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Sample records for juvenile alexander disease

  1. Alexander Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Administrator Channels Synapses Circuits Cluster Neurosurgery Research Fellowships Scientific Director, Division of Intramural Research ... Disease Information Page What research is being done? Recent discoveries show that most individuals (approximately 90 percent) with ...

  2. Computed tomography in Alexander's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, I M; Kendall, B E

    1980-10-01

    Two cases of biopsy-proven Alexander's disease are described with computed tomographic changes which, in our experience and on survey of the literature, have not occurred in any other condition. Such changes in a child with a progressive condition consistent with Alexander's disease, strongly support the diagnosis.

  3. Alexander's disease in a neurologically normal child: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, Scott O.; Knowles, Paul; Marshall, Robert; Burton, Edward M.

    2003-01-01

    We report the clinical and MRI findings of symmetric hyperintensity involving the deep and subcortical white matter of the frontal lobes in a neurologically normal child with macrocephaly. In this patient, a serum test for mutations in glial fibrillary acidic protein, used to diagnose Alexander's disease (AD), was positive. This case indicates an extraordinarily mild or early form of juvenile-onset AD. (orig.)

  4. Alexander disease as a cause of nocturnal vomiting in a 7-year-old girl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niinikoski, Harri; Haataja, Leena; Brander, Antti; Valanne, Leena; Blaser, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Alexander disease is a rare form of leukodystrophy with a highly variable clinical course. Occasionally night-time nausea and vomiting are the first symptoms of juvenile Alexander disease. A 7-year-old girl had recurrent night-time vomiting and her growth and weight gain had deteriorated after her sixth birthday. Cranial MRI demonstrated two small, symmetrical focal areas of abnormally high signal intensity in the dorsal medulla oblongata on T2-W and FLAIR images. These were suggestive of juvenile Alexander disease, and subsequent sequencing of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene revealed a heterogeneous missense mutation in the GFAP gene in exon 6. Alexander disease should be considered in young patients with atypical anorexia nervosa-type symptoms. (orig.)

  5. Alexander disease as a cause of nocturnal vomiting in a 7-year-old girl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niinikoski, Harri [University of Turku, Department of Paediatrics, Turku (Finland); Haataja, Leena [University of Turku, Department of Paediatrics, Turku (Finland); University of Turku, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Turku (Finland); Brander, Antti [University of Tampere, Department of Radiology, Tampere (Finland); Valanne, Leena [University of Helsinki, Department of Radiology, Helsinki (Finland); Blaser, Susan [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Radiology, Toronto (Canada)

    2009-08-15

    Alexander disease is a rare form of leukodystrophy with a highly variable clinical course. Occasionally night-time nausea and vomiting are the first symptoms of juvenile Alexander disease. A 7-year-old girl had recurrent night-time vomiting and her growth and weight gain had deteriorated after her sixth birthday. Cranial MRI demonstrated two small, symmetrical focal areas of abnormally high signal intensity in the dorsal medulla oblongata on T2-W and FLAIR images. These were suggestive of juvenile Alexander disease, and subsequent sequencing of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene revealed a heterogeneous missense mutation in the GFAP gene in exon 6. Alexander disease should be considered in young patients with atypical anorexia nervosa-type symptoms. (orig.)

  6. Commentary. The diseases of Alexander the Great.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, George K; Steinberg, David A

    2004-06-01

    The accompanying articles that speculate that Alexander the Great had a traumatic carotid dissection or congenital cervical scoliosis demonstrate the difficulties in retrospective diagnosis as a historical enterprise. The extant primary sources were written centuries after Alexander's death and are ambiguous in their original languages, and even more so in translation. Thus we cannot be certain what illness Alexander actually had. Furthermore, anachronistic diagnosis removes Alexander from the medical context of this time, telling us little of historical significance about him. Such investigations also illustrate the more general limits that the absence of context imposes on the study of ancient history.

  7. Alexander's disease: magnetic resonance imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Report of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkiewicz, E.; Pakula-Kosciesza, I.; Mierzewska, H.; Walecki, J.; Bekiesinska-Figatowska, M.; Salomons, G.; Kmiec, T.

    2006-01-01

    Alexander's disease is a rare genetic leukodystrophy connected with mutation of the GFAP gene. Infantile, juvenile, and adult subtypes are described. We analyzed MR images in three and HMRS in two cases of Alexander's disease. The examinations were performed with a 1.5 T scanner in the SE, FSE, and FLAIR sequences in T1,T2 WI before and after gadolinium injection. Single voxel HMRS was performed. MRI showed extensive abnormal signal in the white matter of the frontal lobes, in external capsules, basal ganglia, posterior limbs of the internal capsules, and the hilus of dentate nuclei. Focal contrast enhancement was seen near the frontal horns. HMRS revealed increased Cho/Cr and mI/Cr ratios and decreased NAA/Cr ratio. The presence of lactate was also observed. MR is useful in imaging typical forms of Alexander's disease. Genetic investigation is necessary for definitive diagnosis. HMRS demonstrates metabolic abnormalities of white matter. (author)

  8. [An atypical presentation of Infantile Alexander disease lacking macrocephaly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmer, Carmen; Villegas-Aguilera, Miguel; Morales-Ibarra, Juan José; Bravo-Oro, Antonio

    Alexander disease is a rare form of leukodystrophy that involves mainly astrocytes; it is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner and occurs by mutations in the GFAP gene, located on chromosome 17q21. It can occur at any age and its infantile form is characterized by macrocephaly, seizures, severe motor and cognitive delay, and progressive spasticity or ataxia. An 8-month-old female was evaluated with a history of neurodevelopmental delay and unprovoked focal motor seizures. Physical examination showed normal head circumference, increased motor responses to tactile and noise stimuli, pyramidal signs and no visceromegalies. Widespread hypodense white matter was found on magnetic resonance and lumbar puncture showed hyperproteinorrachia. Krabbe disease was ruled out by enzymatic assay and gene sequencing of GALC. In the reassessment of the case, abnormalities in neuroimaging lead to suspicion of Alexander disease, and GFAP gene sequencing reported a pathogenic mutation in exon 4 c.716G>A, which caused a change of arginine to histidine at position 239 of the protein (p.Arg239His). The radiographic signs observed in the resonance were decisive for the diagnosis, later confirmed by molecular study. It is important to consider that certain mutations are not associated with macrocephaly, which may cause delay in diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  9. Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson. Wilson's disease, Queen Square and neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussolle, E; Trocello, J-M; Woimant, F; Lachaux, A; Quinn, N

    2013-12-01

    This historical article describes the life and work of the British physician Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson (1878-1937), who was one of the world's greatest neurologists of the first half of the 20th century. Early in his career, Wilson spent one year in Paris in 1903 where he learned from Pierre-Marie at Bicêtre Hospital. He subsequently retained uninterrupted links with French neurology. He also visited in Leipzig the German anatomist Paul Flechsig. In 1904, Wilson returned to London, where he worked for the rest of his life at the National Hospital for the Paralysed and Epileptic (later the National Hospital for Nervous Diseases, and today the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery) in Queen Square, and also at Kings' College Hospital. He wrote on 'the old motor system and the new', on disorders of motility and muscle tone, on the epilepsies, on aphasia, apraxia, tics, and pathologic laughing and crying, and most importantly on Wilson's disease. The other objective of our paper is to commemorate the centenary of Wilson's most important work published in 1912 in Brain, and also in Revue Neurologique, on an illness newly recognized and characterized by him entitled "Progressive lenticular degeneration, a familial nervous disease associated with liver cirrhosis". He analyzed 12 clinical cases, four of whom he followed himself, but also four cases previously published by others and a further two that he considered in retrospect had the same disease as he was describing. The pathological profile combined necrotic damage in the lenticular nuclei of the brain and hepatic cirrhosis. This major original work is summarized and discussed in the present paper. Wilson not only delineated what was later called hepato-lenticular degeneration and Wilson's disease, but also introduced for the first time the terms extrapyramidal syndrome and extrapyramidal system, stressing the role of the basal ganglia in motility. The present historical work emphasizes the special

  10. Archetypal and new families with Alexander disease and novel mutations in GFAP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Messing, Albee; Li, Rong; Naidu, Sakkubai; Taylor, J. Paul; Silverman, Lital; Flint, Daniel; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Brenner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    To describe genetic analyses of the 2 most thoroughly studied, historically seminal multigenerational families with Alexander disease described prior to the identification of GFAP as the related gene, as well as 1 newly discovered family. Clinical histories were obtained and DNA was analyzed from

  11. Infantile-onset Alexander disease: a genetically proven case with mild clinical course in a 6-year-old Indian boy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramesh, Konanki; Sharma, Suvasini; Kumar, Atin; Salomons, Gajja S.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Gulati, Sheffali

    2013-01-01

    Alexander disease is an autosomal dominant leukoencephalopathy characterized by developmental delay, macrocephaly, and characteristic neuroimaging abnormalities predominantly involving frontal lobes. We report a 6-year-old Indian boy with infantile-onset Alexander disease, who has an unusually mild

  12. Infantile Alexander Disease: Spectrum of GFAP Mutations and Genotype-Phenotype Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Diana; Gauthier, Fernande; Bertini, Enrico; Bugiani, Marianna; Brenner, Michael; N'guyen, Sylvie; Goizet, Cyril; Gelot, Antoinette; Surtees, Robert; Pedespan, Jean-Michel; Hernandorena, Xavier; Troncoso, Monica; Uziel, Graziela; Messing, Albee; Ponsot, Gérard; Pham-Dinh, Danielle; Dautigny, André; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile

    2001-01-01

    Heterozygous, de novo mutations in the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene have recently been reported in 12 patients affected by neuropathologically proved Alexander disease. We searched for GFAP mutations in a series of patients who had heterogeneous clinical symptoms but were candidates for Alexander disease on the basis of suggestive neuroimaging abnormalities. Missense, heterozygous, de novo GFAP mutations were found in exons 1 or 4 for 14 of the 15 patients analyzed, including patients without macrocephaly. Nine patients carried arginine mutations (four had R79H; four had R239C; and one had R239H) that have been described elsewhere, whereas the other five had one of four novel mutations, of which two affect arginine (2R88C and 1R88S) and two affect nonarginine residues (1L76F and 1N77Y). All mutations were located in the rod domain of GFAP, and there is a correlation between clinical severity and the affected amino acid. These results confirm that GFAP mutations are a reliable molecular marker for the diagnosis of infantile Alexander disease, and they also form a basis for the recommendation of GFAP analysis for prenatal diagnosis to detect potential cases of germinal mosaicism. PMID:11567214

  13. Juvenile Gaucher disease simulating osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.H.; Ortega, J.A.; Heisel, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    A case in which several imaging procedures suggested juvenile Gaucher disease in a child who presented with symptomatology of osteomyelitis is discussed. The 20-month girl was given a Technetium-99m radionuclide skeletal examination which revealed intense uptake of tracer agents along the shaft of the right femur. It was also found that the liver and spleen were dramatically Ga-67 avid. The bone pain symptomatology suggested an osteomyelitis of the femur, but skeletal scintigraphy with Tc-99m-labeled bone tracer demonstrated photopenic areas involving the femur, suggesting that the bone pain may have been due to marrow packed with Gaucher cells. This overexpansion of the marrow may lead to microfractures with remodeling seen radiographically as periosteal new bone and scintigraphically as increased periosteal deposition of tracer agent. The radiogallium study was useful to exclude an underlying osteomyelitis in the involved femurs. Although juvenile Gaucher disease is unusual, it should be considered in any child who presents with the constellation of hepatosplenomegaly and bone pain simulating osteomyelitis

  14. Juvenile Gaucher disease simulating osteomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.H.; Ortega, J.A.; Heisel, M.A.

    1981-10-01

    A case in which several imaging procedures suggested juvenile Gaucher disease in a child who presented with symptomatology of osteomyelitis is discussed. The 20-month girl was given a Technetium-99m radionuclide skeletal examination which revealed intense uptake of tracer agents along the shaft of the right femur. It was also found that the liver and spleen were dramatically Ga-67 avid. The bone pain symptomatology suggested an osteomyelitis of the femur, but skeletal scintigraphy with Tc-99m-labeled bone tracer demonstrated photopenic areas involving the femur, suggesting that the bone pain may have been due to marrow packed with Gaucher cells. This overexpansion of the marrow may lead to microfractures with remodeling seen radiographically as periosteal new bone and scintigraphically as increased periosteal deposition of tracer agent. The radiogallium study was useful to exclude an underlying osteomyelitis in the involved femurs. Although juvenile Gaucher disease is unusual, it should be considered in any child who presents with the constellation of hepatosplenomegaly and bone pain simulating osteomyelitis.

  15. Clinical presentation of juvenile Huntington disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruocco Heloísa H.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical presentation a group of patients with juvenile onset of Huntington disease. METHOD: All patients were interviewed following a structured clinical questioner. Patients were genotyped for the trinucleotide cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG repeat in the Huntington Disease gene. High resolution brain MRI was performed in all patients. RESULTS: We identified 4 patients with juvenile onset of disease among 50 patients with Huntington disease followed prospectively in our Neurogenetics clinic. Age at onset varied from 3 to 13 years, there were 2 boys, and 3 patients had a paternal inheritance of the disease. Expanded Huntington disease allele sizes varied from 41 to 69 trinucleotide repeats. The early onset patients presented with rigidity, bradykinesia, dystonia, dysarthria, seizures and ataxia. MRI showed severe volume loss of caudate and putamen nuclei (p=0.001 and reduced cerebral and cerebellum volumes (p=0.01. CONCLUSION: 8% of Huntington disease patients seen in our clinic had juvenile onset of the disease. They did not present with typical chorea as seen in adult onset Huntington disease. There was a predominance of rigidity and bradykinesia. Two other important clinical features were seizures and ataxia, which related with the imaging findings of early cortical atrophy and cerebellum volume loss.

  16. A case of leukodystrophy, suspected of Alexander's diseases, and its magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Nahoko; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Hozumi, Isao; Yuasa, Tatsuhiko; Miyatake, Tadashi

    1987-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy was admitted to our hospital because of macrocephaly and developmental delay of motor function. He was the first son of non-consanguineous healthy parents. All other family members were normal. The increase of head circumference was first noted at 6 months of age. He could not walk until 1 1/2 years old. He had febrile convulsions at 1 1/2 and 2 years old. On admission (3 y 10 mo), his head circumference was 55.8 cm (more than 98th percentile). Intelligence was normal for his age. Neurological examination revealed ataxic-spastic gait and generalized hyperreflexia with bilateral ankle clonus. He could not run, or stand on one foot. Sensation was normal. CT scan showed diffuse low density areas in cerebral white matter, especially in frontal lobes. Ventricular systems were of normal size. Leukocyte lysosomal enzyme activities, blood and urinary amino acid analysis, the amount of very long chain fatty acids in plasma sphingomyelin, blood gas analysis, and organic acid levels in urine were all within normal range. Electroencephalogram, auditory-evoked response, nerve conduction velocities, and cerebrospinal fluid examination were also normal. The diagnosis of Alexander's disease was most likely. However, this case was atypical, in that his mental development was quite normal, and that regression of his motor activities was not noted so far. Magnetic resonance imaging (spin-echo image) revealed widespread abnormal signal intensity areas corresponding to the low densities shown by CT, where both T 1 and T 2 relaxation times were prolonged, suggesting the increase of free water content in the affected white matter. These changes were localized in cerebral white matter and more prominent in frontal lobes. On the other hand, the white matter of cerebellum and brain stem, internal capsule, and anterior commisure looked normal. (J.P.N.)

  17. Computing the Alexander Polynomial Numerically

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikael Sonne

    2006-01-01

    Explains how to construct the Alexander Matrix and how this can be used to compute the Alexander polynomial numerically.......Explains how to construct the Alexander Matrix and how this can be used to compute the Alexander polynomial numerically....

  18. Gas bubble disease monitoring and research of juvenile salmonids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maule, A.G.; Beeman, J.; Hans, K.M.; Mesa, M.G.; Haner, P.; Warren, J.J.

    1997-10-01

    This document describes the project activities 1996--1997 contract year. This report is composed of three chapters which contain data and analyses of the three main elements of the project: field research to determine the vertical distribution of migrating juvenile salmonids, monitoring of juvenile migrants at dams on the Snake and Columbia rivers, and laboratory experiments to describe the progression of gas bubble disease signs leading to mortality. The major findings described in this report are: A miniature pressure-sensitive radio transmitter was found to be accurate and precise and, after compensation for water temperature, can be used to determine the depth of tagged-fish to within 0.32 m of the true depth (Chapter 1). Preliminary data from very few fish suggest that depth protects migrating juvenile steelhead from total dissolved gas supersaturation (Chapter 1). As in 1995, few fish had any signs of gas bubble disease, but it appeared that prevalence and severity increased as fish migrated downstream and in response to changing gas supersaturation (Chapter 2). It appeared to gas bubble disease was not a threat to migrating juvenile salmonids when total dissolved gas supersaturation was < 120% (Chapter 2). Laboratory studies suggest that external examinations are appropriate for determining the severity of gas bubble disease in juvenile salmonids (Chapter 3). The authors developed a new method for examining gill arches for intravascular bubbles by clamping the ventral aorta to reduce bleeding when arches were removed (Chapter 3). Despite an outbreak of bacterial kidney disease in the experimental fish, the data indicate that gas bubble disease is a progressive trauma that can be monitored (Chapter 3)

  19. Assessment of disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The number and the size of joints matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntson, Lillemor; Wernroth, Lisa; Fasth, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Variables for assessment of disease activity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) were studied, in order to develop a disease activity score for children with JIA.......Variables for assessment of disease activity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) were studied, in order to develop a disease activity score for children with JIA....

  20. Treatment of Cushing's disease in juveniles with intestinal pituitary irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassar, J.; Doyle, F.H.; Mashiter, K.; Joplin, G.F.

    1979-01-01

    Nine juvenile patients (five boys and four girls aged 10-18) with Cushing's disease were treated with pituitary implantation of 198 Au and/or 90 Y. No patient had any surgical complication from this procedure. At the latest assessment. 3 months to 17 years after operation, Cushing's disease was in remission in all the patients; the response time following operation was a few days to 3 months. Radiology of the pituitary fossa at time of pituitary implantation was normal in all patients and remains so. The final height in six patients is 149-172 cm (59-67.5 inches) and three patients who continue to grow have increased by 13.6 and 3 cm since implantation. Only one patient required full pituitary hormone replacement therapy, and he had been previously treated by external irradiation, and one other patient failed to complete puberty. In all the other seven sexual maturation is normal and one has fathered two children. It is concluded that pituitary implantation with interstitial irradiation is a satisfactory form of treatment for Cushing's disease in juveniles. (author)

  1. A Case of Adult-Onset Alexander Disease Featuring Severe Atrophy of the Medulla Oblongata and Upper Cervical Cord on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonezu, Tadahiro; Ito, Shoichi; Kanai, Kazuaki; Masuda, Saeko; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Adult-onset Alexander disease (AOAD) has been increasingly recognized since the identification of the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene mutation in 2001. We report on a 56-year-old man who was genetically confirmed as AOAD with the glial fibrillary acidic protein mutation of p.M74T. He developed spastic tetraparesis, sensory disturbances in four limbs, and mild cognitive impairment without apparent dysarthria and dysphagia. The case was characterized by severe atrophy of the medulla oblongata and upper cervical cord with intramedullary signal intensity changes on magnetic resonance imaging. While AOAD is diverse in clinical presentation, the peculiar magnetic resonance imaging findings of marked atrophy of the medulla oblongata and cervical cord are thought to be highly suggestive of the diagnosis of AOAD. PMID:23185175

  2. Adult-onset Alexander disease, associated with a mutation in an alternative GFAP transcript, may be phenotypically modulated by a non-neutral HDAC6 variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchionda, Laura; Fang, Mingyan; Wang, Hairong; Fugnanesi, Valeria; Morbin, Michela; Liu, Xuanzhu; Li, Wenyan; Ceccherini, Isabella; Farina, Laura; Savoiardo, Mario; D'Adamo, Pio; Zhang, Jianguo; Costa, Alfredo; Ravaglia, Sabrina; Ghezzi, Daniele; Zeviani, Massimo

    2013-05-01

    We studied a family including two half-siblings, sharing the same mother, affected by slowly progressive, adult-onset neurological syndromes. In spite of the diversity of the clinical features, characterized by a mild movement disorder with cognitive impairment in the elder patient, and severe motor-neuron disease (MND) in her half-brother, the brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) features were compatible with adult-onset Alexander's disease (AOAD), suggesting different expression of the same, genetically determined, condition. Since mutations in the alpha isoform of glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP-α, the only cause so far known of AOAD, were excluded, we applied exome Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to identify gene variants, which were then functionally validated by molecular characterization of recombinant and patient-derived cells. Exome-NGS revealed a mutation in a previously neglected GFAP isoform, GFAP-ϵ, which disrupts the GFAP-associated filamentous cytoskeletal meshwork of astrocytoma cells. To shed light on the different clinical features in the two patients, we sought for variants in other genes. The male patient had a mutation, absent in his half-sister, in X-linked histone deacetylase 6, a candidate MND susceptibility gene. Exome-NGS is an unbiased approach that not only helps identify new disease genes, but may also contribute to elucidate phenotypic expression.

  3. Biological therapy and development of neoplastic disease in patients with juvenile rheumatic disease: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Patricia L. Pereira

    Full Text Available Abstract Juvenile rheumatic diseases affect the musculoskeletal system and begin before the age of 18. These conditions have varied, identifiable or unknown etiologies, but those of an autoimmune inflammatory nature have been associated with an increased risk of development of cancer, regardless of treatment. This study aims to assess, through a systematic review of the literature according to Prisma (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses quality criteria, the risk of cancer in patients with juvenile rheumatic disease, and its association with biological agents. The criteria described by the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology initiative were used in order to assess the methodological quality of those individual items selected in this study. We analyzed nine publications, from a total of 251 papers initially selected. There was an increase in cancer risk in the population with juvenile rheumatic disease versus the general population. Most specified cancers were of a lymphoproliferative nature. Seven studies did not specify the treatment or not defined an association between treatment and cancer risk. Only one study has suggested this association; in it, their authors observed high risk in patients diagnosed in the last 20 years, a period of the advent of new therapies. One study found an increased risk in a population not treated with biological agents, suggesting a disease in its natural course, and not an adverse effect of therapy. Studies have shown an increased risk of malignancy associated with juvenile rheumatic disease, and this may be related to disease activity and not specifically to the treatment with biological agents.

  4. Nailfold capillaroscopy in juvenile rheumatic diseases: known measures, patterns and indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhold, K; Becker, M O

    2014-01-01

    Nailfold capillaroscopy has become an established method in adults for the evaluation of structural abnormalities of the microcirculation associated with rheumatic disease. It is a cornerstone for the diagnostic work-up of patients with Raynaud's phenomenon and the early diagnosis of systemic sclerosis. However, this non-invasive examination may also be valuable in children and adolescents with rheumatic diseases. Based on the scarce data available, this review focuses on capillaroscopic findings in healthy children and adolescents as well as in children with juvenile systemic sclerosis, juvenile dermatomyositis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and Raynaud's phenomenon. In addition, it outlines the potential benefits and limitations of nailfold capillaroscopy for routine care in paediatric rheumatology.

  5. The death of Alexander the Great: malaria or typhoid fever?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Burke A

    2004-03-01

    Alexander the Great had a profound effect on world history. His conquests covered the entire known world at the time, and he was responsible for the spread of Greek culture throughout the ancient world. In Babylon in 323 BC, Alexander died when he was nearly 33 years old. Possible explanations for his death have included alcoholic liver disease and strychnine poisoning, but little data support either condition as the cause of his death. Alexander most likely died from malaria or typhoid fever, which were rampant in ancient Babylon. The description of his final illness from the royal diaries is consistent with typhoid fever or malaria but is most characteristic of typhoid fever.

  6. Q & A: Alexander Varshavsky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshavsky, Alexander

    2003-07-01

    Alexander Varshavsky is Smits Professor of Cell Biology at the California Institute of Technology. He moved to Caltech in 1992, after 15 years at the MIT's Department of Biology. He was born and educated in Russia, and was 30 at the time of his emigration to the U.S. in 1977. In Russia, and for a while at MIT, he studied the structure and replication of chromosomes. Over the last 24 years, the work of his laboratory focused on the ubiquitin system and closely related fields. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and has received the Gairdner Award, the Lasker Award, the General Motors Sloan Prize, the Wolf Prize, the Horwitz Prize, and the Wilson Medal.

  7. What killed Alexander the Great?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battersby, Cameron

    2007-01-01

    The cause of the death of the Macedonian King, Alexander the Great, at Babylon in 323 BC has excited interest and conjecture throughout the ages. The information available in the surviving ancient sources, none of which is contemporaneous, has been reviewed and compared with modern knowledge as set out in several well-known recent surgical texts. The ancient sources record epic drinking by the Macedonian nobility since at least the time of Phillip II, Alexander's father. Alexander's sudden illness and death is likely to have resulted from a surgical complication of acute alcoholic excess.

  8. TREATMENT FOR GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE AMONG CHILDREN, SUFFERING FROM JUVENILE ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M. Bzarova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the evaluation results of esomeprazol efficacy in the complex therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease among 152 children aged between 3 and 18, suffering from juvenile arthritis. The treatment scheme used in treatment induced the remission of gastro esophageal reflux disease among 45% of patients, conduced to considerable decrease of the esophagus affect intensity among 53% of patients, epithelized erosions of the mucous coat of esophagus among 30 of 32 children. The medication did not cause any clinically significant side responses among the cured children (even younger ones and may be applied to treat gastro esophageal reflux disease among the patients, suffering from juvenile arthritis.Key words: gastroesophageal reflux disease, children, treatment, reflux, esomeprazol, esophagitis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

  9. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve 5 or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  10. Alexander's law revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Gary P; McCaslin, Devin L; Kaylie, David M

    2008-09-01

    It is a common occurrence in the balance function laboratory to evaluate patients in the post-acute period following unilateral vestibular system impairment. It is important to be able to differentiate spontaneous nystagmus (SN) emanating from peripheral vestibular system impairments from asymmetric gaze-evoked nystagmus (GEN) that originates from central ocular motility impairment. To describe the three elements of Alexander's Law (AL) that have been used to define SN from unilateral peripheral impairment. Additionally, a fourth element is described (i.e., augmentation of spontaneous nystagmus from unilateral peripheral vestibular system impairment) that differentiates nystagmus of peripheral vestibular system origin from nystagmus that originates from a central eye movement disorder. Case reports. Case data were obtained from two patients both showing a nystagmus that followed AL. None Videonystagmography (VNG), rotational, vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP), and neuro-imaging studies were presented for each patient. The nystagmus in Case 1 occurred as a result of a unilateral, peripheral, vestibular system impairment. The nystagmus was direction-fixed and intensified in the vision-denied condition. The nystagmus in Case 2, by appearance identical to that in Case 1, was an asymmetric gaze-evoked nystagmus originating from a space-occupying lesion in the cerebello-pontine angle. Unlike Case 1, the nystagmus did not augment in the vision-denied condition. Although nystagmus following AL usually occurs in acute peripheral vestibular system impairment, it can occur in cases of central eye movement impairment. The key element is whether the SN that follows AL is attenuated or augmented in the vision-denied condition. The SN from a unilateral peripheral vestibular system impairment should augment in the vision denied condition. An asymmetric GEN will either not augment, decrease in magnitude, or disappear entirely, in the vision-denied condition.

  11. Chromosome 16 microdeletion in a patient with juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (Batten disease)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taschner, P. E.; de Vos, N.; Thompson, A. D.; Callen, D. F.; Doggett, N.; Mole, S. E.; Dooley, T. P.; Barth, P. G.; Breuning, M. H.

    1995-01-01

    The gene that is involved in juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL), or Batten disease--CLN3--has been localized to 16p12, and the mutation shows a strong association with alleles of microsatellite markers D16S298, D16S299, and D16S288. Recently, haplotype analysis of a Batten patient from a

  12. First case of juvenile granulosa cell tumor in an adult with Ollier disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, L.; Nieboer, T.E.; Kluivers, K.B.; Schreuder, H.W.B.; Bulten, J.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.

    2009-01-01

    Ollier's disease (OD) is a rare disorder associated with the presence of multiple enchondromas. Granulosa cell tumors are rare sex cord-stromal ovarian tumors. This is the first report of a patient in her fourth decade with a combination of OD and juvenile granulosa cell tumor.A 36-year-old woman

  13. Clinical and genetic study of a juvenile-onset Huntington disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAO Ying

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant hereditary progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a distinct phenotype characterized by chorea, dementia, cognitive and affective impairment. There are selective neural cell loss and atrophy in the caudate and putamen. Dr. George Huntington firstly described the disease accurately and insightfully, which led to a widespread recognition of the inherited chorea that now bears his name. Huntington disease gene (IT15 locus on chromosome 4p16.3, and encompasses 67 exons with a trinucleotide repeat (CAG in the first exon. The CAG repeat length is highly polymorphic in the population and expanded on at least one chromosome of individuals with HD. Clinically, patient with HD are often onset in adulthood. Juvenile-onset HD is relatively rare. Adult-onset HD patients usually have a CAG expansion from 40 to 55 whereas those with juvenile-onset greater than 60 which are often inherited from the father. We investigated the clinical features of a juvenile-onset case with Huntington disease and dynamic mutation of his family. Methods The CAG repeats of IT15 gene were detected using polymerase chain reaction and capillary electrophoresis in 115 individuals with preliminary diagnosis as Huntington disease. The repeat numbers of some samples carried expanded or intermediate alleles were verified by the pMD18-T vector clone sequencing. Results Fragment analysis showed that one juvenile-onset case presenting with cognitive dysfunction and hypokinesis carried 15/68 CAG repeats of IT15. His father carried 17/37 and mother carried 15/17. Conclusion 1 The juvenile-onset case of HD presented with different clinical features compared with adult-onset cases. The typical signs of adult-onset cases include progressive chorea, rigidity and dementia. The most common sign of juvenile-onset Huntington disease is cognitive decline. 2 The dynamic mutation of IT15 gene expansion of the CAG repeats in the

  14. Alexander the Great and West Nile virus encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, John S; Calisher, Charles H

    2003-12-01

    Alexander the Great died in Babylon in 323 BC. His death at age 32 followed a 2-week febrile illness. Speculated causes of death have included poisoning; assassination, and a number of infectious diseases. One incident, mentioned by Plutarch but not considered by previous investigators, may shed light on the cause of Alexander's death. The incident, which occurred as he entered Babylon, involved a flock of ravens exhibiting unusual behavior and subsequently dying at his feet. The inexplicable behavior of ravens is reminiscent of avian illness and death weeks before the first human cases of West Nile virus infection were identified in the United States. We posit that Alexander may have died of West Nile virus encephalitis.

  15. The challenge of juvenile Huntington disease: to test or not to test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsis, Georgios; Karadima, Georgia; Kladi, Athina; Panas, Marios

    2013-03-12

    In a cohort of patients with suspected juvenile-onset Huntington disease (HD), we compared HD expansion-positive and -negative cases in order to identify parameters that may allow differentiating between them and may act as a guide to clinicians contemplating genetic testing. We analyzed the clinical and genetic characteristics of 76 juvenile-onset patients referred consecutively for HD genetic testing over a 16-year period. In total, 24 patients were positive for the HD expansion (7.8% of our HD cohort). Mean age at onset of expanded cases was similar to unexpanded cases. All expanded cases had a family history of genetically confirmed HD compared to only 13.5% of unexpanded cases (p = 0.000). Clinical symptoms at onset or at presentation could not differentiate between expanded and unexpanded patients. Although criteria suggested by previous reports allowed statistical differentiation between the 2 groups, they were not sufficiently sensitive and specific to be used in clinical context and performed less satisfactorily than presence of a family history of HD alone. A diagnosis of juvenile HD should be primarily contemplated in symptomatic children with a family history of HD, although a proportion of these will test negative. With no family history of HD, juvenile HD is very unlikely and genetic testing should never delay searching for other causes. The specific nature of symptoms at onset or at presentation is of limited value in guiding the decision to test or not to test.

  16. Analysis of Published Criteria for Clinically Inactive Disease in a Large Juvenile Dermatomyositis Cohort Shows That Skin Disease Is Underestimated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Beverley; Campanilho‐Marques, Raquel; Arnold, Katie; Pilkington, Clarissa A.; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Armon, Kate; Briggs, Vanja; Ellis‐Gage, Joe; Roper, Holly; Watts, Joanna; Baildam, Eileen; Hanna, Louise; Lloyd, Olivia; McCann, Liza; Roberts, Ian; McGovern, Ann; Riley, Phil; Al‐Abadi, Eslam; Ryder, Clive; Scott, Janis; Southwood, Taunton; Thomas, Beverley; Amin, Tania; Burton, Deborah; Jackson, Gillian; Van Rooyen, Vanessa; Wood, Mark; Wyatt, Sue; Browne, Michael; Davidson, Joyce; Ferguson, Sue; Gardner‐Medwin, Janet; Martin, Neil; Waxman, Liz; Foster, Helen; Friswell, Mark; Jandial, Sharmila; Qiao, Lisa; Sen, Ethan; Smith, Eve; Stevenson, Vicky; Swift, Alison; Wade, Debbie; Watson, Stuart; Crate, Lindsay; Frost, Anna; Jordan, Mary; Mosley, Ellen; Satyapal, Rangaraj; Stretton, Elizabeth; Venning, Helen; Warrier, Kishore; Almeida, Beverley; Arnold, Katie; Beard, Laura; Brown, Virginia; Campanilho‐Marques, Raquel; Enayat, Elli; Glackin, Yvonne; Halkon, Elizabeth; Hasson, Nathan; Juggins, Audrey; Kassoumeri, Laura; Lunt, Sian; Maillard, Sue; Nistala, Kiran; Pilkington, Clarissa; Simou, Stephanie; Smith, Sally; Varsani, Hemlata; Wedderburn, Lucy; Murray, Kevin; Ioannou, John; Suffield, Linda; Al‐Obaidi, Muthana; Leach, Sam; Lee, Helen; Smith, Helen; Inness, Emma; Kendall, Eunice; Mayers, David; Wilkinson, Nick; Clinch, Jacqui; Pluess‐Hall, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Objective The Pediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO) recently published criteria for classification of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) as having clinically inactive disease. The criteria require that at least 3 of 4 conditions be met, i.e., creatine kinase level ≤150 units/liter, Childhood Myositis Assessment Scale score ≥48, Manual Muscle Testing in 8 muscles score ≥78, and physician's global assessment of overall disease activity (PGA) ≤0.2. The present study was undertaken to test these criteria in a UK cohort of patients with juvenile DM. Methods We assessed 1,114 patient visits for the 4 items in the PRINTO criteria for clinically inactive disease. Each visit was analyzed to determine whether skin disease was present. The Disease Activity Score (DAS) for juvenile DM was determined in 59 patients. Results At 307 of the 1,114 visits, clinically inactive disease was achieved based on the 3 muscle criteria (but with a PGA of >0.2); rash was present at 65.8% of these visits and nailfold capillary abnormalities at 35.2%. When PGA ≤0.2 was one of the 3 criteria that were met, the frequency of skin signs was significantly lower (rash in 23.1% and nailfold capillary abnormalities in 8.7%). If PGA was considered an essential criterion for clinically inactive disease (P‐CID), patients with active skin disease were less likely to be categorized as having clinically inactive disease (a median DAS skin score of 0 [of a possible maximum of 9] in visits where the PGA was ≤0.2, versus a median DAS skin score of 4 in patients meeting the 3 muscle criteria [with a PGA of >0.2]; P < 0.001). Use of the P‐CID led to improvements in the positive predictive value and the positive likelihood ratio (85.4% and 11.0, respectively, compared to 72.9% and 5.1 with the current criteria). Conclusion There was a high frequency of skin disease among patients with juvenile DM who did not meet the PGA criterion for inactive disease but met

  17. The treatment of juvenile/adult GM1-gangliosidosis with Miglustat may reverse disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deodato, Federica; Procopio, Elena; Rampazzo, Angelica; Taurisano, Roberta; Donati, Maria Alice; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Caciotti, Anna; Morrone, Amelia; Scarpa, Maurizio

    2017-10-01

    Juvenile and adult GM1-gangliosidosis are invariably characterized by progressive neurological deterioration. To date only symptomatic therapies are available. We report for the first time the positive results of Miglustat (OGT 918, N-butyl-deoxynojirimycin) treatment on three Italian GM1-gangliosidosis patients. The first two patients had a juvenile form (enzyme activity ≤5%, GLB1 genotype p.R201H/c.1068 + 1G > T; p.R201H/p.I51N), while the third patient had an adult form (enzyme activity about 7%, p.T329A/p.R442Q). Treatment with Miglustat at the dose of 600 mg/day was started at the age of 10, 17 and 28 years; age at last evaluation was 21, 20 and 38 respectively. Response to treatment was evaluated using neurological examinations in all three patients every 4-6 months, the assessment of Movement Disorder-Childhood Rating Scale (MD-CRS) in the second patient, and the 6-Minute Walking Test (6-MWT) in the third patient. The baseline neurological status was severely impaired, with loss of autonomous ambulation and speech in the first two patients, and gait and language difficulties in the third patient. All three patients showed gradual improvement while being treated; both juvenile patients regained the ability to walk without assistance for few meters, and increased alertness and vocalization. The MD-CRS class score in the second patient decreased from 4 to 2. The third patient improved in movement and speech control, the distance covered during the 6-MWT increased from 338 to 475 m. These results suggest that Miglustat may help slow down or reverse the disease progression in juvenile/adult GM1-gangliosidosis.

  18. A Case of Juvenile Huntington Disease in a 6-Year-Old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Sang Sunwoo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Huntington disease is a neurodegenerative disorder distinguished by the triad of dominant inheritance, choreoathetosis and dementia, usually with onset in the fourth and fifth decades. It is caused by an unstable cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion in the gene IT15 in locus 4p16.3. Juvenile HD that constitutes about 3% to 10% of all patients is clinically different from adult-onset form and characterized by a larger number of CAG repeats typically exceeding 60. We report a case of a 6-year-old boy with myoclonic seizure and 140 CAG repeats confirmed by molecular genetic analysis.

  19. Alexander the Great's relationship with alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liappas, J A; Lascaratos, J; Fafouti, S; Christodoulou, G N

    2003-05-01

    This study sought to clarify if Alexander the Great indulged pathologically in alcohol and whether it contributed to his death. The texts of the historians Diodorus of Sicily, Plutarch, Arrian, Curtius Rufus, Athenaeus, Aelian and Justin were studied, with their information concerning wine consumption by Macedonians, and especially Alexander, and were evaluated. The surviving historical texts, all later than Alexander's epoch, are based on a series of contemporary histories and especially on the 'Royal Journals', an official diary written in the imperial court. Alexander consumed large quantities of undiluted wine periodically, reaching pathological intoxication. However, the existing data do not provide convincing evidence that Alexander the Great manifested abuse of or dependence on alcohol according to DSM-IV or ICD-10 criteria and it seems unlikely that alcohol was involved in his untimely death.

  20. Sphingomyelin lipidosis (Niemann-Pick disease) in a juvenile raccoon (Procyon lotor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vapniarsky, N; Wenger, D A; Scheenstra, D; Mete, A

    2013-01-01

    A wild caught juvenile male raccoon with neurological disease was humanely destroyed due to poor prognosis. Necropsy examination revealed hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and multicentric lymphadenomegaly with diffuse hepatic pallor and pulmonary consolidation with pinpoint pale subpleural foci. Microscopically, there was marked pale cytoplasmic swelling of the central and peripheral neurons as well as the glial cells in the brain, accompanied by multiorgan infiltration by abundant foamy macrophages. Ultrastructural investigation revealed accumulation of concentrically arranged lamellar material within lysosomes of the affected neurons, macrophages and endothelial cells. Biochemical enzymatic analysis detected sphingomyelinase deficiency and lysosomal storage disease consistent with sphingomyelin lipidosis (Niemann-Pick disease [NPD]) was diagnosed. This is the first report of NPD in a raccoon. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ankle arthritis predicts polyarticular disease course and unfavourable outcome in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjörnsson, Anna-Clara; Aalto, Kristiina; Broström, Eva W

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the occurrence, clinical characteristics and prognostic factors associated with ankle arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). METHODS: 440 children with JIA were followed for eight years in a prospective Nordic population-based cohort study. Data...... on remission was available for 427 of these children. Occurrence of clinically assessed ankle arthritis was analysed in relation to JIA category, clinical characteristics and remission data eight years after disease onset. RESULTS: In 440 children with JIA, 251 (57%) experienced ankle arthritis during...... the first eight years of disease. Ankle arthritis was least common in the persistent oligoarticular category (25%) and most common in children with extended oligoarticular (83%) and polyarticular RF-negative (85%) JIA. Children who developed ankle arthritis during the first year of disease were younger...

  2. A central role for TOR signalling in a yeast model for juvenile CLN3 disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Bond

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts provide an excellent genetically tractable eukaryotic system for investigating the function of genes in their biological context, and are especially relevant for those conserved genes that cause disease. We study the role of btn1, the orthologue of a human gene that underlies an early onset neurodegenerative disease (juvenile CLN3 disease, neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCLs or Batten disease in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. A global screen for genetic interactions with btn1 highlighted a conserved key signalling hub in which multiple components functionally relate to this conserved disease gene. This signalling hub includes two major mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades, and centers on the Tor kinase complexes TORC1 and TORC2. We confirmed that yeast cells modelling CLN3 disease exhibit features consistent with dysfunction in the TORC pathways, and showed that modulating TORC function leads to a comprehensive rescue of defects in this yeast disease model. The same pathways may be novel targets in the development of therapies for the NCLs and related diseases.

  3. Feeding frequency affects stress, innate immunity and disease resistance of juvenile blunt snout bream Megalobrama amblycephala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-Fei; Tian, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Ding-Dong; Jiang, Guang-Zhen; Liu, Wen-Bin

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of feeding frequency on stress, innate immunity and disease resistance of juvenile blunt snout bream Megalobrama amblycephala (average weight: 9.92 ± 0.06 g). Fish were randomly assigned to one of six feeding frequencies (1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 times/day) following the same ration size for 8 weeks. After the feeding trial, fish were challenged by Aeromonas hydrophila and cumulative mortality was recorded for the next 10 days. Daily gain index of fish fed 3-5 times/day was significantly higher than that of the other groups. High feeding frequencies induced significantly elevated plasma levels of both cortisol and lactate. Fish fed 3-4 times/day exhibited relatively low liver catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities as well as malondialdehyde contents, but obtained significantly higher reduced glutathione levels and post-challenged haemato-immunological parameters (include blood leukocyte and erythrocyte counts as well as plasma lysozyme, alternative complement, acid phosphatase and myeloperoxidase activities) compared with that of the other groups. After challenge, the lowest mortality was observed in fish fed 4 times/day. It was significantly lower than that of fish fed 1-3 times/day, but exhibited no statistical difference with that of the other groups. In conclusion, both low and high feeding frequencies could cause oxidative stress of juvenile M. amblycephala, as might consequently lead to the depressed immunity and reduced resistance to A. hydrophila infection. The optimal feeding frequency to enhance growth and boost immunity of this species at juvenile stage is 4 times/day. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. X-linked juvenile retinoschisis: mutations at the retinoschisis and Norrie disease gene loci?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraoka, M; Rossi, F; Trese, M T; Shastry, B S

    2001-01-01

    Juvenile retinoschisis (RS) and Norrie disease (ND) are X-linked recessive retinal disorders. Both disorders, in the majority of cases, are monogenic and are caused by mutations in the RS and ND genes, respectively. Here we report the identification of a family in which mutations in both the RS and ND genes are segregating with RS pathology. Although the mutations identified in this report were not functionally characterized with regard to their pathogenicity, it is likely that both of them are involved in RS pathology in the family analyzed. This suggests the complexity and digenic nature of monogenic human disorders in some cases. If this proves to be a widespread problem, it will complicate the strategies used to identify the genes involved in diseases and to develop methods for intervention.

  5. The Haunting Influence of Alexander Graham Bell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sue H.

    1971-01-01

    The article examines the significance that Alexander Graham Bell's attitude and actions had on the social and economic conditions experienced by deaf people during his lifetime and into the present. (CD)

  6. The efficacy of medicine during the campaigns of Alexander the Great.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffin, J R

    1992-09-01

    This paper examines the various factors that may have determined the efficacy of physicians during the campaigns of Alexander the Great. Such general variables as the adequacy of preparation, the nature of the medical profession, and the extent of preventative measures are all discussed at the outset of the paper, followed by a more detailed examination of the specific wounds, illnesses, and treatments of Alexander as described in the accounts of the Alexander historians Plutarch, Curtius, and Arrian. Where no remedy is given by these writers (as is usually the case), this paper speculates on the efficacy of possible treatments as advocated in the contemporary Hippocratic corpus. Casualty statistics of the campaigns are compared to a similar review of Homer's Iliad. From these examinations, this paper concludes that wound treatment efficacy was significantly greater than that of illness treatment, and that Alexander lost many more men to disease than to the wounds of war.

  7. Distribution pattern of MRI abnormalities within the knee and wrist of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients: signature of disease activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert; Schonenberg, Dieneke; Dolman, Koert M.; van Rossum, Marion A. J.; van den Berg, J. Merlijn; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Maas, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study in clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) was to assess the frequency and distribution pattern of synovitis as hallmark of disease and additional soft-tissue and bony abnormalities on MRI in the knee and wrist as two target joints. MRI datasets of 153 clinically

  8. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: relation to growth and disease activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnhart, Birgitte; Juul, Anders; Nielsen, Susan

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been identified as a prognostic marker of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. In this population based study we evaluated associations between plasma concentrations of COMP, disease activity, and growth velocity...... in patients with recent-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). COMP levels in JIA and healthy children were compared with those in healthy adults. Plasma levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1), which has been associated with COMP expression and growth velocity, were studied in parallel. METHODS......: 87 patients with JIA entered the study, including oligoarticular JIA (n = 34), enthesitis-related arthritis (n = 8), polyarticular rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive JIA (n = 2), polyarticular RF-negative JIA (n = 27), systemic JIA (n = 6), and undifferentiated JIA (n = 10). Plasma levels of COMP were...

  9. Tics as an initial manifestation of juvenile Huntington's disease: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shi-Shuang; Ren, Ru-Jing; Wang, Ying; Wang, Gang; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2017-08-08

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant disorder, typically characterized by chorea due to a trinucleotide repeat expansion in the HTT gene, although the clinical manifestations of patients with juvenile HD (JHD) are atypical. A 17-year-old boy with initial presentation of tics attended our clinic and his DNA analysis demonstrated mutation in the HTT gene (49 CAG repeats). After treatment, his symptoms improved. Furthermore, we performed literature review through searching the databases and summarized clinical features in 33 JHD patients. The most prevalent symptoms are ataxia, and two cases reported that tics as initial and prominent manifestation in JHD. Among them, 88% patients carried CAG repeats beyond 60 and most of them have family history. This case here illustrates the variable range of clinical symptoms of JHD and the necessity of testing for the HD mutation in young patients with tics with symptoms unable to be explained by Tourette's syndrome (TS).

  10. A psychoanalytic study of Alexander the Great.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, K R

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was to demonstrate how Freudian concepts such as the Oedipus complex, castration anxiety, fear of loss of love, the psychosexual stages of development, and the tripartite structure of personality can be used to understand the life and achievements of Alexander the Great. To accomplish this purpose, specific incidents, myths, and relationships in Alexander's life were analyzed from a Freudian psychoanalytic perspective. Green (1991), in his recent biography of Alexander, has questioned the merit of using Freudian concepts to understand Alexander's character. In fact, he stated specifically: If he (Alexander) had any kind of Oedipus complex it came in a poor second to the burning dynastic ambition which Olympias so sedulously fostered in him; those who insist on his psychological motivation would do better to take Adler as their mentor than Freud (p.56). Later, in the concluding section of his book, Green (1991, pp. 486-487) discounted Freudian interpretations of Alexander's distaste for sex, the rumors of his homosexual liaisons, his partiality for middle-aged or elderly ladies, and the systematic domination of his early years by Olympias as little more than the projected fears and desires of the interpreters. And again, an Adlerian power-complex paradigm was suggested as the preferable theoretical framework to use. Green's argument was based primarily on an exchange, reported originally by Plutarch, which took place between Alexander and Philip prior to Alexander's tutorship with Aristotle. Purportedly, Philip enjoined his son to study hard and pay close attention to all Aristotle said "so that you may not do a great many things of the sort that I am sorry I have done." At this point, Alexander "somewhat pertly" took Philip to task "because he was having children by other women besides his wife." Philip's reply was: "Well then, if you have many competitors for the kingdom, prove yourself honorable and good, so that you may obtain the

  11. Juvenile Huntington's disease confirmed by genetic examination in twins Doença de Huntington juvenil confirmada por exame genético em gêmeas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GILBERTO LEVY

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Early-onset Huntington's disease (HD occurs in approximately 10% of HD's cases. We report juvenile HD in phenotypically identical twins, evaluated by history, clinical and neurologic examination, mini-mental state examination, blood laboratory exams, cerebrospinal fluid examination, skull computed tomography, and genetic examination for HD. Patients had the akinetic-rigid variety (Westphal variant of the disease and paternal inheritance. The laboratory workup confirmed the clinical diagnosis of HD, which adds this report to the rare cases of HD in twins reported in the literature.Doença de Huntington (DH de início precoce ocorre em aproximadamente 10% dos casos de DH. Relatamos DH juvenil em gêmeas fenotipicamente idênticas, avaliadas por história, exames clínico e neurológico, mini-exame do estado mental, exames de sangue, exame do líquido cefalorraquidiano, tomografia computadorizada de crânio e exame genético para DH. As pacientes apresentavam a variedade rígido-acinética (variante de Westphal da doença e herança paterna. A avaliação laboratorial confirmou o diagnóstico clínico de DH, acrescentando-se este relato aos raros casos de DH em gêmeos relatados na literatura.

  12. Radiographic abnormalities of the wrist in adult-onset still disease: Comparison with juvenile chronic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorkengren, A.G.; Pathria, M.N.; Terkeltaub, R.; Esdaile, J.; Weisman, M.; Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.

    1987-01-01

    Pericapitate involvement of the wrist has been described as characteristic of adult-onset Still disease, a relatively rare disorder that is often diagnosed by exclusion after extensive and frequently invasive tests. To evaluate the diagnostic value of carpal radiography in cases of adult-onset Still disease, a retrospective blinded analysis of 48 patients, 16 each with adult-onset Still disease, juvenile chronic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis, was performed. Pericapitate articular alterations without radiocarpal involvement were found to be frequent in the setting of adult-onset Still disease but distinctly unusual among patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In juvenile chronic arthritis, severe pericapitate involvement was frequent, but generally occurred in conjunction with radiocarpal joint abnormalities

  13. Bilateral coxofemoral degenerative joint disease in a juvenile male yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckle, Kelly N; Alley, Maurice R

    2011-08-01

    A juvenile, male, yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes) with abnormal stance and decreased mobility was captured, held in captivity for approximately 6 weeks, and euthanized due to continued clinical signs. Radiographically, there was bilateral degenerative joint disease with coxofemoral periarticular osteophyte formation. Grossly, the bird had bilaterally distended, thickened coxofemoral joints with increased laxity, and small, roughened and angular femoral heads. Histologically, the left femoral articular cartilage and subchondral bone were absent, and the remaining femoral head consisted of trabecular bone overlain by fibrin and granulation tissue. There was no gross or histological evidence of infection. The historic, gross, radiographic, and histopathologic findings were most consistent with bilateral aseptic femoral head degeneration resulting in degenerative joint disease. Although the chronicity of the lesions masked the initiating cause, the probable underlying causes of aseptic bilateral femoral head degeneration in a young animal are osteonecrosis and osteochondrosis of the femoral head. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bilateral coxofemoral degenerative joint disease in a penguin.

  14. Overlap of disease susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinks, Anne; Eyre, Steve; Ke, Xiayi; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Packham, Jon; Worthington, Jane; Thomson, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been extremely successful in the search for susceptibility risk factors for complex genetic autoimmune diseases. As more studies are published, evidence is emerging of considerable overlap of loci between these diseases. In juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), another complex genetic autoimmune disease, the strategy of using information from autoimmune disease GWAS or candidate gene studies to help in the search for novel JIA susceptibility loci has been successful, with confirmed association with two genes, PTPN22 and IL2RA. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that shares similar clinical and pathological features with JIA and, therefore, recently identified confirmed RA susceptibility loci are also excellent JIA candidate loci. Objective To determine the overlap of disease susceptibility loci for RA and JIA. Methods Fifteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at nine RA-associated loci were genotyped in Caucasian patients with JIA (n=1054) and controls (n=3531) and tested for association with JIA. Allele and genotype frequencies were compared between cases and controls using the genetic analysis software, PLINK. Results Two JIA susceptibility loci were identified, one of which was a novel JIA association (STAT4) and the second confirmed previously published associations of the TRAF1/C5 locus with JIA. Weak evidence of association of JIA with three additional loci (Chr6q23, KIF5A and PRKCQ) was also obtained, which warrants further investigation. Conclusion All these loci are good candidates in view of the known pathogenesis of JIA, as genes within these regions (TRAF1, STAT4, TNFAIP3, PRKCQ) are known to be involved in T-cell receptor signalling or activation pathways. PMID:19674979

  15. Integrative Analysis of Disease Signatures Shows Inflammation Disrupts Juvenile Experience-Dependent Cortical Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Milo R.; Burman, Poromendro

    2016-01-01

    Throughout childhood and adolescence, periods of heightened neuroplasticity are critical for the development of healthy brain function and behavior. Given the high prevalence of neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism, identifying disruptors of developmental plasticity represents an essential step for developing strategies for prevention and intervention. Applying a novel computational approach that systematically assessed connections between 436 transcriptional signatures of disease and multiple signatures of neuroplasticity, we identified inflammation as a common pathological process central to a diverse set of diseases predicted to dysregulate plasticity signatures. We tested the hypothesis that inflammation disrupts developmental cortical plasticity in vivo using the mouse ocular dominance model of experience-dependent plasticity in primary visual cortex. We found that the administration of systemic lipopolysaccharide suppressed plasticity during juvenile critical period with accompanying transcriptional changes in a particular set of molecular regulators within primary visual cortex. These findings suggest that inflammation may have unrecognized adverse consequences on the postnatal developmental trajectory and indicate that treating inflammation may reduce the burden of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:28101530

  16. Dietary supplementation of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) improves growth, stress tolerance, and disease resistance in juvenile Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abass, David Attim; Obirikorang, Kwasi Adu; Campion, Benjamin Betey

    2018-01-01

    resistance in juvenile (body mass ~ 21 g) Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Fish were randomly distributed in groups of 20 into 12 1-m³ hapas and fed isoenergetic (~ 17 kJ g⁻¹ gross energy) and isonitrogenous (~ 300 g kg⁻¹ crude protein) diets at 3% of their bulk weight daily. Specific growth rates were...... as an additive in Nile tilapia diets has beneficial impacts on growth, stress tolerance, and disease resistance...

  17. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis in adulthood: fulfilment of classification criteria for adult rheumatic diseases, long-term outcomes and predictors of inactive disease, functional status and damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Ramos, Filipa; Eusébio, Mónica; M Martins, Fernando; Mourão, Ana Filipa; Furtado, Carolina; Campanilho-Marques, Raquel; Cordeiro, Inês; Ferreira, Joana; Cerqueira, Marcos; Figueira, Ricardo; Brito, Iva; Canhão, Helena; Santos, Maria José; Melo-Gomes, José A; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2016-01-01

    To determine how adult juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients fulfil classification criteria for adult rheumatic diseases, evaluate their outcomes and determine clinical predictors of inactive disease, functional status and damage. Patients with JIA registered on the Rheumatic Diseases Portuguese Register (Reuma.pt) older than 18 years and with more than 5 years of disease duration were included. Data regarding sociodemographic features, fulfilment of adult classification criteria, Health Assessment Questionnaire, Juvenile Arthritis Damage Index-articular (JADI-A) and Juvenile Arthritis Damage Index-extra-articular (JADI-E) damage index and disease activity were analysed. 426 patients were included. Most of patients with systemic JIA fulfilled criteria for Adult Still's disease. 95.6% of the patients with rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive polyarthritis and 57.1% of the patients with RF-negative polyarthritis matched criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 38.9% of the patients with extended oligoarthritis were classified as RA while 34.8% of the patients with persistent oligoarthritis were classified as spondyloarthritis. Patients with enthesitis-related arthritis fulfilled criteria for spondyloarthritis in 94.7%. Patients with psoriatic arthritis maintained this classification. Patients with inactive disease had lower disease duration, lower diagnosis delay and corticosteroids exposure. Longer disease duration was associated with higher HAQ, JADI-A and JADI-E. Higher JADI-A was also associated with biological treatment and retirement due to JIA disability and higher JADI-E with corticosteroids exposure. Younger age at disease onset was predictive of higher HAQ, JADI-A and JADI-E and decreased the chance of inactive disease. Most of the included patients fulfilled classification criteria for adult rheumatic diseases, maintain active disease and have functional impairment. Younger age at disease onset was predictive of higher disability and decreased the

  18. Validity and predictive ability of the juvenile arthritis disease activity score based on CRP versus ESR in a Nordic population-based setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordal, E B; Zak, M; Aalto, K

    2012-01-01

    To compare the juvenile arthritis disease activity score (JADAS) based on C reactive protein (CRP) (JADAS-CRP) with JADAS based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (JADAS-ESR) and to validate JADAS in a population-based setting.......To compare the juvenile arthritis disease activity score (JADAS) based on C reactive protein (CRP) (JADAS-CRP) with JADAS based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (JADAS-ESR) and to validate JADAS in a population-based setting....

  19. Juvenile angiofibroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasal tumor; Angiofibroma - juvenile; Benign nasal tumor; Juvenile nasal angiofibroma; JNA ... Juvenile angiofibroma is not very common. It is most often found in adolescent boys. The tumor contains many blood ...

  20. Alexander von Humboldt and Coenraad Jacob Temminck

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raat, A.J.P.

    1976-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In the archives of the Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie in Leiden there is a map with three letters written by Alexander von Humboldt (17691859) to the first director of the Museum, Coenraad Jacob Temminck (1778-1858). The map, the hard cover of John Gould's "Synopsis of the birds

  1. Alexander Graham Bell: Teacher of the Deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Robert V.

    The lecture on Alexander Graham Bell by Dr. Robert V. Bruce, the author of a biography of Bell, focuses on Bell's association with the Clarke School for the Deaf in Massachusetts. Noted are Bell's employment by the school at 25 years of age and the preceding period during which Bell taught elocution at a boys' school in Scotland and used his…

  2. Ultrasonographic examination in juvenile idiopathic arthritis is better than clinical examination for identification of intraarticular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Erik; Strandberg, Charlotte; Andersen, Steen

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is formally based on clinical examination, but ultrasound (US) examination is used increasingly. Our purpose was to compare US and clinical examination in the assessment of synovitis in JIA.......The diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is formally based on clinical examination, but ultrasound (US) examination is used increasingly. Our purpose was to compare US and clinical examination in the assessment of synovitis in JIA....

  3. Persistent association of nailfold capillaroscopy changes and skin involvement over thirty-six months with duration of untreated disease in patients with juvenile dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen-Zaech, Stéphanie; Seshadri, Roopa; Sundberg, Joyce; Paller, Amy S; Pachman, Lauren M

    2008-02-01

    To determine the association of changes on nailfold capillaroscopy with clinical findings and genotype in children with juvenile dermatomyositis (DM), in order to identify potential differences in disease course over 36 months. At diagnosis of juvenile DM in 61 children prior to the initiation of treatment, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) -308 allele and DQA1*0501 status was determined, juvenile DM Disease Activity Scores (DAS) were obtained, and nailfold capillaroscopy was performed. The disease course was monitored for 36 months. Variations within and between patients were assessed by regression analysis. At diagnosis, shorter duration of untreated disease (P = 0.05) and a lower juvenile DM skin DAS (P = 0.035) were associated with a unicyclic disease course. Over 36 months, end-row loop (ERL) regeneration was associated with lower skin DAS (P nailfold capillaroscopy changes. The correlation of nailfold capillaroscopy results with cutaneous but not with musculoskeletal signs of juvenile DM over a 36-month period suggests that the cutaneous and muscle vasculopathies have different pathophysiologic mechanisms. These findings indicate that efforts to identify the optimal treatment of cutaneous features in juvenile DM require greater attention.

  4. Heart Disease, Hypertension, Gestational Diabetes Mellitus, and Preeclampsia/Eclampsia in Mothers With Juvenile Arthritis: A Nested Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Debbie E; Vinet, Évelyne; Bérard, Anick; Duffy, Ciarán; Hazel, Beth; Meshefedjian, Garbis; Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Bernatsky, Sasha

    2017-02-01

    To determine whether women with a history of juvenile arthritis are at higher risk for heart disease and hypertension and for developing adverse maternal outcomes: gestational diabetes mellitus, maternal hypertension, and preeclampsia/eclampsia. We designed a nested case-control study from a cohort of first-time mothers with prior physician billing codes suggesting juvenile arthritis, and a matched comparison group without juvenile arthritis. For the nested case-control design, we selected 3 controls for each case for the outcomes of heart disease (n = 403), prepregnancy hypertension (n = 66), gestational diabetes mellitus (n = 285), maternal hypertension (n = 561), and preeclampsia/eclampsia (n = 236). We used conditional logistic regression, adjusting for maternal age and education. Having juvenile arthritis was associated with heart disease (odds ratio [OR] 2.44 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.15-5.15]) but not with gestational hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or preeclampsia/eclampsia. All 66 cases of prepregnancy hypertension had juvenile arthritis. Having prepregnancy hypertension was strongly associated with preeclampsia/eclampsia (OR 8.05 [95% CI 2.69-24.07]). Women with a history of juvenile arthritis had a higher risk of heart disease. This risk signals the potential importance of cardiac prevention strategies in juvenile arthritis. As this was a retrospective study, it was not possible to correct for some relevant potential confounders. Further studies should assess the impact of medications, disease severity, and other factors (e.g., obesity) on cardiac outcomes in juvenile arthritis. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Comparação entre o Disease Activity Score-28 e o Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score na artrite idiopática juvenil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Campos Capela

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introdução A avaliação de atividade da artrite reumatoide e da artrite idiopática juvenil é feita por meio de instrumentos distintos, respectivamente pelo DAS-28 e pelo JADAS. Objetivo Comparar o DAS-28 e o JADAS com a pontuação de 71, 27 e 10 articulações, na artrite idiopática juvenil. Método Foram avaliadas 178 visitas em oito pacientes com artrite idiopática juvenil, participantes de um ensaio clínico controlado de fase III, testando eficácia e segurança do abatacepte. Pontuaram-se as articulações ativas e limitadas, a avaliação global pelo médico e pelos pais em escala analógica visual de 0-10 cm e a velocidade de hemossedimentação convertida em escala de 0-10, em todas as visitas. A comparação entre os índices de atividade entre diferentes observações foi por Anova ou modelo ajustado Gama. As observações pareadas entre o DAS-28 e o JADAS 71, 27 e 10, respectivamente, foram analisadas por meio de regressão linear. Resultados Houve diferença significativa entre as medidas individuais, exceto a VHS, nos primeiros quatro meses de tratamento com biológico, quando cinco entre os oito pacientes atingiram a resposta ACR-Pedi 30, com melhora. Os índices DAS-28, JADAS 71, 27 e 10 também apresentaram diferença relevante durante o período de observação. O ajustamento por meio de regressão linear entre o DAS-28 e o JADAS resultou em fórmulas matemáticas para conversão: [DAS-28 = 0,0709 (JADAS 71 + 1,267] (R2 = 0,49; [DAS-28 = 0,084 (JADAS 27 + 1,7404] (R2 = 0,47 e [DAS-28 = 0,1129 (JADAS-10 + 1,5748] (R2 = 0,50. Conclusão A conversão da pontuação do DAS-28 e do JADAS 71, 27 e 10 por esse modelo matemático permitiria a aplicação equivalente de ambos em adolescentes com artrite.

  6. Non-HLA gene polymorphisms in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: associations with disease outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberdi-Saugstrup, M; Enevold, C; Zak, M; Nielsen, S; Nordal, E; Berntson, L; Fasth, A; Rygg, M; Müller, K

    2017-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that non-HLA single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are risk factors for an unfavourable disease outcome at long-term follow-up. The Nordic JIA cohort is a prospective multicentre study cohort of patients from the Nordic countries. In all, 193 patients met the inclusion criteria of having an 8 year follow-up assessment and available DNA sample. Seventeen SNPs met the inclusion criteria of having significant associations with JIA in at least two previous independent study cohorts. Clinical endpoints were disease remission, actively inflamed joints and joints with limitation of motion (LOM), articular or extra-articular damage, and history of uveitis. Evidence of associations between genotypes and endpoints were found for STAT4, ADAD1-IL2-IL21, PTPN2, and VTCN1 (p = 0.003-0.05). STAT4_rs7574865 TT was associated with the presence of actively inflamed joints [odds ratio (OR) 20.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.2-> 100, p = 0.003] and extra-articular damage (OR 7.9, 95% CI 1-56.6, p = 0.057). ADAD1_rs17388568 AA was associated with a lower risk of having joints with LOM (OR 0.1, 95% CI 0-0.55, p = 0.016). PTPN2_rs1893217 CC was associated with a lower risk of having joints with LOM (OR 0.2, 95% CI 0-0.99, p = 0.026), while VTCN1_rs2358820 GA was associated with uveitis (OR 3.5, 95% CI 1-12.1, p = 0.029). This exploratory study, using a prospectively followed JIA cohort, found significant associations between long-term outcome and SNPs, all previously associated with development of JIA and involved in immune regulation and signal transduction in immune cells.

  7. Brief Report: Association of Myositis Autoantibodies, Clinical Features, and Environmental Exposures at Illness Onset With Disease Course in Juvenile Myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habers, G Esther A; Huber, Adam M; Mamyrova, Gulnara; Targoff, Ira N; O'Hanlon, Terrance P; Adams, Sharon; Pandey, Janardan P; Boonacker, Chantal; van Brussel, Marco; Miller, Frederick W; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Rider, Lisa G

    2016-03-01

    To identify early factors associated with disease course in patients with juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs). Univariable and multivariable multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed in a large juvenile IIM registry (n = 365) and included demographic characteristics, early clinical features, serum muscle enzyme levels, myositis autoantibodies, environmental exposures, and immunogenetic polymorphisms. Multivariable associations with chronic or polycyclic courses compared to a monocyclic course included myositis-specific autoantibodies (multinomial odds ratio [OR] 4.2 and 2.8, respectively), myositis-associated autoantibodies (multinomial OR 4.8 and 3.5), and a documented infection within 6 months of illness onset (multinomial OR 2.5 and 4.7). A higher overall clinical symptom score at diagnosis was associated with chronic or monocyclic courses compared to a polycyclic course. Furthermore, severe illness onset was associated with a chronic course compared to monocyclic or polycyclic courses (multinomial OR 2.1 and 2.6, respectively), while anti-p155/140 autoantibodies were associated with chronic or polycyclic courses compared to a monocyclic course (multinomial OR 3.9 and 2.3, respectively). Additional univariable associations of a chronic course compared to a monocyclic course included photosensitivity, V-sign or shawl sign rashes, and cuticular overgrowth (OR 2.2-3.2). The mean ultraviolet index and highest ultraviolet index in the month before diagnosis were associated with a chronic course compared to a polycyclic course in boys (OR 1.5 and 1.3), while residing in the Northwest was less frequently associated with a chronic course (OR 0.2). Our findings indicate that myositis autoantibodies, in particular anti-p155/140, and a number of early clinical features and environmental exposures are associated with a chronic course in patients with juvenile IIM. These findings suggest that early factors, which are associated with poorer

  8. Pain intensity in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis with respect to the level of their activity and disease acceptance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Cepuch

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Being diagnosed with a chronic disease, such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, may adversely affect the activity of a young person. Additionally, the pain associated with the disease may cause difficulty accepting it. The aim was to assess the intensity of pain as well as the degree of activity and acceptance of the disease in young people aged 14–18 years with JIA. Material and methods : The study group consisted of youth of both genders suffering from JIA aged 14–18 years during remission of the disease. The study included 50 people and used the following: numerical rating scale (NRS 0–10, Cantril ladder, activity scale of own authorship (grouped items of the questionnaire form subscales of: tiredness, physical activity, social and intellectual activity and Acceptance of Illness Scale (AIS. Statistical analysis included the following tests: Mann-Whitney U test, Wilcoxon’s, χ2 test, Fisher’s, and Spearman rank correlation. The statistical significance level was set as p value below 0.05. Results : The majority of the respondents observed currently do not feel pain or feel pain of low intensity. The young people are physically, psychologically and socially active. The majority of patients accept their illness. The patients who suffer from pain on the NRS scale within 4–7 points do not adapt to living with the disease as do patients without pain or experiencing pain of low intensity. There was a strong correlation between acceptance of the disease at the time of the study determined by the Cantril ladder and AIS. Conclusions : 1. The pain suffered by patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA has undoubtedly a negative impact on their activity and acceptance of the disease. 2. It seems to be crucial to recognize pain as a significant determinant of acceptance of the disease.

  9. Temporomandibular Joint Involvement in Association With Quality of Life, Disability, and High Disease Activity in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, Paula; Nordal, Ellen; Bovis, Francesca; Giancane, Gabriella; Larheim, Tore A; Rygg, Marite; Pires Marafon, Denise; De Angelis, Donato; Palmisani, Elena; Murray, Kevin J; Oliveira, Sheila; Simonini, Gabriele; Corona, Fabrizia; Davidson, Joyce; Foster, Helen; Steenks, Michel H; Flato, Berit; Zulian, Francesco; Baildam, Eileen; Saurenmann, Rotraud K; Lahdenne, Pekka; Ravelli, Angelo; Martini, Alberto; Pistorio, Angela; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the demographic, disease activity, disability, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) differences between children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and their healthy peers, and between children with JIA with and without clinical temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement and its determinants. This study is based on a cross-sectional cohort of 3,343 children with JIA and 3,409 healthy peers, enrolled in the Pediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation HRQOL study or in the methotrexate trial. Potential determinants of TMJ involvement included demographic, disease activity, disability, and HRQOL measures selected through univariate and multivariable logistic regression. Clinical TMJ involvement was observed in 387 of 3,343 children with JIA (11.6%). Children with TMJ involvement, compared to those without, more often had polyarticular disease course (95% versus 70%), higher Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score (odds ratio [OR] 4.6), more disability, and lower HRQOL. Children with TMJ involvement experienced clearly more disability and lower HRQOL compared to their healthy peers. The multivariable analysis showed that cervical spine involvement (OR 4.6), disease duration >4.4 years (OR 2.8), and having more disability (Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index >0.625) (OR 1.6) were the most important determinants for TMJ involvement. Clinical TMJ involvement in JIA is associated with higher disease activity, higher disability, and impaired HRQOL. Our findings indicate the need for dedicated clinical and imaging evaluation of TMJ arthritis, especially in children with cervical spine involvement, polyarticular course, and longer disease duration. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  10. "Most brilliant in judgment": Alexander the Great and Aristotle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainas, Panagiotis; Panutsopulos, Dimitrios; Skandalakis, Panagiotis N; Zoras, Odysseas; Skandalakis, John E

    2005-03-01

    From historical sources, it is evident that Alexander the Great was indebted to one of his teachers, Aristotle of Stagira. It was the teaching of Aristotle that evoked all the nascent talents of young Alexander and turned him into a great man. Alexander was extremely interested in the secrets of medicine and considered it an art. The medical knowledge he acquired from Aristotle may have saved his life and the lives of his troops on many occasions. If Alexander did not possess medical knowledge and if his everyday life had not been so greatly influenced by medicine, he might never have been able to create his empire.

  11. A Metabiography of Alexander von Humboldt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolaas A. Rupke

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Article in English.The author's recently published monograph on Alexander von Humboldt describes the multiple images of this great cultural icon. The book is a metabiographical study that shows how from the middle of the nineteenth century to the present day Humboldt has served as a nucleus of crystallisation for a variety of successive socio-political ideologies, each producing its own distinctive representation of him. The historiographical implications of this biographical diversity are profound and support current attempts to understand historical scholarship in terms of memory cultures.

  12. Alexander Williamson and the modernisation of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Alwyn G

    2015-01-01

    One hundred and fifty years ago, five students were smuggled out of feudal Japan and came to London to learn Western technology, governance, and economics. They were put into the care of Alexander Williamson, who was Professor of Chemistry at University College London, and when they went back they, and the students who followed them, became the founders of the modern Japanese state. This is the British side of that remarkable story. Williamson's career and chemistry are briefly reviewed, followed by an account of the students' presence in Britain, and then the commemoration of the sesquicentenary of these events.

  13. Alexander Graham Bell (170th birthday anniversary)

    OpenAIRE

    V. P. Samokhin; K. V. Meshcherinova

    2017-01-01

    A brief overview of the main works and achievements of Alexander Graham Bell, an educated teacher for the hard of hearing and public figure, author of 30 US patents, is mainly given in the field of telephony and sound recording and reproduction. Biographical information about the Bell family, as well as some interesting facts from his life and activities are given. Scotsman by birth, A. Bell from his youthful years was carried away by the acoustic features of the human voice apparatus and dev...

  14. Alexander von Humboldt’s footnotes

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Alexander von Humboldts Fußnoten waren ihrer Zeit weit voraus, obwohl sie kaum den heutigen akademischen Standards entsprechen. Dieser Artikel untersucht die Fußnoten in Humboldts Essai politique sur l‘île de Cuba (1826). Zwar ist es nicht immer leicht, die manchmal recht geheimnisvollen Verweise zu entschlüsseln, dennoch lohnt sich der Versuch: Humboldts Fußnoten geben nicht nur Auskunft über seine umfassenden Netzwerke des Wissens. Sie verweisen auch auf Auseinandersetzungen verschiedener G...

  15. Ceroid lipofuscinosis in the border collie dog: retinal lesions in an animal model of juvenile Batten disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R M; Farrow, B R

    1992-02-15

    Ceroid lipofuscinosis, an inherited disorder of lipopigment accumulation, was identified in a group of Border Collie dogs. The dogs developed mental, motor, and visual signs between age 15 and 22 months and progressed rapidly to severe neurological disease. The principal signs were blindness and gait and behavioural abnormalities with progressive dementia. Lipopigment accumulation was severe in neurones and glial cells of the central nervous system and was present in some visceral cells. Inclusions with variable ultrastructure were common in all cells of the retina, but the pigment accumulation did not damage the retinal architecture. The cytoplasmic inclusions were granular, sudanophilic, eosinophilic, and autofluorescent. Ultrastructural morphology varied, but fingerprint and curvilinear patterns predominated. The retinal lesions in the Border Collies were similar to those in English Setters with ceroid lipofuscinosis, but were much less severe than in juvenile human ceroid lipofuscinosis. This disorder bears a close resemblance to ceroid lipofuscinosis in English Setters and is another useful model for Batten's disease.

  16. Neuropathological Comparison of Adult Onset and Juvenile Huntington's Disease with Cerebellar Atrophy: A Report of a Father and Son.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Caitlin S; Flanagan, Margaret E; Cimino, Patrick J; Jayadev, Suman; Davis, Marie; Hoffer, Zachary S; Montine, Thomas J; Gonzalez-Cuyar, Luis F; Bird, Thomas D; Keene, C Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by a trinucleotide (CAG) repeat expansion in huntingtin (HTT) on chromosome 4. Anticipation can cause longer repeat expansions in children of HD patients. Juvenile Huntington's disease (JHD), defined as HD arising before age 20, accounts for 5-10% of HD cases, with cases arising in the first decade accounting for approximately 1%. Clinically, JHD differs from the predominately choreiform adult onset Huntington's disease (AOHD) with variable presentations, including symptoms such as myoclonus, seizures, Parkinsonism, and cognitive decline. The neuropathologic changes of AOHD are well characterized, but there are fewer reports that describe the neuropathology of JHD. Here we report a case of a six-year-old boy with paternally-inherited JHD caused by 169 CAG trinucleotide repeats who presented at age four with developmental delay, dysarthria, and seizures before dying at age 6. The boy's clinical presentation and neuropathological findings are directly compared to those of his father, who presented with AOHD and 54 repeats. A full autopsy was performed for the JHD case and a brain-only autopsy was performed for the AOHD case. Histochemically- and immunohistochemically-stained slides were prepared from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections. Both cases had neuropathology corresponding to Vonsattel grade 3. The boy also had cerebellar atrophy with huntingtin-positive inclusions in the cerebellum, findings not present in the father. Autopsies of father and son provide a unique opportunity to compare and contrast the neuropathologic findings of juvenile and adult onset HD while also providing the first immunohistochemical evidence of cerebellar involvement in JHD. Additionally this is the first known report to include findings from peripheral tissue in a case of JHD.

  17. How common is clinically inactive disease in a prospective cohort of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis? The importance of definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoop-Worrall, Stephanie J W; Verstappen, Suzanne M M; Baildam, Eileen; Chieng, Alice; Davidson, Joyce; Foster, Helen; Ioannou, Yiannis; McErlane, Flora; Wedderburn, Lucy R; Thomson, Wendy; Hyrich, Kimme L

    2017-08-01

    Many criteria for clinically inactive disease (CID) and minimal disease activity (MDA) have been proposed for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). It is not known to what degree each of these criteria overlap within a single patient cohort. This study aimed to compare the frequency of MDA and CID across different criteria in a cohort of children with JIA at 1 year following presentation. The Childhood Arthritis Prospective Study recruits children at initial presentation to paediatric or adolescent rheumatology in seven UK centres. Children recruited between October 2001 and December 2013 were included. The proportions of children with CID and MDA at 1 year were calculated using four investigator-defined and eight published composite criteria. Missing data were accounted for using multiple imputation under different assumptions. In a cohort of 1415 children and adolescents, 67% patients had no active joints at 1 year. Between 48% and 61% achieved MDA and between 25% and 38% achieved CID using published criteria. Overlap between criteria varied. Of 922 patients in MDA by either the original composite criteria, Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score (JADAS) or clinical JADAS cut-offs, 68% were classified as in MDA by all 3 criteria. Similarly, 44% of 633 children with CID defined by either Wallace's preliminary criteria or the JADAS cut-off were in CID according to both criteria. In a large JIA prospective inception cohort, a majority of patients have evidence of persistent disease activity after 1 year. Published criteria to capture MDA and CID do not always identify the same groups of patients. This has significant implications when defining and applying treat-to-target strategies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Alexander Graham Bell (170th birthday anniversary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Samokhin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A brief overview of the main works and achievements of Alexander Graham Bell, an educated teacher for the hard of hearing and public figure, author of 30 US patents, is mainly given in the field of telephony and sound recording and reproduction. Biographical information about the Bell family, as well as some interesting facts from his life and activities are given. Scotsman by birth, A. Bell from his youthful years was carried away by the acoustic features of the human voice apparatus and devoted his entire life to teaching the deaf to the perception of oral speech. The first success in this field Bell reached, opening a private school for the deaf in Boston. Bell's creation of the phone was the result of his attempts to facilitate communication with the hard-of-hearing and led to the development of mass communications technology around the world. Alexander Bell is also known for his achievements in the design of hydroplanes, hydrofoils and as one of the founders of the popular magazine National Geographic. He was awarded many honorable awards and academic titles.

  19. Ludwig Leichhardt und Alexander von Humboldt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliya-Katarina Südfels

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Zusammenfassung Im Juli des Jahres 1841 kommt es zu einem Treffen zwischen zwei Männern, das zunächst belanglos erscheint, sich aber Jahre später als wichtige historische Begebenheit herausstellen wird. In seinem Pariser Büro empfängt der 71jährige Naturforscher Alexander von Humboldt den jungen Preußen Ludwig Leichhardt. Der angehende Naturwissenschaftler erhofft sich Zuspruch und Empfehlung des berühmten Alexander von Humboldts. Die Unterredung ist kurz und verläuft für Leichhardt ergebnislos. Es wird das einzige Treffen der beiden Naturwissenschaftler bleiben. Aus heutiger Sicht unverständlich, da Ludwig Leichhardt und Alexander von Humboldt mehr verband, als ihre Leidenschaft für die Naturwissenschaften. Viel zu wenig ist sich bis jetzt den biographischen Analogien und den vergleichbaren geographischen Leistungen der beiden Preußen gewidmet worden. Abstract During July 1841 a meeting between two men takes place, which seems to have been extraneous, but turns out to be a significant historical incident. 71 year old natural scientist Alexander von Humboldt welcomes young Ludwig Leichhardt from Prussia in his office in Paris. The prospective young scientist expects help and references from famous Alexander von Humboldt. The conversation is short and ends from Leichhardt’s point of view without results. Unfortunately this is going to be the only meeting between the two scientists even though the two Prussians have more in common than their passion for the natural sciences. Way too seldomly have biographical analogy and geographical productivity of the two men been compared. Résumé En juillet 1841 une rencontre entre deux hommes a lieu, qui au premier abord semble sans importance, mais qui des années plus tard est considéré comme un événement historique majeur. Dans son bureau parisien, le naturaliste Alexandre de Humboldt, alors âgé de 71 ans, reçoit le jeune Prussien Ludwig Leichhardt. Le jeune scientifique en devenir

  20. The Alexander the First collection of the Lausanne Museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minina, E.L.

    2004-01-01

    Study of written sources in archives sometimes allows to restore the history of collections. A good example is the Alexander the First collection. In 1819, de la Harpe had sent an Etruscan vase to Alexander I as a gift, and had received a collection of Russian minerals in return. Alexander’s

  1. Anakinra as first-line disease-modifying therapy in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis: report of forty-six patients from an international multicenter series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nigrovic, Peter A.; Mannion, Melissa; Prince, Femke H. M.; Zeft, Andrew; Rabinovich, C. Egla; van Rossum, Marion A. J.; Cortis, Elisabetta; Pardeo, Manuela; Miettunen, Paivi M.; Janow, Ginger; Birmingham, James; Eggebeen, Aaron; Janssen, Erin; Shulman, Andrew I.; Son, Mary Beth; Hong, Sandy; Jones, Karla; Ilowite, Norman T.; Cron, Randy Q.; Higgins, Gloria C.

    2011-01-01

    To examine the safety and efficacy of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist anakinra as first-line therapy for systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Patients with systemic JIA receiving anakinra as part of initial disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy were identified

  2. Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus Transmission and Disease among Juvenile Chinook Salmon Exposed in Culture Compared to Environmentally Relevant Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Scott Foott

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of IHNV infection and disease were followed in a juvenile Chinook salmon population both during hatchery rearing and for two weeks post-release. Cumulative weekly mortality increased from 0.03%–3.5% as the prevalence of viral infection increased from 2%–22% over the same four-week period. The majority of the infected salmon was asymptomatic. Salmon demonstrating clinical signs of infection shed 1000 pfu mL-1 of virus into the water during a 1 min observation period and had a mean concentration of 106 pfu mL-1 in their mucus. The high virus concentration detected in mucus suggests that it could act as an avenue of transmission in high density situations where dominance behavior results in nipping. Infected smolts that had migrated 295 km down river were collected at least two weeks after their release. The majority of the virus positive smolts was asymptomatic. A series of transmission experiments was conducted using oral application of the virus to simulate nipping, brief low dose waterborne challenges, and cohabitation with different ratios of infected to naïve fish. These studies showed that asymptomatic infections will occur when a salmon is exposed for as little as 1 min to >102 pfu mL-1, yet progression to clinical disease is infrequent unless the challenge dose is >104 pfu mL-1. Asymptomatic infections were detected up to 39 d post-challenge. No virus was detected by tissue culture in natural Chinook juveniles cohabitated with experimentally IHNV-infected hatchery Chinook at ratios of 1:1, 1:10, and 1:20 for either 5 min or 24 h. Horizontal transmission of the Sacramento River strain of IHNV from infected juvenile hatchery fish to wild cohorts would appear to be a low ecological risk. The study results demonstrate key differences between IHNV infections as present in a hatchery and the natural environment. These differences should be considered during risk assessments of the impact of IHNV infections on wild salmon and

  3. Ghrelin levels in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: relation to anti-tumor necrosis factor treatment and disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiozoglou-Lampoudi, Thomais; Trachana, Maria; Agakidis, Charalampos; Pratsidou-Gertsi, Polyxeni; Taparkou, Anna; Lampoudi, Sotiria; Kanakoudi-Tsakalidou, Florentia

    2011-10-01

    Studies in adults with rheumatoid arthritis reported low serum ghrelin that increased following anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) infusion. Data on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are lacking. The aim of this pilot study was to explore serum ghrelin levels in patients with JIA and the possible association with anti-TNF treatment, disease activity, and nutritional status. Fifty-two patients with JIA (14/52 on anti-TNF treatment) were studied. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis was inactive in 3 of 14 anti-TNF-treated patients and in 11 of 38 non-anti-TNF-treated patients. The nutritional status, energy intake/requirements, appetite, and fasting serum ghrelin levels were assessed. Ghrelin control values were obtained from 50 individuals with minor illness matched for age, sex, and body mass index. Ghrelin levels in patients with JIA were significantly lower than in controls (P ghrelin levels were comparable to control values only in 3 patients with anti-TNF-induced remission. Ghrelin in non-anti-TNF-treated patients in remission was low. Multiple regression analysis showed that disease activity (P = .002, CI = -84.16 to -20.01) and anti-TNF treatment (P = .003, CI = -82.51 to -18.33) were significant independent predictors of ghrelin after adjusting for other potential confounders. Ghrelin did not correlate with nutritional status, energy balance, and appetite. Serum ghrelin is low in patients with JIA and is restored to values similar to those in controls following anti-TNF-induced remission. Our study provides evidence that TNF blockade is independently associated with serum ghrelin, which possibly contributes to anti-TNF-induced remission. These preliminary results could form the basis for future research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Elevated tissue transglutaminase antibodies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis children: Relation to neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and disease activity

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    Rasha E. Gheith

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subclinical gut inflammation is described in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, so has joint involvement been related to celiac disease (CD. The well-known involvement of tissue transglutaminase (tTG in the pathogenesis of CD stimulated progress in the field of autoimmune diseases. Aim of the work: To screen JIA children for tTG antibodies and to detect its relation to the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR and disease activity. Patients and methods: The study included 44 JIA children with 44 matched controls. All subjects had no GIT symptoms suggestive of CD. Disease activity was assessed using the juvenile arthritis disease activity score in 27 joints (JADAS-27. The tTG antibodies (IgA and IgG were assessed. Results: The patients mean age was 12.5 ± 2.8 years and disease duration 5.01 ± 2.9 years; Female:Male 3.4:1. The mean JADAS-27 score was 12.6 ± 2.04. tTG antibodies were positive in 43.2% of the patients compared to 18.2% control (p = 0.01. Antibodies positivity was comparable according to gender and subtypes. The NLR in JIA children (1.62 ± 0.58 was significantly higher than in control (1.3 ± 0.5 (p = 0.006. Those with positive tTG antibodies had a significantly reduced body mass index (p = 0.02 and increased NLR (p = 0.02 compared to those with negative tTG. Only NLR and JADAS-27 would significantly predict antibodies positivity (p = 0.037 and p = 0.04, respectively. Conclusion: Increased tTG antibodies are frequent in JIA children raising the possibility of an associated subclinical CD. Markedly reduced BMI and increased NLR could forecast the presence of these antibodies. In addition to the JADAS-27, the NLR is a simple test that could predict this association and could be a useful biomarker.

  5. Vincent Alexander Bochdalek (1801-1883).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukas, Marios; El-Sedfy, Abraham; Tubbs, R Shane; Gribben, Walter B; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Cermakova, Andrea

    2008-10-01

    Vincent Alexander Bochdalek, Czech anatomist and professor, was one of the pioneers in describing congenital diaphragmatic hernias in newborns. Interestingly, there is very little in the literature and almost nothing in the English literature regarding this important medical figure. A dedicated individual, Bochdalek had great perseverance, which allowed him to surpass obstacles in both his personal life and career. He is recognized for his accurate description of posterior diaphragmatic herniation, for which during his lifetime, there was no treatment. In addition, Bochdalek has multiple eponyms in his honor: ganglion Bochdalecki, Bochdalek's basket, and the valves of Bochdalek. Always steadfast in his beliefs, Bochdalek fought for the creation of anatomy labs in Prague against society pressures. His devoted study of anatomy, especially of congenital diaphragmatic hernias, laid the foundation for the successful surgical correction of this once lethal anomaly.

  6. Synovial and inflammatory diseases in childhood: role of new imaging modalities in the assessment of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damasio, Maria Beatrice; Malattia, Clara; Martini, Alberto; Toma, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) represents a group of heterogeneous diseases characterized by a chronic inflammatory process primarily targeting the synovial membrane. A persistent synovitis is associated with an increased risk of osteocartilaginous damage. With the advent of effective structure-modifying treatment for JIA, it may be possible to significantly reduce or even completely prevent structural damage and associated functional disability. The trend towards early suppression of inflammation, in order to prevent erosive disease, shifts the emphasis away from conventional radiographic detectable structural damage to the slightest traces of early joint damage, and drives the need for alternative imaging techniques more sensitive in detecting early signs of disease activity and damage. In this regard MRI and US are playing an increasing role in the evaluation of arthritic joints. This article will review the key aspects of the current status and recent important advances of imaging techniques available to investigate the child with rheumatic disease, briefly discussing conventional radiography, and particularly focusing on MRI and US. In this era of advancing imaging technology, knowledge of the relative values of available imaging techniques is necessary to optimize the management of children with JIA. (orig.)

  7. Juvenile mammary papillomatosis; Papilomatosis juvenil mamaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, M.; Jimenez, A. V. [Hospital Reina Sofia. Cordoba (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Juvenile mammary papillomatosis is a benign proliferative disease of young patients, generally under 30 years of age. The most frequent clinical presentation is the existence of an elastic and mobile lymph node of the breast. Anatomopathologically, it is characterized because it presents ductal epithelial hyperplasia, sometimes with marked atypia, and there are numerous cysts having different sizes among the findings. It has been associated with an increase in the incidence of breast cancer, both in the patient herself as well as her family. We review the literature on the subject and present the mammographic and ultrasonographic findings of a 22 year old woman diagnosed of juvenile mammary papillomatosis. (Author) 12 refs.

  8. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Barut

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common chronic rheumatic disease of unknown aetiology in childhood and predominantly presents with peripheral arthritis. The disease is divided into several subgroups, according to demographic characteristics, clinical features, treatment modalities and disease prognosis. Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, which is one of the most frequent disease subtypes, is characterized by recurrent fever and rash. Oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, common among young female patients, is usually accompanied by anti-nuclear antibodie positivity and anterior uveitis. Seropositive polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, an analogue of adult rheumatoid arthritis, is seen in less than 10% of paediatric patients. Seronegative polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, an entity more specific for childhood, appears with widespread large- and small-joint involvement. Enthesitis-related arthritis is a separate disease subtype, characterized by enthesitis and asymmetric lower-extremity arthritis. This disease subtype represents the childhood form of adult spondyloarthropathies, with human leukocyte antigen-B27 positivity and uveitis but commonly without axial skeleton involvement. Juvenile psoriatic arthritis is characterized by a psoriatic rash, accompanied by arthritis, nail pitting and dactylitis. Disease complications can vary from growth retardation and osteoporosis secondary to treatment and disease activity, to life-threatening macrophage activation syndrome with multi-organ insufficiency. With the advent of new therapeutics over the past 15 years, there has been a marked improvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis treatment and long-term outcome, without any sequelae. The treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients involves teamwork, including an experienced paediatric rheumatologist, an ophthalmologist, an orthopaedist, a paediatric psychiatrist and a physiotherapist. The primary goals

  9. Quantitative MR characterization of disease activity in the knee in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a longitudinal pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Workie, Dagnachew W.; Graham, T.B.; Laor, Tal; Racadio, Judy M.; Rajagopal, Akila; O'Brien, Kendall J.; Bommer, Wendy A.; Shire, Norah J.; Dardzinski, Bernard J.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a quantifiable and noninvasive method of monitoring disease activity and response to therapy is vital for arthritis management. The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) based on pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling to evaluate disease activity in the knee and correlate the results with the clinical assessment in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). A group of 17 children with JIA underwent longitudinal clinical and laboratory assessment and DCE-MRI of the knee at enrollment, 3 months, and 12 months. A PK model was employed using MRI signal enhancement data to give three parameters, K trans ' (min -1 ), k ep (min -1 ), and V p ' and to calculate synovial volume. The PK parameters, synovial volumes, and clinical and laboratory assessments in most children were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) at 12 months when compared to the enrollment values. There was excellent correlation between the PK and synovial volume and the clinical and laboratory assessments. Differences in MR and clinical parameter values in individual subjects illustrate persistent synovitis when in clinical remission. A decrease in PK parameter values obtained from DCE-MRI in children with JIA likely reflects diminution of disease activity. This technique may be used as an objective follow-up measure of therapeutic efficacy in patients with JIA. MR imaging can detect persistent synovitis in patients considered to be in clinical remission. (orig.)

  10. Contrast-enhanced MRI compared with the physical examination in the evaluation of disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario; Veenendaal, Mira van; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Dolman, Koert M.; Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Berg, J.M. van den

    2014-01-01

    To assess the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in discriminating between active and inactive juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients and to compare physical examination outcomes with MRI outcomes in the assessment of disease status in JIA patients. Consecutive JIA patients with knee involvement were prospectively studied using an open-bore MRI. Imaging findings from 146 JIA patients were analysed (59.6 % female; mean age, 12.9 years). Patients were classified as clinically active or inactive. MRI features were evaluated using the JAMRIS system, comprising validated scores for synovial hypertrophy, bone marrow oedema, cartilage lesions and bone erosions. Inter-reader reliability was good for all MRI features (intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.87-0.94). No differences were found between the two groups regarding MRI scores of bone marrow oedema, cartilage lesions or bone erosions. Synovial hypertrophy scores differed significantly between groups (P = 0.016). Nonetheless, synovial hypertrophy was also present in 14 JIA patients (35.9 %) with clinically inactive disease. Of JIA patients considered clinically active, 48.6 % showed no signs of MRI-based synovitis. MRI can discriminate between clinically active and inactive JIA patients. However, physical examination is neither very sensitive nor specific in evaluating JIA disease activity compared with MRI. Subclinical synovitis was present in >35 % of presumed clinically inactive patients. (orig.)

  11. Alteration of fecal microbiota profiles in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Associations with HLA-B27 allele and disease status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Di Paola

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Alteration of gut microbiota is involved in several chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, and gut microbial pro-arthritogenic profiles have been hypothesized. Intestinal inflammation may be involved in spondyloarthropathies and in a subset of patients affected by Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA, the most common chronic rheumatic disease of childhood. We compared the fecal microbiota composition of JIA patients with healthy subjects (HS, evaluating differences in microbial profiles between sub-categories of JIA, such as enthesitis-related arthritis (JIA-ERA, in which inflammation of entheses occurs, and polyarticular JIA, non-enthesitis related arthritis (JIA-nERA. Through taxon-level analysis, we discovered alteration of fecal microbiota components that could be involved in subclinical gut inflammation, and promotion of joint inflammation. We observed abundance in Ruminococcaceae in both JIA categories, reduction in Clostridiaceae and Peptostreptococcaceae in JIA-ERA, and increase in Veillonellaceae in JIA-nERA, respectively compared with HS. Among the more relevant genera, we found an increase in Clostridium cluster XIVb, involved in colitis and arthritis, in JIA-ERA patients compared with HS, and a trend of decrease in Faecalibacterium, known for anti-inflammatory properties, in JIA-nERA compared with JIA-ERA and HS. Differential abundant taxa identified JIA patients for the HLA-B27 allele, including Bilophila, Clostridium cluster XIVb, Oscillibacter and Parvimonas. Prediction analysis of metabolic functions showed that JIA-ERA metagenome was differentially enriched in bacterial functions related to cell motility and chemotaxis, suggesting selection of potential virulence traits. We also discovered differential microbial profiles and intra-group variability among active disease and remission, suggesting instability of microbial ecosystem in autoimmune diseases with respect to healthy status. Similarly

  12. Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  13. Juvenile generalized pustular psoriasis is a chronic recalcitrant disease: an analysis of 27 patients seen in a tertiary hospital in Johor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Bi-Wen; Lim, Dee-Zhen; Capon, Francesca; Barker, Jonathan N; Choon, Siew-Eng

    2017-04-01

    Limited information exists regarding juvenile generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP). We aim to determine the clinical profile and outcome of Malaysians with juvenile GPP. Review of hospital case notes on patients with juvenile GPP. Twenty-seven patients with juvenile GPP were identified. Female to male ratio was 1.4:1. The median age at onset of GPP was 6.5 years. Ten patients had prior psoriasis with a median pre-pustular duration of 2.7 years. Onset of GPP was earlier in patients without prior psoriasis (5.1 years vs. 12.0 years, P = 0.002). Precipitating factors identified included stress, upper respiratory tract infection, systemic steroid use, vaccination, and pregnancy. A positive family history of psoriasis and GPP was present in six and one patient(s), respectively. Twenty-one patients had acute, five annular, and one localized variant of GPP. Arthritis was present in 22.2%. Fever, leukocytosis, and transaminitis were mainly seen in patients with acute GPP at 80.9, 72.2, and 11.1%, respectively. Among 20 patients screened, eight carry IL36RN variants and one has CARD14 mutation. IL36RN-positive patients have more severe disease characterized by early onset, low prevalence of prior plaque psoriasis, high prevalence of systemic inflammation, and need for continuous long-term systemic therapy. Acitretin and cyclosporine were effective in aborting acute GPP in 100% of 16 and 66.7% of six patients treated, respectively. However, relapses were common. Only three of the 17 patients whose initial acute GPP was controlled with systemic agents were successfully weaned off treatment. Juvenile GPP is a chronic recalcitrant disease. IL36RN-positive patients have more severe disease. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  14. Temporary Efficacy of Pyrimethamine in Juvenile-Onset Tay-Sachs Disease Caused by 2 Unreported HEXA Mutations in the Indian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaita Udwadia-Hegde MD, DCH, MRCPCH

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Juvenile Tay-Sachs disease is rarer than other forms of Tay-Sachs disease and is usually seen in children between the age of 2 and 10 years. Pyrimethamine as a pharmacological chaperone was used to increase β-hexosaminidase A activity in this patient. Patient: We describe a patient with Tay-Sachs disease from the Indian population, a juvenile case who presented with developmental regression starting at the age of three, initially with motor followed by language regression. She is currently incapacitated with severe behavioral issues. Conclusion: This brief communication gives an insight into the efficacy of pharmacological chaperones. It also describes two unreported mutations in hexosaminidase A gene from the Indian population. After commencing Pyrimethamine, though initial benefits with increase in levels corresponded with briefly halting the motor regression, the observed increase was only transient and not associated with discernible beneficial neurological or psychiatric effects.

  15. Temporary Efficacy of Pyrimethamine in Juvenile-Onset Tay-Sachs Disease Caused by 2 Unreported HEXA Mutations in the Indian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udwadia-Hegde, Anaita; Hajirnis, Omkar

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile Tay-Sachs disease is rarer than other forms of Tay-Sachs disease and is usually seen in children between the age of 2 and 10 years. Pyrimethamine as a pharmacological chaperone was used to increase β-hexosaminidase A activity in this patient. We describe a patient with Tay-Sachs disease from the Indian population, a juvenile case who presented with developmental regression starting at the age of three, initially with motor followed by language regression. She is currently incapacitated with severe behavioral issues. This brief communication gives an insight into the efficacy of pharmacological chaperones. It also describes two unreported mutations in hexosaminidase A gene from the Indian population. After commencing Pyrimethamine, though initial benefits with increase in levels corresponded with briefly halting the motor regression, the observed increase was only transient and not associated with discernible beneficial neurological or psychiatric effects.

  16. Leni Alexander Pollack (1924-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Bustos Valderrama

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available El estudio de Leni Alexander Pollack, considerada la compositora nacional más importante del siglo XX, expande y profundiza nuestro conocimiento del aporte de la mujer a la creación musical chilena. En el presente trabajo las entrevistas personales fueron no sólo la fuente primaria para obtener los antecedentes biográficos iniciales, sino también una oportunidad para discutir y aclarar asuntos de estética, tendencias y estilo. Sobre estas bases se analizan tres obras específicas, consideradas como demarcatorias de la evolución de sus recursos creativos. El catálogo de sus obras es una muestra vívida de la gran versatilidad de la compositora en el libre uso de los parámetros musicales, como elementos básicos generadores de toda una obra y, a la vez, en las sugerencias que hace a los instrumentistas- intérpretes o a los actores de su hörspiel o "teatro para escuchar". En suma, sus composiciones y escritos académicos, a los que se agrega la difusión radial comentada de la música contemporánea en Chile y en el extranjero, confirman su calidad de representante itinerante y portavoz de la vanguardia musical del siglo XXLeni Alexander Pollack, has been considered the most important national female composer of the 20th century. The study of her musical composition has contributed to further our knowledge of women's contributions to musical creation in Chile. For the present paper, personal interviews were not only a primary source for the initial biographical information, but also an opportunity to discuss with the composer topics related to aesthetics, tendencies and style. Upon these bases, three specific works are analyzed, which are considered turning points in the evolution of her creative resources. The catalog of her work is a vivid demonstration of her versatility in the free use of musical parameters, which can be seen as basic element in the generation of complete works, as well as in the suggestions she offers to the

  17. Port Alexander, Alaska Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Port Alexander, Alaska Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  18. A Study of Combined Arms Warfare by Alexander the Great.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-05

    source of Greek literature written about Alexander is from the famous biographer Plutarch . He wrote the Life of Alexander in the second century C.E...emperor Trajan, was appointed governor of Greece for a short time, and like Arrian, also served as Archon. It was in his later years that Plutarch began...and heavy troops were positioned by their territory behind the main battle line. According to Arrian and Plutarch , 41 Darius’ army at this time

  19. Geschichte der Natur bei Alexander von Humboldt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Helmreich

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Article in German, Abstracts in English, German and French.This article analyses the importance of an historical view of nature in the works of Alexander von Humboldt. In several of his first writings, Humboldt seems to outline the importance of what one may call history of nature. But even before his famous American travel, his position changed and he became reluctant to accept the seriousness of historical enquiry in the area of natural sciences: if we want to reconstruct the past state of nature, we cannot rely on empirical proofs; and history of nature is therefore necessarily based on uncertain hypotheses. Humboldt kept his sceptical attitude in the first decades of the 19th century, despite the positive results of the palaeontological researches of his scientific colleagues. However, he gradually convinced himself of the scientific interest of historical investigations in the natural sciences. The Cosmos paradoxally displays two apparently conflicting points of view: in his methodological remarks, Humboldt maintains that precise accounts of the past state of nature are out of reach of human knowledge, yet elsewhere in the same Cosmos he gives broad and rather vivid descriptions of the eventful history of nature.

  20. A rare case of juvenile-onset Behçet's disease: Fournier's gangrene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a multisystemic, inflammatory disease with still unknown etiology and rarely seen in childhood. BD has worse prognosis in young, male patients. BD exacerbations may be triggered by viral, bacterial, and other undefined antigenic stimuli in genetically predisposed individuals. Fournier's gangrene ...

  1. Juvenile Firesetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Brittany; Freeman, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile firesetting is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Male gender, substance use, history of maltreatment, interest in fire, and psychiatric illness are commonly reported risk factors. Interventions that have been shown to be effective in juveniles who set fires include cognitive behavior therapy and educational interventions, whereas satiation has not been shown to be an effective intervention. Forensic assessments can assist the legal community in adjudicating youth with effective interventions. Future studies should focus on consistent assessment and outcome measures to create more evidence for directing evaluation and treatment of juvenile firesetters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evidence for the effectiveness of Alexander Technique lessons in medical and health-related conditions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodman, J P; Moore, N R

    2012-01-01

    Complementary medicine and alternative approaches to chronic and intractable health conditions are increasingly being used, and require critical evaluation. The aim of this review was to systematically evaluate available evidence for the effectiveness and safety of instruction in the Alexander Technique in health-related conditions. PUBMED, EMBASE, PSYCHINFO, ISI Web-of-Knowledge, AMED, CINHAL-plus, Cochrane library and Evidence-based Medicine Reviews were searched to July 2011. Inclusion criteria were prospective studies evaluating Alexander Technique instruction (individual lessons or group delivery) as an intervention for any medical indication/health-related condition. Studies were categorised and data extracted on study population, randomisation method, nature of intervention and control, practitioner characteristics, validity and reliability of outcome measures, completeness of follow-up and statistical analyses.   Of 271 publications identified, 18 were selected: three randomised, controlled trials (RCTs), two controlled non-randomised studies, eight non-controlled studies, four qualitative analyses and one health economic analysis. One well-designed, well-conducted RCT demonstrated that, compared with usual GP care, Alexander Technique lessons led to significant long-term reductions in back pain and incapacity caused by chronic back pain. The results were broadly supported by a smaller, earlier RCT in chronic back pain. The third RCT, a small, well-designed, well-conducted study in individuals with Parkinson's disease, showed a sustained increased ability to carry out everyday activities following Alexander lessons, compared with usual care. The 15 non-RCT studies are also reviewed. Strong evidence exists for the effectiveness of Alexander Technique lessons for chronic back pain and moderate evidence in Parkinson's-associated disability. Preliminary evidence suggests that Alexander Technique lessons may lead to improvements in balance skills in the

  3. Juvenile Prostitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csapo, Marg

    1986-01-01

    Recent research and Canadian government committee reports concerning juvenile prostitution are reviewed. Proposals are made in the realms of law and social policy; and existing programs are described. (DB)

  4. Germline mutation of CBL is associated with moyamoya disease in a child with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia and Noonan syndrome-like disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyakuna, Nobuyuki; Muramatsu, Hideki; Higa, Takeshi; Chinen, Yasutsugu; Wang, Xinan; Kojima, Seiji

    2015-03-01

    Germline mutations in CBL have been identified in patients with Noonan syndrome-like phenotypes, while juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) harbors duplication of a germline CBL, resulting in acquired isodisomy. The association between moyamoya disease and Noonan syndrome carrying a PTPN11 mutation has recently been reported. We present a patient with JMML who developed moyamoya disease and neovascular glaucoma. Our patient exhibited a Noonan syndrome-like phenotype. Genetic analysis revealed acquired isodisomy and a germline heterozygous mutation in CBL. This is a rare case of CBL mutation associated with moyamoya disease. Prolonged RAS pathway signaling may cause disruption of cerebrovascular development. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The chemical work of Alexander and Jane Marcet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, L

    2001-04-01

    Alexander Marcet was an authority on urinary calculi and their analysis when few medical practitioners appreciated the usefulness of chemistry in the explanation and treatment of disease. In An Essay on The Chemical History and Medical Treatment of Calculous Disorders, he described the discovery of an xanthine stone. He drew line illustrations of simple chemical apparatus useful for bedside analysis. His microtechnique used drops of solution and pinhead pieces of calculi; reagents were acids and alkalies and the blowpipe in conjunction with a small alcohol lamp. He reported the earliest description of a disorder later named "alcaptonuria". Marcet's work and that of a few others, on the chemical composition of urine and calculi, laid the foundations of our present knowledge. Between 1807 and 1820, his lectures to the medical students at Guy's Hospital were illustrated by experiments. Jane Haldimand Marcet wrote the very popular CONVERSATIONS: on Chemistry (16 editions in Great Britain). Her book dominated elementary chemical instruction during the first half of the 19th century. She followed Lavoisier's scheme of classification and explained chemical reactions in terms of affinity, aggregation, gravitation, and repulsion. Her advocacy that experimentation accompany lecture was new. The availability of serious scientific education in the new women's academies set the stage for increasing women's involvement in science. She also published a series of CONVERSATIONS: The topics were Political Economy, Natural Philosophy, and Vegetable Physiology.

  6. Naevoxanthoendothelioma (Synonym: Juvenile Xanthogranuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Handa

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of naevoxanthoendothelioma juvenile xanthogranuloma is reported with rare features like late onset of the disease, involvement of liver and diffuse cutaneous lesions including cafe au lait spots and pigmented naevus. Final diagnosis could be achieved only on histopathology report.

  7. Pediatric cardiology. Clinical and practical experiences with heart diseases of children, juveniles and young adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, Nikolaus A.

    2011-01-01

    The book on pediatric cardiology covers the following chapters: (I) Fundamentals and diagnostics: pediatric cardiologic anamnesis, electrocardiograms, thorax X-radiography, MRT and CT of the heart, nuclear medical diagnostics, exercise tests, heart catheter examination, electrophysiological tests. (II) Leading symptoms: Cyanosis, cardiac murmur, thorax pain, palpitation, syncopes. (III) Disease pictures: congenital heart defects, acquired heart defects, cardiomyopathies, heart rhythm disturbances, heart insufficiency, arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, other heart involving syndromes. (IV) Therapy: Catheter interventional therapy, post-surgical pediatric cardiac therapy, surgery involving the life-support machine, mechanical cardiovascular support systems, initial treatment of newborns with critical heart defects, heart transplantation, vaccination of children with heart diseases, medicinal therapy.

  8. Juvenile angio-Behçet's disease: report and brain MRI findings of 3 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Behçet's Disease (BD) is a vasculitis of unknown origin; it is characterized by recurrent mouth and genital ulcerations, uveitis and diverse systemic manifestations. It is very rare in children. Vascular tropism is mainly characterized by phlebothrombosis; arterial involvement is less frequent. Case presentations: ...

  9. Macular function and morphologic features in juvenile stargardt disease: longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Francesco; Melillo, Paolo; Di Iorio, Valentina; Orrico, Ada; Attanasio, Marcella; Rossi, Settimio; Simonelli, Francesca

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate disease progression in a cohort of patients with a clinical and genetic diagnosis of Stargardt disease. Longitudinal cohort study. A total of 56 selected patients with a clinical and molecular diagnosis of Stargardt disease, an early age of onset, and a median follow-up length of 2 years. Patients underwent routine examination, including full-field electroretinography, microperimetry, and optical coherence tomography. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), mean retinal sensitivity, fixation stability, preferred retinal locus, inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) junction loss, and atrophic lesion area. A total of 56 patients with a mean age at disease onset of 15.3 years (range, 3-28 years), a mean disease duration of 12.1 years, and a mean age at baseline of 27.4 years were analyzed. The median BCVA was 20/200 in both eyes. Optical coherence tomography parameters (IS/OS alteration and retinal pigment epithelium lesion area) were obtained in only 49 patients because the signal quality was poor in the remaining 7 patients. Optical coherence tomography revealed a mean retinal pigment epithelium lesion area of 2.6 mm(2), preserved foveal IS/OS in 4.1% of patients, loss of foveal IS/OS in 59.2% of patients, and extensive loss of macular IS/OS in 36.7% of patients. Microperimetric findings showed a reduced macular sensitivity (mean, 10 decibels [dB]) and an unstable fixation in half of the patient cohort. The longitudinal analysis showed a significant progressive reduction of BCVA and macular sensitivity (at an estimated rate of 0.04 decimals and 1.19 dB/year, respectively) associated with a significant enlargement of retinal pigment epithelium lesion area (0.282 mm(2)/year). No significant changes in ophthalmoscopic findings and electroretinographic responses were detected. This study highlights the importance of microperimetry and optical coherence tomography in monitoring patients with Stargardt disease. Quantifying the decline of visual functionality and

  10. Sex-specific effect of juvenile diet on adult disease resistance in a field cricket.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clint D Kelly

    Full Text Available Food limitation is expected to reduce an individual's body condition (body mass scaled to body size and cause a trade-off between growth and other fitness-related traits, such as immunity. We tested the condition-dependence of growth and disease resistance in male and female Gryllus texensis field crickets by manipulating diet quality via nutrient content for their entire life and then subjecting individuals to a host resistance test using the live bacterium Serratia marcescens. As predicted, crickets on a high-quality diet eclosed more quickly, and at a larger body size and mass. Crickets on a high-quality diet were not in better condition at the time of eclosion, but they were in better condition 7-11 days after eclosion, with females also being in better condition than males. Despite being in better condition, however, females provided with a high-quality diet had significantly poorer disease resistance than females on a low-quality diet and in poor condition. Similarly, males on low- and high-quality diets did not differ in their disease resistance, despite differing in their body condition. A sex difference in disease resistance under diet-restriction suggests that females might allocate resources toward immunity during development if they expect harsh environmental conditions as an adult or it might suggest that females allocate resources toward other life history activities (i.e. reproduction when food availability increases. We do not know what immune effectors were altered under diet-restriction to increase disease resistance, but our findings suggest that increased immune function might provide an explanation for the sexually-dimorphic increase in longevity generally observed in diet-restricted animals.

  11. Macular function and morphological features in juvenile Stargardt disease: Longitudinal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Francesco; Melillo, Paolo; Iorio, Valentina Di; Orrico, Ada; Attanasio, Marcella; Rossi, Settimio; Simonelli, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Purpose to evaluate disease progression in a cohort of patients with clinical and genetic diagnosis of Stargardt disease. Design longitudinal cohort study. Subjects 56 selected patients with a clinical and molecular diagnosis of Stargardt disease, an early age of onset and a median follow-up length of two years. Methods patients underwent routine examination including full-field electroretinography, microperimetry and optical coherence tomography. Main Outcome Measures best corrected visual acuity, mean retinal sensitivity, fixation stability, preferred retinal locus, inner-outer segment (IS/OS) junction loss, atrophic lesion area. Results 56 patients with a mean age of disease onset of 15.3 years (range: 3 - 28 years), a mean disease length of 12.1 years and a mean age at baseline of 27.4 years were analyzed. The median best corrected visual acuity was 20/200 in both eyes. Optical coherence tomography parameters (IS/OS alteration and retinal pigment epithelium lesion area) were obtained in 49 patients because signal quality was poor in the remaining 7 patients. Optical coherence tomography revealed a mean retinal pigment epithelium lesion area of 2.6 mm2, preserved foveal IS/OS in 4.1% of patients, loss of foveal IS/OS in 59.2%, and extensive loss of macular IS/OS in 36.7%. Microperimetric findings showed a reduced macular sensitivity (mean 10 dB) and an unstable fixation in half of the patient cohort. The longitudinal analysis showed a significant progressive reduction of best corrected visual acuity and macular sensitivity (at an estimated rate of 0.04 decimals and 1.19 dB per year, respectively) associated with a significant enlargement of retinal pigment epithelium lesion area (0.282 mm2 per year). No significant changes in ophthalmoscopic findings and electroretinographic responses were detected. Conclusions this study highlights the importance of microperimetry and optical coherence tomography in monitoring Stargardt patients. In fact, quantifying the

  12. Extending juvenility in grasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaeppler, Shawn; de Leon Gatti, Natalia; Foerster, Jillian

    2017-04-11

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for modulating the juvenile to adult developmental growth transition in plants, such as grasses (e.g. maize). In particular, the invention provides methods for enhancing agronomic properties in plants by modulating expression of GRMZM2G362718, GRMZM2G096016, or homologs thereof. Modulation of expression of one or more additional genes which affect juvenile to adult developmental growth transition such as Glossy15 or Cg1, in conjunction with such modulation of expression is also contemplated. Nucleic acid constructs for down-regulation of GRMZM2G362718 and/or GRMZM2G096016 are also contemplated, as are transgenic plants and products produced there from, that demonstrate altered, such as extended juvenile growth, and display associated phenotypes such as enhanced yield, improved digestibility, and increased disease resistance. Plants described herein may be used, for example, as improved forage or feed crops or in biofuel production.

  13. Consenso em reumatologia pediátrica: parte I - definição dos critérios de doença inativa e remissão em artrite idiopática juvenil/artrite reumatóide juvenil Consensus in pediatric rheumatology: part I - criteria definition of inactive disease and remission in juvenile idiopathic arthritis / juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Machado

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Não há critérios universalmente aceitos para a remissão clínica em artrite idiopática juvenil/artrite reumatóide juvenil (AIJ/ARJ. OBJETIVO: formar consenso sobre estes critérios. MÉTODOS: foi utilizado um inquérito pelo método Delphi para reunir os critérios vigentes e utilizados por especialistas em reumatologia pediátrica (RP no mundo todo. A análise dos resultados constituiu a base para uma Consensus Conference utilizando a nominal group technique (NGT para alcançar o consenso nas questões não resolvidas após a análise dos questionários deste inquérito. Cento e trinta RP de 34 países responderam ao inquérito e 20 RP de nove países elegeram os critérios durante dois dias, em processo de discussão estruturada, para formar consenso pela NGT. RESULTADOS: os critérios de doença inativa deveriam incluir: 1 nenhuma articulação com artrite em atividade; 2 ausência de febre, rash, serosite, esplenomegalia ou linfadenopatia generalizada atribuída à AIJ/ARJ; 3 ausência de uveíte em atividade; 4 VHS ou PCR negativas (se ambos forem testados, ambos devem ser normais; 5 a avaliação global pelo médico deve indicar o melhor escore possível, indicando doença inativa. CONCLUSÕES: de acordo com o voto de consenso, seis meses contínuos de doença inativa são necessários para se considerar um paciente em estado de remissão com medicação; 12 meses contínuos de doença inativa e sem medicação são necessários para considerar um paciente em estado de remissão sem medicação. O critério para remissão sem medicação deve prever com acurácia de 95% a probabilidade inferior a 20% de recaída em cinco anos.Validated and widely accepted criteria for clinical remission in JIA/JRA do not currently exist. OBJECTIVE: To achieve consensus in this matter. METHODS: The Delphi consensus-formation approach was used to gather the criteria in use by pediatric rheumatologists (PR worldwide. Results from the questionnaires

  14. American College of Rheumatology provisional criteria for defining clinical inactive disease in select categories of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Carol A; Giannini, Edward H; Huang, Bin; Itert, Lukasz; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2011-07-01

    To prospectively validate the preliminary criteria for clinical inactive disease (CID) in patients with select categories of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We used the process for development of classification and response criteria recommended by the American College of Rheumatology Quality of Care Committee. Patient-visit profiles were extracted from the phase III randomized controlled trial of infliximab in polyarticular-course JIA (i.e., patients considered to resemble those with select categories of JIA) and sent to an international group of expert physician raters. Using the physician ratings as the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity were calculated using the preliminary criteria. Modifications to the criteria were made, and these were sent to a larger group of pediatric rheumatologists to determine quantitative, face, and content validity. Variables weighted heaviest by physicians when making their judgment were the number of joints with active arthritis, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), physician's global assessment, and duration of morning stiffness. Three modifications were made: the definition of uveitis, the definition of abnormal ESR, and the addition of morning stiffness. These changes did not alter the accuracy of the preliminary set. The modified criteria, termed the "criteria for CID in select categories of JIA," have excellent feasibility and face, content, criterion, and discriminant validity to detect CID in select categories of JIA. The small changes made to the preliminary criteria set did not alter the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.954) or accuracy (91%), but have increased face and content validity. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Did Alexander the Great die of acute pancreatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbarounis, C N

    1997-06-01

    I propose that Alexander the Great died of acute pancreatitis secondary to heavy alcohol consumption and a very rich meal. The cause of death of prominent historic or artistic figures attracts considerable interest of historians and researchers. This is especially the case for Alexander the Great. More than 20,000 publications, books, or monographs on the life and work of Alexander the Great have been published. There are several theories and hypotheses regarding the cause of his death, that are based on historic descriptions, diaries, notations, and interpretations of events. It is inevitable that history and myth intermingle in any investigative approach, no matter how scholarly. In this article, on the basis of several historic sources. I have made an effort to reconstruct the final 14 days of his life and record the course of medical events that preceded his death with the formulation of a plausible diagnosis.

  16. Juvenile angiofibromer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Anne Daugaard; Jakobsen, John; Nepper-Rasmussen, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    Juvenile angiofibroma is a rare, benign, rich vascular tumor, and approximately one new case is diagnosed in Denmark each year. It sits in the foramen sphenopalatinum and occurs in boys from 14 to 25 years of age. The most frequent initial symptoms are nasal obstruction and epistaxis. Through...... the years, the treatment of juvenile angiofibroma has included many methods, including surgical excision, electrocoagulation, interstitial or external radiation therapy, cryosurgery, hormone administration and chemotherapy. Radiation, chemotherapy and surgery have proven to be the most effective treatments...

  17. Alexander-equivalent Zariski pairs of irreducible sextics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eyral, Christophe; Oka, Mutsuo

    2009-01-01

    The existence of Alexander-equivalent Zariski pairs dealing with irreducible curves of degree 6 was proved by Degtyarev. However, no explicit example of such a pair is available (only the existence is known) in the literature. In this paper, we construct the first concrete example.......The existence of Alexander-equivalent Zariski pairs dealing with irreducible curves of degree 6 was proved by Degtyarev. However, no explicit example of such a pair is available (only the existence is known) in the literature. In this paper, we construct the first concrete example....

  18. Obituary: Walter Alexander Feibelman, 1930-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oergerle, William

    2005-12-01

    Walter Alexander Feibelman, 79, an astronomer who discovered the E-ring of Saturn, died of a heart attack 19 November 2004 at his home at Riderwood Village in Silver Spring, Maryland. Walter was born 30 October 1925 in Berlin, Germany to Bernard and Dora Feibelman. He came to the United States with his parents in 1941. They were some of the last German Jews to flee Nazi Germany. Years later, he reported his experiences in an account contributed to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. As a youth, he worked at a cleaning shop and as a soda jerk before taking a course in tool and die making. He worked at the Abbey Photo Corp. in New York and in a model-making firm, where he constructed models of aircraft for use in identification courses by the Army Air Forces. After high school, he attended the Carnegie Institute of Technology and received his BS degree in 1956. Until 1969, he was a research scientist at the University of Pittsburgh. While working as an assistant research professor in physics and astronomy at the University of Pittsburgh in 1967, he examined a photo of Saturn taken a year earlier at the university's Allegheny Observatory. The E-ring -- unlike the bright main rings, A, B, C, D and F -- is faint and not easily spotted. He paired his observation with calculations and announced his discovery, which remained unconfirmed until the Pioneer 11 flyby in 1979. Walter joined the Optical Astronomy Division of Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt in 1969, and worked there until 2002, when he became an emeritus astronomer at NASA. He became associated with the International Ultraviolet Explorer project, and worked on developing detectors for the orbiting observatory's spectrograph. The project turned out to be one of NASA's most successful observatories, operating from 1978 to 1996. In his scientific career, he published more than 200 refereed articles, mainly on hot stars and planetary nebulae. He also wrote papers in the fields of photography, spectroscopy

  19. Obituary: Donald Alexander Macrae, 1916-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaquist, E. R.

    2007-12-01

    With the passing of Donald Alexander MacRae on 6 December 2006 at age 90, the astronomy community lost a visionary scientist and a great educator in the field. Don MacRae was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, on 19 February 1916, to Donald Alexander and Laura Geddes (Barnstead) MacRae. His father was originally a classics scholar and preceptor of Greek and Latin at Princeton, but at the time of Don's birth in 1916 he was Dean of the Dalhousie Law School in Halifax. The family moved to Toronto, Ontario, in 1924 when his father joined the faculty of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto as a Professor of Law. After the family moved to Toronto, where he received most of his early education, he obtained his undergraduate degree in Mathematics and Physics in 1937 from the University of Toronto (U of T). He obtained the degree of A.M. in 1940 and of Ph.D. in 1943 from Harvard University under the mentorship of Bart Bok in the field of galactic structure. During his early career he worked briefly at the University of Pennsylvania, Cornell University, and Carbide and Chemical Corporation at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. For Don the latter work was a brief and somewhat uneasy association with the Manhattan Project. In 1946, he obtained a position at Case Institute of Technology (now Case Western Reserve University), where he worked until 1953. In 1953, he accepted a position at the U of T, replacing Ralph Williamson, who had earlier introduced Don to the emerging field of radio astronomy while they both were at Cornell. Don's primary research field was stellar spectroscopy, but his interests were much broader than this, and he possessed an abiding ability to interest students and faculty in new and emerging ideas. In the early 1960s he developed a strong interest in the nature and origin of the lunar surface, and discussed these extensively with colleagues. Many of his ideas on this subject were later confirmed by the lunar exploration program. Don's continuing interest in radio astronomy

  20. The Pre-Battle Speeches of Alexander at Issus and Gaugamela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Iglesias-Zoido

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Three complementary aspects of Alexander's speeches before Issus and Gaugamela--typology, style, and argumentation--are studied to clarify the distinct ways in which Alexander's words were presented by ancient historians.

  1. Alexander Falconer Sr Seamen's missionary in New Zealand, son Alexander Falconer medical superintendent for mentally ill, grandson Murray Falconer neurosurgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawgood, Barbara J

    2016-08-01

    Alexander Falconer Sr (1843-1915) came from Scotland to New Zealand. A practical Christian, he set up places of relaxation for miners, sailors and soldiers; he became the Seamen's Missionary. Son, Dr Alexander Falconer (1874-1955) trained at Otago University Medical School. As medical superintendent for the mentally ill, he urged the early introduction of psychotherapy. His son, Murray Falconer (1910-1977) was the first Nuffield Dominions Clinical Fellow, training in neurosurgery in Oxford. He was the first director of the Guy's-Maudsley Neurosurgical Unit in London and was internationally known for the surgical management of temporal lobe epilepsy in adults and children. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. The multivariable Alexander polynomial and modern knot theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleur, H.; Yale Univ., New Haven, CT

    1991-01-01

    This note is a summary of several recent works (by the author and collaborators) that study the Conway Alexander link invariant in the light of quantum groups and topological quantum field theories. Their purpose is to understand connections between ''modern'' knot theory and more classical topological concepts. (author)

  3. The multivariable Alexander polynomial and modern knot theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleur, H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper is a summary of several recent works (by the author and collaborators) that study the Conway-Alexander link invariant in the light of quantum groups and topological quantum field theories. Their purpose is to understand connections between modern knot theory and more classical topological concepts

  4. Alexander von Humboldt's invention of the natural landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwa, C.

    2005-01-01

    Landscape took on a new meaning through the new science of plant geography of Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1857). In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, "landscape" was foremost a painterly genre. Slowly, painted landscapes came to bear on natural surroundings, but by 1800 it was still not

  5. Alexander Meiklejohn in Search of Freedom and Dignity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tony W.

    1982-01-01

    Assesses the contributions of the philosopher/educator Alexander Meiklejohn. Discusses the influences of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, and the U.S. Constitution on Meiklejohn's educational theories, which stressed that human freedom and dignity can be enhanced by rigorous examination of U.S. Supreme Court decisions and the meaning of…

  6. A complex-network perspective on Alexander's wholeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin

    2016-12-01

    The wholeness, conceived and developed by Christopher Alexander, is what exists to some degree or other in space and matter, and can be described by precise mathematical language. However, it remains somehow mysterious and elusive, and therefore hard to grasp. This paper develops a complex network perspective on the wholeness to better understand the nature of order or beauty for sustainable design. I bring together a set of complexity-science subjects such as complex networks, fractal geometry, and in particular underlying scaling hierarchy derived by head/tail breaks - a classification scheme and a visualization tool for data with a heavy-tailed distribution, in order to make Alexander's profound thoughts more accessible to design practitioners and complexity-science researchers. Through several case studies (some of which Alexander studied), I demonstrate that the complex-network perspective helps reduce the mystery of wholeness and brings new insights to Alexander's thoughts on the concept of wholeness or objective beauty that exists in fine and deep structure. The complex-network perspective enables us to see things in their wholeness, and to better understand how the kind of structural beauty emerges from local actions guided by the 15 fundamental properties, and in particular by differentiation and adaptation processes. The wholeness goes beyond current complex network theory towards design or creation of living structures.

  7. Journalism and the Educational Views of Alexander Meiklejohn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Mack R.

    Alexander Meiklejohn, who died in 1964 at the age of 92, was a constitutional scholar whose major interest was education. Among Meiklejohn's beliefs were the following: the social good should take precedence over individual achievement; the liberal arts college is the institution best suited to carry out an affirmative reading of the First…

  8. Alexander the Great, the dahlia, and the tortoise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macmillan, Malcolm

    2004-06-01

    Some of the problems of establishing the cause of the death of Alexander the Great are like the attempts to find causes other than hysteria for Anna O.'s symptoms. The more general problem of using plausibility as a criterion of the truth of such reconstructions are illustrated by the arguments embedded in Tom Stoppard's Arcadia.

  9. The Century-Old Wisdom of Alexander Graham Bell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornett, Orin

    1990-01-01

    This article reflects on Alexander Graham Bell's 1888 testimony before the Royal Commission of the United Kingdom on the Condition of the Deaf and Dumb, Etc. Excerpts are grouped by reference to (1) language education for the hearing impaired; (2) speechreading; (3) methods of teaching; (4) speech; and (5) sign language. (Author/PB)

  10. 76 FR 28226 - Ndahendekire Barbara v. African Shipping; Njoroge Muhia; Alco Logistics, Llc; Brenda Alexander...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-16

    ... Muhia; Alco Logistics, Llc; Brenda Alexander; and AIR 7 Seas Transportlogistics, Inc.; Notice of Filing...; Njoroge Muhia, ALCO Logistics, LLC; Brenda Alexander; and Air 7 Seas Transport Logistics, Inc...; Respondent ALCO Logistics, LLC, is a freight forwarding and logistics company; Respondent Brenda Alexander is...

  11. ECONOMICS OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT (15 vols + 4 cdroms) by Gregory Zorzos

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory Zorzos

    2002-01-01

    Research contains many ancient texts (Ancient Greek, Hebrews, Hieroglyphs, Assyrian, Sumerian, Babylonian, Latin, etc.). 1. (MICRO-MACRO ECONOMICS OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT (5 vols + cdrom). Microeconomics and macroeconomics of Alexander the Great. Economic theories, feasibilities, economic plannings, general description of the campaign's business plan etc. 2. BANKS OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT (2 vols + cdrom) Describes banking system, economists, financiers, investors, accountants, bookkeepers, etc,...

  12. Juvenile polyposis syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yi-Han; Wei, Chin-Hung; Chang, Szu-Wen; Chang, Lung; Fu, Yu-Wei; Lee, Hung-Chang; Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Yeung, Chun-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Juvenile polyposis syndrome, a rare disorder in children, is characterized with multiple hamartomatous polyps in alimentary tract. A variety of manifestations include bleeding, intussusception, or polyp prolapse. In this study, we present an 8-month-old male infant of juvenile polyposis syndrome initially presenting with chronic anemia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the youngest case reported in the literature. Methods: We report a rare case of an 8-month-old male infant who presented with chronic anemia and gastrointestinal bleeding initially. Panendoscopy and abdominal computed tomography showed multiple polyposis throughout the entire alimentary tract leading to intussusception. Technetium-99m-labeled red blood cell (RBC) bleeding scan revealed the possibility of gastrointestinal tract bleeding in the jejunum. Histopathological examination on biopsy samples showed Peutz-Jeghers syndrome was excluded, whereas the diagnosis of juvenile polyposis syndrome was established. Results: Enteroscopic polypectomy is the mainstay of the treatment. However, polyps recurred and occupied the majority of the gastrointestinal tract in 6 months. Supportive management was given. The patient expired for severe sepsis at the age of 18 months. Conclusion: Juvenile polyposis syndrome is an inherited disease, so it is not possible to prevent it. Concerning of its poor outcome and high mortality rate, it is important that we should increase awareness and education of the parents at its earliest stages. PMID:27631205

  13. Doença de Graves associada à artrite idiopática juvenil Graves' disease associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa de Matos Santos Mendonça Marques

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam o caso de uma menina de 10 anos de idade com diagnóstico de doença de Graves (DG, em tratamento com propiltiouracil, que desenvolveu uveíte e artrite poliarticular e cuja mãe também tem DG e lúpus discoide. São discutidos os diagnósticos diferenciais de artrite inflamatória que surge em uma criança com doença tireoidiana autoimune medicada com drogas antitireóideas.The authors report the case of a 10-year-old girl with Graves' disease (GD, treated with propylthiouracil, who developed uveitis and polyarticular arthritis, and whose mother also had GD and discoid lupus. The differential diagnosis of inflammatory arthritis that appears in a child with autoimmune thyroid disease managed with antithyroid drugs is discussed.

  14. Juvenile Dermatomyositis in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Emeka Madu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile dermatomyositis has variable clinical presentations both in and outside of pregnancy. A literature review indicated that optimal maternal and fetal outcomes can be anticipated when the pregnancy is undertaken while the disease is in remission. Poorer outcomes are associated with flare-up of the disease in early pregnancy compared with exacerbation in the second or third trimester, when fetal prognosis is usually good. We present a case of JDM in pregnancy with disease exacerbation late in pregnancy and review of the relevant literature.

  15. Juvenile Angiofibroma: Evolution of Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolai, Piero; Schreiber, Alberto; Bolzoni Villaret, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Juvenile angiofibroma is a rare benign lesion originating from the pterygopalatine fossa with distinctive epidemiologic features and growth patterns. The typical patient is an adolescent male with a clinical history of recurrent epistaxis and nasal obstruction. Although the use of nonsurgical therapies is described in the literature, surgery is currently considered the ideal treatment for juvenile angiofibroma. Refinement in preoperative embolization has provided significant reduction of complications and intraoperative bleeding with minimal risk of residual disease. During the last decade, an endoscopic technique has been extensively adopted as a valid alternative to external approaches in the management of small-intermediate size juvenile angiofibromas. Herein, we review the evolution in the management of juvenile angiofibroma with particular reference to recent advances in diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22164185

  16. Juvenile Angiofibroma: Evolution of Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Nicolai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile angiofibroma is a rare benign lesion originating from the pterygopalatine fossa with distinctive epidemiologic features and growth patterns. The typical patient is an adolescent male with a clinical history of recurrent epistaxis and nasal obstruction. Although the use of nonsurgical therapies is described in the literature, surgery is currently considered the ideal treatment for juvenile angiofibroma. Refinement in preoperative embolization has provided significant reduction of complications and intraoperative bleeding with minimal risk of residual disease. During the last decade, an endoscopic technique has been extensively adopted as a valid alternative to external approaches in the management of small-intermediate size juvenile angiofibromas. Herein, we review the evolution in the management of juvenile angiofibroma with particular reference to recent advances in diagnosis and treatment.

  17. The Disease of the Italian Poet Giacomo Leopardi (1798-1837): A Case of Juvenile Ankylosing Spondylitis in the 19th Century?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sganzerla, Erik Pietro; Riva, Michele Augusto

    2017-06-01

    Some authors sustained that the pessimistic thought of the Italian writer and philosopher Giacomo Leopardi (1798-1837) may be attributed to his unhappy life, characterized by several health problems. His philosophical theories appear as the result of depressive and melancholic state, related to his precarious health conditions, so limiting their intrinsic values. Several authors formulated various hypotheses on the diseases that Leopardi suffered from and postulated different theories on the cause of his early death. This article assumed that Leopardi may have been affected by juvenile ankylosing spondylitis, conditioning spinal deformities, relapsing-remitting uveitis, urinary tract and bowel tract problems, and acute arthritis. Chest deformity, as a complication of juvenile ankylosing spondylitis, may have caused progressive cardiorespiratory failure, worsened by recurrent bronchial and pulmonary complications, until his death caused by acute right ventricular heart failure. The acknowledgment of a physical cause of Leopardi's disease contributes to reevaluate his "cosmic pessimism" as an original expression of his thought, so leading a general revaluation of the figure of one of the most important European thinkers of the 19th century.

  18. What Is Juvenile Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Initiative Breadcrumb Home Health Topics English Español Juvenile Arthritis Basics In-Depth Download Download EPUB Download PDF What is it? Points To Remember About Juvenile Arthritis Juvenile arthritis is the term used to describe ...

  19. Alexander the Great's Tomb at Siwa: The Astronomical Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanassiou, M.; Souvaltzis, Em.; Souvaltzi, L.; Moussas, X.

    A preliminary report on the possible astronomical orientation of the Tomb of Alexander the Great, recently found and excavated by the greek archaeologist Liana Souvaltzi. The tomb is a greek building of doric style. Its enormous dimensions make it the largest amongst the found macedonian tombs (much bigger than the tomb of Philip II, Alexander's father). The tomb faces generally south---west and its orientation could be related either to the constellation of Centaurus or to the star Canopus. The walls of the two long sides of the building have strickingly different widhts. Moreover each wall has three doors (opposite in pairs) of slightly different sizes. We examine the possibility the openings of the doors and their assymetries to be designed and constructed according to some astronomical (solar or stellar) orientations.

  20. Die Ordnung der Weltkulturen. Alexander von Humboldts Ansichten der Kultur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottmar Ette

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Article in German,Abstracts in English, German and Spanish. Focussing Alexander von Humboldt's Vues des Cordillères et Monumens des peuples indigènes de l'Amérique (1810 - 1813 in the context of his monumental work, this essay tries to highlight not only the creation of a new discourse on the Americas but, at the same time, the project(ion of a new order of world cultures. From a transregional perspective, Humboldt's aesthetically most radical book can be fully understood as a musée imaginaire of world cultures whose spatial, temporal, social, literary, frictional, architextual and cultural dimensions allow new insights in one of the most fascinating texts of the early 19th century. Alexander von Humboldt's Vues are creating a transmedial kaleidoscope within a fractal vision of the cultures of the world in the second period of accelerated globalization.

  1. On the Alexander polynominals of alternating two-component links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E. Kidwell

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available Let L be an alternating two-component link with Alexander polynomial Δ(x,y. Then the polynomials (1−xΔ(x,y and (1−yΔ(x,y are alternating. That is, (1−yΔ(x,y can be written as ∑i,jcijxiyj in such a way that (−1i+jcij≥0.

  2. Dr Alexander Graham Bell--audiologist and speech therapist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravorty, R C

    1976-09-01

    Alexander Graham Bell is best known for his role in the invention of the telephone. However, he had a lifelong involvement in speech therapy and audiology besides many other medical investigations. He was also awarded an honorary MD degree from Heidelberg University. In this, the 100th anniversary of his invention of the telephone, his life and some of his medical interests are briefly reviewed.

  3. The Old Serbian Alexander Romance and the Greek Phyllada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Usakiewicz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper includes a short introduction and four excerpts from the Old Serbian Alexander Romance translated into Polish by Maciej Falski.   Tekst zawiera krótką prezentację zagadnienia filiacji Opowieści o Aleksandrze w bałkańskiej przestrzeni kulturowej oraz przekład fragmentów tzw. Serbskiej Aleksandreidy na język polski.

  4. Effect of dietary carbohydrate on non-specific immune response, hepatic antioxidative abilities and disease resistance of juvenile golden pompano (Trachinotus ovatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuanpeng; Ge, Xianping; Lin, Heizhao; Niu, Jin

    2014-12-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary carbohydrate (CHO) levels on non-specific immune responses, hepatic antioxidative status and disease resistance of juvenile golden pompano. Fish were fed six isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets containing various CHO levels for 8 weeks. After the feeding trial, fish were challenged by Vibrio harveyi and survival rate was recorded for the next 12 days. Plasma total protein and albumin content, respiratory burst activity, alkaline phosphatase, slightly increased with dietary starch level from 0% to 16.8%, but significantly decreased at dietary starch levels of 16.8%-28%. Plasma lysozyme, complement 3 and complement 4 levels increased with increasing dietary carbohydrate up to 11.2% and then declined (P 0.05) with those of the other treatments. After challenge, fish fed 11.2% and 16.8% dietary CHO showed higher survival rate than that of fish in 0% CHO group (P 0.05). The results of this study suggest that ingestion of 11.2-16.8% dietary CHO can enhance the non-specific immune responses, increase the hepatic antioxidant abilities, and improve resistance to V. harveyi infection of juvenile golden pompano. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Modulation of growth performance, immunological responses and disease resistance of juvenile Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus (Linnaeus, 1758 by supplementing dietary inosine monophosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abdul Kader

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was investigated to examine supplemental effects of dietary inosine monophosphate (IMP on growth performance, feed utilization, biochemical, hematological and immunological parameters of juvenile Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus. Disease resistance to experimental infection with Streptococcus agalactiae was also assessed. A semi-purified basal diet was supplemented with 0 (IMP0, Control, 1 (IMP1, 2 (IMP2, 4 (IMP4 and 8 (IMP8 g purified IMP kg−1 diet to formulate five experimental diets. Each diet was randomly allocated to triplicate groups of fish (0.59 g for 60 days. The results indicated that supplementation of IMP significantly (P  0.05. Among whole body proximate composition and somatic parameters, condition factor was significantly influenced by dietary supplementation of IMP. A wide variation in hematological parameters were observed and dietary supplementation increased the hematocrit content (P  0.05. Total serum protein (TSP, lysozyme activity (LA, superoxide dismutase activity (SOD and bactericidal activity (BA tended to increase with the supplementation of dietary IMP. TSP and SOD were significantly improved with ≥4 g kg−1 supplementation, while LA with 8 g kg−1 and BA with ≥1 g kg−1 supplementations. IMP supplemented groups showed higher (P > 0.05 cumulative survival compared to that of supplementation free control group. IMP supplemented diet groups also showed significantly higher BA in the post challenge test. Based on the overall performances, the results of the current study indicated that the inclusion of IMP in Nile tilapia diet can improve growth performance, feed utilization, haematological and immunological parameters; and disease resistance of juvenile Nile tilapia. Keywords: Nucleotides, Inosine monophosphate, Growth, Immunity, Disease resistance, Nile tilapia, Streptococcus agalactiae

  6. Choking on food: a rare case of alexander leukodystrophy and choking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murty, O P; Mun, Keinseong; Gopinath, Neetu; Wong, Kum T

    2008-12-01

    Every body has to eat to survive but it becomes a matter of great concern, when the life provider food becomes an asphyxiating agent. In this case, a 60-year-old woman choked herself while swallowing biscuits. On autopsy examination, biscuits were found lodged in larygo-pharynx. Brain showed marked dystrophy and loosened lusterless white matter. On histopathologic examination, brain tissue had numerous eosinophilic globules representing astrocytic processes called "Rosenthal fibers"; hence, it was diagnosed as a case of Alexander dystrophy. It is a disease of white matter, where there is a progressive degeneration of the white matter of the brain because of imperfect growth or development of the myelin sheath. The histopathology of brain showed Rosenthal fibers in abundance. This is one of the rarest disease in which choking can occur because of lack of nervous and muscular coordination and weakness. Its specific relation to choking is documented in this report.

  7. Beneficial Effects of Rhodotorula sp. C11 on Growth and Disease Resistance of Juvenile Japanese Spiky Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, ZhiPing; Sun, JianMing; Xu, Zhe

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of dietary administration of the live yeast, Rhodotorula sp. C11, on growth and disease resistance against Vibrio splendidus infection in juvenile Japanese spiky sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus. Sea cucumbers were fed diets containing Rhodotorula sp. C11 at 0 (control), 10⁴, 10⁵, and 10⁶ CFU/g of feed for 45 d. There were three replicate tanks per dietary treatment. The specific growth rates were higher in all sea cucumbers treated with Rhodotorula sp. C11 than in the controls. Following a challenge with V. splendidus NB13, the cumulative prevalence and mortality of sea cucumbers fed diets supplemented with Rhodotorula sp. C11 were lower than in animals fed the basal diet. In sea cucumbers fed diets supplemented with Rhodotorula sp. C11 for 42 d, the only viable yeast found in the intestine was Rhodotorula sp. C11, which had counts of 1.58-1.98 × 10⁴CFU/g. No yeast was isolated from the intestine of animals fed the basal diet. For the colonization study, 20 sea cucumbers from each dietary treatment were removed to separate tanks and fed the control diet from day 16 to day 46. The viable yeast (Rhodotorula sp. C11) counts in the intestine decreased to 60-80 CFU/g by day 37. Moreover, as demonstrated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, Rhodotorula sp. C11 colonization of the intestine could be detected until day 46. The differences in culture and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis may be due to differences in the sensitivity of both methods. The present result showed that Rhodotorula sp. C11 was able to successfully colonize the intestine of juvenile Japanese spiky sea cucumbers by dietary supplementation, which improved its growth and disease resistance.

  8. Provintsist pärit IT-mõtleja / Alexander Galitsky ; interv. Viktoria Korpan

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Galitsky, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Venemaa tuntumaid info- ja kõrgtehnoloogiavaldkonna spetsialiste infotehnoloogiast ja selle erinevatest võimalustest, tehnoloogia lahendustest ning avastustest, turvaprobleemidest. Lisa: Alexander Galitsky

  9. [Sex-linked juvenile retinoschisis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, P; Turut, P; Soltysik, C; Hache, J C

    1976-02-01

    About 13 observations of sexe linked juvenile retinoschisis, the authors describe the ophthalmoscopic, fluorographic and functional aspects of the disease whose caracteristics are:--its sexe linked recessive heredity; --its clinical characterestics associating: a microcystic macular degeneration, peripheral retinal lesions, vitreous body alterations, --an electroretinogram of the negative type.

  10. Disturbance of the muscoloskeletal system in juvenile ankylosing spondylitis and disease developed in the adulthood (involvement of spine and sacroiliac joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehudina Ye.D.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Two forms of ankylosing spondylitis (AS are distinguished: juvenile and adult, depending on debut age of the disease. The diagnosis of juvenile AS (JAS is one of the most urgent problems in a pediatric rheumatology. The peculiarities of AS course that onsets in childhood and adulthood are manifested by differences in the nature of a spinal column disturbance. At the same time, the evolution of JAS in adulthood remains unexplored. The goals and objectives of research: to study clinical and X-ray symptoms of spondylopathy and sacroiliitis course, to assess their characteristics in the disease that onset in childhood and adulthood. Material and methods. 217 patients with AS (193 men and 24 women with an average age of 38 years were examined. The fast-progressing course of the disease was detected in 21% of cases, moderate and high degree of activity – in 79% of cases, the ІІ-ІІІ stage in 82%, and polyarthritis – in 65%. JAS was detected in 16% of cases (all boys, among them the third stage occurred twice more likely than among the other patients. Results. The clinical and radiologic signs of spondylopathy and sacroiliitis are observed in 95% and 97% of the total number of AS cases, respectively, among all patients with JAS lumbago was detected 4,3 times more frequently, sciatic muscles hypotrophy – 7,8 times, "the string symptom" - 2,9 times", the calcification of the spinal cord - 2,3 times, whereas the prevalence of spinal column injury, the severity of cervico-spondylopathy and sacroiliitis among patients with the disease debut in the adulthood is significantly greater, and the involvement in the process of the lumbar and thoracic spine are detected correspondingly twice as often and by 19%, occurrence of dorsalgia is 4 times as often, the limitation of body lateral bendover by 59%, while there are ambiguous dispersion-correlation links with extraarticular (systemic manifestations of the disease, and the high prevalence of

  11. Chest Abnormalities in Juvenile-Onset Mixed Connective Tissue Disease: Assessment with High-Resolution Computed Tomography and Pulmonary Function Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaloekken, T.M.; Mynarek, G.; Kolbenstvedt, A.; Lilleby, V.; Foerre, Oe.; Soeyseth, V.; Pripp, A.H.; Johansen, B.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is associated with several chest manifestations. Only a few studies have focused on chest manifestations in juvenile-onset MCTD (jMCTD), and the true prevalence of pulmonary abnormalities on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in these patients is unknown. Purpose: To investigate the occurrence of pulmonary abnormalities in jMCTD with particular reference to interstitial lung disease (ILD), and to evaluate a possible association between pulmonary findings and disease-related variables. Material and Methods: Twenty-four childhood-onset MCTD patients with median disease duration of 10.5 years (range 1-21 years) were investigated in a cross-sectional study by means of HRCT, pulmonary function tests (PFT), and clinical assessment. Results: Discrete ILD was identified in six patients (25%). Median extent of ILD was 2.0%, and all except one of the patients had very mild disease in which 5% or less of the parenchyma was affected. The CT features of fibrosis were mainly microcystic and fine intralobular. The most frequently abnormal PFT was carbon monoxide uptake from the lung, which was abnormal in 33% of the patients. PFT and disease duration were not significantly associated with HRCT findings of ILD. Conclusion: The prevalence of ILD in childhood-onset MCTD patients was lower than previously believed. In most of the patients with ILD, the findings were subtle and without clinical correlation. The results suggest a low extent of ILD in childhood-onset MCTD, even after long-term disease duration

  12. Alexander Monro Tertius and his works on hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Tubbs, Isaiah; Loukas, Marios; Oakes, W Jerry

    2015-03-01

    The Monros of the University of Edinburgh reigned over anatomy instruction for over a century. The last of these men, Monro Tertius, was the weaker teacher of the family but still contributed to the anatomical and surgical literature. Herein, we describe the life of Alexander Monro Tertius and his writings, particularly on childhood hydrocephalus. Monro Tertius will not be remembered as a great anatomist or teacher. However, he collected and published important books on his observations and those of others on hydrocephalus. These texts contained the knowledge of his era on this topic.

  13. The 'horns' of a medical dilemma: Alexander the Great.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Gül A

    2004-06-01

    Retrospective 'diagnosis' of clinical disorders of famous historical figures has been of medical interest. In the absence of a patient's 'body', the validity of 'physical symptoms' and their interpretation by contemporary diagnostic criteria are questionable. When the symptoms have been gleaned from the patients's effigy which, as in the case of Alexander the Great, is submerged in legend, the enterprise becomes inherently hazardous. In the present paper, some of the conceptual problems underlying retrospective diagnoses will be identified. Then the use of iconographic records, such as numismatics and sculpture, to provide evidence of clinical symptoms will be shown to be highly misleading.

  14. Reluctant genius Alexander Graham Bell and the passion for invention

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    The popular image of Alexander Graham Bell is that of an elderly American patriarch, memorable only for his paunch, his Santa Claus beard, and the invention of the telephone. In this magisterial reassessment based on thorough new research, acclaimed biographer Charlotte Gray reveals Bell's wide-ranging passion for invention and delves into the private life that supported his genius. The child of a speech therapist and a deaf mother, and possessed of superbly acute hearing, Bell developed an early interest in sound. His understanding of how sound waves might relate to electrical waves enabled h

  15. Evolution of Juvenile Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye.V. Prohorov

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of juvenile ankylosing spondylitis tend to follow a more frequent involvement in the pathological process of elbow and ankle joints, development of enthesiopathies, changes of intraarticular meniscal horns, forming of Baker’s cysts, cartilage flaps and systemic osteoporosis, and total value of all these signs 13 times exceeds thereof in patients with with the debut of disease in adulthood, but for juvenile ankylosing spondylitis vertebral lesion is less common. Age dimorphism of the use of certain groups of drugs and physiotherapy facilities is observed.

  16. Disease course and long-term outcome of juvenile localized scleroderma: Experience from a single pediatric rheumatology Centre and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Giorgia; Fadanelli, Gloria; Agazzi, Anna; Vittadello, Fabio; Meneghel, Alessandra; Zulian, Francesco

    2018-05-03

    Juvenile Localized Scleroderma (JLS) is a rare disorder that may cause severe aesthetic sequelae and functional disability. To date, data on natural history and long-term outcome are discordant and difficult to compare due to the heterogeneity of clinical subtypes, treatments and methods to evaluate activity and outcome in previous studies. A retrospective and cross-sectional study including 133 patients followed between January 1991 and December 2016 was conducted at our Pediatric Rheumatology Centre. Disease course was drawn by retrospective analysis of patients' clinical features, treatment, disease course and outcome at the last evaluation. Disease activity and severity of tissue damage were assessed by using parameters derived from the Localized Scleroderma Cutaneous Assessment Tool (LoSCAT) and thermography. Most patients achieved complete remission, as only 12.5%, all with the linear subtype, had still active disease after over 10 years of follow-up. At least one disease relapse occurred in 22.2% of patients and first flare was observed 20 months after first treatment discontinuation. Mild tissue damage was observed in more than half of patients, in 25.4% was moderate and in 23.0% severe; 19.8% presented a functional limitation. The entity of skin and subcutaneous fat loss established at the early stages of the disease as 27.8% of patients with shorter disease duration had severe damage and the rates remained constant in patients with longer follow-up. The delay in start of systemic treatment was associated with longer disease activity and higher relapse rate. Patients with linear scleroderma (LS), pansclerotic morphea (PM) and mixed subtype (MS) presented more severe aesthetic and functional damage but did not differ from other subtypes as for rate of complete remission. JLS in some patients can be a very aggressive disease with persistent activity after >10 years and/or several disease relapses. As tissue damage establishes early in disease course a

  17. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease to fight microbial invaders and facilitate tissue repair. Normally, the body stops the inflammatory response after healing is complete to prevent damage to its own cells and tissues. In people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis , the inflammatory ...

  18. PSYCHOSOCIAL PROFILE OF JUVENILE DIABETES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dass, Jyoti; Dhavale, H.S.; Rathi, Anup

    1999-01-01

    A study of the complex relationships between the patient characteristics, family and environmental influences, physician's behaviour and the demands of the disease with its management in Juvenile Diabetics was taken up at a general hospital. 90 subjects were selected for the study and grouped into three. Group A consisted of 30 Juvenile Diabetics, Group B of 30 Adult Diabetics and Group C of 30 Normal healthy adolescents. The impact of the illness was measured on the Diabetes Impact Measurement Scale (DIMS), the behavioural deviations and the parental attitudes towards child rearing on the Fallstrom's Questionnaire (FQ) and the family environment on the Family Climate Scale (FCS). Psychiatric morbidity was assessed using DSM-IV criteria. Group A & B were compared on the DIMS and Group A & C on FQ & FCS. Adult diabetics had a greater impact of diabetes. Juvenile diabetics had significantly higher frequency of behavioural deviations as compared to controls. Also there was a higher number of responses on questions indicating an overprotecting attitude amongst parents of juvenile diabetics. There was an increased incidence of psychiatric morbidity in juvenile diabetics as compared to normal adolescents irrespective of the family environment. The results are discussed in relation to current literature. PMID:21430802

  19. IL-6 blockade in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis - achievement of inactive disease and remission (data from the German AID-registry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielak, M; Husmann, E; Weyandt, N; Haas, J-P; Hügle, B; Horneff, G; Neudorf, U; Lutz, T; Lilienthal, E; Kallinich, T; Tenbrock, K; Berendes, R; Niehues, T; Wittkowski, H; Weißbarth-Riedel, E; Heubner, G; Oommen, P; Klotsche, J; Foell, Dirk; Lainka, E

    2018-04-05

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is a complex disease with an autoinflammatory component of unknown etiology related to the innate immune system. A major role in the pathogenesis has been ascribed to proinflammatory cytokines like interleukin-6 (IL-6), and effective drugs inhibiting their signaling are being developed. This study evaluates sJIA patients treated with the IL-6 inhibitor tocilizumab (TCZ) concerning clinical response rate, disease course and adverse effects in a real-life clinical setting. In 2009 a clinical and research consortium was established, including an online registry for autoinflammatory diseases (AID) ( https://aid-register.de ). Data for this retrospective TCZ study were documented by 13 centers. From 7/2009 to 4/2014, 200 patients with sJIA were recorded in the AID-registry. Out of these, 46 (19 m, 27 f, age 1-18 years) received therapy with TCZ. Long term treatment (median 23 months) has been documented in 24/46 patients who were evaluated according to Wallace criteria (active disease 6/24, inactive disease 5/24, remission 13/24 cases). Under observation co-medication were used in 40/46 cases. Adverse events were reported in 11/46 patients. The clinical response rate (no clinical manifestation, no increased inflammation parameters) within the first 12 weeks of treatment was calculated to be 35%. Out of 200 sJIA children reported in the German AID-registry, 46 were treated with TCZ, showing a clinical response rate of 35% during the first 12 weeks, and inactive disease and/or remission under medication in 75% after one year. Adverse events were seen in 24% and severe adverse events in 4%. The AID-Registry is funded by the BMBF (01GM08104, 01GM1112D, 01GM1512D).

  20. Was the death of Alexander the Great due to poisoning? Was it Veratrum album?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schep, Leo J; Slaughter, Robin J; Vale, J Allister; Wheatley, Pat

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the death of Alexander the Great to determine if he died from natural causes or was poisoned and, if the latter, what was the most likely poison. OVID MEDLINE (January 1950-May 2013) and ISI Web of Science (1900-May 2013) databases were searched and bibliographies of identified articles were screened for additional relevant studies. These searches identified 53 relevant citations. Classical literature associated with Alexander's death. There are two divergent accounts of Alexander's death. The first has its origins in the Royal Diary, allegedly kept in Alexander's court. The second account survives in various versions of the Alexander Romance. Nature of the terminal illness. The Royal Diary describes a gradual onset of fever, with a progressive inability to walk, leading to Alexander's death, without offering a cause of his demise. In contrast, the Romance implies that members of Alexander's inner circle conspired to poison him. The various medical hypotheses include cumulative debilitation from his previous wounds, the complications of alcohol imbibing (resulting in alcohol hepatitis, acute pancreatitis, or perforated peptic ulcer), grief, a congenital abnormality, and an unhealthy environment in Babylon possibly exacerbated by malaria, typhoid fever, or some other parasitic or viral illness. Was it poisoning? Of all the chemical and botanical poisons reviewed, we believe the alkaloids present in the various Veratrum species, notably Veratrum album, were capable of killing Alexander with comparable symptoms to those Alexander reportedly experienced over the 12 days of his illness. Veratrum poisoning is heralded by the sudden onset of epigastric and substernal pain, which may also be accompanied by nausea and vomiting, followed by bradycardia and hypotension with severe muscular weakness. Alexander suffered similar features for the duration of his illness. If Alexander the Great was poisoned, Veratrum album offers a more plausible cause than arsenic

  1. Parenting and juvenile delinquency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeve, M.

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile delinquency is a noteworthy problem. This thesis addressed the association between parenting and juvenile delinquency by analyzing the concepts of parenting adopted in family research in relation to criminological concepts and measures of delinquent behavior. Four studies were conducted.

  2. Kinesthetic Ventures Informed by the Work of F. M. Alexander, Stanislavski, Peirce, and Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Ed; Wright, Ben; Protzel, Michael, Ed.

    This book is about education harvested from self-observation. F. Matthias Alexander (1869-1955) studied the experience of self formation, working with motor habits. His method is used in performing arts training to enhance bodily and vocal expression. Like Alexander, Konstantine Stanislavski (1863-1938) and Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) studied human…

  3. The death of Alexander the Great--a spinal twist of fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafian, Hutan

    2004-06-01

    Alexander the Great died in 323 B.C. from an unknown cause. Physical depictions of this historical figure reveal the likelihood of a cervical scoliotic deformity. This is substantiated with the medical history and is correlated with his untimely death. For the first time, it is concluded that Alexander's death may have ensued from the sequelae of congenital scoliotic syndrome.

  4. Alexander's (356-323 BC) expeditionary Medical Corps 334-323 BC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retsas, Spyros

    2009-08-01

    Alexander had a profound interest in medicine and healing. Original Greek texts survive mainly from the works of Plutarch and Arrian. This paper examines original sources naming the physicians who participated in Alexander's expedition in Asia, the battle injuries he sustained and his final illness in Babylon.

  5. A Practical Approach to Juvenile Dermatomyositis and Juvenile Scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Liza J; Pain, Clare E

    2016-02-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis and juvenile scleroderma are rare multisystem autoimmune disorders. Although they share some pathognomonic hallmarks with adult onset myositis or scleroderma, there are significant differences in presentation, characteristics and associated features when the diseases present in childhood. In view of this, and the rarity of the conditions, it is important for care to be led by teams with expertise in pediatric rheumatology conditions. Prognosis has improved significantly in the West; likely due to early diagnosis and aggressive treatment with immunosuppressive medications. However, this trend is not replicated in the developing world. Early recognition of these diseases is crucial to achieve rapid and sustained remission and prevent disease or medication associated complications. This article aims to provide a practical overview for recognition, diagnosis and treatment of these conditions.

  6. Effects of Astragalus polysaccharides (APS) and chitooligosaccharides (COS) on growth, immune response and disease resistance of juvenile largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shi-Mei; Jiang, Yu; Chen, Yong-Jun; Luo, Li; Doolgindachbaporn, Sompong; Yuangsoi, Bundit

    2017-11-01

    The effects of oral administration of Astragalus polysaccharides (APS) and chitooligosaccharides (COS), single or combined, on the growth performance, immunity and disease resistance of M. salmoides were investigated. Largemouth bass juvenile were divided into 4 groups and each group was fed with diets supplemented with or without immunostimulant for 8 weeks. After 8 weeks of feeding trial, five fish per tank were sampled for immunity determination, ten fish per tank were challenged by A. hydrophila. The results showed that the largemouth bass fed with two immunostimulants alone or in combination significantly enhanced the final weight and specific growth rate (SGR), decreased feed conversion ratio (FCR) (P APS. In addition, both COS and APS upregulated respiratory burst activity (RBA), phagocytic activity (PA), lysozyme activity and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Meanwhile, COS also exhibited a increase in total leukocyte count, nitric oxide (NO) content and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity compared to the control. When challenged with A. hydrophila, the mortality of groups fed with COS and/or APS was lower than the control (P APS and COS had a synergistic effect on lysozme activity, iNOS activity, NO content and disease resistance of fish (P < 0.05). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of adhesive gut bacteria composition, immunity, and disease resistance in juvenile hybrid tilapia fed two different Lactobacillus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenshu; Ren, Pengfei; He, Suxu; Xu, Li; Yang, Yaling; Gu, Zemao; Zhou, Zhigang

    2013-07-01

    This study compares the effects of two Lactobacillus strains, highly adhesive Lactobacillus brevis JCM 1170 (HALB) and less-adhesive Lactobacillus acidophilus JCM 1132 (LALB), on the survival and growth, adhesive gut bacterial communities, immunity, and protection against pathogenic bacterial infection in juvenile hybrid tilapia. During a 5-week feeding trial the fish were fed a diet containing 0 to 10(9) cells/g feed of the two Lactobacillus strains. Samples of intestine, kidney, and spleen were taken at the start and at 10, 20, and 35 days for analysis of stress tolerance and cytokine gene mRNA levels and to assess the diversity of adhesive gut bacterial communities. A 14-day immersion challenge with Aeromonas hydrophila NJ-1 was also performed following the feeding trial. The results showed no significant differences in survival rate, weight gain, or feed conversion in the different dietary treatments. The adhesive gut bacterial communities were strikingly altered in the fish fed either the HALB or the LALB, but the response was more rapid and substantial with the adhesive strain. The two strains induced similar changes in the patterns (upregulation or downregulation) of intestinal, splenic or kidney cytokine expression, but they differed in the degree of response for these genes. Changes in intestinal HSP70 expression levels coincided with changes in the similarity coefficient of the adhesive gut bacterial communities between the probiotic treatments. The highest dose of the HALB appeared to protect against the toxic effects of immersion in A. hydrophila (P Lactobacillus strains adhere to the gut may be a favorable criterion in selecting probiotic strain for aquaculture. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Whole rice bran for beef heifers raised on alexander grass pasture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Salvador

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the development of beef heifers exclusively fed alexander grass (Urochloa plantaginea (Link Hitch or alexander grass and whole rice meal as supplement offered from Monday to Friday. The experimental design was completely randomized, with repeated measures over time, and consisted of two treatments and three replications of area. Heifers receiving whole rice meal exhibited higher average daily gain after day 42 of pasture use and a 21% higher body weight at the end of the grazing period. The stocking rate, weight gain per area, hip height, weight-height ratio, and body condition score were similar for heifers exclusively fed alexander grass and alexander grass plus rice bran. Beef heifers raised exclusively on alexander grass from 15 to 18 months of age reached adequate body development, reproductive tract score (4.22 points and pelvic area (206.3 cm² to be bred at 18-20 months of age.

  9. Juvenile Court Statistics - 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Youth Development (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    This report is a statistical study of juvenile court cases in 1972. The data demonstrates how the court is frequently utilized in dealing with juvenile delinquency by the police as well as by other community agencies and parents. Excluded from this report are the ordinary traffic cases handled by juvenile court. The data indicate that: (1) in…

  10. Juvenile Court Statistics, 1974.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Jacqueline; Vereb, Thomas S.

    This report presents information on juvenile court processing of youth in the U.S. during 1974. It is based on data gathered under the National Juvenile Court Statistical Reporting System. Findings can be summarized as follows: (1) 1,252,700 juvenile delinquency cases, excluding traffic offenses, were handled by courts in the U.S. in 1974; (2) the…

  11. Estudo comparativo de testes diagnósticos para olho seco entre crianças saudáveis e portadoras de artrite reumatóide juvenil Comparative study of diagnostic tests for dry eye disease between healthy and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayter Silva de Paula

    2004-10-01

    clinically and underwent tests for keratoconjunctivitis sicca: Schirmer's 1, tear film break-up time and rose bengal staining tests. RESULTS: Six children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis presented one or more symptoms of keratoconjunctivitis sicca (40% and five of them (83.3% presented meibomitis or other signs of this disease. In group 2, no child presented symptoms or signs of keratoconjunctivitis sicca. Mean Schirmer test did not differ between group 1 and 2 (p=0.156. However, the mean tear film break-up time was significantly reduced in group 1 (p=0.0005 and the mean rose Bengal staining score in group 1 was significantly greater than in group 2 (p=0.0038. Five of the fifteen children of group 1 (33% have two or more abnormal tests and were diagnosed as having definite keratoconjunctivitis sicca, while four children (26% were labeled with probable keratoconjunctivitis sicca. No child of group 2 had more than one positive test. CONCLUSIONS: Signs and symptoms of keratoconjunctivitis sicca appear to be a common ocular finding in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis children. Although only tear film break-up time and rose bengal staining score were significantly different in these groups, there was a trend toward worsening of the other dry eye tests in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis children.

  12. Teaching Nuclear Radiation and the Poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapp, David R.

    2008-03-01

    The recent international story about the death of the former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko has more than just a few wondering about radiation poisoning and the sinister sounding polonium-210. I was preparing to begin a nuclear radiation unit the Monday after Thanksgiving 2006. As it turned out, Litvinenko died Thanksgiving Day after a short and terrible three-week illness. Having the story continue to unfold throughout the next two weeks of the new unit provided a daily opportunity for students to see the relevance of what we were doing in class. My students were able to have meaningful and informed conversations with their peers and parents over an important international event. They even began to feel a bit like authorities themselves when listening to experts respond to media questions about polonium-210 and nuclear radiation in general. This paper discusses some of the ways that the story of Litvinenko was used while presenting the topic of nuclear radiation.

  13. Hypertextuality in the Alexander von Humboldt Digital Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Detlev Doherr

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available To do justice to the legacy of Alexander von Humboldt, a 19th century German scientist and explorer an information and knowledge management system is required to preserve the author's original intent and promote an awareness of all his relevant works. Although all of Humboldt's works can be found on the internet as digitized papers, the complexity and internal interconnectivity of the writings is not very transparent. Humboldt's concepts of interaction cannot be adequately represented only by digitized papers or scanned documents. The Humboldt Portal is an attempt to create a new generation of digital libraries, providing a new form of interaction and synthesis between humanistic texts and scientific observation. The digital version of his documents supplies dynamic links to sources, maps, images, graphs and relevant texts in accordance with his visions, because "everything is interconnectedness".

  14. Alexander von Humboldt's perceptions of colonial Spanish America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebok, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    This study presents an in-depth analysis of Alexander von Humboldt's descriptions and critical comments on the colonial society of the different regions he visited during his well-known expedition through the Americas (1799-1804). The criticisms of colonialism that he expressed, reflecting his personal convictions, have already been the focal point of many studies, but Humboldt also was able to offer a more differentiated assessment through comparisons of regional and local traditions and developments. This essay focuses on his personal diaries, which offer many interesting comments on colonial societies. These considerations and impressions made during the expedition are of particular scholarly value since they were not subject to censorship of any kind.

  15. Alexander the Great's tombolos at Tyre and Alexandria, eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriner, N.; Goiran, J. P.; Morhange, C.

    2008-08-01

    Tyre and Alexandria's coastlines are today characterised by wave-dominated tombolos, peculiar sand isthmuses that link former islands to the adjacent continent. Paradoxically, despite a long history of inquiry into spit and barrier formation, understanding of the dynamics and sedimentary history of tombolos over the Holocene timescale is poor. At Tyre and Alexandria we demonstrate that these rare coastal features are the heritage of a long history of natural morphodynamic forcing and human impacts. In 332 BC, following a protracted seven-month siege of the city, Alexander the Great's engineers cleverly exploited a shallow sublittoral sand bank to seize the island fortress; Tyre's causeway served as a prototype for Alexandria's Heptastadium built a few months later. We report stratigraphic and geomorphological data from the two sand spits, proposing a chronostratigraphic model of tombolo evolution.

  16. In Memoru of Alexander M. Poniatoff (1892 – 1980

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Samokhin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A brief overview of the life and works of the main achievements of Alexander M. Poniatoff is given. He was an outstanding engineer and founder of AMPEX – American company that won the world recognition in the field of magnetic recording of signals. The description of life AM Poniatowa in childhood and youth, his education in Russia and Germany, in the imperial service, and the "white" army, emigration and employment in the United States, including the establishment of the company AMPEX details and interesting facts from its progressive development into a global leader audio and video equipment. The AMPEX engineers created the world's first tape recorders and videotape recorders of professional quality, which contributed to the radical improvement of the radio and television broadcasting technologies. Twelve development AMPEX awarded prizes Emmy Awards, awarded by the American Academy of Television Arts & Sciences and the four recognized as the best in the category Monitor Awards International Society of television production.

  17. Alexander William Bickerton: New Zealand’s First Astrophysicist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Gerard F.

    Alexander Bickerton (1842-1929) is of interest to the student of New Zealand astronomical history in several ways. He was the first Professor at Canterbury University College, and had a significant effect on the early development of the University; he was a prominent and successful teacher, Ernest Rutherford being his most famous student; he was a social activist in Victorian Christchurch, eventually establishing a small commune; and he was the originator of the stellar collision theory of novae and other astronomical phenomena. This chapter, which is a slightly revised version of Gilmore (Southern Stars, 29, 87-108, 1982), provides a summary of Bickerton's life and theories, and a bibliography for further reading.

  18. [From gene to disease; mutations in the WFS1-gene as the cause of juvenile type I diabetes mellitus with optic atrophy (Wolfram syndrome)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, R.J.E.; Dikkeschei, L.D.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Ouweland, J.M.W. van den

    2002-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome patients are mainly characterised by juvenile onset diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. A synonym is the acronym DIDMOAD: diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness. Diabetes insipidus and sensorineural high-frequency hearing impairment are important additional

  19. Wheel running from a juvenile age delays onset of specific motor deficits but does not alter protein aggregate density in a mouse model of Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spires Tara L

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder predominantly affecting the cerebral cortex and striatum. Transgenic mice (R6/1 line, expressing a CAG repeat encoding an expanded polyglutamine tract in the N-terminus of the huntingtin protein, closely model HD. We have previously shown that environmental enrichment of these HD mice delays the onset of motor deficits. Furthermore, wheel running initiated in adulthood ameliorates the rear-paw clasping motor sign, but not an accelerating rotarod deficit. Results We have now examined the effects of enhanced physical activity via wheel running, commenced at a juvenile age (4 weeks, with respect to the onset of various behavioral deficits and their neuropathological correlates in R6/1 HD mice. HD mice housed post-weaning with running wheels only, to enhance voluntary physical exercise, have delayed onset of a motor co-ordination deficit on the static horizontal rod, as well as rear-paw clasping, although the accelerating rotarod deficit remains unaffected. Both wheel running and environmental enrichment rescued HD-induced abnormal habituation of locomotor activity and exploratory behavior in the open field. We have found that neither environment enrichment nor wheel running ameliorates the shrinkage of the striatum and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC in HD mice, nor the overall decrease in brain weight, measured at 9 months of age. At this age, the density of ubiquitinated protein aggregates in the striatum and ACC is also not significantly ameliorated by environmental enrichment or wheel running. Conclusion These results indicate that enhanced voluntary physical activity, commenced at an early presymptomatic stage, contributes to the positive effects of environmental enrichment. However, sensory and cognitive stimulation, as well as motor stimulation not associated with running, may constitute major components of the therapeutic benefits associated with enrichment

  20. Correlation between the Modified Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 and the European Consensus Lupus Activity Measurement in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, J O; Corrente, J E; Saad-Magalhães, C

    2016-11-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess Modified Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) and European Consensus Lupus Activity Measurement (ECLAM) disease activity correlation in addition to their respective correlation to Pediatric Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (SLICC/ACR) Damage Index (Ped-SDI), in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE). Methods The activity indices were scored retrospectively and summarized by adjusted means during follow-up. The Ped-SDI was scored during the last visit for those with more than six months follow-up. Pearson correlation between the Modified SLEDAI-2K and ECLAM, as well as Spearman correlations between the Modified SLEDAI-2K, ECLAM, and Ped-SDI were calculated. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was calculated for both activity indices discriminating damage measured by Ped-SDI. Results Thirty-seven patients with mean age at diagnosis 11 ± 2.9 years and mean follow-up time 3.2 ± 2.4 years were studied. The Modified SLEDAI-2K and ECLAM adjusted means were highly correlated ( r = 0.78, p  0.7, p < 0.001), but Modified SLEDAI-2K and ECLAM correlation with Ped-SDI was only moderate. ROC analysis discriminant performance for both activity indices resulted in area under curve (AUC) of 0.74 and 0.73 for Modified SLEDAI-2K and ECLAM, respectively. Conclusion The high correlation found between the Modified SLEDAI-2K and ECLAM adjusted means indicated that both tools can be equally useful for longitudinal estimates of JSLE activity.

  1. The modern mythology of the left-handedness of Alexander the Great.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, I C

    2006-11-01

    The prevalent modern suggestion that Alexander the Great was left-handed probably derives from Michael Barsley's (1966) book, Left-handed man is a right-handed word, perhaps by mutation from as earlier story cited by Wile in 1934 from a 17th century Rabbirical exegesis, which said that Alexander discovered a country where all the inhabitants were left-handed. That itself may derive in part from the medieval Hebrew Book of Jossippon, which mentions Alexander talking of the superiority of the left hand and of how "kings stemming from the tribe of kings are left-handed".

  2. Juvenile osteoarthritis as consequence of enchondral injuries.. Frostbite, Kashin-Beck disease, rat bites and other causes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oestreich, A.E.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose. To review the similarities of the radiographic changes in frostbite, the Asian disease of Kashin-Beck, and long term growth damage from injury such as rate bite. Materials and Methods. Radiographs and literature from subjects with these diagnoses were analyzed for the common features and differences. Included was an infant with hand changes 8 months after unwitnessed rat bites. Results. Each condition revealed findings consistent with the hypothesis of localized damage to sites of enchondral ossification, including at acrophyses - the growth plates that are not between epiphysis and metaphysis, but instead lie at the margins of growth centers, including carpal and tarsal bones, and the non-epiphyseal ends of small tubular bones. Discussion. The patterns observed support a final common pathway of damage in frostbite due to cold injury, Kashin-Beck disease (endemic in China) of unknown etiology, and damage from toxines associated, for example, with rat bite. In frostbite, the distribution is acral because of the site of exposure, while the distribution in Kashin-Beck is more diffuse and often less contiguous. In each condition, arthrotic sequelae may be expected in the natural course of follow-up. MRI may play a role in acute diagnosis that might modify the course of each disease. (orig.) [de

  3. Long term outcomes following achievement of clinically inactive disease in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: the importance of definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoop-Worrall, Stephanie Jw; Verstappen, Suzanne Mm; McDonagh, Janet E; Baildam, Eileen; Chieng, Alice; Davidson, Joyce; Foster, Helen; Ioannou, Yiannis; McErlane, Flora; Wedderburn, Lucy R; Thomson, W; Hyrich, Kimme L

    2018-04-12

    Potential targets for treat-to-target strategies in JIA are minimal disease activity (MDA) and clinically inactive disease (CID). Short and long-term outcomes following achievement of MDA and CID on the cJADAS10 and CID on Wallace's preliminary criteria were compared. Children recruited to the Childhood Arthritis Prospective Study, a UK multicentre inception cohort, were selected if recruited prior to January 2011 and diagnosed with oligoarthritis or rheumatoid factor negative or positive polyarthritis. At one year following diagnosis, children were assessed for MDA on the cJADAS10 and CID on both Wallace's preliminary criteria and the cJADAS10. Associations were tested between these disease states and i) functional ability, ii) absence of limited joints, iii) psychosocial health and v) pain at one year and annually to five years. Of 832 children, 70% were female and the majority had oligoarthritis (68%). At one year, 21% had achieved CID according to both definitions, 7% on Wallace's preliminary criteria only, 16% on cJADAS10 only and 56% on neither. Only 10% of children in the entire cohort achieved MDA without also having CID. Achieving either early CID state was associated with greater absence of limited joints. However, only CID on cJADAS10 was associated with improved functional ability and psychosocial health. Achieving CID was superior to MDA in terms of short and long-term pain and the absence of limited joints. CID on the cJADAS10 may be a preferable treatment target to CID on Wallace's preliminary criteria in terms of both feasibility of application and long-term outcomes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. La pasión de Alexander Crichton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusevich, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Alexander Crichton was born in Edinburgh in 1763; he graduated from Leyden University and travelled through Berlín, Paris, Stuttgart, Prague and Gotinga to perfect his knowledge in medicine while he establish a deep connection between the social media and the culture of those places. On 1798 he published An inquiry into the nature and origin of Mental Derangement, the only book he wrote dedicated to madness. In this paper we review some questions referred to the general method that the author applies, his contributions to the semiotics of the mind and to the analysis of the process of aging and the function of the attention; we also take a look to his conception of the world of passions and of madness, who influenced Philippe Pinel and Dominique Esquirol and also constitute a cornerstone in the birth of psychiatry.Alexander Crichton, nació en Edimburgo en 1763, se graduó en la Universidad de Leyden y completó su formación médica en Berlín, Paris, Stuttgart, Praga y Gotinga, vinculándose estrechamente con el ambiente social y cultural de esos prestigiosos centros europeos. En el año 1798 publicó An Inquiry into the nature and origin of Mental Derangement (Investigación sobre la naturaleza y el origen del trastorno mental, única obra de su autoría dedicada a la locura. En este artículo se analizan algunas cuestiones referidas al método general que aplica el autor para la concepción de su obra, sus contribuciones a la semiología de la mente, al análisis del proceso de envejecimiento y a la función de la atención, para detenernos, finalmente, en su conceptuación del mundo de las pasiones y de la locura que fueron retomadas por otros autores como Philippe Pinel y Dominique Esquirol, y que constituyeron un antecedente fundamental en el nacimiento de la psiquiatría.

  5. Ongoing disease activity and changing categories in a long-term nordic cohort study of juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordal, Ellen; Zak, Marek; Aalto, Kristiina

    2011-01-01

    ), including biologic medications, were used in 58.0% of the children during the observation period. Ongoing disease activity was mostly mild, but 22.9% developed some JIA-related damage. At the last follow-up, remission off medication was found in 42.4% of the children, 8.9% were in remission on medication...... results underline the need to identify early predictors of outcome, to further improve therapy and to continue long-term follow-up of children with JIA....

  6. Juvenile hyperthyroidism: an experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadada, S; Bhansali, A; Velayutham, P; Masoodi, S R

    2006-04-01

    To analyze the clinical profile of juvenile hyperthyroidism at presentation, their treatment outcome; predictors of remission and relapse. Retrospective analysis of medical records of 56 patients with juvenile hyperthyroidism seen over a period of 16 years. A cohort of 38 females and 18 males with mean (+/-SD) age of 14.9 +/- 3.4 years (range 3 to 18 years) was analyzed. Majority of patients was in the age group of 12-16 years. Common symptoms observed at presentation were weight loss (82.1%), excessive sweating (78.6%), heat intolerance (76.8%), increased appetite (73.2%) and diarrhea in 48.2%. In addition, accelerated linear growth was observed in 7.1% of patients. Goiter was present in 98.2% of children; 94.5% of which was diffuse and 4.8% was multinodular. The mean ((+/-SD) T3 was 4.8 +/- 3.4 ng/mL (N, 0.6-1.6), T4 was 218 +/- 98 ng/mL (N, 60-155) and TSH was 0.44 +/- 0.36 (N, 0.5-5.5 microIU/mL). TMA positivity seen in 36.9% of patients. All patients were treated with carbimazole; subsequently 4 patients required thyroidectomy and one required radioactive iodine ablation. Mean (+/-SD) duration of follow-up in our patients was 4.9 +/- 3 years, ranging between 1.6 to 16 years and mean (+/-SD) duration of treatment was 34.4 +/- 22.6 months (range 12 to 120 months). Mean (+/-SD) duration to achieve euthyroidism was 5.2 +/- 4.7 months, ranging between 1-33 months. On intention to treat analysis, remission with carbimazole was achieved in 47.6%, remaining patients failed to achieve remission with drug treatment. Graves disease is the commonest cause of juvenile hyperthyroidism. Carbimazole is safe, effective, cheap, and easily available form of therapy. It is occasionally associated with serious side effects but requires prolonged follow up.

  7. A Russian Man on Horseback: The Rise of General Alexander Lebed

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Malley, Kevin

    1997-01-01

    General Alexander Lebed burst upon the Russian political scene like a man on horseback, promising to restore order out of chaos, crack down on crime and corruption, and resurrect Russian nationalism...

  8. The Berlin tradition in Chicago: Franz Alexander and the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Erika S

    2010-01-01

    Freud considered Franz Alexander, the first graduate of the Berlin Psychoanalytic Institute and an assistant in the Berlin Polyclinic, to be "one of our strongest hopes for the future." Alexander went on to become the first director of the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis in 1932 and modeled some of the Chicago Institute's mission on his Berlin experiences. He was also a researcher in psychosomatic medicine, a prolific writer about psychoanalysis and prominent in psychoanalytic organizations. As he proposed modifications in psychoanalytic technique, he became a controversial figure, especially in the elaboration of his ideas about brief therapy and the corrective emotional experience. This paper puts Alexander's achievements in historical context, draws connections between the Berlin and Chicago Institutes and suggests that, despite his quarrels with traditional psychoanalysis, Alexander's legacy may be in his attitude towards psychoanalysis, characterized by a commitment to scientific study, a willingness to experiment, and a conviction about the role of psychoanalysis within the larger culture.

  9. Siim Nestor soovitab : Ben Frost ja Alexander Robotnik Eclectical / Siim Nestor

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nestor, Siim, 1974-

    2007-01-01

    Austraalia muusik ja helilooja Ben Frost projektiga "6 guitars" esinemas festivali Eclectica raames 6. sept. Tartu klubis Rock ja Roll ja itaalia diskor Alexander Robotnik 7. sept. klubis Trehv, esinejatest

  10. Alexander von Humboldt und die transnationale Wissenschaftskommunikation im 19. Jahrhundert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Päßler

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Article in german, abstracts in english and frenchAlexander von Humboldt has been labelled a “scientific cosmopolitan”. Through his vast correspondence and a network of personal contacts, he upheld a form of scientific exchange that was characteristic of the eighteenth-century “republic of letters”.This article examines how Humboldt adapted this cosmopolitan tradition of communication to a nineteenth century scientific culture that was largely institutionalized and was becoming increasingly nationalized. Humboldt quite successfully fostered scientific exchange between Berlin and Paris after 1830 and, on various occasions between the 1830s and 1850s, readily advocated international large-scale projects. These examples demonstrate that Humboldt observed the development of nationally defined scientific cultures and the opening of the sciences towards the public realm. Moreover, they indicate how he was able to make use of these developments as he promoted the sciences in Prussia. In scientific controversies within the Parisian scientific community, Humboldt was involuntarily assigned the role of a “neutral” foreign arbitrator. Thus, the development of nineteenth century sciences also jeopardized Humboldt’s unique position as an independent “homme des lettres”.

  11. Сharitable activities of Alexander Andreevich Zhelobovskiy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhukova Lekkha

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to charitable works of Alexander Andreevich Zhelobovskiy, and his participation in various charitable General communities. He was the first Russian protopresbyter of the military clergy and did much to shape the staff of experienced and knowledgeable priests who actively worked not only to ensure religious worship in the army, but also for the Patriotic upbringing of soldiers. In these purposes and based on personal beliefs, Zhelobovskiy set up several scholarships for talented students studying in the Theological Academies. In addition, Zhelobovskiy made a great contribution to provision of pensions little-haves elderly priests, as well as to their widows and orphans. To help the poor, by Zhelobovskiy’s own money was built candle factory, profit from which amounted to “orphan’s capital”. The scope of the paper includes the activities of the first Russian protopresbyter of the military clergy on the planting and construction of military and regimental churches in various cities. Until 1901 military churches were required to actively participate in the search of philanthropists. One of the themes of this article is the charity organization and own philanthropy activities Zhelobovskiy during the Russo-Japanese war. Special attention is paid to the contribution of Zhelobovskiy in the case of charity on his «small Motherland». Where Zhelobovskiy not only built the temple, but also established the hospice and also did much to Belozersky spiritual school.

  12. Juvenile plantar dermatosis: A barrier disease beyond eczema: An open prospective uncontrolled study in a tertiary care hospital of South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Kishan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Juvenile plantar dermatosis (JPD, also known as “wet and dry foot syndrome,” is a skin disorder of the feet that commonly affects children from ages 3–14. JPD is frequently seen in children with eczema, but it is not a requirement for diagnosis. Forefoot eczema (FE is synonymous with JPD is a condition characterized by dry fissured dermatitis of the plantar surface of the feet. Aims: To study the clinical patterns of FE and its associated risk factors. Methods: Twenty-five patients were recorded in the study during the period from April 2013 to March 2014. Fungal scrapings, patch testing, and biopsy for histopathological examination were done wherever required. Results: In our study, the most common site affected was the plantar surface of the toes in 8 (32% patients. Hand involvement, with fissuring and soreness of the fingertips and palm, was seen in two patients (8%. Four patients (16% had a personal history of atopy whereas a family history of atopy was present in 3 (12%. Nine patients (36% had associated risk factors with reported aggravation of itching with plastic, rubber, or leather footwear, and with prolonged contact with water and detergents. Negative fungal scrapings and culture in all patients ruled out a dermatophyte infection. Patch testing with Indian Standard Series was performed in all patients and was positive in three. Conclusions: This study concluded FE as a distinctive dermatosis of the first and second decade, predominantly in males, with a multifactorial etiology and confirming the concept of FE as a barrier disease beyond eczema.

  13. Variants in TNFAIP3, STAT4 and c12orf30 loci associated with multiple auto-immune diseases are also associated with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahalad, Sampath; Hansen, Sterling; Whiting, April; Guthery, Stephen L.; Clifford, Bronte; McNally, Bernadette; Zeft, Andrew S.; Bohnsack, John F.; Jorde, Lynn B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Subtypes of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) share phenotypic features with other autoimmune disorders. We investigated several genetic variants associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune disorders for association with JIA, to test the hypothesis that clinically distinct phenotypes share common genetic susceptibility factors. Methods Cases were 445 children with JIA, and controls were 643 healthy adults. Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 7 loci [TNFAIP3 (rs10499194 and rs6920220), RSBN1 (rs6679677), C12ORF30 (rs17696736), TRAF1 (rs3761847), IL2RA (rs2104286), PTPN2 (rs2542151), and STAT4 (rs7574865)] were genotyped by the TaqMan assay. Alleles and genotypes were analyzed for association with JIA and JIA subtypes. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. Results The strongest associations were observed for TNFAIP3 variants rs10499194 (OR: 0.74 (0.61-0.91); p <0.004), and TNFAIP3 rs6920220 (OR: 1.3 (1.05-1.61); p <0.02). We also observed associations between JIA and STAT4 (OR: 1.24 (1.02-1.51); p <0.03) and C12ORF30 (OR: 1.2 (1.01-1.43); p <0.04) variants. The PTPN2 variant rs2542151 deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and was excluded from analyses. Variants in IL2RA, TRAF1, and RSBN1 were not associated with JIA. After stratification by JIA subtype, TNFAIP3 and C12ORF30 variants were associated with oligoarticular JIA, while the STAT4 variant was associated primarily with polyarticular JIA. Conclusions We have demonstrated associations between JIA and variants in TNFAIP3, STAT4 and C12ORF30 regions that have previously shown associations with other autoimmune diseases, including RA and systemic lupus erythematosus. Our results suggest that clinically distinct autoimmune phenotypes share common genetic susceptibility factors. PMID:19565500

  14. Risk of Serious Infection in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients Associated With Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors and Disease Activity in the German Biologics in Pediatric Rheumatology Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Ingrid; Horneff, Gerd

    2017-04-01

    To examine the effects of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors on the risk for serious infections and other influencing factors in a registry. Patients exposed for the first time to etanercept, adalimumab, or methotrexate and serious infections were identified in the German Biologic Registry for Pediatric Rheumatology (BIKER) registry. Serious infection rates per 1,000 observation-years and relative risks were calculated. Cox regression identified risk factors and provided hazard ratios (HRs) for occurrence of infections. A total of 3,350 patients with 5,919 observation-years fulfilled the inclusion criteria for the study. The first biologic agents were etanercept (1,720 cases) and adalimumab (177 cases). A total of 1,453 patients were treated with methotrexate and no biologic agent. In total, 28 serious infections were reported in 26 patients (4.7 per 1,000 patient-years), 5 with methotrexate (1.6 per 1,000 patient-years), 21 with etanercept (8.1 per 1,000 patient-years), and 2 with adalimumab (9.7 per 1,000 patient-years). Significant univariate risk factors for infection were therapy with biologic agents, disease duration before therapy start, corticosteroid medication, nonbiologic premedications, higher clinical Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score including maximal 10 joints (cJADAS10) at therapy start, and higher mean cJADAS10 during therapy. In multivariate Cox regression, only biologic therapy and cJADAS10 at therapy start remained significant. Risk for infection was increased by etanercept (univariate HR 6.0 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 2.0-17.5]) or adalimumab (HR 7.3 [95% CI 1.3-40.0]) compared to methotrexate as well as by an elevated cJADAS10 at therapy start (HR 1.1 [95% CI 1.0-1.2] per unit increase). The total rate of serious infections reported in the BIKER registry seems low. Treatment with etanercept or adalimumab increases the risk for serious infection slightly, compared to methotrexate. Disease activity expressed by cJADAS10 appears to

  15. Retrocalcaneal bursitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldenstein-Schainberg, C; Homsi, C; Rodrigues Pereira, R M; Cossermelli, W

    1992-01-01

    Retrocalcaneal bursitis has been described in various adult rheumatic diseases and septic bursitis unrelated to previous bursal disease has been reported in children. The case is reported here of a girl with juvenile chronic arthritis who developed non-septic retrocalcaneal bursitis; the diagnosis was suggested by a combination of clinical and radiographic studies and was confirmed by ultrasonography.

  16. Retrocalcaneal bursitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenstein-Schainberg, C; Homsi, C; Rodrigues Pereira, R M; Cossermelli, W

    1992-01-01

    Retrocalcaneal bursitis has been described in various adult rheumatic diseases and septic bursitis unrelated to previous bursal disease has been reported in children. The case is reported here of a girl with juvenile chronic arthritis who developed non-septic retrocalcaneal bursitis; the diagnosis was suggested by a combination of clinical and radiographic studies and was confirmed by ultrasonography. Images PMID:1444631

  17. The Diversity of Juvenile Sarcoidosis Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Vougiouka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of juvenile sarcoidosis, emphasizing the variety of clinical manifestations. The child had uveitis, which is among the most common manifestations of the disease. However, fever of unknown origin, glomerulonephritis and lymphadenopathy were also noticed, underscoring the diversity of the clinical spectrum of the disease.

  18. THE BISHOP OF NOLINSK ALEXANDER (MALININ: FOGOTTEN CONFESSOR OF THE FAITH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. KOSTRYUKOV

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article describes life of Vyatka diocese vicar bishop of Nolinsk Alexander (Malinin. Currently fates of hierarch who was ordained in 1920–1930 isn’t investigated. One of the problems in biography of bishop Alexander is mistake of Metropolitan Elevfery (Bogoyavlensky. He called this hierarch John in his book “A week in Patriarhiya”. As a result, bishop Alexander was mentioned twice in all directories — under his own name and under name “bishop John of Glazov”. Life of bishop Alexander was almost unknown. But his biography was managed to establish. According to an investigative case he was arrested two weeks later, after bishop’s ordination in the night from 10-th to 11-th of December. He was arrested because he said reckless statement during his ordination. In his speech he spoke about persecution of the Church and bishop’ arrests. This speech was pronounced in the in the presence of foreign hierarch — Elevfery (Bogoyavlensky. Bishop Alexander was blamed of trying to transmit information abroad about persecution of the Orthodox Church. He was senteneed to three years in camps. He died when he arrived of the place. In the article is concluded that we should approach to source (such as “A week in Patriarhiya” with precautions. Moreover, author pay attention that until recently name of bishop Alexander absented in passionless of casualties of Communist repressions. So, we must explore feats of Martyrs and Russian confessors more actively.

  19. Immunological responses and disease resistance of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) juveniles following dietary administration of stinging nettle (Urtica dioica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidi Asl, Mohammad Reza; Adel, Milad; Caipang, Christopher Marlowe A; Dawood, Mahmoud A O

    2017-12-01

    The present study investigated the effects of dietary supplementation of stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) on growth performance, skin mucus, immune response and disease resistance of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed with diets supplemented with U. dioica at 0, 1, 2 and 3%. After 8 weeks of feeding, the addition of U. dioica at 3% level resulted in improved weight gain, specific growth rate and feed conversion ratio significantly when compared to the other groups (P nettle when measured after 4 weeks; while, total red blood cells, white blood, Htc, Hb, lymphocyte and neutrophil populations significantly increased after 8 weeks in the same group (P nettle at 3% when compared to the other groups after 8 weeks; however, triglycerides decreased significantly in the same group on the 4th and 8th week (P nettle supplementation exhibited improved antagonistic activities against several bacterial pathogens (Streptococcus iniae, Yersinia ruckeri, Vibrio anguillarum and Lactococcus garviae), skin mucus enzymes activities (alkaline phosphatase, lysozyme, protease and esterase) and protein levels in 2 and 3% groups with the highest being in case of 3% group when compared to the other groups (P nettle. The present findings demonstrated that dietary administration of U. dioica enhanced growth and stimulated fish immunity; thus, enabling the fish to be more resistant against bacterial infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Juvenile Confinement in Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendel, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    For more than a century, the predominant strategy for the treatment and punishment of serious and sometimes not-so-serious juvenile offenders in the United States has been placement into large juvenile corrections institutions, alternatively known as training schools, reformatories, or youth corrections centers. America's heavy reliance on…

  1. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul Yagnik

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Fibroadenomas are benign solid tumor associated with aberration of normal lobular development. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma is usually single and >5 cm in size /or >500 gms in weight. Important differential diagnoses are: phyllodes tumor and juvenile gigantomastia. Simple excision is the treatment of choice.

  2. Skeletal and muscular status in juveniles with GFD treated clinical and newly diagnosed atypical celiac disease--preliminary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płudowski, Paweł; Karczmarewicz, Elzbieta; Socha, Jerzy; Matusik, Halina; Syczewska, Małgorzata; Lorenc, Roman S

    2007-01-01

    Undiagnosed and untreated celiac disease (CD) constitutes an increasing skeletal health problem due to its association with low bone density and fractures. Examinations of skeletal status in children using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) are prone to size-related misinterpretation. In contrary, the analysis of muscle-bone relationship seems to limit a possibility of misdiagnosis because skeletal status is evaluated from the functional perspective. The study was aimed to assess skeletal status of children suffering from CD with the use of muscle-bone functional algorithm. The study group comprised 29 celiac patients (13.7yr+/-2.9) on gluten-free diet (GFD), and 24 newly diagnosed atypical celiac patients, including subgroup with normal height (n=14; 12.6yr+/-3.9) and subgroup with short stature (n=10; 12.2yr+/-2.9). Muscular and skeletal status was evaluated by DXA (DPX-L, GE). Anthropometry, total body bone mineral density (TBBMD, g/cm(2)). and total body bone mineral content (TBBMC, g) as well as lean body mass (LBM, g) were evaluated. Muscle-bone interactions were estimated using TBBMC/LBM ratio. Previously established references for healthy controls were used for the calculation of Z-scores (age-matched) and SD-scores (height-matched). GFD treated celiacs and atypical celiacs with normal body height had TBBMD, TBBMC, LBM, and TBBMC/LBM ratio Z-scores and SD-scores within normal range for healthy controls. In contrary, atypical celiacs with short stature had significantly lower Z-scores for TBBMD (-2.3+/-0.4), TBBMC (-2.1+/-0.3), LBM (-1.4+/-0.3). and TBBMC/LBM ratio (-2.3+/-0.6) when compared to respective values observed in GFD treated celiacs (pnormal height (pvalues observed in GFD treated celiacs (+0.04+/-0.2; pnormal height (-0.4+/-0.2; pvalues of DXA assessed indicators of bone and muscle status as well as normal muscle-bone interactions. Untreated atypical celiacs may present a broad spectrum of heterogeneous abnormalities from normal to markedly

  3. Alexander fractional differential window filter for ECG denoising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Atul Kumar; Saini, Indu; Saini, Barjinder Singh

    2018-06-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) non-invasively monitors the electrical activities of the heart. During the process of recording and transmission, ECG signals are often corrupted by various types of noises. Minimizations of these noises facilitate accurate detection of various anomalies. In the present paper, Alexander fractional differential window (AFDW) filter is proposed for ECG signal denoising. The designed filter is based on the concept of generalized Alexander polynomial and the R-L differential equation of fractional calculus. This concept is utilized to formulate a window that acts as a forward filter. Thereafter, the backward filter is constructed by reversing the coefficients of the forward filter. The proposed AFDW filter is then obtained by averaging of the forward and backward filter coefficients. The performance of the designed AFDW filter is validated by adding the various type of noise to the original ECG signal obtained from MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. The two non-diagnostic measure, i.e., SNR, MSE, and one diagnostic measure, i.e., wavelet energy based diagnostic distortion (WEDD) have been employed for the quantitative evaluation of the designed filter. Extensive experimentations on all the 48-records of MIT-BIH arrhythmia database resulted in average SNR of 22.014 ± 3.806365, 14.703 ± 3.790275, 13.3183 ± 3.748230; average MSE of 0.001458 ± 0.00028, 0.0078 ± 0.000319, 0.01061 ± 0.000472; and average WEDD value of 0.020169 ± 0.01306, 0.1207 ± 0.061272, 0.1432 ± 0.073588, for ECG signal contaminated by the power line, random, and the white Gaussian noise respectively. A new metric named as morphological power preservation measure (MPPM) is also proposed that account for the power preservance (as indicated by PSD plots) and the QRS morphology. The proposed AFDW filter retained much of the original (clean) signal power without any significant morphological distortion as validated by MPPM measure that were 0

  4. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naz, S.; Mushtaq, A.; Bari, A.; Maqsud, A.; Khan, M. Z.; Ahmad, T. M.; Saira Rehman

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the spectrum of clinical presentation, laboratory parameters and drug therapy in patients with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA). Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: The Children's Hospital and The Institute of Child Health, Lahore, from October 2008 to October 2011. Methodology: All patients who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for JRA were enrolled. Their clinical features, investigations done and treatment received for JRA were noted. Statistical analysis of data was done on SPSS version 16.0 for obtaining descriptive statistics. Results: Out of 185 patients, 50.3% (n = 93) were females; 54% (n = 100) were between 10 - 15 years of age. Polyarthritis was found in 71.9% (n = 133) followed by oligoarthritis (22.7%, n = 42) and systemic onset disease (5.4%, n = 10). Morning stiffness (78%) and fever (68%) were the most common clinical presentations. All patients with systemic onset disease had fever (n = 10) followed by skin rash, hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy. Uveitis was found in 2 patients, and both belonged to the oligoarticular group. Rheumatoid factor was found in 10.27% (n = 19) of all patients. All patients were given non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Disease modifying agents (methotrexate) were given to 43.8% (n = 81). Steroids were used in 61% (n = 113) of patients either with NSAIDs alone or NSAIDs plus methotrexate. Conclusion: Disease profile of JRA at the study centre showed that polyarthritis is the commonest type. Recognition of subtypes will help in planning the management of these patients. (author)

  5. Juvenile Dermatomyositis in a Nigerian Girl: a Case Report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Juvenile Dermatomyositis in a Nigerian Girl: a Case Report. MG Mustapha, MG Ashir, AA Mayun, Y Machoco, AB Ibrahim. Abstract. A case of Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) in a 10 year old Nigerian girl is herein reported to discuss some of the features of the disease and challenges in management of such a rare but ...

  6. Increased dynamic regulation of postural tone through Alexander Technique training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciatore, T W; Gurfinkel, V S; Horak, F B; Cordo, P J; Ames, K E

    2011-02-01

    Gurfinkel and colleagues (2006) recently found that healthy adults dynamically modulate postural muscle tone in the body axis during anti-gravity postural maintenance and that this modulation is inversely correlated with axial stiffness. Our objective in the present study was to investigate whether dynamic modulation of axial postural tone can change through training. We examined whether teachers of the Alexander Technique (AT), who undergo "long-term" (3-year) training, have greater modulation of axial postural tone than matched control subjects. In addition, we performed a longitudinal study on the effect of "short-term" (10-week) AT training on the axial postural tone of individuals with low back pain (LBP), since short term AT training has previously been shown to reduce LBP. Axial postural tone was quantified by measuring the resistance of the neck, trunk and hips to small (±10°), slow (1°/s) torsional rotation during stance. Modulation of tone was determined by the torsional resistance to rotation (peak-to-peak, phase-advance, and variability of torque) and axial muscle activity (EMG). Peak-to-peak torque was lower (∼50%), while phase-advance and cycle-to-cycle variability were enhanced for AT teachers compared to matched control subjects at all levels of the axis. In addition, LBP subjects decreased trunk and hip stiffness following short-term AT training compared to a control intervention. While changes in static levels of postural tone may have contributed to the reduced stiffness observed with the AT, our results suggest that dynamic modulation of postural tone can be enhanced through long-term training in the AT, which may constitute an important direction for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Severe glomerular disease in juvenile grey snapper Lutjanus griseus L. in the Gulf of Mexico caused by the myxozoan Sphaerospora motemarini n. sp

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holzer, Astrid S.; Pecková, Hana; Patra, Sneha; Brennan, N.P.; Yanes-Roca, C.; Main, K.L.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2, - (2013), s. 124-130 ISSN 2213-2244 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M200961250 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Mangrove snapper * Fisheries * Juvenile pathology * Glomerulonephritis * Mortality * Myxozoa Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology

  8. [Localized eruptive juvenile xanthogranuloma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanotti, S; Chiaverini, C; Rostain, G; Cardot-Leccia, N; Lacour, J-P

    2014-03-01

    Juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG) is a non-Langerhans histiocytosis of young children characterized by solitary or multiple yellowish cutaneous nodules. Atypical skin lesions such as lichenoid eruptions, and pedunculated, maculopapular, plaque-like or linear lesions have been described. We report a case of eruptive XGJ en plaque in the left leg in an infant. A 13-month-old child presented asymptomatic eruptive, yellowish papules of the leg measuring 5 to 10mm since the age of 2months. There was no cutaneous infiltration between the lesions. Darier's sign was negative. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of JXG. The course of the disease comprised a gradual decrease in the number of active lesions with slight residual pigmentation. Our case was suggestive of JXG en plaque. Only 7 cases have been reported in the literature, all appearing before the age of 5months. The lesions corresponded mostly to an asymptomatic erythematous plaque studded with small yellowish/red nodules of variable localisation. Spontaneous involvement was noted in all cases. No systemic involvement was found. Herein we present a unique case of localised multiple JXG without evident clinical infiltrating plaque progressing with self-resolving flares. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I N Sartika

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA is the most common rheumatic condition in children. JRA is defined as persistent arthritis in 1 or more joints for at least 6 weeks, with the onset before age 16 years. The etiology of JRA is unknown. Antigen activated CD4+ T cell stimulate monocytes, macrophages, and synovial fibroblasts to produce the cytokines Interleukin-1 (IL-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-? and to secrete matrix metalloproteinases, which lead to chronic inflammation due to infiltration of inflammatory cell, angiogenesis, destruction of cartilage and bone with pannus formation. The 3 major subtypes of JRA are based on the symptoms at disease onset and are designated systemic onset, pauciarticular onset, and polyarticular onset. For all patients, the goals of therapy are to decrease chronic joint pain and suppress the inflammatory process. Poor prognostic have been observed in patients with polyarticular onset, rheumatoid factor, persistent morning stiffness, tenosynovitis, involvement of the small joints, rapid appearance of erosions, active late onset childhood, subcutaneous nodules, or antinuclear antibody.

  10. Obituary: Alexander (Andy) Franz Lubenow, 1956-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buie, Marc William

    2006-12-01

    Alexander (Andy) Franz Lubenow, Program Coordinator at the Space Telescope Science Institute, was diagnosed with cancer of the gallbladder, pancreas, and liver in May 2005 and died on 29 September 2005. He was forty-nine. Andy was born to Bodo and Helen Lubenow in St. Paul, Minnesota on 4 January 1956. In 1964 at the age of eight, he moved with his family to Buenos Aires, Argentina, and attended the American Community School there until returning with his family in 1973 to St. Paul. Argentina had a big impact on Andy's future as an astronomer. He later recalled how he had observed and was puzzled by the "upside-down" appearance of the Moon in the southern hemisphere. In Argentina, he built his first telescope using a mirror he had ground himself. He never parted ways with that instrument. Andy did not follow a standard educational track. He spent two years at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota, before transferring to the University of Minnesota, where he earned his bachelor's degree and began work towards a master's degree in astrophysics. Later he transferred to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he remained until Dr. Peter Stockman hired him to work on the Hubble Space Telescope project. While in school, he worked as a teacher's assistant, taught night school, and gave demonstrations of stargazing. He was an excellent teacher and had a flair for writing. He later wrote articles for a sailing magazine and a pilot's magazine. Andy was a very practical, meticulous, and steady worker, attributes that he combined with an understated and dry sense of humor. He was always able to find a way through a problem, no matter how sticky. If a job required him to roll up his sleeves and get it done through hard work, he would persevere. Nevertheless, he was always on the lookout for an easier way. He had no patience for being forced to deal with stupid things for stupid reasons. At work at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), Andy was

  11. Juvenil idiopatisk arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlin, Troels

    2002-01-01

    The new classification of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is described in this review. Clinical characteristics divide JIA in to subtypes: systemic, oligoarticular (persistent and extended type), RF-positive and--negative polyarticular, enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic arthritis...

  12. Juvenile Rockfish Recruitment Cruise

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 1983, the groundfish analysis project began a series of yearly cruises designed to assess the annual abundance of juvenile rockfish along the central California...

  13. Juvenile Justice in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Frías Armenta

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The first tribunal in Mexico was established in the central state of San Luis Potosi in 1926. The Law Regarding Social Prevention and Juvenile Delinquency for the Federal District and Mexican territories was promulgated in 1928. In 2005, Article 18 of the Mexican Constitution was modified to establish a comprehensive system (“Sistema Integral de justicia” in Spanish of justice for juveniles between 12 and 18 years old who had committed a crime punishable under criminal law. Its objective was to guarantee juveniles all the due process rights established for adults, in addition to the special ones recognized for minors. The constitutional reform also provides a framework that includes special tribunals as well as alternative justice options for juveniles. With these reforms, institutionalization of minors was to be considered an extreme measure applicable only to felonies and to juveniles older than 14. In 2006, all states within the Mexican federation enacted the “Law of justice for adolescents”. This system, at both the federal and state levels, formalizes a new global paradigm with regard to the triangular relationship between children, the State and the Law. It recognizes that children are also bearers of the inherent human rights recognized for all individuals, instead of simply objects in need of protection. However, despite formally aligning Mexican juvenile justice law with the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC, issues of actual substantive rights remained and new ones have appeared. For example, juveniles younger than 14 who have not committed a felony are released from institutions without any rehabilitation or treatment options, and alternative forms of justice were included without evaluating their possibilities of application or their conditions for success. In addition, the economic status of most juvenile detainees continues to be one of the most important determining factors in the administration of justice

  14. Juvenile polyposis syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiao, Yi-Han; Wei, Chin-Hung; Chang, Szu-Wen; Chang, Lung; Fu, Yu-Wei; Lee, Hung-Chang; Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Yeung, Chun-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Juvenile polyposis syndrome, a rare disorder in children, is characterized with multiple hamartomatous polyps in alimentary tract. A variety of manifestations include bleeding, intussusception, or polyp prolapse. In this study, we present an 8-month-old male infant of juvenile polyposis syndrome initially presenting with chronic anemia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the youngest case reported in the literature. Methods: We report a rare case of an 8-month-old male...

  15. Parenting and juvenile delinquency

    OpenAIRE

    Hoeve, M.

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile delinquency is a noteworthy problem. This thesis addressed the association between parenting and juvenile delinquency by analyzing the concepts of parenting adopted in family research in relation to criminological concepts and measures of delinquent behavior. Four studies were conducted. The first study addressed a meta-analysis on parenting characteristics and styles in relation to delinquency. In this meta-analysis, previous manuscripts were systematically analyzed, computing mean ...

  16. Occurrence of black-spot disease caused by metacercariae of Posthodiplostomum cuticola among juvenile fishes in water bodies in the Morava River basin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondračková, Markéta; Bartošová, Šárka; Valová, Zdenka; Jurajda, Pavel; Gelnar, M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 3 (2004), s. 222-227 ISSN 1230-2821 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/02/0924 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6093917 Keywords : Digenea * juvenile fish * host susceptibility Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.560, year: 2004 http://www.actaparasitologica.pan.pl/archive/49/toc49130.html

  17. IN MEMORIAM: In Memoriam: Alexander A Golovin and Alexei M Oparin In Memoriam: Alexander A Golovin and Alexei M Oparin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    In Memoriam of Alexander A Golovin (1962-2008) Alexander (Sasha) Golovin passed away on 10 September 2008. Sasha's scientific heritage includes seminal works in different fields of physics, from Marangoni convection to self-assembly of quantum dots, and from combustion fronts to anomalous diffusion in flows and on a crystal surface. A graduate of the Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology, he had very broad scientific interests and a unique ability to identify and solve new, intellectually challenging and technologically important problems. One of the basic fields of Sasha's research was the fluid dynamics in systems with interfaces. His favorite subject was the motion of droplets, bubbles and particles in the presence of heat and mass transfer. Sasha's early works contained the discovery of the spontaneous motion of droplets due to the Marangoni effect and the investigation of the interaction between solid particles, bubbles and droplets caused by the Marangoni effect, which is a crucial factor that determines the effect of heat/mass transfer on the rate of coalescence. In both cases, Sasha's work was the first in a long sequence of papers written by different authors. Later, Sasha returned to that field when studying such fascinating subjects as levitation of droplets above the surface of an evaporating liquid and encapsulation of particles and bubbles by an advancing solidification front. The subject of interfacial hydrodynamics overlaps with another basic field of Sasha's research, the theory of pattern formation. The contribution of Sasha's work to the modern understanding of the variety of pattern formation phenomena is significant. It includes the analysis of the interaction between long-wave and short-wave instability modes in Marangoni convection, investigation of the large-scale Marangoni convection that led to the prediction of different patterns including quasipatterns, and the description of various non-potential effects in Marangoni convection

  18. [Physiotherapy for juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spamer, M; Georgi, M; Häfner, R; Händel, H; König, M; Haas, J-P

    2012-07-01

    Control of disease activity and recovery of function are major issues in the treatment of children and adolescents suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Functional therapies including physiotherapy are important components in the multidisciplinary teamwork and each phase of the disease requires different strategies. While in the active phase of the disease pain alleviation is the main focus, the inactive phase requires strategies for improving motility and function. During remission the aim is to regain general fitness by sports activities. These phase adapted strategies must be individually designed and usually require a combination of different measures including physiotherapy, occupational therapy, massage as well as other physical procedures and sport therapy. There are only few controlled studies investigating the effectiveness of physical therapies in JIA and many strategies are derived from long-standing experience. New results from physiology and sport sciences have contributed to the development in recent years. This report summarizes the basics and main strategies of physical therapy in JIA.

  19. Acute Respiratory Failure in 3 Children With Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Britt; Hellebostad, Marit; Ifversen, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is a rare hematopoietic stem cell disease in children with features of both myelodysplasia and myeloproliferation. Extramedullary involvement has been reported and pulmonary involvement secondary to leukemic infiltration is an initial manifestation, which may result...

  20. Zwei Briefe auf Guaraní in Alexander von Humboldts Handschrift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Ringmacher

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gegenstand des Aufsatzes von Manfred Ringmacher sind zwei Briefe auf Guaraní in Alexander von Humboldts Handschrift. Die Originale der Abschriften wurden im Jahr 1800 in der ehemals jesuitisch betreuten Indianersiedlung Santa María la Mayor am Río Uruguay geschrieben und an den Vizekönig des spanischen Vizekönigreichs La Plata gesandt. Sie sind mit einer zeitgenössischen spanischen Übersetzung versehen; außerdem hat Alexander von Humboldt in französischer Sprache noch einige Erläuterungen gegeben.

  1. Juvenile xanthogranuloma of the corneoscleral limbus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanoff, M; Perry, H D

    1995-07-01

    Juvenile xanthogranuloma is a rare and usually benign skin disease of unknown cause that occurs in infants and young children. We studied a case of juvenile xanthogranuloma of the corneoscleral limbus in a 17-year-old black boy, who presented with a 5-month history of a lump in the right eye. The lesion extended from the superior limbus, fanning out as it proceeded posteriorly for 6 mm with a width of 9 mm and a height of 2 to 3 mm. This yellow-orange mass was vascular and firmly fixed to the underlying tissue. The lesion was diagnosed as a dermoid and observed for 7 months without documented growth before an uneventful excisional biopsy was performed. The pathologic diagnosis showed the characteristic picture of juvenile xanthogranuloma with numerous Touton giant cells. Lipid stains provided further confirmation.

  2. Tartu ülikooli Vene ajaloo professor Alexander Brückner (1834-1896) / Tiit Rosenberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rosenberg, Tiit, 1946-

    2004-01-01

    Alexander Brückneri elust, vaadetest, loomingust ja perekonnast. Alexander Brücknerist kui Õpetatud Eesti Seltsi liikmest. Tartu Ülikooli vene ajaloo õppejõududest. Lühidalt Tartust pärit vene ajaloo uurijast Ernst Adolf Herrmannist

  3. Antibodies in juvenile-onset myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansley, Sarah L

    2016-11-01

    Juvenile-onset myositis is a highly heterogeneous disease. Myositis-specific and associated autoantibodies provide a potential means of subdividing patients into clinically homogenous subgroups. Given the increasing availability of autoantibody testing, this review explores the phenotypes associated with different autoantibodies in juvenile-onset myositis and the potential clinical utility of autoantibody testing. Autoantibodies can be identified in 60-70% of children with myositis and the recent discovery of novel myositis-associated autoantibodies in adult patients suggests this may increase in the near future. Detailed phenotype descriptions are now known for several autoantibodies commonly identified in juvenile-onset disease. Whilst there is insufficient evidence to recommend a differential treatment approach based on autoantibody status, it is becoming increasingly clear that some autoantibody subgroups are often treatment resistant and may benefit from a more aggressive approach. The validation of nonspecialised methods for myositis-specific autoantibody detection should lead to more widely available testing. In juvenile-onset disease, this will provide detailed prognostic information and in the future may also influence approach.

  4. Atherosclerosis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jednacz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries. Clinical consequences of the atherosclerotic process occur in the adult population, however atherosclerotic process begins in childhood. The classic risk factors for atherosclerosis include obesity, dyslipidaemia, age, gender or family history. In recent years, attention has been drawn to the similarity between atherosclerotic inflammatory processes and inflammatory changes in the course of systemic connective tissue disease, in particular systemic lupus etythematosus (SLE or rheumatoid arthritis (RA. There is also observed the similarity of the pathogenetic background of development of atherosclerosis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are observed in the course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Also homocysteine concentrations, which may play a significant role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions, are observed higher in patients with JIA. Some studies revealed higher carotid intima-media thickness (IMT index values in children with JIA. In view of the fact that atherosclerotic process begins as early as in childhood, the introduction of appropriate preventive measures in children is a matter of utmost importance.

  5. Imaging of juvenile spondyloarthritis. Part I: Classifications and radiographs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Sudoł-Szopińska

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile spondyloarthropathies are manifested mainly by symptoms of peripheral arthritis and enthesitis. By contrast with adults, children rarely present with sacroiliitis and spondylitis. Imaging and laboratory tests allow early diagnosis and treatment. Conventional radiographs visualize late inflammatory lesions and post-inflammatory complications. Early diagnosis is possible with the use of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. The first part of the article presents classifications of juvenile spondyloarthropathies and discusses their radiographic presentation. Typical radiographic features of individual types of juvenile spondyloarthritis are listed (including ankylosing spondylitis, juvenile psoriatic arthritis, reactive arthritis and arthritis in the course of inflammatory bowel diseases. The second part will describe changes visible on ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. In patients with juvenile spondyloarthropathies, these examinations are conducted to diagnose inflammatory lesions in peripheral joints, tendon sheaths, tendons and bursae. Moreover, magnetic resonance imaging also visualizes early inflammatory changes in the axial skeleton and subchondral bone marrow edema, which is considered an early sign of inflammation.

  6. Long-term outcome in patients with juvenile dermatomyositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, P; Hegaard, H; Herlin, Troels

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate a group of 53 patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), on average 13.9 years after disease onset, in order to describe the long-term disease outcome and to identify disease-related parameters associated with poor disease outcome....

  7. Yellow Fever Vaccine in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-05

    Systemic Lupus; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Spondyloarthritis; Inflammatory Myopathy; Systemic Sclerosis; Mixed Connective Tissue Disease; Takayasu Arteritis; Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis; Sjogren's Syndrome; Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis; Juvenile Dermatomyositis

  8. Avaliação de provas de fase aguda em crianças e adolescentes com artrite idiopática juvenil e sua correlação com atividade da doença Acute phase reactants evaluation in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and its correlation with disease activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Alencar M. F. Nicácio

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO:Analisar a relação entre as provas de fase aguda e a atividade clínica da artrite idiopática juvenil e avaliar a concordância entre velocidade de hemossedimentação e proteína C reativa (VHS e PCR na fase aguda da doença. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado estudo retrospectivo tipo coorte a partir da análise de prontuários de 30 crianças e adolescentes que preenchiam os critérios diagnósticos para artrite idiopática juvenil, estavam em atendimento em ambulatório de Reumatologia Pediátrica e haviam realizado as provas de fase aguda (VHS e PCR. RESULTADOS: Dos 30 pacientes, 21 (70% eram do sexo feminino e 19 (63,3% apresentavam o subtipo oligoarticular da doença. A média de idade de início dos sintomas foi 65,6 meses, a idade de diagnóstico de 85,3 e o tempo de evolução, 57,2 meses. As provas de fase aguda mostraram associação positiva com a atividade de doença. A anemia não teve relação com a atividade de doença. A concordância entre as duas provas de fase aguda foi superior a 80%. CONCLUSÕES: As provas de fase aguda mantêm relação positiva com a atividade da doença e o seu uso concomitante aumenta a especificidade.OBJECTIVE:To analyze the relationship between the acute phase reactants and the disease activity of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA and to evaluate the agreement between erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein during the acute phase of the disease. METHODS: a cohort retrospective study has been conducted based on the analysis of 30 children and adolescents who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of JIA. All of them were in current follow-up at the pediatric rheumatology outpatient clinic and had acute phase reactants blood tests performed. RESULTS: Studied population comprised 30 patients: 21 (70% of them were females and 19 (63.3% presented oligoarticular subtype. The mean age at disease onset was 65.6 months; the age at diagnosis was 85.3 months and the follow-up had 57.2 months of

  9. How Alexander von Humboldt's life story can inspire innovative soil research in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bouma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The pioneering vision of Alexander von Humboldt of science and society of the early 1800s is still highly relevant today. His open mind and urge to make many measurements characterizing the interconnected web of life are crucial ingredients as we now face the worldwide challenge of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Case studies in the Philippines, Vietnam, Kenya, Niger, and Costa Rica demonstrate, in Alexander's spirit, interaction with stakeholders and attention to unique local conditions, applying modern measurement and modeling methods and allowing inter- and transdisciplinary research approaches. But relations between science and society are increasingly problematic, partly as a result of the information revolution and post-truth, fact-free thinking. Overly regulated and financially restricted scientific communities in so-called developed countries may stifle intellectual creativity. Researchers in developing countries are urged to leapfrog these problems in the spirit of Alexander von Humboldt as they further develop their scientific communities. Six suggestions to the science community are made with particular attention to soil science. (The Humboldt lecture, presented by the 2017 recipient of the Alexander von Humboldt lecture, Johan Bouma, can be accessed at http://client.cntv.at/egu2017/ml1.

  10. German-Iowan Strategies in Celebrating the Centennial of Alexander von Humboldt’s Birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Roba

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The two largest cities of Eastern Iowa on the shore of the Mississippi River are Dubuque and Davenport. In each city, an elite group of German-Iowan leaders emerged by the late 1850s. Bill Roba describes and examines their strategies in celebrating the Centennial of Alexander von Humboldt’s Birth.

  11. On the carbonic acid distributed in the atmosphere, of Alexander Von Humboldt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelkoswski, Joaquin

    2001-01-01

    Translation that is made of a essay of Alexander Von Humboldt in which describes their own experiences related with the carbon dioxide (denominated carbonic acid in that time) in the atmosphere and in the we can capture the big difficulties around their measurement and their presence in the great gassy cover that surrounds us and it allows us to live

  12. Alexander Pechersky Testifies: an Open Page of Sobibor Death Camp History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev S. Simkin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, the author introduces the interrogation of the witness Alexander Aronovich Pechersky, the leader of the German death camp Sobibor Revolt during the World War II. Special attention is attached to the daily life of the death camp. The picture of revolt preparation was completed

  13. Alexander Kratochvil. Aufbruch und Rückkehr: Ukrainische und tschechische Prosa im Zeichen der Postmoderne.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Pavlyshyn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alexander Kratochvil. Aufbruch und Rückkehr: Ukrainische und tschechische Prosa im Zeichen der Postmoderne. [Venturing Forth and Coming Back: Ukrainian and Czech Prose in the Context of Postmodernity.] Berlin: Kulturverlag Kadmos, 2013. 311 pp. Bibliography. Index. Paper.

  14. "In the Footsteps of Alexander the Great" PBS Series. Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Washington, DC.

    This teacher's guide correlates with the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) television series "In the Footsteps of Alexander the Great" hosted by historian Michael Wood. The four episodes of the series are entitled: "Son of God"; "Lord of Asia"; "Across the Hindu Kush"; and "To the Ends of the…

  15. The army of Alexander the Great and combat stress syndrome (326 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the summer of 326 BC, Alexander the Great's triumphal seven-year campaign in Asia was unexpectedly halted in the upper reaches of the Indus river — not by enemy action, but by the troops' refusal to march further eastwards. A possible reason for such drastic action by an army which had, until that point, followed its ...

  16. Russia's Literary Genius Alexander Pushkin: The Great-Grandson of an African Slave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lounsbery, Anne

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Pushkin, Russia's most celebrated literary figure, descended from an African slave. On both parents' sides, he was related to Avram Petrovich Gannibal, who was born to an African prince and abducted to become a slave to a Russian diplomat. Pushkin chose to pride himself on both his aristocratic life and his African ancestry. (SM)

  17. Holocene morphogenesis of Alexander the Great's isthmus at Tyre in Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriner, Nick; Morhange, Christophe; Meulé, Samuel

    2007-05-01

    In 332 B.C., Alexander the Great constructed an ≈1,000-m-long causeway to seize the offshore island of Tyre. The logistics behind this engineering feat have long troubled archaeologists. Using the Holocene sedimentary record, we demonstrate that Alexander's engineers cleverly exploited a shallow proto-tombolo, or sublittoral sand spit, to breach the offshore city's defensive impregnability. We elucidate a three-phase geomorphological model for the spit's evolution. Settled since the Bronze Age, the area's geological record manifests a long history of natural and anthropogenic forcings. (i) Leeward of the island breakwater, the maximum flooding surface (e.g., drowning of the subaerial land surfaces by seawater) is dated ≈8000 B.P. Fine-grained sediments and brackish and marine-lagoonal faunas translate shallow, low-energy water bodies at this time. Shelter was afforded by Tyre's elongated sandstone reefs, which acted as a 6-km natural breakwater. (ii) By 6000 B.P., sea-level rise had reduced the dimensions of the island from 6 to 4 km. The leeward wave shadow generated by this island, allied with high sediment supply after 3000 B.P., culminated in a natural wave-dominated proto-tombolo within 1-2 m of mean sea level by the time of Alexander the Great (4th century B.C.). (iii) After 332 B.C., construction of Alexander's causeway entrained a complete anthropogenic metamorphosis of the Tyrian coastal system.

  18. Holocene morphogenesis of Alexander the Great's isthmus at Tyre in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriner, Nick; Morhange, Christophe; Meulé, Samuel

    2007-05-29

    In 332 B.C., Alexander the Great constructed an approximately 1,000-m-long causeway to seize the offshore island of Tyre. The logistics behind this engineering feat have long troubled archaeologists. Using the Holocene sedimentary record, we demonstrate that Alexander's engineers cleverly exploited a shallow proto-tombolo, or sublittoral sand spit, to breach the offshore city's defensive impregnability. We elucidate a three-phase geomorphological model for the spit's evolution. Settled since the Bronze Age, the area's geological record manifests a long history of natural and anthropogenic forcings. (i) Leeward of the island breakwater, the maximum flooding surface (e.g., drowning of the subaerial land surfaces by seawater) is dated approximately 8000 B.P. Fine-grained sediments and brackish and marine-lagoonal faunas translate shallow, low-energy water bodies at this time. Shelter was afforded by Tyre's elongated sandstone reefs, which acted as a 6-km natural breakwater. (ii) By 6000 B.P., sea-level rise had reduced the dimensions of the island from 6 to 4 km. The leeward wave shadow generated by this island, allied with high sediment supply after 3000 B.P., culminated in a natural wave-dominated proto-tombolo within 1-2 m of mean sea level by the time of Alexander the Great (4th century B.C.). (iii) After 332 B.C., construction of Alexander's causeway entrained a complete anthropogenic metamorphosis of the Tyrian coastal system.

  19. Connect the Book. Always Inventing: A Photobiography of Alexander Graham Bell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2004-01-01

    Cell phones, video phones, voice messaging?one wonders what Alexander Graham Bell would have thought about the many venues today for electronic communication with one another. Bell's March 10, 1876 invention is now 128 years old, but there is no doubt that Bell's "talking machine" changed the world. This article presents a brief review of the…

  20. Friendly Letters on the Correspondence of Helen Keller, Anne Sullivan, and Alexander Graham Bell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, Burton

    1985-01-01

    Excerpts from the letters between Alexander Graham Bell and Anne Sullivan and Helen Keller are given to illustrate the educational and personal growth of Helen Keller as well as the educational philosophy of Bell regarding the education of the deaf blind. (DB)

  1. The Doors to Home and History: Post-Colonial Identities in Meena Alexander and Bharati Mukherjee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Shilpa

    1993-01-01

    Examines postcolonial inquiry and studies of identity in Asians of Indian descent, focusing on the works of Meena Alexander and Bharati Mukherjee. Their commentaries on India and immigrant cultures are constantly influenced by a history dependent on Western tradition, although both authors resist the stereotypical definitions imposed by the West.…

  2. New Models at Lasell: Q&A with President Michael Alexander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harney, John O.

    2018-01-01

    The "New England Journal of Higher Education" ("NEJHE") Executive Editor John O. Harney had the chance to catch up with Lasell College President Michael Alexander about the small Newton, Massachusetts, college's plans to challenge the higher education business model. The interview is presented in this article.

  3. 78 FR 53630 - Airworthiness Directives; Alexander Schleicher GmbH & Co. Segelflugzeugbau Sailplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ..., Kansas City, Missouri 64106. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call (816...; email: [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Discussion We issued a notice of proposed... rod for conformity following Alexander Schleicher Automatischer H[ouml]henruderanschlu[beta] (English...

  4. Alexander Kapp--The First Known User of the Andragogy Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeng, Svein

    2017-01-01

    The German gymnasium teacher Alexander Kapp (1800-1869) was to all appearances the first one to use the "andragogy concept" as a term for "adult learning." In 1833 he published the book "Platon's Erziehungslehre, als Pädagogik für die Einzelnen und als Staatspädagogik. Oder dessen praktische Philosophie." This book…

  5. Close to the Clothes : Materiality and Sophisticated Archaism in Alexander van Slobbe’s Design Practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baronian, M.-A.

    This article looks at the work of contemporary Dutch fashion designer Alexander van Slobbe (1959) and examines how, since the 1990s, his fashion practices have consistently and consciously put forward a unique reflection on questions related to materiality, sophisticated archaism, luxury,

  6. Close to the Clothes: Materiality and Sophisticated Archaism in Alexander van Slobbe’s Design Practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baronian, M.-A.

    This article looks at the work of contemporary Dutch fashion designer Alexander van Slobbe (1959) and examines how, since the 1990s, his fashion practices have consistently and consciously put forward a unique reflection on questions related to materiality, sophisticated archaism, luxury,

  7. De luchtvaart van Alexander de Grote in de verbeelding der Middeleeuwen.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, Victor Michael

    1988-01-01

    The story of Alexander the Great's Aerial Flight holds a special position among the manifold legendary traditions around the famous world conqueror that were known during the Middle Ages, since no other legend of his miraculous life was represented so often in art as this one. According to the

  8. Vorstenschool. Vier geschiedenisschrijvers over Alexander en hun visie op het keizerschap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder-Bakker, Antje Beitske

    1983-01-01

    Alexander the Great has been renowned both in the middle ages and at other times as one of the most celebrated heroes. Stories of his deeds have been handed down in almost every language and civilization. He was known everywhere, loved by everyone. He was world famous. This very fact diminishes his

  9. Marathon man: the stubborn persistence of Alexander Kluge, German cinema's polymathic master strategist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsaesser, T.

    2008-01-01

    On the occasion of his 75th birthday in 2008, German filmmaker Alexander Kluge is profiled in detail, and his films are examined in chronological order. The movies discussed are "Abscied von Gestern" ("Yesterday Girl," 1966), "Die Artisten in der Zirkuskuppel: Ratlos" ("Artists Under the Big Top:

  10. Stubb : EL saavutas Gruusia kriisi ajal palju / Alexander Stubb ; interv. Liisi Poll

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Stubb, Alexander, 1968-

    2008-01-01

    Intervjuu Soome välisministri Alexander Stubbiga, kes vastab küsimustele, mis puudutavad Euroopa Liidu positsiooni seoses Venemaa agressiooniga Gruusias ja Soome seisukohti seoses NATOga. Euroliidu reaktsioon Venemaa agressioonile Gruusias oli poliitiliselt tugev ja majanduslikult nõrk, arvab ta

  11. How Alexander von Humboldt's life story can inspire innovative soil research in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Johan

    2017-09-01

    The pioneering vision of Alexander von Humboldt of science and society of the early 1800s is still highly relevant today. His open mind and urge to make many measurements characterizing the interconnected web of life are crucial ingredients as we now face the worldwide challenge of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Case studies in the Philippines, Vietnam, Kenya, Niger, and Costa Rica demonstrate, in Alexander's spirit, interaction with stakeholders and attention to unique local conditions, applying modern measurement and modeling methods and allowing inter- and transdisciplinary research approaches. But relations between science and society are increasingly problematic, partly as a result of the information revolution and post-truth, fact-free thinking. Overly regulated and financially restricted scientific communities in so-called developed countries may stifle intellectual creativity. Researchers in developing countries are urged to leapfrog these problems in the spirit of Alexander von Humboldt as they further develop their scientific communities. Six suggestions to the science community are made with particular attention to soil science. (The Humboldt lecture, presented by the 2017 recipient of the Alexander von Humboldt lecture, Johan Bouma, can be accessed at http://client.cntv.at/egu2017/ml1.)

  12. Miastenia gravis juvenil Juvenile myasthenia gravis

    OpenAIRE

    Oscar Papazian; Israel Alfonso; Nayle Araguez

    2009-01-01

    La miastenia gravis juvenil (MGJ) es un trastorno crónico auto inmune en el cual existen anticuerpos séricos que al unirse a los receptores de acetilcolin nicotínicos de la membrana muscular de la placa motora alteran la transmisión neuromuscular. El resultado es fatiga muscular precoz con progresión a la parálisis durante estados de contracción muscular iterativos (movimientos) o sostenidos (posturas) y más raramente parálisis permanente durante el reposo. Los músculos inervados por los nerv...

  13. DERMATOMIOSITIS JUVENIL Y EMBARAZO

    OpenAIRE

    Evans M,Gregorio; Poulsen R,Ronald; Blanco R,Romiely; Luna V,Viviana

    2002-01-01

    La dermatomiositis juvenil es un desorden inflamatorio crónico multisistémico del tejido conectivo. Tiene una incidencia de 2-3/100.000/año. Con la disminución en la mortalidad experimentada en los últimos decenios, la atención está cifrada en la morbilidad a largo plazo y en las alteraciones funcionales. Con un tratamiento agresivo los niños con dermatomiositis juvenil generalmente tienen un futuro promisorio, sin incapacidad o con incapacidad mínima. La mortalidad actualmente se estima cerc...

  14. Alexander Technique Lessons or Acupuncture Sessions for Persons With Chronic Neck Pain: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPherson, Hugh; Tilbrook, Helen; Richmond, Stewart; Woodman, Julia; Ballard, Kathleen; Atkin, Karl; Bland, Martin; Eldred, Janet; Essex, Holly; Hewitt, Catherine; Hopton, Ann; Keding, Ada; Lansdown, Harriet; Parrott, Steve; Torgerson, David; Wenham, Aniela; Watt, Ian

    2015-11-03

    Management of chronic neck pain may benefit from additional active self-care-oriented approaches. To evaluate clinical effectiveness of Alexander Technique lessons or acupuncture versus usual care for persons with chronic, nonspecific neck pain. Three-group randomized, controlled trial. (Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN15186354). U.K. primary care. Persons with neck pain lasting at least 3 months, a score of at least 28% on the Northwick Park Questionnaire (NPQ) for neck pain and associated disability, and no serious underlying pathology. 12 acupuncture sessions or 20 one-to-one Alexander lessons (both 600 minutes total) plus usual care versus usual care alone. NPQ score (primary outcome) at 0, 3, 6, and 12 months (primary end point) and Chronic Pain Self-Efficacy Scale score, quality of life, and adverse events (secondary outcomes). 517 patients were recruited, and the median duration of neck pain was 6 years. Mean attendance was 10 acupuncture sessions and 14 Alexander lessons. Between-group reductions in NPQ score at 12 months versus usual care were 3.92 percentage points for acupuncture (95% CI, 0.97 to 6.87 percentage points) (P = 0.009) and 3.79 percentage points for Alexander lessons (CI, 0.91 to 6.66 percentage points) (P = 0.010). The 12-month reductions in NPQ score from baseline were 32% for acupuncture and 31% for Alexander lessons. Participant self-efficacy improved for both interventions versus usual care at 6 months (P neck pain and associated disability compared with usual care at 12 months. Enhanced self-efficacy may partially explain why longer-term benefits were sustained. Arthritis Research UK.

  15. [ABOUT JUVENILE NASOPHARYNGEAL ANGIOFIBROMA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbain, V; Meunier, P; Otto, B

    2015-09-01

    We report the case of a young man with a juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. In this paper, we will first remind the clinical signs of this pathology and its radiological appearance (localisation and extensions). Then we will explain how radioembolisation techniques were used to facilitate the surgical intervention. Finally we will discuss the histology of this tumor.

  16. Cardiac juvenile xanthogranuloma in an infant presenting with pericardial effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Delius, Ralph E; Debelenko, Larisa V; Aggarwal, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile xanthogranuloma is a rare histiocytic disorder of childhood mainly affecting skin and rarely deep soft tissues and viscera. We report a 2-month-old infant who presented with respiratory distress secondary to a large pericardial effusion associated with an epicardial mass. Excisional biopsy was performed and the mass was diagnosed as juvenile xanthogranuloma. The child is well without evidence of disease 8 months following the excision. The corresponding literature on juvenile xanthogranuloma with cardiac manifestations is reviewed. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Exercise testing and fitness training in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh-Grewal, D.

    2010-01-01

    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis is the commonest rheumatic disease of childhood affecting 1:1000 children under the age of 16 years. Children with JIA have long been sidelined from physical activity due to active disease or irrational concerns that activity may in some way worsen disease. Children

  18. Astroglia in neurological diseases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio; Parpura, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2013), s. 149-158 ISSN 1479-6708 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0184; GA ČR GA309/09/1696 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : amyotrophic lateral sclerosis * Alzheimer's disease * Alexander disease Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  19. Juvenile chronic arthritis into adulthood: a long-term follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zak, M; Pedersen, F K

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate a group of 65 adults with a history of or persistent juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA), on average, 26.4 yr after disease onset.......To evaluate a group of 65 adults with a history of or persistent juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA), on average, 26.4 yr after disease onset....

  20. Bacteriological study of juvenile periodontitis in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, N M; Xiao, X R; Zhang, L S; Ri, X Q; Zhang, J Z; Tong, Y H; Yang, M R; Xiao, Z R

    1991-09-01

    The predominant cultivable bacteria associated with juvenile periodontitis (JP) in China were studied for the first time. Subgingival plaque samples were taken on paper points from 23 diseased sites in 15 JP patients and from 7 healthy sites in 7 control subjects. Serially diluted plaque samples were plated on nonselective blood agar and on MGB agar, a selective medium for the isolation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Fifteen or more isolated colonies from each sample (in sequence without selection) were purified for identification. The results indicated that the microflora in healthy sulci of the 7 control subjects was significantly different from that in diseased sites of JP patients. The predominant species in healthy sulci were Streptococcus spp. and Capnocytophaga gingivalis. In JP patients, Eubacterium sp. was found in significantly higher frequency and proportion. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was not detected in any samples. It appears that this species is not associated with juvenile periodontitis in China.

  1. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Sarah; Sen, Ethan; Ramanan, Athimalaipet

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease of childhood, with JIA-associated uveitis its most common extra-articular manifestation. JIA-associated uveitis is a potentially sight-threatening condition and thus carries a considerable risk of morbidity. The aetiology of the condition is autoimmune in nature with the predominant involvement of CD4(+) T cells. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms remain unclear, particularly regarding interplay between geneti...

  2. A Review of Passionate Patron: The Life of Alexander Hardcastle and the Greek Temples of Agrigento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Crisa

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Richardson’s 143-page book provides an interesting account on the life of Alexander Hardcastle (London, 1872 – Agrigento, 1933, a rich English patron and archaeologist, who operated in Sicily during the early twentieth century. Son of Hernt and Marie Sophie Hardcastle Herschel, Alexander took his military service in the Royal Navy, gaining a thorough technical knowledge, which he successfully used in Sicily. After he obtained a passport in December 1920, Hardcastle moved to Girgenti (now Agrigento, where he purchased a new house, the so-called Villa Aurea , and allocated private funds to perform excavations and massive renovation works at the nearby Greek temples of Akragas . In particular, he restored eight columns of the Temples of Herakles  and Demetra , and excavated part of the ancient city walls in the 1920s. His activity caused a great sensation in both Sicily and Great Britain, as articles in newspapers clearly testify.

  3. Der Briefwechsel zwischen Alexander von Humboldt und Karl Ernst von Baer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Schmuck

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Zusammenfassung Der kurze, nicht vollständig erhaltene Briefwechsel zwischen Alexander von Humboldt und Karl Ernst von Baer behandelt sehr verschiedene Themen: Politik, Kriegsgefahr, den Wissenschaftsbetrieb, Auszeichnungen und Tagungen, Embryologie und Cholera. Gemeinsam mit Briefen und Reden ergibt sich dabei ein differenziertes Bild der Beurteilung der beiden Wissenschaftler durch den jeweils anderen. Während Baer sich als Bewunderer Humboldts erweist, erscheint umgekehrt Humboldts Einschätzung Baers als ambivalent. Abstract The short, not completely preserved correspondence between Alexander von Humboldt and Karl Ernst von Baer deals with a wide range of subjects: politics and the danger of war, academic activities, scientific awards and conferences, aspects of embryology and the cholera. Letters to third persons and speeches, together with the correspondence between Humboldt and Baer show a differentiated pattern of mutual appraisal: While Baer always remained an admirer of the elder naturalist, Humboldt’s estimation was characterized by ambivalence.

  4. Die gebruik van die mite in Die werfbobbejaan van Alexander Strachan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M.M. Klopper

    1996-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of myths in Die werfbobbejaan by Alexander Strachan This article focuses on the rote of Zulu myths in Alexander Strachan’s novel Die werfbobbejaan. It lakes as point of departure sources on mythology like Cuddon (1991, Baldick (1990, Grimal (1969, Levi-Strauss (1979 and Jung (1969. Die werfbobbejaan essentially recounts the story of a man (the adventurer, the academic, the writer, the hunter who also is the central character in Strachan's two preceding novels. Die werfbobbejaan focuses on the completion of an individuation process in the life of the central character, a process already begun in the preceding two novels and which in this novel finally culminates in the confrontation between hunter and baboon. The completion of this process is facilitated by the African milieu of Zululand where people give meaning to their existence by means of myths, and where no distinction is made between the mythic and rational modes of experiencing reality.

  5. Preventing Juvenile Delinquency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina dos Reis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to problematize discourses about protection and care that have surrounded compulsory hospitalization by evidencing its use as a control and punishment mechanism that increases the social vulnerability of young drug users. For such, we analyze lawsuits involving juveniles who were consigned to psychiatric institutions for drug addiction treatment as a protection measure in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, in Brazil. The analysis of the materials has evidenced discourses that have circumscribed young drug users and constructed this population as potentially dangerous subjects as well as a population category at risk. In this sense, we point out how compulsory hospitalization has emerged out of the lawsuits as a tool for prevention of juvenile delinquency.

  6. Reflection in Russian public opinion accession to the throne of Emperor Alexander II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim N. Krot

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the perception of Russian society coming to the throne of Emperor Alexander II in 1855. The author analyzes the internal and external situation in Russia in this period, identifying the most significant factors that influenced the public's attitude to the new monarch, and the expectations that were associated with his coming to power. The article draws parallels between the initial period of the reign of the two liberal Russian monarchs of the XIX century – Alexander I and Alexander II, most clearly expressed not so much in the circumstances of their accession, but in the public mood that prevailed in the country. It presents a broad picture of the "awakening" of public consciousness and activity after the stagnation and oppression of the preceding reign, which was reflected primarily in an effort to think freely and to discuss pressing issues facing the country, as well as contribute to the supreme power in the modernization of social and political relations, awareness where necessary, at this time it becomes clearly. The author identifies semantic levels of social consciousness of the period, indicating the particular circumstances that have shaped them. Much attention is paid to the influence of Russian society of the Crimean War, which in many ways was the starting point of social upheaval transformed in 1855 from a national-patriotic in the socio-political. The author points out that at this time has unique conditions for overcoming the contradictions between state and society and their successful cooperation in the reform of the country. This suggests a significant, perhaps - the crucial role of the public in the selection of the vector conversion of Russia, which has become a feature of the reign of Alexander II.

  7. The birth of Russian intelligentsia from the spirit of the enlightenment: Alexander Radishchev

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subotić Milan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This text is the second part of a study about Alexander Radishchev, one of the leading representatives of Enlightenment in Russia's XVIII Century. Starting with explanation of the 'enlightened absolutism' of Catherine the Great, the author analyses the political and social ideas presented in Radishchev's book Journey from St. Petersburg to Moscow. Considering Radishchev as a 'father of Russian intelligentsia', the author stress that Radishchev's social criticism anticipated the later phenomenon of 'dissidence'.

  8. Political Storytelling on Instagram: Key Aspects of Alexander Van der Bellen's Successful 2016 Presidential Election Campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Liebhart, Karin; Bernhardt, Petra

    2017-01-01

    This article addresses the strategic use of Instagram in election campaigns for the office of the Austrian Federal President in 2016. Based on a comprehensive visual analysis of 504 Instagram posts from Green-backed but independent presidential candidate Alexander Van der Bellen, who resulted as winner after almost one year of campaigning, this contribution reconstructs key aspects of digital storytelling on Instagram. By identifying relevant image types central to the self-representation of ...

  9. A stone at the Siege of Cyropolis and the death of Alexander the Great.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Andrew N; Arnott, Robert

    2004-06-01

    Alexander the Great was struck by a stone at the Siege of Cyropolis in 329 BC and was rendered temporarily blind and inaudible as a result. Although other authors have written extensively about the likely pathological effects of this injury, none have suggested carotid artery dissection as a possible cause. We present evidence that this should be considered as a differential diagnosis and how it might explain an unusual symptom seen at his deathbed in Babylon six years later.

  10. Late Onset Juvenile Xanthogranuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punithwavathy K

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A 19 year old female was seen with multiple skin coloured and hyperpigmented macules, discrete as well as grouped papules and nodules of varying sizes distributed over the face, neck, extensor and flexor aspects of both upper and lower extremities including joints. The trunk was spared. Some of the lesions showed features of spontaneous regression. Investigations confirmed the diagnosis of juvenile xanthogranuloma. Lesions regressed satisfactorily with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy.

  11. Randomised controlled trial of Alexander technique lessons, exercise, and massage (ATEAM) for chronic and recurrent back pain: economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollinghurst, Sandra; Sharp, Debbie; Ballard, Kathleen; Barnett, Jane; Beattie, Angela; Evans, Maggie; Lewith, George; Middleton, Karen; Oxford, Frances; Webley, Fran; Little, Paul

    2008-12-11

    An economic evaluation of therapeutic massage, exercise, and lessons in the Alexander technique for treating persistent back pain. Cost consequences study and cost effectiveness analysis at 12 month follow-up of a factorial randomised controlled trial. 579 patients with chronic or recurrent low back pain recruited from primary care. Normal care (control), massage, and six or 24 lessons in the Alexander technique. Half of each group were randomised to a prescription for exercise from a doctor plus behavioural counselling from a nurse. Costs to the NHS and to participants. Comparison of costs with Roland-Morris disability score (number of activities impaired by pain), days in pain, and quality adjusted life years (QALYs). Comparison of NHS costs with QALY gain, using incremental cost effectiveness ratios and cost effectiveness acceptability curves. Intervention costs ranged from pound30 for exercise prescription to pound596 for 24 lessons in Alexander technique plus exercise. Cost of health services ranged from pound50 for 24 lessons in Alexander technique to pound124 for exercise. Incremental cost effectiveness analysis of single therapies showed that exercise offered best value ( pound61 per point on disability score, pound9 per additional pain-free day, pound2847 per QALY gain). For two-stage therapy, six lessons in Alexander technique combined with exercise was the best value (additional pound64 per point on disability score, pound43 per additional pain-free day, pound5332 per QALY gain). An exercise prescription and six lessons in Alexander technique alone were both more than 85% likely to be cost effective at values above pound20 000 per QALY, but the Alexander technique performed better than exercise on the full range of outcomes. A combination of six lessons in Alexander technique lessons followed by exercise was the most effective and cost effective option.

  12. History and Pre-History of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Platikanov

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a short review of the history of Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Bonn - Bad Godesberg, Germany, on the occasion of its 60th anniversary is presented. This outstanding German foundation is actually the third one with the same name. Earlier two other Alexander von Humboldt Foundations consequently existed and they consist its pre-history, which is also shortly reviewed. The establishment of the present Foundation in 1953, its development and growth, its activities, information about the six presidents and five executive directors, as well as the main features, principles and guidelines are considered. During the last 60 years the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation became an important institution for the promotion of international research cooperation, which significantly influences the world science. It supported more than 27700 Humboldt fellows to carry out scientific research in Germany, and they form a large Humboldt family: a world-wide network. Large number Bulgarian Humboldt fellows are among the best scientists in Bulgaria.

  13. Angiofibroma juvenil nasofaríngeo Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma

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    Juan Gualberto Lescaille Torres

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de un angiofibroma juvenil nasofaríngeo, en un paciente del consultorio médico No. 9, que pertenece al Policlínico Integral Docente "Carlos Manuel Portuondo" de Marianao. Se reconoce la importancia de realizar una historia clínica detallada, así como un minucioso examen físico, por el médico de familia y el otorrinolaringólogo del área de salud, que incluyó la rinoscopia posterior, para poder llegar al diagnóstico de esa patología, y realizar la extirpación precoz del angiofibroma, mediante el proceder quirúrgico. Se concluyó que el diagnóstico clínico se correspondió con el histopatológico, y que la conducta quirúrgica temprana es resolutiva en la afección.It is presented a case of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in a patient with this pathology, from the clicial practice No. 9, in Comprehensive Teaching Polyclinic "Carlos Manuel Portuondo" in Marianao. It recognizes the importance of a thorough clinical history and careful physical examination by the family physician and the otolaryngologist in this health area, including a posterior rhinoscopy, to diagnose this disease and to achieve early removal of the angiofibroma, by a surgical procedure. It was concluded that the clinical diagnosis corresponded to the histopathological diagnosis, and that early surgical treatment is resolute in this condition.

  14. Plutarcho Aleksandras: interpretacijos problemos. Plutarch‘s Alexander: Problems of Interpretation

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    Nijolė Juchnevičienė

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Alexander‘ s character and his activities occupy a special position in the works of Plutarch. Alexander’s Life is the second largest life in the corpus, there are two elaborated speeches on him included into Moralia, and he is often mentioned in the other pieces of this corpus. The speeches, usually called De Alexandri Magni fortuna aut virtute (A and B, were written by the young Plutarch. They belong to the epideictic rhetoric tradition and are based on the opposition between the hero’s ἀρετήand τύχη, which was in general not favor­able to him. According to Plutarch, all Alexander’s life was a struggle between τύχη and ἀρ��τή. The speeches reveal the impressive portrait of Alexander not only as an invincible warrior, but also as a philosopher in arms, whose immortal achievements are the best proof of his ἀρετή. He managed to overcome the unfavorable τύχη and to civilize the world of the barbarians. There is a difference of interpretation of the character between the speeches and the Life. Alexander is not as perfect there as in the speeches, but his character still is in the center of the narration. The motive of ἀρετήvs. τύχη is also present and Plutarch still sticks to his earlier opinion that Alexander’s ἀρετή, not τύχη was the decisive factor in his life. Plutarch notices the changes in Alexander and his negative features, but at the same time, he tries to explain and extenuate his behavior pointing out to Alexander’s extreme valuation of his δόξα, which he regarded more important than the royal power and the life itself. In my opinion, Alexander’s attitude to his δόξα reveals the difference between the heroes of the pair, Alexander and Caesar. This differ­ence is also expanded in the detailed description of the post-mortal status and fate of their bodies, the effect that reminiscence of them makes on the living. I agree with the opinion, that Caesar is

  15. Teachers' professional development needs and current practices at the Alexander Science Center School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargus, Gerald Vincent

    This investigation represents an in-depth understanding of teacher professional development at the Alexander Science Center School, a dependent charter museum school established through a partnership between the California Science Center and Los Angeles Unified School District. Three methods of data collection were used. A survey was distributed and collected from the school's teachers, resulting in a prioritized list of teacher professional development needs, as well as a summary of teachers' opinions about the school's existing professional development program. In addition, six key stakeholders in the school's professional development program were interviewed for the study. Finally, documents related to the school's professional development program were analyzed. Data collected from the interviews and documents were used to develop an understand various components of the Alexander Science Center School's professional development program. Teachers identified seven areas that had a high-priority for future professional development including developing skills far working with below-grade-level students, improving the analytical skills of student in mathematics, working with English Language Learners, improving students' overall reading ability levels, developing teachers' content-area knowledge for science, integrating science across the curriculum, and incorporating hands-on activity-based learning strategies to teach science. Professional development needs identified by Alexander Science Center School teachers were categorized based on their focus on content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, or curricular knowledge. Analysis of data collected through interviews and documents revealed that the Alexander Science Center School's professional development program consisted of six venues for providing professional development for teachers including weekly "banked time" sessions taking place within the standard school day, grade-level meetings, teacher support

  16. Impact of juvenile idiopathic arthritis on schooling

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    Bouaddi Ilham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is the most common arthropathy of childhood. Different diseases affect school attendance to varying degrees. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA on Moroccan children’s schooling. Methods Thirty-three children with JIA were included in this study, having been previously diagnosed according to the classification criteria of the International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR. Seventy-four healthy children were recruited to serve as controls. Data was obtained for all children on their school level, educational performance, and attendance. The rate of absenteeism due to health complications was noted. Results All healthy children were able to attend school (p Conclusions Our study suggested that the schooling of children with JIA was negatively impacted due to the disorder. More studies, with a larger sample of children, are needed to confirm our findings.

  17. Miastenia gravis juvenil Juvenile myasthenia gravis

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    Oscar Papazian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available La miastenia gravis juvenil (MGJ es un trastorno crónico auto inmune en el cual existen anticuerpos séricos que al unirse a los receptores de acetilcolin nicotínicos de la membrana muscular de la placa motora alteran la transmisión neuromuscular. El resultado es fatiga muscular precoz con progresión a la parálisis durante estados de contracción muscular iterativos (movimientos o sostenidos (posturas y más raramente parálisis permanente durante el reposo. Los músculos inervados por los nervios craneales, especialmente los extraoculares y elevadores de los párpados, tienen más tendencia a la debilidad muscular persistente que los inervados por otros pares craneales y las extremidades. Las formas clínicas de presentación son generalizadas, oculares y respiratorias. El diagnóstico se sospecha mediante la anamnesia, la fatiga anormal se comprueba mediante el examen físico y la estimulación eléctrica iterativa del nervio que inerva al músculo afectado pero no paralizado. Se corrobora mediante la administración de inhibidores de la acetilcolin esterasa (IACE que al aumentar la cantidad de acetilcolin en la hendidura sináptica, corrigen la fatiga o la debilidad muscular transitoriamente. Se hace el diagnóstico de certeza mediante la demostración sérica de anticuerpos contra los receptores de acetilcolin (ACRA. El tratamiento es a largo plazo sintomático con IACE y etiopatogénico con inmunosupresores, plasmaféresis, gamma globulina endovenosa y timectomía. El curso es crónico. La remisión espontánea o después de tratamiento sintomático o etiopatogénico ocurre entre 1-10 años respectivamente. La mortalidad es prácticamente nula aun durantes las crisis miastenias gracias a la educación de padres, pacientes y público en general sobre el tema, al desarrollo del sistema de respuesta rápida de auxilio domiciliario y las unidades de cuidados intensivos y el empleo de la ventilación asistida profiláctica, plasmaféresis y

  18. Safety and Efficacy of Anti-Pandemic H1N1 Vaccination in Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-25

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Spondyloarthritis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE); Dermatomyositis (DM); DMixed Connective Tissue Disease; Systemic Vasculitis; Systemic Sclerosis (SSc); Sjögren's Syndrome; Antiphospholipid Syndrome; Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis; Juvenile SLE; Juvenile DM

  19. Dislipidemia em pacientes com dermatomiosite juvenil

    OpenAIRE

    Katia Tomie Kozu

    2012-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Avaliar a presença de dislipidemia em pacientes com dermatomiosite juvenil (DMJ) e seus possíveis fatores de risco. MÉTODO: 25 pacientes com DMJ foram comparados a 25 controles de acordo com dados demográficos, composição corporal, perfil lipídico, glicêmico, autoanticorpos e enzimas musculares. Foram avaliados os instrumentos de atividade da DMJ: Disease Activity Score (DAS), Childhood Myositis Assessment Scale (CMAS), Manual Muscle Testing (MMT), Myositis Disease Activity Assessme...

  20. Juvenile psittacine environmental enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simone-Freilicher, Elisabeth; Rupley, Agnes E

    2015-05-01

    Environmental enrichment is of great import to the emotional, intellectual, and physical development of the juvenile psittacine and their success in the human home environment. Five major types of enrichment include social, occupational, physical, sensory, and nutritional. Occupational enrichment includes exercise and psychological enrichment. Physical enrichment includes the cage and accessories and the external home environment. Sensory enrichment may be visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, or taste oriented. Nutritional enrichment includes variations in appearance, type, and frequency of diet, and treats, novelty, and foraging. Two phases of the preadult period deserve special enrichment considerations: the development of autonomy and puberty. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The remarkable medical lineage of the Monro family: contributions of Alexander primus, secundus, and tertius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Osmond C; Manjila, Sunil; Malakooti, Nima; Cohen, Alan R

    2012-06-01

    Among the families that have influenced the development of modern medicine into what it is today, the Monro lineage stands as one of the most notable. Alexander Monro primus (1697-1767) was the first of 3 generations with the same name, a dynasty that spanned 126 years occupying the Chair of Anatomy one after the other at the University of Edinburgh. After becoming Professor of Anatomy at the University of Edinburgh in 1719, Monro primus played a principal role in the establishment of the University of Edinburgh School of Medicine and the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary. In 1726, he published The Anatomy of the Humane Bones, of which 8 editions were printed during his lifetime. His son, Alexander Monro secundus (1733-1817), arguably the most notable of the 3 men, succeeded him as Professor of Anatomy. A highly regarded lecturer and anatomist, Monro secundus studied under many great physicians, including William Hunter and Johann Friedrich Meckel the Elder, and was also teacher to other well-known figures at the time, such as Joseph Black and Thomas Trotter. His most notable contributions include his work with the lymphatic system, the interventricular foramen (of Monro), and the Monro-Kellie doctrine. Alexander Monro tertius (1773-1859), the last of the dynasty, also succeeded his father as Professor of Anatomy. His work included insights into abdominal aortic aneurysms and the anatomy of the genitourinary system. The prominent association of the Monro family with the University of Edinburgh and the effects of a tenured professorship under the concept of "Ad vitam aut culpam" over successive generations are also described. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this historical review of the Monro family is among the few published in neurosurgical literature. A vivid historical overview of the medical contributions of the most famous and influential dynasty of physicians in Edinburgh at that time is provided, with relevant excerpts from original publications.

  2. Comparative-historical method in Slavic linguistics and Alexander Vostokov’s philological intuitions

    OpenAIRE

    Melkov Andrey Sergeevich

    2015-01-01

    The article is devoted to the estimation of Alexander Vostokov’s (1781-1864) contribution to the formation and development of the Slavic philology as a scientific discipline. In the foundation of the research there is the analyses of Vostokov’s work “Judgement about the Slavic language”, which has become the result of the scientist’s study the oldest Russian manuscript “Ostromir Gospels”. Vostokov devised a new method for the Slavic philology, which is used to call comparative-historical in m...

  3. The presentation of the results of Alexander von Humboldt's voyage to Carlos IV

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    Miguel Ángel Puig-Samper

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumen  Desde nuestras primeras investigaciones sobre la estancia de Alexander von Humboldt en España siempre nos sorprendió la ausencia de una mínima relación posterior del sabio prusiano con la corona española y sus autoridades. Iniciada una nueva investigación, encontramos que efectivamente se produjo el envío de un primer trabajo a Carlos IV desde Roma acompañado de una carta de gratitud por la protección recibida durante su viaje americano y de sumisión a la corona española, que ahora presentamos.   Summary Ever since our first research into Alexander von Humboldt's stay in Spain, the absence of an ensuing relationship between the wise Prussian and the Spanish Crown and Authorities had always surprised us. On starting new research, we found that indeed he sent his first work to Carlos IV from Rome accompanied by a letter of gratitude for the protection he had received during his American trip and submission to the Spanish Crown, which we now present. This first literary fruit of his voyage, which Alexander von Humboldt alluded to in the letter is the first instalment of his work Plantes Équinoxiales, Recueillies au Mexique, dans l’ile de Cuba, dans les provinces de Caracas, de Cumana etc., published in Paris in 1805.   Zusammenfassung Seit unseren ersten Forschungen über den Aufenthalt Alexander von Humboldts in Spanien hat uns das Fehlen einer hieran anschließenden Beziehung des preußischen Wissenschaftlers mit der spanischen Krone und ihren Behörden erstaunt. Im Laufe einer erneuten Aufnahme der Forschung, haben wir nun entdeckt, dass Humboldt in der Tat von Rom aus eine erste Arbeit an Karl IV gesandt hatte, zusammen mit einem Schreiben des Dankes (für den während der amerikanischen Reise erhaltenen Schutz sowie seiner Unterordnung unter die spanische Krone, das wir nun präsentieren. Das erste literarische Ergebnis seiner Reise, auf das Humboldt in diesem Brief verweist, ist der erste Faszikel seines Werkes

  4. Presentación atípica de la enfermedad de Alexander infantil sin macrocefalia

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen Esmer; Miguel Villegas-Aguilera; Juan José Morales-Ibarra; Antonio Bravo-Oro

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: La enfermedad de Alexander consiste en una forma de leucodistrofia poco frecuente que afecta principalmente a los astrocitos; tiene un patrón de herencia autosómica recesiva y es causada por mutaciones en el gen GFAP, localizado en el cromosoma 17q21. Puede presentarse a cualquier edad y la forma infantil se caracteriza por macrocefalia, crisis convulsivas, retraso motor y cognitivo grave y espasticidad o ataxia progresivas. Caso clínico: Paciente de sexo femenino de 8 meses ...

  5. Das Ganze der Natur Alexander von Humboldt und das romantische Forschungsprogramm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Köchy

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Article in German, Abstracts in English, German and Spanish. The wholeness of natureAlexander von Humboldt and the romantic research programIt does not seem to be clear whether there is a tight junction between the humboldian science and the romantic research program. But by recognizing the principal aim of Humboldts concept – the representation of nature as a whole – one can see how Humboldts view has been developed in contact with romantic ideas. This investigation analyses Humboldts research program in consideration of its main features and the special relations between science, philosophy of nature, feeling of nature, history and art.

  6. "Die Toten reiten schnelle." Literarische Zitate in Briefen von und an Alexander von Humboldt

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    Ingo Schwarz

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Article in GermanAbstract in English and GermanAlexander von Humboldt and his correspondents liked to enrich or embellish their letters with quotations from classic works of ancient literature as well as from recent poems, plays, or novels. This paper tries to show that references to literature were very often used in order to express thoughts and feelings more clearly not so much for impressing the recipients of letters with high education. In educated circles a good knowledge of ancient and modern works of literature was a standard requirement, which often allowed the letter writers to use quotations in a playful manner.

  7. Fluorescence optical imaging and musculoskeletal ultrasonography in juvenile idiopathic polyarticular disease before and during antirheumatic treatment - a multicenter non-interventional diagnostic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Ariane; Just, Georg Werner; Werner, Stephanie Gabriele; Oommen, Prasad T; Minden, Kirsten; Becker, Ingrid; Langer, Hans-Eckhard; Klee, Dirk; Horneff, Gerd

    2017-06-30

    Valid detection of inflamed joints is essential for correct classification, therapeutic decisions, prognosis and assessment of treatment efficacy in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Fluorescence optical imaging (FOI) enables visualization of inflammation in arthritis of finger and hand joints and might be used for monitoring. A 24-week observational study in polyarticular JIA patients newly starting treatment with methotrexate or an approved biologic was performed in three centers. Patients were evaluated clinically, by gray-scale ultrasonography (GSUS), power-Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS) and FOI at baseline, week 12 and week 24. Of 37 patients enrolled, 24 patients started methotrexate and 13 patients a biologic for the first time (etanercept n = 11, adalimumab and tocilizumab n = 1 each). Mean JADAS 10 decreased significantly from 17.7 at baseline to 12.2 and 7.2 at week 12 and 24 respectively. PedACR 30/50/70/100 response rates at week 24 were 85%/73%/50%/27%. The total number of clinically active joints in hand and fingers at baseline/week 12/week 24 was 262 (23.6%)/162 (16.4%)/162 (9.0%). By GSUS, at baseline/week 12/week 24, 192 (19.4%)/135 (16.1%)/83 (11.5%) joints showed effusions and 186 (18.8%)/107 (12.7%)/69 (9.6%) showed synovial thickening, and by PDUS 68 (6.9%)/15 (1.8%)/36 (5%) joints showed hyperperfusion. Any sign of arthritis was detected by US in a total of 243 joints (24.5%) at baseline, 161 joints (19.2%) at week 12 and 123 joints (17%) at week 24. By FOI at baseline/week 12/week 24, 430 (38.7%)/280 (29.2%)/215 (27.6%) showed a signal enhancement in at least one phase. Summarizing all three points of time, the highest numbers of signals were detected by FOI with 32% of joints, especially in phase 2, while by US 20.7% and by clinical examination 17.5% of joints were active. A high number of joints (21.1%) had FOI signals but were inactive by clinical examination. A total 20.1% of joints with signals in FOI did not show effusion

  8. Pediatric cardiology. Clinical and practical experiences with heart diseases of children, juveniles and young adults; Kinderkardiologie. Klinik und Praxis der Herzerkrankungen bei Kindern, Jugendlichen und jungen Erwachsenen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, Nikolaus A. [Herz- und Diabeteszentrum NRW, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany). Klinik fuer angeborene Herzfehler; Kleideiter, Ulrich [Klinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Coesfeld (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The book on pediatric cardiology covers the following chapters: (I) Fundamentals and diagnostics: pediatric cardiologic anamnesis, electrocardiograms, thorax X-radiography, MRT and CT of the heart, nuclear medical diagnostics, exercise tests, heart catheter examination, electrophysiological tests. (II) Leading symptoms: Cyanosis, cardiac murmur, thorax pain, palpitation, syncopes. (III) Disease pictures: congenital heart defects, acquired heart defects, cardiomyopathies, heart rhythm disturbances, heart insufficiency, arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, other heart involving syndromes. (IV) Therapy: Catheter interventional therapy, post-surgical pediatric cardiac therapy, surgery involving the life-support machine, mechanical cardiovascular support systems, initial treatment of newborns with critical heart defects, heart transplantation, vaccination of children with heart diseases, medicinal therapy.

  9. Alexander Dalgarno

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jane L.

    Alex Dalgarno saved my career. I entered the Graduate School at Harvard in the Chemistry Department in September of 1973 from the University of Michigan, where I had (unfortunately) majored in Chemistry. Chemistry is considered a "laboratory science" but I had no talent in the laboratory. I had merely fallen in love with the ideal gas law in high school, and I had stubbornly allowed this to determine my course of studies, most of which had nothing to do with the ideal gas law, and much of which was focused on laboratory studies...

  10. Juvenile prison in parallel legislation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutovac Mitar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for punishment of juveniles occurred from the time when there was no clear line separating them from the adult criminal population. At the same time, the evolution of the juvenile punishment is not in itself involve substantial changes to their criminal status. On the contrary, the status of minors in society did not show serious differences regarding the status of young adults, as well as the adult elderly. On the other hand, on the ground of their punishment is recorded deviations that go in the direction of application of mild corporal punishment. Closing the minor was performed in a physically separate parts of the general penal institutions with the use of a lower degree of restrictions while serving juvenile prison. Due to the different treatment of minors during the evolution of their criminal status leads to their different treatment in comparative law. That is why we are witnessing the existence of numerous differences in the juvenile punishment in some countries in the world. On the European continent there is a wide range of different legal solutions when it comes to punishing juveniles. There are considerable differences in the procedure pronouncing juvenile prison and in particular penal treatment of juveniles in penitentiary institutions. For these reasons, the author has decided to show the basic statutory provisions in the part that relates to the issue of punishment of minors in the legislation of individual countries.

  11. Recurrent giant juvenile fibroadenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn S. King

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Breast masses in children, though rare, present a difficult clinical challenge as they can represent a wide variety of entities from benign fibroadenomas to phyllodes tumors. Rapidly growing or recurrent masses can be particularly concerning to patients, families and physicians alike. Clinical examination and conventional imaging modalities are not efficacious in distinguishing between different tumor types and surgical excision is often recommended for both final diagnosis and for treatment of large or rapidly growing masses. While surgical excision can result in significant long-term deformity of the breast there are some surgical techniques that can be used to limit deformity and/or aid in future reconstruction. Here we present a case of recurrent giant juvenile fibroadenoma with a review of the clinical presentation, diagnostic tools and treatment options.

  12. Fetal and juvenile radiotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    A number of studies conducted under this project have demonstrated that many of the biological parameters used to calculate permissible levels of exposure of adults to radioactive materials are inappropriate for the rapidly growing infant or child or for the pregnant female. These include age-related differences in radionuclide deposition, distribution, and retention and associated differences in microdosimetry, as well as the greater intrinsic radiosensitivity of the immature organism. These findings emphasize the need for more detailed information on the metabolism and toxicity of radionuclides in the prenatal and juvenile mammal. The continuing objective of this project is to obtain such information, which is needed to establish appropriate exposure limits for radionuclides of greatest potential hazard to these age groups

  13. Juvenile delinquency and correctional treatment in Britain

    OpenAIRE

    堀尾, 良弘; ホリオ, ヨシヒロ; Yoshihiro, Horio

    2006-01-01

    Japanese modernistic culture is influenced not a little from Britain. In looking at the Juvenile Law and the history of correctional treatment in Britain, understanding of today's juvenile delinquency and treatment deepen. Moreover, the background and issue of juvenile delinquency in Britain are also discussed. As a feature of the juvenile delinquency in Britain, the common field with Japan and the field peculiar to Britain became clear in each. It is common to the world that the juvenile del...

  14. The architect Alexander Iosif Bernardazzi (1831–1907 and his first projects in Bessarabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Chastina

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This year marks the 185th birthday of the famous architect A. I. Bernardazzi, who is also known for creating various historic buildings in the Northern Caucasus, Ukraine and Bessarabia. The archival documents provide evidence of the beginning of Bernardazzi’s architectural career, when he was appointed as technician for the arrangement of the towns Akkerman and Bendery in 1853, as well as for building some bridges and causeways in those districts. In 1855 he participated in the setting of the third market at the Forest square, which was his first mission in Kishinev. Alexander Bernardazzi performed the duty of municipal architect from 1856 to 1878 replacing Luca Zaushkevich, another architect of Kishinev. In Bessarabia he designed and built buildings such as the temporary theatre, the Lutheran school, the railway station, the Greek Church, Manuk-Bey’s Palace etc. He also dealt with the pavement of streets, the construction of the urban water supply system and the cast-iron fence in Kishinev public garden. After his departure to Odessa, in the second half of the XX century, Alexander Bernardazzi continued to design social facilities in Bessarabia, which became best examples of European architecture.

  15. Trace element analysis of Alexander the Great's silver tetradrachms minted in Macedonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallithrakas-Kontos, N. E-mail: kalli@mred.tuc.gr; Katsanos, A.A.; Touratsoglou, J

    2000-11-01

    The coinage of Alexander the Great presents a special interest because of its international character in the frame of the ancient times. At least 31 mints (from Aigai to Babylon and from Pella to Alexandreia) operated in the vast state, which was created by Alexander in just over 10 years (334-323 BC). Impressive quantities of tetradrachms were consequently minted for the economic affairs of an expanding state. The mints continued to be active and after the premature death of the Macedonian king, producing among others and tetradrachms in his name. The elemental chemical composition of silver tetradrachms minted in Amphipolis as well as in other Macedonian Greek cities was analysed by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), and 12 elements were determined. The problem of the patina (silver corrosion layer) effects on the results was examined by analysis before and after the corrosion product removal. From the results of the chemical composition, a similar numismatic policy is deduced for all the analysed coin as well as metal provenance indications for some of the coins.

  16. Identität und Differenz Goethes Faust und Alexander von Humboldt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Krumpel

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Article in German, Abstracts in English, Spanish and GermanIn the article “Identity and difference between Goethe`s Faust and Alexander von Humboldt” the issue of how much Faust is contained in Humboldt and in which way Goethe`s Faust has to be related to Alexander von Humboldt is discussed. Here the connection of activity, knowledge and vision as well as the relationship between humans and nature are central to the examination. Goethe and Humboldt were greatly influenced by the enlightenment. Their ideas and visions show us today that modernity is an incomplete project. In Goethe`s Faust the question of the essence of mankind is posed because there is a hint of Faust and Mephisto in each human. With Humboldt those principles acted among other things as a driving force for greater productitivity and the extraction of knowledge. Even though Faust did not fail in his bet with Mephisto, on the other hand he also did not win. Humboldt, however, would have won the bet. Considering the global ecological crisis and regional conflicts today the idea of the relation of Goethe´s Faust and Humboldt has an astonishing relevance.

  17. UKRAINIAN HUT AS THE ARCHETYPAL MODEL IN THE WORKS OF ALEXANDER DOVZHENKO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YEVSEYEVA H. P.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Raising of problem. Archetypal model of national dwelling is the basic and determining element of material and spiritual culture, because design features, decorative artwork, ornamentation housing, amulet symbols as elements of the home’s interior structure the ideological system and act as a kind of code for understanding the primary landmark of the national worldview. The purpose. Identify the main components of the design features of the Ukrainian house image on the material of the story "Izba" and the tale "the Enchanted Desna" Alexander Dovzhenko. Conclusions. Research of reproduction features of the Ukrainian hut image in the art world of Alexander Dovzhenko allowed to structure arhetipo model of national dwelling, which appears as the center of the universe and as the source of all organic life forms. Antagonism of the profane and of the sacred can be solved through a paradoxical focus of such binary oppositions as power/spiritual strength, closeness/openness. An important means of the essential characteristics revealing of the house image is the apophaticism device.

  18. Trace element analysis of Alexander the Great's silver tetradrachms minted in Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallithrakas-Kontos, N.; Katsanos, A.A.; Touratsoglou, J.

    2000-01-01

    The coinage of Alexander the Great presents a special interest because of its international character in the frame of the ancient times. At least 31 mints (from Aigai to Babylon and from Pella to Alexandreia) operated in the vast state, which was created by Alexander in just over 10 years (334-323 BC). Impressive quantities of tetradrachms were consequently minted for the economic affairs of an expanding state. The mints continued to be active and after the premature death of the Macedonian king, producing among others and tetradrachms in his name. The elemental chemical composition of silver tetradrachms minted in Amphipolis as well as in other Macedonian Greek cities was analysed by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), and 12 elements were determined. The problem of the patina (silver corrosion layer) effects on the results was examined by analysis before and after the corrosion product removal. From the results of the chemical composition, a similar numismatic policy is deduced for all the analysed coin as well as metal provenance indications for some of the coins

  19. Alexander of Macedon, the greatest warrior of all times: did he have seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, John R

    2004-10-01

    Alexander the Great (356-323 BC) was likely "the most incomparable general the world has ever seen." His name is often listed among the famous individuals in history who have had seizures. Examination of his illnesses reveals that in 333 BC he entered Tarsus, hot and exhausted, and plunged himself into the River Cydnus, ice-cold from melting mountain snows. His cramps were so severe that he was rescued half-conscious and ashen white, and quickly developed acute pneumonia. Only one doctor dared give him a medication, known for producing powerful and immediate effects. Immediately after drinking this medicine "he lost his speech and falling into a swoon, he had scarcely any sense or pulse left" (Plutarch, ad 75). His reactions were the direct effect of the medication, and this and only this phrase represents the "evidence" for epilepsy. None of his other illnesses involved seizures. Clearly, Alexander the Great did not have epilepsy and his name should be removed from the list of famous individuals who have had seizures.

  20. Randomised controlled trial of Alexander technique lessons, exercise, and massage (ATEAM) for chronic and recurrent back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Paul; Lewith, George; Webley, Fran; Evans, Maggie; Beattie, Angela; Middleton, Karen; Barnett, Jane; Ballard, Kathleen; Oxford, Frances; Smith, Peter; Yardley, Lucy; Hollinghurst, Sandra; Sharp, Debbie

    2008-08-19

    To determine the effectiveness of lessons in the Alexander technique, massage therapy, and advice from a doctor to take exercise (exercise prescription) along with nurse delivered behavioural counselling for patients with chronic or recurrent back pain. Factorial randomised trial. 64 general practices in England. 579 patients with chronic or recurrent low back pain; 144 were randomised to normal care, 147 to massage, 144 to six Alexander technique lessons, and 144 to 24 Alexander technique lessons; half of each of these groups were randomised to exercise prescription. Normal care (control), six sessions of massage, six or 24 lessons on the Alexander technique, and prescription for exercise from a doctor with nurse delivered behavioural counselling. Roland Morris disability score (number of activities impaired by pain) and number of days in pain. Exercise and lessons in the Alexander technique, but not massage, remained effective at one year (compared with control Roland disability score 8.1: massage -0.58, 95% confidence interval -1.94 to 0.77, six lessons -1.40, -2.77 to -0.03, 24 lessons -3.4, -4.76 to -2.03, and exercise -1.29, -2.25 to -0.34). Exercise after six lessons achieved 72% of the effect of 24 lessons alone (Roland disability score -2.98 and -4.14, respectively). Number of days with back pain in the past four weeks was lower after lessons (compared with control median 21 days: 24 lessons -18, six lessons -10, massage -7) and quality of life improved significantly. No significant harms were reported. One to one lessons in the Alexander technique from registered teachers have long term benefits for patients with chronic back pain. Six lessons followed by exercise prescription were nearly as effective as 24 lessons. National Research Register N0028108728.

  1. Book review: An Introduction to Audio Content Analysis: Applications in Signal Processing and Music Informatics by Alexander Lerch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturm, Bob L.

    2013-01-01

    A critical review of the book: An Introduction to Audio Content Analysis: Applications in Signal Processing and Music Informatics, by Alexander Lerch, October 2012, Wiley-IEEE Press. ISBN: 978-1-118-26682-3, Hardcover, 272 pages, 503 references. List price $125.00......A critical review of the book: An Introduction to Audio Content Analysis: Applications in Signal Processing and Music Informatics, by Alexander Lerch, October 2012, Wiley-IEEE Press. ISBN: 978-1-118-26682-3, Hardcover, 272 pages, 503 references. List price $125.00...

  2. Review of the secret committees deal with old beliver’s schism in the reign of the Emperor Alexander I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serebrjakova Julija

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses a history of secret committees deal with measures against old believer’s schism. The author studied archival documents possible to consider confessional politics of the Emperor Alexander I as a new stage of struggle with the old believer’s schism. The first secret committee was established by order of Emperor Alexander I in 1820. This committee was a unique phenomenon in the history of the secret committees of the 19th century and the first experience ofjoint efforts of Church and State against.

  3. Group Work with Juvenile Delinquents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimpfer, David G.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews group work literature on juvenile delinquents. Presents overview of interventions, including positive peer culture, cognitive-behavioral treatment, psychoeducational treatment, treatment of learned behavior, action-oriented treatment, milieu therapy, parental involvement, assertiveness training, and music therapy. Discusses outcome…

  4. Bilateral, independent juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørkenborg, Marie-Louise; Frendø, M; Stavngaard, T

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a benign, vascular tumour that primarily occurs in adolescent males. Despite its benign nature, aggressive growth patterns can cause potential life-threatening complications. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is normally unilateral, originating...... from the sphenopalatine artery, but bilateral symptoms can occur if a large tumour extends to the contralateral side of the nasopharynx. This paper presents the first reported case of true bilateral extensive juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma involving clinically challenging pre-surgical planning...... embolisation. Radical removal performed as one-step, computer-assisted functional endoscopic sinus surgery was performed. The follow-up period was uncomplicated. CONCLUSION: This case illustrates the importance of suspecting bilateral juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in patients presenting with bilateral...

  5. A Giant Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüce, Salim; Uysal, İsmail Önder; Doğan, Mansur; Polat, Kerem; Şalk, İsmail; Müderris, Suphi

    2012-01-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) are locally growing highly vascular tumours. They are treated primarily by surgical excision ranging from open approach to endoscopic approach. We presented a 20-year-old male with a giant nasopharyngeal juvenile angiofibroma obliterating the pterygopalatine fossa bilaterally, invasing the sphenoid bone and extending to the left nasal passage. His complaints were epistaxis and nasal obstruction. After embolization, the patient was treated surgically with endoscopic approach and discharged as cured without any complication. PMID:23714961

  6. Uveitis and Juvenile Psoriatic Arthritis or Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salek, Sherveen S; Pradeep, Archana; Guly, Catherine; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Rosenbaum, James T

    2018-01-01

    To describe the phenotype of the uveitis that accompanies juvenile psoriatic arthritis or psoriasis. Observational case series. Setting: Two university-based referral clinics: 1 in England, 1 in the United States. Five children with uveitis and psoriatic arthritis and 1 with uveitis and psoriasis Observational Procedure: Retrospective chart review. Demographics of subjects such as age and sex; description of ocular and joint disease; surgical and other complications; medical treatment. Five of the 6 children in this series had the onset of disease at or before age 6 (P = .0008 compared to expected age of onset for psoriatic arthritis in childhood). All children in this series had an inadequate response to topical corticosteroids. Most of the children were treated with systemic corticosteroids for many months, yet all of them went on to require methotrexate. Therapy with systemic methotrexate did not suffice, as all the patients also required some form of biologic therapy. Five of 6 had surgeries such as vitrectomy, cataract extraction, or a procedure for glaucoma control. The observations suggest that the uveitis that accompanies juvenile psoriatic arthritis might be a distinct disease that is particularly severe when its onset affects children aged 6 years or younger. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Patients' views of receiving lessons in the Alexander technique and an exercise prescription for managing back pain in the ATEAM trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardley, Lucy; Dennison, Laura; Coker, Rebecca; Webley, Frances; Middleton, Karen; Barnett, Jane; Beattie, Angela; Evans, Maggie; Smith, Peter; Little, Paul

    2010-04-01

    Lessons in the Alexander Technique and exercise prescription proved effective for managing low back pain in primary care in a clinical trial. To understand trial participants' expectations and experiences of the Alexander Technique and exercise prescription. A questionnaire assessing attitudes to the intervention, based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour, was completed at baseline and 3-month follow-up by 183 people assigned to lessons in the Alexander Technique and 176 people assigned to exercise prescription. Semi-structured interviews to assess the beliefs contributing to attitudes to the intervention were carried out at baseline with14 people assigned to the lessons in the Alexander Technique and 16 to exercise prescription, and at follow-up with 15 members of the baseline sample. Questionnaire responses indicated that attitudes to both interventions were positive at baseline but became more positive at follow-up only in those assigned to lessons in the Alexander Technique. Thematic analysis of the interviews suggested that at follow-up many patients who had learned the Alexander Technique felt they could manage back pain better. Whereas many obstacles to exercising were reported, few barriers to learning the Alexander Technique were described, since it 'made sense', could be practiced while carrying out everyday activities or relaxing, and the teachers provided personal advice and support. Using the Alexander Technique was viewed as effective by most patients. Acceptability may have been superior to exercise because of a convincing rationale and social support and a better perceived fit with the patient's particular symptoms and lifestyle.

  8. Impact of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Associated Uveitis in Early Adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, AJW; Vernie, Lenneke A; Rothova, Aniki; V D Doe, Patricia; Los, Leonoor I; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E; de Boer, Joke H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as 'JIA-uveitis') has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was to analyze

  9. Impact of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Associated Uveitis in Early Adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, Anne-Mieke J. W.; Vernie, Lenneke A.; Rothova, Aniki; van der Doe, Patricia; Los, Leonoor I.; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E.; de Boer, Joke H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as 'JIA-uveitis') has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was to analyze

  10. Impact of juvenile idiopathic arthritis associated uveitis in early adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, A.-M.J.W. (Anne-Mieke J. W.); Vernie, L.A. (Lenneke A.); A. Rothová (Aniki); Doe, P.V.D. (Patricia V. D.); L.I. Los (Leonoor I.); N.E. Schalij-Delfos (Nicoline); J.H. de Boer (Joke)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as 'JIA-uveitis') has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was

  11. Non-HLA gene polymorphisms in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alberdi-Saugstrup, M.; Enevold, C.; Zak, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that non-HLA single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are risk factors for an unfavourable disease outcome at long-term follow-up. Methods: The Nordic JIA cohort is a prospective multicentre study cohort...

  12. A rare case of juvenile dermatomyositis and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali T Bharani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are rare group of systemic connective tissue diseases. The hallmark of these disorders is symmetrical chronic inflammation and weakness of proximal muscles. Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM is the most common inflammatory myositis in children. We describe a rare case of JDM in a 4-year-old female child who presented with characteristic cutaneous rash and proximal muscle weakness.

  13. Acute respiratory failure in 3 children with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Britt; Hellebostad, Marit; Ifversen, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is a rare hematopoietic stem cell disease in children with features of both myelodysplasia and myeloproliferation. Extramedullary involvement has been reported and pulmonary involvement secondary to leukemic infiltration is an initial manifestation, which may resu...... in acute respiratory failure....

  14. Analysis of the Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Immunization Schedule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Namazova-Baranova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The connection between vaccination and autoimmune diseases (and rheumatic pathology in particular is still a subject of discussions. When discussing the possibility of vaccinating rheumatic patients we should take into account the ultra high dangers that infectious diseases pose for such patients, including those that can be prevented by vaccination. We should also take into account the experience of using various vaccine types in rheumatic patients, which illustrates of their high safety profile.Objective: Our aim was to study the immunization schedule in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.Methods: The evaluation of vaccine history and other anamnestic data in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients was based on individual medical records (individual child’s card/preventive vaccination certificate, as well as questionnaires filled by mothers.Results: It has been determined that a significant proportion of children with vaccination schedule deviations are juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients. Almost one in four children with a confirmed rheumatic diagnosis has not been immunized against the major vaccine-preventable diseases. In one non-vaccinated group, there was a case of juvenile arthritis onset after recovering from measles. A small number of patient mothers connects the manifestation of rheumatic diseases with vaccination.Conclusion: Violations of vaccination status in JIA patients require corrections according to the results of clinical studies and the recommendations of international experts.

  15. [Child-juvenile prostitution: a systematic literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Moneda Oliveira; Dias, Aretuzza de Fátima

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how infant-juvenile prostitution is being explained by researchers through an extensive bibliographical survey on national and international scientific sources. It was possible to access 20 references in full text form, which were analyzed according to the Content Analysis method. The analysis consisted in answering how infant-juvenile prostitution is represented by the author in relation to the concepts, causes, effects and solutions described in the references. It was found that the authors approached the subject as a way of survival, resulting from an unequal society, adult-centered and male chauvinist causing mental and physical diseases in children.

  16. New developments in juvenile systemic and localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foeldvari, Ivan

    2013-11-01

    Juvenile localized scleroderma (jLS) and juvenile systemic sclerosis (jSS) are both orphan diseases, with jLS around 10 times more frequent than jSS. In recent years the time gap between the appearance of symptoms and diagnosis has become significantly shorter. This review focuses on the new classifications of jSS and jLS, and on the developments and adaptations of the outcome measures for certain organ involvements whereby progress has been made regarding pediatric patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... myeloproliferative neoplasms, leukemia , and other conditions . Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Key Points Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is a disease ... chance of recovery) and treatment options. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is a disease in which too many myelocytes ...

  18. Fetal and juvenile radiotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikov, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    This project is directed at obtaining detailed comparative information on the deposition, distribution, retention, and toxicity of radionuclides in the prenatal and juvenile mammal. Because quantitative data cannot necessarily be extrapolated to man, emphasis is also directed toward establishing patterns, phenomenologic interactions, and relationships which will be useful in determining appropriate exposure levels for rapidly growing infants or children and for pregnant women. Further dosimetry for an experiment to evaluate the effects of foster-rearing of newborn rats on the lifetime effects of 239 Pu exposure has demonstrated that most of the lifetime burden is derived from prenatal exposure and that milk contributes little in addition. Other measurements have confirmed a tentative observation that the lifetime burden in offspring is greater with near-term exposure than with exposure earlier in gestation. Additional results from a comparison of the embryotoxicity of 239 Pu and 241 Am have confirmed that, on the basis of dose administered to the dam, the former has a greater effect on the conceptus. Pilot studies indicate that 233 U is teratogenic, acting as a chemical rather than as a radiological teratogen. Studies with 239 Pu-exposed pregnant rabbits have shown that maternal distribution differs from that in rodents; concentration patterns in the placenta and membranes also differed. 4 figures, 1 table

  19. Fetal and juvenile radiotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikov, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    This project is directed at obtaining detailed comparative information on the deposition, distribution, retention, and toxicity of radionuclides in the prenatal and juvenile mammal. Because quantitative data cannot necessarily be extrapolated to man, our emphasis is directed toward establishing patterns, phenomenologic interactions, and relationships which will be useful in determining appropriate exposure levels for the rapidly growing infant or child, and for pregnant women. Recent results demonstrated that injection of pregnant rats with 23 Pu had the greatest effect on longevity and bone-tumor incidence of the offspring when exposure occurred at 19 days of gestation (dg); less effect at 15 dg and the least effect at 9 dg. Ongoing distribution studies are providing data which confirm our tentative explanation that marked variations in the anatomic distributions of bone tumors, with age at the time of injection, were attributable to age-related differences in 239 Pu microdosimetry and concentrations among skeletal components. Other studies, using a placental perfusion technique, have demonstrated that intravenous injection of 239 Pu in pregnant guinea pigs leads to a marked decrease in maternal blood flow to the placenta

  20. Fetal and juvenile radiotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikov, M.R.

    1983-01-01

    Comparative information on the deposition, distribution, retention, and toxicity of radionuclides in the prenatal and juvenile mammal is reported. Emphasis is toward establishing patterns, phenomenologic interactions, and relationships which will be useful in determining appropriate exposure levels for the rapidly growing infant or child and for pregnant women. Recent results have shown that injection of pregnant rats with 239 Pu increases the incidence and severity of adenomatous hyperplasia of the liver in the offspring; the magnitude of these effects is relatd to dose and prenatal age at exposure. Analysis of combined data from several experiments leads to the conclusion that perinatal rats are more sensitive to bone tumor induction by 239 Pu alpha-particle irradiation than are adults. Further histopathologic evaluations of material from earlier experiments have demonstrated that most of the increased incidence of thyroid tumors following 131 I exposure is attributable to follicular tumors. An analysis of the literature led to the conclusion that prenatal irradiation can lead to an increased or decreased incidence of tumors, depending on the specific details of the experimental design and system

  1. Fetal and juvenile radiotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikov, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    This project is directed at obtaining detailed comparative information on the deposition, distribution, retention, and toxicity of radionuclides in the prenatal and juvenile mammal. Because quantitative data cannot necessarily be extrapolated to man, emphasis is also directed toward establishing patterns, phenomenologic interactions, and relationships which will be useful in determining appropriate exposure levels for the rapidly growing infant or child and for pregnant women. An experiment to evaluate the effects of foster-rearing of newborn rats on the lifetime effects of 239 Pu exposure has demonstrated that, while longevity is primarily dependent on radiation history, growth rate and adult body weight are related to the exposure and fitness of the foster dam. Results from an ongoing comparison of the dosimetry and embryotoxicity of 239 Pu and 241 Am confirm that the former has a greater effect on the conceptus, on the basis of dose administered to the dam. Studies in the guinea-pig perfusion system have confirmed that maternal blood flow to the placenta is decreased by intravenous doses of 30 nCi/g 239 Pu and suggest that the threshold lies at approximately 5 nCi/g body weight. A dose of 30 nCi/g of 241 Am does not affect blood flow. Clearance of the two actinides is similar when blood flow effects are not considered. 3 figures, 3 tables

  2. Nasal juvenile angiofibroma: Current perspectives with emphasis on management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Fernando; Triantafyllou, Asterios; Snyderman, Carl H; Hunt, Jennifer L; Suárez, Carlos; Lund, Valerie J; Strojan, Primož; Saba, Nabil F; Nixon, Iain J; Devaney, Kenneth O; Alobid, Isam; Bernal-Sprekelsen, Manuel; Hanna, Ehab Y; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2017-05-01

    Juvenile angiofibroma is an uncommon, benign, locally aggressive vascular tumor. It is found almost exclusively in young men. Common presenting symptoms include nasal obstruction and epistaxis. More advanced tumors may present with facial swelling and visual or neurological disturbances. The evaluation of patients with juvenile angiofibroma relies on diagnostic imaging. Preoperative biopsy is not recommended. The mainstay of treatment is resection combined with preoperative embolization. Endoscopic surgery is the approach of choice in early stages, whereas, in advanced stages, open or endoscopic approaches are feasible in expert hands. Postoperative radiotherapy (RT) or stereotactic radiosurgery seem valuable in long-term control of juvenile angiofibroma, particularly those that extend to anatomically critical areas unsuitable for complete resection. Chemotherapy and hormone therapy are ineffective. The purpose of the present review was to update current aspects of knowledge related to this rare and challenging disease. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 1033-1045, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Paralisia bulbar progressiva juvenil doença de Fazio-Londe: relato de caso Progressive bulbar palsy (Fazio-Londe disease: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Helena Brum Batista

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available A paralisia bulbar progressiva, também denominada doença de Fazio-Londe, caracteriza-se pelo acometimento degenerativo progressivo de nervos cranianos bulbares em crianças. Foi descrita primeiramente por Fazio em 1892 e até a presente data somente 30 casos foram relatados na literatura. Acomete ambos os sexos, assumindo dois padrões clínicos, um de início precoce (idade Progressive bulbar palsy, also called Fazio -Londe disease, is characterized by progressive impairment of cranial nerves in children. It was first reported by Fazio in 1892 and until now only 30 cases have been published in the literature. Both sexes can be affected and clinical course can be divided on early (< 6 years age, predominance of respiratory symptoms and late course (6-20 years of age, predominance of motor symptoms on superior limbs. We report a 4 years old boy that started with intense stridor and respiratory distress, initially being diagnosed as an acute asthma attack. Clinical signs worsened and 12 months latter he already had impairment of cranial nerves V, VII, VIII, IX and X confirmed by clinical examination and neurophysiological evaluation.

  4. Reminescência da Guerra Fria: Alexander Haig (02-12-1924 a 20-02-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgílio Caixeta Arraes

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available O artigo biografa o General Alexander Haig, figura de destaque na gestão de Richard Nixon e Ronald Reagan. Descreve a ambição do militar em ser ele mesmo Presidente dos Estados Unidos.

  5. Reminescência da Guerra Fria: Alexander Haig (02-12-1924 a 20-02-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgílio Caixeta Arraes

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available O artigo biografa o General Alexander Haig, figura de destaque na gestão de Richard Nixon e Ronald Reagan. Descreve a ambição do militar em ser ele mesmo Presidente dos Estados Unidos.

  6. Growing Community: The Impact of the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program on the Social and Learning Environment in Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Karen; Gibbs, Lisa; Staiger, Petra K.; Gold, Lisa; Johnson, Britt; Macfarlane, Susie; Long, Caroline; Townsend, Mardie

    2012-01-01

    This article presents results from a mixed-method evaluation of a structured cooking and gardening program in Australian primary schools, focusing on program impacts on the social and learning environment of the school. In particular, we address the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program objective of providing a pleasurable experience that has…

  7. On the Social Psychology of Higher Education: A Bibliography of Alexander W. Astin. Public Administration Series Bibliography, P-688.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quay, Richard H.

    A bibliography of articles by Alexander W. Astin on the social psychology of higher education is presented. Entries are presented by year, starting with 1980 and dating back to 1956. Topics that are covered include: equal access to higher education, student persistence and attrition, higher education policy, selective admissions and open…

  8. Riding on the Back of a Giant: Adding Malta to the "5 Cultures" Study by Robin Alexander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peresso, Randolph

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the methodology adopted for Malta+5, which builds on Robin Alexander's work by comparing the five pedagogical cultures he studied to the one in Malta. It reflects critically on the research process adopted in this study, and shows how, despite the very limited experience and resources, applying the methodology, frameworks and…

  9. Alexander Claver, Dutch Commerce and Chinese Merchants in Java. Colonial Relationships in Trade and Finance, 1800-1942

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwee Hui Kian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Alexander Claver, Dutch Commerce and Chinese Merchants in Java. Colonial Relationships in Trade and Finance, 1800-1942 (Verhandelingen van het Koninklijk Instituut voor Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde 291; Leiden, Boston: Brill, 2014, xxiv + 442 pp., ISBN 978 90 04 25657 6.

  10. Reduced metabolic disease risk profile by voluntary wheel running accompanying juvenile Western diet in rats bred for high and low voluntary exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruegsegger, Gregory N; Toedebusch, Ryan G; Braselton, Joshua F; Roberts, Christian K; Booth, Frank W

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic disease risk is influenced by genetics and modifiable factors, such as physical activity and diet. Beginning at 6 weeks of age, rats selectively bred for high (HVR) versus low voluntary running distance (LVR) behaviors were housed in a complex design with or without voluntary running wheels being fed either a standard or Western (WD, 42% kcal from fat and added sucrose) diet for 8 weeks. Upon intervention completion, percent body fat, leptin, insulin, and mediobasal hypothalamic mRNAs related to appetite control were assessed. Wheel access led to differences in body weight, food intake, and serum leptin and insulin. Intriguingly, percent body fat, leptin, and insulin did not differ between HVR and LVR lines in response to the two levels of voluntary running, regardless of diet, after the 8 wk. experiment despite HVR eating more calories than LVR regardless of diet and voluntarily running 5-7 times further in wheels than LVR. In response to WD, we observed increases in Cart and Lepr mediobasal hypothalamic mRNA in HVR, but no differences in LVR. Npy mRNA was intrinsically greater in LVR than HVR, while wheel access led to greater Pomc and Cart mRNA in LVR versus HVR. These data suggest that despite greater consumption of WD, HVR animals respond similarly to WD as LVR as a result, in part, of their increased wheel running behavior. Furthermore, high physical activity in HVR may offset the deleterious effects of a WD on adiposity despite greater energy intake in this group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Der Briefwechsel zwischen Karl Kreil und Alexander von Humboldt, ein wichtiger Beitrag zur Geschichte des Erdmagnetismus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Reich

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The correspondence between Alexander von Humboldt und Karl Kreil was voluminous, it concerned earth magnetism. But only one letter has survived. This letter was written by Kreil on September 3, 1836; one day later Kreil wrote a letter to Carl Friedrich Gauss with nearly the same contents, some sentences are even literally corresponding. Four letters from Kreil to Humboldt were published in the „Annalen der Physik und Chemie“. Some letters were mentioned in the biographical literature dealing with Kreil. These letters show, that the correspondence covered at least the period until 1851 and give information about the intensive relationship between the two scientists. A further interesting source is the library of Humboldt which unfortunately has not survived. The catalogue mentions nine works of Kreil some of them where annotated by Humboldt. This makes it plausible that the contacts even lasted until 1856. Zusammenfassung Die Korrespondenz zwischen Alexander von Humboldt und Karl Kreil war umfangreich und betraf den Erdmagnetismus. Aber heute ist nur noch ein einziger Brief im Original bekannt. Dieser Brief, den Kreil am 3. September 1836 Alexander von Humboldt zukommen ließ, stimmt inhaltlich und teilweise wortwörtlich mit dem Brief überein, den Kreil nur einen Tag später, am 4. September 1836, an Carl Friedrich Gauß schickte. Vier Briefe von Kreil an Humboldt wurden in den „Annalen der Physik und Chemie“ publiziert, eine nicht allzu große Anzahl weiterer Briefe an Humboldt wurde in der biographischen Literatur über Kreil und in Briefen Kreils an Koller und Gauß erwähnt. Aber nicht nur die lückenhafte und bruchstückhaft bekannte Korrespondenz zwischen Humboldt und Kreil, die bis 1851 reicht, gibt Aufschluss über die Beziehungen, sondern von besonderer Bedeutung ist des Weiteren der Bestand an Kreiliana in der Bibliothek Humboldts. Es handelt sich um neun Werke Kreils, das letzte aus dem Jahr 1856. Nachweisbare

  12. Finding revelation in anthropology: Alexander Winchell, William Robertson Smith and the heretical imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, David N

    2015-09-01

    Anthropological inquiry has often been considered an agent of intellectual secularization. Not least is this so in the sphere of religion, where anthropological accounts have often been taken to represent the triumph of naturalism. This metanarrative, however, fails to recognize that naturalistic explanations could sometimes be espoused for religious purposes and in defence of confessional creeds. This essay examines two late nineteenth-century figures--Alexander Winchell in the United States and William Robertson Smith in Britain--who found in anthropological analysis resources to bolster rather than undermine faith. In both cases these individuals found themselves on the receiving end of ecclesiastical censure and were dismissed from their positions at church-governed institutions. But their motivation was to vindicate divine revelation, in Winchell's case from the physical anthropology of human origins and in Smith's from the cultural anthropology of Semitic ritual.

  13. From Alexander von Humboldt to Frederic Edwin Church: Voyages of Scientific Exploration and Artistic Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Baron

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Article in English, Abstracts in Spanish, German and English.Stephen Jay Gould wrote recently that “when Church began to paint his great canvases, Alexander von Humboldt may well have been the world’s most famous and influential intellectual.” Humboldt’s influence in the case of the landscape artist Church is especially interesting. If we examine the precise relationship between the German explorer and his American admirer, we gain an insight into how Humboldt transformed Church’s life and signaled a new phase in the career of the artist. Church retraced Humboldt’s travels in Ecuador and in Mexico. If we compare the texts available to Church and the comparison of Church’s paintings and the texts and images of Humboldt’s works we can arrive at new perspectives on Humboldt’s extraordinary influence on American landscape painting in the nineteenth century.

  14. Comparative-historical method in Slavic linguistics and Alexander Vostokov’s philological intuitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melkov Andrey Sergeevich

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the estimation of Alexander Vostokov’s (1781-1864 contribution to the formation and development of the Slavic philology as a scientific discipline. In the foundation of the research there is the analyses of Vostokov’s work “Judgement about the Slavic language”, which has become the result of the scientist’s study the oldest Russian manuscript “Ostromir Gospels”. Vostokov devised a new method for the Slavic philology, which is used to call comparative-historical in modern science. The scientist gave the beginning of Old Church Slavonic and Old Russian written monuments scientific researching. Thanks to Vostokov’s discoveries, there has been formed the basis of Russian comparative-historical linguistics.

  15. The birth of Russian intelligentsia from the spirit of enlightenment: Alexander Radishchev (I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subotić Milan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This text is the first part of a larger study about Alexander Radishchev, one of the leading representatives of Enlightenment in Russia's XVIII Century. Analyzing Voltaire's and Diderot's relationship with Catherine II, the Empress of Russia, in the Introduction of this article, the author formulates the reasons for thematization of Russian reception of Enlightenment. Since Radishchev is considered as 'the father of Russian intelligentsia', different approaches to the meaning of the concept of 'Russian intelligentsia' are considered in the first chapter. Radishchev's biography is interpreted in the second chapter in order to facilitate the understanding of his ideas. Interpretation of his ideas, as well as of Catherina's 'enlightened absolutism', will be subject to further consideration in the second part of the study.

  16. Analysis of the karyotype of Callisia elegans Alexand. (Commelinaceae including differential staining of chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Weryszko-Chmielewska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The number and morphology of Callisia elegans Alexand. chromosomes were studied employing staining with acetic carmine and differential Giemsa staining. It was found that its karyotype was 2n = 12 chromosomes, whose lengths fell in the range of 16.8 to 8.8 µm. The chomosomes, arranged in order of length, were classified respectively to types: sm, t, t, t, t, st. The distribution of C-banding is given for this karyotype. The presence of microsatellites on the long and short arms was found in the chromosomes of the second pair. Frequently there were 4 nucleoli of unequal size in interphase nuclei. In many cells, lower numbers of nucleoli (3-1 were seen which was -probably due to their fusion. The maximum number of nucleoli corresponded to the number of nucleolar organizers accompanying the satellites.

  17. Decentralised energy supply as our future energy supply system? - An interview with Prof. Alexander Wokaun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, Ch.

    2002-01-01

    In this interview with Professor Alexander Wokaun, head of General Energy Research at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Villigen, Switzerland, the decentralised use of small, gas-fired combined heat and power (CHP) units is discussed as a means of meeting Switzerland's Kyoto CO 2 commitments. The question on which of several new CHP technologies such as gas-fired engines and turbines, Stirling engines, fuel cells and thermo-photovoltaics will win the race is discussed. The efficiency and application areas of CHP technologies are examined and the problems involved when controlling complex electricity grids with many small decentrally placed generating facilities is discussed. Finally, Professor Wokaun is asked for his opinion on what the Swiss power mix will look like in 20 years

  18. Alexander von Humboldt: The American Hemisphere and TransArea Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottmar Ette

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available From the very first landing in a bounteous tropical world, European wonderment in the face of so many marvels naturally possessed a dimension that strived for knowledge and tried to conjoin a new world with old and antiquarian knowledge in a very reductionist fashion. Is Alexander von Humboldt therefore merely a new, a “second Columbus,” as he was so often described in the further course of the history of his reception? Does he simply repeat the gestures and res gestae for which the great discoverers had already set the example and in a way even predetermined? Are Humboldt and Bonpland thus caught in the trap of the perception of the other in occidental culture that enters the gray area of colonial expansion and an imperial(ist view?

  19. A Alexander von Humboldt, el Ciudadano Universal, en su natalicio 245

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Leonardo De Sousa

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hace 245 años, en la escala del tiempo del planeta, Alexander von Humboldt vislumbró la luz de la vida el día 14 de septiembre de 1769. A nuestro entender fue el máximo y, quizás, uno de los últimos exponentes de ese movimiento del Enciclopedismo Europeo conocido como la Ilustración . Tal fue su contribución al conocimiento integral del territorio americano que fue calificado por el Libertador Simón Bolívar como el “ descubridor científico del Nuevo Mundo ” y declarado como Ciudadano Mexicano, en 1827, por Guadalupe Victoria (primer presidente de México y luego, como Benemérito de la Patria por el presidente mexicano Benito Juárez.

  20. Alexander Numan (1780-1852 en de veredeling van de Nederlandse schapenrassen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Oldenburger

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Alexander Numan and the improvement of the Dutch sheep breedsAlexander Numan’s life and work provide a splendid illustration of the early nineteenth-century Dutch scientist’s view of the role of science and scientists in society. As a professor at the Utrecht veterinary school he spent a substantial part of his time on a practical endeavour: the improvement of the wool quality of the Dutch sheep breeds. He did not confine his activities to the scientific aspects only, but aimed to obtain the active involvement of all relevant stakeholders in his project: the government, the sheep farmers and the wool industry.In the literature, Numan’s project is seen as a failure: the stakeholders were skeptical about his project from the beginning, as wool improvement was seen as a misguided aim. The Dutch wool industry was perfectly satisfied with the quality of the Dutch wool, and the trend among sheep breeders was to improve their sheeps’ meat meat quality rather than their wool. Eventually, the government withdrew its indispensable support.Nevertheless, Numan clung doggedly to the aim he had set himself, and the question we want to answer is this paper is why. We argue that the answer is to be found in Numan’s view of the role of science in society. His motives were not merely economic, but, first and foremost, of a moral nature. Wool quality, for him, was a measure of the level of civilization a country had reached. Social and cultural progress went hand in hand with the availability of higher quality clothing, the raw materials for which the Dutch sheep were as yet unable to provide. By providing these materials Numan was convinced to contribute directly to the well-being and cultural enhancement of the Dutch population, an objective that was characteristic of the self-fashioned private and public persona of the early nineteenth-century Dutch scientist.

  1. The Alexander Technique and musicians: a systematic review of controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Sabine D; Bayard, Claudine; Wolf, Ursula

    2014-10-24

    Musculoskeletal disorders, stress and performance anxiety are common in musicians. Therefore, some use the Alexander Technique (AT), a psycho-physical method that helps to release unnecessary muscle tension and re-educates non-beneficial movement patterns through intentional inhibition of unwanted habitual behaviours. According to a recent review AT sessions may be effective for chronic back pain. This review aimed to evaluate the evidence for the effectiveness of AT sessions on musicians' performance, anxiety, respiratory function and posture. The following electronic databases were searched up to February 2014 for relevant publications: PUBMED, Google Scholar, CINAHL, EMBASE, AMED, PsycINFO and RILM. The search criteria were "Alexander Technique" AND "music*". References were searched, and experts and societies of AT or musicians' medicine contacted for further publications. 237 citations were assessed. 12 studies were included for further analysis, 5 of which were randomised controlled trials (RCTs), 5 controlled but not randomised (CTs), and 2 mixed methods studies. Main outcome measures in RCTs and CTs were music performance, respiratory function, performance anxiety, body use and posture. Music performance was judged by external experts and found to be improved by AT in 1 of 3 RCTs; in 1 RCT comparing neurofeedback (NF) to AT, only NF caused improvements. Respiratory function was investigated in 2 RCTs, but not improved by AT training. Performance anxiety was mostly assessed by questionnaires and decreased by AT in 2 of 2 RCTs and in 2 of 2 CTs. A variety of outcome measures has been used to investigate the effectiveness of AT sessions in musicians. Evidence from RCTs and CTs suggests that AT sessions may improve performance anxiety in musicians. Effects on music performance, respiratory function and posture yet remain inconclusive. Future trials with well-established study designs are warranted to further and more reliably explore the potential of AT in the

  2. [Juvenile-onset ankylosing spondylitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menkes, C J; Job-Deslandre, C; Feldmann, J L

    1984-02-16

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) with juvenile onset (under 17 years of age) is not infrequent. Thirty-six cases were studied, amounting to 18% of patients hospitalized between 1977 and 1981. The following criteria were used for diagnosis: radiologic sacroiliitis (typical AS), presence of HLA B27 and/or pelvic or vertebral clinical manifestations (possible AS). 31 patients (85%) were boys. Mean age at onset was 12.3 +/- 2.8 years. In three cases, AS was found in a member of the family of the propositus and in one case there was cutaneous psoriasis. Usually (29 cases) onset was in the lower limbs: arthritis of the knee (14 cases), hip (9 cases), ankle (7 cases) or painful heel (4 cases). During the course (with a mean follow-up of 11.2 +/- 7 years), 35 patients exhibited peripheral joint diseases and 25 had axial involvement. Ocular involvement was present in 5 cases. 10 patients had a modification of respiratory function. Radiologic sacroiliitis was found in 31 patients but with a delay of 5.3 +/- 2.6 years. Vertebral radiologic lesions were only seen in 11 patients. Radiologic hip involvement was frequent (20 cases) with complete destruction in 6 patients. Erosion and ossification of the calcaneum were observed in 15 cases. The ESR was above 20 mm/first hour in 26 cases (72%). 81% of these patients were HLA B27 positive. Functional prognosis was good: 16 patients (51.6%) led an almost normal life, 6 were bedridden (Steinbrocker's grade IV), 3 had severe impairment (grade III) and 6 had slight impairment (grade II).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Juvenile-specific cathepsin proteases in Fasciola spp.: their characteristics and vaccine efficacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meemon, Krai; Sobhon, Prasert

    2015-08-01

    Fasciolosis, caused by Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica, is one of the most neglected tropical zoonotic diseases. One sustainable control strategy against these infections is the employment of vaccines that target proteins essential for parasites' invasion and nutrition acquiring processes. Cathepsin proteases are the most abundantly expressed proteins in Fasciola spp. that have been tested successfully as vaccines against fasciolosis in experimental as well as large animals because of their important roles in digestion of nutrients, invasion, and migration. Specifically, juvenile-specific cathepsin proteases are the more effective vaccines because they could block the invasion and migration of juvenile parasites whose immune evasion mechanism has not yet been fully developed. Moreover, because of high sequence similarity and identity of cathepsins from juveniles with those of adults, the vaccines can attack both the juvenile and adult stages. In this article, the characteristics and vaccine potentials of juvenile-specific cathepsins, i.e., cathepsins L and B, of Fasciola spp. were reviewed.

  4. Cytokine profiles in peripheral blood and whole blood cell cultures associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Sørensen, Lars Korsbaek; Stoltze, Kaj

    2005-01-01

    Cytokines play a key role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. An obvious question is whether patients with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, or rheumatoid arthritis share blood cytokine profiles distinguishing them from individuals free of disease.......Cytokines play a key role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. An obvious question is whether patients with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, or rheumatoid arthritis share blood cytokine profiles distinguishing them from individuals free of disease....

  5. REFORMATIONS IN ZIMBABWE'S JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mugumbate

    1996-05-23

    May 23, 1996 ... The article is based on a desk review of existing literature on juvenile crime in the country. ... that Zimbabwe's juvenile justice system is transforming from being ... recommendations include expanding the Pre-trial Diversion ...

  6. Participating in and delivering the ATEAM trial (Alexander technique lessons, exercise, and massage) interventions for chronic back pain: A qualitative study of professional perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Angela; Shaw, Alison; Yardley, Lucy; Little, Paul; Sharp, Debbie

    2010-01-01

    To outline professionals' experiences of participation, perceived benefits and acceptability of the interventions delivered in the ATEAM trial (Alexander technique lessons, exercise, and massage), for patients with chronic or recurrent back pain. Qualitative study using in-depth interviews was conducted with a purposeful sample of twenty professionals (general practitioners (GPs), nurses, Alexander technique teachers, and massage therapists). Data were recorded, transcribed, and analysed thematically using the constant comparison method. Evidence of effectiveness GPs wanted an evidence base for the interventions, whilst nurses, Alexander technique teachers and massage therapists perceived patient reports of benefit as evidence. Professionals' perception of the acceptability of the intervention: professional perspectives differed, with GPs and nurses viewing the structured nature of exercise prescription and Alexander technique lessons as more beneficial and acceptable than massage in alleviating patients' back pain. Economic cost: the cost to patients pursuing Alexander technique lessons and massage was perceived to be a barrier outside the trial. Inter-professional communication: there was little communication between the professionals groups within the trial. Valuable insights have been gained into the perceived benefits and acceptability of exercise, Alexander technique lessons and massage as interventions for chronic back pain. Lessons in the Alexander technique with or without exercise, was perceived as more beneficial and acceptable than massage by professionals who participated and delivered the ATEAM trial interventions. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. JUVENILE SCLERODERMA-what has changed in the meantime?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrovic, Amra; Sahin, Sezgin; Barut, Kenan; Kasapcopur, Ozgur

    2018-04-22

    Juvenile scleroderma is a rarely seen chronic connective tissue disorder characterized by stiffening of the skin. The frequency of the disease was reported as one per million. According to organ involvement, the disease is divided into two main forms: systemic and localized scleroderma. Since it is uncommon in children, many aspects of the disease remain discussable. With this review, we aimed to revise recent findings and new developments in this rare condition. Skin manifestations are most prominent feature of the systemic form, followed by musculoskeletal and vascular involvement. Cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and renal disorders are rare in childhood. Combination of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (methotrexate, mycophenolate-mofetil, cyclosporine) and steroid reprents the first line therapy. Bosentan is used for cases with pulmonary hypertension and for extensive digital ulcerations. Biological treatment emerges as a useful treatment option in most severe form of the disease. Localized scleroderma is characterized with sclerodermatosis of the skin. Internal organ involvement is not expected. Classification of the local scleroderma is made according to the size and localization of the skin changes. There are few different therapeutical options but there is no specific therapy for the localized scleroderma. Many data regarding disease features and treatment options in juvenile scleroderma are based on studies among adults. There is a striking need for multicentric, prospective studies among children with juvenile scleroderma.Emerging biological agents and new treatment options are showing promising results. Anyhow, juvenile scleroderma remains a mystery with many aspects of the disease waiting to be solved. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Juvenile technologies in foreign publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shpagina E.M.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article provides the review of foreign publications, concerning the juvenile technologies used in France, Canada, Germany and Switzerland. The paper presents legal, social and psychotherapeutic aspects of juvenile judiciary in foreign countries. The authors paid special attention to the complexity of approaches to young children and teenagers who found themselves in complicated life circumstances or got into trouble with the law. The article gives examples of using the following techniques: cognitive-behavioral intervention, mediation, family therapy (including family background and family history, relations theory, narrative practices, utilization of «emotional intelligence» resources.

  9. [Morphea or juvenile localised scleroderma: Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Alexis; Gallo, Silvanna; Jaramillo, Pedro; de Toro, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    Morphea or juvenile localised scleroderma (JLS) is an autoimmune, inflammatory, chronic, slowly progressive connective tissue disease of unknown cause that preferably affects skin and underlying tissues. To report a case of Juvenil Localised scleroderma in an 8-year old girl, contributing to an early diagnosis and treatment. The case is presented of an 8 year-old girl who presented with indurated hypopigmented plaques, of linear distribution in the right upper extremity of two years onset, together with papery texture hyperpigmented indurated plaques with whitish areas of thinned skin in right lower extremity, and leg and ankle swelling. The clinical features and diagnostic tests, including histology were compatible with linear and pansclerotic JLS. She started with immunosuppressive therapy, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy. We report a case of linear and pansclerotic ELJ type, in which there was a 2 year delay in diagnosis, however the response to treatment was positive as expected. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. [The life history of Alexander Numan (1780-1852) during his time in Groningen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathijsen, A H

    2001-01-01

    Until the time Numan took on his professorship at the newly established Veterinary School in Utrecht in 1822, he had lived in the Province of Groningen. In order to understand why the minister of Public Education appointed a village doctor from the north of the country as professor for the practice of veteriary medicine, and after some years as director of the school, it was felt essential to investigate his earlier life period. The main sources used are two obituaries, resp. written by his son who was a professor of Law at Groningen University, and by his friend prof. Willem Vrolik who was the secretary of the Academy of Science, supplemented by family histories and some archival research. After a short description of his descent, youth adn education follows the main part devoted to his writings, his medical practice and membership of the Provincial Medical Commission and the Commission for Agriculture. In an appendix some genealogical data are presented on the family of his wife and their children. Alexander lost his father, who was a minister of the Reformed Church, when he was ten years old. He received his education in the circle of family members. A brother of his father, also a minister, teached him Greek and Latin. After this uncle had left the province, he lived in the home of another minister who teached him the modern languages. As this man was involved in politics of the Baravian Republic, young Alexander was exposed to many discussions on the polity of the State. After his mother had remarried with a medical doctor, this man, and also his brother who had a medical practice in another part of the province, complemented the education with an introduction in the sciences. Experiences in their dispensaries, where some knowledge of botany and chemistry could be obtained, and discussions when accompanying them on their visits to patients, were decisive in the choice of his profession. Only at the age of twenty he entered the Medical Faculty of Groningen

  11. Juvenile Courts. Creation and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat GONZÁLEZ FERNÁNDEZ

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the creation of Juvenile or Children's Courts in Spain, analysing their reasons and aims, as well as the ethical and political connotations present on their way of acting. Their history and the one of the institutions that complement them is built from the legislation, writings and ideas of their promoters.

  12. Juvenile Justice: A Bibliographic Essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondak, Ann

    1979-01-01

    Provides information on the background and legal framework of the juvenile justice system, the issues that confront it, and the pressures for change, as well as noting some sources of information on the system. Available from American Association of Law Libraries, 53 West Jackson Blvd., Suite 1201, Chicago, Illinois 60604; sc $4.00. (Author/IRT)

  13. Juvenile European anchovy otolith microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Cermeño

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile European anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus has a complex incremental growth pattern that was studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM and optical microscope observations. Daily increments were identified and related to rhythmic growth patterns while double-band structures were identified as one increment. The causes of these growth patterns are discussed.

  14. CT appearance of juvenile angiofibroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Jun; Hara, Kazuo (Sumitomo Hospital, Osaka (Japan)); Fukuzumi, Akio; Uchida, Hideo

    1983-06-01

    Three verified cases of juvenile angiofibroma were presented. All of them were young and adolescent male CT proved to be an ideal tool in evaluating the extension of this tumor. The appearance on plain CT was multilobulated with displacement of the adjacent bony structures. On enhancement, there was intense staining of the tumor.

  15. What is Justice for Juveniles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, Jennifer Truran

    1997-01-01

    Provides background information and related learning activities for three areas of inquiry involving youth and violence: (1) "Evolution of the Juvenile Justice System"; (2) "The Literature of Crime and Poverty"; (3) "Youth Crime and Public Policy." Includes a list of six recommended Web sites. (MJP)

  16. Juvenil idiopatisk arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlin, Troels

    2002-01-01

    . In addition to the clinical characteristics, genetic and biochemical differences suggest that JIA could be regarded as a general term covering various diseases. Complications described are uveitis, temporomandibular joint affection and growth disturbances. The therapeutic strategy should be planned...... shown a promising effect in severe polyarticular JIA refractory to methotrexate treatment. Udgivelsesdato: 2002-Aug-19...

  17. Unterwegs zum Weltbewußtsein. Alexander von Humboldts Wissenschaftsverständnis und die Entstehung einer ethisch fundierten Weltanschauung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottmar Ette

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Article in German, Abstracts in English and Spanish. Towards Global Consciousness. Alexander von Humboldt's Conception of Science and the emerging ethical Weltanschauung. In the context of recent reflections upon global ethics (Hans Küng, global democracy (Otfried Höffe and a new cultural situation after the end of the Cold War (Clifford Geertz, Alexander von Humboldt's concept of global consciousness (Weltbewußtsein marks a decisive point in the ungoing process of the construction of a new ethics of globalization. This article tries to show how Humboldt's transdisciplinary and intercultural conception of sience as WorldWideWeb integrates Kant's philosophical visions of global political institutions and formulates a critique of the non-empirical foundations of Hegel's teleological Weltanschauung. From his Visions of Nature and his Personal Narrative to his Cosmos, Humboldt's theory and practice of science help us to find a new ethos and new answers to the contemporary questions of divergent modernities.

  18. [Baltisches Welterlebnis. Die kulturgeschichtliche Bedeutung von Alexander, Eduard und Hermann Graf Keyserling. Beiträge eines internationalen Symposium in Tartu vom 19. bis 21. September 2003

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Garleff, Michael, 1940-

    2011-01-01

    Baltisches Welterlebnis. Die kulturgeschichtliche Bedeutung von Alexander, Eduard und Hermann Graf Keyserling. Beiträge eines internationalen Symposium in Tartu vom 19. bis 21. September 2003. Heidelberg : Universitätsverlag Winter, 2007

  19. Publishing at "the request of friends": Alexander Ross and James Beattie’s Authorial Networks in Eighteenth-Century Aberdeen

    OpenAIRE

    Ruth Knezevich

    2016-01-01

    Authorship in eighteenth-century Aberdeen often functioned differently than in London and Edinburgh. The Aberdeen model of authorship relied heavily on an intricate network of booksellers, patrons, readers, and critics involved in preparing a text to be consumed by the reading public; yet the prevailing narrative of the author as rising to “inspired genius” disallows for this network. The authorial career of poet Alexander Ross and his friend/mentorship with philosopher James Beattie offers a...

  20. Semiótica para Horn of Plenty: estética da violência por Alexander Mcqueen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Pezzi Parode

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available O propósito deste artigo é refletir e caracterizar a estética da violência na obra de Alexander Mcqueen, a partir da semiótica de Horn of Plenty, desfile do outono e inverno de 2009/2010. O problema enfrentado é a construção do sentido, no âmbito da experiência estética, pautada pelos mecanismos da arte e da moda.

  1. Efficacy of adalimumab in young children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and chronic uveitis: a case series

    OpenAIRE

    La Torre, Francesco; Cattalini, Marco; Teruzzi, Barbara; Meini, Antonella; Moramarco, Fulvio; Iannone, Florenzo

    2014-01-01

    Background Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is a relatively common chronic disease of childhood, and is associated with persistent morbidity and extra-articular complications, one of the most common being uveitis. The introduction of biologic therapies, particularly those blocking the inflammatory mediator tumor necrosis factor-α, provided a new treatment option for juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients who were refractory to standard therapy such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corti...

  2. CLINICAL CASE OF TOCILIZUMAB THERAPY IN A PATIENT WITH SYSTEMIC JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Alexeeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a case of successful application of a monoclonal antibodies drug to interleukin 6 receptors (tocilizumab at severe systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis with the development of secondary hemophagocytic syndrome. Tocilizumab treatment secured a decrease in clinical and laboratory parameters of the disease activity, life quality improvement, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and hemophagocytic syndrome remission and allowed avoiding the per os prescription of glucocorticoids.

  3. Juvenile localized scleroderma with port wine stain: Coincidental or possible common pathogenetic association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seval Dogruk Kacar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Port wine stain and juvenile localized scleroderma are two different dermatoses usually encountered in pediatric age group. Up to now, there are reports of morphea patients initially diagnosed and treated as port wine stain. Coexistence of both diseases is not found yet. We herein present a case of juvenile localized scleroderma on the left side of trunk, with congenital port wine stain located on the ipsilateral face at V1-V2 distribution.

  4. Juvenile localized scleroderma with port wine stain: coincidental or possible common pathogenetic association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacar, Seval Dogruk; Ozuguz, Pinar; Polat, Serap; Kacar, Emre; Polat, Onur; Tokyol, Cigdem

    2015-01-01

    Port wine stain and juvenile localized scleroderma are two different dermatoses usually encountered in pediatric age group. Up to now, there are reports of morphea patients initially diagnosed and treated as port wine stain. Coexistence of both diseases is not found yet. We herein present a case of juvenile localized scleroderma on the left side of trunk, with congenital port wine stain located on the ipsilateral face at V1-V2 distribution.

  5. Alexander von Humboldt's Idea of Interconnectedness and its Relationship to Interdisciplinarity and Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Detlev Doherr

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Alexander von Humboldt, a German scientist and explorer of the 19th century, viewed the natural world holistically and described the harmony of nature among the diversity of the physical world as a conjoining between all physical disciplines. He noted in his diary: "Everything is interconnectedness." The main feature of Humboldt's pioneering work was later named "Humboldtian science", meaning the accurate study of interconnected real phenomena in order to find a definite law and a dynamic cause. Following Humboldt's idea of nature, an Internet edition of his works must preserve the author's original intention, retain an awareness of all relevant works, and still adhere to the requirements of scholarly edition. At the present time, however, the highly unconventional form of his publications has undermined the awareness and a comprehensive study of Humboldt's works. Digital libraries should supply dynamic links to sources, maps, images, graphs and relevant texts. New forms of interaction and synthesis between humanistic texts and scientific observation need to be created. Information technology is the only way to do justice to the broad range of visions, descriptions and the idea of nature of Humboldt's legacy. It finally leads to virtual research environments as an adequate concept to redesign our digital archives, not only for Humboldt's documents, but for all interconnected data.

  6. PRAYER IN ALEXANDER BLOK'S LYRIC POETRY ("A GIRL WAS SINGING IN THE CHURCH CHOIR..."

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    Irina Aleksandrovna Spiridonova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the genre clash of a prayer and stanzas in Alexander Blok’s poem A girl was singing in the church choir... (1905. Prayer is the main ecclesiastical source, shaping the poem’s lyric model. The genre canon of stanzas with the strophes detached substantially and compositionally, transforms the central musical theme into four scene-developments linked by dissonance. Each of the strophes in A girl was singing in the church choir... has its own semantic point (prayer – singings – illusion – enlightenment and reveals a different content of the event, intensifies and develops the tragic theme of two worlds, intended and unintended substitutions, spiritual quest and time losses. Blok’s stanzas are poetic evidence of a modern man’s exit from a prayerful concentration. The model of “conflicting synthesis” of ecclesiastical and literary genres reflects the religious/mystical opposition in symbolism aesthetics and strengthens the tragic pathos of Blok’s lyric poetry.

  7. Writing in learning/teaching in French (study case- freshmen “Alexander Xhuvani” University students

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    Leonarda Myslihaka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Writing plays an important role in teaching and learning foreign languages. Students that can write in a foreign language have to verify their grammar, lexical and semantic performance and it is the role of the teacher to assess if students have learned rules correctly. This is both important for their reading and speaking skills and in general students are tested through a writing test. Writing is now an object of research and it is generally accepted that teaching/ learning cannot be performed out of the communicative acts. Students are required to produce and interpret different documents such as leaflets, journal articles etc. in a foreign language, in this case in French. The idea is that if you want to own the writing competency, you have to know very well both the lingual and contextual structure. This paper is a based on a research conducted with the first year students, studying French at the “Alexander Xhuvani” University, Elbasan, Albania, taking in consideration the lingual, psychological and social factors that affect writing. From the conclusions was clear that students had difficulties in writing due to their limited lingual competencies that leads them to orthographical mistakes etc. We also noted that students are eager to acquire this competency because learning a language through writing does not merely mean to learn syntax but it also requires a de – contextualization and creating a chance for students to get in touch with everyday language texts.

  8. Causes of ransom private railways in the Russian Empire during the reign of Alexander III

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    Pavel A. Gurianov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on a number of reasons, redemption of private railways in the Russian Empire during the reign of Alexander III. Preconditions for this step. After the defeat in the Crimean War, the state began to consider two basic ways construction of railways: the expense of the treasury at the expense of private capital, including foreign ones. Attempts to organize joint capital of private foreign and domestic on the example of the main Russian Railway Company ended sadly. Foreign capital is mainly interested in speculation on the Russian stock exchange, as a result the majority of the company's shares went to the Russian capital. To support the private Russian capital the government has gone the way of the guarantee capital, in certain cases, as a joint stock or bond or one of the types of capital. When distribution concessions were not crucial economic factors, and the proximity to the elite or the corruption component. Often concession won by those who offered the lowest price, which affects the quality of railway construction in the country. As a result of the concession is not got the most professionally trained people who are almost entirely the burden shifted to the state, and profits for the most part getting any private owners. As a result, such practice is ruinous for the Treasury forced the government to buy back a significant portion of private railways on acceptable terms. As a result, initially malpractice and corruption safeguards prevent a real manifestation of self-employment initiatives

  9. Improvement in automatic postural coordination following alexander technique lessons in a person with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciatore, Timothy W; Horak, Fay B; Henry, Sharon M

    2005-06-01

    The relationship between abnormal postural coordination and back pain is unclear. The Alexander Technique (AT) aims to improve postural coordination by using conscious processes to alter automatic postural coordination and ongoing muscular activity, and it has been reported to reduce low back pain. This case report describes the use of the AT with a client with low back pain and the observed changes in automatic postural responses and back pain. The client was a 49-year-old woman with a 25-year history of left-sided, idiopathic, lumbrosacral back pain. Automatic postural coordination was measured using a force plate during horizontal platform translations and one-legged standing. The client was tested monthly for 4 months before AT lessons and for 3 months after lessons. Before lessons, she consistently had laterally asymmetric automatic postural responses to translations. After AT lessons, the magnitude and asymmetry of her responses and balance improved and her low back pain decreased. Further research is warranted to study whether AT lessons improve low back pain-associated abnormalities in automatic postural coordination and whether improving automatic postural coordination helps to reduce low back pain.

  10. La fabrique du savoir Essai sur les carnets de voyage d'Alexander von Humboldt

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    Marie-Noëlle Bourguet

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Article in French, Abstract in English.Whilst the notebook belongs to the imagery of the enlightened scientist's persona (an auxiliary tool kept by his side to be hastily scribbled with data, when at the bench or in the field, it has been given little attention by historians of science, who are used to consider its manuscript pages as a documentary resource to complement the printed text, but rarely take the notebook as a material and cultural object by itself, the history and epistemology of which is to be explored. Only recently have new trends in the historiography, by historians of printed books and reading practices, and by social and cultural historians of knowledge, called for a fresh look and opened the way for new approaches. Taking Alexander von Humboldt as a paramount example, who expressly devoted his life to "observing and recording" the world, pen in hand, this paper explores the note-taking practices at work in his travel diaries and notebooks from the perspective of the history of scientific observation and cognitive practices. Four themes are successively considered : the question of method and apprenticeship ; the timing of note-taking practices ; the nature and status of the data jotted down on the page ; finally, their uses in the production of scientific knowledge. In the back and forth movement between the observation of the world and the writing of science, the notebook stood as a crucial intellectual step and cognitive tool.

  11. BIBLICAL THEMES AND IMAGES IN ALEXANDER SOLZHENITSYN'S NOVEL "THE FIRST CIRCLE" (V KRUGE PERVOM

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    Svetlana Alexeyevna Martyanova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The author identifies, describes and interprets the biblical allusions in Alexander Solzhenitsyn's novel The First Circle (V Kruge Pervom. It is assumed that many of the biblical characters and stories, mentioned (Moses, Jesus Christ, Holy Mary, Mother of God, or Judas or implied in the novel, are prototypical to its heroes and storylines. Biblical allusions form the overarching storyline (metaplot, and create the religious and philosophical perspective of understanding the value orientations and behavior of the characters. The article reveals the significance of the biblical context for understanding the moral and philosophical search of its heroes, their reflections on happiness, well-being, soul, conscience, friendship, creativity, truth, genuineness and authenticity of marxism as "leading-edge thinking". Special attention is given to the subject of Christmas: the article explains what it means for the formation of artistic time or images of individual characters (Volodin and Rubin, and draws a parallel betweem Stalin and Herod. It is emphasized that Solzhenitsyn as a writer did not copy reality, but portrayed it in light of the Bible and the Gospel ideal, creating the original concept of man's destiny in a totalitarian society and reintroducing to readers religious valueswhich were excluded from a human being by Soviet ideology.

  12. The Development of Information Policy of the Russian Empire During the Reign of Alexander II

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    Elena S. Ustinovich

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available During this historical period was actively carried out the process of interaction and interdependence of the development of state power and social consciousness within the limits of formation of the state information policy. Alexander II and his inner circle, given these trends and evaluating the shortcomings of the reign of his father, after years of ignoring the power of public opinion on important socio-political and socio-economic issues, after a long ban on open discussion of the shortcomings of the actions of the authorities and of the state apparatus, deliberately stimulated the beginning of the «era of conviction». Growth of social consciousness, the press has naturally gained a strong influence on representatives of the Russian society and contributed to raising awareness of and advocate for their rights. The authority is committed to the advancement of social development, directs itself to the expansion of media freedom and on the settlement of socio-political issues through dialogue, carried out with the assistance of the media.

  13. Rediscovering MDMA (ecstasy): the role of the American chemist Alexander T. Shulgin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzenhöfer, Udo; Passie, Torsten

    2010-08-01

    Alexander T. Shulgin is widely thought of as the 'father' of +/-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). This paper re-assesses his role in the modern history of this drug. We analysed systematically Shulgin's original publications on MDMA, his publications on the history of MDMA and his laboratory notebook. According to Shulgin's book PIHKAL (1991), he synthesized MDMA in 1965, but did not try it. In the 1960s Shulgin also synthesized MDMA-related compounds such as 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 3-methoxy-4,5-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MMDA) and 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDE), but this had no impact on his rediscovery of MDMA. In the mid-1970s Shulgin learned of a 'special effect' caused by MDMA, whereupon he re-synthesized it and tried it himself in September 1976, as confirmed by his laboratory notebook. In 1977 he gave MDMA to Leo Zeff PhD, who used it as an adjunct to psychotherapy and introduced it to other psychotherapists. Shulgin was not the first to synthesize MDMA, but he played an important role in its history. It seems plausible that he was so impressed by its effects that he introduced it to psychotherapist Zeff in 1977. This, and the fact that in 1978 he published with David Nichols the first paper on the pharmacological action of MDMA in humans, explains why Shulgin is sometimes (erroneously) called the 'father' of MDMA.

  14. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma staging: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshaikh, Nada Ali; Eleftheriadou, Anna

    2015-06-01

    Staging of tumors is very important in treatment and surgical decision making, as well as in predicting disease recurrence and prognosis. This review focuses on the different available classifications of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) and their impact on the evaluation, management, and prognosis of JNA. The literature was reviewed, and publications on JNA staging were examined. Our MEDLINE search of the entire English-language literature found no review article on the current available staging systems for JNA. In this article, we review the common JNA classification systems that have been published, and we discuss some of their advantages and disadvantages. The most commonly used staging systems for JNA are the Radkowski and the Andrews-Fisch staging systems. However, some newer staging systems that are based on advances in technology and surgical approaches-the Onerci, INCan, and UPMC systems-have shown promising utility, and they will probably gain popularity in the future.

  15. Sexuality education groups in juvenile detention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, J A; Schroeder, E

    1984-01-01

    Several major studies have described the magnitude and character of adolescent sexual activity and sexual knowledge related to contraception and sexually transmitted diseases (Diepold & Young, 1979; Hass, 1979; Sorenson, 1973; Zelnick & Kantner, 1980). Few systematic studies have been conducted, however, which analyze the attitudes toward sexuality and contraception of delinquent adolescents who are generally school dropouts and who may engage in socially unacceptable behaviors such as running away, drug abuse, and prostitution. Delinquent youths, especially delinquent girls, have been characterized as being more sexually active and less sexually knowledgeable than their nondelinquent peers (Gibbon, 1981; Mannarino & Marsh, 1978). Despite the assumed high-risk nature of this delinquent population, few juvenile detention facilities have offered systematically evaluated coeducational sex education programs. One barrier to implementation of such programs in juvenile detention centers is the lack of a treatment or program orientation of most staff, and/or staff denial of adolescent sexuality in general, an attitude which suppresses the development of healthier sexual values and often promotes pathologic sexual interaction within institutions (Shore & Gochros, 1981). A recent survey of adolescent sexuality (Diepold, 1979) points out that teenagers' feelings about their "sexual selves" impacts greatly upon their general self-image. Low self-esteem is more frequently found among delinquents than nondelinquents (Jones & Swain, 1977; Lund & Salury, 1980), and treatment for delinquent girls often focuses on increasing self-esteem and developing assertiveness skills based on feelings of self-worth (DeLange, Lanahan, & Barton, 1981; NiCarthy, 1981). Two studies carried out with juvenile detainees from a large urban center confirmed that sexual activity among delinquent adolescents is significantly greater than that of the general adolescent population, and that the delinquents

  16. Tissue and plasma enzyme activities in juvenile green iguanas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, R A; Wetzel, R

    1999-02-01

    To determine activities of intracellular enzymes in 8 major organs in juvenile green iguanas and to compare tissue and plasma activities. 6 green iguanas iguanas, but high values may not always indicate overt muscle disease. The AMS activity may be specific for the pancreas, but the wide range of plasma activity would likely limit its diagnostic usefulness. Activities of AST and LDH may reflect tissue damage or inflammation, but probably do not reflect damage to specific tissues or organs.

  17. Periodontal aspects of the juvenile form of paracoccidioidomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIGLIARI Dante A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Three cases of the juvenile form of paracoccidioidomycosis are reported. Emphasis has been given to the oral manifestations, particularly the periodontal involvement. The main periodontal findings were: generalized and progressive alveolar bone destruction leading to gingival recession with exposure of the tooth roots, and spontaneous tooth losses. The gingival mucosa was predominantly smooth, erithematous and slightly swollen. These aspects, although rare, may be the earliest signs of the disease and sometimes its only manifestation.

  18. Marcadores de inmunorrespuesta en la periodontitis juvenil

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    Amparo Pérez Borrego,

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available La periodontitis juvenil es una enfermedad del periodonto propia de adolescentes y adultos jóvenes, afecta principalmente los primeros molares y los incisivos y se caracteriza por la pérdida severa del hueso alveolar alrededor de dientes permanentes sin correspondencia entre la rapidez y severidad de la destrucción con los factores locales. En la causa de la enfermedad se citan factores genéticos, infecciosos e inmunológicos. Estudiamos algunos marcadores de inmunorrespuesta en 6 adolescentes que acudieron a nuestro servicio con el diagnóstico de periodontitis juvenil, además de su valoración clínica y radiológica. Ambos sexos se afectaron por igual, la movilidad dentaria y el sangramiento al sondeo fueron los hallazgos clínicos más relevantes y el índice de higiene bucal fue adecuado en todos los casos. No encontramos homogeneidad en las alteraciones inmunológicas, pero todos los pacientes estuvieron afectados en más de un marcador. Predominaron las alteraciones funcionales de linfocitos T en los estudios celulares. La hipogammaglobulinemia y la IgM elevada fueron las alteraciones más frecuentes en la inmunidad de anticuerpos. Se señala la dificultad que aún existe para explicar la patogenia de la enfermedad basándose solamente en un único factor de riesgo, así como la importancia de la valoración individual de cada enfermo.Juvenile periodontitis is a disease of the periodontium inherent to adolescents and young adults, affecting mainly the first molars and incisives and characterized by the severe loss of the alveolar bone sorrounding the permanent teeth with no correspondance between the celerity and severity of the destruction and the local factors. Genetic, infectious and immunological factors are considereed as the causes of the disease. Some immunoresponse markers were studied in 6 adolescents that were seen at our service with the diagnosis of juvenile periodontitis in addition to their clinical and radiological

  19. Uveíte na artrite idiopática juvenil Uveitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Adriana M. Roberto

    2002-02-01

    üente na população de pacientes com AIJ associada com uveíte (60% do que naqueles sem uveíte (12% (pObjective: to evaluate the frequency of chronic anterior uveitis in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and its association with the presence of antinuclear antibodies. Patients and methods: we retrospectively studied 72 patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. All of them were submitted to slit-lamp examination of the anterior chamber at diagnosis. Both antinuclear antibodies and rheumatoid factor were determined. Patients with positive results for antinuclear antibodies were evaluated every three months and those with negative results were assessed every six months.Results: forty patients were male (55.5% and 36 were Caucasoid (50%. The mean age at the onset of juvenile idiopathic arthritis was 6.4 years (range = 1 to 14 years and the mean age at the beginning of the study was 10.4 years (1 to 19 years. According to the type of disease at onset, 32 were pauciarticular (44.4% (17 boys and 15 girls, 30 were polyarticular (41.6% (17 boys and 13 girls and 10 were systemic (14% (6 boys and 4 girls. We observed chronic anterior uveitis in five patients (6.5% (mean age = 11.4 years. Among them, four (80% had pauciarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis at disease onset (three girls with type I juvenile idiopathic arthritis and positive antinuclear antibodies and one boy with type I juvenile idiopathic arthritis and negative antinuclear antibodies and one girl with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (negative antinuclear antibodies and rheumatoid factor. In this group, the mean age at the onset of juvenile idiopathic arthritis was 5.1 years and the mean age of uveitis onset was 9 years. Antinuclear antibodies were positive in 3/5 patients (60% with uveitis. Antinuclear antibodies were positive in 12% of the patients without uveitis (n = 67. Among the patients with uveitis, three had only one flare and the other two had four flares with cataract. The

  20. What is the perceived impact of Alexander technique lessons on health status, costs and pain management in the real life setting of an English hospital? The results of a mixed methods evaluation of an Alexander technique service for those with chronic back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClean, Stuart; Brilleman, Sam; Wye, Lesley

    2015-07-28

    Randomised controlled trial evidence indicates that Alexander Technique is clinically and cost effective for chronic back pain. The aim of this mixed methods evaluation was to explore the role and perceived impact of Alexander Technique lessons in the naturalistic setting of an acute hospital Pain Management Clinic in England. To capture changes in health status and resource use amongst service users, 43 service users were administered three widely used questionnaires (Brief Pain Inventory, MYMOP and Client Service Resource Inventory) at three time points: baseline, six weeks and three months after baseline. We also carried out 27 telephone interviews with service users and seven face-to-face interviews with pain clinic staff and Alexander Technique teachers. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and qualitative data were analysed thematically. Those taking Alexander Technique lessons reported small improvements in health outcomes, and condition-related costs fell. However, due to the non-randomised, uncontrolled nature of the study design, changes cannot be attributed to the Alexander Technique lessons. Service users stated that their relationship to pain and pain management had changed, especially those who were more committed to practising the techniques regularly. These changes may explain the reported reduction in pain-related service use and the corresponding lower associated costs. Alexander Technique lessons may be used as another approach to pain management. The findings suggests that Alexander Technique lessons can help improve self-efficacy for those who are sufficiently motivated, which in turn may have an impact on service utilisation levels.

  1. Genetic architecture distinguishes systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis from otherforms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: clinical and therapeutic implications

    OpenAIRE

    Ombrello, Michael J.; Arthur, Victoria L.; Remmers, Elaine F.; Hinks, Anne; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Grom, Alexei A.; Foell, Dirk; Martini, Alberto; Gattorno, Marco; Ozen, Seza; Prahalad, Sampath; Zeft, Andrew S.; Bohnsack, John F.; Ilowite, Norman T.; Mellins, Elizabeth D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous group of conditions unified by the presence of chronic childhood arthritis without an identifiable cause. Systemic JIA (sJIA) is a rare form of JIA characterized by systemic inflammation. sJIA is distinguished from other forms of JIA by unique clinical features and treatment responses that are similar to autoinflammatory diseases. However approximately half of children with sJIA develop destructive, longstanding arthritis that...

  2. Juvenile morphology in baleen whale phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Hsiu; Fordyce, R Ewan

    2014-09-01

    Phylogenetic reconstructions are sensitive to the influence of ontogeny on morphology. Here, we use foetal/neonatal specimens of known species of living baleen whales (Cetacea: Mysticeti) to show how juvenile morphology of extant species affects phylogenetic placement of the species. In one clade (sei whale, Balaenopteridae), the juvenile is distant from the usual phylogenetic position of adults, but in the other clade (pygmy right whale, Cetotheriidae), the juvenile is close to the adult. Different heterochronic processes at work in the studied species have different influences on juvenile morphology and on phylogenetic placement. This study helps to understand the relationship between evolutionary processes and phylogenetic patterns in baleen whale evolution and, more in general, between phylogeny and ontogeny; likewise, this study provides a proxy how to interpret the phylogeny when fossils that are immature individuals are included. Juvenile individuals in the peramorphic acceleration clades would produce misleading phylogenies, whereas juvenile individuals in the paedomorphic neoteny clades should still provide reliable phylogenetic signals.

  3. Alexander von Humboldt und Carl Friedrich Gauß als Wegbereiter der neuen Disziplin Erdmagnetismus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Reich

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThough Alexander von Humboldt was motivated for the first time to deal with earthmagnetism during his stay in Freiberg, it was in France that he really became a specialist in this respect. During most of his journeys he made earthmagnetic measurements. His collaboration with Arago was of great importance, it was in Paris that the first magnetic observatory was built. Humboldt rendered outstanding services to the investigation of earth magnetism by two major achievements: 1. He emphasized intensity measurements and 2. he put forward the law that the magnetic intensity is increasing from the magnetic equator toward the magnetic poles. At least since 1803 Carl Friedrich Gauss was interested in earthmagnetism and especially in Humboldt’s early published data. That Wilhelm Weber became professor of physics at the University of Göttingen in 1831 was a turning point for Gauss. In 1833 Göttingen was the centre of investigating earthmagnetism, a new era began which lasted only until 1843. Gauss’ main contributions were more or less theoretical, in 1832/3 he transformed Humboldt’s relative intensity measurements into absolute ones which were independent of the instrument’s needle. A new epoch began with Gauss’ publication „Allgemeine Theorie des Erdmagnetismus” (1839. The main point was the newly defined notion of „potential“. Gauss was the first to present the surface of the earth with equipotential lines. ZusammenfassungAlexander von Humboldt hatte sich bereits in Freiberg mit dem Erdmagnetismus beschäftigt; jedoch erst in Frankreich lernte er die entsprechenden Beobachtungsmethoden kennen. Auf allen seinen Reisen machte er erdmagnetische Messungen. Seine Zusammenarbeit mit Arago in Paris war besonders fruchtbar, hier wurde das erste magnetische Observatorium gebaut. Humboldt beschäftigte sich vor allem mit Intensitätsmessungen; sein wichtigster Beitrag war die Feststellung, dass die magnetische Intensität vom

  4. An unusual presentation of juvenile lupus nephritis

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    Malleshwar Bottu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of juvenile lupus varies widely ranging between 4 and 250 per 100,000 population. Most common organ involvement in juvenile lupus is kidney. Neurological, cutaneous and hematological involvements are also involved. Skeletal muscle involvement in the form of myositis is rare. Myositis as presenting manifestation in juvenile lupus is also unusual. Herein, we report one such case wherein myositis preceded the onset of lupus nephritis

  5. Methodology for the evaluation of the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, L; Staiger, P K; Townsend, M; Macfarlane, S; Gold, L; Block, K; Johnson, B; Kulas, J; Waters, E

    2013-04-01

    Community and school cooking and gardening programs have recently increased internationally. However, despite promising indications, there is limited evidence of their effectiveness. This paper presents the evaluation framework and methods negotiated and developed to meet the information needs of all stakeholders for the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden (SAKG) program, a combined cooking and gardening program implemented in selectively funded primary schools across Australia. The evaluation used multiple aligned theoretical frameworks and models, including a public health ecological approach, principles of effective health promotion and models of experiential learning. The evaluation is a non-randomised comparison of six schools receiving the program (intervention) and six comparison schools (all government-funded primary schools) in urban and rural areas of Victoria, Australia. A mixed-methods approach was used, relying on qualitative measures to understand changes in school cultures and the experiential impacts on children, families, teachers, parents and volunteers, and quantitative measures at baseline and 1 year follow up to provide supporting information regarding patterns of change. The evaluation study design addressed the limitations of many existing evaluation studies of cooking or garden programs. The multistrand approach to the mixed methodology maintained the rigour of the respective methods and provided an opportunity to explore complexity in the findings. Limited sensitivity of some of the quantitative measures was identified, as well as the potential for bias in the coding of the open-ended questions. The SAKG evaluation methodology will address the need for appropriate evaluation approaches for school-based kitchen garden programs. It demonstrates the feasibility of a meaningful, comprehensive evaluation of school-based programs and also demonstrates the central role qualitative methods can have in a mixed-method evaluation. So what? This paper

  6. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Port Alexander NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkl, R.J.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.

    1982-07-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Port Alexander NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available fom DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  7. Project Alexander the Great: a study on the world proliferation of bioengineering/biomedical engineering education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Faraj, Ziad O

    2008-01-01

    Bioengineering/Biomedical Engineering is considered amongst the most reputable fields within the global arena, and will likely be the primer for any future breakthroughs in Medicine and Biology. Bioengineering/biomedical engineering education has evolved since late 1950s and is undergoing advancement in leading academic institutions worldwide. This paper delineates an original study on the world proliferation of bioengineering/biomedical engineering education and bears the name 'Project Alexander the Great'. The initial step of the project was to survey all 10448 universities, recognized by the International Association of Universities, spread among the 193 member states of the United Nations within the six continents. The project aims at identifying, disseminating, and networking, through the world-wide-web, those institutions of higher learning that provide bioengineering/biomedical engineering education. The significance of this project is multifold: i) the inception of a web-based 'world-map' in bioengineering/biomedical engineering education for the potential international student desiring to pursue a career in this field; ii) the global networking of bioengineering/biomedical engineering academic/research programs; iii) the promotion of first-class bioengineering/biomedical engineering education and the catalysis of global proliferation of this field; iv) the erection of bridges among educational institutions, industry, and professional societies or organizations involved in Bioengineering/Biomedical Engineering; and v) the catalysis in the establishment of framework agreements for cooperation among the identified institutions offering curricula in this field. This paper presents the results obtained from Africa and North America. The whole project is due to be completed by 2009.

  8. Pesticide load dynamics during stormwater flow events in Mediterranean coastal streams: Alexander stream case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topaz, Tom; Egozi, Roey; Eshel, Gil; Chefetz, Benny

    2018-06-01

    Cultivated land is a major source of pesticides, which are transported with the runoff water and eroded soil during rainfall events and pollute riverine and estuarine environments. Common ecotoxicological assessments of riverine systems are mainly based on water sampling and analysis of only the dissolved phase, and address a single pesticide's toxicological impact under laboratory conditions. A clear overview of mixtures of pesticides in the adsorbed and dissolved phases is missing, and therefore the full ecotoxicological impact is not fully addressed. The aim of this study was to characterize and quantify pesticide concentrations in both suspended sediment and dissolved phases, to provide a better understanding of pesticide-load dynamics during storm events in coastal streams in a Mediterranean climate. High-resolution sampling campaigns of seven flood events were conducted during two rainy seasons in Alexander stream, Israel. Samples of suspended sediments were separated from the solution and both media were analyzed separately for 250 pesticides. A total of 63 pesticides were detected; 18 and 16 pesticides were found solely in the suspended sediments and solution, respectively. Significant differences were observed among the pesticide groups: only 7% of herbicide, 20% of fungicide and 42% of insecticide load was transported with the suspended sediments. However, in both dissolved and adsorbed phases, a mix of pesticides was found which were graded from "mobile" to "non-mobile" with varied distribution coefficients. Diuron, and tebuconazole were frequently found in large quantities in both phases. Whereas insecticide and fungicide transport is likely governed by application time and method, the governing factor for herbicide load was the magnitude of the stream discharge. The results show a complex dynamic of pesticide load affected by excessive use of pesticides, which should be taken into consideration when designing projects to monitor riverine and estuarine

  9. Death by polonium-210: lessons learned from the murder of former Soviet spy Alexander Litvinenko.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFee, Robin B; Leikin, Jerrold B

    2009-02-01

    The medical response to radiation--whether the result of radiological warfare, terrorist deployment of improvised radiation dispersal weapons, political assassination, occupational or industrial accidents or the medically radiated patient remains one of the least taught among all disciplines within medical education. In the aftermath of 9/11 among medical vulnerabilities to toxicant threats, of all the categories of weapons of mass destruction (WMD)--whether using the CBRNE (chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, explosive) or NBC (nuclear, biological, chemical) acronym--radiation is the least taught in professional schools, responder cultures or civil preparedness organizations. To date, few health care professionals (HCP) possess the fundamental knowledge or skills to identify and diagnose, let alone treat a radiation victim; this vulnerability made even more obvious in the aftermath of the high profile assassination of former Russian agent Alexander Litvinenko. He was poisoned with Polonium210. Radioactive substances are ubiquitous with radiation sources being in or transported through virtually every region nationwide. It is essential to increase preparedness among community and rural health care facilities as well as urban and university hospitals. Managing radiation injuries effectively requires access to specialized equipment and expertise. Radiation sickness is progressive and may require acute, critical and long-term care throughout the course of illness. Regardless of the source, preparedness rests upon acknowledging a threat exists and dedicating the resources to address the risks including the enhancement of training and equipment. Mass or individual exposures to radiation present unique challenges to the entire response continuum from law enforcement, first responders and emergency medical care. Increased education about and practice in responding to radiological threats is essential to enhance preparedness.

  10. Analysis of the main activities of the city center of Alexander's psychosomatic hospital of St. Petersburg, focused on the choice of priorities in perfection of treatment and prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Vanchakova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors have analyzed the results of the City Psychosomatic Centre (CPSC activity in 2009-2011 ys in order to find out the most important trends in the clinical work that may be helpful in planning of management and prophylaxis. The methods applied were statistical and clinico-statistical analyses of the results of of the Center work in 2009-2011 ys. There were changes in the structure by increasing the incidence of diseases associated with stress and organic damage brain with mental disorders, showed an increase in the flow of male patients. Found that the average length of stay in bed in the center of psychosomatic inpatient unit was 9.2-9.7 days, which creates barriers to good practice the use of antidepressants. Overcoming of these challenges can be achieved through the formation of new forms of continuity between the departments of the psychosomatic center, the health center and the offices of St. Petersburg SHCI «Alexander's Hospital,» and other medical institutions of the city.

  11. EFFICACY OF ETANERCEPT IN TREATMENT OF VARIOUS TYPES OF JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yu. Konopel'ko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to assess efficacy and safety of etanercept in treatment of various types of juvenile idiopathic arthritis in children under conditions of real clinical practice. Patients and methods: 52 children were included into the study, among them 16 were with systemic and 36 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis without extra-articular involvement. Results: etanercept treatment was the most efficient in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis without extra-articular involvement. In 6 and 12 months of the treatment 50 and 70% improvement according to the ACRpedi criteria were established in 31/36 (86% and 28/36 (78% of the patients, respectively. In 24 months in 5 (29% of 17 children remained in the study remission stage of the diseases was confirmed. Conclusions: etanercept treatment was not associated with significant unfavorable effects, which allows to recommend this drug for treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis without extra-articular involvent and resistant to standard anti-rheumatic therapy.

  12. Giant juvenile fibroadenoma: a case and review of novel modalities in treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosin, Michael; Feldman, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    A giant juvenile fibroadenoma is defined as a fibroadenoma greater than 5 centimeters in size occurring in the pediatric population. It frequently affects adolescents. Rapid growth of the mass may result in breast asymmetry and deformity. Varying techniques in surgical extirpation have been described in order to optimize aesthetics and minimize distortion. The advent of new methods to remove benign breast disease is in its infancy stages. Many practitioners are unaware of the novel options that are emerging in the treatment of fibroadenoma. We describe an excision of a 12 centimeter giant juvenile fibroadenoma and adjacent juvenile fibroadenoma using a strategically atypical incision that resulted in excellent cosmesis and contour of the breast without subsequent reconstruction. Multiple modalities of removing a fibroadenoma are described with a review of the associated risks, benefits, and long term implications as well as a discussion on the indication for reconstructive surgery in patients with giant juvenile fibroadenoma.

  13. Networking Knowledge. Considering Alexander von Humboldt’s Legacy in a New Shared Space in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Lundberg

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Zusammenfassung Weltbürgerschaft und kulturelle Vielfalt sind überall gegenwärtige Konzepte im heutigen Bildungswesen. In den Vereinigten Staaten werden Lernziele und Kompetenzen geformt, um die Studenten gegenüber den vielen kulturellen Hintergründen, die in den Bildungsinstitutionen vorzutreffen sind, zu sensibilisieren.Trotzdem wird wahre Globalität, wie sie heute in den vielfältigen Diskursen und Perspektiven der Welt repräsentiert ist, immer noch in Lehrplänen und Studienarbeiten vernachlässigt. Dieser Artikel untersucht die Möglichkeiten, die sich heute im Bildungswesen durch den neuen, gemeinsam geteilten, globalen Bildungsraum anbieten, in dem die multikulturelle Studentenbevölkerung verschiedene Formen vernetzten Wissens und facettenreiche Perspektiven der Welt eine globale Plattform des Austausches bildet. Das von Alexander von Humboldt am Anfang des neunzehnten Jahrhunderts beschriebene universale Wissenschaftskonzept, beleuchtet solch einen vernetzten Ansatz an ein Wissen um die Welt, der auf heutige Bildungskonzepte und Kursdesigns einen positiven Einfluss nehmen könnte. Humboldts Schriften unterstreichen die Bedeutung der Inklusivität und des Wechselspiels zwischen Kulturen und Naturphänomenen. Indem wir Studenten mit unterschiedlichem kulturellen Hintergrundwissen dazu einladen, ihre jeweiligen Diskurse des Wissens aktiv zu repräsentieren, werden diese gegenseitig mit einander verknüpten Beziehungen des Wissens transparenter. Auf diese Weise, entsteht die Möglichkeit, heutige Lernziele mit neuen, produktiven Formen des Weltwissens zu berreichern, worin sich ein wahres Weltbürgertum, wie es sich in diesem neuen Bildungsraum des globalen Austausches hervortut, wiederspiegeln würde. Summary Global citizenship and diversity are well-represented concepts in today’s higher education. Learning outcomes and competencies are designed to sensitize students to the many cultural backgrounds of U.S. learning institutions

  14. Juvenile offenders: competence to stand trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulier, Matthew

    2012-12-01

    This article details the legal background and assists the reader in the preparation and practical conduct of evaluations regarding juvenile adjudicative competency. The material is presented to be useful as a guide to direct questions of competency and covers aspects of evaluation that include: legal standard for competency to stand trial, developmental immaturity, current practice in juvenile competency to stand trial, forensic evaluation of juvenile competency to stand trial, organizing the evaluation, collateral sources of information, psychiatric evaluation of juvenile adjudicative competency, assessment of mental disorder and intellectual disability, assessment of developmental status, assessment of functional abilities for adjudicative competence, and reaching the forensic opinion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and oral health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobus, Agnieszka; Kierklo, Anna; Sielicka, Danuta; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2016-05-04

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common autoimmune inflammatory disease of connective tissue in children. It is characterized by progressive joint destruction which causes preserved changes in the musculoskeletal system. The literature describes fully clinical symptoms and radiological images in different subtypes of JIA. However, there is still a limited number of studies reporting on the medical condition of the oral cavity of ill children. JIA can affect hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity by: the general condition of the child's health, arthritis of the upper limbs, as the result of the pharmacotherapy, changes in secretion and composition of saliva, inflammation of the temporomandibular joint and facial deformity. The study summarizes the available literature on the condition of the teeth and periodontal and oral hygiene in the course of JIA. The presence of diverse factors that modify the oral cavity, such as facial growth, functioning of salivary glands, or the supervision and care provided by adults, prevents clear identification if JIA leads to severe dental caries and periodontal disease. Despite conflicting results in studies concerning the clinical oral status, individuals with JIA require special attention regarding disease prevention and maintenance of oral health.

  16. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Sarah L N; Sen, Ethan S; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V

    2016-04-27

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease of childhood, with JIA-associated uveitis its most common extra-articular manifestation. JIA-associated uveitis is a potentially sight-threatening condition and thus carries a considerable risk of morbidity. The aetiology of the condition is autoimmune in nature with the predominant involvement of CD4(+) T cells. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms remain unclear, particularly regarding interplay between genetic and environmental factors. JIA-associated uveitis comes in several forms, but the most common presentation is of the chronic anterior uveitis type. This condition is usually asymptomatic and thus screening for JIA-associated uveitis in at-risk patients is paramount. Early detection and treatment aims to stop inflammation and prevent the development of complications leading to visual loss, which can occur due to both active disease and burden of disease treatment. Visually disabling complications of JIA-associated uveitis include cataracts, glaucoma, band keratopathy and macular oedema. There is a growing body of evidence for the early introduction of systemic immunosuppressive therapies in order to reduce topical and systemic glucocorticoid use. This includes more traditional treatments, such as methotrexate, as well as newer biological therapies. This review highlights the epidemiology of JIA-associated uveitis, the underlying pathogenesis and how affected patients may present. The current guidelines and criteria for screening, diagnosis and monitoring are discussed along with approaches to management.

  17. The myositis autoantibody phenotypes of the juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Lisa G; Shah, Mona; Mamyrova, Gulnara; Huber, Adam M; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Targoff, Ira N; Miller, Frederick W

    2013-07-01

    The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, characteristic rashes, and other systemic features. In follow-up to our study defining the major clinical subgroup phenotypes of JIIM, we compared demographics, clinical features, laboratory measures, and outcomes among myositis-specific autoantibody (MSA) subgroups, as well as with published data on adult idiopathic inflammatory myopathy patients enrolled in a separate natural history study. In the present study, of 430 patients enrolled in a nationwide registry study who had serum tested for myositis autoantibodies, 374 had either a single specific MSA (n = 253) or no identified MSA (n = 121) and were the subject of the present report. Following univariate analysis, we used random forest classification and exact logistic regression modeling to compare autoantibody subgroups. Anti-p155/140 autoantibodies were the most frequent subgroup, present in 32% of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) or overlap myositis with JDM, followed by anti-MJ autoantibodies, which were seen in 20% of JIIM patients, primarily in JDM. Other MSAs, including anti-synthetase, anti-signal recognition particle (SRP), and anti-Mi-2, were present in only 10% of JIIM patients. Features that characterized the anti-p155/140 autoantibody subgroup included Gottron papules, malar rash, "shawl-sign" rash, photosensitivity, cuticular overgrowth, lowest creatine kinase (CK) levels, and a predominantly chronic illness course. The features that differed for patients with anti-MJ antibodies included muscle cramps, dysphonia, intermediate CK levels, a high frequency of hospitalization, and a monocyclic disease course. Patients with anti-synthetase antibodies had higher frequencies of interstitial lung disease, arthralgia, and "mechanic's hands," and had an older age at diagnosis. The anti-SRP group, which had exclusively juvenile polymyositis, was characterized by high

  18. Results of surgical treatment for juvenile myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Roque, F J; Hernández-Oliver, M O; Medrano Plana, Y; Castillo Vitlloch, A; Fuentes Herrera, L; Rivero-Valerón, D

    2017-04-01

    Radical or extended thymectomy is an effective treatment for myasthenia gravis in the adult population. There are few reports to demonstrate the effectiveness of this treatment in patients with juvenile myasthenia gravis. The main objective of this study was to show that extended transsternal thymectomy is a valid option for treating this disease in paediatric patients. Twenty-three patients with juvenile myasthenia gravis underwent this surgical treatment in the period between April 2003 and April 2014; mean age was 12.13 years and the sample was predominantly female. The main indication for surgery, in 22 patients, was the generalised form of the disease (Osserman stage II) together with no response to 6 months of medical treatment. The histological diagnosis was thymic hyperplasia in 22 patients and thymoma in one patient. There were no deaths and no major complications in the postoperative period. After a mean follow-up period of 58.87 months, 22 patients are taking no medication or need less medication to manage myasthenic symptoms. Extended (radical) transsternal thymectomy is a safe and effective surgical treatment for juvenile myasthenia gravis. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Safety and efficacy of meningococcal c vaccination in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonneveld-Huijssoon, Evelien; Ronaghy, Arash; van Rossum, Marion A. J.; Rijkers, Ger T.; van der Klis, Fiona R. M.; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; Vermeer-de Bondt, Patricia E.; Hoes, Arno W.; van der Net, Jan Jaap; Engels, Carla; Kuis, Wietse; Prakken, Berent J.; van Tol, Maarten J. D.; Wulffraat, Nico M.

    2007-01-01

    To determine whether vaccinations aggravate the course of autoimmune diseases such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and whether the immune response to vaccinations may be hampered by immunosuppressive therapy for the underlying disease. In this multicenter cohort study, 234 patients with JIA

  20. Safety of measles, mumps and rubella vaccination in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijstek, Marloes W; Pileggi, Gecilmara C S; Zonneveld-Huijssoon, Evelien; Armbrust, Wineke; Hoppenreijs, Esther P A H; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M; Kuis, Wietse; Wulffraat, Nico M

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination on disease activity in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods: A retrospective observational multicentre cohort study was performed in 314 patients with JIA, born between 1989 and 1996. Disease

  1. Familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy : report on a new mutation and a pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lhotta, Karl; Gehringer, A; Jennings, P; Kronenberg, F.; Brezinka, C; Andersone, I; Strazdins, V

    BACKGROUND: Familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy (FJHN) is a rare autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the uromodulin gene (UMOD) and leading to gout, tubulointerstitial nephropathy and end-stage renal disease. CASE REPORTS AND RESULTS: A Latvian family suffering from FJHN is

  2. [Juvenile sterile granulomatous dermatitis and lymphadenitis in the dog].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingart, C; Eule, C; Welle, M; Kohn, B

    2011-04-01

    Juvenile sterile granulomatous dermatitis and lymphadenitis is a rare immune-mediated skin disease in young dogs. History, signalment, diagnostics, treatment, and outcome in 10 dogs are described. The age ranged from 8 - 36 weeks. The lymph nodes were enlarged in all dogs, especially the mandibular and prescapular lymph nodes. Systemic signs including fever were present in 8 dogs. Seven dogs suffered from blepharitis and painful edema of the muzzle with hemorrhagic discharge, pustules and papules. Cytology of pustules and lymph node aspirates revealed a pyogranulomatous inflammation. In 7 cases the diagnosis of juvenile sterile granulomatous dermatitis and lymphadenitis was confirmed by histology. Nine dogs were treated with prednisolone (0.5 - 1.25 mg/kg BID), H2-receptor antagonists and analgetics; all dogs were treated with antibiotics. Four dogs were treated with eye ointment containing antibiotics and glucocorticoids. The prednisolone dosage was tapered over 3 - 8 weeks. One dog had a relapse.

  3. Subpopulations Within Juvenile Psoriatic Arthritis: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L. Stoll

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The presentation of juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JPsA has long been recognized to be clinically heterogeneous. As the definition of JPsA expanded to accommodate atypical manifestations of psoriasis in young children, studies began to reflect an increasingly clear biphasic distribution of age of onset, with peaks in the first few years of life and again in early adolescence. These two subpopulations differ in gender ratio, pattern of joint involvement, laboratory findings and potentially response to therapy. Intriguingly, a similar distribution of age of onset has been observed in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA, and correlates with patterns of HLA association. While a secure classification of subpopulations within JPsA awaits improved pathophysiologic understanding, future research must consider the possibility that different disease mechanisms may be operative in distinct subsets of patients with this disorder.

  4. Self-control with urinalysis in juvenile diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludvigsson, J; Svensson, P G

    1979-11-01

    Urinary glucose excretion reflects the blood glucose levels and is therefore recommended and used as a relevant and practical method for self-control in juvenile diabetes. The purpose of this study was to estimate the attitudes of diabetic children and their parents towards such daily urinalysis. In 1975 69 juvenile diabetics 6--18 years old and their parents were studied and three years later another 69 patients were added. Standardized interviews and questionnaires were used. Only 3 out of 138 patients refused to test their urine regularly and to write down their results in the diary. The results indicate that a great majority of the patients and the parents easily accept the self-testing method and regard it as a valuable tool in the management of the disease. Almost nobody experienced the urine tests as a psychological problem.

  5. Disease: H00274 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available odontitis. Inherited metabolic disease CTSC; cathepsin C...oving dipeptides from the amino termini of its substrates. The disease is characterized by palmoplantar keratoderma and juvenile peri

  6. Negative public perceptions of juvenile diabetics: applying attribution theory to understand the public's stigmatizing views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanath, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Despite a rise in the incidence of juvenile diabetes globally, little research has focused on public perceptions regarding its patients. The need to evaluate whether the public holds stigmatizing views is pressing when one considers the relatively young age of the patients of the disease. The current study extends the attribution theoretic framework to evaluate public stigma regarding juvenile diabetes. The findings suggest that a large percentage of individuals misattribute the causes of the disease and believe it is relatively rare and that its patients are personally responsible for contracting it. Individuals often utilize pejorative terms describing juvenile diabetes as a disease afflicting children who are lazy, unhealthy, fat, obese, lacking exercise, and having eating disorders.

  7. Physiotherapy in pauciarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuk, Beata; Kaczor, Zofia; Zuk-Drążyk, Berenika; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common arthropathy of childhood and adolescence. This term encompasses a group of chronic systemic inflammatory diseases of the connective tissue which cause arthritis in patients under 16 years of age lasting at least 6 weeks. The authors presented the characteristic features of physiotherapy based on functional examination results on the basis of two cases of girls with pauciarticular JIA treated according to an established pharmacological regimen. Physiotherapy should be introduced at an early stage of the disease. Kinesiotherapy preceded by history-taking and a functional examination of the patient, has to focus on both primary and secondary joint lesions.

  8. Imaging in juvenile idiopathic arthritis with a focus on ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurell, Louise; Court-Payen, Michel; Boesen, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Early therapeutic intervention and use of new highly efficacious treatments have improved the outcome in many patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), but have also led to the need for more precise methods to evaluate disease activity. In adult rheumatology, numerous studies have...... US studies have been conducted. Sonographic assessment of disease activity has, however, been proven to be more informative than clinical examination and is also readily available at points of care. This review summarises the literature on imaging in JIA, focusing on US and the important role...

  9. Psoralea corylifolia L. Attenuates Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis in Juvenile Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lishan Zhou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Psoralea corylifolia L. (PC is a traditional Chinese herb used to treat yang deficiency of the spleen and kidney in pediatric disease. Recent studies have shown its liver protection and anti-oxidative effects. The aim of this study was to explore the effect and mechanism of PC on nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in juvenile mice. The juvenile mouse model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NAFLD/NASH was established by being fed a high-fat diet in maternal-offspring manner. PC granules were prepared and the quality was assessed. The main components were identified by high performance liquid chromatography. Then, different dosages of PC were administered for 6 weeks. Homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, plasma liver enzymes, hepatic morphology, hepatic superoxide anion, and triglyceride/total cholesterol levels were examined. The changes of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activity phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt and protein kinase C-α (PKC-α/nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase signaling pathways in hepatic tissues were also determined. Our data demonstrated that PC significantly improved liver dysfunction, liver triglyceride/total cholesterol accumulation and insulin resistance in juvenile NAFLD/NASH mice. PC also alleviated hepatic steatosis, inflammatory cell infiltration, and fibroplasia in the portal area. Additionally, PC inhibited the activation of NF-κB and the mRNA expression of inflammatory factors while enhancing PI3K/Akt signaling in hepatic tissues. PC could also reduce hepatic superoxide anion levels, and NADPH oxidase activity as well as p47phox protein expression and PKCα activation in hepatic tissues. The results suggest that PC is effective in the treatment of NASH in juvenile mice. The mechanism may be related to the attenuation of hepatic oxidative stress through the PKC-α/NADPH oxidase signaling pathway.

  10. Mutation c.255delA in the PARK2 gene as cause of juvenile Parkinson´s disease in a large Colombian family Una mutación en el gen PARK2 causa enfermedad de Parkinson juvenil en una extensa familia colombiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Pineda Trujillo

    2009-05-01

    -hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} .MsoPapDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; margin-bottom:10.0pt; line-height:115%;} @page Section1 {size:612.0pt 792.0pt; margin:70.85pt 3.0cm 70.85pt 3.0cm; mso-header-margin:36.0pt; mso-footer-margin:36.0pt; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} -->

    Parkinson´s is a common disease (PD caused by degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and other brain areas. Several genes and mutations have been mplicated in its pathogenesis, the latter have been identified mainly in the PARK2 gene.

    We report the evaluation of this gene and of its flanking region in a large family from the southwestern part of Colombia. The parents are first cousins and four out of their ten children were affected at juvenile age.

  11. Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis. Radiological diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes, R.; Sar, V.; Cabrera, J.J.; Diaz, L.; Hernandez, B.; Valeron, P.; Baez, O.; Rodriguez, M.

    1993-01-01

    Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis (JHF) is a rare disorder of unknown etiology, very few cases of which have been reported in the literature. It presents similarities to other fibromatosys, but has its particular radiological features which differentiate it from them. The clinical findings consist of several, slow growing, subcutaneous nodules, flexion contractures of the joints which can lead to disability, gingival hypertrophy and muscular atrophy. The suspected radiological diagnosis is confirmed by electron microscopy study of the nodules, although light microscopy can also reveal suggestive images. Author (9 refs.)

  12. Juvenile eye growth, when completed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fledelius, Hans C; Christensen, Anders S; Fledelius, Christian

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To test Sorsby's classical statement of axial eye growth as completed at the age of 13 years, with a view also to differentiating between basic eye growth and juvenile elongation associated with eventual refractive change towards myopia. METHODS: (i) A total of 160 healthy eyes close...... about age 13 as general limit found support from the cross-sectional data, which suggested stable emmetropic eye size from about 11-12 years, with an average apparently outgrown male emmetropic value of 23.5 mm versus females' 22.9 mm. The longitudinal data, however, showed emmetropic growth also beyond...

  13. Juvenile ossifying fibroma: Psammamatoid variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Aggarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile ossifying fibroma is a rare fibro-osseous lesion containing variable amount of calcified masses, which resembles bone or cementum within a fibrocellular connective tissue stroma. It has variable clinical behavior, highly aggressive in nature including invasion and destruction of adjacent anatomic structures with a strong tendency to recur. We reported a 28-year-old female patient with a growth in the upper left vestibule region extending from canine to molar region with clinical, histopathological, and radiological features are presented. Surgical management was done, and regular follow-up was advised.

  14. THE STUDY OF FEATURES OF GUILT OF JUVENILE OFFENDERS IN THE CONTEXT OF JUVENILE JUSTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalija Vladimirovna Galkina

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the results of empirical studies of the experiences of guilt of juvenile offenders in the context of juvenile justice where a minor appears as the subject of legal relations. Restorative approach of juvenile justice is based on an admission of guilt to the victim. In connection with it, the research of features of the guilt of minors who have committed an offence and the conditions for the development of the subjectivity will enhance understanding of the possibilities of restorative juvenile justice system in the prevention of juvenile delinquency.Thus, the results of empirical research presented in the article are important for determining of the psychological bases of realization of rehabilitation programs in the context of juvenile justice. In particular, the results are important for the organization and conduct of psychological work to overcome the psychological barriers in the behavior of juveniles having inherently maladaptive guilt and destructive psychological defense mechanisms.

  15. The Grothendieck festschrift a collection of articles written in honor of the 60th birthday of Alexander Grothendieck

    CERN Document Server

    Cartier, Pierre; Katz, Nicholas; Manin, Yuri; Illusie, Luc; Laumon, Gérard; Ribet, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    This three-volume work contains articles collected on the occasion of Alexander Grothendieck's sixtieth birthday and originally published in 1990. The articles were offered as a tribute to one of the world's greatest living mathematicians. Many of the groundbreaking contributions in these volumes contain material that is now considered foundational to the subject. Topics addressed by these top-notch contributors match the breadth of Grothendieck's own interests, including: functional analysis, algebraic geometry, algebraic topology, number theory, representation theory, K-theory, category theo

  16. THE TRADITIONS OF ERMOLAY-ERAZMUS'S "THE TALE OF PETER AND FEVRONIA" IN ALEXANDER PUSHKIN'S NOVEL "THE CAPTAIN'S DAUGHTER"

    OpenAIRE

    Natalya Gennadievna Komar

    2013-01-01

    This article raises the question of the Old Russian sources of Alexander Pushkin’s novel The Captain’s Daughter and presents an attempt to identify the traditions of Ermolay-Erazmus’s The Tale of Peter and Fevronia in it. The main purpose of the research was to identify the parallelism between Pushkin’s novel and The Tale at the imaginative, narrative and thematic levels. Therefore, it was based on application of the comparative method. The main characters of both the books are compared in su...

  17. Trasmigrazione di piante trasferimenti di concetti: la lettura scientifica ed estetica del paesaggio sud americano in Alexander von Humboldt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Di Bartolo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The institution of plant geography as a science in Alexander von Humboldt implies for the first time the emergence of concept of migration concerning plants and animals. But plant geography and the study on vegetation in Humboldt’s books aims to conjugate various natural sciences in order to reach an understanding of the geographical distribution of vegetation. A new approach in South American analysis, connected with an aestethic lecture of Tropical lands of New Word, redefines the idea of “New” thanks to use of analogic concepts based on science and European aestethic lexicon.

  18. Alexander von Humboldt” als Name für Forschungsschiffe vor dem Hintergrund seiner meereskundlichen Arbeiten

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    Gerhard Kortum

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Article in German, Abstract in English. A. v. Humboldt as a Name of Research VesselsA number of special purpose vessels in the world carried or carry the name of Alexander von Humboldt, who had substantial interests in oceanography. However, most of his marine texts are scattered over his major works, and he never finished his manuscript on ocean circulation. But there is a general agreement that A. v. Humboldt was one of the pioneers of marine sciences. He made his own observations on the sailing vessels he used on his expedition to the Neotropics, mainly concerning sea surface temperatures. In 2002 there was a discussion in Germany about the name of a new research vessel which is going to be commissioned in the summer of 2004. It was suggested by the science community to take the name of „Alexander von Humboldt“ again, as the new vessel is replacing a medium-sized ship with this name operated now by the Baltic Sea Research Institute in Rostock-Warnemünde. This vessel has been in service from 1970 to 1990 for the Academy of Sciences of the former German Democratic Republic. The first German research vessel „Alexander von Humboldt“ was a fishing trawler (1939. Furthermore, Peru and Mexico operate research vessels bearing Humboldt’s name. The best known „Alexander von Humboldt“ is an ocean going sailing ship of the International Sail Training Association, based in Bremen. She is engaged in educational programmes and went the South America in 1999 following Humboldt’s route. Thus, Humboldt’s marine legacy is preserved. The proposal to use the undisputed name of this great all-round scientist for the new German vessel under construction now was not successful. A high-ranking jury decided to prefer “Maria Sibylla Merian” (1647-1717, which was suggested by a young student in a nation-wide competition to find a name. As Humboldt 100 years later, she went to South America to study plants and other fields of natural history.

  19. Connecting the New World. Nets, mobility and progress in the Age of Alexander von Humboldt

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    Moritz von Brescius

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Zusammenfassung Dieser Artikel untersucht das Verhältnis zwischen den revolutionären technologischen Neuerungen des 19. Jahrhunderts und dem Leben und Wirken Alexander von Humboldts (1769-1859. Dabei wird gefragt, wie Humboldt versuchte, die neuen und sprichwörtlich bahnbrechenden Kommunikations- und Transporttechnologien seiner Zeit zu nutzen, um den amerikanischen Kontinent in globale kommerzielle und kulturelle Austauschprozesse zu integrieren. Jüngere Forschungen zu Humboldts amerikanischer Expedition (1799-1804 haben behauptet, dass seine Beschreibungen Südamerikas den Kontinent für zahlreiche „transformative interventions“ (Pratt von Seiten europäischer Kapitalisten und Investoren zugänglich gemacht hätten. Diese Studien haben jedoch nicht analysiert, aus welchen Motiven heraus Humboldt diese Eingriffe in die Natur unterstützte. Darüber hinaus wurde nicht der zentralen Frage nachgegangen, welche Rolle diese Projekte in Humboldts eigener Auffassung über die Kräfte des gesellschaftlichen Fortschritts gespielt haben. Um Humboldts Unterstützung für tiefgreifende Eingriffe in die Natur Amerikas nachvollziehen zu können, analysiert dieser Artikel zunächst, welche Rolle der „Geodeterminismus“ und die Fortschrittstheorien der Aufklärung in seinem Verständnis von zivilisatorischer Entwicklung spielten. Dabei sollen solche Beispiele menschlicher Interventionen in die Natur Amerikas untersucht werden, die Humboldt selbst aktiv förderte – nicht zuletzt, da sie geeignet schienen, „natürliche“ Barrieren für gesellschaftliche Austauschprozesse zu beseitigen. Dies waren vor allem die Nutzung von Dampfschiffen, elektrischer Telegrafie, Eisenbahnen und großangelegten Kanalprojekten, deren gebündelte Effekte zu einer signifikanten Beschleunigung von Welthandel und Kommunikationsprozessen führten. Diese zeitgenössischen Innovationen sollen mit den vier Motiven „Netz“, „Mobilität“, „Fortschritt“ und

  20. Juveniles' Motivations for Remaining in Prostitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Shu-Ling; Bedford, Olwen

    2004-01-01

    Qualitative data from in-depth interviews were collected in 1990-1991, 1992, and 2000 with 49 prostituted juveniles remanded to two rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. These data are analyzed to explore Taiwanese prostituted juveniles' feelings about themselves and their work, their motivations for remaining in prostitution, and their difficulties…

  1. Moral development of solo juvenile sex offenders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, E.; Stams, G.J.; Dekovic, M.; Brugman, D.; Rutten, E.; Hendriks, J.

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the moral development of solo juvenile male sex offenders (n = 20) and juvenile male non-offenders (n = 76), aged 13-19 years, from lower socioeconomic and educational backgrounds. The Moral Orientation Measure (MOM) was used to assess punishment- and victim-based moral

  2. Juvenile Obesity, Physical Activity, and Lifestyle Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Or, Oded

    2000-01-01

    Because many obese children become obese adults, the recent rapid increase in juvenile obesity poses a major public health challenge. Enhanced physical activity is a cornerstone in a multidisciplinary approach to preventing and treating juvenile obesity. Giving exercise recommendations focused for obese youth is critical. Cutting down on sedentary…

  3. Juvenile dispersal in Calomys venustus (Muridae: Sigmodontinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priotto, José; Steinmann, Andrea; Provensal, Cecilia; Polop, Jaime

    2004-05-01

    Both spacing behaviour and dispersal movement are viewed as hierarchical processes in which the effects may be expressed at spatial scale. This research was carried out to examine the hypothesis that the presence of parents promotes the dispersal of juveniles from their natal nest and their father or mother home-range, in Calomys venustus.The study was carried out in four 0.25 ha fences (two controls and two experimentals), in a natural pasture. This study had two periods: Father Removal (FR) (August and December 1997; year one) and Mother Removal (MR) (August 1998 and January 1999; year two). For the FR treatment fathers were removed after juveniles were born, but in the MR treatment mothers were removed after the juveniles were weaned. The effect of parents on the dispersal distance of juveniles was analysed with respect to their natal nest and their mother and father home-range. Dispersal distance from the nest of C. venustus was independent of either male or female parent. Juveniles were more dispersing in relation to the centre of activity of their mothers than to that of their fathers, and females were more dispersing than males. Female juveniles overlap their home-range with their parents less than male juveniles do. The differences observed between female and male juveniles would be related to their different sexual maturation times, as well as to the female territoriality.

  4. Using the Juvenile Justice Poster. Teaching Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Update on Law-Related Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Presents a lesson that can help students review and summarize what they have learned about the juvenile justice system. Explains that the students discuss how the juvenile justice system can be improved and conduct a survey on how it might be changed in the future. Provides a copy of the survey and directions. (CMK)

  5. Intelligence Score Profiles of Female Juvenile Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Shelby Spare; Hart, Kathleen J.; Ficke, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have found that male juvenile offenders typically obtain low scores on measures of intelligence, often with a pattern of higher scores on measures of nonverbal relative to verbal tasks. The research on the intelligence performance of female juvenile offenders is limited. This study explored the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for…

  6. Reformations in Zimbabwe's juvenile justice system | Ruparanganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Children in conflict with the law are often stigmatized and shunned by society as they are perceived as a threat to society. Historically, Zimbabwe's juvenile justice system has been retributive and focused on punishing the juvenile offender. As a result, it has been criticised from a number of viewpoints, including the need to ...

  7. Alexander Mikhailovich Zakharov and his works on the venom apparatus and venoms of some poisonous snakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherlin Vladimir Alexandrovich

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The article gives brief biographical information about a very talented herpetologist Alexander M. Zakharov, and describes the general results of his works on the structure and function of venom glands of some poisonous snakes and their venoms. In his studies, he got the results, which are fundamentally different from the conventional concept of 30s - 70s of the XX century. Unfortunately, among physicians this concept has not changed up today. At that time it was thought that the poisons of Viperidae snakes are almost completely hemotoxic, and poisons of Elapidae (cobra are almost neurotoxic. But A.M.Zaharov found out, that poisons of both types of snakes (Viperidae and Elapidae include three groups of substances: hemotoxins, neurotoxins and non-toxic component – hyaluronidase. Each of these groups of substances is produced by independent part of venom glands and has its own special effect. Neurotoxins act on the central nervous system (mainly the respiratory center, but are greatly destroyed by means of the blood antigen properties and cannot pass through the hematoencephalic barrier. Hyaluronidase , connecting with neurotoxins, has an important property – to "smuggle" neurotoxins through the hematoencephalic barrier exactly into the target organ – the respiratory center in the central nervous system. In this case, neurotoxin enters the respiratory center not through the blood and lymph vessels, but directly through the nerve channel, through synapsis. The main function of hemotoxins is not to kill the victim, but to protect neurotoxins and hyaluronidase from the destructive activity of the victim's blood. Therefore, the target of the poisons of Viperidae and Elapidae snakes is the central nervous system of victims, but Elapidae has almost no hemotoxins. That’s why their striking effect can be achieved only by a strong increase in the amount of neurotoxins and hyaluronidase. Hemotoxins of Viperidae venoms permits to reduce the amount of

  8. What is the perceived impact of Alexander technique lessons on health status, costs and pain management in the real life setting of an English hospital? The results of a mixed methods evaluation of an Alexander technique service for those with chronic back pain

    OpenAIRE

    McClean, Stuart; Brilleman, Sam; Wye, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Background: Randomised controlled trial evidence indicates that Alexander Technique is clinically and cost effective for chronic back pain. The aim of this mixed methods evaluation was to explore the role and perceived impact of Alexander Technique lessons in the naturalistic setting of an acute hospital Pain Management Clinic in England.\\ud \\ud Methods: To capture changes in health status and resource use amongst service users, 43 service users were administered three widely used questionnai...

  9. The Evolution of Juvenile Schönlein-Henoch Purpura

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    O.E. Chernyshova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hemorrhagic vasculitis, or Schönlein-Henoch purpura (SHP, is the most common type of systemic vasculitis in childhood, and peculiarities of the further evolution of the pathological process in adult patients remain unexplored. Objective: to study the evolution of juvenile SHP, comparing the nature of lesions of the skin, joints, heart and kidneys in patients in childhood and adulthood. Material and methods. The study included 92 patients (61 men and 31 women with the average age of 27 years, and the average age of disease onset — 11 years. I degree of the activity of the pathological process is determined in 40 % of cases, II — in 35 %, III — in 25 %. Seropositivity by hyperimmunoglobulinemia A occurred in 27 % of cases, by the presence of rheumatoid factor — in 21 %. At the time of the survey, cutaneous syndrome was diagnosed in 55 % of patients, joint one — in 45 %, kidney one — in 71 %. Renal biopsy was performed in 15 cases. Results. The cutaneous, cutaneous-joint-abdominal and cutaneous-abdominal-renal forms of the disease, lesions of the skin, gastrointestinal tract, wrist, ankle and knee joints become rarer in the process of juvenile SHP evolution, but exceptionally renal variant of the pathological process, changes of skeletal muscles, liver, spleen and the heart are revealed more often, chronic kidney disease with the renal failure progression is developed in 12 % of patients (in 17 % of cases of nephropathy, sacroiliitis, spondylopathy, tendovaginitis, enthesopathies, epiphyseal osteoporosis and meniscitis of the knee joints are arisen, II, III, VI and IV morphological classes of Henoch glomerulonephritis are formed in a ratio of 8 : 4 : 2 : 1 with tubulointerstitial component in all cases, and lymphohistiocytic infiltration of the vascular wall is the unfavorable sign for the prognosis of the disease. Conclusions. In cases of transition of juvenile SHP into the chronic adult form, the disease often obtain

  10. Do juveniles bully more than young offenders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Jane L

    2002-04-01

    This study compares bullying behaviour among juvenile and young offenders and incorporates two different methods to measure bullying. Ninety-five male juvenile and 196 male young offenders completed two questionnaires, one that measured bullying directly and one that measured behaviours indicative of "being bullied" or of "bullying others". Juveniles perceived a higher extent of bullying than young offenders. Juveniles reported significantly more physical, psychological or verbal and overall direct forms of bullying behaviour than young offenders. A number of differences were found between juveniles and young offenders with regard to the types of prisoners likely to become victims, who they would advise a victim to speak to and how bullying could be prevented. The results are discussed in relation to developmental theories of aggression and how bullying behaviour can be defined and measured among prisoners. Copyright 2002 The Association for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Family transitions and juvenile delinquency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Ryan D; Osgood, Aurea K; Oghia, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    There is a large body of research that shows children from non-intact homes show higher rates of juvenile delinquency than children from intact homes, partially due to weaker parental control and supervision in non-intact homes. What has not been adequately addressed in the research is the influence of changes in family structure among individual adolescents over time on delinquent offending. Using the first and third waves of the National Youth Study, we assess the effect of family structure changes on changes in delinquent offending between waves through the intermediate process of changes in family time and parental attachment. Although prior research has documented adolescents in broken homes are more delinquent than youth in intact homes, the process of family dissolution is not associated with concurrent increases in offending. In contrast, family formation through marriage or cohabitation is associated with simultaneous increases in offending. Changes in family time and parental attachment account for a portion of the family formation effect on delinquency, and prior parental attachment and juvenile offending significantly condition the effect of family formation on offending.

  12. A systematic review of the effectiveness of strategies for reducing fracture risk in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis with additional data on long-term risk of fracture and cost of disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, J; Ashcroft, D; O'Neill, T; Elliott, R; Adams, J; Roberts, C; Rooney, M; Symmons, D

    2008-03-01

    To review outcome measures and treatment costs in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and low bone mineral density (BMD) and/or fragility fractures. To review evidence for effectiveness and safety of bisphosphonates and calcium and/or vitamin D in these children. To assess long-term bone health in adults with JIA. Major databases were searched up to July 2005 for effectiveness studies and up to January 2005 for costs. A structured search strategy was conducted. For the evaluation of long-term bone health, outcome data were derived from two cohorts of adult patients with JIA. As there were few published cost data, an ongoing UK longitudinal study (CAPS) provided background data on the cost of managing JIA. Sixteen studies (78 children with JIA) were included. At baseline, the children had BMD below the expected values for age- and sex-matched children; treatment with bisphosphonates increased BMD with mean percentage increases in spine BMD varying from 4.5 to 19.1%. None of the studies with control groups compared results between the intervention and control groups, they only compared each group with its own baseline. Overall, studies were heterogeneous in design, of variable quality and with no consistency in methods of assessing and reporting outcomes. Hence, data could not be combined or an effect size calculated. A further 43 papers were included in the safety review; side-effects were generally transient. Two studies assessed treatment with calcium and/or vitamin D; BMD was increased from 0.75 to 0.830 g/cm2 after 6 months and BMD Z-score from -2.8 to -2.3 after 6 months and -2.4 after 1 year. There are relatively few long-term studies on the occurrence of low BMD and fragility fractures in children with JIA, with most studies only following children for 1 or 2 years. However, the long- and short-term data indicate that children with JIA have a lower BMD and more fractures than children without JIA. There are very few data on long-term bone health

  13. Advances in the treatment of polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Kate; Wedderburn, Lucy R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To review recent advances in the management strategies of polyarticular course juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and identify unanswered questions and avenues for further research. Recent findings There is evidence for an early, aggressive, treat-to-target approach for polyarticular JIA. Clinical disease activity criteria have been recently defined and validated, including criteria for inactive disease and the juvenile arthritis disease activity score (JADAS). There is a need for evidence-based, defined disease targets and biomarkers for prediction of response, including targets for remission induction, and guidelines on drug withdrawal. Recent treatment consensus plans and guidelines are discussed and compared, including the 2015 NHS England clinical policy statement, the 2014 Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) treatment plans and the 2011 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) guidelines. Evidence for new agents such as tocilizumab, rituximab, golimumab, ustekinumab, certolizumab and tofacitinib is promising: the recent clinical trials are summarized here. Stratification of individual patient treatment remains a goal, and predictive biomarkers have been shown to predict success in the withdrawal of methotrexate therapy. Summary There are promising advances in the treatment approaches, disease activity criteria, clinical guidelines, pharmaceutical choices and individually stratified therapy choices for polyarticular JIA. PMID:26147756

  14. EVANGELICAL IMAGES AND MOTIFS IN SERGEY ORLOV'S POEMS ABOUT THE BATTLE OF KULIKOVO (IN COMPARISON WITH ALEXANDER BLOK'S CYCLE OF POEMS "ON THE FIELD OF KULIKOVO"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Olegovna Zakharchenko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Battle of Kulikovo is one of the most significant events in Russian history. This article studies five poems by Alexander Blok and Sergey Orlov devoted to this battle. Alexander Blok's cycle of poems On the Field of Kulikovo prophetically predicts future changes in Russia. Sergey Orlov's poems devoted to this historical event can be seen as a certain indicator of his creative evolution. The image of the homeland, as well as the image of his wife (widow, both in Blok's and Orlov's poems originates from the image of the Mother of God. Images of a celestial body used by both poets are associated with military paraphernalia and arise from the evangelical images, while the warrior image is based on the evangelical image of brotherhood. Poetic experience of Alexander Blok and Sergey Orlov reveals Orthodox roots that nourish the entire Russian culture.

  15. „Vater einer großen Nachkommenschaft von Forschungsreisenden ...“ Ehrungen Alexander von Humboldts im Jahre 1869

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    Ilse Jahn

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Article in German, Abstracts in English and GermanIn 1869 the “Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein” was founded in Magdeburg (Saxony Anhalt. That was the time when the scientific world celebrated Alexander von Humboldt’s 100th birthday. In this context, Humboldt’s achievements were remembered during the founding ceremony of that society. The paper which was read in September 2003 on a meeting of this organisation, focuses on three famous naturalists who celebrated Humboldt because they owed him much help in their own professional careers. The botanist Matthias Jacob Schleiden gave a memorial speech in 1869 in Dresden. The physiologist and pioneer of electro-biology Emil du Bois-Reymond honoured his mentor A. v. Humboldt on the occasion of the dedication of the statues of Wilhelm and Alexander in 1883 in Berlin. Charles Darwin expressed his gratitude to Humboldt by sending him in 1839 the report of his travels and received an interesting reply. These three scholars represented a new epoch in the development of the natural sciences. The paper includes a recently re-discovered letter from Humboldt to Schleiden, dated April 13, 1842.

  16. Common Marmosets: A Potential Translational Animal Model of Juvenile Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Leite Galvão-Coelho

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Major depression is a psychiatric disorder with high prevalence in the general population, with increasing expression in adolescence, about 14% in young people. Frequently, it presents as a chronic condition, showing no remission even after several pharmacological treatments and persisting in adult life. Therefore, distinct protocols and animal models have been developed to increase the understanding of this disease or search for new therapies. To this end, this study investigated the effects of chronic social isolation and the potential antidepressant action of nortriptyline in juvenile Callithrix jacchus males and females by monitoring fecal cortisol, body weight, and behavioral parameters and searching for biomarkers and a protocol for inducing depression. The purpose was to validate this species and protocol as a translational model of juvenile depression, addressing all domain criteria of validation: etiologic, face, functional, predictive, inter-relational, evolutionary, and population. In both sexes and both protocols (IDS and DPT, we observed a significant reduction in cortisol levels in the last phase of social isolation, concomitant with increases in autogrooming, stereotyped and anxiety behaviors, and the presence of anhedonia. The alterations induced by chronic social isolation are characteristic of the depressive state in non-human primates and/or in humans, and were reversed in large part by treatment with an antidepressant drug (nortriptyline. Therefore, these results indicate C. jacchus as a potential translational model of juvenile depression by addressing all criteria of validation.

  17. EFFECTIVENESS OF INFLIXIMAB IN PATIENTS WITH JUVENILE ANKYLOSING SPONDYLARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L. Kozlova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of open-labeled study was estimation of effectiveness and safety of infliximab — monoclonal antibodies to tumor necrosis factor (TNF - in treatment of 48 patients with juvenile ankylosing spondylarthritis. Duration of observation was 6 weeks — 1,5 years. Anticytokine treatment was administrated on the ground of therapy with immunosuppressive agents in 96% of patients. Infliximab was administrated in median dose 7,4 ± 3,7 mg/kg of body weight by standard scheme (0–2–6 — week and further every 8 weeks intravenously. Results of a trial showed that infliximab has evident anti-inflammatory effect. Treatment with infliximab provided development of remission of articular syndrome, decreasing and normalization of laboratory indices of activity of disease, the rate of disability, and increasing of quality of life in 84% of patients. Effect of this medication was registered after first infusion and continued during all period of follow up. Adverse effects included transfusion reactions: fever, head ache, nausea/vomiting in 10% of patients, allergic arthritis — in 2% of patients. Thus, treatment of infliximab is pathogenetically grounded, effective and safe in patients with juvenile ankylosing spondylarthritis.Key words: children, juvenile ankylosing spondylarthritis, infliximab, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(2:20-26

  18. SPATACSIN mutations cause autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlacchio, Antonio; Babalini, Carla; Borreca, Antonella; Patrono, Clarice; Massa, Roberto; Basaran, Sarenur; Munhoz, Renato P; Rogaeva, Ekaterina A; St George-Hyslop, Peter H; Bernardi, Giorgio; Kawarai, Toshitaka

    2010-02-01

    The mutation of the spatacsin gene is the single most common cause of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum. Common clinical, pathological and genetic features between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and hereditary spastic paraplegia motivated us to investigate 25 families with autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and long-term survival for mutations in the spatascin gene. The inclusion criterion was a diagnosis of clinically definite amyotrophic lateral sclerosis according to the revised El Escorial criteria. The exclusion criterion was a diagnosis of hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum in line with an established protocol. Additional pathological and genetic evaluations were also performed. Surprisingly, 12 sequence alterations in the spatacsin gene (one of which is novel, IVS30 + 1 G > A) were identified in 10 unrelated pedigrees with autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and long-term survival. The countries of origin of these families were Italy, Brazil, Canada, Japan and Turkey. The variants seemed to be pathogenic since they co-segregated with the disease in all pedigrees, were absent in controls and were associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis neuropathology in one member of one of these families for whom central nervous system tissue was available. Our study indicates that mutations in the spatascin gene could cause a much wider spectrum of clinical features than previously recognized, including autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  19. Clinical and Biochemical Characteristics of Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.; Ali, S. R.; Ishaque, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical and biochemical characteristics of children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) at a tertiary care centre in Karachi, Pakistan. Study Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Paediatric Rheumatology Clinic of The Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH), Karachi, from January 2008 to December 2011. Methodology: Clinical and laboratory profile and outcome of children less than 15 years of age attending the Paediatric Rheumatology Clinic of the Aga Khan University, Karachi with the diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis according to International League against Rheumatism were studied. These children were classified into different types of JIA; their clinical and laboratory characteristics, response to therapy and outcome was evaluated. Results: Sixty eight patients satisfying the criteria of International League against Rheumatism (ILAR) for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis were enrolled during the study period of four consecutive years, their age ranged from 9 months to 15 years. Mean age at onset was 6.45 +- 4.03 years while mean age at diagnosis was 7.60 +- 3.93 years. Polyarticular was the most predominant subtype with 37 (54%) patients, out of these, 9 (24%) were rheumatoid factor positive. An almost equal gender predisposition was observed. Fever and arthritis were the most common presenting symptoms, with only 2 patients presenting with uveitis. Conclusion: The clinico-biochemical characteristics of JIA at the study centre showed a pattern distinct with early onset of disease, high frequency of polyarticular type and a higher rheumatoid factor (QRA) and ANA positivity in girls. (author)

  20. Teachers of the Alexander Technique in the UK and the people who take their lessons: A national cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldred, J; Hopton, A; Donnison, E; Woodman, J; MacPherson, H

    2015-06-01

    Given the rising profile of the Alexander Technique in the UK, there is a need for a comprehensive description of its teachers and of those who currently take lessons. In a national survey of Alexander teachers, we set out to address this information gap. A cross-sectional survey of 871 UK members of three main Alexander Technique teachers' professional associations was conducted. A questionnaire requested information about their professional background, teaching practice and methods, and about the people who attend lessons and their reasons for seeking help. With an overall response rate of 61%, 534 teachers responded; 74% were female with median age of 58 years, 60% had a higher education qualification, and 95% were self-employed, many with additional non-Alexander paid employment. The majority (87%) offered lessons on their own premises or in a privately rented room, and 19% provided home visits; both individual and group lessons were provided. People who took lessons were predominantly female (66%) with a median age of 48 years, and 91% paid for their lessons privately. Nearly two-thirds (62%) began lessons for reasons related to musculoskeletal conditions, including back symptoms, posture, neck pain, and shoulder pain. Other reasons were general (18%, including well-being), performance-related (10%, including voice-, music-, and sport-related), psychological (5%) and neurological (3%). We estimate that Alexander teachers in the UK provide approximately 400,000 lessons per year. This study provides an overview of Alexander Technique teaching in the UK today and data that may be useful when planning future research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The metallogeny of Late Triassic rifting of the Alexander terrane in southeastern Alaska and northwestern British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C.D.; Premo, W.R.; Meier, A.L.; Taggart, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    A belt of unusual volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) occurrences is located along the eastern margin of the Alexander terrane throughout southeastern Alaska and northwestern British Columbia and exhibits a range of characteristics consistent with a variety of syngenetic to epigenetic deposit types. Deposits within this belt include Greens Creek and Windy Craggy, the economically most significant VMS deposit in Alaska and the largest in North America, respectively. The occurrences are hosted by a discontinuously exposed, 800-km-long belt of rocks that consist of a 200- to 800-m-thick sequence of conglomerate, limestone, marine elastic sedimentary rocks, and tuff intercalated with and overlain by a distinctive unit of mafic pyroclastic rocks and pillowed flows. Faunal data bracket the age of the host rocks between Anisian (Middle Triassic) and late Norian (late Late Triassic). This metallogenic belt is herein referred to as the Alexander Triassic metallogenic belt. The VMS occurrences show systematic differences in degree of structural control, chemistry, and stratigraphic setting along the Alexander Triassic metallogenic belt that suggest important spatial or temporal changes in the tectonic environment of formation. At the southern end of the belt, felsic volcanic rocks overlain by shallow-water limestones characterize the lower part of the sequence. In the southern and middle portion of the belt, a distinctive pebble conglomerate marks the base of the section and is indicative of high-energy deposition in a near slope or basin margin setting. At the northern end of the belt the conglomerates, limestones, and felsic volcanic rocks are absent and the belt is composed of deep-water sedimentary and mafic volcanic rocks. This northward change in depositional environment and lithofacies is accompanied by a northward transition from epithermal-like structurally controlled, discontinuous, vein- and pod-shaped, Pb-Zn-Ag-Ba-(Cu) occurrences with relatively simple mineralogy

  2. Survival, growth performance and immune capacity of the juvenile lined seahorse Hippocampus erectus fed with rifampicin-treated copepods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tingting; Wang, Changbo; Liu, Xin; Gao, Fen; Xiao, Dongxue; Zhang, Dong; Zhu, Xialian

    2017-06-19

    Gastrointestinal disease is one of the most serious diseases in cultured seahorse juveniles. Treatment with antimicrobials of live food (i.e. copepods and Artemia) that is used to feed the juveniles may be a promising measure to alleviate the occurrence of gastrointestinal disease. However, relevant investigations are rare. In the present study, we first investigated the antimicrobial efficacies on bacteria within copepods that were treated with 4 antimicrobials, including 3 antibiotics (i.e. enrofloxacin hydrochloride, oxytetracycline and rifampicin [RFP]) that are approved for use in aquaculture and 1 disinfectant (i.e. povidone iodine). We then assessed the effects of copepods treated with the antimicrobial that had the best antimicrobial efficacy on survival, growth performance and immune capacity of juvenile lined seahorses Hippocampus erectus. The results showed that RFP had the best antimicrobial efficacy on both Pseudoalteromonas spp. and Vibrio spp., 2 dominant bacteria with potential pathogenicity within the copepods; the proper concentration of RFP was 6 mg l-1. Moreover, H. erectus juveniles fed with RFP-treated copepods demonstrated an improved survivorship and immune capacity and had a lower abundance of pathogenic bacteria within their gastrointestinal tracts compared to juveniles fed with untreated copepods. These results suggest that treating live food with RFP is a potential measure for reducing the incidence of gastrointestinal disease in seahorse juveniles.

  3. Vegetative propagation of mature and juvenile northern red oak

    Science.gov (United States)

    James J. Zaczek; K. C. Steiner; C. W., Jr. Heuser

    1993-01-01

    Rooting trials were established to evaluate rooting success of cuttings from mature and juvenile, grafted and ungrafted northern red oak (NRO). Buds from 4 mature NRO ortets and juvenile seedlings were grafted onto juvenile and mature rootstock. Cuttings were collected from the grafts and from juvenile and mature shoots developed in situ and...

  4. Exclusively endoscopic approach for juvenile angiofibroma in an adult – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Gawęcki

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To demonstrate clinical, radiological, and diagnostic pitfalls of juvenile angiofibroma (JA in an adult.Study design: Retrospective analysis of a case report.Results: Juvenile angiofibroma in adults is a rare entity with only two cases reported in the literature, confirming thelow prevalence of the disease. We present a case of juvenile angiofibroma in an adult that preoperatively wassuspected to be a malignant disease. Effective treatment included surgical excision via an exclusively endoscopicapproach.Conclusions: Symptoms of JA in an adult may mimic a malignant process. However, in the case of unilateral epistaxis,rhinorrhea and nasal obstruction in an adult JA should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  5. Alexander von Humboldt brachte Guano nach Europa - mit ungeahnten globalen Folgen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bärbel Rott

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Zusammenfassung Die vorliegende Abhandlung beschäftigt sich mit einem bisher wenig beachteten Aspekt von Humboldts Amerikanischer Reise (1799─1804. Während seine Studien der Pflanzen- und Tierwelt bis heute große Aufmerksamkeit genießen, wird Humboldts Beitrag zu der Entwicklung der modernen Landwirtschaft wenig beachtet. Während seines Aufenthalts in Lima erhielt er Proben von Guano, Vogelmist von den Chincha-Inseln vor der peruanischen Küste. Einige Proben, die er von dieser Reise zurückbrachte, wurden von Wissenschaftlern in Frankreich und Deutschland untersucht. Die Analysenergebnisse zeigten außerordentlich hohe Gehalte an Pflanzennährstoffen, insbesondere Stickstoff und Phosphor. In den folgenden Jahrzehnten wurde Guano zu einem bedeutsamen Düngemittel und Auslöser eines Booms in Europa und Peru. Die Auswirkungen dieser Entwicklung sind bis heute sichtbar und werden hier unter besonderer Beachtung von Phosphor beschrieben. Abstract One aspect of Humboldt’s travel to South America (1799─1804 received little attention. The fascination of his studies of the South American flora and fauna is unbroken to the present day. Yet Humboldt’s contribution to modern agriculture remains almost unnoticed. During his stay in Lima Humboldt received samples of guano, a mixture of bird droppings from the Chincha Islands off the Peruvian coast, which he took to Europe and had analyzed by the most famous chemists in France and Germany. The results showed outstanding fertilizing effects, in particular due to the high content of nitrogen and phosphorus. The ensuing boom starting from the 1840s influenced agriculture in Europe and the economy of Peru seriously. Some aspects of this historical development may give an idea of the ensuing change not only in agriculture. Résumé Il y a un aspect du voyage de Alexander von Humboldt en Amérique du Sud (1799─1804 qui jusqu’à présent a été peu considéré. Ses études de la flore at le da

  6. Juvenile fibromyalgia syndrome. Interdisciplinary treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Siuchnińska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM belongs to soft tissue pain syndromes of unknown cause, also referred to as “soft tissue rheumatism”. It is characterized by chronic widespread pain as well as additional symptoms such as fatigue, sleep and mood disturbance and cognitive problems. There is more and more data showing that this condition may start at a young age or even in childhood, adversely affecting development processes and resulting in dysfunctional social and family relationships. Because of the multifaceted character of fibromyalgia the efficient treatment of this disorder can be difficult and requires comprehensive care. This work reviews most recommended procedures used in integrated treatment programmes for juvenile fibromyalgia syndrome (JFM.

  7. Law & psychiatry: punishing juveniles who kill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, Paul S

    2012-10-01

    Punishment of juvenile murderers forces policy makers to weigh the developmental immaturity of adolescents against the heinousness of their crimes. The U.S. Supreme Court has progressively limited the severity of punishments that can be imposed on juveniles, holding that their impulsivity, susceptibility to peer pressure, and more fluid character render them less culpable for their actions. Having eliminated the death penalty as a punishment, the Court recently struck down mandatory life sentences without prospect of parole. The decision is interesting for its emphasis on rehabilitation, opening the door to further restrictions on punitive sentences for juveniles-and perhaps for adults too.

  8. Juvenile Animal Testing: Assessing Need and Use in the Drug Product Label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldrick, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Juvenile animal testing has become an established part of drug development to support safe clinical use in the human pediatric population and for eventual drug product label use. A review of European Paediatric Investigation Plan decisions showed that from 2007 to mid-2017, 229 drugs had juvenile animal work requested, almost exclusively incorporating general toxicology study designs, in rat (57.5%), dog (8%), mouse (4.5%), monkey (4%), pig (2%), sheep (1%), rabbit (1%), hamster (0.5%), and species not specified (21.5%). A range of therapeutic areas were found, but the most common areas were infectious diseases (15%), endocrinology (13.5%), oncology (13%), neurology (11%), and cardiovascular diseases (10%). Examination of major clinical indications within these therapeutic areas showed some level of consistency in the species of choice for testing and the pediatric age that required support. Examination of juvenile animal study findings presented in product labels raises questions around how useful the data are to allow prescribing the drug to a child. It is hopeful that the new ICH S11 guideline "Nonclinical Safety Testing in Support of Development of Pediatric Medicines" currently in preparation will aid drug developers in clarifying the need for juvenile animal studies as well as in promoting a move away from toxicology studies with a conventional design. This would permit more focused testing to examine identified areas of toxicity or safety concerns and clarify the presentation/interpretation of juvenile animal study findings for proper risk assessment by a drug prescriber.

  9. Uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Ethan S; Dick, Andrew D; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V

    2015-06-01

    Uveitis is a potentially sight-threatening complication of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). JIA-associated uveitis is recognized to have an autoimmune aetiology characterized by activation of CD4(+) T cells, but the underlying mechanisms might overlap with those of autoinflammatory conditions involving activation of innate immunity. As no animal model recapitulates all the features of JIA-associated uveitis, questions remain regarding its pathogenesis. The most common form of JIA-associated uveitis is chronic anterior uveitis, which is usually asymptomatic initially. Effective screening is, therefore, essential to detect early disease and commence treatment before the development of visually disabling complications, such as cataracts, glaucoma, band keratopathy and cystoid macular oedema. Complications can result from uncontrolled intraocular inflammation as well as from its treatment, particularly prolonged use of high-dose topical corticosteroids. Accumulating evidence supports the early introduction of systemic immunosuppressive drugs, such as methotrexate, as steroid-sparing agents. Prospective randomized controlled trials of TNF inhibitors and other biologic therapies are underway or planned. Future research should aim to identify biomarkers to predict which children are at high risk of developing JIA-associated uveitis or have a poor prognosis. Such biomarkers could help to ensure that patients receive earlier interventions and more-potent therapy, with the ultimate aim of reducing loss of vision and ocular morbidity.

  10. Juvenile Myasthenia Gravis: A Paediatric Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria F. Finnis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis (MG is an autoimmune disease in which antibodies are directed against the postsynaptic membrane of the neuromuscular junction, resulting in muscle weakness and fatigability. Juvenile myasthenia gravis (JMG is a rare condition of childhood and has many clinical features that are distinct from adult MG. Prepubertal children in particular have a higher prevalence of isolated ocular symptoms, lower frequency of acetylcholine receptor antibodies, and a higher probability of achieving remission. Diagnosis in young children can be complicated by the need to differentiate from congenital myasthenic syndromes, which do not have an autoimmune basis. Treatment commonly includes anticholinesterases, corticosteroids with or without steroid-sparing agents, and newer immune modulating agents. Plasma exchange and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG are effective in preparation for surgery and in treatment of myasthenic crisis. Thymectomy increases remission rates. Diagnosis and management of children with JMG should take account of their developmental needs, natural history of the condition, and side-effect profiles of treatment options.

  11. The frequency of pulmonary hypertension in patients with juvenile scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amra Adrovic

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile scleroderma (JS represents a rarely seen group of connective tissue diseases with multiple organ involvement. Cardiac involvement in JSS is well known and, although rare in children, it may be an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Therefore, an early determination of cardio-vascular and pulmonary involvement is of the most relevance to reduce the mortality in patients with juvenile scleroderma. The aim of the study was to explore the non-invasive methods (Doppler echocardiography, pulmonary function tests, Forced vital capacity (FVC and Carbon monoxide diffusion capacity (DLCO in the assessment of the cardiopulmonary involvement in patients with JS. The assessment of pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP and risk factors for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH were made by the measurement of maximum tricuspid insufficiency (TI, end-diastolic pulmonary insufficiency (PI, ratio of acceleration time (AT to ejection time (ET (AT/ET, right atrial pressure (RAP and contraction of vena cava inferior during inspiration. Thirty-five patients with confirmed JS were included in the study. The mean age of onset of the disease was 9.57 years (median 10 years, range 2-18 years. The mean disease duration and follow-up time was 2 years (median 1 year, range 0.5-8 years and 3.57 years (median 2 years, range 0.5-14.5 years, respectively.The values of all the analyzed parameters including TI, PI, AT/ET, PAP, FVC and DLCO were found to be within normal ranges in all the patients tested, confirming an uncommonness of cardiopulmonary involvement in patients with juvenile scleroderma.

  12. The frequency of pulmonary hypertension in patients with juvenile scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrovic, Amra; Oztunc, Funda; Barut, Kenan; Koka, Aida; Gojak, Refet; Sahin, Sezgin; Demir, Tuncalp; Kasapcopur, Ozgur

    2015-08-22

    Juvenile scleroderma (JS) represents a rarely seen group of connective tissue diseases with multiple organ involvement. Cardiac involvement in JSS is well known and, although rare in children, it may be an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Therefore, an early determination of cardio-vascular and pulmonary involvement is of the most relevance to reduce the mortality in patients with juvenile scleroderma. The aim of the study was to explore the non-invasive methods (Doppler echocardiography, pulmonary function tests), Forced vital capacity (FVC) and Carbon monoxide diffusion capacity (DLCO) in the assessment of the cardiopulmonary involvement in patients with JS. The assessment of pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) and risk factors for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) were made by the measurement of maximum tricuspid insufficiency (TI), end-diastolic pulmonary insufficiency (PI), ratio of acceleration time (AT) to ejection time (ET) (AT/ET), right atrial pressure (RAP) and contraction of vena cava inferior during inspiration. Thirty-five patients with confirmed JS were included in the study. The mean age of onset of the disease was 9.57 years (median 10 years, range 2-18 years). The mean disease duration and follow-up time was 2 years (median 1 year, range 0.5-8 years) and 3.57 years (median 2 years, range 0.5-14.5 years), respectively.The values of all the analyzed parameters including TI, PI, AT/ET, PAP, FVC and DLCO were found to be within normal ranges in all the patients tested, confirming an uncommonness of cardiopulmonary involvement in patients with juvenile scleroderma.

  13. Conceptualizing juvenile prostitution as child maltreatment: findings from the National Juvenile Prostitution Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Kimberly J; Finkelhor, David; Wolak, Janis

    2010-02-01

    Two studies were conducted to identify the incidence (Study 1) and characteristics (Study 2) of juvenile prostitution cases known to law enforcement agencies in the United States. Study 1 revealed a national estimate of 1,450 arrests or detentions (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1,287-1,614) in cases involving juvenile prostitution during a 1-year period. In Study 2, exploratory data were collected from a subsample of 138 cases from police records in 2005. The cases are broadly categorized into three main types: (a) third-party exploiters, (b) solo prostitution, and (c) conventional child sexual abuse (CSA) with payment. Cases were classified into three initial categories based on police orientation toward the juvenile: (a) juveniles as victims (53%), (b) juveniles as delinquents (31%), and (c) juvenile as both victims and delinquents (16%). When examining the status of the juveniles by case type, the authors found that all the juveniles in CSA with payment cases were treated as victims, 66% in third-party exploiters cases, and 11% in solo cases. Findings indicate law enforcement responses to juvenile prostitution are influential in determining whether such youth are viewed as victims of commercial sexual exploitation or as delinquents.

  14. Stridor: an unusual presentation of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hitendra Prakash; Kumar, Sunil; Vashishtha, Madhukar; Agarwal, Satya Prakash

    2014-04-07

    Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a rare and benign disease, which is mainly found in adolescent male subjects. It is usually diagnosed on clinical grounds on the basis of its presenting symptoms of nasal obstruction, nasal mass and most importantly unprovoked recurrent moderate to severe epistaxis. Imaging studies are only needed to confirm the diagnosis and formulate the management plan. A case of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is presented here, which presented to us with severe respiratory distress and stridor. Urgent tracheostomy had to be performed before definitive management could be started. Definitive treatment was excision through modified transpalatal with sublabial route, which resulted in successful outcome.

  15. Aerobic training in persons who have recovered from juvenile dermatomyositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, M; Mathiesen, P R; Vissing, J

    2013-01-01

    A recent study has shown that 36 persons who had recovered from juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) have on average an 18% decrease in maximal oxygen uptake. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a 12-week aerobic training program in this group, and assess whether aerobic training...... can normalize aerobic capacity to the expected level for age and gender. The patients participating in the study, one male and nine females (16-42years of age), were in remission from JDM, defined as no clinical or biochemical evidence of disease activity and no medical treatment for 1year...

  16. The semantic sphere of juvenile offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshevsky D.S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a preliminary empirical study aimed to identify features of the semantic sphere of adolescents who have committed illegal, including aggressive acts. The study included 50 male juveniles aged of 16 - 17 years. The first group consisted of adolescents convicted of aggressive and violent crimes; the second – of property socially dangerous acts (SDA. It is shown that evaluation of such adolescents is generally categorical and polar, the semantic field is subdifferentiable, less hierarchic, and has not enough realistic structure of meanings. Developed structure of motives and meanings is the basis of voluntary regulation of socially significant behavior. Thus, assessing the semantic sphere of juvenile offenders we can highlight its characteristics as risk factors of unlawful behavior, as well as the resource side, that will contribute to addressing issues of prevention and correction of unlawful behavior. Key words: juvenile offenders, semantic field of juvenile offenders, unlawful behavior.

  17. Juvenile Salmonid Metrics - Ocean Survival of Salmonids

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A study to evaluate the role of changing ocean conditions on growth and survival of juvenile salmon from the Columbia River basin as they enter the Columbia River...

  18. Juvenile Pacific Salmon in Puget Sound

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fresh, Kurt L

    2006-01-01

    Puget sound salmon (genus Oncorhynchus) spawn in freshwater and feed, grow and mature in marine waters, During their transition from freshwater to saltwater, juvenile salmon occupy nearshore ecosystems in Puget Sound...

  19. Epidemic Intelligence. Langmuir and the Birth of Disease Surveillance

    OpenAIRE

    Lyle Fearnley

    2010-01-01

    In the wake of the SARS and influenza epidemics of the past decade, one public health solution has become a refrain: surveillance systems for detection of disease outbreaks. This paper is an effort to understand how disease surveillance for outbreak detection gained such paramount rationality in contemporary public health. The epidemiologist Alexander Langmuir is well known as the creator of modern disease surveillance. But less well known is how he imagined disease surveillance as one part o...

  20. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nusman, Charlotte M. [Emma Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lavini, Cristina; Hemke, Robert; Caan, Matthan W.A.; Maas, Mario [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Berg, J.M. van den; Kuijpers, Taco W. [Emma Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reade Institute location Jan van Breemen, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [Reade Institute location Jan van Breemen, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Emma Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-02-15

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI provides information on the heterogeneity of the synovium, the primary target of disease in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). To evaluate the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in the wrist of children with JIA using conventional descriptive measures and time-intensity-curve shape analysis. To explore the association between enhancement characteristics and clinical disease status. Thirty-two children with JIA and wrist involvement underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI with movement-registration and were classified using validated criteria as clinically active (n = 27) or inactive (n = 5). Outcome measures included descriptive parameters and the classification into time-intensity-curve shapes, which represent the patterns of signal intensity change over time. Differences in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI outcome measures between clinically active and clinically inactive disease were analyzed and correlation with the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score was determined. Comprehensive evaluation of disease status was technically feasible and the quality of the dynamic dataset was improved by movement registration. The conventional descriptive measure maximum enhancement differed significantly between clinically active and inactive disease (P = 0.019), whereas time-intensity-curve shape analysis showed no differences. Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score correlated moderately with enhancing volume (P = 0.484). Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is a promising biomarker for evaluating disease status in children with JIA and wrist involvement. Conventional descriptive dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI measures are better associated with clinically active disease than time-intensity-curve shape analysis. (orig.)

  1. The Impact of Banning Juvenile Gun Possession.

    OpenAIRE

    Marvell, Thomas B

    2001-01-01

    A 1994 federal law bans possession of handguns by persons under 18 years of age. Also in 1994, 11 states passed their own juvenile gun possession bans. Eighteen states had previously passed bans, 15 of them between 1975 and 1993. These laws were intended to reduce homicides, but arguments can be made that they have no effect on or that they even increase the homicide rate. This paper estimates the laws' impacts on various crime measures, primarily juvenile gun homicide victimizations and suic...

  2. Alexander Graham Bell's Patent for the Telephone and Thomas Edison's Patent for the Electric Lamp. The Constitution Community: The Development of the Industrial United States (1870-1900).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schur, Joan Brodsky

    In 1876 Americans held a Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) to celebrate the nation's birth 100 years earlier. Machinery Hall drew the most admiration and wonder. Alexander Graham Bell exhibited the first telephone, and Thomas Alva Edison presented the automatic telegraph, one of more than 1,000 inventions he would patent in his…

  3. The Question of Sign-Language and the Utility of Signs in the Instruction of the Deaf: Two Papers by Alexander Graham Bell (1898)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, M.

    2005-01-01

    Alexander Graham Bell is often portrayed as either hero or villain of deaf individuals and the Deaf community. His writings, however, indicate that he was neither, and was not as clearly definite in his beliefs about language as is often supposed. The following two articles, reprinted from The Educator (1898), Vol. V, pp. 3?4 and pp. 38?44,…

  4. Australian bat lyssavirus infection in a captive juvenile black flying fox.

    OpenAIRE

    Field, H.; McCall, B.; Barrett, J.

    1999-01-01

    The newly emerging Australian bat lyssavirus causes rabieslike disease in bats and humans. A captive juvenile black flying fox exhibited progressive neurologic signs, including sudden aggression, vocalization, dysphagia, and paresis over 9 days and then died. At necropsy, lyssavirus infection was diagnosed by fluorescent antibody test, immunoperoxidase staining, polymerase chain reaction, and virus isolation. Eight human contacts received postexposure vaccination.

  5. The myosin chaperone UNC45B is involved in lens development and autosomal dominant juvenile cataract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Comyn, Sophie; Mang, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide linkage analysis, followed by targeted deep sequencing, in a Danish multigeneration family with juvenile cataract revealed a region of chromosome 17 co-segregating with the disease trait. Affected individuals were heterozygous for two potentially protein-disrupting alleles in this reg...... advance online publication, 19 February 2014; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2014.21....

  6. Periodontal and hematological characteristics associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Westergaard, Jytte; Stoltze, Kaj

    2006-01-01

    Periodontitis shares several clinical and pathogenic characteristics with chronic arthritis, and there is some degree of coexistence. The aims of this study were to elucidate whether patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP), generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP), juvenile...... idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) share periodontal and hematological characteristics distinguishing them from individuals free of diseases....

  7. Preoperative embolization for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Usefulness of IADSA and problems of external carotid ligation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Ryuichi; Nakagawa, Nobuo; Kohrogi, Yukinori; Izunaga, Hiroshi; Bussaka, Hiromasa; Miyawaki, Masayuki; Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Ikawa, Tsutomu; Ishikawa, Takashi (Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-10-01

    Three male cases of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma are presented. Satisfactory results were obtained by performing preoperative embolization combined with intraarterial digital subtraction angiography (IADSA) in two of them. The other case had undergone external carotid ligation. Usefulness of IADSA in performing preoperative embolization for this disease and problems of external carotid ligation are discussed.

  8. JUVENILE DELINQUENCY: TRENDS (REGIONAL ASPECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Selezneva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available he article analyzes the nature and internal structure of various types of crimes in which involved minors. Describes the main social factors contributing to this anomaly in the period of development of society. Investigated the motivation, the system and the types of crimes of minors in the Volgograd region, are the main trends of development of this phenomenon. The study also discusses the theoretical basis of the problem of the influence of economic stability on the species structure of juvenile delinquency. In this study the analysis of various types of deviance minors in different areas of the city of Volgograd. In the process of rapid modernization of communication processes most of today’s youth have not been able to quickly rebuild their behavior. Currently, the value-perception of the adolescents focused on the material benefits in terms of expanded economic interactions. In these conditions, social processes become increasingly removed from humane and spiritual orientations. The effective functioning of society in its interaction based on cooperation and understanding is of great importance to stimulate the positive trends in social sphere in modern Russia. The modern period of development, coupled with a drastic breaking of the foundations of life, the formation of new social relations and institutions and the destruction of the old, inevitably contributes to social tension, the reassessment of social and moral values and development of deviant behavior of minors. The advantages of this study are the involvement of local archives regional committees on Affairs of minors, was first introduced to active scientific revolution, as well as logical structuring and grouping of the main issues related to the dynamics and changes in the species structure of juvenile crime, which allowed us to perform a fairly extensive archive of statistical material. Based on this analysis, the authors made a

  9. [Proceedings of the VII international symposium 'Cultural heritage in geosciences, mining and metallurgy : libraries, archives, museums' : "Museums and their collections" held at the Nationaal Natuurhistorisch Museum Leiden (The Netherlands), 19-23 May, 2003 / Cor F. Winkler Prins and Stephen K. Donovan (editors)]: The Alexander the First collection of the Lausanne Museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minina, E.L.

    2004-01-01

    Study of written sources in archives sometimes allows to restore the history of collections. A good example is the Alexander the First collection. In 1819, de la Harpe had sent an Etruscan vase to Alexander I as a gift, and had received a collection of Russian minerals in return. Alexander's

  10. Hallar e inventar a un público. Nuevos proyectos editoriales acerca de la obra de Alexander von Humboldt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottmar Ette

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Article in español, abstracts in englisch, español and german.In Latin America, Alexander von Humboldt was and is known as one of the most famous historic and literary figures; in his own country, though, the acquaintance with his texts has until the 80s been reduced to groups of specialized scholars. Yet, for a couple of years, a growing interest in the works of Humboldt can be noticed, based on numerous new editions, which have been published since. Among others, these are the new edition of the Relation historique (1991, the editions of the „Humboldt Project“ (2004-2006 as part of the „Andere Bibliothek“, as well as current projects on German editions concerning Asie Centrale and the Examen critique.

  11. Jade aus Amerika und weitere Grünsteinobjekte von Alexander von Humboldt aus dem Berliner Mineralienkabinett

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate Nöller

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Article in German, Abstracts in English, Spanish and German.Alexander von Humboldt sent samples of minerals from America not only for scientific or economic purposes. We also find carved pieces made out of green stone material known as Jade, that has been culturally very important in Mesoamerica. In Europe these green stone objects have been treated differently. The Jade-Celt and the Sun-Disc - known as “Humboldt-Axt” and “Humboldt-Scheibe” - both lost during the second world war, had gained great interest, whereas a small head-pendant - made out of Jade has been totally forgotten. The samples reflect the understanding of their worth in distinct cultural contexts.

  12. Percepción, descripción y explicación en la obra de Alexander Von Humboldt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Jiménez Pazos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Es recurrente la tendencia a considerar a Alexander von Humboldt como autor romántico-naturalista, dada la combinación del método científico de análisis empírico de la naturaleza con su visión estético-subjetiva que posee ciertos rasgos "románticos". Un estudio del léxico empleado por Humboldt en las descripciones de la naturaleza revela, sin embargo, el predominio del lenguaje estrictamente científico e intersubjetivo sobre el subjetivo. La presencia de rasgos semánticos "románticos" no es, empero, meramente ornamental, sino que cumple una función estética que, en la percepción humboldtiana de la naturaleza, es un complemento subjetivo indispensable dentro de su imagen holística del mundo.

  13. FCJ-179 On Governance, Blackboxing, Measure, Body, Affect and Apps: A conversation with Patricia Ticineto Clough and Alexander R. Galloway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Matviyenko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The work of Patricia Ticineto Clough and Alexander Galloway is well known to anyone whose research concerns matters of affect and biopolitics, software, networks and gaming, interface culture and communication, political economy of media and information, the systems of measure and control addressed in the contexts of French theory, feminist and speculative thought, Marxism or psychoanalysis. We were lucky to have them among the keynotes for our Apps and Affect conference, where their talks sparked an interesting exchange that impacted a number of the conference conversations. Afterwards, I suggested to Patricia and Alex that they elaborate on aspects of their discussion, this invitation resulted in the following conversation, which took place via email between April and December 2014.

  14. The appearance of the artist to the people: the creativity, personality and malady of Alexander Ivanov (1806-58).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Vladimir; Witztum, Eliezer

    2005-02-01

    Alexander Ivanov was an outstanding Russian painter who lived in the middle of the nineteenth century, during the romantic period. He did not accept romanticism but instead tried to create his own original style, an ambitious combination of spiritual profundity and a manner of execution unparalleled in Western European art. Ivanov's intention and style are best reflected in his major work The Appearance of Christ to the People, a picture on which he worked for over 20 years. He painted more than 400 sketches of the picture while attempting to bring his masterpiece to perfection. At the end of his life Ivanov became disillusioned, renounced his strong religious conviction and became suspicious. This study examines the influence of his background, life story and personality on the creative process. From a diagnostic perspective, Ivanov's personality featured obsessive, narcissistic and schizoid traits. In his final years he suffered from a delusional disorder.

  15. Impact of the Alexander technique on well-being: a randomised controlled trial involving older adults with visual impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Michael; Sherrington, Catherine; Lo, Serigne; Auld, Robin; Keay, Lisa

    2017-11-01

    Older adults with visual loss have high rates of depression, restricted participation and reduced quality of life. We sought to measure the impact of lessons in the Alexander technique on vision-related emotional and social well-being, as secondary outcomes to a study on improving physical functioning in this population. This is a single-blind randomised controlled trial. One hundred and twenty community-dwelling adults aged 50 to 90 years with visual impairments were randomised to either 12 Alexander lessons over 12 weeks and usual care or usual care. The Perceived Visual Ability Scale, the Keele Assessment of Participation, the emotional subscale of the Impact of Vision Impairment Profile, the Positive and Negative Affect Scale and the five-item Geriatric Depression Scale were administered at baseline and three and 12 months. Participants were receiving services from Guide Dogs NSW/ACT. None of the validated questionnaires found statistically significant improvements after adjustment for baseline at three or 12 months, although the emotional subscale of the Impact of Vision Impairment approached significance in favour of the intervention group (4.54 points, 95 per cent CI: -0.14 to 9.21, p = 0.06). Depressive symptoms were prevalent and associated with greater impact of visual impairment on emotional well-being (odds ratio: 1.12, 95 per cent CI: 1.07 to 1.17, p visual impairment showed a trend toward less distress in the intervention group. Our data found that emotional distress associated with visual impairment influences depressive symptoms but contrary to expectations, the level of social support received was not significant. Additionally, gait speed is a significant predictor of depressive symptoms, suggesting that general mobility is of importance to the well-being of older adults with visual impairments. © 2017 Optometry Australia.

  16. Steers performance fed diets with Alexander grass silage (Urochloa plantaginea x sorghum silage (Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flânia Mônego Argenta

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the parameters related to feedlot beef steers fed with Alexander grass silage or sorghum silage as roughage source. Twelve animals with initial average of weight and age of 245 kg and 20 months, respectively, belonging to Nellore (N, Charolais (C, 21/32 N 11/32 C, 21/32 C 11/32 N; 43/64 N 21/64 C and 43/64 C 21/64 N genetic groups were used. The ration was composed by a roughage:concentrate relation of 50:50 (dry matter basis, offered at ease. The dry matter, crude protein, ether extract, neutral detergent fiber and acid detergent fiber daily intake didn’t differ between roughage sources, being the medium values of 10.18; 1.28; 0.20; 4.96 and 2.51 kg/day, respectively. However, the ether extract intake by metabolic size and by corporal weight percentage were higher for the one that consumed sorghum silage, obtaining values of 2.74 and 2.36 g/metabolic size and 0.06 and 0.05 kg/100 kg of live weight. The same behavior was observed for digestible energy intake, presenting values of 364.87 and 302.83 g/metabolic size and 8.10 and 7.02 kg/100 kg of live weight. The daily average gain, final corporal score and feed conversion weren’t influenced by roughage type, being the values of 1.31 kg; 4.05 points and 7.78 kg of DM/kg of weight gain, respectively. The Alexander grass silage is a feasible alternative as its substitution in relation to sorghum silage.

  17. EXPERIENCE OF TREATMENT OF JUVENILE POLYARTHRITIS WITH EYES LESION WITH ADALIMUMAB

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    A.O. Lisitsin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A case report of early debut and severe course of juvenile poly arthritis with eyes lesion refractory to classic immuno suppressive agents is presented in this article. Successful application of biological agent adalimumab is described: acute inflammatory alterations in affected joints were stopped by 49 the week. Range of motions in affected joints was recovered. The remission of veitis, normalization of indicators of disease activity (ESR, concentration of creactive protein in blood plasma was registered by 89 th week.Key words: children, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatoid uveitis, adalimumab.

  18. THE EXPERIENCE OF ADALIMUMAB USE IN A PATIENT WITH PAUTSIARTICULAR JUVENILE ARTHRITIS AND UVEITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Alexeeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the observation of early debut and the severe course of the juvenile polyarthritis involving the eyes, refractory to treatment by classical immunosuppressants. Successful use of the genetically engineered biological drug — adalimumab is described:  by the 4th week of therapy the acute inflammatory changes in affected joints were stopped, range of motion in them fully recovered; to the 8th week uveitis remission was registered, laboratory values of the disease activity were normalized: erythrocyte sedimentation rate, serum concentration of C-reactive protein. Key words: children, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatoid uveitis, adalimumab. (Pediatric pharmacology. — 2011; 8 (6: 119–124.

  19. Clinical Case of Tocilizumab Use in a Patient with Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Spivakovskiy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a case of using genetically engineered biopharmaceutical tocilizumab in a child with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. On the initial stage, the treatment was characterized by resistance to high doses of glucocorticoids and cytostatic drugs. Successful termination of visceral and articular manifestations of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and normalization of laboratory indicators of disease activity in the setting of use of interleukin 6 receptor blocker were described. We observed stable improvement of the child’s condition during a year-long follow-up in the setting of the selected anti-inflammatory therapy pattern. 

  20. [Bacteriological study on juvenile periodontitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, N

    1991-02-01

    The predominant cultivable microflora of 23 pockets in 15 juvenile periodontitis (JP) patients was studied for the first time in China using the current anaerobic methodology. Samples were taken with sterile paper points and dispersed on a vortex mixer. Then the diluted samples were plated on the non-selective blood agar plates and selective MGB medium which favors the growth of Actinobacillus actimycetemcomitans (Aa) and incubated in anaerobic chamber for 5 days. From each sample 15 or more isolated colonies were picked in sequence without selection and subcultured. The isolates were identified mainly by Schrechenberger's 4 hour rapid methods for biochemical and fermentative tests and the chromatographic analysis of acid end products using ion-chromatography. The results were as follows: 1. The microflora of healthy sulci of 7 healthy young subjects was significantly different from that in the pocket of JP patients. The predominant species in healthy sulci were Streptococcus spp and Capnocytophaga gingivalis. 2. The species increased significantly in JP patients in prevalence and proportions was Eubacterium. Other species in high proportions were Bacteroides oris, B. melaninogenicus, B. gingivalis, Capnocytophaga sputigena, and Actinomyces meyeri, etc. 3. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was not detected in any of the samples.

  1. Imaging of juvenile spondyloarthritis. Part II: Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Sudoł-Szopińska

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile spondyloarthropathies are mainly manifested by symptoms of peripheral arthritis and enthesitis. Early involvement of sacroiliac joints and spine is exceptionally rare in children; this usually happens in adulthood. Conventional radiographs visualize late inflammatory lesions. Early diagnosis is possible with the use of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. The first part of the article presented classifications and radiographic presentation of juvenile spondyloarthropathies. This part discusses changes seen on ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. In patients with juvenile spondyloarthropathies, these examinations are conducted to diagnose inflammatory lesions in peripheral joints, tendon sheaths, tendons and bursae. Moreover, magnetic resonance also shows subchondral bone marrow edema, which is considered an early sign of inflammation. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging do not show specific lesions for any rheumatic disease. Nevertheless, they are conducted for early diagnosis, treatment monitoring and identifying complications. This article presents a spectrum of inflammatory changes and discusses the diagnostic value of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging.

  2. Early-Life Stress Triggers Juvenile Zebra Finches to Switch Social Learning Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farine, Damien R; Spencer, Karen A; Boogert, Neeltje J

    2015-08-17

    Stress during early life can cause disease and cognitive impairment in humans and non-humans alike. However, stress and other environmental factors can also program developmental pathways. We investigate whether differential exposure to developmental stress can drive divergent social learning strategies between siblings. In many species, juveniles acquire essential foraging skills by copying others: they can copy peers (horizontal social learning), learn from their parents (vertical social learning), or learn from other adults (oblique social learning). However, whether juveniles' learning strategies are condition dependent largely remains a mystery. We found that juvenile zebra finches living in flocks socially learned novel foraging skills exclusively from adults. By experimentally manipulating developmental stress, we further show that social learning targets are phenotypically plastic. While control juveniles learned foraging skills from their parents, their siblings, exposed as nestlings to experimentally elevated stress hormone levels, learned exclusively from unrelated adults. Thus, early-life conditions triggered individuals to switch strategies from vertical to oblique social learning. This switch could arise from stress-induced differences in developmental rate, cognitive and physical state, or the use of stress as an environmental cue. Acquisition of alternative social learning strategies may impact juveniles' fit to their environment and ultimately change their developmental trajectories. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Whole-body MRI of juvenile spondyloarthritis: protocols and pictorial review of characteristic patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquino, Michael R. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Tse, Shirley M.L.; Rachlis, Alisa C. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Rheumatology, Toronto (Canada); Gupta, Sumeet; Stimec, Jennifer [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Radiology, Toronto (Canada)

    2015-05-01

    Spondyloarthritides are a group of inflammatory rheumatological diseases that cause arthritis with a predilection for spinal or sacroiliac involvement in addition to a high association with HLA-B27. Juvenile spondyloarthritis is distinct from adult spondyloarthritis and manifests more frequently as peripheral arthritis and enthesitis. Consequently juvenile spondyloarthritis is often referred to as enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA) subtype under the juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) classification criteria. The American College of Rheumatology Treatment Recommendations for JIA, including ERA, are based on the following clinical parameters: current treatment, disease activity and the presence of poor prognostic features. The MRI features of juvenile spondyloarthritis include marrow edema, peri-enthesal soft-tissue swelling and edema, synovitis and joint or bursal fluid. Marrow edema is nonspecific and can be seen with other pathologies as well as in healthy subjects, and this is an important pitfall to consider. With further longitudinal study and validation, however, whole-body MRI with dedicated images of the more commonly affected areas such as the spine, sacroiliac joints, hips, knees, ankles and feet can serve as a more objective tool compared to clinical exam for early detection and monitoring of disease activity and ultimately direct therapeutic management. (orig.)

  4. Depression Risk in Young Adults With Juvenile- and Adult-Onset Lupus: Twelve Years of Followup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Andrea M; Trupin, Laura; Katz, Patricia; Yelin, Edward; Lawson, Erica F

    2018-03-01

    To compare major depression risk among young adults with juvenile-onset and adult-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and to determine demographic and health-related predictors of depression. Young adults with SLE ages 18-45 years (n = 546) in the Lupus Outcomes Study completed annual telephone surveys from 2002-2015, including assessment of depression using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and self-report measures of sociodemographics and health characteristics. Juvenile-onset SLE was defined as age adult-onset SLE. Older age, lower educational attainment, and physical function, higher disease activity, and a history of smoking were associated with an increased depression risk. Juvenile-onset SLE patients had a higher risk of major depression across all educational groups. Young adults with SLE, particularly those with juvenile-onset disease, are at high risk for major depression, which is associated with increased disease activity, poorer physical functioning, and lower educational attainment. Early depression intervention in young adults with SLE has the potential to improve both medical and psychosocial outcomes. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Experience with conservative rehabilitation in patients with juvenile chronic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Shelepina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate a need for conservative rehabilitation treatment in patients with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA.Material and methods. Data on the principles and procedures of rehabilitation treatment were analyzed in patients with JCA on the basis of 25- year experience. The need for these packages of measures in 1999, 2008, and 2014 was compared. Standard procedures for joints at different sites were described. According to the degree of joint functions, there were rehabilitation treatment packages: corrective, mobilization, and general health-improving.Results and discussion. All patients with juvenile arthritis need rehabilitation (physical, psychological, and social. Comparison of the total number of patients who had received rehabilitation treatment in 1999, 2008, and 2014 showed a small trend towards its reduction. This is due to the smaller number of patients with dysfunctions and to the larger number of those without movement disorders who had received adequate treatment in early periods of the disease. The high percentage of patients having limited joint functions needs a mobilization package. Analysis of the data available in the literature and the authors' experience may lead to the conclusion that all patients with JCA need exercise therapy. The latter is a major procedure for physical rehabilitation and should be included in the standards for adjuvant treatment during basic medical therapy. Emphasis is laid on the importance of the early initiation of treatment to prevent incapacitating deformity at early stages of the disease.

  6. Experience of the Tocilizumab Application in Systemic Onset Juvenile Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Krasnopol’skaja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article provides information on the unfavourable course of systemic onset juvenile arthritis, resistant to immunosuppressive therapy with methotrexate in combination with cyclosporine, and pulse therapy with methylprednisolone and methotrexate. We describe the successful use of genetically engineered biological drug tocilizumab in the patient with systemic onset juvenile arthritis. After the first injection, pain was already significantly reduced; after the second, fever was relieved and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs were cancelled; after the third, lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly disappeared and the child’s functional activity improved significantly. After 12 months of treatment, an inactive phase of the disease was achieved, the joints’ kinetics (with the exception of the right hip were almost entirely restored and the patient’s quality of life had significantly improved. At the same time, metabolic disorders and changes in the cardiovascular system were reversed. This example demonstrated the high effectiveness of interleukin-6 antagonist tocilizumab in systemic arthritis, which allowed arresting joint affection as well as extra-articular manifestations of the disease, providing normal puberty, the restoration of growth and sexual development.

  7. Assessment of Microvascular Abnormalities by Nailfold Capillaroscopy in Juvenile Dermatomyositis After Medium- to Long-Term Followup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Zoltan; Witczak, Birgit N; Flatø, Berit; Koller, Akos; Sjaastad, Ivar; Sanner, Helga

    2018-05-01

    In juvenile dermatomyositis (DM), microvascular abnormalities, measured by nailfold capillaroscopy (NFC), are common early in the disease course. We aimed to compare the presence of NFC abnormalities in patients with medium- to long-term juvenile DM with that of controls, and to explore associations between NFC abnormalities and disease activity and other disease characteristics. Fifty-eight juvenile DM patients with a median disease duration of 16.8 (range 2-38) years were clinically examined and compared with matched controls. By NFC, we assessed nailfold capillary density (NCD), giant capillaries, scleroderma, and neovascular pattern (defined as scleroderma active or late pattern). NFC was analyzed with researchers blinded to patient/control identity and disease characteristics. We measured disease activity and damage by validated tools, and patients were categorized as having active or inactive disease according to the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation criteria. Compared to controls, patients had decreased NCD (mean ± SD 6.4 ± 2.1/mm versus 7.6 ± 0.8/mm; P = 0.001) and showed more abnormality in all other NFC parameters; 36% of patients versus 4% of controls had NCD <6/mm (P < 0.001). Giant capillaries, scleroderma, and neovascular pattern were found in 9%, 84%, and 41% of patients, respectively. Patients with active disease (n = 30) presented more frequently with neovascular pattern than patients with inactive disease (n = 28) (P = 0.041). Decreased NCD and neovascular pattern were associated with higher levels of disease activity and impaired muscle function. After medium- to long-term followup, juvenile DM patients had decreased NCD and, often, neovascular pattern; both were associated with higher levels of disease activity and impaired muscle function. This suggests that NFC can be a biomarker for disease activity in longstanding juvenile DM too. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  8. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis – an update on its diagnosis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-03

    Dec 3, 2015 ... Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common form of chronic arthritis in children and the most ... A swollen knee and uveitis in a young girl, for instance, is ..... Methotrexate for treating juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  9. 83 CHALLENGES AND PROSPECTS OF THE JUVENILE JUSTICE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    Juvenile justice administration in Nigeria is weak and has been given very .... The Nigerian criminal justice system, of which the juvenile justice system is an integral part, ... as instruments of security and justice but as weapons of oppression8.

  10. AFSC/ABL: Juvenile rockfish DNA species identification

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Many pelagic juvenile rockfish (Sebastes) were collected in juvenile salmonid surveys in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) from 1998 to 2002. Often species identification of...

  11. Sialendoscopic Approach in Management of Juvenile Recurrent Parotitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, P P; Goyal, M; Goyal, A

    2017-12-01

    To assess the role of sialendoscopy as a diagnostic and therapeutic modality in juvenile recurrent parotitis. Juvenile recurrent parotitis (JRP) is the second most frequent salivary gland disease in childhood and is characterized by recurrent non suppurative and non obstructive parotid inflammation. These attacks influence the quality of life and can even lead to gland destruction, and there are no definitive treatment to avoid them. Sialendoscopic dilatation is emerging as the new treatment modality in this aspect.  retrospective study. Department of Otorhinolaryngology in tertiary care hospital. 17 cases of juvenile recurrent parotitis (i.e. children of age group 3-11 years presenting with complaints of recurrent parotid region swelling and pain, sometimes associated with fever) were included in the study during October 2012-September 2015. All cases underwent sialendoscopy under general anaesthesia. Diagnostic (classifying the ductal lesion) and interventional sialendoscopic procedure (dilatation with instillation of steroid) were carried out in single sitting. Follow up was done for a minimum of 6 months (range 6-36 months). 17 patients with mean age of 5.6 years and gender distribution of 47:53 (boys:girls) underwent sialendoscopy for JRP. 8 patients presented with unilateral parotitis and 9 with bilateral. The mean number of attacks in previous 1 year were 9.2. Average time for procedure was 20 min. All cases had ductal stenosis and ductal mucosa was pale in 15 cases on endoscopy. 1 patient underwent repeat endoscopy after 2 years. 50% had complete resolution of symptoms and 6 patients had one mild (swelling not associated with fever which subsided on its own) attack after treatment. Follow up period ranged from 6 months to 3 years. No complications were observed. Sialendoscopy has emerged as a viable option for assessment and treatment of JRP. Dilatation of the parotid duct and steroid instillation has significantly reduced the morbidity of this

  12. Juvenile Fibromyalgia: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesher, Melissa S

    2015-06-01

    A 14-year-old boy presented with months of severe widespread musculoskeletal pain. He was profoundly fatigued and unable to attend school. Laboratory evaluation, including complete blood count, comprehensive metabolic panel, inflammatory markers, and thyroid function, was unrevealing. Physical examination was also normal except for multiple tender points. The patient was diagnosed with juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome and referred for multidisciplinary treatment including physical therapy, exercise, and counseling, and his daily functioning gradually improves. Juvenile fibromyalgia is a complex syndrome that often severely limits patients' activities and can impede normal adolescent development. Effective treatment requires an understanding of the biologic, psychologic, and social factors contributing to the perpetuation of chronic pain. The author reviews the diagnostic criteria, pathophysiology, and treatment of juvenile fibromyalgia. Medications, particularly antidepressants and anticonvulsants, can be useful adjuncts to therapy. However, multimodal pain management including intensive physical therapy, exercise, counseling, and sleep hygiene is most effective in treating fibromyalgia. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Effect of TBT on Ruditapes decussatus juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, M R; Langston, W J; Bebianno, M J

    2006-06-01

    The effects of sublethal concentrations of tributyltin (TBT) on growth of juvenile clams Ruditapes decussatus were determined during exposure to TBT concentrations of 50, 100 and 250 ng l(-1) (as Sn) for a period up to two years. Length and weight of clams increased continuously in all treatments throughout the experimental period, and, overall, rates were not significantly influenced by TBT exposure, although final length and weight were inversely related to increasing TBT concentration. Juvenile R. decussatus therefore appear to be less sensitive to TBT than larval stages. Some juveniles exposed to TBT developed abnormal shell growth, laterally, changing the typical flattened shape of clams into a more "rounded" form. This characteristic was more visible in the anterior margins of valves than posteriorly, and mainly observed in clams exposed to TBT at 50 ng l(-1) (as Sn).

  14. Corporal and capital punishment of juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, H C

    1990-01-01

    There is a previously unobserved connection between corporal punishment of public school children and capital punishment of juveniles. Both are barometers of acceptable levels of violent punishment and their elimination is a hallmark of a maturing and decent society. Within a majority of the eighteen states where school authorities most frequently strike children are housed 25 of the nation's 28 juvenile death row inmates. On average, the homicide rates of these jurisdictions are two and a half times greater than those that have abolished both state-sanctioned corporal and capital punishment or limit death sentences to those age eighteen and older at the time of their crime(s). Most of the eighteen state abolitions of corporal punishment occurred in the 1980's. The US Supreme Court has ruled both corporal and capital punishment of juveniles constitutional. Additional state legislative abolition of both is anticipated in the 1990s.

  15. Delincuencia y responsabilidad penal juvenil en Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Montalvo Velásquez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEl término «delincuencia juvenil» fue acuñado en Inglaterra en el año 1815, “Se entiende por delincuencia juvenil el conjunto de delitos, contravenciones o comportamientos socialmente reprochables, que cometen las personas consideradas como jóvenes por la ley”1 . Cada Estado está sujeto a su propio sistema jurídico, para algunos es delincuente juvenil el adolescente que comete acciones sancionadas por la ley sin importar su gravedad, otros Estados sólo consideran como delincuente juvenil al joven que comete un acto delictivo grave.El fenómeno de la delincuencia juvenil es algo que se inscribe en los espacios de una sociedad en la cual su estructura material, y su formación social consecuente, se halla en una profunda crisis. Que jóvenes conformen bandas de delincuencia organizada nos está indicando que son el resultado de la misma criminalidad general que se ha apoderado de la sociedad en la perspectiva de lograr sobrevivir materialmente. El capitalismo no es sólo acumulación de riqueza sino concentración de la misma en muy pocas manos; y todo el sistema institucional y legal tiende a favorecer ese fenómeno porque éste constituye la supra estructura del modo de producción capitalista. Así como los adultos se organizan para delinquir, lo hacen los niños y los jóvenes a partir de una edad en la cual pueden percibir que la sociedad no es sana y no tienen porvenir humano en ella. Abandonados y sujetos a la violencia que engendra el sistema, ellos simplemente responden en una manifestación de reflejos condicionados que sostienen la sobrevivencia en forma instintiva; “los niños no saben de normas legales sino de formas de sobrevivir a semejante situación; el instinto de sobrevivencia no tiene edades ni la normatividad puede incidir en él”.Palabras ClavesDelincuencia juvenil, Jóvenes, Criminalidad, Familia, Factores, Acto delictivo, Responsabilidad Penal.AbstractThe term “juvenile delinquency” was coined in

  16. Update on the medical treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashkes, Philip J; Laxer, Ronald M

    2006-12-01

    Many exciting developments in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) have emerged recently, including new tools to assess the results of clinical trials (eg, the definition of remission and a radiologic scoring tool). New controlled studies examined the equivalence of meloxicam to naproxen, the efficacy of leflunomide but the superiority of methotrexate, and the use of infliximab in polyarthritis JIA. Initial studies have shown the potential of anti-interleukin (IL)-1 and anti-IL-6 receptor antibody therapy for systemic JIA. Corticosteroid-sparing medications including the use of "biologic modifiers" for JIA-associated uveitis have been described. Evidence-based guidelines for the main subtypes of JIA have been published. However, good evidence on the treatment of several disease subtypes is still lacking. Studies of new medications and the use of combination therapy, including aggressive induction therapy early in the disease course, are necessary to continue improving the outcome of JIA patients.

  17. Experiment und Wissensvermittlung. Alexander von Humboldts Darstellungsmethoden in seinen Versuchen über die gereizte Muskel- und Nervenfaser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Stöger

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Zusammenfassung Alexander von Humboldt hat sich in jungen Jahren mit galvanischen Experimenten beschäftigt und die Resultate in einem umfassenden, zweibändigen Werk publiziert. Dabei zeigte er nicht nur, dass er als Experimentator und Teil der wissenschaftlichen Gemeinschaft fähig war, sich mit einem so neuen und komplexen Phänomen zu beschäftigen. Es lässt sich auch erkennen, dass er bereits in dieser frühen Schrift versuchte, das umfangreiche Wissen dem Leser zugänglich zu machen. Der Artikel betrachtet Humboldts Galvanismusschrift Versuche über die gereizte Muskel- und Nervenfaser (1797–1798 und untersucht einige Elemente wie Anhänge und Schreibstil, die Humboldt nutzte, um die umfangreichen Informationen zu ordnen und dem Leser so neben den Big Data seiner Erkenntnisse auch passende Suchfunktionen zur Verfügung zu stellen, die eine gezielte Nutzung überhaupt ermöglichen.  Abstract In the early stages of his scientific career, Alexander von Humboldt took an interest in experiments in galvanism. He publicised the results in a two-volume work under the title Versuche über die gereizte Muskel- und Nervenfaser (Experiments on the Stimulated Muscle and Nerve Fibre in 1797 and 1798. In this treatise, he presented himself as competent experimenter and member of the scientific community, but also demonstrated that he was capable of researching new and complex phenomena. These volumes also provide insight into his early attempts to facilitate the readers’ access to the extensive information he had compiled. This article analyses some aspects of Humboldt’s efforts to arrange his vast numbers of observations and theories, for example by means of appendices and narrative style, which he used not only to present the resulting big data collected during his research, but also to make it possible for the reader to organise and utilise this data.   Resumen A temprana edad Alexander von Humboldt se dedicó a galvanismo. En 1797 y 1798

  18. The Cannery Formation--Devonian to Early Permian arc-marginal deposits within the Alexander Terrane, Southeastern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Susan M.; Layer, Paul W.; Harris, Anita G.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Murchey, Benita L.

    2011-01-01

    cherts on both Admiralty and Kupreanof Islands contain radiolarians as young as Permian, the age of the Cannery Formation is herein extended to Late Devonian through early Permian, to include the early Permian rocks exposed in its type locality. The Cannery Formation is folded and faulted, and its stratigraphic thickness is unknown but inferred to be several hundred meters. The Cannery Formation represents an extended period of marine deposition in moderately deep water, with slow rates of deposition and limited clastic input during Devonian through Pennsylvanian time and increasing argillaceous, volcaniclastic, and bioclastic input during the Permian. The Cannery Formation comprises upper Paleozoic rocks in the Alexander terrane of southeastern Alaska. In the pre-Permian upper Paleozoic, the tectonic setting of the Alexander terrane consisted of two or more evolved oceanic arcs. The lower Permian section is represented by a distinctive suite of rocks in the Alexander terrane, which includes sedimentary and volcanic rocks containing early Permian fossils, metamorphosed rocks with early Permian cooling ages, and intrusive rocks with early Permian cooling ages, that form discrete northwest-trending belts. After restoration of 180 km of dextral displacement of the Chilkat-Chichagof block on the Chatham Strait Fault, these belts consist, from northeast to southwest, of (1) bedded chert, siliceous argillite, volcaniclastic turbidites, pillow basalt, and limestone of the Cannery Formation and the Porcupine Slate of Gilbert and others (1987); (2) greenschist-facies Paleozoic metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks that have Permian cooling ages; (3) silty limestone and calcareous argillite interbedded with pillow basalt and volcaniclastic rocks of the Halleck Formation and the William Henry Bay area; and (4) intermediate-composition and syenitic plutons. These belts correspond to components of an accretionary complex, contemporary metamorphic rocks, forearc-basin deposits,

  19. Imágenes juveniles, medios y nuevos escenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Aguilera Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo nace del análisis de los discursos radiales producidos exclusivamente para jóvenes en Santiago de Chile. Aborda además las categorías comprensivas de la vida juvenil, la vida juvenil de los años 90, el imaginario juvenil des-simbolizado, hacia una comprensión de lo juvenil, dinámica social propuesta por los medios y estrategias comunicacionales.

  20. The World of Juvenile Justice According to the Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozalski, Michael; Deignan, Marilyn; Engel, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Intended to be an instructive, yet sobering, introduction to the complex and disturbing nature of the juvenile justice system, this article details the "numbers," including selected percentages, ratios, and dollar amounts, that are relevant to developing a better understanding of the juvenile justice system. General statistics about juvenile and…