WorldWideScience

Sample records for jupiter encounter dated

  1. Jupiter's Global Winds in Advance of the Juno Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michael H.; Tollefson, Joshua; Simon, Amy A.; Cosentino, Rick; de Pater, Imke; Marcus, Philip; Orton, Glenn S.; Morales-Juberias, Raul; Johnson, Perianne

    2016-10-01

    We use Hubble/WFC3 imaging observations in February 2016 to derive Jupiter's global wind field, the closest wind velocity measurement to Juno's focused atmospheric campaign (November 2016 through January 2017).Using the methods of Asay-Davis et al. (2011, Icarus 211, 1215), we derive zonal wind profiles from Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program data in 2015 and 2016, and from 2009 and 2012 data, all taken at red optical wavelengths with the WFC3/UVIS instrument. Several jets show significant variability in peakspeed over the 2000-2016 time period, while most jets are very stable.We quantify uncertainties in order to determine which changes are significant, and we find a roughly 2x improvement in precision compared to the HST/WFPC2 and Cassini-derived zonal wind profiles in Asay-Davis et al. (2011). Some improvement in precision is likely to be instrumental. The WFC3/UVIS detector better samples the HST point-spread function by about 15% compared to WFPC2, and the larger WFC3/UVIS field of view reduces navigational uncertainty by capturing the entire planetary disk in every image. It is not yet clear whether instrumental effects can explain the entire reduction in uncertainty, which could potentially include time-variable noise due to coherent features (waves, vortices) as well as turbulence. Global variability of this magnitude would be a surprise, since Asay-Davis et al. (2011) found the same level of velocity uncertainty (~11 m/s) in both Cassini data from 2000 and HST/WFPC2 data from 2008.We will generate spatial spectra of kinetic energy and cloud features (in multiple filters), using Fourier transforms of OPAL Jupier imaging data and 2D velocity fields. We will fit composite linear models (Barrado-Izagirre et al. 2009, Icarus 202, 181; Choi and Showman 2011, Icarus 216, 597) to the kinetic energy and cloud albedo spectra, comparing spectral indices to past observations and determining forcing scales.

  2. Tracking and data system support for the Pioneer project. Volume 3: Pioneer 10 from 1 April 1972 through the Jupiter encounter period, January 1974

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    The Tracking and Data Systems support of the Pioneer 10 mission from April 1, 1972 through the Jupiter encounter period which ended January 5, 1974 is described. The period covered involves operations in the interplanetary environment from the time of completion of the second trajectory correction to the start of Jupiter encounter; the implementation, planning, and testing that lead to the Jupiter encounter; and the operations during the 60 day encounter period.

  3. Jupiter radiation test levels and their expected impact on an encounter mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barengoltz, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    The upper limit, of electron and proton fluences for a thermoelectric outer planet spacecraft mission in a near-Jupiter environment, for use as radiation design restraints, were extracted from a model of the Jovian trapped radiation belts. Considerations of radiation effects in semiconductor devices were employed to construct simplified radiation test levels based on the design restraints. Corresponding levels, based on the nominal belt models, are one to three orders of magnitude smaller. In terms of expected radiation-induced degradation in semiconductor devices, an encounter with an environment as severe as the design restraints would require hardening the system in order to guarantee high reliability. On the other hand, the nominal levels would only necessitate care in the selection of components and the avoidance of certain semiconductor components.

  4. Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Penne, Barbra

    2017-01-01

    Our solar system's largest planet is huge enough that all of the system's other planets could fit inside it. Although Jupiter has been known since ancient times, scientists are still learning exciting new information about the planet and its satellites today. In fact, several of its moons are now believed to have oceans below their icy surfaces. Chapters focus on topics such as Jupiter's orbit and rotation, rings, atmosphere, and moons, as well as on the space missions that have helped us get a closer look at the planet and its moons over the past decades.

  5. A 'Moving' Jupiter Global Map (Animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on New Horizons has acquired six global maps of Jupiter as the spacecraft approaches the giant planet for a close encounter at the end of February. The high-resolution camera acquired each of six observation 'sets' as a series of individual pictures taken one hour apart, covering a full 10-hour rotation of Jupiter. The LORRI team at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) reduced the sets to form six individual maps in a simple rectangular projection. These six maps were then combined to make the movie. The table below shows the dates and the ranges from Jupiter at which these six sets of observations were acquired. Even for the latest set of images taken January 21-22, from 60.5 million kilometers (37.6 million miles), New Horizons was still farther from Jupiter than the average distance of Mercury from the Sun. At that distance from Jupiter, a single LORRI picture resolution element amounts to 300 kilometers (186 miles) on Jupiter. Many features seen in Jupiter's atmosphere are giant storm clouds. The Little Red Spot, which LORRI will image close-up on February 27, is the target-like feature located near 30 degrees South and 230 degrees West; this storm is larger than the Earth. The even larger Great Red Spot is seen near 20 degrees South and 320 degrees West. The counterclockwise rotation of the clouds within the Great Red Spot can be seen. The westward drift of the Great Red Spot is easily seen in the movie, as is the slower drift, in the opposite direction, of the Little Red Spot. The storms of Jupiter are not fixed in location relative to each other or relative to any solid surface below, because Jupiter is a fluid planet without a solid surface. Also, dramatic changes are seen in the series of bright plume-like clouds encircling the planet between 0 and 10 degrees North. Scientists believe these result from an enormous atmospheric wave with rising air, rich in ammonia that condenses to form

  6. Jupiter Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for high resolution image of Nature Cover Detailed analysis of two continent-sized storms that erupted in Jupiter's atmosphere in March 2007 shows that Jupiter's internal heat plays a significant role in generating atmospheric disturbances. Understanding these outbreaks could be the key to unlock the mysteries buried in the deep Jovian atmosphere, say astronomers. This visible-light image is from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope taken on May 11, 2007. It shows the turbulent pattern generated by the two plumes on the upper left part of Jupiter. Understanding these phenomena is important for Earth's meteorology where storms are present everywhere and jet streams dominate the atmospheric circulation. Jupiter is a natural laboratory where atmospheric scientists study the nature and interplay of the intense jets and severe atmospheric phenomena. According to the analysis, the bright plumes were storm systems triggered in Jupiter's deep water clouds that moved upward in the atmosphere vi gorously and injected a fresh mixture of ammonia ice and water about 20 miles (30 kilometers) above the visible clouds. The storms moved in the peak of a jet stream in Jupiter's atmosphere at 375 miles per hour (600 kilometers per hour). Models of the disturbance indicate that the jet stream extends deep in the buried atmosphere of Jupiter, more than 60 miles (approximately100 kilometers) below the cloud tops where most sunlight is absorbed.

  7. rosuvastatin (JUPITER)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge; Ridker, Paul M; MacFadyen, Jean G;

    2009-01-01

    were calculated across a range of end points, timeframes, and subgroups using data from Justification for the Use of statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER), a randomized evaluation of rosuvastatin 20 mg versus placebo conducted among 17 802 apparently healthy men...... infarction, stroke, revascularization, or death, the 5-year NNT within JUPITER was 20 (95% CI, 14 to 34). All subgroups had 5-year NNT values for this end point below 50; as examples, 5-year NNT values were 17 for men and 31 for women, 21 for whites and 19 for nonwhites, 18 for those with body mass index 300...

  8. Capture of Irregular Satellites at Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvorny, D; Deienno, R

    2014-01-01

    The irregular satellites of outer planets are thought to have been captured from heliocentric orbits. The exact nature of the capture process, however, remains uncertain. We examine the possibility that irregular satellites were captured from the planetesimal disk during the early Solar System instability when encounters between the outer planets occurred (Nesvorny, Vokrouhlicky & Morbidelli 2007, AJ 133; hereafter NVM07). NVM07 already showed that the irregular satellites of Saturn, Uranus and Neptune were plausibly captured during planetary encounters. Here we find that the current instability models present favorable conditions for capture of irregular satellites at Jupiter as well, mainly because Jupiter undergoes a phase of close encounters with an ice giant. We show that the orbital distribution of bodies captured during planetary encounters provides a good match to the observed distribution of irregular satellites at Jupiter. The capture efficiency for each particle in the original transplanetary d...

  9. Voyager-Jupiter radio science data papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, G. S.; Wood, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    The reduction and interpretation of the radio science data from the Voyager 1 and 2 encounters of the planet Jupiter and its satellites resulted in the preparation of several papers for publication in the special Voyager-Jupiter issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research. The radio science and tracking systems of the Deep Space Network provide the data which makes this research possible. This article lists submitted papers by title, with their authors and with abstracts of their contents.

  10. Encountering Materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    2016-01-01

    DHT researcher Connie Svabo and artist Charlotte Grum did a joint performance presentation titled Becoming Sheep, Becoming Animal at the international conference Encountering Materiality – Transdisciplinary Conversations, held in Geneve, Schwitzerland, June 23-25 2016.......DHT researcher Connie Svabo and artist Charlotte Grum did a joint performance presentation titled Becoming Sheep, Becoming Animal at the international conference Encountering Materiality – Transdisciplinary Conversations, held in Geneve, Schwitzerland, June 23-25 2016....

  11. Encountering Materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    2016-01-01

    DHT researcher Connie Svabo and artist Charlotte Grum did a joint performance presentation titled Becoming Sheep, Becoming Animal at the international conference Encountering Materiality – Transdisciplinary Conversations, held in Geneve, Schwitzerland, June 23-25 2016.......DHT researcher Connie Svabo and artist Charlotte Grum did a joint performance presentation titled Becoming Sheep, Becoming Animal at the international conference Encountering Materiality – Transdisciplinary Conversations, held in Geneve, Schwitzerland, June 23-25 2016....

  12. Cosmopolitan encounters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plage, Stefanie; Willing, Indigo; Woodward, Ian

    2017-01-01

    This study contributes to the growing research on everyday cosmopolitanism in diverse societies. We employ a cosmopolitan encounters framework to explore the reflexive openness people perform and the ethical reasoning they draw on to get along with each other. In particular, we look beyond pleasu...

  13. The Role of Solar Neutrinos in the Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Burov, Valery

    2008-01-01

    Judging from the fact that the planet Jupiter is bigger in size than the Earth by 10^3 while is smaller than the Sun by 10^3 and that the average distance of the Jupiter from the Sun is 5.203 a.u., the solar neutrinos, when encounter the Jupiter, may have some accumulating effects bigger than on the Earth. We begin by estimating how much energy/power carried by solar neutrinos get transferred by this unique process, to confirm that solar neutrinos, despite of their feeble neutral weak current interactions, might deposit enough energy in the Jupiter. We also speculate on the other remarkable effects.

  14. The meteorology of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, A. P.

    1976-01-01

    From the point of view of meteorology the most important differences between Jupiter and the earth are related to the fact that Jupiter has an appreciable internal energy source and probably lacks a solid surface. The composition and vertical structure of the Jovian atmosphere is considered along with the composition of Jovian cloud particles, turbulence in Jupiter's atmosphere, data on the horizontal structure and motions of the atmosphere, and questions related to the longevity of Jupiter's clouds. Attention is given to the barotropic characteristics of Jupiter's atmosphere, the radiation balance in the atmosphere of the earth and of Jupiter, and studies of the Great Red Spot.

  15. A fireball in Jupiter's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, A. F.; Duxbury, T. C.

    1981-01-01

    One fireball was photographed during two encounters with Jupiter. Its total luminosity was 120,000 0 mag s (at standard range 100 km). If the luminous efficiency proposed by Cook et al. (1981) for slip flow of a meteoroid in its own vapors is employed, an estimated mass of 11 kg is obtained. A rough absolute magnitude is -12.5. If it is noted that the search was conducted for a total of 223 s during two exposures, a number density near Jupiter of 10 to the -28th/cu cm is estimated for masses of meteoroids of 3 kg and greater. This value is about a factor of six smaller than a rough upper limit reached from an extrapolation from terrestrial observations of meteors and comets.

  16. Rings from Close Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Weve recently discovered narrow sets of rings around two minor planets orbiting in our solar system. How did these rings form? A new study shows that they could be a result of close encounters between the minor planets and giants like Jupiter or Neptune.Unexpected Ring SystemsPositions of the centaurs in our solar system (green). Giant planets (red), Jupiter trojans (grey), scattered disk objects (tan) and Kuiper belt objects (blue) are also shown. [WilyD]Centaurs are minor planets in our solar system that orbit between Jupiter and Neptune. These bodies of which there are roughly 44,000 with diameters larger than 1 km have dynamically unstable orbits that cross paths with those of one or more giant planets.Recent occultation observations of two centaurs, 10199 Chariklo and 2060 Chiron, revealed that these bodies both host narrow ring systems. Besides our four giant planets, Chariklo and Chiron are the only other bodies in the solar system known to have rings. But how did these rings form?Scientists have proposed several models, implicating collisions, disruption of a primordial satellite, or dusty outgassing. But a team of scientists led by Ryuki Hyodo (Paris Institute of Earth Physics, Kobe University) has recently proposed an alternative scenario: what if the rings were formed from partial disruption of the centaur itself, after it crossed just a little too close to a giant planet?Tidal Forces from a GiantHyodo and collaborators first used past studies of centaur orbits to estimate that roughly 10% of centaurs experience close encounters (passing within a distance of ~2x the planetary radius) with a giant planet during their million-year lifetime. The team then performed a series of simulations of close encounters between a giant planet and a differentiated centaur a body in which the rocky material has sunk to form a dense silicate core, surrounded by an icy mantle.Some snapshots of simulation outcomes (click for a closer look!) for different initial states of

  17. Jupiter: Cosmic Jekyll and Hyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazier, Kevin R

    2016-01-01

    It has been widely reported that Jupiter has a profound role in shielding the terrestrial planets from comet impacts in the Solar System, and that a jovian planet is a requirement for the evolution of life on Earth. To evaluate whether jovians, in fact, shield habitable planets from impacts (a phenomenon often referred to as the "Jupiter as shield" concept), this study simulated the evolution of 10,000 particles in each of the jovian inter-planet gaps for the cases of full-mass and embryo planets for up to 100 My. The results of these simulations predict a number of phenomena that not only discount the "Jupiter as shield" concept, they also predict that in a Solar System like ours, large gas giants like Saturn and Jupiter had a different, and potentially even more important, role in the evolution of life on our planet by delivering the volatile-laden material required for the formation of life. The simulations illustrate that, although all particles occupied "non-life threatening" orbits at their onset of the simulations, a significant fraction of the 30,000 particles evolved into Earth-crossing orbits. A comparison of multiple runs with different planetary configurations revealed that Jupiter was responsible for the vast majority of the encounters that "kicked" outer planet material into the terrestrial planet region, and that Saturn assisted in the process far more than has previously been acknowledged. Jupiter also tends to "fix" the aphelion of planetesimals at its orbit irrespective of their initial starting zones, which has the effect of slowing their passages through the inner Solar System, and thus potentially improving the odds of accretion of cometary material by terrestrial planets. As expected, the simulations indicate that the full-mass planets perturb many objects into the deep outer Solar System, or eject them entirely; however, planetary embryos also did this with surprising efficiency. Finally, the simulations predict that Jupiter's capacity to

  18. Orbital Perturbations of the Galilean Satellites During Planetary Encounters

    CERN Document Server

    Deienno, R; Vokrouhlicky, D; Yokoyama, T

    2014-01-01

    The Nice model of the dynamical instability and migration of the giant planets can explain many properties of the present Solar System, and can be used to constrain its early architecture. In the jumping-Jupiter version of the Nice model, required from the terrestrial planet constraint and dynamical structure of the asteroid belt, Jupiter has encounters with an ice giant. Here we study the survival of the Galilean satellites in the jumping-Jupiter model. This is an important concern because the ice-giant encounters, if deep enough, could dynamically perturb the orbits of the Galilean satellites, and lead to implausible results. We performed numerical integrations where we tracked the effect of planetary encounters on the Galilean moons. We considered three instability cases from Nesvorny & Morbidelli (2012) that differed in the number and distribution of encounters. We found that in one case, where the number of close encounters was relatively small, the Galilean satellite orbits were not significantly af...

  19. Moving Encounters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Deslandes

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay explores my experience of losing an authoritative speaking position – that is, ‘falling on my face’ in a research encounter with the Brazilian Landless Worker’s Movement (O Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais sem Terra, or MST.  My specific movements through this locale invoke Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak’s concept of ‘unlearning one’s privilege as a loss’; and Sara Ahmed’s theory of ‘stranger fetishism’.  In writing my brief loss, I also; of course, recover my speaking position, meaning that I can always efface the loss by re-writing it as a source of ethnographic authority.  This essay is written in two voices in order to reflect this paradox: one which describes the encounter, and one that critically ruminates upon it.  I note, for example, that the MST as a variegated conglomerate of people takes the form of particular ‘Others’ when they are represented in the scholarship and polemic of ‘first world’ activists in the so called ‘global justice movement’.  ‘Falling on my face in the street’ of these Others locates particular processes of fetishization within the global justice movement and the relationships across power and difference that are contained herein; processes that impact on the idea of a ‘global’ solidarity against systemic ‘global’ oppressions.

  20. Jupiter's moon Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows a special color reconstruction of one of the erupting volcanos on Io discovered by Voyager 1 during its encounter with Jupiter on the 4th and 5th of March. The picture was taken March 4 about 5:00 p.m. from a range of about half a million kilometers showing an eruption region on the horizon. This method of color analysis allows scientists to combine data from four pictures, taken in ultraviolet, blue, green and orange light. In this picture one can see the strong change in color of the erupting plume. The region that is brighter in ultraviolet light (blue in this image) is much more extensive than the denser, bright yellow region near the center of the eruption. Scientists will use data of this type to study the amount of gas and dust in the eruption and the size of dust particles. Preliminary analysis suggests that the bright ultraviolet part of the cloud may be due to scattered light from very fine particles (the same effect which makes smoke appear bluish).

  1. 76 FR 24513 - Public Land Order No. 7765; Partial Revocation Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse Withdrawal; Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... Bureau of Land Management Public Land Order No. 7765; Partial Revocation Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse... Management to continue to be managed as part of the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse Outstanding Natural Area. DATES... Resource Act of 2008 (43 U.S.C. 1787), which created the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse Outstanding Natural...

  2. Capture of irregular satellites at Jupiter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesvorný, David; Vokrouhlický, David; Deienno, Rogerio [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2014-03-20

    The irregular satellites of outer planets are thought to have been captured from heliocentric orbits. The exact nature of the capture process, however, remains uncertain. We examine the possibility that irregular satellites were captured from the planetesimal disk during the early solar system instability when encounters between the outer planets occurred. Nesvorný et al. already showed that the irregular satellites of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune were plausibly captured during planetary encounters. Here we find that the current instability models present favorable conditions for capture of irregular satellites at Jupiter as well, mainly because Jupiter undergoes a phase of close encounters with an ice giant. We show that the orbital distribution of bodies captured during planetary encounters provides a good match to the observed distribution of irregular satellites at Jupiter. The capture efficiency for each particle in the original transplanetary disk is found to be (1.3-3.6) × 10{sup –8}. This is roughly enough to explain the observed population of jovian irregular moons. We also confirm Nesvorný et al.'s results for the irregular satellites of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.

  3. Capture of Trojans by Jumping Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvorny, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Jupiter Trojans are thought to be survivors of a much larger population of planetesimals that existed in the planetary region when planets formed. They can provide important constraints on the mass and properties of the planetesimal disk, and its dispersal during planet migration. Here we tested a possibility that the Trojans were captured during the early dynamical instability among the outer planets (aka the Nice model), when the semimajor axis of Jupiter was changing as a result of scattering encounters with an ice giant. The capture occurs in this model when Jupiter's orbit and its Lagrange points become radially displaced in a scattering event and fall into a region populated by planetesimals (that previously evolved from their natal transplanetary disk to ~5 AU during the instability). Our numerical simulations of the new capture model, hereafter jump capture, satisfactorily reproduce the orbital distribution of the Trojans and their total mass. The jump capture is potentially capable of explaining the ...

  4. Jupiter System Observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senske, Dave; Kwok, Johnny

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the proposed mission for the Jupiter System Observer. The presentation also includes overviews of the mission timeline, science goals, and spacecraftspecifications for the satellite.

  5. Voyage to Jupiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, David; Samz, Jane

    This publication illustrates the features of Jupiter and its family of satellites pictured by the Pioneer and the Voyager missions. Chapters included are: (1) "The Jovian System" (describing the history of astronomy); (2) "Pioneers to Jupiter" (outlining the Pioneer Mission); (3) "The Voyager Mission"; (4)…

  6. Orbital perturbations of the Galilean satellites during planetary encounters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deienno, Rogerio; Nesvorný, David [Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO (United States); Vokrouhlický, David [Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Yokoyama, Tadashi, E-mail: rogerio.deienno@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-01

    The Nice model of the dynamical instability and migration of the giant planets can explain many properties of the present solar system, and can be used to constrain its early architecture. In the jumping-Jupiter version of the Nice model, required from the terrestrial planet constraint and dynamical structure of the asteroid belt, Jupiter has encounters with an ice giant. Here, we study the survival of the Galilean satellites in the jumping-Jupiter model. This is an important concern because the ice-giant encounters, if deep enough, could dynamically perturb the orbits of the Galilean satellites and lead to implausible results. We performed numerical integrations where we tracked the effect of planetary encounters on the Galilean moons. We considered three instability cases from Nesvorný and Morbidelli that differed in the number and distribution of encounters. We found that in one case, where the number of close encounters was relatively small, the Galilean satellite orbits were not significantly affected. In the other two, the orbital eccentricities of all moons were excited by encounters, Callisto's semimajor axis changed, and, in a large fraction of trials, the Laplace resonance of the inner three moons was disrupted. The subsequent evolution by tides damps eccentricities and can recapture the moons in the Laplace resonance. A more important constraint is represented by the orbital inclinations of the moons, which can be excited during the encounters and not appreciably damped by tides. We find that one instability case taken from Nesvorný and Morbidelli clearly does not meet this constraint. This shows how the regular satellites of Jupiter can be used to set limits on the properties of encounters in the jumping-Jupiter model, and help us to better understand how the early solar system evolved.

  7. Orbital Perturbations of the Galilean Satellites during Planetary Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deienno, Rogerio; Nesvorný, David; Vokrouhlický, David; Yokoyama, Tadashi

    2014-08-01

    The Nice model of the dynamical instability and migration of the giant planets can explain many properties of the present solar system, and can be used to constrain its early architecture. In the jumping-Jupiter version of the Nice model, required from the terrestrial planet constraint and dynamical structure of the asteroid belt, Jupiter has encounters with an ice giant. Here, we study the survival of the Galilean satellites in the jumping-Jupiter model. This is an important concern because the ice-giant encounters, if deep enough, could dynamically perturb the orbits of the Galilean satellites and lead to implausible results. We performed numerical integrations where we tracked the effect of planetary encounters on the Galilean moons. We considered three instability cases from Nesvorný & Morbidelli that differed in the number and distribution of encounters. We found that in one case, where the number of close encounters was relatively small, the Galilean satellite orbits were not significantly affected. In the other two, the orbital eccentricities of all moons were excited by encounters, Callisto's semimajor axis changed, and, in a large fraction of trials, the Laplace resonance of the inner three moons was disrupted. The subsequent evolution by tides damps eccentricities and can recapture the moons in the Laplace resonance. A more important constraint is represented by the orbital inclinations of the moons, which can be excited during the encounters and not appreciably damped by tides. We find that one instability case taken from Nesvorný & Morbidelli clearly does not meet this constraint. This shows how the regular satellites of Jupiter can be used to set limits on the properties of encounters in the jumping-Jupiter model, and help us to better understand how the early solar system evolved.

  8. Jupiter Environment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Erick J.; Monahue, Kenneth M.; Biehl, James P.; Kokorowski, Michael; Ngalande, Cedrick,; Boedeker, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    The Jupiter Environment Tool (JET) is a custom UI plug-in for STK that provides an interface to Jupiter environment models for visualization and analysis. Users can visualize the different magnetic field models of Jupiter through various rendering methods, which are fully integrated within STK s 3D Window. This allows users to take snapshots and make animations of their scenarios with magnetic field visualizations. Analytical data can be accessed in the form of custom vectors. Given these custom vectors, users have access to magnetic field data in custom reports, graphs, access constraints, coverage analysis, and anywhere else vectors are used within STK.

  9. Moons around Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) took this photo of Jupiter at 20:42:01 UTC on January 9, 2007, when the spacecraft was 80 million kilometers (49.6 million miles) from the giant planet. The volcanic moon Io is to the left of the planet; the shadow of the icy moon Ganymede moves across Jupiter's northern hemisphere. Ganymede's average orbit distance from Jupiter is about 1 million kilometers (620,000 miles); Io's is 422,000 kilometers (262,000 miles). Both Io and Ganymede are larger than Earth's moon; Ganymede is larger than the planet Mercury.

  10. Jupiter Laser Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Jupiter Laser Facility is an institutional user facility in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate at LLNL. The facility is designed to provide a high degree...

  11. Inferno on Jupiter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    诸葛勤

    1994-01-01

    The initial sketchy reports began filtering into the U. S. by E-maillate Saturday afternoon. First a Spanish observatory announced that it hadspotted a plume of gas billowing up from the edge of Jupiter. Then a

  12. Longitudinal Variations in Jupiter's Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Gierasch, P. J.; Tierney, G.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term studies of Jupiter's zonal wind field revealed temporal variations on the order of 20 to 40 m/s at many latitudes, greater than the typical data uncertainties of 1 to 10 m/s. No definitive periodicities were evident, however, though some latitudinally-confined signals did appear at periods relevant to the Quasi- Quadrennial Oscillation (Simon-Miller & Gierasch, Icarus, in press). As the QQO appears, from vertical temperature profiles, to propagate downward, it is unclear why a signal is not more obvious, unless other processes dominate over possibly weaker forcing from the QQO. An additional complication is that zonal wind profiles represent an average over some particular set of longitudes for an image pair and most data sets do not offer global wind coverage. Lien avoiding known features, such as the large anticyclonic vortices especially prevalent in the south, there can be distinct variations in longitude. We present results on the full wind field from Voyager and Cassini data, showing apparent longitudinal variations of up to 60 m/s or more. These are particularly obvious near disruptions such as the South Equatorial Disturbance, even when the feature itself is not clearly visible. These two dates represent very different states of the planet for comparison: Voyagers 1 & 2 flew by Jupiter shortly after a global upheaval, while many regions were in a disturbed state, while the Cassini view is typical of a more quiescent period present during much of the 1990s and early 2000s.

  13. Jupiter's Dynamic Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, M. F.; Bunce, E. J.; Kronberg, E. A.; Jackman, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Jupiter's magnetosphere is a highly dynamic environment. Hundreds of reconnection events have been identified in Jupiter's magnetotail through analysis of magnetic field and particle measurements collected by the Galileo spacecraft. Quasi-periodic behavior, suggestive of reconnection, has been intermittently observed on a ~2-3 day time scale in several data sets, including magnetic field dipolarizations, flow bursts, auroral polar dawn spots, and the hectometric radio emission. In this paper we review the present state of knowledge of Jovian magnetospheric dynamics. Throughout the discussion, we highlight similarities and differences to Saturn's magnetosphere. For example, recent analysis of plasmoid signatures at both Jupiter and Saturn has established the role of tail reconnection in the overall mass and flux transport in the outer planet magnetospheres. The results for both Jupiter and Saturn suggest that the observed mass loss rate due to tail reconnection and plasmoid release is insufficient to account for the mass input rate from the moons Io and Enceladus, respectively. We also present new analysis in which we use the Michigan mSWiM propagated solar wind MHD model to estimate the solar wind conditions upstream of Jupiter. This information allows us to determine whether reconnection events occur preferentially during certain solar wind conditions, or whether there is evidence that the solar wind modulates the quasi-periodicity seen in the field dipolarizations and flow bursts.

  14. Jupiter - friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, J.; Jones, B. W.

    2007-08-01

    Throughout both popular science and academia, there is a pervasive belief that Jupiter has acted as a celestial shield, reducing the impact rate on the Earth, and making the planet a significantly more conducive site for the evolution and survival of life. This old idea has, however, undergone little detailed scrutiny. In the first of a series of studies aimed at a better understanding of this idea, we examine the variation in the impact rate on the Earth which results from bodies moving inwards from the Edgeworth- Kuiper belt as a function of the mass of a giant planet in Jupiter's orbit. The results are not entirely what would be expected under the "Jupiter Shield" paradigm.

  15. Sharpening Up Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    New image-correction technique delivers sharpest whole-planet ground-based picture ever A record two-hour observation of Jupiter using a superior technique to remove atmospheric blur has produced the sharpest whole-planet picture ever taken from the ground. The series of 265 snapshots obtained with the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics Demonstrator (MAD) prototype instrument mounted on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) reveal changes in Jupiter's smog-like haze, probably in response to a planet-wide upheaval more than a year ago. Sharpening Up Jupiter ESO PR Photo 33/08 Sharpening Up Jupiter Being able to correct wide field images for atmospheric distortions has been the dream of scientists and engineers for decades. The new images of Jupiter prove the value of the advanced technology used by MAD, which uses two or more guide stars instead of one as references to remove the blur caused by atmospheric turbulence over a field of view thirty times larger than existing techniques [1]. "This type of adaptive optics has a big advantage for looking at large objects, such as planets, star clusters or nebulae," says lead researcher Franck Marchis, from UC Berkeley and the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, USA. "While regular adaptive optics provides excellent correction in a small field of view, MAD provides good correction over a larger area of sky. And in fact, were it not for MAD, we would not have been able to perform these amazing observations." MAD allowed the researchers to observe Jupiter for almost two hours on 16 and 17 August 2008, a record duration, according to the observing team. Conventional adaptive optics systems using a single Jupiter moon as reference cannot monitor Jupiter for so long because the moon moves too far from the planet. The Hubble Space Telescope cannot observe Jupiter continuously for more than about 50 minutes, because its view is regularly blocked by the Earth during Hubble's 96-minute orbit. Using MAD, ESO astronomer Paola Amico

  16. Understanding Jupiter's Interior

    CERN Document Server

    Militzer, Burkhard; Wahl, Sean M; Hubbard, William

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of how models of giant planet interiors are constructed. We review measurements from past space missions that provide constraints for the interior structure of Jupiter. We discuss typical three-layer interior models that consist of a dense central core and an inner metallic and an outer molecular hydrogen-helium layer. These models rely heavily on experiments, analytical theory, and first-principle computer simulations of hydrogen and helium to understand their behavior up to the extreme pressures ~10 Mbar and temperatures ~10,000 K. We review the various equations of state used in Jupiter models and compare them with shock wave experiments. We discuss the possibility of helium rain, core erosion and double diffusive convection may have important consequences for the structure and evolution of giant planets. In July 2016 the Juno spacecraft entered orbit around Jupiter, promising high-precision measurements of the gravitational field that will allow us to test our understandi...

  17. Jupiter's Rings: Sharpest View

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft took the best images of Jupiter's charcoal-black rings as it approached and then looked back at Jupiter. The top image was taken on approach, showing three well-defined lanes of gravel- to boulder-sized material composing the bulk of the rings, as well as lesser amounts of material between the rings. New Horizons snapped the lower image after it had passed Jupiter on February 28, 2007, and looked back in a direction toward the sun. The image is sharply focused, though it appears fuzzy due to the cloud of dust-sized particles enveloping the rings. The dust is brightly illuminated in the same way the dust on a dirty windshield lights up when you drive toward a 'low' sun. The narrow rings are confined in their orbits by small 'shepherding' moons.

  18. A Preliminary Jupiter Model

    CERN Document Server

    Hubbard, W B

    2016-01-01

    In anticipation of new observational results for Jupiter's axial moment of inertia and gravitational zonal harmonic coefficients from the forthcoming Juno orbiter, we present a number of preliminary Jupiter interior models. We combine results from ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures, including immiscibility calculations, with a new nonperturbative calculation of Jupiter's zonal harmonic coefficients, to derive a self-consistent model for the planet's external gravity and moment of inertia. We assume helium rain modified the interior temperature and composition profiles. Our calculation predicts zonal harmonic values to which measurements can be compared. Although some models fit the observed (pre-Juno) second- and fourth-order zonal harmonics to within their error bars, our preferred reference model predicts a fourth-order zonal harmonic whose absolute value lies above the pre-Juno error bars. This model has a dense core of about 12 Earth masses, and a hydrogen-helium-rich envelope with...

  19. A Preliminary Jupiter Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Militzer, B.

    2016-03-01

    In anticipation of new observational results for Jupiter's axial moment of inertia and gravitational zonal harmonic coefficients from the forthcoming Juno orbiter, we present a number of preliminary Jupiter interior models. We combine results from ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures, including immiscibility calculations, with a new nonperturbative calculation of Jupiter's zonal harmonic coefficients, to derive a self-consistent model for the planet's external gravity and moment of inertia. We assume helium rain modified the interior temperature and composition profiles. Our calculation predicts zonal harmonic values to which measurements can be compared. Although some models fit the observed (pre-Juno) second- and fourth-order zonal harmonics to within their error bars, our preferred reference model predicts a fourth-order zonal harmonic whose absolute value lies above the pre-Juno error bars. This model has a dense core of about 12 Earth masses and a hydrogen-helium-rich envelope with approximately three times solar metallicity.

  20. Jupiter Oxygen Corporation/Albany Research Center Crada Progress Report, September

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Paul C.; Schoenfield, Mark (Jupiter Oxygen Corp.)

    2004-09-13

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) has developed a new Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR) process for fossil-fueled boilers. Pursuant to a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) with Jupiter Oxygen Corporation, ARC currently is studying the IPR process as applied to the oxygen fuel technology developed by Jupiter. As discussed further below, these two new technologies are complementary. This interim report summarizes the study results to date and outlines the potential activities under the next phase of the CRADA with Jupiter.

  1. Jupiter's Big Bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kim A.

    1994-01-01

    Collision of a comet with Jupiter beginning July 16, 1994 will be observed by astronomers worldwide, with computerized information relayed to a center at the University of Maryland, financed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and National Science Foundation. Geologists and paleontologists also hope to learn more about earth's…

  2. Radiation belts of jupiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansberry, K G; White, R S

    1973-12-07

    Predictions of Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts are based mainly on decimeter observations of 1966 and 1968. Extensive calculations modeling radial diffusion of particles inward from the solar wind and electron synchrotron radiation are used to relate the predictions and observations.

  3. A Transiting Jupiter Analog

    CERN Document Server

    Kipping, David M; Henze, Chris; Teachey, Alex; Isaacson, Howard T; Petigura, Erik A; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Buchhave, Lars A; Chen, Jingjing; Bryson, Steve T; Sandford, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Decadal-long radial velocity surveys have recently started to discover analogs to the most influential planet of our solar system, Jupiter. Detecting and characterizing these worlds is expected to shape our understanding of our uniqueness in the cosmos. Despite the great successes of recent transit surveys, Jupiter analogs represent a terra incognita, owing to the strong intrinsic bias of this method against long orbital periods. We here report on the first validated transiting Jupiter analog, Kepler-167e (KOI-490.02), discovered using Kepler archival photometry orbiting the K4-dwarf KIC-3239945. With a radius of $(0.91\\pm0.02)$ $R_{\\mathrm{Jup}}$, a low orbital eccentricity ($0.06_{-0.04}^{+0.10}$) and an equilibrium temperature of $(131\\pm3)$ K, Kepler-167e bears many of the basic hallmarks of Jupiter. Kepler-167e is accompanied by three Super-Earths on compact orbits, which we also validate, leaving a large cavity of transiting worlds around the habitable-zone. With two transits and continuous photometric ...

  4. HUBBLE PROVIDES COMPLETE VIEW OF JUPITER'S AURORAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    . Scientists are comparing the Hubble telescope images with measurements taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft of Jupiter's magnetic field and co-rotating charged particles. They believe the data will help them understand the production of Jupiter's auroras. Both auroras clearly show vapor trails of light left by Io. These vapor trails are the white, comet-shaped streaks just outside both auroral ovals. These streaks are not part of the auroral ovals. They are caused when an invisible electrical current of charged particles (equal to about 1 million amperes), ejected from Io, flow along Jupiter's magnetic field lines to the planets north and south magnetic poles. This enormous current produces a bright but localized aurora where it enters Jupiter's atmosphere at both magnetic poles. The brightest part of both emissions (on the left in both images) pinpoints where Io's magnetic field lines leave its footprint on the planet. The trail of light following both emissions extends to the right all the way to Jupiter's edge and represents the most sensitive detection of ultraviolet emissions from Jupiter to date. These emissions are related to magnetically trapped ions and electrons that are carried by Jupiter's magnetic field along Io's orbital path, and some of these charged particles continue to be driven down into Jupiter's atmosphere for several hours after Io has passed by. The images were taken Sept. 20, 1997. The artificial colors used here have been constructed by combining images taken in two different ultraviolet band passes, with one ultraviolet color presented as blue and the other as red. In this color representation, the planet's reflected sunlight appears brown, while the auroral emissions appear white or shades of blue or red. Credits: John Clarke (University of Michigan), and NASA Co-investigators: Joe Ajello, Kent Tobiska, and John Trauger (NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory) Gilda Ballester (University of Michigan) Lotfi Ben jaffel (IAP Paris) Jack Connerney (NASA

  5. Polarized Light from Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    These images taken through the wide angle camera near closest approach in the deep near-infrared methane band, combined with filters which sense electromagnetic radiation of orthogonal polarization, show that the light from the poles is polarized. That is, the poles appear bright in one image, and dark in the other. Polarized light is most readily scattered by aerosols. These images indicate that the aerosol particles at Jupiter's poles are small and likely consist of aggregates of even smaller particles, whereas the particles at the equator and covering the Great Red Spot are larger. Images like these will allow scientists to ascertain the distribution, size and shape of aerosols, and consequently, the distribution of heat, in Jupiter's atmosphere.

  6. Jupiter's Water Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    When the twin Voyager spacecraft cruised past Jupiter in 1979, they did more than rewrite the textbooks on the giant planet. Their cameras also unveiled the astounding diversity of the four planet-size moons of ice and stone known as the Galilean satellites. The Voyagers revealed the cratered countenance of Callisto, the valleys and ridges of Ganymede, the cracked face of Europa, and the spewing volcanoes of Io. But it would take a spacecraft named for Italian scientist Galileo, who discovered the moons in 1610, to reveal the true complexity of these worlds and to begin to divulge their interior secrets. Incredibly, the Galileo data strongly suggest that Jupiter's three large icy moons (all but rocky Io) hide interior oceans.

  7. A PRELIMINARY JUPITER MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, W. B. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Militzer, B. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    In anticipation of new observational results for Jupiter's axial moment of inertia and gravitational zonal harmonic coefficients from the forthcoming Juno orbiter, we present a number of preliminary Jupiter interior models. We combine results from ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen–helium mixtures, including immiscibility calculations, with a new nonperturbative calculation of Jupiter's zonal harmonic coefficients, to derive a self-consistent model for the planet's external gravity and moment of inertia. We assume helium rain modified the interior temperature and composition profiles. Our calculation predicts zonal harmonic values to which measurements can be compared. Although some models fit the observed (pre-Juno) second- and fourth-order zonal harmonics to within their error bars, our preferred reference model predicts a fourth-order zonal harmonic whose absolute value lies above the pre-Juno error bars. This model has a dense core of about 12 Earth masses and a hydrogen–helium-rich envelope with approximately three times solar metallicity.

  8. Jupiter's Grand Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batygin, Konstantin

    2017-06-01

    The statistics of extrasolar planetary systems indicate that the default mode of planetary formation generates planets with orbital periods shorter than 100 days, and masses substantially exceeding that of the Earth. When viewed in this context, the Solar System, which contains no planets interior to Mercury's 88-day orbit, is unusual. Extra-solar planetary detection surveys also suggest that planets with masses and periods broadly similar to Jupiter's are somewhat uncommon, with occurrence fraction of less than ~ 10%. In this talk, I will present calculations which show that a popular formation scenario for Jupiter and Saturn, in which Jupiter migrates inward from a > 5AU to a ˜ 1.5 AU and then reverses direction, can explain the low overall mass of the Solar System's terrestrial planets, as well as the absence of planets with a 10 - 100 km planetesimals into low- order mean-motion resonances, shepherding of order 10 Earth masses of this material into the a ˜ 1 AU region while exciting substantial orbital eccentricity (e ˜ 0.2 - 0.4). We argue that under these conditions, a collisional cascade will ensue, generating a planetesimal disk that would have flushed any preexisting short-period super-Earth-like planets into the Sun. In this scenario, the Solar System's terrestrial planets formed from gas-starved mass-depleted debris that remained after the primary period of dynamical evolution.

  9. Voyager picture of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Voyager 1 took this picture of the planet Jupiter on Saturday, Jan. 6, the first in its three-month-long, close-up investigation of the largest planet. The spacecraft, flying toward a March 5 closest approach, was 35.8 million miles (57.6 million kilometers) from Jupiter and 371.7 million miles (598.2 million kilometers) from Earth when the picture was taken. As the Voyager cameras begin their meteorological surveillance of Jupiter, they reveal a dynamic atmosphere with more convective structure than had previously been thought. While the smallest atmospheric features seen in this picture are still as large as 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) across, Voyager will be able to detect individual storm systems as small as 3 miles (5 kilometers) at closest approach. The Great Red Spot can be seen near the limb at the far right. Most of the other features are too small to be seen in terrestrial telescopes. This picture was transmitted to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory through the Deep Space Network's tracking station at Madrid, Spain. The Voyager Project is managed for NASA by Caltech's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  10. Tilting Saturn without tilting Jupiter: Constraints on giant planet migration

    CERN Document Server

    Brasser, R

    2015-01-01

    The migration and encounter histories of the giant planets in our Solar System can be constrained by the obliquities of Jupiter and Saturn. We have performed secular simulations with imposed migration and N-body simulations with planetesimals to study the expected obliquity distribution of migrating planets with initial conditions resembling those of the smooth migration model, the resonant Nice model and two models with five giant planets initially in resonance (one compact and one loose configuration). For smooth migration, the secular spin-orbit resonance mechanism can tilt Saturn's spin axis to the current obliquity if the product of the migration time scale and the orbital inclinations is sufficiently large (exceeding 30 Myr deg). For the resonant Nice model with imposed migration, it is difficult to reproduce today's obliquity values, because the compactness of the initial system raises the frequency that tilts Saturn above the spin precession frequency of Jupiter, causing a Jupiter spin-orbit resonance...

  11. Voyager 2 Jupiter Eruption Movie

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This movie records an eruptive event in the southern hemisphere of Jupiter over a period of 8 Jupiter days. Prior to the event, an undistinguished oval cloud mass cruised through the turbulent atmosphere. The eruption occurs over avery short time at the very center of the cloud. The white eruptive material is swirled about by the internal wind patterns of the cloud. As a result of the eruption, the cloud then becomes a type of feature seen elsewhere on Jupiter known as 'spaghetti bowls'.As Voyager 2 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 8 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). These images were acquired in the Violet filter around May 6, 1979. The spacecraft was about 50 million kilometers from Jupiter at that time.This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  12. Jupiter small satellite montage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    A montage of images of the small inner moons of Jupiter from the camera onboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft shows the best views obtained of these moons during Galileo's 11th orbit around the giant planet in November 1997. At that point, Galileo was completing its first two years in Jupiter orbit--known as the Galileo 'prime mission'--and was about to embark on a successful two-year extension, called the Galileo Europa Mission. The top two images show the moon Thebe. Thebe rotates by approximately 50 degrees between the time these two images were taken, so that the same prominent impact crater is seen in both views; this crater, which has been given the provisional name Zethus, is near the point on Thebe that faces permanently away from Jupiter. The next two images show the moon Amalthea; they were taken with the Sun directly behind the observer, an alignment that emphasizes patterns of intrinsically bright or dark surface material. The third image from the top is a view of Amalthea's leading side, the side of the moon that 'leads' as Amalthea moves in its orbit around Jupiter. This image looks 'noisy' because it was obtained serendipitously during an observation of the Jovian satellite Io (Amalthea and Io shared the same camera frame but the image was exposed for bright Io rather than for the much darker Amalthea). The fourth image from the top emphasizes prominent 'spots' of relatively bright material that are located near the point on Amalthea that faces permanently away from Jupiter. The bottom image is a view of the tiny moon Metis. In all the images, north is approximately up, and the moons are shown in their correct relative sizes. The images are, from top to bottom: Thebe taken on November 7, 1997 at a range of 504,000 kilometers (about 313,000 miles); Thebe on November 7, 1997 at a range of 548,000 kilometers (about 340,000 miles); Amalthea on November 6, 1997 at a range of about 650,000 kilometers (about 404,000 miles); Amalthea on November 7, 1997 at a

  13. A Day on Jupiter (Animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This 'movie' strings 11 images of Jupiter captured by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on January 9, 2007, when the spacecraft was about 80 million kilometers (49.6 million miles) from the giant planet. The sequence covers a full 10-hour rotation of Jupiter, during which the moons Ganymede and Io -- as well as the shadows they cast on Jupiter -- move across the camera's field of view.

  14. On the Behavior of the Galilean Satellites in the Jumping Jupiter Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deienno, Rogerio; Nesvorný, D.; Yokoyama, T.

    2013-10-01

    The Nice model of the dynamical instability and migration of the giant planets can explain many properties of our present Solar System, and can be used to constrain its early architecture. In the jumping Jupiter version of the Nice model, required from the terrestrial planet constrains, Jupiter is involved in encounters with an ice giant. Here we study the survival of the Galilean satellites in the jumping Jupiter model. This is an important concern because the ice giant encounters, if deep enough, could dynamically interfere with the orbits of the Galilean satellites, and lead to implausible results. The jumping Jupiter models are taken from Nesvorný and Morbidelli 2012 (NM12). Our metodology in this study take into account the effects of the Sun, Jupiter's oblateness and obliquity, as well as the planetary close encounters tracked in NM12 upon the Galilean moons. We considered three instability cases that differed in the number and distribution of ice giant encounters with Jupiter. In each case, we considered 1000 realizations of the Galilean satellite system before the instability, and integrated the dynamical response of satellite orbits to ice giant encounters. We found that in one of the considered cases, where the number of close encounters was relatively small, the Galilean satellite orbits were not significantly disturbed. In the other two, the final orbital eccentricities were [0-0.2], and Callisto's semi-major axis ended within [22-30]Rj, while the other satellites kept their semi-major axis nearly constant. As Callisto's semi-major axis may vary as much, we also hint on the possibility that all four Galilean satellites were originally formed in a Laplace resonance, and Callisto was kicked out of it by encounters. These results: i) show that Galilean satellites are an important constrain on the planetary instability; ii) can check on the possibility to the Galilean system have been formed in a different configuration of seen today. Acknowledgement

  15. Jupiter: Lord of the Planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, William

    1984-01-01

    Presents a chapter from an introductory college-level astronomy textbook in which full-color photographs and numerous diagrams highlight an extensive description of the planet Jupiter. Topics include Jupiter's geology, rotation, magnetic field, atmosphere (including clouds and winds), and the Great Red Spot. (DH)

  16. [To encounter oneself, to encounter each other].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, A A

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to elucidate the concept of encounter within the realm of psycotherapy, either individual or group, with its inter and intrapersonal connotations. Its importance is emphasized and means for its achievement are suggested. A double course is followed to attain this end: on the one hand, the tracing of the concept in the contemporary philosophic anthropology (the positions of M. Buber and of K. Jaspers are briefly examined) and in the views of several psychotherapists who have placed it as a significant issue in their treatments (the therapists considered are K. Binswanger, C. Rogers, J. L. Moreno and E. Pichon-Rivière), and on the other hand, some clinical means, and very special attitudes, are indicated as particularly favourable for the promotion of that enlargement of subjectivity leading to the encounter of one-self as well as the other person. Some fragments of sessions are presented demonstrating that in general the "how" of the attitude prevailing in the therapeutic relation is more effective than the "what" of the specific technical resources employed. However, some of these are commendable as a more direct way to bring about the experience of encounter. This leads me to psychodrama, with its techniques of the double, the inversion of roles, the mirror, and most of all with the general group sharing that closes the sessions, and to the gestalt methods, which involve in many instances physical contacts with other people, with the precise object of achieving a maximum insight, or, in the already classical expression, awareness, which is basically an encounter with oneself. Implicit in all the above considerations lies the conviction that man must share his existence with others not only for biological reasons; it is an indispensable requirement for his full development as an individual, a requirement for being himself. If one of the goals of psychological treatments is to promote personal growth and proximity to oneself, an

  17. Small Friends of Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Luis Ernesto; Johnson, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Hot Jupiters are Jupiter-sized gas giant exoplanets that closely orbit their host star in periods of about 10 days or less. Early models hypothesized that these exoplanets formed away from the star, then over time drifted to their characteristically closer locations. However, new theories predict that Hot Jupiters form at their close proximity during the process of core accretion (Batygin et al. 2015). In fact, a super-Earth and a Neptune-sized exoplanet have already been detected in the Hot Jupiter-hosting star WASP-47 (Becker et al. 2015). We will present our analysis of radial velocity time series plots to determine whether low-mass, short-period planets have been previously overlooked in systems of stars which host Hot Jupiters.The SAO REU program is funded in part by the National Science Foundation REU and Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant no. 1262851.

  18. Ultraviolet Studies of Jupiter's Hydrocarbons and Aerosols from Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, G. Randall

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report for this project. The purpose of this project was to support PI Wayne Pryor's effort to reduce and analyze Galileo UVS (Ultraviolet Spectrometer) data under the JSDAP program. The spectral observations made by the Galileo UVS were to be analyzed to determine mixing ratios for important hydrocarbon species (and aerosols) in Jupiter's stratosphere as a function of location on Jupiter. Much of this work is still ongoing. To date, we have concentrated on analyzing the variability of the auroral emissions rather than the absorption signatures of hydrocarbons, although we have done some work in this area with related HST-STIS data.

  19. Warm Jupiters are less lonely than hot Jupiters: close neighbours

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Chelsea X; Triaud, Amaury H M J

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting the Kepler transit data, we uncover a dramatic distinction in the prevalence of sub-Jovian companions, between systems that contain hot Jupiters (periods inward of 10 days) and those that host warm Jupiters (periods between 10 and 200 days). Hot Jupiters as a whole, with the singular exception of WASP-47b, do not have any detectable inner or outer planetary companions (with periods inward of 50 days and sizes down to $2 R_{\\rm Earth}$). Restricting ourselves to inner companions, our limits reach down to $1 R_{\\rm Earth}$. In stark contrast, half of the warm Jupiters are closely flanked by small companions. Statistically, the companion fractions for hot and warm Jupiters are mutually exclusive, in particular in regard to inner companions. The high companion fraction of warm Jupiters also yields clue to their formation. The warm Jupiters that have close-by siblings should have low orbital eccentricities and low mutual inclinations. The orbital configurations of these systems are reminiscent of those ...

  20. CAPTURE OF TROJANS BY JUMPING JUPITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesvorny, David [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut St., Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Vokrouhlicky, David [Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Morbidelli, Alessandro [Departement Cassiopee, University of Nice, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, Nice, F-06304 (France)

    2013-05-01

    Jupiter Trojans are thought to be survivors of a much larger population of planetesimals that existed in the planetary region when planets formed. They can provide important constraints on the mass and properties of the planetesimal disk, and its dispersal during planet migration. Here, we tested a possibility that the Trojans were captured during the early dynamical instability among the outer planets (aka the Nice model), when the semimajor axis of Jupiter was changing as a result of scattering encounters with an ice giant. The capture occurs in this model when Jupiter's orbit and its Lagrange points become radially displaced in a scattering event and fall into a region populated by planetesimals (that previously evolved from their natal transplanetary disk to {approx}5 AU during the instability). Our numerical simulations of the new capture model, hereafter jump capture, satisfactorily reproduce the orbital distribution of the Trojans and their total mass. The jump capture is potentially capable of explaining the observed asymmetry in the number of leading and trailing Trojans. We find that the capture probability is (6-8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} for each particle in the original transplanetary disk, implying that the disk contained (3-4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} planetesimals with absolute magnitude H < 9 (corresponding to diameter D = 80 km for a 7% albedo). The disk mass inferred from this work, M{sub disk} {approx} 14-28 M{sub Earth}, is consistent with the mass deduced from recent dynamical simulations of the planetary instability.

  1. Jupiter's Moons: Family Portrait

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This montage shows the best views of Jupiter's four large and diverse 'Galilean' satellites as seen by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on the New Horizons spacecraft during its flyby of Jupiter in late February 2007. The four moons are, from left to right: Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. The images have been scaled to represent the true relative sizes of the four moons and are arranged in their order from Jupiter. Io, 3,640 kilometers (2,260 miles) in diameter, was imaged at 03:50 Universal Time on February 28 from a range of 2.7 million kilometers (1.7 million miles). The original image scale was 13 kilometers per pixel, and the image is centered at Io coordinates 6 degrees south, 22 degrees west. Io is notable for its active volcanism, which New Horizons has studied extensively. Europa, 3,120 kilometers (1,938 miles) in diameter, was imaged at 01:28 Universal Time on February 28 from a range of 3 million kilometers (1.8 million miles). The original image scale was 15 kilometers per pixel, and the image is centered at Europa coordinates 6 degrees south, 347 degrees west. Europa's smooth, icy surface likely conceals an ocean of liquid water. New Horizons obtained data on Europa's surface composition and imaged subtle surface features, and analysis of these data may provide new information about the ocean and the icy shell that covers it. New Horizons spied Ganymede, 5,262 kilometers (3,268 miles) in diameter, at 10:01 Universal Time on February 27 from 3.5 million kilometers (2.2 million miles) away. The original scale was 17 kilometers per pixel, and the image is centered at Ganymede coordinates 6 degrees south, 38 degrees west. Ganymede, the largest moon in the solar system, has a dirty ice surface cut by fractures and peppered by impact craters. New Horizons' infrared observations may provide insight into the composition of the moon's surface and interior. Callisto, 4,820 kilometers (2,995 miles) in diameter, was imaged at 03:50 Universal Time on

  2. Dental Encounter System (DES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Dental Encounter System (DES) is an automated health care application designed to capture critical data about the operations of VA Dental Services. Information on...

  3. THE NUCLEAR ENCOUNTER PROBABILITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SMULDERS, PJM

    1994-01-01

    This Letter dicusses the nuclear encounter probability as used in ion channeling analysis. A formulation is given, incorporating effects of large beam angles and beam divergence. A critical examination of previous definitions is made.

  4. Northern Belt of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] A four-panel frame shows a section of Jupiter's north equatorial belt viewed by NASA's Cassini spacecraft at four different wavelengths, and a separate reference frame shows the location of the belt on the planet.A fascinating aspect of the images in the four-panel frame is the small bright spot in the center of each. The images come from different layers of the atmosphere, so the spot appears to be a storm penetrating upward through several layers. This may in fact be a 'monster' thunderstorm, penetrating all the way into the stratosphere, as do some summer thunderstorms in the midwestern United States. These images were taken on Nov. 27, 2000, at a resolution of 192 kilometers (119 miles) per pixel. They have been contrast-enhanced to highlight features in the atmosphere.The top panel of the four-panel frame is an image taken in a near-infrared wavelength at which the gases in Jupiter's atmosphere are relatively non-absorbing. Sunlight can penetrate deeply into the atmosphere at this wavelength and be reflected back out, providing a view of an underlying region of the atmosphere, the lower troposphere.The second panel was taken in the blue portion of wavelengths detected by the human eye. At these wavelengths, gases in the atmosphere scatter a modest amount of sunlight, so the clouds we see tend to be at somewhat higher altitudes than in the top panel.The third panel shows near-infrared reflected sunlight at a wavelength where the gas methane, an important constituent of Jupiter's atmosphere, absorbs strongly. Dark places are regions without high-level clouds and consequently large amounts of methane accessible to sunlight. Bright regions are locations with high clouds in the upper troposphere shielding the methane below.The bottom panel was taken in the ultraviolet. At these very short wavelengths, the clear atmosphere scatters sunlight, and hazes in the stratosphere, above the troposphere, absorb sunlight. That

  5. The dusty ballerina skirt of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, M.; Morfill, G.; Gruen, E.

    1993-12-01

    We suggest a model to explain the unexpected recurrent dust events that were observed during the Jupiter encounter by the dust detector on board the Ulysses spacecraft. This model is based dust-magnetosphere interactions. Dust particles inside the Jovian magnetosphere collect electrostatic charges and their interaction with the magnetic and electric fields can lead to energization and subsequent ejection. We discuss the dusty regions (ring/halo, `gossamer' ring) and also Io as potential sources for the Ulysses events. This model favors Io as a source. The mass and velocity range of the escaping particles are compatible with the observations, and we also suggest internal periodicities to explain the recurrent nature of the Ulysses dust events.

  6. The New Horizons Mission to Pluto and Flyby of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Alan; Weaver, Hal; Young, Leslie; Bagenal, Fran; Binzel, Richard; Buratti, Bonnie; Cheng, andy; Cruikshank, Dale; Gladstone, Randy; Grundy, Will; Hinson, David; Horanyi, Mihaly; Jennings, Don; Linscott, Ivan; McComas, Dave; McKinnon, William; McNutt, Ralph; Moore, Jeffrey; Murchie, Scott; Olkin, Cathy; Porco, Carolyn; Reitsema, Harold; Reuter, Dennis; Slater, Dave; Spencer, John

    2008-01-01

    New Horizons (NH) is NASA's mission to provide the first in situ reconnaissance of Pluto and its moons Charon, Nix, and Hydra. The NH spacecraft will reach Pluto in July 2015 and will then, if approved for an extended mission phase, continue on to a flyby encounter with one or more Kuiper belt objects (KBOs). NH was launched on 19 January 2006 and received a gravity assist during a flyby encounter with Jupiter (with closest approach at -32 RJ on 28 February 2007) that reduced its flight time to Pluto by 3 years. During the Jupiter flyby, NH collected a trove of multi-wavelength imaging and fields-and-particles measurements. Among the many science results at Jupiter were a detection of planet-wide mesoscale waves, eruptions of atmospheric ammonia clouds, unprecedented views of Io's volcanic plumes and Jupiter's tenuous ring system, a first close-up of the Little Red Spot (LRS), first sightings of polar lightning, and a trip down the tail of the magnetosphere. In 2015, NH will conduct a seven-month investigation of the Pluto system culminating in a closest approach some 12,500 km from Pluto's surface. Planning is presently underway for the Pluto encounter with special emphasis on longidentified science goals of studying the terrain, geology, and composition of the surfaces of Pluto and Charon, examining the composition and structure of Pluto's atmosphere, searching for an atmosphere on Charon, and characterizing Pluto's ionosphere and solar wind interaction. Detailed inspections will also be performed of the newly discovered satellites Nix and Hydra. Additionally, NH will characterize energetic particles in Pluto's environment, refine the bulk properties of Pluto and Charon, and search for additional satellites and rings.

  7. The Photoeccentric Effect and Proto-Hot-Jupiters I. Measuring photometric eccentricities of individual transiting planets

    CERN Document Server

    Dawson, Rebekah I

    2012-01-01

    Exoplanet orbital eccentricities offer valuable clues about the origins and orbital evolution of planetary systems. Eccentric, Jupiter-sized planets are particularly interesting: they may link the "cold" Jupiters beyond the ice line to hot Jupiters at a fraction of an AU, where they are unlikely to have formed in situ. To date, all eccentricities of individual planets come from radial velocity measurements. Kepler has discovered hundreds of transiting Jupiters spanning a range of periods, but the faintness of the host stars precludes radial velocity follow-up of most. Here we demonstrate a Bayesian method of measuring an individual planet's eccentricity solely from its transit light curve using prior knowledge of its host star's density. We show that eccentric Jupiters are readily identified by their short ingress/egress/total transit durations --- the "photoeccentric effect" --- even with long-cadence Kepler photometry and loosely-constrained stellar parameters. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo exploration of para...

  8. The clinical encounter revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schattner, Ami

    2014-04-01

    The patient-physician encounter is the pivotal starting point of any healthcare delivery, but it is subject to multiple process breakdowns and prevalent suboptimal performance. An overview of the techniques and components of a successful encounter valid for every setting and readily applicable is presented, stressing 7 rules: (1) ensuring optimal environment, tools, and teamwork; (2) viewing each encounter not only as a cognitive/biomedical challenge, but also as a personal one, and a learning opportunity; (3) adopting an attitude of curiosity, concentration, compassion, and commitment, and maintaining a systematic, orderly approach; (4) "simple is beautiful"-making the most of the basic clinical data and their many unique advantages; (5) minding "the silent dimension"-being attentive to the patient's identity and emotions; (6) following the "Holy Trinity" of gathering all information, consulting databases/colleagues, and tailoring gained knowledge to the individual patient; and (7) using the encounter as a "window of opportunity" to further the patient's health-not just the major problem, by addressing screening and prevention; promoting health literacy and shared decision-making; and establishing proper follow-up. Barriers to implementation identified can be overcome by continuous educational interventions. A high-quality encounter sets a virtuous cycle of patient-provider interaction and results in increasing satisfaction, adherence, and improved health outcomes.

  9. Jupiter Clouds in Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 619 nm [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 727 nm [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 890 nmImages from NASA's Cassini spacecraft using three different filters reveal cloud structures and movements at different depths in the atmosphere around Jupiter's south pole.Cassini's cameras come equipped with filters that sample three wavelengths where methane gas absorbs light. These are in the red at 619 nanometer (nm) wavelength and in the near-infrared at 727 nm and 890 nm. Absorption in the 619 nm filter is weak. It is stronger in the 727 nm band and very strong in the 890 nm band where 90 percent of the light is absorbed by methane gas. Light in the weakest band can penetrate the deepest into Jupiter's atmosphere. It is sensitive to the amount of cloud and haze down to the pressure of the water cloud, which lies at a depth where pressure is about 6 times the atmospheric pressure at sea level on the Earth). Light in the strongest methane band is absorbed at high altitude and is sensitive only to the ammonia cloud level and higher (pressures less than about one-half of Earth's atmospheric pressure) and the middle methane band is sensitive to the ammonia and ammonium hydrosulfide cloud layers as deep as two times Earth's atmospheric pressure.The images shown here demonstrate the power of these filters in studies of cloud stratigraphy. The images cover latitudes from about 15 degrees north at the top down to the southern polar region at the bottom. The left and middle images are ratios, the image in the methane filter divided by the image at a nearby wavelength outside the methane band. Using ratios emphasizes where contrast is due to methane absorption and not to other factors, such as the absorptive properties of the cloud particles, which influence contrast at all wavelengths.The most prominent feature seen in all three filters is the polar stratospheric haze that makes Jupiter bright near the pole

  10. Privacy encounters in Teledialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Bo; Bøge, Ask Risom; Danholt, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Privacy is a major concern when new technologies are introduced between public authorities and private citizens. What is meant by privacy, however, is often unclear and contested. Accordingly, this article utilises grounded theory to study privacy empirically in the research and design project...... Teledialogue aimed at introducing new ways for public case managers and placed children to communicate through IT. The resulting argument is that privacy can be understood as an encounter, that is, as something that arises between implicated actors and entails some degree of friction and negotiation....... An argument which is further qualified through the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze. The article opens with a review of privacy literature before continuing to present privacy as an encounter with five different foci: what technologies bring into the encounter; who is related to privacy by implication; what...

  11. Brief encounter networks

    CERN Document Server

    Kostakos, Vassilis; Penn, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Many complex human and natural phenomena can usefully be represented as networks describing the relationships between individuals. While these relationships are typically intermittent, previous research has used network representations that aggregate the relationships at discrete intervals. However, such an aggregation discards important temporal information, thus inhibiting our understanding of the networks dynamic behaviour and evolution. We have recorded patterns of human urban encounter using Bluetooth technology thus retaining the temporal properties of this network. Here we show how this temporal information influences the structural properties of the network. We show that the temporal properties of human urban encounter are scale-free, leading to an overwhelming proportion of brief encounters between individuals. While previous research has shown preferential attachment to result in scale-free connectivity in aggregated network data, we found that scale-free connectivity results from the temporal prope...

  12. Jupiter Eruptions Captured in Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for high resolution image of Nature Cover Detailed analysis of two continent-sized storms that erupted in Jupiter's atmosphere in March 2007 shows that Jupiter's internal heat plays a significant role in generating atmospheric disturbances. Understanding these outbreaks could be the key to unlock the mysteries buried in the deep Jovian atmosphere, say astronomers. This infrared image shows two bright plume eruptions obtained by the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on April 5, 2007. Understanding these phenomena is important for Earth's meteorology where storms are present everywhere and jet streams dominate the atmospheric circulation. Jupiter is a natural laboratory where atmospheric scientists study the nature and interplay of the intense jets and severe atmospheric phenomena. According to the analysis, the bright plumes were storm systems triggered in Jupiter's deep water clouds that moved upward in the atmosphere vigorously and injected a fresh mixture of ammonia ice and water about 20 miles (30 kilometers) above the visible clouds. The storms moved in the peak of a jet stream in Jupiter's atmosphere at 375 miles per hour (600 kilometers per hour). Models of the disturbance indicate that the jet stream extends deep in the buried atmosphere of Jupiter, more than 60 miles (approximately100 kilometers) below the cloud tops where most sunlight is absorbed.

  13. Encounters in cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høybye, Mette Terp; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine

    2014-01-01

    Based on extensive ethnographic material from in-depth interviews with Danish cancer patients after treatment, this study analyzes their stories to explore how interactions with the physician configures and situates a need for rehabilitation. We identify three themes in the illness stories: (1...... by this encounter. The significance of the social encounters in cancer treatment is elucidated through this analysis, and we demonstrate how the need for recognition of the complex effects of cancer on one's life is central to counter experiences of objectification and dehumanization....

  14. Strange culinary encounters:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leer, Jonatan; Kjær, Katrine Meldgaard

    2015-01-01

    the ‘other’ food cultures in these programs, paying special attention to how the encounter with the local Indian and Italian is imagined to be a gateway to an authentic and/or primitive experience. Our main argument is that despite Jamie and Gordon's ‘noble’ intentions and their ‘enlightened’ cosmopolitan......In this article, we examine the ways in which the encountering of 'other' food cultures is played out in the two travelogue cooking shows Gordon's Great Escape and Jamie's Italian Escape. We investigate how the two protagonist chefs Jamie Oliver and Gordon Ramsay imagine, meet and evaluate...

  15. Japanese mission plan for Jupiter system: The Jupiter magnetospheric orbiter and the Trojan asteroid explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, S.; Fujimoto, M.; Yano, H.; Takashima, T.; Kasaba, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Kimura, J.; Funase, R.; Mori, O.; Tsuda, Y.; Campagnola, S.; Kawakatsu, Y.

    2011-10-01

    In the future Jupiter system study, Coordinated observation of Jovian magnetosphere is one of the important targets of the mission in addition to icy satellites, atmosphere, and interior of Jupiter. JAXA will take a role on the magnetosphere spinner JMO (Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter), in addition to JGO (Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter) by ESA and JEO (Jupiter Europa Orbiter) by NASA. We will combine JMO with a proposed solar sail mission of JAXA for Jupiter and one of Trojan asteroids. Since Trojan asteroids could be representing raw solid materials of Jupiter or at least outer solar system bodies, involvement of Trojan observation should enhance the quality of Jupiter system exploration.

  16. On the nature of S II emission from Jupiter's hot plasma torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. A.; Shemansky, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    An effective electron temperature T(e) of 80,000 K is indicated by the Voyager 1 encounter Jupiter hot torus emission rates in the 6731, 1256, 911 and reclassified 765 A transitions of S II. A set of 53 measurements of the S II red line doublet obtained at 5.9 Jupiter radii shows strong, irregular fluctuations in intensity, but no variation in the line ratio. At this distance from Jupiter, the torus is found to be longitudinally uniform in density; this is consonant with Voyager UVS findings, but contrary to magnetic anomaly model predictions. It is suggested that presently unidentified ion-ion and/or iron-atom reactions are responsible for the S II component irregular variations, in view of the fact that electron properties are regular and variable only over a small range in the hot torus at 5.9 Jupiter radii.

  17. Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9/Jupiter collision observed with a high resolution speckle imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravel, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    During the week of July 16, 1994, comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, broken into 20 plus pieces by tidal forces on its last orbit, smashed into the planet Jupiter, releasing the explosive energy of 500 thousand megatons. A team of observers from LLNL used the LLNL Speckle Imaging Camera mounted on the University of California`s Lick Observatory 3 Meter Telescope to capture continuous sequences of planet images during the comet encounter. Post processing with the bispectral phase reconstruction algorithm improves the resolution by removing much of the blurring due to atmospheric turbulence. High resolution images of the planet surface showing the aftermath of the impact are probably the best that were obtained from any ground-based telescope. We have been looking at the regions of the fragment impacts to try to discern any dynamic behavior of the spots left on Jupiter`s cloud tops. Such information can lead to conclusions about the nature of the comet and of Jupiter`s atmosphere. So far, the Hubble Space Telescope has observed expanding waves from the G impact whose mechanism is enigmatic since they appear to be too slow to be sound waves and too fast to be gravity waves, given the present knowledge of Jupiter`s atmosphere. Some of our data on the G and L impact region complements the Hubble observations but, so far, is inconclusive about spot dynamics.

  18. New Concept for Internal Heat Production in Hot Jupiter Exo-Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Herndon, J M

    2006-01-01

    Discovery of hot Jupiter exo-planets, those with anomalously inflated size and low density relative to Jupiter, has evoked much discussion as to possible sources of internal heat production. But to date, no explanations have come forth that are generally applicable. The explanations advanced typically involve presumed tidal dissipation and/or converted incident stellar radiation. The present, brief communication suggests a novel interfacial nuclear fission-fusion source of internal heat production for hot Jupiters that has been overlooked by theoreticians and which has potentially general applicability.

  19. Communication in medical encounters.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bensing, J.M.; Verhaak, P.F.M.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to provide a theoretical and empirical basis for the concept of communication as the core instrument in the medical encounter. Adequate communication, embedded in a warm and caring relationship, has always been recognized as essential to the concept of good doctoring, but

  20. Global Diabetes Encounters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Nielsen, Annegrete; Langstrup, Henriette

    2014-01-01

    As already recognized, though little theorized within International Relations, the capacity of technology to ensure the achievement of preset policy goals is often grossly overrated. Drawing on Science and Technology Studies, this chapter proposes a lens to investigate global encounters, which ta...

  1. Global Diabetes Encounters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Annegrete; Langstrup, Henriette

    2014-01-01

    As already recognized, though little theorized within International Relations, the capacity of technology to ensure the achievement of preset policy goals is often grossly overrated. Drawing on Science and Technology Studies, this chapter proposes a lens to investigate global encounters, which ta...

  2. Global Diabetes Encounters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Nielsen, Annegrete; Langstrup, Henriette

    2014-01-01

    As already recognized, though little theorized within International Relations, the capacity of technology to ensure the achievement of preset policy goals is often grossly overrated. Drawing on Science and Technology Studies, this chapter proposes a lens to investigate global encounters, which take...

  3. Strange culinary encounters:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leer, Jonatan; Kjær, Katrine Meldgaard

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we examine the ways in which the encountering of 'other' food cultures is played out in the two travelogue cooking shows Gordon's Great Escape and Jamie's Italian Escape. We investigate how the two protagonist chefs Jamie Oliver and Gordon Ramsay imagine, meet and evaluate the ‘o...

  4. A Lakatosian Encounter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chick, Helen

    2010-01-01

    There is much to be learned and pondered by reading "Proofs and Refutations," by Imre Lakatos. It highlights the importance of mathematical definitions, and how definitions evolve to capture the essence of the object they are defining. It also provides an exhilarating encounter with the ups and downs of the mathematical reasoning process, where…

  5. Jupiter's Hot, Mushy Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Jupiter's moon Io is the most volcanically active body in the Solar System. Observations by instruments on the Galileo spacecraft and on telescopes atop Mauna Kea in Hawai'i indicate that lava flows on Io are surprisingly hot, over 1200 oC and possibly as much as 1300 oC; a few areas might have lava flows as hot as 1500 oC. Such high temperatures imply that the lava flows are composed of rock that formed by a very large amount of melting of Io's mantle. This has led Laszlo Keszthelyi and Alfred S. McEwen of the University of Arizona and me to reawaken an old hypothesis that suggests that the interior of Io is a partially-molten mush of crystals and magma. The idea, which had fallen out of favor for a decade or two, explains high-temperature hot spots, mountains, calderas, and volcanic plains on Io. If correct, Io gives us an opportunity to study processes that operate in huge, global magma systems, which scientists believe were important during the early history of the Moon and Earth, and possibly other planetary bodies as well. Though far from proven, the idea that Io has a ocean of mushy magma beneath its crust can be tested with measurements by future spacecraft.

  6. The mechanical design of an imaging photopolarimeter for the Jupiter missions (Pioneer 10 and 11)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodak, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanical design and fabrication are discussed of the imaging photopolarimeter (IPP), a multifunction space-qualified instrument used on the Jupiter Pioneer missions. The extreme environmental requirements for the structural design, optical system, and mechanisms are described with detailed discussion of some of the design and fabrication problems encountered.

  7. Types of Hot Jupiter Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisikalo, Dmitry V.; Kaygorodov, Pavel V.; Ionov, Dmitry E.; Shematovich, Valery I.

    Hot Jupiters, i.e. exoplanet gas giants, having masses comparable to the mass of Jupiter and semimajor axes shorter than 0.1 AU, are a unique class of objects. Since they are so close to the host stars, their atmospheres form and evolve under the action of very active gas dynamical processes caused by the gravitational field and irradiation of the host star. As a matter of fact, the atmospheres of several of these planets fill their Roche lobes , which results in a powerful outflow of material from the planet towards the host star. The energy budget of this process is so important that it almost solely governs the evolution of hot Jupiters gaseous envelopes. Based on the years of experience in the simulations of gas dynamics in mass-exchanging close binary stars, we have investigated specific features of hot Jupiters atmospheres. The analytical estimates and results of 3D numerical simulations, discussed in this Chapter, show that the gaseous envelopes around hot Jupiters may be significantly non-spherical and, at the same time, stationary and long-lived. These results are of fundamental importance for the interpretation of observational data.

  8. Jupiter and Saturn Rotation Periods

    CERN Document Server

    Helled, Ravit; Anderson, John D

    2009-01-01

    Anderson & Schubert (2007, Science,317,1384) proposed that Saturn's rotation period can be ascertained by minimizing the dynamic heights of the 100 mbar isosurface with respect to the geoid; they derived a rotation period of 10h 32m 35s. We investigate the same approach for Jupiter to see if the Jovian rotation period is predicted by minimizing the dynamical heights of its isobaric (1 bar pressure level) surface using zonal wind data. A rotation period of 9h 54m 29s is found. Further, we investigate the minimization method by fitting Pioneer and Voyager occultation radii for both Jupiter and Saturn. Rotation periods of 9h 55m 30s and 10h 32m 35s are found to minimize the dynamical heights for Jupiter and Saturn, respectively. Though there is no dynamical principle requiring the minimization of the dynamical heights of an isobaric surface, the successful application of the method to Jupiter lends support to its relevance for Saturn. We derive Jupiter and Saturn rotation periods using equilibrium theory in ...

  9. Encounters with immigrant customers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Anna; Espersen, Sacha; Nørgaard, Lotte Stig

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore the challenges that Danish community pharmacy staff encounter when serving non-Western immigrant customers. Special attention was paid to similarities and differences between the perceptions of pharmacists and pharmacy assistants. METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed...... to one pharmacist and one pharmacy assistant employed at each of the 55 community pharmacies located in the five local councils in Denmark with the highest number of immigrant inhabitants. KEY FINDINGS: The total response rate was 76% (84/110). Most respondents found that the needs of immigrant customers...... companies. CONCLUSIONS: Community pharmacy staff report poorer quality in their encounters with immigrant customers, including sub-optimal counselling and frequent use of under-aged children as interpreters. Our study also reveals certain differences across personnel groups, which may be explained...

  10. Encountering the Everyday

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    , as sociologists, need to take everyday life seriously. This is the objective of this book. Encountering the Everyday: An Introduction to the Sociologies of the Unnoticed provides the first comprehensive and updated globally applicable introduction to everyday life sociology for many years. The contributors...... present the theoretical, conceptual and methodological groundwork, historical developments and distinct perspectives of a variety of everyday life traditions and relate these to and exemplify them through actual empirical research. Encountering the Everyday contains introductions to ‘classical' everyday...... life traditions such as Chicago sociology, phenomenology, American pragmatism, symbolic interactionism, existentialism and critical everyday life sociologies, but also to the later developments by Erving Goffman, French everyday life thinkers, the ethnomethodologists, conversation analysts...

  11. The Europa Jupiter System Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, A. R.; Clark, K.; Erd, C.; Pappalardo, R.; Greeley, R. R.; Blanc, M.; Lebreton, J.; van Houten, T.

    2009-05-01

    Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) will be an international mission that will achieve Decadal Survey and Cosmic Vision goals. NASA and ESA have concluded a joint study of a mission to Europa, Ganymede and the Jupiter system with orbiters developed by NASA and ESA; contributions by JAXA are also possible. The baseline EJSM architecture consists of two primary elements operating in the Jovian system: the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). The JEO mission has been selected by NASA as the next Flagship mission to the out solar system. JEO and JGO would execute an intricately choreographed exploration of the Jupiter System before settling into orbit around Europa and Ganymede, respectively. JEO and JGO would carry eleven and ten complementary instruments, respectively, to monitor dynamic phenomena (such as Io's volcanoes and Jupiter's atmosphere), map the Jovian magnetosphere and its interactions with the Galilean satellites, and characterize water oceans beneath the ice shells of Europa and Ganymede. EJSM will fully addresses high priority science objectives identified by the National Research Council's (NRC's) Decadal Survey and ESA's Cosmic Vision for exploration of the outer solar system. The Decadal Survey recommended a Europa Orbiter as the highest priority outer planet flagship mission and also identified Ganymede as a highly desirable mission target. EJSM would uniquely address several of the central themes of ESA's Cosmic Vision Programme, through its in-depth exploration of the Jupiter system and its evolution from origin to habitability. EJSM will investigate the potential habitability of the active ocean-bearing moons Europa and Ganymede, detailing the geophysical, compositional, geological and external processes that affect these icy worlds. EJSM would also explore Io and Callisto, Jupiter's atmosphere, and the Jovian magnetosphere. By understanding the Jupiter system and unraveling its history, the

  12. Awkward Encounters and Ethnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koning, Juliette; Ooi, Can-Seng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – Researchers rarely present accounts of their awkward encounters in ethnographies. Awkwardness, however, does matter and affects the ethnographic accounts we write and our understanding of social situations. The purpose is to bring these hidden sides of organizational ethnography...... (Koning), and visiting an artist village in China (Ooi). Based on analysing their awkwardness, and in the context of a critical assessment of the reflexive turn in ethnography, the authors propose a more inclusive reflexivity. The paper ends with formulating several points supportive of reaching inclusive...

  13. The Idealized Cultural Encounter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lene Bull

    ). This paper proposes to study cultural encounters which are organised around ideals of cultural difference as a positive social and political force. The Danish People to People NGO Mellemfolkeligt Samvirke (MS) is build around ideals of equality, co-operation, mutuality and solidarity between people...... framework for an investigation into MS’ organisation of what I have termed ‘the idealized cultural encounter’, while also questioning the ways in which ‘culture’ is envisioned in contexts where ‘encounter’ is seen as a positive and desirable force....

  14. The Idealized Cultural Encounter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lene Bull

    ). This paper proposes to study cultural encounters which are organised around ideals of cultural difference as a positive social and political force. The Danish People to People NGO Mellemfolkeligt Samvirke (MS) is build around ideals of equality, co-operation, mutuality and solidarity between people...... framework for an investigation into MS’ organisation of what I have termed ‘the idealized cultural encounter’, while also questioning the ways in which ‘culture’ is envisioned in contexts where ‘encounter’ is seen as a positive and desirable force....

  15. Super-Eccentric Migrating Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Socrates, Aristotle; Dong, Subo; Tremaine, Scott

    2011-01-01

    An important class of formation theories for hot Jupiters involves the excitation of extreme orbital eccentricity (e=0.99 or even larger) followed by tidal dissipation at periastron passage that eventually circularizes the planetary orbit at a period less than 10 days. In a steady state, this mechanism requires the existence of a significant population of super-eccentric (e>0.9) migrating Jupiters with long orbital periods and periastron distances of only a few stellar radii. For these super-eccentric planets, the periastron is fixed due to conservation of orbital angular momentum and the energy dissipated per orbit is constant, implying that the rate of change in semi-major axis a is \\dot a \\propto a^0.5 and consequently the number distribution satisfies dN/dlog a\\propto a^0.5. If this formation process produces most hot Jupiters, Kepler should detect several super-eccentric migrating progenitors of hot Jupiters, allowing for a test of high-eccentricity migration scenarios.

  16. SUPER-ECCENTRIC MIGRATING JUPITERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Socrates, Aristotle; Katz, Boaz; Dong Subo; Tremaine, Scott [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2012-05-10

    An important class of formation theories for hot Jupiters involves the excitation of extreme orbital eccentricity (e = 0.99 or even larger) followed by tidal dissipation at periastron passage that eventually circularizes the planetary orbit at a period less than 10 days. In a steady state, this mechanism requires the existence of a significant population of super-eccentric (e > 0.9) migrating Jupiters with long orbital periods and periastron distances of only a few stellar radii. For these super-eccentric planets, the periastron is fixed due to conservation of orbital angular momentum and the energy dissipated per orbit is constant, implying that the rate of change in semi-major axis a is a-dot {proportional_to}a{sup 1/2} and consequently the number distribution satisfies dN/d log a{proportional_to}a{sup 1/2}. If this formation process produces most hot Jupiters, Kepler should detect several super-eccentric migrating progenitors of hot Jupiters, allowing for a test of high-eccentricity migration scenarios.

  17. Current Status of the EJSM Jupiter Europa Orbiter Flagship Mission Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K.; Pappalardo, R.; Greeley, R.; Hendrix, A.; Boldt, J.; van Houten, T.; Jun, I.; Lock, R.; Ludwinski, J.; Rasmussen, R.; Tan-Wang, G.

    2008-12-01

    NASA and ESA have embarked on a joint study of a mission to Europa and the Jupiter system with orbiters developed by NASA, ESA, and possibly JAXA. An international Joint Jupiter Science Definition Team (JJSDT) is defining the science content for the Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) mission study run by NASA and for the Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO) mission study run by ESA. Engineering teams for both missions are working closely with the JJSDT to define mission concepts that optimize science, cost, and risk. The NASA-led JEO mission addresses a scientifically rich subset of the complete EJSM science goals and is designed to stand alone or in conjunction with the ESA-led JGO. This paper focuses on the NASA-led JEO mission and will describe the concept in the context of a standalone mission. An orbital mission to Europa is driven by the desire to investigate an astrobiological archetype for icy satellite habitability, with a putative warm, salty, water ocean with plausible energy sources. Additionally, JEO will explore the Jupiter system to better understand how Europa's possible habitability is related to the formation scenario of the other Jovian satellites. The JEO mission will perform 2.5-3 years of Jupiter system science, including encounters with Io, Ganymede and Callisto, before insertion into orbit around Europa for a comprehensive set of science campaigns lasting for up to one year. This paper will highlight the JEO mission design and implementation concept. The work reported was sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  18. Featured Image: Mapping Jupiter with Hubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Zonal wind profile for Jupiter, describing the speed and direction of its winds at each latitude. [Simon et al. 2015]This global map of Jupiters surface (click for the full view!) was generated by the Hubble Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program, which aims to createnew yearly global maps for each of the outer planets. Presented in a study led by Amy Simon (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center), the map above is the first generated for Jupiter in the first year of the OPAL campaign. It provides a detailed look at Jupiters atmospheric structure including the Great Red Spot and allowed the authors to measure the speed and direction of the wind across Jupiters latitudes, constructing an updated zonal wind profile for Jupiter.In contrast to this study, the Juno mission (which will be captured into Jupiters orbit today after a 5-year journey to Jupiter!) will be focusing more on the features below Jupiters surface, studying its deep atmosphere and winds. Some of Junos primary goals are to learn about Jupiters composition, gravitational field, magnetic field, and polar magnetosphere. You can follow along with the NASATV livestream as Juno arrives at Jupiter tonight; orbit insertion coverage starts at 10:30 EDT.CitationAmy A. Simon et al 2015 ApJ 812 55. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/812/1/55

  19. Io in Front of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Jupiter's four largest satellites, including Io, the golden ornament in front of Jupiter in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, have fascinated Earthlings ever since Galileo Galilei discovered them in 1610 in one of his first astronomical uses of the telescope.Images from Cassini that will be released over the next several days capture each of the four Galilean satellites in their orbits around the giant planet.This true-color composite frame, made from narrow angle images taken on Dec. 12, 2000, captures Io and its shadow in transit against the disk of Jupiter. The distance of the spacecraft from Jupiter was 19.5 million kilometers (12.1 million miles). The image scale is 117 kilometers (73 miles) per pixel.The entire body of Io, about the size of Earth's Moon, is periodically flexed as it speeds around Jupiter and feels, as a result of its non-circular orbit, the periodically changing gravitational pull of the planet. The heat arising in Io's interior from this continual flexure makes it the most volcanically active body in the solar system, with more than 100 active volcanoes. The white and reddish colors on its surface are due to the presence of different sulfurous materials. The black areas are silicate rocks.Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  20. Radiocarbon Dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, B A

    2007-12-20

    Radiocarbon dating can be used to determine the age of objects that contain components that were once alive. In the case of human remains, a radiocarbon date can distinguish between a crime scene and an archeological site. Documents, museum artifacts and art objects can be dated to determine if their age is correct for the historical context. A radiocarbon date does not confirm authenticity, but it can help identify a forgery.

  1. Exploring the diversity of Jupiter-class planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Leigh N; Irwin, Patrick G J; Barstow, Joanna K; de Kok, Remco J; Lee, Jae-Min; Aigrain, Suzanne

    2014-04-28

    Of the 900+ confirmed exoplanets discovered since 1995 for which we have constraints on their mass (i.e. not including Kepler candidates), 75% have masses larger than Saturn (0.3 MJ), 53% are more massive than Jupiter and 67% are within 1 AU of their host stars. When Kepler candidates are included, Neptune-sized giant planets could form the majority of the planetary population. And yet the term 'hot Jupiter' fails to account for the incredible diversity of this class of astrophysical object, which exists on a continuum of giant planets from the cool jovians of our own Solar System to the highly irradiated, tidally locked hot roasters. We review theoretical expectations for the temperatures, molecular composition and cloud properties of hydrogen-dominated Jupiter-class objects under a variety of different conditions. We discuss the classification schemes for these Jupiter-class planets proposed to date, including the implications for our own Solar System giant planets and the pitfalls associated with compositional classification at this early stage of exoplanetary spectroscopy. We discuss the range of planetary types described by previous authors, accounting for (i) thermochemical equilibrium expectations for cloud condensation and favoured chemical stability fields; (ii) the metallicity and formation mechanism for these giant planets; (iii) the importance of optical absorbers for energy partitioning and the generation of a temperature inversion; (iv) the favoured photochemical pathways and expectations for minor species (e.g. saturated hydrocarbons and nitriles); (v) the unexpected presence of molecules owing to vertical mixing of species above their quench levels; and (vi) methods for energy and material redistribution throughout the atmosphere (e.g. away from the highly irradiated daysides of close-in giants). Finally, we discuss the benefits and potential flaws of retrieval techniques for establishing a family of atmospheric solutions that reproduce the

  2. First Results of the Juno Magnetometer Investigation in Jupiter's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, Jack; Oliversen, Ronald; Espley, Jared; Kotsiaros, Stavros; Joergensen, John; Joergensen, Peter; Merano, Jose; Denver, Troelz; Benn, Mathias; Bloxham, Jeremy; Bolton, Scott; Levin, Steve

    2017-04-01

    The Juno spacecraft entered polar orbit about Jupiter on July 4, 2016, after a Jupiter Orbit Insertion (JOI) main engine burn lasting 35 minutes. Juno's science instruments were not powered during the critical maneuver sequence ( 5 days) but were fully operational shortly afterward. The 53.5-day capture orbit provides Juno's science instruments with the opportunity to sample the Jovian environment close up (to 1.06 Jovian radii, Rj) and in polar orbit extending to the outer reaches of the Jovian magnetosphere. Jupiter's gravity and magnetic fields will be globally mapped with unprecedented accuracy as Juno conducts a study of Jupiter's interior structure and composition, as well as the first comprehensive exploration of the polar magnetosphere. The magnetic field investigation onboard Juno is equipped with two magnetometer sensor suites, located at 10 and 12 m from the spacecraft body at the end of one of the three solar panel wings. Each contains a vector fluxgate magnetometer (FGM) sensor and a pair of co-located non-magnetic star tracker camera heads which provide accurate attitude determination for the FGM sensors. The first few periapsis passes available to date revealed an extraordinary spatial variation of the magnetic field close to the planet's surface, suggesting that Juno may be sampling the field closer to the dynamo region than widely anticipated, i.e., portending a dynamo surface extending to relatively large radial distance ( 0.9Rj?). We present the first observations of Jupiter's magnetic field obtained in close proximity to the planet, and speculate on what wonders await as more longitudes are drawn across the global map (32 polar orbits separated by designed to acquire.

  3. Evidence for Two Hot-Jupiter Formation Paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Benjamin E.; Ford, Eric B.; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2017-09-01

    Disk migration and high-eccentricity migration are two well-studied theories to explain the formation of hot Jupiters. The former predicts that these planets can migrate up until the planet-star Roche separation ({a}{Roche}) and the latter predicts they will tidally circularize at a minimum distance of 2 {a}{Roche}. Considering long-running radial velocity and transit surveys have identified a couple hundred hot Jupiters to date, we can revisit the classic question of hot-Jupiter formation in a data-driven manner. We approach this problem using data from several exoplanet surveys (radial velocity, Kepler, HAT, and WASP) allowing for either a single population or a mixture of populations associated with these formation channels, and applying a hierarchical Bayesian mixture model of truncated power laws of the form {x}γ -1 to constrain the population-level parameters of interest (e.g., location of inner edges, γ, mixture fractions). Within the limitations of our chosen models, we find that the current radial velocity and Kepler sample of hot Jupiters can be well explained with a single truncated power-law distribution with a lower cutoff near 2 {a}{Roche}, a result that still holds after a decade, and γ =-0.51{+/- }0.200.19. However, the HAT and WASP data show evidence for multiple populations (Bayes factor ≈ {10}21). We find that 15{+/- }69 % reside in a component consistent with disk migration (γ =-0.04{+/- }1.270.53) and 85{+/- }96 % in one consistent with high-eccentricity migration (γ =-1.38{+/- }0.470.32). We find no immediately strong connections with some observed host star properties and speculate on how future exoplanet surveys could improve upon hot-Jupiter population inference.

  4. Dating Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stader, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Dating violence is a form of student-on-student victimization and is a serious school safety issue. Research indicates that at a minimum, 10 percent of high school students are victims of dating violence in one form or another. Among female high school students that date, some data indicate that as many as 30 percent may be victims of dating…

  5. High Latitude Mottling on Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The familiar banded appearance of Jupiter at low and middle latitudes gradually gives way to a more mottled appearance at high latitudes in this striking true color image taken Dec. 13, 2000, by NASA's Cassini spacecraft.The intricate structures seen in the polar region are clouds of different chemical composition, height and thickness. Clouds are organized by winds, and the mottled appearance in the polar regions suggests more vortex-type motion and winds of less vigor at higher latitudes.The cause of this difference is not understood. One possible contributor is that the horizontal component of the Coriolis force, which arises from the planet's rotation and is responsible for curving the trajectories of ocean currents and winds on Earth, has its greatest effect at high latitudes and vanishes at the equator. This tends to create small, intense vortices at high latitudes on Jupiter. Another possibility may lie in that fact that Jupiter overall emits nearly as much of its own heat as it absorbs from the Sun, and this internal heat flux is very likely greater at the poles. This condition could lead to enhanced convection at the poles and more vortex-type structures. Further analysis of Cassini images, including analysis of sequences taken over a span of time, should help us understand the cause of equator-to-pole differences in cloud organization and evolution.By the time this picture was taken, Cassini had reached close enough to Jupiter to allow the spacecraft to return images with more detail than what's possible with the planetary camera on NASA's Earth-orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. The resolution here is 114 kilometers (71 miles) per pixel. This contrast-enhanced, edge-sharpened frame was composited from images take at different wavelengths with Cassini's narrow-angle camera, from a distance of 19 million kilometers (11.8 million miles). The spacecraft was in almost a direct line between the Sun and Jupiter, so the solar illumination on Jupiter is almost full

  6. Thermometric Soots on Hot Jupiters?

    CERN Document Server

    Zahnle, K; Fortney, J J

    2009-01-01

    We use a 1D thermochemical and photochemical kinetics model to predict that the stratospheric chemistry of hot Jupiters should change dramatically as temperature drops from 1200 to 1000 K. At 1200 K methane is too unstable to reach the stratosphere in significant quantities, while thermal decomposition of water is a strong source of OH radicals that oxidize any hydrocarbons that do form to CO and CO$_2$. At 1000 K methane, although very reactive, survives long enough to reach the lower stratosphere, and the greater stability of water coupled with efficient scavenging of OH by H$_2$ raise the effective C/O ratio in the reacting gases above unity. Reduced products such as ethylene, acetylene, and hydrogen cyanide become abundant; such conditions favor polymerization and possible formation of PAHs and soots. Although low temperature is the most important factor favoring hydrocarbons in hot Jupiters, higher rates of vertical mixing and generally lower metallicities also favor organic synthesis. The peculiar prope...

  7. A Study of Jupiter Trojans

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Ola

    2012-01-01

    Jupiter Trojan asteroid dynamics have been studied for a long time but it is only within the last decades that the known population has become large enough to make other studies meaningful. In four articles I have been scratching the surface of the unknown Trojan knowledge space. Paper I presents photometric observations confirming a larger variety in surface redness for the smaller Trojans compared to the larger ones, in line with the groups in the outer main asteroid belt. However, the larg...

  8. Two Moons Meet over Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This beautiful image of the crescents of volcanic Io and more sedate Europa was snapped by New Horizons' color Multispectral Visual Imaging Camera (MVIC) at 10:34 UT on March 2, 2007, about two days after New Horizons made its closest approach to Jupiter. The picture was one of a handful of the Jupiter system that New Horizons took primarily for their artistic, rather than scientific value. This particular scene was suggested by space enthusiast Richard Hendricks of Austin, Texas, in response to an Internet request by New Horizons scientists for evocative, artistic imaging opportunities at Jupiter. This image was taken from a range of 4.6 million kilometers (2.8 million miles) from Io and 3.8 million kilometers (2.4 million miles) from Europa. Although the moons appear close in this view, a gulf of 790,000 kilometers (490,000 miles) separates them. The night side of Io is illuminated here by light reflected from Jupiter, which is out of the frame to the right. Europa's night side is completely dark, in contrast to Io, because that side of Europa faces away from Jupiter. Here, Io steals the show with its beautiful display of volcanic activity. Three volcanic plumes are visible. Most conspicuous is the enormous 300-kilometer (190-mile) -high plume from the Tvashtar volcano at the 11 o'clock position on Io's disk. Two much smaller plumes are barely visible: one from the volcano Prometheus, at the 9 o'clock position on the edge of Io's disk, and one from the volcano Amirani, seen between Prometheus and Tvashtar along Io's terminator (the line dividing day and night). The plumes appear blue because of the scattering of light by tiny dust particles ejected by the volcanoes, similar to the blue appearance of smoke. In addition, the contrasting red glow of hot lava can be seen at the source of the Tvashtar plume. The images are centered at 1 degree north, 60 degrees west on Io, and 0 degrees north, 149 degrees west on Europa. The color in this image was generated using

  9. Universalist ethics in extraterrestrial encounter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Seth D.

    2010-02-01

    If humanity encounters an extraterrestrial civilization, or if two extraterrestrial civilizations encounter each other, then the outcome may depend not only on the civilizations' relative strength to destroy each other but also on what ethics are held by one or both civilizations. This paper explores outcomes of encounter scenarios in which one or both civilizations hold a universalist ethical framework. Several outcomes are possible in such scenarios, ranging from one civilization destroying the other to both civilizations racing to be the first to commit suicide. Thus, attention to the ethics of both humanity and extraterrestrials is warranted in human planning for such an encounter. Additionally, the possibility of such an encounter raises profound questions for contemporary human ethics, even if such an encounter never occurs.

  10. Juno at Jupiter: Mission and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Scott

    2016-07-01

    The Juno mission is the second mission in NASA's New Frontiers program. Launched in August 2011, Juno arrives at Jupiter in July 2016. Juno science goals include the study of Jupiter's origin, interior structure, deep atmosphere, aurora and magnetosphere. Jupiter's formation is fundamental to the evolution of our solar system and to the distribution of volatiles early in the solar system's history. Juno's measurements of the abundance of Oxygen and Nitrogen in Jupiter's atmosphere, and the detailed maps of Jupiter's gravity and magnetic field structure will constrain theories of early planetary development. Juno's orbit around Jupiter is a polar elliptical orbit with perijove approximately 5000 km above the visible cloud tops. The payload consists of a set of microwave antennas for deep sounding, magnetometers, gravity radio science, low and high energy charged particle detectors, electric and magnetic field radio and plasma wave experiment, ultraviolet imaging spectrograph, infrared imager and a visible camera. The Juno design enables the first detailed investigation of Jupiter's interior structure, and deep atmosphere as well as the first in depth exploration of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere. The Juno mission design, science goals, and measurements related to the atmosphere of Jupiter will be presented.

  11. Current Status of the EJSM Jupiter Europa Orbiter: Mission Design and Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunthaner, Paula; Clark, K.; Pappalardo, R.; Greeley, R.; Hendrix, A.; Boldt, J.; Van Houten, T.; Jun, I.; Lock, R.; Ludwinski, J.; Rasmussen, R.; Tan-Wang, G.

    2008-09-01

    NASA and ESA have embarked on a joint study of a mission to Europa and the Jupiter system with orbiters developed by NASA, ESA, and possibly JAXA. An international Jupiter Joint Science Definition Team (JJSDT) is defining the science content for the Europa Orbiter (JEO) mission study run by NASA and for the Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO) mission study run by ESA. Engineering teams for both missions are working closely with the JJSDT to define mission concepts that optimize science, cost, and risk. The NASA-led JEO mission addresses a scientifically rich subset of the complete EJSM science goals and is designed to stand alone or in conjunction with the ESA-led JGO. This paper focuses on the NASA-led JEO mission and will describe the concept in the context of a standalone mission. An orbital mission to Europa is driven by the desire to investigate an astrobiological archetype for icy satellite habitability, with a warm, salty, water ocean with plausible energy sources. Additionally, JEO will explore the Jupiter system to better understand how Europa's possible habitability is related to the formation scenario of the other Jovian satellites. The JEO mission will perform 2.5 to 3 years of Jupiter system science, including encounters with Io, Ganymede and Callisto, before insertion into orbit around Europa for a comprehensive set of science campaigns lasting for up to one year. This paper will highlight the JEO mission design and implementation concept. The work reported was sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  12. The EJSM Jupiter-Ganymede Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, M.; Lebreton, J.-P.; Stankov, A.; Greeley, R.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Fujimoto, M.

    2008-09-01

    The Europa-Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), currently subject of a joint study by NASA, ESA and JAXA, would combine a fleet of three satellites in order to investigate in depth many questions related to the Jupiter System. These investigations are essential for our understanding of the emergence and evolution of habitable worlds, not only within the Solar System, but also for extrasolar planet investigations. Scientific targets of EJSM focus on Europa and Ganymede as a key pair of Galilean satellites, to address the questions on their habitability, formation, and internal structure, as well as the coupling with the whole Jovian system: Jupiter's atmosphere and interior, magnetosphere and magnetodisk.. In combination with a Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO that would be provided by NASA) and a Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter (JMO that would be provided by JAXA), ESA is studying a Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). The mission scenario includes a launch in 2020 with a transfer time to Jupiter of ~6 years. After the orbit insertion around Jupiter, a first phase (~2 years) will be devoted to Jupiter system and Callisto studies, with multiple flybys of Callisto planned at low altitude (~200 km), followed by a Ganymede orbit insertion and extensive study of Ganymede (~1 year). In depth comparative study of inner (Io and Europe) and outer (Ganymede and Callisto) satellites with combined payload of JEO and JGO will address the question of the geologic relative evolution of the satellites. On JGO, the transport phenomena in the magnetosphere of Jupiter will be studied in combination with JMO, and the Ganymede magnetosphere will be observed in situ. Jupiter atmosphere investigations on JGO will focus on coupling phenomena between troposphere, stratosphere and mesosphere, the stratospheric composition and the question of thermospheric heating.

  13. Warm Jupiters Are Less Lonely than Hot Jupiters: Close Neighbors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chelsea; Wu, Yanqin; Triaud, Amaury H. M. J.

    2016-07-01

    Exploiting the Kepler transit data, we uncover a dramatic distinction in the prevalence of sub-Jovian companions between systems that contain hot Jupiters (HJs) (periods inward of 10 days) and those that host warm Jupiters (WJs) (periods between 10 and 200 days). HJs, with the singular exception of WASP-47b, do not have any detectable inner or outer planetary companions (with periods inward of 50 days and sizes down to 2 R Earth). Restricting ourselves to inner companions, our limits reach down to 1 R Earth. In stark contrast, half of the WJs are closely flanked by small companions. Statistically, the companion fractions for hot and WJs are mutually exclusive, particularly in regard to inner companions. The high companion fraction of WJs also yields clues to their formation. The WJs that have close-by siblings should have low orbital eccentricities and low mutual inclinations. The orbital configurations of these systems are reminiscent of those of the low-mass close-in planetary systems abundantly discovered by the Kepler mission. This, and other arguments, lead us to propose that these WJs are formed in situ. There are indications that there may be a second population of WJs with different characteristics. In this picture, WASP-47b could be regarded as the extending tail of the in situ WJs into the HJ region and does not represent the generic formation route for HJs.

  14. Successful I.D. Encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorman, Margaret J.

    Instructional Development (I.D.) encounters are dependent for success on such variables as power, politics, promotion, and organizational placement. I.D. consultants must be aware of power bases or orientation of other personnel and clients, e.g., these four "power personalities" which affect their efforts in managing I.D. encounters: the gate…

  15. Encouragement from Jupiter for Europe's Titan Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Huygens will transmit scientific information for 150 minutes, from the outer reaches of Titan's cold atmosphere and all the way down to its enigmatic surface. For comparison, the Jupiter Probe radioed scientific data for 58 minutes as it descended about 200 kilometres into the outer part of the atmosphere of the giant planet. The parachutes controlling various stages of Huygens' descent will rely upon a system for deployment designed and developed in Europe that is nevertheless similar to that used by the Jupiter Probe. The elaborate sequence of operations in Huygens worked perfectly during a dramatic drop test from a stratospheric balloon over Sweden in May 1995, which approximated as closely as possible to events on Titan. The performance of the American Probe at Jupiter renews the European engineers' confidence in their own descent control system, and also in the lithium sulphur-dioxide batteries which were chosen to power both Probes. "The systems work after long storage in space," comments Hamid Hassan, ESA's Project Manager for Huygens. "Huygens will spend seven years travelling to Saturn's vicinity aboard the Cassini Orbiter. The Jupiter Probe was a passenger in Galileo for six years before its release, so there is no reason to doubt that Huygens will work just as well." Huygens will enter the outer atmosphere of Titan at 20,000 kilometres per hour. A heat shield 2.7 metres in diameter will withstand the friction and slow the Probe to a speed at which parachutes can be deployed. The size of the parachute for the main phase of the descent is chosen to allow Huygens to reach the surface in about 2 hours. The batteries powering Huygens will last for about 21/2 hours. Prepared for surprises A different perspective on the Jupiter Probe comes from Jean-Pierre Lebreton, ESA's Project Scientist for Huygens. The results contradicted many preconceptions of the Galileo scientists, particularly about the abundance of water and the structure of cloud layers. Arguments

  16. The Capture of Jupiter Trojans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbidelli, A.; Nesvorny, D.; Vokrouhlicky, D.

    2013-09-01

    The origin of Jupiter Trojans remained mysterious for decades. Particularly, it was difficult to explain the excitation of the inclinations of the Trojan population [1]. In 2005, Morbidelli et al. [2] proposed a scenario of capture from the trans-Neptunian disk, in the framework of the so-called "Nice model" [3,4]. This scenario explained in a natural way the observed orbital distribution of Trojans. The Nice model, however, evolved in the years, in order to satisfy an increasingly large number of constraints. It now appears that the dynamical evolution of the giant planets was different from that envisioned in [2]. Here, we assess again the process of capture of Trojans within this new evolution. We show that (6-8)×10 - 7 of the original trans-Neptunian planetesimals are captured in the Trojan region, with an orbital distribution consistent with the one observed. Relative to [2], the new capture mechanism has the potential of explaining the asymmetry between the L4 and L5 populations. Moreover, the resulting population of Trojans is consistent with that of the Irregular Satellites of Jupiter, which are captured in the same process; a few bodies from the main asteroid belt could also be captured in the Trojan cloud.

  17. Jupiter's magnetosphere and radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennel, C. F.; Coroniti, F. V.

    1979-01-01

    Radioastronomy and Pioneer data reveal the Jovian magnetosphere as a rotating magnetized source of relativistic particles and radio emission, comparable to astrophysical cosmic ray and radio sources, such as pulsars. According to Pioneer data, the magnetic field in the outer magnetosphere is radially extended into a highly time variable disk-shaped configuration which differs fundamentally from the earth's magnetosphere. The outer disk region, and the energetic particles confined in it, are modulated by Jupiter's 10 hr rotation period. The entire outer magnetosphere appears to change drastically on time scales of a few days to a week. In addition to its known modulation of the Jovian decametric radio bursts, Io was found to absorb some radiation belt particles and to accelerate others, and most importantly, to be a source of neutral atoms, and by inference, a heavy ion plasma which may significantly affect the hydrodynamic flow in the magnetosphere. Another important Pioneer finding is that the Jovian outer magnetosphere generates, or permits to escape, fluxes of relativistic electrons of such intensities that Jupiter may be regarded as the dominant source of 1 to 30 MeV cosmic ray electrons in the heliosphere.

  18. Atmospheric Escape from Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Murray-Clay, Ruth; Murray, Norman

    2008-01-01

    Photoionization heating from UV radiation incident on the atmospheres of hot Jupiters may drive planetary mass loss. We construct a model of escape that includes realistic heating and cooling, ionization balance, tidal gravity, and pressure confinement by the host star wind. We show that mass loss takes the form of a hydrodynamic ("Parker") wind, emitted from the planet's dayside during lulls in the stellar wind. When dayside winds are suppressed by the confining action of the stellar wind, nightside winds might pick up if there is sufficient horizontal transport of heat. A hot Jupiter loses mass at maximum rates of ~2 x 10^12 g/s during its host star's pre-main-sequence phase and ~2 x10^10 g/s during the star's main sequence lifetime, for total maximum losses of ~0.06% and ~0.6% of the planet's mass, respectively. For UV fluxes F_UV < 10^4 erg/cm^2/s, the mass loss rate is approximately energy-limited and is proportional to F_UV^0.9. For larger UV fluxes, such as those typical of T Tauri stars, radiative ...

  19. Engineering a Solution to Jupiter Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Karla; Magner, Thomas; Lisano, Michael; Pappalardo, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) would be an international mission with the overall theme of investigating the emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants. Its goals are to (1) explore Europa to investigate its habitability, (2) characterize Ganymede as a planetary object including its potential habitability and (3) explore the Jupiter system as an archetype for gas giants. NASA and ESA have concluded a detailed joint study of a mission to Europa, Ganymede, and the Jupiter system with conceptual orbiters developed by NASA and ESA. The baseline EJSM architecture consists of two primary elements operating simultaneously in the Jovian system: the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). JEO and JGO would execute an intricately choreographed exploration of the Jupiter System before settling into orbit around Europa and Ganymede, respectively. EJSM would directly address themes concerning the origin and evolution of satellite systems and water-rich environments in icy satellites. The potential habitability of the ocean-bearing moons Europa and Ganymede would be investigated, by characterizing the geophysical, compositional, geological, and external processes that affect these icy worlds. EJSM would also investigate Io and Callisto, Jupiter's atmosphere, and the Jovian magnetosphere. By understanding the Jupiter system and unraveling its history, the formation and evolution of gas giant planets and their satellites would be better known. Most importantly, EJSM would shed new light on the potential for the emergence of life in the celestial neighborhood and beyond. The EJSM baseline architecture would provide opportunities for coordinated synergistic observations by JEO and JGO of the Jupiter and Ganymede magnetospheres, the volcanoes and torus of Io, the atmosphere of Jupiter, and comparative planetology of icy satellites. Each spacecraft would conduct both synergistic dual-spacecraft investigations and stand

  20. The Art of the Encounter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éric Vautrin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available As the archives from the second half of Grotowski’s life were made available, this text focuses on the Polish master’s conceptions of theatre where he describes theatre as the art of the encounter. This paper simultaneously places this proposition in the context of questions of a specific time period, and reveals how this encounter is the anathema that will revert viewpoints both about the art of acting and the creation of theatrical relations. These researches on theatre as the art of the encounter continue today through the Open Program, one of the two groups of the Workcenter of Jerzy Grotowski and Thomas Richards, and, notably, their creations around American poet Allen Ginsberg, an author whose poetry intends, in a similar way, to encounter the other and the world.

  1. Strong Langmuir turbulence at Jupiter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Langmuir wave packets with short scale lengths less than an approximately equal to 100 lambda e have been observed in Jupiter's foreshock. Theoretical constraints on the electric fields and scale sizes of collapsing wave packets are summarized, extended and placed in a form suitable for easy comparison with Voyager and Ulysses data. The published data are reviewed and possible instrumental underestimation of fields discussed. New upper limits for the fields of the published wave packets are estimated. Wave packets formed at the nucleation scale from the observed large-scale fields cannot collapse because they are disrupted before collapse occurs. The published wave packets are quantitatively inconsistent with strong turbulence collapse. Strict constraints exist for more intense wave packets to be able to collapse: E greater than or approximately equals to 1-8 mV/m for scales less than or approximately equal to 100 lambda e. Means for testing these conclusions using Voyager and Ulysses data are suggested.

  2. Could Jupiter or Saturn Have Ejected a Fifth Giant Planet?

    CERN Document Server

    Cloutier, Ryan; Valencia, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Models of the dynamical evolution of the early solar system following the dispersal of the gaseous protoplanetary disk have been widely successful in reconstructing the current orbital configuration of the giant planets. Statistically, some of the most successful dynamical evolution simulations have initially included a hypothetical fifth giant planet, of ice giant mass, which gets ejected by a gas giant during the early solar system's proposed instability phase. We investigate the likelihood of an ice giant ejection event by either Jupiter or Saturn through constraints imposed by the current orbits of their wide-separation regular satellites Callisto and Iapetus respectively. We show that planetary encounters that are sufficient to eject an ice giant, often provide excessive perturbations to the orbits of Callisto and Iapetus making it difficult to reconcile a planet ejection event with the current orbit of either satellite. Quantitatively, we compute the likelihood of reconciling a regular Jovian satellite ...

  3. Overview of Juno Results at Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Scott; Connerney, Jack; Levin, Steve

    2017-04-01

    Juno is the first mission to investigate Jupiter using a close polar orbit. The Juno science goals include the study of Jupiter interior composition and structure, deep atmosphere and its polar magnetosphere. All orbits have peri-jove at approximately 5000 km above Jupiter's visible cloud tops. The payload consists of a set of microwave antennas for deep sounding, magnetometers, gravity radio science, low and high energy charged particle detectors, plasma wave antennas, ultraviolet imaging spectrograph, infrared imager and spectrometer and a visible camera. The Juno mission design, an overview of the early science results from Juno, and a description of the collaborative Earth based campaign will be presented.

  4. Juno's first glimpse of Jupiter's complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Scott; Levin, Steven; Bagenal, Fran

    2017-08-01

    Preliminary results from NASA's Juno mission are presented in this special issue of Geophysical Research Letters. The data were gathered by nine scientific instruments as the Juno spacecraft approached Jupiter on the dawn flank, was inserted into Jupiter orbit on 4 July 2016, and made the first polar passes close to the planet. The first results hint that Jupiter may not have a distinct core, indicate puzzling deep atmospheric convection, and reveal complex small-scale structure in the magnetic field and auroral processes that are distinctly different from those at Earth.

  5. New Views of Jupiter's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J. A.

    1998-09-01

    Jupiter's rings are the archetype of ethereal planetary rings (very-low optical-depth bands containing micron-sized "dust"). As a result of much improved observations by Galileo (Ockert-Bell* -- most citations are et al. and Icarus in press* or this meeting) and Keck (de Pater*), we now understand the nature of such rings. The ring has three components: a 104 km-thick toroidal halo (1.4-1.7 RJ; normal optical depth t = 10-6), a thin main ring (1.7-1.8 RJ; t = 10-6), and a pair of exterior gossamer rings (1.8-3.5RJ; t = 10-7). The main ring has patchy ( 20-30 percent) brightness. The ring is reddish and its particles satisfy a -2.5 differential power-law size distribution. Because particle lifetimes are brief, the rings must be continually regenerated, by collisions into parent bodies, which may be unseen or may be the known small ring-moons (Thomas*, Simonelli). The gossamer ring seems to be collisional ejecta derived from the ring-moons Amalthea and Thebe, and evolving inward by Poynting-Robertson drag (Burns). The particles drift through many electromagnetic resonances, clustering around synchronous orbit, which produce jumps in the particles' inclinations (Hamilton). The main ring is probably debris from Adrastea and Metis, which orbit in the equatorial plane. The halo particles are driven vertically by electromagnetic forces, which may be resonant (Schaffer & Burns) or not (Horanyi & Cravens). When halo orbits become highly distorted, particles are lost into Jupiter. Similar faint rings may be attendant to all small, close-in satellites (Showalter).

  6. Shoemaker-Levy 9/JUPITER Collision Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Information Service (Tel.: +4989-32006276; Fax: +4989-3202362), to obtain a personal invitation. ESO is preparing special arrangements for the Chilean media; they will soon be announced directly to the involved. PHOTO CAPTION ESO PR PHOTO 10/94-1: PORTRAIT OF A DOOMED COMET These two photos from the ESO La Silla observatory show the individual nuclei of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, now headed for collision with Jupiter on 16 - 22 July 1994. The wide-field photo (below, left) was obtained by Klaus Jockers and Galina Chernova (Max-Planck-Institute fur Aeronomie, Katlenburg, Lindau, Germany) on May 1, 1994. For this 5 min exposure in red light they used a CCD camera at the MPIfAe/Hoher List focal reducer at the ESO 1-metre telescope. The entire nuclear train (the "string of pearls") is very well seen, together with the sunlight-reflecting dust from the nuclei, all on one side. On this date, the comet was 654 million km from the Earth and the angular extension of the train was about 5.3 arcmin, corresponding to a projected length of just over 1 million km. A 15 min CCD image was obtained for astrometric purposes on May 11, 1994, by Jean-Francois Claeskens at the Danish 1.5 m telescope at La Silla; it is here reproduced in close-up to show well the individual nuclei, in particular the fainter ones. The bright object to the upper right is a 10th mag star. Note that the stars in the field are somewhat trailed, since the telescope was set to follow the motion of the comet. The first nucleus to hit Jupiter will be "A", here seen 42 mm from the left edge and 33 mm below the upper edge of the large picture. The last is "W", 43 mm above the lower edge and 9 mm from the right edge. The comet was 657 million km from the Earth and the train was somewhat longer, 5.8 arcmin, i.e. the projected length was now 1.1 million km. Technical information: Wide-Field: pixel size 1.5 arcsec; scale on photo: 5.1 arcsec/mm; field size: 12.2 x 6.6 arcmin; 5 min exposure; gunn-r filtre. Close-Up: pixel size 0

  7. Astronomers find distant planet like Jupiter

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Astronomers searching for planetary systems like our solar system have found a planet similar to Jupiter orbiting a nearby star similar to our Sun, about 90 light-years from Earth, according to researchers (1/2 page).

  8. Kepler constraints on planets near hot Jupiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Ragozzine, Darin; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; /UC, Santa Cruz, Astron. Astrophys.; Carter, Joshua A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Ford, Eric B.; /Florida U.; Holman, Matthew J.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Rowe, Jason F.; /NASA, Ames; Welsh, William F.; /San Diego State U., Astron. Dept.; Borucki, William J.; /NASA, Ames; Boss, Alan P.; /Carnegie Inst., Wash., D.C., DTM; Ciardi, David R.; /Caltech /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2012-05-01

    We present the results of a search for planetary companions orbiting near hot Jupiter planet candidates (Jupiter-size candidates with orbital periods near 3 d) identified in the Kepler data through its sixth quarter of science operations. Special emphasis is given to companions between the 2:1 interior and exterior mean-motion resonances. A photometric transit search excludes companions with sizes ranging from roughly two-thirds to five times the size of the Earth, depending upon the noise properties of the target star. A search for dynamically induced deviations from a constant period (transit timing variations) also shows no significant signals. In contrast, comparison studies of warm Jupiters (with slightly larger orbits) and hot Neptune-size candidates do exhibit signatures of additional companions with these same tests. These differences between hot Jupiters and other planetary systems denote a distinctly different formation or dynamical history.

  9. Analysis of JUPITER experiment in ZPPR-9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1980-09-15

    Information and data from the ZPPR-9 reactor JUPITER experiment are presented concerning a general description of data and methods; criticality; reaction rate ratio and reaction rate distribution; Doppler and sample reactivity worth; sodium void worth; and control rod worth.

  10. Kepler constraints on planets near hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Jason H; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Carter, Joshua A; Ford, Eric B; Holman, Matthew J; Rowe, Jason F; Welsh, William F; Borucki, William J; Boss, Alan P; Ciardi, David R; Quinn, Samuel N

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a search for planetary companions orbiting near hot Jupiter planet candidates (Jupiter-size candidates with orbital periods near 3 days) identified in the Kepler data through its sixth quarter of science operations. Special emphasis is given to companions between the 2:1 interior and exterior mean-motion resonances. A photometric transit search excludes companions with sizes ranging from roughly 2/3 to 5 times the size of the Earth, depending upon the noise properties of the target star. A search for dynamically induced deviations from a constant period (transit timing variations or TTVs) also shows no significant signals. In contrast, comparison studies of warm Jupiters (with slightly larger orbits) and hot Neptune-size candidates do exhibit signatures of additional companions with these same tests. These differences between hot Jupiters and other planetary systems denote a distinctly different formation or dynamical history.

  11. Far infrared spectrophotometry of Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, E. F.; Goorvitch, D.; Simpson, J. P.; Strecker, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    Infrared spectral measurements of Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn were obtained from 100 to 470 kaysers and, by taking Mars as a calibration source, brightness temperatures of Jupiter and Saturn were determined with approximately 5 kayser resolution. Internal luminosities were determined from the data and are reported to be approximately 8 times 10 to the minus tenth power of the sun's luminosity for Jupiter and approximately 3.6 times 10 to the minus tenth power of the sun's luminosity for Saturn. Comparison of data with spectra predicted by models suggests the need for an opacity source in addition to gaseous hydrogen and ammonia to help explain Jupiter's observed spectrum in the vicinity of 250 kaysers.

  12. Jupiter Great Red Spot and White Ovals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    This photo of Jupiter was taken by Voyager 1 on March 1, 1979. The spacecraft was 3 million miles (5 million kilometers) from Jupiter at the time. The photo shows Jupiter's Great Red Spot (upper right) and the turbulent region immediately to the west. At the middle right of the frame is one of several white ovals seen on Jupiter from Earth. The structure in every feature here is far better than has ever been seen from any telescopic observations. The Red Spot and the white oval both reveal intricate and involved structure. The smallest details that can be seen in this photo are about 55 miles (95 kilometers) across. JPL manages and controls the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  13. Tidal Response of Preliminary Jupiter Model

    CERN Document Server

    Wahl, Sean M; Militzer, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    In anticipation of improved observational data for Jupiter's gravitational field from the Juno spacecraft, we predict the static tidal response for a variety of Jupiter interior models based on ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures. We calculate hydrostatic-equilibrium gravity terms using the non-perturbative concentric Maclaurin Spheroid (CMS) method that eliminates lengthy expansions used in the theory of figures. Our method captures terms arising from the coupled tidal and rotational perturbations, which we find to be important for a rapidly-rotating planet like Jupiter. Our predicted static tidal Love number $k_2 = 0.5900$ is $\\sim$10\\% larger than previous estimates. The value is, as expected, highly correlated with the zonal harmonic coefficient $J_2$, and is thus nearly constant when plausible changes are made to interior structure while holding $J_2$ fixed at the observed value. We note that the predicted static $k_2$ might change due to Jupiter's dynamical response to the Galilea...

  14. Kepler constraints on planets near hot Jupiters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Jason H; Ragozzine, Darin; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Carter, Joshua A; Ford, Eric B; Holman, Matthew J; Rowe, Jason F; Welsh, William F; Borucki, William J; Boss, Alan P; Ciardi, David R; Quinn, Samuel N

    2012-05-22

    We present the results of a search for planetary companions orbiting near hot Jupiter planet candidates (Jupiter-size candidates with orbital periods near 3 d) identified in the Kepler data through its sixth quarter of science operations. Special emphasis is given to companions between the 21 interior and exterior mean-motion resonances. A photometric transit search excludes companions with sizes ranging from roughly two-thirds to five times the size of the Earth, depending upon the noise properties of the target star. A search for dynamically induced deviations from a constant period (transit timing variations) also shows no significant signals. In contrast, comparison studies of warm Jupiters (with slightly larger orbits) and hot Neptune-size candidates do exhibit signatures of additional companions with these same tests. These differences between hot Jupiters and other planetary systems denote a distinctly different formation or dynamical history.

  15. Encountering social work through STS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Rasmus

    Encountering social work through STS: Marginalization, materials and knowledge In this presentation, I attempt to produce an encounter between STS and social work. Concretely, I focus on the subset of social work called “local community work”, which in Denmark is used to intervene on marginalized...... and their inhabitants. Local community work derives from this assemblage of policy and knowledge as the “social” intervention commonly deployed. Based on an ethnographic field work, I examine how local community practices attempt to interpellate specific futures for individuals and their local environments. I do...... this by examining the materials and types of knowledge that participate in shaping local community work practices and encounters between local community workers and residents in marginalized housing areas. Through this analysis, I argue that social work research can benefit from orienting itself more concretely...

  16. Jupiter's Radiation Belts: Can Pioneer 10 Survive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, W N; Birmingham, T J; Mead, G D

    1973-12-07

    Model calculations of Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts indicate that the Galilean satellites can reduce particle fluxes in certain regions of the inner magnetosphere by as much as six orders of magnitude. Average fluxes should be reduced by a factor of 100 or more along the Pioneer 10 trajectory through the heart of Jupiter's radiation belts in early December. This may be enough to prevent serious radiation damage to the spacecraft.

  17. Tidal Response of Preliminary Jupiter Model

    OpenAIRE

    Wahl, Sean M; Hubbard, Willam B.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    In anticipation of improved observational data for Jupiter's gravitational field from the Juno spacecraft, we predict the static tidal response for a variety of Jupiter interior models based on ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures. We calculate hydrostatic-equilibrium gravity terms using the non-perturbative concentric Maclaurin Spheroid (CMS) method that eliminates lengthy expansions used in the theory of figures. Our method captures terms arising from the coupled tidal...

  18. The Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter : An ESA Contribution to the Europa-Jupiter System Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drossart, Pierre; Blanc, M.; Lebreton, J. P.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Greeley, R.; Fujimoto, M.; EJSM/Jupiter Science Definition Team

    2008-09-01

    In the framework of an outer planets mission, under study after the NASA-Juno mission, the Europa-Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) would combine a fleet of up to three satellites in order to investigate in depth many questions related to the Jupiter System. These investigations are essential for our understanding of the emergence and evolution of habitable worlds, not only within the Solar System, but also for extrasolar planets investigations. Scientific targets of EJSM will focus on Europa and Ganymede as a key pair of Galilean satellites, to address the questions on their habitability, formation, and internal structure, as well as the coupling with the whole Jovian system : Jupiter's atmosphere and interior, magnetosphere and magnetodisk. .In combination with a Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO likely provided by NASA) and a Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter (JMO likely provided by JAXA), ESA is studying a Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). The mission scenario includes a direct launch in 2020 with a transfer time to Jupiter of 6 years. After the orbit insertion around Jupiter, a first phase ( 2 years) will be devoted to Jupiter system and Callisto studies, with multiple flybys of Callisto planned at low altitude ( 200 km), followed by a Ganymede orbit insertion and extensive study of Ganymede ( 1 year). In-depth comparative study of inner (Io and Europa) and outer (Ganymede and Callisto) satellites with combined payload of JEO and JGO will address the question of the relative geological evolution of the satellites. On JGO, the transport phenomena in the magnetosphere of Jupiter will be studied in combination with JMO, and the Ganymede magnetosphere will be observed in situ. Jupiter atmosphere investigations on JGO will focus on coupling phenomena between troposphere, stratosphere and mesosphere, the stratospheric composition and the question of thermospheric heating.

  19. Probing Below the Visible Cloud Layers in Jupiter's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pater, Imke; Sault, Robert J.; Butler, Bryan J.; DeBoer, David R.; Wong, Michael H.

    2016-10-01

    Visible and near-infrared images of the giant planets reveal a multitude of clouds, ranging in size from tiny, hardly visible, features to giant storm systems, such as Jupiter's Great Red Spot and Oval BA. At radio wavelengths we can probe altitudes in Jupiter's atmosphere below these visible cloud layers. We used the upgraded Very Large Array to map this unexplored region down to ~10 bar. We will present full radio maps at frequencies between 4 and ~35 GHz, with typical spatial resolutions of order 1000-2000 km. We will also show spectra and radiative transfer calculations of individual features, such as the Great Red Spot, Oval BA, hot spots and ammonia-rich "plumes". Our maps are complementary to observations planned for Juno's microwave radiometer (MWR). MWR's field-of-view is tiny, ~1000 km at the highest frequencies at perijove, and is limited to extremely narrow swaths of longitude; as such, our VLA maps will provide regional and global context at wavelengths overlapping with Juno MWR. Several maps at 8-12 GHz, at a spatial resolution of ~1000 km, will be taken during Juno perijove passes.Our analysis to date, based on 4-18 GHz maps, reveal a dynamically active planet at pressures up ammonia gas from Jupiter's deep atmosphere in "plumes", at concentrations similar to that measured by the Galileo Probe. At higher altitudes, the ammonia gas in these plumes will condense out, and as such could be responsible for the spectroscopically identified fresh ammonia ice clouds detected by the Galileo spacecraft at these latitudes.

  20. A Lakatosian Encounter with Probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chick, Helen

    2010-01-01

    There is much to be learned and pondered by reading "Proofs and Refutations" by Imre Lakatos (Lakatos, 1976). It highlights the importance of mathematical definitions, and how definitions evolve to capture the essence of the object they are defining. It also provides an exhilarating encounter with the ups and downs of the mathematical reasoning…

  1. Radiocarbon dating of terrestrial carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigati, Jeffrey S.; Rink, W. Jack; Thompson, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial carbonates encompass a wide range of materials that potentially could be used for radiocarbon (14C) dating. Biogenic carbonates, including shells and tests of terrestrial and aquatic gastropods, bivalves, ostracodes, and foraminifera, are preserved in a variety of late Quaternary deposits and may be suitable for 14C dating. Primary calcareous deposits (marls, tufa, speleothems) and secondary carbonates (rhizoliths, fracture fill, soil carbonate) may also be targeted for dating when conditions are favorable. This chapter discusses issues that are commonly encountered in 14C dating of terrestrial carbonates, including isotopic disequilibrium and open-system behavior, as well as methods used to determine the reliability of ages derived from these materials. Recent methodological advancements that may improve the accuracy and precision of 14C ages of terrestrial carbonates are also highlighted.

  2. Using Jupiter's Synchrotron Radiation as a Probe into Jupiter's Inner Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, S. J.; Gulkis, S.; Klein, M. J.; Thorne, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    The Jovian decimetric emission is caused by the combined emission of synchrotron radiation originating from the relativistic electrons trapped in Jupiter's 'Van Allen radiation belts' and thermal emission from the planet's atmosphere. Synchrotron radiation characteristics and variations (which provides insight into the physical properties of Jupiter's inner radiation belts) will be amplified and discussed.

  3. Temporal Variations in Jupiter's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Chanover, N. J.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Hammel, H. B.; dePater, I.; Noll, K.; Wong, M.; Clarke, J.; Sanchez-Levega, A.; Orton, G. S.; Gonzaga, S.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, Jupiter has undergone many atmospheric changes from storms turning red to global. cloud upheavals, and most recently, a cornet or asteroid impact. Yet, on top of these seemingly random changes events there are also periodic phenomena, analogous to observed Earth and Saturn atmospheric oscillations. We will present 15 years of Hubble data, from 1994 to 2009, to show how the equatorial tropospheric cloud deck and winds have varied over that time, focusing on the F953N, F41 ON and F255W filters. These filters give leverage on wind speeds plus cloud opacity, cloud height and tropospheric haze thickness, and stratospheric haze, respectively. The wind data consistently show a periodic oscillation near 7-8 S latitude. We will discuss the potential for variations with longitude and cloud height, within the calibration limits of those filters. Finally, we will discuss the role that large atmospheric events, such as the impacts in 1994 and 2009, and the global upheaval of 2007, have on temporal studies, This work was supported by a grant from the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program. HST observational support was provided by NASA through grants from Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under contract NAS5-26555.

  4. The possible contamination of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Joe

    1988-01-01

    The Galileo probe, though at present its future is uncertain, would, if not sterilized, represent a good chance of contaminating Jupiter. Most scientists opposed to sterilizing the probe argue that to order the probe sterilized would be the death of the project, since sterilization would entail a reconstruction of the probe, and there are not enough funds to accomplish this. These scientists, however, are ignoring a relatively simple and inexpensive alternative to the traditional heat sterilization method. The main threat of contamination comes from Galileo's exterior surfaces: the shell of the probe and its parachute. The probe innermost components would not represent a threat since the probe is sealed. In light of the fact that only the exterior of Galileo would have to be sterilized, heat would not have to be used as a method of sterilization. Instead, various gas mixtures could be sprayed entirely over the probe and its parachute, gases which would kill any and all bacteria. This idea is more thoroughly examined.

  5. Jupiter's radiation belts and atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pater, I.; Dames, H. A. C.

    1979-01-01

    Maps and stripscans of the radio emission from Jupiter were made during the Pioneer 10 flyby in December 1973 at wavelengths of 6 cm, 21 cm, and 50 cm using the Westerbork telescope in the Netherlands. With this instrument the disk of the planet was resolved at 6 and 21 cm. The pictures are averaged over 15 deg of Jovian longitude. At 21 cm the stripscans clearly show the existence of a 'hot region' in the radiation belts at a System III longitude (1965.0) of 255 + or - 10 deg. Its flux is about 9% of the total nonthermal flux, and it has a volume emissivity enhanced by a factor of about 1.6 with respect to the general radiation belts. The temperature of the thermal disk at 21 cm appears to be 290 + or - 20 K. This is likely due to a high ammonia mixing ratio in the atmosphere, a factor of 4-5 larger than the expected solar value of 0.00015.

  6. Hot Jupiters and cool stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villaver, Eva; Mustill, Alexander J. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Módulo 8, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Livio, Mario [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Siess, Lionel, E-mail: eva.villaver@uam.es [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Université Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2014-10-10

    Close-in planets are in jeopardy, as their host stars evolve off the main sequence (MS) to the subgiant and red giant phases. In this paper, we explore the influences of the stellar mass (in the range 1.5-2 M {sub ☉}), mass-loss prescription, planet mass (from Neptune up to 10 Jupiter masses), and eccentricity on the orbital evolution of planets as their parent stars evolve to become subgiants and red giants. We find that planet engulfment along the red giant branch is not very sensitive to the stellar mass or mass-loss rates adopted in the calculations, but quite sensitive to the planetary mass. The range of initial separations for planet engulfment increases with decreasing mass-loss rates or stellar masses and increasing planetary masses. Regarding the planet's orbital eccentricity, we find that as the star evolves into the red giant phase, stellar tides start to dominate over planetary tides. As a consequence, a transient population of moderately eccentric close-in Jovian planets is created that otherwise would have been expected to be absent from MS stars. We find that very eccentric and distant planets do not experience much eccentricity decay, and that planet engulfment is primarily determined by the pericenter distance and the maximum stellar radius.

  7. THE PHOTOECCENTRIC EFFECT AND PROTO-HOT JUPITERS. I. MEASURING PHOTOMETRIC ECCENTRICITIES OF INDIVIDUAL TRANSITING PLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, Rebekah I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-10, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Johnson, John Asher, E-mail: rdawson@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    Exoplanet orbital eccentricities offer valuable clues about the history of planetary systems. Eccentric, Jupiter-sized planets are particularly interesting: they may link the 'cold' Jupiters beyond the ice line to close-in hot Jupiters, which are unlikely to have formed in situ. To date, eccentricities of individual transiting planets primarily come from radial-velocity measurements. Kepler has discovered hundreds of transiting Jupiters spanning a range of periods, but the faintness of the host stars precludes radial-velocity follow-up of most. Here, we demonstrate a Bayesian method of measuring an individual planet's eccentricity solely from its transit light curve using prior knowledge of its host star's density. We show that eccentric Jupiters are readily identified by their short ingress/egress/total transit durations-part of the 'photoeccentric' light curve signature of a planet's eccentricity-even with long-cadence Kepler photometry and loosely constrained stellar parameters. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo exploration of parameter posteriors naturally marginalizes over the periapse angle and automatically accounts for the transit probability. To demonstrate, we use three published transit light curves of HD 17156 b to measure an eccentricity of e = 0.71{sup +0.16}{sub -0.09}, in good agreement with the discovery value e = 0.67 {+-} 0.08 based on 33 radial-velocity measurements. We present two additional tests using Kepler data. In each case, the technique proves to be a viable method of measuring exoplanet eccentricities and their confidence intervals. Finally, we argue that this method is the most efficient, effective means of identifying the extremely eccentric, proto-hot Jupiters predicted by Socrates et al.

  8. Rectification and enhancement of three severely distorted images of Jupiter's north polar region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, R. N.; Burke, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    A number of high-resolution images of Jupiter's northern hemisphere were received from the imaging photopolarimeter (IPP) aboard Pioneer 11 in 1974. Erratic scanning of the IPP caused severe distortions in three scientifically important images, which until now have never been satisfactorily restored. New rectification and enhancement techniques, implemented on up-to-date image processing hardware, yielding images of sufficient quality to enable full scientific exploitation of the photometric data are reported.

  9. Archaeoastronomy and the chronology of the Temple of Jupiter at Baalbek

    OpenAIRE

    Magli, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    One of the most complex architectural feats ever conceived is the magnificent temple of Jupiter at Baalbek, Lebanon. Several issues remain unsolved about this site, and in particular the chronology and dating of the two podia and the true nature of the cult. We present here some hints coming from orientation and from other features of the temple, which seem to point to a unified project of both podia, originally conceived under Herod the Great.

  10. Archaeoastronomy and the chronology of the Temple of Jupiter at Baalbek

    CERN Document Server

    Magli, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    One of the most complex architectural feats ever conceived is the magnificent temple of Jupiter at Baalbek, Lebanon. Several issues remain unsolved about this site, and in particular the chronology and dating of the two podia and the true nature of the cult. We present here some hints coming from orientation and from other features of the temple, which seem to point to a unified project of both podia, originally conceived under Herod the Great.

  11. Monitoring inter-group encounters in wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan E. Watson; Rich Cronn; Neal A. Christensen

    1998-01-01

    Many managers face the challenge of monitoring rates of visitor encounters in wilderness. This study (1) provides estimates of encounter rates through use of several monitoring methods, (2) determines the relationship between the various measures of encounter rates, and (3) determines the relationship between various indirect predictors of encounter rates and actual...

  12. Detection and analysis of Jupiter's decametric micropulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebo, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    The occurrence of Jupiter's decametric radio emission can be correlated with the central meridian longitude of Jupiter as if the active regions were radio transmitters placed at fixed longitudes on its surface. These active regions are commonly called sources and are labelled Source A, Jovian longitude = 200 deg, Source B = 100 deg and Source C =300 deg. These sources are not always active. However, they can be turned-on if Jupiter's innermost Galilean moon, Io, is in the right phase. In fact, if Io is found 90 deg from superior geocentric conjunction (maximum eastern elongation) and if source B is simultaneously on the central meridian, source B radiation is almost guaranteed, whereas source C radiation is highly likely when Io is found 240 deg from superior geocentric conjunction. Source A radiation is largely independent of Io's position. Interestingly, the Io-related radio storms contain unusually rapid events that can only be properly studied using wide-band techniques.

  13. Radiation-Hydrodynamics of Hot Jupiter Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Menou, Kristen

    2009-01-01

    Radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres is usually treated in the static limit, i.e., neglecting atmospheric motions. We argue that hot Jupiter atmospheres, with possibly fast (sonic) wind speeds, may require a more strongly coupled treatment, formally in the regime of radiation-hydrodynamics. To lowest order in v/c, relativistic Doppler shifts distort line profiles along optical paths with finite wind velocity gradients. This leads to flow-dependent deviations in the effective emission and absorption properties of the atmospheric medium. Evaluating the overall impact of these distortions on the radiative structure of a dynamic atmosphere is non-trivial. We present transmissivity and systematic equivalent width excess calculations which suggest possibly important consequences for radiation transport in hot Jupiter atmospheres. If winds are fast and bulk Doppler shifts are indeed important for the global radiative balance, accurate modeling and reliable data interpretation for hot Jupiter atmospheres may p...

  14. Principal components analysis of Jupiter VIMS spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, G.; Formisano, V.; D'Aversa, E.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, Christophe; Chamberlain, M.C.; Hansen, G.; Hibbits, K.; Showalter, M.; Filacchione, G.

    2004-01-01

    During Cassini - Jupiter flyby occurred in December 2000, Visual-Infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) instrument took several image cubes of Jupiter at different phase angles and distances. We have analysed the spectral images acquired by the VIMS visual channel by means of a principal component analysis technique (PCA). The original data set consists of 96 spectral images in the 0.35-1.05 ??m wavelength range. The product of the analysis are new PC bands, which contain all the spectral variance of the original data. These new components have been used to produce a map of Jupiter made of seven coherent spectral classes. The map confirms previously published work done on the Great Red Spot by using NIMS data. Some other new findings, presently under investigation, are presented. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  15. Jupiter's Great Red Spot and White Ovals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    This photo of Jupiter was taken by Voyager 1 on the evening of March 1, 1979, from a distance of 2.7 million miles (4.3 million kilometers). The photo shows Jupiter's Great Red Spot (top) and one of the white ovals than can be seen in Jupiter's atmosphere from Earth. The white ovals were seen to form in 1939, and 1940, and have remained more or less constant ever since. None of the structure and detail evident in these features have ever been seen from Earth. The Great Red Spot is three times as large as Earth. Also evident in the picture is a great deal of atmospheric detail that will require further study for interpretation. The smallest details that can be seen in this picture are about 45 miles (80 kilometers across. JPL manages and controls the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  16. Thermal tides on a hot Jupiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh H.-F.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Following the linear analysis laid out by Gu & Ogilvie 2009 (hereafter GO09, we investigate the dynamical response of a non-synchronized hot Jupiter to stellar irradiation. Besides the internal and Rossby waves considered by GO09, we study the Kelvin waves excited by the diurnal Fourier harmonic of the prograde stellar irradiation. We also present a 2-dimensional plot of internal waves excited by the semi-diurnal component of the stellar irradiation and postulate that thermal bulges may arise in a hot Jupiter. Whether our postulation is valid and is consistent with the recent results from Arras & Socrates (2009b requires further investigation.

  17. Jupiter after Pioneer - A progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonough, T. R.

    1974-01-01

    In December 1973, Pioneer 10 became the first spacecraft to reach the vicinity of Jupiter. The spacecraft passed through the Jovian magnetosphere in two weeks and sent back more than 300 pictures of the big planet. Measurements were conducted of EM fields, energetic particles, and micrometeoroids. Radio occultations observed are discussed along with observations in the infrared and ultraviolet range, magnetic measurements, questions of trajectory analysis, and data obtained with the aid of a plasma analyzer. Pioneer 10 has confirmed as inescapable the fact that Jupiter radiates more energy than it receives from the sun.

  18. Radiation belts of jupiter: a second look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillius, R W; McIlwain, C E; Mogro-Campero, A

    1975-05-02

    The outbound leg of the Pioneer 11 Jupiter flyby explored a region farther from the equator than that traversed by Pioneer 10, and the new data require modification or augmentation of the magnetodisk model based on the Pioneer 10 flyby. The inner moons of Jupiter are sinks of energetic particles and sometimes sources. A large spike of particles was found near lo. Multiple peaks occurred in the particle fluxes near closest approach to the planet; this structure may be accounted for by a complex magnetic field configuration. The decrease in proton flux observed near minimum altitude on the Pioneer 10 flyby appears attributable to particle absorption by Amalthea.

  19. Exploring the Diversity of Jupiter-Class Planets (Discussion Meeting Contribution)

    CERN Document Server

    Fletcher, Leigh N; Barstow, Joanna K; de Kok, Remco J; Lee, Jae-Min; Aigrain, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Royal Society Discussion Meeting (2013) `Characterizing exoplanets'. Of the 900+ confirmed exoplanets discovered since 1995 for which we have constraints on their mass (i.e., not including Kepler candidates), 75% have masses larger than Saturn (0.3MJ), 53% are more massive than Jupiter, and 67% are within 1 AU of their host stars. And yet the term `hot Jupiter' fails to account for the incredible diversity of this class of object, which exists on a continuum of giant planets from the cool jovians of our own solar system to the highly-irradiated, tidally-locked hot roasters. We review theoretical expectations for the temperatures, molecular composition and cloud properties of Jupiter-class objects under a variety of different conditions. We discuss the classification schemes for these Jupiter-class planets proposed to date, including the implications for our own Solar System giant planets and the pitfalls associated with classification at this early stage of exoplanetary spectroscopy. We discuss the range of p...

  20. Age of Jupiter inferred from the distinct genetics and formation times of meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijer, Thomas S; Burkhardt, Christoph; Budde, Gerrit; Kleine, Thorsten

    2017-06-27

    The age of Jupiter, the largest planet in our Solar System, is still unknown. Gas-giant planet formation likely involved the growth of large solid cores, followed by the accumulation of gas onto these cores. Thus, the gas-giant cores must have formed before dissipation of the solar nebula, which likely occurred within less than 10 My after Solar System formation. Although such rapid accretion of the gas-giant cores has successfully been modeled, until now it has not been possible to date their formation. Here, using molybdenum and tungsten isotope measurements on iron meteorites, we demonstrate that meteorites derive from two genetically distinct nebular reservoirs that coexisted and remained spatially separated between ∼1 My and ∼3-4 My after Solar System formation. The most plausible mechanism for this efficient separation is the formation of Jupiter, opening a gap in the disk and preventing the exchange of material between the two reservoirs. As such, our results indicate that Jupiter's core grew to ∼20 Earth masses within <1 My, followed by a more protracted growth to ∼50 Earth masses until at least ∼3-4 My after Solar System formation. Thus, Jupiter is the oldest planet of the Solar System, and its solid core formed well before the solar nebula gas dissipated, consistent with the core accretion model for giant planet formation.

  1. Extreme Environments Technologies for Probes to Venus and Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Tibor S.; Kolawa, Elizabeth A.; Peterson, Craig E.; Cutts, James A.; Belz, Andrea P.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the technologies that are used to mitigate extreme environments for probes at Venus and Jupiter. The contents include: 1) Extreme environments at Venus and Jupiter; 2) In-situ missions to Venus and Jupiter (past/present/future); and 3) Approaches to mitigate conditions of extreme environments for probes with systems architectures and technologies.

  2. Interfaith dialogue as moral encounter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galal, Lise Paulsen

    The concept of interfaith dialogue has been introduced and developed by scholars of different religions. The aim has been to find solutions from within religion to handle and optimise encounters with religious ‘Others’. Furthermore, interfaith dialogue has increasingly become a tool to solve...... problems of integration and geopolitical conflicts. Thus the focus has changed from religion as the solution to an ontologically given differentiation, to religion being the problem that must be transgressed in order to meet on equal terms. In this paper, I discuss the setup of interfaith dialogue meetings...

  3. Special relativity a first encounter

    CERN Document Server

    Giulini, Domenico

    2005-01-01

    Special relativity provides the foundations of our knowledge of space and time. Without it, our understanding of the world, and its place in the universe, would be unthinkable. This book gives a concise, elementary, yet exceptionally modern, introduction to special relativity. It is a gentle yet serious 'first encounter', in that it conveys a true understanding rather than purely reports the basic facts. Only very elementary mathematical knowledge is needed to master it (basichigh-school maths), yet it will leave the reader with a sound understanding of the subject. Special Relativity: A First

  4. Research on genetics of rice heading date

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Heading date is one of the most important traits for rice adaptation to cultivation area and crop seasons, and it is mainly determined by photoperiod, basic vegetative growth, and temperature of cultivars. The diversity of combinations of photo-sensitive varieties and the basic vegetative, makes the heading date varied. On one hand, this supplies abundant resources for different ecotypes breeding; on the other hand, it complicates the inheritance of heading date. In recent years, transgression of late maturity has often been encountered, especially between indica and japonica subspecies, this had inhabited the use of hybrid vigor. Therefore, understanding the inheritance basis of heading date is very important for breeding practices.

  5. On the influence of the plasma generated by comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 on Jupiter`s magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stabile, F.; Zimbardo, G. [Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza, Univ. della Calabria (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    1997-11-01

    The impact of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter has created a variety of magnetospheric plasmas which were detected by their electromagnetic emissions. By means of the Dessler-Parker-Sckopke relation we estimate the perturbation of Jupiter`s magnetic field. It appears that the produced plasma may explain the observed decrease of UV lines in Io`s torus.

  6. JUPITER PROJECT - MERGING INVERSE PROBLEM FORMULATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The JUPITER (Joint Universal Parameter IdenTification and Evaluation of Reliability) project seeks to enhance and build on the technology and momentum behind two of the most popular sensitivity analysis, data assessment, calibration, and uncertainty analysis programs used in envi...

  7. Dramatic Change in Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, A. A.; Wong, M. H.; Rogers, J. H.; Orton, G. S.; de Pater, I.; Asay-Davis, X.; Carlson, R. W.; Marcus, P. S.

    2015-01-01

    Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) is one of its most distinct and enduring features, having been continuously observed since the 1800's. It currently spans the smallest latitude and longitude size ever recorded. Here we show analyses of 2014 Hubble spectral imaging data to study the color, structure and internal dynamics of this long-live storm.

  8. Towards Chemical Constraints on Hot Jupiter Migration

    CERN Document Server

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Kennedy, Grant M

    2014-01-01

    The origin of hot Jupiters -- gas giant exoplanets orbiting very close to their host stars -- is a long-standing puzzle. Planet formation theories suggest that such planets are unlikely to have formed in-situ but instead may have formed at large orbital separations beyond the snow line and migrated inward to their present orbits. Two competing hypotheses suggest that the planets migrated either through interaction with the protoplanetary disk during their formation, or by disk-free mechanisms such as gravitational interactions with a third body. Observations of eccentricities and spin-orbit misalignments of hot Jupiter systems have been unable to differentiate between the two hypotheses. In the present work, we suggest that chemical depletions in hot Jupiter atmospheres might be able to constrain their migration mechanisms. We find that sub-solar carbon and oxygen abundances in Jovian-mass hot Jupiters around Sun-like stars are hard to explain by disk migration. Instead, such abundances are more readily expla...

  9. Jupiter as a Giant Cosmic Ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rimmer, Paul B; Helling, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    We explore the feasibility of using the atmosphere of Jupiter to detect Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR's). The large surface area of Jupiter allows us to probe cosmic rays of higher energies than previously accessible. Cosmic ray extensive air showers in Jupiter's atmosphere could in principle be detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi observatory. In order to be observed, these air showers would need to be oriented toward the Earth, and would need to occur sufficiently high in the atmosphere that the gamma rays can penetrate. We demonstrate that, under these assumptions, Jupiter provides an effective cosmic ray "detector" area of $3.3 \\times 10^7$ km$^2$. We predict that Fermi-LAT should be able to detect events of energy $>10^{21}$ eV with fluence $10^{-7}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ at a rate of about one per month. The observed number of air showers may provide an indirect measure of the flux of cosmic rays $\\gtrsim 10^{20}$ eV. Extensive air showers also produce a synchrotron signature that may ...

  10. The Origin of Retrograde Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoz, Smadar; Farr, W.; Lithwick, Y.; Rasio, F.; Teyssandier, J.

    2011-09-01

    The search for extra-solar planets has led to the surprising discovery of many Jupiter-like planets in very close proximity to their host star, the so-called ``hot Jupiters'' (HJ). Even more surprisingly, many of these HJs have orbits that are eccentric or highly inclined with respect to the equator of the star, and some (about 25%) even orbiting counter to the spin direction of the star. This poses a unique challenge to all planet formation models. We show that secular interactions between Jupiter-like planet and another perturber in the system can easily produce retrograde HJ orbits. We show that in the frame of work of secular hierarchical triple system (the so-called Kozai mechanism) the inner orbit's angular momentum component parallel to the total angular momentum (i.e., the z-component of the inner orbit angular momentum) need not be constant. In fact, it can even change sign, leading to a retrograde orbit. A brief excursion to very high eccentricity during the chaotic evolution of the inner orbit allows planet-star tidal interactions to rapidly circularize that orbit, decoupling the planets and forming a retrograde hot Jupiter. We estimate the relative frequencies of retrograde orbits and counter to the stellar spin orbits using Monte Carlo simulations, and find that the they are consistent with the observations. The high observed incidence of planets orbiting counter to the stellar spin direction may suggest that planet--planet secular interactions are an important part of their dynamical history.

  11. Hot Jupiters and Super-Earths

    CERN Document Server

    Mustill, Alexander James; Johansen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    We explore the role of dynamics in shaping planetary system multiplicities, focussing on two particular problems. (1) We propose that the lack of close-in super-Earths in hot Jupiter systems is a signature of the migration history of the hot Jupiters and helps to discriminate between different mechanisms of migration. We present N-body simulations of dynamical migration scenarios where proto-hot Jupiters are excited to high eccentricities prior to tidal circularisation and orbital decay. We show that in this scenario, the eccentric giant planet typically destroys planets in the inner system, in agreement with the observed lack of close super-Earth companions to hot Jupiters. (2) We explore the role of the dynamics of outer systems in affecting the multiplicities of close-in systems such as those discovered by Kepler. We consider specifically the effects of planet--planet scattering and Kozai perturbations on an exterior giant planet on the architecture of the inner system, and evaluate the ability of such sce...

  12. Europa--Jupiter's Icy Ocean Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, L.

    1999-01-01

    Europa is a puzzle. The sixth largest moon in our solar system, Europa confounds and intrigues scientists. Few bodies in the solar system have attracted as much scientific attention as this moon of Jupiter because of its possible subsurface ocean of water. The more we learn about this icy moon, the more questions we have.

  13. JunoCam's Imaging of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Glenn; Hansen, Candice; Momary, Thomas; Caplinger, Michael; Ravine, Michael; Atreya, Sushil; Ingersoll, Andrew; Bolton, Scott; Rogers, John; Eichstaedt, Gerald

    2017-04-01

    Juno's visible imager, JunoCam, is a wide-angle camera (58° field of view) with 4 color filters: red, green and blue (RGB) and methane at 889 nm, designed for optimal imaging of Jupiter's poles. Juno's elliptical polar orbit offers unique views of Jupiter's polar regions with spatial scales as good as 50 km/pixel. At closest approach ("perijove") the images have spatial scale down to ˜3 km/pixel. As a push-frame imager on a rotating spacecraft, JunoCam uses time-delayed integration to take advantage of the spacecraft spin to extend integration time to increase signal. Images of Jupiter's poles reveal a largely uncharted region of Jupiter, as nearly all earlier spacecraft except Pioneer 11 have orbited or flown by close to the equatorial plane. Poleward of 64-68° planetocentric latitude, Jupiter's familiar east-west banded structure breaks down. Several types of discrete features appear on a darker, bluish-cast background. Clusters of circular cyclonic spirals are found immediately around the north and south poles. Oval-shaped features are also present, ranging in size down to JunoCam's resolution limits. The largest and brightest features usually have chaotic shapes; animations over ˜1 hour can reveal cyclonic motion in them. Narrow linear features traverse tens of degrees of longitude and are not confined in latitude. JunoCam also detected optically thin clouds or hazes that are illuminated beyond the nightside ˜1-bar terminator; one of these detected at Perijove lay some 3 scale heights above the main cloud deck. Tests have been made to detect the aurora and lightning. Most close-up images of Jupiter have been acquired at lower latitudes within 2 hours of closest approach. These images aid in understanding the data collected by other instruments on Juno that probe deeper in the atmosphere. When Jupiter was too close to the sun for ground-based observers to collect data between perijoves 1 and 2, JunoCam took a sequence of routine images to monitor large

  14. Jupiter internal structure: the effect of different equations of state

    CERN Document Server

    Miguel, Yamila; Fayon, Lucile

    2016-01-01

    Heavy elements, even though its smaller constituent, are crucial to understand Jupiter formation history. Interior models are used to determine the amount of heavy elements in Jupiter interior, nevertheless this range is still subject to degeneracies due to uncertainties in the equations of state. Prior to Juno mission data arrival, we present Jupiter optimized calculations exploring the effect of different model parameters in the determination of Jupiter's core and heavy element's mass. We perform comparisons between equations of state published recently. The interior model of Jupiter is calculated from the equations of hydrostatic equilibrium, mass and energy conservation, and energy transport. The mass of the core and heavy elements is adjusted to match Jupiter's observational constrains radius and gravitational moments. We show that the determination of Jupiter interior structure is tied to the estimation of its gravitational moments and the accuracy of equations of state of hydrogen, helium and heavy ele...

  15. The EJSM Jupiter-Europa Orbiter: Mission Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Clark, K.; Greeley, R.; Hendrix, A. R.; Tan-Wang, G.; Lock, R.; van Houten, T.; Ludwinski, J.; Petropoulis, A.; Jun, I.; Boldt, J.; Kinnison, J.

    2008-09-01

    Missions to explore Europa have been imagined ever since the Voyager mission first suggested that Europa was geologically very young. Subsequently, Galileo supplied fascinating new insights into that satellite's secrets. The Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) would be the NASA-led portion of the Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), an international mission with orbiters developed by NASA, ESA and possibly JAXA. JEO would address key components of the complete EJSM science objectives and would be designed to function alone or in conjunction with the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter and JAXA-led Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter. The JEO mission concept uses a single orbiter flight system which would travel to Jupiter to perform a multi-year study of the Jupiter system and Europa, including 2.5-3 years of Jupiter system science and a comprehensive Europa orbit phase of upt ot a year. This abstract describes the design concept of this mission.

  16. H{sub 2}O ABUNDANCES IN THE ATMOSPHERES OF THREE HOT JUPITERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Hedges, Christina [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Crouzet, Nicolas; McCullough, Peter R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Deming, Drake, E-mail: nmadhu@ast.cam.ac.uk [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    The core accretion theory for giant planet formation predicts enrichment of elemental abundances in planetary envelopes caused by runaway accretion of planetesimals, which is consistent with measured super-solar abundances of C, N, P, S, Xe, and Ar in Jupiter's atmosphere. However, the abundance of O, which is expected to be the most dominant constituent of planetesimals, is unknown for solar system giant planets, owing to the condensation of water in their ultra-cold atmospheres, thereby posing a key unknown in solar system formation. On the other hand, hundreds of extrasolar ''hot Jupiters'' are known with very high temperatures (≥1000 K), making them excellent targets to measure H{sub 2}O abundances and, hence, oxygen in their atmospheres. We constrain the atmospheric H{sub 2}O abundances in three hot Jupiters (HD 189733b, HD 209458b, and WASP-12b), spanning a wide temperature range (1200-2500 K), using their near-infrared transmission spectra obtained using the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We report conclusive measurements of H{sub 2}O in HD 189733b and HD 209458b, while that in WASP-12b is not well constrained by present data. The data allow nearly solar as well as significantly sub-solar abundances in HD 189733b and WASP-12b. However, for HD 209458b, we report the most precise H{sub 2}O measurement in an exoplanet to date that suggests a ∼20-135 × sub-solar H{sub 2}O abundance. We discuss the implications of our results on the formation conditions of hot Jupiters and on the likelihood of clouds in their atmospheres. Our results highlight the critical importance of high-precision spectra of hot Jupiters for deriving their H{sub 2}O abundances.

  17. Pan-Planets: Searching for hot Jupiters around cool dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermeier, C.; Koppenhoefer, J.; Saglia, R. P.; Henning, Th.; Bender, R.; Kodric, M.; Deacon, N.; Riffeser, A.; Burgett, W.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Flewelling, H.; Hodapp, K. W.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Price, P. A.; Sweeney, W.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2016-03-01

    The Pan-Planets survey observed an area of 42 sq deg. in the galactic disk for about 165 h. The main scientific goal of the project is the detection of transiting planets around M dwarfs. We establish an efficient procedure for determining the stellar parameters Teff and log g of all sources using a method based on SED fitting, utilizing a three-dimensional dust map and proper motion information. In this way we identify more than 60 000 M dwarfs, which is by far the largest sample of low-mass stars observed in a transit survey to date. We present several planet candidates around M dwarfs and hotter stars that are currently being followed up. Using Monte Carlo simulations we calculate the detection efficiency of the Pan-Planets survey for different stellar and planetary populations. We expect to find 3.0+3.3-1.6 hot Jupiters around F, G, and K dwarfs with periods lower than 10 days based on the planet occurrence rates derived in previous surveys. For M dwarfs, the percentage of stars with a hot Jupiter is under debate. Theoretical models expect a lower occurrence rate than for larger main sequence stars. However, radial velocity surveys find upper limits of about 1% due to their small sample, while the Kepler survey finds a occurrence rate that we estimate to be at least 0.17b(+0.67-0.04) %, making it even higher than the determined fraction from OGLE-III for F, G and K stellar types, 0.14 (+0.15-0.076) %. With the large sample size of Pan-Planets, we are able to determine an occurrence rate of 0.11 (+0.37-0.02) % in case one of our candidates turns out to be a real detection. If, however, none of our candidates turn out to be true planets, we are able to put an upper limit of 0.34% with a 95% confidence on the hot Jupiter occurrence rate of M dwarfs. This limit is a significant improvement over previous estimates where the lowest limit published so far is 1.1% found in the WFCAM Transit Survey. Therefore we cannot yet confirm the theoretical prediction of a lower

  18. Three spacecraft observe Jupiter's glowing polar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The aurorae on Jupiter are like the Aurorae Borealis and Australis on the Earth, although visible only by ultraviolet light. They flicker in a similar way in response to variations in the solar wind of charged particles blowing from the Sun. While Galileo monitored the changing environment of particles and magnetism in Jupiter's vicinity, IUE recorded surprisingly large and rapid variations in the overall strength of the auroral activity. IUE's main 45-centimetre telescope did not supply images,but broke up the ultraviolet rays into spectra, like invisible rainbows, from which astrophysicists could deduce chemical compositions, motions and temperatures in the cosmic objects under examination. In the case of Jupiter's aurorae, the strongest emission came from activated hydrogen atoms at a wavelength of 1216 angstroms. The Hubble Space Telescope's contributions to the International Jupiter Watch included images showing variations in the form of the aurorae, and "close-up" spectra of parts of the auroral ovals. Astronomers will compare the flickering aurorae on Jupiter with concurrent monitoring of the Sun and the solar wind by the ESA-NASA SOHO spacecraft and several satellites of the Interagency Solar-Terrestrial Programme. It is notable that changes in auroral intensity by a factor of two or three occurred during the 1996 observational period, even though the Sun was in an exceptionally quiet phase, with very few sunspots. In principle, a watch on Jupiter's aurorae could become a valuable means of checking the long-range effects of solar activity, which also has important consequences for the Earth. The situation at Jupiter is quite different from the Earth's, with the moons strongly influencing the planet's space environment. But with Hubble busy with other work, any such Jupiter-monitoring programme will have to await a new ultraviolet space observatory. IUE observed Jupiter intensively in 1979-80 in conjunction with the visits of NASA's Voyager spacecraft, and

  19. Studying the Atmospheres of the Most Intriguing WASP Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendl, M.; Delrez, L.; Gillon, M.; Queloz, D.

    2013-09-01

    Among the over 300 transiting planets confirmed to date, approximately 130 have been found by groundbased wide angle transit surveys such asWASP. While these surveys are not sensitive enough to detect lowmass planets, they excel at picking out rare hot- Jupiters orbiting reasonably bright stars (V mag = 9 - 11) across the sky. These planets occupy a favorable region in parameter space, as they show frequent and deep transits. Due to the proximity to their host stars these gas giants possess hot extended atmospheres making them ideal targets for the study of their atmospheres via transmission and occultation spectrophotometry. During occultation, the flux emerging from the planetary dayside is eliminated. By comparing the flux in- and out-of occultation, the planet-to-star brightness ratio can be measured. Observations in different passbands yield a measure of the planetary spectral energy distribution and thereby allow to determine the atmospheric temperature structure, heat redistribution efficiency, albedo, and to place constraints on the atmospheric composition. From the spectro-photometric observation of transits, we can measure wavelength dependencies in the effective planetary radius that are sensitive to signatures of chemical elements in the planetary atmosphere. We present results of ongoing observing campaigns employing these methods to study the atmospheres of hot Jupiters discovered by the WASP survey. In particular we show results for the very short-period planet WASP-19b based on data from the 1m-class Euler-Swiss and TRAPPIST telescopes, as well as a transmission spectrum of the low-density hot Saturn WASP-49b obtained from FORS2 at the VLT/UT1.

  20. High spatial and spectral resolution 10-micron observations of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, A. T.; Ridgway, S. T.; Knacke, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    Ten-micrometer spectra of the North Tropical Zone, North Equatorial Belt, and Great Red Spot at a spectral resolution of 1.1/cm are compared to synthetic spectra. These ground-based spectra were obtained simultaneously with the Voyager 1 encounter with Jupiter in March, 1979. The NH3 vertical distribution is found to decrease with altitude significantly faster than the saturated vapor pressure curve and is different for the three observed regions. Spatial variability in the NH3 mixing ratio could be caused by changes in the amount of NH3 condensation or in the degree of the NH3 photolysis. The C2H6 emission at 12 microns has approximately the same strength at the North Tropical Zone and North Equatorial Belt, but it is 30% weaker at the Great Red Spot. A cooler temperature inversion or a smaller abundance of C2H6 could explain the lower C2H6 emission over the Great Red Spot.

  1. Alien encounter a scientific novel

    CERN Document Server

    Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    It has been nearly 100 years since the Apollo moon landings, when Jack and Vladimir, two astronauts on a mission to Venus, discover a mysterious void related to indigenous life on the planet. Subsequently more voids are detected on Earth, Mars, Titan, and, quite ominously, inside a planetoid emerging from the Kuiper belt. Jack is sent to investigate the voids in the Solar System and intercept the planetoid - which, as becomes increasingly clear, is inhabited by alien life forms. Jack and his crew will have little time to understand their alien biochemistry, abilities, behavior patterns, resilience, and technology, but also how these life forms relate to the voids. Humankind's first encounter with these exotic life forms couldn't be more fateful, becoming a race against time to save life on Earth and to reveal the true nature of the voids, which seem to be intrinsically related to life and the universe itself. In this novel, the author combines many topics related to state-of-the-art research in the field of...

  2. Encounters with Translations of Happiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Titchkosky

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This special issue edited by Katie Aubrecht demonstrates that a focus on translations of happiness makes us attend to the interpretive process animating social relations. There are many registers of translation that individuals, communities, and the state make use of as they grapple with relations to happiness. Among the vast array of historical registers that aim to make happiness comprehensible or compelling, medicine and politics are two of the most noteworthy. Moving from one register to another, such as from institutional versions of happiness as a medically regulated matter, to its appearance in situations of war, trauma, illness, local community or state, between these differing registers, we come to re-encounter happiness in many important ways as this special issue demonstrates. This issue thus invites its readers to question modernity’s progressive interest in and use of happiness as a way to narrate and assemble our essential inter-relatedness.

  3. Warm Jupiters from Secular Planet–Planet Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovich, Cristobal; Tremaine, Scott

    2016-10-01

    Most warm Jupiters (gas-giant planets with 0.1 {{au}}≲ a≲ 1 au) have pericenter distances that are too large for significant orbital migration by tidal friction. We study the possibility that the warm Jupiters are undergoing secular eccentricity oscillations excited by an outer companion (a planet or star) in an eccentric and/or mutually inclined orbit. In this model, the warm Jupiters migrate periodically, in the high-eccentricity phase of the oscillation, but are typically observed at lower eccentricities. We show that in this model the steady-state eccentricity distribution of the warm Jupiters is approximately flat, which is consistent with the observed distribution if we restrict the sample to warm Jupiters with detected outer planetary companions. The eccentricity distribution of warm Jupiters without companions exhibits a peak at e≲ 0.2 that must be explained by a different formation mechanism. Based on a population synthesis study, we find that high-eccentricity migration excited by an outer planetary companion (1) can account for ∼ 20 % of the warm Jupiters and most of the warm Jupiters with e≳ 0.4; and (2) can produce most of the observed population of hot Jupiters, with a semimajor axis distribution that matches the observations, but fails to account adequately for ∼ 60 % of hot Jupiters with projected obliquities ≲ 20^\\circ . Thus ∼ 20 % of the warm Jupiters and ∼ 60 % of the hot Jupiters can be produced by high-eccentricity migration. We also provide predictions for the expected mutual inclinations and spin-orbit angles of the planetary systems with hot and warm Jupiters produced by high-eccentricity migration.

  4. Europa Planetary Protection for Juno Jupiter Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Douglas E.; Abelson, Robert D.; Johannesen, Jennie R.; Lam, Try; McAlpine, William J.; Newlin, Laura E.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Juno mission launched in 2011 and will explore the Jupiter system starting in 2016. Juno's suite of instruments is designed to investigate the atmosphere, gravitational fields, magnetic fields, and auroral regions. Its low perijove polar orbit will allow it to explore portions of the Jovian environment never before visited. While the Juno mission is not orbiting or flying close to Europa or the other Galilean satellites, planetary protection requirements for avoiding the contamination of Europa have been taken into account in the Juno mission design.The science mission is designed to conclude with a deorbit burn that disposes of the spacecraft in Jupiter's atmosphere. Compliance with planetary protection requirements is verified through a set of analyses including analysis of initial bioburden, analysis of the effect of bioburden reduction due to the space and Jovian radiation environments, probabilistic risk assessment of successful deorbit, Monte-Carlo orbit propagation, and bioburden reduction in the event of impact with an icy body.

  5. Jumping Jupiter can explain Mercury's orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Roig, Fernando; DeSouza, Sandro Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The orbit of Mercury has large values of eccentricity and inclination that cannot be easily explained if this planet formed on a circular and coplanar orbit. Here, we study the evolution of Mercury's orbit during the instability related to the migration of the giant planets in the framework of the jumping Jupiter model. We found that some instability models are able to produce the correct values of Mercury's eccentricity and inclination, provided that relativistic effects are included in the precession of Mercury's perihelion. The orbital excitation is driven by the fast change of the normal oscillation modes of the system corresponding to the perihelion precession of Jupiter (for the eccentricity), and the nodal regression of Uranus (for the inclination).

  6. The EJSM Jupiter Europa Orbiter: Planning Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Clark, K.; Greeley, R.; Hendrix, A. R.; Boldt, J.; Tan-Wang, G.; Lock, R.; van Houten, T.; Ludwinski, J.

    2008-09-01

    In the decade since the first return of Europa data by the Galileo spacecraft, the scientific understanding of Europa has greatly matured leading to the formulation of sophisticated new science objectives to be addressed through the acquisition of new data. The Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) is one component of the proposed multi-spacecraft Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) designed to obtain data in support of these new science objectives. The JEO planning payload, while notional, is used to quantify engineering aspects of the mission and spacecraft design, and operational scenarios required to obtain the data necessary to meet the science objectives. The instruments were defined to understand the viability of an approach to meet the measurement objectives, perform in the radiation environment and meet the planetary protection requirements. The actual instrument suite would ultimately be the result of an Announcement of Opportunity (AO) selection process carried out by NASA.

  7. Radiation Environment for the Jupiter Europa Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Insoo

    2008-09-01

    One of the major challenges for the Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) mission would be that the spacecraft should be designed to survive an intense radiation environment expected at Jupiter and Europa. The proper definition of the radiation environments is the important first step, because it could affect almost every aspects of mission and spacecraft design. These include optimizing the trajectory to minimize radiation exposure, determining mission lifetime, selecting parts, materials, detectors and sensors, shielding design, etc. The radiation environments generated for the 2008 JEO study will be covered, emphasizing the radiation environment mainly responsible for the total ionizing dose (TID) and displacement damage dose (DDD). The latest models developed at JPL will be used to generate the TID and DDD environments. Finally, the major radiation issues will be summarized, and a mitigation plan will be discussed.

  8. The Escaping Upper Atmospheres of Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Eric; Jones, Gabrielle; Uribe, Ana; Carson, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Hot Jupiters are massive gaseous planets which orbit closely to their parent star. The strong stellar irradiation at these small orbital separations causes the temperature of the upper atmosphere of the planet to rise. This can cause the planet's atmosphere to escape into space, creating an exoplanet outflow. We ascertained which factors determine the presence and structure of these outflows by creating one dimensional simulations of the density, pressure, velocity, optical depth, and neutral fraction of hot Jupiter atmospheres. This was done for planets of masses and radii ranging from 0.5-1.5 Mj and 0.5-1.5 Rj. We found the outflow rate to be highest for a planet of 0.5 Mj and 1.5 Rj at 5.3×10-14 Mj/Yr. We also found that the higher the escape velocity, the lower the chance of the planet having an outflow.

  9. Secular orbital evolution of Jupiter family comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, H.; Gabryszewski, R.; Wajer, P.; Wiśniowski, T.; Wójcikowski, K.; Szutowicz, S.; Valsecchi, G. B.; Morbidelli, A.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The issue of the long term dynamics of Jupiter family comets (JFCs) involves uncertain assumptions about the physical evolution and lifetimes of these comets. Contrary to what is often assumed, real effects of secular dynamics cannot be excluded and therefore merit investigation. Aims: We use a random sample of late heavy bombardment cometary projectiles to study the long-term dynamics of JFCs by a Monte Carlo approach. In a steady-state picture of the Jupiter family, we investigate the orbital distribution of JFCs, including rarely visited domains like retrograde orbits or orbits within the outer parts of the asteroid main belt. Methods: We integrate 100 000 objects over a maximum of 100 000 orbital revolutions including the Sun, a comet, and four giant planets. Considering the steady-state number of JFCs to be proportional to the total time spent in the respective orbital domain, we derive the capture rate based on observed JFCs with small perihelia and large nuclei. We consider a purely dynamical model and one where the nuclei are eroded by ice sublimation. Results: The JFC inclination distribution is incompatible with our erosional model. This may imply that a new type of comet evolution model is necessary. Considering that comets may live for a long time, we show that JFCs can evolve into retrograde orbits as well as asteroidal orbits in the outer main belt or Cybele regions. The steady-state capture rate into the Jupiter family is consistent with 1 × 109 scattered disk objects with diameters D > 2 km. Conclusions: Our excited scattered disk makes it difficult to explain the JFC inclination distribution, unless the physical evolution of JFCs is more intricate than assumed in standard, erosional models. Independent of this, the population size of the Jupiter family is consistent with a relatively low-mass scattered disk.

  10. Modelling of Jupiter's Innermost Radiation Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov, J. D.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    In order to understand better source and loss processes for energetic trapped protons near Jupiter, a modification of de Pater and Goertz' finite difference diffusion calculations for Jovian equatorial energetic electrons is made to apply to the case of protons inside the orbit of Metis. Explicit account is taken of energy loss in the Jovian ring. Comparison of the results is made with Galileo Probe measurements.

  11. DIRECTLY IMAGING TIDALLY POWERED MIGRATING JUPITERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Subo; Katz, Boaz; Socrates, Aristotle [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2013-01-10

    Upcoming direct-imaging experiments may detect a new class of long-period, highly luminous, tidally powered extrasolar gas giants. Even though they are hosted by {approx} Gyr-'old' main-sequence stars, they can be as 'hot' as young Jupiters at {approx}100 Myr, the prime targets of direct-imaging surveys. They are on years-long orbits and presently migrating to 'feed' the 'hot Jupiters'. They are expected from 'high-e' migration mechanisms, in which Jupiters are excited to highly eccentric orbits and then shrink semimajor axis by a factor of {approx}10-100 due to tidal dissipation at close periastron passages. The dissipated orbital energy is converted to heat, and if it is deposited deep enough into the atmosphere, the planet likely radiates steadily at luminosity L {approx} 100-1000 L{sub Jup}(2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}-2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} L{sub Sun }) during a typical {approx} Gyr migration timescale. Their large orbital separations and expected high planet-to-star flux ratios in IR make them potentially accessible to high-contrast imaging instruments on 10 m class telescopes. {approx}10 such planets are expected to exist around FGK dwarfs within {approx}50 pc. Long-period radial velocity planets are viable candidates, and the highly eccentric planet HD 20782b at maximum angular separation {approx}0.''08 is a promising candidate. Directly imaging these tidally powered Jupiters would enable a direct test of high-e migration mechanisms. Once detected, the luminosity would provide a direct measurement of the migration rate, and together with mass (and possibly radius) estimate, they would serve as a laboratory to study planetary spectral formation and tidal physics.

  12. Solar wind influence on Jupiter's aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyalay, Szilard; Vogt, Marissa F.; Withers, Paul; Bunce, Emma J.

    2016-10-01

    Jupiter's main auroral emission is driven by a system of corotation enforcement currents that arises to speed up outflowing Iogenic plasma and is not due to the magnetosphere-solar wind interaction like at Earth. The solar wind is generally expected to have only a small influence on Jupiter's magnetosphere and aurora compared to the influence of rotational stresses due to the planet's rapid rotation. However, there is considerable observational evidence that the solar wind does affect the magnetopause standoff distance, auroral radio emissions, and the position and brightness of the UV auroral emissions. Using the Michigan Solar Wind Model (mSWiM) to predict the solar wind conditions upstream of Jupiter we have identified intervals of high and low solar wind dynamic pressure in the Galileo dataset, and use this information to quantify how a magnetospheric compression affects the magnetospheric field configuration. We have developed separate spatial fits to the compressed and nominal magnetic field data, accounting for variations with radial distance and local time. These two fits can be used to update the flux equivalence mapping model of Vogt et al. (2011), which links auroral features to source regions in the middle and outer magnetosphere. The updated version accounts for changing solar wind conditions and provides a way to quantify the expected solar wind-induced variability in the ionospheric mapping of the main auroral emission, satellite footprints, and other auroral features. Our results are highly relevant to interpretation of the new auroral observations from the Juno mission.

  13. Hubble Gallery of Jupiter's Galilean Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This is a Hubble Space Telescope 'family portrait' of the four largest moons of Jupiter, first observed by the Italian scientist Galileo Galilei nearly four centuries ago. Located approximately one-half billion miles away, the moons are so small that, in visible light, they appear as fuzzy disks in the largest ground-based telescopes. Hubble can resolve surface details seen previously only by the Voyager spacecraft in the early 1980s. While the Voyagers provided close-up snapshots of the satellites, Hubble can now follow changes on the moons and reveal other characteristics at ultraviolet and near-infrared wavelengths.Over the past year Hubble has charted new volcanic activity on Io's active surface, found a faint oxygen atmosphere on the moon Europa, and identified ozone on the surface of Ganymede. Hubble ultraviolet observations of Callisto show the presence of fresh ice on the surface that may indicate impacts from micrometeorites and charged particles from Jupiter's magnetosphere.Hubble observations will play a complementary role when the Galileo spacecraft arrives at Jupiter in December of this year.This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the World Wide Web on the Space Telescope Science Institute home page at URL http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/

  14. Structures of the Planets Jupiter and Saturn

    CERN Document Server

    Kerley, Gerald I

    2013-01-01

    New equations of state (EOS) for hydrogen, helium, and compounds containing heavier elements are used to construct models for the structures of the planets Jupiter and Saturn. Good agreement with the gravitational moments J2 and J4 is obtained with a model that uses a two-layer gas envelope, in which the inner region is denser than the outer one, together with a small, dense core. It is possible to match J2 with a homogeneous envelope, but an envelope with a denser inner region is needed to match both moments. The two-layer envelope also gives good agreement with the global oscillation data for Jupiter. In Jupiter, the boundary between the inner and outer envelopes occurs at 319 GPa, with an 8% density increase. In Saturn, it occurs at 227 GPa, with a 69% density increase. The differences between the two planets show that the need for a density increase is not due to EOS errors. It is also shown that helium enrichment cannot be the cause of the density increase. The phenomenon can be explained as the result o...

  15. Directly Imaging Tidally Powered Migrating Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Subo; Socrates, Aristotle

    2012-01-01

    We show that ongoing direct imaging experiments may detect a new class of long-period, highly luminous, tidally powered extrasolar gas giants. Even though they are hosted by Gyr-"old" main-sequence stars, they can be as "hot" as young Jupiters at ~100 Myr, the prime targets of direct imaging surveys. These planets, with years-long orbits, are presently migrating to "feed" the "hot Jupiters" in steady state. Their existence is expected from a class of "high-e" migration mechanisms, in which gas giants are excited to highly eccentric orbits and then shrink their semi-major axis by factor of ~ 10-100 due to tidal dissipation at successive close periastron passages. The dissipated orbital energy is converted to heat, and if it is deposited deep enough into the planet atmosphere, the planet likely radiates steadily at luminosity ~2-3 orders of magnitude larger than that of our Jupiter during a typical Gyr migration time scale. Their large orbital separations and expected high planet-to-star flux ratios in IR make ...

  16. Illuminating Hot Jupiters in caustic crossing

    CERN Document Server

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2010-01-01

    In recent years a large number of Hot Jupiters orbiting in a very close orbit around the parent stars have been explored with the transit and doppler effect methods. Here in this work we study the gravitational microlensing effect of a binary lens on a parent star with a Hot Jupiter revolving around it. Caustic crossing of the planet makes enhancements on the light curve of the parent star in which the signature of the planet can be detected by high precision photometric observations. We use the inverse ray shooting method with tree code algorithm to generate the combined light curve of the parent star and the planet. In order to investigate the probability of observing the planet signal, we do a Monte-Carlo simulation and obtain the observational optical depth of $\\tau \\sim 10^{-8}$. We show that about ten years observations of Galactic Bulge with a network of telescopes will enable us detecting about ten Hot Jupiter with this method. Finally we show that the observation of the microlensing event in infra-re...

  17. New Horizons Imaging of Jupiter's Main Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throop, Henry B.; Showalter, Mark Robert; Dones, Henry C. Luke; Hamilton, D. P.; Weaver, Harold A.; Cheng, Andrew F.; Stern, S. Alan; Young, Leslie; Olkin, Catherine B.; New Horizons Science Team

    2016-10-01

    New Horizons took roughly 520 visible-light images of Jupiter's ring system during its 2007 flyby, using the spacecraft's Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI). These observations were taken over nine days surrounding Jupiter close-approach. They span a range in distance of 30 - 100 RJ, and a phase angle range of 20 - 174 degrees. The highest resolution images -- more than 200 frames -- were taken at a resolution approaching 20 km/pix.We will present an analysis of this dataset, much of which has not been studied in detail before. Our results include New Horizons' first quantitative measurements of the ring's intrinsic brightness and variability. We will also present results on the ring's azimuthal and radial structure. Our measurements of the ring's phase curve will be used to infer properties of the ring's dust grains.Our results build on the only previous analysis of the New Horizons Jupiter ring data set, presented in Showalter et al (2007, Science 318, 232-234), which detected ring clumps and placed a lower limit on the population of undetected ring-moons.This work was supported by NASA's OPR program.

  18. Himalia, a Small Moon of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Cassini spacecraft captured images of Himalia, the brightest of Jupiter's outer moons, on Dec. 19, 2000, from a distance of 4.4 million kilometers (2.7 million miles).This near-infrared image, with a resolution of about 27 kilometers (17 miles) per pixel, indicates that the side of Himalia facing the spacecraft is roughly 160 kilometers (100 miles) in the up-down direction. Himalia probably has a non-spherical shape. Scientists believe it is a body captured into orbit around Jupiter, most likely an irregularly shaped asteroid.In the main frame, an arrow indicates Himalia. North is up. The inset shows the little moon magnified by a factor of 10, plus a graphic indicating Himalia's size and the direction of lighting (with sunlight coming from the left). Cassini's pictures of Himalia were taken during a brief period when Cassini's attitude was stabilized by thrusters instead of by a steadier reaction-wheel system. No spacecraft or telescope had previously shown any of Jupiter's outer moons as more than a star-like single dot.Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  19. Absorption of trapped particles by Jupiter's moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, W. N.; Birmingham, T. J.; Mead, G. D.

    1974-01-01

    Inclusion of absorption effects of the four innermost moons in the radial transport equations for electrons and protons in Jupiter's magnetosphere. It is found that the phase space density n at 2 Jupiter radii for electrons with equatorial pitch angles less than 69 deg is reduced by a factor of 42,000 when lunar absorption is included in the calculation. For protons with equatorial pitch angles less than 69 deg the corresponding reduction factor is 2,300,000. The effect of the satellites becomes progressively weaker for both electrons and protons as equatorial pitch angles of 90 deg are approached, because the likelihood of impacting a satellite becomes progressively smaller. The large density decreases found at the orbits of Io, Europa, and Ganymede result in corresponding particle flux decreases that should be observed by spacecraft making particle measurements in Jupiter's magnetosphere. The characteristic signature of satellite absorption should be a downward-pointing vertex in the flux versus radius curve at the L value corresponding to each satellite.

  20. INTERRUPTED STELLAR ENCOUNTERS IN STAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geller, Aaron M. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Leigh, Nathan W. C., E-mail: a-geller@northwestern.edu, E-mail: nleigh@amnh.org [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West and 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

    2015-07-20

    Strong encounters between single stars and binaries play a pivotal role in the evolution of star clusters. Such encounters can also dramatically modify the orbital parameters of binaries, exchange partners in and out of binaries, and are a primary contributor to the rate of physical stellar collisions in star clusters. Often, these encounters are studied under the approximation that they happen quickly enough and within a small enough volume to be considered isolated from the rest of the cluster. In this paper, we study the validity of this assumption through the analysis of a large grid of single–binary and binary–binary scattering experiments. For each encounter we evaluate the encounter duration, and compare this with the expected time until another single or binary star will join the encounter. We find that for lower-mass clusters, similar to typical open clusters in our Galaxy, the percent of encounters that will be “interrupted” by an interloping star or binary may be 20%–40% (or higher) in the core, though for typical globular clusters we expect ≲1% of encounters to be interrupted. Thus, the assumption that strong encounters occur in relative isolation breaks down for certain clusters. Instead, many strong encounters develop into more complex “mini-clusters,” which must be accounted for in studying, for example, the internal dynamics of star clusters, and the physical stellar collision rate.

  1. The asteroid belt outer region under jumping-Jupiter migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, H. S.; Winter, O. C.; Vieira Neto, E.

    2017-09-01

    The radial configuration of the outer region of the main asteroid belt is quite peculiar, and has much to say about the past evolution of Jupiter. In this work, we investigate the dynamical effects of a jumping-Jupiter-like migration over a more extended primordial asteroid belt. Jupiter's migrations are simulated using a fast jumping-Jupiter synthesizer. Among the results, we highlight non-negligible fractions of primordial objects trapped in 3:2 and 4:3 mean motion resonances (MMRs) with Jupiter. They survived the whole truculent phase of migration and originated populations that are like Hildas and Thules. Fractions ranging from 3 to 6 per cent of the initial distribution remained trapped in 3:2 MMR, and at least 0.05 per cent in 4:3. These results show that the resonance trapping of primordial objects may have originated these resonant populations. This theory is consistent even for Jupiter's truculent evolution.

  2. 木星探测轨道分析与设计%Jupiter Exploration Mission Analysis and Trajectory Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈杨; 宝音贺西; 李俊峰

    2012-01-01

    The trajectory design for Jupiter exploration mission is investigated in this paper. The differences between Jupiter exploration trajectory and Mars or Venus exploration trajectory are mainly concerned about. Firstly, the selection of the Jupiter-centered orbit is analyzed based on the Galileo Jupiter mission. As for the Earth-Jupiter transfer orbit, the fuel consumption of the direct transfer is too large. So the energy-saving technologies such as the planetary gravity assist should be used for the trajectory to the Jupiter. The different sequences of planetary gravity assist for the trajectory from the Earth to the Jupiter are examined by applying the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). According to the searching results, Venus-Earth-Earth gravity assist (VEEGA) is the most effective gravity-assist sequence for the Jupiter mission. During the Jupiter mission, the spacecraft will pass though the main asteroid belt which is between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter, and may encounter several asteroids. The Jupiter mission is able to combine with the main-belt asteroid flyby missions. The design method of the intermediate asteroid flyby trajectory is also considered. At last, an entire designed trajectory for the Jupiter mission launched in 2023 is presented.%研究了与木星探测相关的轨道设计问题.重点关注木星探测轨道与火星、金星等类地行星探测轨道的不同及由此带来的轨道设计难点.首先分析了绕木星探测任务轨道的选择.建立近似模型讨论了向木星飞行需要借助多颗行星的多次引力辅助,对地木转移的多种行星引力辅助序列,使用粒子群算法搜索了2020年至2025年之间的燃料最省飞行方案并对比得到了向木星飞行较好的引力辅助方式为金星-地球-地球引力辅助.结合多任务探测,研究了航天器在飞向木星途中穿越主小行星带飞越探测小行星的轨道设计.最后,给出2023年发射完整的结合引力辅助与小行星

  3. Determinants of customer satisfaction with service encounter

    OpenAIRE

    Ariana Nefat; Nika Paus

    2008-01-01

    Service encounters are the focal point of a customer’s perception of a service in terms of its quality, value and customer satisfaction. The paper researches the influence of the components of a service encounter on customer satisfaction. Among several factors that determine customer satisfaction the quality of service, which is related to the characteristics of service, plays an important role. However, a direct insight into the reasons that make a service encounter satisfactory or unsatisfa...

  4. Study of Power Options for Jupiter and Outer Planet Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fincannon, James

    2015-01-01

    Power for missions to Jupiter and beyond presents a challenging goal for photovoltaic power systems, but NASA missions including Juno and the upcoming Europa Clipper mission have shown that it is possible to operate solar arrays at Jupiter. This work analyzes photovoltaic technologies for use in Jupiter and outer planet missions, including both conventional arrays, as well as analyzing the advantages of advanced solar cells, concentrator arrays, and thin film technologies. Index Terms - space exploration, spacecraft solar arrays, solar electric propulsion, photovoltaic cells, concentrator, Fresnel lens, Jupiter missions, outer planets.

  5. Date Rape (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Date Rape KidsHealth > For Teens > Date Rape A A ... Rape en español Violaciones durante citas What Is Date Rape? When people think of rape , they might ...

  6. Identifying familiar strangers in human encounter networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Di; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Yi-Qing

    2016-10-01

    Familiar strangers, pairs of individuals who encounter repeatedly but never know each other, have been discovered for four decades yet lack an effective method to identify. Here we propose a novel method called familiar stranger classifier (FSC) to identify familiar strangers from three empirical datasets, and classify human relationships into four types, i.e., familiar stranger (FS), in-role (IR), friend (F) and stranger (S). The analyses of the human encounter networks show that the average number of FS one may encounter is finite but larger than the Dunbar Number, and their encounters are structurally more stable and denser than those of S, indicating the encounters of FS are not limited by the social capacity, and more robust than the random scenario. Moreover, the temporal statistics of encounters between FS over the whole time span show strong periodicity, which are diverse from the bursts of encounters within one day, suggesting the significance of longitudinal patterns of human encounters. The proposed method to identify FS in this paper provides a valid framework to understand human encounter patterns and analyse complex human social behaviors.

  7. JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE): An ESA mission to orbit Ganymede and to characterise the Jupiter system

    OpenAIRE

    Grasset, O.; Dougherty, K; Coustenis, A.; Bunce, J; Erd, C.; Titov, D.; Blanc, M.; Coates, A; Drossart, P.; Fletcher, N; Hussmann, H.; Jaumann, R.; N. Krupp; Lebreton, P; O. Prieto-Ballesteros

    2013-01-01

    Past exploration of Jupiter's diverse satellite system has forever changed our understanding of the unique environments to be found around gas giants, both in our solar system and beyond. The detailed investigation of three of Jupiter's Galilean satellites (Ganymede, Europa, and Callisto), which are believed to harbour subsurface water oceans, is central to elucidating the conditions for habitability of icy worlds in planetary systems in general. The study of the Jupiter system and the possib...

  8. TrES-5: A Massive Jupiter-sized Planet Transiting A Cool G-dwarf

    CERN Document Server

    Mandushev, Georgi; Buchhave, Lars A; Dunham, Edward W; Rabus, Markus; Oetiker, Brian; Latham, David W; Charbonneau, David; Brown, Timothy M; Belmonte, Juan A; O'Donovan, Francis T

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of TrES-5, a massive hot Jupiter that transits the star GSC 03949-00967 every 1.48 days. From spectroscopy of the star we estimate a stellar effective temperature of$5171 +/- 36 K, and from high-precision B, R and I photometry of the transit we constrain the ratio of the semi-major axis and the stellar radius to be 6.07 +/- 0.14. We compare these values to model stellar isochrones to obtain a stellar mass of 0.893 +/- 0.024 solar masses. Based on this estimate and the photometric time series, we constrain the stellar radius to be 0.866 +/- 0.013 solar radii, and the planet radius to be 1.209 +/- 0.021 Jupiter radii. We model our radial-velocity data assuming a circular orbit and find a planetary mass of 1.778 +/- 0.063 Jupiter masses. Our radial-velocity observations rule out line-bisector variations that would indicate a specious detection resulting from a blend of an eclipsing binary system. TrES-5 orbits one of the faintest stars with transiting planets found to date from the ground...

  9. The 3-4 $\\mu$m Spectra of Jupiter Trojan Asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    To date, reflectance spectra of Jupiter Trojan asteroids have revealed no distinctive absorption features. For this reason, the surface composition of these objects remains a subject of speculation. Spectra have revealed, however, that the Jupiter Trojan asteroids consist of two distinct sub-populations which differ in the optical to near-infrared colors. The origins and compositional differences between the two sub-populations remain unclear. Here we report the results from a 2.2-3.8 $\\mu$m spectral survey of a collection of 16 Jupiter Trojan asteroids, divided equally between the two sub-populations. We find clear spectral absorption features centered around 3.1 $\\mu$m in the less red population. Additional absorption consistent with expected from organic materials might also be present. No such features are see in the red population. A strong correlation exists between the strength of the 3.1 $\\mu$m absorption feature and the optical to near-infrared color of the objects. While traditionally absorptions su...

  10. HATS-17b: A Transiting Compact Warm Jupiter in a 16.3 Days Circular Orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Brahm, R; Bakos, G Á; Penev, K; Espinoza, N; Rabus, M; Hartman, J D; Bayliss, D; Ciceri, S; Zhou, G; Mancini, L; Tan, T G; de Val-Borro, M; Bhatti, W; Csubry, Z; Bento, J; Henning, T; Schmidt, B; Suc, V; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-17b, the first transiting warm Jupiter of the HATSouth network. HATS-17b transits its bright (V=12.4) G-type (M$_{\\star}$=1.131 $\\pm$ 0.030 M$_{\\odot}$, R$_{\\star}$=1.091$^{+0.070}_{-0.046}$ R$_{\\star}$) metal-rich ([Fe/H]=+0.3 dex) host star in a circular orbit with a period of P=16.2546 days. HATS-17b has a very compact radius of 0.777 $\\pm$ 0.056 R$_J$ given its Jupiter-like mass of 1.338 $\\pm$ 0.065 M$_J$. Up to 50% of the mass of HATS-17b may be composed of heavy elements in order to explain its high density with current models of planetary structure. HATS-17b is the longest period transiting planet discovered to date by a ground-based photometric survey, and is one of the brightest transiting warm Jupiter systems known. The brightness of HATS-17b will allow detailed follow-up observations to characterize the orbital geometry of the system and the atmosphere of the planet.

  11. High-resolution maps of the 1.5 GHz emission from Jupiter's disk and radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. A.; Berge, G. L.; Bignell, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    VLA maps of four different faces of Jupiter made with a resolution of about 0.3 Jovian radius show new features of the radiation belt emission. A synchrotron model which reproduces these features serves to define the major characteristics of the relativistic electrons in the radiation belt. The observations provide the best determination to date of the atmospheric emission at 1.5 GHz and yield a disk brightness temperature of 425 + or - 100 K.

  12. Jupiter internal structure: the effect of different equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, Y.; Guillot, T.; Fayon, L.

    2016-12-01

    Context. Heavy elements, even though they are a smaller constituent, are crucial to understand the formation history of Jupiter. Interior models are used to determine the amount of heavy elements in the interior of Jupiter, but this range is still subject to degeneracies because of the uncertainties in the equations of state. Aims: Before Juno mission data arrive, we present optimized calculations for Jupiter that explore the effect of different model parameters on the determination of the core and the mass of heavy elements of Jupiter. We compare recently published equations of state. Methods: The interior model of Jupiter was calculated from the equations of hydrostatic equilibrium, mass, and energy conservation, and energy transport. The mass of the core and heavy elements was adjusted to match the observed radius and gravitational moments of Jupiter. Results: We show that the determination of the interior structure of Jupiter is tied to the estimation of its gravitational moments and the accuracy of equations of state of hydrogen, helium, and heavy elements. Locating the region where helium rain occurs and defining its timescale is important to determine the distribution of heavy elements and helium in the interior of Jupiter. We show that the differences found when modeling the interior of Jupiter with recent EOS are more likely due to differences in the internal energy and entropy calculation. The consequent changes in the thermal profile lead to different estimates of the mass of the core and heavy elements, which explains differences in recently published interior models of Jupiter. Conclusions: Our results help clarify the reasons for the differences found in interior models of Jupiter and will help interpreting upcoming Juno data. Full appendix tables are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A114

  13. JUPITER and satellites: Clinical implications of the JUPITER study and its secondary analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostapanos, Michael S; Elisaf, Moses S

    2011-07-26

    THE JUSTIFICATION FOR THE USE OF STATINS IN PREVENTION: an intervention trial evaluating rosuvastatin (JUPITER) study was a real breakthrough in primary cardiovascular disease prevention with statins, since it was conducted in apparently healthy individuals with normal levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C JUPITER, rosuvastatin was associated with significant reductions in cardiovascular outcomes as well as in overall mortality compared with placebo. In this paper the most important secondary analyses of the JUPITER trial are discussed, by focusing on their novel findings regarding the role of statins in primary prevention. Also, the characteristics of otherwise healthy normocholesterolemic subjects who are anticipated to benefit more from statin treatment in the clinical setting are discussed. Subjects at "intermediate" or "high" 10-year risk according to the Framingham score, those who exhibit low post-treatment levels of both LDL-C (JUPITER added to our knowledge that statins may be effective drugs in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in normocholesterolemic individuals at moderate-to-high risk. Also, statin treatment may reduce the risk of venous thromboembolism and preserve renal function. An increase in physician-reported diabetes represents a major safety concern associated with the use of the most potent statins.

  14. Natural radio emission of Jupiter as interferences for radar investigations of the icy satellites of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconi, B.; Hess, S.; Hérique, A.; Santovito, M. R.; Santos-Costa, D.; Zarka, P.; Alberti, G.; Blankenship, D.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Bruzzone, L.; Kofman, W.

    2012-02-01

    Radar instruments are part of the core payload of the two Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) spacecraft: NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) and ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). At this point of the project, several frequency bands are under study for radar, which ranges between 5 and 50 MHz. Part of this frequency range overlaps with that of the natural jovian radio emissions, which are very intense in the decametric range, below 40 MHz. Radio observations above 40 MHz are free of interferences, whereas below this threshold, careful observation strategies have to be investigated. We present a review of spectral intensity, variability and sources of these radio emissions. As the radio emissions are strongly beamed, it is possible to model the visibility of the radio emissions, as seen from the vicinity of Europa or Ganymede. We have investigated Io-related radio emissions as well as radio emissions related to the auroral oval. We also review the radiation belts synchrotron emission characteristics. We present radio sources visibility products (dynamic spectra and radio source location maps, on still frames or movies), which can be used for operation planning. This study clearly shows that a deep understanding of the natural radio emissions at Jupiter is necessary to prepare the future EJSM radar instrumentation. We show that this radio noise has to be taken into account very early in the observation planning and strategies for both JGO and JEO. We also point out possible synergies with RPW (Radio and Plasma Waves) instrumentations.

  15. Radiative and dynamical modeling of Jupiter's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerlet, Sandrine; Spiga, Aymeric

    2016-04-01

    Jupiter's atmosphere harbours a rich meteorology, with alternate westward and eastward zonal jets, waves signatures and long-living storms. Recent ground-based and spacecraft measurements have also revealed a rich stratospheric dynamics, with the observation of thermal signatures of planetary waves, puzzling meridional distribution of hydrocarbons at odds with predictions of photochemical models, and a periodic equatorial oscillation analogous to the Earth's quasi-biennal oscillation and Saturn's equatorial oscillation. These recent observations, along with the many unanswered questions (What drives and maintain the equatorial oscillations? How important is the seasonal forcing compared to the influence of internal heat? What is the large-scale stratospheric circulation of these giant planets?) motivated us to develop a complete 3D General Circulation Model (GCM) of Saturn and Jupiter. We aim at exploring the large-scale circulation, seasonal variability, and wave activity from the troposphere to the stratosphere of these giant planets. We will briefly present how we adapted our existing Saturn GCM to Jupiter. One of the main change is the addition of a stratospheric haze layer made of fractal aggregates in the auroral regions (poleward of 45S and 30N). This haze layer has a significant radiative impact by modifying the temperature up to +/- 15K in the middle stratosphere. We will then describe the results of radiative-convective simulations and how they compare to recent Cassini and ground-based temperature measurements. These simulations reproduce surprisingly well some of the observed thermal vertical and meridional gradients, but several important mismatches at low and high latitudes suggest that dynamics also plays an important role in shaping the temperature field. Finally, we will present full GCM simulations and discuss the main resulting features (waves and instabilities). We will also and discuss the impact of the choice of spatial resolution and

  16. A Possibly Universal Red Chromophore for Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sromovsky, Lawrence A.; Baines, Kevin; Fry, Patrick M.

    2016-10-01

    A new laboratory-generated chemical compound made from photodissociated ammonia (NH3) molecules reacting with acetylene (C2H2) was suggested as a possible coloring agent for Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) by Carlson et al. (2016, Icarus 274, 106-115). Baines et al. (2016, AAS/DPS Meeting abstract) showed that the GRS spectrum measured by the visual channels of the Cassini VIMS instrument in 2000 could be accurately fit by a cloud model in which the chromophore appeared as small particles in a physically thin layer immediately above the main cloud layer of the GRS. Here we show that the same chromophore and similar layer structure can also provide close matches to the 0.4-1 micron spectra of many other cloud features on Jupiter, suggesting that this material may be a nearly universal chromophore responsible for the various degrees of red coloration on Jupiter. This is a robust conclusion, even for 12 percent changes in VIMS calibration and large uncertainties in the refractive index of the main cloud layer due to uncertain fractions of NH4SH and NH3 in its cloud particles. The chromophore layer can account for color variations among north and south equatorial belts, equatorial zone, and the Great Red Spot, by varying particle size from 0.12 to 0.29 micron and optical depth from 0.06 to 0.76. The total mass of the chromophore layer is much less variable than its optical depth, staying mainly within 6-10 micrograms/cm2 range, but is only about half that amount in the equatorial zone. We also found a depression of the ammonia volume mixing ratio in the two belt regions, which averaged 0.4-0.5 × 10-4 immediately below the ammonia condensation level, while the other regions averaged twice that value.LAS and PMF acknowledge support from NASA Grant NNX14AH40G.

  17. Jupiter's winds and Arnol'd's second stability theorem: Slowly moving waves and neutral stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamp, Andrew P.; Dowling, Timothy E.

    1993-01-01

    Since the Voyager encounters in 1979, it has been known that Jupiter's cloud-top zonal winds violate the barotropic stability criterion. A vortex-tube stretching analysis of the Voyager wind data indicates that the more general Charney-Stern stability criterion is also violated. On the other hand, the zonal winds determined by tracking cloud features in Hubble Space Telescope images taken in 1991 precisely match the zonal winds determined by tracking cloud features in Voyager images, and it is hard to understand how a complicated zonal wind profile like Jupiter's could be unstable and yet not change at all in 12 years. In fact, there are at least two unknown ways to violate the Charney-Stern stability criterion and still have a stable flow. The better known of these is called Fjortoft's theorem, or Arnol'd's 1st theorem for the case of large-amplitude perturbations. Although the Fjortoft-Arnol'd theorem has been extended from the quasi-geostrophic equations to the primitive equations, the basic requirement that the potential vorticity be an increasing function of streamfunction is opposite to the case found in Jupiter, where the Voyager data indicate that the potential vorticity is a decreasing function of streamfunction. But this second case is precisely that which is covered by Arnol'd's 2nd stability theorem. In fact, the Voyager data suggest that Jupiter's zonal winds are neutrally stable with respect to Arnol'd's 2nd stability theorem. Here, we analyze the linear stability problem of a one-parameter family of sinusoidal zonal wind profiles that are close to neutral stability with respect to Arnol'd's 2nd stability theorem. We find numerically that the most unstable mode is always stationary, which may help to explain the slowly moving mode 10 waves observed on Jupiter. We find that violation of Arnol'd's 2nd stability theorem is both necessary and sufficient for instability of sinusoidal profiles. However, there appears to be no simple extension of Arnol'd's 2

  18. Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter and Trojan Asteroid Explorer in EJSM (Europa Jupiter System Mission)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Sho; Fujimoto, Masaki; Takashima, Takeshi; Yano, Hajime; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Kimura, Jun; Tsuda, Yuichi; Funase, Ryu; Mori, Osamu

    2010-05-01

    Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) is an international mission to explore and Jupiter, its satellites and magnetospheric environment in 2020s. EJSM consists of (1) The Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) by NASA, (2) the Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO) by ESA, and (3) the Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter (JMO) studied by JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency). In February 2009, NASA and ESA decided to continue the study of EJSM as a candidate of the outer solar system mission. JMO will have magnetometers, low-energy plasma spectrometers, medium energy particle detectors, energetic particle detectors, electric field / plasma wave instruments, an ENA imager, an EUV spectrometer, and a dust detector. Collaborating with plasma instruments on board JEO and JGO, JMO will investigate the fast and huge rotating magnetosphere to clarify the energy procurement from Jovian rotation to the magnetosphere, to clarify the interaction between the solar wind the magnetosphere. Especially when JEO and JGO are orbiting around Europa and Ganymede, respectively, JMO will measure the outside condition in the Jovian magnetosphere. JMO will clarify the characteristics of the strongest accelerator in the solar system with the investigation of the role of Io as a source of heavy ions in the magnetosphere. JAXA started a study of a solar power sail for deep space explorations. Together with a solar sail (photon propulsion), it will have very efficient ion engines where electric power is produced solar panels within the sail. JAXA has already experienced ion engine in the successful Hayabusa mission, which was launched in 2003 and is still in operation in 2010. For the purpose of testing solar power sail technology, an engineering mission IKAROS (Interplanetary Kite-craft Accelerated by Radiation Of the Sun) will be launched in 2010 together with Venus Climate Orbiter PLANET-C. The shape of the IKAROS' membrane is square, with a diagonal distance of 20m. It is made of polyimide film only 0.0075mm

  19. Beyond the Embodied Digital Service Encounter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jannick Kirk

    2017-01-01

    When a digital service encounter develops differently than anticipated, the client becomes a user. This transformation reveals the ambiguous nature of digital service encounter being neither well-functioning tools, nor having the same sensitivity to and tolerance for service failures as in human...... service encounters. Through the case-study of a service failure and subsequent co-creation of the service recovery, this chapter introduces and unfolds the concept of 'cognitively dominated service encounters'. This category is suggested to supplement and criticise Paul Dourish's (2001) concept...... of Embodied Interaction. With a micro analysis of the interaction in this service journey, we identify the need for a category of knowledge intensive service encounters that acknowledge both the complexity of the service provided, but also the constraints and possibilities in the digital design material....

  20. Jupiter Europa Orbiter Architecture Definition Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Robert; Shishko, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The proposed Jupiter Europa Orbiter mission, planned for launch in 2020, is using a new architectural process and framework tool to drive its model-based systems engineering effort. The process focuses on getting the architecture right before writing requirements and developing a point design. A new architecture framework tool provides for the structured entry and retrieval of architecture artifacts based on an emerging architecture meta-model. This paper describes the relationships among these artifacts and how they are used in the systems engineering effort. Some early lessons learned are discussed.

  1. Equatorial Oscillations in Jupiter's and Saturn's Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasar, F. Michael; Guerlet, S.; Fouchet, T.; Schinder, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Equatorial oscillations in the zonal-mean temperatures and zonal winds have been well documented in Earth's middle atmosphere. A growing body of evidence from ground-based and Cassini spacecraft observations indicates that such phenomena also occur in the stratospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. Earth-based midinfrared measurements spanning several decades have established that the equatorial stratospheric temperatures on Jupiter vary with a cycle of 4-5 years and on Saturn with a cycle of approximately 15 years. Spectra obtained by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) during the Cassini swingby at the end of 2000, with much better vertical resolution than the ground-based data, indicated a series of vertically stacked warm and cold anomalics at Jupiter's equator; a similar structurc was seen at Saturn's equator in CIRS limb measurements made in 2005, in the early phase of Cassini's orbital tour. The thermal wind equation implied similar patterns of mean zonal winds increasing and decreasing with altitude. On Saturn the peak-to-pcak amplitude of this variation was nearly 200 meters per second. The alternating vertical pattern of wanner and colder cquatorial tcmperatures and easterly and westerly tendencies of the zonal winds is seen in Earth's equatorial oscillations, where the pattern descends with time, The Cassini Jupiter and early Saturn observations were snapshots within a limited time interval, and they did not show the temporal evolution of the spatial patterns. However, more recent Saturn observations by CIRS (2010) and Cassini radio-occultation soundings (2009-2010) have provided an opportunity to follow the change of the temperature-zonal wind pattern, and they suggest there is descent, at a rate of roughly one scale height over four years. On Earth, the observed descent in the zonal-mean structure is associated with the absorption of a combination of vertically propagating waves with easlerly and westerly phase velocities. The peak-to-peak zonal wind

  2. Comparative impactology on Jupiter: Cataloging the clumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michael

    2010-09-01

    Seven months after HubbleA?s first servicing mission, the impact of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 {SL9} captured worldwide attentionA?and the newly-installed WFPC2 captured 472 images of Jupiter in Program 5642. We will complete a census of each impact, including evolution, size, morphology, and color, now that the geometric and photometric calibration of WFPC2 has reached its best and final state. The data from Program 5642 prove their great value by still continuing to generate science publications, and we will upload deprojected {latitude-longitude mapped} data as High Level Science Products to further enhance the usability of this unique data set. The WFPC2 data are needed to understand recent observations of the 2009 impact on Jupiter, in which only 36 WFC3 and ACS images were obtained in Program 12003. In the isolated 2009 impact, the debris formed clumps that lasted at least until Jupiter was imaged again on 22 September {Program 11559}, two months after the impact. Clumps were observed in a subset of SL9 impact sites, but a complete survey of all the available WFPC2 impact site imaging data will enable us to measure clump formation, favored dynamical environments, frequency of occurrence, interactions with other Jovian atmospheric features, and rates of change in size and albedo. Based on the 2009 WFC3 and ACS data, we suggest that these clumps are lower stratospheric eddies that maintain aerosol concentrations against dissipation. We will search the proposed complete catalog of 1994 WFPC2 data to isolate the determining factors for the formation and evolution of these clumps, with the goal of finding out whether they are commonplace Jovian dynamical features simply traced by impact-generated aerosols, or unique features generated by the impacts themselves {either through impact-related thermochemical processes, or through differences in particle microphysics}. If the clumps mark commonplace but normally invisible eddies, they may play interesting roles in the

  3. Pan-Planets: Searching for hot Jupiters around cool dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Obermeier, C; Saglia, R P; Henning, Th; Bender, R; Kodric, M; Deacon, N; Riffeser, A; Burgett, W; Chambers, K C; Draper, P W; Flewelling, H; Hodapp, K W; Kaiser, N; Kudritzki, R -P; Magnier, E A; Metcalfe, N; Price, P A; Sweeney, W; Wainscoat, R J; Waters, C

    2015-01-01

    The Pan-Planets survey observed an area of 42 sq deg. in the galactic disk for about 165 hours. The main scientific goal of the project is the detection of transiting planets around M dwarfs. We establish an efficient procedure for determining the stellar parameters $T_{eff}$ and log$g$ of all sources using a method based on SED fitting, utilizing a three-dimensional dust map and proper motion information. In this way we identify more than 60000 M dwarfs, which is by far the largest sample of low-mass stars observed in a transit survey to date. We present several planet candidates around M dwarfs and hotter stars that are currently being followed up. Using Monte-Carlo simulations we calculate the detection efficiency of the Pan-Planets survey for different stellar and planetary populations. We expect to find $3.0^{+3.3}_{-1.6}$ hot Jupiters around F, G, and K dwarfs with periods lower than 10 days based on the planet occurrence rates derived in previous surveys. For M dwarfs, the percentage of stars with a ho...

  4. Can Terrestrial Planets Form in Hot-Jupiter Systems?

    CERN Document Server

    Fogg, Martyn J

    2007-01-01

    Models of terrestrial planet formation in the presence of a migrating giant planet have challenged the notion that hot-Jupiter systems lack terrestrial planets. We briefly review this issue and suggest that hot-Jupiter systems should be prime targets for future observational missions designed to detect Earth-sized and potentially habitable worlds.

  5. Forum on Concepts and Approaches for Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The papers presented at this conference primarily discuss instruments and techniques for conducting science on Jupiter's icy moons, and geologic processes on the moons themselves. Remote sensing of satellites, cratering on satellites, and ice on the surface of Europa are given particular attention. Some papers discuss Jupiter's atmosphere, or exobiology.

  6. Periodic changes of the activity of processes in Jupiter's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    Variations of the Earth jovimagnetic latitude on Jupiter are preferred in solar-driven changes of reflective properties of clouds and haze on Jupiter. Because of the orbit eccentricity (e=0,048450) the northern hemisphere receives 21% greater solar energy flow to the atmosphere, because Jupiter is in the perihelia near the time of the summer solstice. Results of our studies showed that the ratio of the brightness of the northern and southern tropical and temperate regions is evident factor of the photometric activity of the Jupiter's atmospheric processes. The obtained from the analysis of observational data for the period from 1962 to 2015 existence of variations of activity factor of the planet hemispheres with a period of 11.86 years has allowed us to talk about an existence of the seasonal reconstruction of the physical parameters of Jupiter's atmosphere.

  7. Interrupted Stellar Encounters in Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Geller, Aaron M

    2015-01-01

    Strong encounters between single stars and binaries play a pivotal role in the evolution of star clusters. Such encounters can also dramatically modify the orbital parameters of binaries, exchange partners in and out of binaries, and are a primary contributor to the rate of physical stellar collisions in star clusters. Often, these encounters are studied under the approximation that they happen quickly enough and within a small enough volume to be considered isolated from the rest of the cluster. In this paper, we study the validity of this assumption through the analysis of a large grid of single - binary and binary - binary scattering experiments. For each encounter we evaluate the encounter duration, and compare this with the expected time until another single or binary star will join the encounter. We find that for lower-mass clusters, similar to typical open clusters in our Galaxy, the percent of encounters that will be "interrupted" by an interloping star or binary may be 20-40% (or higher) in the core,...

  8. Elliptical instability in hot Jupiter systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cébron, David; Gal, Patrice Le; Moutou, Claire; Leconte, J; Sauret, Alban

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have already considered the influence of tides on the evolution of systems composed of a star and a close-in companion to tentatively explain different observations such as the spin-up of some stars with hot Jupiters, the radius anomaly of short orbital period planets and the synchronization or quasi-synchronization of the stellar spin in some extreme cases. However, the nature of the mechanism responsible for the tidal dissipation in such systems remains uncertain. In this paper, we claim that the so-called elliptical instability may play a major role in these systems, explaining some systematic features present in the observations. This hydrodynamic instability, arising in rotating flows with elliptical streamlines, is suspected to be present in both planet and star of such systems, which are elliptically deformed by tides. The presence and the influence of the elliptical instability in gaseous bodies, such as stars or hot Jupiters, are most of the time neglected. In this paper, using numeri...

  9. Fading of Jupiter's South Equatorial Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, Michael A.; Orton, Glenn; Baines, Kevin; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma

    2011-01-01

    One of Jupiter's most dominant features, the South Equatorial Belt, has historically gone through a "fading" cycle. The usual dark, brownish clouds turn white, and after a period of time, the region returns to its normal color. Understanding this phenomenon, the latest occurring in 2010, will increase our knowledge of planetary atmospheres. Using the near infrared camera, NSFCAM2, at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility in Hawaii, images were taken of Jupiter accompanied by data describing the circumstances of each observation. These images are then processed and reduced through an IDL program. By scanning the central meridian of the planet, graphs were produced plotting the average values across the central meridian, which are used to find variations in the region of interest. Calculations using Albert4, a FORTRAN program that calculates the upwelling reflected sunlight from a designated cloud model, can be used to determine the effects of a model atmosphere due to various absorption, scattering, and emission processes. Spectra that were produced show ammonia bands in the South Equatorial Belt. So far, we can deduce from this information that an upwelling of ammonia particles caused a cloud layer to cover up the region. Further investigations using Albert4 and other models will help us to constrain better the chemical make up of the cloud and its location in the atmosphere.

  10. ECCENTRIC JUPITERS VIA DISK–PLANET INTERACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffell, Paul C.; Chiang, Eugene, E-mail: duffell@berkeley.edu, E-mail: echiang@astro.berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California, Berkeley (United States)

    2015-10-20

    Numerical hydrodynamics calculations are performed to determine the conditions under which giant planet eccentricities can be excited by parent gas disks. Unlike in other studies, Jupiter-mass planets are found to have their eccentricities amplified—provided their orbits start off as eccentric. We disentangle the web of co-rotation, co-orbital, and external resonances to show that this finite-amplitude instability is consistent with that predicted analytically. Ellipticities can grow until they reach of order of the disk's aspect ratio, beyond which the external Lindblad resonances that excite eccentricity are weakened by the planet's increasingly supersonic epicyclic motion. Forcing the planet to still larger eccentricities causes catastrophic eccentricity damping as the planet collides into gap walls. For standard parameters, the range of eccentricities for instability is modest; the threshold eccentricity for growth (∼0.04) is not much smaller than the final eccentricity to which orbits grow (∼0.07). If this threshold eccentricity can be lowered (perhaps by non-barotropic effects), and if the eccentricity driving documented here survives in 3D, it may robustly explain the low-to-moderate eccentricities ≲0.1 exhibited by many giant planets (including Jupiter and Saturn), especially those without planetary or stellar companions.

  11. Thermal Processes Governing Hot-Jupiter Radii

    CERN Document Server

    Spiegel, David S

    2013-01-01

    There have been many proposed explanations for the larger-than-expected radii of some transiting hot Jupiters, including either stellar or orbital energy deposition deep in the atmosphere or deep in the interior. In this paper, we explore the important influences on hot-Jupiter radius evolution of (i) additional heat sources in the high atmosphere, the deep atmosphere, and deep in the convective interior; (ii) consistent cooling of the deep interior through the planetary dayside, nightside, and poles; (iii) the degree of heat redistribution to the nightside; and (iv) the presence of an upper atmosphere absorber inferred to produce anomalously hot upper atmospheres and inversions in some close-in giant planets. In particular, we compare the radius expansion effects of atmospheric and deep-interior heating at the same power levels and derive the power required to achieve a given radius increase when night-side cooling is incorporated. We find that models that include consistent day/night cooling are more simila...

  12. Broadband Linear Polarization of Jupiter Trojans

    CERN Document Server

    Bagnulo, S; Stinson, A; Christou, A; Borisov, G B

    2016-01-01

    Trojan asteroids orbit in the Lagrange points of the system Sun-planet-asteroid. Their dynamical stability make their physical properties important proxies for the early evolution of our solar system. To study their origin, we want to characterize the surfaces of Jupiter Trojan asteroids and check possible similarities with objects of the main belt and of the Kuiper Belt. We have obtained high-accuracy broad-band linear polarization measurements of six Jupiter Trojans of the L4 population and tried to estimate the main features of their polarimetric behaviour. We have compared the polarimetric properties of our targets among themselves, and with those of other atmosphere-less bodies of our solar system. Our sample show approximately homogeneous polarimetric behaviour, although some distinct features are found between them. In general, the polarimetric properties of Trojan asteroids are similar to those of D- and P-type main-belt asteroids. No sign of coma activity is detected in any of the observed objects. A...

  13. The Transit Spectra of Earth and Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, Patrick G J; Bowles, Neil E; Fletcher, Leigh N; Aigrain, Suzanne; Lee, Jae-Min

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a number of observations have been made of the transits of 'Hot Jupiters', such as HD 189733b, which have been modelled to derive atmospheric structure and composition. As measurement techniques improve, the transit spectra of 'Super-Earths' such as GJ 1214b are becoming better constrained, allowing model atmospheres to be fitted for this class of planet also. While it is not yet possible to constrain the atmospheric states of small planets such as the Earth or cold planets like Jupiter, this may become practical in the coming decades and if so, it is of interest to determine what we might infer from such measurements. Here we have constructed atmospheric models of the Solar System planets from 0.4 - 15.5 microns that are consistent with ground-based and satellite observations and from these calculate the primary transit and secondary eclipse spectra (with respect to the Sun and typical M-dwarfs) that would be observed by a 'remote observer', many light years away. From these spectra we test ...

  14. Tidal Response of Preliminary Jupiter Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Sean M.; Hubbard, William B.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2016-11-01

    In anticipation of improved observational data for Jupiter’s gravitational field, from the Juno spacecraft, we predict the static tidal response for a variety of Jupiter interior models based on ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures. We calculate hydrostatic-equilibrium gravity terms, using the non-perturbative concentric Maclaurin Spheroid method that eliminates lengthy expansions used in the theory of figures. Our method captures terms arising from the coupled tidal and rotational perturbations, which we find to be important for a rapidly rotating planet like Jupiter. Our predicted static tidal Love number, {k}2=0.5900, is ˜10% larger than previous estimates. The value is, as expected, highly correlated with the zonal harmonic coefficient J 2, and is thus nearly constant when plausible changes are made to the interior structure while holding J 2 fixed at the observed value. We note that the predicted static k 2 might change, due to Jupiter’s dynamical response to the Galilean moons, and find reasons to argue that the change may be detectable—although we do not present here a theory of dynamical tides for highly oblate Jovian planets. An accurate model of Jupiter’s tidal response will be essential for interpreting Juno observations and identifying tidal signals from effects of other interior dynamics of Jupiter’s gravitational field.

  15. Jupiter's Spot Seen Glowing - Scientists Get First Look at Weather Inside the Solar System's Biggest Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    New ground-breaking thermal images obtained with ESO's Very Large Telescope and other powerful ground-based telescopes show swirls of warmer air and cooler regions never seen before within Jupiter's Great Red Spot, enabling scientists to make the first detailed interior weather map of the giant storm system linking its temperature, winds, pressure and composition with its colour. "This is our first detailed look inside the biggest storm of the Solar System," says Glenn Orton, who led the team of astronomers that made the study. "We once thought the Great Red Spot was a plain old oval without much structure, but these new results show that it is, in fact, extremely complicated." The observations reveal that the reddest colour of the Great Red Spot corresponds to a warm core within the otherwise cold storm system, and images show dark lanes at the edge of the storm where gases are descending into the deeper regions of the planet. The observations, detailed in a paper appearing in the journal Icarus, give scientists a sense of the circulation patterns within the solar system's best-known storm system. Sky gazers have been observing the Great Red Spot in one form or another for hundreds of years, with continuous observations of its current shape dating back to the 19th century. The spot, which is a cold region averaging about -160 degrees Celsius, is so wide that about three Earths could fit inside its boundaries. The thermal images were mostly obtained with the VISIR [1] instrument attached to ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile, with additional data coming from the Gemini South telescope in Chile and the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan's Subaru Telescope in Hawaii. The images have provided an unprecedented level of resolution and extended the coverage provided by NASA's Galileo spacecraft in the late 1990s. Together with observations of the deep cloud structure by the 3-metre NASA Infrared Telescope Facility in Hawaii, the level of thermal detail observed

  16. Constraints on the atmospheric circulation and variability of the eccentric hot Jupiter XO-3b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Ian; Knutson, Heather A. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cowan, Nicolas B. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Astrophysics (CIERA), Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Lewis, Nikole K. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Agol, Eric [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Deming, Drake [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J.; Laughlin, Gregory [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95604 (United States); Fulton, Benjamin J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Langton, Jonathan [Department of Physics, Principia College, Elsah, IL 62028 (United States); Showman, Adam P., E-mail: iwong@caltech.edu [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    We report secondary eclipse photometry of the hot Jupiter XO-3b in the 4.5 μm band taken with the Infrared Array Camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope. We measure individual eclipse depths and center of eclipse times for a total of 12 secondary eclipses. We fit these data simultaneously with two transits observed in the same band in order to obtain a global best-fit secondary eclipse depth of 0.1580% ± 0.0036% and a center of eclipse phase of 0.67004 ± 0.00013. We assess the relative magnitude of variations in the dayside brightness of the planet by measuring the size of the residuals during ingress and egress from fitting the combined eclipse light curve with a uniform disk model and place an upper limit of 0.05%. The new secondary eclipse observations extend the total baseline from one and a half years to nearly three years, allowing us to place an upper limit on the periastron precession rate of 2.9 × 10{sup –3} deg day{sup –1}— the tightest constraint to date on the periastron precession rate of a hot Jupiter. We use the new transit observations to calculate improved estimates for the system properties, including an updated orbital ephemeris. We also use the large number of secondary eclipses to obtain the most stringent limits to date on the orbit-to-orbit variability of an eccentric hot Jupiter and demonstrate the consistency of multiple-epoch Spitzer observations.

  17. Communication during gynecological out-patient encounters.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, A.M. van

    1999-01-01

    The intimate nature of women's health problems presented during gynecological encounters places great demands on gynecologists' communicative behavior. The present study examined what patients expect from their gynecologist, how gynecologists and patients actually communicate during out-patient

  18. Exploring Digital Encounters in the Public Arena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieck, Ava Fatah Gen.; Kostakos, Vassilis; Penn, Alan

    In this chapter, we explore the types of encounters that technology enables. We consider the differences between digital and nondigital encounters through two pilot studies carried out in the city of Bath, United Kingdom. We investigate how technology can be appropriated for shared interactions that support conscious (or unconscious) social encounters, and highlight the importance of space and the role of place in providing temporal and spatial mechanisms facilitating different types of shared encounters. Here, we apply a method based on intervention through "sensing and projecting" Bluetooth names and digital identity in the public arena, and describe initial observations about people's reaction toward the projection of their Bluetooth names in public. In particular, we note the significance of constructing socially meaningful relations between people mediated by these technologies. We discuss initial results and outline issues raised in detail before finally describing the ongoing work.

  19. Service encounters as bases for innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundbo, Jon; Sundbo, Donna; Henten, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the factors affecting the innovativeness of service encounters – either as drivers or as barriers. The assumption is that a considerable number of innovations in service industries are initiated in service encounters and that employees are the core factor in connecting...... customers with the innovating organization. Based on literature studies and pilot case studies, seven propositions are proposed and tested in a qualitative, hermeneutic way in field experiments in nine service organizations. Important new results are that encounter-based innovation requires mutual empathy...... between employees and customers, employees investing stubbornness and time can be a driver for innovation, and several layers of management can be a barrier. In the field experiments three new factors for encounter-based innovation were found: translation, multitasking, and hyper-professionalism. The two...

  20. Food Product Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prior to its consumption to determine if the product shows signs of spoilage. [ Top of Page ] What Types of Food are Dated? Open dating is found on most foods including meat, poultry, egg and dairy products. "Closed or coded ...

  1. Dynamical Interactions Make Hot Jupiters in Open Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Shara, Michael M; Mardling, Rosemary A

    2014-01-01

    Explaining the origin and evolution of exoplanetary "hot Jupiters" remains a significant challenge. One possible mechanism for their production is planet-planet interactions, which produces hot Jupiters from planets born far from their host stars but near their dynamical stability limits. In the much more likely case of planets born far from their dynamical stability limits, can hot Jupiters can be formed in star clusters? Our N-body simulations of planetary systems inside star clusters answer this question in the affirmative, and show that hot Jupiter formation is not a rare event. We detail three case studies of the dynamics-induced births of hot Jupiters on highly eccentric orbits that can only occur inside star clusters. The hot Jupiters' orbits bear remarkable similarities to those of some of the most extreme exoplanets known: HAT-P-32 b, HAT-P-2 b, HD 80606 b and GJ 876 d. If stellar perturbations formed these hot Jupiters then our simulations predict that these very hot, inner planets are sometimes acc...

  2. Jupiter's Decametric Radio Emission and the Radiation Belts of Its Galilean Satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J A

    1968-03-01

    Many of the observed properties of Jupiter's decametric radiation may be explained by postulation that the inner Galilean satellites of Jupiter have magnetic properties that strongly distort Jupiter's magnetic field in the region of each satellite. Charged particles from Jupiter's radiation belts are trapped by these distorted fields and emit synchrotron radiation.

  3. Tilting Saturn without Tilting Jupiter or Ejecting an Ice Giant: Constraints on migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Douglas S.; Lee, M. H.

    2010-10-01

    The obliquities of the giant planets preserve information about their migration and encounter histories. Are the classic Nice models (Tsiganis et al. 2005) or the resonant Nice models (Morbidelli et al. 2007) compatible with Jupiter's 3 degree tilt and Saturn's 27? Here we consider the obliquity evolution of the giants during the planetesimal-driven migration phase using two methods: (1) a purely secular integration of the Laplace-Lagrange equations with spin, and (2) a hybrid N-body scheme with full interactions between the Sun and the giants but imposed prescriptions for migration and eccentricity and inclination damping. We find that it is difficult to reproduce today's obliquity values as migration timescales sufficient to tilt Saturn via the Hamilton & Ward (2004) secular spin-orbit resonance mechanism generally suffice to tilt Jupiter more than is observed. Moreover, long migration timescales which make tilting Saturn easier simultaneously reduce the survival fraction (to below 20% for timescales longer than 20 Myr.) We discuss the constraints these observations provide on the dynamical history of the giant planets, and the remaining possibility of tilting Saturn during a late very slow migration of Neptune to its present location after the main phase of migration is complete. [This work was supported by Hong Kong RGC grant HKU 7024/08P.

  4. Radiometric Dating Does Work!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, G. Brent

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the accuracy of dating methods and creationist arguments that radiometric dating does not work. Explains the Manson meteorite impact and the Pierre shale, the ages of meteorites, the K-T tektites, and dating the Mount Vesuvius eruption. (Author/YDS)

  5. Energetic electrons in Jupiter's dawn magnetodisc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Allen, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents and analyzes absolute energy density data on electrons from the University of Iowa instrument on Pioneer 10 for one example of a plasma sheet traversal in Jupiter's dawn magnetodisk on 6-7 December 1973. The absolute integral omnidirectional intensity spectrum of electrons is based on a full and accurate reduction of the counting rate data. The main finding is that electrons of energy greater than 0.060 MeV provide only about 3% of the charged particle pressure required to explain the observed depression in the magnetic field at the center of the plasma sheet, in spite of the fact that the intensity of such electrons is well correlated with the depression of the magnetic pressure throughout the sheet.

  6. Auroral meridian scanning photometer calibration using Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackel, Brian J.; Unick, Craig; Creutzberg, Fokke; Baker, Greg; Davis, Eric; Donovan, Eric F.; Connors, Martin; Wilson, Cody; Little, Jarrett; Greffen, M.; McGuffin, Neil

    2016-10-01

    Observations of astronomical sources provide information that can significantly enhance the utility of auroral data for scientific studies. This report presents results obtained by using Jupiter for field cross calibration of four multispectral auroral meridian scanning photometers during the 2011-2015 Northern Hemisphere winters. Seasonal average optical field-of-view and local orientation estimates are obtained with uncertainties of 0.01 and 0.1°, respectively. Estimates of absolute sensitivity are repeatable to roughly 5 % from one month to the next, while the relative response between different wavelength channels is stable to better than 1 %. Astronomical field calibrations and darkroom calibration differences are on the order of 10 %. Atmospheric variability is the primary source of uncertainty; this may be reduced with complementary data from co-located instruments.

  7. Radio observations of Jupiter-family comets

    CERN Document Server

    Crovisier, J; Bockelée-Morvan, D; Colom, P

    2008-01-01

    Radio observations from decimetric to submillimetric wavelengths are now a basic tool for the investigation of comets. Spectroscopic observations allow us i) to monitor the gas production rate of the comets, by directly observing the water molecule, or by observing secondary products (e.g., the OH radical) or minor species (e.g., HCN); ii) to investigate the chemical composition of comets; iii) to probe the physical conditions of cometary atmospheres: kinetic temperature and expansion velocity. Continuum observations probe large-size dust particles and (for the largest objects) cometary nuclei. Comets are classified from their orbital characteristics into two separate classes: i) nearly-isotropic, mainly long-period comets and ii) ecliptic, short-period comets, the so-called Jupiter-family comets. These two classes apparently come from two different reservoirs, respectively the Oort cloud and the trans-Neptunian scattered disc. Due to their different history and - possibly - their different origin, they may h...

  8. Rotational Properties of Jupiter Trojan 1173 Anchises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, Joseph; Henry, Todd; French, Linda; Trilling, David

    2015-11-01

    Anchises (1173) is a large Trojan asteroid librating about Jupiter’s L5 Lagrange point. Here we examine its rotational and lightcurve properties by way of data collected over a 3.5 year observing campaign. The length of the campaign means that data were gathered for more than a quarter of Anchises' full orbital revolution which allows for accurate determinations of pole orientation and bulk shape properties for the asteroid that can then be compared to results of previous work (i.e. French 1987, Horner et al. 2012). In addition to light curves, photometric data taken during this campaign could potentially detect color differences between hemispheres as the viewing geometry changes over time. Understanding these details about a prominent member of the Jupiter Trojans may help us better understand the history of this fascinating and important group of asteroids.

  9. Effects of Collisions with Rocky Planets on the Properties of Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Kassandra R

    2012-01-01

    Observed Hot Jupiters exhibit a wide range of physical properties. For a given mass, many planets have inflated radii, while others are surprisingly compact and may harbor large central cores. Motivated by the observational sample, this paper considers possible effects from collisions of smaller rocky planets with gas giant planets. In this scenario, the Jovian planets migrate first and enter into (approximately) 4 day orbits, whereas rocky planets (mass = 0.1-20 that of Earth) migrate later and then encounter the gaseous giants. Previous work indicates that the collision rates are high for such systems. This paper calculates the trajectories of incoming rocky planets as they orbit within the gaseous planets and are subjected to gravitational, frictional, and tidal forces. These collisions always increase the metallicity of the Jovian planets. If the incoming rocky bodies survive tidal destruction and reach the central regions, they provide a means of producing large planetary cores. Both the added metallicit...

  10. A Transiting Hot Jupiter Orbiting a Metal-Rich Star

    CERN Document Server

    Dunham, Edward W; Koch, David G; Batalha, Natalie M; Buchhave, Lars A; Brown, Timothy M; Caldwell, Douglas A; Cochran, William D; Endl, Michael; Fischer, Debra; Furesz, Gabor; Gautier, Thomas N; Geary, John C; Gilliland, Ronald L; Gould, Alan; Howell, Steve B; Jenkins, Jon M; Kjeldsen, Hans; Latham, David W; Lissauer, Jack J; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Meibom, Soren; Monet, David G; Rowe, Jason F; Sasselov, Dimitar D

    2010-01-01

    We announce the discovery of Kepler-6b, a transiting hot Jupiter orbiting a star with unusually high metallicity, [Fe/H] = +0.34 +/- 0.04. The planet's mass is about 2/3 that of Jupiter, Mp = 0.67 Mj, and the radius is thirty percent larger than that of Jupiter, Rp = 1.32 Rj, resulting in a density of 0.35 g/cc, a fairly typical value for such a planet. The orbital period is P = 3.235 days. The host star is both more massive than the Sun, Mstar = 1.21 Msun, and larger than the Sun, Rstar = 1.39 Rsun.

  11. Maximum frequency of the decametric radiation from Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, C. H.; Alexander, J. K.

    1980-01-01

    The upper frequency limits of Jupiter's decametric radio emission are found to be essentially the same when observed from the earth or, with considerably higher sensitivity, from the Voyager spacecraft close to Jupiter. This suggests that the maximum frequency is a real cut-off corresponding to a maximum gyrofrequency of about 38-40 MHz at Jupiter. It no longer appears to be necessary to specify different cut-off frequencies for the Io and non-Io emission as the maximum frequencies are roughly the same in each case.

  12. Return to Europa: Overview of the Jupiter Europa Orbiter Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K.; Tan-Wang, G.; Boldt, J.; Greeley, R.; Jun, I.; Lock, R.; Ludwinski, J.; Pappalardo, R.; Van Houten, T.; Yan, T.

    2009-01-01

    Missions to explore Europa have been imagined ever since the Voyager mission first suggested that Europa was geologically very young. Subsequently, Galileo supplied fascinating new insights into that satellite's secrets. The Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) would be the NASA-led portion of the Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), an international mission with orbiters developed by NASA, ESA and possibly JAXA. JEO would address a very important subset of the complete EJSM science objectives and is designed to function alone or in conjunction with ESA's Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO).

  13. Determinants of customer satisfaction with service encounter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana Nefat

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Service encounters are the focal point of a customer’s perception of a service in terms of its quality, value and customer satisfaction. The paper researches the influence of the components of a service encounter on customer satisfaction. Among several factors that determine customer satisfaction the quality of service, which is related to the characteristics of service, plays an important role. However, a direct insight into the reasons that make a service encounter satisfactory or unsatisfactory is provided by the critical incident technique, where causes of dis/satisfaction differ primarily depending on whether they derive from interpersonal contact or from contact with technology. The evidence of service, which includes people, process and the physical evidence, plays a critical role in a customer’s dis/satisfaction. The influence of these elements cannot be observed separately; it must be observed in their interaction during the delivery of service and their strongest effect is achieved during face-to-face service encounters that have the characteristics of a theatre metaphor. Even though a high level of satisfaction may be achieved after the recovery of a service, enterprises should aim to conduct excellent service encounters right from the start.

  14. Termite: Emulation Testbed for Encounter Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Bruno

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cutting-edge mobile devices like smartphones and tablets are equipped with various infrastructureless wireless interfaces, such as WiFi Direct and Bluetooth. Such technologies allow for novel mobile applications that take advantage of casual encounters between co-located users. However, the need to mimic the behavior of real-world encounter networks makes testing and debugging of such applications hard tasks. We present Termite, an emulation testbed for encounter networks. Our system allows developers to run their applications on a virtual encounter network emulated by software. Developers can model arbitrary encounter networks and specify user interactions on the emulated virtual devices. To facilitate testing and debugging, developers can place breakpoints, inspect the runtime state of virtual nodes, and run experiments in a stepwise fashion. Termite defines its own Petri Net variant to model the dynamically changing topology and synthesize user interactions with virtual devices. The system is designed to efficiently multiplex an underlying emulation hosting infrastructure across multiple developers, and to support heterogeneous mobile platforms. Our current system implementation supports virtual Android devices communicating over WiFi Direct networks and runs on top of a local cloud infrastructure. We evaluated our system using emulator network traces, and found that Termite is expressive and performs well.

  15. Simulation of Rogue Planet Encounters with the Solar System: Is Planet 9 a Captured Rogue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesper, James; Mason, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Rogue, or free-floating, planets may be abundant in the Galaxy. Several have been observed in the solar neighborhood. They have been predicted to even outnumber stars by a large fraction, and may partially account for dark matter in the disk of the galaxy, as the result of circumbinary planet formation. We performed N-body simulations of rogue encounters with the solar system with a variety of impact parameters. We find that Jupiter mass and higher rogues leave a significant imprint on planetary system architecture. Rogue formation models are therefore constrained by observed planetary system structure. We speculate that if rogue planets are abundant as predicted, then, Planet 9 may be a captured rogue.

  16. JUPITER PROJECT - JOINT UNIVERSAL PARAMETER IDENTIFICATION AND EVALUATION OF RELIABILITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The JUPITER (Joint Universal Parameter IdenTification and Evaluation of Reliability) project builds on the technology of two widely used codes for sensitivity analysis, data assessment, calibration, and uncertainty analysis of environmental models: PEST and UCODE.

  17. How does stellar irradiation make hot Jupiters puffy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yu-Jie; Gu, Pin-Gao

    2017-06-01

    Hot Jupiters appear to be re-inflated as their host stars evolve and become more luminous, shedding more light on the intriguing correlation between stellar irradiation and the size of hot Jupiters. To account for the phenomenon, one of the well-known models is the thermal-tide scenario proposed by Arras and Socrates. We present a linear analysis of semi-diurnal thermal tides in a hot Jupiter. The Coriolis effect is added to our equation, which generates more wave modes than non-rotating models, such as Rossby, Yanai, and inertial waves. We attempt to investigate where and which mode contributes most of the torque that maintains the planet in an asynchronous state against gravitational tides, leading to re-inflation of a hot Jupiter.

  18. Pioneer Jupiter orbiter probe mission 1980, probe description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrees, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The adaptation of the Saturn-Uranus Atmospheric Entry Probe (SUAEP) to a Jupiter entry probe is summarized. This report is extracted from a comprehensive study of Jovian missions, atmospheric model definitions and probe subsystem alternatives.

  19. Planetary geometry handbook: Jupiter positional data, 1985 - 2020, volume 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeyevsky, A. B.; Snyder, G. C.; Paulson, B. L.; Cunniff, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Graphical data necessary for the analysis of planetary exploration missions to Jupiter are presented. Positional and geometric information spanning the time period from 1985 through 2020 is provided. The data and their usage are explained.

  20. Fitting Orbits to Jupiter's Moons with a Spreadsheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Describes how a spreadsheet is used to fit a circular orbit model to observations of Jupiter's moons made with a small telescope. Kepler's Third Law and the inverse square law of gravity are observed. (AIM)

  1. Centaur's ring system formation by close encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santana, Thamiris; Winter, Othon

    2016-10-01

    Rupture of small bodies due to close approach to a massive body is a frequent event in the Solar System. Some of these small bodies can just disintegrate completely or suffer a material loss.In this work we study the gravitational interaction between a giant planet and a small body in close encounters in order to simulate the formation of a planetary ring system around a centaur by the partial rupture of the small body.Considering the current Chariklo's body and a disk of particles around it, we simulated the system under close encounters with one of giant planets.Another motivation for the study is also the centaur Chiron, that is a candidate to have a ring system like Chariklo. The characteristics of the encounters are defined by the impact parameter and the velocity at infinity.The results are presented in terms of conditions that could lead to a rupture that could generate a ring like system.

  2. Search for Asteroid-Asteroid Encounters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A. Mammana

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Earlier studies about asteroids did not consider mutual interactions since they assume a negligible asteroid mass. In 1966 Hertz took into account for the first time the gravitational effects produced by an asteroid on another for mass determination. This gravitational action becomes relevant for enough effective encounters. The most efficient gravitational interaction is that produced in a large time interval and for small distances. For each particular caseful it is relevant to perform a care analysis in order to determinate the feasibility in the mass determination and improved orbital elements. In the present paper we performed a search of asteroid-asteroid encounters occurred in the twenty century for the first 3000 numbered asteroids . Of all encounters we have selected only those asteroid pairs in which one of the asteroids has a diameter larger than 200 km and the other one (the smaller an observational interval of at least ten years.

  3. Challenges in the professional care encounters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaldal, Maiken Holm; Kristiansen, Jette; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    To prepare and guide the nursing students through their clinical periods, evidence on the students’ experiences of professional care encounters in a hospital unit, is required. A systematic review following The Joanna Briggs Institute guidelines. Five qualitative research articles were included...... are challenged by their personal boundaries in the professional care encounter and they experience a great psychological impact Patient contact is an unavoidable and complex component in the nursing education. The students have not yet built up a professional filter and are exposed to a wealth of emotional...... reactions. It is essential that the faculties prepare and guide the students before, during and after the professional care encounter to assist the development of educational strategies to prevent attrition and to the topic “The Established Relationship between the Nurse and Patient” curricula...

  4. Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter and Trojan Asteroid Explorer in EJSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Sho; Fujimoto, Masaki; Yano, Hajime; Takashima, Takeshi; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Funase, Ryu; Tsuda, Yuichi; Kawaguchi, Junichiro; Kawakatsu, Yasuhiro; Mori, Osamu; Morimoto, Mutsuko; Yoshida, Fumi; Takato, Naruhisa

    The international mission to explore the Jovian system is planned as Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) aiming at the launch in 2020. EJSM consists of (1) the Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) by NASA, (2) the Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO) by ESA, and (3) the Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter (JMO) studied by JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency). In February 2009, NASA and ESA decided to continue the study of EJSM as a candidate of the outer solar system mission. In JAXA, a mission plan combining Trojan asteroid explorer with JMO started. According to the mission plan, as the main spacecraft flies by Jupiter, it will deploy the JMO satellite around Jupiter. Then the main will target one (or two) Trojan asteroids. JMO is a spin-stabilized satellite which will have magnetometers, low-energy plasma spectrome-ters, medium energy particle detectors, energetic particle detectors, electric field / plasma wave instruments, an ENA imager, an EUV spectrometer, and a dust detector. Collaborating with plasma instruments on board JEO and JGO, JMO will investigate the fast-rotating huge mag-netosphere to clarify the energy procurement from the rotation of Jupiter to the magnetosphere and to clarify the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere. JAXA started the study of a solar power sail for deep space explorations. In addition to the function of a solar sail (photon propulsion), the solar power sail system has very efficient ion engines where electric power is produced solar panels within the sail. Currently we are studying a mission to Jupiter and Trojan asteroids using a large (100m-scale) solar power sail that can transfer large payload as far as Jupiter. Trojan asteroids, which orbit around Jupiter's Lagrangian points, are primitive bodies with information of the early solar system as well as raw solid materials of Jovian system. Proposed instruments for the Trojan spacecraft are cameras, IR spectrometers, XRS, a laser altimeter, and a small surface rover

  5. Analysis Of The 2009 July Impact Debris In Jupiter'S Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin; Hueso, R.; Legarreta, J.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; García-Melendo, E.; Gómez, J. M.; Rojas, J. F.; Orton, G. S.; Wesley, A.; IOPW International Outer Planet Watch Team

    2009-09-01

    We report the analysis of images obtained by the contributors to the International Outer Planet Watch (IOPW) of the debris left in the atmosphere of Jupiter by the object that impacted the planet between 18 and 19 July 2009. The discovery images by Anthony Wesley in July 19.625 and the first two days of its tracking, shows a dark debris spot (continuum wavelength) located at planetocentric latitude -55.1 deg and 304.5 deg System III longitude. The imaging survey indicates that the spot was not present in July 18.375, so the impact occurred during a window between both dates. The main spot had a size of about 4,500 km and to its Northwest a thin debris halo of similar size was initially observed. Methane band images at a wavelength of 890 nm shows the spot to be bright indicating that the debris aerosols are highly placed in the atmosphere relative to surrounding clouds. At the central latitude of the impact, the Jovian flow has nearly zero speed but anticyclonic vorticity bounded by jets at -51.5 deg (directed westward with velocity -10 m/s) and at -57.5 deg (directed eastward with velocity 25 m/s). The morphology in the continuum and the spot brightness in the methane band strongly suggest that the feature was caused by a cometary or asteroidal impact, similar in behaviour to the SL9 impacts of 1994. This work has been funded by Spanish MEC AYA2006-07735 with FEDER support and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07. RH acknowledges a "Ramón y Cajal” contract from MEC.

  6. Detection of (C-13)-ethane in Jupiter's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Guenter; Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Jennings, Donald E.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution (C-12)- and (C-13)-ethane spectra of Jupiter were acquired with the Kitt Peak 4 m Fourier spectrometer and the Goddard postdisperser in June 1987. A relative abundance ratio (C-12/C-13) of 94 +/- 12 was derived from the measurements. This nearly terrestrial value indicates little or no fractionation of carbon isotopes when ethane is produced in the photolysis of methane in Jupiter's atmosphere.

  7. A Look Inside the Juno Mission to Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammier, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    Juno, the second mission within the New Frontiers Program, is a Jupiter polar orbiter mission designed to return high-priority science data that spans across multiple divisions within NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Juno's science objectives, coupled with the natural constraints of a cost-capped, PI-led mission and the harsh environment of Jupiter, have led to a very unique mission and spacecraft design.

  8. The Jupiter Electron Scattering Program at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arie Bodek

    2004-08-01

    JUPITER (Jlab Unified Program to Investigate nuclear Targets and Electroproduction of Resonances) is a new collaboration between the Nuclear Physics Electron Scattering and High Energy Physics Neutrino Scattering Communities to Investigate the Structure of Nucleons and Nuclei with Electron and Neutrino Beams. The first phase of JUPITER is Hall C experiment E04-001 on Inclusive Electron Scattering from Nuclear Targets. First data run of E04-001 is currently scheduled for January of 2005.

  9. An analysis of Jupiter data from the RAE-1 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, T. D.

    1974-01-01

    The analysis of Radio Astronomy Explorer Satellite data are presented. Radio bursts from Jupiter are reported in the frequency range 4700 KHz to 45 KHz. Strong correlations with lo were found at 4700, 3930, and 2200 KHz, while an equally strong Europa effect was observed at 1300, 900, and 700 KHz. Histograms indicating the relative probability and the successful identification of Jupiter activity were plotted, using automatic computer and visual search techniques.

  10. Homeless women's experiences of service provider encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biederman, Donna J; Nichols, Tracy R

    2014-01-01

    Service providers are gatekeepers to health-sustaining services and resources, although little is known about service encounters from the perspective of homeless women. We conducted in-depth semistructured interviews with 15 homeless women to better understand their experiences of service encounters. Using a phenomenological method, 160 significant statements were extracted from participant transcripts; more positive than negative interactions were reported. The 10 themes that emerged fall along a dehumanizing/humanizing continuum primarily separated by the power participants experienced in the interaction and the trust they felt in the service provider. Implications for nursing practice and research are offered.

  11. Predator-prey encounters in turbulent waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, J.; Ott, Søren; Pécseli, H.L.;

    2002-01-01

    With reference to studies of predator-prey encounters in turbulent waters, we demonstrate the feasibility of an experimental method for investigations of particle fluxes to an absorbing surface in turbulent flows. A laboratory experiment is carried out, where an approximately homogeneous and isot......With reference to studies of predator-prey encounters in turbulent waters, we demonstrate the feasibility of an experimental method for investigations of particle fluxes to an absorbing surface in turbulent flows. A laboratory experiment is carried out, where an approximately homogeneous...

  12. Plankton motility patterns and encounter rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, Andre; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    measure of run length to reaction distance determines whether the underlying encounter is ballistic or diffusive. Since ballistic interactions are intrinsically more efficient than diffusive, we predict that organisms will display motility with long correlation run lengths compared to their reaction...... distances to their prey, but short compared to the reaction distances of their predators. We show motility data for planktonic organisms ranging from bacteria to copepods that support this prediction. We also present simple ballistic and diffusive motility models for estimating encounter rates, which lead...

  13. First Earth-Based Detection of a Superbolide on Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso, R.; Wesley, A.; Go, C.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Wong, M. H.; Fletcher, L. N.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Boslough, M. B.; DePater, I.; Orton, G. S.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Edwards, M. L.; Hammel, H. B.; Clarke, J. T.; Noll, K. S.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2010-01-01

    Cosmic collisions can planets cause detectable optical flashes that range from terrestrial shooting stars to bright fireballs. On 2010 June 3 a bolide in Jupiter's atmosphere was simultaneously observed from the Earth by two amateur astronomers observing Jupiter in red and blue wavelengths, The bolide appeared as a flash of 2 s duration in video recording data of the planet. The analysis of the light carve of the observations results in an estimated energy of the impact of (0.9-4,0) x 10(exp 15) J which corresponds to a colliding body of 8-13 m diameter assuming a mean density of 2 g/cu cm. Images acquired a few days later by the Hubble Space Telescope and other large ground-based facilities did not show any signature of aerosol debris, temperature, or chemical composition anomaly, confirming that the body was small and destroyed in Jupiter's upper atmosphere. Several collisions of this size may happen on Jupiter on a yearly basis. A systematic study of the impact rate and size of these bolides can enable an empirical determination. of the flux of meteoroids in Jupiter with implications for the populations of small bodies in the outer solar system and may allow a better quantification of the threat of impacting bodies to Earth. The serendipitous recording of this optical flash opens a new window in the observation of Jupiter with small telescopes.

  14. Small Inner Companions of Warm Jupiters: Lifetimes and Legacies

    CERN Document Server

    Van Laerhoven, Christa

    2014-01-01

    Although warm jupiters are generally too far from their stars for tides to be important, the presence of an inner planetary companion to a warm jupiter can result in tidal evolution of the system. Insight into the process and its effects comes form classical secular theory of planetary perturbations. The lifetime of the inner planet may be shorter than the age of the system, because the warm jupiter maintains its eccentricity and hence promotes tidal migration into the star. Thus a warm jupiter observed to be alone in its system might have previously cleared away any interior planets. Before its demise, even if an inner planet is of terrestrial scale, it may promote damping of the warm jupiter's eccentricity. Thus any inferences of the initial orbit of an observed warm jupiter must include the possibility of a greater initial eccentricity than would be estimated by assuming it had always been alone. Tidal evolution involving multiple planets also enhances the internal heating of the planets, which readily exc...

  15. Colors and Properties of Jupiter's Greeks and Trojans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, Joseph; Henry, Todd J.; French, Linda M.; Trilling, David E.

    2016-10-01

    In this Ph.D. talk, I will present the colors and properties of Jupiter Trojan asteroids examined in my dissertation research. The Jupiter Trojan asteroids are minor bodies that orbit 60 degrees in front and 60 degrees behind Jupiter. Because these orbits are stable over the lifetime of the Solar System, the properties of these objects may inform us about the conditions under which the Solar System formed. We present BVRKCIKC photometry for over 100 of the intrinsically brightest and presumably largest members of the L4 and L5 Jupiter Trojans. We use a new principal color component derived by Chatelain et al. 2016 that is indicative of taxonomic types relevant to the Jupiter Trojan asteroids. We previously found that 76% of the largest L5 Jupiter Trojans are consistent with a D-type classification, while 24% show shallower slopes more consistent with X-type and C-type classifications. Here we extend this study to the L4 cloud and compare the two populations, as well as include findings about specific objects that have resulted from these data. Specifically, multiple photometric observations hint at color variation in some objects, and our richest datasets allow for the determination of phase curves and shapes for a handful of the most compelling asteroids including a new shape model and pole solution for 1173 Anchises. Our goal is to use this study to shed light on these fascinating objects and to place the Trojans in context in the larger Solar System.

  16. Warm Jupiters from secular planet-planet interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Petrovich, Cristobal

    2016-01-01

    Most warm Jupiters (gas-giant planets with $0.1~{\\rm AU}\\lesssim a \\lesssim1$ AU) have pericenter distances that are too large for significant orbital migration by tidal friction. We study the possibility that the warm Jupiters are undergoing secular eccentricity oscillations excited by an outer companion (a planet or star) in an eccentric and/or mutually inclined orbit. In this model the warm Jupiters migrate periodically, in the high-eccentricity phase of the oscillation when the pericenter distance is small, but are typically observed at much lower eccentricities. We show that the steady-state eccentricity distribution of the warm Jupiters migrating by this mechanism is approximately flat, which is consistent with the observed distribution if and only if we restrict the sample to warm Jupiters that have outer companions detected by radial-velocity surveys. The eccentricity distribution of warm Jupiters without companions exhibits a peak at low eccentricities ($e\\lesssim 0.2$) that must be explained by a di...

  17. Strong tidal dissipation in Io and Jupiter from astrometric observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainey, Valéry; Arlot, Jean-Eudes; Karatekin, Ozgür; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2009-06-18

    Io is the volcanically most active body in the Solar System and has a large surface heat flux. The geological activity is thought to be the result of tides raised by Jupiter, but it is not known whether the current tidal heat production is sufficiently high to generate the observed surface heat flow. Io's tidal heat comes from the orbital energy of the Io-Jupiter system (resulting in orbital acceleration), whereas dissipation of energy in Jupiter causes Io's orbital motion to decelerate. Here we report a determination of the tidal dissipation in Io and Jupiter through its effect on the orbital motions of the Galilean moons. Our results show that the rate of internal energy dissipation in Io (k(2)/Q = 0.015 +/- 0.003, where k(2) is the Love number and Q is the quality factor) is in good agreement with the observed surface heat flow, and suggest that Io is close to thermal equilibrium. Dissipation in Jupiter (k(2)/Q = (1.102 +/- 0.203) x 10(-5)) is close to the upper bound of its average value expected from the long-term evolution of the system, and dissipation in extrasolar planets may be higher than presently assumed. The measured secular accelerations indicate that Io is evolving inwards, towards Jupiter, and that the three innermost Galilean moons (Io, Europa and Ganymede) are evolving out of the exact Laplace resonance.

  18. Temperature Swings in a Hot Jupiter's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Weather variations in the atmosphere of a planet on a highly eccentric orbit are naturally expected to be extreme. Now, a study has directly measured the wild changes in the atmosphere of a highly eccentric hot Jupiter as it passes close to its host star.Diagram of the HD 80606 system. The inset images labeled AH show the temperature distribution of the planet at different stages as it swings around its star. [de Wit et al. 2016]Eccentric OpportunityFor a hot Jupiter a gas giant that orbits close to its host star the exoplanet HD 80606 b exhibits a fairly unusual path. Rather than having a circularized orbit, HD 80606 b travels on an extremely elliptic 111-day orbit, with an eccentricity of e ~ 0.93. Since the amount of flux HD 80606 b receives from its host varies by a factor of ~850 over the course of its orbit, it stands to reason that this planet must have extreme weather swings!Now a team of scientists led by Julien de Wit (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) has reanalyzed old observations of HD 80606 and obtained new ones using the Spitzer Space Telescope. The longer observing time and new data analysis techniques allowed the team to gain new insights into how the exoplanets atmosphere responds to changes in the stellar flux it receives during its orbit.Extreme VariationsBy measuring the infrared light coming from HD 80606, de Wit and collaborators modeled the planets temperature during 80 hours of its closest approach to its host star. This period of time included the ~20 hours in which most of the planets temperature change is expected to occur, as it approaches to a distance a mere 6 stellar radii from its host.The authors find that the layer of the atmosphere probed by Spitzer heats rapidly from 500K to 1400K (thats ~440F to a scalding 2000+F!) as the planet approaches periastron.The atmosphere then cools similarly quickly as the planet heads away from the star once more.Relative infrared brightness of HD 80606 b at 4.5 and 8 m. The dip marks where

  19. Hot-Jupiter Breakfasts Realign Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    Two researchers at the University of Chicago have recently developed a new theory to explain an apparent dichotomy in the orbits of planets around cool vs. hot stars. Their model proposes that the spins of cool stars are affected when they ingest hot Jupiters (HJs) early in their stellar lifetimes. A Puzzling Dichotomy: In exoplanet studies, there is a puzzling difference observed between planet orbits around cool and hot (those with Teff ≥ 6250 K) stars: the orbital planes of planets around cool stars are primarily aligned with the host star's spin, whereas the orbital planes of planets around hot stars seem to be randomly distributed. Previous attempts to explain this dichotomy have focused on tidal interactions between the host star and the planets observed in the system. Now Titos Matsakos and Arieh Königl have taken these models a step further — by including in their calculations not only the effects of observed planets, but also those of HJs that may have been swallowed by the star long before we observed the systems. Modeling Meals: Plots of the distribution of the obliquity λ for hot Jupiters around cool hosts (upper plot) and hot hosts (lower plot). The dashed line shows the initial distribution, the bins show the model prediction for the final distribution after the systems evolve, and the black dots show the current observational data. [Matsakos & Königl, 2015]" class="size-thumbnail wp-image-223" height="386" src="http://aasnova.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/fig22-260x386.png" width="260" /> Plots of the distribution of the obliquity λ for hot Jupiters around cool hosts (upper plot) and hot hosts (lower plot). The dashed line shows the initial distribution, the bins show the model prediction for the final distribution after the systems evolve, and the black dots show the current observational data. [Matsakos & Königl, 2015] The authors' model assumes that as HJs are formed and migrate inward through the protoplanetary disk, they stall out near

  20. Visible spectral slope survey of Jupiter Trojans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, Nicolas; Rivkin, Andrew S.; Sickafoose, Amanda A.

    2016-10-01

    Jupiter's Trojans are predicted by the Nice Model [1,2] to be Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) that moved from 30+ AU to 5.2 AU during the early evolution period of the Solar System. This model, predicting giant planet migration and widespread transport of material throughout the Solar System, is however still lacking important constraints. Correlations between the composition, size, and orbital geometry of Jupiter's Trojans can provide additional information to test predicted migration and evolution models.Two main colour groups have been observed, roughly equivalent to the C (plus low-albedo X) and D classes with distinguishable spectral slopes, and one interpretation is that the two groups have different compositions [3]. Independent compositions together with hints of differing orbital inclination distributions could imply separate formation locations; therefore, determining the relative fractions of C and D asteroids at different sizes would provide a key test for Solar System dynamical models. However, there is a caveat: the distinct colour groups could also arise by other means. Regolith processes or "space weathering" such as micrometeorite impacts and UV irradiation of ice are also plausible explanations for a range of spectrographic slopes from C-like to D-like [4].Here we report on our latest survey observations at Sutherland, South Africa of approximately 50 Trojan targets using the Sutherland High Speed Optical Camera (SHOC) [5] on the 74" telescope. These observations are part of a larger multi-telescope survey to determine the spectral slopes (C-like or D-like) for multiple Trojans, focusing on those of small size. These slopes can be used to determine the relative fraction of C+X and D asteroids at different sizes to determine whether what is seen is more consistent with regolith processes or different compositions.References:[1] A. Morbidelli, et al. Nature, 435, 462-465, (2005)[2] R. Gomes, et al. Nature 435, 466-469 (2005)[3] J.P. Emery, et al. The

  1. Dynamics of a stressful encounter: cognitive appraisal, coping, and encounter outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkman, S; Lazarus, R S; Dunkel-Schetter, C; DeLongis, A; Gruen, R J

    1986-05-01

    Despite the importance that is attributed to coping as a factor in psychological and somatic health outcomes, little is known about actual coping processes, the variables that influence them, and their relation to the outcomes of the stressful encounters people experience in their day-to-day lives. This study uses an intraindividual analysis of the interrelations among primary appraisal (what was at stake in the encounter), secondary appraisal (coping options), eight forms of problem- and emotion-focused coping, and encounter outcomes in a sample of community-residing adults. Coping was strongly related to cognitive appraisal; the forms of coping that were used varied depending on what was at stake and the options for coping. Coping was also differentially related to satisfactory and unsatisfactory encounter outcomes. The findings clarify the functional relations among appraisal and coping variables and the outcomes of stressful encounters.

  2. Sixth Graders Speak Out: Troublesome Intercultural Encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaasma, Marjorie A.

    Researchers have pointed to cultural diversity as a major source of conflict in our nation's schools, noting that these conflicts have the potential to escalate into violence. This study seeks to identify the types of intercultural encounters that young people themselves find troublesome. Participants were 906 sixth graders in 12 elementary…

  3. Managing Complaints in Multilingual Care Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Gunilla; Wadensjö, Cecilia; Plejert, Charlotta

    2017-01-01

    Troubles-telling and complaints are common in contexts of care for older people and need to be managed by care staff in a respectful manner. This paper examines the handling of an older person's complaints in multilingual care encounters that involve participants who do not share a common language. The data consist of video-recordings and…

  4. Entering a Crack: An Encounter with Gossip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Linda

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I enter a crack to think otherwise about the concept "gossip". Drawing on previous scholarship engaging with Deleuzian concepts to inform research methodologies, this paper builds on this body of work. Following Deleuze and Guattari, the paper undertakes a mapping of gossip, subsequent to an encounter with a crack.…

  5. 69 70 THE PHONOLOGICAL PROBLEMS ENCOUNTERED BY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Ike

    2007-05-10

    May 10, 2007 ... This paper examines the phonological problems Nigerian students speaking Igbo language encounter in learning the Chinese language. Introduction ..... Jiao, F. A Chinese-English Dictionary of Measure Words. Beijing: Sinolingua, 2001. Lyons, J. Language and Linguistics: An Introduction. England:.

  6. Moral Relations in Encounters with Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Karin; Öhman, Johan

    2015-01-01

    The overall aim of this article is to develop in-depth knowledge about the connection between outdoor experiences and moral attitudes towards nature. The study focuses on processes in which moral relations are at stake in encounters between students and nature. The purpose is to identify such events, describe their specific circumstances and…

  7. Encountering Pedagogy through Relational Art Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Rita L.; O'Donoghue, Donal

    2012-01-01

    Two artists involved in "socially engaged art" practice were invited to work with art education teacher candidates and instructors in an effort to rethink notions of teaching, learning and art. We initiated this residency, which we called "The Summerhill Residency", to examine how learning encounters might create environments…

  8. Domestic Violence Encountered among Kurdish Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sirwan Kamil

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective; There is growing recognition that violence against women has a large public health impact, in addition to being a gross violation of women's human rights. The study's aims were: To show the types of domestic abuse encountered by Kurdish women, and study the relationship between them. Methods; The study conducted in the…

  9. Encounters on a Shape-changing Bench

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinch, Sofie; Grönvall, Erik; Petersen, Marianne Graves;

    2014-01-01

    ; a concert hall, an airport and a shopping mall. We gathered insights from more than 120 people, as they unexpectedly encountered the shape changing capabilities of the bench. By taking the user tests out of the lab and into the wild, we explored the influence of context on the users experience of a shape...

  10. Primary lumbar hernia: A rarely encountered hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharada Sundaramurthy

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: A surgeon may encounter a primary lumbar hernia perhaps once in his lifetime making it an interesting surgical challenge. Sound anatomical knowledge and adequate imaging are indispensable. Inspite of advances in minimally invasive surgery, it cannot be universally applied to patients with lumbar hernia and management requires a more tailored approach.

  11. Entering a Crack: An Encounter with Gossip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Linda

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I enter a crack to think otherwise about the concept "gossip". Drawing on previous scholarship engaging with Deleuzian concepts to inform research methodologies, this paper builds on this body of work. Following Deleuze and Guattari, the paper undertakes a mapping of gossip, subsequent to an encounter with a crack.…

  12. Moral Relations in Encounters with Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Karin; Öhman, Johan

    2015-01-01

    The overall aim of this article is to develop in-depth knowledge about the connection between outdoor experiences and moral attitudes towards nature. The study focuses on processes in which moral relations are at stake in encounters between students and nature. The purpose is to identify such events, describe their specific circumstances and…

  13. Children's collaborative encounters in pre-school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svinth, Lone

    2013-01-01

    ’s collaboration and how the institutional demands influence children’s collaborative encounters. The study is based on video recordings of paedagogical activities (workshops and circle times) in two Danish pre-schools over a period of 11 months. Although institutional demands challenge children’s initiatives...

  14. The Change in Jupiter's Moment of Inertia due to Core Erosion and Planetary Contraction

    CERN Document Server

    Helled, Ravit

    2012-01-01

    We explore the change in Jupiter's normalized axial moment of inertia (NMOI) assuming that Jupiter undergoes core erosion. It is found that Jupiter's contraction combined with an erosion of 20 M_Earth from a primordial core of 30 M_Earth can change Jupiter's NMOI over time significantly. It is shown that Jupiter's NMOI could have changed from ~0.235 to ~0.264 throughout its evolution. We find that a NMOI value of ~0.235 as suggested by dynamical models (Ward & Canup, 2006, ApJ, 640, L91) could, in principle, be consistent with Jupiter's primordial internal structure. Low NMOI values, however, persist only for the first ~ 10^6 years of Jupiter's evolution. Re-evaluation of dynamical stability models as well as more sophisticated evolution models of Jupiter with core erosion seem to be required in order to provide more robust estimates for Jupiter's primordial NMOI.

  15. Exploration of the Jovian System by EJSM (Europa Jupiter System Mission): Origin of Jupiter and Evolution of Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Sho; Fujimoto, Masaki; Takashima, Takeshi; Yano, Hajime; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Kimura, Jun; Okada, Tatsuaki; Kawakatsu, Yasuhiro; Tsuda, Yuichi; Kawaguchi, Jun-Ichiro; Funase, Ryu; Mori, Osamu; Morimoto, Mutsuko; Ikoma, Masahiro; Naganuma, Takeshi; Yamaji, Atsushi; Hussmann, Hauke; Kurita, Kei; Working Group, Jupiter

    EJSM (Europa Jupiter System Mission) is a planned Jovian system mission with three spacecraft aiming at coordinated observations of the Jovian satellites especially Europa and the magnetosphere, atmosphere and interior of Jupiter. It was formerly called "Laplace" mission. In October 2007, it was selected as one of future ESA scientific missions Cosmic Vision (2015-2025). From the beginning, Japanese group is participating in the discussion process of the mission. JAXA will take a role on the magnetosphere spinner JMO (Jupiter Magnetosphere Orbiter). On the other hand, ESA will take charge of JGO (Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter) and NASA will be responsible for JEO (Jupiter Europa Orbiter). In February 2009, EJSM is prioritized as the first candidate of outer planet flagship mission and mission study continues in the course of Cosmic Vision. The expected launch time of EJSM will be expected in 2020. Currently we are seeking a possibility to combine JMO with a proposed solar sail mission of JAXA for Jupiter and one of Trojan asteroids.

  16. Second Quaternary dating workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    The second Quaternary dating methods workshop was held at Lucas Heights and sponsored by ANSTO and AINSE. Topics covered include, isotope and thermoluminescence dating, usage of accelerator and thermal ionisation mass spectrometry in environmental studies emphasizing on the methodologies used and sample preparation

  17. 'Wiggle matching' radiocarbon dates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramsey, CB; van der Plicht, J; Weninger, B

    2001-01-01

    This paper covers three different methods of matching radiocarbon dates to the 'wiggles' of the calibration curve in those situations where the age difference between the C-14 dates is known. These methods are most often applied to tree-ring sequences. The simplest approach is to use a classical Chi

  18. Date with Death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑慧敏

    2016-01-01

    Have you ever heard about a popular movie called date with an angel? It must be sweet and lovely. But have you ever imagine about dating with death? What is your feeling when you have a chance to talk with death? Excited or afraid? I believe that many people definitely do not think about this question and neither do I.

  19. Radiometric Dating in Geology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankhurst, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Described are several aspects and methods of quantitatively measuring geologic time using a constant-rate natural process of radioactive decay. Topics include half lives and decay constants, radiogenic growth, potassium-argon dating, rubidium-strontium dating, and the role of geochronology in support of geological exploration. (DS)

  20. Dating of cremated bones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanting, JN; Aerts-Bijma, AT; van der Plicht, J; Boaretto, E.; Carmi, I.

    2001-01-01

    When dating unburnt bone, bone collagen, the organic fraction of the bone, is used. Collagen does not survive the heat of the cremation pyre, so dating of cremated bone has been considered impossible. Structural carbonate in the mineral fraction of the bone, however, survives the cremation process.

  1. Pests of stored dates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dates are a major food crop across a large band of Africa and Eurasia, and to a lesser extent elsewhere. In most of its growing range, dates are threatened with infestation in the field by a complex of pests including nitidulid beetles and pyralid moths of the Subfamily Phycitinae. They are further ...

  2. Survival of water ice in Jupiter Trojans

    CERN Document Server

    Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurélie

    2014-01-01

    Jupiter Trojans appear to be a key population of small bodies to study and test the models of the Solar System formation and evolution. Because understanding the evolution of Trojans can bring strong and unique constraints on the origins of our planetary system, a significant observational effort has been undertaken to unveil their physical characteristics. The data gathered so far are consistent with Trojans having volatile-rich interiors (possibly water ice) and volatile-poor surfaces (fine grained silicates). Since water ice is not thermodynamically stable against sublimation at the surface of an object located at ~5 AU, such layering seems consistent with past outgassing. In this work, we study the thermal history of Trojans after the formation of a dust mantle by possible past outgassing, so as to constrain the depth at which water ice could be stable. We find that it could have survived 100 m below the surface, even if Trojans orbited close to the Sun for ~10,000 years, as suggested by the most recent d...

  3. The magnetic fields of Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, N. F.

    1981-01-01

    The magnetic fields of Jupiter and Saturn and the characteristics of their magnetospheres, formed by interaction with the solar wind, are discussed. The origins of both magnetic fields are associated with a dynamo process deep in the planetary interior. The Jovian magnetosphere is analogous to that of a pulsar magnetosphere: a massive central body with a rapid rotation and an associated intense magnetic field. Its most distinctive feature is its magnetodisk of concentrated plasma and particle flux, and reduced magnetic field intensity. The magnetopause near the subsolar point has been observed at radial distances ranging over 50 to 100 Jovian radii, implying a relatively compressible obstacle to solar wind flow. The composition of an embedded current sheet within the magnetic tail is believed to be influenced by volcanic eruptions and emissions from Io. Spectral troughs of the Jovian radiation belts have been interpreted as possible ring particles. The Saturnian magnetosphere appears to be more like the earth in its topology. It is mainly characterized by a dipole axis parallel to the rotational axis of the planet and a magnetic field intensity much less than expected.

  4. Hot Super Earths: disrupted young jupiters?

    CERN Document Server

    Nayakshin, Sergei

    2011-01-01

    Recent {\\em Kepler} observations revealed an unexpected abundance of "hot" Earth-size to Neptune-size planets in the inner $0.02-0.2$ AU from their parent stars. We propose that these smaller planets are the remnants of massive giant planets that migrated inward quicker than they could contract. We show that such disruptions naturally occur in the framework of the Tidal Downsizing hypothesis for planet formation. We find that the characteristic planet-star separation at which such "hot disruptions" occur is $R \\approx 0.03-0.2$ AU. This result is independent of the planet's embryo mass but is dependent on the accretion rate in the disc. At high accretion rates, $\\dot M \\simgt 10^{-6}\\msun$ yr$^{-1}$, the embryo is unable to contract quickly enough and is disrupted. At late times, when the accretion rate drops to $\\dot M \\simlt 10^{-8} \\msun$ yr$^{-1}$, the embryos migrate sufficiently slow to not be disrupted. These "late arrivals" may explain the well known population of hot jupiters. If type I migration reg...

  5. Ground based spectroscopy of hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Ingo

    2010-05-01

    It has been shown in recent years with great success that spectroscopy of exoplanetary atmospheres is feasible using space based observatories such as the HST and Spitzer. However, with the end of the Spitzer cold-phase, space based observations in the near to mid infra-red are limited, which will remain true until the the onset of the JWST. The importance of developing methods of ground based spectroscopic analysis of known hot Jupiters is therefore apparent. In the past, various groups have attempted exoplanetary spectroscopy using ground based facilities and various techniques. Here I will present results using a novel spectral retrieval method for near to mid infra-red emission and transmission spectra of exoplanetary atmospheres taken from the ground and discuss the feasibility of future ground-based spectroscopy in a broader context. My recently commenced PhD project is under the supervision of Giovanna Tinetti (University College London) and in collaboration with J. P. Beaulieu (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris), Mark Swain and Pieter Deroo (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech).

  6. Return to Europa: Overview of the Jupiter Europa orbiter mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K.; Boldt, J.; Greeley, R.; Hand, K.; Jun, I.; Lock, R.; Pappalardo, R.; van Houten, T.; Yan, T.

    2011-08-01

    Missions to explore Europa have been imagined ever since the Voyager mission first suggested that Europa was geologically very young. Subsequently, the Galileo spacecraft supplied fascinating new insights into this satellite of Jupiter. Now, an international team is proposing a return to the Jupiter system and Europa with the Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM). Currently, NASA and ESA are designing two orbiters that would explore the Jovian system and then each would settle into orbit around one of Jupiter's icy satellites, Europa and Ganymede. In addition, the Japanese Aerospace eXploration Agency (JAXA) is considering a Jupiter magnetospheric orbiter and the Russian Space Agency is investigating a Europa lander.The Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) would be the NASA-led portion of the EJSM; JEO would address a very important subset of the complete EJSM science objectives and is designed to function alone or in conjunction with ESA's Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). The JEO mission concept uses a single orbiter flight system that would travel to Jupiter by means of a multiple-gravity-assist trajectory and then perform a multi-year study of Europa and the Jupiter system, including 30 months of Jupiter system science and a comprehensive Europa orbit phase of 9 months.The JEO mission would investigate various options for future surface landings. The JEO mission science objectives, as defined by the international EJSM Science Definition Team, include:Europa's ocean: Characterize the extent of the ocean and its relation to the deeper interior.Europa's ice shell: Characterize the ice shell and any subsurface water, including their heterogeneity, and the nature of surface-ice-ocean exchange.Europa's chemistry: Determine global surface compositions and chemistry, especially as related to habitability.Europa's geology: Understand the formation of surface features, including sites of recent or current activity, and identify and characterize candidate sites for future in situ

  7. Hubble Views Ancient Storm in the Atmosphere of Jupiter - Montage

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    When 17th-century astronomers first turned their telescopes to Jupiter, they noted a conspicuous reddish spot on the giant planet. This Great Red Spot is still present in Jupiter's atmosphere, more than 300 years later. It is now known that it is a vast storm, spinning like a cyclone. Unlike a low-pressure hurricane in the Caribbean Sea, however, the Red Spot rotates in a counterclockwise direction in the southern hemisphere, showing that it is a high-pressure system. Winds inside this Jovian storm reach speeds of about 270 mph.The Red Spot is the largest known storm in the Solar System. With a diameter of 15,400 miles, it is almost twice the size of the entire Earth and one-sixth the diameter of Jupiter itself.The long lifetime of the Red Spot may be due to the fact that Jupiter is mainly a gaseous planet. It possibly has liquid layers, but lacks a solid surface, which would dissipate the storm's energy, much as happens when a hurricane makes landfall on the Earth. However, the Red Spot does change its shape, size, and color, sometimes dramatically. Such changes are demonstrated in high-resolution Wide Field and Planetary Cameras 1 & 2 images of Jupiter obtained by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, and presented here by the Hubble Heritage Project team. The mosaic presents a series of pictures of the Red Spot obtained by Hubble between 1992 and 1999 (see PIA01594 thru PIA01599 and PIA02400 thru PIA02402 for individual images).Astronomers study weather phenomena on other planets in order to gain a greater understanding of our own Earth's climate. Lacking a solid surface, Jupiter provides us with a laboratory experiment for observing weather phenomena under very different conditions than those prevailing on Earth. This knowledge can also be applied to places in the Earth's atmosphere that are over deep oceans, making them more similar to Jupiter's deep atmosphere.

  8. SPECTROSCOPIC EVIDENCE FOR A TEMPERATURE INVERSION IN THE DAYSIDE ATMOSPHERE OF HOT JUPITER WASP-33b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, Korey; Mandell, Avi M. [Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Madhusudhan, Nikku [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Deming, Drake [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Knutson, Heather, E-mail: khaynes0112@gmail.com [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-06-20

    We present observations of two occultations of the extrasolar planet WASP-33b using the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope, which allow us to constrain the temperature structure and composition of its dayside atmosphere. WASP-33b is the most highly irradiated hot Jupiter discovered to date, and the only exoplanet known to orbit a δ-Scuti star. We observed in spatial scan mode to decrease instrument systematic effects in the data, and removed fluctuations in the data due to stellar pulsations. The rms for our final, binned spectrum is 1.05 times the photon noise. We compare our final spectrum, along with previously published photometric data, to atmospheric models of WASP-33b spanning a wide range in temperature profiles and chemical compositions. We find that the data require models with an oxygen-rich chemical composition and a temperature profile that increases at high altitude. We find that our measured spectrum displays an excess in the measured flux toward short wavelengths that is best explained as emission from TiO. If confirmed by additional measurements at shorter wavelengths, this planet would become the first hot Jupiter with a thermal inversion that can be definitively attributed to the presence of TiO in its dayside atmosphere.

  9. Evidence from the asteroid belt for a violent past evolution of Jupiter's orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Morbidelli, Alessandro; Gomes, Rodney; Levison, Harold F; Tsiganis, Kleomenis

    2010-01-01

    We use the current orbital structure of large (>50km) asteroids in the main asteroid belt to constrain the evolution of the giant planets when they migrated from their primordial orbits to their current ones. Minton & Malhotra (2009) showed that the orbital distribution of large asteroids in the main belt can be reproduced by an exponentially-decaying migration of the giant planets on a time scale of tau ~ 0.5My. However, self-consistent numerical simulations show that the planetesimal-driven migration of the giant planets is inconsistent with an exponential change in their semi major axes on such a short time scale (Hahn & Malhotra, 1999). In fact, the typical time scale is tau > 5My. When giant planet migration on this time scale is applied to the asteroid belt, the resulting orbital distribution is incompatible with the observed one. However, the planet migration can be significantly sped up by planet-planet encounters. Consider an evolution where both Jupiter and Saturn have close encounters with ...

  10. A Jupiter Fragmented Comet: Cause of the K/T Boundary Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, N. C.; Wallis, Max K.

    1996-02-01

    The extended period of mass extinctions around the K/T boundary correlating with extraterrestrial amino acids in the sediment record constitutes strong evidence of a cometary cause. The input of extraterrestrial matter over 105 yr supports the hypothesis of a giant comet, fragmented into subcomets on close encounter with Jupiter, and subsequently perturbed into Earth-crossing orbits. Copious amounts of dust were emitted via this and possibly successive fragmenting encounters, and via normal cometary evaporation. The dynamics of dust from the disintegrating comet fragments favours retention in Earth-crossing orbits of the sub-micron fraction of organic composition. The shroud of dust accreted in the Earth's upper atmosphere varied with time and imposed climatic stresses that caused species extinctions over 105 yr. While the iridium peak in the sediments coincides with the Chicxulub crater impactor, other iridium detail suggests that some of the impactor material was reinjected into space and in part re-accreted by Earth from the interplanetary orbits.

  11. Rethinking social identity theory in international encounters:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    In a globalized business environment, interaction across linguistic boundaries is becoming a normal part of everyday life. In these encounters language differences may affect the formation of social identities among organization members. While studies based on Social Identity Theory perceive...... the link between identity and language to be linear, this article takes a different approach. By drawing on anthropological theories on ethnic identity it is argued that the relation between language and social identity is negotiated in interaction. In the empirical analysis the article focuses...... on the encounter between expatriates and local employees of a Danish subsidiary in England. The findings show that identity making may be actualized by competition for resources and recognition. This can be done by investing certain objects such as the symbolic application of language with certain identifications...

  12. Mobbing behaviors encountered by nurse teaching staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Dilek; Yildirim, Aytolan; Timucin, Arzu

    2007-07-01

    The term 'mobbing' is defined as antagonistic behaviors with unethical communication directed systematically at one individual by one or more individuals in the workplace. This cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted for the purpose of determining the mobbing behaviors encountered by nursing school teaching staff in Turkey, its effect on them, and their responses to them. A large percentage (91%) of the nursing school employees who participated in this study reported that they had encountered mobbing behaviors in the institution where they work and 17% that they had been directly exposed to mobbing in the workplace. The academic staff who had been exposed to mobbing behaviors experienced various physiological, emotional and social reactions. They frequently 'worked harder and [were] more organized and worked very carefully to avoid criticism' to escape from mobbing. In addition, 9% of the participants stated that they 'thought about suicide occasionally'.

  13. Encounter-based worms: Analysis and Defense

    CERN Document Server

    Tanachaiwiwat, Sapon

    2007-01-01

    Encounter-based network is a frequently-disconnected wireless ad-hoc network requiring immediate neighbors to store and forward aggregated data for information disseminations. Using traditional approaches such as gateways or firewalls for deterring worm propagation in encounter-based networks is inappropriate. We propose the worm interaction approach that relies upon automated beneficial worm generation aiming to alleviate problems of worm propagations in such networks. To understand the dynamic of worm interactions and its performance, we mathematically model worm interactions based on major worm interaction factors including worm interaction types, network characteristics, and node characteristics using ordinary differential equations and analyze their effects on our proposed metrics. We validate our proposed model using extensive synthetic and trace-driven simulations. We find that, all worm interaction factors significantly affect the pattern of worm propagations. For example, immunization linearly decrea...

  14. The encounters that compose the research craft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Kind

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses ethical and political dimensions of research, which is taken as social practice. To perform this research, with two teams in different regions of Brazil (Northeast and Southeast, building a truly collaborative work was an imperative task. The work process is problematized in a research involving women activists of two Brazilian social movements. The research process is discussed in four specific encouters. The first concerns the process of co-elaborating the project and the challenges of gathering distinct research interests. The second focuses on the daily challenges of staff in working with the theme of death, but also the synergy needed to work remotely. The third encounter discusses the relationship between researchers and participants, highlighting ethical and political dilemmas. The fourth and final encounter to be discussed the constraints posed by working with the theme of death, echoing among the participants and another researchers.

  15. Physical and Chemical Properties of Jupiter's Polar Vortices and Regions of Auroral Influence Revealed Through High-Resolution Infrared Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Josh; Orton, Glenn S.; Sinclair, James; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Sato, Takao M.; Fujiyoshi, Takuya; Momary, Thomas W.; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma A.

    2016-10-01

    We report characterization of the physical and chemical properties of Jupiter's polar regions derived from mid-infrared imaging of Jupiter covering all longitudes at unprecedented spatial resolution using the COMICS instrument at the Subaru Telescope on the nights of January 24 and 25, 2016 (UT). Because of Jupiter's slight axial tilt of 3°, the low angular resolution and incomplete longitudinal coverage of previous mid-infrared observations, the physical and chemical properties of Jupiter's polar regions have been poorly characterized. In advance of the Juno mission's exploration of the polar regions, this study focuses on mapping the 3-dimensional structure of Jupiter's polar regions, specifically to characterize the polar vortices and compact regions of auroral influence. Using mid-infrared images taken in the 7.8 - 24.2 µm range, we determined the 3-dimensional temperature field, mapped the para-H2 fraction and aerosol opacity at 700 mbar and lower pressures, and constrained the distribution of gaseous NH3 in Jupiter's northern and southern polar regions. Retrievals of these atmospheric parameters was performed using NEMESIS, a radiative transfer forward model and retrieval code. Preliminary results indicate that there are vortices at both poles, each with very distinct low-latitude boundaries approximately 60° (planetocentric) from the equator, which can be defined by sharp thermal gradients extending at least from the upper troposphere (500 mbar) and into the stratosphere (0.1 mbar). These polar regions are characterized by lower temperatures, lower aerosol number densities, and lower NH3 volume mixing ratios, compared with the regions immediately outside the vortex boundaries. These images also provided the highest resolution of prominent auroral-related stratospheric heating to date, revealing a teardrop-shaped morphology in the north and a sharp-edged oval shape in the south. Both appear to be contained inside the locus of H3+ auroral emission detected

  16. Winnicott and Lacan: a missed encounter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanier, Alain

    2012-04-01

    Winnicott was able to say that Lacan's paper on the mirror stage "had certainly influenced" him, while Lacan argued that he found his object a in Winnicott's transitional object. By following the development of their personal relations, as well as of their theoretical discussions, it is possible to argue that this was a missed encounter--yet a happily missed one, since the misunderstandings of their theoretical exchanges allowed each of them to clarify concepts otherwise difficult to discern.

  17. Investigation of Wake-Vortex Aircraft Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sonya T.

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is addressing airport capacity enhancements during instrument meteorological conditions though the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) program. The major goal of the TAP program is to develop the technology that will allow air traffic levels during instrument meteorological condition to approach those achieved during visual operations. The Reduced Spacing Operations (RSO) subelement of TAP at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) will develop the Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS). The purpose of the AVOSS is to integrate current and predicted weather conditions, wake vortex transport and decay knowledge, wake vortex sensor data, and operational definitions of acceptable strengths for vortex encounters to produce dynamic wake vortex separation criteria. The proposed research is in support of the wake vortex hazard definition component of the LaRC AVOSS development research. The research program described in the next section provided an analysis of the static test data and uses this data to evaluate the accuracy vortex/wake-encounter models. The accuracy of these models has not before been evaluated using experimental data. The research results also presented the first analysis of the forces and moments imparted on an airplane during a wake vortex encounter using actual flight test data.

  18. Imaging Jupiter Radiation Belts At Low Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, J. N.; de Pater, I.; Zarka, P.; Santos-Costa, D.; Sault, R.; Hess, S.; Cecconi, B.; Fender, R.; Pewg, Lofar

    2014-04-01

    The ultra-relativistic electrons, trapped in the inner radiation belts of Jupiter, generates a strong synchrotron radio emission (historically known as the jovian decimeter radiation (DIM)) which is beamed, polarized (~20% linear, ~1% circular) and broadband. It has been extensively observed by radio telescopes/ probes and imaged by radio interferometers over a wide frequency spectrum (from >300 MHz up to 22 GHz). This extended emission presents two main emission peaks constantly located on both sides of the planet close to the magnetic plane. High latitude emissions were also regularly observed at particular frequencies, times and in particular observational configurations. This region of the magnetosphere is "frozen" due to the strong magnetic field (~4.2 G as the equator) and therefore is forced to rotate at the planetary period (T≈9h55m). Due to the tilt (~ 10o) between the spin axis of the planet and the magnetic axis (which can be seen as dipolar in first approximation), the belts and the associated radio emission wobble around the planet center. The analysis of the flux at different frequencies highlighted spatial, temporal and spectral variabilities which origins are now partly understood. The emission varies at different time scales (short-time variations of hours to long-term variation over decades) due to the combination of visibility effect (wobbling, beaming, position of the observer in the magnetic rotating reference frame) [1], [2] and intrinsic local variations (interaction between relativistic electrons and satellites/dust, delayed effect of the solar wind ram pressure, impacts events) [3], [4], [5]. A complete framework is necessary to fully understand the source, loss and transport processes of the electrons originating from outside the belt, migrating by inward diffusion and populating the inner region of the magnetosphere. Only a few and unresolved measurements were made below 300 MHz and the nonsystematic observation of this radio emission

  19. Transitions in the cloud composition of hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, Vivien; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Showman, Adam; Morley, Caroline; Marley, Mark S.

    2016-10-01

    Over a large range of equilibrium temperatures, clouds shape the transmission spectrum of hot Jupiter atmospheres, yet their composition remains unknown. Recent observations show that the Kepler lightcurves of some hot Jupiters are asymmetric: for the hottest planets, the lightcurve peaks before secondary eclipse, whereas for planets cooler than 1900K, it peaks after secondary eclipse. We use the thermal structure from 3D global circulation models to determine the expected cloud distribution and Kepler lightcurves of hot Jupiters. We demonstrate that the change from an optical lightcurve dominated by thermal emission to one dominated by scattering (reflection) naturally explains the observed trend from negative to positive offset. For the cool planets the presence of an asymmetry in the Kepler lightcurve is a telltale sign of the cloud composition, because each cloud species can produce an offset only over a narrow range of effective temperatures. By comparing our models and the observations, we show that the cloud composition of hot Jupiters likely varies with equilibrium temperature. We suggest that a transition occurs between silicate and manganese sulfide clouds at a temperature near 1600K, analogous to the L/T transition on brown dwarfs. The cold trapping of cloud species below the photosphere naturally produces such a transition and predicts similar transitions for other condensates, including TiO. We predict that most hot Jupiters should have cloudy nightsides, that partial cloudiness should be common at the limb and that the dayside hot spot should often be cloud-free.

  20. XMM-Newton X-Ray Observation of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J. Hunter

    2005-01-01

    Soft X-ray emission has been observed from the disk of both Jupiter and Saturn as well as from the auroral regions of these planets. The low-latitude disk emission as observed by ROSAT, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and XMM-Newton appears to be uniformly distributed across the disk and to be correlated with solar activity. These characteristics suggest that the disk x-rays are produced by: (1) the elastic scattering of solar X-rays by atmospheric neutrals and (2) the absorption of solar X-rays in the carbon K-shell followed by fluorescent emission. The carbon atoms are found in methane molecules located below the homopause. In this paper we present the results of calculations of the scattering albedo for soft x-rays. We also show the calculated x-ray intensity for a range of atmospheric abundances for Jupiter and Saturn and for a number of solar irradiance spectra. The model calculations are compared with recent x-ray observations of Jupiter and Saturn. We conclude that the emission of soft x-rays from the disks of Jupiter and Saturn can be largely explained by the scattering and fluorescence of soft x-rays. We suggest that measured x-ray intensities from the disk regions of Jupiter

  1. The mass disruption of Jupiter Family comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belton, Michael J. S.

    2015-01-01

    I show that the size-distribution of small scattered-disk trans-neptunian objects when derived from the observed size-distribution of Jupiter Family comets (JFCs) and other observational constraints implies that a large percentage (94-97%) of newly arrived active comets within a range of 0.2-15.4 km effective radius must physically disrupt, i.e., macroscopically disintegrate, within their median dynamical lifetime. Additional observational constraints include the numbers of dormant and active nuclei in the near-Earth object (NEO) population and the slope of their size distributions. I show that the cumulative power-law slope (-2.86 to -3.15) of the scattered-disk TNO hot population between 0.2 and 15.4 km effective radius is only weakly dependent on the size-dependence of the otherwise unknown disruption mechanism. Evidently, as JFC nuclei from the scattered disk evolve into the inner Solar System only a fraction achieve dormancy while the vast majority of small nuclei (e.g., primarily those with effective radius Morbidelli, A., Dones, L., Jedicke, R., Wiegert, P.A., Bottke Jr., W.F. [2002]. Science 296, 2212-2215) suggesting that all types of comet nuclei may have similar structural characteristics even though they may have different source regions and thermal histories. The typical disruption rate for a 1 km radius active nucleus is ∼5 × 10-5 disruptions/year and the dormancy rate is typically 3 times less. We also estimate that average fragmentation rates range from 0.01 to 0.04 events/year/comet, somewhat above the lower limit of 0.01 events/year/comet observed by Chen and Jewitt (Chen, J., Jewitt, D.C. [1994]. Icarus 108, 265-271).

  2. Limits to Determining the Core of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, David J.

    2016-10-01

    Simple, approximate models based on perturbations of the n=1 polytrope are used to identify some general properties of models for nearly-isentropic Jupiter-like planets where the total heavy element mass fraction is small. In these models, it is found that the radius is remarkably insensitive to the distribution of heavy elements and is effectively a measure of total heavy element enrichment (sum of core and envelope). The gravity harmonic J2 and the normalized moment of inertia α=I/MR2 are almost entirely determined by the density structure outside the core, and this depends on the reduced core mass, defined to be the actual core mass minus the mass of hydrogen and helium that would occupy that region in the absence of the core. The actual core mass or its radius or composition cannot be well determined, even when there is perfect knowledge of the equation of state, thermal state and envelope enrichment by heavy elements. The central concentration of heavy elements is approximately determined, even when the actual core is more massive and contaminated with hydrogen and helium by mixing or erosion (double diffusive convection). At fixed J2, the dependence of α on core structure is very small, and only exceeds the likely detection limit ~0.1-0.2% for very extended cores. Even though these results are obtained for a simple model, it is argued that they are semi-quantitatively applicable to realistic models. A perturbation scheme is presented for testing this systematically and for assessing the consequences of perturbations to the equation of state, compositional profile and temperature structure for the trade-off between reduced core mass and envelope enrichment.

  3. NAIP 2014 Image Dates

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — This map is produced by the Aerial Phtography Field Office (APFO) to show the image acquisition dates for the 2014 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  4. NAIP 2012 Image Dates

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — This map is produced by the Aerial Phtography Field Office (APFO) to show the image acquisition dates for the 2012 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  5. Expiration Dates Matter

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Expiration Dates Matter ... Should Know CDER FOIA Electronic Reading Room Related Consumer Updates How to Dispose of Unused Medicines Identifying ...

  6. Expiration Dates Matter

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... video, FDA Pharmacist Ilisa Bernstein explains how expiration dates help determine if medicine is safe to use and will work as intended. ... Lock it Up: Medicine Safety in Your Home Giving Medicine to ...

  7. A Blind Date

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周立

    2003-01-01

    英语对话:A: Talking about girls, I still remember my first time to meet my girlfriend. Iwas so clumsy and very nervous.B: That’s the same case with me. I had the jitters at my blind date, too.A: Did you also meet your girlfriend at a blind date?B: Yeah. I was actually very shy of speaking to girls, you know?

  8. Hot Jupiters Aren't As Lonely As We Thought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    The Friends of Hot Jupiters (FOHJ) project is a systematic search for planetary- and stellar-mass companions in systems that have known hot Jupiters short-period, gas-giant planets. This survey has discovered that many more hot Jupiters may have companions than originally believed.Missing FriendsFOHJ was begun with the goal of better understanding the systems that host hot Jupiters, in order to settle several longstanding issues.The first problem was one of observational statistics. We know that roughly half of the Sun-like stars nearby are in binary systems, yet weve only discovered a handful of hot Jupiters around binaries. Are binary systems less likely to host hot Jupiters? Or have we just missed the binary companions in the hot-Jupiter-hosting systems weve seen so far?An additional issue relates to formation mechanisms. Hot Jupiters probably migrated inward from where they formed out beyond the ice lines in protoplanetary disks but how?This median-stacked image, obtained with adaptive optics, shows one of the newly-discovered stellar companions to a star hosting a hot Jupiter. The projected separation is ~180 AU. [Ngo et al. 2015]Observations reveal two populations of hot Jupiters: those with circular orbits aligned with their hosts spins, and those with eccentric, misaligned orbits. The former population support a migration model dominated by local planet-disk interactions, whereas the latter population suggest the hot Jupiters migrated through dynamical interactions with distant companions. A careful determination of the companion rate in hot-Jupiter-hosting systems could help establish the ability of these two models to explain the observed populations.Search for CompanionsThe FOHJ project began in 2012 and studied 51 systems hosting known, transiting hot Jupiters with roughly half on circular, aligned orbits and half on eccentric, misaligned orbits. The survey consisted of three different, complementary components:Study 1Lead author: Heather Knutson

  9. Dating fossil opal phytoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentfer, C.; Boyd, B. [Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW (Australia). School of Resource Science and Management; Torrence, R. [Australian Museum, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Division of Anthropology

    1999-11-01

    Full text: Opal phytoliths are microscopic silica bodies formed by the precipitation of hydrated silica dioxide (SiO{sub 2}nH{sub 2}0) in, around and between cell walls. They are relatively resistant to degradation in most environments and thus, can occur in large quantities in palaeosediments. Consequently, they are valuable tools for environmental reconstruction. Furthermore, phytoliths are often the only recoverable organic material in well oxidised sediments, the occluded carbon provides the opportunity for dating sediment whose ages have previously been difficult to determine, and thus, increase the potential for fine resolution determination of environmental change. This poster describes the results of an investigation assessing the viability of AMS radiocarbon dating of fossil phytolith inclusions using samples from Garua Island, West New Britain, PNG. Thirteen phytolith samples, isolated from sediments previously dated using tephrastratigraphy and C14 dating of macroremains of nutshells and wood charcoal, were used in the analysis. As a control measure, thirteen parallel samples of microscopic charcoal were also dated using AMS. The results show that the AMS dates for the microscopic charcoal samples are consistent with ages anticipated from the other dating methods, for all but one sample. However, the dates for eight of the thirteen phytolith samples are considerably younger than expected. This bias could be explained by several factors, including downwashing of phytolith through soils, bioturbation, carbon exchange through the siliceous matrix of the phytolith bodies, and contamination from extraneous sources of modern carbon retained in the samples. Research is currently focusing on the investigation of these issues and selected samples are in the process of being retreated with strong oxidising agents to clear contaminants prior to re-dating. Further to this, a full investigation of one profile with a long sequence is underway. High concentrations of

  10. Forming Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune in Few Million Years by Core Accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuto, Omar G; Brunini, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Giant planet formation process is still not completely understood. The current most accepted paradigm, the core instability model, explains several observed properties of the solar system's giant planets but, to date, has faced difficulties to account for a formation time shorter than the observational estimates of protoplanetary disks' lifetimes, especially for the cases of Uranus and Neptune. In the context of this model, and considering a recently proposed primordial solar system orbital structure, we performed numerical calculations of giant planet formation. Our results show that if accreted planetesimals follow a size distribution in which most of the mass lies in 30-100 meter sized bodies, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune may have formed according to the nucleated instability scenario. The formation of each planet occurs within the time constraints and they end up with core masses in good agreement with present estimations.

  11. Early Results from the Juno Mission at Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Scott; Juno Science Team

    2016-10-01

    The Juno mission is the second mission in NASA's New Frontiers program. Launched in August 2011, Juno arrived at Jupiter July 4, 2016. Juno science goals include the study of Jupiter's origin, interior structure, deep atmosphere, aurora and magnetosphere. Juno's orbit around Jupiter is a polar elliptical orbit with perijove approximately 5000 km above the visible cloud tops. The payload consists of a set of microwave antennas for deep sounding, magnetometers, gravity radio science, low and high energy charged particle detectors, electric and magnetic field radio and plasma wave experiment, ultraviolet imaging spectrograph, infrared imager and a visible camera. Early results from the mission will be presented as well as an overview of planned observations.

  12. Processing tools refinement for the JIRAM arrival to Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriconi, Maria L.; Noschese, R.; Adriani, A.

    2017-05-01

    The JUNO mission, launched on August 2011 with the goal of investigating the origin and evolution of Jupiter, reached Jupiter in July 2016. The months preceding the JUNO orbit insertion have been crucial for all the instrument teams to check the status and working abilities of the respective experiments. JIRAM (Jupiter Infrared Auroral Mapper), with its imager and slit spectrometer operating over the 2-5μm spectral range will attempt to reveal the deep atmospheric composition -3 to 7 bars- in hot spots, to analyze the infrared auroral emissions of the H3 + molecules ionized by the Jovian magnetosphere currents and to detect the morphology and vertical structure of the clouds. Many different processing tools are in preparation to exploit the incoming JIRAM data. Here some results pertaining to the image quality optimization and the visualizations that can be obtained from the spectrometer data management are reported.

  13. Atmospheric Circulation of Hot Jupiters: Dayside-Nightside Temperature Differences

    CERN Document Server

    Komacek, Thaddeus D

    2016-01-01

    The full-phase infrared light curves of low-eccentricity hot Jupiters show a trend of increasing dayside-to-nightside brightness temperature difference with increasing equilibrium temperature. Here we present a three-dimensional model that explains this relationship, in order to shed insight on the processes that control heat redistribution in tidally-locked planetary atmospheres. This three-dimensional model combines predictive analytic theory for the atmospheric circulation and dayside-nightside temperature differences over a range of equilibrium temperature, atmospheric composition, and potential frictional drag strengths with numerical solutions of the circulation that verify this analytic theory. This analytic theory shows that the longitudinal propagation of waves mediates dayside-nightside temperature differences in hot Jupiter atmospheres, analogous to the wave adjustment mechanism that regulates the thermal structure in Earth's tropics. These waves can be damped in hot Jupiter atmospheres by either r...

  14. In Situ Formation and Dynamical Evolution of Hot Jupiter Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Bodenheimer, Peter H.; Laughlin, Gregory P.

    2016-10-01

    Hot Jupiters, giant extrasolar planets with orbital periods shorter than ˜10 days, have long been thought to form at large radial distances, only to subsequently experience long-range inward migration. Here, we offer the contrasting view that a substantial fraction of the hot Jupiter population formed in situ via the core-accretion process. We show that under conditions appropriate to the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, rapid gas accretion can be initiated by super-Earth-type planets, comprising 10-20 Earth masses of refractory material. An in situ formation scenario leads to testable consequences, including the expectation that hot Jupiters should frequently be accompanied by additional low-mass planets with periods shorter than ˜100 days. Our calculations further demonstrate that dynamical interactions during the early stages of planetary systems’ lifetimes should increase the inclinations of such companions, rendering transits rare. High-precision radial velocity monitoring provides the best prospect for their detection.

  15. Ohmic Dissipation in the Atmospheres of Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Perna, Rosalba; Rauscher, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Hot Jupiter atmospheres exhibit fast, weakly-ionized winds. The interaction of these winds with the planetary magnetic field generates drag on the winds and leads to ohmic dissipation of the induced electric currents. We study the magnitude of ohmic dissipation in representative, three-dimensional atmospheric circulation models of the hot Jupiter HD 209458b. We find that ohmic dissipation can reach or exceed 1% of the stellar insolation power in the deepest atmospheric layers, in models with and without dragged winds. Such power, dissipated in the deep atmosphere, appears sufficient to slow down planetary contraction and explain the typically inflated radii of hot Jupiters. This atmospheric scenario does not require a top insulating layer or radial currents that penetrate deep in the planetary interior. Circulation in the deepest atmospheric layers may actually be driven by spatially non-uniform ohmic dissipation. A consistent treatment of magnetic drag and ohmic dissipation is required to further elucidate t...

  16. Formation of Jets and Equatorial Superrotation on Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Tapio

    2008-01-01

    The zonal flow in Jupiter's upper troposphere is organized into alternating retrograde and prograde jets, with a prograde (superrotating) jet at the equator. Existing models posit as the driver of the flow either differential radiative heating of the atmosphere or intrinsic heat fluxes emanating from the deep interior; however, they do not reproduce all large-scale features of Jupiter's jets and thermal structure. Here it is shown that the difficulties in accounting for Jupiter's jets and thermal structure resolve if the effects of differential radiative heating and intrinsic heat fluxes are considered together, and if upper-tropospheric dynamics are linked to a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) drag that acts deep in the atmosphere. Baroclinic eddies generated by differential radiative heating can account for the off-equatorial jets; meridionally propagating equatorial Rossby waves generated by intrinsic convective heat fluxes can account for the equatorial superrotation. The zonal flow extends deeply into the atmos...

  17. In Situ Formation and Dynamical Evolution of Hot Jupiter Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Batygin, Konstantin; Laughlin, Gregory P

    2015-01-01

    Hot Jupiters, giant extrasolar planets with orbital periods shorter than ~10 days, have long been thought to form at large radial distances, only to subsequently experience long-range inward migration. Here, we propose that in contrast with this picture, a substantial fraction of the hot Jupiter population formed in situ via the core accretion process. We show that under conditions appropriate to the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, rapid gas accretion can be initiated by Super-Earth type planets, comprising 10-20 Earth masses of refractory composition material. An in situ formation scenario leads to testable consequences, including the expectation that hot Jupiters should frequently be accompanied by additional low-mass planets with periods shorter than ~100 days. Our calculations further demonstrate that dynamical interactions during the early stages of planetary systems' lifetimes should increase the inclinations of such companions, rendering transits rare. High-precision radial velocity monitoring p...

  18. Galileo's first images of Jupiter and the Galilean satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belton, M.J.S.; Head, J. W.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Greeley, R.; McEwen, A.S.; Klaasen, K.P.; Senske, D.; Pappalardo, R.; Collins, G.; Vasavada, A.R.; Sullivan, R.; Simonelli, D.; Geissler, P.; Carr, M.H.; Davies, M.E.; Veverka, J.; Gierasch, P.J.; Banfield, D.; Bell, M.; Chapman, C.R.; Anger, C.; Greenberg, R.; Neukum, G.; Pilcher, C.B.; Beebe, R.F.; Burns, J.A.; Fanale, F.; Ip, W.; Johnson, T.V.; Morrison, D.; Moore, J.; Orton, G.S.; Thomas, P.; West, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    The first images of Jupiter, Io, Europa, and Ganymede from the Galileo spacecraft reveal new information about Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) and the surfaces of the Galilean satellites. Features similar to clusters of thunderstorms were found in the GRS. Nearby wave structures suggest that the GRS may be a shallow atmospheric feature. Changes in surface color and plume distribution indicate differences in resurfacing processes near hot spots on lo. Patchy emissions were seen while Io was in eclipse by Jupiter. The outer margins of prominent linear markings (triple bands) on Europa are diffuse, suggesting that material has been vented from fractures. Numerous small circular craters indicate localized areas of relatively old surface. Pervasive brittle deformation of an ice layer appears to have formed grooves on Ganymede. Dark terrain unexpectedly shows distinctive albedo variations to the limit of resolution.

  19. A transition in the composition of clouds in hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Parmentier, Vivien; Showman, Adam P; Morley, Caroline V; Marley, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Over a large range of equilibrium temperatures, clouds shape the transmission spectrum of hot Jupiter atmospheres, yet their composition remains unknown. Recent observations show that the \\emph{Kepler} lightcurves of some hot Jupiters are asymmetric: for the hottest planets, the lightcurve peaks before secondary eclipse, whereas for planets cooler than $\\sim1900\\,\\rm K$, it peaks after secondary eclipse. In this paper we use the thermal structure from 3D global circulation models to determine the expected cloud distribution and \\emph{Kepler} lightcurves of hot Jupiters. We demonstrate that the change from a visible lightcurve dominated by thermal emission to one dominated by scattering (reflection) naturally explains the observed trend from negative to positive offset. For the cool planets the presence of an asymmetry in the \\emph{Kepler} lightcurve is a telltale sign of the cloud composition, because each cloud species can produce an offset only over a narrow range of effective temperatures. Silicate clouds ...

  20. 76 FR 77831 - 2012 Presidential Candidate Matching Fund Submission Dates and Post Date of Ineligibility Dates...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... 2012 Presidential Candidate Matching Fund Submission Dates and Post Date of Ineligibility Dates To...: Notice of matching fund submission dates and submission dates for statements of net outstanding campaign... fund submission dates for publicly funded 2012 presidential primary candidates. Eligible candidates...

  1. Atmospheric Circulation on Hot Jupiters: Modeling and Observable Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Emily Christine

    2010-12-01

    Hot Jupiters are unlike any planets in our Solar System and yet one of the most common types of extrasolar planet discovered. These gas giants orbit their parent stars with periods of a few days. Expected to be tidally locked into synchronous rotation, hot Jupiters experience intense, asymmetric heating from stellar irradiation, such that day-night temperature contrasts could reach hundreds of degrees Kelvin. This unique state of radiative forcing, as well as the slow rotation rates of these planets, places hot Jupiters within a new regime of atmospheric circulation. Hot Jupiters have also been the first type of extrasolar planet with direct detections of their atmospheres, through measurements of emitted, reflected, and transmitted light. This thesis investigates observational methods to distinguish between various atmospheric models, observational signatures of potential atmospheric variability, and presents a three dimensional model with which to study hot Jupiter circulation patterns. First, we find that eclipse mapping is a technique that can be used to image the day sides of these planets and although this is beyond the ability of current instruments, it will be achievable with future missions, such as the James Webb Space Telescope. Second, we consider the signatures of large-scale atmospheric variability in measurements of secondary eclipses and thermal orbital phase curves. For various models we predict the amount of variation in eclipse depth, and the amplitudes and detailed shapes of phase curves. Lastly, we develop a three-dimensional model of hot Jupiter atmospheric dynamics with simplified forcing and adopt a set-up nearly identical to work by another group to facilitate code inter-comparison. Our results are broadly consistent with theirs, with a transonic flow and the hottest region of the atmosphere advected eastward of the substellar point. However, we note important differences and identify areas of concern for future modeling efforts.

  2. Measuring Jupiter's water abundance by Juno: the link between interior and formation models

    CERN Document Server

    Helled, Ravit

    2014-01-01

    The JUNO mission to Jupiter is planned to measure the water abundance in Jupiter's atmosphere below the cloud layer. This measurement is important because it can be used to reveal valuable information on Jupiter's origin and its composition. In this paper we discuss the importance of this measurement, the challenges in its interpretation, and address how it can be connected to interior and formation models of Jupiter.

  3. Launch Period Development for the Juno Mission to Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalkowski, Theresa D.; Johannesen, Jennie R.; Lam, Try

    2008-01-01

    The Juno mission to Jupiter is targeted to launch in 2011 and would reach the giant planet about five years later. The interplanetary trajectory is planned to include two large deep space maneuvers and an Earth gravity assist a little more than two years after launch. In this paper, we describe the development of a 21-day launch period for Juno with the objective of keeping overall launch energy and delta-V low while meeting constraints imposed on Earth departure, the deep space maneuvers' timing and geometry, and Jupiter arrival.

  4. Recent Simulations of the Late Stages Growth of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; D'Angelo, Gennaro; Hubickyj, Olenka

    2012-01-01

    Presented by Lissauer et al. (2009, Icarus 199, 338) are used to test the model of capture of Jupiter's irregular satellites within proto-Jupiter's distended and thermally-supported envelope. We find such capture highly unlikely, since the envelope shrinks too slowly for a large number of moons to be retained, and many of those that would be retained would orbit closer to the planet than do the observed Jovian irregulars. Our calculations do not address (and therefore do not exclude) the possibility that the irregular satellites were captured as a result of gas drag within a circumjovian disk. Support for this research from NASA Outer Planets Research Program is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. THE JOINT ESA-NASA EUROPA JUPITER SYSTEM MISSION (EJSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, J.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Blanc, M.; Bunce, E. J.; Dougherty, M. K.; Erd, C.; Grasset, O.; Greeley, R.; Johnson, T. V.; Clark, K. B.; Prockter, L. M.; Senske, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    The joint "Europa Jupiter System Mission" (EJSM) is an international mission under study in collaboration between NASA and ESA. Its goal is to study Jupiter and its magnetosphere, the diversity of the Galilean satellites, the physical characteristics, composition and geology of their surfaces. Europa and Ganymede are two primary targets of the mission. The reference mission architecture consists of the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). The two primary goals of the mission are i) to determine whether the Jupiter system harbors habitable worlds and ii) to characterize the processes within the Jupiter system. The science objectives addressing the first goal are to: i) characterize and determine the extent of subsurface oceans and their relations to the deeper interior, ii) characterize the ice shells and any subsurface water, including the heterogeneity of the ice, and the nature of surface-ice-ocean exchange; iii) characterize the deep internal structure, differentiation history, and (for Ganymede) the intrinsic magnetic field; iv) compare the exospheres, plasma environments, and magnetospheric interactions; v) determine global surface composition and chemistry, especially as related to habitability; vi) understand the formation of surface features, including sites of recent or current activity, and identify and characterize candidate sites for future in situ exploration. The science objectives for addressing the second goal are to: i) understand the Jovian satellite system, especially as context for Europa and Ganymede; ii) evaluate the structure and dynamics of the Jovian atmosphere; iii) characterize processes of the Jovian magnetodisk/magnetosphere; iv) determine the interactions occurring in the Jovian system; and v) constrain models for the origin of the Jupiter system. Both spacecraft would carry a complement of 11-12 instruments launch separately in 2020 and use a Venus-Earth-Earth Gravity Assist (VEEGA

  6. The EJSM Jupiter-Europa Orbiter: Science Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Blanc, M.; Clark, K.; Greeley, R.; Hendrix, A. R.; Lebreton, J.-P.

    2008-09-01

    Europa is believed to shelter an ocean between its geodynamically active icy shell and its rocky mantle, where the conditions for habitability may be fulfilled. With a warm, salty, water ocean and plausible chemical energy sources, Europa is the astrobiological archetype for icy satellite habitability. It is also a geophysical wonderland of interrelated ice shell processes that are intimately related to the ocean and tides, and of complex interactions among its interior, surface, atmosphere, and magnetospheric environments. The Jupiter-Europa Orbiter (JEO) is one component of the proposed multi-spacecraft Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM). We focus here on the science objectives and heritage of JEO.

  7. Launch Period Development for the Juno Mission to Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalkowski, Theresa D.; Johannesen, Jennie R.; Lam, Try

    2008-01-01

    The Juno mission to Jupiter is targeted to launch in 2011 and would reach the giant planet about five years later. The interplanetary trajectory is planned to include two large deep space maneuvers and an Earth gravity assist a little more than two years after launch. In this paper, we describe the development of a 21-day launch period for Juno with the objective of keeping overall launch energy and delta-V low while meeting constraints imposed on Earth departure, the deep space maneuvers' timing and geometry, and Jupiter arrival.

  8. Unmasking Europa the search for life on Jupiter's ocean moon

    CERN Document Server

    Greenberg, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Jupiter's ice moon Europa is widely regarded as the most likely place to find extraterrestrial life. This book tells the engaging story of Europa, the oceanic moon. It features a large number of stunning images of the ocean moon's surface, clearly displaying the spectacular crack patterns, extensive rifts and ridges, and refrozen pools of exposed water filled with rafts of displaced ice. Coverage also features firsthand accounts of Galileo's mission to Jupiter and its moons. The book tells the rough and tumble inside story of a very human enterprise in science that lead to the discovery of a f

  9. Rethinking social identity theory in international encounters:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    the link between identity and language to be linear, this article takes a different approach. By drawing on anthropological theories on ethnic identity it is argued that the relation between language and social identity is negotiated in interaction. In the empirical analysis the article focuses......In a globalized business environment, interaction across linguistic boundaries is becoming a normal part of everyday life. In these encounters language differences may affect the formation of social identities among organization members. While studies based on Social Identity Theory perceive....... It is finally argued that the processes by which identifications develop can cause both polarization and accommodation in the relation between groups and individuals.  ...

  10. Temporally Varying Ethylene Emission on Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Paul N.; Jennings, Donald E.; Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Sada, Pedro V.; McCabe. Geprge; Boyle, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Ethylene (C2H4) emission has been measured in the poles and equator of Jupiter. The 949 cm(sup -1) spectra were recorded with a high resolution spectrometer at the McMath-Pierce telescope at Kitt Peak in October-November 1998 and at the Infrared Telescope Facility at Mauna Kea in June 2000. C2H4 is an important product of methane chemistry in the outer planets. Knowledge of its abundance can help discriminate among the various proposed sets of CH4 photolysis branching ratios at Ly-alpha, and determine the relative importance of the reaction pathways that produce C2H2 and C2H6. In the equatorial region the C2H4 emission is weak, and we were only able to detect it at high air-mass, near the limb. We derive a peak equatorial molar abundance of C2H4 of 4.5 x 10(exp -7) - 1.7 x 10(exp -6) near 2.2 x 10(exp -3) mbar, with a total column of 5.7 x 10(exp 14) - 2.2 x 10(exp 15) molecules cm(exp -2) above 10 mbar depending upon choice of thermal profile. We observed enhanced C2H4 emission from the poles in the regions where auroras are seen in X-ray, UV, and near infrared images. In 2000 we measured a short-term change in the distribution of polar C2H4 emission; the emission in the north IR auroral "hot spot" decreased by a factor of three over a two-day interval. This transient its contribution peak at 5-10 microbar suggests that the polar e is primarily a thermal effect coupled with vertical transport. Comparing our observations from Kitt Peak and Mauna Kea shows that the C2H4 emission of the northern non-"hot spot" auroral regions did not change over the three-year period while that in the southern polar regions decreased.

  11. Surface Irradiation of Jupiter's Moon Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, M.; Tenishev, V.; Combi, M. R.; Jia, X.; Hansen, K. C.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2010-12-01

    Jupiter’s moon Europa has a complex and tightly coupled interaction with the Jovian magnetosphere. Neutral gas of the moon’s exosphere is ionized and picked up by the corotating plasma that sweeps past Europa at a relative velocity of almost 100 km/s. This pick-up process alters the magnetic and electric field topology around Europa, which in turn affects the trajectories of the pick-up ions as well as the thermal and hot magnetospheric ions that hit the moon’s icy surface. In turn these surface-impinging ions are the responsible source for the sputtered neutral atmosphere, which itself is again crucial for the exospheric mass loading of the surrounding plasma. We use the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model BATSRUS to model the interaction of Europa with the Jovian magnetosphere. The model accounts for the exospheric mass loading, ion-neutral charge exchange, and ion-electron recombination [Kabin et al. (J. Geophys. Res., 104, A9, 19,983-19,992, 1999)]. The derived magnetic and electric fields are then used in our Test Particle Monte Carlo (TPMC) model to integrate individual particle trajectories under the influence of the Lorentz force. We take the measurements performed by Galileo’s Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) [Williams et al. (Sp. Sci. Rev. 60, 385-412, 1992) and Cooper et al. (Icarus 149, 133-159, 2001)] and the Plasma Analyzer (PLS) [Paterson et al. (J. Geophys. Res., 104, A10, 22,779-22,791, 1999)] as boundary conditions. Using a Monte Carlo technique allows to individually track ions in a wide energy range and to individually calculate their energy deposition on the moon’s surface. The sputtering yield is a function of incident particle type, energy, and mass. We use the measurements performed by Shi et al. (J. Geophys. Res., 100, E12, 26,387-26,395, 1995) to turn the modeled impinging ion flux into a neutral gas production rate at the surface. We will show preliminary results of this work with application to the missions to the Jupiter system

  12. Making Space Travel to Jupiter Possible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Samuel P.

    2004-01-01

    From man landing on the moon to a simple satellite being launched into orbit, many incredible space accomplishments have been witnessed by us all. However, what goes un-noticed to the common man is the extensive research and testing that lasts months, years, and even decades. Much of this required research just so happens to take place in the corridors of the Glen Research Center building number 49. In the Advanced Materials division of G.R.C., a number of researchers have the responsibility of discovering which metal, ceramic, or polymer is best for a specific application. Under the guidance of mentor extraordinaire Frank Ritzert, I am involved in many critical projects dealing with refractory metals, two of which I will mention in this report. The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) project actually was under full swing back in the 50's and early 60's. To enable the 14 year trek to the icy moons of Europa, Callisto, and Ganymede, nuclear propulsion methods were selected. Due to the extreme temperature of the reactor and the extended time period, a refractory metal would need to be implemented. After years of research and progress, the program was suddenly canceled. About a decade ago, the JIMO project was re-instated and now has a goal for departure around 2014. However, a few obstacles lie in our way concerning the use of refractory metals. In certain areas of the orbiter a joint is required between the refractories and other less dense metals. Two of these joints are with nickel based super alloys. Being an intern for Frank Ritzert, the refractory metals expert, I have the opportunity to develop the best method to braze refractory metals to Nickel 201. This involves the actual brazing, electron microscopy and reporting the results. My second project involves a certain part of the orbiter where Niobium 1Zirconium, a refractory metal, is joined with Hastelloy-X a Ni based metal. Small quantities of oxygen, helium and other impurities in the Ni alloy could diffuse

  13. 77 FR 63722 - Special Local Regulations; Palm Beach World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ..., Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast... Indiantown Road and Donald Ross Road, just offshore of Jupiter, Florida during the Palm Beach World... will be held on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean, just offshore of Jupiter, Florida. The high...

  14. Rhinoplasty Education Using a Standardized Patient Encounter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Eric J.; Khosla, Rohit K.; Howell, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Background Comprehensive aesthetic surgery training continues to be a challenge for residency programs. Our residency program developed a rhinoplasty-based objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) based upon validated methods as part of the residency education curriculum. We report our experience with the rhinoplasty-based OSCE and offer guidance to its incorporation within residency programs. Methods The encounter involved resident evaluation and operative planning for a standardized patient desiring a rhinoplasty procedure. Validated OSCE methods currently used at our medical school were implemented. Residents were evaluated on appropriate history taking, physical examination, and explanation to the patient of treatment options. Examination results were evaluated using analysis of variance (statistical significance POSCE. Medical knowledge assessment showed increasing performance with clinical year, 50% versus 84% for postgraduate year 3 and 6, respectively (POSCE realistically represents an actual patient encounter. All faculty confirmed the utility of evaluating resident performance during the OSCE as a useful assessment tool for determining the Next Accreditation System Milestone level. Conclusions Aesthetic surgery training for residents will require innovative methods for education. Our examination showed a program-educational weakness in billing/coding, an area that will be improved upon by topic-specific lectures. A thoroughly developed OSCE can provide a realistic educational opportunity to improve residents' performance on the nonoperative aspects of rhinoplasty and should be considered as an adjunct to resident education. PMID:27689053

  15. Envisioning invertebrates and other aquatic encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Eva

    2007-12-01

    To "envision" animals is to visualize, to experience, to figure, to image, kinds of species, discourses, representations, institutions, histories, epistemologies; and, to "imagine possible" a set of material and ethical relationships between species. This dissertation explores the "envisioning of animals" that takes place through/across/between the interfaces of seawater/visuality/experience/biology/technology/phyla---as illustrated in the documentary works of Jean Painleve (scientist and filmmaker), Genevieve Hamon (filmmaker and set-designer), Leni Riefenstahl (filmmaker and photographer), and David Powell (scientist and aquarist). In each case, aesthetic conceptions of beauty and/or ambiguity coupled with biological epistemology and phenomenology of the organisms themselves compete over "what gets to count as culture and nature," and in doing so, construct a host of hybridized and enmeshed "encounters." In the process the following questions are raised: What is the role of the ocean---it's ecosystems and semiotics---in the production of "envisioning"? How are animals used---and in turn shape and reshape the users---to construct tropes of encounter? What theories can be used to understand the phenomenological, semiotic, material, and rhetorical use/miss-use of animals in the articulation of history, economy, biology, narrativity, and representation? How does this motley crew of documentarians answer differently "the animal question," and challenge and/or reinforce anthropocentrism? Divided into two parts, the dissertation first develops a set of methodological questions derived from critical appraisal of "envisioning," encountering, and embodying through science studies, as well as an account of the use and misuse of animals as only "stand ins" for human intentionality; secondly, the dissertation analyses the work of the documentarians in question. Jean Painleve and Genevieve Hamon are shown to critique traditions of representation in nature/science films

  16. Co-creation of Innovations in ICT based service encounters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jannick Kirk; Henten, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Innovations in services often emanate from service encounters (i.e. the touch points between the service producers and the customers). Two different types of service encounters are dealt with: face-to-face and ICT-based service encounters. The aim of the chapter is to examine the specific...... conditions for innovations from ICT-based service encounters. The service encounter research tradition is mostly concerned with customer satisfaction. The perspective of the present chapter is on innovations in the service encounter. The specific contribution of the chapter is to establish a conceptual...

  17. Understanding Teen Dating Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problem by gathering and studying data. Step 2: Identify risk and protective factors It is not enough to ... DM, Breiding M. Beyond correlates: A review of risk and protective factors for adolescent dating violence perpetration. Journal of Youth and Adolescence 2013; 42:633-649. ...

  18. Expiration Dates Matter

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Updates Expiration Dates Matter Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Get Consumer Updates by E-mail | ... Updates RSS Feed If your medicine has expired, it may not provide the treatment you need. In ...

  19. Jupiter family comets in near-Earth orbits: Are some of them interlopers from the asteroid belt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Julio A.; Sosa, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    We analyze a sample of 58 Jupiter family comets (JFCs) in near-Earth orbits, defined as those whose perihelion distances at the time of discovery were qdisc newcomers in the near-Earth region. Yet, a minor fraction of JFCs (less than about one third) are found to move on stable orbits for the past ∼ 104 yr, and in some cases are found to continue to be stable at 5 × 104 yr in the past. They also avoid very close encounters with Jupiter. Their orbital behavior is very similar to that of NEAs in cometary orbits. While "typical" JFCs in unstable orbits probably come from the trans-Neptunian region, the minor group of JFCs in asteroidal orbits may come from the main asteroid belt, like the NEAs. The asteroidal JFCs may have a more consolidated structure and a higher mineral content than that of comets coming from the trans-Neptunian belt or the Oort cloud, which could explain their much longer physical lifetimes in the near-Earth region. In particular, we mention comets 66P/du Toit, 162P/Siding Spring, 169P/NEAT, 182P/LONEOS, 189P/NEAT, 249P/LINEAR, 300P/Catalina, and P/2003 T12 (SOHO) as the most likely candidates to have an origin in the main asteroid belt. Another interesting case is 207P/NEAT, which stays near the 3:2 inner mean motion resonance with Jupiter, possibly evolving from the Hilda asteroid zone.

  20. First results of ISO-SWS observations of Jupiter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Encrenaz, T.; de Graauw, T.; Schaeidt, S.; Lellouch, E.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Beintema, D. A.; Bezard, B.; Drossart, P.; Griffin, M.; Heras, A.; Kessler, M.; Leech, K.; Morris, P.; Roelfsema, P. R.; Roos-Serote, M.; Salama, A.; Vandenbussche, B.; Valentijn, E. A.; Davis, G. R.; Naylor, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    The spectrum of Jupiter has been recorded between 2.75 and 14.5 mu m with the grating mode of the Short-Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) of ISO. The resolving power is 1500. The main preliminary results of this observation are (1) at 3 mu m, the first spectroscopic signature, probably associated with

  1. Orbits of the small inner satellites of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synnott, S. P.

    1984-01-01

    Voyager images led to the discovery of the three small inner satellites of Jupiter, Adrastea, Metis, and Thebe. Attention is presently given to orbital parameter estimates and associated uncertainties that have been determined from Voyager imaging data, the achievable angular accuracy of which is about 0.00005 rad.

  2. Near-IR Spectroscopy of the Atmosphere of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    The Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer obtains spectral images in the wavelength range 0.7 to 5.2 um with a special resolving power of approximately 200. This spectral range allows NIMS to sense cloud-reflected solar radiation, thermal emission from the deep atmosphere, and auroral bands from the thermosphere of Jupiter.

  3. Design study for electronic system for Jupiter Orbit Probe (JOP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elero, B. P., Jr.; Carignan, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    The conceptual design of the Jupiter probe spectrometer is presented. Block and circuit diagrams are presented along with tabulated parts lists. Problem areas are considered to be (1) the schedule, (2) weight limitations for the electronic systems, and (3) radiation hardness of the electronic devices.

  4. Deciphering Jupiter's atmospheric dynamics using the upcoming Juno gravity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspi, Yohai; Galanti, Eli

    2016-07-01

    This summer, the Juno spacecraft will arrive at Jupiter in course for close flybys of the planet, obtaining a high precision gravity spectrum of Jupiter. This data can be used to estimate the depth of Jupiter's observed cloud-level wind, and decipher the possible internal flows, that might be decoupled from the surface wind. In this talk, we discuss the Juno gravity experiment, and the possible outcomes with regard to the flows on Jupiter. We show several ways in which the gravity spectrum might be used to study the large scale flows: 1. measurements of the high order even harmonics which beyond J10 are dominated by the dynamics; 2. measurements of odd gravity harmonics which have no contribution from a static planet, and therefore are a pure signature of dynamics; 3. upper limits on the depth of the surface flow can be obtained by comparing low order even harmonics from dynamical models to the difference between the measured low order even harmonics and the largest possible values of a static planet; 4. direct latitudinally varying measurements of the gravity field exerted on the spacecraft. We will discuss how these methods may be applied given the expected sensitivities of the Juno gravity experiment. In addition, we present an inverse adjoint model, which allows given the gravity data, to infer the flows that produce it. This will allow, hopefully, to make significant progress in one of the longest-standing question in planetary atmospheric dynamics regarding the nature of the flows on the giant planets.

  5. Rotating magnetospheres: transport compared at Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivelson, M. G.; Southwood, D. J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    The magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn are dominated by the effects of rotation and the associated outward stress exerted by heavy ions picked up near the inner moons Fields and particle measurements in both systems show dramatic signatures of rotational periodicity At Jupiter the periodicity results principally from the effects of dipole tilt and the related displacements of the equatorial plasma sheet At Saturn there is little dipole tilt yet field and plasma properties vary periodically Efforts to understand how Saturn s rotational motion can be converted into what appears to be radial motion a conversion from rotation to rocking or reciprocating motion that is imposed in mechanical systems by a camshaft have recently focused on convective patterns with preferred sectors for transport see Southwood et al this session It is possible that similar effects are present at Jupiter and can account for plasma properties that have been described in terms of what has been referred to as the magnetic anomaly model Hill Goertz and Dessler 1983 This talk will use magnetometer data for the two systems to identify the possibly subtle signatures of the camshaft effect at Jupiter

  6. First Earth-based Detection of a Superbolide on Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso, Ricardo; Wesley, A.; Go, C.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Wong, M. H.; Fletcher, L. N.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Boslough, M. B. E.; de Pater, I.; Orton, G. S.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Edwards, M. L.; Hammel, H. B.; Clarke, J. T.; Noll, K. S.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2010-10-01

    On June 3, 2010 a bolide in Jupiter's atmosphere was observed from the Earth for the first time. The flash was detected by amateur astronomers A. Wesley and C. Go observing in two wavelength ranges. We present an analysis of the light curve of those observations that allow estimating the size of the object to be significantly smaller than the SL9 and the July 2009 Jupiter impact. Observations obtained a few days later by large telescopes including HST, VLT, Keck and Gemini showed no signature of the impact in Jupiter atmosphere confirming the small size of the impact body. A nearly continuous observation campaign based on several small telescopes by amateurs astronomers might allow an empirical determination of the flux of meteoroids in Jupiter with implications for the populations of small bodies in the outer solar system and may allow a better quantification of the threat of impacting bodies to Earth. Acknowledgements: RH, ASL and SPH are supported by the Spanish MICIIN AYA2009-10701 with FEDER and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07. LNF is supported by a Glasstone Science Fellowship at the University of Oxford.

  7. Imaging Jupiter's radiation belts down to 127 MHz with LOFAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girard, J. N.; Zarka, P.; Tasse, C.; Hess, S.; de Pater, I.; Santos-Costa, D.; Nenon, Q.; Sicard, A.; Bourdarie, S.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Bell, M. E.; van Bemmel, I.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Breton, R. P.; Broderick, J. W.; Brouw, W. N.; Brüggen, M.; Ciardi, B.; Corbel, S.; Corstanje, A.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; Deller, A.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J.; Gunst, A. W.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hoeft, M.; Hörandel, J.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; van Leeuwen, J.; Loose, M.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; Markoff, S.; McFadden, R.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Moldon, J.; Munk, H.; Nelles, A.; Norden, M. J.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.; Rowlinson, A.; Schwarz, D.; Smirnov, O.; Steinmetz, M.; Swinbank, J.; Tagger, M.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, M. C.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wucknitz, O.

    2016-01-01

    Context. With the limited amount of in situ particle data available for the innermost region of Jupiter's magnetosphere, Earth-based observations of the giant planets synchrotron emission remain the sole method today of scrutinizing the distribution and dynamical behavior of the ultra energetic elec

  8. Ultra-relativistic electrons in Jupiter's radiation belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, S J; Janssen, M; Thorne, R; Levin, S; Klein, M; Gulkis, S; Bastian, T; Sault, R; Elachi, C; Hofstadter, M; Bunker, A; Dulk, G; Gudim, E; Hamilton, G; Johnson, W T K; Leblanc, Y; Liepack, O; McLeod, R; Roller, J; Roth, L; West, R

    2002-02-28

    Ground-based observations have shown that Jupiter is a two-component source of microwave radio emission: thermal atmospheric emission and synchrotron emission from energetic electrons spiralling in Jupiter's magnetic field. Later in situ measurements confirmed the existence of Jupiter's high-energy electron-radiation belts, with evidence for electrons at energies up to 20[?]MeV. Although most radiation belt models predict electrons at higher energies, adiabatic diffusion theory can account only for energies up to around 20[?]MeV. Unambiguous evidence for more energetic electrons is lacking. Here we report observations of 13.8[?]GHz synchrotron emission that confirm the presence of electrons with energies up to 50[?]MeV; the data were collected during the Cassini fly-by of Jupiter. These energetic electrons may be repeatedly accelerated through an interaction with plasma waves, which can transfer energy into the electrons. Preliminary comparison of our data with model results suggests that electrons with energies of less than 20[?]MeV are more numerous than previously believed.

  9. First results of ISO-SWS observations of Jupiter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Encrenaz, T.; de Graauw, T.; Schaeidt, S.; Lellouch, E.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Beintema, D. A.; Bezard, B.; Drossart, P.; Griffin, M.; Heras, A.; Kessler, M.; Leech, K.; Morris, P.; Roelfsema, P. R.; Roos-Serote, M.; Salama, A.; Vandenbussche, B.; Valentijn, E. A.; Davis, G. R.; Naylor, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    The spectrum of Jupiter has been recorded between 2.75 and 14.5 mu m with the grating mode of the Short-Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) of ISO. The resolving power is 1500. The main preliminary results of this observation are (1) at 3 mu m, the first spectroscopic signature, probably associated with N

  10. The high albedo of the hot Jupiter Kepler-7b

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demory, B.-O.; Seager, S.; Madhusudhan, N.

    2011-01-01

    . The NASA Kepler mission provides a means to widen the sample and to assess the extent to which hot Jupiter albedos are low. We present a global analysis of Kepler-7 b based on Q0-Q4 data, published radial velocities, and asteroseismology constraints. We measure an occultation depth in the Kepler bandpass...

  11. The prediction of impact of Comet SL9 on Jupiter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张家祥; 汪琦; 杨捷兴; 王思潮; 陈协珍

    1996-01-01

    Several predictions of the impact of Comet SL9 on Jupiter were made from April to July, 1994. The predictions are basically in agreement with actuality. The method and theory of the prediction are expounded briefly, and the predicted impact times are analyzed and compared with actually accepted impact times.

  12. EJSM Radar instruments: Natural radio noise from Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconi, Baptiste; Hess, Sébastien; Zarka, Philippe; Blankenship, Donald; Bruzzone, Lorenzo; Santos-Costa, Daniel; Bougeret, Jean-Louis

    2010-05-01

    Radar instruments are part of the core payload of the Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) spacecraft: NASA- led JEO (Jupiter Europa Orbiter) and ESA-led JGO (Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter). At this point of the project, several frequency bands are foreseen for radar studies between 5MHz and 50MHz. While the high frequencies (40 to 50 MHz) are clean bands since natural jovian radio emissions show a high frequency cutoff at about 40 MHz, lower frequencies are right in the middle of the intense decametric (DAM) radio emissions. We present a review of spectral intensity, variability and sources of these radio emissions. As the radio emission are beamed, it is possible to model the visibility of the radio emissions, as seen from the vicinity of Europa or Ganymede. We have investigated Io-related radio emissions as well as radio emissions related to the auroral oval. One result from these simulations is that some portion of the orbit of Europa is clean from Non-Io DAM emissions above 22 MHz. We also review the radiation belts synchrotron emission characteristics. This study clearly shows that a deep understanding of the natural radio emissions at Jupiter is necessary to prepare the future EJSM radar instrumentation.

  13. First Earth-based Detection of a Superbolide on Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Hueso, R; Go, C; Perez-Hoyos, S; Wong, M H; Fletcher, L N; Sanchez-Lavega, A; Boslough, M B E; de Pater, I; Orton, G S; Simon-Miller, A A; Djorgovski, S G; Edwards, M L; Hammel, H B; Clarke, J T; Noll, K S; Yanamandra-Fisher, P A; 10.1088/2041-8205/721/2/L129

    2010-01-01

    Cosmic collisions on planets cause detectable optical flashes that range from terrestrial shooting stars to bright fireballs. On June 3, 2010 a bolide in Jupiter's atmosphere was simultaneously observed from the Earth by two amateur astronomers observing Jupiter in red and blue wavelengths. The bolide appeared as a flash of 2 s duration in video recording data of the planet. The analysis of the light curve of the observations results in an estimated energy of the impact of 0.9-4.0x10^{15} J which corresponds to a colliding body of 8-13 m diameter assuming a mean density of 2 g cm^{-3}. Images acquired a few days later by the Hubble Space Telescope and other large ground-based facilities did not show any signature of aerosol debris, temperature or chemical composition anomaly, confirming that the body was small and destroyed in Jupiter's upper atmosphere. Several collisions of this size may happen on Jupiter on a yearly basis. A systematic study of the impact rate and size of these bolides can enable an empiri...

  14. Jupiter and Super-Earth embedded in a gaseous disc

    CERN Document Server

    Podlewska, E

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the evolution of a pair of interacting planets - a Jupiter mass planet and a Super-Earth with the 5.5 Earth masses - orbiting a Solar type star and embedded in a gaseous protoplanetary disc. We focus on the effects of type I and II orbital migrations, caused by the planet-disc interaction, leading to the Super-Earth capture in first order mean motion resonances by the Jupiter. The stability of the resulting resonant system in which the Super-Earth is on the internal orbit relatively to the Jupiter has been studied numerically by means of full 2D hydrodynamical simulations. Our main motivation is to determine the Super-Earth behaviour in the presence of the gas giant in the system. It has been found that the Jupiter captures the Super-Earth into the interior 3:2 or 4:3 mean motion resonances and the stability of such configurations depends on the initial planet positions and eccentricity evolution. If the initial separation of planet orbits is larger or close to that required for t...

  15. Imaging Jupiter's radiation belts down to 127 MHz with LOFAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girard, J. N.; Zarka, P.; Tasse, C.; Hess, S.; de Pater, I.; Santos-Costa, D.; Nenon, Q.; Sicard, A.; Bourdarie, S.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Bell, M. E.; van Bemmel, I.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Breton, R. P.; Broderick, J. W.; Brouw, W. N.; Brüggen, M.; Ciardi, B.; Corbel, S.; Corstanje, A.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; Deller, A.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J.; Gunst, A. W.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hoeft, M.; Hörandel, J.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; van Leeuwen, J.; Loose, M.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; Markoff, S.; McFadden, R.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Moldon, J.; Munk, H.; Nelles, A.; Norden, M. J.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.; Rowlinson, A.; Schwarz, D.; Smirnov, O.; Steinmetz, M.; Swinbank, J.; Tagger, M.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, M. C.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wucknitz, O.

    2016-01-01

    Context. With the limited amount of in situ particle data available for the innermost region of Jupiter's magnetosphere, Earth-based observations of the giant planets synchrotron emission remain the sole method today of scrutinizing the distribution and dynamical behavior of the ultra energetic

  16. An Overview of the Jupiter Europa Orbiter Concept's Europa Science Phase Orbit Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Robert E.; Ludwinski, Jan M.; Petropoulos, Anastassios E.; Clark, Karla B.; Pappalardo, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), the proposed NASA element of the proposed joint NASA-ESA Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), could launch in February 2020 and conceivably arrive at Jupiter in December of 2025. The concept is to perform a multi-year study of Europa and the Jupiter system, including 30 months of Jupiter system science and a comprehensive Europa orbit phase of 9 months. This paper provides an overview of the JEO concept and describes the Europa Science phase orbit design and the related science priorities, model pay-load and operations scenarios needed to conduct the Europa Science phase. This overview is for planning and discussion purposes only.

  17. HUBBLE VIEWS ANCIENT STORM IN THE ATMOSPHERE OF JUPITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    When 17th-century astronomers first turned their telescopes to Jupiter, they noted a conspicuous reddish spot on the giant planet. This Great Red Spot is still present in Jupiter's atmosphere, more than 300 years later. It is now known that it is a vast storm, spinning like a cyclone. Unlike a low-pressure hurricane in the Caribbean Sea, however, the Red Spot rotates in a counterclockwise direction in the southern hemisphere, showing that it is a high-pressure system. Winds inside this Jovian storm reach speeds of about 270 mph. The Red Spot is the largest known storm in the Solar System. With a diameter of 15,400 miles, it is almost twice the size of the entire Earth and one-sixth the diameter of Jupiter itself. The long lifetime of the Red Spot may be due to the fact that Jupiter is mainly a gaseous planet. It possibly has liquid layers, but lacks a solid surface, which would dissipate the storm's energy, much as happens when a hurricane makes landfall on the Earth. However, the Red Spot does change its shape, size, and color, sometimes dramatically. Such changes are demonstrated in high-resolution Wide Field and Planetary Cameras 1 and 2 images of Jupiter obtained by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, and presented here by the Hubble Heritage Project team. The mosaic presents a series of pictures of the Red Spot obtained by Hubble between 1992 and 1999. Astronomers study weather phenomena on other planets in order to gain a greater understanding of our own Earth's climate. Lacking a solid surface, Jupiter provides us with a laboratory experiment for observing weather phenomena under very different conditions than those prevailing on Earth. This knowledge can also be applied to places in the Earth's atmosphere that are over deep oceans, making them more similar to Jupiter's deep atmosphere. The Hubble images were originally collected by Amy Simon (Cornell U.), Reta Beebe (NMSU), Heidi Hammel (Space Science Institute, MIT), and their collaborators, and have been

  18. K2 Warm Jupiters with the LCOGT TECH collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shporer, Avi; Bayliss, Daniel; Cochran, William D.; Colón, Knicole D.; Dragomir, Diana; Palle, Enric; Potter, Stephen; Siverd, Robert; LCOGT TECH Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Many transiting gas giant planets on short orbital periods (so called hot Jupiters) have larger radii than theoretically expected. Although several explanations have been proposed, none have completely solved this puzzle. As the number of known transiting planets grew a correlation was identified between gas giant radius and the stellar incident flux. Still, it is not clear whether this correlation is causation. Several questions remain and answering them will characterize in more detail this observed correlation and in turn the process responsible for the inflated radii, such as: Is the lack of inflated warm Jupiters a robust feature? What is the incident flux below which there are no inflated gas giants? How low in incident flux does this correlation stretch? These questions arise since there are only a small number of transiting gas giants with low incident flux, below about 108 erg/s/cm2, corresponding to orbital periods of about 10 days and longer for a Sun-like host star. Discovering and confirming more transiting warm Jupiters is the goal of this project, undertaken by the LCOGT Transiting Exoplanet CHaracterization (TECH) team. We are using K2 as our main source of transiting warm Jupiter candidates, with a few candidates discovered in each K2 campaign. LCOGT telescopes are being used for obtaining additional ground-based transit light curves, which are critical for confirming and refining the K2 transit ephemeris as outliers during ingress or egress of the few transit events observed by K2 can bias the measured ephemeris. Further ground-based follow-up data, including spectroscopy, radial velocities, and high angular resolution imaging, are obtained by facilities directly accessible by LCOGT TECH team members. In addition, once LCOGT’s Network of Robotic Echelle Spectrographs (NRES) are deployed in the near future they will allow obtaining spectroscopy and radial velocities with LCOGT facilities. On top of studying the inflated hot Jupiter conundrum

  19. Tracking Jupiter at microwave frequencies after the 2009 impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Shinji; García-Miró, Cristina; Rizzo, Ricardo; Forster, James; Hofstadter, Mark; Dorcey, Ryan; Jauncey, David; de Pater, Imke; Baines, Graham; Sotuela, Ioanna

    2010-05-01

    On 19 July 2009, amateur astronomer Anthony Wesley located near Canberra, Australia, discovered an anomalous dark feature near Jupiter's south pole. It was soon confirmed with additional observations that the new feature was an impact site created by an unknown object. The only other observed collision with Jupiter occurred 15 years earlier with the catastrophic impact of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 Comet (SL9). Unlike the well-predicted SL9 event, the biggest question to answer this time is whether the impact body was a comet or an asteroid. We started a campaign to track Jupiter at microwave frequencies with NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN), in Canberra, Goldstone (California), and Madrid, and the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) in California. A 34m DSN radio telescope at Goldstone was operated by students through GAVRT program. Our primary goal was first to detect molecular radio emissions possibly originating from cometary core components, such as OH, H2O, and NH3, and second to detect radio burst in non-thermal continuum emissions, as observed after the SL-9 impact 15 years ago. We used a 70m radio telescope in Canberra and another 70m in Madrid to search for molecular emissions at 1.6 GHz for OH, 22 GHz for water vapors, 23 GHz for ammonia. Several radio spectroscopy observing sessions have been successfully conducted from 23 July to 1 August. We also started continuum emission monitoring, mainly at 2.3 GHz and 8.4 GHz using 34m and 70m DSN telescopes and the ATA. At early stage of this still on-going monitoring, joint observations were conducted with two 34m telescopes in Canberra and the ATA on 30 July and 9 August in order to have long continuous time coverage and to check flux density scales using a common calibrator source. To highlight this campaign, on 22 November we undertook the Jupiter: Project 24 for the International Year of Astronomy. This campaign was over 24 hours of continuous observation of Jupiter using all three DSN complexes around the world. A couple

  20. Hubble Provides Infrared View of Jupiter's Moon, Ring, and Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Probing Jupiter's atmosphere for the first time, the Hubble Space Telescope's new Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) provides a sharp glimpse of the planet's ring, moon, and high-altitude clouds.The presence of methane in Jupiter's hydrogen- and helium-rich atmosphere has allowed NICMOS to plumb Jupiter's atmosphere, revealing bands of high-altitude clouds. Visible light observations cannot provide a clear view of these high clouds because the underlying clouds reflect so much visible light that the higher level clouds are indistinguishable from the lower layer. The methane gas between the main cloud deck and the high clouds absorbs the reflected infrared light, allowing those clouds that are above most of the atmosphere to appear bright. Scientists will use NICMOS to study the high altitude portion of Jupiter's atmosphere to study clouds at lower levels. They will then analyze those images along with visible light information to compile a clearer picture of the planet's weather. Clouds at different levels tell unique stories. On Earth, for example, ice crystal (cirrus) clouds are found at high altitudes while water (cumulus) clouds are at lower levels.Besides showing details of the planet's high-altitude clouds, NICMOS also provides a clear view of the ring and the moon, Metis. Jupiter's ring plane, seen nearly edge-on, is visible as a faint line on the upper right portion of the NICMOS image. Metis can be seen in the ring plane (the bright circle on the ring's outer edge). The moon is 25 miles wide and about 80,000 miles from Jupiter.Because of the near-infrared camera's narrow field of view, this image is a mosaic constructed from three individual images taken Sept. 17, 1997. The color intensity was adjusted to accentuate the high-altitude clouds. The dark circle on the disk of Jupiter (center of image) is an artifact of the imaging system.This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the

  1. Encounter Probability of Individual Wave Height

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Z.; Burcharth, H. F.

    1998-01-01

    wave height corresponding to a certain exceedence probability within a structure lifetime (encounter probability), based on the statistical analysis of long-term extreme significant wave height. Then the design individual wave height is calculated as the expected maximum individual wave height...... associated with the design significant wave height, with the assumption that the individual wave heights follow the Rayleigh distribution. However, the exceedence probability of such a design individual wave height within the structure lifetime is unknown. The paper presents a method for the determination...... of the design individual wave height corresponding to an exceedence probability within the structure lifetime, given the long-term extreme significant wave height. The method can also be applied for estimation of the number of relatively large waves for fatigue analysis of constructions....

  2. Spider behaviors include oral sexual encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorič, Matjaž; Šuen, Klavdija; Cheng, Ren-Chung; Kralj-Fišer, Simona; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2016-01-01

    Several clades of spiders whose females evolved giant sizes are known for extreme sexual behaviors such as sexual cannibalism, opportunistic mating, mate-binding, genital mutilation, plugging, and emasculation. However, these behaviors have only been tested in a handful of size dimorphic spiders. Here, we bring another lineage into the picture by reporting on sexual behavior of Darwin’s bark spider, Caerostris darwini. This sexually size dimorphic Madagascan species is known for extreme web gigantism and for producing the world’s toughest biomaterial. Our field and laboratory study uncovers a rich sexual repertoire that predictably involves cannibalism, genital mutilation, male preference for teneral females, and emasculation. Surprisingly, C. darwini males engage in oral sexual encounters, rarely reported outside mammals. Irrespective of female’s age or mating status males salivate onto female genitalia pre-, during, and post-copulation. While its adaptive significance is elusive, oral sexual contact in spiders may signal male quality or reduce sperm competition. PMID:27126507

  3. Ethics in the bank internet encounter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rendtorff, Jacob Dahl; Mattsson, Jan

    2012-01-01

    /implications – The important implication for managerial research of this study would be for banks to focus on customer competency with an ethical concern instead of only being concerned with technical solutions for effective internet operations. Practical implications – Since more and more businesses are digitally based......Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to discuss some ethical issues in the internet encounter between customer and bank. Empirical data related to the difficulties that customers have when they deal with the bank through internet technology and electronic banking. The authors discuss...... the difficulties that customers expressed from an ethical standpoint. Design/methodology/approach – The key problem of the paper is “how does research handle the user's lack of competence in a web-based commercial environment?” The authors illustrate this ethical dilemma with data from a Danish Bank collected...

  4. Focus Groups as Transformative Spiritual Encounters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Moloney PhD

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Focus groups are a valuable method for exploring the construction and negotiation of meanings. In her doctoral research the author explored how Australian women's experiences of menstruation, birth, and spirituality are invested with meaning and how that meaning influences and shapes those experiences. The focus group has been described as a potentially liminal space, which enables the discussion of taboo subjects by breaking the ice and giving people permission to comment. In addition, she discovered that the groups could be occasions of empowerment and transformation for both participants and researcher. In a way that far exceeded her expectations, the group format was ideally suited to feminist research and the organic inquiry methodology she used. Some groups became deeply spiritual encounters that were nourishing and transformative for all. This article explores how focus groups can be vehicles of spiritual transformation, examining one group in particular to highlight the points raised.

  5. Rhinoplasty Education Using a Standardized Patient Encounter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Wright

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundComprehensive aesthetic surgery training continues to be a challenge for residency programs. Our residency program developed a rhinoplasty-based objective structured clinical examination (OSCE based upon validated methods as part of the residency education curriculum. We report our experience with the rhinoplasty-based OSCE and offer guidance to its incorporation within residency programs.MethodsThe encounter involved resident evaluation and operative planning for a standardized patient desiring a rhinoplasty procedure. Validated OSCE methods currently used at our medical school were implemented. Residents were evaluated on appropriate history taking, physical examination, and explanation to the patient of treatment options. Examination results were evaluated using analysis of variance (statistical significance P<0.05.ResultsTwelve residents completed the rhinoplasty OSCE. Medical knowledge assessment showed increasing performance with clinical year, 50% versus 84% for postgraduate year 3 and 6, respectively (P<0.005. Systems-based practice scores showed that all residents incorrectly submitted forms for billing and operative scheduling. All residents confirmed that the OSCE realistically represents an actual patient encounter. All faculty confirmed the utility of evaluating resident performance during the OSCE as a useful assessment tool for determining the Next Accreditation System Milestone level.ConclusionsAesthetic surgery training for residents will require innovative methods for education. Our examination showed a program-educational weakness in billing/coding, an area that will be improved upon by topic-specific lectures. A thoroughly developed OSCE can provide a realistic educational opportunity to improve residents' performance on the nonoperative aspects of rhinoplasty and should be considered as an adjunct to resident education.

  6. Discriminative predation: Simultaneous and sequential encounter experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.D.BEATTY; D.W.FRANKS

    2012-01-01

    There are many situations in which the ability of animals to distinguish between two similar looking objects can have significant selective consequences.For example,the objects that require discrimination may be edible versus defended prey,predators versus non-predators,or mates of varying quality.Working from the premise that there are situations in which discrimination may be more or less successful,we hypothesized that individuals find it more difficult to distinguish between stimuli when they encounter them sequentially rather than simultaneously.Our study has wide biological and psychological implications from the perspective of signal perception,signal evolution,and discrimination,and could apply to any system where individuals are making relative judgments or choices between two or more stimuli or signals.While this is a general principle that might seem intuitive,it has not been experimentally tested in this context,and is often not considered in the design of models or experiments,or in the interpretation of a wide range of studies.Our study is different from previous studies in psychology in that a) the level of similarity of stimuli are gradually varied to obtain selection gradients,and b) we discuss the implications of our study for specific areas in ecology,such as the level of perfection of mimicry in predator-prey systems.Our experiments provide evidence that it is indeed more difficult to distinguish between stimuli - and to learn to distinguish between stimuli - when they are encountered sequentially rather than simultaneously,even if the intervening time interval is short.

  7. Jupiter's Mid-Infrared Aurora: Solar Connection and Minor Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiuk, Theodore; Livengood, T.A.; Fast, K.E.; Hewagama, T.; Schmilling, F.; Sonnabend, G.; Delgado, J.

    2009-01-01

    High spectral resolution in the 12 pin region of the polar regions of Jupiter reveal unique information on auroral phenomena and upper stratospheric composition. Polar aurorae in Jupiter's atmosphere radiate; throughout the electromagnetic spectrum from X-ray through mid-infrared (mid-IR, 5 - 20 micron wavelength). Voyager IRIS data and ground-based. spectroscopic measurements of Jupiter's northern mid-IR aurora acquired since 1982, reveal a correlation between auroral brightness and solar activity that has not been observed in Jovian aurora at other wavelengths. Over nearly three solar cycles, Jupiter auroral ethane, emission brightness and solar 10.7-cm radar flux and sunspot number are positively correlated with high confidence. Ethane line emission intensity varies over tenfold between low and high scalar activity periods. Detailed measurements have been made using the GSFC HIPWAC spectrometer at the NASA IRTF since the last solar maximum, following the mid-IR emission through the declining phase toward solar minimum. An even more convincing correlation with solar activity is evident in these data. The spectra measured contain features that cannot be attributed to ethane and are most likely spectra of minor constituents whose molecular bands overlap the v9 band of ethane. Possible candidates are allene, propane, and other higher order hydrocarbons. These features appear to be enhanced in the active polar regions. Laboratory measurements at comparable spectral resolution of spectra of candidate molecules will be used to identify the constituents. Current analyses of these results will be described, including planned measurements on polar ethane line emission scheduled through the rise of the next solar maximum beginning in 2009, with a steep gradient to a maximum in 2012. This work is relevant to the Juno mission and to the development of the NASA/ESA Europa Jupiter System Mission.

  8. Simon Marius vs. Galileo: Who First Saw Moons of Jupiter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Van Helden, Albert

    2016-10-01

    In his almanac for 1612 and book Mundus Iovalis of 1614, Simon Marius in Germany reported his discovery of moons around Jupiter, which he started writing down in late 1609 in the Julian calendar, which translated to 8 January 1610 in the Gregorian calendar in use by Galileo in Italy. Is Marius to be believed? Galileo certainly did not. But a Dutch jury of experts about three hundred years later reported that they validated the claim that Marius independently discovered the moons of Jupiter one day after Galileo first both saw and wrote down his discovery! There is no doubt that the names Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto came from Marius (to whom they were suggested by Kepler). See JMP's Journal for the History of Astronomy article, 46(2), 218-234 (2015).Marius wrote that he had been observing the moons around Jupiter since November 1609 (Julian), using a neighboring nobleman's telescope, which would mean that he actually saw the Jupiter satellites first (though publish or perish). Whether this feat was technically possible comes down to discussions of the capabilities of telescopes in the early 17th century.The quadricentennial of Marius's book was celebrated in Nuremberg with a symposium that is now in press in German with an English translation expected. One of us (AVH) has recently prepared a complete English translation of Marius's book, superseding the partial translation made 100 years ago. There is no evidence that, whether he saw what we now call the Galilean satellites first or not, Marius appreciated their cosmological significance the way that Galileo soon did. And Marius was certainly the first to publish tables of the moons of Jupiter.We thank the Chapin Library of Williams College and the Huntington Library for assistance with first editions of Marius's 1614 book, and we thank Pierre Leich of the Simon Marius Gesellschaft for his consultations.

  9. Jupiter's Phase Variations from Cassini: a testbed for future direct-imaging missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, Laura; Jackiewicz, Jason; Rages, Kathy; West, Robert; Knowles, Ben; Marley, Mark; Lewis, Nikole

    2016-10-01

    Phase curves are important for our understanding of the energy balance and scattering behavior of an exoplanet's atmosphere. In preparation for future direct-imaging missions of Jupiter-like planets, we present phase curves of Jupiter from 0--150 degrees as measured in multiple optical bandpasses by Cassini/ISS during the Millennium flyby of Jupiter in late 2000 to early 2001. We demonstrate and confirm that Jupiter is not well represented by a Lambertian phase function and that its color is more variable with phase angle than predicted by Jupiter-like models. This indicates that a Jupiter-twin observed near quadrature may not be as straightforward to classify as a Jupiter-like planet.

  10. Jupiter's Phase Variations from Cassini: a testbed for future direct-imaging missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, Laura; Jackiewicz, Jason; Rages, Kathy; West, Robert A.; Knowles, Ben; Lewis, Nikole K.; Marley, Mark S.

    2017-01-01

    Phase curves are important for our understanding of the energy balance and scattering behavior of an exoplanet's atmosphere. In preparation for future direct-imaging missions of Jupiter-like planets, in particular WFIRST, we present phase curves of Jupiter from 0--150 degrees as measured in multiple optical bandpasses by Cassini/ISS during the Millennium flyby of Jupiter in late 2000 to early 2001. We demonstrate and confirm that Jupiter is not well represented by a Lambertian phase function and that its color is more variable with phase angle than predicted by Jupiter-like models. This indicates that a Jupiter-twin observed near quadrature may not be as straightforward to classify as a Jupiter-like planet and comment on the implications for future missions.

  11. Guest-Host Encounters in Diaspora-Heritage Tourism: The Taglit-Birthright Israel Mifgash (Encounter)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasson, Theodore; Mittelberg, David; Hecht, Shahar; Saxe, Leonard

    2011-01-01

    More than 300,000 diaspora Jewish young adults and tens of thousands of their Israeli peers have participated in structured, cross-cultural encounters--"mifgashim"--in the context of an experiential education program known as Taglit-Birthright Israel. Drawing on field observations, interviews, and surveys, the formal and informal…

  12. Guest-Host Encounters in Diaspora-Heritage Tourism: The Taglit-Birthright Israel Mifgash (Encounter)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasson, Theodore; Mittelberg, David; Hecht, Shahar; Saxe, Leonard

    2011-01-01

    More than 300,000 diaspora Jewish young adults and tens of thousands of their Israeli peers have participated in structured, cross-cultural encounters--"mifgashim"--in the context of an experiential education program known as Taglit-Birthright Israel. Drawing on field observations, interviews, and surveys, the formal and informal…

  13. Customer-to-customer roles and impacts in service encounters

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Linda

    2016-01-01

    This thesis investigates customer-to-customer roles and impacts in the context of service encounters. This topic is studied from two angles: customer interactions during group service encounters and customer perceptions post service encounters. The first angle is a focus on group service encounters that addresses the lack of research on customer-to-customer interactions that occur in customer-to-customer interaction-intensive contexts. These are contexts where the interactions between custome...

  14. Customer-to-customer roles and impacts in service encounters

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Linda

    2016-01-01

    This thesis investigates customer-to-customer roles and impacts in the context of service encounters. This topic is studied from two angles: customer interactions during group service encounters and customer perceptions post service encounters. The first angle is a focus on group service encounters that addresses the lack of research on customer-to-customer interactions that occur in customer-to-customer interaction-intensive contexts. These are contexts where the interactions between custome...

  15. Amino acid racemisation dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray-Wallace, C.V. [University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW (Australia). School of Geosciences

    1999-11-01

    The potential of the time-dependent amino acid racemisation reaction as a method of age assessment was first reported by Hare and Abelson (1968). They noted that in specimens of the bivalve mollusc Mercenaria sp., greater concentrations of amino acids in the D-configuration with increasing fossil age. Hare and Abelson (1968) also reported negligible racemisation in a modern specimen of Mecanaria sp. On this basis they suggested that the extent of amino acid racemisation (epimerisation in the case of isoleucine) may be used to assess the age of materials within and beyond the range of radiocarbon dating. For the past thirty years amino acid racemisation has been extensively applied in Quaternary research as a method of relative and numeric dating, and a particularly large literature has emerged on the subject 12 refs.

  16. Dating fractures in infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halliday, K.E., E-mail: kath.halliday@nuh.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, Nottingham University Hospitals, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Broderick, N.J.; Somers, J.M. [Department of Radiology, Nottingham University Hospitals, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Hawkes, R. [Department of Radiology, Paul O' Gorman Building, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Aim: To document the timing of the appearance of the radiological features of fracture healing in a group of infants in which the date of injury was known and to assess the degree of interobserver agreement. Materials and methods: Three paediatric radiologists independently assessed 161 images of 37 long bone fractures in 31 patients aged 0-44 months. The following features were assessed: soft-tissue swelling, subperiosteal new bone formation (SPNBF), definition of fracture line, presence or absence of callus, whether callus was well or ill defined, and the presence of endosteal callus. Results: Agreement between observers was only moderate for all discriminators except SPNBF. SPNBF was invariably seen after 11 days but was uncommon before this time even in the very young. In one case SPNBF was seen at 4 days. Conclusion: With the exception of SPNBF, the criteria relied on to date fractures are either not reproducible or are poor discriminators of fracture age.

  17. The 2008 Passage of Jupiter's Great Red Spot and Oval BA as Observed from Hubble/WFPC2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Chanover, N. J.; Orton, G. S.; Tsavaris, I.

    2008-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope data of the passage of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) and Oval BA were acquired on May 15, June 28 (near closest approach), and July 8. Wind fields were measured from Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) data with 10-hour separations before and after closest approach, and within the GRS with 40-minute separations on all three dates. Color information was also derived using 8 narrowband WFPC2 filters from 343 to 673-nm on all three dates. We will present the results of principal components and wind analyses and discuss unique features seen in this data set. In addition, we will highlight any changes observed in the GRS, Oval BA and their surroundings as a result of the passage, including the movement of a smaller red anticyclone from west of the GRS, around its southern periphery, and to the east of the GRS.

  18. The 2008 Passage of Jupiter's Great Red Spot and Oval BA as Observed from Hubble/WFPC2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Chanover, N. J.; Orton, G. S.; Tsavaris, I.

    2008-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope data of the passage of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) and Oval BA were acquired on May 15, June 28 (near closest approach), and July 8. Wind fields were measured from Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) data with 10-hour separations before and after closest approach, and within the GRS with 40-minute separations on all three dates. Color information was also derived using 8 narrowband WFPC2 filters from 343 to 673-nm on all three dates. We will present the results of principal components and wind analyses and discuss unique features seen in this data set. In addition, we will highlight any changes observed in the GRS, Oval BA and their surroundings as a result of the passage, including the movement of a smaller red anticyclone from west of the GRS, around its southern periphery, and to the east of the GRS.

  19. Truly Blind Dating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI LI

    2010-01-01

    @@ Compared to parties,bars and nightclubs,in many countries parks are a site for family leisure and recreation and not a spot to find a date.It is not the case in China.Spouse-hunting fairs in big city parks organized by parents eager to see their children tie the knot have made parks in China a haven for relationshiphunters and their parents.

  20. What's the date of

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘京西

    2009-01-01

    @@ A:What's the date of our final examination? B:I'm not sure.I'll have to look it up.I'll let youknow tomorrow. A:Thank you. A:我们期末考试是哪一天? B:我也说不清.我给你查查,明天告诉你. A:谢谢你.

  1. Innovation from the ICT-based service encounter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders

    2012-01-01

    The pupose of the paper is to develop a framework for analyzing the dynamics of innovations emanating from the ICT-based service encounters. Many innovations are based on the direct encounter between employees and customers, and the paper aims to extend the analysis of such encounters to ICT...

  2. Sediment dating in review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prescott, J.R.; Robertson, G.B. [Adelaide Univ., SA (Australia). Dept. of Mathematical Physics

    1997-12-31

    The paper will comment on a few issues of particular relevance to Australasia. Thermoluminescent (TL) methods applied to open sites have been demonstrated to be effective. A particularly good example of this is to be found in the South East of South Australia, where a sequence of low ranges runs roughly parallel with the coast. They represent relict sand dunes left behind, on a slowly rising land surface by successive interglacial incursions of the sea at roughly 120 ka intervals. Comparison with ages established on independent geological grounds allows a test of quartz TL and IRSL ages that is believable back to 500 ka. Older than this, we do not yet understand the physics of the quartz well enough to go unequivocally forward (backward?). Similar results are emerging elsewhere. With dating limits being pushed ever further back, the time variation of the environmental radiation giving rise to the stored luminescent energy needs to be addressed. Particularly at wet sites, radioactive disequilibrium must be considered. In any case, a time profile of the radiation dose rate needs to be determined.In dating a given site or sites the value of ages obtained by any dating method,including C-14, is enhanced by parallel measurements with an different method. Paper no. 10; extended abstract. 6 refs.

  3. Date and Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangJingxian

    1996-01-01

    Nowadays the pace of social life is very fast.TO make clear date and time is very important to everyone,especially those who are away fromhome.You need to learn ways to express date and time in Chinese.Otherwise how can you make arrangements with your Chinese friends?41.请问,今天(是)几号?Qǐngwèn,jīntiān(shǐ)jǐ hào?(May I ask,what is the date today?)In Chinese,jǐntiān.míngtiān,hòutiān and dàhòutiān are used to express today,tomorrow,the day after tomorrow,and the fourth day fromnow.jǐ(how many)is a character used in questioning the number from two to nine.If one asks the number above nine,then shí(ten),bǎi

  4. Emergency Department Physician Internet Use during Clinical Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Robin; Finnell, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study explored the Internet log files from emergency department workstations to determine search patterns, compared them to discharge diagnoses, and the emergency medicine curriculum as a way to quantify physician search behaviors. Methods: The log files from the computers from January 2006 to March 2010 were mapped to the EM curriculum and compared to discharge diagnoses to explore search terms and website usage by physicians and students. Results: Physicians in the ED averaged 1.35 searches per patient encounter using Google.com and UpToDate.com 83.9% of the time. The most common searches were for drug information (23.1%) by all provider types. The majority of the websites utilized were in the third tier evidence level for evidence-based medicine (EBM). Conclusion: We have shown a need for a readily accessible drug knowledge base within the EMR for decision support as well as easier access to first and second tier EBM evidence. PMID:23304394

  5. Solar probe mission: close encounter with the sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittler, E. C., Jr.; McComas, D. J.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Stdt Team

    The Solar Probe Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) recently completed a detailed study of the Solar Probe Mission based on an earliest launch date of October 2014. Solar Probe, when implemented, will be the first close encounter by a spacecraft with a star (i.e., 3 RS above the Sun's photosphere). The report and its executive summary were published by NASA (NASA/TM-2005-212786) in September 2005 and can be found at the website http://solarprobe.gsfc.nasa.gov/. A description of the science will appear in Reviews of Geophysics article led by D. J. McComas. For this talk, we presented the consensus view of the STDT including a brief description of the scientific goals, a description of the overall mission, including trajectory scenarios, spacecraft description and proposed scientific payload. We will discuss all these topics and the importance of flying the Solar Probe mission both with regard to understanding fundamental issues of solar wind acceleration and coronal heating near the Sun and Solar Probe's unique role in understanding the acceleration of Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs), which is critical to future Human Exploration.

  6. FIRE - Flyby of Io with Repeat Encounters: A conceptual design for a New Frontiers mission to Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suer, Terry-Ann; Padovan, Sebastiano; Whitten, Jennifer L.; Potter, Ross W. K.; Shkolyar, Svetlana; Cable, Morgan; Walker, Catherine; Szalay, Jamey; Parker, Charles; Cumbers, John; Gentry, Diana; Harrison, Tanya; Naidu, Shantanu; Trammell, Harold J.; Reimuller, Jason; Budney, Charles J.; Lowes, Leslie L.

    2017-09-01

    A conceptual design is presented for a low complexity, heritage-based flyby mission to Io, Jupiter's innermost Galilean satellite and the most volcanically active body in the Solar System. The design addresses the 2011 Decadal Survey's recommendation for a New Frontiers class mission to Io and is based upon the result of the June 2012 NASA-JPL Planetary Science Summer School. A science payload is proposed to investigate the link between the structure of Io's interior, its volcanic activity, its surface composition, and its tectonics. A study of Io's atmospheric processes and Io's role in the Jovian magnetosphere is also planned. The instrument suite includes a visible/near-IR imager, a magnetic field and plasma suite, a dust analyzer, and a gimbaled high gain antenna to perform radio science. Payload activity and spacecraft operations would be powered by three Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators (ASRG). The primary mission includes 10 flybys with close-encounter altitudes as low as 100 km. The mission risks are mitigated by ensuring that relevant components are radiation tolerant and by using redundancy and flight-proven parts in the design. The spacecraft would be launched on an Atlas V rocket with a delta-v of 1.3 km/s. Three gravity assists (Venus, Earth, Earth) would be used to reach the Jupiter system in a 6-year cruise. The resulting concept demonstrates the rich scientific return of a flyby mission to Io.

  7. ISO celebrates its prolonged life with a video of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-01

    This is excellent news for astronomers and especially for the multinational teams, with leaders in France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, who spent many years devising the four instruments served by ISO's telescope. The camera ISOCAM, the photometer ISOPHOT, the Short Wavelength Spectrometer and the Long Wavelength Spectrometer span between them an unprecedented range of infrared wavelengths from 2 to 200 microns. The atmosphere of Jupiter is one of the cool and cloudy places attracting ISO's attention, and ESA today releases a video of unprecedented images of Jupiter. The planet changes its appearance drastically as the camera ISOCAM scans a range of 90 different infrared wavelengths. Picture by picture, ISOCAM picks out different features of the atmosphere's composition and behaviour. These and other results from ISO will enable scientists to sharpen their ideas about how Jupiter's weather works. "ISO is giving us a new impression of the giant planets of the Solar System," comments Roger Bonnet, ESA's director of science. "Not just Jupiter, but Saturn, Uranus and Neptune too. By observing the planets across its very wide range of infrared wavelengths, ISO can see features overlooked even by spacecraft visiting the planets. The remarkable movie of Jupiter released today represents only a few per cent of ISO's wavelength range, yet every image tells its own story." More information about the Jupiter video appears later in this Information Note. How ISO's cold telescope beat the calendar The need to keep ISO's telescope and instruments chilled to a very low temperature sets a limit to their useful operating life. ISO was supplied with more than 2000 litres of superfluid helium to cool it. Slow evaporation maintains key parts of the spacecraft at temperatures close to absolute zero, below minus 271 degrees C. The rate of loss of helium was expected to be about 3 litres a day, but the cryogenic system could not be tested in exactly the conditions

  8. HATS-31b through HATS-35b: Five Transiting Hot Jupiters Discovered By the HATSouth Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Val-Borro, M.; Bakos, G. Á.; Brahm, R.; Hartman, J. D.; Espinoza, N.; Penev, K.; Ciceri, S.; Jordán, A.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.; Bayliss, D.; Bento, J.; Zhou, G.; Rabus, M.; Mancini, L.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Tan, T. G.; Tinney, C. G.; Wright, D. J.; Kedziora-Chudczer, L.; Bailey, J.; Suc, V.; Durkan, S.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2016-12-01

    We report the discovery of five new transiting hot-Jupiter planets discovered by the HATSouth survey, HATS-31b through HATS-35b. These planets orbit moderately bright stars with V magnitudes within the range of 11.9-14.4 mag while the planets span a range of masses of 0.88-1.22 {M}{{J}} and have somewhat inflated radii between 1.23 and 1.64 {R}{{J}}. These planets can be classified as typical hot Jupiters, with HATS-31b and HATS-35b being moderately inflated gas giant planets with radii of 1.64+/- 0.22 {R}{{J}} and {1.464}-0.044+0.069 {R}{{J}}, respectively, that can be used to constrain inflation mechanisms. All five systems present a higher Bayesian evidence for a fixed-circular-orbit model than for an eccentric orbit. The orbital periods range from 1.8209993+/- 0.0000016 day for HATS-35b) to 3.377960+/- 0.000012 day for HATS-31b. Additionally, HATS-35b orbits a relatively young F star with an age of 2.13+/- 0.51 Gyr. We discuss the analysis to derive the properties of these systems and compare them in the context of the sample of well-characterized transiting hot Jupiters known to date. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. Based in part on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Based in part on observations made with the MPG 2.2 m and Euler1.2 m Telescopes at the ESO Observatory in La Silla. This paper uses observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope.

  9. Design of human missions to Mars and robotic missions to Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okutsu, Masataka

    We consider human missions to Mars and robotic missions to Jupiter for launch dates in the near- and far-future. For the near-future, we design trajectories for currently proposed space missions that have well-defined spacecraft and mission requirements. For example, for early human missions to Mars we assume that the constraints used in NASA's design reference missions are indicative of current and near-future technologies, which of course limit our capabilities to explore Mars--and these limits make the problem challenging. Similarly, in the case of robotic exploration of Jupiter, we consider that the technology levels assumed for the proposed Europa Orbiter mission represent reasonable limits. For the far-future (two to three decades from now), we take the best estimates from current literature about the capabilities that may be available in nuclear-powered electric propulsion. We consider hardware capabilities (in terms of specific mass, specific impulse, thrust, power, etc.) for low-thrust trajectories, which range froth near-term to far-future technologies. In designing such missions, several techniques are found useful. For example, the Tisserand Graph, which tracks the changes in orbital shapes and energies, provides insight in designing Jovian tours for the Europa Orbiter mission. The graph is also useful in analyzing abort trajectories for human missions to Mars. Furthermore, a patched-conic propagator, which can generate thousands of potential trajectories, plays a vital role in three of four chapters of this thesis. For launches in the next three decades, we discovered a class of Earth- Mars-Venus-Earth free returns (which appear only four times in the 100-year period), Jovian tours involving ten to twenty flybys of the Galilean satellites, and low-thrust trajectories to Jupiter via gravity assists from Venus, Earth, and Mars. In addition, our continuation method, in which a solution for a conic trajectory is gradually converted into that for a low

  10. Dating Violence among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iconis, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    Dating violence is a significant problem on college campuses. More than one-fifth of the undergraduate dating population are physically abused by their dating partners and an even greater percentage are psychologically abused. Researchers have identified risk factors for college student dating violence. Preventive interventions are strongly…

  11. Evolution of Jupiter's auroral-related stratospheric heating and chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, James; Orton, Glenn S.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Moses, Julianne I.; Hue, Vincent; Irwin, Patrick Gerard Joseph; Melin, Henrik; Giles, Rohini Sara

    2016-10-01

    Auroral processes on Jupiter are evident over a large range of wavelengths. Emission at X-ray, UV and near-infrared wavelengths highlights the precipitation of charged particles in Jupiter's ionosphere. Jupiter's auroral regions also exhibit enhanced mid-infrared emission of CH4 (7.8-μm), C2H2 (13-μm), C2H4 (10.5-μm) and C2H6 (12.2-μm), which indicates auroral processes modify the thermal structure and chemistry of the neutral stratosphere at pressures from 10 mbar to 10 μbar. In Sinclair et al., 2016a (submitted), 2016b (in preparation), we investigated these processes further by performing a retrieval analysis of Voyager-IRIS (Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer) observations measured in November 1979, Cassini-CIRS (Composite Infrared Spectrometer) observations measured in January 2001 and IRTF-TEXES (Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph on NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility) spectra measured in December 2014. These datasets however captured Jupiter at significantly different epochs and thus the overall global evolution of atmospheric conditions as well as differences in spatial sampling, spectral resolution (and therefore vertical resolution in the atmosphere) have made inferences of the temporal evolution in auroral regions a challenge. However, in April 2016, we acquired IRTF-TEXES observations of Jupiter's high latitudes, using observing parameters very similar to those in December 2014. By performing a similar analysis of these observations and comparing results between December 2014 and April 2016, we can investigate the evolution of the thermal structure and chemistry in Jupiter's auroral regions over a 15 month timescale. The magnitude of temperature/composition changes and the altitudes at which they occur will provide insights into how auroral processes in the ionosphere propagate to the stratosphere. In particular, we can assess whether the evolution of stratospheric conditions in auroral regions is related to the decrease in solar activity

  12. 210Pb dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarzenski, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Roughly fifty years ago, a small group of scientists from Belgium and the United States, trying to better constrain ice sheet accumulation rates, attempted to apply what was then know about environmental lead as a potential geochronometer. Thus Goldberg (1963) developed the first principles of the 210Pb dating method, which was soon followed by a paper by Crozaz et al. (1964), who examined accumulation history of Antarctic snow using 210Pb. Shortly thereafter, Koide et al. (1972, 1973) adapted this technique to unravel sediment deposition and accumulation records in deep-sea environments. Serendipitously, they chose to work in a deep basin off California, where an independent and robust age model had already been developed. Krishanswami et al. (1971) extended the use of this technique to lacustrine deposits to reconstruct depositional histories of lake sediment, and maybe more importantly, contaminant inputs and burial. Thus, the powerful tool for dating recent (up to about one century old) sediment deposits was established and soon widely adopted. Today almost all oceanographic or limnologic studies that address recent depositional reconstructions employ 210Pb as one of several possible geochronometers (Andrews et al., 2009; Gale, 2009; Baskaran, 2011; Persson and Helms, 2011). This paper presents a short overview of the principles of 210Pb dating and provides a few examples that illustrate the utility of this tracer in contrasting depositional systems. Potential caveats and uncertainties (Appleby et al., 1986; Binford, 1990; Binford et al., 1993; Smith, 2001; Hancock et al., 2002) inherent to the use and interpretation of 210Pb-derived age-models are also introduced. Recommendations as to best practices for most reliable uses and reporting are presented in the summary.

  13. Aging and Osteoarthritis: An Inevitable Encounter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hügle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a major health burden of our time. Age is the most prominent risk factor for the development and progression of OA. The mechanistic influence of aging on OA has different facets. On a molecular level, matrix proteins such as collagen or proteoglycans are modified, which alters cartilage function. Collagen cross-linking within the bone results in impaired plasticity and increased stiffness. Synovial or fat tissue, menisci but also ligaments and muscles play an important role in the pathogenesis of OA. In the elderly, sarcopenia or other causes of muscle atrophy are frequently encountered, leading to a decreased stability of the joint. Inflammation in form of cellular infiltration of synovial tissue or subchondral bone and expression of inflammatory cytokines is more and more recognized as trigger of OA. It has been demonstrated that joint movement can exhibit anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Therefore physical activity or physiotherapy in the elderly should be encouraged, also in order to increase the muscle mass. A reduced stem cell capacity in the elderly is likely associated with a decrease of repair mechanisms of the musculoskeletal system. New treatment strategies, for example with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC are investigated, despite clear evidence for their efficacy is lacking.

  14. Close Encounters of the Stellar Kind

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has confirmed that close encounters between stars form X-ray emitting, double-star systems in dense globular star clusters. These X-ray binaries have a different birth process than their cousins outside globular clusters, and should have a profound influence on the cluster's evolution. A team of scientists led by David Pooley of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge took advantage of Chandra's unique ability to precisely locate and resolve individual sources to determine the number of X-ray sources in 12 globular clusters in our Galaxy. Most of the sources are binary systems containing a collapsed star such as a neutron star or a white dwarf star that is pulling matter off a normal, Sun-like companion star. "We found that the number of X-ray binaries is closely correlated with the rate of encounters between stars in the clusters," said Pooley. "Our conclusion is that the binaries are formed as a consequence of these encounters. It is a case of nurture not nature." A similar study led by Craig Heinke of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. confirmed this conclusion, and showed that roughly 10 percent of these X-ray binary systems contain neutron stars. Most of these neutron stars are usually quiet, spending less than 10% of their time actively feeding from their companion. NGC 7099 NGC 7099 A globular cluster is a spherical collection of hundreds of thousands or even millions of stars buzzing around each other in a gravitationally-bound stellar beehive that is about a hundred light years in diameter. The stars in a globular cluster are often only about a tenth of a light year apart. For comparison, the nearest star to the Sun, Proxima Centauri, is 4.2 light years away. With so many stars moving so close together, interactions between stars occur frequently in globular clusters. The stars, while rarely colliding, do get close enough to form binary star systems or cause binary stars to

  15. LHC experiences close encounters with UFOs

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2011-01-01

    On 29 May, yet another record was set as 1092 bunches per beam were injected into the LHC, hitting a peak luminosity of 1.26x1033 cm-2 s-1. While running at 3.5 TeV each beam now packs a total energy of over 70 MJ – equivalent to a TGV travelling at a 70 kph.   Operators in the LHC Control Centre happily show off their display screens after succesfully injecting 1092 bunches injected into the machine for the first time.  As the total beam intensity has been pushed up, the LHC has encountered a number of related problems, such as the so-called UFOs (Unidentified Falling Objects). These are thought to be dust particles falling through the beam, causing localized beam loss. The losses can push nearby beam loss monitors over the threshold and dump the beam. This is more of an annoyance than a danger for the LHC, but UFOs do reduce the operational efficiency of the machine. Despite this, the luminosity delivered to the experiments has steadily increased. On three occasions there ha...

  16. Close encounters of the prototype kind

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    CERN is building a new control centre for the operation of its entire accelerator complex and technical infrastructure. The prototype console for the new centre has just been installed and tested. Close encounters of the prototype kind CERN is building a new control centre for the operation of its entire accelerator complex and technical infrastructure. The prototype console for the new centre has just been installed and tested. The prototype of the control consoles that will be at the heart of the future CERN Control Centre (CCC) has just been installed in the Roy Billinge Room in Building 354. Until now, there have been four separate control rooms for the CERN accelerators and technical infrastructure. The CCC, which will be located on the Prévessin site, will bring them all together in a single room. The Centre will consist of 40 consoles for four different areas (LHC, SPS, PS complex and technical infrastructure). The prototype was tested by the technicians for a month. Following installation and con...

  17. Assortment of encounters and evolution of cooperativeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshel, I; Cavalli-Sforza, L L

    1982-02-01

    The method of evolutionary stable strategies (ESS), in its current form, is confronted with a difficulty when it tries to explain how some social behaviors initiate their evolution. We show that this difficulty may be removed by changing the assumption made tacitly in game theory (and in ESS) of randomness of meetings or encounters. In reality, such randomness seems to be rare in nature. Family, population and social structure, customs, and habits impose various types of deviation from randomness. Introducing nonrandomness of meeting in a way formally similar to assortative mating, we show that the bar to initial increase of inherited cooperative or altruistic behaviors can be removed, provided there is sufficient assortment of meetings. Family structure may cause contacts predominantly between certain types of relatives, and one can reconstruct some results of classical kin selection in terms of evolutionary stable strategy with assortative meetings. Neighbor effects and group selection might be similarly treated. Assortment need not be a passive consequence of population and social structure, but it can also be actively pursued. Behaviors favoring the choice of cooperative companions will have the effect of favoring the evolution of cooperativeness. It can be shown that discrimination in the choice of companions, especially if combined with assortment, can favor the development of cooperativeness, making initial increase of cooperative behavior possible even at levels of assortment passively imposed which would not be adequate, per se, to guarantee the increase of cooperativeness. It is possible that, in some cases, cooperativeness and behavior favoring some type of assortment are coselected.

  18. A close encounter of the massive kind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maíz Apellániz, J.; Sana, H.; Barbá, R. H.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Gamen, R. C.

    2017-01-01

    We have used (i) Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph spectroscopy, (ii) ground-based Precision Integrated-Optics Near-infrared Imaging ExpeRiment/Very Large Telescope long-baseline interferometry, and (iii) ground-based spectroscopy from different instruments to study the orbit of the extreme multiple system HD 93 129 Aa,Ab, which is composed of (at least) two very massive stars in a long-period orbit with e > 0.92, which will pass through periastron in 2017/2018. In several ways, the system is an η Car precursor. Around the time of periastron passage, the two very strong winds will collide and generate an outburst of non-thermal hard X-ray emission without precedent in an O+O binary since astronomers have been able to observe above Earth's atmosphere. A coordinated multiwavelength monitoring in the next two years will enable a breakthrough understanding of the wind interactions in such extreme close encounters. Furthermore, we have found evidence that HD 93 129 Aa may be a binary system itself. In that case, we could witness a three-body interaction which may yield a runaway star or a stellar collision close to or shortly after the periastron passage. Either of those outcomes would be unprecedented, as they are predicted to be low-frequency events in the Milky Way.

  19. A close encounter of the massive kind

    CERN Document Server

    Apellániz, J Maíz; Barbá, R H; Bouquin, J -B Le; Gamen, R C

    2016-01-01

    We have used (a) HST ACS imaging and STIS spectroscopy, (b) ground-based PIONIER/VLT long-baseline interferometry, and (c) ground-based spectroscopy from different instruments to study the orbit of the extreme multiple system HD 93 129 Aa,Ab, which is composed of (at least) two very massive stars in a long-period orbit with e>0.92 that will pass through periastron in 2017/2018. In several ways, the system is an eta Car precursor. Around the time of periastron passage the two very strong winds will collide and generate an outburst of non-thermal hard X-ray emission without precedent in an O+O binary since astronomers have been able to observe above Earth's atmosphere. A coordinated multiwavelength monitoring in the next two years will enable a breakthrough understanding of the wind interactions in such extreme close encounters. Furthermore, we have found evidence that HD 93 129 Aa may be a binary system itself. In that case, we could witness a three-body interaction that may yield a runaway star or a stellar c...

  20. Incorporating Hypnosis into Pediatric Clinical Encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergrast, Robert A

    2017-03-16

    Increasing numbers of licensed health professionals who care for children have been trained in clinical hypnosis. The evidence base for the safety and efficacy of this therapeutic approach in a wide variety of conditions is also growing. Pediatricians and other health professionals who have received training may wish to apply these skills in appropriate clinical scenarios but still may be unsure of the practical matters of how to incorporate this skill-set into day to day practice. Moreover, the practical application of such skills will take very different forms depending on the practice setting, types of acute or chronic conditions, patient and family preferences, and the developmental stages of the child or teen. This article reviews the application of pediatric clinical hypnosis skills by describing the use of hypnotic language outside of formal trance induction, by describing natural trance states that occur in children and teens in healthcare settings, and by describing the process of planning a clinical hypnosis encounter. It is assumed that this article does not constitute training in hypnosis or qualify its readers for the application of such skills; rather, it may serve as a practical guide for those professionals who have been so trained, and may serve to inform other professionals what to expect when referring a patient for hypnotherapy. The reader is referred to specific training opportunities and organizations.

  1. Incorporating Hypnosis into Pediatric Clinical Encounters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Pendergrast

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasing numbers of licensed health professionals who care for children have been trained in clinical hypnosis. The evidence base for the safety and efficacy of this therapeutic approach in a wide variety of conditions is also growing. Pediatricians and other health professionals who have received training may wish to apply these skills in appropriate clinical scenarios but still may be unsure of the practical matters of how to incorporate this skill-set into day to day practice. Moreover, the practical application of such skills will take very different forms depending on the practice setting, types of acute or chronic conditions, patient and family preferences, and the developmental stages of the child or teen. This article reviews the application of pediatric clinical hypnosis skills by describing the use of hypnotic language outside of formal trance induction, by describing natural trance states that occur in children and teens in healthcare settings, and by describing the process of planning a clinical hypnosis encounter. It is assumed that this article does not constitute training in hypnosis or qualify its readers for the application of such skills; rather, it may serve as a practical guide for those professionals who have been so trained, and may serve to inform other professionals what to expect when referring a patient for hypnotherapy. The reader is referred to specific training opportunities and organizations.

  2. Vulcanism and Radiocarbon Dates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, L. M.; Libby, W. F.

    1972-10-01

    We consider whether the long term perturbation of radiocarbon dates, which is known to be approximately a sin function of period about 8000 years and amplitude of about 8% peak-to-peak, could have been caused in any major part by vulcanism. We conclude that this is not the case. On the contrary, present day volcanoes are a far less important source of inert CO{sub 2} (about 100 fold less) than is man's burning of fossil fuels which has caused the Suess dilution of about 2%. (auth)

  3. First Encounters: Knowledge Interpretation on the Front-Lines of Cross-Cultural Encounters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert F. Barsky

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis that guides this work is that although it may be valuable to lobby for competent translators to help vulnerable foreigners in cross-cultural settings, such as the Canadian Convention refugee determination hearings or criminal trials, it is nevertheless too late to make much of a difference at that point, because most of the incriminating damage is done in the initial encounter between claimant/defendant and authority. Approaching a discussion about the relative merits of translation versus interpretation from this perspective, that emphasizes the time at which the conversation occurs, would suggest that linguistic accuracy is much more important in formal hearings, while interpretation is crucial during the initial encounter, because it is during this period of negotiation that a sensitive and qualified interpreter can keep a claimant from incriminating herself or mis-communicating the situation to authority.

  4. Jupiter's Phase Variations from Cassini: a testbed for future direct-imaging missions

    CERN Document Server

    Mayorga, L C; Rages, K; West, R A; Knowles, B; Lewis, N; Marley, M S

    2016-01-01

    We present phase curves of Jupiter from 0-140 degrees as measured in multiple optical bandpasses by Cassini/ISS during the Millennium flyby of Jupiter in late 2000 to early 2001. Phase curves are of interest for studying the energy balance of Jupiter and understanding the scattering behavior of Jupiter as an exoplanet analog. We find that Jupiter is significantly darker at partial phases than an idealized Lambertian planet by roughly 25% and is not well fit by Jupiter-like exoplanet atmospheric models across all wavelengths. We provide analytic fits to Jupiter's phase function in several Cassini/ISS imaging filter bandpasses. In addition, these observations show that Jupiter's color is more variable with phase angle than predicted by models. Therefore, the color of even a near Jupiter-twin planet observed at a partial phase cannot be assumed to be comparable to that of Jupiter at full phase. We discuss how WFIRST and other future direct-imaging missions can enhance the study of cool giants.

  5. Estimating migratory connectivity of birds when re-encounter probabilities are heterogeneous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Emily B.; Hostelter, Jeffrey A.; Royle, J. Andrew; Marra, Peter P.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the biology and conducting effective conservation of migratory species requires an understanding of migratory connectivity – the geographic linkages of populations between stages of the annual cycle. Unfortunately, for most species, we are lacking such information. The North American Bird Banding Laboratory (BBL) houses an extensive database of marking, recaptures and recoveries, and such data could provide migratory connectivity information for many species. To date, however, few species have been analyzed for migratory connectivity largely because heterogeneous re-encounter probabilities make interpretation problematic. We accounted for regional variation in re-encounter probabilities by borrowing information across species and by using effort covariates on recapture and recovery probabilities in a multistate capture–recapture and recovery model. The effort covariates were derived from recaptures and recoveries of species within the same regions. We estimated the migratory connectivity for three tern species breeding in North America and over-wintering in the tropics, common (Sterna hirundo), roseate (Sterna dougallii), and Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia). For western breeding terns, model-derived estimates of migratory connectivity differed considerably from those derived directly from the proportions of re-encounters. Conversely, for eastern breeding terns, estimates were merely refined by the inclusion of re-encounter probabilities. In general, eastern breeding terns were strongly connected to eastern South America, and western breeding terns were strongly linked to the more western parts of the nonbreeding range under both models. Through simulation, we found this approach is likely useful for many species in the BBL database, although precision improved with higher re-encounter probabilities and stronger migratory connectivity. We describe an approach to deal with the inherent biases in BBL banding and re-encounter data to demonstrate

  6. Discovery of a Jupiter/Saturn Analog with Gravitational Microlensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudi, B; Bennett, D; Udalski, A; Gould, A; Christie, G; Maoz, D; Dong, S; McCormick, J; Szymanski, M; Tristram, P; Nikolaev, S; Paczynski, B; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Szewczyk, O; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, L; DePoy, D; Han, C; Kaspi, S; Lee, C; Mallia, F; Natusch, T; Pogge, R; Park, B; Abe, F; Bond, I; Botzler, C; Fukui, A; Hearnshaw, J; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Korpela, A; Kilmartin, P; Lin, W; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Motomura, M; Muraki, Y; Nakamura, S; Okumura, T; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N; Sako, T; Saito, T; Sato, S; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, D; Sumi, T; Sweatman, W; Yock, P; Albrow, M; Beaulieu, J; Burgdorf, M; Cook, K; Coutures, C; Dominik, M; Dieters, S; Fouque, P; Greenhill, J; Horne, K; Steele, I; Tsapras, Y; Chaboyer, B; Crocker, A; Frank, S; Macintosh, B

    2007-11-08

    Searches for extrasolar planets have uncovered an astonishing diversity of planetary systems, yet the frequency of solar system analogs remains unknown. The gravitational microlensing planet search method is potentially sensitive to multiple-planet systems containing analogs of all the solar system planets except Mercury. We report the first detection of a multiple-planet system with microlensing. We identify two planets with masses of {approx} 0.71 and {approx} 0.27 times the mass of Jupiter and orbital separations of {approx} 2.3 and {approx} 4.6 astronomical units orbiting a primary of mass {approx} 0.50 solar masses. This system resembles a scaled version of our solar system in that the mass ratio, separation ratio, and equilibrium temperatures of the planets are similar to those of Jupiter and Saturn. These planets could not have been detected with other techniques; their discovery from only 6 confirmed microlensing planet detections suggests that solar system analogs may be common.

  7. Mechanisms affecting the composition of Hot Jupiters atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Showman Adam P.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Opacities and thus local chemical composition play a key role when characterizing exoplanet atmospheres from observations. When the gas is in chemical equilibrium the chemical abundances depend strongly on the temperature profile. Grey models tend to overestimate the temperatures in the upper atmosphere. We present a new analytical model with a more realistic description of the radiative cooling in the infrared. Mechanisms like quenching and cold traps can drive the upper atmosphere far from its chemical equilibrium. The efficiency of these mechanisms depends on the strength of the vertical mixing. Using 3D global circulation models of HD209458b including passive tracers, we show that, although Hot Jupiter atmospheres are stably stratified, they are strongly mixed by planetary scale circulation patterns. We provide a rough estimate of the effective vertical mixing coefficient in Hot Jupiter atmosphere which can be used in 1D models.

  8. Doppler Signatures of the Atmospheric Circulation on Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Showman, Adam P; Lewis, Nikole K; Shabram, Megan

    2013-01-01

    The meteorology of hot Jupiters has been characterized primarily with thermal measurements, but recent observations suggest the possibility of directly detecting the winds by observing the Doppler shift of spectral lines seen during transit. Motivated by these observations, we show how Doppler measurements can place powerful constraints on the meteorology. We show that the atmospheric circulation--and Doppler signature--of hot Jupiters splits into two regimes. Under weak stellar insolation, the day-night thermal forcing generates fast zonal jet streams from the interaction of atmospheric waves with the mean flow. In this regime, air along the terminator (as seen during transit) flows toward Earth in some regions and away from Earth in others, leading to a Doppler signature exhibiting superposed blue- and redshifted components. Under intense stellar insolation, however, the strong thermal forcing damps these planetary-scale waves, inhibiting their ability to generate jets. Strong frictional drag likewise damps...

  9. Ongoing Analysis of Jupiter's Equatorial Hotspots and Plumes from Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, D. S.; Showmwn, A. P.; Vasavada, A. R.; Simon-Miller, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present updated results from our ongoing analysis of Cassini observations of Jupiter's equatorial meteorology. For two months preceding the spacecraft's closest approach of the planet, the ISS instrument onboard Cassini regularly imaged the atmosphere of Jupiter. We created time-lapse movies from this period that show the complex activity and interactions of the equatorial atmosphere. During this period, hot spots exhibited significant variations in size and shape over timescales of days and weeks. Some of these changes appear to be a result of interactions with passing vortex systems in adjacent latitudes. Strong anticyclonic gyres to the southeast of the dark areas converge with flow from the west and appear to circulate into a hot spot at its southwestern corner.

  10. Tidal Dissipation and Obliquity Evolution in Hot Jupiter Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Valsecchi, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Two formation scenarios have been proposed to explain the tight orbits of hot Jupiters. These giant planets could be formed in low-obliquity orbits via disk migration or in high-obliquity orbits via high-eccentricity migration, where gravitational interactions with a companion are at play, together with tidal dissipation. Here we target the observed misaligned hot Jupiter systems to investigate whether their current properties are consistent with high-eccentricity migration. Specifically, we study whether tidal dissipation in the star can be responsible for the observed distribution of misalignments and orbital separations. Improving on previous studies, we use detailed models for the stellar component, thus accounting for how convection (and thus tidal dissipation) depends on the host star properties. We find that the currently observed degree of misalignment increases as the amount of surface convection in the host star decreases. This trend supports the hypothesis that tides are the mechanism shaping the o...

  11. The STARE Project A Transit Search for Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, T M; Brown, Timothy M.; Charbonneau, David

    2000-01-01

    The STARE instrument is a small aperture, wide-field, CCD-based telescope that delivers high cadence time series photometry on roughly 40,000 stars in a typical field centered on the galactic plane. In a two-month observing run on a field, we obtain sufficient precision on roughly 4,000 stars to detect a close-in Jupiter-sized companion in an edge-on orbit. We also used this instrument to detect the planetary transits across the Sun-like star HD209458. The project is now in its third season, and we have acquired a large dataset on several fields. Given the frequency of close-in extrasolar planets found by the radial velocity surveys, and the recent confirmation that at least some of these are indeed gas giants, the STARE project should be able to detect roughly a dozen Jupiter-sized planets in its existing dataset.

  12. Influence of upstream solar wind on thermospheric flows at Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, J N; Guio, P

    2010-01-01

    The coupling of Jupiter's magnetosphere and ionosphere plays a vital role in creating its auroral emissions. The strength of these emissions is dependent on the difference in speed of the rotational flows within Jupiter's high-latitude thermosphere and the planet's magnetodisc. Using an azimuthally symmetric global circulation model, we have simulated how upstream solar wind conditions affect the energy and direction of atmospheric flows. In order to simulate the effect of a varying dynamic pressure in the upstream solar wind, we calculated three magnetic field profiles representing compressed, averaged and expanded `middle' magnetospheres. These profiles were then used to solve for the angular velocity of plasma in the magnetosphere. This angular velocity determines the strength of currents flowing between the ionosphere and magnetosphere. We examine the influence of variability in this current system upon the global winds and energy inputs within the Jovian thermosphere. We find that the power dissipated by...

  13. Telecommunications Antennas for the Juno Mission to Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchione, Joseph D.; Kruid, Ronald C.; Prata, Aluizio, Jr.; Amaro, Luis R.; Mittskus, Anthony P.

    2012-01-01

    The Juno Mission to Jupiter requires a full sphere of coverage throughout its cruise to and mission at Jupiter. This coverage is accommodated through the use of five (5) antennas; forward facing low gain, medium gain, and high gain antennas, and an aft facing low gain antenna along with an aft mounted low gain antenna with a torus shaped antenna pattern. Three of the antennas (the forward low and medium gain antennas) are classical designs that have been employed on several prior NASA missions. Two of the antennas employ new technology developed to meet the Juno mission requirements. The new technology developed for the low gain with torus shaped radiation pattern represents a significant evolution of the bicone antenna. The high gain antenna employs a specialized surface shaping designed to broaden the antenna's main beam at Ka-band to ease the requirements on the spacecraft's attitude control system.

  14. Where is the main source of Jupiter family comets situated?

    CERN Document Server

    Kazantsev, A M

    2012-01-01

    An attempt to determine spatial location of the main source of short-period comet nuclei was made. There were carried out numerical calculations for orbit evolution of Jupiter family comets, comets with middle-period orbits and bodies of Centaur group. On the basis of the calculations it was shown, that orbital evolution of the solar system small bodies is mainly going in the direction of the semi-major axes increase. It belongs to the bodies which can undergo approaches the planets, and orbital evolution of which is mainly going due to the gravitational forces. Such result is confirmed by qualitative analysis of changes of small body semi-major axes under approaches the planets. The conclusion was drawn that the main source of nuclei of Jupiter family comets is apparently situated at distances from the Sun not more than 6 AU.

  15. Solar wind collimation of the Jupiter high velocity dust streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandes, A.; Krueger, H.

    2006-12-01

    The dust bursts discovered by the Ulysses dust sensor when approaching Jupiter in 1992 were later confirmed as collimated streams of high velocity (~200 km/s) charged (~5V) dust grains escaping from Jupiter and dominated by the interplanetary Magnetic field (IMF). With Cassini, a similar phenomenon was observed in Saturn. It was demonstrated that the Jovian dust streams are closely related to the solar wind compressed regions, either Corotating interaction regions (CIRs) or Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) ¨Cto a minor extent-. Actually the dust streams seem ultimately to be generated by such events. This can be explained considering that dust grains are accelerated as they gain substantial energy while compressed at the forward and reverse shocks that bound or precede these solar wind regions.

  16. Transmission spectral properties of clouds for hot Jupiter exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Wakeford, Hannah R

    2014-01-01

    Clouds have an important role in the atmospheres of planetary bodies. It is expected that, like all the planetary bodies in our solar system, exoplanet atmospheres will also have substantial cloud coverage, and evidence is mounting for clouds in a number of hot Jupiters. In order to better characterise planetary atmospheres we need to consider the effects these clouds will have on the observed broadband transmission spectra. Here we examine the expected cloud condensate species for hot Jupiter exoplanets and the effects of various grain sizes and distributions on the resultant transmission spectra from the optical to infrared, which can be used as a broad framework when interpreting exoplanet spectra. We note that significant infrared absorption features appear in the computed transmission spectrum, the result of vibrational modes between the key species in each condensate, which can potentially be very constraining. While it may be hard to differentiate between individual condensates in the broad transmissio...

  17. Telecommunications Antennas for the Juno Mission to Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchione, Joseph D.; Kruid, Ronald C.; Prata, Aluizio, Jr.; Amaro, Luis R.; Mittskus, Anthony P.

    2012-01-01

    The Juno Mission to Jupiter requires a full sphere of coverage throughout its cruise to and mission at Jupiter. This coverage is accommodated through the use of five (5) antennas; forward facing low gain, medium gain, and high gain antennas, and an aft facing low gain antenna along with an aft mounted low gain antenna with a torus shaped antenna pattern. Three of the antennas (the forward low and medium gain antennas) are classical designs that have been employed on several prior NASA missions. Two of the antennas employ new technology developed to meet the Juno mission requirements. The new technology developed for the low gain with torus shaped radiation pattern represents a significant evolution of the bicone antenna. The high gain antenna employs a specialized surface shaping designed to broaden the antenna's main beam at Ka-band to ease the requirements on the spacecraft's attitude control system.

  18. Detection of an oxygen atmosphere on Jupiter's moon Europa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, D T; Strobel, D F; Feldman, P D; McGrath, M A; Weaver, H A

    1995-02-23

    Europa, the second large satellite out from Jupiter, is roughly the size of Earth's Moon, but unlike the Moon, it has water ice on its surface. There have been suggestions that an oxygen atmosphere should accumulate around such a body, through reactions which break up the water molecules and form molecular hydrogen and oxygen. The lighter H2 molecules would escape from Europa relatively easily, leaving behind an atmosphere rich in oxygen. Here we report the detection of atomic oxygen emission from Europa, which we interpret as being produced by the simultaneous dissociation and excitation of atmospheric O2 by electrons from Jupiter's magnetosphere. Europa's molecular oxygen atmosphere is very tenuous, with a surface pressure about 10(-11) that of the Earth's atmosphere at sea level.

  19. Secular Chaos and the Production of Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yanqin

    2010-01-01

    In a planetary system with two or more well-spaced, eccentric, inclined planets, secular interactions may lead to chaos. The innermost planet may gradually become very eccentric and/or inclined, as a result of the secular degrees of freedom drifting towards equipartition of angular momentum deficit. Secular chaos is known to be responsible for the eventual destabilization of Mercury in our own Solar System. Here we focus on systems with three giant planets. We characterize the secular chaos and demonstrate the criterion for it to occur, but leave a detailed understanding of secular chaos to a companion paper (Lithwick & Wu, 2010). After an extended period of eccentricity diffusion, the inner planet's pericentre can approach the star to within a few stellar radii. Strong tidal interactions and ensuing tidal dissipation extracts orbital energy from the planet and pulls it inward, creating a hot Jupiter. In contrast to other proposed channels for the production of hot Jupiters, such a scenario (which we term...

  20. Dust en-route to Jupiter and the Galilean satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, H; Krueger, Harald; Gruen, Eberhard

    2002-01-01

    Spacecraft investigations during the last ten years have vastly improved our knowledge about dust in the Jovian system. All Galilean satellites, and probably all smaller satellites as well, are sources of dust in the Jovian system. In-situ measurements with the dust detectors on board the Ulysses and Galileo spacecraft have for the first time demonstrated the electromagnetic interaction of charged dust grains with the interplanetary magnetic field and with a planetary magnetosphere. Jupiter's magnetosphere acts as a giant mass-velocity spectrometer for charged 10-nanometer dust grains. These dust grains are released from Jupiter's moon Io with typical rate of 1 kg s^1. The dust streams probe the plasma conditions in the Io plasma torus and can be used as a potential monitor of Io's volcanic plume activity. The other Galilean satellites are surrounded by tenuous impact-generated clouds of mostly sub-micrometer ejecta grains. Galileo measurements have demonstrated that impact-ejecta derived from hypervelocity i...

  1. ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION OF HOT JUPITERS: DAYSIDE–NIGHTSIDE TEMPERATURE DIFFERENCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komacek, Thaddeus D.; Showman, Adam P., E-mail: tkomacek@lpl.arizona.edu [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    The full-phase infrared light curves of low-eccentricity hot Jupiters show a trend of increasing dayside-to-nightside brightness temperature difference with increasing equilibrium temperature. Here, we present a three-dimensional model that explains this relationship, in order to provide insight into the processes that control heat redistribution in tidally locked planetary atmospheres. This three-dimensional model combines predictive analytic theory for the atmospheric circulation and dayside–nightside temperature differences over a range of equilibrium temperatures, atmospheric compositions, and potential frictional drag strengths with numerical solutions of the circulation that verify this analytic theory. The theory shows that the longitudinal propagation of waves mediates dayside–nightside temperature differences in hot Jupiter atmospheres, analogous to the wave adjustment mechanism that regulates the thermal structure in Earth’s tropics. These waves can be damped in hot Jupiter atmospheres by either radiative cooling or potential frictional drag. This frictional drag would likely be caused by Lorentz forces in a partially ionized atmosphere threaded by a background magnetic field, and would increase in strength with increasing temperature. Additionally, the amplitude of radiative heating and cooling increases with increasing temperature, and hence both radiative heating/cooling and frictional drag damp waves more efficiently with increasing equilibrium temperature. Radiative heating and cooling play the largest role in controlling dayside–nightside temperature differences in both our analytic theory and numerical simulations, with frictional drag only being important if it is stronger than the Coriolis force. As a result, dayside–nightside temperature differences in hot Jupiter atmospheres increase with increasing stellar irradiation and decrease with increasing pressure.

  2. RE-INFLATED WARM JUPITERS AROUND RED GIANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Eric D. [Institute for Astronomy, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    Since the discovery of the first transiting hot Jupiters, models have sought to explain the anomalously large radii of highly irradiated gas giants. We now know that the size of hot Jupiter radius anomalies scales strongly with a planet's level of irradiation and numerous models like tidal heating, ohmic dissipation, and thermal tides have since been developed to help explain these inflated radii. In general, however, these models can be grouped into two broad categories: models that directly inflate planetary radii by depositing a fraction of the incident irradiation into the interior and models that simply slow a planet's radiative cooling, allowing it to retain more heat from formation and thereby delay contraction. Here we present a new test to distinguish between these two classes of models. Gas giants orbiting at moderate orbital periods around post-main-sequence stars will experience enormous increases to their irradiation as their host stars move up the sub-giant and red-giant branches. If hot Jupiter inflation works by depositing irradiation into the planet's deep interiors then planetary radii should increase in response to the increased irradiation. This means that otherwise non-inflated gas giants at moderate orbital periods of >10 days can re-inflate as their host stars evolve. Here we explore the circumstances that can lead to the creation of these “re-inflated” gas giants and examine how the existence or absence of such planets can be used to place unique constraints on the physics of the hot Jupiter inflation mechanism. Finally, we explore the prospects for detecting this potentially important undiscovered population of planets.

  3. Ionosphere-Thermosphere Coupling in Jupiter's Low Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallard, T.; Melin, H.; Johnson, R.; O'Donoghue, J.; Moore, L.; Miller, S.; Tao, C.; Achilleos, N. A.; Smith, C.; Ray, L. C.; Yates, J. N.

    2015-12-01

    One of the leading problems in our understanding of Jupiter's atmosphere, known colloquially as the 'energy crisis', is that the upper atmosphere has global temperatures far in excess of that predicted by solar heating. Unlike the Earth, solar heating has only a small effect on the thermosphere, varying little in temperature with local time, and with equatorial neutrals co-rotating with the planet due to meridional advection. Within the auroral region, ionosphere-thermosphere coupling produces strong flows and results in huge Joule Heating from auroral currents. In this region, the temperature excess can be explained, but Jupiter's fast rotation means that Coriolis forces prevent energy in the poles from transferring equatorward, so there remains no explanation of why low latitudes are overheated by a factor of 3-5 over that predicted by solar heating alone.Despite this anomaly, although the past twenty years has seen a wealth of new data and results in Jupiter's auroral region, studies of the equatorial region have been somewhat limited. This lack of investigation comes partly from the apparent uniform nature of the equatorial region, and partly from the difficulty in observing this region. It is only in the past three years that observers begun to re-examine this region, revealing evidence of complex interactions between the thermosphere and ionosphere, including what appears to be thermospheric weather patterns at a fixed planetary longitudes, stable over two decades; perhaps caused by continuous flows from the auroral region. Here, we introduce our recent research, in order to compare and contrast what has been observed at Jupiter with the more well understood interactions between Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere. We hope that this will open a discussion between the communities that will improve our understanding of the underlying physical processes, as they occur at both planets.

  4. The long-term evolution of hydrocarbons in Jupiter's stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Henrik; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Giles, Rohini Sara; Sinclair, James; Orton, Glenn S.; Irwin, Patrick Gerard Joseph

    2016-10-01

    We present the global distribution of hydrocarbons in Jupiter's stratosphere using ground-based mid-infrared R~15,000 TEXES observations from the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), obtained between 2013 and 2016. Ethane and acetylene are the primary products of methane photolysis in Jupiter's stratosphere, and their spatial distribution can be used to trace atmospheric circulation and the lifetimes of chemical constituents. Zonal mean distributions of these species have been previously studied from the Voyager and Cassini spacecraft (Nixon et al., 2010, doi: 10.1016/j.pss.2010.05.008), but the TEXES dataset now provides the opportunity to track the evolution of the hydrocarbons from Earth (Fletcher et al., 2016, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2016.06.008 ). Global spectral maps of methane, ethane and acetylene emission are used to characterize the temporal evolution of large scale features in Jupiter's stratosphere (0.5-20 mbar?), including: equator to pole contrasts driven by large-scale stratospheric overturning; mid-latitude bands of elevated hydrocarbon emission; small-scale wave phenomena driven by meteorological activity in the underlying troposphere; and the tropical changes in emission related to Jupiter's Quasi-Quadrennial Oscillation. The NEMESIS spectral inversion tool (Irwin et al., 2008, doi: 10.1016/j.jqsrt.2007.11.006) is used to derive stratospheric temperatures and hydrocarbon abundances from spatially-resolved spectra at 744, 819, and 1247 cm-1. We use these to investigate the changes in the vertical temperature and ethane and acetylene distributions over time, with the aim of providing the global and temporal context for Juno's exploration of the jovian atmosphere in 2016/17.

  5. Modeling Jupiter's Quasi Quadrennial Oscillation (QQO) with Wave Drag Parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Rick; Morales-Juberias, Raul; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Orton, Glenn S.

    2016-10-01

    The QQO in Jupiter's atmosphere was first discovered after 7.8 micron infrared observations spanning the 1980's and 1990's detected a temperature oscillation near 10 hPa (Orton et al. 1991, Science 252, 537, Leovy et. al. 1991, Nature 354, 380, Friedson 1999, Icarus 137, 34). New observations using the Texas Echelon cross-dispersed Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES), mounted on the NASA Infrared Telescope facility (IRTF), have been used to characterize a complete cycle of the QQO between January 2012 and January 2016 (Greathouse et al. 2016, DPS) . These new observations not only show the thermal oscillation at 10 hPa, but they also show that the QQO extends upwards in Jupiter's atmosphere to pressures as high as 0.4 hPa. We incorporated three different wave-drag parameterizations into the EPIC General Circulation Model (Dowling et al. 1998, Icarus 132, 221) to simulate the observed Jovian QQO temperature signatures as a function of latitude, pressure and time using results from the TEXES datasets as new constraints. Each parameterization produces unique results and offers insight into the spectra of waves that likely exist in Jupiter's atmosphere to force the QQO. High-frequency gravity waves produced from convection are extremely difficult to directly observe but likely contribute a significant portion to the QQO momentum budget. We use different models to simulate the effects of waves such as these, to indirectly explore their spectrum in Jupiter's atmosphere by varying their properties. The model temperature outputs show strong correlations to equatorial and mid-latitude temperature fields retrieved from the TEXES datasets at different epochs. Our results suggest the QQO phenomenon could be more than one alternating zonal jet that descends over time in response to Jovian atmospheric forcing (e.g. gravity waves from convection).Research funding provided by the NRAO Grote Reber Pre-Doctoral Fellowship. Computing resources include the NMT PELICAN cluster and the CISL

  6. The abundance and distribution of water vapor in Jupiter's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Larson, Harold P.; Kunde, Virgil G.

    1986-01-01

    The atmospheric transmission window between 1800 and 2250/cm in Jupiter's atmosphere was observed from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory and by the IR spectrometer (IRIS) on Voyager. The vertical distribution of H2O was derived for the 1-6 bar portion of Jupiter's troposphere. The spatial variation of H2O was measured using IRIS spectra of the Hot Spots in the North and South Equatorial Belts (NEB, SEB) and the Equatorial Zone and for an average of the North and South Tropical Zones. The H2O column abundance above the 4 bar level is the same in the zones as in the SEB Hot Spots, about 20 cm amagats. The NEB Hot Spots are desiccated by a factor of 3 with respect to the rest of Jupiter. For an average between -40 and +40 deg latitude, the H2O mole fraction, qH2O, is saturated for P less than 2 bars, qH2O = 4 millionths in the 2-4 bar range, and it increases to 3/100,000 at 6 bars. A similar vertical profile applies to the spatially resolved zone and belt spectra, except that H2O falls off more rapidly at P less than 4 bars in the NEB Hot Spots. A massive H2O cloud at 5 bars, T = 273 K is inconsistent with the observations. Instead, a thin H2O ice cloud would form at 2 bars, T = 200 K. The O/H ratio in Jupiter, inferred from H2O measurements in both belts and zones at 6 bars, is depleted by a factor of 50 with respect to the sun.

  7. Electrodynamic tethers for exploration of Jupiter and its icy moons

    OpenAIRE

    Sanmartín Losada, Juan Ramón

    2006-01-01

    Use of electrodynamic bare tethers in exploring the Jovian system by tapping its rotational energy for power and propulsion is studied. The position of perijove and apojove in elliptical orbits, relative to the synchronous orbit at 2.24 times Jupiter’s radius, is exploited to conveniently make the induced Lorentz force to be drag or thrust, while generating power, and navigating the system. Capture and evolution to a low elliptical orbit near Jupiter, and capture into low circular orbits at m...

  8. Close Encounters of Lymphoid Cells and Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Adalia, Aranzazu; Veiga, Esteban

    2016-01-01

    During infections, the first reaction of the host against microbial pathogens is carried out by innate immune cells, which recognize conserved structures on pathogens, called pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Afterward, some of these innate cells can phagocytose and destroy the pathogens, secreting cytokines that would modulate the immune response to the challenge. This rapid response is normally followed by the adaptive immunity, more specific and essential for a complete pathogen clearance in many cases. Some innate immune cells, usually named antigen-presenting cells, such as macrophages or dendritic cells, are able to process internalized invaders and present their antigens to lymphocytes, triggering the adaptive immune response. Nevertheless, the traditional boundary of separated roles between innate and adaptive immunity has been blurred by several studies, showing that very specialized populations of lymphocytes (cells of the adaptive immunity) behave similarly to cells of the innate immunity. These “innate-like” lymphocytes include γδ T cells, invariant NKT cells, B-1 cells, mucosal-associated invariant T cells, marginal zone B cells, and innate response activator cells, and together with the newly described innate lymphoid cells are able to rapidly respond to bacterial infections. Strikingly, our recent data suggest that conventional CD4+ T cells, the paradigm of cells of the adaptive immunity, also present innate-like behavior, capturing bacteria in a process called transinfection. Transinfected CD4+ T cells digest internalized bacteria like professional phagocytes and secrete large amounts of proinflammatory cytokines, protecting for further bacterial challenges. In the present review, we will focus on the data showing such innate-like behavior of lymphocytes following bacteria encounter.

  9. Architectural and chemical insights into the origin of hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaufman, Kevin C.

    2015-10-01

    The origin of Jupiter-mass planets with orbital periods of only a few days is still uncertain. This problem has been with us for 20 years, long enough for significant progress to have been made, and also for a great deal of ``lore" to have accumulated about the properties of these planets. Among this lore is the widespread belief that hot Jupiters are less likely to be in multiple giant planet systems than longer-period giant planets. I will show that in this case the lore is not supported by the best data available today: hot Jupiters are not lonely. I will also show that stellar sodium abundance is inversely proportional to the probability that a star hosts a short-period giant planet. This observation is best explained by the effect of decreasing sodium abundance on protoplanetary disk structure and reveals that planetesimal-disk or planet-disk interactions are critical for the existence of short-period giant planets.

  10. The Atmospheric Dynamics of Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasar, F. M.

    2009-01-01

    Comparative studies of Jupiter and Saturn often emphasize their similarities, but recent observations have highlighted important differences. The stratospheres of both planets exhibit an equatorial oscillation reminiscent of that in Earth's middle atmosphere. Jupiter's oscillation has a 4-5 year period, not linked to its season, and it has been modeled as an analog to the terrestrial quasi-biennial oscillation, driven by the stresses associated with vertically propagating waves. Saturn's equatorial oscillation is nearly semiannual, but wave activity may still be a driver. Jupiter's internal rotation rate is inferred from its steady modulated radio emission. Saturn's internal rotation is more enigmatic. It has been inferred from the modulation of the body's kilometric radio emission, but this period has varied by 1% over the last 25 years. Saturn's equatorial winds are also puzzling, as those inferred from cloud tracking by Cassini and more recent HST observations are weaker than those from Voyager. Whether this is attributable to a difference in altitudes of the tracked clouds in winds with vertical shear or a real temporal change in the winds is not known. Both winter and summer poles of Saturn exhibit very compact circumpolar vortices with warm cores, indicating subsidence. Titan's middle atmosphere is characterized by global cyclostrophic winds, particularly the strong circumpolar vortex in the winter hemisphere. In many ways, the spatial distribution of temperature, gaseous constituents, and condensates is reminiscent of conditions in terrestrial winter vortices, albeit with different chemistry. The meridional contrast in Titan's tropospheric temperatures is small, only a few kelvins.

  11. The effect of Jupiter oscillations on Juno gravity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Durante, D; Iess, L

    2016-01-01

    Seismology represents a unique method to probe the interiors of giant planets. Recently, Saturn's f-modes have been indirectly observed in its rings, and there is strong evidence for the detection of Jupiter global modes by means of ground-based, spatially-resolved, velocimetry measurements. We propose to exploit Juno's extremely accurate radio science data by looking at the gravity perturbations that Jupiter's acoustic modes would produce. We evaluate the perturbation to Jupiter's gravitational field using the oscillation spectrum of a polytrope with index 1 and the corresponding radial eigenfunctions. We show that Juno will be most sensitive to the fundamental mode ($n=0$), unless its amplitude is smaller than 0.5 cm/s, i.e. 100 times weaker than the $n \\sim\\ 4 - 11$ modes detected by spatially-resolved velocimetry. The oscillations yield contributions to Juno's measured gravitational coefficients similar to or larger than those expected from shallow zonal winds (extending to depths less than 300 km). In th...

  12. The effect of Jupiter oscillations on Juno gravity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, Daniele; Guillot, Tristan; Iess, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    Seismology represents a unique method to probe the interiors of giant planets. Recently, Saturn's f-modes have been indirectly observed in its rings, and there is strong evidence for the detection of Jupiter global modes by means of ground-based, spatially-resolved, velocimetry measurements. We propose to exploit Juno's extremely accurate radio science data by looking at the gravity perturbations that Jupiter's acoustic modes would produce. We evaluate the perturbation to Jupiter's gravitational field using the oscillation spectrum of a polytrope with index 1 and the corresponding radial eigenfunctions. We show that Juno will be most sensitive to the fundamental mode (n = 0), unless its amplitude is smaller than 0.5 cm/s, i.e. 100 times weaker than the n ∼ 4 - 11 modes detected by spatially-resolved velocimetry. The oscillations yield contributions to Juno's measured gravitational coefficients similar to or larger than those expected from shallow zonal winds (extending to depths less than 300 km). In the case of a strong f-mode (radial velocity ∼ 30 cm/s), these contributions would become of the same order as those expected from deep zonal winds (extending to 3000 km), especially on the low degree zonal harmonics, therefore requiring a new approach to the analysis of Juno data.

  13. Phosphine absorption in the 5-micron window of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, R.; Taylor, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    Since the original suggestion by Gillett et al. (1969) it has generally been assumed that the region of partial transparency near 5 micron in Jupiter's atmosphere (the 5-micron window) is bounded by the nu sub 4 NH3 at 6.1 micron and the nu sub 3 CH4 band at 3.3 micron. New measurements of Jupiter and of laboratory phosphine (PH3) samples show that PH3 is a significant contributor to the continuum opacity in the window and in fact defines its short-wavelength limit. This has important implications for the use of 5-micron observations as a means to probe the deep atmospheric structure of Jupiter. The abundance of PH3 which results from a comparison of Jovian and laboratory spectra is about 3 to 5 cm-am. This is five to eight times less than that found by Larson et al. (1977) in the same spectral region, but is in good agreement with the result of Tokunaga et al. (1979) from 10-micron observations.

  14. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the atmospheres of Titan and Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, Carl; Khare, B. N.; Thompson, W. R.; Mcdonald, G. D.; Wing, Michael R.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Arakawa, E. T.

    1993-01-01

    PAHs are important components of the interstellar medium and carbonaceous chondrites, but have never been identified in the reducing atmospheres of the outer solar system. Incompletely characterized complex organic solids (tholins) produced by irradiating simulated Titan atmospheres reproduce well the observed UV/visible/IR optical constants of the Titan stratospheric haze. Titan tholin and a tholin generated in a crude simulation of the atmosphere of Jupiter are examined by two-step laser desorption/multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry. A range of two- to four-ring PAHs, some with one to four alkylation sites, are identified, with a net abundance of about 0.0001 g/g (grams per gram) of tholins produced. Synchronous fluorescence techniques confirm this detection. Titan tholins have proportionately more one- and two-ring PAHs than do Jupiter tholins, which in turn have more four-ring and larger PAHs. The four-ringed PAH chrysene, prominent in some discussions of interstellar grains, is found in Jupiter tholins.

  15. First Observation of Jupiter by XMM-Newton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Elsner, R. F.; Gladstone, G. R.; Ramsay, G.; Rodriquez, P.; Soria, R.; Waite, J. H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    We present the first X-ray observation of Jupiter by XMM-Newton. Images taken with the EPIC cameras show prominent emission, essentially all confined to the 0.2-2.0 keV band, from the planet s auroral spots; their spectra can be modelled with a combination of unresolved emission lines of highly ionised oxygen (OW and O W) , and a pseudo-continuum which may also be due to the superposition of many weak lines. A 2.8 enhancement in the RGS spectrum at 21-22 A (-0.57 keV) is consistent with an O W identification. Our spectral analysis supports the hypothesis that Jupiter s auroral emissions originate from the capture and acceleration of solar wind ions in the planet s magnetosphere, followed by X-ray production by charge exchange. The X-ray flux of the North spot is modulated at Jupiter s rotation period. We do not detect evidence for the -45 min X-ray oscillations observed by C W r u more than two years earlier. Emission from the equatorial regions of the planet s disk is also observed. Its spectrum is consistent with that of scattered solar X-rays.

  16. Radiative signals from impact of Shoemaker-Levy on Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Orton, Glenn S.; Takata, Toshiko; Okeefe, John D.

    1994-01-01

    The temperature and internal energy fields calculated by Takata et al. in the plume are used to calculate the greybody thermal radiation emitted versus wavelength to predict what might be observed by several spectral sensors operating from different platforms when fragments of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL-9) impact Jupiter in July 1994. A SPH code was used by Takata et al. to calculate the full three dimensional flow and thermodynamic fields in the comet fragment and the atmosphere of Jupiter. We determined the fragment penetration depth, energy partitioning between the atmosphere and the impactor, and energy density deposited per unit length over the trajectory. Once the impactor had disintegrated and stopped, and the strong atmospheric shock decayed, the flow is driven by buoyancy effects. We then used our SPH code to calculate the flow and thermodynamic fields: pressure, article velocity, temperature, and internal energy distributions in the plume. The calculations for 2 and 10 km cometary fragments yield maximum deposition depths of approximately 175 and 525 km, respectively (1 bar = 0 km depth). We also calculated that 0.7 and 0.6 of the initial kinetic energy of the 10 and 2 km bolides, respectively, are deposited as internal energy in Jupiter's atmosphere.

  17. The Collision of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 and Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Keith S.; Weaver, Harold A.; Feldman, Paul D.

    2006-11-01

    Participants; Preface; 1. The orbital motion and impact circumstances of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 Paul W. Chodas and Donald K. Yeomans; 2. Observational constraints on the composition and nature of Comet D/Shoemaker-Levy 9 Jacques Crovisier; 3. Tidal breakup of the nucleus of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 Zdenek Sekanina; 4. Earth-based observations of impact phenomena Philip D. Nicholson; 5. HST imaging of Jupiter shortly after each impact: plumes and fresh sites Heidi B. Hammel; 6. Galileo observations of the impacts Clark R. Chapman; 7. Models of fragment penetration and fireball evolution David A. Crawford; 8. Entry and fireball models vs. observations: what have we learned? Mordecai-Mark Mac Low; 9. Dynamics and chemistry of SL9 plumes Kevin Zahnle; 10. Chemistry induced by the impacts: observations Emmanuel Lellouch; 11. SL9 impact chemistry: long-term photochemical evolution Julianne I. Moses; 12. Particulate matter in Jupiter's atmosphere from the impacts of Comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9 Robert A. West; 13. Jupiter's post-impact atmospheric thermal response Barney J. Conrath; 14. Growth and dispersion of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 impact features from HST imaging Reta F. Beebe; 15. Waves from the Shoemaker-Levy 9 impacts Andrew P. Ingersoll and Hiroo Kanamori; 16. Jovian magnetospheric and auroral effects of the SL9 impacts Wing-Huen Ip.

  18. Imaging Jupiter's radiation belts down to 127 MHz with LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Girard, J N; Tasse, C; Hess, S; de Pater, I; Santos-Costa, D; Nenon, Q; Sicard, A; Bourdarie, S; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Bell, M E; van Bemmel, I; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Breton, R P; Broderick, J W; Brouw, W N; Brüggen, M; Ciardi, B; Corbel, S; Corstanje, A; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; Deller, A; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Falcke, H; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Hörandel, J; Iacobelli, M; Juette, E; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; van Leeuwen, J; Loose, M; Maat, P; Mann, G; Markov, S; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; Moldon, J; Munk, H; Nelles, A; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Rowlinson, A; Schwarz, D; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Thoudam, S; Toribio, M C; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; van Weeren, R J; Wijers, R A M J; Wucknitz, O

    2015-01-01

    Context. Observing Jupiter's synchrotron emission from the Earth remains today the sole method to scrutinize the distribution and dynamical behavior of the ultra energetic electrons magnetically trapped around the planet (because in-situ particle data are limited in the inner magnetosphere). Aims. We perform the first resolved and low-frequency imaging of the synchrotron emission with LOFAR at 127 MHz. The radiation comes from low energy electrons (~1-30 MeV) which map a broad region of Jupiter's inner magnetosphere. Methods (see article for complete abstract) Results. The first resolved images of Jupiter's radiation belts at 127-172 MHz are obtained along with total integrated flux densities. They are compared with previous observations at higher frequencies and show a larger extent of the synchrotron emission source (>=4 $R_J$). The asymmetry and the dynamic of east-west emission peaks are measured and the presence of a hot spot at lambda_III=230 {\\deg} $\\pm$ 25 {\\deg}. Spectral flux density measurements ar...

  19. Re-inflated Warm Jupiters Around Red Giants

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Eric D

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first transiting hot Jupiters, models have sought to explain the anomalously large radii of highly irradiated gas giants. We now know that the size of hot Jupiter radius anomalies scales strongly with a planet's level of irradiation and numerous models like tidal heating, ohmic dissipation, and thermal tides have since been developed to help explain these inflated radii. In general however, these models can be grouped into two broad categories: 1) models that directly inflate planetary radii by depositing a fraction of the incident irradiation into the interior and 2) models that simply slow a planet's radiative cooling allowing it to retain more heat from formation and thereby delay contraction. Here we present a new test to distinguish between these two classes of models. Gas giants orbiting at moderate orbital periods around post main sequence stars will experience enormous increases their irradiation as their host stars move up the sub-giant and red-giant branches. If hot Jupite...

  20. Behavior of Jupiter Non-Trojan Co-Orbitals

    CERN Document Server

    Wajer, Paweł

    2012-01-01

    Searching for the non-Trojan Jupiter co-orbitals we have numerically integrated orbits of 3\\,160 asteroids and 24 comets discovered by October 2010 and situated within and close to the planet co-orbital region. Using this sample we have been able to select eight asteroids and three comets and have analyzed their orbital behavior in a great detail. Among them we have identified five new Jupiter co-orbitals: \\cu, \\sa, \\ql, \\gh, and \\Larsen, as well as we have analyzed six previously identified co-orbitals: \\hr, \\ug, \\qq, \\aee, \\wc\\ and \\ar. \\cu\\ is currently on a quasi-satellite orbit with repeatable transitions into the tadpole state. Similar behavior shows \\gh\\ which additionally librates in a compound tadpole-quasi-satellite orbit. \\ql\\ and \\Larsen\\ are the co-orbitals of Jupiter which are temporarily moving in a horseshoe orbit occasionally interrupted by a quasi-satellite behavior. \\sa\\ is moving in a pure horseshoe orbit. Orbits of the latter three objects are unstable and according to our calculations, t...

  1. The Effect of Stellar Evolution on Migrating Warm Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Frewen, Shane

    2015-01-01

    Warm jupiters are an unexpected population of extrasolar planets that are too near to their host to have formed in situ, but distant enough to retain a significant eccentricity in the face of tidal damping. These planets are curiously absent around stars larger than two solar radii. We hypothesize that the warm jupiters are migrating due to Kozai-Lidov oscillations, which leads to transient episodes of high eccentricity and a consequent tidal decay. As their host evolves, such planets would be rapidly dragged in or engulfed at minimum periapse, leading to a rapid depletion of the population with increasing stellar radius, as is observed. Using numerical simulations, we determine the relationship between periapse distance and orbital migration rate for planets 0.1 to 10 Jupiter masses and with orbital periods between 10 and 100 days. We find that Kozai-Lidov oscillations effectively result in planetary removal early in the evolution of the host star, possibly accounting for the observed deficit. While the obse...

  2. The collapse of Io's primary atmosphere in Jupiter eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Constantine C. C.; Spencer, John R.; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Lopez-Valverde, Miguel A.; Richter, Matthew J.

    2016-08-01

    Volcanic outgassing due to tidal heating is the ultimate source of a tenuous SO2 atmosphere around Jupiter's moon Io. The question of whether SO2 frost on the surface plays a part, and to what degree, in maintaining Io's atmosphere with the constant volcanic outgassing is still debated. It is believed that for a sublimation-supported atmosphere, the primary atmosphere should collapse during eclipses by Jupiter, as the SO2 vapor pressure is strongly coupled to the temperature of the ice on the surface. No direct observations of Io's atmosphere in eclipse have previously been possible, due to the simultaneous need for high spectral and time sensitivity, as well as a high signal-to-noise ratio. Here we present the first ever high-resolution spectra at 19 µm of Io's SO2 atmosphere in Jupiter eclipse from the Gemini telescope. The strongest atmospheric band depth is seen to dramatically decay from 2.5 ± (0.08)% before the eclipse to 0.18 ± (0.16)% after 40 min in eclipse. Further modeling indicates that the atmosphere has collapsed shortly after eclipse ingress, implying that the atmosphere of Io has a strong sublimation-controlled component. The atmospheric column density—from pre-eclipse to in-eclipse—drops by a factor of 5 ± 2.

  3. Form and semantics of communication in dental encounters: oral health, probability and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiko, Olga V; Robinson, Peter G; Ward, Paul R; Gibson, Barry J

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is twofold. First, it introduces a new method for capturing the intricacy of communication in contemporary healthcare encounters. The method, termed 'form analysis', was developed from the systems theory of Niklas Luhmann. It is hoped that the paper will introduce form analysis as a new method to help understand complex communications in health systems. Second, the paper demonstrates an application of form analysis in communications in dental encounters. Data were collected through 36 observed encounters between five dentists and 20 patients in UK NHS primary and secondary care dental clinics. The study found a range of semantic forms relevant for these encounters, three of which are discussed at length in this article. The forms of communications illustrate how the dichotomy of dental professional and patient perspectives transforms into complex, non-linear observations about oral health. Dentistry, it seems, remains up to date not only through the emergence of new technologies, but also through reflexivity in observing and assessing oral health. These observations are exposed to the contingency of clinical decisions and the temporal aspects of the clinical system.

  4. Flirting in Online Dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kristine Køhler

    2017-01-01

    Various fields have examined the activity of flirting, predominantly based on experimental and reported data; the interactional workings are therefore often overlooked. Based on emails and chats from two Danish online dating sites, this article investigates how users negotiate romantic connections...... through the flirting strategy of ‘imagined togetherness’, linguistically constructing imagery of a shared future. Using the notion of the chronotope (Bakhtin 1981), turn-by-turn analysis demonstrates how users, embedded in the activity of getting to know each other, tenuously communicate romantic interest...... by alluding to future points at which they might be together. Central to the strategy is a sequential pattern of avoiding closure and thereby preserving the imagery’s implicitness. The article concludes by arguing that while imagined togetherness functions a way of probing interests and thus protecting...

  5. Laboratory for Radiokrypton Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Z.; Bailey, K.; Jiang, W.; Müller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.; Zappala, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Due to its simple production and transport processes in the terrestrial environment, the long-lived noble-gas isotope 81Kr (half-life = 230 kyr) is the ideal tracer for studying old water and ice in the age range of 10^5-10^6 years, a range beyond the reach of 14C. 81Kr dating, a concept pursued in the past four decades by numerous laboratories employing a variety of techniques, is now available for the first time to the earth science community at large. This is made possible by the development of ATTA-3 (Jiang et al., GCA 91, 1-6; 2012), an efficient and selective atom counter based on the Atom Trap Trace Analysis method (Chen et al., Science 286, 1139-1141; 1999). The instrument is capable of measuring both 81Kr/Kr and 85Kr/Kr ratios of environmental samples in the range of 10^-14-10^-10. For 81Kr-dating in the age range of 150 - 1,500 kyr, the required sample size is 5 - 10 micro-L STP of krypton gas, which can be extracted from approximately 100 - 200 kg of water or 40 - 80 kg of ice. For 85Kr/Kr analysis, the required sample size is generally smaller by an order of magnitude because of the isotope's higher initial abundance in the atmosphere. The Laboratory for Radiokrypton Dating is currently equipped to analyze up to 120 samples per year. With future equipment upgrades, this limit can be increased as demand grows. In the period since November 2011, the Laboratory has measured both 81Kr/Kr and 85Kr/Kr ratios in over 50 samples that had been extracted by collaborators from six different continents. The samples were from groundwater wells in the Great Artesian Basin (Australia), Guarani Aquifer (Brazil), and Locust Grove (Maryland); from brine wells of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (New Mexico); from geothermal steam vents in Yellowstone National Park; from near-surface ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica; and from deep mines in South Africa. Sample collection and purification was performed by groups including the University of Illinois at Chicago, University

  6. Understanding of particle acceleration and loss in Jupiter's magnetosphere from Juno mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Scott

    2016-07-01

    Juno is the first Jupiter polar mission. Juno science goals include the study of Jupiter's origin, interior structure, deep atmosphere, aurora and magnetosphere. The payload consists of a set of microwave antennas for deep sounding, magnetometers, gravity radio science, low and high energy charged particle detectors, electric and magnetic field radio and plasma wave experiment, ultraviolet imaging spectrograph, infrared imager and a visible camera. Juno's extensive suite of fields and particle experiments along with the UV and IR imagers will provide the first detailed investigation of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere. The set of six microwave radiometers on Juno provide an unprecedented view of Jupiter's synchrotron emission from inside Jupiter's powerful radiation belts. The Juno mission design, science goals, and measurements related to the magnetosphere and radiation belts of Jupiter will be presented.

  7. Mass transfer between debris discs during close stellar encounters

    CERN Document Server

    Jilkova, Lucie; Hammer, Michael; Zwart, Simon Portegies

    2016-01-01

    We study mass transfers between debris discs during stellar encounters. We carried out numerical simulations of close flybys of two stars, one of which has a disc of planetesimals represented by test particles. We explored the parameter space of the encounters, varying the mass ratio of the two stars, their pericentre and eccentricity of the encounter, and its geometry. We find that particles are transferred to the other star from a restricted radial range in the disc and the limiting radii of this transfer region depend on the parameters of the encounter. We derive an approximate analytic description of the inner radius of the region. The efficiency of the mass transfer generally decreases with increasing encounter pericentre and increasing mass of the star initially possessing the disc. Depending on the parameters of the encounter, the transfer particles have a specific distributions in the space of orbital elements (semimajor axis, eccentricity, inclination, and argument of pericentre) around their new hos...

  8. Extracting Data From Jupiter GPS Receiver%Jupiter GPS接收机数据的提取

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兆瑞; 戴陇咸; 林强

    2002-01-01

    在各种利用GPS OEM板进行二次开发应用的工作中,对GSP数据的提取是必不可少的过程.文章给出了基于SBS-PC-104 486嵌入式计算机提取Jupiter GPS接收机数据的过程和方法,并且给出了相应的程序流程图.

  9. Plans and Combined Operations of the Flight Elements of the Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erd, Christian; Clark, K.; Ejsm System Teams

    2010-05-01

    The Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) is a joint NASA-ESA mission candidate, where ESA would provide the Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO) and NASA would provide the Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO). Both spacecraft are foreseen to be launched in 2020, allowing for a joint exploration of the Jovian system, and the Galilean moons. The planning of the development, implementation and combined science phase will be described in the poster.

  10. Visuality – Textuality: An Uncanny Encounter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Bronfen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available

     

    Abstract (E: Given that visuality is as much a part of all narration as the fact that we view images by reading them as though they were texts, this essay proposes to speak about an uncanny encounter between the two. In order to illustrate this mutual implication, as well as to bring in the theme of the spectral (that Freud suggests all experiences of the uncanny entail, it offers a cross-mapping between three different media at three different historical moments: a novella by the late Victorian author Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a series of photographs by the late modern photographer Francesca Woodman, and a film by the postmodern film maker Amenábar.

    Abstract (F:

     

    Cet article part de deux observations : à savoir que la visualité fait partie du champ plus large du récit, et que nous regardons les images en les lisant comme si elles étaient des textes. À partir de là, on examine la rencontre du textuel et du visuel comme une forme de l’inquiétante étrangeté. Afin d’illustrer leur implication réciproque et d’introduire la notion de spectre (dont Freud pose qu’il est sous-entendu par toutes les expériences de l’inquiétante étrangeté, l’article procède à l’analyse comparative de trois médias à trois moments historiques différents : un récit par une auteure des dernières années de l’ère victorienne, Charlotte Perkins Gilman ; une suite de photographes par la photographe du modernisme tardif Francesca Woodman ; et un film par le r

  11. Due Regard Encounter Model Version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    Note that no existing model covers encoun- ters between two IFR aircraft in oceanic airspace. The reason for this is that one cannot observe encounters...encounters between instrument flight rules ( IFR ) and non- IFR traffic beyond 12NM. 2 TABLE 1 Encounter model categories. Aircraft of Interest Intruder...Aircraft Location Flight Rule IFR VFR Noncooperative Noncooperative Conventional Unconventional CONUS IFR C C U X VFR C U U X Offshore IFR C C U X VFR C U

  12. The solar wind interaction with comets: A post encounter view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendis, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    The recent spacecraft encounters with comets Giacobini-Zinner and Halley have led to an enormous increase in our knowledge of comets, including their dust, neutral gas, plasma, and magnetic field environments. The latter has in turn led to better understanding of the nature of the solar wind interaction with the well developed atmosphere of a comet. The post-encounter understanding of this interaction is reviewed, underscoring the differences with pre-encounter reasoning. The problems outstanding in this area are emphasized.

  13. Friends of Hot Jupiters I: A Radial Velocity Search for Massive, Long-Period Companions in Hot Jupiter Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Knutson, Heather A; Montet, Benjamin T; Kao, Melodie; Ngo, Henry; Howard, Andrew W; Crepp, Justin R; Hinkley, Sasha; Bakos, Gaspar A; Batygin, Konstantin; Johnson, John Asher; Morton, Timothy D; Muirhead, Philip S

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we search for distant massive companions to known transiting hot Jupiters that may have influenced the dynamical evolution of these systems. We present new radial velocity observations for a sample of 51 hot Jupiters obtained using the Keck HIRES instrument, and use these observations to search for long-term radial velocity accelerations. We find new, statistically significant accelerations in seven systems, including: HAT-P-10, HAT-P-20, HAT-P-22, HAT-P-29, HAT-P-32, WASP-10, and XO-2. We combine our radial velocity fits with Keck NIRC2 AO imaging data to place constraints on the allowed masses and orbital periods of the companions. The estimated masses of the companions range between 1-500 M_Jup, with orbital semi-major axes typically between 1-75 AU. A significant majority of the companions detected by our survey are constrained to have minimum masses comparable to or larger than those of the short-period hot Jupiters in these systems, making them candidates for influencing the orbital evolut...

  14. Encountering whales: How encounter rates became the basis for managing whaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim D Smith

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Declining rates of encountering whales, including both sighting and catching, were noted by whalers throughout the 19th century, and these declines became the first indication that whaling was adversely affecting whale abundance. The interpretation of declines in both sighting and catch rates proved to be a difficult scientific task. Satisfactory quantitative methods of interpreting changes in whale encounter rates were not developed until the second half of the 20th century. Rates of encountering whales played a key role in the International Whaling Commission (IWC Scientific Committee from its beginning in the early 1950s, as well as in the US in implementing its Marine Mammal Protection Act beginning in the early 1970s. The development of methods of collecting and interpreting sighting and catch data was intimately interwoven with the development of themanagement of whaling and cetacean by-catches in fisheries throughout the world, but especially within the context of the Scientific Committees of the IWC and the North Atlantic Marine Mammal Commission (NAMMCO. Although overfishing of whales was initially identified through the use of sighting rate data, catch rate data provided the IWC’s Committee its first firm footing for management advice. However, it was sighting rate data that ultimately became the basis for the scientific advice on whaling and for management advice in other settings. This led to the development of large scale cetacean sighting programmes, such as the IWC’s International Decade of Cetacean Researchsurveys in Antarctic aboard Japanese ships, the North Atlantic Sighting Surveys (NASS aboard Norwegian, Icelandic, Spanish, Greenlandic and Faroese vessels and aircraft (coordinated by NAMMCO through its Scientific Committee from 1995, and surveys under the US’s Marine Mammal Protection Act and the European Union’s Small Cetacean Abundance in the North Sea (SCANS programme. Fishery independent cetacean sighting surveys

  15. Bow Shock Leads the Way for a Speeding Hot Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    As hot Jupiters whip around their host stars, their speeds can exceed the speed of sound in the surrounding material, theoretically causing a shock to form ahead of them. Now, a study has reported the detection of such a shock ahead of transiting exoplanet HD 189733b, providing a potential indicator of the remarkably strong magnetic field of the planet.Rushing PlanetsDue to their proximity to their hosts, hot Jupiters move very quickly through the stellar wind and corona surrounding the star. When this motion is supersonic, the material ahead of the planet can be compressed by a bow shock and for a transiting hot Jupiter, this shock will cross the face of the host star in advance of the planets transit.In a recent study, a team of researchers by Wilson Cauley of Wesleyan University report evidence of just such a pre-transit. The teams target is exoplanet HD 189733b, one of the closest hot Jupiters to our solar system. When the authors examined high-resolution transmission spectra of this system, they found that prior to the optical transit of the planet, there was a large dip in the transmission of the first three hydrogen Balmer lines. This could well be the absorption of an optically-thick bow shock as it moves past the face of the star.Tremendous MagnetismOperating under this assumption, the authors create a model of the absorption expected from a hot Jupiter transiting with a bow shock ahead of it. Using this model, they show that a shock leading the planet at a distance of 12.75 times the planets radius reproduces the key features of the transmission spectrum.This stand-off distance is surprisingly large. Assuming that the location of the bow shock is set by the point where the planets magnetospheric pressure balances the pressure of the stellar wind or corona that it passes through, the planetary magnetic field would have to be at least 28 Gauss. This is seven times the strength of Jupiters magnetic field!Understanding the magnetic fields of exoplanets is

  16. Violence in Adolescent Dating Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouriles, Ernest N.; Platt, Cora; McDonald, Renee

    2009-01-01

    Beginning with a definition of dating and dating violence among adolescents, this article explores the factors which impact such violence. It concludes with a review of two school-based prevention/intervention programs (Safe Dates and The Youth Relationships Project). (Contains 1 table.)

  17. Thermoluminescence dating of flint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladas, H.

    Our ancestors have been making flint tools for over a million years. The tools or the flakes left by the flint-knappers have become important markers of prehistoric habitats. The imperishable and ubiquitous nature of flint explains why generations of prehistorians have used it to build a stone age chronology. To be dateable by TL flint must be heated to at least 450°C. While human use of fire may be as old as half a million years, the first true hearths appear late during the Lower Paleolithic period. At Terra-Amata, one of the oldest hearths discovered in France was dated to 230 ± 40 ka BP by Wintle and Aitken (1977). By the dawn of the Middle Paleolithic fire must have become fully domesticated, judging by the accumulations of charred debris that henceforth litter human habitats. For example, at the Middle Paleolithic site of Kebara the profusion of hearths is vividly illustrated by numerous superposed white ash and black charcoal layers extending to a depth of 4 m (Meignen et al., 1989).

  18. Multi-scale harmonic model for solar and climate cyclical variation throughout the Holocene based on Jupiter-Saturn tidal frequencies plus the 11-year solar dynamo cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    The sunspot record since 1749 is made of three major cycles (9.98, 10.9 and 11.86 yr). The side frequencies are related to the spring tidal period of Jupiter and Saturn (9.93 yr) and to the tidal sidereal period of Jupiter (11.86 yr). A simplified harmonic constituent model based on the above two planetary tidal frequencies and on the exact dates of Jupiter and Saturn planetary tidal phases, plus a theoretically deduced 10.87-year central cycle reveals complex quasi-periodic interference/beat patterns at about 115, 61 and 130 years, plus a quasi-millennial large beat cycle around 983 years. We show that equivalent synchronized cycles are found in cosmogenic records used to reconstruct solar activity and in proxy climate records throughout the Holocene. The quasi-secular beat oscillations hindcast reasonably well the known prolonged periods of low solar activity during the last millennium known as Oort, Wolf, Sporer, Maunder and Dalton minima, as well as 17 115-year long oscillations found in temperature recon...

  19. Tourism Encounters and Controversies: Ontological Politics of Tourism Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jóhannesson, G.T.; Ren, C.; Duim, van der V.R.

    2015-01-01

    The multiplicity of tourism encounters provide some of the best available occasions to observe the social world and its making(s). Focusing on ontological politics of tourism development, this book examines how different versions of tourism are enacted, how encounters between different versions of t

  20. Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM): Exploration Of The Jovian System And Its Icy Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasset, Olivier; Pappalardo, R.; Greeley, R.; Blanc, M.; Dougherty, M.; Bunce, E.; Lebreton, J.; Prockter, L.; Senske, D.; EJSM Joint Science Definition Team

    2009-09-01

    The Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) would be an international mission with the overall theme of investigating the emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants. Its goals are to (1) Determine whether the Jupiter system harbors habitable worlds and (2) Characterize the processes that are operating within the Jupiter system. NASA and ESA have concluded a detailed joint study of a mission to Europa, Ganymede, and the Jupiter system with orbiters developed by NASA and ESA (future contributions by JAXA and Russia are also possible). The baseline EJSM architecture consists of two primary elements operating in the Jovian system: the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). JEO and JGO would execute an intricately choreographed exploration of the Jupiter System before settling into orbit around Europa and Ganymede, respectively. EJSM would directly address themes concerning the origin and evolution of satellite systems and water-rich environments in icy satellites. The potential habitability of the ocean-bearing moons Europa and Ganymede would be investigated, by characterizing the geophysical, compositional, geological, and external processes that affect these icy worlds. EJSM would also investigate Io and Callisto, Jupiter's atmosphere, and the Jovian magnetosphere. By understanding the Jupiter system and unraveling its history, the formation and evolution of gas giant planets and their satellites would be better known. Most important, EJSM would shed new light on the potential for the emergence of life in the celestial neighborhood and beyond. The EJSM architecture provides opportunities for coordinated synergistic observations by JEO and JGO of the Jupiter and Ganymede magnetospheres, the volcanoes and torus of Io, the atmosphere of Jupiter, and comparative planetology of icy satellites. Each spacecraft would conduct both synergistic dual-spacecraft investigations and "stand-alone” measurements.

  1. Formation of diverse ring-satellite systems around Centaurs through tidal disruption at close encounters with giant planet

    CERN Document Server

    Hyodo, Ryuki; Genda, Hidenori; Ohtsuki, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Centaurs are minor planets orbiting between Jupiter and Neptune that have or had crossing orbits with one or more giant planets. Recent observations and reinterpretation of previous observations have revealed the existence of ring systems around 10199 Chariklo and 2060 Chiron. However, the origin of the ring systems around such a minor planet is still an open question. Here, we propose that the tidal disruption of a differentiated object that experiences a close encounter with a giant planet could naturally form diverse ring-satellite systems around the Centaurs. During the close encounter, the icy mantle of the passing object is preferentially ripped off by the planet's tidal force and the debris is distributed mostly within the Roche limit of the largest remnant body. Assuming the existence of $20-50$wt% silicate core below the icy mantle, a disk of particles is formed when the objects pass within $0.4-0.8$ of the planet's Roche limit with the relative velocity at infinity $3-6$km s$^{-1}$ and 8h initial sp...

  2. GASP cloud encounter statistics - Implications for laminar flow control flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasperson, W. H.; Nastrom, G. D.; Davis, R. E.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The cloud observation archive from the NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) is analyzed in order to derive the probability of cloud encounter at altitudes normally flown by commercial airliners, for application to a determination of the feasability of Laminar Flow Control (LFC) on long-range routes. The probability of cloud encounter is found to vary significantly with season. Several meteorological circulation features are apparent in the latitudinal distribution of cloud cover. The cloud encounter data are shown to be consistent with the classical midlatitude cyclone model with more clouds encountered in highs than in lows. Aircraft measurements of route-averaged time-in-clouds fit a gamma probability distribution model which is applied to estimate the probability of extended cloud encounter, and the associated loss of LFC effectiveness along seven high-density routes. The probability is demonstrated to be low.

  3. The space of togetherness--a caring encounter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holopainen, Gunilla; Kasén, Anne; Nyström, Lisbet

    2014-03-01

    Encounters in relation to the nurse-patient relationship are often discussed within nursing and caring literature without a reflection on the actual meaning of the concept. Assuming that an encounter is essential for nursing care, this article seeks to create a deeper understanding of the concept through a hermeneutic approach to texts by the philosophers Buber and Marcel. Presence, recognition, availability and mutuality seem to be essential prerequisites for an encounter. As these prerequisites are fulfilled within and between human beings who encounter each other, it is possible to speak of a space of togetherness, a mutual existence, where life's mystery shines forth and caring is realized. The challenge lies in creating these encounters within nursing care. © 2012 The Authors Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  4. Jupiter's Role in Sculpting the Early Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoz, Smadar

    2015-03-01

    Recent observations made by the Kepler space mission, combined with statistical analysis of existing ground and space-based data, have shown that planets somewhat bigger than the Earth - but substantially smaller than Jupiter - ;are extremely common in our Galaxy (1-4). These systems are typically found to be tightly packed, nearly coplanar, and have nearly circular orbits. Furthermore, these planets tend to have very short-period orbits, ranging from days to months. In contrast, our innermost planet, Mercury, orbits the Sun once every 88 d. Thus, taken at face value, these observations imply that the architecture of our Solar System is unique compared with the galactic population. In other words, why are there no short-period planets in our Solar System? In PNAS, Batygin and Laughlin (5) demonstrate that Jupiter is to blame. In particular, Jupiter's inward-followed-by-outward migration during the Solar System's early evolution could have driven a collisional cascade that would grind planetesimals to smaller size. Gas drag, which dominates these small planetesimals, may then have driven preexisting short-period planets into the Sun. Thus, Batygin and Laughlin (5) suggest that the terrestrial planets in our Solar System are in fact "second-generation planets," which formed after the first short-period planets were destroyed, in mass-dispersed, gas-depleted conditions (see Fig. 1 for the description of the scenario). The developed model suggests that systems with short-period Earth and super-Earth planets are anticorrelated with the existence of giant planets within the same system.

  5. New Measurements Of Jupiter's Equatorial Region In Visible Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Jose; Arregi, J.; García-Melendo, E.; Barrado-Izagirre, N.; Hueso, R.; Gómez-Forrellad, J. M.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Sanz-Requena, J. F.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2010-10-01

    We have studied the equatorial region of Jupiter, between 15ºS and 15ºN, on Cassini ISS images obtained during the Jupiter flyby at the end of 2000 and on HST images acquired in May and July 2008. We have found significant longitudinal variations in the intensity of the 6ºN eastward jet, up to 60 m s-1 in Cassini and HST observations. In the HST case we found that these longitudinal variations are associated to different cloud morphology. Photometric and radiative transfer analysis of the cloud features used as tracers in HST images shows that there is only a small height difference, no larger than 0.5 - 1 scale heights at most, between the slow ( 100 m s-1) and fast ( 150 m s-1) moving features. This suggests that speed variability at 6ºN is not dominated by vertical wind shears and we propose that Rossby wave activity is the responsible for the zonal variability. After removing this variability we found that Jupiter's equatorial jet is actually symmetric relative to the equator with two peaks of 140 - 150 m s-1 located at latitudes 6ºN and 6ºS and at a similar pressure level. We also studied a large, long-lived feature called the White Spot (WS) located at 6ºS that turns to form and desapear. The internal flow field in the White Spot indicates that it is a weakly rotating quasi-equatorial anticyclone relative to the ambient meridionally sheared flow. Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the Spanish MICIIN AYA2009-10701 with FEDER and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07.

  6. DOPPLER SIGNATURES OF THE ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION ON HOT JUPITERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showman, Adam P.; Lewis, Nikole K. [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, 1629 University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Shabram, Megan, E-mail: showman@lpl.arizona.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The meteorology of hot Jupiters has been characterized primarily with thermal measurements, but recent observations suggest the possibility of directly detecting the winds by observing the Doppler shift of spectral lines seen during transit. Motivated by these observations, we show how Doppler measurements can place powerful constraints on the meteorology. We show that the atmospheric circulation-and Doppler signature-of hot Jupiters splits into two regimes. Under weak stellar insolation, the day-night thermal forcing generates fast zonal jet streams from the interaction of atmospheric waves with the mean flow. In this regime, air along the terminator (as seen during transit) flows toward Earth in some regions and away from Earth in others, leading to a Doppler signature exhibiting superposed blueshifted and redshifted components. Under intense stellar insolation, however, the strong thermal forcing damps these planetary-scale waves, inhibiting their ability to generate jets. Strong frictional drag likewise damps these waves and inhibits jet formation. As a result, this second regime exhibits a circulation dominated by high-altitude, day-to-night airflow, leading to a predominantly blueshifted Doppler signature during transit. We present state-of-the-art circulation models including non-gray radiative transfer to quantify this regime shift and the resulting Doppler signatures; these models suggest that cool planets like GJ 436b lie in the first regime, HD 189733b is transitional, while planets hotter than HD 209458b lie in the second regime. Moreover, we show how the amplitude of the Doppler shifts constrains the strength of frictional drag in the upper atmospheres of hot Jupiters. If due to winds, the {approx}2 km s{sup -1} blueshift inferred on HD 209458b may require drag time constants as short as 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} s, possibly the result of Lorentz-force braking on this planet's hot dayside.

  7. A transition in the cloud composition of hot Jupiters atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, Vivien; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Showman, Adam P.; Morley, Caroline; Marley, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Over a large range of equilibrium temperatures clouds seem to dominate the transmission spectrum of Hot Jupiters atmospheres and no trend allowing the classification of these objects have yet emerged. Recently observations of the light reflected by Hot Jupiters atmospheres shed a new light on the cloud distribution on the dayside of these planets : for a handful of planets clouds are more abundant on the western than on the eastern side of the dayside hemisphere and, more importantly, this asymmetry depends on the equilibrium temperature of the planet.Here we use a grid of 3D global circulation models to show that a single cloud species is unable to explain the recent Kepler observations. The cloud asymmetry on the dayside is a strong function of the condensation temperature of the cloud species which allow us to determine the composition of the clouds present in these planets. We show that a transition between silicate clouds and sulfide clouds appear at equilibrium temperatures of 1600K. A mechanism such as the presence of a deep cold trap is necessary to explain this transi- tion. Furthermore, we show that the western limb temperature is always cold, independently of the equilibrium temperature of the planet, allowing cloud particles to form even in the most irradiated planets as seen in the observations.Our results provide the first evidence for a transition in the cloud species of hot Jupiters similar to the L/T Brown Dwarf transition. We further show that inhomogeneous dayside and limbs cloud coverage are expected what should affect the retrieved molecular abundances from emission and transmission spectra of these planets.

  8. Studies on Ammonia Spectral Signatures Relevant to Jupiter's Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, A. U.; Marschall, J.; Wong, M. H.; Kalogerakis, K. S.

    2006-12-01

    Observational evidence and thermochemical models indicate an abundance of ammonia ice clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. However, spectrally identifiable ammonia ice clouds are found covering less than 1% of Jupiter's atmosphere, notably in turbulent areas [1,2]. Current literature suggests two possible explanations: coating by a hydrocarbon haze and/or photochemical processing ("tanning")[2,3]. We are pursuing a research program investigating the above hypotheses. In the experiments, thin films of ammonia ices are deposited in a cryogenic apparatus, coated with hydrocarbons, and characterized by infrared spectroscopy. The ice films can be irradiated by ultraviolet light to study their photochemistry. The spectroscopic measurements aim to identify the processes that control the optical properties of the ice mixtures and quantify their dependence on the identity of the coating, the temperature, and the ice composition. We have observed a consistent suppression of the ammonia absorption feature at 3 μm with coverage by thin layers of hydrocarbons. Modeling calculations of the multi-layer thin films assist in the interpretation of the experimental results and reveal the role of optical interference in masking the aforementioned ammonia spectral feature. The implications of these results for Jupiter's atmosphere will be discussed. Funding from the NSF Planetary Astronomy Program under grant AST-0206270 and from the NASA Outer Planets Research Program under grant NNG06GF37G is gratefully acknowledged. The participation of Anand Oza (Princeton University) was made possible by the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program under grant PHY-0353745. 1. S. K. Atreya, A.-S. Wong, K. H. Baines, M. H. Wong, T. C. Owen, Planet. Space Science 53, 498 (2005). 2. K. H. Baines, R. W. Carlson, and L. W. Kamp, Icarus 159, 74 (2002). 3. A.-S. Wong, Y. L. Yung, and A. J. Friedson, Geophys. Res. Lett. 30, 1447 (2003).

  9. Structure and Evolution of Internally Heated Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komacek, Thaddeus D.; Youdin, Andrew N.

    2015-11-01

    The transit radii of many close-in extrasolar giant planets, or "hot Jupiters," are systematically larger than those expected from models considering only cooling from an initial high-entropy state. Though these planets receive strong irradiation, with equilibrium temperatures of 1000-2500 Kelvin, the absorption of stellar incident flux in the upper atmosphere alone cannot explain these anomalous radii. More promising mechanisms involve irradiation-driven meteorological activity, which penetrates much deeper into the planet than direct stellar heating. This circulation can lead to large-scale mixing and downward transport of kinetic energy, both processes whereby a fraction of the stellar incident power is transported downwards to the interior of the planet. Here we consider how deposition of heat at different pressure levels or structural locations within a planet affects the resulting evolution. To do so, we run global gas giant evolutionary models with with the stellar structure code MESA including additional energy dissipation. We find that relatively shallow atmospheric heating alone can explain the transit radii of the hot Jupiter sample, but heating in the convective zone is an order of magnitude more efficient regardless of exact location. Additionally, a small difference in atmospheric heating location can have a significant effect on radius evolution, especially near the radiative-convective boundary. The most efficient location to heat the planet is at the radiative-convective boundary or deeper. We expect that shear instabilities at this interface may naturally explain energy dissipation at the radiative-convective boundary, which typically lies at a pressure of ~1 kilobar after 5 Gyr for a planet with the mass and incident stellar flux of HD 209458b. Hence, atmospheric processes are most efficient at explaining the bloated radii of hot Jupiters if they can transport incident stellar power downwards to the top of the inner convective zone.

  10. Models of Warm Jupiter Atmospheres: Observable Signatures of Obliquity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Emily

    2017-09-01

    We present three-dimensional atmospheric circulation models of a hypothetical “warm Jupiter” planet, for a range of possible obliquities from 0° to 90°. We model a Jupiter-mass planet on a 10 day orbit around a Sun-like star, since this hypothetical planet sits at the boundary between planets for which we expect that tidal forces should have aligned their rotation axes with their orbital axes (i.e., ones with zero obliquity) and planets whose timescale for tidal alignment is longer than the typical age of an exoplanet system. In line with observational progress, which is pushing atmospheric characterization for planets on longer orbital periods, we calculate the observable signatures of obliquity for a transiting warm Jupiter: in orbital phase curves of thermal emission and in the hemispheric flux gradients that could be measured by eclipse mapping. For both of these predicted measurements, the signal that we would see depends strongly on our viewing geometry relative to the orientation of the planet’s rotation axis, and we thoroughly identify the degeneracies that result. We compare these signals to the predicted sensitivities of current and future instruments and determine that the James Webb Space Telescope should be able to constrain the obliquities of nearby warm Jupiters to be small (if ≤slant 10^\\circ ) or to directly measure them if significantly non-zero (≥slant 30^\\circ ) using the technique of eclipse mapping. For a bright target and assuming photon-limited precision, this could be done with a single secondary eclipse observation.

  11. Determinants of frequency and longevity of hospital encounters' data use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyatt Jeremy C

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of clinically relevant information enables improvement in user interfaces and in data management. However, it is difficult to identify what information is important in daily clinical care, and what is used occasionally. This study aims to determine for how long clinical documents are used in a Hospital Information System (HIS. Methods The access logs of 3 years of usage of a HIS were analysed concerning report departmental source, type of hospital encounter, and inpatient encounter ICD-9-CM main diagnosis. Reports median life indicates the median time elapsed between information creation and its usage. The models that better explains report views over time were explored. Results The number of report views in the study period was 656 583. Fifty two percent of the reports viewed by medical doctors in emergency encounters were from previous encounters - 21% at outpatient attendance, 19% in inpatient (wards and 12% during emergency encounters. In an inpatient setting, 20% of the reports viewed were produced in previous encounters. The median life of information in documents is 1.5 days for emergency, 4.8 days for inpatient and 37.8 days for outpatient encounters. Immune-haemotherapy reports reach their median lives faster (7 days than clinical pathology (15 days, gastroenterology (80 days and pathology (118 days. The median life of reports produced in inpatient encounters varied from 36 days for neoplasms as the main diagnosis to 0.7 days for injury and poisoning. The model with the best fit (R2 > 0.9 was the exponential. Conclusions The usage of past patient information varied significantly according to patient age, type of information, type of hospital encounter and medical cause (main diagnosis for the encounter. The exponential model is a good fit to model how the reports are seen over time, so the design of user interfaces and repository management algorithms should take it in consideration.

  12. Lyapunov Orbits in the Jupiter System Using Electrodynamic Tethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokelmann, Kevin; Russell, Ryan P.; Lantoine, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Various researchers have proposed the use of electrodynamic tethers for power generation and capture from interplanetary transfers. The effect of tether forces on periodic orbits in Jupiter-satellite systems are investigated. A perturbation force is added to the restricted three-body problem model and a series of simplifications allows development of a conservative system that retains the Jacobi integral. Expressions are developed to find modified locations of equilibrium positions. Modified families of Lyapunov orbits are generated as functions of tether size and Jacobi integral. Zero velocity curves and stability analyses are used to evaluate the dynamical properties of tether-modified orbits.

  13. JESTR: Jupiter Exploration Science in the Time Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Keith S.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Wong, M. H.; Choi, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    Solar system objects are inherently time-varying with changes that occur on timescales ranging from seconds to years. For all planets other than the Earth, temporal coverage of atmospheric phenomena is limited and sparse. Many important atmospheric phenomena, especially those related to atmospheric dynamics, can be studied in only very limited ways with current data. JESTR is a mission concept that would remedy this gap in our exploration of the solar system by ncar-continuous imaging and spectral monitoring of Jupiter over a multi-year mission lifetime.

  14. A Post-Stardust Mission View of Jupiter Family Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, M.

    2011-01-01

    Before the Stardust Mission, many persons (including the mission team) believed that comet nuclei would be geologically boring objects. Most believed that comet nucleus mineralogy would be close or identical to the chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), or perhaps contain mainly amorphous nebular condensates or that comets might even be composed mainly of preserved presolar material [1]. Amazingly, the results for Comet Wild 2 (a Jupiter class comet) were entirely different. Whether this particular comet will ultimately be shown to be typical or atypical will not be known for a rather long time, so we describe our new view of comets from the rather limited perspective of this single mission.

  15. JUPITER-3実験解析(4)

    OpenAIRE

    三田 敏男

    1990-01-01

    本報告書は、技術開発部プラント工学室で組識しているJUPITERサブワーキングGrの平成元年度の成果をまとめたものである。JUPITERサブワーキングGrは、動燃事業団が米国エネルギー省(DOE)との共同研究としてアルゴンヌ国立研究所(ANL-W)の大型臨界実験装置ZPPRで実施した大型高速炉臨界実験(JUPITER-III)の計画、実験解析を行うためのワーキンググループである。JUPITER-IIIは電気出力65万kW級の軸方向非均質炉心模擬実験(ZPPR-17シリーズ)と100万kW級の均質炉心模擬実験(ZPPR-18シリーズ)からなる。JUPITER-III実験解析は本年度で終了し、その成果を過去のJUPITER-I,II(電気出力60万sim80万kW級の均質、径方向非均質炉心模擬実験)の解析結果と比較してJUPITER実験解析を総合評価した。本年度の主な成果は下記の通りである。(1) JUPITER実験解析法をセル計算を中心に検討して現状の最新解析法をまとめると共に、これらに基づく炉心設計法を設定した。...

  16. Rocky core solubility in Jupiter and giant exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Hugh F

    2011-01-01

    Gas giants are believed to form by the accretion of hydrogen-helium gas around an initial protocore of rock and ice. The question of whether the rocky parts of the core dissolve into the fluid H-He layers following formation has significant implications for planetary structure and evolution. Here we use ab initio calculations to study rock solubility in fluid hydrogen, choosing MgO as a representative example of planetary rocky materials, and find MgO to be highly soluble in H for temperatures in excess of approximately 10000 K, implying significant redistribution of rocky core material in Jupiter and larger exoplanets.

  17. JUICE: A European Mission to Jupiter and its Icy Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasset, Olivier; Witasse, Olivier; Barabash, Stas; Brandt, Pontus; Bruzzone, Lorenzo; Bunce, Emma; Cecconi, Baptiste; Cavalié, Thibault; Cimo, Giuseppe; Coustenis, Athena; Cremonese, Gabriele; Dougherty, Michele; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Gladstone, Randy; Gurvits, Leonid; Hartogh, Paul; Hoffmann, Holger; Hussmann, Hauke; Iess, Luciano; Jaumann, Ralf; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Kaspi, Yohai; Krupp, Norbert; Langevin, Yves; Mueller-Wodarg, Ingo; Palumbo, Pasquale; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Plaut, Jeffrey; Poulet, Francois; Roatsch, Thomas; Retherford, Kurt D.; Rothkaehl, Hanna; Stevenson, David J.; Tosi, Federico; Van Hoolst, Tim; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Wurz, Peter; Altobelli, Nicolas; Accomazzo, A.; Boutonnet, Arnaud; Erd, Christian; Vallat, Claire

    2016-10-01

    JUICE - JUpiter ICy moons Explorer - is the first large mission in the ESA Cosmic Vision programme [1]. The implementation phase started in July 2015. JUICE will arrive at Jupiter in October 2029, and will spend 3 years characterizing the Jovian system, the planet itself, its giant magnetosphere, and the giant icy moons: Ganymede, Callisto and Europa. JUICE will then orbit Ganymede.The first goal of JUICE is to explore the habitable zone around Jupiter [2]. Ganymede is a high-priority target because it provides a unique laboratory for analyzing the nature, evolution and habitability of icy worlds, including the characteristics of subsurface oceans, and because it possesses unique magnetic fields and plasma interactions with the environment. On Europa, the focus will be on recently active zones, where the composition, surface and subsurface features (including putative water reservoirs) will be characterized. Callisto will be explored as a witness of the early Solar System.JUICE will also explore the Jupiter system as an archetype of gas giants. The circulation, meteorology, chemistry and structure of the Jovian atmosphere will be studied from the cloud tops to the thermosphere and ionosphere. JUICE will investigate the 3D properties of the magnetodisc, and study the coupling processes within the magnetosphere, ionosphere and thermosphere. The mission also focuses on characterizing the processes that influence surface and space environments of the moons.The payload consists of 10 instruments plus a ground-based experiment (PRIDE) to better constrain the S/C position. A remote sensing package includes imaging (JANUS) and spectral-imaging capabilities from UV to sub-mm wavelengths (UVS, MAJIS, SWI). A geophysical package consists of a laser altimeter (GALA) and a radar sounder (RIME) for exploring the moons, and a radio science experiment (3GM) to probe the atmospheres and to determine the gravity fields. The in situ package comprises a suite to study plasma and

  18. Tachyonic Cherenkov emission from Jupiter's radio electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomaschitz, Roman, E-mail: tom@geminga.org

    2013-12-17

    Tachyonic Cherenkov radiation from inertial relativistic electrons in the Jovian radiation belts is studied. The tachyonic modes are coupled to a frequency-dependent permeability tensor and admit a negative mass-square, rendering them superluminal and dispersive. The superluminal radiation field can be cast into Maxwellian form, using 3D field strengths and inductions, and the spectral densities of tachyonic Cherenkov radiation are derived. The negative mass-square gives rise to a longitudinal flux component. A spectral fit to Jupiter's radio spectrum, inferred from ground-based observations and the Cassini 2001 fly-by, is performed with tachyonic Cherenkov flux densities averaged over a thermal electron population.

  19. Phosphine on Jupiter and implications for the Great Red Spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinn, R. G.; Lewis, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    A study of the chemistry and photochemistry of the recently discovered phosphine in the atmosphere of Jupiter suggests that the red colorations on this planet result from photochemical production of red phosphorus particles. Chemical-dynamical models of this red phosphorus haze imply that the intensity of the red coloration is a strong function of the strength of vertical turbulent mixing in the atmosphere. If the Jovian Great Red Spot is a region of considerable dynamical activity our model provides a self-consistent explanation for the redness of this region in comparison to the rest of the planet.

  20. Rocky core solubility in Jupiter and giant exoplanets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Hugh F; Militzer, Burkhard

    2012-03-16

    Gas giants are believed to form by the accretion of hydrogen-helium gas around an initial protocore of rock and ice. The question of whether the rocky parts of the core dissolve into the fluid H-He layers following formation has significant implications for planetary structure and evolution. Here we use ab initio calculations to study rock solubility in fluid hydrogen, choosing MgO as a representative example of planetary rocky materials, and find MgO to be highly soluble in H for temperatures in excess of approximately 10,000 K, implying the potential for significant redistribution of rocky core material in Jupiter and larger exoplanets.