WorldWideScience

Sample records for justice social services

  1. Where's the Justice in Service-Learning? Institutionalizing Service-Learning from a Social Justice Perspective at a Jesuit University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuban, Sondra; Anderson, Jeffrey B.

    2007-01-01

    We attempt to answer "where" the social justice is in service-learning by probing "what" it is, "how" it looks in the process of being institutionalized at a Jesuit university, and "why" it is important. We develop themes about institutionalizing service-learning from a social justice perspective. Our themes were developed through an analysis of…

  2. Preserving Social Justice Identities: Learning from One Pre-Service Literacy Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticknor, Anne Swenson

    2014-01-01

    Identities that include social justice stances are important for pre-service teachers to adopt in teacher education so they may meet the needs of "all" future students. However, maintaining a social justice identity can be difficult when pre-service teachers are confronted with an evaluator without a social justice stance. This article…

  3. Developing School Counseling Students' Social Justice Orientation through Service Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockerman, Melissa S.; Mason, Erin C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Counselor educators must examine the quality and intentionality of coursework and field experiences offered to their students as the role of school counselors continues to transform. The emphasis in the field on school counselors as social justice agents and advocates should be reflected in school counselor training programs. The authors present a…

  4. Service-Learning as a Model for Integrating Social Justice in the Nursing Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Richard W.; Clark, Lauren

    2002-01-01

    A service learning nursing course grounded in social justice principles focused on minority health, poverty, environmental health, and medically underserved populations. Students worked in community agencies, advocated for the underserved, and reflected on the relationship of social justice and citizenship to nursing. (SK)

  5. Service-learning in nursing education: its impact on leadership and social justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groh, Carla J; Stallwood, Lynda G; Daniels, John J

    2011-01-01

    Although studies suggest that service-learning is positive for students, findings reported are primarily qualitative. A convenience sample of 306 senior-level nursing students completed the Service-Learning Self-Evaluation Tool (SLSET) pre- and post-service-learning experience over a six-year span. The constructs measured were leadership skills and social justice. Paired t-tests were calculated. Statistically significant differences were noted between pre- and post-service-learning experience, with students rating themselves higher on leadership and social justice items after the experience. Cronbach's alpha for leadership and social justice were greater than 0.80. Service-learning as an educational methodology that combines community service with academic learning objectives is a viable strategy for facilitating leadership skills and increased awareness of social justice issues in nursing students.

  6. Impact of a Faith-Based Social Justice Course on Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchfield, Meredith

    2018-01-01

    Rapid demographic shifts are occurring around the country. United States' public schools are more diverse than any time in history. To help prepare pre-service teachers for these shifts, this small-scale qualitative case study explored the impact of a required social justice course for pre-service educators at a large private Christian university…

  7. Teaching and Learning Social Justice through Online Service-Learning Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy L. Guthrie

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Creating a virtual classroom in which diverse students feel welcome to discuss and experience topics related to social justice, action, and change is a study in the value of connectedness and collaboration. Through a combination of technologies, pedagogies, and on-site experiences, virtual cultures develop that encourage the formation of demanding yet stimulating learning environments in which communications and interactions are intellectually transformative. This article explores student perceptions of their participation in an online service-learning course while working in local service organizations. Qualitative methodology was used to identify the philosophical intersection at which multiple pedagogies meet: social justice, service-learning, civic engagement, and leadership as instructed in a web-based environment. This study illustrates the capacity for intentionally constructed online educational experiences focused on social justice, civic engagement, and leadership to affect learning and to provide educators with pedagogical best practices to facilitate requisite change in teaching practice.

  8. Integrating HIV & AIDS education in pre-service mathematics education for social justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda van Laren

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1999, many South African education policy documents have mandated integration of HIV & AIDS education in learning areas/disciplines. Policy document research has shown that although South African politicians and managers have produced volumes of eloquent and compelling legislation regarding provision for HIV & AIDS education, little of this is translated into action. The impact of HIV & AIDS permeates the social, economic and political arenas in South Africa. Integration of HIV & AIDS education across disciplines can serve as a strategy to further the ideals of social justice. This paper focuses on how integration in the teaching and learning of Mathematics Education provides opportunities to take action for social justice. The inquiry explores the following question: How can the myth that there is 'nothing we can do' about HIV & AIDS, which is linked to social justice issues, be addressed through integration of HIV & AIDS education in Mathematics pre-service teacher education? Drawing on self-study, the work of a Mathematics teacher educator who worked with pre-service teachers to integrate HIV & AIDS education at a higher education institution is described. By considering integration of HIV & AIDS education in Mathematics Education and taking action it is possible to develop strategies which directly relate to social justice.

  9. Environmental justice research shows the importance of social feedbacks in ecosystem service trade-offs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil M. Dawson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we shine a spotlight on approaches to research ecosystem service trade-offs and critically assess their representation of relevant social dynamics. Although studies linking ecosystem services and human well-being have provided theoretical insights into social and ecological trade-offs, we argue that ecosystem services research has paid insufficient attention to "social feedbacks," people's cognitive and behavioral responses to change. We demonstrate that augmenting ecosystem services research with environmental justice approaches (exploring perceptions of the distribution of costs and benefits, decision making procedures, and recognition of different values and identities can more effectively capture important responses to ecosystem governance. Spatial analysis of land use change, mixed-method assessment of multidimensional well-being, and qualitative environmental justice research were applied in three villages adjacent to Nam Et-Phou Louey National Protected Area in northern Laos. Spatial analysis showed that, from 2006 to 2015, forest clearance for cultivation remained stable within the protected area. Well-being assessment revealed the local population benefited from rapidly increasing incomes, asset ownership, and reduced poverty during that time. In combination, spatial and well-being analyses paint a picture of limited trade-offs, despite growing incentives to exploit protected land and resources through cash crops and high-value forest products. In contrast, results from environmental justice research revealed profound trade-offs between conservation and local practices, and highlight governance deficiencies relating to procedure and recognition. Consequently, formal protected area rules were perceived to be illegitimate by many and actively undermined, for example through negotiated access with alternative authorities. We conclude that although well-being research provides an essential foundation to understand diverse

  10. Impact of Service-Learning on Leadership and an Interest in Social Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Many articles describe how service-learning has been implemented, but few studies have demonstrated its effectiveness. A service-learning component was added to a course in a registered nurse-to-baccalaureate degree (RN-to-BSN) completion program. The service-learning component included a 5-hour service requirement and class discussions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate service-learning's impact on postlicensure RN-to-BSN students' self-evaluation of their leadership skills and their interest in social justice. This study used a quantitative, pretest-posttest control group design and a Likert scale survey. Variations in precourse and postcourse responses of the control group did not demonstrate a measurable effect; responses of the service-learning group revealed a small effect size for both the leadership construct and the social justice construct. This study was unique in that it addressed nontraditional RN-to-BSN students in an accelerated program, 70% of whom were taking the course in an online format. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Art Education as a Means of Promoting Democracy: Preparing Pre-Service Art Teachers for Social Justice Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alazmi, Fatemah M.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate the use of art as a pedagogical tool with pre-service art teachers in a graduate-level art education class. A curriculum was developed focusing on educational social justice theories and their application in regard to gender inequity and diversity issues. The goal was to lead students to…

  12. Reflexivity and social justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksimovic, Tijana; Jakobsen, Helle Nordentoft

    2017-01-01

    Career practitioners’ reflexive understanding of their professional role as change agents in career guidance and counselling practices has a major impact on how social justice can be achieved. This entitles an awareness of the way in which guidance and counselling practices are embedded in the co......Career practitioners’ reflexive understanding of their professional role as change agents in career guidance and counselling practices has a major impact on how social justice can be achieved. This entitles an awareness of the way in which guidance and counselling practices are embedded...

  13. Teaching and Learning Social Justice through Online Service-Learning Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Kathy L.; McCracken, Holly

    2010-01-01

    Creating a virtual classroom in which diverse students feel welcome to discuss and experience topics related to social justice, action, and change is a study in the value of connectedness and collaboration. Through a combination of technologies, pedagogies, and on-site experiences, virtual cultures develop that encourage the formation of demanding…

  14. The Social Justice Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewen, Gladys; Pollard, William

    2010-01-01

    This article shines an important light on the continuing struggle of disabled people for dignity, citizenship rights, and access to the marketplace. Common threads bind the struggle for basic human rights among disenfranchised groups, offer experience and approaches to facilitate change, and move society towards social justice. The philosophy…

  15. Operationalizing Social Justice Counseling: Paradigm to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Judith A.

    2011-01-01

    Social justice counseling, like all humanistic models, recognizes the dignity of each human being, affirms the right of all people to choose and work toward their own goals, and asserts the importance of service to community. The social justice paradigm brings a special emphasis on the role of the environment. (Contains 1 figure and 1 table.)

  16. Understanding Education for Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hytten, Kathy; Bettez, Silvia C.

    2011-01-01

    It has become increasingly common for education scholars to claim a social justice orientation in their work. At the same time, education programs seem to be adding statements about the importance of social justice to their mission, and a growing number of teacher education programs are fundamentally oriented around a vision of social justice.…

  17. Social Justice, Education and School Social Work in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadir, Ural; Aktan, Mehmet Can

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on welfare state, social justice and school social work interaction. In this paper, these three concepts' reflections in Turkey were mentioned. Researchers aimed to discuss how school social work (which is brought to the agenda recently) is important in the provision of social justice in Turkish public service delivery. [For the…

  18. Justice-based social assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Armando

    2016-01-01

    What are the main objectives of social protection institutions in developing countries? What should be their scope and reach? What is the source of their legitimacy? Finding appropriate answers to these questions is essential to understanding, and shaping, the emergence of welfare institutions in low- and middle-income countries. Most available answers rely on instrumental arguments. Few make reference to normative principles. This article draws on three concepts from Rawls – social justice as regulating cooperation, the social minimum, and the need for a freestanding political notion of social justice – to develop a coherent argument for grounding social assistance on social justice. In line with this argument, it identifies some parameters for a justice-based social assistance. This article then discusses, with examples, the tensions existing between a social justice-based social minimum and ‘real’ social assistance institutions emerging in developing countries. PMID:27708544

  19. Social justice in pandemic preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruin, Debra; Liaschenko, Joan; Marshall, Mary Faith

    2012-04-01

    Pandemic influenza planning in the United States violates the demands of social justice in 2 fundamental respects: it embraces the neutrality of procedural justice at the expense of more substantive concern with health disparities, thus perpetuating a predictable and preventable social injustice, and it fails to move beyond lament to practical planning for alleviating barriers to accessing care. A pragmatic social justice approach, addressing both health disparities and access barriers, should inform pandemic preparedness. Achieving social justice goals in pandemic response is challenging, but strategies are available to overcome the obstacles. The public engagement process of one state's pandemic ethics project influenced the development of these strategies.

  20. Social welfare and restorative justice

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Darrell

    2009-01-01

    "This paper explores the links and connections between social work and restorative justice. After a brief description of social work, restorative justice and family group conferencing, I will explore some the complementary theoretical links and practice applications, critically examining the potential implications and opportunities for social work practitioners and academics in relation to practice." [author's abstract

  1. Student Perceptions of Social Justice and Social Justice Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Harding, Susan R.; Steele, Cheronda; Schulz, Erica; Taha, Farah; Pico, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    Encouraging students to engage in activities that actively seek to promote social justice is a goal of many educators. This study analyzed college student perceptions around social justice and related activities in a medium-sized, urban university in the United States. Students' open-ended responses to questions assessing their perceptions of…

  2. Service-learning for students of spanish: promoting civic engagement and social justice through an exchange tutoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Burgo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Service-learning courses are designed to promote civic engagement and social justice, and to connect the classroom with the community in an environment of cooperation and mutual interest. In this article, a service-learning course of Spanish at the university level is supported as a reciprocal language exchange between the campus and the community. According to this course proposal, students attend a Latino community site once a week, where their members are tutored in English and American culture, while students are tutored in Spanish and Spanish-speaking culture. This way, service-learning is connected to the Spanish classroom through “Reflection” sessions led by mentors visiting the class periodically. This course was designed so that students would be able to improve their conversation skills in this exchange tutoring service while they are involved with the community by seeing their members as equal peers.

  3. Collective knowledge sharing as a social justice strategy: the difference it made in a service project about preterm birth disparity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutain, Doris M

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge about how health disparities are created and sustained from those affected is needed. Collective knowledge sharing is one way to redefine and revalue dialogue and critique processes with the aim of promoting just relationships of knowledge production. This article describes how a community service project focused on using collective knowledge sharing as a social justice strategy with health ministry volunteers produced insights about preterm birth disparity issues. Project insights related to (1) the connection between faith and health, (2) the significance of family and congregational stories, and (3) the importance of praising assets in the context of disparity recognition.

  4. Educational Administration and Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Richard

    2006-01-01

    After observing that texts in educational administration have largely failed to address the problem of the justice and fairness of social and educational arrangements, this article goes on to examine the necessary relationships between ethical leadership, community and the notion of social justice. Such relationships are argued to be necessarily…

  5. Health Law as Social Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Lindsay F

    2014-01-01

    Health law is in the midst of a dramatic transformation. From a relatively narrow discipline focused on regulating relationships among individual patients, health care providers, and third-party payers, it is expanding into a far broader field with a burgeoning commitment to access to health care and assurance of healthy living conditions as matters of social justice. Through a series of incremental reform efforts stretching back decades before the Affordable Care Act and encompassing public health law as well as the law of health care financing and delivery, reducing health disparities has become a central focus of American health law and policy. This Article labels, describes, and furthers a nascent "health justice" movement by examining what it means to view health law as an instrument of social justice. Drawing on the experiences of the reproductive justice, environmental justice, and food justice movements, and on the writings of political philosophers and ethicists on health justice, I propose that health justice offers an alternative to the market competition and patient rights paradigms that currently dominate health law scholarship, advocacy, and reform. I then examine the role of law in reducing health disparities through the health justice lens. I argue that the nascent health justice framework suggests three commitments for the use of law to reduce health disparities. First, to a broader inquiry that views access to health care as one among many social determinants of health deserving of public attention and resources. Second, to probing inquiry into the effects of class, racial, and other forms of social and cultural bias on the design and implementation of measures to reduce health disparities. And third, to collective action grounded in community engagement and participatory parity. In exploring these commitments, I highlight tensions within the social justice framework and between the social justice framework and the nascent health justice movement

  6. Experiential Social Justice Judgment Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, M.

    2008-01-01

    Social justice can be thought of as an idea that exists within the minds of individuals and that concerns issues like what is right and wrong, what ought to be or not to be, and what is fair or unfair. This subjective quality of the justice judgment process makes it rather unpredictable how people

  7. Teaching for social justice education: the intersection between identity, critical agency, and social justice education

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis Francis; Adré le Roux

    2011-01-01

    In line with national policy requirements, educators are increasingly addressing forms of social justice education by focusing on classroom pedagogies and educational practices to combat different forms of oppression such as racism and sexism. As all educators have a role to play in dismantling oppression and generating a vision for a more socially just future, teacher education has the responsibility to capacitate pre-service teachers to work in areas of social justice education. It is, howe...

  8. The design of a medical school social justice curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coria, Alexandra; McKelvey, T Greg; Charlton, Paul; Woodworth, Michael; Lahey, Timothy

    2013-10-01

    The acquisition of skills to recognize and redress adverse social determinants of disease is an important component of undergraduate medical education. In this article, the authors justify and define "social justice curriculum" and then describe the medical school social justice curriculum designed by the multidisciplinary Social Justice Vertical Integration Group (SJVIG) at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. The SJVIG addressed five goals: (1) to define core competencies in social justice education, (2) to identify key topics that a social justice curriculum should cover, (3) to assess social justice curricula at other institutions, (4) to catalog institutionally affiliated community outreach sites at which teaching could be paired with hands-on service work, and (5) to provide examples of the integration of social justice teaching into the core (i.e., basic science) curriculum. The SJVIG felt a social justice curriculum should cover the scope of health disparities, reasons to address health disparities, and means of addressing these disparities. The group recommended competency-based student evaluations and advocated assessing the impact of medical students' social justice work on communities. The group identified the use of class discussion of physicians' obligation to participate in social justice work as an educational tool, and they emphasized the importance of a mandatory, longitudinal, immersive, mentored community outreach practicum. Faculty and administrators are implementing these changes as part of an overall curriculum redesign (2012-2015). A well-designed medical school social justice curriculum should improve student recognition and rectification of adverse social determinants of disease.

  9. Saving our criminal justice system: the efficacy of a collaborative social service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamatani, Hide; Spjeldnes, Solveig

    2011-01-01

    On a typical day in 2008, 776,573 individuals were behind bars in nearly 3,500 U.S. jails. Yet the potential benefits of social services in achieving lower recidivism rates and successful reintegration are understudied in jail populations. This three-year study investigated the effects of collaboration-based in-jail services and postrelease transitional services provided by the Allegheny County Jail Collaborative (ACJC). The results included a significantly lower recidivism rate among inmate participants, similar service benefits across racial groups, and successful reintegration into community life among a large majority of participants. At 12 months postrelease, participants had a 50 percent lower recidivism rate than members of the matched comparison group, who were unexposed to the intervention, and multiple indicators showed successful reintegration. This reduced rate would save the county an estimated $5.3 million annually, largely due to increased public safety and lower victimization costs. Data sources included the ACJ's historical inmate data sets from the pre-ACJC and post-ACJC intervention periods, three postrelease face-to-face survey interviews, and focus group sessions with former inmate participants and the study interviewers.The critical importance of social workers in rehabilitative efforts with jail inmates is discussed along with recommendations and implications for policy, practice, and research.

  10. Corrective Justice vs. Social Justice in the Aftermath of War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Kalmanovitz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available How do we justify the practice of corrective justice for losses suffered during armed conflicts? This article seeks to show the force and relevance of this question, and to argue that, in cases of massively destructive wars, social justice should gain priority over corrective justice. Starting from a liberal Rawlsian conception of the relationship between corrective and social justice, it is argued that, paradoxically, the more destructive a war is, the less normative force corrective rights have and the higher priority policies of social justice, which guarantee basic rights to all citizens, should have.

  11. Mathematics education for social justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhendra

    2016-02-01

    Mathematics often perceived as a difficult subject with many students failing to understand why they learn mathematics. This situation has been further aggravated by the teaching and learning processes used, which is mechanistic without considering students' needs. The learning of mathematics tends to be just a compulsory subject, in which all students have to attend its classes. Social justice framework facilitates individuals or groups as a whole and provides equitable approaches to achieving equitable outcomes by recognising disadvantage. Applying social justice principles in educational context is related to how the teachers treat their students, dictates that all students the right to equal treatment regardless of their background and completed with applying social justice issues integrated with the content of the subject in order to internalise the principles of social justice simultaneously the concepts of the subject. The study examined the usefulness of implementing the social justice framework as a means of improving the quality of mathematics teaching in Indonesia involved four teacher-participants and their mathematics classes. The study used action research as the research methodology in which the teachers implemented and evaluated their use of social justice framework in their teaching. The data were collected using multiple research methods while analysis and interpretation of the data were carried out throughout the study. The findings of the study indicated that there were a number of challengesrelated to the implementation of the social justice framework. The findings also indicated that, the teachers were provided with a comprehensive guide that they could draw on to make decisions about how they could improve their lessons. The interactions among students and between the teachers and the students improved, they became more involved in teaching and learning process. Using social justice framework helped the teachers to make mathematics more

  12. Organizational Justice and Social Workers' Intentions to Leave Agency Positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Kuen; Solomon, Phyllis; Jang, Cinjae

    2012-01-01

    The authors investigated the impact of organizational justice on social workers' intention to leave Korean social service agencies. Specifically, this study concentrated on the moderating effect of organizational justice on the relationship between burnout and intention to leave. The authors surveyed 218 front-line social workers from 51 social…

  13. Social justice in climate services: Engaging African American farmers in the American South

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Furman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article contributes to efforts to develop more inclusive climate services, understood as institutional arrangements and processes that generate and disseminate science-based climate information to promote improved preparedness to climate impacts. Discussion on equity in climate services tends to focus on the specific challenges of women and the poor in developing countries. We seek to broaden this scope by considering a farming population in the southern United States, whose particular circumstances are shaped by rural poverty as well as by racial discrimination, namely African American farmers. The research is based on a phone survey, in-depth interviews, and a workshop, and was conducted in collaboration with a civil right organization that helped the research team gain trust and entry to this community. The findings show that farmers in this study are vulnerable to drought given their relatively limited access to resources and risk management mechanisms. Climate forecasts can help these farmers move from coping strategies to deal with the effects of climate anomalies to proactive planning to anticipate and mitigate those effects. Research participants were able to identify a range of options for using such information in risk management decisions. Provision of climate services to African American farmers, however, must be consistent with existing patterns of knowledge management. These patterns are shaped by major trends stemming from the transformation of rural Southern life. Social networks of mutual assistance and knowledge transmission have been eroded by the outmigration of African American farmers from rural areas. Additionally, their relationship with public agencies is marred by a legacy of racial inequities, which makes it difficult for well-meaning projects involving the same agencies to establish legitimacy in this community. We discuss how insights from research findings and research process have guided programmatic efforts

  14. Social Justice, Research, and Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Stephen T

    2016-03-01

    In what ways might research on adolescence contribute to social justice? My 2014 Presidential Address identified strategies for social justice in our field. First, we need research that is conscious of biases, power, and privilege in science, as well as in our roles as scholars. Second, we need research that attends to inequities in lives of adolescents, and as scholars we need to question the ways that our research may unwittingly reinforce those inequalities. Third, we need research that attends to urgencies, that is, issues or conditions that influence adolescents' well-being which demand attention and action. I draw from a range of concepts and theoretical perspectives to make the case for a framework of social justice in research on adolescence.

  15. Globalization and Social Justice in OECD Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Björn Kauder; Niklas Potrafke

    2015-01-01

    Social justice is a topic of importance to social scientists and also political decision makers. We examine the relationship between globalization and social justice as measured by a new indicator for 31 OECD countries. The results show that countries that experienced rapid globalization enjoy social justice. When the KOF index of globalization increases by one standard deviation, the social justice indicator increases by about 0.4 points (on a scale from 1 to 10). The policy implication is t...

  16. SOCIAL JUSTICE FOR DISABLED PEOPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazire Diker

    2013-07-01

    try to evaluate these sources of information so as to analyze  the conditions of disaled people in Turkey with reference to the situation in other developed  and developing countries. This evaluation will be made from the framework of social justice  and with respect to particular rights, such as accessibility to necessary services at different scales, accessibility to job opportunities and integration into the work force as well as their  participation in decision making mechanisms of local and central governments together with or within NGO’s.

  17. Social Justice for Human Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Nathalia

    2010-01-01

    The topic of social justice in U.S. teacher education has a long and protracted history that harkens back to the civil rights movement of the mid-20th century, with its attendant legal rulings and constitutional amendments that sought to undo the legacy of discrimination against communities of color, women, and the poor. What is lost,…

  18. Social Justice and Leadership Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forde, Christine; Torrance, Deirdre

    2017-01-01

    The revised professional standards for the teaching profession in Scotland are underpinned by a set of values which includes a detailed articulation of social justice for education covering rights, diversity and sustainability. There is a future orientation in these standards that privileges the contribution of teachers and leaders to realizing a…

  19. Social Justice and the Future of Higher Education Kinesiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, Brian

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a rationale for the infusion of social justice into kinesiology programs for the purpose of reducing inequities in society. Specifically, the current climate for social justice is considered and discussed using examples from an university-inspired service-learning initiative, law, and politics. Of note are the following areas…

  20. Applying Social Justice Principles through School-Based Restorative Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Embse, Nathan; von der Embse, Daniel; von der Embse Meghan; Levine, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Social justice has recently received attention within the school psychology community. Yet, social justice is a nebulous term, as opined by Connelly (2009), who cautioned against searching for what is wrong and instead striving for the highest standards and recognizing needs of every unique child. Shriberg and colleagues (2008) have sought to…

  1. Doing justice to social justice in South African higher education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper attempts to develop a conceptualisation of social justice in higher education based on a close reading of the current literature in the field. An important assumption we make is that higher education is a valuable mechanism for social justice. We set the literature against policy documents that detail South African ...

  2. Common Frame of Reference and social justice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, M.W.; Satyanarayana, R.

    2009-01-01

    The article "Common Frame of Reference and Social Justice" by Martijn W. Hesselink evaluates the Draft Common Frame of Reference (DCFR) of social justice. It discusses the important areas, namely a common frame of Reference in a broad sense, social justice and contract law, private law and

  3. Social Justice : Perspectives from Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    SOCIAL JUSTICE, HEALTH AND POVERTY IN UGANDA John Barugahare Injustice in Uganda manifests in many ways. One most serious, yet least discussed social injustice, is inequity in Health. Although there are two equally important aims of health systems – efficiency and equity, in Uganda too much focus has been on ensuring efficiency and as a consequence concerns of equity have been relegated. Ultimately, health policy in Uganda has disproportionately negatively affected the poor’s livelihoods in g...

  4. Commentary: School Psychologists as Advocates for Racial Justice and Social Justice: Some Proposed Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriberg, David

    2016-01-01

    In this commentary, Shriberg acknowledges that social justice and racial justice are critical frameworks from which to view school psychology. Individually and collectively, the works in this special issue of "School Psychology Forum" have added a tremendous service to the field. In addition to advancing research, the articles challenge…

  5. The Conversation of Critical Practice: Pre-Service Teachers as Educators for Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderwood, Patricia; Mazza, Morgan Aboud; Ruel, Abiah Clarke; Favano, Amy; Jean-Guilluame, Vonick; McNeill, Daniel; Stenerson, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we examine aspects of the construction of authentic membership, competence, and sense of shared purpose within a professional community of educators accomplished by a class of pre-service teachers during a spontaneous electronic conversation. Implications for teacher education are considered.

  6. Fostering Critical Reflection: Moving From a Service to a Social Justice Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Julie E

    2016-06-01

    This chapter explores how community engagement creates opportunities to facilitate meaningful discussions about issues including: the nature and sources of power; who benefits and who is silenced by service and leadership efforts; which community actions result in change rather than charity; and how to developmentally sequence reflective practice. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  7. Environmental Justice Is a Social Justice Issue: Incorporating Environmental Justice into Social Work Practice Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán, Ramona; Hacker, Alice; Begun, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Social justice education for social work practice is concerned with addressing issues of power and oppression as they impact intersections of identity, experience, and the social environment. However, little focus is directed toward the physical and natural environment despite overwhelming evidence that traditionally marginalized groups bear the…

  8. Harm reduction through a social justice lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Bernadette

    2008-02-01

    People who are street involved such as those experiencing homelessness and drug use face multiple inequities in health and access to health care. Morbidity and mortality are significantly increased among those who are street involved. Incorporation of a harm reduction philosophy in health care has the potential to shift the moral context of health care delivery and enhance access to health care services. However, harm reduction with a primary focus on reducing the harms of drug use fails focus on the harms associated with the context of drug use such as homelessness, violence and poverty. Ethical analysis of the underlying values of harm reduction and examination of different conceptions of justice are discussed as a basis for action that addresses a broad range of harms associated with drug use. Theories of distributive justice that focus primarily on the distribution of material goods are limited as theoretical frameworks for addressing the root causes of harm associated with drug use. Social justice, reconceptualised and interpreted through a critical lens as described by Iris Marion Young, is presented as a promising alternative ethical framework. A critical reinterpretation of social justice leads to insights that can illuminate structural inequities that contribute to the harms associated with the context of drug use. Such an approach provides promise as means of informing policy that aims to reduce a broad range of harms associated with drug use such as homelessness and poverty.

  9. Religious congregations and social justice participation: a multilevel examination of social processes and leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Jaclyn D; Todd, Nathan R

    2013-12-01

    Religious congregations have potential to be mediating structures for social justice participation. However, research has yet to examine the specific social processes or leadership characteristics within congregations that may promote social justice participation. In this study, we use data from 176,901 participants nested within 1,938 congregations to test how social processes (i.e., religious attendance at worship services, extra-worship participation, bonding social capital, a congregational norm for justice) and leadership characteristics (i.e., leader modeling of justice, horizontal leadership style) predict personal social justice involvement through the congregation (i.e., participation in social justice activities sponsored by the congregation) as well as personal social justice involvement outside the congregation (i.e., participation in social justice activities not sponsored by the congregation). We use multilevel logistic regression to examine these social processes and leadership characteristics at both individual and congregational levels of analysis. Results showed distinct patterns of associations at individual and congregational levels of analysis and that different social processes and leadership characteristics predicted personal social justice participation through or outside the congregation. These findings reveal the importance of social processes and leadership characteristics in understanding how congregations may mediate social justice participation. Implications for community psychology research and practiced also are discussed.

  10. Social Justice, Disability, and Rehabilitation Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Daniel; Smart, Julie F.

    2012-01-01

    The academic field and the professional practice of rehabilitation counseling focuses on one aspect of social justice, assisting individuals with disabilities to attain full community inclusion. Nonetheless, social justice focuses on many marginalized groups and in the related fields of counseling and psychology, those with disabilities are rarely…

  11. Christian Social Justice Advocate: Contradiction or Legacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Cher N.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the relationship between Christian religiosity and the principles of social justice is explored, including the sociopolitical aspects of faith and advocacy. A particular emphasis is placed on the historical legacy and theological relationships between Christianity and social justice. The author concludes with a call for…

  12. Social Justice Advocacy in Graduate Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, Amy Gratch

    2018-01-01

    This article includes a description and analysis of a graduate teacher education course designed to engage teachers in taking action for social justice. In the course, students participate in a community of learners in which they examine their cultural identities and engage in social justice advocacy work. Students developed content knowledge and…

  13. Strategic Activism, Educational Leadership and Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, James

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the strategic activism of educational leaders who promote social justice. Given the risks, educational leaders need to be strategic about the ways in which they pursue their activism. Citing current research, this article explores the ways in which leaders strategically pursue their social justice agendas within their own…

  14. Social Justice Leadership and Inclusion: A Genealogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to engage in an historical analysis of research about two concepts: social justice leadership and leadership for inclusion. Recent experiences have caused me to wonder about our interpretations of justice, equity, and inclusion. Analysis of the relevant literature revealed a lack of consensus among scholars as to a…

  15. Social Empathy as a Framework for Teaching Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Elizabeth A.; Wagaman, M. Alex

    2017-01-01

    Social work education stresses training students to understand oppressive structural barriers and promote social and economic justice. Social empathy, which is rooted in a deep understanding of those who are different from us through contextual understanding and macro perspective-taking, offers a framework for teaching social justice that…

  16. Social Studies Teachers’ Perceptions and Experiences of Social Justice

    OpenAIRE

    BURSA, Sercan; ERSOY, Arife Figen

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: Social justice addresses inequality in society, including economic inequality, global migration, racism, xenophobia, prejudice against disabled people, and class discrimination. In Turkey, social studies curriculum aims to cultivate active, democratically minded citizens who value justice, independence, peace, solidarity, tolerance, freedom, and respect and demonstrate critical thinking skills, problem solving skills, social participation, and empathy. Purpose: Since social...

  17. Justice and Social Cohesion: Some conservative perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Hviid

    2011-01-01

    In the wake of recent debates on multiculturalism and value-pluralism, the pressing questions now focuses on whether social cohesion and the notion of justice are sustainable and can be upheld, at least from a European perspective. There are many theoretical and academic responses, mainly from...... liberals, on how to accommodate the different demands of various ethnic and religious groups and at the same time sustain a minimum of social cohesion and justice. One voice is missing and that is a conservative perspective. The purpose of this paper is to formulate a modern conservative analysis...... of this problem. The argument presented in this paper will, first, take its point of departure from David Hume’s notion of sympathy and how this makes social cohesion possible. Second, it will be argued that social cohesion is a prerequisite for the existence of justice, and therefore justice is a derivative...

  18. Teaching for Social Justice: Experiences and Epiphanies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringo, Saroja

    2008-01-01

    If people believe that identities are in large part socially constructed, they might also agree that the morals and values they each hold may also be a product of their experiences as social beings. The author's experiences with othering led her to an epiphany about the importance of teaching for social justice and guided her work as a teacher…

  19. Social Justice becomes a Living Experience for Students, Faculty, and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundo, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This social justice course was the result of a service-learning project with African American and First Nations peoples of a Southern community telling their story of desegregation through the creation of a video documentary project. Combining the pedagogy of service-learning with documentary video making, a social justice project was created that…

  20. Assessment for Social Justice: The Role of Assessment in Achieving Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a rationale for "assessment for social justice", through which a greater focus is given to the role of assessment in achieving the social justice aspirations of higher education. It takes inspiration from work on assessment for learning to propose that as assessment is a powerful driver of how and what students…

  1. "The Path of Social Justice": A Human Rights History of Social Justice Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Carl A.; Gibson, Melissa Leigh

    2013-01-01

    Although not often recognized, social justice education in the U.S. is historically and philosophically tied to the twentieth century's human rights initiatives. The efforts of human rights pioneers, such as those who authored the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, have indelibly shaped social justice efforts, including within education, in…

  2. Navigating the Meanings of Social Justice, Teaching for Social Justice, and Multicultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyunhee

    2017-01-01

    This article uses well-received contemporary scholarship--works by Iris Young, Nancy Fraser, Morva McDonald, Connie North, and Geneva Gay--to illuminate a high degree of coherence among the substantive meanings of social justice, teaching for social justice, and multicultural education. Based on these relationships, the article suggests that…

  3. Privileged Pursuits of Social Justice: Exploring Privileged College Students' Motivation for Engaging in Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Adam

    2011-01-01

    The author of this article explores the motivation factors that lead privileged college students to be involved in social justice efforts. The students participating in this study identified multiple reasons for their initial and continued involvement in social justice work, but all students identified three main sources of motivation: responding…

  4. Social Studies Teachers' Perceptions and Experiences of Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursa, Sercan; Ersoy, Arife Figen

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: Social justice addresses inequality in society, including economic inequality, global migration, racism, xenophobia, prejudice against disabled people, and class discrimination. In Turkey, social studies curriculum aims to cultivate active, democratically minded citizens who value justice, independence, peace, solidarity,…

  5. Climate Change, Social Justice and Development

    OpenAIRE

    Terry Barker; Şerban Scrieciu; David Taylor

    2008-01-01

    Terry Barker, Şerban Scrieciu and David Taylor discuss the implications of climate change for social justice and the prospects for more sustainable development pathways. They state that the analysis and discussions surrounding the climate change problem, particularly those drawing on the traditional economics literature, have relied on a crude economic utilitarianism that no moral philosopher would endorse. Such arguments have typically ignored the concept of justice itself and wider e...

  6. When high pressure, system constraints, and a social justice mission collide: A socio-structural analysis of emergency department social work services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Megan; Cristofalo, Margaret; Dotolo, Danae; Torres, Nicole; Lahdya, Alexandra; Ho, Leyna; Vogel, Mia; Forrester, Mollie; Conley, Bonnie; Fouts, Susan

    2017-04-01

    The emergency department (ED) can be a critical intervention point for many patients with multifaceted needs. Social workers have long been part of interdisciplinary ED teams. This study aimed to contribute to the limited understanding of social worker-patient interactions and factors influencing social work services in this setting. This paper reports a qualitative content analysis of social work medical record notes (N = 1509) of services provided to trauma patients in an urban, public, level 1 trauma center and an in-depth analysis of semi-structured interviews with ED social workers (N = 10). Eight major social work roles were identified: investigator, gatekeeper, resource broker, care coordinator, problem solver, crisis manager, advocate, discharge planner. Analyses revealed a complex interplay between ED social work services and multi-layered contexts. Using a social-ecological framework, we identified the interactions between micro or individual level factors, mezzo or local system level factors and macro environmental and systemic factors that play a role in ED interactions and patient services. Macro-level contextual influences were socio-structural forces including socioeconomic barriers to health, social hierarchies that reflected power differentials between providers and patients, and distrust or bias. Mezzo-level forces were limited resources, lack of healthcare system coordination, a challenging hierarchy within the medical model and the pressure to discharge patients quickly. Micro-level factors included characteristics of patients and social workers, complexity of patient stressors, empathic strain, lack of closure and compassion. All of these forces were at play in patient-social worker interactions and impacted service provision. Social workers were at times able to successfully navigate these forces, yet at other times these challenges were insurmountable. A conceptual model of ED social work and the influences on the patient-social worker

  7. Federalism and social justice: implications for social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhorst, Donald M

    2002-07-01

    Federalism is a system of government that divides power between two or more levels of government. During the current conservative political climate in the United States, power has shifted increasingly from the federal government to states, a move that has implications for the achievement of social justice. Consequently, it is now necessary for social workers to engage in political activity at the state and local levels, in addition to the federal level, to promote social justice. Implications for social work policy practice, research, and education for advancing social justice within the federal system of government are explored.

  8. Flaunting It for Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Janna

    2010-01-01

    By examining various movements in education in "Flaunt It! Queers Organizing for Public Education and Justice," Quinn and Meiners show a systematic and intentional "straightening" of American public schools. Throughout the book, the authors explore how various public and private realms operate to try to silence queer voices, and they discuss ways…

  9. Realising social justice in public health law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Marie; Thomson, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Law has played an important, but largely constitutive, role in the development of the public health enterprise. Thus, law has been central to setting up the institutions and offices of public health. The moral agenda has, however, been shaped to a much greater extent by bioethics. While social justice has been placed at the heart of this agenda, we argue that there has been little place within dominant conceptions of social justice for gender equity and women's interests which we see as crucial to a fully realised vision of social justice. We argue that, aside from particular interventions in the field of reproduction, public health practice tends to marginalise women-a claim we support by critically examining strategies to combat the HIV pandemic in sub-Saharan Africa. To counter the marginalisation of women's interests, this article argues that Amartya Sen's capabilities approach has much to contribute to the framing of public health law and policy. Sen's approach provides an evaluative and normative framework which recognises the importance of both gender and health equity to achieving social justice. We suggest that domestic law and international human rights provisions, in particular the emerging human right to health, offer mechanisms to promote capabilities, and foster a robust and inclusive conception of social justice.

  10. Social justice in medical education: strengths and challenges of a student-driven social justice curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Adrian Jacques H; Andaya, January M; Yamada, Seiji; Maskarinec, Gregory G

    2014-08-01

    In the current rapidly evolving healthcare environment of the United States, social justice programs in pre-medical and medical education are needed to cultivate socially conscious and health professionals inclined to interdisciplinary collaborations. To address ongoing healthcare inequalities, medical education must help medical students to become physicians skilled not only in the biomedical management of diseases, but also in identifying and addressing social and structural determinants of the patients' daily lives. Using a longitudinal Problem-Based Learning (PBL) methodology, the medical students and faculty advisers at the University of Hawai'i John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) developed the Social Justice Curriculum Program (SJCP) to supplement the biomedical curriculum. The SJCP consists of three components: (1) active self-directed learning and didactics, (2) implementation and action, and (3) self-reflection and personal growth. The purpose of introducing a student-driven SJ curriculum is to expose the students to various components of SJ in health and medicine, and maximize engagement by using their own inputs for content and design. It is our hope that the SJCP will serve as a logistic and research-oriented model for future student-driven SJ programs that respond to global health inequalities by cultivating skills and interest in leadership and community service.

  11. Social Justice in Medical Education: Strengths and Challenges of a Student-Driven Social Justice Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andaya, January M; Yamada, Seiji; Maskarinec, Gregory G

    2014-01-01

    In the current rapidly evolving healthcare environment of the United States, social justice programs in pre-medical and medical education are needed to cultivate socially conscious and health professionals inclined to interdisciplinary collaborations. To address ongoing healthcare inequalities, medical education must help medical students to become physicians skilled not only in the biomedical management of diseases, but also in identifying and addressing social and structural determinants of the patients' daily lives. Using a longitudinal Problem-Based Learning (PBL) methodology, the medical students and faculty advisers at the University of Hawai‘i John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) developed the Social Justice Curriculum Program (SJCP) to supplement the biomedical curriculum. The SJCP consists of three components: (1) active self-directed learning and didactics, (2) implementation and action, and (3) self-reflection and personal growth. The purpose of introducing a student-driven SJ curriculum is to expose the students to various components of SJ in health and medicine, and maximize engagement by using their own inputs for content and design. It is our hope that the SJCP will serve as a logistic and research-oriented model for future student-driven SJ programs that respond to global health inequalities by cultivating skills and interest in leadership and community service. PMID:25157325

  12. Values and religiosity as predictors of engagement in social justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Harding, Susan R; Carollo, Olivia; Schamberger, Antú; Clifton-Soderstrom, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Some researchers have suggested that values, including religious values and motivations, might facilitate social justice work. Individuals might view social justice work as an expression of religious beliefs, values, and practices, or as an expression of their personal morals and values. The current study examined the role of religious variables and secular values to predict attitudes, intentions to engage in social justice, perceived norms around social justice, and perceived ability to engage in social justice within a culturally and religiously diverse student population. Implications of the study results for social justice education are presented and discussed.

  13. Rural science education as social justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppley, Karen

    2017-03-01

    What part can science education play in the dismantling of obstacles to social justice in rural places? In this Forum contribution, I use "Learning in and about Rural Places: Connections and Tensions Between Students' Everyday Experiences and Environmental Quality Issues in their Community"(Zimmerman and Weible 2016) to explicitly position rural education as a project of social justice that seeks full participatory parity for rural citizens. Fraser's (2009) conceptualization of social justice in rural education requires attention to the just distribution of resources, the recognition of the inherent capacities of rural people, and the right to equal participation in democratic processes that lead to opportunities to make decisions affecting local, regional, and global lives. This Forum piece considers the potential of place-based science education to contribute to this project.

  14. Educating for Social Justice: Drawing from Catholic Social Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadez, James R.; Mirci, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    This article uses a duoethnographic process to develop a model for socially just education based on social justice theory and Catholic social teaching. Three major issues are addressed, including: (a) the definition of socially just education, (b) explaining a vision for establishing socially just schools, and (c) providing a practical guide for…

  15. The feasibility Problem in Theorizing Social Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Huzum

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available G. A. Cohen and Andrew Mason have recently argued, against many contemporary philosophers, that feasibility is not a legitimate constraint in theorizing about social justice. Their main argument is that principles of justice are logically independent of issues of feasibility and, consequently, feasibility has no bearing on the correctness of these principles. This article is a critical examination of three attempts to show that Cohen and Mason’s argument is unsound. The examined attempts are those of Harry Brighouse, Collin Farrelly, and David Miller. I argue that all these arguments are based on false, unjustified or implausible, premises and/or assumptions. Consequently, they cannot discredit the soundness of Cohen and Mason’s argument and of the thesis that feasibility is not, in fact, a legitimate constraint in theorizing about social justice.

  16. Physical Education Pre-Service Teachers' Understanding of Teaching for Social Justice: The Impact of Teaching Kids' Tennis to Youth Living in Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreider, Carri Sue

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this action research study was to better understand and improve my efforts as a Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) instructor to transform the attitudes, beliefs, and understandings of preservice teachers (PSTs) with regard to issues of social justice, specifically by achieving equality by providing opportunities and…

  17. Teaching social justice: Reframing some common pedagogical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drawing on scholarship in Critical Pedagogy, this article speaks to the debate about pedagogical approaches within social justice education (SJE). The article addresses itself to privileged positionality within the context of university-based SJE, with a specific focus on race and whiteness. As a conceptual piece, it addresses ...

  18. Social Justice Leadership and Family Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMatthews, David E.; Edwards, D. Brent, Jr.; Rincones, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Research Approach: This in-depth qualitative case study explores one school leader's enactment of social justice leadership in an elementary school in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. Analysis of interviews and observations revealed how this leader adapted her leadership to prioritize the severe needs of families and students in one of the world's most…

  19. Enacting Social Justice Leadership through Teacher Hiring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura, Crystal T.

    2018-01-01

    Drawn from a compendium of multiple cases, this single-subject qualitative study offers a nuanced depiction of the ways school principals advocate for social justice through teacher hiring. The hiring experiences of one Hispanic female high school principal was used to explore: (a) the principal's approach to school personnel administration to…

  20. Training Social Justice Journalists: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jacob L.; Lewis, Dan A.

    2015-01-01

    Journalism schools are in the midst of sorting through what it means to prepare journalists for a rapidly transitioning field. In this article, we describe an effort to train students in "social justice journalism" at an elite school of journalism. In our ethnographic analysis of its first iteration, we found that this effort failed to…

  1. Social justice praxis in education: Towards sustainable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lastly, these practitioners aligned their management strategies with human rights values, as well as human dignity and equality, and their strategies found pride of place in extant ubuntu principles. Keywords: determinants; education; human rights; management strategies; restorative; social justice praxis; sustainable ...

  2. Social Justice Competencies and Career Development Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Nancy; Collins, Sandra; Marshall, Catherine; McMahon, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The recent focus on social justice issues in career development is primarily conceptual in nature and few resources account for the challenges or successes experienced by career development practitioners. The purpose of this article is to report the results of a research study of career practitioners in Canada regarding the competencies they use…

  3. Social Justice and Media. Media Corner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Joseph A., III, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that the end of slavery, women's suffrage, and the civil rights movement were watershed events of social justice in U.S. history. Provides reviews of two media-based sets of instructional materials that can help students understand the struggle by disenfranchised groups to become full participants in society. (CFR)

  4. Social Justice and Education as Discursive Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanov, Krassimir

    2016-01-01

    In this essay Krassimir Stojanov attempts first to reconstruct the "heart" of Jürgen Habermas's discourse ethics, namely the so-called "principle of universalization" of ethical norms. This principle grounds Habermas's proceduralist account of social justice via equal access of all concerned to the practices of deliberative…

  5. A Schizoanalytical Praxis for Social Justice Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Delphi

    2017-01-01

    This paper uses Deleuzoguattarian schizoanalysis to interrogate concepts of social justice in relation to the crisis of neo-liberal capitalism by referring to the work of the Situationist International movement, the posthuman philosophy of Giles Deleuze and Félix Guattari as well as Afrofuturism. Providing an array of new theoretical responses as…

  6. Does educational privatisation promote social justice?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levin, Henry M.; Cornelisz, Ilja; Hanisch-Cerda, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Social justice in education refers to the expectation that the education system provides fairness in its access to opportunities and results. Proponents of educational privatisation believe this would not only open up opportunities for those that otherwise are restricted from attending good schools,

  7. Social Justice and Cultural Diversity Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Debra A.; Alston, Reginald J.; Turner-Whittaker, Tyra

    2008-01-01

    Early definitions of cultural diversity focused primarily on race/ethnicity, with subsequent inclusion of age, gender, sexual orientation, class, religion, geography, and a combination of positionalities. More recently, social justice has resurfaced as a component of cultural diversity to explain experiences of people of color, women, and…

  8. Common Frame of Reference & social justice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper evaluates the draft Common Frame of Reference (DCFR) in terms of social justice. It concludes the DCFR has all the characteristics of a typical European compromise. Ideological and esthetical purists will certainly be disappointed. In this respect, it has much in common with the

  9. Poverty: Teaching Mathematics and Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Leah P.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents three mathematics lessons in a social justice setting of learning about poverty. Student activities include budgeting, graphic data representation, and linear regression, all in the context of connecting, communicating, and reasoning about poverty. (Contains 1 table, 5 figures and 6 online resources.)

  10. Music Teacher Educator Perspectives on Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Karen; Kelly-McHale, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Given the shifting demographics in American education, the rising likelihood of students with special needs being taught in inclusive classrooms, and the increasing openness with which students are challenging gender and sex norms, social justice has become a prevalent research topic in music education. This survey sought to investigate the…

  11. Environmental assessment and social justice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, B.M.; Sorensen, J.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hardee, H. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe an approach to assessing environmental justice issues at the start of proposed project. It is a structural approach to screening using readily available census data and commercial products that emphasizes the ability to replicate results and provide systematic data that can be used to identify spatial inequities. While our discussion of the methodology addresses only public health and safety issues related to certain minority and cohort sub-groups, systematic use of methodology could provide a valuable screening tool for identifying impacts particular to low-income groups. While the assumptions can be questioned as to applicability, they are based both on theory and practical knowledge.

  12. Civic Virtue, Social Justice and Catholic Schools: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ognibene, Richard; Paulli, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    Details the history of the Catholic Church's involvement in social justice issues from the Second Vatican Council (1962-65) on. Describes social justice programs in schools in the diocese of Albany, New York, as well as other programs. Stresses that social justice activity rises out gratitude for the gift of life and should be seen in the context…

  13. Exploring the potential for joint training between legal professionals in the criminal justice system and health and social care professionals in the mental-health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hean, Sarah; Heaslip, Vanessa; Warr, Jerry; Staddon, Sue

    2011-05-01

    Effective screening of mentally-ill defendants in the criminal court system requires cooperation between legal professionals in the criminal justice system (CJS), and health and social care workers in the mental-health service (MHS). This interagency working, though, can be problematic, as recognized in the Bradley inquiry that recommended joint training for MHS and CJS professionals. The aim of this study was to examine the experiences and attitudes of workers in the CJS and MHS to inform the development of relevant training. The method was a survey of mental-health workers and legal professionals in the court. The results showed that both agencies were uncertain of their ability to work with the other and there is little training that supports them in this. Both recognized the importance of mentally-ill defendants being dealt with appropriately in court proceedings but acknowledged this is not achieved. There is a shared willingness to sympathize with defendants and a common lack of willingness to give a definite, unqualified response on the relationship between culpability, mental-illness and punishment. Views differ around defendants' threat to security.Findings suggest there is scope to develop interprofessional training programs between the CJS and MHS to improve interagency working and eventually impact on the quality of defendants' lives. Recommendations are made on the type of joint training that could be provided.

  14. The Ethics of Teaching for Social Justice: A Framework for Exploring the Intellectual and Moral Virtues of Social Justice Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rebecca M.

    2015-01-01

    Pursuing social justice in education raises ethical questions about teaching practice that have not been fully addressed in the social justice literature. Hytten (2015) initiated a valuable way forward in developing an ethics of social justice educators, drawing on virtue ethics. In this paper, I provide additional support to this effort by…

  15. Integrating Deliberative Justice Theory into Social Work Policy Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Deliberation that upholds the social work values of justice and inclusion is an essential component of the policy-making process; yet most social welfare policy curricula focus instead on the goals of distributive justice. This article presents a model that demonstrates how deliberative justice can be easily incorporated into beginning level…

  16. Social Justice and the Environmental Commons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Constance A; Byington, Rachel; Gallay, Erin; Sambo, Allison

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we build on the scholarship on youth civic engagement by turning attention to the environmental commons as a space for political action. We begin with a definition of the term and arguments about ways that social justice is implied in it. Following that, we raise several psychological challenges to motivating action on behalf of the environmental commons and discuss the critical experiences and actions that can defy those challenges. Finally, drawing from Ostrom's empirical evidence opposing a tragedy of the commons, we discuss practices consistent with a social justice approach that nurture in younger generations an identification with and commitment to the environmental commons and discuss how this orientation would benefit human beings, democracies, and the earth. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Geographies of justice: preschool-childcare provision and the conceptualisation of social justice

    OpenAIRE

    S L Holloway

    1998-01-01

    During the 1990s geographers of diverse philosophical orientations have shown a renewed interest in questions of justice. The author draws on empirical work on childcare provision in Sheffield, England, in order to evaluate two different approaches to the geography of justice and hence the theories of social justice which lie behind these; in particular she explores the different geographies of childcare produced by the territorial-justice approach, which is based on a liberal conception of s...

  18. Future Directions: Social Development in the Context of Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Melanie; Smetana, Judith G.

    2010-01-01

    Many societies and cultures have become increasingly diverse and heterogeneous over the past decade. This diversity has a direct bearing on social justice in children's and adolescents' social development. Increased diversity can have positive consequences, such as the possibility for increased empathy, tolerance, perspective taking, and the…

  19. Migrations, sexospécificités et justice sociale : faire le pont entre ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Filipino women migrant domestic workers' access to sexual and reproductive health services in Hong Kong, Singapore and Qatar. Briefs. Access to justice for Indonesian women migrant domestic workers in the United Arab Emirates. Reports. Migration, Gender and Social Justice : Final Dissemination Workshop, Centre for ...

  20. Teacher Activism: Enacting a Vision for Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picower, Bree

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study focused on educators who participated in grassroots social justice groups to explore the role teacher activism can play in the struggle for educational justice. Findings show teacher activists made three overarching commitments: to reconcile their vision for justice with the realities of injustice around them; to work within…

  1. Emancipatory Nursing Praxis: A Theory of Social Justice in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Robin R

    Emancipatory nursing praxis (ENP) is a middle-range nursing theory of social justice developed from an international, grounded theory study of the critical factors influencing nurses' perceptions of their role in social justice. The ENPs implementing processes (becoming, awakening, engaging, and transforming) and 2 conditional contexts (relational and reflexive) provide an in-depth understanding of the transformative learning process that determines nurse engagement in social justice. Interpretive findings include the voice of Privilege primarily informed ENP theory, the lack of nursing educational and organizational support in social justice role development, and the advocate role should expand to include the role of an ally.

  2. Teaching Mathematics for Social Justice: Examining Preservice Teachers' Conceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Cindy; Jackson, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Teaching for social justice is a critical pedagogy used to empower students to be social agents in the world they live. This critical pedagogy has extended to mathematics education. Over the last decade, mathematics education researchers have conceptualized what it means to teach mathematics for social justice, but little is known about preservice…

  3. Connecting Information Literacy and Social Justice: Why and How

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Libraries have a long, though not uncomplicated, history with social justice and social advocacy. The new ACRL "Framework for Information Literacy," which is more conceptual and flexible than the original Standards, offers an opportunity for librarians to approach teaching and learning from a social justice perspective. Indeed, the…

  4. Social justice and rural education in South Africa | Hlalele ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper, grounded in a distributive paradigm that views social justice as a proper distribution of social benefits and burdens among members of society, traverses the positive and negative features of rural education related to social justice. It concedes that difference is an inherent, inevitable and indispensable feature of ...

  5. Teaching for Social Justice Education: The Intersection between Identity, Critical Agency, and Social Justice Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Dennis; le Roux, Adré

    2011-01-01

    In line with national policy requirements, educators are increasingly addressing forms of social justice education by focusing on classroom pedagogies and educational practices to combat different forms of oppression such as racism and sexism. As all educators have a role to play in dismantling oppression and generating a vision for a more…

  6. Ironies and Limitations of Educational Leadership for Social Justice: A Call to Social Justice Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capper, Colleen A.; Young, Michelle D.

    2014-01-01

    In this article that reviews this special issue, we identify 5 ironies and limitations of educational leadership for social justice: (a) the meaning of inclusive practice, (b) the intersection of identity and difference, (c) the emphasis given to student achievement, (d) the lack of policy and practice coherence, and (e) the separation of…

  7. Denmark: Welfare Society, Social Justice and the Role of Career Guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rie

    11 in 10 years. This presentation considers what social justice means for educational and vocational guidance in Denmark. It covers the development in the Danish career guidance system for young people and show how the service has become more targeted towards marginalised youth. Finally different......Denmark: Welfare Society, Social Justice and the Role of Career Guidance Dr. Rie Thomsen, Aarhus University in Copenhagen, Denmark Denmark is a welfare state in Scandinavia and amongst the most equal countries in the world but it has dropped from being the most equal country in the world to number...... targeting strategies and modes of delivery are discussed in relation to social justice....

  8. Social justice, climate change, and dengue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Aileen Y; Fuller, Douglas O; Carrasquillo, Olveen; Beier, John C

    2014-06-14

    Climate change should be viewed fundamentally as an issue of global justice. Understanding the complex interplay of climatic and socioeconomic trends is imperative to protect human health and lessen the burden of diseases such as dengue fever. Dengue fever is rapidly expanding globally. Temperature, rainfall, and frequency of natural disasters, as well as non-climatic trends involving population growth and migration, urbanization, and international trade and travel, are expected to increase the prevalence of mosquito breeding sites, mosquito survival, the speed of mosquito reproduction, the speed of viral incubation, the distribution of dengue virus and its vectors, human migration patterns towards urban areas, and displacement after natural disasters. The burden of dengue disproportionately affects the poor due to increased environmental risk and decreased health care. Mobilization of social institutions is needed to improve the structural inequalities of poverty that predispose the poor to increased dengue fever infection and worse outcomes. This paper reviews the link between dengue and climatic factors as a starting point to developing a comprehensive understanding of how climate change affects dengue risk and how institutions can address the issues of social justice and dengue outbreaks that increasingly affect vulnerable urban populations. Copyright © 2014 Chang, Fuller, Carrasquillo, Beier. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

  9. Social and psychological aspects of criminal juvenile justice in the world practice (Anglo-Saxon model of juvenile justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Oshevsky

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is the final part of the review of existing foreign models of juvenile criminal justice system. We analyze the principles of juvenile justice in the criminal trial: protective orientation, personalization and social richness of the trial, the emphasis on educational influences. We present the foreign experience of incorporating social, psychological and clinical special knowledge into specialized justice concerning juvenile offenders. We analyze modern trends in the development of juvenile justice in the United States and Canada. We present material related to methods of risk assessment of re-offending among adolescents. We highlight approaches to complex long-term follow-up of juvenile offenders in Anglo-Saxon juvenile justice. We describe some aspects of the probation service using the method of case management. In the context of the accepted “National Strategy for Action for the Benefit of Children for 2012-2017”, the prospects for the development of specialized criminal justice for young offenders in the Russian Federation are discussed

  10. Developing Critical Social Justice Literacy in an Online Seminar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondy, Elizabeth; Hambacher, Elyse; Murphy, Amy S.; Wolkenhauer, Rachel; Krell, Desi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to report on an effort to cultivate a critical social justice perspective and critical social justice praxis among educators enrolled in an online graduate program. Although the entire program was organized around themes of equity, collaboration, and leadership, this study focused on educators' perspectives of the…

  11. From Redistribution to Recognition: How School Principals Perceive Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Where there are people, there is social in/justice. Using Nancy Fraser's framework, this qualitative research examines how school principals perceive social justice in schools. Twenty-one elementary and secondary school principals were interviewed in the Greater Toronto Area. The study provides some empirical evidence on the ways social…

  12. Post-Disaster Social Justice Group Work and Group Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemak, Fred; Chung, Rita Chi-Ying

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses post-disaster group counseling and group supervision using a social justice orientation for working with post-disaster survivors from underserved populations. The Disaster Cross-Cultural Counseling model is a culturally responsive group counseling model that infuses social justice into post-disaster group counseling and…

  13. Social Justice Leadership as Praxis: Developing Capacities through Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Gail

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to propose a conceptual framework for social justice leadership as praxis and to explore the implications of this framework for leadership preparation programs. Conceptual Argument: The conceptual framework for social justice leadership is grounded in a review of literature and organized around three central…

  14. Engaging Public Space: Art Education Pedagogies for Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncum, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Considering social justice to be founded on human rights, which, in turn, are grounded in freedom of thought, expression, and assembly, this essay reviews efforts by art educators to engage with public space as a form of social justice pedagogy. Public space, whether actual or virtual, is understood to be inherently devoted to contestation in the…

  15. Shaping Social Justice Leadership: Insights of Women Educators Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Linda L.; Strachan, Jane; Lazaridou, Angeliki

    2012-01-01

    "Shaping Social Justice Leadership: Insights of Women Educators Worldwide" contains evocative portraits of twenty-three women educators and leaders from around the world whose actions are shaping social justice leadership. Woven from words of their own narratives, the women's voices lift off the page into readers' hearts and minds to inspire and…

  16. Critical Constructivism: Interpreting Mathematics Education for Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovsmose, Ole

    2018-01-01

    The notion of social justice has been addressed from the perspective of 'ethical realism' and 'ethical anarchistic'. Here, however, the possibility of 'ethical constructivism' becomes formulated. With departure in Rawls' description of an idealised meeting defining social justice, the initial steps into ethical constructivism become taken.…

  17. Striding Toward Social Justice: The Ecologic Milieu of Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Rebecca E.; Cubbin, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Disparities in physical activity should be investigated in light of social justice principles. This manuscript critically evaluates evidence and trends in disparities research within an ecologic framework, focusing on multi-level factors such as neighborhood and racial discrimination that influence physical activity. Discussion focuses on strategies for integrating social justice into physical activity promotion and intervention programming within an ecologic framework. PMID:19098519

  18. Social Justice Advocacy among Graduate Students: An Empirical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnemeyer, Rachel McQuown

    2009-01-01

    Although social justice advocacy has increasingly been acknowledged as important in the field of psychology (e.g., Goodman et al., 2004; Toporek et al., 2006a, Vera & Speight, 2003), there is a dearth of empirical research examining social justice advocacy across graduate psychology students. This mixed-methods study examined demographic and…

  19. Inclusion in Education: A Step towards Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Filiz

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the theoretical relationships between inclusion in education and social justice. It draws on Martha Nussbaum's use of the capability approach is given as one of the few philosophical and political theories that places disability/impairment in the social justice debate. The article goes on to present findings from the initial…

  20. Vulnerability: Self-Study's Contribution to Social Justice Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    Teaching, as a social justice project, seeks to undo and re-imagine oppressive pedagogies in order to transform teachers, their students, and the knowledge with which they work. In this article, I argue that self-study can contribute to social justice in a number of ways by, for instance, making the sometimes limiting norms that frame teaching and…

  1. Bringing Social Justice Principles to Practice: New Practitioners Speak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Kisha V.; Shriberg, David; Conway, Devyn; Ruecker, Dana; Jones, Haley

    2018-01-01

    Using consensual qualitative research methods, this qualitative study explored how nine recent graduates, all graduating within the past 7 years from an overtly social justice-oriented school psychology program, were experiencing social justice in practice. Semistructured interviews were conducted covering the following three theme areas: defining…

  2. social justice in nigeria: the dialectics of ideas and reality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper set out to critically look into the gap that has existed between ideas and reality in the realm of social justice in Nigeria. To realize this objective, the paper examined the dynamics of the Nigerian political economy and how this impinges on the practice and implementation of social justice. The paper subsequently ...

  3. Community Building in Social Justice Work: A Critical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettez, Silvia Cristina; Hytten, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    In this article we argue for the importance of building critical communities as an integral, yet neglected, aspect of education for social justice. We begin by defining critical communities and by describing goals and vision for social justice education. We then explore how community is discussed in the education literature, limitations and…

  4. Nailing Jello to the Wall: Articulating Conceptualizations of Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandretto, Susan; Ballard, Keith; Burke, Pam; Kane, Ruth; Lang, Catherine; Schon, Pamela; Whyte, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    This article presents conceptualizations of social justice expressed by a group of teacher educators in New Zealand and seeks to reinforce the importance of placing social justice on the agenda of teacher education. It is presented in the form of a reader's theater script designed to elicit discussion and encourage others to reflect critically on…

  5. Using Supervision to Prepare Social Justice Counseling Advocates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glosoff, Harriet L.; Durham, Judith C.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past several years, there has been an increased focus on integrating not only multiculturalism in the counseling profession, but also advocacy and social justice. Although the professional literature addresses the importance of cultural competence in supervision, there is a paucity of information about social justice advocacy in relation…

  6. Head Teachers' Leadership for Social Justice and Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liasidou, Anastasia; Antoniou, Androniki

    2015-01-01

    This article is concerned with exploring the ways in which head teachers' leadership for social justice is understood and enacted within the context of inclusion. Head teachers' leadership praxis is influenced by individual understandings of social justice, as well as dominant institutional realities and policy priorities that indicate the extent…

  7. Urban land acquisition and social justice in Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: access to land, land lease, social justice, tenure security, urban land policy. I. INTRODUCTION ... As Mattew Robinson put it correctly, social justice embraces virtues including “share of common humanity .... But such tenure security will not, by its own, reduce poverty and bring about sustainable development.10.

  8. Climate Change, Human Rights, and Social Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Barry S; Patz, Jonathan A

    2015-01-01

    The environmental and health consequences of climate change, which disproportionately affect low-income countries and poor people in high-income countries, profoundly affect human rights and social justice. Environmental consequences include increased temperature, excess precipitation in some areas and droughts in others, extreme weather events, and increased sea level. These consequences adversely affect agricultural production, access to safe water, and worker productivity, and, by inundating land or making land uninhabitable and uncultivatable, will force many people to become environmental refugees. Adverse health effects caused by climate change include heat-related disorders, vector-borne diseases, foodborne and waterborne diseases, respiratory and allergic disorders, malnutrition, collective violence, and mental health problems. These environmental and health consequences threaten civil and political rights and economic, social, and cultural rights, including rights to life, access to safe food and water, health, security, shelter, and culture. On a national or local level, those people who are most vulnerable to the adverse environmental and health consequences of climate change include poor people, members of minority groups, women, children, older people, people with chronic diseases and disabilities, those residing in areas with a high prevalence of climate-related diseases, and workers exposed to extreme heat or increased weather variability. On a global level, there is much inequity, with low-income countries, which produce the least greenhouse gases (GHGs), being more adversely affected by climate change than high-income countries, which produce substantially higher amounts of GHGs yet are less immediately affected. In addition, low-income countries have far less capability to adapt to climate change than high-income countries. Adaptation and mitigation measures to address climate change needed to protect human society must also be planned to protect

  9. Social justice representations of students and teachers in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sainz Vanesa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this empirical study, we designed a questionnaire that seeks to analyse the representation that Spanish students and teachers have about Social Justice. The questionnaire includes a set of different dilemmas about social justice issues, especially in educational context The questions equitably represent three fundamental dimensions in social justice: Representation, Redistribution and Recognition. The questionnaire for students has 30 dilemmas and for teachers has 39 ones. The instrument has been applied to a sample of teachers and students of secondary education in 17 secondary public schools of different Spanish Communities Autonomous. The results show a good reliability of our instrument and differences in social justice conceptions regarding level of education, age and gender. These results show a developmental and gender trend and differences between students and teachers in the accessibility to the three dimensions of Social Justice: Representation, Recognition and Representation.

  10. Jesuit Promotion of Social Justice. Social Justice Action at Jesuit Universities in Spain, as Assessed by Teaching and Research Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivanco, Borja

    2018-01-01

    A substantive and differentiating element of the Jesuits' university paradigm is the promotion of social justice. The results of a telephone poll conducted amongst professors and researchers convey the initiatives to further social justice that Jesuit universities in Spain have been carrying out primarily since the 1990s. Although still a limited…

  11. Relationships are building blocks to social justice: Cases of biblical justice and African Ubuntu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selaelo T. Kgatla

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The entire Bible is full of themes calling humans to live justly with one another and fear God who is the author of justice. The first book of the Bible, Genesis, carries the story of God’s relationship with his people. Their relationship is bound by social justice and mutual love in reciprocity. This article argues that African Ubuntu has an affinity with the Bible’s message of justice and mutual caring for one another. Ubuntu presupposes that humans were created in God’s image and indicates that characteristics such as kindness, charity, equality, love of one’s neighbours and voluntarily dispensing justice to others are present in human life. God created humans to be bound to one another in caring love, coexistence and total dependence. In today’s world, social justice requires good judgement from those who are in privileged positions to implement it.

  12. Social and occupational justice barriers in the transition from foster care to independent adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul-Ward, Amy

    2009-01-01

    The professional discourse on social justice suggests that more critical work is needed to sufficiently address the societal issues that affect occupational therapy practitioners' ability to advocate for and with clients. Occupational therapy offers unique opportunities for the scholarly discussion of social justice and for clinical practice to address these issues. This article discusses the importance of incorporating a social justice perspective into occupational therapy by using an example from the author's research program. The experiences of adolescents in foster care were documented in an ongoing qualitative participatory study. An overview of adolescents' (N = 40) perceived independent living and vocational service needs is provided, and several barriers that affect adolescents' ability to develop the skills needed to achieve independent adulthood are described. The article concludes with a discussion of social justice implications as they relate to the myriad issues in the foster care system, occupational therapy research, and practice.

  13. The Human Rights and Social Justice Scholars Program: a collaborative model for preclinical training in social medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Salina; James, Aisha; Hennelly, Marie Oliva; Karani, Reena; Palermo, Ann-Gel; Jakubowski, Andrea; Ciccariello, Chloe; Atkinson, Holly

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of the role social justice takes in medical professionalism, the need to train health professionals to address social determinants of health, and medical trainees' desire to eliminate health disparities, undergraduate medical education offers few opportunities for comprehensive training in social justice. The Human Rights and Social Justice (HRSJ) Scholars Program at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is a preclinical training program in social medicine consisting of 5 components: a didactic course, faculty and student mentorship, research projects in social justice, longitudinal policy and advocacy service projects, and a career seminar series. The aim of this article is to describe the design and implementation of the HRSJ curriculum with a focus on the cornerstone of the HRSJ Scholars Program: longitudinal policy and advocacy service projects implemented in collaboration with partner organizations in East Harlem. Furthermore, we describe the results of a qualitative survey of inaugural participants, now third-year medical students, to understand how their participation in this service-learning component affected their clinical experiences and professional self-perceptions. Ultimately, through the implementation and evaluation of the HRSJ Scholars Program, we demonstrate an innovative model for social justice education; the enduring effect of service-learning experiences on participants' knowledge, skills, and attitudes; and the potential to increase community capacity for improved health through a collaborative educational model. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Restorative justice as social justice for victims of gendered violence: a standpoint feminist perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wormer, Katherine

    2009-04-01

    This article provides an overview of restorative justice as a process and examines its relevance to women who have been victimized by physical and sexual abuse. The starting point is the justice system with its roots in adversarial, offender-oriented practices of obtaining justice. The widespread dissatisfaction by battered women and rape victims and their advocates with the current system of mandatory law enforcement opens the door for consideration of alternative forms of dealing with domestic violence. Restorative justice strategies, as argued here, have several major advantages. Like social work, these strategies are solution-based rather than problem-based processes, give voice to marginalized people, and focus on healing and reconciliation. Moreover, restorative justice offers an avenue through which the profession of social work can re-establish its historic role in criminal justice. The four models most relevant to women's victimization are victim-offender conferencing, family group conferencing, healing circles, and community reparations. Each model is examined separately from a feminist standpoint. The discussion is informed by insights from the teachings of standpoint feminist theory and social work values, especially social justice.

  15. The social justice imperative in transforming a secondary school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mafora Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The thrust of education policy and legislation in South Africa points to a quest for democracy, equity and social justice throughout the education system. Notwithstanding, research suggests that different stakeholders experience schools as socially unjust and marginalising in some way. This article reports findings of a follow-up qualitative case study of one purposively sampled Soweto secondary school. The study sought to explore the principal’s social justice leadership strategies which account for the school being perceived as democratically transformed and socially just. Data were collected through a series of in-depth semi-structured interviews and observations. Data analysis followed Tesch’s steps for open coding. Findings suggest that the principal’s personal values and commitment to social justice principles account for his resilience in the face of resistance and systemic barriers. The principal’s social justice leadership practices and barriers that he encountered are outlined.

  16. Mental health services costs within the Alberta criminal justice system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Philip; Moffatt, Jessica; Dewa, Carolyn S; Nguyen, Thanh; Zhang, Ting; Lesage, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Mental illness has been widely cited as a driver of costs in the criminal justice system. The objective of this paper is to estimate the additional mental health service costs incurred within the criminal justice system that are incurred because of people with mental illnesses who go through the system. Our focus is on costs in Alberta. We set up a model of the flow of all persons through the criminal justice system, including police, court, and corrections components, and for mental health diversion, review, and forensic services. We estimate the transitional probabilities and costs that accrue as persons who have been charged move through the system. Costs are estimated for the Alberta criminal justice system as a whole, and for the mental illness component. Public expenditures for each person diverted or charged in Alberta in the criminal justice system, including mental health costs, were $16,138. The 95% range of this estimate was from $14,530 to $19,580. Of these costs, 87% were for criminal justice services and 13% were for mental illness-related services. Hospitalization for people with mental illness who were reviewed represented the greatest additional cost associated with mental illnesses. Treatment costs stemming from mental illnesses directly add about 13% onto those in the criminal justice system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Poverty and social justice in the devolved Scotland: Neoliberalism meets social democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Gill; Mooney, Gerry

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on current debates in social policy, this paper considers the extent to which social justice has and is informing social policy making in devolved Scotland. Relating to the work of social justice theorists Young, Fraser and Lister in particular, it critically examines some key Scottish social policy measures since 1999, considering some of the ways in which these have been constructed in terms of social justice and which make claims to the Scottish national. Through a focus on the iss...

  18. Another Look at Distributive Justice and the Social Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Dennis R.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses distributive justice in teaching social studies. Argues that utilitarianism is an inadequate basis for distributive justice because it does not allow for the primacy of civil or natural rights. Suggests addressing such issues in class to encourage student consideration of fundamental principles and their application to contemporary…

  19. Indigenous Teachers and Learners: Higher Education and Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida Huaman, Elizabeth; Abeita, Shawn

    2018-01-01

    Reflecting on our experiences within a program of graduate education in Justice Studies, we offer a discussion of how building and maintaining an iterative teacher-learner stance results in strengthening practices of Indigenous education toward social justice. Through this reflection, we discuss the tenets in Indigenous higher education practices…

  20. Nursing research on religion and spirituality through a social justice lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer-Kirkham, Sheryl

    2014-01-01

    Critical theories such as postcolonial feminism and intersectionality can provide new and vital perspectives on the interplay between social justice, religion, spirituality, health, and nursing. Criticality prompts us to examine taken-for-granted assumptions, such as the neutrality and universality of spirituality, while analyzing social relations of power, including the racialization of religion and religious patriarchy, that may result in oppressive conditions and social exclusion. The argument is made that when refracted through critical, intersectional lenses, religious and spiritual traditions can be rich sources of theoretical foundations and practical services that could inform nursing's recent re/turn toward social justice.

  1. Social inclusion/exclusion as matters of social (in)justice: a call for nursing action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanicki, Sharon M; Kushner, Kaysi E; Reutter, Linda

    2015-06-01

    Social inclusion/exclusion involves just/unjust social relations and social structures enabling or constraining opportunities for participation and health. In this paper, social inclusion/exclusion is explored as a dialectic. Three discourses--discourses on recognition, capabilities, and equality and citizenship--are identified within Canadian literature. Each discourse highlights a different view of the injustices leading to social exclusion and the conditions supporting inclusion and social justice. An Integrated Framework for Social Justice that incorporates the three discourses is developed and used to critique the dominant focus on distributive justice within foundational Canadian nursing documents. We propose a broader conceptualization of social (in)justice that includes both relational and structural dimensions. Opportunities for multilevel interventions to promote social justice are identified. This framework is congruent with nursing's moral imperative to promote health equity and with the multiple roles played by nurses to promote social justice in everyday practice. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Social Justice for Crossover Youth: The Intersection of the Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolivoski, Karen M; Goodkind, Sara; Shook, Jeffrey J

    2017-10-01

    Social workers are critical to promoting racial and social justice. "Crossover youth," a term used to describe youths who have contact with both the child welfare and juvenile justice systems, are an especially vulnerable but often overlooked population with whom social workers engage. A disproportionate number of crossover youth are African American. Empirical research on crossover youth is growing, but such scholarship rarely engages with a human rights and social justice perspective. African American children and youths have a distinct place within the history and current context of the child welfare and juvenile justice systems. These systems have historically excluded them or treated them differently; now, African American youths are overrepresented in each of them, and evidence suggests they are more likely to cross over. The purpose of this article is to describe the historical and current context of crossover youth, with a particular focus on African American youths, to provide the foundation for a discussion of what social workers can do to promote racial and social justice for crossover youth, including specific implications for practice and policy, as well as broader implications for human and civil rights. © 2017 National Association of Social Workers.

  3. Water Demand Management for Social Justice — Women, like men ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-22

    Dec 22, 2010 ... ... and management of water projects enhances the intended results of projects and contributes to the sustainability of water resources as well as to social justice. ... Women's rights and access to water and sanitation in Delhi.

  4. Water Demand Management for Social Justice | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2012-01-18

    Jan 18, 2012 ... Water Demand Management for Social Justice ... Women play larger role in Latin America's commercial urban waste management ... the management of solid waste in Latin America, according to research supported by IDRC.

  5. Visual graphics for human rights, social justice, democracy and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: art, democracy, human rights, social justice, the public good, visual ..... (Figure 1), the symbolism is two-fold; firstly, the upper composition depicts the ... in industry and global communications pay scant regard to their effect on the ...

  6. Rights and Justice and the Social Web Movement (Latin America ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Rights and Justice and the Social Web Movement (Latin America) ... mounted to raise public awareness of the importance of privacy as a human right on the Internet. ... conference of McGill's Institute for the Study of International Development.

  7. Visual graphics for human rights, social justice, democracy and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: art, democracy, human rights, social justice, the public good, visual graphics. Introduction ..... in industry and global communications pay scant regard to their effect on the environment. The ..... Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Merril.

  8. Democracy, ethics and social justice: Implications for secondary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... were interviewed to explore their perspectives on democratic school leadership and establish the ... Inclusion of democratic school leadership principles in teacher training ... Keywords: democracy; ethics; leadership practices; social justice ...

  9. Social Justice and Resilience for African American Male Counselor Educators: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollarhide, Colette T.; Mayes, Renae D.; Dogan, Sabri; Aras, Yahyahan; Edwards, Kaden; Oehrtman, J. P.; Clevenger, Adam

    2018-01-01

    In this phenomenological study, the authors interviewed 4 African American male counselor educators about their social justice efforts. Resulting themes were lifelong commitment to social justice, reaction to resistance, professional and personal support, and the meaning of social justice work. Findings suggest that social justice work can…

  10. Social Justice and Multiculturalism: Persistent Tensions in the History of US Social Welfare and Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Reisch

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Social justice has been a central normative component of U.S. social welfare and social work for over a century, although the meaning and implications of the term have often been ambiguous. A major source of this ambiguity lies in the conflict between universalist views of social justice and those which focus on achieving justice for specific groups. This conflict has been masked by several long-standing assumptions about the relationship between social justice and multiculturalism – assumptions which have been challenged by recent developments. The assumption that the pursuit of social justice requires the creation of a more egalitarian society has been challenged by the new political-economic realities of globalization. The assumption that the maintenance of individual rights complements the pursuit of social equality has been challenged by racially-based attacks on social welfare benefits and civil rights. Most significantly, the assumption that a socially just society is one in which different groups share a compatible vision of social justice has been challenged by the realities of multiculturalism. This paper explores the evolution of four themes regarding the relationship between social justice and multiculturalism during the past century and discusses their implications for the contemporary demographic and cultural context of the U.S. These themes are: the relationship of cultural diversity to the nation’s values and goals; the contradiction between coerced cultural assimilation and coerced physical and social segregation; the relationship between individual and group identity and rights; and the linkage between “Americanization” and the equal application of justice.

  11. A Philosophical Examination of Social Justice and Child Poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Schweiger, Gottfried; Graf, Gunter

    2015-01-01

    Das Buch behandelt Kinderarmut als Thema der sozialen Gerechtigkeit. Ausgehend von einer Konzeption der sozialen Gerechtigkeit für Kinder, die im Capability Approach beheimatet ist, legen die Autoren eine Kritik der Kinderarmut vor und entwickeln eine Theorie über die verantwortlichen Aktuere, die zur Linderung von Kinderarmut verpflichtet sind. This book examines child poverty as a topic of social justice. The authors develop a theory of social justice for children based within the capabi...

  12. Career guidance for Social Justice in Neo-Liberal Times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rie; Skovhus, Randi Boelskifte; Sultana, Ronald

    SIMPOSIO 16. Career guidance for Social Justice in Neo-Liberal Times (English) Ronald Sultana (Coord.), Tristram Hooley (Coord.), Rie Thomsen, Peter Plant, Roger Kjærgård, Marcelo Afonso Ribeiro, Randi Boelskifte Skovhus and Tron Inglar......SIMPOSIO 16. Career guidance for Social Justice in Neo-Liberal Times (English) Ronald Sultana (Coord.), Tristram Hooley (Coord.), Rie Thomsen, Peter Plant, Roger Kjærgård, Marcelo Afonso Ribeiro, Randi Boelskifte Skovhus and Tron Inglar...

  13. American social work, corrections and restorative justice: an appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumz, Edward J

    2004-08-01

    Social work played an active role in American corrections until the 1980s when the ethic of rehabilitation began to give way to a more conservative doctrine of retribution. Changes in the field of social work, characterized by preference of social workers to work only with certain populations, contributed to social work's diminishment in corrections. Although efforts at rehabilitation continue in corrections, the concept of restorative justice that emphasizes assisting victims, communities, and offenders in dealing with the consequences of crime is gaining acceptance in the field of corrections in the United States and in other countries. This study explored social work's presence in corrections, the decline of that presence, and how the concept of restorative justice can invigorate social work within the field of corrections. Several examples of social work's contemporary efforts to use the concept of restorative justice in the United Kingdom are presented.

  14. Social Justice and the “Green” City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liette Gilbert

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A transition to a new, greener urbanism is increasingly imperative in the face of environmental crises. However, such a transition is not possible without considering social justice. This essay examines some ten¬sions between social justice and urban sustainability and some of the reasons why a social justice approach to urban sustainability is often marginalized by a neoliberal sustainability ontology. This essay first engages with various normative concepts of social justice and its long existing but unfulfilled claim in the city. It then considers some gains toward greener urbanism but contends that urban sustainability responses have ge¬nerally been more preoccupied with ecological modernization and the reproduction of best practices rather than with socio-spatial justice. In looking at some workings of green neoliberalism, the essay points to how the ecological is easily recuperated for neoliberal ends. The last section addresses some reasons why the social is de-privileged in the dominant sustainability discourses and practices, and how social justice serves, through citizenship practices, as a claim to urban change where participation is not a bureaucratized process but an everyday practice. Overall, the essay cautions against certain sustainability discourses and green neoliberalism without addressing its ingrained inequalities.

  15. Alternative Education and Social Justice: Considering Issues of Affective and Contributive Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Martin; McGregor, Glenda; Baroutsis, Aspa; Te Riele, Kitty; Hayes, Debra

    2016-01-01

    This article considers the ways in which three alternative education sites in Australia support socially just education for their students and how injustice is addressed within these schools. The article begins with recognition of the importance of Nancy Fraser's work to understandings of social justice. It then goes on to argue that her framework…

  16. The Social Sciences and their compromisse with truth and justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro W. Barbosa de Almeida

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the social scientists responsability in relation to justice and truth, based in the practical and theoretical experiences of the author in the field of Social Anthropology. Although the text adresses the Social Sciences from the perspective of Social Anthropology, it deals with topics in which the researchers and ativists activities require a cooperative action of lawyers, engineers and biologists among the work of sociologists and geographers – all that is involved in the situations when it is necessary to tell the truth and also to judge about justice and injustice in social life. Justice and truth notions are social scientists weapons and they can not be abandoned in the hands of conservative thought.

  17. Learning to teach science for social justice in urban schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Purvi

    This study looks at how beginner teachers learn to teach science for social justice in urban schools. The research questions are: (1) what views do beginner teachers hold about teaching science for social justice in urban schools? (2) How do beginner teachers' views about teaching science for social justice develop as part of their learning? In looking at teacher learning, I take a situative perspective that defines learning as increased participation in a community of practice. I use the case study methodology with five teacher participants as the individual units of analysis. In measuring participation, I draw from mathematics education literature that offers three domains of professional practice: Content, pedagogy and professional identity. In addition, I focus on agency as an important component of increased participation from a social justice perspective. My findings reveal two main tensions that arose as teachers considered what it meant to teach science from a social justice perspective: (1) Culturally responsive teaching vs. "real" science and (2) Teaching science as a political act. In negotiating these tensions, teachers drew on a variety of pedagogical and conceptual tools offered in USE that focused on issues of equity, access, place-based pedagogy, student agency, ownership and culture as a toolkit. Further, in looking at how the five participants negotiated these tensions in practice, I describe four variables that either afforded or constrained teacher agency and consequently the development of their own identity and role as socially just educators. These four variables are: (1) Accessing and activating social, human and cultural capital, (2) reconceptualizing culturally responsive pedagogical tools, (3) views of urban youth and (4) context of participation. This study has implications for understanding the dialectical relationship between agency and social justice identity for beginner teachers who are learning how to teach for social justice. Also

  18. APA efforts in promoting human rights and social justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Frederick T L; Pickren, Wade E; Vasquez, Melba J T

    2017-11-01

    This article reviews the American Psychological Association's (APA) efforts in promoting human rights and social justice. Beginning with a historical review of the conceptualizations of human rights and social justice, the social challenges that have faced the United States over time are discussed in relation to the APA's evolving mission and strategic initiatives enacted through its boards, committees, and directorates. From early efforts on the Board for Social and Ethical Responsibility in Psychology and the Board of Ethnic Minority Affairs to the establishment of the Public Interest Directorate, the APA's efforts to address these human rights and social justice challenges through its task force reports, guidelines, and policies are described. Specifically, issues related to diversity and underrepresentation of minority group members and perspective within the APA, as well as women's issues (prochoice, violence against women, sexualization of young girls, human trafficking) were central to these efforts. These minority groups included racial and ethnic minority groups; immigrants and refugees; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, and queer individuals; and those with disabilities. Later attention shifted to broader social justice challenges within a public health perspective, such as AIDS, obesity, and violence. Also included is a brief discussion of the Hoffman Report. The article ends with a discussion of future directions for the APA's efforts related to human rights and social justice related to health disparities, violent extremism, social inequality, migration, cultural and racial diversity, and an evidence-based approach to programming. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Educational Inequality and Social Justice: Challenges for Career Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The article provides a multiperspective approach to educational careers. It first discusses social justice issues in the distribution of the crucial individual and social good of education. It then summarizes core findings of recent international research on processes and factors generating social disparities in the acquisition of education. Based…

  20. Social Justice Praxis in Education: Towards Sustainable Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Deventer, Idilette; van der Westhuizen, Philip C.; Potgieter, Ferdinand J.

    2015-01-01

    Social justice, defined as an impetus towards a socially just educational world, is based on the assumption that all people, irrespective of belief or societal position, are entitled to be treated according to the values of human rights, human dignity and equality. Diverging from the classical positivist approach in social science research that…

  1. Social Support Among Substance Using Women with Criminal Justice Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majer, John M.; Salina, Doreen D.; Jason, Leonard A.

    2016-01-01

    Social support types (abstinence, appraisal, belonging, tangible) were analyzed among a sample of women with criminal justice involvement and substance use disorders (n = 200). Hierarchical linear regression was conducted to examine social support types in relation to changes in abstinence self-efficacy while controlling for incarceration histories. Only abstinence social support and tangible social support predicted significant increases in abstinence self-efficacy, with tangible support accounting for more variance in the analytic model. Findings suggest women with criminal justice involvement who have substance use disorders have basic needs that if met would have an indirect effect on their recovery. Implications for treatment and research are discussed. PMID:26949443

  2. When Push Comes to Love: Partnership and Social Justice

    OpenAIRE

    Margaret Frimoth

    2018-01-01

    Despite major accomplishments of the modern era, the protection of women, children, and the environment remain vulnerable. In response, there has been increasing growth of social justice protests that use social media to express the need for social change. This article provides a discussion of the rise of several social movements and their attempts to address issues of injustice, particularly focusing on sexual violence and environmental destruction. The increased use of social media prompted...

  3. Feminist intersectionality: bringing social justice to health disparities research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jamie; Kelly, Ursula A

    2011-05-01

    The principles of autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice are well established ethical principles in health research. Of these principles, justice has received less attention by health researchers. The purpose of this article is to broaden the discussion of health research ethics, particularly the ethical principle of justice, to include societal considerations--who and what are studied and why?--and to critique current applications of ethical principles within this broader view. We will use a feminist intersectional approach in the context of health disparities research to firmly establish inseparable links between health research ethics, social action, and social justice. The aim is to provide an ethical approach to health disparities research that simultaneously describes and seeks to eliminate health disparities. © The Author(s) 2011

  4. Critical discourse analysis of social justice in nursing's foundational documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valderama-Wallace, Claire P

    2017-07-01

    Social inequities threaten the health of the global population. A superficial acknowledgement of social justice by nursing's foundational documents may limit the degree to which nurses view injustice as relevant to nursing practice and education. The purpose was to examine conceptualizations of social justice and connections to broader contexts in the most recent editions. Critical discourse analysis examines and uncovers dynamics related to power, language, and inequality within the American Nurses Association's Code of Ethics, Scope and Standards of Practice, and Social Policy Statement. This analysis found ongoing inconsistencies in conceptualizations of social justice. Although the Code of Ethics integrates concepts related to social justice far more than the other two, tension between professionalism and social change emerges. The discourse of professionalism renders interrelated cultural, social, economic, historical, and political contexts nearly invisible. Greater consistency would provide a clearer path for nurses to mobilize and engage in the courageous work necessary to address social injustice. These findings also call for an examination of how nurses can critique and use the power and privilege of professionalism to amplify the connection between social institutions and health equity in nursing education, practice, and policy development. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Just Above the Fray - Interpretive Social Criticism and the Ends of Social Justice

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Gibson

    2008-01-01

    The article lays down the broad strokes of an interpretive approach to social criticism. In developing this approach, the author stresses the importance of both a pluralistic notion of social justice and a rich ideal of personal growth. While objecting to one-dimensional conceptions of social justice centering on legal equality, the author develops the idea of there being multiple "spheres of justice", including the spheres of "care" and "merit". Each of these spheres, he argues, is subject t...

  6. Harnessing social innovation for energy justice: a business model perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Hiteva, Ralitsa; Sovacool, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    This paper uses a business model framework to discuss how principles of energy justice - in particular, equitable distribution of costs and benefits, affordability, due process and greater participation in decision-making - can be embedded in business model innovations for energy, through social innovation. The paper discusses four cases at different scales (local, subnational, regional and global) to highlight opportunities for introducing principles of energy justice into the core of busine...

  7. Social justice issues related to uneven distribution of resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervin, Naomi E; Bell, Sue Ellen

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the social justice issues resulting from the uneven distribution of resources. In this article, justice theories are discussed in relation to two of these issues: lack of adequate food and shelter and inequitable access to an appropriate continuum of health care. Public health nurses have the obligation to deal with the results of poverty and the uneven distribution of resources, which pose a threat to the common good in the United States and throughout the global community.

  8. The Place of Social Justice in Higher Education and Social Change Discourses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mala

    2011-01-01

    A familiar discourse about higher education and social change today relates to higher education's socio-economic role within knowledge societies in a globalizing world. This paper addresses how issues of social justice feature in such discourses; whether social justice in higher education has been appropriated into a neo-liberal strategy for…

  9. Social Justice and the Global Economy: New Challenges for Social Work in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polack, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    The globalization of the economy creates new challenges for social work in the arenas of social and economic justice. This article outlines social justice issues related to the debt crisis of the Global South and sweatshops. A presentation of colonial precursors is followed by a detailed examination of these global institutions with an emphasis on…

  10. Social Justice and School Leadership Preparation: Can We Shift Beliefs, Values, and Commitments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, James G.; Harper, Robert E.; Koschoreck, James W.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between a social justice curriculum and the dispositions of graduate students enrolled in an online pre-service school principal preparation program. Data Collection: Students were asked to write reflective essays before the course began and again after the course was over discussing their…

  11. Globalizing Social Justice Education: The Case of The Global Solidarity Network Study e-Broad Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Yvonne D.; Kostic, Kevin; Toton, Suzanne C.; Zurek, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    This paper documents the development, implementation, and evaluation of "The Global Solidarity Network Study e-Broad Program (GSNSeBP)", an online social justice educational program that is blended into an onsite academic course. This global electronic program, which was developed through a partnership between Catholic Relief Services (CRS) and…

  12. Beyond Ethnic Tidbits: Toward a Critical and Dialogical Model in Multicultural Social Justice Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Christina

    2016-01-01

    This praxis article outlines the value of using a critical and dialogical model (CDM) to teach multicultural social justice education to preservice teachers. Based on practitioner research, the article draws on the author's own teaching experiences to highlight how key features of CDM can be used to help pre-service teachers move beyond thinking…

  13. Social Justice as a Conduit for Broadening Curriculum Access: Stories from Classroom Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Melanie; Ngcobo, Jabulani

    2015-01-01

    It has become public knowledge that teachers have gradually been called to teach learners to world-class standards in order to enable them to participate actively in the global economy. This has fuelled a debate on how teachers should be prepared to fulfil this new role. In-service programmes on social justice and education have often been…

  14. Social Justice and Faith Maturity: Exploring Whether Religious Beliefs Impact Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Christine; Ferrari, Joseph R.; Odahl, Charlynn

    2014-01-01

    The current study compared perceptions by college students (n = 304; M age=19.75 years old) enrolled at an urban and diverse Roman Catholic university on self-report measures of faith/belief structures, social justice, and community service attitudes. Survey results indicated that both horizontal and vertical faith maturity perceptions…

  15. Food as Social Justice: Critical Ethnography as a Lens for Communication Activism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Ross

    2016-01-01

    Courses: Public Speaking. Objectives: This semester-long service-learning activity examines access to affordable healthy food as a social justice issue, using critical ethnography as a framework to help students understand the link between activism and public speaking skills. After completing the project, students will be able to: (1) develop a…

  16. Social justice praxis in education: Towards sustainable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    2015-05-29

    May 29, 2015 ... A lack of education leadership and management invariably contributes to this situation (Bush, Kiggundu & Moorosi,. 2011). ... they necessarily lead to reforms as the outcomes- ... privileged ought to share in the promise of ..... justice remains a challenge. ... who needed to work together and take care of one.

  17. Social justice and the formal principle of freedom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Olga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to show, contra the right-libertarian critique of social justice, that there are good reasons for defending policies of social justice within a free society. In the first part of the paper, we will present two influential right-libertarian critiques of social justice, found in Friedrich Hayek’s Law, Legislation and Liberty and Robert Nozick’s Anarchy, State and Utopia. Based on their approach, policies of social justice are seen as an unjustified infringement on freedoms of individual members of a society. In response to this critique, we will introduce the distincion between formal and factual freedom and argue that the formal principle of freedom defended by Hayek and Nozick does not suffice for the protection of factual freedom of members of a society, because it does not recognize (1 the moral obligation to help those who, without their fault, lack factual freedom to a significant degree, and (2 the legal obligation of the state to protect civic dignity of all members of a society. In the second part of the paper, we offer an interpretation of Kant’s argument on taxation, according to which civic dignity presupposes factual freedom, in order to argue that Kant’s justification of taxation offers good reasons for claiming that the state has the legal obligation to protect factual freedom via the policies of social justice.

  18. Auditing Inequity: Teaching Aspiring Administrators to Be Social Justice Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Frank; Marshall, Joanne

    2017-01-01

    While much has been written about preparing educational leaders to lead for social justice, much less has been written about how to do so. This study is one of the first to analyze the reflections and written assignments of aspiring administrators to determine what they are currently thinking about poverty, race/ethnicity, and social justice…

  19. Social Justice in Music Education: The Problematic of Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    While social justice concerns of feminist research in music education have been mostly ignored or rejected by the profession, democracy based on paternalist Enlightenment concepts of humanism and liberalism is generally understood and accepted with little or no consideration of its social and economic implications. More nuanced accounts refer to…

  20. Failing to Fulfill Tasks of Social Justice Weakens Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    USA Today, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Presents excerpts from an interview with Walter Mondale in which the former vice president expressed fears that the United States will be weakened by current policies of removing government from the tasks of social justice. Topics discussed include social security cuts, reduction of student loans, and elimination of the legal aid program. (DB)

  1. Social Justice and Spirituality: Educating for a Complicated Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Leona M.; Cameron, Paula

    2016-01-01

    This chapter proposes a spiritually relevant and social justice pedagogy that assists learners in making the transition to the workplace. Key elements of this spirituality include religion, cultural diversity, identity, health, and social class. Pedagogical strategies for infusing this spirituality in the curriculum are given.

  2. Judging children's participatory parity from social justice and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article proposes a model for judging children's participatory parity in different social spaces. The notion of participatory parity originates in Nancy Fraser's normative theory for social justice, where it concerns the participatory status of adults. What, then, constitutes participatory parity for children? How should we judge ...

  3. Urban land acquisition and social justice in Ethiopia | Mengie ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, the author argues that the existing urban land acquisition system of Ethiopia has resulted in social injustice by denying the poor from access to urban land; and creating discriminatory environment while enforcing the new lease system. Keywords: access to land, land lease, social justice, tenure security, urban ...

  4. A Pilot Study of a Criminal Justice Service-Learning Course: The Value of a Multicultural Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschinger-Blank, Nancy; Simons, Lori; Finley, Laura; Clearly, Joseph; Thoerig, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a description and evaluation of a service-learning juvenile justice course designed to broaden university students' attitudes toward diversity issues. Diversity service learning integrates academic learning with community service by providing students with opportunities to learn about social disparities associated with…

  5. Understanding Poverty: Teaching Social Justice in Undergraduate Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Ann N; Cass, Cary; Cathey, Heather; Smith, Sarah L; Hurley, Shelia

    This article presents results of an exploratory qualitative study examining gains in empathy and social justice beliefs among undergraduate nursing students. As undergraduate nursing education provides the foundation for future forensic nurses, developing successful methods to increase beliefs and behaviors of social empathy and social justice among nursing students will have a beneficial effect on the specialty of forensic nursing. As such, a team of nursing researchers explored the effects of a poverty simulation on the social empathy and social justice beliefs held by undergraduate students. The research team conducted an exploratory qualitative study of student reflective journals. Using an inductive interpretive process, the researchers performed a content analysis of student responses. The researchers identified three constitutive patterns and eight supporting themes as reflected in the students' reflective journals after participation in poverty simulation sessions. This research study found that, when nursing students participate in poverty simulation experiences, they gain an increased understanding of the vulnerability and complexities of living in poverty and are motivated to both advocate for patients and become change agents. Such increases in social empathy and promotion of social justice will inevitably positively affect their future practice and inform their development as forensic nurses.

  6. Feminist Challenges to the Reframing of Equality and Social Justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siim, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Global mobility and the present economic, political and refugee crisis have resulted in political contestations and new theoretical challenges. Inspired by several European research projects, in this paper I reflect upon feminist activism and the challenges to reframing equality and social justice...... in contemporary society (see Siim & Mokre, 2013; Lazaridis et al., 2016). I first discuss intersectional relations between anti-racist activism and feminist activism in the Danish context. Then I discuss how feminist theorists can contribute to the reframing of (gender) equality and social justice in contemporary...... for a transnational approach to social justice, premised on redistribution, recognition and participatory parity. I argue that both need to be adapted in order to contribute to an understanding of the feminist challenges in the particular Nordic contexts....

  7. Digital story telling in social justice nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Raeann G

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and evaluate how digital stories integrated into public health nursing education can teach social justice concepts essential for nurse leadership. Four digital stories were selected and incorporated into a public health nursing course. Students were asked to reflect on these stories. A retrospective qualitative analysis was completed on the student narrative reflections and analyzed for themes. A total of 108 narrative reflections of public health nursing students were included from 2015 to 2016. Themes were identified based on analysis and include-Encountering Vulnerability, Questioning Systems and Choosing Moral Courage. Digital stories offer an innovative medium to convey the importance of story, advance social justice as an essential practice of nursing, and create opportunities that addresses social justice in nursing and in developing nursing leaders. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Income, Wealth and Health Inequalities - A Scottish Social Justice Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molony, Elspeth; Duncan, Christine

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers health inequalities through a social justice perspective. The authors draw on a variety of existing sources of evidence, including experiential, scientific and contextual knowledge. The authors work with NHS Health Scotland, a national Health Board working to reduce health inequalities and improve health. Working closely with the Scottish Government and with a variety of stakeholders across different sectors, NHS Health Scotland's vision for a fairer, healthier Scotland is founded on the principles of social justice. The paper takes social justice as the starting point and explores what it means for two interlinked paradigms of social injustice-health inequality and income inequality. Utilising the wealth of evidence synthesised by NHS Health Scotland as well as drawing on the writings and evidence of philosophers, epidemiologists, the Scottish Government and international bodies, the authors explore the links between income and wealth inequality, social justice, the right to health and health inequalities. The paper ends by considering the extent to which there is appetite for social change in Scotland by considering the attitudes of the people of Scotland and of Britain to poverty, inequality and welfare.

  9. Exploring Challenges Faced by Students as they Transition to Social Justice Work in the “Real World”: Implications for Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Richards-Schuster

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available For students who are actively engaged in social justice efforts on their college/university campuses, the transition from a relatively easy platform for engagement to the “real world” can pose significant challenges and create new realities for negotiation. Little is known, however, about the nature of these transitions into post-graduate social justice experiences. Drawing on an open-ended survey of recent graduates (92 respondents, 50% response rate from a social justice minor in a school of social work, we explore the ways in which respondents described their transitions into social justice work, focusing on a set of key challenges that emerged from our analysis and reflecting on the implications of these challenges for social work practice and future research. Understanding some of the challenges in making this transition will help social work and non-profit administrators to better support this population’s future volunteer, service, and employment needs.

  10. 28 CFR 20.35 - Criminal Justice Information Services Advisory Policy Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criminal Justice Information Services Advisory Policy Board. 20.35 Section 20.35 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE..., concept, and operational principles of various criminal justice information systems managed by the FBI's...

  11. When Push Comes to Love: Partnership and Social Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Frimoth

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite major accomplishments of the modern era, the protection of women, children, and the environment remain vulnerable. In response, there has been increasing growth of social justice protests that use social media to express the need for social change. This article provides a discussion of the rise of several social movements and their attempts to address issues of injustice, particularly focusing on sexual violence and environmental destruction. The increased use of social media prompted a global response, within the context of popular culture, which was then followed by mainstream news coverage of the protests. This technological shift in news sharing promoted increased awareness about issues of sexual violence and environmental destruction. The lasting impact, however, is unknown. Yet there may be links between current social justice movements and Riane Eisler’s Cultural Transformation Theory that could foster social change. This article formulates a more direct connection between social movements and Eisler’s Cultural Transformation Theory in a manner that intentionally urges progressive social justice groups to understand and move toward partnership in general, and specifically toward a cultural transformation that protects the environment and eliminates violence against women and children. 

  12. Social Justice and Lesbian Feminism: Two Theories Applied to Homophobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise L. Levy

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Trends in contemporary social work include the use of an eclectic theory base. In an effort to incorporate multiple theories, this article will examine the social problem of homophobia using two different theoretical perspectives: John Rawls’ theory of social justice and lesbian feminist theory.Homophobia, a current social problem, can be defined as “dislike or hatred toward homosexuals, including both cultural and personal biases against homosexuals” (Sullivan, 2003, p. 2. Rawls’ theory of justice and lesbian feminist theory are especially relevant to the issue of homophobia and provide a useful lens to understanding this social problem. In this article, these two theories will be summarized, applied to the issue of homophobia, and compared and contrasted based on their utility.

  13. Extending the Ally Model of Social Justice to Social Work Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Priscilla Ann

    2014-01-01

    Social work students, regardless of their multiple social identities in oppressed and oppressor groups, are called upon to take action against social injustice. This conceptual article introduces the Ally Model of social justice and its alignment with social work values and goals and recommends it to social work educators as a pedagogical tool to…

  14. Diversity in midwifery care: working toward social justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Nadya; Ariss, Rachel

    2014-08-01

    As midwifery moved from lay practice to a regulated health-care profession in Ontario toward the end of the twentieth century, it brought with it many of its social movement goals and aspirations. Among these was the desire to attend to diversity and equity in the provision of birthing care. Drawing on interviews with currently practicing Ontario midwives, this paper focuses on midwives' conceptualizations of diversity and explores their everyday work to support and strengthen diversity among those using and those providing midwifery care. We argue that midwifery's recent relocation within state structured health care means neither that the social change projects of midwifery are complete nor that midwifery has abandoned its movement-based commitment to social change. Responses to social diversity in health care range from efforts to simply improve access to care to analyses of the role of social justice in recognizing the needs of diverse populations. The social justice aspiration to "create a better world" continues to animate the work of midwives postregulation. This paper explores the legacy of midwifery as a social movement, addressing the connections between diversity, social justice and midwifery care.

  15. Book Reviews: Social justice and neoliberalism | Vally | New ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Social justice and neoliberalism - Global perspectives. Adriaan Smith, Alison Stenning, Kate Willis (Eds). Zed Books: London and New York. 2008, 253 pp. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL.

  16. Social Justice, Civil Society and the Dramatist in Democratic Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigeria as a democratic nation-state is ailing. One of the consequences of this ailment is the cascading standard of social justice in the country. Instead of correcting the trend, the leaders continue to rationalize every action taken by government and describe Nigeria's democracy as being unique to the cultural environment, ...

  17. Teachers' Perception of Social Justice in Mathematics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthi, Ram Krishna; Luitel, Bal Chandra; Belbase, Shashidhar

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore mathematics teachers' perception of social justice in mathematics classrooms. We applied interpretive qualitative method for data collection, analysis, and interpretation through iterative process. We administered in-depth semi-structured interviews to capture the perceptions of three mathematics teachers…

  18. Kinship Structures and Social Justice in Sub-Saharan Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A major obstacle to the development of sustainable democratic systems of government in contemporary sub-Saharan African states is the difficulty in articulating an adequate conception of social justice to serve as a guiding principle in these polities. This difficulty is a consequence of the ethnically heterogeneous character ...

  19. Creativity, Social Justice and Human Rights within Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Susannah

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the author describes philosophical concepts of adult learning and their application as integrated with creative problem solving within the context of social justice and human rights. The context is framed by the work of the United Nations (1992) which emphasizes importance of women's roles and creativity in the process of forming a…

  20. Building Social Justice among Academic Staffs of Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR Nneka

    Institutions, the Influence of Acculturation, Networking and. School Management .... research on predictors of social justice building among teachers, and how it is related ... Acculturation theory has historically focused on individual and group ... behaviors are used to build and maintain informal contacts that enhance career.

  1. Social Justice Activism: Feminism and Strategies for Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernflores, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Success in social justice activism often hinges on judging when to employ the most effective strategy for action. Strategies for action include militancy, peaceful protest, and sometimes, engaging in a longer term program of "marginal gains." The militant feminism of many 19th century suffragettes, such as Emmeline Pankhurst, is a good…

  2. Teaching social justice using a pedagogy of engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belknap, Ruth Ann

    2008-01-01

    Teaching an undergraduate level diversity course with a health focus requires specific teaching methods. A pedagogy of engagement provides an effective strategy for exploring issues of race, class, gender, and structural inequalities that underlie health disparities. Engagement learning enhances understanding of theories of oppression and liberation presented in the course and highlights social justice issues.

  3. Multiculturalism and Social Justice: Two Sides of the Same Coin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratts, Manivong J.

    2011-01-01

    The development of multicultural and advocacy competencies evolved out of the multicultural and social justice movements. To help readers more fully understand the complementary nature between these 2 sets of competencies and to connect both movements, this article introduces the Multicultural and Advocacy Dimensions model. Implications are also…

  4. Politics without "Brainwashing": A Philosophical Defence of Social Justice Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialystok, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Social justice education (SJE) is a ubiquitous, if inconsistently defined, component of contemporary education theory and practice. Recently, SJE has come under fire for being politically biased and even "brainwashing" children in the public education system. In a liberal democracy such as our own, it is important that state-sponsored…

  5. Migration, Gender and Social Justice : Connecting Research and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Migration, Gender and Social Justice : Connecting Research and Practice Networks. Gender equality in migration as a policy objective requires an understanding of the ... Claiming migrants' rights in Costa Rica through constitutional law. Dossiers. Protecting rights and reducing stigma against Vietnamese women married ...

  6. An Analysis of Social Justice Research in School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybill, Emily; Baker, Courtney N.; Cloth, Allison H.; Fisher, Sycarah; Nastasi, Bonnie K.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the current content analysis was to build upon previous empirical research both within school psychology and in other subdisciplines of psychology to refine the operationalized definition of social justice within school psychology research. Operationalizing the definition and substantiating it within the empirical literature is a…

  7. Critical emancipatory research for social justice and democratic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article proposes a research paradigm located within the respectful relationship between participants and researcher(s) towards construction of positive holding, interactions and invitational environments which privilege social justice. I outline power as expressed at the heart of any form of human society through ...

  8. Justice in Indonesia: The Social Life of a Momentous Concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, L.G.H.; Timmer, J.

    2014-01-01

    In this article we argue that efforts in Indonesia to improve access to justice for the disadvantaged would greatly benefit from a pragmatic approach that takes local circumstances of custom, values and social relations into account at least as much as legal reform and bureaucratic transparency. We

  9. Justice in Indonesia: the social life of a momentous concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, L.; Timmer, J.

    2014-01-01

    In this article we argue that efforts in Indonesia to improve access to justice for the disadvantaged would greatly benefit from a pragmatic approach that takes local circumstances of custom, values and social relations into account at least as much as legal reform and bureaucratic transparency. We

  10. University access for social justice: a capabilities perspective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    University access for social justice: a capabilities perspective. M Wilson-Strydom. Abstract. The closely related, but often contradictory, issues of increasing access to university and improving students' chances of success in their university studies have been and continue to be an important research focus within higher ...

  11. School Leadership for Dual Language Education: A Social Justice Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMatthews, David; Izquierdo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    This article examines how a dual language program can be developed within the framework of social justice leadership. The authors analyzed principal, teacher, and parent interview transcripts as well as field notes and key documents to understand the role of school leadership in creating inclusive dual language programs to close the Latina/o-White…

  12. Promoting Moral Growth through Pluralism and Social Justice Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Dafina Lazarus

    2012-01-01

    Issues of morality, including deciding among competing values and negotiating obligations to self and community, are pervasive and saturate many aspects of life. This article explores the role of educating for pluralism and social justice in promoting moral growth among college students. James Rest's four-component model of moral maturity frames…

  13. Social justice and research using human biological material: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Social justice and research using human biological material: A response to Mahomed, Nöthling-Slabbert and Pepper. ... South African Medical Journal ... In a recent article, Mahomed, Nöthling-Slabbert and Pepper proposed that research participants should be entitled to share in the profits emanating from such research ...

  14. Social justice and disability policy in Southern Africa | Mugumbate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Social justice means different things to different people. This has resulted in diverse meanings and interpretations despite some commonalities, such as a focus on marginalised groups including women, people living in rural areas, persons with disabilities, children, racial minorities, and refugees, among others. In Nancy ...

  15. Migration, Gender and Social Justice : Connecting Research and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Migration, Gender and Social Justice : Connecting Research and Practice Networks. Gender equality in migration as a policy objective requires an understanding of the intersections between different power structures (gender, class, ethnicity and age) and how they produce different experiences with regard to identity ...

  16. Feminist Social Justice Orientation: An Indicator of Optimal Functioning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Bonnie

    2012-01-01

    This article underscores several themes evident in Yoder, Snell, and Tobias's research; these include the conceptualization of feminism and social justice as inextricably linked, the conceptualization and operationalization of optimal functioning at intrapersonal, interpersonal, and collective levels, and potential connections and disconnections…

  17. Industrial Wind Turbine Development and Loss of Social Justice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, Carmen M. E.

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the loss of social justice reported by individuals living in the environs of industrial wind turbines (IWTs). References indicate that some individuals residing in proximity to IWT facilities experience adverse health effects. These adverse health effects are severe enough that some families have abandoned their homes.…

  18. Cosmopolitanism, Global Social Justice and Gender Equality in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterhalter, Elaine

    2008-01-01

    This article attempts to locate approaches to understanding gender, education and notions of the international within debates on global social justice and cosmopolitanism. It looks at the work of three feminist scholars (Martha Nussbaum, Onora O'Neill and Iris Young) on this theme, draws out some ways in which they engage critiques of…

  19. Moving Social Justice: Challenges, Fears and Possibilities in Dance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risner, Doug; Stinson, Susan W.

    2010-01-01

    This essay explores social justice commitments in dance pedagogy and dance education teacher preparation in the USA as developed through a series of conversations between two dance educators and former administrators in higher education. The authors examine the history of multiculturalism, multicultural practices in postsecondary dance, their…

  20. Intersectionality and Social Space: Educational Justice in Deprived Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremm, Nina; Racherbäumer, Kathrin

    2018-01-01

    Drawing upon a broad concept of inclusion, the first section of this article is dedicated to a critical discussion of the principle of "equal opportunities," which currently dominates the social justice discourse in Germany. Specifically, this section examines how far this principle, which focuses on the role of the individual in…

  1. Fostering Authentic Problem Seeking: A Step toward Social Justice Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce-Davis, Micah N.; Gilson, Cindy M.; Matthews, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Because of these learners' potential as future leaders, it is imperative that educators develop gifted students' ability to identify and solve complex social justice problems. Nourishing students' affective traits, including empathy for others, understanding of themselves, and the ability to connect to others in local and global society, will help…

  2. Teaching for social justice education: the intersection between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In line with national policy requirements, educators are increasingly addressing forms of social justice education by focusing on classroom pedagogies and educational practices to combat different forms of oppression such as racism and sexism. As all educators have a role to play in dismantling oppression and generating ...

  3. The School Counselor in Israel: An Agent of Social Justice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhard, Rachel Lea; Sinai, Mirit

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, leaders in the school counseling profession worldwide have been calling on their colleagues to re-examine their role as "agents of social justice" in schools, with a view to promoting equal educational opportunities for all students. This research examines counselors' perceptions of the role, role behaviors, personal…

  4. Sexual Violence through a Social Justice Paradigm: Framing and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Luoluo; Marine, Susan B.

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter, we explore the factors that support the occurrence of sexual violence, including the role of interlocking systems of oppression. Traditional conceptions of "prevention" are deconstructed, a social justice paradigm for addressing sexual violence is advanced, and examples of how the paradigm can be applied to practice are…

  5. Ageism and Gender among Social Work and Criminal Justice Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Michael N.

    2006-01-01

    Undergraduate social work and criminal justice students completed 1 of 4 vignettes that were identical with the exception of the age and gender of the vignette's subject. In each vignette, the subject interacted with an opposite-sex 24-year-old waiter or waitress. Following each vignette, respondents answered 20 items relating to the age, gender,…

  6. "Flipping the Coin": Models for Social Justice in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Tony

    1998-01-01

    Offers a rationale for developing a theory of social justice to support educational research. Using the work of John Rawls and others, explores injustices present within schools and classrooms observable through experiences of powerlessness, violence, exploitation, marginalization, and cultural imperialism. Calls for a transformational focus for…

  7. Social Justice and Education in the Public and Private Spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Sally; Taylor, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the complex relationship between social justice and education in the public and private spheres. The politics of education is often presented as a battle between left and right, the state and the market. In this representation, the public and the private spheres are neatly aligned on either side of the line of battle, and…

  8. Walking in Beauty: An American Indian Perspective on Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Evan Allen; Robbins, Rockey

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce "walking in beauty," an American Indian spiritual perspective related to social justice that emphasizes beauty, harmony, connectedness/unity of experience, and imagination. Walking in beauty includes 3 processes: embodiment, creativity, and appreciation of the sublime. Recommendations are offered for…

  9. Social justice considerations in neonatal care for nurse managers and executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Linda; Walden, Marlene; Verklan, M Terese

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the struggle between social justice and market justice within the current health care system, specifically issues affecting neonatal care. Community benefit is described and discussed as an aspect of social justice demonstrated by hospitals. The federal and state Children's Health Insurance Program also is discussed in relation to social justice and health care costs. Implications for managers and executives overseeing neonatal care are presented in relation to the economic and social issues.

  10. Promoting Social Change through Service-Learning in the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Glenn A.

    2014-01-01

    Service-learning is a high-impact pedagogical strategy embraced by higher education institutions. Direct service based on a charity paradigm tends to be the norm, while little attention is paid to social change-oriented service. This article offers suggestions for incorporating social justice education into courses designed to promote social…

  11. Student Empowerment in an Environmental Science Classroom: Toward a Framework for Social Justice Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimick, Alexandra Schindel

    2012-01-01

    Social justice education is undertheorized in science education. Given the wide range of goals and purposes proposed within both social justice education and social justice science education scholarship, these fields require reconciliation. In this paper, I suggest a student empowerment framework for conceptualizing teaching and learning social…

  12. Problematizing Social Justice in Health Pedagogy and Youth Sport: Intersectionality of Race, Ethnicity, and Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagkas, Symeon

    2016-01-01

    Social justice education recognizes the discrepancies in opportunities among disadvantaged groups in society. The purpose of the articles in this special topic on social justice is to (a) provide a critical reflection on issues of social justice within health pedagogy and youth sport of Black and ethnic-minority (BME) young people; (b) provide a…

  13. Social Justice in Outdoor Experiential Education: A State of Knowledge Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Karen; Roberts, Nina S.; Breunig, Mary; Alvarez, M. Antonio G.

    2014-01-01

    Outdoor experiential education has often been critiqued for its White, male, middle/upper-class, able-bodied history, thereby causing professionals and programs to consider issues of social justice. This state of knowledge paper will review the literature on social and environmental justice, identify gaps in current social justice literature and…

  14. Integrating Social Justice across the Curriculum: The Catholic Mission and Counselor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calley, Nancy G.; Pickover, Sheri; Bennett-Garraway, Jocelyn M.; Hendry, Simon J.; Garraway, Garbette M.

    2011-01-01

    Counselor education and the Catholic faith share an important core value: social justice. As a counselor education program within a Jesuit and Sisters of Mercy institution, the construct of social justice is a unifying value that is rooted in academic preparation and practice. To promote a lifestyle of social justice, the counselor education…

  15. University Access and Theories of Social Justice: Contributions of the Capabilities Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Strydom, Merridy

    2015-01-01

    Issues of social justice in higher education together with a focus on access or widening participation have become of increasing importance globally. Given the complex theoretical terrain of social justice and the tensions inherent in applying social justice frameworks within higher education, and particularly in the area of access, this paper…

  16. Community College Students with Criminal Justice Histories and Human Services Education: Glass Ceiling, Brick Wall, or a Pathway to Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Lisa Hale

    2015-01-01

    In spite of open access to community college education, specifically human service associate degree programs, students with criminal justice histories do not necessarily have an unobstructed pathway to obtaining the degree and admission to the baccalaureate programs in human services and social work that are almost always selective. The first…

  17. Enacting Social Justice Ethically: Individual and Communal Habits. A Response to "Ethics in Teaching for Democracy and Social Justice"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunzenhauser, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    In response to Hytten's provocative opening of a conversation about an ethics for activist teaching, in this essay I address three interesting contributions that Hytten made. First, I explore the significance of the imagined ethical subject in Hytten's example and in many prior authors' work on ethics in social justice teaching. Expanding the…

  18. Enhancing John Rawls's Theory of Justice to Cover Health and Social Determinants of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekci, Perihan Elif; Arda, Berna

    2015-11-01

    The vast improvements in medical technology reviled the crucial role of social determinants of health for the etiology, prevalence and prognosis of diseases. This changed the content of the right to health concept from a demand of health services, to a claim of having access to all social determinants of health. Thus, the just allocation of scarce resources of health and social determinants of health became an issue of ethical theories. John Rawls developed a theory of justice. His theory suggests that the principles of justice should be determined by individuals in a hypothetic initial position. In the initial position, individuals agree on principles of justice. Rawls puts forth that the institutions of the society should be structured in compliance with these principles to reach a fair social system. Although Rawls did not justify right to health in his theory, the efforts to enlarge the theory to cover right to health flourished quite fast. In this paper first the basic components of Rawls theory is explained. Then the most outstanding approaches to enlarge his theory to cover right to health is introduced and discussed within the discourse of Rawls theory of justice.

  19. Inequality and Procedural Justice in Social Dilemmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aksoy, Ozan; Weesie, Jeroen

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of resource inequality and the fairness of the allocation procedure of unequal resources on cooperative behavior in social dilemmas. We propose a simple formal behavioral model that incorporates conflicting selfish and social motivations. This model allows us to

  20. Social Justice Attitudes and Concerns for Labor Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Schulz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study utilizes an adapted version of the Social Justice Scale to capture and assess the extent to which social-justice-related values and attitudes toward labor standards relate to consumer intentions and behaviors. This social cognitive model assesses, based on Ajzen’s theory of planned behavior, how “perceived behavior control” affects these behaviors either directly or indirectly through consumers’ intentions. It is hypothesized that individuals who value fairness and equity in social interactions are going to be more likely to engage with businesses that are known for ethical business practices and abstain from firms that are known to violate labor rights. The results confirm that consumers who are concerned with social justice are less likely to conduct business with enterprises that have the reputation of violating both human rights and labor rights. However, the results also reveal that consumers with low levels of “perceived behavioral control” justify their consumer behaviors as they do not think that they can make a difference.

  1. Social justice and religious participation: a qualitative investigation of Christian perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Nathan R; Rufa, Anne K

    2013-06-01

    This investigation examines how self-identified Christians in the Midwest U.S. understand and work for social justice, with a focus on their process of social justice development and the role of religious congregations in promoting social justice. Using a grounded theory analysis of 15 in-depth interviews, results indicated multiple understandings of social justice such as meeting basic needs, fixing social structures and systems to create equal distributions of resources, promoting human rights and dignity, and as a religious responsibility. Participants also described a process of social justice development facilitated by exposure to injustice, mentors, educating others, and the importance of finding a social justice community. Distinct personal barriers to social justice engagement were identified such as resources and negative emotions, whereas congregational leadership was important for congregational involvement. General frustration with congregations was expressed regarding low social justice engagement; however, participants balanced this frustration with hope for the positive potential of congregations to promote social justice. Together these findings show multifaceted understandings of social justice and a dynamic process of social justice development for these self-identified Christians. Implications for future research and partnership with religious individuals and congregations also are discussed.

  2. Social justice, epidemiology and health inequalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmot, Michael

    2017-07-01

    A lifetime spent studying how social determinants of health lead to health inequalities has clarified many issues. First is that social stratification is an appropriate topic of study for epidemiologists. To ignore it would be to ignore a major source of variation in health in society. Not only is the social gradient in health appropriate to study but we have made progress both in understanding its causes and what can be done to address them. Post-modern 'critical theory' raises questions about the social construction of science. Given the attack on science by politicians of bad faith, it is important to recognise that epidemiology and public health have a crucial role to play in providing evidence to improve health of society and reduce inequalities. Evidence gives grounds for optimism that progress can be made both in improving the health of the worst-off in society and narrowing health inequalities. Theoretical debates about 'inequality of what' have been helpful in clarifying theories that drive further gathering of evidence. While it is important to consider alternative explanations of the social gradient in health-principal among them reverse causation-evidence strongly supports social causation. Social action is by its nature political. It is, though, a vital function to provide the evidence that underpins action.

  3. University Students' Perceptions of Social Justice: The Impact of Implementing a Summer Camp for Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, Ruth E.; Grant, Christina E.; Rye, Lindsay; Bassette, Laura A.; Stuve, Matt; Heneisen, Ryan

    2018-01-01

    University students who experience real-world service tend to develop a more inclusive world view and enhanced understandings outside of their personal perspectives. This project combined course objectives, community collaboration, and service provision to identify the impact of students' understanding of social justice and disability access…

  4. Emotions and Positional Identity in Becoming a Social Justice Science Teacher: Nicole's Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera Maulucci, Maria S.

    2013-01-01

    Becoming a social justice teacher, for high-poverty urban settings, is fraught with emotional ambivalence related to personal, professional, relational, political, and cultural social justice issues. Prospective teachers must navigate their sense of justice, grapple with issues of educational disparity, engage with theories of critical,…

  5. Exploring the benefits of intersectional feminist social justice approaches in art psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, T.; Wright, K.

    2017-01-01

    This paper charts a research and knowledge exchange project between a university and group of art psychotherapists who came together in a project aimed at better understanding the benefits of critical feminist social justice approaches to art psychotherapy. It outlines the impact of the partnership for art psychotherapy practice, practitioners’ continued professional development and patients’/ service users’ benefit. Drawing on knowledges of critical feminisms held within the university and a...

  6. A Bourdieuian Analysis of Teachers' Changing Dispositions towards Social Justice: The Limitations of Practicum Placements in Pre-Service Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    As populations in contemporary Western societies grow increasingly diverse, preparing predominantly White middle-class pre-service teachers to better understand and work with difference productively has become increasingly critical. Historically, however, teacher education programs have aimed to address diversity with add-on or piecemeal…

  7. Communication, Social Justice, and Joyful Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnett, Stephen John

    2010-01-01

    Combining an overview of the history of communication scholarship with lessons learned from 20 years of experience as a prison abolitionist and peace activist, Hartnett argues that the discipline of communication can be enriched intellectually and made more politically relevant by turning our efforts toward community service, problem-based…

  8. Gender, Social Support, and Depression in Criminal Justice Involved Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Jennifer E.; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Miranda, Robert; Rizzo, Christie J.; Justus, Alicia N.; Clum, George

    2010-01-01

    Knowing where criminal justice involved teens look for support and whether those supports reduce depression has important and possibly gender-specific treatment implications for this vulnerable population. This study examines the relationships between social support and depression in a mixed-gender sample of 198 incarcerated adolescents. Greater support from families and overall and greater satisfaction with supports predicted lower depression for boys and girls. Support from siblings and ext...

  9. What Do We Owe the Poles (or the Greeks)? Three Emerging Duties of Transnational Social Justice in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crum, B.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper argues for a conception of social justice that operates beyond the nation-state but does so as an extra layer upon national conceptions of social justice. Thus, in the view transnational duties of social justice are complementary to national conceptions of social justice by, on the one

  10. Social Justice Education in an Urban Charter Montessori School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira Banks

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As the Montessori Method continues its expansion in public education, a social justice lens is needed to analyze its contributions and limitations, given the increase in racial and socioeconomic diversity in the United States. Furthermore, much of the work in Social Justice Education (SJE focuses on classroom techniques and curriculum, overlooking the essential work of school administrators and parents, whose work significantly influences the school community. The current study applied an SJE framework to the efforts of one urban, socioeconomically and racially integrated Montessori charter school. We examined the extent to which SJE principles were incorporated across the school community, using an inductive, qualitative, case-study approach that included meetings, surveys, focus groups, and interviews. Administrators quickly adopted a system-wide approach, but parents—often color-blind or minimizing of the relevance of race—consistently resisted. Study results imply a continued need for an institutional approach, not solely a classroom or curricular focus, when integrating social justice into Montessori schools.

  11. Social inclusion policy: Producing justice or retribution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kym Macfarlane

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The notion of social inclusion has currently gained extraordinary credence in Australia. Policy incorporating social inclusion abounds across all discipline areas with the federal government for the first time instituting a government portfolio for this area, headed by the Deputy Prime Minister. Such a move indicates the importance of managing aspects of inclusion across all sectors, in a country where diversity abounds. However, this focus on inclusion can prove highly problematic, when it becomes such an integral part of policy formulation and of the assumptions, omissions and contradictions that policy produces. This paper examines how policy discourse produces ways of thinking about inclusion/exclusion. Using three vignettes, the author applies the theories of Michel Foucault to argue that the discursive production of such inclusive policy works to simultaneously exclude by categorising particular types of individuals and families as “proper” participants in society. The author contends that understandings of propriety relating to the inclusion/exclusion binary reinscribe each other, in ways that situate particular citizens outside of possibilities for “success” in social and systemic participation. Such understanding is highlighted by a conceptual examination of the ways in which discursively produced notions of propriety become normalised. Keywords: bricolage, discourse, authorised knowledge, imperative discourse, regimes of truth

  12. Reentry Program and Social Work Education: Training the Next Generation of Criminal Justice Social Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Nancy D; Treglia, Dan; Cnaan, Ram A

    2017-01-01

    Social work plays a marginal role in opposing the trend of mass incarceration and high rates of recidivism, and social work education offers limited opportunities for students to specialize in working with people who are currently or were previously incarcerated. How to train students of social work to work against mass-incarceration is still challenging. The authors devised and implemented an in-school social service agency devoted to working with people pre and post release from a prison system. The agency is a field practicum setting where interested students study and practice reentry work. In this article, the authors describe and assess the educational merit of this in-school agency. Findings from surveys of students and alumni suggest that the program attained its educational goals of connecting classroom education to practice experience and training students for careers in the criminal justice system. The authors also discuss pending challenges. The experience of the Goldring Reentry Initiative suggests that by developing their own social work agencies, the authors may be able to heighten their students educational experience and expand their contribution to social work practice broadly.

  13. Empowerment and Social Support: Implications for Practice and Programming among Minority Women with Substance Abuse and Criminal Justice Histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, Alexandra; Hunter, Bronwyn A.; Salina, Doreen; Jason, Leonard A.

    2016-01-01

    Programs for women with substance abuse and criminal justice histories often incorporate empowerment and social support into service delivery systems. Women’s empowerment research has focused on the relationship between women’s personal identities and the larger sociopolitical context, with an emphasis on how community based resources are critical for promoting well-being. Social support often protects against negative outcomes for individuals who live with chronic stress. However, few studies have evaluated community resource knowledge and empowerment among marginalized women or how social support might strengthen or weaken this relationship. This study investigated resource knowledge, social support and empowerment among 200 minority women in substance abuse recovery who had recent criminal justice involvement. Results indicated that resource knowledge was related to empowerment and belonging social support marginally moderated this relationship. In addition, education level increased and current involvement in the criminal justice system decreased empowerment. Implications for research, practice and policy are discussed. PMID:27084362

  14. Social Justice as a Lens for Understanding Workplace Mistreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffa, Christine; Longo, Joy

    2016-01-01

    Workplace mistreatment can be viewed as a social injustice that prohibits one from achieving optimal well-being. Cognitive and interpersonal skills required of nurses can be impacted by workplace mistreatment, thus extending injustices by violating the rights of patients to optimal care. The purpose of this article is to view workplace mistreatment through the lens of Powers and Faden's theory of social justice. Workplace mistreatment is explored through the 6 dimensions of well-being, including health, personal security, reasoning, respect, attachment, and self-determination, identified in the theory. The implications for practice and policy are discussed and recommendations for research made.

  15. Medical education for social justice: Paulo Freire revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DasGupta, Sayantani; Fornari, Alice; Geer, Kamini; Hahn, Louisa; Kumar, Vanita; Lee, Hyun Joon; Rubin, Susan; Gold, Marji

    2006-01-01

    Although social justice is an integral component of medical professionalism, there is little discussion in medical education about how to teach it to future physicians. Using adult learning theory and the work of Brazilian educator Paulo Freire, medical educators can teach a socially-conscious professionalism through educational content and teaching strategies. Such teaching can model non-hierarchical relationships to learners, which can translate to their clinical interactions with patients. Freirian teaching can additionally foster professionalism in both teachers and learners by ensuring that they are involved citizens in their local, national and international communities.

  16. Narratives of social justice: learning in innovative clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer Kirkham, Sheryl; Van Hofwegen, Lynn; Hoe Harwood, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The nursing profession has renewed its commitment to social and political mandates, resulting in increasing attention to issues pertaining to diversity, vulnerable populations, social determinants of health, advocacy and activism, and social justice in nursing curricula. Narratives from a qualitative study examining undergraduate nursing student learning in five innovative clinical settings (corrections, international, parish, rural, and aboriginal) resonate with these curricular emphases. Data were derived from focus groups and interviews with 65 undergraduate nursing students, clinical instructors, and RN mentors. Findings of this study reveal how students in innovative clinical placements bear witness to poverty, inequities, and marginalization (critical awareness), often resulting in dissonance and soul-searching (critical engagement), and a renewed commitment to social transformation (social change). These findings suggest the potential for transformative learning in these settings.

  17. Pedagogy and Diversity: Enrichment and Support for Social Work Instructors Engaged in Social Justice Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garran, Ann Marie; Kang, Hye-Kyung; Fraser, Edith

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of faculty development is to create and sustain a culture of teaching excellence. For social work faculty, an important part of teaching excellence involves incorporating core social work values such as social justice and diversity across the curriculum and developing pedagogical skills and strategies to teach these issues…

  18. Beyond Diversity and Inclusion: Creating a Social Justice Agenda in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Justin E.; Fulambarker, Anjali

    2018-01-01

    A social justice classroom agenda relies on the ability of educators to create a space free from microaggressions that can be strengthened through an approach of cultural humility. Utilizing Bonnycastle's social justice continuum, this article explores how to create a classroom grounded in social equality and guided by social work values to foster…

  19. Social Justice and Career Development: Views and Experiences of Australian Career Development Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Mary; Arthur, Nancy; Collins, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Career development practice had its origins in social justice reform over 100 years ago. A social justice perspective requires practitioners to examine the environmental context of their work, including the social, economic and political systems that influence people's career development. Achieving socially just outcomes for clients may…

  20. ISLAMIC SCHOOLS AND SOCIAL JUSTICE IN INDONESIA: A Student Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raihani R.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The study explores how students of two different Islamic Senior Secondary Schools in Palangkaraya, Indonesia experience school practices in regards to social justice. Employing a qualitative approach, the researcher conducted ethnographic observations of the schools’ practices and events, and interviewed more than fifty students of the two schools individually and in groups to understand their feelings and perspectives about how the schools promote social justice among them. The findings suggest that several school structures including the subject stream selection, student groupings, the emergence of the model or international classroom were found to have been sources for social injustice. Students of the Social Sciences and Language groups, of low academic performance and economically disadvantaged admitted the feeling of unfair treatment because of this structuration. Confirming the theory of social reproduction, the schools failed to provide distributive, cultural and associational justices, and reasserted further inequalities among members of society.[Artikel ini menjelaskan bagaimana siswa pada dua Sekolah Menengah Atas di Palangkaraya, Indonesia merasakan praktek pendidikan di sekolah mereka, khususnya terkait dengan masalah keadilan sosial. Melalui studi kualitatif, penulis melakukan observasi etnografis terhadap praktek pendidikan dan kegiatan sekolah serta melakukan wawancara dengan lebih dari lima puluh orang siswa, baik secara individual maupun dalam kelompok, untuk mengetahui pandangan mereka mengenai bagaimana sekolah mereka mendorong pelaksanaan prinsip keadilan sosial. Artikel ini menemukan bahwa struktur pendidikan di sekolah tersebut, seperti pengelompokan kelas berdasarkan konsentrasi jurusan, pola keberkelompokan siswa, dan munculnya kelas-kelas internasional, menyebabkan ketidakadilan sosial di dalam institusi pendidikan. Siswa kelas Ilmu Sosial dan Bahasa cenderung minim dalam pencapaian akademik, dan secara ekonomi

  1. "Frayed All Over:" the Causes and Consequences of Activist Burnout among Social Justice Education Activists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Paul C.; Chen, Cher

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing body of scholarship on burnout among social justice activists who are working on a variety of issues, from labor rights to queer justice, little attention has been paid to burnout among those whose activism focuses on issues of educational justice. To begin to address this omission and understand what supports might help social…

  2. When the Social Justice Learning Curve Isn't as Steep: How a Social Foundations Course Changed the Conversation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Beth Douthirt; Tokunaga, Tomoko; Colvin, Demetrius J.; Mac, Jacqueline; Martinez, Judith Suyen; Leets, Craig; Lee, Douglas H.

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the limits of introductory social justice education and the ways in which a social foundations course could expand and deepen the social justice lens of current and future educators. The authors, members of an introductory graduate-level Social Foundations course, discuss the limitations they realized in their previous social…

  3. A focus on educational choice has social justice consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovhus, Randi Boelskifte

    2016-01-01

    This presentation demonstrates that in Denmark there is considerable focus on educational and career choices during the last year of lower-secondary school, and investigates the possibility of using Amartya Sen?s capability approach as a lens to analyse this focus. It is argued that attention...... to the processes occurring before choices are made is of central importance, as these help to give students a genuine opportunity to choose from a broader range of options. This consideration is important from a social-justice perspective even if students end up choosing what they would have chosen without broader...

  4. Positioning of Weight Bias: Moving towards Social Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutter, Sarah; Russell-Mayhew, Shelly; Alberga, Angela S; Arthur, Nancy; Kassan, Anusha; Lund, Darren E; Sesma-Vazquez, Monica; Williams, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Weight bias is a form of stigma with detrimental effects on the health and wellness of individuals with large bodies. Researchers from various disciplines have recognized weight bias as an important topic for public health and for professional practice. To date, researchers from various areas have approached weight bias from independent perspectives and from differing theoretical orientations. In this paper, we examined the similarities and differences between three perspectives (i.e., weight-centric, non-weight-centric (health-centric), and health at every size) used to understand weight bias and approach weight bias research with regard to (a) language about people with large bodies, (b) theoretical position, (c) identified consequences of weight bias, and (d) identified influences on weight-based social inequity. We suggest that, despite differences, each perspective acknowledges the negative influences that position weight as being within individual control and the negative consequences of weight bias. We call for recognition and discussion of weight bias as a social justice issue in order to change the discourse and professional practices extended towards individuals with large bodies. We advocate for an emphasis on social justice as a uniting framework for interdisciplinary research on weight bias.

  5. Catalyzing a Reproductive Health and Social Justice Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbiest, Sarah; Malin, Christina Kiko; Drummonds, Mario; Kotelchuck, Milton

    2016-04-01

    The maternal and child health (MCH) community, partnering with women and their families, has the potential to play a critical role in advancing a new multi-sector social movement focused on creating a women's reproductive and economic justice agenda. Since the turn of the twenty-first century, the MCH field has been planting seeds for change. The time has come for this work to bear fruit as many states are facing stagnant or slow progress in reducing infant mortality, increasing maternal death rates, and growing health inequities. This paper synthesizes three current, interrelated approaches to addressing MCH challenges-life course theory, preconception health, and social justice/reproductive equity. Based on these core constructs, the authors offer four directions for advancing efforts to improve MCH outcomes. The first is to ensure access to quality health care for all. The second is to facilitate change through critical conversations about challenging issues such as poverty, racism, sexism, and immigration; the relevance of evidence-based practice in disenfranchised communities; and how we might be perpetuating inequities in our institutions. The third is to develop collaborative spaces in which leaders across diverse sectors can see their roles in creating equitable neighborhood conditions that ensure optimal reproductive choices and outcomes for women and their families. Last, the authors suggest that leaders engage the MCH workforce and its consumers in dialogue and action about local and national policies that address the social determinants of health and how these policies influence reproductive and early childhood outcomes.

  6. Social justice and the university community: does campus involvement make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliff, Kathleen E; Williams, Shannon M; Ferrari, Joseph R

    2013-01-01

    We examined perceptions on school sense of community and social justice attitudes among undergraduates (N = 427; 308 women, 115 men; M age = 19.72, SD = 1.91), and how year in school and club membership affected these constructs. Results demonstrated that involvement with a greater number of clubs was associated with having a stronger school sense of community and more positive social justice attitudes. Multiple regression analyses demonstrated that year in school did not significantly predict social justice attitudes. Results suggested that greater involvement and sense of school belonging might be linked to social justice attitudes.

  7. Rethinking Social Justice and Adult Education for Welcoming, Inclusive Communities: Synthesis of Themes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Elizabeth; Baillie Abidi, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the key themes across the articles on transnational migration, social inclusion, and adult education, using Nancy Fraser's framework of redistributive, recognitive, and representational justice.

  8. Chiropractic and social justice: a view from the perspective of Beauchamp's principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Bart N; Johnson, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Social justice in public health involves the process and product of a community acting to fairly distribute advantages and burdens to improve the health of its population and to reasonably take care of the disadvantaged. Although publications are available about chiropractic public health history, programs, and policy, the potential role of chiropractic in social justice has received little attention. This article discusses Beauchamp's 4 principles of social justice and suggests actions that the chiropractic profession may consider to participate in the practice of social justice in the field of public health. Copyright 2010 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Despite Best Intentions: A Critical Analysis of Social Justice Leadership and Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMatthews, David E.; Mungal, Angus Shiva; Carrola, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the relationship between social justice leadership and organizational decision making in order to make recommendations for how principals can make more socially just decisions in difficult school contexts. This article begins with a discussion of social justice leadership, facets and theories associated…

  10. A Principle in Search of a Practice: On Developing Guidelines/Standards To Evaluate Social Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M. Christopher, II

    The question before educators responsible for preparing the new generation of global citizens is how to translate the principles of social justice into effective practice. In school settings around the United States, educators endeavor to inform learners of the impact and import of social justice. The question remains, however, how social justice…

  11. Restorative Justice as Social Justice for Victims of Gendered Violence: A Standpoint Feminist Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wormer, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an overview of restorative justice as a process and examines its relevance to women who have been victimized by physical and sexual abuse. The starting point is the justice system with its roots in adversarial, offender-oriented practices of obtaining justice. The widespread dissatisfaction by battered women and rape victims…

  12. Leadership for Social Justice: Preparing 21st Century School Leaders for a New Social Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Marie, Gaetane; Normore, Anthony H.; Brooks, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    At the dawn of the 21st century, there has been an increased focus on social justice and educational leadership (Bogotch, Beachum, Blount, Brooks & English, 2008; Marshall & Oliva, 2006; Shoho, Merchang & Lugg, 2005). This paper explores and extends themes in contemporary educational research on leadership preparation in terms of social justice…

  13. Developmental relations between sympathy, moral emotion attributions, moral reasoning, and social justice values from childhood to early adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Ella; Dys, Sebastian P; Buchmann, Marlis; Malti, Tina

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the development of sympathy, moral emotion attributions (MEA), moral reasoning, and social justice values in a representative sample of Swiss children (N = 1273) at 6 years of age (Time 1), 9 years of age (Time 2), and 12 years of age (Time 3). Cross-lagged panel analyses revealed that sympathy predicted subsequent increases in MEA and moral reasoning, but not vice versa. In addition, sympathy and moral reasoning at 6 and 9 years of age were associated with social justice values at 12 years of age. The results point to increased integration of affect and cognition in children's morality from middle childhood to early adolescence, as well as to the role of moral development in the emergence of social justice values. Copyright © 2014 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Incorporating social justice and stigma in cost-effectiveness analysis: drug-resistant tuberculosis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwerling, A; Dowdy, D; von Delft, A; Taylor, H; Merritt, M W

    2017-11-01

    Novel therapies for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) are likely to be expensive. The cost of novel drugs (e.g., bedaquiline, delamanid) may be so prohibitively high that a traditional cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) would rate regimens containing these drugs as not cost-effective. Traditional CEA may not appropriately account for considerations of social justice, and may put the most disadvantaged populations at greater risk. Using the example of novel drug regimens for MDR-TB, we propose a novel methodology, 'justice-enhanced CEA', and demonstrate how such an approach can simultaneously assess social justice impacts alongside traditional cost-effectiveness ratios. Justice-enhanced CEA, as we envision it, is performed in three steps: 1) systematic data collection about patients' lived experiences, 2) use of empirical findings to inform social justice assessments, and 3) incorporation of data-informed social justice assessments into a decision analytic framework that includes traditional CEA. These components are organized around a core framework of social justice developed by Bailey et al. to compare impacts on disadvantage not otherwise captured by CEA. Formal social justice assessments can produce three composite levels: 'expected not to worsen…', 'may worsen…', and 'expected to worsen clustering of disadvantage'. Levels of social justice impact would be assessed for each major type of outcome under each policy scenario compared. Social justice assessments are then overlaid side-by-side with cost-effectiveness assessments corresponding to each branch pathway on the decision tree. In conclusion, we present a 'justice-enhanced' framework that enables the incorporation of social justice concerns into traditional CEA for the evaluation of new regimens for MDR-TB.

  15. Social inequality in health, responsibility and egalitarian justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Marchman; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Johansen, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    Are social inequalities in health unjust when brought about by differences in lifestyle? A widespread idea, luck egalitarianism, is that inequality stemming from individuals’ free choices is not to be considered unjust, since individuals, presumably, are themselves responsible for such choices....... Thus, to the extent that lifestyles are in fact results of free choices, social inequality in health brought about by these choices is not in tension with egalitarian justice. If this is so, then it may put in question the justification of free and equal access to health care and existing medical...... not fully establish - that at the most fundamental level people are never responsible in such a way that appeals to individuals’ own responsibility can justify inequalities in health....

  16. Social Justice and Social Order: Binding Moralities across the Political Spectrum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronnie Janoff-Bulman

    Full Text Available Two studies explored the relationship between political ideology and endorsement of a range of moral principles. Political liberals and conservatives did not differ on intrapersonal or interpersonal moralities, which require self-regulation. However differences emerged on collective moralities, which involve social regulation. Contrary to Moral Foundations Theory, both liberals and conservatives endorsed a group-focused binding morality, specifically Social Justice and Social Order respectively. Libertarians were the group without a binding morality. Although Social Justice and Social Order appear conflictual, analyses based on earlier cross-cultural work on societal tightness-looseness suggest that countries actually benefit in terms of economic success and societal well-being when these group-based moralities co-exist and serve as counterweights in social regulation.

  17. Social Justice and Social Order: Binding Moralities across the Political Spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoff-Bulman, Ronnie; Carnes, Nate C

    2016-01-01

    Two studies explored the relationship between political ideology and endorsement of a range of moral principles. Political liberals and conservatives did not differ on intrapersonal or interpersonal moralities, which require self-regulation. However differences emerged on collective moralities, which involve social regulation. Contrary to Moral Foundations Theory, both liberals and conservatives endorsed a group-focused binding morality, specifically Social Justice and Social Order respectively. Libertarians were the group without a binding morality. Although Social Justice and Social Order appear conflictual, analyses based on earlier cross-cultural work on societal tightness-looseness suggest that countries actually benefit in terms of economic success and societal well-being when these group-based moralities co-exist and serve as counterweights in social regulation.

  18. Changing organisational routines in doctoral education: an intervention to infuse social justice into a social welfare curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapiro, Valerie B.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes one effort to infuse a social justice framework into a social work doctoral education programme in a prominent research university of the United States. The “Social Justice in Doctoral Education” (SJDE Project identified Social Justice Learning Objectives (SJLOs in the categories of scholarship, teaching, and service. Doctoral students were surveyed in 2010 to determine the extent to which the SJLOs were being systematically facilitated by their doctoral programme. The forms that guide and shape the milestones of doctoral education at that institution were revised in 2011 in an attempt to create new opportunities for social justice learning. A second survey of doctoral students in 2013 resulted in two findings. First, doctoral students reported using the SJLOs to guide their education. Second, a pre/post comparison of student perceptions indicated an increase in opportunities for social justice learning through doctoral education. This case study provides preliminary support for the modification of organisational routines to expand social justice education in social work.En este artículo se describe el esfuerzo para infundir un marco de justicia social en un programa doctoral de trabajo social dentro de una universidad prominente de investigación de los Estados Unidos. El proyecto de investigación “Justicia Social en la Educación Doctoral” (SJDE identificó los Objetivos de Aprendizaje de la Justicia Social (SJLOs en una serie de categorías de la investigación científica, como la enseñanza y el servicio. Los estudiantes de doctorado respondieron a una encuesta en 2010 para determinar el grado en el que los SJLOs se facilitaban sistemáticamente en el programa de doctorado. En 2011 se revisaron los formularios que guían y dan forma a los hitos de la educación doctoral en esa institución, en un intento de crear nuevas oportunidades para la justicia social de aprendizaje. En 2013, una encuesta seguimiento a

  19. Social Justice and Counseling Psychology: Listening to the Voices of Doctoral Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anneliese A.; Hofsess, Christy D.; Boyer, Elizabeth M.; Kwong, Agnes; Lau, Allison S. M.; McLain, Melissa; Haggins, Kristee L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand counseling psychology doctoral trainees' perceptions of social justice training in their academic programs. Participants (N = 66) completed an online social justice survey with open-ended questions. Researchers identified major themes of participants' responses (e.g., promotion of social…

  20. Spirituality, Religion, Social Justice Orientation, and the Career Aspirations of Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenot, David; Kim, Hansung

    2017-01-01

    Spirituality and religion predicted the development of social justice orientation (SJO) among young adults in a previous study (Chenot & Kim, 2013). The current study explores the manner in which the effects of spirituality and religion on social justice orientation vary depending on the career aspirations of young adults. The longitudinal…

  1. Education Policy for Social Justice in Cyprus: The Role of Stakeholders' Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajisoteriou, Christina; Angelides, Panayiotis

    2014-01-01

    This article examines (a) the official policy for social justice as developed by the Ministry of Education and Culture and its policy-makers, (b) the ways in which school leaders (head teachers) and school actors (teachers) understand education policy for social justice, and (c) the impact of this process on school leaders' and actors' action or…

  2. Humanism, Feminism, and Multiculturalism: Essential Elements of Social Justice in Counseling, Education, and Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady-Amoon, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the association between and among humanism, feminism, multiculturalism, and social justice in counseling, education, and advocacy. In so doing, it shows how these theoretical forces, individually and collectively, are essential to professional counseling, client welfare, education, and the promotion of social justice. The…

  3. The Technical Communicator as Advocate: Integrating a Social Justice Approach in Technical Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Natasha N.

    2016-01-01

    This article argues for the need for a social justice approach to technical communication research and pedagogy. Given previous calls by scholars in technical and professional communication (TPC) for an attention to diversity, inclusion, and equality, the author examines the place and purpose of social justice in TPC and provides useful approaches…

  4. Measuring Practices of Teaching for Social Justice in Elementary Mathematics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan, Emilie Mitescu; Pedulla, Joseph J.; Jong, Cindy; Cannady, Mac; Cochran-Smith, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    This study used the Teaching for Social Justice Observation Scale (TSJOS) of the Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol-Plus (RTOP+) to examine the extent to which twenty-two novice elementary teachers implemented practices related to teaching for social justice in their mathematics instruction. In addition, this study sought to examine the extent…

  5. Navigating Rough Waters: A Synthesis of the Countervailing Pressures against Leading for Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theoharis, George

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a synthesis of countervailing pressures against leading for social justice as described in the literature. This synthesis focuses on the present-day countervailing pressures that school leaders face as detailed in the literature on leading for social justice. These countervailing pressures include a deficit-thinking status…

  6. Counseling psychology trainees' perceptions of training and commitments to social justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Amanda M; Spanierman, Lisa B; Greene, Jennifer C; Todd, Nathan R

    2012-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined social justice commitments of counseling psychology graduate trainees. In the quantitative portion of the study, a national sample of trainees (n = 260) completed a web-based survey assessing their commitments to social justice and related personal and training variables. Results suggested that students desired greater social justice training than what they experienced in their programs. In the qualitative portion, we used a phenomenological approach to expand and elaborate upon quantitative results. A subsample (n = 7) of trainees who identified as strong social justice activists were interviewed regarding their personal, professional, and training experiences. Eleven themes related to participants' meanings of and experiences with social justice emerged within 4 broad categories: nature of social justice, motivation for activism, role of training, and personal and professional integration. Thematic findings as well as descriptive statistics informed the selection and ordering of variables in a hierarchical regression analysis that examined predictors of social justice commitment. Results indicated that trainees' perceptions of training environment significantly predicted their social justice commitment over and above their general activist orientation and spirituality. Findings are discussed collectively, and implications for training and future research are provided. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. A Framework for Rethinking Educational Leadership in the Margins: Implications for Social Justice Leadership Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Melanie; Rodela, Katherine C.

    2018-01-01

    This article reimagines the social justice educational leadership field, highlighting the leadership of youth, parents, and community. We examine widely cited social justice educational leadership publications, in addition to critical research on youth voice, parent engagement, and community organizing. Our analysis reveals that the field often…

  8. The Dangers of Separating Social Justice from Multicultural Education: Applications in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawyer, Gloshanda

    2018-01-01

    This article presents the case of the author's experience as a student in a multicultural education course. The exploration of this case expands on Cho's (2017) theoretical linking of social justice and multicultural education by highlighting the practical dangers of disengaging social justice from multicultural education. As an alternative to…

  9. Participatory Action Research as a Social-Justice Framework for Assessment in Student Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerquera, Desiree D.; Berumen, Juan G.; Pender, Jason T.

    2017-01-01

    While sufficient methodological training and effective implementation of assessment approaches are essential for successful evaluation in student affairs, those with an interest and passion for social justice may be conflicted. Many of the assessment approaches employed today are misaligned with social justice agendas, lack theoretical grounding…

  10. Bridging Social Justice and Children's Rights to Enhance School Psychology Scholarship and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriberg, David; Desai, Poonam

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the overlap between the common goals of social justice and children's rights advocates as applied to scholarship and practice in school psychology. We argue that these frameworks overlap a great deal, with a primary distinction being the roots of each approach. Specifically, the origins of social justice movements in…

  11. The Case for Restorative Justice: A Crucial Adjunct to the Social Work Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wormer, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the significance of restorative justice practices and orientations for social work education. It describes the four basic forms of restorative justice-victim-offender conferencing, community reparative boards, family group conferencing, and healing circles, with special relevance to social work. Learning about principles and…

  12. Middle School Science Teachers' Perceptions of Social Justice: A Study of Two Female Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Bhaskar

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this qualitative study is to document two middle school science teachers' perceptions of social justice and how these teachers implement various aspects of social justice in their science instruction. The two teachers teach science in an urban school that serves students from low-income, immigrant, and ethnic minority families. The…

  13. Power, Privilege, and Learning: Facilitating Encountered Situations to Promote Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Vicente M.; Clerc, Laura Norman; Howell, Abigail K.

    2009-01-01

    As student affairs professionals increasingly move toward developing their students into active citizens that are committed to both social justice and systemic change, it is important for these students to have a keen awareness of the basic concepts that underlie social justice. The authors argue that fundamental knowledge about the concepts of…

  14. Social Justice Issues and Music Education in the Post 9/11 United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Cynthia L.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is two-fold: first, to examine the impact of historical sociopolitical events on music education, particularly post 9/11 with the intent of establishing a context for social justice issues; and second, how we might examine the broad implications to further music education research focusing on social justice. Issues of…

  15. Competing Priorities and Challenges: Principal Leadership for Social Justice along the U.S.-Mexico Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMatthews, David Edward

    2016-01-01

    Background/Context: Previous research has focused on the importance of a social justice leadership approach to improve schools that serve marginalized students, but less attention has been focused on potential dilemmas associated with social justice leadership and the ways in which principals prioritize when dilemmas or challenges arise.…

  16. Desegregation Policy as Social Justice Leadership?: The Case for Critical Consciousness and Racial Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radd, Sharon I.; Grosland, Tanetha J.

    2018-01-01

    Policy making can be viewed as a large-scale attempt at social justice leadership intended to address vast inequities that persist and are perpetuated in the U.S. K-12 education system. The study examines the text of the Minnesota Desegregation Rule to discern its underlying discourses as they relate to race, racism, and social justice. The…

  17. Social Justice: The Missing Link in School Administrators' Perspectives on Teacher Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Laura Elizabeth; Portelli, John P.; Rottmann, Cindy; Pashby, Karen; Barrett, Sarah Elizabeth; Mujuwamariya, Donatille

    2012-01-01

    Critical scholars view schooling as one piece of a larger struggle for democracy and social justice. We investigated 41 school administrators' perceptions about the role and importance of equity, diversity and social justice in new teacher induction in the province of Ontario. Interviews reveal that principals were interested in shaping teacher…

  18. Social Justice in Preservice and Graduate Education: A Reflective Narrative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Margaret R.; Craig, Cheryl J.

    2012-01-01

    This research shows how two teacher educators, one from Canada and one from the United States, have attempted to imbue their preservice and graduate education practices with a sense of social justice, despite the downgrading of the importance of social justice by accreditation agencies such as National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher…

  19. Pedagogy of Attention: Subverting the Strong Language of Intention in Social Justice Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desroches, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I explore the possibility of social justice education as pedagogy of "attention" rather than simply pedagogy of "intention." Drawing on Gert Biesta's (2010) concept of "strong" education, I begin by explaining how the language of intention in social justice education relies on a discourse in which…

  20. Mob justice as an emerging medico-legal, social and public health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Mob-justice poses a medico-legal, social and public health problem in most developing countries including Tanzania and has shown to have negative effects on social and health of the country, communities, and families. This study was conducted to analyze the mob-justice situation in north-western Tanzania ...

  1. Mob justice in Tanzania: a medico-social problem | Ng'walali ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To investigate the magnitude of mob justice and associated factors. Background: Mob justice is a social and public health problem that has grown in Tanzania in recent decades that has negative effects on social and health of the country, communities, and families. Materials and Methods: A four-year autopsy ...

  2. Forum: Communication Activism Pedagogy. Communication Activism Pedagogy and Research: Communication Education Scholarship to Promote Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Lawrence R.; Palmer, David L.

    2017-01-01

    The recent formation of the National Communication Association's Activism and Social Justice Division puts a spotlight on the extent to which instructional communication and instructional communication research have advanced--or even should advance--the goals of social justice. To examine this issue, two of the leading scholars on this topic,…

  3. Discourses of social justice: examining the ethics of democratic professionalism in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Janice L

    2014-01-01

    This essay provides a critical exploration of discourses of social justice in nursing. It examines commitments to social justice in the work of international nursing scholars and in professional codes of ethics in international nursing organizations. The analysis touches on salient conversations in philosophy, relating these ways of knowing to social justice as an ethical pattern in nursing practice. On the basis of this analysis, the discussion explores questions of professional formation in nursing, noticing when commitments to social justice are taken up or evaded in different models of professionalism. In concluding comments, implications of democratic professionalism are explored for professional formation in nursing, arguing for teaching, learning, and knowledge projects that contribute to social justice in our democracy.

  4. Social Innovations in Music Education: Creating Institutional Resilience for Increasing Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väkevä, Lauri; Westerlund, Heidi; Ilmola-Sheppard, Leena

    2017-01-01

    This article addresses the discourse on social justice and inclusion in music education by exploring how educational systems can be transformed in the rapidly changing world of late modernity. We aim to show that one possible approach to tackling injustice in music education at the micro level is to reflect on the possibilities for institutional…

  5. Becoming a Social Justice Educator: Emerging from the Pits of Whiteness into the Light of Love. A Response to "Respect Differences? Challenging the Common Guidelines in Social Justice Education"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiyoshi, Kay F.

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the limitations of social justice in institutional spaces and in rhetoric. I write in the form of a quest narrative to describe the lessons I learned from a brief sojourn in a temporary position in an urban teacher education program with a social justice focus and at a nonprofit organization with other social justice workers.…

  6. The politics of relative deprivation: A transdisciplinary social justice perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Mengzhu; Exeter, Daniel J; Anderson, Anneka

    2015-05-01

    Relative deprivation was defined by Townsend (1987, p. 125) as "a state of observable and demonstrable disadvantage, relative to the local community or the wider society or nation to which an individual, family or group belongs". This definition is widely used within social and health sciences to identify, measure, and explain forms of inequality in human societies based on material and social conditions. From a multi-disciplinary social science perspective, we conducted a systematic literature review of published material in English through online database searches and books since 1966. We review the concept and measurement of relative 'deprivation' focussing on area-based deprivation in relation to inequities in health and social outcomes. This paper presents a perspective based in Aotearoa/New Zealand where colonisation has shaped the contours of racialised health inequities and current applications and understandings of 'deprivation'. We provide a critique of Townsend's concept of deprivation and area-based deprivation through a critical, structural analysis and suggest alternatives to give social justice a better chance. Deprivation measures used without critical reflection can lead to deficit framing of populations and maintain current inequities in health and social outcomes. We contend therefore that the lack of consideration of (bio)power, privilege, epistemology and (bio)politics is a central concern in studies of deprivation. Our review highlights the need for the academy to balance the asymmetry between qualitative and quantitative studies of deprivation through trans-disciplinary approaches to understanding deprivation, and subsequently, social and health inequities. We recommend that deprivation research needs be critically applied through a decolonising lens to avoid deficit framing and suggest that there is space for a tool that focuses on measuring the unequal distribution of power and privilege in populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All

  7. A focus on educational choice has social justice consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovhus, Randi Boelskifte

    2016-01-01

    This article demonstrates that in Denmark there is considerable focus on educational and career choices during the last year of lower-secondary school, and investigates the possibility of using Amartya Sen’s capability approach as a lens to analyse this focus. It is argued that attention to the p......This article demonstrates that in Denmark there is considerable focus on educational and career choices during the last year of lower-secondary school, and investigates the possibility of using Amartya Sen’s capability approach as a lens to analyse this focus. It is argued that attention...... to the processes occurring before choices are made is of central importance, as these help to give students a genuine opportunity to choose from a broader range of options. This consideration is important from a social-justice perspective even if students end up choosing what they would have chosen without broader...

  8. Teaching College Students Communication Strategies for Effective Social Justice Advocacy. Black Studies and Critical Thinking. Volume 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Robert J., Ed.; Johnson, Richard Greggory, III, Ed.; Murray, Michele C., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The book deals concretely with the most effective ways for educators to be social justice advocates, with questions about what it means to be a social justice advocate, and with the best communication strategies to advocate for a particular social justice view that might start and sustain an open dialogue. The book presents a number of practical…

  9. University access for social justice: a capabilities perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merridy Wilson-Strydom

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The closely related, but often contradictory, issues of increasing access to university and improving students' chances of success in their university studies have been and continue to be an important research focus within higher education studies and policy in South Africa and beyond. More recently, the challenge of underpreparedness of students entering university has gained prominence as universities struggle to increase their throughput rates. It can be argued that increasing access, without increasing chances of success, is becoming a new form of social exclusion within higher education. Thispaperproposes that approaching issues of access from a capabilities perspective (as developed by Amartya Sen provides a means of fostering access for social justice and countering access that leads to social exclusion. As such, this is a theoretical paper building on existing work on the capabilities approach within education to argue that the notion of capabilities provides a useful theoretical and conceptual framework for understanding the complexities of meaningful access to university in a deeply divided society like South Africa.

  10. Towards an explicit justice framing of the social impacts of conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Adrian; Akol, Anne; Gross-Camp, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes that biodiversity conservation practice will benefit from assessment of environmental justice outcomes, especially in contexts of poverty and social marginalisation. Whilst there is an existing body of work that implicitly considers the justices and injustices arising from biodiversity conservation interventions, we suggest that a more explicit justice assessment might complement this work. We develop some general guidelines for such assessment, drawing on traditions of so...

  11. Social Service has moved

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The offices of the Social Service are now on the 1st floor of Building 33 (Reception), exactly one floor above the old location. We remind you that the team, consisting of two social workers, a psychologist (external consultant, 1 day/week) and an administrative assistant, is at the disposal of all members of the personnel, whatever their status, as well as to their family members. Advice and support in the following areas are offered : · information on integration in the local area; · assistance in dealing with the relevant authorities/services; · consultations with a view to resolving problems of a personal, family or professional nature, such as problems of dependency (alcohol, drugs) relationship or behavioral problems (stress, depression, eating disorders), etc.; · support in facing new situations (maternity, divorce, bereavement, job change, separation from family/familiar surroundings); · assistance with decision making relating to family, personal or profes...

  12. The limits of social justice as an aspect of medical professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddle, Thomas S

    2013-08-01

    Contemporary accounts of medical ethics and professionalism emphasize the importance of social justice as an ideal for physicians. This ideal is often specified as a commitment to attaining the universal availability of some level of health care, if not of other elements of a "decent minimum" standard of living. I observe that physicians, in general, have not accepted the importance of social justice for professional ethics, and I further argue that social justice does not belong among professional norms. Social justice is a norm of civic rather than professional life; professional groups may demand that their members conform to the requirements of citizenship but ought not to require civic virtues such as social justice. Nor should any such requirements foreclose reasonable disagreement as to the content of civic norms, as requiring adherence to common specifications of social justice would do. Demands for any given form of social justice among physicians are unlikely to bear fruit as medical education is powerless to produce this virtue.

  13. Maltreatment, family environment, and social risk factors: Determinants of the child welfare to juvenile justice transition among maltreated children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Sarah; Prince, Dana; Connell, Christian M; Caron, Colleen M; Kaufman, Joy S; Tebes, Jacob K

    2017-01-01

    This study prospectively examines the transition from the child welfare system into the juvenile justice system among 10,850 maltreated children and adolescents and explores how patterns of risks, including severity and chronicity of maltreatment, adverse family environment, and social risk factors, affect service systems transition. Almost three percent of maltreated children and adolescents had their first juvenile justice adjudication within an average of approximately six years of their initial child protective services investigation (CPS). Social risk factors, including a child's age at index CPS investigation (older), gender (boys), and race/ethnicity (Black and Hispanic) significantly predicted the risk of transition into the juvenile justice system. Recurrence of maltreatment and experiencing at least one incident of neglect over the course of the study period also increased the risk of transition into the juvenile justice system. However, subtypes of maltreatment, including physical, sexual, and other types of abuse did not significantly predict the risk of juvenile justice system transition. Finally, family environment characterized by poverty also significantly increased the risk of juvenile justice system transition. These findings have important implications for developing and tailoring services for maltreated children, particularly those at-risk for transitioning into the juvenile justice system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The rights of the medically uninsured: an analysis of social justice and disparate health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    As technological advances in the United States continue to improve the effectiveness of medical interventions, expectations among Americans of both improved health and extended life expectancy have also increased. At the same time, many of the population continue to lack the insurance necessary to access even the most basic healthcare services (Institute of Medicine, 2004; Tunzi, 2004; Saha & Bindman, 2001). With approximately 18,000 avoidable deaths attributed annually to inadequate medical coverage and 43.6 million individuals currently without insurance benefits, the need to address the disparity in access to treatment and a means of social justice in the distribution of health care is all too clear (Crispen & Whalen, 2004). As a nation relying on market mechanisms to regulate the costs and quality of available health resources (Baldor, 2003; Saha&Bindman, 2001), the welfare of society as a whole may soon be threatened by the provision of marginal services to a select minority as increasing numbers of the uninsured continue to experience less favorable clinical outcomes and higher mortality rates (Tunzi, 2004; Litaker & Cebul, 2003; Jackson, 2001; Sox, Burstin, Edwards, O'Neil et al., 1998). The author will first examine the consequences of being among the growing number of uninsured individuals in the United States. Attention will then be given to exploring the social justice issues inherent in this critical problem and evaluating these issues through the perspective of both libertarian and feminist theory. Using these theories, innovative strategies for attaining distributive justice in the provision of health care will be offered with recommendations for utilizing these alternative approaches to develop and implement future health policy.

  15. Social inequality in health, responsibility and egalitarian justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchman Andersen, M; Oksbjerg Dalton, S; Lynch, J; Johansen, C; Holtug, N

    2013-03-01

    Are social inequalities in health unjust when brought about by differences in lifestyle? A widespread idea, luck egalitarianism, is that inequality stemming from individuals' free choices is not to be considered unjust, since individuals, presumably, are themselves responsible for such choices. Thus, to the extent that lifestyles are in fact results of free choices, social inequality in health brought about by these choices is not in tension with egalitarian justice. If this is so, then it may put in question the justification of free and equal access to health care and existing medical research priorities. However, personal responsibility is a highly contested issue and in this article we first consider the case for, and second the case against, personal responsibility for health in light of recent developments in philosophical accounts of responsibility and equality. We suggest-but do not fully establish-that at the most fundamental level people are never responsible in such a way that appeals to individuals' own responsibility can justify inequalities in health.

  16. Social Justice and Water Issues in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, E. W.; Fowler, L.

    2014-12-01

    Water resources are critical to human and ecosystem health. Population growth, land use changes, and environmental changes are intensifying stresses on water resources throughout the world. Increasing and competing demands for water require decision-making about water management and allocation to support multiple and competing uses. Further, climatic variability and periods of floods and drought are threats to humans, ecosystems, and economies. Inequalities in the distribution of water resources and access to safe and affordable water abound, greatly affecting communities. Here, we provide examples aiming to bridge the gap between social justice and environmental science literacy through college-level course work in watershed hydrology and management and in water law and policy. Examples are drawn considering water use, water pollution, and water governance. For example, we explore relationships between water governance (e.g., via land ownership and policy), land use (e.g., food production), water use (e.g., irrigation of agricultural lands), water pollution (e.g., pollution of surface and ground waters with agricultural nutrient runoff), and societal well-being (e.g., effects on communities). Course outcomes include increased social awareness, increased knowledge of water resources, and increased scientific literacy.

  17. Morality as the Substructure of Social Justice: Religion in Education as a Case in Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieter, Ferdinand J.

    2011-01-01

    Moral issues and principles do not only emerge in cases of conflict among, for instance, religious communities or political parties; indeed they form the moral substructure of notions of social justice. During periods of conflict each opponent claims justice for his/her side and bases the claim on certain principles. In this article, reference is…

  18. Social Justice and Capacity for Self-Development in Educational Systems in European Union

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo-Ruey

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores social justice and equity in educational policies and systems in the European Union, and analyzes the significance within. Equity indicators of the European educational systems, "Equity of the European Educational Systems: A set of indicators" declared in 2006, introduces the debates on educational justice issues on…

  19. Civic Republican Social Justice and the Case of State Grammar Schools in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to consider the ways in which civic republican theory can provide a meaningful and useful account of social justice, one that is which holds resonance for educational debates. Recognising the need for educationalists interested in civic republicanism to pay greater attention to ideas of justice--and in particular social…

  20. What does social justice require for the public's health? Public health ethics and policy imperatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostin, Lawrence O; Powers, Madison

    2006-01-01

    Justice is so central to the mission of public health that it has been described as the field's core value. This account of justice stresses the fair disbursement of common advantages and the sharing of common burdens. It captures the twin moral impulses that animate public health: to advance human well-being by improving health and to do so particularly by focusing on the needs of the most disadvantaged. This Commentary explores how social justice sheds light on major ongoing controversies in the field, and it provides examples of the kinds of policies that public health agencies, guided by a robust conception of justice, would adopt.

  1. THE RIGHT TO SUTURES: SOCIAL EPIDEMIOLOGY, HUMAN RIGHTS, AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatapuram, Sridhar; Bell, Ruth; Marmot, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The article examines the convergences and contrasts between social epidemiology, social medicine, and human rights approaches toward advancing global health and health equity. The first section describes the goals and work of the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health. The second section discusses the role of human rights in the Commission’s work. The third section evaluates, from the perspective of social epidemiology, two rights-based approaches to advancing health and health equity as compared to a view that focuses more broadly on social justice. The concluding section identifies four areas where social epidemiologists, practitioners of social medicine, and health and human rights advocates can and must work together in order to make progress on health and health equity. PMID:21178186

  2. Service Learning and Political Socialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Diana

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the link between political socialization scholarship and service learning. States that information gleaned from socialization research on adolescents' political identities and beliefs can inform service learning, asserting that the relationship between political socialization and service learning needs to be encouraged. (CMK)

  3. Climate Change & Social Justice: Why We Should Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Nathan T.

    2015-03-01

    In the past several years the global impacts brought about by climate change have become increasingly apparent through the advent of numerous natural disasters. In these events the social costs of climate change have materialized demonstrating high costs in lives, livelihoods, and equity. Due to geographic bad-luck many of the countries most affected by climate change are those that contributed least, a challenge that's exacerbated by a lack of robust infrastructure in these countries. Wealthy nations remain at risk themselves and incidents such as Hurricanes Sandy & Katrina have demonstrated that in times of crisis even institutions like the Red Cross will abandon the poor to their deaths. As necessary action on climate change would cost the fossil fuel industry 20 trillion, money in politics has stymied action. Recently, however, a groundswell grassroots movement (e.g. People's Climate March in NYC) and great strides in energy technology and policy have begun to create necessary change. Reports quantifying the impacts of climate change will be discussed, as well as an update on the current state of the global climate justice movement. The important contributions from scientists to this movement will be highlighted. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. (DGE-1258923).

  4. 76 FR 78950 - FBI Criminal Justice Information Services Division; Revised User Fee Schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ... amounts for volunteers, as explained at 75 FR 18752, and Centralized Billing Service Providers (CBSPs), as... Information Services Division; Revised User Fee Schedule AGENCY: Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI.... Enourato, Section Chief, Resources Management Section, Criminal Justice Information Services Division, FBI...

  5. Contemporary Issues of Social Justice: A Focus on Race and Physical Education in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Louis; Clark, Langston

    2016-09-01

    Ongoing events in the United States show the continual need to address issues of social justice in every social context. Of particular note in this article, the contemporary national focus on race has thrust social justice issues into the forefront of the country's conscious. Although legal segregation has ran its course, schools and many neighborhoods remain, to a large degree, culturally, ethnically, linguistically, economically, and racially segregated and unequal (Orfield & Lee, 2005). Even though an African American president presently occupies the White House, the idea of a postracial America remains an unrealized ideal. Though social justice and racial discussions are firmly entrenched in educational research, investigations that focus on race are scant in physical education literature. Here, we attempt to develop an understanding of social justice in physical education with a focus on racial concerns. We purposely confine the examination to the U.S. context to avoid the dilution of the importance of these issues, while recognizing other international landscapes may differ significantly. To accomplish this goal, we hope to explicate the undergirding theoretical tenants of critical race theory and culturally relevant pedagogy in relation to social justice in physical education. Finally, we make observations of social justice in the physical education and physical education teacher education realms to address and illuminate areas of concern.

  6. The Growth of Higher Educators for Social Justice: Collaborative Professional Development in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly K. Ness, PhD

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we investigate what happened when, contrary to the typical isolation of faculty in higher education, a group of higher educators from various disciplines in a graduate school of education met regularly to discuss issues related to our teaching and social justice. More specifically, we explored the following research question: How does collaboration among higher educators from various disciplines shape their beliefs and practices of teaching for social justice? Over three years of collaboration and conversation, not only did we expand our own knowledge and understandings of notions of social justice, but we began to take important steps towards increasing our social justice actions in our teaching. This article explores our efforts to create a self-directed professional development group of higher educators and provides suggestions for similarly interested higher educators.

  7. Evaluating Restorative Justice Circles of Support and Accountability: Can Social Support Overcome Structural Barriers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohmert, Miriam Northcutt; Duwe, Grant; Hipple, Natalie Kroovand

    2018-02-01

    In a climate in which stigmatic shaming is increasing for sex offenders as they leave prison, restorative justice practices have emerged as a promising approach to sex offender reentry success and have been shown to reduce recidivism. Criminologists and restorative justice advocates believe that providing ex-offenders with social support that they may not otherwise have is crucial to reducing recidivism. This case study describes the expressive and instrumental social support required and received, and its relationship to key outcomes, by sex offenders who participated in Circles of Support and Accountability (COSAs), a restorative justice, reentry program in Minnesota. In-depth interviews with re-entering sex offenders and program volunteers revealed that 75% of offenders reported weak to moderate levels of social support leaving prison, 70% reported receiving instrumental support in COSAs, and 100% reported receiving expressive support. Findings inform work on social support, structural barriers, and restorative justice programming during sex offender reentry.

  8. Welfare, social justice, and equality in educational settings in the Nordic countries

    OpenAIRE

    Lappalainen, Sirpa; Odenbring, Ylva; Steen-Olsen, Tove Herborg

    2013-01-01

    © Universitetsforlaget 2013. This is the authors' accepted and refereed manuscript to the article. The final publication is available at https://www.idunn.no/np/2013/04/welfare_social_justice_and_equality_in_educational_settin

  9. Who Cares about Unions? Ethical Support for Labor as a Matter of Social Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweig, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Labor law reform centers on competitiveness considerations rather than ethics. A social justice perspective suggests religious arguments (dignity of work, accountability) and economic arguments (fairness, democracy) for changing labor law. (SK)

  10. New materialism and social justice:New materialism and social justice a space for productive entanglement, or a political cul-de-sac?

    OpenAIRE

    Mcgregor, Callum; Knox, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in new materialist (NM) politics have surfaced the problem of what social justice might look like in the wake of the post-human. NM has produced its own situated knowledges, which have re-theorised the ‘social’. To an extent, these situated spaces have developed in isolation from established spaces of social justice scholarship. In NM, the ‘social’ is recuperated in a flat ontology, as a mere synonym for the ‘ecological’ (Bryant 2014, p. 192). In this context, one might be...

  11. A critique on the role of social justice perspectives in mathematics education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Bettina

    2008-01-01

    This review of the monograph, International Perspectives on Social Justice in Mathematics Education, is not a chapter-by-chapter summary of each of the 14 chapters per se, but rather, revolves around three overarching themes.......This review of the monograph, International Perspectives on Social Justice in Mathematics Education, is not a chapter-by-chapter summary of each of the 14 chapters per se, but rather, revolves around three overarching themes....

  12. The Challenge and Opportunity of Parental Involvement in Juvenile Justice Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Jeffrey D; Mulvey, Edward P; Schubert, Carol A; Garbin, Sara R

    2014-04-01

    The active involvement of parents - whether as recipients, extenders, or managers of services - during their youth's experience with the juvenile justice system is widely assumed to be crucial. Parents and family advocacy groups note persisting concerns with the degree to which successful parental involvement is achieved. Justice system providers are highly motivated and actively working to make improvements. These coalescing interests provide a strong motivation for innovation and improvement regarding family involvement, but the likely success of these efforts is severely limited by the absence of any detailed definition of parental involvement or validated measure of this construct. Determining whether and how parental involvement works in juvenile justice services depends on the development of clear models and sound measurement. Efforts in other child serving systems offer guidance to achieve this goal. A multidimensional working model developed with parents involved in child protective services is presented as a template for developing a model for parental involvement in juvenile justice. Features of the model requiring changes to make it more adaptable to juvenile justice are identified. A systematic research agenda for developing methods and measures to meet the present demands for enhanced parental involvement in juvenile justice services is presented.

  13. Social justice and intercountry adoptions: the role of the U.S. social work community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roby, Jini L; Rotabi, Karen; Bunkers, Kelley M

    2013-10-01

    Using social justice as the conceptual foundation, the authors present the structural barriers to socially just intercountry adoptions (ICAs) that can exploit and oppress vulnerable children and families participating in ICAs. They argue that such practices threaten the integrity of social work practice in that arena and the survival of ICA as a placement option. Government structures, disparity of power between countries and families on both sides, perceptions regarding poverty, cultural incompetence, misconceptions about orphans and orphanages, lack of knowledge about the impact of institution-based care, and the profit motive are driving forces behind the growing shadow of unethical ICAs. The U.S. social work community has a large role and responsibility in addressing these concerns as the United States receives the most children adopted through ICAs of all receiving countries. In addition to the centrality of social justice as a core value of the profession, the responsibility to carry out ethical and socially just ICA has recently increased as a matter of law, under the implementation legislation to the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption. While acknowledging that these issues are complex, authors provide suggestions for corrective policy and practice measures.

  14. Teaching for Social Justice, Social Responsibility and Social Inclusion: A Respectful Pedagogy for Twenty-First Century Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on a Participatory Action Research (PAR) study that was undertaken in two Australian preschool settings this article examines strategies that support the pedagogy of teaching for social justice and outlines how these strategies raised critical consciousness of both preschoolers (aged three to five years) and early childhood educators to…

  15. Social justice, health disparities, and culture in the care of the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilworth-Anderson, Peggye; Pierre, Geraldine; Hilliard, Tandrea S

    2012-01-01

    Older minority Americans experience worse health outcomes than their white counterparts, exhibiting the need for social justice in all areas of their health care. Justice, fairness, and equity are crucial to minimizing conditions that adversely affect the health of individuals and communities. In this paper, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is used as an example of a health care disparity among elderly Americans that requires social justice interventions. Cultural factors play a crucial role in AD screening, diagnosis, and access to care, and are often a barrier to support and equality for minority communities. The "conundrum of health disparities" refers to the interplay between disparity, social justice, and cultural interpretation, and encourages researchers to understand both (1) disparity caused by economic and structural barriers to access, treatment, and diagnosis, and (2) disparity due to cultural interpretation of disease, in order to effectively address health care issues and concerns among elderly Americans. © 2012 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  16. Struggles for Equal Rights and Social Justice as Unrepresented and Represented in Psychological Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turiel, Elliot; Chung, Eunkyung; Carr, Jessica A

    2016-01-01

    Issues of equality and social justice remain important concerns for contemporary societies. Struggles for equal rights and fair treatment continue in both organized movements and in acts of everyday life. We first consider trends in psychological research that fail to address such struggles and may even impede theoretical understanding of the complex processes of thought and action involved when individuals confront situations of welfare, justice, and rights. Then, we consider research, which attempts to address these issues. We review studies on the development of moral judgments and on understandings of equality and distributive justice. We also discuss research that accounts for the varying social contexts of individual lives and conceives of human behavior as engaged in moral judgments, which often produce resistance and opposition to injustice. In conclusion, we call for more attention in psychological research to issues of equity and social justice. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Towards an Explicit Justice Framing of the Social Impacts of Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Martin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes that biodiversity conservation practice will benefit from assessment of environmental justice outcomes, especially in contexts of poverty and social marginalisation. Whilst there is an existing body of work that implicitly considers the justices and injustices arising from biodiversity conservation interventions, we suggest that a more explicit justice assessment might complement this work. We develop some general guidelines for such assessment, drawing on traditions of social and environmental justice, highlighting the importance of considering two types of justice outcome: distribution and recognition. We note the non-equivalence of these different justice values, implying that they cannot be traded-off against each other. We try out these guidelines through a case study of the Bwindi Impenetrable National Park in Uganda. We find that the assessment helps us to identify intolerable social impacts of conservation, notably failures to adequately address the long-term impoverishment and domination of the indigenous Batwa people, and offers constructive insight for how conservation can better align with the need for environmental justice.

  18. A Learning Architecture: How School Leaders Can Design for Learning Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The field of socially just educational leadership focuses on reducing inequities within schools. The purpose of this article is to illustrate how one strand of social learning theory, communities of practice, can serve as a powerful tool for analyzing learning within a school ostensibly pursuing social justice. The author employs a core…

  19. From Entrepreneurship to Activism: Teacher Autobiography, Peace and Social Justice in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharra, Steve

    2005-01-01

    This article argues that while social entrepreneurship shares concerns similar to those of social justice activism, the corporate and business ethos in the idea of entrepreneurship is not suited to the social concerns that teachers and other educators deal with in their everyday lives. The article points out characteristics of social…

  20. Just sustainability? sustainability and social justice in professional codes of ethics for engineers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brauer, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    Should environmental, social, and economic sustainability be of primary concern to engineers? Should social justice be among these concerns? Although the deterioration of our natural environment and the increase in social injustices are among today's most pressing and important issues, engineering

  1. Participatory Action Research for High School Students: Transforming Policy, Practice, and the Personal with Social Justice Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarota, Julio; Romero, Augustine

    2011-01-01

    The authors discuss how participatory action research (PAR) informs the pedagogy and epistemology of the social justice education. PAR facilitates students' engagement in their social context and acquisition of knowledge to initiate personal and social transformation. The scope of research contains knowledge about social justice issues negatively…

  2. Negotiating Social Justice Teaching: One Full-Time Teacher's Practice Viewed from the Trenches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregson, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    This case study examines the practice of a full-time mathematics teacher and social activist working in a secondary school with the twin missions of college preparation and social justice. Findings detail how this teacher views the relationship between mathematics education and social justice and how her conception of teaching for social justice…

  3. Social Justice and Environmental Awareness Developed through a Citizens' Jury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, J.

    2014-12-01

    A Citizens' Jury (CJ) is a discussion forum in which managers, policymakers or politicians are able to present their case to the general public ('citizens') to whom they are accountable, and for these citizens to critically ask questions of the managers/policymakers/politicians in order to better understand issues surrounding local development, planning and policy, impacts and adaptive measures, and to highlight their concerns. A CJ can be useful with respect to developing social justice and environmental awareness issues because it can empower community action and present different viewpoints. A practical CJ exercise is used in a second-year undergraduate course entitled Climate Change and Society, at University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. The CJ is used to consider some of the impacts of management policies used for climate change and sustainable development adaption, based on a hypothetical scenario. This scenario is that a major energy company wants to build a dam with hydroelectric power station in a developing country. This will provide low-carbon renewable energy to the country, investment in electricity infrastructure, and the company is committed to help economic development in the country, including in jobs and education. However, building and flooding of the dam will involve displacing 10,000 people from rural communities, flooding agricultural areas and areas of high biodiversity, and archaeological sites. The exercise is based on students, in groups, assuming different 'identities' which may include a local business person, resident, politician, member of an NGO, tourist, engineer, farmer etc, from which viewpoint they must argue for/against the proposal and to question other peoples' viewpoints. This exercise is useful because it allows students to develop understandings of different viewpoints, evaluate risk and impacts on different communities, and highlights the complexity of real-world decision-making.

  4. Social Change: Toward an Informed and Critical Understanding of Social Justice and the Capabilities Approach in Community Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munger, Felix; MacLeod, Tim; Loomis, Colleen

    2016-03-01

    Community psychology has long been concerned with social justice. However, deployments of this term are often vague and undertheorized. To address this weakness in the field's knowledge body we explored John Rawls's theory of social justice and Amartya Sen's economic theory of the capabilities approach and evaluated each for its applicability to community psychology theory, research, and action. Our unpacking of the philosophical and political underpinnings of Rawlsian theory of social justice resulted in identifying characteristics that limit the theory's utility in community psychology, particularly in its implications for action. Our analysis of the capability approach proposed by Amartya Sen revealed a framework that operationalizes social justice in both research and action, and we elaborate on this point. Going beyond benefits to community psychology in adopting the capabilities approach, we posit a bi-directional relationship and discuss how community psychology might also contribute to the capabilities approach. We conclude by suggesting that community psychology could benefit from a manifesto or proclamation that provides a historical background of social justice and critiques the focus on the economic, sociological, and philosophical theories that inform present-day conceptualizations (and lack thereof) of social justice for community psychology. © Society for Community Research and Action 2016.

  5. Remote nursing certified practice: viewing nursing and nurse practitioner practice through a social justice lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlier, Denise S; Browne, Annette J

    2011-06-01

    Remote Nursing Certified Practice (RNCP) was introduced in 2010 to regulate nursing practice in remote, largely First Nations communities in British Columbia, Canada. These are communities that often experience profound health and health-care inequities. Typically nurses are the main health-care providers. Using a critical social justice lens, the authors explore the clinical and ethical implications of RNCP in terms of access to equitable, high-quality primary health care.They examine the fit between the level and scope of health services provided by registered nurses working under RNCP and the health needs of remote First Nations communities. In doing so, they draw comparisons between nurse practitioners (NPs) and outpost nurses working in NP roles who historically were employed to provide health care in these communities.The authors conclude by calling for nursing regulations that support equitable, high-quality primary care for all British Columbians.

  6. Exploring Social Justice in Mixed/Divided Cities: From Local to Global Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shdaimah, Corey; Lipscomb, Jane; Strier, Roni; Postan-Aizik, Dassi; Leviton, Susan; Olsen, Jody

    University of Haifa and the University of Maryland, Baltimore faculty developed a parallel binational, interprofessional American-Israeli course which explores social justice in the context of increasing urban, local, and global inequities. This article describes the course's innovative approach to critically examine how social justice is framed in mixed/divided cities from different professional perspectives (social work, health, law). Participatory methods such as photo-voice, experiential learning, and theatre of the oppressed provide students with a shared language and multiple media to express and problematize their own and others' understanding of social (in)justice and to imagine social change. Much learning about "self" takes place in an immersion experience with "others." Crucial conversations about "the other" and social justice can occur more easily within the intercultural context. In these conversations, students and faculty experience culture as diverse, complex, and personal. Students and faculty alike found the course personally and professionally transformative. Examination of social justice in Haifa and Baltimore strengthened our appreciation for the importance of context and the value of global learning to provide insights on local challenges and opportunities. Copyright © 2016 Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An Evaluation of a Service-Learning Model for Criminal Justice Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschinger-Blank, Nancy Beth; Simons, Lori; Kenyon, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    A triangulation mixed-methods design was used to measure differences in service-learning outcomes for 32 students enrolled in criminal justice courses during the academic years 2003 (n = 16) and 2005 (n = 16). Results show that service-learners increase their political awareness and course value but experience a decrease in problem-solving skills…

  8. [Social and health impact of Institutes of Legal Medicine in Spain: beyond justice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbería, Eneko; Xifró, Alexandre; Suelves, Josep María; Arimany-Manso, Josep

    2014-03-01

    The main mission of Spanish Institutes of Legal Medicine (ILMs) is to serve the justice system. We review the potential broader role of the work done by ILMs, with an emphasis on forensic pathology. The relevance of forensic information to increase the quality of mortality statistics is highlighted, taking into account the persistence of the low validity of the external causes of death in the Mortality Register that was already detected more than a decade ago. The new statistical form and reporting system for the deaths under ILMs jurisdiction, as introduced by the Spanish Instituto Nacional de Estadística in 2009, are also described. The IMLs role in the investigation of the following mortality causes and of their determinants is reviewed in detail: traffic accidents, suicide, drugs of abuse, child deaths and sudden deaths. We conclude that an important public role of IMLs is emerging beyond their valuable service to the justice system, mainly through the gathering of data critical to assess and prevent several medical and public health and safety issues of great social impact and through their participation in epidemiologic research and surveillance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. A Grounded Theory of Sexual Minority Women and Transgender Individuals' Social Justice Activism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Whitney B; Hoover, Stephanie M; Morrow, Susan L

    2018-01-01

    Psychosocial benefits of activism include increased empowerment, social connectedness, and resilience. Yet sexual minority women (SMW) and transgender individuals with multiple oppressed statuses and identities are especially prone to oppression-based experiences, even within minority activist communities. This study sought to develop an empirical model to explain the diverse meanings of social justice activism situated in SMW and transgender individuals' social identities, values, and experiences of oppression and privilege. Using a grounded theory design, 20 SMW and transgender individuals participated in initial, follow-up, and feedback interviews. The most frequent demographic identities were queer or bisexual, White, middle-class women with advanced degrees. The results indicated that social justice activism was intensely relational, replete with multiple benefits, yet rife with experiences of oppression from within and outside of activist communities. The empirically derived model shows the complexity of SMW and transgender individuals' experiences, meanings, and benefits of social justice activism.

  10. The World of Work between the Personal and the Collective: A Demand for Social Justice and Guidance for Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Julio Gonzalez; Chacón, Omaira

    2015-01-01

    The struggle for justice has been permanent for a very long period of time. In this sense, it could be said that since Plato conceived it as one of the fundamental virtues, justice has constituted a goal to achieve for any society. In the case of justice, related to social aspects, the situation has been overwhelming in Latin America. Based on a…

  11. Challenging Perceptions of Academic Research as Bias Free: Promoting a Social Justice Framework in Social Work Research Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotera, Nicole; Walls, N. Eugene

    2010-01-01

    The required research courses in social work education are, perhaps, one of the more difficult content areas in which to infuse direct teaching and knowledge acquisition of multiculturalism. The study presented in this article examines the outcomes of systematically addressing social justice within a required master's level social work research…

  12. Substance abuse treatment and services by criminal justice and other funding sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfken, Cynthia L; Kubiak, Sheryl Pimlott

    2009-01-01

    Studies have found funding source, whether public or private, is associated with treatment and services offered in community-based agencies. However, the association of criminal justice funding with community-based treatment and services is unknown. Using a mixed method case study approach with 34 agencies within one state we assessed administrators' perspectives of the most important funding source, treatment and services offered. We found that agencies rely on multiple funding sources and the source rated most important was associated with treatment and services offered in the agency. Those agencies citing a criminal justice entity as the most important funder were more likely to offer specific ancillary services and adopt motivational interviewing than those citing private funds. Although client characteristics or training opportunities may determine these services and practices, the agency's most important funding source may have implications for services offered.

  13. RSE et justice sociale : le cas des multinationales pétrolières dans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dans les pays où les institutions apparaissent encore fragiles, les présupposés sur lesquels a reposé la conception moderne de la justice sociale ne sont pas vérifiés. Les questions de justice ne relèvent pas du seul contexte des Etatsnations souverains, et des distributions à opérer entre citoyens égaux en droit, au sein de ...

  14. EVALUATING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SOCIAL CAPITAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL JUSTICE FORM THE PERSPECTIVE OF EMPLOYEES

    OpenAIRE

    Gholamhossein Barekat and Abdolreza Gilavand*

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Perceived organizational justice has a positive impact on the performance of organizations’ employees and their satisfaction. Thus, the current research was carried out to evaluate the relationship between social capital and organizational justice from the perspective of employees. Methods: This research was conducted using descriptive and correlational method of study. Research population included all nonfaculty employees of central organization and all schools of Ahvaz Jundish...

  15. Forgiveness and justice: a research agenda for social and personality psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exline, Julie Juola; Worthington, Everett L; Hill, Peter; McCullough, Michael E

    2003-01-01

    Forgiveness and related constructs (e.g., repentance, mercy, reconciliation) are ripe for study by social and personality psychologists, including those interested in justice. Current trends in social science, law, management, philosophy, and theology suggest a need to expand existing justice frameworks to incorporate alternatives or complements to retribution, including forgiveness and related processes. In this article, we raise five challenging empirical questions about forgiveness. For each question, we briefly review representative research, raise hypotheses, and suggest specific ways in which social and personality psychologists could make distinctive contributions.

  16. What Are We Teaching in Diversity and Social Justice Courses? A Qualitative Content Analysis of MSW Syllabi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Gita R.; Hudson, Kimberly D.; Self, Jen M.

    2017-01-01

    Diversity and social justice are central to social work and related curricular content is mandated by accreditation standards. However, research regarding diversity and social justice courses remains limited. This study aimed to better understand how these courses are conceptualized through a qualitative content analysis of course descriptions and…

  17. Teachers' Legitimacy: Effects of Justice Perception and Social Comparison Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia-Pereira, Maria; Vala, Jorge; Correia, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Teachers' legitimacy is central to school functioning. Teachers' justice, whether distributive or procedural, predicts teachers' legitimacy. Aims: What is still do be found, and constitutes the goal of this paper, is whether unjust treatment by a teacher affects the legitimacy of the teacher differently when the student knows that the…

  18. Using a Multicultural Social Justice Framework to Analyze Elementary Teachers' Meanings of Multicultural Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kye, Hannah Anne

    In response to the persistent gaps in science opportunities and outcomes across lines of race, class, gender, and disability, decades of science reforms have called for "science for all." For elementary teachers, science for all demands that they not only learn to teach science but learn to teach it in ways that promote more equitable science learning opportunities and outcomes. In this qualitative case study, I use a framework of multicultural social justice education to examine three teachers' beliefs and practices of multicultural science education. The teachers, one preservice and two in-service, taught elementary science in a month-long summer program and met weekly with this researcher to discuss connections between their expressed commitments about teaching toward social justice and their work as science teachers. The data sources for this study included audio recordings of weekly meetings, science lessons, and semi-structured individual interviews. These data were transcribed, coded, and analyzed to define the most salient themes and categories among the individual teachers and across cases. I found that the teachers' beliefs and practices aligned with traditional approaches to school and science wherein science was a set of scripted right answers, diversity was only superficially acknowledged, and multiculturalizing the curriculum meant situating science in unfamiliar real world contexts. These meanings of science positioned the teacher as authority and operated outside of a structural analysis of the salience of race, culture, gender, and disability in students' science learning experiences. As they taught and reflected on their teaching in light of their social justice commitments, I found that the teachers negotiated more constructivist and student-centered approaches to science education. These meanings of science required teachers to learn about students and make their experiences more central to their learning. Yet they continued to only acknowledge

  19. Exploring the relevance of social justice within a relational nursing ethic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In the last few decades, a growing number of commentators have questioned the appropriateness of the 'justice view' of ethics as a suitable approach in health care ethics, and most certainly in nursing. Essentially, in their ethical deliberations, it is argued that nurses do not readily adopt the high degree of impartiality and objectivity that is associated with a justice view; instead their moral practices are more accurately reflected through the use of alternative approaches such as relational or care-based ethics. Yet, it has also been argued that this viewpoint does not necessarily 'do justice' to the broader moral responsibilities of nurses towards humanity in general, i.e. to the wider socio-cultural and socio-political issues in society, and to the concept of social justice in particular. This criticism has triggered a much closer examination of relational and care-based ethics in nursing at levels beyond individual responsiveness within relationships and brought into the spotlight the need for a more ethically refined nursing response to an increasingly complex set of socio-cultural inequalities. This article explores a relational ethic within nursing practices with contemporary ideas regarding social justice. In particular, it is argued that the synergy between the two actually produces an ethic that is capable of not only challenging the continuing predominance of justice-based ethics within health care, but of replacing it. Subsequently, in the discussion that follows, it is suggested that a combined social justice and relational care-based approach, as a social ethic, should guide the moral deliberations and actions of nurses. It is maintained that such an approach is not only possible, but crucial if nurses are to realize their full potential as ethical agents for individual and social good. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Project-Based Social Justice Mathematics: A Case Study of Five 6th Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Maighread L.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative multiple case study was to explore how five sixth grade female students navigated the process of project-based learning as they designed and implemented their own project centered on mathematics while using a social justice lens. The theoretical frameworks of Authentic Intellectual Work and Social Justice…

  1. Problematizing Social Justice in Health Pedagogy and Youth Sport: Intersectionality of Race, Ethnicity, and Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagkas, Symeon

    2016-09-01

    Social justice education recognizes the discrepancies in opportunities among disadvantaged groups in society. The purpose of the articles in this special topic on social justice is to (a) provide a critical reflection on issues of social justice within health pedagogy and youth sport of Black and ethnic-minority (BME) young people; (b) provide a framework for the importance of intersectionality research (mainly the intersection of social class, race, and ethnicity) in youth sport and health pedagogy for social justice; and (c) contextualize the complex intersection and interplay of social issues (i.e., race, ethnicity, social classes) and their influence in shaping physical culture among young people with a BME background. The article argues that there are several social identities in any given pedagogical terrain that need to be heard and legitimized to avoid neglect and "othering." This article suggests that a resurgence of interest in theoretical frameworks such as intersectionality can provide an effective platform to legitimize "non-normative bodies" (diverse bodies) in health pedagogy and physical education and sport by voicing positionalities on agency and practice.

  2. Action Research in Preservice Teachers' Arts-Integration Pedagogies for Social Justice Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felleman-Fattal, Laura Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Age-appropriate children's books can be an effective way to introduce and discuss issues of social justice with young students. These books can be the anchor for interdisciplinary lessons that integrate core content areas, such as language arts, science, and/or social studies with the visual and performing arts to enrich students' learning…

  3. Mapping the Complexities of Effective Leadership for Social Justice Praxis in Urban Auckland Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayavant, Sharona

    2016-01-01

    This empirical research is about strengths-based leadership practices that seek to explore leadership for social justice and equity in New Zealand's culturally and linguistically diverse educational and social landscape. Similar to the diversity in other countries, where leaders demonstrate culturally responsive leadership practices in their quest…

  4. The Power of Discourse: Reclaiming Social Justice from and for Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruce, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Through the prism of the two main paradigms of social justice--"distributive" and "relational"--and drawing on the concept of "discourse," this article examines how more socially just approaches might be embedded in the classroom music education of young people in the upper primary and lower secondary schools (9-13…

  5. The Importance of Principals Supporting Dual Language Education: A Social Justice Leadership Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMatthews, David; Izquierdo, Elena

    2018-01-01

    Recent calls for social justice to be a key aspect of principal preparation have been made, but content related to the efficacy of dual language education has been a neglected area of educational leadership research, coursework, and principal preparation standards. We draw on scholarship focused on dual language education, social justice…

  6. Educational Leadership for Social Justice in Costa Rica, Mexico, and Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Patricia; Slater, Charles L.; Lopez Gorosave, Gema; Cerdas, Victoria; Torres, Nancy; Antunez, Serafin; Briceno, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of school leaders to provide social justice in three contexts: Costa Rica, Mexico, and Spain. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative study was conducted under the interpretative tradition characterized by a search for an understanding of the social world from the point of view of a…

  7. A Study of Rural High School Principals' Perceptions as Social Justice Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albritton, Shelly; Huffman, Stephanie; McClellan, Rhonda

    2017-01-01

    This multisite case study explores how rural principals in high poverty schools in a Southern state that had identified themselves as social justice leaders perceived student diversity, specifically LGBTQ students, and how they sustained a socially-just school climate for all students. Using a qualitative approach lent itself to understanding the…

  8. Managing online service recovery : procedures, justice and customer satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Jaywant; Crisafulli, Benedetta

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The Internet has changed the way services are delivered and has created new forms of customer-firm interactions. Whilst online service failures remain inevitable, the Internet offers opportunities for delivering efficient service recovery through the online channel. Notwithstanding, research evidence on how firms can deliver online service recovery remains scarce. This study investigates the impact of two online service recovery strategies - online information and te...

  9. Transitional justice as social control: political transitions, human rights norms and the reclassification of the past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudai, Ron

    2017-09-12

    This article offers an interpretation of transitional justice policies - the efforts of post-conflict and post-dictatorship societies to address the legacy of past abuses - as a form of social control. While transitional justice is commonly conceptualized as responding to a core problem of impunity, this article argues that such formulation is too narrow and leads to lack of coherence in the analysis of the diverse array of transitional mechanisms, which include among others trials, truth commissions, reparations for victims and apologies. Building on the work of Stanley Cohen, the article contends that the core transitional problem is the denial of human rights violations, and consequently that the common purpose of all transitional justice mechanisms is to reclassify the past: redefining as deviant some acts and individuals which prior to the transition were considered 'normal'. The article identifies and analyses three themes in the application of a social control framework to transitional justice: (1) truth, memory and retroactive social control, pertains to the way truth-seeking transitional justice mechanisms reclassify past events by engaging in social control of and through memory; (2) censure, celebration and transitional social control refers to the reclassification of categories of individuals through expressions of both social disapproval and praise; and (3) civil society and social control from below concerns the role of social movements, organizations and groups as informal agents of social control during transitions. The concluding section recaps and briefly explores the concept of 'good moral panic' in the context of political transitions. While the concept of social control tends to have negative connotations for critical sociologists, this work suggests that efforts to categorize, punish and disapprove certain behaviours as deviant may not only be viewed as supporting a conservative status-quo, but also as promoting fledging human rights norms.

  10. Nursing responsibilities and social justice: an analysis in support of disciplinary goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Pamela J; Willis, Danny G

    2012-01-01

    Social justice is asserted as a responsibility of the nursing profession. However, a reliable conception of social justice that can undergird practice, research, education, and policy endeavors has proved elusive. We discuss this as a problem for the profession and propose Powers and Faden's model of social justice as useful for nursing purposes because of its focus on exploring and rectifying underlying causes of injustice as they lie within the fabric of society. Their model asserts 6 essential dimensions of well-being as universal human needs. These dimensions are interrelated and nonhierarchical. A serious deficiency in any one affects other dimensions and interferes with the ability to experience "a minimally decent life." The model is applied to the problem of child abuse and the effects of its aftermath on well-being as an example of its potential for structuring nursing knowledge development, practice, and policy initiatives. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Revisiting public health preparedness: Incorporating social justice principles into pandemic preparedness planning for influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayman, Harvey; Ablorh-Odjidja, Angela

    2006-01-01

    Public health professionals are responsible for ensuring the health of the nation, which requires that planners for public health emergencies recognize that not including protection for underserved or marginalized communities poses a risk to the entire population. To assure the protection of these populations in the event of a pandemic outbreak, preparedness planning will benefit from the application of several principles of social justice in assuring the protection of all individuals. This article will review the history between public health and social justice, provide a brief review of pandemic preparedness planning efforts, discuss the importance of and make recommendations for the incorporation of principles of social justice in the development of pandemic preparedness plans, and highlight some of the challenges faced by public health in effectively and equitably meeting its charge to protect the nation's health.

  12. Uneasy Bedfellows: Social Justice and Neo-Liberal Practice in the Housing Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Martel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Australian state has ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD, which emphasizes a social justice-based, personalized service delivery model. The upcoming National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS reflects this model and aims to facilitate people living with a disability being able to access services while housed within the private residential market, a move away from a state-based combined residential/service care model. However, in Australia’s neo-liberal housing market government intervention tends to shy away from policies that overtly impose restrictions on private firms. Therefore, in the absence of a subsidy from the state, the CRPD is of limited use in encouraging private developers to improve the appropriateness of its new built stock for people with a disability. A more persuasive approach is to highlight the size, diversity, and economic power of the disability-friendly housing consumer market when housing provision is separated from disability care delivery. This paper examines the feasibility of sustaining innovation in the volume builder housing market by aligning accessibility promoting changes to the existing innovation channels within Australian firms, suggesting that the NDIS concentrate on assisting the housing industry transition to a make-to-order model from the current make-to-forecast one.

  13. Integrating social justice concerns into economic evaluation for healthcare and public health: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukhanin, Vadim; Searle, Alexandra; Zwerling, Alice; Dowdy, David W; Taylor, Holly A; Merritt, Maria W

    2018-02-01

    Social justice is the moral imperative to avoid and remediate unfair distributions of societal disadvantage. In priority setting in healthcare and public health, social justice reaches beyond fairness in the distribution of health outcomes and economic impacts to encompass fairness in the distribution of policy impacts upon other dimensions of well-being. There is an emerging awareness of the need for economic evaluation to integrate all such concerns. We performed a systematic review (1) to describe methodological solutions suitable for integrating social justice concerns into economic evaluation, and (2) to describe the challenges that those solutions face. To be included, publications must have captured fairness considerations that (a) involve cross-dimensional subjective personal life experience and (b) can be manifested at the level of subpopulations. We identified relevant publications using an electronic search in EMBASE, PubMed, EconLit, PsycInfo, Philosopher's Index, and Scopus, including publications available in English in the past 20 years. Two reviewers independently appraised candidate publications, extracted data, and synthesized findings in narrative form. Out of 2388 publications reviewed, 26 were included. Solutions sought either to incorporate relevant fairness considerations directly into economic evaluation or to report them alongside cost-effectiveness measures. The majority of reviewed solutions, if adapted to integrate social justice concerns, would require their explicit quantification. Four broad challenges related to the implementation of these solutions were identified: clarifying the normative basis; measuring and determining the relative importance of criteria representing that basis; combining the criteria; and evaluating trade-offs. All included solutions must grapple with an inherent tension: they must either face the normative and operational challenges of quantifying social justice concerns or accede to offering incomplete policy

  14. Young People, Trouble, and Crime: Restorative Justice as a Normative Theory of Informal Social Control and Social Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazemore, Gordon

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the normative theory of restorative justice in youth crime, highlighting three core principles: repairing the harm of crime; involving stakeholders; and transforming community and government roles in response to crime. Considers connections between restorative intervention theories and informal social control and social support mechanisms…

  15. Rights with Capabilities: Towards a Social Justice Framework for Migrant Activism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Briones

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The paradigm of rights, established throughout the academic, policy and migrant activism arenas, governs the protection of vulnerable migrant workers against abuse. To what extent this approach has achieved social justice for the migrant worker in the current global political economy climate is, however, uncertain. In analyzing the use of rights in migrant activism in Hong Kong, this paper shows the limitation of rights  in the migrant experience at the same time as it shows how a new paradigm based on the Capablities Approach could provide a more appropriate framework from which to achieve social justice for the migrant worker.

  16. Rights with Capabilities: Towards a Social Justice Framework for Migrant Activism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Briones

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available

    The paradigm of rights, established throughout the academic, policy and migrant activism arenas, governs the protection of vulnerable migrant workers against abuse. To what extent this approach has achieved social justice for the migrant worker in the current global political economy climate is, however, uncertain. In analyzing the use of rights in migrant activism in Hong Kong, this paper shows the limitation of rights  in the migrant experience at the same time as it shows how a new paradigm based on the Capablities Approach could provide a more appropriate framework from which to achieve social justice for the migrant worker.

  17. Income, Wealth and Health Inequalities — A Scottish Social Justice Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elspeth Molony

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers health inequalities through a social justice perspective. The authors draw on a variety of existing sources of evidence, including experiential, scientific and contextual knowledge. The authors work with NHS Health Scotland, a national Health Board working to reduce health inequalities and improve health. Working closely with the Scottish Government and with a variety of stakeholders across different sectors, NHS Health Scotland’s vision for a fairer, healthier Scotland is founded on the principles of social justice. The paper takes social justice as the starting point and explores what it means for two interlinked paradigms of social injustice—health inequality and income inequality. Utilising the wealth of evidence synthesised by NHS Health Scotland as well as drawing on the writings and evidence of philosophers, epidemiologists, the Scottish Government and international bodies, the authors explore the links between income and wealth inequality, social justice, the right to health and health inequalities. The paper ends by considering the extent to which there is appetite for social change in Scotland by considering the attitudes of the people of Scotland and of Britain to poverty, inequality and welfare.

  18. Using a social justice and health framework to assess European climate change adaptation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeckmann, Melanie; Zeeb, Hajo

    2014-11-28

    Climate change puts pressure on existing health vulnerabilities through higher frequency of extreme weather events, changes in disease vector distribution or exacerbated air pollution. Climate change adaptation policies may hold potential to reduce societal inequities. We assessed the role of public health and social justice in European climate change adaptation using a three-fold approach: a document analysis, a critical discourse analysis of a subgroup of strategies, and a ranking of strategies against our social justice framework. The ranking approach favored planning that includes various adaptation types, social issues and infrastructure changes. Themes on values identified in the five subgroup documents showed that risks are perceived as contradictory, technology is viewed as savior, responsibilities need to be negotiated, and social justice is advocated by only a few countries. Of 21 strategy documents assessed overall, those from Austria, England and Sweden received the highest scores in the ranking. Our qualitative assessment showed that in European adaptation planning, progress could still be made through community involvement into adaptation decisions, consistent consideration of social and demographic determinants, and a stronger link between infrastructural adaptation and the health sector. Overall, a social justice framework can serve as an evaluation guideline for adaptation policy documents.

  19. Just sustainability? Sustainability and social justice in professional codes of ethics for engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Cletus S

    2013-09-01

    Should environmental, social, and economic sustainability be of primary concern to engineers? Should social justice be among these concerns? Although the deterioration of our natural environment and the increase in social injustices are among today's most pressing and important issues, engineering codes of ethics and their paramountcy clause, which contains those values most important to engineering and to what it means to be an engineer, do not yet put either concept on a par with the safety, health, and welfare of the public. This paper addresses a recent proposal by Michelfelder and Jones (2011) to include sustainability in the paramountcy clause as a way of rectifying the current disregard for social justice issues in the engineering codes. That proposal builds on a certain notion of sustainability that includes social justice as one of its dimensions and claims that social justice is a necessary condition for sustainability, not vice versa. The relationship between these concepts is discussed, and the original proposal is rejected. Drawing on insights developed throughout the paper, some suggestions are made as to how one should address the different requirements that theory and practice demand of the value taxonomy of professional codes of ethics.

  20. Income, Wealth and Health Inequalities — A Scottish Social Justice Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molony, Elspeth; Duncan, Christine

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers health inequalities through a social justice perspective. The authors draw on a variety of existing sources of evidence, including experiential, scientific and contextual knowledge. The authors work with NHS Health Scotland, a national Health Board working to reduce health inequalities and improve health. Working closely with the Scottish Government and with a variety of stakeholders across different sectors, NHS Health Scotland's vision for a fairer, healthier Scotland is founded on the principles of social justice. The paper takes social justice as the starting point and explores what it means for two interlinked paradigms of social injustice—health inequality and income inequality. Utilising the wealth of evidence synthesised by NHS Health Scotland as well as drawing on the writings and evidence of philosophers, epidemiologists, the Scottish Government and international bodies, the authors explore the links between income and wealth inequality, social justice, the right to health and health inequalities. The paper ends by considering the extent to which there is appetite for social change in Scotland by considering the attitudes of the people of Scotland and of Britain to poverty, inequality and welfare. PMID:29546160

  1. Perceived Organizational Justice in Care Services: creation and multi-sample validation of a measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Arechaederra, Diana; Briones, Elena; Lind, Allan; García-Ortiz, Luis

    2014-02-01

    Organizational justice (OJ) perceptions predict attitudes and behaviors of customers and employees across a broad range of services. Although OJ has proven predictive power and relevance, it has rarely been studied in health care settings. This stems partially from the lack of a reliable and valid measure of patients' OJ in health care encounters. The objective here was to create and validate a measure of patients' OJ. With that purpose, a survey study with two sampling contexts - the U.S. and Spain - was carried out in order to provide a cross-national validation of the scale in two versions: English (Perceived Organizational Justice in Care Services, PJustCS) and Spanish (Percepción de Justicia Organizacional en el Ámbito Sanitario, PJustAS). Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) were used to select the appropriate items in the final version of the instrument. Reliability and validity of the measure were tested. A total of 406 patients in the U.S. and 473 patients in Spain participated. The measures used were the newly created scale of Perceived Organizational Justice in Care Services (PJustCS/PJustAS) and scales of patients' Satisfaction, Trust and Global Justice. Factor Analyses supported the four dimensional structure of the instrument for each group. Multigroup CFA substantiated invariant factor loadings and invariant structural models across both samples, hence, supporting that the instrument is applicable in its two versions: English and Spanish. Validation results showed expected positive relations of OJ with patients' satisfaction, trust in clinicians and global perceived justice. These results point out the importance of health care customers' perceived organizational justice in the explanation of health care dynamics. The scale has desirable psychometric properties and shows adequate validity, contributing to the potential development of the area. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. International adoption among families in the United States: considerations of social justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Leslie Doty

    2003-04-01

    The practice of international adoption of children is critiqued, using Rawls' egalitarian concept of a distributive method of social justice. From this perspective, international adoption may be perceived as contradictory to principles of social justice by ignoring the social context within which it occurs. Social contexts that frequently surround international adoption are severe poverty and the disenfranchisement of the adopted child's biological family; the disenfranchisement of certain children because of their lower social status; gender oppression and discrimination against female children; risk to children's rights to the knowledge of their birth history and parentage; risk to children's rights to identification with their ethnic, cultural, and national group; and practices that may involve abduction, deceit, and trafficking in children. The article presents alternate views, including libertarian and utilitarian perspectives. Solutions from two international conventions are critiqued and implications are discussed for social work policy advocacy, practice, and research.

  3. How Do Principals Practise Leadership for Social Justice in Diverse School Settings? A Hong Kong Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Elson; Cheng, Annie Yan Ni

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Empirical research on leadership for social justice is in progress in many parts of the world. The purpose of this paper is to explore principals' school-leadership journeys in response to social-justice issues caused by specific contextual changes at times of uncertainty. It seeks to answer the following key questions: What…

  4. Making Sense of Social Justice Leadership: A Case Study of a Principal's Experiences to Create a More Inclusive School

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMatthews, David

    2015-01-01

    Social justice leadership in high-poverty urban schools is complex. Principals experience a range of feelings and emotions while practicing social justice leadership with implications on their leadership. This article presents a qualitative case study of an elementary school principal in an urban setting and how she led to create a more inclusive…

  5. The Fierce Urgency of Now: Diffusion of Innovation as a Mechanism to Integrate Social Justice in Counselor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratts, Manivong J.; Wood, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The authors present diffusion of innovation theory (Rogers, 2003) as a framework for integrating social justice into counselor education. An overview of diffusion theory is provided along with how the tenets of diffusion of innovation can be used to alleviate fears and anxieties that come with adopting an innovation such as social justice in…

  6. Social Justice Training in School Psychology: Applying Principles of Organizational Consultation to Facilitate Change in Graduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grapin, Sally L.

    2017-01-01

    Scholars and professional organizations have called for an increased emphasis on social justice training in applied psychology graduate programs, including school psychology programs (SPPs). During the past decade, emerging research has identified some features of high-quality social justice education, including a clear program mission statement…

  7. Political Ideology and Its Relationship to Perceptions of Social Justice Advocacy among Members of the American Counseling Association (ACA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Janee Marie

    2010-01-01

    Social justice has become an increasingly controversial topic among members of the American Counseling Association (ACA). Specifically, concerns have been raised over what is perceived to be: (a) the liberal political agenda of social justice advocates, (b) the marginalization of conservative counselors, and (c) the inappropriate use of ACA…

  8. A Co-Created Journey: Designing a College-Wide Graduate Certificate Program in Social Justice Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Linda P.; Yelich Biniecki, Susan M.

    2017-01-01

    A strengths assessment of the College of Education at Kansas State University in the United States showed that a majority of faculty had strong interests in social justice issues in education. The need for providing continuing post-graduate education in social justice education with theory-to-practice relevancy is critical in formal and informal…

  9. Leadership for Social Justice and the Characteristics of Traditional Societies: Ponderings on the Application of Western-Grounded Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oplatka, Izhar; Arar, Khalid Husny

    2016-01-01

    Leadership for social justice has been receiving increasing attention in recent years as more and more scholars have explored the ways by which educational leaders can lead for social justice in schools (e.g. Arar, 2015; Ayers, Quin, & Stovall, 2009; Fua, 2007; Furman, 2012; Jean-Marie, Normore, & Brooks, 2009; Lindsey & Lindsey, 2011;…

  10. Relieving Burnout and the "Martyr Syndrome" among Social Justice Education Activists: The Implications and Effects of Mindfulness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    Activist burnout, which causes activists to disengage from their activism, is a formidable barrier to the sustainability of social justice movements, including those focused on social justice in educational contexts. However, the cultures of these movements often disregard the importance of self-care, seeing it as self-indulgence, putting…

  11. On sampling social networking services

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Baiyang

    2012-01-01

    This article aims at summarizing the existing methods for sampling social networking services and proposing a faster confidence interval for related sampling methods. It also includes comparisons of common network sampling techniques.

  12. Impact Pathways to Address Social Well-Being and Social Justice in SLCA—Fair Wage and Level of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Neugebauer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Social well-being and social justice are meant to create a positive outcome meaningful for people and societies. According to the guidelines of social life cycle assessment, especially well-being should be considered as the main area of protection to assess social impacts of products. In addition, equity and equality need to be addressed in terms of social justice to ensure a fair and ethic society. However, even if a lot of studies focused on the definition social indicators to assess resulting impacts, neither have scientific or common agreements been founded to define a valid set of indicators, nor have consistent pathways from inventory towards impact indicators been established. This work, therefore, proposes possible pathways from life cycle inventory to impact assessment of two social midpoint categories: fair wage and level of education. Respective cause-effect-chains are developed based on the environmental life cycle assessment principle. Correspondingly, social inventory indicators throughout direct impacts to midpoint and endpoint categories are defined. Three endpoint categories are included (economic welfare, damage to human health and environmental stability to address social well-being and social justice. Qualitative characterization factors and a scaling method are proposed to evaluate the impacts according to threshold and reference values from valuable literature.

  13. McSustainability and McJustice: Certification, Alternative Food and Agriculture, and Social Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maki Hatanaka

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Alternative food and agriculture movements increasingly rely on market-based approaches, particularly voluntary standards and certification, to advance environmental sustainability and social justice. Using a case study of an ecological shrimp project in Indonesia that became certified organic, this paper raises concerns regarding the impacts of certification on alternative food and agriculture movements, and their aims of furthering sustainability and justice. Drawing on George Ritzer’s McDonaldization framework, I argue that the ecological shrimp project became McDonaldized with the introduction of voluntary standards and certification. Specifically, efficiency, calculability, predictability, and control became key characteristics of the shrimp project. While the introduction of such characteristics increased market access, it also entailed significant costs, including an erosion of trust and marginalization and alienation of farmers. Given such tradeoffs, in concluding I propose that certification is producing particular forms of environmental sustainability and social justice, what I term McSustainability and McJustice. While enabling the expansion of alternative food and agriculture, McSustainability and McJustice tend to allow little opportunity for farmer empowerment and food sovereignty, as well as exclude aspects of sustainable farming or ethical production that are not easily measured, standardized, and validated.

  14. Improving Access to Justice and Basic Services in the Informal ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Cartels often control basic services in these informal settlements, charging ... It will generate practical knowledge on how formal and informal land tenure, ... Researchers will also assess how these tools and planning processes can be used to ...

  15. teacher education for democracy and social justice: A reply to Harley ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    teacher education for democracy and social justice: A reply to Harley and Parker. B van Wyk. Abstract. No Abstract. South African Journal of Higher Education Vol. 20 (6) 2006: pp.879-887. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online.

  16. On-Line Resources for Teaching an Introductory Social Justice Course

    OpenAIRE

    Jacqueline Keil

    2007-01-01

    It is often difficult to interest students in a course in social justice using just textbooks. It is now possible to use free, on-line resources that positively affect student interest, comprehension, and participation in a course. Such a course is described. Links to suggested materials are provided.

  17. Imagining Flipped Workshops: Considerations for Designing Online Modules for Social Justice Education Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharp, D. Scott

    2017-01-01

    Online learning, defined as the use of Web-based technology to facilitate some or all learning experiences, continues to interest many universities. While technology shapes the landscape of higher education, questions remain regarding the ability and appropriateness of online learning spaces for social justice education (Dominique, 2016). This…

  18. On-Line Resources for Teaching an Introductory Social Justice Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Keil

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available It is often difficult to interest students in a course in social justice using just textbooks. It is now possible to use free, on-line resources that positively affect student interest, comprehension, and participation in a course. Such a course is described. Links to suggested materials are provided.

  19. Building a Community of Young Leaders: Experiential Learning in Jewish Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, Benjamin J.; Thomas, Margaret M. C.

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses whether more frequent participation in Jewish activist learning events is associated with higher levels of engagement in social justice-related activities and conceptions of Jewish identity. The study design was cross-sectional and comparative. An online survey was completed by 165 participants in an activist learning program.…

  20. Fieldwork Using the Professional Development Schools Model: Developing a Social Justice Orientation and Multicultural Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Amy L.; Krell, Megan M.; Hayden, Laura A.; Gracia, Robert; Denitzio, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Practicum fieldwork was conducted in an urban high school setting using a Professional Development Schools (PDS) model, with a focus on multicultural and social justice counseling competencies (MSJCC). Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyze the journal responses of 16 counseling students to ascertain MSJCC development during…

  1. Experiencing the "Growing Edge": Transformative Teacher Education to Foster Social Justice Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baily, Supriya; Stribling, Stacia M.; McGowan, Chandra L.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores how teachers' perceptions of social justice issues are developed through experiential learning opportunities and maps their transformations in thinking onto the three levels of responsibility identified by Berger's "growing edge." The study looked at where teachers were on the growing edge and examples of how they…

  2. The Entanglement of Leadership Styles and Social Justice Leadership: A Case Study from Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembylas, Michalinos; Iasonos, Sotiroula

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the leadership styles of one principal who enacts social justice practices to benefit marginalized students, especially migrant and poor students. The context is how societal challenges and their consequences--in this case the rapid increase of immigration to Cyprus and the recent economic crisis--influence this principal's…

  3. Social Justice, Learning Centredness and a First Year Experience Peer Mentoring Program: How Might They Connect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlinson, Catherine; Willimot, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Peer mentoring is a powerful strategy to support students in their first year of tertiary education utilised by a large number of tertiary institutions. While social justice principles such as rights, access, and equity as outlined by Creagh, Nelson, & Clarke (2013) highlight the importance of "student centredness," Taylor (2013)…

  4. Teaching "Art as Social Justice:" Developing Prefigurative Pedagogies in the (Liberal) Art Studio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Dylan A. T.

    2013-01-01

    In an era of expanding global capital, our role as educators remains one in which we must confront the ever growing discrepancy between the North and South, including the South within the North. Through my experiences teaching a course called "Art as Social Justice," I begin to situate my classroom labor within an emancipatory framework…

  5. The values underlying the Draft Common Frame of Reference: what role for fairness and 'social justice'?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, M.W.

    2008-01-01

    This study provides an in-depth analysis of the provisions of the draft Common Frame of Reference (DCFR), in order to assess if the DCFR perceives contract law only as a tool for regulating private law relations between equally strong parties or if it contains elements of 'social justice' in favour

  6. Factors Related to Play Therapists' Social Justice Advocacy Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Sejal B.; Ceballos, Peggy; Post, Phyllis

    2013-01-01

    The authors used a correlational research design to examine how belief in a just world, political ideology, socioeconomic status of family of origin, and percentage of racial minority clients were related to social justice advocacy attitudes among play therapists. A multiple regression was used to analyze the data. Results indicated that belief in…

  7. Teaching for Social Justice and Equity: The Journey of a Teacher Educator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Jackson, Charlease

    2015-01-01

    Teacher-education programs continue to face the challenge of improving the preparation of teachers for diversity in particular racially diverse and low-income students. Certain factors such as dispositions, self-reflection, and prior experiences contribute to preservice teachers' attitudes and beliefs toward diversity and social justice issues.…

  8. Social Justice in Australian Higher Education Policy: An Historical and Conceptual Account of Student Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Trevor; Tranter, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a synoptic account of historically changing conceptions and practices of social justice in Australian higher education policy. It maps the changes in this policy arena, beginning with the period following the Second World War and concluding with an analysis of the most recent policy proposals of the Bradley Review.…

  9. Compromising social justice in fairtrade? : Case study of a fairtrade organization in India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Das (Ranjana)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe study investigates whether Fair Trade Organizations (FTOs) are able to adhere to their principles of social justice and development goals as they enter mainstream markets which are dominated by neo-liberalism, unequal terms of trade and propagation of the "free market" principle.

  10. Employing a Social Justice Framework to Promote Postsecondary Transition for Students with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Amy L.

    2017-01-01

    Transition from high school to postsecondary education (PSE) and employment can be challenging for all youth, and particularly for youth with intellectual disability (ID). Promoting equity and access to PSE for students with ID is a social justice mandate, and high school counselors are uniquely positioned to assist youth with ID in accessing…

  11. Towards a Capability-Based Theory of Social Justice for Education Policy-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Melanie

    2006-01-01

    Increasingly there is interest in development studies and specifically in the field of education in taking up Amartya Sen's capability approach as a framework for theorizing, implementing and evaluating education policy as a matter of social justice. This paper sets out to contribute to the emerging debate and to show how the capability approach…

  12. Democracy, Ethics and Social Justice: Implications for Secondary School Leadership in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jwan, Julius O.; Kisaka, Sella T.

    2017-01-01

    Principals in Kenyan schools are required to adopt democratic school leadership practises as part of the government policy. Adopting an interpretive case study, this paper set out to explore the application of democracy, ethics and social justice in secondary schools in Kenya. The study was in two phases. Phase one: twelve school principals were…

  13. Teachers Explore How to Support Young Children's Agency for Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Glynne; de Vocht-van Alphen, Lia

    2016-01-01

    This study reports findings from an exploratory research project that contributed to an OMEP World Project on the importance of equality in being able to achieve a sustainable world and a healthy society. The teachers and researchers came together because of their interest in social justice to explore how they could support young children's sense…

  14. Problematising the Role of the White Researcher in Social Justice Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadderton, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    This article contributes to the debate on decolonising methodologies in qualitative research by considering how a white researcher can try and destabilise white supremacy when explicitly conducting research with social justice aims. It draws on data from a recent ethnographic study of minority ethnic pupils' experiences in secondary schools in…

  15. Social Justice in India: Perspectives from School Leaders in Diverse Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jayson W.; Sauers, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on social justice from the perspective of five school leaders in Delhi, India. Four of the schools in the study are affluent. One school serves primarily students who live in extreme poverty. Through interviewing these leaders, two major themes were identified. First, these leaders tended to view human rights as a driver of a…

  16. Social Justice and Technocracy: Tracing the Narratives of Inclusive Education in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danforth, Scot

    2016-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the percentage of American students with disabilities educated in general classrooms with their nondisabled peers has risen by approximately 50%. This gradual but steady policy shift has been driven by two distinct narratives of organisational change. The social justice narrative espouses principles of equality and…

  17. Preparing Preservice English Teachers to Design and Teach Social Justice-Oriented Literacy Lessons Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Bailey

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation investigates how future secondary English teachers construct an understanding of teaching literacy for social justice and how they enact that understanding, particularly with regard for constructing curriculum for and teaching young adult novels online. This research suggests three recommendations for creating strong…

  18. Space, Place, and Social Justice: Developing a Rhythmanalysis of Education in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Pam

    2013-01-01

    This article develops a methodological approach based on the spatial theory of Henri Lefebvre to address relationships between space, place, and social justice in education. In understanding the contradictory effects of globalization on local education policies and the continuing effects of historical geographies in education, Lefebvre's theory…

  19. Is Cultural Competence Enough? Deepening Social Justice Pedagogy in Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Leah R.

    2015-01-01

    This viewpoint examines the limitations of cultural competency in art therapy education through personal reflection, calling for an immersive engagement with social justice practices of naming difference, asserting counter narratives, and following the leadership of people impacted by systemic violence. The author discusses the impact of…

  20. Navigating Contradictory Communities of Practice in Learning to Teach for Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Maria Timmons

    2007-01-01

    In this article, I explore the contradictions that four new teachers experienced as their commitments to social justice collide with urban school culture. Framed within Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger's (1999) theory of situated learning and development concepts of identity, practice, and relationships illustrate how teachers' ideals are challenged…

  1. New Love, Long Love: Keeping Social Justice and Ethnography of Education in Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Shirley Brice

    2011-01-01

    Heath takes readers back to Hymes's years as Dean of the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education. She recalls, in particular, his relentless passion for introducing public school administrators to ethnography's potential for seeing what could be done to increase equity and social justice within public education. She contrasts this…

  2. Relationship between a Belief in a Just World and Social Justice Advocacy Attitudes of School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Sejal B.; Post, Phyllis; Flowers, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how belief in a just world (BJW), political ideology, religious ideology, socioeconomic status of origin, and race relate to social justice advocacy attitudes among school counseling professionals. A sequential multiple regression indicated that political ideology and BJW were statistically significant…

  3. Depoliticization of the Language of Social Justice, Multiculturalism, and Multicultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Carl A.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the depoliticization of the language of social justice, multiculturalism, and multicultural education in this moment of neoliberalism and multiculturalism, and in each section includes both national and international examples of depolicizaton to point out the pervasiveness of depolicization throughout the world.…

  4. School Counselors and Social Justice Advocacy for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidell, Markus P.

    2011-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ) students often face considerable isolation, discrimination, and violence at school, which can exacerbate the acute psychosocial and academic problems they already encounter. The purpose of this article is to introduce gay-straight alliances (GSAs) as a social justice and advocacy approach…

  5. The Potential of Critical Feminist Citizenship Frameworks for Citizenship and Social Justice in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozalek, Vivienne; Carolissen, Ronelle

    2012-01-01

    There is a paucity of South African literature that uses feminist critical approaches as a conceptual tool to examine intersections of social justice and citizenship. This article aims to address this gap by examining the potential of critical feminist approaches to transform conceptions of citizenship in higher education. It outlines how…

  6. The Application of Social Justice Principles to Global School Psychology Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriberg, David; Clinton, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    In as much as school psychology practice is based on the goals of supporting the rights, access, and treatment of children as related to their education, social justice has the potential to be a moral framework for training, research, and practice in school psychology. Accordingly, this article seeks to achieve many objectives. First, a definition…

  7. Social Justice in Teacher Education: A Qualitative Content Analysis of NCATE Conceptual Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapustka, Katherine M.; Howell, Penny; Clayton, Christine D.; Thomas, Shelley

    2009-01-01

    A review of theoretical or conceptual writing on teacher education reveals numerous examples of the term "social justice" in discussions of preservice preparation. Despite this widespread use, little research documents if and how teacher education programs utilize the concept in their programs. This study examines how institutions that included…

  8. How Exemplar Counselor Advocates Develop Social Justice Interest: A Qualitative Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Melissa Robinson; Limberg, Dodie; Gold, Joshua

    2018-01-01

    The authors examined the experiences of 10 peer-nominated exemplar counselor advocates using grounded theory methodology (Strauss & Corbin, [Strauss, A., 1998]). Analysis by the authors yielded a model of how exemplar counselor advocates develop a social justice interest and provided key insights on how counselor educators can enhance social…

  9. Researching Race and Social Justice in Education: Essays in Honour of Barry Troyna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikes, Pat, Ed.; Rizvi, Fazal, Ed.

    The essays in this book comprise a "festschrift", a group of essays, to commemorate Barry Troyna, who made an important contribution to thinking about race, racism, and research on social-justice issues in the school context. Much of his work was directed at showing that it was impossible to research questions of "race"…

  10. Social Justice and the Philosophical Foundations of Critical Peace Education: Exploring Nussbaum, Sen, and Freire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snauwaert, Dale

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to philosophically explore a "realization-focused" capabilities theory of social justice, as articulated by AmartyaSen and Martha Nussbaum, as foundational to a theory of critical peace education. Paulo Freire's philosophy of critical pedagogy has had and continues to have a profound influence on the theory and…

  11. Freedom Riders: A National Geographic Journey in Social Justice through Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Deborah A.; Clabough, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Ann Bausum is an award-winning author who has published more than eight books with National Geographic Society. Passionate about the pursuit of social justice, Bausum channels much of her energy into researching and writing books that help educate young readers about injustices and corruptions that have plagued the country. Her book, "Freedom…

  12. Restorative Practice in New Zealand Schools: Social Development through Relational Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewery, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes that restorative justice practices (RJPs), as used in New Zealand schools, are better understood as an instrument of social development than a behaviour management practice. Concerns about the achievement of Maori students are relocated, from an individualised psychological and pedagogical problem to an interdisciplinary…

  13. Social Justice Leadership in Multicultural Schools: The Case of an Ethnically Divided Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembylas, Michalinos; Iasonos, Sotiroula

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of an exploratory study focusing on the perceptions of elementary school principals who espouse a critical multicultural approach and show signs of a social justice leadership style. The study has taken place in an ethnically divided society (Cyprus) in which the political situation seems to influence the ways in…

  14. African Dance Aesthetics in a K-12 Dance Setting: From History to Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Sheila A.

    2013-01-01

    This article invites the reader to gain a deeper understanding of the aesthetics of African-based dance through the elements of tradition, transformation, and social justice. A discussion of the aesthetics of African dances within Africa and throughout the African diaspora opens the doors to present these dances in a K-12 setting, to explore a…

  15. Work, Health, Diversity, and Social Justice: Expanding and Extending the Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Nicole J.; McNally, Christopher J.; Maguire, Colleen P.; Werth, James L., Jr.; Britton, Paula J.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the authors' response to the reactions by Blustein, Catraio, Coutinho, and Murphy (2008), Chwalisz (2008), Conyers (2008), and Elliott and Johnson (2008) to their articles in "The Counseling Psychologist" on integrating health psychology, vocational psychology, multicultural psychology, and social justice (Maguire, McNally,…

  16. A New DEEL for An Old Problem: Social Justice at the Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Valerie A.; Beeman, Tom

    2006-01-01

    New DEEL does not refer to a specific policy or reform, but rather to an ideology, unencumbered by international borders and domestic politics. In this paper, we first endeavor to identify the rhetoric of New DEEL and social justice, and the reality of its implementation in schools today; spending time on the NCLB Act which we postulate is a major…

  17. (Re)Envisioning Mathematics Education: Examining Equity and Social Justice in an Elementary Mathematics Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koestler, Courtney

    2010-01-01

    In this dissertation, I present my attempts at designing an elementary mathematics methods course to support prospective teachers in developing an understanding of how to teach all students in learning powerful mathematics. To do this, I introduced them to teaching mathematics for equity and social justice by discussing ways to support students'…

  18. Constructing a Social Justice Tour: Pedagogy, Race, and Student Learning through Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnd, Natchee

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a high-impact learning project that combines geography, history, and ethnic studies. It describes the construction of the course, student outcomes, and the final and publicly presented collaborative project: the Social Justice Tour of Corvallis. Based on work in a small largely white town, this project presents a…

  19. Demos as an Explanatory Lens in Teacher Educators' Elusive Search for Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomidoy, Eleni M.; Brock, Cynthia H.; Obenchain, Kathryn M.; Pennington, Julie L.

    2013-01-01

    Borrowing insights from the Ancient Greek ideal conceptions of a democratic civic space (demos), this article examines the applicability of this framework to four teacher educators' journey to implement social justice in their programs. It is proposed that the three constitutive dimensions of demos (freedom of speech, equality to vote and hold…

  20. Education and Development: Dynamics of Access, Equity, and Social Justice in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oghenekohwo, Jonathan E.; Torunarigha, Young D.

    2018-01-01

    Widening access to education as social justice is basic in any discourse on educational investment, growth and development in developing country such as Nigeria. Presently, there is disconnect between educational development expectations and public policy frameworks designed to drive the united nations sustainable development goals (SDGs) in 2030…

  1. Dissertation Journeys of Scholar-Practitioners in an Educational Leadership for Social Justice Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Ardella; Harris, Margaret; Plough, Bobbie; Porfilio, Brad; Winkelman, Peg

    2016-01-01

    The task of guiding the development of scholar-practitioners as leaders for social justice is inherently challenging. The dissertation journey, unlike any other journey practitioner-based doctoral students face in urban school settings, provides a steep learning curve as they transition from practitioner to scholar-practitioner. This journey…

  2. Picking a Hill to Die On: Discreet Activism, Leadership and Social Justice in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, James; Tuters, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe a study that explores the discreet activist strategies of educational leaders who promote social justice. Design/methodology/approach: Part of a larger project, this study employed qualitative methods. In particular, researchers interviewed 26 leaders--principals, vice principals, department heads,…

  3. Developing Educational Leaders for Social Justice: Programmatic Elements that Work or Need Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Patricia L.; Nelson, Sarah W.; Jacobs, Jennifer; Yamamura, Erica

    2013-01-01

    In this qualitative study, Brown's (2004) tripartite theoretical framework on leadership preparation was used to explore the role programmatic elements played in development as social justice leaders within an educational leadership preparation program located in the United States. Findings from focus groups with twelve former graduate students…

  4. Researching Classroom Interaction in the light of social justice. : [paper presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolina Montesano-Montessori; Prof.Dr. Petra Ponte

    2010-01-01

    A research into classroom interaction (behaviour and communication) between teachers and pupils in the light of social justice. The research is based on the concern that educational praxis, defined as 'practice which implies a conscious awareness of the practitioners that their actions are morally

  5. Critical Change for the Greater Good: Multicultural Perceptions in Educational Leadership toward Social Justice and Equity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, Lorri J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Educational leadership for social justice and equity is the primary leadership response to inclusive and equitable education. This inquiry builds on multicultural education and educational leadership to explore an alternative approach to mainstream leadership practice. Purpose: To examine ways in which educational leaders of color in…

  6. Social Justice at the Microlevel: Working with Clients' Prejudices

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Bailey P.

    2013-01-01

    Social justice is considered the 5th force in counseling and has largely been aimed toward advocating for oppressed individuals and groups by creating change in the societal structures that maintain oppression. However, there is a lack of information for counselors who work with clients who oppress others. This article addresses assessment,…

  7. Unpacking Resistance to Change within-School Reform Programmes with a Social Justice Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynds, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Previous research in the area of resistance has inadequately described opposition to change within-school reform initiatives with a social justice orientation. A lack of attention to, and agreement on, the nature and causes of resistance may explain why so many equity-minded educational reforms fail to be sustained. This article highlights various…

  8. Pratfalls, Pitfalls, and Passion: The Melding of Leadership and Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Donnette J.

    2015-01-01

    Frequent conflicts over money, land, power, and other resources make it difficult for some societies to find or sustain any sense of equilibrium. Additionally, racial, ethnic, religious, socioeconomic, educational, and political injustices, among others, require that leaders increase their understanding and commitment to social justice. Such…

  9. Teachers' Views on an ICT Reform in Education for Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarman, Bülent; Baytak, Ahmet; Duman, Harun

    2015-01-01

    FATIH project (Movement of Enhancing Opportunities and Improving Technology) is an information and communication technologies (ICT) project to promote social justice for all schools in Turkey. The educational movements and reforms in Turkish Educational System (TES) are not new but this project has a purpose to integrate the newest technologies…

  10. Social Justice in Hard Times: Celebrating the Vision of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Sonia

    2005-01-01

    It is important to remember that one's presence "can" create a clamor, a person's action "does" make a difference. The author is reminded of this fact whenever he thinks about a poem by Angel Nieto. Similarly, individuals need to be reminded of this fact more than ever before because these are hard times for social justice. As individuals…

  11. The Comparative Impacts of Social Justice Educational Methods on Political Participation, Civic Engagement, and Multicultural Activism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krings, Amy; Austic, Elizabeth A.; Gutiérrez, Lorraine M.; Dirksen, Kaleigh E.

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional, repeated measures, quasi-experimental study evaluates changes in college students' commitment toward, and confidence in, political participation, civic engagement, and multicultural activism. Our sample (n = 653) consisted of college students in a Midwestern university who participated in one of three social justice education…

  12. Social Justice Teaching: Adopting a Critical Pedagogy to Negotiate Old and New Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender-Slack, Delane

    2009-01-01

    Literacy is intricately linked to social justice, and it can shape the learning that occurs in our English language arts (ELA) classrooms. Challenging the notion of the traditional secondary ELA classroom--as centered on literature and old literacies--I advocate utilizing a critical pedagogy with a new literacy approach that employs texts to teach…

  13. On social justice: Comparing Paul with Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although Crossan elsewhere demonstrates the deep roots of this concern in the Jewish tradition, he tends to downplay the importance of Greek contributions in this regard. The purpose of this essay will be to offer, in constant dialogue with. Crossan (and Reed), a more refined comparison of social justice in Paul on the one ...

  14. Principals Learning from Veteran Teachers Serving Impoverished Students: Social Justice Implications for Professors of Educational Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosine, Dale

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study of ten elementary veteran teachers used Hargrove's single, double, and triple-loop thinking to understand their perceptions regarding knowledge new principals need to be social justice leaders working in impoverished schools. Findings in three categories revealed the importance of principals learning to identify their…

  15. Looking Forward: The Potential of Creativity for Social Justice and Equity (And Other Exciting Outcomes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, James C.

    2017-01-01

    This brief essay argues for the importance for more work on how creativity predicts positive outcomes, with a particular emphasis on expanding our definitions of these positive outcomes. The way that creativity may lead to increased equity and social justice is used as an example of these type of potential research questions.

  16. Building Momentum in Student Engagement: Alternative Breaks and Students' Social Justice and Diversity Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Drawing from the theory of academic momentum, the purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between what happens before, during, and after an alternative break (AB) experience and students' reported gains in diversity and social justice orientations 1 year after their AB. Findings point to the importance of considering how these types…

  17. "Keeping the Vision": Collaborative Support for Social Justice Teaching and Transformational Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Nicholas Simon

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about new teachers who graduate from social justice-oriented teacher education programs (SJOTEPs) and go into urban schools as full-time teachers. How does their training translate into conceptual understandings and classroom practices? Moreover, what types of supports are needed for the attainment of such a lofty goal as social…

  18. Teaching for Social Justice: Motivations of Community College Faculty in Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sonia; Blount, Stacye; Dickinson, Charles A.; Better, Alison; Vitullo, Margaret Weigers; Tyler, Deidre; Kisielewski, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This article evaluates the reasons for career choice and job satisfaction among community college faculty who teach sociology, in relation to a social justice motivation for teaching. Using closed- and open-ended response data from a 2014 national survey of community college sociology faculty, this study finds that a preponderance of faculty do…

  19. School Consultants as Agents of Social Justice for Multicultural Children and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chieh; Vazquez-Nuttall, Ena

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses some of the social justice issues that multicultural students and families encounter that are directly relevant to school consultation practice. The issues include culturally fair education, fair expectations of the child from the family and school, fair assessment, evidence-based intervention, and evaluation of…

  20. Advancing Social Justice in Urban Schools through the Implementation of Transformative Groups for Youth of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Richard Q.; Rogers, Jennifer; Stanciu, Amalia; Silas, Melany; Brown-Smythe, Claudette; Austin, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    The unique challenges faced by some youth of color living in high poverty contexts necessitate the creation of innovative, culturally relevant, group interventions. Framing the work of group counselors from a social justice perspective provides a structure for emphasizing the complex intersection of economic, political, and socio-historical issues…

  1. Applied Developmental Science, Social Justice, and Socio-Political Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Celia B.; Busch-Rossnagel, Nancy A.; Jopp, Daniela S.; Brown, Joshua L.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we present a vision of applied developmental science (ADS) as a means of promoting social justice and socio-political well-being. This vision draws upon the field's significant accomplishments in identifying and strengthening developmental assets in marginalized youth communities, understanding the effects of poverty and racial…

  2. Our Stories Matter: Storytelling and Social Justice in the Hollaback! Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wånggren, Lena

    2016-01-01

    As feminist and anti-racist scholars and activists have long known, which stories predominate and which are marginalised is always a question of power and authority--about who is entitled to speak, and who has the authority to decide the meanings of words and actions. Storytelling can be used as a tool for social justice, as exemplified by the…

  3. Principal Preparedness for Leading in Demographically Changing Schools: Where Is the Social Justice Training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Catherine M.; Martin, Barbara N.

    2015-01-01

    This multi-case study sought to construct meaning using a cultural capital lens in relation to educational leadership preparation programs building the capacities of social justice leaders in demographically changing schools. Data revealed principals' perceptions about preparation, expectations and general beliefs and assumptions related to…

  4. An experimental investigation of justice-based service recovery on customer satisfaction, loyalty, and word-of-mouth intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Terri; Nieman-Gonder, Jennifer M; Andreoli, Nicole A; Trimarco-Beta, Darlene

    2006-12-01

    Service recovery is related to many important organizational outcomes such as customer satisfaction, loyalty, and profitability. Within the theoretical framework of organizational justice, an experiment using a simulated "live" service failure was used to assess the effects of justice-based service-recovery strategies on customer satisfaction, loyalty, positive word-of-mouth intentions, and negative word-of-mouth intentions. Analysis indicated that strategies including interactional justice, distributive justice, and a combination of these were equally effective in maintaining customer satisfaction, loyalty, and positive word of mouth, and minimizing negative word of mouth after a service failure. No support for the service recovery paradox, that is, increased satisfaction following service failure and recovery compared to never having a problem, was found. Satisfaction and loyalty for those in the failure conditions were equal to, although not higher than, in the no-failure control condition. Practical implications for organizational practices are discussed.

  5. SOCIAL WORK FORENSIC REPORTS IN SOUTH AFRICAN CRIMINAL COURTS: INEVITABILITY IN THE QUEST FOR JUSTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joubert, Mariëtte

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Social work forensic reports can play a vital role in sentencing. In this article the expectations of criminal courts of social work forensic reports were established in order to improve the contribution of the social work discipline in the search for justice. An important result indicates that courts would like to make use of social work forensic reports, among others. However, the poor writing style of some of these reports makes them unfit for use in the legal context. It is argued that social workers must be trained in critical thinking and the elements of clear writing to enable them to produce high-quality forensic reports.

  6. Seeing through the lens of social justice: A threshold for engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabo, Jens David

    In recent times the need for educational research dedicated to engineering education has been recognised. This PhD project is a contribution to the development of engineering education scholarship and the growing body of engineering education research. In this project it was recognised that problem solving is a central activity to engineering. However, it was also recognised that the conditions for doing engineering are changing, especially in light of pressing issues of poverty and environmental sustainability that humanity currently faces, and as a consequence, engineering education needs to emphasise problem definition to a greater extent. One mechanism for achieving this, which has been adopted by some engineering educators in recent years, is through courses that explicitly relate engineering to social justice. However, creating this relationship requires critical interdisciplinary thinking that is alien to most engineering students. In this dissertation it is suggested that for engineering students, and more generally, engineers, looking at their practice and profession through a social justice lens might be seen as a threshold that needs to be crossed. By studying the variation present among students in three different courses at three different North American universities, the intention was to understand how students approach and internalise social justice as a perspective on engineering and/or develop their abilities to think critically. A conceptual model to frame the study was developed by combining elements of threshold concept theory and the educational research methodology, phenomenographic variation theory. All three of the courses studied operated on a similar basic pedagogical model, however, the courses were framed differently, with social justice in the foreground or in the background with the focus on, in one case, ethics and in the other, sustainability. All courses studied appeared to be successful in encouraging engineering students to engage

  7. European Adult and Lifelong Education in Times of Crisis: Where is Social Justice when the Social Dimension turns into Social Cohesion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella

    2014-01-01

    of society; for example, in terms of access to, benefit from and success in education and employment. In this contribution, I adopt a social justice perspective to examine the redistributive function of the European Union and the role it attributes to adult and lifelong education in alleviating social......Four years on from the 2010 debt crisis, economists claim that Europe has still not recovered from the recession that worsened social inequality. This raises the important question of whether social inequality can be tackled by social justice. The concept of social justice emphasises the idea...... inequality. In doing so, I highlight not only how member states represent the primary source of revenue for the Union but also how they benefit in return from the redistribution of economic means through several financial tools and programmes. This also applies to areas such as education and vocational...

  8. Beyond Income: A Social Justice Approach to Assessing Poverty among Older Adults with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Mary A; Washington, Tiffany R; Swanner, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    How social workers define and assess poverty is a matter of economic and social justice. Recent conceptual and measurement advances point to a multidimensional definition of poverty which captures material, social, and political deprivations. Using data from a survey, this article describes how nephrology social workers assess poverty among older adults living with a chronic kidney disease (N = 52). Results suggest respondents already conceive of poverty as a multidimensional experience, support awareness-raising about poverty, and primarily assess poverty by employment status, income, access to transportation, and education. Opportunities to expand poverty assessment in future work are promising.

  9. Achieving social justice for children: How can children's rights thinking make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Anne B

    2016-01-01

    This article draws on themes from the author's book, Children’s Rights: Toward Social Justice , that emerge from surveying children’s rights issues in different childhood contexts; the family, education, child protection, and health services. The author has selected five examples of application of children’s rights to a policy area and identified the implications for policy and practice. There are four core rights that cut across all children’s rights issues that are mentioned before discussing specific areas. First, children, regardless of race, sex, language, religion, disability, or class, are entitled to rights. In other words, all children should enjoy their rights and should not be discriminated against. Second, “the best interests of the child” should be “a primary consideration” in actions or decisions concerning children. Third, children have the right to survival and development. And fourth, children have the right to be consulted and have their views heard in matters that affect them. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved

  10. Community psychology contributions to the study of social inequalities,well-being and social justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel García-Ramírez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of the Journal of Psychosocial Intervention aims to contribute to the understanding ofhuman well-being as a matter of social justice. Inequities in health and well-being are closely linked tosocial inequalities and addressing them involves the improvement of the quality of life and living conditionsof communities. Although reaching a more just society requires systemic changes, actions aimed at groupsthat are at greater risk of multiple vulnerabilities must be intensified in order to reduce the slope of thesocial gradient of health and well-being. Community psychology embraces as one of its key principles toadvocate for social change through the empowerment of disadvantaged groups, such as children and youthliving in poverty, women suffering violence, people with disabilities and elderly immigrants. Thecontributions of this monograph offer courses of action for a scientific agenda whose goal is to provideopportunities for all individuals to achieve meaning and greater control over the resources they need fortheir well-being and prosperity.

  11. Social Justice Teacher Activism and Social Movement Unionism: Tensions, Synergies, and Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lois Weiner

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Though the titles and acronyms of policies differ from one country to another, throughout the world a political project has taken root with the assumption that to reduce poverty and inequality, governments should privatize school systems, alter teaching from a career to contract labor, use standardized tests to make students and teachers accountable, and curtail the power and legal rights of teachers unions. This article explores how teacher activists might help reverse neoliberal educational politics by developing mutually-respectful collaborations among teachers, parents and youth in poor communities, in school-based and system-wide partnerships that involve teachers unions. Analyzing events as they were experienced and influenced by a New York City-based NGO of teachers committed to educational justice, the author examines the landscape of educational reform politics and the creation of new spaces and organizational forms not confined by collective bargaining jurisdictions and traditional bargaining demands. The study suggests that development of a social movement of teachers that might edge teachers unions in the direction of social movement teacher unionism may not occur in a linear fashion. Rather, a complex push-pull dynamic occurs with each change, opening and retracting space, remaking networks and influencing longstanding personal ties among activists.

  12. Using Intergroup Dialogue to Promote Social Justice and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessel, Adrienne; Rogge, Mary E.; Garlington, Sarah B.

    2006-01-01

    Intergroup dialogue is a public process designed to involve individuals and groups in an exploration of societal issues such as politics, racism, religion, and culture that are often flashpoints for polarization and social conflict. This article examines intergroup dialogue as a bridging mechanism through which social workers in clinical, other…

  13. 'Knowledge,' Curriculum and Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrigley, Terry

    2018-01-01

    This article considers the place of knowledge in developing a socially just curriculum. It pursues the unusual route of a critique of Social Realism, a small but influential tendency in curriculum studies which claims that knowledge has been squeezed out by recent curriculum reforms and that there has been a descent into relativism. This paper…

  14. "They Lacked the Right Food": A Brief History of Breastfeeding and the Quest for Social Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Jacqueline H

    2018-05-01

    In the late 19th-century United States and Europe, infants died at high rates from diarrhea. Physicians and social justice advocates responded to the public health crisis with attempts to clean up the water and cows' milk supplies, as well as social welfare legislation and assorted educational efforts to help mothers better care for their children. Most visible among the educational efforts were breastfeeding campaigns. A century later in developing countries, physicians and activists were confronted with a similar problem-infants dying from diarrhea due to the unethical advertising and marketing practices of formula companies. I argue in this article that crusades for social justice at the most basic level-to ensure that children will live to adulthood-have long been connected with efforts to safeguard mothers' ability to adequately breastfeed their children.

  15. Domesticating Social Justice Activism in the Global Era? The Process of Reconfiguring the Czech Social Justice Movement in Times of Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Navratil

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The contemporary economic crisis is sometimes labeled as the greatest crisis of capitalism since the Great Depression. Therefore one might expect it to become a perfect mobilizing grievance for the transnational social justice movement, which used to target the ideology of neoliberal governance and social consequences of unrestricted global financial markets. However, the current responses to the crisis and consequent austerity policies have remained mostly embedded at the national or even local level. The symbols of this struggle—Los Indignados and the Occupy movement—have focused on targeting national political issues rather than on organizing transnational coalitions and international protest events, while paying little attention to the role of global institutions and corporations. This article focuses on the case of Czech Republic and traces two broad processes—scale shift and identity shift— that led to a broader change in the meta-logic of social justice mobilization. These processes and their constituent mechanisms have transformed the globally-focused and weakly-integrated movement into dense and nationally embedded coalitions that have started to target the national consequences of neoliberal governance instead of its global political foundations.

  16. The Arts to Encourage Multiple Perspectives and Promote Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinhasi-Vittorio, Limor; Vernola, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the use of the arts and aesthetic education in a graduate literacy course for in-service and pre-service teachers followed by a description of how one graduate student implemented her learned theory in the high school classroom in which she taught. The core theory of the paper follows the assumption that aesthetic education…

  17. A Longitudinal Model of School Climate, Social Justice Orientation, and Academic Outcomes among Latina/o Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Gualdrón, Leyla, M.; Helms, Janet E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Social justice orientation (SJO) is the motivation to promote justice and equity among all in society. Researchers argue that students of Color with high SJO can resist structural racism in their schools/society and have positive academic outcomes. Purpose: In the present study, a longitudinal model of cultural and environmental…

  18. Teaching Science for Social Justice: An Examination of Elementary Preservice Teachers' Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslinger, James C.

    This qualitative study examines the beliefs and belief changes of eleven elementary preservice teachers about teaching science for social justice. Using constructivist grounded theory, it forwards a new theory of belief change about teaching science for social justice. The theory posits that three teaching and learning conditions may facilitate belief change: preservice teachers need to recognize (1) the relationship between science and society; (2) the relationship between individuals and society; and (3) the importance of taking action on socioscientific issues. This research responds to calls by critical scholars of teacher education who contend that beliefs in relation to equity, diversity, and multiculturalism need to be explored. They have found that many preservice teachers hold beliefs that are antithetical to social justice tenets. Since beliefs are generally considered to be precursors to actions, identifying and promoting change in beliefs are important to teaching science for social justice. Such a move may lead to the advancement of curricular and pedagogical efforts to promote the academic participation and success in elementary science of Aboriginal and racialized minority students. The study was undertaken in a year-long science methods course taught by the researcher. It was centered on the preservice teachers -- their beliefs, their belief changes, and the course pedagogies that they identified as crucial to their changes. However, the course was based on the researcher-instructor's review of the scholarly literature on science education, teacher education, and social justice. It utilized a critical -- cultural theoretical framework, and was aligned to the three dimensions of critical nature of science, critical knowledge and pedagogy, and sociopolitical action. Findings indicate that, at the beginning of the year, preservice teachers held two types of beliefs (liberal and critical) and, by the end of the course, they experienced three kinds of

  19. Democracy and social justice: Implications for school leadership in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jwan

    Inclusion of democratic school leadership principles in teacher training programmes and an inculcation of .... appreciate the social, cultural and political role of schooling as follows: ...... democratic organizational landscape. Educational.

  20. Applying a Social Justice Lens to Youth Mentoring: A Review of the Literature and Recommendations for Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Jamie N; Hurd, Noelle M; Hussain, Saida B

    2017-06-01

    Youth mentoring interventions are often designed with the intention of promoting improved outcomes among marginalized youth. Despite their promise to reduce inequality through the provision of novel opportunities and increased social capital to marginalized youth, youth mentoring interventions hold the potential to reproduce rather than reduce inequality. In the current review, we explore literature on youth mentoring that has incorporated a social justice lens. We conclude that there is a need for greater attention to principles of social justice in the design, implementation, and evaluation of youth mentoring interventions. After reviewing the literature, we make recommendations for research and practice based on a social justice perspective and explore alternatives to traditional youth mentoring that may allow for better alignment with social justice principles. © Society for Community Research and Action 2017.

  1. Social Justice at the Core of Breastfeeding Protection, Promotion and Support: A Conceptualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paige Hall

    2018-05-01

    Despite widespread awareness of the health benefits for both mothers and babies we are far from achieving universal breastfeeding. Breastfeeding rates globally are lower than recommended levels and there are concerns that some global breastfeeding efforts have stalled (1, 2). In addition, we see persistent disparities in breastfeeding rates by race, ethnicity, class and status (3). A growing literature documents how a range of injustices, including gender inequality (7), racism (8), poverty (9), and violence (10, 11) shape whether, how exclusive, and for how long mothers and others will be able to breastfeed or feed their infants human milk. These social injustices and inequities work to privilege breastfeeding even as the health message becomes more mainstreamed and human milk more desirable. A social justice approach could help us address the gender, race, and sexuality-based inequities and injustices in opportunities, resources, status, and power that are influencing the patterns of breastfeeding we see today. The 12th Breastfeeding and Feminism International Conference held in 2017 took as its theme Breastfeeding as Social Justice: From Crucial Conversation to Inspired Action. The planning team for that conference identified seven core domains that could help us conceptualize a framework for placing social justice at the core of our work. This paper presents this framework and suggestions for policy and practice that follow.

  2. Organizational Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Travis

    2013-01-01

    Helping principals understand the importance of organizational justice is the first step in enhancing learning outcomes for all learners, regardless of their social class, race, abilities, sex, or gender. In schools, organizational justice may be defined as teachers' perceptions of fairness, respect, and equity that relate to their interactions…

  3. Correlates of justice encounter in service recovery and word-of-mouth publicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hart O. Awa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines word-of-mouth publicity as an outcome of consumer perception of equitable recovery programs. Survey data were drawn from 317 teachers of Federal Government Colleges and 79 executives of mobile telephone firms in the southeastern and south–south zones; this sample came from locations where Global Systems for Mobile Communications and Code Data Multiple Access networks have interface. Using the partial least square to analyze the data, the path coefficients with their respective t-values greater than 1.96 confirm that the justice dimensions have statistically significant relationship with word-of-mouth. Thus, the manipulation of justice dimensions in the events of service failure affects customers’ advocacy behavior. The study recommends proactive and relational approaches in dealing with customer issues as well as fair and equitable recovery and complaint handling programs to suit the needs of the complainants, get them satisfied, and to cause them to progress in the loyalty ladder.

  4. Tend to Compare and Tend to Be Fair: The Relationship between Social Comparison Sensitivity and Justice Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Shanshan; Yu, Rongjun

    2016-01-01

    Social comparison is a prerequisite for processing fairness, although the two types of cognition may be associated with different emotions. Whereas social comparison may induce envy, the perception of unfairness may elicit anger. Yet, it remains unclear whether people who tend to have a strong sense of fairness also tend to compare themselves more with others. Here, Study 1 used a modified ultimatum game (UG) and a social comparison game (SCG) to examine the relationship between justice sensitivity and social comparison sensitivity in 51 young adults. Study 2 examined self-reported social comparison and justice sensitivity in 142 young adults. Both studies showed a positive correlation between social comparison sensitivity and justice sensitivity. We reason that social comparison and justice sensitivity have an important positive correlation in human decision-making. The rejection of self-disadvantageous inequality offers may be due to the social comparison effect, which suggests that the tendency to compare oneself with others may contribute to having a strong sense of justice. Our findings suggest that the predictions of game theory may vary depending on the social culture context and incorporating notions of fairness and social comparison tendency may be essential to better predict the actual behavior of players in social interactive situations.

  5. Tend to Compare and Tend to Be Fair: The Relationship between Social Comparison Sensitivity and Justice Sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Zhen

    Full Text Available Social comparison is a prerequisite for processing fairness, although the two types of cognition may be associated with different emotions. Whereas social comparison may induce envy, the perception of unfairness may elicit anger. Yet, it remains unclear whether people who tend to have a strong sense of fairness also tend to compare themselves more with others. Here, Study 1 used a modified ultimatum game (UG and a social comparison game (SCG to examine the relationship between justice sensitivity and social comparison sensitivity in 51 young adults. Study 2 examined self-reported social comparison and justice sensitivity in 142 young adults. Both studies showed a positive correlation between social comparison sensitivity and justice sensitivity. We reason that social comparison and justice sensitivity have an important positive correlation in human decision-making. The rejection of self-disadvantageous inequality offers may be due to the social comparison effect, which suggests that the tendency to compare oneself with others may contribute to having a strong sense of justice. Our findings suggest that the predictions of game theory may vary depending on the social culture context and incorporating notions of fairness and social comparison tendency may be essential to better predict the actual behavior of players in social interactive situations.

  6. Out of sight, out of mind: racial retrieval cues increase the accessibility of social justice concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Phia S; Kelley, Nicholas J; Molina, Ludwin E; Thai, Luyen T

    2017-09-01

    Photographs provide critical retrieval cues for personal remembering, but few studies have considered this phenomenon at the collective level. In this research, we examined the psychological consequences of visual attention to the presence (or absence) of racially charged retrieval cues within American racial segregation photographs. We hypothesised that attention to racial retrieval cues embedded in historical photographs would increase social justice concept accessibility. In Study 1, we recorded gaze patterns with an eye-tracker among participants viewing images that contained racial retrieval cues or were digitally manipulated to remove them. In Study 2, we manipulated participants' gaze behaviour by either directing visual attention toward racial retrieval cues, away from racial retrieval cues, or directing attention within photographs where racial retrieval cues were missing. Across Studies 1 and 2, visual attention to racial retrieval cues in photographs documenting historical segregation predicted social justice concept accessibility.

  7. Promoting positive human development and social justice: Integrating theory, research and application in contemporary developmental science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Richard M

    2015-06-01

    The bold claim that developmental science can contribute to both enhancing positive development among diverse individuals across the life span and promoting social justice in their communities, nations and regions is supported by decades of theoretical, methodological and research contributions. To explain the basis of this claim, I describe the relational developmental systems (RDS) metamodel that frames contemporary developmental science, and I present an example of a programme of research within the adolescent portion of the life span that is associated with this metamodel and is pertinent to promoting positive human development. I then discuss methodological issues associated with using RDS-based models as frames for research and application. Finally, I explain how the theoretical and methodological ideas associated with RDS thinking may provide the scholarly tools needed by developmental scientists seeking to contribute to human thriving and to advance social justice in the Global South. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  8. Teaching Human Rights from Below: Towards Solidarity, Resistance and Social Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Canlas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we discuss our approaches, pedagogies, and practices for a weekly human rights club that serves immigrant and refugee youth.  The research team is involved in a research collaboration with a public high school in a large urban area on the West Coast.  In this article, we discuss some of our curricular and pedagogical strategies and students’ responses to lesson plans and activities that aimed to build solidarity, resistance to dominant and assimilative narratives, and action towards social justice.  Our approach focuses on intersecting a transforamtive human rights perspective with the praxes of critical pedagogies and social justice.  This article discusses a radical approach to teaching Human Rights along three key themes: student-centered human rights pedagogy, cultural wealth and HRE, and students’ articulation of human rights language into action.

  9. Forming Social Justice Projects: Student Activists Reflect on Coalition-Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren E. Lund

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Student activists share their experiences with racism and more specifically, their attempts to form school diversity initiatives. The author outlines a problematic lack of engagement of student activists in the scholarly literature on social justice, particularly related to their undervalued role as leaders in school-based antiracist coalitions. Excerpts from in-depth interviews with seven student participants in western Canadian schools offer new understandings on the potential of school-based activists. They explain the challenges and successes in building and sustaining activist coalitions and in pursuing their social justice efforts beyond school. Their contributions represent new voices to join the ongoing conversation in educational research and community activism.

  10. The Space That Difference Makes: On Marginality, Social Justice and the Future of the Health Humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Kevin J; DasGupta, Sayantani

    2016-12-01

    Feminist theorist and educator, bell hooks, asserts that to seek true liberation one must choose marginality. One must choose to occupy the space outside the binary between colonizer-colonized, hegemonic center-periphery, and us-them in order to create a location of possibility. This essay will reveal the practice of social justice as the navigation of the space that difference makes and argue that choosing marginality provides a framework for health humanities work towards social justice in health care. The space of the launderette that is depicted in Hanif Kureishi's 1986 film, My Beautiful Laundrette, provides an example of choosing marginality and illustrates how difference structures both real and imagined spaces, which influences how individuals ultimately perceive one another. We will draw from the work of bell hooks; political geographer, Edward Soja; and Marxist philosopher, Henri Lefebvre, to demonstrate the importance of the health humanities' position at the margin to traditional health care education.

  11. Visual graphics for human rights, social justice, democracy and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The value of human rights in a democratic South Africa is constantly threatened and often waived for nefarious reasons. We contend that the use of visual graphics among incoming university visual art students provides a mode of engagement that helps to inculcate awareness of human rights, social responsibility, and the ...

  12. Their Highest Vocation: Social Justice and the Millennial Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Helen

    2012-01-01

    According to polls, today's "Millennial" college students are the most politically progressive generation in U.S. history. They are deeply concerned about social and economic inequality, they support egalitarian relationships among nations and peoples, and they believe that the government should do whatever it takes to protect the environment.…

  13. Legal pluralism and social justice in economic and political development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benda-Beckmann, von F.

    2001-01-01

    Legal pluralism is an approach which accepts the possibility that within any given polity, there can be more than one 'legal order' and that the state is not the exclusive source of legal regulation. Nevertheless, defining whether a particular claim or social relation is legally sanctioned is a

  14. Justice or Care? Ethical Reasoning of Preservice Social Studies Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlmeier, Jada; Saye, John W.

    2012-01-01

    The authors explored the ethical reasoning of 27 preservice teachers in the first course of a 4-course social studies education program. The students discussed 2 historically analogous cases that focused on 1 of 4 value problem areas: consent of the governed, general welfare, property, and morality. The authors were interested in exploring whether…

  15. Second Modernity, (In)equality, and Social (In)justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, John; George, Rosalyn

    2016-01-01

    It is important to realize that the economic climate since the banking crisis in 2007 has seen the rate of income and wealth inequality accelerate. This has reached the point where concerns for political, economic, and social stability have been raised by those representing the pillars and foundations of institutions that represent the market…

  16. Incorporating intersectionality into psychology: An opportunity to promote social justice and equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    Intersectionality is receiving increasing attention in many fields, including psychology. This theory or framework has its roots in the work of Black feminist scholar-activists, and it focuses on interlocking systems of oppression and the need to work toward structural-level changes to promote social justice and equity. Thus, the current interest in intersectionality in psychology presents an opportunity to draw psychologists' attention more to structural-level issues and to make social justice and equity more central agendas to the field. The large, ever-growing bodies of research demonstrating the wide-ranging adverse consequences of structural- and interpersonal-level oppression, inequality, and stigma for the health and well-being of many diverse groups of people support that these issues are central to the field of psychology. We as individual psychologists and the field as a whole can work to fully incorporate the insights of intersectionality and therefore contribute to making social justice and equity more central across the varied subfields and realms of our work. Specific ways that we can do this are to (a) engage and collaborate with communities, (b) address and critique societal structures, (c) work together/build coalitions, (d) attend to resistance in addition to resilience, and (e) teach social justice curricula. There are important examples both within and outside of psychology that can guide us in achieving these goals. These suggestions are meant to foster conversation and consideration by psychologists across all subfields and areas of focus. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. La gestion de la demande en eau, un instrument de justice sociale ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Les données probantes issues de la recherche confirment la thèse voulant que la participation des femmes, au même titre que les hommes, à la conception et à la gestion des projets relatifs à l'eau décuple les résultats escomptés et contribue à la pérennité des ressources hydriques ainsi qu'à la justice sociale.

  18. How Gender Conscious Pedagogy in Higher Education Can Stimulate Actions of Social Justice in Society

    OpenAIRE

    Ann-Katrin Witt; Marta Cuesta

    2014-01-01

    In order to reflect about methods that can generate social justice and democratization, this article emphasises on practical implementations, connected to gender conscious pedagogy. Gender conscious pedagogy aims at overcoming the myth of objectivity, and by questioning through teaching what is considered as common sense and "normal". This entails acting and reflecting on breakthroughs, for example about an understanding of how gender codes influence everyday instances as well as working life...

  19. From the Sylvia Plath Effect to Social Justice: Moving Forward With Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, James C

    2017-05-01

    The author contrasts an early research passion, creativity and mental illness, with his current interest in creativity and social justice. Kaufman's initial research revolved around the Sylvia Plath Effect, yet was insensitive to broader implications or concerns. As his thinking about creativity has evolved, he is currently more focused on a more positive use for creativity - namely, how creativity can help issues of fairness and equity.

  20. From the Sylvia Plath Effect to Social Justice: Moving Forward With Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C. Kaufman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The author contrasts an early research passion, creativity and mental illness, with his current interest in creativity and social justice. Kaufman’s initial research revolved around the Sylvia Plath Effect, yet was insensitive to broader implications or concerns. As his thinking about creativity has evolved, he is currently more focused on a more positive use for creativity – namely, how creativity can help issues of fairness and equity.