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  1. Radio observations of Jupiter-family comets

    CERN Document Server

    Crovisier, J; Bockelée-Morvan, D; Colom, P

    2008-01-01

    Radio observations from decimetric to submillimetric wavelengths are now a basic tool for the investigation of comets. Spectroscopic observations allow us i) to monitor the gas production rate of the comets, by directly observing the water molecule, or by observing secondary products (e.g., the OH radical) or minor species (e.g., HCN); ii) to investigate the chemical composition of comets; iii) to probe the physical conditions of cometary atmospheres: kinetic temperature and expansion velocity. Continuum observations probe large-size dust particles and (for the largest objects) cometary nuclei. Comets are classified from their orbital characteristics into two separate classes: i) nearly-isotropic, mainly long-period comets and ii) ecliptic, short-period comets, the so-called Jupiter-family comets. These two classes apparently come from two different reservoirs, respectively the Oort cloud and the trans-Neptunian scattered disc. Due to their different history and - possibly - their different origin, they may h...

  2. Jupiter Laser Facility - COMET Laser

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — COMET has 4 beam configurations with uncompressed pulse lengths from 500 ps to 6 ns, compressed pulses to 0.5 ps, and beam energies up to 20 J. COMET can fire every...

  3. Secular orbital evolution of Jupiter family comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, H.; Gabryszewski, R.; Wajer, P.; Wiśniowski, T.; Wójcikowski, K.; Szutowicz, S.; Valsecchi, G. B.; Morbidelli, A.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The issue of the long term dynamics of Jupiter family comets (JFCs) involves uncertain assumptions about the physical evolution and lifetimes of these comets. Contrary to what is often assumed, real effects of secular dynamics cannot be excluded and therefore merit investigation. Aims: We use a random sample of late heavy bombardment cometary projectiles to study the long-term dynamics of JFCs by a Monte Carlo approach. In a steady-state picture of the Jupiter family, we investigate the orbital distribution of JFCs, including rarely visited domains like retrograde orbits or orbits within the outer parts of the asteroid main belt. Methods: We integrate 100 000 objects over a maximum of 100 000 orbital revolutions including the Sun, a comet, and four giant planets. Considering the steady-state number of JFCs to be proportional to the total time spent in the respective orbital domain, we derive the capture rate based on observed JFCs with small perihelia and large nuclei. We consider a purely dynamical model and one where the nuclei are eroded by ice sublimation. Results: The JFC inclination distribution is incompatible with our erosional model. This may imply that a new type of comet evolution model is necessary. Considering that comets may live for a long time, we show that JFCs can evolve into retrograde orbits as well as asteroidal orbits in the outer main belt or Cybele regions. The steady-state capture rate into the Jupiter family is consistent with 1 × 109 scattered disk objects with diameters D > 2 km. Conclusions: Our excited scattered disk makes it difficult to explain the JFC inclination distribution, unless the physical evolution of JFCs is more intricate than assumed in standard, erosional models. Independent of this, the population size of the Jupiter family is consistent with a relatively low-mass scattered disk.

  4. The mass disruption of Jupiter Family comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belton, Michael J. S.

    2015-01-01

    I show that the size-distribution of small scattered-disk trans-neptunian objects when derived from the observed size-distribution of Jupiter Family comets (JFCs) and other observational constraints implies that a large percentage (94-97%) of newly arrived active comets within a range of 0.2-15.4 km effective radius must physically disrupt, i.e., macroscopically disintegrate, within their median dynamical lifetime. Additional observational constraints include the numbers of dormant and active nuclei in the near-Earth object (NEO) population and the slope of their size distributions. I show that the cumulative power-law slope (-2.86 to -3.15) of the scattered-disk TNO hot population between 0.2 and 15.4 km effective radius is only weakly dependent on the size-dependence of the otherwise unknown disruption mechanism. Evidently, as JFC nuclei from the scattered disk evolve into the inner Solar System only a fraction achieve dormancy while the vast majority of small nuclei (e.g., primarily those with effective radius Morbidelli, A., Dones, L., Jedicke, R., Wiegert, P.A., Bottke Jr., W.F. [2002]. Science 296, 2212-2215) suggesting that all types of comet nuclei may have similar structural characteristics even though they may have different source regions and thermal histories. The typical disruption rate for a 1 km radius active nucleus is ∼5 × 10-5 disruptions/year and the dormancy rate is typically 3 times less. We also estimate that average fragmentation rates range from 0.01 to 0.04 events/year/comet, somewhat above the lower limit of 0.01 events/year/comet observed by Chen and Jewitt (Chen, J., Jewitt, D.C. [1994]. Icarus 108, 265-271).

  5. A Post-Stardust Mission View of Jupiter Family Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, M.

    2011-01-01

    Before the Stardust Mission, many persons (including the mission team) believed that comet nuclei would be geologically boring objects. Most believed that comet nucleus mineralogy would be close or identical to the chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), or perhaps contain mainly amorphous nebular condensates or that comets might even be composed mainly of preserved presolar material [1]. Amazingly, the results for Comet Wild 2 (a Jupiter class comet) were entirely different. Whether this particular comet will ultimately be shown to be typical or atypical will not be known for a rather long time, so we describe our new view of comets from the rather limited perspective of this single mission.

  6. Where is the main source of Jupiter family comets situated?

    CERN Document Server

    Kazantsev, A M

    2012-01-01

    An attempt to determine spatial location of the main source of short-period comet nuclei was made. There were carried out numerical calculations for orbit evolution of Jupiter family comets, comets with middle-period orbits and bodies of Centaur group. On the basis of the calculations it was shown, that orbital evolution of the solar system small bodies is mainly going in the direction of the semi-major axes increase. It belongs to the bodies which can undergo approaches the planets, and orbital evolution of which is mainly going due to the gravitational forces. Such result is confirmed by qualitative analysis of changes of small body semi-major axes under approaches the planets. The conclusion was drawn that the main source of nuclei of Jupiter family comets is apparently situated at distances from the Sun not more than 6 AU.

  7. The prediction of impact of Comet SL9 on Jupiter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张家祥; 汪琦; 杨捷兴; 王思潮; 陈协珍

    1996-01-01

    Several predictions of the impact of Comet SL9 on Jupiter were made from April to July, 1994. The predictions are basically in agreement with actuality. The method and theory of the prediction are expounded briefly, and the predicted impact times are analyzed and compared with actually accepted impact times.

  8. The Collision of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 and Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Keith S.; Weaver, Harold A.; Feldman, Paul D.

    2006-11-01

    Participants; Preface; 1. The orbital motion and impact circumstances of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 Paul W. Chodas and Donald K. Yeomans; 2. Observational constraints on the composition and nature of Comet D/Shoemaker-Levy 9 Jacques Crovisier; 3. Tidal breakup of the nucleus of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 Zdenek Sekanina; 4. Earth-based observations of impact phenomena Philip D. Nicholson; 5. HST imaging of Jupiter shortly after each impact: plumes and fresh sites Heidi B. Hammel; 6. Galileo observations of the impacts Clark R. Chapman; 7. Models of fragment penetration and fireball evolution David A. Crawford; 8. Entry and fireball models vs. observations: what have we learned? Mordecai-Mark Mac Low; 9. Dynamics and chemistry of SL9 plumes Kevin Zahnle; 10. Chemistry induced by the impacts: observations Emmanuel Lellouch; 11. SL9 impact chemistry: long-term photochemical evolution Julianne I. Moses; 12. Particulate matter in Jupiter's atmosphere from the impacts of Comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9 Robert A. West; 13. Jupiter's post-impact atmospheric thermal response Barney J. Conrath; 14. Growth and dispersion of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 impact features from HST imaging Reta F. Beebe; 15. Waves from the Shoemaker-Levy 9 impacts Andrew P. Ingersoll and Hiroo Kanamori; 16. Jovian magnetospheric and auroral effects of the SL9 impacts Wing-Huen Ip.

  9. Hilda family contribution to the Jupiter Family Comets (JFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Sisto, R. P.; Brunini, A.; Dirani, L. D.; Orellana, R. B.

    The distinction between asteroids and comets, is based in their observational qualities rather than in their orbital characteristics. Comets show activity when they reach the interior Solar System. Asteroids from the outer Belt, may have compound of the same volatile material, dust and organic molecules than comets, but they didn't approach enough to the Sun, to show activity. From the compositional point of view, it is a bit arbitrary or at least difficult to distinguish between asteroids from the external main belt and comets. The firsts may be very similar to comets, or at least be objects of intermediate characteristics. The Hildas asteroids, in 3:2 mean motion with Jupiter, have great quantity of volatiles. The main source of Jupiter Family Comets (JFC) is the transneptunian region, but less than 10 % of them comes from the Troyan swarms. In this article we study the Hilda family as another probable source of JFC. We perform numerical simulations and follow the dynamical evolution of Hildas escaped from the resonance. From the 391 particles that escaped from the resonance, 386 (98.7 %) live at least for 1000 years as JFC. The mean life time in this zone is 1.4 × 106 years. The escape rate of an Hilda asteroid, with diameter D greater than 1 km. Is 1.1 × 10-4, so, there is 65 Hildas with D > 1km. (the typical size of a comet) in the JFC region. Therefore, the contribution of Hilda asteroids to the population of comets is important.

  10. On the influence of the plasma generated by comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 on Jupiter`s magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stabile, F.; Zimbardo, G. [Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza, Univ. della Calabria (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    1997-11-01

    The impact of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter has created a variety of magnetospheric plasmas which were detected by their electromagnetic emissions. By means of the Dessler-Parker-Sckopke relation we estimate the perturbation of Jupiter`s magnetic field. It appears that the produced plasma may explain the observed decrease of UV lines in Io`s torus.

  11. A catalog of observed nuclear magnitudes of Jupiter family comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tancredi, G.; Fernández, J. A.; Rickman, H.; Licandro, J.

    2000-10-01

    A catalog of a sample of 105 Jupiter family (JF) comets (defined as those with Tisserand constants T > 2 and orbital periods P nuclear magnitudes H_N = V(1,0,0). The catalog includes all the nuclear magnitudes reported after 1950 until August 1998 that appear in the International Comet Quarterly Archive of Cometary Photometric Data, the Minor Planet Center (MPC) data base, IAU Circulars, International Comet Quarterly, and a few papers devoted to some particular comets, together with our own observations. Photometric data previous to 1990 have mainly been taken from the Comet Light Curve Catalogue (CLICC) compiled by Kamél (\\cite{kamel}). We discuss the reliability of the reported nuclear magnitudes in relation to the inherent sources of errors and uncertainties, in particular the coma contamination often present even at large heliocentric distances. A large fraction of the JF comets of our sample indeed shows various degrees of activity at large heliocentric distances, which is correlated with recent downward jumps in their perihelion distances. The reliability of coma subtraction methods to compute the nuclear magnitude is also discussed. Most absolute nuclear magnitudes are found in the range 15 - 18, with no magnitudes fainter than H_N ~ 19.5. The catalog can be found at: http://www.fisica.edu.uy/ ~ gonzalo/catalog/. Table 2 and Appendix B are only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org Table 5 is also available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

  12. Periodic Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 Collides with Jupiter. Background Material for Science Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA.

    In July of 1994, fragments of Comet Shoemaker-Levy collided with Jupiter. This document has been provided to better inform students of the work that will be done by scientists and others involved in the study of this event. This document offers some background material on Jupiter, comets, what has and possibly will happen, and how scientists…

  13. The Composition of Dust in Jupiter-Family Comets as Inferred from Infrared Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, Michael S

    2008-01-01

    We review the composition of Jupiter-family comet dust as inferred from infrared spectroscopy. We find that Jupiter-family comets have 10 micron silicate emission features with fluxes roughly 20-25% over the dust continuum (emission strength 1.20-1.25), similar to the weakest silicate features in Oort Cloud comets. We discuss the grain properties that change the silicate emission feature strength (composition, size, and structure/shape), and emphasize that thermal emission from the comet nucleus can have significant influence on the derived silicate emission strength. Recent evidence suggests that porosity is the dominant parameter, although more observations and models of silicates in Jupiter-family comets are needed to determine if a consistent set of grain parameters can explain their weak silicate emission features. Models of 8 m telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope observations have shown that Jupiter-family comets have crystalline silicates with abundances similar to or less than those found in Oort Cl...

  14. Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, Jupiter, and Impact Shock Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Cuzzi, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Four years ago this month, a hitherto unknown comet in loose orbit around Jupiter passed so near the giant planet that it was torn apart into 20 fragments by tides. One orbit later, two years ago this month, the fragments of doomed comet P/Shoemaker Levy (SL9) fell into Jupiter. The enormous energies of these impacts (the largest fragments were nearly 1 km across and, hitting at 60 km/s, released some 2-4 x 10(exp 27) ergs) produced enormous explosions. Several of the ejecta plumes were imaged towering 3000 km above Jupiter's limb. The heat released when the plumes fell was considerable and easily observed on Earth. The impacts produced strong shocks, both promptly at the impact site and again, later, and over thousands of kilometers, when the ejecta plume reentered the atmosphere. The focus of this talk will be to discuss what the SL9 impacts taught us about impact shock chemistry - the processes, the ingredients, the results - and what inferences we may draw for impacts on early Earth. Shock chemistry generates a suite of molecules not usually seen on Jupiter. The most surprising report was of a huge amount of diatomic sulfur S2 at the site of the G impact. Other unusual products include CS, CS2, OCS, H2S, SO2, HCN, CO, and H2O; although H2S and H2O are doubtless abundant below the visible clouds. Hot or enhanced CH4 and NH3 were also detected. A general rule of shock chemistry is that CO forms until either C or O is exhausted. If O greater than C, the other products are oxidized, and excess O goes to H2O. If C greater than O, the other products are reduced, and excess C goes to HCN, C2H2, and a wide variety of more complicated organics. Ultimately, given time, the carbon would react all the way to graphite, but in practice the reactions are incomplete. The dark ejecta debris were probably composed in part of carbonaceous particles generated by the shocks. In a sense, the SL9 impacts performed the famous Miller-Urey experiment on a grand scale, with one result

  15. Organic composition of C/1999 S4 (LINEAR): a comet formed near Jupiter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumma, M J; Dello Russo, N; DiSanti, M A; Magee-Sauer, K; Novak, R E; Brittain, S; Rettig, T; McLean, I S; Reuter, D C; Xu, L H

    2001-05-18

    In the current paradigm, Oort cloud comets formed in the giant planets' region of the solar nebula, where temperatures and other conditions varied greatly. The measured compositions of four such comets (Halley, Hyakutake, Hale-Bopp, and Lee) are consistent with formation from interstellar ices in the cold nebular region beyond Uranus. The composition of comet C/1999 S4 (LINEAR) differs greatly, which suggests that its ices condensed from processed nebular gas, probably in the Jupiter-Saturn region. Its unusual organic composition may require reevaluation of the prebiotic organic material delivered to the young Earth by comets.

  16. Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9/Jupiter collision observed with a high resolution speckle imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravel, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    During the week of July 16, 1994, comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, broken into 20 plus pieces by tidal forces on its last orbit, smashed into the planet Jupiter, releasing the explosive energy of 500 thousand megatons. A team of observers from LLNL used the LLNL Speckle Imaging Camera mounted on the University of California`s Lick Observatory 3 Meter Telescope to capture continuous sequences of planet images during the comet encounter. Post processing with the bispectral phase reconstruction algorithm improves the resolution by removing much of the blurring due to atmospheric turbulence. High resolution images of the planet surface showing the aftermath of the impact are probably the best that were obtained from any ground-based telescope. We have been looking at the regions of the fragment impacts to try to discern any dynamic behavior of the spots left on Jupiter`s cloud tops. Such information can lead to conclusions about the nature of the comet and of Jupiter`s atmosphere. So far, the Hubble Space Telescope has observed expanding waves from the G impact whose mechanism is enigmatic since they appear to be too slow to be sound waves and too fast to be gravity waves, given the present knowledge of Jupiter`s atmosphere. Some of our data on the G and L impact region complements the Hubble observations but, so far, is inconclusive about spot dynamics.

  17. Potential Jupiter-Family Comet Contamination of the Main Asteroid Belt

    CERN Document Server

    Hsieh, Henry H

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of "snapshot" numerical integrations of test particles representing comet-like and asteroid-like objects in the inner solar system aimed at investigating the short-term dynamical evolution of objects close to the dynamical boundary between asteroids and comets as defined by the Tisserand parameter with respect to Jupiter, T_J (i.e., T_J=3). As expected, we find that T_J for individual test particles is not always a reliable indicator of initial orbit types. Furthermore, we find that a few percent of test particles with comet-like starting elements (i.e., similar to Jupiter-family comets) reach main-belt-like orbits (at least temporarily) during our 2 Myr integrations, even without the inclusion of non-gravitational forces, apparently via a combination of gravitational interactions with the terrestrial planets and temporary trapping by mean-motion resonances with Jupiter. We estimate that the fraction of real Jupiter-family comets occasionally reaching main-belt-like orbits on Myr timesc...

  18. Potential Jupiter-Family comet contamination of the main asteroid belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Henry H.; Haghighipour, Nader

    2016-10-01

    We present the results of "snapshot" numerical integrations of test particles representing comet-like and asteroid-like objects in the inner Solar System aimed at investigating the short-term dynamical evolution of objects close to the dynamical boundary between asteroids and comets as defined by the Tisserand parameter with respect to Jupiter, TJ (i.e., TJ = 3). As expected, we find that TJ for individual test particles is not always a reliable indicator of initial orbit types. Furthermore, we find that a few percent of test particles with comet-like starting elements (i.e., similar to those of Jupiter-family comets) reach main-belt-like orbits (at least temporarily) during our 2 Myr integrations, even without the inclusion of non-gravitational forces, apparently via a combination of gravitational interactions with the terrestrial planets and temporary trapping by mean-motion resonances with Jupiter. We estimate that the fraction of real Jupiter-family comets occasionally reaching main-belt-like orbits on Myr timescales could be on the order of ∼ 0.1-1%, although the fraction that remain on such orbits for appreciable lengths of time is certainly far lower. For this reason, the number of JFC-like interlopers in the main-belt population at any given time is likely to be small, but still non-zero, a finding with significant implications for efforts to use apparently icy yet dynamically asteroidal main-belt comets as tracers of the primordial distribution of volatile material in the inner Solar System. The test particles with comet-like starting orbital elements that transition onto main-belt-like orbits in our integrations appear to be largely prevented from reaching low eccentricity, low inclination orbits, suggesting that the real-world population of main-belt objects with both low eccentricities and inclinations may be largely free of this potential occasional Jupiter-family comet contamination. We therefore find that low-eccentricity, low-inclination main

  19. Variations in Jupiter's Radiation Belts and Synchrotron Radiation as a Result of the Impacts of Comet Shoemaker-Levy/9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, S.; Gulkis, S.; Klein, M.; Thorne, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    Changes to Jupiter's synchrotron radiation following the impact of Comet Shoemaker-Levy/9 are reported. Also, the consequences are reported for three possible mechanisms that might have caused those changes.

  20. The Persistent Activity of Jupiter-Family Comets at 3 to 7 AU

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, Michael S; Licandro, Javier; Lisse, Carey M; Reach, William T; A'Hearn, Michael F; Bauer, James; Campins, Humberto; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Groussin, Olivier; Lamy, Philippe L; Lowry, Stephen C; Meech, Karen J; Pittichova, Jana; Snodgrass, Colin; Toth, Imre; Weaver, Harold A

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of comet activity based on the Spitzer Space Telescope component of the Survey of the Ensemble Physical Properties of Cometary Nuclei. We show that the survey is well suited to measuring the activity of Jupiter-family comets at 3-7 AU from the Sun. Dust was detected in 33 of 89 targets (37 +/- 6%), and we conclude that 21 comets (24 +/- 5%) have morphologies that suggest ongoing or recent cometary activity. Our dust detections are sensitivity limited, therefore our measured activity rate is necessarily a lower limit. All comets with small perihelion distances (q < 1.8 AU) are inactive in our survey, and the active comets in our sample are strongly biased to post-perihelion epochs. We introduce the quantity epsilon-f-rho, intended to be a thermal emission counterpart to the often reported A-f-rho, and find that the comets with large perihelion distances likely have greater dust production rates than other comets in our survey at 3-7 AU from the Sun, indicating a bias in the discovered...

  1. Size and Fraction of Active Surface Area of Some Jupiter Family Comets: Implications with Respect to their Physical Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio A. Fernández

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the sample of measured nuclear magnitudes of the observed Jupiter Family comets (taken as those with orbital periods P 2 to derive sizes of comet nuclei, fraction of active surface areas, as well as to try to gain insight about their physical lifetimes and end states.

  2. A model for the common origin of Jupiter family and Halley type comets

    CERN Document Server

    Emel'yanenko, V V; Bailey, M E

    2014-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the Oort cloud is used to explain the observed orbital distributions and numbers of Jupiter-family and Halley-type short-period comets. Comets are given initial orbits with perihelion distances between 5 and 36 AU, and evolve under planetary, stellar and Galactic perturbations for 4.5 Gyr. This process leads to the formation of an Oort cloud (which we define as the region of semimajor axes a>1000 AU), and to a flux of cometary bodies from the Oort cloud returning to the planetary region at the present epoch. The results are consistent with the dynamical characteristics of short-period comets and other observed cometary populations: the near-parabolic flux, Centaurs, and high-eccentricity trans-Neptunian objects. To achieve this consistency with observations, the model requires that the number of comets versus initial perihelion distance is concentrated towards the outer planetary region. Moreover, the mean physical lifetime of observable comets in the inner planetary region (q<2.5...

  3. Migration of Jupiter-family comets and resonant asteroids to near-Earth space

    CERN Document Server

    Ipatov, S I

    2003-01-01

    We estimated the rate of comet and asteroid collisions with the terrestrial planets by calculating the orbits of 13000 Jupiter-crossing objects (JCOs) and 1300 resonant asteroids and computing the probabilities of collisions based on random-phase approximations and the orbital elements sampled with a 500 yr step. The Bulirsh-Stoer and a symplectic orbit integrator gave similar results for orbital evolution, but sometimes give different collision probabilities with the Sun. A small fraction of former JCOs reached orbits with aphelia inside Jupiter's orbit, and some reached Apollo orbits with semi-major axes less than 2 AU, Aten orbits, and inner-Earth orbits (with aphelia less than 0.983 AU) and remained there for millions of years. Though less than 0.1% of the total, these objects were responsible for most of the collision probability of former JCOs with Earth and Venus. Some Jupiter-family comets can reach inclinations i>90 deg. We conclude that a significant fraction of near-Earth objects could be extinct c...

  4. Hydrogen cyanide polymers from the impact of comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9 on Jupiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, C N

    1997-01-01

    Hydrogen cyanide polymers--heterogeneous solids ranging in color from yellow to orange to brown to black--may be among the organic macromolecules most readily formed within the Solar System. The non-volatile black crust of comet Halley, for example, as well as the extensive orange-brown streaks in the atmosphere of Jupiter, might consist largely of such polymers synthesized from HCN formed by photolysis of methane and ammonia. Laboratory studies of these ubiquitous compounds point to the presence of polyamidine structures synthesized directly from hydrogen cyanide. These would be converted by water to polypeptides which can be further hydrolyzed to alpha-amino acids. Other polymers and multimers with ladder structures derived from HCN would also be present and might well be the source of the many nitrogen heterocycles, adenine included, detected by thermochemolytic analysis. The dark brown color arising from the impacts of comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9 on Jupiter could therefore be mainly caused by the presence of HCN polymers, whether originally present, deposited by the impactor or synthesized from freshly formed HCN. Spectroscopic detection of these predicted macromolecules and their hydrolytic and pyrolytic by-products would strengthen significantly the hypothesis that cyanide polymerization is a preferred pathway for prebiotic and extraterrestrial chemistry.

  5. Physical and dynamical characterization of (5201) Ferraz-Mello, a possible extinct Jupiter family comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvano, J. M.; Ferraz-Mello, S.; Lazzaro, D.

    2008-10-01

    Context: The subject of asteroids in cometary orbits (ACOs) has been of growing interest lately. These objects have the orbital characteristics typical of comets, but are asteroidal in appearance, i.e., show no signs of a coma at any part of their orbits. At least a fraction of these objects are thought to be comets that have either exhausted all their volatile content or developed a refractory crust that prevents sublimation. In particular, the asteroid (5201) Ferraz-Mello has, since its discovery, been suspected to be an extinct Jupiter family comet due to the peculiar nature of its orbit. Aims: The aim of this work is to put constraints on the possible origin of (5201) Ferraz-Mello by means of spectroscopic characterization and a study of the dynamics of this asteroid Methods: We used the SOAR Optical Imager (SOI) to obtain observations of (5201) Ferraz-Mello using four SDSS filters. These observations were compared to asteroids listed in the Sloan Moving objects catalog and also to photometry of cometary nuclei, Centaurs, and TNOs. The orbital evolution of (5201) Ferraz-Mello and of a sample of asteroids and comets that are close to that object in the a-e plane were simulated using a pure N-body code for 4 000 years forward and 4 000 years backward in time. Results: The reflectance spectrum obtained from its colors in the SDSS system is unusual, with a steep spectral gradient that is comparable to TNOs and Centaurs, but with an increase in the reflectance in the g band that is not common in those populations. A similar behavior is seen in cometary nuclei that were observed in the presence of a faint dust coma. The dynamical results confirm the very chaotic evolution found previously and its dynamical similarity to the chaotic evolution of some comets. The asteroid is situated in the very stochastic layer at the border of the 2/1 resonance, and it has a very short Lyapunov time (30-40) years. Together, the spectral characteristcs and the dynamical evolution

  6. Dynamical analysis on the transitivity of Jupiter Family Comets to Near-Earth Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erece, Orhan; Aslan, Gürkan; Eker, Zeki; Kaplan, Murat

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify the contribution of JFC (Jupiter Family Comet) population to NEA (Near-Earth Asteroid) region by integrating their orbits forward in time. To test and compare the statistics we also integrated NEAs having Tisserand parameters from 2 to 3 and their clones backward in time. As a result, 31.9% of orbits turned out to be Earth-crossing orbits for forward integrations while 66.7% of NEAs reached JFC region for backward integrations. From another point of view, when the number of chosen body population is considered; 304 JFC region body is possibly going to reach NEA orbits, 254 NEA region body look like come from JFC region in a comparable time interval. These results substantially support each other.

  7. Monitoring Observations of the Jupiter-Family Comet 17P/Holmes during 2014 Perihelion Passage

    CERN Document Server

    Kwon, Yuna Grace; Hanayama, Hidekazu; Kuroda, Daisuke; Honda, Satoshi; Takahashi, Jun; Kim, Yoonyoung; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Choi, Young-Jun; Kim, Myung-Jin; Vaubaillon, Jeremie J; Miyaji, Takeshi; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Ohta, Kouji; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Fukushima, Hideo; Watanabe, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    We performed a monitoring observation of a Jupiter-Family comet, 17P/Holmes, during its 2014 perihelion passage to investigate its secular change in activity. The comet has drawn the attention of astronomers since its historic outburst in 2007, and this occasion was its first perihelion passage since then. We analyzed the obtained data using aperture photometry package and derived the Afrho parameter, a proxy for the dust production rate. We found that Afrho showed asymmetric properties with respect to the perihelion passage: it increased moderately from 100 cm at the heliocentric distance r_h=2.6-3.1 AU to a maximal value of 185 cm at r_h = 2.2 AU (near the perihelion) during the inbound orbit, while dropping rapidly to 35 cm at r_h = 3.2 AU during the outbound orbit. We applied a model for characterizing dust production rates as a function of r_h and found that the fractional active area of the cometary nucleus had dropped from 20%-40% in 2008-2011 (around the aphelion) to 0.1%-0.3% in 2014-2015 (around the...

  8. A Jupiter Fragmented Comet: Cause of the K/T Boundary Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, N. C.; Wallis, Max K.

    1996-02-01

    The extended period of mass extinctions around the K/T boundary correlating with extraterrestrial amino acids in the sediment record constitutes strong evidence of a cometary cause. The input of extraterrestrial matter over 105 yr supports the hypothesis of a giant comet, fragmented into subcomets on close encounter with Jupiter, and subsequently perturbed into Earth-crossing orbits. Copious amounts of dust were emitted via this and possibly successive fragmenting encounters, and via normal cometary evaporation. The dynamics of dust from the disintegrating comet fragments favours retention in Earth-crossing orbits of the sub-micron fraction of organic composition. The shroud of dust accreted in the Earth's upper atmosphere varied with time and imposed climatic stresses that caused species extinctions over 105 yr. While the iridium peak in the sediments coincides with the Chicxulub crater impactor, other iridium detail suggests that some of the impactor material was reinjected into space and in part re-accreted by Earth from the interplanetary orbits.

  9. Jupiter's Synchrotron Emission Induced by the Collision of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olano, C. A.

    1999-08-01

    From July 13 to August 21, 1994, we observed Jupiter at 1420 MHz using one of the 30-m single dishes of the Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomía. After the impact of fragment G, we detected a rapid increase of the 21cm-continuum flux, which reached the maximum (≈ 20% of Jupiter's flux) at the end of the impact period. The nature of this radiation is clearly synchrotron. We interpret it in terms of a new population of relativistic electrons (≈ 2 × 1029) injected into the Jovian magnetosphere as a consequence of the impact explosions. The proposed mechanism is that the relativistic plasma was blown as magnetic clouds that flowed along the magnetic lines of force towards the jovimagnetic equator. We constructed a model in which the energies of the fresh electrons, generated within the magnetized clouds with a power law energy spectrum, were highly degraded by the comet dust grains attached to the magnetized plasma. The model can account for the spectral shape based on observations at several frequencies (de Pater et al., 1995, Science 268, 1879; Venturi et al., 1996, Astron. Astrophys. 316, 243). The energy released by the explosions under the form of relativistic electrons is of ≈ 2 × 1025 erg, which represents a fraction of about 1 3 per cent of the explosion energy. The efficiency in converting the explosion energy into the relativistic electron energy is, therefore, of the same order of magnitude as that of supernova explosions. An alternative model is considered. This gives figures for the total energy and number of relativistic electrons that are similar to the corresponding ones of the favoured model. Finally, we suggest that the behavior of the flux decay in the various observed frequencies is the result of the diffusion of electrons into the loss-cone due to the resonant scattering of the electrons by Alfven waves.

  10. Distant Jupiter family Comet P/2011 P1 (McNaught)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsun, Pavlo P.; Ivanova, Oleksandra V.; Afanasiev, Viktor L.; Kulyk, Irina V.

    2016-03-01

    The spectra and images obtained through broadband BVRc filters for Jupiter family Comet P/2011 P1 (McNaught) were analyzed. We observed the comet on November 24, 2011, when its heliocentric distance was 5.43 AU. Two dimensional long slit spectra and photometric images were obtained using the focal reducer SCORPIO attached to the prime focus of the 6-m telescope BTA (SAO RAS, Russia). The spectra cover the wavelength range of 4200-7000 Å. No emissions of C2 and CO+, which are expected in this wavelength region, were detected above 3σ level. An upper limit in gas production rate of C2 is expected to be 1.1 × 1024 mol s-1. The continuum shows a reddening effect with the normalized gradient of reflectivity along dispersion of 5.1 ± 1.2% per 1000 Å. The color indices (B-V) = 0.89 ± 0.09 and (V-Rc) = 0.42 ± 0.07 for the nucleus region or (B-V) = 0.68 ± 0.12 and (V-Rc) = 0.39 ± 0.10 for the coma region, which are derived from the photometric data, also evidence that the color of the cometary nucleus and dust are redder with respect to the Sun. The normalized gradients of 5.9 ± 2.9% per 1000 Å and 2.6 ± 1.9% per 1000 Å for VRc filters were obtained for the cometary nucleus and the dust coma, respectively. The estimated dust mass production rate is about 12 kg s-1 for Rc filter. The dust coma like a spiral galaxy edge-on was fitted using a Monte Carlo model. Since it is expected that the particles forming the dust coma consist of "dirty" ice, Greenberg's model was adopted to track grains with an icy component that evaporates slowly when exposed to solar radiation. The observed coma was fitted assuming two isolated active zones located at the cometocentric latitudes of -8° and -35° with outflow of the dust within the cones having half opening angles of 8° and 70°, respectively. About, 45% and 55% of the observed dust were originated from the high collimated and low collimated active zones, respectively. The spin-axis of the rotating nucleus is positioned in

  11. Why are Jupiter-family comets active and asteroids in cometary-like orbits inactive?

    CERN Document Server

    Gundlach, B

    2016-01-01

    Surveys in the visible and near-infrared spectral range have revealed the presence of low-albedo asteroids in cometary like orbits (ACOs). In contrast to Jupiter family comets (JFCs), ACOs are inactive, but possess similar orbital parameters. In this work, we discuss why ACOs are inactive, whereas JFCs show gas-driven dust activity, although both belong to the same class of primitive solar system bodies. We hypothesize that ACOs and JFCs have formed under the same physical conditions, namely by the gravitational collapse of ensembles of ice and dust aggregates. We use the memory effect of dust-aggregate layers under gravitational compression to discuss under which conditions the gas-driven dust activity of these bodies is possible. Owing to their smaller sizes, JFCs can sustain gas-driven dust activity much longer than the bigger ACOs, whose sub-surface regions possess an increased tensile strength, due to gravitational compression of the material. The increased tensile strength leads to the passivation again...

  12. Comet Shoemaker-Levy's 1994 collision with Jupiter and Saturn's 1995 ring plane crossings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhee, Colleen Anne

    2000-10-01

    In 1994, humankind had the unique opportunity to witness directly the collisions between Jupiter and the ~20 separate fragments of Comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9. From Palomar observatory, we obtained high-resolution (λ/Δλ ~= 2000) and low-resolution (λ/Δλ ~= 100) spectra of Jupiter in the 8-14 μm spectral region from July 16 to July 24. We were able to record the actual impacts of fragments L, R and V, while continuously monitoring the aging scars from previous impact sites. Spectra of the impact sites showed no evidence for temperature enhancements at tropospheric levels. However, large brightness temperature enhancements in CH4 emission lines over the impact sites are indicative of elevated stratospheric temperatures. Enhanced NH3 abundance in the upper stratosphere is inferred from bright emission cores superimposed on the normal broad NH3 absorption lines. A broad emission feature seen at ~10 μm in nearly all low- resolution spectra of impact sites is similar to silicate emission features observed in most comets. Detailed characteristics of the SL9 spectra, however, differ from those of cometary spectra, probably because the original silicate particles underwent vaporization and recondensation during the impacts. In May, August and November 1995, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations during Saturn's ring plane crossings (RPX) allowed us to view several faint saturnian satellites normally hidden to Earth-based observers in the glare of the rings. New measurements of Janus, Epimetheus, Prometheus and Pandora have been combined to form revised orbital solutions based on the three HST data sets. While most satellites were found to be close to their expected positions based on previous orbital solutions, Prometheus consistently lagged behind its predicted longitude by 18.85° +/- 0.04°, as first noted by Bosh and Rivkin (1995). A previously unsuspected systematic drift in Pandora's longitude of -1.85° relative to the Voyager ephemeris was observed between

  13. Jupiter family comets in near-Earth orbits: Are some of them interlopers from the asteroid belt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Julio A.; Sosa, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    We analyze a sample of 58 Jupiter family comets (JFCs) in near-Earth orbits, defined as those whose perihelion distances at the time of discovery were qdisc newcomers in the near-Earth region. Yet, a minor fraction of JFCs (less than about one third) are found to move on stable orbits for the past ∼ 104 yr, and in some cases are found to continue to be stable at 5 × 104 yr in the past. They also avoid very close encounters with Jupiter. Their orbital behavior is very similar to that of NEAs in cometary orbits. While "typical" JFCs in unstable orbits probably come from the trans-Neptunian region, the minor group of JFCs in asteroidal orbits may come from the main asteroid belt, like the NEAs. The asteroidal JFCs may have a more consolidated structure and a higher mineral content than that of comets coming from the trans-Neptunian belt or the Oort cloud, which could explain their much longer physical lifetimes in the near-Earth region. In particular, we mention comets 66P/du Toit, 162P/Siding Spring, 169P/NEAT, 182P/LONEOS, 189P/NEAT, 249P/LINEAR, 300P/Catalina, and P/2003 T12 (SOHO) as the most likely candidates to have an origin in the main asteroid belt. Another interesting case is 207P/NEAT, which stays near the 3:2 inner mean motion resonance with Jupiter, possibly evolving from the Hilda asteroid zone.

  14. Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Penne, Barbra

    2017-01-01

    Our solar system's largest planet is huge enough that all of the system's other planets could fit inside it. Although Jupiter has been known since ancient times, scientists are still learning exciting new information about the planet and its satellites today. In fact, several of its moons are now believed to have oceans below their icy surfaces. Chapters focus on topics such as Jupiter's orbit and rotation, rings, atmosphere, and moons, as well as on the space missions that have helped us get a closer look at the planet and its moons over the past decades.

  15. Rotation Rates and Spin Changes of Jupiter Family Comet Nuclei: New optical lightcurves and an update on the population properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotanekova, Rosita; Snodgrass, Colin; Lacerda, Pedro; Green, Simon F.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we revise the physical characteristics of Jupiter family comets (JFCs) by expanding the sample of nuclei with known rotational and shape properties.The study provides a review of the properties of all JFCs with known rotation rates derived from optical, radar or spacecraft measurements. This sample is complemented by newly obtained lightcurves of eight comets which are used to improve the precision of some known spin rates as well as to add new objects to the sample. We derive the new lightcurves from archival data partially taken within the framework of the Survey of Ensemble Physical Properties of Cometary Nuclei (SEPPCoN) and from devoted phase function observing campaigns. The lightcurves are produced with a specially-developed pipeline which enables data from various instruments at different epochs and geometries to be analyzed together. All lightcurves are absolutely calibrated using PanSTARRs photometric standards. Combining photometric measurements from different epochs allows us to achieve high precision in the period determinations and to constrain the phase functions of the comets. For three of the comets - 8P/Tuttle, 110P/Hartley 3 and 162P/Siding Spring - we obtain well-sampled phase functions which we compare to these of other well-studied JFCs.The newly added data provide us with a better-constrained sample which we use to compare JFC characteristics with the rotation rates, shapes and surface properties of other small-body populations.A special focus is put on the handful of JFCs which are known to demonstrate spin changes on orbital timescales. We are expanding this sample by adding new lightcurves derived from archival data as well as from our targeted survey using 2-4m telescopes. The rotational changes are obtained by comparison of the comets' current spin rates to those from previous apparitions. Using the new extended sample, we study the relation between the measured period changes and the physical properties of the nuclei.

  16. Surface of young Jupiter family comet 81P/Wild 2: view from the Stardust Spacecraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee, Donald E; Horz, Friedrich; Newburn, Ray L; Zolensky, Michael; Duxbury, Thomas C; Sandford, Scott; Sekanina, Zdenek; Tsou, Peter; Hanner, Martha S; Clark, Benton C; Green, Simon F; Kissel, Jochen

    2004-06-18

    Images taken by the Stardust mission during its flyby of 81P/Wild 2 show the comet to be a 5-kilometer oblate body covered with remarkable topographic features, including unusual circular features that appear to be impact craters. The presence of high-angle slopes shows that the surface is cohesive and self-supporting. The comet does not appear to be a rubble pile, and its rounded shape is not directly consistent with the comet being a fragment of a larger body. The surface is active and yet it retains ancient terrain. Wild 2 appears to be in the early stages of its degradation phase as a small volatile-rich body in the inner solar system.

  17. Where do long-period comets come from? Moving through Jupiter-Saturn barrier

    CERN Document Server

    Dybczyński, Piotr A

    2011-01-01

    Past and future dynamical evolution of all 64 long period comets having 1/a_ori 3.0 au and discovered after 1970 is studied. For all of them we obtained a new, homogeneous set of osculating orbits, including 15 orbits with detected non-gravitational parameters. Each comet was then replaced with the swarm of 5001 virtual comets well representing observations. These swarms were propagated numerically back and forth up to the 250 au heliocentric distance, constituting sets of original and future orbits together with their uncertainties. This allowed us to show that the 1/a_ori distribution is significantly different in shape as well as the maximum position when including non-gravitational orbits. Next we followed the dynamical evolution under the Galactic tides for one orbital revolution to the past and future, obtaining orbital elements at previous/next perihelion passages. We obtained a clear dependence of the last revolution change in perihelion distance with respect to the 1/a_ori, what confirmed theoretical...

  18. The formation heritage of Jupiter Family Comet 10P/Tempel 2 as revealed by infrared spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Paganini, L; Bonev, B P; Villanueva, G L; DiSanti, M A; Keane, J V; Meech, K J

    2012-01-01

    We present spectral and spatial information for major volatile species in Comet 10P/Tempel 2, based on high-dispersion infrared spectra acquired on UT 2010 July 26 (heliocentric distance Rh = 1.44 AU) and September 18 (Rh = 1.62 AU), following the comet's perihelion passage on UT 2010 July 04. The total production rate for water on July 26 was (1.90 \\pm 0.12) \\times 10^28 molecules s-1, and abundances of six trace gases (relative to water) were: CH3OH (1.58% \\pm 0.23), C2H6 (0.39% \\pm 0.04), NH3 (0.83% \\pm 0.20), and HCN (0.13% \\pm 0.02). A detailed analysis of intensities for water emission lines provided a rotational temperature of 35 \\pm 3 K. The mean OPR is consistent with nuclear spin populations in statistical equilibrium (OPR = 3.01 \\pm 0.18), and the (1{\\sigma}) lower bound corresponds to a spin temperature > 38 K. Our measurements were contemporaneous with a jet-like feature observed at optical wavelengths. The spatial profiles of four primary volatiles display strong enhancements in the jet directio...

  19. Jupiter's Big Bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kim A.

    1994-01-01

    Collision of a comet with Jupiter beginning July 16, 1994 will be observed by astronomers worldwide, with computerized information relayed to a center at the University of Maryland, financed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and National Science Foundation. Geologists and paleontologists also hope to learn more about earth's…

  20. Drawbar Pull

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-26

    Includes procedures for hard surface, soil, and water tests. Discusses vehicle preparation, instrumentation method of computing results, data reduction...tracked vehicles on hard -surfaced roads, in soft soils, and of amphibious vehicles in water . b. Drawbar pull provides a measure of the reserve power...Drawbar Pull (Common).................................................. 5 4.2 Drawbar Pull on Hard Surface ......................................... 7

  1. The chemical diversity of comets

    CERN Document Server

    Crovisier, J; Bockelée-Morvan, D; Boissier, J; Colom, P; Lis, D C

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental question in cometary science is whether the different dynamical classes of comets have different chemical compositions, which would reflect different initial conditions. From the ground or Earth orbit, radio and infrared spectroscopic observations of a now significant sample of comets indeed reveal deep differences in the relative abundances of cometary ices. However, no obvious correlation with dynamical classes is found. Further results come, or are expected, from space exploration. Such investigations, by nature limited to a small number of objects, are unfortunately focussed on short-period comets (mainly Jupiter-family). But these in situ studies provide "ground truth" for remote sensing. We discuss the chemical differences in comets from our database of spectroscopic radio observations, which has been recently enriched by several Jupiter-family and Halley-type comets.

  2. Pulled elbow.

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Pulled elbow (distal subluxation of the radial head) is a common, painful condition in young children. Although it has been well documented it is often missed, often mistreated, and generally over-investigated. Treatment is simple and effective. Without treatment the condition can continue for several days.

  3. Maverick Comet Splits during Dramatic Outburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    New ESO Observations of P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 A few months ago, Periodic Comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 underwent a dramatic and completely unexpected, thousand-fold brightening. At that time, the cause for this interesting event was unknown. However, observations with the two largest ESO telescopes have now shown that the ``dirty snowball'' nucleus of this comet has recently split into at least four individual pieces [1]. There is little doubt that the outburst and the splitting event(s) are closely related and that the greatly increased dust and gas production is due to ``fresh'' material of the icy cometary nucleus becoming exposed to the surrounding space for the first time. A Comet with a Troubled History Comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 was discovered on May 2, 1930, on a photographic plate obtained at the Hamburg Observatory (Germany) by two astronomers at this institution, Arnold Schwassmann and Arthur Arno Wachmann. The subsequent observations showed that the comet moved in an elliptical orbit with a revolution period of somewhat more than 5 years. Great efforts were expended to observe the comet during the next returns, but it was not recovered until nearly 50 years and eight revolutions later, when its faint image was found of a plate obtained in August 1979 with a telescope at the Perth Observatory in Western Australia. It was missed in 1984, but was sighted again in 1989 and most recently in 1994. Thus this comet has only been observed during four out of thirteen approaches since 1930. While this may be partly due to a less advantageous location in the sky at some returns, it is also a strong indication that the comet behaves unpredictably and must have a quite variable brightness. For the sake of convenience this comet is often referred to as ``SW-3'' by professional astronomers. Recent orbital calculations have shown that it was inserted into the present, short-period orbit by the strong gravitational pull of Jupiter during several, relatively close

  4. Cometary Volatiles and the Origin of Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    A'Hearn, Michael F.; Feaga, Lori M.; Keller, H. Uwe; Kawakita, Hideyo; Hampton, Donald L.; Kissel, Jochen; Klaasen, Kenneth P.; McFadden, Lucy A.; Meech, Karen J.; Schultz, Peter H.; Sunshine, Jessica M.; Thomas, Peter C.; Veverka, Joseph; Yeomans, Donald K.; Besse, Sebastien; Bodewits, Dennis; Farnham, Tony L.; Groussin, Olivier; Kelley, Michael S.; Lisse, Carey M.; Merlin, Frederic; Protopapa, Silvia; Wellnitz, Dennis D.

    2012-01-01

    We describe recent results on the CO/C02/H2O composition of comets and compare these with models of the protoplanetary disk. We argue that the cometary observations require reactions on grain surfaces to convert CO to CO2 and also require formation between the CO and CO2 snow lines. This then requires very early mixing of cometesimals in the protoplanetary disk analogous to the mixing described for the asteroid belt by Walsh and Morbidelli. We suggest that most comets formed in the region of the giant planets. the traditional source of the Oort-cloud comets but not of the Jupiter-family comets

  5. Jupiter Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for high resolution image of Nature Cover Detailed analysis of two continent-sized storms that erupted in Jupiter's atmosphere in March 2007 shows that Jupiter's internal heat plays a significant role in generating atmospheric disturbances. Understanding these outbreaks could be the key to unlock the mysteries buried in the deep Jovian atmosphere, say astronomers. This visible-light image is from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope taken on May 11, 2007. It shows the turbulent pattern generated by the two plumes on the upper left part of Jupiter. Understanding these phenomena is important for Earth's meteorology where storms are present everywhere and jet streams dominate the atmospheric circulation. Jupiter is a natural laboratory where atmospheric scientists study the nature and interplay of the intense jets and severe atmospheric phenomena. According to the analysis, the bright plumes were storm systems triggered in Jupiter's deep water clouds that moved upward in the atmosphere vi gorously and injected a fresh mixture of ammonia ice and water about 20 miles (30 kilometers) above the visible clouds. The storms moved in the peak of a jet stream in Jupiter's atmosphere at 375 miles per hour (600 kilometers per hour). Models of the disturbance indicate that the jet stream extends deep in the buried atmosphere of Jupiter, more than 60 miles (approximately100 kilometers) below the cloud tops where most sunlight is absorbed.

  6. Realistic Detectability of Close Interstellar Comets

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, Nathaniel V; Granvik, Mikael; Stephens, Denise C

    2016-01-01

    During the planet formation process, billions of comets are created and ejected into interstellar space. The detection and characterization of such interstellar comets (also known as extra-solar planetesimals or extra-solar comets) would give us in situ information about the efficiency and properties of planet formation throughout the galaxy. However, no interstellar comets have ever been detected, despite the fact that their hyperbolic orbits would make them readily identifiable as unrelated to the solar system. Moro-Mart\\'in et al. 2009 have made a detailed and reasonable estimate of the properties of the interstellar comet population. We extend their estimates of detectability with a numerical model that allows us to consider "close" interstellar comets, e.g., those that come within the orbit of Jupiter. We include several constraints on a "detectable" object that allow for realistic estimates of the frequency of detections expected from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and other surveys. The inf...

  7. Atlas of Great Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyan, Ronald; Dunlop, Storm

    2015-01-01

    Foreword; Using this book; Part I. Introduction: Cometary beliefs and fears; Comets in art; Comets in literature and poetry; Comets in science; Cometary science today; Great comets in antiquity; Great comets of the Middle Ages; Part II. The 30 Greatest Comets of Modern Times: The Great Comet of 1471; Comet Halley 1531; The Great Comet of 1556; The Great Comet of 1577; Comet Halley, 1607; The Great Comet of 1618; The Great Comet of 1664; Comet Kirch, 1680; Comet Halley, 1682; The Great Comet of 1744; Comet Halley, 1759; Comet Messier, 1769; Comet Flaugergues, 1811; Comet Halley, 1835; The Great March Comet of 1843; Comet Donati, 1858; Comet Tebbutt, 1861; The Great September Comet of 1882; The Great January Comet of 1910; Comet Halley, 1910; Comet Arend-Roland, 1956; Comet Ikeya-Seki, 1965; Comet Bennett, 1970; Comet Kohoutek, 1973-4; Comet West, 1976; Comet Halley, 1986; Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, 1994; Comet Hyakutake, 1996; Comet Hale-Bopp, 1997; Comet McNaught, 2007; Part III. Appendices; Table of comet data; Glossary; References; Photo credits; Index.

  8. Great Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Robert

    2000-05-01

    Spectacular and mysterious objects that come and go in the night sky, comets have dwelt in our popular culture for untold ages. As remnants from the formation of the Solar system, they are objects of key scientific research and space missions. As one of nature's most potent and dramatic dangers, they pose a threat to our safety--and yet they were the origin of our oceans and perhaps even life itself. This beautifully illustrated book tells the story of the biggest and most awe-inspiring of all comets: those that have earned the title "Great." Robert Burnham focuses on the Great comets Hyakutake in 1996 and Hale-Bopp in 1997, which gripped attention worldwide because, for many, they were the first comets ever seen. He places these two recent comets in the context of their predecessors from past ages, among them the famous Comet Halley. Great Comets explains the exciting new discoveries that have come from these magnificent objects and profiles the spaceprobes to comets due for launch in the next few years. The book even takes a peek behind Hollywood's science-fiction fantasies to assess the real risks humanity faces from potential impacts of both comets and asteroids. For everyone interested in astronomy, this exciting book reveals the secrets of the Great Comets and provides essential tools for keeping up to date with comet discoveries in the future. Robert Burnham has been an amateur astronomer since the mid-1950s. He has been a senior editor of Astronomy magazine (1986-88) and is the author of many books and CD-ROMS, including Comet Hale-Bopp: Find and Enjoy the Great Comet and Comet Explorer.

  9. rosuvastatin (JUPITER)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge; Ridker, Paul M; MacFadyen, Jean G;

    2009-01-01

    were calculated across a range of end points, timeframes, and subgroups using data from Justification for the Use of statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER), a randomized evaluation of rosuvastatin 20 mg versus placebo conducted among 17 802 apparently healthy men...... infarction, stroke, revascularization, or death, the 5-year NNT within JUPITER was 20 (95% CI, 14 to 34). All subgroups had 5-year NNT values for this end point below 50; as examples, 5-year NNT values were 17 for men and 31 for women, 21 for whites and 19 for nonwhites, 18 for those with body mass index 300...

  10. Anatomy of a Busted Comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version (Figure 1) NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope captured the picture on the left of comet Holmes in March 2008, five months after the comet suddenly erupted and brightened a millionfold overnight. The contrast of the picture has been enhanced on the right to show the anatomy of the comet. Every six years, comet 17P/Holmes speeds away from Jupiter and heads inward toward the sun, traveling the same route typically without incident. However, twice in the last 116 years, in November 1892 and October 2007, comet Holmes mysteriously exploded as it approached the asteroid belt. Astronomers still do not know the cause of these eruptions. Spitzer's infrared picture at left hand side of figure 1, reveals fine dust particles that make up the outer shell, or coma, of the comet. The nucleus of the comet is within the bright whitish spot in the center, while the yellow area shows solid particles that were blown from the comet in the explosion. The comet is headed away from the sun, which lies beyond the right-hand side of figure 1. The contrast-enhanced picture on the right shows the comet's outer shell, and strange filaments, or streamers, of dust. The streamers and shell are a yet another mystery surrounding comet Holmes. Scientists had initially suspected that the streamers were small dust particles ejected from fragments of the nucleus, or from hyerpactive jets on the nucleus, during the October 2007 explosion. If so, both the streamers and the shell should have shifted their orientation as the comet followed its orbit around the sun. Radiation pressure from the sun should have swept the material back and away from it. But pictures of comet Holmes taken by Spitzer over time show the streamers and shell in the same configuration, and not pointing away from the sun. The observations have left astronomers stumped. The horizontal line seen in the contrast-enhanced picture is a trail of debris that travels along with the

  11. Jupiter: Cosmic Jekyll and Hyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazier, Kevin R

    2016-01-01

    It has been widely reported that Jupiter has a profound role in shielding the terrestrial planets from comet impacts in the Solar System, and that a jovian planet is a requirement for the evolution of life on Earth. To evaluate whether jovians, in fact, shield habitable planets from impacts (a phenomenon often referred to as the "Jupiter as shield" concept), this study simulated the evolution of 10,000 particles in each of the jovian inter-planet gaps for the cases of full-mass and embryo planets for up to 100 My. The results of these simulations predict a number of phenomena that not only discount the "Jupiter as shield" concept, they also predict that in a Solar System like ours, large gas giants like Saturn and Jupiter had a different, and potentially even more important, role in the evolution of life on our planet by delivering the volatile-laden material required for the formation of life. The simulations illustrate that, although all particles occupied "non-life threatening" orbits at their onset of the simulations, a significant fraction of the 30,000 particles evolved into Earth-crossing orbits. A comparison of multiple runs with different planetary configurations revealed that Jupiter was responsible for the vast majority of the encounters that "kicked" outer planet material into the terrestrial planet region, and that Saturn assisted in the process far more than has previously been acknowledged. Jupiter also tends to "fix" the aphelion of planetesimals at its orbit irrespective of their initial starting zones, which has the effect of slowing their passages through the inner Solar System, and thus potentially improving the odds of accretion of cometary material by terrestrial planets. As expected, the simulations indicate that the full-mass planets perturb many objects into the deep outer Solar System, or eject them entirely; however, planetary embryos also did this with surprising efficiency. Finally, the simulations predict that Jupiter's capacity to

  12. Rosetta: Comet-Chaser, Comet-Lander, and Comet-Hopper All In One Mission! (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Artur B.

    2015-09-01

    Mission to Catch a Comet! Comets have inspired awe and wonder since the dawn of history. Many scientists today believe that comets crashed into Earth in its formative period spewing organic molecules that were crucial to the growth of life. Comets may have formed about the same time as the giant planets of our solar system (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune) - about 4.6 billion years ago. Some scientists think that comets and planets were both made from the same clumps of dust and ice that spewed from our Sun's birth; others think that these roving time capsules are even older than that, and that they may contain grains of interstellar stuff that is even older than our solar system.

  13. A fireball in Jupiter's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, A. F.; Duxbury, T. C.

    1981-01-01

    One fireball was photographed during two encounters with Jupiter. Its total luminosity was 120,000 0 mag s (at standard range 100 km). If the luminous efficiency proposed by Cook et al. (1981) for slip flow of a meteoroid in its own vapors is employed, an estimated mass of 11 kg is obtained. A rough absolute magnitude is -12.5. If it is noted that the search was conducted for a total of 223 s during two exposures, a number density near Jupiter of 10 to the -28th/cu cm is estimated for masses of meteoroids of 3 kg and greater. This value is about a factor of six smaller than a rough upper limit reached from an extrapolation from terrestrial observations of meteors and comets.

  14. Hair Pulling (Trichotillomania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facts for Families Guide Facts for Families - Vietnamese Hair Pulling (Trichotillomania) No. 96; Reviewed July 2013 It ... for children and adolescents to play with their hair. However, frequent or obsessive hair pulling can lead ...

  15. The World of Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemin, Amédée; Glaisher, James

    2010-10-01

    1. Beliefs and superstitions relative to comets; 2. Cometary astronomy up to the time of Newton; 3. The motions and orbits of comets; 4. Periodical comets; 5. Periodical comets; 6. The world of comets and cometary systems; 7. Physical and chemical constitution of comets; 8. Physical transformations of comets; 9. Mass and density of comets; 10. The light of comets; 11. Theory of cometary phenomena; 12. Comets and shooting stars; 13. Comets and the earth; 14. Physical influences of comets; 15. Some questions about comets; Tables.

  16. When Comets Get Old: A Synthesis of Comet and Meteor Observations of the Low Activity Comet 209P/LINEAR

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Quan-Zhi; Brown, Peter G; Campbell-Brown, Margaret D; Pokorný, Petr; Wiegert, Paul A; Gao, Xing

    2015-01-01

    It is speculated that some weakly active comets may be transitional objects between active and dormant comets. These objects are at a unique stage of the evolution of cometary nuclei, as they are still identifiable as active comets, in contrast to inactive comets that are observationally indistinguishable from low albedo asteroids. In this paper, we present a synthesis of comet and meteor observations of Jupiter-family comet 209P/LINEAR, one of the most weakly active comets recorded to-date. Images taken by the Xingming 0.35-m telescope and the Gemini Flamingo-2 camera are modeled by a Monte Carlo dust model, which yields a low dust ejection speed ($1/10$ of that of moderately active comets), dominance of large dust grains, and a low dust production of $0.4~\\mathrm{kg \\cdot s^{-1}}$ at 19~d after the 2014 perihelion passage. We also find a reddish nucleus of 209P/LINEAR that is similar to D-type asteroids and most Trojan asteroids. Meteor observations with the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR), coupled with ...

  17. Io in Front of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Jupiter's four largest satellites, including Io, the golden ornament in front of Jupiter in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, have fascinated Earthlings ever since Galileo Galilei discovered them in 1610 in one of his first astronomical uses of the telescope.Images from Cassini that will be released over the next several days capture each of the four Galilean satellites in their orbits around the giant planet.This true-color composite frame, made from narrow angle images taken on Dec. 12, 2000, captures Io and its shadow in transit against the disk of Jupiter. The distance of the spacecraft from Jupiter was 19.5 million kilometers (12.1 million miles). The image scale is 117 kilometers (73 miles) per pixel.The entire body of Io, about the size of Earth's Moon, is periodically flexed as it speeds around Jupiter and feels, as a result of its non-circular orbit, the periodically changing gravitational pull of the planet. The heat arising in Io's interior from this continual flexure makes it the most volcanically active body in the solar system, with more than 100 active volcanoes. The white and reddish colors on its surface are due to the presence of different sulfurous materials. The black areas are silicate rocks.Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  18. Color Systematics of Comets and Related Bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Jewitt, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Most comets are volatile-rich bodies that have recently entered the inner solar system following long-term storage in the Kuiper belt and the Oort cloud reservoirs. These reservoirs feed several distinct, short-lived "small body" populations. Here, we present new measurements of the optical colors of cometary and comet-related bodies including long-period (Oort cloud) comets, Damocloids (probable inactive nuclei of long-period comets) and Centaurs (recent escapees from the Kuiper belt and precursors to the Jupiter family comets). We combine the new measurements with published data on short-period comets, Jovian Trojans and Kuiper belt objects to examine the color systematics of the comet-related populations. We find that the mean optical colors of the dust in short-period and long-period comets are identical within the uncertainties of measurement, as are the colors of the dust and of the underlying nuclei. These populations show no evidence for scattering by optically-small particles or for compositional gra...

  19. The meteorology of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, A. P.

    1976-01-01

    From the point of view of meteorology the most important differences between Jupiter and the earth are related to the fact that Jupiter has an appreciable internal energy source and probably lacks a solid surface. The composition and vertical structure of the Jovian atmosphere is considered along with the composition of Jovian cloud particles, turbulence in Jupiter's atmosphere, data on the horizontal structure and motions of the atmosphere, and questions related to the longevity of Jupiter's clouds. Attention is given to the barotropic characteristics of Jupiter's atmosphere, the radiation balance in the atmosphere of the earth and of Jupiter, and studies of the Great Red Spot.

  20. Ensemble Properties of Comets in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solontoi, Michael; /Adler Planetarium, Chicago; Ivezic, Zeljko; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Juric, Mario; /Harvard Coll. Observ.; Becker, Andrew C.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Jones, Lynne; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; West, Andrew A.; /Boston U.; Kent, Steve; /Fermilab; Lupton, Robert H.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Claire, Mark; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Knapp, Gillian R.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Quinn, Tom; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Princeton U. Observ.

    2012-02-01

    We present the ensemble properties of 31 comets (27 resolved and 4 unresolved) observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This sample of comets represents about 1 comet per 10 million SDSS photometric objects. Five-band (u, g, r, i, z) photometry is used to determine the comets colors, sizes, surface brightness profiles, and rates of dust production in terms of the Afp formalism. We find that the cumulative luminosity function for the Jupiter Family Comets in our sample is well fit by a power law of the form N(comets. The resolved comets show an extremely narrow distribution of colors (0.57 {+-} 0.05 in g - r for example), which are statistically indistinguishable from that of the Jupiter Trojans. Further, there is no evidence of correlation between color and physical, dynamical, or observational parameters for the observed comets.

  1. ISO's analysis of Comet Hale-Bopp

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-03-01

    spatial resolution of ISO. We have a long time coverage of the comet, so we hope to determine the light-curve of the nucleus -- which, in turn, will reveal its gross shape and an estimate of its rotation period." A commanding role in comet research As comets are relics from the construction of the Solar System, and played a major role in the formation of the planets, they are a link between the Earth and the wider Universe of stars. The carbon compounds contained in comets probably contributed raw materials for the origin of life on the Earth, and according to one theory the Earth's oceans were made from comet ice. Growing knowledge of the composition and behaviour of comets is therefore crucial for a fuller understanding of our cosmic origins. ESA has a commanding role in space research on comets. Its Giotto spacecraft was the most daring of the international fleet of spacecraft that visited Halley's Comet in March 1986. Giotto obtained exceptional pictures and other data as it passed within 600 kilometres of the nucleus. Dust from the comet badly damaged the spacecraft, but in a navigational tour de force Giotto made an even closer approach to Comet Grigg-Skjellerup in July 1992. Now ESA is planning the Rosetta mission that will rendezvous with Comet Wirtanen and fly in company with it, making observations far more detailed than the fast flybys of Halley's Comet and Comet Grigg-Skjellerup could achieve. As for space astronomy, the International Ultraviolet Explorer, in which ESA was a partner, made unrivalled observations of Halley's Comet by ultraviolet light. ESA is also a partner in the Hubble Space Telescope, which saw the historic impacts of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 on Jupiter in July 1994, and has recently observed Comet Hyakutake as well as Hale-Bopp. The SOHO spacecraft, built by ESA for a joint ESA-NASA project to examine the Sun, has a distinctive view of comets. It has observed the hydrogen coronas of comets with its SWAN instrument. SOHO's coronagraph LASCO

  2. Comet or Asteroid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-11-01

    When is a minor object in the solar system a comet? And when is it an asteroid? Until recently, there was little doubt. Any object that was found to display a tail or appeared diffuse was a comet of ice and dust grains, and any that didn't, was an asteroid of solid rock. Moreover, comets normally move in rather elongated orbits, while most asteroids follow near-circular orbits close to the main plane of the solar system in which the major planets move. However, astronomers have recently discovered some `intermediate' objects which seem to possess properties that are typical for both categories. For instance, a strange object (P/1996 N2 - Elst-Pizarro) was found last year at ESO ( ESO Press Photo 36/96 ) which showed a cometary tail, while moving in a typical asteroidal orbit. At about the same time, American scientists found another (1996 PW) that moved in a very elongated comet-type orbit but was completely devoid of a tail. Now, a group of European scientists, by means of observations carried out at the ESO La Silla observatory, have found yet another object that at first appeared to be one more comet/asteroid example. However, continued and more detailed observations aimed at revealing its true nature have shown that it is most probably a comet . Consequently, it has received the provisional cometary designation P/1997 T3 . The Uppsala-DLR Trojan Survey Some time ago, Claes-Ingvar Lagerkvist (Astronomical Observatory, Uppsala, Sweden), in collaboration with Gerhard Hahn, Stefano Mottola, Magnus Lundström and Uri Carsenty (DLR, Institute of Planetary Exploration, Berlin, Germany), started to study the distribution of asteroids near Jupiter. They were particularly interested in those that move in orbits similar to that of Jupiter and which are located `ahead' of Jupiter in the so-called `Jovian L4 Lagrangian point'. Together with those `behind' Jupiter, these asteroids have been given the names of Greek and Trojan Heroes who participated in the famous Trojan war

  3. Comet classification with new methods for gas and dust spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langland-Shula, Laura E.; Smith, Graeme H.

    2011-05-01

    We present the results of a program of comet long-slit spectroscopy with the Kast Dual Spectrograph on the 3-m Shane Telescope at Lick Observatory. A total of 26 comets, from a variety of dynamical families, were observed on 39 different nights from 1996 to 2007. A new statistical method extracted the twilight sky from comet frames, because traditional sky subtraction techniques were inadequate. Because previously published Haser model parent and daughter scale lengths did not fit the data well, unbiased ranges of scale lengths were searched for the best-fitting pairs. Coma gas production rates for OH, CN, C 2, C 3, NH, NH 2, and OH confirmed the widely reported carbon-chain depletion for a sub-class of comets, most notably high-perihelion Jupiter-family comets observed at rh > 1.5 AU, with different behaviors for C 2 and C 3. Our long-slit spectroscopy data was also adapted for the A( θ) fρ dust production parameter. The assumption that A( θ) fρ is constant throughout the nucleus was not upheld. High dust-to-gas ratios for comets with large perihelia were not a selection effect, and suggest that the dust was released earlier in the formation of the coma than the gas. The dust-to-gas ratio did not exhibit any evolutionary traces between different comet dynamical families. The comet survey illuminates the diversity among comets, including the unusually carbon poor Comet 96P/Machholz.

  4. COLOR SYSTEMATICS OF COMETS AND RELATED BODIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jewitt, David, E-mail: jewitt@ucla.edu [Department of Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences, UCLA, 595 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Most comets are volatile-rich bodies that have recently entered the inner solar system following long-term storage in the Kuiper belt and the Oort cloud reservoirs. These reservoirs feed several distinct, short-lived “small body” populations. Here, we present new measurements of the optical colors of cometary and comet-related bodies including long-period (Oort cloud) comets, Damocloids (probable inactive nuclei of long-period comets) and Centaurs (recent escapees from the Kuiper belt and precursors to the Jupiter family comets). We combine the new measurements with published data on short-period comets, Jovian Trojans and Kuiper belt objects to examine the color systematics of the comet-related populations. We find that the mean optical colors of the dust in short-period and long-period comets are identical within the uncertainties of measurement, as are the colors of the dust and of the underlying nuclei. These populations show no evidence for scattering by optically small particles or for compositional gradients, even at the largest distances from the Sun, and no evidence for ultrared matter. Consistent with earlier work, ultrared surfaces are common in the Kuiper belt and on the Centaurs, but not in other small body populations, suggesting that this material is hidden or destroyed upon entry to the inner solar system. The onset of activity in the Centaurs and the disappearance of the ultrared matter in this population begin at about the same perihelion distance (∼10 AU), suggesting that the two are related. Blanketing of primordial surface materials by the fallback of sub-orbital ejecta, for which we calculate a very short timescale, is the likely mechanism. The same process should operate on any mass-losing body, explaining the absence of ultrared surface material in the entire comet population.

  5. Finding long-lost Comet Lexell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegert, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Comet D/1770 L1 (Lexell) made the closest observed pass by a comet to the Earth at approximately 0.015 AU on 1 July 1770. A naked-eye object observed by many astronomers of the time, it was subsequently lost: the best contemporary estimates had it removed from its 1770 orbit by Jupiter in 1779 and sent to the outer Solar System.Near-Earth asteroid 2010 JL33 has an orbit similar to that followed by Lexell's comet during its observed apparition. However, this NEA's nominal orbit, which is well-known on the basis of a decade-long arc which includes radar observations, does not approach the Earth at the correct time to be Lexell's comet. That is, unless modest non-gravitational forces are applied, in which case the famous near-miss can be reproduced.Modern measurements of 2010 JL33 together with those Lexell's comet made in the 18th century -which include motion exceeding 40 degrees per day on the sky at closest approach- provide exquisite constraints on the dynamical processes at work, cometary, Yarkovsky or other. I will discuss the implications of and the conditions required for asteroid 2010 JL33 to be, in fact, long-lost comet Lexell.

  6. Mid-infrared spectra of comet nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, Michael S P; Gehrz, Robert D; Reach, William T; Harker, David E

    2016-01-01

    Jovian Trojan D-type asteroids have mid-infrared emissivity features strikingly similar to comet comae, suggesting that they have the same compositions and that the surfaces of the Trojans are highly porous. However, a direct comparison between a comet and asteroid surface has not been possible due to the paucity of spectra of comet nuclei at mid-infrared wavelengths. We present 5-35 {\\mu}m thermal emission spectra of comets 10P/Tempel 2, and 49P/Arend-Rigaux observed with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our analysis suggests the spectra are dominated by the comet nucleus. We fit each spectrum with the near-Earth asteroid thermal model (NEATM) and find sizes in agreement with previous values. However, the NEATM beaming parameters of the nuclei, 0.74 to 0.83, are systematically lower than the Jupiter-family comet population mean of 1.03+/-0.11, derived from 16- and 22-{\\mu}m photometry. When the spectra are normalized by the NEATM model, a weak 10-{\\mu}m silicate plateau is evident, w...

  7. The end states of long-period comets and the origin of Halley-type comets

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández, Julio A; Young, Juan D

    2016-01-01

    We analyze a sample of 73 old long-period comets (LPCs) (orbital periods $200 < P < 1000$ yr) with perihelion distances $q < 2.5$ au, discovered in the period 1850-2014. We cloned the observed comets and also added fictitious LPCs with perihelia in the Jupiter's zone. We consider both a purely dynamical evolution and a physico-dynamical one with different physical lifetimes. We can fit the computed energy distribution of comets with $q < 1.3$ au to the observed one only within the energy range $0.01 < x < 0.04$ au$^{-1}$ (or periods $125 < P < 1000$ yr), where the "energy" is taken as the inverse of the semimajor axis $a$, namely $x \\equiv 1/a$. The best results are obtained for physical lifetimes of about 200-300 revolutions (for a comet with a standard $q = 1$ au). We find that neither a purely dynamical evolution, nor a physico-dynamical one can reproduce the long tail of larger binding energies ($x \\gsim 0.04$ au$^{-1}$) that correspond to most Halley-type comets (HTCs) and Jupiter...

  8. Aging comets and their meteor showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Quan-Zhi

    2016-10-01

    Comets are thought to be responsible for the terrestrial accretion of water and organic materials. The aging of comets is one of the most critical yet poorly understood problems in planetary astronomy. Here we attack this problem by examining different parts of the cometary aging spectrum of Jupiter-family comets (JFCs), a group of comets that dominates the cometary influx in the near-Earth space, using both telescopic and meteor observations.We examine two representative JFCs and the population of dormant comets. At the younger end of the aging spectrum, we examine a moderately active JFC, 15P/Finlay, and review the puzzle of the non-detection of the associated Finlayid meteor shower. We find that, although having been behaved like a dying comet in the past several 102 years, 15P/Finlay does possess ability for energetic outbursts without a clear reason. Towards the more aged end of the spectrum, we examine a weakly active JFC, 209P/LINEAR. By bridging telescopic observations at visible and infrared wavelength, meteor observations and dynamical investigations, we find that 209P/LINEAR is indeed likely an aged yet long-lived comet. At the other end of the spectrum, we examine the population of dormant near-Earth comets, by conducting a comprehensive meteor-based survey looking for dormant comets that have recently been active. We find the lower limit of the dormant comet fraction in the near-Earth object (NEO) population to be 2.0 ± 1.7%. This number is at the lower end of the numbers found using dynamical and telescopic techniques, which may imply that a significant fraction of comets in the true JFC population are weakly active and are not yet detected.These results have revealed interesting diversities in dying or dead comets, both in their behaviors as well as their natures. An immediate quest in the understanding of cometary aging would be to examine a large number of dying or dead comets and understand their general characteristics.

  9. The Low Albedo of Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, B. J.; Choukroun, M.; Bauer, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Comets are among the handful of objects with very low albedos, in the 0.02-0.06 range. Dark material is common in the outer Solar System, but analysis of the spectra and albedo of this material by spacecraft including Cassini and New Horizons shows that it is diverse, covering a range of compositions. Some is neutral-colored in the visible, such as that found on Phoebe, while some is very red, such as that on the surfaces of D-type asteroids or the low-albedo side of Iapetus. The different types of low-albedo material may reflect both compositional diversity, including contamination by volatiles or darkening agents, and divergent alteration histories. The key question is whether a particular sub-type of low albedo material is pristine - an unprocessed accumulation of interstellar dust - or an end product of polymerization and photolysis into ever more complex materials. Comets have albedos similar to the leading hemisphere of Iapetus, the surface of Titan, and the lowest-albedo C-type and D-type asteroids. Observations by the WISE and NEOWISE cameras show that comets have consistently low albedos (1). The first quantitative measurement of low-albedo material in the Kuiper Belt, from which comets such as Jupiter Family Comets including 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko come, shows that even this material is not as dark as that found on comets (2). Results from both Stardust (3) and more recently Rosetta (4, 5) show that cometary surfaces contain prebiotic molecules, including the amino acid glycine. Other very low albedo objects have also been connected to complex organic molecules: on Iapetus, PAHs have been detected (6), and Titan's surface is believed to be covered with hydrocarbons produced in its haze layer (7). The presence of organic molecules, including complex ones, could be the unique characteristic of the very darkest material. The delivery of pre-biotic material from comets to the young Earth could represent a key link in the origins of terrestrial life. (1

  10. PushPull++

    KAUST Repository

    Lipp, Markus

    2014-07-27

    PushPull tools are implemented in most commercial 3D modeling suites. Their purpose is to intuitively transform a face, edge, or vertex, and then to adapt the polygonal mesh locally. However, previous approaches have limitations: Some allow adjustments only when adjacent faces are orthogonal; others support slanted surfaces but never create new details. Moreover, self-intersections and edge-collapses during editing are either ignored or work only partially for solid geometry. To overcome these limitations, we introduce the PushPull++ tool for rapid polygonal modeling. In our solution, we contribute novel methods for adaptive face insertion, adjacent face updates, edge collapse handling, and an intuitive user interface that automatically proposes useful drag directions. We show that PushPull++ reduces the complexity of common modeling tasks by up to an order of magnitude when compared with existing tools. Copyright © ACM.

  11. Three spacecraft observe Jupiter's glowing polar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-01

    again in 1994, when the fragments of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 hit Jupiter in a spectacular series of events. The explosive impacts appeared to repress the auroral activity at the time, suggesting a remarkable effect of comet dust on the charged particles creating the aurorae in Jupiter's atmosphere. The new results on variability due to other causes will help astronomers to assess that effect more confidently. They will also compare the 1994 and 1996 IUE data to see how the atmosphere of Jupiter has recovered from the impacts. In Jupiter's vicinity IUE registered ultraviolet emissions from oxygen and sulphur atoms littering the orbit of Io, and probably released by volcanic emissions from that peculiar moon. This Io Torus is highly variable too. The record of its ultraviolet emissions, both within the 1996 campaign and in comparison with earlier observations, will help the astronomers to understand the reasons for the variations. A remarkable history The close scrutiny of Jupiter and its moons was the final astronomical task of IUE, before the termination of space operations on 30 September 1996. Over the past few months the IUE science team and collaborating astronomers in Europe have fulfilled a wish-list of important observations precluded by the intense demands on their ultraviolet space observatory throughout its life of nearly nineteen years. The observations in the final science programme confirmed and extended IUE's record, as the most reliable and productive astronomical satellite that ever flew. In March of this year the spacecraft was ailing, with only one of its six gyros still functioning, which severely limited the scope of its original mission. By skillful control and spacecraft engineering it went on harvesting new data, including prolonged observations of Comet Hyakutake. The concluding campaigns that began in April targeted the gamma-ray emitting "blazar" Markarian 421, various other active galaxies, and stellar winds, as well as Jupiter. "I am sad but

  12. Jupiter System Observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senske, Dave; Kwok, Johnny

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the proposed mission for the Jupiter System Observer. The presentation also includes overviews of the mission timeline, science goals, and spacecraftspecifications for the satellite.

  13. Molecular Oxygen in Oort Cloud Comet 1P/Halley

    CERN Document Server

    Rubin, Martin; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Schwehm, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Recently the ROSINA mass spectrometer suite on board the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft discovered an abundant amount of molecular oxygen, O2, in the coma of Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko of O2/H2O = 3.80+/-0.85%. It could be shown that O2 is indeed a parent species and that the derived abundances point to a primordial origin. One crucial question is whether the O2 abundance is peculiar to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko or Jupiter family comets in general or whether also Oort cloud comets such as comet 1P/Halley contain similar amounts of molecular oxygen. We investigated mass spectra obtained by the Neutral Mass Spectrometer instrument obtained during the flyby by the European Space Agency's Giotto probe at comet 1P/Halley. Our investigation indicates that a production rate of O2 of 3.7+/-1.7% with respect to water is indeed compatible with the obtained Halley data and therefore that O2 might be a rather common and abundant parent species.

  14. MOLECULAR OXYGEN IN OORT CLOUD COMET 1P/HALLEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K. [Physikalisches Institut, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Dishoeck, E. F. van [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Schwehm, G. [ESA (retired) Science Operations Department, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    2015-12-10

    Recently, the ROSINA mass spectrometer suite on board the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft discovered an abundant amount of molecular oxygen, O{sub 2}, in the coma of Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko of O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O = 3.80 ± 0.85%. It could be shown that O{sub 2} is indeed a parent species and that the derived abundances point to a primordial origin. Crucial questions are whether the O{sub 2} abundance is peculiar to comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko or Jupiter family comets in general, and also whether Oort cloud comets such as comet 1P/Halley contain similar amounts of molecular oxygen. We investigated mass spectra obtained by the Neutral Mass Spectrometer instrument during the flyby by the European Space Agency's Giotto probe of comet 1P/Halley. Our investigation indicates that a production rate of O{sub 2} of 3.7 ± 1.7% with respect to water is indeed compatible with the obtained Halley data and therefore that O{sub 2} might be a rather common and abundant parent species.

  15. The location of Asteroidal Belt Comets (ABCs), in a comet's evolutionary diagram: The Lazarus Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrín, Ignacio; Zuluaga, Jorge; Cuartas, Pablo

    2013-09-01

    There is a group of newly recognized asteroids in the main belt that are exhibiting cometary characteristics. We will call them Asteroidal Belt Comets or ABCs for short. The surprising property of these objects is that their orbits are entirely asteroidal while their behaviour is entirely cometary, with Tisserand invariants larger than 3.0, while all Jupiter family comets have Tisserand invariants smaller than 3.0. An analysis of their orbital and physical properties has resulted in the following conclusion. (1) We define the `detached group (DG)' as those objects that exhibit cometary characteristics (sublimating water) and have aphelion distances Q < 4.5 au. The DG contains all the ABCs traditionally recognized, plus a few other members not traditionally recognized like 2P and 107P. With the above definition there are 11 members of the ABC group: 2P, 107P, 133P, 176P, 233P, 238P, C/2008 R1, C/2010 R2, 2011 CR42, 3200 and 300163 = 2006 VW139. And there are three members of the collisioned asteroids, CA, P/2010 A2, 596 Scheila and P/2012 F5 Gibbs. (2) In the literature a common reason for activity is interplanetary collisions. Active objects sublimate ices except for the CA that have exhibited dust tails due to collisions and 3200 Phaethon activated by solar wind sputtering. In this work, we will trace the origin of activity to a diminution of their perihelion distances, a hypothesis that has not been previously explored in the literature. (3) We have calibrated the blackbody (colour) temperature of comets versus perihelion distance, R, regardless of class. We find T = 325 ± 5 K/√R. (4) Using a mathematical model of the thermal wave we calculate the thickness of the crust or dust layer on comet nuclei. We find a thickness of 2.0 ± 0.5 m for comet 107P, 4.7 ± 1.2 m for comet 133P and 1.9 ± 0.5 m for a sample of nine comets. Note the small errors. (5) We have located three ABCs in an evolutionary diagram of Remaining Revolutions (RR) versus Water-Budget Age (WB

  16. Voyage to Jupiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, David; Samz, Jane

    This publication illustrates the features of Jupiter and its family of satellites pictured by the Pioneer and the Voyager missions. Chapters included are: (1) "The Jovian System" (describing the history of astronomy); (2) "Pioneers to Jupiter" (outlining the Pioneer Mission); (3) "The Voyager Mission"; (4)…

  17. Pulling on adhered vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ana-Suncana; Goennenwein, Stefanie; Lorz, Barbara; Seifert, Udo; Sackmann, Erich

    2004-03-01

    A theoretical model describing pulling of vesicles adhered in a contact potential has been developed. Two different regimes have been recognized. For weak to middle-strength adhesive potentials, locally stable shapes are found in a range of applied forces, separated from the free shape by an energy barrier. The phase diagram contains regions with either a unique bound shape or an additional meta-stable shape. Upon pulling, these shapes unbind discontinuously since the vesicle disengage from the surface while still possessing a finite adhesion area (Smith 2003a). In a strong adhesion regime, a competition between adhesion and tether formation is observed. A critical onset force is identified where a tether spontaneously appears as a part of a second order shape transition. Further growth of a tether is followed by a detachment process which terminates at a finite force when a vesicle continuously unbinds from the substrate (Smith 2003b). Both critical forces, as well as all shape parameters, are calculated as a function of the reduced volume and the strength of adhesive potential. Analogous experimental study has been performed where a vertical magnetic tweezers are used in combination with micro-interferometric and confocal techniques to reproduce the same symmetry as in the theoretical investigation. Giant vesicles are bound to the substrate by numerous specific bonds formed between ligands and receptors incorporated into the vesicle and the substrate, respectively. Application of a constant force is inducing a new thermodynamic equilibrium of the system where the vesicle is partially unbound from the substrate (Goennenwein 2003). The shapes of vesicles are compared prior and during application of the force. Very good agreement is obtained, particularly in the middle-strength adhesion regime (Smith 2003c). References: 1. A.-S. Smith, E. Sackmann, U. Seifert: Effects of a pulling force on the shape of a bound vesicle, Europhys. Lett., 64, 2 (2003). 2. A.-S. Smith

  18. Comet of the Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, Fred; Ottewell, G.

    The present century has been a disappointing one for comets, but past centuries often featured spectacular, unforgettable comet shows that dominated the night (and even daytime) sky for months: comets that outshone Venus or even the Moon, whose spectacular tails stretched more than halfway across the sky or were weirdly split, and whose apparition was held responsible for everything from wars to unusually good wine vintages. Published to coincide with the first naked-eye appearance of Comet Hale-Bopp, perhaps our own comet of the century, this book is an irresistible guide to comet facts and lore throughout history.

  19. Hydrogen cyanide polymers on comets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, C N; Ludicky, R

    1992-01-01

    The original presence on cometary nuclei of frozen volatiles such as methane, ammonia and water makes them ideal sites for the formation and condensed-phase polymerization of hydrogen cyanide. We propose that the non-volatile black crust of comet Halley consists largely of such polymers. Dust emanating from Halley's nucleus, contributing to the coma and tail, would also arise partly from these solids. Indeed, secondary species such as CN have been widely detected, as well as HCN itself and particles consisting only of H, C and N. Our continuing investigations suggest that the yellow-orange-brown-black polymers are of two types: ladder structures with conjugated -C=N- bonds, and polyamidines readily converted by water to polypeptides. These easily formed macromolecules could be major components of the dark matter observed on the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn, as well as on outer solar system bodies such as asteroids, moons and other comets. Implications for prebiotic chemistry are profound. Primitive Earth may have been covered by HCN polymers either through cometary bombardment or by terrestrial happenings of the kind that brought about the black crust of Halley. The resulting proteinaceous matrix could have promoted the molecular interactions leading to the emergence of life.

  20. Jupiter Environment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Erick J.; Monahue, Kenneth M.; Biehl, James P.; Kokorowski, Michael; Ngalande, Cedrick,; Boedeker, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    The Jupiter Environment Tool (JET) is a custom UI plug-in for STK that provides an interface to Jupiter environment models for visualization and analysis. Users can visualize the different magnetic field models of Jupiter through various rendering methods, which are fully integrated within STK s 3D Window. This allows users to take snapshots and make animations of their scenarios with magnetic field visualizations. Analytical data can be accessed in the form of custom vectors. Given these custom vectors, users have access to magnetic field data in custom reports, graphs, access constraints, coverage analysis, and anywhere else vectors are used within STK.

  1. Moons around Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) took this photo of Jupiter at 20:42:01 UTC on January 9, 2007, when the spacecraft was 80 million kilometers (49.6 million miles) from the giant planet. The volcanic moon Io is to the left of the planet; the shadow of the icy moon Ganymede moves across Jupiter's northern hemisphere. Ganymede's average orbit distance from Jupiter is about 1 million kilometers (620,000 miles); Io's is 422,000 kilometers (262,000 miles). Both Io and Ganymede are larger than Earth's moon; Ganymede is larger than the planet Mercury.

  2. The end states of long-period comets and the origin of Halley-type comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Julio A.; Gallardo, Tabaré; Young, Juan D.

    2016-09-01

    We analyse a sample of 73 old long-period comets (LPCs) (orbital periods 200 lifetimes. We can fit the computed energy distribution of comets with q lifetimes of about 200-300 revolutions (for a comet with a standard q = 1 au). We find that neither a purely dynamical evolution, nor a physico-dynamical one can reproduce the long tail of larger binding energies (x ≳ 0.04 au-1) that correspond to most Halley-type comets (HTCs) and Jupiter-family comets. We conclude that most HTCs are not the end states of the evolution of LPCs, but come from a different source, a flattened one that we identify with the Centaurs that are scattered to the inner planetary region from the trans-Neptunian belt. These results also show that the boundary between LPCs and HTCs should be located at an energy x ˜ 0.04 au-1 (P ˜ 125 yr), rather than the conventional classical boundary at P = 200 yr.

  3. Jupiter Laser Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Jupiter Laser Facility is an institutional user facility in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate at LLNL. The facility is designed to provide a high degree...

  4. Inferno on Jupiter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    诸葛勤

    1994-01-01

    The initial sketchy reports began filtering into the U. S. by E-maillate Saturday afternoon. First a Spanish observatory announced that it hadspotted a plume of gas billowing up from the edge of Jupiter. Then a

  5. Debiasing the NEOWISE Cryogenic Mission Comet Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, James M.; Grav, Tommy; Fernández, Yanga R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Kramer, Emily A.; Masiero, Joseph R.; Spahr, Timothy; Nugent, C. R.; Stevenson, Rachel A.; Meech, Karen J.; Cutri, Roc M.; Lisse, Carey M.; Walker, Russell; Dailey, John W.; Rosser, Joshua; Krings, Phillip; Ruecker, Kinjal; Wright, Edward L.; the NEOWISE Team

    2017-08-01

    We use NEOWISE data from the four-band and three-band cryogenic phases of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mission to constrain size distributions of the comet populations and debias measurements of the short- and long-period comet (LPC) populations. We find that the fit to the debiased LPC population yields a cumulative size-frequency distribution (SFD) power-law slope (β) of -1.0 ± 0.1, while the debiased Jupiter-family comet (JFC) SFD has a steeper slope with β = -2.3 ± 0.2. The JFCs in our debiased sample yielded a mean nucleus size of 1.3 km in diameter, while the LPCs’ mean size is roughly twice as large, 2.1 km, yielding mean size ratios ( / ) that differ by a factor of 1.6. Over the course of the 8 months of the survey, our results indicate that the number of LPCs passing within 1.5 au are a factor of several higher than previous estimates, while JFCs are within the previous range of estimates of a few thousand down to sizes near 1.3 km in diameter. Finally, we also observe evidence for structure in the orbital distribution of LPCs, with an overdensity of comets clustered near 110° inclination and perihelion near 2.9 au that is not attributable to observational bias.

  6. HUBBLE PROVIDES COMPLETE VIEW OF JUPITER'S AURORAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    . Scientists are comparing the Hubble telescope images with measurements taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft of Jupiter's magnetic field and co-rotating charged particles. They believe the data will help them understand the production of Jupiter's auroras. Both auroras clearly show vapor trails of light left by Io. These vapor trails are the white, comet-shaped streaks just outside both auroral ovals. These streaks are not part of the auroral ovals. They are caused when an invisible electrical current of charged particles (equal to about 1 million amperes), ejected from Io, flow along Jupiter's magnetic field lines to the planets north and south magnetic poles. This enormous current produces a bright but localized aurora where it enters Jupiter's atmosphere at both magnetic poles. The brightest part of both emissions (on the left in both images) pinpoints where Io's magnetic field lines leave its footprint on the planet. The trail of light following both emissions extends to the right all the way to Jupiter's edge and represents the most sensitive detection of ultraviolet emissions from Jupiter to date. These emissions are related to magnetically trapped ions and electrons that are carried by Jupiter's magnetic field along Io's orbital path, and some of these charged particles continue to be driven down into Jupiter's atmosphere for several hours after Io has passed by. The images were taken Sept. 20, 1997. The artificial colors used here have been constructed by combining images taken in two different ultraviolet band passes, with one ultraviolet color presented as blue and the other as red. In this color representation, the planet's reflected sunlight appears brown, while the auroral emissions appear white or shades of blue or red. Credits: John Clarke (University of Michigan), and NASA Co-investigators: Joe Ajello, Kent Tobiska, and John Trauger (NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory) Gilda Ballester (University of Michigan) Lotfi Ben jaffel (IAP Paris) Jack Connerney (NASA

  7. Color Systematics of Comets and Related Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewitt, David

    2015-12-01

    Most comets are volatile-rich bodies that have recently entered the inner solar system following long-term storage in the Kuiper belt and the Oort cloud reservoirs. These reservoirs feed several distinct, short-lived "small body" populations. Here, we present new measurements of the optical colors of cometary and comet-related bodies including long-period (Oort cloud) comets, Damocloids (probable inactive nuclei of long-period comets) and Centaurs (recent escapees from the Kuiper belt and precursors to the Jupiter family comets). We combine the new measurements with published data on short-period comets, Jovian Trojans and Kuiper belt objects to examine the color systematics of the comet-related populations. We find that the mean optical colors of the dust in short-period and long-period comets are identical within the uncertainties of measurement, as are the colors of the dust and of the underlying nuclei. These populations show no evidence for scattering by optically small particles or for compositional gradients, even at the largest distances from the Sun, and no evidence for ultrared matter. Consistent with earlier work, ultrared surfaces are common in the Kuiper belt and on the Centaurs, but not in other small body populations, suggesting that this material is hidden or destroyed upon entry to the inner solar system. The onset of activity in the Centaurs and the disappearance of the ultrared matter in this population begin at about the same perihelion distance (˜10 AU), suggesting that the two are related. Blanketing of primordial surface materials by the fallback of sub-orbital ejecta, for which we calculate a very short timescale, is the likely mechanism. The same process should operate on any mass-losing body, explaining the absence of ultrared surface material in the entire comet population. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the

  8. Dynamic Sublimation Pressure and the Catastrophic Breakup of Comet ISON

    CERN Document Server

    Steckloff, Jordan K; Bowling, Timothy; Melosh, H Jay; Minton, David; Lisse, Carey M; Battams, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Previously proposed mechanisms have difficulty explaining the disruption of Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) as it approached the Sun. We describe a novel cometary disruption mechanism whereby comet nuclei fragment and disperse through dynamic sublimation pressure, which induces differential stresses within the interior of the nucleus. When these differential stresses exceed its material strength, the nucleus breaks into fragments. We model the sublimation process thermodynamically and propose that it is responsible for the disruption of Comet ISON. We estimate the bulk unconfined crushing strength of Comet ISON's nucleus and the resulting fragments to be 0.5 Pa and 1-9 Pa respectively, assuming typical Jupiter Family Comet (JFC) albedos. However, if Comet ISON has an albedo similar to Pluto, this strength estimate drops to 0.2 Pa for the intact nucleus and 0.6-4 Pa for its fragments. Regardless of assumed albedo, these are similar to previous strength estimates of JFCs. This suggests that, if Comet ISON is representat...

  9. Physics of comets

    CERN Document Server

    Krishna Swamy, K S

    1997-01-01

    The study of Comet Halley in 1986 was a tremendous success for cometary science. In March of that year, six spacecrafts passed through Comet Halley as close as 600 km from the nucleus and made the in situ measurements of various kinds. These space missions to Comet Halley and that of the ICE spacecraft to Comet Giacobini-Zinner combined with studies, both ground-based and above the atmosphere, have increased our knowledge of cometary science in a dramatic way.This new edition of Physics of Comets incorporates these new and exciting findings. The emphasis of the book is on the physical processe

  10. Visibility of comet nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ney, E.P.

    1982-01-22

    Photography of the nucleus of comet Halley is the goal of several planned space missions. The nucleus of a comet is surrounded by a cloud of dust particles. If this cloud is optically thick, it will prevent observation of the nuclear surface. Broadband photometry of nine comets has been analyzed to determine the visibility of their nuclei. Only in the case of comet West near perihelion was the dust dense enough to interfere with imaging. Comparison of the visual brightness of the well-observed comets with that of Halley in 1910 leads to the conclusion that the nucleus of Halley can be imaged without significant obscuration by the dust.

  11. Perspectives on Comets, Comet-like Asteroids, and Their Predisposition to Provide an Environment That Is Friendly to Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosiek, Katharina; Hausmann, Michael; Hildenbrand, Georg

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, studies have shown that there are many similarities between comets and asteroids. In some cases, it cannot even be determined to which of these groups an object belongs. This is especially true for objects found beyond the main asteroid belt. Because of the lack of comet fragments, more progress has been made concerning the chemical composition of asteroids. In particular, the SMASSII classification establishes a link between the reflecting spectra and chemical composition of asteroids and meteorites. To find clues for the chemical structure of comets, the parameters of all known asteroids of the SMASSII classification were compared to those of comet groups like the Encke-type comets, the Jupiter-family comets, and the Halley-type comets, as well as comet-like objects like the damocloids and the centaurs. Fifty-six SMASSII objects similar to comets were found and are categorized as comet-like asteroids in this work. Aside from the chemistry, it is assumed that the available energy on these celestial bodies plays an important role concerning habitability. For the determination of the available energy, the effective temperature was calculated. Additionally, the size of these objects was considered in order to evaluate the possibility of a liquid water core, which provides an environment that is more likely to support processes necessary to create the building blocks of life. Further study of such objects could be notable for the period of the Late Heavy Bombardment and could therefore provide important implications for our understanding of the inner workings of the prebiotic evolution within the Solar System since the beginning.

  12. Perspectives on Comets, Comet-like Asteroids, and Their Predisposition to Provide an Environment That Is Friendly to Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosiek, Katharina; Hausmann, Michael; Hildenbrand, Georg

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, studies have shown that there are many similarities between comets and asteroids. In some cases, it cannot even be determined to which of these groups an object belongs. This is especially true for objects found beyond the main asteroid belt. Because of the lack of comet fragments, more progress has been made concerning the chemical composition of asteroids. In particular, the SMASSII classification establishes a link between the reflecting spectra and chemical composition of asteroids and meteorites. To find clues for the chemical structure of comets, the parameters of all known asteroids of the SMASSII classification were compared to those of comet groups like the Encke-type comets, the Jupiter-family comets, and the Halley-type comets, as well as comet-like objects like the damocloids and the centaurs. Fifty-six SMASSII objects similar to comets were found and are categorized as comet-like asteroids in this work. Aside from the chemistry, it is assumed that the available energy on these celestial bodies plays an important role concerning habitability. For the determination of the available energy, the effective temperature was calculated. Additionally, the size of these objects was considered in order to evaluate the possibility of a liquid water core, which provides an environment that is more likely to support processes necessary to create the building blocks of life. Further study of such objects could be notable for the period of the Late Heavy Bombardment and could therefore provide important implications for our understanding of the inner workings of the prebiotic evolution within the Solar System since the beginning.

  13. Visually observing comets

    CERN Document Server

    Seargent, David A J

    2017-01-01

    In these days of computers and CCD cameras, visual comet observers can still contribute scientifically useful data with the help of this handy reference for use in the field. Comets are one of the principal areas for productive pro-amateur collaboration in astronomy, but finding comets requires a different approach than the observing of more predictable targets. Principally directed toward amateur astronomers who prefer visual observing or who are interested in discovering a new comet or visually monitoring the behavior of known comets, it includes all the advice needed to thrive as a comet observer. After presenting a brief overview of the nature of comets and how we came to the modern understanding of comets, this book details the various types of observations that can usefully be carried out at the eyepiece of a telescope. Subjects range from how to search for new comets to visually estimating the brightness of comets and the length and orientation of tails, in addition to what to look for in comet heads a...

  14. The origin of comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, M. E.; Clube, S. V. M.; Napier, W. M.

    Theories of the nature and origin of comets are discussed in a historical review covering the period from ancient times to the present. Consideration is given to the ancient controversy as to the atmospheric or celestial nature of comets, Renaissance theories of comet orbits, superstitions regarding the effects of comets, Kant's (1755) theory of solar-system origin, the nineteenth-century discovery of the relationship between comets and meteor showers, and the continuing solar-system/interstellar debate. Oort's (1950) model of a comet swarm surrounding the solar system is examined in detail; arguments advanced to explain the formation of comets within this model are summarized; and the question of cometary catastrophism is addressed.

  15. Planetary perturbations for Oort cloud comets: II. Implications for the origin of observable comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouchard, M.; Rickman, H.; Froeschlé, Ch.; Valsecchi, G. B.

    2014-03-01

    We present Monte Carlo simulations of the dynamical history of the Oort cloud, where in addition to the main external perturbers (Galactic tides and stellar encounters) we include, as done in a companion paper (Fouchard, M., Rickman, H., Froeschlé, Ch., Valsecchi, G.B. [2013b]. Icarus, in press), the planetary perturbations experienced each time the comets penetrate to within 50 AU of the Sun. Each simulation involves an initial sample of four million comets and extends over a maximum of 5 Gyr. For better understanding of the outcomes, we supplement the full dynamical model by others, where one or more of the effects are left out. We concentrate on the production of observable comets, reaching for the first time a perihelion within 5 AU of the Sun. We distinguish between four categories, depending on whether the comet jumps across, or creeps through, the Jupiter-Saturn barrier (perihelion distances between 5 and 15 AU), and whether the orbit leading to the observable perihelion is preceded by a major planetary perturbation or not. For reasons explained in the paper, we call the strongly perturbed comets "Kaib-Quinn comets". We thus derive a synthetic picture of the Oort spike, from which we draw two main conclusions regarding the full dynamical model. One is that 2/3 of the observable comets are injected with the aid of a planetary perturbation at the previous perihelion passage, and about half of the observable comets are of the Kaib-Quinn type. The other is that the creepers dominate over the jumpers. Due to this fact, the spike peaks at only 31 000 AU, and the majority of new comets have semi-major axes less than this value. The creepers show a clear preference for retrograde orbits as a consequence of the need to avoid untimely, planetary ejection before becoming observable. Thus, the new comets should have a 60/40 preference for retrograde against prograde orbits in apparent conflict with observations. However, both these and other results depend on our model

  16. The Comet With a Broken Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    On the night of April 23 to 24, ESO's Very Large Telescope observed fragment B of the comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 that had split a few days earlier. To their great surprise, the ESO astronomers discovered that the piece just ejected by fragment B was splitting again! Five other mini-comets are also visible on the image. The comet seems thus doomed to disintegrate but the question remains in how much time. Comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 (SW 3) is a body with a very tormented past. This comet revolves around the Sun in about 5.4 years, in a very elongated orbit that brings it from inwards of the Earth's orbit to the neighbourhood of giant planet Jupiter. In 1995, when it was coming 'close' to the Earth, it underwent a dramatic and completely unexpected, thousand-fold brightening. Observations in 1996, with ESO's New Technology Telescope and 3.6-m telescope, at La Silla, showed that this was due to the fact that the comet had split into three distinct pieces. Later, in December 1996, two more fragments were discovered. At the last comeback, in 2001, of these five fragments only three were still seen, the fragments C (the largest one), B and E. No new fragmentations happened during this approach, apparently. ESO PR Photo 15a/06 ESO PR Photo 15a/06 Fragment B of Comet SW-3 Things were different this time, when the comet moved again towards its closest approach to the Sun - and to the Earth. Early in March, seven fragments were observed, the brightest (fragment C) being of magnitude 12, i.e. 250 fainter than what the unaided can see, while fragment B was 10 times fainter still. In the course of March, 6 new fragments were seen. Early in April, fragment B went into outburst, brightening by a factor 10 and on 7 April, six new fragments were discovered, confirming the high degree of fragmentation of the comet. On 12 April, fragment B was as bright as the main fragment C, with a magnitude around 9 (16 times fainter than what a keen observer can see with unaided eyes

  17. Jupiter's Dynamic Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, M. F.; Bunce, E. J.; Kronberg, E. A.; Jackman, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Jupiter's magnetosphere is a highly dynamic environment. Hundreds of reconnection events have been identified in Jupiter's magnetotail through analysis of magnetic field and particle measurements collected by the Galileo spacecraft. Quasi-periodic behavior, suggestive of reconnection, has been intermittently observed on a ~2-3 day time scale in several data sets, including magnetic field dipolarizations, flow bursts, auroral polar dawn spots, and the hectometric radio emission. In this paper we review the present state of knowledge of Jovian magnetospheric dynamics. Throughout the discussion, we highlight similarities and differences to Saturn's magnetosphere. For example, recent analysis of plasmoid signatures at both Jupiter and Saturn has established the role of tail reconnection in the overall mass and flux transport in the outer planet magnetospheres. The results for both Jupiter and Saturn suggest that the observed mass loss rate due to tail reconnection and plasmoid release is insufficient to account for the mass input rate from the moons Io and Enceladus, respectively. We also present new analysis in which we use the Michigan mSWiM propagated solar wind MHD model to estimate the solar wind conditions upstream of Jupiter. This information allows us to determine whether reconnection events occur preferentially during certain solar wind conditions, or whether there is evidence that the solar wind modulates the quasi-periodicity seen in the field dipolarizations and flow bursts.

  18. Mid-infrared spectra of comet nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Michael S. P.; Woodward, Charles E.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Reach, William T.; Harker, David E.

    2017-03-01

    Comet nuclei and D-type asteroids have several similarities at optical and near-IR wavelengths, including near-featureless red reflectance spectra, and low albedos. Mineral identifications based on these characteristics are fraught with degeneracies, although some general trends can be identified. In contrast, spectral emissivity features in the mid-infrared provide important compositional information that might not otherwise be achievable. Jovian Trojan D-type asteroids have emissivity features strikingly similar to comet comae, suggesting that they have the same compositions and that the surfaces of the Trojans are highly porous. However, a direct comparison between a comet and asteroid surface has not been possible due to the paucity of spectra of comet nuclei at mid-infrared wavelengths. We present 5-35 μm thermal emission spectra of comets 10P/Tempel 2, and 49P/Arend-Rigaux observed with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our analysis reveals no evidence for a coma or tail at the time of observation, suggesting the spectra are dominated by the comet nucleus. We fit each spectrum with the near-Earth asteroid thermal model (NEATM) and find sizes in agreement with previous values. However, the NEATM beaming parameters of the nuclei, 0.74-0.83, are systematically lower than the Jupiter-family comet population mean of 1.03 ± 0.11, derived from 16- and 22-μm photometry. We suggest this may be either an artifact of the spectral reduction, or the consequence of an emissivity low near 16 μm. When the spectra are normalized by the NEATM model, a weak 10-μm silicate plateau is evident, with a shape similar to those seen in mid-infrared spectra of D-type asteroids. A silicate plateau is also evident in previously published Spitzer spectra of the nucleus of comet 9P/Tempel 1. We compare, in detail, these comet nucleus emission features to those seen in spectra of the Jovian Trojan D-types (624) Hektor, (911) Agamemnon, and (1172) Aneas, as well

  19. Jupiter - friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, J.; Jones, B. W.

    2007-08-01

    Throughout both popular science and academia, there is a pervasive belief that Jupiter has acted as a celestial shield, reducing the impact rate on the Earth, and making the planet a significantly more conducive site for the evolution and survival of life. This old idea has, however, undergone little detailed scrutiny. In the first of a series of studies aimed at a better understanding of this idea, we examine the variation in the impact rate on the Earth which results from bodies moving inwards from the Edgeworth- Kuiper belt as a function of the mass of a giant planet in Jupiter's orbit. The results are not entirely what would be expected under the "Jupiter Shield" paradigm.

  20. Sharpening Up Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    New image-correction technique delivers sharpest whole-planet ground-based picture ever A record two-hour observation of Jupiter using a superior technique to remove atmospheric blur has produced the sharpest whole-planet picture ever taken from the ground. The series of 265 snapshots obtained with the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics Demonstrator (MAD) prototype instrument mounted on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) reveal changes in Jupiter's smog-like haze, probably in response to a planet-wide upheaval more than a year ago. Sharpening Up Jupiter ESO PR Photo 33/08 Sharpening Up Jupiter Being able to correct wide field images for atmospheric distortions has been the dream of scientists and engineers for decades. The new images of Jupiter prove the value of the advanced technology used by MAD, which uses two or more guide stars instead of one as references to remove the blur caused by atmospheric turbulence over a field of view thirty times larger than existing techniques [1]. "This type of adaptive optics has a big advantage for looking at large objects, such as planets, star clusters or nebulae," says lead researcher Franck Marchis, from UC Berkeley and the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, USA. "While regular adaptive optics provides excellent correction in a small field of view, MAD provides good correction over a larger area of sky. And in fact, were it not for MAD, we would not have been able to perform these amazing observations." MAD allowed the researchers to observe Jupiter for almost two hours on 16 and 17 August 2008, a record duration, according to the observing team. Conventional adaptive optics systems using a single Jupiter moon as reference cannot monitor Jupiter for so long because the moon moves too far from the planet. The Hubble Space Telescope cannot observe Jupiter continuously for more than about 50 minutes, because its view is regularly blocked by the Earth during Hubble's 96-minute orbit. Using MAD, ESO astronomer Paola Amico

  1. Understanding Jupiter's Interior

    CERN Document Server

    Militzer, Burkhard; Wahl, Sean M; Hubbard, William

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of how models of giant planet interiors are constructed. We review measurements from past space missions that provide constraints for the interior structure of Jupiter. We discuss typical three-layer interior models that consist of a dense central core and an inner metallic and an outer molecular hydrogen-helium layer. These models rely heavily on experiments, analytical theory, and first-principle computer simulations of hydrogen and helium to understand their behavior up to the extreme pressures ~10 Mbar and temperatures ~10,000 K. We review the various equations of state used in Jupiter models and compare them with shock wave experiments. We discuss the possibility of helium rain, core erosion and double diffusive convection may have important consequences for the structure and evolution of giant planets. In July 2016 the Juno spacecraft entered orbit around Jupiter, promising high-precision measurements of the gravitational field that will allow us to test our understandi...

  2. Jupiter's Rings: Sharpest View

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft took the best images of Jupiter's charcoal-black rings as it approached and then looked back at Jupiter. The top image was taken on approach, showing three well-defined lanes of gravel- to boulder-sized material composing the bulk of the rings, as well as lesser amounts of material between the rings. New Horizons snapped the lower image after it had passed Jupiter on February 28, 2007, and looked back in a direction toward the sun. The image is sharply focused, though it appears fuzzy due to the cloud of dust-sized particles enveloping the rings. The dust is brightly illuminated in the same way the dust on a dirty windshield lights up when you drive toward a 'low' sun. The narrow rings are confined in their orbits by small 'shepherding' moons.

  3. A Preliminary Jupiter Model

    CERN Document Server

    Hubbard, W B

    2016-01-01

    In anticipation of new observational results for Jupiter's axial moment of inertia and gravitational zonal harmonic coefficients from the forthcoming Juno orbiter, we present a number of preliminary Jupiter interior models. We combine results from ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures, including immiscibility calculations, with a new nonperturbative calculation of Jupiter's zonal harmonic coefficients, to derive a self-consistent model for the planet's external gravity and moment of inertia. We assume helium rain modified the interior temperature and composition profiles. Our calculation predicts zonal harmonic values to which measurements can be compared. Although some models fit the observed (pre-Juno) second- and fourth-order zonal harmonics to within their error bars, our preferred reference model predicts a fourth-order zonal harmonic whose absolute value lies above the pre-Juno error bars. This model has a dense core of about 12 Earth masses, and a hydrogen-helium-rich envelope with...

  4. A Preliminary Jupiter Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Militzer, B.

    2016-03-01

    In anticipation of new observational results for Jupiter's axial moment of inertia and gravitational zonal harmonic coefficients from the forthcoming Juno orbiter, we present a number of preliminary Jupiter interior models. We combine results from ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures, including immiscibility calculations, with a new nonperturbative calculation of Jupiter's zonal harmonic coefficients, to derive a self-consistent model for the planet's external gravity and moment of inertia. We assume helium rain modified the interior temperature and composition profiles. Our calculation predicts zonal harmonic values to which measurements can be compared. Although some models fit the observed (pre-Juno) second- and fourth-order zonal harmonics to within their error bars, our preferred reference model predicts a fourth-order zonal harmonic whose absolute value lies above the pre-Juno error bars. This model has a dense core of about 12 Earth masses and a hydrogen-helium-rich envelope with approximately three times solar metallicity.

  5. Jupiter - Friend or Foe? IV: The influence of orbital eccentricity and inclination

    CERN Document Server

    Horner, J

    2011-01-01

    For many years, it was assumed that Jupiter prevented the Earth from being subject to a punishing impact regime that would greatly hinder the development of life. Here, we present the 4th in a series of studies investigating this hypothesis. Previously, we examined the effect of Jupiter's mass on the impact rate experienced by Earth. Here, we extend that approach to consider the influence of Jupiter's orbital eccentricity and inclination on the impact rate. We first consider scenarios in which Jupiter's orbital eccentricity was somewhat higher and somewhat lower than that in our Solar System. We find that Jupiter's orbital eccentricity plays a moderate role in determining the impact flux at Earth, with more eccentric orbits resulting in a higher impact rate of asteroids than for more circular orbits. This is particularly pronounced at high "Jupiter" masses. For short-period comets, the same effect is clearly apparent, albeit to a lesser degree. The flux of short-period comets impacting the Earth is slightly h...

  6. Optical design of the comet Shoemaker-Levy speckle camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissinger, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    An optical design is presented in which the Lick 3 meter telescope and a bare CCD speckle camera system was used to image the collision sites of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 comet with the Planet Jupiter. The brief overview includes of the optical constraints and system layout. The choice of a Risley prism combination to compensate for the time dependent atmospheric chromatic changes are described. Plate scale and signal-to-noise ratio curves resulting from imaging reference stars are compared with theory. Comparisons between un-corrected and reconstructed images of Jupiter`s impact sites. The results confirm that speckle imaging techniques can be used over an extended time period to provide a method to image large extended objects.

  7. I Spy a Comet!

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This image shows comet Tempel 1 as seen through the clear filter of the medium resolution imager camera on Deep Impact. It was taken on June 25, 2005, when the spacecraft was 8,007,845.1 kilometers (4,976,075 miles) away from the comet. Ten images were combined to create this picture, and a logarithmic stretch was applied to enhance the coma of the comet.

  8. Radiative signals from impact of Shoemaker-Levy on Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Orton, Glenn S.; Takata, Toshiko; Okeefe, John D.

    1994-01-01

    The temperature and internal energy fields calculated by Takata et al. in the plume are used to calculate the greybody thermal radiation emitted versus wavelength to predict what might be observed by several spectral sensors operating from different platforms when fragments of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL-9) impact Jupiter in July 1994. A SPH code was used by Takata et al. to calculate the full three dimensional flow and thermodynamic fields in the comet fragment and the atmosphere of Jupiter. We determined the fragment penetration depth, energy partitioning between the atmosphere and the impactor, and energy density deposited per unit length over the trajectory. Once the impactor had disintegrated and stopped, and the strong atmospheric shock decayed, the flow is driven by buoyancy effects. We then used our SPH code to calculate the flow and thermodynamic fields: pressure, article velocity, temperature, and internal energy distributions in the plume. The calculations for 2 and 10 km cometary fragments yield maximum deposition depths of approximately 175 and 525 km, respectively (1 bar = 0 km depth). We also calculated that 0.7 and 0.6 of the initial kinetic energy of the 10 and 2 km bolides, respectively, are deposited as internal energy in Jupiter's atmosphere.

  9. Behavior of Jupiter Non-Trojan Co-Orbitals

    CERN Document Server

    Wajer, Paweł

    2012-01-01

    Searching for the non-Trojan Jupiter co-orbitals we have numerically integrated orbits of 3\\,160 asteroids and 24 comets discovered by October 2010 and situated within and close to the planet co-orbital region. Using this sample we have been able to select eight asteroids and three comets and have analyzed their orbital behavior in a great detail. Among them we have identified five new Jupiter co-orbitals: \\cu, \\sa, \\ql, \\gh, and \\Larsen, as well as we have analyzed six previously identified co-orbitals: \\hr, \\ug, \\qq, \\aee, \\wc\\ and \\ar. \\cu\\ is currently on a quasi-satellite orbit with repeatable transitions into the tadpole state. Similar behavior shows \\gh\\ which additionally librates in a compound tadpole-quasi-satellite orbit. \\ql\\ and \\Larsen\\ are the co-orbitals of Jupiter which are temporarily moving in a horseshoe orbit occasionally interrupted by a quasi-satellite behavior. \\sa\\ is moving in a pure horseshoe orbit. Orbits of the latter three objects are unstable and according to our calculations, t...

  10. ExploreNEOs. VIII. Dormant Short-period Comets in the Near-Earth Asteroid Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommert, M.; Harris, A. W.; Mueller, M.; Hora, J. L.; Trilling, D. E.; Bottke, W. F.; Thomas, C. A.; Delbo, M.; Emery, J. P.; Fazio, G.; Smith, H. A.

    2015-10-01

    We perform a search for dormant comets, asteroidal objects of cometary origin, in the near-Earth asteroid (NEA) population based on dynamical and physical considerations. Our study is based on albedos derived within the ExploreNEOs program and is extended by adding data from NEOWISE and the Akari asteroid catalog. We use a statistical approach to identify asteroids on orbits that resemble those of short-period near-Earth comets (NECs) using the Tisserand parameter with respect to Jupiter, the aphelion distance, and the minimum orbital intersection distance with respect to Jupiter. From the sample of NEAs on comet-like orbits, we select those with a geometric albedo pV ≤ 0.064 as dormant comet candidates, and find that only ˜50% of NEAs on comet-like orbits also have comet-like albedos. We identify a total of 23 NEAs from our sample that are likely to be dormant short-period NECs and, based on a de-biasing procedure applied to the cryogenic NEOWISE survey, estimate both magnitude-limited and size-limited fractions of the NEA population that are dormant short-period comets. We find that 0.3%-3.3% of the NEA population with H ≤ 21, and ({9}-5+2)% of the population with diameters d ≥ 1 km, are dormant short-period NECs.

  11. Radiation belts of jupiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansberry, K G; White, R S

    1973-12-07

    Predictions of Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts are based mainly on decimeter observations of 1966 and 1968. Extensive calculations modeling radial diffusion of particles inward from the solar wind and electron synchrotron radiation are used to relate the predictions and observations.

  12. A Transiting Jupiter Analog

    CERN Document Server

    Kipping, David M; Henze, Chris; Teachey, Alex; Isaacson, Howard T; Petigura, Erik A; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Buchhave, Lars A; Chen, Jingjing; Bryson, Steve T; Sandford, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Decadal-long radial velocity surveys have recently started to discover analogs to the most influential planet of our solar system, Jupiter. Detecting and characterizing these worlds is expected to shape our understanding of our uniqueness in the cosmos. Despite the great successes of recent transit surveys, Jupiter analogs represent a terra incognita, owing to the strong intrinsic bias of this method against long orbital periods. We here report on the first validated transiting Jupiter analog, Kepler-167e (KOI-490.02), discovered using Kepler archival photometry orbiting the K4-dwarf KIC-3239945. With a radius of $(0.91\\pm0.02)$ $R_{\\mathrm{Jup}}$, a low orbital eccentricity ($0.06_{-0.04}^{+0.10}$) and an equilibrium temperature of $(131\\pm3)$ K, Kepler-167e bears many of the basic hallmarks of Jupiter. Kepler-167e is accompanied by three Super-Earths on compact orbits, which we also validate, leaving a large cavity of transiting worlds around the habitable-zone. With two transits and continuous photometric ...

  13. Jovian stratospheric temperature during the two months following the impacts of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno, R; Marten, A; Biraud, Y; Bezard, B; Lellouch, E; Paubert, G; Wild, W

    2001-01-01

    We present millimeter heterodyne observations of Jupiter performed at the IRAM 30-m telescope during and immediately after the infall of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 on the planet. Rotational lines of CO and CS were first observed in emission during the impacts. They faded rapidly and turned into absorpti

  14. Tracking Jupiter at microwave frequencies after the 2009 impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Shinji; García-Miró, Cristina; Rizzo, Ricardo; Forster, James; Hofstadter, Mark; Dorcey, Ryan; Jauncey, David; de Pater, Imke; Baines, Graham; Sotuela, Ioanna

    2010-05-01

    On 19 July 2009, amateur astronomer Anthony Wesley located near Canberra, Australia, discovered an anomalous dark feature near Jupiter's south pole. It was soon confirmed with additional observations that the new feature was an impact site created by an unknown object. The only other observed collision with Jupiter occurred 15 years earlier with the catastrophic impact of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 Comet (SL9). Unlike the well-predicted SL9 event, the biggest question to answer this time is whether the impact body was a comet or an asteroid. We started a campaign to track Jupiter at microwave frequencies with NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN), in Canberra, Goldstone (California), and Madrid, and the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) in California. A 34m DSN radio telescope at Goldstone was operated by students through GAVRT program. Our primary goal was first to detect molecular radio emissions possibly originating from cometary core components, such as OH, H2O, and NH3, and second to detect radio burst in non-thermal continuum emissions, as observed after the SL-9 impact 15 years ago. We used a 70m radio telescope in Canberra and another 70m in Madrid to search for molecular emissions at 1.6 GHz for OH, 22 GHz for water vapors, 23 GHz for ammonia. Several radio spectroscopy observing sessions have been successfully conducted from 23 July to 1 August. We also started continuum emission monitoring, mainly at 2.3 GHz and 8.4 GHz using 34m and 70m DSN telescopes and the ATA. At early stage of this still on-going monitoring, joint observations were conducted with two 34m telescopes in Canberra and the ATA on 30 July and 9 August in order to have long continuous time coverage and to check flux density scales using a common calibrator source. To highlight this campaign, on 22 November we undertook the Jupiter: Project 24 for the International Year of Astronomy. This campaign was over 24 hours of continuous observation of Jupiter using all three DSN complexes around the world. A couple

  15. Constraints on Comet 332P/Ikeya-Murakami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Man-To; Ye, Quan-Zhi; Wiegert, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Encke-type comet 332P/Ikeya-Murakami is experiencing cascading fragmentation events during its 2016 apparition. It is likely the first splitting Encke-type comet ever observed. A nongravitational solution to the astrometry reveals a statistical detection of the radial and transverse nongravitational parameters, {A}1=(1.54+/- 0.39)× {10}-8 au day‑2 and {A}2=(7.19+/- 1.92)× {10}-9 au day‑2, respectively, which implies a nucleus erosion rate of (9.1+/- 1.7)‰ per orbital revolution. The mass-loss rate likely has to be supported by a much larger fraction of an active surface area than known cases of short-period comets; it may be relevant to the ongoing fragmentation. We failed to detect any serendipitous pre-discovery observations of the comet in archival data from major sky surveys, whereby we infer that 332P used to be largely inactive, and is perhaps among the few short-period comets that have been reactivated from weakly active or dormant states. We therefore constrain an upper limit to the nucleus size as 2.0 ± 0.2 km in radius. A search for small bodies in similar orbits to that of 332P reveals comet P/2010 B2 (WISE) to be the best candidate. From an empirical generalized Jupiter-family (Encke-type included) comet population model, we estimate the likelihood of a chance alignment of the 332P–P/2010 B2 pair to be 1 in 33, a small number indicative of a genetic linkage between the two comets on a statistical basis. The pair possibly originated from a common progenitor, which underwent a disintegration event well before the twentieth century.

  16. Realistic Detectability of Close Interstellar Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Nathaniel V.; Ragozzine, Darin; Granvik, Mikael; Stephens, Denise C.

    2016-07-01

    During the planet formation process, billions of comets are created and ejected into interstellar space. The detection and characterization of such interstellar comets (ICs) (also known as extra-solar planetesimals or extra-solar comets) would give us in situ information about the efficiency and properties of planet formation throughout the galaxy. However, no ICs have ever been detected, despite the fact that their hyperbolic orbits would make them readily identifiable as unrelated to the solar system. Moro-Martín et al. have made a detailed and reasonable estimate of the properties of the IC population. We extend their estimates of detectability with a numerical model that allows us to consider “close” ICs, e.g., those that come within the orbit of Jupiter. We include several constraints on a “detectable” object that allow for realistic estimates of the frequency of detections expected from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and other surveys. The influence of several of the assumed model parameters on the frequency of detections is explored in detail. Based on the expectation from Moro-Martín et al., we expect that LSST will detect 0.001-10 ICs during its nominal 10 year lifetime, with most of the uncertainty from the unknown number density of small (nuclei of ˜0.1-1 km) ICs. Both asteroid and comet cases are considered, where the latter includes various empirical prescriptions of brightening. Using simulated LSST-like astrometric data, we study the problem of orbit determination for these bodies, finding that LSST could identify their orbits as hyperbolic and determine an ephemeris sufficiently accurate for follow-up in about 4-7 days. We give the hyperbolic orbital parameters of the most detectable ICs. Taking the results into consideration, we give recommendations to future searches for ICs.

  17. Polarized Light from Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    These images taken through the wide angle camera near closest approach in the deep near-infrared methane band, combined with filters which sense electromagnetic radiation of orthogonal polarization, show that the light from the poles is polarized. That is, the poles appear bright in one image, and dark in the other. Polarized light is most readily scattered by aerosols. These images indicate that the aerosol particles at Jupiter's poles are small and likely consist of aggregates of even smaller particles, whereas the particles at the equator and covering the Great Red Spot are larger. Images like these will allow scientists to ascertain the distribution, size and shape of aerosols, and consequently, the distribution of heat, in Jupiter's atmosphere.

  18. Jupiter's Water Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    When the twin Voyager spacecraft cruised past Jupiter in 1979, they did more than rewrite the textbooks on the giant planet. Their cameras also unveiled the astounding diversity of the four planet-size moons of ice and stone known as the Galilean satellites. The Voyagers revealed the cratered countenance of Callisto, the valleys and ridges of Ganymede, the cracked face of Europa, and the spewing volcanoes of Io. But it would take a spacecraft named for Italian scientist Galileo, who discovered the moons in 1610, to reveal the true complexity of these worlds and to begin to divulge their interior secrets. Incredibly, the Galileo data strongly suggest that Jupiter's three large icy moons (all but rocky Io) hide interior oceans.

  19. A PRELIMINARY JUPITER MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, W. B. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Militzer, B. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    In anticipation of new observational results for Jupiter's axial moment of inertia and gravitational zonal harmonic coefficients from the forthcoming Juno orbiter, we present a number of preliminary Jupiter interior models. We combine results from ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen–helium mixtures, including immiscibility calculations, with a new nonperturbative calculation of Jupiter's zonal harmonic coefficients, to derive a self-consistent model for the planet's external gravity and moment of inertia. We assume helium rain modified the interior temperature and composition profiles. Our calculation predicts zonal harmonic values to which measurements can be compared. Although some models fit the observed (pre-Juno) second- and fourth-order zonal harmonics to within their error bars, our preferred reference model predicts a fourth-order zonal harmonic whose absolute value lies above the pre-Juno error bars. This model has a dense core of about 12 Earth masses and a hydrogen–helium-rich envelope with approximately three times solar metallicity.

  20. Jupiter's Grand Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batygin, Konstantin

    2017-06-01

    The statistics of extrasolar planetary systems indicate that the default mode of planetary formation generates planets with orbital periods shorter than 100 days, and masses substantially exceeding that of the Earth. When viewed in this context, the Solar System, which contains no planets interior to Mercury's 88-day orbit, is unusual. Extra-solar planetary detection surveys also suggest that planets with masses and periods broadly similar to Jupiter's are somewhat uncommon, with occurrence fraction of less than ~ 10%. In this talk, I will present calculations which show that a popular formation scenario for Jupiter and Saturn, in which Jupiter migrates inward from a > 5AU to a ˜ 1.5 AU and then reverses direction, can explain the low overall mass of the Solar System's terrestrial planets, as well as the absence of planets with a 10 - 100 km planetesimals into low- order mean-motion resonances, shepherding of order 10 Earth masses of this material into the a ˜ 1 AU region while exciting substantial orbital eccentricity (e ˜ 0.2 - 0.4). We argue that under these conditions, a collisional cascade will ensue, generating a planetesimal disk that would have flushed any preexisting short-period super-Earth-like planets into the Sun. In this scenario, the Solar System's terrestrial planets formed from gas-starved mass-depleted debris that remained after the primary period of dynamical evolution.

  1. Voyager picture of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Voyager 1 took this picture of the planet Jupiter on Saturday, Jan. 6, the first in its three-month-long, close-up investigation of the largest planet. The spacecraft, flying toward a March 5 closest approach, was 35.8 million miles (57.6 million kilometers) from Jupiter and 371.7 million miles (598.2 million kilometers) from Earth when the picture was taken. As the Voyager cameras begin their meteorological surveillance of Jupiter, they reveal a dynamic atmosphere with more convective structure than had previously been thought. While the smallest atmospheric features seen in this picture are still as large as 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) across, Voyager will be able to detect individual storm systems as small as 3 miles (5 kilometers) at closest approach. The Great Red Spot can be seen near the limb at the far right. Most of the other features are too small to be seen in terrestrial telescopes. This picture was transmitted to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory through the Deep Space Network's tracking station at Madrid, Spain. The Voyager Project is managed for NASA by Caltech's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  2. Secular Chaos and the Production of Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yanqin

    2010-01-01

    In a planetary system with two or more well-spaced, eccentric, inclined planets, secular interactions may lead to chaos. The innermost planet may gradually become very eccentric and/or inclined, as a result of the secular degrees of freedom drifting towards equipartition of angular momentum deficit. Secular chaos is known to be responsible for the eventual destabilization of Mercury in our own Solar System. Here we focus on systems with three giant planets. We characterize the secular chaos and demonstrate the criterion for it to occur, but leave a detailed understanding of secular chaos to a companion paper (Lithwick & Wu, 2010). After an extended period of eccentricity diffusion, the inner planet's pericentre can approach the star to within a few stellar radii. Strong tidal interactions and ensuing tidal dissipation extracts orbital energy from the planet and pulls it inward, creating a hot Jupiter. In contrast to other proposed channels for the production of hot Jupiters, such a scenario (which we term...

  3. Comparative impactology on Jupiter: Cataloging the clumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michael

    2010-09-01

    Seven months after HubbleA?s first servicing mission, the impact of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 {SL9} captured worldwide attentionA?and the newly-installed WFPC2 captured 472 images of Jupiter in Program 5642. We will complete a census of each impact, including evolution, size, morphology, and color, now that the geometric and photometric calibration of WFPC2 has reached its best and final state. The data from Program 5642 prove their great value by still continuing to generate science publications, and we will upload deprojected {latitude-longitude mapped} data as High Level Science Products to further enhance the usability of this unique data set. The WFPC2 data are needed to understand recent observations of the 2009 impact on Jupiter, in which only 36 WFC3 and ACS images were obtained in Program 12003. In the isolated 2009 impact, the debris formed clumps that lasted at least until Jupiter was imaged again on 22 September {Program 11559}, two months after the impact. Clumps were observed in a subset of SL9 impact sites, but a complete survey of all the available WFPC2 impact site imaging data will enable us to measure clump formation, favored dynamical environments, frequency of occurrence, interactions with other Jovian atmospheric features, and rates of change in size and albedo. Based on the 2009 WFC3 and ACS data, we suggest that these clumps are lower stratospheric eddies that maintain aerosol concentrations against dissipation. We will search the proposed complete catalog of 1994 WFPC2 data to isolate the determining factors for the formation and evolution of these clumps, with the goal of finding out whether they are commonplace Jovian dynamical features simply traced by impact-generated aerosols, or unique features generated by the impacts themselves {either through impact-related thermochemical processes, or through differences in particle microphysics}. If the clumps mark commonplace but normally invisible eddies, they may play interesting roles in the

  4. Voyager 2 Jupiter Eruption Movie

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This movie records an eruptive event in the southern hemisphere of Jupiter over a period of 8 Jupiter days. Prior to the event, an undistinguished oval cloud mass cruised through the turbulent atmosphere. The eruption occurs over avery short time at the very center of the cloud. The white eruptive material is swirled about by the internal wind patterns of the cloud. As a result of the eruption, the cloud then becomes a type of feature seen elsewhere on Jupiter known as 'spaghetti bowls'.As Voyager 2 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 8 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). These images were acquired in the Violet filter around May 6, 1979. The spacecraft was about 50 million kilometers from Jupiter at that time.This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  5. Jupiter small satellite montage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    A montage of images of the small inner moons of Jupiter from the camera onboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft shows the best views obtained of these moons during Galileo's 11th orbit around the giant planet in November 1997. At that point, Galileo was completing its first two years in Jupiter orbit--known as the Galileo 'prime mission'--and was about to embark on a successful two-year extension, called the Galileo Europa Mission. The top two images show the moon Thebe. Thebe rotates by approximately 50 degrees between the time these two images were taken, so that the same prominent impact crater is seen in both views; this crater, which has been given the provisional name Zethus, is near the point on Thebe that faces permanently away from Jupiter. The next two images show the moon Amalthea; they were taken with the Sun directly behind the observer, an alignment that emphasizes patterns of intrinsically bright or dark surface material. The third image from the top is a view of Amalthea's leading side, the side of the moon that 'leads' as Amalthea moves in its orbit around Jupiter. This image looks 'noisy' because it was obtained serendipitously during an observation of the Jovian satellite Io (Amalthea and Io shared the same camera frame but the image was exposed for bright Io rather than for the much darker Amalthea). The fourth image from the top emphasizes prominent 'spots' of relatively bright material that are located near the point on Amalthea that faces permanently away from Jupiter. The bottom image is a view of the tiny moon Metis. In all the images, north is approximately up, and the moons are shown in their correct relative sizes. The images are, from top to bottom: Thebe taken on November 7, 1997 at a range of 504,000 kilometers (about 313,000 miles); Thebe on November 7, 1997 at a range of 548,000 kilometers (about 340,000 miles); Amalthea on November 6, 1997 at a range of about 650,000 kilometers (about 404,000 miles); Amalthea on November 7, 1997 at a

  6. A Day on Jupiter (Animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This 'movie' strings 11 images of Jupiter captured by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on January 9, 2007, when the spacecraft was about 80 million kilometers (49.6 million miles) from the giant planet. The sequence covers a full 10-hour rotation of Jupiter, during which the moons Ganymede and Io -- as well as the shadows they cast on Jupiter -- move across the camera's field of view.

  7. A Comet's Missing Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    On 28 November 2013, comet C/2012 S1 better known as comet ISON should have passed within two solar radii of the Suns surface as it reached perihelion in its orbit. But instead of shining in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths as it grazed the solar surface, the comet was never detected by EUV instruments. What happened to comet ISON?Missing EmissionWhen a sungrazing comet passes through the solar corona, it leaves behind a trail of molecules evaporated from its surface. Some of these molecules emit EUV light, which can be detected by instruments on telescopes like the space-based Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO).Comet ISON, a comet that arrived from deep space and was predicted to graze the Suns corona in November 2013, was expected to cause EUV emission during its close passage. But analysis of the data from multiple telescopes that tracked ISON in EUV including SDO reveals no sign of it at perihelion.In a recent study, Paul Bryans and DeanPesnell, scientists from NCARs High Altitude Observatory and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, try to determine why ISON didnt display this expected emission.Comparing ISON and LovejoyIn December 2011, another comet dipped into the Suns corona: comet Lovejoy. This image, showingthe orbit Lovejoy took around the Sun, is a composite of SDO images of the pre- and post-perihelion phases of the orbit. Click for a closer look! The dashed part of the curve represents where Lovejoy passed out of view behind the Sun. [Bryans Pesnell 2016]This is not the first time weve watched a sungrazing comet with EUV-detecting telescopes: Comet Lovejoy passed similarly close to the Sun in December 2011. But when Lovejoy grazed the solar corona, it emitted brightly in EUV. So why didnt ISON? Bryans and Pesnell argue that there are two possibilities:the coronal conditions experienced by the two comets were not similar, orthe two comets themselves were not similar.To establish which factor is the most relevant, the authors first demonstrate that both

  8. The Rosetta Mission to Comet 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.

    2017-06-01

    As remnant bodies left over from the formation of the Solar System, comets offer clues to the physical conditions and architecture of the protosolar nebula. The Rosetta spacecraft, which included an orbiter and a lander that were built and managed by the European Space Agency with NASA contributing four instruments and scientific expertise, was the first mission to orbit and study a comet through a perihelion passage. The targeted Jupiter-family comet 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko, is seemingly two distinct planetesimals stuck together. The comet has not melted or been processed substantially, except for its outer layers, which consist of reaccreted dust and a crust of heated, devolatized, and annealed refractory materials and organics. The exceptionally low density (0.53 gm/cc) of 67P/ implies it is a rubble pile. The comet also appears to contain a hierarchy of building blocks: smaller spherically shaped meter-sized bodies can be seen in its interior, and even smaller cm-sized pebbles were imaged by the camera as the spacecraft made a soft crash landing on the comet’s surface on 30 September 2016. The unexpected discovery of molecular oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrogen imply that 67P/ was formed under cold conditions not exceeding 30K. The discovery of many organic compounds, including the amino acid glycine, lends support to the idea that comets, which originate in the Kuiper Belt and the Oort Cloud, brought the building blocks of life to Earth. More laboratory data on organic compounds would help to identify additional organic compounds on the comet. The differences between cometary and terrestrial D/H ratios suggest that comets are not the primary source of terrestrial water, although data on more comets is needed to confirm this result.Besides being primordial objects offering a window into the formation of solar systems, comets are astrophysical laboratories, ejecting dust and charged particles into the plasma comprising the solar wind. Several unusual phenomena

  9. Spatial distribution of water in the stratosphere of Jupiter from observations with the Herschel space observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalié, T.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Lellouch, E.; de Val-Borro, M.; Jarchow, C.; Moreno, R.; Hartogh, P.; Orton, G.; Greathouse, T. K.; Billebaud, F.; Dobrijevic, M.; Lara, L. M.; Gonzalez, A.; Sagawa, H.

    2013-09-01

    Water in the atmospheres of the outer planets has both an internal and an external source (e.g., [1] and [2] for Jupiter). These sources are separated by a condensation layer, the tropopause cold trap, which acts as a transport barrier between the troposphere and the stratosphere. Thus, the water vapor observed by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) in the stratosphere of the giant planets has an external origin [3]. This external supply of water may have several sources: (i) a permanent flux from interplanetary dust particles produced from asteroid collisions and from comet activity [4], (ii) local sources from planetary environments (rings, satellites) [5], (iii) cometary "Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) type" impacts [6]. In the past 15 years, several studies suggested that water in the stratosphere of Jupiter originated from the SL9 comet impacts in July 1994, but a direct proof was missing. We will report the first high S/N spatially resolved mapping observations of water in Jupiter's stratosphere carried out with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) [7] and Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) [8] instruments onboard the ESA Herschel Space Observatory [9]. These observations have been obtained in the framework of the Guaranteed Time Key Program "Water and related chemistry in the Solar System", also known as "Herschel Solar System Observations" (HssO) [10]. In parallel, we have monitored Jupiter's stratospheric temperature with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) to separate temperature from water variability. We will present the results recently published by our team [11]. Water is found to be restricted to pressures lower than 2mbar. Its column density decreases by a factor of 2-3 between southern and northern latitudes (see Fig. 1), consistently between the HIFI and the PACS 66.4μm maps. Latitudinal temperature variability cannot explain the global north-south asymmetry in the water maps. From the latitudinal and vertical

  10. Push-pull farming systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, John A; Woodcock, Christine M; Midega, Charles A O; Khan, Zeyaur R

    2014-04-01

    Farming systems for pest control, based on the stimulo-deterrent diversionary strategy or push-pull system, have become an important target for sustainable intensification of food production. A prominent example is push-pull developed in sub-Saharan Africa using a combination of companion plants delivering semiochemicals, as plant secondary metabolites, for smallholder farming cereal production, initially against lepidopterous stem borers. Opportunities are being developed for other regions and farming ecosystems. New semiochemical tools and delivery systems, including GM, are being incorporated to exploit further opportunities for mainstream arable farming systems. By delivering the push and pull effects as secondary metabolites, for example, (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene repelling pests and attracting beneficial insects, problems of high volatility and instability are overcome and compounds are produced when and where required.

  11. Comet composition and Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Biver, Nicolas

    2016-10-01

    Comet composition and properties provide information on chemical and physical processes that occurred in the early Solar system, 4.6 Gyr ago. The study of comets and of star-forming regions both help for a better understanding of the formation of planetary systems. A review of our present knowledge of cometary composition is presented. We also discuss laboratory studies that would be helpful for data analysis.

  12. Motion planning with pull moves

    CERN Document Server

    Ritt, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that Sokoban is PSPACE-complete (Culberson 1998) and several of its variants are NP-hard (Demaine et al. 2003). In this paper we prove the NP-hardness of some variants of Sokoban where the warehouse keeper can only pull boxes.

  13. Jupiter: Lord of the Planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, William

    1984-01-01

    Presents a chapter from an introductory college-level astronomy textbook in which full-color photographs and numerous diagrams highlight an extensive description of the planet Jupiter. Topics include Jupiter's geology, rotation, magnetic field, atmosphere (including clouds and winds), and the Great Red Spot. (DH)

  14. Comets in Australian Aboriginal Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Hamacher, Duane W

    2010-01-01

    We present 25 accounts of comets from 40 Australian Aboriginal communities, citing both supernatural perceptions of comets and historical accounts of bright comets. Historical and ethnographic descriptions include the Great Comets of 1843, 1861, 1901, 1910, and 1927. We describe the perceptions of comets in Aboriginal societies and show that they are typically associated with fear, death, omens, malevolent spirits, and evil magic, consistent with many cultures around the world. We also provide a list of words for comets in 16 different Aboriginal languages.

  15. Comets in Australian Aboriginal Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Duane W.; Norris, Ray P.

    2011-03-01

    We present 25 accounts of comets from 40 Australian Aboriginal communities, citing both supernatural perceptions of comets and historical accounts of historically bright comets. Historical and ethnographic descriptions include the Great Comets of 1843, 1861, 1901, 1910, and 1927. We describe the perceptions of comets in Aboriginal societies and show that they are typically associated with fear, death, omens, malevolent spirits, and evil magic, consistent with many cultures around the world. We also provide a list of words for comets in 16 different Aboriginal languages.

  16. Small Friends of Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Luis Ernesto; Johnson, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Hot Jupiters are Jupiter-sized gas giant exoplanets that closely orbit their host star in periods of about 10 days or less. Early models hypothesized that these exoplanets formed away from the star, then over time drifted to their characteristically closer locations. However, new theories predict that Hot Jupiters form at their close proximity during the process of core accretion (Batygin et al. 2015). In fact, a super-Earth and a Neptune-sized exoplanet have already been detected in the Hot Jupiter-hosting star WASP-47 (Becker et al. 2015). We will present our analysis of radial velocity time series plots to determine whether low-mass, short-period planets have been previously overlooked in systems of stars which host Hot Jupiters.The SAO REU program is funded in part by the National Science Foundation REU and Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant no. 1262851.

  17. Dormant Comets Among the Near-Earth Object Population: A Meteor-Based Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Quan-Zhi; Pokorný, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Dormant comets in the near-Earth object (NEO) population are thought to be involved in the terrestrial accretion of water and organic materials. Identification of dormant comets is difficult as they are observationally indistinguishable from their asteroidal counterparts, however they may have produced dust during their final active stages which potentially are detectable today as weak meteor showers at the Earth. Here we present the result of a reconnaissance survey looking for dormant comets using 13~567~542 meteor orbits measured by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR). We simulate the dynamical evolution of the hypothetical meteoroid streams originated from 407 near-Earth asteroids in cometary orbits (NEACOs) that resemble orbital characteristics of Jupiter-family comets (JFCs). Out of the 44 hypothetical showers that are predicted to be detectable by CMOR, we identify 5 positive detections that are statistically unlikely to be chance associations, including 3 previously known associations. This transla...

  18. Warm Jupiters are less lonely than hot Jupiters: close neighbours

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Chelsea X; Triaud, Amaury H M J

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting the Kepler transit data, we uncover a dramatic distinction in the prevalence of sub-Jovian companions, between systems that contain hot Jupiters (periods inward of 10 days) and those that host warm Jupiters (periods between 10 and 200 days). Hot Jupiters as a whole, with the singular exception of WASP-47b, do not have any detectable inner or outer planetary companions (with periods inward of 50 days and sizes down to $2 R_{\\rm Earth}$). Restricting ourselves to inner companions, our limits reach down to $1 R_{\\rm Earth}$. In stark contrast, half of the warm Jupiters are closely flanked by small companions. Statistically, the companion fractions for hot and warm Jupiters are mutually exclusive, in particular in regard to inner companions. The high companion fraction of warm Jupiters also yields clue to their formation. The warm Jupiters that have close-by siblings should have low orbital eccentricities and low mutual inclinations. The orbital configurations of these systems are reminiscent of those ...

  19. Comet Tempel 1 Went Back to Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    after the impact, the morphology of Comet Tempel 1 had changed, with the appearance of a new plume-like structure, produced by matter being ejected with a speed of about 700 to 1000 km/h (see ESO PR Photo 23/05). This structure, however, diffused away in the following days, being more and more diluted and less visible, the comet taking again the appearance it had before the impact. Further images obtained with, among others, the adaptive optics NACO instrument on the Very Large Telescope, showed the same jets that were visible prior to impact, demonstrating that the comet activity survived widely unaffected by the spacecraft crash. The study of the gas in Comet Tempel 1 (see "Looking for Molecules"), made with UVES on Kueyen (UT2 of the VLT), reveals a small flux increase the first night following the impact. At that time, more than 17 hours after the impact, the ejected matter was fading away but still measurable thanks to the large light collecting power of the VLT. The data accumulated during 10 nights around the impact have provided the astronomers with the best ever time series of optical spectra of a Jupiter Family comet, with a total of more than 40 hours of exposure time. This unique data set has already allowed the astronomers to characterize the normal gas activity of the comet and also to detect, to their own surprise, an active region. This active region is not related to the impact as it was also detected in data collected in June. It shows up about every 41 hours, the rotation period of the comet nucleus determined by the Deep Impact spacecraft. Exciting measurements of the detailed chemical composition (such as the isotopic ratios) of the material released by the impact as well as the one coming from that source will be performed by the astronomers in the next weeks and months. Further spectropolarimetric observations with FORS1 have confirmed the surface of the comet to be rather evolved - as expected - but more importantly, that the dust is not coming

  20. Ground-Based Centimeter, Millimeter, and Submillimeter Observations of Recent Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, S. N.; Chuang, Y.-L.; Charnley, S. B.; Kuan, Y. -J.; Villanueva, G. L.; Coulson, I. M.; Remijan. A. R.

    2012-01-01

    Comets provide important clues to the physical and chemical processes that occurred during the formation and early evolution of the Solar System, and could also have been important for initiating prebiotic chemistry on the early Earth [I]. Comets are comprised of molecular ices, that may be pristine interstellar remnants of Solar System formation, along with high-temperature crystalline silicate dust that is indicative of a more thermally varied history in the protosolar nebula [2]. Comparing abundances of cometary parent volatiles, and isotopic fractionation ratios, to those found in the interstellar medium, in disks around young stars, and between cometary families, is vital to understanding planetary system formation and the processing history experienced by organic matter in the so-called interstellar-comet connection [3]. In the classical picture, the long-period comets probably formed in the nebular disk across the giant planet formation region (5-40 AU) with the majority of them originating from the Uranus-Neptune region. They were subsequently scattered out to the Oort Cloud (OC) by Jupiter. The short-period comets (also known as ecliptic or Jupiter Family Comets - JFC) reside mainly in the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt where they were formed. Given the gradient in physical conditions expected across this region of the nebula, chemical diversity in this comet population is to be expected [4,5]. We have conducted observations of comets I 03P/Hartley 2 (JFC) and C/2009 PI (Garradd) (OC), at primarily millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths, to determine important cosmogonic quantities, such as the ortho:para ratio and isotope ratios, as well as probe the origin of cometary organics and if they vary between the two dynamic reservoirs.

  1. Pull factors of Finland and voluntary work

    OpenAIRE

    Jurvakainen, Janika

    2016-01-01

    This thesis studies pull factors of Finland and voluntary work. The aim of this study is to understand the pull factors of Finland from the perspective of young travelers. Which pull factors attract to choose Finland as their destination? In addition, which pull factors attract young travelers to participate in international voluntary work? The commissioner of this thesis is Allianssi Youth Exchange. The thesis is research-based and includes a quantitative Webropol survey and some qualit...

  2. Jupiter's Moons: Family Portrait

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This montage shows the best views of Jupiter's four large and diverse 'Galilean' satellites as seen by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on the New Horizons spacecraft during its flyby of Jupiter in late February 2007. The four moons are, from left to right: Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. The images have been scaled to represent the true relative sizes of the four moons and are arranged in their order from Jupiter. Io, 3,640 kilometers (2,260 miles) in diameter, was imaged at 03:50 Universal Time on February 28 from a range of 2.7 million kilometers (1.7 million miles). The original image scale was 13 kilometers per pixel, and the image is centered at Io coordinates 6 degrees south, 22 degrees west. Io is notable for its active volcanism, which New Horizons has studied extensively. Europa, 3,120 kilometers (1,938 miles) in diameter, was imaged at 01:28 Universal Time on February 28 from a range of 3 million kilometers (1.8 million miles). The original image scale was 15 kilometers per pixel, and the image is centered at Europa coordinates 6 degrees south, 347 degrees west. Europa's smooth, icy surface likely conceals an ocean of liquid water. New Horizons obtained data on Europa's surface composition and imaged subtle surface features, and analysis of these data may provide new information about the ocean and the icy shell that covers it. New Horizons spied Ganymede, 5,262 kilometers (3,268 miles) in diameter, at 10:01 Universal Time on February 27 from 3.5 million kilometers (2.2 million miles) away. The original scale was 17 kilometers per pixel, and the image is centered at Ganymede coordinates 6 degrees south, 38 degrees west. Ganymede, the largest moon in the solar system, has a dirty ice surface cut by fractures and peppered by impact craters. New Horizons' infrared observations may provide insight into the composition of the moon's surface and interior. Callisto, 4,820 kilometers (2,995 miles) in diameter, was imaged at 03:50 Universal Time on

  3. Reassessing the Source of Long-Period Comets

    CERN Document Server

    Kaib, Nathan A; 10.1126/science.1172676

    2009-01-01

    We present numerical simulations to model the production of observable long-period comets (LPCs) from the Oort Cloud, a vast reservoir of icy bodies surrounding the Sun. We show that inner Oort Cloud objects can penetrate Jupiter's orbit via a largely unexplored dynamical pathway, and they are an important, if not the dominant, source of known LPCs. We use this LPC production to place observationally motivated constraints on the population and mass of the inner Oort Cloud, which are consistent with giant planet formation theory. These constraints indicate that only one comet shower producing late Eocene bombardment levels has likely occurred since the Cambrian Explosion, making these phenomena an improbable cause of additional extinction events.

  4. Comets in ancient India

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Patrick Das

    2014-01-01

    The Indo-aryans of ancient India observed stars and constellations for ascertaining auspicious times for sacrificial rites ordained by vedas. It is but natural that they would have recounted in the vedic texts about comets. In Rigveda ($\\sim $ 1700 - 1500 BC) and Atharvaveda ($\\sim $ 1150 BC), there are references to dhumaketus and ketus, which stand for comets in Sanskrit. Varahamihira in 550 AD and Ballala Sena ($\\sim $ 1100 - 1200 AD) have described a large number of comets recorded by ancient seers such as Parashara, Vriddha Garga, Narada, Garga, etc. In this article, I conjecture that an episode narrated in Mahabharata of a radiant king, Nahusha, ruling the heavens, and later turning into a serpent after he had kicked the seer Agastya (also the star Canopus), is a mythological retelling of a cometary event.

  5. Infrared observations of comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanner, Martha S.

    1991-01-01

    Selected comets are observed in the near infrared (1 to 2.2 micron) and thermal infrared (3.5 to 20 micron) with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) and other telescopes as appropriate, in order to characterize the physical properties of the dust grains; their composition, size distribution, emissivity, and albedo. Systematic variations in these properties among comets are looked for, in order to understand the heterogeneity of comet nuclei. Spectrophotometry of the 10 micron silicate emission feature is particularly emphasized. The rate of dust production from the nucleus and its temporal variability are also determined. Knowledge of the dust environment is essential to S/C design and mission planning for NASA's CRAF mission.

  6. Astrobiology of Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Wickramasinghe, Nalin C.; Wallis, Max K.; Sheldon, Robert B.

    2004-01-01

    We review the current state of knowledge concerning microbial extremophiles and comets and the potential significance of comets to Astrobiology. We model the thermal history of a cometary body, regarded as an assemblage of boulders, dust, ices and organics, as it approaches a perihelion distance of - IAU. The transfer of incident energy from sunlight into the interior leads to the melting of near surface ices, some under stable porous crust, providing possible habitats for a wide range of microorganisms. We provide data concerning new evidence for indigenous microfossils in CI meteorites, which may be the remains of extinct cometary cores. We discuss the dominant microbial communities of polar sea-ice, Antarctic ice sheet, and cryoconite environments as possible analogs for microbial ecosystems that may grow in sub-crustal pools or in ice/water films in comets.

  7. Microdroplet oscillations during optical pulling

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingsen, Simen Å

    2011-01-01

    It was recently shown theoretically that it is possible to pull a spherical dielectric body towards the source of a laser beam [Nature Photonics {\\bf 5}, 531 (2011)], a result with immediate consequences to optical manipulation of small droplets. Optical pulling can be realised e.g.\\ using a diffraction free Bessel beam, and is expected to be of great importance in manipulation of microscopic droplets in micro- and nanofluidics. Compared to conventional optical pushing, however, the radio of optical net force to stress acting on a droplet is much smaller, increasing the importance of oscillations. We describe the time-dependent surface deformations of a water microdroplet under optical pulling to linear order in the deformation. Shape oscillations have a lifetime in the order of microseconds for droplet radii of a few micrometers. The force density acting on the initially spherical droplet is strongly peaked near the poles on the beam axis, causing the deformations to take the form of jet-like protrusions.

  8. Northern Belt of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] A four-panel frame shows a section of Jupiter's north equatorial belt viewed by NASA's Cassini spacecraft at four different wavelengths, and a separate reference frame shows the location of the belt on the planet.A fascinating aspect of the images in the four-panel frame is the small bright spot in the center of each. The images come from different layers of the atmosphere, so the spot appears to be a storm penetrating upward through several layers. This may in fact be a 'monster' thunderstorm, penetrating all the way into the stratosphere, as do some summer thunderstorms in the midwestern United States. These images were taken on Nov. 27, 2000, at a resolution of 192 kilometers (119 miles) per pixel. They have been contrast-enhanced to highlight features in the atmosphere.The top panel of the four-panel frame is an image taken in a near-infrared wavelength at which the gases in Jupiter's atmosphere are relatively non-absorbing. Sunlight can penetrate deeply into the atmosphere at this wavelength and be reflected back out, providing a view of an underlying region of the atmosphere, the lower troposphere.The second panel was taken in the blue portion of wavelengths detected by the human eye. At these wavelengths, gases in the atmosphere scatter a modest amount of sunlight, so the clouds we see tend to be at somewhat higher altitudes than in the top panel.The third panel shows near-infrared reflected sunlight at a wavelength where the gas methane, an important constituent of Jupiter's atmosphere, absorbs strongly. Dark places are regions without high-level clouds and consequently large amounts of methane accessible to sunlight. Bright regions are locations with high clouds in the upper troposphere shielding the methane below.The bottom panel was taken in the ultraviolet. At these very short wavelengths, the clear atmosphere scatters sunlight, and hazes in the stratosphere, above the troposphere, absorb sunlight. That

  9. Discovering the Nature of Comets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, Fred L.

    1986-01-01

    "The Mystery of Comets" by Dr. Fred Whipple provides an introduction to the modern picture of comets and his personal reminiscences of how his model of comets came to be. An adaptation of several sections of the book is presented. (JN)

  10. Look--It's a Comet!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Kay

    1997-01-01

    Describes a classroom lesson on comets that uses modeling and guided imagery to spark students' curiosity. Comet models are built using chunks of rock salt, polystyrene balls, and tinsel. Abstract ideas are made more concrete with a guided imagery story called Comet Ride! Includes an introduction to the use of parallax to measure the distance of…

  11. Lingering grains of truth around comet 17P/HOLMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, R.; Bauer, J. M.; Mainzer, A. K.; Masiero, J. R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, MS 183-427, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Kramer, E. A. [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Grav, T., E-mail: Rachel.A.Stevenson@jpl.nasa.gov [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 East Fort Lowell, Suite 106, Tucson, AZ 85719-2395 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Comet 17P/Holmes underwent a massive outburst in 2007 October, brightening by a factor of almost a million in under 48 hr. We used infrared images taken by the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer mission to characterize the comet as it appeared at a heliocentric distance of 5.1 AU almost 3 yr after the outburst. The comet appeared to be active with a coma and dust trail along the orbital plane. We constrained the diameter, albedo, and beaming parameter of the nucleus to 4.135 ± 0.610 km, 0.03 ± 0.01, and 1.03 ± 0.21, respectively. The properties of the nucleus are consistent with those of other Jupiter family comets. The best-fit temperature of the coma was 134 ± 11 K, slightly higher than the blackbody temperature at that heliocentric distance. Using Finson-Probstein modeling, we found that the morphology of the trail was consistent with ejection during the 2007 outburst and was made up of dust grains between 250 μm and a few cm in radius. The trail mass was ∼1.2-5.3 × 10{sup 10} kg.

  12. Shoemaker-Levy 9/JUPITER Collision Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    There are many signs that the upcoming collision between comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 and giant planet Jupiter is beginning to catch the imagination of the public. Numerous reports in the various media describe the effects expected during this unique event which according to the latest calculations will start in the evening of July 16 and end in the morning of July 22, 1994. (The times in this Press Release are given in Central European Summer Time (CEST), i.e., Universal Time (UT) + 2 hours. The corresponding local time in Chile is CEST - 6 hours.) Astronomers all over the world are now preparing to observe the associated phenomena with virtually all major telescopes. There will be no less than 12 different investigations at the ESO La Silla observatory during this period. This Press Release updates the information published in ESO PR 02/94 (27 January 1994) and provides details about the special services which will be provided by ESO to the media around this rare astronomical event. SCIENTIFIC EXPECTATIONS The nucleus of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 broke into many smaller pieces during a near passage of Jupiter in July 1992. They are now moving in parallel orbits around this planet and recent calculations show with close to 100 % certainty that they will all collide with it, just two months from now. At some time, more than 20 individual nuclei were observed. This Press Release is accompanied by a photo that shows this formation, the famous "string of pearls", as it looked like in early May 1994. Both Jupiter and these nuclei have been extensively observed during the past months. A large, coordinated observing programme at La Silla has been active since early April and the first results have become available. However, while we now possess more accurate information about the comet's motion and the times of impact, there is still great uncertainty about the effects which may actually be observed at the time of the impacts. This is first of all due to the fact that it has not

  13. Comet LINEAR Splits Further

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    Third Nucleus Observed with the VLT Summary New images from the VLT show that one of the two nuclei of Comet LINEAR (C/2001 A2), now about 100 million km from the Earth, has just split into at least two pieces . The three fragments are now moving through space in nearly parallel orbits while they slowly drift apart. This comet will pass through its perihelion (nearest point to the Sun) on May 25, 2001, at a distance of about 116 million kilometres. It has brightened considerably due to the splitting of its "dirty snowball" nucleus and can now be seen with the unaided eye by observers in the southern hemisphere as a faint object in the southern constellation of Lepus (The Hare). PR Photo 18a/01 : Three nuclei of Comet LINEAR . PR Photo 18b/01 : The break-up of Comet LINEAR (false-colour). Comet LINEAR splits and brightens ESO PR Photo 18a/01 ESO PR Photo 18a/01 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 438 pix - 55k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 875 pix - 136k] ESO PR Photo 18b/01 ESO PR Photo 18b/01 [Preview - JPEG: 367 x 400 pix - 112k] [Normal - JPEG: 734 x 800 pix - 272k] Caption : ESO PR Photo 18a/01 shows the three nuclei of Comet LINEAR (C/2001 A2). It is a reproduction of a 1-min exposure in red light, obtained in the early evening of May 16, 2001, with the 8.2-m VLT YEPUN (UT4) telescope at Paranal. ESO PR Photo 18b/01 shows the same image, but in a false-colour rendering for more clarity. The cometary fragment "B" (right) has split into "B1" and "B2" (separation about 1 arcsec, or 500 km) while fragment "A" (upper left) is considerably fainter. Technical information about these photos is available below. Comet LINEAR was discovered on January 3, 2001, and designated by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) as C/2001 A2 (see IAU Circular 7564 [1]). Six weeks ago, it was suddenly observed to brighten (IAUC 7605 [1]). Amateurs all over the world saw the comparatively faint comet reaching naked-eye magnitude and soon thereafter, observations with professional telescopes indicated

  14. Development of Sample Handling and Analytical Expertise For the Stardust Comet Sample Return

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, J; Bajt, S; Brennan, S; Graham, G; Grant, P; Hutcheon, I; Ishii, H; Pianetta, P; Toppani, A; Westphal, A

    2006-02-09

    NASA's Stardust mission returned to Earth in January 2006 with ''fresh'' cometary particles from a young Jupiter family comet. The cometary particles were sampled during the spacecraft flyby of comet 81P/Wild-2 in January 2004, when they impacted low-density silica aerogel tiles and aluminum foils on the sample tray assembly at approximately 6.1 km/s. This LDRD project has developed extraction and sample recovery methodologies to maximize the scientific information that can be obtained from the analysis of natural and man-made nano-materials of relevance to the LLNL programs.

  15. I. T. - R. O. C. K. S. Comet Nuclei Sample Return Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalcher, N.

    2009-04-01

    Ices, organics and minerals recording the chemical evolution of the outer regions of the early solar nebula are the main constituents of comets. Because comets maintain the nearly pristine nature of the cloud where they formed, the analyses of their composition, structure, thermodynamics and isotope ratios will increase our understanding of the processes that occurred in the early phases of the solar system as well as the Interstellar Medium (ISM) Cloud that predated the formation of the solar nebula [1]. While the deep impact mission aimed at determining the internal structure of comet Temple1's nuclei [e.g. 3], the stardust mission sample return has dramatically increased our understanding of comets. Its first implications indicated that some of the comet material originated in the inner solar system and was later transported outward beyond the freezing line [4]. A wide range of organic compounds identified within different grains of the aerogel collectors has demonstrated the heterogeneity in their assemblages [5]. This suggests either many histories associated with these material or possibly analytical constraints imposed by capture heating of Wild2 material in silica aerogel. The current mission ROSETTA, will further expand our knowledge about comets considerably through rigorous in situ analyses of a Jupiter Family Comet (JFC). As the next generation of comet research post ROSETTA, we present the comet nuclei sample return mission IT - ROCKS (International Team - Return Of Comet's Key Samples) to return several minimally altered samples from various locations of comet 88P/Howell, a typical JFC. The mission scenario includes remote sensing of the comet's nucleus with onboard instruments similar to the ROSETTA instruments [6, 7, 8] (VIS, IR, Thermal IR, X-Ray, Radar) and gas/dust composition measurements including a plasma science package. Additionally two microprobes [9] will further investigate the physical properties of the comet's surface. Retrieving of the

  16. Jupiter Clouds in Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 619 nm [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 727 nm [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 890 nmImages from NASA's Cassini spacecraft using three different filters reveal cloud structures and movements at different depths in the atmosphere around Jupiter's south pole.Cassini's cameras come equipped with filters that sample three wavelengths where methane gas absorbs light. These are in the red at 619 nanometer (nm) wavelength and in the near-infrared at 727 nm and 890 nm. Absorption in the 619 nm filter is weak. It is stronger in the 727 nm band and very strong in the 890 nm band where 90 percent of the light is absorbed by methane gas. Light in the weakest band can penetrate the deepest into Jupiter's atmosphere. It is sensitive to the amount of cloud and haze down to the pressure of the water cloud, which lies at a depth where pressure is about 6 times the atmospheric pressure at sea level on the Earth). Light in the strongest methane band is absorbed at high altitude and is sensitive only to the ammonia cloud level and higher (pressures less than about one-half of Earth's atmospheric pressure) and the middle methane band is sensitive to the ammonia and ammonium hydrosulfide cloud layers as deep as two times Earth's atmospheric pressure.The images shown here demonstrate the power of these filters in studies of cloud stratigraphy. The images cover latitudes from about 15 degrees north at the top down to the southern polar region at the bottom. The left and middle images are ratios, the image in the methane filter divided by the image at a nearby wavelength outside the methane band. Using ratios emphasizes where contrast is due to methane absorption and not to other factors, such as the absorptive properties of the cloud particles, which influence contrast at all wavelengths.The most prominent feature seen in all three filters is the polar stratospheric haze that makes Jupiter bright near the pole

  17. Death of a comet

    CERN Multimedia

    Hawkes, N

    2000-01-01

    The comet Linear dissolved as it made its closest approach to the sun on July 25th. The first stages of its breakup had been witnessed by the Hubble telescope when it threw off a piece of its crust (3 paragraphs).

  18. DIRBE Comet Trails

    CERN Document Server

    Arendt, Richard G

    2014-01-01

    Re-examination of the COBE DIRBE data reveals the thermal emission of several comet dust trails. The dust trails of 1P/Halley, 169P/NEAT, and 3200 Phaethon have not been previously reported. The known trails of 2P/Encke, and 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 are also seen. The dust trails have 12 and 25 micron surface brightnesses of <0.1 and <0.15 MJy/sr, respectively, which is <1% of the zodiacal light intensity. The trails are very difficult to see in any single daily image of the sky, but are evident as rapidly moving linear features in movies of the DIRBE data. Some trails are clearest when crossing through the orbital plane of the parent comet, but others are best seen at high ecliptic latitudes as the Earth passes over or under the dust trail. All these comets have known associations with meteor showers. This re-examination also reveals one additional comet and 13 additional asteroids that had not previously been recognized in the DIRBE data.

  19. Comets in Indian Scriptures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Gupta, P.

    2016-01-01

    The Indo-Aryans of ancient India observed stars and constellations for ascertaining auspicious times in order to conduct sacrificial rites ordained by the Vedas. Naturally, they would have sighted comets and referred to them in the Vedic texts. In Rigveda (circa 1700-1500 BC) and Atharvaveda (circa 1150 BC), there are references to dhumaketus and ketus, which stand for comets in Sanskrit. Rigveda speaks of a fig tree whose aerial roots spread out in the sky (Parpola 2010). Had this imagery been inspired by the resemblance of a comet's tail with long and linear roots of a banyan tree (ficus benghalensis)? Varahamihira (AD 550) and Ballal Sena (circa AD 1100-1200) described a large number of comets recorded by ancient seers, such as Parashara, Vriddha Garga, Narada, and Garga, to name a few. In this article, we propose that an episode in Mahabharata in which a radiant king, Nahusha, who rules the heavens and later turns into a serpent after he kicked the seer Agastya (also the star Canopus), is a mythological retelling of a cometary event.

  20. DRBE comet trails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arendt, Richard G., E-mail: Richard.G.Arendt@nasa.gov [CREST/UMBC, Code 665, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Re-examination of the Cosmic Background Explorer Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) data reveals the thermal emission of several comet dust trails. The dust trails of 1P/Halley, 169P/NEAT, and 3200 Phaethon have not been previously reported. The known trails of 2P/Encke and 73P/Schwassmann–Wachmann 3 are also seen. The dust trails have 12 and 25 μm surface brightnesses of <0.1 and <0.15 MJy sr{sup −1}, respectively, which is <1% of the zodiacal light intensity. The trails are very difficult to see in any single daily image of the sky, but are evident as rapidly moving linear features in movies of the DIRBE data. Some trails are clearest when crossing through the orbital plane of the parent comet, but others are best seen at high ecliptic latitudes as the Earth passes over or under the dust trail. All these comets have known associations with meteor showers. This re-examination also reveals 1 additional comet and 13 additional asteroids that had not previously been recognized in the DIRBE data.

  1. Asteroids, meteorites, and comets

    CERN Document Server

    Elkins-Tanton, Linda T

    2010-01-01

    Asteroids, Comets, and Meteorites provides students, researchers, and general readers with the most up-to-date information on this fascinating field. From the days of the dinosaurs to our modern environment, this book explores all aspects of these cosmic invaders.

  2. The Composition of Comets

    CERN Document Server

    Cochran, Anita L; Cordiner, Martin; Hadamcik, Edith; Lasue, Jeremie; Gicquel, Adeline; Schleicher, David G; Charnley, Steven B; Mumma, Michael J; Paganini, Lucas; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Biver, Nicolas; Kuan, Yi-Jehng

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the result of the International Cometary Workshop, held in Toulouse, France in April 2014, where the participants came together to assess our knowledge of comets prior to the ESA Rosetta Mission. In this paper, we look at the composition of the gas and dust from the comae of comets. With the gas, we cover the various taxonomic studies that have broken comets into groups and compare what is seen at all wavelengths. We also discuss what has been learned from mass spectrometers during flybys. A few caveats for our interpretation are discussed. With dust, much of our information comes from flybys. They include {\\it in situ} analyses as well as samples returned to Earth for laboratory measurements. Remote sensing IR observations and polarimetry are also discussed. For both gas and dust, we discuss what instruments the Rosetta spacecraft and Philae lander will bring to bear to improve our understanding of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as "ground-truth" for our previous comprehensive studies. Finally...

  3. A Search of Reactivated Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Quan-Zhi

    2017-05-01

    Dormant or near-dormant short-period comets can unexpectedly regain the ability to eject dust. In many known cases, the resurrection is short-lived and lasts less than one orbit. However, it is possible that some resurrected comets can remain active in later perihelion passages. We search the archival images of various facilities to look for these “reactivated” comets. We identify two candidates, 297P/Beshore and 332P/Ikeya-Murakami, both of which were found to be inactive or weakly active in the previous orbit before their discovery. We derive a reactivation rate of ˜ 0.007 {{comet}}-1 {{orbit}}-1, which implies that typical short-period comets only become temporarily dormant a few times or less. Smaller comets are prone to rotational instability and may undergo temporary dormancy more frequently. Next generation high-cadence surveys may find more reactivation events of these comets.

  4. Jupiter Eruptions Captured in Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for high resolution image of Nature Cover Detailed analysis of two continent-sized storms that erupted in Jupiter's atmosphere in March 2007 shows that Jupiter's internal heat plays a significant role in generating atmospheric disturbances. Understanding these outbreaks could be the key to unlock the mysteries buried in the deep Jovian atmosphere, say astronomers. This infrared image shows two bright plume eruptions obtained by the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on April 5, 2007. Understanding these phenomena is important for Earth's meteorology where storms are present everywhere and jet streams dominate the atmospheric circulation. Jupiter is a natural laboratory where atmospheric scientists study the nature and interplay of the intense jets and severe atmospheric phenomena. According to the analysis, the bright plumes were storm systems triggered in Jupiter's deep water clouds that moved upward in the atmosphere vigorously and injected a fresh mixture of ammonia ice and water about 20 miles (30 kilometers) above the visible clouds. The storms moved in the peak of a jet stream in Jupiter's atmosphere at 375 miles per hour (600 kilometers per hour). Models of the disturbance indicate that the jet stream extends deep in the buried atmosphere of Jupiter, more than 60 miles (approximately100 kilometers) below the cloud tops where most sunlight is absorbed.

  5. Japanese mission plan for Jupiter system: The Jupiter magnetospheric orbiter and the Trojan asteroid explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, S.; Fujimoto, M.; Yano, H.; Takashima, T.; Kasaba, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Kimura, J.; Funase, R.; Mori, O.; Tsuda, Y.; Campagnola, S.; Kawakatsu, Y.

    2011-10-01

    In the future Jupiter system study, Coordinated observation of Jovian magnetosphere is one of the important targets of the mission in addition to icy satellites, atmosphere, and interior of Jupiter. JAXA will take a role on the magnetosphere spinner JMO (Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter), in addition to JGO (Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter) by ESA and JEO (Jupiter Europa Orbiter) by NASA. We will combine JMO with a proposed solar sail mission of JAXA for Jupiter and one of Trojan asteroids. Since Trojan asteroids could be representing raw solid materials of Jupiter or at least outer solar system bodies, involvement of Trojan observation should enhance the quality of Jupiter system exploration.

  6. Invariant Manifolds and the Transport and Capture of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Travis; Lo, Martin W.

    2017-06-01

    Poincaré stated that “periodic orbits” are the only means by which we can understand the dynamics of differential equations. The objects he really meant are the “invariant manifolds of periodic orbits” which he discovered. It was the intersection of invariant manifolds that led to his discovery of homoclinic orbits and deterministic chaos in his celebrated work on the 3 body problem. Koon, Lo, Marsden, Ross 2000 explained the theory of how invariant manifolds of periodic orbits around the L1 and L2 Lagrange points control the transport of small bodies between the 2:3 resonance outside of Jupiter’s orbit to the 3:2 resonance inside of Jupiter’s orbit. This resonance transition is exhibited by many members of the Jupiter Family of comets as shown by Howell, Marchand, and Lo 2001 computed in the JPL ephemeris model. These comets include Gehrels 3, Helin-Roman-Crockett, Oterma, and others. We present some recent work on the role of invariant manifolds for the capture and impact of comet Shoemaker-Levy9 (SL9). The comet underwent resonance transition in the Sun-Saturn three-body problem until it was captured by invariant manifolds of the Sun-Jupiter three-body problem. We show how these manifolds guided SL9 towards Jupiter and through the periodic orbits which act as gateways to Jupiter and the inner solar system. We demonstrate that invariant manifolds controlled the dynamics of capture, ultimately leading to the impact of SL9 in 1994.

  7. Jupiter's moon Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows a special color reconstruction of one of the erupting volcanos on Io discovered by Voyager 1 during its encounter with Jupiter on the 4th and 5th of March. The picture was taken March 4 about 5:00 p.m. from a range of about half a million kilometers showing an eruption region on the horizon. This method of color analysis allows scientists to combine data from four pictures, taken in ultraviolet, blue, green and orange light. In this picture one can see the strong change in color of the erupting plume. The region that is brighter in ultraviolet light (blue in this image) is much more extensive than the denser, bright yellow region near the center of the eruption. Scientists will use data of this type to study the amount of gas and dust in the eruption and the size of dust particles. Preliminary analysis suggests that the bright ultraviolet part of the cloud may be due to scattered light from very fine particles (the same effect which makes smoke appear bluish).

  8. Jupiter's Hot, Mushy Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Jupiter's moon Io is the most volcanically active body in the Solar System. Observations by instruments on the Galileo spacecraft and on telescopes atop Mauna Kea in Hawai'i indicate that lava flows on Io are surprisingly hot, over 1200 oC and possibly as much as 1300 oC; a few areas might have lava flows as hot as 1500 oC. Such high temperatures imply that the lava flows are composed of rock that formed by a very large amount of melting of Io's mantle. This has led Laszlo Keszthelyi and Alfred S. McEwen of the University of Arizona and me to reawaken an old hypothesis that suggests that the interior of Io is a partially-molten mush of crystals and magma. The idea, which had fallen out of favor for a decade or two, explains high-temperature hot spots, mountains, calderas, and volcanic plains on Io. If correct, Io gives us an opportunity to study processes that operate in huge, global magma systems, which scientists believe were important during the early history of the Moon and Earth, and possibly other planetary bodies as well. Though far from proven, the idea that Io has a ocean of mushy magma beneath its crust can be tested with measurements by future spacecraft.

  9. RACE pulls for shared control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, M. B., Jr.; Cassiday, B. K.

    1993-02-01

    Maintaining and supporting an aircraft fleet, in a climate of reduced manpower and financial resources, dictates effective utilization of robotics and automation technologies. To help develop a winning robotics and automation program the Air Force Logistics Command created the Robotics and Automation Center of Excellence (RACE). RACE is a command wide focal point. Race is an organic source of expertise to assist the Air Logistic Center (ALC) product directorates in improving process productivity through the judicious insertion of robotics and automation technologies. RACE is a champion for pulling emerging technologies into the aircraft logistic centers. One of those technology pulls is shared control. Small batch sizes, feature uncertainty, and varying work load conspire to make classic industrial robotic solutions impractical. One can view ALC process problems in the context of space robotics without the time delay. The ALC's will benefit greatly from the implementation of a common architecture that supports a range of control actions from fully autonomous to teleoperated. Working with national laboratories and private industry, we hope to transition shared control technology to the depot floor. This paper provides an overview of the RACE internal initiatives and customer support, with particular emphasis on production processes that will benefit from shared control technology.

  10. 67P, Singing Comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Ekaterina

    2017-04-01

    I would like to propose to present a short science-art-music collaboration film called "67P, Singing Comet" (5:27 min). If time of the session will allow, prior to the film I would like to make a slide show introduction to this project, highlighting the inspiration - the mission Rosetta by the European Space Agency (ESA) - and the artistic collaboration that took place in creating this piece. 
 Inspired by the ESA Rosetta mission to the comet 67P, Ekaterina Smirnova (artist and project director, New York), Lee Mottram (clarinetist, Wales), Takuto Fukuda (composer, Japan) and Brian Hekker (video editor, New York) collaborated to create a unique atmospheric piece.
 Water and the origins of life throughout the Universe (specifically the Earth) is an element of the mission and the focus of Ekaterina's artistic vision. Ekaterina literally and figuratively paints a sensory assemblage using a combination of synthetic and natural elements to shape this artistic creation. To paint her watercolor works she is using a replica of the water found on the comet and implementing her own heartbeat into the music to create a recognizable inward sound of life.
 The Electro-Acoustic composition by Takuto Fukuda features an electronically manipulated performance by clarinetist Lee Mottram. The piece ceremoniously begins with reverberant bursts of low-register atonal bells transporting the listener to their ethereal inner origins of body and mind. The imagination takes the experience to an unknown destination as it gains speed gliding through the visual and audible textures of space and time. 
The comet's water similarly reacts with an ebb and flow thawing ice to potentially give life a chance as it is thrust along an orbit around the Sun. Near then far from the heat the comet forms frozen particles from vapors as it reaches it's furthest stretches creating an aerodynamic tail of icicles that slowly dissipate in a cycle that repeats itself until the comet's ultimate collision

  11. Station Program Note Pull Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Upon commencement of my internship, I was in charge of maintaining the CoFR (Certificate of Flight Readiness) Tool. The tool acquires data from existing Excel workbooks on NASA's and Boeing's databases to create a new spreadsheet listing out all the potential safety concerns for upcoming flights and software transitions. Since the application was written in Visual Basic, I had to learn a new programming language and prepare to handle any malfunctions within the program. Shortly afterwards, I was given the assignment to automate the Station Program Note (SPN) Pull process. I developed an application, in Python, that generated a GUI (Graphical User Interface) that will be used by the International Space Station Safety & Mission Assurance team here at Johnson Space Center. The application will allow its users to download online files with the click of a button, import SPN's based on three different pulls, instantly manipulate and filter spreadsheets, and compare the three sources to determine which active SPN's (Station Program Notes) must be reviewed for any upcoming flights, missions, and/or software transitions. Initially, to perform the NASA SPN pull (one of three), I had created the program to allow the user to login to a secure webpage that stores data, input specific parameters, and retrieve the desired SPN's based on their inputs. However, to avoid any conflicts with sustainment, I altered it so that the user may login and download the NASA file independently. After the user has downloaded the file with the click of a button, I defined the program to check for any outdated or pre-existing files, for successful downloads, to acquire the spreadsheet, convert it from a text file to a comma separated file and finally into an Excel spreadsheet to be filtered and later scrutinized for specific SPN numbers. Once this file has been automatically manipulated to provide only the SPN numbers that are desired, they are stored in a global variable, shown on the GUI, and

  12. Molecular junctions: can pulling influence optical controllability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Shane M; Smeu, Manuel; Franco, Ignacio; Ratner, Mark A; Seideman, Tamar

    2014-08-13

    We suggest the combination of single molecule pulling and optical control as a way to enhance control over the electron transport characteristics of a molecular junction. We demonstrate using a model junction consisting of biphenyl-dithiol coupled to gold contacts. The junction is pulled while optically manipulating the dihedral angle between the two rings. Quantum dynamics simulations show that molecular pulling enhances the degree of control over the dihedral angle and hence over the transport properties.

  13. Tycho Brahe, Abū Macshar, and the comet beyond Venus (ninth century A.D.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhäuser, Ralph; Kunitzsch, Paul; Mugrauer, Markus; Luge, Daniela; van Gent, Rob

    2016-05-01

    From his observations of the A.D. 1572 super-nova and the A.D. 1577 comet, Tycho Brahe concluded that such transient celestial objects are outside the Earth's atmosphere, and he quoted the 9th century A.D. Persian astrologer and astronomer Abu Mashar: Dixit Albumasar, Cometa supra Venerem visus fuit, i.e. that he had reported much earlier that comets were seen beyond Venus. However, even from a more detailed Latin translation, the observations and logic behind Abu Mashar's conclusion were not understandable. We present here the original Arabic text (MS Ankara, Saib 199) together with our translation and interpretation: Abu Mashar reported that he had observed Venus in (or projected onto) the tail of a comet and concluded that the comet was behind Venus, because he had observed the extinction of Venus due to the cometary tail to be negligible (light of Venus was unimpaired). He then concluded that the comet would be located behind Venus. He also mentioned that others had observed Jupiter and Saturn in cometary tails, so that those comets would even be located beyond those two outer planets - in the sphere of the stars. The dates of the observed close conjunctions were not mentioned; using known orbital elements for a few comets, we found a few close conjunctions between comets and planets from A.D. 770 to 868, but we cannot be sure regarding which conjunctions were reported. While the argument of Abu Mashar is not correct (as cometary tails are optically thin), parts of the conclusion - namely that comets are outside the Earth atmosphere and beyond the moon - is correct. This may have helped Tycho Brahe to come to his revolutionary conclusion.

  14. Comets and their origin the tools to decipher a comet

    CERN Document Server

    Meierhenrich, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Divided into two parts, the first four chapters of Comets and their Origin refer to comets and their formation in general, describing cometary missions, comet remote observations, astrochemistry, artificial comets, and the chirality phenomenon.The second part covers the cometary Rosetta mission, its launch, journey, scientific objectives, and instrumentations, as well as the landing scenario on a cometary nucleus. Along the way, the author presents general questions concerning the origin of terrestrial water and the molecular beginnings of lifeon Earth, as well as how the instruments used on

  15. CINE: Comet INfrared Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Val-Borro, Miguel; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2017-08-01

    CINE calculates infrared pumping efficiencies that can be applied to the most common molecules found in cometary comae such as water, hydrogen cyanide or methanol. One of the main mechanisms for molecular excitation in comets is the fluorescence by the solar radiation followed by radiative decay to the ground vibrational state. This command-line tool calculates the effective pumping rates for rotational levels in the ground vibrational state scaled by the heliocentric distance of the comet. Fluorescence coefficients are useful for modeling rotational emission lines observed in cometary spectra at sub-millimeter wavelengths. Combined with computational methods to solve the radiative transfer equations based, e.g., on the Monte Carlo algorithm, this model can retrieve production rates and rotational temperatures from the observed emission spectrum.

  16. Comets at radio wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Crovisier, Jacques; Colom, Pierre; Biver, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Comets are considered as the most primitive objects in the Solar System. Their composition provides information on the composition of the primitive solar nebula, 4.6 Gyr ago. The radio domain is a privileged tool to study the composition of cometary ices. Observations of the OH radical at 18 cm wavelength allow us to measure the water production rate. A wealth of molecules (and some of their isotopologues) coming from the sublimation of ices in the nucleus have been identified by observations in the millimetre and submillimetre domains. We present an historical review on radio observations of comets, focusing on the results from our group, and including recent observations with the Nan\\c{c}ay radio telescope, the IRAM antennas, the Odin satellite, the Herschel space observatory, ALMA, and the MIRO instrument aboard the Rosetta space probe.

  17. Chemistry of comets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delsemme, A.H.

    1988-07-29

    In comets, most elements seem to be present in their cosmic abundances. This includes the metals whose abundances are the same as in chondrites, but also the light elements C, N, O, S that are the same as in the Sun; only hydrogen (and presumably helium and neon) is depleted by a factor close to 1000. In the bright comets of the 1970s, three-quarters of the cosmic abundance of carbon was found to be missing from the gaseous fraction. The missing carbon has now been found in Comet Halley: it was in the large organic fraction representing 33% of the cometary dust. A part of this fraction vaporizes slowly out of the dust grains: it is the origin of an extended source of gas discovered around the nucleus of Comet Halley. Water remains the major constituent being 80% of the volatile ices. Formic acid, formaldehyde, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide explain together more than 13% of the rest of the volatiles. The last 7% include the parent molecules of the radicals excited by fluorescence and observed in the traditional spectra, like hydrogen cyanide HCN (for CN), probably acetylene C/sub 2/C/sub 2/ (for C/sub 2/) and cyclopropadiene C/sub 3/H/sub 2/ (for C/sub 3/). The inorganic fraction of the dust contains mainly silicates and some iron sulphide, whereas the organic fraction also contains unsaturated hydrocarbons and probably hydrogen cyanide, acetonitrile, aminoethylene, pyrrole, pyridine, pyrimidine and possibly purines including adenine. Some prebiotic precursors of the nucleic bases are present, but no traces of any amino acids have been found.

  18. Types of Hot Jupiter Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisikalo, Dmitry V.; Kaygorodov, Pavel V.; Ionov, Dmitry E.; Shematovich, Valery I.

    Hot Jupiters, i.e. exoplanet gas giants, having masses comparable to the mass of Jupiter and semimajor axes shorter than 0.1 AU, are a unique class of objects. Since they are so close to the host stars, their atmospheres form and evolve under the action of very active gas dynamical processes caused by the gravitational field and irradiation of the host star. As a matter of fact, the atmospheres of several of these planets fill their Roche lobes , which results in a powerful outflow of material from the planet towards the host star. The energy budget of this process is so important that it almost solely governs the evolution of hot Jupiters gaseous envelopes. Based on the years of experience in the simulations of gas dynamics in mass-exchanging close binary stars, we have investigated specific features of hot Jupiters atmospheres. The analytical estimates and results of 3D numerical simulations, discussed in this Chapter, show that the gaseous envelopes around hot Jupiters may be significantly non-spherical and, at the same time, stationary and long-lived. These results are of fundamental importance for the interpretation of observational data.

  19. Jupiter and Saturn Rotation Periods

    CERN Document Server

    Helled, Ravit; Anderson, John D

    2009-01-01

    Anderson & Schubert (2007, Science,317,1384) proposed that Saturn's rotation period can be ascertained by minimizing the dynamic heights of the 100 mbar isosurface with respect to the geoid; they derived a rotation period of 10h 32m 35s. We investigate the same approach for Jupiter to see if the Jovian rotation period is predicted by minimizing the dynamical heights of its isobaric (1 bar pressure level) surface using zonal wind data. A rotation period of 9h 54m 29s is found. Further, we investigate the minimization method by fitting Pioneer and Voyager occultation radii for both Jupiter and Saturn. Rotation periods of 9h 55m 30s and 10h 32m 35s are found to minimize the dynamical heights for Jupiter and Saturn, respectively. Though there is no dynamical principle requiring the minimization of the dynamical heights of an isobaric surface, the successful application of the method to Jupiter lends support to its relevance for Saturn. We derive Jupiter and Saturn rotation periods using equilibrium theory in ...

  20. Dormant comets among the near-Earth object population: a meteor-based survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Quan-Zhi; Brown, Peter G.; Pokorný, Petr

    2016-11-01

    Dormant comets in the near-Earth object (NEO) population are thought to be involved in the terrestrial accretion of water and organic materials. Identification of dormant comets is difficult as they are observationally indistinguishable from their asteroidal counterparts, however, they may have produced dust during their final active stages which potentially are detectable today as weak meteor showers at the Earth. Here we present the result of a reconnaissance survey looking for dormant comets using 13 567 542 meteor orbits measured by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR). We simulate the dynamical evolution of the hypothetical meteoroid streams originated from 407 near-Earth asteroids in cometary orbits that resemble orbital characteristics of Jupiter-family comets (JFCs). Out of the 44 hypothetical showers that are predicted to be detectable by CMOR, we identify five positive detections that are statistically unlikely to be chance associations, including three previously known associations. This translates to a lower limit to the dormant comet fraction of 2.0 ± 1.7 per cent in the NEO population and a dormancy rate of ˜10-5 yr-1 per comet. The low dormancy rate confirms disruption and dynamical removal as the dominant end state for near-Earth JFCs. We also predict the existence of a significant number of meteoroid streams whose parents have already been disrupted or dynamically removed.

  1. An Introduction to Comets and Their Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Robert D.; Brandt, John C.

    1985-01-01

    Presents excerpts from "The Comet Book," a nontechnical primer on comets. Various topics discusses in these excerpts include such basic information about comets as their components, paths, and origins. (DH)

  2. PAHs in Comets: An Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Aigen

    2008-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, ubiquitously seen in the interstellar medium (ISM) of our own and external galaxies, might have been incorporated into comets if they are formed from relatively unprocessed interstellar matter. The detection of PAHs in comets would be an important link between the ISM and comets. This review compiles our current knowledge on cometary PAHs, based on ground-based and space-borne observations of infrared vibrational and ultraviolet fluorescence spectra of comets, and laboratory analysis of interplanetary dust particles possibly of cometary origin and cometary samples returned to Earth by the Stardust spacecraft. The latter provided the most unambiguous evidence for the presence of PAHs in cometary nuclei.

  3. The TRAPPIST comet survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehin, E.; Opitom, C.; Manfroid, J.; Hutsemékers, D.; Gillon, M.

    2014-07-01

    TRAPPIST (TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope) is a 60-cm robotic telescope that has been installed in June 2010 at the ESO La Silla Observatory [1]. Operated from Liège (Belgium) it is devoted to the detection and characterisation of exoplanets and to the study of comets and other small bodies in the Solar System. We describe here the hardware and the goals of the project and give an overview of the comet production rates monitoring after three years of operations. The telescope and observatory --- TRAPPIST's optical tube unit is a Ritchey-Chretien 0.6 meter telescope with a focal length of 4.8 meter. It is associated with a German equatorial mount that is, thanks to its direct drive system, extremely fast (up to 50 deg/s), accurate (tracking accuracy without autoguider better than 2'' in 10 min), and free of periodic error. The instrument is a Peltier cooled commercial camera equipped with a Fairchild 3041 back-illuminated 2k×2k chip. The pixel scale is 0.64''/pixel. Three read-out modes are available, the shortest read-out time being 2s. The total field of view of the camera is 22'×22'. It is associated to a custom-made dual filter wheel. One of the filter wheel contains broad band filters (Johnson B, V, R, Cousins Ic, Sloan z, and a special I+z filter), while the other contains the narrow-band NASA HB cometary filters (OH, NH, CN, CO+, C3, and C2 gaseous species; UC, BC, GC and RC solar continuum windows and a NaI D filter) [2]. The telescope is protected by a 5 meter diameter dome that was totally refurbished and automatized. The observatory is fully robotic and equipped with a weather station, an UPS and webcams. The la Silla site is excellent with more than 300 clear nights per year and the telescope has proven to be very reliable with a small amount of technical downtime. Comet monitoring --- For relatively bright comets (V alert is given and can bring important information on the nature of comets. In addition to providing the

  4. High Resolution 3D Radar Imaging of Comet Interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asphaug, E. I.; Gim, Y.; Belton, M.; Brophy, J.; Weissman, P. R.; Heggy, E.

    2012-12-01

    Knowing the interiors of comets and other primitive bodies is fundamental to our understanding of how planets formed. We have developed a Discovery-class mission formulation, Comet Radar Explorer (CORE), based on the use of previously flown planetary radar sounding techniques, with the goal of obtaining high resolution 3D images of the interior of a small primitive body. We focus on the Jupiter-Family Comets (JFCs) as these are among the most primitive bodies reachable by spacecraft. Scattered in from far beyond Neptune, they are ultimate targets of a cryogenic sample return mission according to the Decadal Survey. Other suitable targets include primitive NEOs, Main Belt Comets, and Jupiter Trojans. The approach is optimal for small icy bodies ~3-20 km diameter with spin periods faster than about 12 hours, since (a) navigation is relatively easy, (b) radar penetration is global for decameter wavelengths, and (c) repeated overlapping ground tracks are obtained. The science mission can be as short as ~1 month for a fast-rotating JFC. Bodies smaller than ~1 km can be globally imaged, but the navigation solutions are less accurate and the relative resolution is coarse. Larger comets are more interesting, but radar signal is unlikely to be reflected from depths greater than ~10 km. So, JFCs are excellent targets for a variety of reasons. We furthermore focus on the use of Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) to rendezvous shortly after the comet's perihelion. This approach leaves us with ample power for science operations under dormant conditions beyond ~2-3 AU. This leads to a natural mission approach of distant observation, followed by closer inspection, terminated by a dedicated radar mapping orbit. Radar reflections are obtained from a polar orbit about the icy nucleus, which spins underneath. Echoes are obtained from a sounder operating at dual frequencies 5 and 15 MHz, with 1 and 10 MHz bandwidths respectively. The dense network of echoes is used to obtain global 3D

  5. Main-Belt Comet P/2008 R1 (Garradd)

    CERN Document Server

    Jewitt, David; Haghighipour, Nader

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of the newly-discovered main-belt comet P/2008 R1 (Garradd), an object with the dynamical characteristics of an asteroid and the physical characteristics of a comet. Photometry sets a limit to the effective radius of the nucleus at r_e < 0.7 km (red geometric albedo 0.05 assumed). The coma shows a secular fading in our data caused by the escape of dust particles from the near-nucleus environment. The optical reflection spectrum is a nearly neutral continuum devoid of gaseous emission lines, from which we derive a limit to the cyanide (CN) radical production rate of Q_CN <1.4e23/s and infer a mass loss rate <1.5 kg/s at the time of our observations. Unlike the first-reported main-belt comets, P/2008 R1 is not dynamically stable. The nearby 8:3 mean-motion resonance with Jupiter induces dynamical instability on timescales 20 to 30 Myr. Hence, we conclude that P/2008 R1 has recently arrived from a more stable source elsewhere. The high Tisserand parameter of the orbit (in fact, with T...

  6. The Europa Jupiter System Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, A. R.; Clark, K.; Erd, C.; Pappalardo, R.; Greeley, R. R.; Blanc, M.; Lebreton, J.; van Houten, T.

    2009-05-01

    Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) will be an international mission that will achieve Decadal Survey and Cosmic Vision goals. NASA and ESA have concluded a joint study of a mission to Europa, Ganymede and the Jupiter system with orbiters developed by NASA and ESA; contributions by JAXA are also possible. The baseline EJSM architecture consists of two primary elements operating in the Jovian system: the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). The JEO mission has been selected by NASA as the next Flagship mission to the out solar system. JEO and JGO would execute an intricately choreographed exploration of the Jupiter System before settling into orbit around Europa and Ganymede, respectively. JEO and JGO would carry eleven and ten complementary instruments, respectively, to monitor dynamic phenomena (such as Io's volcanoes and Jupiter's atmosphere), map the Jovian magnetosphere and its interactions with the Galilean satellites, and characterize water oceans beneath the ice shells of Europa and Ganymede. EJSM will fully addresses high priority science objectives identified by the National Research Council's (NRC's) Decadal Survey and ESA's Cosmic Vision for exploration of the outer solar system. The Decadal Survey recommended a Europa Orbiter as the highest priority outer planet flagship mission and also identified Ganymede as a highly desirable mission target. EJSM would uniquely address several of the central themes of ESA's Cosmic Vision Programme, through its in-depth exploration of the Jupiter system and its evolution from origin to habitability. EJSM will investigate the potential habitability of the active ocean-bearing moons Europa and Ganymede, detailing the geophysical, compositional, geological and external processes that affect these icy worlds. EJSM would also explore Io and Callisto, Jupiter's atmosphere, and the Jovian magnetosphere. By understanding the Jupiter system and unraveling its history, the

  7. A retrograde co-orbital asteroid of Jupiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegert, Paul; Connors, Martin; Veillet, Christian

    2017-03-29

    Recent theoretical work in celestial mechanics has revealed that an asteroid may orbit stably in the same region as a planet, despite revolving around the Sun in the sense opposite to that of the planet itself. Asteroid 2015 BZ509 was discovered in 2015, but with too much uncertainty in its measured orbit to establish whether it was such a retrograde co-orbital body. Here we report observations and analysis that demonstrates that asteroid 2015 BZ509 is indeed a retrograde co-orbital asteroid of the planet Jupiter. We find that 2015 BZ509 has long-term stability, having been in its current, resonant state for around a million years. This is long enough to preclude precise calculation of the time or mechanism of its injection to its present state, but it may be a Halley-family comet that entered the resonance through an interaction with Saturn. Retrograde co-orbital asteroids of Jupiter and other planets may be more common than previously expected.

  8. A retrograde co-orbital asteroid of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegert, Paul; Connors, Martin; Veillet, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Recent theoretical work in celestial mechanics has revealed that an asteroid may orbit stably in the same region as a planet, despite revolving around the Sun in the sense opposite to that of the planet itself. Asteroid 2015 BZ509 was discovered in 2015, but with too much uncertainty in its measured orbit to establish whether it was such a retrograde co-orbital body. Here we report observations and analysis that demonstrates that asteroid 2015 BZ509 is indeed a retrograde co-orbital asteroid of the planet Jupiter. We find that 2015 BZ509 has long-term stability, having been in its current, resonant state for around a million years. This is long enough to preclude precise calculation of the time or mechanism of its injection to its present state, but it may be a Halley-family comet that entered the resonance through an interaction with Saturn. Retrograde co-orbital asteroids of Jupiter and other planets may be more common than previously expected.

  9. Detecting active comets with SDSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solontoi, Michael; Ivezic, Zeljko; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; West, Andrew A.; /MIT, MKI; Claire, Mark; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Juric, Mario; /Princeton U. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; Jones, Lynne; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Hall, Patrick B.; /York U., Canada; Kent, Steve; /Fermilab; Lupton, Robert H.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Quinn, Tom; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Princeton U. Observ.

    2010-12-01

    Using a sample of serendipitously discovered active comets in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we develop well-controlled selection criteria for greatly increasing the efficiency of comet identification in the SDSS catalogs. After follow-up visual inspection of images to reject remaining false positives, the total sample of SDSS comets presented here contains 19 objects, roughly one comet per 10 million other SDSS objects. The good understanding of selection effects allows a study of the population statistics, and we estimate the apparent magnitude distribution to r {approx} 18, the ecliptic latitude distribution, and the comet distribution in SDSS color space. The most surprising results are the extremely narrow range of colors for comets in our sample (e.g. root-mean-square scatter of only {approx}0.06 mag for the g-r color), and the similarity of comet colors to those of jovian Trojans. We discuss the relevance of our results for upcoming deep multi-epoch optical surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey, Pan-STARRS, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and estimate that LSST may produce a sample of about 10,000 comets over its 10-year lifetime.

  10. Super-Eccentric Migrating Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Socrates, Aristotle; Dong, Subo; Tremaine, Scott

    2011-01-01

    An important class of formation theories for hot Jupiters involves the excitation of extreme orbital eccentricity (e=0.99 or even larger) followed by tidal dissipation at periastron passage that eventually circularizes the planetary orbit at a period less than 10 days. In a steady state, this mechanism requires the existence of a significant population of super-eccentric (e>0.9) migrating Jupiters with long orbital periods and periastron distances of only a few stellar radii. For these super-eccentric planets, the periastron is fixed due to conservation of orbital angular momentum and the energy dissipated per orbit is constant, implying that the rate of change in semi-major axis a is \\dot a \\propto a^0.5 and consequently the number distribution satisfies dN/dlog a\\propto a^0.5. If this formation process produces most hot Jupiters, Kepler should detect several super-eccentric migrating progenitors of hot Jupiters, allowing for a test of high-eccentricity migration scenarios.

  11. SUPER-ECCENTRIC MIGRATING JUPITERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Socrates, Aristotle; Katz, Boaz; Dong Subo; Tremaine, Scott [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2012-05-10

    An important class of formation theories for hot Jupiters involves the excitation of extreme orbital eccentricity (e = 0.99 or even larger) followed by tidal dissipation at periastron passage that eventually circularizes the planetary orbit at a period less than 10 days. In a steady state, this mechanism requires the existence of a significant population of super-eccentric (e > 0.9) migrating Jupiters with long orbital periods and periastron distances of only a few stellar radii. For these super-eccentric planets, the periastron is fixed due to conservation of orbital angular momentum and the energy dissipated per orbit is constant, implying that the rate of change in semi-major axis a is a-dot {proportional_to}a{sup 1/2} and consequently the number distribution satisfies dN/d log a{proportional_to}a{sup 1/2}. If this formation process produces most hot Jupiters, Kepler should detect several super-eccentric migrating progenitors of hot Jupiters, allowing for a test of high-eccentricity migration scenarios.

  12. Asteroids and Comets

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez, Yanga R; Howell, Ellen S; Woodney, Laura M

    2015-01-01

    Asteroids and comets are remnants from the era of Solar System formation over 4.5 billion years ago, and therefore allow us to address two fundamental questions in astronomy: what was the nature of our protoplanetary disk, and how did the process of planetary accretion occur? The objects we see today have suffered many geophysically-relevant processes in the intervening eons that have altered their surfaces, interiors, and compositions. In this chapter we review our understanding of the origins and evolution of these bodies, discuss the wealth of science returned from spacecraft missions, and motivate important questions to be addressed in the future.

  13. Sungrazing Comets: Snowballs in Hell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battams, K.

    2012-12-01

    Experiencing the most extreme environment our solar system has to offer, so-called "Sungrazing" comets approach, penetrate, and on rare occasion survive passage through, the several million degree solar corona on a surprisingly routine basis. Discoveries of such comets occur on average every 3-days in data recorded by the ESA/NASA SOHO and NASA STEREO satellites, with 17-years of near-continuous observations by SOHO having led to the discovery of over 2,300 new comets to date. In this talk I will provide a brief introduction and status update for the "Sungrazing Comets" project that enables the discovery and recording of these objects. I will then present an overview of the instruments that discover these "Sungrazing comets", explaining how their unique design gives us a window into an otherwise unobservable world, and finally will discuss the tremendous scientific value that they bring to both the solar and cometary communities.

  14. Multiwavelength Observations of Recent Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.; Gicquel, Adeline; Cordiner, Martin; Kuan, Yi-Jehng; Chuang, Yo-Ling; Villanueva, Geronimo; DiSanti, Michael A.; Bonev, Boncho P.; Remijan, Anthony J.; Coulson, Iain

    2013-01-01

    Comets provide important clues to the physical and chemical processes that occurred during the formation and early evolution of the Solar System, and could also have been important for initiating prebiotic chemistry on the early Earth. Comets are comprised of molecular ices, that may be pristine inter-stellar remnants of Solar System formation, along with high-temperature crystalline silicate dust that is indicative of a more thermally varied history in the protosolar nebula. Comparing abundances of cometary parent volatiles, and isotopic fractionation ratios, to those found in the interstellar medium, in disks around young stars, and between cometary families, is vital to understanding planetary system formation and the processing history experienced by organic matter in the so-called interstellar-comet connection. We will present a comparison of molecular abundances in these comets to those observed in others, supporting a long-term effort of building a comet taxonomy based on composition.

  15. Featured Image: Mapping Jupiter with Hubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Zonal wind profile for Jupiter, describing the speed and direction of its winds at each latitude. [Simon et al. 2015]This global map of Jupiters surface (click for the full view!) was generated by the Hubble Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program, which aims to createnew yearly global maps for each of the outer planets. Presented in a study led by Amy Simon (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center), the map above is the first generated for Jupiter in the first year of the OPAL campaign. It provides a detailed look at Jupiters atmospheric structure including the Great Red Spot and allowed the authors to measure the speed and direction of the wind across Jupiters latitudes, constructing an updated zonal wind profile for Jupiter.In contrast to this study, the Juno mission (which will be captured into Jupiters orbit today after a 5-year journey to Jupiter!) will be focusing more on the features below Jupiters surface, studying its deep atmosphere and winds. Some of Junos primary goals are to learn about Jupiters composition, gravitational field, magnetic field, and polar magnetosphere. You can follow along with the NASATV livestream as Juno arrives at Jupiter tonight; orbit insertion coverage starts at 10:30 EDT.CitationAmy A. Simon et al 2015 ApJ 812 55. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/812/1/55

  16. Giant comets and mass extinctions of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, W. M.

    2015-03-01

    I find evidence for clustering in age of well-dated impact craters over the last 500 Myr. At least nine impact episodes are identified, with durations whose upper limits are set by the dating accuracy of the craters. Their amplitudes and frequency are inconsistent with an origin in asteroid breakups or Oort cloud disturbances, but are consistent with the arrival and disintegration in near-Earth orbits of rare, giant comets, mainly in transit from the Centaur population into the Jupiter family and Encke regions. About 1 in 10 Centaurs in Chiron-like orbits enter Earth-crossing epochs, usually repeatedly, each such epoch being generally of a few thousand years' duration. On time-scales of geological interest, debris from their breakup may increase the mass of the near-Earth interplanetary environment by two or three orders of magnitude, yielding repeated episodes of bombardment and stratospheric dusting. I find a strong correlation between these bombardment episodes and major biostratigraphic and geological boundaries, and propose that episodes of extinction are most effectively driven by prolonged encounters with meteoroid streams during bombardment episodes. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  17. Giant comets and mass extinctions of life

    CERN Document Server

    Napier, W M

    2015-01-01

    I find evidence for clustering in age of well-dated impact craters over the last 500 Myr. At least nine impact episodes are identified, with durations whose upper limits are set by the dating accuracy of the craters. Their amplitudes and frequency are inconsistent with an origin in asteroid breakups or Oort cloud disturbances, but are consistent with the arrival and disintegration in near-Earth orbits of rare, giant comets, mainly in transit from the Centaur population into the Jupiter family and Encke regions. About 1 in 10 Centaurs in Chiron-like orbits enter Earth-crossing epochs, usually repeatedly, each such epoch being generally of a few thousand years duration. On time-scales of geological interest, debris from their breakup may increase the mass of the near-Earth interplanetary environment by two or three orders of magnitude, yielding repeated episodes of bombardment and stratospheric dusting. I find a strong correlation between these bombardment episodes and major biostratigraphic and geological boun...

  18. Emerging trends and a comet taxonomy based on the volatile chemistry measured in thirty comets with high-resolution infrared spectroscopy between 1997 and 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dello Russo, Neil; Kawakita, Hideyo; Vervack, Ronald J.; Weaver, Harold A.

    2016-11-01

    A systematic analysis of the mixing ratios with respect to H2O for eight species (CH3OH, HCN, NH3, H2CO, C2H2, C2H6, CH4, and CO) measured with high-resolution infrared spectroscopy in thirty comets between 1997 and 2013 is presented. Some trends are beginning to emerge when mixing ratios in individual comets are compared to average mixing ratios obtained for all species within the population. The variation in mixing ratios for all measured species is at least an order of magnitude. Overall, Jupiter-family comets are depleted in volatile species with respect to H2O compared to long-period Oort cloud comets, with the most volatile species showing the greatest relative depletion. There is a high positive correlation between the mixing ratios of HCN, C2H6, and CH4, whereas NH3, H2CO, and C2H2 are moderately correlated with each other but generally uncorrelated or show only weak correlation with other species. CO is generally uncorrelated with the other measured species possibly because it has the highest volatility and is therefore more susceptible to thermal evolutionary effects. Most of these correlations appear to be independent of dynamical class with a few possible exceptions. Molecular mixing ratios for CH3OH, HCN, C2H6, and CH4 show an expected behavior with heliocentric distance suggesting a dominant ice source, whereas there is emerging evidence that the mixing ratios of NH3, H2CO, C2H2, NH2, and CN may increase at small heliocentric distances, suggesting the possibility of additional sources related to the thermal decomposition of organic dust. Although this provides information on the composition of the most volatile grains in comets, it presents an additional difficulty in classifying comet chemistry because most comets within this dataset were only observed over a limited range of heliocentric distance. Although there is remarkable compositional diversity resulting in a unique chemical fingerprint for each comet, a hierarchical tree cluster analysis is

  19. High Latitude Mottling on Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The familiar banded appearance of Jupiter at low and middle latitudes gradually gives way to a more mottled appearance at high latitudes in this striking true color image taken Dec. 13, 2000, by NASA's Cassini spacecraft.The intricate structures seen in the polar region are clouds of different chemical composition, height and thickness. Clouds are organized by winds, and the mottled appearance in the polar regions suggests more vortex-type motion and winds of less vigor at higher latitudes.The cause of this difference is not understood. One possible contributor is that the horizontal component of the Coriolis force, which arises from the planet's rotation and is responsible for curving the trajectories of ocean currents and winds on Earth, has its greatest effect at high latitudes and vanishes at the equator. This tends to create small, intense vortices at high latitudes on Jupiter. Another possibility may lie in that fact that Jupiter overall emits nearly as much of its own heat as it absorbs from the Sun, and this internal heat flux is very likely greater at the poles. This condition could lead to enhanced convection at the poles and more vortex-type structures. Further analysis of Cassini images, including analysis of sequences taken over a span of time, should help us understand the cause of equator-to-pole differences in cloud organization and evolution.By the time this picture was taken, Cassini had reached close enough to Jupiter to allow the spacecraft to return images with more detail than what's possible with the planetary camera on NASA's Earth-orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. The resolution here is 114 kilometers (71 miles) per pixel. This contrast-enhanced, edge-sharpened frame was composited from images take at different wavelengths with Cassini's narrow-angle camera, from a distance of 19 million kilometers (11.8 million miles). The spacecraft was in almost a direct line between the Sun and Jupiter, so the solar illumination on Jupiter is almost full

  20. A Creaking and Cracking Comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faurschou Hviid, Stubbe; Hüttig, Christian; Groussin, Olivier; Mottola, Stefano; Keller, Horst Uwe; OSIRIS Team

    2016-10-01

    Since the middle of 2014 the OSIRIS cameras on the ESA Rosetta mission have been monitoring the evolution of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as it passed through perihelion. During the perihelion passage several change events have been observed on the nucleus surface. For example existing large scale cracks have expanded and new large scale cracks have been created. Also several large scale "wave pattern" like change events have been observed in the Imhotep and Hapi regions. These are events not directly correlated with any normal visible cometary activity. One interpretation is that these are events likely caused by "seismic" activity. The seismic activity is created by the self-gravity stress of the non-spherical comet nucleus and stress created by the non-gravitational forces acting on the comet. The non-gravitational forces are changing the rotation period of the comet (~20min/perihelion passage) which induces a changing mechanical stress pattern through the perihelion passage. Also the diurnal cycle with its changing activity pattern is causing a periodic wobble in the stress pattern that can act as a trigger for a comet quake. The stress pattern has been modeled using a finite element model that includes self-gravity, the comet spin and the non-gravitational forces based on a cometary activity model. This paper will discuss what can be learned about the comet nucleus structure and about the cometary material properties from these events and from the FEM model.

  1. Rosetta following a living comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accomazzo, Andrea; Ferri, Paolo; Lodiot, Sylvain; Pellon-Bailon, Jose-Luis; Hubault, Armelle; Porta, Roberto; Urbanek, Jakub; Kay, Ritchie; Eiblmaier, Matthias; Francisco, Tiago

    2016-09-01

    The International Rosetta Mission was launched on 2nd March 2004 on its 10 year journey to rendezvous with comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Rosetta performed comet orbit insertion on the 6th of August 2014, after which it characterised the nucleus and orbited it at altitudes as low as a few kilometres. In November 2014 Rosetta delivered the lander Philae to perform the first soft landing ever on the surface of a comet. The critical landing operations have been conducted with remarkable accuracy and will constitute one of the most important achievements in the history of spaceflight. After this critical operation, Rosetta began the escort phase of the comet in its journey in the Solar System heading to the perihelion, reached in August 2015. Throughout this period, the comet environment kept changing with increasing gas and dust emissions. A first phase of bound orbits was followed by a sequence of complex flyby segments which allowed the scientific instruments to perform in depth investigation of the comet environment and nucleus. The unpredictable nature of the comet activity forced the mission control team to implement unplanned changes to the flight plan prepared for this mission phase and to plan the whole mission in a more dynamic way than originally conceived. This paper describes the details of the landing operations and of the main comet escort phase. It also includes the mission status as achieved after perihelion and the findings about the evolution of the comet and its environment from a mission operations point of view. The lessons learned from this unique and complex operations phase and the plans for the next mission phases, which include a mission extension into 2016, are also described.

  2. ESA Unveils Its New Comet Chaser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    October 2007 before heading away from the Sun towards Comet Wirtanen. As it bounces around the Solar System, Rosetta will also make two excursions into the main asteroid belt, where it will obtain the first close-up images and information on two contrasting objects, 4979 Otawara and 140 Siwa. Scientists believe Otawara is less than 20 km across, whereas Siwa is probably 110 km in diameter, much larger than any asteroid which has so far been visited by spacecraft. Rosetta will fly to within 1,000 km of Otawara in July 2006, followed by a similar rendezvous with Siwa two years later. However, the most difficult phase of the mission will be the final rendezvous with the fast-moving comet (the foreseen date for the rendezvous manoeuvre is 27 November 2011, close approach is set for 20 May 2012 and orbit insertion around the nucleus is set for 28 May 2012). Thus, after a 5.3 billion km space odyssey, Rosetta will make first contact with Wirtanen about 675 million km from the Sun. At this distance, sunlight is 20 times weaker than on Earth, and the comet's nucleus will still be frozen and inactive. Once the navigation team are able to determine the comet's exact location from images returned by the spacecraft camera, a series of braking manoeuvres will allow Rosetta to match speed and direction with its target. After about seven months of edging closer, Rosetta will eventually close to within 2 km of Wirtanen's frozen nucleus. From its close orbit above the tiny nucleus, Rosetta will be able to send back the most detailed images and information ever obtained of a comet. When a suitable landing site has been chosen, about a month after global mapping starts, the orbiter will release a 100 kg lander onto the comet's solid surface. Touchdown must be quite slow - less than one metre per second - to allow for the almost negligible gravitational pull of the tiny nucleus. In order to ensure that the lander does not bounce and disappear into space, an anchoring harpoon will be fired

  3. Tabulation of comet observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Concerning comets: C/1940 R2 (Cunningham), C/1941 B2 (de Kock-Paraskevopoulos), C/1941 K1 (van Gent), C/1942 X1 (Whipple-Fedtke-Tevzadze), C/1946 C1 (Timmers), C/1946 K1 (Pajdušáková-Rotbart-Weber), C/1946 P1 (Jones), C/1946 U1 (Bester), C/1947 S1 (Bester), C/1947 X1 (Southern comet), C/1947 Y1 (Mrkos), C/1948 E1 (Pajdušáková-Mrkos), C/1948 L1 (Honda-Bernasconi), C/1948 V1 (Eclipse comet), C/1949 N1 (Bappu-Bok-Newkirk), C/1950 K1 (Minkowski), C/1951 C1 (Pajdušáková), C/1952 H1 (Mrkos), C/1952 M1 (Peltier), C/1952 Q1 (Harrington), C/1953 G1 (Mrkos-Honda), C/1953 T1 (Abell), C/1954 O1 (Vozárová), C/1955 L1 (Mrkos), C/1955 N1 (Bakharev-Macfarlane-Krienke), C/1955 O1 (Honda), C/1956 E1 (Mrkos), C/1956 R1 (Arend-Roland), C/1957 P1 (Mrkos), C/1957 U1 (Latyshev-Wild-Burnham), C/1959 Q1 (Alcock), C/1959 Q2 (Alcock), C/1959 Y1 (Burnham), C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp), C/1996 J1 (Evans-Drinkwater), C/1996 P2 (Russell-Watson), C/1997 BA6 (Spacewatch), C/1997 D1 (Mueller), C/1997 J1 (Mueller), C/1997 J2 (Meunier-Dupouy), C/1997 N1 (Tabur), C/1997 T1 (Utsunomiya), 10P/Tempel 2, 21P/Giacobini-Zinner, 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1, 43P/Wolf-Harrington, 55P/Tempel-Tuttle, 62P/Tsuchinshan 1, 69P/Taylor, 78P/Gehrels 2, 81P/Wild 2, 88P/Howell, 95P/Chiron, 103P/Hartley 2, 104P/Kowal 2, 111P/Helin-Roman-Crockett, 118P/Shoemaker-Levy 4, 121P/Shoemaker-Holt 2, 129P/Shoemaker-Levy 3, 134P/Kowal-Vavrova, P/1997 C1 (Gehrels), P/1997 G1 (Montani).

  4. A protosolar nebula origin for the ices agglomerated by Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    CERN Document Server

    Mousis, O; Luspay-Kuti, A; Guillot, T; Marty, B; Ali-Dib, M; Wurz, P; Altwegg, K; Bieler, A; Hässig, M; Rubin, M; Vernazza, P; Waite, J H

    2016-01-01

    The nature of the icy material accreted by comets during their formation in the outer regions of the protosolar nebula is a major open question in planetary science. Some scenarios of comet formation predict that these bodies agglomerated from crystalline ices condensed in the protosolar nebula. Concurrently, alternative scenarios suggest that comets accreted amorphous ice originating from the interstellar cloud or from the very distant regions of the protosolar nebula. On the basis of existing laboratory and modeling data, we find that the N$_2$/CO and Ar/CO ratios measured in the coma of the Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by the ROSINA instrument aboard the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft match those predicted for gases trapped in clathrates. If these measurements are representative of the bulk N$_2$/CO and Ar/CO ratios in 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, it implies that the ices accreted by the comet formed in the nebula and do not originate from the interstellar medium, supporting the...

  5. Tycho Brahe, Abu Mashar, and the comet beyond Venus (ninth century A.D.)

    CERN Document Server

    Neuhaeuser, Ralph; Mugrauer, Markus; Luge, Daniela; van Gent, Rob

    2016-01-01

    From his observations of the A.D. 1572 super-nova and the A.D. 1577 comet, Tycho Brahe concluded that such transient celestial objects are outside the Earth's atmosphere, and he quoted the 9th century A.D. Persian astrologer and astronomer Abu Mashar: Dixit Albumasar, Cometa supra Venerem visus fuit, i.e. that he had reported much earlier that comets were seen beyond Venus. However, even from a more detailed Latin translation, the observations and logic behind Abu Mashar's conclusion were not understandable. We present here the original Arabic text (MS Ankara, Saib 199) together with our translation and interpretation: Abu Mashar reported that he had observed Venus in (or projected onto) the tail of a comet and concluded that the comet was behind Venus, because he had observed the extinction of Venus due to the cometary tail to be negligible (light of Venus was unimpaired). He then concluded that the comet would be located behind Venus. He also mentioned that others had observed Jupiter and Saturn in cometary...

  6. Thermometric Soots on Hot Jupiters?

    CERN Document Server

    Zahnle, K; Fortney, J J

    2009-01-01

    We use a 1D thermochemical and photochemical kinetics model to predict that the stratospheric chemistry of hot Jupiters should change dramatically as temperature drops from 1200 to 1000 K. At 1200 K methane is too unstable to reach the stratosphere in significant quantities, while thermal decomposition of water is a strong source of OH radicals that oxidize any hydrocarbons that do form to CO and CO$_2$. At 1000 K methane, although very reactive, survives long enough to reach the lower stratosphere, and the greater stability of water coupled with efficient scavenging of OH by H$_2$ raise the effective C/O ratio in the reacting gases above unity. Reduced products such as ethylene, acetylene, and hydrogen cyanide become abundant; such conditions favor polymerization and possible formation of PAHs and soots. Although low temperature is the most important factor favoring hydrocarbons in hot Jupiters, higher rates of vertical mixing and generally lower metallicities also favor organic synthesis. The peculiar prope...

  7. A Study of Jupiter Trojans

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Ola

    2012-01-01

    Jupiter Trojan asteroid dynamics have been studied for a long time but it is only within the last decades that the known population has become large enough to make other studies meaningful. In four articles I have been scratching the surface of the unknown Trojan knowledge space. Paper I presents photometric observations confirming a larger variety in surface redness for the smaller Trojans compared to the larger ones, in line with the groups in the outer main asteroid belt. However, the larg...

  8. Thermal Properties, Sizes, and Size Distribution of Jupiter-Family Cometary Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez, Y R; Lamy, P L; Toth, I; Groussin, O; Lisse, C M; A'Hearn, M F; Bauer, J M; Campins, H; Fitzsimmons, A; Licandro, J; Lowry, S C; Meech, K J; Pittichova, J; Reach, W T; Snodgrass, C; Weaver, H A

    2013-01-01

    We present results from SEPPCoN, an on-going Survey of the Ensemble Physical Properties of Cometary Nuclei. In this report we discuss mid-infrared measurements of the thermal emission from 89 nuclei of Jupiter-family comets (JFCs). All data were obtained in 2006 and 2007 with the Spitzer Space Telescope. For all 89 comets, we present new effective radii, and for 57 comets we present beaming parameters. Thus our survey provides the largest compilation of radiometrically-derived physical properties of nuclei to date. We conclude the following. (a) The average beaming parameter of the JFC population is 1.03+/-0.11, consistent with unity, and indicating low thermal inertia. (b) The known JFC population is not complete even at 3 km radius, and even for comets with perihelia near ~2 AU. (c) We find that the JFC nuclear cumulative size distribution (CSD) has a power-law slope of around -1.9. (d) This power-law is close to that derived from visible-wavelength observations, suggesting that there is no strong dependenc...

  9. Rosetta - a comet ride to solve planetary mysteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    be kept in hibernation during most of its 8-year trek towards Wirtanen. What makes Rosetta's cruise so long? To reach Comet Wirtanen, the spacecraft needs to go out in deep space as far from the Sun as Jupiter is. No launcher could possibly get Rosetta there directly. ESA's spacecraft will gather speed from gravitational ‘kicks’ provided by three planetary fly-bys: one of Mars in 2005 and two of Earth in 2005 and 2007. During the trip, Rosetta will also visit two asteroids, Otawara (in 2006) and Siwa (in 2008). During these encounters, scientists will switch on Rosetta's instruments for calibration and scientific studies. Long trips in deep space include many hazards, such as extreme changes in temperature. Rosetta will leave the benign environment of near-Earth space to the dark, frigid regions beyond the asteroid belt. To manage these thermal loads, experts have done very tough pre-launch tests to study Rosetta's endurance. For example, they have heated its external surfaces to more than 150°C, then quickly cooled it to -180°C in the next test. The spacecraft will be fully reactivated prior to the comet rendezvous manoeuvre in 2011. Then, Rosetta will orbit the comet - an object only 1.2 km wide - while it cruises through the inner Solar System at 135 000 kilometres per hour. At that time of the rendezvous - around 675 million km from the Sun - Wirtanen will hardly show any surface activity. It means that the carachteristic coma (the comet’s ‘atmosphere’) and the tail will not be formed yet, because of the large distance from the Sun. The comet's tail is in fact made of dust grains and frozen gases from the comet's surface that vapourise because of the Sun's heat. During 6-month, Rosetta will extensively map the comet surface, prior to selecting a landing site. In July 2012, the lander will self-eject from the spacecraft from a height of just one kilometre. Touchdown will take place at walking speed - less than 1 metre per second. Immediately after

  10. Comets and Asteroids with FIRST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Crovisier, J.

    2001-07-01

    The infrared and microwave domains have proved to be privileged tools to study the physical and chemical properties of small bodies of the Solar System. After a review of the recent results obtained on comets and asteroids in these wavelength ranges, we forecast the major outcomes that can be expected from their observations with the Herschel Space Observatory (hereafter referred as to FIRST, the former denomination). This prospect is focussed on: 1) observations of water rotational lines in comets to measure water outgassing and study water excitation in the coma and its kinematics; 2) observations of HDO in comets to constrain solar nebula models and formation scenarii of comets; 3) the study of surface properties of asteroids.

  11. Two Moons Meet over Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This beautiful image of the crescents of volcanic Io and more sedate Europa was snapped by New Horizons' color Multispectral Visual Imaging Camera (MVIC) at 10:34 UT on March 2, 2007, about two days after New Horizons made its closest approach to Jupiter. The picture was one of a handful of the Jupiter system that New Horizons took primarily for their artistic, rather than scientific value. This particular scene was suggested by space enthusiast Richard Hendricks of Austin, Texas, in response to an Internet request by New Horizons scientists for evocative, artistic imaging opportunities at Jupiter. This image was taken from a range of 4.6 million kilometers (2.8 million miles) from Io and 3.8 million kilometers (2.4 million miles) from Europa. Although the moons appear close in this view, a gulf of 790,000 kilometers (490,000 miles) separates them. The night side of Io is illuminated here by light reflected from Jupiter, which is out of the frame to the right. Europa's night side is completely dark, in contrast to Io, because that side of Europa faces away from Jupiter. Here, Io steals the show with its beautiful display of volcanic activity. Three volcanic plumes are visible. Most conspicuous is the enormous 300-kilometer (190-mile) -high plume from the Tvashtar volcano at the 11 o'clock position on Io's disk. Two much smaller plumes are barely visible: one from the volcano Prometheus, at the 9 o'clock position on the edge of Io's disk, and one from the volcano Amirani, seen between Prometheus and Tvashtar along Io's terminator (the line dividing day and night). The plumes appear blue because of the scattering of light by tiny dust particles ejected by the volcanoes, similar to the blue appearance of smoke. In addition, the contrasting red glow of hot lava can be seen at the source of the Tvashtar plume. The images are centered at 1 degree north, 60 degrees west on Io, and 0 degrees north, 149 degrees west on Europa. The color in this image was generated using

  12. CO in distantly active comets

    CERN Document Server

    Womack, Maria; Wierzchos, Kacper

    2016-01-01

    Activity of most comets near the Sun is dominated by sublimation of frozen water, the most abundant ice in comets. Some comets, however, are active well beyond the water-ice sublimation limit of ~3 AU. Three bodies dominate the observational record and modeling efforts for distantly active comets: the long-period comet C/1995 O1 Hale-Bopp and the short-period comets (with Centaur orbits) 29P/Schwassmann Wachmann 1 and 2060 Chiron. We summarize what is known about these three objects emphasizing their gaseous comae. We calculate their CN/CO and CO2/CO production rate ratios from the literature and discuss implications. Using our own data we derive CO production rates for all three objects, in order to examine a correlation between gas production and different orbital histories and/or size. We find that orbital history does not appear to play a significant role in explaining 29P's CO production rates. 29P outproduces Hale-Bopp at the same heliocentric distance, even though it has been subjected to much more sol...

  13. Helium and Neon in Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewitt, David

    1996-01-01

    Two comets were observed with EUVE in late 1994. Both comet Mueller and comet Borrelly are short-period comets having well established orbital elements and accurate ephemerides. Spectra of 40 ksec were taken of each. No evidence for emission lines from either Helium or Neon was detected. We calculated limits on the production rates of these atoms (relative to solar) assuming a standard isotropic outflow model, with a gas streaming speed of 1 km/s. The 3-sigma (99.7% confidence) limits (1/100,000 for He, 0.8 for Ne) are based on a conservative estimate of the noise in the EUVE spectra. They are also weakly dependent on the precise pointing and tracking of the EUVE field of view relative to the comet during the integrations. These limits are consistent with ice formation temperatures T greater than or equal to 30 K, as judged from the gas trapping experiments of Bar-Nun. For comparison, the solar abundances of these elements are He/O = 110, Ne/O = 1/16. Neither limit was as constraining as we had initially hoped, mainly because comets Mueller and Borrelly were intrinsically less active than anticipated.

  14. THE SPLITTING OF COMET HALLEY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Daohan; Liu Linzhong; Alan Gilmore

    2000-01-01

    In combination with the authors previous obsewation about the splitting of Comet Halley in March 1986, the events involving the sharp, straight feature in the antisolar direction observed in the head of Comet Halley in 1910 (such as those occurring on May 14, 25 and 31, and June 2) are rediscussed The analysis leads to the following scenario: When Comet Halley explodes and splits, a fragment jettisoned or thrown off from the nucleus will, after moving in the direction of its tail, develop into a mini-comet. Although not well developed or permanent, it has its own plasma tail and, sometimes, a dust tail. If Bobrovnikoffs definition of a secondary nucleus is assumed, then the fragment should be considered as a real secondary nucleus. It seems that the current idea of a tailward jet suggested by Sekanina and Larson is a wrong explanation for the plasma tail of a mini-comet and hence the rotation period of 52-53h for Comet Halley is doubtful

  15. The splitting of Comet Halley

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈道汉; 刘麟仲; Alan Gilmore

    1995-01-01

    In combination with the authors’ previous observation about the splitting of Comet Halley in March 1986, the events involving the sharp, straight feature in the antisolar direction observed in the bead of Comet Halley in 1910 (such as those occurring on May 14, 25 and 31, and June 2) are rediscussed. The analysis leads to the following scenario: When Comet Halley explodes and splits, a fragment jettisoned or thrown off from the nucleus will, after moving in the direction of its tail, develop into a mini-comet. Although not well developed or permanent, it has its own plasma tail and, sometimes, a dust tail. If Bobrovnikoff’s definition of a secondary nucleus is assumed, then the fragment should be considered as a real secondary nucleus. It seems that the current idea of a tailward jet suggested by Sekanina and Larson is a wrong explanation for the plasma tail of a mini-comet and hence the rotation period of 52- 53 h for Comet Halley is doubtful.

  16. Juno at Jupiter: Mission and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Scott

    2016-07-01

    The Juno mission is the second mission in NASA's New Frontiers program. Launched in August 2011, Juno arrives at Jupiter in July 2016. Juno science goals include the study of Jupiter's origin, interior structure, deep atmosphere, aurora and magnetosphere. Jupiter's formation is fundamental to the evolution of our solar system and to the distribution of volatiles early in the solar system's history. Juno's measurements of the abundance of Oxygen and Nitrogen in Jupiter's atmosphere, and the detailed maps of Jupiter's gravity and magnetic field structure will constrain theories of early planetary development. Juno's orbit around Jupiter is a polar elliptical orbit with perijove approximately 5000 km above the visible cloud tops. The payload consists of a set of microwave antennas for deep sounding, magnetometers, gravity radio science, low and high energy charged particle detectors, electric and magnetic field radio and plasma wave experiment, ultraviolet imaging spectrograph, infrared imager and a visible camera. The Juno design enables the first detailed investigation of Jupiter's interior structure, and deep atmosphere as well as the first in depth exploration of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere. The Juno mission design, science goals, and measurements related to the atmosphere of Jupiter will be presented.

  17. Mass transport around comets and its impact on the seasonal differences in water production rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; Thomas, N. [Physikalisches Institut, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Fougere, N.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V. M. [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Le Roy, L. [Center for Space and Habitability, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-06-20

    Comets are surrounded by a thin expanding atmosphere, and although the nucleus' gravity is small, some molecules and grains, possibly with the inclusion of ices, can get transported around the nucleus through scattering (atoms/molecules) and gravitational pull (grains). Based on the obliquity of the comet, it is also possible that volatile material and icy grains get trapped in regions, which are in shadow until the comet passes its equinox. When the Sun rises above the horizon and the surface starts to heat up, this condensed material starts to desorb and icy grains will sublimate off the surface, possibly increasing the comet's neutral gas production rate on the outbound path. In this paper we investigate the mass transport around the nucleus, and based on a simplified model, we derive the possible contribution to the asymmetry in the seasonal gas production rate that could arise from trapped material released from cold areas once they come into sunlight. We conclude that the total amount of volatiles retained by this effect can only contribute up to a few percent of the asymmetry observed in some comets.

  18. Ortho-to-para abundance ratios of NH2 in 26 comets: implications for the real meaning of OPRs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo; Jehin, Emmanuël; Decock, Alice; Hutsemékers, Damien; Manfroid, Jean

    2016-11-01

    Abundance ratios of nuclear-spin isomers for cometary molecules having identical protons, such as water and ammonia, have been measured and discussed from the viewpoint that they are primordial characters in comet. In the case of ammonia, its ortho-to-para abundance ratio (OPR) is usually estimated from OPRs of NH2 because of difficulty in measuring OPR of ammonia directly. We report our survey for OPRs of NH2 in 26 comets. A weighted mean of ammonia OPRs for the comets is 1.12 ± 0.01 and no significant difference is found between the Oort Cloud comets and the Jupiter-family comets. These values correspond to ˜30 K as nuclear-spin temperatures. The OPRs of ammonia in comets probably reflect the physicochemical conditions in coma, rather than the conditions for the molecular formation or condensation in the pre-solar molecular cloud/the solar nebula, based on comparison of OPRs (and nuclear-spin temperatures) of ammonia with those of water, 14N/15N ratios in ammonia, and D/H ratios in water. The OPRs could be reset to a nuclear-spin weights ratio in solid phase and modified by interactions with protonated ions like H3O+, water clusters (H2O)n, ice grains, and paramagnetic impurities (such as O2 molecules and grains) in the inner coma gas. Relationship between the OPRs of ammonia and water is a clue to understanding the real meaning of the OPRs.

  19. The EJSM Jupiter-Ganymede Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, M.; Lebreton, J.-P.; Stankov, A.; Greeley, R.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Fujimoto, M.

    2008-09-01

    The Europa-Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), currently subject of a joint study by NASA, ESA and JAXA, would combine a fleet of three satellites in order to investigate in depth many questions related to the Jupiter System. These investigations are essential for our understanding of the emergence and evolution of habitable worlds, not only within the Solar System, but also for extrasolar planet investigations. Scientific targets of EJSM focus on Europa and Ganymede as a key pair of Galilean satellites, to address the questions on their habitability, formation, and internal structure, as well as the coupling with the whole Jovian system: Jupiter's atmosphere and interior, magnetosphere and magnetodisk.. In combination with a Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO that would be provided by NASA) and a Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter (JMO that would be provided by JAXA), ESA is studying a Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). The mission scenario includes a launch in 2020 with a transfer time to Jupiter of ~6 years. After the orbit insertion around Jupiter, a first phase (~2 years) will be devoted to Jupiter system and Callisto studies, with multiple flybys of Callisto planned at low altitude (~200 km), followed by a Ganymede orbit insertion and extensive study of Ganymede (~1 year). In depth comparative study of inner (Io and Europe) and outer (Ganymede and Callisto) satellites with combined payload of JEO and JGO will address the question of the geologic relative evolution of the satellites. On JGO, the transport phenomena in the magnetosphere of Jupiter will be studied in combination with JMO, and the Ganymede magnetosphere will be observed in situ. Jupiter atmosphere investigations on JGO will focus on coupling phenomena between troposphere, stratosphere and mesosphere, the stratospheric composition and the question of thermospheric heating.

  20. An emerging chemical classifications of comets: implications for the early Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumma, M. J.

    Cometary nuclei are messengers from the early solar system; they contain key information from the time when planets were forming, and even earlier - some contain material from the natal interstellar cloud. During the first 500 million years of Earth's existence, comets likely delivered vast quantities of pre-biotic organic material along with water for its oceans. The most easily modified forms of matter -the ices, low-temperature-refractory organics, and refractory minerals - hold special significance for understanding these processes. More than two dozen parent volatile species can be characterized directly from Earth-based observatories. Hyakutake and Hale-Bopp were the first bright comets to be studied with powerful new astronomical facilities. A wealth of new information on cometary organic composition was obtained, including the discovery of symmetric hydrocarbons (methane, ethane, acetylene) by infrared spectroscopy and the detection of six new parent volatiles at radio wavelengths. Since then, larger telescopes and even more powerful instruments have become available, permitting in-depth investigation of much fainter comets. With the powerful cross-dispersed cryogenic infrared echelle spectrometer (NIRSPEC, at the 10-m Keck-2 telescope), ten parent volatile species can be characterized in about two hours, eliminating many sources of systematic error. Six Oort cloud comets have been studied with it since 1999. The apparition of two bright comets in spring 2004 doubled the number of comets in which more than a dozen parent volatiles were quantified. The compositions of eleven Oort-cloud comets (including comet Halley and the deceased comet C/1999 S4 LINEAR) and two Jupiter-family comets (Encke, G-Z) will be compared and discussed in the context of chemical diversity in the giant-planets' nebular region. Implications for the delivery of water and pre-biotic organics to the early Earth will be mentioned. Mumma, M. J. et al. (2001), Ap. J. 546, 1183-1193. Mumma

  1. Polarimetry of comets 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, 74P/Smirnova-Chernykh, and 152P/Helin-Lawrence

    CERN Document Server

    Stinson, A; Tozzi, G P; Boehnhardt, H; Protopapa, S; Kolokolova, L; Muinonen, K; Jones, G H

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Polarimetric characteristics of comets at large heliocentric distances is a relatively unexplored area; we extend the idea by adding and analysing the data for three Jupiter family comets (JFCs). Methods. With the FORS2 instrument of the ESO VLT, we performed quasi-simultaneous photometry and polarimetry of three active JFCs 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, 74P/Smirnova-Chernykh, and 152P/Helin-Lawrence. Results. We obtained in total 23 polarimetric measurements at different epochs, covering a phase-angle range ~1 -16 degrees and heliocentric distances from 3 to 4.6 au. From our observations we obtained both colour and polarimetric maps to look for structures in the comae and tails of the comets. Conclusions. 74P/Smirnova-Chernykh and 152P/Helin-Lawrence exhibit enough activity at large heliocentric distances to be detectable in polarimetric measurements. Polarimetric and colour maps indicate no evidence of dust particle

  2. Warm Jupiters Are Less Lonely than Hot Jupiters: Close Neighbors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chelsea; Wu, Yanqin; Triaud, Amaury H. M. J.

    2016-07-01

    Exploiting the Kepler transit data, we uncover a dramatic distinction in the prevalence of sub-Jovian companions between systems that contain hot Jupiters (HJs) (periods inward of 10 days) and those that host warm Jupiters (WJs) (periods between 10 and 200 days). HJs, with the singular exception of WASP-47b, do not have any detectable inner or outer planetary companions (with periods inward of 50 days and sizes down to 2 R Earth). Restricting ourselves to inner companions, our limits reach down to 1 R Earth. In stark contrast, half of the WJs are closely flanked by small companions. Statistically, the companion fractions for hot and WJs are mutually exclusive, particularly in regard to inner companions. The high companion fraction of WJs also yields clues to their formation. The WJs that have close-by siblings should have low orbital eccentricities and low mutual inclinations. The orbital configurations of these systems are reminiscent of those of the low-mass close-in planetary systems abundantly discovered by the Kepler mission. This, and other arguments, lead us to propose that these WJs are formed in situ. There are indications that there may be a second population of WJs with different characteristics. In this picture, WASP-47b could be regarded as the extending tail of the in situ WJs into the HJ region and does not represent the generic formation route for HJs.

  3. Maximization of Growth Rates During Czochralski Pulling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargo, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    It was suggested from theory(1-4) that silicon can be grown from the melt at rates far exceeding the current state of the art. Previous theoretical and experimental investigations which predict maximum rates of pulling during Czochralski growth are reviewed. Several experimental methods are proposed to modify the temperature distribution in a growing crystal to achieve higher rates of pulling. A physical model of a Czochralski crystal of germanium in contact with its melt was used to quantitatively determine, by direct measurement of the axial temperature distribution in the solid, the increase in axial temperature gradients effected by an inverted conical heat reflector located above the melt and coaxially about the physical model. Preliminary results indicate that this is an effective method of increasing the thermal resistance between the hot melt and crucible wall and a growing crystal. Under these conditions the enhancement of the interfacial temperature gradients permit a commensurate increase in the rate of crystal pulling.

  4. Planetary Trojans - the main source of short period comets?

    CERN Document Server

    Horner, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    We present a short review of the impact regime experienced by the terrestrial planets within our own Solar system, describing the three populations of potentially hazardous objects which move on orbits that take them through the inner Solar system. Of these populations, the origins of two (the Near-Earth Asteroids and the Long-Period Comets) are well understood, with members originating in the Asteroid belt and Oort cloud, respectively. By contrast, the source of the third population, the Short-Period Comets, is still under debate. The proximate source of these objects is the Centaurs, a population of dynamically unstable objects that pass perihelion between the orbits of Jupiter and Neptune. However, a variety of different origins have been suggested for the Centaur population. Here, we present evidence that at least a significant fraction of the Centaur population can be sourced from the planetary Trojan clouds, stable reservoirs of objects moving in 1:1 mean-motion resonance with the giant planets (primari...

  5. Shoemaker-Levy 9 and the tidal disruption of comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, W.; Asphaug, E.

    1994-01-01

    The break-up of Periodic Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 into multiple pieces following its grazing encounter with Jupiter in July 1992 can be used to study tidally-induced fracture in comets. This spectacular event allows us not only to set limits on the size, strength and density of Shoemaker-Levy 9 itself, but provides invaluable guidance to numerical modeling of such encounters. In an extensive treatment of tidal breakup which assumed self-gravitating, homogeneous, perfectly elastic bodies, Dobrovolskis derived simple analytical expressions for the tidally-induced surface and central stresses. Both can be cast in such a way that Poisson's ratio is the only material dependent constant entering these expressions. Whether both surface and central failure must be initiated as a criterion for breakup, or either one of them is sufficient, remains a subject of disagreement. To resolve this debate, we model the details of cometary breakup using a three-dimensional Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) code modified to simulate fracture in small solid objects. At lower stresses associated with brittle failure, we use a rate-dependent strength based on the nucleation of incipient flaws whose number density is given by a Weibull distribution.

  6. Gaseous activity of distant comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womack, Maria; Sarid, Gal; Wierzchos, Kacper

    2016-10-01

    The activity of most comets within 3AU of the Sun is dominated by the sublimation of frozen water, the most abundant ice in comets. Some comets, however, are active well beyond the water-ice sublimation limit. Studying distantly active comets provides valuable opportunities to explore primitive bodies when water-ice sublimation is largely dormant, which is the case for most of a comet's lifetime. Beyond 4 AU, super-volatiles such as CO or CO2 are thought to play a major role in driving observed activity. Carbon monoxide is of special interest because it is a major contributor to comae and has a very low sublimation temperature. Three bodies dominate the observational record and modeling efforts for distantly active small bodies: the long-period comet C/1995 O1 Hale-Bopp and the short-period comets (with centaur orbits) 29P/Schwassmann Wachmann 1 and 2060 Chiron. Hale-Bopp's long-period orbit means it has experienced very little solar heating in its lifetime and is analogous to dynamically new comets making their first approach to the Sun. Because Chiron and 29P have much smaller orbits closer to the Sun, they have experienced much more thermal processing than Hale-Bopp and this is expected to have changed their chemical composition from their original state. We point out that the observed CO production rates and line-widths in these three distantly active objects are consistent with each other when adjusted for heliocentric distance. This is particularly interesting for Hale-Bopp and 29P, which have approximately the same radius. The consistent CO production rates may point to a similar CO release mechanism in these objects. We also discuss how observed radio line profiles support that the development and sublimation of icy grains in the coma at about 5-6 AU is probably a common feature in distantly active comets, and an important source of other volatiles within 6 AU, including H2O, HCN, CH3OH, and H2CO.

  7. The Capture of Jupiter Trojans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbidelli, A.; Nesvorny, D.; Vokrouhlicky, D.

    2013-09-01

    The origin of Jupiter Trojans remained mysterious for decades. Particularly, it was difficult to explain the excitation of the inclinations of the Trojan population [1]. In 2005, Morbidelli et al. [2] proposed a scenario of capture from the trans-Neptunian disk, in the framework of the so-called "Nice model" [3,4]. This scenario explained in a natural way the observed orbital distribution of Trojans. The Nice model, however, evolved in the years, in order to satisfy an increasingly large number of constraints. It now appears that the dynamical evolution of the giant planets was different from that envisioned in [2]. Here, we assess again the process of capture of Trojans within this new evolution. We show that (6-8)×10 - 7 of the original trans-Neptunian planetesimals are captured in the Trojan region, with an orbital distribution consistent with the one observed. Relative to [2], the new capture mechanism has the potential of explaining the asymmetry between the L4 and L5 populations. Moreover, the resulting population of Trojans is consistent with that of the Irregular Satellites of Jupiter, which are captured in the same process; a few bodies from the main asteroid belt could also be captured in the Trojan cloud.

  8. Longitudinal Variations in Jupiter's Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Gierasch, P. J.; Tierney, G.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term studies of Jupiter's zonal wind field revealed temporal variations on the order of 20 to 40 m/s at many latitudes, greater than the typical data uncertainties of 1 to 10 m/s. No definitive periodicities were evident, however, though some latitudinally-confined signals did appear at periods relevant to the Quasi- Quadrennial Oscillation (Simon-Miller & Gierasch, Icarus, in press). As the QQO appears, from vertical temperature profiles, to propagate downward, it is unclear why a signal is not more obvious, unless other processes dominate over possibly weaker forcing from the QQO. An additional complication is that zonal wind profiles represent an average over some particular set of longitudes for an image pair and most data sets do not offer global wind coverage. Lien avoiding known features, such as the large anticyclonic vortices especially prevalent in the south, there can be distinct variations in longitude. We present results on the full wind field from Voyager and Cassini data, showing apparent longitudinal variations of up to 60 m/s or more. These are particularly obvious near disruptions such as the South Equatorial Disturbance, even when the feature itself is not clearly visible. These two dates represent very different states of the planet for comparison: Voyagers 1 & 2 flew by Jupiter shortly after a global upheaval, while many regions were in a disturbed state, while the Cassini view is typical of a more quiescent period present during much of the 1990s and early 2000s.

  9. Jupiter's magnetosphere and radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennel, C. F.; Coroniti, F. V.

    1979-01-01

    Radioastronomy and Pioneer data reveal the Jovian magnetosphere as a rotating magnetized source of relativistic particles and radio emission, comparable to astrophysical cosmic ray and radio sources, such as pulsars. According to Pioneer data, the magnetic field in the outer magnetosphere is radially extended into a highly time variable disk-shaped configuration which differs fundamentally from the earth's magnetosphere. The outer disk region, and the energetic particles confined in it, are modulated by Jupiter's 10 hr rotation period. The entire outer magnetosphere appears to change drastically on time scales of a few days to a week. In addition to its known modulation of the Jovian decametric radio bursts, Io was found to absorb some radiation belt particles and to accelerate others, and most importantly, to be a source of neutral atoms, and by inference, a heavy ion plasma which may significantly affect the hydrodynamic flow in the magnetosphere. Another important Pioneer finding is that the Jovian outer magnetosphere generates, or permits to escape, fluxes of relativistic electrons of such intensities that Jupiter may be regarded as the dominant source of 1 to 30 MeV cosmic ray electrons in the heliosphere.

  10. Atmospheric Escape from Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Murray-Clay, Ruth; Murray, Norman

    2008-01-01

    Photoionization heating from UV radiation incident on the atmospheres of hot Jupiters may drive planetary mass loss. We construct a model of escape that includes realistic heating and cooling, ionization balance, tidal gravity, and pressure confinement by the host star wind. We show that mass loss takes the form of a hydrodynamic ("Parker") wind, emitted from the planet's dayside during lulls in the stellar wind. When dayside winds are suppressed by the confining action of the stellar wind, nightside winds might pick up if there is sufficient horizontal transport of heat. A hot Jupiter loses mass at maximum rates of ~2 x 10^12 g/s during its host star's pre-main-sequence phase and ~2 x10^10 g/s during the star's main sequence lifetime, for total maximum losses of ~0.06% and ~0.6% of the planet's mass, respectively. For UV fluxes F_UV < 10^4 erg/cm^2/s, the mass loss rate is approximately energy-limited and is proportional to F_UV^0.9. For larger UV fluxes, such as those typical of T Tauri stars, radiative ...

  11. Engineering a Solution to Jupiter Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Karla; Magner, Thomas; Lisano, Michael; Pappalardo, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) would be an international mission with the overall theme of investigating the emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants. Its goals are to (1) explore Europa to investigate its habitability, (2) characterize Ganymede as a planetary object including its potential habitability and (3) explore the Jupiter system as an archetype for gas giants. NASA and ESA have concluded a detailed joint study of a mission to Europa, Ganymede, and the Jupiter system with conceptual orbiters developed by NASA and ESA. The baseline EJSM architecture consists of two primary elements operating simultaneously in the Jovian system: the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). JEO and JGO would execute an intricately choreographed exploration of the Jupiter System before settling into orbit around Europa and Ganymede, respectively. EJSM would directly address themes concerning the origin and evolution of satellite systems and water-rich environments in icy satellites. The potential habitability of the ocean-bearing moons Europa and Ganymede would be investigated, by characterizing the geophysical, compositional, geological, and external processes that affect these icy worlds. EJSM would also investigate Io and Callisto, Jupiter's atmosphere, and the Jovian magnetosphere. By understanding the Jupiter system and unraveling its history, the formation and evolution of gas giant planets and their satellites would be better known. Most importantly, EJSM would shed new light on the potential for the emergence of life in the celestial neighborhood and beyond. The EJSM baseline architecture would provide opportunities for coordinated synergistic observations by JEO and JGO of the Jupiter and Ganymede magnetospheres, the volcanoes and torus of Io, the atmosphere of Jupiter, and comparative planetology of icy satellites. Each spacecraft would conduct both synergistic dual-spacecraft investigations and stand

  12. 100 and counting : SOHO's score as the world's top comet finder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-02-01

    comet hunters," said Shanklin, who is director of the British Astronomical Association's comet section. "It allows amateurs to discover some of the smallest comets ever seen. Yet they link us to sightings of great comets going back more than 2000 years." Nine of the comets found with LASCO, including SOHO-100, 101 and 102, passed the Sun at a safe distance. SOHO-49, which showed up in LASCO images in May 1998 and was designated as Comet 1998 J1, became visible to the naked eye in the southern hemisphere. But the great majority of SOHO's comets failed to survive very close encounters with the Sun. Snowballs in hell Of the first 100 SOHO comets, 92 vaporized in the solar atmosphere. Isaac Newton suggested 300 years ago that infalling comets might supply the Sun with fuel, but no one has ever tracked a comet that definitely hit the bright surface. Near misses are well known, and 100 years ago Heinrich Kreutz in Kiel, Germany, realized that several comets seen buzzing the Sun seemed to have a common origin, because they came from the same direction among the stars. These comets are now called the Kreutz sungrazers, and the 92 vanishing SOHO comets belong to that class. They were not unexpected. Between 1979 and 1989 the P78-1 and SMM solar satellites spotted 16 comets closing with the Sun. Life is perilous for a sungrazer. The mixture of ice and dust that makes up a comet's nucleus is heated like the proverbial snowball in hell, and can survive its visit to the Sun only if it is quite large. What's more, the very strong tidal effect of the Sun's gravity can tear the loosely glued nucleus apart. The disruption that created the many SOHO sungrazers was similar to the fate of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, which went too close to Jupiter and broke up into many pieces that eventually fell into the massive planet in 1994. "SOHO is seeing fragments from the gradual break-up of a great comet, perhaps the one that the Greek astronomer Ephorus saw in 372 BC," commented Brian Marsden of the

  13. The Phosphorous Inventory of Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boice, Daniel; De Almeida, Amaury

    2012-07-01

    Phosphorus is a key element in all known forms of life but its role in life's origin is not known. Phosphorus-bearing compounds have been observed in space, are ubiquitous in meteorites, albeit in small quantities, and have been detected as part of the dust component in comet Halley. However, searches for P-bearing species in the gas phase in cometary comae have been unsuccessful. We present results of the first quantitative study of phosphorus-bearing molecules in comets to identify likely species containing phosphorus and to aid in future searches for this important element, possibly shedding light on issues of comet formation (time and place) and understanding prebiotic to biotic evolution of life.

  14. Catastrophic Disruption of Comet ISON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Jacqueline V.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Coulson, Iain M.; Kleyna, Jan T.; Sekanina, Zdenek; Kracht, Rainer; Riesen, Timm-Emmanuel; Meech, Karen J.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    We report submillimeter 450 and 850 microns dust continuum observations for comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) obtained at heliocentric distances 0.31-0.08 au prior to perihelion on 2013 November 28 (rh?=?0.0125 au). These observations reveal a rapidly varying dust environment in which the dust emission was initially point-like. As ISON approached perihelion, the continuum emission became an elongated dust column spread out over as much as 60? (greater than 10(exp 5) km in the anti-solar direction. Deconvolution of the November 28.04 850 microns image reveals numerous distinct clumps consistent with the catastrophic disruption of comet ISON, producing approximately 5.2?×?10(exp 10) kg of submillimeter-sized dust. Orbital computations suggest that the SCUBA-2 emission peak coincides with the comet's residual nucleus.

  15. Sedna and the cloud of comets surrounding the solar system in Milgromian dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paučo, R.; Klačka, J.

    2016-05-01

    We reconsider the hypothesis of a vast cometary reservoir surrounding the solar system - the Oort cloud of comets - within the framework of Milgromian dynamics (MD or MOND). For this purpose we built a numerical model of the cloud, assuming the theory of modified gravity, QUMOND. In modified gravity versions of MD, the internal dynamics of a system is influenced by the external gravitational field in which the system is embedded, even when this external field is constant and uniform, a phenomenon dubbed the external field effect (EFE). Adopting the popular pair ν(x) = [1-exp(-x1 / 2)] -1 for the MD interpolating function and a0 = 1.2 × 10-10 m s-2 for the MD acceleration scale, we found that the observationally inferred Milgromian cloud of comets is much more radially compact than its Newtonian counterpart. The comets of the Milgromian cloud stay away from the zone where the Galactic tide can torque their orbits significantly. However, this does not need to be an obstacle for the injection of the comets into the inner solar system as the EFE can induce significant change in perihelion distance during one revolution of a comet around the Sun. Adopting constraints on different interpolating function families and a revised value of a0 (provided recently by the Cassini spacecraft), the aforementioned qualitative results no longer hold, and, in conclusion, the Milgromian cloud is very similar to the Newtonian in its overall size, binding energies of comets and hence the operation of the Jupiter-Saturn barrier. However, EFE torquing of perihelia still play a significant role in the inner parts of the cloud. Consequently Sedna-like orbits and orbits of large semi-major axis Centaurs are easily comprehensible in MD. In MD, they both belong to the same population, just in different modes of their evolution.

  16. Comparison of the oxidation state of Fe in comet 81P/Wild 2 and chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogliore, Ryan C.; Butterworth, Anna L.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Gainsforth, Zack; Marcus, Matthew A.; Westphal, Andrew J.

    2010-07-16

    The fragile structure of chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and their minimal parent-body alteration have led researchers to believe these particles originate in comets rather than asteroids where aqueous and thermal alterations have occurred. The solar elemental abundances and atmospheric entry speed of CP-IDPs also suggest a cometary origin. With the return of the Stardust samples from Jupiter-family comet 81P/Wild 2, this hypothesis can be tested. We have measured the Fe oxidation state of 15 CP-IDPs and 194 Stardust fragments using a synchrotron-based x-ray microprobe. We analyzed {approx}300 ng of Wild 2 material - three orders of magnitude more material than other analyses comparing Wild 2 and CP-IDPs. The Fe oxidation state of these two samples of material are > 2{sigma} different: the CP-IDPs are more oxidized than the Wild 2 grains. We conclude that comet Wild 2 contains material that formed at a lower oxygen fugacity than the parent-body, or parent bodies, of CP-IDPs. If all Jupiter-family comets are similar, they do not appear to be consistent with the origin of CP-IDPs. However, comets that formed from a different mix of nebular material and are more oxidized than Wild 2 could be the source of CP-IDPs.

  17. UK pulls out of plans for ILC

    CERN Multimedia

    Durrani, Matin

    2007-01-01

    "A funding crisis at one of the UK's leading research councils has forced the country to pull out of plans for the International Linear Collider (ILC). The science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) says in a report published today that it does not see "a practicable path towards the realization of this facility as currently conceived on a reasonable timescale". (1 page)

  18. Intermode beat stabilized laser with frequency pulling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, S; Araki, T; Suzuki, N

    1994-01-20

    A frequency-stabilized two-mode He-Ne laser has been developed. The intermode beat frequency of the experimental laser was approximately 600 MHz for a 25-cm cavity. The laser frequency in which the mode stands is pulled to the center of the gain curve (frequency pulling). The degree of pulling depends on where the longitudinal modes stand in the broadened gain curve. Beat frequency is thereby changed periodically of the order of hundreds of kilohertz with respect to cavity expansion. The frequency pulling was effectively used for frequency stabilization of the laser. The standing position of the longitudinal mode lights was locked in the gain curve by controlling the change of intermode beat frequency. A microwave mixer was applied to extract the frequency change of the intermode beat. Excellent frequency stability (10(10) for the laser oscillation and 10(6) for the beat frequency) was attained. The polarization orthogonality of the proposed laser was superior to that of Zeeman lasers.

  19. IN SITU PLASMA MEASUREMENTS OF FRAGMENTED COMET 73P SCHWASSMANN–WACHMANN 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, J. A.; Lepri, S. T.; Combi, M.; Zurbuchen, T. H. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Rubin, M., E-mail: jagi@umich.edu [Universität Bern, Bern (Switzerland)

    2015-12-10

    The interiors of comets contain some of the most pristine material in the solar system. Comet 73P/Schwassmann–Wachmann 3, discovered in 1930, is a Jupiter-family comet with a 5.34-year period. This comet split into 5 fragments in 1995 and disintegrated into nearly 70 major pieces in 2006. In 2006 May and June, recently ionized cometary particles originating from fragments including and surrounding some of these major objects were collected with the ACE/SWICS and Wind/STICS sensors. Due to a combination of the instrument characteristics and the close proximity of the fragments passing between those spacecraft and the Sun, unique measurements regarding the charge state composition and the elemental abundances of both cometary and heliospheric plasma were made during that time. The cometary material released from some of these fragments can be identified by the concentrations of water-group pickup ions having a mass-per-charge ratio of 16–18 amu e{sup −1}, indicating that while these fragments are small, they are still actively sublimating. We present an analysis of cometary composition, spatial distribution, and heliospheric interactions, with a focus on helium, C{sup +}/O{sup +}, and water-group ions.

  20. Low-Energy Asteroid and Comet Transit Analysis using Isolating Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Rodney L.; Chodas, Paul; Easton, Robert W.; Lo, Martin W.

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that asteroids and comets typically capture or transit near a planet by traveling through the L1 and L2 libration point gateways. These regions are therefore key to understanding the mechanism by which these captures, transits, and potential impacts occur. Recently, Anderson, Easton, and Lo (2015) explored the L2 region in the Earth-Moon system using isolating blocks in the circular restricted three-body problem (CRTBP). Isolating blocks provide a theoretically rigorous method for computing the invariant manifolds of libration point periodic orbits and all possible transit trajectories at a particular Jacobi constant in the CRTBP. Using isolating block methods allows us to directly compute and study the transit trajectories used by comets and asteroids in the low-energy regimes common for these types of bodies. In this study, both L1 and L2 isolating blocks are computed for the Sun-Earth and Sun-Jupiter CRTBP systems to compute trajectories transiting near the Earth and Jupiter. Statistics based on transit time, periapse passages, and exit location are first computed. Then individual trajectory solutions corresponding to different trajectory types are analyzed. The transit trajectories are also characterized using their orbital elements and compared to known comets and asteroids. These results show that the invariant manifolds of the orbits in the isolating block control and guide the dynamics of comets and asteroids as they temporarily capture between the L1 and L2 region of a planet or satellite.Reference: Anderson, R. L., R. W. Easton, M. W. Lo (2015), AAS/AIAA Astrodynamics Conf., AAS 15-615.

  1. Comets. [and solar system evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, M.

    1986-01-01

    The nature, history, and evolution of comets are considered. Cometary ions, formed by photoionization and other processes, are forced into a highly structured ion tail by the interaction with the solar wind. The importance of comets to solar-system studies lies in the possibilities that they are well-preserved samples of either the interstellar cloud which collapsed to form the solar system or the planetesimals from which the outer planets accumulated, and that they provided either the prebiotic complex molecules from which life evolved or some volatiles necessary for the evolution of these molecules.

  2. EUV observations of comet Halley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripken, H. W.; Fahr, H. J.; Lay, G.

    The use of spaceborne or sounding-rocket EUV observations to determine the He/H abundance ratio, the shape of the Lyman-alpha emission line, and the H velocity distribution in comet Halley is discussed. The resonance-absorption-cell spectrophotometers of the payloads proposed by Fahr et al. (1984) for the Ultra-Halley experiment are briefly characterized and shown to be capable of obtaining quantitative measurements of the 58.4-nm line of He for comet He/H ratios in excess of 0.0004, successfully eliminating or accounting for geocoronal and cosmic contamination.

  3. The Impact of a Large Object with Jupiter in July 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin; Wesley, A.; Orton, G.; Chodas, P.; Hueso, R.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Fletcher, L.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Legarreta, J.; Gomez-Forrellad, J. M.

    2010-05-01

    The only major impact ever observed directly in the Solar System was that of a large fragmented comet with Jupiter in July (1994) (Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9; SL9). We report here the observation of a second, single, large impact on Jupiter that occurred on 19 July 2009 at a latitude of -55° with an orthogonal entry trajectory and a lower incidence angle compared to those of SL9. The size of the initial aerosol cloud debris was 4,800 km East-West and 2,500 km North-South. Comparison its properties with those produced by the SL9 fragments, coupled with dynamical calculations of possible pre-impact orbits, indicates that the impactor was most probably an icy body with a size of 0.5-1 km. We calculate that the rate of collisions of this magnitude may be five to ten times more frequent than previously thought. The search for unpredicted impacts, such as the current one, could be best performed in the near-infrared methane absorption bands at 890 nm and in the 2.12 to 2.3 μm K methane-hydrogen absorption band, where the high-altitude aerosols detach by their brightness relative to Jupiter's primary clouds. We present measurements of the debris dispersion by Jovian winds from a long-term imaging campaign with ground-based telescopes. Ackowledgements: Work was supported by the Spanish MICIIN AYA2009-10701 with FEDER and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07, by NASA funds to JPL, Caltech, by the NASA Postdoctoral Program at JPL, and by the Glasstone Fellowship program at Oxford.

  4. Tabulation of comet observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    Concerning comets: 1957 III Arend-Roland, 1957 V Mrkos, 1958 III Burnham, 1959 III Bester-Hoffmeister, 1959 VI Alcock, 1959 VIII P/Giacobini-Zinner, 1960 I P/Wild 1, 1960 II Burnham, 1960 III P/Schaumasse, 1960 VIII P/Finlay, 1961 V Wilson-Hubbard, 1961 VIII Seki, 1962 III Seki-Lines, 1962 VIII Humason, 1963 I Ikeya, 1963 III Alcock, 1963 V Pereyra, 1964 VI Tomita-Gerber-Honda, 1964 VIII Ikeya, 1964 IX Everhart, 1979 X Bradfield, 1980 X P/Stephan-Oterma, 1980 XII Meier, 1980 XIII P/Tuttle, 1981 II Panther, 1982 I Bowell, 1982 IV P/Grigg-Skjellerup, 1982 VII P/d'Arrest, 1986 III P/Halley, 1987 IV Shoemaker, 1987 XII P/Hartley 3, 1987 XIX P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 2, 1987 XXIX Bradfield, 1987 XXX Levy, 1987 XXXII McNaught, 1987 XXXIII P/Borrelly, 1987 XXXVI P/Parker-Hartley, 1987 XXXVII P/Helin- Roman-Alu 1, 1988 III Shoemaker-Holt, 1988 V Liller, 1988 VIII P/Ge-Wang, 1988 XI P/Shoemaker-Holt 2, 1988 XIV P/Tempel 2, 1988 XV Machholz, 1988 XX Yanaka, 1988 XXI Shoemaker, 1988 XXIV Yanaka, 1989 III Shoemaker, 1989 V Shoemaker-Holt-Rodriquez, 1989 VIII P/Pons-Winnecke, 1989 X P/Brorsen-Metcalf, 1989 XI P/Gunn, 1989 XIII P/Lovas 1, 1989 XVIII McKenzie-Russell, 1989 XIX Okazaki-Levy-Rudenko, 1989 XX P/Clark, 1989 XXI Helin-Ronan-Alu, 1989 XXII Aarseth-Brewington, 1989h P/Van Biesbroeck, 1989t P/Wild 2, 1989u P/Kearns-Kwee, 1989c1 Austin, 1989e1 Skorichenko-George, 1990a P/Wild 4, 1990b Černis-Kiuchi-Nakamura, 1990c Levy, 1990e P/Wolf-Harrington, 1990f P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdušáková, 1990g McNaught-Hughes, 1990i Tsuchiya-Kiuchi, 1990n P/Taylor, 1990ο P/Shoemaker-Levy 1, 1991a P/Metcalf-Brewington, 1991b Arai, 1991c P/Swift-Gehrels, 1991d Shoemaker-Levy, 1991e P/Shoemaker-Levy 3, 1991h P/Takamizawa, 1991j P/Hartley 1, 1991k P/Mrkos, 1991l Helin-Lawrence, 1991n P/Faye, 1991q P/Levy, 1991t P/Hartley 2, P/Encke, P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1.

  5. Strong Langmuir turbulence at Jupiter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Langmuir wave packets with short scale lengths less than an approximately equal to 100 lambda e have been observed in Jupiter's foreshock. Theoretical constraints on the electric fields and scale sizes of collapsing wave packets are summarized, extended and placed in a form suitable for easy comparison with Voyager and Ulysses data. The published data are reviewed and possible instrumental underestimation of fields discussed. New upper limits for the fields of the published wave packets are estimated. Wave packets formed at the nucleation scale from the observed large-scale fields cannot collapse because they are disrupted before collapse occurs. The published wave packets are quantitatively inconsistent with strong turbulence collapse. Strict constraints exist for more intense wave packets to be able to collapse: E greater than or approximately equals to 1-8 mV/m for scales less than or approximately equal to 100 lambda e. Means for testing these conclusions using Voyager and Ulysses data are suggested.

  6. Overview of Juno Results at Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Scott; Connerney, Jack; Levin, Steve

    2017-04-01

    Juno is the first mission to investigate Jupiter using a close polar orbit. The Juno science goals include the study of Jupiter interior composition and structure, deep atmosphere and its polar magnetosphere. All orbits have peri-jove at approximately 5000 km above Jupiter's visible cloud tops. The payload consists of a set of microwave antennas for deep sounding, magnetometers, gravity radio science, low and high energy charged particle detectors, plasma wave antennas, ultraviolet imaging spectrograph, infrared imager and spectrometer and a visible camera. The Juno mission design, an overview of the early science results from Juno, and a description of the collaborative Earth based campaign will be presented.

  7. Juno's first glimpse of Jupiter's complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Scott; Levin, Steven; Bagenal, Fran

    2017-08-01

    Preliminary results from NASA's Juno mission are presented in this special issue of Geophysical Research Letters. The data were gathered by nine scientific instruments as the Juno spacecraft approached Jupiter on the dawn flank, was inserted into Jupiter orbit on 4 July 2016, and made the first polar passes close to the planet. The first results hint that Jupiter may not have a distinct core, indicate puzzling deep atmospheric convection, and reveal complex small-scale structure in the magnetic field and auroral processes that are distinctly different from those at Earth.

  8. New Views of Jupiter's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J. A.

    1998-09-01

    Jupiter's rings are the archetype of ethereal planetary rings (very-low optical-depth bands containing micron-sized "dust"). As a result of much improved observations by Galileo (Ockert-Bell* -- most citations are et al. and Icarus in press* or this meeting) and Keck (de Pater*), we now understand the nature of such rings. The ring has three components: a 104 km-thick toroidal halo (1.4-1.7 RJ; normal optical depth t = 10-6), a thin main ring (1.7-1.8 RJ; t = 10-6), and a pair of exterior gossamer rings (1.8-3.5RJ; t = 10-7). The main ring has patchy ( 20-30 percent) brightness. The ring is reddish and its particles satisfy a -2.5 differential power-law size distribution. Because particle lifetimes are brief, the rings must be continually regenerated, by collisions into parent bodies, which may be unseen or may be the known small ring-moons (Thomas*, Simonelli). The gossamer ring seems to be collisional ejecta derived from the ring-moons Amalthea and Thebe, and evolving inward by Poynting-Robertson drag (Burns). The particles drift through many electromagnetic resonances, clustering around synchronous orbit, which produce jumps in the particles' inclinations (Hamilton). The main ring is probably debris from Adrastea and Metis, which orbit in the equatorial plane. The halo particles are driven vertically by electromagnetic forces, which may be resonant (Schaffer & Burns) or not (Horanyi & Cravens). When halo orbits become highly distorted, particles are lost into Jupiter. Similar faint rings may be attendant to all small, close-in satellites (Showalter).

  9. Affective and sensory correlates of hair pulling in pediatric trichotillomania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Suzanne A; Tolin, David F; Franklin, Martin

    2009-05-01

    Hair pulling in pediatric populations has not received adequate empirical study. Investigations of the affective and sensory states contributing to the etiology and maintenance of hair pulling may help to elucidate the classification of trichotillomania (TTM) as an impulse control disorder or obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorder. The current study aimed to examine children's self-reported affective and sensory states associated with hair pulling. Fifteen participants completed a questionnaire assessing children's experiences during first and recent hair pulling episodes. Results revealed that pulling hair for the first time was associated with pleasure and pain whereas recent hair pulling was associated with pleasure only, suggesting that the punishing quality of hair pulling may diminish over time. The findings also support the notion that hair pulling may be maintained primarily through positive reinforcement, which is consistent with its classification as an impulse control disorder.

  10. Miniature Tractor Pull Helps Teach Mechanical Power Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Todd C.

    1996-01-01

    A miniature tractor pull was developed as a high school activity, enabling students to assess a tractor's pulling capabilities and determine subsequent horsepower. The activity takes the textbook concept of horsepower and makes it come alive. (JOW)

  11. Featured Image: A Comet's Coma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    This series of images (click for the full view!) features the nucleus of comet 67P/Churymov-Gerasimenko. The images were taken with the Wide Angle Camera of RosettasOSIRIS instrument asRosetta orbited comet 67P. Each column represents a different narrow-band filter that allows us to examine the emission of a specific fragment species, and the images progress in time from January 2015 (top) to June 2015 (bottom). In a recent study, Dennis Bodewits (University of Maryland) and collaborators used these images to analyze the comets inner coma, the cloud of gas and dust produced around the nucleus as ices sublime. OSIRISs images allowed the team to explore how the 67Ps inner coma changed over time as the comet approached the Sun marking the first time weve been able to study such an environment at this level of detail. To read more about what Bodewits and collaborators learned, you can check out their paper below!CitationD. Bodewits et al 2016 AJ 152 130. doi:10.3847/0004-6256/152/5/130

  12. Landslides and impacts on comets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czechowski, Leszek

    2016-07-01

    The recent landing of Philae on the comet 67P/Czuriumow-Gierasimienko indicates that elastic properties of comet's nuclei could be similar to elastic properties of dry snow, namely Young modulus is assumed to be 106 - 108 Pa. We considered a simple model of two spheres (with radius 1400 m each) connected by cylinder (with radius of 200 m and length of 200 m). Density is 470 kg m-3. This shape corresponds approximately to shape of some comets. A few vibration modes are possible. In present research we consider 3 modes: bending, lengthening-shortening along axis of symmetry, and torsion. Let assume that comets are hit by small meteoroid of the mass of 1 kg and velocity 20 km s-1. The maximum values of acceleration of the surface resulting from this impact are given in Table 1. Note that these values are higher than acceleration of the gravity of the comet. Consequently, these vibrations could be an important factor of surface evolution, e.g. they could trigger landslides. It could be alternative mechanism to that presented in [4] (i.e. fluidization). Acknowledgement: The research is partly supported by Polish National Science Centre (decision 2014/15/B/ST 10/02117) References [1] T. Spohn, J. Knollenberg, A. J. Ball, M. Ba-naszkiewicz, J. Benkhoff, M. Grott, J. Gry-gorczuk, C. Hüttig, A. Hagermann, G. Kargl, E. Kaufmann, N. Kömle, E. Kührt, K. J. Kossacki, W. Marczewski, I. Pelivan, R. Schrödter, K. Seiferlin. (2015) Thermal and mechanical properties of the near-surface layers of comet 67P/Churyumov- Gera-simenko Science 31 July 2015: Vol. 349 no. 6247 DOI: 10.1126/science.aab0464 [2] Reuter B. (2013) On how to measure snow mechanical properties relevant to slab avalanche release. International Snow Science Workshop Grenoble - Chamonix Mont-Blanc - 2013 007 [3] Ball A.J. (1997) Ph. D. Thesis: Measuring Physical Properties at the Surface of a Comet Nu-cleus, Univ.of Kent U.K. [4] Belton M. J.S., Melosh J. (2009). Fluidization and multiphase transport of

  13. Weightlifting pulling derivatives: rationale for implementation and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchomel, Timothy J; Comfort, Paul; Stone, Michael H

    2015-06-01

    This review article examines previous weightlifting literature and provides a rationale for the use of weightlifting pulling derivatives that eliminate the catch phase for athletes who are not competitive weightlifters. Practitioners should emphasize the completion of the triple extension movement during the second pull phase that is characteristic of weightlifting movements as this is likely to have the greatest transference to athletic performance that is dependent on hip, knee, and ankle extension. The clean pull, snatch pull, hang high pull, jump shrug, and mid-thigh pull are weightlifting pulling derivatives that can be used in the teaching progression of the full weightlifting movements and are thus less complex with regard to exercise technique. Previous literature suggests that the clean pull, snatch pull, hang high pull, jump shrug, and mid-thigh pull may provide a training stimulus that is as good as, if not better than, weightlifting movements that include the catch phase. Weightlifting pulling derivatives can be implemented throughout the training year, but an emphasis and de-emphasis should be used in order to meet the goals of particular training phases. When implementing weightlifting pulling derivatives, athletes must make a maximum effort, understand that pulling derivatives can be used for both technique work and building strength-power characteristics, and be coached with proper exercise technique. Future research should consider examining the effect of various loads on kinetic and kinematic characteristics of weightlifting pulling derivatives, training with full weightlifting movements as compared to training with weightlifting pulling derivatives, and how kinetic and kinematic variables vary between derivatives of the snatch.

  14. CO in Distantly Active Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womack, M.; Sarid, G.; Wierzchos, K.

    2017-03-01

    The activity of most comets near the Sun is dominated by the sublimation of frozen water, the most abundant ice in comets. Some comets, however, are active well beyond the water-ice sublimation limit of ∼3 au. Three bodies dominate the observational record and modeling efforts for distantly active comets: the long-period comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp), and the short-period comets (with Centaur orbits) 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 and 2060 Chiron. We summarize what is known about these three objects with an emphasis on their gaseous comae. We calculate their CN/CO and CO2/CO production rate ratios from the literature and discuss implications, such as HCN and CO2 outgassing are not significant contributors to their comae. Using our own data we derive CO production rates, Q(CO), for all three objects to examine whether there is a correlation between gas production and different orbital histories and/or size. The CO measurements of Hale-Bopp (4–11 AU) and 29P are consistent with a nominal production rate of Q(CO) = 3.5 × 1029 r‑2 superimposed with sporadic outbursts. The similarity of Hale-Bopp CO production rates for pre- and post-perihelion suggests that thermal inertia was not very important and therefore most of the activity is at or near the surface of the comet. We further examine the applicability of existing models in explaining the systematic behavior of our small sample. We find that orbital history does not appear to play a significant role in explaining 29P’s CO production rates. 29P outproduces Hale-Bopp at the same heliocentric distance, even though it has been subjected to much more solar heating. Previous modeling work on such objects predicts that 29P should have been devolatilized over a fresher comet like Hale-Bopp. This may point to 29P having a different orbital history than current models predict, with its current orbit acquired more recently. On the other hand, Chiron’s CO measurements are consistent with it being significantly depleted

  15. Customized Pull Systems for Single-Product Flow Lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaury, E.G.A.; Kleijnen, J.P.C.; Pierreval, H.

    1998-01-01

    Traditionally pull production systems are managed through classic control systems such as Kanban, Conwip, or Base stock, but this paper proposes ‘customized’ pull control. Customization means that a given production line is managed through a pull control system that in principle connects each stage

  16. 30 CFR 75.828 - Trailing cable pulling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trailing cable pulling. 75.828 Section 75.828... Longwalls § 75.828 Trailing cable pulling. The trailing cable must be de-energized prior to being pulled by any equipment other than the continuous mining machine. The cable manufacturer's recommended...

  17. Customized Pull Systems for Single-Product Flow Lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaury, E.G.A.; Kleijnen, J.P.C.; Pierreval, H.

    1998-01-01

    Traditionally pull production systems are managed through classic control systems such as Kanban, Conwip, or Base stock, but this paper proposes ‘customized’ pull control. Customization means that a given production line is managed through a pull control system that in principle connects each stage

  18. Astronomers find distant planet like Jupiter

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Astronomers searching for planetary systems like our solar system have found a planet similar to Jupiter orbiting a nearby star similar to our Sun, about 90 light-years from Earth, according to researchers (1/2 page).

  19. Kepler constraints on planets near hot Jupiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Ragozzine, Darin; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; /UC, Santa Cruz, Astron. Astrophys.; Carter, Joshua A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Ford, Eric B.; /Florida U.; Holman, Matthew J.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Rowe, Jason F.; /NASA, Ames; Welsh, William F.; /San Diego State U., Astron. Dept.; Borucki, William J.; /NASA, Ames; Boss, Alan P.; /Carnegie Inst., Wash., D.C., DTM; Ciardi, David R.; /Caltech /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2012-05-01

    We present the results of a search for planetary companions orbiting near hot Jupiter planet candidates (Jupiter-size candidates with orbital periods near 3 d) identified in the Kepler data through its sixth quarter of science operations. Special emphasis is given to companions between the 2:1 interior and exterior mean-motion resonances. A photometric transit search excludes companions with sizes ranging from roughly two-thirds to five times the size of the Earth, depending upon the noise properties of the target star. A search for dynamically induced deviations from a constant period (transit timing variations) also shows no significant signals. In contrast, comparison studies of warm Jupiters (with slightly larger orbits) and hot Neptune-size candidates do exhibit signatures of additional companions with these same tests. These differences between hot Jupiters and other planetary systems denote a distinctly different formation or dynamical history.

  20. Analysis of JUPITER experiment in ZPPR-9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1980-09-15

    Information and data from the ZPPR-9 reactor JUPITER experiment are presented concerning a general description of data and methods; criticality; reaction rate ratio and reaction rate distribution; Doppler and sample reactivity worth; sodium void worth; and control rod worth.

  1. Kepler constraints on planets near hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Jason H; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Carter, Joshua A; Ford, Eric B; Holman, Matthew J; Rowe, Jason F; Welsh, William F; Borucki, William J; Boss, Alan P; Ciardi, David R; Quinn, Samuel N

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a search for planetary companions orbiting near hot Jupiter planet candidates (Jupiter-size candidates with orbital periods near 3 days) identified in the Kepler data through its sixth quarter of science operations. Special emphasis is given to companions between the 2:1 interior and exterior mean-motion resonances. A photometric transit search excludes companions with sizes ranging from roughly 2/3 to 5 times the size of the Earth, depending upon the noise properties of the target star. A search for dynamically induced deviations from a constant period (transit timing variations or TTVs) also shows no significant signals. In contrast, comparison studies of warm Jupiters (with slightly larger orbits) and hot Neptune-size candidates do exhibit signatures of additional companions with these same tests. These differences between hot Jupiters and other planetary systems denote a distinctly different formation or dynamical history.

  2. Far infrared spectrophotometry of Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, E. F.; Goorvitch, D.; Simpson, J. P.; Strecker, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    Infrared spectral measurements of Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn were obtained from 100 to 470 kaysers and, by taking Mars as a calibration source, brightness temperatures of Jupiter and Saturn were determined with approximately 5 kayser resolution. Internal luminosities were determined from the data and are reported to be approximately 8 times 10 to the minus tenth power of the sun's luminosity for Jupiter and approximately 3.6 times 10 to the minus tenth power of the sun's luminosity for Saturn. Comparison of data with spectra predicted by models suggests the need for an opacity source in addition to gaseous hydrogen and ammonia to help explain Jupiter's observed spectrum in the vicinity of 250 kaysers.

  3. Jupiter Great Red Spot and White Ovals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    This photo of Jupiter was taken by Voyager 1 on March 1, 1979. The spacecraft was 3 million miles (5 million kilometers) from Jupiter at the time. The photo shows Jupiter's Great Red Spot (upper right) and the turbulent region immediately to the west. At the middle right of the frame is one of several white ovals seen on Jupiter from Earth. The structure in every feature here is far better than has ever been seen from any telescopic observations. The Red Spot and the white oval both reveal intricate and involved structure. The smallest details that can be seen in this photo are about 55 miles (95 kilometers) across. JPL manages and controls the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  4. Tidal Response of Preliminary Jupiter Model

    CERN Document Server

    Wahl, Sean M; Militzer, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    In anticipation of improved observational data for Jupiter's gravitational field from the Juno spacecraft, we predict the static tidal response for a variety of Jupiter interior models based on ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures. We calculate hydrostatic-equilibrium gravity terms using the non-perturbative concentric Maclaurin Spheroid (CMS) method that eliminates lengthy expansions used in the theory of figures. Our method captures terms arising from the coupled tidal and rotational perturbations, which we find to be important for a rapidly-rotating planet like Jupiter. Our predicted static tidal Love number $k_2 = 0.5900$ is $\\sim$10\\% larger than previous estimates. The value is, as expected, highly correlated with the zonal harmonic coefficient $J_2$, and is thus nearly constant when plausible changes are made to interior structure while holding $J_2$ fixed at the observed value. We note that the predicted static $k_2$ might change due to Jupiter's dynamical response to the Galilea...

  5. Kepler constraints on planets near hot Jupiters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Jason H; Ragozzine, Darin; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Carter, Joshua A; Ford, Eric B; Holman, Matthew J; Rowe, Jason F; Welsh, William F; Borucki, William J; Boss, Alan P; Ciardi, David R; Quinn, Samuel N

    2012-05-22

    We present the results of a search for planetary companions orbiting near hot Jupiter planet candidates (Jupiter-size candidates with orbital periods near 3 d) identified in the Kepler data through its sixth quarter of science operations. Special emphasis is given to companions between the 21 interior and exterior mean-motion resonances. A photometric transit search excludes companions with sizes ranging from roughly two-thirds to five times the size of the Earth, depending upon the noise properties of the target star. A search for dynamically induced deviations from a constant period (transit timing variations) also shows no significant signals. In contrast, comparison studies of warm Jupiters (with slightly larger orbits) and hot Neptune-size candidates do exhibit signatures of additional companions with these same tests. These differences between hot Jupiters and other planetary systems denote a distinctly different formation or dynamical history.

  6. Surface plasmon polariton assisted optical pulling force

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, M I; Bogdanov, A A; Shalin, A S; Dogariu, A

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate both analytically and numerically the existence of optical pulling forces acting on particles located near plasmonic interfaces. Two main factors contribute to the appearance of this negative reaction force. The interference between the incident and reflected waves induces a rotating dipole with an asymmetric scattering pattern while the directional excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) enhances the linear momentum of scattered light. The strongly asymmetric SPP excitation is determined by spin-orbit coupling of the rotating dipole and surface plasmon polariton. As a result of the total momentum conservation, the force acting on the particle points in a direction opposite to the incident wave propagation. We derive analytical expressions for the force acting on a dipolar particles placed in the proximity of plasmonic surfaces. Analytical expressions for this pulling force are derived within the dipole approximation and are in excellent agreement with results of electromagnetic numerica...

  7. Import-push or Export-pull?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäkel, Ina Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Does the selection effect of trade work solely through competition from imports, or does the export market further contribute to firm selection? This paper provides a re-interpretation of the different mechanisms in terms of selection on profitability - rather than productivity - and derives novel...... predictions regarding the export market and the role of product differentiation. Empirical results for a sample of Danish manufacturing industries confirm the import- "push" hypothesis as well as the export- "pull" hypothesis, but also reveal differences across industries. The selection effect of trade...... is mainly driven by the "import-push" if product differentiation is high, whereas it is driven by the "export-pull" if goods are homogeneous....

  8. Import-push or Export-pull?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäkel, Ina Charlotte

    Does the selection effect of trade work solely through competition from imports, or does the export market further contribute to firm selection? This paper provides a re-interpretation of the different mechanisms in terms of selection on profitability - rather than productivity - and derives novel...... predictions regarding the export market and the role of product differentiation. Empirical results for a sample of Danish manufacturing industries confirm the import-"push" hypothesis as well as the export-"pull" hypothesis, but also reveal differences across industries. The selection effect of trade...... is mainly driven by the "import-push" if product differentiation is high, whereas it is driven by the "export-pull" if goods are homogeneous....

  9. RF Bead Pull Measurements of the DQW

    CERN Document Server

    Jaume, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    This report was written within the framework of the CERN Summer Student Program. It is focused on the Radio Frequency study of the Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity [1] considered for the crab-crossing scheme of the LHC Luminosity upgrade [2]. HFSS simulation [3] and Bead-Pull Measurements technique were used for the characterization of the higher-order terms of the main deflecting mode.

  10. Laparoscopic assisted anorectal pull through: Reformed techniques

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To assess the modifications in the technique of laparoscopic assisted anorectal pull through (LAARP) practiced at our institute and analyze the post operative outcome and associated complications. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study from January 2001 to May 2009 analyzing LAARP for high anorectal malformations. Results: A total of 40 patients - 34 males and six females, in the age group of two months to six years were studied. Staged procedure was done in 39 patients; one c...

  11. Voyager-Jupiter radio science data papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, G. S.; Wood, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    The reduction and interpretation of the radio science data from the Voyager 1 and 2 encounters of the planet Jupiter and its satellites resulted in the preparation of several papers for publication in the special Voyager-Jupiter issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research. The radio science and tracking systems of the Deep Space Network provide the data which makes this research possible. This article lists submitted papers by title, with their authors and with abstracts of their contents.

  12. Jupiter's Radiation Belts: Can Pioneer 10 Survive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, W N; Birmingham, T J; Mead, G D

    1973-12-07

    Model calculations of Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts indicate that the Galilean satellites can reduce particle fluxes in certain regions of the inner magnetosphere by as much as six orders of magnitude. Average fluxes should be reduced by a factor of 100 or more along the Pioneer 10 trajectory through the heart of Jupiter's radiation belts in early December. This may be enough to prevent serious radiation damage to the spacecraft.

  13. Tidal Response of Preliminary Jupiter Model

    OpenAIRE

    Wahl, Sean M; Hubbard, Willam B.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    In anticipation of improved observational data for Jupiter's gravitational field from the Juno spacecraft, we predict the static tidal response for a variety of Jupiter interior models based on ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures. We calculate hydrostatic-equilibrium gravity terms using the non-perturbative concentric Maclaurin Spheroid (CMS) method that eliminates lengthy expansions used in the theory of figures. Our method captures terms arising from the coupled tidal...

  14. Pulling rigid bodies through granular material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubik, Ryan; Dressaire, Emilie

    2016-11-01

    The need for anchoring systems in granular materials such as sand is present in the marine transportation industry, e.g. to layout moorings, keep vessels and docks fixed in bodies of water, build oil rigs, etc. The holding power of an anchor is associated with the force exerted by the granular media. Empirical evidence indicates that the holding power depends on the size and shape of the anchoring structure. In this model study, we use a two-dimensional geometry in which a rigid body is pulled through a granular media at constant velocity to determine the drag and lift forces exerted by a granular medium on a moving object. The method allows measuring the drag force and recording the trajectory of the rigid object through the sand. We systematically vary the size and geometry of the rigid body, the properties of the granular medium and the extraction speed. For different initial positions of a cylindrical object pulled horizontally through the medium, we record large variations in magnitude of the drag and a significant lift force that pulls the object out of the sand.

  15. How primordial is the structure of comet 67P/C-G (and of comets in general)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbidelli, Alessandro; Jutzi, Martin; Benz, Willy; Toliou, Anastasia; Rickman, Hans; Bottke, William; Brasser, Ramon

    2016-10-01

    Several properties of the comet 67P-CG suggest that it is a primordial planetesimal. On the other hand, the size-frequency distribution (SFD) of the craters detected by the New Horizons missions at the surface of Pluto and Charon reveal that the SFD of trans-Neptunian objects smaller than 100km in diameter is very similar to that of the asteroid belt. Because the asteroid belt SFD is at collisional equilibrium, this observation suggests that the SFD of the trans-Neptunian population is at collisional equilibrium as well, implying that comet-size bodies should be the product of collisional fragmentation and not primordial objects. To test whether comet 67P-CG could be a (possibly lucky) survivor of the original population, we conducted a series of numerical impact experiments, where an object with the shape and the density of 67P-CG, and material strength varying from 10 to 1,000 Pa, is hit on the "head" by a 100m projectile at different speeds. From these experiments we derive the impact energy required to disrupt the body catastrophically, or destroy its bi-lobed shape, as a function of impact speed. Next, we consider a dynamical model where the original trans-Neptunian disk is dispersed during a phase of temporary dynamical instability of the giant planets, which successfully reproduces the scattered disk and Oort cloud populations inferred from the current fluxes of Jupiter-family and long period comets. We find that, if the dynamical dispersal of the disk occurs late, as in the Late Heavy Bombardment hypothesis, a 67P-CG-like body has a negligible probability to avoid all catastrophic collisions. During this phase, however, the collisional equilibrium SFD measured by the New Horizons mission can be established. Instead, if the dispersal of the disk occurred as soon as gas was removed, a 67P-CG-like body has about a 20% chance to avoid catastrophic collisions. Nevertheless it would still undergo 10s of reshaping collisions. We estimate that, statistically, the

  16. The Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter : An ESA Contribution to the Europa-Jupiter System Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drossart, Pierre; Blanc, M.; Lebreton, J. P.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Greeley, R.; Fujimoto, M.; EJSM/Jupiter Science Definition Team

    2008-09-01

    In the framework of an outer planets mission, under study after the NASA-Juno mission, the Europa-Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) would combine a fleet of up to three satellites in order to investigate in depth many questions related to the Jupiter System. These investigations are essential for our understanding of the emergence and evolution of habitable worlds, not only within the Solar System, but also for extrasolar planets investigations. Scientific targets of EJSM will focus on Europa and Ganymede as a key pair of Galilean satellites, to address the questions on their habitability, formation, and internal structure, as well as the coupling with the whole Jovian system : Jupiter's atmosphere and interior, magnetosphere and magnetodisk. .In combination with a Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO likely provided by NASA) and a Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter (JMO likely provided by JAXA), ESA is studying a Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). The mission scenario includes a direct launch in 2020 with a transfer time to Jupiter of 6 years. After the orbit insertion around Jupiter, a first phase ( 2 years) will be devoted to Jupiter system and Callisto studies, with multiple flybys of Callisto planned at low altitude ( 200 km), followed by a Ganymede orbit insertion and extensive study of Ganymede ( 1 year). In-depth comparative study of inner (Io and Europa) and outer (Ganymede and Callisto) satellites with combined payload of JEO and JGO will address the question of the relative geological evolution of the satellites. On JGO, the transport phenomena in the magnetosphere of Jupiter will be studied in combination with JMO, and the Ganymede magnetosphere will be observed in situ. Jupiter atmosphere investigations on JGO will focus on coupling phenomena between troposphere, stratosphere and mesosphere, the stratospheric composition and the question of thermospheric heating.

  17. Emerging Trends on the Volatile Chemistry in Comets as Measured with High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dello Russo, Neil; Kawakita, Hideyo; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Weaver, Harold A.

    2016-10-01

    A systematic analysis of the mixing ratios with respect to H2O for eight species (CH3OH, HCN, NH3, H2CO, C2H2, C2H6, CH4, and CO) measured with high-resolution infrared spectroscopy is presented. Some trends are beginning to emerge when mixing ratios in individual comets are compared to average mixing ratios obtained for all species within the population. The variation in mixing ratios for all measured species is at least an order of magnitude. Overall, Jupiter-family comets are depleted in volatile species with respect to H2O compared to long-period Oort cloud comets, with the most volatile species showing the greatest relative depletion. There is a high positive correlation between the mixing ratios of HCN, C2H6, and CH4, whereas NH3, H2CO, and C2H2 are moderately correlated with each other but generally uncorrelated or show only weak correlation with other species. CO is generally uncorrelated with the other measured species possibly because it has the highest volatility and is therefore more susceptible to thermal evolutionary effects. Molecular mixing ratios for CH3OH, HCN, C2H6, and CH4 show an expected behavior with heliocentric distance suggesting a dominant ice source, whereas there is emerging evidence that the mixing ratios of NH3, H2CO, and C2H2 may increase at small heliocentric distances, suggesting the possibility of additional sources related to the thermal decomposition of organic dust. Although this provides information on the composition of the most volatile grains in comets, it presents an additional difficulty in classifying comet chemistry because most comets within this dataset were only observed over a limited range of heliocentric distance. Optical and infrared comparisons indicate that mixing ratios of daughter species and potential parents from cometary ices are sometimes but not always consistent with one another. This suggests that in many comets there are significant sources of C2 and/or CN from grains, and that the importance of these

  18. Comets 169P/NEAT and P/2003 T12 (SOHO): Two possible fragments of a common ancestor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Andrea; Fernández, Julio Angel

    2015-08-01

    In a recent work we analyzed the orbit evolution of Jupiter family comets in near-Earth orbits, and found some comets moving on highly stable orbits, like the near-Earth asteroids (Fernández & Sosa 2015). Two of them actually show almost identical orbits; they are the comets 169P/NEAT and P/2003 T12 (SOHO). Comet 169P seems to be a few km-sized, almost inactive body, while P/2003 T12 would be a very small comet, with a sub-km radius nucleus. We performed extended orbital integrations for the past 100,000 yr to further study their dynamical evolution. We found that the orbital parameters remain stable for several thousand years, with a well defined absolute minimum of their relative spatial distance around 2900 yr in the past, coincident with a low value of the relative velocity. This spatial minimum is in a remarkable good agreement with the results obtained by means of other methods to study common origins between pairs of asteroids (Vokrouhlicky & Nesvorny 2008, Southworth & Hawkins 1963), and to test a comet-meteor shower association (Drummond 1981). Our results support the hypothesis of a breakup of a parent body, that ocurred about 2900 yr ago, as the most probable origin for the studied pair of comets. Possible fragmentation mechanisms, like thermal stress, rotational instability, or colisions, are briefly discussed.References:Drumond J.D. 1981. Icarus 45, 545-553.Fernández J.A., & Sosa A. 2015. Submitted to Planetary & Space Science.Southworth R.B., & Hawkins, G.S. 1963. Smithson. Contrib. Astrophys. 7, 261-285Vokrouhlicky D., & Nesvorny D. 2008. Astron. J. 136, 280-290.

  19. Post-perihelion observations of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko at the 6 m BTA telescope: optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, O. V.; Rosenbush, V. K.; Kiselev, N. N.; Afanasiev, V. L.; Korsun, P. P.

    2017-07-01

    In the framework of the worldwide ground-based campaign, long-slit spectroscopy of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko was performed at the 6 m BTA telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory RAS in the post-perihelion period from 2015 November to 2016 April at a heliocentric distance from 1.61 to 2.72 au. Strong CN and relatively weak C2, C3, and CO+ emissions were identified in the spectra of the comet on 2015 November 8 and December 9, while NH2 emissions were only observed on November 8. In the spectrum derived on 2016 April 3, only the CN emission was found. The production rates of CN, C3, and C2 are in good agreement with data obtained by other authors. The value log[Q(C2)/Q(CN)] = -0.43 corresponds to the carbon-chain depleted class of comets. The spectra of the comet show a high level of the continuum referring to dust-rich comets. The dust production Afρ decreased from 172 cm at r = 1.62 au to 55 cm at r = 2.72 au, which is close to data derived from photometry at this telescope. The normalized gradient of the cometary dust reflectivity in the 3600-7070 Å spectral range varied from 12.5 ± 2 per cent 1000 Å-1 to 11.3 ± 2 per cent 1000 Å-1, which is close to a mean spectral reddening of cometary dust of 11 ± 2 per cent 1000 Å-1. In general, the photometric properties of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko show that it is a typical Jupiter-family comet.

  20. Optical Pulling Force and Tractor Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Nayan Kumar

    Light-matter interaction has been an interesting subject of intense analytical and experimental research since the formulation of Maxwell's electromagnetic wave theory. Optical forces exerted on particles excited by incident light waves have been studied for the last few decades. The interaction of light with materials gives rise to light scattering from the particle in the form of energy. The divergence of the Maxwell stress tensor provides a good approximation of the total optical forces on a particle. The divergence of the stress tensor is mathematically equal to the time average Lorentz force since [special characters omitted]. Others have claimed that the stress tensor is "fraught with danger," but it is a matter of application. The stress tensor approach is computationally simpler since application of the divergence theorem allows for a reduction of dimension in the integration. For example, you can either integrate the force density over the volume of an object (3-D), or integrate the divergence of the stress tensor on a surface (2-D) enclosing the volume. It gives a straightforward prediction of the total optical forces on a particle, but may be challenging in the case of multiple particles or for larger particles. The Rayleigh approximation estimates the radiation pressure on small particles in the propagation direction of light, but may be inappropriate for larger particles in comparison to the wavelength of the incident light waves. Light waves exert radiation pressure on a particle and pushes it away from the light source toward the direction of propagation. It is shown that plane waves propagating in a rectangular waveguide not only push a passive particle toward the propagation direction, but also pull it toward the light source. The particle remains trapped in the transverse direction of the rectangular waveguide. The Lorentz force and the Rayleigh approximation are applied to calculate the total force on the particle. The push-pull phenomenon

  1. Using Jupiter's Synchrotron Radiation as a Probe into Jupiter's Inner Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, S. J.; Gulkis, S.; Klein, M. J.; Thorne, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    The Jovian decimetric emission is caused by the combined emission of synchrotron radiation originating from the relativistic electrons trapped in Jupiter's 'Van Allen radiation belts' and thermal emission from the planet's atmosphere. Synchrotron radiation characteristics and variations (which provides insight into the physical properties of Jupiter's inner radiation belts) will be amplified and discussed.

  2. Mixing fraction of inner solar system material in comet 81P/Wild2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westphal, Andrew J.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Gainsforth, Zack; Marcus, Matthew A.; Ogliore, Ryan C.; Butterworth, Anna L.

    2008-04-01

    The presence of crystalline silicates in the comae of comets, inferred through infrared observations, has been a long-standing puzzle. Crystalline silicates are unexpectedif comets are composed of pristine interstellar material, since interstellar silicates are almost entirely amorphous. Heating to> 1100 K can anneal silicates to crystallinity,but no protoplanetary heating sources have been identified that were sufficiently strong to heat materials in the outer nebula to such high temperatures. This conundrum led to the suggestion that large-scalemixing was important in theprotoplanetary disk. Reports of refractory calcium - aluminum-rich inclusion-like objects and large concentrations of noble gases in Stardust samples underscore the need for such mixing. However, the evidence from the Stardust samples until now has been largely anecdotal, and it has not been possible to place quantitative constraints on the mixing fraction. Here we report synchrotron-based X-ray microprobe measurements of the relative concentrations of the chemical state of iron in material from a known comet, the Jupiter-family comet 81P/Wild2. We find that the comet is rich in iron sulfides. The elemental S/Fe ratio based on the sulfide concentration, S/Fe> 0.31(2 sigma), is higher than in most chondritic meteorites. We also found that Fe-bearing silicates are at least 50percent crystalline. Based on these measurements, we estimate the fraction psi of inner nebular material in 81P/Wild2. With the lower bound on the crystalline Fe-bearing silicate fraction, we find that psi> 0.5. If the observed S depletion in the inner solar system predated or was contemporaneous with large-scale mixing, our lower bound on the S/Fe ratio gives an upper bound on psi of ~;; 0.65. This measurement may be used to test mixing models of the early solar system.

  3. A PROTOSOLAR NEBULA ORIGIN FOR THE ICES AGGLOMERATED BY COMET 67P/CHURYUMOV–GERASIMENKO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousis, O.; Vernazza, P. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Lunine, J. I. [Center For Radiophysics And Space Research, Space Sciences Building Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Luspay-Kuti, A.; Hässig, M.; Waite, J. H. [Department of Space Research, Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); Guillot, T. [Laboratoire J.-L. Lagrange, Université de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d’Azur, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice (France); Marty, B. [CRPG-CNRS, Nancy-Université, 15 rue Notre Dame des Pauvres, F-54501 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Ali-Dib, M. [Université de Franche-Comté, Institut UTINAM, CNRS/INSU, UMR 6213, Besançon Cedex (France); Wurz, P.; Altwegg, K.; Bieler, A.; Rubin, M., E-mail: olivier.mousis@lam.fr [Physikalisches Institut, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2016-03-10

    The nature of the icy material accreted by comets during their formation in the outer regions of the protosolar nebula (PSN) is a major open question in planetary science. Some scenarios of comet formation predict that these bodies agglomerated from crystalline ices condensed in the PSN. Concurrently, alternative scenarios suggest that comets accreted amorphous ice originating from the interstellar cloud or from the very distant regions of the PSN. On the basis of existing laboratory and modeling data, we find that the N{sub 2}/CO and Ar/CO ratios measured in the coma of the Jupiter-family comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko by the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis instrument on board the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft match those predicted for gases trapped in clathrates. If these measurements are representative of the bulk N{sub 2}/CO and Ar/CO ratios in 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, it implies that the ices accreted by the comet formed in the nebula and do not originate from the interstellar medium, supporting the idea that the building blocks of outer solar system bodies have been formed from clathrates and possibly from pure crystalline ices. Moreover, because 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko is impoverished in Ar and N{sub 2}, the volatile enrichments observed in Jupiter’s atmosphere cannot be explained solely via the accretion of building blocks with similar compositions and require an additional delivery source. A potential source may be the accretion of gas from the nebula that has been progressively enriched in heavy elements due to photoevaporation.

  4. Temporal Variations in Jupiter's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Chanover, N. J.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Hammel, H. B.; dePater, I.; Noll, K.; Wong, M.; Clarke, J.; Sanchez-Levega, A.; Orton, G. S.; Gonzaga, S.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, Jupiter has undergone many atmospheric changes from storms turning red to global. cloud upheavals, and most recently, a cornet or asteroid impact. Yet, on top of these seemingly random changes events there are also periodic phenomena, analogous to observed Earth and Saturn atmospheric oscillations. We will present 15 years of Hubble data, from 1994 to 2009, to show how the equatorial tropospheric cloud deck and winds have varied over that time, focusing on the F953N, F41 ON and F255W filters. These filters give leverage on wind speeds plus cloud opacity, cloud height and tropospheric haze thickness, and stratospheric haze, respectively. The wind data consistently show a periodic oscillation near 7-8 S latitude. We will discuss the potential for variations with longitude and cloud height, within the calibration limits of those filters. Finally, we will discuss the role that large atmospheric events, such as the impacts in 1994 and 2009, and the global upheaval of 2007, have on temporal studies, This work was supported by a grant from the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program. HST observational support was provided by NASA through grants from Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under contract NAS5-26555.

  5. The possible contamination of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Joe

    1988-01-01

    The Galileo probe, though at present its future is uncertain, would, if not sterilized, represent a good chance of contaminating Jupiter. Most scientists opposed to sterilizing the probe argue that to order the probe sterilized would be the death of the project, since sterilization would entail a reconstruction of the probe, and there are not enough funds to accomplish this. These scientists, however, are ignoring a relatively simple and inexpensive alternative to the traditional heat sterilization method. The main threat of contamination comes from Galileo's exterior surfaces: the shell of the probe and its parachute. The probe innermost components would not represent a threat since the probe is sealed. In light of the fact that only the exterior of Galileo would have to be sterilized, heat would not have to be used as a method of sterilization. Instead, various gas mixtures could be sprayed entirely over the probe and its parachute, gases which would kill any and all bacteria. This idea is more thoroughly examined.

  6. Jupiter's radiation belts and atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pater, I.; Dames, H. A. C.

    1979-01-01

    Maps and stripscans of the radio emission from Jupiter were made during the Pioneer 10 flyby in December 1973 at wavelengths of 6 cm, 21 cm, and 50 cm using the Westerbork telescope in the Netherlands. With this instrument the disk of the planet was resolved at 6 and 21 cm. The pictures are averaged over 15 deg of Jovian longitude. At 21 cm the stripscans clearly show the existence of a 'hot region' in the radiation belts at a System III longitude (1965.0) of 255 + or - 10 deg. Its flux is about 9% of the total nonthermal flux, and it has a volume emissivity enhanced by a factor of about 1.6 with respect to the general radiation belts. The temperature of the thermal disk at 21 cm appears to be 290 + or - 20 K. This is likely due to a high ammonia mixing ratio in the atmosphere, a factor of 4-5 larger than the expected solar value of 0.00015.

  7. Hot Jupiters and cool stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villaver, Eva; Mustill, Alexander J. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Módulo 8, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Livio, Mario [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Siess, Lionel, E-mail: eva.villaver@uam.es [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Université Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2014-10-10

    Close-in planets are in jeopardy, as their host stars evolve off the main sequence (MS) to the subgiant and red giant phases. In this paper, we explore the influences of the stellar mass (in the range 1.5-2 M {sub ☉}), mass-loss prescription, planet mass (from Neptune up to 10 Jupiter masses), and eccentricity on the orbital evolution of planets as their parent stars evolve to become subgiants and red giants. We find that planet engulfment along the red giant branch is not very sensitive to the stellar mass or mass-loss rates adopted in the calculations, but quite sensitive to the planetary mass. The range of initial separations for planet engulfment increases with decreasing mass-loss rates or stellar masses and increasing planetary masses. Regarding the planet's orbital eccentricity, we find that as the star evolves into the red giant phase, stellar tides start to dominate over planetary tides. As a consequence, a transient population of moderately eccentric close-in Jovian planets is created that otherwise would have been expected to be absent from MS stars. We find that very eccentric and distant planets do not experience much eccentricity decay, and that planet engulfment is primarily determined by the pericenter distance and the maximum stellar radius.

  8. Comet Assay in Cancer Chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Raffaela; Ferraiuolo, Maria; Morgano, Gian Paolo; Muti, Paola; Strano, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The comet assay can be useful in monitoring DNA damage in single cells caused by exposure to genotoxic agents, such as those causing air, water, and soil pollution (e.g., pesticides, dioxins, electromagnetic fields) and chemo- and radiotherapy in cancer patients, or in the assessment of genoprotective effects of chemopreventive molecules. Therefore, it has particular importance in the fields of pharmacology and toxicology, and in both environmental and human biomonitoring. It allows the detection of single strand breaks as well as double-strand breaks and can be used in both normal and cancer cells. Here we describe the alkali method for comet assay, which allows to detect both single- and double-strand DNA breaks.

  9. Pull-pull position control of dual motor wire rope transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Quan; Jiao, Zongxia; Yan, Liang; Yu, Qian; Shang, Yaoxing

    2016-08-01

    Wire rope transmission is very efficient because of the small total moving object mass. The wire rope could only transmit pulling force. Therefore it has to be kept in a tightened state during transmission; in high speed applications the dynamic performance depends on the rope's stiffness, which can be adjusted by the wire rope tension. To improve the system dynamic performance output, this paper proposes a novel pull-pull method based on dual motors connected by wire ropes, for precise, high speed position control applications. The method can regulate target position and wire rope tension simultaneously. Wire ropes remain in a pre-tightening state at all times, which prevents the influence of elasticity and reduces the position tracking error in the changing direction process. Simulations and experiments were conducted; the results indicate that both position precision and superior dynamic performance can be synchronously achieved. The research is relevant to space craft precision pointing instruments.

  10. X-ray emission from comets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravens, T E

    2002-05-10

    The discovery of x-ray emission from comet Hyakutake was surprising given that comets are known to be cold. Observations by x-ray satellites such as the Röntgen Satellite (ROSAT) indicate that x-rays are produced by almost all comets. Theoretical and observational work has demonstrated that charge-exchange collisions of highly charged solar wind ions with cometary neutral species can explain this emission. X-ray observations of comets and other solar system objects may be used to determine the structure and dynamics of the solar wind.

  11. Evidence of Fragmenting Dust Particles from Near-Simultaneous Optical and Near-IR Photometry and Polarimetry of Comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Terry Jay; Woodward, Charles E; Kelley, Michael S; Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Clemens, Dan; Pinnick, April

    2008-01-01

    We report imaging polarimetry of segments B and C of the Jupiter-family Comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 in the I and H bandpasses at solar phase angles of approximately 35 and 85deg. The level of polarization was typical for active comets, but larger than expected for a Jupiter-family comet. The polarimetric color was slightly red (dP/dL = +1.2 +/- 0.4) at a phase angle of ~ 35deg and either neutral or slightly blue at a phase angle of ~ 85deg. Observations during the closest approach from 2006 May 11-13 achieved a resolution of 35 km at the nucleus. Both segments clearly depart from a 1/rho surface brightness for the first 50 - 200 km from the nucleus. Simulations of radiation driven dust dynamics can reproduce some of the observed coma morphology, but only with a wide distribution of initial dust velocities (at least a factor of 10) for a given grain radius. Grain aggregate breakup and fragmentation are able to reproduce the observed profile perpendicular to the Sun-Comet axis, but fit the observations les...

  12. Import-push or Export-pull?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäkel, Ina Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Does the selection effect of trade work solely through competition from imports, or does the export market further contribute to firm selection? This paper provides a re-interpretation of the different mechanisms in terms of selection on profitability - rather than productivity - and derives novel...... predictions regarding the export market and the role of product differentiation. Empirical results for a sample of Danish manufacturing industries confirm the import- "push" hypothesis as well as the export- "pull" hypothesis, but also reveal differences across industries. The selection effect of trade...

  13. A 'Moving' Jupiter Global Map (Animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on New Horizons has acquired six global maps of Jupiter as the spacecraft approaches the giant planet for a close encounter at the end of February. The high-resolution camera acquired each of six observation 'sets' as a series of individual pictures taken one hour apart, covering a full 10-hour rotation of Jupiter. The LORRI team at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) reduced the sets to form six individual maps in a simple rectangular projection. These six maps were then combined to make the movie. The table below shows the dates and the ranges from Jupiter at which these six sets of observations were acquired. Even for the latest set of images taken January 21-22, from 60.5 million kilometers (37.6 million miles), New Horizons was still farther from Jupiter than the average distance of Mercury from the Sun. At that distance from Jupiter, a single LORRI picture resolution element amounts to 300 kilometers (186 miles) on Jupiter. Many features seen in Jupiter's atmosphere are giant storm clouds. The Little Red Spot, which LORRI will image close-up on February 27, is the target-like feature located near 30 degrees South and 230 degrees West; this storm is larger than the Earth. The even larger Great Red Spot is seen near 20 degrees South and 320 degrees West. The counterclockwise rotation of the clouds within the Great Red Spot can be seen. The westward drift of the Great Red Spot is easily seen in the movie, as is the slower drift, in the opposite direction, of the Little Red Spot. The storms of Jupiter are not fixed in location relative to each other or relative to any solid surface below, because Jupiter is a fluid planet without a solid surface. Also, dramatic changes are seen in the series of bright plume-like clouds encircling the planet between 0 and 10 degrees North. Scientists believe these result from an enormous atmospheric wave with rising air, rich in ammonia that condenses to form

  14. Abundant molecular oxygen in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieler, A; Altwegg, K; Balsiger, H; Bar-Nun, A; Berthelier, J-J; Bochsler, P; Briois, C; Calmonte, U; Combi, M; De Keyser, J; van Dishoeck, E F; Fiethe, B; Fuselier, S A; Gasc, S; Gombosi, T I; Hansen, K C; Hässig, M; Jäckel, A; Kopp, E; Korth, A; Le Roy, L; Mall, U; Maggiolo, R; Marty, B; Mousis, O; Owen, T; Rème, H; Rubin, M; Sémon, T; Tzou, C-Y; Waite, J H; Walsh, C; Wurz, P

    2015-10-29

    The composition of the neutral gas comas of most comets is dominated by H2O, CO and CO2, typically comprising as much as 95 per cent of the total gas density. In addition, cometary comas have been found to contain a rich array of other molecules, including sulfuric compounds and complex hydrocarbons. Molecular oxygen (O2), however, despite its detection on other icy bodies such as the moons of Jupiter and Saturn, has remained undetected in cometary comas. Here we report in situ measurement of O2 in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, with local abundances ranging from one per cent to ten per cent relative to H2O and with a mean value of 3.80 ± 0.85 per cent. Our observations indicate that the O2/H2O ratio is isotropic in the coma and does not change systematically with heliocentric distance. This suggests that primordial O2 was incorporated into the nucleus during the comet's formation, which is unexpected given the low upper limits from remote sensing observations. Current Solar System formation models do not predict conditions that would allow this to occur.

  15. Ground-based Multiwavelength Observations of Comet 103P/Hartley 2

    CERN Document Server

    Gicquel, A; Villanueva, G L; Remijan, A J; Coulson, I M; Chuang, Y -L; Charnley, S B; Cordiner, M A; Kuan, Y -J

    2014-01-01

    The Jupiter-family comet 103P/Hartley 2 (103P) was the target of the NASA EPOXI mission. In support of this mission, we conducted observations from radio to submillimeter wavelengths of comet 103P in the three weeks preceding the spacecraft rendezvous on UT 2010 November 4.58. This time period included the passage at perihelion and the closest approach of the comet to the Earth. Here we report detections of HCN, H2CO, CS, and OH and upper limits for HNC and DCN towards 103P, using the Arizona Radio Observatory Kitt Peak 12m telescope (ARO 12m) and submillimeter telescope (SMT), the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) and the Greenbank Telescope (GBT). The water production rate, QH2O = (0.67 - 1.07) x 10^28 s^-1, was determined from the GBT OH data. From the average abundance ratios of HCN and H2CO relative to water (0.13 +/- 0.03 % and 0.14 +/- 0.03 %, respectively), we conclude that H2CO is depleted and HCN is normal with respect to typically-observed cometary mixing ratios. However, the abundance ratio of ...

  16. Laparoscopic assisted anorectal pull through: Reformed techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhandary Karthik

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the modifications in the technique of laparoscopic assisted anorectal pull through (LAARP practiced at our institute and analyze the post operative outcome and associated complications. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study from January 2001 to May 2009 analyzing LAARP for high anorectal malformations. Results: A total of 40 patients - 34 males and six females, in the age group of two months to six years were studied. Staged procedure was done in 39 patients; one child with recto vestibular fistula underwent single stage procedure. All the patients withstood surgery well. One patient required conversion due to problems in gaining enough length for the distal rectum in a patient with rectovesical fistula so colostomy was closed and re-located at a proximal splenic flexure. The complications were mucosal prolapse (six cases, anal stenosis (three, adhesive obstruction (two, distal rectal necrosis (one, and urethral diverticulum (one. The patients were followed up with clinical evaluation and continence scoring. The progress has been satisfactory and weight-gain is adequate. Conclusions: The advantages of the reformed techniques are as follows: Transcutaneous bladder stitch provides excellent visualization; traction over the fistula helps in dissection of the puborectalis, dividing the fistula without ligation is safe, railroading of Hegar′s dilators over the suction canula creates adequate pull through channel, saves time and makes procedure simpler with reproducible comparable reports.

  17. These are images of the fireball associated with the R fragment of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, obtained

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    These are images of the fireball associated with the R fragment of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, obtained with the MIRAC Mid Infrared Array Camera at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea. The three images are 2-second exposures at 7.85, 10.3, and 12.2 microns, characteristic of methane, ammonia and hydrogen in Jupiter's atmosphere, respectively. They were obtained about 15 minutes after the predicted impact time during the rise in brightness of the explosion fireball. At maximum, the fireball surface brightness was about 50 times that of Jupiter. The images are displayed with logrithmic scaling in order to display the full range of brightness. The multiple thermal wavelengths will help determine the temperature evolution of the plume and distinguish between gasous and particulate emission. The images were obtained by the NASA/IRTF Shoemaker-Levy Science Team.

  18. Detection and analysis of Jupiter's decametric micropulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebo, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    The occurrence of Jupiter's decametric radio emission can be correlated with the central meridian longitude of Jupiter as if the active regions were radio transmitters placed at fixed longitudes on its surface. These active regions are commonly called sources and are labelled Source A, Jovian longitude = 200 deg, Source B = 100 deg and Source C =300 deg. These sources are not always active. However, they can be turned-on if Jupiter's innermost Galilean moon, Io, is in the right phase. In fact, if Io is found 90 deg from superior geocentric conjunction (maximum eastern elongation) and if source B is simultaneously on the central meridian, source B radiation is almost guaranteed, whereas source C radiation is highly likely when Io is found 240 deg from superior geocentric conjunction. Source A radiation is largely independent of Io's position. Interestingly, the Io-related radio storms contain unusually rapid events that can only be properly studied using wide-band techniques.

  19. Radiation-Hydrodynamics of Hot Jupiter Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Menou, Kristen

    2009-01-01

    Radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres is usually treated in the static limit, i.e., neglecting atmospheric motions. We argue that hot Jupiter atmospheres, with possibly fast (sonic) wind speeds, may require a more strongly coupled treatment, formally in the regime of radiation-hydrodynamics. To lowest order in v/c, relativistic Doppler shifts distort line profiles along optical paths with finite wind velocity gradients. This leads to flow-dependent deviations in the effective emission and absorption properties of the atmospheric medium. Evaluating the overall impact of these distortions on the radiative structure of a dynamic atmosphere is non-trivial. We present transmissivity and systematic equivalent width excess calculations which suggest possibly important consequences for radiation transport in hot Jupiter atmospheres. If winds are fast and bulk Doppler shifts are indeed important for the global radiative balance, accurate modeling and reliable data interpretation for hot Jupiter atmospheres may p...

  20. Capture of Trojans by Jumping Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvorny, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Jupiter Trojans are thought to be survivors of a much larger population of planetesimals that existed in the planetary region when planets formed. They can provide important constraints on the mass and properties of the planetesimal disk, and its dispersal during planet migration. Here we tested a possibility that the Trojans were captured during the early dynamical instability among the outer planets (aka the Nice model), when the semimajor axis of Jupiter was changing as a result of scattering encounters with an ice giant. The capture occurs in this model when Jupiter's orbit and its Lagrange points become radially displaced in a scattering event and fall into a region populated by planetesimals (that previously evolved from their natal transplanetary disk to ~5 AU during the instability). Our numerical simulations of the new capture model, hereafter jump capture, satisfactorily reproduce the orbital distribution of the Trojans and their total mass. The jump capture is potentially capable of explaining the ...

  1. Principal components analysis of Jupiter VIMS spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, G.; Formisano, V.; D'Aversa, E.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, Christophe; Chamberlain, M.C.; Hansen, G.; Hibbits, K.; Showalter, M.; Filacchione, G.

    2004-01-01

    During Cassini - Jupiter flyby occurred in December 2000, Visual-Infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) instrument took several image cubes of Jupiter at different phase angles and distances. We have analysed the spectral images acquired by the VIMS visual channel by means of a principal component analysis technique (PCA). The original data set consists of 96 spectral images in the 0.35-1.05 ??m wavelength range. The product of the analysis are new PC bands, which contain all the spectral variance of the original data. These new components have been used to produce a map of Jupiter made of seven coherent spectral classes. The map confirms previously published work done on the Great Red Spot by using NIMS data. Some other new findings, presently under investigation, are presented. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  2. Jupiter's Great Red Spot and White Ovals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    This photo of Jupiter was taken by Voyager 1 on the evening of March 1, 1979, from a distance of 2.7 million miles (4.3 million kilometers). The photo shows Jupiter's Great Red Spot (top) and one of the white ovals than can be seen in Jupiter's atmosphere from Earth. The white ovals were seen to form in 1939, and 1940, and have remained more or less constant ever since. None of the structure and detail evident in these features have ever been seen from Earth. The Great Red Spot is three times as large as Earth. Also evident in the picture is a great deal of atmospheric detail that will require further study for interpretation. The smallest details that can be seen in this picture are about 45 miles (80 kilometers across. JPL manages and controls the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  3. Capture of Irregular Satellites at Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvorny, D; Deienno, R

    2014-01-01

    The irregular satellites of outer planets are thought to have been captured from heliocentric orbits. The exact nature of the capture process, however, remains uncertain. We examine the possibility that irregular satellites were captured from the planetesimal disk during the early Solar System instability when encounters between the outer planets occurred (Nesvorny, Vokrouhlicky & Morbidelli 2007, AJ 133; hereafter NVM07). NVM07 already showed that the irregular satellites of Saturn, Uranus and Neptune were plausibly captured during planetary encounters. Here we find that the current instability models present favorable conditions for capture of irregular satellites at Jupiter as well, mainly because Jupiter undergoes a phase of close encounters with an ice giant. We show that the orbital distribution of bodies captured during planetary encounters provides a good match to the observed distribution of irregular satellites at Jupiter. The capture efficiency for each particle in the original transplanetary d...

  4. Spectrophotometry of 25 comets - Post-Halley updates for 17 comets plus new observations for eight additional comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newburn, Ray L., Jr.; Spinrad, Hyron

    1989-01-01

    The best possible production figures within the current post-Halley framework and available observations are given for H2O, O(1D), CN, C3, C2 and dust in 25 comets. Of these, the three objects with the smallest mixing ratios of all minor species have moderate to little or no dust and appear 'old'. Comets with large amounts of CN are very dusty, and there is a clear correlation of CN with dust, although comets with little or no dust still have some CN. Thus, CN appears to have at least two sources, dust and one or more parent gases. Also, the C2/CN production ratio changes continuously with heliocentric distance in every comet considered, suggesting that C2 production may be a function of coma density as well as parental abundance. Dust production ranges from essentially zero in Comet Sugano-Saigusa-Fujikawa up to 67,000 kg/s for Halley on March 14, 1986.

  5. Thermal tides on a hot Jupiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh H.-F.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Following the linear analysis laid out by Gu & Ogilvie 2009 (hereafter GO09, we investigate the dynamical response of a non-synchronized hot Jupiter to stellar irradiation. Besides the internal and Rossby waves considered by GO09, we study the Kelvin waves excited by the diurnal Fourier harmonic of the prograde stellar irradiation. We also present a 2-dimensional plot of internal waves excited by the semi-diurnal component of the stellar irradiation and postulate that thermal bulges may arise in a hot Jupiter. Whether our postulation is valid and is consistent with the recent results from Arras & Socrates (2009b requires further investigation.

  6. Jupiter after Pioneer - A progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonough, T. R.

    1974-01-01

    In December 1973, Pioneer 10 became the first spacecraft to reach the vicinity of Jupiter. The spacecraft passed through the Jovian magnetosphere in two weeks and sent back more than 300 pictures of the big planet. Measurements were conducted of EM fields, energetic particles, and micrometeoroids. Radio occultations observed are discussed along with observations in the infrared and ultraviolet range, magnetic measurements, questions of trajectory analysis, and data obtained with the aid of a plasma analyzer. Pioneer 10 has confirmed as inescapable the fact that Jupiter radiates more energy than it receives from the sun.

  7. Radiation belts of jupiter: a second look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillius, R W; McIlwain, C E; Mogro-Campero, A

    1975-05-02

    The outbound leg of the Pioneer 11 Jupiter flyby explored a region farther from the equator than that traversed by Pioneer 10, and the new data require modification or augmentation of the magnetodisk model based on the Pioneer 10 flyby. The inner moons of Jupiter are sinks of energetic particles and sometimes sources. A large spike of particles was found near lo. Multiple peaks occurred in the particle fluxes near closest approach to the planet; this structure may be accounted for by a complex magnetic field configuration. The decrease in proton flux observed near minimum altitude on the Pioneer 10 flyby appears attributable to particle absorption by Amalthea.

  8. Extreme Environments Technologies for Probes to Venus and Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Tibor S.; Kolawa, Elizabeth A.; Peterson, Craig E.; Cutts, James A.; Belz, Andrea P.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the technologies that are used to mitigate extreme environments for probes at Venus and Jupiter. The contents include: 1) Extreme environments at Venus and Jupiter; 2) In-situ missions to Venus and Jupiter (past/present/future); and 3) Approaches to mitigate conditions of extreme environments for probes with systems architectures and technologies.

  9. Episodic Aging and End States of Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekanina, Zdenek

    2008-01-01

    It is known that comets are aging very rapidly on cosmic scales, because they rapidly shed mass. The processes involved are (i) normal activity - sublimation of ices and expulsion of dust from discrete emission sources on and/or below the surface of a comet's nucleus, and (ii) nuclear fragmentation. Both modes are episodic in nature, the latter includes major steps in the comet's life cycle. The role and history of dynamical techniques used are described and results on mass losses due to sublimation and dust expulsion are reviewed. Studies of split comets, Holmes-like exploding comets, and cataclysmically fragmenting comets show that masses of 10 to 100 million tons are involved in the fragmentation process. This and other information is used to investigate the nature of comets' episodic aging. Based on recent advances in understanding the surface morphology of cometary nuclei by close-up imaging, a possible mechanism for large-scale fragmentation events is proposed and shown to be consistent with evidence available from observations. Strongly flattened pancake-like shapes appear to be required for comet fragments by conceptual constraints. Possible end states are briefly examined.

  10. RFP for the Comet Nuclei Tour (CONTOUR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Madsen, Peter Buch; Betto, Maurizio

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the ASC Star Tracker (performance, functionality, requirements etc.) to The Johns Hopkins University - Applied Physics Laboratory for their Comet Nuclei TOUR (CONTOUR) Program.......This document describes the ASC Star Tracker (performance, functionality, requirements etc.) to The Johns Hopkins University - Applied Physics Laboratory for their Comet Nuclei TOUR (CONTOUR) Program....

  11. Episodic Aging and End States of Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekanina, Zdenek

    2008-01-01

    It is known that comets are aging very rapidly on cosmic scales, because they rapidly shed mass. The processes involved are (i) normal activity - sublimation of ices and expulsion of dust from discrete emission sources on and/or below the surface of a comet's nucleus, and (ii) nuclear fragmentation. Both modes are episodic in nature, the latter includes major steps in the comet's life cycle. The role and history of dynamical techniques used are described and results on mass losses due to sublimation and dust expulsion are reviewed. Studies of split comets, Holmes-like exploding comets, and cataclysmically fragmenting comets show that masses of 10 to 100 million tons are involved in the fragmentation process. This and other information is used to investigate the nature of comets' episodic aging. Based on recent advances in understanding the surface morphology of cometary nuclei by close-up imaging, a possible mechanism for large-scale fragmentation events is proposed and shown to be consistent with evidence available from observations. Strongly flattened pancake-like shapes appear to be required for comet fragments by conceptual constraints. Possible end states are briefly examined.

  12. Comet mission hopes to uncover Earth's origins

    CERN Multimedia

    Henderson, M

    2004-01-01

    "A European spacecraft that will hunt down a comet in search of clues to the origin of life on Earth will blast off tomorrow from the Kourou spaceport in French Guiana. The Rosetta probe will take 12 years to catch up with Churyumov-Gerasimenko before becoming the first spacecraft to make a soft, controlled landing on a comet's nucleus" (1 page).

  13. Perspectives of oil pulling therapy in dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Lakshmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil pulling has its origin in Ayurvedic medicine, is a natural remedy to improve oral health. Its antibacterial properties help to eradicate the bacteria and other debris from adhering to the oral cavity. It reduces the accumulation of plaque, prevents halitosis, cavities, gingivitis. It is used to heal the bleeding gums and mouth ulcers. Oil pulling with sesame oil improves overall health. Other than oral health, oil pulling also helps in reducing asthma, allergies, chronic fatigue, diabetes, migraine headaches and chronic skin problems. It works by detoxifying or cleansing the body. The aim of this article is to highlight the benefits of oil pulling in management of oral health.

  14. Amino Acids from a Comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jamie Elisla

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 to Earth in January 2006. Examinations of the organic compounds in cometary samples can reveal information about the prebiotic organic inventory present on the early Earth and within the early Solar System, which may have contributed to the origin of life. Preliminary studies of Stardust material revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds (cometary- vs. terrestrial contamination) could not be identified. We have recently measured the carbon isotopic ratios of these amino acids to determine their origin, leading to the first detection of a coetary amino acid.

  15. Organic matter in comets and cometary dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorca, Jordi

    2005-03-01

    Comets are primitive conglomerates of the solar system containing a mixture of frozen gases, refractory grains, and carbonaceous particles rich in biogenic elements. The dramatic display of comets is mostly caused by a cloud of micrometer-sized dust particles that leave the comet nucleus when frozen gases sublimate as they approach the Sun. Analyses of cometary dust captured in the stratosphere together with data obtained from space missions to comets have revealed the presence of a great variety of organic molecules. Since substantial amounts of cometary dust were gently deposited on Earth, their organic content could have played a major role in prebiotic processes prior to the appearance of microorganisms. This review discusses the description and implications for life of the organic content of comets and cometary dust.

  16. Comets and How to Observe Them

    CERN Document Server

    Schmude, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Comets have inspired wonder, excitement and even fear ever since they were first observed. They contain material from early in the life of the Solar System, held in deep-freeze. This makes them key in our understanding of the formation and evolution of many Solar System bodies. Recent ground- and space-based observations have changed much in our understanding of comets. Comets and How to Observe Them gives a summary of our current knowledge and describes how amateur astronomers can contribute to the body of scientific knowledge of comets. This book contains many practical examples of how to construct comet light-curves, measure how fast a comet’s coma expands, and determine the rotation period of the nucleus. All these examples are illustrated with drawings and photographs.

  17. Polarimetry of comets 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, 74P/Smirnova-Chernykh, and 152P/Helin-Lawrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, A.; Bagnulo, S.; Tozzi, G. P.; Boehnhardt, H.; Protopapa, S.; Kolokolova, L.; Muinonen, K.; Jones, G. H.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: Polarimetric characteristics of comets at large heliocentric distances is a relatively unexplored area; we extend the idea by adding and analysing the data for three Jupiter family comets (JFCs). Methods: With the FORS2 instrument of the ESO VLT, we performed quasi-simultaneous photometry and polarimetry of three active JFCs 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, 74P/Smirnova-Chernykh, and 152P/Helin-Lawrence. Results: We obtained in total 23 polarimetric measurements at different epochs, covering a phase-angle range ~1°-16° and heliocentric distances from 3 to 4.6 au. From our observations we obtained both colour and polarimetric maps to look for structures in the comae and tails of the comets. Conclusions: 74P/Smirnova-Chernykh and 152P/Helin-Lawrence exhibit enough activity at large heliocentric distances to be detectable in polarimetric measurements. Polarimetric and colour maps indicate no evidence of dust particle evolution in the coma. From near-infrared spectra we find no evidence of water ice in the coma of comet 152P/Helin-Lawrence. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under Programme IDs:089.C-0619 (PI = Tozzi), and 384.C-0115 (PI = Boehnhardt).

  18. Rotationally Induced Surface Slope-Instabilities and the Activation of CO2 Activity on Comet 103P/Hartley 2

    CERN Document Server

    Steckloff, Jordan K; Hirabayashi, Toshi; Melosh, H Jay; Richardson, James

    2016-01-01

    Comet 103P/Hartley 2 has diurnally controlled, CO2-driven activity on the tip of the small lobe of its bilobate nucleus. Such activity is unique among the comet nuclei visited by spacecraft, and suggests that CO2 ice is very near the surface, which is inconsistent with our expectations of an object that thermophysically evolved for ~45 million years prior to entering the Jupiter Family of comets. Here we explain this pattern of activity by showing that a very plausible recent episode of rapid rotation (rotation period of ~11 [10-13] hours) would have induced avalanches in Hartley 2's currently active regions that excavated down to CO2-rich ices and activated the small lobe of the nucleus. At Hartley 2's current rate of spindown about its principal axis, the nucleus would have been spinning fast enough to induce avalanches ~3-4 orbits prior to the DIXI flyby (~1984-1991). This coincides with Hartley 2's discovery in 1986, and implies that the initiation of CO2 activity facilitated the comet's discovery. During...

  19. High-Power Radar Sounders for the Investigation of Jupiter Icy Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaeinili, A.; Ostro, S.; Rodriquez, E.; Blankenship, D.; Kurth, W.; Kirchner, D.

    2005-01-01

    The high power and high data rate capability made available by a Prometheus class spacecraft could significantly enhance our ability to probe the subsurface of the planets/moons and asteroid/comets. The main technology development driver for our radar is the proposed Jupiter Icy Moon Orbiter (or JIMO) mission due to its harsh radiation environment. We plan to develop a dual-band radar at 5 and 50 MHz in response to the two major science requirements identified by the JIMO Science Definition Team: studying the near subsurface (less than 2 km) at high resolution and detection of the ice/ocean interface for Europa (depth up to 30 km). The 50-MHz band is necessary to provide high spatial resolution (footprint and depth) as required by the JIMO mission science requirements as currently defined. Our preliminary assessment indicates that the 50-MHz system is not required to be as high-power as the 5-MHz system since it will be more limited by the surface clutter than the Jupiter or galactic background noise. The low frequency band (e.g. 5 MHz), which is the focus of this effort, would be necessary to mitigate the performance risks posed by the unknown subsurface structure both in terms of unknown attenuation due to volumetric scattering and also the detection of the interface through the attenuative transition region at the ice/ocean interface. Additionally, the 5-MHz band is less affected by the surface roughness that can cause loss of coherence and clutter noise. However, since the Signal-to-Noise-Ratio (SNR) of the 5-MHz radar band is reduced due to Jupiter noise when operating in the Jupiter side of the moon, it is necessary to increase the radiated power. Our challenge is to design a high-power HF radar that can hnction in Jupiter's high radiation environment, yet be able to fit into spacecraft resource constraints such as mass and thermal limits. Our effort to develop the JIMO radar sounder will rely on our team's experience with planetary radar sounder design

  20. Spectral Emissivity (6 – 38 µm) of Jupiter's Trojan Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Audrey; Emery, Joshua P.; Lindsay, Sean S.

    2016-10-01

    Jovian Trojan asteroids, located in Jupiter's stable Lagrange points, are an extensive population of primitive bodies in the Solar System. Previous work in the visible and NIR shows Trojans have featureless, red-sloped spectra and low albedos, making mineralogical characterization difficult. However, it has been shown that three Trojans exhibit silicate emissivity features in the thermal IR (6 – 38 μm Emery et al. 2006, Icarus 182). The detected features indicate the presence of fine-grained (micron-sized) silicate dust on the surfaces, and closely resemble spectral features measured of cometary comae. We hypothesize that Trojan surface mineralogy is fairly uniform and is similar to comet dust. The principal goal of this work is, therefore, to derive primary surface mineralogy from thermal emission spectra. We present thermal IR spectra of 12 Trojans observed with NASA's Spitzer space telescope, using the InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS) in Staring Mode from June 2006 to June 2007. Eight objects were observed over the 5.2 – 38 µm spectral range, and four objects over the 7.5 – 38 µm range. Using the NEATM thermal model, we have computed size, albedo, and beaming parameter for the 12 Trojans. Results for these physical parameters are comparable to those derived from WISE data (Grav et al. 2011, ApJ 742 (1); Grav et al. 2012, ApJ 759 (49)). There are, however, some discrepancies, especially with 2797 Teucer. The emissivity spectra fall into groups that directly correlate with the red and less-red spectral slope groupings described in Emery et al. (2011, ApJ, 141(1)). Strong 10 µm emission features appear in each object, suggesting the presence of fine-grained silicates. Features found between 12-13 µm, and 18-19 µm are also observed in all spectra. We will present these new Trojan asteroid data with mineralogical estimates derived from the emissivity spectra.

  1. Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 Impact Press Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    A Press conference held on July 20, 1994 is presented. Leading off the press conference was an announcement about a major discovery that was made possible from the study of the impact. The participants in the panel were: (1) Roger Yelle from the University of Arizona, (2) Renee Prange of the Institute Astrophysique Spatiale, (3) Lucy McFadden of the University of California, and the University of Maryland, (4) David Levy, the co-discoverer of the Shoemaker-Levy comet. The moderator for this conference was Steven Maran of the Goddard Space Flight Center. Roger Yelle, who had been working on analyzing spectrographic evidence, made the announcement that sulfur in the form of S2 had been discovered. There was also discussion about the interactions of the atmosphere with the fragments. This interaction had caused a shift in the aurora of Jupiter. The observations of the impact sites made by amatuers were discussed. A summary of the observations from different observatories was also given. Included in these observations were reports from the airborne Kuiper Observatory Telescope and the McDonald observatory.

  2. Using metaheuristic and fuzzy system for the optimization of material pull in a push-pull flow logistics network

    OpenAIRE

    Afshin Mehrsai; Hamid-Reza Karimi; Klaus-Dieter Thoben; Bernd Scholz-Reiter

    2013-01-01

    Alternative material flow strategies in logistics networks have crucial influences on the overall performance of the networks. Material flows can follow push, pull, or hybrid systems. To get the advantages of both push and pull flows in networks, the decoupling-point strategy is used as coordination mean. At this point, material pull has to get optimized concerning customer orders against pushed replenishment-rates. To compensate the ambiguity and uncertainty of both dynamic flows, fuzzy set ...

  3. Using Metaheuristic and Fuzzy System for the Optimization of Material Pull in a Push-Pull Flow Logistics Network

    OpenAIRE

    Afshin Mehrsai; Hamid-Reza Karimi; Klaus-Dieter Thoben; Bernd Scholz-Reiter

    2013-01-01

    Alternative material flow strategies in logistics networks have crucial influences on the overall performance of the networks. Material flows can follow push, pull, or hybrid systems. To get the advantages of both push and pull flows in networks, the decoupling-point strategy is used as coordination mean. At this point, material pull has to get optimized concerning customer orders against pushed replenishment-rates. To compensate the ambiguity and uncertainty of both dynamic flows, fuzzy set ...

  4. The global size-frequency distribution of boulders > 7 m on Comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajola, Maurizio; Baptiste Vincent, Jean; Lee, Jui-Chi; Ip, Wing-Huen; Lin, Zhong-Yi; Bertini, Ivano; Massironi, Matteo; Simioni, Emanuele; Barbieri, Cesare; Cremonese, Gabriele; Marzari, Francesco; Naletto, Giampiero; Giacomini, Lorenza; Jorda, Laurent; Thomas, Nicholas; Pommerol, Antoine; Kueppers, Michael; Moissl, Richard; Besse, Sebastien; Sierks, Holger

    2015-04-01

    After a ten years journey through the Solar System, the ESA Rosetta spacecraft reached on 6 August 2014 its primary target, the Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, hereafter 67P. During the approaching phase, several images of the nucleus of comet 67P, captured by the OSIRIS scientific imaging camera, have been taken to study its structure, activity and the surface morphology. The close distance between spacecraft and comet, and the high resolution of our images, provided a unique opportunity to study features which could not have been detected before on other comets, but yet hold key parameters to derive the physical properties of the surface. We made use of the images acquired by the OSIRIS Narrow Angle Camera, NAC, on 5 and 6 August 2014 in order to study the statistical size-frequency distribution and the morphological properties of both clustered and isolated roundish structures ("boulders") scattered all over the currently illuminated side of the comet (70% of the total surface). Such dataset has been taken at a distance ranging between 131.45 and 109.76 km far from the comet center and the scale of these images (2.44 - 2.03 m/px) is such that boulders ≥ 7 m can be unequivocally identified and extracted. These images are the last ones where the entire comet is 2048 x 2048 pixels full frame and they cover a complete comet rotation (12.4 h), hence providing the possibility to derive a global size-frequency distribution statistics of the presently illuminated surface of 67P. A total amount of 3526 boulders has been identified on the surface of the comet: i) 2218 belonging to the big lobe, body, ii) 1115 boulders are located on the small lobe, head, while iii) 213 boulders belong to the transition region between the two lobes, called the neck. Here, global cumulative size-frequency distributions of boulders per square km are presented, together with specific and localized areas distributions. Moreover we indicate the different formation processes

  5. Optical Micro- and Nanofiber Pulling Rig

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, J M; Le, Vu H; Chormaic, S Nic

    2014-01-01

    We review the method of producing adiabatic optical micro- and nanofibers using a hydrogen/oxygen flame brushing technique. The flame is scanned along the fiber, which is being simultaneously stretched by two translation stages. The tapered fiber fabrication is reproducible and yields highly adiabatic tapers with either exponential or linear profiles. Details regarding the setup of the flame brushing rig and the various parameters used are presented. Information available from the literature is compiled and further details that are necessary to have a functioning pulling rig are included. This should enable the reader to fabricate various taper profiles, while achieving adiabatic transmission of ~ 99% for fundamental mode propagation. Using this rig, transmissions greater than 90% for higher order modes in an optical nanofiber have been obtained.

  6. RNA unwinding from reweighted pulling simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Colizzi, Francesco; 10.1021/ja210531q

    2012-01-01

    The forming and melting of complementary base pairs in RNA duplexes are conformational transitions required to accomplish a plethora of biological functions. Yet the dynamic steps of these transitions have not been quantitatively characterized at the molecular level. In this work, the base opening process was first enforced by atomistic pulling simulations and then analyzed with a novel reweighting scheme which allowed the free-energy profile along any suitable reaction coordinate, e.g. solvation, to be reconstructed. The systematic application of such approach to different base-pair combinations provides a molecular motion picture of helix opening which is validated by comparison with an extensive set of experimental observations and links them to the enzyme-dependent unwinding mechanism. The RNA intrinsic dynamics disclosed in this work could rationalize the directionality observed in RNA-processing molecular machineries.

  7. Jupiter's Upper Atmospheric Winds Revealed in Ultraviolet Images by Hubble Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    These four NASA Hubble Space Telescope images of Jupiter, as seen in visible (violet) and far-ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, show the remarkable spreading of the clouds of smoke and dust thrown into the atmosphere after the impacts of the fragments of comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9. These dark regions provide the only information ever obtained on the wind direction and speed in Jupiter's upper atmosphere.TOP Three impact sites appear as dark smudges lined up along Jupiter's southern hemisphere (from left to right, sites C, A, and E). This pair of images was obtained on 17 July, several hours after the E impact. These 3 impact sites appear strikingly darker in the far-ultraviolet images to the right. This is because the smoke and dust rising from the fireballs absorbs UV light more strongly than violet light, so that the clouds appear both darker and larger in the UV images. Apparently, the fireball and plume threw large amounts of material completely above the atmosphere. This material diffused back down through the atmosphere with the smaller and lighter particles suspended at high altitudes.BOTTOM Hubble's view of the same hemisphere of Jupiter 12-13 days later shows that the smoke and dust have now been spread mainly in the east/west direction by the prevailing winds at the altitude where the dark material is suspended or 'floating' in the atmosphere.HST shows that winds in Jupiter's upper atmosphere carry the high altitude smoke and dust in different directions than in the lower atmosphere. For example, the UV image shows a fainter cloud near 45 deg. south latitude, which does not appear in the violet image. The fainter cloud may be due to high altitude material which is drifting with the upper atmospheric winds to the north away from the polar regions. However, in the left-hand impact regions the clouds being observed are lower in the atmosphere where there is apparently no such northerly wind.The violet images show the Great Red Spot, on the eastern (right) limb

  8. JUPITER PROJECT - MERGING INVERSE PROBLEM FORMULATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The JUPITER (Joint Universal Parameter IdenTification and Evaluation of Reliability) project seeks to enhance and build on the technology and momentum behind two of the most popular sensitivity analysis, data assessment, calibration, and uncertainty analysis programs used in envi...

  9. Dramatic Change in Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, A. A.; Wong, M. H.; Rogers, J. H.; Orton, G. S.; de Pater, I.; Asay-Davis, X.; Carlson, R. W.; Marcus, P. S.

    2015-01-01

    Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) is one of its most distinct and enduring features, having been continuously observed since the 1800's. It currently spans the smallest latitude and longitude size ever recorded. Here we show analyses of 2014 Hubble spectral imaging data to study the color, structure and internal dynamics of this long-live storm.

  10. Towards Chemical Constraints on Hot Jupiter Migration

    CERN Document Server

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Kennedy, Grant M

    2014-01-01

    The origin of hot Jupiters -- gas giant exoplanets orbiting very close to their host stars -- is a long-standing puzzle. Planet formation theories suggest that such planets are unlikely to have formed in-situ but instead may have formed at large orbital separations beyond the snow line and migrated inward to their present orbits. Two competing hypotheses suggest that the planets migrated either through interaction with the protoplanetary disk during their formation, or by disk-free mechanisms such as gravitational interactions with a third body. Observations of eccentricities and spin-orbit misalignments of hot Jupiter systems have been unable to differentiate between the two hypotheses. In the present work, we suggest that chemical depletions in hot Jupiter atmospheres might be able to constrain their migration mechanisms. We find that sub-solar carbon and oxygen abundances in Jovian-mass hot Jupiters around Sun-like stars are hard to explain by disk migration. Instead, such abundances are more readily expla...

  11. Jupiter as a Giant Cosmic Ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rimmer, Paul B; Helling, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    We explore the feasibility of using the atmosphere of Jupiter to detect Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR's). The large surface area of Jupiter allows us to probe cosmic rays of higher energies than previously accessible. Cosmic ray extensive air showers in Jupiter's atmosphere could in principle be detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi observatory. In order to be observed, these air showers would need to be oriented toward the Earth, and would need to occur sufficiently high in the atmosphere that the gamma rays can penetrate. We demonstrate that, under these assumptions, Jupiter provides an effective cosmic ray "detector" area of $3.3 \\times 10^7$ km$^2$. We predict that Fermi-LAT should be able to detect events of energy $>10^{21}$ eV with fluence $10^{-7}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ at a rate of about one per month. The observed number of air showers may provide an indirect measure of the flux of cosmic rays $\\gtrsim 10^{20}$ eV. Extensive air showers also produce a synchrotron signature that may ...

  12. The Origin of Retrograde Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoz, Smadar; Farr, W.; Lithwick, Y.; Rasio, F.; Teyssandier, J.

    2011-09-01

    The search for extra-solar planets has led to the surprising discovery of many Jupiter-like planets in very close proximity to their host star, the so-called ``hot Jupiters'' (HJ). Even more surprisingly, many of these HJs have orbits that are eccentric or highly inclined with respect to the equator of the star, and some (about 25%) even orbiting counter to the spin direction of the star. This poses a unique challenge to all planet formation models. We show that secular interactions between Jupiter-like planet and another perturber in the system can easily produce retrograde HJ orbits. We show that in the frame of work of secular hierarchical triple system (the so-called Kozai mechanism) the inner orbit's angular momentum component parallel to the total angular momentum (i.e., the z-component of the inner orbit angular momentum) need not be constant. In fact, it can even change sign, leading to a retrograde orbit. A brief excursion to very high eccentricity during the chaotic evolution of the inner orbit allows planet-star tidal interactions to rapidly circularize that orbit, decoupling the planets and forming a retrograde hot Jupiter. We estimate the relative frequencies of retrograde orbits and counter to the stellar spin orbits using Monte Carlo simulations, and find that the they are consistent with the observations. The high observed incidence of planets orbiting counter to the stellar spin direction may suggest that planet--planet secular interactions are an important part of their dynamical history.

  13. Hot Jupiters and Super-Earths

    CERN Document Server

    Mustill, Alexander James; Johansen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    We explore the role of dynamics in shaping planetary system multiplicities, focussing on two particular problems. (1) We propose that the lack of close-in super-Earths in hot Jupiter systems is a signature of the migration history of the hot Jupiters and helps to discriminate between different mechanisms of migration. We present N-body simulations of dynamical migration scenarios where proto-hot Jupiters are excited to high eccentricities prior to tidal circularisation and orbital decay. We show that in this scenario, the eccentric giant planet typically destroys planets in the inner system, in agreement with the observed lack of close super-Earth companions to hot Jupiters. (2) We explore the role of the dynamics of outer systems in affecting the multiplicities of close-in systems such as those discovered by Kepler. We consider specifically the effects of planet--planet scattering and Kozai perturbations on an exterior giant planet on the architecture of the inner system, and evaluate the ability of such sce...

  14. Europa--Jupiter's Icy Ocean Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, L.

    1999-01-01

    Europa is a puzzle. The sixth largest moon in our solar system, Europa confounds and intrigues scientists. Few bodies in the solar system have attracted as much scientific attention as this moon of Jupiter because of its possible subsurface ocean of water. The more we learn about this icy moon, the more questions we have.

  15. Assessing the Main-Belt Comet Population with Comet Hunters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Hsieh, Henry H.; Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Chen, Ying-Tung; Lintott, Chris; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Mishra, Ishan

    2017-01-01

    Cometary activity in the asteroid belt is a recent discovery. Evidence suggests recent collisions play a role excavating subsurface water ice in these Main Belt Comets (MBCs). MBCs may be an alternative source of Earth’s water. The properties and origins of the MBCs remain elusive. To date ~15 MBCs are known, but only with many tens to 100s of MBCs can we fully explore this new reservoir and its implications for the early Earth.Automated routines identify cometary objects by comparing the point spread functions (PSFs) of moving objects to background stars. This approach may miss cometary activity with low-level dust comae or trails that are too weak or extended to affect an object's near-nucleus PSF profile. Direct visual inspection of moving objects by survey team members can often catch such unusual objects, but such an approach is impractical for the largest surveys to date, and will only become more intractable with the next generation wide-field surveys.With the Internet, tens of thousands of people can be engaged in the scientific process. With this citizen science approach, the combined assessment of many non-experts often equals or rivals that of a trained expert and in many cases outperforms automated algorithms. The Comet Hunters (http://www.comethunters.org) project enlists the public to search for MBCs in data from the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) wide survey. HSC is to date the largest field-of-view camera (covering a 1.5 degree diameter circle on sky) on a 8-10-m class telescope. The HSC wide survey provides the sensitivity to detect cometary activity at lower levels than have been possible for previous surveys.We will give an overview of the Comet Hunters project. We will present the results from the first ~10,000 HSC asteroids searched and provide an estimate on the frequency of cometary activity in the Main Asteroid beltAcknowledgements: This work uses data generated via the Zooniverse.org platform, development of which was supported by a Global

  16. OpenComet: an automated tool for comet assay image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyori, Benjamin M; Venkatachalam, Gireedhar; Thiagarajan, P S; Hsu, David; Clement, Marie-Veronique

    2014-01-01

    Reactive species such as free radicals are constantly generated in vivo and DNA is the most important target of oxidative stress. Oxidative DNA damage is used as a predictive biomarker to monitor the risk of development of many diseases. The comet assay is widely used for measuring oxidative DNA damage at a single cell level. The analysis of comet assay output images, however, poses considerable challenges. Commercial software is costly and restrictive, while free software generally requires laborious manual tagging of cells. This paper presents OpenComet, an open-source software tool providing automated analysis of comet assay images. It uses a novel and robust method for finding comets based on geometric shape attributes and segmenting the comet heads through image intensity profile analysis. Due to automation, OpenComet is more accurate, less prone to human bias, and faster than manual analysis. A live analysis functionality also allows users to analyze images captured directly from a microscope. We have validated OpenComet on both alkaline and neutral comet assay images as well as sample images from existing software packages. Our results show that OpenComet achieves high accuracy with significantly reduced analysis time.

  17. OpenComet: An automated tool for comet assay image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M. Gyori

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive species such as free radicals are constantly generated in vivo and DNA is the most important target of oxidative stress. Oxidative DNA damage is used as a predictive biomarker to monitor the risk of development of many diseases. The comet assay is widely used for measuring oxidative DNA damage at a single cell level. The analysis of comet assay output images, however, poses considerable challenges. Commercial software is costly and restrictive, while free software generally requires laborious manual tagging of cells. This paper presents OpenComet, an open-source software tool providing automated analysis of comet assay images. It uses a novel and robust method for finding comets based on geometric shape attributes and segmenting the comet heads through image intensity profile analysis. Due to automation, OpenComet is more accurate, less prone to human bias, and faster than manual analysis. A live analysis functionality also allows users to analyze images captured directly from a microscope. We have validated OpenComet on both alkaline and neutral comet assay images as well as sample images from existing software packages. Our results show that OpenComet achieves high accuracy with significantly reduced analysis time.

  18. JunoCam's Imaging of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Glenn; Hansen, Candice; Momary, Thomas; Caplinger, Michael; Ravine, Michael; Atreya, Sushil; Ingersoll, Andrew; Bolton, Scott; Rogers, John; Eichstaedt, Gerald

    2017-04-01

    Juno's visible imager, JunoCam, is a wide-angle camera (58° field of view) with 4 color filters: red, green and blue (RGB) and methane at 889 nm, designed for optimal imaging of Jupiter's poles. Juno's elliptical polar orbit offers unique views of Jupiter's polar regions with spatial scales as good as 50 km/pixel. At closest approach ("perijove") the images have spatial scale down to ˜3 km/pixel. As a push-frame imager on a rotating spacecraft, JunoCam uses time-delayed integration to take advantage of the spacecraft spin to extend integration time to increase signal. Images of Jupiter's poles reveal a largely uncharted region of Jupiter, as nearly all earlier spacecraft except Pioneer 11 have orbited or flown by close to the equatorial plane. Poleward of 64-68° planetocentric latitude, Jupiter's familiar east-west banded structure breaks down. Several types of discrete features appear on a darker, bluish-cast background. Clusters of circular cyclonic spirals are found immediately around the north and south poles. Oval-shaped features are also present, ranging in size down to JunoCam's resolution limits. The largest and brightest features usually have chaotic shapes; animations over ˜1 hour can reveal cyclonic motion in them. Narrow linear features traverse tens of degrees of longitude and are not confined in latitude. JunoCam also detected optically thin clouds or hazes that are illuminated beyond the nightside ˜1-bar terminator; one of these detected at Perijove lay some 3 scale heights above the main cloud deck. Tests have been made to detect the aurora and lightning. Most close-up images of Jupiter have been acquired at lower latitudes within 2 hours of closest approach. These images aid in understanding the data collected by other instruments on Juno that probe deeper in the atmosphere. When Jupiter was too close to the sun for ground-based observers to collect data between perijoves 1 and 2, JunoCam took a sequence of routine images to monitor large

  19. Jupiter internal structure: the effect of different equations of state

    CERN Document Server

    Miguel, Yamila; Fayon, Lucile

    2016-01-01

    Heavy elements, even though its smaller constituent, are crucial to understand Jupiter formation history. Interior models are used to determine the amount of heavy elements in Jupiter interior, nevertheless this range is still subject to degeneracies due to uncertainties in the equations of state. Prior to Juno mission data arrival, we present Jupiter optimized calculations exploring the effect of different model parameters in the determination of Jupiter's core and heavy element's mass. We perform comparisons between equations of state published recently. The interior model of Jupiter is calculated from the equations of hydrostatic equilibrium, mass and energy conservation, and energy transport. The mass of the core and heavy elements is adjusted to match Jupiter's observational constrains radius and gravitational moments. We show that the determination of Jupiter interior structure is tied to the estimation of its gravitational moments and the accuracy of equations of state of hydrogen, helium and heavy ele...

  20. The EJSM Jupiter-Europa Orbiter: Mission Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Clark, K.; Greeley, R.; Hendrix, A. R.; Tan-Wang, G.; Lock, R.; van Houten, T.; Ludwinski, J.; Petropoulis, A.; Jun, I.; Boldt, J.; Kinnison, J.

    2008-09-01

    Missions to explore Europa have been imagined ever since the Voyager mission first suggested that Europa was geologically very young. Subsequently, Galileo supplied fascinating new insights into that satellite's secrets. The Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) would be the NASA-led portion of the Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), an international mission with orbiters developed by NASA, ESA and possibly JAXA. JEO would address key components of the complete EJSM science objectives and would be designed to function alone or in conjunction with the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter and JAXA-led Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter. The JEO mission concept uses a single orbiter flight system which would travel to Jupiter to perform a multi-year study of the Jupiter system and Europa, including 2.5-3 years of Jupiter system science and a comprehensive Europa orbit phase of upt ot a year. This abstract describes the design concept of this mission.

  1. Analytical Model for Hook Anchor Pull-Out

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Ulfkjær, J. P.; Adamsen, P.

    1995-01-01

    A simple analytical model for the pull-out of a hook anchor is presented. The model is based on a simplified version of the fictitious crack model. It is assume that the fracture process is the pull-off of a cone shaped concrete part, simplifying the problem by assuming pure rigid body motions...

  2. Analytical Model for Hook Anchor Pull-out

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Ulfkjær, J. P.; Adamsen, P.

    A simple analytical model for the pull-out of a hook anchor is presented. The model is based on a simplified version of the fictitious crack model. It is assumed that the fracture process is the pull-off of a cone shaped concrete part, simplifying the problem by assuming pure rigid body motions...

  3. Workload balancing capability of pull systems in MTO production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germs, R.; Riezebos, J.

    2010-01-01

    Pull systems focusing on throughput time control and applicable in situations with high variety and customisation are scarce. This paper compares three unit-based pull systems that can cope with such situations: POLCA, CONWIP and m-CONWIP. These systems control the shop floor throughput time of orde

  4. Heat-and-pull rig for fiber taper fabrication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ward, Jonathan M.; O'Shea, Danny G.; Shortt, Brian J.; Morrissey, Michael J.; Deasy, Kieran; Chormaic, Sile G. Nic

    2006-01-01

    We describe a reproducible method of fabricating adiabatic tapers with 3-4 mu m diameter. The method is based on a heat-and-pull rig, whereby a CO(2) laser is continuously scanned across a length of fiber that is being pulled synchronously. Our system relies on a CO(2) mirror mounted on a geared ste

  5. Designing pull production control systems : Customization and robustness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaury, E.G.A.

    2000-01-01

    In this dissertation we address the issues of selecting and configuring pull production control systems for single-product flowlines. We start with a review of pull systems in the literature, yielding a new classification. Then we propose a novel selection procedure based on a generic system that we

  6. Workload balancing capability of pull systems in MTO production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germs, R.; Riezebos, J.

    2010-01-01

    Pull systems focusing on throughput time control and applicable in situations with high variety and customisation are scarce. This paper compares three unit-based pull systems that can cope with such situations: POLCA, CONWIP and m-CONWIP. These systems control the shop floor throughput time of

  7. On the Push-Pull Mobile Learning of Electric Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chih-Chao; Dzan, Wei-Yuan; Cheng, Yuh-Ming; Lou, Shi-Jer

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to explore the learning effects and attitudes of students in the course electric welding practice in a university of science and technology to which the push-pull technology-based mobile learning system is applied. In this study, the push-pull technology is adopted to establish a mobile learning system and develop the Push-pull…

  8. The location of Asteroidal Belt Comets (ABCs), in a comets' evolutionary diagram: The Lazarus Comets

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrin, Ignacio; Cuartas, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    There is a group of newly recognized asteroids in the main belt that are exhibiting cometary characteristics. We will call them Asteroidal Belt Comets or ABCs. An analysis of their orbital and physical properties has resulted in the following conclusion: (1) We define the detached group, DG, as objects sublimating water that have aphelion distances Q < 4.5 AU. The detached group contains all the ABCs traditionally recognized, plus a few other members like 2P and 107P. With the above definition there are 11 members of the ABC group: 2P, 107P, 133P, 176P, 233P, 238P, C/2008 R1, C/2010 R2, 2011 CR42, 3200, and 300163 = 2006 VW139. (2) Active objects sublimate ices except collisioned asteroids, CA, P/2010 A2, 596 Scheila, and P/2012 F5 Gibbs, and 3200 Phaethon who was active due to sputtering. (3)We have calibrated the black body (color) temperature of comets vs perihelion distance, R. We find T = 325+-5 K/SQRT(R). (4) Using a mathematical model of the thermal wave we calculate the thickness of the dust layer ...

  9. An asymmetry between pushing and pulling for crawling cells

    CERN Document Server

    Recho, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells possess motility mechanisms allowing them not only to self-propel but also to exert forces on obstacles (to push) and to carry cargoes (to pull). To study the inherent asymmetry between active pushing and pulling we model a crawling acto-myosin cell extract as a 1D layer of active gel subjected to external forces. We show that pushing is controlled by protrusion and that the macroscopic signature of the protrusion dominated motility mechanism is concavity of the force velocity relation. Instead, pulling is driven by protrusion only at small values of the pulling force and it is replaced by contraction when the pulling force is sufficiently large. This leads to more complex convex-concave structure of the force velocity relation, in particular, competition between protrusion and contraction can produce negative mobility in a biologically relevant range. The model illustrates active readjustment of the force generating machinery in response to changes in the dipole structure of external forces....

  10. Casing pull tests for directionally drilled environmental wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staller, G.E.; Wemple, R.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Layne, R.R. [Charles Machine Works, Inc., Perry, OK (United States)

    1994-11-01

    A series of tests to evaluate several types of environmental well casings have been conducted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and it`s industrial partner, The Charles Machine Works, Inc. (CMW). A test bed was constructed at the CMW test range to model a typical shallow, horizontal, directionally drilled wellbore. Four different types of casings were pulled through this test bed. The loads required to pull the casings through the test bed and the condition of the casing material were documented during the pulling operations. An additional test was conducted to make a comparison of test bed vs actual wellbore casing pull loads. A directionally drilled well was emplaced by CMW to closely match the test bed. An instrumented casing was installed in the well and the pull loads recorded. The completed tests are reviewed and the results reported.

  11. LCOGT Network observations of spacecraft target comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Tim; Knight, Matthew M.; Snodgrass, Colin; Samarasinha, Nalin H.

    2015-01-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) network currently has 12 telescopes at 6 locations in the northern and southern hemispheres with expansion plans for more. This network is versatile and can respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also perform long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena.We have been using the LCOGT Network to perform photometric monitoring of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko to support the ESA Rosetta comet mission and of C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) as part of the ground-based observation teams for these important comets. This broadband photometry will allow a vital link between the detailed in-situ measurements made by the spacecraft and the global properties of the coma, at a time when the comet is only visible for short periods from single sites. The science we can extract includes the rotational state of the nucleus, characterization of the nucleus' activity, gas and dust properties in the coma (e.g., outflow velocities), chemical origin of gas species in the coma, and temporal behavior of the coma structure when the comet is close to the sun. Comet Siding Spring is a dynamically new comet on its first approach to the Sun that will pass close to Mars, so we can directly sample the composition of an original unaltered remnant of the protoplanetary disc. We will also be making use of specialized comet filters available at LCOGT's 2-m Faulkes Telescope North (FTN) to obtain a unique data set on comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring), as part of a large worldwide campaign. As one of only two robotic telescope equipped with cometary narrowband filters in the Northern hemisphere and having the largest aperture plus a high quality site, FTN can provide critical regular monitoring that cannot be achieved by any other single facility in the campaign.

  12. Simulations of directed energy comet deflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qicheng; Lubin, Philip M.; Hughes, Gary B.

    2016-09-01

    Earth-crossing asteroids and comets pose a long-term hazard to life and property on Earth. Schemes to mitigate the impact threat have been studied extensively but tend to focus on asteroid diversion while neglecting the possibility of a comet threat. Such schemes often demand physically intercepting the target by spacecraft, a task feasible only for targets identified decades in advance in a restricted range of orbits. A threatening comet is unlikely to satisfy these criteria and so necessitates a fundamentally different approach for diversion. Comets are naturally perturbed from purely gravitational trajectories through solar heating of their surfaces which activates sublimation-driven jets. Artificial heating of a comet, such as by a high-powered laser array in Earth orbit, may supplement natural heating by the Sun to purposefully manipulate its path to avoid an impact. The effectiveness of any particular laser array for a given comet depends on the comet's heating response which varies dramatically depending on factors including nucleus size, orbit and dynamical history. These factors are incorporated into a numerical orbital model using established models of nongravitational perturbations to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of using high-powered laser arrays in Earth orbit or on the ground to deflect a variety of comets. Simulation results suggest that orbital arrays of 500m and 10GW operating for 10 min=d over 1 yr may be adequate for mitigating impacts by comets up to 500m in diameter. Continuously operating ground-based arrays of 100m and 10GW may be similarly effective when appropriately located.

  13. A Comet Engulfs Mars: MAVEN Observations of Comet Siding Spring's Influence on the Martian Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espley, Jared R.; Dibraccio, Gina A.; Connerney, John E. P.; Brain, David; Gruesbeck, Jacob; Soobiah, Yasir; Halekas, Jasper S.; Combi, Michael; Luhmann, Janet; Ma, Yingjuan

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus of comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) passed within 141,000?km of Mars on 19 October 2014. Thus, the cometary coma and the plasma it produces washed over Mars for several hours producing significant effects in the Martian magnetosphere and upper atmosphere. We present observations from Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN's (MAVEN's) particles and field's instruments that show the Martian magnetosphere was severely distorted during the comet's passage. We note four specific major effects: (1) a variable induced magnetospheric boundary, (2) a strong rotation of the magnetic field as the comet approached, (3) severely distorted and disordered ionospheric magnetic fields during the comet's closest approach, and (4) unusually strong magnetosheath turbulence lasting hours after the comet left. We argue that the comet produced effects comparable to that of a large solar storm (in terms of incident energy) and that our results are therefore important for future studies of atmospheric escape, MAVEN's primary science objective.

  14. Testing the comet nature of main belt comets. The spectra of 133P/Elst-Pizarro and 176P/LINEAR

    CERN Document Server

    Licandro, J; Tozzi, G P; de León, J; Pinilla-Alonso, N; Boehnhardt, H; Hainaut, O R; .,

    2011-01-01

    We present the visible spectrum of MBCs 133P/Elst-Pizarro and 176P/LINEAR, as well as three Themis family asteroids: (62) Erato, (379), Huenna and (383) Janina, obtained in 2007 using three telescopes at "El Roque de los Muchachos"' Observatory, in La Palma, Spain, and the 8m Kueyen (UT2) VLT telescope at Cerro Paranal, Chile. The spectra of 133P and 176P resemble best those of B-type asteroid and are very similar to those of Themis family members and are significantly different from the spectrum of comet 162P/Siding-Spring and most of the observed cometary nuclei. CN gas emission is not detected in the spectrum of 133P. We determine an upper limit for the CN production rate Q(CN) = $= 2.8 \\times 10^{21}$ mol/s, three orders of magnitude lower than the Q(CN) of Jupiter family comets observed at similar heliocentric distances. The spectra of 133P/Elst-Pizarro and 176P/LINEAR confirm that they are likely members of the Themis family of asteroids, fragments that probably retained volatiles, and unlikely have a c...

  15. Comet Lesions in Patients with Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan Tatlıpınar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE is a genetic multisystemic disorder affecting the skin, eyes and cardiovascular system. Basic fundoscopic findings in PXE result from Bruch’s membrane involvement. The most important fundoscopic findings are angioid streaks. Other significant ocular findings are peau d’orange appearance, optic disc drusen, pattern dystrophy-like macular appearance, comet lesions, and choroidal neovascularization. Comet lesions are a pathognomonic ocular finding for PXE. The presence of both angioid streaks in the fundus and typical skin lesions should alert clinicians to PXE. Herein, we present two PXE cases with comet lesions.

  16. Implications of the Nitrogen Isotope Ratio in Titan's Atmosphere for the Nitrogen Ratio in Ammonia in Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandt, K.; Mousis, O.

    2013-12-01

    The D/H ratio of water measured in solar system bodies has been established as a tool for determining the conditions under which bodies such as comets or icy moons formed. This ratio varies significantly and indicates complex thermal and chemical evolution of the solar nebula during solar system and planetary formation. Nitrogen isotope ratios also vary significantly, and in some but not all cases correlate to D/H ratios, but are poorly understood. Nitrogen in the solar nebula was primarily in the form of atomic and molecular nitrogen. The isotope ratio (14N/15N) of this reservoir is expected to be ~435 based on the ratio measured in Jupiter's atmosphere, because the atmosphere of Jupiter is made up of gas captured from the solar nebula (Owen et al., 2001). The terrestrial atmospheric ratio is 272, which is close to the ratio measured in the Earth's mantle. This may be the primordial ratio for nitrogen delivered to Earth depending on the amount of exchange between the atmosphere and the mantle and any atmospheric fractionation processes that may have influenced the ratio over time. Comets are a possible source of nitrogen in the Earth's atmosphere (Hutsmekers et al., 2009), although chondrites have also been suggested as a source (Marty, 2012). In the case of comets, nitrogen would have been essentially retained in the form of ammonia (Mousis et al., 2012), which is the most abundant form of nitrogen in comets. The nitrogen in Titan's atmosphere is expected to have originated as ammonia hydrates and converted to N2 early in Titan's history (Atreya et al., 1978). The nitrogen ratio in Titan's atmosphere is ~170, which is significantly enriched in the heavy isotope compared to the terrestrial value. We will discuss the evolution of the nitrogen ratio in Titan's atmosphere (Mandt et al., 2009), the limits of the primordial ratio in ammonia, and the implications for this ratio for the isotope ratio in ammonia in comets that should be measured by the ROSINA instrument

  17. The Dynamics Of Inner Solar System Bodies With 2.8 < Tj < 3.2 And The Implications For The Origin Of Main-Belt Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighipour, Nader; Hsieh, Henry H.

    2014-05-01

    Main-belt comets (MBCs) have attracted a great deal of interest since their identification as a new class of bodies by Hsieh and Jewitt in 2006. Much of this interest is due to the implication that MBC activity is driven by the sublimation of volatile material (presumed to be water ice) presenting these bodies as probable candidates for the delivery of a significant fraction of the Earth’s water. An interesting characteristic of these objects is that while similar to comets, they have comae and dusty tails, they resemble asteroids, dynamically (i.e., their Tisserand numbers with respect to Jupiter, Tj, are larger than 3). The Tisserand parameter is a conserved quantity in the restricted three-body problem, and the Tisserand parameter with respect to Jupiter is frequently used to distinguish between asteroids (Tj>3), which are thought to be stable on Gyr timescales, and comets (Tjfact not as distinct as the common use of the Tisserand parameter would suggest. We studied the dynamical evolution of test particles with Tisserand numbers ranging from 2.8 to 3.2 to explore the behavior of solar system objects (such as MBCs) with Tj values close to the canonical asteroid-comet boundary of 3. We find, as expected, that Tj is not a hard boundary between asteroids and comets, and that we can expect to find objects that are dynamically stable (over the time period of integrations) with Tj3. Dynamical stability can be seen to be a function of not just Tj, but also other orbital elements such as the eccentricity and aphelion distance. We will report on the detailed findings of our analysis and discuss their implications for the origin of MBCs.

  18. Warm Jupiters from Secular Planet–Planet Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovich, Cristobal; Tremaine, Scott

    2016-10-01

    Most warm Jupiters (gas-giant planets with 0.1 {{au}}≲ a≲ 1 au) have pericenter distances that are too large for significant orbital migration by tidal friction. We study the possibility that the warm Jupiters are undergoing secular eccentricity oscillations excited by an outer companion (a planet or star) in an eccentric and/or mutually inclined orbit. In this model, the warm Jupiters migrate periodically, in the high-eccentricity phase of the oscillation, but are typically observed at lower eccentricities. We show that in this model the steady-state eccentricity distribution of the warm Jupiters is approximately flat, which is consistent with the observed distribution if we restrict the sample to warm Jupiters with detected outer planetary companions. The eccentricity distribution of warm Jupiters without companions exhibits a peak at e≲ 0.2 that must be explained by a different formation mechanism. Based on a population synthesis study, we find that high-eccentricity migration excited by an outer planetary companion (1) can account for ∼ 20 % of the warm Jupiters and most of the warm Jupiters with e≳ 0.4; and (2) can produce most of the observed population of hot Jupiters, with a semimajor axis distribution that matches the observations, but fails to account adequately for ∼ 60 % of hot Jupiters with projected obliquities ≲ 20^\\circ . Thus ∼ 20 % of the warm Jupiters and ∼ 60 % of the hot Jupiters can be produced by high-eccentricity migration. We also provide predictions for the expected mutual inclinations and spin-orbit angles of the planetary systems with hot and warm Jupiters produced by high-eccentricity migration.

  19. A Comet Surface Sample Return System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Phase II investigation will focus on the development of spacecraft systems required to obtain a sample from the nucleus of a comet, hermetically seal...

  20. A Comet Surface Sample Return System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Phase I investigation will focus on the development of spacecraft systems required to obtain a sample from the nucleus of a comet, hermetically seal the...

  1. Spacecraft fleet to comet Halley - an introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsurutani, B.T.

    1985-01-01

    Questions related to the formation and the characteristics of comets are discussed, and it is suggested that an evolutionary link exists between comets, prebiotic organic synthesis, and the origin of life as it is known. Fundamental questions about the solar wind interaction with comets, are considered, giving attention to the ionization mechanisms in the different cometary regions, the presence of field-aligned currents, and the cometary plasma tail. It is pointed out that some of the questions will soon be answered when the NASA-ESA International Cometary Explorer (ICE) goes through the tail of Giacobini-Zinner in September 1985, and when a five spacecraft fleet arrives at comet Halley in March 1986. 14 references.

  2. The seeding of life by comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, J. M.; Mendoza-Gomez, Celia X.

    1992-01-01

    The chemical and morphological structures of comets and interstellar dust are reviewed to demonstrate the feasibility of comets providing the necessary prebiotic molecules for the formation of life on the early earth. The chemical evolution of interstellar dust is shown to be the source of organics in comets, and the molecules observed in the grains are listed as are the products resulting from grain photolysis. It is emphasized that comets could only transfer prebiotic molecules to the earth if they are fluffy aggregates that break up into fine fragments. The contributions to the early earth are considered in terms of the competition between the evolution of the living organisms and the destructive effects of impacts. It is considered that life began as the bombardment during the first 5 x 10 exp 8 years began to tail off.

  3. The seeding of life by comets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, J M; Mendoza-Gomez, C X

    1992-01-01

    The evidence that living organisms were already extant on the earth almost 4 Gyr ago and that early bombardment by comets and asteroids created a hostile environment up to about this time has revived the question of how it was possible for prebiotic chemical evolution to have provided the necessary ingredients for life to have developed in the short intervening time. The actual bracketed available temporal space is no more than 0.5 Gyr and probably much less. Was this sufficient time for an earth-based source of the first simple organic precursor molecules to have led to the level of the prokaryotic cell? If not, then the difficulty would be resolved if the ancient earth was impregnated by organic molecular seed from outer space. Curiously, it seems that the most likely source of such seeds was the same a one of the sources of the hostile enviroment, namely the comets which bombarded the earth. With the knowledge of comets gained by the space missions it has become clear that a very large fraction of the chemical composition of comet nuclei consists of quite complex organic molecules. Furthermore it has been demonstrated that comets consist of very fluffy aggregates of interstellar dust whose chemistry derives from photoprocessing of simple ice mixtures in space. Thus, the ultimate source of organics in comets comes from the chemical evolution of interstellar dust. An important and critical justification for assuming that interstellar dust is the ultimate source of prebiotic molecular insertion on the earth is the proof that comets are extremely fluffy aggregates, which have the possibility of breaking up into finely divided fragments when the comet impacts the earth's atmosphere. In the following we will summarize the properties of interstellar dust and the chemical and morphological structure of comets indicated by the most recent interpretations of comet observations. It will be shown that the suitable condition for comets having provided abundant prebiotic

  4. Triggering Comet-Like Activity of Main Belt Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighipour, Nader; Maindl, Thomas I.; Schaefer, Christoph; Speith, Roland; Dvorak, Rudolf

    2016-10-01

    Main-belt comets (MBCs) have attracted a great deal of interest since their identification as activated asteroids by Hsieh and Jewitt in 2006. It has been suggested that the comet-like activity of these objects are due to the sublimation of sub-surface water-ice that has been exposed as a result of their surfaces being impacted by small (e.g, m-sized) bodies. We have examined the viability of this scenario by simulating impacts between m-sized impactors and km-sized targets using a smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) approach. We have carried out simulations for a range of impact velocities and angles, material type and strength, and water content of the target allowing m-sized impactors to erode enough of an MBC's surface to trigger its activation. Results indicate that for the range of impact velocities corresponding to those in the asteroid belt, the depth of an impact crater is slightly larger than 10 m suggesting that if the activation of MBCs is due to the sublimation of sub-surface water-ice, this ice has to exist no deeper than a few meters from the surface. Our simulations point to a clearly notable spread in the aggregated crater depths due to different impact energy, impact angles, and MBC's water contents showing deeper craters due to less overall material strength. Results also show that ice-exposure occurs in the bottom and on the interior surface of impact craters as well as the surface of the target where some of the ejected icy inclusions are re-accreted. Our results, in addition to demonstrating that the impact scenario is indeed a viable mechanism to expose ice and trigger the activity of MBCs, indicate that the activity of the current MBCs is likely due to ice sublimation from multiple impact sites and/or the water contents of these objects (and other asteroids in the outer asteroid belt) is larger than the 5% that is traditionally considered in models of terrestrial planet formation. We present details of our simulations and discuss their

  5. Europa Planetary Protection for Juno Jupiter Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Douglas E.; Abelson, Robert D.; Johannesen, Jennie R.; Lam, Try; McAlpine, William J.; Newlin, Laura E.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Juno mission launched in 2011 and will explore the Jupiter system starting in 2016. Juno's suite of instruments is designed to investigate the atmosphere, gravitational fields, magnetic fields, and auroral regions. Its low perijove polar orbit will allow it to explore portions of the Jovian environment never before visited. While the Juno mission is not orbiting or flying close to Europa or the other Galilean satellites, planetary protection requirements for avoiding the contamination of Europa have been taken into account in the Juno mission design.The science mission is designed to conclude with a deorbit burn that disposes of the spacecraft in Jupiter's atmosphere. Compliance with planetary protection requirements is verified through a set of analyses including analysis of initial bioburden, analysis of the effect of bioburden reduction due to the space and Jovian radiation environments, probabilistic risk assessment of successful deorbit, Monte-Carlo orbit propagation, and bioburden reduction in the event of impact with an icy body.

  6. Jumping Jupiter can explain Mercury's orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Roig, Fernando; DeSouza, Sandro Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The orbit of Mercury has large values of eccentricity and inclination that cannot be easily explained if this planet formed on a circular and coplanar orbit. Here, we study the evolution of Mercury's orbit during the instability related to the migration of the giant planets in the framework of the jumping Jupiter model. We found that some instability models are able to produce the correct values of Mercury's eccentricity and inclination, provided that relativistic effects are included in the precession of Mercury's perihelion. The orbital excitation is driven by the fast change of the normal oscillation modes of the system corresponding to the perihelion precession of Jupiter (for the eccentricity), and the nodal regression of Uranus (for the inclination).

  7. The EJSM Jupiter Europa Orbiter: Planning Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Clark, K.; Greeley, R.; Hendrix, A. R.; Boldt, J.; Tan-Wang, G.; Lock, R.; van Houten, T.; Ludwinski, J.

    2008-09-01

    In the decade since the first return of Europa data by the Galileo spacecraft, the scientific understanding of Europa has greatly matured leading to the formulation of sophisticated new science objectives to be addressed through the acquisition of new data. The Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) is one component of the proposed multi-spacecraft Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) designed to obtain data in support of these new science objectives. The JEO planning payload, while notional, is used to quantify engineering aspects of the mission and spacecraft design, and operational scenarios required to obtain the data necessary to meet the science objectives. The instruments were defined to understand the viability of an approach to meet the measurement objectives, perform in the radiation environment and meet the planetary protection requirements. The actual instrument suite would ultimately be the result of an Announcement of Opportunity (AO) selection process carried out by NASA.

  8. Radiation Environment for the Jupiter Europa Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Insoo

    2008-09-01

    One of the major challenges for the Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) mission would be that the spacecraft should be designed to survive an intense radiation environment expected at Jupiter and Europa. The proper definition of the radiation environments is the important first step, because it could affect almost every aspects of mission and spacecraft design. These include optimizing the trajectory to minimize radiation exposure, determining mission lifetime, selecting parts, materials, detectors and sensors, shielding design, etc. The radiation environments generated for the 2008 JEO study will be covered, emphasizing the radiation environment mainly responsible for the total ionizing dose (TID) and displacement damage dose (DDD). The latest models developed at JPL will be used to generate the TID and DDD environments. Finally, the major radiation issues will be summarized, and a mitigation plan will be discussed.

  9. The Escaping Upper Atmospheres of Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Eric; Jones, Gabrielle; Uribe, Ana; Carson, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Hot Jupiters are massive gaseous planets which orbit closely to their parent star. The strong stellar irradiation at these small orbital separations causes the temperature of the upper atmosphere of the planet to rise. This can cause the planet's atmosphere to escape into space, creating an exoplanet outflow. We ascertained which factors determine the presence and structure of these outflows by creating one dimensional simulations of the density, pressure, velocity, optical depth, and neutral fraction of hot Jupiter atmospheres. This was done for planets of masses and radii ranging from 0.5-1.5 Mj and 0.5-1.5 Rj. We found the outflow rate to be highest for a planet of 0.5 Mj and 1.5 Rj at 5.3×10-14 Mj/Yr. We also found that the higher the escape velocity, the lower the chance of the planet having an outflow.

  10. The comet assay: a heavenly method!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Andrew R

    2015-01-01

    The contributions to this special issue of Mutagenesis have been selected to cover the main research areas served by the comet assay, namely genotoxicology, environmental toxicology, human biomonitoring and fundamental investigations into mechanisms of DNA damage and repair. Innovative methods are described, technical issues are explored, and guidelines are given for venturing into relatively new or unexploited areas of research. The popularity of the comet assay in a historical context is illustrated by a bibliometric survey.

  11. Atlas of Secular Light Curves of Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrin, Ignacio

    2007-12-01

    We have completed work on the secular light curves of 30 periodic and non-periodic comets. The objectives and approach of this project has been explained in Ferrin (Icarus, 178, 493-516, 2005). Each comet requires 2 plots. The time plot shows the reduced (to Δ = 1 AU) magnitude of the comet as a function of time, thus displaying the brightness history of the object. The log plot is a reflected double log plot. The reflection takes place at R=1 AU, to allow the determination of the absolute magnitude by extrapolation. 22 photometric parameters are measured from the plots, most of them new. The plots have been collected in a document that constitutes "The Atlas". We have defined a photometric age, P-AGE, that attempts to measure the age of a comet based on its activity. P-AGE has been scaled to human ages to help in its interpretation. We find that comets Hale-Bopp and 29P/SW 1, are baby comets (P-AGE 100 cy). The secular light curve of 9P/Tempel 1 exhibits sublimation due to H2O and due to CO. Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimento to be visited by the Rossetta spacecraft in 2014 exhibits a photometric anomaly. Comet 65P/Gunn exhibits a lag in maximum brightness of LAG = + 254 days after perihelion. We suggest that the pole is pointing to the sun at that time. The secular light curves will be presented and a preliminary interpretation will be advanced. The secular light curves present complexity beyond current understanding. The observations described in this work were carried out at the National Observatory of Venezuela (ONV), managed by the Center for Research in Astronomy (CIDA), for the Ministry of Science and Technology (MinCyT).

  12. On the classification of comet plasma tails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozhenkov, E. R.; Vaisberg, O. L.

    2017-07-01

    The investigation of plasma tails of comets is an important part of comet research. Different classifications of plasma tails of comets are proposed. Plasma acceleration in the tails is investigated in sufficient detail. Several cometary forms are explained. Plasma tails of Mars and Venus were observed during the first studies of these planets. They are associated with the capture of ionized atoms and exosphere molecules by the solar wind magnetized plasma flow. Distinct plasma tails of Mars and Venus are caused by the mass loading of the solar wind with heavy ions. It was shown that the transverse dimension of the tails of Mars, Venus, and comets can be quite accurately determined by production rate of the obstacle to the solar wind flow. While plasma tails of Mars and Venus are investigated by in situ measurements from spacecraft, observations of comet tails from the Earth make it possible to see the entire object under study and to monitor changes in its structure. A certain similarity of cometary and planetary tails can be explained by the nonmagnetic nature of both types of bodies. Thus, it is reasonable to suppose that investigations of plasma tails of comets can supplement the information obtained by in situ methods of the study of the planets. In this paper, plasma tails of comets, presumably analogous to the plasma tails of Mars and Venus, have been identified on modern photographs of comets (more than 1500 photographs viewed). Only quasi-steady laminar tails are considered. They are divided into two types: double structures and outflows. The paper attempts to define the 3D structure of double structures and to determine certain characteristics of outflows.

  13. Modelling of Jupiter's Innermost Radiation Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov, J. D.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    In order to understand better source and loss processes for energetic trapped protons near Jupiter, a modification of de Pater and Goertz' finite difference diffusion calculations for Jovian equatorial energetic electrons is made to apply to the case of protons inside the orbit of Metis. Explicit account is taken of energy loss in the Jovian ring. Comparison of the results is made with Galileo Probe measurements.

  14. DIRECTLY IMAGING TIDALLY POWERED MIGRATING JUPITERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Subo; Katz, Boaz; Socrates, Aristotle [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2013-01-10

    Upcoming direct-imaging experiments may detect a new class of long-period, highly luminous, tidally powered extrasolar gas giants. Even though they are hosted by {approx} Gyr-'old' main-sequence stars, they can be as 'hot' as young Jupiters at {approx}100 Myr, the prime targets of direct-imaging surveys. They are on years-long orbits and presently migrating to 'feed' the 'hot Jupiters'. They are expected from 'high-e' migration mechanisms, in which Jupiters are excited to highly eccentric orbits and then shrink semimajor axis by a factor of {approx}10-100 due to tidal dissipation at close periastron passages. The dissipated orbital energy is converted to heat, and if it is deposited deep enough into the atmosphere, the planet likely radiates steadily at luminosity L {approx} 100-1000 L{sub Jup}(2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}-2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} L{sub Sun }) during a typical {approx} Gyr migration timescale. Their large orbital separations and expected high planet-to-star flux ratios in IR make them potentially accessible to high-contrast imaging instruments on 10 m class telescopes. {approx}10 such planets are expected to exist around FGK dwarfs within {approx}50 pc. Long-period radial velocity planets are viable candidates, and the highly eccentric planet HD 20782b at maximum angular separation {approx}0.''08 is a promising candidate. Directly imaging these tidally powered Jupiters would enable a direct test of high-e migration mechanisms. Once detected, the luminosity would provide a direct measurement of the migration rate, and together with mass (and possibly radius) estimate, they would serve as a laboratory to study planetary spectral formation and tidal physics.

  15. Biomechanical study of the final push-pull in archery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroyer, P; Van Hoecke, J; Helal, J N

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse archery performance among eight archers of different abilities by means of displacement pull-hand measurements during the final push-pull phase of the shoot. The archers showed an irregular displacement negatively related to their technical level. Displacement signal analysis showed high power levels in both the 0-5 Hz and 8-12 Hz ranges. The latter peak corresponds to electromyographic tremor observed during a prolonged push-pull effort. The results are discussed in relation to some potentially helpful training procedures such as biofeedback and strength conditioning.

  16. Solar wind influence on Jupiter's aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyalay, Szilard; Vogt, Marissa F.; Withers, Paul; Bunce, Emma J.

    2016-10-01

    Jupiter's main auroral emission is driven by a system of corotation enforcement currents that arises to speed up outflowing Iogenic plasma and is not due to the magnetosphere-solar wind interaction like at Earth. The solar wind is generally expected to have only a small influence on Jupiter's magnetosphere and aurora compared to the influence of rotational stresses due to the planet's rapid rotation. However, there is considerable observational evidence that the solar wind does affect the magnetopause standoff distance, auroral radio emissions, and the position and brightness of the UV auroral emissions. Using the Michigan Solar Wind Model (mSWiM) to predict the solar wind conditions upstream of Jupiter we have identified intervals of high and low solar wind dynamic pressure in the Galileo dataset, and use this information to quantify how a magnetospheric compression affects the magnetospheric field configuration. We have developed separate spatial fits to the compressed and nominal magnetic field data, accounting for variations with radial distance and local time. These two fits can be used to update the flux equivalence mapping model of Vogt et al. (2011), which links auroral features to source regions in the middle and outer magnetosphere. The updated version accounts for changing solar wind conditions and provides a way to quantify the expected solar wind-induced variability in the ionospheric mapping of the main auroral emission, satellite footprints, and other auroral features. Our results are highly relevant to interpretation of the new auroral observations from the Juno mission.

  17. Hubble Gallery of Jupiter's Galilean Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This is a Hubble Space Telescope 'family portrait' of the four largest moons of Jupiter, first observed by the Italian scientist Galileo Galilei nearly four centuries ago. Located approximately one-half billion miles away, the moons are so small that, in visible light, they appear as fuzzy disks in the largest ground-based telescopes. Hubble can resolve surface details seen previously only by the Voyager spacecraft in the early 1980s. While the Voyagers provided close-up snapshots of the satellites, Hubble can now follow changes on the moons and reveal other characteristics at ultraviolet and near-infrared wavelengths.Over the past year Hubble has charted new volcanic activity on Io's active surface, found a faint oxygen atmosphere on the moon Europa, and identified ozone on the surface of Ganymede. Hubble ultraviolet observations of Callisto show the presence of fresh ice on the surface that may indicate impacts from micrometeorites and charged particles from Jupiter's magnetosphere.Hubble observations will play a complementary role when the Galileo spacecraft arrives at Jupiter in December of this year.This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the World Wide Web on the Space Telescope Science Institute home page at URL http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/

  18. Capture of irregular satellites at Jupiter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesvorný, David; Vokrouhlický, David; Deienno, Rogerio [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2014-03-20

    The irregular satellites of outer planets are thought to have been captured from heliocentric orbits. The exact nature of the capture process, however, remains uncertain. We examine the possibility that irregular satellites were captured from the planetesimal disk during the early solar system instability when encounters between the outer planets occurred. Nesvorný et al. already showed that the irregular satellites of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune were plausibly captured during planetary encounters. Here we find that the current instability models present favorable conditions for capture of irregular satellites at Jupiter as well, mainly because Jupiter undergoes a phase of close encounters with an ice giant. We show that the orbital distribution of bodies captured during planetary encounters provides a good match to the observed distribution of irregular satellites at Jupiter. The capture efficiency for each particle in the original transplanetary disk is found to be (1.3-3.6) × 10{sup –8}. This is roughly enough to explain the observed population of jovian irregular moons. We also confirm Nesvorný et al.'s results for the irregular satellites of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.

  19. Structures of the Planets Jupiter and Saturn

    CERN Document Server

    Kerley, Gerald I

    2013-01-01

    New equations of state (EOS) for hydrogen, helium, and compounds containing heavier elements are used to construct models for the structures of the planets Jupiter and Saturn. Good agreement with the gravitational moments J2 and J4 is obtained with a model that uses a two-layer gas envelope, in which the inner region is denser than the outer one, together with a small, dense core. It is possible to match J2 with a homogeneous envelope, but an envelope with a denser inner region is needed to match both moments. The two-layer envelope also gives good agreement with the global oscillation data for Jupiter. In Jupiter, the boundary between the inner and outer envelopes occurs at 319 GPa, with an 8% density increase. In Saturn, it occurs at 227 GPa, with a 69% density increase. The differences between the two planets show that the need for a density increase is not due to EOS errors. It is also shown that helium enrichment cannot be the cause of the density increase. The phenomenon can be explained as the result o...

  20. Directly Imaging Tidally Powered Migrating Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Subo; Socrates, Aristotle

    2012-01-01

    We show that ongoing direct imaging experiments may detect a new class of long-period, highly luminous, tidally powered extrasolar gas giants. Even though they are hosted by Gyr-"old" main-sequence stars, they can be as "hot" as young Jupiters at ~100 Myr, the prime targets of direct imaging surveys. These planets, with years-long orbits, are presently migrating to "feed" the "hot Jupiters" in steady state. Their existence is expected from a class of "high-e" migration mechanisms, in which gas giants are excited to highly eccentric orbits and then shrink their semi-major axis by factor of ~ 10-100 due to tidal dissipation at successive close periastron passages. The dissipated orbital energy is converted to heat, and if it is deposited deep enough into the planet atmosphere, the planet likely radiates steadily at luminosity ~2-3 orders of magnitude larger than that of our Jupiter during a typical Gyr migration time scale. Their large orbital separations and expected high planet-to-star flux ratios in IR make ...

  1. Illuminating Hot Jupiters in caustic crossing

    CERN Document Server

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2010-01-01

    In recent years a large number of Hot Jupiters orbiting in a very close orbit around the parent stars have been explored with the transit and doppler effect methods. Here in this work we study the gravitational microlensing effect of a binary lens on a parent star with a Hot Jupiter revolving around it. Caustic crossing of the planet makes enhancements on the light curve of the parent star in which the signature of the planet can be detected by high precision photometric observations. We use the inverse ray shooting method with tree code algorithm to generate the combined light curve of the parent star and the planet. In order to investigate the probability of observing the planet signal, we do a Monte-Carlo simulation and obtain the observational optical depth of $\\tau \\sim 10^{-8}$. We show that about ten years observations of Galactic Bulge with a network of telescopes will enable us detecting about ten Hot Jupiter with this method. Finally we show that the observation of the microlensing event in infra-re...

  2. New Horizons Imaging of Jupiter's Main Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throop, Henry B.; Showalter, Mark Robert; Dones, Henry C. Luke; Hamilton, D. P.; Weaver, Harold A.; Cheng, Andrew F.; Stern, S. Alan; Young, Leslie; Olkin, Catherine B.; New Horizons Science Team

    2016-10-01

    New Horizons took roughly 520 visible-light images of Jupiter's ring system during its 2007 flyby, using the spacecraft's Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI). These observations were taken over nine days surrounding Jupiter close-approach. They span a range in distance of 30 - 100 RJ, and a phase angle range of 20 - 174 degrees. The highest resolution images -- more than 200 frames -- were taken at a resolution approaching 20 km/pix.We will present an analysis of this dataset, much of which has not been studied in detail before. Our results include New Horizons' first quantitative measurements of the ring's intrinsic brightness and variability. We will also present results on the ring's azimuthal and radial structure. Our measurements of the ring's phase curve will be used to infer properties of the ring's dust grains.Our results build on the only previous analysis of the New Horizons Jupiter ring data set, presented in Showalter et al (2007, Science 318, 232-234), which detected ring clumps and placed a lower limit on the population of undetected ring-moons.This work was supported by NASA's OPR program.

  3. Himalia, a Small Moon of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Cassini spacecraft captured images of Himalia, the brightest of Jupiter's outer moons, on Dec. 19, 2000, from a distance of 4.4 million kilometers (2.7 million miles).This near-infrared image, with a resolution of about 27 kilometers (17 miles) per pixel, indicates that the side of Himalia facing the spacecraft is roughly 160 kilometers (100 miles) in the up-down direction. Himalia probably has a non-spherical shape. Scientists believe it is a body captured into orbit around Jupiter, most likely an irregularly shaped asteroid.In the main frame, an arrow indicates Himalia. North is up. The inset shows the little moon magnified by a factor of 10, plus a graphic indicating Himalia's size and the direction of lighting (with sunlight coming from the left). Cassini's pictures of Himalia were taken during a brief period when Cassini's attitude was stabilized by thrusters instead of by a steadier reaction-wheel system. No spacecraft or telescope had previously shown any of Jupiter's outer moons as more than a star-like single dot.Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  4. Absorption of trapped particles by Jupiter's moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, W. N.; Birmingham, T. J.; Mead, G. D.

    1974-01-01

    Inclusion of absorption effects of the four innermost moons in the radial transport equations for electrons and protons in Jupiter's magnetosphere. It is found that the phase space density n at 2 Jupiter radii for electrons with equatorial pitch angles less than 69 deg is reduced by a factor of 42,000 when lunar absorption is included in the calculation. For protons with equatorial pitch angles less than 69 deg the corresponding reduction factor is 2,300,000. The effect of the satellites becomes progressively weaker for both electrons and protons as equatorial pitch angles of 90 deg are approached, because the likelihood of impacting a satellite becomes progressively smaller. The large density decreases found at the orbits of Io, Europa, and Ganymede result in corresponding particle flux decreases that should be observed by spacecraft making particle measurements in Jupiter's magnetosphere. The characteristic signature of satellite absorption should be a downward-pointing vertex in the flux versus radius curve at the L value corresponding to each satellite.

  5. Comet 17P/Holmes: contrast in activity between before and after the 2007 outburst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiguro, Masateru; Kim, Yoonyoung; Warjurkar, Dhanraj S.; Ham, Ji-Beom [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Junhan [Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Usui, Fumihiko [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Vaubaillon, Jeremie J. [Observatoire de Paris, I.M.C.C.E., Denfert Rochereau, Bat. A., F-75014 Paris (France); Ishihara, Daisuke [Department of Physics, School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan); Hanayama, Hidekazu [Ishigakijima Astronomical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Ishigaki, Okinawa 907-0024 (Japan); Sarugaku, Yuki; Hasegawa, Sunao [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Kasuga, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Jun-ichi [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Pyo, Jeonghyun [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Kuroda, Daisuke [National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, Kamogata-cho, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Ootsubo, Takafumi [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Sakamoto, Makoto; Narusawa, Shin-ya; Takahashi, Jun [Nishi-Harima Astronomical Observatory, Center for Astronomy, University of Hyogo, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5313 (Japan); Akisawa, Hiroki, E-mail: ishiguro@astro.snu.ac.kr [Himeji City Science Museum, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2222 (Japan)

    2013-11-20

    A Jupiter-family comet, 17P/Holmes, underwent outbursts in 1892 and 2007. In particular, the 2007 outburst is known as the greatest outburst over the past century. However, little is known about the activity before the outburst because it was unpredicted. In addition, the time evolution of the nuclear physical status has not been systematically studied. Here, we study the activity of 17P/Holmes before and after the 2007 outburst through optical and mid-infrared observations. We found that the nucleus was highly depleted in its near-surface icy component before the outburst but that it became activated after the 2007 outburst. Assuming a conventional 1 μm sized grain model, we derived a surface fractional active area of 0.58% ± 0.14% before the outburst whereas the area was enlarged by a factor of ∼50 after the 2007 outburst. We also found that large (≥1 mm) particles could be dominant in the dust tail observed around aphelion. Based on the size of the particles, the dust production rate was ≳170 kg s{sup –1} at a heliocentric distance of r{sub h} = 4.1 AU, suggesting that the nucleus was still active around the aphelion passage. The nucleus color was similar to that of the dust particles and average for a Jupiter-family comet but different from that of most Kuiper Belt objects, implying that color may be inherent to icy bodies in the solar system. On the basis of these results, we concluded that more than 76 m of surface material was blown off by the 2007 outburst.

  6. The asteroid belt outer region under jumping-Jupiter migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, H. S.; Winter, O. C.; Vieira Neto, E.

    2017-09-01

    The radial configuration of the outer region of the main asteroid belt is quite peculiar, and has much to say about the past evolution of Jupiter. In this work, we investigate the dynamical effects of a jumping-Jupiter-like migration over a more extended primordial asteroid belt. Jupiter's migrations are simulated using a fast jumping-Jupiter synthesizer. Among the results, we highlight non-negligible fractions of primordial objects trapped in 3:2 and 4:3 mean motion resonances (MMRs) with Jupiter. They survived the whole truculent phase of migration and originated populations that are like Hildas and Thules. Fractions ranging from 3 to 6 per cent of the initial distribution remained trapped in 3:2 MMR, and at least 0.05 per cent in 4:3. These results show that the resonance trapping of primordial objects may have originated these resonant populations. This theory is consistent even for Jupiter's truculent evolution.

  7. Repeatability of arm pull patterns in front crawl swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lester K.; Kegelman, John C.

    2009-11-01

    The arm pull in human swimming has seen extensive study, particularly involving the front crawl stroke. This work has primarily been aimed either at clarifying the mechanisms of thrust generation by the arm and hand, or at comparing the relative performance of different canonical pulling patterns. In this work we investigate the degree to which swimmers adjust their arm and hand trajectories in response to instantaneous ambient conditions. Video imaging data from competitive swimmers indicates that there may be wide stroke-to-stroke variations in pull trajectories. This suggests that optimal stroking form may be less about a swimmer's ability to repeat idealized pull patterns, than about the swimmer's ability to respond to local flow conditions, or what is referred to in the swimming vernacular as the ``feel'' for the water.

  8. A Parallel-pulling Protocol for Free Energy Evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Ngo, Van

    2011-01-01

    Jarzynski's equality (JE) allows us to compute free energy differences (FEDs) from distributions of work performed on a system. We show that it is possible to generate the work distributions in single step-wise pulling simulations in order to compute FEDs by JE without generating many trajectories using virtual optical traps. We suggest an alternative method for directly computing FEDs in both sequential- and parallel-pulling protocols based on measurements of averaged reaction coordinates along pathways. In comparison with the commonly used Potential of Mean Force method applied to stretching a Deca-Alanine molecule, we show that the parallel-pulling protocol is at least 20 times faster than slow sequential-pulling protocols for producing the same free energy barrier with the uncertainty less than 2.0 kcal/mol.

  9. Behavioural analysis of the pull-in dynamic transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, L. A.; Cretu, E.; Wolffenbuttel, R. F.

    2004-09-01

    A careful analysis of the dynamics of the pull-in displacement reveals a metastable transient interval for devices with a Q factor lower than 1.2. The duration of this metastable regime could be up to 20 ms for the structure used in this work, depending on the damping. For typical device dimensions this regime dominates pull-in dynamics. This paper explicitly focuses on the metastable regime. The results of numerical simulations are confirmed with measurement results with the purpose of providing a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms. This may contribute to both improved actuator design and enhanced sensitivity of pressure sensors and accelerometers operating on pull-in time interval measurement. The sensitivity of the pull-in time to external accelerations is 6 × 10-2 s/ms-2 (~0.6 ms mg-1) for current devices and can be increased by design.

  10. Mechanism of oil-pulling therapy -In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharath Asokan

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The myth that the effect of oil-pulling therapy on oral health was just a placebo effect has been broken and there are clear indications of possible saponification and emulsification process, which enhances its mechanical cleaning action.

  11. Study of Power Options for Jupiter and Outer Planet Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fincannon, James

    2015-01-01

    Power for missions to Jupiter and beyond presents a challenging goal for photovoltaic power systems, but NASA missions including Juno and the upcoming Europa Clipper mission have shown that it is possible to operate solar arrays at Jupiter. This work analyzes photovoltaic technologies for use in Jupiter and outer planet missions, including both conventional arrays, as well as analyzing the advantages of advanced solar cells, concentrator arrays, and thin film technologies. Index Terms - space exploration, spacecraft solar arrays, solar electric propulsion, photovoltaic cells, concentrator, Fresnel lens, Jupiter missions, outer planets.

  12. The Role of Solar Neutrinos in the Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Burov, Valery

    2008-01-01

    Judging from the fact that the planet Jupiter is bigger in size than the Earth by 10^3 while is smaller than the Sun by 10^3 and that the average distance of the Jupiter from the Sun is 5.203 a.u., the solar neutrinos, when encounter the Jupiter, may have some accumulating effects bigger than on the Earth. We begin by estimating how much energy/power carried by solar neutrinos get transferred by this unique process, to confirm that solar neutrinos, despite of their feeble neutral weak current interactions, might deposit enough energy in the Jupiter. We also speculate on the other remarkable effects.

  13. Acellular comet assay: a tool for assessing variables influencing the alkaline comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Erin K; McNamee, James P; Prud'homme Lalonde, Louise; Jones, Trevor; Wilkinson, Diana

    2012-01-01

    In this study, an acellular modification to the alkaline comet assay to further evaluate key variables within the assay that may influence the outcome of genotoxicity studies is described. This acellular comet assay can detect differences of 0.2 Gy of (60)Co gamma-ray radiation between 0 and 1 Gy and differences of 1 Gy between 0 and 8 Gy; thus, this assay is applicable for a wide range of DNA damage levels. It is also shown that DNA damage from different radiation energies was not significantly different from (60)Co gamma-ray. This assay displayed a statistical increase in DNA damage due to uncontrolled exposure to natural light; however, the slope of the dose-response curve for light-exposed samples was similar to that for samples protected from light. A comparison of the alkaline comet assay with the acellular comet assay allowed for the intrinsic repair capacity of the alkaline comet assay to be quantified.

  14. "The 2009 Apparition of Methuselah Comet 107P/Wilson-Harrington: A Case of Comet Rejuvenation?"

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrín, I; Hamanowa, Hiroko; Hernández, J; Sira, E; Sánchez, A; Zhao, H; Miles, R

    2012-01-01

    (1) We find that comet 107P/WH was active in 1949, 1979, 1992, 2005, and 2009. (2) Its age can be measured. We find T-AGE=4700 comet years, WB-AGE=7800 cy. (3) This is a methuselah comet very near to its dormancy phase, being temporarily rejuvenated due to a diminution of its perihelion distance. (4) We measured the diameter as Deffe=3.67\\pm0.06 km, and the rotational period, Prot=6.093\\pm0.002 h. (5) We define the region of the graveyard of comets, and three comets belong to the graveyard: 107P/Wilson-Harrington, 133P/Elst-Pizarro and D/1891W1 Blanpain.

  15. Using a metal detector to locate a swallowed ring pull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J; Perez-Avila, C A; Cherukuri, A; Tidey, B

    1995-03-01

    A 48-year-old man accidently swallowed the ring pull from a soft drink can. He complained of pain in his chest. Chest radiographs were normal. A metal detector emitted a strong response when passed across the front of his chest. Oesophagoscopy was carried out and the ring pull was successfully removed. We recommend the wider use of metal detectors by accident and emergency (A&E) department staff particularly when dealing with patients who have ingested metals of low radiodensity.

  16. Pull-Through Capacity in Plywood and OSB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Andersen, Jørgen; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    The characteristic pull-through capacity of heads of nails and screws is needed to determine the rope effect for laterally loaded fasteners used to fix sheathing to timberframes. There is no values given in EN 1995 (Eurocode 5) but data for the pull through capacity of nail and screw heads has be...... found in four different references. All fasteners and panels are North American. A fairly general and accurate model is found and the characteristic values according to EN 1990 are determined....

  17. Push and pull strategies: applications for health care marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, B R

    1987-08-01

    As health care markets mature and expand, strategies available in other industries become useful. This article examines how traditional push-pull strategies apply to health care. Marketers using a push strategy recognize that the sale of their services or goods is dependent upon the endorsement of a middleman and promote their product through the middleman. Those using a pull strategy market directly to the consumer. In this article, the author outlines the advantages and disadvantages of using each strategy.

  18. Tails of a Recent Comet

    CERN Document Server

    Zysman, Milton

    2010-01-01

    Drain away the earth's oceans and a global pattern of great ridges appears. Adjacent to these continental and undersea mountain ranges are layers of silt and clay, so thick that they fill the gaps between ridges, creating extensive plateaus. Ranging across this planet's higher latitudes are thousands of tiny replicas of these ridge systems. These esker and drumlin swarms run up hills and across streams in roughly parallel discontinuous strands for hundreds of kilometers. Preserved by encapsulation in the ice and snow of our last ice age, eskers, drumlins and their related structures will be the focus of this paper. We contend that Greater and lesser ridge systems alike, including the water and sediments that fill them are cometary debris. Each ridge may be traced to a single stream, or 'jet' of disintegrating materials emanating from shifting areas on a comet's nucleus. A band of these jets, captured into planetary orbit, will land its debris in a unique manner. All debris will be laid down in a sheet perpend...

  19. Incorporation of a Late-forming Chondrule into Comet Wild 2

    CERN Document Server

    Ogliore, R C; Nagashima, K; Butterworth, A L; Gainsforth, Z; Stodolna, J; Westphal, A J; Joswiak, D; Tyliszczak, T

    2011-01-01

    We report the petrology, O isotopic composition, and Al-Mg isotope system- atics of a chondrule fragment from the Jupiter-family comet Wild 2, returned to Earth by NASA's Stardust mission. This object shows characteristics of a type II chondrule that formed from an evolved oxygen isotopic reservoir. No evidence for extinct 26Al was found, with (26Al/ 27Al)0 < 3.0\\times10^-6. Assuming homogenous distribution of 26Al in the solar nebula, this particle crystallized at least 3 Myr after the earliest solar system objects-relatively late compared to most chondrules in meteorites. We interpret the presence of this object in a Kuiper Belt body as evidence of late, large-scale transport of small objects between the inner and outer solar nebula. Our observations constrain the formation of Jupiter (a barrier to outward transport if it formed further from the Sun than this cometary chondrule) to be more than 3 Myr after CAIs.

  20. INCORPORATION OF A LATE-FORMING CHONDRULE INTO COMET WILD 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogliore, R. C.; Huss, G. R.; Nagashima, K. [Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Butterworth, A. L.; Gainsforth, Z.; Stodolna, J.; Westphal, A. J. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Joswiak, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Tyliszczak, T. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    We report the petrology, O isotopic composition, and Al-Mg isotope systematics of a chondrule fragment from the Jupiter-family comet Wild 2, returned to Earth by NASA's Stardust mission. This object shows characteristics of a type II chondrule that formed from an evolved oxygen isotopic reservoir. No evidence for extinct {sup 26}Al was found, with ({sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al){sub 0} < 3.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}. Assuming homogenous distribution of {sup 26}Al in the solar nebula, this particle crystallized at least 3 Myr after the earliest solar system objects-relatively late compared to most chondrules in meteorites. We interpret the presence of this object in a Kuiper Belt body as evidence of late, large-scale transport of small objects between the inner and outer solar nebula. Our observations constrain the formation of Jupiter (a barrier to outward transport if it formed further from the Sun than this cometary chondrule) to be more than 3 Myr after calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions.

  1. Evidence for geologic processes on comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunshine, Jessica M.; Thomas, Nicolas; El-Maarry, Mohamed Ramy; Farnham, Tony L.

    2016-11-01

    Spacecraft missions have resolved the nuclei of six periodic comets and revealed a set of geologically intriguing and active small bodies. The shapes of these cometary nuclei are dominantly bilobate reflecting their formation from smaller cometesimals. Cometary surfaces include a diverse set of morphologies formed from a variety of mechanisms. Sublimation of ices, driven by the variable insolation over the time since each nucleus was perturbed into the inner Solar System, is a major process on comets and is likely responsible for quasi-circular depressions and ubiquitous layering. Sublimation from near-vertical walls is also seen to lead to undercutting and mass wasting. Fracturing has only been resolved on one comet but likely exists on all comets. There is also evidence for mass redistribution, where material lifted off the nucleus by subliming gases is deposited onto other surfaces. It is surprising that such sedimentary processes are significant in the microgravity environment of comets. There are many enigmatic features on cometary surfaces including tall spires, kilometer-scale flows, and various forms of depressions and pits. Furthermore, even after accounting for the differences in resolution and coverage, significant diversity in landforms among cometary surfaces clearly exists. Yet why certain landforms occur on some comets and not on others remains poorly understood. The exploration and understanding of geologic processes on comets is only beginning. These fascinating bodies will continue to provide a unique laboratory for examining common geologic processes under the uncommon conditions of very high porosity, very low strength, small particle sizes, and near-zero gravity.

  2. JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE): An ESA mission to orbit Ganymede and to characterise the Jupiter system

    OpenAIRE

    Grasset, O.; Dougherty, K; Coustenis, A.; Bunce, J; Erd, C.; Titov, D.; Blanc, M.; Coates, A; Drossart, P.; Fletcher, N; Hussmann, H.; Jaumann, R.; N. Krupp; Lebreton, P; O. Prieto-Ballesteros

    2013-01-01

    Past exploration of Jupiter's diverse satellite system has forever changed our understanding of the unique environments to be found around gas giants, both in our solar system and beyond. The detailed investigation of three of Jupiter's Galilean satellites (Ganymede, Europa, and Callisto), which are believed to harbour subsurface water oceans, is central to elucidating the conditions for habitability of icy worlds in planetary systems in general. The study of the Jupiter system and the possib...

  3. Optical and Near-Infrared Polarimetry for a Highly Dormant Comet 209P/LINEAR

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroda, Daisuke; Watanabe, Makoto; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Jun; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ui, Takahiro; Kanda, Yuka; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Itoh, Ryosuke; Moritani, Yuki; Imai, Masataka; Goda, Shuhei; Takagi, Yuhei; Morihana, Kumiko; Honda, Satoshi; Arai, Akira; Hanayama, Hidekazu; Nagayama, Takahiro; Nogami, Daisaku; Sarugaku, Yuki; Murata, Katsuhiro; Morokuma, Tomoki; Saito, Yoshihiko; Oasa, Yumiko; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    We conducted an optical and near-infrared polarimetric observation of the highly dormant Jupiter-Family Comet, 209P/LINEAR. Because of its low activity, we were able to determine the linear polarization degrees of the coma dust particles and nucleus independently, that is $P_n$=30.3$^{+1.3}_{-0.9}$% at $\\alpha$=92.2$^\\circ$ and $P_n$=31.0$^{+1.0}_{-0.7}$% at $\\alpha$=99.5$^\\circ$ for the nucleus, and $P_c$=28.8$^{+0.4}_{-0.4}$% at $\\alpha$=92.2$^\\circ$ and 29.6$^{+0.3}_{-0.3}$% at $\\alpha$=99.5$^\\circ$ for the coma. We detected no significant variation in $P$ at the phase angle coverage of 92.2$^\\circ$-99.5$^\\circ$, which may imply that the obtained polarization degrees are nearly at maximum in the phase-polarization curves. By fitting with an empirical function, we obtained the maximum values of linear polarization degrees $P_\\mathrm{max}$=30.8% for the nucleus and $P_\\mathrm{max}$=29.6% for the dust coma. The $P_\\mathrm{max}$ of the dust coma is consistent with those of dust-rich comets. The low geometric a...

  4. Optical and Near-infrared Polarimetry for a Highly Dormant Comet 209P/LINEAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Daisuke; Ishiguro, Masateru; Watanabe, Makoto; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Jun; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ui, Takahiro; Kanda, Yuka; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Itoh, Ryosuke; Moritani, Yuki; Imai, Masataka; Goda, Shuhei; Takagi, Yuhei; Morihana, Kumiko; Honda, Satoshi; Arai, Akira; Hanayama, Hidekazu; Nagayama, Takahiro; Nogami, Daisaku; Sarugaku, Yuki; Murata, Katsuhiro; Morokuma, Tomoki; Saito, Yoshihiko; Oasa, Yumiko; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Jun-ichi

    2015-12-01

    We conducted an optical and near-infrared polarimetric observation of the highly dormant Jupiter-Family Comet, 209P/LINEAR. Because of its low activity, we were able to determine the linear polarization degrees of the coma dust particles and nucleus independently, that is Pn = {30.3}-0.9+1.3% at α = 92.°2 and Pn = {31.0}-0.7+1.0% at α = 99.°5 for the nucleus, and Pc = {28.8}-0.4+0.4% at α = 92.°2 and {29.6}-0.3+0.3% at α = 99.°5 for the coma. We detected no significant variation in P at the phase angle coverage of 92.°2-99.°5, which may imply that the obtained polarization degrees are nearly at maximum in the phase-polarization curves. By fitting with an empirical function, we obtained the maximum values of linear polarization degrees Pmax = 30.8% for the nucleus and Pmax = 29.6% for the dust coma. The Pmax of the dust coma is consistent with those of dust-rich comets. The low geometric albedo of Pv = 0.05 was derived from the slope-albedo relationship and was associated with high {P}{max}. We examined Pmax-albedo relations between asteroids and 209P, and found that the so-called Umov law seems to be applicable on this cometary surface.

  5. Hubble Space Telescope observations of comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9 (1993e)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, H.A.; Feldman, P.D.; A'Hearn, M.F.; Arpigny, C.; Brown, R.A.; Helin, E.F.; Levy, D.H.; Marsden, B.G.; Meech, K.J.; Larson, S.M.; Noll, K.S.; Scotti, J.V.; Sekanina, Z.; Shoemaker, C.S.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Smith, T.E.; Storrs, A.D.; Yeomans, D.K.; Zellner, B.

    1994-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope observed the fragmented comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9 (1993e) (P indicates that it is a periodic comet) on 1 July 1993. Approximately 20 individual nuclei and their comae were observed in images taken with the Planetary Camera. After subtraction of the comae light, the 11 brightest nuclei have magnitudes between ~23.7 and 24.8. Assuming that the geometric albedo is 0.04, these magnitudes imply that the nuclear diameters are in the range ~2.5 to 4.3 kilometers. If the density of each nucleus is 1 gram per cubic centimeter, the total energy deposited by the impact of these 11 nuclei into Jupiter's atmosphere next July will be ~4 x 1030 ergs (~108 megatons of TNT). This latter number should be regarded as an upper limit because the nuclear magnitudes probably contain a small residual coma contribution. The Faint Object Spectrograph was used to search for fluorescence from OH, which is usually an excellent indicator of cometary activity. No OH emission was detected, and this can be translated into an upper limit on the water production rate of ~2 x 1027 molecules per second.

  6. Physical and dynamical properties of the anomalous comet 249P/LINEAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Julio A.; Licandro, Javier; Moreno, Fernando; Sosa, Andrea; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio; de León, Julia; Birtwhistle, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Images and low-resolution spectra of the near-Earth Jupiter family comet (JFC) 249P/LINEAR in the visible range obtained with the instrument OSIRIS in the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) (La Palma, Spain) on January 3, 4, 6 and February 6, 2016 are presented, together with a series of images obtained with the 0.4m telescope of the Great Shefford Observatory obtained on Oct. 22 and 27, and Nov. 1 and 24, 2006. The reflectance spectrum of 249P is similar to that of a B-type asteroid. The comet has an absolute (visual) nuclear magnitude HV = 17.0 ± 0.4 , which corresponds to a radius of about 1-1.3 km for a geometric albedo ∼ 0.04 - 0.07 . From the analysis of GTC images using a Monte Carlo dust tail code we find that the time of maximum dust ejection rate was around 1.6 days before perihelion. The analysis of the dust tails during the 2006 and 2016 perihelion approaches reveals that, during both epochs, the comet repeated the same dust ejection pattern, with a similar short-lived activity period of about 20 days (FWHM) around perihelion and a dust loss rate peaking at 145 ± 50 kg/s. The total dust mass ejected during its last perihelion passage was (2.5 ± 0.9) × 108 kg, almost all this mass being emitted before the first observation of January 3, 2016. The activity onset, duration, and total ejected mass were very similar during the 2006 perihelion passage. This amount of dust mass is very low as compared with that from other active JFCs. The past orbital evolution of 249P and 100 clones were also followed over a time scale of ∼ 5 × 104 yr. The object and more than 60% of the clones remained bound to the near-Earth region for the whole computed period, keeping its perihelion distance within the range q ≃ 0.4 - 1.1 au. The combination of photometric and spectroscopic observations and dynamical studies show that the near-Earth comet 249P/LINEAR has several peculiar features that clearly differentiate it from typical JFCs. We may be in front of a new

  7. Composition of Irradiation Residue from Jupiter Trojan Laboratory Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, Michael; Mahjoub, Ahmed; Blacksberg, Jordana; Brown, Michael E.; Carlson, Robert W.; Ehlmann, Bethany; Eiler, John; Hand, Kevin P.; Hodyss, Robert; Wong, Ian

    2016-10-01

    Today's Jupiter Trojan asteroids may have originated in the Kuiper Belt (eg. Morbidelli et al. Nature 2005, Nesvorny et al. ApJ 2013) and migrated to capture at their present locations. If this is the case, it is expected that their surfaces will contain chemical traces of this history. Our work broadly considers laboratory simulations of this history. In this work we report on the refractory residue left behind when irradiated mixed ice samples were brought to Earth-normal conditions and removed from the vacuum system. Ices that will be discussed include a 3:3:3:1 mixture of H2S:NH3:CH3OH:H2O and a 3:3:1 mixture of NH3:CH3OH:H2O. After deposition at 50K, the ices were irradiated with a beam of 10 keV electrons to form a processed crust mixed with unreacted ices. The films were then warmed to 142K under irradiation over several days. After stopping irradiation, the mixtures were slowly heated through the desorption temperatures of the unreacted ices (about 150-180K), leaving only more-stable compounds behind, and up to room temperature. Some of the reaction products were seen to desorb during heating to room temperature, while a significant amount remained as a refractory residue. After backfilling the vacuum system with nitrogen gas, residues were analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, and Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometry. Results indicate a complex chemistry including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, and nitrogen and sulfur-containing organics. Notably, when sulfur is not present, a number of nitrogen-containing organic candidates are identified, however, in the mixtures containing sulfur, sulfur-containing compounds appear to dominate the chemistry. While these experiments were conducted with Trojan asteroids in mind, the results are also relevant to comets and other cold locations in the solar system that have experienced large swings in temperature.This work has been supported by the Keck Institute for

  8. Abundant Solar Nebula Solids in Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Nguyen, A. N.; Clemett, S.

    2016-01-01

    Comets have been proposed to consist of unprocessed interstellar materials together with a variable amount of thermally annealed interstellar grains. Recent studies of cometary solids in the laboratory have shown that comets instead consist of a wide range of materials from across the protoplanetary disk, in addition to a minor complement of interstellar materials. These advances were made possible by the return of direct samples of comet 81P/Wild 2 coma dust by the NASA Stardust mission and recent advances in microscale analytical techniques. Isotopic studies of 'cometary' chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and comet 81P/Wild 2 Stardust samples show that preserved interstellar materials are more abundant in comets than in any class of meteorite. Identified interstellar materials include sub-micron-sized presolar silicates, oxides, and SiC dust grains and some fraction of the organic material that binds the samples together. Presolar grain abundances reach 1 weight percentage in the most stardust-rich CP-IDPs, 50 times greater than in meteorites. Yet, order of magnitude variations in presolar grain abundances among CP-IDPs suggest cometary solids experienced significant variations in the degree of processing in the solar nebula. Comets contain a surprisingly high abundance of nebular solids formed or altered at high temperatures. Comet 81P/Wild 2 samples include 10-40 micron-sized, refractory Ca- Al-rich inclusion (CAI)-, chondrule-, and ameboid olivine aggregate (AOA)-like materials. The O isotopic compositions of these refractory materials are remarkably similar to their meteoritic counterparts, ranging from 5 percent enrichments in (sup 16) O to near-terrestrial values. Comet 81P/Wild 2 and CP-IDPs also contain abundant Mg-Fe crystalline and amorphous silicates whose O isotopic compositions are also consistent with Solar System origins. Unlike meteorites, that are dominated by locally-produced materials, comets appear to be composed of

  9. Satellite Meteorology Education & Training Resources from COMET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, W. E.; Dills, P. N.; Weingroff, M.; Lee, T. F.

    2012-12-01

    The COMET® Program (www.comet.ucar.edu) receives funding from NOAA NESDIS as well as EUMETSAT and the Meteorological Service of Canada to support education and training in satellite meteorology. These partnerships enable COMET to create educational materials of global interest on geostationary and polar-orbiting remote sensing platforms. These materials focus on the capabilities and applications of current and next-generation satellites and their relevance to operational forecasters and other user communities. By partnering with experts from the Naval Research Laboratory, NOAA-NESDIS and its Cooperative Institutes, Meteorological Service of Canada, EUMETSAT, and other user communities, COMET stimulates greater use of satellite data observations and products. This presentation provides an overview of COMET's recent satellite education efforts in the area of polar orbiting satellites. COMET has a new module on Suomi NPP, which describes the satellite system and discusses the improvements that it is bringing to forecasting, numerical weather prediction, and environmental monitoring. COMET has also published an updated version of its module on the VIIRS instrument. "Imaging with VIIRS: A Convergence of Technologies and Experience, 2nd Edition" covers the instrument's enhanced capabilities by examining the systems that contributed to its development. Special attention is paid to the Day/Night Visible channel as VIIRS is the first instrument on a civilian satellite to image atmospheric and terrestrial features with and without moonlight. An upcoming module will exclusively focus on nighttime imaging with the VIIRS Day/Night Band (DNB). "Applications of the VIIRS Day-Night Band" will introduce the capabilities of DNB imagery to a wide audience ranging from forecasters and emergency managers to wildfire fighters and oceanographers. DNB products will be compared to traditional satellite products made from infrared data, including the "fog" product. Users will learn how DNB

  10. Jupiter internal structure: the effect of different equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, Y.; Guillot, T.; Fayon, L.

    2016-12-01

    Context. Heavy elements, even though they are a smaller constituent, are crucial to understand the formation history of Jupiter. Interior models are used to determine the amount of heavy elements in the interior of Jupiter, but this range is still subject to degeneracies because of the uncertainties in the equations of state. Aims: Before Juno mission data arrive, we present optimized calculations for Jupiter that explore the effect of different model parameters on the determination of the core and the mass of heavy elements of Jupiter. We compare recently published equations of state. Methods: The interior model of Jupiter was calculated from the equations of hydrostatic equilibrium, mass, and energy conservation, and energy transport. The mass of the core and heavy elements was adjusted to match the observed radius and gravitational moments of Jupiter. Results: We show that the determination of the interior structure of Jupiter is tied to the estimation of its gravitational moments and the accuracy of equations of state of hydrogen, helium, and heavy elements. Locating the region where helium rain occurs and defining its timescale is important to determine the distribution of heavy elements and helium in the interior of Jupiter. We show that the differences found when modeling the interior of Jupiter with recent EOS are more likely due to differences in the internal energy and entropy calculation. The consequent changes in the thermal profile lead to different estimates of the mass of the core and heavy elements, which explains differences in recently published interior models of Jupiter. Conclusions: Our results help clarify the reasons for the differences found in interior models of Jupiter and will help interpreting upcoming Juno data. Full appendix tables are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A114

  11. Comet assay on mice testicular cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Kumar Sharma

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Heritable mutations may result in a variety of adverse outcomes including genetic disease in the offspring. In recent years the focus on germ cell mutagenicity has increased and the “Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS” has published classification criteria for germ cell mutagens (Speit et al., 2009. The in vivo Comet assay is considered a useful tool for investigating germ cell genotoxicity. In the present study DNA strand breaks in testicular cells of mice were investigated. Different classes of chemicals were tested in order to evaluate the sensitivity of the comet assay in testicular cells. The chemicals included environmentally relevant substances such as Bisphenol A, PFOS and Tetrabrombisphenol A. Statistical power calculations will be presented to aid in the design of future Comet assay studies on testicular cells. Power curves were provided with different fold changes in % tail DNA, different number of cells scored and different number of gels (Hansen et al., 2014. An example is shown in Figure 1. A high throughput version of the Comet assay was used. Samples were scored with a fully automatic comet assay scoring system that provided faster scoring of randomly selected cells.

  12. Study of some comets through imaging polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Choudhury, S.; Hadamcik, E.; Sen, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Comets C/2007 N3 (Lulin), C/2011 L4 (PANSTARRS) and 290P/Jager were observed at phase angles <40○; between 2009 and 2014; with the 0.8 m Telescope at Haute-Provence Observatory (OHP) in France. The observations were polarimetric and mainly carried out in the red and near infra-red wavelength domains to reduce gaseous contaminations. The overall shape of the coma of comet Lulin is about circular without evident jet structure. The coma of comet C/2011 L4 is enlarged in the antisolar direction. Jets in a fan-like structure have been noticed between position angles 135°-245° in the treated intensity images. A correlated higher polarization region is noted on the corresponding polarization map. The shape of the coma of 290P/Jager is slightly elongated in the antisolar direction. Deeper negative polarization is found in the inner coma. The whole coma polarization values of these three comets correspond to the synthetic phase curve for comets at similar phase angles and wavelength.

  13. Galactic tide and orbital evolution of comets

    CERN Document Server

    Komar, L; Pastor, P

    2009-01-01

    Equation of motion for a comet in the Oort cloud is numerically solved. Orbital evolution of the comet under the action of the gravity of the Sun and the Galaxy is presented for various initial conditions. Oscillations of the Sun with respect to the galactic equatorial plane are taken into account. Real values of physical quantities concerning the gravitational action of the galactic neighbourhood of the Sun are important. The results are compared with currently used more simple models of the galactic tide. It turns out that physically improved models yield results which significantly differ from the results obtained on the basis of the conventional models. E.g., the number of returns of the comets into the inner part of the Solar System are about two times greater than it is in the conventional models. It seems that a comet from the Oort cloud can be a source of the dinosaurs extinction at about 65 Myr ago. A close encounter of a star or an interstellar cloud disturbed a comet of the Oort cloud in the way th...

  14. JUPITER and satellites: Clinical implications of the JUPITER study and its secondary analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostapanos, Michael S; Elisaf, Moses S

    2011-07-26

    THE JUSTIFICATION FOR THE USE OF STATINS IN PREVENTION: an intervention trial evaluating rosuvastatin (JUPITER) study was a real breakthrough in primary cardiovascular disease prevention with statins, since it was conducted in apparently healthy individuals with normal levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C JUPITER, rosuvastatin was associated with significant reductions in cardiovascular outcomes as well as in overall mortality compared with placebo. In this paper the most important secondary analyses of the JUPITER trial are discussed, by focusing on their novel findings regarding the role of statins in primary prevention. Also, the characteristics of otherwise healthy normocholesterolemic subjects who are anticipated to benefit more from statin treatment in the clinical setting are discussed. Subjects at "intermediate" or "high" 10-year risk according to the Framingham score, those who exhibit low post-treatment levels of both LDL-C (JUPITER added to our knowledge that statins may be effective drugs in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in normocholesterolemic individuals at moderate-to-high risk. Also, statin treatment may reduce the risk of venous thromboembolism and preserve renal function. An increase in physician-reported diabetes represents a major safety concern associated with the use of the most potent statins.

  15. Natural radio emission of Jupiter as interferences for radar investigations of the icy satellites of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconi, B.; Hess, S.; Hérique, A.; Santovito, M. R.; Santos-Costa, D.; Zarka, P.; Alberti, G.; Blankenship, D.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Bruzzone, L.; Kofman, W.

    2012-02-01

    Radar instruments are part of the core payload of the two Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) spacecraft: NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) and ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). At this point of the project, several frequency bands are under study for radar, which ranges between 5 and 50 MHz. Part of this frequency range overlaps with that of the natural jovian radio emissions, which are very intense in the decametric range, below 40 MHz. Radio observations above 40 MHz are free of interferences, whereas below this threshold, careful observation strategies have to be investigated. We present a review of spectral intensity, variability and sources of these radio emissions. As the radio emissions are strongly beamed, it is possible to model the visibility of the radio emissions, as seen from the vicinity of Europa or Ganymede. We have investigated Io-related radio emissions as well as radio emissions related to the auroral oval. We also review the radiation belts synchrotron emission characteristics. We present radio sources visibility products (dynamic spectra and radio source location maps, on still frames or movies), which can be used for operation planning. This study clearly shows that a deep understanding of the natural radio emissions at Jupiter is necessary to prepare the future EJSM radar instrumentation. We show that this radio noise has to be taken into account very early in the observation planning and strategies for both JGO and JEO. We also point out possible synergies with RPW (Radio and Plasma Waves) instrumentations.

  16. Using Metaheuristic and Fuzzy System for the Optimization of Material Pull in a Push-Pull Flow Logistics Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Mehrsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative material flow strategies in logistics networks have crucial influences on the overall performance of the networks. Material flows can follow push, pull, or hybrid systems. To get the advantages of both push and pull flows in networks, the decoupling-point strategy is used as coordination mean. At this point, material pull has to get optimized concerning customer orders against pushed replenishment-rates. To compensate the ambiguity and uncertainty of both dynamic flows, fuzzy set theory can practically be applied. This paper has conceptual and mathematical parts to explain the performance of the push-pull flow strategy in a supply network and to give a novel solution for optimizing the pull side employing Conwip system. Alternative numbers of pallets and their lot-sizes circulating in the assembly system are getting optimized in accordance with a multi-objective problem; employing a hybrid approach out of meta-heuristics (genetic algorithm and simulated annealing and fuzzy system. Two main fuzzy sets as triangular and trapezoidal are applied in this technique for estimating ill-defined waiting times. The configured technique leads to smoother flows between push and pull sides in complex networks. A discrete-event simulation model is developed to analyze this thesis in an exemplary logistics network with dynamics.

  17. SEPPCoN: Comet Dust and Activity at Moderate Heliocentric Distances as Observed with Spitzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Michael S.; Fernández, Y. R.; Reach, W. T.; Lisse, C. M.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Bauer, J. M.; Campins, H.; Fitzsimmons, A.; Groussin, O.; Lamy, P. L.; Licandro, J.; Lowry, S. C.; Meech, K. J.; Pittichova, J.; Toth, I.; Weaver, H. A.

    2007-10-01

    A Survey of Ensemble Physical Properties of Cometary Nuclei (SEPPCoN) is underway to characterize the nuclei of 100 Jupiter-family comets (JFC). The survey combines both visible and mid-infrared observations to measure the JFC size and albedo distributions. We inspected Spitzer Space Telescope MIPS and IRS images of the survey targets for dust comae, tails, and trails. Out of 98 observed comets, we found 32 to have some emission from dust outside of the central point source. A few of these sources were also observed to have dust in visible, ground-based data. The heliocentric distances (rh) of the 32 targets range from 3.5 to 6.5 AU, with most between 4 and 5 AU. We derive color-temperatures for the 20 dust detections observed in both the 16 and 22 micron IRS cameras and find the color-temperature approximately varies as 280*rh^(-0.5) [K], as expected for isothermal low-albedo dust in local thermodynamic equilibrium. We discuss the evidence for outliers from this trend. We compare our observations to dust syndynes and 3-dimensional dust models to distinguish dust trails from dust tails. Unlike dust tails, dust trails only weakly respond to solar radiation pressure and, therefore, likely represent the largest (> 1 mm) grains ejected from the nucleus. We also compare observations to model images in order to determine the extent of recent coma activity. Water sublimation is expected to be greatly extinguished on comet surfaces by 3.5 AU. Dust structures observed outside of this rh could arise from recent coma activity (timescales up to weeks) caused by the sublimation of highly volatile ices (such as CO2) or the crystallization of amorphous water ice. Alternatively, the observed dust may be slowly dispersing grains ejected at a much earlier epoch (timescales up to years) when water sublimation dominated coma activity.

  18. VIRTIS on board Rosetta: cryocoolers usage analysis in support of Comet phases observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuppi, Stefano; Politi, Romolo; Capria, Maria Teresa; Piccioni, Giuseppe; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Erard, Stéphane; Tosi, Federico; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianrico

    Rosetta is a planetary cornerstone mission of the European Space Agency (ESA). It is devoted to the study of minor bodies of our solar system and it will be the first mission ever to land on a comet (the Jupiter-family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko). VIRTIS-M is a sophisticated imaging spectrometer that combines two data channels in one compact instrument, respectively for the visible and the infrared range (0.25-5.0 μm). VIRTIS-H is devoted to infrared spectroscopy (2.5-5.0 μm) with high spectral resolution. Since the satellite will be inside the tail of the comet during one of the most important phases of the mission, it would not be appropriate to use a passive cooling system, due to the high flux of contaminants on the radiator. Therefore the IR sensors are cooled by two Stirling cycle cryocoolers. This paper focuses on the usage of VIRTIS cryocoolers from the beginning of the Rosetta mission till spacecraft hibernation in order to optimize their usage. After a description of the cryocooler used in the mission, a detailed information about time usage and power consumption is provided. On the basis of previous experiences with this kind of cryocoolers it has been made an estimation of the remaining working life of the VIRTIS coolers operating in Rosetta mission. Moreover an estimation of the minimum time between a cryocooler switch off and on again has been carried out in order to preserve the coolers working life.

  19. SUBLIMATION-DRIVEN ACTIVITY IN MAIN-BELT COMET 313P/GIBBS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Henry H. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Hainaut, Olivier [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Straße 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Novaković, Bojan [Department of Astronomy, Faculty of Mathematics, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Bolin, Bryce [Observatoire de la Côte d’Azur, Boulevard de l’Observatoire, B.P. 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Denneau, Larry; Haghighipour, Nader; Kleyna, Jan; Meech, Karen J.; Schunova, Eva; Wainscoat, Richard J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Fitzsimmons, Alan [Astrophysics Research Centre, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Kokotanekova, Rosita; Snodgrass, Colin [Planetary and Space Sciences, Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Lacerda, Pedro [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Micheli, Marco [ESA SSA NEO Coordination Centre, Frascati, RM (Italy); Moskovitz, Nick; Wasserman, Lawrence [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W. Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Waszczak, Adam, E-mail: hhsieh@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-02-10

    We present an observational and dynamical study of newly discovered main-belt comet 313P/Gibbs. We find that the object is clearly active both in observations obtained in 2014 and in precovery observations obtained in 2003 by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, strongly suggesting that its activity is sublimation-driven. This conclusion is supported by a photometric analysis showing an increase in the total brightness of the comet over the 2014 observing period, and dust modeling results showing that the dust emission persists over at least three months during both active periods, where we find start dates for emission no later than 2003 July 24 ± 10 for the 2003 active period and 2014 July 28 ± 10 for the 2014 active period. From serendipitous observations by the Subaru Telescope in 2004 when the object was apparently inactive, we estimate that the nucleus has an absolute R-band magnitude of H{sub R} = 17.1 ± 0.3, corresponding to an effective nucleus radius of r{sub e} ∼ 1.00 ± 0.15 km. The object’s faintness at that time means we cannot rule out the presence of activity, and so this computed radius should be considered an upper limit. We find that 313P’s orbit is intrinsically chaotic, having a Lyapunov time of T{sub l} = 12,000 yr and being located near two three-body mean-motion resonances with Jupiter and Saturn, 11J-1S-5A and 10J+12S-7A, yet appears stable over >50 Myr in an apparent example of stable chaos. We furthermore find that 313P is the second main-belt comet, after P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS), to belong to the ∼155 Myr old Lixiaohua asteroid family.

  20. Ground-based multiwavelength observations of comet 103P/Hartley 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gicquel, A.; Villanueva, G. L.; Cordiner, M. A. [Catholic University of America, Physics Department, 620 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC (United States); Milam, S. N.; Charnley, S. B. [Goddard Center for Astrobiology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Remijan, A. J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Coulson, I. M. [Joint Astronomy Centre, 660 North A' ohoku Place University Park, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Chuang, Y.-L.; Kuan, Y.-J., E-mail: adeline.gicquel@nasa.gov, E-mail: stefanie.n.milam@nasa.gov, E-mail: geronimo.l.villanueva@nasa.gov, E-mail: steven.b.charnley@nasa.gov, E-mail: martin.a.cordiner@nasa.gov, E-mail: aremijan@nrao.edu, E-mail: i.coulson@jach.hawaii.edu, E-mail: ylchuang@std.ntnu.edu.tz, E-mail: kuan@ntnu.edu.tw [National Taiwan Normal University, 88 Sec. 4 Ting-Chou Road, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-10

    The Jupiter-family comet 103P/Hartley 2 (103P) was the target of the NASA EPOXI mission. In support of this mission, we conducted observations from radio to submillimeter wavelengths of comet 103P in the three weeks preceding the spacecraft rendezvous on UT 2010 November 4.58. This time period included the passage at perihelion and the closest approach of the comet to the Earth. Here, we report detections of HCN, H{sub 2}CO, CS, and OH and upper limits for HNC and DCN toward 103P using the Arizona Radio Observatory Kitt Peak 12 m telescope (ARO 12 m) and submillimeter telescope (SMT), the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), and the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). The water production rate, Q{sub H{sub 2O}} = (0.67-1.07) × 10{sup 28} s{sup –1}, was determined from the GBT OH data. From the average abundance ratios of HCN and H{sub 2}CO relative to water (0.13 ± 0.03% and 0.14 ± 0.03%, respectively), we conclude that H{sub 2}CO is depleted and HCN is normal with respect to typically observed cometary mixing ratios. However, the abundance ratio of HCN with water shows a large diversity with time. Using the JCMT data, we measured an upper limit for the DCN/HCN ratio <0.01. Consecutive observations of ortho-H{sub 2}CO and para-H{sub 2}CO on November 2 (from data obtained at the JCMT) allowed us to derive an ortho:para ratio (OPR) of ≈2.12 ± 0.59 (1σ), corresponding to T {sub spin} > 8 K (2σ).

  1. CAPTURE OF TROJANS BY JUMPING JUPITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesvorny, David [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut St., Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Vokrouhlicky, David [Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Morbidelli, Alessandro [Departement Cassiopee, University of Nice, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, Nice, F-06304 (France)

    2013-05-01

    Jupiter Trojans are thought to be survivors of a much larger population of planetesimals that existed in the planetary region when planets formed. They can provide important constraints on the mass and properties of the planetesimal disk, and its dispersal during planet migration. Here, we tested a possibility that the Trojans were captured during the early dynamical instability among the outer planets (aka the Nice model), when the semimajor axis of Jupiter was changing as a result of scattering encounters with an ice giant. The capture occurs in this model when Jupiter's orbit and its Lagrange points become radially displaced in a scattering event and fall into a region populated by planetesimals (that previously evolved from their natal transplanetary disk to {approx}5 AU during the instability). Our numerical simulations of the new capture model, hereafter jump capture, satisfactorily reproduce the orbital distribution of the Trojans and their total mass. The jump capture is potentially capable of explaining the observed asymmetry in the number of leading and trailing Trojans. We find that the capture probability is (6-8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} for each particle in the original transplanetary disk, implying that the disk contained (3-4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} planetesimals with absolute magnitude H < 9 (corresponding to diameter D = 80 km for a 7% albedo). The disk mass inferred from this work, M{sub disk} {approx} 14-28 M{sub Earth}, is consistent with the mass deduced from recent dynamical simulations of the planetary instability.

  2. Radiative and dynamical modeling of Jupiter's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerlet, Sandrine; Spiga, Aymeric

    2016-04-01

    Jupiter's atmosphere harbours a rich meteorology, with alternate westward and eastward zonal jets, waves signatures and long-living storms. Recent ground-based and spacecraft measurements have also revealed a rich stratospheric dynamics, with the observation of thermal signatures of planetary waves, puzzling meridional distribution of hydrocarbons at odds with predictions of photochemical models, and a periodic equatorial oscillation analogous to the Earth's quasi-biennal oscillation and Saturn's equatorial oscillation. These recent observations, along with the many unanswered questions (What drives and maintain the equatorial oscillations? How important is the seasonal forcing compared to the influence of internal heat? What is the large-scale stratospheric circulation of these giant planets?) motivated us to develop a complete 3D General Circulation Model (GCM) of Saturn and Jupiter. We aim at exploring the large-scale circulation, seasonal variability, and wave activity from the troposphere to the stratosphere of these giant planets. We will briefly present how we adapted our existing Saturn GCM to Jupiter. One of the main change is the addition of a stratospheric haze layer made of fractal aggregates in the auroral regions (poleward of 45S and 30N). This haze layer has a significant radiative impact by modifying the temperature up to +/- 15K in the middle stratosphere. We will then describe the results of radiative-convective simulations and how they compare to recent Cassini and ground-based temperature measurements. These simulations reproduce surprisingly well some of the observed thermal vertical and meridional gradients, but several important mismatches at low and high latitudes suggest that dynamics also plays an important role in shaping the temperature field. Finally, we will present full GCM simulations and discuss the main resulting features (waves and instabilities). We will also and discuss the impact of the choice of spatial resolution and

  3. A Possibly Universal Red Chromophore for Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sromovsky, Lawrence A.; Baines, Kevin; Fry, Patrick M.

    2016-10-01

    A new laboratory-generated chemical compound made from photodissociated ammonia (NH3) molecules reacting with acetylene (C2H2) was suggested as a possible coloring agent for Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) by Carlson et al. (2016, Icarus 274, 106-115). Baines et al. (2016, AAS/DPS Meeting abstract) showed that the GRS spectrum measured by the visual channels of the Cassini VIMS instrument in 2000 could be accurately fit by a cloud model in which the chromophore appeared as small particles in a physically thin layer immediately above the main cloud layer of the GRS. Here we show that the same chromophore and similar layer structure can also provide close matches to the 0.4-1 micron spectra of many other cloud features on Jupiter, suggesting that this material may be a nearly universal chromophore responsible for the various degrees of red coloration on Jupiter. This is a robust conclusion, even for 12 percent changes in VIMS calibration and large uncertainties in the refractive index of the main cloud layer due to uncertain fractions of NH4SH and NH3 in its cloud particles. The chromophore layer can account for color variations among north and south equatorial belts, equatorial zone, and the Great Red Spot, by varying particle size from 0.12 to 0.29 micron and optical depth from 0.06 to 0.76. The total mass of the chromophore layer is much less variable than its optical depth, staying mainly within 6-10 micrograms/cm2 range, but is only about half that amount in the equatorial zone. We also found a depression of the ammonia volume mixing ratio in the two belt regions, which averaged 0.4-0.5 × 10-4 immediately below the ammonia condensation level, while the other regions averaged twice that value.LAS and PMF acknowledge support from NASA Grant NNX14AH40G.

  4. Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter and Trojan Asteroid Explorer in EJSM (Europa Jupiter System Mission)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Sho; Fujimoto, Masaki; Takashima, Takeshi; Yano, Hajime; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Kimura, Jun; Tsuda, Yuichi; Funase, Ryu; Mori, Osamu

    2010-05-01

    Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) is an international mission to explore and Jupiter, its satellites and magnetospheric environment in 2020s. EJSM consists of (1) The Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) by NASA, (2) the Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO) by ESA, and (3) the Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter (JMO) studied by JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency). In February 2009, NASA and ESA decided to continue the study of EJSM as a candidate of the outer solar system mission. JMO will have magnetometers, low-energy plasma spectrometers, medium energy particle detectors, energetic particle detectors, electric field / plasma wave instruments, an ENA imager, an EUV spectrometer, and a dust detector. Collaborating with plasma instruments on board JEO and JGO, JMO will investigate the fast and huge rotating magnetosphere to clarify the energy procurement from Jovian rotation to the magnetosphere, to clarify the interaction between the solar wind the magnetosphere. Especially when JEO and JGO are orbiting around Europa and Ganymede, respectively, JMO will measure the outside condition in the Jovian magnetosphere. JMO will clarify the characteristics of the strongest accelerator in the solar system with the investigation of the role of Io as a source of heavy ions in the magnetosphere. JAXA started a study of a solar power sail for deep space explorations. Together with a solar sail (photon propulsion), it will have very efficient ion engines where electric power is produced solar panels within the sail. JAXA has already experienced ion engine in the successful Hayabusa mission, which was launched in 2003 and is still in operation in 2010. For the purpose of testing solar power sail technology, an engineering mission IKAROS (Interplanetary Kite-craft Accelerated by Radiation Of the Sun) will be launched in 2010 together with Venus Climate Orbiter PLANET-C. The shape of the IKAROS' membrane is square, with a diagonal distance of 20m. It is made of polyimide film only 0.0075mm

  5. Jupiter Europa Orbiter Architecture Definition Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Robert; Shishko, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The proposed Jupiter Europa Orbiter mission, planned for launch in 2020, is using a new architectural process and framework tool to drive its model-based systems engineering effort. The process focuses on getting the architecture right before writing requirements and developing a point design. A new architecture framework tool provides for the structured entry and retrieval of architecture artifacts based on an emerging architecture meta-model. This paper describes the relationships among these artifacts and how they are used in the systems engineering effort. Some early lessons learned are discussed.

  6. Equatorial Oscillations in Jupiter's and Saturn's Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasar, F. Michael; Guerlet, S.; Fouchet, T.; Schinder, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Equatorial oscillations in the zonal-mean temperatures and zonal winds have been well documented in Earth's middle atmosphere. A growing body of evidence from ground-based and Cassini spacecraft observations indicates that such phenomena also occur in the stratospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. Earth-based midinfrared measurements spanning several decades have established that the equatorial stratospheric temperatures on Jupiter vary with a cycle of 4-5 years and on Saturn with a cycle of approximately 15 years. Spectra obtained by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) during the Cassini swingby at the end of 2000, with much better vertical resolution than the ground-based data, indicated a series of vertically stacked warm and cold anomalics at Jupiter's equator; a similar structurc was seen at Saturn's equator in CIRS limb measurements made in 2005, in the early phase of Cassini's orbital tour. The thermal wind equation implied similar patterns of mean zonal winds increasing and decreasing with altitude. On Saturn the peak-to-pcak amplitude of this variation was nearly 200 meters per second. The alternating vertical pattern of wanner and colder cquatorial tcmperatures and easterly and westerly tendencies of the zonal winds is seen in Earth's equatorial oscillations, where the pattern descends with time, The Cassini Jupiter and early Saturn observations were snapshots within a limited time interval, and they did not show the temporal evolution of the spatial patterns. However, more recent Saturn observations by CIRS (2010) and Cassini radio-occultation soundings (2009-2010) have provided an opportunity to follow the change of the temperature-zonal wind pattern, and they suggest there is descent, at a rate of roughly one scale height over four years. On Earth, the observed descent in the zonal-mean structure is associated with the absorption of a combination of vertically propagating waves with easlerly and westerly phase velocities. The peak-to-peak zonal wind

  7. Fast photo-processes in triazole-based push-pull systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoon, P.D.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Parent, M.; Mongin, O.; Blanchard-Desce, M.; Brouwer, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Electron donor-acceptor compounds 1 (asymmetrical push-pull derivative) and 2 (symmetrical push-pull-push derivative) were studied in which one (push-pull) or two aniline units (push-pull-push) are connected to a biphenyl group via triazole linkers, made by "click" chemistry. Steady-state and time-r

  8. Forearm posture and grip effects during push and pull tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Domizio, Jennifer; Keir, Peter J

    2010-03-01

    Direction of loading and performance of multiple tasks have been shown to elevate muscle activity in the upper extremity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of gripping on muscle activity and applied force during pushing and pulling tasks with three forearm postures. Twelve volunteers performed five hand-based tasks in supinated, neutral and pronated forearm postures with the elbow at 90 degrees and upper arm vertical. All tasks were performed with the right (dominant) hand and included hand grip alone, push and pull with and without hand grip. Surface EMG from eight upper extremity muscles, hand grip force, tri-axial push and pull forces and wrist angles were recorded during the 10 s trials. The addition of a pull force to hand grip elevated activity in all forearm muscles (all p push with grip tasks, forearm extensor muscle activity tended to increase when compared with grip only while flexor activity tended to decrease. Forearm extensor muscle activity was higher with the forearm pronated compared with neutral and supinated postures during most isolated grip tasks and push or pull with grip tasks (all p push and pull forces could act to assist in creating grip force, forearm muscle activity generally decreased. These results provide strategies for reducing forearm muscle loading in the workplace. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Tools and tasks designed to take advantage of coupling grip with push or pull actions may be beneficial in reducing stress and injury in the muscles of the forearm. These factors should be considered in assessing the workplace in terms of acute and cumulative loading.

  9. Can Terrestrial Planets Form in Hot-Jupiter Systems?

    CERN Document Server

    Fogg, Martyn J

    2007-01-01

    Models of terrestrial planet formation in the presence of a migrating giant planet have challenged the notion that hot-Jupiter systems lack terrestrial planets. We briefly review this issue and suggest that hot-Jupiter systems should be prime targets for future observational missions designed to detect Earth-sized and potentially habitable worlds.

  10. Forum on Concepts and Approaches for Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The papers presented at this conference primarily discuss instruments and techniques for conducting science on Jupiter's icy moons, and geologic processes on the moons themselves. Remote sensing of satellites, cratering on satellites, and ice on the surface of Europa are given particular attention. Some papers discuss Jupiter's atmosphere, or exobiology.

  11. Search for Cyclopropenylidene in Comet Lulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Yi-Jehng; Chuang, Yo-Ling; Charnley, Steven

    The Oort-Cloud comet C/2007 N3 (Lulin) was observed in the 1.3-mm band with the Sub-millimeter Telescope of Arizona Radio Observatory between 2009 February and March during the apparition. Many of the molecules observed in cometary comae could be pristine remnants of the interstellar material that collapsed to form the protosolar nebula. The coma species observed may either be distinct interstellar molecules sublimated from the nuclear ices, or frag-ments of larger organic macromolecules which decomposed farther out in the coma. With a water production rate of 1E+29 mol s-1 near its perihelion, the bright Comet Lulin was only 0.4 AU from Earth at perigee; we therefore searched for c-C3H2, a simple ring molecule. Cy-clopropenylidene is ubiquitous in interstellar space but unknown in comets. Here, we report the first detection of cyclopropenylidene in the cometary coma of Lulin.

  12. A unidimensional model of comet ionosphere structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eviatar, Aharon; Goldstein, Bruce E.

    1988-01-01

    The one-dimensional continuity and momentum equations for the plasma formed in the expanding coma of a comet near the sun are studied. An analytic expression for the magnetic field configuration in the presence of outflow, photoionization, dissociative recombination, plasma fluid pressure, and friction between the ions and neutrals is obtained. It is suggested that for a Halley-type comet there will be a region sunward of the nucleus from which the magnetic field is excluded, consistent with Giotto observations. Calculations have been performed for Halley and Giacobini-Zinner type comets, and in the field-free regions it is shown that the dominant terms in the momentum equation balancing the magnetic pressure gradient are the ion neutral friction and the net mass loading momentum gain.

  13. Optical polarimetry of Comet West 1976 VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalsky, J.J.

    1981-09-01

    Four narrowband filters covering the 440-850 nm wavelengths were used to measure the polarization of the continuum of Comet West 1976 VI. Postperihelion observations indicated wavelength-independent linear polarization in all of the three measurements made, in agreement with other polarization measurements of the comet from the visible to the near-infrared but in contrast with the general tendency in comets toward polarization increase with wavelength. No circular polarization was detected, and it is suggested by (1) the magnitude of polarization as a function of scattering angle, (2) wavelength independence, and (3) infrared and optical photometric properties, that dirty silicates with radii approaching 5 microns may be responsible for the phenomena observed.

  14. To Catch A Comet...Learning From Halley's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    Comet chronicles and stories extend back over thousands of years. A common theme has been that comets are a major cause of catastrophe and tragedy here on earth. In addition, both Aristotle and Ptolemy believed that comets were phenomena within the earth's atmosphere, and it wasn't until the 16th century, when Danish astronomer Tycho Brache…

  15. Periodic changes of the activity of processes in Jupiter's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    Variations of the Earth jovimagnetic latitude on Jupiter are preferred in solar-driven changes of reflective properties of clouds and haze on Jupiter. Because of the orbit eccentricity (e=0,048450) the northern hemisphere receives 21% greater solar energy flow to the atmosphere, because Jupiter is in the perihelia near the time of the summer solstice. Results of our studies showed that the ratio of the brightness of the northern and southern tropical and temperate regions is evident factor of the photometric activity of the Jupiter's atmospheric processes. The obtained from the analysis of observational data for the period from 1962 to 2015 existence of variations of activity factor of the planet hemispheres with a period of 11.86 years has allowed us to talk about an existence of the seasonal reconstruction of the physical parameters of Jupiter's atmosphere.

  16. Dust from Comet 209P/LINEAR during its 2014 Return: Parent Body of a New Meteor Shower, the May Camelopardalids

    CERN Document Server

    Ishiguro, Masateru; Hanayama, Hidekazu; Takahashi, Jun; Hasegawa, Sunao; Sarugaku, Yuki; Watanabe, Makoto; Imai, Masataka; Goda, Shuhei; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Takagi, Yuhei; Morihana, Kumiko; Honda, Satoshi; Arai, Akira; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiro; Oasa, Yumiko; Saito, Yoshihiko; Morokuma, Tomoki; Murata, Katsuhiro; Nogami, Daisaku; Nagayama, Takahiro; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Ohta, Kouji; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Miyaji, Takeshi; Fukushima, Hideo; Watanabe, Jun-ichi; Opitom, Cyrielle; Jehin, Emmanuel; Gillon, Michael; Vaubaillon, Jeremie J

    2014-01-01

    We report a new observation of the Jupiter-family comet 209P/LINEAR during its 2014 return. The comet is recognized as a dust source of a new meteor shower, the May Camelopardalids. 209P/LINEAR was apparently inactive at a heliocentric distance rh = 1.6 au and showed weak activity at rh < 1.4 au. We found an active region of <0.001% of the entire nuclear surface during the comet's dormant phase. An edge-on image suggests that particles up to 1 cm in size (with an uncertainty of factor 3-5) were ejected following a differential power-law size distribution with index q=-3.25+-0.10. We derived a mass loss rate of 2-10 kg/s during the active phase and a total mass of ~5x10^7 kg during the 2014 return. The ejection terminal velocity of millimeter- to centimeter-sized particles was 1-4 m/s, which is comparable to the escape velocity from the nucleus (1.4 m/s). These results imply that such large meteoric particles marginally escaped from the highly dormant comet nucleus via the gas drag force only within a fe...

  17. DUST FROM COMET 209P/LINEAR DURING ITS 2014 RETURN: PARENT BODY OF A NEW METEOR SHOWER, THE MAY CAMELOPARDALIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiguro, Masateru [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kuroda, Daisuke [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Hanayama, Hidekazu [Ishigakijima Astronomical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Ishigaki, Okinawa 907-0024 (Japan); Takahashi, Jun; Takagi, Yuhei; Morihana, Kumiko; Honda, Satoshi; Arai, Akira [Nishi-Harima Astronomical Observatory, Center for Astronomy, University of Hyogo, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5313 (Japan); Hasegawa, Sunao; Sarugaku, Yuki [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Watanabe, Makoto; Imai, Masataka; Goda, Shuhei [Department of Cosmosciences, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Akitaya, Hiroshi [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Kazuhiro [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, National Institute of Natural Sciences, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Oasa, Yumiko [Faculty of Education, Saitama University, Sakura, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Saito, Yoshihiko [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Morokuma, Tomoki [Institute of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Murata, Katsuhiro [Department of Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Nogami, Daisaku [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); and others

    2015-01-10

    We report a new observation of the Jupiter family comet 209P/LINEAR during its 2014 return. The comet is recognized as a dust source of a new meteor shower, the May Camelopardalids. 209P/LINEAR was apparently inactive at a heliocentric distance r{sub h} = 1.6 AU and showed weak activity at r{sub h} ≤ 1.4 AU. We found an active region of <0.001% of the entire nuclear surface during the comet's dormant phase. An edge-on image suggests that particles up to 1 cm in size (with an uncertainty of factor 3-5) were ejected following a differential power-law size distribution with index q = –3.25 ± 0.10. We derived a mass-loss rate of 2-10 kg s{sup –1} during the active phase and a total mass of ≈5 × 10{sup 7} kg during the 2014 return. The ejection terminal velocity of millimeter- to centimeter-sized particles was 1-4 m s{sup –1}, which is comparable to the escape velocity from the nucleus (1.4 m s{sup –1}). These results imply that such large meteoric particles marginally escaped from the highly dormant comet nucleus via the gas drag force only within a few months of the perihelion passage.

  18. Ammonia and other parent molecules in comet 10P/Tempel 2 from Herschel/HIFI and ground-based radio observations

    CERN Document Server

    Biver, N; Bockelée-Morvan, D; Szutowicz, S; Lis, D C; Hartogh, P; de Val-Borro, M; Moreno, R; Boissier, J; Kidger, M; Küppers, M; Paubert, G; Russo, N Dello; Vervack, R; Weaver, H

    2012-01-01

    The Jupiter-family comet 10P/Tempel 2 was observed during its 2010 return with the Herschel Space Observatory. We present here the observation of the (J, K) = (1, 0)-(0, 0) transition of ammonia at 572 GHz in this comet with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) of Herschel. We also report on radio observations of other molecules (HCN, CH3OH, H2S and CS) obtained during the 1999 return of the comet with the CSO telescope and the JCMT, and during its 2010 return with the IRAM 30-m telescope. Molecular abundances relative to water are 0.09%, 1.8%, 0.4%, and 0.08% for HCN, CH3OH, H2S, and CS, respectively. An abundance of 0.5% for NH3 is obtained, which is similar to the values measured in other comets. The hyperfine structure of the ammonia line is resolved for the first time in an astronomical source. Strong anisotropy in the outgassing is present in all observations from 1999 to 2010 and is modelled to derive the production rates.

  19. POSITION OBSERVATIONS OF THE COMET HYAKUTAKE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Guangjie; Ji Kaifan

    2000-01-01

    On March 16 of 1996, we used a new developed 1024×1024 CCD camera attached to the 1 meter telescope at Yunnan Observatory, to take photometric observations for the Comet Hyakutake. The positions have been measured accurately. Our result clearly states that even a new ephemeris of this comet just given by EMPC on February 29 of 1996 still has obvious systematical deviation with our observations.From images observed, we can clearly see that the cometary coma is very large and basically symmetric with a peach shape. It means that there is material flowing along the cometary tail which opposited the solar direction.

  20. Comets: mechanisms of x-ray activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    2016-07-01

    Basic mechanisms of X-ray activity of comets are considered, including D-D mechanism corresponding to generation of X-rays due to production of hot short-living plasma clumps at high-velocity collisions between cometary and interplanetary dust particles as well as M-M one corresponding to production of X-rays due to recombination of multicharge ions of solar wind plasma via charge exchange process at their collisions with molecules/atoms of the cometary atmospheres. Peculiarities of the variation of the comet X-ray spectrum and X-ray luminosity with variation of its heliocentric distance are revealed.

  1. KOMPARASI SISTEM MANUFAKTUR PUSH DAN PULL MELALUI PENDEKATAN SIMULASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Wibisono

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing systems that are often classified as push and pull often invite question: "How far do the differences between those two systems exist?" Many researches have been carried out but succinct answer to the above question is always difficult to reach. The difficulty roots from the variety of definition of the push and pull systems itself and also from the variety of complexity of a manufacturing system. This paper attempts to study the differences in performance between push and pull systems in a relatively simple model that consists of 4 serial processors with buffers located between these processors. Variations being modelled is on the setting of the system's load (high and low and the buffer size with performance being measured include machine utilization, number of outputs and mean flow time of jobs. The approach used is simulation using ProModel software as the tool. From the experiments it can be derived that buffer size turns out to be a very critical factor in system performance. Moreover, it is also proved that when the buffer size is large, push and pull systems do not differ significantly. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Sistem manufaktur yang umumnya dikategorikan menjadi sistem push dan pull sering mengundang pertanyaan: "Seberapa jauh perbedaan dari kedua sistem tersebut ada?" Banyak penelitian telah dilakukan namun jawaban yang lugas atas pertanyaan tersebut sulit diperoleh. Kesulitan ini umumnya berakar dari beragamnya definisi sistem push dan pull itu sendiri serta variasi dari kompleksitas suatu sistem manufaktur. Makalah ini mencoba melihat perbedaan antara kinerja sistem push dan pull dalam suatu model sederhana yang terdiri dari 4 prosesor serial dengan buffer yang diletakkan di antara masing-masing prosesor tersebut. Variasi yang dilakukan adalah pada setting beban kerja sistem (padat dan ringan dan ukuran buffer dengan kinerja yang diukur adalah utilisasi mesin, jumlah output dan rata-rata waktu tinggal job

  2. Orbits of Comets C/1845 L1 (Great June Comet) and C/1846 D1 (de Vico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branham, R. L., Jr.

    2009-04-01

    Orbits are calculated for Comet C/1845 L1 (the Great June Comet) and C/1846 D1 (de Vico), the former based on 157 observations in right ascension and 152 in declination and the latter on 10 and 9, respectively. Both orbits are hyperbolic and statistically distinguishable from parabolas. Statistical tests indicate that the residuals are random and thus the orbits satisfactory. The Great June Comet is in no way associated with the comet Tycho Brahe observed in 1596.

  3. Elliptical instability in hot Jupiter systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cébron, David; Gal, Patrice Le; Moutou, Claire; Leconte, J; Sauret, Alban

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have already considered the influence of tides on the evolution of systems composed of a star and a close-in companion to tentatively explain different observations such as the spin-up of some stars with hot Jupiters, the radius anomaly of short orbital period planets and the synchronization or quasi-synchronization of the stellar spin in some extreme cases. However, the nature of the mechanism responsible for the tidal dissipation in such systems remains uncertain. In this paper, we claim that the so-called elliptical instability may play a major role in these systems, explaining some systematic features present in the observations. This hydrodynamic instability, arising in rotating flows with elliptical streamlines, is suspected to be present in both planet and star of such systems, which are elliptically deformed by tides. The presence and the influence of the elliptical instability in gaseous bodies, such as stars or hot Jupiters, are most of the time neglected. In this paper, using numeri...

  4. Fading of Jupiter's South Equatorial Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, Michael A.; Orton, Glenn; Baines, Kevin; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma

    2011-01-01

    One of Jupiter's most dominant features, the South Equatorial Belt, has historically gone through a "fading" cycle. The usual dark, brownish clouds turn white, and after a period of time, the region returns to its normal color. Understanding this phenomenon, the latest occurring in 2010, will increase our knowledge of planetary atmospheres. Using the near infrared camera, NSFCAM2, at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility in Hawaii, images were taken of Jupiter accompanied by data describing the circumstances of each observation. These images are then processed and reduced through an IDL program. By scanning the central meridian of the planet, graphs were produced plotting the average values across the central meridian, which are used to find variations in the region of interest. Calculations using Albert4, a FORTRAN program that calculates the upwelling reflected sunlight from a designated cloud model, can be used to determine the effects of a model atmosphere due to various absorption, scattering, and emission processes. Spectra that were produced show ammonia bands in the South Equatorial Belt. So far, we can deduce from this information that an upwelling of ammonia particles caused a cloud layer to cover up the region. Further investigations using Albert4 and other models will help us to constrain better the chemical make up of the cloud and its location in the atmosphere.

  5. ECCENTRIC JUPITERS VIA DISK–PLANET INTERACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffell, Paul C.; Chiang, Eugene, E-mail: duffell@berkeley.edu, E-mail: echiang@astro.berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California, Berkeley (United States)

    2015-10-20

    Numerical hydrodynamics calculations are performed to determine the conditions under which giant planet eccentricities can be excited by parent gas disks. Unlike in other studies, Jupiter-mass planets are found to have their eccentricities amplified—provided their orbits start off as eccentric. We disentangle the web of co-rotation, co-orbital, and external resonances to show that this finite-amplitude instability is consistent with that predicted analytically. Ellipticities can grow until they reach of order of the disk's aspect ratio, beyond which the external Lindblad resonances that excite eccentricity are weakened by the planet's increasingly supersonic epicyclic motion. Forcing the planet to still larger eccentricities causes catastrophic eccentricity damping as the planet collides into gap walls. For standard parameters, the range of eccentricities for instability is modest; the threshold eccentricity for growth (∼0.04) is not much smaller than the final eccentricity to which orbits grow (∼0.07). If this threshold eccentricity can be lowered (perhaps by non-barotropic effects), and if the eccentricity driving documented here survives in 3D, it may robustly explain the low-to-moderate eccentricities ≲0.1 exhibited by many giant planets (including Jupiter and Saturn), especially those without planetary or stellar companions.

  6. Thermal Processes Governing Hot-Jupiter Radii

    CERN Document Server

    Spiegel, David S

    2013-01-01

    There have been many proposed explanations for the larger-than-expected radii of some transiting hot Jupiters, including either stellar or orbital energy deposition deep in the atmosphere or deep in the interior. In this paper, we explore the important influences on hot-Jupiter radius evolution of (i) additional heat sources in the high atmosphere, the deep atmosphere, and deep in the convective interior; (ii) consistent cooling of the deep interior through the planetary dayside, nightside, and poles; (iii) the degree of heat redistribution to the nightside; and (iv) the presence of an upper atmosphere absorber inferred to produce anomalously hot upper atmospheres and inversions in some close-in giant planets. In particular, we compare the radius expansion effects of atmospheric and deep-interior heating at the same power levels and derive the power required to achieve a given radius increase when night-side cooling is incorporated. We find that models that include consistent day/night cooling are more simila...

  7. Broadband Linear Polarization of Jupiter Trojans

    CERN Document Server

    Bagnulo, S; Stinson, A; Christou, A; Borisov, G B

    2016-01-01

    Trojan asteroids orbit in the Lagrange points of the system Sun-planet-asteroid. Their dynamical stability make their physical properties important proxies for the early evolution of our solar system. To study their origin, we want to characterize the surfaces of Jupiter Trojan asteroids and check possible similarities with objects of the main belt and of the Kuiper Belt. We have obtained high-accuracy broad-band linear polarization measurements of six Jupiter Trojans of the L4 population and tried to estimate the main features of their polarimetric behaviour. We have compared the polarimetric properties of our targets among themselves, and with those of other atmosphere-less bodies of our solar system. Our sample show approximately homogeneous polarimetric behaviour, although some distinct features are found between them. In general, the polarimetric properties of Trojan asteroids are similar to those of D- and P-type main-belt asteroids. No sign of coma activity is detected in any of the observed objects. A...

  8. The Transit Spectra of Earth and Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, Patrick G J; Bowles, Neil E; Fletcher, Leigh N; Aigrain, Suzanne; Lee, Jae-Min

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a number of observations have been made of the transits of 'Hot Jupiters', such as HD 189733b, which have been modelled to derive atmospheric structure and composition. As measurement techniques improve, the transit spectra of 'Super-Earths' such as GJ 1214b are becoming better constrained, allowing model atmospheres to be fitted for this class of planet also. While it is not yet possible to constrain the atmospheric states of small planets such as the Earth or cold planets like Jupiter, this may become practical in the coming decades and if so, it is of interest to determine what we might infer from such measurements. Here we have constructed atmospheric models of the Solar System planets from 0.4 - 15.5 microns that are consistent with ground-based and satellite observations and from these calculate the primary transit and secondary eclipse spectra (with respect to the Sun and typical M-dwarfs) that would be observed by a 'remote observer', many light years away. From these spectra we test ...

  9. Tidal Response of Preliminary Jupiter Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Sean M.; Hubbard, William B.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2016-11-01

    In anticipation of improved observational data for Jupiter’s gravitational field, from the Juno spacecraft, we predict the static tidal response for a variety of Jupiter interior models based on ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures. We calculate hydrostatic-equilibrium gravity terms, using the non-perturbative concentric Maclaurin Spheroid method that eliminates lengthy expansions used in the theory of figures. Our method captures terms arising from the coupled tidal and rotational perturbations, which we find to be important for a rapidly rotating planet like Jupiter. Our predicted static tidal Love number, {k}2=0.5900, is ˜10% larger than previous estimates. The value is, as expected, highly correlated with the zonal harmonic coefficient J 2, and is thus nearly constant when plausible changes are made to the interior structure while holding J 2 fixed at the observed value. We note that the predicted static k 2 might change, due to Jupiter’s dynamical response to the Galilean moons, and find reasons to argue that the change may be detectable—although we do not present here a theory of dynamical tides for highly oblate Jovian planets. An accurate model of Jupiter’s tidal response will be essential for interpreting Juno observations and identifying tidal signals from effects of other interior dynamics of Jupiter’s gravitational field.

  10. Push-pull membrane mirrors for adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonora, Stefano; Poletto, Luca

    2006-12-11

    We propose an improvement to the electrostatic membrane deformable mirror technique introducing push-pull capability that increases the performance in the correction of optical aberrations. The push-pull effect is achieved by the addition of some transparent electrodes on the top of the device. The transparent electrode is an indium-tin-oxide coated glass. The improvement of the mirror in generating surfaces is demonstrated by the comparison with a pull membrane mirror. The control is carried out in open loop by the knowledge of the response of each single electrode. An effective iterative strategy for the clipping management is presented. The performances are evaluated both in terms of Zernike polynomials generation and in terms of aberrations compensation based on the statistics of human eyes.

  11. Push-pull membrane mirrors for adaptive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonora, Stefano; Poletto, Luca

    2006-12-01

    We propose an improvement to the electrostatic membrane deformable mirror technique introducing push-pull capability that increases the performance in the correction of optical aberrations. The push-pull effect is achieved by the addition of some transparent electrodes on the top of the device. The transparent electrode is an indium-tin-oxide coated glass. The improvement of the mirror in generating surfaces is demonstrated by the comparison with a pull membrane mirror. The control is carried out in open loop by the knowledge of the response of each single electrode. An effective iterative strategy for the clipping management is presented. The performances are evaluated both in terms of Zernike polynomials generation and in terms of aberrations compensation based on the statistics of human eyes.

  12. The push-pull strategy for citrus psyllid control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huaxue; Zeng, Jiwu; Zhong, Guangyan

    2015-07-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is the only natural vector of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus that causes citrus huanglongbing (HLB), a most destructive disease of citrus. Currently, no remedial therapy exists for the disease, and so effective control of ACP is very important in curbing the transmission of the disease. The push-pull strategy should be thoroughly explored as an approach to ACP management. This mini-review summarises the current progress towards more effective repellent and attractant chemicals through investigating known repellent and attractive plants. Interactions between ACP and its host plants are also addressed, with emphasis on the possible involvement of the host biochemicals in attracting the insect. Potential ways to increase the effectiveness of the pull-push strategy are briefly discussed. It is expected that the pull-push strategy will be gradually developed following more extensive research.

  13. AGGLOMERATION AND RADIATION EFFECT OF THE PULL OF URBANIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Jin-li

    2003-01-01

    In order to explore the train of thought for China's urbanizing development and coordinated rural eco-nomic development, and to find good ways of solving rural problems through urbanization, this paper absorbs the push-and-pull forces theory and the systematic dynamic theory in the traditional population migration theories, views urbanization as a dynamic system, makes research on the push-and-pull mechanism of urbanization. The pull ingpower of urbanization is analyzed according to two aspects, the agglomeration effect and the radiation effect of cities. The agglomeration effect provides continuous propelling force for urbanization, and the radiation effect furtheraccelerates the urbanization process by pushing forward the development of rural economy. Of course, the slow de-velopment of urbanization can result in the hindrance to rural economic development.

  14. Frobenius Pull Backs of Vector Bundles in Higher Dimensions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Trivedi

    2012-11-01

    We prove that for a smooth projective variety of arbitrary dimension and for a vector bundle over , the Harder–Narasimhan filtration of a Frobenius pull back of is a refinement of the Frobenius pull back of the Harder–Narasimhan filtration of , provided there is a lower bound on the characteristic (in terms of rank of and the slope of the destabilizing sheaf of the cotangent bundle of ). We also recall some examples, due to Raynaud and Monsky, to show that some lower bound on is necessary. We also give a bound on the instability degree of the Frobenius pull back of in terms of the instability degree of and well defined invariants of .

  15. Comets and the origin and evolution of life

    CERN Document Server

    McKay, Christopher P

    2006-01-01

    Nine years after the publication of Comets and the Origin and Evolution of Life, one of the pioneering books in Astrobiology, this second edition revisits the role comets may have played in the origins and evolution of life. Recent analyses of Antarctic micrometeorites and ancient rocks in Australia and South Africa, the continuing progress in discovering complex organic macromolecules in comets, protostars and interstellar clouds, new insights into organic synthesis in comets, and numerical simulations of comet impacts on the Earth and other members of the solar system yield a spectacular wea

  16. Summer fireworks on comet 67P

    CERN Document Server

    Vincent, J -B; Lin, Z -Y; El-Maarry, M R; Pajola, M; Sierks, H; Barbieri, C; Lamy, P L; Rodrigo, R; Koschny, D; Rickman, H; Keller, H U; Agarwal, J; Barucci, M A; Bertaux, J -L; Bertini, I; Besse, S; Bodewits, D; Cremonese, G; Da Deppo, V; Davidsson, B; Debei, S; De Cecco, M; Deller, J; Fornasier, S; Fulle, M; Gicquel, A; Groussin, O; Gutierrez, P J; Gutierrez-Marquez, P; Guettler, C; Hoefner, S; Hofmann, M; Hviid, S F; Ip, W -H; Jorda, L; Knollenberg, J; Kovacs, G; Kramm, J -R; Kuehrt, E; Kueppers, M; Lara, L M; Lazzarin, M; Moreno, J J Lopez; Marzari, F; Massironi, M; Mottola, S; Naletto, G; Oklay, N; Preusker, F; Scholten, F; Shi, X; Thomas, N; Toth, I; Tubiana, C

    2016-01-01

    During its two years mission around comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, ESA's Rosetta spacecraft had the unique opportunity to follow closely a comet in the most active part of its orbit. Many studies have presented the typical features associated to the activity of the nucleus, such as localized dust and gas jets. Here we report on series of more energetic transient events observed during the three months surrounding the comet's perihelion passage in August 2015. We detected and characterized 34 outbursts with the Rosetta cameras, one every 2.4 nucleus rotation. We identified 3 main dust plume morphologies associated to these events: a narrow jet, a broad fan, and more complex plumes featuring both previous types together. These plumes are comparable in scale and temporal variation to what has been observed on other comets. We present a map of the outbursts source locations, and discuss the associated topography. We find that the spatial distribution sources on the nucleus correlates well with morphological reg...

  17. An infrared search for HDO in comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, E. L.; Mumma, M. J.; Disanti, M. A.; dello Russo, N.; Magee-Sauer, K.

    2002-11-01

    We searched for HDO emission in our infrared database of six Oort Cloud comets (C/2002 C1 (Ikeya-Zhang), C/2001 A2 (LINEAR), C/2000 WM1 (LINEAR), C/1999 H1 (Lee), C/1999 S4 (LINEAR), and C/1999 T1 (McNaught-Hartley)). Spectral lines of the ν1 fundamental vibrational band of HDO were sampled using high resolution infrared spectra acquired with both CSHELL at NASA's IRTF and NIRSPEC at the W.M. Keck Observatory. Of these comets, the recent apparition of the bright Comet Ikeya-Zhang, with its high gas production rate and good geocentric Doppler shift, provided an exceptional opportunity to search for minor constituents such as HDO. We report tentative detections of HDO in three Oort Cloud comets with upper limits determined for the remaining three. These data, combined with future observations, will be used to test models of nebular chemistry and delivery of water and organics to the early Earth.

  18. Comet and Meteorite Traditions of Aboriginal Australians

    CERN Document Server

    Hamacher, Duane W

    2014-01-01

    Of the hundreds of distinct Aboriginal cultures of Australia, many have oral traditions rich in descriptions and explanations of comets, meteors, meteorites, airbursts, impact events, and impact craters. These views generally attribute these phenomena to spirits, death, and bad omens. There are also many traditions that describe the formation of meteorite craters as well as impact events that are not known to Western science.

  19. Comet assay on mice testicular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anoop Kumar

    2015-01-01

    for germ cell mutagens (Speit et al., 2009). The in vivo Comet assay is considered a useful tool for investigating germ cell genotoxicity. In the present study DNA strand breaks in testicular cells of mice were investigated. Different classes of chemicals were tested in order to evaluate the sensitivity...

  20. Does Comet WILD-2 contain Gems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, M.; Ishii, H.; Dai, Z. R.; Toppani, A.; Joswiak, D. J.; Leroux, H.; Zolensky, M.; Keller, L. P.; Browning, N. D.

    2007-01-01

    It is expected that Comet Wild-2 dust should resemble anhydrous carbon-rich, chondritic porous (CP) interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere because some CP IDPs are suspected to be from comets. The rarity of carbonaceous grains and presolar silicates, as well as the presence of high-temperature inner solar nebula minerals in the Wild-2 sample (e.g. osbornite and melilite), appear incompatible with most CP IDPs. However, it is premature to draw firm conclusions about the mineralogy of comet Wild-2 because only approx. 1% of the sample has been examined. The most abundant silicates in CP IDPs are GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides). Nonsolar O isotopic compositions confirm that at least some GEMS in IDPs are presolar amorphous silicates. The presence or absence of GEMS in the Wild-2 sample is important because it addresses, (a) the relationship between CP IDPs and comets, and (b) the hypothesis that other GEMS in IDPs formed in the solar nebula. Here we show that most of the GEMSlike materials so far identified in Stardust aerogel were likely impact generated during collection. At the nanometer scale, they are compositionally and crystallographically distinct from GEMS in IDPs.

  1. NASA returns rocks from a comet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Don S

    2006-12-15

    Cometary particles returned by the Stardust Discovery Mission are primarily silicate materials of solar system origin. Some of the grains were formed at high temperatures close to the Sun, but then transported far out to the Kuiper belt region of the solar system before being incorporated in the comet.

  2. Spectral analysis of the Chandra comet survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, D.; Christian, D. J.; Torney, M.; Dryer, M.; Lisse, C. M.; Dennerl, K.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Wolk, S. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Hoekstra, R.

    2007-01-01

    Aims. We present results of the analysis of cometary X-ray spectra with an extended version of our charge exchange emission model (Bodewits et al. 2006). We have applied this model to the sample of 8 comets thus far observed with the Chandra X-ray observatory and acis spectrometer in the 300 - 1000

  3. EFFECT OF DRIVING WHEEL TYPE ON DRAWBAR PULL OF TRACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Abrahám

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on the possibility of increasing the drawbar pull of agricultural tractor on the soil and grass-covered surface. From our perspective, we have chosen one available and the cheapest way, i.e. steel boots for tyres of small tractors, and this was compared with a newly developed system of auto-extensible blades next to the wheel. The tractor with steel boots and auto-extensible blades reached a higher drawbar pull on average by 70 % in comparison with tyres.

  4. A pulled sutures technique for bony Bankart lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Ill; Choi, Hyung Suk; Min, Kyung Dae; Kwon, Sai Won; Kim, Jun Bum; Kim, Yong-Beom; Chun, Dong-Il

    2014-05-01

    In an attempt to present a new surgical technique for arthroscopic bony Bankart fixation, the authors developed the pulled sutures technique. In executing the new method, the authors first passed several non-absorbable sutures through labroligamentous tissue with displaced articular fragment by mimicking transglenoid suture technique. Aimed at achieving a safe and stable fixation, using a knotless anchor rather than transglenoid suture, was deployed. Overall, this pulled sutures technique was shown to be effective with the result of direct reduction, stable, and safe fixation for bony Bankart's lesion.

  5. Dynamical Interactions Make Hot Jupiters in Open Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Shara, Michael M; Mardling, Rosemary A

    2014-01-01

    Explaining the origin and evolution of exoplanetary "hot Jupiters" remains a significant challenge. One possible mechanism for their production is planet-planet interactions, which produces hot Jupiters from planets born far from their host stars but near their dynamical stability limits. In the much more likely case of planets born far from their dynamical stability limits, can hot Jupiters can be formed in star clusters? Our N-body simulations of planetary systems inside star clusters answer this question in the affirmative, and show that hot Jupiter formation is not a rare event. We detail three case studies of the dynamics-induced births of hot Jupiters on highly eccentric orbits that can only occur inside star clusters. The hot Jupiters' orbits bear remarkable similarities to those of some of the most extreme exoplanets known: HAT-P-32 b, HAT-P-2 b, HD 80606 b and GJ 876 d. If stellar perturbations formed these hot Jupiters then our simulations predict that these very hot, inner planets are sometimes acc...

  6. Towards a better understanding of the apparent source of long period comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybczyński, P. A.; Królikowska, M.

    2014-07-01

    comets with long periods covered with astrometric data, it can be fruitful to obtain original or future orbits not from the whole set of observations but from shorter arcs, e.g., to exclude observations close to perihelion, where violent non-gravitational effects can disturb the comet motion. 3. Taking into account the observational uncertainties for 1/a-distribution of original/future orbits, we produce a detailed shape of the famous 'Oort spike' that fully reflects observational constraints. 4. We found that a significant percentage of LPCs have their previous perihelia deep in the planetary region --- as a result, one cannot treat them as 'new comets' since they experienced both planetary perturbations and solar radiation heating at least during their previous perihelion passage. 5. The widely used concept of the Jupiter-Saturn barrier should be revised since a significant number of LPCs can migrate through it without any significant orbital changes. 6. None of the known stars have significantly changed any of the studied LPCs orbits.

  7. Jupiter's Decametric Radio Emission and the Radiation Belts of Its Galilean Satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J A

    1968-03-01

    Many of the observed properties of Jupiter's decametric radiation may be explained by postulation that the inner Galilean satellites of Jupiter have magnetic properties that strongly distort Jupiter's magnetic field in the region of each satellite. Charged particles from Jupiter's radiation belts are trapped by these distorted fields and emit synchrotron radiation.

  8. Energetic electrons in Jupiter's dawn magnetodisc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Allen, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents and analyzes absolute energy density data on electrons from the University of Iowa instrument on Pioneer 10 for one example of a plasma sheet traversal in Jupiter's dawn magnetodisk on 6-7 December 1973. The absolute integral omnidirectional intensity spectrum of electrons is based on a full and accurate reduction of the counting rate data. The main finding is that electrons of energy greater than 0.060 MeV provide only about 3% of the charged particle pressure required to explain the observed depression in the magnetic field at the center of the plasma sheet, in spite of the fact that the intensity of such electrons is well correlated with the depression of the magnetic pressure throughout the sheet.

  9. The dusty ballerina skirt of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, M.; Morfill, G.; Gruen, E.

    1993-12-01

    We suggest a model to explain the unexpected recurrent dust events that were observed during the Jupiter encounter by the dust detector on board the Ulysses spacecraft. This model is based dust-magnetosphere interactions. Dust particles inside the Jovian magnetosphere collect electrostatic charges and their interaction with the magnetic and electric fields can lead to energization and subsequent ejection. We discuss the dusty regions (ring/halo, `gossamer' ring) and also Io as potential sources for the Ulysses events. This model favors Io as a source. The mass and velocity range of the escaping particles are compatible with the observations, and we also suggest internal periodicities to explain the recurrent nature of the Ulysses dust events.

  10. Auroral meridian scanning photometer calibration using Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackel, Brian J.; Unick, Craig; Creutzberg, Fokke; Baker, Greg; Davis, Eric; Donovan, Eric F.; Connors, Martin; Wilson, Cody; Little, Jarrett; Greffen, M.; McGuffin, Neil

    2016-10-01

    Observations of astronomical sources provide information that can significantly enhance the utility of auroral data for scientific studies. This report presents results obtained by using Jupiter for field cross calibration of four multispectral auroral meridian scanning photometers during the 2011-2015 Northern Hemisphere winters. Seasonal average optical field-of-view and local orientation estimates are obtained with uncertainties of 0.01 and 0.1°, respectively. Estimates of absolute sensitivity are repeatable to roughly 5 % from one month to the next, while the relative response between different wavelength channels is stable to better than 1 %. Astronomical field calibrations and darkroom calibration differences are on the order of 10 %. Atmospheric variability is the primary source of uncertainty; this may be reduced with complementary data from co-located instruments.

  11. Rotational Properties of Jupiter Trojan 1173 Anchises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, Joseph; Henry, Todd; French, Linda; Trilling, David

    2015-11-01

    Anchises (1173) is a large Trojan asteroid librating about Jupiter’s L5 Lagrange point. Here we examine its rotational and lightcurve properties by way of data collected over a 3.5 year observing campaign. The length of the campaign means that data were gathered for more than a quarter of Anchises' full orbital revolution which allows for accurate determinations of pole orientation and bulk shape properties for the asteroid that can then be compared to results of previous work (i.e. French 1987, Horner et al. 2012). In addition to light curves, photometric data taken during this campaign could potentially detect color differences between hemispheres as the viewing geometry changes over time. Understanding these details about a prominent member of the Jupiter Trojans may help us better understand the history of this fascinating and important group of asteroids.

  12. Exploring the fission and reconfiguration cycle of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheeres, Daniel J.; Hirabayashi, Masatoshi; Chesley, Steven R.; McMahon, Jay W.

    2016-10-01

    In Hirabayashi et al. (Nature, 2016) the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P) is studied with a focus on the straight cracks observed on the Hapi region. These cracks were shown to have formed during a period of fast rotation and led to a proposed evolutionary scenario in which the nuclei may eventually split into two components and recombine to create a new bilobate configuration. Other bilobate nuclei should be subject to such a reconfiguration process, based on the relative sizes of the components, suggesting that this evolutionary scenario may be common for bilobate nuclei which comprise the majority of comet nuclei observed at high spatial resolution. Such reconfigurations could explain the observed occurrence of comet nucleus splitting and brightening events, which still lack a definitive geophysical understanding. Motivated by the proposed theory in Hirabayashi et al., the current work explores the dynamics of the 67P nucleus' rotation rate, fission limits, and subsequent dynamics. One aspect of the theory posits that the comet's distant Jupiter flybys will cause the latitude of the sub-solar point at perihelion to vary chaotically, leading to periods of net positive and negative torques and causing the nucleus to spin-up and spin-down in a random fashion. We analyze the current 67P nucleus shape and orbit to estimate the characteristic time-scale of this rotational evolution, providing an estimate of the current nucleus lifetime in its current configuration. Once the nucleus reaches a spin period shorter than ~7 hours the components will fission into a bound orbit, with the components subsequently reimpacting at speeds less than local escape speed (about 0.4 m/s). The current study extends Hirabayashi et al., explicitly modeling the mutual gravity and orbital dynamics of the head and body, assuming that the head and body rest on each other with the current shape of the 67P nucleus. The results show that when the components are released at a spin

  13. A Transiting Hot Jupiter Orbiting a Metal-Rich Star

    CERN Document Server

    Dunham, Edward W; Koch, David G; Batalha, Natalie M; Buchhave, Lars A; Brown, Timothy M; Caldwell, Douglas A; Cochran, William D; Endl, Michael; Fischer, Debra; Furesz, Gabor; Gautier, Thomas N; Geary, John C; Gilliland, Ronald L; Gould, Alan; Howell, Steve B; Jenkins, Jon M; Kjeldsen, Hans; Latham, David W; Lissauer, Jack J; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Meibom, Soren; Monet, David G; Rowe, Jason F; Sasselov, Dimitar D

    2010-01-01

    We announce the discovery of Kepler-6b, a transiting hot Jupiter orbiting a star with unusually high metallicity, [Fe/H] = +0.34 +/- 0.04. The planet's mass is about 2/3 that of Jupiter, Mp = 0.67 Mj, and the radius is thirty percent larger than that of Jupiter, Rp = 1.32 Rj, resulting in a density of 0.35 g/cc, a fairly typical value for such a planet. The orbital period is P = 3.235 days. The host star is both more massive than the Sun, Mstar = 1.21 Msun, and larger than the Sun, Rstar = 1.39 Rsun.

  14. Maximum frequency of the decametric radiation from Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, C. H.; Alexander, J. K.

    1980-01-01

    The upper frequency limits of Jupiter's decametric radio emission are found to be essentially the same when observed from the earth or, with considerably higher sensitivity, from the Voyager spacecraft close to Jupiter. This suggests that the maximum frequency is a real cut-off corresponding to a maximum gyrofrequency of about 38-40 MHz at Jupiter. It no longer appears to be necessary to specify different cut-off frequencies for the Io and non-Io emission as the maximum frequencies are roughly the same in each case.

  15. Return to Europa: Overview of the Jupiter Europa Orbiter Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K.; Tan-Wang, G.; Boldt, J.; Greeley, R.; Jun, I.; Lock, R.; Ludwinski, J.; Pappalardo, R.; Van Houten, T.; Yan, T.

    2009-01-01

    Missions to explore Europa have been imagined ever since the Voyager mission first suggested that Europa was geologically very young. Subsequently, Galileo supplied fascinating new insights into that satellite's secrets. The Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) would be the NASA-led portion of the Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), an international mission with orbiters developed by NASA, ESA and possibly JAXA. JEO would address a very important subset of the complete EJSM science objectives and is designed to function alone or in conjunction with ESA's Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO).

  16. Encouragement from Jupiter for Europe's Titan Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Huygens will transmit scientific information for 150 minutes, from the outer reaches of Titan's cold atmosphere and all the way down to its enigmatic surface. For comparison, the Jupiter Probe radioed scientific data for 58 minutes as it descended about 200 kilometres into the outer part of the atmosphere of the giant planet. The parachutes controlling various stages of Huygens' descent will rely upon a system for deployment designed and developed in Europe that is nevertheless similar to that used by the Jupiter Probe. The elaborate sequence of operations in Huygens worked perfectly during a dramatic drop test from a stratospheric balloon over Sweden in May 1995, which approximated as closely as possible to events on Titan. The performance of the American Probe at Jupiter renews the European engineers' confidence in their own descent control system, and also in the lithium sulphur-dioxide batteries which were chosen to power both Probes. "The systems work after long storage in space," comments Hamid Hassan, ESA's Project Manager for Huygens. "Huygens will spend seven years travelling to Saturn's vicinity aboard the Cassini Orbiter. The Jupiter Probe was a passenger in Galileo for six years before its release, so there is no reason to doubt that Huygens will work just as well." Huygens will enter the outer atmosphere of Titan at 20,000 kilometres per hour. A heat shield 2.7 metres in diameter will withstand the friction and slow the Probe to a speed at which parachutes can be deployed. The size of the parachute for the main phase of the descent is chosen to allow Huygens to reach the surface in about 2 hours. The batteries powering Huygens will last for about 21/2 hours. Prepared for surprises A different perspective on the Jupiter Probe comes from Jean-Pierre Lebreton, ESA's Project Scientist for Huygens. The results contradicted many preconceptions of the Galileo scientists, particularly about the abundance of water and the structure of cloud layers. Arguments

  17. Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy (pull method and Jejunal Extension Tube Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-jiang Tang

    2014-04-01

    Conclusions: PEG-pull method is the most widely used PEG technique. Appropriate patient selection, timing of the procedure, informed consent, antibiotic prophylaxis, adequate endoscopic air insufflation during PEG site selection, and optimal PEG site localization are the keys in this procedure.

  18. An Original Testing Apparatus for Rapid Pull-Out Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprialdi, D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pull-out test is commonly used to investigate the pull-out behavior of geotextile reinforcement embedded in soil. It is also used by different authors to propose interface friction angles values. Unfortunately these works mainly deal with cyclic loadings with reference to seismic action, which are believed to be different to the load exposed to reinforced earthworks due to lateral impacts. Therefore an original rapid pull-out test apparatus is proposed in this study. This article assess the proposed test method in addressing the rapid pull-out response of a geotextile embedded in soil. The testing apparatus allows investigating shear velocities within the range of 0.1 to 1.2 m/s. This test method seems promising in addressing the response of soil-geotextile interfaces under dynamic loadings. Nevertheless, improvements concerning the testing apparatus are still required. The loading system could be modified to avoid oscillations and specific equipment should be added to increase the normal stress.

  19. Pulling cylindrical particles using a soft-nonparaxial tractor beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; Ding, Weiqiang; Wang, Maoyan

    2017-01-01

    the nonparaxiality requirements, reducing the incidence angle of the partial plane waves of the light beam down to 45 degrees and even to 30 degrees for respectively dipole and dipole-quadrupole objects. The optical pulling force attributed to the interaction of magnetic dipole and magnetic quadrupole moments...

  20. Ultrabroadband pulse shaping with a push-pull deformable mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonora, Stefano; Brida, Daniele; Villoresi, Paolo; Cerullo, Giulio

    2010-10-25

    We report the programmable pulse shaping of ultrabroadband pulses by the use of a novel design of electrostatic deformable mirror based on push pull technology. We shape few-optical pulses from near-IR and visible optical parametric amplifiers, and demonstrate strong-field control of excited state population transfer in a dye molecule.

  1. Effectiveness of Push and Pull Learning Strategies in Construction Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Aguinaldo; Powell, James Alfred

    2001-01-01

    Study of a construction contractor modernizing production showed that creation of an effective learning mood was more likely in a supportive environment in which people explore their actions as they work ("pull learning"). However, an external change agent ("push learning") was useful in provoking the reflection that triggered workplace learning.…

  2. Active Harmonic Load–Pull With Realistic Wideband Communications Signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchetti, M.; Pelk, M.J.; Buisman, K.; Neo, W.C.E.; Spirito, M.; De Vreede, L.C.N.

    2008-01-01

    A new wideband open-loop active harmonic load–pull measurement approach is presented. The proposed method is based on wideband data-acquisition and wideband signal-injection of the incident and device generated power waves at the frequencies of interest. The system provides full, user defined, in-ba

  3. Non-paraxial beam to push and pull microparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; Qiu, C.-W.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss a feasibility of the pulling (backward) force acting on a spherical microparticle in a non-paraxial Bessel beam. The effect can be explained by the strong interaction of particle's multipoles or by the conservation of momentum in the system “photons-particle.” It is remarkable that the...

  4. Oil pulling: A traditional method on the edge of evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Mythri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oil pulling is an ancient, traditional folk remedy that has been practiced for centuries in India and southern Asia as a holistic Ayurvedic technique. The practice of oil pulling involves placing a tablespoon of an edible oil (e.g. sesame, olive, sunflower, coconut inside the mouth, and swishing or “pulling” the oil through the teeth and oral cavity for anywhere from 1–5 minutes to up to 20 minutes or longer. Materials and Methods: Articles related to oil pulling were collected by using oil pulling as Keyword in Google and Medline. Out of the 21 related articles published till 2016, 6 articles with the proper study designs were used for analysis. Results: The studies were unreliable for many reasons, including the misinterpretation of results due to small sample size and improper study design. Conclusion: Though the promoters claim it as one of the best method to be as adjuvant to mechanical control methods, scientific evidences are lacking.

  5. Effectiveness of Push and Pull Learning Strategies in Construction Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Aguinaldo; Powell, James Alfred

    2001-01-01

    Study of a construction contractor modernizing production showed that creation of an effective learning mood was more likely in a supportive environment in which people explore their actions as they work ("pull learning"). However, an external change agent ("push learning") was useful in provoking the reflection that triggered workplace learning.…

  6. Temporal Evolution of SL-9 Impact Sites on Jupiter and Global Maps of Jupiter from Multi-Observatory Visible and Infrared Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Sanjay S.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the temporal behavior of the impact features on Jupiter created by the fragments of the Shoemaker Levy-9 comet that collided with the planet in July 1994. The primary observations used in the study were ground based images of Jupiter acquired from the Swedish Solar Vacuum Tube on the island of La Palma in the Canary Islands. The measurement of position of the impact features in images acquired immediately after the impact over a period of a few days revealed that the apparent drift rates were too high and that a repetitive pattern could be seen in the longitude position on successive rotations. This could be explained only by the fact that the measured longitudes of the impact sites were being affected by parallax due to a significant elevation of the impact debris above the nominal cloud top altitude value used for image navigation. Once the apparent positions are analyzed as a function of the meridian angle, the parallax equation can be used to infer the height of the impact features above the cloud deck, once the true impact position (longitude) for the feature is known. Due to their inherent high spatial resolution, the HST measurements of the impact site locations have been accepted widely. However, these suffer from the parallax themselves since few of them were obtained at central meridian. Ground based imaging have the potential to improve this knowledge as they do observe most of the impact sites on either side of the central meridian, except for the degraded resolution. Measurements over a large number of images enables us to minimize the position error through regression and thus estimate both the actual impact site location devoid of parallax bias, and also of the altitude level of the impact debris above the cloud deck. With rapid imaging there is the potential to examine the time evolution of the altitude level. Several hundred ground based images were processed, navigated and subjected to the impact

  7. Reducing the Asteroid and Comet Impact Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, David

    1998-10-01

    Of the 140 impact craters known on the surface of Earth, the most famous was created about 65 million years ago when a 10 km asteroid or comet came down in shallow water near the present day town of Chicxulub, Mexico. With a kinetic energy equivalent to 100 trillion tons of TNT, the impact event lofted enough debris onto globe-straddling trajectories to flash heat much of the surface of the Earth and then darken the skies for several years. Numerous investigations have demonstrated that such an event, which happens, on average, every 100 million years, caused extreme stress on Earth's climate and most likely led to the extinction of many species. Computational simulations demonstrate that more numerous asteroids or comets as small as 1 km in diameter, impacting, on average, every 300,000 years may be globally catastrophic. Indeed, the odds of an individual dying from a relatively frequent 1 km impacting object (about 1 in 10,000) are substantially greater than from the impact of an infrequent dinosaur killer (1 in 1,000,000). What can we do to reduce the hazard from impacting comets and asteroids? First, we should find what's out there with our name on it. Only about 10 percent of the potential Earth-crossing asteroids have been found. Even at the greatly increased detection rate of recent years, it will be several decades before we've found 90 percent of the Earth-crossers. Second, we should learn everything we can about the physical, compositional and mechanical properties of asteroids and comets. A recent computational study demonstrated that weakly bound asteroids (little more than rubble piles) are easier to break than deflect(E. Asphaug, S. J. Ostro, R. S. Hudson, D. J. Scheeres and W. Benz (1998), Nature, Vol. 393, pp. 437-440.). Is this an advantage or disadvantage? Third, we should study potential means of mitigating the hazard by deflecting the object while still in space or evacuating affected regions (such as coastlines) of the Earth. Because the

  8. A ∼32–70 K FORMATION TEMPERATURE RANGE FOR THE ICE GRAINS AGGLOMERATED BY COMET 67 P/CHURYUMOV–GERASIMENKO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lectez, S.; Simon, J.-M.; Salazar, J. M. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303, CNRS-Université de Bourgogne Franche Comté, Dijon (France); Mousis, O. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Marseille (LAM), UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Picaud, S. [Institut UTINAM, UMR 6213, CNRS-Université de Bourgogne Franche Comté, Besançon (France); Altwegg, K.; Rubin, M., E-mail: jmsimon@u-bourgogne.fr [Physikalisches Institut, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2015-05-20

    Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations are used to reproduce the N{sub 2}/CO ratio ranging between 1.7 × 10{sup −3} and 1.6 × 10{sup −2} observed in situ in the Jupiter-family comet 67 P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko (67 P) by the ROSINA mass spectrometer on board the Rosetta spacecraft. By assuming that this body has been agglomerated from clathrates in the protosolar nebula (PSN), simulations are developed using elaborated interatomic potentials for investigating the temperature dependence of the trapping within a multiple-guest clathrate formed from a gas mixture of CO and N{sub 2} in proportions corresponding to those expected for the PSN. By assuming that 67 P agglomerated from clathrates, our calculations suggest the cometary grains must have been formed at temperatures ranging between ∼31.8 and 69.9 K in the PSN to match the N{sub 2}/CO ratio measured by the ROSINA mass spectrometer. The presence of clathrates in Jupiter-family comets could then explain the potential N{sub 2} depletion (factor of up to ∼87 compared to the protosolar value) measured in 67 P.

  9. JUPITER PROJECT - JOINT UNIVERSAL PARAMETER IDENTIFICATION AND EVALUATION OF RELIABILITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The JUPITER (Joint Universal Parameter IdenTification and Evaluation of Reliability) project builds on the technology of two widely used codes for sensitivity analysis, data assessment, calibration, and uncertainty analysis of environmental models: PEST and UCODE.

  10. How does stellar irradiation make hot Jupiters puffy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yu-Jie; Gu, Pin-Gao

    2017-06-01

    Hot Jupiters appear to be re-inflated as their host stars evolve and become more luminous, shedding more light on the intriguing correlation between stellar irradiation and the size of hot Jupiters. To account for the phenomenon, one of the well-known models is the thermal-tide scenario proposed by Arras and Socrates. We present a linear analysis of semi-diurnal thermal tides in a hot Jupiter. The Coriolis effect is added to our equation, which generates more wave modes than non-rotating models, such as Rossby, Yanai, and inertial waves. We attempt to investigate where and which mode contributes most of the torque that maintains the planet in an asynchronous state against gravitational tides, leading to re-inflation of a hot Jupiter.

  11. Pioneer Jupiter orbiter probe mission 1980, probe description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrees, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The adaptation of the Saturn-Uranus Atmospheric Entry Probe (SUAEP) to a Jupiter entry probe is summarized. This report is extracted from a comprehensive study of Jovian missions, atmospheric model definitions and probe subsystem alternatives.

  12. Planetary geometry handbook: Jupiter positional data, 1985 - 2020, volume 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeyevsky, A. B.; Snyder, G. C.; Paulson, B. L.; Cunniff, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Graphical data necessary for the analysis of planetary exploration missions to Jupiter are presented. Positional and geometric information spanning the time period from 1985 through 2020 is provided. The data and their usage are explained.

  13. Fitting Orbits to Jupiter's Moons with a Spreadsheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Describes how a spreadsheet is used to fit a circular orbit model to observations of Jupiter's moons made with a small telescope. Kepler's Third Law and the inverse square law of gravity are observed. (AIM)

  14. Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter and Trojan Asteroid Explorer in EJSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Sho; Fujimoto, Masaki; Yano, Hajime; Takashima, Takeshi; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Funase, Ryu; Tsuda, Yuichi; Kawaguchi, Junichiro; Kawakatsu, Yasuhiro; Mori, Osamu; Morimoto, Mutsuko; Yoshida, Fumi; Takato, Naruhisa

    The international mission to explore the Jovian system is planned as Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) aiming at the launch in 2020. EJSM consists of (1) the Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) by NASA, (2) the Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO) by ESA, and (3) the Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter (JMO) studied by JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency). In February 2009, NASA and ESA decided to continue the study of EJSM as a candidate of the outer solar system mission. In JAXA, a mission plan combining Trojan asteroid explorer with JMO started. According to the mission plan, as the main spacecraft flies by Jupiter, it will deploy the JMO satellite around Jupiter. Then the main will target one (or two) Trojan asteroids. JMO is a spin-stabilized satellite which will have magnetometers, low-energy plasma spectrome-ters, medium energy particle detectors, energetic particle detectors, electric field / plasma wave instruments, an ENA imager, an EUV spectrometer, and a dust detector. Collaborating with plasma instruments on board JEO and JGO, JMO will investigate the fast-rotating huge mag-netosphere to clarify the energy procurement from the rotation of Jupiter to the magnetosphere and to clarify the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere. JAXA started the study of a solar power sail for deep space explorations. In addition to the function of a solar sail (photon propulsion), the solar power sail system has very efficient ion engines where electric power is produced solar panels within the sail. Currently we are studying a mission to Jupiter and Trojan asteroids using a large (100m-scale) solar power sail that can transfer large payload as far as Jupiter. Trojan asteroids, which orbit around Jupiter's Lagrangian points, are primitive bodies with information of the early solar system as well as raw solid materials of Jovian system. Proposed instruments for the Trojan spacecraft are cameras, IR spectrometers, XRS, a laser altimeter, and a small surface rover

  15. Detection of (C-13)-ethane in Jupiter's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Guenter; Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Jennings, Donald E.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution (C-12)- and (C-13)-ethane spectra of Jupiter were acquired with the Kitt Peak 4 m Fourier spectrometer and the Goddard postdisperser in June 1987. A relative abundance ratio (C-12/C-13) of 94 +/- 12 was derived from the measurements. This nearly terrestrial value indicates little or no fractionation of carbon isotopes when ethane is produced in the photolysis of methane in Jupiter's atmosphere.

  16. A Look Inside the Juno Mission to Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammier, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    Juno, the second mission within the New Frontiers Program, is a Jupiter polar orbiter mission designed to return high-priority science data that spans across multiple divisions within NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Juno's science objectives, coupled with the natural constraints of a cost-capped, PI-led mission and the harsh environment of Jupiter, have led to a very unique mission and spacecraft design.

  17. The Jupiter Electron Scattering Program at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arie Bodek

    2004-08-01

    JUPITER (Jlab Unified Program to Investigate nuclear Targets and Electroproduction of Resonances) is a new collaboration between the Nuclear Physics Electron Scattering and High Energy Physics Neutrino Scattering Communities to Investigate the Structure of Nucleons and Nuclei with Electron and Neutrino Beams. The first phase of JUPITER is Hall C experiment E04-001 on Inclusive Electron Scattering from Nuclear Targets. First data run of E04-001 is currently scheduled for January of 2005.

  18. An analysis of Jupiter data from the RAE-1 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, T. D.

    1974-01-01

    The analysis of Radio Astronomy Explorer Satellite data are presented. Radio bursts from Jupiter are reported in the frequency range 4700 KHz to 45 KHz. Strong correlations with lo were found at 4700, 3930, and 2200 KHz, while an equally strong Europa effect was observed at 1300, 900, and 700 KHz. Histograms indicating the relative probability and the successful identification of Jupiter activity were plotted, using automatic computer and visual search techniques.

  19. Comet assay on tetraploid yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rank, Jette; Syberg, Kristian; Jensen, Klara

    2009-01-01

    Tetraploid yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were used in the comet assay with the intention of developing a new, fast and easy assay for detecting environmental genotoxic agents without using higher organisms. Two DNA-damaging chemicals, H2O2 and acrylamide, together with wastewater from...... three municipal treatment plants were tested for their effect on the yeast-cell DNA. The main problem with using yeast in the comet assay is the necessity to degrade the cell wall. This was achieved by using Zymolase 100 T twice during the procedure, since Zymolase 20 T did not open the cell wall....... Analytical problems that arose due to the small amount of DNA in the yeast nuclei in haploid and diploid cells, which contain 13 Mbp and 26 Mbp DNA per cell, respectively, were solved by using tetraploid yeast cells (52 Mbp) instead. DNA damage was shown after exposure to H2O2 and acrylamide. The lowest dose...

  20. Probing heavy neutrinos in the COMET experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Asaka, Takehiko

    2015-01-01

    We argue that the COMET experiment --- a dedicated experiment for the $\\mu$-$e$ conversion search --- can be a powerful facility to search for heavy neutrinos in the mass range $1\\,{\\rm MeV} \\lesssim M \\lesssim 100\\,{\\rm MeV}$. The stopped muons captured by the target nuclei or decaying in orbit are efficiently produce heavy neutrinos via the active-sterile mixing. The produced heavy neutrinos then decay to electron-positron pair (plus an active neutrino), which events are clearly seen by the cylindrical drift chamber surrounding the target. The expected sensitivity is comparable to the PS191 bound when the COMET experiment achieves $\\sim 10^{17}$ stopping muons in the target.