WorldWideScience

Sample records for jupiter icy moon

  1. Europa--Jupiter's Icy Ocean Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, L.

    1999-01-01

    Europa is a puzzle. The sixth largest moon in our solar system, Europa confounds and intrigues scientists. Few bodies in the solar system have attracted as much scientific attention as this moon of Jupiter because of its possible subsurface ocean of water. The more we learn about this icy moon, the more questions we have.

  2. Forum on Concepts and Approaches for Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The papers presented at this conference primarily discuss instruments and techniques for conducting science on Jupiter's icy moons, and geologic processes on the moons themselves. Remote sensing of satellites, cratering on satellites, and ice on the surface of Europa are given particular attention. Some papers discuss Jupiter's atmosphere, or exobiology.

  3. Neutral atmosphere near the icy surface of Jupiter's moon Ganymede

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shematovich, V. I.

    2016-07-01

    The paper discusses the formation and dynamics of the rarefied gas envelope near the icy surface of Jupiter's moon Ganymede. Being the most massive icy moon, Ganymede can form a rarefied exosphere with a relatively dense near-surface layer. The main parent component of the gas shell is water vapor, which enters the atmosphere due to thermal degassing, nonthermal radiolysis, and other active processes and phenomena on the moon's icy surface. A numerical kinetic simulation is performed to investigate, at the molecular level, the formation, chemical evolution, and dynamics of the mainly H2O- and O2-dominant rarefied gas envelopes. The ionization processes in these rarefied gas envelopes are due to exposure to ultraviolet radiation from the Sun and the magnetospheric plasma. The chemical diversity of the icy moon's gas envelope is attributed to the primary action of ultraviolet solar photons and plasma electrons on the rarefied gas in the H2O- or O2-dominant atmosphere. The model is used to calculate the formation and development of the chemical diversity in the relatively dense near-surface envelope of Ganymede, where an important contribution comes from collisions between parent molecules and the products of their photolysis and radiolysis.

  4. Surface Penetrating Radar Simulations for Jupiter's Icy Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Thorsten; Gogineni, S. P.; Green, J. L.; Reinisch, B. W.; Song, P.; Fung, S. F.; Benson, R. F.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Cooper, F.

    2003-01-01

    The icy moons of Jupiter (Europa, Callisto, and Ganymede) are of similar overall composition but show different surface features as a result of different sub-surface processes. Furthermore, each of these moons could have a liquid ocean of water buried underneath the icy crust, but their depth can only be speculated. For Europa, estimates put the thickness of the ice shell anywhere between 2-30 km, with'a few models predicting up to 100 km. Much of the uncertainties are due to the largely unknown temperature gradients and levels of water impurities across different surface layers. One of the most important geological processes is the possible transportation of heat by ice convection. If the ice is convecting, then an upper limit of about 20 km is set for the depth of the ocean underneath. Convection leads to a sharp increase in temperature followed by a thick region of nearly constant temperature. If ice is not convecting, then an exponentially increasing temperature profile is expected. The crust is thought to be a mixture of ice and rock, and although the exact percentage of rock is not known, it is expected to be low. Additionally, the ice crust could contain salt, similar to sea ice on Earth. The exact amount of salt and how that amount changes with depth is also unknown. In preparation for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission, we performed simulations for a surface-penetrating radar investigating signatures for different possible surface and sub-surface structures of these moons in order to estimate the applicability of using radar with a frequency range between 1 and 50 MHz. This includes simulations of power requirements, attenuation losses, layer resolutions for scenarios with and without the presence of a liquid ocean underneath the ice, cases of convecting and non-convecting ice, different impurities within the ice, and different surface roughnesses.

  5. JUICE: A European Mission to Jupiter and its Icy Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasset, Olivier; Witasse, Olivier; Barabash, Stas; Brandt, Pontus; Bruzzone, Lorenzo; Bunce, Emma; Cecconi, Baptiste; Cavalié, Thibault; Cimo, Giuseppe; Coustenis, Athena; Cremonese, Gabriele; Dougherty, Michele; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Gladstone, Randy; Gurvits, Leonid; Hartogh, Paul; Hoffmann, Holger; Hussmann, Hauke; Iess, Luciano; Jaumann, Ralf; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Kaspi, Yohai; Krupp, Norbert; Langevin, Yves; Mueller-Wodarg, Ingo; Palumbo, Pasquale; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Plaut, Jeffrey; Poulet, Francois; Roatsch, Thomas; Retherford, Kurt D.; Rothkaehl, Hanna; Stevenson, David J.; Tosi, Federico; Van Hoolst, Tim; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Wurz, Peter; Altobelli, Nicolas; Accomazzo, A.; Boutonnet, Arnaud; Erd, Christian; Vallat, Claire

    2016-10-01

    JUICE - JUpiter ICy moons Explorer - is the first large mission in the ESA Cosmic Vision programme [1]. The implementation phase started in July 2015. JUICE will arrive at Jupiter in October 2029, and will spend 3 years characterizing the Jovian system, the planet itself, its giant magnetosphere, and the giant icy moons: Ganymede, Callisto and Europa. JUICE will then orbit Ganymede.The first goal of JUICE is to explore the habitable zone around Jupiter [2]. Ganymede is a high-priority target because it provides a unique laboratory for analyzing the nature, evolution and habitability of icy worlds, including the characteristics of subsurface oceans, and because it possesses unique magnetic fields and plasma interactions with the environment. On Europa, the focus will be on recently active zones, where the composition, surface and subsurface features (including putative water reservoirs) will be characterized. Callisto will be explored as a witness of the early Solar System.JUICE will also explore the Jupiter system as an archetype of gas giants. The circulation, meteorology, chemistry and structure of the Jovian atmosphere will be studied from the cloud tops to the thermosphere and ionosphere. JUICE will investigate the 3D properties of the magnetodisc, and study the coupling processes within the magnetosphere, ionosphere and thermosphere. The mission also focuses on characterizing the processes that influence surface and space environments of the moons.The payload consists of 10 instruments plus a ground-based experiment (PRIDE) to better constrain the S/C position. A remote sensing package includes imaging (JANUS) and spectral-imaging capabilities from UV to sub-mm wavelengths (UVS, MAJIS, SWI). A geophysical package consists of a laser altimeter (GALA) and a radar sounder (RIME) for exploring the moons, and a radio science experiment (3GM) to probe the atmospheres and to determine the gravity fields. The in situ package comprises a suite to study plasma and

  6. A Passive Probe for Subsurface Oceans and Liquid Water in Jupiter's Icy Moons

    OpenAIRE

    Romero-Wolf, Andrew; Vance, Steve; Maiwald, Frank; Heggy, Essam; Ries, Paul; Liewer, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    We describe an interferometric reflectometer method for passive detection of subsurface oceans and liquid water in Jovian icy moons using Jupiter's decametric radio emission (DAM). The DAM flux density exceeds 3,000 times the galactic background in the neighborhood of the Jovian icy moons, providing a signal that could be used for passive radio sounding. An instrument located between the icy moon and Jupiter could sample the DAM emission along with its echoes reflected in the ice layer of the...

  7. Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) Electrical Systems Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapp, Scott J.

    2004-01-01

    The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission will send a spacecraft to explore three of Jupiter s moons (Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa), all of which show evidence of containing vast subterranean oceans beneath their icy surfaces. The evidence of these oceans was discovered by Galileo, and the moons are believed to have the three essential ingredients for life: water, energy, and the necessary chemical elements. Galileo has shown that melted water on Europa has been in contact with the surface of the moon in geologically recent times, and may still lie relatively close to the surface. This project will also introduce a revolutionary new form of electric propulsion powered by a nuclear fission reactor. This electric propulsion is called ion propulsion. It was used on a previous mission called Deep Space 1, proving that ion propulsion works for interplanetary travel. Since JIMO will be traveling farther from the sun, solar power will be difficult to supply the electric energy demanded by the mission. Therefore a nuclear reactor and a thermo-electric converter system will be necessary. Besides making the trip to three of Jupiter's moons - one after the other - a realistic possibility, this new form of power and propulsion opens up the rest of the outer solar system for future exploration. JIMO will fulfill its goals by exploring Europa first, with subsequent trips to the moons Callisto and Ganymede in order to provide comparisons key to understanding the evolution of all three. In order to ensure the stability and proper preparation of the electrical system on JIMO, the High Power AC Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) Test Bed is being developed. The testing on.this AC PMAD will consist of electrical performance verification of candidate power system components. Examples of these components are: high power AC switchgear, high power ACDC converters, AC power distribution units, DC power distribution units, etc. Throughout the course of the summer the over

  8. Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer: mission status after the Definition Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, Dmitri; Barabash, Stas; Bruzzone, Lorenzo; Dougherty, Michele; Erd, Christian; Fletcher, Leigh; Gare, Philippe; Gladstone, Randall; Grasset, Olivier; Gurvits, Leonid; Hartogh, Paul; Hussmann, Hauke; Iess, Luciano; Jaumann, Ralf; Langevin, Yves; Palumbo, Pasquale; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Sarri, Giuseppe; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Witasse, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE), the ESA first large-class mission within the Cosmic Vision Program 2015-2025, was adopted in November 2014. The mission will perform detailed investigations of Jupiter and its system with particular emphasis on Ganymede as a planetary body and potential habitat. The overarching theme for JUICE is: The emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants. At Ganymede, the mission will characterize in detail the ocean layers; provide topographical, geological and compositional mapping of the surface; study the physical properties of the icy crusts; characterize the internal mass distribution, investigate the exosphere; study Ganymede's intrinsic magnetic field and its interactions with the Jovian magnetosphere. For Europa, the focus will be on the non-ice chemistry, understanding the formation of surface features and subsurface sounding of the icy crust over recently active regions. Callisto will be explored as a witness of the early solar system. JUICE will perform a multidisciplinary investigation of the Jupiter system as an archetype for gas giants. The circulation, meteorology, chemistry and structure of the Jovian atmosphere will be studied from the cloud tops to the thermosphere. The focus in Jupiter's magnetosphere will include an investigation of the three dimensional properties of the magnetodisc and in-depth study of the coupling processes within the magnetosphere, ionosphere and thermosphere. Aurora and radio emissions will be elucidated. JUICE will study the moons' interactions with the magnetosphere, gravitational coupling and long-term tidal evolution of the Galilean satellites. JUICE highly capable scientific payload includes 10 state-of-the-art instruments onboard the spacecraft plus one experiment that uses the spacecraft telecommunication system with ground-based radio telescopes. The remote sensing package includes a high-resolution multi-band visible imager (JANUS) and spectro-imaging capabilities from the

  9. Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE): Science Objectives, Mission and Instruments (abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurvits, L.; Plaut, J.J.; Barabash, S.; Bruzzone, L.; Dougherty, M.; Erd, C.; Fletcher, L.; Gladstone, R.; Grasset, O.; Hartogh, P.; Hussmann, H.; Iess, L.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Palumbo, P.; Piccioni, G...; Titov, D.; Wahlund, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    The JUpiter ICy Moons Explorer (JUICE) is a European Space Agency mission that will fly by and observe the Galilean satellites Europa, Ganymede and Callisto, characterize the Jovian system in a lengthy Jupiter-orbit phase, and ultimately orbit Ganymede for in-depth studies of habitability, evolution

  10. A Passive Probe for Subsurface Oceans and Liquid Water in Jupiter's Icy Moons

    CERN Document Server

    Romero-Wolf, Andrew; Maiwald, Frank; Heggy, Essam; Ries, Paul; Liewer, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    We describe an interferometric reflectometer method for passive detection of subsurface oceans and liquid water in Jovian icy moons using Jupiter's decametric radio emission (DAM). The DAM flux density exceeds 3,000 times the galactic background in the neighborhood of the Jovian icy moons, providing a signal that could be used for passive radio sounding. An instrument located between the icy moon and Jupiter could sample the DAM emission along with its echoes reflected in the ice layer of the target moon. Cross-correlating the direct emission with the echoes would provide a measurement of the ice shell thickness along with its dielectric properties. The interferometric reflectometer provides a simple solution to sub-Jovian radio sounding of ice shells that is complementary to ice penetrating radar measurements better suited to measurements in the anti-Jovian hemisphere that shadows Jupiter's strong decametric emission. The passive nature of this technique also serves as risk reduction in case of radar transmi...

  11. Power-Conversion Concept Designed for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lee S.

    2004-01-01

    The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) is a bold new mission being developed by NASA's Office of Space Science under Project Prometheus. JIMO is examining the potential of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) technology to efficiently deliver scientific payloads to three of Jupiter's moons: Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa. A critical element of the NEP spacecraft is the space reactor power system (SRPS), consisting of the nuclear reactor, power conversion, heat rejection, and power management and distribution (PMAD).

  12. An Overview of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) Mission, Environments, and Materials Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Dave

    2012-01-01

    Congress authorized NASA's Prometheus Project in February 2003, with the first Prometheus mission slated to explore the icy moons of Jupiter with the following main objectives: (1) Develop a nuclear reactor that would provide unprecedented levels of power and show that it could be processed safely and operated reliably in space for long-duration. (2) Explore the three icy moons of Jupiter -- Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa -- and return science data that would meet the scientific goals as set forth in the Decadal Survey Report of the National Academy of Sciences.

  13. A Low Frequency Radio and Radar Instrument to Explore Jupiter's Icy Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Plaut, J.; Bolton, S. J.; Farrell, W. M.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Zarka, P.; Lecacheux, A.; Bale, S. D.

    2003-01-01

    The addition of a comprehensive wave investigation to the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) science payload will provide a broad range of information on the icy moons of Jupiter including the detection of subsurface liquid oceans; mapping of their ionospheres; their interaction with the magnetospheric environment; and on the Jovian magnetosphere. These measurements are obtained through the use of both passive and active (sounding) means over broad frequency ranges. The frequency range of interest extends from less than 1 Hz to 40 MHz for passive measurements, from approximately 1 kHz to a few MHz for magnetospheric and ionospheric sounding, and between 1 and approximately 10 MHz for subsurface radar sounding. An instrument to detect subsurface radar sounding, magnetospheric interactions, and ionospheric sounding is discussed.

  14. Experimental study of surface erosion processes of the icy moons of Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Galli, A; Wurz, P; Jost, B; Scheer, J A; Vorburger, A; Tulej, M; Thomas, N; Wieser, M; Barabash, S

    2015-01-01

    We use an existing laboratory facility for space hardware calibration in vacuum to study the impact of energetic ions on water ice. The experiment is intended to simulate the conditions on the surface of Jupiter's icy moons. We present first results of ion sputtering in a sample of porous ice, including the first experimental results for sulphur ion sputtering of ice. The results confirm theoretical predictions and extrapolations from previous sputtering experiments obtained at different impact angles for non-porous water ice.

  15. Electrodynamic tethers for exploration of Jupiter and its icy moons

    OpenAIRE

    Sanmartín Losada, Juan Ramón

    2006-01-01

    Use of electrodynamic bare tethers in exploring the Jovian system by tapping its rotational energy for power and propulsion is studied. The position of perijove and apojove in elliptical orbits, relative to the synchronous orbit at 2.24 times Jupiter’s radius, is exploited to conveniently make the induced Lorentz force to be drag or thrust, while generating power, and navigating the system. Capture and evolution to a low elliptical orbit near Jupiter, and capture into low circular orbits at m...

  16. New Evidence Suggests Ocean on Icy Jupiter Moon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lisa; Richwine; 鲁见馨

    2000-01-01

    人类是孤独的,遥望夜空,星汉灿烂!然而,茫茫宇宙,只有地球,是一个生机勃勃、各种生命繁衍不息的星球。Jupiter(木星)有一颗卫星,叫Europa(木卫二),其体积与地球相仿。从Galileo spacecraft传回的信息发现:the presence of water in liquid form on Europa。虽然。科学家们尚不明白whether the water was frozen or in liquid form,但是,他们已经展开了想象的双翅: Even though it is buried beneath a thick layer of ice, life forms could draw energy from heat sources below, just asdeep-sea creatures do in the Earth’s oceans. 除了驰骋想象之外,美国国家航空和航天局在“囊中羞涩”之时,仍然决定:to send another spacecraft there!】

  17. Cosmic ion bombardment of the icy moons of Jupiter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strazzulla, G., E-mail: gianni@oact.inaf.i [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2011-05-01

    A large number of experiments have been performed in many laboratories in the world with the aim to investigate the physico-chemical effects induced by fast ions irradiating astrophysical relevant materials. The laboratory in Catania (Italy) has given a contribution to some experimental works. In this paper I review the results of two class of experiments performed by the Catania group, namely implantation of reactive (H{sup +}, C{sup +}, N{sup +}, O{sup +} and S{sup +}) ions in ices and the ion irradiation induced synthesis of molecules at the interface between water ice and carbonaceous or sulfurous solid materials. The results, discussed in the light of some questions concerning the surfaces of the Galilean moons, contribute to understand whether minor molecular species (CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, etc.) observed on those objects are endogenic i.e. native from the satellite or are produced by exogenic processes, such as ion implantation. The results indicate that: - C-ion implantation is not the dominant formation mechanism of CO{sub 2} on Europa, Ganimede and Callisto. - Implantation of sulfur ions into water ice produces hydrated sulfuric acid with high efficiency such to give a very important contribution to the sulfur cycle on the surface of Europa and other satellites. - Implantation of protons into carbon dioxide produces some species containing the projectile (H{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and O-H in poly-water). - Implantation of protons into sulfur dioxide produces SO{sub 3}, polymers, and O{sub 3} but not H-S bonds. - Water ice has been deposited on refractory carbonaceous materials: a general finding is the formation of a noteworthy quantity of CO{sub 2}. We suggest that this is the primary mechanism to explain the presence of carbon dioxide on the surfaces of the Galilean satellites. -Water ice has been deposited on refractory sulfurous materials originating from SO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S irradiation. No evidence for an efficient synthesis of SO{sub 2

  18. Feasibility Study of Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter Permanent Magnet Alternator Start Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Barbara H.; Tokars, Roger P.

    2006-01-01

    The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission was a proposed, (recently cancelled) long duration science mission to study three moons of Jupiter: Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa. One design of the JIMO spacecraft used a nuclear heat source in conjunction with a Brayton rotating machine to generate electrical power for the electric thrusters and the spacecraft bus. The basic operation of the closed cycle Brayton system was as follows. The working fluid, a heliumxenon gas mixture, first entered a compressor, then went through a recuperator and hot-side heat exchanger, then expanded across a turbine that drove an alternator, then entered the cold-side of the recuperator and heat exchanger and finally returned to the compressor. The spacecraft was to be launched with the Brayton system off-line and the nuclear reactor shut down. Once the system was started, the helium-xenon gas would be circulated into the heat exchangers as the nuclear reactors were activated. Initially, the alternator unit would operate as a motor so as to drive the turbine and compressor to get the cycle started. This report investigated the feasibility of the start up sequence of a permanent magnet (PM) machine, similar in operation to the alternator unit, without any position or speed feedback sensors ("sensorless") and with a variable load torque. It is found that the permanent magnet machine can start with sensorless control and a load torque of up to 30 percent of the rated value.

  19. High-Power Radar Sounders for the Investigation of Jupiter Icy Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaeinili, A.; Ostro, S.; Rodriquez, E.; Blankenship, D.; Kurth, W.; Kirchner, D.

    2005-01-01

    The high power and high data rate capability made available by a Prometheus class spacecraft could significantly enhance our ability to probe the subsurface of the planets/moons and asteroid/comets. The main technology development driver for our radar is the proposed Jupiter Icy Moon Orbiter (or JIMO) mission due to its harsh radiation environment. We plan to develop a dual-band radar at 5 and 50 MHz in response to the two major science requirements identified by the JIMO Science Definition Team: studying the near subsurface (less than 2 km) at high resolution and detection of the ice/ocean interface for Europa (depth up to 30 km). The 50-MHz band is necessary to provide high spatial resolution (footprint and depth) as required by the JIMO mission science requirements as currently defined. Our preliminary assessment indicates that the 50-MHz system is not required to be as high-power as the 5-MHz system since it will be more limited by the surface clutter than the Jupiter or galactic background noise. The low frequency band (e.g. 5 MHz), which is the focus of this effort, would be necessary to mitigate the performance risks posed by the unknown subsurface structure both in terms of unknown attenuation due to volumetric scattering and also the detection of the interface through the attenuative transition region at the ice/ocean interface. Additionally, the 5-MHz band is less affected by the surface roughness that can cause loss of coherence and clutter noise. However, since the Signal-to-Noise-Ratio (SNR) of the 5-MHz radar band is reduced due to Jupiter noise when operating in the Jupiter side of the moon, it is necessary to increase the radiated power. Our challenge is to design a high-power HF radar that can hnction in Jupiter's high radiation environment, yet be able to fit into spacecraft resource constraints such as mass and thermal limits. Our effort to develop the JIMO radar sounder will rely on our team's experience with planetary radar sounder design

  20. Compositional Impact of Io Volcanic Emissions on Jupiter's Magnetosphere and the Icy Galilean Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John; Fegley, Bruce; Lipatov, Alexander; Richardson, John; Sittler, Edward

    2011-01-01

    measured throughout the jovian magnetosphere and in the local moon environments can act as tracers if we know from direct measurements and models the distributions at the mostly likely sources, i.e. at IO. However, our knowledge of these abundances are very limited from earlier in-situ and remote measurements, mainly confined to major (S, O) and some minor (Na, K, Cl) species with abundances at or above a few percent relative to O. Future in-situ plasma measurements by the planned Jupiter Europa Orbiter and Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter missions should extend the abundance coverage to minor and even trace elemental species. For Europa astrobiological investigations it is also important to specify iogenic inputs and surface processing of isotopic species. We discuss the range of abundance distributions arising from models for IO hot volcanic emissions, and from the subsequent dynamics of ion injection, magnetospheric transport, and icy moon surface bombardment.

  1. JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE): An ESA mission to orbit Ganymede and to characterise the Jupiter system

    OpenAIRE

    Grasset, O.; Dougherty, K; Coustenis, A.; Bunce, J; Erd, C.; Titov, D.; Blanc, M.; Coates, A; Drossart, P.; Fletcher, N; Hussmann, H.; Jaumann, R.; N. Krupp; Lebreton, P; O. Prieto-Ballesteros

    2013-01-01

    Past exploration of Jupiter's diverse satellite system has forever changed our understanding of the unique environments to be found around gas giants, both in our solar system and beyond. The detailed investigation of three of Jupiter's Galilean satellites (Ganymede, Europa, and Callisto), which are believed to harbour subsurface water oceans, is central to elucidating the conditions for habitability of icy worlds in planetary systems in general. The study of the Jupiter system and the possib...

  2. Moons around Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) took this photo of Jupiter at 20:42:01 UTC on January 9, 2007, when the spacecraft was 80 million kilometers (49.6 million miles) from the giant planet. The volcanic moon Io is to the left of the planet; the shadow of the icy moon Ganymede moves across Jupiter's northern hemisphere. Ganymede's average orbit distance from Jupiter is about 1 million kilometers (620,000 miles); Io's is 422,000 kilometers (262,000 miles). Both Io and Ganymede are larger than Earth's moon; Ganymede is larger than the planet Mercury.

  3. Main Power Distribution Unit for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Melissa R.

    2004-01-01

    Around the year 2011, the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) will be launched and on its way to orbit three of Jupiter s planet-sized moons. The mission goals for the JIMO project revolve heavily around gathering scientific data concerning ingredients we, as humans, consider essential: water, energy and necessary chemical elements. The JIM0 is an ambitious mission which will implore propulsion from an ION thruster powered by a nuclear fission reactor. Glenn Research Center is responsible for the development of the dynamic power conversion, power management and distribution, heat rejection and ION thrusters. The first test phase for the JIM0 program concerns the High Power AC Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) Test Bed. The goal of this testing is to support electrical performance verification of the power systems. The test bed will incorporate a 2kW Brayton Rotating Unit (BRU) to simulate the nuclear reactor as well as two ION thrusters. The first module of the PMAD Test Bed to be designed is the Main Power Distribution Unit (MPDU) which relays the power input to the various propulsion systems and scientific instruments. The MPDU involves circuitry design as well as mechanical design to determine the placement of the components. The MPDU consists of fourteen relays of four different variations used to convert the input power into the appropriate power output. The three phase system uses 400 Vo1ts(sub L-L) rms at 1000 Hertz. The power is relayed through the circuit and distributed to the scientific instruments, the ION thrusters and other controlled systems. The mechanical design requires the components to be positioned for easy electrical wiring as well as allowing adequate room for the main buss bars, individual circuit boards connected to each component and power supplies. To accomplish creating a suitable design, AutoCAD was used as a drafting tool. By showing a visual layout of the components, it is easy to see where there is extra room or where the

  4. Status of the Ganymede Laser Altimeter (GALA) for ESA's Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussmann, Hauke; Luedicke, Fabian

    2017-04-01

    The Ganymede Laser Altimeter (GALA) is one of the instruments selected for ESA's Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE). A fundamental goal of any exploratory space mission is to characterize and measure the shape, topography, and rotation of the target bodies. A state of the art tool for this task is laser altimetry because it can provide absolute topographic height and position with respect to a body centered reference system. With respect to Ganymede, the GALA instrument aims at mapping of global, regional and local topography; confirming the global subsurface ocean and further characterization of the water-ice/liquid shell by monitoring the dynamic response of the ice shell to tidal forces; providing constraints on the forced physical librations and spin-axis obliquity; determining Ganymede's shape; obtaining detailed topographic profiles across the linear features of grooved terrain, impact structures, possible cryo-volcanic features and other different surface units; providing information about slope, roughness and albedo (at 1064nm) of Ganymede's surface. After several flyby's (Ganymede, Europa, Callisto) it is scheduled that the JUICE orbiter will enter first into an elliptical orbit (200 km x 10.000 km) for around 150 days and then into a circular orbit (500 km) around Ganymede for 130 days. Accordingly to the different orbits and trajectories, distances to the moons respectively, the spot size of the GALA laser varies between 21 m and 140 m. GALA uses the direct-detection (classical) approach of laser altimetry. Laser pulses are emitted at a wavelength of 1064 nm by using an actively Q-switched Nd:Yag laser. The pulse energy and pulse repetition frequency are 17 mJ at 30 Hz (nominal), respectively. For targeted observations and flybys the frequency can be switched to 50 Hz. The emission time of each pulse is measured by the detector. The beam is reflected from the surface and received at a 25 cm diameter telescope. The returning laser pulse is refocused onto

  5. Radio Science Concepts for Exploring the Interior Structures of Jupiter's Icy Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmar, S. W.; Anderson, J. D.; Castillo, J. C.; Folkner, W. M.; Konopliv, A. S.; Marouf, E. A.; Rappaport, N. J.; Schubert, G.; Spilker, T. R.; Tyler, G. L.; Watkins, M. M.; Yoder, C. F.

    2003-12-01

    A set of concepts are proposed for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) to apply Radio Science tools to investigate the interior structures of the Galilean Satellites and address key questions on their thermal and dynamical evolution. Multi-frequency Doppler tracking and ranging of the orbiter can be used to measure the gravity harmonic coefficients of the satellites as well as their secular and dynamic potential Love numbers. These measurements will confirm the presence of a subsurface ocean and constrain the oceanic density. Under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium, the core's size and density will be determined. The potential tidal phase lag, a function of the viscosity profile, will be determined or limited for each body. Altimetry data produce local topography and topographic harmonic coefficients as well as the topographic Love number. Combining the gravity and topography data will determine the mean as well as the spatial variations of the crustal thickness and produce a model of the cryospheric structure. This knowledge leads to understanding the mechanisms of topographic support or compensation and any large-scale geomorphological features related to the interior. Accelerometers measure the non-gravitational forces acting on the spacecraft, a typical systematic noise type in the gravity data and, thus, improve the accuracy of the measurement. Gradiometers improve the resolution of the data by providing higher spatial resolution in the gravity field and its correlation with the topography. The resulting information will be crucial to establishing the link between surface and internal dynamics leading to identifying the terrain with easiest ocean access and to understanding the origin of the chaotic terrains and ridges. Time observations of surface features enable an examination of the difference between the obliquity and inclination which, when combined with the gravity data, provide a measurement of the moments of inertia. High stability coherent

  6. Development of radiative transfer code for JUICE/SWI mission toward the atmosphere of icy moons of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takayoshi; Kasai, Yasuko; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2016-07-01

    The Submillimeter Wave Instrument (SWI) is one of the scientific instruments on the JUpiter Icy moon Explorer (JUICE). We plan to observe atmospheric compositions including water vapor and its isotopomers in Galilean moons (Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto). The frequency windows of SWI are 530 to 625 GHz and 1080 to 1275 GHz with 100 kHz spectral resolution. We are developing a radiative transfer code in Japan with line-by-line method for Ganymede atmosphere in THz region (0 - 3 THz). Molecular line parameters (line intensity and partition function) were taken from JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) catalogue. The pencil beam was assumed to calculate a spectrum of H _{2}O and CO in rotational transitions at the THz region. We performed comparisons between our model and ARTS (Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator). The difference were less than 10% and 5% for H _{2}O and CO, respectively, under the condition of the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). Comparison with several models with non-LTE assumption will be presented.

  7. Exploring Jupiter's icy moons with old techniques and big facilities - new insights on sulfuric acid hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard-Casely, H. E.; Avdeev, M.; Brand, H.; Wallwork, K.

    2013-12-01

    Sulfuric acid hydrates have been proposed to be abundant on the surface of Europa [1], and hence would be important planetary forming materials for this moon and its companions Ganymede and Callisto. Understanding of the surface features and subsurface of these moons could be advanced by firmer knowledge of the icy materials that comprise them [2], insight into which can be drawn from firmer knowledge of physical properties and phase behaviour of the candidate materials. We wish to present results from a study that started with the question ';What form of sulfuric acid hydrate would form on the surface of Europa'. The intrinsic hydrogen-domination of planetary ices, makes studying these materials with laboratory powder diffraction very challenging. Insights into their crystalline phase behavior and the extraction of a number of thermal and mechanical properties is often only accessible with high-flux synchrotron x-ray diffraction and utilization of the large scattering cross section with neutron diffraction. We have used the Powder Diffraction beamline at Australian synchrotron [4] and the Echidna (High-resolution neutron powder diffraction) instrument of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, [5] to obtain an number of new insights into the crystalline phases formed from sulfruic acid and water mixtures. These instruments have enabled the discovery a new water-rich sulfuric acid hydrate form [6], improved structural characterisation of existing forms [7] and a charting the phase diagram of this fundamental binary system [8]. This has revealed exciting potential for understanding more about the surface of Europa from space, perhaps even providing a window into its past. [1] Carlson, R.W., R.E. Johnson, and M.S. Anderson, Science, 1999. 286(5437): p. 97-99. [2] Fortes, A.D. and M. Choukroun. Space Sci Rev, 2010. 153(1-4): p. 185-218. [3] Blake, D., et al., Space Sci Rev,, 2012. 170(1-4): p. 341-399. [4] Wallwork, K.S., Kennedy B. J. and Wang, D

  8. Jupiter's Moons: Family Portrait

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This montage shows the best views of Jupiter's four large and diverse 'Galilean' satellites as seen by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on the New Horizons spacecraft during its flyby of Jupiter in late February 2007. The four moons are, from left to right: Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. The images have been scaled to represent the true relative sizes of the four moons and are arranged in their order from Jupiter. Io, 3,640 kilometers (2,260 miles) in diameter, was imaged at 03:50 Universal Time on February 28 from a range of 2.7 million kilometers (1.7 million miles). The original image scale was 13 kilometers per pixel, and the image is centered at Io coordinates 6 degrees south, 22 degrees west. Io is notable for its active volcanism, which New Horizons has studied extensively. Europa, 3,120 kilometers (1,938 miles) in diameter, was imaged at 01:28 Universal Time on February 28 from a range of 3 million kilometers (1.8 million miles). The original image scale was 15 kilometers per pixel, and the image is centered at Europa coordinates 6 degrees south, 347 degrees west. Europa's smooth, icy surface likely conceals an ocean of liquid water. New Horizons obtained data on Europa's surface composition and imaged subtle surface features, and analysis of these data may provide new information about the ocean and the icy shell that covers it. New Horizons spied Ganymede, 5,262 kilometers (3,268 miles) in diameter, at 10:01 Universal Time on February 27 from 3.5 million kilometers (2.2 million miles) away. The original scale was 17 kilometers per pixel, and the image is centered at Ganymede coordinates 6 degrees south, 38 degrees west. Ganymede, the largest moon in the solar system, has a dirty ice surface cut by fractures and peppered by impact craters. New Horizons' infrared observations may provide insight into the composition of the moon's surface and interior. Callisto, 4,820 kilometers (2,995 miles) in diameter, was imaged at 03:50 Universal Time on

  9. X-MIME: An Imaging X-ray Spectrometer for Detailed Study of Jupiter's Icy Moons and the Planet's X-ray Aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, R. F.; Ramsey, B. D.; Waite, J. H.; Rehak, P.; Johnson, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Swartz, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    Remote observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the XMM-Newton Observatory have shown that the Jovian system is a source of x-rays with a rich and complicated structure. The planet's polar auroral zones and its disk are powerful sources of x-ray emission. Chandra observations revealed x-ray emission from the Io Plasma Torus and from the Galilean moons Io, Europa, and possibly Ganymede. The emission from these moons is certainly due to bombardment of their surfaces of highly energetic protons, oxygen and sulfur ions from the region near the Torus exciting atoms in their surfaces and leading to fluorescent x-ray emission lines. Although the x-ray emission from the Galilean moons is faint when observed from Earth orbit, an imaging x-ray spectrometer in orbit around these moons, operating at 200 eV and above with 150 eV energy resolution, would provide a detailed mapping (down to 40 m spatial resolution) of the elemental composition in their surfaces. Such maps would provide important constraints on formation and evolution scenarios for the surfaces of these moons. Here we describe the characteristics of X-MIME, an imaging x-ray spectrometer under going a feasibility study for the JIMO mission, with the ultimate goal of providing unprecedented x-ray studies of the elemental composition of the surfaces of Jupiter's icy moons and Io, as well as of Jupiter's auroral x-ray emission.

  10. Early development of Science Opportunity Analysis tools for the Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE) mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardesin Moinelo, Alejandro; Vallat, Claire; Altobelli, Nicolas; Frew, David; Llorente, Rosario; Costa, Marc; Almeida, Miguel; Witasse, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    JUICE is the first large mission in the framework of ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 program. JUICE will survey the Jovian system with a special focus on three of the Galilean Moons: Europa, Ganymede and Callisto.The mission has recently been adopted and big efforts are being made by the Science Operations Center (SOC) at the European Space and Astronomy Centre (ESAC) in Madrid for the development of tools to provide the necessary support to the Science Working Team (SWT) for science opportunity analysis and early assessment of science operation scenarios. This contribution will outline some of the tools being developed within ESA and in collaboration with the Navigation and Ancillary Information Facility (NAIF) at JPL.The Mission Analysis and Payload Planning Support (MAPPS) is developed by ESA and has been used by most of ESA's planetary missions to generate and validate science observation timelines for the simulation of payload and spacecraft operations. MAPPS has the capability to compute and display all the necessary geometrical information such as the distances, illumination angles and projected field-of-view of an imaging instrument on the surface of the given body and a preliminary setup is already in place for the early assessment of JUICE science operations.NAIF provides valuable SPICE support to the JUICE mission and several tools are being developed to compute and visualize science opportunities. In particular the WebGeoCalc and Cosmographia systems are provided by NAIF to compute time windows and create animations of the observation geometry available via traditional SPICE data files, such as planet orbits, spacecraft trajectory, spacecraft orientation, instrument field-of-view "cones" and instrument footprints. Other software tools are being developed by ESA and other collaborating partners to support the science opportunity analysis for all missions, like the SOLab (Science Operations Laboratory) or new interfaces for observation definitions and

  11. Traveling Wave Tube (TVT) RF Power Combining Demonstration for use in the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Joseph A.

    2004-01-01

    The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) is set to launch between the years 2012 and 2015. It will possibly utilize a nuclear reactor power source and ion engines as it travels to the moons of Jupiter. The nuclear reactor will produce hundreds of kilowatts of power for propulsion, communication and various scientific instruments. Hence, the RF amplification devices aboard will be able to operate at a higher power level and data rate. The initial plan for the communications system is for an output of 1000 watts of RF power, a data rate of at least 10 megabits a second, and a frequency of 32 GHz. A higher data rate would be ideal to fully utilize the instruments aboard JIMO. At NASA Glenn, one of our roles in the JIMO project is to demonstrate RF power combining using multiple traveling wave tubes (TWT). In order for the power of separate TWT s to be combined, the RF output waves from each must be in-phase and have the same amplitude. Since different tubes act differently, we had to characterize each tube using a Network Analyzer. We took frequency sweeps and power sweeps to characterize each tube to ensure that they will behave similarly under the same conditions. The 200 watt Dornier tubes had been optimized to run at a lower power level (120 watts) for their extensive use in the ACTS program, so we also had to experiment with adjusting the voltage settings on several internal components (helix, anode, collector) of the tubes to reach the full 200 watt potential. from the ACTS program. Phase shifters and power attenuators were placed in the waveguide circuit at the inputs to the tubes so that adjustments could be made individually to match them exactly. A magic tee was used to route and combine the amplified electromagnetic RF waves on the tube output side. The demonstration of 200 watts of combined power was successful with efficiencies greater than 90% over a 500 MHz bandwidth. The next step will be to demonstrate the use of three amplifiers using two magic tees by

  12. The Earth transiting the Sun as seen from Jupiter's moons: detection of an inverse Rossiter-McLaughlin effect produced by the Opposition Surge of the icy Europa

    CERN Document Server

    Molaro, Paolo; Monaco, Lorenzo; Zaggia, Simone; Lovis, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    We report on a multi-wavelength observational campaign which followed the Earth's transit on the Sun as seen from Jupiter on 5 Jan the 2014. Simultaneous observations of Jupiter's moons Europa and Ganymede obtained with HARPS from La Silla, Chile, and HARPS-N from La Palma, Canary Islands, were performed to measure the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect due to the Earth's passage using the same technique successfully adopted for the 2012 Venus Transit (Molaro et al 2013). The expected modulation in radial velocities was of about 20 cm/s but an anomalous drift as large as 38 m/s, i.e. more than two orders of magnitude higher and opposite in sign, was detected instead. The consistent behaviour of the two spectrographs rules out instrumental origin of the radial velocity drift and BiSON observations rule out the possible dependence on the Sun's magnetic activity. We suggest that this anomaly is produced by the Opposition Surge on Europa's icy surface, which amplifies the intensity of the solar radiation from a portion o...

  13. The Earth transiting the Sun as seen from Jupiter's moons: detection of an inverse Rossiter-McLaughlin effect produced by the opposition surge of the icy Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaro, P.; Barbieri, M.; Monaco, L.; Zaggia, S.; Lovis, C.

    2015-10-01

    We report on a multiwavelength observational campaign which followed the Earth's transit on the Sun as seen from Jupiter on 2014 January 2014. Simultaneous observations of Jupiter's moons Europa and Ganymede obtained with high accuracy radial velocity planetary searcher (HARPS) from La Silla, Chile and HARPS-N from La Palma, Canary Islands were performed to measure the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect due to the Earth's passage using the same technique successfully adopted for the 2012 Venus Transit. The expected modulation in radial velocities was of ≈20 cm s-1 but an anomalous drift as large as ≈38 m s-1, i.e. more than two orders of magnitude higher and opposite in sign, was detected instead. The consistent behaviour of the two spectrographs rules out instrumental origin of the radial velocity drift and Birmingham Solar Oscillations Network observations rule out the possible dependence on the Sun's magnetic activity. We suggest that this anomaly is produced by the opposition surge on Europa's icy surface, which amplifies the intensity of the solar radiation from a portion of the solar surface centred around the crossing Earth which can then be observed as a sort of inverse Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. in fact, a simplified model of this effect can explain in detail most features of the observed radial velocity anomalies, namely the extensions before and after the transit, the small differences between the two observatories and the presence of a secondary peak closer to Earth passage. This phenomenon, observed here for the first time, should be observed every time similar Earth alignments occur with rocky bodies without atmospheres. We predict that it should be observed again during the next conjunction of Earth and Jupiter in 2026.

  14. Jupiter's Hot, Mushy Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Jupiter's moon Io is the most volcanically active body in the Solar System. Observations by instruments on the Galileo spacecraft and on telescopes atop Mauna Kea in Hawai'i indicate that lava flows on Io are surprisingly hot, over 1200 oC and possibly as much as 1300 oC; a few areas might have lava flows as hot as 1500 oC. Such high temperatures imply that the lava flows are composed of rock that formed by a very large amount of melting of Io's mantle. This has led Laszlo Keszthelyi and Alfred S. McEwen of the University of Arizona and me to reawaken an old hypothesis that suggests that the interior of Io is a partially-molten mush of crystals and magma. The idea, which had fallen out of favor for a decade or two, explains high-temperature hot spots, mountains, calderas, and volcanic plains on Io. If correct, Io gives us an opportunity to study processes that operate in huge, global magma systems, which scientists believe were important during the early history of the Moon and Earth, and possibly other planetary bodies as well. Though far from proven, the idea that Io has a ocean of mushy magma beneath its crust can be tested with measurements by future spacecraft.

  15. The Jupitor icy moons orbiter project: The scientific rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creely, Ronald; Johnson, Torrence

    The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) is proposed by NASA as the next step in the exploration of the Jovian system following the successful Galileo project. JIMO would use nuclear-electric propulsion to deliver a highly capable scientific payload to Jupiter and go into orbit around Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, and to conduct investigations of the Jovian system. In early 2003, a NASA Science Definition Team (SDT) was appointed to develop the scientific rationale and priorities for JIMO. The SDT, co-chaired by T. Johnson and R. Greeley, consisted of 38 scientists representing the broad scientific potential afforded by JIMO.This article summarizes the principal findings of the SDT.

  16. The long-period librations of large synchronous icy moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yseboodt, Marie; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2014-11-01

    A moon in synchronous rotation has longitudinal librations because of its non-spherical mass distribution and its elliptical orbit around the planet. We study the long-period librations of the Galilean satellites and Titan and include deformation effects and the existence of a subsurface ocean. We take into account the fact that the orbit is not keplerian and has other periodicities than the main period of orbital motion around Jupiter or Saturn due to perturbations by the Sun, other planets and moons. An orbital theory is used to compute the orbital perturbations due to these other bodies. For Titan we also take into account the large atmospheric torque at the semi-annual period of Saturn around the Sun.We numerically evaluate the amplitude and phase of the long-period librations for many interior structure models of the icy moons constrained by the mass, radius and gravity field.

  17. Jupiter's moon Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows a special color reconstruction of one of the erupting volcanos on Io discovered by Voyager 1 during its encounter with Jupiter on the 4th and 5th of March. The picture was taken March 4 about 5:00 p.m. from a range of about half a million kilometers showing an eruption region on the horizon. This method of color analysis allows scientists to combine data from four pictures, taken in ultraviolet, blue, green and orange light. In this picture one can see the strong change in color of the erupting plume. The region that is brighter in ultraviolet light (blue in this image) is much more extensive than the denser, bright yellow region near the center of the eruption. Scientists will use data of this type to study the amount of gas and dust in the eruption and the size of dust particles. Preliminary analysis suggests that the bright ultraviolet part of the cloud may be due to scattered light from very fine particles (the same effect which makes smoke appear bluish).

  18. Two Moons Meet over Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This beautiful image of the crescents of volcanic Io and more sedate Europa was snapped by New Horizons' color Multispectral Visual Imaging Camera (MVIC) at 10:34 UT on March 2, 2007, about two days after New Horizons made its closest approach to Jupiter. The picture was one of a handful of the Jupiter system that New Horizons took primarily for their artistic, rather than scientific value. This particular scene was suggested by space enthusiast Richard Hendricks of Austin, Texas, in response to an Internet request by New Horizons scientists for evocative, artistic imaging opportunities at Jupiter. This image was taken from a range of 4.6 million kilometers (2.8 million miles) from Io and 3.8 million kilometers (2.4 million miles) from Europa. Although the moons appear close in this view, a gulf of 790,000 kilometers (490,000 miles) separates them. The night side of Io is illuminated here by light reflected from Jupiter, which is out of the frame to the right. Europa's night side is completely dark, in contrast to Io, because that side of Europa faces away from Jupiter. Here, Io steals the show with its beautiful display of volcanic activity. Three volcanic plumes are visible. Most conspicuous is the enormous 300-kilometer (190-mile) -high plume from the Tvashtar volcano at the 11 o'clock position on Io's disk. Two much smaller plumes are barely visible: one from the volcano Prometheus, at the 9 o'clock position on the edge of Io's disk, and one from the volcano Amirani, seen between Prometheus and Tvashtar along Io's terminator (the line dividing day and night). The plumes appear blue because of the scattering of light by tiny dust particles ejected by the volcanoes, similar to the blue appearance of smoke. In addition, the contrasting red glow of hot lava can be seen at the source of the Tvashtar plume. The images are centered at 1 degree north, 60 degrees west on Io, and 0 degrees north, 149 degrees west on Europa. The color in this image was generated using

  19. Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM): Exploration Of The Jovian System And Its Icy Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasset, Olivier; Pappalardo, R.; Greeley, R.; Blanc, M.; Dougherty, M.; Bunce, E.; Lebreton, J.; Prockter, L.; Senske, D.; EJSM Joint Science Definition Team

    2009-09-01

    The Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) would be an international mission with the overall theme of investigating the emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants. Its goals are to (1) Determine whether the Jupiter system harbors habitable worlds and (2) Characterize the processes that are operating within the Jupiter system. NASA and ESA have concluded a detailed joint study of a mission to Europa, Ganymede, and the Jupiter system with orbiters developed by NASA and ESA (future contributions by JAXA and Russia are also possible). The baseline EJSM architecture consists of two primary elements operating in the Jovian system: the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). JEO and JGO would execute an intricately choreographed exploration of the Jupiter System before settling into orbit around Europa and Ganymede, respectively. EJSM would directly address themes concerning the origin and evolution of satellite systems and water-rich environments in icy satellites. The potential habitability of the ocean-bearing moons Europa and Ganymede would be investigated, by characterizing the geophysical, compositional, geological, and external processes that affect these icy worlds. EJSM would also investigate Io and Callisto, Jupiter's atmosphere, and the Jovian magnetosphere. By understanding the Jupiter system and unraveling its history, the formation and evolution of gas giant planets and their satellites would be better known. Most important, EJSM would shed new light on the potential for the emergence of life in the celestial neighborhood and beyond. The EJSM architecture provides opportunities for coordinated synergistic observations by JEO and JGO of the Jupiter and Ganymede magnetospheres, the volcanoes and torus of Io, the atmosphere of Jupiter, and comparative planetology of icy satellites. Each spacecraft would conduct both synergistic dual-spacecraft investigations and "stand-alone” measurements.

  20. A passive low frequency instrument for radio wave sounding the subsurface oceans of the Jovian icy moons: An instrument concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartogh, P.; Ilyushin, Ya. A.

    2016-10-01

    Exploration of subsurface oceans on Jovian icy moons is a key issue of the icy moons' geology. Electromagnetic wave propagation is the only way to probe their icy mantles from the orbit. In the present paper, a principal concept of a passive interferometric instrument for deep sounding of the icy moons' crust is proposed. Its working principle is measuring and correlating Jupiter's radio wave emissions with reflections from the deep sub-surface of the icy moons. A number of the functional aspects of the proposed experiment are studied, in particular, impact of the wave scattering on the surface terrain on the instrument performance and digital sampling of the noisy signal. Results of the test of the laboratory prototype of the instrument are also presented in the paper.

  1. Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Penne, Barbra

    2017-01-01

    Our solar system's largest planet is huge enough that all of the system's other planets could fit inside it. Although Jupiter has been known since ancient times, scientists are still learning exciting new information about the planet and its satellites today. In fact, several of its moons are now believed to have oceans below their icy surfaces. Chapters focus on topics such as Jupiter's orbit and rotation, rings, atmosphere, and moons, as well as on the space missions that have helped us get a closer look at the planet and its moons over the past decades.

  2. Habitability potential of icy moons: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena; Encrenaz, Thérèse; Sohl, Frank; Hussmann, Hauke; Bampasidis, Georgios; Wagner, Frank; Raulin, François; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Lopes, Rosaly

    2014-05-01

    environments to look for biomarkers. Currently, for Titan and Enceladus, geophysical models try to explain the possible existence of an oceanic layer that decouples the mantle from the icy crust. If the silicate mantles of Eu-ropa and Ganymede and the liquid sources of Titan and Enceladus are geologically active as on Earth, giving rise to the equivalent of hydrothermal systems, the simultaneous presence of water, geodynamic interactions, chemical en-ergy sources and a diversity of key chemical elements may fulfill the basic conditions for habitability. Titan has been suggested to be a possible cryovolcanic world due to the presence of local complex volcanic-like geomorphol-ogy and the indications of surface albedo changes with time [7,8]. Such dynamic activity that would most probably include tidal heating, possible internal convection, and ice tectonics, is believed to be a pre-requisite of a habitable planetary body as it allows the recycling of minerals and potential nutrients and provides localized energy sources. In a recent study by Sohl et al. [2013], we have shown that tidal forces are a constant and significant source of inter-nal deformation on Titan and the interior liquid water ocean can be relatively warm for reasonable amounts of am-monia concentrations, thus completing the set of parameters needed for a truly habitable planetary body. Such habi-tability indications from bodies at distances of 10 AU, are essential discoveries brought to us by space exploration and which have recently revolutionized our perception of habitability in the solar system. In the solar system's neighborhood, such potential habitats can only be investigated with appropriate designed space missions, like JUICE-Laplace (JUpiter ICy moon Explorer) for Ganymede and Europa [9]. JUICE is an ESA mission to Jupiter and its icy moons, recently selected to launch in 2022. References: [1] Coustenis, A., Encrenaz, Th., in "Life Beyond Earth : the search for habitable worlds in the Universe

  3. Surface Irradiation of Jupiter's Moon Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, M.; Tenishev, V.; Combi, M. R.; Jia, X.; Hansen, K. C.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2010-12-01

    Jupiter’s moon Europa has a complex and tightly coupled interaction with the Jovian magnetosphere. Neutral gas of the moon’s exosphere is ionized and picked up by the corotating plasma that sweeps past Europa at a relative velocity of almost 100 km/s. This pick-up process alters the magnetic and electric field topology around Europa, which in turn affects the trajectories of the pick-up ions as well as the thermal and hot magnetospheric ions that hit the moon’s icy surface. In turn these surface-impinging ions are the responsible source for the sputtered neutral atmosphere, which itself is again crucial for the exospheric mass loading of the surrounding plasma. We use the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model BATSRUS to model the interaction of Europa with the Jovian magnetosphere. The model accounts for the exospheric mass loading, ion-neutral charge exchange, and ion-electron recombination [Kabin et al. (J. Geophys. Res., 104, A9, 19,983-19,992, 1999)]. The derived magnetic and electric fields are then used in our Test Particle Monte Carlo (TPMC) model to integrate individual particle trajectories under the influence of the Lorentz force. We take the measurements performed by Galileo’s Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) [Williams et al. (Sp. Sci. Rev. 60, 385-412, 1992) and Cooper et al. (Icarus 149, 133-159, 2001)] and the Plasma Analyzer (PLS) [Paterson et al. (J. Geophys. Res., 104, A10, 22,779-22,791, 1999)] as boundary conditions. Using a Monte Carlo technique allows to individually track ions in a wide energy range and to individually calculate their energy deposition on the moon’s surface. The sputtering yield is a function of incident particle type, energy, and mass. We use the measurements performed by Shi et al. (J. Geophys. Res., 100, E12, 26,387-26,395, 1995) to turn the modeled impinging ion flux into a neutral gas production rate at the surface. We will show preliminary results of this work with application to the missions to the Jupiter system

  4. The Radar for Icy Moon Exploration (RIME) on the JUICE Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzone, L.; Plaut, J.; Alberti, G.; Blankenship, D. D.; Bovolo, F.; Campbell, B. A.; Castelletti, D.; Gim, Y.; Ilisei, A. M.; Kofman, W. W.; Komatsu, G.; McKinnon, W. B.; Mitri, G.; Moussessian, A.; Notarnicola, C.; Orosei, R.; Patterson, G. W.; Pettinelli, E.; Plettemeier, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Radar for Icy Moon Exploration (RIME) is one of the main instruments included in the JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) ESA mission. It is a radar sounder designed for studying the subsurface geology and geophysics of Galilean icy moons (i.e., Ganymede, Europa and Callisto) and for detecting possible subsurface water. RIME is designed for penetration of the icy moons up to a depth of 9 km. Two main operation scenarios are foreseen for RIME: i) flyby observations of Europa, Ganymede and Callisto (from a distance of 1000 km to the closest approach of about 400 km); and ii) circular orbital observations around Ganymede at 500 km of altitude. According to these scenarios, RIME is designed to explore the icy shell of the Galilean icy satellites by characterizing the wide range of compositional, thermal, and structural variation found in the subsurface of these moons. RIME observations will profile the ice shells of the Galilean icy satellites with specific focus on Ganymede given the circular orbital phase. The acquired measures will provide geological context on hemispheric (thousands of km), regional (hundreds of km with multiple overlaps), and targeted (tens of km) scales appropriate for a variety of hypothesis tests. RIME will operate in a single frequency band, centred at 9 MHz. The frequency was selected as the result of extensive study of penetration capabilities, surface roughness of the moons, Jovian radio noise, antenna accommodation, and system design. The 9 MHz frequency provides penetration capabilities and mitigation of surface scattering (which can cause signal loss and clutter issues), at the expense of mapping coverage, as it is likely to obtain high SNR observations only on the anti-Jovian side of the target moons. The RIME antenna is a 16 m dipole. The chirp pulse bandwidth is up to 3 MHz, which provides vertical resolution of about 50 m in ice after side lobe weighting. RIME will also operate with 1 MHz bandwidth to reduce data volume when

  5. Himalia, a Small Moon of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Cassini spacecraft captured images of Himalia, the brightest of Jupiter's outer moons, on Dec. 19, 2000, from a distance of 4.4 million kilometers (2.7 million miles).This near-infrared image, with a resolution of about 27 kilometers (17 miles) per pixel, indicates that the side of Himalia facing the spacecraft is roughly 160 kilometers (100 miles) in the up-down direction. Himalia probably has a non-spherical shape. Scientists believe it is a body captured into orbit around Jupiter, most likely an irregularly shaped asteroid.In the main frame, an arrow indicates Himalia. North is up. The inset shows the little moon magnified by a factor of 10, plus a graphic indicating Himalia's size and the direction of lighting (with sunlight coming from the left). Cassini's pictures of Himalia were taken during a brief period when Cassini's attitude was stabilized by thrusters instead of by a steadier reaction-wheel system. No spacecraft or telescope had previously shown any of Jupiter's outer moons as more than a star-like single dot.Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  6. Absorption of trapped particles by Jupiter's moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, W. N.; Birmingham, T. J.; Mead, G. D.

    1974-01-01

    Inclusion of absorption effects of the four innermost moons in the radial transport equations for electrons and protons in Jupiter's magnetosphere. It is found that the phase space density n at 2 Jupiter radii for electrons with equatorial pitch angles less than 69 deg is reduced by a factor of 42,000 when lunar absorption is included in the calculation. For protons with equatorial pitch angles less than 69 deg the corresponding reduction factor is 2,300,000. The effect of the satellites becomes progressively weaker for both electrons and protons as equatorial pitch angles of 90 deg are approached, because the likelihood of impacting a satellite becomes progressively smaller. The large density decreases found at the orbits of Io, Europa, and Ganymede result in corresponding particle flux decreases that should be observed by spacecraft making particle measurements in Jupiter's magnetosphere. The characteristic signature of satellite absorption should be a downward-pointing vertex in the flux versus radius curve at the L value corresponding to each satellite.

  7. Radio Sounding Techniques for the Galilean Icy Moons and their Jovian Magnetospheric Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James L.; Markus, Thursten; Fung, Shing F.; Benson, Robert F.; Reinich, Bodo W.; Song, Paul; Gogineni, S. Prasad; Cooper, John F.; Taylor, William W. L.; Garcia, Leonard

    2004-01-01

    Radio sounding of the Earth's topside ionosphere and magnetosphere is a proven technique from geospace missions such as the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) and the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE). Application of this technique to Jupiter's icy moons and the surrounding Jovian magnetosphere will provide unique remote sensing observations of the plasma and magnetic field environments and the subsurface conductivities, of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. Spatial structures of ionospheric plasma above the surfaces of the moons vary in response to magnetic-field perturbations from (1) magnetospheric plasma flows, (2) ionospheric currents from ionization of sputtered surface material, and (3) induced electric currents in salty subsurface oceans and from the plasma flows and ionospheric currents themselves. Radio sounding from 3 kHz to 10 MHz can provide the global electron densities necessary for the extraction of the oceanic current signals and supplements in-situ plasma and magnetic field measurements. While radio sounding requires high transmitter power for subsurface sounding, little power is needed to probe the electron density and magnetic field intensity near the spacecraft. For subsurface sounding, reflections occur at changes in the dielectric index, e.g., at the interfaces between two different phases of water or between water and soil. Variations in sub-surface conductivity of the icy moons can be investigated by radio sounding in the frequency range from 10 MHz to 50 MHz, allowing the determination of the presence of density and solid-liquid phase boundaries associated with oceans and related structures in overlying ice crusts. The detection of subsurface oceans underneath the icy crusts of the Jovian moons is one of the primary objectives of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission. Preliminary modeling results show that return signals are clearly distinguishable be&een an ice crust with a thickness of

  8. Cassini finds an oxygen-carbon dioxide atmosphere at Saturn's icy moon Rhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teolis, B D; Jones, G H; Miles, P F; Tokar, R L; Magee, B A; Waite, J H; Roussos, E; Young, D T; Crary, F J; Coates, A J; Johnson, R E; Tseng, W-L; Baragiola, R A

    2010-12-24

    The flyby measurements of the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn's moon Rhea reveal a tenuous oxygen (O(2))-carbon dioxide (CO(2)) atmosphere. The atmosphere appears to be sustained by chemical decomposition of the surface water ice under irradiation from Saturn's magnetospheric plasma. This in situ detection of an oxidizing atmosphere is consistent with remote observations of other icy bodies, such as Jupiter's moons Europa and Ganymede, and suggestive of a reservoir of radiolytic O(2) locked within Rhea's ice. The presence of CO(2) suggests radiolysis reactions between surface oxidants and organics or sputtering and/or outgassing of CO(2) endogenic to Rhea's ice. Observations of outflowing positive and negative ions give evidence for pickup ionization as a major atmospheric loss mechanism.

  9. X-Ray Probes of Jupiter's Auroral Zones, Galilean Moons, and the Io Plasma Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, R. F.; Ramsey, B. D.; Swartz, D. A.; Rehak, P.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Cooper, J. F.; Johnson, R. E.

    2005-01-01

    Remote observations from the Earth orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory and the XMM-Newton Observatory have shown the the Jovian system is a rich and complex source of x-ray emission. The planet's auroral zones and its disk are powerful sources of x-ray emission, though with different origins. Chandra observations discovered x-ray emission from the Io plasma torus and from the Galilean moons Io, Europa, and possibly Ganymede. The emission from the moons is due to bombardment of their surfaces by highly energetic magnetospheric protons, and oxygen and sulfur ions, producing fluorescent x-ray emission lines from the elements in their surfaces against an intense background continuum. Although very faint when observed from Earth orbit, an imaging x-ray spectrometer in orbit around the icy Galilean moons would provide a detail mapping of the elemental composition in their surfaces. Here we review the results of Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of the Jovian system and describe the characteristics of X-MIME, an imaging x-ray spectrometer undergoing study for possible application to future missions to Jupiter such as JIMO. X-MIME has the ultimate goal of providing detailed high-resolution maps of the elemental abundances of the surfaces of Jupiter's icy moons and Io, as well as detailed study of the x-ray mission from the Io plasma torus, Jupiter's auroral zones, and the planetary disk.

  10. Unmasking Europa the search for life on Jupiter's ocean moon

    CERN Document Server

    Greenberg, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Jupiter's ice moon Europa is widely regarded as the most likely place to find extraterrestrial life. This book tells the engaging story of Europa, the oceanic moon. It features a large number of stunning images of the ocean moon's surface, clearly displaying the spectacular crack patterns, extensive rifts and ridges, and refrozen pools of exposed water filled with rafts of displaced ice. Coverage also features firsthand accounts of Galileo's mission to Jupiter and its moons. The book tells the rough and tumble inside story of a very human enterprise in science that lead to the discovery of a f

  11. Thermo-chemical Ice Penetrator for Icy Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenberg, J. W.; Lee, G.; Harpole, G.; Zamel, J.; Sen, B.; Ross, F.; Retherford, K. D.

    2016-12-01

    The ability to place sensors or to take samples below the ice surface enables a wide variety of potential scientific investigations. Penetrating an ice cap can be accomplished via a mechanical drill, laser drill, kinetic impactor, or heated penetrator. This poster reports on the development of technology for the latter most option, namely a self-heated probe driven by an exothermic chemical reaction: a Thermo-chemical ice penetrator (TChIP). Our penetrator design employs a eutectic mix of alkali metals that produce an exothermic reaction upon contact with an icy surface. This reaction increases once the ice starts melting, so no external power is required. This technology is inspired by a classified Cold-War era program developed at Northrop Grumman for the US Navy. Terrestrial demonstration of this technology took place in the Arctic; however, this device cannot be considered high TRL for application at the icy moons of the solar system due to the environmental differences between Earth's Arctic and the icy moons. These differences demand a TChIP design specific to these cold, low mass, airless worlds. It is expected that this model of TChIP performance will be complex, incorporating all of the forces on the penetrator, gravity, the thermo-chemistry at the interface between penetrator and ice, and multi-phase heat and mass transport, and hydrodynamics. Our initial efforts are aimed at the development of a validated set of tools and simulations to predict the performance of the penetrator for both the environment found on these icy moons and for a terrestrial environment. The purpose of the inclusion of the terrestrial environment is to aid in model validation. Once developed and validated, our models will allow us to design penetrators for a specific scientific application on a specific body. This poster discusses the range of scientific investigations that are enabled by TChIP. We also introduce the development plan to advance TChIP to the point where it can be

  12. Fitting Orbits to Jupiter's Moons with a Spreadsheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Describes how a spreadsheet is used to fit a circular orbit model to observations of Jupiter's moons made with a small telescope. Kepler's Third Law and the inverse square law of gravity are observed. (AIM)

  13. Radar glory from buried craters on icy moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshleman, Von R.

    1986-10-01

    Three ice-covered moons of Jupiter, in comparison with rocky planets and earth's moon, produce radar echoes of astounding strengths and bizarre polarizations. Scattering from buried craters can explain these and other anomalous properties of the echoes. The role of such craters is analogous to that of the water droplets that create the apparition known as 'the glory', the optically bright region surrounding an observer's shadow on a cloud. Both situations involve the electromagnetic phenomenon of total internal reflection at a dielectric interface, operating in a geometry that strongly favors exact backscattering. Dim surface craters are transformed into bright glory holes by being buried under somewhat denser material, thereby increasing the intensity of their echoes by factors of hundreds. The dielectric interface thus formed at the crater walls nicely accounts for the unusual polarizations of the echoes.

  14. High energy electron processing of icy regoliths on Saturn's moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaible, Micah; Johnson, Robert E.

    2015-11-01

    A unique space weathering phenomenon has been identified on several icy Saturnian moons. Cassini revealed anomalous lens shaped regions in both optical and thermal wavelengths, colloquially known as the 'PacMan' feature, which are centered on the leading hemispheres and approximately symmetric about the equators. In particular, the Cassini InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) measurements of thermal emission in the mid-IR showed that surface temperature variations during a diurnal cycle were smaller inside the anomalous regions. The locations of the anomalies were shown to closely match the expected deposition profile of high energy (~ MeV) electrons moving counter rotational to the moons, suggesting an energetic source to drive their formation. However, the mechanisms by which thermal conductivity enhancement occur lack quantitative comparison with theoretical and experimental results.Electron interactions with the grains can excite molecules, which, if near enough to an intergrain contact, can cause atoms or molecules to migrate into the contact region, thus increasing the contact volume or 'sintering' the grains. Sintering improves the thermal contact between grains, leading to increased effective thermal conductivity of the regolith. Equations previously developed to describe material behavior in nuclear reactor were used to estimate the timescale for the energetic electrons to increase the contact volume sufficiently to describe the enhanced thermal conductivity of the anomalous regions. In order to properly constrain the sintering calculations, the unique electron energy distribution measured in the vicinity of each of the moons was used in the calculations, and molecular dynamics simulations of excited electrons in water ice were carried out to determine the length scale for an average electron excitation or ionization event. This length scale determines the distance from the primary reaction at which electrons can still be mobilized to move into the contact region

  15. Polymerization of building blocks of life on Europa and other icy moons

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The outer solar system may provide a potential habitat for extraterrestrial life. Remote sensing data from the Galileo spacecraft suggest that the jovian icy moons, Europa, Ganymede, and possibly Callisto, may harbor liquid water oceans underneath their icy crusts. Although compositional information required for the discussion of habitability is limited because of significantly restricted observation data, organic molecules are ubiquitous in the universe. Recently, in-situ spacecraft measurements and experiments suggest that amino acids can be formed abiotically on interstellar ices and comets. These amino acids could be continuously delivered by meteorite or comet impacts to icy moons. Here, we show that polymerization of organic monomers, in particular amino acids and nucleotides, could proceed spontaneously in the cold environment of icy moons, in particular the Jovian icy moon Europa as a typical example, based on thermodynamic calculations, though kinetics of formation are not addressed. Observed surface...

  16. Iceless Icy Moons: Is the Nice Model In Trouble?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dones, Henry C. Luke; Levison, H. F.

    2012-05-01

    Nimmo and Korycansky (2012; henceforth NK12) stated that if the outer Solar System underwent a Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) in the Nice model, the mass striking the icy satellites at speeds up to tens of km/s would have vaporized so much ice that moons such as Mimas, Enceladus, and Miranda would have been devolatilized. NK12's possible explanations of this apparent discrepancy with observations include (1) the mass influx was a factor of 10 less than that in the Nice model; (2) the mass distribution of the impactors was top-heavy, so that luck might have saved some of the moons from suffering large, vapor-removing impacts; or (3) the inner moons formed after the LHB. NK12 calculated the mass influx onto the satellites from the lunar impact rate estimated by Gomes et al. (2005) and scaling factors calculated by Zahnle et al. (1998, 2003; also see Barr and Canup 2010). Production of vapor in hypervelocity impacts is calculated from Kraus et al. (2011). Our preliminary results show that there is about an order-of-magnitude uncertainty in the mass striking the satellites during the LHB, with NK12's estimate at the upper end of the range. We will discuss how the mass influx depends on the velocity and mass distributions of the impactors. The Nice model lives. We thank the NASA Lunar Science Institute (http://lunarscience.nasa.gov/) for support. Barr, A.C., Canup, R.M., Nature Geoscience 3, 164-167 (2010). Gomes, R., Levison, H.F., Tsiganis, K., Morbidelli, A., Nature 435, 466-469 (2005). Kraus, R.G., Senft, L.E., Stewart, S.T., Icarus 214, 724-738 (2011). Nimmo, F., Korycansky, D.G., Icarus, in press, http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0019103512000310 (2012). Zahnle, K., Dones, L., Levison, H.F., Icarus 136, 202-222 (1998). Zahnle, K., Schenk, P., Levison, H.F., Dones, L., Icarus 163, 263-289 (2003).

  17. Modeling the Neutral Gas and Plasma Environment of Jupiter's Moon Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Martin; Tenishev, Valeriy; Hansen, Kenneth; Jia, Xianzhe; Combi, Michael; Gombosi, Tamas

    Jupiter's moon Europa has a thin gravitationally bound neutral atmosphere, which is mostly created through sputtering of high-energy ions impacting on its icy surface. The interaction of Europa with the Jovian magnetosphere is simulated using the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model BATSRUS. We start from the model by Kabin et al. [JGR, Vol. 104, No. A9, (1999)], which accounts for the exospheric mass loading, ion-neutral charge exchange, and ion-electron recombination. The derived magnetic field topology and plasma speeds are used to calculate the Lorentz force for our test particle Monte Carlo model. We use this model to simulate Europa's plasma and neutral environment by tracking particles created on the moon's surface by sputtering or sublimation, through dissociation and/or ionization in the atmosphere, or entering the system from Jupiter's magnetosphere as high energy ions. Neutral particle trajectories are followed by solving the equation of motion in Europa's gravity field whereas the ion population is additionally subject to the Lorentz force. We will show preliminary results of this work with application to the missions to the Jupiter system currently under consideration by NASA (JEO) and ESA (JGO).

  18. Simon Marius vs. Galileo: Who First Saw Moons of Jupiter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Van Helden, Albert

    2016-10-01

    In his almanac for 1612 and book Mundus Iovalis of 1614, Simon Marius in Germany reported his discovery of moons around Jupiter, which he started writing down in late 1609 in the Julian calendar, which translated to 8 January 1610 in the Gregorian calendar in use by Galileo in Italy. Is Marius to be believed? Galileo certainly did not. But a Dutch jury of experts about three hundred years later reported that they validated the claim that Marius independently discovered the moons of Jupiter one day after Galileo first both saw and wrote down his discovery! There is no doubt that the names Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto came from Marius (to whom they were suggested by Kepler). See JMP's Journal for the History of Astronomy article, 46(2), 218-234 (2015).Marius wrote that he had been observing the moons around Jupiter since November 1609 (Julian), using a neighboring nobleman's telescope, which would mean that he actually saw the Jupiter satellites first (though publish or perish). Whether this feat was technically possible comes down to discussions of the capabilities of telescopes in the early 17th century.The quadricentennial of Marius's book was celebrated in Nuremberg with a symposium that is now in press in German with an English translation expected. One of us (AVH) has recently prepared a complete English translation of Marius's book, superseding the partial translation made 100 years ago. There is no evidence that, whether he saw what we now call the Galilean satellites first or not, Marius appreciated their cosmological significance the way that Galileo soon did. And Marius was certainly the first to publish tables of the moons of Jupiter.We thank the Chapin Library of Williams College and the Huntington Library for assistance with first editions of Marius's 1614 book, and we thank Pierre Leich of the Simon Marius Gesellschaft for his consultations.

  19. Detection of an oxygen atmosphere on Jupiter's moon Europa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, D T; Strobel, D F; Feldman, P D; McGrath, M A; Weaver, H A

    1995-02-23

    Europa, the second large satellite out from Jupiter, is roughly the size of Earth's Moon, but unlike the Moon, it has water ice on its surface. There have been suggestions that an oxygen atmosphere should accumulate around such a body, through reactions which break up the water molecules and form molecular hydrogen and oxygen. The lighter H2 molecules would escape from Europa relatively easily, leaving behind an atmosphere rich in oxygen. Here we report the detection of atomic oxygen emission from Europa, which we interpret as being produced by the simultaneous dissociation and excitation of atmospheric O2 by electrons from Jupiter's magnetosphere. Europa's molecular oxygen atmosphere is very tenuous, with a surface pressure about 10(-11) that of the Earth's atmosphere at sea level.

  20. Numerical investigation of mapping orbits about Jupiter's icy moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, John

    2005-01-01

    A proposed mission that would orbit Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa will require low altitude, high inclination orbits for gravity and surface mapping. This paper explores the dynamics of these orbits by direct propagation against an ephemeris model. Initial conditions within the context of a mapping mission's likely requirements are considered. The results complement the analytical studies and reveal additional dependencies.

  1. Hubble Provides Infrared View of Jupiter's Moon, Ring, and Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Probing Jupiter's atmosphere for the first time, the Hubble Space Telescope's new Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) provides a sharp glimpse of the planet's ring, moon, and high-altitude clouds.The presence of methane in Jupiter's hydrogen- and helium-rich atmosphere has allowed NICMOS to plumb Jupiter's atmosphere, revealing bands of high-altitude clouds. Visible light observations cannot provide a clear view of these high clouds because the underlying clouds reflect so much visible light that the higher level clouds are indistinguishable from the lower layer. The methane gas between the main cloud deck and the high clouds absorbs the reflected infrared light, allowing those clouds that are above most of the atmosphere to appear bright. Scientists will use NICMOS to study the high altitude portion of Jupiter's atmosphere to study clouds at lower levels. They will then analyze those images along with visible light information to compile a clearer picture of the planet's weather. Clouds at different levels tell unique stories. On Earth, for example, ice crystal (cirrus) clouds are found at high altitudes while water (cumulus) clouds are at lower levels.Besides showing details of the planet's high-altitude clouds, NICMOS also provides a clear view of the ring and the moon, Metis. Jupiter's ring plane, seen nearly edge-on, is visible as a faint line on the upper right portion of the NICMOS image. Metis can be seen in the ring plane (the bright circle on the ring's outer edge). The moon is 25 miles wide and about 80,000 miles from Jupiter.Because of the near-infrared camera's narrow field of view, this image is a mosaic constructed from three individual images taken Sept. 17, 1997. The color intensity was adjusted to accentuate the high-altitude clouds. The dark circle on the disk of Jupiter (center of image) is an artifact of the imaging system.This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the

  2. Natural radio emission of Jupiter as interferences for radar investigations of the icy satellites of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconi, B.; Hess, S.; Hérique, A.; Santovito, M. R.; Santos-Costa, D.; Zarka, P.; Alberti, G.; Blankenship, D.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Bruzzone, L.; Kofman, W.

    2012-02-01

    Radar instruments are part of the core payload of the two Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) spacecraft: NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) and ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). At this point of the project, several frequency bands are under study for radar, which ranges between 5 and 50 MHz. Part of this frequency range overlaps with that of the natural jovian radio emissions, which are very intense in the decametric range, below 40 MHz. Radio observations above 40 MHz are free of interferences, whereas below this threshold, careful observation strategies have to be investigated. We present a review of spectral intensity, variability and sources of these radio emissions. As the radio emissions are strongly beamed, it is possible to model the visibility of the radio emissions, as seen from the vicinity of Europa or Ganymede. We have investigated Io-related radio emissions as well as radio emissions related to the auroral oval. We also review the radiation belts synchrotron emission characteristics. We present radio sources visibility products (dynamic spectra and radio source location maps, on still frames or movies), which can be used for operation planning. This study clearly shows that a deep understanding of the natural radio emissions at Jupiter is necessary to prepare the future EJSM radar instrumentation. We show that this radio noise has to be taken into account very early in the observation planning and strategies for both JGO and JEO. We also point out possible synergies with RPW (Radio and Plasma Waves) instrumentations.

  3. High energy electron sintering of icy regoliths: Formation of the PacMan thermal anomalies on the icy Saturnian moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaible, M. J.; Johnson, R. E.; Zhigilei, L. V.; Piqueux, S.

    2017-03-01

    The so-called 'PacMan' features on the leading hemispheres of the icy Saturnian moons of Mimas, Tethys and Dione were initially identified as anomalous optical discolorations and subsequently shown to have greater thermal inertia than the surrounding regions. The shape of these regions matches calculated deposition contours of high energy plasma electrons moving opposite to the moon's orbital direction, thus suggesting that electron interactions with the grains produce the observed anomalies. Here, descriptions of radiation-induced diffusion processes are given, and various sintering models are considered to calculate the rate of increase in the contact volume between grains in an icy regolith. Estimates of the characteristic sintering timescale, i.e. the time necessary for the thermal inertia to increase from that measured outside the anomalous regions to that within, are given for each of the moons. Since interplanetary dust particle (IDP) impact gardening and E-ring grain infall would be expected to mix the regolith and obscure the effects of high energy electrons, sintering rates are compared to rough estimates of the impact-induced resurfacing rates. Estimates of the sintering timescale determined by extrapolating laboratory measurements are below ∼0.03 Myr, while the regolith renewal timescales are larger than ∼0.1 Myr, thus indicating that irradiation by the high energy electrons should be sufficient to form stable thermal anomalies. More detailed models developed for sintering of spherical grains are able to account for the radiation-induced anomalies on Mimas and Tethys only if the regoliths on those bodies are relatively compact and composed of small (≲ 5 μm) grains or grain aggregates, and/or the grains are highly non-spherical with surface defect densities in the inter-grain contact regions that are much higher than expected for crystalline water ice grains at thermal equilibrium. These results are consistent with regolith thermal conductivity

  4. MAJIS (Moons and Jupiter Imaging Spectrometer): the VIS-NIR imaging spectrometer of the JUICE mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Yves; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Dumesnil, Cydalise; Filacchione, Gianrico; Poulet, Francois; MAJIS Team

    2016-10-01

    MAJIS is the VIS-NIR imaging spectrometer of JUICE. This ambitious mission of ESA's « cosmic vision » program will investigate Jupiter and its system with a specific focus on Ganymede. After a tour of more than 3 years including 2 fly-bys of Europa and up to 20 flybys of Ganymede and Callisto, the end of the nominal mission will be dedicated to an orbital phase around Ganymede with 120 days in a near-circular, near-polar orbit at an altitude of 5000 km and 130 days in a circular near-polar orbit at an altitude of 500 km. MAJIS will adress 17 of the 19 primary science objectives of JUICE, investigating the surface and exosphere of the Galilean satellites (Ganymede during the orbital phase, Europa and Callisto during close flybys, Io from a minimum distance of 570,000 km), the atmosphere / exosphere of Jupiter, small satellites and rings, and their role as sources and sinks of particles in the Jupiter magnetosphere.The main technical characteristics are the following:Spectral range : 0.5 - 5.7 µm with two overlapping channels (VIS-NIR : 0.5 - 2.35 µm ; IR : 2.25 - 5.7 µm)Spatial resolution : 0.125 to 0.15 mradSpectral sampling (VIS-NIR channel) : 2.9 to 3.45 nmSpectral sampling (IR channel) : 5.4 to 6.45 nmThe spectral and spatial resolution will be finalized in october 2016 after the selection of the MAJIS detectors.Passive cooling will provide operating temperatures noise model will be larger than 100 over most of the spectral range except for high resolution observations of icy moons at low altitude due to limitations on the integration time even with motion compensation provided by a scanner and for exospheric observations due to intrinsic low signal levels.

  5. Remote Sensing of Icy Galilean Moon Surface and Atmospheric Composition Using Low Energy (1 eV-4 keV) Neutral Atom Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, M. R.; Sittler, E.; Chornay, D.; Cooper, J. F.; Coplan, M.; Johnson, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a low energy neutral atom imager suitable for composition measurements Europa and other icy Galilean moons in the Jovian magnetosphere. This instrument employs conversion surface technology and is sensitive to either neutrals converted to negative ions, neutrals converted to positive ions and the positive ions themselves depending on the power supply. On a mission such as the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO), two back-to-back sensors would be flown with separate power supplies fitted to the neutral atom and iodneutral atom sides. This will allow both remote imaging of 1 eV atmospheres, and in situ measurements of ions at similar energies in the moon ionospheres and Jovian magnetospheric plasma. The instrument provides composition measurements of the neutrals and ions that enter the spectrometer with a mass resolution dependent on the time-of-flight subsystem and capable of resolving molecules. The lower energy neutrals, up to tens of eV, arise from atoms and molecules sputtered off the moon surfaces and out of the moon atmospheres by impacts of more energetic (keV to MeV) ions from the magnetosphere. Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) models are used to convert measured neutral abundances to compositional distributions of primary and trace species in the sputtered surfaces and atmospheres. The escaping neutrals can also be detected as ions after photo- or plasma-ionization and pickup. Higher energy, keV neutrals come from charge exchange of magnetospheric ions in the moon atmospheres and provide information on atmospheric structure. At the jovicentric orbits of the icy moons the presence of toroidal gas clouds, as detected at Europa's orbit, provide M e r opportunities to analyze both the composition of neutrals and ions originating from the moon surfaces, and the characteristics of magnetospheric ions interacting with neutral cloud material. Charge exchange of low energy ions near the moons, and directional distributions of the resultant neutrals

  6. The Extremes of Volcanic Activity: Earth and Jupiter's Moon Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, L. L.; Lopes, R.

    2004-12-01

    Jupiter's moon Io is the solar system's most volcanically active body, and the only place that magmatic volcanic eruptions have been observed beyond Earth. One of the first images of Io obtained by NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft in 1979 shows a plume above one of its volcanoes. The NASA Voyager and Galileo spacecraft imaged many explosive eruptions of plumes and deposits - which travel hundreds of kilometers (farther than on the Earth or the Moon). Very hot lavas that are erupting from volcanic vents on Io may be similar to lavas that erupted on Earth billions of years ago. Understanding the physical processes driving volcanic eruptions is important for the understanding of terrestrial volcanoes, not only because of their potential hazards, but also as geologic resources, biologic environments, and for their role in shaping the surface of Earth and other planets. Volcanic eruptions are perhaps the most dramatic events on Earth, and are of intrinsic interest to students, youth, and adults. Topics involving volcanoes are a part of the national science education benchmarks for understanding the Earth's composition and structure for grades 6-8 (the process of creating landforms) and grades 9-12 (the effects of movement of crustal plates). Natural events on Earth coupled with exciting discoveries in space can serve to heighten the awareness of these phenomena and provide learning opportunities for real world applications of science. Educational applications for youth to compare volcanic activity on Io and Earth have been done through NASA-sponsored field trip workshops to places such as Yellowstone National Park (allowing educators to experience environments similar to those on other worlds), targeted classroom and hands-on activities, special interest books, and other resources. A sampling of such activities will be presented, and discussion invited on other related developmentally appropriate resources and activities.

  7. Mid-infrared spectroscopy to better characterize icy moon surface compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Cindy L.; Wray, James J.; Hand, Kevin P.; Poston, Michael; Carlson, Robert W.; Clark, Roger Nelson; Spencer, John R.; Jennings, Donald

    2016-10-01

    Previous spectroscopy work on icy moons has focused primarily on the visible and near-IR portion of the spectrum due to challenges presented by a low signal to noise ratio at the longer wavelengths. However, the mid-IR is the region of the strongest fundamental vibrations of many important types of molecules (e.g., organics) and has the potential to reveal unique compositional information [1]. We use the wealth of data that is now available from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) to average spectra over similar regions to improve the signal to noise, helping to reveal spectral features never before observed.Our initial work has already led to the detection and tentative laboratory identification of the first spectral features observed for any icy moon in the mid-IR [2]. On Iapetus' dark terrain, we found an emissivity feature at ~855 cm-1 and a possible doublet at 660 and 690 cm-1 that does not correspond to any known instrument artifacts. We attributed the 855 cm-1 feature to fine-grained silicates, similar to those found in dust on Mars and in meteorites, which are nearly featureless at shorter wavelengths [e.g., 3, 4]. Silicates on the dark terrains of Saturn's icy moons have been suspected for decades, but there have been no definitive detections until this work.We measured the vacuum, low temperature mid-IR spectra of various fine-grained powdered silicates, including Mg-rich serpentines, often present in meteorites. Some of these materials do have emissivity features near 855 cm-1 and exhibit a doublet. Presently, we are continuing to comb the CIRS icy moon database for spectral features (particularly focusing on the warmer surfaces in the Saturn system) and are performing further vacuum chamber measurements to experiment with more sample types and ice/sample mixtures to determine the impacts of changing conditions in the chamber on features. We are also working to understand how surface porosity and mixing with various darkening agents may

  8. Galilean Moons, Kepler's Third Law, and the Mass of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Simulations of physical systems are widely available online, with no cost, and are ready to be used in our classrooms. Such simulations offer an accessible tool that can be used for a range of interactive learning activities. The Jovian Moons Apple allows the user to track the position of Jupiter's four Galilean moons with a variety of…

  9. Technology for a Thermo-chemical Ice Penetrator for Icy Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenberg, Jonathan; Harpole, George; Zamel, James; Sen, Bashwar; Lee, Greg; Ross, Floyd; Retherford, Kurt D.

    2016-10-01

    The ability to place sensors or to take samples below the ice surface enables a wide variety of potential scientific investigations. Penetrating an ice cap can be accomplished via a mechanical drill, laser drill, kinetic impactor, or heated penetrator. This poster reports on the development of technology for the latter most option, namely a self-heated probe driven by an exothermic chemical reaction: a Thermo-chemical ice penetrator (TChIP). Our penetrator design employs a eutectic mix of alkali metals that produce an exothermic reaction upon contact with an icy surface. This reaction increases once the ice starts melting, so no external power is required. This technology is inspired by a classified Cold-War era program developed at Northrop Grumman for the US Navy. Terrestrial demonstration of this technology took place in the Arctic; however, this device cannot be considered high TRL for application at the icy moons of the solar system due to the environmental differences between Earth's Arctic and the icy moons. These differences demand a TChIP design specific to these cold, low mass, airless worlds. It is expected that this model of TChIP performance will be complex, incorporating all of the forces on the penetrator, gravity, the thermo-chemistry at the interface between penetrator and ice, and multi-phase heat and mass transport, and hydrodynamics. Our initial efforts are aimed at the development of a validated set of tools and simulations to predict the performance of the penetrator for both the environment found on these icy moons and for a terrestrial environment. The purpose of the inclusion of the terrestrial environment is to aid in model validation. Once developed and validated, our models will allow us to design penetrators for a specific scientific application on a specific body. This poster discusses the range of scientific investigations that are enabled by TChIP. We also introduce the development plan to advance TChIP to the point where it can be

  10. Tidal Heating in a Magma Ocean within Jupiter's Moon Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Robert H.; Henning, Wade G.; Hamilton, Christopher W.

    2015-06-01

    Active volcanism observed on Io is thought to be driven by the temporally periodic, spatially differential projection of Jupiter's gravitational field over the moon. Previous theoretical estimates of the tidal heat have all treated Io as essentially a solid, with fluids addressed only through adjustment of rheological parameters rather than through appropriate extension of the dynamics. These previous estimates of the tidal response and associated heat generation on Io are therefore incomplete and possibly erroneous because dynamical aspects of the fluid behavior are not permitted in the modeling approach. Here we address this by modeling the partial-melt asthenosphere as a global layer of fluid governed by the Laplace Tidal Equations. Solutions for the tidal response are then compared with solutions obtained following the traditional solid-material approach. It is found that the tidal heat in the solid can match that of the average observed heat flux (nominally 2.25 W m-2), though only over a very restricted range of plausible parameters, and that the distribution of the solid tidal heat flux cannot readily explain a longitudinal shift in the observed (inferred) low-latitude heat fluxes. The tidal heat in the fluid reaches that observed over a wider range of plausible parameters, and can also readily provide the longitudinal offset. Finally, expected feedbacks and coupling between the solid/fluid tides are discussed. Most broadly, the results suggest that both solid and fluid tidal-response estimates must be considered in exoplanet studies, particularly where orbital migration under tidal dissipation is addressed.

  11. Resonance locking as the source of rapid tidal migration in the Jupiter and Saturn moon systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, Jim; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-01-01

    The inner moons of Jupiter and Saturn migrate outwards due to tidal energy dissipation within the planets, the details of which remain poorly understood. We demonstrate that resonance locking between moons and internal oscillation modes of the planet can produce rapid tidal migration. Resonance locking arises due to the internal structural evolution of the planet and typically produces an outward migration rate comparable to the age of the solar system. Resonance locking predicts a similar migration timescale but a different effective tidal quality factor Q for each moon. It also predicts nearly constant migration timescales a function of semi-major axis, such that effective Q values were larger in the past. Recent measurements of Jupiter and Saturn's moon systems find effective Q values that are smaller than expected (and are different between moons), and which correspond to migration timescales of roughly 10 Gyr. If confirmed, the measurements are broadly consistent with resonance locking as the dominant so...

  12. Carbonic acid as a reserve of carbon dioxide on icy moons: The formation of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in a polar environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Brant M.; Kaiser, Ralf I. [W. M. Keck Research Laboratory in Astrochemistry, University of Hawai' i at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Strazzulla, Giovanni, E-mail: brantmj@hawaii.edu [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2014-06-20

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) has been detected on the surface of several icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn via observation of the ν{sub 3} band with the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Galileo spacecraft and the Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Cassini spacecraft. Interestingly, the CO{sub 2} band for several of these moons exhibits a blueshift along with a broader profile than that seen in laboratory studies and other astrophysical environments. As such, numerous attempts have been made in order to clarify this abnormal behavior; however, it currently lacks an acceptable physical or chemical explanation. We present a rather surprising result pertaining to the synthesis of carbon dioxide in a polar environment. Here, carbonic acid was synthesized in a water (H{sub 2}O)-carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) (1:5) ice mixture exposed to ionizing radiation in the form of 5 keV electrons. The irradiated ice mixture was then annealed, producing pure carbonic acid which was then subsequently irradiated, recycling water and carbon dioxide. However, the observed carbon dioxide ν{sub 3} band matches almost exactly with that observed on Callisto; subsequent temperature program desorption studies reveal that carbon dioxide synthesized under these conditions remains in solid form until 160 K, i.e., the sublimation temperature of water. Consequently, our results suggest that carbon dioxide on Callisto as well as other icy moons is indeed complexed with water rationalizing the shift in peak frequency, broad profile, and the solid state existence on these relatively warm moons.

  13. Heat transport in the high-pressure ice mantle of large icy moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choblet, G.; Tobie, G.; Sotin, C.; Kalousová, K.; Grasset, O.

    2017-03-01

    While the existence of a buried ocean sandwiched between surface ice and high-pressure (HP) polymorphs of ice emerges as the most plausible structure for the hundreds-of-kilometers thick hydrospheres within large icy moons of the Solar System (Ganymede, Callisto, Titan), little is known about the thermal structure of the deep HP ice mantle and its dynamics, possibly involving melt production and extraction. This has major implications for the thermal history of these objects as well as on the habitability of their ocean as the HP ice mantle is presumed to limit chemical transport from the rock component to the ocean. Here, we describe 3D spherical simulations of subsolidus thermal convection tailored to the specific structure of the HP ice mantle of large icy moons. Melt production is monitored and melt transport is simplified by assuming instantaneous extraction to the ocean above. The two controlling parameters for these models are the rheology of ice VI and the heat flux from the rock core. Reasonable end-members are considered for both parameters as disagreement remains on the former (especially the pressure effect on viscosity) and as the latter is expected to vary significantly during the moon's history. We show that the heat power produced by radioactive decay within the rock core is mainly transported through the HP ice mantle by melt extraction to the ocean, with most of the melt produced directly above the rock/water interface. While the average temperature in the bulk of the HP ice mantle is always relatively cool when compared to the value at the interface with the rock core (∼ 5 K above the value at the surface of the HP ice mantle), maximum temperatures at all depths are close to the melting point, often leading to the interconnection of a melt path via hot convective plume conduits throughout the HP ice mantle. Overall, we predict long periods of time during these moons' history where water generated in contact with the rock core is transported to

  14. Ionization chemistry in the H2O-dominant atmospheres of the icy moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shematovich, V. I.; Johnson, R. E.

    2007-08-01

    The main pathways of the ionization chemistry for pure H2O- and mixed H2O+O2+CO2+NH3+CH4 atmospheres which are representative for neutral and ionized atmospheres of the icy bodies in the Jovian and Saturnian systems are discussed. The gaseous envelopes of the icy moons of the giant planets are formed usually due to the surface radiolysis by the solar UV radiation and energetic magnetospheric plasma (Johnson, 1990). The standard astrochemical UMIST2005 (UDFA05) network is used to infer the main chemical pathways of ionization chemistry in the pure or with admixtures of other volatile molecules water vapor atmospheres. In case of the H2O- dominant atmosphere the parent H2O molecules are easily dissociated and ionized by the solar UVradiation and the energetic magnetospheric electrons. These impact processes result in the formation of the secondary neutral and ionized products - chemically active radicals O and OH, and H+, H2+, O+, OH+, and H2O+ ions. Secondary ions have admixture abundances in the H2O-dominant atmospheres, because they are efficiently transformed to H3O+ hydroxonium ions in the fast ion-molecular reactions. The major H3O+ hydroxonium ion does not chemically interact with other neutrals, and is destroyed in the dissociative recombination with thermal electrons mainly reproducing the chemically simple H, H2, O, and OH species. In case of the mixed H2O+O2-dominant atmosphere corresponding to the near-surface atmospheres of icy moons (Shematovich et al., 2005), the ionization chemistry results in the formation of the second major ion O2+ - because ion of molecular oxygen has the lower ionization potential comparing with other parent species -H2, H2O, CO2. The H+, O+, OH+, and H2O+ ions can be easily converted to O2+ ions through the ion-molecular reactions. In case of significant admixture of molecular hydrogen it is possible to transfer the O2+ ions to the O2H+ ions through the fast reaction with H2 and further to the H3O+ ions through the ion

  15. Between ice and gas: CO2 on the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbitts, C.

    2010-12-01

    CO2 exists in the surfaces of the icy Galilean and Saturnian satellites [1-6], yet despite its discovery over a decade ago on Ganymede, and five years ago on the Saturnian satellites, its nature is still debated [7]. On the Galilean satellites Callisto and Ganymede, the CO2 that is detected is bound to, or trapped within, the non-ice materials that prevent it from sublimating or otherwise escaping from the surface. On Europa, it resides within both the ice and nonice materials [8,9]. While greater abundances of CO2 may exist in the interiors of these moons, or small amounts may be continually created through particle bombardment of the surface, the observed CO2 is only a trace material, with a few hundred molecules responsible for the deepest absorption features and an estimated molar abundance of 0.1% [2; 10-12]. Yet its presence may provide essential clues to processes that shape the surfaces of the moon [13] and potentially key to understanding the composition of potential oceans in the subsurfaces. We continue measurements of the infrared properties associated with CO2 adsorbed onto nonice materials under pressures and at temperatures relevant to these icy satellites using bidirectional reflectance spectroscopy from ~ 1.5 to 5.5 μm. Previous measurements, using transmission spectroscopy, demonstrated both a compositional and a temperature dependence on the spectral signature of adsorbed CO2 [14]. Bidirectional spectroscopy enables detection of lower concentrations of adsorbate on fine-grained materials such as clays due to their large surface area to volume ratios and thus large surface areas that may be covered by adsorbate [15]. The effectiveness of transmission spectroscopy was also limited by the strong absorption of light within the pressed sample and its impermeability, which limited the coverage by adsorbate to the pellet’s outer surface. All measurements demonstrate that CO2 adsorbs onto montmorillonite clays, possibly due to its quadrupole moment

  16. Resonance locking as the source of rapid tidal migration in the Jupiter and Saturn moon systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Jim; Luan, Jing; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-10-01

    The inner moons of Jupiter and Saturn migrate outwards due to tidal energy dissipation within the planets, the details of which remain poorly understood. We demonstrate that resonance locking between moons and internal oscillations of the planet can produce rapid tidal migration. Resonance locking arises due to the structural evolution of the planet and typically produces an outward migration rate comparable to the age of the solar system. Resonance locking predicts a similar migration timescale but a different effective tidal quality factor Q governing the migration of each moon. It also predicts nearly constant migration timescales a function of semi-major axis, such that effective Q values were larger in the past. Recent measurements of Jupiter and Saturn's moon systems find effective Q values that are much smaller than expected (and are different between moons), and which correspond to migration timescales of ~10 Gyr. If confirmed, the measurements are broadly consistent with resonance locking as the dominant source of tidal dissipation in Jupiter and Saturn. Resonance locking also provides solutions to several problems posed by current measurements: it naturally explains the exceptionally small Q governing Rhea's migration, it allows the large heating rate of Enceladus to be achieved in an equilibrium eccentricity configuration, and it resolves evolutionary problems arising from present-day migration/heating rates.

  17. Crater Relaxation and Stereo Imaging of the Icy Satellites of Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, C. B.; Beyer, R. A.; Nimmo, F.; Roberts, J. H.; Robuchon, G.

    2010-12-01

    Crater relaxation has been used as a probe of subsurface temperature structure for over thirty years, both on terrestrial bodies and icy satellites. We are developing and testing two independent methods for processing stereo pairs to produce digital elevation models, to address how crater relaxation depends on crater diameter, geographic location, and stratigraphic position on the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. Our topographic profiles will then serve as input into two numerical models, one viscous and one viscoelastic, to allow us to probe the subsurface thermal profiles and relaxation histories of these satellites. We are constructing stereo topography from Galileo and Cassini image pairs using the NASA Ames Stereo Pipeline (Moratto et al. 2010), an automated stereogrammetry tool designed for processing planetary imagery captured from orbiting and landed robotic explorers on other planets. We will also be using the commercial program SOCET SET from BAE Systems (Miller and Walker 1993; 1995). Qualitatively, it is clear that there are large spatial variations in the degree of crater relaxation among Jupiter’s and Saturn’s satellites. However, our use of stereo topography will allow quantitative measures of crater relaxation (e.g. depth:diameter ratio or equivalent) to be derived. Such measures are essential to derive quantitative estimates of the heat fluxes responsible for this relaxation. Estimating how surface heat flux has varied with time provides critical constraints on satellite thermal (and orbital) evolution. Craters undergo viscous relaxation over time at a rate that depends on the temperature gradient and crater scale. We are investigating how the near-surface satellite heat flux varied in time and space, based on our crater relaxation observations. Once we have crater profiles from our DEMs, we use them as input to two theoretical approaches: a relatively simple (viscous) numerical model in which time-varying heat fluxes can be included, and

  18. I0-Jupiter system A unique case of Moon-Planet interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, A I

    2002-01-01

    Io and Jupiter constitute a moon-planet system that is unique in our solar system. Io is the most volcanically active planetary body, while Jupiter is the first among the planets in terms of size, mass, magnetic field strength, spin rate, and volume of the magnetosphere. That Io is electrodynamically linked to Jupiter is known for nearly four decades from the radio emissions. Io influences Jupiter by supplying heavy ions to its magnetosphere, which dominates its energetic and dynamics. Jupiter influences Io by tidally heating its interior, which in turn drives the volcanic activity on Io. The role of Io and Jupiter in their mutual interaction and the nature of their coupling were first elaborated in greater detail by the two Voyagers flybys in 1979. Subsequent exploration of this system by ground-based and Earth-satellite-borne observatories and by the Galileo orbiter mission has improved our understanding of the highly complex electrodynamical interaction between Io and Jupiter many fold. A distinct feature ...

  19. Physicochemical Requirements Inferred for Chemical Self-Organization Hardly Support an Emergence of Life in the Deep Oceans of Icy Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Robert

    2016-05-01

    An approach to the origin of life, focused on the property of entities capable of reproducing themselves far from equilibrium, has been developed recently. Independently, the possibility of the emergence of life in the hydrothermal systems possibly present in the deep oceans below the frozen crust of some of the moons of Jupiter and Saturn has been raised. The present report is aimed at investigating the mutual compatibility of these alternative views. In this approach, the habitability concept deduced from the limits of life on Earth is considered to be inappropriate with regard to emerging life due to the requirement for an energy source of sufficient potential (equivalent to the potential of visible light). For these icy moons, no driving force would have been present to assist the process of emergence, which would then have had to rely exclusively on highly improbable events, thereby making the presence of life unlikely on these Solar System bodies, that is, unless additional processes are introduced for feeding chemical systems undergoing a transition toward life and the early living organisms.

  20. Production of Oxidants by Ion Bombardment of Icy Moons in the Outer Solar System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Boduch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Our groups in Brazil, France and Italy have been active, among others in the world, in performing experiments on physical-chemical effects induced by fast ions colliding with solids (frozen gases, carbonaceous and organic materials, silicates, etc. of astrophysical interest. The used ions span a very large range of energies, from a few keV to hundreds MeV. Here we present a summary of the results obtained so far on the formation of oxidants (hydrogen peroxide and ozone after ion irradiation of frozen water, carbon dioxide and their mixtures. Irradiation of pure water ice produces hydrogen peroxide whatever is the used ion and at different temperatures. Irradiation of carbon dioxide and water frozen mixtures result in the production of molecules among which hydrogen peroxide and ozone. The experimental results are discussed in the light of the relevance they have to support the presence of an energy source for biosphere on Europa and other icy moons in the outer Solar System.

  1. An Impacting Descent Probe for Europa and the Other Galilean Moons of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurz, P.; Lasi, D.; Thomas, N.; Piazza, D.; Galli, A.; Jutzi, M.; Barabash, S.; Wieser, M.; Magnes, W.; Lammer, H.; Auster, U.; Gurvits, L. I.; Hajdas, W.

    2017-08-01

    We present a study of an impacting descent probe that increases the science return of spacecraft orbiting or passing an atmosphere-less planetary bodies of the solar system, such as the Galilean moons of Jupiter. The descent probe is a carry-on small spacecraft (return to a mission at a low extra level of complexity, engineering effort, and risk. This study builds upon earlier studies for a Callisto Descent Probe for the former Europa-Jupiter System Mission of ESA and NASA, and extends them with a detailed assessment of a descent probe designed to be an additional science payload for the NASA Europa Mission.

  2. Clump detections and limits on moons in Jupiter's ring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, Mark R; Cheng, Andrew F; Weaver, Harold A; Stern, S Alan; Spencer, John R; Throop, Henry B; Birath, Emma M; Rose, Debi; Moore, Jeffrey M

    2007-10-12

    The dusty jovian ring system must be replenished continuously from embedded source bodies. The New Horizons spacecraft has performed a comprehensive search for kilometer-sized moons within the system, which might have revealed the larger members of this population. No new moons were found, however, indicating a sharp cutoff in the population of jovian bodies smaller than 8-kilometer-radius Adrastea. However, the search revealed two families of clumps in the main ring: one close pair and one cluster of three to five. All orbit within a brighter ringlet just interior to Adrastea. Their properties are very different from those of the few other clumpy rings known; the origin and nonrandom distribution of these features remain unexplained, but resonant confinement by Metis may play a role.

  3. Derivation of the collision probability between orbiting objects The lifetimes of Jupiter's outer moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    A general form is derived for Opik's equations relating to the probability of collision between two orbiting objects to their orbital elements, and used to determine the collisional lifetime of the eight outer moons of Jupiter. The derivation is based on a concept of spatial density, or average number of objects found in a unit volume, and results in a set of equations that are easily applied to a variety of orbital collision problems. When applied to the outer satellites, which are all in irregular orbits, the equations predict a relatively long collisional lifetime for the four retrograde moons (about 270 billon years on the average) and a shorter time for the four posigrade moons (0.9 billion years). This short time is suggestive of a past collision history, and may account for the orbiting dust detected by Pioneers 10 and 11.

  4. Deconvolution of IRTF Observations of Jupiter's Moon Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernher, Hannah; Rathbun, Julie A.; Spencer, John R.

    2016-10-01

    Io is a active volcanic world with a heat output more than 40 times that of earth. While spacecraft have been used to study Io's volcanoes, their high level of variability requires Earth-based observations to reveal their eruptions in the absence of spacecraft data. Our nearly 20 years of observations from the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF) have been used to monitor volcanic eruptions on Io. Our observations allow us not only to better understand the eruption properties of Ionian volcanoes, but also how the volcanic eruptions affect the rest of the Jovian system, such as the Io plasma torus, sodium clouds, Jovian magnetosphere, and aurorae. While our Jupiter occultation lightcurves of an eclipsed Io have been the focus of this program, due to their ability to determine volcano brightnesses and 1D locations, those observations only allow us to measure volcanic eruptions on the sub-Jovian hemisphere. We also observe Io in reflected sunlight so that we can observe other longitudes on Io. But, brighter eruptions are required for us to be able to distinguish them above the reflected sunlight. We are able to increase the spatial resolution of these images of in order to detect and locate fainter hotspots. We have employed shift-and-add techniques using multiple short exposures to detect eruptions in the past (Rathbun and Spencer, 2010). We will report on the use of publically available deconvolution algorithms to further improve spatial resolution and hot spot detectability, using images of a standard star as our PSF, including experiments with performing the deconvolution both before and after shift and add. We will present results of observations from 2007 and 2013.

  5. The effect of viscosity on impact cratering and possible application to the icy satellites of Saturn and Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, J.; Gault, D.; Greeley, R.

    1984-01-01

    Impact experiments in Newtonian fluids with a range of viscosities of 0.001 to 60 Pa s demonstrate that transient crater volume and shape depend on target viscosity as well as on gravity. Volume is reduced, and depth-to-diameter ratio is increased for cratering events in which viscosity plays a dominant role. In addition to being affected by target kinematic viscosity, viscous scaling is most strongly influenced by projectile diameter, less strongly by projectile velocity, and least strongly by gravity. In a planetary context, viscous effects can occur for craters formed by small or slow moving impacting bodies, low planetary surface densities, high surface viscosities, and low gravity values; conditions all likely for certain impacts into the icy satellites of Saturn and Jupiter, especially if liquid mantles were still present beneath solid crusts. Age dating based on crater counts and size-frequency distributions for these icy bodies may have to be modified to account for the possibility that viscosity-dominated craters were initially smaller and deeper than their gravity-controlled counterparts.

  6. Development and Testing of a Laser-Powered Cryobot for Outer Planet Icy Moon Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, V.; Stone, W.; Hogan, B.; Lelievre, S.; Flesher, C.

    2013-12-01

    Project VALKYRIE (Very-deep Autonomous Laser-powered Kilowatt-class Yo-yoing Robotic Ice Explorer) is a NASA-funded effort to develop the first laser powered cryobot - a self-contained intelligent ice penetrator capable of delivering science payloads through ice caps of the outer planet icy moons. The long range objective is to enable a full-scale Europa lander mission in which an autonomous life-searching underwater vehicle is transported by the cryobot and launched into the sub-surface Europan ocean. Mission readiness testing will involve an Antarctic sub-glacial lake cryobot sample return through kilometers of ice cap thickness. A key element of VALKYRIE's design is the use of a high energy laser as the primary power source. 1070 nm laser light is transmitted at a power level of 5 kW from a surface-based laser and injected into a custom-designed optical waveguide that is spooled out from the descending cryobot. Light exits the downstream end of the fiber, travels through diverging optics, and strikes a beam dump, which channels thermal power to hot water jets that melt the descent hole. Some beam energy is converted, via photovoltaic cells, to electricity for running onboard electronics and jet pumps. Since the vehicle can be sterilized prior to deployment and the melt path freezes behind it, preventing forward contamination, expansions on VALKYRIE concepts may enable cleaner and faster access to sub-glacial Antarctic lakes. Testing at Stone Aerospace between 2010 and 2013 has already demonstrated high power optical energy transfer over relevant (kilometer scale) distances as well as the feasibility of a vehicle-deployed optical waveguide (through which the power is transferred). The test vehicle is equipped with a forward-looking synthetic aperture radar (SAR) that can detect obstacles out to 1 kilometer from the vehicle. The initial ASTEP test vehicle will carry a science payload consisting of a DUV flow cytometer and a water sampling sub-system that will be

  7. Exploration of Icy Moons in the Outer Solar System: Updated Planetary Protection Requirements for Missions to Enceladus and Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, J. D.; Race, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    Enceladus and Europa are bodies with icy/watery environments and potential habitable conditions for life, making both of great interest in astrobiological studies of chemical evolution and /or origin of life. They are also of significant planetary protection concern for spacecraft missions because of the potential for harmful contamination during exploration. At a 2015 COSPAR colloquium in Bern Switzerland, international scientists identified an urgent need to establish planetary protection requirements for missions proposing to return samples to Earth from Saturn's moon Enceladus. Deliberations at the meeting resulted in recommended policy updates for both forward and back contamination requirements for missions to Europa and Enceladus, including missions sampling plumes originating from those bodies. These recently recommended COSPAR policy revisions and biological contamination requirements will be applied to future missions to Europa and Encealadus, particularly noticeable in those with plans for in situ life detection and sample return capabilities. Included in the COSPAR policy are requirementsto `break the chain of contact' with Europa or Enceladus, to keep pristine returned materials contained, and to complete required biohazard analyses, testing and/or sterilization upon return to Earth. Subsequent to the Bern meeting, additional discussions of Planetary Protection of Outer Solar System bodies (PPOSS) are underway in a 3-year study coordinated by the European Science Foundation and involving multiple international partners, including Japan, China and Russia, along with a US observer. This presentation will provide science and policy updates for those whose research or activities will involve icy moon missions and exploration.

  8. ESA radiation and micro-meteoroid models applied to Space Weathering of atmosphere-less bodies: icy moons and asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallat, Claire; Altobelli, Nicolas; Cornet, Thomas; Schmidt, Jürgen; Navarro, Sara; Erd, Christian; Witasse, Olivier; Rodmann, Jens; Mints, Alexey

    2016-10-01

    The Galilean moons reveal large albedo variations on their surfaces, in particular between their leading and trailing hemispheres. The differences observed are likely the results of a balance between various weathering processes of the surface, determined by the moons' local environment. Chemical and physical alterations occur at the surface, triggered by multiple exogenic energy deposit processes (radiolysis, plasma sputtering, micro-meteoroids impacts, …).The observed variations are probably due to anisotropy in the energy fluxes received on each hemisphere and due to to a different relative contribution of the weathering agents (plasma, dust…) as function of the distance to Jupiter. We will be testing this hypothesis by estimating quantitatively the kinetic energy flux impacting different part of the surfaces of the Galilean moons. This work is essential in the context of the future missions to the Jovian moons, such as the JUICE ESA mission, as a proper understanding of the moons' surface history can be achieved only if one is able to constrain the balance between exogenic and endogenic alteration processes.Impacts of dust particles coming from the Galilean moons and evolving dynamically in the Jovian system will be simulated using the Jovian Micrometeoroid Environment Model (JMEM) [1]. Direct interplanetary dust impacts are simulated using the prediction of the Interplanetary Micrometeoroid Environment Model (IMEM) [2] computed at Jupiter's Hill radius, taking into account gravitational focusing by the planet. Finally, electron and ion fluxes interacting with different parts of the moons' surfaces can be estimated using the Jovian Specification Environment model (JOSE) [3].In parallel, signature of surface weathering will be assessed using reflectance maps based on the Galileo imaging data.Those models will also be applied, for comparison, to other atmosphere-less bodies of the solar system such as the asteroids Ceres, Vesta and Pallas.References[1] Liu et

  9. High-powered Radar Sounders for the Investigation of Jupiter's Icy Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaeinili, A.; Rodriguez, E.; Edelstein, Wendy

    2003-01-01

    This talk will address the main drivers in the design of a radar sounder for the JIMO mission and provide a potential solution that will optimize the chances of success in the detection of ice/water interface and sub-surface stratigraphy.

  10. Experimental investigation of the radiation shielding efficiency of a MCP detector in the radiation environment near Jupiter's moon Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulej, M.; Meyer, S.; Lüthi, M.; Lasi, D.; Galli, A.; Piazza, D.; Desorgher, L.; Reggiani, D.; Hajdas, W.; Karlsson, S.; Kalla, L.; Wurz, P.

    2016-09-01

    Neutral Ion Mass spectrometer (NIM) is one of the instruments in the Particle Environmental Package (PEP) designed for the JUICE mission of ESA to the Jupiter system. NIM, equipped with a sensitive MCP ion detector, will conduct detailed measurements of the chemical composition of Jovian icy moons exospheres. To achieve high sensitivity of the instrument, radiation effects due to the high radiation background (high-energy electrons and protons) around Jupiter have to be minimised. We investigate the performance of an Al-Ta-Al composite stack as a potential shielding against high-energy electrons. Experiments were performed at the PiM1 beam line of the High Intensity Proton Accelerator Facilities located at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland. The facility delivers a particle beam containing e-, μ- and π- with momentum from 17.5 to 345 MeV/c (Hajdas et al., 2014). The measurements of the radiation environment generated during the interaction of primary particles with the Al-Ta-Al material were conducted with dedicated beam diagnostic methods and with the NIM MCP detector. In parallel, modelling studies using GEANT4 and GRAS suites were performed to identify products of the interaction and predict ultimate fluxes and particle rates at the MCP detector. Combination of experiment and modelling studies yields detailed characterisation of the radiation fields produced by the interaction of the incident e- with the shielding material in the range of the beam momentum from 17.5 to 345 MeV/c. We derived the effective MCP detection efficiency to primary and secondary radiation and effective shielding transmission coefficients to incident high-energy electron beam in the range of applied beam momenta. This study shows that the applied shielding attenuates efficiently high-energy electrons. Nevertheless, owing to nearly linear increase of the bremsstrahlung production rate with incident beam energy, above 130 MeV their detection rates measured by the MCP

  11. Revised Full-Disk Spectra by Cassini-VIMS of the Saturnian Minor Icy Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchione, G.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Clark, R. N.; Buratti, B. J.; Capaccioni, F.; Tosi, F.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Adriani, A.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Brown, R. H.; Nicholson, P. D.; Baines, K. H.; Nelson, R. M.; McCord, T. B.

    2009-03-01

    This abstract concern with a detailed re-analysis of the disk-integrated spectra of the minor moons of Saturn (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Calypso and Telesto) obtained by Cassini-VIMS.

  12. Jupiter's Water Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    When the twin Voyager spacecraft cruised past Jupiter in 1979, they did more than rewrite the textbooks on the giant planet. Their cameras also unveiled the astounding diversity of the four planet-size moons of ice and stone known as the Galilean satellites. The Voyagers revealed the cratered countenance of Callisto, the valleys and ridges of Ganymede, the cracked face of Europa, and the spewing volcanoes of Io. But it would take a spacecraft named for Italian scientist Galileo, who discovered the moons in 1610, to reveal the true complexity of these worlds and to begin to divulge their interior secrets. Incredibly, the Galileo data strongly suggest that Jupiter's three large icy moons (all but rocky Io) hide interior oceans.

  13. Observations of the Galilean moons of Jupiter in 2013-2015 at Pulkovo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narizhnaya, N. V.

    2016-09-01

    Observational results are presented for Jupiter and its Galilean moons from the Normal Astrograph at Pulkovo Observatory in 2013-2015. The following data are obtained: 154 positions of the Galilean satellites and 47 calculated positions of Jupiter in the system of the UCAC4 (ICRS, J2000.0) catalogue; the differential coordinates of the satellites relative to one another are determined. The mean errors of the satellites' normal places in right ascension and declination over the entire observational period are, respectively: ɛα = 0.0065″ and ɛδ = 0.0068″, and their standard deviations are σα = 0.0804″ and σδ = 0.0845″. The equatorial coordinates are compared with planetary and satellite motion theories. The average (O-C) residuals in the two coordinates relative to the motion theories are 0.05″ or less. The best agreement with the observations is achieved by a combination of the EPM2011m and V. Lainey-V.2.0|V1.1 motion theories; the average (O-C) residuals are 0.03″ or less. The (O-C) residuals for the features of the positions of Io and Ganymede are comparable with measurement errors. Jupiter's positions calculated from the observations of the satellites and their theoretical jovicentric coordinates are in good agreement with the motion theories. The (O-C) residuals for Jupiter's coordinates are, on average, 0.027″ and-0.025″ in the two coordinates.

  14. Thermal Conductive Heat Transfer and Partial Melting of Volatiles in Icy Moons, Asteroids, and Kuiper Belt Objects (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargel, J. S.; Furfaro, R.

    2013-12-01

    Thermal gradients within conductive layers of icy satellite and asteroids depend partly on heat flow, which is related to the secular decay of radioactive isotopes, to heat released by chemical phase changes, by conversion of gravitational potential energy to heat during differentiation, tidal energy dissipation, and to release of heat stored from prior periods. Thermal gradients are also dependent on the thermal conductivity of materials, which in turn depends on their composition, crystallinity, porosity, crystal fabric anisotropy, and details of their mixture with other materials. Small impurities can produce lattice defects and changes in polymerization, and thereby have a huge influence on thermal conductivity, as can cage-inclusion (clathrate) compounds. Heat flow and thermal gradients can be affected by fluid phase advection of mass and heat (in oceans or sublimating upper crusts), by refraction related to heterogeneities of thermal conductivity due to lateral variations and composition or porosity. Thermal profiles depend also on the surface temperature controlled by albedo and climate, surface relief, and latitude, orbital obliquity and surface insolation, solid state greenhouses, and endogenic heating of the surface. The thermal state of icy moon interiors and thermal gradients can be limited at depth by fluid phase advection of heat (e.g., percolating meteoric methane or gas emission), by the latent heat of phase transitions (melting, solid-state transitions, and sublimation), by solid-state convective or diapiric heat transfer, and by foundering. Rapid burial of thick volatile deposits can also affect thermal gradients. For geologically inactive or simple icy objects, most of these controls on heat flow and thermal gradients are irrelevant, but for many other icy objects they can be important, in some cases causing large lateral and depth variations in thermal gradients, large variations in heat flow, and dynamically evolving thermal states. Many of

  15. Two-phase convection in the high-pressure ice layer of the large icy moons: geodynamical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalousova, K.; Sotin, C.; Tobie, G.; Choblet, G.; Grasset, O.

    2015-12-01

    The H2O layers of large icy satellites such as Ganymede, Callisto, or Titan probably include a liquid water ocean sandwiched between the deep high-pressure ice layer and the outer ice I shell [1]. It has been recently suggested that the high-pressure ice layer could be decoupled from the silicate core by a salty liquid water layer [2]. However, it is not clear whether accumulation of liquids at the bottom of the high-pressure layer is possible due to positive buoyancy of water with respect to high-pressure ice. Numerical simulation of this two-phase (i.e. ice and water) problem is challenging, which explains why very few studies have self-consistently handled the presence and transport of liquids within the solid ice [e.g. 3]. While using a simplified description of water production and transport, it was recently showed in [4] that (i) a significant fraction of the high-pressure layer reaches the melting point and (ii) the melt generation and its extraction to the overlying ocean significantly influence the global thermal evolution and interior structure of the large icy moons.Here, we treat the high-pressure ice layer as a compressible mixture of solid ice and liquid water [5]. Several aspects are investigated: (i) the effect of the water formation on the vigor of solid-state convection and its influence on the amount of heat that is transferred from the silicate mantle to the ocean; (ii) the fate of liquids within the upper thermal boundary layer - whether they freeze or reach the ocean; and (iii) the effect of salts and volatile compounds (potentially released from the rocky core) on the melting/freezing processes. Investigation of these aspects will allow us to address the thermo-chemical evolution of the internal ocean which is crucial to evaluate the astrobiological potential of large icy moons. This work has been performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. [1] Hussmann et al. (2007), Treatise of

  16. A multifluid magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the interaction between Jupiter's magnetosphere and its moon Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, M.; Jia, X.; Altwegg, K.; Combi, M. R.; Daldorff, L. K. S.; Gombosi, T. I.; Khurana, K. K.; Kivelson, M.; Tenishev, V.; Toth, G.; van der Holst, B.; Wurz, P.

    2015-12-01

    Jupiter's moon Europa is believed to contain a subsurface water ocean whose finite electrical conductance imposes clear induction signatures on the magnetic field in its surroundings. The evidence rests heavily on measurements performed by the magnetometer on board the Galileo spacecraft during multiple flybys of the moon. Europa's interaction with the Jovian magnetosphere has become a major target of research in planetary science, partly because of the potential of a salty ocean to harbor life outside our own planet. Thus it is of considerable interest to develop numerical simulations of the Europa-Jupiter interaction that can be compared with data in order to refine our knowledge of Europa's subsurface structure. In this presentation we show aspects of Europa's interaction with the Jovian magnetosphere extracted from a multifluid magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code BATS-R-US recently developed at the University of Michigan. The model dynamically separates magnetospheric and pick-up ions and is capable of capturing some of the physics previously accessible only to kinetic approaches. The model utilizes an adaptive grid to maintain the high spatial resolution on the surface required to resolve the portion of Europa's neutral atmosphere with a scale height of a few tens of kilometers that is in thermal equilibrium. The model also derives the electron temperature, which is crucial to obtain the local electron impact ionization rates and hence the plasma mass loading in Europa's atmosphere. We compare our results with observations made by the plasma particles and fields instruments on the Galileo spacecraft to validate our model. We will show that multifluid MHD is able to reproduce the basic features of the plasma moments and magnetic field observations obtained during the Galileo E4 and E26 flybys at Europa.

  17. An Impacting Descent Probe for Europa and the Other Galilean Moons of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurz, P.; Lasi, D.; Thomas, N.; Piazza, D.; Galli, A.; Jutzi, M.; Barabash, S.; Wieser, M.; Magnes, W.; Lammer, H.; Auster, U.; Gurvits, L. I.; Hajdas, W.

    2017-08-01

    We present a study of an impacting descent probe that increases the science return of spacecraft orbiting or passing an atmosphere-less planetary bodies of the solar system, such as the Galilean moons of Jupiter. The descent probe is a carry-on small spacecraft (fast ( km/s) descent to the surface until impact. The science goals and the concept of operation are discussed with particular reference to Europa, including options for flying through water plumes and after-impact retrieval of very-low altitude science data. All in all, it is demonstrated how the descent probe has the potential to provide a high science return to a mission at a low extra level of complexity, engineering effort, and risk. This study builds upon earlier studies for a Callisto Descent Probe for the former Europa-Jupiter System Mission of ESA and NASA, and extends them with a detailed assessment of a descent probe designed to be an additional science payload for the NASA Europa Mission.

  18. Crustal control of dissipative ocean tides in Enceladus and other icy moons

    CERN Document Server

    Beuthe, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Could tidal dissipation within Enceladus' subsurface ocean account for the observed heat flow? Earthlike models of dynamical tides give no definitive answer because they neglect the influence of the crust. I propose here the first model of dissipative tides in a subsurface ocean, by combining the Laplace Tidal Equations with the membrane approach. For the first time, it is possible to compute tidal dissipation rates within the crust, ocean, and mantle in one go. I show that oceanic dissipation is strongly reduced by the crustal constraint, and thus contributes little to Enceladus' present heat budget. Tidal resonances could have played a role in a forming or freezing ocean less than 100 m deep. The model is general: it applies to all icy satellites with a thin crust and a shallow ocean. Scaling rules relate the resonances and dissipation rate of a subsurface ocean to the ones of a surface ocean. If the ocean has low viscosity, the westward obliquity tide does not move the crust. Therefore, crustal dissipation...

  19. Radar probing of Jovian icy moons: Understanding subsurface water and structure detectability in the JUICE and Europa missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggy, Essam; Scabbia, Giovanni; Bruzzone, Lorenzo; Pappalardo, Robert T.

    2017-03-01

    Radar probing of Jovian icy satellites is fundamental for understanding the moons' origin and their thermal evolution as potential habitable environments in our Solar System. Using the current state of knowledge of the geological and geophysical properties of Ganymede, Europa and Callisto, we perform a comprehensive radar detectability study to quantify the exploration depth and the lower limit for subsurface identification of water and key tectonic structural elements. To achieve these objectives, we establish parametric dielectric models that reflect different hypotheses on the formation and thermal evolution of each moon. The models are then used for FDTD radar propagation simulations at the 9-MHz sounding frequency proposed for both ESA JUICE and NASA Europa missions. We investigate the detectability above the galactic noise level of four predominant subsurface features: brittle-ductile interfaces, shallow faults, brine aquifers, and the hypothesized global oceans. For Ganymede, our results suggest that the brittle-ductile interface could be within radar detectability range in the bright terrains, but is more challenging for the dark terrains. Moreover, understanding the slope variation of the brittle-ductile interface is possible after clutter reduction and focusing. For Europa, the detection of shallow subsurface structural elements few kilometers deep (such as fractures, faults and brine lenses) is achievable and not compromised by surface clutter. The objective of detecting the potential deep global ocean on Europa is also doable under both the convective and conductive hypotheses. Finally, for Callisto, radar waves can achieve an average penetration depth of ∼15 km, although the current understanding of Callisto's subsurface dielectric properties does not suggest sufficiently strong contrasts to produce unambiguous radar returns.

  20. Photographer : JPL Range : 4.2 million km. ( 2.6 million miles ) Jupiter's moon Europa, the size of

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Photographer : JPL Range : 4.2 million km. ( 2.6 million miles ) Jupiter's moon Europa, the size of earth's moon, is apparently covered by water ice, as indicated by ground spectrometers and its brightness. In this view, global scale dark sreaks discovered by Voyager 1 that criss-cross the the satelite are becoming visible. Bright rayed impact craters, which are abundant on Ganymede and Callisto, would be easily visible at this range, suggesting that Europa's surface is young and that the streaks are reflections of currently active internal dynamic processes.

  1. Earth-based and Cassini-spacecraft Observations of Irregular Moons of Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denk, Tilmann; Mottola, S.; Roatsch, T.; Rosenberg, H.; Neukum, G.

    2010-10-01

    We observed irregular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn with the ISS camera of the Cassini spacecraft [1] and with the 1.23-m telescope of the Calar Alto observatory in Spain [2]. Scientific goals are the determination of rotation periods, rotation-axis orientations, spin directions, size parameters, color properties, phase curves, and searches for binaries. Himalia (J6), the largest of the irregular jovian moons, has been imaged by Cassini on 18 Dec 2000; a body size of 120±5 km x 150±10 km and an albedo of 0.05±0.01 have been measured [3,4]. Earth-based observations revealed that Himalia's rotation period is probably 9.3 h, which is in agreement with the 9.2 to 9.8 h suggested by [5], although periods of 7.8 or 11.7 h cannot be ruled out yet. In the saturnian system, 10 irregular moons were scheduled for Cassini ISS observations over time spans >9 hrs until end-of-August, 2010. Observation distances vary between 5.6 and 22 million km, corresponding to ISS pixel scales of 34 to 130 km. For the objects measured so far, the rotation periods vary significantly. For instance, Siarnaq (S/2000 S3; size 40 km) and Ymir (S/2000 S1; 18 km) exhibit rotation periods of 6.7 h and 7.3 h, respectively, while Kiviuq (S/2000 S5; 16 km) might take about 22 h for one rotation. First results from the observation campaigns will be presented at the meeting. References: [1] Porco, C.C., et al. (2004), Space Sci. Rev. 115, 363; [2] http://www.caha.es/CAHA/Telescopes/1.2m.html; [3] Denk, T. et al. (2001), Conference on Jupiter (Planet, Satellites & Magnetosphere), Boulder, CO, 25-30 June 2001, abstracts book p. 30-31; [4] Porco, C.C., et al. (2003), Science 299, 1541; [5] Degewij, J., et al. (1980), Icarus 44, 520. We gratefully acknowledge funding by the German Space Agency (DLR) Bonn through grant no. 50 OH 0305.

  2. Bacterial Motility As a Biosignature: Tests at Icy Moon Analogue Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, J. L.; Lindensmith, C.; Deming, J. W.; Stocker, R.; Graff, E.; Serabyn, E.; Wallace, J. K.; Liewer, K.; Kuhn, J.

    2014-12-01

    Extraterrestrial life in our Solar System, if present, is almost certain to be microbial. Methods and technologies for unambiguous detection of living or extinct microorganisms are needed for life-detection missions to the Jovian and Saturnian moons, where liquid water is known to exist. Our research focuses specifically on microbial meaningful motion as a biosignature—"waving crowds" at the micron scale. Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) is an excellent tool for unambiguous identification of bacterial and protozoal swimming, even in the presence of turbidity, drift, and currents. The design of a holographic instrument with bacteria scale resolution was described in the previous talk. In this presentation, we will illustrate the design challenges for construction of a field instrument for extreme environments and space, and present plans for scientific investigations at analogue sites for the coming season. The challenges of creating a field instrument involve performance trade-offs, the ability to operate at extreme temperatures, and handling large volumes of data. A fully autonomous instrument without external cables or power is also desirable, and this is something that previous holographic instruments have not achieved. The primary issues for space exploration are identification of a laser and drive electronics that are qualified for the expected radiation environments of the moons around gas giant planets. Tests in Earth analogue environments will establish performance parameters as well as answer scientific questions that traditional microscopic techniques cannot. Specifically, we will visit a Greenland field site to determine whether or not microorganisms are motile within the brine-filled interior network of sea ice, and if they can be autonomously tracked using the instrument. Motility within the liquid phase of a frozen matrix has been hypothesized to explain how bacteria contribute to the biogeochemical signatures detected in ice, but observational

  3. Engineering a Solution to Jupiter Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Karla; Magner, Thomas; Lisano, Michael; Pappalardo, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) would be an international mission with the overall theme of investigating the emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants. Its goals are to (1) explore Europa to investigate its habitability, (2) characterize Ganymede as a planetary object including its potential habitability and (3) explore the Jupiter system as an archetype for gas giants. NASA and ESA have concluded a detailed joint study of a mission to Europa, Ganymede, and the Jupiter system with conceptual orbiters developed by NASA and ESA. The baseline EJSM architecture consists of two primary elements operating simultaneously in the Jovian system: the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). JEO and JGO would execute an intricately choreographed exploration of the Jupiter System before settling into orbit around Europa and Ganymede, respectively. EJSM would directly address themes concerning the origin and evolution of satellite systems and water-rich environments in icy satellites. The potential habitability of the ocean-bearing moons Europa and Ganymede would be investigated, by characterizing the geophysical, compositional, geological, and external processes that affect these icy worlds. EJSM would also investigate Io and Callisto, Jupiter's atmosphere, and the Jovian magnetosphere. By understanding the Jupiter system and unraveling its history, the formation and evolution of gas giant planets and their satellites would be better known. Most importantly, EJSM would shed new light on the potential for the emergence of life in the celestial neighborhood and beyond. The EJSM baseline architecture would provide opportunities for coordinated synergistic observations by JEO and JGO of the Jupiter and Ganymede magnetospheres, the volcanoes and torus of Io, the atmosphere of Jupiter, and comparative planetology of icy satellites. Each spacecraft would conduct both synergistic dual-spacecraft investigations and stand

  4. Infrared Spectra of Hydrated Magnesium Salts and their Role in the Search for Possible Life Conditions on Jupiter Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Galina; Huo, Winifred M.; Lee, Timothy J.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recent observations from the Galileo satellite indicate that three of the Jupiter moons, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, may have subsurface oceans. Possible existence of such ocean and the nature of its composition are of great interest to astrobiologists. Data from Galileo's NIMS spectrometer indicate the possibility of hydrated salts on Europa's surface. To aid in the design of future missions, we investigated infrared spectra of MgSO4-nH20, n=1-3 using ab initio calculations. Geometry, energetics, dipole moments, vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities of pure and hydrated MgSO4 salts were determined. Significant differences are found between vibrational spectra of water molecules in complexes with MgSO4 and pure water. Some of the O-H stretching frequencies in the complexes are shifted to the red by up to 1,500 - 2,000 per cm. In addition, the SO2 stretching vibrations are found at lower frequency regions than the water vibrations. The calculated bands of water and SO2 fragments can serve as markers for the existence of the salt-water complexes on the surface of Jupiter's moon.

  5. Next-Generation Laser Retroreflectors for the Science and Exploration of the Moon, Mars and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Agnello, S.; SCF Lab Team; Currie, D.; Richards, R.; Chandler, J.

    2016-10-01

    We describe next-generation laser retroreflectors for solar system science/exploration, developed at INFN-LNF, Frascati, Italy in collaboration with ASI and NASA-SSERVI, for lunar missions, ExoMars, Mars2020, Phobos, Jupiter icy/rocky moons, asteroids.

  6. The Jupiter icy moons explorer (JUICE): Complementarity of the payload in addressing the mission science objectives (abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grasset, O.; Altobelli, N.; Barabash, S.; Bruzzone, L.; Dougherty, M.; Erd, C.; Fletcher, L.; Gare, P.; Gladstone, R.; Gurvits, L.; Hartogh, P.; Hussmann, H.; Jaumann, R.; Iess, L.; Langevin, Y.; Palumbo, P.; Piccioni, G...; Titov, D.; Wahlund, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation will give a status of the JUICE mission in the end of the definition phase, its science scenario, and the observation strategies that are foreseen with a strong emphasis on the complemen-tarity of the suite of instruments. To summarize, the instrument suite on-board JUICE will allo

  7. Salt partitioning between water and high-pressure ices. Implication for the dynamics and habitability of icy moons and water-rich planetary bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journaux, Baptiste; Daniel, Isabelle; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Cardon, Hervé; Perrillat, Jean-Philippe; Caracas, Razvan; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    Water-rich planetary bodies including large icy moons and ocean exoplanets may host a deep liquid water ocean underlying a high-pressure icy mantle. The latter is often considered as a limitation to the habitability of the uppermost ocean because it would limit the availability of nutrients resulting from the hydrothermal alteration of the silicate mantle located beneath the deep ice layer. To assess the effects of salts on the physical properties of high-pressure ices and therefore the possible chemical exchanges and habitability inside H2O-rich planetary bodies, we measured partitioning coefficients and densities in the H2O-RbI system up to 450 K and 4 GPa; RbI standing as an experimentally amenable analog of NaCl in the H2O-salt solutions. We measured the partitioning coefficient of RbI between the aqueous fluid and ices VI and VII, using in-situ Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). With in-situ X-ray diffraction, we measured the unit-cell parameters and the densities of the high-pressure ice phases in equilibrium with the aqueous fluid, at pressures and temperatures relevant to the interior of planetary bodies. We conclude that RbI is strongly incompatible towards ice VI with a partitioning coefficient Kd(VI-L) = 5.0 (± 2.1) ṡ10-3 and moderately incompatible towards ice VII, Kd(VII-L) = 0.12 (± 0.05). RbI significantly increases the unit-cell volume of ice VI and VII by ca. 1%. This implies that RbI-poor ice VI is buoyant compared to H2O ice VI while RbI-enriched ice VII is denser than H2O ice VII. These new experimental results might profoundly impact the internal dynamics of water-rich planetary bodies. For instance, an icy mantle at moderate conditions of pressure and temperature will consist of buoyant ice VI with low concentration of salt, and would likely induce an upwelling current of solutes towards the above liquid ocean. In contrast, a deep and/or thick icy mantle of ice VII will be enriched in salt and hence would form a stable chemical boundary

  8. Saturn's Icy Moon Rhea: a Prediction for Bulk Chemical Composition and Physical Structure at the Time of the Cassini Spacecraft First Flyby

    CERN Document Server

    Prentice, A J R

    2005-01-01

    I report a model for the formation of Saturn's family of mid-sized icy moons to coincide with the first flypast of Rhea by the Cassini Orbiter spacecraft on 26 November 2005. It is proposed that these moons had condensed from a concentric family of orbiting gas rings that were cast off some 4600 Myr ago by the contracting proto-Saturnian cloud. Numerical and structural models for Rhea are constructed on the basis of a computed bulk chemical mix of hydrated rock (mass fraction 0.385), H2O ice (0.395), and NH3 ice (0.220). The large proportion of NH3 in the ice mass inhibits the formation of the dense crystalline phase II of H2O ice at the satellite's centre. This may explain the absence of compressional features on the surface. The favoured model of Rhea has a chemically uniform interior and is very cold. The satellite is nearly isodense and the predicted value of the axial moment-of-inertia factor is C/MR^2 = 0.399 +/- 0.004. NH3 is unstable at Saturn's distance from the Sun, except near the polar regions of ...

  9. Jupiter's and Saturn's ice moons: geophysical aspects and opportunities of geophysical survey of the planetary geoelectrical markers and oreols of the subsurface liquid ocean on the surface ice moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozorovich, Yuri; Linkin, Vacheslav; Kosov, Alexandr; Fournier-Sicre, Alain; Klimov, Stanislav; Novikov, Denis; Ivanov, Anton; Skulachev, Dmitriy; Menshenin, Yaroslav

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a new conceptual and methodological approach for geophysical survey of the planetary geoelectrical markers and oreols of the subsurface liquid ocean on the surface ice moons on the base "conceptual design phase" of the future space missions on the ice moons. At the design stage of such projects is considered the use of various space instruments and tools for the full the complex geophysical studies of the manifestations and planetary processes of the subsurface liquid ocean on the surface ice moons. The existence of various forms of the cryolithozone on terrestrial planets and their moons: advanced Martian permafrost zone in the form of existing of the frozen polar caps, subsurface frozen horizons, geological markers and oreols of the martian ancient (relict) ocean, subsurface oceans of Jupiter's and Saturn's moons-Europe and Enceladus, with the advanced form of permafrost freezes planetary caps, it allows to develop a common methodological basis and operational geophysical instruments (tools) for the future space program and planning space missions on these unique objects of the solar system, specialized for specific scientific problems of planetary missions. Geophysical practices and methodological principles, used in 1985-2015 by aurthors [ 1-5 ], respectively, as an example of the comprehensive geophysical experiment MARSES to study of the Martian permafrost zone and the martian ancient (relict) ocean, creating the preconditions for complex experimental setting and geo-physical monitoring of operational satellites of Jupiter and Saturn- Europe and Enceladus. This range of different planetary (like) planets with its geological history and prehistory of the common planetology formation processes of the planets formation and to define the role of a liquid ocean under the ice as a climate indicator of such planets, which is extremely important for the future construction of the geological and climatic history of the Earth. Main publications: [1

  10. Sounding of Icy Galilean Satellites by Surface Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, K. K.; Banerdt, W. B.; Johnson, T. V.; Russell, C. T.; Kivelson, M. G.; Davis, P. M.; Vidale, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    Several independent geological and geophysical investigations suggest that Europa and Ganymede contain subsurface oceans. Using Jupiter's rotating magnetic field as a primary signal, the magnetometer experiment onboard Galileo has measured secondary induction signals emanating from Europa, Ganymede, and surprisingly Callisto. The strong electromagnetic induction from these moons suggests that large global electrical conductors are located just below their icy crusts. A detailed analysis reveals that global salty oceans with salinity similar to the Earth's ocean and thicknesses in the range of approx. 6-100 kms can explain the induction observed by the Galileo magnetometer. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. What Does Galileo's Discovery of Jupiter's Moons Tell Us About the Process of Scientific Discovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Anton E.

    In 1610, Galileo Galilei discovered Jupiter''smoons with the aid of a new morepowerful telescope of his invention. Analysisof his report reveals that his discoveryinvolved the use of at least three cycles ofhypothetico-deductive reasoning. Galileofirst used hypothetico-deductive reasoning to generateand reject a fixed star hypothesis.He then generated and rejected an ad hocastronomers-made-a-mistake hypothesis.Finally, he generated, tested, and accepted a moonhypothesis. Galileo''s reasoningis modeled in terms of Piaget''s equilibration theory,Grossberg''s theory of neurologicalactivity, a neural network model proposed by Levine &Prueitt, and another proposedby Kosslyn & Koenig. Given that hypothetico-deductivereasoning has played a rolein other important scientific discoveries, thequestion is asked whether it plays a rolein all important scientific discoveries. In otherwords, is hypothetico-deductive reasoningthe essence of the scientific method? Possiblealternative scientific methods, such asBaconian induction and combinatorial analysis,are explored and rejected as viablealternatives. Educational implications of thishypothetico-deductive view of scienceare discussed.

  12. Europa the ocean moon : search for an alien biosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Greenberg, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Europa - The Ocean Moon tells the story of the Galileo spacecraft probe to Jupiter's moon, Europa. It provides a detailed description of the physical processes, including the dominating tidal forces that operate on Europa, and includes a comprehensive tour of Europa using images taken by Galileo's camera. The book reviews and evaluates the interpretative work carried out to date, providing a philosophical discussion of the scientific process of analyzing results and the pitfalls that accompany it. It also examines the astrobiological constraints on this possible biosphere, and implications for future research, exploration and planetary biological protection. Europa - The Ocean Moon provides a unique understanding of the Galileo images of Europa, discusses the theory of tidal processes that govern its icy ridged and disrupted surface, and examines in detail the physical setting that might sustain extra-terrestrial life in Europa's ocean and icy crust.

  13. Laboratory permittivity measurements of icy planetary analogs in the millimeter and submillimeter domains, in relation with JUICE mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouet, Y.; Jacob, K.; Murk, A.; Poch, O.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The European Space Agency's JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) spacecraft is planned for launch in 2022 and arrival at Jupiter in 2030. It will observe the planet Jupiter and three of its largest moons, Ganymede, Callisto and Europa. One instrument on the JUICE spacecraft is the Sub-millimeter Wave Instrument (SWI), which will measure brightness temperatures from Jupiter's stratosphere and troposphere, and from subsurfaces of Jupiter's icy moons. In the baseline configuration SWI consists of two tunable sub-millimeter wave receivers operating from 530 to 625 GHz. As an alternative one of the receivers could cover the range of 1080 and 1275 GHz. Inversion models are strongly dependent on the knowledge of the complex relative permittivity (hereafter permittivity) of the target material to retrieve the physical properties of the subsurface (e.g. [1][2]). We set up a laboratory experiment allowing us to perform reproducible measurements of the complex scattering parameters S11 and S21 in the ranges of 70 to 110 GHz, of 100 to 160 GHz, of 140 to 220 GHz, of 140 to 220 GHz and of 510 to 715 GHz. These scattering parameters can be used to retrieve the permittivity of icy analogs of the surfaces and subsurfaces of Jupiter's icy moons in order to prepare the data interpretation of SWI [3]. The measurements are performed under laboratory conditions with a quasi-optical bench (Institute of Applied Physics, University of Bern). The icy analogs that we prepare in the Laboratory for Outflow Studies of Sublimating Materials (LOSSy, Physics Institute, University of Bern), include two different porous water ice samples composed of fine-grained ice particles with a size range of 4 to 6 microns and ice particles with a size range of 50 to 100 microns [4][5]; and possibly CO2 ice. We will present the general experimental set-up and the first results in the context to prepare the data interpretation of SWI. [1] Ulaby, F. T., Long, D. G., 2014. Microwave radar and radiometric remote

  14. The Europa Jupiter System Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, A. R.; Clark, K.; Erd, C.; Pappalardo, R.; Greeley, R. R.; Blanc, M.; Lebreton, J.; van Houten, T.

    2009-05-01

    Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) will be an international mission that will achieve Decadal Survey and Cosmic Vision goals. NASA and ESA have concluded a joint study of a mission to Europa, Ganymede and the Jupiter system with orbiters developed by NASA and ESA; contributions by JAXA are also possible. The baseline EJSM architecture consists of two primary elements operating in the Jovian system: the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). The JEO mission has been selected by NASA as the next Flagship mission to the out solar system. JEO and JGO would execute an intricately choreographed exploration of the Jupiter System before settling into orbit around Europa and Ganymede, respectively. JEO and JGO would carry eleven and ten complementary instruments, respectively, to monitor dynamic phenomena (such as Io's volcanoes and Jupiter's atmosphere), map the Jovian magnetosphere and its interactions with the Galilean satellites, and characterize water oceans beneath the ice shells of Europa and Ganymede. EJSM will fully addresses high priority science objectives identified by the National Research Council's (NRC's) Decadal Survey and ESA's Cosmic Vision for exploration of the outer solar system. The Decadal Survey recommended a Europa Orbiter as the highest priority outer planet flagship mission and also identified Ganymede as a highly desirable mission target. EJSM would uniquely address several of the central themes of ESA's Cosmic Vision Programme, through its in-depth exploration of the Jupiter system and its evolution from origin to habitability. EJSM will investigate the potential habitability of the active ocean-bearing moons Europa and Ganymede, detailing the geophysical, compositional, geological and external processes that affect these icy worlds. EJSM would also explore Io and Callisto, Jupiter's atmosphere, and the Jovian magnetosphere. By understanding the Jupiter system and unraveling its history, the

  15. Shepherd Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of Shepherd Moons The New Horizons spacecraft took the best images of Jupiter's charcoal-black rings as it approached and then looked back at Jupiter in February 2007. This sequence of pictures from the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) shows the well-defined lanes of gravel- to boulder-sized material composing the bulk of the rings; labels point out how these narrow rings are confined in their orbits by small 'shepherding' moons (Metis and Adrastea).

  16. Coupling of the Matched Gravity and Electromagnetic Fields of the Sun with Jupiter and its Moons Together in Nearest Portion of Jupiter's Orbit to the Sun as the Main Cause of the Peak of Approximately 11 Yearly Solar Cycles and Hazards from Solar Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholibeigian, Kazem; Gholibeigian, Hassan

    2016-04-01

    On March 13, 1989 the entire province of Quebec Blackout by solar storm during solar cycle 22. The solar storm of 1859, also known as the Carrington event, was a powerful geomagnetic solar storm during solar cycle 10. The solar storm of 2012 during solar cycle 24 was of similar magnitude, but it passed Earth's orbit without striking the plane. All of these solar storms occurred in the peak of 11 yearly solar cycles. In this way, the White House in its project which is focusing on hazards from solar system, in a new strategy and action plan to increase protection from damaging solar emissions, should focus on coupling of the matched Gravity and Electromagnetic Fields)GEFs) of the Sun with Jupiter and its moons together. On the other hand, in solar system, the Jupiter's gravity has largest effect to the Sun's core and its dislocation, because the gravity force between the Jupiter and the Sun is 11.834 times, In addition overlapping of the solar cycles with the Jupiter's orbit period is 11.856 years. These observable factors lead us to the effect of the Jupiter and Sun gravity fields coupling as the main cause of the approximately 11 years duration for solar cycles. Its peak in each cycle is when the Jupiter is in nearest portion to the Sun in its orbit. In this way, the other planets in their coupling with Sun help to the variations and strengthening solar cycles. [Gholibeigian, 7/24/2015http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGU]. In other words, the both matched GEFs are generating by the large scale forced convection system inside the stars and planets [Gholibeigian et. al, AGU Fall Meeting 2015]. These two fields are couple and strengthening each other. The Jupiter with its 67 moons generate the largest coupled and matched GEFs in its core and consequently strongest effect on the Sun's core. Generation and coupling of the Jupiter's GEFs with its moons like Europa, Io and Ganymede make this planet of thousands of times brighter and many times bigger than Earth as the

  17. Experimental determination of salt partition coefficients between aqueous fluids, ice VI and ice VII: implication for the composition of the deep ocean and the geodynamics of large icy moons and water rich planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journaux, Baptiste; Daniel, Isabelle; Cardon, Hervé; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Perrillat, Jean-Philippe; Caracas, Razvan; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    The potential habitability of extraterrestrial large aqueous reservoir in icy moons and exoplanets requires an input of nutrients and chemicals that may come from the rocky part of planetary body. Because of the presence of high pressure (HP) water ices (VI, VII, etc.) between the liquid ocean and the silicates, such interactions are considered to be limited in large icy moons, like Ganymede and Titan, and water rich exoplanets. In the case of salty-rich oceans, recent experimental and modeling works have shown that aqueous fluids can be stable at higher pressures [1, 2]. This can ultimately allow direct interaction with the rocky core of icy moons. This effect is nevertheless limited and for larger bodies such as water rich exoplanets with much higher pressures in their hydrosphere, HP ice should be present between the rocky core and a putative ocean. Salts are highly incompatible with low pressure ice Ih, but recent experimental work has shown that alkali metal and halogen salts are moderately incompatible with ice VII, that can incorporate up to several mol/kg of salts [3, 4, 5]. As far as we know, no similar study has been done on ice VI, a HP ice phase expected inside large icy moons. We present here the first experimental data on the partition coefficient of RbI salt between aqueous fluids, ice VI and ice VII using in-situ synchrotron X-Ray single crystal diffraction and X-Ray fluorescence mapping (ESRF - ID-27 beam line [6]). Our experiment enable us to observe a density inversion between ice VI and the salty fluid, and to measure the values of salt partition coefficients between the aqueous fluid and ice VI (strongly incompatible) and ice VII (moderately incompatible). Using the volumes determined with X-Ray diffraction, we were able to measure the density of salty ice VI and ice VII and determine that salty ice VI is lighter than pure H2O ice VI. These results are very relevant for the study of water rich planetary bodies interior because the partition

  18. Japanese mission plan for Jupiter system: The Jupiter magnetospheric orbiter and the Trojan asteroid explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, S.; Fujimoto, M.; Yano, H.; Takashima, T.; Kasaba, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Kimura, J.; Funase, R.; Mori, O.; Tsuda, Y.; Campagnola, S.; Kawakatsu, Y.

    2011-10-01

    In the future Jupiter system study, Coordinated observation of Jovian magnetosphere is one of the important targets of the mission in addition to icy satellites, atmosphere, and interior of Jupiter. JAXA will take a role on the magnetosphere spinner JMO (Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter), in addition to JGO (Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter) by ESA and JEO (Jupiter Europa Orbiter) by NASA. We will combine JMO with a proposed solar sail mission of JAXA for Jupiter and one of Trojan asteroids. Since Trojan asteroids could be representing raw solid materials of Jupiter or at least outer solar system bodies, involvement of Trojan observation should enhance the quality of Jupiter system exploration.

  19. Measuring the speed of light using Jupiter's moons: a global citizen science project for International Year of Light 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Martin A.; Hammond, Giles; Simmons, Mike

    2015-08-01

    2015 represents both the centenary of General Relativity and International Year of Light - the latter marking the 150th anniversary of James Clerk Maxwell's ground-breaking paper on "A dynamical theory of the electromagnetic field". These landmark dates provide an exciting opportunity to set up a global citizen science project that re-enacts the seminal 1675 experiment of Ole Romer: to measure the speed of light by observing the time eclipses of the satellites of Jupiter. This project - which has been set up by astronomers at the University of Glasgow, UK in partnership with Astronomers without Borders - is an ideal platform for engaging the amateur astronomy community, schools and the wider public across the globe. It requires only simple observations, with a small spotting scope or telescope, and can be carried out straightforwardly in both cities and dark-sky locations. It highlights a fascinating chapter in astronomical history, as well as the ongoing importance of accurate astrometry, orbital motion, the concept of longitude and knowing one's position on the Earth. In the context of the GR centenary, it also links strongly to the science behind GPS satellites and a range of important topics in the high school curriculum - from the electromagnetic spectrum to the more general principles of the scientific method.In this presentation we present an overview of our global citizen science project for IYL2015: its scope and motivation, the total number and global distribution of its participants to date and how astronomers around the world can get involved. We also describe the intended legacy of the project: a extensive database of observations that can provide future astronomy educators with an accessible and historically important context in which to explore key principles for analysing large astronomical datasets.

  20. From the Icy Satellites to Small Moons and Rings: Spectral Indicators by Cassini-VIMS Unveil Compositional Trends in the Saturnian System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Ciarniello, M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Clark, R. N.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Buratti, B. B.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Brown, R. H.

    2017-01-01

    Despite water ice being the most abundant species on Saturn satellites' surfaces and ring particles, remarkable spectral differences in the 0.35-5.0 μm range are observed among these objects. Here we report about the results of a comprehensive analysis of more than 3000 disk-integrated observations of regular satellites and small moons acquired by VIMS aboard Cassini mission between 2004 and 2016. These observations, taken from very different illumination and viewing geometries, allow us to classify satellites' and rings' compositions by means of spectral indicators, e.g. 350-550 nm - 550-950 nm spectral slopes and water ice band parameters [1,2,3]. Spectral classification is further supported by indirect retrieval of temperature by means of the 3.6 μm I/F peak wavelength [4,5]. The comparison with syntethic spectra modeled by means of Hapke's theory point to different compositional classes where water ice, amorphous carbon, tholins and CO2 ice in different quantities and mixing modalities are the principal endmembers [3, 6]. When compared to satellites, rings appear much more red at visible wavelengths and show more intense 1.5-2.0 μm band depths [7]. Our analysis shows that spectral classes are detected among the principal satellites with Enceladus and Tethys the ones with stronger water ice band depths and more neutral spectral slopes while Rhea evidences less intense band depths and more red visible spectra. Even more intense reddening in the 0.55-0.95 μm range is observed on Iapetus leading hemisphere [8] and on Hyperion [9]. With an intermediate reddening, the minor moons seems to be the spectral link between the principal satellites and main rings [10]: Prometheus and Pandora appear similar to Cassini Division ring particles. Epimetheus shows more intense water ice bands than Janus. Epimetheus' visible colors are similar to water ice rich moons while Janus is more similar to C ring particles. Finally, Dione and Tethys lagrangian satellites show a very

  1. Galileo's Medicean Moons (IAU S269)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Cesare; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Coradini, Marcello; Lazzarin, Monica

    2010-11-01

    Preface; 1. Galileo's telescopic observations: the marvel and meaning of discovery George V. Coyne, S. J.; 2. Popular perceptions of Galileo Dava Sobel; 3. The slow growth of humility Tobias Owen and Scott Bolton; 4. A new physics to support the Copernican system. Gleanings from Galileo's works Giulio Peruzzi; 5. The telescope in the making, the Galileo first telescopic observations Alberto Righini; 6. The appearance of the Medicean Moons in 17th century charts and books. How long did it take? Michael Mendillo; 7. Navigation, world mapping and astrometry with Galileo's moons Kaare Aksnes; 8. Modern exploration of Galileo's new worlds Torrence V. Johnson; 9. Medicean Moons sailing through plasma seas: challenges in establishing magnetic properties Margaret G. Kivelson, Xianzhe Jia and Krishan K. Khurana; 10. Aurora on Jupiter: a magnetic connection with the Sun and the Medicean Moons Supriya Chakrabarti and Marina Galand; 11. Io's escaping atmosphere: continuing the legacy of surprise Nicholas M. Schneider; 12. The Jovian Rings Wing-Huen Ip; 13. The Juno mission Scott J. Bolton and the Juno Science Team; 14. Seeking Europa's ocean Robert T. Pappalardo; 15. Europa lander mission: a challenge to find traces of alien life Lev Zelenyi, Oleg Korablev, Elena Vorobyova, Maxim Martynov, Efraim L. Akim and Alexander Zakahrov; 16. Atmospheric moons Galileo would have loved Sushil K. Atreya; 17. The study of Mercury Louise M. Prockter and Peter D. Bedini; 18. Jupiter and the other giants: a comparative study Thérèse Encrenaz; 19. Spectroscopic and spectrometric differentiation between abiotic and biogenic material on icy worlds Kevin P. Hand, Chris McKay and Carl Pilcher; 20. Other worlds, other civilizations? Guy Consolmagno, S. J.; 21. Concluding remarks Roger M. Bonnet; Posters; Author index; Object index.

  2. Properties of CO2 clathrate hydrates formed in the presence of MgSO4 solutions with implications for icy moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, E.; Thompson, S. P.; Evans, A.; Day, S. J.; Murray, C. A.; Parker, J. E.; Baker, A. R.; Oliveira, J. M.; van Loon, J. Th.

    2017-04-01

    Context. There is evidence to suggest that clathrate hydrates have a significant effect on the surface geology of icy bodies in the solar system. However the aqueous environments believed to be present on these bodies are likely to be saline rather than pure water. Laboratory work to underpin the properties of clathrate hydrates in such environments is generally lacking. Aims: We aim to fill this gap by carrying out a laboratory investigation of the physical properties of CO2 clathrate hydrates produced in weak aqueous solutions of MgSO4. Methods: We use in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction to investigate clathrate hydrates formed at high CO2 pressure in ice that has formed from aqueous solutions of MgSO4 with varying concentrations. We measure the thermal expansion, density and dissociation properties of the clathrates under temperature conditions similar to those on icy solar system bodies. Results: We find that the sulphate solution inhibits the formation of clathrates by lowering their dissociation temperatures. Hysteresis is found in the thermal expansion coefficients as the clathrates are cooled and heated; we attribute this to the presence of the salt in solution. We find the density derived from X-ray powder diffraction measurements is temperature and pressure dependent. When comparing the density of the CO2 clathrates to that of the solution in which they were formed, we conclude that they should sink in the oceans in which they form. We also find that the polymorph of ice present at low temperatures is Ih rather than the expected Ic, which we tentatively attribute to the presence of the MgSO4. Conclusions: We (1) conclude that the density of the clathrates has implications for their behaviour in satellite oceans as their sinking and floating capabilities are temperature and pressure dependent; (2) conclude that the presence of MgSO4 inhibits the formation of clathrates and in some cases may even affect their structure and (3) report the dominance

  3. Ion processing of ices and the origin of SO2 and O3 on the icy surfaces of the icy jovian satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boduch, P.; Brunetto, R.; Ding, J. J.; Domaracka, A.; Kaňuchová, Z.; Palumbo, M. E.; Rothard, H.; Strazzulla, G.

    2016-10-01

    We present new experimental results relative to 144 keV S9+ or Ar9+ ion implantation in targets made of oxygen rich frozen gases (O2, CO2) and mixtures with water ice. Spectra in the UV (200-400 nm) range have been obtained before and after implantation. The targets have been selected because they can be representative of the parent molecules from which SO2 and O3, observed to be present on the surfaces of Jupiter's icy Moons, could be formed due to radiolysis induced by the abundant magnetospheric ions. The results indicate that sulfur dioxide is not detectable after sulfur implantation in oxygen bearing species. Ozone is formed after argon and sulfur ion implantation. Sulfur implantation in O2 and CO2 targets also induces the formation of a band centered at about 255 nm (that we tentatively attribute to SO3- radicals). In the mixtures with water the band appears initially at the same wavelength and shifts to about 247 nm at higher ion fluences possibly indicating the formation of sulfite (HSO3-) ions. An absorption band observed on Ganymede is well fitted by using three components: ozone, sulfite ions and a not identified component having an absorption band centered at 298 nm. In all of the studied cases ion implantation produces a spectral reddening over the investigated spectral range (200-400 nm) that well mimics the observed spectral slopes of Jupiter's icy satellites.

  4. A Day on Jupiter (Animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This 'movie' strings 11 images of Jupiter captured by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on January 9, 2007, when the spacecraft was about 80 million kilometers (49.6 million miles) from the giant planet. The sequence covers a full 10-hour rotation of Jupiter, during which the moons Ganymede and Io -- as well as the shadows they cast on Jupiter -- move across the camera's field of view.

  5. X-ray Probes of Magnetospheric Interactions with Jupiter's Auroral zones, the Galilean Satellites, and the Io Plasma Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, R. F.; Ramsey, B. D.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Rehak, P.; Johnson, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Swartz, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    Remote observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the XMM-Newton Observatory have shown that the Jovian system is a source of x-rays with a rich and complicated structure. The planet's polar auroral zones and its disk are powerful sources of x-ray emission. Chandra observations revealed x-ray emission from the Io Plasma Torus and from the Galilean moons Io, Europa, and possibly Ganymede. The emission from these moons is certainly due to bombardment of their surfaces of highly energetic protons, oxygen and sulfur ions from the region near the Torus exciting atoms in their surfaces and leading to fluorescent x-ray emission lines. Although the x-ray emission from the Galilean moons is faint when observed fiom Earth orbit, an imaging x-ray spectrometer in orbit around these moons, operating at 200 eV and above with 150 eV energy resolution, would provide a detailed mapping (down to 40 m spatial resolution) of the elemental composition in their surfaces. Here we describe the physical processes leading to x-ray emission fiom the surfaces of Jupiter's moons and the instrumental properties, as well as energetic ion flux models or measurements, required to map the elemental composition of their surfaces. We discuss the proposed scenarios leading to possible surface compositions. For Europa, the two most extreme are (1) a patina produced by exogenic processes such as meteoroid bombardment and ion implantation, and (2) upwelling of material fiom the subsurface ocean. We also describe the characteristics of X - m , an imaging x-ray spectrometer under going a feasibility study for the JIM0 mission, with the ultimate goal of providing unprecedented x-ray studies of the elemental composition of the surfaces of Jupiter's icy moons and Io, as well as of Jupiter's auroral x-ray emission.

  6. Jupiter small satellite montage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    A montage of images of the small inner moons of Jupiter from the camera onboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft shows the best views obtained of these moons during Galileo's 11th orbit around the giant planet in November 1997. At that point, Galileo was completing its first two years in Jupiter orbit--known as the Galileo 'prime mission'--and was about to embark on a successful two-year extension, called the Galileo Europa Mission. The top two images show the moon Thebe. Thebe rotates by approximately 50 degrees between the time these two images were taken, so that the same prominent impact crater is seen in both views; this crater, which has been given the provisional name Zethus, is near the point on Thebe that faces permanently away from Jupiter. The next two images show the moon Amalthea; they were taken with the Sun directly behind the observer, an alignment that emphasizes patterns of intrinsically bright or dark surface material. The third image from the top is a view of Amalthea's leading side, the side of the moon that 'leads' as Amalthea moves in its orbit around Jupiter. This image looks 'noisy' because it was obtained serendipitously during an observation of the Jovian satellite Io (Amalthea and Io shared the same camera frame but the image was exposed for bright Io rather than for the much darker Amalthea). The fourth image from the top emphasizes prominent 'spots' of relatively bright material that are located near the point on Amalthea that faces permanently away from Jupiter. The bottom image is a view of the tiny moon Metis. In all the images, north is approximately up, and the moons are shown in their correct relative sizes. The images are, from top to bottom: Thebe taken on November 7, 1997 at a range of 504,000 kilometers (about 313,000 miles); Thebe on November 7, 1997 at a range of 548,000 kilometers (about 340,000 miles); Amalthea on November 6, 1997 at a range of about 650,000 kilometers (about 404,000 miles); Amalthea on November 7, 1997 at a

  7. Sharpening Up Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    New image-correction technique delivers sharpest whole-planet ground-based picture ever A record two-hour observation of Jupiter using a superior technique to remove atmospheric blur has produced the sharpest whole-planet picture ever taken from the ground. The series of 265 snapshots obtained with the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics Demonstrator (MAD) prototype instrument mounted on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) reveal changes in Jupiter's smog-like haze, probably in response to a planet-wide upheaval more than a year ago. Sharpening Up Jupiter ESO PR Photo 33/08 Sharpening Up Jupiter Being able to correct wide field images for atmospheric distortions has been the dream of scientists and engineers for decades. The new images of Jupiter prove the value of the advanced technology used by MAD, which uses two or more guide stars instead of one as references to remove the blur caused by atmospheric turbulence over a field of view thirty times larger than existing techniques [1]. "This type of adaptive optics has a big advantage for looking at large objects, such as planets, star clusters or nebulae," says lead researcher Franck Marchis, from UC Berkeley and the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, USA. "While regular adaptive optics provides excellent correction in a small field of view, MAD provides good correction over a larger area of sky. And in fact, were it not for MAD, we would not have been able to perform these amazing observations." MAD allowed the researchers to observe Jupiter for almost two hours on 16 and 17 August 2008, a record duration, according to the observing team. Conventional adaptive optics systems using a single Jupiter moon as reference cannot monitor Jupiter for so long because the moon moves too far from the planet. The Hubble Space Telescope cannot observe Jupiter continuously for more than about 50 minutes, because its view is regularly blocked by the Earth during Hubble's 96-minute orbit. Using MAD, ESO astronomer Paola Amico

  8. Jupiter's Rings: Sharpest View

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft took the best images of Jupiter's charcoal-black rings as it approached and then looked back at Jupiter. The top image was taken on approach, showing three well-defined lanes of gravel- to boulder-sized material composing the bulk of the rings, as well as lesser amounts of material between the rings. New Horizons snapped the lower image after it had passed Jupiter on February 28, 2007, and looked back in a direction toward the sun. The image is sharply focused, though it appears fuzzy due to the cloud of dust-sized particles enveloping the rings. The dust is brightly illuminated in the same way the dust on a dirty windshield lights up when you drive toward a 'low' sun. The narrow rings are confined in their orbits by small 'shepherding' moons.

  9. Making Space Travel to Jupiter Possible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Samuel P.

    2004-01-01

    From man landing on the moon to a simple satellite being launched into orbit, many incredible space accomplishments have been witnessed by us all. However, what goes un-noticed to the common man is the extensive research and testing that lasts months, years, and even decades. Much of this required research just so happens to take place in the corridors of the Glen Research Center building number 49. In the Advanced Materials division of G.R.C., a number of researchers have the responsibility of discovering which metal, ceramic, or polymer is best for a specific application. Under the guidance of mentor extraordinaire Frank Ritzert, I am involved in many critical projects dealing with refractory metals, two of which I will mention in this report. The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) project actually was under full swing back in the 50's and early 60's. To enable the 14 year trek to the icy moons of Europa, Callisto, and Ganymede, nuclear propulsion methods were selected. Due to the extreme temperature of the reactor and the extended time period, a refractory metal would need to be implemented. After years of research and progress, the program was suddenly canceled. About a decade ago, the JIMO project was re-instated and now has a goal for departure around 2014. However, a few obstacles lie in our way concerning the use of refractory metals. In certain areas of the orbiter a joint is required between the refractories and other less dense metals. Two of these joints are with nickel based super alloys. Being an intern for Frank Ritzert, the refractory metals expert, I have the opportunity to develop the best method to braze refractory metals to Nickel 201. This involves the actual brazing, electron microscopy and reporting the results. My second project involves a certain part of the orbiter where Niobium 1Zirconium, a refractory metal, is joined with Hastelloy-X a Ni based metal. Small quantities of oxygen, helium and other impurities in the Ni alloy could diffuse

  10. Storms and Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) took this 2-millisecond exposure of Jupiter at 04:41:04 UTC on January 24, 2007. The spacecraft was 57 million kilometers (35.3 million miles) from Jupiter, closing in on the giant planet at 41,500 miles (66,790 kilometers) per hour. At right are the moons Io (bottom) and Ganymede; Ganymede's shadow creeps toward the top of Jupiter's northern hemisphere. Two of Jupiter's largest storms are visible; the Great Red Spot on the western (left) limb of the planet, trailing the Little Red Spot on the eastern limb, at slightly lower latitude. The Great Red Spot is a 300-year old storm more than twice the size of Earth. The Little Red Spot, which formed over the past decade from the merging of three smaller storms, is about half the size of its older and 'greater' counterpart.

  11. Jupiter's Dynamic Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, M. F.; Bunce, E. J.; Kronberg, E. A.; Jackman, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Jupiter's magnetosphere is a highly dynamic environment. Hundreds of reconnection events have been identified in Jupiter's magnetotail through analysis of magnetic field and particle measurements collected by the Galileo spacecraft. Quasi-periodic behavior, suggestive of reconnection, has been intermittently observed on a ~2-3 day time scale in several data sets, including magnetic field dipolarizations, flow bursts, auroral polar dawn spots, and the hectometric radio emission. In this paper we review the present state of knowledge of Jovian magnetospheric dynamics. Throughout the discussion, we highlight similarities and differences to Saturn's magnetosphere. For example, recent analysis of plasmoid signatures at both Jupiter and Saturn has established the role of tail reconnection in the overall mass and flux transport in the outer planet magnetospheres. The results for both Jupiter and Saturn suggest that the observed mass loss rate due to tail reconnection and plasmoid release is insufficient to account for the mass input rate from the moons Io and Enceladus, respectively. We also present new analysis in which we use the Michigan mSWiM propagated solar wind MHD model to estimate the solar wind conditions upstream of Jupiter. This information allows us to determine whether reconnection events occur preferentially during certain solar wind conditions, or whether there is evidence that the solar wind modulates the quasi-periodicity seen in the field dipolarizations and flow bursts.

  12. Thermal Conductivity Measurements on Icy Satellite Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javeed, Aurya; Barmatz, Martin; Zhong, Fang; Choukroun, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    With regard to planetary science, NASA aspires to: "Advance scientific knowledge of the origin and history of the solar system, the potential for life elsewhere, and the hazards and resources present as humans explore space". In pursuit of such an end, the Galileo and Cassini missions garnered spectral data of icy satellite surfaces implicative of the satellites' structure and material composition. The potential for geophysical modeling afforded by this information, coupled with the plausibility of life on icy satellites, has pushed Jupiter's Europa along with Saturn's Enceladus and Titan toward the fore of NASA's planetary focus. Understanding the evolution of, and the present processes at work on, the aforementioned satellites falls squarely in-line with NASA's cited goal.

  13. The Saturn System's Icy Satellites: New Results from Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Gautier, Rosaly M.; Buratti, Bonnie; Hendrix, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    Cassini-Huygens is a multidisciplinary, international planetary mission consisting of an orbiting spacecraft and a probe. The Huygens probe successfully landed on Titan's surface on January 14, 2005, while the orbiter has performed observations of Saturn, its rings, satellites, and magnetosphere since it entered orbit around Saturn on July 1, 2004. The Cassini mission has been prolific in its scientific discoveries about the Saturn system. In this special section, we present new mission results with a focus on the 'icy satellites,' which we define as all Saturn's moons with the exception of Titan. The results included in this section have come out of the Cassini SOST--Satellites Orbiter Science Team--a multi-instrument and multidiscipline group that works together to better understand the icy satellites and their interactions with Saturn and its rings. Other papers included in this issue present ground-based observations and interior modeling of these icy moons.

  14. Seeding Life on the Moons of the Outer Planets via Lithopanspermia

    CERN Document Server

    Worth, R J; House, Christopher H

    2013-01-01

    Material from the surface of a planet can be ejected into space by a large impact, and could carry primitive life forms with it. We performed n-body simulations of such ejecta to determine where in the Solar System rock from Earth and Mars may end up. We find that, in addition to frequent transfer of material among the terrestrial planets, transfer of material from Earth and Mars to the moons of Jupiter and Saturn is also possible, but rare. We expect that such transfer is most likely during the Late Heavy Bombardment or during the next one or two billion years. At this time, the icy moons were warmer and likely had little or no icy shell to prevent meteorites from reaching their liquid interiors. We also note significant rates of re-impact in the first million years after ejection. This could re-seed life on a planet after partial or complete sterilization by a large impact, which would aid the survival of early life during the Late Heavy Bombardment.

  15. Jupiter Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for high resolution image of Nature Cover Detailed analysis of two continent-sized storms that erupted in Jupiter's atmosphere in March 2007 shows that Jupiter's internal heat plays a significant role in generating atmospheric disturbances. Understanding these outbreaks could be the key to unlock the mysteries buried in the deep Jovian atmosphere, say astronomers. This visible-light image is from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope taken on May 11, 2007. It shows the turbulent pattern generated by the two plumes on the upper left part of Jupiter. Understanding these phenomena is important for Earth's meteorology where storms are present everywhere and jet streams dominate the atmospheric circulation. Jupiter is a natural laboratory where atmospheric scientists study the nature and interplay of the intense jets and severe atmospheric phenomena. According to the analysis, the bright plumes were storm systems triggered in Jupiter's deep water clouds that moved upward in the atmosphere vi gorously and injected a fresh mixture of ammonia ice and water about 20 miles (30 kilometers) above the visible clouds. The storms moved in the peak of a jet stream in Jupiter's atmosphere at 375 miles per hour (600 kilometers per hour). Models of the disturbance indicate that the jet stream extends deep in the buried atmosphere of Jupiter, more than 60 miles (approximately100 kilometers) below the cloud tops where most sunlight is absorbed.

  16. Spatial distribution of water in the stratosphere of Jupiter from observations with the Herschel space observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalié, T.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Lellouch, E.; de Val-Borro, M.; Jarchow, C.; Moreno, R.; Hartogh, P.; Orton, G.; Greathouse, T. K.; Billebaud, F.; Dobrijevic, M.; Lara, L. M.; Gonzalez, A.; Sagawa, H.

    2013-09-01

    distributions of water in Jupiter's stratosphere, we rule out interplanetary dust particles as its main source. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Jupiter's stratospheric water was delivered by the SL9 comet and that more than 95% of the observed water comes from the comet according to our models. On the longer term, this study can be regarded as a preparation of the observations to be performed by the SubmillimetreWave Instrument (SWI) [12]. SWI is an instrument proposed for the payload of the Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer (JUICE). This instrument will observe water and the other SL9-derived species in Jupiter with a higher spatiotemporal resolution than Herschel to constrain its 3D stratospheric circulation.

  17. The Moon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范图雨

    2000-01-01

    The sun goes down in the west. The moon comes up in the east. Last week the moon was round. It is a half-moon this evening. A round moon loods like a big silver(银色)ball in the sky. A new moon looks like a comb(梳子)。

  18. The EJSM Jupiter-Europa Orbiter: Science Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Blanc, M.; Clark, K.; Greeley, R.; Hendrix, A. R.; Lebreton, J.-P.

    2008-09-01

    Europa is believed to shelter an ocean between its geodynamically active icy shell and its rocky mantle, where the conditions for habitability may be fulfilled. With a warm, salty, water ocean and plausible chemical energy sources, Europa is the astrobiological archetype for icy satellite habitability. It is also a geophysical wonderland of interrelated ice shell processes that are intimately related to the ocean and tides, and of complex interactions among its interior, surface, atmosphere, and magnetospheric environments. The Jupiter-Europa Orbiter (JEO) is one component of the proposed multi-spacecraft Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM). We focus here on the science objectives and heritage of JEO.

  19. Considerations for a Radar System to Detect an Ocean Underneath the Icy Shell of Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Thorsten; Gogineni, Prasad; Green, James; Cooper, John; Fung, Shing; Taylor, William; Benson, Robert; Reinisch, Bodo; Song, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The detection of an ocean underneath Europa is one of the primary objectives of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission. An orbiting surface penetrating radar has the potential of providing that measurement thus yielding information regarding the possibility of life support on Europa. Radars in the MHz range have successfully monitored the kilometer-deep ice shelves of Greenland and Antarctica, including the detection of Lake Vostok (and others) below an ice sheet thickness of about 4 km. The performance of a radar system orbiting Europa will be subject to several potential complications and unknowns. Besides ionospheric dispersion and the actual depth of the ocean, which is estimated between 2 and 30 km, major unknowns affecting radar performance are the temperature profile, the amount of salt and other impurities within the ice crust as well as the surface roughness. These impurities can in part be produced at the highly irradiated surface by magnetospheric interactions and transported downward into the ice crust by geologic processes. The ionospheric interference must also be modeled from effects of these interactions on production of the thin neutral atmosphere and subsequent ionization of the neutrals. We investigated these uncertainties through radar simulations using different surface and ice characteristics over a frequency range from 10 to 50 MHz. The talk will present results from these simulations discussing potential limitations.

  20. Moon Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Bob

    2010-01-01

    When teaching Moon phases, the focus seems to be on the sequence of Moon phases and, in some grade levels, how Moon phases occur. Either focus can sometimes be a challenge, especially without the use of models and observations of the Moon. In this month's column, the author describes some of the lessons that he uses to teach the phases of the Moon…

  1. rosuvastatin (JUPITER)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge; Ridker, Paul M; MacFadyen, Jean G;

    2009-01-01

    were calculated across a range of end points, timeframes, and subgroups using data from Justification for the Use of statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER), a randomized evaluation of rosuvastatin 20 mg versus placebo conducted among 17 802 apparently healthy men...... infarction, stroke, revascularization, or death, the 5-year NNT within JUPITER was 20 (95% CI, 14 to 34). All subgroups had 5-year NNT values for this end point below 50; as examples, 5-year NNT values were 17 for men and 31 for women, 21 for whites and 19 for nonwhites, 18 for those with body mass index 300...

  2. Overview of the Project Prometheus Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, G. M.

    2003-01-01

    This presentation will give an overview of the Project Prometheus Program (PPP, formerly the Nuclear Systems Initiative, NSI) and the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) Project (a component of PPP), a mission to the three icy Galilean moons of Jupiter.

  3. Mass-radius relationships in icy satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, M. J.; Lewis, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    Using published laboratory data for H2O ice, a modeling technique was developed by which the bulk density, density and temperature profile, rotational moment of inertia, central pressure, and location of the rock-ice interface can all be obtained as a function of the radius, the heliocentric distance, and the silicate composition. Models of the interiors of Callisto, Ganymede, Europa, Rhea, and Titan are given, consistent with present mass and radius data. The radius and mass of spheres of ice under self-gravitation for two different temperature classes are given (103 and 77 deg K). Measurements of mass, radius and I/MR2 by spacecraft can be interpreted by this model to yield substantial information about the internal structure and the ice/rock ratio of the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn.

  4. The Formation Environment of Jupiter's Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Neal; Lee, Man Hoi; Sano, Takayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Do circumjovian disk models have conductivities consistent with the assumed accretion stresses? Broadly, YES, for both minimum-mass and gas-starved models: magnetic stresses are weak in the MM models, as needed to keep the material in place. Stresses are stronger in the gas-starved models, as assumed in deriving the flow to the planet. However, future minimum-mass modeling may need to consider the loss of dust-depleted gas from the surface layers to the planet. The gas-starved models should have stress varying in radius. Dust evolution is a key process for further study, since the recombination occurs on the grains.

  5. Ion pick-up near the icy Galilean satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volwerk, M.; Khurana, K. K.

    2010-12-01

    The ion pick-up near the icy Galilean satellites is studied using ion cyclotron waves. Using Galileo magnetometer data, we show evidence for the existence of ion cyclotron waves, which are generated by pick-up of freshly ionized particles. Near Europa, in the wake various kinds of ions are detected, which were already predicted to be present on the moon. Upstream of the moon there is evidence for water ion pick-up, which could facilitate the slow down of the plasma flow. Ganymede shows evidence for either water or oxygen pick up on the flanks of the magnetosphere. Callisto shows indication of hydrogen pick-up from its atmosphere.

  6. Habitability potential of satellites around Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coustenis, Athena; Raulin, Francois; Encrenaz, Therese; Grasset, Olivier; Solomonidou, Anezina

    2016-07-01

    biomarkers. Currently, for Titan and Enceladus, geophysical models try to explain the possible existence of an oceanic layer that decouples the mantle from the icy crust. Titan has further been suggested to be a possible cryovolcanic world due to the presence of local complex volcanic-like geomorphology and the indications of surface albedo changes with time [7,8]. Such dynamic activity that would most probably include tidal heating, possible internal convection, and ice tectonics, is believed to be a pre-requisite of a habitable planetary body as it allows the recycling of minerals and potential nutrients and provides localized energy sources. In one of our geophysical studies [4], we have showed that tidal forces are a constant and significant source of internal deformation on Titan and the interior liquid water ocean can be relatively warm for reasonable amounts of ammonia concentrations, thus completing the set of parameters needed for a truly habitable planetary body. If the silicate mantles of Europa and Ganymede and the liquid sources of Titan and Enceladus are geologically active as on Earth, giving rise to the equivalent of hydrothermal systems, the simultaneous presence of water, geodynamic interactions, chemical energy sources and a diversity of key chemical elements may fulfill the basic conditions for habitability. Such habitability indications from bodies at distances of 10 AU, are essential discoveries brought to us by space exploration and which have recently revolutionized our perception of habitability in the solar system. In the solar system's neighborhood, such potential habitats can only be investigated with appropriate designed space missions, like JUICE (JUpiter ICy moon Explorer) for Ganymede and Europa [9]. JUICE is an ESA mission to Jupiter and its icy moons, recently selected to launch in 2022. Other future mission concepts are being studied for exploring the moons around Saturn. References: [1] Coustenis, A., Encrenaz, Th., in "Life Beyond Earth

  7. Hubble Gallery of Jupiter's Galilean Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This is a Hubble Space Telescope 'family portrait' of the four largest moons of Jupiter, first observed by the Italian scientist Galileo Galilei nearly four centuries ago. Located approximately one-half billion miles away, the moons are so small that, in visible light, they appear as fuzzy disks in the largest ground-based telescopes. Hubble can resolve surface details seen previously only by the Voyager spacecraft in the early 1980s. While the Voyagers provided close-up snapshots of the satellites, Hubble can now follow changes on the moons and reveal other characteristics at ultraviolet and near-infrared wavelengths.Over the past year Hubble has charted new volcanic activity on Io's active surface, found a faint oxygen atmosphere on the moon Europa, and identified ozone on the surface of Ganymede. Hubble ultraviolet observations of Callisto show the presence of fresh ice on the surface that may indicate impacts from micrometeorites and charged particles from Jupiter's magnetosphere.Hubble observations will play a complementary role when the Galileo spacecraft arrives at Jupiter in December of this year.This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the World Wide Web on the Space Telescope Science Institute home page at URL http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/

  8. Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The purpose of ICIS is to meet evolving Enforcement and Compliance business needs for EPA and State users by integrating information into a single integrated data...

  9. Radiation belts of jupiter: a second look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillius, R W; McIlwain, C E; Mogro-Campero, A

    1975-05-02

    The outbound leg of the Pioneer 11 Jupiter flyby explored a region farther from the equator than that traversed by Pioneer 10, and the new data require modification or augmentation of the magnetodisk model based on the Pioneer 10 flyby. The inner moons of Jupiter are sinks of energetic particles and sometimes sources. A large spike of particles was found near lo. Multiple peaks occurred in the particle fluxes near closest approach to the planet; this structure may be accounted for by a complex magnetic field configuration. The decrease in proton flux observed near minimum altitude on the Pioneer 10 flyby appears attributable to particle absorption by Amalthea.

  10. Seeding Life on the Moons of the Outer Planets via Lithopanspermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdsson, Steinn; House, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Material from the surface of a planet can be ejected into space by a large impact and could carry primitive life-forms with it. We performed n-body simulations of such ejecta to determine where in the Solar System rock from Earth and Mars may end up. We found that, in addition to frequent transfer of material among the terrestrial planets, transfer of material from Earth and Mars to the moons of Jupiter and Saturn is also possible, but rare. We expect that such transfers were most likely to occur during the Late Heavy Bombardment or during the ensuing 1–2 billion years. At this time, the icy moons were warmer and likely had little or no ice shell to prevent meteorites from reaching their liquid interiors. We also note significant rates of re-impact in the first million years after ejection. This could re-seed life on a planet after partial or complete sterilization by a large impact, which would aid the survival of early life during the Late Heavy Bombardment. Key Words: Panspermia—Impact—Meteorites—Titan—Europa. Astrobiology 13, 1155–1165. PMID:24341459

  11. Seeding life on the moons of the outer planets via lithopanspermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth, R J; Sigurdsson, Steinn; House, Christopher H

    2013-12-01

    Material from the surface of a planet can be ejected into space by a large impact and could carry primitive life-forms with it. We performed n-body simulations of such ejecta to determine where in the Solar System rock from Earth and Mars may end up. We found that, in addition to frequent transfer of material among the terrestrial planets, transfer of material from Earth and Mars to the moons of Jupiter and Saturn is also possible, but rare. We expect that such transfers were most likely to occur during the Late Heavy Bombardment or during the ensuing 1-2 billion years. At this time, the icy moons were warmer and likely had little or no ice shell to prevent meteorites from reaching their liquid interiors. We also note significant rates of re-impact in the first million years after ejection. This could re-seed life on a planet after partial or complete sterilization by a large impact, which would aid the survival of early life during the Late Heavy Bombardment.

  12. Io in Front of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Jupiter's four largest satellites, including Io, the golden ornament in front of Jupiter in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, have fascinated Earthlings ever since Galileo Galilei discovered them in 1610 in one of his first astronomical uses of the telescope.Images from Cassini that will be released over the next several days capture each of the four Galilean satellites in their orbits around the giant planet.This true-color composite frame, made from narrow angle images taken on Dec. 12, 2000, captures Io and its shadow in transit against the disk of Jupiter. The distance of the spacecraft from Jupiter was 19.5 million kilometers (12.1 million miles). The image scale is 117 kilometers (73 miles) per pixel.The entire body of Io, about the size of Earth's Moon, is periodically flexed as it speeds around Jupiter and feels, as a result of its non-circular orbit, the periodically changing gravitational pull of the planet. The heat arising in Io's interior from this continual flexure makes it the most volcanically active body in the solar system, with more than 100 active volcanoes. The white and reddish colors on its surface are due to the presence of different sulfurous materials. The black areas are silicate rocks.Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  13. Abrupt climate transition of icy worlds from snowball to moist or runaway greenhouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Ding, Feng; Ramirez, Ramses M.; Peltier, W. R.; Hu, Yongyun; Liu, Yonggang

    2017-08-01

    Ongoing and future space missions aim to identify potentially habitable planets in our Solar System and beyond. Planetary habitability is determined not only by a planet's current stellar insolation and atmospheric properties, but also by the evolutionary history of its climate. It has been suggested that icy planets and moons become habitable after their initial ice shield melts as their host stars brighten. Here we show from global climate model simulations that a habitable state is not achieved in the climatic evolution of those icy planets and moons that possess an inactive carbonate-silicate cycle and low concentrations of greenhouse gases. Examples for such planetary bodies are the icy moons Europa and Enceladus, and certain icy exoplanets orbiting G and F stars. We find that the stellar fluxes that are required to overcome a planet's initial snowball state are so large that they lead to significant water loss and preclude a habitable planet. Specifically, they exceed the moist greenhouse limit, at which water vapour accumulates at high altitudes where it can readily escape, or the runaway greenhouse limit, at which the strength of the greenhouse increases until the oceans boil away. We suggest that some icy planetary bodies may transition directly to a moist or runaway greenhouse without passing through a habitable Earth-like state.

  14. Icy Satellite Science Today and in Cassini's Final Three Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Cassini Mission has turned our view of Saturn's icy moons from scientific sketches to fully realized worlds. Among the major discoveries are: Activity on Enceladus and associated plumes that originate in small hot spots on its south pole and that appear to be modulated by tidal forces; a liquid subsurface water ocean on Enceladus that is a habitable environment; several new moons; debris rings associated with moons; a unique equatorial ridge on Iapetus; the identity of new constituents on the moons including carbon dioxide ice on most of them and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)on Iapetus; differentiated or partially differentiated interiors; nano-iron on the surfaces of the moons and in the rings; volatile segregation on Iapetus and Hyperion; and a bewildering array of geologic processes on the small moons. But our new view of these icy worlds has spawned new questions. Among these unanswered questions are: How variable are the plumes? Have any other moons had activity similar to that on Enceladus and did it continue up to the recent past? How much dust do the moons contribute to the region around Saturn? What caused the ridge on Iapetus? What are the interiors of the moons like? How differentiated and compensated are they? Five additional targeted flybys, two of Dione and three of Enceladus, have been designed to answer these questions and will be implemented during the remainder of the Solstice Mission. The Dione flybys both include gravity passes to determine its state of differentiation. One of the flybys is optimized to measure the fields and particle environment around Dione. One of the two remote-sensing flybys of Enceladus will scrutinize the south polar region to further understand the size, temperature, and variability of the emitting areas, while the other will observe the north pole to determine why it is so different from the south. The third Enceladus flyby involves an unprecedented pass less than 50 km above the surface into the midst of

  15. Detection and analysis of Jupiter's decametric micropulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebo, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    The occurrence of Jupiter's decametric radio emission can be correlated with the central meridian longitude of Jupiter as if the active regions were radio transmitters placed at fixed longitudes on its surface. These active regions are commonly called sources and are labelled Source A, Jovian longitude = 200 deg, Source B = 100 deg and Source C =300 deg. These sources are not always active. However, they can be turned-on if Jupiter's innermost Galilean moon, Io, is in the right phase. In fact, if Io is found 90 deg from superior geocentric conjunction (maximum eastern elongation) and if source B is simultaneously on the central meridian, source B radiation is almost guaranteed, whereas source C radiation is highly likely when Io is found 240 deg from superior geocentric conjunction. Source A radiation is largely independent of Io's position. Interestingly, the Io-related radio storms contain unusually rapid events that can only be properly studied using wide-band techniques.

  16. The meteorology of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, A. P.

    1976-01-01

    From the point of view of meteorology the most important differences between Jupiter and the earth are related to the fact that Jupiter has an appreciable internal energy source and probably lacks a solid surface. The composition and vertical structure of the Jovian atmosphere is considered along with the composition of Jovian cloud particles, turbulence in Jupiter's atmosphere, data on the horizontal structure and motions of the atmosphere, and questions related to the longevity of Jupiter's clouds. Attention is given to the barotropic characteristics of Jupiter's atmosphere, the radiation balance in the atmosphere of the earth and of Jupiter, and studies of the Great Red Spot.

  17. Europa Planetary Protection for Juno Jupiter Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Douglas E.; Abelson, Robert D.; Johannesen, Jennie R.; Lam, Try; McAlpine, William J.; Newlin, Laura E.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Juno mission launched in 2011 and will explore the Jupiter system starting in 2016. Juno's suite of instruments is designed to investigate the atmosphere, gravitational fields, magnetic fields, and auroral regions. Its low perijove polar orbit will allow it to explore portions of the Jovian environment never before visited. While the Juno mission is not orbiting or flying close to Europa or the other Galilean satellites, planetary protection requirements for avoiding the contamination of Europa have been taken into account in the Juno mission design.The science mission is designed to conclude with a deorbit burn that disposes of the spacecraft in Jupiter's atmosphere. Compliance with planetary protection requirements is verified through a set of analyses including analysis of initial bioburden, analysis of the effect of bioburden reduction due to the space and Jovian radiation environments, probabilistic risk assessment of successful deorbit, Monte-Carlo orbit propagation, and bioburden reduction in the event of impact with an icy body.

  18. Moon Bound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    China’s first lunar probe,Chang’e-1, blasts off aboard a Long March 3A carrier rocket at 6:05 p.m.(10:05 GMT)from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in Sichuan Province. Chang’e-1,named after a legendary Chinese goddess of the moon,is expected to experience four accelerations and enter earth-moon transfer orbit on October 31,arriving in the moon’s orbit on November 5 for a yearlong scientific exploration. The launch of the circumlunar satellite marked the start of China’s ambitious three-phase moon mission.Scientists have planned a moon landing and release of a moon rover around 2012 in the second phase.In the third phase,another rover will land on the moon and return to earth with lunar soil and stone samples for scientific research around 2017. Inset:Staff at the Beijing Aerospace Control Center applaud the successful launch of Chang’e-1.

  19. Plans and Combined Operations of the Flight Elements of the Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erd, Christian; Clark, K.; Ejsm System Teams

    2010-05-01

    The Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) is a joint NASA-ESA mission candidate, where ESA would provide the Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO) and NASA would provide the Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO). Both spacecraft are foreseen to be launched in 2020, allowing for a joint exploration of the Jovian system, and the Galilean moons. The planning of the development, implementation and combined science phase will be described in the poster.

  20. New Views of Jupiter's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J. A.

    1998-09-01

    Jupiter's rings are the archetype of ethereal planetary rings (very-low optical-depth bands containing micron-sized "dust"). As a result of much improved observations by Galileo (Ockert-Bell* -- most citations are et al. and Icarus in press* or this meeting) and Keck (de Pater*), we now understand the nature of such rings. The ring has three components: a 104 km-thick toroidal halo (1.4-1.7 RJ; normal optical depth t = 10-6), a thin main ring (1.7-1.8 RJ; t = 10-6), and a pair of exterior gossamer rings (1.8-3.5RJ; t = 10-7). The main ring has patchy ( 20-30 percent) brightness. The ring is reddish and its particles satisfy a -2.5 differential power-law size distribution. Because particle lifetimes are brief, the rings must be continually regenerated, by collisions into parent bodies, which may be unseen or may be the known small ring-moons (Thomas*, Simonelli). The gossamer ring seems to be collisional ejecta derived from the ring-moons Amalthea and Thebe, and evolving inward by Poynting-Robertson drag (Burns). The particles drift through many electromagnetic resonances, clustering around synchronous orbit, which produce jumps in the particles' inclinations (Hamilton). The main ring is probably debris from Adrastea and Metis, which orbit in the equatorial plane. The halo particles are driven vertically by electromagnetic forces, which may be resonant (Schaffer & Burns) or not (Horanyi & Cravens). When halo orbits become highly distorted, particles are lost into Jupiter. Similar faint rings may be attendant to all small, close-in satellites (Showalter).

  1. Strong tidal dissipation in Io and Jupiter from astrometric observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainey, Valéry; Arlot, Jean-Eudes; Karatekin, Ozgür; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2009-06-18

    Io is the volcanically most active body in the Solar System and has a large surface heat flux. The geological activity is thought to be the result of tides raised by Jupiter, but it is not known whether the current tidal heat production is sufficiently high to generate the observed surface heat flow. Io's tidal heat comes from the orbital energy of the Io-Jupiter system (resulting in orbital acceleration), whereas dissipation of energy in Jupiter causes Io's orbital motion to decelerate. Here we report a determination of the tidal dissipation in Io and Jupiter through its effect on the orbital motions of the Galilean moons. Our results show that the rate of internal energy dissipation in Io (k(2)/Q = 0.015 +/- 0.003, where k(2) is the Love number and Q is the quality factor) is in good agreement with the observed surface heat flow, and suggest that Io is close to thermal equilibrium. Dissipation in Jupiter (k(2)/Q = (1.102 +/- 0.203) x 10(-5)) is close to the upper bound of its average value expected from the long-term evolution of the system, and dissipation in extrasolar planets may be higher than presently assumed. The measured secular accelerations indicate that Io is evolving inwards, towards Jupiter, and that the three innermost Galilean moons (Io, Europa and Ganymede) are evolving out of the exact Laplace resonance.

  2. Space Weathering on Icy Satellites in the Outer Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R. N.; Perlman, Z.; Pearson, N.; Cruikshank, D. P.

    2014-01-01

    Space weathering produces well-known optical effects in silicate minerals in the inner Solar System, for example, on the Moon. Space weathering from solar wind and UV (ultraviolet radiation) is expected to be significantly weaker in the outer Solar System simply because intensities are low. However, cosmic rays and micrometeoroid bombardment would be similar to first order. That, combined with the much higher volatility of icy surfaces means there is the potential for space weathering on icy outer Solar System surfaces to show optical effects. The Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn is providing evidence for space weathering on icy bodies. The Cassini Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument has spatially mapped satellite surfaces and the rings from 0.35-5 microns and the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) instrument from 0.1 to 0.2 microns. These data have sampled a complex mixing space between H2O ice and non-ice components and they show some common spectral properties. Similarly, spectra of the icy Galilean satellites and satellites in the Uranian system have some commonality in spectral properties with those in the Saturn system. The UV absorber is spectrally similar on many surfaces. VIMS has identified CO2, H2 and trace organics in varying abundances on Saturn's satellites. We postulate that through the spatial relationships of some of these compounds that they are created and destroyed through space weathering effects. For example, the trapped H2 and CO2 observed by VIMS in regions with high concentrations of dark material may in part be space weathering products from the destruction of H2O and organic molecules. The dark material, particularly on Iapetus which has the highest concentration in the Saturn system, is well matched by space-weathered silicates in the .4 to 2.6 micron range, and the spectral shapes closely match those of the most mature lunar soils, another indicator of space weathered material.

  3. Jupiter System Observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senske, Dave; Kwok, Johnny

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the proposed mission for the Jupiter System Observer. The presentation also includes overviews of the mission timeline, science goals, and spacecraftspecifications for the satellite.

  4. Modeled Ion and Neutral Particle Distributions around Jupiter’s Moon Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, M.; Tenishev, V.; Hansen, K. C.; Jia, X.; Combi, M. R.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2009-12-01

    Jupiter’s moon Europa has a thin gravitationally bound neutral atmosphere which is mostly created through sputtering of high energy ions impacting on its icy surface. In a first step we will simulate the interaction of Europa with the Jovian magnetosphere by using the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model BATSRUS. Starting from the model used by Kabin et al. [JGR, Vol. 104, No. A9, (1999)] which accounts for the exospheric mass loading, ion-neutral charge exchange, and recombination we will further use the resistive MHD equations addressing the finite electron diffusivity. These results, including the magnetic field topology, are then used to calculate the Lorentz forces for our test particle Monte Carlo model. We use this model to simulate Europa’s plasma and neutral environment by tracking particles created on the moon’s surface by sputtering or sublimation, through dissociation and/or ionization in the atmosphere, or entering the system from Jupiter’s magnetosphere as high energy ions. Neutral particle trajectories are followed by solving the equation of motion in Europa’s gravity field whereas the ion population is additionally subject to the Lorentz force. We will show preliminary results of this work with application to the missions to the Jupiter system currently under consideration by NASA (JEO) and ESA (JGO).

  5. Electron irradiation effects in icy regoliths: The PacMan anomalies at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaible, Micah; Johnson, Robert E.; Zhigilei, Leo

    2016-10-01

    The anomalous regions identified on the leading hemispheres of the icy Saturnian moons, colloquially known as the 'PacMan' features, were found to have larger thermal inertia than the surrounding regions. The locations of the anomalies were shown to closely match the expected deposition profile of high energy (~ MeV) electrons moving counter rotational to the moons, suggesting an energetic source to drive their formation. Here we consider the mechanisms by which electron radiation can produce changes in the thermal conductivity of an icy regolith and compare estimates obtained from theoretical and experimental results with the measured thermal inertia and grain impact resurfacing rates on the icy moons.Electron interactions with the grains can both create and anneal defects in the crystalline lattice, and deposited energy drives molecular diffusion. Mobilized molecules accumulate in the contact region between grains due to the surface energy minimum, thus increasing the contact volume or 'sintering' the grains. Previously developed sintering rate equations and measured electron energy distributions near the icy moons were used to estimate the timescale for the energetic electrons to increase the contact volume sufficiently to produce the enhanced thermal conductivity of the anomalous regions. In order to properly constrain the sintering calculations, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of electron interactions in water ice were carried out to determine the number and diffusion length of excited molecules. Water molecules were artificially excited both in a water ice bulk and near a grain surface, and several ice polymorphs relevant to ice grain formation in outer solar system conditions were considered. Comparing the estimated sintering timescales to micrometeorite resurfacing rates indicates that grains must be small (~5um) and/or irregularly shaped with a high defect density in the contact regions. Since there is some disagreement in these grains sizes and

  6. ICIS FE&C Compliance Monitoring Screens

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Web Based Training for Integrated Compliance Information System Updated Compliance Monitoring Training for ICIS Federal Enforcement and Compliance User. This...

  7. Voyage to Jupiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, David; Samz, Jane

    This publication illustrates the features of Jupiter and its family of satellites pictured by the Pioneer and the Voyager missions. Chapters included are: (1) "The Jovian System" (describing the history of astronomy); (2) "Pioneers to Jupiter" (outlining the Pioneer Mission); (3) "The Voyager Mission"; (4)…

  8. A 'Moving' Jupiter Global Map (Animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    the plume tails, and with falling air in the dark areas just to the east of each plume. The maps of Jupiter shown here do not include the polar regions, because those regions are not well seen by LORRI from its vantage point high above Jupiter's equatorial region. Shadows of Jupiter's moons (first of Io, then of Ganymede) appear in two of the maps. Name Dates Range from Jupiter [million km] Image resolution element [km] JobsATM1 Jan 8-9, 2007 81.2 402 JobsATM2 Jan 9-10, 2007 79.9 396 JobsATM3 Jan 14-15, 2007 71.9 356 JobsATM4 Jan 15, 2007 70.5 349 JobsATM5 Jan 20-21, 2007 61.8 306 JobsATM6 Jan 21-22, 2007 60.5 300

  9. Distribution of CO2 ice on the large moons of Uranus and evidence for compositional stratification of their near-surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Cartwright, Richard J; Rivkin, Andy S; Trilling, David E; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi

    2015-01-01

    The surfaces of the large Uranian satellites are characterized by a mixture of H2O ice and a dark, potentially carbon-rich, constituent, along with CO2 ice. At the mean heliocentric distance of the Uranian system, native CO2 ice should be removed on timescales shorter than the age of the Solar System. Consequently, the detected CO2 ice might be actively produced. Analogous to irradiation of icy moons in the Jupiter and Saturn systems, we hypothesize that charged particles caught in Uranus' magnetic field bombard the surfaces of the Uranian satellites, driving a radiolytic CO2 production cycle. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the distribution of CO2 ice by analyzing near-infrared (NIR) spectra of these moons, gathered using the SpeX spectrograph at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) (2000 - 2013). Additionally, we made spectrophotometric measurements using images gathered by the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope (2003 - 2005). We find that the detected CO2 ice is ...

  10. The effects of laterally varying icy shell structure on the tidal response of Europa and Ganymede

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahr, J. M.; A, G.; Zhong, S.

    2013-12-01

    One of the long-sought objectives of an icy moon orbiter or fly-by mission, has been to use tidal observations to help determine the existence of a liquid ocean and characteristics of the overlying icy shell. The radio science component of such a mission could be used to estimate the tidal potential Love number k2 for gravity. And if there is an on-board laser altimeter, it could be used to determine the radial displacement Love number h2. Knowledge of either of those Love numbers could provide information on the presence of an ocean beneath the icy outer shell, and the two Love numbers could be combined to place constraints on the thickness of the icy shell. Though if a subsurface ocean exists, complications could conceivably arise if the icy outer shell has significant lateral variations in elastic thickness or shear modulus, or if the ocean is not global in extent so that the icy shell is grounded in places but floating in others. In these cases, the tidal deformation pattern would not be represented as the sum of degree 2 harmonics, and so the results could not be characterized in terms of a single Love number. In this study, by solving a set of tidal loading problems with laterally variable icy shell structures (for which the existence of an ocean layer is assumed), we investigate how those structures might complicate the interpretation of the tide measurements, and we discuss how to extract information regarding the interior structure of Ganymede and Europa from measurements of their tidal response.

  11. Global Moon Coverage via Hyperbolic Flybys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffington, Brent; Strange, Nathan; Campagnola, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The scientific desire for global coverage of moons such as Jupiter's Galilean moons or Saturn's Titan has invariably led to the design of orbiter missions. These orbiter missions require a large amount of propellant needed to insert into orbit around such small bodies, and for a given launch vehicle, the additional propellant mass takes away from mass that could otherwise be used for scientific instrumentation on a multiple flyby-only mission. This paper will present methods--expanding upon techniques developed for the design of the Cassini prime and extended missions--to obtain near global moon coverage through multiple flybys. Furthermore we will show with proper instrument suite selection, a flyby-only mission can provide science return similar (and in some cases greater) to that of an orbiter mission.

  12. Recent Simulations of the Late Stages Growth of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; D'Angelo, Gennaro; Hubickyj, Olenka

    2012-01-01

    Presented by Lissauer et al. (2009, Icarus 199, 338) are used to test the model of capture of Jupiter's irregular satellites within proto-Jupiter's distended and thermally-supported envelope. We find such capture highly unlikely, since the envelope shrinks too slowly for a large number of moons to be retained, and many of those that would be retained would orbit closer to the planet than do the observed Jovian irregulars. Our calculations do not address (and therefore do not exclude) the possibility that the irregular satellites were captured as a result of gas drag within a circumjovian disk. Support for this research from NASA Outer Planets Research Program is gratefully acknowledged.

  13. Origin and evolution of the earth-moon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfven, H.; Arrhenius, G.

    1972-01-01

    The general problem of formation of secondary bodies around a central body is studied, and comparison is made with other satellite systems (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus). The normal satellite systems of Neptune and the earth are reconstructed. The capture theory, the tidal evolution of the lunar orbit, destruction of a normal satellite system, asteroids and the earth-moon system, and accretion and heat structure of the moon are discussed. It is concluded that the moon originated as a planet accreted in a jet stream near the orbit of the earth, and was probably captured in a retrograde orbit.

  14. Jupiter Environment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Erick J.; Monahue, Kenneth M.; Biehl, James P.; Kokorowski, Michael; Ngalande, Cedrick,; Boedeker, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    The Jupiter Environment Tool (JET) is a custom UI plug-in for STK that provides an interface to Jupiter environment models for visualization and analysis. Users can visualize the different magnetic field models of Jupiter through various rendering methods, which are fully integrated within STK s 3D Window. This allows users to take snapshots and make animations of their scenarios with magnetic field visualizations. Analytical data can be accessed in the form of custom vectors. Given these custom vectors, users have access to magnetic field data in custom reports, graphs, access constraints, coverage analysis, and anywhere else vectors are used within STK.

  15. Jupiter Laser Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Jupiter Laser Facility is an institutional user facility in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate at LLNL. The facility is designed to provide a high degree...

  16. Inferno on Jupiter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    诸葛勤

    1994-01-01

    The initial sketchy reports began filtering into the U. S. by E-maillate Saturday afternoon. First a Spanish observatory announced that it hadspotted a plume of gas billowing up from the edge of Jupiter. Then a

  17. JunoCam's Imaging of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Glenn; Hansen, Candice; Momary, Thomas; Caplinger, Michael; Ravine, Michael; Atreya, Sushil; Ingersoll, Andrew; Bolton, Scott; Rogers, John; Eichstaedt, Gerald

    2017-04-01

    Juno's visible imager, JunoCam, is a wide-angle camera (58° field of view) with 4 color filters: red, green and blue (RGB) and methane at 889 nm, designed for optimal imaging of Jupiter's poles. Juno's elliptical polar orbit offers unique views of Jupiter's polar regions with spatial scales as good as 50 km/pixel. At closest approach ("perijove") the images have spatial scale down to ˜3 km/pixel. As a push-frame imager on a rotating spacecraft, JunoCam uses time-delayed integration to take advantage of the spacecraft spin to extend integration time to increase signal. Images of Jupiter's poles reveal a largely uncharted region of Jupiter, as nearly all earlier spacecraft except Pioneer 11 have orbited or flown by close to the equatorial plane. Poleward of 64-68° planetocentric latitude, Jupiter's familiar east-west banded structure breaks down. Several types of discrete features appear on a darker, bluish-cast background. Clusters of circular cyclonic spirals are found immediately around the north and south poles. Oval-shaped features are also present, ranging in size down to JunoCam's resolution limits. The largest and brightest features usually have chaotic shapes; animations over ˜1 hour can reveal cyclonic motion in them. Narrow linear features traverse tens of degrees of longitude and are not confined in latitude. JunoCam also detected optically thin clouds or hazes that are illuminated beyond the nightside ˜1-bar terminator; one of these detected at Perijove lay some 3 scale heights above the main cloud deck. Tests have been made to detect the aurora and lightning. Most close-up images of Jupiter have been acquired at lower latitudes within 2 hours of closest approach. These images aid in understanding the data collected by other instruments on Juno that probe deeper in the atmosphere. When Jupiter was too close to the sun for ground-based observers to collect data between perijoves 1 and 2, JunoCam took a sequence of routine images to monitor large

  18. Water ice lines and the formation of giant moons around super-Jovian planets

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, René

    2014-01-01

    Most of the exoplanets with known masses at Earth-like distances to Sun-like stars are heavier than Jupiter, which raises the question of whether such planets are accompanied by detectable, possibly habitable moons. Here we simulate the accretion disks around super-Jovian planets and find that giant moons with masses similar to Mars can form. Our results suggest that the Galilean moons formed during the final stages of accretion onto Jupiter, when the circumjovian disk was sufficiently cool. But in contrast to other studies, we show that Jupiter was still feeding from the circumsolar disk and that its principal moons cannot have formed after the complete photoevaporation of the circumsolar nebula. To counteract the steady loss of moons into the planet due to type I migration, we propose that the water ice line around Jupiter and super-Jovian exoplanets acted as a migration trap for moons. Heat transitions, however, cross the disk during the gap opening within 10^4 yr, which makes them inefficient as moon trap...

  19. 76 FR 75914 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... Joint NASA-European Space Agency Mars Program. -- Update on Europa Jupiter System Mission Descope Options. -- Status of European Space Agency's Potential JUpitor ICy moon Explorer Mission. -- Status...

  20. Capture of irregular satellites at Jupiter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesvorný, David; Vokrouhlický, David; Deienno, Rogerio [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2014-03-20

    The irregular satellites of outer planets are thought to have been captured from heliocentric orbits. The exact nature of the capture process, however, remains uncertain. We examine the possibility that irregular satellites were captured from the planetesimal disk during the early solar system instability when encounters between the outer planets occurred. Nesvorný et al. already showed that the irregular satellites of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune were plausibly captured during planetary encounters. Here we find that the current instability models present favorable conditions for capture of irregular satellites at Jupiter as well, mainly because Jupiter undergoes a phase of close encounters with an ice giant. We show that the orbital distribution of bodies captured during planetary encounters provides a good match to the observed distribution of irregular satellites at Jupiter. The capture efficiency for each particle in the original transplanetary disk is found to be (1.3-3.6) × 10{sup –8}. This is roughly enough to explain the observed population of jovian irregular moons. We also confirm Nesvorný et al.'s results for the irregular satellites of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.

  1. New Horizons Imaging of Jupiter's Main Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throop, Henry B.; Showalter, Mark Robert; Dones, Henry C. Luke; Hamilton, D. P.; Weaver, Harold A.; Cheng, Andrew F.; Stern, S. Alan; Young, Leslie; Olkin, Catherine B.; New Horizons Science Team

    2016-10-01

    New Horizons took roughly 520 visible-light images of Jupiter's ring system during its 2007 flyby, using the spacecraft's Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI). These observations were taken over nine days surrounding Jupiter close-approach. They span a range in distance of 30 - 100 RJ, and a phase angle range of 20 - 174 degrees. The highest resolution images -- more than 200 frames -- were taken at a resolution approaching 20 km/pix.We will present an analysis of this dataset, much of which has not been studied in detail before. Our results include New Horizons' first quantitative measurements of the ring's intrinsic brightness and variability. We will also present results on the ring's azimuthal and radial structure. Our measurements of the ring's phase curve will be used to infer properties of the ring's dust grains.Our results build on the only previous analysis of the New Horizons Jupiter ring data set, presented in Showalter et al (2007, Science 318, 232-234), which detected ring clumps and placed a lower limit on the population of undetected ring-moons.This work was supported by NASA's OPR program.

  2. Observing the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Gerald

    2014-03-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. 'Magnificent desolation'; 2. The moon through the looking glass; 3. Telescopes and drawing boards; 4. The Moon in camera; 5. Stacking up the Moon; 6. The physical Moon; 7. Lunarware; 8. 'A to Z' of selected lunar landscapes; 9. TLP or not TLP?; Appendix 1. Telescope collimation; Appendix 2. Field-testing a telescope's optics; Appendix 3. Polar alignment; Index.

  3. Emergence of Habitable Environments in Icy World Interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Finding habitable worlds is a key driver of solar system exploration. Many solar system missions seek environments providing liquid water, energy, and nutrients, the three ingredients necessary to sustain life [1]. Such environments include hydrothermal systems, spatially confined systems where hot aqueous fluid circulates through rock by convection. Hydrothermal activity may be widespread in the solar system. Most solar system worlds larger than 200 km in radius are icy moons and dwarf planets, likely composed of an icy, cometary mantle surrounding a rocky, chondritic core [2]. By improving an icy world evolution code [3] to include the effects of core fracturing and hydrothermal circulation, I show that several icy moons and dwarf planets likely have undergone extensive water-rock interaction [4,5]. This supports observations of aqueous products on their surfaces [6,7]. I simulated the alteration of chondritic rock [8] by pure water or fluid of cometary composition [9] to show that aqueous alteration feeds back on geophysical evolution: it modifies the fluid antifreeze content, affecting its persistence over geological timescales; and the distribution of radionuclides, whose decay is a chief heat source on dwarf planets [10]. Hydrothermal circulation also efficiently transports heat from the core into the ocean, thereby increasing ocean persistence [4]. Thus, these coupled geophysical-geochemical models provide a comprehensive picture of icy world evolution and the emergence of liquid environments in chemical disequilibrium with underlying rock in their interiors. Habitable settings also require a suitable supply of bioessential elements; but what constitutes "suitable"? I sought to quantify the bulk elemental composition of hydrothermal microbial communities, collected in hot spring sediments and mats at Yellowstone National Park, USA. To do so, one must minimize the contribution of non-biological material to the samples analyzed. This was achieved using a

  4. HUBBLE PROVIDES COMPLETE VIEW OF JUPITER'S AURORAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has captured a complete view of Jupiter's northern and southern auroras. Images taken in ultraviolet light by the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) show both auroras, the oval- shaped objects in the inset photos. While the Hubble telescope has obtained images of Jupiter's northern and southern lights since 1990, the new STIS instrument is 10 times more sensitive than earlier cameras. This allows for short exposures, reducing the blurring of the image caused by Jupiter's rotation and providing two to five times higher resolution than earlier cameras. The resolution in these images is sufficient to show the 'curtain' of auroral light extending several hundred miles above Jupiter's limb (edge). Images of Earth's auroral curtains, taken from the space shuttle, have a similar appearance. Jupiter's auroral images are superimposed on a Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 image of the entire planet. The auroras are brilliant curtains of light in Jupiter's upper atmosphere. Jovian auroral storms, like Earth's, develop when electrically charged particles trapped in the magnetic field surrounding the planet spiral inward at high energies toward the north and south magnetic poles. When these particles hit the upper atmosphere, they excite atoms and molecules there, causing them to glow (the same process acting in street lights). The electrons that strike Earth's atmosphere come from the sun, and the auroral lights remain concentrated above the night sky in response to the 'solar wind,' as Earth rotates underneath. Earth's auroras exhibit storms that extend to lower latitudes in response to solar activity, which can be easily seen from the northern U. S. But Jupiter's auroras are caused by particles spewed out by volcanoes on Io, one of Jupiter's moons. These charged particles are then magnetically trapped and begin to rotate with Jupiter, producing ovals of auroral light centered on Jupiter's magnetic poles in both the day and night skies

  5. ICIS2005印象

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董阳泽

    2006-01-01

    International Conference on Intelligent Systems(ICIS2005,2005年国际智能系统大会)于2005年12月1-3日在马来西亚吉隆坡举行。此次会议由马来西亚高等教育部批准,马来西来国家石油公司Petronas主赞助,Universiti Teknologi Petronas主办。参加会议的有来自中国、美国、日本、英国、马来西亚、印度等30个国家的200余篇论文作者及相关领域的研究人员。马来西来高等教育部部长Y.B.Dato’Sri Dr Haji Shafie Hj.Mohd Salleh亲临开幕式并致欢迎辞。

  6. Three spacecraft observe Jupiter's glowing polar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The aurorae on Jupiter are like the Aurorae Borealis and Australis on the Earth, although visible only by ultraviolet light. They flicker in a similar way in response to variations in the solar wind of charged particles blowing from the Sun. While Galileo monitored the changing environment of particles and magnetism in Jupiter's vicinity, IUE recorded surprisingly large and rapid variations in the overall strength of the auroral activity. IUE's main 45-centimetre telescope did not supply images,but broke up the ultraviolet rays into spectra, like invisible rainbows, from which astrophysicists could deduce chemical compositions, motions and temperatures in the cosmic objects under examination. In the case of Jupiter's aurorae, the strongest emission came from activated hydrogen atoms at a wavelength of 1216 angstroms. The Hubble Space Telescope's contributions to the International Jupiter Watch included images showing variations in the form of the aurorae, and "close-up" spectra of parts of the auroral ovals. Astronomers will compare the flickering aurorae on Jupiter with concurrent monitoring of the Sun and the solar wind by the ESA-NASA SOHO spacecraft and several satellites of the Interagency Solar-Terrestrial Programme. It is notable that changes in auroral intensity by a factor of two or three occurred during the 1996 observational period, even though the Sun was in an exceptionally quiet phase, with very few sunspots. In principle, a watch on Jupiter's aurorae could become a valuable means of checking the long-range effects of solar activity, which also has important consequences for the Earth. The situation at Jupiter is quite different from the Earth's, with the moons strongly influencing the planet's space environment. But with Hubble busy with other work, any such Jupiter-monitoring programme will have to await a new ultraviolet space observatory. IUE observed Jupiter intensively in 1979-80 in conjunction with the visits of NASA's Voyager spacecraft, and

  7. Using Simple Harmonic Motion to Follow the Galilean Moons--Testing Kepler's Third Law on a Small System

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, I. G.; Pereira, J. A. M.

    2009-01-01

    The motion of the four Galilean moons of Jupiter is studied in this work. The moons had their positions with respect to the centre of the planet measured during one week of observation by means of telescopic charge coupled device images. It is shown that their movement can be well described as a simple harmonic motion. The revolution period and…

  8. Jupiter - friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, J.; Jones, B. W.

    2007-08-01

    Throughout both popular science and academia, there is a pervasive belief that Jupiter has acted as a celestial shield, reducing the impact rate on the Earth, and making the planet a significantly more conducive site for the evolution and survival of life. This old idea has, however, undergone little detailed scrutiny. In the first of a series of studies aimed at a better understanding of this idea, we examine the variation in the impact rate on the Earth which results from bodies moving inwards from the Edgeworth- Kuiper belt as a function of the mass of a giant planet in Jupiter's orbit. The results are not entirely what would be expected under the "Jupiter Shield" paradigm.

  9. Understanding Jupiter's Interior

    CERN Document Server

    Militzer, Burkhard; Wahl, Sean M; Hubbard, William

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of how models of giant planet interiors are constructed. We review measurements from past space missions that provide constraints for the interior structure of Jupiter. We discuss typical three-layer interior models that consist of a dense central core and an inner metallic and an outer molecular hydrogen-helium layer. These models rely heavily on experiments, analytical theory, and first-principle computer simulations of hydrogen and helium to understand their behavior up to the extreme pressures ~10 Mbar and temperatures ~10,000 K. We review the various equations of state used in Jupiter models and compare them with shock wave experiments. We discuss the possibility of helium rain, core erosion and double diffusive convection may have important consequences for the structure and evolution of giant planets. In July 2016 the Juno spacecraft entered orbit around Jupiter, promising high-precision measurements of the gravitational field that will allow us to test our understandi...

  10. A Preliminary Jupiter Model

    CERN Document Server

    Hubbard, W B

    2016-01-01

    In anticipation of new observational results for Jupiter's axial moment of inertia and gravitational zonal harmonic coefficients from the forthcoming Juno orbiter, we present a number of preliminary Jupiter interior models. We combine results from ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures, including immiscibility calculations, with a new nonperturbative calculation of Jupiter's zonal harmonic coefficients, to derive a self-consistent model for the planet's external gravity and moment of inertia. We assume helium rain modified the interior temperature and composition profiles. Our calculation predicts zonal harmonic values to which measurements can be compared. Although some models fit the observed (pre-Juno) second- and fourth-order zonal harmonics to within their error bars, our preferred reference model predicts a fourth-order zonal harmonic whose absolute value lies above the pre-Juno error bars. This model has a dense core of about 12 Earth masses, and a hydrogen-helium-rich envelope with...

  11. A Preliminary Jupiter Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Militzer, B.

    2016-03-01

    In anticipation of new observational results for Jupiter's axial moment of inertia and gravitational zonal harmonic coefficients from the forthcoming Juno orbiter, we present a number of preliminary Jupiter interior models. We combine results from ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures, including immiscibility calculations, with a new nonperturbative calculation of Jupiter's zonal harmonic coefficients, to derive a self-consistent model for the planet's external gravity and moment of inertia. We assume helium rain modified the interior temperature and composition profiles. Our calculation predicts zonal harmonic values to which measurements can be compared. Although some models fit the observed (pre-Juno) second- and fourth-order zonal harmonics to within their error bars, our preferred reference model predicts a fourth-order zonal harmonic whose absolute value lies above the pre-Juno error bars. This model has a dense core of about 12 Earth masses and a hydrogen-helium-rich envelope with approximately three times solar metallicity.

  12. An ice crystal model for jupiter's moon Europa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; schmidt, Karen Guldbae

    2003-01-01

    A simple model for crystal growth in the ice shell of Europa has been made in order to estimate the size of ice crystals at Europa's surface. If mass is lost from the surface of Europa due to sputtering processes, and the ice thickness is constant in time, ice crystals will be transported upwards...... in the ice shell. The crystals will therefore grow under varying conditions through the shell.The model predicts that ice crystals are 4 cm-80 m across at the surface. For the preferred parameter values, a crystal size of the order of 7 m is calculated. Udgivelsesdato: 1 june...

  13. "Sniffing" Jupiter's moon Europa through ground-based IR observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganini, Lucas; Mumma, Michael J.; Hurford, Terry; Roth, Lorenz; Villanueva, Geronimo Luis

    2016-10-01

    The ability to sample possible plumes from the subsurface ocean in Europa represents a major step in our search for extraterrestrial life. If plumes exist, sampling the effluent material would provide insights into their chemistry and relevant information about the prospect that life could exist, or now exists, within the ocean. Most of the difficulties in detecting plumes come from the less frequent observational coverage of Europa, which contrasts strongly with the frequent Cassini flybys of Enceladus (Spencer & Nimmo 2013). Recent observations have been taken with HST/STIS in 2014/2015, but results have shown no evident confirmation of the 2012 plume detection (Roth et al. 2014, 2015). Future in situ observations (Europa Mission) will provide definitive insights, but not before the spacecraft's arrival in ~2025, thus an interim approach is needed to inform such space mission planning and to complement existing observations at other wavelengths.In 2015, we initiated a strong campaign to build a comprehensive survey of possible plumes on Europa through high-resolution IR spectroscopy with Keck/NIRSPEC. We were awarded 10 nights out of 15 total nights available for Key Strategic Mission Support projects for the 2016A, 2016B, 2017A, and 2017B semesters under NASA time with the Keck Observatory. In 2016A, we observed Europa during 10 half-nights and will continue to do so for another 10 half-nights in 2017A. We target a serendipitous search of gaseous activity from Europa to confirm and constrain the chemical composition of possible Europan plumes that can aid the investigation of physical processes underlying (or on) its surface. Ultimately, we seek to: (1) provide information that can inform planning for NASA's Europa mission, (2) further our current understanding of Europa's gas environment, and (3) complement studies that are currently underway with other facilities (like the Hubble Space Telescope). In this presentation, we will discuss preliminary results, challenges, and future plans of our observing campaign.* This work was supported by a NASA Keck PI Data Award (PI LP), administered by the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, and by the NASA Astrobiology Institute under proposal 13-13NAI7-0032 (PI MJM).

  14. Tidal reorientation and the fracturing of Jupiter's moon Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcewen, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    The lineaments on Europa are discussed in terms of the orientation of the lineaments relative to the tensile stress trajectories due to tidal distortions and to nonsynchronous rotation. The cracks are noticeable by their darker albedo compared to the presumed water ice surrounding them. The stress trajectories for tidal distortion of a thin elastic shell are superimposed on Mercator projection maps of the lineaments. It is shown that the lineaments are mainly oriented at high angles to the tensile stress trajectories that would be expected for regularly occurring nonsynchronous rotation, i.e., extensional fractures would appear. The reorientation motions which would cause the fractures are estimated. It is suggested that the fractures occur episodically to release stresses built up on the tensile surface of the crust during the continuous nonsynchronous rotation of Europa.

  15. Jupiter Moon May Have a Salt-Water Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟淑一

    2001-01-01

    @@[编者按:上帝若有知,也应为人类探索宇宙空间的努力而感动.遥望夜空,星汉灿烂.好像地球在宇宙间并不孤独,然而,当要寻觅外星朋友时,人类便怅然若失!NASA,(美国)国家航空和航天局的伽里略号太空船发回的数据显示:木星最大

  16. Jupiter Moon May Have a Salt-Water Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟淑一

    2001-01-01

    上帝若有知,也应为人类探索宇宙空间的努力而感动。遥望夜空,星汉灿烂。好像地球在宇宙间并不孤独,然而,当要寻觅外星朋友时,人类便怅然若失!NASA,(美国)国家航空和航天局的伽里略号太空船发回的数据显示:木星最大的卫星,Ganymede(土卫三), may possess a huge salt-water ocean beneath its crusty(有硬壳的)surface. 本文末句发人深省:...but the issue of whether it’s there is different than the issue of whether you can expect to see it clearly in the data. 此言初读有些难,再读,便为科学家的求实精神所染。

  17. A tenuous carbon dioxide atmosphere on Jupiter's moon Callisto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    An off-limb scan of Callisto was conducted by the Galileo near-infrared mapping spectrometer to search for a carbon dioxide atmosphere. Airglow in the carbon dioxide nu3 band was observed up to 100 kilometers above the surface and indicates the presence of a tenuous carbon dioxide atmosphere with surface pressure of 7.5 x 10(-12) bar and a temperature of about 150 kelvin, close to the surface temperature. A lifetime on the order of 4 years is suggested, based on photoionization and magnetospheric sweeping. Either the atmosphere is transient and was formed recently or some process is currently supplying carbon dioxide to the atmosphere.

  18. High-temperature silicate volcanism on Jupiter's moon Io.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, A S; Keszthelyi, L; Spencer, J R; Schubert, G; Matson, D L; Lopes-Gautier, R; Klaasen, K P; Johnson, T V; Head, J W; Geissler, P; Fagents, S; Davies, A G; Carr, M H; Breneman, H H; Belton, M J

    1998-07-03

    Infrared wavelength observations of Io by the Galileo spacecraft show that at least 12 different vents are erupting lavas that are probably hotter than the highest temperature basaltic eruptions on Earth today. In at least one case, the eruption near Pillan Patera, two independent instruments on Galileo show that the lava temperature must have exceeded 1700 kelvin and may have reached 2000 kelvin. The most likely explanation is that these lavas are ultramafic (magnesium-rich) silicates, and this idea is supported by the tentative identification of magnesium-rich orthopyroxene in lava flows associated with these high-temperature hot spots.

  19. Polar Gateways Arctic Circle Sunrise Conference 2008, Barrow, Alaska: IHY-IPY Outreach on Exploration of Polar and Icy Worlds in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Kauristie, Kirsti; Weatherwax, Allan T.; Sheehan, Glenn W.; Smith, Roger W.; Sandahl, Ingrid; Ostgaard, Nikolai; Chernouss, Sergey; Thompson, Barbara J.; Peticolas, Laura; Moore, Marla H.; Senske, David A.; Tamppari, Leslie K.; Lewis, Elaine M.

    2008-01-01

    Polar, heliophysical, and planetary science topics related to the International Heliophysical and Polar Years 2007-2009 were addressed during this circumpolar video conference hosted January 23-29, 2808 at the new Barrow Arctic Research Center of the Barrow Arctic Science Consortium in Barrow, Alaska. This conference was planned as an IHY-IPY event science outreach event bringing together scientists and educational specialists for the first week of sunrise at subzero Arctic temperatures in Barrow. Science presentations spanned the solar system from the polar Sun to Earth, Moon, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and the Kuiper Belt. On-site participants experienced look and feel of icy worlds like Europa and Titan by being in the Barrow tundra and sea ice environment and by going "on the ice" during snowmobile expeditions to the near-shore sea ice environment and to Point Barrow, closest geographic point in the U.S. to the North Pole. Many science presentations were made remotely via video conference or teleconference from Sweden, Norway, Russia, Canada, Antarctica, and the United States, spanning up to thirteen time zones (Alaska to Russia) at various times. Extensive educational outreach activities were conducted with the local Barrow and Alaska North Slope communities and through the NASA Digital Learning Network live from the "top of the world" at Barrow. The Sun- Earth Day team from Goddard, and a videographer from the Passport to Knowledge project, carried out extensive educational interviews with many participants and native Inupiaq Eskimo residents of Barrow. Video and podcast recordings of selected interviews are available at http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/2008/multimedidpodcasts.php. Excerpts from these and other interviews will be included in a new high definition video documentary called "From the Sun to the Stars: The New Science of Heliophysics" from Passport to Knowledge that will later broadcast on NASA TV and other educational networks. Full conference

  20. Spectral properties of icy satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf; Wagner, Roland; Clark, Roger; Cruikshank, Dale; Brown, Robert; Roatsch, Thomas; Buratti, Bonnie; Matson, Dennis; Dalle Ore, Cristina; Filacchione, Gianrico; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Nicholson, Phil; Baines, Kevin; Sotin, Christoph

    2015-08-01

    Since 2004 Cassini is orbiting the Saturnian system with its instruments investigating the chemical and physical properties of Saturn ‘s atmosphere, its magnetosphere, its numerous satellites and rings. The VIMS instrument onboard Cassini enables not only to identify the Saturn satellites’ compositional units but also to map their distribution across the surfaces, to relate their location and extension to specific geological and/or geomorphological surface features and to characterize surface alterations induced by the space environment. Although, the VIMS spectra of the Saturnian satellites’ surfaces are dominated by H2O-ice, its distribution and physical characteristics differ distinctly from one satellite to the other. Global hemispherical differences are mostly related to the satellite’s orbital position within the Saturnian system, i.e. the distance to Saturn and its E ring, with particles originating from Saturn’s magnetosphere and/or the ice grains coming from the E ring impacting their surfaces. Often, these hemispherical differences are characterized by a dark non-icy contaminant more concentrated on their trailing hemispheres, while the more water ice-rich leading hemispheres appear covered by fresh material ejected by an impact event and/or by impacting E-ring particles. Tethys, however, situated closer to Enceladus and the E ring and deeper within Saturn’s magnetosphere, shows a more complex pattern. Compositional changes on a regional and local scale could be identified and related to the geological processes, i.e. impact cratering, tectonics, and erosion. Particularly, young impact craters and tectonic features reveal clean H2O ice of relatively large grain size while the “fresh” (unaltered) surface material offers a unique view into the crustal properties and evolution of its satellite. Whereas, prominent graben systems on Dione and Rhea are characterized by a pronounced ice signature - Ithaca Chasma on Tethys is barely recognizable

  1. The rheology of icy satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammis, C. G.

    1984-01-01

    High-temperature creep in orthoenstatite under conditions of controlled oxygen fugacity was studied. It was found that creep was conttrolled by the extremely thin layer of SiO2 which wetted the grain boundaries. Slight reduction of the (Mg, Fe)SiO3 enstatite during hot pressing produced microscopic particles of Fe and the thin film of intergranular SiO2. This result highlights another complication in determining the flow properties of iron bearing silicates which constitute the bulk of terrestrial planets and moons. The Phenomenon may be important in the ductile formation of any extraterrestrial body which is formed in a reducing environment. The rheology of dirty ice was studied. This involves micromechanical modeling of hardening phenomena due to contamination by a cosmic distribution of silicate particles. The larger particles are modeled by suspension theory. In order to handle the distribution of particles sizes, the hardening is readed as a critical phenomenon, and real space renormalization group techniques are used. Smaller particles interact directly with the dislocations. The particulate hardening effect was studied in metals. The magnitude of such hardening in ice and the defect chemistry of ice are studied to assess the effects of chemical contamination by methane, ammonia, or other likely contaminants.

  2. Return to Europa: Overview of the Jupiter Europa orbiter mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K.; Boldt, J.; Greeley, R.; Hand, K.; Jun, I.; Lock, R.; Pappalardo, R.; van Houten, T.; Yan, T.

    2011-08-01

    Missions to explore Europa have been imagined ever since the Voyager mission first suggested that Europa was geologically very young. Subsequently, the Galileo spacecraft supplied fascinating new insights into this satellite of Jupiter. Now, an international team is proposing a return to the Jupiter system and Europa with the Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM). Currently, NASA and ESA are designing two orbiters that would explore the Jovian system and then each would settle into orbit around one of Jupiter's icy satellites, Europa and Ganymede. In addition, the Japanese Aerospace eXploration Agency (JAXA) is considering a Jupiter magnetospheric orbiter and the Russian Space Agency is investigating a Europa lander.The Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) would be the NASA-led portion of the EJSM; JEO would address a very important subset of the complete EJSM science objectives and is designed to function alone or in conjunction with ESA's Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). The JEO mission concept uses a single orbiter flight system that would travel to Jupiter by means of a multiple-gravity-assist trajectory and then perform a multi-year study of Europa and the Jupiter system, including 30 months of Jupiter system science and a comprehensive Europa orbit phase of 9 months.The JEO mission would investigate various options for future surface landings. The JEO mission science objectives, as defined by the international EJSM Science Definition Team, include:Europa's ocean: Characterize the extent of the ocean and its relation to the deeper interior.Europa's ice shell: Characterize the ice shell and any subsurface water, including their heterogeneity, and the nature of surface-ice-ocean exchange.Europa's chemistry: Determine global surface compositions and chemistry, especially as related to habitability.Europa's geology: Understand the formation of surface features, including sites of recent or current activity, and identify and characterize candidate sites for future in situ

  3. PAINT SUPPLIES AND LOCATION: EXAMINING ICI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Herron

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available How important is location to an international retailer? Not just any retailer but the second largest paint retailer in the world. Imperial Chemical Industries (ICI was a British chemical company and was at one stage the largest manufacturer in Britain. Formed from the merger of several leading British chemical companies in 1926, ICI makes paints and speciality products, including food ingredients, speciality polymers, electronic materials, fragrances and flavourings. ICI paints purchased the Cleveland Ohiobased Glidden Coatings & Resins (Glidden Paint Company in 1986 for USD$580 million. The addition of Glidden to ICI's North American operations more than doubled that subsidiary's annual sales to $3 billion and increased ICI's corporate presence in the United States dramatically. A decline in paint and solvent consumption during the 2000 decade slowed the average growth of the paint industry to about 2% annually. Rauch Associates, the leading US paint analyst firm, predicted near-term growth to slow even further to 1.2% per annum. Through the 1990’s and early 2000’s Glidden paint was sold only through Glidden-badged paint stores and smaller retailers under licence, developing a strong identifiable brand and reputation. How were potential Glidden retail paint store locations chosen across America to enable and support this market growth? This paper investigates the real process that was developed and applied to construct a national network of retail outlets across the United States. It also highlights the change in direction that occurred at ICI paints culminating in its eventual acquisition by AkzoNobel in 2008 who immediately sold parts of ICI to Henkel, and integrated ICI's remaining operations within its existing organisation. This sale and the associated corporate restructure caused considerable change in marketing directions allowing for the first time the selling of Glidden paint products to mass market centres

  4. The moons of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderblom, L. A.; Johnson, T. V.

    1982-01-01

    Knowledge gained of the 17 Saturn moons with observations by the Voyager spacecraft are reviewed. Titan was found to have the only atmosphere, which is opaque and precludes geologic inferences. Synchronous rotation is experienced by the 14 inner moons, with a constant inner face turned toward the planet. Phoebe is too far away from the planet to lose its spin to planetary tidal forces, and has an orbit inclined 150 deg from the equatorial plane, while Iapetus is inclined 14.7 deg in its orbit. The abundance of ice on the moons is accepted as evidence of condensation formation of the moons at very low temperatures. Newly discovered moons of Saturn, including both the shepherd moons, which are suspected to maintain the rings in place, and the moons discovered by earth-based astronomy, are discussed. Finally, photographs of all the moons are examined for definitive details.

  5. Jupiter's Big Bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kim A.

    1994-01-01

    Collision of a comet with Jupiter beginning July 16, 1994 will be observed by astronomers worldwide, with computerized information relayed to a center at the University of Maryland, financed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and National Science Foundation. Geologists and paleontologists also hope to learn more about earth's…

  6. Radiation belts of jupiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansberry, K G; White, R S

    1973-12-07

    Predictions of Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts are based mainly on decimeter observations of 1966 and 1968. Extensive calculations modeling radial diffusion of particles inward from the solar wind and electron synchrotron radiation are used to relate the predictions and observations.

  7. A Transiting Jupiter Analog

    CERN Document Server

    Kipping, David M; Henze, Chris; Teachey, Alex; Isaacson, Howard T; Petigura, Erik A; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Buchhave, Lars A; Chen, Jingjing; Bryson, Steve T; Sandford, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Decadal-long radial velocity surveys have recently started to discover analogs to the most influential planet of our solar system, Jupiter. Detecting and characterizing these worlds is expected to shape our understanding of our uniqueness in the cosmos. Despite the great successes of recent transit surveys, Jupiter analogs represent a terra incognita, owing to the strong intrinsic bias of this method against long orbital periods. We here report on the first validated transiting Jupiter analog, Kepler-167e (KOI-490.02), discovered using Kepler archival photometry orbiting the K4-dwarf KIC-3239945. With a radius of $(0.91\\pm0.02)$ $R_{\\mathrm{Jup}}$, a low orbital eccentricity ($0.06_{-0.04}^{+0.10}$) and an equilibrium temperature of $(131\\pm3)$ K, Kepler-167e bears many of the basic hallmarks of Jupiter. Kepler-167e is accompanied by three Super-Earths on compact orbits, which we also validate, leaving a large cavity of transiting worlds around the habitable-zone. With two transits and continuous photometric ...

  8. Under a Harvest Moon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    When it comes to expressing adoration for a loved one,doing it under the light of a full moon is guaranteed to score mega romantic points.In China,at Mid-Autumn Festival the moon is the guest of honor and along with a connection of hearts comes a nation’s insatiable desire for moon cakes. Second in importance only to the Chinese New Year, Mid-Autumn Festival,also known as Moon Festival,has

  9. Perceptions about Moon Phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Steven

    2002-01-01

    Presents research on different techniques to determine the level of understanding among middle school students regarding the phases of the moon. Quotes student responses to provide some insight into students' level of understanding of general knowledge about the moon, moon phases, and modeling the phases. Presents implications for teachers. (KHR)

  10. Full moon and crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, C P; Sharma, D

    The incidence of crimes reported to three police stations in different towns (one rural, one urban, one industrial) was studied to see if it varied with the day of the lunar cycle. The period of the study covered 1978-82. The incidence of crimes committed on full moon days was much higher than on all other days, new moon days, and seventh days after the full moon and new moon. A small peak in the incidence of crimes was observed on new moon days, but this was not significant when compared with crimes committed on other days. The incidence of crimes on equinox and solstice days did not differ significantly from those on other days, suggesting that the sun probably does not influence the incidence of crime. The increased incidence of crimes on full moon days may be due to "human tidal waves" caused by the gravitational pull of the moon.

  11. Polarized Light from Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    These images taken through the wide angle camera near closest approach in the deep near-infrared methane band, combined with filters which sense electromagnetic radiation of orthogonal polarization, show that the light from the poles is polarized. That is, the poles appear bright in one image, and dark in the other. Polarized light is most readily scattered by aerosols. These images indicate that the aerosol particles at Jupiter's poles are small and likely consist of aggregates of even smaller particles, whereas the particles at the equator and covering the Great Red Spot are larger. Images like these will allow scientists to ascertain the distribution, size and shape of aerosols, and consequently, the distribution of heat, in Jupiter's atmosphere.

  12. Tidal Response of Preliminary Jupiter Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Sean M.; Hubbard, William B.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2016-11-01

    In anticipation of improved observational data for Jupiter’s gravitational field, from the Juno spacecraft, we predict the static tidal response for a variety of Jupiter interior models based on ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures. We calculate hydrostatic-equilibrium gravity terms, using the non-perturbative concentric Maclaurin Spheroid method that eliminates lengthy expansions used in the theory of figures. Our method captures terms arising from the coupled tidal and rotational perturbations, which we find to be important for a rapidly rotating planet like Jupiter. Our predicted static tidal Love number, {k}2=0.5900, is ˜10% larger than previous estimates. The value is, as expected, highly correlated with the zonal harmonic coefficient J 2, and is thus nearly constant when plausible changes are made to the interior structure while holding J 2 fixed at the observed value. We note that the predicted static k 2 might change, due to Jupiter’s dynamical response to the Galilean moons, and find reasons to argue that the change may be detectable—although we do not present here a theory of dynamical tides for highly oblate Jovian planets. An accurate model of Jupiter’s tidal response will be essential for interpreting Juno observations and identifying tidal signals from effects of other interior dynamics of Jupiter’s gravitational field.

  13. A PRELIMINARY JUPITER MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, W. B. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Militzer, B. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    In anticipation of new observational results for Jupiter's axial moment of inertia and gravitational zonal harmonic coefficients from the forthcoming Juno orbiter, we present a number of preliminary Jupiter interior models. We combine results from ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen–helium mixtures, including immiscibility calculations, with a new nonperturbative calculation of Jupiter's zonal harmonic coefficients, to derive a self-consistent model for the planet's external gravity and moment of inertia. We assume helium rain modified the interior temperature and composition profiles. Our calculation predicts zonal harmonic values to which measurements can be compared. Although some models fit the observed (pre-Juno) second- and fourth-order zonal harmonics to within their error bars, our preferred reference model predicts a fourth-order zonal harmonic whose absolute value lies above the pre-Juno error bars. This model has a dense core of about 12 Earth masses and a hydrogen–helium-rich envelope with approximately three times solar metallicity.

  14. Jupiter's Grand Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batygin, Konstantin

    2017-06-01

    The statistics of extrasolar planetary systems indicate that the default mode of planetary formation generates planets with orbital periods shorter than 100 days, and masses substantially exceeding that of the Earth. When viewed in this context, the Solar System, which contains no planets interior to Mercury's 88-day orbit, is unusual. Extra-solar planetary detection surveys also suggest that planets with masses and periods broadly similar to Jupiter's are somewhat uncommon, with occurrence fraction of less than ~ 10%. In this talk, I will present calculations which show that a popular formation scenario for Jupiter and Saturn, in which Jupiter migrates inward from a > 5AU to a ˜ 1.5 AU and then reverses direction, can explain the low overall mass of the Solar System's terrestrial planets, as well as the absence of planets with a 10 - 100 km planetesimals into low- order mean-motion resonances, shepherding of order 10 Earth masses of this material into the a ˜ 1 AU region while exciting substantial orbital eccentricity (e ˜ 0.2 - 0.4). We argue that under these conditions, a collisional cascade will ensue, generating a planetesimal disk that would have flushed any preexisting short-period super-Earth-like planets into the Sun. In this scenario, the Solar System's terrestrial planets formed from gas-starved mass-depleted debris that remained after the primary period of dynamical evolution.

  15. Voyager picture of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Voyager 1 took this picture of the planet Jupiter on Saturday, Jan. 6, the first in its three-month-long, close-up investigation of the largest planet. The spacecraft, flying toward a March 5 closest approach, was 35.8 million miles (57.6 million kilometers) from Jupiter and 371.7 million miles (598.2 million kilometers) from Earth when the picture was taken. As the Voyager cameras begin their meteorological surveillance of Jupiter, they reveal a dynamic atmosphere with more convective structure than had previously been thought. While the smallest atmospheric features seen in this picture are still as large as 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) across, Voyager will be able to detect individual storm systems as small as 3 miles (5 kilometers) at closest approach. The Great Red Spot can be seen near the limb at the far right. Most of the other features are too small to be seen in terrestrial telescopes. This picture was transmitted to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory through the Deep Space Network's tracking station at Madrid, Spain. The Voyager Project is managed for NASA by Caltech's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  16. Titan's Impact Cratering Record: Erosion of Ganymedean (and other) Craters on a Wet Icy Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, P.; Moore, J.; Howard, A.

    2012-04-01

    We examine the cratering record of Titan from the perspective of icy satellites undergoing persistent landscape erosion. First we evaluate whether Ganymede (and Callisto) or the smaller low-gravity neighboring icy satellites of Saturn are the proper reference standard for evaluating Titan’s impact crater morphologies, using topographic and morphometric measurements (Schenk, 2002; Schenk et al. (2004) and unpublished data). The special case of Titan’s largest crater, Minrva, is addressed through analysis of large impact basins such as Gilgamesh, Lofn, Odysseus and Turgis. Second, we employ a sophisticated landscape evolution and modification model developed for study of martian and other planetary landforms (e.g., Howard, 2007). This technique applies mass redistribution principles due to erosion by impact, fluvial and hydrological processes to a planetary landscape. The primary advantage of our technique is the possession of a limited but crucial body of areal digital elevation models (DEMs) of Ganymede (and Callisto) impact craters as well as global DEM mapping of Saturn’s midsize icy satellites, in combination with the ability to simulate rainfall and redeposition of granular material to determine whether Ganymede craters can be eroded to resemble Titan craters and the degree of erosion required. References: Howard, A. D., “Simulating the development of martian highland landscapes through the interaction of impact cratering, fluvial erosion, and variable hydrologic forcing”, Geomorphology, 91, 332-363, 2007. Schenk, P. "Thickness constraints on the icy shells of the galilean satellites from impact crater shapes". Nature, 417, 419-421, 2002. Schenk, P.M., et al. "Ages and interiors: the cratering record of the Galilean satellites". In: Jupiter: The Planet, Satellites, and Magnetosphere, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, pp. 427-456, 2004.

  17. Current Status of the EJSM Jupiter Europa Orbiter Flagship Mission Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K.; Pappalardo, R.; Greeley, R.; Hendrix, A.; Boldt, J.; van Houten, T.; Jun, I.; Lock, R.; Ludwinski, J.; Rasmussen, R.; Tan-Wang, G.

    2008-12-01

    NASA and ESA have embarked on a joint study of a mission to Europa and the Jupiter system with orbiters developed by NASA, ESA, and possibly JAXA. An international Joint Jupiter Science Definition Team (JJSDT) is defining the science content for the Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) mission study run by NASA and for the Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO) mission study run by ESA. Engineering teams for both missions are working closely with the JJSDT to define mission concepts that optimize science, cost, and risk. The NASA-led JEO mission addresses a scientifically rich subset of the complete EJSM science goals and is designed to stand alone or in conjunction with the ESA-led JGO. This paper focuses on the NASA-led JEO mission and will describe the concept in the context of a standalone mission. An orbital mission to Europa is driven by the desire to investigate an astrobiological archetype for icy satellite habitability, with a putative warm, salty, water ocean with plausible energy sources. Additionally, JEO will explore the Jupiter system to better understand how Europa's possible habitability is related to the formation scenario of the other Jovian satellites. The JEO mission will perform 2.5-3 years of Jupiter system science, including encounters with Io, Ganymede and Callisto, before insertion into orbit around Europa for a comprehensive set of science campaigns lasting for up to one year. This paper will highlight the JEO mission design and implementation concept. The work reported was sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  18. Voyager 2 Jupiter Eruption Movie

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This movie records an eruptive event in the southern hemisphere of Jupiter over a period of 8 Jupiter days. Prior to the event, an undistinguished oval cloud mass cruised through the turbulent atmosphere. The eruption occurs over avery short time at the very center of the cloud. The white eruptive material is swirled about by the internal wind patterns of the cloud. As a result of the eruption, the cloud then becomes a type of feature seen elsewhere on Jupiter known as 'spaghetti bowls'.As Voyager 2 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 8 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). These images were acquired in the Violet filter around May 6, 1979. The spacecraft was about 50 million kilometers from Jupiter at that time.This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  19. Family Portrait of the Small Inner Satellites of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    These images, taken by Galileo's solid state imaging system between November 1996 and June 1997, provide the first ever 'family portrait' of the four small, irregularly shaped moons that orbit Jupiter in the zone between the planet's ring and the larger Galilean satellites. The moons are shown in their correct relative sizes, with north approximately up in all cases. From left to right, arranged in order of increasing distance from Jupiter, are Metis (longest dimension is approximately 60 kilometers or 37 miles across), Adrastea (20 kilometers or 12 miles across), Amalthea (247 kilometers or 154 miles across), and Thebe (116 kilometers or 72 miles across). While Amalthea, the largest of these four tiny moons, was imaged by NASA's two Voyager spacecraft in 1979 with a resolution comparable to what is shown here, the new Galileo observations represent the first time that Metis, Adrastea, and Thebe have been seen as more than points of light.The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  20. VIS-NIR Spectrophotometric Study of the Saturnian icy Satellites by Cassini-VIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Tosi, F.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Adriani, A.; McCord, T. B.; Baines, K. H.; Bellucci, G.; Brown, R. H.; Bibring, J.; Buratti, B. J.; Clark, R. N.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Formisano, V.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y. G.; Matson, D. L.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R. M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.

    2007-12-01

    After the first three years of the nominal mission aboard the Cassini probe the VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) experiment has collected more than one thousand useful full-disk observations of both regular (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus, Phoebe) and minor (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso) icy moons of Saturn. These data, acquired from a variety of distances and inclinations from the equatorial plane, with different phase angles and hemispheric coverage, are analyzed by using several spectroscopic indicators (I/F continuum level, slopes, bands strengths) in order to identify analogies and differences in the compositional units of satellites and derive the phase curves at different longitudes; many observations acquired close to zero phase angle allow us to measure the opposition surge effect on several satellites. Concerning the composition we have derived the distribution of the water ice abundance and grain size from the almost pure icy surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. We report about the differences observed in the CO2 band position which is shifted at shorter wavelengths on Hyperion respect to Phoebe and Iapetus; this effect is probably related to a different distribution of clathrates on these icy surfaces. This research was completed thanks to the support of the Italian Space Agency (ASI).

  1. Rotating magnetospheres: transport compared at Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivelson, M. G.; Southwood, D. J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    The magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn are dominated by the effects of rotation and the associated outward stress exerted by heavy ions picked up near the inner moons Fields and particle measurements in both systems show dramatic signatures of rotational periodicity At Jupiter the periodicity results principally from the effects of dipole tilt and the related displacements of the equatorial plasma sheet At Saturn there is little dipole tilt yet field and plasma properties vary periodically Efforts to understand how Saturn s rotational motion can be converted into what appears to be radial motion a conversion from rotation to rocking or reciprocating motion that is imposed in mechanical systems by a camshaft have recently focused on convective patterns with preferred sectors for transport see Southwood et al this session It is possible that similar effects are present at Jupiter and can account for plasma properties that have been described in terms of what has been referred to as the magnetic anomaly model Hill Goertz and Dessler 1983 This talk will use magnetometer data for the two systems to identify the possibly subtle signatures of the camshaft effect at Jupiter

  2. Dust en-route to Jupiter and the Galilean satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, H; Krueger, Harald; Gruen, Eberhard

    2002-01-01

    Spacecraft investigations during the last ten years have vastly improved our knowledge about dust in the Jovian system. All Galilean satellites, and probably all smaller satellites as well, are sources of dust in the Jovian system. In-situ measurements with the dust detectors on board the Ulysses and Galileo spacecraft have for the first time demonstrated the electromagnetic interaction of charged dust grains with the interplanetary magnetic field and with a planetary magnetosphere. Jupiter's magnetosphere acts as a giant mass-velocity spectrometer for charged 10-nanometer dust grains. These dust grains are released from Jupiter's moon Io with typical rate of 1 kg s^1. The dust streams probe the plasma conditions in the Io plasma torus and can be used as a potential monitor of Io's volcanic plume activity. The other Galilean satellites are surrounded by tenuous impact-generated clouds of mostly sub-micrometer ejecta grains. Galileo measurements have demonstrated that impact-ejecta derived from hypervelocity i...

  3. Ion Acceleration at Earth, Saturn and Jupiter and its Global Impact on Magnetospheric Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Pontus

    2016-07-01

    -midnight sector that seem to be related to centrifugal interchange. We will show how the plasma pressure resulting from the large-scale injections perturb the magnetic field and give rise the periodic oscillations as measured by Cassini. At Jupiter, quasi-periodic, large-scale injections also occur in the post-midnight sector, but at much larger distances. Analysis of Galileo measurements have shown that there are also features with similarities to the effects of planetward moving dipolarization fronts, and that the protons, O+ and S+ have different spectral signatures. Although the magnetodisc structure is partly a result of centrifugal forces exerted by the cold plasma, the anisotropies of the hot plasma have been found to account for a very significant part of the force-balance responsible for the disc structure. We will briefly also discuss our science planning and development of the plasma, energetic particle and ENA instrumentation on board the ESA Jupiter Icy moon Explorer and how we plan to address these intriguing science topics.

  4. Distinct Aqueous and Hydrocarbon Cryovolcanism on Titan and Other Icy Satellites (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargel, J. S.; Furfaro, R.; Candelaria, P.

    2010-12-01

    Almost as soon as low-temperature solar nebula condensation sequences were first computed, it was realized that icy satellites have an internal heat source in long-lived radioactivities and could undergo differentiation; furthermore, freezing-point depressants, such as ammonia, and apolar gases, such as methane, could enable icy satellites to undergo aqueous cryovolcanism. The subsequent recognition of tidal and gravitational potential energy sources increased expectations for cryovolcanism. Voyager imaging and discovery of apparent cryovolcanic landforms—best exhibited by Triton, more ambiguous elsewhere-- motivated studies of the phase relations, phase densities and other thermodynamic properties, solid- and liquid-state rheologies, and possible cryovolcanic eruptive behaviors and landform characteristics. Ironically, the closer we examined Jovian icy moons with Galileo, the rarer cryovolcanic landforms appeared to be, with only a few compelling and very well characterized cases found mainly on Europa. Compelling examples of effusive cryovolcanism mainly occupied local topographic lows, whereas cases not in low spots tended to exhibit signs of explosive emplacement. Spectacular evidence of explosive cryovolcanism or geyser-like behavior was found by Cassini on Enceladus, but most other icy Saturnian moons did not reveal any compelling indicators of eruptions. Titan has so far been a mixed case, where some indicators of cryovolcanism have been reported, but there is scant compelling evidence for the process. We think that the sparseness of compelling effusive cryovolcanic features on icy satellites is because free, unreacted ammonia is less common than previously thought, and the main aqueous liquids are salt-water solutions denser than ice I; hence, they tend not to erupt, or they erupt only if driven by gas exsolution; even then, a thin ice shell and high heat flow is needed to allow aqueous liquids near enough to the surface to erupt. On satellites with thick

  5. Jupiter: Lord of the Planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, William

    1984-01-01

    Presents a chapter from an introductory college-level astronomy textbook in which full-color photographs and numerous diagrams highlight an extensive description of the planet Jupiter. Topics include Jupiter's geology, rotation, magnetic field, atmosphere (including clouds and winds), and the Great Red Spot. (DH)

  6. Impact-induced differentiation in icy bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Tonks, W Brian; Melosh, H Jay

    2016-01-01

    By the time icy objects grow to about the mass of Europa and silicate bodies grow to approximately lunar mass, a large high-speed impact can generate an intact melt region that allows the dense material to gravitationally segregate, forming a large density anomaly. If this anomaly generates sufficient differential stress, it rapidly segregates to the object's center, triggering whole body differentiation. We used an impact melting model based on the Hugoniot equations, the linear shock-particle velocity relationship, and the empirical relationship between shock pressure and distance coupled with a Monte Carlo simulation of the late accretion process to determine conditions under which large impacts trigger differentiation in icy bodies. In a gas-free environment, impacts of projectiles in the satellite's accretion zone have a small probability of triggering differentiation in surviving proto-satellites as small as Triton. The probability increases to 100% by the time surviving proto-satellites grow to the mas...

  7. Small Friends of Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Luis Ernesto; Johnson, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Hot Jupiters are Jupiter-sized gas giant exoplanets that closely orbit their host star in periods of about 10 days or less. Early models hypothesized that these exoplanets formed away from the star, then over time drifted to their characteristically closer locations. However, new theories predict that Hot Jupiters form at their close proximity during the process of core accretion (Batygin et al. 2015). In fact, a super-Earth and a Neptune-sized exoplanet have already been detected in the Hot Jupiter-hosting star WASP-47 (Becker et al. 2015). We will present our analysis of radial velocity time series plots to determine whether low-mass, short-period planets have been previously overlooked in systems of stars which host Hot Jupiters.The SAO REU program is funded in part by the National Science Foundation REU and Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant no. 1262851.

  8. Resonant interactions and chaotic rotation of Pluto's small moons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, M R; Hamilton, D P

    2015-06-04

    Four small moons--Styx, Nix, Kerberos and Hydra--follow near-circular, near-equatorial orbits around the central 'binary planet' comprising Pluto and its large moon, Charon. New observational details of the system have emerged following the discoveries of Kerberos and Styx. Here we report that Styx, Nix and Hydra are tied together by a three-body resonance, which is reminiscent of the Laplace resonance linking Jupiter's moons Io, Europa and Ganymede. Perturbations by the other bodies, however, inject chaos into this otherwise stable configuration. Nix and Hydra have bright surfaces similar to that of Charon. Kerberos may be much darker, raising questions about how a heterogeneous satellite system might have formed. Nix and Hydra rotate chaotically, driven by the large torques of the Pluto-Charon binary.

  9. Space Environmental Erosion of Polar Icy Regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, William M.; Killen, R. M.; Vondrak, R. R.; Hurley, D. M.; Stubbs, T. J.; Delory, G. T.; Halekas, J. S.; Zimmerman, M. I.

    2011-01-01

    While regions at the floors of permanently shadowed polar craters are isolated from direct sunlight, these regions are still exposed to the harsh space environment, including the interplanetary Lyman-a background, meteoric impacts, and obstacle-affected solar wind. We demonstrate that each of these processes can act to erode the polar icy regolith located at or near the surface along the crater floor. The Lyman-a background can remove/erode the icy-regolith via photon stimulated desorption [1], meteoric impacts can vaporize the regolith [2], and redirected solar wind ions can sputter the ice-regolith mix [3]. As an example we shall examine in detail the inflow of solar wind ions and electrons into polar craters, One might expect such ions to flow horizontally over the crater top (see Figure). However, we find that plasma ambipolar processes act to deflect passing ions into the craters [3]. We examine this plasma process and determine the ion flux as a function of position across a notional crater floor. We demonstrate that inflowing solar wind ions can indeed create sputtering along the crater floor, effectively eroding the surface. Erosion time scales rrom sputtering will be presented. We shall also consider the effect of impact vaporization on buried icy-regolith regions. There will also be a discussion of solar wind electrons that enter into the PSR, demonstrating that these also have the ability rree surface-bound atoms via electron stimulated desorption processes [l].

  10. Tower To The Moon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShirleeP.Newman; 黄献党

    2002-01-01

    There was once a king who was different from other kings. Instead of sitting on a high throne(王位、宝座),this king liked to sit outside and lood at the moon. He would sit for hours, just looking at the moon and wondering what it would be like to go there.

  11. The Portrayal of the Medicean Moons in Early Astronomical Charts and Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendillo, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Galileo’s talents in perspective and chiaroscuro drawing led to his images of the Moon being accepted as the portrayal of a truly natural physical place. The Moon was seen as a world—real but separate from Earth. In contrast to his resolved views of the Moon, Galileo saw the moons of Jupiter as only points of light, and thus in Sidereus Nuncius they appear as star-symbols. Within 50 years, in Cellarius’ Atlas Coelestis seu Harmonia Macrocosmica (1660), the Medicean moons continue to appear in multiple charts as star-shaped symbols—in most cases equidistant from Jupiter. They appear in the Cellarius charts as updates to the cosmological systems of Copernicus and Tycho Brahe, but not in the charts devoted to the Ptolemaic system. A quarter century later, Mallet did not include the moons of Jupiter in his Copernican chart in Description de l’Universe (1683). Around 1690, in Jaillot’s Four Systems of Cosmology, the Medicean moons appear as circular symbols in four distinct concentric orbits around Jupiter. Additional examples appear in a later edition of Mallet ((1690s), and in De Fer (1705), Dopplemayer (1720), and still later in Buy de Mornas (1761). As objects discussed in scientific book, symbolic representations of the Medicean moons appear in Marius (1614), Descartes (1644), Fontana (1646) and Hevelius (1647). A pictorial survey of antiquarian charts and books depicting the Medicean moons will be the focus of this presentation. As telescope sizes increased, the Galilean moons could be seen as extended objects, and thus the transition occurred from portraying the moons as points of light to disks with physically-meaningful details. Initially, these were done via drawings of glimpses of the disks of the four moons during moments of extremely good seeing (termed “lucky images” in the pre-adaptive optics period). This era of portraying surface characteristics of Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto by hand-drawn images from naked-eye observations ended

  12. Transit Model of Planets with Moon and Ring System

    CERN Document Server

    Tusnski, Luis Ricardo M; 10.1088/0004-637X/743/1/97

    2011-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first exoplanets, those most adequate for life to begin and evolve have been sought. Due to observational bias, however, most of the discovered planets so far are gas giants, precluding their habitability. However, if these hot Jupiters are located in the habitable zones of their host stars, and if rocky moons orbit them, then these moons may be habitable. In this work, we present a model for planetary transit simulation considering the presence of moons and planetary rings around a planet. The moon's orbit is considered to be circular and coplanar with the planetary orbit. The other physical and orbital parameters of the star, planet, moon, and rings can be adjusted in each simulation. It is possible to simulate as many successive transits as desired. Since the presence of spots on the surface of the star may produce a signal similar to that of the presence of a moon, our model also allows for the inclusion of starspots. The result of the simulation is a light curve with a planetar...

  13. Warm Jupiters are less lonely than hot Jupiters: close neighbours

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Chelsea X; Triaud, Amaury H M J

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting the Kepler transit data, we uncover a dramatic distinction in the prevalence of sub-Jovian companions, between systems that contain hot Jupiters (periods inward of 10 days) and those that host warm Jupiters (periods between 10 and 200 days). Hot Jupiters as a whole, with the singular exception of WASP-47b, do not have any detectable inner or outer planetary companions (with periods inward of 50 days and sizes down to $2 R_{\\rm Earth}$). Restricting ourselves to inner companions, our limits reach down to $1 R_{\\rm Earth}$. In stark contrast, half of the warm Jupiters are closely flanked by small companions. Statistically, the companion fractions for hot and warm Jupiters are mutually exclusive, in particular in regard to inner companions. The high companion fraction of warm Jupiters also yields clue to their formation. The warm Jupiters that have close-by siblings should have low orbital eccentricities and low mutual inclinations. The orbital configurations of these systems are reminiscent of those ...

  14. Current Status of the EJSM Jupiter Europa Orbiter: Mission Design and Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunthaner, Paula; Clark, K.; Pappalardo, R.; Greeley, R.; Hendrix, A.; Boldt, J.; Van Houten, T.; Jun, I.; Lock, R.; Ludwinski, J.; Rasmussen, R.; Tan-Wang, G.

    2008-09-01

    NASA and ESA have embarked on a joint study of a mission to Europa and the Jupiter system with orbiters developed by NASA, ESA, and possibly JAXA. An international Jupiter Joint Science Definition Team (JJSDT) is defining the science content for the Europa Orbiter (JEO) mission study run by NASA and for the Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO) mission study run by ESA. Engineering teams for both missions are working closely with the JJSDT to define mission concepts that optimize science, cost, and risk. The NASA-led JEO mission addresses a scientifically rich subset of the complete EJSM science goals and is designed to stand alone or in conjunction with the ESA-led JGO. This paper focuses on the NASA-led JEO mission and will describe the concept in the context of a standalone mission. An orbital mission to Europa is driven by the desire to investigate an astrobiological archetype for icy satellite habitability, with a warm, salty, water ocean with plausible energy sources. Additionally, JEO will explore the Jupiter system to better understand how Europa's possible habitability is related to the formation scenario of the other Jovian satellites. The JEO mission will perform 2.5 to 3 years of Jupiter system science, including encounters with Io, Ganymede and Callisto, before insertion into orbit around Europa for a comprehensive set of science campaigns lasting for up to one year. This paper will highlight the JEO mission design and implementation concept. The work reported was sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  15. The Europa Jupiter System Mission: Synergistic Science Enabled by JEO and JGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senske, D. A.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Prockter, L. M.; Lebreton, J.; Greeley, R.; Bunce, E. J.; Dougherty, M. K.; Grasset, O.; Titov, D.

    2010-12-01

    The Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), a joint mission under study by NASA and ESA, has the overarching theme: The emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants. This mission would consist of two major flight elements, the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). The science which could be achieved by EJSM centers around three goals: (1) Explore Europa to investigate its habitability (JEO-focus); (2) Characterize Ganymede as a planetary object including its potential habitability (JGO-focus) and (3) Explore the Jupiter system as an archetype for gas giants (JEO + JGO). The last goal would be addressed primarily during the tour phase of the mission, lasting upwards of 2.5-years, whereby each spacecraft would perform multiple, Galilean satellite fly-bys and make measurements of Jupiter and the Jupiter system. The EJSM Jupiter baseline tour would provide abundant opportunities to perform coordinated Jupiter system science, including fields and particles/magnetometer observations; Jupiter atmosphere monitoring; Io monitoring; spacecraft-to-spacecraft radio occultations of various targets; Galilean satellite flybys; and distant observations of the Galilean moons, small moons, and rings. In realm of understanding the Jovian environment, fields and particles/magnetometer measurements could be carried out nearly continuously, providing unique multipoint measurements of the time-dependent three-dimensional structure of the magnetosphere. In terms of understanding the structure and dynamics of the Jupiter atmosphere, it would be possible to perform coordinated, long-duration (20+ hours), observations over regular periods to monitor weather and understand the behavior of individual storm systems. In a similar manner, regular monitoring of volcanic activity at Io would make it possible to assess the variability in levels of volcanic activity, characterize plume structure, and aid in determining heat flow and transport. Unique

  16. Current Status of the Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO): Science & Science Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Robert T.; Blanc, M.; Clark, K.; Greeley, R.; Hendrix, A.; Lebreton, J.; Prockter, L.; Joint Jupiter Science Definition Team

    2008-09-01

    The Jupiter-Europa Orbiter (JEO) is one component of the proposed multi-spacecraft Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM). The overarching goal of JEO is to explore Europa to investigate its habitability. Europa is believed to shelter an ocean between its geodynamically active icy shell and its rocky mantle, where the conditions for habitability may be fulfilled. With a warm, salty, water ocean and plausible chemical energy sources, Europa is the astrobiological archetype for icy satellite habitability. It is also a geophysical wonderland of interrelated ice shell processes that are intimately related to the ocean and tides, and of complex interactions among its interior, surface, atmosphere, and magnetospheric environments. A mission to Europa has been studied for a decade and has strong links to and recommendations from NASA reports. The conditions at Europa are well-understood, and JEO is prepared for the radiation environment at Europa. Europa science is mature, and hypotheses are well-formed. Five broad investigations have been defined to address the overarching goal: the Ocean, the Ice Shell, Chemistry, Geology and the Jupiter System. Measuring Europa's tides provides a simple and definitive test of the existence of an internal ocean - and the ocean and ice shell can be studied and characterized. Composition and chemistry form the linkages that enable understanding Europa's potential for life and habitability in the context of geologic processes, probe the interior structure, and record the evolution of the surface under the influence of internal and external processes. The search for recent or current geologic activity is important for understanding the origin of landforms, and especially significant for understanding Europa's potential for habitability. Understanding the Jupiter system as a whole is critical for placing Europa in its context as a member of the Jovian satellite system and for understanding the origin and evolution of the system, including

  17. Current Status of the Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO): Science and Science Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Blanc, M.; Clark, K.; Greeley, R.; Hendrix, A. R.; Lebreton, J.; Prockter, L.; JEO Definition Team

    2008-12-01

    The Jupiter-Europa Orbiter (JEO) is one component of the proposed multi-spacecraft Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM). The overarching goal of JEO is to explore Europa to investigate its habitability. Europa is believed to shelter an ocean between its geodynamically active icy shell and its rocky mantle, where the conditions for habitability may be fulfilled. With a warm, salty, water ocean and plausible chemical energy sources, Europa is the astrobiological archetype for icy satellite habitability. It is also a geophysical wonderland of interrelated ice shell processes that are intimately related to the ocean and tides, and of complex interactions among its interior, surface, atmosphere, and magnetospheric environments. A mission to Europa has been studied for a decade and has strong links to and recommendations from NASA reports. The conditions at Europa are well-understood, and JEO is prepared for the radiation environment at Europa. Europa science is mature, and hypotheses are well-formed. Five broad investigations have been defined to address the overarching goal: the Ocean, the Ice Shell, Chemistry, Geology and the Jupiter System. Measuring Europa's tides provides a simple and definitive test of the existence of an internal ocean - and the ocean and ice shell can be studied and characterized. Composition and chemistry form the linkages that enable understanding Europa's potential for life and habitability in the context of geologic processes, probe the interior structure, and record the evolution of the surface under the influence of internal and external processes. The search for recent or current geologic activity is important for understanding the origin of landforms, and especially significant for understanding Europa's potential for habitability. Understanding the Jupiter system as a whole is critical for placing Europa in its context as a member of the Jovian satellite system and for understanding the origin and evolution of the system, including

  18. The Moon Village Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Piero; Foing, Bernard H.; Hufenbach, Bernhard; Haignere, Claudie; Schrogl, Kai-Uwe

    2016-07-01

    The "Moon Village" concept Space exploration is anchored in the International Space Station and in the current and future automatic and planetary automatic and robotic missions that pave the way for future long-term exploration objectives. The Moon represents a prime choice for scientific, operational and programmatic reasons and could be the enterprise that federates all interested Nations. On these considerations ESA is currently elaborating the concept of a Moon Village as an ensemble where multiple users can carry out multiple activities. The Moon Village has the ambition to serve a number of objectives that have proven to be of interest (including astronomy, fundamental research, resources management, moon science, etc. ) to the space community and should be the catalyst of new alliances between public and private entities including non-space industries. Additionally the Moon Village should provide a strong inspirational and education tool for the younger generations . The Moon Village will rely both on automatic, robotic and human-tendered structures to achieve sustainable moon surface operations serving multiple purposes on an open-architecture basis. This Europe-inspired initiative should rally all communities (across scientific disciplines, nations, industries) and make it to the top of the political agendas as a the scientific and technological undertaking but also political and inspirational endeavour of the XXI century. The current reflections are of course based on the current activities and plans on board the ISS and the discussion held in international fora such as the ISECG. The paper will present the status of these reflections, also in view of the ESA Council at Ministerial Level 2016, and will give an overview of the on-going activities being carried out to enable the vision of a Moon Village.

  19. Northern Belt of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] A four-panel frame shows a section of Jupiter's north equatorial belt viewed by NASA's Cassini spacecraft at four different wavelengths, and a separate reference frame shows the location of the belt on the planet.A fascinating aspect of the images in the four-panel frame is the small bright spot in the center of each. The images come from different layers of the atmosphere, so the spot appears to be a storm penetrating upward through several layers. This may in fact be a 'monster' thunderstorm, penetrating all the way into the stratosphere, as do some summer thunderstorms in the midwestern United States. These images were taken on Nov. 27, 2000, at a resolution of 192 kilometers (119 miles) per pixel. They have been contrast-enhanced to highlight features in the atmosphere.The top panel of the four-panel frame is an image taken in a near-infrared wavelength at which the gases in Jupiter's atmosphere are relatively non-absorbing. Sunlight can penetrate deeply into the atmosphere at this wavelength and be reflected back out, providing a view of an underlying region of the atmosphere, the lower troposphere.The second panel was taken in the blue portion of wavelengths detected by the human eye. At these wavelengths, gases in the atmosphere scatter a modest amount of sunlight, so the clouds we see tend to be at somewhat higher altitudes than in the top panel.The third panel shows near-infrared reflected sunlight at a wavelength where the gas methane, an important constituent of Jupiter's atmosphere, absorbs strongly. Dark places are regions without high-level clouds and consequently large amounts of methane accessible to sunlight. Bright regions are locations with high clouds in the upper troposphere shielding the methane below.The bottom panel was taken in the ultraviolet. At these very short wavelengths, the clear atmosphere scatters sunlight, and hazes in the stratosphere, above the troposphere, absorb sunlight. That

  20. Shoot the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont-Bloch, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    1. Introducing lunar imaging; 2. Choosing your imaging equipment; 3. Adapting your image device to the instrument; 4. Tuning your telescope for lunar imaging; 5. Wide-field, lunar imaging; 6. High-resolution, lunar imaging; 7. Essential image processing; 8. Advanced image processing; 9. Making 3D lunar images; 10. Measuring and identifying lunar features; 11. Photogenic features of the Moon; 12. Naming, archiving, printing and sharing lunar images; Appendix: maps of the Moon, Lunar 100 and other targets; Web pages, books and freeware for the Moon; Figure data; Index.

  1. Origin of earth's moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The major geochemical properties of the moon are briefly considered along with the significant facts of the moon's geologic history, and then the three current hypotheses regarding the moon's origin, namely, fission, capture, and binary accretion, are reviewed. The individual merits and improbabilities associated with each mechanism are taken into consideration. Special attention is given to the binary accretion model as the most promising one. In the variants of this model, of crucial importance is the nature of the more general hypothesis assumed for planetary formation from the solar nebula. The two main models differ considerably in the amount of chemical fractionation they allow to accompany planetary formation.

  2. Phase behavior and thermodynamic modeling of ices - implications for the geophysics of icy satellites. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choukroun, M.

    2010-12-01

    Ground-based observations and space missions to the outer Solar System (Voyager, Galileo, Cassini-Huygens) have evidenced recent geologic activity on many satellites of the giant planets. The diversity in surface expression of these icy moons’ activity is striking: from a scarred and young surface on Europa,1 with hydrated salts that may originate from a liquid layer buried at depth,2 to the South Polar plumes of Enceladus,3 where water ice particles are expelled along with a myriad of more complex molecules,4 to Titan, largest satellite of Saturn, with a dense atmosphere and a hydrocarbon cycle similar to the hydrological cycle on Earth.5 Large icy moons, i.e. with a radius greater than 500 km, share two particularities: a high content in water (on the order of a 30-70% bulk composition), and an interior segregated between a water-dominated mantle and a silicate-dominated core. The many forms water may have beneath the surface (ice polymorphs, liquid, hydrated compounds) bear a crucial role in the detected or alleged activity, and in the potential for astrobiological relevance. Indeed, any endogenic activity can only be approached through geophysical modelling of the internal structure and the thermal evolution. Current internal structure models for the icy moonse.g.,6 rely mainly on the contribution of each internal layer to the moment of inertia, generating non-unique solutions due to the large variability in density of H2O-bearing phases. Thermal evolution models,e.g.,7 can help constrain further the internal structure and geophysical activity, by starting with a given initial composition and state and investigating the thickening of icy layers through time. However, such models require both observational datasets and a precise description, as a function of pressure, temperature, and composition, of the thermophysical properties of the individual layers. Over the past century, experimental studies have provided a comprehensive view of the phase diagram of

  3. Electron irradiation of carbon dioxide-carbon disulphide ice analog and its implication on the identification of carbon disulphide on Moon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Sivaraman

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon disulphide (CS2) molecular ice mixture was prepared under low temperature (85 K) astrochemical conditions. The icy mixture irradiated with keV electrons simulates the irradiation environment experienced by icy satellites and Interstellar Icy Mantles (IIM). Upon electron irradiation the chemical composition was found to have altered and the new products from irradiation were found to be carbonyl sulphide (OCS), sulphur dioxide (SO2), ozone (O3), carbon trioxide (CO3), sulphur trioxide (SO3), carbon subsulphide (C3S2) and carbon monoxide (CO). Results obtained confirm the presence of CS2 molecules in lunar south-pole probed by the Moon Impact Probe (MIP).

  4. The Impact of Stars on Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    In other solar systems, the radiation streaming from the central star can have a destructive impact on the atmospheres of the stars close-in planets. A new study suggests that these exoplanets may also have a much harder time keeping their moons.Where Are the Exomoons?Moons are more common in our solar system than planets by far (just look at Jupiters enormous collection of satellites!) and yet we havent made a single confirmed discovery of a moon around an planet outside of our solar system. Is this just because moons have smaller signals and are more difficult to detect? Or might there also be a physical reason for there to be fewer moons around the planets were observing?Led by Ming Yang, a team of scientists from Nanjing University in China have explored one mechanism that could limit the number of moons we might find around exoplanets: photoevaporation.Artists illustration of the process of photoevaporation, in which the atmosphere of a planet is stripped by radiation from its star. [NASA Goddard SFC]Effects of RadiationPhotoevaporation is a process by which the harsh high-energy radiation from a star blasts a close-in planet, imparting enough energy to the atoms of the planets atmosphere for those atoms to escape. As the planets atmosphere gradually erodes, significant mass loss occurs on timescales of tens or hundreds of millions of years.How might this process affect such a planets moons? To answer this question, Yang and collaborators used an N-body code called MERCURY to model solar systems in which a Neptune-like planet at 0.1 AU gradually loses mass. The planet starts out with a large system of moons, and the team tracks the moons motions to determine their ultimate fates.Escaping BodiesEvolution of the planet mass (top) in a simulation containing 500 small moons. The evolution of the semimajor axes of the moons (middle) and their eccentricities (bottom) are shown, with three example moons, starting at different radii, highlighted in blue, red and green

  5. Full Moon Feeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Gil, A.; Ballesteros Roselló, F.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Lanzara, M.; Moya, M. J.

    2012-09-01

    The Moon is, together with the Sun, the very first astronomical object that we experience in our life. As this is an exclusively visual experience, people with visual impairments need to follow a different path to experience it too. Here we will show the process of designing and testing a tactile 3D Moon sphere whose goal is to reproduce on a tactile support the experience of observing the Moon visually. We have used imaging data obtained by NASA's mission Clementine, along with free image processing and 3D rendering software. This method is also useful to produce other artifacts that can be employed in the communication of astronomy to all kinds of public. The tactile Moon project for the blind has been funded partially by the 2011 Europlanet Outreach Funding Scheme.

  6. Santa and the moon

    CERN Document Server

    Barthel, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Happy end-of-the-year evening and night events provide good opportunities to explain the phases of the moon. The need for such moon phase education is once again demonstrated, through an investigation of illustrations on Santa Claus and Christmas gift wrap and in children's books, in two countries which have been important in shaping the image of Santa Claus and his predecessor Sinterklaas: The Netherlands and the USA. The moon on Halloween illustrations is also considered. The lack of knowledge concerning the physical origin of the moon phases, or lack of interest in understanding, is found to be widespread in The Netherlands but is also clearly present in the USA, and is quite possibly global. Definitely incomplete, but surely representative lists compiling both scientifically correct and scientifically incorrect gift wrap and children's books are also presented.

  7. Moon nature and culture

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    Long before a rocket hit the Man in the Moon in the eye in Georges Méliès's early film Le Voyage dans la Lune, the earth's lone satellite had entranced humans. We have worshipped it as a deity, believed it to cause madness, used it as a means of organizing time, and we now know that it manipulates the tides-our understanding of the moon continues to evolve. Following the moon from its origins to its rich cultural resonance in literature, art, religion, and politics, Moon provides a comprehensive account of the significance of our lunar companion. Edgar Williams explores the interdependence of

  8. Under a Harvest Moon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    When it comes to expressing adoration for a loved one,doing it under the light of a full moon is guaranteed to score mega romantic points.In China,at MidAutumn Festival the moon is the guest of honor and along with a connection of hearts comes a nation's insatiable desire for moon cakes.Second in importance only to the Chinese New Year,Mid-Autumn Festival,also known as Moon Festival,has as its focus the reunion of families and loved ones.As an officially sanctioned one day holiday,it has therefore developed over time into a gathering of family members living in the same city - and for those split by distance,it's become a lunar connection.

  9. Geometry and Moon Phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kenneth W.; Harrell, Marvin E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity, designed to comply with the National Science Education Standards, that integrates science and mathematics concepts. Mathematical modeling of the moon's phases is employed to show students the role of mathematics in describing scientific phenomena. (DKM)

  10. Survivability of bacteria ejected from icy surfaces after hypervelocity impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, Mark J; Galloway, James A; Bunch, Alan W; Brandão, Pedro F B

    2003-02-01

    Both the Saturnian and Jovian systems contain satellites with icy surfaces. If life exists on any of these icy bodies (in putative subsurface oceans for example) then the possibility exists for transfer of life from icy body to icy body. This is an application of the idea of Panspermia, wherein life migrates naturally through space. A possible mechanism would be that life, here taken as bacteria, could become frozen in the icy surface of one body. If a high-speed impact occurred on that surface, ejecta containing the bacteria could be thrown into space. It could then migrate around the local region of space until it arrived at a second icy body in another high-speed impact. In this paper we consider some of the necessary steps for such a process to occur, concentrating on the ejection of ice bearing bacteria in the initial impact, and on what happens when bacteria laden projectiles hit an icy surface. Laboratory experiments using high-speed impacts with a light gas gun show that obtaining icy ejecta with viable bacterial loads is straightforward. In addition to demonstrating the viability of the bacteria carried on the ejecta, we have also measured the angular and size distribution of the ejecta produced in hypervelocity impacts on ice. We have however been unsuccessful at transferring viable bacteria to icy surfaces from bacteria laden projectiles impacting at hypervelocities.

  11. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History Online: ICIS-NPDES Limit

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit Limits data set for Clean Water Act permitted...

  12. Map of the Moon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    China releases data about the Moon collected its first lunar probe China has finished the full map of the Moon based on data obtained by its lunar probe Chang ’e 1,said Ouyang Ziyuan,chief scientist of China’s lunar exploration program and an academician at the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS),at a press conference about the scientific achievements made by Chang’e 1 on July 16,2010.

  13. Dynamical modelling of the Galilean moons for the JUICE mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkx, D.; Lainey, V.; Gurvits, L. I.; Visser, P. N. A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Radio tracking and astrometric data obtained by the JUICE mission, using the PRIDE, 3GM and JANUS instruments, will allow the dynamics of the Galilean moons to be measured to unprecedented accuracy. As a result, the dynamical models used for creating ephemerides from these data will most likely require the inclusion of various heretofore neglected physical effects. To determine which effects will need to be included, we perform a sensitivity analysis of the influence on the dynamics of the system for a wide array of gravitational, tidal and rotational characteristics of the system. We estimate the dynamics of the Galilean moons with a given perturbation turned off, using ideal three-dimensional measurements of the satellites' positions generated with these perturbations turned on. In doing so, we assess the capabilities of the nominal dynamical model to absorb the influence of this perturbations. We analyze the dynamical behaviour over a period of five years, and limit our analysis to effects that may be observable from JUICE radio tracking and optical astrometry data. Our simulations comprise a short-period (5 years) sensitivity analysis of the dynamics of the moons, and not a simulation of the tracking data inversion for JUICE. Our analysis indicates that the nominal dynamical model of the Galilean satellites can very efficiently absorb the influence of the current uncertainties in most of the physical parameters of the Jovian system, to a level where these uncertainties will not be influential for JUICE-derived ephemerides. An important exception is the influence of tidal dissipation: the k2 / Q of Io will be clearly observable by JUICE tracking data, which will be strongly correlated with the weaker effect of Jupiter's k2 / Q . The dissipation inside Europa may also be weakly constrained by JUICE tracking data. Without improvements in the Jovian gravity field from the Juno mission, the estimation of Jupiter zonal gravity field coefficients at degrees 2, 3 and 5

  14. Jupiter Clouds in Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 619 nm [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 727 nm [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 890 nmImages from NASA's Cassini spacecraft using three different filters reveal cloud structures and movements at different depths in the atmosphere around Jupiter's south pole.Cassini's cameras come equipped with filters that sample three wavelengths where methane gas absorbs light. These are in the red at 619 nanometer (nm) wavelength and in the near-infrared at 727 nm and 890 nm. Absorption in the 619 nm filter is weak. It is stronger in the 727 nm band and very strong in the 890 nm band where 90 percent of the light is absorbed by methane gas. Light in the weakest band can penetrate the deepest into Jupiter's atmosphere. It is sensitive to the amount of cloud and haze down to the pressure of the water cloud, which lies at a depth where pressure is about 6 times the atmospheric pressure at sea level on the Earth). Light in the strongest methane band is absorbed at high altitude and is sensitive only to the ammonia cloud level and higher (pressures less than about one-half of Earth's atmospheric pressure) and the middle methane band is sensitive to the ammonia and ammonium hydrosulfide cloud layers as deep as two times Earth's atmospheric pressure.The images shown here demonstrate the power of these filters in studies of cloud stratigraphy. The images cover latitudes from about 15 degrees north at the top down to the southern polar region at the bottom. The left and middle images are ratios, the image in the methane filter divided by the image at a nearby wavelength outside the methane band. Using ratios emphasizes where contrast is due to methane absorption and not to other factors, such as the absorptive properties of the cloud particles, which influence contrast at all wavelengths.The most prominent feature seen in all three filters is the polar stratospheric haze that makes Jupiter bright near the pole

  15. The sculpting of Jupiter's gossamer rings by its shadow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas P; Krüger, Harald

    2008-05-01

    Dust near Jupiter is produced when interplanetary impactors collide energetically with small inner moons, and is organized into a main ring, an inner halo, and two fainter and more distant gossamer rings. Most of these structures are constrained by the orbits of the moons Adrastea, Metis, Amalthea and Thebe, but a faint outward protrusion called the Thebe extension behaves differently and has eluded understanding. Here we report on dust impacts detected during the Galileo spacecraft's traversal of the outer ring region: we find a gap in the rings interior to Thebe's orbit, grains on highly inclined paths, and a strong excess of submicrometre-sized dust just inside Amalthea's orbit. We present detailed modelling that shows that the passage of ring particles through Jupiter's shadow creates the Thebe extension and fully accounts for these Galileo results. Dust grains alternately charge and discharge when traversing shadow boundaries, allowing the planet's powerful magnetic field to excite orbital eccentricities and, when conditions are right, inclinations as well.

  16. Jupiter Eruptions Captured in Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for high resolution image of Nature Cover Detailed analysis of two continent-sized storms that erupted in Jupiter's atmosphere in March 2007 shows that Jupiter's internal heat plays a significant role in generating atmospheric disturbances. Understanding these outbreaks could be the key to unlock the mysteries buried in the deep Jovian atmosphere, say astronomers. This infrared image shows two bright plume eruptions obtained by the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on April 5, 2007. Understanding these phenomena is important for Earth's meteorology where storms are present everywhere and jet streams dominate the atmospheric circulation. Jupiter is a natural laboratory where atmospheric scientists study the nature and interplay of the intense jets and severe atmospheric phenomena. According to the analysis, the bright plumes were storm systems triggered in Jupiter's deep water clouds that moved upward in the atmosphere vigorously and injected a fresh mixture of ammonia ice and water about 20 miles (30 kilometers) above the visible clouds. The storms moved in the peak of a jet stream in Jupiter's atmosphere at 375 miles per hour (600 kilometers per hour). Models of the disturbance indicate that the jet stream extends deep in the buried atmosphere of Jupiter, more than 60 miles (approximately100 kilometers) below the cloud tops where most sunlight is absorbed.

  17. L'espion d'ici

    CERN Document Server

    Omnes, Roland

    2000-01-01

    On les appelle " ceux-qui-savent-le-savoir-inutile ". De leur planète puissante qui répond au nom orgueilleux d'" Ici ", ils dépêchent sur Terre un agent : à charge pour lui d'évaluer l'état d'avancement des connaissances chez les humains et de mesurer les risques que ceux-ci représentent. L'espion sera introduit auprès des sages grecs, il s'initiera aux mystères de Pythagore, il tiendra tête à Aristote, il se réincarnera en Merlin, il fréquentera le salon de Mme du Châtelet, il s'entretiendra avec Darwin, il côtoiera Einstein, il assistera à la naissance de la mécanique quantique, il fera un détour par les cafés de philosophie... Au terme de ses pérégrinations, il devra finalement choisir. Prendra-t-il le parti d'" Ici ", dont les connaissances plongent dans des temps insondables, ou celui de la Terre, au savoir étonnamment neuf ?

  18. Worlds Without Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-04-01

    Many of the exoplanets that weve discovered lie in compact systems with orbits very close to their host star. These systems are especially interesting in the case of cool stars where planets lie in the stars habitable zone as is the case, for instance, for the headline-making TRAPPIST-1 system.But other factors go into determining potential habitability of a planet beyond the rough location where water can remain liquid. One possible consideration: whether the planets have moons.Supporting HabitabilityLocations of equality between the Hill and Roche radius for five different potential moon densities. The phase space allows for planets of different semi-major axes and stellar host masses. Two example systems are shown, Kepler-80 and TRAPPIST-1, with dots representing the planets within them. [Kane 2017]Earths Moon is thought to have been a critical contributor to our planets habitability. The presence of a moon stabilizes its planets axial tilt, preventing wild swings in climate as the stars radiation shifts between the planets poles and equator. But what determines if a planet can have a moon?A planet can retain a moon in a stable orbit anywhere between an outer boundary of the Hill radius (beyond which the planets gravity is too weak to retain the moon) and an inner boundary of the Roche radius (inside which the moon would be torn apart by tidal forces). The locations of these boundaries depend on both the planets and moons properties, and they can be modified by additional perturbative forces from the host star and other planets in the system.In a new study, San Francisco State University scientist Stephen R. Kane modeled these boundaries for planets specifically in compact systems, to determine whether such planets can host moons to boost their likelihood of habitability.Allowed moon density as a function of semimajor axis for the TRAPPIST-1 system, for two different scenarios with different levels of perturbations. The vertical dotted lines show the locations

  19. Galileo infrared imaging spectrometry measurements at the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccord, Thomas B.; Soderblom, Larry A.; Carlson, Robert W.; Fanale, Fraser P.; Lopes-Gautier, Rosaly; Ocampo, Adriano; Forsythe, Jennifer; Campbell, Bruce; Granahan, James C.; Smythe, W. D.

    1994-01-01

    Imaging spectrometer observations were made of the surface of the Moon during the December 1990 flyby of the Earth-Moon system by the Galileo spacecraft. This article documents this data set and presents analyses of some of the data. The near infrared mapping spectrometer (NIMS) investigation obtained 17 separate mosaics of the Moon in 408 spectral channels between about 0.7 and 5.2 micrometers. The instrument was originally designed to operate in orbit about Jupiter and therefore saturates at many spectral channels for most measurement situations at 1 AU. However, sufficient measurements were made of the Moon to verify the proper operation of the instrument and to demonstrate its capabilities. Analysis of these data show that the NIMS worked as expected and produced measurements consistent with previous ground-based telescopic studies. These are the first imaging spectrometer measurements of this type from space for the Moon, and they illustrate several major points concerning this type of observation and about the NIMS capabilities specifically. Of major importance are the difference between framing and scanning instruments and the effects of the spacecraft and the scan platform on the performance of such and experiment. The science return of subsequent NIMS and other investigation measurements will be significantly enhanced by the experience and results gained.

  20. The collapse of Io's primary atmosphere in Jupiter eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Constantine C. C.; Spencer, John R.; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Lopez-Valverde, Miguel A.; Richter, Matthew J.

    2016-08-01

    Volcanic outgassing due to tidal heating is the ultimate source of a tenuous SO2 atmosphere around Jupiter's moon Io. The question of whether SO2 frost on the surface plays a part, and to what degree, in maintaining Io's atmosphere with the constant volcanic outgassing is still debated. It is believed that for a sublimation-supported atmosphere, the primary atmosphere should collapse during eclipses by Jupiter, as the SO2 vapor pressure is strongly coupled to the temperature of the ice on the surface. No direct observations of Io's atmosphere in eclipse have previously been possible, due to the simultaneous need for high spectral and time sensitivity, as well as a high signal-to-noise ratio. Here we present the first ever high-resolution spectra at 19 µm of Io's SO2 atmosphere in Jupiter eclipse from the Gemini telescope. The strongest atmospheric band depth is seen to dramatically decay from 2.5 ± (0.08)% before the eclipse to 0.18 ± (0.16)% after 40 min in eclipse. Further modeling indicates that the atmosphere has collapsed shortly after eclipse ingress, implying that the atmosphere of Io has a strong sublimation-controlled component. The atmospheric column density—from pre-eclipse to in-eclipse—drops by a factor of 5 ± 2.

  1. Encouragement from Jupiter for Europe's Titan Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Huygens will transmit scientific information for 150 minutes, from the outer reaches of Titan's cold atmosphere and all the way down to its enigmatic surface. For comparison, the Jupiter Probe radioed scientific data for 58 minutes as it descended about 200 kilometres into the outer part of the atmosphere of the giant planet. The parachutes controlling various stages of Huygens' descent will rely upon a system for deployment designed and developed in Europe that is nevertheless similar to that used by the Jupiter Probe. The elaborate sequence of operations in Huygens worked perfectly during a dramatic drop test from a stratospheric balloon over Sweden in May 1995, which approximated as closely as possible to events on Titan. The performance of the American Probe at Jupiter renews the European engineers' confidence in their own descent control system, and also in the lithium sulphur-dioxide batteries which were chosen to power both Probes. "The systems work after long storage in space," comments Hamid Hassan, ESA's Project Manager for Huygens. "Huygens will spend seven years travelling to Saturn's vicinity aboard the Cassini Orbiter. The Jupiter Probe was a passenger in Galileo for six years before its release, so there is no reason to doubt that Huygens will work just as well." Huygens will enter the outer atmosphere of Titan at 20,000 kilometres per hour. A heat shield 2.7 metres in diameter will withstand the friction and slow the Probe to a speed at which parachutes can be deployed. The size of the parachute for the main phase of the descent is chosen to allow Huygens to reach the surface in about 2 hours. The batteries powering Huygens will last for about 21/2 hours. Prepared for surprises A different perspective on the Jupiter Probe comes from Jean-Pierre Lebreton, ESA's Project Scientist for Huygens. The results contradicted many preconceptions of the Galileo scientists, particularly about the abundance of water and the structure of cloud layers. Arguments

  2. Lagrange L4/L5 points and the origin of our Moon and Saturn's moons and rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gott, J Richard

    2005-12-01

    The current standard theory of the origin of the Moon is that the Earth was hit by a giant impactor the size of Mars causing ejection of debris from its mantle that coalesced to form the moon; but where did this Mars-sized impactor come from? Isotopic evidence suggests that it came from 1 AU radius in the solar nebula, and computer simulations are consistent with its approaching Earth on a zero-energy parabolic trajectory. How could such a large object form at 1 AU in a quiescent disk of planetesimals without having already collided with the Earth at an earlier epoch before having the chance to grow large? Belbruno and Gott propose that the giant impactor could have formed in a stable orbit from debris at the Earth's Lagrange point L(5) (or L(4)). It would grow quietly by accretion at L(5) (or L(4)), but eventually gravitational perturbations by other growing planetesimals would kick it out into a horseshoe orbit and finally into a chaotic creeping orbit, which Belbruno and Gott show would, with high probability, hit the Earth on a near zero-energy parabolic trajectory. We can see other examples of this phenomenon occurring in the solar system. Asteroid 2002AA29 is in a horseshoe orbit relative to the Earth that looks exactly like the horseshoe orbits that Belbruno and Gott found for objects that had been perturbed from L(4)/L(5). The regular moons of Saturn are made of ice and have the same albedo as the ring particles (ice chunks, plus some dust). We (J. R. Gott, R. Vanderbei, and E. Belbruno) propose that the regular icy moons of Saturn (out to the orbit of Titan), which are all in nearly circular orbits, formed out of a thin disk of planetesimals (ice chunks) rather like the rings of Saturn today only larger in extent. In such a situation formation of objects at L(4)/L(5) might be expected. Indeed, Saturn's moon Dione is accompanied by moons (Helene and Polydeuces) at both L(4) and L(5) Lagrange points, and Saturn's moon Tethys is also accompanied by moons

  3. Space Weathering Perspectives on Europa Amidst the Tempest of the Jupiter Magnetospheric System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J. F.; Hartle, R. E.; Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C.; Cassidy, T. A.; Ip. W.-H.

    2010-01-01

    Europa resides within a "perfect storm" tempest of extreme external field, plasma, and energetic particle interactions with the magnetospheric system of Jupiter. Missions to Europa must survive, functionally operate, make useful measurements, and return critical science data, while also providing full context on this ocean moon's response to the extreme environment. Related general perspectives on space weathering in the solar system are applied to mission and instrument science requirements for Europa.

  4. IPPF Co-operative Information Service (ICIS). November 1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    This ICIS bulletin replaces the formal Library Bulletin of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF). It represents the integration of a bibliographic information network. Entries in ICIS are classified according to the following nine categories: (0) General Reference; (1) IPPF; (2) Family Planning and Health Care; (3) Biomedical…

  5. IPPF Co-operative Information Service (ICIS). August 1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    The pooling of documentation service resources has resulted in the creation of an International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) integrated bibliographic information system. The former Library Bulletin has become IPPF Cooperative Information Service (ICIS). Entries in ICIS are classified according to the following nine categories: (0) General…

  6. IPPF Co-operative Information Service (ICIS). May 1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    The pooling of documentation service resources has resulted in the creation of an International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) integrated bibliographic information system. Thus, the former Library Bulletin has become IPPF Cooperative Information Service (ICIS). This is the first such publication. Entries in ICIS are classified according to…

  7. Moon (Form-Origin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2016-04-01

    When the Earth was formed, it was in a state of burning heat. As time went by, temperature on the planet's surface was falling due to radiation and heat transfer, and various components (crusts) began taking solid form at the Earth's poles. The formation of crusts took place at the Earth's poles, because the stirring of burning and fluid masses on the surface of the Earth was significantly slighter there than it was on the equator. Due to centrifugal force and Coriolis Effect, these solid masses headed towards the equator; those originating from the North Pole followed a south-western course, while those originating from the South Pole followed a north-western course and there they rotated from west to east at a lower speed than the underlying burning and liquid earth, because of their lower initial linear velocity, their solid state and inertia. Because inertia is proportional to mass, the initially larger solid body swept all new solid ones, incorporating them to its western side. The density of the new solid masses was higher, because the components on the surface would freeze and solidify first, before the underlying thicker components. As a result, the western side of the initial islet of solid rocks submerged, while the east side elevated. . As a result of the above, this initial islet began to spin in reverse, and after taking on the shape of a sphere, it formed the "heart" of the Moon. The Moon-sphere, rolling on the equator, would sink the solid rocks that continued to descend from the Earth's poles. The sinking rocks partially melted because of higher temperatures in the greater depths that the Moon descended to, while part of the rocks' mass bonded with the Moon and also served as a heat-insulating material, preventing the descended side of the sphere from melting. Combined with the Earth's liquid mass that covered its emerging eastern surface, new sphere-shaped shells were created, with increased density and very powerful structural cohesion. During the

  8. Moon (Form-Origin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiapas, Elias; Soumelidou, Despina; Tsiapas, Christos

    2017-04-01

    When the Earth was formed, it was in a state of burning heat. As time went by, temperature on the planet's surface was falling due to radiation and heat transfer, and various components (crusts) began taking solid form at the Earth's poles. The formation of crusts took place at the Earth's poles, because the stirring of burning and fluid masses on the surface of the Earth was significantly slighter there than it was on the equator. Due to centrifugal force and Coriolis Effect, these solid masses headed towards the equator; those originating from the North Pole followed a south-western course, while those originating from the South Pole followed a north-western course and there they rotated from west to east at a lower speed than the underlying burning and liquid earth, because of their lower initial linear velocity, their solid state and inertia. Because inertia is proportional to mass, the initially larger solid body swept all new solid ones, incorporating them to its western side. The density of the new solid masses was higher, because the components on the surface would freeze and solidify first, before the underlying thicker components. As a result, the western side of the initial islet of solid rocks submerged, while the east side elevated. . As a result of the above, this initial islet began to spin in reverse, and after taking on the shape of a sphere, it formed the "heart" of the Moon. The Moon-sphere, rolling on the equator, would sink the solid rocks that continued to descend from the Earth's poles. The sinking rocks partially melted because of higher temperatures in the greater depths that the Moon descended to, while part of the rocks' mass bonded with the Moon and also served as a heat-insulating material, preventing the descended side of the sphere from melting. Combined with the Earth's liquid mass that covered its emerging eastern surface, new sphere-shaped shells were created, with increased density and very powerful structural cohesion. During the

  9. Space Radiation Effects and Reliability Consideration for the Proposed Jupiter Europa Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Allan

    2011-01-01

    The proposed Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) mission to explore the Jovian moon Europa poses a number of challenges. The spacecraft must operate for about seven years during the transit time to the vicinity of Jupiter, and then endure unusually high radiation levels during exploration and orbiting phases. The ability to withstand usually high total dose levels is critical for the mission, along with meeting the high reliability standards for flagship NASA missions. Reliability of new microelectronic components must be sufficiently understood to meet overall mission requirements.The proposed Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) mission to explore the Jovian moon Europa poses a number of challenges. The spacecraft must operate for about seven years during the transit time to the vicinity of Jupiter, and then endure unusually high radiation levels during exploration and orbiting phases. The ability to withstand usually high total dose levels is critical for the mission, along with meeting the high reliability standards for flagship NASA missions. Reliability of new microelectronic components must be sufficiently understood to meet overall mission requirements.

  10. Main methods of trajectory synthesis for scenarios of space missions with gravity assist maneuvers in the system of Jupiter and with landing on one of its satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubev, Yu. F.; Tuchin, A. G.; Grushevskii, A. V.; Koryanov, V. V.; Tuchin, D. A.; Morskoy, I. M.; Simonov, A. V.; Dobrovolskii, V. S.

    2016-12-01

    The development of a methodology for designing trajectories of spacecraft intended for the contact and remote studies of Jupiter and its natural satellites is considered. This methodology should take into account a number of specific features. Firstly, in order to maintain the propellant consumption at an acceptable level, the flight profile, ensuring the injection of the spacecraft into orbit around the Jovian moon, should include a large number of gravity assist maneuvers both in the interplanetary phase of the Earth-to-Jupiter flight and during the flight in the system of the giant planet. Secondly, the presence of Jupiter's powerful radiation belts also imposes fairly strict limitations on the trajectory parameters.

  11. Types of Hot Jupiter Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisikalo, Dmitry V.; Kaygorodov, Pavel V.; Ionov, Dmitry E.; Shematovich, Valery I.

    Hot Jupiters, i.e. exoplanet gas giants, having masses comparable to the mass of Jupiter and semimajor axes shorter than 0.1 AU, are a unique class of objects. Since they are so close to the host stars, their atmospheres form and evolve under the action of very active gas dynamical processes caused by the gravitational field and irradiation of the host star. As a matter of fact, the atmospheres of several of these planets fill their Roche lobes , which results in a powerful outflow of material from the planet towards the host star. The energy budget of this process is so important that it almost solely governs the evolution of hot Jupiters gaseous envelopes. Based on the years of experience in the simulations of gas dynamics in mass-exchanging close binary stars, we have investigated specific features of hot Jupiters atmospheres. The analytical estimates and results of 3D numerical simulations, discussed in this Chapter, show that the gaseous envelopes around hot Jupiters may be significantly non-spherical and, at the same time, stationary and long-lived. These results are of fundamental importance for the interpretation of observational data.

  12. Jupiter and Saturn Rotation Periods

    CERN Document Server

    Helled, Ravit; Anderson, John D

    2009-01-01

    Anderson & Schubert (2007, Science,317,1384) proposed that Saturn's rotation period can be ascertained by minimizing the dynamic heights of the 100 mbar isosurface with respect to the geoid; they derived a rotation period of 10h 32m 35s. We investigate the same approach for Jupiter to see if the Jovian rotation period is predicted by minimizing the dynamical heights of its isobaric (1 bar pressure level) surface using zonal wind data. A rotation period of 9h 54m 29s is found. Further, we investigate the minimization method by fitting Pioneer and Voyager occultation radii for both Jupiter and Saturn. Rotation periods of 9h 55m 30s and 10h 32m 35s are found to minimize the dynamical heights for Jupiter and Saturn, respectively. Though there is no dynamical principle requiring the minimization of the dynamical heights of an isobaric surface, the successful application of the method to Jupiter lends support to its relevance for Saturn. We derive Jupiter and Saturn rotation periods using equilibrium theory in ...

  13. Structure of the moon's surface

    CERN Document Server

    Fielder, Gilbert

    1961-01-01

    Structure of the Moon's Surface aims to assemble and marshal relevant matter, and to produce a largely unprejudiced text which brings lunar studies up to date and stresses the importance of certain features of the Moon which have frequently been disregarded in the past, largely because of lack of knowledge about them. The book contains 14 chapters organized into two parts. Part I reviews and summarizes important physical problems. These include the liberations of the moon; height determinations of points of the moon's surface; the figure of the moon; and the moon's temperature and atmosphere.

  14. Moons a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Rothery, David A

    2015-01-01

    Moons: A Very Short Introduction introduces the reader to the varied and fascinating moons of our Solar System. Beginning with the early discoveries of Galileo and others, it describes their variety of mostly mythological names, and the early use of Jupiter’s moons to establish position at sea and to estimate the speed of light. It discusses the structure, formation, and profound influence of our Moon, those of the other planets, and ends with the recent discovery of moons orbiting asteroids, whilst looking forward to the possibility of discovering microbial life beyond Earth and of finding moons of exoplanets in planetary systems far beyond our own.

  15. The New Horizons Mission to Pluto and Flyby of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Alan; Weaver, Hal; Young, Leslie; Bagenal, Fran; Binzel, Richard; Buratti, Bonnie; Cheng, andy; Cruikshank, Dale; Gladstone, Randy; Grundy, Will; Hinson, David; Horanyi, Mihaly; Jennings, Don; Linscott, Ivan; McComas, Dave; McKinnon, William; McNutt, Ralph; Moore, Jeffrey; Murchie, Scott; Olkin, Cathy; Porco, Carolyn; Reitsema, Harold; Reuter, Dennis; Slater, Dave; Spencer, John

    2008-01-01

    New Horizons (NH) is NASA's mission to provide the first in situ reconnaissance of Pluto and its moons Charon, Nix, and Hydra. The NH spacecraft will reach Pluto in July 2015 and will then, if approved for an extended mission phase, continue on to a flyby encounter with one or more Kuiper belt objects (KBOs). NH was launched on 19 January 2006 and received a gravity assist during a flyby encounter with Jupiter (with closest approach at -32 RJ on 28 February 2007) that reduced its flight time to Pluto by 3 years. During the Jupiter flyby, NH collected a trove of multi-wavelength imaging and fields-and-particles measurements. Among the many science results at Jupiter were a detection of planet-wide mesoscale waves, eruptions of atmospheric ammonia clouds, unprecedented views of Io's volcanic plumes and Jupiter's tenuous ring system, a first close-up of the Little Red Spot (LRS), first sightings of polar lightning, and a trip down the tail of the magnetosphere. In 2015, NH will conduct a seven-month investigation of the Pluto system culminating in a closest approach some 12,500 km from Pluto's surface. Planning is presently underway for the Pluto encounter with special emphasis on longidentified science goals of studying the terrain, geology, and composition of the surfaces of Pluto and Charon, examining the composition and structure of Pluto's atmosphere, searching for an atmosphere on Charon, and characterizing Pluto's ionosphere and solar wind interaction. Detailed inspections will also be performed of the newly discovered satellites Nix and Hydra. Additionally, NH will characterize energetic particles in Pluto's environment, refine the bulk properties of Pluto and Charon, and search for additional satellites and rings.

  16. Precision Navigation of Cassini Images Using Rings, Icy Satellites, and Fuzzy Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Robert S.; Showalter, Mark R.; Gordon, Mitchell K.

    2016-10-01

    Before images from the Cassini spacecraft can be analyzed, errors in the published pointing information (up to ~110 pixels for the Imaging Science Subsystem Narrow Angle Camera) must be corrected so that the line of sight vector for each pixel is known. This complicated and labor-intensive process involves matching the image contents with known features such as stars, rings, or moons. Metadata, such as lighting geometry or ring radius and longitude, must be computed for each pixel as well. Both steps require mastering the SPICE toolkit, a highly capable piece of software with a steep learning curve. Only after these steps are completed can the actual scientific investigation begin.We have embarked on a three-year project to perform these steps for all 400,000+ Cassini ISS images as well as images taken by the VIMS, UVIS, and CIRS instruments. The result will be a series of SPICE kernels that include accurate pointing information and a series of backplanes that include precomputed metadata for each pixel. All data will be made public through the PDS Ring-Moon Systems Node (http://www.pds-rings.seti.org). We expect this project to dramatically decrease the time required for scientists to analyze Cassini data.In a previous poster (French et al. 2014, DPS #46, 422.01) we discussed our progress navigating images using stars, simple ring models, and well-defined icy bodies. In this poster we will report on our current progress including the use of more sophisticated ring models, navigation of "fuzzy" bodies such as Titan and Saturn, and use of crater matching on high-resolution images of the icy satellites.

  17. Studying the Moon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The moon,sister sphere to the Earth, has long held the attention of mankind as a source of mystery,inspiration and wonder.Its sway has been chronicled in myth,literature and song.In the final week of October,China embarked on its first attempt to better scientifically understand the moon and its relationship to the Earth by launching the lunar orbiter Chang’e-1.Though named after a deity that Chinese fairy tales say lived in the moon,this new venture to study our closest celestial neighbor is based largely on the reality of technology and scientific advancement.As the most recent phase in China’s decades old aerospace program,the launch showcases both the country’s place on the world stage and its technological and scientific advancements-not only for the benefit of its own people,but for all of mankind.

  18. The Tethered Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Lupu, Roxana Elena; Dubrovolskis, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    A reasonable initial condition on Earth after the Moonforming impact is that it begins as a hot global magma ocean1,2. We therefore begin our study with the mantle as a liquid ocean with a surface temperature on the order of 3000- 4000 K at a time some 100-1000 years after the impact, by which point we can hope that early transients have settled down. A 2nd initial condition is a substantial atmosphere, 100-1000 bars of H2O and CO2, supplemented by smaller amounts of CO, H2, N2, various sulfur-containing gases, and a suite of geochemical volatiles evaporated from the magma. Third, we start the Moon with its current mass at the relevant Roche limit. The 4th initial condition is the angular momentum of the Earth-Moon system. Canonical models hold this constant, whilst some recent models begin with considerably more angular momentum than is present today. Here we present a ruthlessly simplified model of Earth's cooling magmasphere based on a full-featured atmosphere and including tidal heating by the newborn Moon. Thermal blanketing by H2O-CO2 atmospheres slows cooling of a magma ocean. Geochemical volatiles - chiefly S, Na, and Cl - raise the opacity of the magma ocean's atmosphere and slow cooling still more. We assume a uniform mantle with a single internal (potential) temperature and a global viscosity. The important "freezing point" is the sharp rheological transition between a fluid carrying suspended crystals and a solid matrix through which fluids percolate. Most tidal heating takes place at this "freezing point" in a gel that is both pliable and viscous. Parameterized convection links the cooling rate to the temperature and heat generation inside the Earth. Tidal heating is a major effect. Tidal dissipation in the magma ocean is described by viscosity. The Moon is entwined with Earth by the negative feedback between thermal blanketing and tidal heating that comes from the temperature-dependent viscosity of the magma ocean. Because of this feedback, the rate

  19. Theia's Collision With The Early Earth - Dry Or Wet Moon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, R.; Loibnegger, B.; Burger, C.; Maindl, T. I.; Schäfer, C.

    2016-04-01

    Our study exist of three separated parts concerning the formation of the Moon due to a catastrophic collision of a Mars-sized body - often referred to as Theia - with the early Earth. The first one deals with planet-formation in the early Solar System, the second one with the dynamical evolution of the planets Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn and an additional planet (Theia) between Earth and Mars, and the third one with the proposed giant collision itself and its outcome concerning masses and water contents of the resulting bodies (or fragments), computed via Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations.

  20. Horseshoe orbits in the Earth-Moon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreisman, B. B.

    2016-11-01

    Horseshoe orbits in the restricted three-body problem have been mostly considered in the Sun-Jupiter system and, in recent years, in the Sun-Earth system. Here, these orbits have been used to find asteroids that have orbits of this kind. We have built a planar family of horseshoe orbits in the Earth-Moon system and determined the points of planar and 1/1 vertical resonances on this family. We have presented examples of orbits generated by these spatial families.

  1. Impact-Generated Dust Clouds Surrounding the Galilean Moons

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, H; Grün, E; Kr\\"uger, Harald~; Krivov, Alexander V.; Gr\\"un, Eberhard

    2003-01-01

    Tenuous dust clouds of Jupiter's Galilean moons Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto have been detected with the in-situ dust detector on board the Galileo spacecraft. The majority of the dust particles have been sensed at altitudes below five radii of these lunar-sized satellites. We identify the particles in the dust clouds surrounding the moons by their impact direction, impact velocity, and mass distribution. Average particle sizes are 0.5 to $\\rm 1 \\mu m$, just above the detector threshold, indicating a size distribution with decreasing numbers towards bigger particles. Our results imply that the particles have been kicked up by hypervelocity impacts of micrometeoroids onto the satellites' surfaces. The measured radial dust density profiles are consistent with predictions by dynamical modeling for satellite ejecta produced by interplanetary impactors (Krivov et al., PSS, 2003, 51, 251--269), assuming yield, mass and velocity distributions of the ejecta from laboratory measurements. The dust clouds of the th...

  2. Meteoroids Impact the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, D. E.

    2017-01-01

    Most meteoroids are broken up by Earth's atmosphere before they reach the ground. The Moon, however, has little-to-no atmosphere to prevent meteoroids from impacting the lunar surface. Upon impact they excavate a crater and generate a plume of debris. A flash of light at the moment of impact can also be seen. Meteoroids striking the Moon create an impact flash observable by telescopes here on Earth. NASA observers use telescopes at the Automated Lunar and Meteor Observatory (ALaMO) to routinely monitor the Moon for impact flashes each month when the lunar phase is right. Flashes recorded by two telescope simultaneously rule out false signals from cosmic rays and satellites. Over 400 impact flashes have been observed by NASA since 2005. This map shows the location of each flash. No observations are made near the poles or center line. On average, one impact is observed every two hours. The brightest and longest-lasting impact flash was observed in Mare Imbrium on March 17, 2013. The imaging satellite Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, in orbit around the Moon, discovered the fresh crater created by this impact. The crater is 60 across and was caused by a meteoroid 9 inches in diameter likely traveling at a speed of 57,000 mph!

  3. Over the Moon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao (right) applauds after he unveiled China’s first photo of the moon surface,taken by its lunar probe Chang’e-1,in Beijing on November 26. The framed black-and-white photo,grouping 19 images,shows part of the moon’s highland that is mainly composed of plagioclase,a common

  4. The Moon Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Pat; Leddy, Diana; Johnson, Lindy; Biggam, Sue; Locke, Suzan

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a first-grade research project that incorporates trade books and challenges misconceptions. Educators see the power of their students' wonder at work in their classrooms on a daily basis. This wonder must be nourished by students' own experiences--observing the moon on a crystal clear night--as well as by having…

  5. Approaching the Moon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    China’s second unmanned lunar probe,Chang’e-2,completed its second braking on October 8.The satellite needs to brake three times before entering the designed 118-minute orbit around the Moon.The first braking,shown by virtual animation on a screen in the Beijing Aerospace Control Center in this picture,succeeded on October 6.

  6. Map of the Moon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG YUANKAI

    2010-01-01

    @@ China has finished the full map of the Moon based on data obtained by its lunar probe Chang'e l,said Ouyang Ziyuan,chief scientist of China's lunar exploration program and an academician at the Chinese Academy of Sciences(CAS),at a press conference about the scientific achievements made by Chang'e1 on July 16,2010.

  7. Santa and the Moon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barthel, P.

    2012-01-01

    This article reflects on the use of illustrations of the Moon in images of Santa Claus, on Christmas gift-wrapping paper and in children's books, in two countries which have been important in shaping the image of Santa Claus and his predecessor Sinterklaas: the USA and the Netherlands. The appearanc

  8. Wenestor ja Moons

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    1995. a. tööd alustanud mööblifirma Wenestor (70 töötajat) ja selle tütarfirma Moons (15 töötajat) toodangust, millest eksporditakse 95%. Mehhiko stiili mööblist, klotsmööblist (disainer Kuldar Moor)

  9. Santa and the Moon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barthel, P.

    This article reflects on the use of illustrations of the Moon in images of Santa Claus, on Christmas gift-wrapping paper and in children's books, in two countries which have been important in shaping the image of Santa Claus and his predecessor Sinterklaas: the USA and the Netherlands. The

  10. The Face of the Moon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张保

    2001-01-01

    Have you ever seen the man in the moon?If you look closelyat the moon on some nights, you can see the face of the man in themoon. Some people say that they can see an old man carryingsticks. Others see a girl reading a book. These pictures are madeby the mountains (山脉) and plains (平原) of the moon.

  11. Moon-bevægelsen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, René Dybdal

    2014-01-01

    Moon-bevægelsen er det populære navn for religionen "Family Federation for World peace and Unification", som også tidligere kaldte sig "Unification Church". Moon-bevægelsen ser sig selv som den sande kristne kirke. Til forskel fra mange andre kristne kirker mener Moon-bevægelsen, at Gud ønskede...

  12. Experience the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Gil, A.; Benacchio, L.; Boccato, C.

    2011-10-01

    The Moon is, together with the Sun, the very first astronomical object that we experience in our life. As this is an exclusively visual experience, people with visual impairments need a different mode to experience it too. This statement is especially true when events, such as more and more frequent public observations of sky, take place. This is the reason why we are preparing a special package for visual impaired people containing three brand new items: 1. a tactile 3D Moon sphere in Braille with its paper key in Braille. To produce it we used imaging data obtained by NASA's mission Clementine, along with free image processing and 3D rendering software. In order to build the 3D small scale model funding by Europlanet and the Italian Ministry for Research have been used. 2. a multilingual web site for visually impaired users of all ages, on basic astronomy together with an indepth box about the Moon; 3. a book in Braille with the same content of the Web site mentioned above. All the items will be developed with the collaboration of visually impaired people that will check each step of the project and support their comments and criticism to improve it. We are going to test this package during the next International Observe the Moon Night event. After a first testing phase we'll collect all the feedback data in order to give an effective form to the package. Finally the Moon package could be delivered to all those who will demand it for outreach or educational goals.

  13. Super-Eccentric Migrating Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Socrates, Aristotle; Dong, Subo; Tremaine, Scott

    2011-01-01

    An important class of formation theories for hot Jupiters involves the excitation of extreme orbital eccentricity (e=0.99 or even larger) followed by tidal dissipation at periastron passage that eventually circularizes the planetary orbit at a period less than 10 days. In a steady state, this mechanism requires the existence of a significant population of super-eccentric (e>0.9) migrating Jupiters with long orbital periods and periastron distances of only a few stellar radii. For these super-eccentric planets, the periastron is fixed due to conservation of orbital angular momentum and the energy dissipated per orbit is constant, implying that the rate of change in semi-major axis a is \\dot a \\propto a^0.5 and consequently the number distribution satisfies dN/dlog a\\propto a^0.5. If this formation process produces most hot Jupiters, Kepler should detect several super-eccentric migrating progenitors of hot Jupiters, allowing for a test of high-eccentricity migration scenarios.

  14. SUPER-ECCENTRIC MIGRATING JUPITERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Socrates, Aristotle; Katz, Boaz; Dong Subo; Tremaine, Scott [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2012-05-10

    An important class of formation theories for hot Jupiters involves the excitation of extreme orbital eccentricity (e = 0.99 or even larger) followed by tidal dissipation at periastron passage that eventually circularizes the planetary orbit at a period less than 10 days. In a steady state, this mechanism requires the existence of a significant population of super-eccentric (e > 0.9) migrating Jupiters with long orbital periods and periastron distances of only a few stellar radii. For these super-eccentric planets, the periastron is fixed due to conservation of orbital angular momentum and the energy dissipated per orbit is constant, implying that the rate of change in semi-major axis a is a-dot {proportional_to}a{sup 1/2} and consequently the number distribution satisfies dN/d log a{proportional_to}a{sup 1/2}. If this formation process produces most hot Jupiters, Kepler should detect several super-eccentric migrating progenitors of hot Jupiters, allowing for a test of high-eccentricity migration scenarios.

  15. A Common Origin for Ridge-and-Trough Terrain on Icy Satellites by Sluggish Lid Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Barr, Amy C

    2014-01-01

    Ridge and trough terrain is a common landform on icy satellites of the outer solar system. Examples include the grooved terrain on Ganymede, gray bands on Europa, coronae on Uranus's moon Miranda, and ridges and troughs in the northern plains of Saturn's small, but active, moon Enceladus. Regardless of setting, the heat flow and strain rates associated with the formation of each of these terrains are similar: heat flows of order tens to a hundred milliwatts per meter squared, and deformation rates of order $10^{-16}$ to $10^{-12}$ s$^{-1}$. Barr (2008) and Hammond & Barr (2014a) have previously shown that the conditions associated with the formation of ridge and trough terrain on Ganymede and the south polar terrain on Enceladus are consistent with solid-state ice shell convection in a shell with a weak surface. Here, we show that sluggish lid convection can simultaneously create the heat flow and deformation appropriate for the formation of ridge and trough terrains on a number of satellites. This conclu...

  16. Jupiter: Cosmic Jekyll and Hyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazier, Kevin R

    2016-01-01

    It has been widely reported that Jupiter has a profound role in shielding the terrestrial planets from comet impacts in the Solar System, and that a jovian planet is a requirement for the evolution of life on Earth. To evaluate whether jovians, in fact, shield habitable planets from impacts (a phenomenon often referred to as the "Jupiter as shield" concept), this study simulated the evolution of 10,000 particles in each of the jovian inter-planet gaps for the cases of full-mass and embryo planets for up to 100 My. The results of these simulations predict a number of phenomena that not only discount the "Jupiter as shield" concept, they also predict that in a Solar System like ours, large gas giants like Saturn and Jupiter had a different, and potentially even more important, role in the evolution of life on our planet by delivering the volatile-laden material required for the formation of life. The simulations illustrate that, although all particles occupied "non-life threatening" orbits at their onset of the simulations, a significant fraction of the 30,000 particles evolved into Earth-crossing orbits. A comparison of multiple runs with different planetary configurations revealed that Jupiter was responsible for the vast majority of the encounters that "kicked" outer planet material into the terrestrial planet region, and that Saturn assisted in the process far more than has previously been acknowledged. Jupiter also tends to "fix" the aphelion of planetesimals at its orbit irrespective of their initial starting zones, which has the effect of slowing their passages through the inner Solar System, and thus potentially improving the odds of accretion of cometary material by terrestrial planets. As expected, the simulations indicate that the full-mass planets perturb many objects into the deep outer Solar System, or eject them entirely; however, planetary embryos also did this with surprising efficiency. Finally, the simulations predict that Jupiter's capacity to

  17. Featured Image: Mapping Jupiter with Hubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Zonal wind profile for Jupiter, describing the speed and direction of its winds at each latitude. [Simon et al. 2015]This global map of Jupiters surface (click for the full view!) was generated by the Hubble Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program, which aims to createnew yearly global maps for each of the outer planets. Presented in a study led by Amy Simon (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center), the map above is the first generated for Jupiter in the first year of the OPAL campaign. It provides a detailed look at Jupiters atmospheric structure including the Great Red Spot and allowed the authors to measure the speed and direction of the wind across Jupiters latitudes, constructing an updated zonal wind profile for Jupiter.In contrast to this study, the Juno mission (which will be captured into Jupiters orbit today after a 5-year journey to Jupiter!) will be focusing more on the features below Jupiters surface, studying its deep atmosphere and winds. Some of Junos primary goals are to learn about Jupiters composition, gravitational field, magnetic field, and polar magnetosphere. You can follow along with the NASATV livestream as Juno arrives at Jupiter tonight; orbit insertion coverage starts at 10:30 EDT.CitationAmy A. Simon et al 2015 ApJ 812 55. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/812/1/55

  18. Saturn's icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. II. Results at the end of nominal mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Clark, R.N.; Cuzzi, J.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Nicholson, P.D.; McCord, T.B.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Tosi, F.; Nelson, R.M.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detailed analysis of the spectrophotometric properties of Saturn's icy satellites as derived by full-disk observations obtained by visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) experiment aboard Cassini. In this paper, we have extended the coverage until the end of the Cassini's nominal mission (June 1st 2008), while a previous paper (Filacchione, G., and 28 colleagues [2007]. Icarus 186, 259-290, hereby referred to as Paper I) reported the preliminary results of this study. During the four years of nominal mission, VIMS has observed the entire population of Saturn's icy satellites allowing us to make a comparative analysis of the VIS-NIR spectral properties of the major satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus) and irregular moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso, Phoebe). The results we discuss here are derived from the entire dataset available at June 2008 which consists of 1417 full-disk observations acquired from a variety of distances and inclinations from the equatorial plane, with different phase angles and hemispheric coverage. The most important spectrophotometric indicators (as defined in Paper I: I/F continua at 0.55 ??m, 1.822 ??m and 3.547 ??m, visible spectral slopes, water and carbon dioxide bands depths and positions) are calculated for each observation in order to investigate the disk-integrated composition of the satellites, the distribution of water ice respect to "contaminants" abundances and typical regolith grain properties. These quantities vary from the almost pure water ice surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic and carbon dioxide rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Janus visible colors are intermediate between these two classes having a slightly positive spectral slope. These results could help to decipher the origins and evolutionary history of the minor moons of the Saturn's system. We introduce a polar representation of the spectrophotometric

  19. ICI optical data storage tape: An archival mass storage media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddick, Andrew J.

    1993-01-01

    At the 1991 Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies, ICI Imagedata presented a paper which introduced ICI Optical Data Storage Tape. This paper placed specific emphasis on the media characteristics and initial data was presented which illustrated the archival stability of the media. More exhaustive analysis that was carried out on the chemical stability of the media is covered. Equally important, it also addresses archive management issues associated with, for example, the benefits of reduced rewind requirements to accommodate tape relaxation effects that result from careful tribology control in ICI Optical Tape media. ICI Optical Tape media was designed to meet the most demanding requirements of archival mass storage. It is envisaged that the volumetric data capacity, long term stability and low maintenance characteristics demonstrated will have major benefits in increasing reliability and reducing the costs associated with archival storage of large data volumes.

  20. The Other Chemistry of the Jovian Icy Satellites - Low Energy and Sulfurous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Loeffler, M. J.; Moore, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Spectra of Jupiter's icy satellites reveal surfaces dominated by H2O-ice with minor amounts of SO2 and other materials. The co-existence of H2O and SO2 in surfaces exposed to jovian magnetospheric radiation suggests that sulfuric acid (H2SO4) also could be present. This was noted by Carlson et al. (1999), who supported this suggestion with assignments of near-IR bands in Europa spectra to hydrated H2SO4. Laboratory experiments since have demonstrated radiolytically-driven syntheses in S- and SO2-containing H2O-Ices (Carlson et al., 2002; Moore et al., 2006). In the Cosmic Ice Laboratory, we recently have investigated the thermal chemistry of SO2 trapped in H2O-ice. IR spectra of H2O + SO2 mixtures recorded at 10 to 230 K were used to follow low-temperature reactions in the absence of radiation effects. No SO2 reactions were found at 10 K, but warming to more-relevant Europa temperatures produced both HSO3(-) and S2O5(2-). Added NH3 shifted the product composition toward SO3(2-) and away from the other ions. We find that H2O and SO2 react to produce sulfur oxyanions, such as bisulfite, that as much as 30% of the SO2 can be consumed through this reaction, and that the products remain in the ice when the temperature is lowered, indicating that these reactions are irreversible. Our results suggest that thermally-induced reactions can alter the chemistry at and below the surfaces of the icy satellites in the jovian system.

  1. ICI Alleviation in OFDM System Utilizing Scale Alpha Pulse Shaping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Adibah Ibrahim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a new pulse shaping method namely scale alpha is proposed for mitigating Inter-Carrier Interference (ICI effect in Orthogonal Frequency-Division Multiplexing (OFDM system. The suggested pulse shape is designed and simulated using MATLAB software. Results show that the new pulse shape has lower ICI power and better impulse response performance than Franks, raised cosine and double-jump pulses.

  2. Exploring the Moon

    CERN Document Server

    Harland, David M

    2008-01-01

    David Harland opens with a review of the robotic probes, namely the Rangers which returned television before crashing into the Moon, the Surveyors which ''soft landed'' in order to investigate the nature of the surface, and the Lunar Orbiters which mapped prospective Apollo landing sites. He then outlines the historic landing by Apollo 11 in terms of what was discovered, and how over the next several missions the program was progressively geared up to enable the final three missions each to spend three days on comprehensive geological investigations. He concludes with a review of the robotic spacecraft that made remote-sensing observations of the Moon. Although aimed at the enthusiast, and can be read as an adventure in exploration, the book develops the scientific theme of lunar geology, and therefore will be of use as background reading for undergraduate students of planetary sciences. In addition, with the prospect of a resumption of human missions, it will help journalists understand what Apollo achieved ...

  3. Ferry to the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, Graeme

    1987-01-01

    Solar-electric propulsion for a fleet of lunar ferry vehicles may allow the creation of a permanent lunar base not long after the turn of the century with greater cost effectiveness than a fleet of chemically powered spacecraft. After delivery by the Space Shuttle to a 300-km earth orbit, the lunar ferry envisioned would travel in spiral trajectory to the moon under the power of 300-kW solar arrays and ten 30-kW Xe-ion engines; each of the solar arrays would be 12 x 61 m long. Each trip between the earth parking orbit and the moon would take about 1 year, so that a fleet of four ferries operating simultaneously could deliver 20 metric tons to a lunar base every 100 days.

  4. Pathways Towards Habitable Moons

    CERN Document Server

    Kipping, David M; Campanella, Giammarco; Schneider, Jean; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2009-01-01

    The search for life outside of the Solar System should not be restricted to exclusively planetary bodies; large moons of extrasolar planets may also be common habitable environments throughout the Galaxy. Extrasolar moons, or exomoons, may be detected through transit timing effects induced onto the host planet as a result of mutual gravitational interaction. In particular, transit timing variations (TTV) and transit duration variations (TDV) are predicted to produce a unique exomoon signature, which is not only easily distinguished from other gravitational perturbations, but also provides both the period and mass of an exomoon. Using these timing effects, photometry greater or equal to that of the Kepler Mission is readily able to detect habitable-zone exomoons down to 0.2 Earth masses and could survey up to 25,000 stars for 1 Earth-mass satellites. We discuss future possibilities for spectral retrieval of such bodies and show that transmission spectroscopy with JWST should be able to detect molecular species...

  5. Moon Portrait Accomplished

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    After the release of its first picture of the moon surface cap- tured by Chang’e-l last November,China published a photo of the moon’s polar areas on January 31,the first-ever such picture taken by China."We have obtained pictures of good quality,"said spokes- person Pei Zhaoyu of the China National Space Administration. Chinese scientists adjusted the camera aboard the satellite

  6. Science of the Joint ESA-NASA Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Michel; Greeley, Ron

    2010-05-01

    The Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), an international joint mission under study by NASA and ESA, has the overarching theme to investigate the emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants. Jupiter's diverse Galilean satellites—three of which are believed to harbor internal oceans—are the key to understanding the habitability of icy worlds. To this end, the reference mission architecture consists of the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). JEO and JGO will execute a coordinated exploration of the Jupiter System before settling into orbit around Europa and Ganymede, respectively. JEO and JGO carry sets of complementary instruments, to monitor dynamic phenomena (such as Io's volcanoes and Jupiter's atmosphere), map the Jovian magnetosphere and its interactions with the Galilean satellites, and characterize water oceans beneath the ice shells of Europa and Ganymede. Encompassed within the overall mission theme are two science goals, (1) Determine whether the Jupiter System harbors habitable worlds and (2) Characterize the processes within the Jupiter System. The science objectives addressed by the first goal are to: i) characterize and determine the extent of subsurface oceans and their relations to the deeper interior, ii) characterize the ice shells and any subsurface water, including the heterogeneity of the ice, and the nature of surface-ice-ocean exchange; iii) characterize the deep internal structure, differentiation history, and (for Ganymede) the intrinsic magnetic field; iv) compare the exospheres, plasma environments, and magnetospheric interactions; v) determine global surface composition and chemistry, especially as related to habitability; vi) understand the formation of surface features, including sites of recent or current activity, and identify and characterize candidate sites for future in situ exploration. The science objectives for addressed by the second goal are to: i) understand the

  7. High Latitude Mottling on Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The familiar banded appearance of Jupiter at low and middle latitudes gradually gives way to a more mottled appearance at high latitudes in this striking true color image taken Dec. 13, 2000, by NASA's Cassini spacecraft.The intricate structures seen in the polar region are clouds of different chemical composition, height and thickness. Clouds are organized by winds, and the mottled appearance in the polar regions suggests more vortex-type motion and winds of less vigor at higher latitudes.The cause of this difference is not understood. One possible contributor is that the horizontal component of the Coriolis force, which arises from the planet's rotation and is responsible for curving the trajectories of ocean currents and winds on Earth, has its greatest effect at high latitudes and vanishes at the equator. This tends to create small, intense vortices at high latitudes on Jupiter. Another possibility may lie in that fact that Jupiter overall emits nearly as much of its own heat as it absorbs from the Sun, and this internal heat flux is very likely greater at the poles. This condition could lead to enhanced convection at the poles and more vortex-type structures. Further analysis of Cassini images, including analysis of sequences taken over a span of time, should help us understand the cause of equator-to-pole differences in cloud organization and evolution.By the time this picture was taken, Cassini had reached close enough to Jupiter to allow the spacecraft to return images with more detail than what's possible with the planetary camera on NASA's Earth-orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. The resolution here is 114 kilometers (71 miles) per pixel. This contrast-enhanced, edge-sharpened frame was composited from images take at different wavelengths with Cassini's narrow-angle camera, from a distance of 19 million kilometers (11.8 million miles). The spacecraft was in almost a direct line between the Sun and Jupiter, so the solar illumination on Jupiter is almost full

  8. Imaging Jupiter Radiation Belts At Low Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, J. N.; de Pater, I.; Zarka, P.; Santos-Costa, D.; Sault, R.; Hess, S.; Cecconi, B.; Fender, R.; Pewg, Lofar

    2014-04-01

    , at different epochs only provided, each time, glimpses of the spectral content in different observational configurations. As the synchrotron emission frequency peaks at Vmax / E2B (with Vmax in MHz, E, the electron energy in MeV and B, the magnetic field in Gauss), the low frequency content of this emission is associated with low energy electron populations inside the inner belt and the energetic electrons located in regions of weaker magnetic field (at few jovian radii). Therefore, there is much interest in extending and completing the current knowledge of the synchrotron emission from the belts, with low frequency resolved observations. LOFAR, the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) [6], is a giant flexible and digital ground-based radio interferometer operating in the 30-250 MHz band. It brings very high time (~ μs), frequency (~ kHz) and angular resolutions (~1") and huge sensitivity (mJy). In November 2011, a single 10-hour track enabled to cover an entire planetary rotation and led to the first resolved image of the radiation belts between 127- 172 MHz [7,8]. In Feb 2013, an 2×5h30 joint LOFAR/ WSRT observing campaign seized the state of the radiation belts from 45 MHz up to 5 GHz. We will present the current state of the study (imaging, reconstruction method and modeling) of the radiation belts dynamic with this current set of observations. LOFAR can contribute to the understanding of the physics taking place in the inner belt as well as possibly providing a fast and a systematic "diagnostic" of the state of the belts. The latter represents an opportunity to give context and ground-based support for the arrival of JUNO (NASA) scheduled in July 2016 and also for future missions, such as JUICE (ESA), at the vicinity of Jupiter by the exploration of its icy satellites.

  9. Multi-layer hydrostatic equilibrium of planets and synchronous moons: theory and application to Ceres and to solar system moons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tricarico, Pasquale [Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2014-02-20

    The hydrostatic equilibrium of multi-layer bodies lacks a satisfactory theoretical treatment despite its wide range of applicability. Here we show that by using the exact analytical potential of homogeneous ellipsoids we can obtain recursive analytical solutions and an exact numerical method for the hydrostatic equilibrium shape problem of multi-layer planets and synchronous moons. The recursive solutions rely on the series expansion of the potential in terms of the polar and equatorial shape eccentricities, while the numerical method uses the exact potential expression. These solutions can be used to infer the interior structure of planets and synchronous moons from their observed shape, rotation, and gravity. When applied to the dwarf planet Ceres, we show that it is most likely a differentiated body with an icy crust of equatorial thickness 30-90 km and a rocky core of density 2.4-3.1 g cm{sup –3}. For synchronous moons, we show that the J {sub 2}/C {sub 22} ≅ 10/3 and the (b – c)/(a – c) ≅ 1/4 ratios have significant corrections of order Ω{sup 2}/(πGρ), with important implications for how their gravitational coefficients are determined from fly-by radio science data and for how we assess their hydrostatic equilibrium state.

  10. Multi-Layer Hydrostatic Equilibrium of Planets and Synchronous Moons: Theory and Application to Ceres and to Solar System Moons

    CERN Document Server

    Tricarico, Pasquale

    2013-01-01

    The hydrostatic equilibrium of multi-layer bodies lacks a satisfactory theoretical treatment despite its wide range of applicability. Here we show that by using the exact analytical potential of homogeneous ellipsoids we can obtain recursive analytical solutions and an exact numerical method for the hydrostatic equilibrium shape problem of multi-layer planets and synchronous moons. The recursive solutions rely on the series expansion of the potential in terms of the polar and equatorial shape eccentricities, while the numerical method uses the exact potential expression. These solutions can be used to infer the interior structure of planets and synchronous moons from the observed shape, rotation, and gravity. When applied to dwarf planet Ceres, we show that it is most likely a differentiated body with an icy crust of equatorial thickness 30-90 km and a rocky core of density 2.4-3.1 g/cm$^3$. For synchronous moons, we show that the $J_2/C_{22} \\simeq 10/3$ and the $(b-c)/(a-c) \\simeq 1/4$ ratios have significa...

  11. A fireball in Jupiter's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, A. F.; Duxbury, T. C.

    1981-01-01

    One fireball was photographed during two encounters with Jupiter. Its total luminosity was 120,000 0 mag s (at standard range 100 km). If the luminous efficiency proposed by Cook et al. (1981) for slip flow of a meteoroid in its own vapors is employed, an estimated mass of 11 kg is obtained. A rough absolute magnitude is -12.5. If it is noted that the search was conducted for a total of 223 s during two exposures, a number density near Jupiter of 10 to the -28th/cu cm is estimated for masses of meteoroids of 3 kg and greater. This value is about a factor of six smaller than a rough upper limit reached from an extrapolation from terrestrial observations of meteors and comets.

  12. Thermometric Soots on Hot Jupiters?

    CERN Document Server

    Zahnle, K; Fortney, J J

    2009-01-01

    We use a 1D thermochemical and photochemical kinetics model to predict that the stratospheric chemistry of hot Jupiters should change dramatically as temperature drops from 1200 to 1000 K. At 1200 K methane is too unstable to reach the stratosphere in significant quantities, while thermal decomposition of water is a strong source of OH radicals that oxidize any hydrocarbons that do form to CO and CO$_2$. At 1000 K methane, although very reactive, survives long enough to reach the lower stratosphere, and the greater stability of water coupled with efficient scavenging of OH by H$_2$ raise the effective C/O ratio in the reacting gases above unity. Reduced products such as ethylene, acetylene, and hydrogen cyanide become abundant; such conditions favor polymerization and possible formation of PAHs and soots. Although low temperature is the most important factor favoring hydrocarbons in hot Jupiters, higher rates of vertical mixing and generally lower metallicities also favor organic synthesis. The peculiar prope...

  13. Micro moon versus macro moon: Brightness and size

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Dulli Chandra

    2015-01-01

    The moon, moonlight, phases of the moon and its relatively simple recurring cycle has been of interest since time immemorial to the human beings, navigators, astronomers and astrologers. The fact that its orbit is elliptical as well its plane is inclined with the plane of rotation of the earth gives rise to new moon to full moon and solar and lunar eclipses. During the phase of the full moon, the luminous flux and its apparent size will depend on its distance from the earth. In case it is at farthest point known as lunar apogee causes smallest full moon or micro full moon and if it is closest to us termed as lunar perigee will result in macro full moon, also known as super moon, a term coined by astrologer Richard Nolle in 1979. The theoretical expressions for the lunar luminous fluxes on the earth representing the power of lunar light the earth intercepts in the direction normal to the incidence over an area of one square meter are derived for two extreme positions lunar apogee and lunar perigee. The express...

  14. A Study of Jupiter Trojans

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Ola

    2012-01-01

    Jupiter Trojan asteroid dynamics have been studied for a long time but it is only within the last decades that the known population has become large enough to make other studies meaningful. In four articles I have been scratching the surface of the unknown Trojan knowledge space. Paper I presents photometric observations confirming a larger variety in surface redness for the smaller Trojans compared to the larger ones, in line with the groups in the outer main asteroid belt. However, the larg...

  15. "Fly me to the moon"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ China's first lunar probe Chang'e-I, named after a mythical Chinese goddess who, according to legend, made her home on the moon, blasted off on 24 October from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in the southwestern province of Sichuan. In addition to making the dream cherished by Chinese people to fly to the moon come true, it is the first step into China's ambitious threestage moon mission, marking a new milestone in the country's space exploration history.

  16. Impact origin of the Moon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slattery, W.L.

    1998-12-31

    A few years after the Apollo flights to the Moon, it became clear that all of the existing theories on the origin of the Moon would not satisfy the growing body of constraints which appeared with the data gathered by the Apollo flights. About the same time, researchers began to realize that the inner (terrestrial) planets were not born quietly -- all had evidences of impacts on their surfaces. This fact reinforced the idea that the planets had formed by the accumulation of planetesimals. Since the Earth`s moon is unique among the terrestrial planets, a few researchers realized that perhaps the Moon originated in a singular event; an event that was quite probable, but not so probable that one would expect all the terrestrial planets to have a large moon. And thus was born the idea that a giant impact formed the Moon. Impacts would be common in the early solar system; perhaps a really large impact of two almost fully formed planets of disparate sizes would lead to material orbiting the proto-earth, a proto-moon. This idea remained to be tested. Using a relatively new, but robust, method of doing the hydrodynamics of the collision (Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics), the author and his colleagues (W. Benz, Univ. of Arizona, and A.G.W. Cameron, Harvard College Obs.) did a large number of collision simulations on a supercomputer. The author found two major scenarios which would result in the formation of the Moon. The first was direct formation; a moon-sized object is boosted into orbit by gravitational torques. The second is when the orbiting material forms a disk, which, with subsequent evolution can form the Moon. In either case the physical and chemical properties of the newly formed Moon would very neatly satisfy the physical and chemical constraints of the current Moon. Also, in both scenarios the surface of the Earth would be quite hot after the collision. This aspect remains to be explored.

  17. Recent Formation of Saturnian Moons: Constraints from Their Cratering Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dones, Henry C. Luke; Charnoz, Sebastien; Robbins, Stuart J.; Bierhaus, Edward B.

    2015-05-01

    Charnoz et al. (2010) proposed that Saturn's small "ring moons" out to Janus and Epimetheus consist of ring material that viscously spread beyond the Roche limit and coagulated into moonlets. The moonlets evolve outward due to the torques they exert at resonances in the rings. More massive moonlets migrate faster; orbits can cross and bodies can merge, resulting in a steep trend of mass vs. distance from the planet. Canup (2010) theorized that Saturn's rings are primordial and originated when a differentiated, Titan-like moon migrated inward when the planet was still surrounded by a gas disk. The satellite's icy shell could have been tidally stripped, and would have given rise to today's rings and the mid-sized moons out to Tethys. Charnoz et al. (2011) investigated the formation of satellites out to Rhea from a spreading massive ring, and Crida and Charnoz (2012) extended this scenario to other planets. Once the mid-sized moons recede far from the rings, tidal interaction with the planet determines the rate at which the satellites migrate. Charnoz et al. (2011) found that Mimas would have formed about 1 billion years more recently than Rhea. The cratering records of these moons (Kirchoff and Schenk 2010; Robbins et al. 2015) provide a test of this scenario. If the mid-sized moons are primordial, most of their craters were created through hypervelocity impacts by ecliptic comets from the Kuiper Belt/Scattered Disk (Zahnle et al. 2003; Dones et al. 2009). In the Charnoz et al. scenario, the oldest craters on the moons would result from low-speed accretionary impacts. We thank the Cassini Data Analysis program for support.ReferencesCanup, R. M. (2010). Nature 468, 943Charnoz, S.; Salmon, J., Crida, A. (2010). Nature 465, 752Charnoz, S., et al. (2011). Icarus 216, 535Crida, A.; Charnoz, S. (2012). Science 338, 1196Dones, L., et al. (2009). In Saturn from Cassini-Huygens, p. 613Kirchoff, M. R.; Schenk, P. (2010). Icarus 206, 485Robbins, S. J.; Bierhaus, E. B.; Dones, L

  18. Magmatism on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaut, Chloé; Thorey, Clément; Pinel, Virginie

    2016-04-01

    Volcanism on the Moon is dominated by large fissure eruptions of mare basalt and seems to lack large, central vent, shield volcanoes as observed on all the other terrestrial planets. Large shield volcanoes are constructed over millions to several hundreds of millions of years. On the Moon, magmas might not have been buoyant enough to allow for a prolonged activity at the same place over such lengths of time. The lunar crust was indeed formed by flotation of light plagioclase minerals on top of the lunar magma ocean, resulting in a particularly light and relatively thick crust. This low-density crust acted as a barrier for the denser primary mantle melts. This is particularly evident in the fact that subsequent mare basalts erupted primarily within large impact basins where at least part of the crust was removed by the impact process. Thus, the ascent of lunar magmas might have been limited by their reduced buoyancy, leading to storage zone formation deep in the lunar crust. Further magma ascent to shallower depths might have required local or regional tensional stresses. Here, we first review evidences of shallow magmatic intrusions within the lunar crust of the Moon that consist in surface deformations presenting morphologies consistent with models of magma spreading at depth and deforming an overlying elastic layer. We then study the preferential zones of magma storage in the lunar crust as a function of the local and regional state of stress. Evidences of shallow intrusions are often contained within complex impact craters suggesting that the local depression caused by the impact exerted a strong control on magma ascent. The depression is felt over a depth equivalent to the crater radius. Because many of these craters have a radius less than 30km, the minimum crust thickness, this suggests that the magma was already stored in deeper intrusions before ascending at shallower depth. All the evidences for intrusions are also preferentially located in the internal

  19. Does Vesta Have Moons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, L. A.; Sykes, M.; Joy, S.; Tricarico, P.; O'Brien, D.; Li, J. Y.; Mutchler, M.; Memarsadeghi, N.; Safavi, H.; Gutierrez-Marques, P.; Nathues, A.; Sierks, H.; Schroder, S.; Polansky, C.; Jacobson, R.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; Rayman, M.; Weinstein-Weiss, S.; Palmer, E.

    2011-01-01

    Previous searches for moons around Vesta have found nothing to an upper limit of 22.5 magnitude, that corresponds to 44 +/- 4 m diameter assuming the same albedo as Vesta. The Dawn mission's approach phase has dedicated satellite search observations consisting of two mosaic sequences bracketing the first observations of a complete rotation of Vesta scheduled for early July, 2011. In addition, we use the approach optical navigation image sequences for initial satellite searches. We will report any findings from these observations, and upper limits of magnitude and size.

  20. Hot moons and cool stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heller René

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The exquisite photometric precision of the Kepler space telescope now puts the detection of extrasolar moons at the horizon. Here, we firstly review observational and analytical techniques that have recently been proposed to find exomoons. Secondly, we discuss the prospects of characterizing potentially habitable extrasolar satellites. With moons being much more numerous than planets in the solar system and with most exoplanets found in the stellar habitable zone being gas giants, habitable moons could be as abundant as habitable planets. However, satellites orbiting planets in the habitable zones of cool stars will encounter strong tidal heating and likely appear as hot moons.

  1. The Moon and My Dream

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹萌

    2007-01-01

    The moon changes its shape and brightness each night all the year round. On the night of August 15 in the lunar calendar, the moon is said to be the most round and the most bright. As the round moon indicates "reunion" according to the Chinese culture, we usually celebrate the harvest by eating mooncakes and fruits and enjoy the full moon in the evening. Generally, all the family members would get together and have a good time on this occasion. I love this festival very much, not only because I can eat d...

  2. On the Behavior of the Galilean Satellites in the Jumping Jupiter Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deienno, Rogerio; Nesvorný, D.; Yokoyama, T.

    2013-10-01

    The Nice model of the dynamical instability and migration of the giant planets can explain many properties of our present Solar System, and can be used to constrain its early architecture. In the jumping Jupiter version of the Nice model, required from the terrestrial planet constrains, Jupiter is involved in encounters with an ice giant. Here we study the survival of the Galilean satellites in the jumping Jupiter model. This is an important concern because the ice giant encounters, if deep enough, could dynamically interfere with the orbits of the Galilean satellites, and lead to implausible results. The jumping Jupiter models are taken from Nesvorný and Morbidelli 2012 (NM12). Our metodology in this study take into account the effects of the Sun, Jupiter's oblateness and obliquity, as well as the planetary close encounters tracked in NM12 upon the Galilean moons. We considered three instability cases that differed in the number and distribution of ice giant encounters with Jupiter. In each case, we considered 1000 realizations of the Galilean satellite system before the instability, and integrated the dynamical response of satellite orbits to ice giant encounters. We found that in one of the considered cases, where the number of close encounters was relatively small, the Galilean satellite orbits were not significantly disturbed. In the other two, the final orbital eccentricities were [0-0.2], and Callisto's semi-major axis ended within [22-30]Rj, while the other satellites kept their semi-major axis nearly constant. As Callisto's semi-major axis may vary as much, we also hint on the possibility that all four Galilean satellites were originally formed in a Laplace resonance, and Callisto was kicked out of it by encounters. These results: i) show that Galilean satellites are an important constrain on the planetary instability; ii) can check on the possibility to the Galilean system have been formed in a different configuration of seen today. Acknowledgement

  3. The Impact of a Large Object on Jupiter in 2009 July

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Wesley, A.; Orton, G.; Hueso, R.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Fletcher, L. N.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Legarreta, J.; de Pater, I.; Hammel, H.; Simon-Miller, A.; Gomez-Forrellad, J. M.; Ortiz, J. L.; Garcia-Melendo, E.; Puetter, R. C.; Chodas, P.

    2010-01-01

    On 2009 July 19, we observed a single, large impact on Jupiter at a planetocentric latitude of 55 S. This and the Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) impacts on Jupiter in 1994 are the only planetary-scale impacts ever observed. The 2009 impact had an entry trajectory in the opposite direction and with a Tower incidence angle than that of SL9. Comparison of the initial aerosol cloud debris properties, spanning 4800 km east west and 2500 km north south, with those produced by the SL9 fragments and dynamical calculations of pre-impact orbit indicates that the impactor was most probably an icy body with a size of 0.5-1 km. The collision rate of events of this magnitude may be five to ten times more frequent than previously thought. The search for unpredicted impacts, such as the current one, could be best performed in 890 nm and K (2.03--2.36 micrometer) filters in strong gaseous absorption, where the high-altitude aerosols are more reflective than Jupiter's primary clouds.

  4. The impact of a large object with Jupiter in July 2009

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez-Lavega, A; Orton, G; Hueso, R; Perez-Hoyos, S; Fletcher, L N; Yanamandra-Fisher, P; Legarreta, J; de Pater, I; Hammel, H; Simon-Miller, A; Gomez-Forrellad, J M; Ortiz, J L; García-Melendo, E; Puetter, R C; Chodas, P; 10.1088/2041-8205/715/2/L155

    2010-01-01

    On 2009 July 19, we observed a single, large impact on Jupiter at a planetocentric latitude of 55^{\\circ}S. This and the Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) impacts on Jupiter in 1994 are the only planetary-scale impacts ever observed. The 2009 impact had an entry trajectory opposite and with a lower incidence angle than that of SL9. Comparison of the initial aerosol cloud debris properties, spanning 4,800 km east-west and 2,500 km north-south, with those produced by the SL9 fragments, and dynamical calculations of pre-impact orbit, indicate that the impactor was most probably an icy body with a size of 0.5-1 km. The collision rate of events of this magnitude may be five to ten times more frequent than previously thought. The search for unpredicted impacts, such as the current one, could be best performed in 890-nm and K (2.03-2.36 {\\mu}m) filters in strong gaseous absorption, where the high-altitude aerosols are more reflective than Jupiter's primary cloud.

  5. The response of subsurface oceans in icy satellites to tidally driven forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, E. M.; Glatzmaier, G. A.; Nimmo, F.

    2009-12-01

    Observations from the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft suggest that subsurface global water oceans are likely present on multiple icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. However, the dynamics of these oceans, under the influence of a time-varying tidal potential and buoyancy and coriolis forces, have not been investigated in detail. We have investigated the large scale ocean flow in two ways. First, we simulate the 3-D global circulation of the subsurface oceans on Europa and Titan driven primarily by a time-varying tidal potential and secondarily by heating at the base of the ocean. Second, we analyze the behavior of tidally-forced subsurface oceans in two-dimensions using quasi-nonlinear shallow water theory. These approaches allow us to predict potentially observable effects, in particular non-synchronous rotation of the ice shell driven by ocean torques and spatial variations in the heat flow supplied to the base of the ice shell, and magnetic induction effects due to the ocean circulation. Time-series analyses suggest that the ocean responds primarily at the tidal frequency; however, there are responses at lower frequencies as well. Preliminary results of full 3-D simulations will be presented, and comparisons will be made to the forced shallow water model.

  6. Juno at Jupiter: Mission and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Scott

    2016-07-01

    The Juno mission is the second mission in NASA's New Frontiers program. Launched in August 2011, Juno arrives at Jupiter in July 2016. Juno science goals include the study of Jupiter's origin, interior structure, deep atmosphere, aurora and magnetosphere. Jupiter's formation is fundamental to the evolution of our solar system and to the distribution of volatiles early in the solar system's history. Juno's measurements of the abundance of Oxygen and Nitrogen in Jupiter's atmosphere, and the detailed maps of Jupiter's gravity and magnetic field structure will constrain theories of early planetary development. Juno's orbit around Jupiter is a polar elliptical orbit with perijove approximately 5000 km above the visible cloud tops. The payload consists of a set of microwave antennas for deep sounding, magnetometers, gravity radio science, low and high energy charged particle detectors, electric and magnetic field radio and plasma wave experiment, ultraviolet imaging spectrograph, infrared imager and a visible camera. The Juno design enables the first detailed investigation of Jupiter's interior structure, and deep atmosphere as well as the first in depth exploration of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere. The Juno mission design, science goals, and measurements related to the atmosphere of Jupiter will be presented.

  7. Moon4You : A first Dutch footprint on the moon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, E.

    2009-01-01

    Moon4You is an initiative led by the Dutch Organisation for Applied Scientific Research TNO, with partners from industry and universities in the Netherlands that aims to provide a combined Raman/LIBS instrument as scientific payload for lunar exploration missions, and specifically for Odyssey Moon's

  8. Moon4You : A first Dutch footprint on the moon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, E.

    2009-01-01

    Moon4You is an initiative led by the Dutch Organisation for Applied Scientific Research TNO, with partners from industry and universities in the Netherlands that aims to provide a combined Raman/LIBS instrument as scientific payload for lunar exploration missions, and specifically for Odyssey Moon's

  9. The Tethered Moon

    CERN Document Server

    Zahnle, Kevin J; Dobrovolskis, Anthony; Sleep, Norman H

    2015-01-01

    We address the thermal history of the Earth after the Moon-forming impact, taking tidal heating and thermal blanketing by the atmosphere into account. The atmosphere sets an upper bound of ~100 W/m^2 on how quickly the Earth can cool. The liquid magma ocean cools over 2-10 Myrs, with longer times corresponding to high angular-momentum events. Tidal heating is focused mostly in mantle materials that are just beginning to freeze. The atmosphere's control over cooling sets up a negative feedback between viscosity-dependent tidal heating and temperature-dependent viscosity of the magma ocean. While the feedback holds, evolution of the Moon's orbit is limited by the modest radiative cooling rate of Earth's atmosphere. Orbital evolution is orders of magnitude slower than in conventional constant Q models, which promotes capture by resonances. The evection resonance is encountered early, when the Earth is molten. Capture by the evection resonance appears certain but unlikely to generate much eccentricity because it ...

  10. The formation of the Galilean moons and Titan in the Grand Tack scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, René; Pudritz, Ralph Egon

    2015-01-01

    In the "Grand Tack" (GT) scenario for the young solar system, Jupiter formed beyond 3.5 AU from the Sun and migrated as close as 1.5 AU until it encountered an orbital resonance with Saturn. Both planets then supposedly migrated outward for several $10^5$ yr, with Jupiter ending up at ~5 AU. The initial conditions of the GT and the timing between Jupiter's migration and the formation of the Galilean satellites remain unexplored. We study the formation of Ganymede and Callisto, both of which consist of ~50% water and rock, respectively, in the GT scenario. We examine why they lack dense atmospheres, while Titan is surrounded by a thick nitrogen envelope. We model an axially symmetric circumplanetary disk (CPD) in hydrostatic equilibrium around Jupiter. The CPD is warmed by viscous heating, Jupiter's luminosity, accretional heating, and the Sun. The position of the water ice line in the CPD, which is crucial for the formation of massive moons, is computed at various solar distances. We assess the loss of Galile...

  11. NASA's Proposed Budget Sees Small Dip, Emphasizes Innovation and Autonomy in Space

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kumar, Mohi

    2014-01-01

    NASA's proposed federal budget for fiscal year (FY) 2015, released on 4 March, includes new plans to send a probe to Jupiter's icy moon Europa, a ramp up in funding for a mission to redirect an asteroid into near...

  12. Planetary science: Flow of an alien ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Liquid water may lurk beneath the frozen surfaces of Jupiter's moon Europa and other icy worlds. Extending ocean science beyond Earth, planetary oceanographers are linking Europa's ocean dynamics to its enigmatic surface geology.

  13. The EJSM Jupiter-Ganymede Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, M.; Lebreton, J.-P.; Stankov, A.; Greeley, R.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Fujimoto, M.

    2008-09-01

    The Europa-Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), currently subject of a joint study by NASA, ESA and JAXA, would combine a fleet of three satellites in order to investigate in depth many questions related to the Jupiter System. These investigations are essential for our understanding of the emergence and evolution of habitable worlds, not only within the Solar System, but also for extrasolar planet investigations. Scientific targets of EJSM focus on Europa and Ganymede as a key pair of Galilean satellites, to address the questions on their habitability, formation, and internal structure, as well as the coupling with the whole Jovian system: Jupiter's atmosphere and interior, magnetosphere and magnetodisk.. In combination with a Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO that would be provided by NASA) and a Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter (JMO that would be provided by JAXA), ESA is studying a Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). The mission scenario includes a launch in 2020 with a transfer time to Jupiter of ~6 years. After the orbit insertion around Jupiter, a first phase (~2 years) will be devoted to Jupiter system and Callisto studies, with multiple flybys of Callisto planned at low altitude (~200 km), followed by a Ganymede orbit insertion and extensive study of Ganymede (~1 year). In depth comparative study of inner (Io and Europe) and outer (Ganymede and Callisto) satellites with combined payload of JEO and JGO will address the question of the geologic relative evolution of the satellites. On JGO, the transport phenomena in the magnetosphere of Jupiter will be studied in combination with JMO, and the Ganymede magnetosphere will be observed in situ. Jupiter atmosphere investigations on JGO will focus on coupling phenomena between troposphere, stratosphere and mesosphere, the stratospheric composition and the question of thermospheric heating.

  14. Should Moon Cakes Be Taxed?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    It is a custom in China that when the Mid-Autumn Festival draws near,a company or organization will offer its staff moon cakes,as non-cash benefits.It has recently been reported that these noncash benefits,such as moon cakes,should be taxed according to their value,which has spurred heated debate.

  15. Should Moon Cakes Be Taxed?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    It is a custom in China that when the Mid-Autumn Festival draws near, a company or organization will offer its staff moon cakes, as non-cash benefits. It has recently been reported that these noncash benefits, such as moon cakes, should be taxed according to their value, which has spurred heated debate.

  16. Facts and Suggestions from a Brief History of the Galilean Moons and Space Weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John

    2010-05-01

    From Galileo Galilei's Starry Messenger of four centuries ago we began the long journey of Galilean moon exploration now planned to continue with the joint ESA-NASA Europa Jupiter System Mission. Nearly eighty years after this historic beginning, the Keplerian orbital motions of these moons could be understood in terms of universal laws of motion and gravitation with Newton's Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy of 1687. But now looking back from the present to long before the discovery of magnetospheric radio emissions from Jupiter by Burke and Franklin in 1955 [1], we can infer the first apparent evidence for magnetospheric space weathering of the moon surfaces only from the 1926 first report of Stebbins [2] on photometric measurements of surface albedo light curves. These observations established the tidal locking of rotational and orbital motions from leading-trailing albedo asymmetries that we now significantly (if not entirely) associate with space weathering effects of the moon-magnetosphere-moon interactions. Of all the remote and in-situ observations that followed, those of the Pioneer (1973-1974), Voyager (1979), and Galileo (1995-2003) missions, and of the supporting measurements that followed in passing by the Ulysses (1992), Cassini (2000), and New Horizons (2007) missions, the discovery of greatest impact for space weathering may have been the first detection of Io volcanism by the Voyagers [3]. Accelerated as pickup ions in the corotating planetary magnetic field of Jupiter, atoms and molecules from the volcanic plume ejecta provide the primary source of magnetospheric ions for interactions with the other Galilean moons. These interactions include simple surface implantation of the iogenic ions, erosion of surface materials by ion sputtering, and modification of surface chemistry induced by volume ionization from more penetrating ions and electrons. From the highest energy magnetospheric protons and heavier ions, these interactions can be

  17. Warm Jupiters Are Less Lonely than Hot Jupiters: Close Neighbors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chelsea; Wu, Yanqin; Triaud, Amaury H. M. J.

    2016-07-01

    Exploiting the Kepler transit data, we uncover a dramatic distinction in the prevalence of sub-Jovian companions between systems that contain hot Jupiters (HJs) (periods inward of 10 days) and those that host warm Jupiters (WJs) (periods between 10 and 200 days). HJs, with the singular exception of WASP-47b, do not have any detectable inner or outer planetary companions (with periods inward of 50 days and sizes down to 2 R Earth). Restricting ourselves to inner companions, our limits reach down to 1 R Earth. In stark contrast, half of the WJs are closely flanked by small companions. Statistically, the companion fractions for hot and WJs are mutually exclusive, particularly in regard to inner companions. The high companion fraction of WJs also yields clues to their formation. The WJs that have close-by siblings should have low orbital eccentricities and low mutual inclinations. The orbital configurations of these systems are reminiscent of those of the low-mass close-in planetary systems abundantly discovered by the Kepler mission. This, and other arguments, lead us to propose that these WJs are formed in situ. There are indications that there may be a second population of WJs with different characteristics. In this picture, WASP-47b could be regarded as the extending tail of the in situ WJs into the HJ region and does not represent the generic formation route for HJs.

  18. The Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter mission and spacecraft architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulade, Sebastien; Maliet, Eric; Saks, Noah; Lang, Rainer; Kemble, Steve

    2010-05-01

    The Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) is a joint NASA-ESA mission candidate, featuring two planetary orbiters in Jovian environment. It will study Jupiter and its magnetosphere, the diversity of the Galilean satellites, the physical characteristics, composition and geology of their surfaces, with a resolution and coverage far beyond what was achieved by Galileo. It will determine their internal structure and the existence of subsurface oceans. It will study the Laplace resonance and its role in maintaining tidal heating. Constraints for the habitability of Europa over geologic timescales will be inferred from monitoring Io and Europa in the visible and infrared combined with precise determination of the satellites' orbital positions. To meet these science objectives, the EJSM mission will optimize the role of each platform. NASA-supplied Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) will focus on the two "rocky" inner Galilean satellites, Io and Europa. Following a similar approach, ESA-procured Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO) will focus on the two "icy" outer Galilean satellites, Ganymede and Callisto. With these two orbiters around Europa and Ganymede, it will be possible to perform an in-depth comparison, to understand the origin of their geophysical dichotomy and to better understand the unique characteristics of Europa which may make it habitable. Coordination of observations between JEO and JGO could also bring important synergistic science. As part of this EJSM mission, the JGO spacecraft is now one of the candidates for the "L1" launch slot in the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015/2025 plan, with a foreseen launch in 2020. All studies candidate for this L mission concepts currently undergo parallel assessment studies until end of 2010, when two mission concepts will be selected for definition studies, until 2012. Eventually, the first L mission will be selected for industrial implementation starting in 2013. The mission scenario for JGO is based on a launch in 2020 with Ariane 5

  19. The Brick Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Science fiction writers, like Jules Verne in France and Edward Everett Hale in America, had discovered one of the most vital elements in the formula for space travel-a fertile imagination. The first known proposal for a marned-satellite appears in a story by Hale entitled 'The Brick Moon' published in 1899. The story involved a group of young Bostonians who planned to put an artificial satellite into polar orbit for sailors to use to determine longitude accurately and easily. They planned to send a brick satellite into orbit because the satellite would have to withstand fire very well. The Satellite's 37 inhabitants signaled the Earth in morse code by jumping up and down on the outside of the satellite.

  20. The Brick Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Science fiction writers, like Jules Verne in France and Edward Everett Hale in America, had discovered one of the most vital elements in the formula for space travel-a fertile imagination. The first known proposal for a marned-satellite appears in a story by Hale entitled 'The Brick Moon' published in 1899. The story involved a group of young Bostonians who planned to put an artificial satellite into polar orbit for sailors to use to determine longitude accurately and easily. They planned to send a brick satellite into orbit because the satellite would have to withstand fire very well. The Satellite's 37 inhabitants signaled the Earth in morse code by jumping up and down on the outside of the satellite.

  1. Shooting the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    This story is about an unlikely NASA mission to the Moon. It was unlikely because it was started with far too little time and too-little money to complete. It was unlikely because it was able to take chances to accept risk of failure. It was unlikely because it was searching for the unthinkable: water-ice on the moon... Figure 1-1: LCROSS Mission. The mission of the Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) was to investigate the possibility of water ice in craters on the Moon s poles. This is certainly an interesting scientific topic in itself, but I intend to focus on the compelling experience of managing the LCROSS Project in the context of this storied Agency. Perhaps most interesting are the implications this story has for managing any development effort, lunar or not, and working a balance to achieve success. NASA is by design a risk-taking agency within the US Government. It could be argued that NASA s purpose in the aerospace community is to take on the really big challenges that either the corporate world can t afford, are not yet profitable endeavors, or are just too risky for private corporations to entertain. However, expectations of the Agency have evolved. A combination of grim human tragedies and some very public cost and schedule overruns have challenged the public s and Congress s tolerance for risk-taking within the Agency. NASA, which is supposed to be in the business of taking risks to do bold, difficult things, has become less and less able to do so within its cost framework. Yet effectively replacing prudent risk management with attempts to "risk-eliminate" is completely unaffordable. So where does risk-taking fit within the Agency, or within private/corporate organizations for that matter? Where astronauts play there is clearly concern about risk. When an organization puts humans in harm s way, it is understandably going to take extra effort to assure nobody gets hurt. Doing so, of course, costs money - a lot of money to pay for

  2. Physics and astronomy of the Moon

    CERN Document Server

    Kopal, Zdenek

    2013-01-01

    Physics and Astronomy of the Moon focuses on the application of principles of physics in the study of the moon, including perturbations, equations, light scattering, and photometry. The selection first offers information on the motion of the moon in space and libration of the moon. Topics include Hill's equations of motion, non-solar perturbations, improved lunar ephemeris, optical and physical libration of the moon, and adjustment of heliometric observations of the moon's libration. The text then elaborates on the dynamics of the earth-moon system, photometry of the moon, and polarization of

  3. Moon shots for management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Gary

    2009-02-01

    In May 2008, a group of management scholars and senior executives worked to define an agenda for management during the next 100 years. The so-called renegade brigade, led by Gary Hamel, included academics, such as C.K. Prahalad, Peter Senge, and Jeffrey Pfeffer; new-age thinkers, like James Surowiecki; and progressive CEOs, such as Whole Foods' John Mackey, W.L. Gore's Terri Kelly, and IDEO's Tim Brown. What drew them together was a set of shared beliefs about the importance of management and a sense of urgency about reinventing it for a new era. The group's first task was to compile a roster of challenges that would focus the energies of management innovators around the world. Accordingly, in this article, Hamel (who has set up the Management Lab, a research organization devoted to management innovation) outlines 25 "moon shots"--ambitious goals that managers should strive to achieve and in the process create Management 2.0. Topping the list is the imperative of extending management's responsibilities beyond just creating shareholder value. To do so will require both reconstructing the field's philosophical foundations so that work serves a higher purpose and fully embedding the ideas of community and citizenship into organizations. A number of challenges focus on ameliorating the toxic effects of hierarchy. Others focus on better ways to unleash creativity and capitalize on employees' passions. Still others seek to transcend the limitations of traditional patterns of management thinking. Not all the moon shots are new, but many tackle issues that are endemic in large organizations. Their purpose is to inspire new solutions to long-simmering problems by making every company as genuinely human as the people who work there.

  4. The Capture of Jupiter Trojans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbidelli, A.; Nesvorny, D.; Vokrouhlicky, D.

    2013-09-01

    The origin of Jupiter Trojans remained mysterious for decades. Particularly, it was difficult to explain the excitation of the inclinations of the Trojan population [1]. In 2005, Morbidelli et al. [2] proposed a scenario of capture from the trans-Neptunian disk, in the framework of the so-called "Nice model" [3,4]. This scenario explained in a natural way the observed orbital distribution of Trojans. The Nice model, however, evolved in the years, in order to satisfy an increasingly large number of constraints. It now appears that the dynamical evolution of the giant planets was different from that envisioned in [2]. Here, we assess again the process of capture of Trojans within this new evolution. We show that (6-8)×10 - 7 of the original trans-Neptunian planetesimals are captured in the Trojan region, with an orbital distribution consistent with the one observed. Relative to [2], the new capture mechanism has the potential of explaining the asymmetry between the L4 and L5 populations. Moreover, the resulting population of Trojans is consistent with that of the Irregular Satellites of Jupiter, which are captured in the same process; a few bodies from the main asteroid belt could also be captured in the Trojan cloud.

  5. Longitudinal Variations in Jupiter's Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Gierasch, P. J.; Tierney, G.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term studies of Jupiter's zonal wind field revealed temporal variations on the order of 20 to 40 m/s at many latitudes, greater than the typical data uncertainties of 1 to 10 m/s. No definitive periodicities were evident, however, though some latitudinally-confined signals did appear at periods relevant to the Quasi- Quadrennial Oscillation (Simon-Miller & Gierasch, Icarus, in press). As the QQO appears, from vertical temperature profiles, to propagate downward, it is unclear why a signal is not more obvious, unless other processes dominate over possibly weaker forcing from the QQO. An additional complication is that zonal wind profiles represent an average over some particular set of longitudes for an image pair and most data sets do not offer global wind coverage. Lien avoiding known features, such as the large anticyclonic vortices especially prevalent in the south, there can be distinct variations in longitude. We present results on the full wind field from Voyager and Cassini data, showing apparent longitudinal variations of up to 60 m/s or more. These are particularly obvious near disruptions such as the South Equatorial Disturbance, even when the feature itself is not clearly visible. These two dates represent very different states of the planet for comparison: Voyagers 1 & 2 flew by Jupiter shortly after a global upheaval, while many regions were in a disturbed state, while the Cassini view is typical of a more quiescent period present during much of the 1990s and early 2000s.

  6. Jupiter's magnetosphere and radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennel, C. F.; Coroniti, F. V.

    1979-01-01

    Radioastronomy and Pioneer data reveal the Jovian magnetosphere as a rotating magnetized source of relativistic particles and radio emission, comparable to astrophysical cosmic ray and radio sources, such as pulsars. According to Pioneer data, the magnetic field in the outer magnetosphere is radially extended into a highly time variable disk-shaped configuration which differs fundamentally from the earth's magnetosphere. The outer disk region, and the energetic particles confined in it, are modulated by Jupiter's 10 hr rotation period. The entire outer magnetosphere appears to change drastically on time scales of a few days to a week. In addition to its known modulation of the Jovian decametric radio bursts, Io was found to absorb some radiation belt particles and to accelerate others, and most importantly, to be a source of neutral atoms, and by inference, a heavy ion plasma which may significantly affect the hydrodynamic flow in the magnetosphere. Another important Pioneer finding is that the Jovian outer magnetosphere generates, or permits to escape, fluxes of relativistic electrons of such intensities that Jupiter may be regarded as the dominant source of 1 to 30 MeV cosmic ray electrons in the heliosphere.

  7. Atmospheric Escape from Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Murray-Clay, Ruth; Murray, Norman

    2008-01-01

    Photoionization heating from UV radiation incident on the atmospheres of hot Jupiters may drive planetary mass loss. We construct a model of escape that includes realistic heating and cooling, ionization balance, tidal gravity, and pressure confinement by the host star wind. We show that mass loss takes the form of a hydrodynamic ("Parker") wind, emitted from the planet's dayside during lulls in the stellar wind. When dayside winds are suppressed by the confining action of the stellar wind, nightside winds might pick up if there is sufficient horizontal transport of heat. A hot Jupiter loses mass at maximum rates of ~2 x 10^12 g/s during its host star's pre-main-sequence phase and ~2 x10^10 g/s during the star's main sequence lifetime, for total maximum losses of ~0.06% and ~0.6% of the planet's mass, respectively. For UV fluxes F_UV < 10^4 erg/cm^2/s, the mass loss rate is approximately energy-limited and is proportional to F_UV^0.9. For larger UV fluxes, such as those typical of T Tauri stars, radiative ...

  8. MoonNEXT: A European Mission to the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, J. D.; Koschny, D.; Crawford, I.; Falcke, H.; Kempf, S.; Lognonne, P.; Ricci, C.; Houdou, B.; Pradier, A.

    2008-09-01

    MoonNEXT is a mission currently being studied, under the direction of the European Space Agency, whose launch is foreseen between 2015 and 2018. MoonNEXT is intended to prepare the way for future exploration activities on the Moon, while addressing key science questions. Exploration Objectives The primary goal for the MoonNEXT mission is to demonstrate autonomous soft precision landing with hazard avoidance; a key capability for future exploration missions. The nominal landing site is at the South Pole of the Moon, at the edge of the Aitken basin and in the region of Shackleton crater, which has been identified as an optimal location for a future human outpost by the NASA lunar architecture team [1]. This landing site selection ensures a valuable contribution by MoonNEXT to the Global Exploration Strategy [2]. MoonNEXT will also prepare for future lunar exploration activities by characterising the environment at the lunar surface. The potentially hazardous radiation environment will me monitored while a dedicated instrument package will investigate the levitation and mobility of lunar dust. Experience on Apollo demonstrated the potentially hazardous effects of dust for surface operations and human activities and so an understanding of these processes is important for the future. Life sciences investigations will be carried out into the effects of the lunar environment (including radiation, gravity and illumination conditions) on a man made ecosystem analogous to future life support systems. In doing so MoonNEXT will demonstrate the first extraterrestrial man made ecosystem and develop valuable expertise for future missions. Geological and geochemical investigations will explore the possibilities for In Situ Resource Utilisation (ISRU), which will be essential for long term human habitation on the Moon and is of particular importance at the proposed landing site, given its potential as a future habitat location. Science Objectives In addition to providing extensive

  9. Broad search for trajectories from Earth to Callisto-Ganymede-JOI double-satellite-aided capture at Jupiter from 2020 to 2060

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynam, Alfred E.

    2016-01-01

    Employing multiple gravity-assist flybys of Jupiter's Galilean moons can save a substantial amount of \\varDelta V when capturing into orbit about Jupiter. Using Callisto and Ganymede, the most massive and distant of the Galilean moons, as gravity-assist bodies reduces the Jupiter orbit insertion \\varDelta V cost, while allowing the spacecraft to remain above the worst of Jupiter's radiation belts. A phase-angle approach is used to find initial guesses for a Lambert targeter to find patched-conic Callisto-Ganymede transfers. A B-plane targeter using grid search methodology is used to backward target Earth to find launch conditions. Twenty-nine distinct patched-conic trajectories were found from Earth to Callisto-Ganymede-JOI capture throughout the search space from 2020-2060. Five promising trajectories were found that launch from Earth between July 11, 2023 and July 20, 2023, and arrive at Jupiter between February and September 2026. These trajectories were numerically integrated using GMAT and, in the author's opinion, are excellent candidates for use on NASA's planned Europa Clipper mission.

  10. IPPF Co-operative Information Service (ICIS). February 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    This publication is a catalogue of document descriptions that may be of use to national family planning/population organizations. The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) Cooperative Information Service (ICIS) has developed this quarterly series as a service to population documentation centers so that these centers can acquire the…

  11. The earth and the moon

    CERN Document Server

    Elkins-Tanton, Linda T

    2010-01-01

    The moon is the only body in the solar system outside of the Earth that has been visited by humans. More than 440 pounds of lunar material are brought by NASA and Soviet space missions to Earth for study. The information gleaned about the moon from this relatively small pile of rocks is mind-boggling and stands as the greatest proof that Martian planetary science would be greatly enhanced by returning samples to Earth. Compositional studies of lunar rocks show that the moon and the Earth are made of similar material, and because lunar material has not been reworked through erosion and plate te

  12. Investigation of the properties of icy lunar polar regolith simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Craig; Kömle, Norbert; Leibniz, Otto; Morales-Calderon, Odalys; Gao, Yang; Richter, Lutz

    2016-03-01

    As icy regolith is believed to exist in the subsurface of permanently shadowed areas near the lunar south pole, there is a growing interest in obtaining samples from these polar regions. To qualify for spaceflight, sampling instruments must demonstrate their ability to operate in the expected environment. However, there is currently no quantitative data detailing the extent and distribution of ice in polar regolith. While work has been done to determine the effects of water ice content in simulants such as JSC-1A, to date there has been no investigation into the properties of icy simulants of the regolith believed to be found at lunar polar regions. A series of experiments has therefore been conducted to determine the properties of icy NU-LHT-2M lunar highland simulant, an approximation of lunar polar regolith, at varying degrees of saturation. A number of procedures for preparing the simulant were tested, with the aim of defining a standardised technique for the creation of icy simulants with controlled water contents. Saturation of the highland simulant was found to occur at a water mass content between 13% and 17%, while cone penetration tests demonstrated that a significant increase in penetration resistance occurs at 5 ± 1%. Uniaxial compression tests showed an increase in regolith strength with water mass and density, which slows down as the saturation level is reached. The results presented here demonstrate the first characterisation of the properties of icy lunar polar regolith simulants, which can be expanded upon to further the understanding of its properties for use in future instrumentation testing.

  13. Reflected Light Curves, Spherical and Bond Albedos of Jupiter- and Saturn-like Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Zhang, Xi; Li, Liming; Kopparla, Pushkar; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Dones, Henry C. Luke; Verbiscer, Anne J.; Yung, Yuk

    2016-10-01

    Reflected light curves observed for exoplanets indicate that a few of them host bright clouds. We estimate how the light curve and total stellar heating of a planet depends on forward and backward scattering in the clouds based on Pioneer and Cassini spacecraft images of Jupiter and Saturn. We fit analytical functions to the local reflected brightnesses of Jupiter and Saturn depending on the planet's phase. These observations cover broad bands at 0.59-0.72 and 0.39-0.5 μm, and narrow bands at 0.938 (atmospheric window), 0.889 (CH4 absorption band), and 0.24-0.28 μm. We simulate the images of the planets with a ray-tracing model, and disk-integrate them to produce the full-orbit light curves. For Jupiter, we also fit the modeled light curves to the observed full-disk brightness. We derive spherical albedos for Jupiter and Saturn, and for planets with Lambertian and Rayleigh-scattering atmospheres. Jupiter-like atmospheres can produce light curves that are a factor of two fainter at half-phase than the Lambertian planet, given the same geometric albedo at transit. The spherical albedo is typically lower than for a Lambertian planet by up to a factor of ˜1.5. The Lambertian assumption will underestimate the absorption of the stellar light and the equilibrium temperature of the planetary atmosphere. We also compare our light curves with the light curves of solid bodies: the moons Enceladus and Callisto. Their strong backscattering peak within a few degrees of opposition (secondary eclipse) can lead to an even stronger underestimate of the stellar heating. This work is published: Dyudina, U.,et al., 2016: ApJ, 822, 76, http://arxiv.org/abs/1511.04415.

  14. Moon Cakes, A Chinese Favorite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    CHINA is a nation with many ethnic groups. Thus, there are many legends to explain the nation’s many festivals. The largest and most striking of these festivals are the Spring Festival and Midautumn Festival. Anywhere Chinese people go, they will remember and celebrate these two festivals. The Mid-autumn Festival falls on the fifteenth day of the 8th lunar month. In this festival, Chinese people eat moon cakes, a baked food, with a flour crust around a dense filling. Coming in a great variety of flavors and styles, the moon cake carries a great deal of symbolic significance. The moon cake is round like the moon. "Round" is pronounced "yuan" in Chinese. This character is full of good meanings. When used in reference to a

  15. System concepts and enabling technologies for an ESA low-cost mission to Jupiter / Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, P.; Koeck, C.; Kemble, Steve; Atzei, Alessandro; Falkner, Peter

    2004-11-01

    The European Space Agency is currently studying the Jovian Minisat Explorer (JME), as part of its Technology Reference Studies (TRS), used for its development plan of technologies enabling future scientific missions. The JME focuses on the exploration of the Jovian system and particularly of Europa. The Jupiter Minisat Orbiter (JMO) study concerns the first mission phase of JME that counts up to three missions using pairs of minisats. The scientific objectives are the investigation of Europa's global topography, the composition of its (sub)surface and the demonstration of existence of a subsurface ocean below its icy crust. The present paper describes the candidate JMO system concept, based on a Europa Orbiter (JEO) supported by a communications relay satellite (JRS), and its associated technology development plan. It summarizes an analysis performed in 2004 jointly by ESA and the EADS-Astrium Company in the frame of an industrial technical assistance to ESA.

  16. Strong Langmuir turbulence at Jupiter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Langmuir wave packets with short scale lengths less than an approximately equal to 100 lambda e have been observed in Jupiter's foreshock. Theoretical constraints on the electric fields and scale sizes of collapsing wave packets are summarized, extended and placed in a form suitable for easy comparison with Voyager and Ulysses data. The published data are reviewed and possible instrumental underestimation of fields discussed. New upper limits for the fields of the published wave packets are estimated. Wave packets formed at the nucleation scale from the observed large-scale fields cannot collapse because they are disrupted before collapse occurs. The published wave packets are quantitatively inconsistent with strong turbulence collapse. Strict constraints exist for more intense wave packets to be able to collapse: E greater than or approximately equals to 1-8 mV/m for scales less than or approximately equal to 100 lambda e. Means for testing these conclusions using Voyager and Ulysses data are suggested.

  17. Overview of Juno Results at Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Scott; Connerney, Jack; Levin, Steve

    2017-04-01

    Juno is the first mission to investigate Jupiter using a close polar orbit. The Juno science goals include the study of Jupiter interior composition and structure, deep atmosphere and its polar magnetosphere. All orbits have peri-jove at approximately 5000 km above Jupiter's visible cloud tops. The payload consists of a set of microwave antennas for deep sounding, magnetometers, gravity radio science, low and high energy charged particle detectors, plasma wave antennas, ultraviolet imaging spectrograph, infrared imager and spectrometer and a visible camera. The Juno mission design, an overview of the early science results from Juno, and a description of the collaborative Earth based campaign will be presented.

  18. Juno's first glimpse of Jupiter's complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Scott; Levin, Steven; Bagenal, Fran

    2017-08-01

    Preliminary results from NASA's Juno mission are presented in this special issue of Geophysical Research Letters. The data were gathered by nine scientific instruments as the Juno spacecraft approached Jupiter on the dawn flank, was inserted into Jupiter orbit on 4 July 2016, and made the first polar passes close to the planet. The first results hint that Jupiter may not have a distinct core, indicate puzzling deep atmospheric convection, and reveal complex small-scale structure in the magnetic field and auroral processes that are distinctly different from those at Earth.

  19. It's Far, It's Small, It's Cool: It's an Icy Exoplanet!

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Using a network of telescopes scattered across the globe, including the Danish 1.54m telescope at ESO La Silla (Chile), astronomers [1] discovered a new extrasolar planet significantly more Earth-like than any other planet found so far. The planet, which is only about 5 times as massive as the Earth, circles its parent star in about 10 years. It is the least massive exoplanet around an ordinary star detected so far and also the coolest [2]. The planet most certainly has a rocky/icy surface. Its discovery marks a groundbreaking result in the search for planets that support life. ESO PR Photo 03a/06 ESO PR Photo 03a/06 Artist's Impression of the Newly Found Exoplanet The new planet, designated by the unglamorous identifier of OGLE-2005-BLG-390Lb, orbits a red star five times less massive than the Sun and located at a distance of about 20,000 light years, not far from the centre of our Milky Way galaxy. Its relatively cool parent star and large orbit implies that the likely surface temperature of the planet is 220 degrees Centigrade below zero, too cold for liquid water. It is likely to have a thin atmosphere, like the Earth, but its rocky surface is probably deeply buried beneath frozen oceans. It may therefore more closely resemble a more massive version of Pluto, rather than the rocky inner planets like Earth and Venus. "This planet is actually the first and only planet that has been discovered so far that is in agreement with the theories for how our Solar System formed ", said Uffe Gråe Jørgensen (Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark), member of the team. The favoured theoretical explanation for the formation of planetary systems proposes that solid 'planetesimals' accumulate to build up planetary cores, which then accrete nebular gas - to form giant planets - if they are sufficiently massive. Around red dwarfs, the most common stars of our Galaxy, this model favours the formation of Earth- to Neptune-mass planets being between 1 and 10 times the Earth

  20. Effect of the tiger stripes on the deformation of Saturn's moon Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souček, Ondřej; Hron, Jaroslav; Běhounková, Marie; Čadek, Ondřej

    2016-07-01

    Enceladus is a small icy moon of Saturn with active jets of water emanating from fractures around the south pole, informally called tiger stripes, which might be connected to a subsurface water ocean. The effect of these features on periodic tidal deformation of the moon has so far been neglected because of the difficulties associated with implementation of faults in continuum mechanics models. Here we estimate the maximum possible impact of the tiger stripes on tidal deformation and heat production within Enceladus's ice shell by representing them as narrow zones with negligible frictional and bulk resistance passing vertically through the whole ice shell. Assuming a uniform ice shell thickness of 25 km, consistent with the recent estimate of libration, we demonstrate that the faults can dramatically change the distribution of stress and strain in Enceladus's south polar region, leading to a significant increase of the heat production in this area.

  1. SELENE: The Moon-Orbiting Observatory Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, H.; Kato, M.; Sasaki, S.; Iijima, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Takizawa, Y.

    The Moon-orbiting SELENE (Selenological and Engineering Explorer) mission is prepared in Japan for lunar science and technology development. The launch target has been changed from 2005 to 2006 because of the launch failure of H2A rocket in 2003. The spacecraft consists of a main orbiting satellite at about 100 km altitude in the polar orbit and two sub-satellites in the elliptical orbits. The scientific objectives of the mission are; 1) study of the origin and evolution of the Moon, 2) in-situ measurement of the lunar environment, and 3) observation of the solar-terrestrial plasma environment. SELENE carries the instruments for scientific investigation, including mapping of lunar topography and surface composition, measurement of the gravity and magnetic fields, and observation of lunar and solar-terrestrial plasma environment. The total mass of scientific payload is about 300 kg. The mission period will be 1 year. If extra fuel is available, the mission will be extended in a lower orbit around 50 km. The elemental abundances are measured by x-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers. Alpha particles from the radon gas and polonium are detected by an alpha particle spectrometer. The mineralogical abundance is characterized by a multi-band imager. The mineralogical composition is identified by a spectral profiler which is a continuous spectral analyzer. The surface topographic data are obtained by a high resolution terrain camera and a laser altimeter. The inside structure up to 5 km below the lunar surface is observed by the radar sounder experiment using a 5 MHz radio wave. A magnetometer and an electron reflectometer provides data on the lunar surface magnetic field. Doppler tracking of the orbiter via the sub-satellite when the orbiter is in the far side is used to determine the gravity field of the far side. Radio sources on the two sub-satellites are used to conduct differential VLBI observation from the ground stations. The lunar environment of high energy particles

  2. Secondary craters from large impacts on Europa and Ganymede: Ejecta size-velocity distributions on icy worlds, and the scaling of ejected blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Kelsi N.; McKinnon, William B.; Nowicki, L. T.

    2013-09-01

    We have mapped fields of secondary craters around three large primary craters on Europa and Ganymede and estimated the size and velocity of the fragments that formed the secondaries using updated scaling equations for ice impacts. We characterize the upper envelope of the fragment size-velocity distribution to obtain a function for the largest fragments at a given ejection velocity. Power-law velocity exponents found in our study of icy satellite secondary fields are compared to the exponents found for similar studies of mercurian, lunar, and martian craters; for all but basin-scale impacts, fragment size decreases more slowly with increasing ejection velocity than on rocky bodies. Spallation theory provides estimates of the size of ejected spall plates at a given velocity, but this theory predicts fragments considerably smaller than are necessary to form most of our observed secondaries. In general, ejecta fragment sizes scale with primary crater diameter and decrease with increasing ejection velocity, υej, by 1/υej or greater, and point-source scaling implies a relation between the two. The largest crater represented in any of these studies, Gilgamesh on Ganymede, exhibits a relatively steep velocity dependence. Extrapolating the results to the escape speed for each icy moon yields the size of the largest fragment that could later re-impact to form a so-called sesquinary crater, either on the parent moon or a neighboring satellite. We find that craters above 2 km in diameter on Europa and Ganymede are unlikely to be sesquinaries.

  3. Strong ocean tidal flow and heating on moons of the outer planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Robert H

    2008-12-11

    Data from recent space missions have added strong support for the idea that there are liquid oceans on several moons of the outer planets, with Jupiter's moon Europa having received the most attention. But given the extremely cold surface temperatures and meagre radiogenic heat sources of these moons, it is still unclear how these oceans remain liquid. The prevailing conjecture is that these oceans are heated by tidal forces that flex the solid moon (rock plus ice) during its eccentric orbit, and that this heat entering the ocean does not rapidly escape because of the insulating layer of ice over the ocean surface. Here, however, I describe strong tidal dissipation (and heating) in the liquid oceans; I show that a subdominant and previously unconsidered tidal force due to obliquity (axial tilt of the moon with respect to its orbital plane) has the right form and frequency to resonantly excite large-amplitude Rossby waves in these oceans. In the specific case of Europa, the minimum kinetic energy of the flow associated with this resonance (7.3 x 10(18) J) is two thousand times larger than that of the flow excited by the dominant tidal forces, and dissipation of this energy seems large enough to be a primary ocean heat source.

  4. Astrometry of mutual approximations between the Galilean moons observed at 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Bruno Eduardo; Vieira-Martins, Roberto; Lainey, Valery

    2017-06-01

    A precise astrometry of natural satellites is very important to constrain dynamical models when taking into account week disturbances forces, such as tidal. For the Galilean moons of Jupiter, this astrometry is not an easy task, due to the brightness of Jupiter and its satellites. Usual CCD astrometry has a precision in the range of 100-120 mas. During the period of mutual phenomena, positions with a precision of a few mas can be obtained. However, mutual phenomena only happen during the equinox of the host planet, in the case of the Galilean moons every six years. This scenario motivates the development of alternatives methods to determine precise positions of these moons. One of these is the mutual approximations technique, in this method we determine the central instant in an apparent closest approach between two satellites. In this work, we determine the central instant of 50 curves observed from different observers. In total, 27 events were obtained, and 14 of those had at least two observers. All observations were made with a narrow-band filter centred at 889 nm with a width of 15 nm. The primary mirror of the telescopes ranges between 120-25 cm. The average precision obtained was 13 mas.

  5. Astronomers find distant planet like Jupiter

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Astronomers searching for planetary systems like our solar system have found a planet similar to Jupiter orbiting a nearby star similar to our Sun, about 90 light-years from Earth, according to researchers (1/2 page).

  6. Kepler constraints on planets near hot Jupiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Ragozzine, Darin; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; /UC, Santa Cruz, Astron. Astrophys.; Carter, Joshua A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Ford, Eric B.; /Florida U.; Holman, Matthew J.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Rowe, Jason F.; /NASA, Ames; Welsh, William F.; /San Diego State U., Astron. Dept.; Borucki, William J.; /NASA, Ames; Boss, Alan P.; /Carnegie Inst., Wash., D.C., DTM; Ciardi, David R.; /Caltech /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2012-05-01

    We present the results of a search for planetary companions orbiting near hot Jupiter planet candidates (Jupiter-size candidates with orbital periods near 3 d) identified in the Kepler data through its sixth quarter of science operations. Special emphasis is given to companions between the 2:1 interior and exterior mean-motion resonances. A photometric transit search excludes companions with sizes ranging from roughly two-thirds to five times the size of the Earth, depending upon the noise properties of the target star. A search for dynamically induced deviations from a constant period (transit timing variations) also shows no significant signals. In contrast, comparison studies of warm Jupiters (with slightly larger orbits) and hot Neptune-size candidates do exhibit signatures of additional companions with these same tests. These differences between hot Jupiters and other planetary systems denote a distinctly different formation or dynamical history.

  7. Analysis of JUPITER experiment in ZPPR-9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1980-09-15

    Information and data from the ZPPR-9 reactor JUPITER experiment are presented concerning a general description of data and methods; criticality; reaction rate ratio and reaction rate distribution; Doppler and sample reactivity worth; sodium void worth; and control rod worth.

  8. Kepler constraints on planets near hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Jason H; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Carter, Joshua A; Ford, Eric B; Holman, Matthew J; Rowe, Jason F; Welsh, William F; Borucki, William J; Boss, Alan P; Ciardi, David R; Quinn, Samuel N

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a search for planetary companions orbiting near hot Jupiter planet candidates (Jupiter-size candidates with orbital periods near 3 days) identified in the Kepler data through its sixth quarter of science operations. Special emphasis is given to companions between the 2:1 interior and exterior mean-motion resonances. A photometric transit search excludes companions with sizes ranging from roughly 2/3 to 5 times the size of the Earth, depending upon the noise properties of the target star. A search for dynamically induced deviations from a constant period (transit timing variations or TTVs) also shows no significant signals. In contrast, comparison studies of warm Jupiters (with slightly larger orbits) and hot Neptune-size candidates do exhibit signatures of additional companions with these same tests. These differences between hot Jupiters and other planetary systems denote a distinctly different formation or dynamical history.

  9. Far infrared spectrophotometry of Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, E. F.; Goorvitch, D.; Simpson, J. P.; Strecker, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    Infrared spectral measurements of Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn were obtained from 100 to 470 kaysers and, by taking Mars as a calibration source, brightness temperatures of Jupiter and Saturn were determined with approximately 5 kayser resolution. Internal luminosities were determined from the data and are reported to be approximately 8 times 10 to the minus tenth power of the sun's luminosity for Jupiter and approximately 3.6 times 10 to the minus tenth power of the sun's luminosity for Saturn. Comparison of data with spectra predicted by models suggests the need for an opacity source in addition to gaseous hydrogen and ammonia to help explain Jupiter's observed spectrum in the vicinity of 250 kaysers.

  10. Jupiter Great Red Spot and White Ovals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    This photo of Jupiter was taken by Voyager 1 on March 1, 1979. The spacecraft was 3 million miles (5 million kilometers) from Jupiter at the time. The photo shows Jupiter's Great Red Spot (upper right) and the turbulent region immediately to the west. At the middle right of the frame is one of several white ovals seen on Jupiter from Earth. The structure in every feature here is far better than has ever been seen from any telescopic observations. The Red Spot and the white oval both reveal intricate and involved structure. The smallest details that can be seen in this photo are about 55 miles (95 kilometers) across. JPL manages and controls the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  11. Tidal Response of Preliminary Jupiter Model

    CERN Document Server

    Wahl, Sean M; Militzer, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    In anticipation of improved observational data for Jupiter's gravitational field from the Juno spacecraft, we predict the static tidal response for a variety of Jupiter interior models based on ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures. We calculate hydrostatic-equilibrium gravity terms using the non-perturbative concentric Maclaurin Spheroid (CMS) method that eliminates lengthy expansions used in the theory of figures. Our method captures terms arising from the coupled tidal and rotational perturbations, which we find to be important for a rapidly-rotating planet like Jupiter. Our predicted static tidal Love number $k_2 = 0.5900$ is $\\sim$10\\% larger than previous estimates. The value is, as expected, highly correlated with the zonal harmonic coefficient $J_2$, and is thus nearly constant when plausible changes are made to interior structure while holding $J_2$ fixed at the observed value. We note that the predicted static $k_2$ might change due to Jupiter's dynamical response to the Galilea...

  12. Kepler constraints on planets near hot Jupiters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Jason H; Ragozzine, Darin; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Carter, Joshua A; Ford, Eric B; Holman, Matthew J; Rowe, Jason F; Welsh, William F; Borucki, William J; Boss, Alan P; Ciardi, David R; Quinn, Samuel N

    2012-05-22

    We present the results of a search for planetary companions orbiting near hot Jupiter planet candidates (Jupiter-size candidates with orbital periods near 3 d) identified in the Kepler data through its sixth quarter of science operations. Special emphasis is given to companions between the 21 interior and exterior mean-motion resonances. A photometric transit search excludes companions with sizes ranging from roughly two-thirds to five times the size of the Earth, depending upon the noise properties of the target star. A search for dynamically induced deviations from a constant period (transit timing variations) also shows no significant signals. In contrast, comparison studies of warm Jupiters (with slightly larger orbits) and hot Neptune-size candidates do exhibit signatures of additional companions with these same tests. These differences between hot Jupiters and other planetary systems denote a distinctly different formation or dynamical history.

  13. Voyager-Jupiter radio science data papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, G. S.; Wood, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    The reduction and interpretation of the radio science data from the Voyager 1 and 2 encounters of the planet Jupiter and its satellites resulted in the preparation of several papers for publication in the special Voyager-Jupiter issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research. The radio science and tracking systems of the Deep Space Network provide the data which makes this research possible. This article lists submitted papers by title, with their authors and with abstracts of their contents.

  14. Jupiter's Radiation Belts: Can Pioneer 10 Survive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, W N; Birmingham, T J; Mead, G D

    1973-12-07

    Model calculations of Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts indicate that the Galilean satellites can reduce particle fluxes in certain regions of the inner magnetosphere by as much as six orders of magnitude. Average fluxes should be reduced by a factor of 100 or more along the Pioneer 10 trajectory through the heart of Jupiter's radiation belts in early December. This may be enough to prevent serious radiation damage to the spacecraft.

  15. Tidal Response of Preliminary Jupiter Model

    OpenAIRE

    Wahl, Sean M; Hubbard, Willam B.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    In anticipation of improved observational data for Jupiter's gravitational field from the Juno spacecraft, we predict the static tidal response for a variety of Jupiter interior models based on ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures. We calculate hydrostatic-equilibrium gravity terms using the non-perturbative concentric Maclaurin Spheroid (CMS) method that eliminates lengthy expansions used in the theory of figures. Our method captures terms arising from the coupled tidal...

  16. The Inside of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Roger J.

    2008-09-01

    Fundamental questions remain regarding the lunar interior, e.g.: Why did the Moon apparently cool so early? Why does the Moon have an asymmetric structure (nearside/farside)? What is the thickness of the lunar crust? How much of crustal variability is due to variable melting vs. impact redistribution? How big are impact basins and how deep did they excavate and thermally perturb the mantle? What was the temporal evolution of magmatism and brecciation? Did the mantle overturn subsequent to magma ocean solidification? How laterally heterogeneous is the lunar mantle? Does the Moon have a seismic discontinuity in the mantle? Does the Moon have a core? Does the Moon have a liquid outer core? Did the Moon have a core dynamo? Some of these questions will be at least partially answered in the next several years through new spacecraft investigations such as the GRAIL mission, which will map the lunar gravity field to unprecedented spatial resolution and accuracy. Furthermore, a long-lived, multi-station seismic network is also essential for understanding interior structure. Recent analyses of Apollo seismic data call into question the existence of the mantle discontinuity at 500-km depth, and the thickness of the lunar crust beneath the Apollo 12 and 14 landing sites now has multiple estimates. However, there is still a great deal that can be learned from existing lunar data sets. One productive approach would construct a set of self-consistent models that describe the coupled petrological-thermal evolution of the Moon. Such an investigation involves the high-level marriage of detailed petrological information from samples of the lunar crust and possibly mantle; of models that can predict accurately lunar solidi, liquidi, and equilibrium compositions; and of sophisticated thermal models that accurately incorporate the physics of melting and melt migration.

  17. China's first large tanker for icy area successfully launched

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Jianan

    2006-01-01

    @@ On July 10, the 51800 dwt product/chemical tanker developed, designed and built by China for navigating in icy areas was launched at Guangzhou Shipyard International. The tanker is scheduled for delivery at the end of this year. The second follow-on ship will soon be built on the berths. At present, Guangzhou Shipyard International has a backlog order of 11 such tankers.

  18. The Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter : An ESA Contribution to the Europa-Jupiter System Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drossart, Pierre; Blanc, M.; Lebreton, J. P.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Greeley, R.; Fujimoto, M.; EJSM/Jupiter Science Definition Team

    2008-09-01

    In the framework of an outer planets mission, under study after the NASA-Juno mission, the Europa-Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) would combine a fleet of up to three satellites in order to investigate in depth many questions related to the Jupiter System. These investigations are essential for our understanding of the emergence and evolution of habitable worlds, not only within the Solar System, but also for extrasolar planets investigations. Scientific targets of EJSM will focus on Europa and Ganymede as a key pair of Galilean satellites, to address the questions on their habitability, formation, and internal structure, as well as the coupling with the whole Jovian system : Jupiter's atmosphere and interior, magnetosphere and magnetodisk. .In combination with a Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO likely provided by NASA) and a Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter (JMO likely provided by JAXA), ESA is studying a Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). The mission scenario includes a direct launch in 2020 with a transfer time to Jupiter of 6 years. After the orbit insertion around Jupiter, a first phase ( 2 years) will be devoted to Jupiter system and Callisto studies, with multiple flybys of Callisto planned at low altitude ( 200 km), followed by a Ganymede orbit insertion and extensive study of Ganymede ( 1 year). In-depth comparative study of inner (Io and Europa) and outer (Ganymede and Callisto) satellites with combined payload of JEO and JGO will address the question of the relative geological evolution of the satellites. On JGO, the transport phenomena in the magnetosphere of Jupiter will be studied in combination with JMO, and the Ganymede magnetosphere will be observed in situ. Jupiter atmosphere investigations on JGO will focus on coupling phenomena between troposphere, stratosphere and mesosphere, the stratospheric composition and the question of thermospheric heating.

  19. Saturn’s icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. II. Results at the end of nominal mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Clark, R. N.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Nicholson, P. D.; McCord, T. B.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Tosi, F.; Nelson, R. M.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.

    2010-04-01

    We report the detailed analysis of the spectrophotometric properties of Saturn's icy satellites as derived by full-disk observations obtained by visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) experiment aboard Cassini. In this paper, we have extended the coverage until the end of the Cassini's nominal mission (June 1st 2008), while a previous paper ( Filacchione, G., and 28 colleagues [2007]. Icarus 186, 259-290, hereby referred to as Paper I) reported the preliminary results of this study. During the four years of nominal mission, VIMS has observed the entire population of Saturn's icy satellites allowing us to make a comparative analysis of the VIS-NIR spectral properties of the major satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus) and irregular moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso, Phoebe). The results we discuss here are derived from the entire dataset available at June 2008 which consists of 1417 full-disk observations acquired from a variety of distances and inclinations from the equatorial plane, with different phase angles and hemispheric coverage. The most important spectrophotometric indicators (as defined in Paper I: I/ F continua at 0.55 μm, 1.822 μm and 3.547 μm, visible spectral slopes, water and carbon dioxide bands depths and positions) are calculated for each observation in order to investigate the disk-integrated composition of the satellites, the distribution of water ice respect to "contaminants" abundances and typical regolith grain properties. These quantities vary from the almost pure water ice surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic and carbon dioxide rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Janus visible colors are intermediate between these two classes having a slightly positive spectral slope. These results could help to decipher the origins and evolutionary history of the minor moons of the Saturn's system. We introduce a polar representation of the spectrophotometric

  20. Plasma IMS Composition Measurements for Europa and the Other Galilean Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittler, Edward; Cooper, John; Hartle, Richard; Lipatov, Alexander; Mahaffy, Paul; Paterson, William; Pachalidis, Nick; Coplan, Mike; Cassidy, Tim

    2010-01-01

    NASA and ESA are planning the joint Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) to the Jupiter system with specific emphasis to Europa and Ganymede, respectively. The Japanese Space Agency is also planning an orbiter mission to explore Jupiter's magnetosphere and the Galilean satellites. For NASA's Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) we are developing the 3D Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) with two main goals which can also be applied to the other Galilean moons, 1) measure the plasma interaction between Europa and Jupiter's magnetosphere and 2) infer the 4 pi surface composition to trace elemental and significant isotopic levels. The first goal supports the magnetometer (MAG) measurements, primarily directed at detection of Europa's sub-surface ocean, while the second gives information about transfer of material between the Galilean moons, and between the moon surfaces and subsurface layers putatively including oceans. The measurement of the interactions for all the Galilean moons can be used to trace the in situ ion measurements of pickup ions back to either Europa's or Ganymede's surface from the respectively orbiting spacecraft. The IMS instrument, being developed under NASA's Astrobiology Instrument Development Program, would maximally achieve plasma measurement requirements for JEO and EJSM while moving forward our knowledge of Jupiter system composition and source processes to far higher levels than previously envisaged. The composition of the global surfaces of Europa and Ganymede can be inferred from the measurement of ejected neutrals and pick-up ions using at minimum an in situ payload including MAG and IMS also fully capable of meeting Level 1 mission requirements for ocean detection and survey. Elemental and isotopic analysis of potentially extruded oceanic materials at the moon surfaces would further support the ocean objectives. These measurements should be made from a polar orbiting spacecraft about Europa or Ganymede at height 100 km. The ejecta produced by

  1. Comparing Jupiter and Saturn: dimensionless input rates from plasma sources within the magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Vasyliūnas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative significance for a planetary magnetosphere of plasma sources associated with a moon of the planet can be assessed only by expressing the plasma mass input rate in dimensionless form, as the ratio of the actual mass input to some reference value. Traditionally, the solar wind mass flux through an area equal to the cross-section of the magnetosphere has been used. Here I identify another reference value of mass input, independent of the solar wind and constructed from planetary parameters alone, which can be shown to represent a mass input sufficiently large to prevent corotation already at the source location. The source rate from Enceladus at Saturn has been reported to be an order of magnitude smaller (in absolute numbers than that from Io at Jupiter. Both reference values, however, are also smaller at Saturn than at Jupiter, by factors ~40 to 60; expressed in dimensionless form, the estimated mass input from Enceladus may be larger than that from Io by factors ~4 to 6. The magnetosphere of Saturn may thus, despite a lower mass input in kg s−1, intrinsically be more heavily mass-loaded than the magnetosphere of Jupiter.

  2. Down-tail mass loss by plasmoids in Jupiter's and Saturn's magnetospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, S. W. H.; Nichols, J. D.; Jackman, C. M.

    2015-08-01

    Recent estimates of the plasma mass-loss rates by the formation and down-tail propagation of plasmoids observed in the plasma sheet in Jupiter's and Saturn's magnetosphere fall short of inner moon source rates by at least an order of magnitude. Here we argue that on the time scale between large-scale disconnection events, ~15 h at Jupiter and ~45 h at Saturn, mass-loaded closed flux tubes will typically have stretched out a few hundred planetary radii down tail at speeds ~100-200 km s-1. Consequently, the "plasmoids" of order ~10 planetary radii in length observed at closer planetary distances represent only a small planetward portion of the overall structure that is disconnected and lost down tail. Plasmoid mass-loss estimates are then revised upward by around an order of magnitude, becoming comparable to the moon source values. Additional "hidden," e.g., small-scale, mass-loss processes of comparable strength may not then be required. The essentially continuous azimuthally flowing source plasma in the dusk sector is shown to correspond to a plasma sheet layer adjacent to the magnetopause of width typically ~10% of the distance to the magnetopause in that local time sector. This physical picture also provides a simple explanation for the asymmetry in the plasmoid bipolar field signature observed at both Jupiter and Saturn and predicts that the apparent plasmoid length will increase with distance down tail to a limit beyond a few hundred planetary radii where the full ~100-200 planetary radii structures will be observed.

  3. Using Jupiter's Synchrotron Radiation as a Probe into Jupiter's Inner Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, S. J.; Gulkis, S.; Klein, M. J.; Thorne, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    The Jovian decimetric emission is caused by the combined emission of synchrotron radiation originating from the relativistic electrons trapped in Jupiter's 'Van Allen radiation belts' and thermal emission from the planet's atmosphere. Synchrotron radiation characteristics and variations (which provides insight into the physical properties of Jupiter's inner radiation belts) will be amplified and discussed.

  4. Temporal Variations in Jupiter's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Chanover, N. J.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Hammel, H. B.; dePater, I.; Noll, K.; Wong, M.; Clarke, J.; Sanchez-Levega, A.; Orton, G. S.; Gonzaga, S.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, Jupiter has undergone many atmospheric changes from storms turning red to global. cloud upheavals, and most recently, a cornet or asteroid impact. Yet, on top of these seemingly random changes events there are also periodic phenomena, analogous to observed Earth and Saturn atmospheric oscillations. We will present 15 years of Hubble data, from 1994 to 2009, to show how the equatorial tropospheric cloud deck and winds have varied over that time, focusing on the F953N, F41 ON and F255W filters. These filters give leverage on wind speeds plus cloud opacity, cloud height and tropospheric haze thickness, and stratospheric haze, respectively. The wind data consistently show a periodic oscillation near 7-8 S latitude. We will discuss the potential for variations with longitude and cloud height, within the calibration limits of those filters. Finally, we will discuss the role that large atmospheric events, such as the impacts in 1994 and 2009, and the global upheaval of 2007, have on temporal studies, This work was supported by a grant from the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program. HST observational support was provided by NASA through grants from Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under contract NAS5-26555.

  5. The possible contamination of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Joe

    1988-01-01

    The Galileo probe, though at present its future is uncertain, would, if not sterilized, represent a good chance of contaminating Jupiter. Most scientists opposed to sterilizing the probe argue that to order the probe sterilized would be the death of the project, since sterilization would entail a reconstruction of the probe, and there are not enough funds to accomplish this. These scientists, however, are ignoring a relatively simple and inexpensive alternative to the traditional heat sterilization method. The main threat of contamination comes from Galileo's exterior surfaces: the shell of the probe and its parachute. The probe innermost components would not represent a threat since the probe is sealed. In light of the fact that only the exterior of Galileo would have to be sterilized, heat would not have to be used as a method of sterilization. Instead, various gas mixtures could be sprayed entirely over the probe and its parachute, gases which would kill any and all bacteria. This idea is more thoroughly examined.

  6. Jupiter's radiation belts and atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pater, I.; Dames, H. A. C.

    1979-01-01

    Maps and stripscans of the radio emission from Jupiter were made during the Pioneer 10 flyby in December 1973 at wavelengths of 6 cm, 21 cm, and 50 cm using the Westerbork telescope in the Netherlands. With this instrument the disk of the planet was resolved at 6 and 21 cm. The pictures are averaged over 15 deg of Jovian longitude. At 21 cm the stripscans clearly show the existence of a 'hot region' in the radiation belts at a System III longitude (1965.0) of 255 + or - 10 deg. Its flux is about 9% of the total nonthermal flux, and it has a volume emissivity enhanced by a factor of about 1.6 with respect to the general radiation belts. The temperature of the thermal disk at 21 cm appears to be 290 + or - 20 K. This is likely due to a high ammonia mixing ratio in the atmosphere, a factor of 4-5 larger than the expected solar value of 0.00015.

  7. Hot Jupiters and cool stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villaver, Eva; Mustill, Alexander J. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Módulo 8, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Livio, Mario [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Siess, Lionel, E-mail: eva.villaver@uam.es [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Université Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2014-10-10

    Close-in planets are in jeopardy, as their host stars evolve off the main sequence (MS) to the subgiant and red giant phases. In this paper, we explore the influences of the stellar mass (in the range 1.5-2 M {sub ☉}), mass-loss prescription, planet mass (from Neptune up to 10 Jupiter masses), and eccentricity on the orbital evolution of planets as their parent stars evolve to become subgiants and red giants. We find that planet engulfment along the red giant branch is not very sensitive to the stellar mass or mass-loss rates adopted in the calculations, but quite sensitive to the planetary mass. The range of initial separations for planet engulfment increases with decreasing mass-loss rates or stellar masses and increasing planetary masses. Regarding the planet's orbital eccentricity, we find that as the star evolves into the red giant phase, stellar tides start to dominate over planetary tides. As a consequence, a transient population of moderately eccentric close-in Jovian planets is created that otherwise would have been expected to be absent from MS stars. We find that very eccentric and distant planets do not experience much eccentricity decay, and that planet engulfment is primarily determined by the pericenter distance and the maximum stellar radius.

  8. Tracking Apollo to the Moon

    CERN Document Server

    Lindsay, Hamish

    2001-01-01

    This is perhaps the most complete, detailed and readable story of manned space-flight ever published Beginning with the historical origins of the dream of walking on the Moon, Tracking Apollo to the Moon is the complete story of manned spaceflight, from the earliest Mercury and Gemini flights through to the end of the Apollo era In readable, fascinating detail, Hamish Lindsay - who was directly involved in all three programs - chronicles mankind's greatest adventure with a great narrative, interviews, quotes and masses of photographs, including some previously unpublished As well as bringing the history of these missions to life Tracking Apollo to the Moon serves as a detailed reference for space enthusiasts and students Having seen the manuscript, the Smithsonian requested two copies of the finished book, and Buzz Aldrin asked for five!

  9. GRAVITY ANOMALIES OF THE MOON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Pugacheva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The source of gravity anomalies of the Moon are large mascons with a high mass concentration at a depth of volcanic plains and lunar Maria. New data on the gravitational field of the Moon were obtained from two Grail spacecrafts. The article presents the data of physical and mechanical properties of the surface soil layer of the lunar Maria and gives an assessment of the chemical composition of the soil. There have been calculated heterogeneity parameters of the surface macro-relief of the lunar Maria: albedo, soil density, average grain diameter of the particles forming the surface layer and the volume fraction occupied by particles. It can be assumed that mascons include rich KREEP rocks with a high content of thorium and iron oxide. Formation of mascons is connected with intensive development of basaltic volcanism on the Moon in the early periods of its existence.

  10. Potential Jupiter-Family comet contamination of the main asteroid belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Henry H.; Haghighipour, Nader

    2016-10-01

    We present the results of "snapshot" numerical integrations of test particles representing comet-like and asteroid-like objects in the inner Solar System aimed at investigating the short-term dynamical evolution of objects close to the dynamical boundary between asteroids and comets as defined by the Tisserand parameter with respect to Jupiter, TJ (i.e., TJ = 3). As expected, we find that TJ for individual test particles is not always a reliable indicator of initial orbit types. Furthermore, we find that a few percent of test particles with comet-like starting elements (i.e., similar to those of Jupiter-family comets) reach main-belt-like orbits (at least temporarily) during our 2 Myr integrations, even without the inclusion of non-gravitational forces, apparently via a combination of gravitational interactions with the terrestrial planets and temporary trapping by mean-motion resonances with Jupiter. We estimate that the fraction of real Jupiter-family comets occasionally reaching main-belt-like orbits on Myr timescales could be on the order of ∼ 0.1-1%, although the fraction that remain on such orbits for appreciable lengths of time is certainly far lower. For this reason, the number of JFC-like interlopers in the main-belt population at any given time is likely to be small, but still non-zero, a finding with significant implications for efforts to use apparently icy yet dynamically asteroidal main-belt comets as tracers of the primordial distribution of volatile material in the inner Solar System. The test particles with comet-like starting orbital elements that transition onto main-belt-like orbits in our integrations appear to be largely prevented from reaching low eccentricity, low inclination orbits, suggesting that the real-world population of main-belt objects with both low eccentricities and inclinations may be largely free of this potential occasional Jupiter-family comet contamination. We therefore find that low-eccentricity, low-inclination main

  11. Resource Production on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    A self-sustaining settlement on the moon, or on other airless bodies such as asteroids, will require the ability to refine desired raw materials from available resources, such as lunar or asteroidal regolith. This work will focus on the example case of pro-duction from lunar regolith. The same process sequences could be used at other locations. Stony asteroids typically have regolith similar to that of the moon, and refining of asteroidal material could use the same techniques, adapted for microgravity. Likewise, Martian rock and soil could also be processed by the techniques discussed here.

  12. The Impact of a Large Object with Jupiter in July 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin; Wesley, A.; Orton, G.; Chodas, P.; Hueso, R.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Fletcher, L.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Legarreta, J.; Gomez-Forrellad, J. M.

    2010-05-01

    The only major impact ever observed directly in the Solar System was that of a large fragmented comet with Jupiter in July (1994) (Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9; SL9). We report here the observation of a second, single, large impact on Jupiter that occurred on 19 July 2009 at a latitude of -55° with an orthogonal entry trajectory and a lower incidence angle compared to those of SL9. The size of the initial aerosol cloud debris was 4,800 km East-West and 2,500 km North-South. Comparison its properties with those produced by the SL9 fragments, coupled with dynamical calculations of possible pre-impact orbits, indicates that the impactor was most probably an icy body with a size of 0.5-1 km. We calculate that the rate of collisions of this magnitude may be five to ten times more frequent than previously thought. The search for unpredicted impacts, such as the current one, could be best performed in the near-infrared methane absorption bands at 890 nm and in the 2.12 to 2.3 μm K methane-hydrogen absorption band, where the high-altitude aerosols detach by their brightness relative to Jupiter's primary clouds. We present measurements of the debris dispersion by Jovian winds from a long-term imaging campaign with ground-based telescopes. Ackowledgements: Work was supported by the Spanish MICIIN AYA2009-10701 with FEDER and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07, by NASA funds to JPL, Caltech, by the NASA Postdoctoral Program at JPL, and by the Glasstone Fellowship program at Oxford.

  13. Modeling Spectra of Icy Satellites and Cometary Icy Particles Using Multi-Sphere T-Matrix Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Mackowski, Daniel; Pitman, Karly M.; Joseph, Emily C. S.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Protopapa, Silvia; Kelley, Michael S.

    2016-10-01

    The Multi-Sphere T-matrix code (MSTM) allows rigorous computations of characteristics of the light scattered by a cluster of spherical particles. It was introduced to the scientific community in 1996 (Mackowski & Mishchenko, 1996, JOSA A, 13, 2266). Later it was put online and became one of the most popular codes to study photopolarimetric properties of aggregated particles. Later versions of this code, especially its parallelized version MSTM3 (Mackowski & Mishchenko, 2011, JQSRT, 112, 2182), were used to compute angular and wavelength dependence of the intensity and polarization of light scattered by aggregates of up to 4000 constituent particles (Kolokolova & Mackowski, 2012, JQSRT, 113, 2567). The version MSTM4 considers large thick slabs of spheres (Mackowski, 2014, Proc. of the Workshop ``Scattering by aggregates``, Bremen, Germany, March 2014, Th. Wriedt & Yu. Eremin, Eds., 6) and is significantly different from the earlier versions. It adopts a Discrete Fourier Convolution, implemented using a Fast Fourier Transform, for evaluation of the exciting field. MSTM4 is able to treat dozens of thousands of spheres and is about 100 times faster than the MSTM3 code. This allows us not only to compute the light scattering properties of a large number of electromagnetically interacting constituent particles, but also to perform multi-wavelength and multi-angular computations using computer resources with rather reasonable CPU and computer memory. We used MSTM4 to model near-infrared spectra of icy satellites of Saturn (Rhea, Dione, and Tethys data from Cassini VIMS), and of icy particles observed in the coma of comet 103P/Hartley 2 (data from EPOXI/DI HRII). Results of our modeling show that in the case of icy satellites the best fit to the observed spectra is provided by regolith made of spheres of radius ~1 micron with a porosity in the range 85% - 95%, which slightly varies for the different satellites. Fitting the spectra of the cometary icy particles requires icy

  14. Cryogenic Ice Penetration Mechanics for Investigating the Existence of Life on the Jupiter Moon Europa Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A key challenge is that ice properties at the temperatures that exist on Europa are not well characterized. Our previous studies have shown that hardness as well as...

  15. What Does Galileo's Discovery of Jupiter's Moons Tell Us about the Process of Scientific Discovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Anton E.

    2002-01-01

    Given that hypothetico-deductive reasoning has played a role in other important scientific discoveries, asks the question whether it plays a role in all important scientific discoveries. Explores and rejects as viable alternatives possible alternative scientific methods such as Baconian induction and combinatorial analysis. Discusses the…

  16. Mysteries Of The Farside Of The Moon: What Galileo Couldn't See

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Carlé M.

    When Galileo first turned his improved spyglass to view the Moon from Padua, he was astounded at what he saw: ``And it is like the face of the Earth itself … which is marked here and there with chains of mountains and depths of valleys'' (Galilei, 1610). His remarks about his new discoveries captured the joy which ultimately drives every planetary explorer: ``I render infinite thanks to God for being so kind as to make me alone the first observer of marvels kept hidden in obscurity for all previous centuries'' (Galilei, 1610). Four centuries later his intellectual heirs have expanded human understanding of our place in the universe with an elegant symmetry. The Apollo and Luna programs demonstrated that the origin and history of the Earth and the Moon are intimately linked. Two decades later the Galileo spacecraft swung by the Moon to obtain a gravity-assist from Earth in order to complete its exploration journey to Jupiter and the Galilean satellites. The Galileo spacecraft was the first to return to the Moon with modern sensors, and its brief passage provided dramatic evidence that the farside of the Moon held secrets unimagined from study of the nearside. Subsequent missions, Clementine and Lunar Prospector, provided the first global assessment of lunar topography and composition, and placed the farside in context. There are few of the extensive plains of basaltic lava on the farside of the Moon. This fact is clearly a product of the earliest history of the Moon (the first 500 My), the details of which are being investigated from clues that remain on the Moon today. The dominant feature on the lunar farside is the enormous South Pole-Aitken Basin, which extends from the south pole to the crater Aitken, just 15° south of the equator. This basin includes the deepest area on the Moon and appears as a slightly darker circular region encompassing the lower half of the lunar farside. The composition of the interior is uniquely enriched with iron-bearing minerals

  17. The role of Io in the dynamics of Jupiter's magnetosphere: A sandpile modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, J. J.; Jackman, C. M.; Freeman, M. P.

    2015-10-01

    Jupiter's magnetosphere is thought to be largely internally driven, by the combination of the loading of ~500 kg/s of plasma into the system by the volcanic moon Io, and the rapid rotation of the planet itself. Since we do not see a continuously expanding torus and magnetosphere, we would expect a long-term balance between the inflow of mass, primarily from Io, and the outflow of mass, via plasmoid release. Simple calculations, which attempt to match the mass-loading rate from Io with the amount of mass lost via large-scale tail reconnection events, indicate a significant mass imbalance at Jupiter. This mass imbalance may be due to several reasons, including visibility issues linked to single spacecraft observations. This is where modelling can be a powerful tool. A single spacecraft can only expect to observe a global 'systemwide' event, where energy is redistributed across the entiresystem, with any certainty. While 'internal' events, with a more local redistribution of energy, are likely to be missed. Usingcomputational modeling we are able to'observe' an entire system at any time. Cellular automata (CA) based on robust physical parameters and rules can allow us to manipulate the inputs and drivers of magnetotail physics, and to explore the response of the system over a range of temporal and spatial scales. Here we examine the variability of the mass-loading and the response of our CA sandpile model to an analogous driving. We explore whether Jupiter's magnetospheric dynamics can be explained purely in terms of Io massloading. In particular we examine the difference between the small local events ("internal" avalanches) and larger global events ("systemwide" avalanches), and what this can tell us about the fate of mass in Jupiter's magnetosphere.

  18. Lost in Jupiter's Shadow: Can Resonant Charge Variations Explain Dust Grain Sizes in the Main Ring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Hamilton, D. P.

    2012-10-01

    Interplanetary impacts onto the tiny moons Metis and Adrastea replenish Jupiter's main ring with dusty ejecta of all sizes. The equilibrium size distribution present in the rings at a given time is a function of production and loss mechanisms, both of which may be vary with particle size. Loss mechanisms include collisions and dynamical processes. Here we explore some of the latter. Grains tend to pick up negative electric charges due to motion through Jupiter's plasma environment, and positive charges from the photoelectric effect of sunlight. The periodic interruption of sunlight in Jupiter's shadow causes the equilibrium electric charge, and hence the Lorentz force, to resonate with the Kepler orbital frequency. The eccentricity increases for grains moving radially inwards during the shadow transit, and decreases when grains move outward in the shadow, hence the azimuthal location of pericenter is important. For smaller grains, the eccentricity increases monotonically until they collide with Jupiter. For much larger grains, precession due to both the Lorentz force and planetary oblateness causes the eccentricity to oscillate periodically. We explore the shadow instability in the main ring for a variety of uniform plasma density models, comparing numerical data with a semi-analytic approximation. We find that the effect of the shadow dwindles in importance for plasma that is either too sparse or too dense. In sparse plasma, the charging timescale slows, limiting the change in electric potential from sunlight to shadow. In dense plasma, charging currents from the plasma overwhelm the photoelectric effect in sunlight, also resulting in a small change in electric potential. Between these two regimes, the shadow resonance efficiently removes grains up to a particular size threshold in the main ring. This size-dependent loss mechanism may contribute to the observed flattening in the size distribution index for smaller grains.

  19. The Moon in Close Up

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG YUANKAI

    2010-01-01

    @@ Anifty gold-colored vehicle equipped with two solar panel wings attracted the attention of many visitors to the Space Pavilion at the World Expo site in Shanghai.It was the model of the lunar rover for China's moon probe program.

  20. Full moon: uh-oh?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hollander, Dore

    2005-01-01

    ... of the moon, the researchers found no statistically significant differences in the number of births overall or of births to women who had had more than one pregnancy, in types of delivery or in complications. Nevertheless, with a nod to human nature, they expect that the superstition will endure and that some labor and delivery personnel "will continue to l...

  1. When the Moon Is Perfect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The Mid-Autumn Festival is a time for all Chinese people to enjoy the Moon while making family reunion september 22 will be the Mid-Autumn Festival, a traditional Chinese festival celebrated on the 15th day of the eighth month eachyear according to the lunar calendar.

  2. Harvest Moon At Lakeview Place

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The Mid-Autumn Festival is an important traditional Chinese festival. Although many families usually celebrate the festival at home in the traditional way, this year, thousands of families had their celebration at Lakeview Place enjoying the lake and full moon.

  3. Fly Me to the Moon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    One of the most prominent talking points last month was the high-profile launch on October 24 of China’s first moon orbiter.Named Chang ’e-1,the satellite is expected to fulfill a number of scientific objectives,ranging from

  4. Geochemical Exploration of the Moon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Isidore

    1984-01-01

    Provides information based on explorations of the Apollo program about the geochemistry of the moon and its importance in developing an understanding of formation/evolution of the solar system. Includes description and some results of orbital remote sensing, lunar x-ray experiments, gamma-ray experiments, alpha-particle experiments, and the Apollo…

  5. Backyard Astronomy: Observing Moon Phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandou, Bob

    1997-01-01

    Presents an activity involving the observation of moon phases that can provide a one-on-one learning experience and stimulate interaction between a child and an adult family member. This activity can also be initiated by teachers and outcomes can be integrated into the classroom science curriculum. (JRH)

  6. Dream recall and the full moon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schredl, Michael; Fulda, Stephany; Reinhard, Iris

    2006-02-01

    There is ongoing debate on whether the full moon is associated with sleep and dreaming. The analysis of diaries kept by the participants (N = 196) over 28 to 111 nights showed no association of a full moon and dream recall. Psychological factors might explain why some persons associate a full moon with increased dream recall.

  7. Radiation-Hydrodynamics of Hot Jupiter Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Menou, Kristen

    2009-01-01

    Radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres is usually treated in the static limit, i.e., neglecting atmospheric motions. We argue that hot Jupiter atmospheres, with possibly fast (sonic) wind speeds, may require a more strongly coupled treatment, formally in the regime of radiation-hydrodynamics. To lowest order in v/c, relativistic Doppler shifts distort line profiles along optical paths with finite wind velocity gradients. This leads to flow-dependent deviations in the effective emission and absorption properties of the atmospheric medium. Evaluating the overall impact of these distortions on the radiative structure of a dynamic atmosphere is non-trivial. We present transmissivity and systematic equivalent width excess calculations which suggest possibly important consequences for radiation transport in hot Jupiter atmospheres. If winds are fast and bulk Doppler shifts are indeed important for the global radiative balance, accurate modeling and reliable data interpretation for hot Jupiter atmospheres may p...

  8. Capture of Trojans by Jumping Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvorny, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Jupiter Trojans are thought to be survivors of a much larger population of planetesimals that existed in the planetary region when planets formed. They can provide important constraints on the mass and properties of the planetesimal disk, and its dispersal during planet migration. Here we tested a possibility that the Trojans were captured during the early dynamical instability among the outer planets (aka the Nice model), when the semimajor axis of Jupiter was changing as a result of scattering encounters with an ice giant. The capture occurs in this model when Jupiter's orbit and its Lagrange points become radially displaced in a scattering event and fall into a region populated by planetesimals (that previously evolved from their natal transplanetary disk to ~5 AU during the instability). Our numerical simulations of the new capture model, hereafter jump capture, satisfactorily reproduce the orbital distribution of the Trojans and their total mass. The jump capture is potentially capable of explaining the ...

  9. Principal components analysis of Jupiter VIMS spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, G.; Formisano, V.; D'Aversa, E.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, Christophe; Chamberlain, M.C.; Hansen, G.; Hibbits, K.; Showalter, M.; Filacchione, G.

    2004-01-01

    During Cassini - Jupiter flyby occurred in December 2000, Visual-Infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) instrument took several image cubes of Jupiter at different phase angles and distances. We have analysed the spectral images acquired by the VIMS visual channel by means of a principal component analysis technique (PCA). The original data set consists of 96 spectral images in the 0.35-1.05 ??m wavelength range. The product of the analysis are new PC bands, which contain all the spectral variance of the original data. These new components have been used to produce a map of Jupiter made of seven coherent spectral classes. The map confirms previously published work done on the Great Red Spot by using NIMS data. Some other new findings, presently under investigation, are presented. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  10. Jupiter's Great Red Spot and White Ovals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    This photo of Jupiter was taken by Voyager 1 on the evening of March 1, 1979, from a distance of 2.7 million miles (4.3 million kilometers). The photo shows Jupiter's Great Red Spot (top) and one of the white ovals than can be seen in Jupiter's atmosphere from Earth. The white ovals were seen to form in 1939, and 1940, and have remained more or less constant ever since. None of the structure and detail evident in these features have ever been seen from Earth. The Great Red Spot is three times as large as Earth. Also evident in the picture is a great deal of atmospheric detail that will require further study for interpretation. The smallest details that can be seen in this picture are about 45 miles (80 kilometers across. JPL manages and controls the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  11. Capture of Irregular Satellites at Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvorny, D; Deienno, R

    2014-01-01

    The irregular satellites of outer planets are thought to have been captured from heliocentric orbits. The exact nature of the capture process, however, remains uncertain. We examine the possibility that irregular satellites were captured from the planetesimal disk during the early Solar System instability when encounters between the outer planets occurred (Nesvorny, Vokrouhlicky & Morbidelli 2007, AJ 133; hereafter NVM07). NVM07 already showed that the irregular satellites of Saturn, Uranus and Neptune were plausibly captured during planetary encounters. Here we find that the current instability models present favorable conditions for capture of irregular satellites at Jupiter as well, mainly because Jupiter undergoes a phase of close encounters with an ice giant. We show that the orbital distribution of bodies captured during planetary encounters provides a good match to the observed distribution of irregular satellites at Jupiter. The capture efficiency for each particle in the original transplanetary d...

  12. (abstract) Observation by Clementine of a Hugh Opposition Surge on the Moon at Very Small Solar Phase Angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, B. J.; Wang, M. C.

    1994-01-01

    The Clementine mission enabled the first quantative observations of the Moon at very small solar phase angles. It is well established from Earth-based observations that the Moon exhibits a non-linear increase in brightness as its face becomes fully illuminated to a terrestrial observer. Because the models of the opposition effect are sensitive indicators of surfical compaction state and particle size, observations at small solar phase angles are important to obtain. A recent model for optical coherent backscatter seeks to explain a narrow opposition spike at very small phase angles (Moon's surface at phase angles less than 0.5(deg) (the minimum phase angle observable from Earth due to the Moon's angular size) were obtained by the Clementine spacecraft. Our analysis of these images shows the moon exhibits a surge in brightness of approximately 20% below 0.25(deg), comparable to the values observed on icy satellites. No color dependence was detected in the lunar phase curve below 2 degrees.

  13. An excess of pedestrian injuries in icy conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrild, Ulrik; Bak, Soeren

    1983-01-01

    An "icy condition epidemic" has been analyzed in an investigation of patients treated in the casualty department of Odense University Hospital: it was found that the victims were mainly comprised of pedestrians and that the pedestrians had 14 times more injuries than during a normal winter period...... clearing of the snow, and (3) spreading of sand, and possibly salt, on footpaths and bicycle paths. Specific measures should be launched to help the elderly during such periods, in order that outdoor activities may be cut to a minimum. © 1983....

  14. Thermal tides on a hot Jupiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh H.-F.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Following the linear analysis laid out by Gu & Ogilvie 2009 (hereafter GO09, we investigate the dynamical response of a non-synchronized hot Jupiter to stellar irradiation. Besides the internal and Rossby waves considered by GO09, we study the Kelvin waves excited by the diurnal Fourier harmonic of the prograde stellar irradiation. We also present a 2-dimensional plot of internal waves excited by the semi-diurnal component of the stellar irradiation and postulate that thermal bulges may arise in a hot Jupiter. Whether our postulation is valid and is consistent with the recent results from Arras & Socrates (2009b requires further investigation.

  15. Jupiter after Pioneer - A progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonough, T. R.

    1974-01-01

    In December 1973, Pioneer 10 became the first spacecraft to reach the vicinity of Jupiter. The spacecraft passed through the Jovian magnetosphere in two weeks and sent back more than 300 pictures of the big planet. Measurements were conducted of EM fields, energetic particles, and micrometeoroids. Radio occultations observed are discussed along with observations in the infrared and ultraviolet range, magnetic measurements, questions of trajectory analysis, and data obtained with the aid of a plasma analyzer. Pioneer 10 has confirmed as inescapable the fact that Jupiter radiates more energy than it receives from the sun.

  16. Extreme Environments Technologies for Probes to Venus and Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Tibor S.; Kolawa, Elizabeth A.; Peterson, Craig E.; Cutts, James A.; Belz, Andrea P.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the technologies that are used to mitigate extreme environments for probes at Venus and Jupiter. The contents include: 1) Extreme environments at Venus and Jupiter; 2) In-situ missions to Venus and Jupiter (past/present/future); and 3) Approaches to mitigate conditions of extreme environments for probes with systems architectures and technologies.

  17. New Moon water, exploration, and future habitation

    CERN Document Server

    Crotts, Arlin

    2014-01-01

    Explore Earth's closest neighbor, the Moon, in this fascinating and timely book and discover what we should expect from this seemingly familiar but strange, new frontier. What startling discoveries are being uncovered on the Moon? What will these tell us about our place in the Universe? How can exploring the Moon benefit development on Earth? Discover the role of the Moon in Earth's past and present; read about the lunar environment and how it could be made more habitable for humans; consider whether continued exploration of the Moon is justified; and view rare Apollo-era photos and film still

  18. Complex prebiotic chemistry within a simple impacting icy mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Nir

    2013-06-01

    We present results of prebiotic molecule synthesis in shock compressed mixtures of simple ices from quantum molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Given the likelihood of a CO2-rich primitive atmosphere, it is possible that impact processes of comets or other icy bodies were partially responsible for the creation of prebiotic chemical compounds on early Earth. We have conducted simulations of the chemical reactivity within an oxidized astrophysical icy mixture to close to equilibrium using a density functional tight binding (DFTB) approach. We observe that moderate shock pressures and temperatures (35 GPa and 2800 K) produce a number of functionalized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which remain intact upon expansion and cooling to lower conditions. At higher shock pressures and temperatures (48-62 GPa, 3700-4700 K), we observe the synthesis of a variety of short-lived, exotic C--C and C--N bonded oligomers which decompose upon expansion and cooling to form precursors to amino acids and other prebiotic compounds, such as long chain alkanes, HCN, CH4 and formaldehyde. Our results provide a mechanism for shock synthesis of prebiotic molecules at realistic impact conditions that is independent of external features such as the presence of a catalyst, illuminating UV radiation, or pre-existing conditions on a planet. This work was performed at LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and was funded by the NASA Astrobiology program.

  19. BENZENE FORMATION ON INTERSTELLAR ICY MANTLES CONTAINING PROPARGYL ALCOHOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaraman, B.; Mukherjee, R.; Subramanian, K. P.; Banerjee, S. B., E-mail: bhala@prl.res.in [Space and Atmospheric Sciences Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad (India)

    2015-01-10

    Propargyl alcohol (CHCCH{sub 2}OH) is a known stable isomer of the propenal (CH{sub 2}CHCHO) molecule that was reported to be present in the interstellar medium (ISM). At astrochemical conditions in the laboratory, icy layers of propargyl alcohol grown at 85 K were irradiated by 2 keV electrons and probed by a Fourier Transform InfraRed spectrometer in the mid-infrared (IR) region, 4000-500 cm{sup –1}. Propargyl alcohol ice under astrochemical conditions was studied for the first time; therefore, IR spectra of reported amorphous (85 K) and crystalline (180 K) propargyl alcohol ices can be used to detect its presence in the ISM. Moreover, our experiments clearly show benzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}) formation to be the major product from propargyl alcohol irradiation, confirming the role of propargyl radicals (C{sub 3}H{sub 3}) formed from propargyl alcohol dissociation that was long expected based on theoretical modeling to effectively synthesize C{sub 6}H{sub 6} in the interstellar icy mantles.

  20. Stabilization of ammonia-rich hydrate inside icy planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naden Robinson, Victor; Wang, Yanchao; Ma, Yanming; Hermann, Andreas

    2017-08-22

    The interior structure of the giant ice planets Uranus and Neptune, but also of newly discovered exoplanets, is loosely constrained, because limited observational data can be satisfied with various interior models. Although it is known that their mantles comprise large amounts of water, ammonia, and methane ices, it is unclear how these organize themselves within the planets-as homogeneous mixtures, with continuous concentration gradients, or as well-separated layers of specific composition. While individual ices have been studied in great detail under pressure, the properties of their mixtures are much less explored. We show here, using first-principles calculations, that the 2:1 ammonia hydrate, (H2O)(NH3)2, is stabilized at icy planet mantle conditions due to a remarkable structural evolution. Above 65 GPa, we predict it will transform from a hydrogen-bonded molecular solid into a fully ionic phase O(2-)([Formula: see text])2, where all water molecules are completely deprotonated, an unexpected bonding phenomenon not seen before. Ammonia hemihydrate is stable in a sequence of ionic phases up to 500 GPa, pressures found deep within Neptune-like planets, and thus at higher pressures than any other ammonia-water mixture. This suggests it precipitates out of any ammonia-water mixture at sufficiently high pressures and thus forms an important component of icy planets.

  1. Aqueous geochemistry in icy world interiors: Equilibrium fluid, rock, and gas compositions, and fate of antifreezes and radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, Marc; Desch, Steven J.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.

    2017-09-01

    The geophysical evolution of many icy moons and dwarf planets seems to have provided opportunities for interaction between liquid water and rock (silicate and organic solids). Here, we explore two ways by which water-rock interaction can feed back on geophysical evolution: the production or consumption of antifreeze compounds, which affect the persistence and abundance of cold liquid; and the potential leaching into the fluid of lithophile radionuclides, affecting the distribution of a long-term heat source. We compile, validate, and use a numerical model, implemented with the PHREEQC code, of the interaction of chondritic rock with pure water and with C, N, S-bearing cometary fluid, thought to be the materials initially accreted by icy worlds, and describe the resulting equilibrium fluid and rock assemblages at temperatures, pressures, and water-to-rock ratios of 0-200 ° C, 1-1000 bar, and 0.1-10 by mass, respectively. Our findings suggest that water-rock interaction can strongly alter the nature and amount of antifreezes, resulting in solutions rich in reduced nitrogen and carbon, and sometimes dissolved H2, with additional sodium, calcium, chlorine, and/or oxidized carbon. Such fluids can remain partially liquid down to 176 K if NH3 is present. The prominence of Cl in solution seems to hinge on its primordial supply in ices, which is unconstrained by the meteoritical record. Equilibrium assemblages, rich in serpentine and saponite clays, retain thorium and uranium radionuclides unless U-Cl or U-HCO3 complexing, which was not modeled, significantly enhances U solubility. However, the radionuclide 40 K can be leached at high water:rock ratio and/or low temperature at which K is exchanged with ammonium in minerals. We recommend the inclusion of these effects in future models of the geophysical evolution of ocean-bearing icy worlds. Our simulation products match observations of chloride salts on Europa and Enceladus; CI chondrites mineralogies; the observation of

  2. Exposure age of Saturn's A and B rings, and the Cassini Division as suggested by their non-icy material content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Hayes, A. G.; Janssen, M. A.; Nicholson, P. D.; Cuzzi, J. N.; de Pater, I.; Dunn, D. E.

    2017-09-01

    , and ∼0.1%-0.2% in the middle regions. For the A ring interior to the Encke gap, the derived non-icy material volume fraction is ∼0.2%-0.3% everywhere for porosities ranging from 55%-90%. Finally, our results for the Cassini Division indicate a non-icy material fraction of ∼1%-2% similar to most regions in the C ring, except that the Cassini Division particles are more likely to have a porosity ≳ 90% due to the high opacity there. We find that the overall pollution exposure time for the A and B rings and the Cassini Division ranges from ∼30-150 Myr, which is in line with the ∼15-90 Myr we previously derived for most regions in the C ring. These exposure times assume an initially nearly pure-ice ring that has been continuously contaminated by in-falling micrometeoroids since its formation, using the currently accepted value of the micrometeoroid flux (Grün et al., 1985; Cuzzi and Estrada, 1998; Kempf et al., 2013; Altobelli et al., 2015). Our results here, taken together with our previous findings for the C ring, further support the idea that Saturn's rings may be ≲150 Myr old suggesting an origin scenario in which the rings are derived from the relatively recent breakup of an icy moon.

  3. Magnetospheres of Planets and Moons: Links to Their Ionospheres. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivelson, M. G.

    2010-12-01

    The phrase “magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling” has become almost hackneyed in the terrestrial context, but plays an important role in the terrestrial system and must also be emphasized in the context of planetary- and moon-magnetospheres because the underlying principles are similar in all systems. This talk will introduce only two intriguing aspects of the coupling problem for planets and moons. In describing the first topic, we note that, especially for the gas giants Jupiter and Saturn, much of the evidence of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling is obtained from auroral imaging. In images of Jupiter’s polar ionosphere, bright auroral spots are found to link magnetically to the moons Io, Europa and Ganymede. The spots give evidence of intense field-aligned currents generated near the equator in the interaction between the moons and the flowing plasma of Jupiter’s magnetosphere. The currents must penetrate through regions of impedance mismatch near the upper and lower boundaries of Jupiter’s equatorial plasma torus in order to close in the planetary ionosphere. There is some evidence that the signal propagates through the strong gradient of plasma density at the boundary of the plasma torus by converting into a striated structure that guides high frequency waves. As well, at Io, the interaction has been found to generate localized intense electron fluxes observed to flow along and antiparallel to the magnetic field near the equator. These bidirectional beams are probably accelerated by parallel electric fields near the ionospheric ends of the flux tube, but how the accelerated electrons reach the equator has not been explained. It seems likely that their presence there requires that the (parallel) electric fields in the Jovian ionosphere vary either temporally at high frequency or spatially on short transverse length scales. The full explanation has not yet been developed. As a second example of the role of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in planetary

  4. On the influence of the plasma generated by comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 on Jupiter`s magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stabile, F.; Zimbardo, G. [Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza, Univ. della Calabria (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    1997-11-01

    The impact of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter has created a variety of magnetospheric plasmas which were detected by their electromagnetic emissions. By means of the Dessler-Parker-Sckopke relation we estimate the perturbation of Jupiter`s magnetic field. It appears that the produced plasma may explain the observed decrease of UV lines in Io`s torus.

  5. A Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter for the EJSM mission: the JGO assessment phase study by the Thales Alenia Space consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncy, Joel; Couzin, Patrice; Mercier, Manuel; Boschetti, Demis

    2010-05-01

    ESA and NASA have undertaken advanced studies of a common mission to Jupiter's system, EJSM (Europa Jupiter System Mission). This mission comprises two spacecrafts launched independently in 2020 and reaching the system in 2026. This is a one-in-a-generation opportunity for Europe to contribute significantly to the science of this part of the Solar System, and as such, all efforts shall subsequently be made to maximize the scientific return without jeopardizing the technical and programmatic feasibility of the mission. A sub-glacial ocean on Europa and potentially two others on Ganymede and Callisto, the monitoring of Io's volcanic activity, the upper atmosphere of Jupiter, its rings, its tens of irregular moons, the tides, the magnetic fields of Jupiter and Ganymede and the behaviour of the plasma, the list of science objectives is not only impressive but also generates enthusiasm in the mission. In this NASA-ESA joint mission, NASA will take charge of both Io and Europa with the Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO). Europe will get a fascinating share with the Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO), which will achieve the close study of the two largest and outermost Galilean moons Ganymede and Callisto and in addition, at-a-distance, the observation of the other targets mentioned above. ESA has awarded three industrial contracts for an assessment phase of JGO. As leader of one of the consortia, Thales Alenia Space is proud to present in this poster its achievements on this exciting mission. The requirements are discussed and the mission drivers identified. The main trades and the resulting architecture are recalled, along with the main selection drivers. The major system interrelated trades have covered the launcher and propulsion type, the number of regulated phases, the strategy for communications and science timeline, the need for HGA pointing, the sizing and configuration of the Solar Array, the accommodation of external appendages, the accommodation of the payload, the

  6. JUPITER PROJECT - MERGING INVERSE PROBLEM FORMULATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The JUPITER (Joint Universal Parameter IdenTification and Evaluation of Reliability) project seeks to enhance and build on the technology and momentum behind two of the most popular sensitivity analysis, data assessment, calibration, and uncertainty analysis programs used in envi...

  7. Dramatic Change in Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, A. A.; Wong, M. H.; Rogers, J. H.; Orton, G. S.; de Pater, I.; Asay-Davis, X.; Carlson, R. W.; Marcus, P. S.

    2015-01-01

    Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) is one of its most distinct and enduring features, having been continuously observed since the 1800's. It currently spans the smallest latitude and longitude size ever recorded. Here we show analyses of 2014 Hubble spectral imaging data to study the color, structure and internal dynamics of this long-live storm.

  8. Towards Chemical Constraints on Hot Jupiter Migration

    CERN Document Server

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Kennedy, Grant M

    2014-01-01

    The origin of hot Jupiters -- gas giant exoplanets orbiting very close to their host stars -- is a long-standing puzzle. Planet formation theories suggest that such planets are unlikely to have formed in-situ but instead may have formed at large orbital separations beyond the snow line and migrated inward to their present orbits. Two competing hypotheses suggest that the planets migrated either through interaction with the protoplanetary disk during their formation, or by disk-free mechanisms such as gravitational interactions with a third body. Observations of eccentricities and spin-orbit misalignments of hot Jupiter systems have been unable to differentiate between the two hypotheses. In the present work, we suggest that chemical depletions in hot Jupiter atmospheres might be able to constrain their migration mechanisms. We find that sub-solar carbon and oxygen abundances in Jovian-mass hot Jupiters around Sun-like stars are hard to explain by disk migration. Instead, such abundances are more readily expla...

  9. Jupiter as a Giant Cosmic Ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rimmer, Paul B; Helling, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    We explore the feasibility of using the atmosphere of Jupiter to detect Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR's). The large surface area of Jupiter allows us to probe cosmic rays of higher energies than previously accessible. Cosmic ray extensive air showers in Jupiter's atmosphere could in principle be detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi observatory. In order to be observed, these air showers would need to be oriented toward the Earth, and would need to occur sufficiently high in the atmosphere that the gamma rays can penetrate. We demonstrate that, under these assumptions, Jupiter provides an effective cosmic ray "detector" area of $3.3 \\times 10^7$ km$^2$. We predict that Fermi-LAT should be able to detect events of energy $>10^{21}$ eV with fluence $10^{-7}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ at a rate of about one per month. The observed number of air showers may provide an indirect measure of the flux of cosmic rays $\\gtrsim 10^{20}$ eV. Extensive air showers also produce a synchrotron signature that may ...

  10. The Origin of Retrograde Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoz, Smadar; Farr, W.; Lithwick, Y.; Rasio, F.; Teyssandier, J.

    2011-09-01

    The search for extra-solar planets has led to the surprising discovery of many Jupiter-like planets in very close proximity to their host star, the so-called ``hot Jupiters'' (HJ). Even more surprisingly, many of these HJs have orbits that are eccentric or highly inclined with respect to the equator of the star, and some (about 25%) even orbiting counter to the spin direction of the star. This poses a unique challenge to all planet formation models. We show that secular interactions between Jupiter-like planet and another perturber in the system can easily produce retrograde HJ orbits. We show that in the frame of work of secular hierarchical triple system (the so-called Kozai mechanism) the inner orbit's angular momentum component parallel to the total angular momentum (i.e., the z-component of the inner orbit angular momentum) need not be constant. In fact, it can even change sign, leading to a retrograde orbit. A brief excursion to very high eccentricity during the chaotic evolution of the inner orbit allows planet-star tidal interactions to rapidly circularize that orbit, decoupling the planets and forming a retrograde hot Jupiter. We estimate the relative frequencies of retrograde orbits and counter to the stellar spin orbits using Monte Carlo simulations, and find that the they are consistent with the observations. The high observed incidence of planets orbiting counter to the stellar spin direction may suggest that planet--planet secular interactions are an important part of their dynamical history.

  11. Hot Jupiters and Super-Earths

    CERN Document Server

    Mustill, Alexander James; Johansen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    We explore the role of dynamics in shaping planetary system multiplicities, focussing on two particular problems. (1) We propose that the lack of close-in super-Earths in hot Jupiter systems is a signature of the migration history of the hot Jupiters and helps to discriminate between different mechanisms of migration. We present N-body simulations of dynamical migration scenarios where proto-hot Jupiters are excited to high eccentricities prior to tidal circularisation and orbital decay. We show that in this scenario, the eccentric giant planet typically destroys planets in the inner system, in agreement with the observed lack of close super-Earth companions to hot Jupiters. (2) We explore the role of the dynamics of outer systems in affecting the multiplicities of close-in systems such as those discovered by Kepler. We consider specifically the effects of planet--planet scattering and Kozai perturbations on an exterior giant planet on the architecture of the inner system, and evaluate the ability of such sce...

  12. Photon Luminescence of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T.L.; Lee, K.T.

    2009-01-01

    Luminescence is typically described as light emitted by objects at low temperatures, induced by chemical reactions, electrical energy, atomic interactions, or acoustical and mechanical stress. An example is photoluminescence created when photons (electromagnetic radiation) strike a substance and are absorbed, resulting in the emission of a resonant fluorescent or phosphorescent albedo. In planetary science, there exists X-ray fluorescence induced by sunlight absorbed by a regolith a property used to measure some of the chemical composition of the Moon s surface during the Apollo program. However, there exists an equally important phenomenon in planetary science which will be designated here as photon luminescence. It is not conventional photoluminescence because the incoming radiation that strikes the planetary surface is not photons but rather cosmic rays (CRs). Nevertheless, the result is the same: the generation of a photon albedo. In particular, Galactic CRs (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs) both induce a photon albedo that radiates from the surface of the Moon. Other particle albedos are generated as well, most of which are hazardous (e.g. neutrons). The photon luminescence or albedo of the lunar surface induced by GCRs and SEPs will be derived here, demonstrating that the Moon literally glows in the dark (when there is no sunlight or Earthshine). This extends earlier work on the same subject [1-4]. A side-by-side comparison of these two albedos and related mitigation measures will also be discussed.

  13. Seismic tomography of the Moon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO DaPeng; LEI JianShe; LIU Lucy

    2008-01-01

    We attempted to determine the first three-dimensional P and S wave velocity and Poisson's ratio structures of the lunar crust and mantle down to 1000 km depth under the near-side of the Moon by applying seismic tomography to the moonquake arrival-time data recorded by the Apollo seismic network operated during 1969 to 1977. Our results show that significant lateral heterogeneities may exist in the lunar interior. Because there is no plate tectonics in the Moon, the lateral heterogeneities may be produced at the early stage of the Moon formation and evolution, and they have been preserved till today. There seems to be a correlation between the distribution of deep moonquakes and lateral velocity variations in the lunar lower mantle, suggesting that the occurrence of deep moonquakes may be affected by the lunar structural heterogeneity in addition to the tidal stresses. Although this is an experimental work and the result is still preliminary, it indicates that tomographic imaging of the lunar interior is feasible.

  14. Blue moons and Martian sunsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Kurt; Chakrabarty, Rajan; Moosmüller, Hans

    2014-03-20

    The familiar yellow or orange disks of the moon and sun, especially when they are low in the sky, and brilliant red sunsets are a result of the selective extinction (scattering plus absorption) of blue light by atmospheric gas molecules and small aerosols, a phenomenon explainable using the Rayleigh scattering approximation. On rare occasions, dust or smoke aerosols can cause the extinction of red light to exceed that for blue, resulting in the disks of the sun and moon to appear as blue. Unlike Earth, the atmosphere of Mars is dominated by micron-size dust aerosols, and the sky during sunset takes on a bluish glow. Here we investigate the role of dust aerosols in the blue Martian sunsets and the occasional blue moons and suns on Earth. We use the Mie theory and the Debye series to calculate the wavelength-dependent optical properties of dust aerosols most commonly found on Mars. Our findings show that while wavelength selective extinction can cause the sun's disk to appear blue, the color of the glow surrounding the sun as observed from Mars is due to the dominance of near-forward scattering of blue light by dust particles and cannot be explained by a simple, Rayleigh-like selective extinction explanation.

  15. Mass-radius relationships in icy satellites after Voyager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    Using improved data for the masses and radii of the satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, models accounting for self-compression effects are presented for the interiors of Europa, Ganymede, Callisto, Rhea, and Titan. For the differentiated models, two different possible scenarios for heat transport are treated, as well as two different compositions for the silicate component. Undifferentiated models are also treated. In each case, the models of Ganymede, Callisto, and Titan show noticeable similarities. It is found that estimates of the ice-rock ratio are dependent upon the assumptions made about the heat transport mechanisms, the rock composition, and on the distribution of rock and ice in the satellite's interior.

  16. Migration of icy planetesimals to forming terrestrial planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipatov, Sergei I.; Marov, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    Our studies of migration of planetesimals from the feeding zone of Jupiter and Saturn to forming terrestrial planets were based on computer simulations of the orbital evolution of 10^4 planetesimals under the gravitational influence of planets. In series JN, all planets were considered in present orbits with present masses, and in series JS, Uranus and Neptune were excluded. Initial eccentricities and inclinations of planetesimals were 0.3 and 0.15 rad, respectively. Their initial semi-major axes were between 4.5 and 12 AU. Masses of planets moving in the orbits of the terrestrial planets were equal to present masses of the planets in series JS and JN, and were smaller by a factor of 10 in series JS_{01} and JN_{01}. The obtained results show that the ratio of the fraction of the planetesimals collided with an embryo of the Earth's embryo was about 2\\cdot10^{-6} and 4\\cdot10^{-7} for the mass of the embryo equal to the Earth mass and to 10% of the Earth mass, respectively. We concluded that during the growth of the mass of the Earth's embryo up to a half of the present mass of the Earth, the amount of water delivered to the embryo could be about 30% of all water delivered to the Earth from the feeding zone of Jupiter and Saturn. The total mass of water delivered to the Earth from the feeding zones of the giant planets and beyond these zones could be comparable with the mass of the Earth's oceans. A half of this water could come from the feeding zone of Jupiter and Saturn, and another half from more distant regions. Most of the water that was delivered from the distant regions to the Earth's embryo came when its mass was not small (e.g., was mainly greater than a half of the Earth mass). In series JS, the ratio of the mass of water delivered to a planet to the mass of the planet for the Earth was smaller by a factor of 2, 1.25, and 1.3 than for Mars, Venus and Mercury, respectively. For series JN, the above values of the factor were equal to 3.4, 0.7 i 0.8. For

  17. Erosion of icy cores in giant gas planets

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Hugh F

    2010-01-01

    Using ab initio simulations we investigate whether water ice is stable in the cores of giant planets, or whether it dissolves into the layer of metallic hydrogen above. By Gibbs free energy calculations we find that for pressures between 10 and 40 Mbar the ice-hydrogen interface is unstable at temperatures above approximately 3000 K, far below the temperature of the core-mantle boundaries in Jupiter and Saturn that are of the order of 10000 K. This implies that the cores of solar and extrasolar giant planets are at least partially eroded.

  18. The formation of jupiter, the jovian early bombardment and the delivery of water to the asteroid belt: the case of (4) vesta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrini, Diego; Svetsov, Vladimir

    2014-01-28

    The asteroid (4) Vesta, parent body of the Howardite-Eucrite-Diogenite meteorites, is one of the first bodies that formed, mostly from volatile-depleted material, in the Solar System. The Dawn mission recently provided evidence that hydrated material was delivered to Vesta, possibly in a continuous way, over the last 4 Ga, while the study of the eucritic meteorites revealed a few samples that crystallized in presence of water and volatile elements. The formation of Jupiter and probably its migration occurred in the period when eucrites crystallized, and triggered a phase of bombardment that caused icy planetesimals to cross the asteroid belt. In this work, we study the flux of icy planetesimals on Vesta during the Jovian Early Bombardment and, using hydrodynamic simulations, the outcome of their collisions with the asteroid. We explore how the migration of the giant planet would affect the delivery of water and volatile materials to the asteroid and we discuss our results in the context of the geophysical and collisional evolution of Vesta. In particular, we argue that the observational data are best reproduced if the bulk of the impactors was represented by 1-2 km wide planetesimals and if Jupiter underwent a limited (a fraction of au) displacement.

  19. The Formation of Jupiter, the Jovian Early Bombardment and the Delivery of Water to the Asteroid Belt: The Case of (4 Vesta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Turrini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The asteroid (4 Vesta, parent body of the Howardite-Eucrite-Diogenite meteorites, is one of the first bodies that formed, mostly from volatile-depleted material, in the Solar System. The Dawn mission recently provided evidence that hydrated material was delivered to Vesta, possibly in a continuous way, over the last 4 Ga, while the study of the eucritic meteorites revealed a few samples that crystallized in presence of water and volatile elements. The formation of Jupiter and probably its migration occurred in the period when eucrites crystallized, and triggered a phase of bombardment that caused icy planetesimals to cross the asteroid belt. In this work, we study the flux of icy planetesimals on Vesta during the Jovian Early Bombardment and, using hydrodynamic simulations, the outcome of their collisions with the asteroid. We explore how the migration of the giant planet would affect the delivery of water and volatile materials to the asteroid and we discuss our results in the context of the geophysical and collisional evolution of Vesta. In particular, we argue that the observational data are best reproduced if the bulk of the impactors was represented by 1–2 km wide planetesimals and if Jupiter underwent a limited (a fraction of au displacement.

  20. Jupiter internal structure: the effect of different equations of state

    CERN Document Server

    Miguel, Yamila; Fayon, Lucile

    2016-01-01

    Heavy elements, even though its smaller constituent, are crucial to understand Jupiter formation history. Interior models are used to determine the amount of heavy elements in Jupiter interior, nevertheless this range is still subject to degeneracies due to uncertainties in the equations of state. Prior to Juno mission data arrival, we present Jupiter optimized calculations exploring the effect of different model parameters in the determination of Jupiter's core and heavy element's mass. We perform comparisons between equations of state published recently. The interior model of Jupiter is calculated from the equations of hydrostatic equilibrium, mass and energy conservation, and energy transport. The mass of the core and heavy elements is adjusted to match Jupiter's observational constrains radius and gravitational moments. We show that the determination of Jupiter interior structure is tied to the estimation of its gravitational moments and the accuracy of equations of state of hydrogen, helium and heavy ele...

  1. The EJSM Jupiter-Europa Orbiter: Mission Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Clark, K.; Greeley, R.; Hendrix, A. R.; Tan-Wang, G.; Lock, R.; van Houten, T.; Ludwinski, J.; Petropoulis, A.; Jun, I.; Boldt, J.; Kinnison, J.

    2008-09-01

    Missions to explore Europa have been imagined ever since the Voyager mission first suggested that Europa was geologically very young. Subsequently, Galileo supplied fascinating new insights into that satellite's secrets. The Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) would be the NASA-led portion of the Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), an international mission with orbiters developed by NASA, ESA and possibly JAXA. JEO would address key components of the complete EJSM science objectives and would be designed to function alone or in conjunction with the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter and JAXA-led Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter. The JEO mission concept uses a single orbiter flight system which would travel to Jupiter to perform a multi-year study of the Jupiter system and Europa, including 2.5-3 years of Jupiter system science and a comprehensive Europa orbit phase of upt ot a year. This abstract describes the design concept of this mission.

  2. Tether-mission design for multiple flybys of moon Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmartin, J. R. S.; Charro, M. C.; Sanchez-Arriaga, G. S. A.; Sanchez-Torres, A. S. T.

    2015-10-01

    A tether mission to carry out multiple flybys of Jovian moon Europa is here presented. There is general agreement on elliptic-orbit flybys of Europa resulting in cost to attain given scientific goals lower than if actually orbiting the moon, tethers being naturally fit to fly-by rather than orbit moons1. The present mission is similar in this respect to the Clipper mission considered by NASA, the basic difference lying in location of periapsis, due to different emphasis on mission-challenge metrics. Clipper minimizes damaging radiation-dose by avoiding the Jupiter neighborhood and its very harsh environment; periapsis would be at Europa, apoapsis as far as moon Callisto. As in all past outer-planet missions, Clipper faces, however, critical power and propulsion needs. On the other hand, tethers can provide both propulsion and power, but must reach near the planet to find high plasma density and magnetic field values, leading to high induced tether current, and Lorentz drag and power. The bottom line is a strong radiation dose under the very intense Radiation Belts of Jupiter. Mission design focuses on limiting dose. Perijove would be near Jupiter, at about 1.2-1.3 Jovian radius, apojove about moon Ganymede, corresponding to 1:1 resonance with Europa, so as to keep dose down: setting apojove at Europa, for convenient parallel flybys, would require two perijove passes per flyby (the Ganymede apojove, resulting in high eccentricity, about 0.86, is also less requiring on tether operations). Mission is designed to attain reductions in eccentricity per perijove pass as high as Δe ≈ - 0.04. Due the low gravity-gradient, tether spinning is necessary to keep it straight, plasma contactors placed at both ends taking active turns at being cathodic. Efficiency of capture of the incoming S/C by the tether is gauged by the ratio of S/C mass to tether mass; efficiency is higher for higher tape-tether length and lower thickness and perijove. Low tether bowing due to the Lorentz

  3. On the Possibility of Habitable Moons in the System of HD 23079: Results from Orbital Stability Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Cuntz, M; Eberle, J; Shukayr, A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study is to investigate the possibility of habitable moons orbiting the giant planet HD 23079b, a Jupiter-mass planet, which follows a low-eccentricity orbit in the outer region of HD 23079's habitable zone. We show that HD 23079b is able to host habitable moons in prograde and retrograde orbits, as expected, noting that the outer stability limit for retrograde orbits is increased by nearly 90% compared to that of prograde orbits, a result consistent with previous generalized studies. For the targeted parameter space it was found that the outer stability limit for habitable moons varies between 0.05236 and 0.06955 AU (prograde orbits) and between 0.1023 and 0.1190 AU (retrograde orbits) depending on the orbital parameters of the Jupiter-type planet if a minimum mass is assumed. These intervals correspond to 0.306 and 0.345 (prograde orbits) and 0.583 and 0.611 (retrograde orbits) of the planet's Hill radius. Larger stability limits are obtained if an increased value for the planetary mass m_p i...

  4. Migration of Icy Bodies to the Terrestrial Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergei, I. I.; Mather, J. C.; Marov, M. Y.

    2006-05-01

    In our opinion [1-2], some trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) and planetesimals in the feeding zone of the giant planets with diameters up to 1000 km could be formed directly by the compression of large rarefied dust condensations, but not by the accretion of smaller solid planetesimals. Migration processes of small bodies from the outer regions of the solar system, including the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt, could be responsible for the delivery of the original matter (mainly volatiles) to the terrestrial planets and thus to give rise to the life origin. As migration of TNOs to Jupiter's orbit was studied by several authors, we integrated the orbital evolution of 30,000 Jupiter-crossing objects under the gravitational influence of planets [3]. A few considered objects got Earth-crossing orbits with aphelion distances QAIP Conference Proceedings, 713, 277-280. [3] Ipatov S.I. and Mather J.C. (2004) Annals of the New York Acad. of Sciences, 1017, 46-65. [4] Ipatov S.I., Mather J.C., and Taylor P. (2004) Annals of the New York Acad. of Sciences, 1017, 66-80. [5] Ipatov S.I. and Mather J.C. (2006) Advances in Space Research, in press. [6] Marov M.Ya. and Ipatov S.I. (2005) Solar System Research, 39, 374-380.

  5. Thermo-Chemical Convection in Europa's Icy Shell with Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, L.; Showman, A. P.

    2005-01-01

    Europa's icy surface displays numerous pits, uplifts, and chaos terrains that have been suggested to result from solid-state thermal convection in the ice shell, perhaps aided by partial melting. However, numerical simulations of thermal convection show that plumes have insufficient buoyancy to produce surface deformation. Here we present numerical simulations of thermochemical convection to test the hypothesis that convection with salinity can produce Europa's pits and domes. Our simulations show that domes (200-300 m) and pits (300-400 m) comparable to the observations can be produced in an ice shell of 15 km thick with 5-10% compositional density variation if the maximum viscosity is less than 10(exp 18) Pa sec. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  6. Digging Into the Surface of the Icy Dwarf Planet Eris

    CERN Document Server

    Abernathy, M R; Grundy, W M; Licandro, J; Romanishin, W; Cornelison, D; Vilas, F

    2008-01-01

    We describe optical spectroscopic observations of the icy dwarf planet Eris with the 6.5 meter MMT telescope and the Red Channel Spectrograph. We report a correlation, that is at the edge of statistical significance, between blue shift and albedo at maximum absorption for five methane ice bands. We interpret the correlation as an increasing dilution of methane ice with another ice component, probably nitrogen, with increasing depth into the surface. We suggest a mechanism to explain the apparent increase in nitrogen with depth. Specifically, if we are seeing Eris 50 degrees from pole-on (Brown and Schaller, 2008), the pole we are seeing now at aphelion was in winter darkness at perihelion. Near perihelion, sublimation could have built up atmospheric pressure on the sunlit (summer) hemisphere sufficient to drive winds toward the dark (winter) hemisphere, where the winds would condense. Because nitrogen is more volatile and scarcer than methane, it sublimated from the sunlit hemisphere relatively early in the s...

  7. Fantastic Icy Worlds and Where to Find Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannister, Michele T.

    2017-06-01

    The outer Solar System has a wealth of recent discoveries that inform our understanding of orbital dynamics and provoke exciting new questions. The populations of small icy worlds orbiting in the vast volume beyond Neptune are remarkably abundant. Observational surveys including the Outer Solar System Origins Survey are revealing an intricate filigree of mean-motion resonant orbits, emplaced by the historic migration of Neptune. There are also new discoveries of rare trans-Neptunian objects that orbit even further afield, so far from planetary and Galactic tide influences that they are not thought to be produced in the current known planetary architecture of the Solar System. These have informed the recent debate on the existence of a distant giant planet. The hard-to-observe extreme TNOs require a formation method - and offer tantalizing hints that our Solar System is more complex than our current conception.

  8. A Holographic Microscope for Detection of Microorganisms on Icy Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindensmith, C. A.; Nadeau, J. L.; Deming, J. W.; Showalter, G. M.; Rider, S.; Bedrossian, M.

    2015-12-01

    Holography is a well-established imaging technique that uses the interference of light to record and reproduce three-dimensional images of objects. Its use began in the 1960s with the invention of the laser. Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) has several advantages over ordinary imaging microscopy which make it ideal for field and astrobiology use, including no need for focus or scanning so that instruments are readily made autonomous. DHM can produce simultaneous bright-field and quantitative phase-contrast images of the same field, providing additional information about transparent objects, e.g., refractive index and/or thickness; thus it inherently supports effective label-free imaging. We have built a fieldable DHM for detection of microorganisms in bodies of water and in brines collected from sea ice. Ice that appears solid to the eye contains interconnected brine-filled microscopic pores and veins which are occupied by populations of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The presence of life in "solid" ice has important implications for exploration of icy worlds, where it is unlikely that the first missions will be able to access the subsurface oceans. Using this new instrument, we examined several dozen samples from three different sites around Nuuk, Greenland. In all samples, mixed populations of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms were observed. Many of the organisms were motile immediately upon extraction from sea ice, and others became motile after warming or addition of sugars and/or amino acids. Meaningful motility was readily distinguished from turbulence or fluid flow. The spatial resolution of the instrument was better than 1 μm, leading to unambiguous recognition of subcellular structures in eukaryotes, including nuclei and chloroplasts. We present mission scenrios for both orbiters and landers in which DHM may be used as a valuable complement to chemical-based life detection techniques for discovery of cellular life on icy worlds.

  9. Convection in Icy Satellites: Implications for Habitability and Planetary Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, A. C.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    Solid-state convection and endogenic resurfacing in the outer ice shells of the icy Galilean satellites (especially Europa) may contribute to the habitability of their internal oceans and to the detectability of any biospheres by spacecraft. If convection occurs in an ice I layer, fluid motions are confined beneath a thick stagnant lid of cold, immobile ice that is too stiff to participate in convection. The thickness of the stagnant lid varies from 30 to 50% of the total thickness of the ice shell, depending on the grain size of ice. Upward convective motions deliver approximately 10(exp 9) to 10(exp 13) kg yr(sup -1) of ice to the base of the stagnant lid, where resurfacing events driven by compositional or tidal effects (such as the formation of domes or ridges on Europa, or formation of grooved terrain on Ganymede) may deliver materials from the stagnant lid onto the surface. Conversely, downward convective motions deliver the same mass of ice from the base of the stagnant lid to the bottom of the satellites ice shells. Materials from the satellites surfaces may be delivered to their oceans by downward convective motions if material from the surface can reach the base of the stagnant lid during resurfacing events. Triggering convection from an initially conductive ice shell requires modest amplitude (a few to tens of kelvins) temperature anomalies to soften the ice to permit convection, which may require tidal heating. Therefore, tidal heating, compositional buoyancy, and solid-state convection in combination may be required to permit mass transport between the surfaces and oceans of icy satellites. Callisto and probably Ganymede have thick stagnant lids with geologically inactive surfaces today, so forward contamination of their surfaces is not a significant issue. Active convection and breaching of the stagnant lid is a possibility on Europa today, so is of relevance to planetary protection policy.

  10. Jupiter's Upper Atmospheric Winds Revealed in Ultraviolet Images by Hubble Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    , one of Jupiter's moons crossing in front of the planet in the northern hemisphere (and its shadow on Jupiter's clouds on the left-hand side in the lower image), and the dark clouds above 3 of the impact sites near 45 deg. south latitude. In addition, Jupiter's polar aurora can also be seen in the far-ultraviolet images near both northern and southern poles.The images were taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2.This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the World Wide Web on the Space Telescope Science Institute home page at URL http:// oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/

  11. The vertical thickness of Jupiter's Europa gas torus from charged particle measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, P.; Paranicas, C.; Clark, G.; Roussos, E.; Lagg, A.; Krupp, N.

    2016-09-01

    Measurements and modeling suggest the presence of a neutral gas torus collocated with the orbit of Jupiter's moon Europa. Here we use data from the CMS instrument that is part of the Energetic Particles Detector (EPD) on board the Galileo spacecraft to characterize the distribution of 130 keV protons. Near the orbit of Europa this distribution has a minimum around 70° in equatorial pitch angle. We reproduce this with a model assuming that the protons are lost via charge exchange with a gas torus. Since the pitch angle characterizes whether the protons remain mostly in the dense center of the torus or continuously bounce through it, we can determine the latitudinal extent of the torus. We find that the full thickness where its density falls to 1/e of its maximum has to be ≲2RJ and is closer to ≈1RJ.

  12. Precisely measuring the distance to the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, J. E.; Dickey, J. O.

    1990-01-01

    Continuing improvements in the lasers and the detection electronics over the years which have led to accurate measurements of the distance from the earth to the moon are discussed. The first reflector of laser light pulses, deployed on the moon surface twenty years ago by the Apollo 11 astronauts, consisted of 100 fused silica corner cubes, and reflected a beam of light directly back toward its point of origin. Observatories located in Texas, Hawaii, and France now regularly range the moon with an accuracy of approximately 1 inch. Ranging programs have also been carried out in Australia and the Soviet Union. The ranges are computer-analyzed to determine precisely the positions of the observatories on earth, the positions of the reflectors on the moon, the orbit of the moon around the earth, and the rotation and orientation of the earth and the moon. The most important scientific advances derived from lunar ranging are also reviewed.

  13. Water on The Moon, III. Volatiles & Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Crotts, Arlin

    2012-01-01

    For centuries some scientists have argued that there is activity on the Moon (or water, as recounted in Parts I & II), while others have thought the Moon is simply a dead, inactive world. The question comes in several forms: is there a detectable atmosphere? Does the surface of the Moon change? What causes interior seismic activity? From a more modern viewpoint, we now know that as much carbon monoxide as water was excavated during the LCROSS impact, as detailed in Part I, and a comparable amount of other volatiles were found. At one time the Moon outgassed prodigious amounts of water and hydrogen in volcanic fire fountains, but released similar amounts of volatile sulfur (or SO2), and presumably large amounts of carbon dioxide or monoxide, if theory is to be believed. So water on the Moon is associated with other gases. We review what is known (and touch on what is unknown) about outgassing of various gases from the Moon.

  14. A Microseismometer for Penetrometer Deployment in the Jupiter System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, William; Standley, Ian; Karl, Werner; Delahunty, Aifric; Calcutt, Simon

    2010-05-01

    The internal structure of the moons of Jupiter is an area of great interest. Seismic investigations, either in the long-period band of 0.1 to 1 Hz, or at shorter periods of 1 to 100 Hz, have been studied as a means to determine the depth of subsurface liquid water with a single, triaxial seismometer. A penetrometer would be an ideal deployment for such an instrument as it would ensure excellent coupling, minimise thermal variations, and substantially reduce the radiation environment during operation. A microseismometer is under development which combines the required sensitivity for identification of the ambient seismicity with the robustness to survive the shock of deployment. At the heart of the instrument is a single-crystal silicon suspension machined through the full thickness of a wafer resulting in a very high quality factor. The movement of the proof mass is determined by extremely sensitive capacitive array transducer. This transducer is coupled to readout and feedback electronics which are designed for very low power operation. A unique combination of open and closed loop feedback enables the instrument to operate over a wide range of tilt angles, a vital consideration for a penetrometer deployment. The current measured noise is 3 ng/sqrtHz at 20 s, with the capability of a further order of magnitude improvement. The suspension has been tested on rocket-sled impacts to simulate a penetrometer deployment, surviving shocks up to 14,000 g with suitable encapsulation. Such an instrument would have the capability for deployment on the surface of Europa or Ganymede and should provide vital information on the internal structure of these bodies.

  15. The Early Years: Seeing the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2012-01-01

    Spotting the Moon in the sky is like finding a treasure--unexpected and beautiful. When children look for the Moon in the sky, they don't know where to look. The Moon is far away and most easily observed at a time when most young children are sleeping. Because direct contact isn't possible, adults have to be creative in how they help children…

  16. Impact cratering of the terrestrial planets and the Moon during the giant planet instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, Fernando Virgilio; Nesvorny, David; Bottke, William

    2016-10-01

    The dynamical instability of the giant planets and the planetesimal driven migration both have major implications for the crater record of the terrestrial planets and the Moon. The crater record can thus provide contraints to the behavior of the planets in the early Solar System. Here we determine the impact fluxes and the crater production rates on the terrestrial planets and the Moon from impactors originating in the primordial asteroid main belt (2.1 to 3.2 au) and the E-belt (1.5 to 2.1 au - Bottke et al. 2012). We determine the impact flux over the age of the Solar System, with particular focus on the instability of the giant planets in the jumping Jupiter model. We start with a population of asteroids uniformly distributed in the orbital parameters space, and numerically evolve them as test particles under the gravitational perturbations of the giant and terrestrial planets. We test the effects on this population due to different jumping Jupiter evolutions (the idealized jump as in Bottke et al. 2012 or models taken from Nesvorny & Morbidelli 2012). The number of impacts is determined by applying Opik's theory. We compute the impact rates on different targets (Mercury, Venus, Earth, Moon, and Mars) and from different source regions in the asteroid belt (E-belt, inner belt, outer belt). By properly calibrating the impact rates, and using crater scaling laws, we estimate the number and size distribution of craters. We show how the impact flux and crater production rates depend on the different parameters of the model such as the initial orbital distribution of the asteroids, time of the instability, different evolution of the planets, initial size distribution of the impactors, etc.

  17. ISA accelerometer and Moon science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iafolla, Valerio; Peron, Roberto; Santoli, Francesco; Fiorenza, Emiliano; Lefevre, Carlo; Nozzoli, Sergio; Reale, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    In recent years the Moon has become again a target for exploration activities, as shown by many performed, ongoing or foreseen missions. The reason for this new wave are manifold. The knowledge of formation and evolution of the Moon to current state is important in order to trace the overall history of Solar System. An effective driving factor is the possibility of building a human settlement on its surface, with all the related issues of environment characterization, safety, resources, communication and navigation. Our natural satellite is also an important laboratory for fundamental physics: Lunar Laser Ranging is continuing to provide important data that constrain possible theories of gravitation. All these topics are providing stimulus and inspirations for new experiments. ISA (Italian Spring Accelerometer) can provide an important tool for lunar studies. Thanks to its structure (three one-dimensional sensors assembled in a composite structure) it works both in-orbit and on-ground, with the same configuration. It therefore can be used onboard a spacecraft, as a support to a radio science mission, and on the surface of the Moon, as a seismometer. The first option has been explorated in the context of MAGIA (Missione Altimetrica Gravimetrica geochImica lunAre), a proposal for an exploration mission with a noteworthy part dedicated to gravimetry and fundamental physics. The second option is candidate to be hosted on NASA ILN (International Lunar Network) and ESA First Lunar Lander. After a description of the instrument, both of them will be described and discussed, giving emphasis on the integration of the instrument with the other components of the respective experiments.

  18. Can Sulfur Explain the Bimodal Color Distribution Observed in the Jupiter Trojans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Mahjoub, Ahmed; Poston, Michael; Brown, Michael E.; Eiler, John; Ehlmann, Bethany; Hodyss, Robert; Hand, Kevin P.; Carlson, Robert W.; Wong, Ian

    2016-10-01

    We present a series of experiments aimed at exploring the hypothesis that the presence or absence of H2S ice on the surface of primitive icy bodies in the early solar system is responsible for the bimodal color distribution of the Jupiter Trojans.Central to our proposed hypothesis is a location-dependent sublimation of ices in the primordial trans-neptunian disk which would have divided objects according to whether they retained H2S on their surfaces for sufficient time to incorporate their constituents into irradiated organic crusts. The irradiated crusts of objects with and without H2S would have different chemistry and therefore different optical properties. Dynamical instability models of the early solar system (e.g. Morbidelli et al., 2005, Nesvorny et al., 2013) predict that Trojans, formed from this primordial population, were later emplaced inward to co-orbit with Jupiter during large-scale rearrangement events. According to our hypothesis, the Trojans today would show evidence of their primordial location with respect to the H2S sublimation line in the form of a bimodal distribution in surface chemistry, and thus color.We present laboratory spectroscopy experiments in support of this hypothesis. Numerous thin ice films composed of H2O, CH3OH, NH3, were produced both with and without H2S. Subsequent processing of these icy bodies was simulated using electron irradiation and heating. Visible reflectance spectra show significant reddening when H2S is present. Mid-infrared spectra confirm the formation of non-volatile sulfur-containing molecules in the products of H2S-containing ices. The infrared spectral properties of the organic residues remaining at room temperature show that sulfur significantly changes the chemistry of these irradiation-produced organics. These experiments suggest that the presence of specific sulfur-bearing chemical species may play an important role in the colors of both the KBOs and Trojans today. This testable hypothesis could feed

  19. Warm Jupiters from Secular Planet–Planet Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovich, Cristobal; Tremaine, Scott

    2016-10-01

    Most warm Jupiters (gas-giant planets with 0.1 {{au}}≲ a≲ 1 au) have pericenter distances that are too large for significant orbital migration by tidal friction. We study the possibility that the warm Jupiters are undergoing secular eccentricity oscillations excited by an outer companion (a planet or star) in an eccentric and/or mutually inclined orbit. In this model, the warm Jupiters migrate periodically, in the high-eccentricity phase of the oscillation, but are typically observed at lower eccentricities. We show that in this model the steady-state eccentricity distribution of the warm Jupiters is approximately flat, which is consistent with the observed distribution if we restrict the sample to warm Jupiters with detected outer planetary companions. The eccentricity distribution of warm Jupiters without companions exhibits a peak at e≲ 0.2 that must be explained by a different formation mechanism. Based on a population synthesis study, we find that high-eccentricity migration excited by an outer planetary companion (1) can account for ∼ 20 % of the warm Jupiters and most of the warm Jupiters with e≳ 0.4; and (2) can produce most of the observed population of hot Jupiters, with a semimajor axis distribution that matches the observations, but fails to account adequately for ∼ 60 % of hot Jupiters with projected obliquities ≲ 20^\\circ . Thus ∼ 20 % of the warm Jupiters and ∼ 60 % of the hot Jupiters can be produced by high-eccentricity migration. We also provide predictions for the expected mutual inclinations and spin-orbit angles of the planetary systems with hot and warm Jupiters produced by high-eccentricity migration.

  20. A Submersible, Off-Axis Holographic Microscope for Detection of Microbial Motility and Morphology in Aqueous and Icy Environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian A Lindensmith

    Full Text Available Sea ice is an analog environment for several of astrobiology's near-term targets: Mars, Europa, Enceladus, and perhaps other Jovian or Saturnian moons. Microorganisms, both eukaryotic and prokaryotic, remain active within brine channels inside the ice, making it unnecessary to penetrate through to liquid water below in order to detect life. We have developed a submersible digital holographic microscope (DHM that is capable of resolving individual bacterial cells, and demonstrated its utility for immediately imaging samples taken directly from sea ice at several locations near Nuuk, Greenland. In all samples, the appearance and motility of eukaryotes were conclusive signs of life. The appearance of prokaryotic cells alone was not sufficient to confirm life, but when prokaryotic motility occurred, it was rapid and conclusive. Warming the samples to above-freezing temperatures or supplementing with serine increased the number of motile cells and the speed of motility; supplementing with serine also stimulated chemotaxis. These results show that DHM is a useful technique for detection of active organisms in extreme environments, and that motility may be used as a biosignature in the liquid brines that persist in ice. These findings have important implications for the design of missions to icy environments and suggest ways in which DHM imaging may be integrated with chemical life-detection suites in order to create more conclusive life detection packages.

  1. Jumping Jupiter can explain Mercury's orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Roig, Fernando; DeSouza, Sandro Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The orbit of Mercury has large values of eccentricity and inclination that cannot be easily explained if this planet formed on a circular and coplanar orbit. Here, we study the evolution of Mercury's orbit during the instability related to the migration of the giant planets in the framework of the jumping Jupiter model. We found that some instability models are able to produce the correct values of Mercury's eccentricity and inclination, provided that relativistic effects are included in the precession of Mercury's perihelion. The orbital excitation is driven by the fast change of the normal oscillation modes of the system corresponding to the perihelion precession of Jupiter (for the eccentricity), and the nodal regression of Uranus (for the inclination).

  2. The EJSM Jupiter Europa Orbiter: Planning Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Clark, K.; Greeley, R.; Hendrix, A. R.; Boldt, J.; Tan-Wang, G.; Lock, R.; van Houten, T.; Ludwinski, J.

    2008-09-01

    In the decade since the first return of Europa data by the Galileo spacecraft, the scientific understanding of Europa has greatly matured leading to the formulation of sophisticated new science objectives to be addressed through the acquisition of new data. The Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) is one component of the proposed multi-spacecraft Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) designed to obtain data in support of these new science objectives. The JEO planning payload, while notional, is used to quantify engineering aspects of the mission and spacecraft design, and operational scenarios required to obtain the data necessary to meet the science objectives. The instruments were defined to understand the viability of an approach to meet the measurement objectives, perform in the radiation environment and meet the planetary protection requirements. The actual instrument suite would ultimately be the result of an Announcement of Opportunity (AO) selection process carried out by NASA.

  3. Radiation Environment for the Jupiter Europa Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Insoo

    2008-09-01

    One of the major challenges for the Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) mission would be that the spacecraft should be designed to survive an intense radiation environment expected at Jupiter and Europa. The proper definition of the radiation environments is the important first step, because it could affect almost every aspects of mission and spacecraft design. These include optimizing the trajectory to minimize radiation exposure, determining mission lifetime, selecting parts, materials, detectors and sensors, shielding design, etc. The radiation environments generated for the 2008 JEO study will be covered, emphasizing the radiation environment mainly responsible for the total ionizing dose (TID) and displacement damage dose (DDD). The latest models developed at JPL will be used to generate the TID and DDD environments. Finally, the major radiation issues will be summarized, and a mitigation plan will be discussed.

  4. The Escaping Upper Atmospheres of Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Eric; Jones, Gabrielle; Uribe, Ana; Carson, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Hot Jupiters are massive gaseous planets which orbit closely to their parent star. The strong stellar irradiation at these small orbital separations causes the temperature of the upper atmosphere of the planet to rise. This can cause the planet's atmosphere to escape into space, creating an exoplanet outflow. We ascertained which factors determine the presence and structure of these outflows by creating one dimensional simulations of the density, pressure, velocity, optical depth, and neutral fraction of hot Jupiter atmospheres. This was done for planets of masses and radii ranging from 0.5-1.5 Mj and 0.5-1.5 Rj. We found the outflow rate to be highest for a planet of 0.5 Mj and 1.5 Rj at 5.3×10-14 Mj/Yr. We also found that the higher the escape velocity, the lower the chance of the planet having an outflow.

  5. Secular orbital evolution of Jupiter family comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, H.; Gabryszewski, R.; Wajer, P.; Wiśniowski, T.; Wójcikowski, K.; Szutowicz, S.; Valsecchi, G. B.; Morbidelli, A.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The issue of the long term dynamics of Jupiter family comets (JFCs) involves uncertain assumptions about the physical evolution and lifetimes of these comets. Contrary to what is often assumed, real effects of secular dynamics cannot be excluded and therefore merit investigation. Aims: We use a random sample of late heavy bombardment cometary projectiles to study the long-term dynamics of JFCs by a Monte Carlo approach. In a steady-state picture of the Jupiter family, we investigate the orbital distribution of JFCs, including rarely visited domains like retrograde orbits or orbits within the outer parts of the asteroid main belt. Methods: We integrate 100 000 objects over a maximum of 100 000 orbital revolutions including the Sun, a comet, and four giant planets. Considering the steady-state number of JFCs to be proportional to the total time spent in the respective orbital domain, we derive the capture rate based on observed JFCs with small perihelia and large nuclei. We consider a purely dynamical model and one where the nuclei are eroded by ice sublimation. Results: The JFC inclination distribution is incompatible with our erosional model. This may imply that a new type of comet evolution model is necessary. Considering that comets may live for a long time, we show that JFCs can evolve into retrograde orbits as well as asteroidal orbits in the outer main belt or Cybele regions. The steady-state capture rate into the Jupiter family is consistent with 1 × 109 scattered disk objects with diameters D > 2 km. Conclusions: Our excited scattered disk makes it difficult to explain the JFC inclination distribution, unless the physical evolution of JFCs is more intricate than assumed in standard, erosional models. Independent of this, the population size of the Jupiter family is consistent with a relatively low-mass scattered disk.

  6. Modelling of Jupiter's Innermost Radiation Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov, J. D.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    In order to understand better source and loss processes for energetic trapped protons near Jupiter, a modification of de Pater and Goertz' finite difference diffusion calculations for Jovian equatorial energetic electrons is made to apply to the case of protons inside the orbit of Metis. Explicit account is taken of energy loss in the Jovian ring. Comparison of the results is made with Galileo Probe measurements.

  7. DIRECTLY IMAGING TIDALLY POWERED MIGRATING JUPITERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Subo; Katz, Boaz; Socrates, Aristotle [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2013-01-10

    Upcoming direct-imaging experiments may detect a new class of long-period, highly luminous, tidally powered extrasolar gas giants. Even though they are hosted by {approx} Gyr-'old' main-sequence stars, they can be as 'hot' as young Jupiters at {approx}100 Myr, the prime targets of direct-imaging surveys. They are on years-long orbits and presently migrating to 'feed' the 'hot Jupiters'. They are expected from 'high-e' migration mechanisms, in which Jupiters are excited to highly eccentric orbits and then shrink semimajor axis by a factor of {approx}10-100 due to tidal dissipation at close periastron passages. The dissipated orbital energy is converted to heat, and if it is deposited deep enough into the atmosphere, the planet likely radiates steadily at luminosity L {approx} 100-1000 L{sub Jup}(2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}-2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} L{sub Sun }) during a typical {approx} Gyr migration timescale. Their large orbital separations and expected high planet-to-star flux ratios in IR make them potentially accessible to high-contrast imaging instruments on 10 m class telescopes. {approx}10 such planets are expected to exist around FGK dwarfs within {approx}50 pc. Long-period radial velocity planets are viable candidates, and the highly eccentric planet HD 20782b at maximum angular separation {approx}0.''08 is a promising candidate. Directly imaging these tidally powered Jupiters would enable a direct test of high-e migration mechanisms. Once detected, the luminosity would provide a direct measurement of the migration rate, and together with mass (and possibly radius) estimate, they would serve as a laboratory to study planetary spectral formation and tidal physics.

  8. Interaction of Jovian energetic particles with moons and gas tori based on recent Juno/JEDI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, P.; Mauk, B.; Clark, G. B.; Paranicas, C.; Haggerty, D. K.; Rymer, A. M.; Bolton, S. J.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Levin, S.

    2016-12-01

    Juno is the first spacecraft in a polar orbit around Jupiter. It entered orbit in July 2016, will deliver the first science data from near Jupiter at the end of August, and pass very close to Jupiter 4 more times by December. We will use data from the three JEDI instruments onboard that measure ions and electrons in the tens of keV to MeV range while discriminating among ion species. Recording of the full energy and time-of-flight information of a subset of the detected particles will allow distinguishing foreground from contaminating background in many cases. Since Juno will be mostly at high latitudes, the JEDI measurements will differ from the measurements of previous missions that were mostly in the equatorial plane. The increasingly strong radiation environment inwards of Europa's orbit caused contamination and/or dead time effects in many of the previously flown particle instruments, which made it difficult to study this region with the existing data. We expect that Juno's unique orbit and the JEDI design will largely avoid these problems. During one hour of closest approach, Juno will be on magnetic field lines that map within the orbits of the Galilean moons. We will study the data in this region and analyze the intensity dropouts that are caused by the interaction between the particles that bounce along field lines and drift around the planet with the moons and associated gas and plasma tori. Also, we will analyze the rate of intensity change towards Jupiter that is determined by radial transport, potential local source processes, and the range of pitch angles that can reach the changing latitudes.

  9. Solar wind influence on Jupiter's aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyalay, Szilard; Vogt, Marissa F.; Withers, Paul; Bunce, Emma J.

    2016-10-01

    Jupiter's main auroral emission is driven by a system of corotation enforcement currents that arises to speed up outflowing Iogenic plasma and is not due to the magnetosphere-solar wind interaction like at Earth. The solar wind is generally expected to have only a small influence on Jupiter's magnetosphere and aurora compared to the influence of rotational stresses due to the planet's rapid rotation. However, there is considerable observational evidence that the solar wind does affect the magnetopause standoff distance, auroral radio emissions, and the position and brightness of the UV auroral emissions. Using the Michigan Solar Wind Model (mSWiM) to predict the solar wind conditions upstream of Jupiter we have identified intervals of high and low solar wind dynamic pressure in the Galileo dataset, and use this information to quantify how a magnetospheric compression affects the magnetospheric field configuration. We have developed separate spatial fits to the compressed and nominal magnetic field data, accounting for variations with radial distance and local time. These two fits can be used to update the flux equivalence mapping model of Vogt et al. (2011), which links auroral features to source regions in the middle and outer magnetosphere. The updated version accounts for changing solar wind conditions and provides a way to quantify the expected solar wind-induced variability in the ionospheric mapping of the main auroral emission, satellite footprints, and other auroral features. Our results are highly relevant to interpretation of the new auroral observations from the Juno mission.

  10. Structures of the Planets Jupiter and Saturn

    CERN Document Server

    Kerley, Gerald I

    2013-01-01

    New equations of state (EOS) for hydrogen, helium, and compounds containing heavier elements are used to construct models for the structures of the planets Jupiter and Saturn. Good agreement with the gravitational moments J2 and J4 is obtained with a model that uses a two-layer gas envelope, in which the inner region is denser than the outer one, together with a small, dense core. It is possible to match J2 with a homogeneous envelope, but an envelope with a denser inner region is needed to match both moments. The two-layer envelope also gives good agreement with the global oscillation data for Jupiter. In Jupiter, the boundary between the inner and outer envelopes occurs at 319 GPa, with an 8% density increase. In Saturn, it occurs at 227 GPa, with a 69% density increase. The differences between the two planets show that the need for a density increase is not due to EOS errors. It is also shown that helium enrichment cannot be the cause of the density increase. The phenomenon can be explained as the result o...

  11. Directly Imaging Tidally Powered Migrating Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Subo; Socrates, Aristotle

    2012-01-01

    We show that ongoing direct imaging experiments may detect a new class of long-period, highly luminous, tidally powered extrasolar gas giants. Even though they are hosted by Gyr-"old" main-sequence stars, they can be as "hot" as young Jupiters at ~100 Myr, the prime targets of direct imaging surveys. These planets, with years-long orbits, are presently migrating to "feed" the "hot Jupiters" in steady state. Their existence is expected from a class of "high-e" migration mechanisms, in which gas giants are excited to highly eccentric orbits and then shrink their semi-major axis by factor of ~ 10-100 due to tidal dissipation at successive close periastron passages. The dissipated orbital energy is converted to heat, and if it is deposited deep enough into the planet atmosphere, the planet likely radiates steadily at luminosity ~2-3 orders of magnitude larger than that of our Jupiter during a typical Gyr migration time scale. Their large orbital separations and expected high planet-to-star flux ratios in IR make ...

  12. Illuminating Hot Jupiters in caustic crossing

    CERN Document Server

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2010-01-01

    In recent years a large number of Hot Jupiters orbiting in a very close orbit around the parent stars have been explored with the transit and doppler effect methods. Here in this work we study the gravitational microlensing effect of a binary lens on a parent star with a Hot Jupiter revolving around it. Caustic crossing of the planet makes enhancements on the light curve of the parent star in which the signature of the planet can be detected by high precision photometric observations. We use the inverse ray shooting method with tree code algorithm to generate the combined light curve of the parent star and the planet. In order to investigate the probability of observing the planet signal, we do a Monte-Carlo simulation and obtain the observational optical depth of $\\tau \\sim 10^{-8}$. We show that about ten years observations of Galactic Bulge with a network of telescopes will enable us detecting about ten Hot Jupiter with this method. Finally we show that the observation of the microlensing event in infra-re...

  13. The compression behavior of blödite at low and high temperature up to ~10GPa: Implications for the stability of hydrous sulfates on icy planetary bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comodi, Paola; Stagno, Vincenzo; Zucchini, Azzurra; Fei, Yingwei; Prakapenka, Vitali

    2017-03-01

    0[1 + 7.6(7)10 - 5ΔT - 0.026(3)P - 5.6(9)10 - 6PΔT-6.6(9)10 - 6PΔT)] from which the density of blödite can be determined at conditions of the mantle of the large icy satellites of Jupiter. Blödite has higher density, bulk modulus and thermal stability than similar hydrous sulfates (e.g. mirabilite and epsomite) implying, therefore, a different contribution of these minerals to the extent of deep oceans in icy planets and their distribution over the local geotherms.

  14. Introducing the Moon's Orbital Eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    I present a novel way to introduce the lunar orbital eccentricity in introductory astronomy courses. The Moon is perhaps the clearest illustration of the general orbital elements such as inclination, ascending node, eccentricity, perigee, and so on. Furthermore, I like the students to discover astronomical phenomena for themselves, by means of a guided exercise, rather than just telling them the facts.1 The inclination and nodes may be found by direct observation, monitoring carefully the position of the Moon among the stars. Even the regression of the nodes may be discovered in this way2 To find the eccentricity from students' observations is also possible,3 but that requires considerable time and effort. if a whole class should discover it in a short time, here is a method more suitable for a one-day class or home assignment. The level I aim at is, more or less, advanced high school or first-year college students. I assume them to be acquainted with celestial coordinates and the lunar phases, and to be able to use algebra and trigonometry.

  15. Taking Europe To The Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The first step in this ESA initiated programme is a unique project called 'Euromoon 2000' which is currently being studied by ESA engineers/ scientists and key European Space Industries. The project is intended to celebrate Europe's entry into the New Millennium; and to promote public awareness and interest in science, technology and space exploration. Euromoon 2000 has an innovative and ambitious implementation plan. This includes a 'partnership with industry' and a financing scheme based on raising part of the mission's budget from sponsorship through a dynamic public relations strategy and marketing programme. The mission begins in earnest with the small (approx. 100 kg) LunarSat orbiter satellite, to be designed and built by 50 young scientists and engineers from across Europe. Scheduled for launch in 2000 as a secondary payload on a European Ariane 5 rocket, it will then orbit the Moon, mapping the planned landing area in greater detail in preparation of the EuroMoon Lander in 2001. The Lander's 40 kg payload allocation will accommodate amongst others scientific instrumentation for in-situ investigation of the unique site. Elements of specific support to the publicity and fund-raising campaign will also be considered. The Lander will aim for the 'Peak of Eternal Light' on the rim of the 20 km-diameter, 3 km-deep Shackleton South Pole crater - a site uniquely suited for establishing a future outpost. This location enjoys almost continuous sunlight thus missions can rely on solar power instead of bulky batteries or costly and potentially hazardous nuclear power generation. As a consequence of the undulating South Pole terrain there are also permanently shadowed areas - amongst the coldest in the Solar System resulting in conditions highly favourable for the formation of frozen volatiles (as suggested by the Clementine mission in 1994). Earlier this year (7th January 1998), NASA launched its Lunar Prospector satellite which is currently performing polar lunar

  16. HST Observations of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storrs, A. D.; Garner, C. J.; McIntosh, C. M.; Landis, R. R.; Schultz, A. B.

    2005-12-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observed the Moon in August 2005, using the High Resolution Camera (HRC) of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) (proposal ID 10719, PI Garvin). Three sites were observed: the Apollo 15 and 17 landing sites, and Aristarchus crater. Four filters were used: the F658N in the red, the F502N in the visible, the F344N in the UV, and the F250W in the vacuum UV. HST affords spatial resolution of about 100m on the Moon, as well as access to the vacuum UV, which are impossible from ground based observations. Tracking was necessarily done under gyro control and so some image drift occurred between and during exposures. We present HST data that has been processed to remove instrumental distortion and drift during the exposures. We use the MISTRAL image restoration algorithm (Mugnier et al. 2004) and a trailed point spread function to minimize the effects of image motion. We will make mosaics of data in individual filters and where there is spatial overlap between the mosaics, present maps showing both the relative age of the surface material, as well as its overall composition. Mugnier et al. (2004): "MISTRAL: a myopic edge-preserving image restoration method, with application to astronomical adaptive-optics-corrected long-exposure images", JOSA A, vol 21 no. 10, pp. 1841-1854

  17. Academic Training - Exploring Planets and Moons in our Solar System

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 6, 7, 8, 9 June 11:00-12:00. On the 8 June from 10:00 to 12:00 - Auditorium, bldg 500 Exploring Planets and Moons in our Solar System H.O. RUCKER / Space Research Institut, Graz The lecture series comprises 5 lectures starting with the interplanetary medium, the solar wind and its interaction with magnetized planets. Knowledge on the magnetically dominated 'spheres'around the Giant Planets have been obtained by the Grand Tour of both Voyager spacecraft to Jupiter, Saturn, with the continuation of Voyager 2 to Uranus, and Neptune, in the late seventies and eighties of last century. These findings are now extensively supported and complemented by Cassini/Huygens to the Saturnian system. This will be discussed in detail in lecture 2. Specific aspects of magnetospheric physics, in particular radio emissions from the planets, observed in-situ and by remote sensing techniques, will be addressed in the following lecture 3. Of high importance are also the rec...

  18. The asteroid belt outer region under jumping-Jupiter migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, H. S.; Winter, O. C.; Vieira Neto, E.

    2017-09-01

    The radial configuration of the outer region of the main asteroid belt is quite peculiar, and has much to say about the past evolution of Jupiter. In this work, we investigate the dynamical effects of a jumping-Jupiter-like migration over a more extended primordial asteroid belt. Jupiter's migrations are simulated using a fast jumping-Jupiter synthesizer. Among the results, we highlight non-negligible fractions of primordial objects trapped in 3:2 and 4:3 mean motion resonances (MMRs) with Jupiter. They survived the whole truculent phase of migration and originated populations that are like Hildas and Thules. Fractions ranging from 3 to 6 per cent of the initial distribution remained trapped in 3:2 MMR, and at least 0.05 per cent in 4:3. These results show that the resonance trapping of primordial objects may have originated these resonant populations. This theory is consistent even for Jupiter's truculent evolution.

  19. A Venus-Mass Planet Orbiting a Brown Dwarf: Missing Link between Planets and Moons

    CERN Document Server

    Udalski, A; Han, C; Gould, A; Kozlowski, S; Skowron, J; Poleski, R; Soszyński, I; Pietrukowicz, P; Mróz, P; Szymański, M K; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Ulaczyk, K; Pietrzyński, G; Shvartzvald, Y; Maoz, D; Kaspi, S; Gaudi, B S; Hwang, K -H; Choi, J -Y; Shin, I -G; Park, H; Bozza, V

    2015-01-01

    The co-planarity of solar-system planets led Kant to suggest that they formed from an accretion disk, and the discovery of hundreds of such disks around young stars as well as hundreds of co-planar planetary systems by the {\\it Kepler} satellite demonstrate that this formation mechanism is extremely widespread. Many moons in the solar system, such as the Galilean moons of Jupiter, also formed out of the accretion disks that coalesced into the giant planets. We report here the discovery of an intermediate system OGLE-2013-BLG-0723LB/Bb composed of a Venus-mass planet orbiting a brown dwarf, which may be viewed either as a scaled down version of a planet plus star or as a scaled up version of a moon plus planet orbiting a star. The latter analogy can be further extended since they orbit in the potential of a larger, stellar body. For ice-rock companions formed in the outer parts of accretion disks, like Uranus and Callisto, the scaled masses and separations of the three types of systems are similar, leading us ...

  20. Comparative study of icy patches on comet nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklay, Nilda; Pommerol, Antoine; Barucci, Maria Antonietta; Sunshine, Jessica; Sierks, Holger; Pajola, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    Cometary missions Deep Impact, EPOXI and Rosetta investigated the nuclei of comets 9P/Tempel 1, 103P/Hartley 2 and 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko respectively. Bright patches were observed on the surfaces of each of these three comets [1-5]. Of these, the surface of 67P is mapped at the highest spatial resolution via narrow angle camera (NAC) of the Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System (OSIRIS, [6]) on board the Rosetta spacecraft. OSIRIS NAC is equipped with twelve filters covering the wavelength range of 250 nm to 1000 nm. Various filters combinations are used during surface mapping. With high spatial resolution data of comet 67P, three types of bright features were detected on the comet surface: Clustered, isolated and bright boulders [2]. In the visible spectral range, clustered bright features on comet 67P display bluer spectral slopes than the average surface [2, 4] while isolated bright features on comet 67P have flat spectra [4]. Icy patches observed on the surface of comets 9P and 103P display bluer spectral slopes than the average surface [1, 5]. Clustered and isolated bright features are blue in the RGB composites generated by using the images taken in NIR, visible and NUV wavelengths [2, 4]. This is valid for the icy patches observed on comets 9P and 103P [1, 5]. Spectroscopic observations of bright patches on comets 9P and 103P confirmed the existence of water [1, 5]. There were more than a hundred of bright features detected on the northern hemisphere of comet 67P [2]. Analysis of those features from both multispectral data and spectroscopic data is an ongoing work. Water ice is detected in eight of the bright features so far [7]. Additionally, spectroscopic observations of two clustered bright features on the surface of comet 67P revealed the existence of water ice [3]. The spectral properties of one of the icy patches were studied by [4] using OSIRIS NAC images and compared with the spectral properties of the active regions observed

  1. The alteration of icy samples during sample acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, G.; Bearman, G.; Beegle, L. W.; Hecht, M.; Peters, G. H.; Glucoft, J.; Strothers, K.

    2006-12-01

    Valid in situ scientific studies require both that samples be analyzed in as pristine condition as possible and that any modification from the pristine to the sampled state be well understood. While samples with low to high ice concentration are critical for the study of astrobiology and geology, they pose problems with respect to the sample acquisition, preparation and distribution systems (SPAD) upon which the analytical instruments depend. Most significant of the processes that occur during SPAD is sublimation or melting caused by thermal loading from drilling, coring, etc. as well as exposure to a dry low pressure ambient environment. These processes can alter the sample, as well as generating, meta-stable liquid water that can refreeze in the sample transfer mechanisms, interfering with proper operation and creating cross-contamination. We have investigated and quantified loss of volatiles such as H2O, CO, CO2, and organics contained within icy and powdered samples when acquired, processed and transferred. During development of the MSL rock crusher, for example, ice was observed to pressure-fuse and stick to the side even at -70C. We have investigated sublimation from sample acquisition at Martian temperature and pressure for a samples ranging from 10 to 100 water/dirt ratios. Using the RASP that will be on Phoenix, we have measured sublimation of ice during excavation at Martian pressure and find that the sublimation losses can range from 10 to 50 percent water. It is the thermal conductivity of the soil that determines local heat transport, and how much of the sample acquisition energy is wicked away into the soil and how much goes into the sample. Modeling of sample acquisition methods requires measurement of these parameters. There is a two phase model for thermal conductivity as a function of dirt/ice ratio but it needed to be validated. We used an ASTM method for measuring thermal conductivity and implemented it in the laboratory. The major conclusion is

  2. After Apollo: Fission Origin of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, John A.

    1973-01-01

    Presents current ideas about the fission process of the Moon, including loss of mass. Saturnian rings, center of the Moon, binary stars, and uniformitarianism. Indicates that planetary formation may be best explained as a destructive, rather than a constructive process. (CC)

  3. Escape of atmospheric gases from the Moon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Da Dao-an; Yang Ya-tian

    2005-12-01

    The escape rate of atmospheric molecules on the Moon is calculated.Based on the assumption that the rates of emission and escape of gases attain equilibrium, the ratio of molecular number densities during day and night, 0/0, can be explained. The plausible emission rate of helium and radioactive elements present in the Moon has also been calculated.

  4. The Moon's Phases and the Self Shadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Timothy; Guy, Mark

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a new way of teaching the phases of the Moon. Through the introduction of a "self shadow" (an idea of a shadow that is not well-known), they illuminate students' understanding of the phases of the Moon and help them understand the distinction between the shadows that cause eclipses and the shadows that relate…

  5. Formative Assessment Probes: The Daytime Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Page

    2012-01-01

    The familiar adage "seeing is believing" implies that children will recall a particular phenomenon if they had the experience of seeing it with their own eyes. If this were true, then most children would believe that one could see the Moon in both daytime and at night. However, when children are asked, "Can you see the Moon in the daytime?" many…

  6. Origin and Evolution of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Cuixiang

    2014-01-01

    Since the Moon is the only natural satellite of the Earth, the research on the formation of the Moon can not only find out the formation mechanism of the satellites of Solar System planets but also reveal the evolution law of galaxies in the universe. Hence many hypotheses have been proposed for the Moon's formation, including fission,capture,condensation,and impact event hypothesis, but they all have problems. Recently, the author of this abstract discovered the formation mechanism of the Moon, which can be called ``evolution theory'', and described as follows: During some violent volcanic eruptions of the Earth, some rock debris such as pumice through deep rock hole could achieve a velocity no less than the first cosmic velocity (7.9 km/s) to enter an orbit around the Earth, one of the biggest debris is the young Moon. The orbit of the young Moon might be much closer to the Earth than it is today. There were a lot of ejecta from the Earth in the space. Hence, the Moon has merged these ejecta to become larger and larger, and farther and farther away from the Earth.This can be proved as follows: When the Moon moved around the Earth normally, the centrifugal force produced by the Moon's rotation around the Earth and the Earth's gravitation pull on the Moon had the same size. Let M be the mass of the Earth, m 1 be the mass of the Moon, r m be the radius of the Moon, r be the centroid distance between the Earth and the Moon, v be the tangential velocity of the Moon around the Earth, then Gm 1 M/r 2=m 1 v 2/r, therefore $v=\\sqrt{GM/r}$ . Near the orbit of the Moon, there were also many smaller prograde planetesimals moving around the Earth in circular orbits of radius r x (r-r m \\sqrt{GM/r}$ , which implies v x > v, these planetesimals would finally catch and merge with the Moon.Especially,if a planetesimals was large enough, it would impact the Moon forcefully, making the Moon's velocity increase to a larger value v 2. Then m 1 v 2 2/r>m 1 v 2/r=Gm 1 M/r 2

  7. The Moon that Wasn't

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Helge

    This book details the history of one of astronomy's many spurious objects, the satellite of Venus. First spotted in 1645, the non-existing moon was observed more than a dozen times until the late eighteenth century. Although few astronomers believed in the existence of the moon after about 1770...

  8. Study of Power Options for Jupiter and Outer Planet Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fincannon, James

    2015-01-01

    Power for missions to Jupiter and beyond presents a challenging goal for photovoltaic power systems, but NASA missions including Juno and the upcoming Europa Clipper mission have shown that it is possible to operate solar arrays at Jupiter. This work analyzes photovoltaic technologies for use in Jupiter and outer planet missions, including both conventional arrays, as well as analyzing the advantages of advanced solar cells, concentrator arrays, and thin film technologies. Index Terms - space exploration, spacecraft solar arrays, solar electric propulsion, photovoltaic cells, concentrator, Fresnel lens, Jupiter missions, outer planets.

  9. The Role of Solar Neutrinos in the Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Burov, Valery

    2008-01-01

    Judging from the fact that the planet Jupiter is bigger in size than the Earth by 10^3 while is smaller than the Sun by 10^3 and that the average distance of the Jupiter from the Sun is 5.203 a.u., the solar neutrinos, when encounter the Jupiter, may have some accumulating effects bigger than on the Earth. We begin by estimating how much energy/power carried by solar neutrinos get transferred by this unique process, to confirm that solar neutrinos, despite of their feeble neutral weak current interactions, might deposit enough energy in the Jupiter. We also speculate on the other remarkable effects.

  10. The squint Moon and the witch ball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, M. V.

    2015-06-01

    A witch ball is a reflecting sphere of glass. Looking into the disk that it subtends, the whole sky can be seen at one glance. This feature can be exploited to see and photograph the squint Moon illusion, in which the direction normal to the illuminated face of the Moon—its ‘attitude vector’—does not appear to point towards the Sun. The images of the Sun and Moon in the disk, the geodesic connecting them, the Moon’s attitude, and the squint angle (distinct from the tilt), can be calculated and simulated, for all celestial configurations and viewing inclinations. The Moon direction antipodal to the Sun, corresponding to full Moon, is a singularity of the attitude vector field, with index +1. The main features of the witch ball images also occur in other ways of imaging the squint Moon.

  11. 'My Sun' and 'Guided by the Moon'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Baillie

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available My Sun and Guided by the Moon (2012 show the heavily pregnant artist with her swollen belly covered in gold and silver leaf. The work is suggestive that the connectivity experienced by an expectant mother, extends outwards, even as far as her relationship with the cosmos. The 'sun' portrait was taken on a bright September morning, and its partner image, the following October, on the night of a full moon. Female cycles and the importance of time passing during a pregnancy are referenced. Interestingly, bearing in mind that the artist gave birth to a son in November, creating the 'moon' portrait felt like a familiar, empowering and yet isolated expression of selfhood, whilst the 'sun/son' version exuded the energy of a collaboration, and stimulated feelings of joy, liberation and potentiality. By seeming contradiction, the boy was born on a full moon, exactly a month to the day that Guided by the Moon was taken.

  12. Synthesis of novel ICIE16/BSG and ICIE16/BSG-NITRI bioglasses and description of ionic release kinetics upon immersion in SBF fluid: Effect of nitridation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgaz, Felipe; Amat, Daniel; Szycht, Olga; Dzika, Aleksandra; Barba, Flora; Becerra, José; Santos-Ruiz, Leonor

    2015-01-01

    A novel bioactive glass scaffold ICIE16/BSG has been prepared from a mixture of two different melt-derived glasses: a silicate bioglass (ICIE16) and a borosilicate bioglass (BSG). Combined processing techniques (gel casting and foam replication) were used to form three-dimensional, interconnected porous monolith scaffolds (Orgaz et al., 2016) [1]. They were then nitrided with a hot ammonia flow as described in (Aleixandre et al., 1973) [3] and (Nieto, 1984) [4] to synthesize the ICIE16/BSG-NITRI bioglass (Orgaz et al., 2016) [1]. Herein we present a flow chart summarizing the forming process, plus images of the resulting scaffold after sintering and drying. Bioactivity was characterized in vitro by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) for up to seven days. Data of ionic release kinetics upon SBF immersion are presented. PMID:26858981

  13. Synthesis of novel ICIE16/BSG and ICIE16/BSG-NITRI bioglasses and description of ionic release kinetics upon immersion in SBF fluid: Effect of nitridation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Orgaz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel bioactive glass scaffold ICIE16/BSG has been prepared from a mixture of two different melt-derived glasses: a silicate bioglass (ICIE16 and a borosilicate bioglass (BSG. Combined processing techniques (gel casting and foam replication were used to form three-dimensional, interconnected porous monolith scaffolds (Orgaz et al., 2016 [1]. They were then nitrided with a hot ammonia flow as described in (Aleixandre et al., 1973 [3] and (Nieto, 1984 [4] to synthesize the ICIE16/BSG-NITRI bioglass (Orgaz et al., 2016 [1]. Herein we present a flow chart summarizing the forming process, plus images of the resulting scaffold after sintering and drying. Bioactivity was characterized in vitro by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF for up to seven days. Data of ionic release kinetics upon SBF immersion are presented.

  14. 10 years of mapping the icy saturnian satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatsch, Thomas; Kersten, Elke; Matz, Klaus-Dieter; Porco, Carolyn

    2014-05-01

    The Cassini spacecraft started its tour through the Saturnian system in July 2004. The Imaging Science Subsystem onboard the orbiter con-sists of a high-resolution Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) with a focal length of 2000 mm and a Wide Angle Camera (WAC) with a focal length of 200 mm [1]. One of the main objectives of the Cassini mission is to investigate the icy Saturnian satellites. These satellites were imaged in many flybys during the no-minal mission between 2004 and 2008. The imaging campaign continued during the first extended mission (''Equinox mission'') between 2008 and 2010 and continues during the current second extended mission (''Solstice mission''). It is now possible to image also the Northern parts of the Icy satellites which were not illuminated during the nominal mission. Mosaicking: The image data processing chain con-sists of the same steps as described in [2]: radiometric calibration, geometric correction, map projection, and mosaicking. Spacecraft position and camera pointing data are available in the form of SPICE kernels (http://naif.jpl.nasa.gov). While the orbit information is sufficiently accurate to be used directly for mapping purposes, the pointing information must be corrected using limb fits (semi-controlled mosaics) or by photo-grammetric bundle adjustment (controlled mosaics). The coordinate system adopted by the Cassini mis-sion for satellite mapping is the IAU ''planetographic'' system, consisting of planetographic latitude and posi-tive West longitude. The surface position of the prime meridian as defined by the IAU cartography working group [3] is defined by small craters. New values for the rotational parameter W0 which defines the location of the prime meridian at January 1, 2000 were calcula-ted based on the high-resolution mosaics to be consis-tent with this definition [4] and approved by the IAU [3]. Cartographic maps: Three different quadrangle schemes were used for the generation of the maps and the atlases [5]: • A

  15. A Possible Icy Kuiper Belt around HD 181327

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Christine H; Smith, Paul S

    2008-01-01

    We have obtained a Gemini South T-ReCS Qa-band (18.3 micron) image and a Spitzer MIPS SED-mode observation of HD181327, an F5/F6V member of the ~12 Myr old beta Pictoris moving group. We resolve the disk in thermal-emission for the first time and find that the northern arm of the disk is 1.4x brighter than the southern arm. In addition, we detect a broad peak in the combined Spitzer IRS and MIPS spectra at 60 - 75 micron that may be produced by emission from crystalline water ice. We model the IRS and MIPS data using a size distribution of amorphous olivine and water ice grains (dn/da proportional to a^{-2.25} with a_{min} consistent with the minimum blow out size and a_{max} = 20 micron) located at a distance of 86.3 AU from the central star, as observed in previously published scattered-light images. Since the photo-desorption lifetime for the icy particles is ~1400 yr, significantly less than the estimated ~12 Myr age of the system, we hypothesize that we have detected debris that may be steadily replenish...

  16. Life sciences on the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G.

    Despite of the fact that the lunar environment lacks essential prerequisites for supporting life, lunar missions offer new and promising opportunities to the life sciences community. Among the disciplines of interest are exobiology, radiation biology, ecology and human physiology. In exobiology, the Moon offers an ideal platform for studies related to the understanding of the principles, leading to the origin, evolution and distribution of life. These include the analysis of lunar samples and meteorites in relatively pristine conditions, radioastronomical search for other planetary systems or Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI), and studies on the role of radiation in evolutionary processes and on the environmental limits for life. For radiation biology, the Moon provides an unique laboratory with built-in sources for optical as well as ionising radiation to investigate the biological importance of the various components of cosmic and solar radiation. Before establishing a lunar base, precursor missions will provide a characterisation of the radiation field, determination of depth dose distributions in different absorbers, the installation of a solar flare alert system, and a qualification of the biological efficiency of the mixed radiation environment. One of the most challenging projects falls into the domain of ecology with the establishment for the first time of an artificial ecosystem on a celestial body beyond the Earth. From this venture, a better understanding of the dynamics regulating our terrestrial biosphere is expected. It will also serve as a precursor of bioregenerative life support systems for a lunar base. The establishment of a lunar base with eventually long-term human presence will raise various problems in the fields of human physiology and health care, psychology and sociology. Protection guidelines for living in this hostile environment have to be established.

  17. Precoded OFDM System for ICI Mitigation over Time-Frequency Selective Fading Channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Yi; KUANG Linling; LU Jianhua

    2009-01-01

    In orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) systems, the capability to support high mo-bility is greatly limited by the intercarrier interference (ICI) caused by time-frequency selective fading chan-nels. This paper presents a precoded OFDM system for ICI mitigation. A precoder is introduced to relieve the ICI by transmitting N-point composite information symbols at twice the subcarrier interval. A Ha-damard-matrix-like pilot pattern is used to recover the composite information symbols in a postprocessor at the receiver. Simulations show that, compared to the conventional self-cancellation scheme, this scheme gives much better signal-to-interference-noise ratio performance with much less overhead. Furthermore, the scheme can support twice the vehicle speed in time-frequency selective fading channels than the standard OFDM systems without ICI mitigation.

  18. Zooplankton Biomass Data from Prince William Sound, Icy Bay and Yakutat Bay, Alaska 2010-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes zooplankton biomass from Prince William Sound, Icy Bay and Yakutat Bay, Alaska. Zooplankton were sampled with a ring net (0.6 m diameter with...

  19. Common eiders nesting and arctic fox predation at Icy Cape, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report discusses the common eiders nesting and arctic fox predation at Icy Cape, Alaska. Study areas, methods, and results are discussed.

  20. Jupiter internal structure: the effect of different equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, Y.; Guillot, T.; Fayon, L.

    2016-12-01

    Context. Heavy elements, even though they are a smaller constituent, are crucial to understand the formation history of Jupiter. Interior models are used to determine the amount of heavy elements in the interior of Jupiter, but this range is still subject to degeneracies because of the uncertainties in the equations of state. Aims: Before Juno mission data arrive, we present optimized calculations for Jupiter that explore the effect of different model parameters on the determination of the core and the mass of heavy elements of Jupiter. We compare recently published equations of state. Methods: The interior model of Jupiter was calculated from the equations of hydrostatic equilibrium, mass, and energy conservation, and energy transport. The mass of the core and heavy elements was adjusted to match the observed radius and gravitational moments of Jupiter. Results: We show that the determination of the interior structure of Jupiter is tied to the estimation of its gravitational moments and the accuracy of equations of state of hydrogen, helium, and heavy elements. Locating the region where helium rain occurs and defining its timescale is important to determine the distribution of heavy elements and helium in the interior of Jupiter. We show that the differences found when modeling the interior of Jupiter with recent EOS are more likely due to differences in the internal energy and entropy calculation. The consequent changes in the thermal profile lead to different estimates of the mass of the core and heavy elements, which explains differences in recently published interior models of Jupiter. Conclusions: Our results help clarify the reasons for the differences found in interior models of Jupiter and will help interpreting upcoming Juno data. Full appendix tables are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A114