the potent estrogen 17ß-estradiol (E[subscript 2]), affect hippocampal morphology, plasticity, and memory in male and female rodents. Yet relatively few investigators who work with male subjects consider the effects of these hormones on learning and memory. This review describes…

  2. [Characteristics of polyamine biosynthesis regulation and tumor growth rate in hormone-dependant grafted breast tumors of mice and rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlovskiĭ, A A

    2007-01-01

    Effect of the inhibitors of polyamines biosynthesis on completely or partially hormone-dependant breast tumors (mouse Ca755 carcinoma and Walker W-256 carcinosarcoma) is essentially special: in contrary to hormone-dependant tumors, this effect may be not only breaking but stimulating as well. Change-over from one to another mode of reaction is conditioned, most probable, by hormonal status, which is determined by one or another estral cycle phase. Biochemical mechanisms of this change-over are closely connected with polyamines metabolism, namely the degree of polyamines (especially spermine) interconvertion and physiological reactivity level of the system controlling expression of ornithin-decarboxilase. At that, the first of these pathways is predominant for completely hormone-dependant Ca755 and the second one -for partially hormone-dependant W-256.

  3. Transcriptome Profiling Reveals the Negative Regulation of Multiple Plant Hormone Signaling Pathways Elicited by Overexpression of C-Repeat Binding Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aixin Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available C-repeat binding factors (CBF are a subfamily of AP2 transcription factors that play critical roles in the regulation of plant cold tolerance and growth in low temperature. In the present work, we sought to perform a detailed investigation into global transcriptional regulation of plant hormone signaling associated genes in transgenic plants engineered with CBF genes. RNA samples from Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing two CBF genes, CBF2 and CBF3, were subjected to Illumina HiSeq 2000 RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq. Our results showed that more than half of the hormone associated genes that were differentially expressed in CBF2 or CBF3 transgenic plants were related to auxin signal transduction and metabolism. Most of these alterations in gene expression could lead to repression of auxin signaling. Accordingly, the IAA content was significantly decreased in young tissues of plants overexpressing CBF2 and CBF3 compared with wild type. In addition, genes associated with the biosynthesis of Jasmonate (JA and Salicylic acid (SA, as well as the signal sensing of Brassinolide (BR and SA, were down-regulated, while genes associated with Gibberellin (GA deactivation were up-regulated. In general, overexpression of CBF2 and CBF3 negatively affects multiple plant hormone signaling pathways in Arabidopsis. The transcriptome analysis using CBF2 and CBF3 transgenic plants provides novel and integrated insights into the interaction between CBFs and plant hormones, particularly the modulation of auxin signaling, which may contribute to the improvement of crop yields under abiotic stress via molecular engineering using CBF genes.

  4. [Serum hormones that regulate the reproductive axis in men with testicular germ cell cancer and its impact on fertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar-Rodríguez, José María; Chávez-Zúñiga, Irma; Bañuelos-Ávila, Leticia; Vargas-Hernández, Víctor Manuel; Acosta-Altamirano, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies treat testicular germ cancer as a single disease, the behavior of the two histological types of cancer; seminoma and nonseminoma have differences in reproductive hormone secretion and impair fertility differently. To demonstrate that the serum concentration of pituitary hormones involved in fertility and spermatogenesis in the affected male is different in the two histological types. Were determined by radioimmunoassay or inmunoradiometric assay, luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, total testosterone, prolactin, estradiol, human chorionic gonadotropin and alpha fetoprotein in 37 patients with germ cell cancer (15 seminoma and 22 nonseminoma) and 35 controls. We analyzed the semen of patients, and were questioned about paternity before the cancer diagnosis. Age was higher in patients with seminoma cancer, showed decreased luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, and testosterone and increased estradiol and prolactin in nonseminoma compared with seminoma. In patients with nonseminoma they had 9 children, 5 were oligozoospermic, 3 azoospermic and 6 normal concentration, 8 did not provide sample, seminoma group they had eight children, only one azoospermic, nine normal concentration, and 5 did not provide sample . The hormonal behavior is different in men with nonseminoma compared with seminoma, so that the negative impact on the reproductive axis and fertility is higher in cases of non-seminoma.

  5. Evaluation of thyroid-mediated otolith growth of larval and juvenile tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiao, Jen-Chieh; Wu, Su-Mei; Hwang, Yi-Ping; Wu, Done-Ping; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2008-06-01

    Thyroid-mediated otolith growth in tilapia was evaluated by the ontogenic triiodothyronine (T3) profile revealed by radioimmunoassay during the first month after hatching. Thyroid hormone receptor genes (TRalpha and TRbeta) were cloned and only the expression of TRalpha mRNA, quantified by real-time PCR, was similar to the T3 profile. Variations in otolith growth showed median correlation with the T3 profile and TRalpha mRNA expression pattern. Hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism were induced in tilapia juveniles and larvae by administration of different concentrations of thiourea (TU) and T3, respectively, for 13 days. T3 and TU had little effect on otolith growth during the larval stage. However, T3 increased otolith growth and TU retarded, or stopped, otolith growth during the juvenile stage. Furthermore, TU treatment caused permanent changes in otolith shape in the ventral area. Otolith growth recovered slowly from hypothyroidism, requiring 2 days to form an increment during the first week. These results suggest that otolith growth, at least during the juvenile stage, is regulated by the thyroid hormones and the process may be mediated by TRalpha.

  6. A genome-wide association meta-analysis of circulating sex hormone-binding globulin reveals multiple Loci implicated in sex steroid hormone regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea D Coviello

    Full Text Available Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG is a glycoprotein responsible for the transport and biologic availability of sex steroid hormones, primarily testosterone and estradiol. SHBG has been associated with chronic diseases including type 2 diabetes (T2D and with hormone-sensitive cancers such as breast and prostate cancer. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS meta-analysis of 21,791 individuals from 10 epidemiologic studies and validated these findings in 7,046 individuals in an additional six studies. We identified twelve genomic regions (SNPs associated with circulating SHBG concentrations. Loci near the identified SNPs included SHBG (rs12150660, 17p13.1, p = 1.8 × 10(-106, PRMT6 (rs17496332, 1p13.3, p = 1.4 × 10(-11, GCKR (rs780093, 2p23.3, p = 2.2 × 10(-16, ZBTB10 (rs440837, 8q21.13, p = 3.4 × 10(-09, JMJD1C (rs7910927, 10q21.3, p = 6.1 × 10(-35, SLCO1B1 (rs4149056, 12p12.1, p = 1.9 × 10(-08, NR2F2 (rs8023580, 15q26.2, p = 8.3 × 10(-12, ZNF652 (rs2411984, 17q21.32, p = 3.5 × 10(-14, TDGF3 (rs1573036, Xq22.3, p = 4.1 × 10(-14, LHCGR (rs10454142, 2p16.3, p = 1.3 × 10(-07, BAIAP2L1 (rs3779195, 7q21.3, p = 2.7 × 10(-08, and UGT2B15 (rs293428, 4q13.2, p = 5.5 × 10(-06. These genes encompass multiple biologic pathways, including hepatic function, lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and T2D, androgen and estrogen receptor function, epigenetic effects, and the biology of sex steroid hormone-responsive cancers including breast and prostate cancer. We found evidence of sex-differentiated genetic influences on SHBG. In a sex-specific GWAS, the loci 4q13.2-UGT2B15 was significant in men only (men p = 2.5 × 10(-08, women p = 0.66, heterogeneity p = 0.003. Additionally, three loci showed strong sex-differentiated effects: 17p13.1-SHBG and Xq22.3-TDGF3 were stronger in men, whereas 8q21.12-ZBTB10 was stronger in women. Conditional analyses identified additional signals at the SHBG gene that together almost double the proportion

  7. Transcriptional regulation of receptor-like protein genes by environmental stresses and hormones and their overexpression activities in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinbin; Liu, Zhijun; Zhang, Zhao; Lv, Yanting; Yang, Nan; Zhang, Guohua; Wu, Menyao; Lv, Shuo; Pan, Lixia; Joosten, Matthieu H A J; Wang, Guodong

    2016-05-01

    Receptor-like proteins (RLPs) have been implicated in multiple biological processes, including plant development and immunity to microbial infection. Fifty-seven AtRLP genes have been identified in Arabidopsis, whereas only a few have been functionally characterized. This is due to the lack of suitable physiological screening conditions and the high degree of functional redundancy among AtRLP genes. To overcome the functional redundancy and further understand the role of AtRLP genes, we studied the evolution of AtRLP genes and compiled a comprehensive profile of the transcriptional regulation of AtRLP genes upon exposure to a range of environmental stresses and different hormones. These results indicate that the majority of AtRLP genes are differentially expressed under various conditions that were tested, an observation that will help to select certain AtRLP genes involved in a specific biological process for further experimental studies to eventually dissect their function. A large number of AtRLP genes were found to respond to more than one treatment, suggesting that one single AtRLP gene may be involved in multiple physiological processes. In addition, we performed a genome-wide cloning of the AtRLP genes, and generated and characterized transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the individual AtRLP genes, presenting new insight into the roles of AtRLP genes, as exemplified by AtRLP3, AtRLP11 and AtRLP28 Our study provides an overview of biological processes in which AtRLP genes may be involved, and presents valuable resources for future investigations into the function of these genes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  8. Vinclozolin exposure in utero induces postpubertal prostatitis and reduces sperm production via a reversible hormone-regulated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowin, Prue A; Gold, Elspeth; Aleksova, Jasna; O'Bryan, Moira K; Foster, Paul M D; Scott, Hamish S; Risbridger, Gail P

    2010-02-01

    Vinclozolin is an endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC) that binds with high affinity to the androgen receptor (AR) and blocks the action of gonadal hormones on male reproductive organs. An alternative mechanism of action of Vinclozolin involves transgenerational effects on the male reproductive tract. We previously reported in utero Vinclozolin exposure-induced prostatitis (prostate inflammation) in postpubertal rats concurrent with down-regulation of AR and increased nuclear factor-kappaB activation. We postulated the male reproductive abnormalities induced by in utero Vinclozolin exposure could be reversed by testosterone supplementation, in contrast to the permanent modifications involving DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts) described by others. To test this hypothesis, we administered high-dose testosterone at puberty to Vinclozolin-treated rats and determined the effect on anogenital distance (AGD); testicular germ cell apoptosis, concentration of elongated spermatids, and the onset of prostatitis. Concurrently we examined Dnmt1, -3A, -3B, and -3L mRNA expression. Consistent with previous reports, in utero exposure to Vinclozolin significantly reduced AGD, increased testicular germ cell apoptosis 3-fold, reduced elongated spermatid number by 40%, and induced postpubertal prostatitis in 100% of exposed males. Administration of high-dose testosterone (25 mg/kg) at puberty normalized AGD, reduced germ cell apoptosis, and restored elongated spermatid number. Testosterone restored AR and nuclear factor-kappaB expression in the prostate and abolished Vinclozolin-induced prostatitis. Altered Dnmt expression was evident with in utero Vinclozolin exposure and was not normalized after testosterone treatment. These data demonstrate in utero Vinclozolin-induced male reproductive tract abnormalities are AR mediated and reversible and involve a mechanism independent of Dnmt expression.

  9. High-fructose corn syrup and sucrose have equivalent effects on energy-regulating hormones at normal human consumption levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiping; Lowndes, Joshua; Rippe, James

    2013-12-01

    Intake of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) has been suggested to contribute to the increased prevalence of obesity, whereas a number of studies and organizations have reported metabolic equivalence between HFCS and sucrose. We hypothesized that HFCS and sucrose would have similar effects on energy-regulating hormones and metabolic substrates at normal levels of human consumption and that these values would not change over a 10-week, free-living period at these consumption levels. This was a randomized, prospective, double-blind, parallel group study in which 138 adult men and women consumed 10 weeks of low-fat milk sweetened with either HFCS or sucrose at levels of the 25th, 50th, and 90th percentile population consumption of fructose (the equivalent of 40, 90, or 150 g of sugar per day in a 2000-kcal diet). Before and after the 10-week intervention, 24-hour blood samples were collected. The area under the curve (AUC) for glucose, insulin, leptin, active ghrelin, triglyceride, and uric acid was measured. There were no group differences at baseline or posttesting for all outcomes (interaction, P > .05). The AUC response of glucose, active ghrelin, and uric acid did not change between baseline and posttesting (P > .05), whereas the AUC response of insulin (P < .05), leptin (P < .001), and triglyceride (P < .01) increased over the course of the intervention when the 6 groups were averaged. We conclude that there are no differences in the metabolic effects of HFCS and sucrose when compared at low, medium, and high levels of consumption. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Experiment K-6-22. Growth hormone regulation, synthesis and secretion in microgravity. Part 1: Somatotroph physiology. Part 2: Immunohistochemical analysis of hypothalamic hormones. Part 3: Plasma analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindeland, R.; Vale, W.; Hymer, W.; Sawchenko, P.; Vasques, M.; Krasnov, I.; Kaplanski, A.; Victorov, I.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of the 1887 mission were: (1) to determine if the results of the SL-3 pituitary gland experiment (1) were repeatable; and (2) to determine what effect a longer mission would have on the rat pituitary gland growth hormone (GH) system. In the 1887 experiment two issues were considered especially important. First, it was recognized that cells prepared from individual rat pituitary glands should be considered separately so that the data from the 5 glands could be analyzed in a statistically meaningful way. Second, results of the SL-3 flight involving the hollow fiber implant and HPLC GH-variant experiments suggested that the biological activity of the hormone had been negatively affected by flight. The results of the 1887 experiment documented the wisdom of addressing both issues in the protocol. Thus, the reduction in secretory capacity of flight cells during subsequent extended cell culture on Earth was documented statistically, and thereby established the validity of the SL-3 result. The results of both flight experiments thus support the contention that there is a secretory lesion in pituitary GH cells of flight animals. The primary objective of both missions was a clear definition of the effect of spaceflight on the GH cell system. There can no longer be any reasonable doubt that this system is affected in microgravity. One explanation for the reason(s) underlying the better known effects of spaceflight on organisms, viz. changes in bone, muscle and immune systems may very well rest with such changes in bGH. In spite of the fact that rats in the Cosmos 1887 flight were on Earth for two days after flight, the data show that the GH system had still not recovered from the effects of flight. Many questions remain. One of the more important concerns the GRF responsiveness of somatotrophs after flight. This will be tested in an upcoming experiment.

  11. Regulation of the phosphoinositide pathway in cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats: effects of follicle-stimulating hormone and fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirk, S.M.; Reichert, L.E. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Many hormones elicit effects on target cells by stimulating the enzyme phospholipase-C, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides to the intracellular second messengers diacylglycerol and inositol phosphates. The present study examined the roles of FSH and guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G-proteins) in regulating the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides in Sertoli cells. Sertoli cell cultures prepared from 16- to 18-day-old rats were incubated for 24 h with myo-[2-3H] inositol to label endogenous phospholipids. Treatment of cells from 0.5-20 min with preparations of ovine FSH ranging in potency from 1-60 times that of NIH FSH S1 did not affect accumulation of inositol phosphates. Levels of total [3H]inositol phosphates [[3H]inositol mono-, di-, and triphosphates (IP, IP2, and IP3)] in FSH-treated cultures was 75-120% the levels in control cultures over the various time intervals studied. Addition of testosterone and the combination of testosterone plus retinoic acid, agents that have been shown to potentiate effects of FSH in other systems, did not affect accumulation of inositol phosphates in response to FSH. In contrast to the lack of effect on accumulation of inositol phosphates, FSH stimulated 4- to 11-fold increases in estradiol secretion over 24 h of culture, indicating that Sertoli cells were viable and responsive to FSH. AIF4- has been shown to activate G-proteins involved in regulation of adenylate cyclase activity. In the present study, AIF4- induced 4- to 5-fold increases in IP, IP2, and IP3 in experiments wherein FSH had no effect. Pretreatment of Sertoli cells with pertussis toxin (100 and 1000 ng/ml) for 24 h inhibited fluoride-induced generation of IP, IP2, and IP3 by 24-51%. Similar treatment with cholera toxin had no effect on basal or fluoride-induced generation of IP2 or IP3, but increased fluoride-induced generation of IP by 20-34%

  12. The p27 Pathway Modulates the Regulation of Skeletal Growth and Osteoblastic Bone Formation by Parathyroid Hormone-Related Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Zhang, Jing; Dong, Zhan; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Rong; Karaplis, Andrew; Goltzman, David; Miao, Dengshun

    2015-11-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) 1-84 knock-in mice (Pthrp KI) develop skeletal growth retardation and defective osteoblastic bone formation. To further examine the mechanisms underlying this phenotype, microarray analyses of differential gene expression profiles were performed in long bone extracts from Pthrp KI mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates. We found that the expression levels of p27, p16, and p53 were significantly upregulated in Pthrp KI mice relative to WT littermates. To determine whether p27 was involved in the regulation by PTHrP of skeletal growth and development in vivo, we generated compound mutant mice, which were homozygous for both p27 deletion and the Pthrp KI mutation (p27(-/-) Pthrp KI). We then compared p27(-/-) Pthrp KI mice with p27(-/-), Pthrp KI, and WT littermates. Deletion of p27 in Pthrp KI mice resulted in a longer lifespan, increased body weight, and improvement in skeletal growth. At 2 weeks of age, skeletal parameters, including length of long bones, size of epiphyses, numbers of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive chondrocytes, bone mineral density, trabecular bone volume, osteoblast numbers, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-, type I collagen-, and osteocalcin-positive bone areas were increased in p27(-/-) mice and reduced in both Pthrp KI and p27(-/-) Pthrp KI mice compared with WT mice; however, these parameters were increased in p27(-/-) Pthrp KI mice compared with Pthrp KI mice. As well, protein expression levels of PTHR, IGF-1, and Bmi-1, and the numbers of total colony-forming unit fibroblastic (CFU-f) and ALP-positive CFU-f were similarly increased in p27(-/-) Pthrp KI mice compared with Pthrp KI mice. Our results demonstrate that deletion of p27 in Pthrp KI mice can partially rescue defects in skeletal growth and osteoblastic bone formation by enhancing endochondral bone formation and osteogenesis. These studies, therefore, indicate that the p27 pathway may function downstream in the action

  13. SIRT1 Regulates Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Release by Enhancing PIP5Kgamma Activity through Deacetylation of Specific Lysine Residues in Mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayaka Akieda-Asai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SIRT1, a NAD-dependent deacetylase, has diverse roles in a variety of organs such as regulation of endocrine function and metabolism. However, it remains to be addressed how it regulates hormone release there. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report that SIRT1 is abundantly expressed in pituitary thyrotropes and regulates thyroid hormone secretion. Manipulation of SIRT1 level revealed that SIRT1 positively regulated the exocytosis of TSH-containing granules. Using LC/MS-based interactomics, phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase (PIP5Kgamma was identified as a SIRT1 binding partner and deacetylation substrate. SIRT1 deacetylated two specific lysine residues (K265/K268 in PIP5Kgamma and enhanced PIP5Kgamma enzyme activity. SIRT1-mediated TSH secretion was abolished by PIP5Kgamma knockdown. SIRT1 knockdown decreased the levels of deacetylated PIP5Kgamma, PI(4,5P(2, and reduced the secretion of TSH from pituitary cells. These results were also observed in SIRT1-knockout mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings indicated that the control of TSH release by the SIRT1-PIP5Kgamma pathway is important for regulating the metabolism of the whole body.

  14. Dynamic changes in extracellular release of GABA and glutamate in the lateral septum during social play behavior in juvenile rats: Implications for sex-specific regulation of social play behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredewold, Remco; Schiavo, Jennifer K.; van der Hart, Marieke; Verreij, Michelle; Veenema, Alexa H.

    2015-01-01

    Social play is a motivated and rewarding behavior that is displayed by nearly all mammals and peaks in the juvenile period. Moreover, social play is essential for the development of social skills and is impaired in social disorders like autism. We recently showed that the lateral septum (LS) is involved in the regulation of social play behavior in juvenile male and female rats. The LS is largely modulated by GABA and glutamate neurotransmission, but their role in social play behavior is unknown. Here, we determined whether social play behavior is associated with changes in the extracellular release of GABA and glutamate in the LS and to what extent such changes modulate social play behavior in male and female juvenile rats. Using intracerebral microdialysis in freely behaving rats, we found no sex difference in extracellular GABA concentrations, but extracellular glutamate concentrations are higher in males than in females under baseline condition and during social play. This resulted in a higher glutamate/GABA concentration ratio in males versus females and thus, an excitatory predominance in the LS of males. Furthermore, social play behavior in both sexes is associated with significant increases in extracellular release of GABA and glutamate in the LS. Pharmacological blockade of GABA-A receptors in the LS with bicuculline (100 ng/0.5 µl, 250 ng/0.5 µl) dose-dependently decreased the duration of social play behavior in both sexes. In contrast, pharmacological blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors (NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptors) in the LS with AP-5 + CNQX (2 mM+0.4 mM/0.5 µl, 30 mM+3 mM/0.5 µl) dose-dependently decreased the duration of social play behavior in females, but did not alter social play behavior in males. Together, these data suggest a role for GABA neurotransmission in the LS in the regulation of juvenile social play behavior in both sexes, while glutamate neurotransmission in the LS is involved in the sex-specific regulation of juvenile

  15. Opposite effect of phencyclidine on activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) in juvenile and adult limbic rat brain regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Hansen, Henrik H; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2010-01-01

    The psychotomimetic effect of NMDA antagonists such as phencyclidine (PCP) in humans spurred the hypoglutamatergic theory of schizophrenia. This theory is supported by animal studies demonstrating schizophrenia-like behavioral and molecular changes following PCP administration to adult or neonatal...... animals. However, schizophrenia is believed to develop in part due to neurodevelopmental dysfunction during adolescence. Therefore, the effects of PCP in juvenile animals may better reflect the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Here, we compare the effect of PCP (5mg/kg/day for 5 days) on activity......RNA in juvenile rats corresponds best with the proposed "hypofrontality" in schizophrenia, suggesting the merits of using PCP in juvenile animals as a model for schizophrenia, as this would relate better to the typical onset and clinical features of schizophrenia....

  16. Regulation of wheat seed dormancy by after-ripening is mediated by specific transcriptional switches that induce changes in seed hormone metabolism and signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Liu

    Full Text Available Treatments that promote dormancy release are often correlated with changes in seed hormone content and/or sensitivity. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of after-ripening (seed dry storage in triggering hormone related changes and dormancy decay in wheat (Triticum aestivum, temporal expression patterns of genes related to abscisic acid (ABA, gibberellin (GA, jasmonate and indole acetic acid (IAA metabolism and signaling, and levels of the respective hormones were examined in dormant and after-ripened seeds in both dry and imbibed states. After-ripening mediated developmental switch from dormancy to germination appears to be associated with declines in seed sensitivity to ABA and IAA, which are mediated by transcriptional repressions of PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2C, SNF1-RELATED PROTEIN KINASE2, ABA INSENSITIVE5 and LIPID PHOSPHATE PHOSPHTASE2, and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR and RELATED TO UBIQUITIN1 genes. Transcriptomic analysis of wheat seed responsiveness to ABA suggests that ABA inhibits the germination of wheat seeds partly by repressing the transcription of genes related to chromatin assembly and cell wall modification, and activating that of GA catabolic genes. After-ripening induced seed dormancy decay in wheat is also associated with the modulation of seed IAA and jasmonate contents. Transcriptional control of members of the ALLENE OXIDE SYNTHASE, 3-KETOACYL COENZYME A THIOLASE, LIPOXYGENASE and 12-OXOPHYTODIENOATE REDUCTASE gene families appears to regulate seed jasmonate levels. Changes in the expression of GA biosynthesis genes, GA 20-OXIDASE and GA 3-OXIDASE, in response to after-ripening implicate this hormone in enhancing dormancy release and germination. These findings have important implications in the dissection of molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of seed dormancy in cereals.

  17. Prolactin receptor, growth hormone receptor, and putative somatolactin receptor in Mozambique tilapia: tissue specific expression and differential regulation by salinity and fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, A L; Fox, B K; Davis, L K; Visitacion, N; Kitahashi, T; Hirano, T; Grau, E G

    2007-01-01

    In fish, pituitary growth hormone family peptide hormones (growth hormone, GH; prolactin, PRL; somatolactin, SL) regulate essential physiological functions including osmoregulation, growth, and metabolism. Teleost GH family hormones have both differential and overlapping effects, which are mediated by plasma membrane receptors. A PRL receptor (PRLR) and two putative GH receptors (GHR1 and GHR2) have been identified in several teleost species. Recent phylogenetic analyses and binding studies suggest that GHR1 is a receptor for SL. However, no studies have compared the tissue distribution and physiological regulation of all three receptors. We sequenced GHR2 from the liver of the Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus), developed quantitative real-time PCR assays for the three receptors, and assessed their tissue distribution and regulation by salinity and fasting. PRLR was highly expressed in the gill, kidney, and intestine, consistent with the osmoregulatory functions of PRL. PRLR expression was very low in the liver. GHR2 was most highly expressed in the muscle, followed by heart, testis, and liver, consistent with this being a GH receptor with functions in growth and metabolism. GHR1 was most highly expressed in fat, liver, and muscle, suggesting a metabolic function. GHR1 expression was also high in skin, consistent with a function of SL in chromatophore regulation. These findings support the hypothesis that GHR1 is a receptor for SL. In a comparison of freshwater (FW)- and seawater (SW)-adapted tilapia, plasma PRL was strongly elevated in FW, whereas plasma GH was slightly elevated in SW. PRLR expression was reduced in the gill in SW, consistent with PRL's function in freshwater adaptation. GHR2 was elevated in the kidney in FW, and correlated negatively with plasma GH, whereas GHR1 was elevated in the gill in SW. Plasma IGF-I, but not GH, was reduced by 4 weeks of fasting. Transcript levels of GHR1 and GHR2 were elevated by fasting in the muscle. However

  18. Parenting and juvenile delinquency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeve, M.

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile delinquency is a noteworthy problem. This thesis addressed the association between parenting and juvenile delinquency by analyzing the concepts of parenting adopted in family research in relation to criminological concepts and measures of delinquent behavior. Four studies were conducted.

  19. Alcohol intake and its effect on some appetite-regulating hormones in man: influence of gastroprotection with sucralfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calissendorff, Jan; Gustafsson, Thomas; Holst, Jens Juul; Brismar, Kerstin; Röjdmark, Sven

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol stimulates appetite. Ghrelin, obestatin, glucagon-like peptide 1 and leptin are putative mediators. We studied whether alcohol ingestion affects serum levels of these peripheral hormones, and if gastroprotective sucralfate prevents such an effect. Ten participants were investigated on four occasions. On one alcohol was ingested; on another alcohol was given after pretreatment with sucralfate; on a third water was ingested; and on a fourth sucralfate was ingested followed by water. Serum hormones and ethanol concentrations were determined. The ghrelin and leptin levels fell after ingestion of alcohol, whereas the obestatin and GLP-1 levels remained unchanged. Sucralfate did not affect any of the basal four hormone levels, nor the ghrelin or leptin responses to alcohol. An appetite-stimulating effect of alcohol is hardly mediated by any of the hormones studied in this investigation, as the GLP-1 and obestatin levels were unaffected by alcohol, the ghelin level decreased, and leptin - although declining after alcohol - has not previously been found to have short-term inhibitory effect on hunger.

  20. Juvenile Court Statistics - 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Youth Development (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    This report is a statistical study of juvenile court cases in 1972. The data demonstrates how the court is frequently utilized in dealing with juvenile delinquency by the police as well as by other community agencies and parents. Excluded from this report are the ordinary traffic cases handled by juvenile court. The data indicate that: (1) in…

  1. Juvenile Court Statistics, 1974.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Jacqueline; Vereb, Thomas S.

    This report presents information on juvenile court processing of youth in the U.S. during 1974. It is based on data gathered under the National Juvenile Court Statistical Reporting System. Findings can be summarized as follows: (1) 1,252,700 juvenile delinquency cases, excluding traffic offenses, were handled by courts in the U.S. in 1974; (2) the…

  2. Phosphorylation of the adaptor protein SH2B1β regulates its ability to enhance growth hormone-dependent macrophage motility

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Hsiao-Wen; Lanning, Nathan J.; Morris, David L.; Argetsinger, Lawrence S.; Lumeng, Carey N.; Carter-Su, Christin

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that growth hormone (GH) recruits the adapter protein SH2B1β to the GH-activated, GH receptor-associated tyrosine kinase JAK2, implicating SH2B1β in GH-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling, and suggesting that phosphorylation at serines 161 and 165 in SH2B1β releases SH2B1β from the plasma membrane. Here, we examined the role of SH2B1β in GH regulation of macrophage migration. We show that GH stimulates migration of cultured RAW264.7 macrophages, and primary cul...

  3. Effects of a brown beans evening meal on metabolic risk markers and appetite regulating hormones at a subsequent standardized breakfast: a randomized cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Anne; Johansson, Elin; Ekström, Linda; Björck, Inger

    2013-01-01

    Dietary prevention strategies are increasingly recognized as essential to combat the current epidemic of obesity and related metabolic disorders. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential prebiotic effects of indigestible carbohydrates in Swedish brown beans (Phaseolus vulgaris var. nanus) in relation to cardiometabolic risk markers and appetite regulating hormones. Brown beans, or white wheat bread (WWB, reference product) were provided as evening meals to 16 healthy young adults in a randomised crossover design. Glucose, insulin, appetite regulatory hormones, GLP-1, GLP-2, appetite sensations, and markers of inflammation were measured at a following standardised breakfast, that is at 11 to 14 h post the evening meals. Additionally, colonic fermentation activity was estimated from measurement of plasma short chain fatty acids (SCFA, including also branched chain fatty acids) and breath hydrogen (H2) excretion. An evening meal of brown beans, in comparison with WWB, lowered blood glucose (-15%, prisk and appetite regulatory hormones, within a time frame of 11-14 h, in comparison to a WWB evening meal. Concentrations of plasma SCFA and H2 were increased, indicating involvement of colonic fermentation. Indigestible colonic substrates from brown beans may provide a preventive tool in relation to obesity and the metabolic syndrome. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01706042.

  4. Regulation of hormone release by cultured cells from a thyrotropin-growth hormone-secreting pituitary tumor. Direct inhibiting effects of 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine and dexamethasone on thyrotropin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberts, S W; Oosterom, R; Verleun, T; Krenning, E P; Assies, H

    1984-08-01

    The regulation of TSH and GH secretion was investigated in cultured tumor cells prepared from a mixed TSH/GH secreting pituitary tumor. The tumor tissue had been removed transsphenoidally from a patient with hyperthyroidism and inappropriately high serum TSH levels and acromegaly. TSH and GH secretion by cultured cells were stimulated in a parallel way by TRH (300 nM) and LHRH (50 nM), but were unaffected by bromocriptine (10 nM). Exposure of the tumor cells to dexamethasone (0.1 microM) or T3 (50 nM) had differential effects on hormone secretion. GH secretion was greatly stimulated by dexamethasone, but unaffected by T3. TSH secretion was inhibited both by T3 and by dexamethasone. So, T3 and glucocorticoids inhibit TSH release by the human pituitary tumor cells studied at least partly by means of a direct effect.

  5. Hormone assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisentraut, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    An improved radioimmunoassay is described for measuring total triiodothyronine or total thyroxine levels in a sample of serum containing free endogenous thyroid hormone and endogenous thyroid hormone bound to thyroid hormone binding protein. The thyroid hormone is released from the protein by adding hydrochloric acid to the serum. The pH of the separated thyroid hormone and thyroid hormone binding protein is raised in the absence of a blocking agent without interference from the endogenous protein. 125 I-labelled thyroid hormone and thyroid hormone antibodies are added to the mixture, allowing the labelled and unlabelled thyroid hormone and the thyroid hormone antibody to bind competitively. This results in free thyroid hormone being separated from antibody bound thyroid hormone and thus the unknown quantity of thyroid hormone may be determined. A thyroid hormone test assay kit is described for this radioimmunoassay. It provides a 'single tube' assay which does not require blocking agents for endogenous protein interference nor an external solid phase sorption step for the separation of bound and free hormone after the competitive binding step; it also requires a minimum number of manipulative steps. Examples of the assay are given to illustrate the reproducibility, linearity and specificity of the assay. (UK)

  6. Sex steroid hormones matter for learning and memory: estrogenic regulation of hippocampal function in male and female rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaekyoon; Tuscher, Jennifer J.; Fortress, Ashley M.

    2015-01-01

    Ample evidence has demonstrated that sex steroid hormones, such as the potent estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2), affect hippocampal morphology, plasticity, and memory in male and female rodents. Yet relatively few investigators who work with male subjects consider the effects of these hormones on learning and memory. This review describes the effects of E2 on hippocampal spinogenesis, neurogenesis, physiology, and memory, with particular attention paid to the effects of E2 in male rodents. The estrogen receptors, cell-signaling pathways, and epigenetic processes necessary for E2 to enhance memory in female rodents are also discussed in detail. Finally, practical considerations for working with female rodents are described for those investigators thinking of adding females to their experimental designs. PMID:26286657

  7. The role of leptin and other hormones related to bone metabolism and appetite-regulation as determinants of gain in body fat and fat-free mass in 8-11 year old children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalskov, Stine-Mathilde; Ritz, Christian; Larnkjær, Anni

    2015-01-01

    Background: Regulation of body composition during childhood is complex. Numerous hormones are potentially involved. Leptin has been proposed to restrain weight gain, but results are inconsistent. Objectives: We examined if baseline fasting levels of ghrelin, adiponectin, leptin, insulin, insulin......-like growth factor I (IGF-1), osteocalcin and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) were associated with body composition cross-sectionally and longitudinally in 633 8-11-year-olds. Design: Data on hormones and body composition by Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry from OPUS School Meal Study were used. We looked...... at baseline hormones as predictors of baseline fat mass index (FMI) or fat-free mass index (FFMI), and also subsequent changes (three and six months) in FMI or FFMI using models with hormones individually or combined. Results: Cross-sectionally, baseline leptin was positively associated with FMI in girls (0...

  8. Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone (VIH) is predominantly expressed in the brain and negatively regulates hepatopancreatic vitellogenin (VTG) gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Zhang, Lv-Ping; Wong, Nai-Kei; Zhong, Ming; Ren, Chun-Hua; Hu, Chao-Qun

    2014-03-01

    Ovarian maturation in crustaceans is temporally orchestrated by two processes: oogenesis and vitellogenesis. The peptide hormone vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone (VIH), by far the most potent negative regulator of crustacean reproduction known, critically modulates crustacean ovarian maturation by suppressing vitellogenin (VTG) synthesis. In this study, cDNA encoding VIH was cloned from the eyestalk of Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, a highly significant commercial culture species. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that L. vannamei VIH (lvVIH) can be classified as a member of the type II crustacean hyperglycemic hormone family. Northern blot and RT-PCR results reveal that both the brain and eyestalk were the major sources for lvVIH mRNA expression. In in vitro experiments on primary culture of shrimp hepatopancreatic cells, it was confirmed that some endogenous inhibitory factors existed in L. vannamei hemolymph, brain, and eyestalk that suppressed hepatopancreatic VTG gene expression. Purified recombinant lvVIH protein was effective in inhibiting VTG mRNA expression in both in vitro primary hepatopancreatic cell culture and in vivo injection experiments. Injection of recombinant VIH could also reverse ovarian growth induced by eyestalk ablation. Furthermore, unilateral eyestalk ablation reduced the mRNA level of lvVIH in the brain but not in the remaining contralateral eyestalk. Our study, as a whole, provides new insights on VIH regulation of shrimp reproduction: 1) the brain and eyestalk are both important sites of VIH expression and therefore possible coregulators of hepatopancreatic VTG mRNA expression and 2) eyestalk ablation could increase hepatopancreatic VTG expression by transcriptionally abolishing eyestalk-derived VIH and diminishing brain-derived VIH.

  9. Hormone response to bidirectional selection on social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amdam, Gro V; Page, Robert E; Fondrk, M Kim; Brent, Colin S

    2010-01-01

    Behavior is a quantitative trait determined by multiple genes. Some of these genes may have effects from early development and onward by influencing hormonal systems that are active during different life-stages leading to complex associations, or suites, of traits. Honey bees (Apis mellifera) have been used extensively in experiments on the genetic and hormonal control of complex social behavior, but the relationships between their early developmental processes and adult behavioral variation are not well understood. Bidirectional selective breeding on social food-storage behavior produced two honey bee strains, each with several sublines, that differ in an associated suite of anatomical, physiological, and behavioral traits found in unselected wild type bees. Using these genotypes, we document strain-specific changes during larval, pupal, and early adult life-stages for the central insect hormones juvenile hormone (JH) and ecdysteroids. Strain differences correlate with variation in female reproductive anatomy (ovary size), which can be influenced by JH during development, and with secretion rates of ecdysteroid from the ovaries of adults. Ovary size was previously assigned to the suite of traits of honey bee food-storage behavior. Our findings support that bidirectional selection on honey bee social behavior acted on pleiotropic gene networks. These networks may bias a bee's adult phenotype by endocrine effects on early developmental processes that regulate variation in reproductive traits. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Regulation of C. elegans fat uptake and storage by acyl-CoA synthase-3 is dependent on NR5A family nuclear hormone receptor nhr-25

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullaney, Brendan C; Blind, Raymond D; Lemieux, George A

    2010-01-01

    Acyl-CoA synthases are important for lipid synthesis and breakdown, generation of signaling molecules, and lipid modification of proteins, highlighting the challenge of understanding metabolic pathways within intact organisms. From a C. elegans mutagenesis screen, we found that loss of ACS-3...... mutant phenotypes require the nuclear hormone receptor NHR-25, a key regulator of C. elegans molting. Our findings suggest that ACS-3-derived long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs, perhaps incorporated into complex ligands such as phosphoinositides, modulate NHR-25 function, which in turn regulates an endocrine...... program of lipid uptake and synthesis. These results reveal a link between acyl-CoA synthase function and an NR5A family nuclear receptor in C. elegans....

  11. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of polypeptide hormones is a regulated process: inhibition of [125I]iodoinsulin internalization in hypoinsulinemic diabetes of rat and man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpentier, J.L.; Robert, A.; Grunberger, G.; van Obberghen, E.; Freychet, P.; Orci, L.; Gorden, P.

    1986-01-01

    Much data suggest that receptor-mediated endocytosis is regulated in states of hormone excess. Thus, in hyperinsulinemic states there is an accelerated loss of cell surface insulin receptors. In the present experiments we addressed this question in hypoinsulinemic states, in which insulin binding to cell surface receptors is generally increased. In hepatocytes obtained from hypoinsulinemic streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, [ 125 I]iodoglucagon internalization was increased, while at the same time [ 125 I]iodoinsulin internalization was decreased. The defect in [ 125 I]iodoinsulin internalization was corrected by insulin treatment of the animal. In peripheral blood monocytes from patients with type I insulinopenic diabetes, internalization of [ 125 I]iodoinsulin was impaired; this defect was not present in insulin-treated patients. These data in the hypoinsulinemic rat and human diabetes suggest that receptor-mediated endocytosis is regulated in states of insulin deficiency as well as insulin excess. Delayed or reduced internalization of the insulin-receptor complex could amplify the muted signal caused by deficient hormone secretion

  12. Dlk1/FA1 Is a Novel Endocrine Regulator of Bone and Fat Mass and Its Serum Level Is Modulated By Growth Hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, B.M.; Ding, M.; Jensen, C.H.

    2007-01-01

    Fat and bone metabolism are two linked processes regulated by several hormonal factors. FA1 (fetal antigen 1) is the soluble form of dlk1 (delta like 1), which is a member of the Notch-Delta family. We have previously identified FA1 as a negative regulator of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell...... differentiation. Here, we studied the effects of circulating FA1 on fat and bone mass in vivo by generating mice expressing high serum levels of FA1 (FA1-mice) using the hydrodynamic-based gene transfer procedure (HGTP). We found that increased serum FA1 levels led to a significant reduction in total body weight......, fat mass and bone mass in a dose-dependent manner. Reduced bone mass in FA1-mice was associated with the inhibition of mineral apposition rate and bone formation rates by 58% and 72% respectively. Since FA1 is co-localized with growth hormone (GH) in the pituitary gland, we explored the possible...

  13. Comparison of Appetite-regulating Hormones and Body Composition in Pediatric Patients in Predialysis Stage of Chronic Kidney Disease and Healthy Control Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hassan Eftekhari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM is a common complication in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. Components incorporated in the regulation of appetite and body composition appear to be of the focus in renal insufficiency and may influence the CKD-associated PEM. The purpose of this study was to investigate plasma levels of appetite-regulating hormones and their correlation with the body composition variables in a pediatric in predialysis stage of CKD. Methods: Thirty children with CKD in predialysis stage were selected and compared with 30 healthy sex- and age-matched controls. Blood samples were collected in fasting. Serum total ghrelin, leptin, and obestatin levels were measured using enzyme immunometric assay methods. Anthropometric parameters measurement and body composition analysis were done using the bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA method. Results: Patients showed insignificant elevated total ghrelin (105.40±30.83 ng/l, leptin (5.32±1.17 ng/ml and obestatin (5.07±1.09 ng/ml levels in comparison with healthy participants. By using BIA, patients had significantly different Dry Lean Weight (P=0.048, Extra Cellular Water (P=0.045, Body Cell Mass (BCM (P=0.021, Basal Metabolic Rate (P=0.033 and Body Mass Index (P=0.029 compared with controls. Furthermore, the total body water was slightly and the ECW was significantly higher in CKD participants. There were significant negative correlation between obestatin and BCM (r=-0.40, P=0.03 and fat free mass index (FFMI (r=-0.40, P=0.029 in patients. Conclusion: It seems that our results are insufficient to clarify the role of appetite-regulating hormones in PEM in CKD patients. It is apparent that there are still many unknown parameters related to both appetite regulating and CKD-associated PEM.

  14. Thyroid Hormone Receptor β (TRβ) and Liver X Receptor (LXR) Regulate Carbohydrate-response Element-binding Protein (ChREBP) Expression in a Tissue-selective Manner*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Karine; Billon, Cyrielle; Bissler, Marie; Beylot, Michel; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc; Vanacker, Jean-Marc; Samarut, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TR) and liver X (LXR) receptors are transcription factors involved in lipogenesis. Both receptors recognize the same consensus DNA-response element in vitro. It was previously shown that their signaling pathways interact in the control of cholesterol elimination in the liver. In the present study, carbohydrate-response element-binding protein (ChREBP), a major transcription factor controlling the activation of glucose-induced lipogenesis in liver, is characterized as a direct target of thyroid hormones (TH) in liver and white adipose tissue (WAT), the two main lipogenic tissues in mice. Using genetic and molecular approaches, ChREBP is shown to be specifically regulated by TRβ but not by TRα in vivo, even in WAT where both TR isoforms are expressed. However, this isotype specificity is not found in vitro. This TRβ specific regulation correlates with the loss of TH-induced lipogenesis in TRβ−/− mice. Fasting/refeeding experiments show that TRβ is not required for the activation of ChREBP expression particularly marked in WAT following refeeding. However, TH can stimulate ChREBP expression in WAT even under fasting conditions, suggesting completely independent pathways. Because ChREBP has been described as an LXR target, the interaction of LXR and TRβ in ChREBP regulation was assayed both in vitro and in vivo. Each receptor recognizes a different response element on the ChREBP promoter, located only 8 bp apart. There is a cross-talk between LXR and TRβ signaling on the ChREBP promoter in liver but not in WAT where LXR does not regulate ChREBP expression. The molecular basis for this cross-talk has been determined in in vitro systems. PMID:20615868

  15. The semantic sphere of juvenile offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshevsky D.S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a preliminary empirical study aimed to identify features of the semantic sphere of adolescents who have committed illegal, including aggressive acts. The study included 50 male juveniles aged of 16 - 17 years. The first group consisted of adolescents convicted of aggressive and violent crimes; the second – of property socially dangerous acts (SDA. It is shown that evaluation of such adolescents is generally categorical and polar, the semantic field is subdifferentiable, less hierarchic, and has not enough realistic structure of meanings. Developed structure of motives and meanings is the basis of voluntary regulation of socially significant behavior. Thus, assessing the semantic sphere of juvenile offenders we can highlight its characteristics as risk factors of unlawful behavior, as well as the resource side, that will contribute to addressing issues of prevention and correction of unlawful behavior. Key words: juvenile offenders, semantic field of juvenile offenders, unlawful behavior.

  16. Effects of a brown beans evening meal on metabolic risk markers and appetite regulating hormones at a subsequent standardized breakfast: a randomized cross-over study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Nilsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dietary prevention strategies are increasingly recognized as essential to combat the current epidemic of obesity and related metabolic disorders. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential prebiotic effects of indigestible carbohydrates in Swedish brown beans (Phaseolus vulgaris var. nanus in relation to cardiometabolic risk markers and appetite regulating hormones. METHODS: Brown beans, or white wheat bread (WWB, reference product were provided as evening meals to 16 healthy young adults in a randomised crossover design. Glucose, insulin, appetite regulatory hormones, GLP-1, GLP-2, appetite sensations, and markers of inflammation were measured at a following standardised breakfast, that is at 11 to 14 h post the evening meals. Additionally, colonic fermentation activity was estimated from measurement of plasma short chain fatty acids (SCFA, including also branched chain fatty acids and breath hydrogen (H2 excretion. RESULTS: An evening meal of brown beans, in comparison with WWB, lowered blood glucose (-15%, p<0.01- and insulin (-16%, p<0.05 responses, increased satiety hormones (PYY 51%, p<0.001, suppressed hunger hormones (ghrelin -14%, p<0.05, and hunger sensations (-15%, p = 0.05, increased GLP-2 concentrations (8.4%, p<0.05 and suppressed inflammatory markers (IL-6 -35%, and IL-18 -8.3%, p<0.05 at a subsequent standardised breakfast. Breath H2 (141%, p<0.01, propionate (16%, p<0.05, and isobutyrate (18%, P<0.001 were significantly increased after brown beans compared to after WWB, indicating a higher colonic fermentative activity after brown beans. CONCLUSIONS: An evening meal with brown beans beneficially affected important measures of cardiometabolic risk and appetite regulatory hormones, within a time frame of 11-14 h, in comparison to a WWB evening meal. Concentrations of plasma SCFA and H2 were increased, indicating involvement of colonic fermentation. Indigestible colonic substrates from brown

  17. Effects of bifenthrin exposure on the estrogenic and dopaminergic pathways in zebrafish embryos and juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertotto, Luísa Becker; Richards, Jaben; Gan, Jay; Volz, David Christopher; Schlenk, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Bifenthrin is a pyrethroid insecticide used in urban and agricultural applications. Previous studies have shown that environmentally relevant (ng/L) concentrations of bifenthrin increased plasma concentrations of 17β-estradiol (E2) and altered the expression of dopaminergic pathway components. The dopaminergic neurons can indirectly regulate E2 biosynthesis, suggesting that bifenthrin may disrupt the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Because embryos do not have a complete HPG axis, the hypothesis that bifenthrin impairs dopamine regulation was tested in embryonic and 1-mo-old juvenile zebrafish (Danio rerio) with exposure to measured concentrations of 0.34 and 3.1 µg/L bifenthrin for 96 h. Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was used to investigate transcripts of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine receptor 1 (DR1) and 2A (DR2A), dopamine active transporter (DAT), estrogen receptor α (ERα), ERβ1, ERβ2, luteinizing hormone β (LHβ), follicle-stimulating hormone β (FSHβ), vitellogenin (VTG), cytochrome P450 cyp19a1a, and cyp19a1b. Levels of E2 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Dopamine and its metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) concentrations were measured by liquid chromatrography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Significant decreases in TH and DR1 transcripts and HVA levels, as well as ratios of HVA/dopamine and HVA+DOPAC/dopamine, in zebrafish embryos were observed after bifenthrin treatment. In juveniles, a significant increase in the expression of ERβ1 and the DOPAC to dopamine ratio was noted. These results show a possible antiestrogenic effect of bifenthrin in embryos, and estrogenicity in juveniles, indicating life-stage-dependent toxicity in developing fish. Environ Toxicol Chem 2018;37:236-246. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  18. The Nutrient-Responsive Hormone CCHamide-2 Controls Growth by Regulating Insulin-like Peptides in the Brain of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Hiroko; Nakamura, Akira; Texada, Michael J; Truman, James W; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Kamikouchi, Azusa; Nibu, Yutaka; Kume, Kazuhiko; Ida, Takanori; Kojima, Masayasu

    2015-05-01

    The coordination of growth with nutritional status is essential for proper development and physiology. Nutritional information is mostly perceived by peripheral organs before being relayed to the brain, which modulates physiological responses. Hormonal signaling ensures this organ-to-organ communication, and the failure of endocrine regulation in humans can cause diseases including obesity and diabetes. In Drosophila melanogaster, the fat body (adipose tissue) has been suggested to play an important role in coupling growth with nutritional status. Here, we show that the peripheral tissue-derived peptide hormone CCHamide-2 (CCHa2) acts as a nutrient-dependent regulator of Drosophila insulin-like peptides (Dilps). A BAC-based transgenic reporter revealed strong expression of CCHa2 receptor (CCHa2-R) in insulin-producing cells (IPCs) in the brain. Calcium imaging of brain explants and IPC-specific CCHa2-R knockdown demonstrated that peripheral-tissue derived CCHa2 directly activates IPCs. Interestingly, genetic disruption of either CCHa2 or CCHa2-R caused almost identical defects in larval growth and developmental timing. Consistent with these phenotypes, the expression of dilp5, and the release of both Dilp2 and Dilp5, were severely reduced. Furthermore, transcription of CCHa2 is altered in response to nutritional levels, particularly of glucose. These findings demonstrate that CCHa2 and CCHa2-R form a direct link between peripheral tissues and the brain, and that this pathway is essential for the coordination of systemic growth with nutritional availability. A mammalian homologue of CCHa2-R, Bombesin receptor subtype-3 (Brs3), is an orphan receptor that is expressed in the islet β-cells; however, the role of Brs3 in insulin regulation remains elusive. Our genetic approach in Drosophila melanogaster provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, that bombesin receptor signaling with its endogenous ligand promotes insulin production.

  19. Periodic regulation of expression of genes for kisspeptin, gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone and their receptors in the grass puffer: Implications in seasonal, daily and lunar rhythms of reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Hironori; Shahjahan, Md; Kitahashi, Takashi

    2018-04-03

    The seasonal, daily and lunar control of reproduction involves photoperiodic, circadian and lunar changes in the activity of kisspeptin, gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. These changes are brought through complex networks of light-, time- and non-photic signal-dependent control mechanisms, which are mostly unknown at present. The grass puffer, Takifugu alboplumbeus, a semilunar spawner, provides a unique and excellent animal model to assess this question because its spawning is synchronized with seasonal, daily and lunar cycles. In the diencephalon, the genes for kisspeptin, GnIH and their receptors showed similar expression patterns with clear seasonal and daily oscillations, suggesting that they are regulated by common mechanisms involving melatonin, circadian clock and water temperature. For implications in semilunar-synchronized spawning rhythm, melatonin receptor genes showed ultradian oscillations in expression with the period of 14.0-15.4 h in the pineal gland. This unique ultradian rhythm might be driven by circatidal clock. The possible circatidal clock and circadian clock in the pineal gland may cooperate to drive circasemilunar rhythm to regulate the expression of the kisspeptin, GnIH and their receptor genes. On the other hand, high temperature (over 28 °C) conditions, under which the expression of the kisspeptin and its receptor genes is markedly suppressed, may provide an environmental signal that terminates reproduction at the end of breeding period. Taken together, the periodic regulation of the kisspeptin, GnIH and their receptor genes by melatonin, circadian clock and water temperature may be important in the precisely-timed spawning of the grass puffer. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Regulation of plant vascular stem cells by endodermis-derived EPFL-family peptide hormones and phloem-expressed ERECTA-family receptor kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Naoyuki; Tasaka, Masao

    2013-12-01

    Plant vasculatures are complex tissues consisting of (pro)cambium, phloem, and xylem. The (pro)cambium serves as vascular stem cells that produce all vascular cells. The Arabidopsis ERECTA (ER) receptor kinase is known to regulate the architecture of inflorescence stems. It was recently reported that the er mutation enhances a vascular phenotype induced by a mutation of TDR/PXY, which plays a significant role in procambial proliferation, suggesting that ER participates in vascular development. However, detailed molecular mechanisms of the ER-dependent vascular regulation are largely unknown. Here, this work found that ER and its paralogue, ER-LIKE1, were redundantly involved in procambial development of inflorescence stems. Interestingly, their activity in the phloem was sufficient for vascular regulation. Furthermore, two endodermis-derived peptide hormones, EPFL4 and EPFL6, were redundantly involved in such regulation. It has been previously reported that EPFL4 and EPFL6 act as ligands of phloem-expressed ER for stem elongation. Therefore, these findings indicate that cell-cell communication between the endodermis and the phloem plays an important role in procambial development as well as stem elongation. Interestingly, similar EPFL-ER modules control two distinct developmental events by slightly changing their components: the EPFL4/6-ER module for stem elongation and the EPFL4/6-ER/ERL1 module for vascular development.

  1. Regulation of root morphogenesis in arbuscular mycorrhizae: what role do fungal exudates, phosphate, sugars and hormones play in lateral root formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusconi, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background Arbuscular mycorrhizae (AMs) form a widespread root–fungus symbiosis that improves plant phosphate (Pi) acquisition and modifies the physiology and development of host plants. Increased branching is recognized as a general feature of AM roots, and has been interpreted as a means of increasing suitable sites for colonization. Fungal exudates, which are involved in the dialogue between AM fungi and their host during the pre-colonization phase, play a well-documented role in lateral root (LR) formation. In addition, the increased Pi content of AM plants, in relation to Pi-starved controls, as well as changes in the delivery of carbohydrates to the roots and modulation of phytohormone concentration, transport and sensitivity, are probably involved in increasing root system branching. Scope This review discusses the possible causes of increased branching in AM plants. The differential root responses to Pi, sugars and hormones of potential AM host species are also highlighted and discussed in comparison with those of the non-host Arabidopsis thaliana. Conclusions Fungal exudates are probably the main compounds regulating AM root morphogenesis during the first colonization steps, while a complex network of interactions governs root development in established AMs. Colonization and high Pi act synergistically to increase root branching, and sugar transport towards the arbusculated cells may contribute to LR formation. In addition, AM colonization and high Pi generally increase auxin and cytokinin and decrease ethylene and strigolactone levels. With the exception of cytokinins, which seem to regulate mainly the root:shoot biomass ratio, these hormones play a leading role in governing root morphogenesis, with strigolactones and ethylene blocking LR formation in the non-colonized, Pi-starved plants, and auxin inducing them in colonized plants, or in plants grown under high Pi conditions. PMID:24227446

  2. Neuropeptide B in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus: molecular cloning and its effects on the regulation of food intake and mRNA expression of growth hormone and prolactin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lu; Sun, Caiyun; Li, Wensheng

    2014-05-01

    Neuropeptide B (NPB) regulates food intake, energy homeostasis and hormone secretion in mammals via two G-protein coupled receptors, termed as GPR 7 and GPR 8. However, there is no study that reports the function of NPB in teleosts. In this study, the full-length cDNA of prepro-NPB with the size of 663bp was cloned from the hypothalamus of Nile tilapia. The CDS of the prepro-NPB is 387bp which encodes a precursor protein with the size of 128a.a. This precursor contains a mature peptide with the size of 29a.a, and it was named as NPB29. Tissue distribution study showed that this gene was mainly expressed in different parts of brain, especially in the diencephalon as well as hypothalamus, and the spinal cord in Nile tilapia. Fasting significantly stimulated the mRNA expression of NPB in the brain area without hypothalamus, and refeeding after fasting for 3 and 14days also showed similar effects on NPB expression. While, only short-term fasting (3days) and refeeding after fasting for 7 and 14days induced mRNA expression of NPB in the hypothalamus. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of NPB remarkably elevated the mRNA expression of hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY), cholecystokinin 1 (CCK1) and pituitary prolactin (PRL), whereas significantly inhibited growth hormone (GH) expression in pituitary. These observations in the present study suggested that NPB may participate in the regulation of feeding and gene expression of pituitary GH and PRL in Nile tilapia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Regulated expression of homeobox genes Msx-1 and Msx-2 in mouse mammary gland development suggests a role in hormone action and epithelial-stromal interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Y; Daniel, C W

    1996-07-10

    The murine homeobox genes Msx-1 and Msx-2 are related to the Drosophila msh gene and are expressed in a variety of tissues during mouse embryogenesis. We now report the developmentally regulated expression of Msx-1 and Msx-2 in the mouse mammary gland and show that their expression patterns point toward significant functional roles. Msx-1 and Msx-2 transcripts were present in glands of virgin mice and in glands of mice in early pregnancy, but transcripts decreased dramatically during late pregnancy. Low levels of Msx-1 transcripts were detected in glands from lactating animals and during the first days of involution, whereas Msx-2 expression was not detected during lactation or early involution. Expression of both genes increased gradually as involution progressed. Msx-2 but not Msx-1 expression was decreased following ovariectomy or following exposure to anti-estrogen implanted directly into the gland. Hormonal regulation of Msx-2 expression was confirmed when transcripts returned to normal levels after estrogen was administered to ovariectomized animals. In situ molecular hybridization for Msx-1 showed transcripts localized to the mammary epithelium, whereas Msx-2 expression was confined to the periductal stroma. Mammary stroma from which mammary epithelium had been removed did not transcribe detectable amounts of Msx-2, showing that expression is regulated by contiguous mammary epithelium, and indicating a role for these homeobox genes in mesenchymal-epithelial interactions during mammary development.

  4. FOXL2 Is an Essential Activator of SF-1-Induced Transcriptional Regulation of Anti-Müllerian Hormone in Human Granulosa Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanyong Jin

    Full Text Available Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH is required for proper sexual differentiation by regulating the regression of the Müllerian ducts in males. Recent studies indicate that AMH could be an important factor for maintaining the ovarian reserve. However, the mechanisms of AMH regulation in the ovary are largely unknown. Here, we provide evidence that AMH is an ovarian target gene of steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1, an orphan nuclear receptor required for proper follicle development. FOXL2 is an evolutionally conserved transcription factor, and its mutations cause blepharophimosis, ptosis, and epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES, wherein affected females display eyelid defects and premature ovarian failure (POF. Notably, we found that functional FOXL2 is essential for SF-1-induced AMH regulation, via protein-protein interactions between FOXL2 and SF-1. A BPES-inducing mutant of FOXL2 (290-291delCA was unable to interact with SF-1 and failed to mediate the association between SF-1 and the AMH promoter. Therefore, this study identified a novel regulatory circuit for ovarian AMH production; specifically, through the coordinated interplay between FOXL2 and SF-1 that could control ovarian follicle development.

  5. Juvenile Confinement in Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendel, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    For more than a century, the predominant strategy for the treatment and punishment of serious and sometimes not-so-serious juvenile offenders in the United States has been placement into large juvenile corrections institutions, alternatively known as training schools, reformatories, or youth corrections centers. America's heavy reliance on…

  6. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul Yagnik

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Fibroadenomas are benign solid tumor associated with aberration of normal lobular development. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma is usually single and >5 cm in size /or >500 gms in weight. Important differential diagnoses are: phyllodes tumor and juvenile gigantomastia. Simple excision is the treatment of choice.

  7. Down-regulation of parathyroid hormone (PTH) receptors in cultured bone cells is associated with agonist-specific intracellular processing of PTH-receptor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitelbaum, A P; Silve, C M; Nyiredy, K O; Arnaud, C D

    1986-02-01

    Exposure of cultured embryonic chicken bone cells to the PTH agonists bovine (b) PTH-(1-34) and [8Nle, 18Nle, 34Tyr]bPTH-(1-34)amide [bPTH-(1-34)A] reduces the subsequent cAMP response to the hormone and decreases the specific binding of 125I-labeled PTH to these cultures. To determine whether PTH receptor down-regulation in cultured bone cells is mediated by cellular internalization of PTH-receptor complexes, we measured the uptake of [125I]bPTH-(1-34) into an acid-resistant compartment. Uptake of radioactivity into this compartment was inhibited by incubating cells at 4 C with phenylarsineoxide and unlabeled bPTH-(1-34). Tracer uptake into the acid-resistant compartment at any time was directly proportional to total cell binding at 22 C. Thus, it is likely that PTH-receptor complexes are internalized by bone cells. This mechanism may explain the loss of cell surface receptors after PTH pretreatment. To determine whether internalized PTH-receptor complexes are reinserted into the plasma membrane, we measured PTH binding and PTH stimulation of cAMP production after cells were exposed to monensin, a known inhibitor of receptor recycling. Monensin (25 microM) had no effect on PTH receptor number or affinity and did not alter PTH-stimulated cAMP accumulation. However, monensin (25 microM) incubated with cells pretreated with various concentrations of bPTH-(1-34) for 1 h potentiated the effect of the hormone to reduce subsequent [125I]bPTH-(1-34) binding and PTH-stimulated cAMP accumulation by more than 2 orders of magnitude. Chloroquine also potentiated PTH-induced down-regulation of PTH receptors. By contrast, neither agent influenced PTH binding or PTH-stimulated cAMP production in cells pretreated with the antagonist bPTH-(3-34)A. Thus, monensin potentiated PTH receptor loss only in cells pretreated with PTH agonists, indicating that antagonist-occupied receptors may be processed differently from agonist-occupied receptors in bone cells. The data further suggest

  8. Gastrointestinal hormone research - with a Scandinavian annotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hormones are peptides released from neuroendocrine cells in the digestive tract. More than 30 hormone genes are currently known to be expressed in the gut, which makes it the largest hormone-producing organ in the body. Modern biology makes it feasible to conceive the hormones...... as a blood-borne hormone, a neurotransmitter, a local growth factor or a fertility factor. The targets of gastrointestinal hormones are specific G-protein-coupled receptors that are expressed in the cell membranes also outside the digestive tract. Thus, gut hormones not only regulate digestive functions...

  9. Juvenile mammary papillomatosis; Papilomatosis juvenil mamaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, M.; Jimenez, A. V. [Hospital Reina Sofia. Cordoba (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Juvenile mammary papillomatosis is a benign proliferative disease of young patients, generally under 30 years of age. The most frequent clinical presentation is the existence of an elastic and mobile lymph node of the breast. Anatomopathologically, it is characterized because it presents ductal epithelial hyperplasia, sometimes with marked atypia, and there are numerous cysts having different sizes among the findings. It has been associated with an increase in the incidence of breast cancer, both in the patient herself as well as her family. We review the literature on the subject and present the mammographic and ultrasonographic findings of a 22 year old woman diagnosed of juvenile mammary papillomatosis. (Author) 12 refs.

  10. Oxygen-sensitive regulation and neuroprotective effects of growth hormone-dependent growth factors during early postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Susan; Boie, Gudrun; Doerr, Helmuth-Guenther; Trollmann, Regina

    2017-04-01

    Perinatal hypoxia severely disrupts metabolic and somatotrophic development, as well as cerebral maturational programs. Hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs) represent the most important endogenous adaptive mechanisms to hypoxia, activating a broad spectrum of growth factors that contribute to cell survival and energy homeostasis. To analyze effects of systemic hypoxia and growth hormone (GH) therapy (rhGH) on HIF-dependent growth factors during early postnatal development, we compared protein (using ELISA) and mRNA (using quantitative RT PCR) levels of growth factors in plasma and brain between normoxic and hypoxic mice (8% O 2 , 6 h; postnatal day 7 , P7) at P14. Exposure to hypoxia led to reduced body weight ( P controls and was associated with significantly reduced plasma levels of mouse GH ( P controls. In addition, rhGH treatment increased cerebral IGF-1, IGF-2, IGFBP-2, and erythropoietin mRNA levels, resulting in significantly reduced apoptotic cell death in the hypoxic, developing mouse brain. These data indicate that rhGH may functionally restore hypoxia-induced systemic dysregulation of the GH/IGF-1 axis and induce upregulation of neuroprotective, HIF-dependent growth factors in the hypoxic developing brain. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Major advances associated with hormone and growth factor regulation of mammary growth and lactation in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, R M

    2006-04-01

    In recent years, the number of researchers interested in mammary development and mammary function in dairy animals has declined. More importantly this cadre of workers has come to rely more than ever on scientists focused on and funded by breast cancer interests to provide fundamental mechanistic and basic cellular insights. Philosophically and practically this is a risky path to better understand, manipulate, and control a national resource as important as the dairy cow. The efficiency, resourcefulness, and dedication of dairy scientists have mirrored the actions of many dairy producers but there are limits. Many of the applications of research, use of bovine somatotropin, management of transition cows, estrus synchronization techniques, and so on, are based on decades-old scientific principles. Specific to dairy, do rodents or breast cancer cell lines adequately represent the dairy cow? Will these results inspire the next series of lactation-related dairy improvements? These are key unanswered questions. Study of the classic mammogenic and lactogenic hormones has served dairy scientists well. But there is an exciting, and bewildering universe of growth factors, transcription factors, receptors, intracellular signaling intermediates, and extracellular molecules that must ultimately interact to determine the size of the mature udder and the functional capacity of mammary gland in the lactating cow. We can only hope that enough scientific, fiscal, and resource scraps fall from the biomedical research banquet table to allow dairy-focused mammary gland research to continue.

  12. Distinct hormonal regulation of Na+,K+-ATPase genes in the salmonid gill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tipsmark, Christian Kølbæk; Madsen, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    the a1a (freshwater (FW) isoform) and the a1b  seawater (SW) isoform) by cortisol, Gh, prolactin (Prl) and Igf 1. Injection with cortisol into FW salmon increased a1a expression, while Gh had no effect. Conversely, both cortisol and Gh stimulated a1b expression, and a significant synergy was observed....... igf1 expression was increased by Gh in both gill and liver, and inhibited by cortisol in the liver. Gill Igf1 and Gh receptor expression increased in response to cortisol. Injection with Prl into SW salmon compromised their hypo-osmoregulatory performance, selectively reduced the expression of the a1b...... isoform and decreased enzymatic NaC,KC-atpase activity in the gill. Cortisol and Prl reduced gill and liver igf1 expression, and both hormones stimulated gill Igf1 receptor expression. In a short-term experiment with incubation of FW gill cell suspensions, cortisol stimulated a1a and a1b expression, while...

  13. Central dopamine D2 receptors regulate growth-hormone-dependent body growth and pheromone signaling to conspecific males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noaín, Daniela; Pérez-Millán, M Inés; Bello, Estefanía P; Luque, Guillermina M; Casas Cordero, Rodrigo; Gelman, Diego M; Peper, Marcela; Tornadu, Isabel García; Low, Malcolm J; Becú-Villalobos, Damasia; Rubinstein, Marcelo

    2013-03-27

    Competition between adult males for limited resources such as food and receptive females is shaped by the male pattern of pituitary growth hormone (GH) secretion that determines body size and the production of urinary pheromones involved in male-to-male aggression. In the brain, dopamine (DA) provides incentive salience to stimuli that predict the availability of food and sexual partners. Although the importance of the GH axis and central DA neurotransmission in social dominance and fitness is clearly appreciated, the two systems have always been studied unconnectedly. Here we conducted a cell-specific genetic dissection study in conditional mutant mice that selectively lack DA D2 receptors (D2R) from pituitary lactotropes (lacDrd2KO) or neurons (neuroDrd2KO). Whereas lacDrd2KO mice developed a normal GH axis, neuroDrd2KO mice displayed fewer somatotropes; reduced hypothalamic Ghrh expression, pituitary GH content, and serum IGF-I levels; and exhibited reduced body size and weight. As a consequence of a GH axis deficit, neuroDrd2KO adult males excreted low levels of major urinary proteins and their urine failed to promote aggression and territorial behavior in control male challengers, in contrast to the urine taken from control adult males. These findings reveal that central D2Rs mediate a neuroendocrine-exocrine cascade that controls the maturation of the GH axis and downstream signals that are critical for fitness, social dominance, and competition between adult males.

  14. Hsp70 cochaperones HspBP1 and BAG-1M differentially regulate steroid hormone receptor function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina T Knapp

    Full Text Available Hsp70 binding protein 1 (HspBP1 and Bcl2-associated athanogene 1 (BAG-1, the functional orthologous nucleotide exchange factors of the heat shock protein 70 kilodalton (Hsc70/Hsp70 chaperones, catalyze the release of ADP from Hsp70 while inducing different conformational changes of the ATPase domain of Hsp70. An appropriate exchange rate of ADP/ATP is crucial for chaperone-dependent protein folding processes. Among Hsp70 client proteins are steroid receptors such as the glucocorticoid receptor (GR, the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR, and the androgen receptor (AR. BAG-1 diversely affects steroid receptor activity, while to date the influence of HspBP1 on steroid receptor function is mostly unknown. Here, we compared the influence of HspBP1 and BAG-1M on Hsp70-mediated steroid receptor folding complexes and steroid receptor activity. Coimmunoprecipitation studies indicated preferential binding of Hsp40 and the steroid receptors to BAG-1M as compared to HspBP1. Furthermore, Hsp70 binding to the ligand-binding domain of GR was reduced in the presence of HspBP1 but not in the presence of BAG-1M as shown by pull-down assays. Reporter gene experiments revealed an inhibitory effect on GR, MR, and AR at a wide range of HspBP1 protein levels and at hormone concentrations at or approaching saturation. BAG-1M exhibited a transition from stimulatory effects at low BAG-1M levels to inhibitory effects at higher BAG-1M levels. Overall, BAG-1M and HspBP1 had differential impacts on the dynamic composition of steroid receptor folding complexes and on receptor function with important implications for steroid receptor physiology.

  15. Juvenile-onset hypothyroidism in a dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greco, D.S.; Peterson, M.E.; Cho, D.Y.; Markovits, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Juvenile-onset hypothyroidism was diagnosed in an adult mixed-breed dog examined because of quadraparesis. Unusual clinical signs attributable to juvenile-onset or congenital hypothyroidism included disproportionate dwarfism; enlarged, protruding tongue; mental dullness; and retention of a 'puppy' coat, which was soft and fluffy, without guard hairs. Radiography of the vertebral column and long bones revealed multiple areas of delayed epiphyseal closure and epiphyseal dysgenesis. Myelography demonstrated several intervertebral disk protrusions in the cervical and lumbar regions. Hypothyroidism was confirmed on the basis of a low basal serum thyroxine concentration that failed to increase after the administration of thyroid stimulating hormone. Other laboratory abnormalities included nonregenerative, normocytic, normochromic anemia; mild hypercalcemia; and an impaired growth hormone (GH) secretory response after xylazine administration. At necropsy, the thyroid gland was small and weighed only 0.2g. Microscopic examination of the thyroid gland revealed a loss of glandular tissue, which was replaced by adipose tissue along its periphery. Gross or microscopic abnormalities were not noted in the pituitary gland, and immunohistochemical staining of the pituitary gland revealed a normal number of GH-containing acidophils. This suggests that primary hypothyroidism may result in an impaired secretion of growth hormone, and that pituitary dwarfism or GH deficiency may be difficult to differentiate from hypothyroid dwarfism on the basis of provocative GH testing alone

  16. How Did Arthropod Sesquiterpenoids and Ecdysteroids Arise? Comparison of Hormonal Pathway Genes in Noninsect Arthropod Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhe; Kenny, Nathan James; Lam, Hon Ming; Chan, Ting Fung; Chu, Ka Hou; Bendena, William G; Tobe, Stephen S; Hui, Jerome Ho Lam

    2015-06-25

    The phylum Arthropoda contains the largest number of described living animal species, with insects and crustaceans dominating the terrestrial and aquatic environments, respectively. Their successful radiations have long been linked to their rigid exoskeleton in conjunction with their specialized endocrine systems. In order to understand how hormones can contribute to the evolution of these animals, here, we have categorized the sesquiterpenoid and ecdysteroid pathway genes in the noninsect arthropod genomes, which are known to play important roles in the regulation of molting and metamorphosis in insects. In our analyses, the majority of gene homologs involved in the biosynthetic, degradative, and signaling pathways of sesquiterpenoids and ecdysteroids can be identified, implying these two hormonal systems were present in the last common ancestor of arthropods. Moreover, we found that the "Broad-Complex" was specifically gained in the Pancrustacea, and the innovation of juvenile hormone (JH) in the insect linage correlates with the gain of the JH epoxidase (CYP15A1/C1) and the key residue changes in the binding domain of JH receptor ("Methoprene-tolerant"). Furthermore, the gain of "Phantom" differentiates chelicerates from the other arthropods in using ponasterone A rather than 20-hydroxyecdysone as molting hormone. This study establishes a comprehensive framework for interpreting the evolution of these vital hormonal pathways in these most successful animals, the arthropods, for the first time. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  17. How Did Arthropod Sesquiterpenoids and Ecdysteroids Arise? Comparison of Hormonal Pathway Genes in Noninsect Arthropod Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhe; Kenny, Nathan James; Lam, Hon Ming; Chan, Ting Fung; Chu, Ka Hou; Bendena, William G.; Tobe, Stephen S.; Hui, Jerome Ho Lam

    2015-01-01

    The phylum Arthropoda contains the largest number of described living animal species, with insects and crustaceans dominating the terrestrial and aquatic environments, respectively. Their successful radiations have long been linked to their rigid exoskeleton in conjunction with their specialized endocrine systems. In order to understand how hormones can contribute to the evolution of these animals, here, we have categorized the sesquiterpenoid and ecdysteroid pathway genes in the noninsect arthropod genomes, which are known to play important roles in the regulation of molting and metamorphosis in insects. In our analyses, the majority of gene homologs involved in the biosynthetic, degradative, and signaling pathways of sesquiterpenoids and ecdysteroids can be identified, implying these two hormonal systems were present in the last common ancestor of arthropods. Moreover, we found that the “Broad-Complex” was specifically gained in the Pancrustacea, and the innovation of juvenile hormone (JH) in the insect linage correlates with the gain of the JH epoxidase (CYP15A1/C1) and the key residue changes in the binding domain of JH receptor (“Methoprene-tolerant”). Furthermore, the gain of “Phantom” differentiates chelicerates from the other arthropods in using ponasterone A rather than 20-hydroxyecdysone as molting hormone. This study establishes a comprehensive framework for interpreting the evolution of these vital hormonal pathways in these most successful animals, the arthropods, for the first time. PMID:26112967

  18. Hormone action. Part I. Peptide hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birnbaumer, L.; O'Malley, B.W.

    1985-01-01

    The major sections of this book on the hormonal action of peptide hormones cover receptor assays, identification of receptor proteins, methods for identification of internalized hormones and hormone receptors, preparation of hormonally responsive cells and cell hybrids, purification of membrane receptors and related techniques, assays of hormonal effects and related functions, and antibodies in hormone action

  19. Dlk1/FA1 is a novel endocrine regulator of bone and fat mass and its serum level is modulated by growth hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem; Ding, Ming; Jensen, Charlotte H

    2007-01-01

    Fat and bone metabolism are two linked processes regulated by several hormonal factors. Fetal antigen 1 (FA1) is the soluble form of dlk1 (delta-like 1), which is a member of the Notch-Delta family. We previously identified FA1 as a negative regulator of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell...... differentiation. Here, we studied the effects of circulating FA1 on fat and bone mass in vivo by generating mice expressing high serum levels of FA1 (FA1 mice) using the hydrodynamic-based gene transfer procedure. We found that increased serum FA1 levels led to a significant reduction in total body weight, fat...... mass, and bone mass in a dose-dependent manner. Reduced bone mass in FA1 mice was associated with the inhibition of mineral apposition rate and bone formation rates by 58 and 72%, respectively. Because FA1 is colocalized with GH in the pituitary gland, we explored the possible modulation of serum FA1...

  20. Regulation of skeletal muscle mitochondrial activity by thyroid hormones: focus on "old" triiodothyronine and the "emerging" 3,5-diiodothyronine".

    OpenAIRE

    Assunta eLombardi; Maria eMoreno; Pieter eDe Lange; Susanna eIossa; Rosa Anna eBusiello; Fernando eGoglia

    2015-01-01

    3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) plays a crucial role in regulating metabolic rate and fuel oxidation; however, the mechanisms by which it affects whole-body energy metabolism are still not completely understood. Skeletal muscle (SKM) plays a relevant role in energy metabolism and responds to thyroid state by remodeling the metabolic characteristics and cytoarchitecture of myocytes. These processes are coordinated with changes in mitochondrial content, bioenergetics, substrate oxidation rate, ...

  1. Agonist-mediated activation of Bombyx mori diapause hormone receptor signals to extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 through Gq-PLC-PKC-dependent cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xue; Yang, Jingwen; Shen, Zhangfei; Chen, Yajie; Shi, Liangen; Zhou, Naiming

    2016-08-01

    Diapause is a developmental strategy adopted by insects to survive in challenging environments such as the low temperatures of a winter. This unique process is regulated by diapause hormone (DH), which is a neuropeptide hormone that induces egg diapause in Bombyx mori and is involved in terminating pupal diapause in heliothis moths. An G protein-coupled receptor from the silkworm, B. mori, has been identified as a specific cell surface receptor for DH. However, the detailed information on the DH-DHR system and its mechanism(s) involved in the induction of embryonic diapause remains unknown. Here, we combined functional assays with various specific inhibitors to elucidate the DHR-mediated signaling pathways. Upon activation by DH, B. mori DHR is coupled to the Gq protein, leading to a significant increase of intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP response element-driven luciferase activity in an UBO-QIC, a specific Gq inhibitor, sensitive manner. B. mori DHR elicited ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a dose- and time-dependent manner in response to DH. This effect was almost completely inhibited by co-incubation with UBO-QIC and was also significantly suppressed by PLC inhibitor U73122, PKC inhibitors Gö6983 and the Ca(2+) chelator EGTA. Moreover, DHR-induced activation of ERK1/2 was significantly attenuated by treatment with the Gβγ specific inhibitors gallein and M119K and the PI3K specific inhibitor Wortmannin, but not by the Src specific inhibitor PP2. Our data also demonstrates that the EGFR-transactivation pathway is not involved in the DHR-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Future efforts are needed to clarify the role of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway in the DH-mediated induction of B. mori embryonic diapause. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Regulation of porcine skeletal muscle nuclear 3,5,3'-tri-iodothyronine receptor binding capacity by thyroid hormones: modification by energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morovat, A; Dauncey, M J

    1995-02-01

    Thyroid hormones have been implicated in the regulation of nuclear 3,5,3'-tri-iodothyronine (T3) receptor binding capacity (Bmax) but, despite numerous in vivo and in vitro studies, there is considerable controversy regarding their exact role. Since changes in thyroid status alter energy balance and hence may influence T3 receptor numbers, the effects of chronic hypothyroidism and T4 treatment have been studied in young pigs under conditions of controlled energy intake. Four groups of animals comprising a hypothyroid, a euthyroid and a hyperthyroid group, all on the same level of food intake, and a hyperthyroid group on twice the amount of food were used. After 3 weeks on the treatment regimes, both the hypothyroid animals on the same level of food intake and the hyperthyroid animals on twice the amount of food had significantly increased Bmax values (97% and 137% higher respectively) compared with euthyroid controls. However, there was no difference between controls and the hyperthyroid animals on the same level of food intake. In a second study, the effects of short-term treatment of euthyroid animals with T3 was investigated. Results showed that in two groups of controls that received intravenous saline, those on a higher food intake had higher Bmax values (76% increase). Intravenous T3 administration to animals on a low food intake did not change the receptor numbers. In none of the studies was there any change in the dissociation constant of the receptors as a result of different treatments. It is suggested that, at least in postnatal life, thyroid hormones per se have no significant effect on nuclear T3 receptor numbers in skeletal muscle.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Growth hormone secretagogues protect mouse cardiomyocytes from in vitro ischemia/reperfusion injury through regulation of intracellular calcium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ischemic heart disease is a leading cause of mortality. To study this disease, ischemia/reperfusion (I/R models are widely used to mimic the process of transient blockage and subsequent recovery of cardiac coronary blood supply. We aimed to determine whether the presence of the growth hormone secretagogues, ghrelin and hexarelin, would protect/improve the function of heart from I/R injury and to examine the underlying mechanisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Isolated hearts from adult male mice underwent 20 min global ischemia and 30 min reperfusion using a Langendorff apparatus. Ghrelin (10 nM or hexarelin (1 nM was introduced into the perfusion system either 10 min before or after ischemia, termed pre- and post-treatments. In freshly isolated cardiomyocytes from these hearts, single cell shortening, intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+](i transients and caffeine-releasable sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR Ca(2+ were measured. In addition, RT-PCR and Western blots were used to examine the expression level of GHS receptor type 1a (GHS-R1a, and phosphorylated phospholamban (p-PLB, respectively. Ghrelin and hexarelin pre- or post-treatments prevented the significant reduction in the cell shortening, [Ca(2+](i transient amplitude and caffeine-releasable SR Ca(2+ content after I/R through recovery of p-PLB. GHS-R1a antagonists, [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 (200 nM and BIM28163 (100 nM, completely blocked the effects of GHS on both cell shortening and [Ca(2+](i transients. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Through activation of GHS-R1a, ghrelin and hexarelin produced a positive inotropic effect on ischemic cardiomyocytes and protected them from I/R injury probably by protecting or recovering p-PLB (and therefore SR Ca(2+ content to allow the maintenance or recovery of normal cardiac contractility. These observations provide supporting evidence for the potential therapeutic application of ghrelin and hexarelin in patients with cardiac I/R injury.

  4. Potential role of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and transforming growth factor (TGFβ1) in the regulation of ovarian angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Shih-Wei; Ke, Ferng-Chun; Chang, Geen-Dong; Lee, Ming-Ting; Hwang, Jiuan-Jiuan

    2011-06-01

    Angiogenesis occurs during ovarian follicle development and luteinization. Pituitary secreted FSH was reported to stimulate the expression of endothelial mitogen VEGF in granulosa cells. And, intraovarian cytokine transforming growth factor (TGF)β1 is known to facilitate FSH-induced differentiation of ovarian granulosa cells. This intrigues us to investigate the potential role of FSH and TGFβ1 regulation of granulosa cell function in relation to ovarian angiogenesis. Granulosa cells were isolated from gonadotropin-primed immature rats and treated once with FSH and/or TGFβ1 for 48 h, and the angiogenic potential of conditioned media (granulosa cell culture conditioned media; GCCM) was determined using an in vitro assay with aortic ring embedded in collagen gel and immunoblotting. FSH and TGFβ1 increased the secreted angiogenic activity in granulosa cells (FSH + TGFβ1 > FSH ≈ TGFβ1 >control) that was partly attributed to the increased secretion of pro-angiogenic factors VEGF and PDGF-B. This is further supported by the evidence that pre-treatment with inhibitor of VEGF receptor-2 (Ki8751) or PDGF receptor (AG1296) throughout or only during the first 2-day aortic ring culture period suppressed microvessel growth in GCCM-treated groups, and also inhibited the FSH + TGFβ1-GCCM-stimulated release of matrix remodeling-associated gelatinase activities. Interestingly, pre-treatment of AG1296 at late stage suppressed GCCM-induced microvessel growth and stability with demise of endothelial and mural cells. Together, we provide original findings that both FSH and TGFβ1 increased the secretion of VEGF and PDGF-B, and that in turn up-regulated the angiogenic activity in rat ovarian granulosa cells. This implicates that FSH and TGFβ1 play important roles in regulation of ovarian angiogenesis during follicle development. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Hormone regulation system and cyclic nucleotids in the Chernobyl accident liquidators with doses absorbed less then 1 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, A.N.

    1997-01-01

    During 6 years after the accident (1987-1992) a functional state of endocrine system that regulate the adaptation, reproduction, metabolism, vessels tonicity and water-electrolyte balance were investigated in 249 liquidators with doses absorbed less then 1 Gy. The changes of these systems activity in state of basal secretion and peculiarities of their reactions under influence of perturbation (adrenaline, insulin) were revealed. Post-irradiation endocrinopathy was characterized and its role in decrease of the organism's adaptation and in mechanism of sanogenesis and pathogenesis was found. (author)

  6. Interaction of hepatocyte nuclear factors in transcriptional regulation of tissue specific hormonal expression of human multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (abcc2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qadri, Ishtiaq; Hu, L.-J.; Iwahashi, Mieko; Al-Zuabi, Subhi; Quattrochi, Linda C.; Simon, Francis R.

    2009-01-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) (ABCC2) is an ATP-binding cassette membrane protein located primarily on apical surface of hepatocytes that mediates transport of conjugated xenobiotics and endogenous compounds into bile. MRP2 is highly expressed in hepatocytes, and at lower levels in small intestines, stomach and kidney. Previous reports have characterized mammalian MRP2 promoters, but none have established the molecular mechanism(s) involved in liver enriched expression. This study aims to investigate the mechanism of hepatic MRP2 regulation. A 2130 bp of MRP2 promoter was cloned from PAC-1 clone P108G1-7, to identify putative liver specific/hormone responsive functional DNA binding sites. Using deletion analysis, site specific mutagenesis and co-transfection studies, liver specific expression was determined. MRP2 promoter-LUC constructs were highly expressed in liver cell lines compared to non-liver cells. The region extending from - 3 to+ 458 bp of MRP2 promoter starting from AUG contained the potential binding sites for CAAATT box enhancer binding protein (C/EBP), hepatocytes nuclear factor 1, 3 and 4 (HNF1, HNF3, and HNF4. Only HNF1 and HNF4 co-transfection with MRP2 luciferase increased expression. Site specific mutational analysis of HNF1 binding site indicated an important role for HNF1α. HNF4α induction of MRP2 was independent of HNF1 binding site. C/EBP, HNF3, and HNF6 inhibited HNF1α while HNF4α induced MRP2 luciferase expression and glucocorticoids stimulated MRP2 expression. This study emphasizes the complex regulation of MRP2 with HNF1α and HNF4α playing a central role. The coordinated regulation of xenobiotic transporters and oxidative conjugation may determine the adaptive responses to cellular detoxification processes

  7. Thyroid hormone deiodinase type 2 mRNA levels in sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) are regulated during metamorphosis and in response to a thyroid challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilborn, S Salina M; Manzon, Lori A; Schauenberg, Jennifer D; Manzon, Richard G

    2013-03-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are crucial for normal vertebrate development and are the one obligate morphogen that drives amphibian metamorphosis. However, contrary to other metamorphosing vertebrates, lampreys exhibit a sharp drop in serum TH early in metamorphosis, and anti-thyroid agents such as potassium perchlorate (KClO(4)) induce metamorphosis. The type 2 deiodinase (D2) enzyme is a key regulator of TH availability during amphibian metamorphosis. We set out to determine how D2 may be involved in the regulation of lamprey metamorphosis and thyroid homeostasis. We cloned a 1.8Kb Petromyzon marinus D2 cDNA that includes the entire protein coding region and a selenocysteine (Sec) codon. Northern blotting indicated that the lamprey D2 mRNA is the longest reported to date (>9Kb). Using real-time PCR, we showed that intestinal and hepatic D2 mRNA levels were elevated prior to and during the early stages of metamorphosis and then declined dramatically to low levels that were sustained for the remainder of metamorphosis. These data are consistent with previously reported changes in serum TH levels and deiodinase activity. Treatment of larvae with either TH or KClO(4) significantly affected D2 mRNA levels in the intestine and liver. These D2 mRNA levels during metamorphosis and in response to thyroid challenges suggest that D2 may function in the regulation of TH levels during lamprey metamorphosis and the maintenance of TH homeostasis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Salt tolerance of Glycine max.L induced by endophytic fungus Aspergillus flavus CSH1, via regulating its endogenous hormones and antioxidative system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubna; Asaf, Sajjad; Hamayun, Muhammad; Khan, Abdul Latif; Waqas, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Aaqil; Jan, Rahmatullah; Lee, In-Jung; Hussain, Anwar

    2018-07-01

    Abiotic stress resistance strategies are powerful approaches to sustainable agriculture because they reduce chemical input and enhance plant productivity. In current study, an endophytic fungus, Aspergillus flavus CHS1 was isolated from Chenopodium album Roots. CHS1 was initially screened for growth promoting activities like siderphore, phosphate solubilization, and the production of indole acetic acid and gibberellins and were further assayed for its ability to promote the growth of mutant Waito-C rice. The results revealed that different plant growth characteristic such as chlorophyll content, root-shoot length, and biomass production were significantly promoted during CHS1 treatment. This growth promotion action was due to the presence of various types of GAs and IAA in the endophyte culture filtrate. Significant up regulation with respect to levels in the control was observed in all endogenous plant GAs, after treatment with CHS1. Furthermore, to evaluate the potential of CHS1 against NaCl stress up to 400 mM, it was tested for its ability to improve soybean plant growth under NaCl stress. In endophyte-soybean interaction, CHS1 association significantly increased plant growth and attenuated the NaCl stress by down regulating ABA and JA synthesis. Similarly, it significantly elevated antioxidant activities of enzymes catalase, polyphenoloxidase, superoxide dismutase and peroxidase as compared to non-inoculated salt stress plants. Thus, CHS1 ameliorated the adverse effect of high NaCl stress and rescued soybean plant growth by regulating the endogenous plant hormones and antioxidative system. We conclude that CHS1 isolate could be exploited to increase salt resistant and yield in crop plants. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. The human luteinizing hormone receptor gene promoter: activation by Sp1 and Sp3 and inhibitory regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Y; Tsai-Morris, C H; Zhang, Y; Dufau, M L

    1999-09-24

    To understand the transcriptional mechanism(s) of human LH receptor (LHR) gene expression, we have identified the dominant functional cis-elements that regulate the activity of the promoter domain (-1 to -176 bp from ATG). Mutagenesis demonstrated that the promoter activity was dependent on two Sp1 domains (-79 bp, -120 bp) in a transformed normal placental cell (PLC) and the choriocarcinoma JAR cell. Both elements interacted with endogenous Sp1 and Sp3 factors but not with Sp2 or Sp4. In Drosophila SL2 cells, the promoter was activated by either Sp1 or Sp3. An ERE half-site (EREhs) at -174 bp was inhibitory (by 100%), but was unresponsive to estradiol and did not bind the estrogen receptor or orphan receptors ERR1 and SF-1. The 5' upstream sequence (-177 to -2056 bp) inhibited promoter activity in PLC by 60%, but only minimally in JAR cells. Activation of the human LHR promoter through Sp1/3 factors is negatively regulated through EREhs and upstream sequences to exert control of gene expression. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  10. Juvenil idiopatisk arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlin, Troels

    2002-01-01

    The new classification of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is described in this review. Clinical characteristics divide JIA in to subtypes: systemic, oligoarticular (persistent and extended type), RF-positive and--negative polyarticular, enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic arthritis...

  11. Juvenile Rockfish Recruitment Cruise

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 1983, the groundfish analysis project began a series of yearly cruises designed to assess the annual abundance of juvenile rockfish along the central California...

  12. Juvenile Justice in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Frías Armenta

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The first tribunal in Mexico was established in the central state of San Luis Potosi in 1926. The Law Regarding Social Prevention and Juvenile Delinquency for the Federal District and Mexican territories was promulgated in 1928. In 2005, Article 18 of the Mexican Constitution was modified to establish a comprehensive system (“Sistema Integral de justicia” in Spanish of justice for juveniles between 12 and 18 years old who had committed a crime punishable under criminal law. Its objective was to guarantee juveniles all the due process rights established for adults, in addition to the special ones recognized for minors. The constitutional reform also provides a framework that includes special tribunals as well as alternative justice options for juveniles. With these reforms, institutionalization of minors was to be considered an extreme measure applicable only to felonies and to juveniles older than 14. In 2006, all states within the Mexican federation enacted the “Law of justice for adolescents”. This system, at both the federal and state levels, formalizes a new global paradigm with regard to the triangular relationship between children, the State and the Law. It recognizes that children are also bearers of the inherent human rights recognized for all individuals, instead of simply objects in need of protection. However, despite formally aligning Mexican juvenile justice law with the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC, issues of actual substantive rights remained and new ones have appeared. For example, juveniles younger than 14 who have not committed a felony are released from institutions without any rehabilitation or treatment options, and alternative forms of justice were included without evaluating their possibilities of application or their conditions for success. In addition, the economic status of most juvenile detainees continues to be one of the most important determining factors in the administration of justice

  13. Hormonal control of euryhalinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Yoshio; McCormick, Stephen D.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Farrell, Anthony Peter; Brauner, Colin J.

    2013-01-01

    Hormones play a critical role in maintaining body fluid balance in euryhaline fishes during changes in environmental salinity. The neuroendocrine axis senses osmotic and ionic changes, then signals a