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Sample records for jupiter atmospheric models

  1. Radiative and dynamical modeling of Jupiter's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerlet, Sandrine; Spiga, Aymeric

    2016-04-01

    Jupiter's atmosphere harbours a rich meteorology, with alternate westward and eastward zonal jets, waves signatures and long-living storms. Recent ground-based and spacecraft measurements have also revealed a rich stratospheric dynamics, with the observation of thermal signatures of planetary waves, puzzling meridional distribution of hydrocarbons at odds with predictions of photochemical models, and a periodic equatorial oscillation analogous to the Earth's quasi-biennal oscillation and Saturn's equatorial oscillation. These recent observations, along with the many unanswered questions (What drives and maintain the equatorial oscillations? How important is the seasonal forcing compared to the influence of internal heat? What is the large-scale stratospheric circulation of these giant planets?) motivated us to develop a complete 3D General Circulation Model (GCM) of Saturn and Jupiter. We aim at exploring the large-scale circulation, seasonal variability, and wave activity from the troposphere to the stratosphere of these giant planets. We will briefly present how we adapted our existing Saturn GCM to Jupiter. One of the main change is the addition of a stratospheric haze layer made of fractal aggregates in the auroral regions (poleward of 45S and 30N). This haze layer has a significant radiative impact by modifying the temperature up to +/- 15K in the middle stratosphere. We will then describe the results of radiative-convective simulations and how they compare to recent Cassini and ground-based temperature measurements. These simulations reproduce surprisingly well some of the observed thermal vertical and meridional gradients, but several important mismatches at low and high latitudes suggest that dynamics also plays an important role in shaping the temperature field. Finally, we will present full GCM simulations and discuss the main resulting features (waves and instabilities). We will also and discuss the impact of the choice of spatial resolution and

  2. Atmospheric Circulation on Hot Jupiters: Modeling and Observable Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Emily Christine

    2010-12-01

    Hot Jupiters are unlike any planets in our Solar System and yet one of the most common types of extrasolar planet discovered. These gas giants orbit their parent stars with periods of a few days. Expected to be tidally locked into synchronous rotation, hot Jupiters experience intense, asymmetric heating from stellar irradiation, such that day-night temperature contrasts could reach hundreds of degrees Kelvin. This unique state of radiative forcing, as well as the slow rotation rates of these planets, places hot Jupiters within a new regime of atmospheric circulation. Hot Jupiters have also been the first type of extrasolar planet with direct detections of their atmospheres, through measurements of emitted, reflected, and transmitted light. This thesis investigates observational methods to distinguish between various atmospheric models, observational signatures of potential atmospheric variability, and presents a three dimensional model with which to study hot Jupiter circulation patterns. First, we find that eclipse mapping is a technique that can be used to image the day sides of these planets and although this is beyond the ability of current instruments, it will be achievable with future missions, such as the James Webb Space Telescope. Second, we consider the signatures of large-scale atmospheric variability in measurements of secondary eclipses and thermal orbital phase curves. For various models we predict the amount of variation in eclipse depth, and the amplitudes and detailed shapes of phase curves. Lastly, we develop a three-dimensional model of hot Jupiter atmospheric dynamics with simplified forcing and adopt a set-up nearly identical to work by another group to facilitate code inter-comparison. Our results are broadly consistent with theirs, with a transonic flow and the hottest region of the atmosphere advected eastward of the substellar point. However, we note important differences and identify areas of concern for future modeling efforts.

  3. Models of Warm Jupiter Atmospheres: Observable Signatures of Obliquity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Emily

    2017-09-01

    We present three-dimensional atmospheric circulation models of a hypothetical “warm Jupiter” planet, for a range of possible obliquities from 0° to 90°. We model a Jupiter-mass planet on a 10 day orbit around a Sun-like star, since this hypothetical planet sits at the boundary between planets for which we expect that tidal forces should have aligned their rotation axes with their orbital axes (i.e., ones with zero obliquity) and planets whose timescale for tidal alignment is longer than the typical age of an exoplanet system. In line with observational progress, which is pushing atmospheric characterization for planets on longer orbital periods, we calculate the observable signatures of obliquity for a transiting warm Jupiter: in orbital phase curves of thermal emission and in the hemispheric flux gradients that could be measured by eclipse mapping. For both of these predicted measurements, the signal that we would see depends strongly on our viewing geometry relative to the orientation of the planet’s rotation axis, and we thoroughly identify the degeneracies that result. We compare these signals to the predicted sensitivities of current and future instruments and determine that the James Webb Space Telescope should be able to constrain the obliquities of nearby warm Jupiters to be small (if ≤slant 10^\\circ ) or to directly measure them if significantly non-zero (≥slant 30^\\circ ) using the technique of eclipse mapping. For a bright target and assuming photon-limited precision, this could be done with a single secondary eclipse observation.

  4. Working model of the atmosphere and near planetary space of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, V. I. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Basic physical characteristics of Jupiter, its gravitational field, atmosphere, electromagnetic radiation, magnetosphere, meteorite situation and satellites are presented in tables, graphs and figures. Means of observation of the atmosphere and three models of the atmosphere are presented and analyzed.

  5. Transmission Spectra of Three-Dimensional Hot Jupiter Model Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Fortney, J J; Showman, A P; Lian, Y; Freedman, R S; Marley, M S; Lewis, N K

    2009-01-01

    We compute models of the transmission spectra of planets HD 209458b, HD 189733b, and generic hot Jupiters. We examine the effects of temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity for the generic planets as a guide to understanding transmission spectra in general. We find that carbon dioxide absorption at 4.4 and 15 microns is prominent at high metallicity, and is a clear metallicity indicator. For HD 209458b and HD 189733b, we compute spectra for both one-dimensional and three-dimensional model atmospheres and examine the differences between them. The differences are usually small, but can be large if atmospheric temperatures are near important chemical abundance boundaries. The calculations for the 3D atmospheres, and their comparison with data, serve as constraints on these dynamical models that complement the secondary eclipse and light curve data sets. For HD 209458b, even if TiO and VO gases are abundant on the day side, their abundances can be considerably reduced on the cooler planetary limb. However, ...

  6. Radiation-Hydrodynamics of Hot Jupiter Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Menou, Kristen

    2009-01-01

    Radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres is usually treated in the static limit, i.e., neglecting atmospheric motions. We argue that hot Jupiter atmospheres, with possibly fast (sonic) wind speeds, may require a more strongly coupled treatment, formally in the regime of radiation-hydrodynamics. To lowest order in v/c, relativistic Doppler shifts distort line profiles along optical paths with finite wind velocity gradients. This leads to flow-dependent deviations in the effective emission and absorption properties of the atmospheric medium. Evaluating the overall impact of these distortions on the radiative structure of a dynamic atmosphere is non-trivial. We present transmissivity and systematic equivalent width excess calculations which suggest possibly important consequences for radiation transport in hot Jupiter atmospheres. If winds are fast and bulk Doppler shifts are indeed important for the global radiative balance, accurate modeling and reliable data interpretation for hot Jupiter atmospheres may p...

  7. Types of Hot Jupiter Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisikalo, Dmitry V.; Kaygorodov, Pavel V.; Ionov, Dmitry E.; Shematovich, Valery I.

    Hot Jupiters, i.e. exoplanet gas giants, having masses comparable to the mass of Jupiter and semimajor axes shorter than 0.1 AU, are a unique class of objects. Since they are so close to the host stars, their atmospheres form and evolve under the action of very active gas dynamical processes caused by the gravitational field and irradiation of the host star. As a matter of fact, the atmospheres of several of these planets fill their Roche lobes , which results in a powerful outflow of material from the planet towards the host star. The energy budget of this process is so important that it almost solely governs the evolution of hot Jupiters gaseous envelopes. Based on the years of experience in the simulations of gas dynamics in mass-exchanging close binary stars, we have investigated specific features of hot Jupiters atmospheres. The analytical estimates and results of 3D numerical simulations, discussed in this Chapter, show that the gaseous envelopes around hot Jupiters may be significantly non-spherical and, at the same time, stationary and long-lived. These results are of fundamental importance for the interpretation of observational data.

  8. Atmospheric Escape from Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Murray-Clay, Ruth; Murray, Norman

    2008-01-01

    Photoionization heating from UV radiation incident on the atmospheres of hot Jupiters may drive planetary mass loss. We construct a model of escape that includes realistic heating and cooling, ionization balance, tidal gravity, and pressure confinement by the host star wind. We show that mass loss takes the form of a hydrodynamic ("Parker") wind, emitted from the planet's dayside during lulls in the stellar wind. When dayside winds are suppressed by the confining action of the stellar wind, nightside winds might pick up if there is sufficient horizontal transport of heat. A hot Jupiter loses mass at maximum rates of ~2 x 10^12 g/s during its host star's pre-main-sequence phase and ~2 x10^10 g/s during the star's main sequence lifetime, for total maximum losses of ~0.06% and ~0.6% of the planet's mass, respectively. For UV fluxes F_UV < 10^4 erg/cm^2/s, the mass loss rate is approximately energy-limited and is proportional to F_UV^0.9. For larger UV fluxes, such as those typical of T Tauri stars, radiative ...

  9. Treatment of overlapping gaseous absorption with the correlated-k method in hot Jupiter and brown dwarf atmosphere models

    OpenAIRE

    Amundsen, David. S.; Tremblin, Pascal; Manners, James; Baraffe, Isabelle; Mayne, Nathan J.

    2016-01-01

    The correlated-k method is frequently used to speed up radiation calculations in both one-dimensional and three-dimensional atmosphere models. An inherent difficulty with this method is how to treat overlapping absorption, i.e. absorption by more than one gas in a given spectral region. We have evaluated the applicability of three different methods in hot Jupiter and brown dwarf atmosphere models, all of which have been previously applied within models in the literature: (i) Random overlap, b...

  10. A pseudo 2D chemical model of hot Jupiter atmospheres: application to HD 209458b and HD 189733b

    CERN Document Server

    Agundez, Marcelino; Venot, Olivia; Hersant, Franck; Selsis, Franck

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a pseudo two-dimensional model of a planetary atmosphere, which takes into account thermochemical kinetics, photochemistry, vertical mixing, and horizontal transport, the latter being modeled as a uniform zonal wind. We have applied the model to the atmospheres of the hot Jupiters HD 209458b and HD 189733b. The adopted eddy diffusion coefficients are calculated by following the behaviour of passive tracers in three-dimensional general circulation models, which results in eddy values significantly below previous estimates. We find that the distribution of molecules with altitude and longitude in the atmospheres of these two hot Jupiters is complex because of the interplay of the various physical and chemical processes at work. Much of the distribution of molecules is driven by the strong zonal wind and the limited extent of vertical transport, resulting in an important homogenisation of the chemical composition with longitude. In general, molecular abundances are quenched horizontally to valu...

  11. Temporal Variations in Jupiter's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Chanover, N. J.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Hammel, H. B.; dePater, I.; Noll, K.; Wong, M.; Clarke, J.; Sanchez-Levega, A.; Orton, G. S.; Gonzaga, S.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, Jupiter has undergone many atmospheric changes from storms turning red to global. cloud upheavals, and most recently, a cornet or asteroid impact. Yet, on top of these seemingly random changes events there are also periodic phenomena, analogous to observed Earth and Saturn atmospheric oscillations. We will present 15 years of Hubble data, from 1994 to 2009, to show how the equatorial tropospheric cloud deck and winds have varied over that time, focusing on the F953N, F41 ON and F255W filters. These filters give leverage on wind speeds plus cloud opacity, cloud height and tropospheric haze thickness, and stratospheric haze, respectively. The wind data consistently show a periodic oscillation near 7-8 S latitude. We will discuss the potential for variations with longitude and cloud height, within the calibration limits of those filters. Finally, we will discuss the role that large atmospheric events, such as the impacts in 1994 and 2009, and the global upheaval of 2007, have on temporal studies, This work was supported by a grant from the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program. HST observational support was provided by NASA through grants from Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under contract NAS5-26555.

  12. The Atmospheric Circulation of the Hot Jupiter WASP-43b: Comparing Three-Dimensional Models to Spectrophotometric Data

    CERN Document Server

    Kataria, Tiffany; Fortney, Jonathan J; Stevenson, Kevin B; Line, Michael R; Kreidberg, Laura; Bean, Jacob L; Désert, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    The hot Jupiter WASP-43b has now joined the ranks of transiting hot Jupiters HD 189733b and HD 209458b as an exoplanet with a large array of observational constraints on its atmospheric properties. Because WASP-43b receives a similar stellar flux as HD 209458b but has a rotation rate 4 times faster and a much higher gravity, studying WASP-43b serves as a test of the effect of rotation rate and gravity on the circulation when stellar irradiation is held approximately constant. Here we present 3D atmospheric circulation models of WASP-43b using the SPARC/MITgcm, a coupled radiation and circulation model, exploring the effects of composition, metallicity, and frictional drag. We find that the circulation regime of WASP-43b is not unlike other hot Jupiters, with equatorial superrotation that yields an eastward-shifted hotspot and large day-night temperature variations (~600 K at photospheric pressures). We then compare our model results to observations from Stevenson et al. which utilize HST/WFC3 to collect spect...

  13. THE ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION OF THE HOT JUPITER WASP-43b: COMPARING THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODELS TO SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataria, Tiffany; Showman, Adam P. [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J.; Line, Michael R. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Stevenson, Kevin B.; Kreidberg, Laura; Bean, Jacob L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Désert, Jean-Michel, E-mail: tkataria@astro.ex.ac.uk [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2015-03-10

    The hot Jupiter WASP-43b (2 M{sub J}, 1 R{sub J}, T {sub orb} = 19.5 hr) has now joined the ranks of transiting hot Jupiters HD 189733b and HD 209458b as an exoplanet with a large array of observational constraints. Because WASP-43b receives a similar stellar flux as HD 209458b but has a rotation rate four times faster and a higher gravity, studying WASP-43b probes the effect of rotation rate and gravity on the circulation when stellar irradiation is held approximately constant. Here we present three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric circulation models of WASP-43b, exploring the effects of composition, metallicity, and frictional drag. We find that the circulation regime of WASP-43b is not unlike other hot Jupiters, with equatorial superrotation that yields an eastward-shifted hotspot and large day-night temperature variations (∼600 K at photospheric pressures). We then compare our model results to Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/WFC3 spectrophotometric phase curve measurements of WASP-43b from 1.12 to 1.65 μm. Our results show the 5× solar model light curve provides a good match to the data, with a peak flux phase offset and planet/star flux ratio that is similar to observations; however, the model nightside appears to be brighter. Nevertheless, our 5× solar model provides an excellent match to the WFC3 dayside emission spectrum. This is a major success, as the result is a natural outcome of the 3D dynamics with no model tuning. These results demonstrate that 3D circulation models can help interpret exoplanet atmospheric observations, even at high resolution, and highlight the potential for future observations with HST, James Webb Space Telescope, and other next-generation telescopes.

  14. Jupiter's radiation belts and atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pater, I.; Dames, H. A. C.

    1979-01-01

    Maps and stripscans of the radio emission from Jupiter were made during the Pioneer 10 flyby in December 1973 at wavelengths of 6 cm, 21 cm, and 50 cm using the Westerbork telescope in the Netherlands. With this instrument the disk of the planet was resolved at 6 and 21 cm. The pictures are averaged over 15 deg of Jovian longitude. At 21 cm the stripscans clearly show the existence of a 'hot region' in the radiation belts at a System III longitude (1965.0) of 255 + or - 10 deg. Its flux is about 9% of the total nonthermal flux, and it has a volume emissivity enhanced by a factor of about 1.6 with respect to the general radiation belts. The temperature of the thermal disk at 21 cm appears to be 290 + or - 20 K. This is likely due to a high ammonia mixing ratio in the atmosphere, a factor of 4-5 larger than the expected solar value of 0.00015.

  15. A Preliminary Jupiter Model

    CERN Document Server

    Hubbard, W B

    2016-01-01

    In anticipation of new observational results for Jupiter's axial moment of inertia and gravitational zonal harmonic coefficients from the forthcoming Juno orbiter, we present a number of preliminary Jupiter interior models. We combine results from ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures, including immiscibility calculations, with a new nonperturbative calculation of Jupiter's zonal harmonic coefficients, to derive a self-consistent model for the planet's external gravity and moment of inertia. We assume helium rain modified the interior temperature and composition profiles. Our calculation predicts zonal harmonic values to which measurements can be compared. Although some models fit the observed (pre-Juno) second- and fourth-order zonal harmonics to within their error bars, our preferred reference model predicts a fourth-order zonal harmonic whose absolute value lies above the pre-Juno error bars. This model has a dense core of about 12 Earth masses, and a hydrogen-helium-rich envelope with...

  16. A Preliminary Jupiter Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Militzer, B.

    2016-03-01

    In anticipation of new observational results for Jupiter's axial moment of inertia and gravitational zonal harmonic coefficients from the forthcoming Juno orbiter, we present a number of preliminary Jupiter interior models. We combine results from ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures, including immiscibility calculations, with a new nonperturbative calculation of Jupiter's zonal harmonic coefficients, to derive a self-consistent model for the planet's external gravity and moment of inertia. We assume helium rain modified the interior temperature and composition profiles. Our calculation predicts zonal harmonic values to which measurements can be compared. Although some models fit the observed (pre-Juno) second- and fourth-order zonal harmonics to within their error bars, our preferred reference model predicts a fourth-order zonal harmonic whose absolute value lies above the pre-Juno error bars. This model has a dense core of about 12 Earth masses and a hydrogen-helium-rich envelope with approximately three times solar metallicity.

  17. Ohmic Dissipation in the Atmospheres of Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Perna, Rosalba; Rauscher, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Hot Jupiter atmospheres exhibit fast, weakly-ionized winds. The interaction of these winds with the planetary magnetic field generates drag on the winds and leads to ohmic dissipation of the induced electric currents. We study the magnitude of ohmic dissipation in representative, three-dimensional atmospheric circulation models of the hot Jupiter HD 209458b. We find that ohmic dissipation can reach or exceed 1% of the stellar insolation power in the deepest atmospheric layers, in models with and without dragged winds. Such power, dissipated in the deep atmosphere, appears sufficient to slow down planetary contraction and explain the typically inflated radii of hot Jupiters. This atmospheric scenario does not require a top insulating layer or radial currents that penetrate deep in the planetary interior. Circulation in the deepest atmospheric layers may actually be driven by spatially non-uniform ohmic dissipation. A consistent treatment of magnetic drag and ohmic dissipation is required to further elucidate t...

  18. Atmospheric Circulation of Hot Jupiters: Dayside-Nightside Temperature Differences

    CERN Document Server

    Komacek, Thaddeus D

    2016-01-01

    The full-phase infrared light curves of low-eccentricity hot Jupiters show a trend of increasing dayside-to-nightside brightness temperature difference with increasing equilibrium temperature. Here we present a three-dimensional model that explains this relationship, in order to shed insight on the processes that control heat redistribution in tidally-locked planetary atmospheres. This three-dimensional model combines predictive analytic theory for the atmospheric circulation and dayside-nightside temperature differences over a range of equilibrium temperature, atmospheric composition, and potential frictional drag strengths with numerical solutions of the circulation that verify this analytic theory. This analytic theory shows that the longitudinal propagation of waves mediates dayside-nightside temperature differences in hot Jupiter atmospheres, analogous to the wave adjustment mechanism that regulates the thermal structure in Earth's tropics. These waves can be damped in hot Jupiter atmospheres by either r...

  19. A fireball in Jupiter's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, A. F.; Duxbury, T. C.

    1981-01-01

    One fireball was photographed during two encounters with Jupiter. Its total luminosity was 120,000 0 mag s (at standard range 100 km). If the luminous efficiency proposed by Cook et al. (1981) for slip flow of a meteoroid in its own vapors is employed, an estimated mass of 11 kg is obtained. A rough absolute magnitude is -12.5. If it is noted that the search was conducted for a total of 223 s during two exposures, a number density near Jupiter of 10 to the -28th/cu cm is estimated for masses of meteoroids of 3 kg and greater. This value is about a factor of six smaller than a rough upper limit reached from an extrapolation from terrestrial observations of meteors and comets.

  20. Temperature Swings in a Hot Jupiter's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Weather variations in the atmosphere of a planet on a highly eccentric orbit are naturally expected to be extreme. Now, a study has directly measured the wild changes in the atmosphere of a highly eccentric hot Jupiter as it passes close to its host star.Diagram of the HD 80606 system. The inset images labeled AH show the temperature distribution of the planet at different stages as it swings around its star. [de Wit et al. 2016]Eccentric OpportunityFor a hot Jupiter a gas giant that orbits close to its host star the exoplanet HD 80606 b exhibits a fairly unusual path. Rather than having a circularized orbit, HD 80606 b travels on an extremely elliptic 111-day orbit, with an eccentricity of e ~ 0.93. Since the amount of flux HD 80606 b receives from its host varies by a factor of ~850 over the course of its orbit, it stands to reason that this planet must have extreme weather swings!Now a team of scientists led by Julien de Wit (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) has reanalyzed old observations of HD 80606 and obtained new ones using the Spitzer Space Telescope. The longer observing time and new data analysis techniques allowed the team to gain new insights into how the exoplanets atmosphere responds to changes in the stellar flux it receives during its orbit.Extreme VariationsBy measuring the infrared light coming from HD 80606, de Wit and collaborators modeled the planets temperature during 80 hours of its closest approach to its host star. This period of time included the ~20 hours in which most of the planets temperature change is expected to occur, as it approaches to a distance a mere 6 stellar radii from its host.The authors find that the layer of the atmosphere probed by Spitzer heats rapidly from 500K to 1400K (thats ~440F to a scalding 2000+F!) as the planet approaches periastron.The atmosphere then cools similarly quickly as the planet heads away from the star once more.Relative infrared brightness of HD 80606 b at 4.5 and 8 m. The dip marks where

  1. A PRELIMINARY JUPITER MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, W. B. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Militzer, B. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    In anticipation of new observational results for Jupiter's axial moment of inertia and gravitational zonal harmonic coefficients from the forthcoming Juno orbiter, we present a number of preliminary Jupiter interior models. We combine results from ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen–helium mixtures, including immiscibility calculations, with a new nonperturbative calculation of Jupiter's zonal harmonic coefficients, to derive a self-consistent model for the planet's external gravity and moment of inertia. We assume helium rain modified the interior temperature and composition profiles. Our calculation predicts zonal harmonic values to which measurements can be compared. Although some models fit the observed (pre-Juno) second- and fourth-order zonal harmonics to within their error bars, our preferred reference model predicts a fourth-order zonal harmonic whose absolute value lies above the pre-Juno error bars. This model has a dense core of about 12 Earth masses and a hydrogen–helium-rich envelope with approximately three times solar metallicity.

  2. Treatment of overlapping gaseous absorption with the correlated-k method in hot Jupiter and brown dwarf atmosphere models

    CERN Document Server

    Amundsen, David S; Manners, James; Baraffe, Isabelle; Mayne, Nathan J

    2016-01-01

    The correlated-k method is frequently used to speed up radiation calculations in both one-dimensional and three-dimensional atmosphere models. An inherent difficulty with this method is how to treat overlapping absorption, i.e. absorption by more than one gas in a given spectral region. We have evaluated the applicability of three different methods in hot Jupiter and brown dwarf atmosphere models, all of which have been previously applied within models in the literature: (i) Random overlap, both with and without resorting and rebinning, (ii) equivalent extinction and (iii) pre-mixing of opacities, where (i) and (ii) combine k-coefficients for different gases to obtain k-coefficients for a mixture of gases, while (iii) calculates k-coefficients for a given mixture from the corresponding mixed line-by-line opacities. We find that the random overlap method is the most accurate and flexible of these treatments, and is fast enough to be used in one-dimensional models with resorting and rebinning. In three-dimensio...

  3. Mechanisms affecting the composition of Hot Jupiters atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Showman Adam P.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Opacities and thus local chemical composition play a key role when characterizing exoplanet atmospheres from observations. When the gas is in chemical equilibrium the chemical abundances depend strongly on the temperature profile. Grey models tend to overestimate the temperatures in the upper atmosphere. We present a new analytical model with a more realistic description of the radiative cooling in the infrared. Mechanisms like quenching and cold traps can drive the upper atmosphere far from its chemical equilibrium. The efficiency of these mechanisms depends on the strength of the vertical mixing. Using 3D global circulation models of HD209458b including passive tracers, we show that, although Hot Jupiter atmospheres are stably stratified, they are strongly mixed by planetary scale circulation patterns. We provide a rough estimate of the effective vertical mixing coefficient in Hot Jupiter atmosphere which can be used in 1D models.

  4. Treatment of overlapping gaseous absorption with the correlated-k method in hot Jupiter and brown dwarf atmosphere models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, David S.; Tremblin, Pascal; Manners, James; Baraffe, Isabelle; Mayne, Nathan J.

    2017-02-01

    The correlated-k method is frequently used to speed up radiation calculations in both one-dimensional and three-dimensional atmosphere models. An inherent difficulty with this method is how to treat overlapping absorption, i.e. absorption by more than one gas in a given spectral region. We have evaluated the applicability of three different methods in hot Jupiter and brown dwarf atmosphere models, all of which have been previously applied within models in the literature: (i) random overlap, both with and without resorting and rebinning, (ii) equivalent extinction and (iii) pre-mixing of opacities, where (i) and (ii) combine k-coefficients for different gases to obtain k-coefficients for a mixture of gases, while (iii) calculates k-coefficients for a given mixture from the corresponding mixed line-by-line opacities. We find that the random overlap method is the most accurate and flexible of these treatments, and is fast enough to be used in one-dimensional models with resorting and rebinning. In three-dimensional models such as global circulation models (GCMs) it is too slow, however, and equivalent extinction can provide a speed-up of at least a factor of three with only a minor loss of accuracy while at the same time retaining the flexibility gained by combining k-coefficients computed for each gas individually. Pre-mixed opacities are significantly less flexible, and we also find that particular care must be taken when using this method in order to to adequately resolve steep variations in composition at important chemical equilibrium boundaries. We use the random overlap method with resorting and rebinning in our one-dimensional atmosphere model and equivalent extinction in our GCM, which allows us to e.g. consistently treat the feedback of non-equilibrium chemistry on the total opacity and therefore the calculated P-T profiles in our models.

  5. The Escaping Upper Atmospheres of Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Eric; Jones, Gabrielle; Uribe, Ana; Carson, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Hot Jupiters are massive gaseous planets which orbit closely to their parent star. The strong stellar irradiation at these small orbital separations causes the temperature of the upper atmosphere of the planet to rise. This can cause the planet's atmosphere to escape into space, creating an exoplanet outflow. We ascertained which factors determine the presence and structure of these outflows by creating one dimensional simulations of the density, pressure, velocity, optical depth, and neutral fraction of hot Jupiter atmospheres. This was done for planets of masses and radii ranging from 0.5-1.5 Mj and 0.5-1.5 Rj. We found the outflow rate to be highest for a planet of 0.5 Mj and 1.5 Rj at 5.3×10-14 Mj/Yr. We also found that the higher the escape velocity, the lower the chance of the planet having an outflow.

  6. The collapse of Io's primary atmosphere in Jupiter eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Constantine C. C.; Spencer, John R.; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Lopez-Valverde, Miguel A.; Richter, Matthew J.

    2016-08-01

    Volcanic outgassing due to tidal heating is the ultimate source of a tenuous SO2 atmosphere around Jupiter's moon Io. The question of whether SO2 frost on the surface plays a part, and to what degree, in maintaining Io's atmosphere with the constant volcanic outgassing is still debated. It is believed that for a sublimation-supported atmosphere, the primary atmosphere should collapse during eclipses by Jupiter, as the SO2 vapor pressure is strongly coupled to the temperature of the ice on the surface. No direct observations of Io's atmosphere in eclipse have previously been possible, due to the simultaneous need for high spectral and time sensitivity, as well as a high signal-to-noise ratio. Here we present the first ever high-resolution spectra at 19 µm of Io's SO2 atmosphere in Jupiter eclipse from the Gemini telescope. The strongest atmospheric band depth is seen to dramatically decay from 2.5 ± (0.08)% before the eclipse to 0.18 ± (0.16)% after 40 min in eclipse. Further modeling indicates that the atmosphere has collapsed shortly after eclipse ingress, implying that the atmosphere of Io has a strong sublimation-controlled component. The atmospheric column density—from pre-eclipse to in-eclipse—drops by a factor of 5 ± 2.

  7. ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION OF HOT JUPITERS: DAYSIDE–NIGHTSIDE TEMPERATURE DIFFERENCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komacek, Thaddeus D.; Showman, Adam P., E-mail: tkomacek@lpl.arizona.edu [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    The full-phase infrared light curves of low-eccentricity hot Jupiters show a trend of increasing dayside-to-nightside brightness temperature difference with increasing equilibrium temperature. Here, we present a three-dimensional model that explains this relationship, in order to provide insight into the processes that control heat redistribution in tidally locked planetary atmospheres. This three-dimensional model combines predictive analytic theory for the atmospheric circulation and dayside–nightside temperature differences over a range of equilibrium temperatures, atmospheric compositions, and potential frictional drag strengths with numerical solutions of the circulation that verify this analytic theory. The theory shows that the longitudinal propagation of waves mediates dayside–nightside temperature differences in hot Jupiter atmospheres, analogous to the wave adjustment mechanism that regulates the thermal structure in Earth’s tropics. These waves can be damped in hot Jupiter atmospheres by either radiative cooling or potential frictional drag. This frictional drag would likely be caused by Lorentz forces in a partially ionized atmosphere threaded by a background magnetic field, and would increase in strength with increasing temperature. Additionally, the amplitude of radiative heating and cooling increases with increasing temperature, and hence both radiative heating/cooling and frictional drag damp waves more efficiently with increasing equilibrium temperature. Radiative heating and cooling play the largest role in controlling dayside–nightside temperature differences in both our analytic theory and numerical simulations, with frictional drag only being important if it is stronger than the Coriolis force. As a result, dayside–nightside temperature differences in hot Jupiter atmospheres increase with increasing stellar irradiation and decrease with increasing pressure.

  8. Deciphering Jupiter's atmospheric dynamics using the upcoming Juno gravity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspi, Yohai; Galanti, Eli

    2016-07-01

    This summer, the Juno spacecraft will arrive at Jupiter in course for close flybys of the planet, obtaining a high precision gravity spectrum of Jupiter. This data can be used to estimate the depth of Jupiter's observed cloud-level wind, and decipher the possible internal flows, that might be decoupled from the surface wind. In this talk, we discuss the Juno gravity experiment, and the possible outcomes with regard to the flows on Jupiter. We show several ways in which the gravity spectrum might be used to study the large scale flows: 1. measurements of the high order even harmonics which beyond J10 are dominated by the dynamics; 2. measurements of odd gravity harmonics which have no contribution from a static planet, and therefore are a pure signature of dynamics; 3. upper limits on the depth of the surface flow can be obtained by comparing low order even harmonics from dynamical models to the difference between the measured low order even harmonics and the largest possible values of a static planet; 4. direct latitudinally varying measurements of the gravity field exerted on the spacecraft. We will discuss how these methods may be applied given the expected sensitivities of the Juno gravity experiment. In addition, we present an inverse adjoint model, which allows given the gravity data, to infer the flows that produce it. This will allow, hopefully, to make significant progress in one of the longest-standing question in planetary atmospheric dynamics regarding the nature of the flows on the giant planets.

  9. Equatorial Oscillations in Jupiter's and Saturn's Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasar, F. Michael; Guerlet, S.; Fouchet, T.; Schinder, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Equatorial oscillations in the zonal-mean temperatures and zonal winds have been well documented in Earth's middle atmosphere. A growing body of evidence from ground-based and Cassini spacecraft observations indicates that such phenomena also occur in the stratospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. Earth-based midinfrared measurements spanning several decades have established that the equatorial stratospheric temperatures on Jupiter vary with a cycle of 4-5 years and on Saturn with a cycle of approximately 15 years. Spectra obtained by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) during the Cassini swingby at the end of 2000, with much better vertical resolution than the ground-based data, indicated a series of vertically stacked warm and cold anomalics at Jupiter's equator; a similar structurc was seen at Saturn's equator in CIRS limb measurements made in 2005, in the early phase of Cassini's orbital tour. The thermal wind equation implied similar patterns of mean zonal winds increasing and decreasing with altitude. On Saturn the peak-to-pcak amplitude of this variation was nearly 200 meters per second. The alternating vertical pattern of wanner and colder cquatorial tcmperatures and easterly and westerly tendencies of the zonal winds is seen in Earth's equatorial oscillations, where the pattern descends with time, The Cassini Jupiter and early Saturn observations were snapshots within a limited time interval, and they did not show the temporal evolution of the spatial patterns. However, more recent Saturn observations by CIRS (2010) and Cassini radio-occultation soundings (2009-2010) have provided an opportunity to follow the change of the temperature-zonal wind pattern, and they suggest there is descent, at a rate of roughly one scale height over four years. On Earth, the observed descent in the zonal-mean structure is associated with the absorption of a combination of vertically propagating waves with easlerly and westerly phase velocities. The peak-to-peak zonal wind

  10. Heating of Jupiter's upper atmosphere above the Great Red Spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, James; Moore, Luke; Stallard, Tom; Melin, Henrik

    2016-10-01

    Measured upper-atmospheric, mid-to-low latitude temperatures of the giant planets are hundreds of degrees warmer than simulations based on solar heating alone can explain. Modelling studies, focused on additional sources of heating, have been so far unable to resolve this significant model-data discrepancy. Equatorward transport of energy from the hot auroral regions was expected to heat low latitude regions; instead, models have demonstrated that auroral energy is trapped at high latitudes, a consequence of the strong Coriolis forces on these rapidly rotating planets. Wave heating, driven from below, represents another potential source of upper-atmospheric heating. Using data taken in 2012 by the ground-based NASA IRTF, we found through observations of the H3+ ion that the upper atmosphere above Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) - the largest storm in the solar system - is hundreds of degrees hotter than anywhere else on the planet. Specifically, the result shows that the northern region of the spot was over 1600 K, and that background temperatures away from the spot are ~850 K. The hotspot, by process of elimination, must be heated from below, and this detection is therefore strong evidence for coupling between Jupiter's lower and upper atmospheres, likely the result of upward propagating acoustic and/or gravity waves. Our results indicate that the lower atmosphere may yet play an important role in resolving the giant planet 'energy crisis'.

  11. Periodic changes of the activity of processes in Jupiter's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    Variations of the Earth jovimagnetic latitude on Jupiter are preferred in solar-driven changes of reflective properties of clouds and haze on Jupiter. Because of the orbit eccentricity (e=0,048450) the northern hemisphere receives 21% greater solar energy flow to the atmosphere, because Jupiter is in the perihelia near the time of the summer solstice. Results of our studies showed that the ratio of the brightness of the northern and southern tropical and temperate regions is evident factor of the photometric activity of the Jupiter's atmospheric processes. The obtained from the analysis of observational data for the period from 1962 to 2015 existence of variations of activity factor of the planet hemispheres with a period of 11.86 years has allowed us to talk about an existence of the seasonal reconstruction of the physical parameters of Jupiter's atmosphere.

  12. The Atmospheric Dynamics of Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasar, F. M.

    2009-01-01

    Comparative studies of Jupiter and Saturn often emphasize their similarities, but recent observations have highlighted important differences. The stratospheres of both planets exhibit an equatorial oscillation reminiscent of that in Earth's middle atmosphere. Jupiter's oscillation has a 4-5 year period, not linked to its season, and it has been modeled as an analog to the terrestrial quasi-biennial oscillation, driven by the stresses associated with vertically propagating waves. Saturn's equatorial oscillation is nearly semiannual, but wave activity may still be a driver. Jupiter's internal rotation rate is inferred from its steady modulated radio emission. Saturn's internal rotation is more enigmatic. It has been inferred from the modulation of the body's kilometric radio emission, but this period has varied by 1% over the last 25 years. Saturn's equatorial winds are also puzzling, as those inferred from cloud tracking by Cassini and more recent HST observations are weaker than those from Voyager. Whether this is attributable to a difference in altitudes of the tracked clouds in winds with vertical shear or a real temporal change in the winds is not known. Both winter and summer poles of Saturn exhibit very compact circumpolar vortices with warm cores, indicating subsidence. Titan's middle atmosphere is characterized by global cyclostrophic winds, particularly the strong circumpolar vortex in the winter hemisphere. In many ways, the spatial distribution of temperature, gaseous constituents, and condensates is reminiscent of conditions in terrestrial winter vortices, albeit with different chemistry. The meridional contrast in Titan's tropospheric temperatures is small, only a few kelvins.

  13. Decoupling Jupiter's deep and atmospheric flows using the upcoming Juno gravity measurements and a dynamical inverse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai

    2017-04-01

    Observations of the flow on Jupiter exists essentially only for the cloud-level, which is dominated by strong east-west jet-streams. These have been suggested to result from dynamics in a superficial thin weather-layer, or alternatively be a manifestation of deep interior cylindrical flows. However, it is possible that the observed wind is indeed superficial, yet there exists a completely decoupled deep flow. To date, all models linking the wind, via the induced density anomalies, to the gravity field, to be measured by Juno, consider only flow that is a projection of the observed cloud-level wind. Here we explore the possibility of complex wind dynamics that include both the shallow weather-layer wind, and a deep flow that is decoupled from the flow above it. The upper flow is based on the observed cloud-level flow and is set to decay with depth. The deep flow is constructed to produce cylindrical structures with variable width and magnitude, thus allowing for a wide range of possible scenarios for the unknown deep flow. The combined flow is then related to the density anomalies and gravitational moments via a dynamical model. An adjoint inverse model is used for optimizing the parameters controlling the setup of the deep and surface-bound flows, so that these flows can be reconstructed given a gravity field. We show that the model can be used for examination of various scenarios, including cases in which the deep flow is dominating over the surface wind, and discuss the uncertainties associated with the model solution. The flexibility of the adjoint method allows for a wide range of dynamical setups, so that when new observations and physical understanding will arise, these constraints could be easily implemented and used to better decipher Jupiter flow dynamics.

  14. In-situ measurements of Jupiter and Titan: Implications for their chemical models and the origin of atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, S. K.

    Whereas in-situ measurements of the composition of Jupiter by the Galileo probe have resulted in the determination of the elemental abundances of C N S Ne Ar Kr Xe Noble gas isotopes D H 3He 4He and 14N 15N in the well-mixed atmosphere 1 2 the GCMS measurements on the Hyugens probe 3 have shed light on the chemical species that are produced in the stratosphere but condense in the troposphere and the surface of Titan In both cases such measurements are key to understanding the formation of these bodies and the origin of their atmsospheres In this talk I will discuss the composition stratospheric chemistry and tropospheric condensation processes in the giant planets and Titan drawing parallels where they exist and contrasting where they don t The important role of transport to and from the interior for recycling key photochemical species on the giant planets and of photochemical loss of methane in the stratopshere and its geologic production in the interior will also be discussed References 1 Atreya S K paper in Session C3 1 2 Atreya S K Wong A S in Outer Planets T Encrenaz et al eds Springer-Verlag pp 121-136 2005 3 Niemann H B and the Cassini-Huygens GCMS Team Nature 438 779 2005

  15. DOPPLER SIGNATURES OF THE ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION ON HOT JUPITERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showman, Adam P.; Lewis, Nikole K. [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, 1629 University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Shabram, Megan, E-mail: showman@lpl.arizona.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The meteorology of hot Jupiters has been characterized primarily with thermal measurements, but recent observations suggest the possibility of directly detecting the winds by observing the Doppler shift of spectral lines seen during transit. Motivated by these observations, we show how Doppler measurements can place powerful constraints on the meteorology. We show that the atmospheric circulation-and Doppler signature-of hot Jupiters splits into two regimes. Under weak stellar insolation, the day-night thermal forcing generates fast zonal jet streams from the interaction of atmospheric waves with the mean flow. In this regime, air along the terminator (as seen during transit) flows toward Earth in some regions and away from Earth in others, leading to a Doppler signature exhibiting superposed blueshifted and redshifted components. Under intense stellar insolation, however, the strong thermal forcing damps these planetary-scale waves, inhibiting their ability to generate jets. Strong frictional drag likewise damps these waves and inhibits jet formation. As a result, this second regime exhibits a circulation dominated by high-altitude, day-to-night airflow, leading to a predominantly blueshifted Doppler signature during transit. We present state-of-the-art circulation models including non-gray radiative transfer to quantify this regime shift and the resulting Doppler signatures; these models suggest that cool planets like GJ 436b lie in the first regime, HD 189733b is transitional, while planets hotter than HD 209458b lie in the second regime. Moreover, we show how the amplitude of the Doppler shifts constrains the strength of frictional drag in the upper atmospheres of hot Jupiters. If due to winds, the {approx}2 km s{sup -1} blueshift inferred on HD 209458b may require drag time constants as short as 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} s, possibly the result of Lorentz-force braking on this planet's hot dayside.

  16. Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Penne, Barbra

    2017-01-01

    Our solar system's largest planet is huge enough that all of the system's other planets could fit inside it. Although Jupiter has been known since ancient times, scientists are still learning exciting new information about the planet and its satellites today. In fact, several of its moons are now believed to have oceans below their icy surfaces. Chapters focus on topics such as Jupiter's orbit and rotation, rings, atmosphere, and moons, as well as on the space missions that have helped us get a closer look at the planet and its moons over the past decades.

  17. Decoupling Jupiter's deep and atmospheric flows using the upcoming Juno gravity measurements and a dynamical inverse model

    CERN Document Server

    Galanti, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Observations of the flow on Jupiter exists essentially only for the cloud-level, which is dominated by strong east-west jet-streams. These have been suggested to result from dynamics in a superficial thin weather-layer, or alternatively be a manifestation of deep interior cylindrical flows. However, it is possible that the observed winds are indeed superficial, yet there exists deep flow that is completely decoupled from it. To date, all models linking the wind, via the induced density anomalies, to the gravity field, to be measured by Juno, consider only flow that is a projection of the observed could-level wind. Here we explore the possibility of complex wind dynamics that include both the shallow weather-layer wind, and a deep flow that is decoupled from the flow above it. The upper flow is based on the observed cloud-level flow and is set to decay with depth. The deep flow is constructed to produce cylindrical structures with variable width and magnitude, thus allowing for a wide range of possible scenari...

  18. A transition in the cloud composition of hot Jupiters atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, Vivien; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Showman, Adam P.; Morley, Caroline; Marley, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Over a large range of equilibrium temperatures clouds seem to dominate the transmission spectrum of Hot Jupiters atmospheres and no trend allowing the classification of these objects have yet emerged. Recently observations of the light reflected by Hot Jupiters atmospheres shed a new light on the cloud distribution on the dayside of these planets : for a handful of planets clouds are more abundant on the western than on the eastern side of the dayside hemisphere and, more importantly, this asymmetry depends on the equilibrium temperature of the planet.Here we use a grid of 3D global circulation models to show that a single cloud species is unable to explain the recent Kepler observations. The cloud asymmetry on the dayside is a strong function of the condensation temperature of the cloud species which allow us to determine the composition of the clouds present in these planets. We show that a transition between silicate clouds and sulfide clouds appear at equilibrium temperatures of 1600K. A mechanism such as the presence of a deep cold trap is necessary to explain this transi- tion. Furthermore, we show that the western limb temperature is always cold, independently of the equilibrium temperature of the planet, allowing cloud particles to form even in the most irradiated planets as seen in the observations.Our results provide the first evidence for a transition in the cloud species of hot Jupiters similar to the L/T Brown Dwarf transition. We further show that inhomogeneous dayside and limbs cloud coverage are expected what should affect the retrieved molecular abundances from emission and transmission spectra of these planets.

  19. Detection of (C-13)-ethane in Jupiter's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Guenter; Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Jennings, Donald E.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution (C-12)- and (C-13)-ethane spectra of Jupiter were acquired with the Kitt Peak 4 m Fourier spectrometer and the Goddard postdisperser in June 1987. A relative abundance ratio (C-12/C-13) of 94 +/- 12 was derived from the measurements. This nearly terrestrial value indicates little or no fractionation of carbon isotopes when ethane is produced in the photolysis of methane in Jupiter's atmosphere.

  20. Mass Spectrometry in Jupiter's Atmosphere: Vertical Variation of Volatile Vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michael H.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2014-05-01

    The Galileo Probe made the first and only in situ measurements of composition in Jupiter's atmosphere, led by the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer, or GPMS [1]. The major contribution from this instrument was the measurement of abundances and isotope ratios of the noble gases, as well as the volatile gases CH4, NH3, H2O, and H2S [2,3]. These initial results were further refined by detailed laboratory calibrations for the noble gases [4] and the volatiles [5]. The probe measurements resulted in the first determination of the heavy element abundances (except carbon that was known previously) and He/H ratio, which provide critical constraints to models of the formation of Jupiter and the origin of its atmosphere [6,7]. The condensable volatiles, or CVs (ammonia, H2S, and water), increased with depth in the probe entry site. This vertical variation was observed at levels much deeper than the modeled cloud bases, as predicted by one-dimensional chemical equilibrium models. The discrepancy is due to the probe's entry into a dry region known as a 5-μm hot spot. The 5-μm hot spots are part of an atmospheric wave system that encircles Jupiter just north of the equator. Despite the anomalous meteorology, the bulk abundances of NH3 and H2S were measured by the probe, and found to be enriched with respect to solar composition (similarly to the non-condensable volatile CH4). The deepest water mixing ratio, however, was observed to be depleted relative to solar composition. We review an updated context for the CV vertical profiles measured by the GPMS, based on the latest results from remote sensing, simulation, and reinterpretation of Galileo Probe measurements. In particular, we find that (1) the bulk abundance of water in Jupiter's atmosphere must be greater than the subsolar abundance derived from the deepest GPMS measurements [8], and that (2) CV mixing ratios are controlled by a range of processes in addition to condensation of the ices NH3, NH4SH, and H2O [5-9]. Both

  1. Measuring Jupiter's water abundance by Juno: the link between interior and formation models

    CERN Document Server

    Helled, Ravit

    2014-01-01

    The JUNO mission to Jupiter is planned to measure the water abundance in Jupiter's atmosphere below the cloud layer. This measurement is important because it can be used to reveal valuable information on Jupiter's origin and its composition. In this paper we discuss the importance of this measurement, the challenges in its interpretation, and address how it can be connected to interior and formation models of Jupiter.

  2. Hubble Views Ancient Storm in the Atmosphere of Jupiter - Montage

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    When 17th-century astronomers first turned their telescopes to Jupiter, they noted a conspicuous reddish spot on the giant planet. This Great Red Spot is still present in Jupiter's atmosphere, more than 300 years later. It is now known that it is a vast storm, spinning like a cyclone. Unlike a low-pressure hurricane in the Caribbean Sea, however, the Red Spot rotates in a counterclockwise direction in the southern hemisphere, showing that it is a high-pressure system. Winds inside this Jovian storm reach speeds of about 270 mph.The Red Spot is the largest known storm in the Solar System. With a diameter of 15,400 miles, it is almost twice the size of the entire Earth and one-sixth the diameter of Jupiter itself.The long lifetime of the Red Spot may be due to the fact that Jupiter is mainly a gaseous planet. It possibly has liquid layers, but lacks a solid surface, which would dissipate the storm's energy, much as happens when a hurricane makes landfall on the Earth. However, the Red Spot does change its shape, size, and color, sometimes dramatically. Such changes are demonstrated in high-resolution Wide Field and Planetary Cameras 1 & 2 images of Jupiter obtained by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, and presented here by the Hubble Heritage Project team. The mosaic presents a series of pictures of the Red Spot obtained by Hubble between 1992 and 1999 (see PIA01594 thru PIA01599 and PIA02400 thru PIA02402 for individual images).Astronomers study weather phenomena on other planets in order to gain a greater understanding of our own Earth's climate. Lacking a solid surface, Jupiter provides us with a laboratory experiment for observing weather phenomena under very different conditions than those prevailing on Earth. This knowledge can also be applied to places in the Earth's atmosphere that are over deep oceans, making them more similar to Jupiter's deep atmosphere.

  3. Detection of an oxygen atmosphere on Jupiter's moon Europa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, D T; Strobel, D F; Feldman, P D; McGrath, M A; Weaver, H A

    1995-02-23

    Europa, the second large satellite out from Jupiter, is roughly the size of Earth's Moon, but unlike the Moon, it has water ice on its surface. There have been suggestions that an oxygen atmosphere should accumulate around such a body, through reactions which break up the water molecules and form molecular hydrogen and oxygen. The lighter H2 molecules would escape from Europa relatively easily, leaving behind an atmosphere rich in oxygen. Here we report the detection of atomic oxygen emission from Europa, which we interpret as being produced by the simultaneous dissociation and excitation of atmospheric O2 by electrons from Jupiter's magnetosphere. Europa's molecular oxygen atmosphere is very tenuous, with a surface pressure about 10(-11) that of the Earth's atmosphere at sea level.

  4. Near-IR Spectroscopy of the Atmosphere of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    The Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer obtains spectral images in the wavelength range 0.7 to 5.2 um with a special resolving power of approximately 200. This spectral range allows NIMS to sense cloud-reflected solar radiation, thermal emission from the deep atmosphere, and auroral bands from the thermosphere of Jupiter.

  5. Neutral atmosphere near the icy surface of Jupiter's moon Ganymede

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shematovich, V. I.

    2016-07-01

    The paper discusses the formation and dynamics of the rarefied gas envelope near the icy surface of Jupiter's moon Ganymede. Being the most massive icy moon, Ganymede can form a rarefied exosphere with a relatively dense near-surface layer. The main parent component of the gas shell is water vapor, which enters the atmosphere due to thermal degassing, nonthermal radiolysis, and other active processes and phenomena on the moon's icy surface. A numerical kinetic simulation is performed to investigate, at the molecular level, the formation, chemical evolution, and dynamics of the mainly H2O- and O2-dominant rarefied gas envelopes. The ionization processes in these rarefied gas envelopes are due to exposure to ultraviolet radiation from the Sun and the magnetospheric plasma. The chemical diversity of the icy moon's gas envelope is attributed to the primary action of ultraviolet solar photons and plasma electrons on the rarefied gas in the H2O- or O2-dominant atmosphere. The model is used to calculate the formation and development of the chemical diversity in the relatively dense near-surface envelope of Ganymede, where an important contribution comes from collisions between parent molecules and the products of their photolysis and radiolysis.

  6. HUBBLE VIEWS ANCIENT STORM IN THE ATMOSPHERE OF JUPITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    When 17th-century astronomers first turned their telescopes to Jupiter, they noted a conspicuous reddish spot on the giant planet. This Great Red Spot is still present in Jupiter's atmosphere, more than 300 years later. It is now known that it is a vast storm, spinning like a cyclone. Unlike a low-pressure hurricane in the Caribbean Sea, however, the Red Spot rotates in a counterclockwise direction in the southern hemisphere, showing that it is a high-pressure system. Winds inside this Jovian storm reach speeds of about 270 mph. The Red Spot is the largest known storm in the Solar System. With a diameter of 15,400 miles, it is almost twice the size of the entire Earth and one-sixth the diameter of Jupiter itself. The long lifetime of the Red Spot may be due to the fact that Jupiter is mainly a gaseous planet. It possibly has liquid layers, but lacks a solid surface, which would dissipate the storm's energy, much as happens when a hurricane makes landfall on the Earth. However, the Red Spot does change its shape, size, and color, sometimes dramatically. Such changes are demonstrated in high-resolution Wide Field and Planetary Cameras 1 and 2 images of Jupiter obtained by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, and presented here by the Hubble Heritage Project team. The mosaic presents a series of pictures of the Red Spot obtained by Hubble between 1992 and 1999. Astronomers study weather phenomena on other planets in order to gain a greater understanding of our own Earth's climate. Lacking a solid surface, Jupiter provides us with a laboratory experiment for observing weather phenomena under very different conditions than those prevailing on Earth. This knowledge can also be applied to places in the Earth's atmosphere that are over deep oceans, making them more similar to Jupiter's deep atmosphere. The Hubble images were originally collected by Amy Simon (Cornell U.), Reta Beebe (NMSU), Heidi Hammel (Space Science Institute, MIT), and their collaborators, and have been

  7. Doppler Signatures of the Atmospheric Circulation on Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Showman, Adam P; Lewis, Nikole K; Shabram, Megan

    2013-01-01

    The meteorology of hot Jupiters has been characterized primarily with thermal measurements, but recent observations suggest the possibility of directly detecting the winds by observing the Doppler shift of spectral lines seen during transit. Motivated by these observations, we show how Doppler measurements can place powerful constraints on the meteorology. We show that the atmospheric circulation--and Doppler signature--of hot Jupiters splits into two regimes. Under weak stellar insolation, the day-night thermal forcing generates fast zonal jet streams from the interaction of atmospheric waves with the mean flow. In this regime, air along the terminator (as seen during transit) flows toward Earth in some regions and away from Earth in others, leading to a Doppler signature exhibiting superposed blue- and redshifted components. Under intense stellar insolation, however, the strong thermal forcing damps these planetary-scale waves, inhibiting their ability to generate jets. Strong frictional drag likewise damps...

  8. Atmospheric Characterization of the Hot Jupiter Kepler-13Ab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shporer, Avi; O'Rourke, Joseph G.; Knutson, Heather A.; Szabó, Gyula M.; Zhao, Ming; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Jonathan; Agol, Eric; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Desert, Jean-Michel; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard; Lewis, Nikole K.; Showman, Adam P.; Todorov, Kamen O.

    2014-06-01

    Kepler-13Ab (= KOI-13.01) is a unique transiting hot Jupiter. It is one of very few known short-period planets orbiting a hot A-type star, making it one of the hottest planets currently known. The availability of Kepler data allows us to measure the planet's occultation (secondary eclipse) and phase curve in the optical, which we combine with occultations observed by warm Spitzer at 4.5 μm and 3.6 μm and a ground-based occultation observation in the Ks band (2.1 μm). We derive a day-side hemisphere temperature of 2750 ± 160 K as the effective temperature of a black body showing the same occultation depths. Comparing the occultation depths with one-dimensional planetary atmosphere models suggests the presence of an atmospheric temperature inversion. Our analysis shows evidence for a relatively high geometric albedo, A g = 0.33^{+0.04}_{-0.06}. While measured with a simplistic method, a high A g is supported also by the fact that the one-dimensional atmosphere models underestimate the occultation depth in the optical. We use stellar spectra to determine the dilution, in the four wide bands where occultation was measured, due to the visual stellar binary companion 1.''15 ± 0.''05 away. The revised stellar parameters measured using these spectra are combined with other measurements, leading to revised planetary mass and radius estimates of Mp = 4.94-8.09 M J and Rp = 1.406 ± 0.038 R J. Finally, we measure a Kepler midoccultation time that is 34.0 ± 6.9 s earlier than expected based on the midtransit time and the delay due to light-travel time and discuss possible scenarios.

  9. Atmospheric characterization of the hot Jupiter Kepler-13Ab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shporer, Avi; O' Rourke, Joseph G.; Knutson, Heather A. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Szabó, Gyula M. [ELTE Gothard Astrophysical Observatory, H-9704 Szombathely, Szent Imre herceg út 112 (Hungary); Zhao, Ming [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Agol, Eric [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Cowan, Nicolas B. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2131 Tech Drive, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Desert, Jean-Michel [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Howard, Andrew W. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Isaacson, Howard [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lewis, Nikole K.; Showman, Adam P. [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Todorov, Kamen O. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zürich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-06-10

    Kepler-13Ab (= KOI-13.01) is a unique transiting hot Jupiter. It is one of very few known short-period planets orbiting a hot A-type star, making it one of the hottest planets currently known. The availability of Kepler data allows us to measure the planet's occultation (secondary eclipse) and phase curve in the optical, which we combine with occultations observed by warm Spitzer at 4.5 μm and 3.6 μm and a ground-based occultation observation in the K{sub s} band (2.1 μm). We derive a day-side hemisphere temperature of 2750 ± 160 K as the effective temperature of a black body showing the same occultation depths. Comparing the occultation depths with one-dimensional planetary atmosphere models suggests the presence of an atmospheric temperature inversion. Our analysis shows evidence for a relatively high geometric albedo, A {sub g} = 0.33{sub −0.06}{sup +0.04}. While measured with a simplistic method, a high A {sub g} is supported also by the fact that the one-dimensional atmosphere models underestimate the occultation depth in the optical. We use stellar spectra to determine the dilution, in the four wide bands where occultation was measured, due to the visual stellar binary companion 1.''15 ± 0.''05 away. The revised stellar parameters measured using these spectra are combined with other measurements, leading to revised planetary mass and radius estimates of M{sub p} = 4.94-8.09 M {sub J} and R{sub p} = 1.406 ± 0.038 R {sub J}. Finally, we measure a Kepler midoccultation time that is 34.0 ± 6.9 s earlier than expected based on the midtransit time and the delay due to light-travel time and discuss possible scenarios.

  10. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the atmospheres of Titan and Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, Carl; Khare, B. N.; Thompson, W. R.; Mcdonald, G. D.; Wing, Michael R.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Arakawa, E. T.

    1993-01-01

    PAHs are important components of the interstellar medium and carbonaceous chondrites, but have never been identified in the reducing atmospheres of the outer solar system. Incompletely characterized complex organic solids (tholins) produced by irradiating simulated Titan atmospheres reproduce well the observed UV/visible/IR optical constants of the Titan stratospheric haze. Titan tholin and a tholin generated in a crude simulation of the atmosphere of Jupiter are examined by two-step laser desorption/multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry. A range of two- to four-ring PAHs, some with one to four alkylation sites, are identified, with a net abundance of about 0.0001 g/g (grams per gram) of tholins produced. Synchronous fluorescence techniques confirm this detection. Titan tholins have proportionately more one- and two-ring PAHs than do Jupiter tholins, which in turn have more four-ring and larger PAHs. The four-ringed PAH chrysene, prominent in some discussions of interstellar grains, is found in Jupiter tholins.

  11. Solar Flux Deposition And Heating Rates In Jupiter's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2009-09-01

    We discuss here the solar downward net flux in the 0.25 - 2.5 µm range in the atmosphere of Jupiter and the associated heating rates under a number of vertical cloud structure scenarios focusing in the effect of clouds and hazes. Our numerical model is based in the doubling-adding technique to solve the radiative transfer equation and it includes gas absorption by CH4, NH3 and H2, in addition to Rayleigh scattering by a mixture of H2 plus He. Four paradigmatic Jovian regions have been considered (hot-spots, belts, zones and Polar Regions). The hot-spots are the most transparent regions with downward net fluxes of 2.5±0.5 Wm-2 at the 6 bar level. The maximum solar heating is 0.04±0.01 K/day and occurs above 1 bar. Belts and zones characterization result in a maximum net downward flux of 0.5 Wm-2 at 2 bar and 0.015 Wm-2 at 6 bar. Heating is concentrated in the stratospheric and tropospheric hazes. Finally, Polar Regions are also explored and the results point to a considerable stratospheric heating of 0.04±0.02 K/day. In all, these calculations suggest that the role of the direct solar forcing in the Jovian atmospheric dynamics is limited to the upper 1 - 2 bar of the atmosphere except in the hot-spot areas. Acknowledgments: This work has been funded by Spanish MEC AYA2006-07735 with FEDER support and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07.

  12. Jupiter Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for high resolution image of Nature Cover Detailed analysis of two continent-sized storms that erupted in Jupiter's atmosphere in March 2007 shows that Jupiter's internal heat plays a significant role in generating atmospheric disturbances. Understanding these outbreaks could be the key to unlock the mysteries buried in the deep Jovian atmosphere, say astronomers. This visible-light image is from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope taken on May 11, 2007. It shows the turbulent pattern generated by the two plumes on the upper left part of Jupiter. Understanding these phenomena is important for Earth's meteorology where storms are present everywhere and jet streams dominate the atmospheric circulation. Jupiter is a natural laboratory where atmospheric scientists study the nature and interplay of the intense jets and severe atmospheric phenomena. According to the analysis, the bright plumes were storm systems triggered in Jupiter's deep water clouds that moved upward in the atmosphere vi gorously and injected a fresh mixture of ammonia ice and water about 20 miles (30 kilometers) above the visible clouds. The storms moved in the peak of a jet stream in Jupiter's atmosphere at 375 miles per hour (600 kilometers per hour). Models of the disturbance indicate that the jet stream extends deep in the buried atmosphere of Jupiter, more than 60 miles (approximately100 kilometers) below the cloud tops where most sunlight is absorbed.

  13. Tidal Response of Preliminary Jupiter Model

    OpenAIRE

    Wahl, Sean M; Hubbard, Willam B.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    In anticipation of improved observational data for Jupiter's gravitational field from the Juno spacecraft, we predict the static tidal response for a variety of Jupiter interior models based on ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures. We calculate hydrostatic-equilibrium gravity terms using the non-perturbative concentric Maclaurin Spheroid (CMS) method that eliminates lengthy expansions used in the theory of figures. Our method captures terms arising from the coupled tidal...

  14. Tidal Response of Preliminary Jupiter Model

    CERN Document Server

    Wahl, Sean M; Militzer, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    In anticipation of improved observational data for Jupiter's gravitational field from the Juno spacecraft, we predict the static tidal response for a variety of Jupiter interior models based on ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures. We calculate hydrostatic-equilibrium gravity terms using the non-perturbative concentric Maclaurin Spheroid (CMS) method that eliminates lengthy expansions used in the theory of figures. Our method captures terms arising from the coupled tidal and rotational perturbations, which we find to be important for a rapidly-rotating planet like Jupiter. Our predicted static tidal Love number $k_2 = 0.5900$ is $\\sim$10\\% larger than previous estimates. The value is, as expected, highly correlated with the zonal harmonic coefficient $J_2$, and is thus nearly constant when plausible changes are made to interior structure while holding $J_2$ fixed at the observed value. We note that the predicted static $k_2$ might change due to Jupiter's dynamical response to the Galilea...

  15. Ellipsoidal Chapman Function for Atmosphere of Relevance to Ionospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan. Contribution to Models JIRA, SIRA, and TIRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velinov, P.; Ruder, H.; Kostov, V.; Mateev, L.

    As a continuation of our investigations of ellipsoidal Chapman Che function of the atmospheres of oblate planets Velinov et al 2004 we present new calculations for the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn and its satellite Titan In the above mentioned paper Che function only for the north and south pole regions is presented There some computations for Che function for the ionosphere of Saturn only on latitudes 90 degree at different altitudes and solar zenith angles 45 60 75 80 83 85 87 90 93 95 97 and 100 degree are made This new paper presents the results of our work on the ellipsoidal Chapman function of oblate planetary bodies Here the calculations for Che function in the oblate planet atmospheres of giant planets from Jovian group for middle and lower latitudes including the equator in Tables 1 - 3 are presented Che function for a rotational ellipsoid depends on the oblateness and on the solar zenith angle altitude latitude and the solar declination A comparison between Che function and classical Chapman function Ch for a spherical planet is made The last function is applicable for the ionospheres of terrestrial planets Venus Earth and Mars This comparison shows the necessity of introducing Che function in numerical analysis of ionospheres of Jupiter Saturn and Titan The function Che determines more precisely the optical depth parameter for solar XUV radiation and also the particle depth parameter for galactic and solar cosmic ray particles The difference between evaluations of electron production rate profiles with Che and Ch

  16. Multi-temperature model derived from state-to-state kinetics for hypersonic entry in Jupiter atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colonna, G.; Pietanza, L. D. [Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e Plasmi, CNR, Via Amendola 144/D, 70126 Bari (Italy); D' Ambrosio, D. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Aerospaziale, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, I-10129 Torino (Italy); D' Ammando, G.; Capitelli, M. [Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e Plasmi, CNR, Via Amendola 144/D, 70126 Bari, Italy and Dipartimento di Chimica, Universitá degli studi di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70125 Bari (Italy)

    2014-12-09

    A state-to-state model of H{sub 2}/He plasmas coupling the master equations for internal distributions of heavy species with the transport equation for the free electrons has been used as a basis for implementing a multi-temperature kinetic model. In the multi-temperature model internal distributions of heavy particles are Boltzmann, the electron energy distribution function is Maxwell, and the rate coefficients of the elementary processes become a function of local temperatures associated to the relevant equilibrium distributions. The state-to-state and multi-temperature models have been compared in the case of a homogenous recombining plasma, reproducing the conditions met during supersonic expansion though converging-diverging nozzles.

  17. The abundance and distribution of water vapor in Jupiter's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Larson, Harold P.; Kunde, Virgil G.

    1986-01-01

    The atmospheric transmission window between 1800 and 2250/cm in Jupiter's atmosphere was observed from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory and by the IR spectrometer (IRIS) on Voyager. The vertical distribution of H2O was derived for the 1-6 bar portion of Jupiter's troposphere. The spatial variation of H2O was measured using IRIS spectra of the Hot Spots in the North and South Equatorial Belts (NEB, SEB) and the Equatorial Zone and for an average of the North and South Tropical Zones. The H2O column abundance above the 4 bar level is the same in the zones as in the SEB Hot Spots, about 20 cm amagats. The NEB Hot Spots are desiccated by a factor of 3 with respect to the rest of Jupiter. For an average between -40 and +40 deg latitude, the H2O mole fraction, qH2O, is saturated for P less than 2 bars, qH2O = 4 millionths in the 2-4 bar range, and it increases to 3/100,000 at 6 bars. A similar vertical profile applies to the spatially resolved zone and belt spectra, except that H2O falls off more rapidly at P less than 4 bars in the NEB Hot Spots. A massive H2O cloud at 5 bars, T = 273 K is inconsistent with the observations. Instead, a thin H2O ice cloud would form at 2 bars, T = 200 K. The O/H ratio in Jupiter, inferred from H2O measurements in both belts and zones at 6 bars, is depleted by a factor of 50 with respect to the sun.

  18. High temperature condensate clouds in super-hot Jupiter atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Wakeford, Hannah R; Lewis, Nikole K; Kataria, Tiffany; Marley, Mark S; Fortney, Jonathan J; Mandell, Avi M

    2016-01-01

    Deciphering the role of clouds is central to our understanding of exoplanet atmospheres, as they have a direct impact on the temperature and pressure structure, and observational properties of the planet. Super-hot Jupiters occupy a temperature regime similar to low mass M-dwarfs, where minimal cloud condensation is expected. However, observations of exoplanets such as WASP-12b (Teq ~ 2500 K) result in a transmission spectrum indicative of a cloudy atmosphere. We re-examine the temperature and pressure space occupied by these super-hot Jupiter atmospheres, to explore the role of the initial Al- and Ti-bearing condensates as the main source of cloud material. Due to the high temperatures a majority of the more common refractory material is not depleted into deeper layers and would remain in the vapor phase. The lack of depletion into deeper layers means that these materials with relatively low cloud masses can become significant absorbers in the upper atmosphere. We provide condensation curves for the initial ...

  19. Deuterated Methane and Ethane in the Atmosphere of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, C. D.; Yung, Y. L.; Lee, A. Y.; Crisp, D.

    2003-12-01

    CH3D and C2H5D are isotopic tracers in the deep Jovian atmosphere and susceptible to transport and chemical effects. It is expected that the tropospheric ([D]/[H])CH4 ratios determined from the various observations made should be relatively invariable, yet previous determinations of this quantity for Jupiter have given results inconsistent with experimental error bars. This suggests that there may be a problem with the interpretion of some of the observations, or that the apparent CH3D column abundance is variable. We report on the effects of varying important parameters over this pressure regime on the CH3D and C2H5D mixing ratios, CH3D and C2H5D fractionation, the ([D]/[H])CH4, ([D]/[H])C2H_6 and D/H (= ([D]/[H])H2) ratios and compare with the various CH3D and HD observations. Our results show that since the CH3D and C2H5D mixing ratios are strongly dependent upon K(z) in the region of interest where temporal or latitudinal variations in K(z) could significantly impact the measured ([D]/[H])CH4 ratio. The K(z) adopted represents complex upward convection and downdraft mixing that occurs in the Jovian atmosphere as evidenced by recent observations (Gierasch et al., 2000; Ingersoll et al., 2000; Roos-Serote et al., 2000; Vincent et al., 2000). Using our technique allows for the first time a way to explain the discrepancies in the ([D]/[H])CH4 ratio observations by offering a plausible link between the CH3D and C2H5D observations and upper tropospheric dynamical processes. In any case our calculations show how ([D]/[H])CH4 and ([D]/[H])C2H_6 can be used as a diagnostic tracer to constrain K(z) and to better understand the dynamics of the atmosphere in this pressure regime. Additionally, we have made calculations of the C2H5D in the thermosphere of Jupiter. The principal reactions determining the D abundance appear to be generation by reaction of H with vibrationally hot HD and loss by reaction of D with H2(v=0,1) and CH3. The H, CH3D and C2H5D distributions have

  20. Exploring Biases of Atmospheric Retrievals in Simulated JWST Transmission Spectra of Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Rocchetto, M; Venot, O; Lagage, P -O; Tinetti, G

    2016-01-01

    With a scheduled launch in October 2018, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is expected to revolutionise the field of atmospheric characterization of exoplanets. The broad wavelength coverage and high sensitivity of its instruments will allow us to extract far more information from exoplanet spectra than what has been possible with current observations. In this paper, we investigate whether current retrieval methods will still be valid in the era of JWST, exploring common approximations used when retrieving transmission spectra of hot Jupiters. To assess biases, we use 1D photochemical models to simulate typical hot Jupiter cloud-free atmospheres and generate synthetic observations for a range of carbon-to-oxygen ratios. Then, we retrieve these spectra using TauREx, a Bayesian retrieval tool, using two methodologies: one assuming an isothermal atmosphere, and one assuming a parametrized temperature profile. Both methods assume constant-with-altitude abundances. We found that the isothermal approximation bi...

  1. Studying the Atmospheres of the Most Intriguing WASP Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendl, M.; Delrez, L.; Gillon, M.; Queloz, D.

    2013-09-01

    Among the over 300 transiting planets confirmed to date, approximately 130 have been found by groundbased wide angle transit surveys such asWASP. While these surveys are not sensitive enough to detect lowmass planets, they excel at picking out rare hot- Jupiters orbiting reasonably bright stars (V mag = 9 - 11) across the sky. These planets occupy a favorable region in parameter space, as they show frequent and deep transits. Due to the proximity to their host stars these gas giants possess hot extended atmospheres making them ideal targets for the study of their atmospheres via transmission and occultation spectrophotometry. During occultation, the flux emerging from the planetary dayside is eliminated. By comparing the flux in- and out-of occultation, the planet-to-star brightness ratio can be measured. Observations in different passbands yield a measure of the planetary spectral energy distribution and thereby allow to determine the atmospheric temperature structure, heat redistribution efficiency, albedo, and to place constraints on the atmospheric composition. From the spectro-photometric observation of transits, we can measure wavelength dependencies in the effective planetary radius that are sensitive to signatures of chemical elements in the planetary atmosphere. We present results of ongoing observing campaigns employing these methods to study the atmospheres of hot Jupiters discovered by the WASP survey. In particular we show results for the very short-period planet WASP-19b based on data from the 1m-class Euler-Swiss and TRAPPIST telescopes, as well as a transmission spectrum of the low-density hot Saturn WASP-49b obtained from FORS2 at the VLT/UT1.

  2. Pre-Juno Optical Analysis of Jupiter's Atmosphere with the NMSU Acousto-optic Imaging Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Emma; Chanover, Nancy J.; Voelz, David; Kuehn, David M.; Strycker, Paul D.

    2016-10-01

    Jupiter's upper atmosphere is a highly dynamic system in which clouds and storms change color, shape, and size on variable timescales. The exact mechanism by which the deep atmosphere affects these changes in the uppermost cloud deck is still unknown. With Juno's arrival at Jupiter in July 2016, the thermal radiation from the deep atmosphere will be measurable with the spacecraft's Microwave Radiometer. By taking detailed optical measurements of Jupiter's uppermost cloud deck in conjunction with Juno's microwave observations, we can provide a context in which to better understand these observations. This data will also provide a complement to the near-IR sensitivity of the Jovian InfraRed Auroral Mapper and will expand on the limited spectral coverage of JunoCam. Ultimately, we can utilize the two complementary datasets in order to thoroughly characterize Jupiter's atmosphere in terms of its vertical cloud structure, color distribution, and dynamical state throughout the Juno era. In order to obtain high spectral resolution images of Jupiter's atmosphere in the optical regime, we use the New Mexico State University Acousto-optic Imaging Camera (NAIC). NAIC contains an acousto-optic tunable filter, which allows us to take hyperspectral image cubes of Jupiter from 450-950 nm at an average spectral resolution (λ/dλ) of 242. We present an analysis of our pre-Juno dataset obtained with NAIC at the Apache Point Observatory 3.5-m telescope during the night of March 28, 2016. Under primarily photometric conditions, we obtained 6 hyperspectral image cubes of Jupiter over the course of the night, totaling approximately 2,960 images. From these data we derive low-resolution optical spectra of the Great Red Spot and a representative belt and zone to compare with previous work and laboratory measurements of candidate chromophore materials. Future work will focus on radiative transfer modeling to elucidate the Jovian cloud structure during the Juno era. This work was supported

  3. Modeling Jupiter's Quasi Quadrennial Oscillation (QQO) with Wave Drag Parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Rick; Morales-Juberias, Raul; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Orton, Glenn S.

    2016-10-01

    The QQO in Jupiter's atmosphere was first discovered after 7.8 micron infrared observations spanning the 1980's and 1990's detected a temperature oscillation near 10 hPa (Orton et al. 1991, Science 252, 537, Leovy et. al. 1991, Nature 354, 380, Friedson 1999, Icarus 137, 34). New observations using the Texas Echelon cross-dispersed Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES), mounted on the NASA Infrared Telescope facility (IRTF), have been used to characterize a complete cycle of the QQO between January 2012 and January 2016 (Greathouse et al. 2016, DPS) . These new observations not only show the thermal oscillation at 10 hPa, but they also show that the QQO extends upwards in Jupiter's atmosphere to pressures as high as 0.4 hPa. We incorporated three different wave-drag parameterizations into the EPIC General Circulation Model (Dowling et al. 1998, Icarus 132, 221) to simulate the observed Jovian QQO temperature signatures as a function of latitude, pressure and time using results from the TEXES datasets as new constraints. Each parameterization produces unique results and offers insight into the spectra of waves that likely exist in Jupiter's atmosphere to force the QQO. High-frequency gravity waves produced from convection are extremely difficult to directly observe but likely contribute a significant portion to the QQO momentum budget. We use different models to simulate the effects of waves such as these, to indirectly explore their spectrum in Jupiter's atmosphere by varying their properties. The model temperature outputs show strong correlations to equatorial and mid-latitude temperature fields retrieved from the TEXES datasets at different epochs. Our results suggest the QQO phenomenon could be more than one alternating zonal jet that descends over time in response to Jovian atmospheric forcing (e.g. gravity waves from convection).Research funding provided by the NRAO Grote Reber Pre-Doctoral Fellowship. Computing resources include the NMT PELICAN cluster and the CISL

  4. Probing Below the Visible Cloud Layers in Jupiter's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pater, Imke; Sault, Robert J.; Butler, Bryan J.; DeBoer, David R.; Wong, Michael H.

    2016-10-01

    Visible and near-infrared images of the giant planets reveal a multitude of clouds, ranging in size from tiny, hardly visible, features to giant storm systems, such as Jupiter's Great Red Spot and Oval BA. At radio wavelengths we can probe altitudes in Jupiter's atmosphere below these visible cloud layers. We used the upgraded Very Large Array to map this unexplored region down to ~10 bar. We will present full radio maps at frequencies between 4 and ~35 GHz, with typical spatial resolutions of order 1000-2000 km. We will also show spectra and radiative transfer calculations of individual features, such as the Great Red Spot, Oval BA, hot spots and ammonia-rich "plumes". Our maps are complementary to observations planned for Juno's microwave radiometer (MWR). MWR's field-of-view is tiny, ~1000 km at the highest frequencies at perijove, and is limited to extremely narrow swaths of longitude; as such, our VLA maps will provide regional and global context at wavelengths overlapping with Juno MWR. Several maps at 8-12 GHz, at a spatial resolution of ~1000 km, will be taken during Juno perijove passes.Our analysis to date, based on 4-18 GHz maps, reveal a dynamically active planet at pressures up ammonia gas from Jupiter's deep atmosphere in "plumes", at concentrations similar to that measured by the Galileo Probe. At higher altitudes, the ammonia gas in these plumes will condense out, and as such could be responsible for the spectroscopically identified fresh ammonia ice clouds detected by the Galileo spacecraft at these latitudes.

  5. The impact of atmospheric circulation on the chemistry of the hot Jupiter HD 209458b

    CERN Document Server

    Agundez, M; Iro, N; Selsis, F; Hersant, F; Hebrard, E; Dobrijevic, M

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the effects of atmospheric circulation on the chemistry of the hot Jupiter HD 209458b. We use a simplified dynamical model and a robust chemical network, as opposed to previous studies which have used a three dimensional circulation model coupled to a simple chemical kinetics scheme. The temperature structure and distribution of the main atmospheric constituents are calculated in the limit of an atmosphere that rotates as a solid body with an equatorial rotation rate of 1 km/s. Such motion mimics a uniform zonal wind which resembles the equatorial superrotation structure found by three dimensional circulation models. The uneven heating of this tidally locked planet causes, even in the presence of such a strong zonal wind, large temperature contrasts between the dayside and nightside, of up to 800 K. This would result in important longitudinal variations of some molecular abundances if the atmosphere were at chemical equilibrium. The zonal wind, however, acts as a powerful disequilibrium process...

  6. Water Clouds in the Atmosphere of a Jupiter-Like Brown Dwarf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Lying a mere 7.2 light-years away, WISE 0855 is the nearest known planetary-mass object. This brown dwarf, a failed star just slightly more massive than Jupiter, is also the coldest known compact body outside of our solar system and new observations have now provided us with a first look at its atmosphere.Temperaturepressure profiles of Jupiter, WISE 0855, and what was previously the coldest extrasolar object with a 5-m spectrum, Gl 570D. Thicker lines show the location of each objects 5-m photospheres. WISE 0855s and Jupiters photospheres are near the point where water starts to condense out into clouds (dashed line). [Skemer et al. 2016]Challenging ObservationsWith a chilly temperature of 250 K, the brown dwarf WISE 0855 is the closest thing weve been able to observe to a body resembling Jupiters ~130 K. WISE 0855 therefore presents an intriguing opportunity to directly study the atmosphere of an object whose physical characteristics are similar to our own gas giants.But studying the atmospheric characteristics of such a body is tricky. WISE 0855 is too cold and faint to be able to obtain traditional optical or near-infrared ( 2.5 m) spectroscopy of it. Luckily, like Jupiter, the opacity of its gas allows thermal emission from its deep atmosphere to escape through an atmospheric window around ~5 m.A team of scientists led by Andrew Skemer (UC Santa Cruz) set out to observe WISE 0855 in this window with the Gemini-North telescope and the Gemini Near-Infrared Spectrograph. Though WISE 0855 is five times fainter than the faintest object previously detected with ground-based 5-m spectroscopy, the dry air of Mauna Kea (and a lot of patience!) allowed the team to obtain unprecedented spectra of this object.WISE 0855s spectrum shows absorption features consistent with water vapor, and its best fit by a cloudy brown-dwarf model. [Skemer et al. 2016]Water Clouds FoundExoplanets and brown dwarfs cooler than ~350 K are expected to form water ice clouds in upper atmosphere

  7. Photosynthesis of organic compounds in the atmosphere of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, J. P.; Chen, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    An efficient conversion of CH4 to hydrocarbons and HCN takes place when NH3 is photolysed in the presence of CH4, H2, and He using a 184.9 nm light source. The extent of NH3 decomposition after a 1 hr exposure was determined spectrophotometrically; CH4, N2, and C2 and C3 hydrocarbons were detected and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Photolysis of one molar equivalent of NH3 results in the loss of 0.84 molar equivalent of CH4, which apparently reacts with hot hydrogen atoms produced by photolysis. The 8% of the NH3 which is not converted to N2 probably is converted to organic amines and nitrile derivatives. The results indicate that NH3 photolysis is a highly probable mechanism for the conversion of methane to more complex hydrocarbons in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter, and predict the occurrence of HCN, NH2NH2, and higher hydrocarbons in the Jovian atmosphere above the NH3 clouds.

  8. Atmospheric circulation of eccentric hot Jupiter HAT-P-2B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Nikole K. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Showman, Adam P. [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Knutson, Heather A. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Marley, Mark S., E-mail: nklewis@mit.edu [NASA Ames Research Center 245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    The hot Jupiter HAT-P-2b has become a prime target for Spitzer Space Telescope observations aimed at understanding the atmospheric response of exoplanets on highly eccentric orbits. Here we present a suite of three-dimensional atmospheric circulation models for HAT-P-2b that investigate the effects of assumed atmospheric composition and rotation rate on global scale winds and thermal patterns. We compare and contrast atmospheric models for HAT-P-2b, which assume one and five times solar metallicity, both with and without TiO/VO as atmospheric constituents. Additionally we compare models that assume a rotation period of half, one, and two times the nominal pseudo-synchronous rotation period. We find that changes in assumed atmospheric metallicity and rotation rate do not significantly affect model predictions of the planetary flux as a function of orbital phase. However, models in which TiO/VO are present in the atmosphere develop a transient temperature inversion between the transit and secondary eclipse events that results in significant variations in the timing and magnitude of the peak of the planetary flux compared with models in which TiO/VO are omitted from the opacity tables. We find that no one single atmospheric model can reproduce the recently observed full orbit phase curves at 3.6, 4.5 and 8.0 μm, which is likely due to a chemical process not captured by our current atmospheric models for HAT-P-2b. Further modeling and observational efforts focused on understanding the chemistry of HAT-P-2b's atmosphere are needed and could provide key insights into the interplay between radiative, dynamical, and chemical processes in a wide range of exoplanet atmospheres.

  9. Atmospheric Circulation of Eccentric Hot Jupiter HAT-P-2b

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Nikole K; Fortney, Jonathan J; Knutson, Heather A; Marley, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    The hot-Jupiter HAT-P-2b has become a prime target for Spitzer Space Telescope observations aimed at understanding the atmospheric response of exoplanets on highly eccentric orbits. Here we present a suite of three-dimensional atmospheric circulation models for HAT-P-2b that investigate the effects of assumed atmospheric composition and rotation rate on global scale winds and thermal patterns. We compare and contrast atmospheric models for HAT-P-2b, which assume one and five times solar metallicity, both with and without TiO/VO as atmospheric constituents. Additionally we compare models that assume a rotation period of half, one, and two times the nominal pseudo-synchronous rotation period. We find that changes in assumed atmospheric metallicity and rotation rate do not significantly affect model predictions of the planetary flux as a function of orbital phase. However, models in which TiO/VO are present in the atmosphere develop a transient temperature inversion between the transit and secondary eclipse even...

  10. Exploring Biases of Atmospheric Retrievals in Simulated JWST Transmission Spectra of Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchetto, M.; Waldmann, I. P.; Venot, O.; Lagage, P.-O.; Tinetti, G.

    2016-12-01

    With a scheduled launch in 2018 October, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is expected to revolutionize the field of atmospheric characterization of exoplanets. The broad wavelength coverage and high sensitivity of its instruments will allow us to extract far more information from exoplanet spectra than what has been possible with current observations. In this paper, we investigate whether current retrieval methods will still be valid in the era of JWST, exploring common approximations used when retrieving transmission spectra of hot Jupiters. To assess biases, we use 1D photochemical models to simulate typical hot Jupiter cloud-free atmospheres and generate synthetic observations for a range of carbon-to-oxygen ratios. Then, we retrieve these spectra using TauREx, a Bayesian retrieval tool, using two methodologies: one assuming an isothermal atmosphere, and one assuming a parameterized temperature profile. Both methods assume constant-with-altitude abundances. We found that the isothermal approximation biases the retrieved parameters considerably, overestimating the abundances by about one order of magnitude. The retrieved abundances using the parameterized profile are usually within 1σ of the true state, and we found the retrieved uncertainties to be generally larger compared to the isothermal approximation. Interestingly, we found that by using the parameterized temperature profile we could place tight constraints on the temperature structure. This opens the possibility of characterizing the temperature profile of the terminator region of hot Jupiters. Lastly, we found that assuming a constant-with-altitude mixing ratio profile is a good approximation for most of the atmospheres under study.

  11. Combining Abundance/Temperature Retrieval with 3D Atmospheric Circulation Simulations of Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Kevin

    2011-09-01

    The atmospheres of hot Jupiters are three-dimensional, non-linear entities and understanding them requires the construction of a hierarchy of models of varying sophistication. Since previous work has either focused on the atmospheric dynamics or implemented multi-band radiative transfer, a reasonable approach is to combine the treatment of 3D dynamics with dual-band radiative transfer, where the assumption is that the stellar irradiation and re-emitted radiation from the exoplanet are at distinct wavelengths. I report on the successful implementation of such a setup and demonstrate how it can be used to compute self-consistent temperature-pressure profiles on both the day and night sides of a hot Jupiter, as well as zonal-wind profiles, circulation cell patterns and the angular/temporal offset of the hotspot from the substellar point. In particular, the hotspot offset should aid us in distinguishing between different types of hot Jupiter atmospheres. Together with N. Madhusudhan, we combine the dual-band simulation technique with the abundance/temperature retrieval method of Madhusudhan & Seager, by empirically constraining a range of values for the broad-band opacities which are consistent with the current observations. The advantage of our novel method is that the range of opacities used improves with time as the observations get better. The ability to thoroughly, efficiently and systematically explore the interplay between atmospheric dynamics, radiation and synthetic spectra is an important step forward, as it prepares us for the theoretical interpretation of exoplanetary spectra which will be obtained by future space-based missions such as JWST and EChO. I acknowledge generous support from the Zwicky Prize Fellowship and the Star and Planet Formation Group (PI: Michael Meyer) at ETH Zurich.

  12. Life on the second sun. [thermophilic life possibility on Jupiter atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macelroy, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility of thermophilic life on Jupiter is considered. A speculative toruslike atmospheric biosphere is described, the environment within this 'biotorus' is discussed, and environmental niches available to thermophilic bacteria are considered. Effects of temperature on such organisms are examined along with the origins and evolutionary antecedents of thermophiles. It is concluded that the probability of life in the atmosphere of Jupiter, Saturn, or Uranus would appear to be low.

  13. Analysis Of The 2009 July Impact Debris In Jupiter'S Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin; Hueso, R.; Legarreta, J.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; García-Melendo, E.; Gómez, J. M.; Rojas, J. F.; Orton, G. S.; Wesley, A.; IOPW International Outer Planet Watch Team

    2009-09-01

    We report the analysis of images obtained by the contributors to the International Outer Planet Watch (IOPW) of the debris left in the atmosphere of Jupiter by the object that impacted the planet between 18 and 19 July 2009. The discovery images by Anthony Wesley in July 19.625 and the first two days of its tracking, shows a dark debris spot (continuum wavelength) located at planetocentric latitude -55.1 deg and 304.5 deg System III longitude. The imaging survey indicates that the spot was not present in July 18.375, so the impact occurred during a window between both dates. The main spot had a size of about 4,500 km and to its Northwest a thin debris halo of similar size was initially observed. Methane band images at a wavelength of 890 nm shows the spot to be bright indicating that the debris aerosols are highly placed in the atmosphere relative to surrounding clouds. At the central latitude of the impact, the Jovian flow has nearly zero speed but anticyclonic vorticity bounded by jets at -51.5 deg (directed westward with velocity -10 m/s) and at -57.5 deg (directed eastward with velocity 25 m/s). The morphology in the continuum and the spot brightness in the methane band strongly suggest that the feature was caused by a cometary or asteroidal impact, similar in behaviour to the SL9 impacts of 1994. This work has been funded by Spanish MEC AYA2006-07735 with FEDER support and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07. RH acknowledges a "Ramón y Cajal” contract from MEC.

  14. SPECTROSCOPIC EVIDENCE FOR A TEMPERATURE INVERSION IN THE DAYSIDE ATMOSPHERE OF HOT JUPITER WASP-33b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, Korey; Mandell, Avi M. [Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Madhusudhan, Nikku [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Deming, Drake [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Knutson, Heather, E-mail: khaynes0112@gmail.com [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-06-20

    We present observations of two occultations of the extrasolar planet WASP-33b using the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope, which allow us to constrain the temperature structure and composition of its dayside atmosphere. WASP-33b is the most highly irradiated hot Jupiter discovered to date, and the only exoplanet known to orbit a δ-Scuti star. We observed in spatial scan mode to decrease instrument systematic effects in the data, and removed fluctuations in the data due to stellar pulsations. The rms for our final, binned spectrum is 1.05 times the photon noise. We compare our final spectrum, along with previously published photometric data, to atmospheric models of WASP-33b spanning a wide range in temperature profiles and chemical compositions. We find that the data require models with an oxygen-rich chemical composition and a temperature profile that increases at high altitude. We find that our measured spectrum displays an excess in the measured flux toward short wavelengths that is best explained as emission from TiO. If confirmed by additional measurements at shorter wavelengths, this planet would become the first hot Jupiter with a thermal inversion that can be definitively attributed to the presence of TiO in its dayside atmosphere.

  15. The Influence of Atmospheric Scattering and Absorption on Ohmic Dissipation in Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Heng, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Using semi-analytical, one-dimensional models, we elucidate the influence of scattering and absorption on the degree of Ohmic dissipation in hot Jovian atmospheres. With the assumption of Saha equilibrium, the variation in temperature is the main driver of the variations in the electrical conductivity, induced current and Ohmic power dissipated. Atmospheres possessing temperature inversions tend to dissipate most of the Ohmic power superficially, at high altitudes, whereas those without temperature inversions are capable of greater dissipation deeper down. Scattering in the optical range of wavelengths tends to cool the lower atmosphere, thus reducing the degree of dissipation at depth. Purely absorbing cloud decks (in the infrared), of a finite extent in height, allow for localized reductions in dissipation and may reverse a temperature inversion if they are dense and thick enough, thus greatly enhancing the dissipation at depth. If Ohmic dissipation is the mechanism for inflating hot Jupiters, then variatio...

  16. HST hot-Jupiter transmission spectral survey: Haze in the atmosphere of WASP-6b

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolov, N; Burrows, A S; Fortney, J J; Henry, G W; Pont, F; Ballester, G E; Aigrain, S; Wilson, P A; Huitson, C M; Gibson, N P; Desert, J -M; Etangs, A Lecavelier des; Showman, A P; Vidal-Madjar, A; Wakeford, H R; Zahnle, K

    2014-01-01

    We report Hubble Space Telescope (HST) optical to near-infrared transmission spectroscopy of the hot Jupiter WASP-6b, measured with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and Spitzer's InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC). The resulting spectrum covers the range $0.29-4.5\\,\\mu$m. We find evidence for modest stellar activity of WASP-6b and take it into account in the transmission spectrum. The overall main characteristic of the spectrum is an increasing radius as a function of decreasing wavelength corresponding to a change of $\\Delta (R_p/R_{\\ast})=0.0071$ from 0.33 to $4.5\\,\\mu$m. The spectrum suggests an effective extinction cross-section with a power law of index consistent with Rayleigh scattering, with temperatures of $973\\pm144$ K at the planetary terminator. We compare the transmission spectrum with hot-Jupiter atmospheric models including condensate-free and aerosol-dominated models incorporating Mie theory. While none of the clear-atmosphere models is found to be in good agreement with the data, we ...

  17. The microwave opacity of ammonia and water vapor: Application to remote sensing of the atmosphere of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Thomas Ryan

    2008-06-01

    The object of this research program has been to provide a baseline for microwave remote sensing of ammonia and water vapor in the atmosphere of Jupiter through laboratory measurements of their microwave absorption properties. Jupiter is not only the largest planet in our solar system, but one of the most interesting and complex. Despite a handful of spacecraft missions and many astronomical measurements, much of Jupiter's atmospheric dynamics and composition remain a mystery. Although constraints have been formed on the amount of certain gases present, the global abundances and distributions of water vapor (H 2 O) and ammonia (NH 3 ) are relatively unknown. Measurements of H 2 O and NH 3 in the Jovian atmosphere to hundreds of bars of pressure are best accomplished via passive microwave emission measurements. For these measurements to be accurately interpreted, however, the hydrogen and helium pressure-broadened microwave opacities of H 2 O and NH 3 must be well characterized, a task that is very difficult if based solely on theory and limited laboratory measurements. Therefore, accurate laboratory measurements have been taken under a broad range of conditions that mimic those of the Jovian atmosphere. These measurements, performed using a newly redesigned high- accuracy system, and the corresponding models of microwave opacity that have been developed from them comprise the majority of this work. The models allow more accurate retrievals of H 2 O and NH 3 abundances from previous as well as future missions to Jupiter and the outer planets, such as the NASA New Frontiers class Juno mission scheduled for launch in 2011. This information will enable a greater understanding of the concentration and distribution of H 2 O and NH 3 in the Jovian atmosphere, which will reveal much about how Jupiter and our solar system formed and how similar planets could form in other solar systems, even planets that may be hospitable to life.

  18. Tidal Response of Preliminary Jupiter Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Sean M.; Hubbard, William B.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2016-11-01

    In anticipation of improved observational data for Jupiter’s gravitational field, from the Juno spacecraft, we predict the static tidal response for a variety of Jupiter interior models based on ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures. We calculate hydrostatic-equilibrium gravity terms, using the non-perturbative concentric Maclaurin Spheroid method that eliminates lengthy expansions used in the theory of figures. Our method captures terms arising from the coupled tidal and rotational perturbations, which we find to be important for a rapidly rotating planet like Jupiter. Our predicted static tidal Love number, {k}2=0.5900, is ˜10% larger than previous estimates. The value is, as expected, highly correlated with the zonal harmonic coefficient J 2, and is thus nearly constant when plausible changes are made to the interior structure while holding J 2 fixed at the observed value. We note that the predicted static k 2 might change, due to Jupiter’s dynamical response to the Galilean moons, and find reasons to argue that the change may be detectable—although we do not present here a theory of dynamical tides for highly oblate Jovian planets. An accurate model of Jupiter’s tidal response will be essential for interpreting Juno observations and identifying tidal signals from effects of other interior dynamics of Jupiter’s gravitational field.

  19. Detection of titanium oxide in the atmosphere of a hot Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedaghati, Elyar; Boffin, Henri M. J.; MacDonald, Ryan J.; Gandhi, Siddharth; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Gibson, Neale P.; Oshagh, Mahmoudreza; Claret, Antonio; Rauer, Heike

    2017-09-01

    As an exoplanet transits its host star, some of the light from the star is absorbed by the atoms and molecules in the planet’s atmosphere, causing the planet to seem bigger; plotting the planet’s observed size as a function of the wavelength of the light produces a transmission spectrum. Measuring the tiny variations in the transmission spectrum, together with atmospheric modelling, then gives clues to the properties of the exoplanet’s atmosphere. Chemical species composed of light elements—such as hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, sodium and potassium—have in this way been detected in the atmospheres of several hot giant exoplanets, but molecules composed of heavier elements have thus far proved elusive. Nonetheless, it has been predicted that metal oxides such as titanium oxide (TiO) and vanadium oxide occur in the observable regions of the very hottest exoplanetary atmospheres, causing thermal inversions on the dayside. Here we report the detection of TiO in the atmosphere of the hot-Jupiter planet WASP-19b. Our combined spectrum, with its wide spectral coverage, reveals the presence of TiO (to a confidence level of 7.7σ), a strongly scattering haze (7.4σ) and sodium (3.4σ), and confirms the presence of water (7.9σ) in the atmosphere.

  20. Molecular formation along the atmospheric mass loss of HD 209458 b and similar Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Pinotti, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The chemistry along the mass loss of Hot Jupiters is generally considered to be simple, consisting mainly of atoms, prevented from forming more complex species by the intense radiation field from their host stars. In order to probe the region where the temperature is low (T < 2000 K), we developed a 1D chemical and photochemical reaction model of the atmospheric mass loss of HD 209458 b, involving 56 species, including carbon chain and oxygen bearing ones, interacting through 566 reactions. The simulation results indicate that simple molecules like OH+, H2O+ and H3O+ are formed inside the region, considering that residual H2 survives in the exosphere, a possibility indicated by recent observational work. The molecules are formed and destroyed within a radial distance of less than 10^7 km, but the estimated integrated column density of OH+, a potential tracer of H2, is high enough to allow detection, which, once achieved, would indicate a revision of chemical models of the upper atmosphere of Hot Jupiters. ...

  1. THREE-DIMENSIONAL ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION OF WARM AND HOT JUPITERS: EFFECTS OF ORBITAL DISTANCE, ROTATION PERIOD, AND NONSYNCHRONOUS ROTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showman, Adam P. [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 University Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Lewis, Nikole K. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J., E-mail: showman@lpl.arizona.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2015-03-10

    Efforts to characterize extrasolar giant planet (EGP) atmospheres have so far emphasized planets within 0.05 AU of their stars. Despite this focus, known EGPs populate a continuum of orbital separations from canonical hot Jupiter values (0.03–0.05 AU) out to 1 AU and beyond. Unlike typical hot Jupiters, these more distant EGPs will not generally be synchronously rotating. In anticipation of observations of this population, we here present three-dimensional atmospheric circulation models exploring the dynamics that emerge over a broad range of rotation rates and incident stellar fluxes appropriate for warm and hot Jupiters. We find that the circulation resides in one of two basic regimes. On typical hot Jupiters, the strong day–night heating contrast leads to a broad, fast superrotating (eastward) equatorial jet and large day–night temperature differences. At faster rotation rates and lower incident fluxes, however, the day–night heating gradient becomes less important, and baroclinic instabilities emerge as a dominant player, leading to eastward jets in the midlatitudes, minimal temperature variations in longitude, and, often, weak winds at the equator. Our most rapidly rotating and least irradiated models exhibit similarities to Jupiter and Saturn, illuminating the dynamical continuum between hot Jupiters and the weakly irradiated giant planets of our own solar system. We present infrared (IR) light curves and spectra of these models, which depend significantly on incident flux and rotation rate. This provides a way to identify the regime transition in future observations. In some cases, IR light curves can provide constraints on the rotation rate of nonsynchronously rotating planets.

  2. On the Oscillations of the Jovian Atmosphere Above the Clouds of the Equatorial Zone of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, M. V.; Gorda, S. Yu.; Shagabutdinov, A. I.

    2017-02-01

    Spectral observations of the equatorial zone of Jupiter and the Sun as a star in the optical range of wavelengths have been carried out. The spectra of oscillations of the atmospheres of Jupiter and the Sun have been constructed on the base of these observations. The spectrum of oscillations of the Jovian atmosphere can considerably change during several days. The comparison of the spectra of oscillations of the atmospheres of "quiet" Jupiter and the Sun yields the following periods of oscillations of the Jovian atmosphere: 72.7, 30.2, 13.2, 7.5, 5.3 and 2.8 min, which are the strongest ones in power. The average amplitude of oscillations of the radial velocity of 0.364±0.100 km/s is found to have a period of 32.5±1.5 min in the layer of the atmosphere above the equatorial zone of Jupiter (the rotation period of this layer around Jupiter is determined to be decreasing from 6.55 to 6.28 hours in the time interval from March 30, 2016 to April 29, 2016). The influence of the solar activity on the spectrum of oscillations of the Jovian atmosphere is discussed.

  3. Atmospheric circulation of hot Jupiters: Coupled radiative-dynamical general circulation model simulations of HD 189733b and HD 209458b

    CERN Document Server

    Showman, Adam P; Lian, Yuan; Marley, Mark S; Freedman, Richard S; Knutson, Heather A; Charbonneau, David

    2008-01-01

    We present global, three-dimensional numerical simulations of HD 189733b and HD 209458b that couple the atmospheric dynamics to a realistic representation of non-gray cloud-free radiative transfer. The model, which we call the Substellar and Planetary Atmospheric Radiation and Circulation (SPARC) model, adopts the MITgcm for the dynamics and uses the radiative model of McKay, Marley, Fortney, and collaborators for the radiation. Like earlier work with simplified forcing, our simulations develop a broad eastward equatorial jet, mean westward flow at higher latitudes, and substantial flow over the poles at low pressure. For HD 189733b, our simulations without TiO and VO opacity can explain the broad features of the observed 8 and 24-micron light curves, including the modest day-night flux variation and the fact that the planet/star flux ratio peaks before the secondary eclipse. Our simulations also provide reasonable matches to the Spitzer secondary-eclipse depths at 4.5, 5.8, 8, 16, and 24 microns and the grou...

  4. Shear-driven instabilities and shocks in the atmospheres of hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromang, Sébastien; Leconte, Jeremy; Heng, Kevin

    2016-07-01

    Context. General circulation models of the atmosphere of hot Jupiters have shown the existence of a supersonic eastward equatorial jet. These results have been obtained using numerical schemes that filter out vertically propagating sound waves and assume vertical hydrostatic equilibrium, or were acquired with fully compressive codes that use large dissipative coefficients. Aims: We remove these two limitations and investigate the effects of compressibility on the atmospheric dynamics by solving the standard Euler equations. Methods: This was done by means of a series of simulations performed in the framework of the equatorial β-plane approximation using the finite-volume shock-capturing code RAMSES. Results: At low resolution, we recover the classical results described in the literature: we find a strong and steady supersonic equatorial jet of a few km s-1 that displays no signature of shocks. We next show that the jet zonal velocity depends significantly on the grid meridional resolution. When this resolution is fine enough to properly resolve the jet, the latter is subject to a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The jet zonal mean velocity displays regular oscillations with a typical timescale of a few days and a significant amplitude of about 15% of the jet velocity. We also find compelling evidence for the development of a vertical shear instability at pressure levels of a few bars. It seems to be responsible for an increased downward kinetic energy flux that significantly affects the temperature of the deep atmosphere and appears to act as a form of drag on the equatorial jet. This instability also creates velocity fluctuations that propagate upward and steepen into weak shocks at pressure levels of a few mbars. Conclusions: We conclude that hot-Jupiter equatorial jets are potentially unstable to both a barotropic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and a vertical shear instability. Upon confirmation using more realistic models, these two instabilities could result in

  5. Modeling the temporal and spatial variations of the vertical structure of Jupiter's atmosphere using observations of the 3-0 hydrogen quadrupole lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, C. C.; Hunten, D. M.; Tomasko, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    An observational program was established in 1983 to monitor the spatial and temporal variations in the Jovian atmosphere over short and long time scales. The program involves tracking several different longitudes as they rotate around the planet from one limb to another. This tracking experiment was done at many different wavelengths including the 3-0 S(1) and S(0) hydrogen quadrupole lines as well as several broad band methane absorptions. The June 1983 hydrogen quadrupole data was reduced and equivalent widths were measured for approximately 25 east-west positions across the planet at 7 different latitudes for both wavelengths. The data for the South Tropical Zone (20 deg. S) was modeled extensively and the effects of the various model parameters on the value of the calculated equivalent widths of both lines was measured as a longitude rotated from the east (or morning) limb to the west (or evening) limb. The value of the equivalent width is also quite sensitive to the height of the NH3 cloud top and to the value used for the single scattering albedo. A combination of these parameters changing on a diurnal time scale could also explain these observations. This gradual increase from one limb to the other appears in the data for both the North and South Equatorial Belts as well as the equatorial region and the North Tropical Zone. Models that used only normal hydrogen and models that used only equilibrium hydrogen were studied.

  6. Aerosol influence on energy balance of the middle atmosphere of Jupiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; West, Robert A; Irwin, Patrick G J; Nixon, Conor A; Yung, Yuk L

    2015-12-22

    Aerosols are ubiquitous in planetary atmospheres in the Solar System. However, radiative forcing on Jupiter has traditionally been attributed to solar heating and infrared cooling of gaseous constituents only, while the significance of aerosol radiative effects has been a long-standing controversy. Here we show, based on observations from the NASA spacecraft Voyager and Cassini, that gases alone cannot maintain the global energy balance in the middle atmosphere of Jupiter. Instead, a thick aerosol layer consisting of fluffy, fractal aggregate particles produced by photochemistry and auroral chemistry dominates the stratospheric radiative heating at middle and high latitudes, exceeding the local gas heating rate by a factor of 5-10. On a global average, aerosol heating is comparable to the gas contribution and aerosol cooling is more important than previously thought. We argue that fractal aggregate particles may also have a significant role in controlling the atmospheric radiative energy balance on other planets, as on Jupiter.

  7. Strict Upper Limits on the Carbon-to-Oxygen Ratios of Eight Hot Jupiters from Self-Consistent Atmospheric Retrieval

    CERN Document Server

    Benneke, Björn

    2015-01-01

    The elemental compositions of hot Jupiters are informative relics of planet formation that can help us answer long-standing questions regarding the origin and formation of giant planets. Here, I present the main conclusions from a comprehensive atmospheric retrieval survey of eight hot Jupiters with detectable molecular absorption in their near-infrared transmission spectra. I analyze the eight transmission spectra using the newly-developed, self-consistent atmospheric retrieval framework, SCARLET. Unlike previous methods, SCARLET combines the physical and chemical consistency of complex atmospheric models with the statistical treatment of observational uncertainties known from atmospheric retrieval techniques. I find that all eight hot Jupiters consistently require carbon-to-oxygen ratios (C/O) below 0.9. The finding of C/O<0.9 is highly robust for HD209458b, WASP-12b, WASP-19b, HAT-P-1b, and XO-1b. For HD189733b, WASP-17b, and WASP-43b, I find that the published WFC3 transmission spectra favor C/O<0.9...

  8. The atmospheric circulation of a nine-hot Jupiter sample: Probing circulation and chemistry over a wide phase space

    CERN Document Server

    Kataria, Tiffany; Lewis, Nikole K; Visscher, Channon; Showman, Adam P; Fortney, Jonathan J; Marley, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    We present results from an atmospheric circulation study of nine hot Jupiters that comprise a large transmission spectral survey using the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes. These observations exhibit a range of spectral behavior over optical and infrared wavelengths which suggest diverse cloud and haze properties in their atmospheres. By utilizing the specific system parameters for each planet, we naturally probe a wide phase space in planet radius, gravity, orbital period, and equilibrium temperature. First, we show that our model "grid" recovers trends shown in traditional parametric studies of hot Jupiters, particularly equatorial superrotation and increased day-night temperature contrast with increasing equilibrium temperature. We show how spatial temperature variations, particularly between the dayside and nightside and west and east terminators, can vary by hundreds of K, which could imply large variations in Na, K, CO and CH4 abundances in those regions. These chemical variations can be large enough...

  9. Quenching of Carbon Monoxide and Methane in the Atmospheres of Cool Brown Dwarfs and Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Visscher, Channon

    2011-01-01

    We explore CO-CH4 quench kinetics in the atmospheres of substellar objects using updated time-scale arguments, as suggested by a thermochemical kinetics and diffusion model that transitions from the thermochemical-equilibrium regime in the deep atmosphere to a quench-chemical regime at higher altitudes. More specifically, we examine CO quench chemistry on the T dwarf Gliese 229B and CH4 quench chemistry on the hot-Jupiter HD 189733b. We describe a method for correctly calculating reverse rate coefficients for chemical reactions, discuss the predominant pathways for CO-CH4 interconversion as indicated by the model, and demonstrate that a simple time-scale approach can be used to accurately describe the behavior of quenched species when updated reaction kinetics and mixing-length-scale assumptions are used. Proper treatment of quench kinetics has important implications for estimates of molecular abundances and/or vertical mixing rates in the atmospheres of substellar objects. Our model results indicate signific...

  10. Ground-based Observational Characterization of Transiting Hot-Jupiter Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G.

    2016-09-01

    -rich model is unable to explain all the data, a carbon-rich model provides a reasonable fit but violates the energy balance. The GROND emission measurements of WASP-46 b also suggest an isothermal temperature profile for its dayside atmosphere. Our K-band measurement for WASP-43 b confirms previous detections obtained in the 2.09 μm narrow band and K_S band. All three hot Jupiters seem to have very poor day to nightside heat redistribution. Furthermore, we present the analysis of optical eclipse measurements for WASP-46 b and WASP-43 b, which are either false positives or indication of reflective clouds at high altitude. Additionally, thanks to the simultaneous multi-band observing capability of GROND, a broad-band transmission spectrum is derived for WASP-43 b. Limited by current spectral resolution and precision, the atmospheric compositions can not be distinguished, indicating the necessity of the spectroscopic observations. In Chapter 6 and 7, the spectroscopic observations on the transits of HAT-P-1 b and HAT-P-32 b are summarized, respectively. Stellar light that has been transmitted through planetary terminator atmosphere carries information of atmospheric compositions. We report the first detection of the K resonance doublet absorption in HAT-P-1 b. This is the first time to resolve the K doublets in any planet. The K absorption profile consists of only narrow cores while lacks pressure-broadened wings, indicating clouds or hazes. Our optical transmission spectrum, covering the wavelength ranges of 310-520 nm and 610-1000 nm, rules out the presence of TiO and VO and the presence of pure Rayleigh-scattering hazes. Together with the 1.1-1.7 μm transmission spectrum derived by HST/WFC3, we also rule out the possibility of optically thick clouds. The current combined dataset is well explained by a nearly solar-abundance atmosphere of Na, K, H_2O, and CH_4. For HAT-P-32 b, the measured optical transmission spectrum shows signatures of TiO/VO absorption to some degree

  11. Bayesian Evolution Models for Jupiter with Helium Rain and Double-diffusive Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Mankovich, Christopher; Moore, Kevin L

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen and helium demix when sufficiently cool, and this bears on the evolution of all giant planets at large separations at or below roughly a Jupiter mass. We model the thermal evolution of Jupiter, including its evolving helium distribution following results of ab initio simulations for helium immiscibility in metallic hydrogen. After 4 Gyr of homogeneous evolution, differentiation establishes a thin helium gradient below 1 Mbar that dynamically stabilizes the fluid to convection. The region undergoes overstable double-diffusive convection (ODDC), whose weak heat transport maintains a superadiabatic temperature gradient. With a generic parameterization for the ODDC efficiency, the models can reconcile Jupiter's intrinsic flux, atmospheric helium content, and radius at the age of the solar system if the Lorenzen et al. H-He phase diagram is translated to lower temperatures. We cast the evolutionary models in an MCMC framework to explore tens of thousands of evolutionary sequences, retrieving probability d...

  12. Atmospheric Characterization of the Hot Jupiter Kepler-13Ab

    CERN Document Server

    Shporer, Avi; Knutson, Heather A; Szabo, Gyula M; Zhao, Ming; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Jonathan; Agol, Eric; Cowan, Nicolas B; Desert, Jean-Michel; Howard, Andrew W; Isaacson, Howard; Lewis, Nikole A; Showman, Adam P; Todorov, Kamen O

    2014-01-01

    (abridged) Kepler-13Ab (= KOI-13.01) is one of very few known short-period (1.76 day) transiting planets orbiting a bright A-type star. The availability of Kepler data allows a measurement of the planet's occultation (secondary eclipse) and orbital phase curve, which we combine with occultations observed by Spitzer at 3.6 micron and 4.5 micron and a ground-based occultation observation in the $Ks$ band (2.1 micron). For the day-side hemisphere we derive a temperate of 2,750 $\\pm$ 160 K as the effective temperature of a black body that will show the same occultation depths, and a high geometric albedo $A_g$ = 0.33$^{+0.04}_{-0.06}$. Comparing the occultation depths with one-dimensional planetary atmosphere models suggests the presence of an atmospheric temperature inversion. The Kepler mid-occultation time measured here is 34.0 $\\pm$ 6.9 s earlier than expected based on the mid-transit time reported in the literature and the expected time delay due to light travel time. This could be due to a small orbital ecc...

  13. H{sub 2}O ABUNDANCES IN THE ATMOSPHERES OF THREE HOT JUPITERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Hedges, Christina [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Crouzet, Nicolas; McCullough, Peter R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Deming, Drake, E-mail: nmadhu@ast.cam.ac.uk [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    The core accretion theory for giant planet formation predicts enrichment of elemental abundances in planetary envelopes caused by runaway accretion of planetesimals, which is consistent with measured super-solar abundances of C, N, P, S, Xe, and Ar in Jupiter's atmosphere. However, the abundance of O, which is expected to be the most dominant constituent of planetesimals, is unknown for solar system giant planets, owing to the condensation of water in their ultra-cold atmospheres, thereby posing a key unknown in solar system formation. On the other hand, hundreds of extrasolar ''hot Jupiters'' are known with very high temperatures (≥1000 K), making them excellent targets to measure H{sub 2}O abundances and, hence, oxygen in their atmospheres. We constrain the atmospheric H{sub 2}O abundances in three hot Jupiters (HD 189733b, HD 209458b, and WASP-12b), spanning a wide temperature range (1200-2500 K), using their near-infrared transmission spectra obtained using the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We report conclusive measurements of H{sub 2}O in HD 189733b and HD 209458b, while that in WASP-12b is not well constrained by present data. The data allow nearly solar as well as significantly sub-solar abundances in HD 189733b and WASP-12b. However, for HD 209458b, we report the most precise H{sub 2}O measurement in an exoplanet to date that suggests a ∼20-135 × sub-solar H{sub 2}O abundance. We discuss the implications of our results on the formation conditions of hot Jupiters and on the likelihood of clouds in their atmospheres. Our results highlight the critical importance of high-precision spectra of hot Jupiters for deriving their H{sub 2}O abundances.

  14. A tenuous carbon dioxide atmosphere on Jupiter's moon Callisto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    An off-limb scan of Callisto was conducted by the Galileo near-infrared mapping spectrometer to search for a carbon dioxide atmosphere. Airglow in the carbon dioxide nu3 band was observed up to 100 kilometers above the surface and indicates the presence of a tenuous carbon dioxide atmosphere with surface pressure of 7.5 x 10(-12) bar and a temperature of about 150 kelvin, close to the surface temperature. A lifetime on the order of 4 years is suggested, based on photoionization and magnetospheric sweeping. Either the atmosphere is transient and was formed recently or some process is currently supplying carbon dioxide to the atmosphere.

  15. The Mechanical Greenhouse: Burial of Heat by Turbulence in Hot Jupiter Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Youdin, Andrew N

    2010-01-01

    The intense irradiation received by hot Jupiters suppresses convection in the outer layers of their atmospheres and lowers their cooling rates. "Inflated" hot Jupiters, i.e., those with anomalously large transit radii, require additional sources of heat or suppressed cooling. We consider the effect of forced turbulent mixing in the radiative layer, which could be driven by atmospheric circulation or by another mechanism. Due to stable stratification in the atmosphere, forced turbulence drives a downward flux of heat. Weak turbulent mixing slows the cooling rate by this process, as if the planet was irradiated more intensely. Stronger turbulent mixing buries heat into the convective interior, provided the turbulence extends to the radiative-convective boundary. This inflates the planet until a balance is reached between the heat buried into and radiated from the interior. We also include the direct injection of heat due to the dissipation of turbulence or other effects. Such heating is already known to slow pl...

  16. Modelling of Jupiter's Innermost Radiation Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov, J. D.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    In order to understand better source and loss processes for energetic trapped protons near Jupiter, a modification of de Pater and Goertz' finite difference diffusion calculations for Jovian equatorial energetic electrons is made to apply to the case of protons inside the orbit of Metis. Explicit account is taken of energy loss in the Jovian ring. Comparison of the results is made with Galileo Probe measurements.

  17. Jupiter's Upper Atmospheric Winds Revealed in Ultraviolet Images by Hubble Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    These four NASA Hubble Space Telescope images of Jupiter, as seen in visible (violet) and far-ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, show the remarkable spreading of the clouds of smoke and dust thrown into the atmosphere after the impacts of the fragments of comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9. These dark regions provide the only information ever obtained on the wind direction and speed in Jupiter's upper atmosphere.TOP Three impact sites appear as dark smudges lined up along Jupiter's southern hemisphere (from left to right, sites C, A, and E). This pair of images was obtained on 17 July, several hours after the E impact. These 3 impact sites appear strikingly darker in the far-ultraviolet images to the right. This is because the smoke and dust rising from the fireballs absorbs UV light more strongly than violet light, so that the clouds appear both darker and larger in the UV images. Apparently, the fireball and plume threw large amounts of material completely above the atmosphere. This material diffused back down through the atmosphere with the smaller and lighter particles suspended at high altitudes.BOTTOM Hubble's view of the same hemisphere of Jupiter 12-13 days later shows that the smoke and dust have now been spread mainly in the east/west direction by the prevailing winds at the altitude where the dark material is suspended or 'floating' in the atmosphere.HST shows that winds in Jupiter's upper atmosphere carry the high altitude smoke and dust in different directions than in the lower atmosphere. For example, the UV image shows a fainter cloud near 45 deg. south latitude, which does not appear in the violet image. The fainter cloud may be due to high altitude material which is drifting with the upper atmospheric winds to the north away from the polar regions. However, in the left-hand impact regions the clouds being observed are lower in the atmosphere where there is apparently no such northerly wind.The violet images show the Great Red Spot, on the eastern (right) limb

  18. The occultation of beta Scorpii by Jupiter. I - The structure of the Jovian upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veverka, J.; Wasserman, L. H.; Elliot, J.; Sagan, C.; Liller, W.

    1974-01-01

    The light curves of beta Scorpii AB and C were recorded during occultation by Jupiter with a time resolution of 0.01 sec. The spikes on the curves, correlated with flashes observed through the eyepiece, are shown to be due to density fluctuations in Jupiter's atmosphere. Using the delays in spike arrival times, the ratio of the refractivities at 3934 and 6201 A is found to be 0.9713 + or - 0.0015. Temperature profiles for three different assumed atmospheric compositions are generated from the light curves. Assuming the terrestrial value for the eddy diffusion coefficient, the turbopause is calculated to occur at the 10 to the 13th power per cu cm level, below which a positive temperature gradient of about 1 K/km is indicated.

  19. Probing the terminator region atmosphere of the Hot-Jupiter XO-1b with transmission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Tinetti, G; Swain, M R; Griffith, C A; Vasisht, G; Brown, L R; Burke, C; McCullough, P

    2010-01-01

    We report here the first infrared spectrum of the hot-Jupiter XO-1b. The observations were obtained with NICMOS instrument onboard the Hubble Space Telescope during a primary eclipse of the XO-1 system. Near photon-noise-limited spectroscopy between 1.2 and 1.8 micron allows us to determine the main composition of this hot-Jupiter's planetary atmosphere with good precision. This is the third hot-Jupiter's atmosphere for which spectroscopic data are available in the near IR. The spectrum shows the presence of water vapor (H2O), methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2), and suggests the possible presence of carbon monoxide (CO). We show that the published IRAC secondary transit emission photometric data are compatible with the atmospheric composition at the terminator determined from the NICMOS spectrum, with a range of possible mixing-ratios and thermal profiles; additional emission spectroscopy data are needed to reduce the degeneracy of the possible solutions. Finally, we note the similarity between the 1.2-1....

  20. Minimal prospects for radio detection of extensive air showers in the atmosphere of Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Bray, J D

    2016-01-01

    One possible approach for detecting ultra-high-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos is to search for radio emission from extensive air showers created when they interact in the atmosphere of Jupiter, effectively utilizing Jupiter as a particle detector. We investigate the potential of this approach. For searches with current or planned radio telescopes we find that the effective area for detection of cosmic rays is substantial (~3*10^7 km^2), but the acceptance angle is so small that the typical geometric aperture (~10^3 km^2 sr) is less than that of existing terrestrial detectors, and cosmic rays also cannot be detected below an extremely high threshold energy (~10^23 eV). The geometric aperture for neutrinos is slightly larger, and greater sensitivity can be achieved with a radio detector on a Jupiter-orbiting satellite, but in neither case is this sufficient to constitute a practical detection technique. Exploitation of the large surface area of Jupiter for detecting ultra-high-energy particles remains a long-...

  1. Minimal Prospects for Radio Detection of Extensive Air Showers in the Atmosphere of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, J. D.; Nelles, A.

    2016-07-01

    One possible approach for detecting ultra-high-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos is to search for radio emission from extensive air showers created when they interact in the atmosphere of Jupiter, effectively utilizing Jupiter as a particle detector. We investigate the potential of this approach. For searches with current or planned radio telescopes we find that the effective area for detection of cosmic rays is substantial (˜3 × 107 km2), but the acceptance angle is so small that the typical geometric aperture (˜103 km2 sr) is less than that of existing terrestrial detectors, and cosmic rays also cannot be detected below an extremely high threshold energy (˜1023 eV). The geometric aperture for neutrinos is slightly larger, and greater sensitivity can be achieved with a radio detector on a Jupiter-orbiting satellite, but in neither case is this sufficient to constitute a practical detection technique. Exploitation of the large surface area of Jupiter for detecting ultra-high-energy particles remains a long-term prospect that will require a different technique, such as orbital fluorescence detection.

  2. Jupiter models with improved ab initio hydrogen EOS (H-REOS.2)

    CERN Document Server

    Nettelmann, Nadine; Holst, Bastian; Redmer, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    The amount and distribution of heavy elements in Jupiter gives indications on the process of its formation and evolution. Core mass and metallicity predictions however depend on the equations of state used, and on model assumptions. We present an improved ab initio hydrogen equation of state, H-REOS.2 and compute the internal structure and thermal evolution of Jupiter within the standard three-layer approach. The advance over comparable previous Jupiter models (Nettelmann et al. 2008, ApJ 683, 1217) is that the new models are also consistent with the observed \\gtrsim 2 times solar heavy element abundances in Jupiter's atmosphere. Such models have a rock core mass Mcore=0-8 ME, total mass of heavy elements MZ=28-31 ME, a deep internal layer boundary at \\geq 4 Mbar, and a cooling time of 4.7 Gyrs when assuming homogeneous evolution. We also calculate two-layer models in the manner of Militzer et al. (2008), ApJ 688, L45, and find a comparable core mass but significantly higher envelope metallicity of 4.5 times ...

  3. STUDYING ATMOSPHERE-DOMINATED HOT JUPITER KEPLER PHASE CURVES: EVIDENCE THAT INHOMOGENEOUS ATMOSPHERIC REFLECTION IS COMMON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shporer, Avi; Hu, Renyu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    We identify three Kepler transiting planets, Kepler-7b, Kepler-12b, and Kepler-41b, whose orbital phase-folded light curves are dominated by planetary atmospheric processes including thermal emission and reflected light, while the impact of non-atmospheric (i.e., gravitational) processes, including beaming (Doppler boosting) and tidal ellipsoidal distortion, is negligible. Therefore, those systems allow a direct view of their atmospheres without being hampered by the approximations used in the inclusion of both atmospheric and non-atmospheric processes when modeling the phase-curve shape. We present here the analysis of Kepler-12b and Kepler-41b atmosphere based on their Kepler phase curve, while the analysis of Kepler-7b was already presented elsewhere. The model we used efficiently computes reflection and thermal emission contributions to the phase curve, including inhomogeneous atmospheric reflection due to longitudinally varying cloud coverage. We confirm Kepler-12b and Kepler-41b show a westward phase shift between the brightest region on the planetary surface and the substellar point, similar to Kepler-7b. We find that reflective clouds located on the west side of the substellar point can explain the phase shift. The existence of inhomogeneous atmospheric reflection in all three of our targets, selected due to their atmosphere-dominated Kepler phase curve, suggests this phenomenon is common. Therefore, it is also likely to be present in planetary phase curves that do not allow a direct view of the planetary atmosphere as they contain additional orbital processes. We discuss the implications of a bright-spot shift on the analysis of phase curves where both atmospheric and gravitational processes appear, including the mass discrepancy seen in some cases between the companion’s mass derived from the beaming and ellipsoidal photometric amplitudes. Finally, we discuss the potential detection of non-transiting but otherwise similar planets, whose mass is too

  4. Atmospheric Waves and Dynamics Beneath Jupiters Clouds from Radio Wavelength Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Richard G.; Butler, Bryan; Sault, Bob; Morales-Juberias, Raul; Simon, Amy; De Pater, Imke

    2017-01-01

    We observed Jupiter at wavelengths near 2 cm with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in February 2015. These frequencies are mostly sensitive to variations in ammonia abundance and probe between approx. 0.5- 2.0 bars of pressure in Jupiters atmosphere; within and below the visible cloud deck which has its base near 0.7 bars. The resultant observed data were projected into a cylindrical map of the planet with spatial resolution of approx. 1500 km at the equator. We have examined the data for atmospheric waves and observed a prominent bright belt of radio hotspot features near 10 N, likely connected to the same equatorial wave associated with the 5-m hotspots. We conducted a passive tracer power spectral wave analysis for the entire map and latitude regions corresponding to eastward and westward jets and compare our results to previous studies. The power spectra analysis revealed that the atmosphere sampled in our observation (excluding the NEB region) is in a 2-D turbulent regime and its dynamics are predominately governed by the shallow water equations. The Great Red Spot (GRS) is also very prominent and has a noticeable meridional asymmetry and we compare it, and nearby storms, with optical images. We find that the meridional radio profile has a global north-south hemisphere distinction and find correlations of it to optical intensity banding and to shear zones of the zonal wind profile over select regions of latitude. Amateur optical images taken before and after our observation complemented the radio wave- length map to investigate dynamics of the equatorial region in Jupiters atmosphere. We find that two radio hotspots at 2 cm are well correlated with optical plumes in the NEB, additionally revealing they are not the same 5 m hotspot features correlated with optical dark patches between adjacent plumes. This analysis exploits the VLAs upgraded sensitivity and explores the opportunities now possible when studying gas giants, especially atmospheric

  5. Modeling the Neutral Gas and Plasma Environment of Jupiter's Moon Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Martin; Tenishev, Valeriy; Hansen, Kenneth; Jia, Xianzhe; Combi, Michael; Gombosi, Tamas

    Jupiter's moon Europa has a thin gravitationally bound neutral atmosphere, which is mostly created through sputtering of high-energy ions impacting on its icy surface. The interaction of Europa with the Jovian magnetosphere is simulated using the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model BATSRUS. We start from the model by Kabin et al. [JGR, Vol. 104, No. A9, (1999)], which accounts for the exospheric mass loading, ion-neutral charge exchange, and ion-electron recombination. The derived magnetic field topology and plasma speeds are used to calculate the Lorentz force for our test particle Monte Carlo model. We use this model to simulate Europa's plasma and neutral environment by tracking particles created on the moon's surface by sputtering or sublimation, through dissociation and/or ionization in the atmosphere, or entering the system from Jupiter's magnetosphere as high energy ions. Neutral particle trajectories are followed by solving the equation of motion in Europa's gravity field whereas the ion population is additionally subject to the Lorentz force. We will show preliminary results of this work with application to the missions to the Jupiter system currently under consideration by NASA (JEO) and ESA (JGO).

  6. On the effects of clouds and hazes in the atmospheres of hot Jupiters: semi-analytical temperature-pressure profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Kevin; Hayek, Wolfgang; Pont, Frédéric; Sing, David K.

    2012-02-01

    Motivated by the work of Guillot, we present a semi-analytical formalism for calculating the temperature-pressure profiles in hot Jovian atmospheres which includes the effects of clouds/hazes and collision-induced absorption. Using the dual-band approximation, we assume that stellar irradiation and thermal emission from the hot Jupiter occur at distinct wavelengths ('shortwave' versus 'longwave'). For a purely absorbing cloud/haze, we demonstrate its dual effect of cooling and warming the upper and lower atmosphere, respectively, which modifies, in a non-trivial manner, the condition for whether a temperature inversion is present in the upper atmosphere. The warming effect becomes more pronounced as the cloud/haze deck resides at greater depths. If it sits below the shortwave photosphere, the warming effect becomes either more subdued or ceases altogether. If shortwave scattering is present, its dual effect is to warm and cool the upper and lower atmospheres, respectively, thus counteracting the effects of enhanced longwave absorption by the cloud/haze. We make a tentative comparison of a four-parameter model to the temperature-pressure data points inferred from the observations of HD 189733b and estimate that its Bond albedo is approximately 10 per cent. Besides their utility in developing physical intuition, our semi-analytical models are a guide for the parameter space exploration of hot Jovian atmospheres via three-dimensional simulations of atmospheric circulation.

  7. The meteorology of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, A. P.

    1976-01-01

    From the point of view of meteorology the most important differences between Jupiter and the earth are related to the fact that Jupiter has an appreciable internal energy source and probably lacks a solid surface. The composition and vertical structure of the Jovian atmosphere is considered along with the composition of Jovian cloud particles, turbulence in Jupiter's atmosphere, data on the horizontal structure and motions of the atmosphere, and questions related to the longevity of Jupiter's clouds. Attention is given to the barotropic characteristics of Jupiter's atmosphere, the radiation balance in the atmosphere of the earth and of Jupiter, and studies of the Great Red Spot.

  8. The Deep Water Abundance on Jupiter: New Constraints from Thermochemical Kinetics and Diffusion Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Visscher, Channon; Saslow, Sarah A

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a one-dimensional thermochemical kinetics and diffusion model for Jupiter's atmosphere that accurately describes the transition from the thermochemical regime in the deep troposphere (where chemical equilibrium is established) to the quenched regime in the upper troposphere (where chemical equilibrium is disrupted). The model is used to calculate chemical abundances of tropospheric constituents and to identify important chemical pathways for CO-CH4 interconversion in hydrogen-dominated atmospheres. In particular, the observed mole fraction and chemical behavior of CO is used to indirectly constrain the Jovian water inventory. Our model can reproduce the observed tropospheric CO abundance provided that the water mole fraction lies in the range (0.25-6.0) x 10^-3 in Jupiter's deep troposphere, corresponding to an enrichment of 0.3 to 7.3 times the protosolar abundance (assumed to be H2O/H2 = 9.61 x 10^-4). Our results suggest that Jupiter's oxygen enrichment is roughly similar to that for carb...

  9. An integrated model for Jupiter's dynamo action and mean jet dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastine, Thomas; Wicht, Johannes; Duarte, Lucia; Heimpel, Moritz

    2014-05-01

    Data from various space crafts revealed that Jupiter's large scale interior magnetic field is very Earth-like. This is surprising since numerical simulations have demonstrated that, for example, the radial dependence of density, electrical conductivity and other physical properties, which is only mild in the iron cores of terrestrial planets but very drastic in gas planets, can significantly affect the interior dynamics. Jupiter's dynamo action is thought to take place in the deeper envelope where hydrogen, the main constituent of Jupiter's atmosphere, assumes metallic properties. The potential interaction between the observed zonal jets and the deeper dynamo region is an unresolved problem with important consequences for the magnetic field generation. Here we present the first numerical simulation that is based on recent interior models and covers 99% of the planetary radius (below the 1 bar level). A steep decease in the electrical conductivity over the outer 10% in radius allowed us to model both the deeper metallic region and the outer molecular layer in an integrated approach. The magnetic field very closely reproduces Jupiter's known large scale field. A strong equatorial zonal jet remains constrained to the molecular layer while higher latitude jets are suppressed by Lorentz forces. This suggests that Jupiter's higher latitude jets remain shallow and are driven by an additional effect not captured in our deep convection model. The dynamo action of the equatorial jet produces a band of magnetic field located around the equator. The unprecedented magnetic field resolution expected from the Juno mission will allow to resolve this feature allowing a direct detection of the equatorial jet dynamics at depth. Typical secular variation times scales amount to around 750 yr for the dipole contribution but decrease to about 5 yr at the expected Juno resolution (spherical harmonic degree 20). At a nominal mission duration of one year Juno should therefore be able to

  10. Io's SO2 Atmosphere Viewed in Silhouette by Jupiter Lyman-α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retherford, Kurt D.; Roth, Lorenz; Feaga, Lori M.; Becker, Tracy M.; Tsang, Constantine; Jessup, Kandis-Lea; Grava, Cesare

    2016-10-01

    We report a new technique for mapping Io's SO2 vapor distribution. Hubble's Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) instrument observed Io during four Jupiter transit events to obtain medium resolution far-UV spectral images near the Lyman-α wavelength of 121.6 nm. Jupiter's bright Lyman-α dayglow provides a background light source for opacity measurements, much like during a stellar occultation or transiting exoplanet event. Peaks in the photoabsorption cross-sections for sulfur dioxide occur near 122 nm, with resulting absorptions raising the altitude where a tangential line of sight opacity of tau=1 is detected up to resolvable distances above the disk. This method of measuring column densities along lines of sight above the limb complements Lyman-α reflectance imaging and other methods for measuring Io's SO2 gas. For example, interpretation of Io's surface reflected components at far-UV wavelengths is complicated by SO2 frost features being correlated with regions of known volcanic outgassing activity, while Jupiter's Lyman-α dayglow provides a more spatially uniform background light source. Initial examination of these near-terminator limb observations with STIS confirms the findings from previous Lyman-α disk reflectance imaging using STIS's G140L mode (e.g., Feldman et al., GRL, 2000; Feaga et al. 2009) that Io's polar SO2 density is roughly an order of magnitude lower than found at the equator. As Strobel & Wolven (2001) described it, Io appears to wear its dayside atmosphere as "a belt" around the equator. We describe detailed simulations, now underway, that incorporate the STIS point spread function and consideration of additional attenuation by atmospheric hydrogen atoms, which are produced by charge exchange reactions between magnetospheric protons and Io's atmosphere.

  11. Jupiter Eruptions Captured in Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for high resolution image of Nature Cover Detailed analysis of two continent-sized storms that erupted in Jupiter's atmosphere in March 2007 shows that Jupiter's internal heat plays a significant role in generating atmospheric disturbances. Understanding these outbreaks could be the key to unlock the mysteries buried in the deep Jovian atmosphere, say astronomers. This infrared image shows two bright plume eruptions obtained by the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on April 5, 2007. Understanding these phenomena is important for Earth's meteorology where storms are present everywhere and jet streams dominate the atmospheric circulation. Jupiter is a natural laboratory where atmospheric scientists study the nature and interplay of the intense jets and severe atmospheric phenomena. According to the analysis, the bright plumes were storm systems triggered in Jupiter's deep water clouds that moved upward in the atmosphere vigorously and injected a fresh mixture of ammonia ice and water about 20 miles (30 kilometers) above the visible clouds. The storms moved in the peak of a jet stream in Jupiter's atmosphere at 375 miles per hour (600 kilometers per hour). Models of the disturbance indicate that the jet stream extends deep in the buried atmosphere of Jupiter, more than 60 miles (approximately100 kilometers) below the cloud tops where most sunlight is absorbed.

  12. An Analysis of Cassini Observations Regarding the Structure of Jupiter's Equatorial Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, David S.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.

    2012-01-01

    A variety of intriguing atmospheric phenomena reside on both sides of Jupiter's equator. 5-micron bright hot spots and opaque plumes prominently exhibit dynamic behavior to the north, whereas compact, dark chevron-shaped features and isolated anticyclonic disturbances periodically occupy the southern equatorial latitudes. All of these phenomena are associated with the vertical and meridional perturbations of Rossby waves disturbing the mean atmospheric state. As previous observational analysis and numerical simulations have investigated the dynamics of the region, an examination of the atmosphere's vertical structure though radiative transfer analysis is necessary for improved understanding of this unique environment. Here we present preliminary analysis of a multispectral Cassini imaging data set acquired during the spacecraft's flyby of Jupiter in 2000. We evaluated multiple methane and continuum spectral channels at available viewing angles to improve constraints on the vertical structure of the haze and cloud layers comprising these interesting features. Our preliminary results indicate distinct differences in the structure for both hemispheres. Upper troposphere hazes and cloud layers are prevalent in the northern equatorial latitudes, but are not present in corresponding southern latitudes. Continued analysis will further constrain the precise structure present in these phenomena and the differences between them.

  13. An Analysis of Cassini Observations Regarding the Structure of Jupiter's Equatorial Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, David S.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.

    2012-01-01

    A variety of intriguing atmospheric phenomena reside on both sides of Jupiter's equator. 5-micron bright hot spots and opaque plumes prominently exhibit dynamic behavior to the north, whereas compact, dark chevron-shaped features and isolated anticyclonic disturbances periodically occupy the southern equatorial latitudes. All of these phenomena are associated with the vertical and meridional perturbations of Rossby waves disturbing the mean atmospheric state. As previous observational analysis and numerical simulations have investigated the dynamics of the region, an examination of the atmosphere's vertical structure though radiative transfer analysis is necessary for improved understanding of this unique environment. Here we present preliminary analysis of a multispectral Cassini imaging data set acquired during the spacecraft's flyby of Jupiter in 2000. We evaluated multiple methane and continuum spectral channels at available viewing angles to improve constraints on the vertical structure of the haze and cloud layers comprising these interesting features. Our preliminary results indicate distinct differences in the structure for both hemispheres. Upper troposphere hazes and cloud layers are prevalent in the northern equatorial latitudes, but are not present in corresponding southern latitudes. Continued analysis will further constrain the precise structure present in these phenomena and the differences between them.

  14. Atmospheric Characterization of Five Hot Jupiters with the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Sukrit; Charbonneau, David; Desert, Jean-Michel; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Deming, Drake; Wilkins, Ashlee; Mandell, Avi M.

    2014-01-01

    We probe the structure and composition of the atmospheres of five hot Jupiter exoplanets using the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument. We use the G141 grism (1.1-1.7 micrometers) to study TrES-2b, TrES-4b, and CoRoT-1b in transit; TrES-3b in secondary eclipse; and WASP-4b in both. This wavelength region includes a predicted absorption feature from water at 1.4 micrometers, which we expect to be nondegenerate with the other molecules that are likely to be abundant for hydrocarbon-poor (e.g., solar composition) hot Jupiter atmospheres. We divide our wavelength regions into 10 bins. For each bin we produce a spectrophotometric light curve spanning the time of transit or eclipse. We correct these light curves for instrumental systematics without reference to an instrument model. For our transmission spectra, our mean 1s precision per bin corresponds to variations of 2.1, 2.8, and 3.0 atmospheric scale heights for TrES-2b, TrES-4b, and CoRoT-1b, respectively. We find featureless spectra for these three planets. We are unable to extract a robust transmission spectrum for WASP-4b. For our dayside emission spectra, our mean 1 sigma precision per bin corresponds to a planet-to-star flux ratio of 1.5 x 10(exp -4) and 2.1 x 10(exp -4) for WASP-4b and TrES-3b, respectively. We combine these estimates with previous broadband measurements and conclude that for both planets isothermal atmospheres are disfavored. We find no signs of features due to water. We confirm that WFC3 is suitable for studies of transiting exoplanets, but in staring mode multivisit campaigns are necessary to place strong constraints on water abundance.

  15. Atmospheric Characterization of Five Hot Jupiters with the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Sukrit; Charbonneau, David; Desert, Jean-Michel; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Deming, Drake; Wilkins, Ashlee; Mandell, Avi M.

    2014-01-01

    We probe the structure and composition of the atmospheres of five hot Jupiter exoplanets using the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument. We use the G141 grism (1.1-1.7 micrometers) to study TrES-2b, TrES-4b, and CoRoT-1b in transit; TrES-3b in secondary eclipse; and WASP-4b in both. This wavelength region includes a predicted absorption feature from water at 1.4 micrometers, which we expect to be nondegenerate with the other molecules that are likely to be abundant for hydrocarbon-poor (e.g., solar composition) hot Jupiter atmospheres. We divide our wavelength regions into 10 bins. For each bin we produce a spectrophotometric light curve spanning the time of transit or eclipse. We correct these light curves for instrumental systematics without reference to an instrument model. For our transmission spectra, our mean 1s precision per bin corresponds to variations of 2.1, 2.8, and 3.0 atmospheric scale heights for TrES-2b, TrES-4b, and CoRoT-1b, respectively. We find featureless spectra for these three planets. We are unable to extract a robust transmission spectrum for WASP-4b. For our dayside emission spectra, our mean 1 sigma precision per bin corresponds to a planet-to-star flux ratio of 1.5 x 10(exp -4) and 2.1 x 10(exp -4) for WASP-4b and TrES-3b, respectively. We combine these estimates with previous broadband measurements and conclude that for both planets isothermal atmospheres are disfavored. We find no signs of features due to water. We confirm that WFC3 is suitable for studies of transiting exoplanets, but in staring mode multivisit campaigns are necessary to place strong constraints on water abundance.

  16. Atmospheric characterization of five hot Jupiters with the wide field Camera 3 on the Hubble space telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjan, Sukrit; Charbonneau, David [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Désert, Jean-Michel [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Madhusudhan, Nikku [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Deming, Drake; Wilkins, Ashlee [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Mandell, Avi M., E-mail: sranjan@cfa.harvard.edu [NASA' s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-04-20

    We probe the structure and composition of the atmospheres of five hot Jupiter exoplanets using the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument. We use the G141 grism (1.1-1.7 μm) to study TrES-2b, TrES-4b, and CoRoT-1b in transit; TrES-3b in secondary eclipse; and WASP-4b in both. This wavelength region includes a predicted absorption feature from water at 1.4 μm, which we expect to be nondegenerate with the other molecules that are likely to be abundant for hydrocarbon-poor (e.g., solar composition) hot Jupiter atmospheres. We divide our wavelength regions into 10 bins. For each bin we produce a spectrophotometric light curve spanning the time of transit or eclipse. We correct these light curves for instrumental systematics without reference to an instrument model. For our transmission spectra, our mean 1σ precision per bin corresponds to variations of 2.1, 2.8, and 3.0 atmospheric scale heights for TrES-2b, TrES-4b, and CoRoT-1b, respectively. We find featureless spectra for these three planets. We are unable to extract a robust transmission spectrum for WASP-4b. For our dayside emission spectra, our mean 1σ precision per bin corresponds to a planet-to-star flux ratio of 1.5 × 10{sup –4} and 2.1 × 10{sup –4} for WASP-4b and TrES-3b, respectively. We combine these estimates with previous broadband measurements and conclude that for both planets isothermal atmospheres are disfavored. We find no signs of features due to water. We confirm that WFC3 is suitable for studies of transiting exoplanets, but in staring mode multivisit campaigns are necessary to place strong constraints on water abundance.

  17. High-temperature condensate clouds in super-hot Jupiter atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeford, H. R.; Visscher, C.; Lewis, N. K.; Kataria, T.; Marley, M. S.; Fortney, J. J.; Mandell, A. M.

    2017-02-01

    Deciphering the role of clouds is central to our understanding of exoplanet atmospheres, as they have a direct impact on the temperature and pressure structure, and observational properties of the planet. Super-hot Jupiters occupy a temperature regime similar to low-mass M-dwarfs, where minimal cloud condensation is expected. However, observations of exoplanets such as WASP-12b (Teq ˜ 2500 K) result in a transmission spectrum indicative of a cloudy atmosphere. We re-examine the temperature and pressure space occupied by these super-hot Jupiter atmospheres, to explore the role of the initial Al- and Ti-bearing condensates as the main source of cloud material. Due to the high temperatures, a majority of the more common refractory material is not depleted into deeper layers and would remain in the vapour phase. The lack of depletion into deeper layers means that these materials with relatively low cloud masses can become significant absorbers in the upper atmosphere. We provide condensation curves for the initial Al- and Ti-bearing condensates which may be used to provide quantitative estimates of the effect of metallicity on cloud masses, as planets with metal-rich hosts potentially form more opaque clouds because more mass is available for condensation. Increased metallicity also pushes the point of condensation to hotter, deeper layers in the planetary atmosphere further increasing the density of the cloud. We suggest that planets around metal-rich hosts are more likely to have thick refractory clouds, and discuss the implication on the observed spectra of WASP-12b.

  18. Unfolding the atmospheric and deep internal flows on Jupiter and Saturn using the Juno and Cassini gravity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai

    2016-10-01

    In light of the first orbits of Juno at Jupiter, we discuss the Juno gravity experiment and possible initial results. Relating the flow on Jupiter and Saturn to perturbations in their density field is key to the analysis of the gravity measurements expected from both the Juno (Jupiter) and Cassini (Saturn) spacecraft during 2016-17. Both missions will provide latitude-dependent gravity fields, which in principle could be inverted to calculate the vertical structure of the observed cloud-level zonal flow on these planets. Current observations for the flow on these planets exists only at the cloud-level (0.1-1 bar). The observed cloud-level wind might be confined to the upper layers, or be a manifestation of deep cylindrical flows. Moreover, it is possible that in the case where the observed wind is superficial, there exists deep interior flow that is completely decoupled from the observed atmospheric flow.In this talk, we present a new adjoint based inverse model for inversion of the gravity measurements into flow fields. The model is constructed to be as general as possible, allowing for both cloud-level wind extending inward, and a decoupled deep flow that is constructed to produce cylindrical structures with variable width and magnitude, or can even be set to be completely general. The deep flow is also set to decay when approaching the upper levels so it has no manifestation there. The two sources of flow are then combined to a total flow field that is related to the density anomalies and gravity moments via a dynamical model. Given the measured gravitational moments from Jupiter and Saturn, the dynamical model, together with the adjoint inverse model are used for optimizing the control parameters and by this unfolding the deep and surface flows. Several scenarios are examined, including cases in which the surface wind and the deep flow have comparable effects on the gravity field, cases in which the deep flow is dominating over the surface wind, and an extreme

  19. Atmospheric waves and dynamics beneath Jupiter's clouds from radio wavelength observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Richard G.; Butler, Bryan; Sault, Bob; Morales-Juberías, Raúl; Simon, Amy; de Pater, Imke

    2017-08-01

    We observed Jupiter at wavelengths near 2 cm with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in February 2015. These frequencies are mostly sensitive to variations in ammonia abundance and probe between ∼ 0.5 - 2.0 bars of pressure in Jupiter's atmosphere; within and below the visible cloud deck which has its base near 0.7 bars. The resultant observed data were projected into a cylindrical map of the planet with spatial resolution of ∼1500 km at the equator. We have examined the data for atmospheric waves and observed a prominent bright belt of radio hotspot features near 10°N, likely connected to the same equatorial wave associated with the 5-μm hotspots. We conducted a passive tracer power spectral wave analysis for the entire map and latitude regions corresponding to eastward and westward jets and compare our results to previous studies. The power spectra analysis revealed that the atmosphere sampled in our observation (excluding the NEB region) is in a 2-D turbulent regime and its dynamics are predominately governed by the shallow water equations. The Great Red Spot (GRS) is also very prominent and has a noticeable meridional asymmetry and we compare it, and nearby storms, with optical images. We find that the meridional radio profile has a global north-south hemisphere distinction and find correlations of it to optical intensity banding and to shear zones of the zonal wind profile over select regions of latitude. Amateur optical images taken before and after our observation complemented the radio wavelength map to investigate dynamics of the equatorial region in Jupiter's atmosphere. We find that two radio hotspots at 2 cm are well correlated with optical plumes in the NEB, additionally revealing they are not the same 5 μm hotspot features correlated with optical dark patches between adjacent plumes. This analysis exploits the VLA's upgraded sensitivity and explores the opportunities now possible when studying gas giants, especially atmospheric dynamics

  20. Simulation of equatorial and high-latitude jets on Jupiter in a deep convection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimpel, Moritz; Aurnou, Jonathan; Wicht, Johannes

    2005-11-10

    The bands of Jupiter represent a global system of powerful winds. Broad eastward equatorial jets are flanked by smaller-scale, higher-latitude jets flowing in alternating directions. Jupiter's large thermal emission suggests that the winds are powered from within, but the zonal flow depth is limited by increasing density and electrical conductivity in the molecular hydrogen-helium atmosphere towards the centre of the planet. Two types of planetary flow models have been explored: shallow-layer models reproduce multiple high-latitude jets, but not the equatorial flow system, and deep convection models only reproduce an eastward equatorial jet with two flanking neighbours. Here we present a numerical model of three-dimensional rotating convection in a relatively thin spherical shell that generates both types of jets. The simulated flow is turbulent and quasi-two-dimensional and, as observed for the jovian jets, simulated jet widths follow Rhines' scaling theory. Our findings imply that Jupiter's latitudinal transition in jet width corresponds to a separation between the bottom-bounded flow structures in higher latitudes and the deep equatorial flows.

  1. Observations, Thermochemical Calculations, and Modeling of Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Blecic, Jasmina

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation as a whole aims to provide means to better understand hot-Jupiter planets through observing, performing thermochemical calculations, and modeling their atmospheres. We used Spitzer multi-wavelength secondary-eclipse observations and targets with high signal-to-noise ratios, as their deep eclipses allow us to detect signatures of spectral features and assess planetary atmospheric structure and composition with greater certainty. Chapter 1 gives a short introduction. Chapter 2 presents the Spitzer secondary-eclipse analysis and atmospheric characterization of WASP-14b. WASP-14b is a highly irradiated, transiting hot Jupiter. By applying a Bayesian approach in the atmospheric analysis, we found an absence of thermal inversion contrary to theoretical predictions. Chapter 3 describes the infrared observations of WASP-43b Spitzer secondary eclipses, data analysis, and atmospheric characterization. WASP-43b is one of the closest-orbiting hot Jupiters, orbiting one of the coolest stars with a hot Ju...

  2. Accuracy tests of radiation schemes used in hot Jupiter Global Circulation Models

    CERN Document Server

    Amundsen, David Skålid; Tremblin, Pascal; Manners, James; Hayek, Wolfgang; Mayne, N J; Acreman, David M

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of radiation transport in global circulation models (GCMs) is crucial to correctly describe Earth and exoplanet atmospheric dynamics processes. The two-stream approximation and correlated-$k$ method are currently state-of-the-art approximations applied in both Earth and hot Jupiter GCM radiation schemes to facilitate rapid calculation of fluxes and heating rates. Their accuracy have been tested extensively for Earth-like conditions, but verification of the methods' applicability to hot Jupiter-like conditions is lacking in the literature. We are adapting the UK Met Office GCM, the Unified Model (UM), for the study of hot Jupiters, and present in this work the adaptation of the Edwards-Slingo radiation scheme based on the two-stream approximation and the correlated-$k$ method. We discuss the calculation of absorption coefficients from high temperature line lists and highlight the large uncertainty in the pressure-broadened line widths. We compare fluxes and heating rates obtained with our adapted...

  3. Ambipolar Electric Field, Photoelectrons, and Their Role in Atmospheric Escape From Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, O.; Glocer, A.

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric mass loss from Hot Jupiters can be large due to the close proximity of these planets to their host star and the strong radiation the planetary atmosphere receives. On Earth, a major contribution to the acceleration of atmospheric ions comes from the vertical separation of ions and electrons, and the generation of the ambipolar electric field. This process, known as the "polar wind," is responsible for the transport of ionospheric constituents to Earth's magnetosphere, where they are well observed. The polar wind can also be enhanced by a relatively small fraction of super-thermal electrons (photoelectrons) generated by photoionization.We formulate a simplified calculation of the effect of the ambipolar electric field and the photoelectrons on the ion scale height in a generalized manner. We find that the ion scale height can be increased by a factor of 2-15 due to the polar wind effects. We also estimate a lower limit of an order of magnitude increase of the ion density and the atmospheric mass-loss rate when polar wind effects are included.

  4. Ambipolar Electric Field, Photoelectrons, and their Role in Atmospheric Escape From Hot-jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, O

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric mass-loss from Hot-jupiters can be large due to the close proximity of these planets to their host star and the strong radiation the planetary atmosphere receives. On Earth, a major contribution to the acceleration of atmospheric ions comes from the vertical separation of ions and electrons, and the generation of the ambipolar electric field. This process, known as the "polar wind", is responsible for the transport of ionospheric constituents to the Earth's magnetosphere, where they are well observed. The polar wind can also be enhanced by a relatively small fraction of super-thermal electrons (photoelectrons) generated by photoionization. We formulate a simplified calculation of the effect of the ambipolar electric field and the photoelectrons on the ion scale-height in a generalized manner. We find that the ion scale-height can be increased by a factor of 2-15 due to the polar wind effects. We also estimate a lower limit of an order of magnitude increase of the ion density and the atmospheric ma...

  5. AMBIPOLAR ELECTRIC FIELD, PHOTOELECTRONS, AND THEIR ROLE IN ATMOSPHERIC ESCAPE FROM HOT JUPITERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, O. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Glocer, A. [NASA/GSFC, Code 673, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Atmospheric mass loss from Hot Jupiters can be large due to the close proximity of these planets to their host star and the strong radiation the planetary atmosphere receives. On Earth, a major contribution to the acceleration of atmospheric ions comes from the vertical separation of ions and electrons, and the generation of the ambipolar electric field. This process, known as the 'polar wind', is responsible for the transport of ionospheric constituents to Earth's magnetosphere, where they are well observed. The polar wind can also be enhanced by a relatively small fraction of super-thermal electrons (photoelectrons) generated by photoionization. We formulate a simplified calculation of the effect of the ambipolar electric field and the photoelectrons on the ion scale height in a generalized manner. We find that the ion scale height can be increased by a factor of 2-15 due to the polar wind effects. We also estimate a lower limit of an order of magnitude increase of the ion density and the atmospheric mass-loss rate when polar wind effects are included.

  6. Development of radiative transfer code for JUICE/SWI mission toward the atmosphere of icy moons of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takayoshi; Kasai, Yasuko; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2016-07-01

    The Submillimeter Wave Instrument (SWI) is one of the scientific instruments on the JUpiter Icy moon Explorer (JUICE). We plan to observe atmospheric compositions including water vapor and its isotopomers in Galilean moons (Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto). The frequency windows of SWI are 530 to 625 GHz and 1080 to 1275 GHz with 100 kHz spectral resolution. We are developing a radiative transfer code in Japan with line-by-line method for Ganymede atmosphere in THz region (0 - 3 THz). Molecular line parameters (line intensity and partition function) were taken from JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) catalogue. The pencil beam was assumed to calculate a spectrum of H _{2}O and CO in rotational transitions at the THz region. We performed comparisons between our model and ARTS (Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator). The difference were less than 10% and 5% for H _{2}O and CO, respectively, under the condition of the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). Comparison with several models with non-LTE assumption will be presented.

  7. Accuracy tests of radiation schemes used in hot Jupiter global circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, David S.; Baraffe, Isabelle; Tremblin, Pascal; Manners, James; Hayek, Wolfgang; Mayne, Nathan J.; Acreman, David M.

    2014-04-01

    The treatment of radiation transport in global circulation models (GCMs) is crucial for correctly describing Earth and exoplanet atmospheric dynamics processes. The two-stream approximation and correlated-k method are currently state-of-the-art approximations applied in both Earth and hot Jupiter GCM radiation schemes to facilitate the rapid calculation of fluxes and heating rates. Their accuracy have been tested extensively for Earth-like conditions, but verification of the methods' applicability to hot Jupiter-like conditions is lacking in the literature. We are adapting the UK Met Office GCM, the Unified Model (UM), for the study of hot Jupiters, and present in this work the adaptation of the Edwards-Slingo radiation scheme based on the two-stream approximation and the correlated-k method. We discuss the calculation of absorption coefficients from high-temperature line lists and highlight the large uncertainty in the pressure-broadened line widths. We compare fluxes and heating rates obtained with our adapted scheme to more accurate discrete ordinate (DO) line-by-line (LbL) calculations ignoring scattering effects. We find that, in most cases, errors stay below 10% for both heating rates and fluxes using ~10 k-coefficients in each band and a diffusivity factor D = 1.66. The two-stream approximation and the correlated-k method both contribute non-negligibly to the total error. We also find that using band-averaged absorption coefficients, which have previously been used in radiative-hydrodynamical simulations of a hot Jupiter, may yield errors of ~100%, and should thus be used with caution.

  8. Constraints on the atmospheric circulation and variability of the eccentric hot Jupiter XO-3b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Ian; Knutson, Heather A. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cowan, Nicolas B. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Astrophysics (CIERA), Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Lewis, Nikole K. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Agol, Eric [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Deming, Drake [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J.; Laughlin, Gregory [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95604 (United States); Fulton, Benjamin J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Langton, Jonathan [Department of Physics, Principia College, Elsah, IL 62028 (United States); Showman, Adam P., E-mail: iwong@caltech.edu [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    We report secondary eclipse photometry of the hot Jupiter XO-3b in the 4.5 μm band taken with the Infrared Array Camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope. We measure individual eclipse depths and center of eclipse times for a total of 12 secondary eclipses. We fit these data simultaneously with two transits observed in the same band in order to obtain a global best-fit secondary eclipse depth of 0.1580% ± 0.0036% and a center of eclipse phase of 0.67004 ± 0.00013. We assess the relative magnitude of variations in the dayside brightness of the planet by measuring the size of the residuals during ingress and egress from fitting the combined eclipse light curve with a uniform disk model and place an upper limit of 0.05%. The new secondary eclipse observations extend the total baseline from one and a half years to nearly three years, allowing us to place an upper limit on the periastron precession rate of 2.9 × 10{sup –3} deg day{sup –1}— the tightest constraint to date on the periastron precession rate of a hot Jupiter. We use the new transit observations to calculate improved estimates for the system properties, including an updated orbital ephemeris. We also use the large number of secondary eclipses to obtain the most stringent limits to date on the orbit-to-orbit variability of an eccentric hot Jupiter and demonstrate the consistency of multiple-epoch Spitzer observations.

  9. Spectroscopic Evidence for a Temperature Inversion in the Dayside Atmosphere of the Hot Jupiter WASP-33b

    CERN Document Server

    Haynes, Korey; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Deming, Drake; Knutson, Heather

    2015-01-01

    We present observations of two occultations of the extrasolar planet WASP-33b using the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the HST, which allow us to constrain the temperature structure and composition of its dayside atmosphere. WASP-33b is the most highly irradiated hot Jupiter discovered to date, and the only exoplanet known to orbit a delta-Scuti star. We observed in spatial scan mode to decrease instrument systematic effects in the data, and removed fluctuations in the data due to stellar pulsations. The RMS for our final, binned spectrum is approximately 1.05 times the photon noise. We compare our final spectrum, along with previously published photometric data, to atmospheric models of WASP-33b spanning a wide range in temperature profiles and chemical compositions. We find that the data require models with an oxygen-rich chemical composition and a temperature profile that increases at high altitude. We also find that our spectrum displays an excess in the measured flux towards short wavelengths that is best...

  10. HST hot Jupiter transmission spectral survey: evidence for aerosols and lack of TiO in the atmosphere of WASP-12b

    CERN Document Server

    Sing, D K; Fortney, J J; Burrows, A S; Pont, F; Wakeford, H R; Ballester, G E; Nikolov, N; Henry, G W; Aigrain, S; Deming, D; Evans, T M; Gibson, N P; Huitson, C M; Knutson, H; Showman, A P; Vidal-Madjar, A; Wilson, P A; Williamson, M H; Zahnle, K

    2013-01-01

    We present HST optical transmission spectra of the transiting hot Jupiter WASP-12b, taken with the STIS instrument. From the transmission spectra, we are able to decisively rule out prominent absorption by TiO in the exoplanet's atmosphere. Strong pressure-broadened Na and K absorption signatures are also excluded, as are significant metal-hydride features. We compare our combined broadband spectrum to a wide variety of existing aerosol-free atmospheric models, though none are satisfactory fits. However, we do find that the full transmission spectrum can be described by models which include significant opacity from aerosols: including Rayleigh scattering, Mie scattering, tholin haze, and settling dust profiles. The transmission spectrum follows an effective extinction cross section with a power-law of index alpha, with the slope of the transmission spectrum constraining the quantity alphaT = -3528+/-660 K, where T is the atmospheric temperature. Rayleigh scattering (alpha=-4) is among the best fitting models,...

  11. Temperature-Pressure Profile of the hot Jupiter HD 189733b from HST Sodium Observations: Detection of Upper Atmospheric Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Huitson, Catherine M; Vidal-Madjar, Alfred; Ballester, Gilda E; Etangs, Alain Lecavelier des; Désert, Jean-Michel; Pont, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    We present transmission spectra of the hot Jupiter HD 189733b taken with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph aboard HST. The spectra cover the wavelength range 5808-6380 Ang with a resolving power of R=5000. We detect absorption from the NaI doublet within the exoplanet's atmosphere at the 9 sigma confidence level within a 5 Ang band (absorption depth 0.09 +/- 0.01%) and use the data to measure the doublet's spectral absorption profile. We detect only the narrow cores of the doublet. The narrowness of the feature could be due to an obscuring high-altitude haze of an unknown composition or a significantly sub-solar NaI abundance hiding the line wings beneath a H2 Rayleigh signature. We compare the spectral absorption profile over 5.5 scale heights with model spectral absorption profiles and constrain the temperature at different atmospheric regions, allowing us to construct a vertical temperature profile. We identify two temperature regimes; a 1280 +/- 240 K region derived from the NaI doublet line wings ...

  12. Atmospheric Circulation of Hot Jupiters: Dayside–Nightside Temperature Differences. II. Comparison with Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komacek, Thaddeus D.; Showman, Adam P.; Tan, Xianyu

    2017-02-01

    The full-phase infrared light curves of low-eccentricity hot Jupiters show a trend of increasing fractional dayside–nightside brightness temperature difference with increasing incident stellar flux, both averaged across the infrared and in each individual wavelength band. The analytic theory of Komacek & Showman shows that this trend is due to the decreasing ability with increasing incident stellar flux of waves to propagate from day to night and erase temperature differences. Here, we compare the predictions of this theory with observations, showing that it explains well the shape of the trend of increasing dayside–nightside temperature difference with increasing equilibrium temperature. Applied to individual planets, the theory matches well with observations at high equilibrium temperatures but, for a fixed photosphere pressure of 100 {mbar}, systematically underpredicts the dayside–nightside brightness temperature differences at equilibrium temperatures less than 2000 {{K}}. We interpret this as being due to the effects of a process that moves the infrared photospheres of these cooler hot Jupiters to lower pressures. We also utilize general circulation modeling with double-gray radiative transfer to explore how the circulation changes with equilibrium temperature and drag strengths. As expected from our theory, the dayside–nightside temperature differences from our numerical simulations increase with increasing incident stellar flux and drag strengths. We calculate model phase curves using our general circulation models, from which we compare the broadband infrared offset from the substellar point and dayside–nightside brightness temperature differences against observations, finding that strong drag or additional effects (e.g., clouds and/or supersolar metallicities) are necessary to explain many observed phase curves.

  13. Pioneer Jupiter orbiter probe mission 1980, probe description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrees, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The adaptation of the Saturn-Uranus Atmospheric Entry Probe (SUAEP) to a Jupiter entry probe is summarized. This report is extracted from a comprehensive study of Jovian missions, atmospheric model definitions and probe subsystem alternatives.

  14. Jupiter's interior and deep atmosphere: The initial pole-to-pole passes with the Juno spacecraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolton, S. J.; Adriani, Alberto; Adumitroaie, V.

    2017-01-01

    On 27 August 2016, the Juno spacecraft acquired science observations of Jupiter, passing less than 5000 kilometers above the equatorial cloud tops. Images of Jupiter's poles show a chaotic scene, unlike Saturn's poles. Microwave sounding reveals weather features at pressures deeper than 100 bars,...

  15. The merger of two giant anticyclones in the atmosphere of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Orton, G. S.; Morales, R.; Lecacheux, J.; Colas, F.; Fisher, B.; Fukumura-Sawada, P.; Golisch, W.; Griep, D.; Kaminski, C.; Baines, K.; Rages, K.; West, R.

    2000-10-01

    Two giant ovals in Jupiter's southern atmosphere, vortices of counterclockwise-rotating winds, merged in a 3-week period, starting in March 2000. One of the ovals called FA was more than 60 years old; the other called BE was the product of two 60-year ovals (BC and DE) that merged in 1998 (Sanchez-Lavega et al., Icarus, Vol. 142, 116. 1999). Here we report the coordinated observations of the BE - FA merger obtained with different facilities: The 1 - m Pic-du-Midi telescope (visual wavelength range), the 3.5 m NASA - IRTF telescope (red and near infrared range) and the Hubble Space Telescope (visual range). The merger took place when the ovals were southeast of the Great Red Spot and after the disappearance of a smaller, clockwise-rotating oval midway between them. The interaction began when the high-altitude oval clouds showed counterclockwise rotation about each other, followed by coalescence and shrinking. The interaction in deeper clouds did not include mutual rotation, but there was evidence of complex cloud structure during the merger. After 60 years, these three vortices consolidate into a single vortex that could now either (1) merge with the large, axisymmetric high-albedo band from which the ovals were originally formed or (2) continue as a stable and long-lived vortex in Jupiter. If the new oval (BA) is long-lived, then it is tempting to speculate that the more than 300-year old Great Red Spot could have had a similar genesis. The Spanish team was supported by Gobierno Vasco PI 034/97. The French team was supported by the "Programme National de Planetologie." The US team was supported by NASA through grants to the Institute for Astronomy (U. Hawaii) and JPL. Some of the observations were made by the NASA-ESA Hubble Space Telescope, with support provided through grant GO-8148 from the Space Telescope Science Institute which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronmy under NASA contract NAS5-26555. RM acknowledges a fellowship

  16. Nonisothermal Pluto atmosphere models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, W.B.; Yelle, R.V.; Lunine, J.I. (Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA))

    1990-03-01

    The present thermal profile calculation for a Pluto atmosphere model characterized by a high number fraction of CH4 molecules encompasses atmospheric heating by solar UV flux absorption and conductive transport cooling to the surface of Pluto. The stellar occultation curve predicted for an atmosphere of several-microbar surface pressures (which entail the existence of a substantial temperature gradient close to the surface) agrees with observations and implies that the normal and tangential optical depth of the atmosphere is almost negligible. The minimum period for atmospheric methane depletion is calculated to be 30 years. 29 refs.

  17. Modeling the disequilibrium species for Jupiter and Saturn: Implications for Juno and Saturn entry probe

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Dong; Mousis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Disequilibrium species have been used previously to probe the deep water abundances and the eddy diffusion coefficient for giant planets. In this paper, we present a diffusion-kinetics code that predicts the abundances of disequilibrium species in the tropospheres of Jupiter and Saturn with updated thermodynamic and kinetic data. The dependence on the deep water abundance and the eddy diffusion coefficient is investigated. We quantified the disagreements in CO kinetics that comes from using different reaction networks and identified C$_2$H$_6$ as a useful tracer for the eddy diffusion coefficient. We first apply a H/P/O reaction network to Jupiter and Saturn's atmospheres and suggest a new PH$_3$ destruction pathway. New chemical pathways for SiH$_4$ and GeH$_4$ destruction are also suggested, and another AsH$_3$ destruction pathway is investigated thanks to new thermodynamic and kinetic data. These new models should enhance the interpretation of the measurement of disequilibrium species by JIRAM on board Jun...

  18. Modeling the disequilibrium species for Jupiter and Saturn: Implications for Juno and Saturn entry probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Lunine, J. I.; Mousis, O.

    2016-12-01

    Disequilibrium species have been used previously to probe the deep water abundances and the eddy diffusion coefficient for giant planets. In this abstract, we present a diffusion-kinetics code that predicts the abundances of disequilibrium species in the tropospheres of Jupiter and Saturn with updated thermodynamic and kinetic data. The dependence on the deep water abundance and the eddy diffusion coefficient is investigated. We quantified the disagreements in CO kinetics that comes from using different reaction networks and identified C2H6 as a useful tracer for the eddy diffusion coefficient. We first apply an H/P/O reaction network to Jupiter and Saturn's atmospheres and suggest a new PH3 destruction pathway. New chemical pathways for SiH4 and GeH4 destruction are also suggested, and another AsH3 destruction pathway is investigated thanks to new thermodynamic and kinetic data. These new models should enhance the interpretation of the measurement of disequilibrium species by JIRAM on board Juno and allow disentangling between methods for constraining the Saturn's deep water abundance with the Saturn entry probes envisaged by NASA or ESA.

  19. BUILDING MODEL ANALYSIS APPLICATIONS WITH THE JOINT UNIVERSAL PARAMETER IDENTIFICATION AND EVALUATION OF RELIABILITY (JUPITER) API

    Science.gov (United States)

    The open-source, public domain JUPITER (Joint Universal Parameter IdenTification and Evaluation of Reliability) API (Application Programming Interface) provides conventions and Fortran-90 modules to develop applications (computer programs) for analyzing process models. The input ...

  20. On the effects of clouds and hazes in the atmospheres of hot Jupiters: semi-analytical temperature-pressure profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Heng, Kevin; Pont, Frédéric; Sing, David K

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the work of Guillot (2010), we present a semi-analytical formalism for calculating the temperature-pressure profiles in hot Jovian atmospheres which includes the effects of clouds/hazes and collision-induced absorption. Using the dual-band approximation, we assume that stellar irradiation and thermal emission from the hot Jupiter occur at distinct wavelengths ("shortwave" versus "longwave"). For a purely absorbing cloud/haze, we demonstrate its dual effect of cooling and warming the upper and lower atmosphere, respectively, which modifies, in a non-trivial manner, the condition for whether a temperature inversion is present in the upper atmosphere. The warming effect becomes more pronounced as the cloud/haze deck resides at greater depths. If it sits below the shortwave photosphere, the warming effect becomes either more subdued or ceases altogether. If shortwave scattering is present, its dual effect is to warm and cool the upper and lower atmosphere, respectively, thus counteracting the effects...

  1. Magnetospheres of hot Jupiters: hydrodynamic models & ultraviolet absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, R D; Mohammed, H; Nichols, J D; Ercolano, B

    2015-01-01

    We present hydrodynamic simulations of stellar wind-magnetosphere interactions in hot Jupiters such as WASP-12b. For fiducial stellar wind rates we find that a planetary magnetic field of a few G produces a large magnetospheric cavity, which is typically 6-9 planetary radii in size. A bow shock invariably forms ahead of the magnetosphere, but the pre-shock gas is only mildly supersonic (with typical Mach numbers of $\\simeq$1.6-1.8) so the shock is weak. This results in a characteristic signature in the ultraviolet light curve: a broad absorption feature that leads the optical transit by 10-20% in orbital phase. The shapes of our synthetic light-curves are consistent with existing observations of WASP-12b, but the required near-UV optical depth ($\\tau \\sim 0.1$) can only be achieved if the shocked gas cools rapidly. We further show that radiative cooling is inefficient, so we deem it unlikely that a magnetospheric bow shock is responsible for the observed near-UV absorption. Finally, we apply our model to two ...

  2. Bayesian thermal evolution models for giant planets: Helium rain and double-diffusive convection in Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankovich, Christopher; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Nettelmann, Nadine; Moore, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen and helium unmix when sufficiently cool, and this bears on the thermal evolution of all cool giant planets at or below one Jupiter mass. Over the past few years, ab initio simulations have put us in the era of quantitative predictions for this H-He immiscibility at megabar pressures. We present models for the thermal evolution of Jupiter, including its evolving helium distribution following one such ab initio H-He phase diagram. After 4 Gyr of homogeneous evolution, differentiation establishes a helium gradient between 1 and 2 Mbar that dynamically stabilizes the fluid to overturning convection. The result is a region undergoing overstable double-diffusive convection (ODDC), whose relatively weak vertical heat transport maintains a superadiabatic temperature gradient. With a general parameterization for the ODDC efficiency, the models can reconcile Jupiter's intrinsic flux, atmospheric helium content, and mean radius at the age of the solar system if the H-He phase diagram is translated to cooler temperatures.We cast our nonadiabatic thermal evolution models in a Markov chain Monte Carlo parameter estimation framework, retrieving the total heavy element mass, the superadiabaticity of the deep temperature gradient, and the phase diagram temperature offset. Models using the interpolated Saumon, Chabrier and van Horn (1995) equation of state (SCvH-I) favor very inefficient ODDC such that the deep temperature gradient is strongly superadiabatic, forming a thermal boundary layer that allows the molecular envelope to cool quickly while the deeper interior (most of the planet's mass) actually heats up over time. If we modulate the overall cooling time with an additional free parameter, mimicking the effect of a colder or warmer EOS, the models favor those that are colder than SCvH-I; this class of EOS is also favored by shock experiments. The models in this scenario have more modest deep superadiabaticities such that the envelope cools more gradually and the deep

  3. Zonal Flow and Vortices in Anelastic Deep Convection Models of Jupiter and Saturn With Shallow Stable Stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimpel, M. H.; Wicht, J.; Gastine, T.

    2015-12-01

    Planetary jet streams and vortices have been studied for over 350 years, yet their origin and dynamics are still vigorously debated. On both Jupiter and Saturn zonal flow consists of equatorial superrotation and alternating East-West jets at higher latitude. On Jupiter, numerous vortices, the vast majority anticyclones, occur with various sizes and lifetimes, interacting strongly with the zonal flow. Saturn's vortices and jets are also clearly coupled, and its North and South polar vortices are cyclonic. Models of giant planet atmospheres have generally been of two classes. Shallow flow models produce jets and vortices from 2D turbulence in a very thin spherical layer, but require special conditions to reproduce observed equatorial superrotation. In contrast, deep convection models generically reproduce equatorial superrotation, but typically lack coherent vortices, which do not survive the formation of jets. Here, we combine elements of both approaches using a 3D spherical shell compressible fluid numerical model, driven by convection at depth, but grading to a stably stratified shallow layer. In typical model simulations convective plumes rising from the deep interior impinge on the stably stratified layer, diverge near the outer spherical surface, and efficiently create the dominant anticyclones, which are shielded by downwelling cyclonic rings and filaments. These results may explain the dominance of anticyclones and the flow structure of small and medium sized anticyclonic ovals on Jupiter. The largest of our model vortices form in westward anticyclonic shear nearest the equatorial jet, similar to Saturn's "storm alley" and Jupiter's Great Red Spot. We also explore conditions under which cyclones, including polar cyclones like those on Saturn, may form.

  4. Jupiter's interior and deep atmosphere: The initial pole-to-pole passes with the Juno spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, S. J.; Adriani, A.; Adumitroaie, V.; Allison, M.; Anderson, J.; Atreya, S.; Bloxham, J.; Brown, S.; Connerney, J. E. P.; DeJong, E.; Folkner, W.; Gautier, D.; Grassi, D.; Gulkis, S.; Guillot, T.; Hansen, C.; Hubbard, W. B.; Iess, L.; Ingersoll, A.; Janssen, M.; Jorgensen, J.; Kaspi, Y.; Levin, S. M.; Li, C.; Lunine, J.; Miguel, Y.; Mura, A.; Orton, G.; Owen, T.; Ravine, M.; Smith, E.; Steffes, P.; Stone, E.; Stevenson, D.; Thorne, R.; Waite, J.; Durante, D.; Ebert, R. W.; Greathouse, T. K.; Hue, V.; Parisi, M.; Szalay, J. R.; Wilson, R.

    2017-05-01

    On 27 August 2016, the Juno spacecraft acquired science observations of Jupiter, passing less than 5000 kilometers above the equatorial cloud tops. Images of Jupiter's poles show a chaotic scene, unlike Saturn's poles. Microwave sounding reveals weather features at pressures deeper than 100 bars, dominated by an ammonia-rich, narrow low-latitude plume resembling a deeper, wider version of Earth's Hadley cell. Near-infrared mapping reveals the relative humidity within prominent downwelling regions. Juno's measured gravity field differs substantially from the last available estimate and is one order of magnitude more precise. This has implications for the distribution of heavy elements in the interior, including the existence and mass of Jupiter's core. The observed magnetic field exhibits smaller spatial variations than expected, indicative of a rich harmonic content.

  5. 3D modeling of lightning-induced electromagnetic pulses on Venus, Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Invernón, Francisco J.; Luque, Alejandro; Gordillo-Vázquez, Francisco J.

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric electricity is a common phenomenon in some planets of The Solar System. We know that atmospheric discharges exist on Earth and gaseous planets; however, some characteristics of lightning on Saturn and Jupiter as well as their relevance on the effects of lightning in the atmospheres of these planets are still unknown. In the case of Venus, there exist some radio evidences of lightning, but the lack of optical observations suggests exploring indirect methods of detection, such as searching for lightning-induced transient optical emissions from the upper atmosphere. The Akatsuki probe, currently orbiting Venus, is equipped with a camera whose temporal resolution is high enough to detect optical emissions from lightning discharges and to measure nightglow enhancements. In this work, we extend previous models [1,2] to investigate the chemical impact and transient optical emissions produced by possible lightning-emitted electromagnetic pulses (EMP) in Venus, Saturn and Jupiter. Using a 3D FDTD ("Finite Differences Time Domain") model we solve the Maxwell equations coupled with the Langevin equation for electrons [3] and with a kinetic scheme, different for each planetary atmosphere. This method is useful to investigate the temporal and spatial impact of lightning-induced electromagnetic fields in the atmosphere of each planet for different lightning characteristics (e.g. energy released, orientation). This 3D FDTD model allows us to include the saturnian and jovian background magnetic field inclination and magnitude at different latitudes, and to determine the effects of different lightning channel inclinations. Results provide useful information to interpret lightning observations on giant gaseous planets and in the search for indirect optical signals from atmospheric discharge on Venus such as fast nightglow transient enhancements related to lightning as seen on Earth. Furthermore, we underline the observation of electrical discharges characteristics as a

  6. Bayesian Evolution Models for Jupiter with Helium Rain and Double-diffusive Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankovich, Christopher; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Moore, Kevin L.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen and helium demix when sufficiently cool, and this bears on the evolution of all giant planets at large separations at or below roughly a Jupiter mass. We model the thermal evolution of Jupiter, including its evolving helium distribution following results of ab initio simulations for helium immiscibility in metallic hydrogen. After 4 Gyr of homogeneous evolution, differentiation establishes a thin helium gradient below 1 Mbar that dynamically stabilizes the fluid to convection. The region undergoes overstable double-diffusive convection (ODDC), whose weak heat transport maintains a superadiabatic temperature gradient. With a generic parameterization for the ODDC efficiency, the models can reconcile Jupiter’s intrinsix flux, atmospheric helium content, and radius at the age of the solar system if the Lorenzen et al. H-He phase diagram is translated to lower temperatures. We cast the evolutionary models in an MCMC framework to explore tens of thousands of evolutionary sequences, retrieving probability distributions for the total heavy-element mass, the superadiabaticity of the temperature gradient due to ODDC, and the phase diagram perturbation. The adopted SCvH-I equation of state (EOS) favors inefficient ODDC such that a thermal boundary layer is formed, allowing the molecular envelope to cool rapidly while the deeper interior actually heats up over time. If the overall cooling time is modulated with an additional free parameter to imitate the effect of a colder or warmer EOS, the models favor those that are colder than SCvH-I. In this case the superadiabaticity is modest and warming and cooling deep interiors are equally likely.

  7. No Detectable H3+ Emission from the Atmospheres of Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Shkolnik, E; Moskovitz, N; Shkolnik, Evgenya; Gaidos, Eric; Moskovitz, Nick

    2006-01-01

    H$_3^+$ emission is the dominant cooling mechanism in Jupiter's thermosphere and a useful probe of temperature and ion densities. The H$_3^+$ ion is predicted to form in the thermospheres of close-in `hot Jupiters' where its emission would be a significant factor in the thermal energy budget, affecting temperature and the rate of hydrogen escape from the exosphere. Hot Jupiters are predicted to have up to 10$^5$ times Jupiter's H$_3^+$ emission because they experience extreme stellar irradiation and enhanced interactions may occur between the planetary magnetosphere and the stellar wind. Direct (but unresolved) detection of an extrasolar planet, or the establishment of useful upper limits, may be possible because a small but significant fraction of the total energy received by the planet is re-radiated in a few narrow lines of H$_3^+$ within which the flux from the star is limited. We present the observing strategy and results of our search for emission from the Q(1,0) transition of H$_3^+$ (3.953~$\\mu$m) fro...

  8. Determining atmospheric conditions at the terminator of the hot-Jupiter HD209458b

    CERN Document Server

    Sing, David K; Etangs, A Lecavelier des; Desert, J -M; Ballester, G; Ehrenreich, D

    2008-01-01

    We present a theoretical model fit to the HST/STIS optical transit transmission spectra of HD209458b. In our fit, we use the sodium absorption line profile along with the Rayleigh scattering by H2 to determine the average temperature-pressure profile at the planetary terminator, and infer the abundances of atomic and molecular species. The observed sodium line profile spans an altitude range of ~3,500 km, corresponding to pressures between ~0.001 and 50 mbar in our atmospheric model. We find that the sodium line profile requires condensation at pressures lower than ~3 mbar, presumably into sodium sulfide, depleting atomic sodium only at high altitudes. The condensation of sodium is supported by an observed sudden abundance change, from 2 times solar abundance in the lower atmosphere to 0.2 in the upper atmosphere, within a low temperature region which falls below that of the chemical equilibrium condensation curve of sodium sulfide. Our findings also indicate the presence of a hot atmosphere near stratospheri...

  9. Results of Joint Observations of Jupiter's Atmosphere by Juno and a Network of Earth-Based Observing Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Glenn; Momary, Thomas; Bolton, Scott; Levin, Steven; Hansen, Candice; Janssen, Michael; Adriani, Alberto; Gladstone, G. Randall; Bagenal, Fran; Ingersoll, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    The Juno mission has promoted and coordinated a network of Earth-based observations, including both Earth-proximal and ground-based facilities, to extend and enhance observations made by the Juno mission. The spectral region and timeline of all of these observations are summarized in the web site: https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/planned-observations. Among the earliest of these were observation of Jovian auroral phenomena at X-ray, ultraviolet and infrared wavelengths and measurements of Jovian synchrotron radiation from the Earth simultaneously with the measurement of properties of the upstream solar wind. Other observations of significance to the magnetosphere measured the mass loading from Io by tracking its observed volcanic activity and the opacity of its torus. Observations of Jupiter's neutral atmosphere included observations of reflected sunlight from the near-ultraviolet through the near-infrared and thermal emission from 5 μm through the radio region. The point of these measurements is to relate properties of the deep atmosphere that are the focus of Juno's mission to the state of the "weather layer" at much higher atmospheric levels. These observations cover spectral regions not included in Juno's instrumentation, provide spatial context for Juno's often spatially limited coverage of Jupiter, and they describe the evolution of atmospheric features in time that are measured only once by Juno. We will summarize the results of measurements during the approach phase of the mission that characterized the state of the atmosphere, as well as observations made by Juno and the supporting campaign during Juno's perijoves 1 (2016 August 27), 3 (2016 December 11), 4 (2017 February 2) and possibly "early" results from 5 (2017 March 27). Besides a global network of professional astronomers, the Juno mission also benefited from the enlistment of a network of dedicated amateur astronomers who provided a quasi-continuous picture of the evolution of features observed by

  10. 3D Structures of equatorial waves and the resulting superrotation in the atmosphere of a tidally locked hot Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Shang-Min; Gu, Pin-Gao

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional equatorial trapped waves excited by stellar isolation and the resulting equatorial superrotating jet in a vertical stratified atmosphere of a tidally-locked hot Jupiter are investigated. Taking the hot Jupiter HD 189733b as a fiducial example, we analytically solve a set of linear equations subject to stationary stellar heating with a uniform zonal-mean flow included. We also extract wave information in the final equilibrium state of the atmosphere from the radiative hydrodynamical simulation for HD 189733b by Dobbs-Dixon & Agol (2013). We find that the analytic wave solutions are able to qualitatively explain the three-dimensional simulation results. Studying the vertical structure of waves allows us to explore new wave features such as the westward tilt of wavefronts related to the Rossby-wave resonance as well as double gyres of dispersive Rossby waves. We also make an attempt to apply our linear wave analysis to explain some numerical features associated with the equatorial jet devel...

  11. Early Juno Era Optical Imaging and Analysis of Jupiter's Atmospheric Structure and Color with the NMSU Acousto-optic Imaging Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, E.; Chanover, N.; Voelz, D.; Kuehn, D.; Strycker, P.

    2016-12-01

    Jupiter's upper atmosphere is a highly dynamic system in which clouds and storms change color, shape, and size on variable timescales. The exact mechanism by which the deep atmosphere affects these changes in the uppermost cloud deck is still unknown. However, with Juno's arrival in July 2016, it is now possible to take detailed observations of the deep atmosphere with the spacecraft's Microwave Radiometer. By taking detailed optical measurements of Jupiter's uppermost cloud deck in conjunction with these microwave observations, we can provide a context in which to better understand these observations. Ultimately, we can utilize these two complementary datasets in order to thoroughly characterize Jupiter's atmosphere in terms of its vertical cloud structure, color distribution, and dynamical state throughout the Juno era. These optical data will also provide a complement to the near-IR sensitivity of the Jovian InfraRed Auroral Mapper and will expand on the limited spectral coverage of JunoCam. In order to obtain high spectral resolution images of Jupiter's atmosphere in the optical regime we use the New Mexico State University Acousto-optic Imaging Camera (NAIC). NAIC's acousto-optic tunable filter allows us to take hyperspectral image cubes of Jupiter from 450-950 nm at an average spectral resolution (λ/dλ) of 242. We present a preliminary analysis of two datasets obtained with NAIC at the Apache Point Observatory 3.5-m telescope: one pre-Juno dataset from March 2016 and the other from November 2016. From these data we derive low-resolution optical spectra of the Great Red Spot and a representative belt and zone to compare with previous work and laboratory measurements of candidate chromophore materials. Additionally, we compare these two datasets to inspect how the atmosphere has changed since before Juno arrived at Jupiter. NASA supported this work through award number NNX15AP34A.

  12. Characterization of the atmosphere of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-32Ab and the M-dwarf companion HAT-P-32B

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Ming; Wright, Jason T; Knutson, Heather A; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Johnathan; Ngo, Henry; Fulton, Benjamin J; Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas M; Muirhead, Philip S; Hinkley, Sasha; Showman, Adam P; Curtis, Jason; Burruss, Rick

    2014-01-01

    We report secondary eclipse photometry of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-32Ab, taken with Hale/WIRC in H and Ks bands and with Spitzer/IRAC at 3.6 and 4.5 micron. We carried out adaptive optics imaging of the planet host star HAT-P-32A and its companion HAT-P-32B in the near-IR and the visible. We clearly resolve the two stars from each other and find a separation of 2.923" +/- 0. 004" and a position angle 110.64 deg +/- 0.12 deg. We measure the flux ratios of the binary in g' r' i' z' and H & Ks bands, and determine Teff = 3565 +/- 82 K for the companion star, corresponding to an M1.5 dwarf. We use PHOENIX stellar atmosphere models to correct the dilution of the secondary eclipse depths of the hot Jupiter due to the presence of the M1.5 companion. We also improve the secondary eclipse photometry by accounting for the non-classical, flux-dependent nonlinearity of the WIRC IR detector in the H band. We measure planet-to-star flux ratios of 0.090 +/- 0.033%, 0.178 +/- 0.057%, 0.364 +/- 0.016%, and 0.438 +/- 0.020% i...

  13. The Jupiter ONERA Electron (JOE) and Jupiter ONERA Proton (JOP) specification models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdarie, , S.; Sicard-Piet, A.

    2008-09-01

    The use of recent improvement in the understanding of the Jovian radiation belt structure has allowed to develop a more accurate engineering model of the Jovian electron and proton radiation belts. The basic idea was to combine the results of the Salammbô code when available (for proton and electron species) with the Divine and Garret model 1983 and/or with GIRE. The advantage of such an approach was that the resulting model is global in term of spatial and energy coverage, is optimised inside Europa orbit (the Divine and Garret model is not accurate inside Io orbit due to poor in-situ data there - note that inside Io is the region where ionizing radiation fluxes are maximum) and take advantage of the two models. The resulting JOE-JOP models will be presented, pro and cons will be listed and commented. Finally future plans to upgrade these models will be given.

  14. A Model of Jupiter's Decametric Radio Emissions as a Searchlight Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, K.; Garcia, L.; Reyes, F.; Imai, M.; Thieman, J. R.

    It has long been recognized that there is a marked long-term periodic variation in Jupiter's integrated radio occurrence probability. The period of the variation is on the order of a decade. Carr et al. [1970] showed that such variations are closely correlated with Jovicentric declination of the Earth (DE). The range of the smoothed variation of DE is from approximately +3.3 to -3.3 degrees. This DE effect was extensively studied and confirmed by Garcia [1996]. It shows that the occurrence probability of the non-Io-A source is clearly controlled by DE at 18, 20, and 22 MHz during the 1957-1994 apparitions. We propose a new model to explain the DE effect. This new model shows that the beam structure of Jupiter radio emissions, which has been thought of like a hollow-cone, has a narrow beam like a searchlight, which can be explained by assuming that the three dimensional shape of the radio source expands along the line of the magnetic field. If we consider the sizes of the radio coherent region are 1000 m along Jupiter's magnetic field line and 200 m along the latitudinal direction, the equivalent beam pattern is 1 degree wide along Jupiter's magnetic field line and 5 degrees in latitude. As the searchlight beam is fixed with Jupiter's magnetic field, the pure geometrical effect of DE can be explained by this searchlight beam model.

  15. Modeling of Cometary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombosi, Tamas

    2004-01-01

    The NASA supported project 'Modeling of Cometary Atmospheres' has been quite successful in broadening our understanding of the cometary environment. We list peer reviewed publications and conference presentation that have been made as a result of studies performed under this project. Following the list we present details of a selection of the results.

  16. Numerical Modeling of the 2009 Impact Event on Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Pond, Jarrad W T; Gabriel, Travis; Korycansky, Donald G; Harrington, Joseph; Rebeli, Noemi; 10.1088/0004-637X/745/2/113

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the 2009 July impact event on Jupiter using the ZEUS-MP 2 three-dimensional hydrodynamics code. We studied the impact itself and the following plume development. Eight impactors were considered: 0.5 km and 1 km porous (\\rho = 1.760 g cm^{-3}) and non-porous (\\rho = 2.700 g cm^{-3}) basalt impactors, and 0.5 km and 1 km porous (\\rho = 0.600 g cm^{-3}) and non-porous \\rho = 0.917 g cm^{-3}) ice impactors. The simulations consisted of these bolides colliding with Jupiter at an incident angle of \\theta = 69 degrees from the vertical and with an impact velocity of v = 61.4 km s^{-1}. Our simulations show the development of relatively larger, faster plumes created after impacts involving 1 km diameter bodies. Comparing simulations of the 2009 event with simulations of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 events reveals a difference in plume development, with the higher incident angle of the 2009 impact leading to a shallower terminal depth and a smaller and slower plume. We also studied the amount of dynamical...

  17. Atmospheric Circulation of Hot Jupiters: Dayside-Nightside Temperature Differences. II. Comparison with Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Komacek, Thaddeus D; Tan, Xianyu

    2016-01-01

    The full-phase infrared light curves of low-eccentricity hot Jupiters show a trend of increasing fractional dayside-nightside brightness temperature difference with increasing incident stellar flux, both averaged across the infrared and in each individual wavelength band. The analytic theory of Komacek & Showman (2016) shows that this trend is due to the decreasing ability with increasing incident stellar flux of waves to propagate from day to night and erase temperature differences. Here, we compare the predictions of this theory to observations, showing that it explains well the shape of the trend of increasing dayside-nightside temperature difference with increasing equilibrium temperature. Applied to individual planets, the theory matches well with observations at high equilibrium temperatures but systematically under-predicts the dayside-nightside brightness temperature differences at equilibrium temperatures less than $2000 \\ \\mathrm{K}$. We interpret this as likely due to as the effects of clouds m...

  18. Inferring the depth of the atmospheric circulation on Jupiter and Saturn through the gravity measurements by Juno and Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspi, Y.; Galanti, E.

    2014-04-01

    In approximately two years the Juno and Cassini spacecraft will both perform close flybys of Jupiter and Saturn respectively, obtaining for the first time a high precision gravity spectrum for these planets. We discuss how this data can be used to estimate the depth of the observed jet streams on these planets. This can be done in several ways: 1. measurements of the high order even harmonics which beyond J10 are dominated by the dynamics; 2. measurements of odd gravity harmonics which have no contribution from a static planet, and therefore are a pure signature of dynamics; 3. upper limits on the depth can be obtained by comparing low order even harmonics from dynamical models to the difference between the measured low order even harmonics and the largest possible values of a static planet; 4. direct latitudinally varying measurements of the gravity field exerted on the spacecraft. We discuss how these methods may be applied and show that given the expected sensitivities of Juno and Cassini the odd harmonics J3 and J5 will have the best sensitivity to deep dynamics, allowing detection of winds reaching only ~ 100 km deep, if those exist on Jupiter and Saturn (Kaspi, 2013). For this analysis we use a hierarchy of dynamical models ranging from deep compressible GCMs to simplified thermal wind models in order to relate the three-dimensional flow to perturbations of the density field, and therefore to the gravity field.

  19. The UK Met Office global circulation model with a sophisticated radiation scheme applied to the hot Jupiter HD 209458b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, David S.; Mayne, Nathan J.; Baraffe, Isabelle; Manners, James; Tremblin, Pascal; Drummond, Benjamin; Smith, Chris; Acreman, David M.; Homeier, Derek

    2016-10-01

    To study the complexity of hot Jupiter atmospheres revealed by observations of increasing quality, we have adapted the UK Met Office Global Circulation Model (GCM), the Unified Model (UM), to these exoplanets. The UM solves the full 3D Navier-Stokes equations with a height-varying gravity, avoiding the simplifications used in most GCMs currently applied to exoplanets. In this work we present the coupling of the UM dynamical core to an accurate radiation scheme based on the two-stream approximation and correlated-k method with state-of-the-art opacities from ExoMol. Our first application of this model is devoted to the extensively studied hot Jupiter HD 209458b. We have derived synthetic emission spectra and phase curves, and compare them to both previous models also based on state-of-the-art radiative transfer, and to observations. We find a reasonable agreement between observations and both our days side emission and hot spot offset, however, our night side emissions is too large. Overall our results are qualitatively similar to those found by Showman et al. (2009, ApJ, 699, 564) with the SPARC/MITgcm, however, we note several quantitative differences: Our simulations show significant variation in the position of the hottest part of the atmosphere with pressure, as expected from simple timescale arguments, and in contrast to the "vertical coherency" found by Showman et al. (2009). We also see significant quantitative differences in calculated synthetic observations. Our comparisons strengthen the need for detailed intercomparisons of dynamical cores, radiation schemes and post-processing tools to understand these differences. This effort is necessary in order to make robust conclusions about these atmospheres based on GCM results.

  20. 3D multispecies collisional model of Ganymede's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Francois; Leclercq, Ludivine; Oza, Apurva; Schmidt, Carl; Modolo, Ronan; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Johnson, Robert E.

    2016-10-01

    Ganymede's atmosphere is produced by the interaction of the Sun and of the Jovian magnetosphere with its surface. It is a reflection of Ganymede's surface properties, but also of the complex interaction between the Ganymede and Jupiter magnetospheres. The Exospheric Global Model (EGM) has been developed in order to be able to integrate surface and magnetosphere processes with those in Ganymede's atmosphere. It is a 3D parallelized multi-species collisional model, coupled with LatHys, a hybrid multi-grid 3D multi-species model of Ganymede's magnetosphere (Leclercq et al., Geophys. Res. Let., Submitted, 2016). EGM's description of the species-dependent spatial distribution of Ganymede's atmosphere, its temporal variability during rotation around Jupiter, its connection to the surface, the role of collisions, and respective roles of sublimation and sputtering in producing Ganymede's exosphere, illustrates how modeling combined with in situ and remote sensing of Ganymede's atmosphere can contribute to our understanding of this unique surface-atmosphere-magnetosphere integrated system.

  1. Modelling Saturn's atmospheric circulations and cloud structure with OPUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuchowski, L. C.; Read, P. L.; Yamazaki, Y. H.

    2009-04-01

    We are investigating Saturn's atmospheric circulations and cloud structure in the Northern and Southern hemisphere as initial value problems by use of the Oxford Planetary Unified model System (OPUS), a sophisticated GCM based on the UK Met Office Unified Model. Solving an extended form of the Hydrodynamic Primitive Equations, OPUS is capable of including 40 vertical levels from 0.1 bar to 100 bar. The model was initiated with temperature and balanced thermal wind profiles recently obtained by Cassini's Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS). A simple cloud scheme for the Jovian planets has been added to OPUS and is employed to model the three major cloud decks (ammonia, ammonium-hydrosulfide and water) on Saturn and the advection of these clouds with the atmosphere. We have already conducted several numerical studies with OPUS, simulating jet scale meridional circulations, the formation of cloud bands and discrete turbulent features on Jupiter. By modelling the dynamics and clouds of Saturn in a similar way, we are hoping to gain further insight into the formation of circulation cells over the zonal jet streams as well as to examine the distribution of atmospheric condensates in response to these motions. The model will also be used to numerically investigate the characteristic features in Saturn's Northern hemisphere. It is envisioned to directly compare the atmospheric configurations obtained for Saturn with previous results from the Jupiter model.

  2. Development of the Non-Hydrostatic Jupiter Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (J-GITM): Status and Current Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougher, Stephen; Ridley, Aaron; Majeed, Tariq; Waite, J. Hunter; Gladstone, Randy; Bell, Jared

    2016-07-01

    The primary objectives for development and validation of a new 3-D non-hydrostatic model of Jupiter's upper atmosphere is to improve our understanding of Jupiter's thermosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere system and to provide a global context within which to analyze the data retrieved from the new JUNO mission. The new J-GITM model presently incorporates the progress made on the previous Jupiter-TGCM code (i.e. key parameterizations, ion-neutral chemistry, IR cooling) while also employing the non-hydrostatic numerical core of the Earth Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (GITM). The GITM numerical framework has been successfully applied to Earth, Mars, and Titan (see Ridley et al. [2006], Bougher et al. [2015], Bell [2008, 2010]). Moreover, it has been shown to simulate the effects of strong, localized heat sources (such as joule heating and auroral heating) more accurately than strictly hydrostatic GCMs (Deng et al. [2007, 2008]). Thus far, in the J-GITM model development and testing, model capability has been progressively augmented to capture the neutral composition (e.g. H, H2, He major species), 3-component neutral winds, and thermal structure, as well as the ion composition (H3+, H2+, and H+ among others) above 250 km. Presently, J-GITM: (a) provides an interactive calculation for auroral particle precipitation (i.e. heating, ionization), an improvement over the static formulation used previously in the J-TGCM (Bougher et al., 2005; Majeed et al., 2005, 2009, 2015); (b) self-consistently calculates an ionosphere using updated ion-neutral chemistry, ion dynamics, and electron transport; (c) simulates the chemistry that forms key hydrocarbons at the base of the thermosphere, focusing on CH4, C2H2, and C2H6; (d) allows the production of H3+, CH4, C2H2, and C2H6 to modify the global thermal balance of Jupiter through their non-LTE radiative cooling; (e) provides a calculation of H2 vibrational chemistry to regulate H+ densities; and (f) uses the improved

  3. The Influence of Coronal Mass Ejections on the Gas Dynamics of the Atmosphere of a "Hot~Jupiter" Exoplanet

    CERN Document Server

    Bisikalo, D V

    2016-01-01

    The results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of the gas dynamics of the atmosphere of a "hot Jupiter" exoplanet during the passage of a coronal mass ejection (CME) from the central star are presented. These computations assumed the parameters for the stellar wind and the CME to be typical of the solar values. The characteristic variations of the flow pattern are considered for quasi-closed and closed (but appreciably distorted by the gravitational influence of the star) gaseous envelopes of the exoplanet. It is shown that a typical CME is sufficient to tear off the outer part of an asymmetric envelope that is located beyond the Roche lobe and carry it away from the exoplanet. This leads to a substantial increase in the mass-loss rate from the exoplanet envelope during the passage of CMEs. The mass-loss rate grows by about a factor of 11 for a closed envelope, and by about a factor of 14 for a quasi-closed envelope. Possible evolutionary consequences of the loss of part of the atmosphere during the p...

  4. MARCS model atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plez, B [GRAAL, CNRS, UMR5024, Universite Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier, Cedex 5 (France) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden)], E-mail: bertrand.plez@graal.univ-montp2.fr

    2008-12-15

    In this review presented at the Symposium A Stellar Journey in Uppsala, June 2008, I give an account of the historical development of the MARCS code, and its premises from the first version published in 1975 to the 2008 grid. The primary driver for the development team who constantly strive to include the best possible physical data, is the science that can be done with the models. A few preliminary comparisons of M star model spectra to spectrophotometric observations are presented. Particular results related to opacity effects are discussed. The size of errors in spectral energy distribution (SED) and model thermal stratification is estimated for different densities of wavelength sampling. The number of points used in the MARCS 2008 grid (108 000) is large enough to ensure errors of only a few K in all models of the grid, except the optically very thin layers of metal-poor stars. Errors in SEDs may reach about 10% locally in the UV. The published sampled SEDs are thus adequate to compute synthetic broadband photometry, but higher resolution spectra will be computed in the near future and published as well on the MARCS site (marcs.astro.uu.se). Test model calculations with TiO line opacity accounted for in scattering show significant cooling of the upper atmospheric layers of red giants. Rough estimates of radiative and collisional time scales for electronic transitions of TiO indicate that scattering may well be the dominant mechanism in these lines. However, models constructed with this hypothesis are incompatible with optical observations of TiO (Arcturus) or IR observations of OH (Betelgeuse), although they may succeed in explaining H{sub 2}O line observations. More work is needed in that direction.

  5. Japanese mission plan for Jupiter system: The Jupiter magnetospheric orbiter and the Trojan asteroid explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, S.; Fujimoto, M.; Yano, H.; Takashima, T.; Kasaba, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Kimura, J.; Funase, R.; Mori, O.; Tsuda, Y.; Campagnola, S.; Kawakatsu, Y.

    2011-10-01

    In the future Jupiter system study, Coordinated observation of Jovian magnetosphere is one of the important targets of the mission in addition to icy satellites, atmosphere, and interior of Jupiter. JAXA will take a role on the magnetosphere spinner JMO (Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter), in addition to JGO (Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter) by ESA and JEO (Jupiter Europa Orbiter) by NASA. We will combine JMO with a proposed solar sail mission of JAXA for Jupiter and one of Trojan asteroids. Since Trojan asteroids could be representing raw solid materials of Jupiter or at least outer solar system bodies, involvement of Trojan observation should enhance the quality of Jupiter system exploration.

  6. THE HOT-JUPITER KEPLER-17b: DISCOVERY, OBLIQUITY FROM STROBOSCOPIC STARSPOTS, AND ATMOSPHERIC CHARACTERIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, David; Ballard, Sarah; Carter, Joshua A.; Quinn, Samuel N.; Fressin, Francois; Latham, David W.; Torres, Guillermo [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Demory, Brice-Olivier [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02159 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin (United States); Isaacson, Howard T.; Knutson, Heather A. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Buchhave, Lars A. [Neils Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Denmark (Denmark); Bryson, Stephen T.; Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Batalha, Natalie M. [San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Brown, Timothy M., E-mail: jdesert@cfa.harvard.edu [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); and others

    2011-11-01

    This paper reports the discovery and characterization of the transiting hot giant exoplanet Kepler-17b. The planet has an orbital period of 1.486 days, and radial velocity measurements from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope show a Doppler signal of 419.5{sup +13.3}{sub -15.6} m s{sup -1}. From a transit-based estimate of the host star's mean density, combined with an estimate of the stellar effective temperature T{sub eff} = 5630 {+-} 100 from high-resolution spectra, we infer a stellar host mass of 1.06 {+-} 0.07 M{sub Sun} and a stellar radius of 1.02 {+-} 0.03 R{sub Sun }. We estimate the planet mass and radius to be M{sub P} = 2.45 {+-} 0.11 M{sub J} and R{sub P} = 1.31 {+-} 0.02 R{sub J}. The host star is active, with dark spots that are frequently occulted by the planet. The continuous monitoring of the star reveals a stellar rotation period of 11.89 days, eight times the planet's orbital period; this period ratio produces stroboscopic effects on the occulted starspots. The temporal pattern of these spot-crossing events shows that the planet's orbit is prograde and the star's obliquity is smaller than 15 Degree-Sign . We detected planetary occultations of Kepler-17b with both the Kepler and Spitzer Space Telescopes. We use these observations to constrain the eccentricity, e, and find that it is consistent with a circular orbit (e < 0.011). The brightness temperatures of the planet's infrared bandpasses are T{sub 3.6{mu}m} = 1880 {+-} 100 K and T{sub 4.5{mu}m} = 1770 {+-} 150 K. We measure the optical geometric albedo A{sub g} in the Kepler bandpass and find A{sub g} = 0.10 {+-} 0.02. The observations are best described by atmospheric models for which most of the incident energy is re-radiated away from the day side.

  7. Jupiter's Phase Variations from Cassini: a testbed for future direct-imaging missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, Laura; Jackiewicz, Jason; Rages, Kathy; West, Robert; Knowles, Ben; Marley, Mark; Lewis, Nikole

    2016-10-01

    Phase curves are important for our understanding of the energy balance and scattering behavior of an exoplanet's atmosphere. In preparation for future direct-imaging missions of Jupiter-like planets, we present phase curves of Jupiter from 0--150 degrees as measured in multiple optical bandpasses by Cassini/ISS during the Millennium flyby of Jupiter in late 2000 to early 2001. We demonstrate and confirm that Jupiter is not well represented by a Lambertian phase function and that its color is more variable with phase angle than predicted by Jupiter-like models. This indicates that a Jupiter-twin observed near quadrature may not be as straightforward to classify as a Jupiter-like planet.

  8. Jupiter's Phase Variations from Cassini: a testbed for future direct-imaging missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, Laura; Jackiewicz, Jason; Rages, Kathy; West, Robert A.; Knowles, Ben; Lewis, Nikole K.; Marley, Mark S.

    2017-01-01

    Phase curves are important for our understanding of the energy balance and scattering behavior of an exoplanet's atmosphere. In preparation for future direct-imaging missions of Jupiter-like planets, in particular WFIRST, we present phase curves of Jupiter from 0--150 degrees as measured in multiple optical bandpasses by Cassini/ISS during the Millennium flyby of Jupiter in late 2000 to early 2001. We demonstrate and confirm that Jupiter is not well represented by a Lambertian phase function and that its color is more variable with phase angle than predicted by Jupiter-like models. This indicates that a Jupiter-twin observed near quadrature may not be as straightforward to classify as a Jupiter-like planet and comment on the implications for future missions.

  9. Band parameters for self-broadened ammonia gas in the range 0.74 to 5.24 μm to support measurements of the atmosphere of the planet Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Neil; Calcutt, Simon; Irwin, Pat; Temple, Jon

    2008-08-01

    We present new measurements and modelling of low-resolution transmission spectra of self-broadened ammonia gas, one of the most important absorbers found in the near-infrared spectrum of the planet Jupiter. These new spectral measurements were specifically designed to support measurements of Jupiter's atmosphere made by the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) which was part of the Galileo mission that orbited Jupiter from 1995 to September 2003. To reach approximate jovian conditions in the lab, a new gas spectroscopy facility was developed and used to measure self-broadened ammonia spectra from 0.74 to 5.2 μm, virtually the complete range of the NIMS instrument, for the first time. Spectra were recorded at temperatures varying from 300 to 215 K, pressures from 1000 to 33 mb and using three different path lengths (10.164, 6.164 and 2.164 m). The spectra were then modelled using a series of increasingly complex physically based transmittance functions.

  10. Long-term changes in reflectivity and larger scale motions in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    A multi-color, broad-band photographic program for monitoring atmospheric variability of Jupiter and Saturn with the 61-cm, f/75 telescope was continued. The archivial product consists of approximately 20 sequential images on 3 1/4 x 4 1/4 glass plates with a plate scale of 4.53 arc sec/mm. An eleven-step sensitometric wedge, recorded times of acquisition, and fiducial marks which determine the orientation of the plate, are recorded on each individual plate. This allows accurate positional measurements, as well as detailed relative surface brightness determinations. Detailed measurements of the Red Spot are being utilized in a study of zonal velocity variation and the ability to predict the longitude of the Red Spot during the Galileo mission. An ongoing 5-color series of Saturn has been maintained to map the seasonal changes in the belt-zone reflectivity. Digitization of a series of blue images containing the Red Spot and a series of red and blue images excluding the Red Spot are being processed and reduced to normalized surface brightness maps. This data is being utilized to map time-dependent brightness variations of selected features, belts, and ones.

  11. Detection of CO in the atmosphere of the hot Jupiter HD 189733b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnes John R.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available With time-series spectroscopic observations taken with the Near Infrared Spectrometer (NIRSPEC at Keck II, we investigated the atmosphere of the close orbiting transiting extrasolar giant planet, HD 189733b. In paticular, we intended to measure the dense absorption line forest around 2.3 micron, which is produced by carbon monoxide (CO. CO is expected to be present in the planetary atmosphere, although no detection of this molecule has been claimed yet. We analyzed the NIRSPEC data with cross-correlation and detect CO absorption in the day-side spectrum of HD 189733b at the known planetary radial velocity semi-amplitude with 99.54% (2.8σ confidence.

  12. The role of Io in the dynamics of Jupiter's magnetosphere: A sandpile modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, J. J.; Jackman, C. M.; Freeman, M. P.

    2015-10-01

    Jupiter's magnetosphere is thought to be largely internally driven, by the combination of the loading of ~500 kg/s of plasma into the system by the volcanic moon Io, and the rapid rotation of the planet itself. Since we do not see a continuously expanding torus and magnetosphere, we would expect a long-term balance between the inflow of mass, primarily from Io, and the outflow of mass, via plasmoid release. Simple calculations, which attempt to match the mass-loading rate from Io with the amount of mass lost via large-scale tail reconnection events, indicate a significant mass imbalance at Jupiter. This mass imbalance may be due to several reasons, including visibility issues linked to single spacecraft observations. This is where modelling can be a powerful tool. A single spacecraft can only expect to observe a global 'systemwide' event, where energy is redistributed across the entiresystem, with any certainty. While 'internal' events, with a more local redistribution of energy, are likely to be missed. Usingcomputational modeling we are able to'observe' an entire system at any time. Cellular automata (CA) based on robust physical parameters and rules can allow us to manipulate the inputs and drivers of magnetotail physics, and to explore the response of the system over a range of temporal and spatial scales. Here we examine the variability of the mass-loading and the response of our CA sandpile model to an analogous driving. We explore whether Jupiter's magnetospheric dynamics can be explained purely in terms of Io massloading. In particular we examine the difference between the small local events ("internal" avalanches) and larger global events ("systemwide" avalanches), and what this can tell us about the fate of mass in Jupiter's magnetosphere.

  13. Non-solar noble gas abundances in the atmosphere of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunine, Jonathan I.; Stevenson, David J.

    1986-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of clathrate hydrate is calculated to predict the formation conditions corresponding to a range of solar system parameters. The calculations were performed using the statistical mechanical theory developed by van der Waals and Platteeuw (1959) and existing experimental data concerning clathrate hydrate and its components. Dissociation pressures and partition functions (Langmuir constants) are predicted at low pressure for CO clathrate (hydrate) using the properties of chemicals similar to CO. It is argued that nonsolar but well constrained noble gas abundances may be measurable by the Galileo spacecraft in the Jovian atmosphere if the observed carbon enhancement is due to bombardment of the atmosphere by clathrate-bearing planetesimals sometime after planetary formation. The noble gas abundances of the Jovian satellite Titan are predicted, assuming that most of the methane in Titan is accreted as clathrate. It is suggested that under thermodynamically appropriate conditions, complete clathration of water ice could have occurred in high-pressure nebulas around giant planets, but probably not in the outer solar nebula. The stability of clathrate in other pressure ranges is also discussed.

  14. The evolution of asteroids in the jumping-Jupiter migration model

    CERN Document Server

    Roig, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the evolution of a primordial belt of asteroids, represented by a large number of massless test particles, under the gravitational effect of migrating Jovian planets in the framework of the jumping-Jupiter model. We perform several simulations considering test particles distributed in the Main Belt, as well as in the Hilda and Trojan groups. The simulations start with Jupiter and Saturn locked in the mutual 3:2 mean motion resonance plus 3 Neptune-mass planets in a compact orbital configuration. Mutual planetary interactions during migration led one of the Neptunes to be ejected in less than 10 Myr of evolution, causing Jupiter to jump by about 0.3 au in semi-major axis. This introduces a large scale instability in the studied populations of small bodies. After the migration phase, the simulations are extended over 4 Gyr, and we compare the final orbital structure of the simulated test particles to the current Main Belt of asteroids with absolute magnitude $H<9.7$. The results ...

  15. KELT-10b and KELT-11b: Two Sub-Jupiter Mass Planets well-Suited for Atmospheric Characterization in the Southern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Joseph E.

    2015-12-01

    The Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) project is a photometric survey in both the northern and southern hemispheres for transiting planets around bright stars (8 inflated transiting sub-Jupiter mass planet (0.68 MJ) around a V=10.7 early G-star. It has the 3rd deepest transit (1.4%) in the southern hemisphere for a star V target for transmission spectroscopy. KELT-11b is a highly inflated transiting Saturn mass planet (0.22 MJ) orbiting one of the brightest planet-hosting stars in the southern hemisphere. Interestingly, KELT-11b's host star is a clear sub-giant star (log(g) ~ 3.7). I will discuss their impact for atmospheric characterization. For example, the highly inflated nature of the KELT-11b planet provides the ability to study a sub-Jupiter atmosphere at very low planetary gravity, while the sub-giant nature of its host star allows us to study the effects of post main sequence evolution of a host star on a hot Jupiter.

  16. An ice crystal model for jupiter's moon Europa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; schmidt, Karen Guldbae

    2003-01-01

    A simple model for crystal growth in the ice shell of Europa has been made in order to estimate the size of ice crystals at Europa's surface. If mass is lost from the surface of Europa due to sputtering processes, and the ice thickness is constant in time, ice crystals will be transported upwards...... in the ice shell. The crystals will therefore grow under varying conditions through the shell.The model predicts that ice crystals are 4 cm-80 m across at the surface. For the preferred parameter values, a crystal size of the order of 7 m is calculated. Udgivelsesdato: 1 june...

  17. A comparison of the radio data and model calculations of Jupiter's synchrotron radiation. I - The high energy electron distribution in Jupiter's inner magnetosphere. II - East-west asymmetry in the radiation belts as a function of Jovian longitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pater, I.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison has been made between detailed model calculations of Jupiter's synchrotron radiation and the radio data at wavelengths of 6, 21, and 50 cm. The calculations were performed for a Jovian longitude of 200 deg and were based on the multipole field configurations as derived from the Pioneer data. The electron distribution in the inner magnetosphere was derived as a function of energy, pitch angle, and spatial coordinates. In addition, the hot region or east-west asymmetry in the radiation belts is investigated. It is suggested that this asymmetry is due to the combined effect of an overabundance of electrons at jovicentric longitudes of 240-360 deg and the existence of a dusk-to-dawn directed electric field over the inner magnetosphere generated by the wind system in the upper atmosphere.

  18. Effect of transient solar wind pulses on atmospheric heating at Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, J N; Guio, P

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we have presented the first study to investigate the response of the Jovian thermosphere to transient variations in solar wind dynamic pressure, using a coupled, azimuthally symmetric global circulation model coupled with a simple magnetosphere model. This work (Yates et al., 2013, submitted) described the response of thermospheric flows, momentum sources, and the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling currents to transient compressions and expansions in the magnetosphere. The present study describes the response of thermospheric heating, cooling and the auroral emissions to the aforementioned transient events. We find that transient compressions and expansions, on time scales = 25 K and a ~2000 TW increase in the total power dissipated in the thermosphere. In terms of auroral processes, transient compressions increase main oval UV emission by a factor of ~4.5 whilst transient expansions increase this main emission by a more modest 37%. Both types of transient event cause shifts in the position of the ...

  19. AEOLUS: A MARKOV CHAIN MONTE CARLO CODE FOR MAPPING ULTRACOOL ATMOSPHERES. AN APPLICATION ON JUPITER AND BROWN DWARF HST LIGHT CURVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karalidi, Theodora; Apai, Dániel; Schneider, Glenn; Hanson, Jake R. [Steward Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Pasachoff, Jay M., E-mail: tkaralidi@email.arizona.edu [Hopkins Observatory, Williams College, 33 Lab Campus Drive, Williamstown, MA 01267 (United States)

    2015-11-20

    Deducing the cloud cover and its temporal evolution from the observed planetary spectra and phase curves can give us major insight into the atmospheric dynamics. In this paper, we present Aeolus, a Markov chain Monte Carlo code that maps the structure of brown dwarf and other ultracool atmospheres. We validated Aeolus on a set of unique Jupiter Hubble Space Telescope (HST) light curves. Aeolus accurately retrieves the properties of the major features of the Jovian atmosphere, such as the Great Red Spot and a major 5 μm hot spot. Aeolus is the first mapping code validated on actual observations of a giant planet over a full rotational period. For this study, we applied Aeolus to J- and H-band HST light curves of 2MASS J21392676+0220226 and 2MASS J0136565+093347. Aeolus retrieves three spots at the top of the atmosphere (per observational wavelength) of these two brown dwarfs, with a surface coverage of 21% ± 3% and 20.3% ± 1.5%, respectively. The Jupiter HST light curves will be publicly available via ADS/VIZIR.

  20. Potassium detection in the clear atmosphere of a hot-Jupiter: WASP-17b transmission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sedaghati, Elyar; Jeřabková, Tereza; Muñoz, Antonio García; Grenfell, John L; Smette, Alain; Ivanov, Valentin D; Csizmadia, Szilard; Cabrera, Juan; Kabath, Petr; Rocchetto, Marco; Rauer, Heike

    2016-01-01

    We present FORS2 (attached to ESO's Very Large Telescope) observations of the exoplanet WASP-17b during its primary transit, for the purpose of differential spectrophotometry analysis. We use the instrument in its Mask eXchange Unit (MXU) mode to simultaneously obtain low resolution spectra of the planet hosting star, as well as several reference stars in the field of view. The integration of these spectra within broadband and smaller 100\\AA~bins provides us with 'white' and spectrophotometric light curves, from 5700 to 8000\\AA. Through modelling the white light curve, we obtain refined bulk and transit parameters of the planet, as well as wavelength-dependent variations of the planetary radius from smaller spectral bins through which the transmission spectrum is obtained. The inference of transit parameters, as well as the noise statistics, is performed using a Gaussian Process model. We achieve a typical precision in the transit depth of a few hundred parts per million from various transit light curves. Fro...

  1. Jupiter: Lord of the Planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, William

    1984-01-01

    Presents a chapter from an introductory college-level astronomy textbook in which full-color photographs and numerous diagrams highlight an extensive description of the planet Jupiter. Topics include Jupiter's geology, rotation, magnetic field, atmosphere (including clouds and winds), and the Great Red Spot. (DH)

  2. Jupiter's Phase Variations from Cassini: a testbed for future direct-imaging missions

    CERN Document Server

    Mayorga, L C; Rages, K; West, R A; Knowles, B; Lewis, N; Marley, M S

    2016-01-01

    We present phase curves of Jupiter from 0-140 degrees as measured in multiple optical bandpasses by Cassini/ISS during the Millennium flyby of Jupiter in late 2000 to early 2001. Phase curves are of interest for studying the energy balance of Jupiter and understanding the scattering behavior of Jupiter as an exoplanet analog. We find that Jupiter is significantly darker at partial phases than an idealized Lambertian planet by roughly 25% and is not well fit by Jupiter-like exoplanet atmospheric models across all wavelengths. We provide analytic fits to Jupiter's phase function in several Cassini/ISS imaging filter bandpasses. In addition, these observations show that Jupiter's color is more variable with phase angle than predicted by models. Therefore, the color of even a near Jupiter-twin planet observed at a partial phase cannot be assumed to be comparable to that of Jupiter at full phase. We discuss how WFIRST and other future direct-imaging missions can enhance the study of cool giants.

  3. Jupiter Environment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Erick J.; Monahue, Kenneth M.; Biehl, James P.; Kokorowski, Michael; Ngalande, Cedrick,; Boedeker, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    The Jupiter Environment Tool (JET) is a custom UI plug-in for STK that provides an interface to Jupiter environment models for visualization and analysis. Users can visualize the different magnetic field models of Jupiter through various rendering methods, which are fully integrated within STK s 3D Window. This allows users to take snapshots and make animations of their scenarios with magnetic field visualizations. Analytical data can be accessed in the form of custom vectors. Given these custom vectors, users have access to magnetic field data in custom reports, graphs, access constraints, coverage analysis, and anywhere else vectors are used within STK.

  4. THE EVOLUTION OF ASTEROIDS IN THE JUMPING-JUPITER MIGRATION MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roig, Fernando [Observatòrio Nacional, Rua Gal. Jose Cristino 77, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20921-400 (Brazil); Nesvorný, David, E-mail: froig@on.br, E-mail: davidn@boulder.swri.edu [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut St., Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    In this work, we investigate the evolution of a primordial belt of asteroids, represented by a large number of massless test particles, under the gravitational effect of migrating Jovian planets in the framework of the jumping-Jupiter model. We perform several simulations considering test particles distributed in the Main Belt, as well as in the Hilda and Trojan groups. The simulations start with Jupiter and Saturn locked in the mutual 3:2 mean motion resonance plus three Neptune-mass planets in a compact orbital configuration. Mutual planetary interactions during migration led one of the Neptunes to be ejected in less than 10 Myr of evolution, causing Jupiter to jump by about 0.3 AU in semimajor axis. This introduces a large-scale instability in the studied populations of small bodies. After the migration phase, the simulations are extended over 4 Gyr, and we compare the final orbital structure of the simulated test particles to the current Main Belt of asteroids with absolute magnitude H < 9.7. The results indicate that, in order to reproduce the present Main Belt, the primordial belt should have had a distribution peaked at ∼10° in inclination and at ∼0.1 in eccentricity. We discuss the implications of this for the Grand Tack model. The results also indicate that neither primordial Hildas, nor Trojans, survive the instability, confirming the idea that such populations must have been implanted from other sources. In particular, we address the possibility of implantation of Hildas and Trojans from the Main Belt population, but find that this contribution should be minor.

  5. Voyager 2 Jupiter Eruption Movie

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This movie records an eruptive event in the southern hemisphere of Jupiter over a period of 8 Jupiter days. Prior to the event, an undistinguished oval cloud mass cruised through the turbulent atmosphere. The eruption occurs over avery short time at the very center of the cloud. The white eruptive material is swirled about by the internal wind patterns of the cloud. As a result of the eruption, the cloud then becomes a type of feature seen elsewhere on Jupiter known as 'spaghetti bowls'.As Voyager 2 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 8 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). These images were acquired in the Violet filter around May 6, 1979. The spacecraft was about 50 million kilometers from Jupiter at that time.This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  6. Lagrangian Modeling of the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-08-01

    Like watching a balloon borne by the breeze, a Lagrangian model tracks a parcel of air as it flows through the atmosphere. Whether running forward or backward in time, Lagrangian models offer a powerful tool for tracking and understanding the fates, or origins, of atmospheric flows. In the AGU monograph Lagrangian Modeling of the Atmosphere, editors John Lin, Dominik Brunner, Christoph Gerbig, Andreas Stohl, Ashok Luhar, and Peter Webley explore the nuances of the modeling technique. In this interview Eos talks to Lin about the growing importance of Lagrangian modeling as the world settles on climate change mitigation strategies, the societal value of operational modeling, and how recent advances are making it possible to run these complex calculations at home.

  7. Geophysical Plasmas and Atmospheric Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    will be submitted to the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. 32 - .- I. LIMITATIONS ON STRATOSPHERIC DYNAMICS We have performed an investigation of...Amplitudes" which will be submitted to the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. 1i 33 A& J. GENERAL CIRCULATION MODEL STUDIES Comparison computer runs...In tis case, as clearly shov.i by Petvia-mensona. I ths cseas ceary sou byPetia- cavities requires a local theory going beyond the limitshvilli,’ the

  8. JUPITER: Joint Universal Parameter IdenTification and Evaluation of Reliability - An Application Programming Interface (API) for Model Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, Edward R.; Poeter, Eileen P.; Doherty, John E.; Hill, Mary C.

    2006-01-01

    The Joint Universal Parameter IdenTification and Evaluation of Reliability Application Programming Interface (JUPITER API) improves the computer programming resources available to those developing applications (computer programs) for model analysis. The JUPITER API consists of eleven Fortran-90 modules that provide for encapsulation of data and operations on that data. Each module contains one or more entities: data, data types, subroutines, functions, and generic interfaces. The modules do not constitute computer programs themselves; instead, they are used to construct computer programs. Such computer programs are called applications of the API. The API provides common modeling operations for use by a variety of computer applications. The models being analyzed are referred to here as process models, and may, for example, represent the physics, chemistry, and(or) biology of a field or laboratory system. Process models commonly are constructed using published models such as MODFLOW (Harbaugh et al., 2000; Harbaugh, 2005), MT3DMS (Zheng and Wang, 1996), HSPF (Bicknell et al., 1997), PRMS (Leavesley and Stannard, 1995), and many others. The process model may be accessed by a JUPITER API application as an external program, or it may be implemented as a subroutine within a JUPITER API application . In either case, execution of the model takes place in a framework designed by the application programmer. This framework can be designed to take advantage of any parallel processing capabilities possessed by the process model, as well as the parallel-processing capabilities of the JUPITER API. Model analyses for which the JUPITER API could be useful include, for example: * Compare model results to observed values to determine how well the model reproduces system processes and characteristics. * Use sensitivity analysis to determine the information provided by observations to parameters and predictions of interest. * Determine the additional data needed to improve selected

  9. 3D Modeling of Spectra and Light Curves of Hot Jupiters with PHOENIX; a First Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Torres, J. J.

    2016-04-01

    A detailed global circulation model was used to feed the PHOENIX code and calculate 3D spectra and light curves of hot Jupiters. Cloud free and dusty radiative fluxes for the planet HD179949b were modeled to show differences between them. The PHOENIX simulations can explain the broad features of the observed 8 μm light curves, including the fact that the planet-star flux ratio peaks before the secondary eclipse. The PHOENIX reflection spectrum matches the Spitzer secondary-eclipse depth at 3.6 μm and underpredicts eclipse depths at 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 μm. These discrepancies result from the chemical composition and suggest the incorporation of different metallicities in future studies.

  10. 3D MODELING OF SPECTRA AND LIGHT CURVES OF HOT JUPITERS WITH PHOENIX; A FIRST APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J. Jiménez-Torres

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed global circulation model was used to feed the PHOENIX code and calculate 3D spectra and light curves of hot Jupiters. Cloud free and dusty radiative fluxes for the planet HD179949b were modeled to show differences between them. The PHOENIX simulations can explain the broad features of the observed 8 µm light curves, including the fact that the planet-star flux ratio peaks before the secondary eclipse. The PHOENIX reflection spectrum matches the Spitzer secondary-eclipse depth at 3.6 µm and underpredicts eclipse depths at 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 µm. These discrepancies result from the chemical composition and suggest the incorporation of different metallicities in future studies.

  11. 3D Modeling of Spectra and Light Curves of Hot Jupiters; A First Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez-Torres, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a detailed Global Circulation Model was employed to feed the PHOENIX code to calculate 3D spectra and light curves of hot Jupiters. Cloud free and dusty radiative luxes for the planet HD179949b were modeled to show differences between them. The PHOENIX simulations can explain the broad features of the observed 8 {\\mu}m light curves, including the fact that the planet-star flux ratio peaks before the secondary eclipse. The PHOENIX reflection spectrum matches the Spitzer secondary-eclipse depth at 3.6 {\\mu}m and underpredicts the eclipse depths at 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 {\\mu}m. These discrepancies result from the chemical composition and provide motivation for incorporating different metallicities in future studies.

  12. Sharpening Up Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    New image-correction technique delivers sharpest whole-planet ground-based picture ever A record two-hour observation of Jupiter using a superior technique to remove atmospheric blur has produced the sharpest whole-planet picture ever taken from the ground. The series of 265 snapshots obtained with the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics Demonstrator (MAD) prototype instrument mounted on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) reveal changes in Jupiter's smog-like haze, probably in response to a planet-wide upheaval more than a year ago. Sharpening Up Jupiter ESO PR Photo 33/08 Sharpening Up Jupiter Being able to correct wide field images for atmospheric distortions has been the dream of scientists and engineers for decades. The new images of Jupiter prove the value of the advanced technology used by MAD, which uses two or more guide stars instead of one as references to remove the blur caused by atmospheric turbulence over a field of view thirty times larger than existing techniques [1]. "This type of adaptive optics has a big advantage for looking at large objects, such as planets, star clusters or nebulae," says lead researcher Franck Marchis, from UC Berkeley and the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, USA. "While regular adaptive optics provides excellent correction in a small field of view, MAD provides good correction over a larger area of sky. And in fact, were it not for MAD, we would not have been able to perform these amazing observations." MAD allowed the researchers to observe Jupiter for almost two hours on 16 and 17 August 2008, a record duration, according to the observing team. Conventional adaptive optics systems using a single Jupiter moon as reference cannot monitor Jupiter for so long because the moon moves too far from the planet. The Hubble Space Telescope cannot observe Jupiter continuously for more than about 50 minutes, because its view is regularly blocked by the Earth during Hubble's 96-minute orbit. Using MAD, ESO astronomer Paola Amico

  13. Featured Image: Mapping Jupiter with Hubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Zonal wind profile for Jupiter, describing the speed and direction of its winds at each latitude. [Simon et al. 2015]This global map of Jupiters surface (click for the full view!) was generated by the Hubble Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program, which aims to createnew yearly global maps for each of the outer planets. Presented in a study led by Amy Simon (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center), the map above is the first generated for Jupiter in the first year of the OPAL campaign. It provides a detailed look at Jupiters atmospheric structure including the Great Red Spot and allowed the authors to measure the speed and direction of the wind across Jupiters latitudes, constructing an updated zonal wind profile for Jupiter.In contrast to this study, the Juno mission (which will be captured into Jupiters orbit today after a 5-year journey to Jupiter!) will be focusing more on the features below Jupiters surface, studying its deep atmosphere and winds. Some of Junos primary goals are to learn about Jupiters composition, gravitational field, magnetic field, and polar magnetosphere. You can follow along with the NASATV livestream as Juno arrives at Jupiter tonight; orbit insertion coverage starts at 10:30 EDT.CitationAmy A. Simon et al 2015 ApJ 812 55. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/812/1/55

  14. Chemical modeling of exoplanet atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Venot, Olivia

    2014-01-01

    The past twenty years have revealed the diversity of planets that exist in the Universe. It turned out that most of exoplanets are different from the planets of our Solar System and thus, everything about them needs to be explored. Thanks to current observational technologies, we are able to determine some information about the atmospheric composition, the thermal structure and the dynamics of these exoplanets, but many questions remain still unanswered. To improve our knowledge about exoplanetary systems, more accurate observations are needed and that is why the Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory (EChO) is an essential space mission. Thanks to its large spectral coverage and high spectral resolution, EChO will provide exoplanetary spectra with an unprecedented accuracy, allowing to improve our understanding of exoplanets. In this work, we review what has been done to date concerning the chemical modeling of exoplanet atmospheres and what are the main characteristics of warm exoplanet atmospheres, which a...

  15. An empirical model of the high-energy electron environment at Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria-Santacruz, M.; Garrett, H. B.; Evans, R. W.; Jun, I.; Kim, W.; Paranicas, C.; Drozdov, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present an empirical model of the energetic electron environment in Jupiter's magnetosphere that we have named the Galileo Interim Radiation Electron Model version-2 (GIRE2) since it is based on Galileo data from the Energetic Particle Detector (EPD). Inside 8RJ, GIRE2 adopts the previously existing model of Divine and Garrett because this region was well sampled by the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft but poorly covered by Galileo. Outside of 8RJ, the model is based on 10 min averages of Galileo EPD data as well as on measurements from the Geiger Tube Telescope on board the Pioneer spacecraft. In the inner magnetosphere the field configuration is dipolar, while in the outer magnetosphere it presents a disk-like structure. The gradual transition between these two behaviors is centered at about 17RJ. GIRE2 distinguishes between the two different regions characterized by these two magnetic field topologies. Specifically, GIRE2 consists of an inner trapped omnidirectional model between 8 to 17RJ that smoothly joins onto the original Divine and Garrett model inside 8RJ and onto a GIRE2 plasma sheet model at large radial distances. The model provides a complete picture of the high-energy electron environment in the Jovian magnetosphere from ˜1 to 50RJ. The present manuscript describes in great detail the data sets, formulation, and fittings used in the model and provides a discussion of the predicted high-energy electron fluxes as a function of energy and radial distance from the planet.

  16. Modelling land surface - atmosphere interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Højmark

    related to inaccurate land surface modelling, e.g. enhanced warm bias in warm dry summer months. Coupling the regional climate model to a hydrological model shows the potential of improving the surface flux simulations in dry periods and the 2 m air temperature in general. In the dry periods......The study is investigates modelling of land surface – atmosphere interactions in context of fully coupled climatehydrological model. With a special focus of under what condition a fully coupled model system is needed. Regional climate model inter-comparison projects as ENSEMBLES have shown bias...... representation of groundwater in the hydrological model is found to important and this imply resolving the small river valleys. Because, the important shallow groundwater is found in the river valleys. If the model does not represent the shallow groundwater then the area mean surface flux calculation...

  17. Model Atmospheres and Transit Spectra for Hot Rocky Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupu, Roxana

    hot Jupiters in similar transit configurations. For example, Na has been the first species to be detected in an exoplanet atmosphere, by observing the evaporating hotJupiter HD209458b. Understanding the interplay between the magma outgassing and volatile loss will be an important part of this project. Our team has the expertise in the chemistry, radiative transfer, and atmospheric escape modeling at these exotic temperatures. Our recent work has analyzed the emerging atmospheres of terrestrial planets after giant impacts, using a well-established radiativeconvective atmospheric structure code, with an extensive opacity database for all relevant molecules, and the chemistry self-consistently calculated for continental crust and bulk silicate earth compositions. We will expand on this work by considering a wider range of chemical compositions, assessing the importance of clouds and generating cloudy models, and developing dis-equilibrium models by taking into account vertical mixing and photochemistry. Photo-evaporation will be considered in the energy balance between heating, cooling and mass loss. We also have in-house codes to generate high-resolution eclipse spectra and predict transit depths and observable signatures. The development of the atmospheric code, the molecular opacity updates, the atmospheric structure calculations and the high resolution eclipse spectra will be performed by R. Lupu, M. Marley, and R. Freedman at NASA Ames. The atmospheric chemistry grids will be provided by B. Fegley and K. Lodders at Washington University. The transit spectra and observational features will be computed by J. Fortney at UCSC, and the atmospheric escape calculations will be performed by K. Zahnle at NASA Ames. This proposal addresses the following goals of the Exoplanet Research program: explain observations of exoplanetary systems, and understand the chemical and physical processes of exoplanets. Our results will also inform future JWST observations.

  18. Potassium detection in the clear atmosphere of a hot-Jupiter. FORS2 transmission spectroscopy of WASP-17b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedaghati, E.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Jeřabková, T.; García Muñoz, A.; Grenfell, J. L.; Smette, A.; Ivanov, V. D.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Cabrera, J.; Kabath, P.; Rocchetto, M.; Rauer, H.

    2016-11-01

    We present FORS2 (attached to ESO's Very Large Telescope) observations of the exoplanet WASP-17b during its primary transit, for the purpose of differential spectrophotometry analysis. We use the instrument in its Mask eXchange Unit (MXU) mode to simultaneously obtain low resolution spectra of the planet hosting star, as well as several reference stars in the field of view. The integration of these spectra within broadband and smaller 100 Å bins provides us with "white" and spectrophotometric light curves, from 5700 to 8000 Å. Through modelling the white light curve, we obtain refined bulk and transit parameters of the planet, as well as wavelength-dependent variations of the planetary radius from smaller spectral bins through which the transmission spectrum is obtained. The inference of transit parameters, as well as the noise statistics, is performed using a Gaussian Process model. We achieve a typical precision in the transit depth of a few hundred parts per million from various transit light curves. From the transmission spectra we rule out a flat spectrum at >3σ and detect marginal presence of the pressure-broadened sodium wings. Furthermore, we detect the wing of the potassium absorption line in the upper atmosphere of the planet with 3σ confidence, both facts pointing to a relatively shallow temperature gradient in the atmosphere. These conclusions are mostly consistent with previous studies of this exo-atmosphere, although previous potassium measurements have been inconclusive. The data of the light curves are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A47

  19. A Detection of Water in the Transmission Spectrum of the Hot Jupiter WASP-12b and Implications for its Atmospheric Composition

    CERN Document Server

    Kreidberg, Laura; Bean, Jacob L; Stevenson, Kevin B; Desert, Jean-Michel; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Fortney, Jonathan J; Barstow, Joanna K; Henry, Gregory W; Williamson, Michael; Showman, Adam P

    2015-01-01

    Detailed characterization of exoplanets has begun to yield measurements of their atmospheric properties that constrain the planets' origins and evolution. For example, past observations of the dayside emission spectrum of the hot Jupiter WASP-12b indicated that its atmosphere has a high carbon-to-oxygen ratio (C/O $>$ 1), suggesting it had a different formation pathway than is commonly assumed for giant planets. Here we report a precise near-infrared transmission spectrum for WASP-12b based on six transit observations with the Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3. We bin the data in 13 spectrophotometric light curves from 0.84 - 1.67 $\\mu$m and measure the transit depths to a median precision of 51 ppm. We retrieve the atmospheric properties using the transmission spectrum and find strong evidence for water absorption (7$\\sigma$ confidence). This detection marks the first high-confidence, spectroscopic identification of a molecule in the atmosphere of WASP-12b. The retrieved 1$\\sigma$ water volume mixin...

  20. Model for Simulation Atmospheric Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik

    1976-01-01

    A method that produces realistic simulations of atmospheric turbulence is developed and analyzed. The procedure makes use of a generalized spectral analysis, often called a proper orthogonal decomposition or the Karhunen-Loève expansion. A set of criteria, emphasizing a realistic appearance, a co....... The method is unique in modeling the three velocity components simultaneously, and it is found that important cross-statistical features are reasonably well-behaved. It is concluded that the model provides a practical, operational simulator of atmospheric turbulence.......A method that produces realistic simulations of atmospheric turbulence is developed and analyzed. The procedure makes use of a generalized spectral analysis, often called a proper orthogonal decomposition or the Karhunen-Loève expansion. A set of criteria, emphasizing a realistic appearance......, a correct spectral shape, and non-Gaussian statistics, is selected in order to evaluate the model turbulence. An actual turbulence record is analyzed in detail providing both a standard for comparison and input statistics for the generalized spectral analysis, which in turn produces a set of orthonormal...

  1. The Explicit Planetary Isentropic-Coordinate (EPIC) Atmospheric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, T. E.; Fischer, A. S.; Gierasch, P. J.; Harrington, J.; LeBeau, R. P.; Santori, C. M.

    1998-04-01

    We describe a new general circulation model (GCM) designed for planetary atmospheric studies called the EPIC model. This is a finite-difference model based on the isentropic-coordinate scheme of Hsu and Arakawa (1990.Mon. Wea. Rev.118, 1933-1959). We report on previously undocumented modifications, additions, and key practical issues that experience running the model has revealed to be important. The model integrates the hydrostatic primitive equations, which are valid for large-scale atmospheric dynamics and include gravity waves (buoyancy waves), planetary waves (Rossby waves), and horizontally propagating sound waves (Lamb waves), but not vertically propagating sound waves because of the hydrostatic approximation. The vertical coordinate is entropy in the form of potential temperature, which coincides with material surfaces for adiabatic motion. This means that there is no vertical velocity except where there is heating, which improves accuracy and helps the model maintain conservation properties over long integrations. An isentropic vertical coordinate is natural for the atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, which are believed to have essentially adiabatic interiors that match up with the bottom of the model and is also excellent for middle-atmosphere studies on any planet. Radiative processes are parameterized by Newtonian cooling, and the latent heat of ortho-para hydrogen conversion is included when appropriate, with a suitably defined mean potential temperature. The model is written with general map factors that make it easy to configure in oblate spherical, cylindrical, or Cartesian coordinates. The code includes optional Message Passing Interface (MPI) library calls and hence runs on any Unix-based parallel computer or network cluster. An optional graphical user interface to commercial visualization software facilitates control of the model and analysis of output. Memory is allocated dynamically such that the user does not recompile to

  2. Understanding Jupiter's Interior

    CERN Document Server

    Militzer, Burkhard; Wahl, Sean M; Hubbard, William

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of how models of giant planet interiors are constructed. We review measurements from past space missions that provide constraints for the interior structure of Jupiter. We discuss typical three-layer interior models that consist of a dense central core and an inner metallic and an outer molecular hydrogen-helium layer. These models rely heavily on experiments, analytical theory, and first-principle computer simulations of hydrogen and helium to understand their behavior up to the extreme pressures ~10 Mbar and temperatures ~10,000 K. We review the various equations of state used in Jupiter models and compare them with shock wave experiments. We discuss the possibility of helium rain, core erosion and double diffusive convection may have important consequences for the structure and evolution of giant planets. In July 2016 the Juno spacecraft entered orbit around Jupiter, promising high-precision measurements of the gravitational field that will allow us to test our understandi...

  3. Formation of Jets and Equatorial Superrotation on Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Tapio

    2008-01-01

    The zonal flow in Jupiter's upper troposphere is organized into alternating retrograde and prograde jets, with a prograde (superrotating) jet at the equator. Existing models posit as the driver of the flow either differential radiative heating of the atmosphere or intrinsic heat fluxes emanating from the deep interior; however, they do not reproduce all large-scale features of Jupiter's jets and thermal structure. Here it is shown that the difficulties in accounting for Jupiter's jets and thermal structure resolve if the effects of differential radiative heating and intrinsic heat fluxes are considered together, and if upper-tropospheric dynamics are linked to a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) drag that acts deep in the atmosphere. Baroclinic eddies generated by differential radiative heating can account for the off-equatorial jets; meridionally propagating equatorial Rossby waves generated by intrinsic convective heat fluxes can account for the equatorial superrotation. The zonal flow extends deeply into the atmos...

  4. Global Deep Convection Models of Saturn's Atmospheric Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimpel, Moritz; Cuff, Keith; Gastine, Thomas; Wicht, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    The Cassini mission, along with previous missions and ground-based observations, has revealed a rich variety of atmospheric phenomena and time variability on Saturn. Some examples of dynamical features are: zonal flows with multiple jet streams, turbulent tilted shear flows that seem to power the jets, the north polar hexagon, the south polar cyclone, large anticyclones in "storm alley", numerous convective storms (white spots) of various sizes, and the 2010/2011 great storm, which destroyed an array of vortices dubbed the "string of pearls". Here we use the anelastic dynamo code MagIC, in non-magnetic mode, to study rotating convection in a spherical shell. The thickness of the shell is set to approximate the depth of the low electrical conductivity deep atmosphere of Saturn, and the convective forcing is set to yield zonal flows of similar velocity (Rossby number) to those of Saturn. Internal heating and the outer entropy boundary conditions allow simple modelling of atmospheric layers with neutral stability or stable stratification. In these simulations we can identify several saturnian and jovian atmospheric features, with some variations. We find that large anticyclonic vortices tend to form in the first anticyclonic shear zones away from the equatorial jet. Cyclones form at the poles, and polar polygonal jet streams, comparable to Saturn's hexagon, may or may not form, depending on the model conditions. Strings of small scale vortical structures arise as convective plumes near boundaries of shear zones. They typically precede larger scale convective storms that spawn propagating shear flow disturbances and anticyclonic vortices, which tend to drift across anticyclonic shear zones, toward the equator (opposite the drift direction of Saturn's 2010/2011 storm). Our model results indicate that many identifiable dynamical atmospheric features seen on Jupiter and Saturn arise from deep convection, shaped by planetary rotation, underlying and interacting with stably

  5. New evidence for chemical depletion of ammonia in the 1 to 2 bar region of Jupiter's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, M. H.; Atreya, S. K.; Romani, P. N.; De Pater, I.; Kuhn, W. R.; Kalogerakis, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    It has long been known that the vertical profile of ammonia within Jupiter's cloud layers is not well-described by a simple equilibrium profile, with saturated vapor above the cloud base and the well-mixed deep abundance below the cloud base. An additional depletion of ammonia by a factor of 4-10 is required by global microwave spectra at p Wong et al. (2004), Icarus 171, 153-170.[6] Magalhães, Seiff, and Young (2002), Icarus 158, 410-433.[7] Wong et al. (2014), Icarus, submitted.[8] Sromovsky et al. (2010), Icarus 210, 211-229 and 230-257. [This material is supported by the NASA Juno Project through a SWRI subcontract (SKA), and by NASA Grant No. NNX11AM55G issued through the Outer Planets Research Program (MHW).

  6. rosuvastatin (JUPITER)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge; Ridker, Paul M; MacFadyen, Jean G;

    2009-01-01

    were calculated across a range of end points, timeframes, and subgroups using data from Justification for the Use of statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER), a randomized evaluation of rosuvastatin 20 mg versus placebo conducted among 17 802 apparently healthy men...... infarction, stroke, revascularization, or death, the 5-year NNT within JUPITER was 20 (95% CI, 14 to 34). All subgroups had 5-year NNT values for this end point below 50; as examples, 5-year NNT values were 17 for men and 31 for women, 21 for whites and 19 for nonwhites, 18 for those with body mass index 300...

  7. Juno at Jupiter: Mission and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Scott

    2016-07-01

    The Juno mission is the second mission in NASA's New Frontiers program. Launched in August 2011, Juno arrives at Jupiter in July 2016. Juno science goals include the study of Jupiter's origin, interior structure, deep atmosphere, aurora and magnetosphere. Jupiter's formation is fundamental to the evolution of our solar system and to the distribution of volatiles early in the solar system's history. Juno's measurements of the abundance of Oxygen and Nitrogen in Jupiter's atmosphere, and the detailed maps of Jupiter's gravity and magnetic field structure will constrain theories of early planetary development. Juno's orbit around Jupiter is a polar elliptical orbit with perijove approximately 5000 km above the visible cloud tops. The payload consists of a set of microwave antennas for deep sounding, magnetometers, gravity radio science, low and high energy charged particle detectors, electric and magnetic field radio and plasma wave experiment, ultraviolet imaging spectrograph, infrared imager and a visible camera. The Juno design enables the first detailed investigation of Jupiter's interior structure, and deep atmosphere as well as the first in depth exploration of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere. The Juno mission design, science goals, and measurements related to the atmosphere of Jupiter will be presented.

  8. Stochastic models for atmospheric dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2003-01-01

    Simple stochastic differential equation models have been applied by several researchers to describe the dispersion of tracer particles in the planetary atmospheric boundary layer and to form the basis for computer simulations of particle paths. To obtain the drift coefficient, empirical vertical...... velocity distributions that depend on height above the ground both with respect to standard deviation and skewness are substituted into the stationary Fokker/Planck equation. The particle position distribution is taken to be uniform *the well/mixed condition( and also a given dispersion coefficient...

  9. Stochastic models for atmospheric dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2003-01-01

    Simple stochastic differential equation models have been applied by several researchers to describe the dispersion of tracer particles in the planetary atmospheric boundary layer and to form the basis for computer simulations of particle paths. To obtain the drift coefficient, empirical vertical...... positions close to the boundaries. Different rules have been suggested in the literature with justifications based on simulation studies. Herein the relevant stochastic differential equation model is formulated in a particular way. The formulation is based on the marginal transformation of the position...... dependent particle velocity into a position independent Gaussian velocity. Boundary conditions are obtained from Itos rule of stochastic differentiation. The model directly point at a canonical rule of reflection for the approximating random walk with finite time step. This reflection rule is different from...

  10. Thermal Processes Governing Hot-Jupiter Radii

    CERN Document Server

    Spiegel, David S

    2013-01-01

    There have been many proposed explanations for the larger-than-expected radii of some transiting hot Jupiters, including either stellar or orbital energy deposition deep in the atmosphere or deep in the interior. In this paper, we explore the important influences on hot-Jupiter radius evolution of (i) additional heat sources in the high atmosphere, the deep atmosphere, and deep in the convective interior; (ii) consistent cooling of the deep interior through the planetary dayside, nightside, and poles; (iii) the degree of heat redistribution to the nightside; and (iv) the presence of an upper atmosphere absorber inferred to produce anomalously hot upper atmospheres and inversions in some close-in giant planets. In particular, we compare the radius expansion effects of atmospheric and deep-interior heating at the same power levels and derive the power required to achieve a given radius increase when night-side cooling is incorporated. We find that models that include consistent day/night cooling are more simila...

  11. Jupiter's Dynamic Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, M. F.; Bunce, E. J.; Kronberg, E. A.; Jackman, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Jupiter's magnetosphere is a highly dynamic environment. Hundreds of reconnection events have been identified in Jupiter's magnetotail through analysis of magnetic field and particle measurements collected by the Galileo spacecraft. Quasi-periodic behavior, suggestive of reconnection, has been intermittently observed on a ~2-3 day time scale in several data sets, including magnetic field dipolarizations, flow bursts, auroral polar dawn spots, and the hectometric radio emission. In this paper we review the present state of knowledge of Jovian magnetospheric dynamics. Throughout the discussion, we highlight similarities and differences to Saturn's magnetosphere. For example, recent analysis of plasmoid signatures at both Jupiter and Saturn has established the role of tail reconnection in the overall mass and flux transport in the outer planet magnetospheres. The results for both Jupiter and Saturn suggest that the observed mass loss rate due to tail reconnection and plasmoid release is insufficient to account for the mass input rate from the moons Io and Enceladus, respectively. We also present new analysis in which we use the Michigan mSWiM propagated solar wind MHD model to estimate the solar wind conditions upstream of Jupiter. This information allows us to determine whether reconnection events occur preferentially during certain solar wind conditions, or whether there is evidence that the solar wind modulates the quasi-periodicity seen in the field dipolarizations and flow bursts.

  12. XMM-Newton X-Ray Observation of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J. Hunter

    2005-01-01

    Soft X-ray emission has been observed from the disk of both Jupiter and Saturn as well as from the auroral regions of these planets. The low-latitude disk emission as observed by ROSAT, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and XMM-Newton appears to be uniformly distributed across the disk and to be correlated with solar activity. These characteristics suggest that the disk x-rays are produced by: (1) the elastic scattering of solar X-rays by atmospheric neutrals and (2) the absorption of solar X-rays in the carbon K-shell followed by fluorescent emission. The carbon atoms are found in methane molecules located below the homopause. In this paper we present the results of calculations of the scattering albedo for soft x-rays. We also show the calculated x-ray intensity for a range of atmospheric abundances for Jupiter and Saturn and for a number of solar irradiance spectra. The model calculations are compared with recent x-ray observations of Jupiter and Saturn. We conclude that the emission of soft x-rays from the disks of Jupiter and Saturn can be largely explained by the scattering and fluorescence of soft x-rays. We suggest that measured x-ray intensities from the disk regions of Jupiter

  13. Lessons from our Own Solar System: Generation Mechanisms of Radio Emissions from Earth, Saturn and Jupiter and Atmospheric Loss from Magnetized versus non-magnetized planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Pontus

    2017-05-01

    The understanding of the engines and mechanisms behind kilometric and decametric radio emissions from the planets in our own solar system have taken great leaps with missions such as the NASA/Cassini, IMAGE and Galileo missions. The periodic Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR), the Auroral Kilometric Radiation (AKR) at Earth and the periodic decametric radio emissions from Jupiter all point to the same generation mechanisms: very large-scale explosive plasma heating events in the magnetotail of each of the planets. The character and periodicity of the associated radio emissions not only tells us about the presence of a magnetic field but also about the plasma content and size of the planetary magnetosphere, and the nature of the interaction with the solar wind.The presence of a planetary magnetic field, as could be established for exoplanets by the positive detection of low-frequency exoplanetary radio emissions, has been thought to shield a planet from atmospheric loss to space. However, recent data from Mars Express, MAVEN, and Venus Express, together with the wealth of terrestrial measurements of atmospheric escape to space has brought a surprising question in to light: Does a planetary magnetic field suppress or enhance atmospheric loss? While at the non-magnetized planets such as Mars and Venus, the solar wind has a more direct access to the ionized upper atmosphere, these planets do set up self shielding currents that do limit escape. Furthermore, it is not clear if Mars have lost the majority of its atmosphere by condensation in to surface and sub-surface frost, or through atmospheric escape. At Earth, the geomagnetic field sets up a relatively large cross section to the solar wind, that allows the induced solar-wind electric field to transfer substantial energy to the upper ionosphere and atmosphere resulting in substantial loss. It is therefore not clear how a planetary magnetic field correlates to the atmospheric loss, or if it does at all.In this

  14. Seasonal and Non-Seasonal Variations of Jupiter's Atmosphere from Observations of Thermal Emission, 1994-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, G.; Fletcher, L.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Greathouse, T.; Fisher, B.; Greco, J.; Wakefield, L.; Snead, E.; Boydstun, K.; Simon-Miller, A.; Arzumanyan, G.; Christian, J.

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed mid-infrared images of Jupiter's thermal emission, covering approx.1.5 Jovian years, acquired in discrete filters between 7.8 and 24.5 microns. The behavior of stratospheric (approx.10-mbar) and tropospheric (approx.100-400 mbar) temperatures is generally consistent with predictions of seasonal variability, with differences between 100-mbar temperatures +/-50-60deg from the equator on the order of +/-2. Removing this effect, there appear to be long-term quasi-periodic variability of tropospheric temperatures, whose amplitude, phase and period depend on latitude. The behavior of temperatures in the Equatorial Zone (EZ) suggests a approx.4-6-year period with amplitude of about +/-1-1.5 K in temperature. At mid-latitudes, the periodicity is more distinct with amplitudes around +/-1.5-2.5 K and 4-8 year periods. The 4.2-year variation of stratospheric temperatures known as the quasiquadrennial oscillation or "QQO" (Leovy et al. 1991, Nature 354, 380) continued during this period. There were no variations of zonal mean temperatures associated with any of the "global upheaval" events that have produced dramatic changes of jupiter's visible appearance and cloud cover, although there are colder discrete regions associated with updrafts, e.g. the early stages of the re-darkening ("revival") of the South Equatorial Belt (SEB) in late 2010. On the other hand increases in the visible albedos ("fades") of belts are accompanied by increases in the thickness of a 700-mbar cloud layer (most likely NH3 ice) and clouds at higher pressures, together with the mixing ratio of NH3 gas near 400 mbar (above its condensation level). These quantities decrease during re-darkening ("revival") episodes, during which we note discrete features that are exceptions to the general correlation between dark albedos and minimal cloudiness. In contrast to all these changes, the meridional distribution of the 240-mbar para-H2 fraction appears to be invariant in time.

  15. A model for the common origin of Jupiter family and Halley type comets

    CERN Document Server

    Emel'yanenko, V V; Bailey, M E

    2014-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the Oort cloud is used to explain the observed orbital distributions and numbers of Jupiter-family and Halley-type short-period comets. Comets are given initial orbits with perihelion distances between 5 and 36 AU, and evolve under planetary, stellar and Galactic perturbations for 4.5 Gyr. This process leads to the formation of an Oort cloud (which we define as the region of semimajor axes a>1000 AU), and to a flux of cometary bodies from the Oort cloud returning to the planetary region at the present epoch. The results are consistent with the dynamical characteristics of short-period comets and other observed cometary populations: the near-parabolic flux, Centaurs, and high-eccentricity trans-Neptunian objects. To achieve this consistency with observations, the model requires that the number of comets versus initial perihelion distance is concentrated towards the outer planetary region. Moreover, the mean physical lifetime of observable comets in the inner planetary region (q<2.5...

  16. Search for sulfur (H2S) on Jupiter at millimeter wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Joanna; Steffes, Paul G.; Noll, Keith S.

    1992-01-01

    Jupiter was observed at two wavelengths near 1.4 mm in an attempt to detect gaseous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or place new upper limits on its abundance on Jupiter's atmosphere. Although no H2S was detected, the first brightness temperature observations of Jupiter at 1.4 mm are reported with a spectral resolution of approximately 1 GHz using Mars as a calibration standard. The methodology and results of a laboratory experiment in which H2S absorption at 1.4 mm was measured in a simulated Jovian atmosphere. The results of laboratory measurements are applied to a radiative transfer model which is used to interpret the observations of Jupiter.

  17. Small Friends of Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Luis Ernesto; Johnson, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Hot Jupiters are Jupiter-sized gas giant exoplanets that closely orbit their host star in periods of about 10 days or less. Early models hypothesized that these exoplanets formed away from the star, then over time drifted to their characteristically closer locations. However, new theories predict that Hot Jupiters form at their close proximity during the process of core accretion (Batygin et al. 2015). In fact, a super-Earth and a Neptune-sized exoplanet have already been detected in the Hot Jupiter-hosting star WASP-47 (Becker et al. 2015). We will present our analysis of radial velocity time series plots to determine whether low-mass, short-period planets have been previously overlooked in systems of stars which host Hot Jupiters.The SAO REU program is funded in part by the National Science Foundation REU and Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant no. 1262851.

  18. Voyager picture of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Voyager 1 took this picture of the planet Jupiter on Saturday, Jan. 6, the first in its three-month-long, close-up investigation of the largest planet. The spacecraft, flying toward a March 5 closest approach, was 35.8 million miles (57.6 million kilometers) from Jupiter and 371.7 million miles (598.2 million kilometers) from Earth when the picture was taken. As the Voyager cameras begin their meteorological surveillance of Jupiter, they reveal a dynamic atmosphere with more convective structure than had previously been thought. While the smallest atmospheric features seen in this picture are still as large as 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) across, Voyager will be able to detect individual storm systems as small as 3 miles (5 kilometers) at closest approach. The Great Red Spot can be seen near the limb at the far right. Most of the other features are too small to be seen in terrestrial telescopes. This picture was transmitted to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory through the Deep Space Network's tracking station at Madrid, Spain. The Voyager Project is managed for NASA by Caltech's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  19. Radiation belts of jupiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansberry, K G; White, R S

    1973-12-07

    Predictions of Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts are based mainly on decimeter observations of 1966 and 1968. Extensive calculations modeling radial diffusion of particles inward from the solar wind and electron synchrotron radiation are used to relate the predictions and observations.

  20. The Transit Spectra of Earth and Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, Patrick G J; Bowles, Neil E; Fletcher, Leigh N; Aigrain, Suzanne; Lee, Jae-Min

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a number of observations have been made of the transits of 'Hot Jupiters', such as HD 189733b, which have been modelled to derive atmospheric structure and composition. As measurement techniques improve, the transit spectra of 'Super-Earths' such as GJ 1214b are becoming better constrained, allowing model atmospheres to be fitted for this class of planet also. While it is not yet possible to constrain the atmospheric states of small planets such as the Earth or cold planets like Jupiter, this may become practical in the coming decades and if so, it is of interest to determine what we might infer from such measurements. Here we have constructed atmospheric models of the Solar System planets from 0.4 - 15.5 microns that are consistent with ground-based and satellite observations and from these calculate the primary transit and secondary eclipse spectra (with respect to the Sun and typical M-dwarfs) that would be observed by a 'remote observer', many light years away. From these spectra we test ...

  1. Exact results in modeling planetary atmospheres-I. Gray atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevallier, L. [Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, Laboratoire LUTH, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon cedex (France)]. E-mail: loic.chevallier@obspm.fr; Pelkowski, J. [Institut fuer Meteorologie und Geophysik, J.W. Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt, Robert Mayer Strasse 1, D-60325 Frankfurt (Germany); Rutily, B. [Universite de Lyon, Lyon, F-69000 (France) and Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, F-69622 (France) and Centre de Recherche Astronomique de Lyon, Observatoire de Lyon, 9 avenue Charles Andre, Saint-Genis Laval cedex, F-69561 (France) and CNRS, UMR 5574; Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, Lyon (France)

    2007-04-15

    An exact model is proposed for a gray, isotropically scattering planetary atmosphere in radiative equilibrium. The slab is illuminated on one side by a collimated beam and is bounded on the other side by an emitting and partially reflecting ground. We provide expressions for the incident and reflected fluxes on both boundary surfaces, as well as the temperature of the ground and the temperature distribution in the atmosphere, assuming the latter to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Tables and curves of the temperature distribution are included for various values of the optical thickness. Finally, semi-infinite atmospheres illuminated from the outside or by sources at infinity is dealt with.

  2. Polarized Light from Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    These images taken through the wide angle camera near closest approach in the deep near-infrared methane band, combined with filters which sense electromagnetic radiation of orthogonal polarization, show that the light from the poles is polarized. That is, the poles appear bright in one image, and dark in the other. Polarized light is most readily scattered by aerosols. These images indicate that the aerosol particles at Jupiter's poles are small and likely consist of aggregates of even smaller particles, whereas the particles at the equator and covering the Great Red Spot are larger. Images like these will allow scientists to ascertain the distribution, size and shape of aerosols, and consequently, the distribution of heat, in Jupiter's atmosphere.

  3. A transition in the composition of clouds in hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Parmentier, Vivien; Showman, Adam P; Morley, Caroline V; Marley, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Over a large range of equilibrium temperatures, clouds shape the transmission spectrum of hot Jupiter atmospheres, yet their composition remains unknown. Recent observations show that the \\emph{Kepler} lightcurves of some hot Jupiters are asymmetric: for the hottest planets, the lightcurve peaks before secondary eclipse, whereas for planets cooler than $\\sim1900\\,\\rm K$, it peaks after secondary eclipse. In this paper we use the thermal structure from 3D global circulation models to determine the expected cloud distribution and \\emph{Kepler} lightcurves of hot Jupiters. We demonstrate that the change from a visible lightcurve dominated by thermal emission to one dominated by scattering (reflection) naturally explains the observed trend from negative to positive offset. For the cool planets the presence of an asymmetry in the \\emph{Kepler} lightcurve is a telltale sign of the cloud composition, because each cloud species can produce an offset only over a narrow range of effective temperatures. Silicate clouds ...

  4. Transitions in the cloud composition of hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, Vivien; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Showman, Adam; Morley, Caroline; Marley, Mark S.

    2016-10-01

    Over a large range of equilibrium temperatures, clouds shape the transmission spectrum of hot Jupiter atmospheres, yet their composition remains unknown. Recent observations show that the Kepler lightcurves of some hot Jupiters are asymmetric: for the hottest planets, the lightcurve peaks before secondary eclipse, whereas for planets cooler than 1900K, it peaks after secondary eclipse. We use the thermal structure from 3D global circulation models to determine the expected cloud distribution and Kepler lightcurves of hot Jupiters. We demonstrate that the change from an optical lightcurve dominated by thermal emission to one dominated by scattering (reflection) naturally explains the observed trend from negative to positive offset. For the cool planets the presence of an asymmetry in the Kepler lightcurve is a telltale sign of the cloud composition, because each cloud species can produce an offset only over a narrow range of effective temperatures. By comparing our models and the observations, we show that the cloud composition of hot Jupiters likely varies with equilibrium temperature. We suggest that a transition occurs between silicate and manganese sulfide clouds at a temperature near 1600K, analogous to the L/T transition on brown dwarfs. The cold trapping of cloud species below the photosphere naturally produces such a transition and predicts similar transitions for other condensates, including TiO. We predict that most hot Jupiters should have cloudy nightsides, that partial cloudiness should be common at the limb and that the dayside hot spot should often be cloud-free.

  5. Fading of Jupiter's South Equatorial Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, Michael A.; Orton, Glenn; Baines, Kevin; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma

    2011-01-01

    One of Jupiter's most dominant features, the South Equatorial Belt, has historically gone through a "fading" cycle. The usual dark, brownish clouds turn white, and after a period of time, the region returns to its normal color. Understanding this phenomenon, the latest occurring in 2010, will increase our knowledge of planetary atmospheres. Using the near infrared camera, NSFCAM2, at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility in Hawaii, images were taken of Jupiter accompanied by data describing the circumstances of each observation. These images are then processed and reduced through an IDL program. By scanning the central meridian of the planet, graphs were produced plotting the average values across the central meridian, which are used to find variations in the region of interest. Calculations using Albert4, a FORTRAN program that calculates the upwelling reflected sunlight from a designated cloud model, can be used to determine the effects of a model atmosphere due to various absorption, scattering, and emission processes. Spectra that were produced show ammonia bands in the South Equatorial Belt. So far, we can deduce from this information that an upwelling of ammonia particles caused a cloud layer to cover up the region. Further investigations using Albert4 and other models will help us to constrain better the chemical make up of the cloud and its location in the atmosphere.

  6. Optical models of the molecular atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuev, V. E.; Makushkin, Y. S.; Mitsel, A. A.; Ponomarev, Y. N.; Rudenko, V. P.; Firsov, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    The use of optical and laser methods for performing atmospheric investigations has stimulated the development of the optical models of the atmosphere. The principles of constructing the optical models of molecular atmosphere for radiation with different spectral composition (wideband, narrowband, and monochromatic) are considered in the case of linear and nonlinear absorptions. The example of the development of a system which provides for the modeling of the processes of optical-wave energy transfer in the atmosphere is presented. Its physical foundations, structure, programming software, and functioning were considered.

  7. Performance Engineering in the Community Atmosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worley, P; Mirin, A; Drake, J; Sawyer, W

    2006-05-30

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) is the atmospheric component of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and is the primary consumer of computer resources in typical CCSM simulations. Performance engineering has been an important aspect of CAM development throughout its existence. This paper briefly summarizes these efforts and their impacts over the past five years.

  8. A comparison of radio data and model calculations of Jupiter's synchrotron radition 2. East-west asymmetry in the radiation belts as a functon of Jovian longitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pater, Imke

    1981-05-01

    On the basis of comparison of radio data and model calculations of Jupiter's synchrotron radiaton the 'hot region' or east-west asymmetry in the planet's radiation belts is proposed to be due to the combined effect of an overabundance of electrons at jovicentric longitudes λJ~240°-360° and the existence of a dusk dawn directed electric field over the inner magnetosphere, generated by the wind system in the upper atmosphere. The model calculations were based upon the magnetic field configurations derived from the Pioneer data by Acuna and Ness [1976] (the O4 model) and Davis, Jones and Smith (quoted in Smith and Gulkis [1979]) (the P11 (3,2)A model), with an electron distribution derived in the first paper of this series [de Pater, this issue]. We would infer from the calculations that the O4 model gives a slightly better fit to the data; the relatively large number density at λJ~240°-360°, however, might indicate the presence of even higher order moments in the field.

  9. Light curves, Spherical and Bond albedos of Jupiter, Saturn, and exoplanets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyudina, U.

    2015-12-01

    We estimate how the light curve and stellar light reflection of a planet depends on forward and backward scattering, which was observed on Jupiter and Saturn. We fit analytical scattering phase function to Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft observations of Jupiter at 0.64 μm and Saturn at 0.64 and 0.44 μm and to Cassini spacecraft observations of Jupiter at 0.938 μm atmospheric window, 0.889 μm CH4 absorption band, and 0.258 μm UV filter. Using scattering ray-tracing model of a planet by Dyudina et al. (2005)*, the images of the planets with different scattering properties are simulated to calculate the reflected luminosity as it varies with scattering phase to produce full-orbit light curves. We compare the light curve shapes and total reflection integrated in all directions (spherical albedos) for Jupiter and Saturn with the ones for planets with Lambertian and semi-infinite Rayleigh-scattering atmosphere. Saturn-like and especially Jupiter-like atmosphere produces light curves that are several times fainter at half-phase than does a Lambertian planet, given the same brightness at transit. The spherical albedo (and hence the wavelengh-integrated Bond albedo) is lower than for a Lambertian planet. Corresponding absorption of the stellar light and planet's heating rate would be higher than estimated for Lambertian planets, especially for bright planets. In extreme case of Jupiter-like scattering at 0.64 μm Lambertian assumption can overestimate spherical albedo by a factor of ˜1.5. We will discuss how the light curves and absorption for planets covered by atmospheres would differ from the light curves of rocky planet without atmosphere. * Dyudina, U. A., et al., Phase Light Curves for Extrasolar Jupiters and Saturns. ApJ, 618, 973-986, 2005

  10. Turbulent convection in rapidly rotating spherical shells: A model for equatorial and high latitude jets on Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimpel, Moritz; Aurnou, Jonathan

    2007-04-01

    The origin of zonal jets on the jovian planets has long been a topic of scientific debate. In this paper we show that deep convection in a spherical shell can generate zonal flow comparable to that observed on Jupiter and Saturn, including a broad prograde equatorial jet and multiple alternating jets at higher latitudes. We present fully turbulent, 3D spherical numerical simulations of rapidly rotating convection with different spherical shell geometries. The resulting global flow fields tend to be segregated into three regions (north, equatorial, and south), bounded by the tangent cylinder that circumscribes the inner boundary equator. In all of our simulations a strong prograde equatorial jet forms outside the tangent cylinder, whereas multiple jets form in the northern and southern hemispheres, inside the tangent cylinder. The jet scaling of our numerical models and of Jupiter and Saturn is consistent with the theory of geostrophic turbulence, which we extend to include the effect of spherical shell geometry. Zonal flow in a spherical shell is distinguished from that in a full sphere or a shallow layer by the effect of the tangent cylinder, which marks a reversal in the sign of the planetary β-parameter and a jump in the Rhines length. This jump is manifest in the numerical simulations as a sharp equatorward increase in jet widths—a transition that is also observed on Jupiter and Saturn. The location of this transition gives an estimate of the depth of zonal flow, which seems to be consistent with current models of the jovian and saturnian interiors.

  11. Jupiter cloud composition, stratification, convection, and wave motion: a view from new horizons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, D C; Simon-Miller, A A; Lunsford, A; Baines, K H; Cheng, A F; Jennings, D E; Olkin, C B; Spencer, J R; Stern, S A; Weaver, H A; Young, L A

    2007-10-12

    Several observations of Jupiter's atmosphere made by instruments on the New Horizons spacecraft have implications for the stability and dynamics of Jupiter's weather layer. Mesoscale waves, first seen by Voyager, have been observed at a spatial resolution of 11 to 45 kilometers. These waves have a 300-kilometer wavelength and phase velocities greater than the local zonal flow by 100 meters per second, much higher than predicted by models. Additionally, infrared spectral measurements over five successive Jupiter rotations at spatial resolutions of 200 to 140 kilometers have shown the development of transient ammonia ice clouds (lifetimes of 40 hours or less) in regions of strong atmospheric upwelling. Both of these phenomena serve as probes of atmospheric dynamics below the visible cloud tops.

  12. The EJSM Jupiter-Ganymede Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, M.; Lebreton, J.-P.; Stankov, A.; Greeley, R.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Fujimoto, M.

    2008-09-01

    The Europa-Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), currently subject of a joint study by NASA, ESA and JAXA, would combine a fleet of three satellites in order to investigate in depth many questions related to the Jupiter System. These investigations are essential for our understanding of the emergence and evolution of habitable worlds, not only within the Solar System, but also for extrasolar planet investigations. Scientific targets of EJSM focus on Europa and Ganymede as a key pair of Galilean satellites, to address the questions on their habitability, formation, and internal structure, as well as the coupling with the whole Jovian system: Jupiter's atmosphere and interior, magnetosphere and magnetodisk.. In combination with a Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO that would be provided by NASA) and a Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter (JMO that would be provided by JAXA), ESA is studying a Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). The mission scenario includes a launch in 2020 with a transfer time to Jupiter of ~6 years. After the orbit insertion around Jupiter, a first phase (~2 years) will be devoted to Jupiter system and Callisto studies, with multiple flybys of Callisto planned at low altitude (~200 km), followed by a Ganymede orbit insertion and extensive study of Ganymede (~1 year). In depth comparative study of inner (Io and Europe) and outer (Ganymede and Callisto) satellites with combined payload of JEO and JGO will address the question of the geologic relative evolution of the satellites. On JGO, the transport phenomena in the magnetosphere of Jupiter will be studied in combination with JMO, and the Ganymede magnetosphere will be observed in situ. Jupiter atmosphere investigations on JGO will focus on coupling phenomena between troposphere, stratosphere and mesosphere, the stratospheric composition and the question of thermospheric heating.

  13. Gas dynamic modeling of the CME propagation through the envelope of a hot Jupiter-type exoplanet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherenkov, A. A.; Kaygorodov, P. V.; Bisikalo, D. V.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a 3D gasdynamic numerical model for the study of the interaction between the extended envelopes of hot Jupiters, overfilling their Roche lobes, and non-stationary stellar wind. In the model we use a Roe-Osher numerical scheme with Eindfeldt entropy fix. To test the model we have simulated a flow structure, forming due to the interaction between the extended quasi-stationary envelope of the hot Jupiter planet HD 209458b and the bow shock formed ahead of a propagating coronal mass ejection (CME). We have adopted the solar CME parameters in our computations and taken into account the fact that the planet is located close to its host star. The simulation results show that the bow shock of the CME partially destroys the stream, starting from the Li point of the quasi-closed planet's envelope. A bow shock, existing ahead of the planet in its orbital motion when the stellar wind is undisturbed, almost disappears when the CME shock passes through the system.

  14. Using Jupiter's Synchrotron Radiation as a Probe into Jupiter's Inner Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, S. J.; Gulkis, S.; Klein, M. J.; Thorne, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    The Jovian decimetric emission is caused by the combined emission of synchrotron radiation originating from the relativistic electrons trapped in Jupiter's 'Van Allen radiation belts' and thermal emission from the planet's atmosphere. Synchrotron radiation characteristics and variations (which provides insight into the physical properties of Jupiter's inner radiation belts) will be amplified and discussed.

  15. A CRIRES-search for H3+ emission from the hot Jupiter atmosphere of HD 209458 b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, L. F.; Reiners, A.; Seifahrt, A.; Käufl, H. U.

    2016-05-01

    Close-in extrasolar giant planets are expected to cool their thermospheres by producing H3+ emission in the near-infrared (NIR), but simulations predict H3+ emission intensities that differ in the resulting intensity by several orders of magnitude. We want to test the observability of H3+ emission with CRIRES at the Very Large Telescope (VLT), providing adequate spectral resolution for planetary atmospheric lines in NIR spectra. We search for signatures of planetary H3+ emission in the L' band, using spectra of HD 209458 obtained during and after secondary eclipse of its transiting planet HD 209458 b. We searched for H3+ emission signatures in spectra containing the combined light of the star and, possibly, the planet. With the information on the ephemeris of the transiting planet, we derive the radial velocities at the time of observation and search for the emission at the expected line positions. We also apply a cross-correlation test to search for planetary signals and use a shift and add technique combining all observed spectra taken after secondary eclipse to calculate an upper emission limit. We do not find signatures of atmospheric H3+ emission in the spectra containing the combined light of HD 209458 and its orbiting planet. We calculate the emission limit for the H3+ line at 3953.0 nm [Q(1,0)] to be 8.32 × 1018 W and a limit of 5.34 × 1018 W for the line at 3985.5 nm [Q(3,0)]. Comparing our emission limits to the theoretical predictions suggests that we lack 1 to 3 magnitudes of sensitivity to measure H3+ emission in our target object. We show that under more favorable weather conditions the data quality can be improved significantly, reaching 5 × 1016 W for star-planet systems that are close to Earth. We estimate that pushing the detection limit down to 1015 W will be possible with ground-based observations with future instrumentation, for example, the European Extremly Large Telescope. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for

  16. A CRIRES-search for H3+ emission from the hot Jupiter atmosphere of HD 209458 b

    CERN Document Server

    Lenz, Lea; Seifahrt, Andreas; Kaeufl, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Close-in extrasolar giant planets are expected to cool their thermospheres by producing H3+ emission in the near-infrared (NIR), but simulations predict H3+ emission intensities that differ in the resulting intensity by several orders of magnitude. We want to test the observability of H3+ emission with CRIRES at the Very Large Telescope (VLT), providing adequate spectral resolution for planetary atmospheric lines in NIR spectra. We search for signatures of planetary H3+ emission in the L` band, using spectra of HD 209458 obtained during and after secondary eclipse of its transiting planet HD 209458 b. We searched for H3+ emission signatures in spectra containing the combined light of the star and, possibly, the planet. With the information on the ephemeris of the transiting planet, we derive the radial velocities at the time of observation and search for the emission at the expected line positions and search for planetary signals and use a shift and add technique combining all observed spectra taken after sec...

  17. Northern Belt of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] A four-panel frame shows a section of Jupiter's north equatorial belt viewed by NASA's Cassini spacecraft at four different wavelengths, and a separate reference frame shows the location of the belt on the planet.A fascinating aspect of the images in the four-panel frame is the small bright spot in the center of each. The images come from different layers of the atmosphere, so the spot appears to be a storm penetrating upward through several layers. This may in fact be a 'monster' thunderstorm, penetrating all the way into the stratosphere, as do some summer thunderstorms in the midwestern United States. These images were taken on Nov. 27, 2000, at a resolution of 192 kilometers (119 miles) per pixel. They have been contrast-enhanced to highlight features in the atmosphere.The top panel of the four-panel frame is an image taken in a near-infrared wavelength at which the gases in Jupiter's atmosphere are relatively non-absorbing. Sunlight can penetrate deeply into the atmosphere at this wavelength and be reflected back out, providing a view of an underlying region of the atmosphere, the lower troposphere.The second panel was taken in the blue portion of wavelengths detected by the human eye. At these wavelengths, gases in the atmosphere scatter a modest amount of sunlight, so the clouds we see tend to be at somewhat higher altitudes than in the top panel.The third panel shows near-infrared reflected sunlight at a wavelength where the gas methane, an important constituent of Jupiter's atmosphere, absorbs strongly. Dark places are regions without high-level clouds and consequently large amounts of methane accessible to sunlight. Bright regions are locations with high clouds in the upper troposphere shielding the methane below.The bottom panel was taken in the ultraviolet. At these very short wavelengths, the clear atmosphere scatters sunlight, and hazes in the stratosphere, above the troposphere, absorb sunlight. That

  18. Atmospheric Boundary Layers: Modeling and Parameterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution we deal with the representation of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) for modeling studies of weather, climate, and air quality. As such we review the major characteristics of the ABL, and summarize the basic parameterizations for the description of atmospheric turbulence and

  19. Modeling the atmospheric chemistry of TICs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Michael V.; Burns, Douglas S.; Chynwat, Veeradej; Moore, William; Plitz, Angela; Rottmann, Shawn; Hearn, John

    2009-05-01

    An atmospheric chemistry model that describes the behavior and disposition of environmentally hazardous compounds discharged into the atmosphere was coupled with the transport and diffusion model, SCIPUFF. The atmospheric chemistry model was developed by reducing a detailed atmospheric chemistry mechanism to a simple empirical effective degradation rate term (keff) that is a function of important meteorological parameters such as solar flux, temperature, and cloud cover. Empirically derived keff functions that describe the degradation of target toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) were derived by statistically analyzing data generated from the detailed chemistry mechanism run over a wide range of (typical) atmospheric conditions. To assess and identify areas to improve the developed atmospheric chemistry model, sensitivity and uncertainty analyses were performed to (1) quantify the sensitivity of the model output (TIC concentrations) with respect to changes in the input parameters and (2) improve, where necessary, the quality of the input data based on sensitivity results. The model predictions were evaluated against experimental data. Chamber data were used to remove the complexities of dispersion in the atmosphere.

  20. THE JOINT ESA-NASA EUROPA JUPITER SYSTEM MISSION (EJSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, J.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Blanc, M.; Bunce, E. J.; Dougherty, M. K.; Erd, C.; Grasset, O.; Greeley, R.; Johnson, T. V.; Clark, K. B.; Prockter, L. M.; Senske, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    The joint "Europa Jupiter System Mission" (EJSM) is an international mission under study in collaboration between NASA and ESA. Its goal is to study Jupiter and its magnetosphere, the diversity of the Galilean satellites, the physical characteristics, composition and geology of their surfaces. Europa and Ganymede are two primary targets of the mission. The reference mission architecture consists of the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). The two primary goals of the mission are i) to determine whether the Jupiter system harbors habitable worlds and ii) to characterize the processes within the Jupiter system. The science objectives addressing the first goal are to: i) characterize and determine the extent of subsurface oceans and their relations to the deeper interior, ii) characterize the ice shells and any subsurface water, including the heterogeneity of the ice, and the nature of surface-ice-ocean exchange; iii) characterize the deep internal structure, differentiation history, and (for Ganymede) the intrinsic magnetic field; iv) compare the exospheres, plasma environments, and magnetospheric interactions; v) determine global surface composition and chemistry, especially as related to habitability; vi) understand the formation of surface features, including sites of recent or current activity, and identify and characterize candidate sites for future in situ exploration. The science objectives for addressing the second goal are to: i) understand the Jovian satellite system, especially as context for Europa and Ganymede; ii) evaluate the structure and dynamics of the Jovian atmosphere; iii) characterize processes of the Jovian magnetodisk/magnetosphere; iv) determine the interactions occurring in the Jovian system; and v) constrain models for the origin of the Jupiter system. Both spacecraft would carry a complement of 11-12 instruments launch separately in 2020 and use a Venus-Earth-Earth Gravity Assist (VEEGA

  1. Jupiter's unearthly jets: a new turbulent model exhibiting statistical steadiness without large-scale dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Thomson, Stephen I

    2014-01-01

    A longstanding mystery about Jupiter has been the straightness and steadiness of its weather-layer jets, quite unlike terrestrial strong jets with their characteristic unsteadiness and long-wavelength meandering. The problem is addressed in two steps. The first is to take seriously the classic Dowling-Ingersoll $1 {-2pt}\\frac{1}{2}$-layer scenario and its supporting observational evidence. The evidence implies the existence of deep, massive, zonally-symmetric zonal jets in the underlying dry-convective layer. There is then the possibility of straight, stable weather-layer jets with the deep jets acting as guide-rails. Stability is possible even with nonmonotonic weather-layer potential-vorticity gradients. The second step is to improve the realism of the small-scale stochastic forcing used to represent Jupiter's moist convection, as far as possible within the $1 {-2pt}\\frac{1}{2}$-layer dynamics. The real, three-dimensional moist convection should be strongest in the belts where the interface to the deep flow...

  2. Soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikonen, J.P.; Sucksdorff, Y. [Finnish Environment Agency, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In this study the soil/vegetation/atmosphere-model based on the formulation of Deardorff was refined to hour basis and applied to a field in Vihti. The effect of model parameters on model results (energy fluxes, temperatures) was also studied as well as the effect of atmospheric conditions. The estimation of atmospheric conditions on the soil-vegetation system as well as an estimation of the effect of vegetation parameters on the atmospheric climate was estimated. Areal surface fluxes, temperatures and moistures were also modelled for some river basins in southern Finland. Land-use and soil parameterisation was developed to include properties and yearly variation of all vegetation and soil types. One classification was selected to describe the hydrothermal properties of the soils. Evapotranspiration was verified against the water balance method

  3. Atmosphere of Mars - Mariner IV models compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshleman, V. R.; Fjeldbo, G.; Fjeldbo, W. C.

    1966-01-01

    Mariner IV models of three Mars atmospheric layers analogous to terrestrial E, F-1 and F-2 layers, considering relative mass densities, temperatures, carbon dioxide photodissociation and ionization profile

  4. Engineering a Solution to Jupiter Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Karla; Magner, Thomas; Lisano, Michael; Pappalardo, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) would be an international mission with the overall theme of investigating the emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants. Its goals are to (1) explore Europa to investigate its habitability, (2) characterize Ganymede as a planetary object including its potential habitability and (3) explore the Jupiter system as an archetype for gas giants. NASA and ESA have concluded a detailed joint study of a mission to Europa, Ganymede, and the Jupiter system with conceptual orbiters developed by NASA and ESA. The baseline EJSM architecture consists of two primary elements operating simultaneously in the Jovian system: the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). JEO and JGO would execute an intricately choreographed exploration of the Jupiter System before settling into orbit around Europa and Ganymede, respectively. EJSM would directly address themes concerning the origin and evolution of satellite systems and water-rich environments in icy satellites. The potential habitability of the ocean-bearing moons Europa and Ganymede would be investigated, by characterizing the geophysical, compositional, geological, and external processes that affect these icy worlds. EJSM would also investigate Io and Callisto, Jupiter's atmosphere, and the Jovian magnetosphere. By understanding the Jupiter system and unraveling its history, the formation and evolution of gas giant planets and their satellites would be better known. Most importantly, EJSM would shed new light on the potential for the emergence of life in the celestial neighborhood and beyond. The EJSM baseline architecture would provide opportunities for coordinated synergistic observations by JEO and JGO of the Jupiter and Ganymede magnetospheres, the volcanoes and torus of Io, the atmosphere of Jupiter, and comparative planetology of icy satellites. Each spacecraft would conduct both synergistic dual-spacecraft investigations and stand

  5. Status and future of hydrodynamical model atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Ludwig, H G

    2004-01-01

    Since about 25 years ago work has been dedicated to the development of hydrodynamical model atmospheres for cool stars (of A to T spectral type). Despite their obviously sounder physical foundation in comparison with standard hydrostatic models, their general application has been rather limited. In order to understand why this is, and how to progress, we review the present status of hydrodynamical modelling of cool star atmospheres. The development efforts were and are motivated by the theoretical interest of understanding the dynamical processes operating in stellar atmospheres. To show the observational impact, we discuss examples in the fields of spectroscopy and stellar structure where hydrodynamical modelling provided results on a level qualitatively beyond standard models. We stress present modelling challenges, and highlight presently possible and future observations that would be particularly valuable in the interplay between model validation and interpretation of observables, to eventually widen the ...

  6. Phosphine on Jupiter and implications for the Great Red Spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinn, R. G.; Lewis, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    A study of the chemistry and photochemistry of the recently discovered phosphine in the atmosphere of Jupiter suggests that the red colorations on this planet result from photochemical production of red phosphorus particles. Chemical-dynamical models of this red phosphorus haze imply that the intensity of the red coloration is a strong function of the strength of vertical turbulent mixing in the atmosphere. If the Jovian Great Red Spot is a region of considerable dynamical activity our model provides a self-consistent explanation for the redness of this region in comparison to the rest of the planet.

  7. Atmosphere expansion and mass loss of close-orbit giant exoplanets heated by stellar XUV. I. Modeling of hydrodynamic escape of upper atmospheric material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaikhislamov, I. F. [Institute of Laser Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Khodachenko, M. L.; Sasunov, Yu. L.; Lammer, H.; Kislyakova, K. G. [Space Research Institute, Austrian Acad. Sci., Graz (Austria); Erkaev, N. V., E-mail: maxim.khodachenko@oeaw.ac.at [Institute of Computational Modelling, SB RAS, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-10

    In the present series of papers we propose a consistent description of the mass loss process. To study in a comprehensive way the effects of the intrinsic magnetic field of a close-orbit giant exoplanet (a so-called hot Jupiter) on atmospheric material escape and the formation of a planetary inner magnetosphere, we start with a hydrodynamic model of an upper atmosphere expansion in this paper. While considering a simple hydrogen atmosphere model, we focus on the self-consistent inclusion of the effects of radiative heating and ionization of the atmospheric gas with its consequent expansion in the outer space. Primary attention is paid to an investigation of the role of the specific conditions at the inner and outer boundaries of the simulation domain, under which different regimes of material escape (free and restricted flow) are formed. A comparative study is performed of different processes, such as X-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) heating, material ionization and recombination, H{sub 3}{sup +} cooling, adiabatic and Lyα cooling, and Lyα reabsorption. We confirm the basic consistency of the outcomes of our modeling with the results of other hydrodynamic models of expanding planetary atmospheres. In particular, we determine that, under the typical conditions of an orbital distance of 0.05 AU around a Sun-type star, a hot Jupiter plasma envelope may reach maximum temperatures up to ∼9000 K with a hydrodynamic escape speed of ∼9 km s{sup –1}, resulting in mass loss rates of ∼(4-7) · 10{sup 10} g s{sup –1}. In the range of the considered stellar-planetary parameters and XUV fluxes, that is close to the mass loss in the energy-limited case. The inclusion of planetary intrinsic magnetic fields in the model is a subject of the follow-up paper (Paper II).

  8. Ultra-relativistic electrons in Jupiter's radiation belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, S J; Janssen, M; Thorne, R; Levin, S; Klein, M; Gulkis, S; Bastian, T; Sault, R; Elachi, C; Hofstadter, M; Bunker, A; Dulk, G; Gudim, E; Hamilton, G; Johnson, W T K; Leblanc, Y; Liepack, O; McLeod, R; Roller, J; Roth, L; West, R

    2002-02-28

    Ground-based observations have shown that Jupiter is a two-component source of microwave radio emission: thermal atmospheric emission and synchrotron emission from energetic electrons spiralling in Jupiter's magnetic field. Later in situ measurements confirmed the existence of Jupiter's high-energy electron-radiation belts, with evidence for electrons at energies up to 20[?]MeV. Although most radiation belt models predict electrons at higher energies, adiabatic diffusion theory can account only for energies up to around 20[?]MeV. Unambiguous evidence for more energetic electrons is lacking. Here we report observations of 13.8[?]GHz synchrotron emission that confirm the presence of electrons with energies up to 50[?]MeV; the data were collected during the Cassini fly-by of Jupiter. These energetic electrons may be repeatedly accelerated through an interaction with plasma waves, which can transfer energy into the electrons. Preliminary comparison of our data with model results suggests that electrons with energies of less than 20[?]MeV are more numerous than previously believed.

  9. Overview of Juno Results at Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Scott; Connerney, Jack; Levin, Steve

    2017-04-01

    Juno is the first mission to investigate Jupiter using a close polar orbit. The Juno science goals include the study of Jupiter interior composition and structure, deep atmosphere and its polar magnetosphere. All orbits have peri-jove at approximately 5000 km above Jupiter's visible cloud tops. The payload consists of a set of microwave antennas for deep sounding, magnetometers, gravity radio science, low and high energy charged particle detectors, plasma wave antennas, ultraviolet imaging spectrograph, infrared imager and spectrometer and a visible camera. The Juno mission design, an overview of the early science results from Juno, and a description of the collaborative Earth based campaign will be presented.

  10. Juno's first glimpse of Jupiter's complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Scott; Levin, Steven; Bagenal, Fran

    2017-08-01

    Preliminary results from NASA's Juno mission are presented in this special issue of Geophysical Research Letters. The data were gathered by nine scientific instruments as the Juno spacecraft approached Jupiter on the dawn flank, was inserted into Jupiter orbit on 4 July 2016, and made the first polar passes close to the planet. The first results hint that Jupiter may not have a distinct core, indicate puzzling deep atmospheric convection, and reveal complex small-scale structure in the magnetic field and auroral processes that are distinctly different from those at Earth.

  11. The Europa Jupiter System Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, A. R.; Clark, K.; Erd, C.; Pappalardo, R.; Greeley, R. R.; Blanc, M.; Lebreton, J.; van Houten, T.

    2009-05-01

    Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) will be an international mission that will achieve Decadal Survey and Cosmic Vision goals. NASA and ESA have concluded a joint study of a mission to Europa, Ganymede and the Jupiter system with orbiters developed by NASA and ESA; contributions by JAXA are also possible. The baseline EJSM architecture consists of two primary elements operating in the Jovian system: the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). The JEO mission has been selected by NASA as the next Flagship mission to the out solar system. JEO and JGO would execute an intricately choreographed exploration of the Jupiter System before settling into orbit around Europa and Ganymede, respectively. JEO and JGO would carry eleven and ten complementary instruments, respectively, to monitor dynamic phenomena (such as Io's volcanoes and Jupiter's atmosphere), map the Jovian magnetosphere and its interactions with the Galilean satellites, and characterize water oceans beneath the ice shells of Europa and Ganymede. EJSM will fully addresses high priority science objectives identified by the National Research Council's (NRC's) Decadal Survey and ESA's Cosmic Vision for exploration of the outer solar system. The Decadal Survey recommended a Europa Orbiter as the highest priority outer planet flagship mission and also identified Ganymede as a highly desirable mission target. EJSM would uniquely address several of the central themes of ESA's Cosmic Vision Programme, through its in-depth exploration of the Jupiter system and its evolution from origin to habitability. EJSM will investigate the potential habitability of the active ocean-bearing moons Europa and Ganymede, detailing the geophysical, compositional, geological and external processes that affect these icy worlds. EJSM would also explore Io and Callisto, Jupiter's atmosphere, and the Jovian magnetosphere. By understanding the Jupiter system and unraveling its history, the

  12. The organization of Jupiter's upper tropospheric temperature structure and its evolution, 1996-1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Brendan M.; Orton, Glenn S.; Liu, Junjun; Schneider, Tapio; Ressler, Michael E.; Hoffman, William F.

    2016-12-01

    High signal-to-noise images of Jupiter were made at wavelengths between 13.2 and 22.8 μm in five separate observing runs between 1996 June and 1997 November at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. Maps of Jupiter's upper-tropospheric temperatures at pressures of 100 and 400 mbar were made from these images. We use the relatively frequent, well sampled data sets to examine in detail the short-term evolution of the temperature structure. Our 2-6 month sampling periods demonstrate that the longitudinal temperature structures evolve significantly in these short periods and exhibit wave features. Using a three-dimensional general circulation model simulation of Jupiter's upper atmosphere, we show that the thermal structures are consistent with convectively generated Rossby waves that propagate upward from the lower to the upper atmosphere.

  13. A model of the primordial lunar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Prabal; Elkins-Tanton, Lindy; Petro, Noah; Mandell, Avi

    2017-09-01

    We create the first quantitative model for the early lunar atmosphere, coupled with a magma ocean crystallization model. Immediately after formation, the moon's surface was subject to a radiative environment that included contributions from the early Sun, a post-impact Earth that radiated like a mid-type M dwarf star, and a cooling global magma ocean. This radiative environment resulted in a largely Earth-side atmosphere on the Moon, ranging from ∼104 to ∼102 pascals, composed of heavy volatiles (Na and SiO). This atmosphere persisted through lid formation and was additionally characterized by supersonic winds that transported significant quantities of moderate volatiles and likely generated magma ocean waves. The existence of this atmosphere may have influenced the distribution of some moderate volatiles and created temperature asymmetries which influenced ocean flow and cooling. Such asymmetries may characterize young, tidally locked rocky bodies with global magma oceans and subject to intense irradiation.

  14. The Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter : An ESA Contribution to the Europa-Jupiter System Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drossart, Pierre; Blanc, M.; Lebreton, J. P.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Greeley, R.; Fujimoto, M.; EJSM/Jupiter Science Definition Team

    2008-09-01

    In the framework of an outer planets mission, under study after the NASA-Juno mission, the Europa-Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) would combine a fleet of up to three satellites in order to investigate in depth many questions related to the Jupiter System. These investigations are essential for our understanding of the emergence and evolution of habitable worlds, not only within the Solar System, but also for extrasolar planets investigations. Scientific targets of EJSM will focus on Europa and Ganymede as a key pair of Galilean satellites, to address the questions on their habitability, formation, and internal structure, as well as the coupling with the whole Jovian system : Jupiter's atmosphere and interior, magnetosphere and magnetodisk. .In combination with a Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO likely provided by NASA) and a Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter (JMO likely provided by JAXA), ESA is studying a Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). The mission scenario includes a direct launch in 2020 with a transfer time to Jupiter of 6 years. After the orbit insertion around Jupiter, a first phase ( 2 years) will be devoted to Jupiter system and Callisto studies, with multiple flybys of Callisto planned at low altitude ( 200 km), followed by a Ganymede orbit insertion and extensive study of Ganymede ( 1 year). In-depth comparative study of inner (Io and Europa) and outer (Ganymede and Callisto) satellites with combined payload of JEO and JGO will address the question of the relative geological evolution of the satellites. On JGO, the transport phenomena in the magnetosphere of Jupiter will be studied in combination with JMO, and the Ganymede magnetosphere will be observed in situ. Jupiter atmosphere investigations on JGO will focus on coupling phenomena between troposphere, stratosphere and mesosphere, the stratospheric composition and the question of thermospheric heating.

  15. Stellar model atmospheres with magnetic line blanketing

    CERN Document Server

    Kochukhov, O; Shulyak, D

    2004-01-01

    Model atmospheres of A and B stars are computed taking into account magnetic line blanketing. These calculations are based on the new stellar model atmosphere code LLModels which implements direct treatment of the opacities due to the bound-bound transitions and ensures an accurate and detailed description of the line absorption. The anomalous Zeeman effect was calculated for the field strengths between 1 and 40 kG and a field vector perpendicular to the line of sight. The model structure, high-resolution energy distribution, photometric colors, metallic line spectra and the hydrogen Balmer line profiles are computed for magnetic stars with different metallicities and are discussed with respect to those of non-magnetic reference models. The magnetically enhanced line blanketing changes the atmospheric structure and leads to a redistribution of energy in the stellar spectrum. The most noticeable feature in the optical region is the appearance of the 5200 A depression. However, this effect is prominent only in ...

  16. New atmospheric model of Epsilon Eridani

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieytes, Mariela; Fontenla, Juan; Buccino, Andrea; Mauas, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    We present a new semi-empirical model of the atmosphere of the widely studied K-dwarf Epsilon Eridani (HD 22049). The model is build to reproduce the visible spectral observations from 3800 to 6800 Angstrom and the h and k Mg II lines profiles. The computations were carried out using the Solar-Stellar Radiation Physical Modeling (SSRPM) tools, which calculate non-LTE population for the most important species in the stellar atmosphere. We show a comparison between the synthetic and observed spectrum, obtaining a good agreement in all the studied spectral range.

  17. Interaction of moist convection with zonal jets on Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liming; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Huang, Xianglei

    2006-01-01

    Observations suggest that moist convection plays an important role in the large-scale dynamics of Jupiter's and Saturn's atmospheres. Here we use a reduced-gravity quasigeostrophic model, with a parameterization of moist convection that is based on observations, to study the interaction between moist convection and zonal jets on Jupiter and Saturn. Stable jets with approximately the same width and strength as observations are generated in the model. The observed zonal jets violate the barotropic stability criterion but the modeled jets do so only if the flow in the deep underlying layer is westward. The model results suggest that a length scale and a velocity scale associated with moist convection control the width and strength of the jets. The length scale and velocity scale offer a possible explanation of why the jets of Saturn are stronger and wider than those of Jupiter.

  18. Hydrodynamic models of a Cepheid atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    Instead of computing a large number of coarsely zoned hydrodynamic models covering the entire atmospheric instability strip, the author computed a single model as well as computer limitations allow. The implicit hydrodynamic code of Kutter and Sparks was modified to include radiative transfer effects in optically thin zones.

  19. Coupled atmosphere-wildland fire modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Henri Balbi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Simulating the interaction between fire and atmosphere is critical to the estimation of the rate of spread of the fire. Wildfire’s convection (i.e., entire plume can modify the local meteorology throughout the atmospheric boundary layer and consequently affect the fire propagation speed and behaviour. In this study, we use for the first time the Méso-NH meso-scale numerical model coupled to the point functional ForeFire simplified physical front-tracking wildfire model to investigate the differences introduced by the atmospheric feedback in propagation speed and behaviour. Both numerical models have been developed as research tools for operational models and are currently used to forecast localized extreme events. These models have been selected because they can be run coupled and support decisions in wildfire management in France and Europe. The main originalities of this combination reside in the fact that Méso-NH is run in a Large Eddy Simulation (LES configuration and that the rate of spread model used in ForeFire provides a physical formulation to take into account the effect of wind and slope. Simulations of typical experimental configurations show that the numerical atmospheric model is able to reproduce plausible convective effects of the heat produced by the fire. Numerical results are comparable to estimated values for fire-induced winds and present behaviour similar to other existing numerical approaches.

  20. Infrared radiation models for atmospheric ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, David P.; Ces, Robert D.

    1988-01-01

    A hierarchy of line-by-line, narrow-band, and broadband infrared radiation models are discussed for ozone, a radiatively important atmospheric trace gas. It is shown that the narrow-band (Malkmus) model is in near-precise agreement with the line-by-line model, thus providing a means of testing narrow-band Curtis-Godson scaling, and it is found that this scaling procedure leads to errors in atmospheric fluxes of up to 10 percent. Moreover, this is a direct consequence of the altitude dependence of the ozone mixing ratio. Somewhat greater flux errors arise with use of the broadband model, due to both a lesser accuracy of the broadband scaling procedure and to inherent errors within the broadband model, despite the fact that this model has been tuned to the line-by-line model.

  1. Atmospheric neutrino flux calculation using the NRLMSISE00 atmospheric model

    CERN Document Server

    Honda, M; Kajita, T; Kasahara, K; Midorikawa, S

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we extend the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux~\\cite{hkkm2004,hkkms2006,hkkm2011} to the sites in polar and tropical regions. In our earliest full 3D-calculation~\\cite{hkkm2004}, we used DPMJET-III~\\cite{dpm} for the hadronic interaction model above 5~GeV, and NUCRIN~\\cite{nucrin} below 5~GeV. We modified DPMJET-III as in Ref.~\\cite{hkkms2006} to reproduce the experimental muon spectra better, mainly using the data observed by BESS group~\\cite{BESSTeVpHemu}. In a recent work~\\cite{hkkm2011}, we introduced JAM interaction model for the low energy hadronic interactions. JAM is a nuclear interaction model developed with PHITS (Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System)~\\cite{phits}. In Ref.~\\cite{hkkm2011}, we could reproduce the observed muon flux at the low energies at balloon altitude with DPMJET-III above 32 GeV and JAM below that better than the combination of DPMJET-III above 5~GeV and NUCRIN below that. Besides the interaction model, we have also improved the calculation sche...

  2. Synthetic Spectra and Colors of Young Giant Planet Atmospheres: Effects of Initial Conditions and Atmospheric Metallicity

    CERN Document Server

    Fortney, Jonathan J; Saumon, Didier; Lodders, Katharina

    2008-01-01

    We examine the spectra and infrared colors of the cool methane-dominated atmospheres at Teff < 1400 K expected for young gas giant planets. We couple these spectral calculations to an updated version of the Marley et al. (2007) giant planet thermal evolution models that include formation by core accretion-gas capture. These relatively cool "young Jupiters" can be 1-6 magnitudes fainter than predicted by standard cooling tracks that include a traditional initial condition, which may provide a diagnostic of formation. If correct, this would make true Jupiter-like planets much more difficult to detect at young ages than previously thought. Since Jupiter and Saturn are of distinctly super-solar composition, we examine emitted spectra for model planets at both solar metallicity and a metallicity of 5 times solar. These metal-enhanced young Jupiters have lower pressure photospheres than field brown dwarfs of the same effective temperatures arising from both lower surface gravities and enhanced atmospheric opacit...

  3. Coupling approaches used in atmospheric entry models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsevich, M. I.

    2012-09-01

    While a planet orbits the Sun, it is subject to impact by smaller objects, ranging from tiny dust particles and space debris to much larger asteroids and comets. Such collisions have taken place frequently over geological time and played an important role in the evolution of planets and the development of life on the Earth. Though the search for near-Earth objects addresses one of the main points of the Asteroid and Comet Hazard, one should not underestimate the useful information to be gleaned from smaller atmospheric encounters, known as meteors or fireballs. Not only do these events help determine the linkages between meteorites and their parent bodies; due to their relative regularity they provide a good statistical basis for analysis. For successful cases with found meteorites, the detailed atmospheric path record is an excellent tool to test and improve existing entry models assuring the robustness of their implementation. There are many more important scientific questions meteoroids help us to answer, among them: Where do these objects come from, what are their origins, physical properties and chemical composition? What are the shapes and bulk densities of the space objects which fully ablate in an atmosphere and do not reach the planetary surface? Which values are directly measured and which are initially assumed as input to various models? How to couple both fragmentation and ablation effects in the model, taking real size distribution of fragments into account? How to specify and speed up the recovery of a recently fallen meteorites, not letting weathering to affect samples too much? How big is the pre-atmospheric projectile to terminal body ratio in terms of their mass/volume? Which exact parameters beside initial mass define this ratio? More generally, how entering object affects Earth's atmosphere and (if applicable) Earth's surface? How to predict these impact consequences based on atmospheric trajectory data? How to describe atmospheric entry

  4. Modeling the Interaction of Moist Convection with the Zonal Jets of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Ingersoll, A. P.

    2004-11-01

    We use a reduced-gravity quasi-geostrophic model with a parameterization of moist convection that is based on Galileo and Cassini observations of lightning and convective storms (Little et al., 1999; Gierasch et al., 2000; Porco et al., 2003). The features of the jets we want to reproduce in the model include: (1) the curvature of the zonal jet profile, which violates the barotropic stability criterion near many of the westward jets (Ingersoll et al., 1981; Li et al., 2004), (2) the speed of the zonal jets, which is related to their width, given that the jets marginally violate the barotropic stability criterion, and (3) the sign of the eddy momentum flux, which is into the jets and tends to sustain them (Beebe et al., 1979; Ingersoll et al., 1981; Salyk et al., 2004). The features of moist convective storms that are taken from observation include: (1) the tendency of the storms to occur in the cyclonic belts, (2) the rapid divergence of horizontal velocity near the cloud tops, and (3) the lifetime of the storms, which is on average 4-5 days (Li et al., 2004). We find that moist convection leads to zonal jets in the upper layer, but the jets violate the barotropic stability criterion only if the flow in the deep underlying layer is westward. We can reproduce the chevron shape on the sides of the jets if we postulate that the clouds persist longer than the storms that produce them. We can reproduce the number and frequency of moist convection storms by assuming that they carry most of the planet's vertical heat flux (Gierasch et al., 2000). The NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program supported this research.

  5. Models of magnetized neutron star atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Suleimanov, V; Werner, K

    2009-01-01

    We present a new computer code for modeling magnetized neutron star atmospheres in a wide range of magnetic fields (10^{12} - 10^{15} G) and effective temperatures (3 \\times 10^5 - 10^7 K). The atmosphere is assumed to consist either of fully ionized electron-ion plasmas or of partially ionized hydrogen. Vacuum resonance and partial mode conversion are taken into account. Any inclination of the magnetic field relative to the stellar surface is allowed. We use modern opacities of fully or partially ionized plasmas in strong magnetic fields and solve the coupled radiative transfer equations for the normal electromagnetic modes in the plasma. Using this code, we study the possibilities to explain the soft X-ray spectra of isolated neutron stars by different atmosphere models. In particular, the outgoing spectrum using the "sandwich" model (thin atmosphere with a hydrogen layer above a helium layer) is constructed. Thin partially ionized hydrogen atmospheres with vacuum polarization are shown to be able to improv...

  6. Condensation-inhibited convection in hydrogen-rich atmospheres . Stability against double-diffusive processes and thermal profiles for Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leconte, Jérémy; Selsis, Franck; Hersant, Franck; Guillot, Tristan

    2017-02-01

    In an atmosphere, a cloud condensation region is characterized by a strong vertical gradient in the abundance of the related condensing species. On Earth, the ensuing gradient of mean molecular weight has relatively few dynamical consequences because N2 is heavier than water vapor, so that only the release of latent heat significantly impacts convection. On the contrary, in a hydrogen dominated atmosphere (e.g., giant planets), all condensing species are significantly heavier than the background gas. This can stabilize the atmosphere against convection near a cloud deck if the enrichment in the given species exceeds a critical threshold. This raises two questions. What is transporting energy in such a stabilized layer, and how affected can the thermal profile of giant planets be? To answer these questions, we first carry out a linear analysis of the convective and double-diffusive instabilities in a condensable medium showing that an efficient condensation can suppress double-diffusive convection. This suggests that a stable radiative layer can form near a cloud condensation level, leading to an increase in the temperature of the deep adiabat. Then, we investigate the impact of the condensation of the most abundant species (water) with a steady-state atmosphere model. Compared to standard models, the temperature increase can reach several hundred degrees at the quenching depth of key chemical tracers. Overall, this effect could have many implications for our understanding of the dynamical and chemical state of the atmosphere of giant planets, for their future observations (with Juno for example), and for their internal evolution.

  7. Jupiter before Juno: State of the atmosphere at cloud level in 2016 from PlanetCam observations in the 0.4-1.7 microns wavelength range and amateur observations in the visible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso, Ricardo; Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Rojas, Jose Felix; Iñurrigarro, Peio; Mendikoa, Iñigo; Go, Christopher; PVOL-IOPW Team

    2016-10-01

    The arrival of Juno to Jupiter provides a unique opportunity to link findings of the inner structure of the planet with astronomical observations of its meteorology at cloud level. Long time base observations of Jupiter's atmosphere before and during the Juno mission are critical in providing context to Junocam observations and may benefit the interpretation of the MWR data on the lower atmosphere structure as well as Juno data on the depth of the zonal winds. We have performed a long campaign of observations in the visible with the PlanetCam lucky imaging instrument in the 2.2m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory in Spain with observations obtained in December 2015 and in March, May, June and July 2016. In observations under good atmospheric seeing, the instrument allows to obtain images with a spatial resolution of 0.05'' in the visible and 0.1'' from 1.0 to 1.7 microns. The later is an interesting range of wavelengths for observing Jupiter because of the existence of several strong and weak methane absorption bands not generally used in high-resolution ground-based observations of the planet. A combination of images using narrow filters centered in methane absorption bands and their adjacent continuum allows studying the vertical structure of the clouds at horizontal spatial scales of 350-1000 km over the planet depending on the atmospheric seeing and filter used. The best images can be further processed showing features at spatial resolutions of about 150 km. We have also monitored the state of the atmosphere with images obtained by amateur astronomers contributing to the Planetary Virtual Observatory Laboratory database (http://pvol.ehu.eus). Based on both datasets we present zonal winds from -70 to +75 deg with an accuracy of 10 m/s in the low latitudes and 25 m/s in subpolar latitudes. Relative altitude maps of features observed in bands J, H and others with different methane absorption will be presented.

  8. The Collision of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 and Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Keith S.; Weaver, Harold A.; Feldman, Paul D.

    2006-11-01

    Participants; Preface; 1. The orbital motion and impact circumstances of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 Paul W. Chodas and Donald K. Yeomans; 2. Observational constraints on the composition and nature of Comet D/Shoemaker-Levy 9 Jacques Crovisier; 3. Tidal breakup of the nucleus of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 Zdenek Sekanina; 4. Earth-based observations of impact phenomena Philip D. Nicholson; 5. HST imaging of Jupiter shortly after each impact: plumes and fresh sites Heidi B. Hammel; 6. Galileo observations of the impacts Clark R. Chapman; 7. Models of fragment penetration and fireball evolution David A. Crawford; 8. Entry and fireball models vs. observations: what have we learned? Mordecai-Mark Mac Low; 9. Dynamics and chemistry of SL9 plumes Kevin Zahnle; 10. Chemistry induced by the impacts: observations Emmanuel Lellouch; 11. SL9 impact chemistry: long-term photochemical evolution Julianne I. Moses; 12. Particulate matter in Jupiter's atmosphere from the impacts of Comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9 Robert A. West; 13. Jupiter's post-impact atmospheric thermal response Barney J. Conrath; 14. Growth and dispersion of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 impact features from HST imaging Reta F. Beebe; 15. Waves from the Shoemaker-Levy 9 impacts Andrew P. Ingersoll and Hiroo Kanamori; 16. Jovian magnetospheric and auroral effects of the SL9 impacts Wing-Huen Ip.

  9. OUTWARD MIGRATION OF JUPITER AND SATURN IN 3:2 OR 2:1 RESONANCE IN RADIATIVE DISKS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE GRAND TACK AND NICE MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierens, Arnaud; Raymond, Sean N. [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Bordeaux, Univ. Bordeaux, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France); Nesvorny, David [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Morbidelli, Alessandro, E-mail: arnaud.pierens@obs.u-bordeaux1.fr [University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la côte d' Azur, Laboratoire Lagrange, BP4229, F-06304 NICE Cedex 4 (France)

    2014-11-01

    Embedded in the gaseous protoplanetary disk, Jupiter and Saturn naturally become trapped in 3:2 resonance and migrate outward. This serves as the basis of the Grand Tack model. However, previous hydrodynamical simulations were restricted to isothermal disks, with moderate aspect ratio and viscosity. Here we simulate the orbital evolution of the gas giants in disks with viscous heating and radiative cooling. We find that Jupiter and Saturn migrate outward in 3:2 resonance in modest-mass (M {sub disk} ≈ M {sub MMSN}, where MMSN is the {sup m}inimum-mass solar nebula{sup )} disks with viscous stress parameter α between 10{sup –3} and 10{sup –2}. In disks with relatively low-mass (M {sub disk} ≲ M {sub MMSN}), Jupiter and Saturn get captured in 2:1 resonance and can even migrate outward in low-viscosity disks (α ≤ 10{sup –4}). Such disks have a very small aspect ratio (h ∼ 0.02-0.03) that favors outward migration after capture in 2:1 resonance, as confirmed by isothermal runs which resulted in a similar outcome for h ∼ 0.02 and α ≤ 10{sup –4}. We also performed N-body runs of the outer solar system starting from the results of our hydrodynamical simulations and including 2-3 ice giants. After dispersal of the gaseous disk, a Nice model instability starting with Jupiter and Saturn in 2:1 resonance results in good solar systems analogs. We conclude that in a cold solar nebula, the 2:1 resonance between Jupiter and Saturn can lead to outward migration of the system, and this may represent an alternative scenario for the evolution of the solar system.

  10. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar re

  11. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar re

  12. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar

  13. Jupiter Clouds in Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 619 nm [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 727 nm [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 890 nmImages from NASA's Cassini spacecraft using three different filters reveal cloud structures and movements at different depths in the atmosphere around Jupiter's south pole.Cassini's cameras come equipped with filters that sample three wavelengths where methane gas absorbs light. These are in the red at 619 nanometer (nm) wavelength and in the near-infrared at 727 nm and 890 nm. Absorption in the 619 nm filter is weak. It is stronger in the 727 nm band and very strong in the 890 nm band where 90 percent of the light is absorbed by methane gas. Light in the weakest band can penetrate the deepest into Jupiter's atmosphere. It is sensitive to the amount of cloud and haze down to the pressure of the water cloud, which lies at a depth where pressure is about 6 times the atmospheric pressure at sea level on the Earth). Light in the strongest methane band is absorbed at high altitude and is sensitive only to the ammonia cloud level and higher (pressures less than about one-half of Earth's atmospheric pressure) and the middle methane band is sensitive to the ammonia and ammonium hydrosulfide cloud layers as deep as two times Earth's atmospheric pressure.The images shown here demonstrate the power of these filters in studies of cloud stratigraphy. The images cover latitudes from about 15 degrees north at the top down to the southern polar region at the bottom. The left and middle images are ratios, the image in the methane filter divided by the image at a nearby wavelength outside the methane band. Using ratios emphasizes where contrast is due to methane absorption and not to other factors, such as the absorptive properties of the cloud particles, which influence contrast at all wavelengths.The most prominent feature seen in all three filters is the polar stratospheric haze that makes Jupiter bright near the pole

  14. Atmospheric Modelling for the Removal of Telluric Features from Infrared Planetary Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Cotton, Daniel V; Kedziora-Chudczer, Lucyna

    2013-01-01

    The effects of telluric absorption on infrared spectra present a problem for the observer. Strong molecular absorptions from species whose concentrations vary with time can be particularly challenging to remove precisely. Yet removing these effects is key to accurately determining the composition of many astronomical objects, planetary atmospheres in particular. Here we present a method for removing telluric effects based on a modelling approach. The method relies only on observations usually made by the planetary astronomer, and so is directly comparable with current techniques. We use the modelling approach to process observations made of Jupiter, and Saturnian moon Titan and compare the results with those of the standard telluric division technique, finding the modelling approach to have distinct advantages even in conditions regarded as ideal for telluric division.

  15. The Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boville, B. A.; Garcia, R. R.; Sassi, F.; Kinnison, D.; Roble, R. G.

    The Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) is an upward exten- sion of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model. WACCM simulates the atmosphere from the surface to the lower thermosphere (140 km) and includes both dynamical and chemical components. The salient points of the model formulation will be summarized and several aspects of its performance will be discussed. Comparison with observations indicates that WACCM produces re- alistic temperature and zonal wind distributions. Both the mean state and interannual variability will be summarized. Temperature inversions in the midlatitude mesosphere have been reported by several authors and are also found in WACCM. These inver- sions are formed primarily by planetary wave forcing, but the background state on which they form also requires gravity wave forcing. The response to sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies will be examined by com- paring simulations with observed SSTs for 1950-1998 to a simulation with clima- tological annual cycle of SSTs. The response to ENSO events is found to extend though the winter stratosphere and mesosphere and a signal is also found at the sum- mer mesopause. The experimental framework allows the ENSO signal to be isolated, because no other forcings are included (e.g. solar variability and volcanic eruptions) which complicate the observational record. The temperature and wind variations asso- ciated with ENSO are large enough to generate significant perturbations in the chem- ical composition of the middle atmosphere, which will also be discussed.

  16. Influence of upstream solar wind on thermospheric flows at Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, J N; Guio, P

    2010-01-01

    The coupling of Jupiter's magnetosphere and ionosphere plays a vital role in creating its auroral emissions. The strength of these emissions is dependent on the difference in speed of the rotational flows within Jupiter's high-latitude thermosphere and the planet's magnetodisc. Using an azimuthally symmetric global circulation model, we have simulated how upstream solar wind conditions affect the energy and direction of atmospheric flows. In order to simulate the effect of a varying dynamic pressure in the upstream solar wind, we calculated three magnetic field profiles representing compressed, averaged and expanded `middle' magnetospheres. These profiles were then used to solve for the angular velocity of plasma in the magnetosphere. This angular velocity determines the strength of currents flowing between the ionosphere and magnetosphere. We examine the influence of variability in this current system upon the global winds and energy inputs within the Jovian thermosphere. We find that the power dissipated by...

  17. Probing Clouds in Planets with a Simple Radiative Transfer Model: The Jupiter Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendikoa, Inigo; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin

    2012-01-01

    Remote sensing of planets evokes using expensive on-orbit satellites and gathering complex data from space. However, the basic properties of clouds in planetary atmospheres can be successfully estimated with small telescopes even from an urban environment using currently available and affordable technology. This makes the process accessible for…

  18. Probing Clouds in Planets with a Simple Radiative Transfer Model: The Jupiter Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendikoa, Inigo; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin

    2012-01-01

    Remote sensing of planets evokes using expensive on-orbit satellites and gathering complex data from space. However, the basic properties of clouds in planetary atmospheres can be successfully estimated with small telescopes even from an urban environment using currently available and affordable technology. This makes the process accessible for…

  19. Applications of Conditional Nonlinear Optimal Perturbation to the Study of the Stability and Sensitivity of the Jovian Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A two-layer quasi-geostrophic model is used to study the stability and sensitivity of motions on small-scale vortices in Jupiter's atmosphere. Conditional nonlinear optimal perturbations (CNOPs) and linear singular vectors (LSVs) are both obtained numerically and compared in this paper. The results show that CNOPs can capture the nonlinear characteristics of motions in small-scale vortices in Jupiter's atmosphere and show great difference from LSVs under the condition that the initial constraint condition is large or the optimization time is not very short or both. Besides, in some basic states, local CNOPs are found.The pattern of LSV is more similar to local CNOP than global CNOP in some cases. The elementary application of the method of CNOP to the Jovian atmosphere helps us to explore the stability of variousscale motions of Jupiter's atmosphere and to compare the stability of motions in Jupiter's atmosphere and Earth's atmosphere further.

  20. Global Atmospheric Models for Cosmic Ray Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Will, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge of atmospheric parameters -- such as temperature, pressure, and humidity -- is very important for a proper reconstruction of air showers, especially with the fluorescence technique. The Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) provides altitude-dependent profiles of these state variables of the atmosphere and several more. Every three hours, a new data set on 23 constant pressure level plus an additional surface values is available for the entire globe. These GDAS data are now used in the standard air shower reconstruction of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The validity of the data was verified by comparisons with monthly models that were averaged from on-site meteorological radio soundings and weather station measurements obtained at the Observatory in Malarg\\"ue. Comparisons of reconstructions using the GDAS data and the monthly models are also presented. Since GDAS is a global model, the data can potentially be used for other cosmic and gamma ray detectors. Several studies were already performed ...

  1. Models of magnetized neutron star atmospheres: thin atmospheres and partially ionized hydrogen atmospheres with vacuum polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Suleimanov, V F; Werner, K

    2009-01-01

    Observed X-ray spectra of some isolated magnetized neutron stars display absorption features, sometimes interpreted as ion cyclotron lines. Modeling the observed spectra is necessary to check this hypothesis and to evaluate neutron star parameters.We develop a computer code for modeling magnetized neutron star atmospheres in a wide range of magnetic fields (10^{12} - 10^{15} G) and effective temperatures (3 \\times 10^5 - 10^7 K). Using this code, we study the possibilities to explain the soft X-ray spectra of isolated neutron stars by different atmosphere models. The atmosphere is assumed to consist either of fully ionized electron-ion plasmas or of partially ionized hydrogen. Vacuum resonance and partial mode conversion are taken into account. Any inclination of the magnetic field relative to the stellar surface is allowed. We use modern opacities of fully or partially ionized plasmas in strong magnetic fields and solve the coupled radiative transfer equations for the normal electromagnetic modes in the plas...

  2. Jupiter internal structure: the effect of different equations of state

    CERN Document Server

    Miguel, Yamila; Fayon, Lucile

    2016-01-01

    Heavy elements, even though its smaller constituent, are crucial to understand Jupiter formation history. Interior models are used to determine the amount of heavy elements in Jupiter interior, nevertheless this range is still subject to degeneracies due to uncertainties in the equations of state. Prior to Juno mission data arrival, we present Jupiter optimized calculations exploring the effect of different model parameters in the determination of Jupiter's core and heavy element's mass. We perform comparisons between equations of state published recently. The interior model of Jupiter is calculated from the equations of hydrostatic equilibrium, mass and energy conservation, and energy transport. The mass of the core and heavy elements is adjusted to match Jupiter's observational constrains radius and gravitational moments. We show that the determination of Jupiter interior structure is tied to the estimation of its gravitational moments and the accuracy of equations of state of hydrogen, helium and heavy ele...

  3. Forum on Concepts and Approaches for Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The papers presented at this conference primarily discuss instruments and techniques for conducting science on Jupiter's icy moons, and geologic processes on the moons themselves. Remote sensing of satellites, cratering on satellites, and ice on the surface of Europa are given particular attention. Some papers discuss Jupiter's atmosphere, or exobiology.

  4. THOR: A New and Flexible Global Circulation Model to Explore Planetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Mendonça, João M; Grosheintz, Luc; Heng, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    We have designed and developed, from scratch, a global circulation model named THOR that solves the three-dimensional non-hydrostatic Euler equations. Our general approach lifts the commonly used assumptions of a shallow atmosphere and hydrostatic equilibrium. We solve the "pole problem" (where converging meridians on a sphere lead to increasingly smaller time steps near the poles) by implementing an icosahedral grid. Irregularities in the grid, which lead to grid imprinting, are smoothed using the "spring dynamics" technique. We validate our implementation of spring dynamics by examining calculations of the divergence and gradient of test functions. To prevent the computational time step from being bottlenecked by having to resolve sound waves, we implement a split-explicit method together with a horizontally explicit and vertically implicit integration. We validate our global circulation model by reproducing the Earth and also the hot Jupiter-like benchmark tests. THOR was designed to run on Graphics Proces...

  5. A Global Atmospheric Model of Meteoric Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wuhu; Marsh, Daniel R.; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Janches, Diego; Hoffner, Josef; Yi, Fan; Plane, John M. C.

    2013-01-01

    The first global model of meteoric iron in the atmosphere (WACCM-Fe) has been developed by combining three components: the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), a description of the neutral and ion-molecule chemistry of iron in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT), and a treatment of the injection of meteoric constituents into the atmosphere. The iron chemistry treats seven neutral and four ionized iron containing species with 30 neutral and ion-molecule reactions. The meteoric input function (MIF), which describes the injection of Fe as a function of height, latitude, and day, is precalculated from an astronomical model coupled to a chemical meteoric ablation model (CABMOD). This newly developed WACCM-Fe model has been evaluated against a number of available ground-based lidar observations and performs well in simulating the mesospheric atomic Fe layer. The model reproduces the strong positive correlation of temperature and Fe density around the Fe layer peak and the large anticorrelation around 100 km. The diurnal tide has a significant effect in the middle of the layer, and the model also captures well the observed seasonal variations. However, the model overestimates the peak Fe+ concentration compared with the limited rocket-borne mass spectrometer data available, although good agreement on the ion layer underside can be obtained by adjusting the rate coefficients for dissociative recombination of Fe-molecular ions with electrons. Sensitivity experiments with the same chemistry in a 1-D model are used to highlight significant remaining uncertainties in reaction rate coefficients, and to explore the dependence of the total Fe abundance on the MIF and rate of vertical transport.

  6. Parallel computing in atmospheric chemistry models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotman, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Div.

    1996-02-01

    Studies of atmospheric chemistry are of high scientific interest, involve computations that are complex and intense, and require enormous amounts of I/O. Current supercomputer computational capabilities are limiting the studies of stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry and will certainly not be able to handle the upcoming coupled chemistry/climate models. To enable such calculations, the authors have developed a computing framework that allows computations on a wide range of computational platforms, including massively parallel machines. Because of the fast paced changes in this field, the modeling framework and scientific modules have been developed to be highly portable and efficient. Here, the authors present the important features of the framework and focus on the atmospheric chemistry module, named IMPACT, and its capabilities. Applications of IMPACT to aircraft studies will be presented.

  7. Jupiter System Observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senske, Dave; Kwok, Johnny

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the proposed mission for the Jupiter System Observer. The presentation also includes overviews of the mission timeline, science goals, and spacecraftspecifications for the satellite.

  8. Spectroscopic observations of Hot-Jupiters with the Hubble WFC3 camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Mario; Morello, Giuseppe; Tsiaras, Angelos; Zingales, Tiziano; Tinetti, Giovanna; ExoLights, ExoMol

    2016-10-01

    Thousands of exoplanets have been discovered with a huge range of masses, sizes and orbits. The next step to characterize them is to study their atmosphere. The atmospheres of giant planets are mostly made of hydrogen and helium. The relevant questions therefore concern the amounts of all elements other than hydrogen and helium, i.e. the heavy elements, that are present.The atmospheres of hot Jupiters present a critical advantage compared to the planets of the Solar System: their high temperature.Unlike Jupiter and Saturn, there is no cold trap in their atmosphere for species such as H2O, CH4, NH3, CO2 etc., which condense at much colder temperatures. Observations of hot gaseous exoplanets can therefore provide a unique access to their elementary composition (especially C, O, N, S) and enable the understanding of the early stage of planetary and atmospheric formation during the nebular phase and the following few millions years.Here we present new spectroscopic observations of hot-Jupiters' atmospheres obtained with the WFC3 camera. In our presentation we will focus on the data reduction method used and on the interpretation of the results through state of the art spectral retrieval models.

  9. Structure and Evolution of Internally Heated Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komacek, Thaddeus D.; Youdin, Andrew N.

    2015-11-01

    The transit radii of many close-in extrasolar giant planets, or "hot Jupiters," are systematically larger than those expected from models considering only cooling from an initial high-entropy state. Though these planets receive strong irradiation, with equilibrium temperatures of 1000-2500 Kelvin, the absorption of stellar incident flux in the upper atmosphere alone cannot explain these anomalous radii. More promising mechanisms involve irradiation-driven meteorological activity, which penetrates much deeper into the planet than direct stellar heating. This circulation can lead to large-scale mixing and downward transport of kinetic energy, both processes whereby a fraction of the stellar incident power is transported downwards to the interior of the planet. Here we consider how deposition of heat at different pressure levels or structural locations within a planet affects the resulting evolution. To do so, we run global gas giant evolutionary models with with the stellar structure code MESA including additional energy dissipation. We find that relatively shallow atmospheric heating alone can explain the transit radii of the hot Jupiter sample, but heating in the convective zone is an order of magnitude more efficient regardless of exact location. Additionally, a small difference in atmospheric heating location can have a significant effect on radius evolution, especially near the radiative-convective boundary. The most efficient location to heat the planet is at the radiative-convective boundary or deeper. We expect that shear instabilities at this interface may naturally explain energy dissipation at the radiative-convective boundary, which typically lies at a pressure of ~1 kilobar after 5 Gyr for a planet with the mass and incident stellar flux of HD 209458b. Hence, atmospheric processes are most efficient at explaining the bloated radii of hot Jupiters if they can transport incident stellar power downwards to the top of the inner convective zone.

  10. Jupiter's Great Red Spot and White Ovals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    This photo of Jupiter was taken by Voyager 1 on the evening of March 1, 1979, from a distance of 2.7 million miles (4.3 million kilometers). The photo shows Jupiter's Great Red Spot (top) and one of the white ovals than can be seen in Jupiter's atmosphere from Earth. The white ovals were seen to form in 1939, and 1940, and have remained more or less constant ever since. None of the structure and detail evident in these features have ever been seen from Earth. The Great Red Spot is three times as large as Earth. Also evident in the picture is a great deal of atmospheric detail that will require further study for interpretation. The smallest details that can be seen in this picture are about 45 miles (80 kilometers across. JPL manages and controls the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  11. Seasonal Predictability in a Model Atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hai

    2001-07-01

    The predictability of atmospheric mean-seasonal conditions in the absence of externally varying forcing is examined. A perfect-model approach is adopted, in which a global T21 three-level quasigeostrophic atmospheric model is integrated over 21 000 days to obtain a reference atmospheric orbit. The model is driven by a time-independent forcing, so that the only source of time variability is the internal dynamics. The forcing is set to perpetual winter conditions in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and perpetual summer in the Southern Hemisphere.A significant temporal variability in the NH 90-day mean states is observed. The component of that variability associated with the higher-frequency motions, or climate noise, is estimated using a method developed by Madden. In the polar region, and to a lesser extent in the midlatitudes, the temporal variance of the winter means is significantly greater than the climate noise, suggesting some potential predictability in those regions.Forecast experiments are performed to see whether the presence of variance in the 90-day mean states that is in excess of the climate noise leads to some skill in the prediction of these states. Ensemble forecast experiments with nine members starting from slightly different initial conditions are performed for 200 different 90-day means along the reference atmospheric orbit. The serial correlation between the ensemble means and the reference orbit shows that there is skill in the 90-day mean predictions. The skill is concentrated in those regions of the NH that have the largest variance in excess of the climate noise. An EOF analysis shows that nearly all the predictive skill in the seasonal means is associated with one mode of variability with a strong axisymmetric component.

  12. Reflected Light Curves, Spherical and Bond Albedos of Jupiter- and Saturn-like Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Zhang, Xi; Li, Liming; Kopparla, Pushkar; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Dones, Henry C. Luke; Verbiscer, Anne J.; Yung, Yuk

    2016-10-01

    Reflected light curves observed for exoplanets indicate that a few of them host bright clouds. We estimate how the light curve and total stellar heating of a planet depends on forward and backward scattering in the clouds based on Pioneer and Cassini spacecraft images of Jupiter and Saturn. We fit analytical functions to the local reflected brightnesses of Jupiter and Saturn depending on the planet's phase. These observations cover broad bands at 0.59-0.72 and 0.39-0.5 μm, and narrow bands at 0.938 (atmospheric window), 0.889 (CH4 absorption band), and 0.24-0.28 μm. We simulate the images of the planets with a ray-tracing model, and disk-integrate them to produce the full-orbit light curves. For Jupiter, we also fit the modeled light curves to the observed full-disk brightness. We derive spherical albedos for Jupiter and Saturn, and for planets with Lambertian and Rayleigh-scattering atmospheres. Jupiter-like atmospheres can produce light curves that are a factor of two fainter at half-phase than the Lambertian planet, given the same geometric albedo at transit. The spherical albedo is typically lower than for a Lambertian planet by up to a factor of ˜1.5. The Lambertian assumption will underestimate the absorption of the stellar light and the equilibrium temperature of the planetary atmosphere. We also compare our light curves with the light curves of solid bodies: the moons Enceladus and Callisto. Their strong backscattering peak within a few degrees of opposition (secondary eclipse) can lead to an even stronger underestimate of the stellar heating. This work is published: Dyudina, U.,et al., 2016: ApJ, 822, 76, http://arxiv.org/abs/1511.04415.

  13. Organic chemistry in the atmosphere. [laboratory modeling of Titan atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, C.

    1974-01-01

    The existence of an at least moderately complex organic chemistry on Titan is stipulated based on clear evidence of methane, and at least presumptive evidence of hydrogen in its atmosphere. The ratio of methane to hydrogen is the highest of any atmosphere in the solar system. Irradiation of hydrogen/methane mixtures produces aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. A very reasonable hypothesis assumes that the red cloud cover of Titan is made of organic chemicals. Two-carbon hydrocarbons experimentally produced from irradiated mixtures of methane, ammonia, water, and hydrogen bear out the possible organic chemistry of the Titanian environment.

  14. MODA - A hybrid atmospheric pollutant dispersion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favaron, M.; Oliveti Selmi, O. [Servizi Territorio srl, Milan (Italy); Sozzi, R. [Agenzia Regionale Protezione Ambiente (ARPA) Lazio, Rieti (Italy)

    2004-07-01

    MODA is a Gaussian-hybrid atmospheric dispersion model, intended for regulatory applications, and designed to meet the following requirements: ability to operate in complex terrain, standard use of a refined description of turbulence, operational efficiency (in terms of both speed and ease to change simulation parameters), ease of integration in modelling interfaces, output compatibility with the widely-used ISC3. MODA can operate in two modes: a standard mode, in which the pollutant dispersion is treated as Gaussian, and an advanced mode, in which the hybrid relations are used to compute the pollutant concentrations. (orig.)

  15. Jupiter as an exoplanet: UV to NIR transmission spectrum reveals hazes, a Na layer and possibly stratospheric H2O-ice clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Montañes-Rodriguez, P; Palle, E; Lopez-Puertas, M; Garcia-Melendo, E

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the analysis of transmission spectra is the most successful technique to probe the chemical composition of exoplanet atmospheres. But the accuracy of these measurements is constrained by observational limitations and the diversity of possible atmospheric compositions. Here we show the UV-VIS-IR transmission spectrum of Jupiter, as if it were a transiting exoplanet, obtained by observing one of its satellites, Ganymede, while passing through Jupiter's shadow i.e., during a solar eclipse from Ganymede. The spectrum shows strong extinction due to the presence of clouds (aerosols) and haze in the atmosphere, and strong absorption features from CH4. More interestingly, the comparison with radiative transfer models reveals a spectral signature, which we attribute here to a Jupiter stratospheric layer of crystalline H2O ice. The atomic transitions of Na are also present. These results are relevant for the modeling and interpretation of giant transiting exoplanets. They also open a new technique to explore...

  16. Encouragement from Jupiter for Europe's Titan Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Huygens will transmit scientific information for 150 minutes, from the outer reaches of Titan's cold atmosphere and all the way down to its enigmatic surface. For comparison, the Jupiter Probe radioed scientific data for 58 minutes as it descended about 200 kilometres into the outer part of the atmosphere of the giant planet. The parachutes controlling various stages of Huygens' descent will rely upon a system for deployment designed and developed in Europe that is nevertheless similar to that used by the Jupiter Probe. The elaborate sequence of operations in Huygens worked perfectly during a dramatic drop test from a stratospheric balloon over Sweden in May 1995, which approximated as closely as possible to events on Titan. The performance of the American Probe at Jupiter renews the European engineers' confidence in their own descent control system, and also in the lithium sulphur-dioxide batteries which were chosen to power both Probes. "The systems work after long storage in space," comments Hamid Hassan, ESA's Project Manager for Huygens. "Huygens will spend seven years travelling to Saturn's vicinity aboard the Cassini Orbiter. The Jupiter Probe was a passenger in Galileo for six years before its release, so there is no reason to doubt that Huygens will work just as well." Huygens will enter the outer atmosphere of Titan at 20,000 kilometres per hour. A heat shield 2.7 metres in diameter will withstand the friction and slow the Probe to a speed at which parachutes can be deployed. The size of the parachute for the main phase of the descent is chosen to allow Huygens to reach the surface in about 2 hours. The batteries powering Huygens will last for about 21/2 hours. Prepared for surprises A different perspective on the Jupiter Probe comes from Jean-Pierre Lebreton, ESA's Project Scientist for Huygens. The results contradicted many preconceptions of the Galileo scientists, particularly about the abundance of water and the structure of cloud layers. Arguments

  17. Rotating shallow water modeling of planetary,astrophysical and plasma vortical structures (plasma transport across a magnetic field,model of the jupiter's GRS, prediction of existence of giant vortices in spiral galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Nezlin

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Three kinds of results have been described in this paper. Firstly, an experimental study of the Rossby vortex meridional drift on the rotating shallow water has been carried out. Owing to the stringent physical analogy between the Rossby vortices and drift vortices in the magnetized plasma, the results obtained have allowed one to make a conclusion that the transport rate of the plasma, trapped by the drift vortices, across the magnetic field is equivalent to the “gyro-Bohm” diffusion coefficient. Secondly, a model of big vortices of the type of the Great Red Spot of Jupiter, dominating in the atmospheres of the outer planets, has been produced. Thirdly, the rotating shallow water modeling has been carried out of the hydrodynamical generation mechanism of spiral structures in galaxies. Trailing spiral waves of various azimuthal modes, generated by a shear flow between fast rotating “nucleus” and slow rotating periphery, were produced. The spirals are similar to those existing in the real galaxies. The hydrodynamical concept of the spiral structure formation in galaxies has been substantiated. Strong anticyclonic vortices between the spiral arms of the structures under study have been discovered for the first time. The existence of analogous vortices in real galaxies has been predicted. (This prediction has been reliably confirmed recently in special astronomical observations, carried out on the basis of the mentioned laboratory modeling and the prediction made – see the paper by A. Fridman et al. (Astrophysics and Space Science, 1997, 252, 115.

  18. Simulated Photoevaporative Mass Loss from Hot Jupiters in 3D

    CERN Document Server

    Tripathi, Anjali; Murray-Clay, Ruth A; Krumholz, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing stellar photons heat the upper regions of planetary atmospheres, driving atmospheric mass loss. Gas escaping from several hot, hydrogen-rich planets has been detected using UV and X-ray transmission spectroscopy. Because these planets are tidally locked, and thus asymmetrically irradiated, escaping gas is unlikely to be spherically symmetric. In this paper, we focus on the effects of asymmetric heating on local outflow structure. We use the Athena code for hydrodynamics to produce 3D simulations of hot Jupiter mass loss that jointly model wind launching and stellar heating via photoionization. Our fiducial planet is an inflated, hot Jupiter with radius $R_p=2.14 R_{\\rm Jup}$ and mass $M_p = 0.53 M_{\\rm Jup}$. We irradiate the initially neutral, atomic hydrogen atmosphere with 13.6 eV photons and compute the outflow's ionization structure. There are clear asymmetries in the atmospheric outflow, including a neutral shadow on the planet's nightside. Given an incident ionizing UV flux comparable to that ...

  19. Model atmospheres - Tool for identifying interstellar features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, P. C.; Slojkowski, S. E.; Rodriguez-Bell, T.; York, D.

    1993-01-01

    Model atmosphere parameters are derived for 14 early A stars with rotation velocities, from optical spectra, in excess of 80 km/s. The models are compared with IUE observations of the stars in regions where interstellar lines are expected. In general, with the assumption of solar abundances, excellent fits are obtained in regions longward of 2580 A, and accurate interstellar equivalent widths can be derived using models to establish the continuum. The fits are poorer at shorter wavelengths, particularly at 2026-2062 A, where the stellar model parameters seem inadequate. Features indicating mass flows are evident in stars with known infrared excesses. In gamma TrA, variability in the Mg II lines is seen over the 5-year interval of these data, and also over timescales as short as 26 days. The present technique should be useful in systematic studies of episodic mass flows in A stars and for stellar abundance studies, as well as interstellar features.

  20. Atmospheric transmittance model for photosynthetically active radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulescu, Marius; Stefu, Nicoleta; Gravila, Paul; Paulescu, Eugenia; Boata, Remus; Pacurar, Angel; Mares, Oana [Physics Department, West University of Timisoara, V Parvan 4, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Pop, Nicolina [Department of Physical Foundations of Engineering, Politehnica University of Timisoara, V Parvan 2, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Calinoiu, Delia [Mechanical Engineering Faculty, Politehnica University of Timisoara, Mihai Viteazu 1, 300222 Timisoara (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    A parametric model of the atmospheric transmittance in the PAR band is presented. The model can be straightforwardly applied for calculating the beam, diffuse and global components of the PAR solar irradiance. The required inputs are: air pressure, ozone, water vapor and nitrogen dioxide column content, Ångström's turbidity coefficient and single scattering albedo. Comparison with other models and ground measured data shows a reasonable level of accuracy for this model, making it suitable for practical applications. From the computational point of view the calculus is condensed into simple algebra which is a noticeable advantage. For users interested in speed-intensive computation of the effective PAR solar irradiance, a PC program based on the parametric equations along with a user guide are available online at http://solar.physics.uvt.ro/srms.

  1. Voyage to Jupiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, David; Samz, Jane

    This publication illustrates the features of Jupiter and its family of satellites pictured by the Pioneer and the Voyager missions. Chapters included are: (1) "The Jovian System" (describing the history of astronomy); (2) "Pioneers to Jupiter" (outlining the Pioneer Mission); (3) "The Voyager Mission"; (4)…

  2. Science of the Joint ESA-NASA Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Michel; Greeley, Ron

    2010-05-01

    Jovian satellite system, especially as context for Europa and Ganymede; ii) evaluate the structure and dynamics of the Jovian atmosphere; iii) characterize processes of the Jovian magnetodisk/magnetosphere; iv) determine the interactions occurring in the Jovian system; and v) constrain models for the origin of the Jupiter system. 

 Both spacecraft launch separately in 2020 and use a Venus-Earth-Earth Gravity Assist (VEEGA) trajectory to reach Jupiter in 2026. After orbit insertion, each would perform a multi-year tour of the Jovian system. The tours would include i) multiple flybys of Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, ii) continuous magnetospheric monitoring, and iii) regular monitoring of Io and Jupiter's atmosphere and Jupiter's ring system. JEO's Europa orbital phase would start on a circular 200 km altitude around Europa at 90°-100° inclination for about one month before transferring to a 100 km orbit. JGO's Ganymede orbital phase would start on an elliptical orbit 200 x 10000 km at 86° inclination for about 2-3 months and later transfer to a 200 km circular orbit. JEO would eventually impact Europa and JGO Ganymede, bringing the joint mission to a close. Operation of two spacecraft in the Jupiter system provides the unparalleled opportunity to address the high-priority questions posed by the NASA Decadal Survey and ESA Cosmic Vision for exploration of the outer solar system. The EJSM mission concept represents a conservative and robust design approach to successfully answering these high-priority questions and making a major step forward in understanding the emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants.

  3. Modeling Atmospheric Activity of Cool Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrijver, C. J.

    2003-10-01

    This review discusses a set of simple models for cool-star activity with which we compute (1) photospheric field patterns on stars of different activity levels, (2) the associated outer-atmospheric field configurations, and (3) the soft X-ray emission that is expected to result from the ensemble of loop atmospheres in the coronae of these stars. The model is based on empirically-determined properties of solar activity. It allows us to extrapolate to stars of significantly higher and lower activity than seen on the present-day Sun through its cycle. With it, we can, for example, gain insight into stellar field patterns (including a possible formation mechanism for polar starspots), as well as in the properties of coronal heating (helpful in the identification of the quiescent coronal heating mechanism). Lacking comprehensive theoretical understanding, the model's reliance on empirical solar data means that the multitude of processes involved are approximated to be independent of rotation rate, activity level, and fundamental stellar parameters, or -- where unavoidably necessary -- assumed to simply scale with activity. An evaluation of the most important processes involved guides a discussion of the limits of the model, of the limitations in our knowledge, and of future needs. "I propose to adopt such rules as will ensure the testability of scientific statements; which is to say, their falsifiability." Karl Popper (1902-1994)

  4. Outward migration of Jupiter and Saturn in 3:2 or 2:1 resonance in radiative disks: implications for the Grand Tack and Nice models

    CERN Document Server

    Pierens, Arnaud; Nesvorny, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Embedded in the gaseous protoplanetary disk, Jupiter and Saturn naturally become trapped in 3:2 resonance and migrate outward. This serves as the basis of the Grand Tack model. However, previous hydrodynamical simulations were restricted to isothermal disks, with moderate aspect ratio and viscosity. Here we simulate the orbital evolution of the gas giants in disks with viscous heating and radiative cooling. We find that Jupiter and Saturn migrate outward in 3:2 resonance in modest-mass ($M_{disk} \\approx M_{MMSN}$, where MMSN is the "minimum-mass solar nebula") disks with viscous stress parameter $\\alpha$ between $10^{-3}$ and $10^{-2} $. In disks with relatively low-mass ($M_{disk} \\lesssim M_{MMSN}$) , Jupiter and Saturn get captured in 2:1 resonance and can even migrate outward in low-viscosity disks ($\\alpha \\le 10^{-4}$). Such disks have a very small aspect ratio ($h\\sim 0.02-0.03$) that favors outward migration after capture in 2:1 resonance, as confirmed by isothermal runs which resulted in a similar o...

  5. Multi-scale harmonic model for solar and climate cyclical variation throughout the Holocene based on Jupiter-Saturn tidal frequencies plus the 11-year solar dynamo cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    The sunspot record since 1749 is made of three major cycles (9.98, 10.9 and 11.86 yr). The side frequencies are related to the spring tidal period of Jupiter and Saturn (9.93 yr) and to the tidal sidereal period of Jupiter (11.86 yr). A simplified harmonic constituent model based on the above two planetary tidal frequencies and on the exact dates of Jupiter and Saturn planetary tidal phases, plus a theoretically deduced 10.87-year central cycle reveals complex quasi-periodic interference/beat patterns at about 115, 61 and 130 years, plus a quasi-millennial large beat cycle around 983 years. We show that equivalent synchronized cycles are found in cosmogenic records used to reconstruct solar activity and in proxy climate records throughout the Holocene. The quasi-secular beat oscillations hindcast reasonably well the known prolonged periods of low solar activity during the last millennium known as Oort, Wolf, Sporer, Maunder and Dalton minima, as well as 17 115-year long oscillations found in temperature recon...

  6. A new approach for estimating the Jupiter and Saturn gravity fields using Juno and Cassini measurements, trajectory estimation analysis, and a dynamical wind model optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanti, Eli; Durante, Daniele; Iess, Luciano; Kaspi, Yohai

    2017-04-01

    The ongoing Juno spacecraft measurements are improving our knowledge of Jupiter's gravity field. Similarly, the Cassini Grand Finale will improve the gravity estimate of Saturn. The analysis of the Juno and Cassini Doppler data will provide a very accurate reconstruction of spacial gravity variations, but these measurements will be very accurate only over a limited latitudinal range. In order to deduce the full gravity fields of Jupiter and Saturn, additional information needs to be incorporated into the analysis, especially with regards to the planets' wind structures. In this work we propose a new iterative approach for the estimation of Jupiter and Saturn gravity fields, using simulated measurements, a trajectory estimation model, and an adjoint based inverse thermal wind model. Beginning with an artificial gravitational field, the trajectory estimation model is used to obtain the gravitational moments. The solution from the trajectory model is then used as an initial guess for the thermal wind model, and together with an optimization method, the likely penetration depth of the winds is computed, and its uncertainty is evaluated. As a final step, the gravity harmonics solution from the thermal wind model is given back to the trajectory model, along with an estimate of their uncertainties, to be used as a priori for a new calculation of the gravity field. We test this method both for zonal harmonics only and with a full gravity field including tesseral harmonics. The results show that by using this method some of the gravitational moments are fitted better to the `observed' ones, mainly due to the added information from the dynamical model which includes the wind structure and its depth. Thus, it is suggested that the method presented here has the potential of improving the accuracy of the expected gravity moments estimated from the Juno and Cassini radio science experiments.

  7. The Zodiacal Cloud Model applied to the Martian atmosphere. Diurnal variations in Meteoric ion layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego Carrillo-Sánchez, Juan; Plane, John M. C.; Withers, Paul; Fallows, Kathryn; Nesvorný, David; Pokorný, Petr; Feng, Wuhu

    2016-04-01

    Sporadic metal layers have been detected in the Martian atmosphere by radio occultation measurements using the Mars Express Orbiter and Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. More recently, metallic ion layers produced by the meteor storm event following the close encounter between Comet Siding Spring (C/2013 A1) and Mars were identified by the Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph (IUVS) aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft. However, the background metal layers produced by the influx of sporadic meteors have not yet been detected at Mars (contrary to the permanent metal layers identified in the Earth's atmosphere). The Zodiacal Dust Cloud (ZDC) model for particle populations released by asteroids (AST), and dust grains from Jupiter Family Comets (JFC) and Halley-Type Comets (HTC) has been combined with a Monte Carlo sampling method and the Chemical ABlation MODel (CABMOD) to predict the ablation rates of Na, K, Fe, Si, Mg, Ca and Al above 40 km altitude in the Martian atmosphere. CABMOD considers the standard treatment of meteor physics, including the balance of frictional heating by radiative losses and the absorption of heat energy through temperature increases, melting phase transitions and vaporization, as well as sputtering by inelastic collisions with the air molecules. These vertical profiles are input into the Leeds 1-D Mars atmospheric model which includes photo-ionization, and gas-phase ion-molecule and neutral chemistry, in order to explore the evolution of the resulting metallic ions and atoms. We conclude that the formation of the sporadic ion layers observed below 100 km with a plasma density exceeding 104 cm-3 requires the combination of the three different influx sources considered by the ZDC model, with a significant asteroidal contribution. Finally, we explore the changes of the neutral and ionized Mg and Fe layers over a diurnal cycle.

  8. The PHOENIX Model Atmosphere Grid for Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, F.

    2016-12-01

    We present a new project for a 1D static though full NLTE model atmosphere grid ranging T_{eff}= 15,000 to 1500 K in 100K steps, surface gravities ranging from log g= -0.5 to 6.0 in steps of 0.25 dex, and metallicity ranging from [M/H]=-2.5 to +0.5 in steps of 0.25 dex accounting for alpha element enrichment of [α/H]= +0.0, +0.2, +0.4 and C/O enhancement.

  9. Spectral Analysis and Atmospheric Models of Microflares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Fang; Yu-Hua Tang; Zhi Xu

    2006-01-01

    By use of the high-resolution spectral data obtained with THEMIS on 2002 September 5, the spectra and characteristics of five well-observed microflares have been analyzed. Our results indicate that some of them are located near the longitudinal magnetic polarity inversion lines. All the microflares are accompanied by mass motions. The most obvious characteristic of the Hα microflare spectra is the emission at the center of both Hα and CaII 8542(A) lines. For the first time both thermal and non-thermal semi-empirical atmospheric models for the conspicuous and faint microflares are computed. In computing the non-thermal models, we assume that the electron beam resulting from magnetic reconnection is produced in the chromosphere, because it requires lower energies for the injected particles.It is found there is obvious heating in the low chromosphere. The temperature enhancement is about 1000-2200 K in the thermal models. If the non-thermal effects are included, then the required temperature increase can be reduced by 100-150 K. These imply that the Hα microflares can probably be produced by magnetic reconnection in the solar Iower atmosphere.The radiative and kinetic energies of the Hα microflares are estimated and the total energy is found to be 1027 - 4× 1028 erg.

  10. Studies on Ammonia Spectral Signatures Relevant to Jupiter's Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, A. U.; Marschall, J.; Wong, M. H.; Kalogerakis, K. S.

    2006-12-01

    Observational evidence and thermochemical models indicate an abundance of ammonia ice clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. However, spectrally identifiable ammonia ice clouds are found covering less than 1% of Jupiter's atmosphere, notably in turbulent areas [1,2]. Current literature suggests two possible explanations: coating by a hydrocarbon haze and/or photochemical processing ("tanning")[2,3]. We are pursuing a research program investigating the above hypotheses. In the experiments, thin films of ammonia ices are deposited in a cryogenic apparatus, coated with hydrocarbons, and characterized by infrared spectroscopy. The ice films can be irradiated by ultraviolet light to study their photochemistry. The spectroscopic measurements aim to identify the processes that control the optical properties of the ice mixtures and quantify their dependence on the identity of the coating, the temperature, and the ice composition. We have observed a consistent suppression of the ammonia absorption feature at 3 μm with coverage by thin layers of hydrocarbons. Modeling calculations of the multi-layer thin films assist in the interpretation of the experimental results and reveal the role of optical interference in masking the aforementioned ammonia spectral feature. The implications of these results for Jupiter's atmosphere will be discussed. Funding from the NSF Planetary Astronomy Program under grant AST-0206270 and from the NASA Outer Planets Research Program under grant NNG06GF37G is gratefully acknowledged. The participation of Anand Oza (Princeton University) was made possible by the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program under grant PHY-0353745. 1. S. K. Atreya, A.-S. Wong, K. H. Baines, M. H. Wong, T. C. Owen, Planet. Space Science 53, 498 (2005). 2. K. H. Baines, R. W. Carlson, and L. W. Kamp, Icarus 159, 74 (2002). 3. A.-S. Wong, Y. L. Yung, and A. J. Friedson, Geophys. Res. Lett. 30, 1447 (2003).

  11. Jupiter's Radiation Belts: Can Pioneer 10 Survive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, W N; Birmingham, T J; Mead, G D

    1973-12-07

    Model calculations of Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts indicate that the Galilean satellites can reduce particle fluxes in certain regions of the inner magnetosphere by as much as six orders of magnitude. Average fluxes should be reduced by a factor of 100 or more along the Pioneer 10 trajectory through the heart of Jupiter's radiation belts in early December. This may be enough to prevent serious radiation damage to the spacecraft.

  12. The Atmospheric Radionuclide Transport Model (ARTM) - Validation of a long-term atmospheric dispersion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettrich, Sebastian; Wildermuth, Hans; Strobl, Christopher; Wenig, Mark

    2016-04-01

    In the last couple of years, the Atmospheric Radionuclide Transport Model (ARTM) has been developed by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) and the Society for Plant and Reactor Security (GRS). ARTM is an atmospheric dispersion model for continuous long-term releases of radionuclides into the atmosphere, based on the Lagrangian particle model. This model, developed in the first place as a more realistic replacement for the out-dated Gaussian plume models, is currently being optimised for further scientific purposes to study atmospheric dispersion in short-range scenarios. It includes a diagnostic wind field model, allows for the application of building structures and multiple sources (including linear, 2-and 3-dimensional source geometries), and considers orography and surface roughness. As an output it calculates the activity concentration, dry and wet deposition and can model also the radioactive decay of Rn-222. As such, ARTM requires to undergo an intense validation process. While for short-term and short-range models, which were mainly developed for examining nuclear accidents or explosions, a few measurement data-sets are available for validation, data-sets for validating long-term models are very sparse and the existing ones mostly prove to be not applicable for validation. Here we present a strategy for the validation of long-term Lagrangian particle models based on the work with ARTM. In our validation study, the first part we present is a comprehensive analysis of the model sensitivities on different parameters like e.g. (simulation grid size resolution, starting random number, amount of simulation particles, etc.). This study provides a good estimation for the uncertainties of the simulation results and consequently can be used to generate model outputs comparable to the available measurements data at various distances from the emission source. This comparison between measurement data from selected scenarios and simulation results

  13. The Change in Jupiter's Moment of Inertia due to Core Erosion and Planetary Contraction

    CERN Document Server

    Helled, Ravit

    2012-01-01

    We explore the change in Jupiter's normalized axial moment of inertia (NMOI) assuming that Jupiter undergoes core erosion. It is found that Jupiter's contraction combined with an erosion of 20 M_Earth from a primordial core of 30 M_Earth can change Jupiter's NMOI over time significantly. It is shown that Jupiter's NMOI could have changed from ~0.235 to ~0.264 throughout its evolution. We find that a NMOI value of ~0.235 as suggested by dynamical models (Ward & Canup, 2006, ApJ, 640, L91) could, in principle, be consistent with Jupiter's primordial internal structure. Low NMOI values, however, persist only for the first ~ 10^6 years of Jupiter's evolution. Re-evaluation of dynamical stability models as well as more sophisticated evolution models of Jupiter with core erosion seem to be required in order to provide more robust estimates for Jupiter's primordial NMOI.

  14. Far infrared spectrophotometry of Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, E. F.; Goorvitch, D.; Simpson, J. P.; Strecker, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    Infrared spectral measurements of Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn were obtained from 100 to 470 kaysers and, by taking Mars as a calibration source, brightness temperatures of Jupiter and Saturn were determined with approximately 5 kayser resolution. Internal luminosities were determined from the data and are reported to be approximately 8 times 10 to the minus tenth power of the sun's luminosity for Jupiter and approximately 3.6 times 10 to the minus tenth power of the sun's luminosity for Saturn. Comparison of data with spectra predicted by models suggests the need for an opacity source in addition to gaseous hydrogen and ammonia to help explain Jupiter's observed spectrum in the vicinity of 250 kaysers.

  15. Jupiter as a Giant Cosmic Ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rimmer, Paul B; Helling, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    We explore the feasibility of using the atmosphere of Jupiter to detect Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR's). The large surface area of Jupiter allows us to probe cosmic rays of higher energies than previously accessible. Cosmic ray extensive air showers in Jupiter's atmosphere could in principle be detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi observatory. In order to be observed, these air showers would need to be oriented toward the Earth, and would need to occur sufficiently high in the atmosphere that the gamma rays can penetrate. We demonstrate that, under these assumptions, Jupiter provides an effective cosmic ray "detector" area of $3.3 \\times 10^7$ km$^2$. We predict that Fermi-LAT should be able to detect events of energy $>10^{21}$ eV with fluence $10^{-7}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ at a rate of about one per month. The observed number of air showers may provide an indirect measure of the flux of cosmic rays $\\gtrsim 10^{20}$ eV. Extensive air showers also produce a synchrotron signature that may ...

  16. The Jovian atmospheric window at 2.7 microns - A search for H2S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, H. P.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Davis, D. S.; Hofmann, R.

    1984-01-01

    The atmospheric transmission window at 2.7 microns in Jupiter's atmosphere was observed at a spectral resolution of 0.1/cm from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. From an analysis of the CH4 abundance (80 m-am) and the H2O abundance (0.0125 cm-am) it was determined that the penetration depth of solar flux at 2.7 microns is near the base of the NH3 cloud layer. The upper limit to H2O at 2.7 microns and other results suggest that photolytic reactions in Jupiter's lower troposphere may not be as significant as was previously thought. A search for H2S in Jupiter's atmosphere yielded an upper limit of 0.1 cm-am. The corresponding limit to the element abundance ratio S/H was approx. 1.7 x 10(-8), about 10(-3) times the solar value. Upon modeling the abundance and distribution of H2S in Jupiter's atmosphere it was concluded that, contrary to expectations, sulfur-bearing chromophores are not present in significant amounts in Jupiter's visible clouds. Rather, it appears that most of Jupiter's sulfur is locked up as NH4SH in a lower cloud layer. Alternatively, the global abundance of sulfur in Jupiter may be significantly depleted.

  17. The Jovian atmospheric window at 2.7 microns: A search for H2S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, H. P.; Davis, D. S.; Hofmann, R.; Bjoraker, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    The atmospheric transmission window at 2.7 microns in Jupiter's atmosphere was observed at a spectral resolution of 0.1/cm from the Kuiiper Airborne Observatory. From an analysis of the CH4 abundance (80 m-am) and the H2O abundance ( 0.0125 cm-am) it was determined that the penetration depth of solar flux at 2.7 microns is near the base of the NH3 cloud layer. The upper limit to H2O at 2.7 microns and other results suggest that photolytic reactions in Jupiter's lower troposphere may not be as significant as was previously thought. A search for H2S in Jupiter's atmosphere yielded an upper limit of 0.1 cm-am. The corresponding limit to the element abundance ratio S/H was approx. 1.7x10(-8), about 10(-3) times the solar value. Upon modeling the abundance and distribution of H2S in Jupiter's atmosphere it was concluded that, contrary to expectations, sulfur-bearing chromophores are not present in significant amounts in Jupiter's visible clouds. Rather, it appears that most of Jupiter's sulfur is locked up as NH4SH in a lower cloud layer. Alternatively, the global abundance of sulfur in Jupiter may be significantly depleted.

  18. Moons around Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) took this photo of Jupiter at 20:42:01 UTC on January 9, 2007, when the spacecraft was 80 million kilometers (49.6 million miles) from the giant planet. The volcanic moon Io is to the left of the planet; the shadow of the icy moon Ganymede moves across Jupiter's northern hemisphere. Ganymede's average orbit distance from Jupiter is about 1 million kilometers (620,000 miles); Io's is 422,000 kilometers (262,000 miles). Both Io and Ganymede are larger than Earth's moon; Ganymede is larger than the planet Mercury.

  19. A 0.8-2.4 Micron Transmission Spectrum of the Hot Jupiter CoRoT-1b

    CERN Document Server

    Schlawin, Everett; Teske, Johanna K; Herter, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Hot Jupiters with brightness temperatures > ~2000K can have TiO and VO molecules as gaseous species in their atmospheres. The TiO and VO molecules can potentially induce temperature inversions in hot Jupiter atmospheres and also have an observable signature of large optical to infrared transit depth ratios. Previous transmission spectra of very hot Jupiters have shown a lack of TiO and VO, but only in planets that also appear to lack temperature inversions. We measure the transmission spectrum of CoRoT-1b, a hot Jupiter that was predicted to have a temperature inversion potentially due to significant TiO and VO in its atmosphere. We employ the multi-object spectroscopy (MOS) method using the SpeX and MORIS instruments on the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) and the Gaussian Process method to model red noise. By using a simultaneous reference star on the slit for calibration and a wide slit to minimize slit losses, we achieve transit depth precision of 0.03% to 0.09%, comparable to the atmospheric scale heig...

  20. Extended Heat Deposition in Hot Jupiters: Application to Ohmic Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Ginzburg, Sivan

    2015-01-01

    Many giant exoplanets in close orbits have observed radii which exceed theoretical predictions. One suggested explanation for this discrepancy is heat deposited deep inside the atmospheres of these "hot Jupiters". Here, we study extended power sources which distribute heat from the photosphere to the deep interior of the planet. Our analytical treatment is a generalization of a previous analysis of localized "point sources". We model the deposition profile as a power law in the optical depth and find that planetary cooling and contraction halt when the internal luminosity (i.e. cooling rate) of the planet drops below the heat deposited in the planet's convective region. A slowdown in the evolutionary cooling prior to equilibrium is possible only for sources which do not extend to the planet's center. We estimate the Ohmic dissipation resulting from the interaction between the atmospheric winds and the planet's magnetic field, and apply our analytical model to Ohmically heated planets. Our model can account fo...

  1. Ohmic Inflation of Hot Jupiters: an Analytical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, Sivan; Sari, Re'em

    2015-12-01

    Many giant exoplanets in close orbits have observed radii which exceed theoretical predictions.One suggested explanation for this discrepancy is heat deposited deep inside the atmospheres of these hot Jupiters.We present an analytical model for the evolution of such irradiated, and internally heated gas giants, and derive scaling laws for their cooling rates and radii.We estimate the Ohmic dissipation resulting from the interaction between the atmospheric winds and the planet's magnetic field, and apply our model to Ohmically heated planets.Our model can account for the observed radii of many inflated planets, but not the most extreme ones.We show that Ohmically heated planets have already reached their equilibrium phase and they no longer contract.We show that it is possible to re-inflate planets, but we confirm that re-heating timescales are longer by about a factor of 30 than cooling times.

  2. Atmospheric Circulation of Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Showman, Adam P; Menou, Kristen

    2009-01-01

    We survey the basic principles of atmospheric dynamics relevant to explaining existing and future observations of exoplanets, both gas giant and terrestrial. Given the paucity of data on exoplanet atmospheres, our approach is to emphasize fundamental principles and insights gained from Solar-System studies that are likely to be generalizable to exoplanets. We begin by presenting the hierarchy of basic equations used in atmospheric dynamics, including the Navier-Stokes, primitive, shallow-water, and two-dimensional nondivergent models. We then survey key concepts in atmospheric dynamics, including the importance of planetary rotation, the concept of balance, and scaling arguments to show how turbulent interactions generally produce large-scale east-west banding on rotating planets. We next turn to issues specific to giant planets, including their expected interior and atmospheric thermal structures, the implications for their wind patterns, and mechanisms to pump their east-west jets. Hot Jupiter atmospheric d...

  3. Swell impact on wind stress and atmospheric mixing in a regional coupled atmosphere-wave model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Lichuan; Rutgersson, Anna; Sahlée, Erik;

    2016-01-01

    Over the ocean, the atmospheric turbulence can be significantly affected by swell waves. Change in the atmospheric turbulence affects the wind stress and atmospheric mixing over swell waves. In this study, the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress is introduced into an atmosphere......-wave-coupled regional climate model, separately and combined. The swell influence on atmospheric mixing is introduced into the atmospheric mixing length formula by adding a swell-induced contribution to the mixing. The swell influence on the wind stress under wind-following swell, moderate-range wind, and near......-neutral and unstable stratification conditions is introduced by changing the roughness length. Five year simulation results indicate that adding the swell influence on atmospheric mixing has limited influence, only slightly increasing the near-surface wind speed; in contrast, adding the swell influence on wind stress...

  4. Effect of stellar wind induced magnetic fields on planetary obstacles of non-magnetized hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkaev, N. V.; Odert, P.; Lammer, H.; Kislyakova, K. G.; Fossati, L.; Mezentsev, A. V.; Johnstone, C. P.; Kubyshkina, D. I.; Shaikhislamov, I. F.; Khodachenko, M. L.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the interaction between the magnetized stellar wind plasma and the partially ionized hydrodynamic hydrogen outflow from the escaping upper atmosphere of non-magnetized or weakly magnetized hot Jupiters. We use the well-studied hot Jupiter HD 209458b as an example for similar exoplanets, assuming a negligible intrinsic magnetic moment. For this planet, the stellar wind plasma interaction forms an obstacle in the planet's upper atmosphere, in which the position of the magnetopause is determined by the condition of pressure balance between the stellar wind and the expanded atmosphere, heated by the stellar extreme ultraviolet radiation. We show that the neutral atmospheric atoms penetrate into the region dominated by the stellar wind, where they are ionized by photoionization and charge exchange, and then mixed with the stellar wind flow. Using a 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, we show that an induced magnetic field forms in front of the planetary obstacle, which appears to be much stronger compared to those produced by the solar wind interaction with Venus and Mars. Depending on the stellar wind parameters, because of the induced magnetic field, the planetary obstacle can move up to ≈0.5-1 planetary radii closer to the planet. Finally, we discuss how estimations of the intrinsic magnetic moment of hot Jupiters can be inferred by coupling hydrodynamic upper planetary atmosphere and MHD stellar wind interaction models together with UV observations. In particular, we find that HD 209458b should likely have an intrinsic magnetic moment of 10-20 per cent that of Jupiter.

  5. Radiation Belt Electron Dynamics: Modeling Atmospheric Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selesnick, R. S.

    2003-01-01

    The first year of work on this project has been completed. This report provides a summary of the progress made and the plan for the coming year. Also included with this report is a preprint of an article that was accepted for publication in Journal of Geophysical Research and describes in detail most of the results from the first year of effort. The goal for the first year was to develop a radiation belt electron model for fitting to data from the SAMPEX and Polar satellites that would provide an empirical description of the electron losses into the upper atmosphere. This was largely accomplished according to the original plan (with one exception being that, for reasons described below, the inclusion of the loss cone electrons in the model was deferred). The main concerns at the start were to accurately represent the balance between pitch angle diffusion and eastward drift that determines the dominant features of the low altitude data, and then to accurately convert the model into simulated data based on the characteristics of the particular electron detectors. Considerable effort was devoted to achieving these ends. Once the model was providing accurate results it was applied to data sets selected from appropriate periods in 1997, 1998, and 1999. For each interval of -30 to 60 days, the model parameters were calculated daily, thus providing good short and long term temporal resolution, and for a range of radial locations from L = 2.7 to 3.9. .

  6. Warm Jupiters from Secular Planet–Planet Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovich, Cristobal; Tremaine, Scott

    2016-10-01

    Most warm Jupiters (gas-giant planets with 0.1 {{au}}≲ a≲ 1 au) have pericenter distances that are too large for significant orbital migration by tidal friction. We study the possibility that the warm Jupiters are undergoing secular eccentricity oscillations excited by an outer companion (a planet or star) in an eccentric and/or mutually inclined orbit. In this model, the warm Jupiters migrate periodically, in the high-eccentricity phase of the oscillation, but are typically observed at lower eccentricities. We show that in this model the steady-state eccentricity distribution of the warm Jupiters is approximately flat, which is consistent with the observed distribution if we restrict the sample to warm Jupiters with detected outer planetary companions. The eccentricity distribution of warm Jupiters without companions exhibits a peak at e≲ 0.2 that must be explained by a different formation mechanism. Based on a population synthesis study, we find that high-eccentricity migration excited by an outer planetary companion (1) can account for ∼ 20 % of the warm Jupiters and most of the warm Jupiters with e≳ 0.4; and (2) can produce most of the observed population of hot Jupiters, with a semimajor axis distribution that matches the observations, but fails to account adequately for ∼ 60 % of hot Jupiters with projected obliquities ≲ 20^\\circ . Thus ∼ 20 % of the warm Jupiters and ∼ 60 % of the hot Jupiters can be produced by high-eccentricity migration. We also provide predictions for the expected mutual inclinations and spin-orbit angles of the planetary systems with hot and warm Jupiters produced by high-eccentricity migration.

  7. Thermometric Soots on Hot Jupiters?

    CERN Document Server

    Zahnle, K; Fortney, J J

    2009-01-01

    We use a 1D thermochemical and photochemical kinetics model to predict that the stratospheric chemistry of hot Jupiters should change dramatically as temperature drops from 1200 to 1000 K. At 1200 K methane is too unstable to reach the stratosphere in significant quantities, while thermal decomposition of water is a strong source of OH radicals that oxidize any hydrocarbons that do form to CO and CO$_2$. At 1000 K methane, although very reactive, survives long enough to reach the lower stratosphere, and the greater stability of water coupled with efficient scavenging of OH by H$_2$ raise the effective C/O ratio in the reacting gases above unity. Reduced products such as ethylene, acetylene, and hydrogen cyanide become abundant; such conditions favor polymerization and possible formation of PAHs and soots. Although low temperature is the most important factor favoring hydrocarbons in hot Jupiters, higher rates of vertical mixing and generally lower metallicities also favor organic synthesis. The peculiar prope...

  8. Jupiter Laser Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Jupiter Laser Facility is an institutional user facility in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate at LLNL. The facility is designed to provide a high degree...

  9. Inferno on Jupiter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    诸葛勤

    1994-01-01

    The initial sketchy reports began filtering into the U. S. by E-maillate Saturday afternoon. First a Spanish observatory announced that it hadspotted a plume of gas billowing up from the edge of Jupiter. Then a

  10. A 'Moving' Jupiter Global Map (Animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on New Horizons has acquired six global maps of Jupiter as the spacecraft approaches the giant planet for a close encounter at the end of February. The high-resolution camera acquired each of six observation 'sets' as a series of individual pictures taken one hour apart, covering a full 10-hour rotation of Jupiter. The LORRI team at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) reduced the sets to form six individual maps in a simple rectangular projection. These six maps were then combined to make the movie. The table below shows the dates and the ranges from Jupiter at which these six sets of observations were acquired. Even for the latest set of images taken January 21-22, from 60.5 million kilometers (37.6 million miles), New Horizons was still farther from Jupiter than the average distance of Mercury from the Sun. At that distance from Jupiter, a single LORRI picture resolution element amounts to 300 kilometers (186 miles) on Jupiter. Many features seen in Jupiter's atmosphere are giant storm clouds. The Little Red Spot, which LORRI will image close-up on February 27, is the target-like feature located near 30 degrees South and 230 degrees West; this storm is larger than the Earth. The even larger Great Red Spot is seen near 20 degrees South and 320 degrees West. The counterclockwise rotation of the clouds within the Great Red Spot can be seen. The westward drift of the Great Red Spot is easily seen in the movie, as is the slower drift, in the opposite direction, of the Little Red Spot. The storms of Jupiter are not fixed in location relative to each other or relative to any solid surface below, because Jupiter is a fluid planet without a solid surface. Also, dramatic changes are seen in the series of bright plume-like clouds encircling the planet between 0 and 10 degrees North. Scientists believe these result from an enormous atmospheric wave with rising air, rich in ammonia that condenses to form

  11. Comparison of the dynamics and structure of Saturn and Jupiter magnetospheres: camshaft, magnetic anomalies and corotating convection models compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwood, D. J.; Kivelson, M. G.

    Scenarios are presented for the overall flux and mass circulation in the jovian and saturnian magnetospheres It is argued that similar fundamanetal processes underly the dynamical processes at both planets However the differences in parameter regime for the two systems leads to substantial resulting differences in morphology Transport is accomplished from the inner magnetosphere by interchange motion which then feeds into the outer magnetosphere where ballooning driven by centrifugal stress leads to field reconnection and plasma loss It seems likely that Jupiter loses much more material per rotation cycle than Saturn and is possibly much more symmetrically loaded in respect of planetary longitude Material loss and flux return at Jupiter have fixed orientations in local time early evening and morning sector respectively and newly returned flux is probably responsible for the morningside cushion region in the outer magnetosphere At Jupiter the dawn-dusk asymmetry in the current sheet thin in morning thick in afternoon is also a dominant feature At Saturn there seems no evidence of a cushion region flux return is thought to take place sporadically over much of the nightside Although definitive statements about the dusk plasma sheet await the orbit evolution of Cassini a fundamental observational feature in the Saturnian context is a planetary rotation induced magnetic field asymmetry which argues against major dawn-dusk asymmetry We propose the rotational feature could originate from a localized ionospheric magnetic anomaly The

  12. Two Moons Meet over Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    individual MVIC images at wavelengths of 480, 620 and 850 nanometers. The human eye is sensitive to slightly shorter wavelengths, from 400 to 700 nanometers, and thus would see the scene slightly differently. For instance, while the eye would notice the difference between the yellow and reddish brown colors of Io's surface and the paler color of Europa, the two worlds appear very similar in color to MVIC's longer-wavelength vision. The night side of Io appears greenish compared to the day side, because methane in Jupiter's atmosphere absorbs 850-nanometer light and makes Jupiter-light green to MVIC's 'eyes.' MVIC is a component of the Ralph imaging instrument.

  13. Swell impact on wind stress and atmospheric mixing in a regional coupled atmosphere-wave model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lichuan; Rutgersson, Anna; Sahlée, Erik; Guo Larsén, Xiaoli

    2016-07-01

    Over the ocean, the atmospheric turbulence can be significantly affected by swell waves. Change in the atmospheric turbulence affects the wind stress and atmospheric mixing over swell waves. In this study, the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress is introduced into an atmosphere-wave-coupled regional climate model, separately and combined. The swell influence on atmospheric mixing is introduced into the atmospheric mixing length formula by adding a swell-induced contribution to the mixing. The swell influence on the wind stress under wind-following swell, moderate-range wind, and near-neutral and unstable stratification conditions is introduced by changing the roughness length. Five year simulation results indicate that adding the swell influence on atmospheric mixing has limited influence, only slightly increasing the near-surface wind speed; in contrast, adding the swell influence on wind stress reduces the near-surface wind speed. Introducing the wave influence roughness length has a larger influence than does adding the swell influence on mixing. Compared with measurements, adding the swell influence on both atmospheric mixing and wind stress gives the best model performance for the wind speed. The influence varies with wave characteristics for different sea basins. Swell occurs infrequently in the studied area, and one could expect more influence in high-swell-frequency areas (i.e., low-latitude ocean). We conclude that the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress should be considered when developing climate models.

  14. THREE-DIMENSIONAL ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION MODELS OF HD 189733b AND HD 209458b WITH CONSISTENT MAGNETIC DRAG AND OHMIC DISSIPATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauscher, Emily [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 East University Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Menou, Kristen [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th St., New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2013-02-10

    We present the first three-dimensional circulation models for extrasolar gas giant atmospheres with geometrically and energetically consistent treatments of magnetic drag and ohmic dissipation. Atmospheric resistivities are continuously updated and calculated directly from the flow structure, strongly coupling the magnetic effects with the circulation pattern. We model the hot Jupiters HD 189733b (T {sub eq} Almost-Equal-To 1200 K) and HD 209458b (T {sub eq} Almost-Equal-To 1500 K) and test planetary magnetic field strengths from 0 to 30 G. We find that even at B = 3 G the atmospheric structure and circulation of HD 209458b are strongly influenced by magnetic effects, while the cooler HD 189733b remains largely unaffected, even in the case of B = 30 G and super-solar metallicities. Our models of HD 209458b indicate that magnetic effects can substantially slow down atmospheric winds, change circulation and temperature patterns, and alter observable properties. These models establish that longitudinal and latitudinal hot spot offsets, day-night flux contrasts, and planetary radius inflation are interrelated diagnostics of the magnetic induction process occurring in the atmospheres of hot Jupiters and other similarly forced exoplanets. Most of the ohmic heating occurs high in the atmosphere and on the dayside of the planet, while the heating at depth is strongly dependent on the internal heat flux assumed for the planet, with more heating when the deep atmosphere is hot. We compare the ohmic power at depth in our models, and estimates of the ohmic dissipation in the bulk interior (from general scaling laws), to evolutionary models that constrain the amount of heating necessary to explain the inflated radius of HD 209458b. Our results suggest that deep ohmic heating can successfully inflate the radius of HD 209458b for planetary magnetic field strengths of B {>=} 3-10 G.

  15. General circulation of giant planet atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Schneider, T.

    2008-12-01

    The atmospheres of the giant planets are driven by differential solar heating and intrinsic heat fluxes emanating from the deep interior. We show that if both processes are taken into account in an energetic consistent manner, the observed large-scale features of the general circulations of all giant planet atmospheres can be reproduced. We use energetically consistent general circulation models to simulate the outer atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. In the models, the solar radiative fluxes are deposited in the upper atmosphere by absorption and scattering, and temporally constant and spatially homogeneous heat fluxes consistent with the observed intrinsic heat fluxes are imposed at the bottom boundary. Convection transports heat from the bottom boundary into the upper atmosphere when the intrinsic heat fluxes are sufficiently strong to generate statically unstable conditions. For Jupiter and Saturn, the intrinsic heat fluxes are strong enough to lead to convection, which generates Rossby waves in the equatorial upper atmosphere. Momentum transport associated with these Rossby waves leads to the generation of equatorial superrotation on Jupiter and Saturn. For Uranus and Neptune, the intrinsic heat fluxes are not strong enough to lead to convection penetrating into the upper atmosphere; as a consequence, the equatorial flow is retrograde. Differences in the optical properties of the atmospheres and in planetary parameters such as the gravitational acceleration and rotation rate can account for the differences in the general circulations of the giant planets, such as the different jet widths and strengths.

  16. HUBBLE PROVIDES COMPLETE VIEW OF JUPITER'S AURORAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has captured a complete view of Jupiter's northern and southern auroras. Images taken in ultraviolet light by the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) show both auroras, the oval- shaped objects in the inset photos. While the Hubble telescope has obtained images of Jupiter's northern and southern lights since 1990, the new STIS instrument is 10 times more sensitive than earlier cameras. This allows for short exposures, reducing the blurring of the image caused by Jupiter's rotation and providing two to five times higher resolution than earlier cameras. The resolution in these images is sufficient to show the 'curtain' of auroral light extending several hundred miles above Jupiter's limb (edge). Images of Earth's auroral curtains, taken from the space shuttle, have a similar appearance. Jupiter's auroral images are superimposed on a Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 image of the entire planet. The auroras are brilliant curtains of light in Jupiter's upper atmosphere. Jovian auroral storms, like Earth's, develop when electrically charged particles trapped in the magnetic field surrounding the planet spiral inward at high energies toward the north and south magnetic poles. When these particles hit the upper atmosphere, they excite atoms and molecules there, causing them to glow (the same process acting in street lights). The electrons that strike Earth's atmosphere come from the sun, and the auroral lights remain concentrated above the night sky in response to the 'solar wind,' as Earth rotates underneath. Earth's auroras exhibit storms that extend to lower latitudes in response to solar activity, which can be easily seen from the northern U. S. But Jupiter's auroras are caused by particles spewed out by volcanoes on Io, one of Jupiter's moons. These charged particles are then magnetically trapped and begin to rotate with Jupiter, producing ovals of auroral light centered on Jupiter's magnetic poles in both the day and night skies

  17. Condensation-inhibited convection in hydrogen-rich atmospheres: Stability against double-diffusive processes and thermal profiles for Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune

    CERN Document Server

    Leconte, Jérémy; Hersant, Franck; Guillot, Tristan

    2016-01-01

    In an atmosphere, a cloud condensation region is characterized by a strong vertical gradient in the abundance of the related condensing species. On Earth, the ensuing gradient of mean molecular weight has relatively few dynamical consequences because N$_2$ is heavier than water vapor, so that only the release of latent heat significantly impacts convection. On the contrary, in an hydrogen dominated atmosphere (e.g. giant planets), all condensing species are significantly heavier than the background gas. This can stabilize the atmosphere against convection near a cloud deck if the enrichment in the given species exceeds a critical threshold. This raises two questions. What is transporting energy in such a stabilized layer, and how affected can the thermal profile of giant planets be? To answer these questions, we first carry out a linear analysis of the convective and double-diffusive instabilities in a condensable medium showing that an efficient condensation can suppress double-diffusive convection. This sug...

  18. Jupiter internal structure: the effect of different equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, Y.; Guillot, T.; Fayon, L.

    2016-12-01

    Context. Heavy elements, even though they are a smaller constituent, are crucial to understand the formation history of Jupiter. Interior models are used to determine the amount of heavy elements in the interior of Jupiter, but this range is still subject to degeneracies because of the uncertainties in the equations of state. Aims: Before Juno mission data arrive, we present optimized calculations for Jupiter that explore the effect of different model parameters on the determination of the core and the mass of heavy elements of Jupiter. We compare recently published equations of state. Methods: The interior model of Jupiter was calculated from the equations of hydrostatic equilibrium, mass, and energy conservation, and energy transport. The mass of the core and heavy elements was adjusted to match the observed radius and gravitational moments of Jupiter. Results: We show that the determination of the interior structure of Jupiter is tied to the estimation of its gravitational moments and the accuracy of equations of state of hydrogen, helium, and heavy elements. Locating the region where helium rain occurs and defining its timescale is important to determine the distribution of heavy elements and helium in the interior of Jupiter. We show that the differences found when modeling the interior of Jupiter with recent EOS are more likely due to differences in the internal energy and entropy calculation. The consequent changes in the thermal profile lead to different estimates of the mass of the core and heavy elements, which explains differences in recently published interior models of Jupiter. Conclusions: Our results help clarify the reasons for the differences found in interior models of Jupiter and will help interpreting upcoming Juno data. Full appendix tables are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A114

  19. Laboratory Measurements and Modeling of Molecular Photoabsorption Cross Sections in the Ultraviolet for Planetary Atmospheres Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Glenn; Smith, P. L.; Lewis, B. R.; Heays, A. N.; Pickering, J.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.; Blackie, D.

    2008-09-01

    Our research program is dedicated to the measurement and modeling of vacuum ultraviolet and UV molecular photoabsorption cross sections with the highest practical resolution. It supports efforts to interpret and model observations of planetary atmospheres. Measurement and modeling efforts on molecular nitrogen, carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and diatomic sulfur are in progress. N2: We focus on the measurement of line f-values and line widths within the complex spectrum between 80 and 100 nm. Our measurements are incorporated into a theoretical model of the absorption spectrum of N2 which has established the mechanisms responsible for predissociation and reproduces all observed features in 14N2 and its isotopomers as a function of temperature. CO2: The photodissociation of CO2 is a fundamental photochemical process in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Our research centers on the measurement of high resolution cross sections from 91 to 120 nm. We have completed measurements at 295 K and 195 K over the 106 to 120 nm region, and we are analyzing recent measurements of cross sections between 91 and 106 nm. SO2: We provide astronomers with high-resolution cross section data for the complex ultraviolet absorption spectrum between 198 and 325 nm. Using the Imperial College VUV Fourier transform spectrometer, we have completed and published room temperature cross sections, and we are completing work on low-temperature measurements over the same spectral region. S2: Interpretations of atmospheric (Io, Jupiter, cometary comae) S2 absorption features are hindered by a complete lack of laboratory cross section data in the ultraviolet. We are beginning an effort to quantify the photoabsorption spectrum of S2 from 200 to 300 nm based on theoretical calculations and laboratory measurements. Coupled-channel calculations will be complemented by measurements of the absorption spectrum of S2 at high resolution.

  20. Capture of Trojans by Jumping Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvorny, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Jupiter Trojans are thought to be survivors of a much larger population of planetesimals that existed in the planetary region when planets formed. They can provide important constraints on the mass and properties of the planetesimal disk, and its dispersal during planet migration. Here we tested a possibility that the Trojans were captured during the early dynamical instability among the outer planets (aka the Nice model), when the semimajor axis of Jupiter was changing as a result of scattering encounters with an ice giant. The capture occurs in this model when Jupiter's orbit and its Lagrange points become radially displaced in a scattering event and fall into a region populated by planetesimals (that previously evolved from their natal transplanetary disk to ~5 AU during the instability). Our numerical simulations of the new capture model, hereafter jump capture, satisfactorily reproduce the orbital distribution of the Trojans and their total mass. The jump capture is potentially capable of explaining the ...

  1. Europa Planetary Protection for Juno Jupiter Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Douglas E.; Abelson, Robert D.; Johannesen, Jennie R.; Lam, Try; McAlpine, William J.; Newlin, Laura E.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Juno mission launched in 2011 and will explore the Jupiter system starting in 2016. Juno's suite of instruments is designed to investigate the atmosphere, gravitational fields, magnetic fields, and auroral regions. Its low perijove polar orbit will allow it to explore portions of the Jovian environment never before visited. While the Juno mission is not orbiting or flying close to Europa or the other Galilean satellites, planetary protection requirements for avoiding the contamination of Europa have been taken into account in the Juno mission design.The science mission is designed to conclude with a deorbit burn that disposes of the spacecraft in Jupiter's atmosphere. Compliance with planetary protection requirements is verified through a set of analyses including analysis of initial bioburden, analysis of the effect of bioburden reduction due to the space and Jovian radiation environments, probabilistic risk assessment of successful deorbit, Monte-Carlo orbit propagation, and bioburden reduction in the event of impact with an icy body.

  2. Orbital circularization of a planet accreting disk gas: the formation of distant jupiters in circular orbits based on a core accretion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Akihiro; Higuchi, Arika [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ida, Shigeru, E-mail: kikuchi.a@geo.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: higuchia@geo.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: ida@elsi.jp [Earth-Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2014-12-10

    Recently, gas giant planets in nearly circular orbits with large semimajor axes (a ∼ 30-1000 AU) have been detected by direct imaging. We have investigated orbital evolution in a formation scenario for such planets, based on a core accretion model. (1) Icy cores accrete from planetesimals at ≲ 30 AU, (2) they are scattered outward by an emerging nearby gas giant to acquire highly eccentric orbits, and (3) their orbits are circularized through the accretion of disk gas in outer regions, where they spend most of their time. We analytically derived equations to describe the orbital circularization through gas accretion. Numerical integrations of these equations show that the eccentricity decreases by a factor of more than 5 while the planetary mass increases by a factor of 10. Because runaway gas accretion increases planetary mass by ∼10-300, the orbits are sufficiently circularized. On the other hand, a is reduced at most only by a factor of two, leaving the planets in the outer regions. If the relative velocity damping by shock is considered, the circularization slows down, but is still efficient enough. Therefore, this scenario potentially accounts for the formation of observed distant jupiters in nearly circular orbits. If the apocenter distances of the scattered cores are larger than the disk sizes, their a shrink to a quarter of the disk sizes; the a-distribution of distant giants could reflect the outer edges of the disks in a similar way that those of hot jupiters may reflect inner edges.

  3. Jupiter - friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, J.; Jones, B. W.

    2007-08-01

    Throughout both popular science and academia, there is a pervasive belief that Jupiter has acted as a celestial shield, reducing the impact rate on the Earth, and making the planet a significantly more conducive site for the evolution and survival of life. This old idea has, however, undergone little detailed scrutiny. In the first of a series of studies aimed at a better understanding of this idea, we examine the variation in the impact rate on the Earth which results from bodies moving inwards from the Edgeworth- Kuiper belt as a function of the mass of a giant planet in Jupiter's orbit. The results are not entirely what would be expected under the "Jupiter Shield" paradigm.

  4. Jupiter's Rings: Sharpest View

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft took the best images of Jupiter's charcoal-black rings as it approached and then looked back at Jupiter. The top image was taken on approach, showing three well-defined lanes of gravel- to boulder-sized material composing the bulk of the rings, as well as lesser amounts of material between the rings. New Horizons snapped the lower image after it had passed Jupiter on February 28, 2007, and looked back in a direction toward the sun. The image is sharply focused, though it appears fuzzy due to the cloud of dust-sized particles enveloping the rings. The dust is brightly illuminated in the same way the dust on a dirty windshield lights up when you drive toward a 'low' sun. The narrow rings are confined in their orbits by small 'shepherding' moons.

  5. Microwave Radiometers from 0.6 to 22 GHz for Juno, A Polar Orbiter Around Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingree, P.; Janssen, M.; Oswald, J.; Brown, S.; Chen, J.; Hurst, K.; Kitiyakara, A.; Maiwald, F.; Smith, S.

    2008-01-01

    A compact instrument called the MWR (MicroWave Radiometer) is under development at JPL for Juno, the next NASA New Frontiers mission, scheduled to launch in 2011. It's purpose is to measure the thermal emission from Jupiter's atmosphere at six selected frequencies from 0.6 to 22 GHz, operating in direct detection mode, in order to quantify the distributions and abundances of water and ammonia in Jupiter's atmosphere. The goal is to understand the previously unobserved dynamics of the sub-cloud atmosphere, and to discriminate among models for planetary formation in our solar system. As part of a deep space mission aboard a solar-powered spacecraft, MWR is designed to be compact, lightweight, and low power. The receivers and control electronics are protected by a radiation-shielding enclosure on the Juno spacecraft that would provide a benign and stable operating temperature environment. All antennas and RF transmission lines outside the vault must withstand low temperatures and the harsh radiation environment surrounding Jupiter. This paper describes the concept of the MWR instrument and presents results of one breadboard receiver channel.

  6. The Juno and Cassini gravity measurements: probing the interior dynamics of Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspi, Y.; Galanti, E.; Hubbard, W. B.; Davighi, J. E.

    2015-10-01

    During 2016-2017 both the Juno and Cassini spacecraft will enter into close-by polar orbits of Jupiter and Saturn, respectively. Using Doppler tracking from Earth these flybys will allow high precision gravity measurements of these planets [1]. These will include high order gravity harmonics (at least up to J10), and the yet to be measured odd gravity spectrum. As the dynamics of deep flows relate to perturbations in the density of the planets, this data can be used to probe for the first time the atmospheric and interior flows on these planets [4, 5, 8]. Particularly, this may allow addressing one of the longest-standing questions in planetary atmospheric dynamics regarding the depth of the observed strong east-west jets-streams on Jupiter and Saturn. In this talk we review different approaches to analyze the gravity measurements, discuss the proposed models relating the gravity fields to the dynamics, and the implications of the results for understanding the mechanisms governing the interiors and atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn.

  7. Formulations of moist thermodynamics for atmospheric modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Marquet, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Internal energy, enthalpy and entropy are the key quantities to study thermodynamic properties of the moist atmosphere, because they correspond to the First (internal energy and enthalpy) and Second (entropy) Laws of thermodynamics. The aim of this chapter is to search for analytical formulas for the specific values of enthalpy and entropy and for the moist-air mixture composing the atmosphere. The Third Law of thermodynamics leads to the definition of absolute reference values for thermal enthalpies and entropies of all atmospheric species. It is shown in this Chapter 22 that it is possible to define and compute a general moist-air entropy potential temperature, which is really an equivalent of the moist-air specific entropy in all circumstances (saturated, or not saturated). Similarly, it is shown that it is possible to define and compute the moist-air specific enthalpy, which is different from the thermal part of what is called Moist-Static-Energy in atmospheric studies.

  8. 1-D Radiative-Convective Model for Terrestrial Exoplanet Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cecilia W. S.; Robinson, Tyler D.

    2016-10-01

    We present a one dimensional radiative-convective model to study the thermal structure of terrestrial exoplanetary atmospheres. The radiative transfer and equilibrium chemistry in our model is based on similar methodologies in models used for studying Extrasolar Giant Planets (Fortney et al. 2005b.) We validated our model in the optically thin and thick limits, and compared our pressure-temperature profiles against the analytical solutions of Robinson & Catling (2012). For extrasolar terrestrial planets with pure hydrogen atmospheres, we evaluated the effects of H2-H2 collision induced absorption and identified the purely roto-translational band in our modeled spectra. We also examined how enhanced atmospheric metallicities affect the temperature structure, chemistry, and spectra of terrestrial exoplanets. For a terrestrial extrasolar planet whose atmospheric compostion is 100 times solar orbiting a sun-like star at 2 AU, our model resulted in a reducing atmosphere with H2O, CH4, and NH3 as the dominant greenhouse gases.

  9. Atomic hydrogen distribution. [in Titan atmospheric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarie, N.

    1974-01-01

    Several possible H2 vertical distributions in Titan's atmosphere are considered with the constraint of 5 km-A a total quantity. Approximative calculations show that hydrogen distribution is quite sensitive to two other parameters of Titan's atmosphere: the temperature and the presence of other constituents. The escape fluxes of H and H2 are also estimated as well as the consequent distributions trapped in the Saturnian system.

  10. Spectral Characteristics of Atmospheric Turbulence Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuojunXINShida; LIUShikouLIU; 等

    1996-01-01

    In this paper,KdV-Burgers equation can be regarded as the normal equation of atmospheric turbulence in the stable boundary layer.On the basis of the travelling wave analytic solution of KdV-Burgers equation,the turbulent spectrum is obtained.We observe that the behavior of the spectra is consistent with actual turbulent spectra of stable atmospheric boundary layer.

  11. Atmospheric Modeling Using Accelerometer Data During Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) Flight Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolson, Robert H.; Lugo, Rafael A.; Baird, Darren T.; Cianciolo, Alicia D.; Bougher, Stephen W.; Zurek, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft is a NASA orbiter designed to explore the Mars upper atmosphere, typically from 140 to 160 km altitude. In addition to the nominal science mission, MAVEN has performed several Deep Dip campaigns in which the orbit's closest point of approach, also called periapsis, was lowered to an altitude range of 115 to 135 km. MAVEN accelerometer data were used during mission operations to estimate atmospheric parameters such as density, scale height, along-track gradients, and wave structures. Density and scale height estimates were compared against those obtained from the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model and used to aid the MAVEN navigation team in planning maneuvers to raise and lower periapsis during Deep Dip operations. This paper describes the processes used to reconstruct atmosphere parameters from accelerometers data and presents the results of their comparison to model and navigation-derived values.

  12. Mesoscale, Sources and Models: Sources for Nitrogen in the Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, O.

    1994-01-01

    Projektet Mesoscales, Sources and Models: Sources for Nitrogen in the Atmosphere er opdelt i 3 delprojekter: Sources - farmland, Sources - sea og Sources - biogenic nitrogen.......Projektet Mesoscales, Sources and Models: Sources for Nitrogen in the Atmosphere er opdelt i 3 delprojekter: Sources - farmland, Sources - sea og Sources - biogenic nitrogen....

  13. Can Terrestrial Planets Form in Hot-Jupiter Systems?

    CERN Document Server

    Fogg, Martyn J

    2007-01-01

    Models of terrestrial planet formation in the presence of a migrating giant planet have challenged the notion that hot-Jupiter systems lack terrestrial planets. We briefly review this issue and suggest that hot-Jupiter systems should be prime targets for future observational missions designed to detect Earth-sized and potentially habitable worlds.

  14. Spatial distribution of water in the stratosphere of Jupiter from observations with the Herschel space observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalié, T.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Lellouch, E.; de Val-Borro, M.; Jarchow, C.; Moreno, R.; Hartogh, P.; Orton, G.; Greathouse, T. K.; Billebaud, F.; Dobrijevic, M.; Lara, L. M.; Gonzalez, A.; Sagawa, H.

    2013-09-01

    Water in the atmospheres of the outer planets has both an internal and an external source (e.g., [1] and [2] for Jupiter). These sources are separated by a condensation layer, the tropopause cold trap, which acts as a transport barrier between the troposphere and the stratosphere. Thus, the water vapor observed by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) in the stratosphere of the giant planets has an external origin [3]. This external supply of water may have several sources: (i) a permanent flux from interplanetary dust particles produced from asteroid collisions and from comet activity [4], (ii) local sources from planetary environments (rings, satellites) [5], (iii) cometary "Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) type" impacts [6]. In the past 15 years, several studies suggested that water in the stratosphere of Jupiter originated from the SL9 comet impacts in July 1994, but a direct proof was missing. We will report the first high S/N spatially resolved mapping observations of water in Jupiter's stratosphere carried out with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) [7] and Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) [8] instruments onboard the ESA Herschel Space Observatory [9]. These observations have been obtained in the framework of the Guaranteed Time Key Program "Water and related chemistry in the Solar System", also known as "Herschel Solar System Observations" (HssO) [10]. In parallel, we have monitored Jupiter's stratospheric temperature with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) to separate temperature from water variability. We will present the results recently published by our team [11]. Water is found to be restricted to pressures lower than 2mbar. Its column density decreases by a factor of 2-3 between southern and northern latitudes (see Fig. 1), consistently between the HIFI and the PACS 66.4μm maps. Latitudinal temperature variability cannot explain the global north-south asymmetry in the water maps. From the latitudinal and vertical

  15. Probing the Physics and Chemistry in Hot Jupiter Exoclimes for Future Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin Badhan, Mahmuda; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Deming, Drake; Hébrard, Eric; Irwin, Patrick GJ; Batalha, Natasha; Mandell, Avi

    2017-01-01

    Unique and exotic planets give us an opportunity to understand how planetary systems form and evolve over their lifetime, by placing our own planetary system in the context of vastly different extrasolar systems. In particular, close-in planets such as Hot Jupiters provide us with valuable insights about the host stellar atmosphere and planetary atmospheres subjected to such high levels of stellar insolation. Observed spectroscopic signatures from a planet reveal all spectrally active species in its atmosphere, along with information about its thermal structure and dynamics, allowing us to characterize the planet's atmosphere. NASA’s upcoming missions will give us the high-resolution spectra necessary to constrain such atmospheric properties with unprecedented accuracy. However, to interpret the observed signals from exoplanetary transit events with any certainty, we need reliable atmospheric modeling tools that map both the physical and chemical processes affecting the particular type of planet under investigation. My work seeks to expand on past efforts in these two categories for irradiated giant exoplanets. These atmospheric models can be combined with future mission simulations to build tools that allow us to self-consistently “retrieve” the signatures we can expect to observe with the instruments. In my work thus far, I have built the robust Markov Chain Monte Carlo convergence scheme, with an analytical radiative equilibrium formulation to represent the thermal structures, within the NEMESIS atmospheric radiative transfer modeling and retrieval tool. I have combined this physics-based thermal structure with photochemical abundance profiles for the major gas atmospheric constituents, using the NASA Astrobiology Institute’s VPL/Atmos photochemistry model, which I recently extended to giant planet regimes. Here I will present my new Hot Jupiter models and retrievals results constructed from these latest enhancements. For comparison, I will show

  16. An Analytic Radiative-Convective Model for Planetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Tyler D; 10.1088/0004-637X/757/1/104

    2012-01-01

    We present an analytic 1-D radiative-convective model of the thermal structure of planetary atmospheres. Our model assumes that thermal radiative transfer is gray and can be represented by the two-stream approximation. Model atmospheres are assumed to be in hydrostatic equilibrium, with a power law scaling between the atmospheric pressure and the gray thermal optical depth. The convective portions of our models are taken to follow adiabats that account for condensation of volatiles through a scaling parameter to the dry adiabat. By combining these assumptions, we produce simple, analytic expressions that allow calculations of the atmospheric pressure-temperature profile, as well as expressions for the profiles of thermal radiative flux and convective flux. We explore the general behaviors of our model. These investigations encompass (1) worlds where atmospheric attenuation of sunlight is weak, which we show tend to have relatively high radiative-convective boundaries, (2) worlds with some attenuation of sunli...

  17. Towards Chemical Constraints on Hot Jupiter Migration

    CERN Document Server

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Kennedy, Grant M

    2014-01-01

    The origin of hot Jupiters -- gas giant exoplanets orbiting very close to their host stars -- is a long-standing puzzle. Planet formation theories suggest that such planets are unlikely to have formed in-situ but instead may have formed at large orbital separations beyond the snow line and migrated inward to their present orbits. Two competing hypotheses suggest that the planets migrated either through interaction with the protoplanetary disk during their formation, or by disk-free mechanisms such as gravitational interactions with a third body. Observations of eccentricities and spin-orbit misalignments of hot Jupiter systems have been unable to differentiate between the two hypotheses. In the present work, we suggest that chemical depletions in hot Jupiter atmospheres might be able to constrain their migration mechanisms. We find that sub-solar carbon and oxygen abundances in Jovian-mass hot Jupiters around Sun-like stars are hard to explain by disk migration. Instead, such abundances are more readily expla...

  18. Modeling the effects of atmospheric emissions on groundwater composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T.J.

    1994-12-31

    A composite model of atmospheric, unsaturated and groundwater transport is developed to evaluate the processes determining the distribution of atmospherically derived contaminants in groundwater systems and to test the sensitivity of simulated contaminant concentrations to input parameters and model linkages. One application is to screen specific atmospheric emissions for their potential in determining groundwater age. Temporal changes in atmospheric emissions could provide a recognizable pattern in the groundwater system. The model also provides a way for quantifying the significance of uncertainties in the tracer source term and transport parameters on the contaminant distribution in the groundwater system, an essential step in using the distribution of contaminants from local, point source atmospheric emissions to examine conceptual models of groundwater flow and transport.

  19. A Atmospheric Dispersion Model for the Sudbury, Ontario, Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, Frank Jones

    1982-03-01

    A mathematical model was developed and tested to predict the relationship between sulphur oxide and trace metal emissions from smelters in the Sudbury, Ontario area, and atmospheric, precipitation, lake water and sediment chemistry. The model consists of atmospheric and lake chemistry portions. The atmospheric model is a Gaussian crosswind concentration distribution modification to a box model with a uniform vertical concentration gradient limited by a mixing height. In the near-field Briggs' plume rise and vertical dispersion terms are utilized. Oxidation, wet and dry deposition mechanisms are included to account for the gas, liquid and solid phases separately. Important improvements over existing models include (1) near- and far-field conditions treated in a single model; (2) direct linkage of crosswind dispersion to hourly meteorological observations; (3) utilization of maximum to minimum range of input parameters to realistically model the range of outputs; (4) direct linkage of the atmospheric model to a lake model. Precipitation chemistry as calculated by the atmospheric model is related to lake water and sediment chemistry utilizing a mass balance approach and assuming a continuously stirred reactor (CSTR) model to describe lake circulation. All inputs are atmospheric, modified by hydrology, soil chemistry and sedimentation. Model results were tested by comparison with existing atmospheric and precipitation chemistry measurements, supplemented with analyses of lake water and sediment chemistry collected in a field program. Eight pollutant species were selected for modeling: sulphur dioxide, sulphate ion, hydrogen ion, copper, nickel, lead, zinc, and iron. The model effectively predicts precipitation chemistry within 150 km of Sudbury, with an average prediction to measurement ratio of 90 percent. Atmospheric concentrations are effectively predicted within 80 km, with an average prediction to measurement ratio of 81 percent. Lake chemistry predictions are

  20. Jupiter's Big Bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kim A.

    1994-01-01

    Collision of a comet with Jupiter beginning July 16, 1994 will be observed by astronomers worldwide, with computerized information relayed to a center at the University of Maryland, financed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and National Science Foundation. Geologists and paleontologists also hope to learn more about earth's…

  1. A Transiting Jupiter Analog

    CERN Document Server

    Kipping, David M; Henze, Chris; Teachey, Alex; Isaacson, Howard T; Petigura, Erik A; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Buchhave, Lars A; Chen, Jingjing; Bryson, Steve T; Sandford, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Decadal-long radial velocity surveys have recently started to discover analogs to the most influential planet of our solar system, Jupiter. Detecting and characterizing these worlds is expected to shape our understanding of our uniqueness in the cosmos. Despite the great successes of recent transit surveys, Jupiter analogs represent a terra incognita, owing to the strong intrinsic bias of this method against long orbital periods. We here report on the first validated transiting Jupiter analog, Kepler-167e (KOI-490.02), discovered using Kepler archival photometry orbiting the K4-dwarf KIC-3239945. With a radius of $(0.91\\pm0.02)$ $R_{\\mathrm{Jup}}$, a low orbital eccentricity ($0.06_{-0.04}^{+0.10}$) and an equilibrium temperature of $(131\\pm3)$ K, Kepler-167e bears many of the basic hallmarks of Jupiter. Kepler-167e is accompanied by three Super-Earths on compact orbits, which we also validate, leaving a large cavity of transiting worlds around the habitable-zone. With two transits and continuous photometric ...

  2. External Photoevaporation of the Solar Nebula: Jupiter's Noble Gas Enrichments

    CERN Document Server

    Monga, Nikhil

    2014-01-01

    We present a model explaining elemental enrichments in Jupiter's atmosphere, particularly the noble gases Ar, Kr, and Xe. While He, Ne and O are depleted, seven other elements show similar enrichments ($\\sim$3 times solar, relative to H). Being volatile, Ar is difficult to fractionate from ${\\rm H}_{2}$. We argue that external photoevaporation by far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from nearby massive stars removed ${\\rm H}_{2}$, He, and Ne from the solar nebula, but Ar and other species were retained because photoevaporation occurred at large heliocentric distances where temperatures were cold enough ($\\lt 30$ K) to trap them in amorphous water ice. As the solar nebula lost H it became relatively and uniformly enriched in other species. Our model improves on the similar model of Guillot \\& Hueso (2006). We recognize that cold temperatures alone do not trap volatiles; continuous water vapor production also is necessary. We demonstrate that FUV fluxes that photoevaporated the disk generated sufficient water va...

  3. Model Predictions and Ground-based Observations for Jupiter's Magnetospheric Environment: Application to the JUICE and Juno Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilleos, N. A.; Guio, P.; Arridge, C. S.; Ray, L. C.; Yates, J. N.; Fossey, S.; Savini, G.; Pearson, M.; Fernando, N.; Gerasimov, R.; Murat, T.

    2016-12-01

    The advent of new missions to the Jovian system such as Juno (recentlyarrived) and JUICE (scheduled for 2022 launch) makes timely the provision of model-based predictions for thephysical conditions to be encountered by these spacecraft; as well as the planning of simultaneous, ground-basedobservations of the Jovian system.Using the UCL Jovian magnetodisc model, which calculates magnetic field and plasma distributionsaccording to Caudal's (1986) force-balance formalism, we provide predictions of the following quantities alongrepresentative Juno / JUICE orbits through the middle magnetosphere: (i) Magnetic field strength and direction; (ii)Density and / or pressure of the 'cold' and 'hot' particle populations; (iii) Plasma angular velocity.The characteristic variation in these parameters is mainly influenced by the periodic approaches towards andrecessions from the magnetodisc imposed on the 'synthetic spacecraft' by the planet's rotating, tilteddipole field. We also include some corresponding predictions for ionospheric / thermospheric conditions at themagnetic footpoint of the spacecraft, using the JASMIN model (Jovian Atmospheric Simulatorwith Magnetosphere, Ionosphere and Neutrals).We also present preliminary imaging results from `IoSpot', a planned, ground-based programme of observationsbased at the University College London Observatory (UCLO) which targets ionized sulphur emissions from the Ioplasma torus. Such programmes, conducted simultaneously with the above missions, will provide valuable context forthe overall physical conditions within the Jovian magnetosphere, for which Io's volcanoes are the principal source ofplasma.

  4. Model Predictions and Ground-based Observations for Jupiter's Magnetospheric Environment: Application to the JUICE and Juno Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilleos, Nicholas; Guio, Patrick; Arridge, Christopher S.; Ray, Licia C.; Yates, Japheth N.; Fossey, Stephen J.; Savini, Giorgio; Pearson, Mick; Fernando, Nathalie; Gerasimov, Roman; Murat, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The advent of new missions to the Jovian system such as Juno (recently arrived) and JUICE (scheduled for 2022 launch) makes timely the provision of model-based predictions for the physical conditions to be encountered by these spacecraft; as well as the planning of simultaneous, ground-based observations of the Jovian system.Using the UCL Jovian magnetodisc model, which calculates magnetic field and plasma distributionsaccording to Caudal's (1986) force-balance formalism, we provide predictions of the following quantities along representative Juno / JUICE orbits through the middle magnetosphere: (i) Magnetic field strength and direction; (ii) Density and / or pressure of the 'cold' and 'hot' particle populations; (iii) Plasma angular velocity.The characteristic variation in these parameters is mainly influenced by the periodic approaches towards and recessions from the magnetodisc imposed on the 'synthetic spacecraft' by the planet's rotating, tilteddipole field. We also include some corresponding predictions for ionospheric / thermospheric conditions at the magnetic footpoint of the spacecraft, using the JASMIN model (Jovian Atmospheric Simulatorwith Magnetosphere, Ionosphere and Neutrals).We also present preliminary imaging results from 'IoSpot', a planned, ground-based programme of observations based at the University College London Observatory (UCLO) which targets ionized sulphur emissions from the Io plasma torus. Such programmes, conducted simultaneously with the above missions, will provide valuable context for the overall physical conditions within the Jovian magnetosphere, for which Io's volcanoes are the principal source of plasma.

  5. Capture of Irregular Satellites at Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvorny, D; Deienno, R

    2014-01-01

    The irregular satellites of outer planets are thought to have been captured from heliocentric orbits. The exact nature of the capture process, however, remains uncertain. We examine the possibility that irregular satellites were captured from the planetesimal disk during the early Solar System instability when encounters between the outer planets occurred (Nesvorny, Vokrouhlicky & Morbidelli 2007, AJ 133; hereafter NVM07). NVM07 already showed that the irregular satellites of Saturn, Uranus and Neptune were plausibly captured during planetary encounters. Here we find that the current instability models present favorable conditions for capture of irregular satellites at Jupiter as well, mainly because Jupiter undergoes a phase of close encounters with an ice giant. We show that the orbital distribution of bodies captured during planetary encounters provides a good match to the observed distribution of irregular satellites at Jupiter. The capture efficiency for each particle in the original transplanetary d...

  6. The imprint of exoplanet formation history on observable present-day spectra of hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Mordasini, Christoph; Mollière, Paul; Henning, Thomas; Benneke, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The composition of a planet's atmosphere is determined by its formation, evolution, and present-day insolation. A planet's spectrum therefore may hold clues on its origins. We present a "chain" of models, linking the formation of a planet to its observable present-day spectrum. The chain links include (1) the planet's formation and migration, (2) its long-term thermodynamic evolution, (3) a variety of disk chemistry models, (4) a non-gray atmospheric model, and (5) a radiometric model to obtain simulated spectroscopic observations with JWST and ARIEL. In our standard chemistry model the inner disk is depleted in refractory carbon as in the Solar System and in white dwarfs polluted by extrasolar planetesimals. Our main findings are: (1) Envelope enrichment by planetesimal impacts during formation dominates the final planetary atmospheric composition of hot Jupiters. We investigate two, under this finding, prototypical formation pathways: a formation inside or outside the water iceline, called "dry" and "wet" p...

  7. Radiation belts of jupiter: a second look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillius, R W; McIlwain, C E; Mogro-Campero, A

    1975-05-02

    The outbound leg of the Pioneer 11 Jupiter flyby explored a region farther from the equator than that traversed by Pioneer 10, and the new data require modification or augmentation of the magnetodisk model based on the Pioneer 10 flyby. The inner moons of Jupiter are sinks of energetic particles and sometimes sources. A large spike of particles was found near lo. Multiple peaks occurred in the particle fluxes near closest approach to the planet; this structure may be accounted for by a complex magnetic field configuration. The decrease in proton flux observed near minimum altitude on the Pioneer 10 flyby appears attributable to particle absorption by Amalthea.

  8. Estimate Total Number of the Earth Atmospheric Particle with Standard Atmosphere Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Chong-Yi

    2001-01-01

    The total number of atmospheric particle (AP) is an important datum for planetary science and geoscience.Estimating entire AP number is also a familiar question in general physics.With standard atmosphere model,considering the number difference of AP caused by rough and uneven in the earth surface below,the sum of dry clean atmosphere particle is 1.06962 × 1044.So the whole number of AP including water vapor is 1.0740 × 1044.The rough estimation for the total number of AP on other planets (or satellites) in condensed state is also discussed on the base of it.

  9. First Earth-Based Detection of a Superbolide on Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso, R.; Wesley, A.; Go, C.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Wong, M. H.; Fletcher, L. N.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Boslough, M. B.; DePater, I.; Orton, G. S.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Edwards, M. L.; Hammel, H. B.; Clarke, J. T.; Noll, K. S.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2010-01-01

    Cosmic collisions can planets cause detectable optical flashes that range from terrestrial shooting stars to bright fireballs. On 2010 June 3 a bolide in Jupiter's atmosphere was simultaneously observed from the Earth by two amateur astronomers observing Jupiter in red and blue wavelengths, The bolide appeared as a flash of 2 s duration in video recording data of the planet. The analysis of the light carve of the observations results in an estimated energy of the impact of (0.9-4,0) x 10(exp 15) J which corresponds to a colliding body of 8-13 m diameter assuming a mean density of 2 g/cu cm. Images acquired a few days later by the Hubble Space Telescope and other large ground-based facilities did not show any signature of aerosol debris, temperature, or chemical composition anomaly, confirming that the body was small and destroyed in Jupiter's upper atmosphere. Several collisions of this size may happen on Jupiter on a yearly basis. A systematic study of the impact rate and size of these bolides can enable an empirical determination. of the flux of meteoroids in Jupiter with implications for the populations of small bodies in the outer solar system and may allow a better quantification of the threat of impacting bodies to Earth. The serendipitous recording of this optical flash opens a new window in the observation of Jupiter with small telescopes.

  10. CFD Modeling of Non-Neutral Atmospheric Boundary Layer Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koblitz, Tilman

    to the atmospheric boundary-layer, are mostly ignored so far. In order to decrease the uncertainty of wind resource assessment, the present work focuses on atmospheric flows that include atmospheric stability and the Coriolis effect. Within the present work a RANS model framework is developed and implemented......For wind resource assessment, the wind industry is increasingly relying on Computational Fluid Dynamics models that focus on modeling the airflow in a neutrally stratified surface-layer. Physical processes like the Coriolis force, buoyancy forces and heat transport, that are important...

  11. SMART - a computer program for modelling stellar atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Aret, Anna; Poolamäe, Raivo; Sapar, Lili

    2013-01-01

    Program SMART (Spectra and Model Atmospheres by Radiative Transfer) has been composed for modelling atmospheres and spectra of hot stars (O, B and A spectral classes) and studying different physical processes in them (Sapar & Poolam\\"ae 2003, Sapar et al. 2007). Line-blanketed models are computed assuming plane-parallel, static and horizontally homogeneous atmosphere in radiative, hydrostatic and local thermodynamic equilibrium. Main advantages of SMART are its shortness, simplicity, user friendliness and flexibility for study of different physical processes. SMART successfully runs on PC both under Windows and Linux.

  12. A theoretical model of atmospheric ozone depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midya, S. K.; Jana, P. K.; Lahiri, T.

    1994-01-01

    A critical study on different ozone depletion and formation processes has been made and following important results are obtained: (i) From analysis it is shown that O3 concentration will decrease very minutely with time for normal atmosphere when [O], [O2] and UV-radiation remain constant. (ii) An empirical equation is established theoretically between the variation of ozone concentration and time. (iii) Special ozone depletion processes are responsible for the dramatic decrease of O3-concentration at Antarctica.

  13. High-resolution maps of the 1.5 GHz emission from Jupiter's disk and radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. A.; Berge, G. L.; Bignell, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    VLA maps of four different faces of Jupiter made with a resolution of about 0.3 Jovian radius show new features of the radiation belt emission. A synchrotron model which reproduces these features serves to define the major characteristics of the relativistic electrons in the radiation belt. The observations provide the best determination to date of the atmospheric emission at 1.5 GHz and yield a disk brightness temperature of 425 + or - 100 K.

  14. The Capture of Jupiter Trojans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbidelli, A.; Nesvorny, D.; Vokrouhlicky, D.

    2013-09-01

    The origin of Jupiter Trojans remained mysterious for decades. Particularly, it was difficult to explain the excitation of the inclinations of the Trojan population [1]. In 2005, Morbidelli et al. [2] proposed a scenario of capture from the trans-Neptunian disk, in the framework of the so-called "Nice model" [3,4]. This scenario explained in a natural way the observed orbital distribution of Trojans. The Nice model, however, evolved in the years, in order to satisfy an increasingly large number of constraints. It now appears that the dynamical evolution of the giant planets was different from that envisioned in [2]. Here, we assess again the process of capture of Trojans within this new evolution. We show that (6-8)×10 - 7 of the original trans-Neptunian planetesimals are captured in the Trojan region, with an orbital distribution consistent with the one observed. Relative to [2], the new capture mechanism has the potential of explaining the asymmetry between the L4 and L5 populations. Moreover, the resulting population of Trojans is consistent with that of the Irregular Satellites of Jupiter, which are captured in the same process; a few bodies from the main asteroid belt could also be captured in the Trojan cloud.

  15. Memory efficient atmospheric effects modeling for infrared scene generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavak, Çaǧlar; Özsaraç, Seçkin

    2015-05-01

    The infrared (IR) energy radiated from any source passes through the atmosphere before reaching the sensor. As a result, the total signature captured by the IR sensor is significantly modified by the atmospheric effects. The dominant physical quantities that constitute the mentioned atmospheric effects are the atmospheric transmittance and the atmospheric path radiance. The incoming IR radiation is attenuated by the transmittance and path radiance is added on top of the attenuated radiation. In IR scene simulations OpenGL is widely used for rendering purposes. In the literature there are studies, which model the atmospheric effects in an IR band using OpenGLs exponential fog model as suggested by Beers law. In the standard pipeline of OpenGL, the related fog model needs single equivalent OpenGL variables for the transmittance and path radiance, which actually depend on both the distance between the source and the sensor and also on the wavelength of interest. However, in the conditions where the range dependency cannot be modeled as an exponential function, it is not accurate to replace the atmospheric quantities with a single parameter. The introduction of OpenGL Shading Language (GLSL) has enabled the developers to use the GPU more flexible. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for the atmospheric effects modeling using the least squares estimation with polynomial fitting by programmable OpenGL shader programs built with GLSL. In this context, a radiative transfer model code is used to obtain the transmittance and path radiance data. Then, polynomial fits are computed for the range dependency of these variables. Hence, the atmospheric effects model data that will be uploaded in the GPU memory is significantly reduced. Moreover, the error because of fitting is negligible as long as narrow IR bands are used.

  16. Atmospheric monitoring and model applications at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilhauer, Bianca

    2015-03-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory detects high-energy cosmic rays with energies above ˜1017 eV. It is built as a multi-hybrid detector measuring extensive air showers with different techniques. For the reconstruction of extensive air showers, the atmospheric conditions at the site of the Observatory have to be known quite well. This is particularly true for reconstructions based on data obtained by the fluorescence technique. For these data, not only the weather conditions near ground are relevant, most important are altitude-dependent atmospheric profiles. The Pierre Auger Observatory has set up a dedicated atmospheric monitoring programme at the site in the Mendoza province, Argentina. Beyond this, exploratory studies were performed in Colorado, USA, for possible installations in the northern hemisphere. In recent years, the atmospheric monitoring programme at the Pierre Auger Observatory was supplemented by applying data from atmospheric models. Both GDAS and HYSPLIT are developments by the US weather department NOAA and the data are freely available. GDAS is a global model of the atmospheric state parameters on a 1 degree geographical grid, based on real-time measurements and numeric weather predictions, providing a full altitude-dependent data set every 3 hours. HYSPLIT is a powerful tool to track the movement of air masses at various heights, and with it the aerosols. Combining local measurements of the atmospheric state variables and aerosol scattering with the given model data, advanced studies about atmospheric conditions can be performed and high precision air shower reconstructions are achieved.

  17. JunoCam's Imaging of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Glenn; Hansen, Candice; Momary, Thomas; Caplinger, Michael; Ravine, Michael; Atreya, Sushil; Ingersoll, Andrew; Bolton, Scott; Rogers, John; Eichstaedt, Gerald

    2017-04-01

    Juno's visible imager, JunoCam, is a wide-angle camera (58° field of view) with 4 color filters: red, green and blue (RGB) and methane at 889 nm, designed for optimal imaging of Jupiter's poles. Juno's elliptical polar orbit offers unique views of Jupiter's polar regions with spatial scales as good as 50 km/pixel. At closest approach ("perijove") the images have spatial scale down to ˜3 km/pixel. As a push-frame imager on a rotating spacecraft, JunoCam uses time-delayed integration to take advantage of the spacecraft spin to extend integration time to increase signal. Images of Jupiter's poles reveal a largely uncharted region of Jupiter, as nearly all earlier spacecraft except Pioneer 11 have orbited or flown by close to the equatorial plane. Poleward of 64-68° planetocentric latitude, Jupiter's familiar east-west banded structure breaks down. Several types of discrete features appear on a darker, bluish-cast background. Clusters of circular cyclonic spirals are found immediately around the north and south poles. Oval-shaped features are also present, ranging in size down to JunoCam's resolution limits. The largest and brightest features usually have chaotic shapes; animations over ˜1 hour can reveal cyclonic motion in them. Narrow linear features traverse tens of degrees of longitude and are not confined in latitude. JunoCam also detected optically thin clouds or hazes that are illuminated beyond the nightside ˜1-bar terminator; one of these detected at Perijove lay some 3 scale heights above the main cloud deck. Tests have been made to detect the aurora and lightning. Most close-up images of Jupiter have been acquired at lower latitudes within 2 hours of closest approach. These images aid in understanding the data collected by other instruments on Juno that probe deeper in the atmosphere. When Jupiter was too close to the sun for ground-based observers to collect data between perijoves 1 and 2, JunoCam took a sequence of routine images to monitor large

  18. Ensemble data assimilation in the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedatella, N. M.; Raeder, K.; Anderson, J. L.; Liu, H.-L.

    2014-08-01

    We present results pertaining to the assimilation of real lower, middle, and upper atmosphere observations in the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) using the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART) ensemble adjustment Kalman filter. The ability to assimilate lower atmosphere observations of aircraft and radiosonde temperature and winds, satellite drift winds, and Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate refractivity along with middle/upper atmosphere temperature observations from SABER and Aura MLS is demonstrated. The WACCM+DART data assimilation system is shown to be able to reproduce the salient features, and variability, of the troposphere present in the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research Re-Analysis. In the mesosphere, the fit of WACCM+DART to observations is found to be slightly worse when only lower atmosphere observations are assimilated compared to a control experiment that is reflective of the model climatological variability. This differs from previous results which found that assimilation of lower atmosphere observations improves the fit to mesospheric observations. This discrepancy is attributed to the fact that due to the gravity wave drag parameterizations, the model climatology differs significantly from the observations in the mesosphere, and this is not corrected by the assimilation of lower atmosphere observations. The fit of WACCM+DART to mesospheric observations is, however, significantly improved compared to the control experiment when middle/upper atmosphere observations are assimilated. We find that assimilating SABER observations reduces the root-mean-square error and bias of WACCM+DART relative to the independent Aura MLS observations by ˜50%, demonstrating that assimilation of middle/upper atmosphere observations is essential for accurate specification of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region in WACCM+DART. Last, we demonstrate that

  19. Revisiting the Carrington Event: Updated modeling of atmospheric effects

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Brian C; Snyder, Brock R

    2011-01-01

    The terrestrial effects of major solar events such as the Carrington white-light flare and subsequent geomagnetic storm of August-September 1859 are of considerable interest, especially in light of recent predictions that such extreme events will be more likely over the coming decades. Here we present results of modeling the atmospheric effects, especially production of odd nitrogen compounds and subsequent depletion of ozone, by solar protons associated with the Carrington event. This study combines approaches from two previous studies of the atmospheric effect of this event. We investigate changes in NOy compounds as well as depletion of O3 using a two-dimensional atmospheric chemistry and dynamics model. Atmospheric ionization is computed using a range-energy relation with four different proxy proton spectra associated with more recent well-known solar proton events. We find that changes in atmospheric constituents are in reasonable agreement with previous studies, but effects of the four proxy spectra use...

  20. Comparison of modelled and empirical atmospheric propagation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, J. R.; Biegel, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The radiometric integrity of TM thermal infrared channel data was evaluated and monitored to develop improved radiometric preprocessing calibration techniques for removal of atmospheric effects. Modelled atmospheric transmittance and path radiance were compared with empirical values derived from aircraft underflight data. Aircraft thermal infrared imagery and calibration data were available on two dates as were corresponding atmospheric radiosonde data. The radiosonde data were used as input to the LOWTRAN 5A code which was modified to output atmospheric path radiance in addition to transmittance. The aircraft data were calibrated and used to generate analogous measurements. These data indicate that there is a tendancy for the LOWTRAN model to underestimate atmospheric path radiance and transmittance as compared to empirical data. A plot of transmittance versus altitude for both LOWTRAN and empirical data is presented.

  1. Reflected Light Curves, Spherical and Bond Albedos of Jupiter- and Saturn-like Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Dyudina, Ulyana; Li, Liming; Kopparla, Pushkar; Yung, Yuk L; Ingersoll, Andrew P; Dones, Luke

    2015-01-01

    We estimate how the light curve and total stellar heating of a planet depend on forward and backward scattering clouds. To do that, we construct light curves for Jupiter- and Saturn-like planet based on observations. We fit analytical functions to the reflected brightness of Jupiter's and Saturn's surface versus planet's phase. We use Pioneer and Cassini spacecraft images to estimate these functions. These observations cover broad bands at 0.59-0.72 microns and 0.39-0.5 microns, and narrow bands at 0.938 microns (atmospheric window), 0.889 microns (CH4 absorption band), and 0.24-0.28 microns. We simulate the images of the planets at different phases with ray-tracing model of a planet by Dyudina et al. (2005). The full-disk luminosity of these simulated images changes with planet's phase producing the full-orbit light curves. We also derive total planet's reflection integrated in all directions (spherical albedos) for Jupiter, Saturn, and for planets with Lambertian and Rayleigh-scattering atmosphere. For Jupi...

  2. CHIMERE 2013: a model for regional atmospheric composition modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Menut

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric trace gas and aerosol pollutants have adverse effects on health, environment and climate. In order to quantify and mitigate such effects, a wide range of processes leading to the formation and transport of pollutants must be considered, understood and represented in numerical models. Regional scale pollution episodes result from the combination of several factors: high emissions (from anthropogenic or natural sources, stagnant meteorological conditions, kinetics and efficiency of the chemistry and the deposition. All these processes are highly variable in time and space, and their relative contribution to the pollutants budgets can be quantified with chemistry-transport models. The CHIMERE chemistry-transport model is dedicated to regional atmospheric pollution event studies. Since it has now reached a certain level a maturity, the new stable version, CHIMERE 2013, is described to provide a reference model paper. The successive developments of the model are reviewed on the basis of published investigations that are referenced in order to discuss the scientific choices and to provide an overview of the main results.

  3. Exact results in modeling planetary atmospheres-II. Semi-gray atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutily, B. [Universite de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Observatoire de Lyon, 9 avenue Charles Andre, F-69230 Saint-Genis-Laval (France); CNRS, UMR 5574, Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon (France); Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Chevallier, L. [Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, Laboratoire LUTH, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon cedex (France); Pelkowski, J. [Institut fuer Atmosphaere und Umwelt, J.W. Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt, Campus Riedberg, Altenhaferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt a.M. (Germany)], E-mail: Pelkowski@meteor.uni-frankfurt.de; Bergeat, J. [Universite de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Observatoire de Lyon, 9 avenue Charles Andre, F-69230 Saint-Genis-Laval (France); CNRS, UMR 5574, Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon (France); Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France)

    2008-01-15

    We solve the radiative transfer equation for a semi-gray planetary atmosphere in radiative equilibrium, in an attempt to define an entirely analytical non-gray model atmosphere of finite optical thickness. The salient feature of the model is that the incident solar radiation is partitioned between two adjacent spectral domains-the 'visible' and the 'infrared'-in each of which the atmosphere's (effective) opacity is assumed to be independent of frequency (the semi-gray assumption). We envisage a plane-parallel atmosphere illuminated by a beam of parallel radiation and bounded below by a partially reflecting and emitting ground. The former emits infrared radiation, induced by the absorption of radiation both visible and infrared, deriving from the external irradiation as well as from the emission of the planet's surface layer. For an atmosphere with given single-scattering albedos and optical thicknesses in both the visible and infrared domains, we compute the temperature at every depth of the atmosphere, as well as the ground's temperature.

  4. Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Regional Atmospheric Model: Samoa

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale numerical weather prediction model 7-day hourly forecast for the region surrounding the islands of Samoa at...

  5. Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Regional Atmospheric Model: Guam

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale numerical weather prediction model 7-day hourly forecast for the region surrounding the island of Guam at...

  6. Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Regional Atmospheric Model: CNMI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale numerical weather prediction model 7-day hourly forecast for the region surrounding the Commonwealth of the Northern...

  7. Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Regional Atmospheric Model: Oahu

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale numerical weather prediction model 3.5-day hourly forecast for the region surrounding the Hawaiian island of Oahu at...

  8. Fast and simple model for atmospheric radiative transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidel, F.C.; Kokhanovsky, A.A.; Schaepman, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Radiative transfer models (RTMs) are of utmost importance for quantitative remote sensing, especially for compensating atmospheric perturbation. A persistent trade-off exists between approaches that prefer accuracy at the cost of computational complexity, versus those favouring simplicity at the

  9. Jupiter's Water Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    When the twin Voyager spacecraft cruised past Jupiter in 1979, they did more than rewrite the textbooks on the giant planet. Their cameras also unveiled the astounding diversity of the four planet-size moons of ice and stone known as the Galilean satellites. The Voyagers revealed the cratered countenance of Callisto, the valleys and ridges of Ganymede, the cracked face of Europa, and the spewing volcanoes of Io. But it would take a spacecraft named for Italian scientist Galileo, who discovered the moons in 1610, to reveal the true complexity of these worlds and to begin to divulge their interior secrets. Incredibly, the Galileo data strongly suggest that Jupiter's three large icy moons (all but rocky Io) hide interior oceans.

  10. Accelerating Atmospheric Modeling Through Emerging Multi-core Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Linford, John Christian

    2010-01-01

    The new generations of multi-core chipset architectures achieve unprecedented levels of computational power while respecting physical and economical constraints. The cost of this power is bewildering program complexity. Atmospheric modeling is a grand-challenge problem that could make good use of these architectures if they were more accessible to the average programmer. To that end, software tools and programming methodologies that greatly simplify the acceleration of atmospheric modeling...

  11. Characterizing Exoplanet Atmospheres: From Light-curve Observations to Radiative-transfer Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Cubillos, Patricio E

    2016-01-01

    Multi-wavelength transit and secondary-eclipse light-curve observations are some of the most powerful techniques to probe the thermo-chemical properties of exoplanets. Although the large planet-to-star brightness contrast and few available spectral bands produce data with low signal-to-noise ratios, a Bayesian approach can robustly reveal what constraints we can set, without over-interpreting the data. Here I performed an end-to-end analysis of transiting exoplanet data. I analyzed space-telescope data for three planets to characterize their atmospheres and refine their orbits, investigated correlated noise estimators, and contributed to the development of the respective data-analysis pipelines. Chapters 2 and 3 describe the Photometry for Orbits, Eclipses and Transits (POET) pipeline to model Spitzer Space Telescope light curves, applied to secondary-eclipse observations of the Jupiter-sized planets WASP-8b and TrES-1. Chapter 4 studies commonly used correlated-noise estimators for exoplanet light-curve mode...

  12. THOR: A New and Flexible Global Circulation Model to Explore Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, João M.; Grimm, Simon L.; Grosheintz, Luc; Heng, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    We have designed and developed, from scratch, a global circulation model (GCM) named THOR that solves the three-dimensional nonhydrostatic Euler equations. Our general approach lifts the commonly used assumptions of a shallow atmosphere and hydrostatic equilibrium. We solve the “pole problem” (where converging meridians on a sphere lead to increasingly smaller time steps near the poles) by implementing an icosahedral grid. Irregularities in the grid, which lead to grid imprinting, are smoothed using the “spring dynamics” technique. We validate our implementation of spring dynamics by examining calculations of the divergence and gradient of test functions. To prevent the computational time step from being bottlenecked by having to resolve sound waves, we implement a split-explicit method together with a horizontally explicit and vertically implicit integration. We validate our GCM by reproducing the Earth and hot-Jupiter-like benchmark tests. THOR was designed to run on graphics processing units (GPUs), which allows for physics modules (radiative transfer, clouds, chemistry) to be added in the future, and is part of the open-source Exoclimes Simulation Platform (www.exoclime.org).

  13. Jupiter's Grand Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batygin, Konstantin

    2017-06-01

    The statistics of extrasolar planetary systems indicate that the default mode of planetary formation generates planets with orbital periods shorter than 100 days, and masses substantially exceeding that of the Earth. When viewed in this context, the Solar System, which contains no planets interior to Mercury's 88-day orbit, is unusual. Extra-solar planetary detection surveys also suggest that planets with masses and periods broadly similar to Jupiter's are somewhat uncommon, with occurrence fraction of less than ~ 10%. In this talk, I will present calculations which show that a popular formation scenario for Jupiter and Saturn, in which Jupiter migrates inward from a > 5AU to a ˜ 1.5 AU and then reverses direction, can explain the low overall mass of the Solar System's terrestrial planets, as well as the absence of planets with a 10 - 100 km planetesimals into low- order mean-motion resonances, shepherding of order 10 Earth masses of this material into the a ˜ 1 AU region while exciting substantial orbital eccentricity (e ˜ 0.2 - 0.4). We argue that under these conditions, a collisional cascade will ensue, generating a planetesimal disk that would have flushed any preexisting short-period super-Earth-like planets into the Sun. In this scenario, the Solar System's terrestrial planets formed from gas-starved mass-depleted debris that remained after the primary period of dynamical evolution.

  14. Evaluation protocol for the WIND system atmospheric models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, J.D.

    1991-12-31

    Atmospheric transport and diffusion models have been developed for real-time calculations of the location and concentration of toxic or radioactive materials during a accidental release at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These models are have been incorporated into an automated menu-driven computer based system called the WIND (Weather INformation and Display) system. In an effort to establish more formal quality assurance procedures for the WIND system atmospheric codes, a software evaluation protocol is being developed. An evaluation protocol is necessary to determine how well they may perform in emergency response (real-time) situations. The evaluation of high-impact software must be conducted in accordance with WSRC QA Manual, 1Q, QAP 20-1. This report will describe the method that will be used to evaluate the atmospheric models. The evaluation will determine the effectiveness of the atmospheric models in emergency response situations, which is not necessarily the same procedure used for research purposes. The format of the evaluation plan will provide guidance for the evaluation of atmospheric models that may be added to the WIND system in the future. The evaluation plan is designed to provide the user with information about the WIND system atmospheric models that is necessary for emergency response situations.

  15. Evaluation protocol for the WIND system atmospheric models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Atmospheric transport and diffusion models have been developed for real-time calculations of the location and concentration of toxic or radioactive materials during a accidental release at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These models are have been incorporated into an automated menu-driven computer based system called the WIND (Weather INformation and Display) system. In an effort to establish more formal quality assurance procedures for the WIND system atmospheric codes, a software evaluation protocol is being developed. An evaluation protocol is necessary to determine how well they may perform in emergency response (real-time) situations. The evaluation of high-impact software must be conducted in accordance with WSRC QA Manual, 1Q, QAP 20-1. This report will describe the method that will be used to evaluate the atmospheric models. The evaluation will determine the effectiveness of the atmospheric models in emergency response situations, which is not necessarily the same procedure used for research purposes. The format of the evaluation plan will provide guidance for the evaluation of atmospheric models that may be added to the WIND system in the future. The evaluation plan is designed to provide the user with information about the WIND system atmospheric models that is necessary for emergency response situations.

  16. Studying urban land-atmospheric interactions by coupling an urban canopy model with a single column atmospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J.; Wang, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Studying urban land-atmospheric interactions by coupling an urban canopy model with a single column atmospheric models Jiyun Song and Zhi-Hua Wang School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, PO Box 875306, Tempe, AZ 85287-5306 Landuse landcover changes in urban area will modify surface energy budgets, turbulent fluxes as well as dynamic and thermodynamic structures of the overlying atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In order to study urban land-atmospheric interactions, we coupled a single column atmospheric model (SCM) to a cutting-edge single layer urban canopy model (SLUCM). Modification of surface parameters such as the fraction of vegetation and engineered pavements, thermal properties of building and pavement materials, and geometrical features of street canyon, etc. in SLUCM dictates the evolution of surface balance of energy, water and momentum. The land surface states then provide lower boundary conditions to the overlying atmosphere, which in turn modulates the modification of ABL structure as well as vertical profiles of temperature, humidity, wind speed and tracer gases. The coupled SLUCM-SCM model is tested against field measurements of surface layer fluxes as well as profiles of temperature and humidity in the mixed layer under convective conditions. After model test, SLUCM-SCM is used to simulate the effect of changing urban land surface conditions on the evolution of ABL structure and dynamics. Simulation results show that despite the prescribed atmospheric forcing, land surface states impose significant impact on the physics of the overlying vertical atmospheric layer. Overall, this numerical framework provides a useful standalone modeling tool to assess the impacts of urban land surface conditions on the local hydrometeorology through land-atmospheric interactions. It also has potentially far-reaching implications to urban ecohydrological services for cities under future expansion and climate challenges.

  17. PCBs in the Arctic atmosphere: determining important driving forces using a global atmospheric transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Friedman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a spatially and temporally resolved global atmospheric PCB model, driven by meteorological data, that is skilled at simulating mean atmospheric PCB concentrations and seasonal cycles in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes, and mean Arctic concentrations. However, the model does not capture the observed Arctic summer maximum in atmospheric PCBs. We use the model to estimate global budgets for the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea 7 PCBs, and demonstrate that congeners that deposit more readily show lower potential for long-range transport, consistent with a recently-described "differential removal hypothesis" regarding the hemispheric transport of PCBs. Using sensitivity simulations to assess processes within, outside, or transport to the Arctic, we examine the influence of climate- and emissions-driven processes on Arctic concentrations and their effect on improving the simulated Arctic seasonal cycle. We find evidence that processes occurring outside the Arctic have a greater influence on Arctic atmospheric PCB levels than processes that occur within the Arctic. Our simulations suggest that re-emissions from sea ice melting or from the Arctic Ocean during summer would have to be unrealistically high in order to capture observed temporal trends of PCBs in the Arctic atmosphere. We conclude that mid-latitude processes are likely to have a greater effect on the Arctic under global change scenarios than re-emissions within the Arctic.

  18. Multi-band, Multi-epoch Observations of the Transiting Warm Jupiter WASP-80b

    CERN Document Server

    Fukui, Akihiko; Ikoma, Masahiro; Narita, Norio; Onitsuka, Masahiro; Ita, Yoshifusa; Onozato, Hiroki; Nishiyama, Shogo; Baba, Haruka; Ryu, Tsuguru; Hirano, Teruyuki; Hori, Yasunori; Kurosaki, Kenji; Kawauchi, Kiyoe; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H; Nagayama, Takahiro; Tamura, Motohide; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kuroda, Daisuke; Nagayama, Shogo; Ohta, Kouji; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Izumiura, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    WASP-80b is a warm Jupiter transiting a bright late-K dwarf, providing a good opportunity to extend the atmospheric study of hot Jupiters toward the lower temperature regime. We report multi-band, multi-epoch transit observations of WASP-80b by using three ground-based telescopes covering from optical (g', Rc, and Ic bands) to near infrared (NIR; J, H, and Ks bands) wavelengths. We observe five primary transits, each of which in three or four different bands simultaneously, obtaining 17 independent transit light curves. Combining them with previous works, we find that the observed transmission spectrum is largely consistent with both a solar-abundance and thick-cloud atmospheric models at 1.7-$\\sigma$ discrepancy level. On the other hand, we find a marginal spectral rise in optical region compared to NIR region at 2.9-$\\sigma$ level, which possibly indicates the existence of haze in the atmosphere. We simulate theoretical transmission spectra for a solar-abundance but hazy atmosphere, finding that a model wit...

  19. An Overview of the Jupiter Europa Orbiter Concept's Europa Science Phase Orbit Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Robert E.; Ludwinski, Jan M.; Petropoulos, Anastassios E.; Clark, Karla B.; Pappalardo, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), the proposed NASA element of the proposed joint NASA-ESA Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), could launch in February 2020 and conceivably arrive at Jupiter in December of 2025. The concept is to perform a multi-year study of Europa and the Jupiter system, including 30 months of Jupiter system science and a comprehensive Europa orbit phase of 9 months. This paper provides an overview of the JEO concept and describes the Europa Science phase orbit design and the related science priorities, model pay-load and operations scenarios needed to conduct the Europa Science phase. This overview is for planning and discussion purposes only.

  20. Jupiter small satellite montage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    A montage of images of the small inner moons of Jupiter from the camera onboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft shows the best views obtained of these moons during Galileo's 11th orbit around the giant planet in November 1997. At that point, Galileo was completing its first two years in Jupiter orbit--known as the Galileo 'prime mission'--and was about to embark on a successful two-year extension, called the Galileo Europa Mission. The top two images show the moon Thebe. Thebe rotates by approximately 50 degrees between the time these two images were taken, so that the same prominent impact crater is seen in both views; this crater, which has been given the provisional name Zethus, is near the point on Thebe that faces permanently away from Jupiter. The next two images show the moon Amalthea; they were taken with the Sun directly behind the observer, an alignment that emphasizes patterns of intrinsically bright or dark surface material. The third image from the top is a view of Amalthea's leading side, the side of the moon that 'leads' as Amalthea moves in its orbit around Jupiter. This image looks 'noisy' because it was obtained serendipitously during an observation of the Jovian satellite Io (Amalthea and Io shared the same camera frame but the image was exposed for bright Io rather than for the much darker Amalthea). The fourth image from the top emphasizes prominent 'spots' of relatively bright material that are located near the point on Amalthea that faces permanently away from Jupiter. The bottom image is a view of the tiny moon Metis. In all the images, north is approximately up, and the moons are shown in their correct relative sizes. The images are, from top to bottom: Thebe taken on November 7, 1997 at a range of 504,000 kilometers (about 313,000 miles); Thebe on November 7, 1997 at a range of 548,000 kilometers (about 340,000 miles); Amalthea on November 6, 1997 at a range of about 650,000 kilometers (about 404,000 miles); Amalthea on November 7, 1997 at a

  1. Atmospheric Dispersion Model Validation in Low Wind Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, Patrick

    2007-11-01

    Atmospheric plume dispersion models are used for a variety of purposes including emergency planning and response to hazardous material releases, determining force protection actions in the event of a Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) attack and for locating sources of pollution. This study provides a review of previous studies that examine the accuracy of atmospheric plume dispersion models for chemical releases. It considers the principles used to derive air dispersion plume models and looks at three specific models currently in use: Aerial Location of Hazardous Atmospheres (ALOHA), Emergency Prediction Information Code (EPIcode) and Second Order Closure Integrated Puff (SCIPUFF). Results from this study indicate over-prediction bias by the EPIcode and SCIPUFF models and under-prediction bias by the ALOHA model. The experiment parameters were for near field dispersion (less than 100 meters) in low wind speed conditions (less than 2 meters per second).

  2. Atmospheric Dispersion Model Validation in Low Wind Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, Patrick

    2007-11-01

    Atmospheric plume dispersion models are used for a variety of purposes including emergency planning and response to hazardous material releases, determining force protection actions in the event of a Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) attack and for locating sources of pollution. This study provides a review of previous studies that examine the accuracy of atmospheric plume dispersion models for chemical releases. It considers the principles used to derive air dispersion plume models and looks at three specific models currently in use: Aerial Location of Hazardous Atmospheres (ALOHA), Emergency Prediction Information Code (EPIcode) and Second Order Closure Integrated Puff (SCIPUFF). Results from this study indicate over-prediction bias by the EPIcode and SCIPUFF models and under-prediction bias by the ALOHA model. The experiment parameters were for near field dispersion (less than 100 meters) in low wind speed conditions (less than 2 meters per second).

  3. Measuring the basic parameters of neutron stars using model atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suleimanov, V.F. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (Germany); Kazan Federal University, Kazan (Russian Federation); Poutanen, J. [University of Turku, Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Piikkioe (Finland); KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Nordita, Stockholm (Sweden); Klochkov, D.; Werner, K. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Model spectra of neutron star atmospheres are nowadays widely used to fit the observed thermal X-ray spectra of neutron stars. This fitting is the key element in the method of the neutron star radius determination. Here, we present the basic assumptions used for the neutron star atmosphere modeling as well as the main qualitative features of the stellar atmospheres leading to the deviations of the emergent model spectrum from blackbody. We describe the properties of two of our model atmosphere grids: i) pure carbon atmospheres for relatively cool neutron stars (1-4MK) and ii) hot atmospheres with Compton scattering taken into account. The results obtained by applying these grids to model the X-ray spectra of the central compact object in supernova remnant HESS 1731-347, and two X-ray bursting neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries, 4U 1724-307 and 4U 1608-52, are presented. Possible systematic uncertainties associated with the obtained neutron star radii are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Measuring the basic parameters of neutron stars using model atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Suleimanov, V F; Klochkov, D; Werner, K

    2015-01-01

    Model spectra of neutron star atmospheres are nowadays widely used to fit the observed thermal X-ray spectra of neutron stars. This fitting is the key element in the method of the neutronstar radius determination. Here, we present the basic assumptions used for the neutron star atmosphere modeling as well as the main qualitative features of the stellar atmospheres leading to the deviations of the emergent model spectrum from blackbody. We describe the properties of two of our model atmosphere grids: (i) pure carbon atmospheres for relatively cool neutron stars (1--4 MK) and (ii) hot atmospheres with Compton scattering taken into account. The results obtained by applying these grids to model the X-ray spectra of the central compact object in supernova remnant HESS 1731-347, and two X-ray bursting neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries, 4U 1724-307 and 4U 1608-52, are presented. Possible systematic uncertainties associated with the obtained neutron star radii are discussed.

  5. A Day on Jupiter (Animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This 'movie' strings 11 images of Jupiter captured by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on January 9, 2007, when the spacecraft was about 80 million kilometers (49.6 million miles) from the giant planet. The sequence covers a full 10-hour rotation of Jupiter, during which the moons Ganymede and Io -- as well as the shadows they cast on Jupiter -- move across the camera's field of view.

  6. South African seasonal rainfall prediction performance by a coupled ocean-atmosphere model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Landman, WA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is presented that coupled ocean-atmosphere models can already outscore computationally less expensive atmospheric models. However, if the atmospheric models are forced with highly skillful SST predictions, they may still be a very strong...

  7. THE ATMOSPHERES OF THE HOT-JUPITERS KEPLER-5b AND KEPLER-6b OBSERVED DURING OCCULTATIONS WITH WARM-SPITZER AND KEPLER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, David; Fressin, Francois; Latham, David W. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Madhusudhan, Nikku [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Knutson, Heather A. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Deming, Drake [Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Borucki, William J. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Brown, Timothy M. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Caldwell, Douglas [SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Ford, Eric B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Gilliland, Ronald L. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Marcy, Geoffrey W. [Berkeley Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Seager, Sara, E-mail: jdesert@cfa.harvard.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02159 (United States)

    2011-11-01

    This paper reports the detection and the measurements of occultations of the two transiting hot giant exoplanets Kepler-5b and Kepler-6b by their parent stars. The observations are obtained in the near-infrared with Warm-Spitzer Space Telescope and at optical wavelengths by combining more than a year of Kepler photometry. The investigation consists of constraining the eccentricities of these systems and of obtaining broadband emergent photometric data for individual planets. For both targets, the occultations are detected at the 3{sigma} level at each wavelength with mid-occultation times consistent with circular orbits. The brightness temperatures of these planets are deduced from the infrared observations and reach T{sub Spitzer} = 1930 {+-} 100 K and T{sub Spitzer} = 1660 {+-} 120 K for Kepler-5b and Kepler-6b, respectively. We measure optical geometric albedos A{sub g} in the Kepler bandpass and find A{sub g} = 0.12 {+-} 0.04 for Kepler-5b and A{sub g} = 0.11 {+-} 0.04 for Kepler-6b, leading to upper an limit for the Bond albedo of A{sub B} {<=} 0.17 in both cases. The observations for both planets are best described by models for which most of the incident energy is redistributed on the dayside, with only less than 10% of the absorbed stellar flux redistributed to the nightside of these planets.

  8. Some results regarding the comparison of the Earth's atmospheric models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šegan S.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we examine air densities derived from our realization of aeronomic atmosphere models based on accelerometer measurements from satellites in a low Earth's orbit (LEO. Using the adapted algorithms we derive comparison parameters. The first results concerning the adjustment of the aeronomic models to the total-density model are given.

  9. Information Flow in an Atmospheric Model and Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young-noh

    2011-01-01

    Weather forecasting consists of two processes, model integration and analysis (data assimilation). During the model integration, the state estimate produced by the analysis evolves to the next cycle time according to the atmospheric model to become the background estimate. The analysis then produces a new state estimate by combining the background…

  10. Understanding of particle acceleration and loss in Jupiter's magnetosphere from Juno mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Scott

    2016-07-01

    Juno is the first Jupiter polar mission. Juno science goals include the study of Jupiter's origin, interior structure, deep atmosphere, aurora and magnetosphere. The payload consists of a set of microwave antennas for deep sounding, magnetometers, gravity radio science, low and high energy charged particle detectors, electric and magnetic field radio and plasma wave experiment, ultraviolet imaging spectrograph, infrared imager and a visible camera. Juno's extensive suite of fields and particle experiments along with the UV and IR imagers will provide the first detailed investigation of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere. The set of six microwave radiometers on Juno provide an unprecedented view of Jupiter's synchrotron emission from inside Jupiter's powerful radiation belts. The Juno mission design, science goals, and measurements related to the magnetosphere and radiation belts of Jupiter will be presented.

  11. Regional atmospheric budgets of reduced nitrogen over the British isles assessed using a multi-layer atmospheric transport model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fournier, N.; Tang, Y.S.; Dragosits, U.; Kluizenaar, Y.de; Sutton, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric budgets of reduced nitrogen for the major political regions of the British Isles are investigated with a multi-layer atmospheric transport model. The model is validated against measurements of NH3 concentration and is developed to provide atmospheric budgets for defined subdomains of the

  12. Accurate Spectral Fits of Jupiter's Great Red Spot: VIMS Visual Spectra Modelled with Chromophores Created by Photolyzed Ammonia Reacting with Acetyleneχ±

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, Kevin; Sromovsky, Lawrence A.; Fry, Patrick M.; Carlson, Robert W.; Momary, Thomas W.

    2016-10-01

    We report results incorporating the red-tinted photochemically-generated aerosols of Carlson et al (2016, Icarus 274, 106-115) in spectral models of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS). Spectral models of the 0.35-1.0-micron spectrum show good agreement with Cassini/VIMS near-center-meridian and near-limb GRS spectra for model morphologies incorporating an optically-thin layer of Carlson (2016) aerosols at high altitudes, either at the top of the tropospheric GRS cloud, or in a distinct stratospheric haze layer. Specifically, a two-layer "crème brûlée" structure of the Mie-scattering Carlson et al (2016) chromophore attached to the top of a conservatively scattering (hereafter, "white") optically-thick cloud fits the spectra well. Currently, best agreement (reduced χ2 of 0.89 for the central-meridian spectrum) is found for a 0.195-0.217-bar, 0.19 ± 0.02 opacity layer of chromophores with mean particle radius of 0.14 ± 0.01 micron. As well, a structure with a detached stratospheric chromophore layer ~0.25 bar above a white tropospheric GRS cloud provides a good spectral match (reduced χ2 of 1.16). Alternatively, a cloud morphology with the chromophore coating white particles in a single optically- and physically-thick cloud (the "coated-shell model", initially explored by Carlson et al 2016) was found to give significantly inferior fits (best reduced χ2 of 2.9). Overall, we find that models accurately fit the GRS spectrum if (1) most of the optical depth of the chromophore is in a layer near the top of the main cloud or in a distinct separated layer above it, but is not uniformly distributed within the main cloud, (2) the chromophore consists of relatively small, 0.1-0.2-micron-radius particles, and (3) the chromophore layer optical depth is small, ~ 0.1-0.2. Thus, our analysis supports the exogenic origin of the red chromophore consistent with the Carlson et al (2016) photolytic production mechanism rather than an endogenic origin, such as upwelling of material

  13. High Resolution Global Modeling of the Atmospheric Circulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    An informal review is presented of recent developments in numerical simulation of the global atmospheric circulation with very fine numerical resolution models. The focus is on results obtained recently with versions of the GFDL SKYHI model and the Atmospheric Model for the Earth Simulator (AFES) global atmospheric models. These models have been run with effective horizontal grid resolution of ~10-40 km and fine vertical resolution. The results presented demonstrate the utility of such models for the study of a diverse range of phenomena. Specifically the models are shown to simulate the development of tropical cyclones with peak winds and minimum central pressures comparable to those of the most intense hurricanes actually observed. More fundamentally, the spectrum of energy content in the mesoscale in the flow can be reproduced by these models down to near the smallest explicitly-resolved horizontal scales. In the middle atmosphere it is shown that increasing horizontal resolution can lead to significantly improved overall simulation of the global-scale circulation. The application of the models to two specific problems requiring very fine resolution global will be discussed. The spatial and temporal variability of the vertical eddy flux of zonal momentum associated with gravity waves near the tropopause is evaluated in the very fine resolution AFES model. This is a subject of great importance for understanding and modelling the flow in the middle atmosphere. Then the simulation of the small scale variations of the semidiurnal surface pressure oscillation is analyzed, and the signature of significant topographic modulation of the semidiurnal atmospheric tide is identified.

  14. Constructing an advanced software tool for planetary atmospheric modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Richard M.; Sims, Michael; Podolak, Ester; Mckay, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Scientific model building can be an intensive and painstaking process, often involving the development of large and complex computer programs. Despite the effort involved, scientific models cannot be easily distributed and shared with other scientists. In general, implemented scientific models are complex, idiosyncratic, and difficult for anyone but the original scientist/programmer to understand. We believe that advanced software techniques can facilitate both the model building and model sharing process. In this paper, we describe a prototype for a scientific modeling software tool that serves as an aid to the scientist in developing and using models. This tool includes an interactive intelligent graphical interface, a high level domain specific modeling language, a library of physics equations and experimental datasets, and a suite of data display facilities. Our prototype has been developed in the domain of planetary atmospheric modeling, and is being used to construct models of Titan's atmosphere.

  15. Atmosphere-magma ocean modeling of GJ 1132 b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Laura; Wordsworth, Robin; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Sasselov, Dimitar

    2017-01-01

    GJ 1132 b is a nearby Earth-sized exoplanet transiting an M dwarf, and is amongst the most highly characterizable small exoplanets currently known. Using a coupled atmosphere-magma ocean model, we determine that GJ 1132 b must have begun with more than 5 wt% initial water in order to still retain a water-based atmosphere. We also determine the amount of O2 that can build up in the atmosphere as a result of hydrogen dissociation and loss. We find that the magma ocean absorbs at most ~ 10% of the O2 produced, whereas more than 90% is lost to space through hydrodynamic drag. The results of the model depend strongly on the initial water abundance and the XUV model. The most common outcome for GJ 1132 b from our simulations is a tenuous atmosphere dominated by O2, although for very large initial water abundances, atmospheres with several thousands of bars of O2 are possible. A substantial steam envelope would indicate either the existence of an earlier H2 envelope or low XUV flux over the system's lifetime. A steam atmosphere would also imply the continued existence of a magma ocean on GJ 1132 b. Preliminary modeling with the addition of CO2 gas will be presented.

  16. Examining Tatooine: Atmospheric Models of Neptune-Like Circumbinary Planets

    CERN Document Server

    May, E M

    2016-01-01

    Circumbinary planets experience a time varying irradiation pattern as they orbit their two host stars. In this work, we present the first detailed study of the atmospheric effects of this irradiation pattern on known and hypothetical gaseous circumbinary planets. Using both a one-dimensional Energy Balance Model and a three-dimensional General Circulation Model, we look at the temperature differences between circumbinary planets and their equivalent single-star cases in order to determine the nature of the atmospheres of these planets. We find that for circumbinary planets on stable orbits around their host stars, temperature differences are on average no more than 1.0% in the most extreme cases. Based on detailed modeling with the General Circulation Model, we find that these temperature differences are not large enough to excite circulation differences between the two cases. We conclude that gaseous circumbinary planets can be treated as their equivalent single-star case in future atmospheric modeling effor...

  17. Using Existing Arctic Atmospheric Mercury Measurements to Refine Global and Regional Scale Atmospheric Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C. W.; Dastoor, A.; Steffen, A.; Nghiem, S. V.; Agnan, Y.; Obrist, D.

    2015-12-01

    Northern hemisphere background atmospheric concentrations of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) have been declining by up to 25% over the last ten years at some lower latitude sites. However, this decline has ranged from no decline to 9% over 10 years at Arctic long-term measurement sites. Measurements also show a highly dynamic nature of mercury (Hg) species in Arctic air and snow from early spring to the end of summer when biogeochemical transformations peak. Currently, models are unable to reproduce this variability accurately. Estimates of Hg accumulation in the Arctic and Arctic Ocean by models require a full mechanistic understanding of the multi-phase redox chemistry of Hg in air and snow as well as the role of meteorology in the physicochemical processes of Hg. We will show how findings from ground-based atmospheric Hg measurements like those made in spring 2012 during the Bromine, Ozone and Mercury Experiment (BROMEX) near Barrow, Alaska can be used to reduce the discrepancy between measurements and model output in the Canadian GEM-MACH-Hg model. The model is able to reproduce and to explain some of the variability in Arctic Hg measurements but discrepancies still remain. One improvement involves incorporation of new physical mechanisms such as the one we were able to identify during BROMEX. This mechanism, by which atmospheric mercury depletion events are abruptly ended via sea ice leads opening and inducing shallow convective mixing that replenishes GEM (and ozone) in the near surface atmospheric layer, causing an immediate recovery from the depletion event, is currently lacking in models. Future implementation of this physical mechanism will have to incorporate current remote sensing sea ice products but also rely on the development of products that can identify sea ice leads quantitatively. In this way, we can advance the knowledge of the dynamic nature of GEM in the Arctic and the impact of climate change along with new regulations on the overall

  18. The physical theory and propagation model of THz atmospheric propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, R; Yao, J Q; Xu, D G; Wang, J L; Wang, P, E-mail: wangran19861014@163.com [College of Precision Instrument and Opto-electronics Engineering, Institute of Laser and Opto-electronics, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2011-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation is extensively applied in diverse fields, such as space communication, Earth environment observation, atmosphere science, remote sensing and so on. And the research on propagation features of THz wave in the atmosphere becomes more and more important. This paper firstly illuminates the advantages and outlook of THz in space technology. Then it introduces the theoretical framework of THz atmospheric propagation, including some fundamental physical concepts and processes. The attenuation effect (especially the absorption of water vapor), the scattering of aerosol particles and the effect of turbulent flow mainly influence THz atmosphere propagation. Fundamental physical laws are illuminated as well, such as Lamber-beer law, Mie scattering theory and radiative transfer equation. The last part comprises the demonstration and comparison of THz atmosphere propagation models like Moliere(V5), SARTre and AMATERASU. The essential problems are the deep analysis of physical mechanism of this process, the construction of atmospheric propagation model and databases of every kind of material in the atmosphere, and the standardization of measurement procedures.

  19. The physical theory and propagation model of THz atmospheric propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Yao, J. Q.; Xu, D. G.; Wang, J. L.; Wang, P.

    2011-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation is extensively applied in diverse fields, such as space communication, Earth environment observation, atmosphere science, remote sensing and so on. And the research on propagation features of THz wave in the atmosphere becomes more and more important. This paper firstly illuminates the advantages and outlook of THz in space technology. Then it introduces the theoretical framework of THz atmospheric propagation, including some fundamental physical concepts and processes. The attenuation effect (especially the absorption of water vapor), the scattering of aerosol particles and the effect of turbulent flow mainly influence THz atmosphere propagation. Fundamental physical laws are illuminated as well, such as Lamber-beer law, Mie scattering theory and radiative transfer equation. The last part comprises the demonstration and comparison of THz atmosphere propagation models like Moliere(V5), SARTre and AMATERASU. The essential problems are the deep analysis of physical mechanism of this process, the construction of atmospheric propagation model and databases of every kind of material in the atmosphere, and the standardization of measurement procedures.

  20. Key features of the IPSL ocean atmosphere model and its sensitivity to atmospheric resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marti, Olivier; Braconnot, P.; Bellier, J.; Brockmann, P.; Caubel, A.; Noblet, N. de; Friedlingstein, P.; Idelkadi, A.; Kageyama, M. [Unite Mixte CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, IPSL/LSCE, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Dufresne, J.L.; Bony, S.; Codron, F.; Fairhead, L.; Grandpeix, J.Y.; Hourdin, F.; Musat, I. [Unite Mixte CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique-ENS-UPCM, IPSL/LMD, Paris Cedex 05 (France); Benshila, R.; Guilyardi, E.; Levy, C.; Madec, G.; Mignot, J.; Talandier, C. [unite mixte CNRS-IRD-UPMC, IPLS/LOCEAN, Paris Cedex 05 (France); Cadule, P.; Denvil, S.; Foujols, M.A. [Institut Pierre Simon Laplace des Sciences de l' Environnement (IPSL), Paris Cedex 05 (France); Fichefet, T.; Goosse, H. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Institut d' Astronomie et de Geophysique Georges Lemaitre, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Krinner, G. [Unite mixte CNRS-UJF Grenoble, LGGE, BP96, Saint-Martin-d' Heres (France); Swingedouw, D. [CNRS/CERFACS, Toulouse (France)

    2010-01-15

    This paper presents the major characteristics of the Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL) coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model. The model components and the coupling methodology are described, as well as the main characteristics of the climatology and interannual variability. The model results of the standard version used for IPCC climate projections, and for intercomparison projects like the Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison Project (PMIP 2) are compared to those with a higher resolution in the atmosphere. A focus on the North Atlantic and on the tropics is used to address the impact of the atmosphere resolution on processes and feedbacks. In the North Atlantic, the resolution change leads to an improved representation of the storm-tracks and the North Atlantic oscillation. The better representation of the wind structure increases the northward salt transports, the deep-water formation and the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. In the tropics, the ocean-atmosphere dynamical coupling, or Bjerknes feedback, improves with the resolution. The amplitude of ENSO (El Nino-Southern oscillation) consequently increases, as the damping processes are left unchanged. (orig.)

  1. JUPITER PROJECT - JOINT UNIVERSAL PARAMETER IDENTIFICATION AND EVALUATION OF RELIABILITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The JUPITER (Joint Universal Parameter IdenTification and Evaluation of Reliability) project builds on the technology of two widely used codes for sensitivity analysis, data assessment, calibration, and uncertainty analysis of environmental models: PEST and UCODE.

  2. Fitting Orbits to Jupiter's Moons with a Spreadsheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Describes how a spreadsheet is used to fit a circular orbit model to observations of Jupiter's moons made with a small telescope. Kepler's Third Law and the inverse square law of gravity are observed. (AIM)

  3. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The next decade will almost certainly see the direct imaging of extrasolar giant planets around nearby stars. Unlike purely radial velocity detections, direct imaging will open the door to characterizing the atmosphere and interiors of extrasola planets and ultimately provide clues on their formation and evolution through time. This process has already begun for the transiting planets, placing new constraints on their atmospheric structure, composition, and evolution. Indeed the key to understanding giant planet detectability, interpreting spectra, and constraining effective temperature and hence evolution-is the atmosphere. I will review the universe of extrasolar giant planet models, focusing on what we have already learned from modeling and what we will likely be able to learn from the first generation of direct detection data. In addition to these theoretical considerations, I will review the observations and interpretation of the - transiting hot Jupiters. These objects provide a test of our ability to model exotic atmospheres and challenge our current understanding of giant planet evolution.

  4. Exact results in modeling planetary atmospheres-III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelkowski, J. [Institut fuer Atmosphaere und Umwelt, J.W. Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt, Campus Riedberg, Altenhoferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt a.M. (Germany)], E-mail: Pelkowski@meteor.uni-frankfurt.de; Chevallier, L. [Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, Laboratoire LUTH, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon cedex (France); Rutily, B. [Universite de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Observatoire de Lyon, 9 avenue Charles Andre, F-69230 Saint-Genis-Laval (France); CNRS, UMR 5574, Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon (France); Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Titaud, O. [Centro de Modelamiento Matematico, UMI 2807 CNRS-UChile, Blanco Encalada 2120 - 7 Piso, Casilla 170 - Correo 3, Santiago (Chile)

    2008-01-15

    We apply the semi-gray model of our previous paper to the particular case of the Earth's atmosphere, in order to illustrate quantitatively the inverse problem associated with the direct problem we dealt with before. From given climatological values of the atmosphere's spherical albedo and transmittance for visible radiation, the single-scattering albedo and the optical thickness in the visible are inferred, while the infrared optical thickness is deduced for given global average surface temperature. Eventually, temperature distributions in terms of the infrared optical depth will be shown for a terrestrial atmosphere assumed to be semi-gray and, locally, in radiative and thermodynamic equilibrium.

  5. Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Fourth year report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowley, T.J.; North, G.R.; Smith, N.R. [Applied Research Corp., College Station, TX (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The scope of the report is to present the results of the fourth year`s work on the atmospheric modeling part of the global climate studies task. The development testing of computer models and initial results are discussed. The appendices contain studies that provide supporting information and guidance to the modeling work and further details on computer model development. Complete documentation of the models, including user information, will be prepared under separate reports and manuals.

  6. A dynamic model reduction algorithm for atmospheric chemistry models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillana, Mauricio; Le Sager, Philippe; Jacob, Daniel J.; Brenner, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Understanding the dynamics of the chemical composition of our atmosphere is essential to address a wide range of environmental issues from air quality to climate change. Current models solve a very large and stiff system of nonlinear advection-reaction coupled partial differential equations in order to calculate the time evolution of the concentration of over a hundred chemical species. The numerical solution of this system of equations is difficult and the development of efficient and accurate techniques to achieve this has inspired research for the past four decades. In this work, we propose an adaptive method that dynamically adjusts the chemical mechanism to be solved to the local environment and we show that the use of our approach leads to accurate results and considerable computational savings. Our strategy consists of partitioning the computational domain in active and inactive regions for each chemical species at every time step. In a given grid-box, the concentration of active species is calculated using an accurate numerical scheme, whereas the concentration of inactive species is calculated using a simple and computationally inexpensive formula. We demonstrate the performance of the method by application to the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model.

  7. Atmospheric Turbulence Modeling for Aero Vehicles: Fractional Order Fits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence models are necessary for the design of both inlet/engine and flight controls, as well as for studying coupling between the propulsion and the vehicle structural dynamics for supersonic vehicles. Models based on the Kolmogorov spectrum have been previously utilized to model atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, a more accurate model is developed in its representative fractional order form, typical of atmospheric disturbances. This is accomplished by first scaling the Kolmogorov spectral to convert them into finite energy von Karman forms and then by deriving an explicit fractional circuit-filter type analog for this model. This circuit model is utilized to develop a generalized formulation in frequency domain to approximate the fractional order with the products of first order transfer functions, which enables accurate time domain simulations. The objective of this work is as follows. Given the parameters describing the conditions of atmospheric disturbances, and utilizing the derived formulations, directly compute the transfer function poles and zeros describing these disturbances for acoustic velocity, temperature, pressure, and density. Time domain simulations of representative atmospheric turbulence can then be developed by utilizing these computed transfer functions together with the disturbance frequencies of interest.

  8. Complex source rate estimation for atmospheric transport and dispersion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, L.L.

    1993-09-13

    The accuracy associated with assessing the environmental consequences of an accidental atmospheric release of radioactivity is highly dependent on our knowledge of the source release rate which is generally poorly known. This paper reports on a technique that integrates the radiological measurements with atmospheric dispersion modeling for more accurate source term estimation. We construct a minimum least squares methodology for solving the inverse problem with no a priori information about the source rate.

  9. Atmospheric Turbulence Modeling for Aerospace Vehicles: Fractional Order Fit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An improved model for simulating atmospheric disturbances is disclosed. A scale Kolmogorov spectral may be scaled to convert the Kolmogorov spectral into a finite energy von Karman spectral and a fractional order pole-zero transfer function (TF) may be derived from the von Karman spectral. Fractional order atmospheric turbulence may be approximated with an integer order pole-zero TF fit, and the approximation may be stored in memory.

  10. The Origin of Retrograde Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoz, Smadar; Farr, W.; Lithwick, Y.; Rasio, F.; Teyssandier, J.

    2011-09-01

    The search for extra-solar planets has led to the surprising discovery of many Jupiter-like planets in very close proximity to their host star, the so-called ``hot Jupiters'' (HJ). Even more surprisingly, many of these HJs have orbits that are eccentric or highly inclined with respect to the equator of the star, and some (about 25%) even orbiting counter to the spin direction of the star. This poses a unique challenge to all planet formation models. We show that secular interactions between Jupiter-like planet and another perturber in the system can easily produce retrograde HJ orbits. We show that in the frame of work of secular hierarchical triple system (the so-called Kozai mechanism) the inner orbit's angular momentum component parallel to the total angular momentum (i.e., the z-component of the inner orbit angular momentum) need not be constant. In fact, it can even change sign, leading to a retrograde orbit. A brief excursion to very high eccentricity during the chaotic evolution of the inner orbit allows planet-star tidal interactions to rapidly circularize that orbit, decoupling the planets and forming a retrograde hot Jupiter. We estimate the relative frequencies of retrograde orbits and counter to the stellar spin orbits using Monte Carlo simulations, and find that the they are consistent with the observations. The high observed incidence of planets orbiting counter to the stellar spin direction may suggest that planet--planet secular interactions are an important part of their dynamical history.

  11. Hot Jupiter Magnetospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Trammell, George B; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2010-01-01

    (Abridged) The upper atmospheres of close-in gas giant exoplanets are subjected to intense heating/tidal forces from their parent stars. Atomic/ionized hydrogen (H) layers are sufficiently rarefied that magnetic pressure may dominate gas pressure for expected planetary magnetic field strength. We examine the magnetospheric structure using a 3D isothermal magnetohydrodynamic model that includes: a static "dead zone" near the magnetic equator containing magnetically confined gas; a "wind zone" outside the magnetic equator in which thermal pressure gradients and the magneto-centrifugal-tidal effect give rise to transonic outflow; and a region near the poles where sufficiently strong tidal forces may suppress transonic outflow. Using dipole field geometry, we estimate the size of the dead zone to be ~1-10 planetary radii for a range of parameters. To understand appropriate base conditions for the 3D isothermal model, we compute a 1D thermal model in which photoelectric heating from the stellar Lyman continuum is ...

  12. Medicanes in an ocean–atmosphere coupled regional climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Akhtar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available So-called medicanes (Mediterranean hurricanes are meso-scale, marine, and warm-core Mediterranean cyclones that exhibit some similarities to tropical cyclones. The strong cyclonic winds associated with medicanes threaten the highly populated coastal areas around the Mediterranean basin. To reduce the risk of casualties and overall negative impacts, it is important to improve the understanding of medicanes with the use of numerical models. In this study, we employ an atmospheric limited-area model (COSMO-CLM coupled with a one-dimensional ocean model (1-D NEMO-MED12 to simulate medicanes. The aim of this study is to assess the robustness of the coupled model in simulating these extreme events. For this purpose, 11 historical medicane events are simulated using the atmosphere-only model, COSMO-CLM, and coupled model, with different setups (horizontal atmospheric grid-spacings of 0.44°, 0.22°, and 0.08°; with/without spectral nudging, and an ocean grid-spacing of 1/12°. The results show that at high-resolution, the coupled model is able to not only simulate most of medicane events but also improve the track length, core temperature, and wind speed of simulated medicanes compared to the atmosphere-only simulations. The results suggest that the coupled model is more proficient for systemic and detailed studies of historical medicane events, and that this model can be an effective tool for future projections.

  13. A new atmospheric aerosol phase equilibrium model (UHAERO: organic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Amundson

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In atmospheric aerosols, water and volatile inorganic and organic species are distributed between the gas and aerosol phases in accordance with thermodynamic equilibrium. Within an atmospheric particle, liquid and solid phases can exist at equilibrium. Models exist for computation of phase equilibria for inorganic/water mixtures typical of atmospheric aerosols; when organic species are present, the phase equilibrium problem is complicated by organic/water interactions as well as the potentially large number of organic species. We present here an extension of the UHAERO inorganic thermodynamic model (Amundson et al., 2006c to organic/water systems. Phase diagrams for a number of model organic/water systems characteristic of both primary and secondary organic aerosols are computed. Also calculated are inorganic/organic/water phase diagrams that show the effect of organics on inorganic deliquescence behavior. The effect of the choice of activity coefficient model for organics on the computed phase equilibria is explored.

  14. A new atmospheric aerosol phase equilibrium model (UHAERO: organic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Amundson

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In atmospheric aerosols, water and volatile inorganic and organic species are distributed between the gas and aerosol phases in accordance with thermodynamic equilibrium. Within an atmospheric particle, liquid and solid phases can exist at equilibrium. Models exist for computation of phase equilibria for inorganic/water mixtures typical of atmospheric aerosols; when organic species are present, the phase equilibrium problem is complicated by organic/water interactions as well as the potentially large number of organic species. We present here an extension of the UHAERO inorganic thermodynamic model (Amundson et al., 2006c to organic/water systems. Phase diagrams for a number of model organic/water systems characteristic of both primary and secondary organic aerosols are computed. Also calculated are inorganic/organic/water phase diagrams that show the effect of organics on inorganic deliquescence behavior. The effect of the choice of activity coefficient model for organics on the computed phase equilibria is explored.

  15. Critical review of wind tunnel modeling of atmospheric heat dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orgill, M.M.

    1977-05-01

    There is increasing concern by scientists that future proposed energy or power parks may significantly affect the environment by releasing large quantities of heat and water vapor to the atmosphere. A critical review is presented of the potential application of physical modeling (wind tunnels) to assess possible atmospheric effects from heat dissipation systems such as cooling towers. A short inventory of low-speed wind tunnel facilities is included in the review. The useful roles of wind tunnels are assessed and the state-of-the-art of physical modeling is briefly reviewed. Similarity criteria are summarized and present limitations in satisfying these criteria are considered. Current physical models are defined and limitations are discussed. Three experimental problems are discussed in which physical modeling may be able to provide data. These are: defining the critical atmospheric heat load; topographic and local circulation effects on thermal plumes; and plume rise and downstream effects.

  16. Exploration of the Jovian System by EJSM (Europa Jupiter System Mission): Origin of Jupiter and Evolution of Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Sho; Fujimoto, Masaki; Takashima, Takeshi; Yano, Hajime; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Kimura, Jun; Okada, Tatsuaki; Kawakatsu, Yasuhiro; Tsuda, Yuichi; Kawaguchi, Jun-Ichiro; Funase, Ryu; Mori, Osamu; Morimoto, Mutsuko; Ikoma, Masahiro; Naganuma, Takeshi; Yamaji, Atsushi; Hussmann, Hauke; Kurita, Kei; Working Group, Jupiter

    EJSM (Europa Jupiter System Mission) is a planned Jovian system mission with three spacecraft aiming at coordinated observations of the Jovian satellites especially Europa and the magnetosphere, atmosphere and interior of Jupiter. It was formerly called "Laplace" mission. In October 2007, it was selected as one of future ESA scientific missions Cosmic Vision (2015-2025). From the beginning, Japanese group is participating in the discussion process of the mission. JAXA will take a role on the magnetosphere spinner JMO (Jupiter Magnetosphere Orbiter). On the other hand, ESA will take charge of JGO (Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter) and NASA will be responsible for JEO (Jupiter Europa Orbiter). In February 2009, EJSM is prioritized as the first candidate of outer planet flagship mission and mission study continues in the course of Cosmic Vision. The expected launch time of EJSM will be expected in 2020. Currently we are seeking a possibility to combine JMO with a proposed solar sail mission of JAXA for Jupiter and one of Trojan asteroids.

  17. Hubble Gallery of Jupiter's Galilean Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This is a Hubble Space Telescope 'family portrait' of the four largest moons of Jupiter, first observed by the Italian scientist Galileo Galilei nearly four centuries ago. Located approximately one-half billion miles away, the moons are so small that, in visible light, they appear as fuzzy disks in the largest ground-based telescopes. Hubble can resolve surface details seen previously only by the Voyager spacecraft in the early 1980s. While the Voyagers provided close-up snapshots of the satellites, Hubble can now follow changes on the moons and reveal other characteristics at ultraviolet and near-infrared wavelengths.Over the past year Hubble has charted new volcanic activity on Io's active surface, found a faint oxygen atmosphere on the moon Europa, and identified ozone on the surface of Ganymede. Hubble ultraviolet observations of Callisto show the presence of fresh ice on the surface that may indicate impacts from micrometeorites and charged particles from Jupiter's magnetosphere.Hubble observations will play a complementary role when the Galileo spacecraft arrives at Jupiter in December of this year.This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the World Wide Web on the Space Telescope Science Institute home page at URL http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/

  18. Directly Imaging Tidally Powered Migrating Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Subo; Socrates, Aristotle

    2012-01-01

    We show that ongoing direct imaging experiments may detect a new class of long-period, highly luminous, tidally powered extrasolar gas giants. Even though they are hosted by Gyr-"old" main-sequence stars, they can be as "hot" as young Jupiters at ~100 Myr, the prime targets of direct imaging surveys. These planets, with years-long orbits, are presently migrating to "feed" the "hot Jupiters" in steady state. Their existence is expected from a class of "high-e" migration mechanisms, in which gas giants are excited to highly eccentric orbits and then shrink their semi-major axis by factor of ~ 10-100 due to tidal dissipation at successive close periastron passages. The dissipated orbital energy is converted to heat, and if it is deposited deep enough into the planet atmosphere, the planet likely radiates steadily at luminosity ~2-3 orders of magnitude larger than that of our Jupiter during a typical Gyr migration time scale. Their large orbital separations and expected high planet-to-star flux ratios in IR make ...

  19. Internal atmospheric noise characteristics in twentieth century coupled atmosphere-ocean model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colfescu, Ioana; Schneider, Edwin K.

    2017-09-01

    The statistical characteristics of the atmospheric internal variability (hereafter internal atmospheric noise) for surface pressure (PS) in twentieth century simulations of a coupled general circulation model are documented. The atmospheric noise is determined from daily post-industrial (1871-1998) Community Climate System Model 3 simulations by removing the SST and externally forced responses from the total fields. The forced responses are found from atmosphere-only simulations forced by the SST and external forcing of the coupled runs. However, we do not address the influence of the SST variability on the synoptic scale high frequency weather noise.The spatial patterns of the main seasonal modes of atmospheric noise variability are found for boreal winter and summer from empirical orthogonal function analyses performed globally and for various regions, including the North Atlantic, the North Pacific, and the equatorial Pacific. The temporal characteristics of the modes are illustrated by power spectra and probability density functions (PDF) of the principal components (PC). Our findings show that, for two different realizations of noise, the variability is dominated by large scale spatial structures of the atmospheric noise that resemble observed patterns, and that their relative amplitudes in the CGCM and AGCM simulations are very similar. The regional expression of the dominant global mode, a seasonally dependent AO-like or AAO-like pattern is also found in the regional analyses, with similar time dependence. The PCs in the CGCM and the corresponding SST forced AGCM simulations are uncorrelated, but the spectra and PDFs of the CGCM and AGCM PCs are similar.The temporal structures of the noise PCs are white at timescales larger than few months, so that these modes can be thought of as stochastic forcings (in time) for the climate system. The PDFs of the noise PCs are not statistically distinguishable from Gaussian distributions with the same standard deviation

  20. Modeling Planetary Atmospheric Energy Deposition By Energetic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Christopher; Bougher, Stephen; Gronoff, Guillaume; Barthelemy, Mathieu

    2016-07-01

    The structure, dynamics, chemistry, and evolution of planetary upper atmospheres are in large part determined by the available sources of energy. In addition to the solar EUV flux, the solar wind and solar energetic particle (SEP) events are also important sources. Both of these particle populations can significantly affect an atmosphere, causing atmospheric loss and driving chemical reactions. Attention has been paid to these sources from the standpoint of the radiation environment for humans and electronics, but little work has been done to evaluate their impact on planetary atmospheres. At unmagnetized planets or those with crustal field anomalies, in particular, the solar wind and SEPs of all energies have direct access to the atmosphere and so provide a more substantial energy source than at planets having protective global magnetic fields. Additionally, solar wind and energetic particle fluxes should be more significant for planets orbiting more active stars, such as is the case in the early history of the solar system for paleo-Venus and Mars. Therefore quantification of the atmospheric energy input from the solar wind and SEP events is an important component of our understanding of the processes that control their state and evolution. We have applied a full Lorentz motion particle transport model to study the effects of particle precipitation in the upper atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Such modeling has been previously done for Earth and Mars using a guiding center precipitation model. Currently, this code is only valid for particles with small gyroradii in strong uniform magnetic fields. There is a clear necessity for a Lorentz formulation, hence, a systematic study of the ionization, excitation, and energy deposition has been conducted, including a comparison of the influence relative to other energy sources (namely EUV photons). The result is a robust examination of the influence of energetic ion transport on the Venus and Mars upper atmosphere which

  1. Atmospheric monitoring and model applications at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keilhauer Bianca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Pierre Auger Observatory detects high-energy cosmic rays with energies above ∼1017 eV. It is built as a multi-hybrid detector measuring extensive air showers with different techniques. For the reconstruction of extensive air showers, the atmospheric conditions at the site of the Observatory have to be known quite well. This is particularly true for reconstructions based on data obtained by the fluorescence technique. For these data, not only the weather conditions near ground are relevant, most important are altitude-dependent atmospheric profiles. The Pierre Auger Observatory has set up a dedicated atmospheric monitoring programme at the site in the Mendoza province, Argentina. Beyond this, exploratory studies were performed in Colorado, USA, for possible installations in the northern hemisphere. In recent years, the atmospheric monitoring programme at the Pierre Auger Observatory was supplemented by applying data from atmospheric models. Both GDAS and HYSPLIT are developments by the US weather department NOAA and the data are freely available. GDAS is a global model of the atmospheric state parameters on a 1 degree geographical grid, based on real-time measurements and numeric weather predictions, providing a full altitude-dependent data set every 3 hours. HYSPLIT is a powerful tool to track the movement of air masses at various heights, and with it the aerosols. Combining local measurements of the atmospheric state variables and aerosol scattering with the given model data, advanced studies about atmospheric conditions can be performed and high precision air shower reconstructions are achieved.

  2. Jupiter's X-ray aurora via polar ion precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jackson; Houston, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Jupiter's auroral X-ray emission was first observed by the Einstein X-ray Observatory in 1979 and has since been observed over the past 20 years by the Roentgen satellite, Chandra X-ray Observatory, and XMM-Newton. The strong X-ray emission produces a spectacular 1 GW of total power at the polar caps. There has been extensive research of X-ray production from incident electrons; however, this has not been able to account for the full power of the generated X-rays. The remainder of the X-ray production can be modeled and reproduced into observable results by the precipitation of several MeV oxygen and sulfur ions from the outer magnetosphere into an atmosphere that has been adapted to the auroral conditions. The present research uses a revised model of a hybrid Monte Carlo method with varying oxygen ion energies (10 keV/u - 5 MeV/u) and updated collision cross-sections to concentrate on the ionization of the atmosphere, generation of secondary electron fluxes and their escape from the atmosphere, and characterization of the H2 Lyman-Werner band emission. Predictions relevant to awaited NASA's Juno results are made: escaping electrons with an energy range of 1 eV to 6 keV, H2 band emission rates of 80 kR, and downward field-aligned currents of at least 2 MA.

  3. Regional atmospheric composition modeling with CHIMERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menut, L.; Bessagnet, B.; Khvorostyanov, D.; Beekmann, M.; Colette, A.; Coll, I.; Curci, G.; Foret, G.; Hodzic, A.; Mailler, S.; Meleux, F.; Monge, J.-L.; Pison, I.; Turquety, S.; Valari, M.; Vautard, R.; Vivanco, M. G.

    2013-01-01

    Tropospheric trace gas and aerosol pollutants have adverse effects on health, environment and climate. In order to quantify and mitigate such effects, a wide range of processes leading to the formation and transport of pollutants must be considered, understood and represented in numerical models. Regional scale pollution episodes result from the combination of several factors: high emissions (from anthropogenic or natural sources), stagnant meteorological conditions, velocity and efficiency of the chemistry and the deposition. All these processes are highly variable in time and space, and their relative importance to the pollutants budgets can be quantified within a chemistry-transport models (CTM). The offline CTM CHIMERE model uses meteorological model fields and emissions fluxes and calculates deterministically their behavior in the troposphere. The calculated three-dimensional fields of chemical concentrations can be compared to measurements to analyze past periods or used to make air quality forecasts and CHIMERE has enabled a fine understanding of pollutants transport during numerous measurements campaigns. It is a part of the PREVAIR french national forecast platform, delivering pollutant concentrations up to three days in advance. The model also allows scenario studies and long term simulations for pollution trends. The modelling of photochemical air pollution has reached a good level of maturity, and the latest projects involving CHIMERE now aim at increasing our understanding of pollution impact on health at the urban scale or at the other end of the spectrum for long term air quality and climate change interlinkage studies, quantifying the emissions and transport of pollen, but also, at a larger scale, analyzing the transport of pollutants plumes emitted by volcanic eruptions and forest fires.

  4. Regional atmospheric composition modeling with CHIMERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Menut

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric trace gas and aerosol pollutants have adverse effects on health, environment and climate. In order to quantify and mitigate such effects, a wide range of processes leading to the formation and transport of pollutants must be considered, understood and represented in numerical models. Regional scale pollution episodes result from the combination of several factors: high emissions (from anthropogenic or natural sources, stagnant meteorological conditions, velocity and efficiency of the chemistry and the deposition. All these processes are highly variable in time and space, and their relative importance to the pollutants budgets can be quantified within a chemistry-transport models (CTM. The offline CTM CHIMERE model uses meteorological model fields and emissions fluxes and calculates deterministically their behavior in the troposphere. The calculated three-dimensional fields of chemical concentrations can be compared to measurements to analyze past periods or used to make air quality forecasts and CHIMERE has enabled a fine understanding of pollutants transport during numerous measurements campaigns. It is a part of the PREVAIR french national forecast platform, delivering pollutant concentrations up to three days in advance. The model also allows scenario studies and long term simulations for pollution trends. The modelling of photochemical air pollution has reached a good level of maturity, and the latest projects involving CHIMERE now aim at increasing our understanding of pollution impact on health at the urban scale or at the other end of the spectrum for long term air quality and climate change interlinkage studies, quantifying the emissions and transport of pollen, but also, at a larger scale, analyzing the transport of pollutants plumes emitted by volcanic eruptions and forest fires.

  5. Jupiter and Planet Earth. [planetary and biological evolution and natural satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The evolution of Jupiter and Earth are discussed along with their atmospheres, the radiation belts around both planets, natural satellites, the evolution of life, and the Pioneer 10. Educational study projects are also included.

  6. Atmospheric modelling for seasonal prediction at the CSIR

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Landman, WA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available by observed monthly sea-surface temperature (SST) and sea-ice fields. The AGCM is the conformal-cubic atmospheric model (CCAM) administered by the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. Since the model is forced with observed rather than predicted...

  7. Three spacecraft observe Jupiter's glowing polar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-01

    again in 1994, when the fragments of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 hit Jupiter in a spectacular series of events. The explosive impacts appeared to repress the auroral activity at the time, suggesting a remarkable effect of comet dust on the charged particles creating the aurorae in Jupiter's atmosphere. The new results on variability due to other causes will help astronomers to assess that effect more confidently. They will also compare the 1994 and 1996 IUE data to see how the atmosphere of Jupiter has recovered from the impacts. In Jupiter's vicinity IUE registered ultraviolet emissions from oxygen and sulphur atoms littering the orbit of Io, and probably released by volcanic emissions from that peculiar moon. This Io Torus is highly variable too. The record of its ultraviolet emissions, both within the 1996 campaign and in comparison with earlier observations, will help the astronomers to understand the reasons for the variations. A remarkable history The close scrutiny of Jupiter and its moons was the final astronomical task of IUE, before the termination of space operations on 30 September 1996. Over the past few months the IUE science team and collaborating astronomers in Europe have fulfilled a wish-list of important observations precluded by the intense demands on their ultraviolet space observatory throughout its life of nearly nineteen years. The observations in the final science programme confirmed and extended IUE's record, as the most reliable and productive astronomical satellite that ever flew. In March of this year the spacecraft was ailing, with only one of its six gyros still functioning, which severely limited the scope of its original mission. By skillful control and spacecraft engineering it went on harvesting new data, including prolonged observations of Comet Hyakutake. The concluding campaigns that began in April targeted the gamma-ray emitting "blazar" Markarian 421, various other active galaxies, and stellar winds, as well as Jupiter. "I am sad but

  8. Biology on the outer planets. [life possibility in atmospheres and moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. S.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    A brief review is given of information on the structure and composition of the outer planets and the organic reactions that may be occurring on them. The possibility of life arising or surviving in the atmospheres of these planets is considered, and the problem of contamination during future unmanned missions is assessed. Atmospheric models or available atmospheric data are reviewed for Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Pluto, the Galilean satellites, and Titan. The presence of biologically interesting gases on Jupiter and Saturn is discussed, requirements for life on Jupiter are summarized, and possible sources of biological energy are examined. Proposals are made for protecting these planets and satellites from biological contamination by spacecraftborne terrestrial organisms.

  9. Interfacing the Urban Land-Atmosphere System Through Coupled Urban Canopy and Atmospheric Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiyun; Wang, Zhi-Hua

    2015-03-01

    We couple a single column model (SCM) to a cutting-edge single-layer urban canopy model (SLUCM) with realistic representation of urban hydrological processes. The land-surface transport of energy and moisture parametrized by the SLUCM provides lower boundary conditions to the overlying atmosphere. The coupled SLUCM-SCM model is tested against field measurements of sensible and latent heat fluxes in the surface layer, as well as vertical profiles of temperature and humidity in the mixed layer under convective conditions. The model is then used to simulate urban land-atmosphere interactions by changing urban geometry, surface albedo, vegetation fraction and aerodynamic roughness. Results show that changes of landscape characteristics have a significant impact on the growth of the boundary layer as well as on the distributions of temperature and humidity in the mixed layer. Overall, the proposed numerical framework provides a useful stand-alone modelling tool, with which the impact of urban land-surface conditions on the local hydrometeorology can be assessed via land-atmosphere interactions.

  10. DIRECTLY IMAGING TIDALLY POWERED MIGRATING JUPITERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Subo; Katz, Boaz; Socrates, Aristotle [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2013-01-10

    Upcoming direct-imaging experiments may detect a new class of long-period, highly luminous, tidally powered extrasolar gas giants. Even though they are hosted by {approx} Gyr-'old' main-sequence stars, they can be as 'hot' as young Jupiters at {approx}100 Myr, the prime targets of direct-imaging surveys. They are on years-long orbits and presently migrating to 'feed' the 'hot Jupiters'. They are expected from 'high-e' migration mechanisms, in which Jupiters are excited to highly eccentric orbits and then shrink semimajor axis by a factor of {approx}10-100 due to tidal dissipation at close periastron passages. The dissipated orbital energy is converted to heat, and if it is deposited deep enough into the atmosphere, the planet likely radiates steadily at luminosity L {approx} 100-1000 L{sub Jup}(2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}-2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} L{sub Sun }) during a typical {approx} Gyr migration timescale. Their large orbital separations and expected high planet-to-star flux ratios in IR make them potentially accessible to high-contrast imaging instruments on 10 m class telescopes. {approx}10 such planets are expected to exist around FGK dwarfs within {approx}50 pc. Long-period radial velocity planets are viable candidates, and the highly eccentric planet HD 20782b at maximum angular separation {approx}0.''08 is a promising candidate. Directly imaging these tidally powered Jupiters would enable a direct test of high-e migration mechanisms. Once detected, the luminosity would provide a direct measurement of the migration rate, and together with mass (and possibly radius) estimate, they would serve as a laboratory to study planetary spectral formation and tidal physics.

  11. Onboard Atmospheric Modeling and Prediction for Autonomous Aerobraking Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolson, Robert H.; Prince, Jill L. H.

    2011-01-01

    Aerobraking has proven to be an effective means of increasing the science payload for planetary orbiting missions and/or for enabling the use of less expensive launch vehicles. Though aerobraking has numerous benefits, large operations cost have been required to maintain the aerobraking time line without violating aerodynamic heating or other constraints. Two operations functions have been performed on an orbit by orbit basis to estimate atmospheric properties relevant to aerobraking. The Navigation team typically solves for an atmospheric density scale factor using DSN tracking data and the atmospheric modeling team uses telemetric accelerometer data to recover atmospheric density profiles. After some effort, decisions are made about the need for orbit trim maneuvers to adjust periapsis altitude to stay within the aerobraking corridor. Autonomous aerobraking would reduce the need for many ground based tasks. To be successful, atmospheric modeling must be performed on the vehicle in near real time. This paper discusses the issues associated with estimating the planetary atmosphere onboard and evaluates a number of the options for Mars, Venus and Titan aerobraking missions.

  12. Models of ash-laden intrusions in a stratified atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Andrew; Johnson, Chris; Sparks, Steve; Huppert, Herbert; Woodhouse, Mark; Phillips, Jeremy

    2013-04-01

    Recent volcanic eruptions and the associated dispersion of ash through the atmosphere have led to widespread closures of airspace, for example the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajokull and 2011 eruption of Puyehue-Cordón Caulle. These episodes bring into sharp focus the need to predict quantitatively the transport and deposition of fine ash and in particular, its interaction with atmospheric wind. Many models of this process are based upon capturing the physics of advection with the wind, turbulence-induced diffusion and gravitational settling. Buoyancy-induced processes, associated with the density of the ash cloud and the background stratification of the atmosphere, are neglected and it is this issue that we address in this contribution. In particular, we suggest that the buoyancy-induced motion may account for the relatively thin distal ash layers that have been observed in the atmosphere and their relatively weak cross-wind spreading. We formulate a new model for buoyancy-driven spreading in the atmosphere in which we treat the evolving ash layer as relatively shallow so that its motion is predominantly horizontal and the pressure locally hydrostatic. The motion is driven by horizontal pressure gradients along with interfacial drag between the flowing ash layer and the surrounding atmosphere. Ash-laden fluid is delivered to this intrusion from a plume source and has risen through the atmosphere to its height of neutral buoyancy. The ash particles are then transported horizontally by the intrusion and progressively settle out of it to sediment through the atmosphere and form the deposit on the ground. This model is integrated numerically and analysed asymptotically in various regimes, including scenarios in which the atmosphere is quiescent and in which there is a sustained wind. The results yield predictions for the variation of the thickness of the intrusion with distance from the source and for how the concentration of ash is reduced due to settling. They

  13. Box models for the evolution of atmospheric oxygen: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    A simple 3-box model of the atmosphere/ocean system is used to describe the various stages in the evolution of atmospheric oxygen. In Stage I, which probably lasted until redbeds began to form about 2.0 Ga ago, the Earth's surface environment was generally devoid of free O2, except possibly in localized regions of high productivity in the surface ocean. In Stage II, which may have lasted for less than 150 Ma, the atmosphere and surface ocean were oxidizing, while the deep ocean remained anoxic. In Stage III, which commenced with the disappearance of banded iron formations around 1.85 Ga ago and has lasted until the present, all three surface reservoirs contained appreciable amounts of free O2. Recent and not-so-recent controversies regarding the abundance of oxygen in the Archean atmosphere are identified and discussed. The rate of O2 increase during the Middle and Late Proterozoic is identified as another outstanding question.

  14. Light self-focusing in the atmosphere: thin window model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaseva, Irina A.; Fedoruk, Mikhail P.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-high power (exceeding the self-focusing threshold by more than three orders of magnitude) light beams from ground-based laser systems may find applications in space-debris cleaning. The propagation of such powerful laser beams through the atmosphere reveals many novel interesting features compared to traditional light self-focusing. It is demonstrated here that for the relevant laser parameters, when the thickness of the atmosphere is much shorter than the focusing length (that is, of the orbit scale), the beam transit through the atmosphere in lowest order produces phase distortion only. This means that by using adaptive optics it may be possible to eliminate the impact of self-focusing in the atmosphere on the laser beam. The area of applicability of the proposed “thin window” model is broader than the specific physical problem considered here. For instance, it might find applications in femtosecond laser material processing.

  15. Box models for the evolution of atmospheric oxygen: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    A simple 3-box model of the atmosphere/ocean system is used to describe the various stages in the evolution of atmospheric oxygen. In Stage I, which probably lasted until redbeds began to form about 2.0 Ga ago, the Earth's surface environment was generally devoid of free O2, except possibly in localized regions of high productivity in the surface ocean. In Stage II, which may have lasted for less than 150 Ma, the atmosphere and surface ocean were oxidizing, while the deep ocean remained anoxic. In Stage III, which commenced with the disappearance of banded iron formations around 1.85 Ga ago and has lasted until the present, all three surface reservoirs contained appreciable amounts of free O2. Recent and not-so-recent controversies regarding the abundance of oxygen in the Archean atmosphere are identified and discussed. The rate of O2 increase during the Middle and Late Proterozoic is identified as another outstanding question.

  16. Model atmospheres for Mercury based on a lunar analogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Similarities in daytime spectral reflectivities and nighttime infrared emission from Mercury and the moon are shown to imply that the atmosphere of Mercury must be tenuous, like that of the moon. The theory of formation, transport, and loss in the lunar atmosphere is applied to Mercury. Models of the Hermian atmosphere at perihelion and aphelion are presented, based on the solar wind as the dominant source of gases. Only the noncondensable species - hydrogen, helium and neon - are considered. Of these, helium is the most abundant atmospheric gas, with maximum concentration of about 40,000,000 per cu cm at the nighttime surface. The maximum concentration of H2 is 6,000,000 per cu cm, and that of neon is 700,000 per cu cm.

  17. Mars Entry Atmospheric Data System Modeling, Calibration, and Error Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlgaard, Christopher D.; VanNorman, John; Siemers, Paul M.; Schoenenberger, Mark; Munk, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI)/Mars Entry Atmospheric Data System (MEADS) project installed seven pressure ports through the MSL Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) heatshield to measure heatshield surface pressures during entry. These measured surface pressures are used to generate estimates of atmospheric quantities based on modeled surface pressure distributions. In particular, the quantities to be estimated from the MEADS pressure measurements include the dynamic pressure, angle of attack, and angle of sideslip. This report describes the calibration of the pressure transducers utilized to reconstruct the atmospheric data and associated uncertainty models, pressure modeling and uncertainty analysis, and system performance results. The results indicate that the MEADS pressure measurement system hardware meets the project requirements.

  18. Model Atmospheres for X-ray Bursting Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Medin, Zach; Calder, Alan C; Fontes, Christopher J; Fryer, Chris L; Hungerford, Aimee L

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen and helium accreted by X-ray bursting neutron stars is periodically consumed in runaway thermonuclear reactions that cause the entire surface to glow brightly in X-rays for a few seconds. With models of the emission, the mass and radius of the neutron star can be inferred from the observations. By simultaneously probing neutron star masses and radii, X-ray bursts are one of the strongest diagnostics of the nature of matter at extremely high densities. Accurate determinations of these parameters are difficult, however, due to the highly non-ideal nature of the atmospheres where X-ray bursts occur. Observations from X-ray telescopes such as RXTE and NuStar can potentially place strong constraints on nuclear matter once uncertainties in atmosphere models have been reduced. Here we discuss current progress on modeling atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars and some of the challenges still to be overcome.

  19. GEOS Atmospheric Model: Challenges at Exascale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, William M.; Suarez, Max J.

    2017-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) model at NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) is used to simulate the multi-scale variability of the Earth's weather and climate, and is used primarily to assimilate conventional and satellite-based observations for weather forecasting and reanalysis. In addition, assimilations coupled to an ocean model are used for longer-term forecasting (e.g., El Nino) on seasonal to interannual times-scales. The GMAO's research activities, including system development, focus on numerous time and space scales, as detailed on the GMAO website, where they are tabbed under five major themes: Weather Analysis and Prediction; Seasonal-Decadal Analysis and Prediction; Reanalysis; Global Mesoscale Modeling, and Observing System Science. A brief description of the GEOS systems can also be found at the GMAO website. GEOS executes as a collection of earth system components connected through the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF). The ESMF layer is supplemented with the MAPL (Modeling, Analysis, and Prediction Layer) software toolkit developed at the GMAO, which facilitates the organization of the computational components into a hierarchical architecture. GEOS systems run in parallel using a horizontal decomposition of the Earth's sphere into processing elements (PEs). Communication between PEs is primarily through a message passing framework, using the message passing interface (MPI), and through explicit use of node-level shared memory access via the SHMEM (Symmetric Hierarchical Memory access) protocol. Production GEOS weather prediction systems currently run at 12.5-kilometer horizontal resolution with 72 vertical levels decomposed into PEs associated with 5,400 MPI processes. Research GEOS systems run at resolutions as fine as 1.5 kilometers globally using as many as 30,000 MPI processes. Looking forward, these systems can be expected to see a 2 times increase in horizontal resolution every two to three years, as well as

  20. How does stellar irradiation make hot Jupiters puffy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yu-Jie; Gu, Pin-Gao

    2017-06-01

    Hot Jupiters appear to be re-inflated as their host stars evolve and become more luminous, shedding more light on the intriguing correlation between stellar irradiation and the size of hot Jupiters. To account for the phenomenon, one of the well-known models is the thermal-tide scenario proposed by Arras and Socrates. We present a linear analysis of semi-diurnal thermal tides in a hot Jupiter. The Coriolis effect is added to our equation, which generates more wave modes than non-rotating models, such as Rossby, Yanai, and inertial waves. We attempt to investigate where and which mode contributes most of the torque that maintains the planet in an asynchronous state against gravitational tides, leading to re-inflation of a hot Jupiter.

  1. WM-basic: Modeling atmospheres of hot stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauldrach, A. W. A.

    2012-04-01

    WM-basic is an easy-to-use interface to a program package which models the atmospheres of Hot Stars (and also SN and GN). The release comprises all programs required to calculate model atmospheres which especially yield ionizing fluxes and synthetic spectra. WM-basic is a native 32-bit application, conforming to the Multiple Documents Interface (MDI) standards for Windows XP/2000/NT/9x. All components of the program package have been compiled with Digital Visual Fortran V6.6(Pro) and Microsoft Visual C++.

  2. Warm Jupiters are less lonely than hot Jupiters: close neighbours

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Chelsea X; Triaud, Amaury H M J

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting the Kepler transit data, we uncover a dramatic distinction in the prevalence of sub-Jovian companions, between systems that contain hot Jupiters (periods inward of 10 days) and those that host warm Jupiters (periods between 10 and 200 days). Hot Jupiters as a whole, with the singular exception of WASP-47b, do not have any detectable inner or outer planetary companions (with periods inward of 50 days and sizes down to $2 R_{\\rm Earth}$). Restricting ourselves to inner companions, our limits reach down to $1 R_{\\rm Earth}$. In stark contrast, half of the warm Jupiters are closely flanked by small companions. Statistically, the companion fractions for hot and warm Jupiters are mutually exclusive, in particular in regard to inner companions. The high companion fraction of warm Jupiters also yields clue to their formation. The warm Jupiters that have close-by siblings should have low orbital eccentricities and low mutual inclinations. The orbital configurations of these systems are reminiscent of those ...

  3. A Long-lived Cyclone In Saturn's Atmosphere: Observations And Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rio Gaztelurrutia, Teresa; Legarreta, J.; Hueso, R.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2009-09-01

    The atmospheres of the Giant Planets Jupiter and Saturn possess large numbers of atmospheric vortices. On Jupiter, anticyclones are generally long-lived structures while cyclones survive a much shorter time. A long term survey of images of Saturn atmosphere obtained by the Cassini ISS camera has revealed the presence of a long-lived cyclone in Saturn's southern hemisphere during at least four years, making this vortex the longest lived cyclone on either Jupiter or Saturn. We find that the vortex drifts following the wind profile, with changes in velocity following changes of latitude. During the four years of our survey its size remained essentially constant, and there was no other structure of comparable size at its latitude. Internal circulation is cyclonic, with a maximum velocity of 20±5 m/s and an average vorticity of 4·10-5 s-1, an order of magnitude lower than planetary vorticity, but only slightly higher than the ambient vorticity. Photometric analysis shows that the vortex is located at a slightly lower altitude than its surroundings, at an average of 10-20 mbar below adjacent clouds. Finally, EPIC simulations of the vortex that reproduce its behavior imply a Rossby deformation radius of 2000 km in the weather layer (1 - 10 bar), consistent with the size of the cyclone. The long-lifetime of this cyclonic spot is surprising in view of its low tangential velocity and it suggests that low dissipation conditions prevail at mid-latitudes in Saturn's upper troposphere. Acknowledgements This work has been funded by Spanish MEC AYA2006-07735 with FEDER support and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07. RH acknowledges a "Ramón y Cajal” contract from MEC.

  4. Model Atmospheres From Very Low Mass Stars to Brown Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Allard, F; Freytag, B

    2010-01-01

    Since the discovery of brown dwarfs in 1994, and the discovery of dust cloud formation in the latest Very Low Mass Stars (VLMs) and Brown Dwarfs (BDs) in 1996, the most important challenge in modeling their atmospheres as become the understanding of cloud formation and advective mixing. For this purpose, we have developed radiation hydrodynamic 2D model atmosphere simulations to study the formation of forsterite dust in presence of advection, condensation, and sedimentation across the M-L-T VLMs to BDs sequence (Teff = 2800 K to 900 K, Freytag et al. 2010). We discovered the formation of gravity waves as a driving mechanism for the formation of clouds in these atmospheres, and derived a rule for the velocity field versus atmospheric depth and Teff , which is relatively insensitive to gravity. This rule has been used in the construction of the new model atmosphere grid, BT-Settl, to determine the microturbulence velocity, the diffusion coefficient, and the advective mixing of molecules as a function of depth. ...

  5. Evaluation of atmospheric density models and preliminary functional specifications for the Langley Atmospheric Information Retrieval System (LAIRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T.; Boland, D. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    This document presents the results of an extensive survey and comparative evaluation of current atmosphere and wind models for inclusion in the Langley Atmospheric Information Retrieval System (LAIRS). It includes recommended models for use in LAIRS, estimated accuracies for the recommended models, and functional specifications for the development of LAIRS.

  6. Atomistic modeling of carbon Cottrell atmospheres in bcc iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, R. G. A.; Perez, M.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.

    2013-01-01

    Atomistic simulations with an EAM interatomic potential were used to evaluate carbon-dislocation binding energies in bcc iron. These binding energies were then used to calculate the occupation probability of interstitial sites in the vicinity of an edge and a screw dislocation. The saturation concentration due to carbon-carbon interactions was also estimated by atomistic simulations in the dislocation core and taken as an upper limit for carbon concentration in a Cottrell atmosphere. We obtained a maximum concentration of 10 ± 1 at.% C at T = 0 K within a radius of 1 nm from the dislocation lines. The spatial carbon distributions around the line defects revealed that the Cottrell atmosphere associated with an edge dislocation is denser than that around a screw dislocation, in contrast with the predictions of the classical model of Cochardt and colleagues. Moreover, the present Cottrell atmosphere model is in reasonable quantitative accord with the three-dimensional atom probe data available in the literature.

  7. A Vertical Grid Module for Baroclinic Models of the Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, John B [ORNL

    2008-04-01

    The vertical grid of an atmospheric model assigns dynamic and thermo- dynamic variables to grid locations. The vertical coordinate is typically not height but one of a class of meteorological variables that vary with atmo- spheric conditions. The grid system is chosen to further numerical approx- imations of the boundary conditions so that the system is terrain following at the surface. Lagrangian vertical coordinates are useful in reducing the numerical errors from advection processes. That the choices will effect the numercial properties and accuracy is explored in this report. A MATLAB class for Lorentz vertical grids is described and applied to the vertical struc- ture equation and baroclinic atmospheric circulation. A generalized meteo- rolgoical coordinate system is developed which can support σ, isentropic θ vertical coordinate, or Lagrangian vertical coordinates. The vertical atmo- spheric column is a MATLAB class that includes the kinematic and ther- modynamic variables along with methods for computing geopoentials and terms relevant to a 3D baroclinc atmospheric model.

  8. Atmospheric dispersion modeling: Challenges of the Fukushima Daiichi response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Gayle [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nasstrom, John [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pobanz, Brenda [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, Kevin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Simpson, Matthew [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vogt, Phil [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Aluzzi, Fernando [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Homann, Steve [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    In this research, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provided a wide range of predictions and analyses as part of the response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident including: daily Japanese weather forecasts and atmospheric transport predictions to inform planning for field monitoring operations and to provide U.S. government agencies with ongoing situational awareness of meteorological conditions; estimates of possible dose in Japan based on hypothetical U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission scenarios of potential radionuclide releases to support protective action planning for U.S. citizens; predictions of possible plume arrival times and dose levels at U.S. locations; and source estimation and plume model refinement based on atmospheric dispersion modeling and available monitoring data.

  9. Non-hydrostatic general circulation model of the Venus atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, Alexander V.; Mingalev, Igor; Orlov, Konstantin; Ignatiev, Nikolay

    We present the first non-hydrostatic global circulation model of the Venus atmosphere based on the complete set of gas dynamics equations. The model employs a spatially uniform triangular mesh that allows to avoid artificial damping of the dynamical processes in the polar regions, with altitude as a vertical coordinate. Energy conversion from the solar flux into atmospheric motion is described via explicitly specified heating and cooling rates or, alternatively, with help of the radiation block based on comprehensive treatment of the Venus atmosphere spectroscopy, including line mixing effects in CO2 far wing absorption. Momentum equations are integrated using the semi-Lagrangian explicit scheme that provides high accuracy of mass and energy conservation. Due to high vertical grid resolution required by gas dynamics calculations, the model is integrated on the short time step less than one second. The model reliably repro-duces zonal superrotation, smoothly extending far below the cloud layer, tidal patterns at the cloud level and above, and non-rotating, sun-synchronous global convective cell in the upper atmosphere. One of the most interesting features of the model is the development of the polar vortices resembling those observed by Venus Express' VIRTIS instrument. Initial analysis of the simulation results confirms the hypothesis that it is thermal tides that provides main driver for the superrotation.

  10. Systematic evaluation of atmospheric chemistry-transport model CHIMERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khvorostyanov, Dmitry; Menut, Laurent; Mailler, Sylvain; Siour, Guillaume; Couvidat, Florian; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Turquety, Solene

    2017-04-01

    Regional-scale atmospheric chemistry-transport models (CTM) are used to develop air quality regulatory measures, to support environmentally sensitive decisions in the industry, and to address variety of scientific questions involving the atmospheric composition. Model performance evaluation with measurement data is critical to understand their limits and the degree of confidence in model results. CHIMERE CTM (http://www.lmd.polytechnique.fr/chimere/) is a French national tool for operational forecast and decision support and is widely used in the international research community in various areas of atmospheric chemistry and physics, climate, and environment (http://www.lmd.polytechnique.fr/chimere/CW-articles.php). This work presents the model evaluation framework applied systematically to the new CHIMERE CTM versions in the course of the continuous model development. The framework uses three of the four CTM evaluation types identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the American Meteorological Society (AMS): operational, diagnostic, and dynamic. It allows to compare the overall model performance in subsequent model versions (operational evaluation), identify specific processes and/or model inputs that could be improved (diagnostic evaluation), and test the model sensitivity to the changes in air quality, such as emission reductions and meteorological events (dynamic evaluation). The observation datasets currently used for the evaluation are: EMEP (surface concentrations), AERONET (optical depths), and WOUDC (ozone sounding profiles). The framework is implemented as an automated processing chain and allows interactive exploration of the results via a web interface.

  11. Advances in parallel computer technology for desktop atmospheric dispersion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, X.; Ionescu-Niscov, S.; Fast, J.D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Allwine, K.J. [Allwine Enviornmental Serv., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Desktop models are those models used by analysts with varied backgrounds, for performing, for example, air quality assessment and emergency response activities. These models must be robust, well documented, have minimal and well controlled user inputs, and have clear outputs. Existing coarse-grained parallel computers can provide significant increases in computation speed in desktop atmospheric dispersion modeling without considerable increases in hardware cost. This increased speed will allow for significant improvements to be made in the scientific foundations of these applied models, in the form of more advanced diffusion schemes and better representation of the wind and turbulence fields. This is especially attractive for emergency response applications where speed and accuracy are of utmost importance. This paper describes one particular application of coarse-grained parallel computer technology to a desktop complex terrain atmospheric dispersion modeling system. By comparing performance characteristics of the coarse-grained parallel version of the model with the single-processor version, we will demonstrate that applying coarse-grained parallel computer technology to desktop atmospheric dispersion modeling systems will allow us to address critical issues facing future requirements of this class of dispersion models.

  12. Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM): Exploration Of The Jovian System And Its Icy Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasset, Olivier; Pappalardo, R.; Greeley, R.; Blanc, M.; Dougherty, M.; Bunce, E.; Lebreton, J.; Prockter, L.; Senske, D.; EJSM Joint Science Definition Team

    2009-09-01

    The Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) would be an international mission with the overall theme of investigating the emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants. Its goals are to (1) Determine whether the Jupiter system harbors habitable worlds and (2) Characterize the processes that are operating within the Jupiter system. NASA and ESA have concluded a detailed joint study of a mission to Europa, Ganymede, and the Jupiter system with orbiters developed by NASA and ESA (future contributions by JAXA and Russia are also possible). The baseline EJSM architecture consists of two primary elements operating in the Jovian system: the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). JEO and JGO would execute an intricately choreographed exploration of the Jupiter System before settling into orbit around Europa and Ganymede, respectively. EJSM would directly address themes concerning the origin and evolution of satellite systems and water-rich environments in icy satellites. The potential habitability of the ocean-bearing moons Europa and Ganymede would be investigated, by characterizing the geophysical, compositional, geological, and external processes that affect these icy worlds. EJSM would also investigate Io and Callisto, Jupiter's atmosphere, and the Jovian magnetosphere. By understanding the Jupiter system and unraveling its history, the formation and evolution of gas giant planets and their satellites would be better known. Most important, EJSM would shed new light on the potential for the emergence of life in the celestial neighborhood and beyond. The EJSM architecture provides opportunities for coordinated synergistic observations by JEO and JGO of the Jupiter and Ganymede magnetospheres, the volcanoes and torus of Io, the atmosphere of Jupiter, and comparative planetology of icy satellites. Each spacecraft would conduct both synergistic dual-spacecraft investigations and "stand-alone” measurements.

  13. The EJSM Jupiter-Europa Orbiter: Science Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Blanc, M.; Clark, K.; Greeley, R.; Hendrix, A. R.; Lebreton, J.-P.

    2008-09-01

    Europa is believed to shelter an ocean between its geodynamically active icy shell and its rocky mantle, where the conditions for habitability may be fulfilled. With a warm, salty, water ocean and plausible chemical energy sources, Europa is the astrobiological archetype for icy satellite habitability. It is also a geophysical wonderland of interrelated ice shell processes that are intimately related to the ocean and tides, and of complex interactions among its interior, surface, atmosphere, and magnetospheric environments. The Jupiter-Europa Orbiter (JEO) is one component of the proposed multi-spacecraft Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM). We focus here on the science objectives and heritage of JEO.

  14. HATS-17b: A Transiting Compact Warm Jupiter in a 16.3 Days Circular Orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Brahm, R; Bakos, G Á; Penev, K; Espinoza, N; Rabus, M; Hartman, J D; Bayliss, D; Ciceri, S; Zhou, G; Mancini, L; Tan, T G; de Val-Borro, M; Bhatti, W; Csubry, Z; Bento, J; Henning, T; Schmidt, B; Suc, V; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-17b, the first transiting warm Jupiter of the HATSouth network. HATS-17b transits its bright (V=12.4) G-type (M$_{\\star}$=1.131 $\\pm$ 0.030 M$_{\\odot}$, R$_{\\star}$=1.091$^{+0.070}_{-0.046}$ R$_{\\star}$) metal-rich ([Fe/H]=+0.3 dex) host star in a circular orbit with a period of P=16.2546 days. HATS-17b has a very compact radius of 0.777 $\\pm$ 0.056 R$_J$ given its Jupiter-like mass of 1.338 $\\pm$ 0.065 M$_J$. Up to 50% of the mass of HATS-17b may be composed of heavy elements in order to explain its high density with current models of planetary structure. HATS-17b is the longest period transiting planet discovered to date by a ground-based photometric survey, and is one of the brightest transiting warm Jupiter systems known. The brightness of HATS-17b will allow detailed follow-up observations to characterize the orbital geometry of the system and the atmosphere of the planet.

  15. THE LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT AND DIFFUSION MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. WILLIAMS [and others

    1999-08-01

    The LANL atmospheric transport and diffusion models are composed of two state-of-the-art computer codes. The first is an atmospheric wind model called HOThlAC, Higher Order Turbulence Model for Atmospheric circulations. HOTMAC generates wind and turbulence fields by solving a set of atmospheric dynamic equations. The second is an atmospheric diffusion model called RAPTAD, Random Particle Transport And Diffusion. RAPTAD uses the wind and turbulence output from HOTMAC to compute particle trajectories and concentration at any location downwind from a source. Both of these models, originally developed as research codes on supercomputers, have been modified to run on microcomputers. Because the capability of microcomputers is advancing so rapidly, the expectation is that they will eventually become as good as today's supercomputers. Now both models are run on desktop or deskside computers, such as an IBM PC/AT with an Opus Pm 350-32 bit coprocessor board and a SUN workstation. Codes have also been modified so that high level graphics, NCAR Graphics, of the output from both models are displayed on the desktop computer monitors and plotted on a laser printer. Two programs, HOTPLT and RAPLOT, produce wind vector plots of the output from HOTMAC and particle trajectory plots of the output from RAPTAD, respectively. A third CONPLT provides concentration contour plots. Section II describes step-by-step operational procedures, specifically for a SUN-4 desk side computer, on how to run main programs HOTMAC and RAPTAD, and graphics programs to display the results. Governing equations, boundary conditions and initial values of HOTMAC and RAPTAD are discussed in Section III. Finite-difference representations of the governing equations, numerical solution procedures, and a grid system are given in Section IV.

  16. Atmospheric distribution of methane on Mars: A model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viscardy, Sébastien; Daerden, Frank; Neary, Lori

    2016-10-01

    In the past decade, the detection of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere of Mars has been reported several times. These observations have strongly drawn the attention of the scientific community and triggered a renewed interest in Mars as their implications for the geochemical or biological activities are remarkable. However, given that methane is expected to have a photochemical lifetime of several centuries, the relatively fast loss rates of methane estimated from Earth-based measurements remain unexplained. Although this gave rise to objections against the validity of those observations, recent in situ measurements confirmed that methane is being occasionally released into the atmosphere from an unknown source (possibly from the ground). Additionally, ExoMars/TGO was launched to Mars in March 2016. NOMAD, one of the instruments onboard TGO, will provide the first global detailed observations of methane on Mars. It is in this context that we present a model study of the behavior of methane plumes.A general circulation model for the atmosphere of Mars is applied to simulate surface emission of methane and to investigate its vertical distribution during the first weeks after the release. Such surface emissions were suggested to explain observations of methane. Previous GCM simulations focused on the horizontal evolution of the methane, but the present study focuses on the three-dimensional dispersion of methane throughout the atmosphere after the surface release. It is found that a highly nonuniform vertical distribution, including distinct vertical layers, can appear throughout the atmosphere during the first weeks after the emission. This is explained by the global circulation patterns in the atmosphere at the time of the emission. Large Hadley cells transport the methane rapidly to other locations over the planet, and methane will be stretched out in layers along the general circulation streamlines at heights corresponding to strong zonal jets.This result changes

  17. Jupiter's Moons: Family Portrait

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This montage shows the best views of Jupiter's four large and diverse 'Galilean' satellites as seen by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on the New Horizons spacecraft during its flyby of Jupiter in late February 2007. The four moons are, from left to right: Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. The images have been scaled to represent the true relative sizes of the four moons and are arranged in their order from Jupiter. Io, 3,640 kilometers (2,260 miles) in diameter, was imaged at 03:50 Universal Time on February 28 from a range of 2.7 million kilometers (1.7 million miles). The original image scale was 13 kilometers per pixel, and the image is centered at Io coordinates 6 degrees south, 22 degrees west. Io is notable for its active volcanism, which New Horizons has studied extensively. Europa, 3,120 kilometers (1,938 miles) in diameter, was imaged at 01:28 Universal Time on February 28 from a range of 3 million kilometers (1.8 million miles). The original image scale was 15 kilometers per pixel, and the image is centered at Europa coordinates 6 degrees south, 347 degrees west. Europa's smooth, icy surface likely conceals an ocean of liquid water. New Horizons obtained data on Europa's surface composition and imaged subtle surface features, and analysis of these data may provide new information about the ocean and the icy shell that covers it. New Horizons spied Ganymede, 5,262 kilometers (3,268 miles) in diameter, at 10:01 Universal Time on February 27 from 3.5 million kilometers (2.2 million miles) away. The original scale was 17 kilometers per pixel, and the image is centered at Ganymede coordinates 6 degrees south, 38 degrees west. Ganymede, the largest moon in the solar system, has a dirty ice surface cut by fractures and peppered by impact craters. New Horizons' infrared observations may provide insight into the composition of the moon's surface and interior. Callisto, 4,820 kilometers (2,995 miles) in diameter, was imaged at 03:50 Universal Time on

  18. An Overview of Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Quality Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew S.

    2017-01-01

    This presentation will include my personal research experience and an overview of atmospheric chemistry and air quality modeling to the participants of the NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP 2017). The presentation will also provide examples on ways to apply airborne observations for chemical transport (CTM) and air quality (AQ) model evaluation. CTM and AQ models are important tools in understanding tropospheric-stratospheric composition, atmospheric chemistry processes, meteorology, and air quality. This presentation will focus on how NASA scientist currently apply CTM and AQ models to better understand these topics. Finally, the importance of airborne observation in evaluating these topics and how in situ and remote sensing observations can be used to evaluate and improve CTM and AQ model predictions will be highlighted.

  19. Meteorological Uncertainty of atmospheric Dispersion model results (MUD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havskov Sørensen, Jens; Amstrup, Bjarne; Feddersen, Henrik

    The MUD project addresses assessment of uncertainties of atmospheric dispersion model predictions, as well as optimum presentation to decision makers. Previously, it has not been possible to estimate such uncertainties quantitatively, but merely to calculate the 'most likely' dispersion scenario...... of the meteorological model results. These uncertainties stem from e.g. limits in meteorological obser-vations used to initialise meteorological forecast series. By perturbing the initial state of an NWP model run in agreement with the available observa-tional data, an ensemble of meteorological forecasts is produced....... However, recent developments in numerical weather prediction (NWP) include probabilistic forecasting techniques, which can be utilised also for atmospheric dispersion models. The ensemble statistical methods developed and applied to NWP models aim at describing the inherent uncertainties...

  20. Meteorological Uncertainty of atmospheric Dispersion model results (MUD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havskov Sørensen, Jens; Amstrup, Bjarne; Feddersen, Henrik

    The MUD project addresses assessment of uncertainties of atmospheric dispersion model predictions, as well as possibilities for optimum presentation to decision makers. Previously, it has not been possible to estimate such uncertainties quantitatively, but merely to calculate the ‘most likely...... uncertainties of the meteorological model results. These uncertainties stem from e.g. limits in meteorological observations used to initialise meteorological forecast series. By perturbing e.g. the initial state of an NWP model run in agreement with the available observational data, an ensemble......’ dispersion scenario. However, recent developments in numerical weather prediction (NWP) include probabilistic forecasting techniques, which can be utilised also for long-range atmospheric dispersion models. The ensemble statistical methods developed and applied to NWP models aim at describing the inherent...

  1. New Model Atmospheres: Testing the Solar Spectrum in the UV

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez-Merino, L H; Bertone, E; Chavez, M; Buzzoni, A

    2007-01-01

    We present preliminary results on the calculation of synthetic spectra obtained with the stellar model atmospheres developed by Cardona, Crivellari, and Simonneau. These new models have been used as input within the SYNTHE series of codes developed by Kurucz. As a first step we have tested if SYNTHE is able to handle these models which go down to log tau(Ross)= -13. We have successfully calculated a synthetic solar spectrum in the wavelength region 2000--4500 A at high resolution (R=522,000). Within this initial test we have found that layers at optical depths with log tau(Ross) < -7 significantly affect the mid-UV properties of a synthetic spectrum computed from a solar model. We anticipate that these new extended models will be a valuable tool for the analysis of UV stellar light arising from the outermost layers of the atmospheres.

  2. New Model Atmospheres: Testing the Solar Spectrum in the UV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Merino, L. H.; Cardona, O.; Bertone, E.; Chávez, M.; Buzzoni, A.

    2009-03-01

    We present preliminary results on the calculation of synthetic spectra obtained with the stellar model atmospheres developed by Cardona, Crivellari, and Simonneau. These new models have been used as input within the Synthe series of codes developed by Kurucz. As a first step we have tested if Synthe is able to handle these models which go down to log{τ_{Ross}}= -13. We have successfully calculated a synthetic solar spectrum in the wavelength region 2000-4500 Å at high resolution (R=522 000). Within this initial test we have found that layers at optical depths with log{τ_{Ross}} < -7 significantly affect the mid-UV properties of a synthetic spectrum computed from a solar model. We anticipate that these new extended models will be a valuable tool for the analysis of UV stellar light arising from the outermost layers of the atmospheres.

  3. Dynamical Analysis of the Lorenz-84 Atmospheric Circulation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamical behaviors of the Lorenz-84 atmospheric circulation model are investigated based on qualitative theory and numerical simulations. The stability and local bifurcation conditions of the Lorenz-84 atmospheric circulation model are obtained. It is also shown that when the bifurcation parameter exceeds a critical value, the Hopf bifurcation occurs in this model. Then, the conditions of the supercritical and subcritical bifurcation are derived through the normal form theory. Finally, the chaotic behavior of the model is also discussed, the bifurcation diagrams and Lyapunov exponents spectrum for the corresponding parameter are obtained, and the parameter interval ranges of limit cycle and chaotic attractor are calculated in further. Especially, a computer-assisted proof of the chaoticity of the model is presented by a topological horseshoe theory.

  4. Jumping Jupiter can explain Mercury's orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Roig, Fernando; DeSouza, Sandro Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The orbit of Mercury has large values of eccentricity and inclination that cannot be easily explained if this planet formed on a circular and coplanar orbit. Here, we study the evolution of Mercury's orbit during the instability related to the migration of the giant planets in the framework of the jumping Jupiter model. We found that some instability models are able to produce the correct values of Mercury's eccentricity and inclination, provided that relativistic effects are included in the precession of Mercury's perihelion. The orbital excitation is driven by the fast change of the normal oscillation modes of the system corresponding to the perihelion precession of Jupiter (for the eccentricity), and the nodal regression of Uranus (for the inclination).

  5. A new physical model of the electron radiation belts of Jupiter: on the importance of the wave-particle interaction between Io and Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nénon, Quentin; Sicard-Piet, Angélica

    2017-04-01

    From 1998 to 2004, ONERA has adapted its 3D physical model of the Earth radiation belts, Salammbô, to the Jovian electron belts. An upgraded Jupiter-Salammbô model will be presented, now taking into account the gyro-resonant interaction with the plasma waves between Io and Europa. The full spectrum of the electromagnetic waves detected by the Galileo Plasma Wave Science experiment was considered. The WAPI (WAve-Particle Interaction) code, developed by ONERA and implementing the quasi-linear theory, has then been used to estimate the pitch angle and kinetic energy diffusion rates. Regarding the boundary condition, the Galileo Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) high-resolution data suggests that the electron distribution at a Mc Illwain parameter of L=9.5 is almost isotropic, with a flux ratio between equatorial electrons and those bouncing near the loss cone lower than 5 at all the observed kinetic energies. We therefore adopted an isotropic boundary condition at L=9.5 that relies on the in-situ flux measurements coming from the Pioneer 10, Pioneer 11, Voyager 1 and Galileo missions. We propose to model the radial diffusion process with a diffusion coefficient DLL = 10-10L4s-1 for L extending from 1 to 9.5. The validation of the new model against in-situ and remote (synchrotron emission) observations will be presented. We will then discuss the effect of the wave-particle interaction on the predicted in-situ fluxes. In particular, the observable depletions of the Pioneer and Voyager fluxes near the orbit of Io seem to be predominantly induced by the plasma waves and not by the sweeping effect of Io.

  6. Aeolian dunes as ground truth for atmospheric modeling on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, R.K.; Titus, T.N.; Michaels, T.I.; Fenton, L.K.; Colaprete, A.; Christensen, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    Martian aeolian dunes preserve a record of atmosphere/surface interaction on a variety of scales, serving as ground truth for both Global Climate Models (GCMs) and mesoscale climate models, such as the Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS). We hypothesize that the location of dune fields, expressed globally by geographic distribution and locally by dune centroid azimuth (DCA), may record the long-term integration of atmospheric activity across a broad area, preserving GCM-scale atmospheric trends. In contrast, individual dune morphology, as expressed in slipface orientation (SF), may be more sensitive to localized variations in circulation, preserving topographically controlled mesoscale trends. We test this hypothesis by comparing the geographic distribution, DCA, and SF of dunes with output from the Ames Mars GCM and, at a local study site, with output from MRAMS. When compared to the GCM: 1) dunes generally lie adjacent to areas with strongest winds, 2) DCA agrees fairly well with GCM modeled wind directions in smooth-floored craters, and 3) SF does not agree well with GCM modeled wind directions. When compared to MRAMS modeled winds at our study site: 1) DCA generally coincides with the part of the crater where modeled mean winds are weak, and 2) SFs are consistent with some weak, topographically influenced modeled winds. We conclude that: 1) geographic distribution may be valuable as ground truth for GCMs, 2) DCA may be useful as ground truth for both GCM and mesoscale models, and 3) SF may be useful as ground truth for mesoscale models. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Using observations to evaluate biosphere-atmosphere interactions in models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Julia; Konings, Alexandra G.; Alemohammad, Seyed H.; Gentine, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Biosphere-atmosphere interactions influence the hydrologic cycle by altering climate and weather patterns (Charney, 1975; Koster et al., 2006; Seneviratne et al., 2006), contributing up to 30% of precipitation and radiation variability in certain regions (Green et al., 2017). They have been shown to contribute to the persistence of drought in Europe (Seneviratne et al., 2006), as well as to increase rainfall in the Amazon (Spracklen et al., 2012). Thus, a true representation of these feedbacks in Earth System Models (ESMs) is crucial for accurate forecasting and planning. However, it has been difficult to validate the perf