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  1. Chapter 2. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources--Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley group, Jurassic Smackover interior salt basins total petroleum system, in the East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyman, T.S.; Condon, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System is defined for this assessment to include (1) Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation carbonates and calcareous shales and (2) Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley Group organic-rich shales. The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System includes four conventional Cotton Valley assessment units: Cotton Valley Blanket Sandstone Gas (AU 50490201), Cotton Valley Massive Sandstone Gas (AU 50490202), Cotton Valley Updip Oil and Gas (AU 50490203), and Cotton Valley Hypothetical Updip Oil (AU 50490204). Together, these four assessment units are estimated to contain a mean undiscovered conventional resource of 29.81 million barrels of oil, 605.03 billion cubic feet of gas, and 19.00 million barrels of natural gas liquids. The Cotton Valley Group represents the first major influx of clastic sediment into the ancestral Gulf of Mexico. Major depocenters were located in south-central Mississippi, along the Louisiana-Mississippi border, and in northeast Texas. Reservoir properties and production characteristics were used to identify two Cotton Valley Group sandstone trends across northern Louisiana and east Texas: a high-permeability blanket-sandstone trend and a downdip, low-permeability massive-sandstone trend. Pressure gradients throughout most of both trends are normal, which is characteristic of conventional rather than continuous basin-center gas accumulations. Indications that accumulations in this trend are conventional rather than continuous include (1) gas-water contacts in at least seven fields across the blanket-sandstone trend, (2) relatively high reservoir permeabilities, and (3) high gas-production rates without fracture stimulation. Permeability is sufficiently low in the massive-sandstone trend that gas-water transition zones are vertically extensive and gas-water contacts are poorly defined. The interpreted presence of gas-water contacts within the Cotton Valley

  2. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain, Final Report and Topical Reports 5-8 on Smackover Petroleum system and Underdevelopment Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Ernest A.; Puckett, T. Markham; Parcell, William C.; Llinas, Juan Carlos; Kopaska-Merkel, David C.; Townsend, Roger N.

    2002-03-05

    The Smackover Formation, a major hydrocarbon-producing horizon in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin (MISB), conformably overlies the Norphlet Formation and is conformably overlain by the Buckner Anhydrite Member of the Haynesville Formation. The Norphlet-Smackover contact can be either gradational or abrupt. The thickness and lithofacies distribution of the Smackover Formation were controlled by the configuration of incipient paleotopography. The Smackover Formation has been subdivided into three informal members, referred to as the lower, middle and upper members.

  3. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-12-31

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance

  4. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Costal Plain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-05-31

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance

  5. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-02-25

    The University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company, has undertaken an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary goal of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. Geoscientific reservoir property, geophysical seismic attribute, petrophysical property, and engineering property characterization has shown that reef (thrombolite) and shoal reservoir lithofacies developed on the flanks of high-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Vocation Field example) and on the crest and flanks of low-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Appleton Field example). The reef thrombolite lithofacies have higher reservoir quality than the shoal lithofacies due to overall higher permeabilities and greater interconnectivity. Thrombolite dolostone flow units, which are dominated by dolomite intercrystalline and vuggy pores, are characterized by a pore system comprised of a higher percentage of large-sized pores and larger pore throats. Rock-fluid interactions (diagenesis) studies have shown that although the primary control on

  6. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2002-09-25

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of rockfluid interactions, (2) petrophysical and engineering characterization, (3) data integration, (4) 3-D geologic modeling, (5) 3-D reservoir simulation and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 2. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions is near completion. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and

  7. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2001-09-14

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project has been reservoir description and characterization. This effort has included four tasks: (1) geoscientific reservoir characterization, (2) the study of rock-fluid interactions, (3) petrophysical and engineering characterization and (4) data integration. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 1. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been initiated. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been

  8. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-12-31

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance

  9. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Costal Plain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-05-31

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance

  10. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-09-25

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling that utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling, testing of the geologic-engineering model, and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of seismic attributes, (2) petrophysical characterization, (3) data integration, (4) the building of the geologic-engineering model, (5) the testing of the geologic-engineering model and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 3. Progress on the project is as follows: geoscientific reservoir characterization is completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been completed. Observations regarding the diagenetic

  11. Lime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, US lime production was 20 Mt with a value of $1.5 billion. Production was unchanged compared with 2004. Captive production was 1.4 Mt. US consumption was 20.2 Mt. Most of the US lime trade was with Canada and Mexico. Despite some disruptions due to hurricanes Katrina and Rita, normal sales activities remained healthy.

  12. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plan (Phase II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Joe Benson; David Hilton; David Cate; Lewis Brown

    2006-05-29

    The principal research efforts for Phase II of the project were drilling an infill well strategically located in Section 13, T. 10 N., R. 2 W., of the Womack Hill Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, and obtaining fresh core from the upper Smackover reservoir to test the feasibility of implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in this field. The Turner Land and Timber Company 13-10 No. 1 well was successfully drilled and tested at a daily rate of 132 barrels of oil in Section 13. The well has produced 27,720 barrels of oil, and is currently producing at a rate of 60 barrels of oil per day. The 13-10 well confirmed the presence of 175,000 barrels of attic (undrained) oil in Section 13. As predicted from reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation, the top of the Smackover reservoir in the 13-10 well is structurally high to the tops of the Smackover in offsetting wells, and the 13-10 well has significantly more net pay than the offsetting wells. The drilling and testing of the 13-10 well showed that the eastern part of the field continues to have a strong water drive and that there is no need to implement a pressure maintenance program in this part of the Womack Hill Field at this time. The success achieved in drilling and testing the 13-10 infill well demonstrates the benefits of building a geologic model to target areas in mature fields that have the potential to contain undrained oil, thus increasing the productivity and profitability of these fields. Microbial cultures that grew at 90 C and converted ethanol to acid were recovered from fresh cuttings from the Smackover carbonate reservoir in an analogous field to the Womack Hill Field in southwest Alabama; however, no viable microorganisms were found in the Smackover cores recovered from the drilling of the 13-10 well in Womack Hill Field. Further evaluation is, therefore, required prior to implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in the Womack Hill Field.

  13. Lime Pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Rocio; Granda, Cesar Benigno; Holtzapple, Mark T.

    Lime pretreatment has proven to be a useful method for selectively reducing the lignin content of lignocellulosic biomass without significant loss in carbohydrates, thus realizing an important increase in biodigestibility. In lime pretreatment, the biomass is pretreated with calcium hydroxide and water under different conditions of temperature and pressure. It can be accomplished in one of three fashions: (1) short-term pretreatment that lasts up to 6 h, requires temperatures of 100-160°C, and can be applied with or without oxygen (pressure ~200 psig); (2) long-term pretreatment taking up to 8 weeks, requiring only 55-65°C, and capable of running with or without air (atmospheric pressure); and (3) simple pretreatment requiring 1 h in boiling water, without air or oxygen. Nonoxidative conditions are effective at low lignin contents (below ~18% lignin), whereas oxidative conditions are required for high lignin contents (above ~18% lignin).

  14. Mesozoic (Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous) deep gas reservoir play, central and eastern Gulf coastal plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, E.A.; Li, P.; Goddard, D.A.; Ramirez, V.O.; Talukdar, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    The Mesozoic (Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous) deeply buried gas reservoir play in the central and eastern Gulf coastal plain of the United States has high potential for significant gas resources. Sequence-stratigraphic study, petroleum system analysis, and resource assessment were used to characterize this developing play and to identify areas in the North Louisiana and Mississippi Interior salt basins with potential for deeply buried gas reservoirs. These reservoir facies accumulated in Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous Norphlet, Haynesville, Cotton Valley, and Hosston continental, coastal, and marine siliciclastic environments and Smackover and Sligo nearshore marine shelf, ramp, and reef carbonate environments. These Mesozoic strata are associated with transgressive and regressive systems tracts. In the North Louisiana salt basin, the estimate of secondary, nonassociated thermogenic gas generated from thermal cracking of oil to gas in the Upper Jurassic Smackover source rocks from depths below 3658 m (12,000 ft) is 4800 tcf of gas as determined using software applications. Assuming a gas expulsion, migration, and trapping efficiency of 2-3%, 96-144 tcf of gas is potentially available in this basin. With some 29 tcf of gas being produced from the North Louisiana salt basin, 67-115 tcf of in-place gas remains. Assuming a gas recovery factor of 65%, 44-75 tcf of gas is potentially recoverable. The expelled thermogenic gas migrated laterally and vertically from the southern part of this basin to the updip northern part into shallower reservoirs to depths of up to 610 m (2000 ft). Copyright ?? 2008. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  15. Jurassic Amber in Lebanon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dany AZAR; Raymond G(E)ZE; Antoine EL-SAMRANI; Jacqueline MAALOULY; André NEL

    2010-01-01

    Reports of amber predating the Lower Cretaceous are unusual and scarce; they mostly refer to amber pieces of millimetric dimension.In the present study,we report the discovery of 10 new outcrops of Jurassic amber in Lebanon.Some of these had large centimetric-sized pieces of amber.The new localities are described,amber is characterized,and its infrared spectra given.Although the new Jurassic amber yielded to date no more than fungal inclusions,this material is significant and promising.The discovery of several Jurassic outcrops provides crucial information on the prevailing paleoenvironment of that time.

  16. Jurassic fishes of Gondwana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana López-Arbarello

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Jurassic is an important period for understanding the origin of modern fish faunas, since it saw the first radiation - and in some cases the origin - of most modern groups. In chondrichthyans, neoselachian sharks and rays diversified during this time. In actinopterygians, the neopterygians, and among them the teleosts, experienced an important radiation, which led to the appearance of several of the modern teleosts groups. In the sarcopterygians, dipnoans and actinistians approached their current forms. However, the Jurassic fossil record of fishes is strongly biased towards the Northern Hemisphere. The only notable Early Jurassic fish fauna from Gondwana is that of the Kota Formation of India. For the Middle Jurassic, the most important Gondwanan fish faunas are those of the Aalenian-Bathonian Stanleyville Beds of the Democratic Republic of Congo, in which a distinct freshwater and a marine fauna are found. In the Late Jurassic, the Gondwanan record is slightly better, with important marine faunas being known from the Oxfordian Quebrada del Profeta in Chile and the Tithonian Vaca Muerta Formation of Argentina. Freshwater faunas have been described from the Tithonian Talbragar Beds of eastern Australia and the Tithonian Cañadón Calcáreo Formation of Argentina. The taxonomic composition of the known marine actinopterygian faunas of Gondwana is in general agreement with faunas of the Northern Hemisphere. However, the Jurassic fish record from Gondwana is highly incomplete both stratigraphically and geographically, and most faunas are in need of revision, further hampering an interpretation of Jurassic fish evolution in the Southern Hemisphere.

  17. Rootstocks for 'Tahiti' lime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stenzel Neusa Maria Colauto

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The 'Tahiti' lime (Citrus latifolia Tanaka is an important commercial citrus cultivar in Brazil. 'Rangpur' lime has being used as its main rootstock, but it is susceptible to root rot caused by Phytophthora, reducing tree longevity. An experiment was set up in a randomized block design, with three trees per plot of each rootstock and four replicates, and run for 12 years, aiming to compare the performance of 'IAC-5 Tahiti' lime, budded on 'Rangpur' lime (Citrus limonia Osb.; 'C-13' citrange (Citrus sinensis (L. Osb. × Poncirus trifoliata (L. Raf.; 'African' rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri Lush.; 'Volkamer' lemon (Citrus volkameriana Ten. & Pasq.; trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata (L. Raf.; 'Sunki' mandarin (Citrus sunki Hort. ex Tan. and 'Cleopatra' mandarin (Citrus reshni Hort. ex Tan.. Eleven years after the establishment of the orchard, trees with the greatest canopy development were budded on 'C-13' citrange and 'African' rough lemon, and both differed significantly from trees budded on trifoliate orange, 'Sunki' and 'Cleopatra' mandarins, which presented the smallest canopy development. Trees budded on 'Rangpur' lime and 'C-13' citrange had the highest cumulative yields, and were different from trees budded on trifoliate orange, 'Cleopatra' and 'Sunki' mandarins. There was no rootstock effect on mean fruit weight and on the total soluble solid/acid ratio in the juice. The 'Rangpur' lime and the 'Cleopatra' mandarin rootstocks reduced longevity of plants.

  18. Exploring Jurassic Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Patricia E.; Wiley, Clyde

    1993-01-01

    Describes several student-tested activities built around "Jurassic Park." The activities feature students engaged in role-playing scenarios, investigative research projects, journal writing and communications skills activities, cooperative learning groups, and learning experiences that make use of reading skills and mathematical knowledge. (PR)

  19. Exploring Jurassic Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Patricia E.; Wiley, Clyde

    1993-01-01

    Describes several student-tested activities built around "Jurassic Park." The activities feature students engaged in role-playing scenarios, investigative research projects, journal writing and communications skills activities, cooperative learning groups, and learning experiences that make use of reading skills and mathematical knowledge. (PR)

  20. Potential Use Of Carbide Lime Waste As An Alternative Material To Conventional Hydrated Lime Of Cement-Lime Mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Al Khaja, Waheeb A.

    1992-01-01

    The present study aimed at the possibility of using the carbide lime waste as an alternative material to the conventional lime used for cement-lime mortar. The waste is a by-product obtained in the generation of acetylene from calcium carbide. Physical and chemical properties of the wastes were studied. Two cement-lime-sand mix proportions containing carbide lime waste were compared with the same mix proportions containing conventional lime along with a control mix without lime. Specimens wer...

  1. Evaluation of enhanced recovery operations in Smackover fields of southwest Alabama. Draft topical report on Subtasks 5 and 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, D.R.

    1992-06-01

    This report contains detailed geologic and engineering information on enhanced-recovery techniques used in unitized Smackover fields in Alabama. The report also makes recommendations on the applicability of these enhanced-recovery techniques to fields that are not now undergoing enhanced recovery. Eleven Smackover fields in Alabama have been unitized. Three fields were unitized specifically to allow the drilling of a strategically placed well to recover uncontacted oil. Two fields in Alabama are undergoing waterflood projects. Five fields are undergoing gas-injection programs to increase the ultimate recovery of hydrocarbons. Silas and Choctaw Ridge fields were unitized but no enhanced-recovery operations have been implemented.

  2. LIME REQUIREMENT DETERMINATION AND LIMING IMPACT ON SOIL NUTRIENT STATUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krunoslav Karalić

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of conducted research was to determine the influence of liming, mineral and organic fertilization on soil chemical properties and nutrient availability in the soil, yield height and mineral composition of alfalfa. Results were used to create regression models for prediction of liming impact on soil chemical properties. Liming and fertilization experiment was sat up in 20 L volume plastic pots with two types of acid soils with different texture from two sites. Ten liming and fertilization treatments were applied in four repetitions. Lime treatments increased soil pH values and decreased hydrolytic acidity. Mineral and organic fertilization affected additional soil acidification. Application of lime intensified mineralization and humus decomposition, while organic fertilization raised humus content. The results showed significant increase of AL-P2O5 and K2O availability. The treatments increased soil Ca concentrations, but at the same time decreased exchangeable Mg concentrations. Soil pH increase resulted in lower Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu availability. Soil CEC was increased by applied treatments. Lime rates increased number and height of alfalfa plants, as well as yield of leaf, stalk increased concentrations of N, P, K and Ca in alfalfa leaf and stalk, but decreased leaf Mg and Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu concentrations. Regression computer models predicted with adequate accuracy P, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu availability and final pH value as a result of liming and fertilization impact.

  3. Durability of air lime mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    This contribution deals with the physical and chemical reasons why pure air lime mortars used in masonry of burned bricks exposed to outdoor climate have shown to be durable from the Middle Ages to our days. This sounds strange in modern times where pure air lime mortars are regarded as weak...

  4. Jurassic Park: Adventure in Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Marcia; Boteler, Trina

    1993-01-01

    Describes using the movie "Jurassic Park" as a foundation for a middle school interdisciplinary unit involving science, math, language arts, history, and geography. Suggested books and activities are presented. (PR)

  5. Jurassic Park: Adventure in Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Marcia; Boteler, Trina

    1993-01-01

    Describes using the movie "Jurassic Park" as a foundation for a middle school interdisciplinary unit involving science, math, language arts, history, and geography. Suggested books and activities are presented. (PR)

  6. Lime pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shushien

    Lignocellulose is a valuable alternative energy source. The susceptibility of lignocellulosic biomass to enzymatic hydrolysis is constrained due to its structural features, so pretreatment is essential to enhance enzymatic digestibility. Of the chemicals used as pretreatment agents, it has been reported that alkalis improve biomass digestibility significantly. In comparison with other alkalis such as NaOH and ammonia, lime (calcium hydroxide) has many advantages; it is very inexpensive, is safe, and can be recovered by carbonating wash water. The effects of lime pretreatment were explored on switchgrass and poplar wood, representing herbaceous and woody biomass, respectively. The effects of pretreatment conditions (time, temperature, lime loading, water loading, particle size, and oxygen pressure) have been systematically studies. Lime alone enhances the digestibility of switchgrass significantly; under the recommended conditions, the 3-d total sugar (glucose + xylose) yields of lime-treated switchgrass were 7 times that of untreated sample. When treating poplar wood, lime must be combined with oxygen to achieve high digestibility; oxidative lime pretreatment increased the 3-d total sugar yield of poplar wood to 12 times that of untreated sample. In a fundamental study, to determine why lime pretreatment is effective, the effects of three structural features on enzymatic digestibility were studied: lignin content, acetyl content, and crystallinity index (CrI). Poplar wood was treated with peracetic acid, potassium hydroxide, and ball milling to produce model lignocelluloses with a broad spectrum of lignin contents, acetyl contents, and CrI, respectively. Enzymatic hydrolysis was performed on the model lignocelluloses to determine the digestibility. Correlations between lignin/carbohydrate ratio, acetyl/carbohydrate ratio, CrI and digestibility were developed. The 95% prediction intervals show that the correlations predict the 1-h and 3-d total sugar conversions of

  7. Arsenic removal by lime softening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaosol, T.; Suksaroj, C.; Bregnhøj, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    This paper focuses on the study of arsenic removal for drinking water by lime softening. The initial arsenic (V) concentration was 500 and 1,000 ug/L in synthetic groundwater. The experiments were performed as batch tests with varying lime dosages and mixing time. For the synthetic groundwater......, arsenic (V) removal increased with increasing lime dosage and mixing time, as well as with the resulting pH. The residual arsenic (V) in all cases was lower than the WHO guideline of 10 ug/L at pH higher than 11.5. Kinetic of arsenic (V) removal can be described by a first-order equation as C1 = C0*e......^-k*t. The relation between the constant (k value) and increasing lime dosage was found to be linear, described by k = 0.0034 (Dlime). The results support a theory from the literature that the arsenic (V) was removed by precipitation af Ca3(AsO4)2. The results obtained in the present study suggest that lime...

  8. Freeze concentration of lime juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ampawan Tansakul

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research was to study the effects of processing conditions, i.e. cooling medium temperature (-6, -12 and -18C and scraper blade rotational speed (50, 100 and 150 rpm on the freeze concentration of lime juice. The initial soluble solid content of lime juice was 7.6 Brix. Results showed that soluble solid content of lime juice increased as cooling medium temperature decreased while scraper blade rotational speed increased. It was also found that the processing condition with -18˚C cooling medium temperature and 150 rpm rotational speed of the scraper blade was the best among all studied conditions, although the loss of the soluble solids with ice crystals during ice separation was relatively high at 35%.

  9. Mineral resource of the month: lime

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2009-01-01

    The article presents facts about lime, which is said to be a caustic chemical manufactured from limestone or other calcium carbonates in a kiln at temperatures ranging from 935 to 1,350 degrees Celsius. It states that lime is widely used in industries such as steelmaking, paper production and chemical manufacturing. It also mentions that global lime production amounts up to 280 million metric tons annually. However, it notes that international trade in lime is limited.

  10. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Ernest A.

    2003-02-06

    The project objectives are improving access to information for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin by inventorying data files and records of the major information repositories in the region, making these inventories easily accessible in electronic format, increasing the amount of information available on domestic sedimentary basins through a comprehensive analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, and enhancing the understanding of the petroleum systems operating in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  11. Estimated Thickness of the Cotton Valley Group to the Top of the Smackover Formation, Western Gulf and East Texas Basin and Louisiana-Mississippi Salt Basins Provinces (047, 048 and 049)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This isopach map shows the thickness of the interval from the top of the Cotton Valley Group to the top of the Smackover Formation. It was necessary to contour this...

  12. Evidence for carbon sequestration by agricultural liming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Stephen K.; Kurzman, Amanda L.; Arango, Clay; Jin, Lixin; Robertson, G. Philip

    2007-06-01

    Agricultural lime can be a source or a sink for CO2, depending on whether reaction occurs with strong acids or carbonic acid. Here we examine the impact of liming on global warming potential by comparing the sum of Ca2+ and Mg2+ to carbonate alkalinity in soil solutions beneath unmanaged vegetation versus limed row crops, and of streams and rivers in agricultural versus forested watersheds, mainly in southern Michigan. Soil solutions sampled by tension indicated that lime can act as either a source or a sink for CO2. However, infiltrating waters tended to indicate net CO2 uptake, as did tile drainage waters and streams draining agricultural watersheds. As nitrate concentrations increased in infiltrating waters, lime switched from a net CO2 sink to a source, implying nitrification as a major acidifying process. Dissolution of lime may sequester CO2 equal to roughly 25-50% of its C content, in contrast to the prevailing assumption that all of the carbon in lime becomes CO2. The ˜30 Tg/yr of agricultural lime applied in the United States could thus sequester up to 1.9 Tg C/yr, about 15% of the annual change in the U.S. CO2 emissions (12 Tg C/yr for 2002-2003). The implications of liming for atmospheric CO2 stabilization should be considered in strategies to mitigate global climate change.

  13. Comparative evaluation of aerial lime mortars for architectural conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Faria, Paulina; Henriques, Fernando M.A.; Rato, Vasco

    2008-01-01

    Journal of Cultural Heritage 9 (2008) 338-346 International bibliography on conservation usually refers that mortars made with lime putty with long extinction periods behave better than others made with the current dry hydrated limes. In order to evaluate this assess, an experimental study of lime mortars was carried out, using dry hydrated lime and two lime putties. It becomes clear that the use of lime putties with long extinction periods in mortars allow better performances, pa...

  14. Corrosion effects on soda lime glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, F.A.; Rodichev, Y.M.

    2010-01-01

    Although soda lime glass is the most common used transparent material in architecture, little is known about the corrosion effects on long term strength and the interaction between corrosion and defects. Extensive testing on soda lime bars under different environmental conditions and different degre

  15. Simple Analysis of Historical Lime Mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Joa~o

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described in which a simple characterization of a historical lime mortar is made by the determination of its approximate composition by a gravimetric method. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) are also used for the qualitative characterization of the lime mortar components. These…

  16. Simple Analysis of Historical Lime Mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Joa~o

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described in which a simple characterization of a historical lime mortar is made by the determination of its approximate composition by a gravimetric method. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) are also used for the qualitative characterization of the lime mortar components. These…

  17. Corrosion effects on soda lime glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, F.A.; Rodichev, Y.M.

    2010-01-01

    Although soda lime glass is the most common used transparent material in architecture, little is known about the corrosion effects on long term strength and the interaction between corrosion and defects. Extensive testing on soda lime bars under different environmental conditions and different

  18. LANDSCAPE ARCHAEOLOGY ALONG LIMES TRANSALUTANUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen S. Teodor

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The project addresses the historical monuments comprised in the longest Roman ‘linear defence’ structure present on the Romanian territory.Despite it being the longest, this historic structure is the least protected and the least known in its technical details. Was indeed Limes Transalutanus an incomplete limes (lacking civilian settlements, for example, an odd construction (a vallum without fossa, an early-alarm line rather than a proper defensive line? Taking on these historical and archaeological challenges, the team attempts to develop an investigation technology applicable to large scale archaeological landscapes - a full evaluation chain, involving aerial survey, surface survey, geophysical investigation, multispectral images analysis, statistic evaluation and archaeological diggings. This technological chain will be systematically applied on the whole length of the objective, that is, on a 155 km distance. The attempt to find answers to issues related to the earth works’ functionality, layout, structure, chronology and relation with adjacent sites will be grounded on exploring the relations of the monument with the surrounding environment, by focussing on finding methods to reconstruct the features of the ancient landscapes, like systematic drilling, palynological tests and toponymical studies.

  19. Evaluation of Lime for Use in Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naktode P.L.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Lime has been used in India as material of construction from very ancient days. The manner in which lime structures about 2000 years old have withstood the ravages of time bear irrefutable evidence to the durability of lime mortars. Lime mortars were the mortars of very recent years – used until the twentieth century. Although they are almost forgotten today, they still remain a viable and important construction method [1]. There is something about this material that remains just as valuable today as it was 150 years ago [2]. The lime belt of Vidarbha area is not of industrial grade. To use for construction purpose it needs some improvement and alteration in the ingredients. This calls the development of an alternative approach to make it suitable for construction in large extent. Keywords:

  20. Effect of Reactivity of Quick Lime on the Properties of Hydrated Lime Sorbent for SO2 Removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.G.Shin; H.Kim; Y.N.Kim; H.S.Lee

    2009-01-01

    The hydration of quick lime and the sulfation of hydrated lime were carried out for verification of relationship between the reactivity of quick lime and the properties of hydrated lime as a sorbent.The effect of reactivity of quick lime was investigated with the change of calcination temperature and time.Results obtained showed that the temperature rise during the hydration of quick limes varied from 31 to 69℃ with the variation of calcination temperature and time.The specific surface area and the sulfation ability of hydrated lime prepared by hydration of quick lime showed a proportional relationship with the reactivity of quick lime.The hydrated lime which was prepared by hydration of quick lime calcined at 1100℃ had the highest reactivity and showed 41.53 m2/g of the specific surface area, 0.16 cm3/g of the pore volume and 87% of the removal efficiency for SO2 removal.

  1. The shrinkage in lime mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez, J. A.

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the methodology existing to measure the shrinkage in air, developed for paste and cement mortars, has serious problems to be applied to lime mortars, due to its different mechanism of hardening several modifications in Norms UNE 80-113-86 y 80-112-89 make possible the determination of the shrinkage in these traditional mortars.

    La metodología existente en la actualidad para la medida de la retracción de secado, desarrollada para las pastas y los morteros de cemento, presenta serios problemas a la hora de su aplicación a los morteros de cal debido a su distinto mecanismo de endurecimiento. Algunas modificaciones de las normas UNE 80-113-86 y 80-112-89 hacen posible la determinación de la retracción en estos morteros tradicionales.

  2. Volume Change Measurement Of Collapsible Soil Stabilized With Lime And Waste Lime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khawla A. Al-Juari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a series of laboratory tests to evaluate the effects of lime and waste lime on the volume change and strength characteristics of moderately collapsible soil selected from Al-Rashidia in Mosul city. The tests are performed at different percentages of lime and waste lime of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 6.0 and 8.0% by dry weight of soil. One dimensional compression tests are conducted to clarify the influences of relative compaction, compaction water content, vertical stress level and curing time on the volume change and strength characteristics.The results of this study indicated a decrease in the plasticity, swelling potential and swelling pressure of treated soil. The soil became non-plastic at (3&6% of lime and waste lime respectively. Swelling pressure and swelling potential reached to zero at 2% lime and  2&7 days of curing time.Unconfined compressive strength (UCS reached to maximum value at optimum stabilizers content. The UCS of lime treated soil is more than that treated by waste lime at different curing time. The collapse index and potential of treated soil are found less than that of natural soil and decrease with increasing stabilizer content until drop to zero at 2% lime. Collapsing increased continuously with applied stresses, but with curing time reached a maximum value at 2 day. On the other hand, collapsing of treated soil with lime is less than that  of waste lime treated soil at different curing time and stresses.

  3. Local development of affordable lime in southern Africa

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    Lime is an important and versatile chemical used in a wide range of applications. The term lime, which is strictly calcium oxide (CaO), is applied to a range of products arising from the processing of limestone and dolomite. Many less developed countries do not have adequate lime production and this leads to problems associated with under-utilisation of lime. In particular, insufficient application of agricultural lime (aglime) can lead to soil acidification, with associated aluminium / manga...

  4. Lime-Crusted Rammed Earth: Materials Study

    OpenAIRE

    Mileto, Camilla; Vegas López-Manzanares, Fernando; Alejandre, Francisco Javier; Martín, Juan Jesús; Garcia Soriano, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    This study analyses the durability of rammed-earth wall construction techniques. The analysis focuses on three medieval masonry types from the Castle of Villavieja (Castellón, Spain) using two variations of lime-reinforced rammed earth in its walls: lime-crusted rammed earth and brick-reinforced rammed earth. Materials analysis reveals the good properties of the materials used in the outer wall facing despite its age. It also clearly shows how deterioration depends more on the construction t...

  5. The Early Gulf of Mexico as a Subaerial Basin Below Sea Level (SABSEL) Basin. Evidence from Stratigraphy and Facies of Luanne salt, Norphlet sandstone and Smackover Brown Dense Formations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    Many workers recognize that large salt deposits form in post-rift sag basins which were subaerial and susceptible to rapid flooding from adjacent oceansl. I have termed these basins "subaerial basins below sea level" or "SABSEL" basins. A key marker of SABSEL basins are terrestrial sediments immediately overlain by deepwater sediments with no transition. Desert deposits -including Aeolian dunes- are preserved in the adiabatically heated depression. Dunes are not eroded by transgressing seas but are drowned by rising water as in a bath tub. They maintain their shape. Deepwater marine black shales or limestones drape the dunes. The Southern North sea is an example. Above the original marine shale over the dunes are evaporites. Winds descending into the basin were heated by adiabatic compression providing the very hot air need to allow survival of potassium salts. A similar situation was probably active during the Messinian salinity crisis in the Mediterranean basin, and the opening of the South Atlantic. In the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) a desert is on the Louann salt. Here the sea invaded the lows first to deposit the salt overlying tilted fault blocks of the opening basin, as in the Afar Triangle of Africa. In the GOM entry to the west fed in sea water, then closed. The Norphlet desert formed. Streams carried sands to the basin to be spread by winds where they willed, not limited to sand entry areas. Upon deposition their original weight depressed the salt. Seismic shows depressions in the salt but the dunes are high at the top Norphlet, forming distinctive small "eyes" at the top salt. The 600 foot dunes are draped by deep water dolomitic finely laminated organic rich black/ brown shale, the Brown Dense Facies of the Smackover formation. The lack of reworking of the dunes found by detailed seismic is distinctive of deposition in a SABSEL basin. The overlap of terrestrial sediments by deep water deposition is good evidence of sudden flooding. In summary this vertical

  6. Tectonic Evolution of the Jurassic Pacific Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, M.; Ishihara, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present the tectonic evolution of the Jurassic Pacific plate based on magnetic anomly lineations and abyssal hills. The Pacific plate is the largest oceanic plate on Earth. It was born as a microplate aroud the Izanagi-Farallon-Phoenix triple junction about 192 Ma, Early Jurassic [Nakanishi et al., 1992]. The size of the Pacific plate at 190 Ma was nearly half that of the present Easter or Juan Fernandez microplates in the East Pacific Rise [Martinez et at, 1991; Larson et al., 1992]. The plate boundary surrounding the Pacific plate from Early Jurassic to Early Cretaceous involved the four triple junctions among Pacific, Izanagi, Farallon, and Phoenix plates. The major tectonic events as the formation of oceanic plateaus and microplates during the period occurred in the vicinity of the triple junctions [e.g., Nakanishi and Winterer, 1998; Nakanishi et al., 1999], implying that the study of the triple junctions is indispensable for understanding the tectonic evolution of the Pacific plate. Previous studies indicate instability of the configuration of the triple junctions from Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous (155-125 Ma). On the other hand, the age of the birth of the Pacific plate was determined assuming that all triple junctions had kept their configurations for about 30 m.y. [Nakanishi et al., 1992] because of insufficient information of the tectonic history of the Pacific plate before Late Jurassic.Increase in the bathymetric and geomagnetic data over the past two decades enables us to reveal the tectonic evolution of the Pacific-Izanagi-Farallon triple junction before Late Jurassic. Our detailed identication of magnetic anomaly lineations exposes magnetic bights before anomaly M25. We found the curved abyssal hills originated near the triple junction, which trend is parallel to magnetic anomaly lineations. These results imply that the configuration of the Pacific-Izanagi-Farallon triple junction had been RRR before Late Jurassic.

  7. Recycled sand in lime-based mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanidou, M; Anastasiou, E; Georgiadis Filikas, K

    2014-12-01

    The increasing awareness of the society about safe guarding heritage buildings and at the same time protecting the environment promotes strategies of combining principles of restoration with environmentally friendly materials and techniques. Along these lines, an experimental program was carried out in order to investigate the possibility of producing repair, lime-based mortars used in historic buildings incorporating secondary materials. The alternative material tested was recycled fine aggregates originating from mixed construction and demolition waste. Extensive tests on the raw materials have been performed and mortar mixtures were produced using different binding systems with natural, standard and recycled sand in order to compare their mechanical, physical and microstructure properties. The study reveals the improved behavior of lime mortars, even at early ages, due to the reaction of lime with the Al and Si constituents of the fine recycled sand. The role of the recycled sand was more beneficial in lime mortars rather than the lime-pozzolan or lime-pozzolan-cement mortars as a decrease in their performance was recorded in the latter cases due to the mortars' structure.

  8. Balancing guava nutrition with liming and fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Hernandes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Guava response to liming and fertilization can be monitored by tissue testing. Tissue nutrient signature is often diagnosed against nutrient concentration standards. However, this approach has been criticized for not considering nutrient interactions and to generate numerical biases as a result of data redundancy, scale dependency and non-normal distribution. Techniques of compositional data analysis can control those biases by balancing groups of nutrients, such as those involved in liming and fertilization. The sequentially arranged and orthonormal isometric log ratios (ilr or balances avoid numerical bias inherent to compositional data. The objectives were to relate tissue nutrient balances with the production of "Paluma" guava orchards differentially limed and fertilized, and to adjust the current patterns of nutrient balance with the range of more productive guava trees. It was conducted one experiment of 7-yr of liming and three experiments of 3-yr with N, P and K trials in 'Paluma' orchards on an Oxisol. Plant N, P, K, Ca and Mg were monitored yearly. It was selected the [N, P, K | Ca, Mg], [N, P | K], [N | P] and [Ca | Mg] balances to set apart the effects of liming (Ca-Mg and fertilizers (N-K on macronutrient balances. Liming largely influenced nutrient balances of guava in the Oxisol while fertilization was less influential. The large range of guava yields and nutrient balances allowed defining balance ranges and comparing them with the critical ranges of nutrient concentration values currently used in Brazil and combined into ilr coordinates.

  9. Dinosaur dynamics in the Jurassic Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott

    2010-04-01

    Dinosaurs were fascinating animals and elicit much excitement in the classroom. Analysis of fossilized dinosaur trackways permits one to estimate the locomotion speeds and accelerations of these extinct beasts. Such analysis allows one to apply Newton's laws of motion to examples from the Jurassic Era.

  10. SICILIAN JURASSIC PHYSIOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGIC REALMS (ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BENEDETTO ABATE

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Two tectono-sedimentary domains, which were deformed during the Neogene and evolved into two large structural sectors, characterize the Sicilian Jurassic: the Maghrebides and Peloritani. Africa margin sediments, passing downward to Triassic successions and perhaps originally to Paleozoic deposits, characterize the former. The latter belongs to the European "Calabrian Arc", where the Jurassic transgressively rests on a continental substrate (i.e. the crystalline Variscan basement. These domains are characterized by four sedimentary facies: shallow platform-derived limestones; condensed seamount-type red limestones; nodular limestones with ammonites; deep radiolarites and shales. These facies are illustrated in a dozen of stratigraphic logs. The drowning of most Triassic-Liassic carbonate platforms or ramps and the deepening of adjacent basins came with inferred Jurassic strike-slip tectonics, connected to the relative movement of Africa (Gondwanan part vs Europe (Laurasian part; the same strike-slip tectonics may have caused scattered intraplate volcanic seamounts found in Maghrebides. During the Jurassic the Maghrebide realm was characterized by the interfingering of basins and carbonate platforms. During the Early and Middle Liassic, carbonate platforms and ramps were dominant. Since Toarcian either radiolarites in some basins or Ammonite-bearing calcareous muds developed with intervening basaltic flows, and were accompanied by condensed pelagic carbonates on the ensialic seamount-type highs. The Peloritani realm displays similar characteristics, but with later transgression on the basement, several strike-slip basins and without any volcanoes.

  11. New Early Jurassic Tetrapod Assemblages Constrain Triassic-Jurassic Tetrapod Extinction Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, P. E.; Shubin, N. H.; Anders, M. H.

    1987-08-01

    The discovery of the first definitively correlated earliest Jurassic (200 million years before present) tetrapod assemblage (Fundy basin, Newark Supergroup, Nova Scotia) allows reevaluation of the duration of the Triassic-Jurassic tetrapod extinction event. Present are tritheledont and mammal-like reptiles, prosauropod, theropod, and ornithischian dinosaurs, protosuchian and sphenosuchian crocodylomorphs, sphenodontids, and hybodont, semionotid, and palaeonisciform fishes. All of the families are known from Late Triassic and Jurassic strata from elsewhere; however, pollen and spore, radiometric, and geochemical correlation indicate an early Hettangian age for these assemblages. Because all ``typical Triassic'' forms are absent from these assemblages, most Triassic-Jurassic tetrapod extinctions occurred before this time and without the introduction of new families. As was previously suggested by studies of marine invertebrates, this pattern is consistent with a global extinction event at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. The Manicouagan impact structure of Quebec provides dates broadly compatible with the Triassic-Jurassic boundary and, following the impact theory of mass extinctions, may be implicated in the cause.

  12. Hydrogen Chloride Reaction with Lime and Limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erik Weinell, Claus; Jensen, Peter I.; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1992-01-01

    The capacity of solid slaked lime and limestone for binding HCl from a gas phase has been investigated in the temperature range 60-1000 °C. The binding capacity is largest in the range 500-600 °C. However, for slaked lime in the presence of water, a large binding capacity is observed also below 150...... °C. This is ascribed to the formation of a partially liquid product phase. At temperatures exceeding 500 °C the binding capacity is limited by chemical equilibrium between gas and solid. For the range of properties studied the binding capacity is independent of particle size and only depends slightly...

  13. 27 CFR 9.27 - Lime Kiln Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lime Kiln Valley. 9.27... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.27 Lime Kiln Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Lime Kiln...

  14. 46 CFR 148.04-23 - Unslaked lime in bulk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Unslaked lime in bulk. 148.04-23 Section 148.04-23... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN BULK Special Additional Requirements for Certain Material § 148.04-23 Unslaked lime in bulk. (a) Unslaked lime in bulk must be transported in unmanned, all steel, double-hulled...

  15. Microstructure evolution of lime putty upon aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascolo, Giuseppe; Mascolo, Maria Cristina; Vitale, Alessandro; Marino, Ottavio

    2010-08-01

    The microstructure evolution of lime putty upon aging was investigated by slaking quicklime (CaO) with an excess of water for 3, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 66 months. The as-obtained lime putties were characterized in the water retention and in the particle size distribution using the static laser scattering (SLS). The same lime putties, dehydrated by lyophilization, were also investigated in the pore size distribution by mercury intrusion porosimetry, in the surface area by the BET method and, finally, in particle morphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect of the extended exposure of quicklime to water confirms a shape change from prismatic crystals of portlandite, Ca(OH) 2, into platelike ones. Simultaneously a growth of larger hexagonal crystals at the expense of the smallest ones (Ostwald ripening) favours a secondary precipitation of submicrometer platelike crystals of portlandite. The shape change and the broader particles size distribution of portlandite crystals upon aging seem to contribute to a better plasticity of lime putty.

  16. A new lime material for container substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The primary component in greenhouse potting substrates is sphagnum peatmoss. Substrate solution pH of non-amended peatmoss ranges from 4.0 to 4.5. Ideal pH for most greenhouse floriculture crops ranges from 5.8 to 6.2. Dolomitic lime is most often used to elevate substrate pH in peatmoss-based me...

  17. Fertilizer and Lime: Why They Are Used.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaslin, Judith Strand

    This unit teaching guide is designed to help teachers explain the principles of fertilizer and lime use. The first of four major sections is a teaching outline keyed to transparency masters and student handouts. Thirteen major areas are covered in the teaching outline: (1) plant needs; (2) uses of fertilizer; (3) nutrients for plant growth; (4)…

  18. Oxidative lime pretreatment of Alamo switchgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falls, Matthew; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that oxidative lime pretreatment is an effective delignification method that improves the enzymatic digestibility of many biomass feedstocks. The purpose of this work is to determine the recommended oxidative lime pretreatment conditions (reaction temperature, time, pressure, and lime loading) for Alamo switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). Enzymatic hydrolysis of glucan and xylan was used to determine the performance of the 52 studied pretreatment conditions. The recommended condition (110°C, 6.89 bar O(2), 240 min, 0.248 g Ca(OH)(2)/g biomass) achieved glucan and xylan overall yields (grams of sugar hydrolyzed/100 g sugar in raw biomass, 15 filter paper units (FPU)/g raw glucan) of 85.9 and 52.2, respectively. In addition, some glucan oligomers (2.6 g glucan recovered/100 g glucan in raw biomass) and significant levels of xylan oligomers (26.0 g xylan recovered/100 g xylan in raw biomass) were recovered from the pretreatment liquor. Combining a decrystallization technique (ball milling) with oxidative lime pretreatment further improved the overall glucan yield to 90.0 (7 FPU/g raw glucan).

  19. LIME mediates immunological synapse formation through activation of VAV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Myoungsun; Park, Inyoung; Lee, Ok-Hee; Rhee, Inmoo; Park, Changwon; Yun, Yungdae

    2012-04-01

    Lck Interacting Membrane protein (LIME) was previously characterized as a transmembrane adaptor protein mediating TCR-dependent T cell activation. Here, we show that LIME associates with Vav in response to TCR stimulation and is required for Vav guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity for Rac1. Consistent with this finding, actin polymerization at the immunological synapse (IS) was markedly enhanced by overexpression of LIME, but was reduced by expression of a LIME shRNA. Moreover, TCR-mediated cell adhesion to ICAM-1, laminin, or fibronectin was downregulated by expression of LIME shRNA. In addition, in the IS, LIME but not LAT was found to localize at the peripheral-supramolecular activation cluster (p-SMAC) where the integrins were previously shown to be localized. Together, these results establish LIME as a transmembrane adaptor protein linking TCR stimulation to IS formation and integrin activation through activation of Vav.

  20. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: The Jurassic of Skåne, southern Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivhed, Ulf

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available In Sweden, Jurassic strata are restricted to Skåne and adjacent offshore areas. Jurassic sedimentary rocks predominantly comprise sandy to muddy siliciclastics, with subordinate coal beds andfew carbonate-rich beds. During Mesozoic times, block-faulting took place in the Sorgenfrei–Tornquist Zone, a tectonic zone which transects Skåne in a NW–SE direction. The Jurassic depositionalenvironments in Skåne were thus strongly influenced by uplift and downfaulting, and to some extent by volcanism. Consequently, the sedimentary record reveals evidence of numerous transgressions, regressions and breaks in sedimentation. Relative sea-level changes played a significant role in controlling the facies distribution, as deposition mainly took place in coastal plain to shallow shelf environments.The alluvial deposits in Skåne include floodplain palaeosols, autochthonous coals, overbank sandstones, and stream channel pebbly sandstones. Restricted marine strata comprise intertidalheteroliths with mixed freshwater and marine trace fossil assemblages, and intertidal delta distributary channel sandstones. Shallow marine sediments encompass subtidal and shoreface sandstoneswith herringbone structures, and bioturbated mudstones with tempestite sandstones. Offshore deposits typically comprise extensively bioturbated muddy sandstones.Floral remains, palaeopedology, clay mineralogy and arenite maturity indicate a warm and humid climate in Skåne throughout the Jurassic, possibly with slightly increasing aridity towards the end of the period. Most Jurassic strata in Skåne have been subjected to mild burial diagenesis, and the petroleum generative window has rarely been reached.

  1. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: The Upper Jurassic of Europe: its subdivision and correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeiss, Arnold

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available In the last 40 years, the stratigraphy of the Upper Jurassic of Europe has received much attention and considerable revision; much of the impetus behind this endeavour has stemmed from the work of the International Subcommission on Jurassic Stratigraphy. The Upper Jurassic Series consists of three stages, the Oxfordian, Kimmeridgian and Tithonian which are further subdivided into substages, zones and subzones, primarily on the basis of ammonites. Regional variations between the Mediterranean, Submediterranean and Subboreal provinces are discussed and correlation possibilities indicated. The durations of the Oxfordian, Kimmeridgian and Tithonian Stages are reported to have been 5.3, 3.4 and 6.5 Ma, respectively. This review of the present status of Upper Jurassic stratigraphy aids identification of a number of problems of subdivision and definition of Upper Jurassic stages; in particular these include correlation of the base of the Kimmeridgian and the top of the Tithonian between Submediterranean and Subboreal Europe. Although still primarily based on ammonite stratigraphy, subdivision of the Upper Jurassic is increasingly being refined by the incorporation of other fossil groups; these include both megafossils, such as aptychi, belemnites, bivalves, gastropods, brachiopods, echinoderms, corals, sponges and vertebrates, and microfossils such as foraminifera, radiolaria, ciliata, ostracodes, dinoflagellates, calcareous nannofossils, charophyaceae, dasycladaceae, spores and pollen. Important future developments will depend on the detailed integration of these disparate biostratigraphic data and their precise combination with the abundant new data from sequence stratigraphy, utilising the high degree of stratigraphic resolution offered by certain groups of fossils. This article also contains some notes on the recent results of magnetostratigraphy and sequence chronostratigraphy.

  2. Terrestrial Liming As a Restoration Technique for Acidified Forest Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Pabian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the effects of liming on soils and forest songbirds as well as vegetation and calcium-rich invertebrate prey variables that were predicted to link birds to changes in soil conditions. We observed increases in soil pH, calcium, and magnesium, as well as in songbird abundances in response to lime application, with continuing increases through five years after liming. We observed an overall increase in snail abundance on limed sites, but an initial peak of a 23 fold increase three years after liming was reduced to an 11 fold increase five years after liming. We observed an increase in forb ground cover on limed sites, but liming had no effect on millipede abundance or other vegetation measures. Of the variables we measured, snail abundance was the most likely mechanism for the response in bird abundances. Because we observed continued benefits of liming up to five years post treatment, we concluded that liming is a very promising technique for restoring forest ecosystems impacted by acidic deposition.

  3. Energy efficiency opportunity guide in the lime industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The lime industry processes limestone, an abundant inorganic mineral, for metallurgical, industrial and chemical, environmental, and construction applications. The energy the industry uses results in greenhouse gas emissions and the Canadian Lime Institute, in collaboration with Natural Resources Canada, sponsored the development of this guidebook which is intended to provide ideas for saving energy in the lime industry. This document is a practical source of information and can be used to develop self-audit and evaluation techniques to monitor energy usage. The report first provides an overview of the lime industry, then presents its energy costs. General energy efficiency methodologies are highlighted and, in conclusion, advice on improving energy efficiency in general and specifically for lime industry operations is given. This guidebook provides useful information for lime industry operators who are trying to improve the energy efficiency of their operations.

  4. Engineering Properties of Bentonite Stabilized with Lime and Phosphogypsum

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar Sujeet MR; Dutta Rakesh Kumar; Mohanty Bijayananda

    2014-01-01

    Engineering properties such as compaction, unconfined compressive strength, consistency limits, percentage swell, free swell index, the California bearing ratio and the consolidation of bentonite stabilized with lime and phosphogypsum are presented in this paper. The content of the lime and phosphogypsum varied from 0 to 10 %. The results reveal that the dry unit weight and optimum moisture content of bentonite + 8 % lime increased with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum. The percentage of swe...

  5. Removal of phosphate from greenhouse wastewater using hydrated lime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunets, C Siobhan; Zheng, Youbin

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate (P) contamination in nutrient-laden wastewater is currently a major topic of discussion in the North American greenhouse industry. Precipitation of P as calcium phosphate minerals using hydrated lime could provide a simple, inexpensive method for retrieval. A combination of batch experiments and chemical equilibrium modelling was used to confirm the viability of this P removal method and determine lime addition rates and pH requirements for greenhouse wastewater of varying nutrient compositions. Lime: P ratio (molar ratio of CaMg(OH)₄: PO₄‒P) provided a consistent parameter for estimating lime addition requirements regardless of initial P concentration, with a ratio of 1.5 providing around 99% removal of dissolved P. Optimal P removal occurred when lime addition increased the pH from 8.6 to 9.0, suggesting that pH monitoring during the P removal process could provide a simple method for ensuring consistent adherence to P removal standards. A Visual MINTEQ model, validated using experimental data, provided a means of predicting lime addition and pH requirements as influenced by changes in other parameters of the lime-wastewater system (e.g. calcium concentration, temperature, and initial wastewater pH). Hydrated lime addition did not contribute to the removal of macronutrient elements such as nitrate and ammonium, but did decrease the concentration of some micronutrients. This study provides basic guidance for greenhouse operators to use hydrated lime for phosphate removal from greenhouse wastewater.

  6. Modeling the Middle Jurassic ocean circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura Brunetti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We present coupled ocean–sea-ice simulations of the Middle Jurassic (∼165 Ma when Laurasia and Gondwana began drifting apart and gave rise to the formation of the Atlantic Ocean. Since the opening of the Proto-Caribbean is not well constrained by geological records, configurations with and without an open connection between the Proto-Caribbean and Panthalassa are examined. We use a sea-floor bathymetry obtained by a recently developed three-dimensional (3D elevation model which compiles geological, palaeogeographical and geophysical data. Our original approach consists in coupling this elevation model, which is based on detailed reconstructions of oceanic realms, with a dynamical ocean circulation model. We find that the Middle Jurassic bathymetry of the Central Atlantic and Proto-Caribbean seaway only allows for a weak current of the order of 2 Sv in the upper 1000 m even if the system is open to the west. The effect of closing the western boundary of the Proto-Caribbean is to increase the transport related to barotropic gyres in the southern hemisphere and to change water properties, such as salinity, in the Neo-Tethys. Weak upwelling rates are found in the nascent Atlantic Ocean in the presence of this superficial current and we discuss their compatibility with deep-sea sedimentological records in this region.

  7. Lower Jurassic palynostratigraphy of Eastern Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryacheva, A. A.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the results of a palynological study of the natural outcrops of the Lower and Middle Jurassic on the Kelimyar River (Outcrops 5, 6, 7, 14, and 16) and two boreholes, Middle-Nakynskaya and Ygyata-Tyungskaya 1, in Eastern Siberia. The Ukugut, Tyung, Motorchuna, Suntar, Kyrin, and Kelimyar formations were studied. Six biostrata with dinocysts were established for the Upper Sinemurian-Toarcian. The analysis of the stratigraphic ranges of dinocysts in the sections allowed the identification of the stratigraphic ranges for important genera of dinocysts, which enabled the updating of the geochronology of some biostrata. Three main stages of the evolution of dinocysts in the Early Jurassic in the Siberian Paleobasin were characterized by the appearance, diversification, and disappearance of some orders of dinocysts at certain times. Seven biostrata (beds with characteristic palynoassemblages) were established for the upper Sinemurian-Toarcian on the basis of the study of the taxonomic composition of spores and pollen of land plants and successive changes in the composition of the palynospectra.

  8. LIMES Large Infrastructure in Mathematics - Enhanced Services

    CERN Document Server

    Fachinformationszentrum Energie, Physik, Mathematik. Karlsruhe

    The Large Infrastructure in Mathematics - Enhanced Services (LIMES) Project is a RTD project within the Fifth (EC) Framework Programme - Horizontal Programme "Improving human research potential and the socio-economic knowledge base", Access to Resear The objective of this project is to upgrade the existing database Zentralblatt-MATH into a European based world class database for mathematics (pure and applied) by a process of technical improvement and wide Europeanisation, improving the present distribuited system. The goal is to make Zentralblatt MATH a world reference database, offering full coverage of the mathematics literature worldwide ncluding bibliographic data, peer reviews and/or abstracts, indexing, classification and search,

  9. An Aerobic Digestion of Lime Sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    AD-AL1B 502 AllMy MEDICAL BIOENGINEERING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT -- ETC F/6 13/2 ANAEROBIC DIGESTION OF LIME SLUDGE.U) JUL 82 EA KBYLINSKI, B A BELL...Applied for Digesters 1 and 3, Run 1 9262- 9313 .................................... 55 32. Volatile Solids Destroyed vs. Volatile Solids Applied for...CONCENTRATIONS Feed Effluent NH-N NH -N Reactor Run Julian Date mgfL mg/L 1 1 9261- 9313 100 203 1 1 9314-0008 58 243 2 1 9261-0008 72 147 3 1 9261

  10. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: The Jurassic of the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herngreen, G.F. Waldemar

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available A recent revision of the lithostratigraphy of the Netherlands has triggered an extensive re-evaluation of existing ideas on the Jurassic structural and depositional history. Significant advances can be attributed to the incorporation of sequence stratigraphic concepts. In the course of the Triassic and Jurassic, structural complexity increased progressively. The Jurassic sedimentary succession can be subdivided into three depositional megasequences. Megasequence I (Rhaetian- Aalenian reflects the period between the so-called early and mid-Cimmerian tectonic phases. Megasequence II (Aalenian - Middle Callovian covers the period of activity of the mid-Cimmerian phase. Megasequence III (Middle Callovian - Ryazanian corresponds with the period between the mid-Cimmerian and late Cimmerian phases (particularly after pulse II. In this latter megasequence, six stages (IIIa-f are recognised. Sediments deposited during the Rhaetian and Ryazanian bear a stronger affinity with the Jurassic succession than with Triassic and Cretaceous sediments respectively. These stages are thus treated here as an integral part of the Jurassic succession. During the Rhaetian-Bajocian the area subsided relatively uniformly. A sheet of predominantly fine-grained marine sediments of great lateral uniformity was deposited. During the Toarcian, in particular, basin circulation was largely restricted. The cooling that followed the thermal Central North Sea dome uplift triggered an important extensional phase during the Aalenian-Callovian. The rift phase resulted in the formation of several smaller basins, each with its own characteristic depositional succession. The basins fall into three structural provinces: the eastern province (Lower Saxony Basin, E-W-striking; the northern province (Central Graben, N-S-striking; and the southern-central system (Roer Valley Graben - Broad Fourteens, with a strong NW-SE strike. The mid-Cimmerian event started to affect the Dutch basins during

  11. 77 FR 45715 - Application of Key Lime Air Corporation for Commuter Authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ...] Application of Key Lime Air Corporation for Commuter Authority AGENCY: Department of Transportation. ACTION... Lime Air Corporation fit, willing, and able, and awarding it a Commuter Air Carrier...

  12. Antibacterial activity of garlic and lime on isolates of extracted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-05-24

    May 24, 2010 ... essential ingredient in the preparation of most herbal concortions. It is used ... The antimicrobial activity of the volatile oils of tangerine fruit peel ... (Zingber officinale Roscoe) and lime on Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus sp. ..... (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and lime (Citrus aurantifolia Linn). Afr. J. Biotechnol.

  13. Efficacy and phytotoicity of lime sulphur in organic apple production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holb, I.J.; Jong, de P.F.; Heijne, B.

    2003-01-01

    Curative and preventive efficacy and phytotoxicity of lime sulphur spray schedules, based on a warning system, were evaluated in the Netherlands during two growing seasons under field conditions. In most cases, lime sulphur treatments applied either curatively or preventively resulted in significant

  14. Effects of lime juice on malaria parasite clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, S A; Oyelami, O A; Olatunya, O S; Adeyemi, L A

    2011-10-01

    One hundred and twenty children with acute uncomplicated malaria who were managed at the children's outpatient department of the Wesley Guild Hospital, Ilesa (a unit of Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals' Complex, Ile-Ife, Osun state, Nigeria) were recruited into the study to determine the effects of lime juice on malaria parasite clearance. These children were randomized into treatment with World Health Organization recommended antimalarials (artemisinin combination therapy, ACT) either alone or with lime juice. Nine of them were lost to follow-up, four were in the group that were managed with ACT and lime, and five in the group that were managed on ACT alone. The average (SD) time to achieve >75% reduction in parasite load was significantly lower in patients on ACT and lime; 30.5 ± 2.4 h against 38.6 ± 3.3 h for those on ACT alone (p lime juice achieved complete parasite clearance by 72 h of therapy (p = 0.007), ten (18.2%) patients without lime had early treatment failure (p = 0.003). There were no side effects with the use of lime juice. It may therefore be inferred, from this preliminary work, that lime juice when used with the appropriate antimalarial may enhance malaria parasite clearance especially in those with uncomplicated malaria.

  15. Investigation of Copper Sorption by Sugar Beet Processing Lime Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the western United States, sugar beet processing for sugar recovery generates a lime-based waste product (~250,000 Mg yr-1) that has little liming value in the region’s calcareous soils. This area has recently experienced an increase in dairy production, with dairi...

  16. 76 FR 82295 - Central Power & Lime LLC; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Central Power & Lime LLC; Notice of Filing December 23, 2011. Take notice that on December 22, 2011, Central Power & Lime LLC, pursuant to sections 18 CFR 292.205(c) and...

  17. Investigation of Copper Sorption by Sugar Beet Processing Lime Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the western United States, sugar beet processing for sugar recovery generates a lime-based waste product (~250,000 Mg yr-1) that has little liming value in the region’s calcareous soils. This area has recently experienced an increase in dairy production, with dairi...

  18. Some studies on the reaction between fly ash and lime

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Basumajumdar; A K Das; N Bandyopadhyay; S Maitra

    2005-04-01

    The reaction between fly ash (FA) and lime is extensively exploited for the manufacture of building bricks, blocks and aggregates. To get a better idea of this reaction, FA from different sources were mixed in different ratios with lime and compacted. The compacts were treated both by ordinary water and hydrothermal curing to promote lime bearing hydrate bond formation e.g. CaO–SiO2–H2O (C–S–H), CaO–Al2O3–H2O (C–A–H) etc. The decrease in free lime content in these compacts was measured as a function of curing time and curing process. This drop in this content was correlated to the chemical composition of the fly ashes. The mathematical relationships between free lime remaining in the compacts after its maximum decrease in concentration and lime binding modulus (a ratio between the amount of added lime and the total amount of lime binding constituents present in FA) for both types of curing were developed. Further, the rate of decrease in free CaO content under both types of curing conditions was compared from kinetic study. From this study the orders of the reactions and rate constants were found out.

  19. Engineering Properties of Bentonite Stabilized with Lime and Phosphogypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sujeet

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Engineering properties such as compaction, unconfined compressive strength, consistency limits, percentage swell, free swell index, the California bearing ratio and the consolidation of bentonite stabilized with lime and phosphogypsum are presented in this paper. The content of the lime and phosphogypsum varied from 0 to 10 %. The results reveal that the dry unit weight and optimum moisture content of bentonite + 8 % lime increased with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum. The percentage of swell increased and the free swell index decreased with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum to the bentonite + 8 % lime mix. The unconfined compressive strength of the bentonite + 8 % lime increased with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum as well as an increase in the curing period up to 14 days. The liquid limit and plastic limit of the bentonite + 8 % lime increased, whereas the plasticity index remained constant with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum. The California bearing ratio, modulus of subgrade reaction, and secant modulus increased for the bentonite stabilized with lime and phosphogypsum. The coefficient of the consolidation of the bentonite increased with the addition of 8 % lime and no change with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum.

  20. Engineering Properties of Bentonite Stabilized with Lime and Phosphogypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sujeet; Dutta, Rakesh Kumar; Mohanty, Bijayananda

    2014-12-01

    Engineering properties such as compaction, unconfined compressive strength, consistency limits, percentage swell, free swell index, the California bearing ratio and the consolidation of bentonite stabilized with lime and phosphogypsum are presented in this paper. The content of the lime and phosphogypsum varied from 0 to 10 %. The results reveal that the dry unit weight and optimum moisture content of bentonite + 8 % lime increased with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum. The percentage of swell increased and the free swell index decreased with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum to the bentonite + 8 % lime mix. The unconfined compressive strength of the bentonite + 8 % lime increased with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum as well as an increase in the curing period up to 14 days. The liquid limit and plastic limit of the bentonite + 8 % lime increased, whereas the plasticity index remained constant with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum. The California bearing ratio, modulus of subgrade reaction, and secant modulus increased for the bentonite stabilized with lime and phosphogypsum. The coefficient of the consolidation of the bentonite increased with the addition of 8 % lime and no change with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum.

  1. Root distribution of rootstocks for 'Tahiti' lime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neves Carmen Silvia Vieira Janeiro

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Field studies on citrus roots are important for genetic selection of cultivars and for management practices such as localized irrigation and fertilization. To characterize root systems of six rootstocks, taking into consideration chemical and physical characteristics of a clayey Typic Hapludox of the Northern State of Paraná, this study was performed having as scion the 'IAC-5 Tahiti' lime [Citrus latifolia (Yu. Tanaka]. The rootstocks 'Rangpur' lime (C. limonia Osbeck, 'Africa Rough' lemon (C. jambhiri Lush., 'Sunki' mandarin [C. sunki (Hayata hort. ex Tan.], Poncirus trifoliata (L. Raf., 'C13' citrange [C. sinensis (L. Osb. x P. trifoliata (L. Raf] and 'Catânia 2' Volkamer lemon (C. volkameriana Ten. & Pasq. were used applying the trench profile method and the SIARCS® 3.0 software to determine root distribution. 'C-13' citrange had the largest root system. 'Volkamer' lemon and 'Africa Rough' lemon presented the smallest amount of roots. The effective depth for 80 % of roots was 31-53 cm in rows and 67-68 cm in inter-rows. The effective distance of 80 % of roots measured from the tree trunk exceeded the tree canopy for P. trifoliata, 'Sunki' mandarin, and 'Volkamer' and 'Africa Rough' lemons.

  2. Oxidative lime pretreatment of Dacotah switchgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falls, Matthew; Sierra-Ramirez, Rocio; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2011-09-01

    Oxidative lime pretreatment increases the enzymatic digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass primarily by removing lignin. In this study, recommended pretreatment conditions (reaction temperature, oxygen pressure, lime loading, and time) were determined for Dacotah switchgrass. Glucan and xylan overall hydrolysis yields (72 h, 15 FPU/g raw glucan) were measured for 105 different reaction conditions involving three different reactor configurations (very short term, short term, and long term). The short-term reactor was the most productive. At the recommended pretreatment condition (120 °C, 6.89 bar O(2), 240 min), it achieved an overall glucan hydrolysis yield of 85.2 g glucan hydrolyzed/100 g raw glucan and an overall xylan yield of 50.1 g xylan hydrolyzed/100 g raw xylan. At this condition, glucan oligomers (1.80 g glucan recovered/100 g glucan in raw biomass) and xylan oligomers (25.20 g xylan recovered/100 g xylan in raw biomass) were recovered from the pretreatment liquor, which compensate for low pretreatment yields.

  3. New gliding mammaliaforms from the Jurassic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qing-Jin; Grossnickle, David M.; Liu, Di; Zhang, Yu-Guang; Neander, April I.; Ji, Qiang; Luo, Zhe-Xi

    2017-08-01

    Stem mammaliaforms are Mesozoic forerunners to mammals, and they offer critical evidence for the anatomical evolution and ecological diversification during the earliest mammalian history. Two new eleutherodonts from the Late Jurassic period have skin membranes and skeletal features that are adapted for gliding. Characteristics of their digits provide evidence of roosting behaviour, as in dermopterans and bats, and their feet have a calcaneal calcar to support the uropagatium as in bats. The new volant taxa are phylogenetically nested with arboreal eleutherodonts. Together, they show an evolutionary experimentation similar to the iterative evolutions of gliders within arboreal groups of marsupial and placental mammals. However, gliding eleutherodonts possess rigid interclavicle-clavicle structures, convergent to the avian furculum, and they retain shoulder girdle plesiomorphies of mammaliaforms and monotremes. Forelimb mobility required by gliding occurs at the acromion-clavicle and glenohumeral joints, is different from and convergent to the shoulder mobility at the pivotal clavicle-sternal joint in marsupial and placental gliders.

  4. Influence of curing conditions on lime and lime-metakaolin mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Faria, Paulina; Martins, A

    2011-01-01

    Comunicação apresentada ao XII DBMC - International Conference on Durability of Building Materials and Components, Porto, April 12th-15th, 2011 Air-lime mortars with or without pozzolanic components were largely used in historic buildings. Due to natural or accidental degradation it is often necessary the application of repair mortars, durable and compatible with the masonries of historic buildings. Within this context and associating the improvement of mortars characteristics to the ne...

  5. LIMING AND FERTILIZING FOR MAHOGANI (Switenia macrophylla King. SEEDLING FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Franco Tucci

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The production of seedlings is one of the most important phases of the cultivation of forest species. Seedlings ofappropriate quality are fundamental in the growth and development of the species. In the production of seedlings, the substratum isfundamental for the good development of the plants. However, the subsoil in general, is acid and it contains low levels of nutritious.The acidity of the soil and the deficiency of nutrients can be corrected through liming and mineral fertilization. The objective of thepresent work was to evaluate the effect of liming and of the fertilization of the soil for the production of mahogany seedlings. Theexperiment was carried out in the period of 120 days, in the Federal University of Amazonas, UFAM. The experimental design wasrandomized complete blocks with statistical analysis in split plot. The plots were composed with eight treatments and four repetitionsand the subplots were eight sampling times of the plants. The treatments were control (natural soil, liming, corrective phosphate,fertilizing with NPK, liming + corrective phosphate, corrective phosphate + fertilizing with NPK, liming + fertilizing with NPK andliming + corrective phosphate + fertilizing with NPK. It was concluded that the associated liming and corrective phosphate and withthe fertilizing with nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium promoted the smallest levels of exchangeable aluminum and the largestlevels of calcium, magnesium, phosphorous and potassium in the soil. These levels of nutrients in the soil caused larger levels ofnutrients in the plants, providing larger growth rate. The liming, corrective phosphate and fertilizing are a fundamental practices inthe formation of mahogany seedlings.

  6. Effect of lime concentration on gelatinized maize starch dispersions properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato-Calleros, C; Hernandez-Jaimes, C; Chavez-Esquivel, G; Meraz, M; Sosa, E; Lara, V H; Alvarez-Ramirez, J; Vernon-Carter, E J

    2015-04-01

    Maize starch was lime-cooked at 92 °C with 0.0-0.40% w/w Ca(OH)2. Optical micrographs showed that lime disrupted the integrity of insoluble remnants (ghosts) and increased the degree of syneresis of the gelatinized starch dispersions (GSD). The particle size distribution was monomodal, shifting to smaller sizes and narrower distributions with increasing lime concentration. X-ray patterns and FTIR spectra showed that crystallinity decreased to a minimum at lime concentration of 0.20% w/w. Lime-treated GSD exhibited thixotropic and viscoelastic behaviour. In the linear viscoelastic region the storage modulus was higher than the loss modulus, but a crossover between these moduli occurred in the non-linear viscoelastic region. The viscoelastic properties decreased with increased lime concentration. The electrochemical properties suggested that the amylopectin-rich remnants and the released amylose contained in the continuous matrix was firstly attacked by calcium ions at low lime levels (<0.20% w/w), disrupting the starch gel microstructure.

  7. Phytochemical fingerprints of lime honey collected in serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gašić, Uroš; Šikoparija, Branko; Tosti, Tomislav; Trifković, Jelena; Milojković-Opsenica, Dušanka; Natić, Maja; Tešić, Živoslav

    2014-01-01

    Composition of phenolic compounds and the sugar content were determined as the basis for characterization of lime honey from Serbia. Particular attention was given to differences in phytochemical profiles of ripe and unripe lime honey and lime tree nectar. Melissopalynological analysis confirmed domination of Tilia nectar in all analyzed samples. Phenolic acids, abscisic acid, flavonoids, and flavonoid glycosides were determined by means of ultra-HPLC coupled with a hybrid mass spectrometer (UHPLC-OrbiTrap). Sugar content was determined using high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with amperometric detection. Similar phenolic compounds characterized unripe and ripe honeys, while the lime tree nectar profile showed notable differences. Compared to lime tree nectar, a high amount of chrysin, pinocembrin, and galangin were detected in both ripe and unripe lime honey. Fructose and glucose were the major constituents of all investigated samples, and amounts were within the limits established by European Union legislation. Sucrose content in the nectar sample was up to two-fold higher when compared to all honey samples. Isomaltose and gentiobiose with turanose content were different in analyzed production stages of lime honey.

  8. Stabilization of Expansive Soil by Lime and Fly Ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ji-ru; CAO Xing

    2002-01-01

    An experimental program was undertaken to study the individual and admixed effects of lime and fly ash on the geotechnical characteristics of expansive soil. Lime and fly ash were added to the expansive soil at 4% -6% and 40% - 50% by dry weight of soil, respectively. Testing specimens were determined and examined in chemical composition, grain size distribution, consistency limits, compaction, CBR ,free swell and swell capacity. The effect of lime and fly ash addition on reducing the swelling potential of an expansive soil is presented.It is revealed that a change of expansive soil texture takes place when lime and fly ash are mixed with expansive soil. Plastic limit increases by mixing lime and liquid limit decreases by mixing fly ash, which decreases plasticity index. As the amount of lime and fly ash is increased, there are an apparent reduction in maximum dry density,free swell and swelling capacity under 50 kPa pressure, and a corresponding increase in the percentage of coarse particles, optimum moisture content and CBR value. Based on the results, it can be concluded that the expansive soil can be successfully stabilized by lime and fly ash.

  9. The Middle Jurassic basinal deposits of the Surmeh Formation in the Central Zagros Mountains, southwest Iran: Facies, sequence stratigraphy, and controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasemi, Y.; Jalilian, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    The lower part of the Lower to Upper Jurassic Surmeh Formation consists of a succession of shallow marine carbonates (Toarcian-Aalenian) overlain by a deep marine basinal succession (Aalenian-Bajocian) that grades upward to Middle to Upper Jurassic platform carbonates. The termination of shallow marine carbonate deposition of the lower part of the Surmeh Formation and the establishment of deep marine sedimentation indicate a change in the style of sedimentation in the Neotethys passive margin of southwest Iran during the Middle Jurassic. To evaluate the reasons for this change and to assess the basin configuration during the Middle Jurassic, this study focuses on facies analysis and sequence stratigraphy of the basinal deposits (pelagic and calciturbidite facies) of the Surmeh Formation, referred here as 'lower shaley unit' in the Central Zagros region. The upper Aalenian-Bajocian 'lower shaley unit' overlies, with an abrupt contact, the Toarcian-lower Aalenian platform carbonates. It consists of pelagic (calcareous shale and limestone) and calciturbidite facies grading to upper Bajocian-Bathonian platform carbonates. Calciturbidite deposits in the 'lower shaley unit' consist of various graded grainstone to lime mudstone facies containing mixed deep marine fauna and platform-derived material. These facies include quartz-bearing lithoclast/intraclast grainstone to lime mudstone, bioclast/ooid/peloid intraclast grainstone, ooid grainstone to packstone, and lime wackestone to mudstone. The calciturbidite layers are erosive-based and commonly exhibit graded bedding, incomplete Bouma turbidite sequence, flute casts, and load casts. They consist chiefly of platform-derived materials including ooids, intraclasts/lithoclasts, peloids, echinoderms, brachiopods, bivalves, and open-ocean biota, such as planktonic bivalves, crinoids, coccoliths, foraminifers, and sponge spicules. The 'lower shaley unit' constitutes the late transgressive and the main part of the highstand

  10. Lime stabilization of fine-grained sediments in western Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders Stuhr; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas; Skels, Peteris

    2011-01-01

    due to the cold climate, and it is therefore of great interest to study possible methods to improve the stability and strength properties. This project includes laboratory studies of lime stabilization on fine-grained marine sediments from Kangerlussuaq, western Greenland. The results have included...... tests to determine the optimum lime content and the strength development in relation to both reaction time and curing temperature. Hopefully the results from this project will lead to a future use of lime stabilization and make it possible to use/reuse materials of poor quality at construction sites...

  11. Chapter 5. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources-Lower Cretaceous Travis Peak and Hosston formations, Jurassic Smackover interior salt basins total petroleum system, in the East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyman, T.S.; Condon, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    The Lower Cretaceous Travis Peak Formation of east Texas and southern Arkansas (and the correlative Hosston Formation of Louisiana and Mississippi) is a basinward-thickening wedge of terrigenous clastic sedimentary rocks that underlies the northern Gulf of Mexico Basin from east Texas across northern Louisiana to southern Mississippi. Clastic detritus was derived from two main fluvial-deltaic depocenters, one in northeastern Texas and the other extending from southeastern Mississippi northwestward into northeastern Louisiana. Across the main hydrocarbon-productive trend in east Texas and northern Louisiana, the Travis Peak and Hosston Formations are about 2,000 ft thick.

  12. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain, Class II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Ernest A.; Cate, David; Blasingame, Thomas; Major, R.P.; Brown, Lewis; Stafford, Wayne

    2001-08-07

    The principal objectives of this project was to: increase the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. Efforts for Year 1 of this project has been reservoir characterization, which has included three (3) primary tasks: geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, and microbial characterization.

  13. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain, Class II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Ernest, A.; Crate, David; Blasingame, Thomas; Major, R.P.; Brown, Lewis; Stafford, Wayne

    2002-11-02

    The principal objectives of the project were: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs.

  14. Local development of affordable lime in southern Africa: Project Summary Report

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Lime is an important and versatile chemical used in a wide range of industrial and other applications. The term lime, which strictly refers to calcium oxide (CaO), is applied to a range of products arising from the grinding, calcination and hydration of limestone and dolomite. Many less developed countries do not have adequate lime production and this leads to problems associated with under-utilisation of lime. In particular, insufficient application of agricultural lime can lead to soil acid...

  15. Incorporation of turmeric-lime mixture during the preparation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-03-19

    Mar 19, 2007 ... new type of turmeric-lime treated tomato puree product. ... Retention of natural pigment is one of the symbols of livelihood. Thermal treatment is one of the most important methods of preservation of vegetables (Lund, 1975).

  16. Effects of liming; Effekter av kalkning. IKEU aarsrapport 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelberg, M. [Institute for Freshwater Research, Drottningholm (Sweden)

    1995-11-01

    Since 1989 an extensive investigation have been made of 14 limed lakes in Sweden. On a regular basis monitoring is made of the water chemistry, nutrients and metals in fish, plankton and bottom fauna. This report covers the result from 1994 as well as a compilation of the trend during 1989-1994. The aim of the monitoring programme is (1) to analyze the long-term chemical and biological effects of liming of acidified waters, (2) to evaluate if the Swedish liming program restores the ecosystems with regard to species composition and biological richness, (3) to judge if the liming efforts leads to unwanted effects in lakes and water courses, and (4) to be able to forecast the capacity of the acidified lakes to return to pre-acidification conditions and to compare this to costs and risks for unwanted effects. 16 refs, 70 figs, 2 tabs

  17. Schmeissneria: An angiosperm from the Early Jurassic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin WANG

    2010-01-01

    The origin of angiosperms has been a focus of intensive research for a long time. The so-called preCretaceous angiosperms, including Schmeissneria, are usually clouded with doubt. To expel the cloud around the enigmatic Schmeissneria, the syntype and new materials of Schmeissneria collected previously in Germany and recently in China are studied. These materials include female inflorescences and infructescences. The latter are old materials but were under-studied previously. Light microscopy and scanning electron microscope observations indicate that the fruits in these infructescences have in situ seeds enclosed, and that the ovaries are closed before pollination. Thus the plants meet two strict criteria for angiosperms: angiospermy plus angio-ovuly. Placing Schmeissneria in angiosperms will extend the record of angiosperms up to the Early Jurassic, more compatible with many molecular dating conclusions on the age of angiosperms, and demanding a reassessment of the current doctrines on the origin of angiosperms. Although the phylogenetic relationship of Schmeissneria to other angiosperms apparently is still an open question, this study adds to research concerning the origin of angiosperms.

  18. Damage Development in Confined Borosilicate and Soda-Lime Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    Elmira, NY). BF is a borosilicate glass manufactured by Schott Glass using a float process. SP float glass is a crystal clear, soda-lime glass . This...2005. 22 21. ASTM £494, "Technique for Measuring Ultrasonic Velocity in Materials", July 2001. 22. Schott Glass , Borofloat 33 Thermal Properties...21945 Damage Development in Conf"med Borosilicate and Soda-Lime Glasses Kathryn A. Dannemann1, Charles E. Anderson. Jr. 1, Sidney Chocron1, James

  19. Property Changes in Lime Treated Expansive Clays under Continuous Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    decreasing soil-lime reactivity in areas of better drainage . In poorly drained soils, the removal of soil "constituents" are slowed and leaching effects are...minimized, thereby maintaining the calcium/magnesium ratio and higher soil pH (Thompson 1966; Joffe 1949). Also, soils with poor drainage will have a...these soil-lime mixtures may not exhibit as much autogenous healing, particularly after prolonged leaching, as they are generally believed to have

  20. Effects of liming on crayfish and fish in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyberg, P.; Appleberg, M.; Degerman, E.

    1986-12-01

    The effects of lime treatment on crayfish (Astacus astacus and Pacifastacus leniusculus) populations in 17 lakes and fish populations in 47 lakes and 7 rivers within the trial period 1976-82 have been evaluated. An increase in the catch of crayfish per unit effort was observed in 7 lakes, although significantly in one lake only. The varying results in the other lakes indicate that factors other than pH may be of greater importance for the development of crayfish populations after liming. Recruitment of fish improved in waters where liming resulted in pH <5.5. In lakes with pH <5.5 before and pH >5.5 after treatment, there was a significant increase in the number of fish caught, from 12 to 34 per unit effort. Due to improved recruitment the individual average weight was smaller and hence the catch in weight per unit effort was about the same as before liming. After lime treatment in streams which resulted in a stable pH of >5.5, the abundance of juvenile salmonids increased to numbers found in non-acidified streams. In other streams acid spates reduced the positive influence of liming on the abundance of juvenile salmonids. 33 references.

  1. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: Upper Jurassic – Lower Cretaceous of the Danish Central Graben: structural framework and nomenclature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Japsen, Peter

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The Danish Central Graben is part of the mainly Late Jurassic complex of grabens in the central and southern North Sea which form the Central Graben. The tectonic elements of the Danish Central Graben in the Late Jurassic are outlined and compared to those in the Early Cretaceous based on reduced versions of published maps (1:200 000, compiled on the basis of all 1994 public domain seismic and well data. The Tail End Graben, a half-graben which stretches for about 90 km along the East North Sea High, is the dominant Late Jurassic structural feature. The Rosa Basin (new name is a narrow, north-south-trending basin extending from the south-western part of the Tail End Graben. The Tail End Graben ceased to exist as a coherent structural element during the Early Cretaceous and developed into three separate depocentres: the Iris and Gulnare Basins to the north and the Roar Basin to the south (new names. The Early Cretaceous saw a shift from subsidence focused along the East North Sea High during the Late Jurassic to a more even distribution of minor basins within the Danish Central Graben. The depth to the top of the Upper Jurassic - lowermost Cretaceous Farsund Formation reaches a maximum of 4800 m in the northern part of the study area, while the depth to the base of the Upper Jurassic reaches 7500 m in the Tail End Graben, where the Upper Jurassic attains a maximum thickness of 3600 m. The Lower Cretaceous Cromer Knoll Group attains a maximum thickness of 1100 m in the Outer Rough Basin.

  2. Effect of Lime on Mechanical and Durability Properties of Blended Cement Based Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Prasanna Kumar; Patro, Sanjaya Kumar; Moharana, Narayana C.

    2016-06-01

    This work presents the results of experimental investigations performed to evaluate the effect of lime on mechanical and durability properties of concrete mixtures made with blended cement like Portland Slag Cement (PSC) and Portland Pozzolana Cement (PPC) with lime content of 0, 5, 7 and 10 %. Test result indicated that inclusion of hydraulic lime on replacement of cement up to 7 % increases compressive strength of concrete made with both PSC and PPC. Flexural strength increased with lime content. Highest flexural strength is reported at 7 % lime content for both PSC and PPC. Workability is observed to decrease with lime addition which could be compensated with introduction of super plasticizer. Acid and sulphate resistance increase slightly up to 7 % of lime addition and is found to decrease with further addition of lime. Lime addition up to 10 % does not affect the soundness of blended cements like PSC and PPC.

  3. First evidence of lime burning in southern Scandinavia: lime kilns found at the royal residence on the west bank of Lake Tissø

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Peter Steen; Holst, Sandie

    2015-01-01

    In connection with investigations of the aristocratic residence at Tissø from the Viking Age, the earliest evidence so far of lime burning in Denmark has been excavated. The excavations unearthed traces of up to five lime kilns which were subsequently dated to the end of the ninth century....... This corresponds well with the dating of the erection of the hall in the third construction phase at Fugledegård. Finds of mud-and-wattle with whitewashing show that the lime was used to whitewash the halls at Tissø in both the Germanic Iron Age and the Viking Age. Analyses of lime from the lime kilns...

  4. Harvestmen (Arachnida: Opiliones) from the Middle Jurassic of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Diying; Selden, Paul A.; Dunlop, Jason A.

    2009-08-01

    Harvestmen (Arachnida: Opiliones) are familiar animals in most terrestrial habitats but are rare as fossils, with only a handful of species known from each of the Palaeozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic eras. Fossil harvestmen from Middle Jurassic (ca. 165 Ma) strata of Daohugou, Inner Mongolia, China, are described as Mesobunus martensi gen. et sp. nov. and Daohugopilio sheari gen. et sp. nov.; the two genera differ primarily in the relative length of their legs and details of the pedipalps. Jurassic arachnids are extremely rare and these fossils represent the first Jurassic, and only the fourth Mesozoic, record of Opiliones. These remarkably well-preserved and modern-looking fossils are assigned to the Eupnoi, whereby M. martensi demonstrably belongs in Sclerosomatidae. It thus represents the oldest record of a modern harvestman family and implies a high degree of evolutionary stasis among one of the most widespread and abundant groups of long-legged, round-bodied harvestmen.

  5. The second Jurassic dinosaur rush and the dawn of dinomania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Paul D

    2010-09-01

    During the second Jurassic dinosaur rush museum paleontologists raced to display the world's first mounted sauropod dinosaur. The American Museum of Natural History triumphed in 1905 when its Brontosaurus debuted before an admiring crowd of wealthy New Yorkers. The Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, the Field Columbian Museum in Chicago and other institutions were quick to follow with their own sauropod displays. Thereafter, dinomania spread far and wide, and big, showpiece dinosaurs became a museum staple. This brief but intensely competitive period of acquisitiveness fostered important Jurassic dinosaur revisions and crucial innovations in paleontological field and lab techniques.

  6. Jurassic domes in the North Sea - northern North Atlantic region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surlyk, F. [Univ. of Copenhagen, Geological Inst., Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1996-12-31

    The stratigraphic and tectonic evolution of the Jurassic of East Greenland, the Norwegian Shelf and the North Sea is remarkably similar. A major Middle Jurassic unconformity occurs in all three areas. In the North Sea it is commonly termed the `Mid-Cimmerian Unconformity` and is characterized by progressive truncation of the underlying section towards a centre at the triple junction between the Central Graben, Viking Graben and Moray Firth. Strata above the unconformity show a progressive Late Aalenian-Early Kimmeridgian onlap in the same direction. These relations have been interpreted as caused by Early Jurassic uplift and of a major thermal dome in the central North Sea, followed by Medial and Late Jurassic rifting, erosion, deflation and transgression of the dome. The East Greenland unconformity shows progressive truncation of underlying strata from south to north, and Bajocian to Callovian onlap in the same direction. The same pattern seems to be developed on the conjugate Norwegian margin. This suggests the possibility that the three unconformities have similar causes for their development. It is proposed that major rift domes formed in the Central North Sea and in the Greenland-Norway seaway in Early Jurassic times. The domes were eroded and gradually deflated during Medial Jurassic times and were finally submerged by the Late Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian. They were associated with volcanism and rifting which was delayed with respect to dome initiation. Roughly contemperaneous domes were present west of Britain, north of the Porcupine Seabight, and in Scania, southern Sweden, as reflected by development of asymmetrical unconformities showing progressive truncation of underlying strata, onlap of overlying Jurassic strata, and associated intrusive and extrusive volcanism. The domes are related to impingement of the heads of transient mantle plumes at the base of the lithosphere. The associated unconformities are thus of non-eustatic nature. Domal uplift and

  7. Trachyteuthis covacevichi n. sp., a Late Jurassic Palaeopacific coleoid cephalopod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Fuchs

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A new early Oxfordian coleoid cephalopod, Trachyteuthis covacevichi n. sp., is described from northern Chile. It represents the first Late Jurassic Palaeopacific vampyropod and thus considerably extends the palaeogeographic distribution of trachyteuthids. In general, Tr. covacevichi n. sp. possesses a gladius typical for the genus, but wider than in other species. Similarities between Tr. covacevichi n. sp., Tr. palmeri from the Oxfordian of Cuba and Tr. sp. from the Kimmeridgian of Europe confirm a Caribbean Seaway between the Tethys and the Palaeopacific during Late Jurassic times. Morphologically, the wide gladius of Tr. covacevichi n. sp. supports a close phylogenetic relationship between Teudopsis and Trachyteuthis. doi:10.1002/mmng.200700012

  8. Jurassic Tectonics of North China: A Synthetic View

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yueqiao; DONG Shuwen; ZHAO Yue; ZHANG Tian

    2008-01-01

    This paper gives a synthetic view on the Jurassic tectonics of North China, with an attempt to propose a framework for the stepwise tectonic evolution history. Jurassic sedimentation, deformation and magmatism in North China have been divided into three stages. The earliest Jurassic is marked by a period of magmatism quiescence (in 205-190 Ma) and regional uplift, which are considered to be the continuation of the "Indosinian movement" characterized by continent-continent collision between the North and South China blocks. The Early to Middle Jurassic (in 190-170 Ma) was predominated by weak lithospheric extension expressed by mantle-derived plutonism and volcanism along the Yanshan belt and alongside the Tan-Lu fault zone, normal faulting and graben formation along the Yinshan-Yanshan tectonic belt, depression and resuming of coal-bearing sedimentation in vast regions of the North China block (NCB). The Middle to Late Jurassic stage started at 165,.5 Ma and ended up before 136 Ma; it was dominated by intensive intraplate deformation resulting from multi-directional compressions. Two major deformation events have been identified. One is marked by stratigraphic unconformity beneath the thick Upper Jurassic molasic series in the foreland zones of the western Ordos thrust-fold belt and along the Yinshan-Yanshan belt; it was predated 160 Ma. The other one is indicated by stratigraphic unconformity at the base of the Lower Cretaceous and predated 135 Ma. During this last stage, two latitudinal tectonic belts, the Yinshan-Yanshan belt in the north and the Qinling-Dabie belt in the south, and the western margin of the Ordos basin were all activated by thrusting; the NCB itself was deformed by the NE to NNE-trending structural system involving thrusting, associated folding and sinistral strike-slip faulting, which were spatially partitioned. Foliated S-type granitic plutons aged 160-150 Ma were massively emplaced in the Jiao-Liao massif east of the Tan-Lu fault zone and

  9. Experimental investigation and constitutive model for lime mudstone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junbao; Liu, Xinrong; Zhao, Baoyun; Song, Zhanping; Lai, Jinxing

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanical properties of lime mudstone, conventional triaxial compression tests under different confining pressures (0, 5, 15 and 20 MPa) are performed on lime mudstone samples. The test results show that, from the overall perspective of variation law, the axial peak stress, axial peak strain and elastic modulus of lime mudstone tend to gradually increase with increasing confining pressure. In the range of tested confining pressure, the variations in axial peak stress and elastic modulus with confining pressure can be described with linear functions; while the variation in axial peak strain with confining pressure can be reflected with a power function. To describe the axial stress-strain behavior in failure process of lime mudstone, a new constitutive model is proposed, with the model characteristics analyzed and the parameter determination method put forward. Compared with Wang' model, only one parameter n is added to the new model. The comparison of predicted curves from the model and test data indicates that the new model can preferably simulate the strain softening property of lime mudstone and the axial stress-strain response in rock failure process.

  10. Liming of acid soils in Osijek-Baranja county

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolijanović Željko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The negative trend of soil degradation process increases with intensive agricultural production. Therefore, there is a need for soil conditioning like liming, humification, fertilization, etc. to improve soil quality. One of the major problems that occur on agricultural soils of Croatia is acidification. A downward trend of soil pH is mainly present in soils of poor structure with intensive agricultural production. In agricultural practice liming often needs to rely only on the pH value, without determining the hydrolytic acidity, CEC or soil texture. Due to the above mentioned facts, calculation of liming for Osijek-Baranja County was conducted with the help of ALRxp calculator, which takes CEC, soil pH in KCl, hydrolytic acidity, bulk density of soil, soil textural class and depth of the plow layer to 30 cm into account. Low soil pH values have a great influence on soil suitability for crops as well as on the deficit of calcium and magnesium. All of these lead to the degradation of soil structure, and can even lead to disturbances of plant nutrition in some production areas. On such soils, liming would be imperatively required, but with caution because an excessive intake of lime materials, especially without the necessary analysis, causes a decline in organic matter and reduces accessibility for plant uptake of microelements.

  11. Long term trends of fish after liming of Swedish streams and lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Kerstin; Degerman, Erik; Petersson, Erik; Bergquist, Björn

    2016-12-01

    Thousands of Swedish acidified lakes and streams have been regularly limed for about 30 years. Standard sampling of fish assemblages in lakes and streams was an important part of monitoring the trends after liming, i.e. sampling with multi-mesh gillnets in lakes (EN 14757) and electrofishing in streams (EN 14011). Monitoring data are nationally managed, in the National Register of Survey test-fishing and the Swedish Electrofishing Register. We evaluated long-term data from 1029 electrofishing sites in limed streams and gillnet sampling in 750 limed lakes, along with reference data from 195 stream sites and 101 lakes with no upstream liming in their catchments. The median year of first liming was 1986 for both streams and lakes. The proportion of limed stream sites with no fish clearly decreased with time, mean species richness and proportion of sites with brown trout (Salmo trutta) recruits increased. There were no consistent trends in fish occurrence or species richness at non-limed sites, but occurrence of brown trout recruits also increased in acid as well as neutral reference streams. Abundance of brown trout, perch (Perca fluviatilis) and roach (Rutilus rutilus) increased significantly more at limed sites than at non-limed reference sites sampled before and after 1986. The mean species richness did not change consistently in limed lakes, but decreased in low alkalinity reference lakes, and fish abundance decreased significantly in limed as well as in non-limed lakes.

  12. Influence of water-repellent treatment on the properties lime and lime pozzolan mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fortes Revilla, C.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence that water-repellent products can have on physical and micro-structural properties of lime mortars, and lime plus pozzolan mortars has been studied. Three water repellent products have been used. Mixes of the previously mentioned three water repellents plus a biocide product were also applied. Treatments make the total porosity and saturation coefficient of both mortars to decrease, while colorimetric coordinates bear little alteration. All treatments with water repellent products provided mortars with a hydrophobic property index close to 100%. Durability of such mortars has been also studied: salt crystallization test, frost-thaw and dry-wet cycles, as well as ultraviolet radiation test were carried out. Relationship between mortars behavior and their porosity and saturation coefficient were found.

    En el presente trabajo se ha estudiado la influencia de la aplicación de productos hidrofugantes a morteros de cal y morteros de cal y puzolana sobre sus propiedades físicas y microestructurales. Se han estudiado tres productos hidrofugantes. También han sido estudiados dichos productos junto con un biocida. La porosidad total y el coeficiente de saturación de ambos tipos de morteros se ve reducido por el efecto de los tratamientos mientras que las coordenadas colorimétricas se ven poco alteradas. Todos los tratamientos confieren un índice de hidrofobicidad a los morteros próximo al 100%. Asimismo, también se ha estudiado la durabilidad de dichos morteros frente a la cristalización de sales, hielo-deshielo, los ciclos de humedad-sequedad y radiaciones ultravioleta. Se relaciona el comportamiento de los morteros con su porosidad y el coeficiente de saturación.

  13. Soil Stabilization Using Lime: Advantages, Disadvantages and Proposing a Potential Alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibtehaj Taha Jawad

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study is an overview of previous studies on lime (quick and hydrated -treated soil. Lime is the oldest traditional stabilizer used for soil stabilization. The mechanism of soil-lime treatment involves cation exchange, which leads to the flocculation and agglomeration of soil particles. The high pH environment then causes a pozzolanic reaction between the free Ca+2 cations and the dissolved silica and alumina. Lime-treated soil effectively increases the strength, durability and workability of the soil. Such treatment also improves soil compressibility. A fluctuation behavior was observed on the influence of lime on soil permeability. However, the factors affecting the permeability of the soil-lime mixture should be extensively studied. Nonetheless, lime treatment has a number of inherent disadvantages, such as carbonation, sulfate attack and environment impact. Magnesium oxide/hydroxide are thus proposed as a suitable alternative stabilizer to overcome at least some of the disadvantages of using lime in soil stabilization.

  14. EVALUATION OF BIOAEROSOL COMPONENTS, GENERATION FACTORS, AND AIRBORNE TRANSPORT ASSOCIATED WITH LIME TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lime treatment has been used in contaminated sediment management activities for many purposes such as dewatering, improvement of physical properties, and reducing contaminant mobility. Exothermic volatilization of volatile organic compounds from lime-treated sediment is well kno...

  15. REMOVAL OF BERYLLIUM FROM DRINKING WATER BY CHEMICAL COAGULATION AND LIME SOFTENING

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effectiveness of conventional drinking water treatment and lime softening was evaluated for beryllium removal from two drinking water sources. ar test studies were conducted to determine how common coagulants (aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride and lime softening performed ...

  16. Liming Poultry Manures to Kill Pathogens and Decrease Soluble Phosphorus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maguire,R.; Hesterberg, D.; Gernat, A.; Anderson, K.; Wineland, M.; Grimes, J.

    2006-01-01

    Received for publication September 9, 2005. Stabilizing phosphorus (P) in poultry waste to reduce P losses from manured soils is important to protect surface waters, while pathogens in manures are an emerging issue. This study was conducted to evaluate CaO and Ca(OH){sub 2} for killing manure bacterial populations (pathogens) and stabilizing P in poultry wastes and to investigate the influence on soils following amendment with the treated wastes. Layer manure and broiler litter varying in moisture content were treated with CaO and Ca(OH){sub 2} at rates of 2.5, 5, 10, and 15% by weight. All treated wastes were analyzed for microbial plate counts, pH, and water-soluble phosphorus (WSP), while a few selected layer manures were analyzed by phosphorus X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES). A loamy sand and a silt loam were amended with broiler litter and layer manure treated with CaO at rates of 0, 2.5, 5, 10, and 15% and soil WSP and pH were measured at times 1, 8, and 29 d. Liming reduced bacterial populations, with greater rates of lime leading to greater reductions; for example 10% CaO applied to 20% solids broiler litter reduced the plate counts from 793 000 to 6500 mL{sup -1}. Liming also reduced the WSP in the manures by over 90% in all cases where at least 10% CaO was added. Liming the manures also reduced WSP in soils immediately following application and raised soil pH. The liming process used successfully reduced plate counts and concerns about P losses in runoff following land application of these limed products due to decreased WSP.

  17. Microstructures of Early Jurassic (Toarcian) shales of Northern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, M.E.; Barnhoorn, A.; Wasch, L.; Trabucho-Alexandre, João; Peach, C.J.; Drury, M.R.

    2016-01-01

    The Toarcian (Early Jurassic) Posidonia Shale Formation is a possible unconventional gas source in Northern Europe and occurs within the Cleveland Basin (United Kingdom), the Anglo-Paris Basin (France), the Lower Saxony Basin and the Southwest Germany Basin (Germany), and the Roer Valley Graben, the

  18. Evidence for a Mid-Jurassic Adaptive Radiation in Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Roger A; Friedman, Matt; Lloyd, Graeme T; Benson, Roger B J

    2015-08-17

    A series of spectacular discoveries have transformed our understanding of Mesozoic mammals in recent years. These finds reveal hitherto-unsuspected ecomorphological diversity that suggests that mammals experienced a major adaptive radiation during the Middle to Late Jurassic. Patterns of mammalian macroevolution must be reinterpreted in light of these new discoveries, but only taxonomic diversity and limited aspects of morphological disparity have been quantified. We assess rates of morphological evolution and temporal patterns of disparity using large datasets of discrete characters. Rates of morphological evolution were significantly elevated prior to the Late Jurassic, with a pronounced peak occurring during the Early to Middle Jurassic. This intense burst of phenotypic innovation coincided with a stepwise increase in apparent long-term standing diversity and the attainment of maximum disparity, supporting a "short-fuse" model of early mammalian diversification. Rates then declined sharply, and remained significantly low until the end of the Mesozoic, even among therians. This supports the "long-fuse" model of diversification in Mesozoic therians. Our findings demonstrate that sustained morphological innovation in Triassic stem-group mammals culminated in a global adaptive radiation of crown-group members during the Early to Middle Jurassic.

  19. Klukiopsis jurassica--A new Jurassic schizaeaceous fern from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new Jurassic schizaeaceous fern Klukiopsis jurassica gen. et sp. nov. from Yima, Henan Province, China is described. The new fern is characterized by the abaxial sori arranged in two rows, apical and complete annulus and more than 800 smooth trilete spores in each sorus.

  20. Jurassic Park as a Teaching Tool in the Chemistry Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jollis, W. Gary, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Describes how the science fiction novel "Jurassic Park" has been used to provide the focus for summate discussions among gifted high school students participating in a state-sponsored, science-intensive summer program. Discusses adaptations of this approach for use in chemistry classes from the high school to intermediate college level. (JRH)

  1. In situ Gymnosperm pollen from the Middle Jurassic of Yorkshire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konijnenburg-van Cittert, van Johanna H.A.

    1971-01-01

    In this paper the morphology of pollen grains yielded by male Gymnosperm fructifications from the Jurassic flora of Yorkshire is studied and discussed. Several new male fructifications were found and described: Hastystrobus gen. nov. was erected for male cones yielding the Eucommiidites type of poll

  2. DNA markers provide insight about common lime in historicalplantings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ole Kim; Thomsen, Pernille; Rasmussen, Christine Waage

    2014-01-01

    nurseries in the Netherlands and Germany. It also provides evidence that it is possible to obtain the same genetic material as originally planted when common lime trees are to be replaced in historical plantings. Furthermore, the utility of DNA markers in the management of plant material in parks......As part of the restoration process of an avenue of common lime (Tilia × europaea) from 1760 in the Royal Danish Gardens, all remaining trees were genotyped with DNA markers before they were felled. As such, information about the nature of the plant material (clonal versus non-clonal) and mode...

  3. Glass-Forming Ability of Soda Lime Borate Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Qiuju; Mauro, J.C.; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the composition dependence of glass-forming ability (GFA) of a series of iron-containing soda lime borate liquids by substituting Na2O for B2O3. We have characterized GFA by measuring the glass stability against crystallization using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC......). The results show that the GFA decreases when substituting Na2O for B2O3. Moreover, we find that there is no direct link between the kinetic fragility and GFA for the soda lime borate series studied herein. We have also discovered and clarified a striking thermal history dependence of the glass stability...

  4. Soil Stabilization Using Lime: Advantages, Disadvantages and Proposing a Potential Alternative

    OpenAIRE

    Ibtehaj Taha Jawad; Mohd Raihan Taha; Zaid Hameed Majeed; Tanveer A Khan

    2014-01-01

    This study is an overview of previous studies on lime (quick and hydrated) -treated soil. Lime is the oldest traditional stabilizer used for soil stabilization. The mechanism of soil-lime treatment involves cation exchange, which leads to the flocculation and agglomeration of soil particles. The high pH environment then causes a pozzolanic reaction between the free Ca+2 cations and the dissolved silica and alumina. Lime-treated soil effectively increases the strength, durability and workabili...

  5. JURASSIC PALEOGEOGRAPHY OF THE PIENINY AND OUTER CARPATHIAN BASINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAN GOLONKA

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The Jurassic history of the Pieniny/Outer Carpathian basins reflects the evolution of the Circum-Tethyan area, especially its Alpine Tethys part. The Alpine Tethys that is Ligurian, Penninic Oceans and Pieniny/Magura Basin constitute the extension of the Central Atlantic system. The synrift stage lasted in the Pieniny/Magura Basin from late Early Jurassic to Tithonian (the Magura Unit constitutes the southernmost part of the Outer Flysch Carpathians. The Pieniny rift opened during Pliensbachian – Aalenian. The central Atlantic and Alpine Tethys went into a drifting stage during the Middle Jurassic. The Late Jurassic (Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian history of the Pieniny/Magura Basin reflects strongest facial differentiation within sedimentary basin where mixed siliceous-carbonate sedimentation took place. Greatest deepening effect is indicated by widespread Oxfordian radiolarites, which occur in the all basinal successions, whereas the shallowest zone is completely devoid of siliceous intercalations at that time (sedimentation from Ammonitico Rosso facies up to coral reef limestone. The southern part of the North European Platform, north from the Pieniny/Magura realm, started to be rifted during Late Jurassic time and Silesian Basin in the Outer Western Carpathians and Sinaia Basin in the Eastern Carpathians, with black, mainly redeposited marls have been created. The outer sub-basins were differentiated during the latest (Hauterivian-Barremian phase of basinal development. The connection of Silesian Basin with Sinaia and Southern Carpathian Severin areas suggests the NW-SE direction of the basinal axis while the orientation of the Pieniny Klippen Belt/Magura Basin was SW-NE so, two Outer Carpathian perpendicular directions are possible within the basins. Major reorganization happened during the Tithonian-Berriasian time. It was reflected by both paleoceanographical and paleoclimatical changes. The Neo-Cimmerian tectonic events as well as main phase

  6. 40 CFR 180.1232 - Lime-sulfur; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lime-sulfur; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1232 Lime-sulfur; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of lime-sulfur....

  7. 40 CFR 180.1231 - Lime; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lime; exemption from the requirement... From Tolerances § 180.1231 Lime; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of lime....

  8. Trans-border (east Serbia/west Bulgaria correlation of the Jurassic sediments: Main Jurassic paleogeographic units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tchoumatchenco Platon

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the region across the Serbian/Bulgarian state border, there are individualized 5 Jurassic paleogeographic units (from West to East: (1 the Thracian Massif Unit without Jurassic sediments; (2 the Lužnica-Koniavo Unit - partially with Liassic in Grsten facies and with deep water Middle Callovian-Kimmeridgian (p. p sediments of the type "ammonitico rosso", and Upper Kimmeridgian-Tithonian siliciclastics flysch; (3 The Getic Unit subdivided into two subunits - the Western Getic Sub-Uni - without Lower Jurassic sediments and the Eastern Getic Sub-Unit with Lower Jurassic continental and marine sediments, which are followed in both sub-units by carbonate platform limestones (type Stramberk; (4 the Infra (Sub-Getic Unit - with relatively deep water Liassic and Dogger sediments (the Dogger of type "black shales with Bossitra alpine" and Middle Callovian-Tithonian of type "ammonitico rosso"; (5 the Danubian Unit - with shallow water Liassic, Dogger and Malm (Miroč-Vrška Čuka Zone, deep water Dogger and Malm (Donjomilanovačko-Novokoritska Zone.

  9. Origin of intraformational folds in the Jurassic Todilto Limestone, Ambrosia Lake uranium mining district, McKinley and Valencia counties, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M.W.

    1982-01-01

    The Todilto Limestone of Middle Jurassic age in the Ambrosia Lake uranium mining district of McKinley and Valencia Counties, New Mexico, is the host formation for numerous small- to medium-sized uranium deposits in joints, shear zones, and fractures within small- to large-scale intraformational folds. The folds probably were formed as a result of differential sediment loading when eolian sand dunes of the overlying Summerville Formation of Middle Jurassic age migrated over soft, chemically precipitated, lime muds of the Todilto shortly after their deposition in a regressive, mixed fresh and saline lacustrine or marine environment of deposition. Encroachment of Summerville eolian dunes over soft Todilto lime muds was apparently a local phenomenon and was restricted to postulated beltlike zones which trended radially across the Todilto coastline toward the receding body of water. Intraformational folding is believed to be confined to the pathways of individual eolian dunes or clusters of dunes within the dune belts. During the process of sediment loading by migrating sand dunes, layers of Todilto lime mud were differentially compacted, contorted, and dewatered, producing both small- and large-scale plastic deformation structures, including convolute laminations, mounds, rolls, folds, and small anticlines and synclines. With continued compaction and dewatering, the mud, in localized areas, reached a point of desaturation at which sediment plasticity was lost. Prolonged loading by overlying dune sands thus caused faulting, shearing, fracturing, and jointing of contorted limestone beds. These areas or zones of deformation within the limestone became the preferred sites of epigenetic uranium mineralization because of the induced transmissivity created by sediment rupture. Along most of the prograding Todilto coastline, adjacent to the eolian dune belts, both interdune and coastal sabkha environments dominated during Todilto-Summerville time. Sediments in coastal areas

  10. Simulation of self-healing of dolomitic lime mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.A.; Nijland, T.G.; Hees, R.P.J. van

    2011-01-01

    In the present research a test procedure was set up to reproduce self-healing on lime-based (both pure calcium and magnesium-calcium) mortar specimens in laboratory. After few months testing, during which the specimens were subjected to wet-dry cycles, thin sections of the specimens were prepared an

  11. Simulation of the self-healing of dolomitic lime mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.; Nijland, T.G.; Hees, R.P.J. van

    2012-01-01

    A test procedure was set up to reproduce laboratory self-healing on lime-based (both pure calcium and magnesium-calcium) mortar specimens. After a few months of testing, during which time the specimens were submitted to wet-dry cycles, thin sections of the specimens were prepared and observed using

  12. Lime pretreatment and fermentation of enzymatically hydrolyzed sugarcane bagasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabelo, Sarita C; Maciel Filho, Rubens; Costa, Aline C

    2013-03-01

    Sugarcane bagasse was subjected to lime (calcium hydroxide) pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis for second-generation ethanol production. A central composite factorial design was performed to determine the best combination of pretreatment time, temperature, and lime loading, as well as to evaluate the influence of enzymatic loadings on hydrolysis conversion. The influence of increasing solids loading in the pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis stages was also determined. The hydrolysate was fermented using Saccharomyces cerevisiae in batch and continuous mode. In the continuous fermentation, the hydrolysates were concentrated with molasses. Lime pretreatment significantly increased the enzymatic digestibility of sugarcane bagasse without the need for prior particle size reduction. In the optimal pretreatment conditions (90 h, 90 °C, 0.47 glime/g bagasse) and industrially realistic conditions of hydrolysis (12.7 FPU/g of cellulase and 7.3 CBU/g of β-glucosidase), 139.6 kglignin/ton raw bagasse and 126.0 kg hemicellulose in the pretreatment liquor per ton raw bagasse were obtained. The hydrolysate from lime pretreated sugarcane bagasse presented low amounts of inhibitors, leading to ethanol yield of 164.1 kgethanol/ton raw bagasse.

  13. K'qizaghetnu Ht'ana (Stories from Lime Village).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobby, Pete; And Others

    A cross section of Athabascan life as related by eight inhabitants of Lime Village, Alaska, is given in this document. The short narratives are printed in English and in Dena'ina. Illustrations accompany the text. The stories tell of making eagle feather robes, birchbark or mooseskin boats, a raincoat from black bear intestines, and boots from…

  14. Evaluation of Hydrated Lime Filler in Asphalt Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abbas Hasan Al-Jumaily

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mineral filler is one of important materials and affecting on properties and quality of asphalt mixtures .There are different types of mineral filler depended on cost and quality , the matter encourages us to achieve this study to evaluate hydrated lime filler effects on properties of asphalt mixes related with strength and durability. Conventional asphaltic concrete mixtures with Portland cement and soft sandstone fillers and mixtures modified with hydrated lime were evaluated for their fundamental engineering properties as defined by Marshall properties , index of retained strength , indirect tensile strength , permanent deformation characteristics , and fatigue resistance .A typical dense graded mixture employed in construction of surface course pavement in Iraq in accordance with SCRB specifications was used .The materials used in this study included mineral aggregate materials (coarse and fine sizes were originally obtained from Najaf Sea quarries and two grades of asphalt cements produced from Daurah refinery which are D47 and D66 . The physical properties , stiffness modulus and chemical composition are evaluated for the recovered asphalt cement from prepared asphalt mixes containing various filler types .The paper results indicated that the addition of hydrated lime as mineral filler improved the permanent deformation characteristics and fatigue life and the use of hydrated lime will decrease the moisture susceptibility of the asphalt mixtures.

  15. Performance of sand-lime products made with plastic waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowek Milena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the studies on the sand-lime (silicate masonry units modified with recycled plastics in various forms: regranulate, regrind and powder. The following materials were examined: high impact polystyrene (HIPS and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS. The results of the functional properties tests, such as compressive strength, softening behavior, bulk density and water absorption are presented in the article. The microstructure of the products was analyzed using SEM and XRD methods.Obtained results show that the properties of modified product largely depend on the type, form and amount of used polymer. The highest compressive strength was achieved with 15% of HIPS regranulate in the product (by weight. ABS does not improve the strength of the sample, however, it does block the capillary action in the sand-lime product. The lowest softening coefficient was obtained in the sample modified with HIPS regranulate. The examined polymers contributed to decrease in bulk density of the samples as well as lowered their water absorption. The samples with pulverized polymer have the worst properties. All the results are compared with those of the traditional sand-lime bricks and sand-lime product modified with other additives. The analysis indicate that silicate masonry units with post-production and post-consumption plastic waste can possess interesting functional properties what brings a new potential possibility to dispose of still growing number of plastic waste.

  16. EFFECTS OF LIME (CAO) ON THE ENDOTOXIN LEVELS OF BIOSOLIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lime addition is a common practice for treating biosolids in order to meet EPA 503 requirements for land application. Since this treatment kills the majority of microorganisms, will it increase the level of endotoxins present in biosolids? And, if endotoxin levels are increased, ...

  17. A Model for Dissolution of Lime in Steelmaking Slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Rahul; Roy, Ushasi; Ghosh, Dinabandhu

    2016-08-01

    In a previous study by Sarkar et al. (Metall. Mater. Trans. B 46B:961 2015), a dynamic model of the LD steelmaking was developed. The prediction of the previous model (Sarkar et al. in Metall. Mater. Trans. B 46B:961 2015) for the bath (metal) composition matched well with the plant data (Cicutti et al. in Proceedings of 6th International Conference on Molten Slags, Fluxes and Salts, Stockholm City, 2000). However, with respect to the slag composition, the prediction was not satisfactory. The current study aims to improve upon the previous model Sarkar et al. (Metall. Mater. Trans. B 46B:961 2015) by incorporating a lime dissolution submodel into the earlier one. From the industrial point of view, the understanding of the lime dissolution kinetics is important to meet the ever-increasing demand of producing low-P steel at a low basicity. In the current study, three-step kinetics for the lime dissolution is hypothesized on the assumption that a solid layer of 2CaO·SiO2 should form around the unreacted core of the lime. From the available experimental data, it seems improbable that the observed kinetics should be controlled singly by any one kinetic step. Accordingly, a general, mixed control model has been proposed to calculate the dissolution rate of the lime under varying slag compositions and temperatures. First, the rate equation for each of the three rate-controlling steps has been derived, for three different lime geometries. Next, the rate equation for the mixed control kinetics has been derived and solved to find the dissolution rate. The model predictions have been validated by means of the experimental data available in the literature. In addition, the effects of the process conditions on the dissolution rate have been studied, and compared with the experimental results wherever possible. Incorporation of this submodel into the earlier global model (Sarkar et al. in Metall. Mater. Trans. B 46B:961 2015) enables the prediction of the lime dissolution rate

  18. Effect of liquid liming on sorghum growth in an Ultisol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel E. Camacho

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available   The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the application of liquid lime on sorghum growth in an Ultisol. This research was conducted between August and November, 2011 at the Agricultural Research Center, San José, Costa Rica. In an Ultisol planted with sorghum, in pots of 800 ml, the following treatments where applied: control without lime, calcium carbonate at doses of 10 and 20 l/ha, magnesium oxide at doses of 10 and 20 l/ha, calcium carbonate + magnesium oxide at doses of 5 + 5 and 10 + 10 l/ha, respectively. Six weeks after planting, sorghum was harvested, measuring leaf area, dry and fresh weight of the aerial and root biomass, nutrient absorption and the soil chemical characteristics. Treatments using calcium carbonate and calcium carbonate + magnesium oxide obtained the best values of leaf area and the higher weight of the aerial and root biomass of sorghum. Even though there were no significant differences between liquid lime treatments, there were regarding control without lime and weight biomass variables. Liquid calcium carbonate significantly increased Ca absorption, and the calcium carbonate + magnesium oxide treatment at doses of 10 l/h showed the highest Mg absorption. All amendment treatments caused an improvement of the soil fertility, the most notable being the application of 20 l/ha of magnesium oxide that dropped the exchangeable acidity from 9.02 to 0.36 cmol(+/l, acidity saturation dropped from 95 to 3.3%, and pH increased from 5 to 5.7. It was concluded that the liquid liming amendments had a positive effect over the crop and the soil fertility.

  19. The relationships among lemons, limes and citron: a chromosomal comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, R; Soares Filho, W S; Brasileiro-Vidal, A C; Guerra, M

    2005-01-01

    Lemons, limes and citron constitute a group of closely related Citrus species, whose species delimitations and taxonomic relationships are unclear. In order to identify karyotypic similarities and species relationships within this group, the CMA+/DAPI- banding pattern and the distribution of the 5S and 45S rDNA sites of 10 accessions of lime, lemon, and citron were investigated. The four cultivars of C. limon analyzed showed the same pattern of CMA+ bands and rDNA sites, suggesting that they originated from a single germplasm, later differentiated by distinct somatic mutations. The lemons C. jambhiri, C. limonia and C. volkameriana displayed karyotypes very similar to each other, but they differed from C. limon by the absence of a single chromosome with one band in each telomere. The limes, C. aurantifolia and C. limettioides, seemed less related to each other and exhibited different heteromorphic chromosome pairs. In C. aurantifolia, the presence of a chromosome type unknown in all other Citrus species cytologically known so far supports the assumption that this accession may be derived from a hybrid with a species from the subgenus Papeda or from another genus. Citrus medica was the only homozygous accession of this group and all of its chromosome types were clearly represented in limes and lemons, some of them forming heteromorphic pairs. The analysis of the distribution of rDNA sites allowed a further refinement of the comparison among accessions. The lemons and limes were heterozygous for all rDNA sites, whereas C. medica was entirely homozygous. These data support the hypothesis that C. medica is a true species while the other nine accessions are hybrids. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. The properties of doped sand-lime products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dachowski Ryszard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sand-lime products are natural materials consisting of lime, sand and water with the least content of radioactive elements in comparison to other masonry elements. They are characterized by very high compressive strength, high acoustic insulation, good thermal properties, provide a friendly atmosphere and prevent the spread of mold and bacterial flora. In addition they are fully recyclable. White bricks through the porous structure and the occurrence of capillaries have the ability to rising water. The height of capillary action is dependent on the contact angle and the size of existing pores in the material. This property affects the frost resistance and other characteristics of durability of wall materials operated under conditions of intense exposure to moisture. The aim of the study is to determine the impact modifier on the properties of autoclaved sand-lime products. For testing used autoclaved sand-lime brick dimensions 40x40x160 [mm]. The weight of the products consists of 5% lime, 90% sand and 5% lithium water glass (MP=2,6 and MP=7,0. The produced samples were subjected to autoclaving at temperatures of 203◦C and pressure of 1.6 MPa in collaboration with the Silicate Production Plant in Ludynia. Three finished sets of samples (standard, modified with lithium silicate 2.6 and 7.0 have been immersed in water to the desired height during certain time. The results show the diversity of the internal structure of the tested products. In particular pore distribution, size and volume.

  1. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2005-10-28

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization and modeling. Understanding the burial, thermal maturation, and hydrocarbon expulsion histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in hydrocarbon resource assessment. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and initial thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicated that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The initial modeling also indicated that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Refined thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling and additional petroleum source rock analysis have confirmed that the major source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early to Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary.

  2. [Study on Archaeological Lime Powders from Taosi and Yinxu Sites by FTIR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guo-feng; Zhang, Chen; Chen, Guo-liang; He, Yu-ling; Gao, Jiang-tao; Zhang, Bing-jian

    2015-03-01

    Archaeological lime powders samples from Taosi and Yinxu sites, natural limestone and experimentally prepared lime mortar were investigated by means of Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) to identify the raw material of lime powders from Taosi and Yinxu sites. Results show that ν2/ν4 ratio of calcite resulted from carbonation reaction of man-made lime is around 6.31, which is higher than that of calcite in natural limestone and reflects the difference in the disorder of calcite crystal structure among the natural limestone and prepared lime mortar. With additional grinding, the values of v2 and ν4 in natural limestone and prepared lime mortar decrease. Meanwhile, the trend lines of ν2 versus ν4 for calcite in experimentally prepared lime mortar have a steeper slope when compared to calcite in natural limestone. These imply that ν2/ν4 ratio and the slope of the trend lines of ν2 versus ν4 can be used to determine the archaeological man-made lime. Based on the experiment results, it is possible that the archaeological lime powder from Taosi and Yinxu sites was prepared using man-made lime and the ancient Chinese have mastered the calcining technology of man-made lime in the late Neolithic period about 4 300 years ago.

  3. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: Shallow marine syn-rift sedimentation: Middle Jurassic Pelion Formation, Jameson Land, East Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engkilde, Michael

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The Middle Jurassic Pelion Formation – Fossilbjerget Formation couplet of Jameson Land, East Greenland, is a well-exposed example of the Middle Jurassic inshore–offshore successions characteristicof the rifted seaways in the Northwest European – North Atlantic region. Early Jurassic deposition took place under relatively quiet tectonic conditions following Late Permian – earliest Triassic and Early Triassic rift phases and the Lower Jurassic stratal package shows an overall layer-cake geometry. A long-term extensional phase was initiated in Middle Jurassic (Late Bajocian time, culminated in the Late Jurassic (Kimmeridgian–Volgian, and petered out in the earliest Cretaceous (Valanginian. The Upper Bajocian – Middle Callovian early-rift succession comprises shallow marine sandstones of the Pelion Formation and correlative offshore siltstones of theFossilbjerget Formation. Deposition was initiated by southwards progradation of shallow marine sands of the Pelion Formation in the Late Bajocian followed by major backstepping in Bathonian–Callovian times and drowning of the sandy depositional system in the Middle–Late Callovian. Six facies associations are recognised in the Pelion–Fossilbjerget couplet, representing estuarine, shoreface, offshore transition zone and offshore environments. The north–southtrendingaxis of the Jameson Land Basin had a low inclination, and deposition was sensitive to even small changes in relative sea level which caused the shorelines to advance or retreat over tens to several hundreds of kilometres. Eight composite sequences, termed P1–P8, are recognised and are subdivided into a total of 28 depositional sequences. The duration of the two orders of sequences was about 1–2 Ma and 360,000 years, respectively. The Upper Bajocian P1–2 sequencesinclude the most basinally positioned shallow marine sandstones, deposited during major sealevel lowstands. The lowstands were terminated by significant marine

  4. Rock mechanics related to Jurassic underburden at Valdemar oil field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels

    1999-01-01

    .It has been initiated as a feasibility study of the North Jens-1 core 12 taken in the top Jurassic clay shale as a test specimens for integrated petrological, mineralogical and rock mechanical studies. Following topics are studied:(1) Pore pressure generation due to conversion of organic matter...... and deformation properties of the clay shale using the actual core material or outcrop equivalents.(3) Flushing mechanisms for oil and gas from source rocks due to possibly very high pore water pressure creating unstable conditions in deeply burried sedimentsThere seems to be a need for integrating the knowledge...... in a number of geosciences to the benefit of common understanding of important reservoir mechanisms. Rock mechanics and geotechnical modelling might be key points for this understanding of reservoir geology and these may constitute a platform for future research in the maturing and migration from the Jurassic...

  5. A new carnivorous dinosaur from the Late Jurassic Solnhofen archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göhlich, Ursula B; Chiappe, Luis M

    2006-03-16

    Small Late Jurassic theropod dinosaurs are rare worldwide. In Europe these carnivorous dinosaurs are represented primarily by only two skeletons of Compsognathus, neither of which is well preserved. Here we describe a small new theropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic period of Schamhaupten in southern Germany. Being exquisitely preserved and complete from the snout to the distal third of the tail, the new fossil is the best-preserved predatory, non-avian dinosaur in Europe. It possesses a suite of characters that support its identification as a basal coelurosaur. A cladistic analysis indicates that the new taxon is closer to maniraptorans than to tyrannosauroids, grouping it with taxa often considered to be compsognathids. Large portions of integument are preserved along its tail. The absence of feathers or feather-like structures in a fossil phylogenetically nested within feathered theropods indicates that the evolution of these integumentary structures might be more complex than previously thought.

  6. A basal tyrannosauroid dinosaur from the Late Jurassic of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xing; Clark, James M; Forster, Catherine A; Norell, Mark A; Erickson, Gregory M; Eberth, David A; Jia, Chengkai; Zhao, Qi

    2006-02-01

    The tyrannosauroid fossil record is mainly restricted to Cretaceous sediments of Laurasia, although some very fragmentary Jurassic specimens have been referred to this group. Here we report a new basal tyrannosauroid, Guanlong wucaii gen. et sp. nov., from the lower Upper Jurassic of the Junggar Basin, northwestern China. G. wucaii is the oldest known tyrannosauroid and shows several unexpectedly primitive pelvic features. Nevertheless, the limbs of G. wucaii share several features with derived coelurosaurs, and it possesses features shared by other coelurosaurian clades. This unusual combination of character states provides an insight into the poorly known early radiation of the Coelurosauria. Notably, the presumed predatory Guanlong has a large, fragile and highly pneumatic cranial crest that is among the most elaborate known in any non-avian dinosaur and could be comparable to some classical exaggerated ornamental traits among vertebrates.

  7. A mysterious giant ichthyosaur from the lowermost Jurassic of Wales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy E. Martin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ichthyosaurs rapidly diversified and colonised a wide range of ecological niches during the Early and Middle Triassic period, but experienced a major decline in diversity near the end of the Triassic. Timing and causes of this demise and the subsequent rapid radiation of the diverse, but less disparate, parvipelvian ichthyosaurs are still unknown, notably because of inadequate sampling in strata of latest Triassic age. Here, we describe an exceptionally large radius from Lower Jurassic deposits at Penarth near Cardiff, south Wales (UK the morphology of which places it within the giant Triassic shastasaurids. A tentative total body size estimate, based on a regression analysis of various complete ichthyosaur skeletons, yields a value of 12–15 m. The specimen is substantially younger than any previously reported last known occurrences of shastasaurids and implies a Lazarus range in the lowermost Jurassic for this ichthyosaur morphotype.

  8. Rock mechanics related to Jurassic underburden at Valdemar oil field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels

    1999-01-01

    The presented study is a part of the Danish Energy Research project PRIORITY - Imroved Oil Recovery and Productivity from Lower Cretaceous Carbonates.It considers a multi-disciplinary study of the Jurassic shale underlying the Valdemar structure and gives a status of the on-going research work.......It has been initiated as a feasibility study of the North Jens-1 core 12 taken in the top Jurassic clay shale as a test specimens for integrated petrological, mineralogical and rock mechanical studies. Following topics are studied:(1) Pore pressure generation due to conversion of organic matter...... and deformation properties of the clay shale using the actual core material or outcrop equivalents.(3) Flushing mechanisms for oil and gas from source rocks due to possibly very high pore water pressure creating unstable conditions in deeply burried sedimentsThere seems to be a need for integrating the knowledge...

  9. The palaeogeography of Sundaland and Wallacea since the Late Jurassic

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Hall

    2013-01-01

    The continental core of Southeast (SE) Asia, Sundaland, was assembled from Gondwana fragments by the Early Mesozoic. Continental blocks rifted from Australia in the Jurassic [South West (SW) Borneo, East Java-West Sulawesi-Sumba], and the Woyla intraoceanic arc of Sumatra, were added to Sundaland in the Cretaceous. These fragments probably included emergent areas and could have carried a terrestrial flora and fauna. Sarawak, the offshore Luconia-Dangerous Grounds areas, and Palawan include As...

  10. MIDDLE TO LATE JURASSIC BIOFACIES OF SAUDI ARABIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GERAINT W. HUGHES

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Saudi Arabian Jurassic carbonate hydrocarbon reservoirs were first examined stratigraphically using microfauna. Current microfaunal studies concentrate on the identification and constraint of palaeoenvironmental variations and determination of high-resolution depositional cyclicity of the reservoir carbonates. It is apparent that the environmental sensitivity of benthonic foraminifera provides a potentially valuable technique for the determining subtle variations in the depositional environment and also providing a proxy for sea-level fluctuations.

  11. Carbon cycle history through the Middle Jurassic of Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Gregory; Fozy, Istvan; Galacz, Andras

    2016-04-01

    A carbonate carbon isotope curve from the Aalenian-Bathonian interval is presented from the Obanya valley, of the Mecsek Mountains, Hungary. This interval is less well constrained and studied that other Jurassic time slices. The Obanya valley lies in the eastern part of the Mecsek Mountains, between Obanya and Kisujbanya and provides excellent exposures of a near continuous Aalenian to Lower Cretaceous sequence. It is not strongly affected by tectonics, as compared to other sections of eastern Mecsek of the same age. In parts, a rich fossil assemblage has been collected; the Bathonian ammonites are especially valuable as this locality. The pelagic Middle Jurassic is represented by thin-bedded limestones (the Obanya Limestone) and is overlain by Upper Jurassic siliceous limestones and radiolarites (the Fonyaszo Limestone). The new data indicates a series of positive anomalies within the late Aalenian and early-middle Bajocian. These data are comparable with carbonate carbon isotope recorded from other Tethyan margin sediments. Our integrated biostratigraphy and carbon isotope stratigraphy enables us to improve stratigraphic correlation and age determination of the examined strata.

  12. Archosaur evolution during the Jurassic: a southern perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver W. M. Rauhut

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The fossil record of archosaurs - crocodylomorphs, pterosaurs and dinosaurs - from the Jurassic of the Southern Hemisphere is critically reviewed, and its evolutionary implications are evaluated. Although several important faunas and also isolated finds are known from Gondwana, the record in total is still very patchy, and any evolutionary scenario based on this record should be seen as tentative. Compared to the Northern Hemisphere, southern archosaurs are much more poorly known, which is especially true for terrestrial crocodiles and pterosaurs. Marine crocodiles are rather well represented in south-western South America, whereas the report of terrestrial archosaurs is currently best for Africa. However, in South America, important and especially promising archosaur faunas are known from the Callovian Cañadón Asfalto and the (?Tithonian Cañadón Calcáreo formations of Chubut province, Argentina. Early and Middle Jurassic Gondwanan archosaurs demonstrate that the faunas of that period still had a generally Pangean distribution, whereas first indications of differential archosaur evolution in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres are evident in Late Jurassic Gondwanan faunas.

  13. JURASSIC PALAEOGEOGRAPHY OF THE TRANSDANUBIAN CENTRAL RANGE (HUNGARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ATTILA VÖRÖS

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The Transdanubian Central Range (TCR is a flattened range of hills in northern Transdanubia (Hungary, formed mainly by Mesozoic carbonate rocks showing strong facies similarities with the Southern Alps and the Austroalpine domain. The Jurassic system is divided into several formations of predominantly pelagic limestones. Ammonoids are frequent and were collected bed-by-bed in numerous sections, providing an excellent biostratigraphic resolution. The thickness of the Jurassic system is usually small but changes along the strike of the TCR. It reaches a maximum thickness of 500 m in the western part; is very variable (10-400 m in the central segment (Bakony Mts. and rather low (less than 100 m in the east (Gerecse. In the Bakony segment, the thickness variation reflects the strongly dissected topography of the Jurassic sea-floor. Synsedimentary tectonics is dominated by normal faults; tilted blocks and listric faults may be inferred only in the east.Five main steps were identified in the palaeogeographic evolution: 1 Late Hettangian: carbonate oolitic shoals prevail, except for a few sites where non-deposition or neritic sediments occur. 2 Sinemurian and Pliensbachian: tectonic disintegration resulted in an intricate pattern of submarine horsts and intervening basins, with condensed sedimentation or non-deposition on the horsts and thicker, continuous sedimentary sequences in the basins. The submarine topographic highs are surrounded by aprons of redeposited material (scarp breccias, brachiopod coquinas, crinoidal calcarenites, spiculitic cherty limestones, while pure or argillaceous limestones (Rosso Ammonitico prevail in the distal areas. 3 Early Toarcian: the Tethys-wide anoxic event is superimposed on the previous submarine bottom topography; the resulting black shales and sedimentary Mn-ores are concentrated on the western sides of some horsts. 4 Dogger to Early Malm: radiolarites with heterochronous lower and upper boundaries (Aalenian to

  14. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: key elements in the reconstruction of the North Atlantic Jurassic rift system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surlyk, Finn

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The Jurassic succession of Denmark is largely confined to the subsurface with the exception of exposures on the island of Bornholm in the Baltic Sea. In East Greenland, in contrast, the Jurassic is extensively exposed. Comparison of basin evolution in the two regions, which now occur on two separate plates, thus relies on highly different datasets. It is possible nevertheless to construct an integrated picture allowing testing of hypotheses concerning basin evolution, regional uplift, onset and climax of rifting, relative versus eustatic sea-level changes and sequence stratigraphic subdivision and correlation. On a smaller scale, it is possible to compare the signatures of sequence stratigraphic surfaces as seen on well logs, in cores and at outcrop and of sequences recognised and defined on the basis of very different data types. Breakdown of the successions into tectonostratigraphic megasequences highlights the high degree of similarity in overall basin evolution and tectonic style. An important difference, however, lies in the timing. Major events such as late Early - Middle Jurassic uplift, followed by onset of rifting, basin reorganisation and rift climax were delayed in East Greenland relative to the Danish region. This has important implications both for regional reconstructions of the rift system and for the understanding and testing of classical sequence stratigraphic concepts involving eustatic versus tectonic controls of basin evolution and stratigraphy.

  15. Influence of Lime and Phosphorus Application Rates on Growth of Maize in an Acid Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Asbon Opala

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactive effects of lime and phosphorus on maize growth in an acid soil were investigated in a greenhouse experiment. A completely randomized design with 12 treatments consisting of four lime levels, 0, 2, 10, and 20 t ha−1, in a factorial combination with three phosphorus rates, 0, 30, and 100 kg ha−1, was used. Maize was grown in pots for six weeks and its heights and dry matter yield were determined and soils were analyzed for available P and exchangeable acidity. Liming significantly reduced the exchangeable acidity in the soils. The effect of lime on available P was not significant but available P increased with increasing P rates. There was a significant effect of lime, P, and P by lime interactions on plant heights and dry matter. Without lime application, dry matter increased with increasing P rates but, with lime, dry mattes increased from 0 to 30 kg P ha−1 but declined from 30 to 100 kg P ha−1. The highest dry matter yield (13.8 g pot−1 was obtained with a combined 2 t ha−1 of lime with 30 kg P ha−1 suggesting that lime application at low rates combined with moderate amounts of P would be appropriate in this soil.

  16. Temporal patterns in disparity and diversity of the Jurassic ammonoids of southern Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Simon

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A morphometric analysis of the characteristic whorl cross-sections of 1,200 Jurassic ammonoid species from southern Germany enabled us to characterise their morphospace. The successive Jurassic ammonoid faunas of southern Germany show characteristic patterns in morphospace occupation. While Early and Middle Jurassic ammonoids occupy limited areas of the morphospace range, the Late Jurassic ammonoids cover the entire spectrum. The ammonoids are characterised by an overall increase of both taxonomic diversity and morphological disparity in the course of the Jurassic. Strong fluctuations occur until the middle Late Jurassic, followed by a diversity decrease in the early Kimmeridgian and a disparity reduction in the early Tithonian. While diversity and disparity show similar progression during most of the Early Jurassic, they diverge subsequently and show only poor correlation until the end of the Jurassic. Particularly in the Middle Jurassic diversity and sea level changes correlate strongly. Neither temporal patterns in diversity nor disparity support the hypothesis of a mass extinction event in the early Toarcian. Significant changes in diversity and disparity in the early Callovian support a putative migration event of Boreal ammonoids into the Tethyan realm. doi:10.1002/mmng.201000016

  17. Geochemistry evidence for depositional settings and provenance of Jurassic argillaceous rocks of Jiyuan Basin, North China

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yao Meng; Deshun Zheng; Minglong Li

    2017-02-01

    This paper aims to discuss the depositional settings and provenances for the Jurassic in Jiyuan basin, North China, based on the rare earth element (REE) and trace element features of 16 Jurassic argillaceous rock samples from the Anyao, Yangshuzhuang and Ma’ao Formations, respectively. Generally, geochemical analysis results show that chondrite-normalised REE distribution patterns of all the three formations are characterised by light-REE (LREE) enrichment, moderately negative Eu anomalies, slightly negative Ce anomalies, and strong fractionation between LREE and heavy-REE (HREE). Trace element proxies V/(V+Ni), Ceanom index, Ce/La, Sr/Ba, and Sr/Cu indicate a weak oxidation–reduction environment, progressively decreasing reducibility and water depth from the bottom up during Jurassic in Jiyuan basin. Palaeoclimate varied from humid in the Early Jurassic to arid in the Middle Jurassic, corresponding with the variations of palaeoredox and palaeosalinity. The provenances of Jurassic rocks in Jiyuan basin are mainly from felsic sources related to active continental margin and continental island arc. The Early–Middle Jurassic (Anyao and Yangshuzhuang Formations) provenances are mainly derived from North Qinling and partially from the eroded recycled felsic sedimentary covers of Taihang Mountain. In the late stage of Middle Jurassic (Ma’ao Formation), Taihang Mountain has been the primary source to Jiyuan basin. We conclude that the Jurassic rocks of Jiyuan basin reveal the progressive uplift and denudation processes of the Taihang Mountain.

  18. Repair mortars based on lime. Accelerated aging tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Ramírez, S.

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour under different accelerated aging tests (freeze/thaw and crystallization cycles of a new lime mortar with biocide properties destinated to monumental repair has been studied. New mortars (which have the biocide impregnated in a clay called sepiolite have a similar behaviour to lime mortars used as a reference. After the aging tests, the biocide properties of the mortars have been tried.

    Se ha estudiado el comportamiento frente a distintos ensayos de envejecimiento acelerado (ciclos de hielo/deshielo y cristalización de sales de un nuevo mortero de cal con propiedades biocidas, destinado a la reparación monumental. Se ha comprobado que los nuevos morteros (que llevan incorporado el biocida impregnado en una arcilla denominada sepiolita tienen un comportamiento muy similar a los morteros de cal utilizados como referencia. Tras los ensayos de envejecimiento se ha visto que las propiedades biocidas de los morteros se mantienen.

  19. OPTIMIZATION OF LIME PRETREATMENT FOR ENZYMATIC SACCHARIFICATION OF WHEAT STRAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Ondrejovič

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was optimization of lime pretreatment parameters such as temperature, time and reaction ratio to maximization of reducing saccharide yields occurred by enzyme hydrolysis of pretreated plant material (wheat straw. Pretreatment conditions were optimized using response surface methodology. The optimal conditions were chosen to promote reducing saccharide yields following enzymatic digestion and they were temperature 91.5 °C, time 2.4 hours and reaction ratio 19.7 mL to 1 g of treated wheat straw. The experimental values agreed with predicted within a 95 % confidence interval. The computed model of wheat straw pretreatment by lime can be used for the effective utilization of secondary products obtained in agriculture sector.

  20. Advanced treatment of swine wastewater using an agent synthesized from amorphous silica and hydrated lime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yasuo; Hasegawa, Teruaki; Sugimoto, Kiyomi; Miura, Keiichi; Aketo, Tsuyoshi; Minowa, Nobutaka; Toda, Masaya; Kinoshita, Katsumi; Yamashita, Takahiro; Ogino, Akifumi

    2014-01-01

    Advanced treatment using an agent synthesized from amorphous silica and hydrated lime (M-CSH-lime) was developed and applied to swine wastewater treatment. Biologically treated wastewater and M-CSH-lime (approximately 6 w/v% slurry) were fed continuously into a column-shaped reactor from its bottom. Accumulated M-CSH-lime gradually formed a bed layer. The influent permeated this layer and contacted the M-CSH-lime, and the treatment reaction progressed. Treated liquid overflowing from the top of the reactor was neutralized with CO₂gas bubbling. The colour removal rate approximately exceeded 50% with M-CSH-lime addition rates of > 0.15 w/v%. The removal rate of PO(3⁻)(4) exceeded 80% with the addition of>0.03 w/v% of M-CSH-lime. The removal rates of coliform bacteria and Escherichia coli exceeded 99.9% with > 0.1 w/v%. Accumulated M-CSH-lime in the reactor was periodically withdrawn from the upper part of the bed layer. The content of citric-acid-soluble P₂O₅ in the recovered matter was>15% when the weight ratio of influent PO(3⁻)(4) -P to added M-CSH-lime was > 0.15. This content was comparable with commercial phosphorus fertilizer. The inhibitory effect of recovered M-CSH-lime on germination and growth of leafy vegetable komatsuna (Brassica rapa var. perviridis) was evaluated by an experiment using the Neubauer's pot. The recovered M-CSH-lime had no negative effect on germination and growth. These results suggest that advanced water treatment with M-CSH-lime was effective for simultaneous removal of colour, [Formula: see text] and coliform bacteria at an addition rate of 0.03-0.15 w/v%, and that the recovered M-CSH-lime would be suitable as phosphorus fertilizer.

  1. Preparation and Metallurgical Analysis of High Activity Burnt Lime for Steelmaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-qiang HAO; Yu-zhu ZHANG; Su-ju HAO; Chao-fa ZHANG; Wu-feng JIANG; Peng-hui CUI

    2016-01-01

    Burnt lime is an important material in steelmaking and its activity degree is a key factor for liquid steel quality.The burnt lime was made by the calcination of limestone in a high pressure electric furnace.The burnt lime mineralogical phases and micro-morphologies were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD)and field emission scan-ning electron microscopy (FE-SEM).The burnt lime activity degree was determined by acid-base titration,the burnt lime pore distribution was measured by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP),and the thermal effect of a mixture of burnt lime and slag was measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC).The results showed that the CaO grain size and pore size of burnt lime made under high pressure were larger than those of burnt lime made under atmos-pheric pressure.The CaO grain size and pore size increased and the laminate phenomenon also occurred clearly under high pressure.The activity degree of burnt lime made under high pressure was greater than that made under atmos-pheric pressure.The maximum activity degree was 437 mL for burnt lime made under a pressure of 0.4 MPa.For the same ratio of CaO to SiO2 ,the melting temperature,hemisphere temperature and fluidity temperature of slag decreased with increasing burnt lime activity degree.The higher the activity degree the burnt lime had,the better the slag forming occurred.It was advantageous for 2CaO.SiO2 and 3CaO.SiO2 forming at lower temperatures if the burnt lime activity degree was increased.

  2. A Simple Ballistic Material Model for Soda-Lime Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    for soda-lime glass devel- oped and parameterized in the previous sections is next imple- mented in a VUMAT Material User Subroutine of the commercial...each element. The essential features of the coupling between the ABAQUS/ Explicit finite-element solver and the VUMAT Material User Subroutine at...state as well as values of the material state variables at the end of the time increment are determined within the VUMAT and returned to the ABAQUS

  3. Between tradition and technological innovation: challenges to lime Heritage conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marluci Menezes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to discuss the relationship between traditional and scientific technological knowledge as innovative and fundamental to heritage conservation. It is argued that this innovation does not necessarily come from scientific knowledge, but potentially from a wise articulation between these two types of knowledge. This discussion starts from an already long process of reflection on lime heritage conservation, as developed in LNEC from research projects.

  4. Between tradition and technological innovation: challenges to lime Heritage conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marluci Menezes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to discuss the relationship between traditional and scientific technological knowledge as innovative and fundamental to heritage conservation. It is argued that this innovation does not necessarily come from scientific knowledge, but potentially from a wise articulation between these two types of knowledge. This discussion starts from an already long process of reflection on lime heritage conservation, as developed in LNEC from research projects.

  5. Improvement in hardness of soda-lime-silica glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Riya; De, Moumita; Roy, Sudakshina; Dey, Arjun; Biswas, Sampad K.; Middya, Tapas Ranjan; Mukhopadhyay, Anoop K.

    2012-06-01

    Hardness is a key design parameter for structural application of brittle solids like glass. Here we report for the first time the significant improvement of about 10% in Vicker's hardness of a soda-lime-silica glass with loading rate in the range of 0.1-10 N.s-1. Corroborative dark field optical and scanning electron microscopy provided clue to this improvement through evidence of variations in spatial density of shear deformation band formation as a function of loading rate.

  6. Flavor chemistry of lemon-lime carbonated beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausch, Bethany J; Lorjaroenphon, Yaowapa; Cadwallader, Keith R

    2015-01-14

    The most potent aroma-active components of Sprite (SP), Sierra Mist (SM), and 7UP (7UP) were identified. Aroma extracts were prepared by liquid–liquid continuous extraction/solvent-assisted flavor evaporation (LLCE/SAFE). Twenty-eight compounds were detected by gas chromatography–olfactometry (GC-O) with linalool (floral, lavender), octanal (pungent orange), and 2,3-dehydro-1,8-cineole (minty) determined to be predominant aroma compounds based on their high flavor dilution (FD) factors by aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA). The data indicate that lemon-lime flavor is composed of a small number of compounds (22 at the most in SM), and only a subset of these may be important because many compounds were detected only at low FD factors. Predominant aroma compounds (23) were quantified using static headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) combined with stable isotope dilution assays (SIDA). In contrast to FD factors, the calculated odor-activity values (OAVs) indicate that octanal and limonene make the greatest contribution to the overall aroma of lemon-lime carbonated beverages, followed by nonanal, decanal, linalool, 1,8-cineole, and geranyl acetate. The results demonstrate that lemon-lime carbonated beverages share many of the same compounds but the relative abundance of these compounds varies by brand.

  7. Thermophysical properties of hydrophobised lime plasters - The influence of ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlíková, Milena; Zemanová, Lucie; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2017-07-01

    The building envelope is a principal responsible for buildings energy loses. Lime plasters as the most popular finishing materials of historical buildings and culture monuments influence the thermal behaviour as well as construction material of masonry. On this account, the effect of ageing on the thermophysical properties of a newly designed lime plasters containing hydrophobic admixture is analysed in the paper. For the comparative purposes, the reference lime plaster is tested. The ageing is accelerated with controlled carbonation process to simulate the final plasters properties. Basic characterization of the tested materials is done using bulk density, matrix density, and porosity measurements. Thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity are experimentally assessed using a transient impulse method. The obtained data revealed the significant changes of the both studied thermal parameters in the dependence on plasters composition and age. The assessed material parameters will be stored in a material database, where will find use as an input data for computational modelling of heat transport in this type of porous building materials and evaluation of energy-savings and sustainability issues.

  8. Speciation of aluminium, arsenic and molybdenum in excessively limed lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöstedt, Carin; Wällstedt, Teresia; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Borg, Hans

    2009-09-01

    The possible existence of the potentially toxic oxyanions of Al (Al(OH)(4)(-)), As (HAsO(4)(2-)), and Mo (MoO(4)(2-)) was examined in excessively limed lakes. In-situ dialysis (MWCO 1 kDa) was performed in the surface and bottom waters of two excessively limed lakes (pH 7.1-7.7) and one acidic lake (pH approximately 5.4). The dialysable metal concentrations were compared to the equilibrium distribution of species as calculated with the geochemical code Visual MINTEQ incorporating the CD-MUSIC and Stockholm Humic models for complexation onto colloidal ferrihydrite and dissolved organic matter. Arsenic and molybdenum in the excessively limed lakes were to a large extent present in the dialysable fraction (>79% and >92% respectively). They were calculated to exist as free or adsorbed oxyanions. Most of the Al was observed to reside in the colloidal fraction (51-82%). In agreement with this, model predictions indicated aluminium to be present mostly as colloids or bound to dissolved organic matter. Only a small fraction was modelled as Al(OH)(4)(-) ions. In most cases, modelled values were in agreement with the dialysis results. The free concentrations of the three oxyanions were mostly low compared to toxic levels.

  9. Speciation of aluminium, arsenic and molybdenum in excessively limed lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoestedt, Carin, E-mail: carinsj@kth.se [Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, KTH (Royal Institute of Technology), Teknikringen 76, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Waellstedt, Teresia [Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, SLU (Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences), P.O. Box 7050, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Gustafsson, Jon Petter [Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, KTH (Royal Institute of Technology), Teknikringen 76, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Borg, Hans [Department of Applied Environmental Science, SU (Stockholm University), SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-09-01

    The possible existence of the potentially toxic oxyanions of Al (Al(OH){sub 4}{sup -}), As (HAsO{sub 4}{sup 2-}), and Mo (MoO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) was examined in excessively limed lakes. In-situ dialysis (MWCO 1 kDa) was performed in the surface and bottom waters of two excessively limed lakes (pH 7.1-7.7) and one acidic lake (pH {approx} 5.4). The dialysable metal concentrations were compared to the equilibrium distribution of species as calculated with the geochemical code Visual MINTEQ incorporating the CD-MUSIC and Stockholm Humic models for complexation onto colloidal ferrihydrite and dissolved organic matter. Arsenic and molybdenum in the excessively limed lakes were to a large extent present in the dialysable fraction (> 79% and > 92% respectively). They were calculated to exist as free or adsorbed oxyanions. Most of the Al was observed to reside in the colloidal fraction (51-82%). In agreement with this, model predictions indicated aluminium to be present mostly as colloids or bound to dissolved organic matter. Only a small fraction was modelled as Al(OH){sub 4}{sup -} ions. In most cases, modelled values were in agreement with the dialysis results. The free concentrations of the three oxyanions were mostly low compared to toxic levels.

  10. Liming impacts on soils, crops and biodiversity in the UK: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, J E; Bennett, A E; Newton, A C; White, P J; McKenzie, B M; George, T S; Pakeman, R J; Bailey, J S; Fornara, D A; Hayes, R C

    2017-08-11

    Fertile soil is fundamental to our ability to achieve food security, but problems with soil degradation (such as acidification) are exacerbated by poor management. Consequently, there is a need to better understand management approaches that deliver multiple ecosystem services from agricultural land. There is global interest in sustainable soil management including the re-evaluation of existing management practices. Liming is a long established practice to ameliorate acidic soils and many liming-induced changes are well understood. For instance, short-term liming impacts are detected on soil biota and in soil biological processes (such as in N cycling where liming can increase N availability for plant uptake). The impacts of liming on soil carbon storage are variable and strongly relate to soil type, land use, climate and multiple management factors. Liming influences all elements in soils and as such there are numerous simultaneous changes to soil processes which in turn affect the plant nutrient uptake; two examples of positive impact for crops are increased P availability and decreased uptake of toxic heavy metals. Soil physical conditions are at least maintained or improved by liming, but the time taken to detect change varies significantly. Arable crops differ in their sensitivity to soil pH and for most crops there is a positive yield response. Liming also introduces implications for the development of different crop diseases and liming management is adjusted according to crop type within a given rotation. Repeated lime applications tend to improve grassland biomass production, although grassland response is variable and indirect as it relates to changes in nutrient availability. Other indicators of liming response in grassland are detected in mineral content and herbage quality which have implications for livestock-based production systems. Ecological studies have shown positive impacts of liming on biodiversity; such as increased earthworm abundance that

  11. [Study on the traditional lime mortar from the memorial archway in the southern Anhui province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guo-Feng; Sun, Sheng; Wang, Cheng-Xing; Zhang, Bing-Jian; Chen, Xi-Min

    2013-07-01

    The traditional lime mortar was investigated by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffractometry and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). The results show that the mortar from the memorial archway in the southern Anhui province was the organic-inorganic composite materials composed of lime with tung oil or sticky rice. It was found that the excellent performance of the tung oil-lime mortar can be explained by the compact lamellar organic-inorganic composite structure that was produced by carbonization reaction of lime, cross-linking reactions of tung oil and oxygen and complexing reaction of Ca2+ and -COO-. The compact micro-structure of sticky rice-lime mortar, which was produced due to carbonation process of lime controlled by amylopectin, should be the cause of the good performance of this kind of organic-inorganic mortar.

  12. Models for predicting the mass of lime fruits by some engineering properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraei Ashtiani, Seyed-Hassan; Baradaran Motie, Jalal; Emadi, Bagher; Aghkhani, Mohammad-Hosein

    2014-11-01

    Grading fruits based on mass is important in packaging and reduces the waste, also increases the marketing value of agricultural produce. The aim of this study was mass modeling of two major cultivars of Iranian limes based on engineering attributes. Models were classified into three: 1-Single and multiple variable regressions of lime mass and dimensional characteristics. 2-Single and multiple variable regressions of lime mass and projected areas. 3-Single regression of lime mass based on its actual volume and calculated volume assumed as ellipsoid and prolate spheroid shapes. All properties considered in the current study were found to be statistically significant (ρ lime based on minor diameter and first projected area are the most appropriate models in the first and the second classifications, respectively. In third classification, the best model was obtained on the basis of the prolate spheroid volume. It was finally concluded that the suitable grading system of lime mass is based on prolate spheroid volume.

  13. Plasticity, Swell-Shrink, and Microstructure of Phosphogypsum Admixed Lime Stabilized Expansive Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jijo James

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study involved utilization of an industrial waste, Phosphogypsum (PG, as an additive to lime stabilization of an expansive soil. Three lime dosages, namely, initial consumption of lime (ICL, optimum lime content (OLC, and less than ICL (LICL, were identified for the soil under study for stabilizing the soil. Along with lime, varying doses of PG were added to the soil for stabilization. The effect of stabilization was studied by performing index tests, namely, liquid limit, plastic limit, shrinkage limit, and free swell test, on pulverized remains of failed unconfined compression test specimens. The samples were also subjected to a microstructural study by means of scanning electron microscope. Addition of PG to lime resulted in improvement in the plasticity and swell-shrink characteristics. The microstructural study revealed the formation of a dense compact mass of stabilized soil.

  14. Influencing factors of compressive strength of solidified inshore saline soil using SH lime-ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃银辉; 刘付华; 周琦

    2008-01-01

    Through unconfined compressive strength test,influencing factors on compressive strength of solidified inshore saline soil with SH lime-ash,ratio of lime-ash(1-K),quantity of lime-ash,age,degree of compression and salt content were studied.The results show that because inshore saline soil has special engineering characteristic,more influencing factors must be considered compared with ordinary soil for the perfect effect of solidifying.

  15. Effect of Liming on Cadmium Forms and Its Toxicity in Red Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.M.FARAH; XIEZHENGMIAO; 等

    1996-01-01

    The effect of liming 4 soils developed from Quaternary red clay and red sandstone on the cadmium forms and its toxicity were investigated.Liming the acid red soils could greatly reduce Cd toxicity to plants because the soluble Cd and organic Cd in the soils decreased significantly while Cd bound to minerals/oxides and residual Cd increased markedly with increasing lime rates(pH).

  16. COMPARATIVE EXTRACTION OF PECTIC AND POLYPHENOLS FROM MEXICAN LIME POMACE AND BAGASSE

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Mexican lime bagasse and pomace are rich in pectin and they also represent an important source of value-added compounds such as polyphenols. Two different options for the combined recovery of pectin and phenolic compounds from Mexican lime bagasse and pomace, two byproducts of industrial lime processing, were developed. Conventional and microwave-assisted extraction methods were used. All pectic extracts presented a degree of esterification in the range of 70%. Pomace extracts had the higher ...

  17. Lime-based repair mortars with water-repellent admixtures: laboratory durability assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes, C.; Slížková, Z. (Zuzana)

    2015-01-01

    Conservation of architectural structures using lime binders is currently an important research topic aiming compatibility, durability and sustainability. In this study, lime (L) and lime-metakaolin (LM) mortars were prepared with the addition of water-repellent admixtures: linseed oil, stand oil and a silane based water-repellent. Experimental results demonstrate that oil imparts higher hydrophobicity to both L and LM mixtures. Durability was assessed through freeze-thaw and NaCl crystal...

  18. Latest Jurassic-early Cretaceous regressive facies, northeast Africa craton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Houten, F.B.

    1980-06-01

    Nonmarine to paralic detrital deposits accumulated in six large basins between Algeria and the Arabo-Nubian shield during major regression in latest Jurassic and Early Cretaceous time. The Ghadames Sirte (north-central Libya), and Northern (Egypt) basins lay along the cratonic margin of northeastern Africa. The Murzuk, Kufra, and Southern (Egypt) basins lay in the south within the craton. Data for reconstructing distribution, facies, and thickness of relevant sequences are adequate for the three northern basins only. High detrital influx near the end of Jurassic time and in mid-Cretaceous time produced regressive nubian facies composed largely of low-sinuosity stream and fahdelta deposits. In the west and southwest the Ghadames, Murzuk, and Kufra basins were filled with a few hundred meters of detritus after long-continued earlier Mesozoic aggradation. In northern Egypt the regressive sequence succeeded earlier Mesozoic marine sedimentation; in the Sirte and Southern basins correlative deposits accumulated on Precambrian and Variscan terranes after earlier Mesozoic uplift and erosion. Waning of detrital influx into southern Tunisia and adjacent Libya in the west and into Israel in the east initiated an Albian to early Cenomanian transgression of Tethys. By late Cenomanian time it had flooded the entire cratonic margin, and spread southward into the Murzuk and Southern basins, as well as onto the Arabo-Nubian shield. Latest Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous, mid-Cretaceous, and Late Cretaceous transgressions across northeastern Africa recorded in these sequences may reflect worldwide eustatic sea-level rises. In contrast, renewed large supply of detritus during each regression and a comparable subsidence history of intracratonic and marginal basins imply regional tectonic control. 6 figures.

  19. Numerical simulation of thermal process and energy saving of lime furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Zheng-ming; ZHOU Jie-min; CHEN Hong-rong

    2005-01-01

    Based on the principle of thermal balance and material balance of lime furnace, the reaction and heat transfer process mathematical-physical model and the on-line monitoring model of the decomposition rate of limestone were set up. With this model, numerical simulation is used to analyze the effects of operational parameters on the process of lime calcining and to optimize it. By using visual basic program to communicate and program, the centralized management and automatic control of the lime furnace are realized. The software is put into practical production, which makes the lime furnace operate steadily and efficiently, and causes the increase in output and decrease in energy consumption.

  20. Long-term field-scale experiment on using lime filters in an agricultural catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkkala, Teija; Ventelä, Anne-Mari; Tarvainen, Marjo

    2012-01-01

    The River Yläneenjoki catchment in southwest Finland is an area with a high agricultural nutrient load. We report here on the nutrient removal performance of three on-site lime-sand filters (F1, F2, and F3), established within or on the edge of the buffer zones. The filters contain burnt lime (CaO) or spent lime [CaO, Ca(OH), and CaCO]. Easily soluble lime results in a high pH level (>11) and leads to an efficient precipitation of soluble phosphorus (P) from the runoff. Water samples were taken from the inflow and outflow of each site in different hydrological situations. The length of the monitoring period was 4 yr for F1, 6 yr for F2, and 1.5 yr for F3. F1 and F2 significantly reduced the suspended solids (SS), total P (PTOT), and dissolved reactive P (DRP) in the treated water. The proportional reduction (%) varied but was usually clearly positive. Filter F3 was divided into two equal parts, one containing burnt lime and the other spent lime. Both filter parts removed PTOT and SS efficiently from the water; the burnt-lime part also removed DRP. The mixed-lime part removed DRP for a year, but then the efficiency decreased. The effect of filters on nitrogen compounds varied. We conclude that sand filters incorporating lime can be used together with buffer zones to reduce both P and SS load to watercourses.

  1. Lime application methods, water and bottom soil acidity in fresh water fish ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Queiroz Julio Ferraz de

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Although some methods for determining lime requirement of pond soils are available and commonly used, there is still no consensus on whether it is more effective to apply liming materials to the bottoms of empty ponds or to wait and apply them over the water surface after ponds are filled. There is also little information on how deep lime reacts in pond sediment over time, and whether the depth of reaction is different when liming materials are applied to the water or to the soil. Therefore, three techniques for treating fish ponds with agricultural limestone were evaluated in ponds with clayey soils at a commercial fish farm. Amounts of agricultural limestone equal to the lime requirement of bottom soils were applied to each of three ponds by: direct application over the pond water surface; spread uniformly over the bottom of the empty pond; spread uniformly over the bottom of the empty pond followed by tilling of the bottom. Effectiveness of agricultural limestone applications did not differ among treatment methods. Agricultural limestone also reacted quickly to increase total alkalinity and total hardness of pond water to acceptable concentrations within 2 weeks after application. The reaction of lime to increase soil pH was essentially complete after one to two months, and lime had no effect below a soil depth of 8 cm. Tilling of pond bottoms to incorporate liming materials is unnecessary, and tilling consumes time and is an expensive practice; filled ponds can be limed effectively.

  2. Newly discovered Jurassic skarnfields in the Ecuadorian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litherland, M.; Fortey, N. J.; Beddoe-Stephens, B.

    1992-08-01

    A series of calcic magnetite skarn klippen in the north of the Cordillera Real are interpreted as erosional relics of a great skarn sheet, over 150 km long, formed by thrusting of island-arc type sediments and volcanics over the Jurassic Azafran batholith during an accretion event. The skarns are contrasted petrographically and compositionally with those of the Nambija field in the south of the Cordillera, which probably relates to the same chain of batholiths. However, the Nambija skarns are autochthonous and rich in gold, with Au:Ag ratios in the region of 20:1, whereas those to the north are allochthonous and relatively barren.

  3. An arboreal docodont from the Jurassic and mammaliaform ecological diversification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qing-Jin; Ji, Qiang; Zhang, Yu-Guang; Liu, Di; Grossnickle, David M.; Luo, Zhe-Xi

    2015-02-01

    A new docodontan mammaliaform from the Middle Jurassic of China has skeletal features for climbing and dental characters indicative of an omnivorous diet that included plant sap. This fossil expands the range of known locomotor adaptations in docodontans to include climbing, in addition to digging and swimming. It further shows that some docodontans had a diet with a substantial herbivorous component, distinctive from the faunivorous diets previously reported in other members of this clade. This reveals a greater ecological diversity in an early mammaliaform clade at a more fundamental taxonomic level not only between major clades as previously thought.

  4. Tectonic forcing of early to middle jurassic seawater Sr/Ca

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz; Hesselbo, Stephen P.; Korte, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The Jurassic Period (ca. 201–145 Ma) is marked by fundamental reorganizations of paleogeography, paleoceanography, ecosystems, and the progressive shift from aragonite to calcite as the favored marine biogenic carbonate polymorph. Sr/Ca ratios of well-preserved Jurassic oysters and belemnites from...

  5. Lime Kiln Modeling. CFD and One-dimensional simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svedin, Kristoffer; Ivarsson, Christofer; Lundborg, Rickard

    2009-03-15

    The incentives for burning alternative fuels in lime kilns are growing. An increasing demand on thorough investigations of alternative fuel impact on lime kiln performance have been recognized, and the purpose of this project has been to develop a lime kiln CFD model with the possibility to fire fuel oil and lignin. The second part of the project consists of three technical studies. Simulated data from a one-dimensional steady state program has been used to support theories on the impact of biofuels and lime mud dryness. The CFD simulations was carried out in the commercial code FLUENT. Due to difficulties with the convergence of the model the calcination reaction is not included. The model shows essential differences between the two fuels. Lignin gives a different flame shape and a longer flame length compared to fuel oil. Mainly this depends on how the fuel is fed into the combustion chamber and how much combustion air that is added as primary and secondary air. In the case of lignin combustion the required amount of air is more than in the fuel oil case. This generates more combustion gas and a different flow pattern is created. Based on the values from turbulent reaction rate for the different fuels an estimated flame length can be obtained. For fuel oil the combustion is very intense with a sharp peak in the beginning and a rapid decrease. For lignin the combustion starts not as intense as for the fuel oil case and has a smoother shape. The flame length appears to be approximately 2-3 meter longer for lignin than for fuel oil based on turbulent reaction rate in the computational simulations. The first technical study showed that there are many benefits of increasing dry solids content in the lime mud going into a kiln such as increased energy efficiency, reduced TRS, and reduced sodium in the kiln. However, data from operating kilns indicates that these benefits can be offset by increasing exit gas temperature that can limit kiln production capacity. Simulated

  6. Lime Kiln Modeling. CFD and One-dimensional simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svedin, Kristoffer; Ivarsson, Christofer; Lundborg, Rickard

    2009-03-15

    The incentives for burning alternative fuels in lime kilns are growing. An increasing demand on thorough investigations of alternative fuel impact on lime kiln performance have been recognized, and the purpose of this project has been to develop a lime kiln CFD model with the possibility to fire fuel oil and lignin. The second part of the project consists of three technical studies. Simulated data from a one-dimensional steady state program has been used to support theories on the impact of biofuels and lime mud dryness. The CFD simulations was carried out in the commercial code FLUENT. Due to difficulties with the convergence of the model the calcination reaction is not included. The model shows essential differences between the two fuels. Lignin gives a different flame shape and a longer flame length compared to fuel oil. Mainly this depends on how the fuel is fed into the combustion chamber and how much combustion air that is added as primary and secondary air. In the case of lignin combustion the required amount of air is more than in the fuel oil case. This generates more combustion gas and a different flow pattern is created. Based on the values from turbulent reaction rate for the different fuels an estimated flame length can be obtained. For fuel oil the combustion is very intense with a sharp peak in the beginning and a rapid decrease. For lignin the combustion starts not as intense as for the fuel oil case and has a smoother shape. The flame length appears to be approximately 2-3 meter longer for lignin than for fuel oil based on turbulent reaction rate in the computational simulations. The first technical study showed that there are many benefits of increasing dry solids content in the lime mud going into a kiln such as increased energy efficiency, reduced TRS, and reduced sodium in the kiln. However, data from operating kilns indicates that these benefits can be offset by increasing exit gas temperature that can limit kiln production capacity. Simulated

  7. A New Theropod Dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic of Lufeng, Yunnan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xiao-chun; Philip J.CURRIE; DONG Zhiming; PAN Shigang; WANG Tao

    2009-01-01

    A new theropod dinosaur,Shidaisaurusjinae gen.et sp.nov.,has been described on the basis of an incomplete skeleton.The specimen was found near the base of the Upper Lufeng Formation(early Middle Jurassic)in Yunnan,China.It is the first theropod dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic of Yunnan.Shidaisaurus jinae is distinguishable from other Jurassic theropods by certain features from the braincase,axis,and pelvic girdle.The absence of any pleurocoels in the axis or in any anterior dorsal vertebrae suggests that the new Lufeng theropod is relatively primitive and more plesiomorphic than most of the Middle to Late Jurassic theropods from China.Most Chinese taxa of Jurassic theropod dinosaurs have not been well described;a further detailed study will be necessary for us to determine their phylogenetic relationships with Shidaisaurus jinae.

  8. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF DENSE-GAS EXTRACTS FROM LIME FLOWERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demyanenko DV

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to make qualitative and quantitative analysis of phenolic biologically active substances (BAS in the extracts produced from lime flowers with condensed gases, using method of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Materials and methods: materials for this study were the extracts obtained by consequent processing of the herbal drug and marcs thereof with various condensed gases: difluorochloromethane (Freon R22, difluoromethane (Freon R32, azeotropic mixture of difluoromethane with pentafluoroethane (Freon 410A and freon-ammonium mixture. Extracts obtained with the latter were subjected to further fractionation by liquidliquid separation into hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and aqueous-alcohol phases. Besides, the supercritical СО2 extract, obtained from the herbal drug under rather strong conditions (at temperature 60°С and pressure 400 bar, was studied in our previous research. Presence of phenolic BAS and their quantity in the researched samples were determined by method of HPLC with UVspectrometric detection. Results and discussion: It has been found that Freon R22 extracted trace amounts of rutin from lime flowers – its content was only 0.08% of the total extract weight. On the other hand, Freons R32 and R410А showed good selectivity to moderately polar BAS of lime flowers (derivatives of flavonoids and hydroxycinnamic acids: in particular, the extract obtained with freon R32 contained about 1.3% of the total phenolic substances, and it was the only one of the investigated condensed gases used by us which took the basic flavonoid of lime flowers tiliroside – its content was 0.42% of extract weight. Also Freons R32 and R410А were able to withdraw another compound dominating among phenolic substances in the yielded extracts. Its quantity was rather noticeable – up to 0.87% of extract weight. This substance was not identified by existing database, but its UV-spectrum was similar to those of

  9. PCM-enhanced lime plasters for vernacular and contemporary architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoridou, Magdalini; Kyriakou, Loucas; Ioannou, Ioannis

    2016-04-01

    In 1997, the European Union (EU) pledged to reduce the amount of greenhouse gas emissions by 20% below the levels of 1990 by the end of 2020. In recent years it has become evident that, in order to reach that goal, EU Member States must take measures to encourage sustainability in the building industry, which is a major energy consumer. Such measures should involve the use of innovative, environmentally friendly materials and methods in new constructions, as well as the renovation of existing properties by upgrading their current state of energy efficiency. Phase Change Materials (PCMs) have the ability to absorb and release thermal energy, in the form of latent heat, during the melting or solidifying processes respectively. Thus, they may be used as additives in the production of thermally efficient composite building materials. A PCM-enhanced plaster is a heat storage medium combining an appropriate PCM with a cementitious or non-cementitious matrix to produce a low-cost thermal storage material with structural and thermostatic properties. Although innovative technologies, such as PCMs, have certainly contributed to the boost in the evolution of the building materials industry in recent years, a significant proportion of these technologies and practices have not yet been fully exploited in materials based on traditional principles. This paper focuses on the design and production of novel cementless PCM-enhanced lime plasters, in line with the traditional production technology of lime composites. The new plasters are produced using either hydrated or natural hydraulic lime binder, crushed calcarenite sand (0-2 mm) and commercial microencapsulated PCM in powder form (5% w/w of solids). Results from comparative tests between reference mixtures and mixtures with the addition of PCM, carried out 28, 56 and 90 days after laboratory production, prove the potential of PCMs in enhancing the thermal performance of traditional lime-based composites. The modified composites

  10. Transgression regression event element geochemistry records of southwestern Fujian in Late Triassic-Middle Jurassic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许中杰; 程日辉; 张莉; 王嘹亮

    2013-01-01

    Southwest Fujian area has experienced a large-scale transgression regression cycle in Late Triassic-Middle Jurassic and the maximum transgression has taken place in Early Jurassic. The migration and enrichment of geochemical element in the continuous fine-grained sediments in the basin recorded the paleosalinity and the paleodepth. The changes of paleosalinity and paleodepth indicate the sea(lake) level relative change in every period of Late Triassic-Middle Jurassic in southwestern Fujian. The relative change curve of sea(lake) level in southwestern Fujian is established based on the m value(m=100×w(MgO)/w(Al2 O3)) and the ratios of w(B)/w(Ga), w(Sr)/w(Ba) and w(Ca)/w(Mg). The curve indicates that level I sea-level relative change in southwestern Fujian is composed of the transgression in Late Triassic-Early Jurassic and the regression in the late period of Early Jurassic-Middle Jurassic. The level III sea-level relative change is frequent, which is composed by the lake level descent lake level rise lake level descent of Wenbin Shan formation in Late Triassic, the regression transgression regression of Lishan formation in Early Jurassic and the lake level rise lake level descent-lake level rise lake level descent of Zhangping formation in Middle Jurassic. The transgression regression cycle in southwestern Fujian is significantly controlled by the sea-level change in the north of South China Sea. The relative change curve trends of the level I sea-level in the north of South China Sea and the one in southwestern Fujian are the same. The maximum transgressions both occur in Early Jurassic. The level III sea-level curve reflects the fluctuation of a transgression and two regressions in the early period of Early Jurassic.

  11. Amphibious flies and paedomorphism in the Jurassic period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Diying; Nel, André; Cai, Chenyang; Lin, Qibin; Engel, Michael S

    2013-03-01

    The species of the Strashilidae (strashilids) have been the most perplexing of fossil insects from the Jurassic period of Russia and China. They have been widely considered to be ectoparasites of pterosaurs or feathered dinosaurs, based on the putative presence of piercing and sucking mouthparts and hind tibio-basitarsal pincers purportedly used to fix onto the host's hairs or feathers. Both the supposed host and parasite occur in the Daohugou beds from the Middle Jurassic epoch of China (approximately 165 million years ago). Here we analyse the morphology of strashilids from the Daohugou beds, and reach markedly different conclusions; namely that strashilids are highly specialized flies (Diptera) bearing large membranous wings, with substantial sexual dimorphism of the hind legs and abdominal extensions. The idea that they belong to an extinct order is unsupported, and the lineage can be placed within the true flies. In terms of major morphological and inferred behavioural features, strashilids resemble the recent (extant) and relict members of the aquatic fly family Nymphomyiidae. Their ontogeny are distinguished by the persistence in adult males of larval abdominal respiratory gills, representing a unique case of paedomorphism among endopterygote insects. Adult strashilids were probably aquatic or amphibious, shedding their wings after emergence and mating in the water.

  12. Triassic-Jurassic pteridosperms of Australasia: speciation, diversity and decline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattemore, G. A.; Rigby, J. F.; Playford, G.

    2015-07-01

    Pteridosperms are preserved abundantly in the Gondwanan Triassic, with many species exhibiting consider- able morphological variation that has been attributed to a hybridization model of speciation. This is an improbable explanation given that hybridization is very rare in gymnosperms. Allopatric speciation resulting from geographic and climatic provincialism is a more likely explanation for the morphological diversity which is well represented in Anisian Norian (Middle and Upper Triassic) floras of Australasia and elsewhere in Gondwana. Most specimens are distributed among three families: Umkomasiaceae, Peltaspermaceae and Matatiellaceae. These families, together with other possibly pteridospermous genera, are reviewed herein. Diversity in these families apparently declined by the Rhaetian and they did not persist into the Gondwanan post-Triassic. Australasian post-Triassic strata contain remarkably different floral assemblages to those of the Triassic. No fructifications are clearly pteridospermous and no remains show any obvious relationship with pteridosperms of the Gondwanan Triassic. Caytonialean fructifications are not known in Australasian strata; however, associated foliage has been reported from the Eastern Gondwanan Upper Triassic through Middle Jurassic including Australia. Much fern-like foliage, claimed to be pteridospermous from the Lower Jurassic through Eocene of Eastern Gondwana, lacks supporting evidence of such affiliation. (Author)

  13. [The Analysis of Traditional Lime Mortars from Zhejiang Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-bin; Cui, Biao; Zhang, Bing-jian

    2016-01-01

    The components of ancient mortars have always been an important research field in historic building conservation. It has been well known that using traditional mortars in conservation projects have many advantages, such as compatibility and stability. So, developing new binding materials based on traditional mortar has become an international study hotspot. With China's economic development, the protection of ancient buildings also began to put on the agenda, but the understanding on Chinese traditional mortar is limited, and rare literatures are reported. In the present work, the authors investigate seven ancient city wall sites in Zhejiang Province in situ, and subsequently laboratory analysis were carried out on collected mortar samples. The characterizations of mortar samples were made by multi-density gauge, XRD, FTIR, TG-DSC and wet chemical analysis. The experimental results showed that: the main component of masonry mortars is calcium carbonate, the content between 75% - 90%, and they should be made from relatively pure lime mortar. The raw materials of mortar samples were mainly calcareous quick lime, and sample from Taizhou city also contained magnesium quick lime. There are four city walls were built by sticky-rice mortars. It suggests that the technology of adding the sticky rice soup into mortar was universal in the Ming Dynasties. These mortars have lower density between 1.2 and 1.9 g x cm(-3); this outcome should be the result of long-term natural erosion. We have also analyzed other chemical and physical characteristics of these masonry mortars. The results can afford the basic data for the future repairmen programs, development of new protective materials, and comparative study of mortars.

  14. Lime and fertilizer recommendation system for coconut trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Nogueira Guedes Pereira Rosa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Fertilizer recommendation to most agricultural crops is based on response curves. Such curves are constructed from field experimental data, obtained for a particular condition and may not be reliable to be applied to other regions. The aim of this study was to develop a Lime and Fertilizer Recommendation System for Coconut Crop based on the nutritional balance. The System considers the expected productivity and plant nutrient use efficiency to estimate nutrient demand, and effective rooting layer, soil nutrient availability, as well as any other nutrient input to estimate the nutrient supply. Comparing the nutrient demand with the nutrient supply the System defines the nutrient balance. If the balance for a given nutrient is negative, lime and, or, fertilization is recommended. On the other hand, if the balance is positive, no lime or fertilizer is needed. For coconut trees, the fertilization regime is divided in three stages: fertilization at the planting spot, band fertilization and fertilization at the production phase. The data set for the development of the System for coconut trees was obtained from the literature. The recommendations generated by the System were compared to those derived from recommendation tables used for coconut crop in Brazil. The main differences between the two procedures were for the P rate applied in the planting hole, which was higher in the proposed System because the tables do not pay heed to the pit volume, whereas the N and K rates were lower. The crop demand for K is very high, and the rates recommended by the System are superior to the table recommendations for the formation and initial production stage. The fertilizer recommendations by the System are higher for the phase of coconut tree growth as compared to the production phase, because greater amount of biomass is produced in the first phase.

  15. Hydration products of lime-metakaolin pastes at ambient temperature with ageing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gameiro, A., E-mail: agameiro@lnec.pt [National Laboratory of Civil Engineering, Materials Department, Av. do Brasil, 101, 1700 Lisbon (Portugal); Santos Silva, A., E-mail: ssilva@lnec.pt [National Laboratory of Civil Engineering, Materials Department, Av. do Brasil, 101, 1700 Lisbon (Portugal); Veiga, R., E-mail: rveiga@lnec.pt [National Laboratory of Civil Engineering, Buildings Department, Av. do Brasil, 101, 1700 Lisbon (Portugal); Velosa, A., E-mail: avelosa@ua.pt [Department of Civil Engineering, Geobiotec, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2012-05-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the compounds formed in lime/MK blended pastes and their stability over time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different mixes of lime/MK pastes show different reaction kinetics during curing time, being the pozzolanic compounds formed directly proportional to the lime by MK replacement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some pozzolanic products are found to be unstable during the hydration reaction employed in our study. - Abstract: Mortars constituted of lime mixtures with pozzolanic additions have been extensively used in the past for the construction of historic and traditional buildings. This paper presents the results of blended pastes of lime and metakaolin (MK), namely compounds formed and their stability over time. This research is part of an extensive study aiming at the formulation of lime based mortars for restoration purposes. It has been shown for several years that MK has been applied in inorganic binders due to its capacity to react vigorously with calcium hydroxide (CH). In the presence of water originating a series of major hydrated phases, namely tetra calcium aluminate hydrate (C{sub 4}AH{sub 13}), calcium silicates hydrates (CSH) and calcium aluminium silicate hydrates (stratlingite - C{sub 2}ASH{sub 8}). Several blended pastes of lime and MK, with different substitution rates of lime by MK (wt%) were prepared and cured at a temperature of 20 Degree-Sign C and relative humidity RH > 95%. The phase composition of the formed hydrated phases was determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and simultaneous thermal analysis (TG-DTA). The obtained results showed that lime/MK pastes compositions displayed different reaction kinetics during curing time, being the pozzolanic products content directly proportional to the substitution rate of lime by MK. Also, a relationship between the increase stratlingite content and the MK substitution rate of lime by MK was found.

  16. Forest liming increases forest floor carbon and nitrogen stocks in a mixed hardwood forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, April M; Lichstein, Jeremy W; Goodale, Christine L

    2013-12-01

    In acid-impacted forests, decreased soil pH and calcium (Ca) availability have the potential to influence biotic and abiotic controls on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling. We investigated the effects of liming on above- and belowground C and N pools and fluxes 19 years after lime addition to the Woods Lake Watershed, Adirondack Park, New York, USA. Soil pH and exchangeable Ca remained elevated in the forest floor and upper mineral soil of limed areas. Forest floor C and N stocks were significantly larger in limed plots (68 vs. 31 Mg C/ha, and 3.0 vs. 1.5 Mg N/ha), resulting from a larger mass of Oa material. Liming reduced soil basal respiration rates by 17% and 43% in the Oe and Oa horizons, respectively. Net N mineralization was significantly lower in the limed soils for both forest floor horizons. Additional measurements of forest floor depth outside of our study plots, but within the treatment and control subcatchments also showed a deeper forest floor in limed areas; however, the mean depth of limed forest floor was 5 cm shallower than that observed in our study plots. Using a differential equation model of forest floor C dynamics, we found that liming effects on C fluxes measured within our study plots could explain the small observed increase in the Oe C stock but were not large enough to explain the increase in the Oa. Our catchment-wide assessment of forest floor depth, however, indicates that our plot analysis may be an overestimate of ecosystem-scale C and N stocks. Our results suggest that the mechanisms identified in our study, primarily liming-induced reduction in decomposition rates, may account for much of the observed increase in forest floor C. These findings emphasize the importance of understanding of the effects of liming in hardwood forests, and the long-term impacts of acid deposition on forest C and N uptake and retention.

  17. Pore structure and carbonation in blended lime-cement pastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvarez, J. I.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to gain a fuller understandingof the curing process in lime pastes (100, 90, 80, 70,60, 50 and 40% lime blended with cement by analyzingcarbonation in these materials. A hydrated, airslaked lime powder and CEM II A/L 32.5 Portlandcement were used for the blends. These materialswere singled out for research primarily because theymay be used in the restoration of heritage monuments.Variation in weight was used as an indicator for carbonation.A new parameter, A, was found to vary inverselywith the percentage of the cement because of theprevalence of Knudsen diffusion in the paste, in turndue to the characteristics of the pore structure, whichwas studied by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP.The hygroscopic study conducted on the different pastesprovided information on water content at a givenhumidity and its location, i.e., adsorbed on the surfaceof the pores or condensed inside them, obstructing thediffusion of CO2. The conclusion drawn from this studyof the curing process was that neither drying nor C3Shydration retarded lime carbonation.En este trabajo se estudia el proceso de carbonatacionen pastas mixtas de cal y cemento (100, 90, 80, 70, 60,50 y 40% de cal con el objeto de obtener un mejorconocimiento del proceso de curado en estos materiales.Para ello se ha empleado una cal aerea hidratada en polvoy un cemento Portland del tipo CEM II A/L 32,5. Enparticular, este estudio investiga estos materiales ya quepueden ser utilizados en la restauracion del PatrimonioCultural. Se ha utilizado la variacion de peso como indicadordel proceso de carbonatacion. Se ha establecidoun nuevo parametro, A, que varia inversamente con elporcentaje de cemento en la pasta, debido al predominiode la difusion de Knudsen como consecuencia de laestructura porosa, que ha sido estudiada por medio deporosimetria de intrusion de mercurio (PIM. El estudiohigroscopico realizado sobre las diversas pastas permiteconocer el contenido en agua a una

  18. Improvement in hardness of soda-lime-silica glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Riya; De, Moumita; Roy, Sudakshina; Dey, Arjun; Biswas, Sampad K.; Middya, Tapas Ranjan; Mukhopadhyay, Anoop K. [CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata-700032, CSIR (India); Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata-700032 (India); CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata-700032, CSIR (India)

    2012-06-05

    Hardness is a key design parameter for structural application of brittle solids like glass. Here we report for the first time the significant improvement of about 10% in Vicker's hardness of a soda-lime-silica glass with loading rate in the range of 0.1-10 N.s{sup -1}. Corroborative dark field optical and scanning electron microscopy provided clue to this improvement through evidence of variations in spatial density of shear deformation band formation as a function of loading rate.

  19. Photoacoustic thermal characterization of lime-partially stabilized zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, M.E.; Serrato, J.; Zarate, J.; Pacheco, C.; Villasenor, L. [Univ. Michoacana, Morelia Michoacan (Mexico)

    1997-01-01

    Photoacoustic and photothermal techniques are used to investigate the room-temperature thermophysical properties of 9.4 mol% lime-partially stabilized zirconia (C-PSZ) samples in the density range of 5.12 {times} 10{sup 3}--5.58 {times} 10{sup 3}kg/m{sup 3}. The open-photoacoustic-cell approach is used to measure thermal diffusivity, and the photothermal technique of continuous illumination of the sample in vacuum is used to measure the product of density and specific heat capacity. Thermal conductivity is shown to be the thermophysical parameter most sensitive to changes in porosity.

  20. Geologic map of the east half of the Lime Hills 1:250,000-scale quadrangle, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Bruce M.; Reed, Bruce L.; Richter, Donald H.; Lanphere, Marvin A.

    2013-01-01

    This map is compiled from geologic mapping conducted between 1985 and 1992 by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of the Alaska Mineral Resource Assessment Program. That mapping built upon previous USGS work (1963–1988) unraveling the magmatic history of the Alaska–Aleutian Range batholith. Quaternary unit contacts depicted on this map are derived largely from aerial-photograph interpretation. K-Ar ages made prior to this study have been recalculated using 1977 decay constants. The east half of the Lime Hills 1:250,000-scale quadrangle includes part of the Alaska–Aleutian Range batholith and several sequences of sedimentary rocks or mixed sedimentary and volcanic rocks. The Alaska–Aleutian Range batholith contains rocks that represent three major igneous episodes, (1) Early and Middle Jurassic, (2) Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary, and (3) middle Tertiary; only rocks from the latter two episodes are found in this map area. The map area is one of very steep and rugged terrain; elevations range from a little under 1,000 ft (305 m) to 9,828 ft (2,996 m). Foot traverses are generally restricted to lowermost elevations. Areas suitable for helicopter landings can be scarce at higher elevations. Most of the area was mapped from the air, supplemented by direct examination of rocks where possible. This restricted access greatly complicates understanding some of the more complex geologic units. For example, we know there are plutons whose compositions vary from gabbro to granodiorite, but we have little insight as to how these phases are distributed and what their relations might be to each other. It is also possible that some of what we have described as compositionally complex plutons might actually be several distinct intrusions.

  1. Cytotoxic and antibacterial activity of the mixture of olive oil and lime cream in vitro conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumer, Zeynep; Yildirim, Gulay; Sumer, Haldun; Yildirim, Sahin

    2013-01-01

    The mixture of olive oil and lime cream has been traditionally used to treat external burns in the region of Hatay/Antakya and middle Anatolia. Olive oil and lime cream have been employed by many physicians to treat many ailments in the past. A limited number of studies have shown the antibacterial effect of olive oil and that it does not have any toxic effect on the skin. But we did not find any reported studies on the mixture of olive oil and lime cream. The aim of this paper is to investigate the cytotoxic and antibacterial activity of olive oil and lime cream individually or/and in combination in vitro conditions, by using disk-diffusion method and in cell culture. The main purpose in using this mixture is usually to clear burns without a trace. Agar overlay, MTT (Cytotoxicity assay) and antibacterial susceptibility tests were used to investigate the cytotoxic and antibacterial activity of olive oil and lime cream. We found that lime cream has an antibacterial activity but also cytotoxic on the fibroblasts. On the other hand olive oil has limited or no antibacterial effect and it has little or no cytotoxic on the fibroblasts. When we combined lime cream and olive oil, olive oil reduced its cytotoxic impact. These results suggest that mixture of olive oil and lime cream is not cytotoxic and has antimicrobial activity.

  2. Self-healing of lime based mortars: Microscopy observations on case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.; Nijland, T.G.; Hees, R.P.J. van

    2011-01-01

    Lime mortars have, up to a certain extent, a self-healing capacity which may contribute to their durability. Self-healing in lime mortars consists of a process of dissolution, transport and re-precipitation of calcium compounds to heal cracks and fissures. The spontaneous occurrence of self-healing

  3. Substrate pH and butterfly bush response to dolomitic lime or steel slag amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel slag is a fertilizer amendment with a high concentration of calcium oxide, and thus capable of raising substrate pH similar to dolomitic lime. Steel slag, however, contains higher concentrations of some nutrients, such as iron, manganese, and silicon, compared to dolomitic lime. The objectiv...

  4. Self-healing of lime based mortars: microscopy observations on case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.; Nijland, T.G.; Van Hees, R.P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Lime mortars have, up to a certain extent, a self-healing capacity which may contribute to their durability. Self-healing in lime mortars consists of a process of dissolution, transport and re-precipitation of calcium compounds to heal cracks and fissures. The spontaneous occurrence of self-healing

  5. Impact of lime, nitrogen and plant species on bacterial community structure in grassland microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Nabla; Brodie, Eoin; Connolly, John; Clipson, Nicholas

    2004-10-01

    A microcosm-based approach was used to study impacts of plant and chemical factors on the bacterial community structure of an upland acidic grassland soil. Seven perennial plant species typical of both natural, unimproved (Nardus stricta, Agrostis capillaris, Festuca ovina and F. rubra) and fertilized, improved (Holcus lanatus, Lolium perenne and Trifolium repens) grasslands were either left unamended or treated with lime, nitrogen, or lime plus nitrogen in a 75-day glasshouse experiment. Lime and nitrogen amendment were shown to have a greater effect on microbial activity, biomass and bacterial ribotype number than plant species. Liming increased soil pH, microbial activity and biomass, while decreasing ribotype number. Nitrogen addition decreased soil pH, microbial activity and ribotype number. Addition of lime plus nitrogen had intermediate effects, which appeared to be driven more by lime than nitrogen. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis revealed that lime and nitrogen addition altered soil bacterial community structure, while plant species had little effect. These results were further confirmed by multivariate redundancy analysis, and suggest that soil lime and nitrogen status are more important controllers of bacterial community structure than plant rhizosphere effects.

  6. Molecular characterization and pathogenicity assays of Colletotrichum acutatum, causal agent for lime anthracnose in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several distorted Mexican lime [Citrus aurantiifolia (Christm). Swingle] fruit, leaf, and twig samples with lime anthracnose symptoms were collected from three trees in residential areas of Brownsville, Texas. The causal fungal organism, Colletotrichum acutatum J. H. Simmonds was isolated from leave...

  7. Effects of liming on forage availability and nutrient content in a forest impacted by acid rain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Pabian

    Full Text Available Acidic deposition and subsequent forest soil acidification and nutrient depletion can affect negatively the growth, health and nutrient content of vegetation, potentially limiting the availability and nutrient content of forage for white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus and other forest herbivores. Liming is a mitigation technique that can be used to restore forest health in acidified areas, but little is known about how it affects the growth or nutrient content of deer forage. We examined the effects of dolomitic limestone application on the growth and chemical composition of understory plants in an acidified forest in central Pennsylvania, with a focus on vegetative groups included as white-tailed deer forage. We used a Before-After-Control-Impact study design with observations 1 year before liming and up to 5 years post-liming on 2 treated and 2 untreated 100-ha sites. Before liming, forage availability and several nutrients were below levels considered optimal for white-tailed deer, and many vegetative characteristics were related to soil chemistry. We observed a positive effect of liming on forb biomass, with a 2.7 fold increase on limed sites, but no biomass response in other vegetation groups. We observed positive effects of liming on calcium and magnesium content and negative effects on aluminum and manganese content of several plant groups. Responses to liming by forbs and plant nutrients show promise for improving vegetation health and forage quality and quantity for deer.

  8. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Communities in the Roots of Maize Lines Contrasting for Al Tolerance Grown in Limed and Non-Limed Brazilian Oxisoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Eliane A; Oliveira, Christiane A; Lana, Ubiraci G P; Noda, Roberto W; Marriel, Ivanildo E; de Souza, Francisco A

    2015-07-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is one of the greatest limitations to agriculture in acid soils, particularly in tropical regions. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can supply plants with nutrients and give protection against Al toxicity. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of soil liming (i.e., reducing Al saturation) on the AMF community composition and structure in the roots of maize lines contrasting for Al tolerance. To this end, we constructed four 18S rDNA cloning libraries from L3 (Al tolerant) and L22 (Al sensitive) maize lines grown in limed and non-limed soils. A total of 790 clones were sequenced, 69% belonging to the Glomeromycota phylum. The remaining sequences were from Ascomycota, which were more prominent in the limed soil, mainly in the L3 line. The most abundant AM fungal clones were related to the family Glomeraceae represented by the genera uncultured Glomus followed by Rhizophagus and Funneliformis. However, the most abundant operational taxonomic units with 27% of the Glomeromycota clones was affiliated to genus Racocetra. This genus was present in all the four libraries, but it was predominant in the non-limed soils, suggesting that Racocetra is tolerant to Al toxicity. Similarly, Acaulospora and Rhizophagus were also present mostly in both lines in non-limed soils. The community richness of AMF in the non-limed soils was higher than the limed soil for both lines. The results suggest that the soil Al saturation was the parameter that mostly influences the AMF species composition in the soils in this study.

  9. INFLUENCES OF LIMING ON YIELDS OF ALFALFA HAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetislav Popović

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Alfalfa is the most important forage legume on cultivated fields in Croatia (about 45000 ha of growing area – status 2003. The field experiment with application of four dolomite (Agrovapno MgO: 56% CaO and 40% MgO rates (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 tha-1 were conducted in autumn of 2004. The experiment was conducted by randomized block design in four replicates. Alfalfa (cultivar Osječanka 88 of the Agricultural Institute Osijek, Croatia was sown on March 25, 2005. Four cuttings / year were made. Fresh mass of alfalfa (cutting area 0.25 m2 was oven-dried at 65 oC. Year was the most influencing factor of alfalfa hay yields (13.03, 28.63, 29.43 and 32.77 tha-1, for 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008, respectively. Liming resulted in low increases of yields up to 5% only. We presume that possible high tolerance of Osječanka 88 cultivar to soil acidity could be the main reason of low effects of liming on alfalfa yields.

  10. Characterization of limes (Citrus aurantifolia) grown in Bhutan and Indonesia using high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penjor, Tshering; Mimura, Takashi; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Yamamoto, Masashi; Nagano, Yukio

    2014-04-30

    Lime [Citrus aurantifolia (Cristm.) Swingle] is a Citrus species that is a popular ingredient in many cuisines. Some citrus plants are known to originate in the area ranging from northeastern India to southwestern China. In the current study, we characterized and compared limes grown in Bhutan (n = 5 accessions) and Indonesia (n = 3 accessions). The limes were separated into two groups based on their morphology. Restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) separated the eight accessions into two clusters. One cluster contained four accessions from Bhutan, whereas the other cluster contained one accession from Bhutan and the three accessions from Indonesia. This genetic classification supported the morphological classification of limes. The analysis suggests that the properties associated with asexual reproduction, and somatic homologous recombination, have contributed to the genetic diversification of limes.

  11. Pre-desilication and digestion of gibbsitic bauxite with lime in sodium aluminate liquor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiao-lin; Yu, Hai-yan; Dong, Kai-wei; Tu, Gan-feng; Bi, Shi-wen

    2012-11-01

    The effect of lime on the pre-desilication and digestion of gibbsitic bauxite in synthetic sodium aluminate liquor at different temperatures was investigated. The bauxite is comprised of gibbsite, aluminogoethite, hematite, kaolin, quartz, and minor boehmite. Lime increases the desilication efficiency of the bauxite during the pre-desilication process by promoting the conversion of sodalite and cancrinite to hydrogarnet. Desilication reactions during the digestion process promoted by lime result in the loss of Al2O3 entering the red mud, but the amount of aluminogoethite-to-hematite conversion promoted by lime leads to the increase of aluminogoethitic Al2O3 entering the digested liquor. The alumina digestion rate at 245°C is higher than that at 145°C due to the more pronounced conversion of aluminogoethite to hematite. The soda consumption during the digestion process decreases due to lime addition, especially at higher temperatures.

  12. JURASSIC PALEONTOLOGICAL HERITAGE OF MURCIA (BETIC CORDILLERA, SOUTH-EASTERN SPAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GREGORIO ROMERO

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Jurassic rocks of the External and Internal Zones of the Betic Cordillera are widespread in the province of Murcia. Four areas are considered of special interest for stratigraphical and paleontological analysis: a Sierra Quípar and b Sierras Lúgar-Corque (External Subbetic, c Sierra Ricote (Median Subbetic and d Sierra Espuña (Malaguide Complex. The first two contain Jurassic sections including Sinemurian-Tithonian deposits, and major stratigraphic discontinuities, containing significant cephalopod concentrations of taphonomic and taxonomic interest, occuring in the Lower-Upper Pliensbachian, Lower/Middle Jurassic and Middle/Upper Jurassic boundaries. These areas are also relevant for biostratigraphical analysis of the Middle-Upper Jurassic interval. In the Sierra de Ricote, the Mahoma section is of especial interest for the study of Lías/Dogger transition. Casa Chimeneas section constitutes the best Subbetic site for the analysis of the Lower/Upper Bajocian boundary. In the La Bermeja-Casas de Vite area, the Bajocian-Tithonian interval is well-represented, including a parastratotype of the Radiolarite Jarropa Formation. Finally, the Malvariche section in Sierra Espuña represents the best Jurassic succession of Internal Zones of the Betic Cordillera and could be considered as a reference section for this Betic Domain. In this paper a heritage evaluation has been carried out for these classical jurassic sections with the object of protecting these sites according to the legal framework prevailing in the province of Murcia.

  13. Long-term effects of forest liming on soil, soil leachate, and foliage chemistry in northern Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert P. Long; Scott W. Bailey; Stephen B. Horsley; Thomas J. Hall; Bryan R. Swistock; David R. DeWalle

    2015-01-01

    Sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) decline disease, decreased growth, and regeneration failure have been related to a low supply of Ca and Mg. There is increased interest in augmenting cation availability via liming, but there is little information on the amounts of lime required and the longevity of the lime treatment. A single application of 22.4...

  14. 40 CFR 141.553 - My system practices lime softening-is there any special provision regarding my combined filter...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false My system practices lime softening-is... Filter Effluent Requirements § 141.553 My system practices lime softening—is there any special provision regarding my combined filter effluent? If your system practices lime softening, you may...

  15. Action time effect of lime on its depressive ability for pyrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tichang Sun

    2004-01-01

    Two sample groups of bulk concentrates consisting mainly of pyrite and chalcopyrite from Daye and Chenghchao Mines in Hubei Province of China were used to investigate the effect of the action time of lime on its depressive ability for pyrite. The experimental results conducted with different samples and collectors showed that the action time between lime and pyrite markedly influences the depressive ability of lime. The depressive ability of lime increased with the action time increasing. It was also proved that the depressive results obtained at a large lime dosage after a shorter action time are similar to those obtained at a small lime dosage after a longer action time. The increase of depressive ability of lime after a longer action time is because that there are different mechanisms in different action time. The composition on the surface of pyrite acted for different time with lime was studied by using ESCA (Electron Spectroscopic Chemical Analysis). The results showed that iron hydroxide and calcium sulphate formed on the pyrite surface at the presence of lime in the pulp but the amounts of iron hydroxide and calcium sulphate were different at different action time. At the beginning action time the compound formed on the pyrite surface was mainly calcium sulphate and almost no iron hydroxide formed; but with the action time increasing, iron hydroxide formed. The longer the action time, the more iron hydroxide and the less calcium sulphate formed. It was considered that the stronger depressive ability of lime after a longer action time is because more iron hydroxide forms on the pyrite surface.

  16. The geographic and phylogenetic position of sauropod dinosaurs from the Kota formation (Early Jurassic) of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillette, David D.

    2003-03-01

    The earliest sauropods are the Late Triassic Isanosaurus from Thailand, the Early Jurassic Barapasaurus and Kotasaurus from the Kota Formation of the Pranhita-Godavari Basin of India and Vulcanodon from Zimbabwe, and a variety of Middle Jurassic genera from many localities in Gondwana and Laurasia except North America. These early sauropod genera are related, but their phylogenetic positions remain unresolved. Sauropods originated in Laurasia (Thailand and vicinity) or Pangea (broadly, Thailand, China, India), with at least three additional steps involving expansion and diversification through the Middle Jurassic.

  17. POROSPHAERA (PORIFERA, A GLOBULAR SPONGE FROM THE UPPER JURASSIC OF THE CENTRAL IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BABA SENOWBARI-DARYAN

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Porosphaera, an abundant small spherical calcisponge, well known from Cretaceous strata of Europe, was found in Middle and Upper Jurassic deposits of east-central Iran. This is the first record of Porosphaera from the Jurassic, except for a questionable occurrence of the genus from the Upper Jurassic of Canada, described by Jansa et al. (1982. The following species are new: P. regularis n. sp., P. biporata n. sp., P.? labyrinthica n. sp.,  and P.? asymmetrica n. sp. 

  18. Early Jurassic Flora and Stratigraphy from Shansonggang of Southern Jilin,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengxiang Liu; Yuewu Sun; Chunlin Sun; Jiansheng Lu; Yanhua Zhao

    2003-01-01

    More than 35 species belonging to 22 genera of fossil plants are recognized by the authors from the Shansonggang flora in the 8hansonggang Basin of Jilin, China. Among them, the coexistence of Coniopteris and Cycadocarpidium demonstrates that the present flora possesses the characters of the early assemblage of Early Jurassic floras in Eurasia. Therefore, the age of the Shansonggang flora is considered the Early Jurassic.This study would be beneficial for better understanding the paleoecological and paleoclimatic characteristics of the Shansonggang Basin. Based mainly on the characters of the flora, the authors suggest that the Lower Jurassic coal-bearing strata, the Shansongang Formation, should namely be renewed.

  19. Molecular composition and ultrastructure of Jurassic paravian feathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Johan; Sjövall, Peter; Carney, Ryan M; Cincotta, Aude; Uvdal, Per; Hutcheson, Steven W; Gustafsson, Ola; Lefèvre, Ulysse; Escuillié, François; Heimdal, Jimmy; Engdahl, Anders; Gren, Johan A; Kear, Benjamin P; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Yans, Johan; Godefroit, Pascal

    2015-08-27

    Feathers are amongst the most complex epidermal structures known, and they have a well-documented evolutionary trajectory across non-avian dinosaurs and basal birds. Moreover, melanosome-like microbodies preserved in association with fossil plumage have been used to reconstruct original colour, behaviour and physiology. However, these putative ancient melanosomes might alternatively represent microorganismal residues, a conflicting interpretation compounded by a lack of unambiguous chemical data. We therefore used sensitive molecular imaging, supported by multiple independent analytical tests, to demonstrate that the filamentous epidermal appendages in a new specimen of the Jurassic paravian Anchiornis comprise remnant eumelanosomes and fibril-like microstructures, preserved as endogenous eumelanin and authigenic calcium phosphate. These results provide novel insights into the early evolution of feathers at the sub-cellular level, and unequivocally determine that melanosomes can be preserved in fossil feathers.

  20. Paleomagnetic studies on sedimentary Jurassic rocks from southern Bulgaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruczyk, J.; Kaḑziałko-Hofmokl, M.; Nozharov, P.; Petkov, N.; Nachev, I.

    Paleomagnetic investigations were performed on Jurassic sediments sampled in the mobile area of Bulgaria comprising Srednogorie, Kreiste and Stranja. The main carriers of magnetic properties of rocks studied are pigmentary haematite and goethite of post-sedimentary origin. The characteristic component of natural remanence (CARM), isolated by means of analysis of demagnetization procedure is secondary, and was acquired after the main tectonic event that took place in this area during the Upper Cretaceous. The CARM directions before tectonic correction are close to the results for Upper Cretaceous magmatic rocks from Srednogorie. The mean CARM direction and the corresponding polar position obtained for the whole region studied are compared with reference data for the Eurasian Platform. The difference between the reference and our data implies anticlockwise rotation of southern Bulgaria relative to Eurasia by ˜ 10-20° and a northward tilt of the region under study by ˜ 10-15° after acquisition of CARM.

  1. Three new Jurassic euharamiyidan species reinforce early divergence of mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Shundong; Wang, Yuanqing; Guan, Jian; Sheng, Xia; Meng, Jin

    2014-10-30

    The phylogeny of Allotheria, including Multituberculata and Haramiyida, remains unsolved and has generated contentious views on the origin and earliest evolution of mammals. Here we report three new species of a new clade, Euharamiyida, based on six well-preserved fossils from the Jurassic period of China. These fossils reveal many craniodental and postcranial features of euharamiyidans and clarify several ambiguous structures that are currently the topic of debate. Our phylogenetic analyses recognize Euharamiyida as the sister group of Multituberculata, and place Allotheria within the Mammalia. The phylogeny suggests that allotherian mammals evolved from a Late Triassic (approximately 208 million years ago) Haramiyavia-like ancestor and diversified into euharamiyidans and multituberculates with a cosmopolitan distribution, implying homologous acquisition of many craniodental and postcranial features in the two groups. Our findings also favour a Late Triassic origin of mammals in Laurasia and two independent detachment events of the middle ear bones during mammalian evolution.

  2. An Undercover Angiosperm from the Jurassic of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shaolin; WANG Xin

    2010-01-01

    Searching for early angiosperms is a riveting activity in botany because it helps to resolve the phylogenetic relationships among seed plants and among angiosperms themselves.One of the challenges for this job is what the target fossils look like.Most possibly early angiosperms may elude our scrutiny with gymnospermous appearances.This possibility becomes a reality in a Jurassic plant,Solaranthus gen.nov,which bears a peltaspermalean appearance and enclosed ovules.According to knowledge available hitherto,the latter feature makes it an angiosperm.However,such a feature is more likely to be eclipsed by its gymnospermous appearance.The early age and unexpected character assemblage of Solaranthus urge for a fresh look on the assumed-simple relationship between angiosperms and gymnosperms.Its resemblance to the order Peltaspermales favors the Mostly Male Theory.

  3. Geomagnetic field intensity in the middle jurassic - oligocene

    CERN Document Server

    Kurazhkovskii, A Yu; Klain, B I

    2014-01-01

    The present paper summarizes results of the studies on the intensity of geomagnetic field in the (167 - 23) Ma interval by sedimentary rocks of the Russian Plate and adjacent territories. The joint analysis of the data paleointensity obtained by sedimentary and thermomagnetized (from PINT12) rocks within this temporal interval is conducted. It is shown that the changes of the paleointensity were occurred chaotically. Alternating bursts and periods of quiet regime of the geomagnetic field are typical for intermittent processes and is a characteristic of the geological interval Jurassic-beginning of Paleogene. The distributions of the paleointensity corresponding to different intervals of geologic time were investigated. It is revealed that the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the paleointensity values is best approximated by a power function. The indices of the power functions varied depending on geologic time intervals.The analysis of the paleomagnetic data suggests that the medium in which the geoma...

  4. Extreme adaptations for aquatic ectoparasitism in a Jurassic fly larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Bo; Engel, Michael S; Wappler, Torsten; Jarzembowski, Edmund A; Zhang, Haichun; Wang, Xiaoli; Zheng, Xiaoting; Rust, Jes

    2014-06-24

    The reconstruction of ancient insect ectoparasitism is challenging, mostly because of the extreme scarcity of fossils with obvious ectoparasitic features such as sucking-piercing mouthparts and specialized attachment organs. Here we describe a bizarre fly larva (Diptera), Qiyia jurassica gen. et sp. nov., from the Jurassic of China, that represents a stem group of the tabanomorph family Athericidae. Q. jurassica exhibits adaptations to an aquatic habitat. More importantly, it preserves an unusual combination of features including a thoracic sucker with six radial ridges, unique in insects, piercing-sucking mouthparts for fluid feeding, and crocheted ventral prolegs with upward directed bristles for anchoring and movement while submerged. We demonstrate that Q. jurassica was an aquatic ectoparasitic insect, probably feeding on the blood of salamanders. The finding reveals an extreme morphological specialization of fly larvae, and broadens our understanding of the diversity of ectoparasitism in Mesozoic insects.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02844.001.

  5. Triassic-Jurassic Mass Extinction: Evidence for Bolide Impact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, R.; Becker, L.; Haggart, J.; Poreda, R.

    2003-04-01

    The Triassic-Jurassic (TJ) mass extinction event is one of the most severe in geologic history and is one of the five largest in the Phanerozoic with as many as 80% of the species lost. It is also one of the most poorly understood. Only a few geologic sections have been identified for the TJ extinction and most of those are not well preserved. Previously, the paucity of suitable stratigraphic sections has prevented corroborative geochemical studies. Recently a well-preserved stratigraphic section spanning the Triassic-Jurassic boundary (˜200 mya) was identified at Kennecott Point, Queen Charlotte, Islands, British Columbia. Initial studies have shown that the Kennecott Point sequence is one of the best preserved and contains one of the most complete radiolarian microfossil turnovers known. Analyses of stable isotopes have shown that a 13C perturbation exits within the sequence and suggests a decline in organic productivity (Ward et al., 2001). Preliminary results of laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) of selected Queen Charlotte samples suggest that fullerenes (C60 to C200) may be present in the Kennecott Point stratigraphic sequence. Previous studies have shown that fullerenes are present in the mass extinction boundary of the Permian-Triassic (˜251 mya) as well as the well-known "dinosaur" extinction event of the Cretaceous-Tertiary (˜65 mya). Therefore, three of the big five extinction events appear to have associated fullerenes. The possible presence of fullerenes along with the productivity collapse (rapid environmental change) suggests that a cometary or asteroidal impact may have occurred. Although no known impact crater exists, we hope to present chemical evidence that an impact or multiple impacts may have been responsible for the TJ mass extinction.

  6. Porphyrin geochemistry of Atlantic Jurassic-Cretaceous black shales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, E.W.; Louda, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Late Jurassic-early Cretaceous black shales and an overlying sequence of Albian-Campanian zeolitic claystones from the Falkland Plateau (DSDP/IPOD Leg 71, Site 511) were analyzed for tetrapyrrole pigment type and abundance. The black shale sequence was found to be rich in DPEP-series dominated free-base, nickel (Ni) and, to a lesser extent, vanadyl (V = 0) porphyrins. A low level of organic maturity (i.e. precatagenesis) is indicated for these strata as nickel chelation by free-base porphyrins is only 50-75% complete, proceeding down-hole to 627 meters sub-bottom. Electronic and mass spectral data reveal that the proposed benzo-DPEP (BD) and tetrahydrobenzo-DPEP (THBD) series are present in the free-base and Ni species, as well as the more usual occurrence in V = 0 porphyrin arrays. Highly reducing conditions are suggested by an abundance of the PAH perylene, substantial amounts of the THBD/BD series and a redox equilibrium between free-base DPEP and 7,8-dihydro-DPEP series, which exist in a 7:1 molar ratio. The Albian-Campanian claystone strata were found to be tetrapyrrole poor, and those pigments present were typed as Cu/Ni highly dealkylated (C/sub 26/ max.) etioporphyrins, thought to be derived via redeposition and oxidation of terrestrial organic matter (OM). Results from the present study are correlated to their past analyses of Jurassic-Cretaceous sediments from Atlantic margins in an effort to relate tetrapyrrole quality and quantity to basin evolution and OM sources in the proto-Atlantic.

  7. Remagnetization and Clay diagenesis in Jurassic Sediments of Skye, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, A.; Elliott, W.; Wampler, J.; Elmore, R.; Engel, M. H.

    2003-12-01

    The thrust of this study is to test the hypothesized connection between magnetite authigenesis and diagenetic reactions forming illite, an idea based on the results of paleomagnetic, rock magnetic, geochemical, and petrographic/SEM studies on Jurassic sedimentary rocks of Skye, Scotland. The Jurassic rocks in southern Skye contain a dual polarity magnetization residing in magnetite that is interpreted as a chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) and has directions similar to those of early Tertiary igneous rocks on Skye. The presence-absence test and the timing of acquisition for this CRM suggest that magnetite authigenesis is related to the smectite-to-illite conversion, and that clay diagenesis is a viable remagnetization mechanism. The clay fractions consist of illite-smectite (I-S), kaolinite, and trace amounts of chlorite. The I-S exhibits Kalkberg order (IISI) and typically contains ˜ 85% to 90% illite layers based on the positions of the 001 reflection. The 2M1, 1M and 1Md illite polytypes are present in variable proportions depending on size fraction. The K-Ar dates of I-S in the finest fraction range from 100 to 131 Ma while the K-Ar dates of I-S of the coarse fractions range from 160-210 Ma. In all cases, the dates of the finest I-S are much greater than the Tertiary CRM ages recorded in these rocks (65 Ma). The K-Ar dates decrease with decrease in particle size. At first approximation, the decrease is thought to reflect smaller amounts of detrital illite in the finer fractions. The youngest K-Ar dates of I-S are significantly greater than the CRM age recorded in these sediments. The most likely explanation of the discordance between K-Ar dates and CRM is that the finest fractions contain small amounts of detrital illite.

  8. Phylogenetic origin of limes and lemons revealed by cytoplasmic and nuclear markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curk, Franck; Ollitrault, Frédérique; Garcia-Lor, Andres; Luro, François; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The origin of limes and lemons has been a source of conflicting taxonomic opinions. Biochemical studies, numerical taxonomy and recent molecular studies suggested that cultivated Citrus species result from interspecific hybridization between four basic taxa (C. reticulata,C. maxima,C. medica and C. micrantha). However, the origin of most lemons and limes remains controversial or unknown. The aim of this study was to perform extended analyses of the diversity, genetic structure and origin of limes and lemons. The study was based on 133 Citrus accessions. It combined maternal phylogeny studies based on mitochondrial and chloroplastic markers, and nuclear structure analysis based on the evaluation of ploidy level and the use of 123 markers, including 73 basic taxa diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and indel markers. The lime and lemon horticultural group appears to be highly polymorphic, with diploid, triploid and tetraploid varieties, and to result from many independent reticulation events which defined the sub-groups. Maternal phylogeny involves four cytoplasmic types out of the six encountered in the Citrus genus. All lime and lemon accessions were highly heterozygous, with interspecific admixture of two, three and even the four ancestral taxa genomes. Molecular polymorphism between varieties of the same sub-group was very low. Citrus medica contributed to all limes and lemons and was the direct male parent for the main sub-groups in combination with C. micrantha or close papeda species (for C. aurata, C. excelsa, C. macrophylla and C. aurantifolia--'Mexican' lime types of Tanaka's taxa), C. reticulata(for C. limonia, C. karna and C. jambhiri varieties of Tanaka's taxa, including popular citrus rootstocks such as 'Rangpur' lime, 'Volkamer' and 'Rough' lemons), C. aurantium (for C. limetta and C. limon--yellow lemon types--varieties of Tanaka's taxa) or the C. maxima × C. reticulate hybrid (for C. limettioides--'Palestine sweet' lime types--and C

  9. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: The Middle Jurassic of western and northern Europe: its subdivisions, geochronology and correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callomon, John H.

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The palaeogeographic settings of Denmark and East Greenland during the Middle Jurassic are outlined. They lay in the widespread epicontinental seas that covered much of Europe in the post-Triassic transgression. It was a period of continuing eustatic sea-level rise, with only distant connections to world oceans: to the Pacific, via the narrow Viking Straits between Greenland and Norway and hence the arctic Boreal Sea to the north; and to the subtropical Tethys, via some 1200 km of shelf-seas to the south. The sedimentary history of the region was strongly influenced by two factors: tectonism and climate. Two modes of tectonic movement governed basinal evolution: crustal extension leading to subsidence through rifting, such as in the Viking and Central Grabens of the North Sea; and subcrustal thermal upwelling, leading to domal uplift and the partition of marine basins through emergent physical barriers, as exemplified by the Central North Sea Dome with its associated volcanics. The climatic gradient across the 30º of temperate latitude spanned by the European seas governed biotic diversity and biogeography, finding expression in rock-forming biogenic carbonates that dominate sediments in the south and give way to largely siliciclastic sediments in the north. Geochronology of unrivalled finesse is provided by standard chronostratigraphy based on the biostratigraphy of ammonites. The Middle Jurassic saw the onset of considerable bioprovincial endemisms in these guide-fossils, making it necessary to construct parallel standard zonations for Boreal, Subboreal or NW European and Submediterranean Provinces, of which the NW European zonation provides the primary international standard. The current versions of these zonations are presented and reviewed.

  10. A study on engineering characteristics of asphalt concrete using filler with recycled waste lime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung Do, Hwang; Hee Mun, Park; Suk keun, Rhee

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on determining the engineering characteristics of asphalt concrete using mineral fillers with recycled waste lime, which is a by-product of the production of soda ash (Na(2)CO(3)). The materials tested in this study were made using a 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% mixing ratio based on the conventional mineral filler ratio to analyze the possibility of using recycled waste lime. The asphalt concretes, made of recycled waste lime, hydrated lime, and conventional asphalt concrete, were evaluated through their fundamental engineering properties such as Marshall stability, indirect tensile strength, resilient modulus, permanent deformation characteristics, moisture susceptibility, and fatigue resistance. The results indicate that the application of recycled waste lime as mineral filler improves the permanent deformation characteristics, stiffness and fatigue endurance of asphalt concrete at the wide range of temperatures. It was also determined that the mixtures with recycled waste lime showed higher resistance against stripping than conventional asphalt concrete. It was concluded from various test results that a waste lime can be used as mineral filler and, especially, can greatly improve the resistance of asphalt concrete to permanent deformation at high temperatures.

  11. Effect of adding natural pozzolana on geotechnical properties of lime-stabilized clayey soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aref al-Swaidani; Ibrahim Hammoud; Ayman Meziab

    2016-01-01

    Clayey soils in Syria cover a total area of more than 20,000 km2 of the country, most of which are located in the southwestern region. In many places of the country, the clayey soils caused severe damage to infrastructures. Extensive studies have been carried out on the stabilization of clayey soils using lime. Syria is rich in both lime and natural pozzolana. However, few works have been conducted to investigate the influence of adding natural pozzolana on the geotechnical properties of lime-treated clayey soils. The aim of this paper is to understand the effect of adding natural pozzolana on some geotechnical properties of lime-stabilized clayey soils. Natural pozzolana and lime are added to soil within the range of 0%-20%and 0%-8%, respectively. Consistency, compaction, California bearing ratio (CBR) and linear shrinkage properties are particularly investigated. The test results show that the investigated properties of lime-treated clayey soils can be considerably enhanced when the natural pozzolana is added as a stabiliz-ing agent. Analysis results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spec-troscopy (EDX) show significant changes in the microstructure of the treated clayey soil. A better flocculation of clayey particles and further formation of cementing materials in the natural pozzolana-lime-treated clayey soil are clearly observed.

  12. A new look at liming as an approach to accelerate recovery from acidic deposition effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Gregory B; Burns, Douglas A; Riva-Murray, Karen

    2016-08-15

    Acidic deposition caused by fossil fuel combustion has degraded aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems in North America for over four decades. The only management option other than emissions reductions for combating the effects of acidic deposition has been the application of lime to neutralize acidity after it has been deposited on the landscape. For this reason, liming has been a part of acid rain science from the beginning. However, continued declines in acidic deposition have led to partial recovery of surface water chemistry, and the start of soil recovery. Liming is therefore no longer needed to prevent further damage, so the question becomes whether liming would be useful for accelerating recovery of systems where improvement has lagged. As more is learned about recovering ecosystems, it has become clear that recovery rates vary with watershed characteristics and among ecosystem components. Lakes appear to show the strongest recovery, but recovery in streams is sluggish and recovery of soils appears to be in the early stages. The method in which lime is applied is therefore critical in achieving the goal of accelerated recovery. Application of lime to a watershed provides the advantage of increasing Ca availability and reducing or preventing mobilization of toxic Al, an outcome that is beneficial to both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. However, the goal should not be complete neutralization of soil acidity, which is naturally produced. Liming of naturally acidic areas such as wetlands should also be avoided to prevent damage to indigenous species that rely on an acidic environment. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Application of organic compounds to lime and limestone products; Yuki kagobutsu wo riyoshita sekkaikei zairyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, H. [Okutama Kogyo Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    Outlined herein are lime-based composites with organic compounds by classifying them into three groups of limestone-, unslacked lime- and slacked lime-based. Calcium carbonate, being hydrophilic on the surface, is sparingly wettable with hydrophobic polymers. It is therefore surface-modified with organic compounds to secure filler surfaces compatible and strongly interactive with polymers. These organic compounds include fatty acids and their salts, rosin, amines, esters, surfactants, wax, monomers and polymers. Composites of resins with calcium carbonate are limited to plastics for common use. PTFE resin containing cement or lime as the soil stabilizer has shown good results to prevent dust for the soil improvement method which uses soil of the site. Also described herein are compositing researches to increase strength of carbonated and hardened slacked lime by impregnating it with MMA, and development of slacked lime having an approximately 3 times larger specific surface area than slacked lime of special grade to remove dry, acidic emissions exhausted from garbage incinerators. 15 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Soil acidification and the importance of liming agricultural soils with particular reference to the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, K W T

    2016-09-01

    Soil acidification is caused by a number of factors including acidic precipitation and the deposition from the atmosphere of acidifying gases or particles, such as sulphur dioxide, ammonia and nitric acid. The most important causes of soil acidification on agricultural land, however, are the application of ammonium-based fertilizers and urea, elemental S fertilizer and the growth of legumes. Acidification causes the loss of base cations, an increase in aluminium saturation and a decline in crop yields; severe acidification can cause nonreversible clay mineral dissolution and a reduction in cation exchange capacity, accompanied by structural deterioration. Soil acidity is ameliorated by applying lime or other acid-neutralizing materials. 'Liming' also reduces N2O emissions, but this is more than offset by CO 2 emissions from the lime as it neutralizes acidity. Because crop plants vary in their tolerance to acidity and plant nutrients have different optimal pH ranges, target soil pH values in the UK are set at 6.5 (5.8 in peaty soils) for cropped land and 6.0 (5.3 in peaty soils) for grassland. Agricultural lime products can be sold as 'EC Fertiliser Liming Materials' but, although vital for soil quality and agricultural production, liming tends to be strongly influenced by the economics of farming. Consequently, much less lime is being applied in the UK than required, and many arable and grassland soils are below optimum pH.

  15. Storms in the deep: tempestite- and beach-like deposits in pelagic sequences (Middle-Upper Jurassic, Subbetic, South of Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomar, Luis; Molina, Jose M.; Ruiz-Ortiz, Pedro A.; Vera, Juan A.

    2017-04-01

    Fine-peloidal- to coarse oolitic-bioclastic grainstones with hummocky cross stratification (HCS) occur interbedded in Middle-Upper Jurassic pelagic lime-mudstone successions (Betic ranges, Southern Spain). These strata were deposited in pelagic troughs and swells, away from continental areas, in the Southern Iberian Continental Margin of the Western Tethys. Previously interpreted as tempestites, mainly due to the attribution of the HCS to surface storm waves, they are now reinterpreted as the product of turbulence in deeper conditions. Among many, some selected examples are here presented. All of them share: 1) Grainstone beds are interbedded with pelagic mudstones and marls 2) Grainstone components were reworked by oscillatory flows superimposed to unidirectional tractive flows (unidirectional ripple lamination and HCS). 3) Components were either derived from shallow-water environments (e.g., ooids), or produced in pelagic conditions (e.g., radiolarians, Saccocoma, peloids, etc). 4) Although surface-storm tempestite flows can be required to bring downslope components from shallow-water settings, the grainstone beds reflect sediment reworking at a depth dominated by fine pelagic sedimentation. 5) Internal waves propagating along a pycnocline and breaking against a sloping surface are the best candidate to induce the sedimentary structures and sediment organization that characterize these grainstone beds. The examples here presented (Middle-Upper Jurassic of the Subbetic) include: a) Peloid grainstones interbedded with radiolarite marls deposited on the flanks of volcanic guyots. The interbedded lime muds and marls contain 'filaments', sponge spicules and radiolarians. b) Peloid-bioclastic (radiolarians, Saccocoma, etc.) grainstone beds with HCS, interbedded with pelagic lime muds. c) Coarse oolitic grainstone unit, encased in pelagic marls, with wedge-shaped crossbed-sets with gently seaward-dipping parallel lamination, and sets of low-angle up-slope dipping

  16. Occurrence of sauropod dinosaur tracks in the Upper Jurassic of Chile (redescription of Iguanodonichnus frenki)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Karen; Benton, Michael J.

    2005-12-01

    New observations from the only studied Upper Jurassic dinosaur unit in South America, the Baños del Flaco Formation, Chile, are presented herein. The original description of the ichnospecies Iguanodonichnus frenki contains several mistakes and information that needs updating. Therefore, we provide a redescription, including new data collected in the field, that supports I. frenki as a sauropod in origin on the basis of the following features: step angles average less than 110°; pes prints intersect the trackway midline; pes prints are longer than wide, with the long axis rotated outward; the claw impression of digit I is prominent and directed forward; and claws on digits II, III, and IV are strongly reduced. These morphological characteristics might give clues about the pes morphology of the South American Jurassic sauropods, whose foot bone remains are scarce. The presence of this sauropod ichnospecies in the Late Jurassic agrees with Early-Middle Jurassic faunal associations in South America.

  17. Fe-Ni Micrometorites from Upper Jurassic Cañadon Asfalto Fm., Patagonia, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteini, M.; Hauser, N.; Cabaleri, N.; Silva Nieto, D.; Cuadros, F. A.; Reyes, S.

    2014-09-01

    Microspherules from an upper Jurassic sediments from Patagonia, show mineralogical, geochemical and textural features very similar to those reported for I-type micrometeorites whereas some spherules are interpreted as typical G-type micrometeorites.

  18. Hettangian (early jurassic) plant fossils from Puale Bay (peninsular terrane, Alaska)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Middle Hettangian (Early Jurassic) plant macrofossils from the Kamishak Formation at Puale Bay,Alaska occur mainly as leaves and leafy shoots found together with...

  19. Luminescence quartz dating of lime mortars. A first research approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, N; Mauz, B; Michael, C T

    2002-01-01

    Lime mortars mixed with sand are well suited for connecting structural materials, like stones and bricks, due to the mechanical properties this material exhibits. Their extensive use in architectural and decorative works during the last 4000 years motivated the introduction of the 'Luminescence clock' for age determination of mortars. The same principles as for quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of sediments were applied for age estimation of a mortar fragment removed from a Byzantine church monument dated by archaeological means to 1050-1100 years ago (the first half of the 10th century). The OSL from the quartz was monitored under blue light stimulation and UV detection, using a single-aliquot-regenerative-dose protocol. The quartz-OSL dating of the mortar resulted in 870 +/- 230 a. TL polymineral fine grain dating was also performed on a brick fragment which was connected to the mortar, resulting in a TL age of 1095 +/- 190 a.

  20. Shock wave propagation in soda lime glass using optical shadowgraphy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRASAD Y B S R; BARNWAL S; NAIK P A; YADAV Y; PATIDAR R; KAMATH M P; UPADHYAY A; BAGCHI S; KUMAR A; JOSHI A S; GUPTA P D

    2016-07-01

    Propagation of shock waves in soda lime glass, which is a transparent material, has been studied using the optical shadowgraphy technique. The time-resolved shock velocity information has been obtained (1) in single shot, using the chirped pulse shadowgraphy technique, with a temporal resolution of tens of picoseconds and (2) in multiple shots, using conventional snapshot approach, with a second harmonic probe pulse. Transient shock velocities of $(5–7) \\times 10^{6}$ cm/s have been obtained. The scaling of the shock velocity with intensity in the $2 \\times 10^{13}–10^{14}$ W/cm$^2$ range has been obtained. The shock velocity is observed to scale with laser intensity as $I^{0.38}$. The present experiments also show the presence of ionization tracks, generated probably due to X-ray hotspots from small-scale filamentation instabilities. The results and various issues involved in these experiments are discussed

  1. Fragrance mix reactions and lime allergic contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swerdlin, Amy; Rainey, David; Storrs, Frances J

    2010-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis due to citrus fruits is rare, but has been reported in cooks and bartenders. We report an interesting case of a bartender with hand dermatitis who had an allergic contact sensitivity to lime peel, fragrance mix I, and fragrance mix II. Most reported cases of citrus peel allergy are due to d-limonene, which makes up the majority of the peel oil. However, our patient had an allergic reaction to geraniol, which is a minor component of the peel oil and is present in fragrance mix I. It is important to consider a contact sensitivity to citrus in patients who have positive reactions to fragrance mix I and II and who are occupationally exposed to citrus fruits. An initial positive reaction to fragrance mixes should prompt further testing to citrus in these individuals.

  2. STRESS RELAXATION AND RELIABILITY EVALUATION OF SODA-LIME GLASS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.W.Bao; Y.F.Han; F.T.Gong

    2004-01-01

    Stress relaxation of glass is a dualism effect, it often lead to strength degradation in strengthened glass, but on the other hand, it improves the reliability and stressuniformity of glasses. In this work, stress relaxation of soda-lime glass was investigated using three-point bending tests at 400-560℃ which is near the brittle to ductile transition temperature, for enhancing the safety of glass productions and exploring the most economic anneal process. The experimental results show that the speed of stress relaxation increases but the ultimate stress decreases with increasing temperature. The stress uniformity of the glass samples before and after anneal was examined using spherical indentation at arranged testing points. It indicates that the scatter of the local strength measured by the Hertzian indentation is smaller in the anneal glass than in initial specimen, so that the estimated Weibull modulus for the anneal specimen is higher. Furthermore, the strength evaluation by Hertzian indentation and statistical analysis was presented.

  3. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF A SODA LIME GLASS THERMAL SHOCK RESISTANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert FANTOZZI

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Comparatively to the as received soda lime glass samples, the strength distribution after thermal shocks showed the appearance of a second branch in the Weibull curves. This branch is observed for temperature differences (ΔT equal or higher than the critical temperature difference (ΔTc for both water and motor oil cooling baths. The dispersion is more spread out in these two baths in comparison with the olive oil bath probably because of more pronounced slow crack growth effect. The Weibull modulus varies according to the used cooling bath and the considered temperature difference. In the case of thermal shock caused by air blast cooling at T = 20°C, a bimodal distribution is observed for only the critical state. The initial cracking time, obtained by acoustic emission, corresponds to the unstable propagation of the most critical defect. The number of cracks induced by thermal shock is proportional to the number of acoustic events.

  4. Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Soda Lime Silicate Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL; Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Vuono, Daniel J [ORNL

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Frictional effects contribute to fracture initiation. (2) Spheres with a lower elastic modulus require less force to initiate fracture in the Starphire than spheres with a higher elastic modulus. (3) Contact-induced fracture did not initiate in the Starphire SLS for impact kinetic energies < 150 mJ. Fracture sometimes initiated or kinetic energies between {approx} 150-1100 mJ; however, it tended to occur when lower elastic modulus spheres were impacting it. Contact-induced fracture would always occur for impact energies > 1100 mJ. (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic or impact conditions than it is under quasi-static indentation conditions. (5) Among the five used sphere materials, silicon nitride was the closest match to 'rock' in terms of both density and (probably) elastic modulus.

  5. Effects of Bamboo Leaf Ash on Lime Stabilized Lateritic Soil for Highway Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S. Babajide

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This research determined the effects of bamboo leaf ash on lime stabilized lateritic soil for highway construction. It was necessary to utilize the properties of waste materials such as bamboo leaf in order to determine its usefulness as a possible complement stabilizer for lime and hence reduce highway construction cost. The three samples A, B and C used in this study were collected from different locations in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Preliminary tests such as the natural moisture content, specific gravity, grain size analysis and Atterberg’s limits were performed on them at their natural states and when stabilized with optimum percentages of lime. Engineering tests such as compaction, California Bearing Ratio (CBR and undrained traixial were also performed on them at their natural states, when stabilized with the optimum lime percentages and when Bamboo Leaf Ash (BLA was introduced at 2, 4 and 6% to the samples. The results of the strength tests showed that BLA improved the strengths of all the lime stabilized samples. The unsoaked CBR values increased from 4-11, 2-10 and 2-11%, respectively in lime stabilized samples A, B and C with the addition of BLA. The shear strengths also increased substantially, from 42.16 to 398.96 kN/m2, 42.96 to 146.84 kN/m2 and 197.48 to 365.90 kN/m2, respectively with the addition of BLA to the lime stabilized samples. It was therefore concluded that BLA will further increase the strength of lime stabilized lateritic soil for highway construction since it was found as an effective complement for lime in soil stabilization.

  6. Nutrient leaching potential following application of papermill lime-sludge to an acidic clay soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Vettorazzo

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was carried out under greenhouse conditions with soil pots during 210 days, to evaluate the effect of calcitic papermill lime-sludge application (at the rates 0, 773, 1.547, and 2.320 mg kg-1 or respective equivalents to control, 2, 4, and 6 t ha-1, on chemical composition of soil leachate and its effects on eucalypt growth and yield. Highest soil leachate pH, SO4, and Na concentrations occurred in the 4 and 6 t ha-1 treatments. Soil leachate nitrate concentrations decreased with increasing lime-sludge rate. Soil leachate phosphate remained low (below the detection limit in all treatments until 120 days, while the concentration increased in the lime-sludge treatments at 210 days (last sampling in about 600 mg L-1. Lime-sludge decreased leachate Mg concentration, but had no significant effect among rates. Soil leachate Ca, K, B, Cu, Fe, and Zn did not change significantly for any lime-sludge application rates. The maximum NO3, Ca, Mg, K, and Na concentrations in the soil leachate occurred at 60 days after lime-sludge application (leaching equivalent to 1 pore volume, but for pH and SO4, the maximum occurred at 210 days (leaching equivalent to 4 pore volumes. Lime-sludge application decreased the concentration of exchangeable Al in the soil. Plant diameter growth and dry matter yield were increased with increasing lime-sludge rate. Beneficial effects on mineral nutrition (P, K, Ca, B, and Zn of eucalypts were also obtained by the application of 4 and 6 t ha-1 of lime-sludge.

  7. Microbial Response to Soil Liming of Damaged Ecosystems Revealed by Pyrosequencing and Phospholipid Fatty Acid Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendrula-Kotha, Ramya; Nkongolo, Kabwe K.

    2017-01-01

    Aims To assess the effects of dolomitic limestone applications on soil microbial communities’ dynamics and bacterial and fungal biomass, relative abundance, and diversity in metal reclaimed regions. Methods and Results The study was conducted in reclaimed mining sites and metal uncontaminated areas. The limestone applications were performed over 35 years ago. Total microbial biomass was determined by Phospholipid fatty acids. Bacterial and fungal relative abundance and diversity were assessed using 454 pyrosequencing. There was a significant increase of total microbial biomass in limed sites (342 ng/g) compared to unlimed areas (149 ng/g). Chao1 estimates followed the same trend. But the total number of OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units) in limed (463 OTUs) and unlimed (473 OTUs) soil samples for bacteria were similar. For fungi, OTUs were 96 and 81 for limed and unlimed soil samples, respectively. Likewise, Simpson and Shannon diversity indices revealed no significant differences between limed and unlimed sites. Bacterial and fungal groups specific to either limed or unlimed sites were identified. Five major bacterial phyla including Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria were found. The latter was the most prevalent phylum in all the samples with a relative abundance of 50%. Bradyrhizobiaceae family with 12 genera including the nitrogen fixing Bradirhizobium genus was more abundant in limed sites compared to unlimed areas. For fungi, Ascomycota was the most predominant phylum in unlimed soils (46%) while Basidiomycota phylum represented 86% of all fungi in the limed areas. Conclusion Detailed analysis of the data revealed that although soil liming increases significantly the amount of microbial biomass, the level of species diversity remain statistically unchanged even though the microbial compositions of the damaged and restored sites are different. Significance and Impact of the study Soil liming still have a significant

  8. Two new species of Paramesosciophilodes (Diptera, Nematocera, Mesosciophilidae from the Middle Jurassic of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqi Gao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Two new species, Paramesosciophilodes bellus sp. n. and Paramesosciophilodes rarissima sp. n., from the Jiulongshan Formation at Daohugou Village, Inner Mongolia, China, are described in the extinct family Mesosciophilidae. Altogether seven genera with 21 species of mesosciophilids have been described from the Jurassic of Siberia and Kazakhstan, the Lower Cretaceous of Transbaikalia, and the Middle Jurassic of Inner Mongolia. An emended generic diagnosis of Paramesosciophilodes and a list of known taxa of mesosciophilids are provided.

  9. Two new species of Paramesosciophilodes (Diptera, Nematocera, Mesosciophilidae) from the Middle Jurassic of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jiaqi; Shi, Guifeng; Shih, Chungkun; Ren, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Two new species, Paramesosciophilodesbellus sp. n. and Paramesosciophilodesrarissima sp. n., from the Jiulongshan Formation at Daohugou Village, Inner Mongolia, China, are described in the extinct family Mesosciophilidae. Altogether seven genera with 21 species of mesosciophilids have been described from the Jurassic of Siberia and Kazakhstan, the Lower Cretaceous of Transbaikalia, and the Middle Jurassic of Inner Mongolia. An emended generic diagnosis of Paramesosciophilodes and a list of known taxa of mesosciophilids are provided.

  10. The first euthemistid damsel-dragonfly from the Middle Jurassic of China (Odonata, Epiproctophora, Isophlebioptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sinoeuthemis daohugouensis gen. et sp. n. is the first record of the isophlebiopteran family Euthemistidae from Middle Jurassic of northeast China, while previously this family was restricted to the early Late Jurassic Kazakhstan. This new finding allows us to emend the family diagnosis with hindwing characters. This new species shows a mixture of characters alternatively present in different genera of the two families Euthemistidae and Sphenophlebiidae.

  11. Genetic variation assessment of acid lime accessions collected from south of Iran using SSR and ISSR molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafi, Ata Allah; Abkenar, Asad Asadi; Sharafi, Ali; Masaeli, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Iran has a long history of acid lime cultivation and propagation. In this study, genetic variation in 28 acid lime accessions from five regions of south of Iran, and their relatedness with other 19 citrus cultivars were analyzed using Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) and Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) molecular markers. Nine primers for SSR and nine ISSR primers were used for allele scoring. In total, 49 SSR and 131 ISSR polymorphic alleles were detected. Cluster analysis of SSR and ISSR data showed that most of the acid lime accessions (19 genotypes) have hybrid origin and genetically distance with nucellar of Mexican lime (9 genotypes). As nucellar of Mexican lime are susceptible to phytoplasma, these acid lime genotypes can be used to evaluate their tolerance against biotic constricts like lime "witches' broom disease".

  12. Chemo-physical evolution and microstructure features of lime treated soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russo Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper some results on the effects of chemo-physical evolution of clay-lime-water suspensions on the microstructure of a lime treated kaolin have been presented. A multi-scale investigation on the sedimentation behaviour of clay suspensions under different pore water chemistry has been developed highlighting the chemo-physical mechanisms controlling particle arrangement and the soil fabric formation. The results evidenced the key role of ionic exchange in the short term on the microstructure features of the lime treated soil.

  13. Post-Jurassic tectonic evolution of Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahirovic, Sabin; Seton, Maria; Dietmar Müller, R.; Flament, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    The accretionary growth of Asia, linked to long-term convergence between Eurasia, Gondwana-derived blocks and the Pacific, resulted in a mosaic of terranes for which conflicting tectonic interpretations exist. Here, we propose solutions to a number of controversies related to the evolution of Sundaland through a synthesis of published geological data and plate reconstructions that reconcile both geological and geophysical constraints with plate driving forces. We propose that West Sulawesi, East Java and easternmost Borneo rifted from northern Gondwana in the latest Jurassic, collided with an intra-oceanic arc at ~115 Ma and subsequently sutured to Sundaland by 80 Ma. Although recent models argue that the Southwest Borneo core accreted to Sundaland at this time, we use volcanic and biogeographic constraints to show that the core of Borneo was on the Asian margin since at least the mid Jurassic. This northward transfer of Gondwana-derived continental fragments required a convergent plate boundary in the easternmost Tethys that we propose gave rise to the Philippine Archipelago based on the formation of latest Jurassic-Early Cretaceous supra-subduction zone ophiolites on Halmahera, Obi Island and Luzon. The Late Cretaceous marks the shift from Andean-style subduction to back-arc opening on the east Asian margin. Arc volcanism along South China ceased by ~60 Ma due to the rollback of the Izanagi slab, leading to the oceanward migration of the volcanic arc and the opening of the Proto South China Sea (PSCS). We use the Apennines-Tyrrhenian system in the Mediterranean as an analogue to model this back-arc. Continued rollback detaches South Palawan, Mindoro and the Semitau continental blocks from the stable east Asian margin and transfers them onto Sundaland in the Eocene to produce the Sarawak Orogeny. The extrusion of Indochina and subduction polarity reversal along northern Borneo opens the South China Sea and transfers the Dangerous Grounds-Reed Bank southward to

  14. Broad-scale patterns of late jurassic dinosaur paleoecology.

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    Christopher R Noto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There have been numerous studies on dinosaur biogeographic distribution patterns. However, these distribution data have not yet been applied to ecological questions. Ecological studies of dinosaurs have tended to focus on reconstructing individual taxa, usually through comparisons to modern analogs. Fewer studies have sought to determine if the ecological structure of fossil assemblages is preserved and, if so, how dinosaur communities varied. Climate is a major component driving differences between communities. If the ecological structure of a fossil locality is preserved, we expect that dinosaur assemblages from similar environments will share a similar ecological structure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study applies Ecological Structure Analysis (ESA to a dataset of 100+ dinosaur taxa arranged into twelve composite fossil assemblages from around the world. Each assemblage was assigned a climate zone (biome based on its location. Dinosaur taxa were placed into ecomorphological categories. The proportion of each category creates an ecological profile for the assemblage, which were compared using cluster and principal components analyses. Assemblages grouped according to biome, with most coming from arid or semi-arid/seasonal climates. Differences between assemblages are tied to the proportion of large high-browsing vs. small ground-foraging herbivores, which separates arid from semi-arid and moister environments, respectively. However, the effects of historical, taphonomic, and other environmental factors are still evident. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study is the first to show that the general ecological structure of Late Jurassic dinosaur assemblages is preserved at large scales and can be assessed quantitatively. Despite a broad similarity of climatic conditions, a degree of ecological variation is observed between assemblages, from arid to moist. Taxonomic differences between Asia and the other regions demonstrate at

  15. Chasing the Late Jurassic APW Monster Shift in Ontario Kimberlites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, D. V.; Muttoni, G.; Gee, J. S.; Kjarsgaard, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    A 30° gap was recognized in a composite APW path when global poles from predominantly igneous rocks were assembled in North American coordinates using plate reconstructions (Kent & Irving 2010 JGR). The 'monster shift' occurred between a 160-190 Ma cluster of mean poles at 75-80°N 90-110°E to a 140-145 Ma grouping centered at 60-65°N ~200°E. There are hardly any intermediate igneous poles whereas the rather divergent directions from the Late Jurassic Morrison Formation published by Steiner & Helsley (1975 GSA Bulletin) are subject to adjustments for Colorado Plateau rotation and sedimentary inclination error, neither of which are precisely known for this redbed unit sampled in Colorado. On the other hand, similar large rapid swings have been recognized in the Late Jurassic APW path for Adria (Channell et al. 2010 Paleo3), suggesting a global phenomena. In an effort to fill the data gap between ~145 and 160 Ma, we sampled accessible outcrops/subcrops of kimberlites in the Timiskaming area of Ontario, Canada, that are associated with high precision U-Pb perovskite ages (Heamon & Kjarsgaard 2000 EPSL). We report initial results from two of the intrusions: the 153.6±2.4 Ma Peddie kimberlite from outcrop and the Triple B kimberlite that was accessible by trenching and is assumed to be the same age as the nearby 153.7±1.8 Ma Seed kimberlite as delineated by aeromagnetic surveys and borings. Systematic progressive thermal demagnetization indicated in each unit a dominant characteristic component with unblocking temperatures to 575° that presumably reflect a magnetite carrier that will be checked by further rock magnetic experiments. Samples from the Peddie kimberlite had stable downward (normal polarity) magnetizations whose mean direction gives a paleopole at 73°N 184°E. In contrast, samples from the Triple B kimberlite have upward (reverse polarity) magnetizations with a well-grouped direction whose (north) paleopole is 78°N 197°E, proximal to the Peddie

  16. Recovery of lignocelluloses from pre-hydrolysis liquor in the lime kiln of kraft-based dissolving pulp production process by adsorption to lime mud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jing; Fatehi, Pedram; Soleimani, Pendar; Ni, Yonghao

    2011-11-01

    Dissolved lignocelluloses from the pre-hydrolysis liquor (PHL) of kraft-based dissolving pulp production process were recovered by adsorption to lime mud produced in the causticizing plant of the kraft process. The adsorption of lignocelluloses was a fast process, and could be completed within one hour. The addition of polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDADMAC) significantly increased the amounts of adsorbed lignin and hemicelluloses, which more than doubled at the PDADMAC dosage of 0.1% (based on the weight of PHL). The measured heating values of the adsorbed lignocelluloses indicate that adsorption of lignocelluloses to lime mud may result in the energy saving of the lime kiln. The process proposed in this study could also be adapted to decrease inhibitor concentrations (lignin and acetic acid) if the dissolved hemicelluloses in the PHL were used to produce value-added products, e.g., ethanol, xylitol, based on the fermentation process.

  17. The use of lime in building tasks during recent Prehistory: new evidence in Eastern Iberian peninsula

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    Francisco Javier Jover Maestre

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The uses of lime in building tasks in the Late Prehistory along the Mediterranean area, constitutes one of the most relevant questions in the research process in the last decades. The important difficulties to determine with reliability the presence of anthropic lime among the building materials obtained from the archeological places is been commented in different studies. To identify this pyrotechnological product in the prehistoric constructions, distinguishing it from natural lime, is really important due to the social and environmental implications that its uses and production involve. The application of an ample analysis protocol to several samples coming from different human settlements of the VI to II millennium cal BC in the East of the Iberian peninsula, allow us to suggest the use of lime from early stages of the III millennium cal BC, and with more certainty, from II millennium cal BC.

  18. Chemical Characterization of Lime-Based Binders in Historic Buildings of Latvia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilovica, I.; Gulbe, L.; Vitina, I.; Igaune-Blumberga, S.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the chemical composition of stone materials of several local historic buildings with a purpose of elaboration of restoration strategy, including the choice of restoration materials. Most of the examined mortars are lime- based hydraulic mortars, characteristic of the architecture of 19th/20th century. Pure aerial lime binders show reduced compatibility with historic materials, that is why lime binders with pozzolan additive (cement) are an appropriate choice for restoration. In order to examine the changes of hydraulicity (i.e. the property of binders to harden when exposed to water) of perspective restoration binders, a series of blended lime-cement mixtures were synthesized with growing content of cement (up to 10% by weight). A significant relationship between cement content and hydraulic properties has been shown.

  19. Effect of curing conditions and ionic additives on properties of fly ash–lime compacts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saikat Maitra; Farooq Ahmad; Ananta K Das; Santanu Das; Binay K Dutta

    2010-04-01

    In the present work the reaction between fly ash and lime in fly ash–lime compacts under water curing and steam curing conditions was studied thoroughly in relation to the processing conditions. Fly ash from different sources were collected, characterized, mixed with lime in different ratios and compacted. The compacts were cured with water and steam separately. The reduction in the free CaO content in these compacts was measured as a function of curing time and curing process. Role of two ionic additives, FeCl3 and MgCl2, on the reaction between fly ash and lime was also investigated by measuring the free CaO content. Kinetics of these reactions was studied by determining the reaction order and rate constants with respect to the free CaO content and it was observed that the curing conditions and additives affected the reaction kinetics significantly.

  20. Lime kiln dust as a potential raw material in portland cement manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. Michael; Callaghan, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    In the United States, the manufacture of portland cement involves burning in a rotary kiln a finely ground proportional mix of raw materials. The raw material mix provides the required chemical combination of calcium, silicon, aluminum, iron, and small amounts of other ingredients. The majority of calcium is supplied in the form of calcium carbonate usually from limestone. Other sources including waste materials or byproducts from other industries can be used to supply calcium (or lime, CaO), provided they have sufficiently high CaO content, have low magnesia content (less than 5 percent), and are competitive with limestone in terms of cost and adequacy of supply. In the United States, the lime industry produces large amounts of lime kiln dust (LKD), which is collected by dust control systems. This LKD may be a supplemental source of calcium for cement plants, if the lime and cement plants are located near enough to each other to make the arrangement economical.

  1. Influence of lime on struvite formation and nitrogen conservation during food waste composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed at investigating the feasibility of supplementing lime with struvite salts to reduce ammonia emission and salinity consequently to accelerate the compost maturity. Composting was performed in 20-L bench-scale reactors for 35days using artificial food waste mixed with sawdust at 1.2:1 (w/w dry basis), and Mg and P salts (MgO and K2HPO4, respectively). Nitrogen loss was significantly reduced from 44.3% to 27.4% during composting through struvite formation even with the addition of lime. Lime addition significantly reduced the salinity to less than 4mS/cm with a positive effect on improving compost maturity. Thus addition of both lime and struvite salts synergistically provide advantages to buffer the pH, reduce ammonia emission and salinity, and accelerate food waste composting.

  2. Separation of hemicellulose-derived saccharides from wood hydrolysate by lime and ion exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojun; Zhuang, Jingshun; Fu, Yingjuan; Tian, Guoyu; Wang, Zhaojiang; Qin, Menghua

    2016-04-01

    A combined process of lime treatment and mixed bed ion exchange was proposed to separate hemicellulose-derived saccharides (HDS) from prehydrolysis liquor (PHL) of lignocellulose as value added products. The optimization of lime treatment achieved up to 44.2% removal of non-saccharide organic compounds (NSOC), mainly colloidal substances, with negligible HDS degradation at 0.5% lime level and subsequent neutralization by phosphoric acid. The residual NSOC and calcium ions in lime-treated PHL were eliminated by mixed bed ion exchange. The breakthrough curves of HDS and NSOC showed selective retention toward NSOC, leading to 75% HDS recovery with 95% purity at 17 bed volumes of exchange capacity. In addition, macroporous resin showed higher exchange capacity than gel resin as indicated by the triple processing volume. The remarkable selectivity of the combined process suggested the feasibility for HDS separation from PHL.

  3. The potential roles of lime and molybdenum on the growth, nitrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-04-26

    Apr 26, 2010 ... Experiments with soybean have shown that molybdenum fertilization in .... Evidence in the literature shows that lime, organic and different ...... Foliar application of molybdenum in common beans. I. Nitrogenase and reductase ...

  4. The effect of reuse of unhairing-liming residual floats through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-03

    Sep 3, 2008 ... ISSN 1684–5315 © 2008 Academic Journals. Full Length Research Paper. The effect of reuse of unhairing-liming residual floats through regeneration on ... employ both enormous volume of water and hazardous chemicals ...

  5. Alleviation of Subsoil Acidity of Red Soil in Southeast China with Lime and Gypsum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNBO; R.MOREAU; 等

    1998-01-01

    Application of lime or gypsum is a common agricultrual practice to ameliorate soils with low pH which prohibits crop prduction,Its integrated effect on soil properties in a red soil derved from Quaternary red clay in Southeast China is discussed in this paper,Application of gypsum in the topsoil without leaching raised soil pH and promoted the production of soil NH4,but lime addition had a contrary effect.Generally,application of lime and /or gypsum has little on soil electrical properties.Gypsum had a little effect on soil exchange complex and its effect went down to 30 cm in depth ,The effect of lime reached only to 5 cm below its application layer.With leaching,Ca transferred from top soil to subsoil and decreased exchangeable Al in subsiol.Gypsum application led to a sharp decrease in soil exchangeable Mg but had no effect on K.

  6. Strength Studies of Dadri Fly Ash Modified with Lime Sludge – A Composite Material

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    Vaishali Sahu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work is to prepare a new type of fly ash–lime sludge composite totally composed with industrial by-products which can be utilized as road construction material. The lime sludge content was varied from 10% to 50% (at an interval of 10% and the various composites were tested for unconfined compressive strength after 7 and 28 days curing period. The mix formula of this composite was optimized based on maximum strength and equal utilization of both the by-products. The composite with optimal mix formula (fly ash/lime sludge =1:1 results in highest strength. This paper outlines the characteristics of fly ash and lime sludge, method of preparation of compaction specimen and unconfined compression test specimen, testing procedure and salient results thereof. The strength formation mechanism of this composite is discussed. This composite can be further engineered as road construction material with competitive properties.

  7. Estimating Magic Numbers Larger Than 126 by Fermi-Yang Liming Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xian-Hui; ZHOU Zhi-Ning; ZHONG Yu-Shu; YANG Ze-Sen

    2001-01-01

    The Fermi Yang Liming method is followed and developed to estimate new magic numbers in nuclei with a Woods Saxon density function. The calculated results predict that the magic number next to 126 should be around 184 and 258.

  8. Final Rule to Reduce Toxic Air Emissions from Lime Manufacturing Plants Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains an August 2003 fact sheet with information regarding the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Lime Manufacturing Plants. This document provides a summary of the information for this NESHAP.

  9. Evaluation of bioaerosol components, generation factors, and airborne transport associated with lime treatment of contaminated sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Edwin F; Reponen, Tiina; Succop, Paul

    2009-05-01

    Lime treatment has been used in contaminated sediment management activities for many purposes such as dewatering, improvement of physical properties, and reducing contaminant mobility. Exothermic volatilization of volatile organic compounds from lime-treated sediment is well known, but potential aerosolization of bioaerosol components has not been evaluated. A physical model of a contaminated sediment treatment and airborne transport process and an experimental protocol were developed to identify specific bioaerosol components (bacteria, fungi, cell structural components, and particles) that may be aerosolized and transported. Key reaction variables (amount of lime addition, rate of lime addition, mixing energy supplied) that may affect the aerosolization of bioaerosol components were evaluated. Lime treatment of a sediment contaminated with heavy metals, petroleum-based organics, and microorganisms increased the sediment pH and solids content. Lime treatment reduced the number of water-extractable bacteria and fungi in the sediment from approximately 10(6) colony-forming units (CFU) x mL(-1) to less than the detection limit of 10(3) CFU x mL(-1). This reduction was seen immediately for bacteria and within 21 days for fungi. Lime treatment immediately reduced the amount of endotoxin in the sediment, but the effects of lime treatment on beta-D-glucan could not be determined. The temperature of the treated sediment was linearly related to the amount of lime added within the range of 0-25%. Bacteria were aerosolized during the treatment trials, but there was no culturable evidence of aerosolization of fungi, most likely because of either their particular growth stage or relatively larger particle size that reduced their aerosolization potential and their collection into the impingers. Nonbiological particles, endotoxin, and beta-D-glucan were not detected in air samples during the treatment trials. The amount of lime added to the reaction beaker and the relative

  10. THE TRIASSIC/JURASSIC BOUNDARY IN THE ANDES OF ARGENTINA

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    ALBERTO C. RICCARDI

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The Arroyo Malo Formation at Alumbre Creek, on the northern bank of the Atuel River, west central Argentina, comprises a c. 300 m thick continuous marine succession across the Triassic-Jurassic System boundary, consisting of massive and laminated pelites indicative of a slope depositional environment. Late Triassic invertebrates, including ammonoids, nautiloids, bivalves, gastropods, brachiopods and corals are restricted to the lower 150 m. Beds between 125-135 m from the bottom yield Choristoceras cf. marshi Hauer, a species found in the Marshi/Crickmayi Zone of Europe and North America, together with loose fragments of Psiloceras cf. pressum Hillebrandt, coeval with the lower to middle part of the Hettangian Planorbis Zone. About 80 m higher are beds yielding Psiloceras cf. rectocostatum Hillebrandt, a species that gives name to an Andean biozone partially coeval with the Johnstoni and Plicatulum Subzones, upper Planorbis Zone. Other fossils recorded in the Rhaetian strata of this section are foraminifers, ostracods and plant remains identified as Zuberia cf. zuberi (Szaj. Freng. and Clathropteris sp. The section was also sampled for conodonts and radiolarians, thus far with negative results. A palaeomagnetic study is underway.

  11. Post-Jurassic mammal-like reptile from the Palaeocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, R C; Youzwyshyn, G P; Krause, D W

    1992-07-16

    Mammal-like reptiles of the order Therapsida document the emergence of mammals from more primitive synapsids and are of unique zoological and palaeontological interest on that account. Therapsids, first appearing in the Early Permian, were thought to become extinct in the Middle Jurassic, soon after the Late Triassic origin of mammals. Here, however, we report the discovery of a therapsid from the late Palaeocene, 100 million years younger than the youngest previous occurrence of the order. This discovery nearly doubles the stratigraphic range of therapsids and furnishes their first record from the Cenozoic. The documenting fossils, an incomplete dentary containing three teeth, and four isolated teeth from other, conspecific individuals (Fig. 1), are from the Paskapoo Formation, at Cochrane, Alberta, Canada, from beds yielding a diverse mammalian fauna of early Tiffanian age. These specimens are catalogued in the collections of the University of Alberta Laboratory for Vertebrate Paleontology (UALVP) and provide the basis for a new taxon, as named and described below: (see text)

  12. Boron-containing organic pigments from a Jurassic red alga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkenstein, Klaus; Gross, Jürgen H.; Falk, Heinz

    2010-01-01

    Organic biomolecules that have retained their basic chemical structures over geological periods (molecular fossils) occur in a wide range of geological samples and provide valuable paleobiological, paleoenvironmental, and geochemical information not attainable from other sources. In rare cases, such compounds are even preserved with their specific functional groups and still occur within the organisms that produced them, providing direct information on the biochemical inventory of extinct organisms and their possible evolutionary relationships. Here we report the discovery of an exceptional group of boron-containing compounds, the borolithochromes, causing the distinct pink coloration of well-preserved specimens of the Jurassic red alga Solenopora jurassica. The borolithochromes are characterized as complicated spiroborates (boric acid esters) with two phenolic moieties as boron ligands, representing a unique class of fossil organic pigments. The chiroptical properties of the pigments unequivocally demonstrate a biogenic origin, at least of their ligands. However, although the borolithochromes originated from a fossil red alga, no analogy with hitherto known present-day red algal pigments was found. The occurrence of the borolithochromes or their possible diagenetic products in the fossil record may provide additional information on the classification and phylogeny of fossil calcareous algae. PMID:20974956

  13. Eurycormus – Eurypoma, two Jurassic actinopterygian genera with mixed identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Arratia

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Three Late Jurassic actinopterygian species are commonly placed in the genus Eurycormus: E. egertoni, E. grandis and E. speciosus. A detailed comparison supports an earlier assignment to two different genera, Eurycormus Wagner, 1863 (speciosus and Eurypoma Huxley, 1866 (E. egertoni and E. grande. Systematically, the two genera are only distantly related; Eurycormus belongs to the Teleosteomorpha, whereas Eurypoma is a halecomorph closely related to or a member of the Caturoidea within the Amiiformes. Drei oberjurassische Actinopterygier-Arten, egertoni, grandis und speciosus, werden gewöhnlich zur Gattung Eurycormus gestellt. Ein detaillierter Vergleich der drei Arten bestätigt eine frühere Zuordnung zu zwei verschiedenen Gattungen, Eurycormus Wagner, 1863 (speciosus und Eurypoma Huxley, 1866 (E. egertoni und E. grande, die zwei höheren Taxa innerhalb der Neopterygii zugeordnet werden: Eurycormus zu den Teleosteomorpha und Eurypoma zu den Amiiformes innerhalb der Halecomorphi, möglicherweise nahe oder innerhalb der Caturoidea. doi:10.1002/mmng.200600016

  14. Ichnological evidence of Megalosaurid Dinosaurs Crossing Middle Jurassic Tidal Flats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzolini, Novella L; Oms, Oriol; Castanera, Diego; Vila, Bernat; Santos, Vanda Faria Dos; Galobart, Àngel

    2016-08-19

    A new dinosaur tracksite in the Vale de Meios quarry (Serra de Aire Formation, Bathonian, Portugal)preserves more than 700 theropod tracks. They are organized in at least 80 unidirectional trackways arranged in a bimodal orientation pattern (W/NW and E/SE). Quantitative and qualitative comparisons reveal that the large tridactyl, elongated and asymmetric tracks resemble the typical Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Megalosauripus ichnogenus in all morphometric parameters. Few of the numerous tracks are preserved as elite tracks while the rest are preserved as different gradients of modified true tracks according to water content, erosive factors, radial fractures and internal overtrack formations. Taphonomical determinations are consistent with paleoenvironmental observations that indicate an inter-tidal flat located at the margin of a coastal barrier. The Megalosauripus tracks represent the oldest occurrence of this ichnotaxon and are attributed to large megalosaurid dinosaurs. Their occurrence in Vale de Meios tidal flat represents the unique paleoethological evidence of megalosaurids moving towards the lagoon, most likley during the low tide periods with feeding purposes.

  15. Ichnological evidence of Megalosaurid Dinosaurs Crossing Middle Jurassic Tidal Flats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzolini, Novella L.; Oms, Oriol; Castanera, Diego; Vila, Bernat; Santos, Vanda Faria Dos; Galobart, Àngel

    2016-08-01

    A new dinosaur tracksite in the Vale de Meios quarry (Serra de Aire Formation, Bathonian, Portugal)preserves more than 700 theropod tracks. They are organized in at least 80 unidirectional trackways arranged in a bimodal orientation pattern (W/NW and E/SE). Quantitative and qualitative comparisons reveal that the large tridactyl, elongated and asymmetric tracks resemble the typical Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Megalosauripus ichnogenus in all morphometric parameters. Few of the numerous tracks are preserved as elite tracks while the rest are preserved as different gradients of modified true tracks according to water content, erosive factors, radial fractures and internal overtrack formations. Taphonomical determinations are consistent with paleoenvironmental observations that indicate an inter-tidal flat located at the margin of a coastal barrier. The Megalosauripus tracks represent the oldest occurrence of this ichnotaxon and are attributed to large megalosaurid dinosaurs. Their occurrence in Vale de Meios tidal flat represents the unique paleoethological evidence of megalosaurids moving towards the lagoon, most likley during the low tide periods with feeding purposes.

  16. Lower Jurassic beds with bivalves in south Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Debeljak

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available The Lower Jurassic beds of south Slovenia outcrop on a surface of several hundred km^ with their thickness in places exceeding 300 meters. They were deposited on the Dinaric Carbonate Platform. In them rich accumulations of characteristic bivalves occur that in Pliensbachian and Toarcian inhabited the wide interconnected shallow water regions of the western and southern margins of Tethysand the eastern Pacific. The most interesting are three large bivalve species:Lithiotis problematica, Cochlearites loppianus and Lithiopedalion scutatus.In addition, numerous other genera can be found: Gervilleiopema, Mytilus, Opisoma and Pachyrisma (with subgenera Pachymegalodon and Durga.The bivalves formed in the region of south Slovenia, in the prevailingly quiet environment of the restricted shelf, sea-bottom mats or biostromes. Their shells can be only rarely found in their growth position. The horizon with bivalves ("lithiotid horizon" in south Slovenia is attributed to Pliensbachian (Domerian. It isup to 75 metres thick and it almost does not pinch out. Within it individual lumachelles of bivalves occur which are from several centimetres to ten metres thick.They are almost exclusively associated with dark, micritic, in places marly limestone and bituminous dolomite. The biodiversity in lumachelles is very low. The intermediate beds that do not contain bivalves mostly consist of oolitic and biospariticlimestone. In this article some localities from various areas of the carbonate platform are described. Considered are paleogeographical and paleoecological conditions that permitted the existence of this typical bivalve fauna.

  17. Neuroanatomy of the marine Jurassic turtle Plesiochelys etalloni (Testudinata, Plesiochelyidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabajal, Ariana Paulina; Sterli, Juliana; Müller, Johannes; Hilger, André

    2013-01-01

    Turtles are one of the least explored clades regarding endocranial anatomy with few available descriptions of the brain and inner ear of extant representatives. In addition, the paleoneurology of extinct turtles is poorly known and based on only a few natural cranial endocasts. The main goal of this study is to provide for the first time a detailed description of the neuroanatomy of an extinct turtle, the Late Jurassic Plesiochelysetalloni, including internal carotid circulation, cranial endocast and inner ear, based on the first digital 3D reconstruction using micro CT scans. The general shape of the cranial endocast of P. etalloni is tubular, with poorly marked cephalic and pontine flexures. Anteriorly, the olfactory bulbs are clearly differentiated suggesting larger bulbs than in any other described extinct or extant turtle, and indicating a higher capacity of olfaction in this taxon. The morphology of the inner ear of P. etalloni is comparable to that of extant turtles and resembles those of slow-moving terrestrial vertebrates, with markedly low, short and robust semicircular canals, and a reduced lagena. In P. etalloni the arterial pattern is similar to that found in extant cryptodires, where all the internal carotid branches are protected by bone. As the knowledge of paleoneurology in turtles is scarce and the application of modern techniques such as 3D reconstructions based on CT scans is almost unexplored in this clade, we hope this paper will trigger similar investigations of this type in other turtle taxa.

  18. The Cost Implications of Replacing Soda Lime with Amsorb Plus in Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Osman Ahmed; Stephen Mannion

    2011-01-01

    Background and Goal of the Study. Desiccated soda lime is known to produce toxic compounds when interacting with volatile anesthetic agents. Amsorb Plus does not produce these but is more expensive per unit weight. Materials and Methods. In a prospective cross-over study, we evaluated the cost of using soda lime (Spherasorb, Intersurgical, UK) and Amsorb Plus. In four operating theatres over two 4-week periods, one for each product, we measured sevoflurane consumption, amount of absorbent use...

  19. Stabilization of Free Lime in BOF Slag by Melting and Solidification in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunwei; Guo, Muxing; Pandelaers, Lieven; Blanpain, Bart; Huang, Shuigen

    2016-12-01

    The present study reports on the mineralogy of BOF slag after melting and solidification under Ar and air atmosphere. Results indicate that free lime can be effectively stabilized in air without additional stabilizers like SiO2. The stabilization mechanism was analyzed, and the role of the oxygen partial pressure was explored. Wustite is believed to be oxidized to hematite under high oxygen partial pressure and then stabilizes the free lime by forming brownmillerite.

  20. Calculation of k factor function for the carbonation process of lime-based plasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlíková, Milena; Pokorný, Jaroslav; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2017-07-01

    The carbonation process of prepared lime plaster and lime based plaster with pozzolana active metakaolin is performed in an accelerated test arrangement. The depth of carbonation head is determined using colorimetric method and FTIR spectroscopy. Based on experimental data of carbonation head, time dependent k factor function is calculated that points to the decelerated and retarded propagation of the carbonation process due to metakaolin used in plaster composition.

  1. Evaluation of air lime and clayish earth mortars for earthen wall renders

    OpenAIRE

    Faria, Paulina; Silva, Vitor; Jamú, Naila; Dias, Inês; Gomes, M. Idália

    2013-01-01

    CIAV2013 – International Conference on Vernacular Architecture, 7º ATP, VerSus, 16-20 october 2013 An experimental rammed earth wall was traditionally made with local earth and characterized in terms of superficial hardness, compactness, thermal conductivity and water absorption, in exterior environmental conditions. Two mortars were made with an air lime and a mixture of three washed graduated siliceous sands, with volumetric proportions of 1:2 and 1:3 (air lime:sand). A clayish earth was...

  2. STUDY ON CORROSION RESISTANCE OF REBAR IN HYBRID GRINDING FLY ASH-LIME SILICATE CONCRETE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of rebar in fly ash-lime sili cate concrete as well as its marco properties and pore distribution is investiga ted.The results show that the fly ash is activated, the compressive strength of the silicate concrete is strengthened and its pore structure is modified after f ly ash and lime being hybrid ground.Also the corrosion resistance of rebar in the silicate concrete is improved.

  3. Nature of Soil Acidity in Relation to Properties and Lime Requirement of Some Inceptisols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. K. DOLUI; S. BHATTACHARJEE

    2003-01-01

    Some Inceptisols representing the Singla catchment area in Karimgaunge district of Assam, India, were studied for lime requirement as influenced by the nature of soil acidity. The electrostatically bonded (EB)-H+ and EB-Al3+ acidities constituted 33 and 67 percent of exchangeable acidity while EB-H+, EB-Al3+,exchangeable and pH-dependent acidities comprised 6, 14, 20 and 80 percent of total potential acidity. The pH-dependent acidity made a major contribution towards the total potential acidity (67%~84%). Grand mean of lime requirement determined by the laboratory incubation method and estimated by the methods of New Woodruff, Woodruff and Peech as expressed in MgCaCO3 ha-1 was in the order: Woodruff (15.6) > New Woodruff (14.9) > Peech (5.1) > incubation (5.0). Correlations analysis among different forms of acidity and lime requirement methods with selected soil properties showed that pH in three media, namely water, 1 mol L-1 KCl and 0.01 mol L-1 CaCl2, had a significant negative correlation with different forms of acidity and lime requirement methods. Exchangeable Fe and Al showed significant positive correlations with EB-Al3+ acidity, exchangeable acidity, pH-dependent acidity and total potential acidity, and also lime requirement methods. Extractable Al showed positive correlations with different forms of acidity except EB-H+ and EB-Al3+ acidities. The lime requirement by different methods depended upon the extractable aluminium.Significant positive correlations existed between lime requirements and different forms of acidity of the soils except EB-H+ acidity and incubation method. The nature of soil acidity was mostly pH-dependent. Statistically, the Woodruff method did slightly better than the New Woodruff, incubation and Peech methods at estimating lime requirement and hence the Woodruff procedure may be recommended for routine soil testing because of its speed and simplicity.

  4. Effects of lime and concrete waste on Vadose Zone carbon cycling

    OpenAIRE

    Thaysen, Eike Marie; Jessen, Søren; Postma, D; Jakobsen, R.; Jacques, D; Ambus, Per; E. Laloy; Jakobsen, Iver

    2014-01-01

    In this work we investigate how lime and crushed concrete waste (CCW) affect carbon cycling in the vadose zone and explore whether these amendments could be employed to mitigate climate change by increasing the transport of CO2 from the atmosphere to the groundwater. We use a combination of experimental and modeling tools to determine ongoing biogeochemical processes. Our results demonstrate that lime and CCW amendments to acid soil contribute to the climate forcing by largely increasing the ...

  5. Evaluating and quantifying the liming potential of phosphate rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, F.J. [Division of Regulatory Services, Soil Testing Laboratory, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)]. E-mail: fsikora@ca.uky.edu

    2002-05-15

    The liming potential of phosphate rock was evaluated with theoretical calculations and quantified by laboratory titration and soil incubation. Three anions present in the carbonate apatite structure of phosphate rock that can consume protons and cause an increase in pH when dissolved from apatite are PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, and F{sup -}. The pKa for HF is so low that F{sup -} has very little effect on increasing pH. The pKa for 2 protons on H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup -} and H{sub 2}CO{sub 3} are sufficiently high enough to cause an increase in pH with PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} released into solution if the pH range is between 4 and 6. Because of the greater molar quantity of PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} compared toCO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} exerts a greater affect on the liming potential of P rock. For a variety of phosphate rocks with a axes ranging from 9.322 to 9.374 A in the carbonate apatite structure, the theoretical % calcium carbonate equivalence (CCE) ranges from 59.5 to 62%. With the presence of gangue carbonate minerals from 2.5 to 10% on a weight basis in the phosphate rocks, the theoretical %CCE ranges from 59.5 to 63.1%. Use of AOAC method 955.01 for quantifying the %CCE of North Carolina phosphate rock (NCPR) and Idaho phosphate rock (IDPR) resulted in %CCE ranging from 39.9 to 53.7% which were less than the theoretical values. The lower values measured in the AOAC method was presumed to be due to formation of CaHPO{sub 4} or CaHPO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O precipitates which would result in less than 2 protons neutralized per mole of PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} released from carbonate apatite. The highly concentrated solution formed in the method was considered not indicative of a soil solution and thus determined %CCE values would be suspect. A soil incubation study was conducted to determine a more appropriate %CCE value in a soil environment using Copper Basin, Tennessee soil with a soil pH of 4.2. Agricultural limestone, NCPR

  6. Evolution of the water chemistry of Lake Orta after liming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele A. TARTARI

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Since 1963 Lake Orta has been an emblematic case of industrial pollution by heavy metals and acidifying compounds (ammonium sulphate, to the extent that up to 1989 it was the largest acidified deep lake in the world. The low pH values of between 3.9 and 4.4 helped to keep high the levels of toxic compounds in solution, such as copper, aluminium, zinc and nickel. The liming performed in 1989-1990 brought the pH back to neutral values, determining the precipitation of the metals and the recovery of normal chemical conditions. The main results of researches conducted continuously on the lake water chemistry from 1988 to March 2000 are as follows. The whole water mass has been completely neutralised since the beginning of 1991; pH subsequently rose until in 1999-2000 it reached the values (6.7-6.9 units of the years when the lake was in a natural condition. The alkaline reserve showed a continuous increase after the lake water was neutralised, until March 2000, when total alkalinity values levelled off at 0.19 meq l-1. The increase in pH has allowed a full recovery of nitrification processes; in fact, during the liming period the concentration of ammonium was drastically reduced, by over 80%; ammonium has been practically absent since the end of 1992, and it may be affirmed that the primary cause of the acidification of the lake has been completely removed. The nitrate content in the lake has almost halved compared with the mean concentrations measured before the liming; in March 2000 mean values of 2.0 mg N l-1 were measured, and it is likely that these values will fall further in the next few years, to below 1.5 mg N l-1. The concentrations of toxic metals have shown a progressive reduction, to the extent that in 1999 the content of copper and aluminium was close to zero in the whole water mass. The situation of Lake Orta has therefore improved enormously, and is now very similar to the original condition of the lake before it was polluted

  7. Jurassic sedimentary evolution of southern Junggar Basin:Implication for palaeoclimate changes in northern Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-Li Li; Xing-He Yu; Cheng-Peng Tan; Ronald Steel

    2014-01-01

    Junggar Basin, located in northern Xinjiang, presents continuous and multi-kilometer-thick strata of the Jurassic deposits. The Jurassic was entirely terrestrial lfuvial and lacustrine deltaic sedimentation. Eight outcrop sections across the Jurassic strata were meas-ured at a resolution of meters in southern Junggar Basin. Controlling factors of sedimentary evolution and palaeoclimate changes in Junggar Basin during the Jurassic were discussed based on lithology, fossils and tectonic setting. In the Early to Middle Jurassic, the warm and wide Tethys Sea generated a strong monsoonal circulation over the central Asian continent, and provided adequate moisture for Junggar Basin. Coal-bearing strata of the Badaowan, Sangonghe, and Xishanyao Formations were developed under warm and humid palaeocli-mate in Junggar Basin. In the late Middle Jurassic, Junggar Basin was in a semi-humid and semi-arid environment due to global warming event. Stratigraphy in the upper part of the Mid-dle Jurassic with less plant fossils became multicolor or reddish from dark color sediments. During the Late Jurassic, collision of Lhasa and Qiangtang Block obstructed monsoon from the Tethys Sea. A major change in climate from semi-humid and semi-arid to arid conditions took place, and reddish strata of the Upper Jurassic were developed across Junggar Basin.

  8. Jurassic sedimentary evolution of southern Junggar Basin:Implication for palaeoclimate changes in northern Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-Li; Li; Xing-He; Yu; Cheng-Peng; Tan; Ronald; Steel

    2014-01-01

    Junggar Basin,located in northern Xinjiang,presents continuous and multikilometer-thick strata of the Jurassic deposits.The Jurassic was entirely terrestrial fluvial and lacustrine deltaic sedimentation.Eight outcrop sections across the Jurassic strata were measured at a resolution of meters in southern Junggar Basin.Controlling factors of sedimentary evolution and palaeoclimate changes in Junggar Basin during the Jurassic were discussed based on lithology,fossils and tectonic setting.In the Early to Middle Jurassic,the warm and wide Tethys Sea generated a strong monsoonal circulation over the central Asian continent,and provided adequate moisture for Junggar Basin.Coal-bearing strata of the Badaowan,Sangonghe,and Xishanyao Formations were developed under warm and humid palaeoclimate in Junggar Basin.In the late Middle Jurassic,Junggar Basin was in a semi-humid and semi-arid environment due to global warming event.Stratigraphy in the upper part of the Middle Jurassic with less plant fossils became multicolor or reddish from dark color sediments.During the Late Jurassic,collision of Lhasa and Qiangtang Block obstructed monsoon from the Tethys Sea.A major change in climate from semi-humid and semi-arid to arid conditions took place,and reddish strata of the Upper Jurassic were developed across Junggar Basin.

  9. Jurassic sedimentary evolution of southern Junggar Basin: Implication for palaeoclimate changes in northern Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Li Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Junggar Basin, located in northern Xinjiang, presents continuous and multikilometer-thick strata of the Jurassic deposits. The Jurassic was entirely terrestrial fluvial and lacustrine deltaic sedimentation. Eight outcrop sections across the Jurassic strata were measured at a resolution of meters in southern Junggar Basin. Controlling factors of sedimentary evolution and palaeoclimate changes in Junggar Basin during the Jurassic were discussed based on lithology, fossils and tectonic setting. In the Early to Middle Jurassic, the warm and wide Tethys Sea generated a strong monsoonal circulation over the central Asian continent, and provided adequate moisture for Junggar Basin. Coal-bearing strata of the Badaowan, Sangonghe, and Xishanyao Formations were developed under warm and humid palaeoclimate in Junggar Basin. In the late Middle Jurassic, Junggar Basin was in a semi-humid and semi-arid environment due to global warming event. Stratigraphy in the upper part of the Middle Jurassic with less plant fossils became multicolor or reddish from dark color sediments. During the Late Jurassic, collision of Lhasa and Qiangtang Block obstructed monsoon from the Tethys Sea. A major change in climate from semi-humid and semi-arid to arid conditions took place, and reddish strata of the Upper Jurassic were developed across Junggar Basin.

  10. A New Basal Sauropod Dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic of Niger and the Early Evolution of Sauropoda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remes, Kristian; Ortega, Francisco; Fierro, Ignacio; Joger, Ulrich; Kosma, Ralf; Marín Ferrer, José Manuel; Ide, Oumarou Amadou; Maga, Abdoulaye

    2009-01-01

    Background The early evolution of sauropod dinosaurs is poorly understood because of a highly incomplete fossil record. New discoveries of Early and Middle Jurassic sauropods have a great potential to lead to a better understanding of early sauropod evolution and to reevaluate the patterns of sauropod diversification. Principal Findings A new sauropod from the Middle Jurassic of Niger, Spinophorosaurus nigerensis n. gen. et sp., is the most complete basal sauropod currently known. The taxon shares many anatomical characters with Middle Jurassic East Asian sauropods, while it is strongly dissimilar to Lower and Middle Jurassic South American and Indian forms. A possible explanation for this pattern is a separation of Laurasian and South Gondwanan Middle Jurassic sauropod faunas by geographic barriers. Integration of phylogenetic analyses and paleogeographic data reveals congruence between early sauropod evolution and hypotheses about Jurassic paleoclimate and phytogeography. Conclusions Spinophorosaurus demonstrates that many putatively derived characters of Middle Jurassic East Asian sauropods are plesiomorphic for eusauropods, while South Gondwanan eusauropods may represent a specialized line. The anatomy of Spinophorosaurus indicates that key innovations in Jurassic sauropod evolution might have taken place in North Africa, an area close to the equator with summer-wet climate at that time. Jurassic climatic zones and phytogeography possibly controlled early sauropod diversification. PMID:19756139

  11. A new basal sauropod dinosaur from the middle Jurassic of Niger and the early evolution of sauropoda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Remes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The early evolution of sauropod dinosaurs is poorly understood because of a highly incomplete fossil record. New discoveries of Early and Middle Jurassic sauropods have a great potential to lead to a better understanding of early sauropod evolution and to reevaluate the patterns of sauropod diversification. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A new sauropod from the Middle Jurassic of Niger, Spinophorosaurus nigerensis n. gen. et sp., is the most complete basal sauropod currently known. The taxon shares many anatomical characters with Middle Jurassic East Asian sauropods, while it is strongly dissimilar to Lower and Middle Jurassic South American and Indian forms. A possible explanation for this pattern is a separation of Laurasian and South Gondwanan Middle Jurassic sauropod faunas by geographic barriers. Integration of phylogenetic analyses and paleogeographic data reveals congruence between early sauropod evolution and hypotheses about Jurassic paleoclimate and phytogeography. CONCLUSIONS: Spinophorosaurus demonstrates that many putatively derived characters of Middle Jurassic East Asian sauropods are plesiomorphic for eusauropods, while South Gondwanan eusauropods may represent a specialized line. The anatomy of Spinophorosaurus indicates that key innovations in Jurassic sauropod evolution might have taken place in North Africa, an area close to the equator with summer-wet climate at that time. Jurassic climatic zones and phytogeography possibly controlled early sauropod diversification.

  12. Studies on termite hill and lime as partial replacement for cement in plastering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olusola, K.O.; Olanipekun, E.A.; Ata, O.; Olateju, O.T. [Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Osun State (Nigeria). Department of Building

    2006-03-15

    This study investigated the compressive strength and water absorption capacity of 50x50x50mm mortar cubes made from mixes containing lime, termite hill and cement and sand. Two mix ratios (1:4 and 1:6) and varying binder replacements of cement with lime or termite hill amounting to 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% were used. Test results showed that the compressive strength of the mortar cubes increases with age and decreases with increasing percentage replacement of cement with lime and termite hill. However, for mix ratio 1:6, up to 20% replacement of cement with either lime or termite hill, all the mortar cubes had the same strength; subsequently, the termite hill exhibited a higher compressive strength. For mix ratio 1:4, mortar cubes made from lime/cement and termite hill/cement mixtures had the same strength at 50% replacement. Generally, water absorption is higher in mixtures containing lime (18.10% and 14.20% for mix ratios 1:6 and 1:4, respectively, both at 50% replacement level) than those containing termite hill (16.10% and 13.02% for mix ratios 1:6 and 1:4, respectively, both at 50% replacement level). Termite hills seem to be promising as a suitable, locally available housing material for plastering. (author)

  13. A novel eco-friendly technique for efficient control of lime water softening process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostovar, Mohamad; Amiri, Mohamad

    2013-12-01

    Lime softening is an established type of water treatment used for water softening. The performance of this process is highly dependent on lime dosage. Currently, lime dosage is adjusted manually based on chemical tests, aimed at maintaining the phenolphthalein (P) and total (M) alkalinities within a certain range (2 P - M > or = 5). In this paper, a critical study of the softening process has been presented. It has been shown that the current method is frequently incorrect. Furthermore, electrical conductivity (EC) has been introduced as a novel indicator for effectively characterizing the lime softening process.This novel technique has several advantages over the current alkalinities method. Because no chemical reagents are needed for titration, which is a simple test, there is a considerable reduction in test costs. Additionally, there is a reduction in the treated water hardness and generated sludge during the lime softening process. Therefore, it is highly eco-friendly, and is a very cost effective alternative technique for efficient control of the lime softening process.

  14. Lime muds and their genesis off-Northwestern India during the late Quaternary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Purnachandra Rao; A Anil Kumar; S W A Naqvi; Allan R Chivas; B Sekar; Pratima M Kessarkar

    2012-06-01

    Two sediment types were found in five gravity cores collected from water depths between 56 m and 121 m along the northwestern continental margin of India: lime muds were abundant in the lower section while siliciclastic sediments dominated the upper section. Lime mud-dominated sediments in shelf cores contained 60%–75% carbonate, 0.3%–0.6% Sr and terrigenous minerals, whereas those at the shelf break were found to have < 90% carbonate, 0.6%–0.8% Sr and traces of terrigenous minerals. Aragonite needles showing blunt edges, jointed needles and needles wrapped in smooth aragonite cement were found to be common. Stable (O and C) isotopes of lime mud indicate a potentially freshwater contribution for shelf cores and purely marine contribution for those at the shelf break. Calibrated radiocarbon ages of the lime muds ranged from 17.6–11.9 ka in different cores. The results reported here suggest that the lime muds in the shallow shelf are probably reworked from the Gulf of Kachchh, whereas those at the shelf break were biodetrital, initially formed on the carbonate platform during low stands of sea level and then exported. The change in lime mud-dominated to siliciclastic-dominated sediments in the cores may be due to climate change and rapid rise in sea level during the early Holocene.

  15. Liming effect in the degradation of 14C-glyphosate in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arantes, Sayonara A.C.M.; Lavorenti, Arquimedes [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz]. E-mails: samoreno@esalq.usp.br; alavoren@esalq.usp.br; Tornisielo, Valdemar L. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: vltornis@cena.usp.br

    2007-07-01

    Liming is soil fertility management practice essential in tropical soils, in general extremely acidic. This practice, by influencing physical, chemical and biological features of soils may influence the behavior of organic molecules in soils. The glyphosate is one the most widely used pesticides in Brazil in several cultures to pest management control. Studies on its fate in soil are still incipient, mainly under the effect of liming practice The objective of the present study was to verify the effect of liming practice in the degradation of glyphosate in Red Latosol (LE) and Quartzarenic Neosol (RQ) soils and also in the microbial activity of the same soils. The experiment was conducted in a completely randomized design in a 2 x 2 factorial scheme, corresponding to two soils and two management conditions (with liming and without liming), with four replicates. The Radiometric technique was utilized to evaluate the evolution the {sup 14}CO{sub 2} at intervals of 7 days, during 70 days. The study of microbial activity was conducted parallel to the degradation experiment, using the methodology of radiolabelled glucose ({sup 14}C-glucose), which was measured at intervals of fourteen days, during 70 days. The results showed that in the studied soils, the liming increased the {sup 14}C-glyphosate mineralization and the microbial activity. (author)

  16. Potassium supply to cotton roots as affected by potassium fertilization and liming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosolem Ciro Antonio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum is known to have a high requirement for K and to be very sensitive to low soil pH. Most of K reaches plant roots by diffusion in the soil. As K interacts with Ca and Mg, liming can interfere in K movement in the soil, affecting eventually the plant nutrition. The objective of this work was to study the effect of dolomitic lime and 0, 15, 30, 45 and 60 g kg-1 of K on the supply of K to cotton roots. Cotton plants were grown up to 40 days in 5 L pots containing a Dark Red Latosol (Typic Haplusthox with 68% and 16% of sand and clay, respectively. There was an increase in dry matter yields and in K accumulation due to K fertilization. Root interception of soil K was also increased by K application, but was not affected by lime. Mass flow and diffusion increased linearly with K levels up to 60 mg kg-1, in pots with lime. In pots without lime the amount of K reaching the roots by diffusion increased up to 45 mg kg-1, but decreased at the highest K level. Accordingly, there was more K reaching the roots through mass flow at the highest K level. This happened because there were more fine roots in pots without lime, at the highest K level. As the roots grew closer, there was a stronger root competition leading to a decrease in the amount of K diffused to cotton roots.

  17. An introduction to LIME 1.0 and its use in coupling codes for multiphysics simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belcourt, Noel; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Hooper, Russell Warren

    2011-11-01

    LIME is a small software package for creating multiphysics simulation codes. The name was formed as an acronym denoting 'Lightweight Integrating Multiphysics Environment for coupling codes.' LIME is intended to be especially useful when separate computer codes (which may be written in any standard computer language) already exist to solve different parts of a multiphysics problem. LIME provides the key high-level software (written in C++), a well defined approach (with example templates), and interface requirements to enable the assembly of multiple physics codes into a single coupled-multiphysics simulation code. In this report we introduce important software design characteristics of LIME, describe key components of a typical multiphysics application that might be created using LIME, and provide basic examples of its use - including the customized software that must be written by a user. We also describe the types of modifications that may be needed to individual physics codes in order for them to be incorporated into a LIME-based multiphysics application.

  18. Middle Jurassic Topawa group, Baboquivari Mountains, south-central Arizona: Volcanic and sedimentary record of deep basins within the Jurassic magmatic arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxel, G.B.; Wright, J.E.; Riggs, N.R.; Tosdal, R.M.; May, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    Among supracrustal sequences of the Jurassic magmatic arc of the southwestern Cordillera, the Middle Jurassic Topawa Group, Baboquivari Mountains, south-central Arizona, is remarkable for its lithologic diversity and substantial stratigraphic thickness, ???8 km. The Topawa Group comprises four units (in order of decreasing age): (1) Ali Molina Formation-largely pyroclastic rhyolite with interlayered eolian and fluvial arenite, and overlying conglomerate and sandstone; (2) Pitoikam Formation-conglomerate, sedimentary breccia, and sandstone overlain by interbedded silt- stone and sandstone; (3) Mulberry Wash Formation-rhyolite lava flows, flow breccias, and mass-flow breccias, with intercalated intraformational conglomerate, sedimentary breccia, and sandstone, plus sparse within-plate alkali basalt and comendite in the upper part; and (4) Tinaja Spring Porphyry-intrusive rhyolite. The Mulberry Wash alkali basalt and comendite are genetically unrelated to the dominant calcalkaline rhyolite. U-Pb isotopic analyses of zircon from volcanic and intrusive rocks indicate the Topawa Group, despite its considerable thickness, represents only several million years of Middle Jurassic time, between approximately 170 and 165 Ma. Sedimentary rocks of the Topawa Group record mixing of detritus from a minimum of three sources: a dominant local source of porphyritic silicic volcanic and subvolcanic rocks, identical or similar to those of the Topawa Group itself; Meso- proterozoic or Cambrian conglomerates in central or southeast Arizona, which contributed well-rounded, highly durable, polycyclic quartzite pebbles; and eolian sand fields, related to Middle Jurassic ergs that lay to the north of the magmatic arc and are now preserved on the Colorado Plateau. As the Topawa Group evidently represents only a relatively short interval of time, it does not record long-term evolution of the Jurassic magmatic arc, but rather represents a Middle Jurassic "stratigraphic snapshot" of the arc

  19. Development of a three-dimensional CFD model for rotary lime kilns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lixin Tao; Blom, Roger (FS Dynamics Sweden AB, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Nordgren, Daniel (Innventia, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-11-15

    In the calcium loop of the recovery cycle in a Kraft process of pulp and paper production, rotary lime kilns are used to convert the lime mud, mainly CaCO3, back to quick lime, CaO, for re-use in the causticizing process. The lime kilns are one of the major energy consumption devices for paper and pulp industry. Because of the rising oil price and new emission limits, the pulp mills have been forced to look for alternative fuels for their lime kilns. One interesting alternative to oil, often easily available at pulp mills, is biofuels such as sawdust and bark. However the practical kiln operation often encounters some difficulties because of the uncertainties around the biofuel impact on the lime kiln performance. A deeper understanding of the flame characteristics is required when shifting from oil to biofuels. Fortunately recent advances in modern Computational Fluid Dynamics, CFD, have provided the possibility to study and predict the detailed flame characteristics regarding the lime kiln performance. In this project a three-dimensional CFD model for rotary lime kilns has been developed. To simulate a rotary lime kiln the developed CFD model integrates the three essential sub-models, i.e. the freeboard hot flow model, the lime bed model and the rotating refractory wall model and it is developed based on the modern CFD package: FLUENT which is commercially available on the market. The numerical simulations using the developed CFD model have been performed for three selected kiln operations fired with three different fuel mixtures. The predicted results from the CFD modelling are presented and discussed in order to compare the impacts on the kiln performance due to the different firing conditions. During the development, the lime kiln at the Soedra Cell Moensteraas mill has been used as reference kiln. To validate the CFD model, in-plant measurements were carried out in the Moensteraas lime kiln during an experiment campaign. The results obtained from the

  20. Reductive spectrophotometry of divalent tin sensitization on soda lime glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejugam, Vinith; Wei, Xingfei; Roper, D. Keith

    2016-07-01

    Rapid and facile evaluation of tin (II) sensitization could lead to improved understanding of metal deposition in electroless (EL) plating. This report used a balanced redox reaction between 3,3‧,5,5‧-tetramethylbenzidine dihydrochloride (TMB-HCL) and N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) to evaluate effects of sensitization conditions (i.e., sensitization time, analyte concentration, aqueous immersion, and acid content) on the accumulated mass of surface-associated divalent tin ion. The accumulated mass of tin (II) increased as the sensitization time increased up to 30 s in proportion to aqueous tin (II) chloride concentrations between 2.6 and 26 mM at a trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) content of 68 mM. The average mass peaked at 7.3 nanomoles (nmol) per cm2 after a 5 s aqueous immersion post-sensitization, and then decreased with increasing aqueous immersion post-sensitization. The total average tin (II) + tin (IV) accumulated on soda lime glass measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) was 17% higher at 30 s sensitization, suggesting a fraction of the tin (II) present may have oxidized to tin (IV). These results indicated that in situ spectrophotometric evaluation of tin (II) could support development of EL plating for electronics, catalysis, and solar cells.

  1. Soda-lime glass behavior under laser shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loison, D.; Guin, J.-P.; Sangleboeuf, J.-C.; Nivard, M.; Lescoute, E.; Sollier, A.; Seisson, G.; Hebert, D.; Berthe, L.; Boustie, M.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding and modeling the behavior of glass is an issue for certain aeronautical, military and civil applications. For example, parts of satellites and shuttles are made of glasses. During their lifetime, they are subjected to potentially damaging high velocity impacts. To determine the behavior of these structures during and after impact we used instrumented laser driven shock loading performed on high power intensity laser facilities. Transverse shadowgraphs of the front wave propagating inside the transparent material are collected at different times. These shadowgraphs provide information regarding the shock wave velocity. PDV or VISAR measurements provide time-resolved free surface velocity to determine material velocity when the shock wave breakout occurs. For some laser shots, shock wave corresponds to elastic wave then Hugoniot elastic limit may be determined. Under high pressure conditions glass permanently densifies and traces of such a plastic deformation are looked for on the path of the shock wave. Those experimental data are necessary to characterize the material behavior under such conditions and to model the mechanical behavior of glass structures. In this presentation we will present experimental results obtained for soda-lime silica glass samples loaded by laser induced shock.

  2. THERMAL SHOCK RESISTANCE OF A SODA LIME GLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. MALOU

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We studied the thermal shock of a three millimeters thickness soda lime glass using the hot-cold thermal shock technique. The cooling was made by ambient air jet on previously warmed samples. The heat transfer coefficient was about 600 W/°C.m2 (Biot number β = 0.3. The thermal shock duration was fixed at 6 seconds. The hot temperature was taken between 100°C and 550°C while the cold temperature of the air flux was kept constant at 20°C. The acoustic emission technique was used for determining the failure time and the critical temperature difference (ΔTC. By referring to experimental results, thermal shock modelling computations are conducted. Our aim is especially focused on the fracture initiation moments during the cooling process and on the crack initiation sites. The used modeling is based on the local approach of the thermal shock during the experimental data treatment. For each test, the temperature profile and the transient stress state through the samples thickness are determined. By applying the linear superposition property of the stress intensity factors, evolution of the stress intensity factor KI in function of the pre-existing natural flaws in the glass surface is established. The size of the critical flaw is determined by the linear fracture mechanics laws. Computation results confirm the experimental values of the critical difference temperature obtained that is the source of the glass degradation.

  3. Nitrification and nitrifying bacterial communities in coniferous forest soils. Effects of liming and clear-cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeckman, Jenny

    2003-05-01

    This thesis deals with the effects of liming and clear-cutting on nitrification in hemi-boreal and northern temperate coniferous forest soils. The approach has been to study both the potential nitrification and the community structure of the ammonia-oxidising bacteria, which carry out the first step of autotrophic nitrification. The potential nitrification was measured over short time incubations at optimal conditions for acid-sensitive, autotrophic nitrification. This method yields the potential nitrification of the actual nitrifying community. I studied the autotrophic ammonia-oxidising community at gene level (16S rRNA gene) using molecular methods, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), and DNA sequencing. The results illustrate that both liming and clear-cutting may increase the potential nitrification by stimulating the growth of ammonia-oxidisers. Both these forest practises seem to favour the growth of Nitrosospira cluster 4-affiliated ammonia-oxidisers, although Nitrosospira cluster 2-affiliated bacteria also was present. The stimulated growth of the ammonia-oxidisers is caused by increased ammonia availability and more favourable pH (i.e. higher and more stable pH over time). The results also show that clear-cutting causes more intense growth of the ammonia-oxidisers and thereby larger potential nitrification than liming does. When forests that have previously been limed are clear-cut, nitrification responses more rapidly and the rates are larger compared to non-limed forests, since the ammonia-oxidising communities in limed soils seem better adapted to the conditions after the cutting. Liming does, however, not always increase nitrification. Although it may increase nitrogen mineralisation, it seems like the nitrogen status of the soil prior to liming is the most important factor, since liming caused the greatest response in potential nitrification in areas

  4. Study of sticky rice-lime mortar technology for the restoration of historical masonry construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fuwei; Zhang, Bingjian; Ma, Qinglin

    2010-06-15

    Replacing or repairing masonry mortar is usually necessary in the restoration of historical constructions, but the selection of a proper mortar is often problematic. An inappropriate choice can lead to failure of the restoration work, and perhaps even further damage. Thus, a thorough understanding of the original mortar technology and the fabrication of appropriate replacement materials are important research goals. Many kinds of materials have been used over the years in masonry mortars, and the technology has gradually evolved from the single-component mortar of ancient times to hybrid versions containing several ingredients. Beginning in 2450 BCE, lime was used as masonry mortar in Europe. In the Roman era, ground volcanic ash, brick powder, and ceramic chip were added to lime mortar, greatly improving performance. Because of its superior properties, the use of this hydraulic (that is, capable of setting underwater) mortar spread, and it was adopted throughout Europe and western Asia. Perhaps because of the absence of natural materials such as volcanic ash, hydraulic mortar technology was not developed in ancient China. However, a special inorganic-organic composite building material, sticky rice-lime mortar, was developed. This technology was extensively used in important buildings, such as tombs, in urban constructions, and even in water conservancy facilities. It may be the first widespread inorganic-organic composite mortar technology in China, or even in the world. In this Account, we discuss the origins, analysis, performance, and utility in historic preservation of sticky rice-lime mortar. Mortar samples from ancient constructions were analyzed by both chemical methods (including the iodine starch test and the acid attack experiment) and instrumental methods (including thermogravimetric differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared, and scanning electron microscopy). These analytical results show that the ancient masonry

  5. Nutritional characteristics of two pigeon pea hybrids – Liming and phosphated fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Atauri Cardelli de Lucena

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of legumes in animal production systems can be a sustainable alternative as a protein source in rotational grazing system and/or as a protein bank. Pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan (L. Millsp. figure as an example of success of this use on animal nutrition. The development of this species can be limited by the high acidity and low soil phosphorus content. There is a lack of scientific information on the effects of liming and phosphorus fertilization on some nutritional variables of two pigeon pea new hybrids. This study was conducted in pots containing 5 kg of soil in a greenhouse at the Instituto de Zootecnia, Nova Odessa, São Paulo State. There were studied two pigeon pea hybrids, H1 and H2, and the treatments involved agronomic practices: 1 No liming and without phosphorus (control, 2 Liming (L, 3 Phosphorus fertilization (P and 4 Liming plus phosphorus. Liming was proposed to increase soil base saturation to 50%, it was used dolomite lime PRNT = 90%, in an amount corresponding to 4.5 t/ha. Phosphorus fertilization (as superphosphate rate was 60 kg/ha of PO25. The experimental units were allocated according to a complete randomised block design, with five replications. We analyzed the levels of crude protein (CP, neutral detergent fiber (NDF, acid detergent fiber (ADF, in pigeon pea shoot at 45 days of age. Statistical analyzes were performed using the software SISVAR, averages were compared using test for multiple comparisons Student Newman-Keuls - SNK test (P < 0.05. The H1 hybrid had the highest content of CP, by applying P, lime plus P and the control treatment compared to H2 hybrid. The association lime plus P resulted in higher content of CP mainly due to the increased availability of P for plants. Smaller values were observed for NDF in H2 with P application. Lower values of ADF were observed in H1 in both control treatment and P application. The ADF values were lower for the hybrid H2 only for the treatment lime plus P. The two

  6. Effects of liming on soil properties and plant performance of temperate mountainous grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijangos, Iker; Albizu, Isabel; Epelde, Lur; Amezaga, Ibone; Mendarte, Sorkunde; Garbisu, Carlos

    2010-10-01

    The application of lime or liming materials to acid-soil grasslands might help mitigate soil acidity, a major constraint to forage productivity in many temperate mountainous grasslands. Nowadays, in these mountainous grasslands, it is essential to promote agricultural practices to increase forage yield and nutritive value while preserving biodiversity and agroecosystem functioning. Two different field experiments were conducted in the Gorbeia Natural Park, northern Spain: (i) one in a calcareous mountainous grassland (Arraba) and (ii) the other in a siliceous mountainous grassland (Kurtzegan) to study the effects of a single application of two liming products, i.e. 2429 kg lime (164.3% CaCO(3)) ha(-1) and 4734 kg calcareous sand (84.3% CaCO(3)) ha(-1), applied one month before the beginning of the sheep grazing season (May-October), on soil chemical (pH, organic C, total N, C/N ratio, %Al saturation, Olsen P, exchangeable K(+) and Ca(2+)) and biological parameters (dehydrogenase, beta-glucosidase, urease, acid phosphatase and arylsulphatase activity) as well as on botanical diversity (graminoids, forbs, shrubs) and forage yield and nutritive value (crude protein, modified acid detergent fibre, digestibility). Untreated control plots were also included in the experiment. Soil sampling was carried out at the end of the sheep grazing season (6 months after liming treatment), while botanical composition was determined one year after treatments application. Although no increase in soil pH was observed in Arraba, liming significantly increased dehydrogenase activity (an indicator of soil microbial activity) by 30.4 and 86.7% at Arraba and Kurtzegan site, respectively. Liming treatments significantly improved forage yield and nutritive value in Arraba but not in Kurtzegan. Furthermore, no differences in soil biological quality, evaluated using the "treated-soil quality index" as proposed in this work, were observed between treated and untreated soils, and between the two

  7. Effect of lime on some physical properties of mud as an alternative refractory material for lining of furnaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsina Christopher BALA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In ceramic industries, lime or calcium oxide (CaO has been used successfully to improve the permeability of materials made from clay. This paper presents the outcome of research into the possible use of mud mixed with lime to improve the quality of mud bricks for use in lining of furnaces in the foundry. Results of the tests show that mud generally consist mainly of very fine clay and silt particles sizes less than 300 µm. It was also found that the addition of lime in mud improves the permeability with an average conductivity of 1.15 mm/s. The addition of lime also reduces the resistance of the mud to thermal resistance as the samples indicated cracks at high temperatures. The compressive strength and setting time of the mud- lime brick was found to increase progressively. The addition of lime to mud can therefore be recommended for low temperature furnace lining.

  8. The Oldest Jurassic Dinosaur: A Basal Neotheropod from the Hettangian of Great Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martill, David M; Vidovic, Steven U; Howells, Cindy; Nudds, John R

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 40% of a skeleton including cranial and postcranial remains representing a new genus and species of basal neotheropod dinosaur is described. It was collected from fallen blocks from a sea cliff that exposes Late Triassic and Early Jurassic marine and quasi marine strata on the south Wales coast near the city of Cardiff. Matrix comparisons indicate that the specimen is from the lithological Jurassic part of the sequence, below the first occurrence of the index ammonite Psiloceras planorbis and above the last occurrence of the Rhaetian conodont Chirodella verecunda. Associated fauna of echinoderms and bivalves indicate that the specimen had drifted out to sea, presumably from the nearby Welsh Massif and associated islands (St David's Archipelago). Its occurrence close to the base of the Blue Lias Formation (Lower Jurassic, Hettangian) makes it the oldest known Jurassic dinosaur and it represents the first dinosaur skeleton from the Jurassic of Wales. A cladistic analysis indicates basal neotheropodan affinities, but the specimen retains plesiomorphic characters which it shares with Tawa and Daemonosaurus.

  9. The Oldest Jurassic Dinosaur: A Basal Neotheropod from the Hettangian of Great Britain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Martill

    Full Text Available Approximately 40% of a skeleton including cranial and postcranial remains representing a new genus and species of basal neotheropod dinosaur is described. It was collected from fallen blocks from a sea cliff that exposes Late Triassic and Early Jurassic marine and quasi marine strata on the south Wales coast near the city of Cardiff. Matrix comparisons indicate that the specimen is from the lithological Jurassic part of the sequence, below the first occurrence of the index ammonite Psiloceras planorbis and above the last occurrence of the Rhaetian conodont Chirodella verecunda. Associated fauna of echinoderms and bivalves indicate that the specimen had drifted out to sea, presumably from the nearby Welsh Massif and associated islands (St David's Archipelago. Its occurrence close to the base of the Blue Lias Formation (Lower Jurassic, Hettangian makes it the oldest known Jurassic dinosaur and it represents the first dinosaur skeleton from the Jurassic of Wales. A cladistic analysis indicates basal neotheropodan affinities, but the specimen retains plesiomorphic characters which it shares with Tawa and Daemonosaurus.

  10. Episodic Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous intraplate compression in Central Patagonia during Gondwana breakup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, César; Gianni, Guido; Echaurren, Andrés; Kingler, Federico Lince; Folguera, Andrés

    2016-12-01

    From Lower Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous, several intraplate compression events affected discrete sectors of Central Patagonia, under a general context of crustal extension associated with Gondwana breakup. This was demonstrated by means of 2D and 3D seismic and borehole data, which show partial inversion of Lower and Middle Jurassic extensional structures of the Chubut and Cañadón Asfalto basins, during the earliest stages of breakup. A comparison with surrounding areas in Patagonia, where similar Jurassic intraplate compression was described, allowed the discrimination of three discrete pulses of subtle compression (C1: ∼188-185 Ma; C2: ∼170-163; C3: ∼157-136? Ma). Interestingly, episodic intraplate compressional events are closely followed by high flux magmatic events linked to the westward expansion of the Karoo-Ferrar thermal anomaly, which impacted on the lithosphere of southwest Gondwana in Lower Jurassic. In addition, we determined the approximate direction of the main compressive strain (σ1) compatible with other Jurassic intraplate belts of South America. These observations led us to propose a linkage between a thermo mechanically weakened continental crust due to LIPs activity, changes in plate motions and ridge-push forces generated by the opening of the Weddell Sea, in order to explain intraplate shortening, interrupted while Karoo LIPs magmatic invigoration took place.

  11. Palinspastic reconstruction and geological evolution of Jurassic basins in Mongolia and neighboring China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Genyao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The important event in Jurassic tectonics in Mongolia was the subduction and closure of the Mongolia-Okhotsk ocean; correspondingly, basin evolution can be divided into two main stages, related to the orogeny and collapse of the orogenic belt, respectively. The developing of Early–Middle Jurassic basins to the north of the ocean resulted from back-arc extension. The fossil sutures, from the China–SE Asia sub-continent to the south of the ocean, were rejuvenated by subduction-related orogeny; in addition, the Yanshanian intra-continental movement occurred. Three Early–Middle Jurassic molasse basins were developed by movement in Inner Mongolia, all of which stretched westwards (or northwards into Mongolia; therefore, the molasse basins in eastern and southern Mongolia had the same geometric and kinematic features as the basins in the Inner Mongolia. Owing to the collapse of the Mongolia-Okhotsk orogenic belt, a group of rift basins developed during the Late Jurassic. In eastern Mongolia, the NE orientated extensional basins were controlled by the neogenic NE-structure. The contemporary basins in southern Mongolia and the neighboring areas in China were constrained by remobilization (inherited activation of the latitudinal or ENE-directional basement structures. Three stages can be recognized in the evolution of the Early–Middle Jurassic basins after reversal; the basins also experienced four episodes of reformation.

  12. Early Jurassic allotherians from South Wales (United Kingdom

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    W. A. Clemens

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Fossils from two fissure fillings in Pant Quarry (designated Pant 4 and Pant 5, South Wales, United Kingdom, probably of Early Jurassic age document a taxonomically diverse vertebrate fauna, the Morganucodon-sphenodont fauna, composed of several kinds of reptiles, non-mammalian synapsids, and mammals. Six isolated molariform teeth from Pant 4 and 5 fissures clearly record the presence of Thomasia (Mammalia, Allotheria, Haramiyidae, a genus previously known only from purported Late Triassic faunas of southwestern England, France, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, and Switzerland. Small morphological differences from teeth in the larger English and continental European samples warrant identification of the Welsh material as Thomasia cf. moorei. The highly derived morphology of an isolated molariform tooth from Pant 5 fissure indicates the presence of another, possibly allotherian, taxon. Fossilien aus zwei wahrscheinlich unterjurassischen Spaltenfüllungen (Pant 4 und Pant 5 im Steinbruch Pant in Süd-Wales dokumentieren eine taxonomisch diverse Wirbeltierfauna. Diese Morganucodon-Sphenodontiden-Fauna besteht aus verschiedenen Formen von Reptilien, Synapsiden und Säugetieren. Sechs isolierte molariforme Zähne aus den Spaltenfüllungen Pant 4 und Pant 5 belegen eindeutig das Vorkommen von Thomasia (Mammalia, Allotheria, Haramiyidae, einer bisher nur aus vermutlich obertriassischen Faunen Südwest-Englands, Frankreichs, Belgiens, Luxemburgs, Deutschlands und der Schweiz bekannten Gattung. Geringe morphologische Unterschiede zu dem umfangreicheren Material aus England und Kontinental-Europa sprechen für die Identifikation des neuen Materials als Thomasia cf. moorei. Die stark abgeleitete Morphologie eines isolierten molariformen Zahnes aus der Spalte Pant 5 belegt das Vorkommen eines anderen Taxons, das möglicherweise auch den Allotheria zuzuordnen ist. doi:10.1002/mmng.200600018

  13. An Analysis of the Nonlinear Spectral Mixing of Didymium and Soda-Lime Glass Beads Using Hyperspectral Imagery (HSI) Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    lime glass beads using hyperspectral imagery (HSI) microscopy Ronald G. Resmini1*, Robert S. Rand2, David W. Allen3, and Christopher J. Deloye1...materials are spherical beads of didymium glass and soda- lime glass both ranging in particle size from 63 µm to 125 µm. Mixtures are generated by...plate: 0%/100%, 25%/75%, 50%/50%, 80%/20%, and 100%/0% didymium/soda- lime . Analysis methods are linear spectral unmixing (LSU), LSU applied to

  14. Utilization of slaked lime for the regulation of pH value in the process of copper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petković Aleksandar V.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigations of used lime at plant from company Messer-Tehnogas, Belgrade, were in the aim to improvement technologically results from flotation concentration of copper minerals in flotation plant Veliki Krivelj. This paper shows usage of slaked lime, which is waste in the process of technical gas production, for regulation of pH value in the process of copper minerals flotation concentration. It is important to point out that slaked lime is a waste material that is not dangerous. Preparation and dosage includes preparation procedures, which enable introduction into flotation process with the aim of achieving better results. Lime from Limekiln Zagrađe is brought into four storage places in flotation. Volume of each storage place is 80 m3. Lime in pieces from storage place is added by airbladders on transportation line and by system of transportation lines lime gets to the ball mill. At the mill entrance water is added and then follows lime grinding. Milk glass of lime thus prepared goes to the pump basket from where is transported by pipeline to conditioner, and then by manual and (or automatic valves it is dosed to the flotation concentration of copper minerals process. Prospect of advancement and rationalization of the used lime in flotation plant Bor, Veliki Krivelj and Majdanpek as well as a way to link different branches of industry was demonstrated. Total cost of lime supplying, transporting, preparation and distribution related slaked lime is lower for 2.955 din/kg. Particularly, using lime from Messer in content of 2.1 g/l value of pH 11.82 is possible to obtain.

  15. Determination of the Host Status of the 'Persian' Lime (Citrus latifolia Tanaka) for Anastrepha ludens (Loew) (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo, José; Ruiz, Lia; López, Gladis; Díaz-Fleischer, Francisco

    2015-02-01

    Field and laboratory no-choice oviposition tests were performed to determine whether the 'Persian' lime (Citrus latifolia Tanaka) is a host of Anastrepha ludens Loew (Diptera: Tephritidae). Trapping and fruit sampling were performed to determine adult population densities and the level of infestation in the two lime orchards. Additionally, unharvested and harvested limes were exposed to sexually mature flies and the number of eggs laid and the immature developmental rates were determined. As a control, parthenocarpic 'Ataulfo' mangoes (Mangifera indica L.), a suitable host for A. ludens, were exposed to similar experimental procedures. The fecundity and fertility of adults obtained from limes and mangoes were compared. Our results demonstrate that A. ludens, under forced infestation conditions, oviposit on limes and also on control fruit. However, differences were detected in unharvested and harvested fruit, as unharvested limes were not infested. In the case of harvested fruit, the numbers of eggs laid and survival rates of immatures were significantly lower for 'Persian' limes compared with mangoes. Egg clutches were larger in limes than in mangoes, and most were deposited in the albedo rather than in the pulp. Moreover, oviposition rates were much higher in limes than in mangoes. Despite the fact that few of the immatures reached adulthood, the females obtained from limes were as fecund and fertile as those obtained from mangoes. Although adult A. ludens flies were captured in the two orchards, fruit sampling showed a complete absence of natural infestation among 'Persian' limes. We discuss the importance of our findings for determining the host status for 'Persian' limes. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Study of the Use of Lime Plaster on Heritage Buildings’ in Malaysia: A Case Study in George Town, Penang

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Sabri A.A.; Suleiman M.Z.

    2014-01-01

    Awareness of the use of compatible materials in historical building conservation has resulted in a rebirth of lime technology and application. However, knowledge of the preparation of and procedures influencing the final quality of lime is still limited and disagreement regarding the proper use of lime in heritage building conservation still continues to exist. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the reasons for deterioration and to suggest possible treatments for external walls of heri...

  17. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: Early and Middle Jurassic mires of Bornholm and the Fennoscandian Border Zone: a comparison of depositional environments and vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koppelhus, Eva B.

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Suitable climatic conditions for peat formation existed during Early–Middle Jurassic times in the Fennoscandian Border Zone. Autochthonous peat and allochthonous organic matter were depositedfrom north Jylland, south-east through the Kattegat and Øresund area, to Skåne and Bornholm. The increase in coal seam abundance and thickness from north Jylland to Bornholm indicates that the most favourable peat-forming conditions were present towards the south-east. Peat formation and deposition of organic-rich muds in the Early Jurassic coastal mires were mainly controlled by a continuous rise of relative sea level governed by subsidence and an overall eustatic rise. Watertable rise repeatedly outpaced the rate of accumulation of organic matter and terminated peat formationby lacustrine or lagoonal flooding. Organic matter accumulated in open-water mires and in continuously waterlogged, anoxic and periodically marine-influenced mires. The latter conditionsresulted in huminite-rich coals containing framboidal pyrite. The investigated Lower Jurassic seams correspond to peat and peaty mud deposits that ranged from 0.5–5.7 m in thickness, but were generallyless than 3 m thick. It is estimated that on Bornholm, the mires existed on average for c. 1200 years in the Hettangian–Sinemurian and for c. 2300 years in the Late Pliensbachian; the Early Jurassic(Hettangian–Sinemurian mires in the Øresund area existed for c. 1850 years. Aalenian uplift of the Ringkøbing–Fyn High and major parts of the Danish Basin caused a significant change in the basinconfiguration and much reduced subsidence in the Fennoscandian Border Zone during the Middle Jurassic. This resulted in a more inland position for the Middle Jurassic mires which on occasionenabled peat accumulation to keep pace with, or temporarily outpace, watertable rise. Thus, peat formation was sometimes sustained for relatively long periods, and the mires may have existed for up to 7000 years in the

  18. Efficacy of eight commercial formulations of lime sulphur on in vitro growth inhibition of Microsporum canis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesel, Alison; Verbrugge, Maria; Moriello, Karen A

    2011-04-01

    Lime sulphur is a common topical treatment for dermatophytosis in animals. Until recently, a single veterinary lime sulphur formulation was available. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of eight lime sulphur products for in vitro growth inhibition of Microsporum canis using the isolated infected spore model. Infective M. canis spores were isolated from hairs collected from untreated cats. Hairs were macerated in Triton-X solution and isolated according to a previously published protocol. Equal volumes of spore suspension and lime sulphur solutions were incubated for 5 min and plated onto modified BBL™ Mycosel™ agar (Becton, Dickinson and Company; Sparks, MD, USA) plates. Five plates were inoculated for each sample solution. Distilled water and bleach were used as controls. Colony forming units were counted daily for 21 days; positive control plates contained >300 colony forming units/plate. Seven of the products were supplied as concentrates and they were tested at the manufacturer's recommended dilution, twice label concentration and half label concentration. A prediluted product SulfaDip(®) (Trask Research, Inc.; Daluca, GA, USA) was tested at the label and half label concentration. All veterinary products formed recommended treatment dilutions of 3% sulphurated lime solution except one (LymDyp(®), IVX Animal Health Inc.; St Joseph, MO, USA), which formed a 2.4% sulphurated lime solution. Results of the study showed complete growth inhibition of M. canis spores by all products at all dilutions tested. These results indicate that all tested lime sulphur-containing products were equivalent. Field studies are needed to test product equivalency in vivo.

  19. Process optimisation on Maerz PFR lime kilns; Maerz optimise le process de ses fours a chaux PFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piringer, H. [Maerz Ofenbau, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2005-09-01

    A considerable proportion of the world production of high reactive lime is manufactured in Parallel Flow Regenerative kilns (PFR kilns). For many decades their unmatched features i.e. the lowest heat consumption of all types of lime kilns has been a known fact in the industry. Over 400 PFR kilns world-wide have provided extensive operating data which resulted in essential findings concerning practical kiln operation. PFR lime kilns can now be built with capacities ranging from 100 to 850 metric tons of lime per day using limestone grain sizes from 10 to 200 mm and almost all types of fuel. (author)

  20. Effectiveness of lime and peat applications on cadmium availability in a paddy soil under various moisture regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanhui; Xie, Tuanhui; Liang, Qiaofeng; Liu, Mengjiao; Zhao, Mingliu; Wang, Mingkuang; Wang, Guo

    2016-04-01

    In paddy soils, amendments and moisture play important role in the immobilization of cadmium (Cd). The effects of applying lime, peat, and a combination of both on soil Eh, pH, and Cd availability in contaminated soils were investigated under wetted (80 ± 5 % of water holding capacity) and flooded (completely submerged) conditions. In wetted soils, there was little change in Eh, compared to flooded soils where Eh reduced rapidly. Amendments of lime only or in a mixture with peat increased soil pH to different degrees, depending on the lime application rate. However, peat addition only slightly affected soil pH. The decreased Cd availability in flooded soils was related to submergence duration and was significantly lower than that in wetted soils after 14 days. Liming wetted and flooded soils decreased exchangeable Cd and increased carbonates or Fe-Mn oxides bound fractions, while peat addition transformed Cd from carbonates to organic matter bound fractions. The combined application of peat and lime generally showed better inhibitory effects on the availability of Cd than separately application of lime or peat. Higher application rates of lime, peat, or their mixture were more effective at reducing Cd contamination in flooded soil. This indicates that application of peat and lime mixture under flooded conditions was most effective for in situ remediation of Cd-contaminated soils. Further studies are required to assess the long-term effectiveness of the peat and lime mixture on Cd availability in paddy soils.

  1. The First Stegosaur (Dinosauria, Ornithischia) from the Upper Jurassic Shishugou Formation of Xinjiang, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Chengkai; Catherine A. FOSTER; XU Xing; James M. CLARK

    2007-01-01

    A new stegosaur species, Jiangjunosaurus junggarensis, gen. et sp. nov., is erected based on a specimen collected from the Upper Jurassic upper section of the Shishugou Formation in the Junggar Basin, Xinjiang, China. It represents the first stegosaur from the Jurassic of Xinjiang and increases the diversity of the dinosaur fauna in the Shishugou Formation. The new genus is characterized by symmetrical and proportionally wide tooth crowns, a sub-rectangular axial neural spine seen in lateral view, and large openings on the lateral surfaces of the cervical centra. A preliminary character analysis suggests that this new taxon is more derived than the Middle Jurassic stegosaur Huayangosaurus but more primitive than most other known stegosaur species.

  2. A New Sauropod, Gongxianosaurus, from the Lower Jurassic of Sichuan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes an early and primitive sauropod dinosaur, Gongxianosaurus shibeiensis (gen. et sp. nov.), from the Dongyuemiao Member of the Lower Jurassic Ziliujing Formation in Shibei Township, Gongxian County, Sichuan Province, China, which is one of the 5 dinosaur fossils discovered in Gongxian in 1997. Except the skull which is incomplete, the fossils are well preserved. It has some features of both sauropods and prosauropods. It is an intermediate type in the evolution of dinosaurs from prosauropods to sauropods and provides materials for the study of the origin and evolution of the sauropod dinosaur fauna. The discovery of this new sauropod furnishes a way for the stratigraphic correlation between the Early Jurassic Ziliujing Formation in the Sichuan basin and the Lower Jurassic Lufeng Formation in the Central Yunnan basin.

  3. Three new species of mesosciophilid gnats from the Middle-Late Jurassic of China (insecta: Diptera: Nematocera: Mesosciophilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J F

    2008-11-15

    Three extinct new species from the Callovian or Oxfordian (uppermost Middle Jurassic or lowermost Upper Jurassic) Daohugou beds in Inner Mongolia, China is described as Mesosciophila abstracta sp. n., Mesosciophilodes synchrona sp. n. and Paramesosciophilodes eximia sp. n. (Family Mesosciophilidae). All the records of mesosciophilid gnats are briefly reviewed.

  4. First American record of the Jurassic ichnogenus Deltapodus and a review of the fossil record of stegosaurian footprints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milàn, Jesper; Chiappe, Luis M

    2009-01-01

    of a well-preserved pes track and the eroded remains of a manus track. Previously, Deltapodus was known only from the Middle Jurassic Yorkshire coast of England and the Upper Jurassic of Portugal and Spain. The new discovery thus substantially extends the geographic record of this ichnospecies...

  5. Critical review of research on the Lower Jurassic flora of Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacyna Grzegorz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Lower Jurassic plant macrofossils of Poland are poorly known. Relatively rich sources of fossils are found in only a few outcrops in the Holy Cross Mountains. Other described plant remains come from drill cores taken from most areas of Poland, but as a rule these are single specimens. The only professional descriptions of Lower Jurassic macroflora are papers by Raciborski, Makarewiczówna, and a team of researchers consisting of Reymanówna, Barbacka, Ziaja, and Wcisło-Luraniec. Raciborski’s fossil collection is still available for research and revision. Such work is in progress. The collection described by Makarewiczówna contained many interesting specimens but unfortunately the majority of them are now missing. Stratigraphic research by geologists has provided some new specimens from drill cores and outcrops in the Holy Cross Mountains but these have not been subjected to detailed palaeobotanical analysis. The palynology of the Lower Jurassic was focused on biostratigraphy from the outset of that research. As an outcome it provided spore-pollen and megaspore zonations for Lower Jurassic strata in Poland. The Polish Lower Jurassic flora is comprised of ferns (very numerous, lycopsids, sphenopsids, cycadaleans, bennettitaleans, gnetaleans, ginkgoaleans, and conifers. This flora is taxonomically poorer than the equally old and geographically close floras of Denmark, Sweden, and Germany. Macrofloristic data have been used by geologists as an important source of information for assessing the age of Lower Jurassic formations, particularly in the Holy Cross Mountains. Hence the need for the old collections to be taxonomically revised and for new material from outcrops and drill cores to be examined and described.

  6. Lithographic fabrication of soda-lime glass based microfluidics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas, L.; Norarat, R.; Napari, M.; Kivistö, H. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Chienthavorn, O. [Department of Chemistry and the Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Whitlow, H.J., E-mail: harry.whitlow@he-arc.ch [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Institut des Microtechnologies Appliquées Arc, Haute Ecole Arc Ingénierie, Eplatures-Grise 17, CH-2300 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Department of Chemistry and the Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)

    2013-07-01

    Glass is an important material for chemical processing and analysis because of its relatively low cost, mechanical strength, chemical inertness, optical transparency, and electrical insulation and temperature resistance far beyond that of most polymeric materials. We have investigated techniques for direct writing with MeV ions on soda-lime glass as well as capping procedures to form closed buried channels suitable for high-pressure driven flow. Exposure and development of open-channel structures was studied using a combination of programmable proximity aperture lithography and different developers. Unlike our previous work on MeV ion beam lithography of natural silica where an 8% w/v HF in aqueous solution was used as a developer, it was found that 6% w/v HF + 0.5% w/v HCl was an effective developer. Addition of HCl to the developer was necessary, presumably to dissolve oxide residues that were insoluble in HF solution. Different capping and bonding procedures to create closed channels that are strong enough to withstand high hydrostatic pressure have also been tested. It was found that capping to create a closed channel could be achieved after thorough cleaning. This was followed by activation in ∼32% w/v NH{sub 4}OH or ∼30% w/v H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solution, drying on a hot plate and bonded under uniaxial pressure in a furnace ramped up and down at 1 °C/min to 575 °C. Activation in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was found to give better bonding. Other methods using HF lead to poor bonding due to oxide precipitation.

  7. LIME: 3D visualisation and interpretation of virtual geoscience models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Simon; Ringdal, Kari; Dolva, Benjamin; Naumann, Nicole; Kurz, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Three-dimensional and photorealistic acquisition of surface topography, using methods such as laser scanning and photogrammetry, has become widespread across the geosciences over the last decade. With recent innovations in photogrammetric processing software, robust and automated data capture hardware, and novel sensor platforms, including unmanned aerial vehicles, obtaining 3D representations of exposed topography has never been easier. In addition to 3D datasets, fusion of surface geometry with imaging sensors, such as multi/hyperspectral, thermal and ground-based InSAR, and geophysical methods, create novel and highly visual datasets that provide a fundamental spatial framework to address open geoscience research questions. Although data capture and processing routines are becoming well-established and widely reported in the scientific literature, challenges remain related to the analysis, co-visualisation and presentation of 3D photorealistic models, especially for new users (e.g. students and scientists new to geomatics methods). Interpretation and measurement is essential for quantitative analysis of 3D datasets, and qualitative methods are valuable for presentation purposes, for planning and in education. Motivated by this background, the current contribution presents LIME, a lightweight and high performance 3D software for interpreting and co-visualising 3D models and related image data in geoscience applications. The software focuses on novel data integration and visualisation of 3D topography with image sources such as hyperspectral imagery, logs and interpretation panels, geophysical datasets and georeferenced maps and images. High quality visual output can be generated for dissemination purposes, to aid researchers with communication of their research results. The background of the software is described and case studies from outcrop geology, in hyperspectral mineral mapping and geophysical-geospatial data integration are used to showcase the novel

  8. Reclamation of acid sulfate soils using lime-stabilized biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orndorff, Zenah W; Daniels, W Lee; Fanning, Delvin S

    2008-01-01

    Excavation of sulfidic materials during construction has resulted in acid rock drainage (ARD) problems throughout Virginia. The most extensive documented uncontrolled disturbance at a single location is Stafford Regional Airport (SRAP) in Stafford, Virginia. Beginning in 1998, over 150 ha of sulfidic Coastal Plain sediments were disturbed, including steeply sloping cut surfaces and spoils placed into fills. Acid sulfate soils developed, and ARD generated on-site degraded metal and concrete structures and heavily damaged water quality with effects noted over 1 km downstream. The site was not recognized as sulfidic until 2001 when surface soil sampling revealed pH values ranging from 1.9 to 5.3 and peroxide potential acidity (PPA) values ranging from 1 to 42 Mg CaCO(3) per 1000 Mg material. In February 2002 a water quality program was established in and around the site to monitor baseline pH, EC, NO(3)-N, NH(4)-N, PO(4)-P, Fe, Al, Mn, and SO(4)-S, and initial pH values as low as 2.9 were noted in on-site receiving streams. In the spring and fall of 2002, the site was treated with variable rates of lime-stabilized biosolids, straw-mulch, and acid- and salt-tolerant legumes and grasses. By October 2002, the site was fully revegetated (> or = 90% living cover) with the exception of a few highly acidic outcrops and seepage areas. Surface soil sampling in 2003, 2004, and 2006 revealed pH values typically > 6.0. Water quality responded quickly to treatment, although short-term NH(4)(+) release occurred. Despite heavy loadings, no significant surface water P losses were observed.

  9. Steam slaking of lime - kinetics and technology. New energy effective lime slaking technology in kraft pulping; Aangslaeckning av kalk - kinetik och teknik. Ny energieffektiv teknik foer slaeckning av mesakalk i sulfatmassaindustrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundqvist, Roland

    2008-06-15

    Lime stone is widely used in chemical recovery for regeneration of white liquor in kraft pulping. Slaked (hydrated) lime is used to convert (causticize) sodium carbonate into sodium hydroxide, whereby lime mud (calcium carbonate) precipitates from the solution. Lime mud is dried and reburned in a lime kiln, where burned lime (calcium oxide) is formed. The circle is closed when lime is slaked (hydrated) in green liquor in an exotherm reaction. Problems with traditional lime burning and slaking methods are that heat recovery is bad and heat is recovered at low temperatures. With the method described in this report there is potential to increase heat recovery in the causticizing plant, and to recover heat at higher temperatures. The forecasted method means that lime is slaked with water vapour, for example combined with an indirect heated lime mud drier and a lime kiln. This project is a follow-up to pilot tests performed in a specific machine equipment at year 2006. The target group is pulp and paper industry using the kraft process. The owner of this new project is Carnot AB and the project is performed inside the Vaermeforsk Program for Pulp and Paper Industry 2006-2008. Partners and advisers in project group have been KTH Energy Processes, CTH Energy and Environment, LTH Chemical Technology, SMA Mineral AB, and reference group from STORA Enso Skoghall, Sodra Cell, M-Real Husum and SCA Packaging Piteaa. The task in this stage has included market investigations and laboratory tests. Contacts have been made with suppliers, preliminary dimensioning of process equipment and budget offers are received. Economic calculations have been made out of the offers. The laboratory tests are done as an examination paper at KTH Energiprocesser on the reactivity of burned lime from kraft lime kiln when it is slaked with water vapour instead of green liquor. The vapour intended to be used is at atmospheric pressure or even down to 0,2 atm. Complementary addition to these laboratory

  10. Carbonation kinetics in roman-like lime mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-Moral, S.

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic parameterisation of lime mortar carbonation is a useful technique for understanding ancient building methods and the long-lived physical-chemical stability of roman monuments. Portlandite (Ca(OH2 binders harden in the air on contact with atmospheric CO2, producing CaCO3. Water evaporation and the presence of silicate aggregates have a three-fold effect: prompting the development of a pore system that permits CO2, self-diffusion, reducing shrinkage and cracking during drying and (possibly giving rise to subsequent pozzolanic reactions. The present survey involved air-hardening a series of roman-like lime mortars which differed in terms of: (i type of aggregate, volcanic tephra and arkose; (ii aggregate/binder ratio, 1:2 as used in the catacombs and 1:4 as found in standard roman construction and (iii temperature, the 17 ºC prevailing in underground environments and the 30 ºC typical of warm Mediterranean areas. The analyses that provided the most useful information were performed in a classic X-ray diffractometer adapted to accommodate an author-designed chamber in which temperature control was achieved by an internal refrigerant and a PID-governed electrical heater Additional data were obtained with DTA and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM. The tests conducted on the Roman-like lime mortars manufactured for the experiment showed that the hardening temperature is a critical factor in the initial phases of carbonation. Calcite precipitation rates and total mineral precipitation increased with temperature, but fell very quickly as calcite precipitated. In theoretical calculations assuming an open reactor with continuous CO2, input, total calcitisation time was found to be 156 m in. at 30 ºC and 175 min. at 17 ºC, whilst in the mortars actually hardened in the experimental part of the study, calcitisation gradually blocked the flow or CO2, gas into the

  11. A basal alvarezsauroid theropod from the early Late Jurassic of Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choiniere, Jonah N; Xu, Xing; Clark, James M; Forster, Catherine A; Guo, Yu; Han, Fenglu

    2010-01-29

    The fossil record of Jurassic theropod dinosaurs closely related to birds remains poor. A new theropod from the earliest Late Jurassic of western China represents the earliest diverging member of the enigmatic theropod group Alvarezsauroidea and confirms that this group is a basal member of Maniraptora, the clade containing birds and their closest theropod relatives. It extends the fossil record of Alvarezsauroidea by 63 million years and provides evidence for maniraptorans earlier in the fossil record than Archaeopteryx. The new taxon confirms extreme morphological convergence between birds and derived alvarezsauroids and illuminates incipient stages of the highly modified alvarezsaurid forelimb.

  12. Jurassic Lake T'oo'dichi': a large alkaline, saline lake, Morrison Formation, eastern Colorado Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, C.E.; Fishman, N.S.

    1991-01-01

    Recognition of alkaline, saline-lake deposits in the Morrison Formation significantly alters interpretations of depositional environments of this formation, and it also has important implications for paleoclimatic interpretation. Late Jurassic climate was apparently much more arid than had previously been thought. In fact, sedimentologic evidence suggests that the lake basin was typically dry for extended periods and enjoyed only brief wet intervals. This conclusion has important consequences for environmental interpretation of the habitat that was favorable for large herbivorous dinosaurs, which thrived in the Late Jurassic. -from Authors

  13. Androecium of Archaefructus, the Late Jurassic Angiosperms from Western Liaoning, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ge; ZHENG Shaolin; SUN Chunlin; SUN Yuewu; David L. DILCHER; MIAO Yuyan

    2002-01-01

    Androecium of the earliest known flowering plant Archaefructus liaoningensis was found from the Upper Jurassic Jianshangou Formation of western Liaoning, China. The androecium consists of numerous stamens bearing in pair on the reproductive axes below conduplicate carpels. The stamens are composed of a short filament and basifixed anther for each. Monosulcate pollen in situ are found from the anthers. The characters of the androecium reveals that Archaefructus are probably protandrous, and the paired stamens and monosulcate pollen appear to indicate that Archaefructus, as primitive angiosperms,might be derived from extinct seed -ferns during the Older Mesozoic. Archaefructus is considered Late Jurassic in age.

  14. Early and Middle Jurassic climate changes: implications for palaeoceanography and tectonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korte, Christoph; Hesselbo, Stephen; Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz;

    2014-01-01

    three pronounced oxygen isotope ‘Ice Age’ cycles, and the subsequent well known Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic ‘supergreenhouse’ Event is followed by very warm seawater temperatures in the late Toarcian. Moreover, a very pronounced and effective cooling occurred during the latest Toarcian and early Aalenian...... (Early-Middle Jurassic Boundary Event) resulted in substantial expansion of Arctic climates to palaeolatitudes as low as 45° and in distinctly cooler seawater temperatures in lower latitude European seas. At least the extensive cooling at the Early-Middle Jurassic Boundary Event was most likely driven...

  15. Earliest evolution of multituberculate mammals revealed by a new Jurassic fossil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chong-Xi; Ji, Qiang; Meng, Qing-Jin; Tabrum, Alan R; Luo, Zhe-Xi

    2013-08-16

    Multituberculates were successful herbivorous mammals and were more diverse and numerically abundant than any other mammal groups in Mesozoic ecosystems. The clade also developed diverse locomotor adaptations in the Cretaceous and Paleogene. We report a new fossil skeleton from the Late Jurassic of China that belongs to the basalmost multituberculate family. Dental features of this new Jurassic multituberculate show omnivorous adaptation, and its well-preserved skeleton sheds light on ancestral skeletal features of all multituberculates, especially the highly mobile joints of the ankle, crucial for later evolutionary success of multituberculates in the Cretaceous and Paleogene.

  16. Advanced mineral calciner for regeneration of lime. Final report, March 1995--May 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namazian, M.; Nickeson, R.; Lovas, B.; Miller, G.; Kelly, J.

    1997-12-31

    There are approximately 800 pulp, paper and paperboard mills in the United States. Pulp and paper is the ninth largest industry in US, uses 2.8 quads of energy per year and ranks third among all domestic US industries in the cost of energy consumed. A significant fraction of the energy consumed in pulp and paper plants is needed to recover chemicals that are used in breaking down the wood chips into pulp. In particular, 0.1 quads of energy per year are used to regenerate lime. Furthermore, pulp and paper plant operations generate 9,870 tons of NOx per year. Additionally over two million tons of spent lime are sent to landfills each year. In addition, growth in paper demand and changes in plant processes (e.g., bleaching), as a result of environmental pressures, will continue to drive the need for more lime regeneration capacity. Unless the increased capacity can be delivered productively and inexpensively, the growth in pulp and paper may occur in overseas markets. Furthermore, if new environmental constraints cannot be met at low cost, existing US pulp and paper production capacity may also move off-shore. The advanced mineral calciner (AMC) technology was developed to address this lime regeneration need. Prior to describing the technology, and the program of work that was used to test the concept, conventional lime regeneration systems and their limitations are described.

  17. A paleolimnological assessment of acidification and liming effects on diatom assemblages in a Swedish lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renberg, I. (Umea Univ. (Sweden)); Hultberg, H. (Swedish Environmental Research Inst., Goteborg (Sweden))

    1992-01-01

    In Sweden, ca 6000 lakes have been limed to mitigate acidification. Lysevatten in southwestern Sweden was limed in 1974 and 1986 and has better historical pH and fish records than most other, similar forest lakes. Historical data were compared with diatom analyses of a sediment core to assess to what extent diatom-inferred pH reflects the known pH history. The diatom-inferred pH history agrees well with the development known from documentary sources, although the sediment record is slightly smoothed. Both the historical and sediment records show that the acidification, with acid episodes that caused severe damage to lake biota, began during the 1940s and became acute in the 1960s, with pH values of 4.5-4.9. Prior to acidification, the lake water pH was between 6 and 7, and the lake had a planktonic Cyclotella flora. The liming increased pH to 7.5 and resulted in the expansion of Achnanthes minutissima, Cymbella microcephala, and Synedra acus. The reacidification is reflected by a decrease in abundance of these species. Neither the liming in 1974 or the liming in 1986 restored the preacidification diatom flora; there was no recovery of Cyclotella. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Long-term sustainability of metal immobilization by soil amendments: Cyclonic ashes versus lime addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruttens, A.; Adriaensen, K. [Hasselt University, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Agoralaan, building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Meers, E. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry and Applied Ecochemistry, Ghent University, Coupure 653, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); De Vocht, A.; Geebelen, W.; Carleer, R. [Hasselt University, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Agoralaan, building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Mench, M. [UMR BIOGECO INRA 1202, Ecologie des Communautes, Universite Bordeaux 1, Bat. B8, RdC Est, 2, Avenue des Facultes, F-33405 Talence (France); Vangronsveld, J., E-mail: jaco.vangronsveld@uhasselt.b [Hasselt University, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Agoralaan, building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    A soil column leaching experiment was used to gain insight into the long-term metal immobilization capacity of cyclonic ashes (CAH) compared to lime (LIME). Twenty six years of rainfall were simulated. Initially, all amended soils were brought to an equal soil pH. This was done to obtain optimal conditions for the detection of metal immobilization mechanisms different from just a pH effect. During the simulation period, soil pH in all treatments decreased in parallel. However, the evolution of metal mobility and phytoavailability showed a clearly distinct pattern. The strong reduction in metal immobilizing efficiency observed in the lime treatment at the end of the simulation period was much less pronounced, or even absent, in the CAH treatments. Moreover, metal accumulation in plants grown on the CAH amended soil was significantly lower compared to the untreated and the lime treated soil. CAH + SS treatment delivered the strongest reductions in metal mobility and bioavailability. - In a soil column leaching experiment, simulating 26 years of rainfall, application of cyclonic ashes resulted in a more durable metal immobilization compared to lime.

  19. Amendment of biosolids with waste materials and lime: Effect on geoenvironmental properties and leachate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Claudia; Larkin, Tam; Singhal, Naresh

    2015-12-01

    Residuals from wastewater treatment operations (biosolids) were mixed with lime, fly ash, lime kiln dust, or two smelter slags to assess their efficacy as potential stabilisation agents by assessing their effects on the shear strength, compressibility, and solids content of mixtures. In addition, the minerals formed and leachate produced during stabilisation were determined. Tests were performed to explore the change of the geoenvironmental properties of the amended biosolids, while under pressure, at different scales using laboratory, pilot and field scale tests. The settlement characteristics of the amended biosolids under a range of applied pressures were determined using a consolidometer. All amended biosolids mixtures showed higher strength than the unamended biosolids, with mixtures containing a combination of 20% fly ash and 20% lime giving the highest (up to eightfold) increase in strength, and that with lime kiln dust and the smelter slags showing the lowest (up to twofold). The biosolids mixtures with only lime gave the second highest increase in strength (up to fourfold), but produced the largest amount of leachate, with higher level of dissolved calcium. The increase in strength correlated with availability of calcium oxide in the mixtures which lead to calcium carbonate formation, accompanied with higher leachate production and settlement during consolidation. Copper, nickel and zinc concentrations increased with alkaline additives and corresponded to higher pH and DOC levels. Nonetheless, concentrations were within the New Zealand regulatory limits for Class A landfills.

  20. Kinetics of lime pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Laura L G; Rabelo, Sarita C; Filho, Rubens Maciel; Costa, Aline C

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the optimum conditions of sugarcane bagasse pretreatment with lime to increase the enzymatic hydrolysis of the polysaccharide component and to study the delignification kinetics. The first stage was an evaluation of the influence of temperature, reaction time, and lime concentration in the pretreatment performance measured as glucose release after hydrolysis using a 2(3) central composite design and response surface methodology. The maximum glucose yield was 228.45 mg/g raw biomass, corresponding to 409.9 mg/g raw biomass of total reducing sugars, with the pretreatment performed at 90°C, for 90 h, and with a lime loading of 0.4 g/g dry biomass. The enzymes loading was 5.0 FPU/dry pretreated biomass of cellulase and 1.0 CBU/dry pretreated biomass of β-glucosidase. Kinetic data of the pretreatment were evaluated at different temperatures (60°C, 70°C, 80°C, and 90°C), and a kinetic model for bagasse delignification with lime as a function of temperature was determined. Bagasse composition (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin) was measured, and the study has shown that 50% of the original material was solubilized, lignin and hemicellulose were selectively removed, but cellulose was not affected by lime pretreatment in mild temperatures (60-90°C). The delignification was highly dependent on temperature and duration of pretreatment.

  1. Raman scattering or fluorescence emission? Raman spectroscopy study on lime-based building and conservation materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszowska, Zofia; Malek, Kamilla; Staniszewska-Slezak, Emilia; Niedzielska, Karina

    2016-12-05

    This work presents an in-depth study on Raman spectra excited with 1064 and 532nm lasers of lime binders employed in the past as building materials and revealed today as valuable conservation materials. We focus our interest on the bands of strong intensity, which are present in the spectra of all binders acquired with laser excitation at 1064nm, but absent in the corresponding spectra acquired with laser excitation at 532nm. We suggest, that the first group of spectra represents fluorescence phenomena of unknown origin and the second true Raman scattering. In our studies, we also include two other phases of lime cycle, i.e. calcium carbonate (a few samples of calcite of various origins) and calcium oxide (quicklime) to assess how structural and chemical transformations of lime phases affect the NIR-Raman spectral profile. Furthermore, we analyse a set of carbonated limewashes and lime binders derived from old plasters to give an insight into their spectral characteristics after excitation with the 1064nm laser line. NIR-Raman micro-mapping results are also presented to reveal the spatial distribution of building materials and fluorescent species in the cross-section of plaster samples taken from a 15th century chapel. Our study shows that the Raman analysis can help identify lime-based building and conservation materials, however, a caution is advised in the interpretation of the spectra acquired using 1064nm excitation.

  2. Liming and fertilisation in Pinus taeda plantations with severe nutrient deficiency in savanna soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araína Hulmann Batista

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Soils with high acidity and low exchangeable bases may be responsible for low yields of Pinus taeda in a forest plantation at Jaguariaíva, Paraná State, Brazil. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of liming and fertilisation, applied over litter, on two selected areas with Pinus taeda plantations. Soil, litter and pine needles were evaluated for K, Ca and Mg concentrations and soil acidity parameters. Seven treatments were applied: (i complete (N, P, K, Zn, Cu, B, Mo, and lime; (ii without N, P, and K; (iii without Zn, Cu, B, and Mo; (iv without K; (v without Zn; (vi without lime; and (vii control (without nutrients and lime. Soil samples were collected at five soil depths (0-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-40 and 40-60 cm simultaneously with litter samples. Needles were also collected from the first and second pine flushes. Liming induced soil pH, Ca2+, and Mg2+ increases, and the opposite was observed for Al3+ and Al saturation. Fertilisation increased soil exchangeable K+ concentrations and needle and litter K concentrations. The low Ca and Mg concentrations found in the plant needles might be attributable to their low mobility.

  3. Application of lime and urea and its effect on development of Phythophthora palmivora.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakti Widyanta Pratama

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Black pod rot disease (BPRD which is caused by Phytophthora palmivora is one of the main diseases of cocoa cultivations particularly in plantations with wet climate. Black pod rot can develop rapidly under high humidity environments, particularly during rainy seasons. This disease can cause loss of harvest of up to 46.63% in East Java. The various control efforts attempted so far have not resulted in significant improvements. Urea, in addition to functioning as fertilizer, can also produce the ammonia gas which is believed to be able to suppress black pod rot. This research aims to determine the effectiveness of black pod rot control using the combination of lime and urea. This research was conducted from June to September 2013. The materials used in test included sterile soil, black pod rot infected cocoa, urea, and agricultural lime. Observation results showed that ammonia could form from urea. Lime can increase the speed of the formation. The ammonia gas forming from 0.06% urea and 0.3% lime can control the P. palmivora fungus inside the soil. Key words: Pod rot, P. palmivora, urea, lime, ammonia

  4. The Effect of Liming and Fertilization on Yields of Maize and Winter Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Kisić

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Effect of different rates of hydrated lime and zeolite tuffs, as lime materials, mineral and organic fertilizers upon the yield of maize and winter wheat grain was studied in an exact field trial set up on Eutric Gleysol, near Karlovac, Central Croatia. The following crops were cultivated during the study period: 1999 and 2001 – maize, 1999/00 and 2001/02 – winter wheat. In the first investigation year, the highest yield of maize grain of 9.78 t ha-1 was achieved with the combination of the higher mineral fertilizer rate and the higher rate of farmyard manure. In the following year, the highest yield of winter wheat grain of 5.85 t ha-1 was achieved with the combination of the higher mineral fertilizer rate and the higher rate of hydrated lime. In the third and fourth investigation years, the highest yields of maize grain (10.05 t ha-1 and wheat (5.48 t ha-1 were recorded for the combination of the higher rates of mineral fertilizers and hydrated lime. The foregoing allows the conclusion that mineral and organic fertilization combined with hydrated lime is the optimal solution for increasing the yields of test crops.

  5. The palaeogeography of Sundaland and Wallacea since the Late Jurassic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Hall

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The continental core of Southeast (SE Asia, Sundaland, was assembled from Gondwana fragments by the Early Mesozoic. Continental blocks rifted from Australia in the Jurassic [South West (SW Borneo, East Java-West Sulawesi-Sumba], and the Woyla intraoceanic arc of Sumatra, were added to Sundaland in the Cretaceous. These fragments probably included emergent areas and could have carried a terrestrial flora and fauna. Sarawak, the offshore Luconia-Dangerous Grounds areas, and Palawan include Asian continental material. These probably represent a wide accretionary zone at the Asia-Pacific boundary, which was an active continental margin until the mid Cretaceous. Subduction ceased around Sundaland in the Late Cretaceous, and from about 80 Ma most of Sundaland was emergent, physically connected to Asia, but separated by deep oceans from India and Australia. India moved rapidly north during the Late Cretaceous and Early Cenozoic but there is no evidence that it made contact with SE Asia prior to collision with Asia. One or more arc-India collisions during the Eocene may have preceded India-Asia collision. The arcs could have provided dispersal pathways from India into SE Asia before final suturing of the two continents. During the Late Cretaceous and Early Cenozoic there was no significant subduction beneath Sumatra, Java and Borneo. At about 45 Ma Australia began to move north, subduction resumed and there was widespread rifting within Sundaland. During the Paleogene east and north Borneo were largely submerged, the Makassar Straits became a wide marine barrier within Sundaland, and West Sulawesi was separated from Sundaland but included land. By the Early Miocene the proto-South China Sea had been eliminated by subduction leading to emergence of land in central Borneo, Sabah and Palawan. Australia-SE Asia collision began, eliminating the former deep ocean separating the two continents, and forming the region now known as Wallacea. The microplate or

  6. Polar record of Early Jurassic massive carbon injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suan, Guillaume; Nikitenko, Boris L.; Rogov, Mikhail A.; Baudin, François; Spangenberg, Jorge E.; Knyazev, Valeriy G.; Glinskikh, Larisa A.; Goryacheva, Anna A.; Adatte, Thierry; Riding, James B.; Föllmi, Karl B.; Pittet, Bernard; Mattioli, Emanuela; Lécuyer, Christophe

    2011-12-01

    The Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE) (ca. 182 Myr, Early Jurassic) represents one of the best-recognized examples of greenhouse warming, decreased seawater oxygenation and mass extinction. The leading hypothesis to explain these changes is the massive injection of thermogenic or gas hydrate-derived 13C-depleted carbon into the atmosphere, resulting in a > 3 per mil negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE), accelerated nutrient input and dissolved oxygen consumption in the oceans. Nevertheless, the lack of a precisely dated record of the T-OAE outside low latitudes has led to considerable debate about both its temporal and spatial extent and hence concerning its underlying causes. Here we present new isotopic and lithological data from three precisely dated N Siberian sections, which demonstrate that mass extinction and onset of strong oxygen-deficiency occurred near synchronously in polar and most tropical sites and were intimately linked to the onset of a marked 6‰ negative CIE recorded by bulk organic carbon. Rock Eval pyrolysis data from Siberia and comparisons with low latitudes show that the CIE cannot be explained by the extent of stratification of the studied basins or changes in organic matter sourcing and suggest that the negative CIE reflects rapid 13C-depleted carbon injection to all exchangeable reservoirs. Sedimentological and palynological indicators show that the injection coincided with a change from cold (abundant glendonites and exotic boulder-sized clasts) to exceptionally warm conditions (dominance of the thermophyllic pollen genus Classopollis) in the Arctic, which likely triggered a rapid, possibly partly glacioeustatic sea-level rise. Comparisons with low latitude records reveal that warm climate conditions and poor marine oxygenation persisted in continental margins at least 600 kyr after the CIE, features that can be attributed to protracted and massive volcanic carbon dioxide degassing. Our data reveal that the T-OAE profoundly

  7. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard; Ronald K. Zimmerman

    2005-05-10

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been data compilation and the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin and basin modeling and petroleum system identification. In the first nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus was on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories, and during the remainder of the year the emphasis has basin modeling and petroleum system identification. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, regional cross sections have been prepared, structure and isopach maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and related profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs are mainly Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies and Lower Cretaceous and Upper Cretaceous shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary

  8. Differences in the rheological properties of calcitic and dolomitic lime slurries: influence of particle characteristics and practical implications in lime-based mortar manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arizzi, A.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of the rheological properties of lime suspensions is a useful means to evaluate the workability of lime mortars. In this work, we studied the flow behaviour of two industrial hydrated limes, one of calcitic and the other of dolomitic composition, by means of two types of rheometer with different geometry and setup mode. The obtained results were interpreted taking into account the differences in microstructure and surface properties of the suspended particles. Calcitic lime dry particles are formed by angular and polydisperse clusters and, once dispersed in water, they behave like thixotropic materials. On the other hand, the dolomitic lime is formed by nanoparticles and small round cluster and it shows a pronounced plastic behaviour in suspension. This fundamental difference between the two materials explains the traditional preference for dolomitic lime mortars for plastering and rendering applications.

    El estudio de las propiedades reológicas de suspensiones de cal es una herramienta muy útil para evaluar la trabajabilidad de morteros de cal. En este trabajo se ha estudiado el comportamiento en suspensión de dos cales hidratadas, de composición calcítica y dolomítica, mediante dos tipos de reómetros con geometría y modalidades distintas de medida. Los resultados obtenidos se han interpretado teniendo en cuenta las diferencias en la microestructura y las propiedades de superficie de las partículas en suspensión. Las partículas de cal calcítica están formadas por aglomerados angulares y polidispersos y, una vez dispersadas en agua, presentan un comportamiento tixotrópico. Por su parte, la cal dolomítica está formada por nanopartículas y pequeños agregados redondeados y muestra en suspensión un pronunciado comportamiento plástico. Esta importante diferencia entre las dos cales explica la preferencia tradicional de morteros de cal dolomítica para aplicaciones en revocos.

  9. Effects of Lime and Concrete Waste on Vadose Zone Carbon Cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Eike Marie; Jessen, Søren; Postma, D.;

    2014-01-01

    In this work we investigate how lime and crushed concrete waste (CCW) affect carbon cycling in the vadose zone and explore whether these amendments could be employed to mitigate climate change by increasing the transport of CO2 from the atmosphere to the groundwater. We use a combination of exper......In this work we investigate how lime and crushed concrete waste (CCW) affect carbon cycling in the vadose zone and explore whether these amendments could be employed to mitigate climate change by increasing the transport of CO2 from the atmosphere to the groundwater. We use a combination.......) grown on podzolic soil material, we have investigated inorganic carbon cycling through the gaseous and liquid phases and how it is affected by different soil amendments. The mesocosm amendments comprised the addition of 0, 9.6, or 21.2 kg m−2 of crushed concrete waste (CCW) or 1 kg lime m−2. The CCW...

  10. Sludge hygienization: Helminth eggs destruction by lime treatment Ascaris eggs as model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banas, S.; Schwartzbrod, J. [Lab. de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie de l' Environnement, Nancy (France); Remy, M. [Lhoist, on behalf of the European Lime Assoication (EuLA), Bruessel (Germany); Boehm, R. [Univ. Hohenheim, Stuttgart (Germany); Verfuerden, M. [Fels-Werke GmbH, im Namen des Bundesverbandes der Deutschen Kalkindustrie (BVK), Koeln (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Most pathogens in the raw sewage are concentrated into the sewage sludge. They can be separated into four categories: viruses, bacteria, protozoa and larger parasites such as human roundworms, tapeworms and liver flukes. Such micro-organisms can cause disease in humans, the transmission occurring in several ways e.g. by inhaling sludge aerosols or dust, by eating vegetables or fruits contaminated by sludge, drinking water contaminated by run-off or by eating meat from livestock infected by grazing pastures fertilised with sludge. The presence of helminth eggs in urban sludge may constitute a sanitary risk when used as agricultural fertiliser. To avoid any contamination, the efficiency of a certain number of sludge hygienization processes must be tested. One of these involves decontamination with quicklime. The Ascaris egg inactivation by liming with lime milk, slaked lime and quicklime is studied in a series of sludges coming from slaughterhouses. (orig.)

  11. Analysis of cubic and orthorhombic C3A hydration in presence of gypsum and lime

    KAUST Repository

    Kirchheim, A. P.

    2009-02-26

    Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been used to study the microstructural changes and phase development that take place during the hydration of cubic (pure) and orthorhombic (Na-doped) tricalcium aluminate (C3A) and gypsum in the absence and presence of lime. The results demonstrate that important differences occur in the hydration of each C3A polymorph and gypsum when no lime is added; orthorhombic C3A reacts faster with gypsum than the cubic phase, forming longer ettringite needles; however, the presence of lime slows down the formation of ettringite in the orthorhombic sample. Additional rheometric tests showed the possible effects on the setting time in these cementitious mixes.

  12. Chemical modeling of backfill composed of quartz sand, lime and an Fe-phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meike, A.; Glassley, W.E.

    1997-01-01

    The area adjacent to the waste package is an important component of the engineered barrier system in a high level radioactive waste repository. The combination of lime, quartz sand, and a phase containing reduced iron is investigated whether it can achieve reduction of oxygen in the waste emplacement drift (thereby reducin corrosion rates) and increase the pH. The simulations conducted to date have examined the following backfill options: Fe metal only, Fe metal and lime, and iron metal/lime/quartz sand in equal volume ratios. Each option was simulated under two environments: limited and unlimited air exchange with the atmosphere. Results suggest that the most important variable during the process of chemical conditioning is the amount of air exchange that occurs in the emplacement drift. The desired chemical conditioing (both oxidation potential and pH) will be far less effective in an emplacement that experiences an unlimited exchange of air with the atmosphere.

  13. A lime based mortar for thermal insulation of medieval church vaults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tessa Kvist; Larsen, Poul Klenz; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    There are 1700 medieval churches in Denmark, and many of these have brick vaults. The thickness is only 12 – 15 cm, and the heat loss through this building component is large. Thermal insulation has not been permitted until now in respect for the antiquarian values and doubts about the effect...... on water vapour transport through the vault, and the risk of condensation inside the insulation. A new mortar was developed for thermal insulation of bricks vaults, consisting mainly of expanded perlite, mixed with slaked lime. These materials are compatible with the fired clay bricks and the lime mortar...... joints. The insulation mortar is applied to the top side of the vault in a thickness of 10 cm, and covered by 10 mm lime plaster, reinforced with cattle hair. This assembly is resistant to the weight of a person, working with maintenance of the roof. The thermal conductivity of the insulation mortar...

  14. A lime based mortar for thermal insulation of medieval church vaults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, P.K.; Hansen, Tessa Kvist

    A new mortar for thermal insulation of medieval church vaults was tested in a full scale experiment in Annisse Church, DK. The mortar consists of perlite, a highly porous aggregate, mixed with slaked lime. These materials are compatible with the fired clay bricks and the lime mortar joints....... The lambda-value of the insulation mortar is 0.08 W/m K or twice the lambda-value for mineral wool. The water vapour permeability is equal to a medieval clay brick, and it has three times higher capacity for liquid water absorption. The mortar was applied to the top side of the vaults in a thickness of 10 cm......, and covered by 10 mm lime plaster, reinforced with cattle hair. This assembly can carry the weight of a person, working with maintenance of the roof. Climate measurements confirmed excellent properties in regards to both moisture transport and thermal insulation. Condensation did not occur at any time...

  15. Pretreatment of corn stover for sugar production using dilute hydrochloric acid followed by lime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Shuai; Li, Wen-zhi; Zhang, Mingjian; Li, Zihong; Wang, Ziyu; Jameel, Hasan; Chang, Hou-min

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a two stage process was evaluated to increase the sugar recovery. Firstly, corn stover was treated with diluted hydrochloric acid to maximize the xylose yield, and then the residue was treated with lime to alter the lignin structure and swell the cellulose surface. The optimal condition was 120 °C and 40 min for diluted hydrochloric acid pretreatment followed by lime pretreatment at 60 °C for 12h with lime loading at 0.1 g/g of substrate. The glucose and xylose yield was 78.0% and 97.0%, respectively, with cellulase dosage at 5 FPU/g of substrate. The total glucose yield increased to 85.9% when the cellulase loading was increased to 10 FPU/g of substrate. This two stage process was effective due to the swelling of the internal surface, an increase in the porosity and a decrease in the degree of polymerization.

  16. The influence of inner hydrophobisation on water transport properties of modified lime plasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlíková, Milena; Pavlík, Zbyšek; Pernicová, Radka; Černý, Robert

    2016-06-01

    The effect of hydrophobic agent admixture on water vapour and liquid water transport properties of newly designed lime plasters is analysed in the paper. The major part of physico - chemical building deterioration is related to the penetration of moisture and soluble salts into the building structure. For that reason, the modified lime plasters were in the broad range of basic material properties tested. From the quantitative point of view, the measured results clearly demonstrate the big differences in the behaviour of studied materials depending on applied modifying admixtures. From the practical point of view, plaster made of lime hydrate, metakaolin, zinc stearate and air-entraining agent can be recommended for renovation purposes. The accessed material parameters will be used as input data for computational modelling of moisture transport in this type of porous building materials and will be stored in material database.

  17. Effect of heat treatment on properties of steam cured fly ash–lime compacts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Maitra; S Das; A K Das; A Basumajumdar

    2005-12-01

    Four different varieties of class F fly ashes, collected from different sources from the state of West Bengal (India) were mixed with lime in 9 : 1 wt ratio, followed by compaction of the mixes. The compacts were subjected to steam curing to develop an optimum strength by the reaction between fly ash and lime. The steam cured compacts were heated at different elevated temperatures and free lime content, compressive strength, bulk density and water absorption tendency of these compacts were measured and FTIR spectral changes were studied as a function of the heating temperatures. Kinetics of thermal dehydration of the compacts was also studied from thermogravimetric measurements under non-isothermal condition to ascertain the order of dehydration process and the associated activation energy.

  18. Effects of Lime and Concrete Waste on Vadose Zone Carbon Cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Eike Marie; Jessen, Søren; Postma, D.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we investigate how lime and crushed concrete waste (CCW) affect carbon cycling in the vadose zone and explore whether these amendments could be employed to mitigate climate change by increasing the transport of CO2 from the atmosphere to the groundwater. We use a combination...... of experimental and modeling tools to determine ongoing biogeochemical processes. Our results demonstrate that lime and CCW amendments to acid soil contribute to the climate forcing by largely increasing the soil CO2 efflux to the atmosphere. In a series of mesocosm experiments, with barley (Hordeum vulgare L...... and lime treatments increased the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) percolation flux by about 150 and 100%, respectively,compared to the controls. However, concurrent increases in the CO2 efflux to the atmosphere (ER) were more than one order of magnitude higher than increases in the DIC percolation flux...

  19. Effect of Lime, Humic Acid and Moisture Regime on the Availability of Zinc in Alfisol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushanta Kumar Naik

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lime and humic acid application can play an important role in the availability of zinc in paddy soils. We conducted laboratory incubation experiments on a rice growing soil (Alfisol to determine the effect of lime, humic acid and different moisture regimes on the availability of Zn. Addition of half doses of liming material (powdered lime stone recorded highest values of DTPA-Zn followed by no lime and 100% of lime requirement throughout the incubation period. With the progress of incubation, DTPA-Zn increased slightly during the first week and then decreased thereafter. The highest DTPA-extractable Zn content of 2.85 mg/kg was found in the treatment Zn10 L1/2 at 7 days of incubation, showing 17.3 % increase in DTPA-Zn content over its corresponding treatment of Zn alone (Zn10L0. The DTPA-Zn concentration increased with the application of humic acid compared with no humic acid throughout 35 days of the incubation period and the peak value obtained was 3.12 mg/kg in the treatment Zn10 HA2 at 14 days after incubation, showing 50 % increase in Zn content over its corresponding treatment of Zn alone (Zn10HA0. The application of 0.2% humic acid compared with 0.1% resulted in greater increase in DTPA-Zn concentration in soil application. During the 35 days of incubation, highest values of DTPA-Zn were recorded in soil maintained at saturated compared to water logged conditions. However, under alternate wetting and drying condition the DTPA-Zn content gradually decreased up to 21 days and thereafter increased slowly.

  20. Impact of lime treated soils performance on design of earthfill dikes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerincx Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays soil treatment with lime in civil engineering is widespread in many countries on all continents, within several construction fields. The interest of the hydraulic works community regarding this technique is currently growing. It has been indeed shown during the last decade that appropriate treatment technologies provide lime treated soils with high level properties such as excellent homogeneity, low permeability, internal and external erosion resistance and mechanical stability. Those have been shown in laboratory and for some properties with full scale experiments. The so conferred soil properties can lead to innovative earthfill dams and dikes designs by addressing some of the typical designer’s problems, such as stability, watertightness, internal erosion, surface protection and flood control. However, lime treated soil external erosion resistance is still to be quantified in the field for proper designing and dimensioning of lime treated soil external erosion protection or spillways. With this purpose, an experimental earthfill dike has been built along the river Vidourle (France in July 2015, in the frame of the French R&D program “DigueELITE”. This 50 m long and 3,5 m high dike is made of lime treated silt and is provided with sensors (succion, water content and temperature and piezometer in order to be monitored. It will also be tested against surface erosion. The final objective of this R&D program is to provide guidelines for designing innovative overflow resistant earthfill dikes. This article describes the performance reached by lime treated soils and associated design requirements and application; the experimental dike construction and lessons learned; the monitoring program; the dike design perspectives opened by soil treatment.

  1. Copper, nickel and zinc phytoavailability in an oxisol amended with sewage sludge and liming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Adão Luiz Castanheiro

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Contents of heavy metal on agricultural soils have been raised by land applications of sewage sludge and may constitute a hazard to plants, animals and humans. A field experiment was carried out from 1983 to 1987, to evaluate the long-term effect of sewage sludge application, with and without liming, on heavy metal accumulation and availability in a Rhodic Hapludox soil grown with maize (HMD 7974 hybrid. Trials were set up in a completely randomized blocks design with four replications. Each block was split in two bands, one with and another without liming. The sludge was applied in each band at rates: 0, 20, 40, 60 and 80 Mg ha-1 (dry basis in a single application; and 40, 60 and 80 Mg ha-1 split in two, three and four equal yearly applications, respectively. The soil was sampled for chemical analysis each year after harvest. Soil samples were analysed for Cu, Ni and Zn in extracts obtained with DTPA and Mehlich-3 solutions, and in extracts obtained by digestion with nitric-perchloric acid (total metal contents, using an inductively coupled plasma (ICP spectrometer. In general, Zn, Cu and Ni concentrations in DTPA and Mehlich-3 extracts increased linearly with sludge application. Total Cu and Zn concentrations increased when sludge was applied, whereas total Ni concentrations were not affected. Both extractants were suitable to evaluate Cu and Zn availability to corn in the soil treated with sewage sludge. Liming reduced the DTPA extractability of Zn. DTPA-extractable Cu concentrations were not significantly affected by liming. Mehlich-3-extractable Cu and Zn concentrations increased with liming. Only DTPA extractant indicated reduction of Ni concentrations in the soil after liming.

  2. Monitoring compared with paleolimnology: implications for the definition of reference condition in limed lakes in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, Matilda; Bigler, Christian; Renberg, Ingemar

    2008-11-01

    Surface water acidification was identified as a major environmental problem in the 1960s. Consequently, a liming program was launched in Sweden in the 1970s. The primary purpose of liming is to restore conditions that existed prior to acidification. To reach this goal, as well as achieve 'good status' (i.e. low levels of distortion resulting from human activity) in European freshwaters until 2016 under the European Union Water Framework Directive, lake data are required to define reference conditions. Here, we compare data from chemical/biological monitoring of 12 limed lakes with results of paleolimnological investigations, to address questions of reference conditions, acidification, and restoration by liming. Using diatom-based lake-water pH inferences, we found clear evidence of acidification in only five of the 12 lakes, which had all originally been classified as acidified according to monitoring data. After liming, measured and diatom-inferred pH agree well in seven lakes. The sediment record of three of the five remaining lakes gave ambiguous results, presumably due to sediment mixing or low sediment accumulation rates. It is difficult to determine whether liming restored the lakes to a good status, especially as some of the lakes were not acidified during the twentieth century. In addition to acid deposition, other factors, such as natural lake and catchment ontogeny or human impact through agricultural activity, influence lake acidity. This study shows that monitoring series are usually too short to define reference conditions for lakes, and that paleolimnological studies are useful to set appropriate goals for restoration and for evaluation of counter measures.

  3. THE LIME PURIFICATION OF SUGAR –CONTAINING SOLUTION USING HIGH VISCOSITY COLLOIDAL SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the work was to determine the efficiency of combined application of lime and high-viscous suspensions, containing the aluminium nanoparticles as a precursor in treatment of sugar-containing solutions. At the first stage the aluminium nanopowder, encapsulated into a salt matrix, was produced by the combined precipitation from a gas phase of metal and halogenide of alkali metal (NaCl. For the long-term stabilization of aluminum nanoparticles the method, developed by the authors, for dispersing these powders in the composition of polyethylene glycols was used, providing the colloidal solution of high viscosity (gel. At the second stage, as an object of investigation a juice of sugar beet, produced in the laboratory conditions by water extracting from the beet chips, was applied. In the produced juice the main characteristics of its quality were determined: the content of solids, sucrose, its purity was calculated (ratio of sucrose to solids content, in%. The content of protein and pectin components was also determined (as the main components of the colloidal fraction of the diffusion juice. Conventionally, as a basic reagent for the process of a lime pretreatment a lime milk of 1.18 g/cm3 density, prepared by liming the burned lime using hot water, was used. During the experiments the effectiveness of reagents, containing aluminum in nanoform, on the degree of removal of the colloidal dispersion substances in the process of juice purification in sugar beet production and improvement of its quality, is shown. However, the obtained results show that, depending on the method of producing, the additional reagents with aluminium nanoparticles have different effect on change of diffusion juice purity in the process of its treatment by the lime milk.

  4. Terrestrial liming benefits birds in an acidified forest in the northeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabian, Sarah E; Brittingham, Margaret C

    2007-12-01

    Studies in Europe have reported negative effects of acid deposition on forest birds, and research in North America has identified links between forest bird abundance and rates of acid deposition. We examined the bird community in an acidified forest in central Pennsylvania (USA) and evaluated the effects of terrestrial lime application on birds. We used a before-after control-impact (BACI) study design, with one year of observation before (2003) and three years after lime application (2004, 2005, and 2006). Between the 2003 and 2004 field seasons, 4500 kg/ha of dolomitic lime were applied to two of four 100-ha watersheds. Each year, we monitored bird abundance and Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla) eggshell thickness and territory size. Soil and snail abundance data were also collected. The bird community and territory size results indicated that the study area may be providing low-quality habitat for forest birds, perhaps as a result of acid deposition. We found lower forest bird abundances than have been found in less acidified areas of Pennsylvania, and larger Ovenbird territory sizes than have been found in other studies. We found a significant positive relationship between soil calcium and bird abundance, indicating that soil calcium may affect bird abundance. Liming increased soil calcium and pH and led to increased snail and bird abundances. After liming, bird abundance was positively related to snail abundance. No significant changes occurred in Ovenbird territory size or eggshell thickness. Our results suggest that acid deposition could be responsible for reduced bird abundance, and that liming is a potential mitigation technique.

  5. Control of geochemical mobility of arsenic by liming in materials subjected to acid mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, R.P. de; Figueiredo, B.R. [Geoscience Inst., UNICAMP, SP (Brazil); Mello, J.W.V. de; Santos, J.C.Z.; Zandonadi, L.U. [Soil Dept., Federal Univ. of Vicosa, MG (Brazil)

    2008-04-15

    Background. Acid mine drainage (AMD) results from the exposure of sulfide materials to atmospheric water and oxygen. In addition to AMD, oxidation of arsenopyrite and other As-bearing sulfides can release arsenic (As) into the environment. In view of the risk to living organisms due to contamination of ground and surface water sources with As, this work was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of lime (CaCO{sub 3}) in controlling the dispersion of this metalloid in the environment. Methods. Partially oxidized samples of sulfide bearing materials from gold mines in Brazil were used to evaluate the arsenic mobilization by leaching tests. Columns containing ground samples, with and without liming treatments, were leached with distilled water every two weeks over a 156-day period. Results and discussion. The acid-base accounting (ABA) static tests classified the samples as potential acid forming materials. In the treatments without liming, As, Fe and S concentrations in the leachates were higher than after treatment with carbonate. Nevertheless, the effectiveness of liming and As mobilization were lower in the sample containing goethite. A high correlation between Fe and As concentrations in the leachates (r=0.749) suggests that iron (hydr)oxides retained arsenic in the solid phase. Oxidation rates of As bearing sulfides were increased at low pH (2.0-3.9), probably due to the enhanced activity of bacteria (Acidithiobacillus) and decreased rate of Fe precipitation, thus reinforcing generation of acid water, and consequently releasing As. Conclusions and perspectives. Our results corroborate the use of lime to control the dispersion of As in AMD-affected environments. However, the effectiveness of the liming treatment seems to be dependent on the presence of iron (hydr)oxides in the sample. These findings can be useful to remediate areas affected by acid mine drainage and arsenic mobilization in partially oxidized sulfide materials. (orig.)

  6. The Influences of Lime Powder (Citrus aurantifolia, S. on Hibiscus Leaf Tea Quality (Hibiscus rosasinensis, L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahadi Didi Ismanto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The first aim of the study is to look the influence of different lime powder concentration level addition tohibiscus leaf dip drink’s quality. Then, the Second influence of different lime powder for tea hibiscus leaf which accepted as best sensory analysis. The study was conducted from August to September 2014 in the Agricultural Technology Laboratory and Tablet preparation laboratory Pharmacy, University of Andalas, Padang Indonesia. This study is used complete randomized design (CRD consisting of 4 treatments and 3 replications. The data were analyzed by using ANOVA statistically and Duncan’s New Multiple Range (DNMRT at5% significance level. The Treatment in this study is the addition of lime powder by 55%, 65%, 75%, and85%. Observations of hibiscus leaf powder and lime powder such us water levels, ash levels, vitamin C and antioxidants, while product tea hibiscus leaf such water levels, ash levels, vitamin C, antioxidants, poly phenols, sensory analysis, and total plate count of it. The result of the study is showed that the addition of lime powder influence on water levels, ash levels, vitamin C, and antioxidants. Based sensory analysis and chemical analysis, the best beverage products hibiscus leaves are dipped in treatment A (addition of lime powder 55% with a 45% level of liking the taste, flavor and color of 75% and 55% chemical step, vitamin C 0.15%, 1.58% total poly phenols, antioxidant activity of 35.51%, total plate count was 2.83 × 103 cfu/ml, 7.76% water levels and ash levels of 9.87%.

  7. SYSTEMATIC FIELD SURVEY ON LIMES TRANSALUTANUS. SĂPATA CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen S. Teodor

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Two adjoined forts and their surroundings, elements of the 3rd century Roman frontier in Dacia – Limes Transalutanus, which were last archaeologically investigated in 1930, were recently systematic surface surveyed, resulting in the identification of the associated civilian settlement in what seemed, at first glance, as an unexpected location, more distant than other military vici the team had previously identified along the same frontier line.Not only the limits of the settlement at Săpata were established, but also the density of occupation and territory division into various functional areas, allowing further interpretations regarding the network of ancient local roads and a better understanding of the way in which the Romans adjusted their built facilities to available resources (water or exploited the strategical features of the relief.Using an efficient, quick and rather inexpensive combination of survey methods (field walking and measurements of the magnetic susceptibility of the soil applied on a 4.8 ha surface, followed by pottery typological and spatial distribution analysis, the investigation team tried to mitigate the challenging vegetation situation, adjusting likewise to the limited resources of a scheduled research project.  Data relevance was increased by applying statistical corrections and using complementary investigation methods in order to cover the various available types of land (relief, vegetation, visibility; while data integration was ensured employing a unitary spatial gridded system for fieldwork and also by relating the obtained results to the high resolution digital terrain model of the sites obtained during UAV photogrammetric aerial survey.In particular, the study takes the opportunity opened by the analysis of the Roman Age pottery found in Săpata vicus to debate on the significance of the traditional, yet not unitary perceived, scholarly division between ‘Chilia-Militari’ ware (dwelling on Dacian

  8. 40 CFR 141.564 - My system practices lime softening-is there any special provision regarding my individual filter...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false My system practices lime softening-is... People Individual Filter Turbidity Requirements § 141.564 My system practices lime softening—is there any special provision regarding my individual filter turbidity monitoring? If your system utilizes...

  9. Response of a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) stand to application of phosphorus, potassium, magnesium and lime: 1. Soil data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, G.; Diest, van A.

    1993-01-01

    In 1985-1988, a 25-yr-old Scots pine forest in Netherlands was limed and fertilized with P, K and Mg in a 24 factorial design and in an experiment with 5 liming levels, in order to alleviate potential nutrient deficiencies as a result of high N depositions (ca. 40 kg ha-1 yr-1). In this paper, effec

  10. No tillage and liming reduce greenhouse gas emissions from poorly drained agricultural soils in Mediterranean regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Marco, Sonia, E-mail: sonia.garcia@upm.es [Departamento de Química y Tecnología de los Alimentos, E.T.S.I. Agronómica, Alimentaria y de Biosistemas, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Abalos, Diego, E-mail: diego.abalosrodriguez@wur.nl [Departamento de Química y Tecnología de los Alimentos, E.T.S.I. Agronómica, Alimentaria y de Biosistemas, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Espejo, Rafael, E-mail: rafael.espejo@upm.es [Departamento de Producción Agraria, E.T.S.I. Agronómica, Alimentaria y de Biosistemas, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Vallejo, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.vallejo@upm.es [Departamento de Química y Tecnología de los Alimentos, E.T.S.I. Agronómica, Alimentaria y de Biosistemas, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Mariscal-Sancho, Ignacio, E-mail: i.mariscal@upm.es [Departamento de Producción Agraria, E.T.S.I. Agronómica, Alimentaria y de Biosistemas, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-10-01

    No tillage (NT) has been associated to increased N{sub 2}O emission from poorly drained agricultural soils. This is the case for soils with a low permeable Bt horizon, which generates a perched water layer after water addition (via rainfall or irrigation) over a long period of time. Moreover, these soils often have problems of acidity and require liming application to sustain crop productivity; changes in soil pH have large implications for the production and consumption of soil greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Here, we assessed in a split-plot design the individual and interactive effects of tillage practices (conventional tillage (CT) vs. NT) and liming (Ca-amendment vs. not-amendment) on N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} emissions from poorly drained acidic soils, over a field experiment with a rainfed triticale crop. Soil mineral N concentrations, pH, temperature, moisture, water soluble organic carbon, GHG fluxes and denitrification capacity were measured during the experiment. Tillage increased N{sub 2}O emissions by 68% compared to NT and generally led to higher CH{sub 4} emissions; both effects were due to the higher soil moisture content under CT plots. Under CT, liming reduced N{sub 2}O emissions by 61% whereas no effect was observed under NT. Under both CT and NT, CH{sub 4} oxidation was enhanced after liming application due to decreased Al{sup 3+} toxicity. Based on our results, NT should be promoted as a means to improve soil physical properties and concurrently reduce N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} emissions. Raising the soil pH via liming has positive effects on crop yield; here we show that it may also serve to mitigate CH{sub 4} emissions and, under CT, abate N{sub 2}O emissions. - Highlights: • The effect of tillage and liming on GHG was studied in poorly drained acidic soils. • NT reduced N{sub 2}O emissions, global warming potential and greenhouse gases intensity. • Liming reduced N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} emissions under CT; no effect was observed under NT

  11. Effects of Ranitidine on Insulin and Lime - Induced Gastric Secretion in Albinowistar Rats

    OpenAIRE

    E.O. Nwaichi; Gwotmut, M. D; Ossai, J

    2013-01-01

    Purpose:To study the possible effect (s) of a relative H2-receptor blocker, ranitidine on lime and insulin-induced gastric secretion in male and female albino rats. Methods: The rats were divided into 3 groups of lime juice, insulin and control in triplicates after 24hr starvation to empty the stomachand were canulated (oesophageal, tracheal and gastric) using Gosh and Schild method. Using N saline, the acid content of the effluentwas recorded. The 1st group of rats was perf...

  12. Extinction of Vibrio choleare in acidic substrata: contaminated cabbage and lettuce treated with lime juice

    OpenAIRE

    Mata, Leonardo; Vargas, Cecilia; Saborío-Argüello, Daniel; Vives-Blanco, Marcela

    1994-01-01

    artículo -- Universidad de Costa Rica. Instituto de Investigaciones en Salud, 1994 Lime juice killed Malian of Vibrio cholerae 01, El Tor, Inaba, present on cabbage and lettuce contaminated in the laboratory. The lethal effect was evident within 5 min of exposure to lime juice. No vibrios could be recovered at dilution 1:10 using alkaline peptone water (APW) and thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-saccharose agar (TCBS). More than 99.9 % of the initial inoculum was effectively destroyed. The nu...

  13. Geotechnical and Physico-Chemical Characterization of Low Lime Fly Ashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Ali Baig Moghal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore the possibility of using low-lime fly ashes, the physical and chemical properties which have a direct bearing on their geotechnical and geoenvironmental behaviors have been investigated. In this paper, two types of low-lime fly ashes, originating from India, have been used. A brief account of various methods adopted in characterizing their physical, chemical, and geotechnical properties is presented. The relative importance of each of these properties in enhancing the bulk applicability of fly ashes has been brought out.

  14. A theory manual for multi-physics code coupling in LIME.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belcourt, Noel; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Hooper, Russell Warren

    2011-03-01

    The Lightweight Integrating Multi-physics Environment (LIME) is a software package for creating multi-physics simulation codes. Its primary application space is when computer codes are currently available to solve different parts of a multi-physics problem and now need to be coupled with other such codes. In this report we define a common domain language for discussing multi-physics coupling and describe the basic theory associated with multiphysics coupling algorithms that are to be supported in LIME. We provide an assessment of coupling techniques for both steady-state and time dependent coupled systems. Example couplings are also demonstrated.

  15. Soil acidification and liming in grassland production and grassland soil fertility in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jure ČOP

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the evidences on grassland soil acidity and liming in relation to soil processes and herbage production. There is also an outline of the present state of soil acidity and acidity-related traits – contents of organic matter (OM, phosphorus (P and potassium (K in Slovene grassland. In grassland, soil acidification is an ongoing process under humid climate conditions. It is mainly driven by leaching of nutrients, net loss of cations due to retention in livestock products, use of physiologically acid fertilizers, acid rain and N2 fixation. This process is reduced by strong pH buffering capacity of the soil and by physiologically basic fertilizers. Acid grassland soils in Slovenia are widely distributed in spite of the fact that 44% of the total land has developed from a carbonate parent material. Of the 1713 grassland soil samples analysed during 2005-2007 45% were regarded as acid ones (pH < 5.5; in KCl, 57% as soils with very low P status (˂ 6 mg P2O5/100 g soil and 22% as soils with very low K status (˂ 10 mg K2O/100 soil. Increased content of soil organic matter was identified for alpine pastures (˃ 10 % OM in 44% of samples, mainly as a result of low decomposition rate. Liming of acid grassland soils did not always reflect in a higher herbage yield. The cause for this inefficiency is plant composition of grassland. Thus, many grassland plants with relatively high production potential have adapted to acid soil conditions. To illustrate the inconsistent liming effect three researches are reviewed. In the first two researches liming along with fertilizer application did not increase the yield comparing to the fertilized control while in the third research the increase amounted 26 %. Liming improves considerably botanical composition of the acid grassland (e.g. sward where Common Bent – Agrostis tenuis Sibth. – prevails and thus indirectly affects palatability and nutritive value of herbage. Grassland liming has a weak

  16. Response to Comment on "A Jurassic ornithischian dinosaur from Siberia with both feathers and scales".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godefroit, Pascal; Sinitsa, Sofia M; Dhouailly, Danielle; Bolotsky, Yuri L; Sizov, Alexander V; McNamara, Maria E; Benton, Michael J; Spagna, Paul

    2014-10-24

    Lingham-Soliar questions our interpretation of integumentary structures in the Middle-Late Jurassic ornithischian dinosaur Kulindadromeus as feather-like appendages and alternatively proposes that the compound structures observed around the humerus and femur of Kulindadromeus are support fibers associated with badly degraded scales. We consider this hypothesis highly unlikely because of the taphonomy and morphology of the preserved structures.

  17. Battling Jurassic Park: From a Fascination with Violence toward Constructive Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Beverlyn; Bohrer, Cynthia

    1997-01-01

    Studied preschool children's inability to distinguish fantasy from fact utilizing the case of the popular movie Jurassic Park and the subsequent false information children obtained about dinosaurs. Described attempts made by teachers to address the resultant aggressive behavior and false knowledge gained and replace it with constructive knowledge.…

  18. Palynology of uppermost Jurassic and lowermost Cretaceous strata in the Eastern Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, D.

    1965-01-01

    The present investigation is a systematical treatment of the sporomorphs from strata at the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary in the eastern Netherlands Twente area, and an attempt to apply palynology to detailed stratigraphical study, by making use of quantitative pollen analyses. The rock samples used

  19. The potential of vertebrate microfossils for marine to non-marine correlation in the Late Jurassic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Detlev Thies; Alexander Mudroch; Susan Turner

    2007-01-01

    Fish (cartilaginous: elasmobranch and bony: osteichthyan actinopterygian) and reptile (crocodile) microfossils comprising scales and teeth have been examined from a series of limestone samples in the Upper Jurassic of France and Germany to gauge the possibilities of using them for correlation between fully marine and hypo- or hyper-saline (non-marine) deposits.

  20. 3D visualisation of a Jurassic oolitic system with GPR data, Isle of Portland (UK)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Hansen, Trine Lykke; Nielsen, Lars

    The Isle of Portland shows exposure of uppermost Jurassic oolitic carbonate all along its coast and within several inland quarries. The exposure quality is very high with a potential 3D control. The site has a potential to understand the 3D architecture and the sedimentary dynamic of an oolitic s...

  1. Strobilus organization in the enigmatic gymnosperm Bernettia inopinata from the Jurassic of Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kustatscher, E.; van Konijnenburg - van Cittert, J.H.A.; Bauer, K.; Krings, M.

    2016-01-01

    The enigmatic fossil Bernettia inopinata from Lower Jurassic strata of Upper Franconia, Germany, has been described as a leaf-like structure a leaf-like structure bearing a proximal cluster of densely spaced, pillow-like objects believed to represent ovules or ovule-containing units. The systematic

  2. New finds of stegosaur tracks from the Upper Jurassic Lourinhã formation, Portugal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateus, Octavio; Milàn, Jesper; Romano, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Eleven new tracks from the Upper Jurassic of Portugal are described and attributed to the stegosaurian ichnogenus Deltapodus. One track exhibits exceptionally well−preserved impressions of skin on the plantar surface, showing the stegosaur foot to be covered by closely spaced skin tubercles of ca...

  3. Geochemical Characteristics of REE in Jurassic Coal of Yan'an Formation from Dongsheng Coalfield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵峰华; 丛志远; 彭苏萍; 唐跃刚; 任德贻

    2002-01-01

    Concentrations of rare earth elements (REE) in Jurassic coal of YanAn Formation from Dongsheng coalfield located in the northeast of Ordos basin were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Curves of distrib ution pattern of REE were drawn, and many geochemical parameters were calculated . The result shows that 1) The contents of REE in Jurassic coal with low ash an d sulfur are lower than those of Carboniferous and Permian coal from the Basin of North China; 2) Inside the Dongsheng coalfield, coal from the north has high er contents of REE than that form the south because the north is near the area of source rock which is the main supplier of REE, while the south is far away from the area of source rocks; 3) Although Jurassic coal in Dongsheng is the low-ash coal with less than 10%, the contents of REE are still proportional to ash yie ld of ash and SiO2 contents. 4) Although the Jurassic coal in Dongsheng were deposited in oxidative continental environment of river-lake, Eu depletion of RE E I n coal commonly exists, and positive abnormity of Ce dose not exist. This reflec ts the REE distribution pattern of REE in source rock of continental area; and 5) Compared with other rocks, coal shows extremely complexity of distribution pa ttern of REE, which is the result of continuous alteration and redistribution of matter in coal occurred in open basin system.

  4. Klukiopsis jurassica——A new Jurassic schizaeaceous fern from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓胜徽[1; 王仕俊[2

    2000-01-01

    A new Jurassic schizaeaceous fern Klukiopsis jurassica gen. et sp. nov. from Yima, Henan Province, China is described. The new fern is characterized by the abaxial sori arranged in two rows, apical and complete annulus and more than 800 smooth trilete spores in each sorus.

  5. The upper Jurassic-lower cretaceous siliciclastic system in the Morocco offshore - Prevenance, transport and deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertotti, G.; Arantegui, A.; Charton, R.; Luber, T.; Redfern, J.

    2015-01-01

    The Morocco segment of the Central Atlantic passive continental margin experienced km-scale exhumation during the early post-rift (late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous). In the Meseta and the High Atlas this led to the development of a N-S trending ridge sourcing terrigenous sediments which were brought t

  6. Architecture of an Upper Jurassic barrier island sandstone reservoir, Danish Central Graben:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Peter N.; Nielsen, Lars H.; Nielsen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    An unusually thick (c. 88 m), transgressive barrier island and shoreface sandstone succession characterizes the Upper Jurassic Heno Formation reservoir of the Freja oil field situated on the boundary of Denmark and Norway. The development and preservation of such thick transgressive barrier islan...... such that the island aggraded and even prograded seawards and became wider and longer due to the large surplus of sand....

  7. Battling Jurassic Park: From a Fascination with Violence toward Constructive Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Beverlyn; Bohrer, Cynthia

    1997-01-01

    Studied preschool children's inability to distinguish fantasy from fact utilizing the case of the popular movie Jurassic Park and the subsequent false information children obtained about dinosaurs. Described attempts made by teachers to address the resultant aggressive behavior and false knowledge gained and replace it with constructive knowledge.…

  8. Sense-Making--a Case Study Using the Movie "Jurassic Park."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Tony P.

    1996-01-01

    Introduces Sense-Making, an alternative methodology which allows an insight into a person's perception of reality. Interviews science teachers following a viewing of "Jurassic Park" to investigate the relationship of the movie to their ontological view of science, society, and self. (Author/MVL)

  9. New Isophlebioid Dragonflies from the Middle Jurassic of Inner Mongolia, China (Insecta: Odonata: Isophlebioptera:Campterophlebiidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Binglan; REN Dong; PANG Hong

    2008-01-01

    Three new species of fossil dragonflies assigned to Sinokaratawia Nel, Huang and Lin in family Campterophlebiidae, i.e. S. daohugouica sp. nov., S. magica sp. nov. and S. gloriosa sp. nov., and new materials of male S. prokopi Nel, Huang and Lin, 2007 are described from the Middle Jurassic of Daohugou, Inner Mongolia, China. An emended diagnosis of genus Sinokaratawia was proposed.

  10. Evolutionary and Ecological Sequelae of Mass Extinctions: Examples From the Continental Triassic-Jurassic Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, P. E.; Whiteside, J. H.

    2003-12-01

    The Triassic-Jurassic boundary at ˜200 Ma marks one of the five major mass-extinctions of the Phanerozoic and, depending on the metrics used, was similar in magnitude to the K-T mass extinction. In continental environments about 50% of all tetrapod families are eliminated and although floral diversity change is difficult to gauge, a similar proportion of palynomorph taxa disappear at the boundary. The extinction event appears to have been very abrupt, followed by a roughly 900 ky super-greenhouse period characterized by increased precipitation. We hypothesize a series of biological consequences of the drop in diversity and associated super-greenhouse based on observations of the earliest Jurassic assemblages, largely from eastern North America. 1) The drop in diversity results in a collapse of ecological interactions that tend to stabilize the composition of regional biotas and buffer them from invading forms. Triassic assemblages show considerable biogeographic provinciality despite the existence of Pangea, but the earliest Jurassic assemblages were extraordinarily homogenous with many vertebrate genera being essentially global in distribution. 2) Initially the post-boundary terrestrial assemblages were comprised of eurytopic trophic generalists, with animal communities with few herbivores, but abundant carnivores and detritivores subsisting on aquatic-based food webs. The earliest Jurassic tetrapod footprint record is overwhelmingly dominated by the footprints of ceratosaurian theropod dinosaurs, the latter having skull characteristics usually associated at least in part with piscivory. 3) The dramatic size changes over very short periods of time were likely due to an absence of competition (i.e., ecological release). The maximum size of theropod dinosaur footprints increased by about 25% within 10 ky following the boundary, corresponding to a doubling of mass. 4) Representatives of clades with intrinsically high rates of speciation tend to form species flocks

  11. Jurassic extension and Cenozoic inversion tectonics in the Asturian Basin, NW Iberian Peninsula: 3D structural model and kinematic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzkeda, Hodei; Bulnes, Mayte; Poblet, Josep; García-Ramos, José Carlos; Piñuela, Laura

    2016-09-01

    We constructed a geological map, a 3D model and cross-sections, carried out a structural analysis, determined the stress fields and tectonic transport vectors, restored a cross section and performed a subsidence analysis to unravel the kinematic evolution of the NE emerged portion of the Asturian Basin (NW Iberian Peninsula), where Jurassic rocks crop out. The major folds run NW-SE, normal faults exhibit three dominant orientations: NW-SE, NE-SW and E-W, and thrusts display E-W strikes. After Upper Triassic-Lower Jurassic thermal subsidence, Middle Jurassic doming occurred, accompanied by normal faulting, high heat flow and basin uplift, followed by Upper Jurassic high-rate basin subsidence. Another extensional event, possibly during Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous, caused an increment in the normal faults displacement. A contractional event, probably of Cenozoic age, led to selective and irregularly distributed buttressing and fault reactivation as reverse or strike-slip faults, and folding and/or offset of some previous faults by new generation folds and thrusts. The Middle Jurassic event could be a precursor of the Bay of Biscay and North Atlantic opening that occurred from Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, whereas the Cenozoic event would be responsible for the Pyrenean and Cantabrian ranges and the partial closure of the Bay of Biscay.

  12. Basin geodynamics and sequence stratigraphy of Upper Triassic to Lower Jurassic deposits of Southern Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Cédric; Hadouth, Suhail; Bouaziz, Samir; Lathuilière, Bernard; Rubino, Jean-Loup

    2016-05-01

    Aims of this paper are to propose a geodynamic and sequential framework for the late Triassic and early Jurassic of and south Tunisia and to evidence the impact of local tectonics on the stratigraphic architecture. Facies of the Upper Triassic to Lower Jurassic of Southern Tunisia have been interpreted in terms of depositional environments. A sequential framework and correlation schemes are proposed for outcrops and subsurface transects. Nineteen middle frequency sequences inserted in three and a half low frequency transgression/regression cycles were evidenced. Despite some datation uncertainties and the unknown durations of Lower Jurassic cycles, middle frequency sequences appear to be controlled by eustasy. In contrast the tectonics acted as an important control on low frequency cycles. The Carnian flooding was certainly favored by the last stages of a rifting episode which started during the Permian. The regression accompanied by the formation of stacked angular unconformities and the deposition of lowstand deposits during the late Carnian and Norian occured during the uplift and tilting of the northern basin margins. The transpressional activity of the Jeffara fault system generated the uplift of the Tebaga of Medenine high from the late Carnian and led to the Rhaetian regional angular Sidi Stout Unconformity. Facies analysis and well-log correlations permitted to evidence that Rhaetian to Lower Jurassic Messaoudi dolomites correspond to brecciated dolomites present on the Sidi Stout unconformity in the North Dahar area. The Early-cimmerian compressional event is a possible origin for the global uplift of the northern African margin and Western Europe during the late Carnian and the Norian. During the Rhaetian and the early Jurassic a new episode of normal faulting occured during the third low frequency flooding. This tectonosedimentary evolution ranges within the general geodynamic framework of the north Gondwana margin controlled by the opening of both

  13. Effect of the juice of lime (Citrus aurantifolia) on estrous cycle and ovulation of Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salawu, Adeola A; Osinubi, Abraham A A; Dosumu, Olufunke O; Kusemiju, Taiwo O; Noronha, Cressie C; Okanlawon, Abayomi O

    2010-01-01

    To determine the effect of lime juice on the estrous cycle and ovulation of cyclic female rats. Twenty-five adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were used. The study was divided into 2 experiments (I and II). In experiment I, 15 rats were randomly subclassified into 3 groups (Ia, Ib, and Ic) of 5 rats each. The estrous cycles of the rats were studied for the first 16 days to establish cyclicity, after which lime juice was administered by gastric gavage for the next 24 days. Rats in group Ia received 1 mL of undiluted lime juice, rats in group Ib received 1 mL of 50% diluted lime juice, and rats in group Ic (control animals) received only distilled water. In experiment II, 10 female rats were used and were categorized into 2 groups (IIa and IIb), with 5 rats in each group. Rats in group IIa received 1 mL of undiluted lime juice during the morning of proestrus, and those in group IIb received only distilled water on the day of proestrus. The rats were killed the next day with use of chloroform anesthesia. The upper parts of the oviducts were excised and examined under the light microscope for assessment of the number of ova shed. There was an irregular pattern in all phases of the estrous cycle of 100% of the rats given undiluted lime juice and in 80% of those given 50% diluted lime juice. There was a significant (P = .001) reduction in the number of ova shed in rats administered undiluted lime juice in comparison with the control animals. Ovulation was partially blocked, as shown by the reduced number of ova observed in the oviducts from the rats given undiluted lime juice (5.10 +/- 2.37) in comparison with the control rats (12.70 +/- 1.14). In rats, lime juice causes irregularity of the estrous cycle, partially blocks ovulation, and may possibly compromise fertility.

  14. Trans-border (north-east Serbia/north-west Bulgaria correlations of the Jurassic lithostratigraphic units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tchoumatchenco Platon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, correlations of the Jurassic sediments from NE Serbia with those of NW Bulgaria are made. The following Jurassic palaeogeographic units: the Eastern Getic, the Infra-Getic and the Moesian Platform are included in the study. The East Getic was studied in the outcrops near Rgotina, where the sedimentation started in the Hettangian and continued during the Callovian-Late Jurassic and is represented by platform carbonates. The Infra-Getic is documented by the sections of Dobra (Pesača and the allochtonous sediments near the Štubik. Very important for the Infra-Getic are the Late Jurassic volcano-sedimentary deposits of the Vratarnica Series, which crop out near Vratarnica Village. The Jurassic Moesian platform was studied in the sections near D. Milanovac and Novo Korito (Serbia and in their prolongation in NW Bulgaria into the Gornobelotintsi palaeograben. Very important are the correlation in the region of Vrška Čuka (Serbia and Vrashka Chuka (Bulgaria - Rabisha Village (Magura Cave. A revision of the Jurassic sediments on the Vidin palaeohorst, which were studied in the Belogradchik palaeohorst, Gorno-Belotintsi palaeograben, Belimel palaeohorst and the Mihaylovgrad palaeograben, is made. The sedimentation on the Vidin palaeohorst started during different parts of the Middle Jurassic, and in the Mihaylovgrad palaeograben during the Hettangian (Lower Jurassic where the sediments were deposited in relatively deeper water conditions. To south, the relatively shallow water sediments deposited on the Jurassic Vratsa palaeohorst on the southern board of the Mihaylovgrad palaeograben are described.

  15. Chapter 6. Tabular data and graphical images in support of the U.S. Geological Survey National Oil and Gas Assessment-East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces, Jurassic Smackover interior salt basins total petroleum system (504902), Travis Peak and Hosston formations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2006-01-01

    This chapter describes data used in support of the process being applied by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment (NOGA) project. Digital tabular data used in this report and archival data that permit the user to perform further analyses are available elsewhere on the CD-ROM. Computers and software may import the data without transcription from the Portable Document Format files (.pdf files) of the text by the reader. Because of the number and variety of platforms and software available, graphical images are provided as .pdf files and tabular data are provided in a raw form as tab-delimited text files (.tab files).

  16. Chapter 3. Tabular data and graphical images in support of the U.S. Geological Survey National Oil and Gas Assessment--East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces, Jurassic Smackover Interior salt basins total petroleum system (504902), Cotton Valley group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, T.R.; Le, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    This chapter describes data used in support of the process being applied by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment (NOGA) project. Digital tabular data used in this report and archival data that permit the user to perform further analyses are available elsewhere on the CD-ROM. Computers and software may import the data without transcription from the Portable Document Format files (.pdf files) of the text by the reader. Because of the number and variety of platforms and software available, graphical images are provided as .pdf files and tabular data are provided in a raw form as tab-delimited text files (.tab files).

  17. GEOGRAPHICAL ASPECTS REGARDING THE ROMAN LIMES IN THE COUNTY OF BISTRIȚA-NĂSĂUD (ROMANIA. CASE STUDY: THE SOMEȘ LIMES (SPERMEZEU-PERIȘOR-ZAGRA-SALVANĂSĂUD SECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan BÂCA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Roman limes from the county of Bistrița-Năsăud is part of the Porolissensis Limes and extends along a line connecting the villages Ciceu Corabia, Negrilești, Ciceu Poieni, Dobric, Spermezeu, Zagra, Salva, Năsăud, Livezile, and Orheiul Bistriței. It features specific elements, represented by Roman roads, watchtowers, burgi, and castra. Geographically, this section of the limes lies in a hilly area, represented by the Someșul Mare Hills (Ciceu Hills, Suplai Hills, Năsăud Hills and the Bistrița Hills. The touristic and leisure value of the Limes from the county of Bistrița-Năsăud is given by the geographical features of the region (relief, climate, vegetation and by the Roman vestiges discovered in the area. The present paper focus on the limes section stretching between the Ilișua Valley (at Spermezeu and the Someșul Mare River (at Năsăud, and aims to identify, catalogue, and evaluate elements of the Roman limes, and to elaborate touristic utilisation strategies of the archaeological sites. The team’s research identified good and very good preserved Roman tower substructures, allowing the precise mapping of the Roman limes line in the northeastern part of the Bistrița-Năsăud County.

  18. Engineering Properties of an Expansive soil Stabilized with Rice husk ash and Lime sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshaya Kumar Sabat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Compaction properties, California bearing ratio, shear strength parameters, compression index, swelling pressure and durability of an expansive soil stabilized with rice husk ash and lime sludge have been discussed in this paper. The effects of 7 and 28 days of curing on these properties except the compaction properties have also been discussed.

  19. Extinction of Vibrio cholerae in acidic substrata: contaminated cabbage and lettuce treated with lime juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, L; Vargas, C; Saborío, D; Vives, M

    1994-12-01

    Lime juice killed millions of Vibrio cholerae O1, El Tor, Inaba, present on cabbage and lettuce contaminated in the laboratory. The lethal effect was evident within 5 min of exposure to lime juice. No vibrios could be recovered at dilution 1:10 using alkaline peptone water (APW) and thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-saccharose agar (TCBS). More than 99.9% of the initial inoculum was effectively destroyed. The number of vibrios killed by lime juice was 2 to 6 logarithms greater than the maximum infecting dose, and 4 to 8 logs greater than the minimum infecting dose for cholera El Tor. The time interval needed for killing was smaller than the usual waiting time for serving food in homes and restaurants. The addition of lime juice to non-acidic foods, beverages and water, is strongly recommended to prevent infection with cholera vibrios and other acid-sensitive microorganisms. This measure is particularly important for rural and slum populations in the tropics and subtropics.

  20. Organic matter fractions and soil fertility under the influence of liming, vermicompost and cattle manure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagi Renato

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluates effects of cattle manure vermicompost in association with liming on soil fertility indexes. The experiment was carried out in greenhouse conditions, in pots containing samples of a Typic Hapludox, medium-textured soil. Five levels of vermicompost (equivalent to 0, 28, 42, 56, and 70 t ha-1, dry weight and five liming levels (to raise base saturation to 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60% were combined in a factorial scheme and samples were incubated for 180 days. Samples of the same soil received the equivalent to 70 t ha-1 of the cattle manure used to produce the vermicompost, and the same lime rates. Cattle manure was better than vermicompost to supply K and Mg. Small differences in P supply were observed between the manures. The vermicompost increased the levels of Ca, pH, organic matter (OM and CEC more than the manure. C-humic acids decreased and C-humin increased with vermicompost application. With liming, C-humic acids decreased, but the total content of OM was not affected.

  1. Thermophysical properties of enzyme clarified Lime (Citrus aurantifolia L) juice at different moisture contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunatha, S S; Raju, P S; Bawa, A S

    2014-11-01

    Thermophysical properties of enzyme clarified lime (Citrus aurantifolia L.) juice were evaluated at different moisture contents ranging from 30.37 % to 89.30 % (wet basis) corresponding to a water activity range of 0.835 to 0.979. The thermophysical properties evaluated were density, Newtonian viscosity, thermal conductivity, specific heat and thermal diffusivity. The investigation showed that density and Newtonian viscosity of enzyme clarified lime juice decreased significantly (p < 0.05) with increase in moisture content and water activity, whereas thermal conductivity and specific heat increased significantly (p < 0.05) with increase in moisture content and water activity and the thermal diffusivity increased marginally. Empirical mathematical models were established relating to thermophysical properties of enzyme clarified lime juice with moisture content/water activity employing regression analysis by the method of least square approximation. Results indicated the existence of strong correlation between thermophysical properties and moisture content/water activity of enzyme clarified lime juice, a significant (p < 0.0001) negative correlation between physical and thermal properties was observed.

  2. Steel foundry electric arc furnace dust management: stabilization by using lime and Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihoglu, Guray; Pinarli, Vedat

    2008-05-30

    The purpose of this study was to determine an appropriate treatment for steel foundry electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) prior to permanent disposal. Lime and Portland cement (PC)-based stabilization was applied to treat the EAFD that contains lead and zinc above the landfilling limits, and is listed by USEPA as hazardous waste designation K061 and by EU as 10 02 07. Three types of paste samples were prepared with EAFD content varying between 0 and 90%. The first type contained the EAFD and Portland cement, the second contained the EAFD, Portland cement, and lime, and the third contained the EAFD and lime. All the samples were subjected to toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP) after an air-curing period of 28 days. pH changes were monitored and acid neutralization capacity of the samples were examined. Treatment effectiveness was evaluated in terms of reducing the heavy metal leachability to the levels below the USEPA landfilling criteria. An optimum composition for the EAFD stabilization was formulated as 30% EAFD +35% lime +35% Portland cement to achieve the landfilling criteria. The pH interval, where the solubility of the heavy metals in the EAFD was minimized, was found to be between 8.2 and 9.4.

  3. Ecological benefits and risks arising from liming sugar maple dominated forests in northeastern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-David Moore; Rock Ouimet; Robert P. Long; Paul. A. Bukaveckas

    2015-01-01

    Liming, the application of carbonate materials (e.g., CaCO3, CaMg(CO3)2) to soils and surface waters, has been used extensively in Europe, and to a lesser extent in Canada and the United States, to mitigate the effects of acid deposition on forest and aquatic ecosystems. This literature review was...

  4. ASHES AS AN AGENT FOR CEMENT-LIME BASED SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION OF THE HAZARDOUS WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora Lyčkova

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the common treatment methods for the hazardous waste is the cement and cement-lime based solidification/stabilization (S/S. This article deals with the possibility of currently used recipe modification using fluidized bed heating plant ashes as an agent.

  5. Application of lime and calcium hypochlorite in the dephenolisation and discolouration of olive mill wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhoubza, F; Jail, A; Korchi, F; Idrissi, L Loukili; Hannache, H; Duarte, J C; Hassani, L; Nejmeddine, A

    2009-10-01

    The application of hypochlorite for the removal of soluble COD, phenolic and polyphenolic like compounds, and other organic compounds responsible for the olive mill wastewater (OOWW) colour has been experimentally studied. After the OOWW filtration on a sand column, the effluent was subjected to a fast liming under optimal conditions. Lime application reduced polyphenols, COD and SS contents to half of their initial values but an important blackening of the treated OOWW was observed, especially when adding high concentrations of lime (10% (W/V) and 15% (W/V)). A second stage of treatment was applied using calcium hypochlorite. In this stage, removal of the studied compounds reached as much as 95% at higher concentrations, and particularly the colouring of OOWW which is generally difficult to eliminate was greatly reduced. The OOWW hypochloration acted through coagulation-flocculation and a rapid oxidation of the organic matter proceeded from the first 5min. The kinetic study of the degradation of the waste polluting compounds from liming showed that Ca(ClO)(2) reacts similarly in the elimination of organic compounds, polyphenols, SS and colouration. The analysis of the organochloride compounds generated by the reaction between hypochlorite and the organic compounds showed that DDD, DDT and the heptachlor contents exceeded the values recommended by the International and European drinking water standards.

  6. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY COAGULATION/FILTRATION AND LIME SOFTENING PLANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents a long term performance (one year) study of 3 water treatment plants to remove arsenic from drinking water sources. The 3 plants consisted of 2 conventional coagulation/filtration plants and 1 lime softening plant. The study involved the collecting of weekly...

  7. Lime and compost promote plant re-colonization of metal-polluted, acidic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulriksen, Christopher; Ginocchio, Rosanna; Mench, Michel; Neaman, Alexander

    2012-09-01

    The revegetation of soils affected by historic depositions of an industrial complex in Central Chile was studied. The plant re-colonization from the existing soil seed bank and changes in the physico-chemical properties of the soil were evaluated in field plots amended with lime and/or compost. We found that the application of lime and/or compost decreased the Cu2+ ion activity in the soil solution and the exchangeable Cu in the soil, showing an effective Cu immobilization in the topsoil. Whereas lime application had no effect on plant productivity in comparison with the unamended control, the application of compost and lime+compost increased the plant cover and aboveground biomass due to the higher nutrient availability and water-holding capacity of the compost-amended soils. Although the Cu2+ activity and the exchangeable Cu were markedly lower in the amended soils than in the unamended control, the shoot Cu concentrations of Lolium spp. and Eschscholzia californica did not differ between the treatments.

  8. A BETTER INDICATOR STUDY EXAMINES ALTERNATIVE BIOLOGICAL INDICATORS OF DISINFECTION IN LIME-TREATED BIOSOLIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under the current regulations (CFR 503), Class B biosolids may be land applied with certain site restrictions. One method for achieving Class B status is to raise the pH of the sludge to >12 for a minimum of 2 hours with an alkaline material (normally lime). Alternately, a Clas...

  9. Water Utility Lime Sludge Reuse – An Environmental Sorbent for Power Utilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lime sludge can be used as an environmental sorbent to remove sulfur dioxide (SO2) and acid gases, by the ultra-fine CaCO3 particles, and to sequester mercury and other heavy metals, by the Natural Organic Matter and residual activated carbon. The laboratory experimental set up ...

  10. Ca(2+) and OH(-) release of ceramsites containing anorthite and gehlenite prepared from waste lime mud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Juan; Yang, Chuanmeng; Cui, Chong; Huang, Jiantao; Hussain, Ahmad; Ma, Hailong

    2016-09-01

    Lime mud is a kind of solid waste in the papermaking industry, which has been a source of serious environmental pollution. Ceramsites containing anorthite and gehlenite were prepared from lime mud and fly ash through the solid state reaction method at 1050°C. The objective of this study was to explore the efficiency of Ca(2+) and OH(-) release and assess the phosphorus and copper ion removal performance of the ceramsites via batch experiments, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that Ca(2+) and OH(-) were released from the ceramsites due to the dissolution of anorthite, gehlenite and available lime. It is also concluded that gehlenite had stronger capacity for Ca(2+) and OH(-) release compared with anorthite. The Ca(2+) release could be fit well by the Avrami kinetic model. Increases of porosity, dosage and temperature were associated with increases in the concentrations of Ca(2+) and OH(-) released. Under different conditions, the ceramsites could maintain aqueous solutions in alkaline conditions (pH=9.3-10.9) and the release of Ca(2+) was not affected. The removal rates of phosphorus and copper ions were as high as 96.88% and 96.81%, respectively. The final pH values of both phosphorus and copper ions solutions changed slightly. The reuse of lime mud in the form of ceramsites is an effective strategy.

  11. Evaluation of the impact of lime softening waste disposal in natural environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinking water treatment residues (WTR), generated from the lime softening processes, are commonly reused or disposed of in a number of applications; these include use as a soil amendment or a subsurface fill. Recently questions were posed by the Florida regulatory community on w...

  12. Assessment of metal bioavailability in smelter-contaminated soil before and after lime amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bade, Rabindra; Oh, Sanghwa; Sik Shin, Won

    2012-06-01

    In this study, changes in bioavailable concentrations of Pb, Zn, Cu and As in former smelter site soils (J1 and J2) were investigated before and after lime amendment. The immobilization efficiencies of metal(loid)s were evaluated by Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). Their bioavailable concentrations in the soils were evaluated by the acid-extractable and -reducible fractions in Standard Measurement and Testing Program (i.e., SM&T(I+II)), in vitro physiologically based extraction test (PBET) and diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT). The results showed that the bioavailable concentrations remarkably decreased after lime amendment in both J1 and J2 soils. DGT uptake and resupply (R) of Zn, Cu and As from soil to soil solution increased but that of Pb decreased. This pattern was consistent with SM&T(I+II)- and PBET-extractable concentrations after lime amendment. This indicates that lime amendment is highly effective for the immobilization of Zn, Cu and As, but not for Pb. Our results implicate that DGT can be used to estimate bioavailability of metal(loid)s in soils and further extended to estimate risk reduction after soil remediation.

  13. Thermophysical properties of hydrophobised lime plaster - Experimental analysis of moisture effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlíková, Milena; Pernicová, Radka; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-07-01

    Lime plasters are the most popular finishing materials in renewal of historical buildings and culture monuments. Because of their limited durability, new materials and design solutions are investigated in order to improve plasters performance in harmful environmental conditions. For the practical use, the plasters mechanical resistivity and the compatibility with substrate are the most decisive material parameters. However, also plasters hygric and thermal parameters affecting the overall hygrothermal function of the renovated structures are of the particular importance. On this account, the effect of moisture content on the thermophysical properties of a newly designed lime plasters containing hydrophobic admixture is analysed in the paper. For the comparative purposes, the reference lime and cement-lime plasters are tested as well. Basic characterization of the tested materials is done using bulk density, matrix density, and porosity measurements. Thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity in the broad range of moisture content are experimentally accessed using a transient impulse method. The obtained data reveals the significant increase of the both studied thermal parameters with increasing moisture content and gives information on plasters behaviour in a highly humid environment and/or in the case of their possible direct contact with liquid water. The accessed material parameters will be stored in a material database, where can find use as an input data for computational modelling of coupled heat and moisture transport in this type of porous building materials.

  14. Fractal Loop Heat Pipe Performance Comparisons of a Soda Lime Glass and Compressed Carbon Foam Wick

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myre, David; Silk, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    This study compares heat flux performance of a Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) wick structure fabricated from compressed carbon foam with that of a wick structure fabricated from sintered soda lime glass. Each wick was used in an LHP containing a fractal based evaporator. The Fractal Loop Heat Pipe (FLHP) was designed and manufactured by Mikros Manufacturing Inc. The compressed carbon foam wick structure was manufactured by ERG Aerospace Inc., and machined to specifications comparable to that of the initial soda lime glass wick structure. Machining of the compressed foam as well as performance testing was conducted at the United States Naval Academy. Performance testing with the sintered soda lime glass wick structures was conducted at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Heat input for both wick structures was supplied via cartridge heaters mounted in a copper block. The copper heater block was placed in contact with the FLHP evaporator which had a circular cross-sectional area of 0.88 cm(sup 2). Twice distilled, deionized water was used as the working fluid in both sets of experiments. Thermal performance data was obtained for three different Condenser/Subcooler temperatures under degassed conditions. Both wicks demonstrated comparable heat flux performance with a maximum of 75 W/cm observed for the soda lime glass wick and 70 W /cm(sup 2) for the compressed carbon foam wick.

  15. Initial growth of Schizolobium parahybae in Brazilian Cerrado soil under liming and mineral fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademilson Coneglian

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT High prices and the scarcity of hardwoods require the use of alternative wood sources, such as the Guapuruvu (Schizolobium parahybae, an arboreal species native to the Atlantic Forest, which has fast growth and high market potential. However, there is no information on its cultivation in the Brazilian Cerrado. Thus, this study aimed to analyze the contribution of mineral fertilization and liming in a Cerrado soil on the initial growth of Schizolobium parahybae. The experiment was set in a randomized block design, with 4 treatments (Cerrado soil; soil + liming; soil + fertilizer; and soil + fertilizer + liming and 15 replicates. The following variables were analyzed: plant height, stem diameter, number of leaves, total, shoot, leaf, root and stem dry matter, and root/shoot ratio. The obtained data were subjected to the analysis of variance, Tukey test and regression analysis. During the initial growth, Schizolobium parahybae can be cultivated in a Brazilian Cerrado soil only under mineral fertilization, with no need for soil liming.

  16. Application of lime and urea and its effect on development of Phythophthora palmivora.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakti Widyanta Pratama

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Black pod rot disease (BPRD which is caused by Phytophthora palmivora is one of the main diseases of cocoa cultivations particularly in plantations with wet climate. Black pod rot can develop rapidly under high humidity environments, particularly during rainy seasons. This disease can cause loss of harvest of up to 46.63% in East Java. The various control efforts attempted so far have not resulted in significant improvements. Urea, in addition to functioning as fertilizer, can also produce the ammonia gas which is believed to be able to suppress black pod rot. This research aims to determine the effectiveness of black pod rot control using the combination of lime and urea. This research was conducted from June to September 2013. The materials used in test included sterile soil, black pod rot infected cocoa, urea, and agricultural lime. Observation results showed that ammonia could form from urea. Lime can increase the speed of the formation. The ammonia gas forming from 0.06% urea and 0.3% lime can control the P. palmivora fungus inside the soil.

  17. Genetic Diversity and Population Differentiation of Guignardia mangiferae from “Tahiti” Acid Lime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Wickert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the citrus plants, “Tahiti” acid lime is known as a host of G. mangiferae fungi. This species is considered endophytic for citrus plants and is easily isolated from asymptomatic fruits and leaves. G. mangiferae is genetically related and sometimes confused with G. citricarpa which causes Citrus Black Spot (CBS. “Tahiti” acid lime is one of the few species that means to be resistant to this disease because it does not present symptoms. Despite the fact that it is commonly found in citric plants, little is known about the populations of G. mangiferae associated with these plants. Hence, the objective of this work was to gain insights about the genetic diversity of the G. mangiferae populations that colonize “Tahiti” acid limes by sequencing cistron ITS1-5.8S-ITS2. It was verified that “Tahiti” acid lime plants are hosts of G. mangiferae and also of G. citricarpa, without presenting symptoms of CBS. Populations of G. mangiferae present low-to-moderate genetic diversity and show little-to-moderate levels of population differentiation. As gene flow was detected among the studied populations and they share haplotypes, it is possible that all populations, from citrus plants and also from the other known hosts of this fungus, belong to one great panmictic population.

  18. Instability improvement of the subgrade soils by lime addition at Borg El-Arab, Alexandria, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Shinawi, A.

    2017-06-01

    Subgrade soils can affect the stability of any construction elsewhere, instability problems were found at Borg El-Arab, Alexandria, Egypt. This paper investigates geoengineering properties of lime treated subgrade soils at Borg El-Arab. Basic laboratory tests, such as water content, wet and dry density, grain size, specific gravity and Atterberg limits, were performed for twenty-five samples. Moisture-density (compaction); California Bearing Ratio (CBR) and Unconfined Compression Strength (UCS) were conducted on treated and natural soils. The measured geotechnical parameters of the treated soil shows that 6% lime is good enough to stabilize the subgrade soils. It was found that by adding lime, samples shifted to coarser side, Atterberg limits values of the treated soil samples decreased and this will improve the soil to be more stable. On the other hand, Subgrade soils improved as a result of the bonding fine particles, cemented together to form larger size and reduce the plastiCity index which increase soils strength. The environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) is point to the presence of innovative aggregated cement materials which reduce the porosity and increase the strength as a long-term curing. Consequently, the mixture of soil with the lime has acceptable mechanical characteristics where, it composed of a high strength base or sub-base materials and this mixture considered as subgrade soil for stabilizations and mitigation the instability problems that found at Borg Al-Arab, Egypt.

  19. COMPARATIVE EXTRACTION OF PECTIC AND POLYPHENOLS FROM MEXICAN LIME POMACE AND BAGASSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Sanchez-Aldana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mexican lime bagasse and pomace are rich in pectin and they also represent an important source of value-added compounds such as polyphenols. Two different options for the combined recovery of pectin and phenolic compounds from Mexican lime bagasse and pomace, two byproducts of industrial lime processing, were developed. Conventional and microwave-assisted extraction methods were used. All pectic extracts presented a degree of esterification in the range of 70%. Pomace extracts had the higher pectin yield and the lower polyphenol content. Among the bioactive compounds identified by HPLC were two flavonones, naringin and hesperidin, all compounds were present in low concentration in the pectic extracts. Microwave pectic extracts presented depolymerization, as observed by molecular weight determination (12 KDa and compared against conventional pectic extracts which presented a molecular weight of 670 KDa. The film forming capacity of pectic extracts was also evaluated. Antioxidant activity of pectic extracts was also assessed by three different methods; all extracts showed a better activity in Fe2+ chelating assay (62.85-73.32% and lipid oxidation inhibition (63.07-72.28% than in DPPH radical inhibition (5.32-6.65%. These findings indicate a correlation between the amount of phenolic compounds and the antioxidative capacity. Conventional pectic extracts from Mexican lime bagasse and pomace presented bioactive compounds with potential application for edible films and coatings in food industry.

  20. Extraction of fleshing oil from waste limed fleshings and biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhya, K V; Abinandan, S; Vedaraman, N; Velappan, K C

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was focused on extraction of fleshing oil from limed fleshings with different neutralization process by ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) followed by solvent extraction. The production of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) from limed fleshing oil by two stage process has also been investigated. The central composite design (CCD) was used to study the effect of process variables viz., amount of flesh, particle size and time of fleshing oil extraction. The maximum yield of fleshing oil from limed fleshings post neutralization by ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) was 26.32g and 12.43g obtained at 200g of flesh, with a particle size of 3.90mm in the time period of 2h. Gas chromatography analysis reveals that the biodiesel (FAME) obtained from limed fleshings is rich in oleic and palmitic acids with weight percentages 46.6 and 32.2 respectively. The resulting biodiesel was characterized for its physio-chemical properties of diesel as per international standards (EN14214).

  1. Effect of feeding poultry manure treated with antibiotic, bacteriostat, and lime on the performance of chicks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadagopan, V.R.; Rao, P.V.; Reddy, V.R.

    1977-01-01

    A 4-week experiment was conducted with 5-week-old New Hampshire chicks employing treated and untreated dried poultry manure (DPM) at 15% level in the diet. Treating the fresh manure either with antibiotic, bacteriostat, or lime did not show any beneficial effect over untreated manure. DPM at 15% of the feed showed a nonsignificant beneficial effect on weight gain.

  2. GEOSTATISTICAL MODEL EVALUATION OF LIMING ON OSIJEK-BARANYA COUNTY EXAMPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Vukadinović

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Unfavorable pH of soil is the main reason for several different problems in debalance of mineral nutrition which can cause many problems in plant growth; such as leaves and fruit chlorosis and necrosis; etc. Therefore; liming as a measure for improving amount of acids soils must be conducted very carefully; with detail chemical soil analyses. This paper presents a segment of computer model for liming recommendation at the example of Osijek-Baranya County. Results of liming recommendation were obtained by geostatistical interpolation method – kriging. Totals of 9023 soil samples were analyzed in the period 2003–2007. The substitution acidity average was 5.49 (minimum 3.41 to maximum 8.20. Kriging shown that 241 379 ha (58.3% area of Osijek-Baranya County were acids soil. Therefore 90 593 ha have substitution acidity lower than 4.5 and 150 786 ha have pH KCl between 4.5 and 5.5. Except carbocalk; other "slowly-effect" materials can be recommended for liming; especially for vineyards and orchards.

  3. Lactic Acid Fermentation, Urea and Lime Addition: Promising Faecal Sludge Sanitizing Methods for Emergency Sanitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, C.; Malambo, D.H.; Gonzalez Perez, M.E.; Nobela, H.N.; De Pooter, L.; Spit, J.; Hooijmans, C.M.; Van de Vossenberg, J.; Greya, W.; Thole, B.; Van Lier, J.B.; Brdjanovic, D.

    2015-01-01

    In this research, three faecal sludge sanitizing methods—lactic acid fermentation, urea treatment and lime treatment—were studied for application in emergency situations. These methods were investigated by undertaking small scale field trials with pit latrine sludge in Blantyre, Malawi. Hydrated lim

  4. Limiting salt crystallization damage in lime mortar by using crystallization modifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granneman, S.J.C.; Shahidzadeh, N.; Lubelli, B.A.; Hees, R.P.J. van

    2014-01-01

    Salt crystallization is a recurrent cause of damage in porous building materials. Lime-based mortars, which were widely used in construction of ancient masonry, are especially prone to salt damage, due to their low mechanical strength. Existing solutions to tackle salt damage in mortars have been ma

  5. Effect of Particle Size Distribution of Lime Sludge on the Hydrophobicity of Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC is a filler that is widely used for papermaking, and lime sludge is a special type of PCC recovered from the black liquor from kraft pulping. There has been some concern that lime sludge may interfere with the development of paper’s hydrophobicity in comparison with commercial PCC and ground calcium carbonate (GCC due to the presence of impurities when alkyl ketene dimer (AKD is used as the sizing additive. In this work, fillers with different particle size distributions were prepared, and the effects of particle composition on surface chemistry of fillers, adsorption for AKD, sizing degree of final paper sheets, and retention behavior of fillers were evaluated. The results showed that, through matching different particle size distributions for lime sludge fillers, the negative zeta potential decreased from -26.2 mV to -20.8 mV, the specific surface area decreased from 15.0 m2/g to 9.1 m2/g, and total pore volume decreased from 0.037 cm3/g to 0.026 cm3/g, which was favorable for the low adsorption for AKD. Consequently the sizing effect of filled paper was improved. Moreover, the retention rate also was increased by changing the particle size distribution of lime sludge.

  6. Belowground ectomycorrhizal fungal communities respond to liming in three southern Swedish coniferous forest stands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, Rasmus; Clemmensen, Karina

    2009-01-01

    In this study we report on changes in the belowground ectomycorrhizal fungal communities in southern Swedish coniferous forests as a consequence of liming with 3-7 ton limestone per hectare 16 years prior to the study. A total of 107 ectomycorrhizal fungi were identified from 969 independently...

  7. Identification of genes differentially expressed during interaction of Mexican lime tree infected with "Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamharir, Maryam Ghayeb; Mardi, Mohsen; Alavi, Seyed Mohammad; Hasanzadeh, Nader; Nekouei, Mojtaba Khayyam; Zamanizadeh, Hamid Reza; Alizadeh, Ali; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hoseini

    2011-01-01

    "Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia", is the causative agent of witches' broom disease in Mexican lime trees (Citrus aurantifolia L.), and is responsible for major losses of Mexican lime trees in Southern Iran and Oman. The pathogen is strictly biotrophic, and thus is completely dependent on living host cells for its survival. The molecular basis of compatibility and disease development in this system is poorly understood. Therefore, we have applied a cDNA- amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) approach to analyze gene expression in Mexican lime trees infected by "Ca. Phytoplasma aurantifolia". We carried out cDNA-AFLP analysis on grafted infected Mexican lime trees of the susceptible cultivar at the representative symptoms stage. Selective amplifications with 43 primer combinations allowed the visualisation of 55 transcript-derived fragments that were expressed differentially between infected and non-infected leaves. We sequenced 51 fragments, 36 of which were identified as lime tree transcripts after homology searching. Of the 36 genes, 70.5% were down-regulated during infection and could be classified into various functional groups. We showed that Mexican lime tree genes that were homologous to known resistance genes tended to be repressed in response to infection. These included the genes for modifier of snc1 and autophagy protein 5. Furthermore, down-regulation of genes involved in metabolism, transcription, transport and cytoskeleton was observed, which included the genes for formin, importin β 3, transducin, L-asparaginase, glycerophosphoryl diester phosphodiesterase, and RNA polymerase β. In contrast, genes that encoded a proline-rich protein, ubiquitin-protein ligase, phosphatidyl glycerol specific phospholipase C-like, and serine/threonine-protein kinase were up-regulated during the infection. The present study identifies a number of candidate genes that might be involved in the interaction of Mexican lime trees with "Candidatus Phytoplasma

  8. Effects of Biochar and Lime on Soil Physicochemical Properties and Tobacco Seedling Growth in Red Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Pan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Red soil, mainly found in the southern China, is developed in a warm, moist climate. The main property of the soils is strong acidity, aluminum toxicity, and low available nutrients. In this study, different effects of biochar and lime on soil physicochemical properties and tobacco growth were determined in red soil, so as to provide a scientific foundation for soil improvement tobacco field. A pot experiment was designed and conducted at four biochar levels(0, 0.5%, 1%, 2% and normal lime level (0.3% to study effects of two different soil amendments on red soil pH, exchangeable aluminum(Exc-Al and exchangeable manganese(Exc-Mn, available nutrients and organic carbon (SOC. Meanwhile, agronomic traits, biomass and leaves elements of tobacco were also tested. Results showed that the agronomic characters and biomass of tobacco seedling had changed effectively after biochar or lime was added. Under 0.5%, 1% biochar treatment, the content of nitrogen(N, phosphorus(P, potassium(K, calcium(Ca and magnesium(Mg in tobacco leaves substantially raised. However, when 2% biochar was applied, leaves N content declined by 9.3%. Compared with the control, leaves N, P and Ca content increased observably in the lime treatment. However, its K and Mg content decreased by 9.0% and 13.3% respectively. Alkaline nitrogen(SAN, available phosphorus (SAP, available potassium (SAK, and exchangeable calcium (Exc-Ca and exchangeable magnesium (Exc-Mg were improved obviously in soil applied with biochar. Only the content of Exc-Ca was significantly increased in lime treatment. In addition, it was beneficial to improve soil pH and reduce soil Exc-Al when biochar or lime had been used. Thus, both biochar and lime are propitious to increase soil pH value, lessen soil Exc-Al content, and improve the growth of tobacco seedling. Furthermore, biochar application also can raise the content of available nutrient and SOC in red soil.

  9. Identification of genes differentially expressed during interaction of Mexican lime tree infected with "Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia"

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    Nekouei Mojtaba

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background "Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia", is the causative agent of witches' broom disease in Mexican lime trees (Citrus aurantifolia L., and is responsible for major losses of Mexican lime trees in Southern Iran and Oman. The pathogen is strictly biotrophic, and thus is completely dependent on living host cells for its survival. The molecular basis of compatibility and disease development in this system is poorly understood. Therefore, we have applied a cDNA- amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP approach to analyze gene expression in Mexican lime trees infected by "Ca. Phytoplasma aurantifolia". Results We carried out cDNA-AFLP analysis on grafted infected Mexican lime trees of the susceptible cultivar at the representative symptoms stage. Selective amplifications with 43 primer combinations allowed the visualisation of 55 transcript-derived fragments that were expressed differentially between infected and non-infected leaves. We sequenced 51 fragments, 36 of which were identified as lime tree transcripts after homology searching. Of the 36 genes, 70.5% were down-regulated during infection and could be classified into various functional groups. We showed that Mexican lime tree genes that were homologous to known resistance genes tended to be repressed in response to infection. These included the genes for modifier of snc1 and autophagy protein 5. Furthermore, down-regulation of genes involved in metabolism, transcription, transport and cytoskeleton was observed, which included the genes for formin, importin β 3, transducin, L-asparaginase, glycerophosphoryl diester phosphodiesterase, and RNA polymerase β. In contrast, genes that encoded a proline-rich protein, ubiquitin-protein ligase, phosphatidyl glycerol specific phospholipase C-like, and serine/threonine-protein kinase were up-regulated during the infection. Conclusion The present study identifies a number of candidate genes that might be involved in the

  10. Energy Efficient Microwave Hybrid Processing of Lime for Cement, Steel, and Glass Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fall, Morgana L; Yakovlev, Vadim; Sahi, Catherine; Baranova, Inessa; Bowers, Johnney G; Esquenazi\t, Gibran L

    2012-02-10

    In this study, the microwave materials interactions were studied through dielectric property measurements, process modeling, and lab scale microwave hybrid calcination tests. Characterization and analysis were performed to evaluate material reactions and energy usage. Processing parameters for laboratory scale and larger scale calcining experiments were developed for MAT limestone calcination. Early stage equipment design concepts were developed, with a focus on microwave post heating treatment. The retrofitting of existing rotary calcine equipment in the lime industry was assessed and found to be feasible. Ceralink sought to address some of the major barriers to the uptake of MAT identified as the need for (1) team approach with end users, technology partners, and equipment manufacturers, (2) modeling that incorporates kiln materials and variations to the design of industrial microwave equipment. This project has furthered the commercialization effort of MAT by working closely with an industrial lime manufacturer to educate them regarding MAT, identifying equipment manufacturer to supply microwave equipment, and developing a sophisticated MAT modeling with WPI, the university partner. MAT was shown to enhance calcining through lower energy consumption and faster reaction rates compared to conventional processing. Laboratory testing concluded that a 23% reduction in energy was possible for calcining small batches (5kg). Scale-up testing indicated that the energy savings increased as a function of load size and 36% energy savings was demonstrated (22 kg). A sophisticated model was developed which combines simultaneous microwave and conventional heating. Continued development of this modeling software could be used for larger scale calcining simulations, which would be a beneficial low-cost tool for exploring equipment design prior to actual building. Based on these findings, estimates for production scale MAT calcining benefits were calculated, assuming uptake of

  11. Remote assessment of instantaneous changes in water chemistry after liming in a Nova Scotia catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelidis, Christine

    2013-04-01

    Remote assessment of instantaneous changes in water chemistry after liming in a Nova Scotia catchment ANGELIDIS, C.1, STERLING, S.1, BREEN, A.2, BIAGI, K.1., and CLAIR, T.A.1 1Dalhousie University, christine.angelidis@dal.ca, 2Bluenose Coastal Action Foundation, andrew@coastalaction.org Southwestern Nova Scotia has some of the most acidic freshwaters in North America due to its location downwind of the major emission sources in eastern Canada and the US and due to a resistant geology which offers little acid buffering capacity (Clair et al. 2007). Because of the poor buffering and regionally high runoff values, hydrological events such as snowmelt and rain storms are frequent and can cause sudden changes in water chemistry which can have devastating effects on freshwater biota due to increases in acidity and metals (Dennis and Clair in press). Clair et al. (2001) have estimated the potential frequency of acidic episodes in this region based on a number of hydrological factors, though the technology available at the time to monitor short-term changes was not dependable. Recent advances in equipment have made the assessment of the frequency and severity of acidic episodes easier and more accurate, allowing better interpretation and prediction of hydrogeochemical changes with variations in weather and deposition patterns. Here we take advantage of these recent advances to monitor water chemistry in an experimental catchment, and explore the response to catchment liming. Catchment liming is one way of mitigating the effects of acid deposition in sensitive areas. We limed a 50 ha catchment at a rate of 5 t/ha in the Gold River watershed of southwest Nova Scotia to examine the interactions between application of lime with the geological and climatological conditions of this region and acid episode frequency. In order to assess changes of episode frequency caused by liming, we established two mobile environmental monitoring platforms in the catchment: a control site

  12. In-Depth Transcriptome Sequencing of Mexican Lime Trees Infected with Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia.

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    Mohsen Mardi

    Full Text Available Witches' broom disease of acid lime greatly affects the production of Mexican lime in Iran. It is caused by a phytoplasma (Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie phytoplasma pathogenicity and the mode of interactions with host plants are largely unknown. Here, high-throughput transcriptome sequencing was conducted to explore gene expression signatures associated with phytoplasma infection in Mexican lime trees. We assembled 78,185 unique transcript sequences (unigenes with an average length of 530 nt. Of these, 41,805 (53.4% were annotated against the NCBI non-redundant (nr protein database using a BLASTx search (e-value ≤ 1e-5. When the abundances of unigenes in healthy and infected plants were compared, 2,805 transcripts showed significant differences (false discovery rate ≤ 0.001 and log2 ratio ≥ 1.5. These differentially expressed genes (DEGs were significantly enriched in 43 KEGG metabolic and regulatory pathways. The up-regulated DEGs were mainly categorized into pathways with possible implication in plant-pathogen interaction, including cell wall biogenesis and degradation, sucrose metabolism, secondary metabolism, hormone biosynthesis and signalling, amino acid and lipid metabolism, while down-regulated DEGs were predominantly enriched in ubiquitin proteolysis and oxidative phosphorylation pathways. Our analysis provides novel insight into the molecular pathways that are deregulated during the host-pathogen interaction in Mexican lime trees infected by phytoplasma. The findings can be valuable for unravelling the molecular mechanisms of plant-phytoplasma interactions and can pave the way for engineering lime trees with resistance to witches' broom disease.

  13. Use of Sewage Sludge After Liming as Fertilizer for Maize Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.K.JAMALI; T.G.KAZI; M.B.ARAIN; H.I.AFRIDI; A.R.MEMON; N.JALBANI; A.SHAH

    2008-01-01

    The use of sewage sludge on agricultural land provides an alternative for its disposal.Therefore,the aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of using industrial sewage sludge produced in Pakistan,as an agricultural fertilizer.The agricultural soil amended with 250 g kg-1 sewage sludge with or without lime treatment was used for the growth of the common local grain crop,maize (Zea maize).The mobility of the trace and toxic metals in the sludge samples was assessed by applying a modified BCR sequential extraction procedure.The single extraction procedure was comprised of the application of a mild extractant (CaC12) and water,for the estimation of the proportion of easily soluble metal fractions.To check the precision of the analytical results,the concentrations of trace and toxic metals in every step of the sequential extraction procedure were summed up and compared with total metal concentrations.The plant-available metal contents,as indicated by the deionized water and 0.01 tool L-1 CaCl2 solution extraction fractions and the exchangeable fraction of the sequential extraction,decreased significantly (P < 0.05) with lime application because of the reduced metal availability at a higher pH,except in the cases of Cd and Cu,whose mobility was slightly increased.Sludge amendment enhanced the dry weight yield of maize and the increase was more obvious for the soil with lime treatment.Liming the sewage sludge reduced the trace and toxic metal contents in the grain tissues,except Cu and Cd,which were below the permissible limits of these metals.The present experiment demonstrates that liming was an important factor in facilitating the growth of maize in sludge-amended soil.

  14. Impacts of fresh lime juice and peel on atherosclerosis progression in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshtam, Maryam; Asgary, Sedigheh; Moshtaghian, Jamal; Naderi, Gholamali; Jafari-Dinani, Narges

    2013-11-01

    The main protective role of antioxidants in the progression of atherosclerosis has been shown in some studies. Therefore, this project evaluated the effects of Citrus aurantifolia (Christm) juice and peel on antioxidant activity and atherosclerosis progression in rabbits receiving a hypercholesterolemic diet. Forty white New Zealand male rabbits were randomly allocated to four groups. All groups were on hypercholesterolemic diet for two months. While the first group was considered as the hypercholesterolemic control, groups 2 and 3 (intervention groups) received 5 ml/day lime juice and 1 g/day dried lime peel powder, respectively. Group 4 was fed a normal diet (normal control). Before and after the study, weight was measured and a fasting blood specimen was taken from the rabbits. Serum lipids analyses and antioxidant activity evaluations were then performed. The rabbits' aorta and coronary arteries were separated and the presence of fatty streaks was studied. Comparing to the hypercholesterolemic control group (-25.2 ± 7.0), only the plasma total antioxidant capacity change was significantly more in rabbits supplemented with lime juice (16.3 ± 14.7) and peel (8.6 ± 7.1) (P = 0.008). The presence of fatty streaks in coronary arteries and aorta of the intervention groups [juice (0.2 ± 0.01); peel (0.0 ± 0.00)] was significantly decreased compared to the hypercholesterolemic control group (1.2 ± 0.4) (P Citrus aurantifolia peel and juice increase plasma antioxidant capacity in rabbits, and can thus prevent or decelerate the process of atherogenesis. However, lime peel is more effective than lime juice.

  15. No tillage and liming reduce greenhouse gas emissions from poorly drained agricultural soils in Mediterranean regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Marco, Sonia; Abalos, Diego; Espejo, Rafael; Vallejo, Antonio; Mariscal-Sancho, Ignacio

    2016-10-01

    No tillage (NT) has been associated to increased N2O emission from poorly drained agricultural soils. This is the case for soils with a low permeable Bt horizon, which generates a perched water layer after water addition (via rainfall or irrigation) over a long period of time. Moreover, these soils often have problems of acidity and require liming application to sustain crop productivity; changes in soil pH have large implications for the production and consumption of soil greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Here, we assessed in a split-plot design the individual and interactive effects of tillage practices (conventional tillage (CT) vs. NT) and liming (Ca-amendment vs. not-amendment) on N2O and CH4 emissions from poorly drained acidic soils, over a field experiment with a rainfed triticale crop. Soil mineral N concentrations, pH, temperature, moisture, water soluble organic carbon, GHG fluxes and denitrification capacity were measured during the experiment. Tillage increased N2O emissions by 68% compared to NT and generally led to higher CH4 emissions; both effects were due to the higher soil moisture content under CT plots. Under CT, liming reduced N2O emissions by 61% whereas no effect was observed under NT. Under both CT and NT, CH4 oxidation was enhanced after liming application due to decreased Al(3+) toxicity. Based on our results, NT should be promoted as a means to improve soil physical properties and concurrently reduce N2O and CH4 emissions. Raising the soil pH via liming has positive effects on crop yield; here we show that it may also serve to mitigate CH4 emissions and, under CT, abate N2O emissions.

  16. Effect of lime pre-treatment on the synergistic hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse by hemicellulases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beukes, Natasha; Pletschke, Brett I

    2010-06-01

    Agricultural crop wastes are typically lignocellulosic in composition and thus partially recalcitrant to enzymatic degradation. The recalcitrant nature of plant biomass and the inability to obtain complete enzymatic hydrolysis has led to the establishment of various pre-treatment strategies. Alkaline pre-treatments increase the accessibility of the exposed surface to enzymatic hydrolysis through the removal of acetyl and uronic acid substituents on hemicelluloses. Unlike the use of steam and acid pre-treatments, alkaline pre-treatments (e.g. lime) solubilise lignin and a small percentage of the hemicelluloses. The most common alkaline pre-treatments that are employed make use of sodium hydroxide and lime. This study compared the synergistic degradation of un-treated and lime pre-treated sugarcane bagasse using cellulosomal and non-cellulosomal hemicellulases as free enzymes. The enzyme combination of 37.5% ArfA and 62.5% ManA produced the highest amount of reducing sugar of 91.834 micromol/min for the degradation of un-treated bagasse. This enzyme combination produced a degree of synergy of 1.87. The free enzymes displayed an approximately 6-fold increase in the enzyme activity, i.e. the total amount of reducing sugar released (593.65 micromol/min) with the enzyme combination of 37.5% ArfA, 25% ManA and 37.5% XynA for the lime pre-treated substrate and a degree of synergy of 2.14. To conclude, this study indicated that pre-treating the sugarcane bagasse is essential, in order to increase the efficiency of lignocellulose enzymatic hydrolysis by disruption of the lignin sheath, that the lime pre-treatment did not have any dramatic effect on the synergistic relationship between the free enzymes, and that time may play an important role in the establishment of synergistic relationships between enzymes.

  17. Application of fractal dimensions to study the structure of flocs formed in lime softening process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedi, Arman; Gorczyca, Beata

    2011-01-01

    The use of fractal dimensions to study the internal structure and settling of flocs formed in lime softening process was investigated. Fractal dimensions of flocs were measured directly on floc images and indirectly from their settling velocity. An optical microscope with a motorized stage was used to measure the fractal dimensions of lime softening flocs directly on their images in 2 and 3D space. The directly determined fractal dimensions of the lime softening flocs were 1.11-1.25 for floc boundary, 1.82-1.99 for cross-sectional area and 2.6-2.99 for floc volume. The fractal dimension determined indirectly from the flocs settling rates was 1.87 that was different from the 3D fractal dimension determined directly on floc images. This discrepancy is due to the following incorrect assumptions used for fractal dimensions determined from floc settling rates: linear relationship between square settling velocity and floc size (Stokes' Law), Euclidean relationship between floc size and volume, constant fractal dimensions and one primary particle size describing entire population of flocs. Floc settling model incorporating variable floc fractal dimensions as well as variable primary particle size was found to describe the settling velocity of large (>50 μm) lime softening flocs better than Stokes' Law. Settling velocities of smaller flocs (lime floc size in this study indicated that two mechanisms are involved in the formation of these flocs: cluster-cluster aggregation for small flocs (50 μm). Therefore, the relationship between the floc fractal dimension and floc size appears to be determined by floc formation mechanisms.

  18. In-Depth Transcriptome Sequencing of Mexican Lime Trees Infected with Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardi, Mohsen; Karimi Farsad, Laleh; Gharechahi, Javad; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2015-01-01

    Witches' broom disease of acid lime greatly affects the production of Mexican lime in Iran. It is caused by a phytoplasma (Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia). However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie phytoplasma pathogenicity and the mode of interactions with host plants are largely unknown. Here, high-throughput transcriptome sequencing was conducted to explore gene expression signatures associated with phytoplasma infection in Mexican lime trees. We assembled 78,185 unique transcript sequences (unigenes) with an average length of 530 nt. Of these, 41,805 (53.4%) were annotated against the NCBI non-redundant (nr) protein database using a BLASTx search (e-value ≤ 1e-5). When the abundances of unigenes in healthy and infected plants were compared, 2,805 transcripts showed significant differences (false discovery rate ≤ 0.001 and log2 ratio ≥ 1.5). These differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were significantly enriched in 43 KEGG metabolic and regulatory pathways. The up-regulated DEGs were mainly categorized into pathways with possible implication in plant-pathogen interaction, including cell wall biogenesis and degradation, sucrose metabolism, secondary metabolism, hormone biosynthesis and signalling, amino acid and lipid metabolism, while down-regulated DEGs were predominantly enriched in ubiquitin proteolysis and oxidative phosphorylation pathways. Our analysis provides novel insight into the molecular pathways that are deregulated during the host-pathogen interaction in Mexican lime trees infected by phytoplasma. The findings can be valuable for unravelling the molecular mechanisms of plant-phytoplasma interactions and can pave the way for engineering lime trees with resistance to witches' broom disease.

  19. Genetic Diversity Assessment of Acid Lime (Citrus Aurantifolia Swingle Landraces of Eastern Nepal Using RAPD Markers

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    NN Munankarmi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Acid lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle is an important commercial fruit crop, cultivated from terai to high hill landscapes of Nepal. However, production and productivity is very low due to various reasons including infestations by various diseases and pests, lack of diseases and pests resistant and high yielding varieties. In this context, determination of genetic variation at molecular level is fundamental to citrus breeders for the development of elite cultivars with desirable traits. In the present study, Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD marker technique has been employed to assess genetic diversity in 60 acid lime landraces representing different agro-ecological zones of eastern Nepal. Nine selected arbitrary primers generated 79 RAPD fragments of which 75 were polymorphic (94.94%. Phenogram was constructed by NTSYSPC ver. 2.21i using UPGMA cluster analysis based on Jaccard’s similarity coefficient to deduce overall genetic diversity and relationships of the acidlime genotypes under study. Sixty acid lime landraces formed seven clusters and similarity value ranged from 38% to 98% with an average of 72%. Genetic variation at different agro-ecological zones was assessed using Popgene ver. 1.32 and found 47% to 69.6% polymorphism. Shannon’s index and Nei’s gene diversity showed highest level of acid lime diversity in Terai zone (PPB, 69.62%; H, 0.213; I, 0.325 followed by mid-hill zone (PPB, 67.09%; H, 0.208; I, 0.317. The results obtained will be useful to citrus breeders for elite cultivar development. The RAPD-PCR technique is found to be the rapid and effective tool for genetic diversity assessment in acid lime landraces of Nepal.

  20. Carbon monoxide production from degradation of desflurane, enflurane, isoflurane, halothane, and sevoflurane by soda lime and Baralyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Z X; Eger, E I; Laster, M J; Chortkoff, B S; Kandel, L; Ionescu, P

    1995-06-01

    Anecdotal reports suggest that soda lime and Baralyme brand absorbent can degrade inhaled anesthetics to carbon monoxide (CO). We examined the factors that govern CO production and found that these include: 1) The anesthetic used: for a given minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC)-multiple, the magnitude of CO production (greatest to least) is desflurane > or = enflurane > isoflurane > halothane = sevoflurane. 2) The absorbent dryness: completely dry soda lime produces much more CO than absorbent with just 1.4% water content, and soda lime containing 4.8% or more water (standard soda lime contains 15% water) generates no CO. In contrast, both completely dry Baralyme and Baralyme with 1.6% water produce high concentrations of CO, and Baralyme containing 4.7% water produces concentrations equaling those produced by soda lime containing 1.4% water. Baralyme containing 9.7% or more water and standard Baralyme (13% water) do not generate CO.3) The type of absorbent: at a given water content, Baralyme produces more CO than does soda lime. 4) The temperature: an increased temperature increases CO production. 5) The anesthetic concentration: more CO is produced from higher anesthetic concentrations. These results suggest that CO generation can be avoided for all anesthetics by using soda lime with 4.8% (or more) water or Baralyme with 9.7% (or more) water, and by using inflow rates of less than 2-3 L/min. Such inflow rates are low enough to ensure that the absorbent does not dry out.

  1. Lime application for the efficient production of nutraceutical glucooligosaccharides from Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-742 (ATCC13146).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Young Hwan; Madsen, Lee; Chung, Chang-Ho; Kim, Doman; Day, Donal F

    2015-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated the production of glucooligosaccharides via a fermentation of sucrose with Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-742 using sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to control the pH. Because NaOH is expensive, we sought to minimize the cost of our process by substituting hydrated lime and saccharate of lime (lime sucrate) in its place. The yield of glucooligosaccharides using either 5 % lime (41.4 ± 0.5 g/100 g) or 5 % lime sucrate (40.0 ± 1.4 g/100 g) were both similar to the NaOH control (42.4 ± 1.5 g/100 g). Based on this, it appears that the cost associated with pH control in our process can be reduced by a factor of approximately 2.4 using lime instead of NaOH. Because our chromatographic stage is based on a Ca(2+)-form resin to separate glucooligosaccharides, the use of lime not only negates the need for costly de-salting via ion-exchange (elimination of two ion-exchange sections) prior to separation, but also greatly reduces the resin regeneration cost.

  2. Simultaneous removal of colour, phosphorus and disinfection from treated wastewater using an agent synthesized from amorphous silica and hydrated lime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takahiro; Aketo, Tsuyoshi; Minowa, Nobutaka; Sugimoto, Kiyomi; Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Ogino, Akifumi; Tanaka, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    An agent synthesized from amorphous silica and hydrated lime (CSH-lime) was investigated for its ability to simultaneously remove the colour, phosphorus and disinfection from the effluents from wastewater treatment plants on swine farms. CSH-lime removed the colour and phosphate from the effluents, with the colour-removal effects especially high at pH 12, and phosphorous removal was more effective in strongly alkaline conditions (pH > 10). Colour decreased from 432 +/-111 (mean +/- SD) to 107 +/- 41 colour units and PO4(3-)P was reduced from 45 +/- 39 mg/L to undetectable levels at the CSH-lime dose of 2.0% w/v. Moreover, CSH-lime reduced the total organic carbon from 99.0 to 37.9 mg/L at the dose of 2.0% w/v and was effective at inactivating total heterotrophic and coliform bacteria. However, CSH-lime did not remove nitrogen compounds such as nitrite, nitrate and ammonium. Colour was also removed from dye solutions by CSH-lime, at the same dose.

  3. Effect of lime, magnesium and boron on wheat (Triticum aestivum L. and their residual effects on mungbean (Vigna radiata L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Hossain

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out during 2007-2008 season in the research field of Wheat Research Centre, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute, Dinajpur to know the effect of lime, Magnesium (Mg and Boron (B on yield and yield components of wheat and also theirresidual effect on mungbean. The geographical position of the area is between 25°62´ N, 88°63´ E and 38.20 meter above sea level. The experiment was laid out in Randomized Complete Block Design with three replications, both in wheat and mungbean. Treatmentsfor wheat were (I recommended fertilizer + Mg + B, (II recommended fertilizer + lime + B + Mg, (III recommended fertilizer + lime + Mg, (IV recommended fertilizer + lime + B and (V control (Only recommended fertilizer and for mungbean were (I recommendedfertilizer + Mg + B, (II 75% of recommended dose, (III recommended fertilizer + B, (IVrecommended fertilizer + Mg and (V control (without fertilizers. Results showed that the highest yield and yield components of wheat were recorded from recommended fertilizers +lime + B + Mg treated plot and the second highest were recorded from recommended fertilizers + lime + Mg treated plot. The lowest was recorded in control plot (only recommended fertilized. In case of mungbean the highest was found from recommended fertilizers + B treated plot, this treatment was limed in previously cultivated wheat crop and the lowest was recorded from control plot (without fertilizer.

  4. A taxonomic review of the Late Jurassic eucryptodiran turtles from the Jura Mountains (Switzerland and France

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    Jérémy Anquetin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Eucryptodiran turtles from the Late Jurassic (mainly Kimmeridgian deposits of the Jura Mountains (Switzerland and France are among the earliest named species traditionally referred to the Plesiochelyidae, Thalassemydidae, and Eurysternidae. As such, they are a reference for the study of Late Jurassic eucryptodires at the European scale. Fifteen species and four genera have been typified based on material from the Late Jurassic of the Jura Mountains. In the past 50 years, diverging taxonomic reassessments have been proposed for these turtles with little agreement in sight. In addition, there has been a shift of focus from shell to cranial anatomy in the past forty years, although most of these species are only represented by shell material. As a result, the taxonomic status of many of these 15 species remains ambiguous, which prevents comprehensive comparison of Late Jurassic turtle assemblages throughout Europe and hinders description of new discoveries, such as the new assemblage recently unearthed in the vicinity of Porrentruy, Switzerland.Methods. An exhaustive reassessment of the available material provides new insights into the comparative anatomy of these turtles. The taxonomic status of each of the 15 species typified based on material from the Late Jurassic of the Jura Mountains is evaluated. New diagnoses and general descriptions are provided for each valid taxon.Results. Six out of the 15 available species names are recognized as valid: Plesiochelys etalloni, Craspedochelys picteti, Craspedochelys jaccardi, Tropidemys langii, Thalassemys hugii, and ‘Thalassemys’ moseri. The intraspecific variability of the shell of P. etalloni is discussed based on a sample of about 30 relatively complete specimens from Solothurn, Switzerland. New characters are proposed to differentiate P. etalloni, C. picteti, and C. jaccardi, therefore rejecting the previously proposed synonymy of these forms. Based partly on previously undescribed

  5. Tango in the Mid-Jurassic: 10,000-Yr Geomagnetic Field Reversals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, M.

    2001-12-01

    A continuous magnetostratigraphic signature of Layer 2A from Jurassic Quiet Zone (JQZ) oceanic crust now is known from two separate paleo-magnetic data sets. Measurement/demagnetization along the length of the entire core at 5-cm intervals generated ~100,000 data points, whereas a suite of 472 discrete samples also were taken from throughout the core. Both data sets display the same magnetization pattern, a series of repeated sinusoidal inclination changes downhole. Six inter-vals of maximum inclination (three positive, three negative) are obser-ved. Maximum inclination intervals of +/-40° are separated by regions of smoothly varying intermediate inclination values. Despite lack of azmuithal orientation of the core, downhole magnetic logging (Larson et al., in prep.) shows full ~360° directional change in the magnetization vector. Therefore, the maximum inclination regions represent polarity intervals of the geomagnetic field, and six polarity intervals in stacked sequence are contained in the upper 400 m thickness of Layer 2A at this site. The time duration spanned by these six reversals was estimated from recent seismic studies of young ocean crustal construction on the East Pacific Rise (EPR). Estimates of completion of construction of Layer 2A within 1-3 km from the rise crest and typical EPR half-spreading rates of 5-8 cm/yr suggest that the studied 400 m of ocean crust represents 37,000-60,000 years. The fast construction of EPR crust implies that the Middle Jurassic geomagnetic field was reversing at a phenomenal rate of 5000-10,000 years. These data establish that the `quiet' signature in the oldest portion of the lineated magnetic anomaly patterns in the ocean crust is due to exceedingly rapid reversals of the geomagnetic field, because succes-sive, superposed opposite-polarity magnetic signatures will essentially cancel one another out at the sea surface. The width of the 'quiet' magnetic signature in the western Pacific Ocean implies that the 5000

  6. TRANSITION FROM CARBONATE PLATFORM TO PELAGIC DEPOSITION (MID JURASSIC- LATE CRETACEOUS, VOURINOS MASSIF, NORTHERN GREECE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NICOLAOS CARRAS

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available A Jurassic- Cretaceous carbonate succession crops out along the Zyghosti Rema, Kozani (Northern Greece. The substratum consists of the ophiolitic succession of the Vourinos Massif (Pelagonian Domain: serpentinites tectonically overlain by basalts, with thin lenses of radiolarian cherts of middle Bathonian age. The contact with the overlying Jurassic limestones is tectonic. Eight informal units have been distinguished within the Mesozoic limestones, from the base upwards. (A bioclastic, intraclastic and oolitic packstone (Callovian- Oxfordian. (B bioclastic packstone and coral boundstone (Oxfordian . (C bioclastic and oncoidal wackestone with Clypeina jurassica (Oxfordian- Upper Kimmeridgian. (D (Upper Kimmeridgian- Portlandian: oncoidal packstone and rudstone (facies D1; intraclastic and bioclastic grainstone and packstone (facies D2; neptunian dykes with intraclastic and bioclastic wackestone and packstone filling (facies D3; neptunian dykes with Fe-Mn rich laterite filling and with pink silty filling of early Late Cretaceous age. An unconformity surface, due to emersion and erosion of the platform during the latest Jurassic- Early Cretaceous, is overlain by (E intraclastic, bioclastic packstone and grainstone (Cenomanian. (F massive body of debrites with coral, echinoderm, algae and rudist large clasts (facies F1 (Cenomanian; turbiditic beds of bioclastic, intraclastic and lithoclastic rudstone and grainstone (facies F2. (G thin bedded bioclastic mudstone and wackestone with planktonic foraminifers and radiolarians, alternating with turbiditic beds of bioclastic, intraclastic packstone and rudstone and with conglomeratic levels and slumped beds of the previous turbidites (upper Santonian- lower Campanian. (H: bioclastic packstone with planktonic foraminifers (facies H1 (lower Campanian - ?Maastrichtian; amalgamated turbiditic beds of bioclastic wackestone and packstone with planktonic foraminifers (facies H2; turbiditic beds of bioclastic

  7. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: Late Triassic – Jurassic development of the Danish Basin and the Fennoscandian Border Zone, southern Scandinavia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen, Lars Henrik

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The continental to marine Upper Triassic – Jurassic succession of the Danish Basin and the Fennoscandian Border Zone is interpreted within a sequence stratigraphic framework, and the evolution of the depositional basin is discussed. The intracratonic Permian–Cenozoic Danish Basin was formed by Late Carboniferous – Early Permian crustal extension followed by subsidence governed primarily by thermal cooling and local faulting. The basin is separated from thestable Precambrian Baltic Shield by the Fennoscandian Border Zone, and is bounded by basement blocks of the Ringkøbing–Fyn High towards the south. In Late Triassic – Jurassic times, the basin was part of the epeiric shallow sea that covered most of northern Europe. The Upper Triassic – Jurassic basin-fill is subdivided into two tectono-stratigraphic units by a basinwide intra-Aalenian unconformity. The Norian – Lower Aalenian succession was formed under relative tectonic tranquillity and shows an overall layer-cake geometry, except for areas with local faults and salt movements.Deposition was initiated by a Norian transgression that led to shallow marine deposition and was accompanied by a gradual climatic change to more humid conditions. Extensive sheets of shoreface sand and associated paralic sediments were deposited during short-lived forced regressions in Rhaetian time. A stepwise deepening and development of fully marine conditions followed in the Hettangian – Early Sinemurian. Thick uniform basinwide mud blankets weredeposited on an open storm-influenced shelf, while sand was trapped at the basin margins. This depositional pattern continued until Late Toarcian – Early Aalenian times when the basin became restricted due to renewed uplift of the Ringkøbing–Fyn High. In Middle Aalenian – Bathonian times, the former basin area was subjected to deep erosion, and deposition became restricted to the fault-bounded Sorgenfrei–Tornquist Zone. Eventually the fault margins

  8. Paleomagnetism of Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks bounding the Santa Marta massif - NW corner of Colombia, South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayona, G.; Jimenez, G.; Silva, C.

    2008-12-01

    The Santa Marta massif (SMM) is a complex terrain located in the NW margin of South America, bounded by the left-lateral Santa Marta fault to the west and the right-lateral Oca fault to the north. The SMM is cored by Precambrian metamorphic and Jurassic intrusive rocks, whereas along the SE flank crop out Jurassic volcanic rocks overlying unconformably by Limestones of Cretaceous age. Paleomagnetic analysis of 30 sites in the Jurassic and Cretaceous units in the SE region uncovered two principal magnetic components. The component "a", isolated in low coercivity and temperatures, has declinations to the north and moderate positive inclinations representing the actual field direction (n=11, D=347.6 I=23 K=30.77, a95=8.4). The component "c", with high coercivity and temperatures, has two orientations. After two-step tilt corrections, the first has northward declination and positive, low inclination (n=9, D=12, I=3, K=18.99, a95=12.1); this direction was uncovered in Cretaceous and some Jurassic rocks near to the Santa Marta fault, and we consider it as a Cretaceous component. The second direction was uncovered only in Jurassic rocks and has NNE declinations with negative-low inclinations (n=9, D=11.3 I=-14.3 K=12.36, a95=15.2); this direction represents a Jurassic component. Jurassic and Cretaceous directions isolated in areas faraway of the Santa Marta Fault suggest slight clockwise vertical-axes rotation. The Jurassic component suggests northward translation of the SMM from Paleolatitude -7.3, to near the magnetic equador in the Cretaceous, and to northern latitudes in the Cenozoic.

  9. MIDDLE JURASSIC-LOWER CRETACEOUS BIOSTRATIGRAPHY IN THE CENTRAL PONTIDES (TURKEY): REMARKS ON PALEOGEOGRAPHY AND TECTONIC EVOLUTION

    OpenAIRE

    BORA ROJAY; DEMIR ALTINER

    1998-01-01

    The deposition of Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous carbonates in the Pontides was controlled mainly by the evolution of an Atlantic-type continental margin in the Tethys. The study of several stratigraphic sections from allochthonous slices and blocks of the North Anatolian Ophiolitic Melange provided insight into the Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous paleogeographic evolution of the Central Pontide Belt. The Callovian-Aptian successions span the Globuligerina gr. oxfordiana, Clypeina jurassica (equi...

  10. A Remarkable New Family of Jurassic Insects (Neuroptera) with Primitive Wing Venation and Its Phylogenetic Position in Neuropterida

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Yang; Vladimir N Makarkin; Winterton, Shaun L.; Khramov, Alexander V.; Dong Ren

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lacewings (insect order Neuroptera), known in the fossil record since the Early Permian, were most diverse in the Mesozoic. A dramatic variety of forms ranged in that time from large butterfly-like Kalligrammatidae to minute two-winged Dipteromantispidae. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe the intriguing new neuropteran family Parakseneuridae fam. nov. with three new genera and 15 new species from the Middle Jurassic of Daohugou (Inner Mongolia, China) and the Early/Middle Jurassic o...

  11. Dinosaur tracks in Lower Jurassic coastal plain sediments (Sose Bugt Member, Rønne Formation) on Bornholm, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Lars B; Milàn, Jesper; Pedersen, Gunver K

    2014-01-01

    Fluvial palaeochannels of coastal plain sediments of the Lower Jurassic Sose Bugt Member of the Rønne Formation exposed in the coastal cliffs at Sose Bugt, Bornholm, contain abundant dinosaur or other large vertebrate tracks in the form of deformation structures exposed in vertical section...... track. Contemporary Upper Triassic – Lower Jurassic strata from southern Sweden and Poland contain a diverse track fauna, supporting our interpretation. This is the earliest evidence of dinosaur activity in Denmark....

  12. The first euthemistid damsel-dragonfly from the Middle Jurassic of China (Odonata, Epiproctophora, Isophlebioptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongjun; Nel, André; Shih, Chungkun; Ren, Dong; Pang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Sinoeuthemis daohugouensis gen. et sp. n. is the first record of the isophlebiopteran family Euthemistidae from Middle Jurassic of northeast China, while previously this family was restricted to the early Late Jurassic Kazakhstan. This new finding allows us to emend the family diagnosis with hindwing characters. This new species shows a mixture of characters alternatively present in different genera of the two families Euthemistidae and Sphenophlebiidae.

  13. Liming and phosphorus fertilization in soils under cerrado. 1. Dry matter accumulation and phosphorus uptake by sorghum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, L.F.S. (Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria, Bahia. Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Mandioca e Fruticultura); Fernandes, M.S.; Velloso, A.C.X. (Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Dept. de Solos); Castro, A.F. de (Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria, Rio de Janeiro. Servico Nacional de Levantamento e Conservacao de Solos)

    1983-07-01

    The effects of liming and phosphorus fertilizer (300 Kg P/sub 2/O/sub 5//ha) application on dry matter accumulation and P-uptake by sorghum plants were studied under greenhouse conditions. Plants were grown in four Oxisols originally under cerrado vegetation. There was a positive correlation between P-fertilization and liming on dry matter accumulation and P-uptake by plants. The results showed that the main effect of liming in these soils was on the elimination of phytotoxicity, mainly due to exchangeable aluminum.

  14. Extraction methods and availability of micronutrients for wheat under a no-till system with a surface application of lime

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca,Adriel Ferreira da; Caires,Eduardo Fávero; Barth,Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Micronutrient availability can be affected by the increase of the soil pH due to surface liming. A field trial was carried out on a loamy, kaolinitic, thermic Typic Hapludox at Ponta Grossa, Paraná State, Brazil. The main objective was to evaluate the effects of surface liming and re-liming on the availability of micronutrients [copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), and zinc (Zn)] for wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cropped under a no-till system. A randomized complete block design was used in...

  15. Dinosaur evolution. A Jurassic ornithischian dinosaur from Siberia with both feathers and scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godefroit, Pascal; Sinitsa, Sofia M; Dhouailly, Danielle; Bolotsky, Yuri L; Sizov, Alexander V; McNamara, Maria E; Benton, Michael J; Spagna, Paul

    2014-07-25

    Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous deposits from northeastern China have yielded varied theropod dinosaurs bearing feathers. Filamentous integumentary structures have also been described in ornithischian dinosaurs, but whether these filaments can be regarded as part of the evolutionary lineage toward feathers remains controversial. Here we describe a new basal neornithischian dinosaur from the Jurassic of Siberia with small scales around the distal hindlimb, larger imbricated scales around the tail, monofilaments around the head and the thorax, and more complex featherlike structures around the humerus, the femur, and the tibia. The discovery of these branched integumentary structures outside theropods suggests that featherlike structures coexisted with scales and were potentially widespread among the entire dinosaur clade; feathers may thus have been present in the earliest dinosaurs.

  16. An enigmatic plant-eating theropod from the Late Jurassic period of Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novas, Fernando E; Salgado, Leonardo; Suárez, Manuel; Agnolín, Federico L; Ezcurra, Martín D; Chimento, Nicolás R; de la Cruz, Rita; Isasi, Marcelo P; Vargas, Alexander O; Rubilar-Rogers, David

    2015-06-18

    Theropod dinosaurs were the dominant predators in most Mesozoic era terrestrial ecosystems. Early theropod evolution is currently interpreted as the diversification of various carnivorous and cursorial taxa, whereas the acquisition of herbivorism, together with the secondary loss of cursorial adaptations, occurred much later among advanced coelurosaurian theropods. A new, bizarre herbivorous basal tetanuran from the Upper Jurassic of Chile challenges this conception. The new dinosaur was discovered at Aysén, a fossil locality in the Upper Jurassic Toqui Formation of southern Chile (General Carrera Lake). The site yielded abundant and exquisitely preserved three-dimensional skeletons of small archosaurs. Several articulated individuals of Chilesaurus at different ontogenetic stages have been collected, as well as less abundant basal crocodyliforms, and fragmentary remains of sauropod dinosaurs (diplodocids and titanosaurians).

  17. Reduced plumage and flight ability of a new Jurassic paravian theropod from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godefroit, Pascal; Demuynck, Helena; Dyke, Gareth; Hu, Dongyu; Escuillié, François; Claeys, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Feathered theropods were diverse in the Early Cretaceous Jehol Group of western Liaoning Province, China. Recently, anatomically distinct feathered taxa have been discovered in the older Middle-Late Jurassic Tiaojishan Formation in the same region. Phylogenetic hypotheses including these specimens have challenged the pivotal position of Archaeopteryx in bird phylogeny. Here we report a basal troodontid from the Tiaojishan Formation that resembles Anchiornis, also from Jianchang County (regarded as sister-taxa). The feathers of Eosinopteryx are less extensive on the limbs and tail than Anchiornis and other deinonychosaurians. With reduced plumage and short uncurved pedal claws, Eosinopteryx would have been able to run unimpeded (with large foot remiges cursorial locomotion was likely problematic for Anchiornis). Eosinopteryx increases the known diversity of small-bodied dinosaurs in the Jurassic, shows that taxa with similar body plans could occupy different niches in the same ecosystem and suggests a more complex picture for the origin of flight.

  18. A bizarre Jurassic maniraptoran from China with elongate ribbon-like feathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fucheng; Zhou, Zhonghe; Xu, Xing; Wang, Xiaolin; Sullivan, Corwin

    2008-10-23

    Recent coelurosaurian discoveries have greatly enriched our knowledge of the transition from dinosaurs to birds, but all reported taxa close to this transition are from relatively well known coelurosaurian groups. Here we report a new basal avialan, Epidexipteryx hui gen. et sp. nov., from the Middle to Late Jurassic of Inner Mongolia, China. This new species is characterized by an unexpected combination of characters seen in several different theropod groups, particularly the Oviraptorosauria. Phylogenetic analysis shows it to be the sister taxon to Epidendrosaurus, forming a new clade at the base of Avialae. Epidexipteryx also possesses two pairs of elongate ribbon-like tail feathers, and its limbs lack contour feathers for flight. This finding shows that a member of the avialan lineage experimented with integumentary ornamentation as early as the Middle to Late Jurassic, and provides further evidence relating to this aspect of the transition from non-avian theropods to birds.

  19. Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian (Late Jurassic) reservoir sandstones in the Witch Ground Graben, U. K. North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harker, S.D. (Occidental Petroleum (Caledonia) Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom)); Mantel, K.A. (Narwhal, London (United Kingdom)); Morton, D.J. (Deminex U.K. Oil and Gas Ltd., London (United Kingdom)); Riley, L.A. (Paleoservices, Watford (United Kingdom))

    1991-03-01

    Oil-bearing Late Jurassic Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian sandstones of the Sgiath and Piper formations are of major economic importance in the Witch Ground Graben. They form the reservoirs in Scott, which in 1993 will be the largest producing North Sea oil field to come on stream for more than a decade. Together with Scott, the Piper, Saltire, Tartan, Highlander, Petronella, Rob Roy, and Ivanhoe fields contained almost 2 Bbbl of recoverable reserves in these formations. The Sgiath and Piper represent two phases of Late Jurassic transgression and regression, initially represented by paralic deposited sand culminating in a wave-dominated delta sequence. The history of the Sgiath and Piper formations is reviewed and lithostratigraphic and biostratigraphic correlations presented to illustrate the distribution of the reservoir sandstones.

  20. The oldest haplogyne spider (Araneae: Plectreuridae), from the Middle Jurassic of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selden, Paul A.; Huang, Diying

    2010-05-01

    New fossil spiders (Arachnida: Araneae) from Middle Jurassic (ca. 165 Ma) strata of Daohugou, Inner Mongolia, China are described as Eoplectreurys gertschi gen. et sp. nov. and referred to the modern haplogyne family Plectreuridae. This small family is restricted to southwestern USA, Mexico, and the adjacent Caribbean area today and hitherto has only a sparse Cenozoic fossil record. The morphology of Eoplectreurys is remarkably similar to modern forms and thus demonstrates great evolutionary conservatism. This new discovery not only extends the fossil record of the family by at least 120 Ma to the Middle Jurassic but also supports the hypothesis of a different distribution of the family in the past than today and subsequent extinction over much of its former range.

  1. Uppermost Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous carbonate deposits from Fara San Martino (Maiella, Italy: biostratigraphic remarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Bruni

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The Uppermost Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous limestone succession in the Maiella region of Italy has been investigated in a profile covering more than 400 m stratigraphical thickness at Fara San Martino. The succession mainly consists of peritidal limestones, intertidal and supratidal sequences being dominant, together with subtidal lagoonal facies. As a consequence, the microfossil assemblages are generally poorly developed, Microfossils occur within the subtidal lagoonal facies of this suite of restricted sediments. This feature led us to recognise five informal biostratigraphic intervals, which are facies related – instead of biozones, each of the intervals being characterized by specific micropaleontological associations. The occurrence and/or disappearance of some marker microfossils were used as references for separating these intervals. Based on these markers, the Uppermost Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous carbonate deposits from Maiella region may be correlated with similar deposits from the Apennines and from other regions in the perimediterranean area.

  2. The Requel: Between the Remake and the Sequel. Jurassic World as a Case Study Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene RAYA BRAVO

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the audiovisual field, the expansion of the stories is, specifically, materialized through remakes, adaptations and franchises. In this context, the remakes or new versions are recurrent formulas because they recover familiar contents for audiences and, at the same time, they reinvent it in order to capture new generations’ attention. Nevertheless, the remake formula has been changing in the new millennium, adapting to new narrative trends. In recent years, because of the rise of intertextuality and the increasing value of nostalgia, many films have been produced halfway between the remake and the sequel, such as Star Wars. Episode VII: The Force Awakens or Terminator Genisys. In particular, the aim of this paper is to make a comparative analysis between Jurassic Park and Jurassic World because, although this last film extends the original discourse as a sequel, it also offers a reinterpretation of the first film.

  3. New evidence of shared dinosaur across Upper Jurassic Proto-North Atlantic: Stegosaurus from Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escaso, Fernando; Ortega, Francisco; Dantas, Pedro; Malafaia, Elisabete; Pimentel, Nuno L.; Pereda-Suberbiola, Xabier; Sanz, José Luis; Kullberg, José Carlos; Kullberg, María Carla; Barriga, Fernando

    2007-05-01

    More than one century after its original description by Marsh in 1877, we report in this paper the first uncontroversial evidence of a member of the genus Stegosaurus out of North America. The specimen consists of a partial skeleton from the Upper Jurassic of Portugal, herein considered as Stegosaurus cf. ungulatus. The presence of this plated dinosaur in the upper Kimmeridgian-lower Tithonian Portuguese record and synchronic levels of the Morrison Formation of North America reinforces previous hypothesis of a close relationship between these two areas during the Late Jurassic. This relationship is also supported by geotectonic evidences indicating high probability of an episodic corridor between the Newfoundland and Iberian landmasses. Together, Portuguese Stegosaurus discovery and geotectonic inferences could provide a scenario with episodical faunal contact among North Atlantic landmasses during the uppermost Kimmeridgian-lowermost Tithonian (ca. 148-153 Ma ago).

  4. Paleogeography of the northern portion of the Mixteca terrain, southern Mexico, during the Middle Jurassic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Miranda, C.; Morán-Zenteno, D. J.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Silva-Romo, G.; Böhnel, H.; Jurado-Chichay, Z.; Cabral-Cano, E.

    A preliminary paleogeographic reconstruction of the northern Mixteca terrain in southern Mexico is presented for the Middle Jurassic. The reconstruction is derived from combined analyses of spatial distribution of marine-continental Jurassic sedimentary units, identification of sediment source, and observations based on sedimentary indicators of environment and transport directions, as well as paleomagnetic and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) results. There is an overall agreement between the AMS magnetic fabric results and the sedimentary indicators of current directions and paleogeographic elements. The results suggest a coastline at the south-southwest portion of this terrain, a general transport of fluvial sediments to the south and southwest, and marine influxes from the south. A Pacific margin provenance is supported by the paleomagnetic results for the northern portion of the Mixteca terrain.

  5. New fossil record of a Jurassic pterosaur from Neuquen Basin, Vaca Muerta Formation, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codorniú, Laura; Garrido, Alberto

    2013-12-01

    Discoveries of Jurassic pterosaurs in the Southern Hemisphere are extremely unusual. In Argentina, pterosaurs from the Upper Jurassic (Tithonian) have only been found in the Northwest of Patagonia (Neuquén Basin). These come from marine deposits and three specimens have been discovered up to the present. In this paper, we report a new finding from the Neuquén Basin. This material is identified as a tibiotarsus, which probably belonged to an osteologically adult individual and represents a new species of a pterodactyloid pterosaur of medium size. This discovery provides new evidence that at least two different species of pterodactyloid pterosaurs may have coexisted in Los Catutos Member, Vaca Muerta Formation, from the shallow marine deposits of the Neuquén Basin.

  6. The oldest known snakes from the Middle Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous provide insights on snake evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Michael W; Nydam, Randall L; Palci, Alessandro; Apesteguía, Sebastián

    2015-01-27

    The previous oldest known fossil snakes date from ~100 million year old sediments (Upper Cretaceous) and are both morphologically and phylogenetically diverse, indicating that snakes underwent a much earlier origin and adaptive radiation. We report here on snake fossils that extend the record backwards in time by an additional ~70 million years (Middle Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous). These ancient snakes share features with fossil and modern snakes (for example, recurved teeth with labial and lingual carinae, long toothed suborbital ramus of maxillae) and with lizards (for example, pronounced subdental shelf/gutter). The paleobiogeography of these early snakes is diverse and complex, suggesting that snakes had undergone habitat differentiation and geographic radiation by the mid-Jurassic. Phylogenetic analysis of squamates recovers these early snakes in a basal polytomy with other fossil and modern snakes, where Najash rionegrina is sister to this clade. Ingroup analysis finds them in a basal position to all other snakes including Najash.

  7. A previously unrecognized group of Middle Jurassic triconodontan mammals from Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Thomas; Averianov, Alexander O.

    2007-01-01

    Ferganodon narynensis gen. et sp. nov. is represented by a lower molariform tooth from the Middle Jurassic (Callovian) Balabansai Svita in Kyrgyzstan. The new genus is allied with Klamelia zhaopengi Chow and Rich 1984 from the Middle Jurassic Shishugou Formation in Xinjiang, northwest China to the new family Klameliidae based on parallelogram-shaped lower molariforms, imbricating rather than interlocking of cusps e- d- f, by a peculiar distolabial cingulid cusp, and by vertical folding of the enamel on the labial crown side. The new family Klameliidae fam. nov. is most similar to Gobiconodontidae by the structure of the molariform teeth and represents a previously unrecognized radiation of eutriconodontan mammals possibly endemic to Central Asia.

  8. Distribution patterns of the Jurassic ostreids (Bivalvia) from Tanggula of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沙金庚

    2001-01-01

    Distribution of the Jurassic ostreids (Bivalvia) from Tanggula area of China includes three patterns, which are (1) Tethys: containing Liostrea birmanica and Eligmus rollandi, (2) western Europe and northern Tethys: consisting of Gryphaea (Bilobissa) bilobata; and (3) Global: composed of Actinostreon gregareum and Nanogyra nana. However, they are all limited between palaeolatidudes 60° South and North. Actinostreon gregareum originated in the Sinemurian of northern Chile and it entered Kenya and Madagascar in the Toarcian, but there is no reliable Si-nemurian-Toarcian A. gregareum fossil record in continental margins between Chile and Kenya and Madagascar. Such distribution patterns and dispersal processes have demonstrated that (1) during the Jurassic all seas and oceans were connected to each other; (2) the Tethys and the western European epicontinental seas did produce some endemic taxa; (3) the distribution of these ostreids was most likely controlled by latitudes and creature ecology; and (4) A, gr

  9. Natural Gas Resource in Jurassic, Y Faulted Subbasin of Songliao Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Haibo; Hu Yutao; Wei Xinghua

    2000-01-01

    Y faulted depression is located in the southeast of Songliao basin, which is another important area explored for natural gas in deep Formation after Xujiaweizi. But it is lowly explored and is not likely to make a major breakthrough in nature gas exploration for shallow and medium layers. The data on the geochemistry and geology indicate that the deep source rocks, especially the Jurassic mudstone bas great potentials of natural gas generation. Based on this, the paper examines the conditions of natural gas generation and further points out the favorable prospective gas - bearing area. The results show that the amount of natural gas generated from the Jurassic mudstone in the Y faulted depression is 8.42 × 1012m3 and the favorable gas - generating area is the body of the faulted depression.

  10. Hidrólise da cana-de-açúcar com cal virgem ou cal hidratada Hydrolysis of cane sugar with lime or hydrated lime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Azevedo Mota

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se estudar o efeito do tratamento alcalino da cana-de-açúcar com cal virgem ou cal hidratada sobre a composição bromatológica e a digestibilidade in vitro da matéria seca, da fibra em detergente neutro e da fibra em detergente ácido. Utilizou-se um delineamento inteiramente casualizado em esquema fatorial 3 × 3, composto de três formas de processamento da cana (in natura; cana hidrolisada com 0,5% de cal virgem; e cana hidrolisada com 0,5% de cal hidratada e três tempos de armazenamento (12, 36 e 60 horas. As formas de processamento influenciaram os teores de matéria orgânica, matéria mineral, carboidratos totais e hemicelulose, assim como os teores de fibra em detergente neutro e nutrientes digestíveis totais. Os tempos de armazenamento influenciaram os teores de proteína bruta, matéria orgânica, carboidratos totais e hemicelulose. Entre os minerais, somente o teor de cálcio teve aumento com a inclusão de ambos os tipos de cal em relação à cana-de-açúcar, que não sofreu o processo de hidrólise. Os coeficientes de digestibilidade da matéria seca e da fibra em detergente neutro aumentaram com a hidrólise da cana em comparação à cana in natura. A hidrólise com cal hidratada ou com cal virgem mantém o valor nutricional da cana-de-açúcar, permitindo que possa ser utilizada depois de até 60 horas de armazenamento.The objective of the present work was to evaluate the effect of the alkaline treatment of sugarcane with virgin lime or hydrated lime on the bromatologic composition and in vitro digestibility of dry matter, neutral detergent fiber, and acid detergent fiber. It was used a complete random design with a 3 × 3 factorial scheme composed by three forms of of sugarcane processing (in natura sugarcane; hydrolyzed sugarcane with 0.5% virgin lime; and hydrolyzed sugarcane with 0.5% hydrated lime and three storage times (12, 36 and 60 hours. The forms of processing changed the contents of organic matter

  11. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2005-04-15

    The principal research effort for the first six months of Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization. Understanding the burial and thermal maturation histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in petroleum system characterization. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicate that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was the Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The Upper Cretaceous Tuscaloosa shale was an effective local petroleum source rock in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and a possible local source bed in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Reservoir rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary siliciclastic and carbonate strata. Seal rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary anhydrite and shale beds. Petroleum traps include structural and combination traps.

  12. ENVIRONMENTS AND FAUNAL PATTERNS IN THE KACHCHH RIFT BASIN, WESTERN INDIA, DURING THE JURASSIC

    OpenAIRE

    FRANZ THEODOR FÜRSICH; Callomon, John H.; DHIRENDRA K. PANDEY; ANAND K. JAITLY

    2004-01-01

    Marine Jurassic sediments (Bajocian-Tithonian) of the Kachchh Basin were deposited in a ramp setting. Except during the Middle and Late Bathonian, when a carbonate regime became established, the fill of the basin consists predominantly of siliciclastics. The sediments represent environments that range from coastal plains (rivers and associated flood plains with caliche nodules), deltas, brackish water lagoons, nearshore sand and iron-oolite bars of the inner ramp, generally situated above fai...

  13. Uppermost Jurassic-lower cretaceous radiolarian chert from the Tanimbar Islands (Banda Arc), Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasin, Basir; Haile, Neville

    This paper describes and figures Mesozoic Radiolaria from cherts in Pulau Ungar, Tanimbar Islands, eastern Indonesia. Two assemblages of Radiolaria are recognised. The lower assemblage is indicative of upper Tithonian (uppermost Jurassic) to Berriasian (lowermost Cretaceous) and the upper assemblage is of upper Valanginian to Barremian age. These are the first precise ages obtained from the Ungar Formation, a unit including sandstones with apparently good petroleum reservoir characteristics.

  14. A golden orb-weaver spider (Araneae: Nephilidae: Nephila) from the Middle Jurassic of China

    OpenAIRE

    Paul A Selden; Shih, Chungkun; Ren, Dong

    2011-01-01

    Nephila are large, conspicuous weavers of orb webs composed of golden silk, in tropical and subtropical regions. Nephilids have a sparse fossil record, the oldest described hitherto being Cretaraneus vilaltae from the Cretaceous of Spain. Five species from Neogene Dominican amber and one from the Eocene of Florissant, CO, USA, have been referred to the extant genus Nephila. Here, we report the largest known fossil spider, Nephila jurassica sp. nov., from Middle Jurassic (approx. 165 Ma) strat...

  15. Dynamic Paleogeography of the Jurassic Andean Basin: pattern of regression and general considerations on main features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J-C. Vicente

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Following examination of the evolution of the Jurassic Andean retroarc basin at a global scale for the Central Andes, this paper analyses the pattern of the regressive process, and discusses some general features concerning Andean Jurassic Paleogeography. The early Upper Jurassic regression obeys to an exactly reverse pattern as the one evidenced for the Lower Jurassic transgressive process. Sectors with late transgressions become those with early regressions while those with early transgressions show later regressions. This fact may indicate that the Norte Chico Isthmus (29°S to 30°30'S was a precociously emerged zone from the Bajocian. This carries again a split up between the Tarapacá and Aconcagua-Neuquén basins until their complete drying up in the Late Oxfordian following their restricted circulation. This evaporitic late stage presents great analogy with the Mediterranean «Messinian crisis» and gives evidence of a general tectonic and magmatic control on the straits. The local transgressions observed on the cratonic margin of the central part of these shrinking basins were due to shifting of water masses resulting from the regressive process on the northern and southern margins. Comparison between the main stages of transgression and regression allows some quantification concerning velocities of displacement of coastlines, specifically lengthwise. The permanence of paleogeographic and structural features over the time argues for an indisputable tectonic heritage. In the dynamic framework of this typical barred retroarc basin where arc magmatic activity has contributed considerably to variation on sediment supply and changing bathymetry of the seaways connecting with the Pacific Ocean, evidence for an assumed global eustatic cycle remains questionable or very subordinated.

  16. Jurassic Tectonic Revolution in China and New Interpretation of the "Yanshan Movement"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Shuwen; ZHANG Yueqiao; LONG Changxing; YANG Zhenyu; JI Qiang; WANG Tao; HU Jianming; CHEN Xuanhua

    2008-01-01

    With acquisition and accumulation of new data of structural geological investigations and high-resolution isotopic dating data, we have greatly improved our understanding of the tectonic events occurring in eastern China during the period from the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous and may give a new interpretation of the nature, timing and geodynamic settings of the "Yanshan Movement". During the Mid-Late Jurassic (165±5 Ma), great readjustment of plate amalgamation kinematics took place in East Asia and the tectonic regime underwent great transformation, thus initiating a new tectonic regime in which the North China Block was the center and different plates converged toward it from the north, east and southwest and forming the "East Asia convergent"tectonic system characterized by intracontinental subduction and orogeny. As a consequence, the crustal lithosphere of the East Asian continent thickened considerably during the Late Jurassic,followed immediately by Early Cretaceous substantial lithospheric thinning and craton destruction featured by drastic lithospheric extension and widespread volcano-magmatic activities, resulting in a major biotic turnover from the Yanliao biota to Jehol Biota. Such a tremendous tectonic event that took place in the continent of China and East Asia is the basic connotation of the "Yanshan Movement". In the paper, according to the deformation patterns, geodynamic settings and deep processes, the "Yanshan Movement" is redefined as the Late Jurassic East Asian multi-directional plate convergent tectonic regime and its associated extensive intracontinental orogeny and great tectonic change that started at ~165±5 Ma. The substantial lithospheric attenuation in East China is considered the post-effect of the Yanshanian intracontinental orogeny and deformation.

  17. THE PROTECTION OF JURASSIC SITES AND FOSSILS: CHALLENGES FOR GLOBAL JURASSIC SCIENCE (INCLUDING A PROPOSED STATEMENT ON THE CONSERVATION OF PALAEONTOLOGICAL HERITAGE AND STRATOTYPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KEVIN N. PAGE

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Effective geoconservation systems are crucial to the activities of subcommissions of the International Subcommission on Stratigraphy, such as the Jurassic Subcommission (ISJS. Fundamentally, the core activity of any Subcommission, the establishment of Global Stratotype Sections and Points (GSSPs is a conservation activity in itself, involving the selection of key sites, to be maintained as references for subsequent consultation. Without adequate national site protection and management systems this fundamental function is liable to fail as the selected site remains vulnerable to loss and damage. In addition, strict conservation systems applied without adequate understanding of the needs of research and education can also prevent or significantly inhibit geological science and the use of sites such as GSSPs. To address these extreme scenarios and assist the development of a more scientific approach to conservation of geological sites of stratigraphical and palaeontological importance during dialogues with administrative authorities, a Statement defining categories of palaeontological heritage requiring protection and the basic requirements needed to achieve the conservation of stratotype localities is here proposed. The context of the protection of Jurassic sites within other international projects is also reviewed, in particular the IUGS Geosites project, within which all GSSPs will be listed.

  18. A new Jurassic theropod from China documents a transitional step in the macrostructure of feathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Ulysse; Cau, Andrea; Cincotta, Aude; Hu, Dongyu; Chinsamy, Anusuya; Escuillié, François; Godefroit, Pascal

    2017-10-01

    Genuine fossils with exquisitely preserved plumage from the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous of northeastern China have recently revealed that bird-like theropod dinosaurs had long pennaceous feathers along their hindlimbs and may have used their four wings to glide or fly. Thus, it has been postulated that early bird flight might initially have involved four wings (Xu et al. Nature 421:335-340, 2003; Hu et al. Nature 461:640-643, 2009; Han et al. Nat Commun 5:4382, 2014). Here, we describe Serikornis sungei gen. et sp. nov., a new feathered theropod from the Tiaojishan Fm (Late Jurassic) of Liaoning Province, China. Its skeletal morphology suggests a ground-dwelling ecology with no flying adaptations. Our phylogenetic analysis places Serikornis, together with other Late Jurassic paravians from China, as a basal paravians, outside the Eumaniraptora clade. The tail of Serikornis is covered proximally by filaments and distally by slender rectrices. Thin symmetrical remiges lacking barbules are attached along its forelimbs and elongate hindlimb feathers extend up to its toes, suggesting that hindlimb remiges evolved in ground-dwelling maniraptorans before being co-opted to an arboreal lifestyle or flight.

  19. Storms and tsunamis: evidence of event sedimentation in the Late Jurassic Tendaguru Beds of southeastern Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussert, Robert; Aberhan, Martin

    2004-06-01

    In Late Jurassic shallow marine siliciclastic sediments of the dinosaur-bearing Tendaguru Beds from the Mandawa Basin of southeastern Tanzania we identified several event deposits. Based on an analysis of their sedimentological and palaeontological features, a storm-induced origin can be assumed for the majority of these deposits. This interpretation is in agreement with the regional palaeogeography and palaeoclimatological data, and is further supported by the widespread evidence of Late Jurassic storm-controlled sedimentation in adjacent basins along the East African margin. A particularly striking feature is a laterally extensive, conglomeratic bed with gravel components up to 30 cm in diameter, and megaripples indicating southward transport directions. The troughs between ripples are filled by cross-bedded fine-grained sandstones and siltsones with inferred transport directions to the north. Giant bedforms, a mixture of clasts of marine and continental origin, and evidence of opposite current directions suggest that this chaotically deposited sediment may have formed from a tsunami. Within the available time resolution this event is synchronous with the Morokweng impact structure in South Africa. However, because of the considerable distance of Morokweng from the Jurassic sea, direct links between both events cannot be established. Alternative mechanisms such as a landslide-generated tsunami are plausible, but not yet supported by geophysical data.

  20. A new Basal sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Lower Jurassic Navajo sandstone of Southern Utah.

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    Joseph J W Sertich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Basal sauropodomorphs, or 'prosauropods,' are a globally widespread paraphyletic assemblage of terrestrial herbivorous dinosaurs from the Late Triassic and Early Jurassic. In contrast to several other landmasses, the North American record of sauropodomorphs during this time interval remains sparse, limited to Early Jurassic occurrences of a single well-known taxon from eastern North America and several fragmentary specimens from western North America. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: On the basis of a partial skeleton, we describe here a new basal sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Lower Jurassic Navajo Sandstone of southern Utah, Seitaad ruessi gen. et sp. nov. The partially articulated skeleton of Seitaad was likely buried post-mortem in the base of a collapsed dune foreset. The new taxon is characterized by a plate-like medial process of the scapula, a prominent proximal expansion of the deltopectoral crest of the humerus, a strongly inclined distal articular surface of the radius, and a proximally and laterally hypertrophied proximal metacarpal I. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Phylogenetic analysis recovers Seitaad as a derived basal sauropodomorph closely related to plateosaurid or massospondylid 'prosauropods' and its presence in western North America is not unexpected for a member of this highly cosmopolitan clade. This occurrence represents one of the most complete vertebrate body fossil specimens yet recovered from the Navajo Sandstone and one of the few basal sauropodomorph taxa currently known from North America.

  1. Discovery of a short-necked sauropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic period of Patagonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauhut, Oliver W M; Remes, Kristian; Fechner, Regina; Cladera, Gerardo; Puerta, Pablo

    2005-06-01

    Sauropod dinosaurs are one of the most conspicuous groups of Mesozoic terrestrial vertebrates. They show general trends towards an overall increase in size and elongation of the neck, by means of considerable elongation of the length of individual vertebrae and a cervical vertebra count that, in some cases, increases to 19 (ref. 1). The long neck is a particular hallmark of sauropod dinosaurs and is usually regarded as a key feeding adaptation. Here we describe a new dicraeosaurid sauropod, from the latest Jurassic period of Patagonia, that has a particularly short neck. With a neck that is about 40% shorter than in other known dicraeosaurs, this taxon demonstrates a trend opposite to that seen in most sauropods and indicates that the ecology of dicraeosaurids might have differed considerably from that of other sauropods. The new taxon indicates that there was a rapid radiation and dispersal of dicraeosaurids in the Late Jurassic of the Southern Hemisphere, after the separation of Gondwana from the northern continents by the late Middle Jurassic.

  2. Timing, duration, and causes for Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous anoxia in the Barents Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Svetoslav V.; Stein, Holly J.; Hannah, Judith L.; Xu, Guangping; Bingen, Bernard; Weiss, Hermann M.

    2017-03-01

    Re-Os isochron ages for black shales of the Hekkingen Formation in the Barents Sea constrain the onset (157.7 ± 1.3 Ma) and termination (138.8 ± 1.0 Ma), and thereby indicate a long duration (∼19 Myr) of widespread Jurassic-Cretaceous anoxia in the Arctic. Integration of these new Re-Os ages with published radiometric ages, ammonite biostratigraphy and geomagnetic polarity chrons shows shorter late Oxfordian-late Kimmeridgian and longer Berriasian stages relative to estimates in the 2012 and 2016 Geological Time Scales. Late Jurassic anoxia was likely the result of warming climate due to high atmospheric CO2 levels from increased oceanic crust production. Rising temperatures enhanced weathering and nutrient supply, increased productivity, and slowed ocean circulation before a sea-level rise brought anoxic waters onto continental shelves. Assessment of new and published Os- and Sr-isotopic data suggests that prolonged oceanic anoxia required a sustained CO2 source from fast spreading rates and/or longer subduction zones and spreading ridges to balance large burial of carbon in voluminous Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous black shales.

  3. Bajocian-Bathonian (Middle Jurassic) sea-level changes in northeastern Egypt: Synthesis and further implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruban, Dmitry A.; Sallam, Emad S.

    2016-08-01

    The global eustatic developments can benefit significantly from properly acquired regional information. Summarizing the available interpretations of the relative sea-level changes from two areas in northeastern Egypt, namely Gebel Maghara and Khashm El-Galala, allows better understanding of the Middle Jurassic sea-level changes. It is established that the Bajocian-Bathonian relative sea-level changes in these areas were coherent. The magnitude of changes was lower in the Bajocian than in the Bathonian. Significant sea-level rises occurred at the Bajocian-Bathonian and middle-late Bathonian transitions, and there was a clear tendency toward sea-level rise throughout the studied time interval. This evidence favors one of the two alternative global eustatic reconstructions that implies "stable" position of the shoreline in the Bajocian and general tendency to eustatic rise throughout the Jurassic. The tectonic regime of northeastern Egypt in the Middle Jurassic provided for strong eustatic control of the relative sea-level changes. The possible influence of hotspot activity is questionable. Filling the accommodation space with materials derived from the eroded continent may explain some sea-level falls that are regionally documented.

  4. Triassic-Jurassic organic carbon isotope stratigraphy of key sections in the western Tethys realm (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhl, Micha; Kürschner, Wolfram M.; Krystyn, Leopold

    2009-05-01

    The late Triassic period is recognized as one of the five major mass extinctions in the fossil record. All these important intervals in earth history are associated with excursions in C-isotope records thought to have been caused by perturbations in the global carbon cycle. The nature and causes of C-isotopic events across the Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) transition however, are poorly understood. We present several new high resolution organic C-isotope records from the Eiberg Basin, Austria, including the proposed Global boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) for the base of the Jurassic. The Triassic-Jurassic boundary interval in these records is characterized by the initial and main negative organic carbon isotope excursions (CIE) of up to 8‰. The initial and main CIEs are biostratigraphically constrained by first and last occurrences of boundary defining macro- and microfossils (e.g. ammonites). High resolution C-isotope records appear to be an excellent correlation proxy for this period in the Eiberg Basin. Pyrolysis analysis demonstrates increased Hydrogen Index (HI) values for organic matter coinciding with the initial CIE. Terrestrial organic matter influx and mass occurrences of green algae remains may have influenced the C-isotope composition of the sedimentary organic matter. This may have contributed to the extreme amplitude of the initial CIE in the Eiberg Basin.

  5. Origination and death of petroleum systems along the Late Jurassic/Early Cretaceous northern Tethyan margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golonka, J. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States); Kiessling, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Krobicki, M. [Academy of Mining and Metallurgy, Cracow (Poland). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering; Bocharova, N.Y. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Center for Program Studies

    1997-09-01

    Breakup of Pangea during Jurassic and Cretaceous times created a system of rifts along the northern Tethyan margin. Some of these rifts developed into oceanic basins while others developed on continental crust and turned into aulacogenes. The basins were separated from the main Tethys ocean by several plates and ridges. Partial uplift of the main European plate and late Kimmerian orogeny resulted in the establishment of restricted conditions in the marginal Tethyan basins. The paleogeographic and paleoclimatic setting favoured upwelling along the ridges and continental margins. Source rock prediction value modelling placed Tethyan marginal basins among the best Jurassic source rocks of the world. Self-contained petroleum systems consisting of source rocks, carbonate reservoirs and evaporitic seals occur in the area east of Poland. Actual hydrocarbon production is ongoing in Afghanistan and the Amu-Daria province. Some of Carpathian oils might also be sourced by Late Jurassic/Early Cretaceous rocks. In the western area, petroleum systems were destroyed during the Alpine orogeny.

  6. Upper Jurassic basin axial turbidites within the Gertrud Graben, Danish Central Graben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, E.S.; Jepsen, A.M.; Maver, K.G.

    1998-10-01

    Fore more than twenty years, the Jurassic succession in the Danish Central Graben has been subject to intense exploration for hydrocarbons. Approximately 43 wildcats have been drilled and most of these tested were structural traps located on footwall crests. The reservoirs encountered were Middle and Upper Jurassic sandstones deposited mainly in near shore depositional environments. Some of these wells penetrated thin turbidites of Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous age. Within the Gertrud Graben distinct seismic anomalies indicate the presence of basin floor turbidites, which can be correlated to fan fringe turbites encountered in the Jeppe-1, Gwen-2 and Mona-1 wells. Within the Gertrud Graben, seismic anomalies characterized by high amplitude reflections with in an otherwise transparent reflection pattern have been recognized. The zone with high amplitude reflections correlates with thin turbidites with oil shows encountered in the Jeppe-1 well. The turbiditic sandstone succession has a gross thickness of 25 m and a net to gross of 75%, with porosity up to 10%. The presence of oil shows in the thin turbiditic sandstones in the Jeppe-1 well, drilled on a footwall crest, suggests the possibility of thicker sandstones in the basinal areas. The aim of this study is to map the distribution of the seismic anomalies by performing seismic inversion. Seismic inversion is used to derive acoustic impedance as a lithology indicator and to establish a geological model that is a likely prediction of the lithology and architecture of the depositional system. (EG) 2 fig., 17 refs.

  7. Floral changes across the Triassic/Jurassic boundary linked to flood basalt volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Schootbrugge, B.; Quan, T. M.; Lindström, S.; Püttmann, W.; Heunisch, C.; Pross, J.; Fiebig, J.; Petschick, R.; Röhling, H.-G.; Richoz, S.; Rosenthal, Y.; Falkowski, P. G.

    2009-08-01

    One of the five largest mass extinctions of the past 600million years occurred at the boundary of the Triassic and Jurassic periods, 201.6million years ago. The loss of marine biodiversity at the time has been linked to extreme greenhouse warming, triggered by the release of carbon dioxide from flood basalt volcanism in the central Atlantic Ocean. In contrast, the biotic turnover in terrestrial ecosystems is not well understood, and cannot be readily reconciled with the effects of massive volcanism. Here we present pollen, spore and geochemical analyses across the Triassic/Jurassic boundary from three drill cores from Germany and Sweden. We show that gymnosperm forests in northwest Europe were transiently replaced by fern and fern-associated vegetation, a pioneer assemblage commonly found in disturbed ecosystems. The Triassic/Jurassic boundary is also marked by an enrichment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which, in the absence of charcoal peaks, we interpret as an indication of incomplete combustion of organic matter by ascending flood basalt lava. We conclude that the terrestrial vegetation shift is so severe and wide ranging that it is unlikely to have been triggered by greenhouse warming alone. Instead, we suggest that the release of pollutants such as sulphur dioxide and toxic compounds such as the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons may have contributed to the extinction.

  8. A Middle Jurassic heterodontosaurid dinosaur from Patagonia and the evolution of heterodontosaurids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pol, Diego; Rauhut, Oliver W. M.; Becerra, Marcos

    2011-05-01

    Heterodontosauridae is a morphologically divergent group of dinosaurs that has recently been interpreted as one of the most basal clades of Ornithischia. Heterodontosaurid remains were previously known from the Early Jurassic of southern Africa, but recent discoveries and studies have significantly increased the geographical and temporal range for this clade. Here, we report a new ornithischian dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic Cañadón Asfalto Formation in central Patagonia, Argentina. This new taxon, Manidens condorensis gen. et sp. nov., includes well-preserved craniomandibular and postcranial remains and represents the only diagnostic ornithischian specimen yet discovered in the Jurassic of South America so far. Derived features of its anatomy indicate that Manidens belongs to Heterodontosauridae, as the sister taxon of Heterodontosaurus and other South African heterodontosaurids. The presence of posterior dentary teeth with high crowns but lacking extensive wear facets in Manidens suggests that this form represents an intermediate stage in the development of the remarkable adaptations to herbivory described for Heterodontosaurus. The dentition of Manidens condorensis also has autapomorphies, such as asymmetrically arranged denticles in posterior teeth and a mesially projected denticle in the posteriormost teeth. At an estimated total length of 60-75 cm, Manidens furthermore confirms the small size of basal heterodontosaurids.

  9. New evidence for mammaliaform ear evolution and feeding adaptation in a Jurassic ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhe-Xi; Meng, Qing-Jin; Grossnickle, David M; Liu, Di; Neander, April I; Zhang, Yu-Guang; Ji, Qiang

    2017-08-17

    Stem mammaliaforms are forerunners to modern mammals, and they achieved considerable ecomorphological diversity in their own right. Recent discoveries suggest that eleutherodontids, a subclade of Haramiyida, were more species-rich during the Jurassic period in Asia than previously recognized. Here we report a new Jurassic eleutherodontid mammaliaform with an unusual mosaic of highly specialized characteristics, and the results of phylogenetic analyses that support the hypothesis that haramiyidans are stem mammaliaforms. The new fossil shows fossilized skin membranes that are interpreted to be for gliding and a mandibular middle ear with a unique character combination previously unknown in mammaliaforms. Incisor replacement is prolonged until well after molars are fully erupted, a timing pattern unique to most other mammaliaforms. In situ molar occlusion and a functional analysis reveal a new mode of dental occlusion: dual mortar-pestle occlusion of opposing upper and lower molars, probably for dual crushing and grinding. This suggests that eleutherodontids are herbivorous, and probably specialized for granivory or feeding on soft plant tissues. The inferred dietary adaptation of eleutherodontid gliders represents a remarkable evolutionary convergence with herbivorous gliders in Theria. These Jurassic fossils represent volant, herbivorous stem mammaliaforms associated with pre-angiosperm plants that appear long before the later, iterative associations between angiosperm plants and volant herbivores in various therian clades.

  10. New Fossil Lepidoptera (Insecta: Amphiesmenoptera) from the Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation of Northeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiting; Shih, Chungkun; Labandeira, Conrad C.; Sohn, Jae-Cheon; Davis, Donald R.; Santiago-Blay, Jorge A.; Flint, Oliver; Ren, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Background The early history of the Lepidoptera is poorly known, a feature attributable to an inadequate preservational potential and an exceptionally low occurrence of moth fossils in relevant mid-Mesozoic deposits. In this study, we examine a particularly rich assemblage of morphologically basal moths that contribute significantly toward the understanding of early lepidopteran biodiversity. Methodology/Principal Findings Our documentation of early fossil moths involved light- and scanning electron microscopic examination of specimens, supported by various illumination and specimen contrast techniques. A total of 20 moths were collected from the late Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation in Northeastern China. Our principal results were the recognition and description of seven new genera and seven new species assigned to the Eolepidopterigidae; one new genus with four new species assigned to the Mesokristenseniidae; three new genera with three new species assigned to the Ascololepidopterigidae fam. nov.; and one specimen unassigned to family. Lepidopteran assignment of these taxa is supported by apomorphies of extant lineages, including the M1 vein, after separation from the M2 vein, subtending an angle greater than 60 degrees that is sharply angulate at the junction with the r–m crossvein (variable in Trichoptera); presence of a foretibial epiphysis; the forewing M vein often bearing three branches; and the presence of piliform scales along wing veins. Conclusions/Significance The diversity of these late Middle Jurassic lepidopterans supports a conclusion that the Lepidoptera–Trichoptera divergence occurred by the Early Jurassic. PMID:24278142

  11. New robertinid foraminifers from the Early Jurassic of Adnet, Austria and their evolutionary importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Rigaud

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available New benthic multichambered foraminifers have been discovered in the Hettangian–Sinemurian of the Northern Calcareous Alps (Adnet, Salzburg, Austria. Originally aragonitic, these forms are completely recrystallized but the early impregnation of their tests by Fe-Mn solutions has, to some extent, allowed an indirect preservation of their primary structure. The most remarkably preserved specimens are found in close vicinity to the marmorea crust, a heavily mineralized multiphased hardground. We describe two new genera, Velleditsiella gen. nov., a microgastropod look-alike foraminifer, which includes the species V. felicitaszae gen. et sp. nov. and V. spinaferra gen. et sp. nov., and Rossanella gen. nov., the first known representative of the superfamily Conorboidoidea, which includes the species R. martinii gen. et sp. nov. Considering their structural and morphological characteristics, Velleditsiella and Rossanella phylogenetically derive from two distinct Triassic lineages, respectively the families Trochosiphoniidae and Variostomatidae. The discovery of diverse aragonitic assemblages in earliest Jurassic strata dismisses the long believed hypothesis that all Jurassic aragonitic multichambered foraminifers originated from a single Oberhauserellidae ancestor. It also supports a lower impact of the Triassic/Jurassic biotic crisis on the evolution of aragonitic foraminifers. Hypotheses for the short term and long term evolution of aragonitic multichambered foraminifers are discussed and new phyletic trees are proposed.

  12. New evidence for mammaliaform ear evolution and feeding adaptation in a Jurassic ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhe-Xi; Meng, Qing-Jin; Grossnickle, David M.; Liu, Di; Neander, April I.; Zhang, Yu-Guang; Ji, Qiang

    2017-08-01

    Stem mammaliaforms are forerunners to modern mammals, and they achieved considerable ecomorphological diversity in their own right. Recent discoveries suggest that eleutherodontids, a subclade of Haramiyida, were more species-rich during the Jurassic period in Asia than previously recognized. Here we report a new Jurassic eleutherodontid mammaliaform with an unusual mosaic of highly specialized characteristics, and the results of phylogenetic analyses that support the hypothesis that haramiyidans are stem mammaliaforms. The new fossil shows fossilized skin membranes that are interpreted to be for gliding and a mandibular middle ear with a unique character combination previously unknown in mammaliaforms. Incisor replacement is prolonged until well after molars are fully erupted, a timing pattern unique to most other mammaliaforms. In situ molar occlusion and a functional analysis reveal a new mode of dental occlusion: dual mortar-pestle occlusion of opposing upper and lower molars, probably for dual crushing and grinding. This suggests that eleutherodontids are herbivorous, and probably specialized for granivory or feeding on soft plant tissues. The inferred dietary adaptation of eleutherodontid gliders represents a remarkable evolutionary convergence with herbivorous gliders in Theria. These Jurassic fossils represent volant, herbivorous stem mammaliaforms associated with pre-angiosperm plants that appear long before the later, iterative associations between angiosperm plants and volant herbivores in various therian clades.

  13. Phosphorus leaching in soils amended with piggery effluent or lime residues from effluent treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, D M; Ritchie, G S

    1994-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) in wastes from piggeries may contribute to the eutrophication of waterways if not disposed of appropriately. Phosphorus leaching, from three soils with different P sorption characteristics (two with low P retention and one with moderate P retention) when treated with piggery effluent (with or without struvite), was investigated using batch and leaching experiments. The leaching of P retained in soil from the application of struvite effluent was determined. In addition, P leaching from lime residues (resulting from the treatment of piggery effluent with lime to remove P) was determined in comparison to superphosphate when applied to the same three soils. Most P was leached from sandy soils with low P retention when effluent with or without struvite was applied. More than 100% of the filterable P applied in struvite effluent was leached in sandy soils with low P retention. Solid, inorganic forms of P (struvite) became soluble and potentially leachable at pHdissolution if there were sufficient sorption sites. In sandy soils with low P retention, more than 39% of the total filterable P applied in recycled effluent (without struvite) was leached. Soil P increased mainly in surface layers after treatment with effluent. Sandy soils pre-treated with struvite effluent leached 40% of the P retained in the previous application. Phosphorus decreased in surface layers and increased at depth in the soil with moderate P retention after leaching the struvite effluent pre-treated soil with water. The soils capacity to adsorb P and the soil pH were the major soil properties that affected the rate and amount of P leaching, whereas the important characteristics of the effluent were pH, P concentration and the forms of P in the effluent. Phosphorus losses from soils amended with hydrated lime and lime kiln dust residues were much lower than losses from soils amended with superphosphate. Up to 92% of the P applied as superphosphate was leached from sandy soils with low P

  14. [Study on the mechanism of liesegang pattern development during carbonating of traditional sticky rice-lime mortar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guo-feng; Fang, Shi-qiang; Zhang, Bing-jian; Wang, Xiao-qi; Li, Zu-guang

    2012-08-01

    Liesegang patterns in traditional sticky rice-lime mortar undergoing carbonation were investigated by means of FTIR, XRD and SEM. Results indicate that well-developed Liesegang patterns only occur in the mortar prepared with aged lime and sticky rice. The smaller Ca(OH)2 particle size in aged lime and the control of the sticky rice for the crystallization of calcium carbonate lead to the small pores in this mortar. These small pores can make Ca2+ and CO3(2-) highly supersaturated, which explains the reason why Liesegang pattern developed in the sticky rice-aged lime mortar. The formed metastable aragonite proves that Liesegang pattern could be explained based on the post-nucleation theory.

  15. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Mexican lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle) using optimized systems for epicotyls and cotelydons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epicotyl and internodal stem segments provide the predominantly used explants for regeneration of transgenic citrus plants following co-cultivation with Agrobacterium. Previous reports using epicotyls segments from Mexican lime have shown low affinity for Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection which re...

  16. Evaluation of the Effects of Lime-bassanite-charcoal Amendment on the Immobilization of Cadmium in Contaminated Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shunhong; Yang, Yi; Li, Qian; Su, Zhen; Yuan, Cuiyu; Ouyang, Kun

    2017-03-01

    The effects of amendments, such as lime, bassanite, sodium phosphate, steel slag and charcoal, and their compounds on the immobilization of cadmium (Cd) are investigated. The lime-bassanite-charcoal compound shows the best remediation performance compared to other agents in conducted experiments. The optimum condition for lime-bassanite-charcoal application in contaminated soil is lime-bassanite-charcoal with a mass ratio of 1:1/3:2/3, a dose of 2% of the soil weight, and a liquid-to-solid ratio of 35%-40%; additionally, the agents should be added before water addition. The highest Cd removal rate was 58.94% (±1.19%) with a ∆pH of 0.23, which is much higher than the rates reported in previous studies. The compound amendment was used in a field experiment, demonstrating a Cd removal efficiency of 48.78% (±4.23), further confirming its effectiveness.

  17. The Effect of Lime Addition on the Setting Time and Strength of Ambient Cured Fly Ash Based Geopolymer Binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Andi Arham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the limitations of geopolymer as the alternative binders in concrete is the necessity of heat curing. This study aimed to produce fly ash geopolymer binder subjected to ambient curing by adding a small proportion of lime and varying the activator dosage. The Class F fly ash from Mpanau coal-fired power plant was mixed with alkaline solution consists of sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide with Na2O dosage of 5%, 7%, and 9%. To achieve ambient cured paste, 8%, 9%, and 10% slaked lime was added as the substitute for the fly ash. The setting time test was conducted for each mix and the compressive strength was performed at age of 7, 14 and 28 days. The test result shows that the setting time of the fly ash based geopolymer paste can be controlled by adding a small proportion of slaked lime. The addition of lime increased strength but decreased the setting time.

  18. Responses of Ammonia-Oxidising Bacterial Communities to Nitrogen, Lime, and Plant Species in Upland Grassland Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre C. Rooney

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural improvement of seminatural grasslands has been shown to result in changes to plant and microbial diversity, with consequences for ecosystem functioning. A microcosm approach was used to elucidate the effects of two key components of agricultural improvement (nitrogen addition and liming on ammonia-oxidising bacterial (AOB communities in an upland grassland soil. Plant species characteristic of unimproved and improved pastures (A. capillaris and L. perenne were planted in microcosms, and lime, nitrogen (NH4NO3, or lime plus nitrogen added. The AOB community was profiled using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP of the amoA gene. AOB community structure was largely altered by NH4NO3 addition, rather than liming, although interactions between nitrogen addition and plant species were also evident. Results indicate that nitrogen addition drives shifts in the structure of key microbial communities in upland grassland soils, and that plant species may play a significant role in determining AOB community structure.

  19. Resistance to Citrus Canker in Key/Mexican Lime Induced by β-Aminobutyric Acid and Green Tea

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    B. Beheshti; G. R. Sharifi-Sirchi; M. Mansouri; A. Hosseinipour; N. L. Schlaich

    2011-01-01

    .... To improve control of this disease, lime (Citrus aurantifolia) plants inoculated with Xcc were treated with β-Aminobutyric Acid (BABA), ascorbic acid (vitamin C), thiamin (vitamin B1), green tea (Camellia sinensis...

  20. The Jurassic petroleum system north and west of Britain: a geochemical oil-source correlation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scotchman, I.C. [Statoil Ltd., London (United Kingdom); Griffith, C.E.; Holmes, A.J. [Mobil North Sea Ltd., London (United Kingdom); Jones, D.M. [University of Newcastle (United Kingdom). Newcastle Research Group in Fossil Fuels and Environmental Geochemistry

    1998-12-31

    Recent significant oil discoveries have focused exploration attention on the Atlantic Margin areas north and west of Britain, in particular the West of Shetlands area. These discoveries, the Foinaven and Schiehallion fields, each have reserves of 250 to 500 million barrels (39.8 to 79.5 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3}) of 24-27 {sup o} API oil while an earlier heavy oil discovery, the Clair Field, is the largest undeveloped oil discovery on the U.K. Continental Shelf with resources estimated in the range 3-5 billion barrels (477 to 795 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3}). Other discoveries include Suilven, the very heavy oil in well 204/28-1 and the Quadrant 205 Strathmore and Solan fields. Potential source rocks in areas adjacent to the West of Shetlands include the Upper Jurassic Kimmeridge CLay Formation equivalent, the Middle and Lower Jurassic and the Middle Devonian. The results of geochemical studies of the oils, reservoir core extracts and source rocks from released wells from these West of Shetlands discoveries show them to be genetically related to North Sea oils sourced from the Kimmeridge Clay Formation equivalent. Detailed geochemical analysis (biomarkers, source rock reaction kinetics, compound specific isotope analysis and fluid inclusion ``crush-leach`` analysis) of the Clair Field and ``Foinaven Complex`` oils showed that at least two episodes of charging from different source facies within the Kimmeridge Clay Formation took place, with an intervening biodegradation event. Oil charging from Middle Jurassic lacustrine source rocks is also indicated in the ``Foinaven Complex`` oils. The source rocks are shown to exhibit variations in organic facies, from very oil-prone to mixed oil and gas, with a corresponding range of kinetic parameters. This complex generation, migration and trapping scenario is directly linked with the tectonic evolution of the West of Shetlands with major oil generation from very oil-prone Kimmeridge Clay and Middle Jurassic lacustrine facies into