WorldWideScience

Sample records for junior fiction ages

  1. Science, fiction and the age of discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brake, Mark; Hook, Neil

    2007-05-01

    This article suggests that the age of discovery and enlightenment of the Scientific Revolution and the universe of Copernicus was responsible for a new way of imagining, which we now call science fiction. This history is important for an understanding of the evolution of the physics, and shows how scientists, such as Johannes Kepler and Galileo Galilei, and philosophers, such as the Bishop of Llandaff, Francis Godwin, and Cyrano de Bergerac, used the fictional imagination to help visualise the unknown.

  2. Relative age effect in junior tennis (male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Agricola

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The issues of the age effect (the theory of the age influence have been shown in sport sciences since the 1980s. The theory of age effect works on the assumption that athletes born in the beginning of a calendar year are, particularly in children’s and junior age, more successful than athletes born in the end of the year. This fact has been proved by a number of research studies, mainly in ice hockey, soccer, and tennis but also in other sports. OBJECTIVE: The submitted contribution is aimed at verifying of the age effect in junior tennis. The research objective was to find out the distribution of birth date frequencies in a population of tennis players’ in individual months, quarters, and half-years in the observed period 2007–2011 and to check the significance of differences. METHODS: The research was conducted on male tennis players aged 13–14 (N = 239, participants of the World Junior Tennis Finals. From the methodological point of view, it was an intentional selection. The birth dates of individual tennis players were taken from official materials of the ITF, the research data were processed using Microsoft Excel. The personal data were processed with the approval of players and the hosting organization (ITF. RESULTS: Testing of the hypothesis on the significance of differences in the distribution of frequencies between individual quarters (Q1–Q4 has proved statistically relevant differences between Q1 and Q3, Q1 and Q4, Q2 and Q3, and Q2 and Q4; a statistically relevant difference has been also found in the distribution of frequencies between the first and second half of the year. On the basis of the results of the presented research, the age effect in the studied population of junior male tennis players can be regarded as significant. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the analysis of the research data confirm the conclusions of similar studies in other sports and prove that in the population of elite junior players

  3. Growing Old before Old Age: Ageing in the Fiction of Marian Keyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Serrano, Elena

    2009-01-01

    This research analyzes the ways in which the ageing process is articulated in Marian Keyes's novels. Keyes is one of numerous authors within the genre of "chick lit," or "post-feminist fiction." This type of literature, begun in the mid-1990s, mainly deals with the process of the coming into adulthood of the female protagonists. They not only…

  4. Books for Today's Young Readers: An Annotated Bibliography of Recommended Fiction for Ages 10-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken, Jeanne; And Others

    The result of a review of fiction for young people ages 9 through 14, this bibliography contains titles of works of fiction that achieve the goal of combining a good readable story with sensitivity to a wide range of negative stereotyping. The bibliography begins with an introduction that discusses in detail the reviewing process that culminated…

  5. Fact or Fiction? Libraries Can Thrive in the Digital Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Today's school library uses an increasing number of digital resources to supplement a print collection that is moving more toward fiction and literary non-fiction. Supplemental resources, including streaming video, online resources, subscription databases, audiobooks, e-books, and even games, round out the new collections. Despite the best…

  6. Traditional-Aged College Juniors' Career Planning Self-Efficacy: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Dawn C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this single-site case study was to explore and describe traditional-age college juniors' reports of self-efficacy (Bandura, 1997) regarding Career Planning (Barker & Kellen, 1998). More specifically, the career planning confidence levels of college juniors enrolled in a required career development course at a private business…

  7. Talking Relative Age Effects: A Fictional Analysis Based on Scientific Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Simon J.

    2014-01-01

    During the past 30 years, there has been a considerable amount of scientific attention dedicated to the reported age discrimination which occurs in youth and elite sport. The purpose of this paper is to examine the notion of relative age effects (RAEs) through a slightly different lens. This paper therefore presents a fictional conversation…

  8. THE ADDRESSEE AGE AS A FACTOR DETERMINING THE DISCURSIVE STRUCTURE OF A WORK OF FICTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beloglazova Elena Vladimirovna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper the author attempts to establish the connection between the discursive structure of a work of fiction and the addressee age factor. At that the point of departure for the argument is (a the thesis on discursive heterogeneity being a feature of fiction in general, which is a direct consequence of literature of literature being aimed at reflecting the world in its entirety and complexity, and (b the assumption that the above-said is applicable to children's fiction, though discursive heterogeneity undergoes a certain transformation due to the specific nature and role of literature for children. The category of addressee in the cornerstone of children's fiction predetermining: on the surface level – the selection of organization of language means in the text; on the contents level – the selection of story and characters; on the ideology level – the configuration of the polydiscourse of the children's fiction, as well as the selection of discourses' representatives. The peculiarity of children's fiction is primarily due to the ideology underlying it - what the society demands from the right book for kids, which is viewed as a socializing tool. And in order to be efficient, the tool needs to be tailored for its object, its exact parameters, age being one of them. Thus the complexity of the discursive structure of literary works for children appears to be directly related to the age of their ideal reader, which is shown in the article by comparative analysis of works addressed to floor and ceiling audiences of the childhood span. The analysis reveals the fact that older readership leads not only to a greater complexity of a literary work's discursive structure, but also to a wider variety in the ways of introducing interdiscursemes into text.

  9. Structural and Dialectal Characteristics of the Fictional and Personal Narratives of School-Age African American Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Monique T.; Watkins, Ruth V.; Washington, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report preliminary comparisons of developing structural and dialectal characteristics associated with fictional and personal narratives in school-age African American children. Method: Forty-three children, Grades 2-5, generated a fictional narrative and a personal narrative in response to a wordless-book elicitation task and a…

  10. Though much is taken, much abides: the storied world of aging in a fictionalized retirement home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Jill

    2009-10-01

    This study explores one elderly author's accounts of life within a fictionalized retirement home to understand how meanings of age are storied within a collective community and offered as alternative narratives to the dominant discourse of aging in our society. An examination of the five novels in content and form reveals how older individuals, acting as embodied and social beings, can reclaim meanings of age through the stories they share. Rather than perpetuate a one-dimensional view of later life, octogenarian Effie Leland Wilder deliberately stories her novels with multifaceted accounts that acknowledge the positive and negative experiences of growing older. Narrative medicine and narrative gerontology position imagination as essential for recognizing, understanding, and empathizing with the lived realities of disparate individuals. This study offers an important understanding of the ways in which storytellers and story-listeners can make sense of aging through fictive stories and literary ways of knowing. Implications for future research and practice are also discussed.

  11. Relative age effects in Swiss junior soccer and their relationship with playing position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romann, Michael; Fuchslocher, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Relative age effects (RAEs) refer to age differences between children in the same selection year. The present study investigated the prevalence of RAEs and their link to playing positions in Swiss junior soccer. Swiss male junior soccer players (n=50,581) representing 11% of the age-matched population - members of extra-curricular soccer teams - were evaluated to determine the influence of RAEs on Swiss junior soccer. Subgroups were the national talent development programme (n=2880), and U-15 to U-21 national teams (n=630). While no RAEs were found for the self-selected extra-curricular soccer teams or for the U-20 teams (P>0.05), significant RAEs were found for talent development and the national U-15 to U-19 and U-21 teams (Psoccer. Additionally, the RAE bias may be a predictor of playing positions in national teams. To minimise RAEs in Swiss soccer, systematic education for all coaches regarding RAEs should be established, in addition to a slotting system with rotating calendar cut-off dates.

  12. Early diagnosis of junior school age children’s posture disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razumeiko N.S.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to describe specificities of early diagnosis method for junior school age children’s posture disorders. Material: in pedagogic experiment 156 junior school age children (boys and girls of 7-10 years’ age participated. All children had no experience of training in sport circles. For determination of uniformity of the tested we fulfilled experts’ examination for presence or absence of external signs of posture disorders in frontal plane. The children’s examination was conducted by qualified specialists at the beginning and at the end of experiment. For determination of early signs of muscular asymmetry in torso right and left sides of the tested children we used methodic, based on registration of tonic vibration reflex. Results: the pupils’ examination permitted to form a group of 108 persons, who did not have external signs of posture disorders. It was proved that it would be purposeful to take prophylaxis measures at very early stages of imbalance in muscular system’s work. Traditional approach in the form of prophylaxis examination can not give confident information about initial stage of imbalance in muscular system’s work in child’s organism. Conclusions: it was found that imbalance of motor nervous centers reflex excitability on both sides of backbone (if no purposeful prophylaxis measures are taken can result in muscular tonus asymmetry on right and left sides of torso in lumbar spine area.

  13. Differentiated correction of junior school age children’s posture at physical culture trainings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razumeiko N.S.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to show peculiarities of differentiated correction of junior school age children’s posture, considering tonic vibration reflex. Material: the research was conducted with participation of 62 junior school age children (7-10 years old boys and girls. All children have no sport training experience. All children were preliminary examined by qualified medical doctors. Tonic vibration reflex of lumbar spine was registered. Children fulfilled test exercises, which characterized power endurance of abdomen muscles, side of torso and back muscles. Results: external signs of posture disorders were absent in frontal plane. In 35 persons (65.8% we registered one-side increased reflex excitability of nervous centers: from right side of backbone - in 28 children (72%; from the left side in 17 children (28%. Correction of posture with the help of correcting exercises can give steady effect only with simultaneous formation of correct posture habit. For this purpose it is necessary to create muscular-joint sense of separate body parts’ position. Conclusions: for determination of functional potentials of in-born muscular corset it is recommended to fulfill special test exercises. For local influence on lumbar spine muscles it is recommended to use exercise of asymmetric character.

  14. Age at menarche in relation to anthropometric characteristics, competition level and boat category in elite junior rowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessens, A L; Bourgois, J; Beunen, G; Philippaerts, R; Thomis, M; Lefevre, J; Loos, R J E; Vrijens, J

    2003-01-01

    Within the context of the effects of training for sports on growth and maturation, there is very little menarcheal data for elite rowing athletes. Knowledge of the relationship of the maturational status with training level, different boat categories, and somatic features of the athletes will clarify the assumed impact of rowing training on the growth and maturational process of youngsters. The aim of this study was to determine the age at menarche in world top junior rowing athletes and to investigate its relationship with anthropometric characteristics, and competition level, rowing style and boat category. The sample consisted of 212 female junior rowers, with a mean chronological age of 17.6 +/- 0.8 years, all participants at the 1997 FISA World Junior Rowing Championships. Anthropometric dimensions, somatotype and body composition characteristics were measured, and age at menarche and training data were retrospectively obtained by questionnaires. Results revealed that the mean age at menarche of the total group of rowers was 12.8 +/- 1.2 years and did not differ from a non-athletic reference population. Rowers who started their rowing training before menarche (n = 78) showed a significant (p athletes.

  15. Calibans for the 1990s and 2000s: Shakespeare and Fantasy in the Age of "Professional Fan Fiction" and Integrative Fiction

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Les auteurs postmodernes de fiction fantastique et merveilleuse aiment à exploiter les intertextes canoniques pour bâtir des suites semblables à la fan fiction, ou pour élaborer d’incroyables rencontres entre personnages littéraires à la manière des cross-over du cinéma fantastique et des bandes dessinées super-héroïques. De tels auteurs se réclament volontiers de l’héritage shakespearien et sont particulièrement sensibles à l’omniprésence du surnaturel dans les œuvres du Barde, notamment dan...

  16. Fictional Theses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourn, Brent

    1999-01-01

    Argues that a piece of fictional writing could be counted as a doctoral thesis, focusing on qualities that are critical for a fictional doctoral thesis (particularly the self-conscious method) and on writing techniques that could enable those qualities (e.g., direct explanation, authorial intervention, and character intervention). (SM)

  17. Prophecy, Pulp, or Punt: Science Fiction, Scenarios, and Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinks, C. W.

    A brief history of science fiction and an analysis of its functions precedes a description of a university level course taught at Trinity University on science fiction, technology, and values. Science fiction writing is briefly traced from Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" through the golden age of science fiction in the 1940s and 1950s to its…

  18. Gedanken fictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Kate

    2017-07-01

    The 14 pairs of short story and essay in Thought X: Fictions and Hypotheticals have at their root the concept that thought experiments in science and philosophy tell stories as they build a scenario to prove a point.

  19. Global Aging and Economic Convergence: A Real Option or Still a Case of Science Fiction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P. van Dalen (Hendrik)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractHow does global aging affect the convergence in global economic development? Both the developing and developed world will be characterized for the coming decades by aging populations. Changes in the age distribution of a population are an important determinant of economic performance as

  20. Global Aging and Economic Convergence: A Real Option or Still a Case of Science Fiction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P. van Dalen (Hendrik)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractHow does global aging affect the convergence in global economic development? Both the developing and developed world will be characterized for the coming decades by aging populations. Changes in the age distribution of a population are an important determinant of economic performance as

  1. Corporate Fictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunæs, Dorthe; Søndergaard, D. M.

    2006-01-01

    The article describes a particular strategy of communication called a social science fiction. The strategy was taken up following an empirical research project on gender and management, in order to communicate results to the company's managers and Human Resource Staff. The research results showed...... fiction was the kind of narrative therapy, which aims to reconfigure the problem in focus by a process of externalisation that allows a reconstruction and retelling of the issue. The article describes how three cultural mechanisms in the company were condensed into three imaginary figures: Mr. Corporate...

  2. Corporate Fictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunæs, Dorthe; Søndergaard, D. M.

    2006-01-01

    The article describes a particular strategy of communication called a social science fiction. The strategy was taken up following an empirical research project on gender and management, in order to communicate results to the company's managers and Human Resource Staff. The research results showed...... fiction was the kind of narrative therapy, which aims to reconfigure the problem in focus by a process of externalisation that allows a reconstruction and retelling of the issue. The article describes how three cultural mechanisms in the company were condensed into three imaginary figures: Mr. Corporate...

  3. Ageism and age discrimination in health care: Fact or fiction? A narrative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kydd, Angela; Fleming, Anne

    2015-08-01

    Ageism and age discrimination are terms used in best practice statements and in the literature to define negative attitudes towards older people and towards people because of their age (whether old or young). However, 'old age' is a nebulous concept with definitions ranging from the over 50s to the over 85s. In seeking to explore ageism and age discrimination within health care, this paper discusses the concept of 'old' and discusses the findings of a narrative review of the literature on these two concepts. Results show that negative attitudes have been perceived by users of health care services, but the reasons are not clear. Such attitudes are usually reported in acute health care settings, where targets and quick turnover are encouraged. Thus people, usually those with complex needs, who require longer periods of recuperation and rehabilitation following an episode of ill health, are troublesome to staff working in a system geared up for early discharges. This type of service user is usually over the age of 85. Recommendations from this paper include the need for acute frailty units, with well trained staff, where frail older people can be comprehensively assessed, receive timely and targeted care, followed by a supported discharge.

  4. The World of Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Sheila

    1971-01-01

    Science fiction is discussed from the following standpoints: What Is Science Fiction?; The History of Science Fiction; and The Themes of Science Fiction. A list of films, books, and records about science fiction is given. (DB)

  5. Fictional Inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Christian; Iversen, Ole Sejer

    At designe i en fortællemæssig ramme giver brugere og designere mulighed for i fællesskab at udforske fremtidens it-anvendelser. Metoden hedder Fictional Inquiry, og den motiverer brugerne til at tænke ud over dagligdagens begrænsninger og sætte ord på ting i hverdagen, som ellers er svære...

  6. Nutritional Status and Age at Menarche on Female Students of Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliyatmi, Rihul Husnul; Handayani, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Menarche is the first menstrual period as one of the sign of puberty. There are many factors may affect the age at menarche such as nutritional status, genetic, environmental conditions, socioeconomic status, and education. The purpose of this research is to determine the relationship between nutritional status and age of menarche on female…

  7. Far Out: Some Approaches to Teaching the Speculative Literature of Science Fiction and the Supernatural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los Angeles City Schools, CA. Div. of Instructional Planning and Services.

    This curriculum guide contains course descriptions (for minicourses and semester-long courses), outlines, and class projects for teaching science fiction and the supernatural in junior and senior high schools. The eight course descriptions include objectives, methods, activities, and resources and materials. Lists of science fiction books and…

  8. Chinese court case fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    2011-01-01

    Western history of crime fiction usually designates Edgar Allan Poe as the undisputed father of the detective story. Crime fiction is, hence, generally associated with incipient modernity and modern societies and cityscapes. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle even asks: Where was the detective story until Po...... sinological sources introducing a revised introduction of crime fiction on the world’s literary scene. So to answer Doyle’s question about crime fiction before Poe: Crime fiction may have been in China....

  9. Making Connections with Historical Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrot, Kathy

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the value of historical fiction, using historical fiction to teach history and to teach literature, and activities using historical fiction. Offers a sample approach using the book "Underground to Canada," and notes cautions in using historical fiction. (SR)

  10. Reading Relationships: Parents, Adolescents, and Popular Fiction by Stephen King.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Kelly

    1999-01-01

    Describes a collective case study of 12 high school juniors who identified themselves as avid readers of popular fiction. Finds strong reading relationships between parents and high school students. Describes the different roles that parents played in their adolescent children's reading lives. Looks at implications for secondary English classrooms…

  11. Reading Relationships: Parents, Adolescents, and Popular Fiction by Stephen King.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Kelly

    1999-01-01

    Describes a collective case study of 12 high school juniors who identified themselves as avid readers of popular fiction. Finds strong reading relationships between parents and high school students. Describes the different roles that parents played in their adolescent children's reading lives. Looks at implications for secondary English classrooms…

  12. Science in Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allday, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Offers some suggestions as to how science fiction, especially television science fiction programs such as "Star Trek" and "Star Wars", can be drawn into physics lessons to illuminate some interesting issues. (Author/KHR)

  13. Jordan Krall's speculative fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doubinsky, Sebastien

    2017-01-01

    Jordan Krall is one of the most interesting writers in American speculative fiction. This article studies the way Krall redefines the tropes and frames of classical dystopian fiction and references, turning them into an idiosyncratic construction.......Jordan Krall is one of the most interesting writers in American speculative fiction. This article studies the way Krall redefines the tropes and frames of classical dystopian fiction and references, turning them into an idiosyncratic construction....

  14. Science Fiction & Scientific Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerneda, Julie E.

    2006-01-01

    The term "science fiction" has become synonymous, in the media at least, for any discovery in science too incredible or unexpected for the nonscientist to imagine. One of the most common classroom uses of science fiction is for students to pick out flaws in science fiction movies or television shows. Unfortunately, this approach can result in…

  15. Ethical Design Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thessa; Vistisen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we examine how ethical challenges can be approached in and through design fiction. To do so, we develop a new framework for analysis as well as creation of design fictions. Our main focus will be on design fiction within a strategical setting, connecting the notion of design fiction...... to the design process within large corporations as well as strategic design and decision making. Three cases are presented to support our findings. The final contribution will be the design fiction framework found in the conclusion....

  16. On Fictions and Wicked Problems: Towards a Social Democratic Criminology Project in the Age of Neo-liberalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Watts

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available If it is true, as Pat Carlen (2010 claims, that contemporary ‘justice’ policies are exhibiting all the signs of ‘penal populism’ and ‘risk crazed governance’, then social democratic criminologists face the dual challenge of explaining why these policies are not only not working but also how this fact continues to be explained away. At stake here are two central questions: firstly, what grounds are available to secure the intellectual legitimacy of criminology; and, secondly, what ways of knowing could secure the legitimacy of a social-democratic criminology. The paper begins by exploring what is at stake when what appears to be a very large number of criminologists claim that theirs is an ‘empirical scientific’ discipline. The paper argues that neither mainstream criminology nor social democratic criminology can base any claims to intellectual legitimacy by relying on an ‘empirical scientific’ frame. The paper draws on Spencer (1987 to advance the ‘unpalatable thesis’ that, as far as the actual practice by conventional criminologists of their kind of social science goes, ‘they do not know what they are doing’ (Spencer 1987: 333 and that their ignorance of this fact has serious consequences for the progress of their field. The paper shows that there is a gap between the actual practice of conventional criminology and its claims to ‘scientific empiricism’: what is actually on offer is an ‘imperfect empiricism’.The long-forgotten work of Bentham, adumbrated by Vaihinger (1935 and Fuller (1967, is then traced and some of the implications of this theory of fictions for contemporary representations of crime are noted. One implication briefly charted here is that any social democratic criminology needs to rehabilitate the proper role played by fictions as they grapple with the ‘wicked problems’ that currently populate this field. The long-standing affectation of ‘scientific empiricism’ by many practicing

  17. Chinese court case fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    2011-01-01

    Western history of crime fiction usually designates Edgar Allan Poe as the undisputed father of the detective story. Crime fiction is, hence, generally associated with incipient modernity and modern societies and cityscapes. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle even asks: Where was the detective story until Poe...... breathed the breath of life into it? The usual answer is that crime fiction, in fact, was invented by Poe, but another counter-view is that China – at that point – had had a long narrative tradition for stories about crime and detection. The socalled gongan genre – court case fiction – was probably...... sinological sources introducing a revised introduction of crime fiction on the world’s literary scene. So to answer Doyle’s question about crime fiction before Poe: Crime fiction may have been in China....

  18. Substantiation and working out of recreation health related technology on the basis of health related hiking and orienteering for junior school age children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goncharova N.N.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study role of health related hiking and orienteering in improvement of children’s physical conditions. Material: 163 children of 7 - 10 years old age participated in the research (82 boys and 81 girls. Tests for assessment of physical condition, physical health, adaptation reserve potentials and motor functioning of junior schoolchildren were used. Results: It was found that 46,01% of pupils can be considered healthy. Accordingly more than half (53,99% have not infectious diseases. Among them nosologies of musculoskeletal apparatus prevail. In academic day with physical culture lesson average and high levels of motor functioning prevail (61,36%. Recreation health related technology on the basis of health related hiking and orienteering has been theoretically substantiated and worked out. Its structural components and content have been described. Realization of recreation health related technology is envisaged to be in three stages. Most of classes shall be in the open air. Conclusions: low level of adaptation reserve potentials and physical health of children have been determined that points at demand in health related measures in junior schoolchildren’s physical education.

  19. Posttraumatic symptoms in elementary and junior high school children after the 2011 Japan earthquake and tsunami: symptom severity and recovery vary by age and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwadare, Yoshitaka; Usami, Masahide; Suzuki, Yuriko; Ushijima, Hirokage; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Kyota; Kodaira, Masaki; Saito, Kazuhiko

    2014-04-01

    To measure psychiatric symptoms exhibited by children in Ishinomaki City, Japan, an area severely damaged by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, at 8 and 20 months post-tsunami to investigate differences in symptom severity and recovery rate by age, sex, and degree of trauma experienced. Prospective data were collected from children in elementary school (5th and 6th grades) and junior high school (8th and 9th grades). Students completed the Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms for Children-15 (PTSSC-15) survey. Trauma severity was scored according to experiences of bereavement, home damage, and evacuation. In total, 3795 PTSSC-15 surveys were analyzed, yielding total scores, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) factor subscores, and depression factor subscores, which were analyzed according to grade group, sex, and degree of trauma (trauma dose). In the elementary school children, mean total PTSSC-15 score, PTSD factor score, and depression factor score were significantly improved at 20 months post-tsunami compared with 8 months (P children. In females of the older group, the depression factor score at 20 months post-tsunami was significantly higher than at 8 months (P children living near the epicenter of the 2011 Japan earthquake and tsunami exhibited marked differences in PTSD and depressive symptoms. The mental health status of elementary school children improved, whereas that of junior high school children did not. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Expo Junior

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Fort de son succès Expo Juniors revient du 22 au 23 novembre 2014 - Papa & Maman Noël seront présents ! Nous avons le plaisir de  proposer à nos membres des billets d'entrées  à un tarif préférentiel, au prix de CHF 10.- l'unité au lieu de CHF 18.- (gratuit pour les enfants de 0 à 4 ans). Des centaines d’ateliers répartis en 3 villages : Sports & Loisirs, Jeux & Jouets, Éducation & Vie pratique. Cet événement propose aux familles aussi d'autres thèmes : tourisme, idées cadeaux, mode, bien-être, beauté, décoration, ainsi que des services destinés aux familles. Parades, attractions, castings, défilés de mode, dédicaces, séances photos avec Papa Noël, ainsi que de nombre...

  1. DEVELOPMENT RESOURSES OF JUNIOR SCHOOLCHILD’S READING REQUIREMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Vladimirovna SMAKHTINA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considered an issue of rooting need for reading books in junior schoolchildren. This study refined the con-cepts of “need for reading books” and “resources for read-ing”. The author in the course of study revealed that the following may stand for such mental and educational re-sources: the reading skill shaped in children, their emo-tional perception of a piece of fiction, their identifying selves with a fiction piece’ character, extrinsic motivation to read the book. Family upbringing (namely, fostering in-family reading and a trendy reading have been considered for resources of social influence and ambient conditions.

  2. Fictional Separation Logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas Buhrkal; Birkedal, Lars

    2012-01-01

    , separation means physical separation. In this paper, we introduce \\emph{fictional separation logic}, which includes more general forms of fictional separating conjunctions P * Q, where "*" does not require physical separation, but may also be used in situations where the memory resources described by P and Q...

  3. Finding Time for Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Justin M

    2015-12-01

    With growing advances in psychiatric care come growing amounts of knowledge to be read by psychiatry trainees. This essay presents one resident's experience putting aside some of the official psychiatric literature during residency in favor of more fiction, and his self-perceived growth because of that. Fiction, in the author's perspective, can make us all better psychiatrists.

  4. Building Collections. Historical Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapp, JoAnn Vergona

    2005-01-01

    At least once a year, teachers generally request a historical fiction assignment. Bare facts make dry reading but historical fiction, set in an actual time period with plausible dialogue and credible characters, is more palatable to youngsters. This column discusses the most widely-requested historical periods of study for intermediate and upper…

  5. Fictional models in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Margaret

    2014-02-01

    When James Clerk Maxwell set out his famous equations 150 years ago, his model of electromagnetism included a piece of pure fiction: an invisible, all-pervasive "aether" made up of elastic vortices separated by electric charges. Margaret Morrison explores how this and other "fictional" models shape science.

  6. Building Collections: Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapp, JoAnn Vergona

    2005-01-01

    Fantasy and science fiction are two genres that are products of imagination. Both present alternate worlds governed by their own laws and values, but it is the plausibility of events in each world that sets the two apart. In fantasy, events happen by magic or inexplicable means. In science fiction, events could happen based on advanced…

  7. Science and Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravetz, David

    2005-01-01

    This article is for teachers looking for new ways to motivate students, increase science comprehension, and understanding without using the old standard expository science textbook. This author suggests reading a science fiction novel in the science classroom as a way to engage students in learning. Using science fiction literature and language…

  8. Ecospirituality in the Age of Technological Overkill: Body-Time Reclamation in the Fiction of Alan Lightman and Don DeLillo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Butler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In exploring the link between ecospirituality and the hard sciences, I argue that theformer provides a much-needed complement to the latter. The fragmentation ofdisciplinary pursuits fostered by the Enlightenment and by the continued progress ofunquestioned technological advance as an end in itself finds its ultimate expression inour current disconnection from the natural world, from each other, and even fromourselves. As a corrective to such disconnection, ecospiritual impulses emerge in anattempt to unify a discombobulated subject, a self so fragmented by the multiplenarratival requirements of a communication-obsessed age (where we can be reached bycell phone, regular phone, multiple email addresses, Facebook, and other social mediathat the "contemplative" facet of being human within the rhythms of the natural worldis all but obscured-indeed, is hardly given the requisite environment in which tofunction. Against this over-reliance on technology, on where the hard sciences have ledus, ecospirituality emerges as a balm for the terrorized human spirit. Don DeLillo'srecent novel Point Omega documents this poignantly. His narrator speaks of the "usualterror" of cities with their "endless counting down," with people constantly checkingtheir watches and other time-keeping devices. DeLillo's protagonist moves to the desertwhere "geological time" becomes the paradigm through which a restorative calm isgenerated. Alan Lightman's fiction proves even more relentless in its depiction of thedissociation engendered by an over-reliance on technology. Lightman's protagonist inThe Diagnosis is an information trader who suffers a breakdown and is only restored towell-being through a re-acquaintance with his own natural body rhythms along withthose of the natural world. Many of the characters in the short-story collectionEinstein's Dreams also find that a connection to nature counteracts the senselesscompetition of a consumer-driven, technologically

  9. Alcoholism between Fiction and Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carota, Antonio; Calabrese, Pasquale

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholism has always been emphasized in literature, narratives, and theater as its prevalence and related disability are very high, is found throughout the world, and affects women and men of all ages and social classes. There is a tragic or romantic fascination in the deep sense of personal failure that drinking is able to relieve and in the uncontrollable inability to stop drinking. These aspects have been portrayed well by fictional alcoholics in movies and novels. It has become evident that biological traits together with a complex series of psychosocial factors (e.g. negative life events, depression, anxiety, and other psychiatric or personality disorders), which are also well represented in novels and movies, can lead to alcohol addiction. Behavioral (euphoria, disinhibiting behaviors, aggressiveness) and neurological changes (confusion, bradypsychism, slurred speech, ataxia, blackouts) related to alcohol intoxication are also well portrayed by fictional characters. Delirium tremens, epilepsy, alcohol dementia, and Wernicke-Korsakoff disease, however, find less representation in literature and on the stage and screen. The treatment of alcoholic dependence is very difficult (as often reported by fictional and real stories), but should never be considered hopeless. It should be initiated at any stage of the disease. The support offered by Alcoholics Anonymous has always had great appeal for the public. Fictional works can portray alcohol addiction superbly and show some dark sides of human nature (negative emotions and autodestructive thoughts and behaviors), and, at the same time, the severity and pervasiveness of mental illnesses. The psychiatric and psychosocial aspects of alcohol addiction in movies and novels could be an inspiring source for new psychological studies and rehabilitation programs.

  10. Chemistry and Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Jack H.

    1998-11-01

    This lively collection looks at science as filtered through literature, film, and television. It discusses classic works in science fiction and provides an in-depth look at the chemistry depicted in popular culture, particularly in Start Trek , Star Wars , and Doctor Who . It includes an examination by Nebula Award winner Connie Willis of how science fiction authors use science, and reprints two tongue-in-cheek short stories by Isaac Asimov. The book also includes suggestions for using science fiction as an educational resource.

  11. Yoga training in junior primary school-aged children has an impact on physical self-perceptions and problem-related behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie eRichter

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present pilot study investigated the effects of yoga training, as compared to physical skill training, on motor and executive function, physical self-concept and anxiety-related behavior in junior primary school-aged children. Twenty-four participants with a mean age of 8.4 (± 1.4 years completed either yoga or physical skill training twice a week for six weeks outside of regular school class time. Both forms of training were delivered in an individualized and child-oriented manner. The type of training did not result in any significant differences in movement and executive function outcomes. In terms of physical self-concept, significant group differences were revealed only for perceived movement speed such that yoga training resulted in perceptions of being slower while physical skill training resulted in perceptions of moving faster. Analysis of anxiety related outcomes revealed significant group effects only for avoidance behavior and coping strategies. Avoidance behavior increased following yoga training, but decreased following physical skill training. In addition, following yoga training, children showed an increased use of divergent coping strategies when facing problematic situations while after physical skill training children demonstrated a decrease in use of divergent coping strategies. Increases in overall physical self-concept scores were significantly correlated with increases in avoidance behavior following yoga training. In contrast, following physical skill training increased physical self-concept was significantly correlated with decreases in avoidance behavior. In sum, exposure to yoga or physical skill training appears to result in distinct effects for specific domains of physical self-concept and anxiety-related behavior. Further studies with larger samples and more rigorous methodologies are required to further investigate the effects reported here. With respect to future studies, we address potential research

  12. Yoga Training in Junior Primary School-Aged Children Has an Impact on Physical Self-Perceptions and Problem-Related Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Stefanie; Tietjens, Maike; Ziereis, Susanne; Querfurth, Sydney; Jansen, Petra

    2016-01-01

    The present pilot study investigated the effects of yoga training, as compared to physical skill training, on motor and executive function, physical self-concept, and anxiety-related behavior in junior primary school-aged children. Twenty-four participants with a mean age of 8.4 (±1.4) years completed either yoga or physical skill training twice a week for 6 weeks outside of regular school class time. Both forms of training were delivered in an individualized and child-oriented manner. The type of training did not result in any significant differences in movement and executive function outcomes. In terms of physical self-concept, significant group differences were revealed only for perceived movement speed such that yoga training resulted in perceptions of being slower while physical skill training resulted in perceptions of moving faster. Analysis of anxiety related outcomes revealed significant group effects only for avoidance behavior and coping strategies. Avoidance behavior increased following yoga training, but decreased following physical skill training. In addition, following yoga training, children showed an increased use of divergent coping strategies when facing problematic situations while after physical skill training children demonstrated a decrease in use of divergent coping strategies. Changes in overall physical self-concept scores were not significantly correlated with changes in avoidance behavior following yoga training. In contrast, following physical skill training increased physical self-concept was significantly correlated with decreases in avoidance behavior. In sum, exposure to yoga or physical skill training appears to result in distinct effects for specific domains of physical self-concept and anxiety-related behavior. Further studies with larger samples and more rigorous methodologies are required to further investigate the effects reported here. With respect to future studies, we address potential research questions and specific

  13. Dialogue in fiction Dialogue in fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Rosa Caldas-Coulthard

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Characters and narrators, in fictional narrative discourse, exchange speech. Their interaction however is pseudo (see Sinclair, 1981, since it is not interactive in the real sense but imagined by an author, and it only happens intra-textually (the conversation only exists on a page of a book. Composed dialogue therefore, has features that distinguish it from real talk, although authors base their representation of speech on a model of what they think conversationalists do. Characters and narrators, in fictional narrative discourse, exchange speech. Their interaction however is pseudo (see Sinclair, 1981, since it is not interactive in the real sense but imagined by an author, and it only happens intra-textually (the conversation only exists on a page of a book. Composed dialogue therefore, has features that distinguish it from real talk, although authors base their representation of speech on a model of what they think conversationalists do.

  14. Science Fiction: Coping with Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymn, Marshall B.

    1979-01-01

    Notes that science fiction has evolved into a literature of serious social commentary while still preserving its origins of romantic escapism and intriguing gadgetry. Argues that science fiction now looks more closely at life on Earth. (FL)

  15. Multicolor-FICTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Subero, José Ignacio; Chudoba, Ilse; Harder, Lana; Gesk, Stefan; Grote, Werner; Novo, Francisco Javier; Calasanz, María José; Siebert, Reiner

    2002-01-01

    Phenotypic and genotypic analyses of cells are increasingly essential for understanding pathogenetic mechanisms as well as for diagnosing and classifying malignancies and other diseases. We report a novel multicolor approach based on the FICTION (fluorescence immunophenotyping and interphase cytogenetics as a tool for the investigation of neoplasms) technique, which enables the simultaneous detection of morphological, immunophenotypic, and genetic characteristics of single cells. As prerequisite, multicolor interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization assays for B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma have been developed. These assays allow the simultaneous detection of the most frequent primary chromosomal aberrations in these neoplasms, such as t(8;14), t(11;14), t(14;18), and t(3;14), and the various rearrangements of the ALK gene, respectively. To establish the multicolor FICTION technique, these assays were combined with the immunophenotypic detection of lineage- or tumor-specific antigens, namely CD20 and ALK, respectively. For evaluation of multicolor FICTION experiments, image acquisition was performed by automatic sequential capturing of multiple focal planes. Thus, three-dimensional information was obtained. The multicolor FICTION assays were applied to well-characterized lymphoma samples, proving the performance, validity, and diagnostic power of the technique. Future multicolor FICTION applications include the detection of preneoplastic lesions, early stage and minimal residual diseases, or micrometastases. PMID:12163366

  16. Fiction, Empathy and Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The article aims to demonstrate that the impact of fiction on adult learning could be illuminated by a deeper engagement with research into empathy. It recognises that the lifelong learning literature acknowledges the importance of empathy in adult learning and that discussions of the role of fiction in adult learning often refer to fiction's…

  17. Fiction, Empathy and Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The article aims to demonstrate that the impact of fiction on adult learning could be illuminated by a deeper engagement with research into empathy. It recognises that the lifelong learning literature acknowledges the importance of empathy in adult learning and that discussions of the role of fiction in adult learning often refer to fiction's…

  18. Science Fiction and Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Terence

    2002-01-01

    Uses science fiction films such as "Jurassic Park" or "Anaconda" to teach science concepts while fostering student interest. Advocates science fiction as a teaching tool to improve learning and motivation. Describes how to use science fiction in the classroom with the sample activity Twister. (YDS)

  19. Science Fiction and Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Terence

    2002-01-01

    Uses science fiction films such as "Jurassic Park" or "Anaconda" to teach science concepts while fostering student interest. Advocates science fiction as a teaching tool to improve learning and motivation. Describes how to use science fiction in the classroom with the sample activity Twister. (YDS)

  20. Making fictions sound real

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Birger

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the role that sound plays in making fictions perceptually real to film audiences, whether these fictions are realist or non-realist in content and narrative form. I will argue that some aspects of film sound practices and the kind of experiences they trigger are related...... to basic rules of human perception, whereas others are more properly explained in relation to how aesthetic devices, including sound, are used to characterise the fiction and thereby make it perceptually real to its audience. Finally, I will argue that not all genres can be defined by a simple taxonomy...... of sounds. Apart from an account of the kinds of sounds that typically appear in a specific genre, a genre analysis of sound may also benefit from a functionalist approach that focuses on how sounds can make both realist and non-realist aspects of genres sound real to audiences....

  1. Pseudoscience and science fiction

    CERN Document Server

    May, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Aliens, flying saucers, ESP, the Bermuda Triangle, antigravity … are we talking about science fiction or pseudoscience? Sometimes it is difficult to tell the difference. Both pseudoscience and science fiction (SF) are creative endeavours that have little in common with academic science, beyond the superficial trappings of jargon and subject matter. The most obvious difference between the two is that pseudoscience is presented as fact, not fiction. Yet like SF, and unlike real science, pseudoscience is driven by a desire to please an audience – in this case, people who “want to believe”. This has led to significant cross-fertilization between the two disciplines. SF authors often draw on “real” pseudoscientific theories to add verisimilitude to their stories, while on other occasions pseudoscience takes its cue from SF – the symbiotic relationship between ufology and Hollywood being a prime example of this. This engagingly written, well researched and richly illustrated text explores a wide range...

  2. Mimesis, fiction, paradoxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Lavocat

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Les théories contemporaines de la fiction, comme les poétiques de la Renaissance, privilégient une conception de la mimesis fondée sur la vraisemblance : la démonstration du profit cognitif et moral de la fiction passe toujours par une définition de l’imitation (de quelque façon qu’on la définisse fondée sur la rationalité. L’auteur de cet article examine tout d’abord le statut des contradictions et de l’impossible chez quelques théoriciens actuels (principalement J.-M. Schaeffer, M.-L. Ryan, L. Doležel et poéticiens du 16e siècle (L. Castelvetro et F. Patrizi. Sont ensuite étudiées la forme et la fonction que prend l’impossible dans trois fictions narratives de la Renaissance. L’hypothèse majeure qui est défendue est que ces paradoxes permettent de penser le non-existant, dans la continuité de la scolastique médiévale et en relation avec une problématique religieuse, sérieuse ou parodique. Par là même, et en raison de leur auto-référentialité constitutive, les paradoxes inscrivent dans la fiction une réflexion sur elle-même qui n’a rien d’une apologie. La pensée de la fiction s’articule en définitive de façon bien différente dans les théories et dans les fictions elles-mêmes.Like Renaissance poetics, contemporary theories of fiction do favour a conception of mimesis based on likelihood. In order to underscore the benefits of fiction, in terms of cognition or ethics, both ancient and present-day authors usually identify imitation (however this is understood as a kind of rationality. The aim of this article is to question the status of contradictions and impossibilities, first in current theories of fiction (J-M Schaeffer, M.-L. Ryan, L. Doležel, then in two sixteenth century comments of Aristotle (by L. Castelvetro and F. Patrizi. In the following steps, forms and functions of the impossible are studied in three narratives of the Renaissance. The main hypothesis here is the following: in

  3. Empathy with fictional stories: reconsideration of the fantasy scale of the interpersonal reactivity index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kohei; Akai, Seiki

    2012-02-01

    The present research compared empathy for real people with empathy for fictional characters. 95 university students (53 men, 42 women) ages 18-22 years (M = 19.5, SD = 1.9) completed the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI) and the Fictional IRI. The IRI is a widely used measure of human empathy, and the Fictional IRI contains items from the original IRI that have been modified to investigate empathy for fictional characters. Empathy for characters in fictional stories was found to correlate statistically significantly with empathy for real people on all but a few factors. The results of the present study indicate that empathy for real people and empathy for fictional characters are similar, suggesting that the Fantasy subscale of the IRI, which is limited to fictional stories, should be reconsidered.

  4. Approaches to Scandinavian Crime Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Gunhild

    2010-01-01

    The working paper discusses some of the major approaches to Scandinavian crime fiction in the light of the dominant features of crime culture, e.g. the broad exposure of crime fiction via different platforms and media. In this connection, the concept of mediatization is considered as well...... as the approach of genre typology and the concept of evil – seemingly disparate concepts and approaches, but all related to the complex processes in the borderlands between crime fiction and society. Using examples from Scandinavian crime fiction, I discuss whether the growing proximity to international genres......, ways of production and standards increasingly removes Scandinavian crime fiction from its original attractions or not....

  5. Approaches to Scandinavian Crime Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Gunhild

    2010-01-01

    as the approach of genre typology and the concept of evil – seemingly disparate concepts and approaches, but all related to the complex processes in the borderlands between crime fiction and society. Using examples from Scandinavian crime fiction, I discuss whether the growing proximity to international genres......The working paper discusses some of the major approaches to Scandinavian crime fiction in the light of the dominant features of crime culture, e.g. the broad exposure of crime fiction via different platforms and media. In this connection, the concept of mediatization is considered as well......, ways of production and standards increasingly removes Scandinavian crime fiction from its original attractions or not....

  6. COMPREHENSIVE JUNIOR COLLEGES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NIKITAS, CHRISTUS M.; AND OTHERS

    TO MEET THE STATE'S HIGHER EDUCATION NEEDS, THE NEW HAMPSHIRE JUNIOR COLLEGE COMMISSION DEVELOPED A PLAN OF (1) GRADUAL AND SELECTIVE CONVERSION OF THE STATE'S TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS TO COMPREHENSIVE JUNIOR COLLEGES, (2) SELECTIVE ADDITION OF 2-YEAR PROGRAMS AT THE STATE COLLEGES AND INSTITUTES, AND (3) ESTABLISHMENT OF A STATE…

  7. Genre Fiction; Science Fiction; The Quest for Utopia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charles N. Brown

    2005-01-01

    This paper will discuss the difference between genre fiction and mainstream fiction, the difference between science fiction and other fields of genre fiction, and in particular, the philosophical use of science fiction in our search for a better world.All genres used to be called ″romance″ to distinguish them from ″true″ novels.There were arguments about it in Hawthorne's The House of Seven Gables and in a heated exchange between H.G.Wells and Henry James.I will talk about this difference.All genre fiction pays attention to the external world, but science fiction is the only one of them that looks forward by being grounded in the present.Is science fiction really a genre? There are some doubts.Science fiction is not about science per se, but about the philosophy of science:the study of the external world and its relation to man.It is ideal for ″thought experiments.″ By exploring possible futures, we cannot only examine our present world, but can see ways in which it can be improved.Hence, science fiction is the search for, if not utopia, then at least a better world.This paper will also discuss the ideas of Kim Stanley Robinson, Ursula K.Le Guin, and others in their search for a better future.

  8. Modern Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Jennie Ora Marriott

    The major prerequisite to studying science fiction as literature is determining the criteria by which it is to be evaluated. A middle ground which recognizes both literary merit and the genre's uniqueness (scientific orientation, dominancy of idea, and interest of speculation) proves to be the most workable approach and stresses the versatility…

  9. The Fiction of Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mubanda Rasmussen, Louise

    research with organisations providing help to "Orphans and Vulnerable Children" in Malawi, this paper discusses how donors, international and local NGOs, and CBOs all participate in keeping alive 'the fiction of sustainability', each for their different reasons. Rather than overt resistance to the power...

  10. [Fictions and stories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, H

    1995-12-01

    A short and interesting work, where the author of "The secret tooth", exposes some opinions about fiction and story, words he considers should not be opposed, but really on the contrary, be harmonized to contribute with their alliance for personal joy of readers. Writers like Joyce, Caillois, Updike, and others, are quoted for renewing texts with reports referred to Dentistry.

  11. Stranger than fiction

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Is the universe - correction: 'our' universe - no more than a speck of cosmic dust amid an infinite number of parallel worlds? A staple of mind-bending science fiction, the possibility of multiple universes has long intrigued hard-nosed physicists, mathematicians and cosmologists too.

  12. The Effects of a Positive Mindset Trigger Word Pre-Performance Routine on the Expressive Performance of Junior High Age Singers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broomhead, Paul; Skidmore, Jon B.; Eggett, Dennis L.; Mills, Melissa M.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of a positive mindset trigger word intervention on the expressive performance of individual junior high singers were tested in this study. Participants (N = 155) were assigned randomly to a control group or an experimental group. Members of the experimental group participated in a 40-min intervention while members of the control group…

  13. Crime fiction and mediatized religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    In recent Scandinavian crime fiction an ongoing discussion on religion and religiosity is taking place. This undercurrent goes historically a long way back, but the past few decades seem to have left room for an altered view on religion in modern crime fiction. Crime fiction has usually been...... connected with modernity, modern society and ensuing secularity, but the question is, then, what happens to crime fiction if modern societies no longer uphold its trust in secular ideals. The thesis is that this leaves modern Scandinavian media open for a religious discussion which then also seeps...... into popular crime fiction. In novels by Arne Dahl, Henning Mortensen, Gunnar Staalesen, A.J. Kazinski, Gretelise Holm and several other Scandinavian writers of crime fiction it is possible to locate an interest in theology and topics of religious philosophy which reflects this current trend in modern...

  14. Religion in Scandinavian Crime Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    In recent Scandinavian crime fiction an ongoing discussion on religion and religiosity is taking place. This undercurrent goes historically a long way back, but the past few decades seem to have left room for an altered view on religion in modern crime fiction. Crime fiction has usually been...... connected with modernity, modern society and ensuing secularity, but the question is, then, what happens to crime fiction if modern societies no longer uphold its trust in secular ideals. The thesis is that this leaves modern Scandinavian media open for a religious discussion which then also seeps...... into popular crime fiction. In novels by Arne Dahl, Henning Mortensen, Gunnar Staalesen, A.J. Kazinski, Gretelise Holm and several other Scandinavian writers of crime fiction it is possible to locate an interest in theology and topics of religious philosophy which reflects this current trend in modern...

  15. Sexuality Education in Junior High Schools in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, N.; Shinohara, H.; Tashiro, M.; Suzuki, S.; Hirose, H.; Ikeya, H.; Ushitora, K.; Komiya, A.; Watanabe, M.; Motegi, T.; Morioka, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to determine via responses to three questionnaire surveys how sexuality education programs are conducted at junior high schools in Japan. Study 1 examined the practice of sexuality education in schools, Study 2 investigated junior high school students' (age 12-13 and 14-15 years) knowledge of sexuality, and Study 3 examined…

  16. Literacy competence based on fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broström, Stig

      The teacher's selection of theories of reading and attached methods for learning to read influence what kind of texts the children will be presented in the first years of school. A teaching strategy based on phonetic theory of reading result in the fact that children will meet less fiction texts...... with fictional quality. This is a problem while fiction literature holds a potential for personal and language Bildung - a potential for both their future life and also their precondition for learning to read. Based on the hypothesis that children's fiction literature (imaginative literature) might be a useful...

  17. Fiction Is Truth, and Sometimes Truth Is Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Carol Lakey

    2008-01-01

    The art of fiction tells truth because it is the truth of life that goes into making good fiction: love, hate, fear, courage, delight, sorrow, betrayal, loyalty, confusion, choice, circumstance, luck, injustice. These essential qualities, says the author, are also the qualities of sound theology, with a sense of time and place; and raising…

  18. The Return of Historical Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycik, Mary Taylor; Rosler, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    Recently, historical fiction has begun to dominate major children's book awards. This article describes the values of using high-quality historical fiction in the classroom and presents different ways to respond to this genre including using modern technology. Two tables, one of picture books and one of novels, with paired nonfiction texts, are…

  19. Religion in Scandinavian Crime Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    2011-01-01

    Firstly, I develop a theoretical framework for the discussion of religion i Scandinavian crime fiction where I consider theories of transgression and religion. Secondly, I run through five relatively popular examples of Scandinavian crime fiction to show how this genre trend works. Lastly, I...

  20. The Return of Historical Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycik, Mary Taylor; Rosler, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    Recently, historical fiction has begun to dominate major children's book awards. This article describes the values of using high-quality historical fiction in the classroom and presents different ways to respond to this genre including using modern technology. Two tables, one of picture books and one of novels, with paired nonfiction texts, are…

  1. Intermediate Genre Study. Historical Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelli, Joan; Lasky, Kathryn

    1996-01-01

    Students can learn to appreciate history as readers and writers of historical fiction. This section presents an introduction to historical fiction, a display idea, a mystery history game, discussion of character-building, charts for students to fill in with information on historical characters, suggestions for customizing writing centers and for…

  2. Postsecularism in Scandinavian Crime Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    2014-01-01

    This article considers the postsecular turn in Scandinavian crime fiction. Postsecularism describes a renewed openness towards questions of spirituality, while maintaining the practice of critical scrutiny. Since 2000, we have seen an intensive increase in the number of titles treating religion and....../or spirituality in a way which differs from the genre’s usual approach. Firstly, I will frame the traditional attitude towards religion in crime fiction by Scandinavian welfare modernity, outlining the conspicuous absence of religion in the genre. Secondly, I propose a typology of the treatment of religion...... in crime fiction. My examples are all taken from the vast corpus of contemporary Scandinavian crime fiction, but it would be rather unproblematic to stretch the scope of the theory to an analysis of western crime fiction in general. Within this typology, I will introduce the phenomenon of a religious...

  3. True-to-Life? Realistic Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Anne Devereaux

    1995-01-01

    Suggests that modern realistic fiction for young readers is intensely moralistic and directive at the spoken and unspoken behest of the adults who write, select, and buy that literature. Discusses moral tales, early realistic fiction, modern realistic fiction, and choosing realistic fiction. (RS)

  4. True-to-Life? Realistic Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Anne Devereaux

    1995-01-01

    Suggests that modern realistic fiction for young readers is intensely moralistic and directive at the spoken and unspoken behest of the adults who write, select, and buy that literature. Discusses moral tales, early realistic fiction, modern realistic fiction, and choosing realistic fiction. (RS)

  5. Why and How I Use Historical Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Tarry

    1995-01-01

    A fifth-grade teacher discusses why she teaches with historical fiction, presenting tips on choosing good historical fiction, reviewing her favorite new historical fiction books, and highlighting how to use historical fiction to teach by discussing Pocahontas to help students differentiate between make-believe and history. (SM)

  6. Science or Science Fiction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefsrud, Lianne M.; Meyer, Renate

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the framings and identity work associated with professionals’ discursive construction of climate change science, their legitimation of themselves as experts on ‘the truth’, and their attitudes towards regulatory measures. Drawing from survey responses of 1077 professional......, legitimation strategies, and use of emotionality and metaphor. By linking notions of the science or science fiction of climate change to the assessment of the adequacy of global and local policies and of potential organizational responses, we contribute to the understanding of ‘defensive institutional work...

  7. Vocabulary Development of Junior Teens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Nikonova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the communicative competence formation of young adolescents in the secondary school at the Russian language lessons. The author maintains that the key element of the above problem is the vocabulary development guaranteeing both comprehension and verbal expression formation – oral and written. The theoretical part of the research explores different word functions: nominal, communicative, text generating and semantic. The correlation between the mental development level and lexical semantic system formation is emphasized. The age specific features of junior teens are listed: rising interest to various life spheres and activi- ties, capability of formulating opinions and judgments, self-awareness, formation of values. The relationship complexity stimulates vocabulary development of 10 to 12 year-old children; however, the process requires peda- gogical facilitation.The monitoring of speech development proves the necessity of commutative competence formation of the fifth- and sixth-year pupils. The paper presents the model of communicative competence development and its approbation results received for the junior adolescents. 

  8. Vocabulary Development of Junior Teens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Nikonova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the communicative competence formation of young adolescents in the secondary school at the Russian language lessons. The author maintains that the key element of the above problem is the vocabulary development guaranteeing both comprehension and verbal expression formation – oral and written. The theoretical part of the research explores different word functions: nominal, communicative, text generating and semantic. The correlation between the mental development level and lexical semantic system formation is emphasized. The age specific features of junior teens are listed: rising interest to various life spheres and activi- ties, capability of formulating opinions and judgments, self-awareness, formation of values. The relationship complexity stimulates vocabulary development of 10 to 12 year-old children; however, the process requires peda- gogical facilitation.The monitoring of speech development proves the necessity of commutative competence formation of the fifth- and sixth-year pupils. The paper presents the model of communicative competence development and its approbation results received for the junior adolescents. 

  9. For Realism in Children's Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stibbs, Andrew

    1980-01-01

    Points out the sometimes excessive lengths that authors carry the suspension of reality in children's fiction. Advocates a more disciplined imagination, and rejection of untrue or impossible worlds. (HTH)

  10. The Poetics of Design Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thomas; Knutz, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Design fiction is an emergent field within HCI and interaction design, the understanding of which ultimately relies, so we argue, of an integrative account of poetics and design praxis. In this paper we give such an account. Initially, a precise definition of design fiction is given by drawing...... on the theory of possible worlds found within poetics. Further, we offer a method of practicing design fiction, which relies on the equal integration of literary practice with design practice. The use of this method is demonstrated by 4 design projects from a workshop set up in collaboration with a Danish...... author. All of this substantiates our notion of a poetics of practicing design fiction, and through our critical examination of related work we conclude on how our approach contribute to HCI and interaction design....

  11. Fiction: Simulation of Social Worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oatley, Keith

    2016-06-23

    Fiction is the simulation of selves in interaction. People who read it improve their understanding of others. This effect is especially marked with literary fiction, which also enables people to change themselves. These effects are due partly to the process of engagement in stories, which includes making inferences and becoming emotionally involved, and partly to the contents of fiction, which include complex characters and circumstances that we might not encounter in daily life. Fiction can be thought of as a form of consciousness of selves and others that can be passed from an author to a reader or spectator, and can be internalized to augment everyday cognition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Crime fiction and moral emotions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2011-01-01

    The article first discusses how crime fiction centrally activates moral emotions related to feelings of social trust and social conflicts. The article uses psychological theory to analyse audio-visual fiction, and it takes an evolutionary stance in relation to morality; within film studies......, and especially within literary studies, the inspiration from evolutionary studies has been strong in the last decade. Humans are adapted to group living, and emotions linked to fairness have an innate basis. The article then shows how different crime stories activate different stages in Kohlberg’s functional...... typology of moral systems and how different stages relate to different social systems. Further, a functional description of the various moral emotions is used to characterize crime fictions. The use of moral emotions in crime fiction is exemplified in Oplev’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2009), angry...

  13. Translating Metaphors in Narrative Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Alet

    1993-01-01

    Argues that in translating fiction it is necessary to take into account the interdependence of intratextual components. Considers this particularly important in the case of metaphors that function as a characterization tool. (NKA)

  14. The Hero in Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Bill

    1999-01-01

    Examines the characterization of heroes in science fiction, focusing on young males. Nine books are reviewed to describe various types of heroes, from common ordinary characters to those with exceptional skills and intelligence, including nonhuman characters such as cyborgs. (LRW)

  15. Fear, Fiction, and the Adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grixti, Joe

    1982-01-01

    The popularity of horror fiction among adolescents is discussed in terms of the use of grammar for social interaction, personal development, and emotional therapy during a developmental stage characterized by fear and emotional upheaval. (MSE)

  16. The Fiction of Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mubanda Rasmussen, Louise

    at maintaining and attracting new donor funding? Despite this contradiction, various actors in the HIV/AIDS field continuously invoke the doctrine of sustainability (Swidler & Watkins) as the remedy for problems such as 'donor dependency' and 'high turn-over' among volunteers. Based on five months ethnographic...... research with organisations providing help to "Orphans and Vulnerable Children" in Malawi, this paper discusses how donors, international and local NGOs, and CBOs all participate in keeping alive 'the fiction of sustainability', each for their different reasons. Rather than overt resistance to the power...... of international donors, the processes I discuss reflect how actors from their different positions become skilled in using established policy models and available resources for their own ends....

  17. Psychopathic characters in fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechowski-Jozwiak, Bartlomiej; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2013-01-01

    The theme of psychopathy has fascinated artists and the general public for centuries. The first concepts on psychopathy came from the parasciences, such as phrenology where anatomical features were linked to certain psychopathic/immoral behaviors. The concept of psychopathy was recognized by forensic psychiatry a few decades ago and this official recognition was followed by the emergence of scientific and clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and prognosis of psychopaths. These modern tools can also be used for historical purposes by allowing us to look back on fictional works and identify psychopaths in literature. Interpretation of fictitious psychopaths needs to be related to the historical situation in which the novels were written; such investigations can be both enriching and thrilling.

  18. Fiction et typification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Zaccaï-Reyners

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Par quelles voies les acquis cognitifs de l’expérience sont-ils mobilisés par ego dans la suite de ses actions, et sont-ils transmis à autrui ? Contrairement à la phénoménologie sociale d’Alfred Schütz dans le cadre de laquelle ces questions sont renvoyées à des processus de généralisation et de stabilisation pensés sous le prisme de la typification sociale, la théorie des fictions élaborée par Jean-Marie Schaeffer appréhende la modélisation de l’expérience vécue à partir des spécificités d’une forme proprement ludique d’expérience. Les blocages décrits par Schütz lorsqu’il envisage les situations exemplaires de l’étranger ou du soldat revenant du front y trouvent un nouvel éclairage. Proposition de mots clés :How are cognitive elements of experience available for the continuation of ego’s action, and how are they passed on to alter ? In the social phenomenology of Alfred Schutz for instance, these questions are related back to generalisation and stabilisation processes viewed through the light of social typification. On the other hand, Jean-Marie Schaeffer’s theory of fiction comprehends the modelling of some lived experiences as the fact of a specific form of ludic experience. It provides a new light on the obstructions described by Schutz considering the exemplar situations of the stranger or of the homecomer.

  19. Postsecularism in Scandinavian Crime Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    2014-01-01

    This article considers the postsecular turn in Scandinavian crime fiction. Postsecularism describes a renewed openness towards questions of spirituality, while maintaining the practice of critical scrutiny. Since 2000, we have seen an intensive increase in the number of titles treating religion a......-constrained modernity and the theological theory of a welfare theodicy as valuable discussions of why we see this spiritual interest in crime fiction....

  20. Leadership between fiction and reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Marinescu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Often, reality overtakes fiction as the real world always contains the fiction germs, the latter growing and becoming susceptible to provide unpredictable results. The individual and organisational development vectors can generate, in the future, leadership patterns difficult to anticipate at this moment. The social and economic networks, the new technologies will define different ways of communication, collaboration, management and decision-making. The nowadays leadership theories risk to become, very soon, inoperative.

  1. Anthropological reading of science fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Gavrilović

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an overview of the prevalence of the analysis of science fiction literature and science fiction in other segments of popular culture in Serbian anthropology. This overview is preceded by a consideration of science fiction as a genre while keeping in mind the fluidity of the genre and the interweaving of subgenres as well as the transformations which science fiction is undergoing in certain media (books, films, TV shows and video games. In Serbian anthropology research on science fiction is more prevalent than the study of other phenomena, as the number of anthropologists whose work is represented in the paper is fairly large compared to the size of the anthropological community as a whole. The causes for this can primarily be found in a collective focus on questions such as: who are we and who the others are, what the basis of creating and building identity is or what the role of context in recognition of species is. Anthropology gives answers to these questions through the interpretation, explanation and understanding of the world around us, while science fiction does it through the literary considerations of these same questions.

  2. The cognitive science of fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oatley, Keith

    2012-07-01

    Fiction might be dismissed as observations that lack reliability and validity, but this would be a misunderstanding. Works of fiction are simulations that run on minds. They were the first kinds of simulation. All art has a metaphorical quality: a painting can be both pigments on canvas and a person. In literary art, this quality extends to readers who can be both themselves and, by empathetic processes within a simulation, also literary characters. On the basis of this hypothesis, it was found that the more fiction people read the better were their skills of empathy and theory-of-mind; the inference from several studies is that reading fiction improves social skills. In functional magnetic resonance imaging meta-analyses, brain areas concerned with understanding narrative stories were found to overlap with those concerned with theory-of-mind. In an orthogonal effect, reading artistic literature was found to enable people to change their personality by small increments, not by a writer's persuasion, but in their own way. This effect was due to artistic merit of a text, irrespective of whether it was fiction or non-fiction. An empirically based conception of literary art might be carefully constructed verbal material that enables self-directed personal change. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:425-430. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1185 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  3. Miku's mask: Fictional encounters in children's costume play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgesen, Espen

    2015-11-01

    Children's engagement with Japanese toys and fictional characters has taken on new significance in the age of YouTube. Drawing on ethnographic research on technology-mediated play among 8- and 9-year-olds in Norway, this article shows how boundaries between "real" humans and "fake" non-humans are blurred and undermined when children take on the perspective of a fictional pop star known as Miku. I argue that YouTube provides a platform for children's playful experimentation with posthuman subjectivities, where they orient themselves toward the future not in terms of becoming adult but in terms of multiple becomings.

  4. Science fiction by scientists an anthology of short stories

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This anthology contains fourteen intriguing short stories by active research scientists and other writers trained in science. Science is at the heart of real science fiction, which is more than just westerns with ray guns or fantasy with spaceships. The people who do science and love science best are scientists. Scientists like Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, and Fred Hoyle wrote some of the legendary tales of golden age science fiction. Today there is a new generation of scientists writing science fiction informed with the expertise of their fields, from astrophysics to computer science, biochemistry to rocket science, quantum physics to genetics, speculating about what is possible in our universe. Here lies the sense of wonder only science can deliver. All the stories in this volume are supplemented by afterwords commenting on the science underlying each story.

  5. Fictional and Factual Discourses in Narratives - and the Grey Zone Between

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Leif

    2012-01-01

    Part 1: Blurring of the border between public and private areas and increasing use of the reality effect in order to create authenticity. Various levels of fictionalizing: minimal fictionalizing, medium fictionalizing, extra fictionalizing, total fictionalizing, super fictionalizing, non fictiona......Part 1: Blurring of the border between public and private areas and increasing use of the reality effect in order to create authenticity. Various levels of fictionalizing: minimal fictionalizing, medium fictionalizing, extra fictionalizing, total fictionalizing, super fictionalizing, non...

  6. Perfectionism and attitudes towards doping in junior athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Madigan, Daniel J.; Stoeber, Joachim; Passfield, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Recent theory and research suggest that perfectionism is a personal factor contributing to athletes’ vulnerability to doping (using banned substances/drugs to enhance sporting performance). So far, however, no study has examined what aspects of perfectionism suggest a vulnerability in junior athletes. Employing a cross-sectional design, this study examined perfectionism and attitudes towards doping in 129 male junior athletes (mean age 17.3 years) differentiating four aspects of perfectionism...

  7. High on Crime Fiction and Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2010-01-01

    how crime fiction activates strong salience (in some respects similar to the effect of dopamine-drugs like cocaine, Ritalin, and amphetamine) and discusses the role of social intelligence in crime fiction. It further contrasts the unempathic classical detector fictions with two subtypes of crime...

  8. Hybrid Fictionality and Vicarious Narrative Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatavara, Mari Annukka; Mildorf, Jarmila

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the recent trends in Fictionality Studies and argues for a point of view focusing more on the narrative dimension of fictionality than on the fictive story content. With the analysis of two case studies, where a non-fictional third person narrator represents the experience ...

  9. Science Fiction: Serious Reading, Critical Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigo, Diane; Moore, Michael T.

    2004-01-01

    Science fiction deserves a greater respect, serious and critical reading and a better place in high school literature classes. Some of the science fiction books by Isaac Asimov, Alfred Bester, Ray Bradbury and Octavia L. Butler and various activities for incorporating science fiction into the English language arts instruction classroom are…

  10. Science fiction : mythology of the future

    OpenAIRE

    Fava, Anna; Duca, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Science fiction reimagines our future. Sometimes it is inspired by science; sometimes it inspires current scientists. Anna Fava visited Prof. Victor Grech at his home to talk about the mythology of science fiction and his love for Star Trek. http://www.um.edu.mt/think/science-fiction-mythology-of-the-future/

  11. Revitalizing History Teaching Through Historical Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Lee C.

    1983-01-01

    Describes the usefulness of including historical fiction on reading lists in high school history courses. Lists criteria for selection and instructional use of historical fiction, and provides a list of historical fiction appropriate for use in studying certain topics in United States history. (KH)

  12. A Guide to Teaching Creative Writing: Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Linda, Ed.; And Others

    Intended for both elementary and secondary school teachers who have little or no experience in teaching creative fiction writing, this booklet presents sample lesson plans for writing short stories, fables, myths, mysteries, science fiction, and historical fiction. The lesson plans discuss such elements as plot, setting, characterization, mood,…

  13. Science Fiction: Serious Reading, Critical Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigo, Diane; Moore, Michael T.

    2004-01-01

    Science fiction deserves a greater respect, serious and critical reading and a better place in high school literature classes. Some of the science fiction books by Isaac Asimov, Alfred Bester, Ray Bradbury and Octavia L. Butler and various activities for incorporating science fiction into the English language arts instruction classroom are…

  14. Religion in Scandinavian Crime Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    2011-01-01

    Firstly, I develop a theoretical framework for the discussion of religion i Scandinavian crime fiction where I consider theories of transgression and religion. Secondly, I run through five relatively popular examples of Scandinavian crime fiction to show how this genre trend works. Lastly, I...... connect this with what has been dubbed mediatized religion and a more general, philosophical explanation of why we see this development: The project of modernity is, as a result of cultural changes, at the moment transgressing its own epistemological boundaries opening up into what has been called...

  15. Augmenting the City with Fiction: Fictional Requirements for Mobile Guides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldskov, Jesper; Paay, Jeni

    2007-01-01

    within the area of interactive narratives and location-based games. We then present and discuss five overall types of fictional mobile guides embodied by the metaphors of 1) treasure hunts, 2) jig-saw puzzles, 3) playing dominos, 4) playing scrabble, and 5) collecting butterflies. Finally, we describe...

  16. Impact of Quality of Life on the Reenlistment Intentions of Junior Enlisted United States Marines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    junior enlisted Marines, known as ’ Millenials ’ (born after 1981). As illustrated earlier in this thesis, the average age of junior enlisted Marines...is just over 21 years (born after 1980). Thus, many junior enlisted Marines studied in this thesis are likely to belong to the Millenial group...Wilcox (2001) found that, to Millenials , "the greatest appeal of the Marine Corps, and the one that makes the service unique, is ’Self- Improvement

  17. The Science in Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Peter, Ed.

    This 12-chapter book discusses the scientific facts behind the ideas included in the novels of Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov, Frederik Pohl, Arthur C. Clark and other science fiction writers. Areas explored in the first 11 chapters include: exploration of deep space; energy and exotic power sources; likelihood of extra-terrestrial life and the…

  18. The Science in Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Peter, Ed.

    This 12-chapter book discusses the scientific facts behind the ideas included in the novels of Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov, Frederik Pohl, Arthur C. Clark and other science fiction writers. Areas explored in the first 11 chapters include: exploration of deep space; energy and exotic power sources; likelihood of extra-terrestrial life and the…

  19. Science Fiction in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brake, Mark; Thornton, Rosi

    2003-01-01

    Considers science fiction as an imaginative forum to focus on the relationships between science, culture, and society. Outlines some of the ways in which using the genre can help achieve a dynamic and pluralistic understanding of the nature and evolution of science. (Author/KHR)

  20. Strain: Fact or Fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbronner, Renée

    2017-04-01

    2017 marks the 50th anniversary of the publication of John Ramsay's well known textbook "Folding and Fracturing of Rocks" - ... and the 30th anniversary of the rejection of a rather less well known paper entitled "Strain: Fact or Fiction?" submitted by Renée Panozzo to the Journal of Structural Geology. The gist of the paper was simple and straight forward: it was argued that not every fabric that can be observed in deformed rocks is necessarily a measure of the amount of strain the rock incurred. A distinction was made between a general "fabric", i.e., the traceable geometry of grain boundaries, for example, and a so-called "strain fabric", i.e., the model geometry that would result from homogeneously straining an initially isotropic fabric and that would exhibit at least orthorhombic symmetry. To verify if a given fabric was indeed a strain fabric it was therefore suggested to use the SURFOR method (published by Panozzo) and to carry out a so-called strain test, i.e., a check of symmetry, before interpreting the results of a fabric analysis in terms of strain. The problem with the paper was that it was very obviously written out of frustration. The frustration came form having reviewed a number of manuscripts which tried to use the then novel SURFOR method for strain analysis without first checking if the the fabric was a indeed a "strain fabric" or not, and then blaming the SURFOR method for producing ambiguous results. As a result, the paper was not exactly well balanced and carefully thought out. It was considered "interesting but not scholarly" by one of the reviewers and down-right offensive by the second. To tell the truth, however, the paper was not formally rejected. The editor Sue Treagus strongly encouraged Panozzo to revise the paper, ... and 30 years later, I will follow her advise and offer a revised paper as a tribute to John Ramsay. To quote from the original manuscript: "We should be a little more impressed that strain works so well, and less

  1. Haruspicating With Science Fiction Or Through the Looking Glass -- Dimly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatham, George N.

    This paper examines the use of science fiction to predict the future. First, science fiction is compared to other fiction literature forms; then the changes in science fiction over the last 20 years are discussed. The influence of recent scientific advances on science fiction is also presented. The generation of alternative scenarios of the future…

  2. A survey on female junior middle school students’ menarche age and its relative factors in Shaanxi Province%陕西省女初中生月经初潮年龄及其相关因素的调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈斌利; 杨文方; 曾令霞; 樊静; 马元春

    2016-01-01

    目的:调查陕西地区女初中生月经初潮年龄分布及其相关因素,为今后进一步开展青春期教育及卫生保健提供理论依据。方法2014年9月至2015年3月期间,采用随机分层抽样的方法对陕西地区6355名初中女学生进行问卷调查,调查的主要内容包括年龄、身高、体重、初潮年龄,城市与农村环境、平素饮食习惯,并对结果进行统计分析。结果调查人群平均月经初潮年龄为13.67±0.98岁;调查对象中城市2236人,农村4119人,城市女生初潮年龄显著早于农村女生(12.85±0.87岁 vs 13.69±0.96岁,t=34.4098,P<0.05);以面食为主的女生初潮年龄显著早于以大米为主的女生(12.49±0.74岁vs 13.55±0.85岁,t=76.1985,P<0.05);体重越重、身高越矮的女生,其初潮年龄越早(r值分别为-0.129、0.015,均P<0.05)。结论陕西地区初中女学生月经初潮年龄适中,月经初潮年龄与体重、身高、城乡生活环境及平日饮食有关。%Objective To explore the distribution of female junior middle school students ’ menarcheal age and its relative factors in Shaanxi Province , so as to provide a theoretical basis for further development of adolescence education and health care .Methods A total of 6 355 female students of junior middle school in Shaanxi area were selected by stratified random sampling method and investigated by questionnaire which included(age, height, weight, menarcheal age, urban and rural environment,and eating habits Results of the survey were analyzed.Results The average menarcheal age was 13.67 ±0.98 years old.Among the surveyed students , 2 236 lived in urban area while 4 119 in rural area.The average menarcheal age of city females was significantly younger than that of the rural ones (12.85 ±0.87 vs 13.69 ±0.96, t=34.4098, P<0.001).The average menarcheal age of female students who consumed flour as the

  3. Recreating the Past: Historical Fiction in the Social Studies Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Evelyn B.; Levstik, Linda

    1988-01-01

    Explores use of historical fiction in elementary social studies curriculum. Examines the value of historical fiction for children and social studies goals it supports. Offers suggestions for using historical fiction in primary and intermediate grades and recommends specific books. (RWB)

  4. [Asperger syndrome in contemporary fictions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourre, F; Aubert, E; Andanson, J; Raynaud, J-P

    2012-12-01

    During recent years, fictions featuring a character with Asperger syndrome have been increasingly produced in literature, cinema and TV. Thus, the public has gradually discovered the existence of this specific category of autism spectrum, which is far removed from old popular representations of autistic disorders, often associated with mental retardation. To describe the reactions generated by these characters in order to identify their major functions and also to try to explain their recent increase in fictions. First, we explored international publications concerning this topic. A group of experienced clinicians systematically examined works of fiction produced between 2000 and 2010 that included a character with Asperger syndrome. More than 30 productions have been identified and analyzed using a method adapted from focus group. Over 30 productions have been recorded and analyzed. The reactions generated by these characters are described. They range from fascination to empathy; if these heroes sometimes induce laughter (because of comedy situations), they also lead us to question our vision of the world and ask ourselves about notions such as difference, normality and tolerance. We illustrate this phenomenon with examples from literature, cinema or television. Four hypotheses are proposed trying to explain the recent multiplication of these fictional characters with Asperger syndrome. The first puts forward authors' informative and educational motivations, these authors being aware of this issue. The second is supported by the "hero" concept, which has evolved gradually into the figures of the scientific world and the so-called "Geek" community. The third hypothesis, a metaphorical one, considers these heroes as symbols of a future society: a hyper systematized society, devoid of empathy, as if to warn of a risk of evolution of humanity toward a generalized mental blindness. The fourth and last hypothesis explores the personal resonance, supported by

  5. Collaboration with Sport Psychologists as Viewed by Female Volleyball Junior Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrebski, Wojciech; Rutkowska, Katarzyna

    2008-01-01

    Study aim: To determine the need of female junior volleyball players to collaborate with a psychologist, considering previous sport career of those players. Material and methods: A group of 78 female volleyball players aged 14-17 years from 7 top Polish junior teams participated in the study. They were requested to fill questionnaires on their…

  6. Collaboration with Sport Psychologists as Viewed by Female Volleyball Junior Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrebski, Wojciech; Rutkowska, Katarzyna

    2008-01-01

    Study aim: To determine the need of female junior volleyball players to collaborate with a psychologist, considering previous sport career of those players. Material and methods: A group of 78 female volleyball players aged 14-17 years from 7 top Polish junior teams participated in the study. They were requested to fill questionnaires on their…

  7. The Role of Narrative Fiction and Semi-Fiction in Organizational Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M. Whiteman (Gail); N. Phillips (Nelson)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIn this chapter, we discuss the use of narrative fiction and semi-fiction in organizational research and explore the strengths and weaknesses of these alternative approaches. We begin with an introduction reviewing the existing literature and clarifying what we mean by fiction and

  8. The Role of Narrative Fiction and Semi-Fiction in Organizational Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M. Whiteman (Gail); N. Phillips (Nelson)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIn this chapter, we discuss the use of narrative fiction and semi-fiction in organizational research and explore the strengths and weaknesses of these alternative approaches. We begin with an introduction reviewing the existing literature and clarifying what we mean by fiction and semi-f

  9. Screen Present and Fictional Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Le Poidevin

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT I intend in this paper to explore the possible consequences for our understanding of fiction of a particular view of the nature of time, namely the hypothesis of the open future. The kind of fiction we will particularly concerned with is film, which provides a convenient way of focusing the general issue I want to raise here. The issue could also be raised in relation to theatre and certain types of novel, but there are nevertheless some disanalogies between film and these other art forms, and I shall indicate these below. The essay is intended as an exercise in bringing metaphysics and aesthetics together, to the benefit (I hope and trust of both.

  10. The fiction of health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    What we know today as Health Services is a fiction, perhaps shaped involuntarily, but with deep health repercussions, more negative than positive. About 24 centuries ago, Asclepius, god of medicine, and Hygeia, goddess of hygiene and health, generated a dichotomy between disease and health that remains with us until today. The confusing substitution of Health Services with Medical Services began toward the end of the XIX century. But it was in 1948 when the so called English National Health Service became a landmark in the world with its model being adopted by many countries with resulting distortion of the true meaning of Health Services. The consequences of this fiction have been ominous. It is necessary to call things by their names and not deceive society. To correct the serious imbalance between Medical Services and Health Services, Hygeia and Asclepius must become a brother and sisterhood. PMID:24893062

  11. Moral fictions and medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Franklin G; Truog, Robert D; Brock, Dan W

    2010-11-01

    Conventional medical ethics and the law draw a bright line distinguishing the permitted practice of withdrawing life-sustaining treatment from the forbidden practice of active euthanasia by means of a lethal injection. When clinicians justifiably withdraw life-sustaining treatment, they allow patients to die but do not cause, intend, or have moral responsibility for, the patient's death. In contrast, physicians unjustifiably kill patients whenever they intentionally administer a lethal dose of medication. We argue that the differential moral assessment of these two practices is based on a series of moral fictions - motivated false beliefs that erroneously characterize withdrawing life-sustaining treatment in order to bring accepted end-of-life practices in line with the prevailing moral norm that doctors must never kill patients. When these moral fictions are exposed, it becomes apparent that conventional medical ethics relating to end-of-life decisions is radically mistaken. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Science fiction and the medical humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gavin; McFarlane, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Research on science fiction within the medical humanities should articulate interpretative frameworks that do justice to medical themes within the genre. This means challenging modes of reading that encourage unduly narrow accounts of science fiction. Admittedly, science studies has moved away from reading science fiction as a variety of scientific popularisation and instead understands science fiction as an intervention in the technoscientific imaginary that calls for investment in particular scientific enterprises, including various biomedical technologies. However, this mode of reading neglects science fiction's critical relationship to the construction of 'the future' in the present: the ways in which science fiction proposes concrete alternatives to hegemonic narratives of medical progress and fosters critical self-awareness of the contingent activity which gives 'the future' substance in the here-and-now. Moreover, the future orientation of science fiction should not distract from the function of medical science fiction as 'cognitive estrangement': the technological innovations that dominate science-fiction narratives are less concrete predictions and more generic devices that explain in historical time the origins of a marvellous world bearing provocative correspondences to our own, everyday reality. The editorial concludes with a series of introductions to the articles comprising the special issue, covering the print edition and a special online-only section.

  13. Fictional privacy among Facebook users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Robert

    2012-08-01

    The current study involved the creation of a fictional Facebook account with limited information and was designed to assess whether participants would accept the friendship of an ambiguous, unknown person. Results indicated that 325 Facebook members (72% of the sample) willingly accepted the friendship of the unknown individual. Results are discussed in relation to privacy concerns, norms of reciprocity, and allowing access to potentially embarrassing information and/or pictures.

  14. Source confusion as an explanation of cultivation: a test of the mechanisms underlying confusion of fiction with reality on television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolstra, Cees M

    2007-02-01

    Cultivation studies have found evidence that heavy television viewers adopt a world view congruent with how the world is portrayed in fictional television programs. An explanation is that viewers may remember fictional TV stories as realistic stories or news (fiction-to-news confusion). Until now, fiction-to-news confusion was found only if at least a week evolved between watching TV and asking viewers what was remembered. The present study conducted with a purposive sample of students and employees of a college in The Netherlands (N=96; M age = 28.6 yr., SD = 10.9) indicates that fiction-to-news confusions can also occur almost immediately after watching. In addition, whereas earlier research suggests that fiction-to-news confusions are associated with heavy viewing, i.e., more confusion when more hours per day are spent on TV viewing in leisure time, and faulty memory, the present study more specifically suggests that participants make many fiction-to-news confusions when they are exposed to relatively many fictional TV fragments that contain threatening, violent events.

  15. Teaching Musical Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawiarski, Marcin

    2008-01-01

    Given the increasing interest in musico-literary studies, I wish to examine some ways in which music can be used for pedagogical purposes in teaching literature. It has been widely recognized that music and poetry sprang from the common origin of chant or incantation. Throughout the ages, the sister arts sometimes went hand in hand and sometimes…

  16. MARGARET ATWOOD'S NON-FICTION ABOUT FICTION: PAYBACK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Maver

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Margaret Atwood's provocative recent book of non-fiction contains many literary references, which help to effectively highlight her points about such a topical matter as debt, debt as a philosophical, politico-economic, religious, and historical issue over the centuries. In the central chapters of the book she looks at the Protestant Reformation and the introduction of interest on loans and in this light analyzes the novels by Dickens, Irving, Thackeray and G. Eliot. Her final statement in the book is, however, about the ecological debt we all have to pay to Earth in order to ensure our existence.

  17. Italian Crime Fiction: A Barbarian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Weller

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a means of analysing the differences between Detective Fiction and Crime Fiction, in terms of multi genre content, concentrating especially on the development of Italian works in these fields. It also provides a shortened case study, analysing The Hound of the Baskervilles in this way.

  18. Markus Davidsen on Fiction-Based Religions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Markus Altena

    2012-01-01

    Interview with Christ Cotter from the Religious Studies Project. The podcast can be foudn here: http://www.religiousstudiesproject.com/2012/04/02/podcast-markus-davidsen-on-fiction-based-religions/......Interview with Christ Cotter from the Religious Studies Project. The podcast can be foudn here: http://www.religiousstudiesproject.com/2012/04/02/podcast-markus-davidsen-on-fiction-based-religions/...

  19. Online Fan Fiction and Critical Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Rebecca W.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores English-language-learning (ELL) youths' engagement with popular media through composing and publicly posting stories in an online fan fiction writing space. Fan fiction is a genre that lends itself to critical engagement with media texts as fans repurpose popular media to design their own narratives. Analyses describe how…

  20. "Frankenstein" as Science Fiction and Fact

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Often called the first of its kind, "Frankenstein" paved the way for science fiction writing. Its depiction of a then impossible scientific feat has in our time become possible and is essentially recognizable in what we now refer to as bioengineering, biomedicine, or biotechnology. The fiction of "Frankenstein" has as it were given way to…

  1. Transgressing the Non-fiction Transmedia Narrative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gifreu-Castells, Arnau; Misek, Richard; Verbruggen, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    abstractOver the last years, interactive digital media have greatly affected the logics of production, exhibition and reception of non-fiction audiovisual works, leading to the emergence of a new area called ‘interactive and transmedia non-fiction’. Whilethe audiovisual non-fiction field has been

  2. Promoting Transformative Learning through Reading Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggan, Chad; Cranton, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    This article is a report on research into the role of fiction in promoting transformative learning in higher education settings. Participants were 131 undergraduate and graduate students from two universities in the United States. To determine the type of learning promoted by reading fiction, we performed qualitative analyses on participants'…

  3. Best Science Fiction, Fantasy, & Horror 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voice of Youth Advocates, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents the annual annotated list of the best science fiction, fantasy, and horror titles for teens that have been reviewed in this journal. Also includes a sidebar with four annotated titles of nonfiction resources related to science fiction, fantasy, and horror. (LRW)

  4. Feminist Fiction and the Uses of Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Gayle

    1991-01-01

    This essay concerns feminist fiction by Doris Lessing, Margaret Drabble, Margaret Atwood, Margaret Laurence, and Toni Morrison that utilizes memory as a means to liberation and explores this at the level of narrative form. In examining 1970s feminist fiction and metafiction, explores the importance of memory at particular cultural moments. (AF)

  5. Science Fiction, Ethics and the Human Condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Christian; Halvorsen, Peter Nicolai; Cornea, Christine

    . Further, those with a concern for the future may find inspiration in what a study of the politics and ethics of science fiction can tell us about the moral and political dilemmas of our own time. Although this book is more likely to be picked up by someone who already has an interest in science fiction...

  6. Historical Fiction: Teaching Tool or Literary Experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Cathy; Nelson-Faulkner, Shari; Pierce, Kathryn Mitchell

    2000-01-01

    Looks at the characteristics of outstanding historical fiction including its literary qualities and criteria associated with authenticity. Discusses how teachers invite readers to approach their experiences with these novels. Looks at the role of historical fiction in today's classrooms. Presents brief annotations of 25 outstanding works of…

  7. Historical Fiction--New and Old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavonetti, Linda M.

    2001-01-01

    Offers brief descriptions of 41 books of historical fiction that may interest intermediate and middle school students, many of them new releases that tackle unusual historical topics. Argues that historical fiction is an ideal medium for taking intermediate and middle school students out of their day-to-day surroundings and into other times and…

  8. "Frankenstein" as Science Fiction and Fact

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Often called the first of its kind, "Frankenstein" paved the way for science fiction writing. Its depiction of a then impossible scientific feat has in our time become possible and is essentially recognizable in what we now refer to as bioengineering, biomedicine, or biotechnology. The fiction of "Frankenstein" has as it were given way to…

  9. Christian Associations in Hollywood Science Fiction Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Rong-qing

    2014-01-01

    Hollywood movies are profoundly influenced by American culture while promoting its mainstream ideologies and core values via the silver screen. The Christian elements embodied in Hollywood science fiction films reflect the importance of Christianity in American culture and distinguish themselves from science fictions made in other countries, therefore serve the studies of Hollywood films and American culture.

  10. Learning Science with Science Fiction Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Terence; Cavanaugh, Catherine

    This paper is an excerpt from a book on learning science using science fiction. The focus is on the use of science fiction films to engage students and encourage greater enthusiasm and interest in science. "Jurassic Park" is used as an example that can provide educators with countless lesson opportunities. This approach recommends the use of fun…

  11. Science Fiction in the English Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donelson, Ken, Ed.

    1972-01-01

    This volume contains suggestions, reading lists, and instructional materials designed for the classroom teacher planning a unit or course on science fiction. Topics covered include "The Study of Science Fiction: Is 'Future' Worth the Time?""Yesterday and Tomorrow: A Study of the Utopian and Dystopian Vision,""Shaping…

  12. Value-meaning Barriers in Research Activity of Junior Scientists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabalovskaya M.V.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Contents of value-meaning barriers are covered that acquire certain specifics in research activity and influence formation of meaning-forming research motivation of junior scientists. Such barriers were assumed to be conditioned by dissonance between dominating values and degree of their realization in junior researchers. Sample of respondents included 88 beginners: postgraduate students (n=65 and masters (n=23 of Tomsk high schools aged between 21 and 35 years. As research methods the expanded version of technique by M. Rokeach (proposed by M.S. Yanitsky and A.V. Seryy, methods of statistical analysis of results (frequency analysis, Mann-Whitney test were used. Relevant value orientations of junior scientists are presented. Gender differences in value-meaning domain are revealed. Differences in values in postgraduate students and masters were found. Dissonance in degree of fulfillment of terminal and instrumental values has been established that indicates disturbances of value-meaning domain of the personality of junior scientists. Results add to scientific ideas about value-meaning barriers in research activity of junior scientists.

  13. Perceived Injury Risk among Junior Cricketers: A Cross Sectional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna J. Gamage

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how junior athletes perceive injury risks when participating in sport and the environment they play in is an important component of injury prevention. This study investigates how Sri Lankan junior cricketers (n = 365, aged 11–14 years, boys perceive injury risks associated with playing cricket. The study used a Sri Lankan modification of an Australian junior cricket injury risk perception survey that considered playing cricket versus other sports, different cricket playing positions and roles, and different ground conditions. The risk of playing cricket was considered to be greater than that for cycling, but lower than that for rugby and soccer. Fast-bowlers, batters facing fast-bowlers, fielding close in the field, and wicket-keeping without a helmet were perceived to pose greater risks of injury than other scenarios. Playing on hard, bumpy and/or wet ground conditions were perceived to have a high risk opposed to playing on a grass field. Fielding in the outfield and wicket-keeping to fast-bowlers whilst wearing a helmet were perceived as low risk actions. The risk perceptions of junior cricketers identified in this study, do not necessarily reflect the true injury risk in some instances. This information will inform the development of injury prevention education interventions to address these risk perceptions in junior cricketers.

  14. Recurrent Respiratory Infections and Psychological Problems in Junior School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelmanson, Igor A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recurrent respiratory infections (RRI) are among most common diseases in school-aged children. Little is known about possible associations between RRI and children psychological well-being. Aim: To study possible associations between RRI in junior school pupils and their emotional/behavioural characteristics. Methods: The RRI group…

  15. Graphic Novels in Community and Junior College Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Although the growth in popularity of graphic novels among readers of all ages and the expansion of graphic novels in both public and academic libraries has been well defined in library literature, the inclusion of graphic novels in community and junior college libraries has received little attention. The purpose of this article is to begin the…

  16. Empathy, Self-Esteem and Creativity among Junior Ballet Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliopuska, Mirja

    This study examined the effect of the active pursuit of ballet as a hobby on personality. The study group consisted of 62 members of the junior ballet of the Finnish National Opera, ranging in age from 9 to 17 with the majority under 14. The dancers were given four self-esteem questionnaires which measured empathy, creativity, and other…

  17. Como Ayudarle a su Hijo con la Tarea Escolar: Una guia para padres de alumnos de escuela primaria y secundaria (Helping Your Child with Homework: For Parents of Elementary and Junior High School-Aged Children).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulu, Nancy, Ed.; Perkinson, Kathryn, Ed.

    This Spanish-language booklet is designed to provide parents of elementary and junior high school students with an understanding of the purpose and nature of homework along with suggestions for helping their children complete homework assignments successfully. Following a discussion of why teachers assign homework, how homework can help children…

  18. Variables and Values in Historical Fiction for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Mingshui

    1992-01-01

    Notes that historical fiction can be more entertaining than history and more informative than fiction. Delimits the boundaries of historical fiction by defining its conventions and expectations. Discusses the four variables of historical fiction (time, truth, tone, and perspective) and the relations among them. (RS)

  19. Perilaku Konsumsi Tembakau Pelajar SMP Usia 13–15 Tahun di Sumatra dan Jawa (Analisis Indonesia–Gyts 2009 (Behavior Tobacco Consumption of Junior High School Student Aged 13–15 Years in Sumatra and Java (Analysis of Indonesia–Gyts 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tati Suryati

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: adolescence is a crucial period that must be maintained properly, because it has a direct and long-termimpact of the act he/she was doing. Baseline Health Research (RISKESDAS 2007 showed that 59.5% of the causes ofdeath in Indonesia were due non communicable diseases (NCD, and tobacco consumption contributed as trigger of majority of NCD cases. Information related to the behavior of youth tobacco consumption is required to formulate strategicplan to reduce the incidence. Method: standard questionnaires were fi lled by students of 40 junior high schools from 33 districts and cities in Sumatra and Java, with a total sample of 142 classes (covering grades 7 to 9. Results: a total of 3,319 junior high school students aged 13–15 years were covered with a 94.0% response rate. About 20.3% of students was active smokers and 11.5% non-smoker students planned to smoke in 2010. There was 4.2% of active smoker students showed symptoms of addiction to the nicotine in cigarettes. Eight out of 10 active smokers need help to quit smoking. The main factors that motivate junior high school students in Sumatra and Java to smoke were 15.7% of all/most of his close friends smoking and 7 out of 10 junior high school students have at least one parent as smoker. Recommendations: Efforts to prevent children from smoking should be conducted together with support of national tobacco control policies, and the local policies with support from non-governmental organizations, community leaders, health workers, educators, school personnel and families.

  20. Tonsillotomy: facts and fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windfuhr, J P; Savva, K; Dahm, J D; Werner, J A

    2015-04-01

    In contrast to total or extracapsular tonsillectomy (TE), subtotal/intracapsular/partial tonsillectomy (SIPT) or tonsillotomy (TT) is associated with significant less postoperative morbidity. It has been stated that patients older than 8 years of age or with a history of tonsillitis should be excluded from SIPT/TT. Some health insurance companies mandate utilization of particular surgical instruments. Finally, it has been stated that the remaining tonsillar tissue may become a subject of recurrent tonsillitis or tonsillar regrowth, in both cases requiring revision surgery in terms of TE. This literature review was undertaken to clarify what has been validated in the literature concerning indications, surgical techniques, complications and outcome of SIPT/TT as reported since 1960. A Medline review was undertaken and all papers included that were published in English or German language until September 30, 2013. Exclusion criteria were: publication date 1960 and earlier, other languages, no relation to tonsil surgery, papers not available to the authors, uncommon surgical techniques, national surveys or studies without patients. The quality of the papers was classified according to "The Oxford 2011 Levels of Evidence". The surgical techniques were classified according to Windfuhr and Werner and extended to interstitial tonsil therapy. Other issues were: study period, hemorrhage, dehydration, intake of analgesics, return to normal diet, surgical instruments, operation time, number of surgeons involved, number of patients, age, indications, follow-up, rate of tonsillar regrowth, tonsillitis and secondary TE. A total of 379 different publications were retrieved, but only 86 studies found eligible for further analysis. There were 10,499 patients in the study groups and 10,448 patients in the control groups. Utilization of the microdebrider largely prevailed, followed by Coblation, CO2-LASER, surgical scissor, Radiofrequency, Interstitial ThermoTherapy with various

  1. Keeping It Real: How Realistic Does Realistic Fiction for Children Need to Be?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    O'Connor, an author of realistic fiction for children, shares her attempts to strike a balance between carefree, uncensored, authentic, realistic writing and age-appropriate writing. Of course, complicating that balancing act is the fact that what seems age-appropriate to her might not seem so to everyone. O'Connor suggests that while it may be…

  2. Keeping It Real: How Realistic Does Realistic Fiction for Children Need to Be?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    O'Connor, an author of realistic fiction for children, shares her attempts to strike a balance between carefree, uncensored, authentic, realistic writing and age-appropriate writing. Of course, complicating that balancing act is the fact that what seems age-appropriate to her might not seem so to everyone. O'Connor suggests that while it may be…

  3. The fiction of health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Echeverry

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available 14.00 800x600 Normal 0 21 false false false ES-CO X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 What we know today as Health Services is a fiction, perhaps shaped involuntarily, but with deep health repercussions, more negative than positive. About 24 centuries ago, Asclepius god of medicine and Hygeia goddess of hygiene and health, generated a dichotomy between disease and health that remains until today. The confusing substitution of Health Services with Medical Services began by the end of the XIX century. But it was in 1948 when the so called English National Health Service became a landmark in the world and its model was adopted by many countries, having distorted the true meaning of Health Services. The consequences of this fiction have been ominous. It is necessary to call things by its name not to deceive society and to correct the serious imbalance between Medical Services and Health Services. Hygeia and Asclepius must become a brotherhood.

  4. Exploring science through science fiction

    CERN Document Server

    Luokkala, Barry B

    2014-01-01

    How does Einstein’s description of space and time compare with Dr. Who? Can James Bond really escape from an armor-plated railroad car by cutting through the floor with a laser concealed in a wristwatch? What would it take to create a fully-intelligent android, such as Star Trek’s Commander Data? How might we discover intelligent civilizations on other planets in the galaxy? Is human teleportation possible? Will our technological society ever reach the point at which it becomes lawful to discriminate on the basis of genetic information, as in the movie GATTACA? Exploring Science Through Science Fiction addresses these and other interesting questions, using science fiction as a springboard for discussing fundamental science concepts and cutting-edge science research. The book is designed as a primary text for a college-level course which should appeal to students in the fine arts and humanities as well as to science and engineering students. It includes references to original research papers, landmark scie...

  5. Junior Professors Question Job Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lauren

    2007-01-01

    Female and minority faculty members rated their institutions less positively as places for junior professors to work than did their male and white counterparts, according to a new report. Young professors said institutional policies designed to help them succeed were important, but they were less satisfied that those policies were effective. Women…

  6. Improving Junior High Classroom Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmer, Edmund T.; And Others

    A field experiment was conducted to determine whether descriptive-correlational results from classroom management research could be implemented by junior high school teachers, and whether such implementation would result in improved classroom management. An experimental group (18 teachers) received management manuals developed by researchers, and…

  7. Holography in the Junior High.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszkiewicz, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Examines the use of holography in the art technology program of a junior high school. Characterizing holography as a valuable artistic experience and discovery experience and stressing the importance of student interest and involvement, the author discusses the necessary equipment for the project and includes two diagrams of a holographic setup.…

  8. 21st Century South African Science Fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARAIVAN LUIZA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses some aspects of South African science fiction, starting with its beginnings in the 1920s and focusing on some 21st century writings. Thus Lauren Beukes’ novels Moxyland (2008 and Zoo City (2010 are taken into consideration in order to present new trends in South African literature and the way science fiction has been marked by Apartheid. The second South African science fiction writer whose writings are examined is Henrietta Rose-Innes (with her novel Nineveh, published in 2011 as this consolidates women's presence in the SF world.

  9. Medical thrillers: doctored fiction for future doctors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpy, Jean-Pierre

    2014-12-01

    Medical thrillers have been a mainstay of popular fiction since the late 1970s and still attract a wide readership today. This article examines this specialized genre and its core conventions within the context of professionally-based fiction, i.e. the class of thrillers written by professionals or former professionals. The author maps this largely unchartered territory and analyzes the fictional representations of doctors and medicine provided in such novels. He argues that medical thrillers, which are not originally aimed at specialized readers and sometimes project a flawed image of medicine, may be used as a pedagogical tool with non-native learners of medical English.

  10. The evolution and extinction of science fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrotic, Steven

    2014-11-01

    Science fiction literature reflects our constantly evolving attitudes towards science and technological innovations, and the kinds of societal impacts believed possible. The newly popular subgenre 'steampunk' shows that these attitudes have significantly shifted. Examined from a cognitive anthropological perspective, science fiction reveals the cultural evolution of the genre as intelligently designed, and implies a cognitive mechanism of group membership reliant on implicit memory. However, such an analysis also suggests that genre science fiction as it was in the 20th century may no longer exist. © The Author(s) 2013.

  11. Learning to learn from stories: children's developing sensitivity to the causal structure of fictional worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Caren M; Gopnik, Alison; Ganea, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    Fiction presents a unique challenge to the developing child, in that children must learn when to generalize information from stories to the real world. This study examines how children acquire causal knowledge from storybooks, and whether children are sensitive to how closely the fictional world resembles reality. Preschoolers (N = 108) listened to stories in which a novel causal relation was embedded within realistic or fantastical contexts. Results indicate that by at least 3 years of age, children are sensitive to the underlying causal structure of the story: Children are more likely to generalize content if the fictional world is similar to reality. Additionally, children become better able at discriminating between realistic and fantastical story contexts between 3 and 5 years of age. © 2014 The Authors. Child Development © 2014 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  12. Psychopathy and the cinema: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leistedt, Samuel J; Linkowski, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The authors investigated the relationship between cinema and psychopathy to describe and analyze the portrayal of fictional psychopathic characters in popular films and over cinematic history. From 400 films (1915-2010), 126 fictional psychopathic characters (21 female and 105 male) were selected based on the realism and clinical accuracy of their profiles. Movies were then analyzed by senior forensic psychiatrists and cinema critics. Secondary (71%) and manipulative (48%) subtypes were the most common in the female group, while secondary (51%) and prototypical (34%) were the most common in the male group. Corresponding to the increased understanding of clinical psychopathy by professional mental health providers over time, the clinical description of and epidemiological data on fictional psychopaths in popular films have become more realistic. Realistic fictional psychopaths remain in the minority but are very important for didactic purposes in Academic facilities, as "teaching Movies." © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. Muddle by Mandate: A Fictionalized Account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson-Bernstein, Harriet

    1988-01-01

    Presents a fictionalized account illustrating the process by which willful states, misguided experts, cunning marketeers, and overworked teachers and administrators produce textbooks that are ill-written, confusing, misleading, and boring. (BJV)

  14. Emotional Sentence Annotation Helps Predict Fiction Genre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samothrakis, Spyridon; Fasli, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Fiction, a prime form of entertainment, has evolved into multiple genres which one can broadly attribute to different forms of stories. In this paper, we examine the hypothesis that works of fiction can be characterised by the emotions they portray. To investigate this hypothesis, we use the work of fictions in the Project Gutenberg and we attribute basic emotional content to each individual sentence using Ekman's model. A time-smoothed version of the emotional content for each basic emotion is used to train extremely randomized trees. We show through 10-fold Cross-Validation that the emotional content of each work of fiction can help identify each genre with significantly higher probability than random. We also show that the most important differentiator between genre novels is fear.

  15. Best Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voice of Youth Advocates, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of 81 science fiction, fantasy, and horror genre titles that were judged best-reads by reviewers in "Voice of Youth Advocates" from June 2001 through April 2002. (LRW)

  16. Best Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voice of Youth Advocates, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of 81 science fiction, fantasy, and horror genre titles that were judged best-reads by reviewers in "Voice of Youth Advocates" from June 2001 through April 2002. (LRW)

  17. West Indian Prose Fiction in the Sixties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brathwaite, Edward

    1971-01-01

    A Review and critical discussion of the West Indian prose fiction in the sixties by one of the best-known poets of the Carribean and a member of the faculty of the University of West Indies, Jamaica. (JM)

  18. Facts about real antimatter collide with fiction

    CERN Document Server

    Siegfried, Tom

    2004-01-01

    When science collides with fiction, sometimes a best seller emerges from the debris. Take Dan Brown's Angels & Demons, for instance, a murder mystery based on science at CERN, the European nuclear research laboratory outside Geneva

  19. Cost Overrun Optimism: Fact or Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-29

    Image designed by Diane Fleischer Cost Overrun Optimism : FACT or FICTION? Maj David D. Christensen, USAF Program managers are advocates by...3 : 254–271 A Publication of the Defense Acquisition University http://www.dau.mil Cost Overrun Optimism : Fact or Fiction? According to Gansler...generally confirmed. From as early as the 10 percent completion point, the optimism of the pro- jected cost overrun at completion is apparent. Throughout

  20. Playing with Time in Digital Fiction

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The exceptional quality of digital fictions lies in their inherently dynamic nature, how they may be flexibly programmed to generate new content and alter the already existing contents. This adds a new temporal level, compared to traditional fictions. Digital games, especially, incorporate aspects of simulation and narration in their structure. As interactive and dynamic media form, games are specifically temporal in nature. They offer us the flexibility and preciseness of digital simulations...

  1. Stranger than fiction: literary and clinical amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieguez, Sebastian; Annoni, Jean-Marie

    2013-01-01

    This chapter broadly covers literary uses of amnesia and memory disorders. Amnesia in fiction offers authors an efficient and dramatic device to tackle themes such as identity, personal liberty, or guilt. We argue against the common complaint that fictional amnesia is scientifically inaccurate, pointing out that the goals of literature are different from those of science, that amnesia is still poorly understood, and that real-life cases can sometimes be stranger than fiction. The chapter provides examples from the neuropsychological literature, media reports, mythology, historical cases, detective stories, war stories, theatrical plays, and other genres. Special attention is given to retrograde and dissociative amnesia, as these are the most frequent types of amnesia portrayed in fiction, while other types of memory disorders are more shortly treated. We argue that the predominance of disorders affecting autobiographical memory in fiction is in itself a revealing fact about the mechanisms of human memory, illustrating how fictional treatments of pathology can inform back neurological and psychological research.

  2. Twitter Fiction: A New Creative Literary Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Al Sharaqi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Twitter, synonymous with social networking, has become a successful social platform for the exchange of ideas, news, and information. It has also emerged as an experimental platform through which users explore creative realms of poetic and narrative content, albeit in 140 characters. The real-time tweets are fundamentally unique and increasingly sophisticated. The attention deficit generation of the fast-paced contemporary world has little time on its hands for extended discourse. Brief stories have been told throughout human history, however, the popularity of short stories skyrocketed with the advent of digital story telling. Twitter has now become a frontier medium that allows a unique mode of digital storytelling that facilitates creative literary experimentation. Twitter offers a unique freedom to writers insofar as a tweet can be an entire bite-sized story or even a snapshot of a story that requires readers’ active imagination to complete. Twitter fiction signifies stylistic word economy, compactness, symbolic structure, and implied narrative. Fragmentariness of the story is a marker of Twitter fiction. The proponents of Twitter fiction enjoy the originality, freedom, and diversity of perspectives offered by the Twitter fiction. Critics, however, argue that the mandated 140 character limitation stunts story development and strangulates creativity. This paper examines Twitter fiction and proposes that limited characters stories are the evolutionary answer to the reduced attention span of the tech-savvy generation. Keywords: twitterature, fiction, brevity, literary art

  3. Antibody persistence after two vaccinations with either FSME-IMMUN® Junior or ENCEPUR® Children followed by third vaccination with FSME-IMMUN® Junior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prymula, Roman; Pöllabauer, Eva Maria; Pavlova, Borislava G; Löw-Baselli, Alexandra; Fritsch, Sandor; Angermayr, Rudolf; Geisberger, Alexander; Barrett, P Noel; Ehrlich, Hartmut J

    2012-06-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccination strategies to induce optimal seroprotection in children are under constant evaluation. This multi-center, randomized, controlled, phase III clinical study examined antibody persistence in children aged 1-11 y following two prospectively administered doses of either the FSME-IMMUN® Junior or Encepur Children® vaccines, as well as investigating the immunogenicity, safety and vaccine interchangeability of a third vaccination with FSME-IMMUN(®) Junior. A high level of antibody persistence was observed in all subjects 6 mo after the first of two vaccinations with either pediatric TBE vaccine. Based on both immunological tests and viral antigens used, slightly higher seropositivity rates and higher GMCs /GMTs were found in children vaccinated with FSME-IMMUN® Junior compared with those who received Encepur® Children. Seropositivity rates across all age strata combined six months after the first vaccination with FSME-IMMUN® 0.25 mL Junior were 95.1% as determined by Immunozym ELISA, 93.2% as determined by Enzygnost ELISA and 95.3% as determined by NT; compared with 62.6%, 80.5% and 91.0% respectively after vaccination with Encepur® Children. A third vaccination with FSME-IMMUN(®) Junior induced 100% seropositivity in both study groups and was well tolerated as demonstrated by the low rates of systemic and injection site reactions. Subjects who received either FSME-IMMUN Junior® or Encepur(®) Children vaccine for the first two vaccinations and FSME-IMMUN Junior® for the third showed a comparably strong immune response regardless of the previous TBE vaccine administered, demonstrating that two vaccinations with Encepur® Children can successfully be followed by a third vaccination with FSME-IMMUN Junior®.

  4. Fiction and Non-Fiction Reading and Comprehension in Preferred Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, Keith J.

    2015-01-01

    Are the books preferred and most enjoyed by children harder than other books they read? Are non-fiction books read and understood at the same level of difficulty as fiction books? The Accelerated Reader software offers computerized comprehension quizzes of real books individually chosen by children, giving children (and teachers, librarians, and…

  5. The Processing of Cohesion in Fiction and Non-fiction by Good and Poor Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Margaret; Chapman, L. John

    1989-01-01

    Investigates how readers use textual cohesion during reading by using a selective deletion procedure. Finds that good readers are able to maintain the global unity of text better than poor readers and that both groups find it easier to perceive cohesion in fiction than in non-fiction. (RS)

  6. Responding from the Heart: Aesthetic Reading of Historical Fiction and Non-fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstone, Bette P.

    2000-01-01

    Shows why aesthetic reading is a crucial pedagogic component in lessons using historical fiction and non-fiction. Provides criteria for selecting high quality books dealing with historical subjects for use in aesthetic reading activities. Discusses specific teaching strategies for promoting aesthetic reading. (SG)

  7. Fiction and Non-Fiction Reading and Comprehension in Preferred Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, Keith J.

    2015-01-01

    Are the books preferred and most enjoyed by children harder than other books they read? Are non-fiction books read and understood at the same level of difficulty as fiction books? The Accelerated Reader software offers computerized comprehension quizzes of real books individually chosen by children, giving children (and teachers, librarians, and…

  8. The paradox of fiction: Emotional response toward fiction and the modulatory role of self-relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperduti, Marco; Arcangeli, Margherita; Makowski, Dominique; Wantzen, Prany; Zalla, Tiziana; Lemaire, Stéphane; Dokic, Jérôme; Pelletier, Jérôme; Piolino, Pascale

    2016-03-01

    For over forty years, philosophers have struggled with the "paradox of fiction", which is the issue of how we can get emotionally involved with fictional characters and events. The few neuroscientific studies investigating the distinction between the processing of real and fictional entities have evidenced that midline cortical structures and lateral fronto-parietal regions are more engaged for real and fictional entities, respectively. Interestingly, the former network is engaged in autobiographical memory retrieval and self-reference, processes that are known to boost emotional reactivity, while the latter underpins emotion regulation. Thus, a possible modulation of the emotional response according to the nature (real or fictional) of the stimulus is conceivable. To test this hypothesis, we presented short emotional (negative and positive) and neutral video as fictional or real. For negative material, we found that subjective emotional experience, but not physiological arousal measured by electrodermal activity, was reduced in the fictional condition. Moreover, the amount of personal memories linked to the scenes counteracted this effect boosting the subjective emotional response. On the contrary, personal memories elicited by the scenes, but not fiction, modulate the emotional response for positive material. These results suggest that when a stimulus triggers a personal memory, the emotional response is less prone to be modulated by contextual factors, and suggest that personal engagement could be responsible for emotional reaction toward fiction. We discuss these results in the emotion regulation framework and underline their implications in informing theoretical accounts of emotion in the neuroscientific domain and the philosophical debate on the paradox of emotional response to fiction. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Reflecting on Scientists' Activity Based on Science Fiction Stories Written by Secondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Pedro; Galvao, Cecilia

    2007-01-01

    In this article the authors resort to a qualitative analysis of the plot of science fiction stories about a group of scientists, written by two 11th-grade Earth and Life Science students (aged 17), and to semi-structured interviews, with the double purpose of diagnosing their conceptions of the nature of science (namely, as regards scientists'…

  10. Souls in Jeopardy: Questions and Innovations for Bibliotherapy with Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detrixhe, Jonathan J.

    2010-01-01

    How is bibliotherapy with fiction hypothesized to work, and what are the ideal conditions for treatment success? Patterns in the bibliotherapy literature are explored. Questions are posed and suggestions offered regarding the practice of bibliotherapy with fiction.

  11. Souls in Jeopardy: Questions and Innovations for Bibliotherapy with Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detrixhe, Jonathan J.

    2010-01-01

    How is bibliotherapy with fiction hypothesized to work, and what are the ideal conditions for treatment success? Patterns in the bibliotherapy literature are explored. Questions are posed and suggestions offered regarding the practice of bibliotherapy with fiction.

  12. Cancer Fact or Fiction: Separating Myths from Good Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Fact or Fiction: Separating Myths from Good Information By the National Cancer Institute To many, cancer remains one of the most frightening ... cancer. It is important to separate fact from fiction. Some of the most common cancer myths not ...

  13. Science Fiction in the Political Science Classroom: A Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landers, Clifford E.

    1977-01-01

    Science fiction can be used for introducing and analyzing political concepts at the undergraduate level for either a specialized theory-oriented course such as Political Science Fiction or an Introduction to Political Science course. (Author/RM)

  14. Automated Fictional Ideation via Knowledge Base Manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llano, Maria Teresa; Colton, Simon; Hepworth, Rose; Gow, Jeremy

    The invention of fictional ideas (ideation) is often a central process in the creative production of artefacts such as poems, music and paintings, but has barely been studied in the computational creativity community. We present here a general approach to automated fictional ideation that works by manipulating facts specified in knowledge bases. More specifically, we specify a number of constructions which, by altering and combining facts from a knowledge base, result in the generation of fictions. Moreover, we present an instantiation of these constructions through the use of ConceptNet, a database of common sense knowledge. In order to evaluate the success of these constructions, we present a curation analysis that calculates the proportion of ideas which pass a typicality judgement. We further evaluate the output of this approach through a crowd-sourcing experiment in which participants were asked to rank ideas. We found a positive correlation between the participant's rankings and a chaining inference technique that automatically assesses the value of the fictions generated through our approach. We believe that these results show that this approach constitutes a firm basis for automated fictional ideation with evaluative capacity.

  15. Sport-specific factors predicting player retention in junior cricket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talpey, Scott; Croucher, Tom; Bani Mustafa, Ahmed; Finch, Caroline F

    2017-04-01

    Understanding factors that motivate young athletes to continue participation in sport can help key stakeholders cultivate an environment that fosters long-term participation. This investigation sought to determine the performance and participation factors that influenced continued participation in junior cricket. Administration-level data were collected each annual season across a seven-year period by a community-level junior cricket association in Australia and analysed to identify the performance and participation-based predictors of player retention. All players were males aged <16 years. Players were categorised according to whether they remained in (or departed from) the association at the end of each playing season. A multivariate logistic regression model with a stepwise variable selection was employed to identify significant independent predictors of player retention. The number of innings batted and overs bowled were significant participation-related contributors to junior cricket player retention. Performance factors such as the number of wickets taken and the number of runs scored also significantly influenced player retention. Finally, team age group, the number of previous seasons played and age were also significant factors in player retention. This demonstrates that sufficient opportunity for children to participate in the game and expression of skills competence are key factors for retention in cricket.

  16. Romance versus Reality: A Look at YA Romantic Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundin, Susan G.

    1985-01-01

    Study of young adult literature found that both formula romance fiction and contemporary realistic fiction reflect problems young people face daily. Three problem-concern areas were addressed by an average of 32.81% of romance books and 30.13% of realistic fiction--personal, intrafamily, and interpersonal. Romance books studied are listed. (14…

  17. A Sense of Responsibility in Realistic Children's Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle, Warren

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the qualities of successful realistic children's fiction and examines issues involved in writing and publishing for children. A historical overview of the image of children in fiction is presented; dealing with sensitive, emotional topics is discussed; and concerns of editors and publishers of children's fiction are addressed. (12…

  18. Children Reading Fiction Books Because They Want To

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ours, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the reading of fiction books by 15-year-olds in 18 OECD countries.It appears that girls fiction books more often than boys, whereas boys read comic books more often than girls.The intensity by which children read fiction books is influenced by parental education, family struc

  19. Which Fiction Genres Are Notable & Best from 2000-2005?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ruth Cox

    2005-01-01

    The fiction genre novels published in the US for children as well as for young adults and their responses to contemporary realistic fiction are discussed. The novels from both the 2000-2005 Children's Notables and Best Books for Young Adults lists displays a strong preference for historical fictions.

  20. Children Reading Fiction Books Because They Want To

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ours, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the reading of fiction books by 15-year-olds in 18 OECD countries.It appears that girls fiction books more often than boys, whereas boys read comic books more often than girls.The intensity by which children read fiction books is influenced by parental education, family

  1. Using Fan Fiction to Teach Critical Reading and Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, Tracey

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about fan fiction, which is defined by Jenkins (2008) as "original stories and novels which are set in the fictional universe of favorite television series, films, comics, games or other media properties." Fan fiction generally involves writing stories with a combination of established characters and established…

  2. Romance versus Reality: A Look at YA Romantic Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundin, Susan G.

    1985-01-01

    Study of young adult literature found that both formula romance fiction and contemporary realistic fiction reflect problems young people face daily. Three problem-concern areas were addressed by an average of 32.81% of romance books and 30.13% of realistic fiction--personal, intrafamily, and interpersonal. Romance books studied are listed. (14…

  3. A Sense of Responsibility in Realistic Children's Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle, Warren

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the qualities of successful realistic children's fiction and examines issues involved in writing and publishing for children. A historical overview of the image of children in fiction is presented; dealing with sensitive, emotional topics is discussed; and concerns of editors and publishers of children's fiction are addressed. (12…

  4. Which Fiction Genres Are Notable & Best from 2000-2005?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ruth Cox

    2005-01-01

    The fiction genre novels published in the US for children as well as for young adults and their responses to contemporary realistic fiction are discussed. The novels from both the 2000-2005 Children's Notables and Best Books for Young Adults lists displays a strong preference for historical fictions.

  5. Core Collections in Genre Studies: Romance Fiction 101

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neal Wyatt; Georgine Olson; Kristin Ramsdell; Joyce Saricks; Lynne Welch

    2007-01-01

    .... The Reading List, as the new list will be called, honors the single best title in eight genre categories: romance, mystery, science fiction, fantasy, horror, historical fiction, women's fiction, and the adrenaline genre group consisting of thriller, suspense, and adventure. To celebrate this new list and explore the wealth of genre l...

  6. Taming the Alien Genre: Bringing Science Fiction into the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Kathrine T.; Manning, M. Lee

    2001-01-01

    Notes the popularity of the science fiction/fantasy genre, and offers a definition of these genres. Discusses teachers' reluctance to read or teach science fiction, but emphasizes its appeal and its usefulness. Discusses how teachers can select and use good science fiction books. Offers a checklist for evaluating such books, and suggests 18…

  7. Teaching History in the Junior College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    1989-01-01

    Recommends techniques for teaching history in the junior college. Discusses subject matter to be taught, the psychology of learning, and the philosophy of teaching history. Addresses the special needs of the junior college classroom. Outlines criteria to be followed in teaching history. (RW)

  8. Junior High Career Planning: What Students Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardick, Angela D.; Bernes, Kerry B.; Magnusson, Kris C.; Witko, Kim D.

    2004-01-01

    This research used "The Comprehensive Career Needs Survey" to assess the career counselling needs of 3,562 junior high students in Southern Alberta. This article examines junior high students' responses regarding their perceptions of (a) the relevance of career planning, (b) who they would approach for help with career planning, and (c)…

  9. Junior High Norms for the Bender Gestalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grow, Richard T.

    1980-01-01

    Junior high students were tested to supply normative data supporting the Bender Gestalt. Subject's performance was not significantly related to sex or occupation of the family bread winner. These variables do not have to be controlled for in norming visual motor tests at the junior high level. (Author)

  10. Effective Management in Junior High Mathematics Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmer, Edmund T.

    Reporting on part of the data collected in the Junior High Classroom Organization Study, this document focuses on the mathematics subsample. Twenty-six mathematics teachers in 11 junior high schools were observed in two classes. The major purpose of this paper is to describe the classroom procedures and behaviors of teachers identified as…

  11. Reading literary fiction improves theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, David Comer; Castano, Emanuele

    2013-10-18

    Understanding others' mental states is a crucial skill that enables the complex social relationships that characterize human societies. Yet little research has investigated what fosters this skill, which is known as Theory of Mind (ToM), in adults. We present five experiments showing that reading literary fiction led to better performance on tests of affective ToM (experiments 1 to 5) and cognitive ToM (experiments 4 and 5) compared with reading nonfiction (experiments 1), popular fiction (experiments 2 to 5), or nothing at all (experiments 2 and 5). Specifically, these results show that reading literary fiction temporarily enhances ToM. More broadly, they suggest that ToM may be influenced by engagement with works of art.

  12. Modifiable futures: science fiction at the bench.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milburn, Colin

    2010-09-01

    Science fiction remains an alien dimension of the history of science. Historical and literary studies of science have become increasingly attentive to various "literary technologies" in scientific practice, the metaphorical features of scientific discourse, and the impact of popular science writing on the social development of scientific knowledge. But the function of science fiction and even literature as such in the history of scientific and technological innovation has often been obscured, misconstrued, or repudiated owing to conventional notions of authorship, influence, and the organic unity of texts. The better to address those close encounters where scientific practice makes use of speculative fiction, this essay proposes that we instead analyze such exchanges as processes of appropriation, remixing, and modification.

  13. Stranger than fiction: Fan identity in cosplay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolle Lamerichs

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Academic accounts of fan cultures usually focus on creative practices such as fan fiction, fan videos, and fan art. Through these practices, fans, as an active audience, closely interpret existing texts and rework them with texts of their own. A practice scarcely examined is cosplay ("costume play", in which fans produce their own costumes inspired by fictional characters. Cosplay is a form of appropriation that transforms and actualizes an existing story in close connection to the fan community and the fan's own identity. I provide analytical insights into this fan practice, focusing on how it influences the subject. Cosplay is understood as a performative activity and analyzed through Judith Butler's concept of performativity. I specifically focus on boundaries between the body and dress, and on those between reality and fiction. I aim to show that cosplay emphasizes the personal enactment of a narrative, thereby offering new perspectives on fan identity.

  14. Network Fictions and the Global Unhomely

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris Mousoutzanis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper suggests that the increasing proliferation of network fictions in literature, film, television and the internet may be interpreted through a theoretical framework that reconceptuallises the originally strictly psychoanalytic concept of the 'Unheimlich' (Freud’s idea of the ‘unhomely’ or ‘uncanny’ within the context of political, economic and cultural disources fo globalisation. ‘Network fictions’ are those texts consisting of multiple interlocking narratives set in various times and places that explore the interconnections of characters and events across different storylines: novels such as William Gibson’s 'Pattern Recognition' (2003, Hari Kunzro’s 'Transmission' (2005 and 'Gods Without Men' (2011, David Mitchell’s 'Cloud Atlas' (2004, or Rana Dasgupta’s 'Tokyo Cancelled' (2005 are some examples. My argument is that central to these fictions is a sense of a ‘global unhomely’. The sense of displacement, unhomeliness and global mobility that is conveyed in these fictions is fundamental to the experience of the 'Unheimlich'. In addition, the ability of the concept to convey a combined sense of the familiar and the strange is useful in exploring the ways in which these fictions engage with theoretical debates on globalisation that perceive the interaction between global flows and local cultures either in terms of homogenisation and uniformity or of heterogenisation and hybridity. Moreover, the repetitive temporality of the 'Unheimlich' is another distinctive aspect that allows a reading of the disjunctive, non-linear temporal structure of these fictions from this perspective. The ‘repetition compulsion’, however, that Freud considered to be an example of uncanniness was also theorised by him as a post-traumatic symptom, and this implicit association of uncanniness with post-traumatic experience also allows to interpret the persistent preoccupation of these fictions with suffering and disaster, as well as

  15. Homophobia, heteronormativity, and slash fan fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April S. Callis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available I analyze the relationship between homophobia/heteronormativity and slash fan fiction. Through reading and coding almost 6,000 pages of Kirk/Spock fan fiction written from 1978 to 2014, I illuminate shifts in how normative gender and sexuality are portrayed by K/S authors. Writers of K/S, while ostensibly writing about the 23rd century, consciously or unconsciously include cultural norms from the 20th and 21st centuries. Thus, slash becomes a lens through which readers can view a decrease in both homophobia and heteronormativity in US culture over the past several decades.

  16. The architecture and fiction in level design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Ole Verner

    2006-01-01

     The architect's professional field has expanded with the new virtual medias There is a new set of rules different from the scenography of the film and different from the architecture of amusement parks. The new rules are fiction, interaction, complexity, and artificial intelligence. But there is...... The architect's professional field has expanded with the new virtual medias There is a new set of rules different from the scenography of the film and different from the architecture of amusement parks. The new rules are fiction, interaction, complexity, and artificial intelligence...

  17. [Self-harm in fiction literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skårderud, Finn

    2009-04-16

    European literature contains fictional descriptions of self-harm and self-punishment over a time span of almost 2 500 years. This article presents such descriptions, from Sofocles' tragedy about King Oedipus to contemporary literature. Particular interest is dedicated to the Austrian Nobel prize laureate Elfriede Jelinek and the Norwegian author Karl Ove Knausgård. In Jelinek's fictional universe, self-harm is particularly related to the topic of autonomy in a family context; while Knausgård describes the role of shame in triggering and sustaining self-harming behaviour.

  18. The Role of Fiction in Experiments within Design, Art & Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knutz, Eva; Markussen, Thomas; Christensen, Poul Rind

    2013-01-01

    This paper offers a typology for understanding design fiction as a new approach in design research. The typology allows design researchers to explain design fictions according to 5 criteria: (1) “What if scenarios” as the basic construal principle of design fiction; (2) the manifestation...... of critique; (3) design aims; (4) materializations and forms; and (5) the aesthetic of design fictions. The typology is premised on the idea that fiction may integrate with reality in many different ways in design experiments. The explanatory power of the typology is exemplified through the analyses of 6 case...

  19. Musculoskeletal Injuries and Training Patterns in Junior Elite Orienteering Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Roos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Findings about the relation between musculoskeletal injuries and training patterns in orienteering athletes are sparse. Therefore, the musculoskeletal injuries and training patterns of 31 Swiss elite orienteering athletes aged 18-19 years were analyzed in a retrospective study. Individual training diaries and medical records were used to assess training data and injury history, respectively. Group comparisons and a multiple linear regression (MLR were performed for statistical analysis. The junior elite orienteering athletes performed 7.38 ± 2.00 training sessions weekly, with a total duration of 455.75 ± 98.22 minutes. An injury incidence rate (IIR of 2.18 ± 2.13 injuries per 1000 hours of training was observed. The lower extremity was affected in 93% of all injuries, and the knee (33% was the most commonly injured location. The MLR revealed that gender and six training variables explained 60% of the variance in the injury severity index in this study. Supported by the low IIR in the observed age group, the training protocol of the junior elite orienteering athletes was generally adequate. In comparison to elite track, marathon, and orienteering athletes, the junior elite athletes performed less high-intensity interval training (HIIT. However, more frequent HIIT seems to be a protective factor against injuries.

  20. Musculoskeletal Injuries and Training Patterns in Junior Elite Orienteering Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Lilian; Taube, Wolfgang; Zuest, Peter; Clénin, German; Wyss, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Findings about the relation between musculoskeletal injuries and training patterns in orienteering athletes are sparse. Therefore, the musculoskeletal injuries and training patterns of 31 Swiss elite orienteering athletes aged 18-19 years were analyzed in a retrospective study. Individual training diaries and medical records were used to assess training data and injury history, respectively. Group comparisons and a multiple linear regression (MLR) were performed for statistical analysis. The junior elite orienteering athletes performed 7.38 ± 2.00 training sessions weekly, with a total duration of 455.75 ± 98.22 minutes. An injury incidence rate (IIR) of 2.18 ± 2.13 injuries per 1000 hours of training was observed. The lower extremity was affected in 93% of all injuries, and the knee (33%) was the most commonly injured location. The MLR revealed that gender and six training variables explained 60% of the variance in the injury severity index in this study. Supported by the low IIR in the observed age group, the training protocol of the junior elite orienteering athletes was generally adequate. In comparison to elite track, marathon, and orienteering athletes, the junior elite athletes performed less high-intensity interval training (HIIT). However, more frequent HIIT seems to be a protective factor against injuries.

  1. 初中教师心理健康状况调查分析%An Investigation on the Mental Health of Junior Middle School Tea chers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴小鸥; 潘孝富

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mental health of junior middle school teachers. Methods: 270 junior middle school teachers in Ch enzhou of Hunan Provin ce were administered SCL-90. Results: Two-fifths of subjec ts reported mental sym ptoms in varying degrees. There were significant differences in mental symptoms in respect of age and region. Conclusion: The junior midd le school teachers had different psychological problems.

  2. Children's direct fright and worry reactions to violence in fiction and news television programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, Juliette H Walma; Bushman, Brad J

    2008-09-01

    To examine whether violence in fictional and news television content frightens and worries children. Mixed factorial. Type of reaction (fright, worry) and television programming (violent news, violent fiction) were within-subjects factors, whereas age, sex, and television viewing frequency were between-subjects factors. Participants included 572 children (47% boys), aged 8 to 12 years, from 9 urban and rural primary schools in the Netherlands. The main exposure was to descriptions of 8 threats frequently depicted in fictional and news programs (eg, murder, war, house fires). Children reported whether they were frightened or worried by these threats. Violent threats increased both fright and worry. These 2 reactions could be distinguished from one another in a factor analysis. When violent content was described as news, it produced more fear reactions than when it was described as fiction. Fright and worry were greater in girls than in boys, in younger children than in older children, and in light television viewers than in heavy television viewers. Pediatricians should inform parents, educators, policy makers, and broadcasters about the potentially harmful effect of violent programming on children's emotions, especially in the case of news programming.

  3. CARIES PREVENTION AMONG JUNIOR SCHOOLCHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.К. Matelo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biennial program of controlled tooth brushing performed econdary school among junior schoolchildren from Minsk secondary school № 166 proved to be highly effective. Decrease in caries increment has been shown on the average up to 50%. No credible differences between remineralising defluorinated toothpastes or pastes enriched with aminofluoride (F = 500 ppm and sodium fluoride  (F = 1000 ppm efficacy were found in this study. Credibility of the results was determined by comparison with similar study conducted on a bigger population of children. Though anti-caries effect of the same tooth-pastes in a bigger-scale study was lower — within 30%. Such difference can be explained by a different level of motivation and discipline of participants.Key words: schoolchildren, dental caries prevention, toothpastes. (Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. — 2011; 10 (6: 48–51

  4. A Look at Young Children's Realistic Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jane M.; Wickersham, Elaine B.

    1980-01-01

    Analyzes recent realistic fiction for children produced in the United States in terms of ethnicity, stereotyped behavior, and themes. Concludes that the sample did not reflect equivalent treatment of males and females nor the culturally pluralistic makeup of U.S. society. Provides an annotated bibliography of the books analyzed. (Author/FL)

  5. Stranger that fiction parallel universes beguile science

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    Is the universe -- correction: 'our' universe -- no more than a speck of cosmic dust amid an infinite number of parallel worlds? A staple of mind-bending science fiction, the possibility of multiple universes has long intrigued hard-nosed physicists, mathematicians and cosmologists too.

  6. Science Consultants, Fictional Films, and Scientific Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Proposes films to be successful communicative devices within the scientific community by showing that other scientists respond to depictions in films and how they respond. Demonstrates that science consultants use fictional films as promotional devices for their research fields. (Author/NB)

  7. A COMPUTER ANALYSIS OF FICTIONAL PROSE STYLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KROEBER, KARL

    FUNDAMENTAL CHARACTERISTICS OF FICTIONAL PROSE STYLE WERE STUDIED THROUGH SYSTEMATIC AND OBJECTIVE ANALYSES OF NOVELISTIC SYNTAX AND VOCABULARY. SAMPLE PASSAGES FROM THE MAJOR NOVELS OF JANE AUSTEN, THE BRONTE SISTERS, AND GEORGE ELIOT AS WELL AS NOVELS BY 13 OTHER AUTHORS WERE ANALYZED. INFORMATION ON PASSAGE SENTENCES, CLAUSES, AND WORDS WAS…

  8. Virtual Processes and Quantum Tunnelling as Fictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Richard T. W.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper it is argued that virtual processes are dispensable fictions. The argument proceeds by a comparison with the phenomenon of quantum tunnelling. Building on an analysis of Levy-Leblond and Balibar, it is argued that, although the phenomenon known as quantum tunnelling certainly occurs and is at the basis of many paradigmatic quantum…

  9. Research, Narrative and Fiction: Conference Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to contribute to the discussion concerning the value and validity of fiction, and arts-based approaches more broadly, as research. I offer this contribution through a narrative: "Conference Story." The narrative involves its characters, in an Oxford pub, debating the merits and otherwise of Peter Clough's (2002)…

  10. Hybrid Fictionality and Vicarious Narrative Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatavara, Mari Annukka; Mildorf, Jarmila

    2016-01-01

    – an interview and an online museum exhibition – show that the employment of fictional modes of mind representation and cognitive attribution occur in conversational and documentary storytelling even if the reference is to the actual world. The results indicate that the procedures used to present and engage...

  11. Review Article: Fiction for Young Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Philip

    1989-01-01

    Surveys some recent fiction which reflects both the diverse interests and varying reading abilities of 11-18 year olds. Presents brief reviews of 26 novels touching on themes such as family, first love, social issues, adventure, fantasy, and thrillers. (RS)

  12. Stranger that fiction parallel universes beguile science

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Is the universe -- correction: 'our' universe -- no more than a speck of cosmic dust amid an infinite number of parallel worlds? A staple of mind-bending science fiction, the possibility of multiple universes has long intrigued hard-nosed physicists, mathematicians and cosmologists too.

  13. Fiction and Religious Education: Be Not Afraid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siejk, Cate

    2009-01-01

    This article is the conversion story of a university professor and voracious reader who has always been afraid to incorporate fiction into her classes. It maps her journey from believing that novels and short stories are effective pedagogical tools only when they are in the hands of competent English professors to recognizing the innumerable…

  14. Sisters Hope - Protected by the Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawaetz, Anna; Hallberg, Gry Worre

    2011-01-01

    In this article we will introduce the fictional and art-pedagogical universe of Sisters Hope and describe how it in different ways transcends into contexts beyond the art world and thus functions as a tool to democratize the aesthetic dimension and mode of being within high schools, academia...

  15. Fiction Reading Strategies of College Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that skilled college readers use a variety of strategies in flexible ways in order to comprehend academic texts. However, little is known about how skilled college readers use strategies when reading fiction, in spite of the fact that literature courses are required at many universities and thousands of students regularly major…

  16. Stepping into Science Fiction: Understanding the Genre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Diane; Barone, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript focuses on fifth graders' understanding of science fiction. It is argued that it is necessary for students to understand both reading strategies and the key elements of a genre for comprehension. Students read "The Giver" within literature circles and conversation and written responses about the book were used for…

  17. A Look at Young Children's Realistic Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jane M.; Wickersham, Elaine B.

    1980-01-01

    Analyzes recent realistic fiction for children produced in the United States in terms of ethnicity, stereotyped behavior, and themes. Concludes that the sample did not reflect equivalent treatment of males and females nor the culturally pluralistic makeup of U.S. society. Provides an annotated bibliography of the books analyzed. (Author/FL)

  18. Stranger than fiction: parallel universes beguile science

    CERN Multimedia

    Hautefeuille, Annie

    2007-01-01

    Is the universe-correction: 'our' universe-no more than a speck of cosmic dust amid an infinite number of parallel worlds? A staple of mind-bending science fiction, the possibility of multiple universes has long intrigued hard-nosed physicists, mathematicians and cosmologists too.

  19. Comprehension Strategies for Reading Historical Fiction Picturebooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngs, Suzette; Serafini, Frank

    2011-01-01

    As the texts readers encounter in and out of school grow in complexity, the strategies that teachers demonstrate and encourage students to employ need to expand to accommodate the changing nature of these texts. In this article, the authors present a three-part framework for utilizing historical fiction picturebooks as instructional resources.…

  20. Authenticating Historical Fiction: Rationale and Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groce, Eric; Groce, Robin

    2005-01-01

    In merging social studies education with language arts, classroom teachers are utilizing selections of historical fiction to teach critical literacy skills while also meeting social studies standards. While most of the selections used for teaching history and social studies themes are strong in terms of literary merit, they may be deficient in…

  1. The Time Machine: Writing Historical Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, Kathleen

    2000-01-01

    Discusses historical fiction for children and young adults from a writer's point of view and equates it to a time machine into the past. Considers the books that influenced the writer; larger-than-life characters; story ideas; and research to really know and feel the setting. (LRW)

  2. Comprehension Strategies for Reading Historical Fiction Picturebooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngs, Suzette; Serafini, Frank

    2011-01-01

    As the texts readers encounter in and out of school grow in complexity, the strategies that teachers demonstrate and encourage students to employ need to expand to accommodate the changing nature of these texts. In this article, the authors present a three-part framework for utilizing historical fiction picturebooks as instructional resources.…

  3. A Pedagogical Approach to Detective Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Torres, Agustín

    2011-01-01

    One of the main concerns when teaching a foreign language is how to encourage students to read and become interested in its literature. This article presents detective fiction as a pedagogical tool that provides the key elements to make it appealing for young readers. In this way, the mystery, the action and the suspense in the story; the figure…

  4. Stepping into Science Fiction: Understanding the Genre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Diane; Barone, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript focuses on fifth graders' understanding of science fiction. It is argued that it is necessary for students to understand both reading strategies and the key elements of a genre for comprehension. Students read "The Giver" within literature circles and conversation and written responses about the book were used for…

  5. Sisters Hope - Protected by the Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawaetz, Anna; Hallberg, Gry Worre

    2011-01-01

    In this article we will introduce the fictional and art-pedagogical universe of Sisters Hope and describe how it in different ways transcends into contexts beyond the art world and thus functions as a tool to democratize the aesthetic dimension and mode of being within high schools, academia...

  6. Reaching Nonscience Students through Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Donald A.

    2009-01-01

    In 2006 I had the chance to design a physics course for students not majoring in scientific fields. I chose to shape the course around science fiction, not as a source for quantitative problems but as a means for conveying important physics concepts. I hoped that, by encountering these concepts in narratives, students with little or no science or…

  7. Science Fiction in the EFL Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Anson

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that a college English-as-a-Foreign-Language course using science fiction texts and films can help students whose imminent concern is not only language proficiency, but also the culture of an English-speaking world. Presents two techniques for helping students enjoy reading, thus enhancing their language skills. (Author/VWL)

  8. Science Fiction Exhibits as STEM Gateways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robie, Samantha

    Women continue to hold less than a quarter of all STEM jobs in the United States, prompting many museums to develop programs and exhibits with the express goal of interesting young girls in scientific fields. At the same time, a number of recent museum exhibits have harnessed the popularity of pop culture and science fiction in order to interest general audiences in STEM subject matter, as well as using the exhibits as springboards to expand or shift mission goals and focus. Because science fiction appears to be successful at raising interest in STEM fields, it may be an effective way to garner the interest of young girls in STEM in particular. This research seeks to describe the ways in which museums are currently using science fiction exhibits to interest young girls in STEM fields and careers. Research focused on four institutions across the country hosting three separate exhibits, and included staff interviews and content analysis of exhibit descriptions, promotional materials, a summative evaluation and supplementary exhibit productions. In some ways, science fiction exhibits do serve young girls, primarily through the inclusion of female role models, staff awareness, and prototype testing to ensure interactives are attractive to girls as well as to boys. However, STEM appears to be underutilized, which may be partly due to a concern within the field that the outcome of targeting a specific gender could be construed as "stereotyping".

  9. Teaching Science Fact with Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raham, R. Gary

    2004-01-01

    The literature of science fiction packs up the facts and discoveries of science and runs off to futures filled with both wonders and warnings. Kids love to take the journeys it offers for the thrill of the ride, but they can learn as they travel, too. This book will provide the reader with: (1) an overview of the past 500 years of scientific…

  10. Fictionalising Experiences-Experiencing through Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannula, Markku S.

    2003-01-01

    Understanding and reporting students' affective experiences with mathematics is difficult if those experiences do not resonate with personal experiences. Utilising fiction-writing in narrative reporting can be a technique that helps both the researcher and the reader of the research report to immerse themselves in the student's experiential world.…

  11. Stranger than fiction parallel universes beguile science

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    A staple of mind-bending science fiction, the possibility of multiple universes has long intrigued hard-nosed physicists, mathematicians and cosmologists too. We may not be able -- at least not yet -- to prove they exist, many serious scientists say, but there are plenty of reasons to think that parallel dimensions are more than figments of eggheaded imagination.

  12. Promoting science through science fiction and pseudoscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslund, C.

    1986-11-01

    A great deal of physics can be learned from reading good science fiction. Many writers of this genre have shown great talent in explaining the laws of physics in language that is both lucid and accessible. Their writings can readily be used by the science teacher to enhance and to stimulate student understanding of physics and science.

  13. Young Adult Fiction by African American Writers, 1968-1993: A Critical and Annotated Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutenplon, Deborah; Olmstead, Ellen

    This bibliography presents annotations and critical appraisals of all fiction titles published between 1968 and 1993 by African American authors and targeting young adult readers--166 titles by 57 authors. Only works of fiction--historical fiction, modern realistic fiction, fantasy and science fiction, and mystery and suspense--by African American…

  14. Reference Values and Gender Differences of the Functional Parameters in Romanian Elite Junior Tennis Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian NAGEL

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To establish the reference values and gender differences regarding fitness, strength, and time reaction of the Romanian elite junior tennis players. Material and Methods: Thirty four junior tennis players (19 male, 15 female with a mean age of 15 years were selected from the database of the Cardiopulmonary Effort Testing and Physical Performance Laboratory from Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, West University of Timisoara. To be included in the study, a tennis player had to belong to the Romanian Tennis Federation as a junior, be among the 50 best players in his/her category, and have no pathology at the evaluation moment. All subjects underwent functional evaluation by performing a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test, the counter movement jump test and complex opto-acoustic reaction test. Results: The functional performance are significantly different for males and females in all parameters studied, with male tennis players showing better performance than female tennis players. Conclusions: The mean values of functional parameters of the Romanian elite junior tennis players are lower than international competitive tennis athletes. There are significant gender differences in junior tennis players. We hope that the present study results provide useful reference values for coaches and physical trainers in order to improve functional performance of their junior tennis players.

  15. Perception of Doping-Related Risks by Junior and Senior Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroczkowska, Helena

    2009-01-01

    Study aim: To assess the degree of acceptance of risk by experienced and inexperienced athletes. Material and methods: Two male teams participated in the study: juniors (football; n = 9) aged 16-18 years and seniors (volleyball; n = 13) aged 20-32 years. The subjects were requested to assess the doping-related risk of losing every of 6 values:…

  16. NIR tracking assists sports medicine in junior basketball training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paeglis, Roberts; Bluss, Kristaps; Rudzitis, Andris; Spunde, Andris; Brice, Tamara; Nitiss, Edgars

    2011-07-01

    We recorded eye movements of eight elite junior basketball players. We hypothesized that a more stable gaze is correlated to a better shot rate. Upon preliminary testing we invited male juniors whose eyes could be reliably tracked in a game situation. To these ends, we used a head-mounted video-based eye tracker. The participants had no record of ocular or other health issues. No significant differences were found between shots made with and without the tracker cap, Paired samples t-test yielded p= .130 for the far and p=..900 > .050 for the middle range shots. The players made 40 shots from common far and middle range locations, 5 and 4 meters respectively for aged 14 years As expected, a statistical correlation was found between gaze fixation (in milliseconds) for the far and middle range shot rates, r=.782, p=.03. Notably, juniors who fixated longer before a shot had a more stable fixation or a lower gaze dispersion (in tracker's screen pixels), r=-.786, p=.02. This finding was augmented by the observation that the gaze dispersion while aiming at the basket was less (i.e., gaze more stable) in those who were more likely to score. We derived a regression equation linking fixation duration to shot success. We advocate infra-red eye tracking as a means to monitor player selection and training success.

  17. Perfectionism and attitudes towards doping in junior athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, Daniel J; Stoeber, Joachim; Passfield, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Recent theory and research suggest that perfectionism is a personal factor contributing to athletes' vulnerability to doping (using banned substances/drugs to enhance sporting performance). So far, however, no study has examined what aspects of perfectionism suggest a vulnerability in junior athletes. Employing a cross-sectional design, this study examined perfectionism and attitudes towards doping in 129 male junior athletes (mean age 17.3 years) differentiating four aspects of perfectionism: perfectionistic strivings, perfectionistic concerns, parental pressure to be perfect, and coach pressure to be perfect. In the bivariate correlations, only parental pressure showed a positive relationship with positive doping attitudes. In a multiple regression analysis controlling for the overlap between the four aspects, perfectionistic strivings additionally showed a negative relationship. Moreover, a structural equation model examining the relationships between all variables suggested that coach pressure had a negative indirect effect on attitudes towards doping via perfectionistic strivings. The findings indicate that perceived parental pressure to be perfect may be a factor contributing to junior athletes' vulnerability to doping, whereas perfectionistic strivings may be a protective factor.

  18. Poetry in Fiction: an approximation to the structure of «El curioso impertinente»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Isabel Santa Aguilar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present work analyzes how poetry breaks into the structure of El curioso impertinente. Firstly, it should be highlighted that El curioso impertinente is a novel considered as fiction within the don Quixote’s frame of reference (fictional plane, and in which characters are constantly acting fake situations, that ends up becoming true, which leads them to a renewed need to feign or to lie. From this perspective, the work focuses on the paradox that, given this plane fixed so far from the reality of the reader, the three poems recited by the characters come from a world outside fiction since they have actual authors in Cervantes’s time. Furthermore, the two sonnets ‘written’ by Lotario belong to the more serious Cervantine poetry, and thus belong to Spanish Golden Age lyrical tradition. Another paradox is also present: the five poems, which are rated as literature by the characters of the novel, foreshadow the events that will take place in the novel’s reality; unveiling a structure in which reality is constantly imitating fiction.

  19. THE FUNCTIONS OF VIENNESE DIALECT IN THE WORKS OF MODERN AUSTRIAN FICTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chukshis Vadim Andreevich

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of definition of linguistic status of the Austrian dialects and their functions in Austrian fiction continues to preserve the academic value. The main peculiarities of Viennese dialect are given, the conclusions of its status among the other Austrian dialects are made in the article, the characteristic features of the functions of the Viennese dialect are given in the works of Austrian fiction. The author of the article proceeds from the position that the Viennese dialect is the important stylistic means and makes the conclusion about its functions in the works of Austrian fiction. Three novels and one story of modern Austrian writers have been selected for the analysis: H. Anderle (The Worthy Funeral. The Mortal Histories, E. Menasse (Vienna, F. Nabl (Edhof, P Campa (The Second Travel. The article studies four functions of Viennese dialect based on the research of the texts of the Austrian fiction works. The analysis based on the utterances of the heroes helped to prove that Austrian writers use the Viennese dialect as 1 means of marking the regional characteristics; 2 means of marking the age; 3 means of marking the social type and 4 means of emotions expression. The research of the speech of the heroes permitted to reveal the most common Viennese words and expressions and demonstrate their role in the texts not only as the means of creating the speech portrait of the heroes but only the markers of the originality of modern Austrian German.

  20. A Study on Emotional Healing Efficacy of Fiction for Undergraduate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Su-May Sheih

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In modern society, undergraduates may encounter multiple pressures and thus feel the sense of alienation, anxiety, disturbance and depression. For undergraduates, reading can be independently conducted without the intervention of an instructor; therefore, undergraduates who feel reluctant to expose private emotions to counselors can help themselves through the reading of emotional healing books. This is the application of bibliotherapy. Among various resources, fiction can serve as an appropriate emotional reading material. The researcher deployed semi-structured in-depth interview, and interviewed 21 undergraduates in Taipei City and Taipei County. This study is aimed to understand the kinds of fictions undergraduates read when they are upset and to analyze the emotional healing process of identification, catharsis, and insight so that the emotional healing efficacy can be evaluated. The findings showed that romance, realistic fiction, fantasy, martial arts novel, inspirational fiction, historical fiction, and science fiction can provide full process of emotional healing efficacy. However, detective fiction, online novel, psychological fiction, and horror fiction can only provide parts of the healing process. Besides, the healing efficacy of a specific fiction is different from reader to reader.

  1. Growth and maturity status of elite British junior tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myburgh, Gillian K; Cumming, Sean P; Coelho E Silva, Manuel; Cooke, Karl; Malina, Robert M

    2016-10-01

    Growth and maturation impact the selection, development and progression of youth athletes. Individual differences in the growth and maturity may afford a performance advantage, clouding coaches and practitioners' perceptions regarding current ability and future potential. This may result in the exclusion of talented, yet less physically gifted athletes. Participants were 91 male (n = 47) and female (n = 44) elite British Junior tennis players, 8-17 years of age (12.5 ± 1.9 years). Height and body mass were measured and compared to growth charts; hand-wrist radiographs were taken. Skeletal age (SA) was estimated with the Fels method and contrasted to chronological age (CA). Mean height and body mass of individual players ranged between the 50th and 90th centiles for age and sex. Females were advanced in SA relative to CA (0.3-0.89 years.) from 8 years. Males were average to delayed in maturation from 8 to 12 years, but advanced in SA from 14 to 16 years (0.75-1.23 years). Individual differences in growth and maturation appear to contribute towards the selection of elite junior tennis players, with a bias towards males and females who are advanced in maturation and comparatively tall and heavy for their age. This has important implications for talent identification and development.

  2. A Study on Emotional Healing Fiction for Undergraduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Su-may Sheih

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Undergraduate students may encounter emotional disturbance when they are under pressures. Healing reading may effectively soothe negative emotions as the readers relate themselves to the fictional characters and life situations in the books. This study employs semi-structured in-depth interview to study 21 undergraduates’ experiences of emotional disturbances, the kinds of fiction they read when suffering from negative emotions, and the criteria for fiction selection. The result showed that academic studies, career planning and interpersonal relationship were the major problems causing emotional disturbances in undergraduates’ lives. The respondents read romance fiction, realism fiction and fantasy fiction when they encounter emotional disturbance. They chose based personal needs, book features, and recommendations from others. The findings may shed lights on how one may effectively conduct self-healing reading and how university libraries may do to provide better bibliotherapeutic services. [Article content in Chinese

  3. N.E.S.F.A. (New England Science Fiction Assn.) Index: Science Fiction Magazines and Original Anthologies 1971-1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New England Science Fiction Association, Cambridge, MA.

    This index is a companion volume and supplement to the "Index to Science Fiction Magazines 1951-1965," published by Erwin S. Strauss, and the "Index to the Science Fiction Magazines 1966-1970," published by the New England Science Fiction Association. This present volume includes all United States and British Science Fiction magazines published in…

  4. Science Fiction and a Rhetorical Analysis of the 'Literature Myth'

    OpenAIRE

    Rutten, Kris; Soetaert, Ronald; Vandermeersche, Geert

    2011-01-01

    In their article "Science Fiction and a Rhetorical Analysis of the 'Literature Myth'" Kris Rutten, Ronald Soetaert, and Geert Vandermeersche discuss what we can learn from science fiction about cultural literacy in general and literary culture in particular. From a theoretical and methodological perspective the authors start from the work of rhetorician Kenneth Burke. First, the authors conceptualize literature as "equipment for living" followed by a discussion of science fiction as "equipmen...

  5. Wilde Rewound: Time-Travelling with Oscar in Recent Author Fictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirby Joris

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the early 1980s historical figures in general – and writers from the past in particular – entered a kind of Golden Age thanks to fiction. Through various forms of semi-biographical novels and other narratives, they have, from that time forward, been enjoying a pampered life in a new genre called “the author-as-character” (Franssen and Hoenselaars 1999 or “author fictions” (Savu 2009 that reanimate them or conjure them up in a present that constantly seeks to reassert its link with the past. This is particularly true of Oscar Wilde’s life, for his disparate and colourful personality has been time and again re-appropriated in recent fiction. This article focuses on three of these contemporary fictional depictions: an epistolary novel, an epistolary website and a fictional interview, all three dealing with a fictionalised Oscar Wilde conversing with a contemporary author who is also an interviewer in his or her own way and right. Because they are very close to each other in terms of narration (i.e. impersonation and pastiche and subject, putting words in Wilde’s mouth as though they were his own, The Unauthorized Letters of Oscar Wilde, the website Dialogus, and Coffee with Oscar Wilde, represent three fascinating means of exploring how Oscar’s rebirth as a man and author actually takes place. Among the numerous fictional portraits of Oscar Wilde, I have thus chosen to pay particular attention to the depictions that are well anchored in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries and which do not, therefore, display a narrative that would merely take place during the fin de siècle, with only period-style people in period costume. By contrast, the three portraits are literal time-travelling narratives that endeavour to bridge the gap between past, present and future.

  6. HORACE ON AUGUSTUS: FACT OR FICTION?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Thom

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Quot homines tot sententiae seems a good summary of the variety of critical readings of lyric poetry in general and of Horace’s position on Augustus in particular. This raises the interesting question of the position of factual information in poetry: does lyric as genre imply a choice for fiction as opposed to fact or can some references to contemporary personalities or incidents be taken as realistic? In this case specifically: can what Horace says about Augustus be taken as a realistic assessment of the emperor? To complicate matters, Augustus was a powerful personage who wanted and often managed to put his own stamp on things1 — in himself an embodiment of the opposition between fact and fiction. Given this undoubtedly heady mix, the paper will try to make some

  7. The Theme of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isakova S.V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the content of six literary works about people with autism spectrum disorders. As cri¬teria for comparison the following things are selected: the genre in which the book is written, the presence of specialized terminology, the narrator of the story, the subjects of relationships, the gender and age of the main character, the description of the symptoms of autism and the nature of that description, the dynamics of the state and the climax of the literary work. The conclusion is drawn that the works of fiction on autism are aimed at informing the society of the problem, improving tolerance towards people with autism and supporting all those who are personally affected by autism

  8. Narrative Politics in Historical Fictions for Children

    OpenAIRE

    Streamas, John

    2008-01-01

    In "Narrative Politics in Historical Fictions for Children," John Streamas points out that narrative theory and ethnic studies need to ask each other basic questions before a reading of race in children's literature can be useful. Is the literature merely a reflection of the experience of adult writers and parents? That is, must we read the literature as nostalgic, reflecting a developmental bias? Or does it engage children on their own contemporary terms? Are children themselves capable of r...

  9. Wordplay, mindplay: Fan fiction and postclassical narratology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veerle Van Steenhuyse

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent narrative theories on story worlds, or the worlds evoked by narratives, call attention to the process of fan reading and the role which the canon plays in that process. This paper posits that such theories can help us understand literary techniques that make a difference on the level of the reading experience that is implied by fan fiction texts. This is illustrated with a close reading of Naguabo's "The Mother of All Marriage Proposals," a Jane Austen fic.

  10. Understanding Management, Trade, and Society Through Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Robin; Zundel, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The article analyzes the television series "The Wire," focusing on elements of the series of interest in relation to management science. The authors discuss strengths of the show as fiction, including the density of its portrayal of urban life and its avoidance of closure. Other topics include th...... the management styles portrayed by the show's characters in a range of settings including police work and the illegal drug trade.....

  11. 'Mere Porteuse', 'Fictional Pregnancies' and 'Settlement'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mere Porteuse, Fictional Pregnancies and Settlement are ink drawings that explore fantasies and imaginings surrounding maternity. The drawings do not resent the longing for an actual child, but rather an exploration of the idea that making art is in fact a maternal act and that we develop deep connections with unrelated children, as well as with our very own ideas, dreams and art works.

  12. The Milky Way: Science and Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, M.

    2014-07-01

    In this work certain concepts of the relationship, not very flowing, between the Milky Way and modern science fiction are analyzed. We focus on the scientific goals of Gaia mission: the structure and components of our Galaxy (My Stepmother is an Alien; Starship Troopers; Independence Day; The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy); the galaxy stellar component (The Black Hole); exoplanets (Interstellar; Les mondes dAldébaran; Valérian); Andromeda galaxy (Tumannost Andromedy) and others.

  13. Multimodal Diversity of Postmodernist Fiction Text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. I. Tykha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the analysis of structural and functional manifestations of multimodal diversity in postmodernist fiction texts. Multimodality is defined as the coexistence of more than one semiotic mode within a certain context. Multimodal texts feature a diversity of semiotic modes in the communication and development of their narrative. Such experimental texts subvert conventional patterns by introducing various semiotic resources – verbal or non-verbal.

  14. Literary Fiction Influences Attitudes Toward Animal Welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małecki, Wojciech; Pawłowski, Bogusław; Sorokowski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Literary fiction has been credited with considerable power to improve attitudes toward outgroups. It was even argued that it has been an important factor behind the global decline of violence against various minorities in the last centuries. Could it also help to reduce the human-inflicted suffering of animals? To test this, we studied the attitude toward animal welfare of n = 921 (experimental group) people of both sexes who read a short fragment of an unpublished novel with a motif of the physical abuse of an animal. The control group (n = 912) read a fragment of a similar length but not related to animals. After reading the text all subjects filled out an on-line questionnaire with seven items (camouflaged among many others items) measuring attitudes toward animal welfare. The questionnaire included also demographical questions, such as whether the subject keeps pets. We found that in comparison with the control group, the experimental group was significantly more concerned about animal welfare. This result indicates that literary fiction can influence attitudes toward other species. It is also worth noting that our study is characterized by a high level of ecological validity, i.e. a relatively high extent to which its results can be generalized (or extended) to real-world settings. Due to its specific design, which involved the cooperation of a bestselling author and his publisher, the study approximated the typical conditions in which people read fiction in a remarkably accurate way. Finally, our research has potential practical implications for promoting animal welfare.

  15. Discovery Mondays: 'Separating science from fiction'

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Photo credit: ESA/NASA, the AVO project and Paolo PadovaniDoes the imaginary word of fiction always end up becoming scientific reality? What futuristic visions can we extrapolate from today's technologies? Here is a short quiz to test your knowledge. Can YOU tell truth from fiction? True False The laser swords featuring in the Star Wars films really exist. Time travel is possible using black holes. You could eat a cake of antimatter. Levitation vehicles really exist. Dan Brown is a space alien. How can you distinguish truth from fiction, dreams from reality, real science and technology from the sci-fi fantasies so realistically described in novels, television and cinema? You are invited to come and discuss these questions at a Discovery Monday at the very frontiers of science..... Join us at Microcosm (Reception, Building 33, Meyrin site), on Monday, 4 September from 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Entrance Free The event will be conducted in French. http://www.cern.ch/LundisDecouverte/ ...

  16. The living dead: fiction, horror, and bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belling, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Popular fiction responds to, and may exacerbate, public anxieties in ways that more highbrow literary texts may not. Robin Cook's 1977 novel Coma exemplifies the ways in which medical thrillers participate in the public discourse about health care. Written shortly after the medical establishment promoted "irreversible coma," or brain death, as a new definition of dying, and at a time when the debate over the removal of Karen Ann Quinlan from life support was the subject of popular attention, Coma crystallized public fears over the uses of medical technology. While Cook hoped that Coma would encourage public participation in health-care decision-making, the book may have fueled public concerns about medicine in ways that he did not anticipate. The public engagement that accompanied the rise of bioethics and that led to increased transparency and patient autonomy in medical decision-making had its birth, in part, in the distrust and paranoia reflected in the medical thriller. Because fiction can shape public perceptions of health-care dilemmas and may affect decision-making on bioethical issues, bioethicists need to pay attention to popular fictional accounts of medicine.

  17. A Review of the Anthropometric Characteristics, Grading and Dispensation of Junior and Youth Rugby Union Players in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Declan Alexander; McIntosh, Andrew Stuart; Denny, Greg

    2016-08-01

    The grading of Australian junior and youth rugby union players has received substantial media attention in recent years. Media reports have focussed on size mismatches observed between players, especially players with Polynesian heritage, and the concerned parents who fear for the safety of their child owing to perceived mismatches. Although such concerns are well meaning, few media reports recognise the need for substantial evidence to determine the best grading system for junior and youth rugby union players. The current study reviewed relevant literature pertinent to the grading and dispensation of junior and youth rugby union players. Using primary and secondary search strategies, a total of 33 articles reporting the anthropometric characteristics of junior and youth rugby players were identified. Anthropometric data from the literature were compared with normative population data and currently used dispensation criteria. Junior and youth rugby players were found to be taller and heavier than normative population data. Current dispensation criteria, in terms of body mass, were found to vary and it is suggested that criteria be revised and standardised across rugby unions throughout Australia. Although it is acknowledged that other factors are important for grading players, anthropometric characteristics should be considered as potential dispensation criteria to supplement current age-based grading for junior and youth rugby union players. Measuring the body mass and stature of each junior player upon pre-season registration is suggested, which would provide data to establish valid dispensation criteria for the following season.

  18. Fan fiction metadata creation and utilization within fan fiction archives: Three primary models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Fay Johnson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Issues related to searchability and ease of access have plagued fan fiction since its inception. This paper discusses the predominate forms of fan-mediated indexing and descriptive metadata, commonly referred to as folksonomy or tagging, and compares the benefits and disadvantages of each model. These models fall into three broad categories: free tagging, controlled vocabulary, and hybrid folksonomy. Each model has distinct advantages and shortcomings related to findability, results filtering, and creative empowerment. Examples for each are provided. Possible ramifications to fan fiction from improved metadata and access are also discussed.

  19. Constructing fictional stories: a study of story narratives by children with autistic spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Diane; Dockrell, Julie; Stuart, Morag

    2014-10-01

    Children with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) are reported to have difficulties with narrative language but little is known about how this affects their production of fictional stories. In this study, we aimed to establish whether fictional narratives of children with ASD differed from those of typically developing children and if performance was commensurate with levels of oral language. Fictional stories produced by 27 high functioning children with ASD, aged 11-14 yrs, were compared with those of language and age matched groups of typically developing children. Differences were found between the children with ASD and comparison groups in structural, evaluative and global features of their stories indicating specific difficulties with this form of narrative. Stories of the ASD group were shorter and contained fewer causal statements than those of both comparison groups and sentences were less grammatically complex than those of the age match but not the language match group. In global measures, the stories of the ASD group were impoverished relative to both comparison groups. The results are discussed in relation to cognitive theories of autism and language development.

  20. Quelques commentaires sur les personnages de fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Eco

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available L’auteur met en place des observations et développe des analyses sur le statut des personnages de fiction, mettant à contribution les ressources de l’histoire, de la littérature, de la sémiotique, de la logique et de la narratologie. De quelle vie particulière vivent les personnages de roman, qui fait que nous sommes capables de les tenir pour plus réels que des personnages réels, et que nous sommes enclins à éprouver les sentiments qu’ils éprouvent, même si nous savons qu’ils n’existent pas ? Comment ces personnages de fiction existent-ils, selon quelle « partition » leur existence se développe-t-elle au point d’interférer avec la nôtre ? L’interrogation porte sur la nature de ce flux émotionnel qui s’écoule du lecteur vers les personnages de fiction et les investit de valeur, sur ce qui se projette de la vie vers le roman, entraînant avec lui le lecteur qui se trouve de la sorte impliqué malgré lui dans l’histoire, et se trouve pris dans le mécanisme de l’identification et de la vie fictive.Some commentaries about fiction charactersPutting into form a number of observations and developing an analysis on the status of fiction characters, the author draws on resources coming from history, literature, semiotic, logic et narration. What is that particular life lived by fiction characters that enable us to consider them as being more real than real characters, and to experience the feelings that they experience, even though we know that they do not exist? How do these characters exist? In other words, according to what “script” does their existence develop to the point of interfering with ours? The questioning centres on the nature of the emotional flux which flows from the reader towards the fictional characters thus giving them value, and on what it is which is projected from real life towards the novel and which is capable of sweeping up the reader who, without having particularly intended to do

  1. Junior High School Students' Ideas about the Shape and Size of the Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokelez, Aytekin

    2012-01-01

    The concept of the atom is one of the building blocks of science education. Although the concept is a foundation for students' subsequent learning experiences, it is difficult for students to comprehend because of common misconceptions and its abstractness. The purpose of this study is to examine junior high school students' (ages 12-13) ideas…

  2. Languages for Children at Tarrant County Junior College: A Ten-Year Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jane

    In response to requests of adult students for foreign language instruction for their kindergarten and elementary school aged children, and after researching the availability of such instruction in the area, Tarrant County Junior College developed a series of nonsequential courses of 12 lessons each on common topics such as parts of the body, the…

  3. Career Calling as a Personal Resource Moderator between Environmental Demands and Burnout in Australian Junior Doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, Peter A.; Rogers, Mary E.; Praskova, Anna; Searle, Judy

    2014-01-01

    We surveyed 355 junior doctors (first 4 years of post-university training; 69% female, mean age = 28 years) from multiple hospital and practice locations and used an online questionnaire to assess their training-related demands (academic stress, concern about training debt, and hours worked), academic burnout, and personal resources…

  4. Stability of Scores on the Junior Eysenck Personality Inventory in an Outpatient Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrys, Jan Bernard

    1980-01-01

    This paper reports a test-retest study of the Junior Eysenck Personality Inventory for 257 children, ages 7-16, receiving psychological services in a British Columbia public health facility. Findings support the test author's claims over a 30-day period of relative score stability on extraversion and neuroticism. (Author/SJL)

  5. Junior High School Students' Ideas about the Shape and Size of the Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokelez, Aytekin

    2012-01-01

    The concept of the atom is one of the building blocks of science education. Although the concept is a foundation for students' subsequent learning experiences, it is difficult for students to comprehend because of common misconceptions and its abstractness. The purpose of this study is to examine junior high school students' (ages 12-13) ideas…

  6. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF TRAINING METHODOLOGY EFFICIENCY ON THE MOTOR SPHERE OF JUNIOR I DANCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigore Virgil

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to highlight the influence of the training methodology on the motor sphere of junior I dancers. This scientific approach has involved the organization of an experimental study in ”Two Step” Club of Bucharest. The research activity was conducted from January 2012 to November 2013, by investigating two groups of athletes, an experimental group and a control group; each group included 12 dancers, aged from 12 to 13, corresponding to sports classification category Junior I. The results of the research show that thanks to the training methodology applied to the Junior I dancers included in the experimental group, these ones improved their strength of abdominal and arms muscles, they had an increase of the spine and coxo-femoral joint mobility and they improved their strength under speed conditions as well.

  7. Features of vertical stability of junior school children with visual impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurchenko A. A.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The importance of vertical stability in the formation of the spatial organization of the body and correct posture for junior school children with visual impairments was determined. In a pilot study involved 23 children with low vision and 60 healthy children, aged 7-10 years old. To obtain the results was used the test of E.Y. Bondarevskogo. The features of orthograde posture of children with low vision and their healthy peers. Distinctive features in terms of retention of vertical posture and goniometric characteristics have been revealed. Found that junior school children with low vision by about 60-65% yield in the reported figures from their healthy peers. The visually impaired junior school children have significantly less ability to retain the static vertical posture than children with normal vision have been proved and verified.

  8. [Investigation of children with congenital cleft lip and palate by Eysenck personality questionnaire(Junior)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H Z; Hu, J F

    1998-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To approach the personality of the children suffering from congenital cleft lip and palate. METHODS: The subject were 50 children (aged 7 to 17) with congenital cleft lip and palate,and 50 normal children as control.Both groups were investigated by Eysenck personality questionnaire EPQ(Junior). RESULTS: According to the general quantitative table of EPQ(Junior),the abnormal cases in cleft group were significantly more than those in control(P<0.005),and also were the abnormal cases in the single quantitative or in the multiple quantitative tables of EPQ(Junior)(P<0.005) respectively. CONCLUSION: The poor personality in children with cleft lip and palate is correlated to the cleft condition.Therefore it is necessary to pay attention to the prevention of poor personality while the cleft lip and palate is treated.

  9. Learner Reading Problems: A Case of Khoe Learners at Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Learner Reading Problems: A Case of Khoe Learners at Junior Secondary School. ... learners' reading ability of English at junior secondary school in Botswana. ... teachers' schemes and records of work to explore the subjects' reading skills.

  10. Indexing Serialized Fiction: May the Force Be with You.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Melissa M.

    The adult novel offers indexers an unusual opportunity to create a serialized fiction index. This research paper involved designing and creating a Character Index, Thesaurus, Glossary, and Abstract (with descriptors) for 21 novels based on the "Star Wars" movies. The novels are an unusual example of serialized fiction featuring main characters,…

  11. Index to the Science Fiction Magazines 1966-1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971

    This index to science fiction magazines includes all United States and British periodicals published from 1966 to 1970, and is a companion to the "Index to Science Fiction Magazines, 1951-1956." The entries are triple-listed by magazines, titles, and authors. A checklist of the magazines indexed contains the month and year, volume and…

  12. LIFE AS FICTION, OR SOME NOTES ON ANTERO DE QUENTAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Figueiredo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Recovery of essayistic route of Antero de Quental . Analysis of the main ideas of Quental's thought and its relation with the biographical path of the poet. The (re creation of fictional "A genius who was a saint", according Eça de Queiroz . The biography as a form of fictional writing.

  13. Textbook vs. Historical Fiction: Impact on Social Studies Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of adding historical fiction novels as a supplement to the textbook in an eighth grade social studies course. This qualitative study focused on student interest and feedback as their social studies class was altered through the addition of historical fiction novels. The research questions were…

  14. Fiction as an Introduction to Computer Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Judy; Mattei, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    The undergraduate computer science curriculum is generally focused on skills and tools; most students are not exposed to much research in the field, and do not learn how to navigate the research literature. We describe how fiction reviews (and specifically science fiction) are used as a gateway to research reviews. Students learn a little about…

  15. Preschoolers Can Infer General Rules Governing Fantastical Events in Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Vondervoort, Julia W.; Friedman, Ori

    2014-01-01

    Young children are frequently exposed to fantastic fiction. How do they make sense of the unrealistic and impossible events that occur in such fiction? Although children could view such events as isolated episodes, the present experiments suggest that children use such events to infer general fantasy rules. In 2 experiments, 2-to 4-year-olds were…

  16. Pairing Books for Learning: The Union of Informational and Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Allison L.

    2012-01-01

    This article aims to present an annotated bibliography of paired books--one fiction and one informational--about multiple topics in history and social studies that, when read together, can help support students' learning through experiencing the topic from multiple perspectives and voices. It begins with a brief rationale for pairing fiction and…

  17. Authentication Projects for Historical Fiction: Do You Believe It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTigue, Erin; Thornton, Elaine; Wiese, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Authentication projects, particularly for historical fiction, provide a means for students to explore literature and history while practicing critical literacy skills. The authors 1) present benefits and cautions for historical fiction use in elementary classrooms, 2) introduce authentication projects as a means to mitigate risks and enhance…

  18. Politely Disregarded: Street Fiction, Mass Incarceration, and Critical Praxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Orman, Karin; Lyiscott, Jamila

    2013-01-01

    Due to prevailing attitudes about the prison industrial complex and African American and Latino/Latina communities, the literary production of urban street fiction has been politely disregarded by our society. Through the use of critical praxis, utilizing urban street fiction in the classroom is a necessary and urgent act of social justice. Street…

  19. Amazing Stories: Acquiring and Avoiding Inaccurate Information from Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, David N.; Hinze, Scott R.; Slaten, Daniel G.; Horton, William S.

    2014-01-01

    Authors of fiction need not provide accurate accounts of the world, which might generate concern about the kinds of information people can acquire from narratives. Research has demonstrated that readers liberally encode and rely upon the information provided in fictional stories. To date, materials used to demonstrate these effects have largely…

  20. An analysis of mind style in the short fiction Chrysanthemums

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵海燕

    2015-01-01

    The paper selected John Steinbeck’s short fiction The Chrysanthemums and focused on the analysis of Steinbeck and Elisa’ mind style.It is hoped that the present research will provide a new perspective for reader s and critics in appreciating and analyzing characters in short fiction.

  1. Authentication Projects for Historical Fiction: Do You Believe It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTigue, Erin; Thornton, Elaine; Wiese, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Authentication projects, particularly for historical fiction, provide a means for students to explore literature and history while practicing critical literacy skills. The authors 1) present benefits and cautions for historical fiction use in elementary classrooms, 2) introduce authentication projects as a means to mitigate risks and enhance…

  2. Textbook vs. Historical Fiction: Impact on Social Studies Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of adding historical fiction novels as a supplement to the textbook in an eighth grade social studies course. This qualitative study focused on student interest and feedback as their social studies class was altered through the addition of historical fiction novels. The research questions were…

  3. Auto-fictional narratives about death in the family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    What are the interrelations of fiction-based and non-fiction based research? In this presentation I explore these interrelations through researching, retracing, and writing about my father’s suicide. In tandem, I consider the methodological issues of using narratives – that they enable a reader t...

  4. Science Fiction and Introductory Sociology: The "Handmaid" in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laz, Cheryl

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the uses of science fiction to teach sociology and develop critical and creative thinking. Maintains that in the last 20 years science fiction has become concerned increasingly with social themes. Concludes with a detailed description of the use of "The Handmaid's Tale" in an introductory sociology course. (MJP)

  5. Serial Monogamy: Extended Fictions and the Television Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Changes in television technology have fostered changes in how we view fiction on television. This article explores some of these changes in the context of the teenage series, "Felicity" (WBTV, 1998-2002). It draws comparisons with the experience of reading series fiction in print, referring to the children's print series, "The Beverly Gray College…

  6. Fiction as an Introduction to Computer Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Judy; Mattei, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    The undergraduate computer science curriculum is generally focused on skills and tools; most students are not exposed to much research in the field, and do not learn how to navigate the research literature. We describe how fiction reviews (and specifically science fiction) are used as a gateway to research reviews. Students learn a little about…

  7. Science Fiction Comes into the Classroom: "Maelstrom II."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Diaz, M. J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Proposes the critical analysis of science fiction as a motivational enhancement for students to be strategically engaged in the learning of scientific concepts. Exemplifies this strategy with the analysis of the data presented in the science fiction short story, "Maelstrom II" written by Arthur C. Clarke, utilizing mathematical concepts…

  8. Reflections on Science Fiction in Light of Today's Global Concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiex, Patrick K.

    Science fiction is a literary genre that can be used in humanities courses to discuss ideas, attitudes, ethics, morality, and the effects of science and technology on the world's population. One of the best examples of a "classic" science fiction novel which can provoke class discussion is Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World,"…

  9. The Double Helix: Why Science Needs Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreadis, Athena

    2003-01-01

    Discusses why science needs science fiction, commenting on the author's book about science that draws heavily on the "Star Trek" series. The best science, in spite of popular thinking, comes from leaps of intuition, and science fiction provides a creative spark that encourages participation in science. (SLD)

  10. Teaching Evolution with the Aid of Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Students obtain much misinformation from TV and movies. Teachers can use the analysis of science fiction to correct misconceptions about biology and spur students' interests in the subject. Suggestions for discussions and assignments based on literary-quality science fiction works are included.

  11. Critique and Fiction: Doing Science Right in Rural Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howley, Craig

    2009-01-01

    This essay explains the relevance of fiction to the practice of rural education research, in so doing engaging questions about the nature and purposes of research and, therefore, of science itself. Although many may assume science and fiction (in this account, novels) harbor contrary purposes and devices, this essay argues that, to the contrary,…

  12. Bridget Jones Meets Mr. Darcy: Challenges of Contemporary Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, Justine

    2007-01-01

    This exploratory study seeks to investigate the collection practices of English Literature librarians with regard to contemporary fiction, including popular genres such as detective fiction and "chick lit". Results of an online survey suggest literature librarians are increasingly receptive to the acquisition of popular genres and identify the…

  13. A mutually beneficial collaboration between the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Junior Members and Clinical and Translational Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomazic, Peter Valentin; Graessel, Anke; Silva, Diana; Eguiluz-Gracia, Ibon; Guibas, George V; Grattan, Clive; Bousquet, Jean; Tsilochristou, Olympia

    2016-01-01

    The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) Junior Members (JM) comprise the largest EAACI section with around 4000 clinicians and scientists under 35 years of age working in the field of allergy and clinical immunology. The Junior Member collaboration with Clinical and Translational Allergy Journal is a mutually beneficial relationship providing Junior Members of EAACI with excellent opportunities to publish their work in the Journal, enhance their visibility in their respective field, and get involved with Journal-related activities and processes. In the future, this collaboration will grow, not only by the consolidation of these activities, but also by the implementation of new initiatives, such as a platform for discussing and/or publishing Junior Members' dissertations in the Journal. From the CTA perspective, the collaboration presents an opportunity to promote a new generation of allergists with experience of conducting and presenting research, with improved skills in critical review.

  14. From the wizard to the doubter: prototypes of scientists and engineers in fiction and non-fiction media aimed at Dutch children and teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gorp, Baldwin; Rommes, Els; Emons, Pascale

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to gain insight into the prototypical scientists as they appear in fiction and non-fiction media consumed by children and teenagers in The Netherlands. A qualitative-interpretive content analysis is used to identify seven prototypes and the associated characteristics in a systematic way. The results show that the element of risk is given more attention in fiction than in non-fiction. Also, eccentric scientists appear more often in fiction. In non-fiction, the dimension useful/useless is more important. Furthermore, fictional scientists are loners, although in practice scientists more often work in a team. In both fiction and non-fiction, the final product of the scientific process gets more attention than the process itself. The prototype of the doubter is introduced as an alternative to the dominant representations because it represents scientists and engineers in a more nuanced way.

  15. Miku’s mask: Fictional encounters in children’s costume play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgesen, Espen

    2015-01-01

    Children’s engagement with Japanese toys and fictional characters has taken on new significance in the age of YouTube. Drawing on ethnographic research on technology-mediated play among 8- and 9-year-olds in Norway, this article shows how boundaries between “real” humans and “fake” non-humans are blurred and undermined when children take on the perspective of a fictional pop star known as Miku. I argue that YouTube provides a platform for children’s playful experimentation with posthuman subjectivities, where they orient themselves toward the future not in terms of becoming adult but in terms of multiple becomings. PMID:26635445

  16. Online video-based resistance training improves the physical capacity of junior basketball athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klusemann, Markus J; Pyne, David B; Fay, Tristan S; Drinkwater, Eric J

    2012-10-01

    Junior basketball athletes require a well-designed resistance training program to improve their physical development. Lack of expert supervision and resistance training in junior development pathways may be overcome by implementing an online video-based program. The aim of this study was to compare the magnitude of improvement (change) in physical performance and strength and functional movement patterns of junior basketball athletes using either a fully supervised or an online video-based resistance training program. Thirty-eight junior basketball athletes (males, n = 17; age, 14 ± 1 year; height, 1.79 ± 0.10 m; mass, 67 ± 12 kg; females, n = 21; age, 15 ± 1 year; height, 1.70 ± 0.07 m; mass, 62 ± 8 kg) were randomly assigned into a supervised resistance training group (SG, n = 13), video training group (VG, n = 13) or control group (CG, n = 12) and participated in a 6-week controlled experimental trial. Pre- and posttesting included measures of physical performance (20-m sprint, step-in vertical jump, agility, sit and reach, line drill, and Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1), strength (15 s push-up and pull-up), and functional movement screening (FMS). Both SG and VG achieved 3-5% ± 2-4% (mean ± 90% confidence limits) greater improvements in several physical performance measures (vertical jump height, 20-m sprint time, and Yo-Yo endurance performance) and a 28 ± 21% greater improvement in push-up strength compared with the CG. The SG attained substantially larger gains in FMS scores over both the VG (12 ± 10%) and CG (13 ± 8%). Video-based training appears to be a viable option to improve physical performance and strength in junior basketball athletes. Qualified supervision is recommended to improve functional movement patterns in junior athletes.

  17. 42 CFR 21.25 - Eligibility; junior assistant grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility; junior assistant grade. 21.25 Section... COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Appointment § 21.25 Eligibility; junior assistant grade. (a) Requirements; all candidates... for appointment in the grade of junior assistant: (1) Shall be a citizen of the United States; (2...

  18. Horror from the Soul--Gothic Style in Allan Poe's Horror Fictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chunyan

    2015-01-01

    Edgar Allan Poe made tremendous contribution to horror fiction. Poe's inheritance of gothic fiction and American literature tradition combined with his living experience forms the background of his horror fictions. He inherited the tradition of the gothic fictions and made innovations on it, so as to penetrate to subconsciousness. Poe's horror…

  19. Using anthropometric and performance characteristics to predict selection in junior UK Rugby League players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Kevin; Cobley, Steve; O'Hara, John; Brightmore, Amy; Cooke, Carlton; Chapman, Chris

    2011-05-01

    Research examining the factors influencing selection within talented junior Rugby League players is limited. The aims of this study were firstly to determine whether differences existed for anthropometric and performance characteristics between regional and national selection in high performance UK junior Rugby League players, and secondly to identify variables that discriminated between these selection levels. Regional representative (n=1172) selected junior players (aged 13-16 years) undertook an anthropometric and fitness testing battery with players split according to selection level (i.e., national, regional). MANCOVA analyses, with age and maturation controlled, identified national players as having lower sum of 4 skinfolds scores compared to regional players, and also performed significantly better on all physical tests. Stepwise discriminant analysis identified that estimated maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max), chronological age, body mass, 20 m sprint, height, sum of 4 skinfolds and sitting height discriminated between selection levels, accounting for 28.7% of the variance. This discriminant analysis corresponded to an overall predictive accuracy of 63.3% for all players. These results indicate that performance characteristics differed between selection levels in junior Rugby League players. However, the small magnitude of difference between selection levels suggests that physical qualities only partially explain higher representative selection. The monitoring and evaluation of such variables, alongside game related performance characteristics, provides greater knowledge and understanding about the processes and consequences of selection, training and performance in youth sport. Copyright © 2011 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. HORACE ON AUGUSTUS: FACT OR FICTION?

    OpenAIRE

    S. Thom

    2012-01-01

    Quot homines tot sententiae seems a good summary of the variety of critical readings of lyric poetry in general and of Horace’s position on Augustus in particular. This raises the interesting question of the position of factual information in poetry: does lyric as genre imply a choice for fiction as opposed to fact or can some references to contemporary personalities or incidents be taken as realistic? In this case specifically: can what Horace says about Augustus be taken as a realistic asse...

  1. Typical Women Figures in Hemingway's Fictional World

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨春会; 范璐

    2008-01-01

    Ernest Hemingway is widely regarded as a giant figure in American literature, but meantime he is often criticized for his prejudice against women. However, whether Ernest Hemingway is a misogynist writer or not, I believe is largely depended on readers' comprehension of his works. This paper launched an interesting study on typical women characters in Hemingway's fictional world. The study also reveals that fact that far from being a misogynist writer, Hemingway shows great concern to women as a group. Not only did he own strong insight on women but also expressed his sympathy towards women.

  2. Using Science Fiction Movies in Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dark, Marta L.

    2005-10-01

    This paper discusses the use of science fiction movies in introductory physics courses at Spelman College. There are several reasons to use these movies in the classroom environment. Movies are a visual learning aid. Introductory physics students show a strong interest in participating in movie-related activities compared to standard group problem-solving sessions. Finally, these activities encourage creative thinking and can be used to develop writing skills. The students involved with these movie-based activities have included biology and pre-medical majors taking general physics. In the introductory level courses, physics, chemistry, and engineering majors worked on movie-based activities.

  3. Computer Fiction: ``A Logic Named Joe''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, David; Swedin, Eric

    The bulk of Science Fiction (SF) has not predicted the most influential computer technologies of the late 20th century. This paper begins with an exception entitled “A Logic Named Joe” and its accurate description of the contemporary environment of PCs and the World Wide Web. It then proposes the possible historical and cultural value of SF in techno-scientific development - more specifically computer development - in both the U.S. and Finland, and argues that social science approaches to understanding technoscience should take SF into account when describing those communities of practice.

  4. Crypto heater:a design fiction

    OpenAIRE

    Lindley, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    This proposal is to exhibit the work named Crypto Heater which is part of a design fiction [c.f 1,5,8:30] series intended to explore a near future world in which cryptographic currencies such as Bitcoin [6] have become commonplace. This work opens up space for discussion about the activities of the distributed peer-to-peer network of so-called "miners" that ensure the security of the Bitcoin network and regulate the supply of new currency in the Bitcoin economy. The physical part of the work ...

  5. A Pedagogical Approach to Detective Fiction

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes Torres, Agustín

    2011-01-01

    One of the main concerns when teaching a foreign language is how to encourage students to read and become interested in its literature. This article presents detective fiction as a pedagogical tool that provides the key elements to make it appealing for young readers. In this way, the mystery, the action and the suspense in the story; the figure of the detective; or the fact that the end of the story is always morally acceptable turn this literary genre in a magnificent reading to practise th...

  6. Abyssal fiction: common shares, colonial cleavages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Montaury

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to develop a reflection on the interaction between the legacies of colonialism and traditional symbolic and cultural practices in African Portuguese-speaking spaces. From a preliminary analysis of fictional texts of wide circulation in Brazil, aims to examine the cleavages, or “abyssal lines” that constitute experiences printed in the daily life of the former Portuguese colony of Cape Verde, Mozambique and Angola.---DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.21881/abriluff.2016n17a378

  7. Truman capote: life as fiction/fiction as life Truman capote: life as fiction/fiction as life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas LaBorie Burns

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Truman Capote was born in New Orleans in 1924. The son of divorced parents, he was sent out from one set of relatives to another in the rural south, an unstable childhood that would be the raw material for much of his work. His education was at northern schools, so it seems that poverty was not one of his vicissitudes, but, in any case, his formal education ended when he was only seventeen. In one of his prefaces he says that he made up stories throughout childhood and decided from a very early age to become a professional writer. Devoting most of his time to his vocation, he claims to have become an accomplished stylist by the time he left school.' This precocious dedication may explain the polish of his earliest published work and the professionalism he would maintain throughout his literary career, however erratic his lifestyle. Truman Capote was born in New Orleans in 1924. The son of divorced parents, he was sent out from one set of relatives to another in the rural south, an unstable childhood that would be the raw material for much of his work. His education was at northern schools, so it seems that poverty was not one of his vicissitudes, but, in any case, his formal education ended when he was only seventeen. In one of his prefaces he says that he made up stories throughout childhood and decided from a very early age to become a professional writer. Devoting most of his time to his vocation, he claims to have become an accomplished stylist by the time he left school.' This precocious dedication may explain the polish of his earliest published work and the professionalism he would maintain throughout his literary career, however erratic his lifestyle.

  8. Accounting Boot Camp for College Juniors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myring, Mark; Wrege, William; Van Alst, Lucinda

    2008-01-01

    We describe a day-long introduction to new accounting majors, which we call a boot camp. Boot camp it is an effort to make juniors more aware of their identity, career purposes and learning resources that are now parts of their world, much of which is not covered explicitly in the accounting curriculum. This paper provides an overview of the…

  9. 7 CFR 765.206 - Junior liens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Junior liens. 765.206 Section 765.206 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... determinations for future requests for assistance and may adversely impact such requests. (b) Conditions...

  10. Pygmalion Effect on Junior English Teaching

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yurong Wang; Li Lin

    2014-01-01

    .... This thesis mainly focuses on the application of Pygmalion effect in English teaching, especially junior English teaching in China. If we can make good use of the Pygmalion Effect to conduct teaching and have positive expectations to students, it will improve teaching greatly.

  11. Organizing and Managing the Junior High Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmer, Edmund T.; And Others

    This manual provides guidelines and activities for organizing and managing junior high school classes. The first five chapters are devoted to the topic of getting ready for the beginning of the school year; the last four chapters suggest guidelines and activities that are helpful in maintaining a management system. Chapter 1 deals with organizing…

  12. A Senior Partner in the Junior College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Fe Community Coll., Gainesville, FL.

    The development and current status of the student personnel program at Sante Fe Junior College is described. Statements of purpose and philosophy are amplified through an outline of the needs and characteristics of Santa Fe students and a description of the elements of the program as they relate to specific needs and characteristics. The elements…

  13. Mathematics for Junior High School. Supplementary Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. D.; And Others

    This is a supplementary SMSG mathematics text for junior high school students. Key ideas emphasized are structure of arithmetic from an algebraic viewpoint, the real number system as a progressing development, and metric and non-metric relations in geometry. Chapter topics include sets, projective geometry, open and closed paths, finite…

  14. DEVELOPING STUDENTS' READING ABILITIES IN JUNIOR SCHOOL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan Bixi

    2001-01-01

    In This Article, the writer focus on an over- all analysis of the present situation of the students' reading activities in junior middle school in the countryside and put forward some suggestions on improving the teaching arts to enhance the students' fast reading abilities . It provided some theoretical basis on the further improcement of students' reading abilities in the school

  15. Do junior doctors take sick leave?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkin, M R; Higton, A; Witcomb, M

    2003-09-01

    Nosocomial infections place a heavy burden on overstretched health services. An audit of junior doctors' sick leave behaviour was undertaken in 1993 and again in 2001. The object was to ascertain the level of common infectious illness and to investigate whether junior doctors were remaining at work inappropriately. The doctors were asked if any factors had influenced their decision to take sick leave or not. Between the two audits several initiatives have been introduced to improve the working conditions of junior doctors, including the New Deal to reduce hours of work. Eighty one junior doctors in a large teaching hospital participated in 1993 and 110 in 2001. The number reporting an infectious illness in the previous six months was similar (61.7% in 1993, 68.2% in 2001). There had been a significant increase in the percentage of infectious illness episodes for which the doctors took sick leave (15.1% in 1993, 36.8% in 2001, p work (72% in 1993, 68% in 2001). Consultant pressure was cited by 26% (1993) and 20% (2001). Use of the staff occupational health unit was minimal, with none of the ill doctors contacting the department in 1993 and only three in 2001. Overall, despite the reduction in the number of infectious doctors not taking sick leave, the majority remained at work. Fundamental changes are needed if potentially infected doctors are not to present a risk of iatrogenic infection.

  16. Foreign Languages at Tarrant County Junior College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jane

    Even during the 1970's when diminished national interest in foreign language study was reflected in declining enrollments at most colleges, Tarrant County Junior College (TCJC) was able to maintain a vigorous language program by emphasizing oral communication and developing a flexible curriculum. Since 1975, the college has offered its preparatory…

  17. Curriculum Reviews: Middle/Junior High Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Richard

    1982-01-01

    Reviews "Pathways in Science" (Globe Book Company), designed as a complete middle/junior high school science program. Strengths (including sixth-grade readability) and weaknesses (indicating that limited process skill development may not challenge more capable students). Limited process skill development and the possibility for the program…

  18. Theme: Junior High and Middle School Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillison, John; And Others

    1994-01-01

    On the topic of agricultural education programs in middle/junior high schools, nine articles address developing self-concept, selecting materials, the benefits of agriscience contests, adopting new curricula, the role of Future Farmers of America in the development of adolescents, teaming science and agriculture, and the rationale for middle…

  19. Santa Fe Junior College, Gainesville, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudill, Rowlett and Scott, Architects, Houston, TX.

    The design of Santa Fe Junior College is examined, beginning with the development of an educational philosophy. Subsequent design decisions are based largely upon this philosophy which emphasizes the development of the individual student and the fulfillment of his needs. Further, the need for flexibility is recognized and is an important aspect of…

  20. Redskin Images. Roy Junior High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, William M.

    The school and self-improvement programs instituted at Roy Junior High School include the development of a self-performance evaluative instrument, the incorporation of a daily 15-minute reading session, the encouragement of dance and movement education through use of visiting professionals, and implementation of a self-esteem improvement mechanism…

  1. Public Relations for Community/Junior Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodress, Fred A.

    This monograph is a practical manual on public relations (PR) for community and junior colleges, containing numerous suggestions and recommendations for establishing and operating an effective public relations effort while avoiding PR pitfalls. An overview of the history of public relations in academe, the rationale underlying today's PR programs…

  2. Infantile colic, facts and fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kheir Abdelmoneim E M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Infantile colic is one of the major challenges of parenthood. It is one of the common reasons parents seek medical advice during their child’s first 3 months of life. It is defined as paroxysms of crying lasting more than 3 hours a day, occurring more than 3 days in any week for 3 weeks in a healthy baby aged 2 weeks to 4 months. Colic is a poorly understood phenomenon affecting up to 30% of babies, underlying organic causes of excessive crying account for less than 5%. Laboratory tests and radiological examinations are unnecessary if the infant is gaining weight normally and has a normal physical examination. Treatment is limited and drug treatment has no role in management. Probiotics are now emerging as promising agents in the treatment of infantile colic. Alternative medicine (Herbal tea, fennel, glucose and massage therapy have not proved to be consistently helpful and some might even be dangerous. In conclusion infantile colic is a common cause of maternal distress and family disturbance, the cornerstone of management remains reassurance of parents regarding the benign and self-limiting nature of the illness. There is a critical need for more evidence based treatment protocols.

  3. Why are junior doctors reluctant to consult attending physicians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, Otto H

    2010-03-01

    A physician performs two tasks: making diagnoses and determining treatments. To reduce medical error, junior doctors are supposed to consult their supervisors when they face uncommon circumstances. However, recent research shows that junior doctors are reluctant to do so. This paper presents a model that explains (i) which junior doctors shy away from consulting; (ii) when junior doctors are reluctant; (iii) the importance of protocols in the medical sector; and (iv) when consulting is a sign of strength or a sign of weakness. Furthermore, I show that encouraging junior doctors to consult by investigating mishaps leads to another distortion: they will give too much weight to own assessments.

  4. Science Fiction and the Big Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, M.

    Advocates of space science promote investment in science education and the development of new technologies necessary for space travel. Success in these areas requires an increase of interest and support among the general public. What role can entertainment media play in inspiring the public ­ especially young people ­ to support the development of space science? Such inspiration is badly needed. Science education and funding in the United States are in a state of crisis. This bleak situation exists during a boom in the popularity of science-oriented television shows and science fiction movies. This paper draws on interviews with professionals in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, as well as students interested in those fields. The interviewees were asked about their lifelong media-viewing habits. Analysis of these interviews, along with examples from popular culture, suggests that science fiction can be a valuable tool for space advocates. Specifically, the aspects of character, story, and special effects can provide viewers with inspiration and a sense of wonder regarding space science and the prospect of long-term human space exploration.

  5. "Angels & Demons" - Distinguishing truth from fiction

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Dan Brown's best-selling novel "Angels & Demons" was published in French on 2 March. A web page on CERN's public site is dedicated to separating truth from fiction in this novel. After the extraordinary success of Dan Brown's "Da Vinci Code", one of his earlier novels "Angels & Demons", published in 2000, has now become a best seller and has generated a flood of questions about CERN. This detective story is about a secret society, the Illuminati, who wish to destroy the Vatican with an antimatter bomb stolen from - wait for it - CERN! Inevitably, CERN has been bombarded with calls about the technologies described in the novel that are supposed to be under development in the Laboratory. The Press Office has always explained that, even if the novel appears to be very informative, it is in fact a mixture of fact and fiction. For instance, according to the novel CERN is supposed to own a plane that can cover the distance between Massachusetts in the United States and Switzerland in just over an hour! ...

  6. [The democratic side of science-fiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecellier, Charles-Henri

    2011-04-01

    Suspicion towards technological advances has progressively grown during the xx(th) century. However, in the XXI(st) century, reading the NBIC (nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology and cognitive science) report of the National Science Foundation, we can note that science has caught up with science fiction. These changes in public mentality on one side and in scientific capacities on the other argue for an evolution of the debate on sciences. The recent example of the national debate on nanotechnology in France has clearly shown that the public is no longer waiting for additional sources of scientific knowledge but rather waiting for the recognition of its authority to participate in the definition of the national R&D priority and associated scientific strategies. This is all the more legitimate that these strategies will have profound impact on the future of our societies and therefore cannot be decided only by scientists. Hence, it is crucial to identify innovative tools promoting debate on sciences and their technological spin-off. Here, we contend that science fiction has major assets that could face this challenge and facilitate the dialogue between sciences and society.

  7. MEANS OF ORIENTEERING IN EDUCATION OF JUNIOR SCHOOLCHILDREN WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Mayorkina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of the adapted methods of basic training in orienteering (BTIO on the correction of physical fitness and mental development of junior schoolchildren with intellectual disability (ID.Methods. The following methods were used: theoretical analysis of literature, generalization, «forming» experiment, mathematical statistics, testing of physical qualities, psychological testing and pedagogical observation.Results and scientific novelty. The conditions of basic training in orienteering for junior schoolchildren with intellectual disability are determined wherein the correction of physical fitness and mental functions through the means of orienteering will be the most effective. Methods of basic training were substantiated and adapted for the capabilities of junior schoolchildren with ID. The author has defined the effect of orienteering exercises on the development of speed-andstrength qualities, overall endurance, movement speed, coordination; fine motor skills; stability, volume and switching of attention, volume of picturesque and verbal memory, representational thought and verbal-logical thinking; volitional qualities.The study has revealed wholesome influence of orienteering on correction of physical fitness and mental functions of schoolchildren of 9–10 years with intellectual disability.Practical significance. The results could be used for education of junior schoolchildren with ID during extra classes in special (correctional schools of Type-7 and during remedial classes (remedial and developing teaching in schools of general education. The results could also be applied for training of teachers of additional education. The adapted methods of BTIO for junior schoolchildren with ID could be used for normally developing children of younger age. Practical recommendations on the organization and conditions of orienteering exercises for junior schoolchildren with ID, games and intellectual

  8. Journeys beyond pages: The use of fiction in tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipovšek Emilija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims at looking into the examples of most popular literary induced tours on the European continent in order to establish interconnectivity between works of fiction as created cultural forms and their impact on tourism industry and consumer society. Accordingly, not only does the human urge to travel refer to the phenomenon of escapism and escapism into fictional, but it is also intrinsically linked to the fact of recreating oneself, i.e. finding one's own destiny/destination. Therefore, the focus is on the acknowledgement that fictional is employed in the non-fictional setting so as to produce man-made tourist attractions. Thus, the illusion of the fictional is perpetuated into the actual places used as attractions for avid readers and cinephiles. For instance, 221b Baker Street in London known as the Sherlock Holmes's home is recreated in reality and made into a museum for those intrigued by the mystery of Conan Doyle's fiction. The tourist is thus perceived both as a consumer and homo ludens in the postmodern contemporary context. The same way as a reader immerses into the text, the tourist embarks on a journey. Thus, various literary tours represent a twofold experience of the fictional world.

  9. Reading fiction during sick leave, a multidimensional occupation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mårtensson, Lena; Andersson, Christina

    2015-01-01

    In bibliotherapy, the therapeutic gains of reading fiction are ascribed to the literature. Viewing reading fiction as an occupation may give other explanations of its therapeutic function. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of reading fiction among women during a period of sick leave. A qualitative approach was applied. Eight women who had been reading fiction during sick leave were interviewed. An overarching theme: Supporting one's active self, comprised five categories of experiences: a prospect of ordinary life, a place of refuge, a life together with others, a source of power, and as supporting an active life. Based on the categories, reading fiction is seen to comprise intentional, functional, mental, relational, and personal dimensions. A tentative model of supporting one's active self is proposed, which may be helpful in clarifying the mechanisms of the process of change. The health-related dimensions of reading fiction suggest that reading fiction should be regarded as a significant occupation comparable with other, more highlighted ones. Understood in this way, it is argued that the results add to the knowledge base in occupational therapy focusing on how meaningful occupations connect to occupational life trajectories.

  10. Amateur mythographies: Fan fiction and the myth of myth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ika Willis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws on classical scholarship on myth in order to critically examine three ways in which scholars and fans have articulated a relationship between fan fiction and myth. These are (1 the notion of fan fiction as a form of folk culture, reclaiming popular story from corporate ownership; (2 the notion of myth as counterhegemonic, often feminist, discourse; (3 the notion of myth as a commons of story and a universal story world. I argue that the first notion depends on an implicit primitivizing of fan fiction and myth, which draws ultimately on the work of Gottfried von Herder in the 18th century and limits our ability to produce historically and politically nuanced understandings of fan fiction. The second notion, which is visible in the work of Henry Jenkins and Constance Penley, is more helpful because of its attention to the politics of narration. However, it is the third model of myth, as a universal story world, where we find the richest crossover between fan fiction's creative power and contemporary classical scholarship on myth, especially in relation to Sarah Iles Johnston's analysis of hyperserial narrative. I demonstrate this through some close readings of fan fiction from the Greek and Roman Mythology fandom on Archive of Our Own. I conclude the paper by extending Johnston's arguments to show that fan-fictional hyperseriality, specifically, can be seen as mythic because it intervenes not only in the narrative worlds of its source materials but also in the social world of its telling.

  11. Biological maturity influences running performance in junior Australian football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastin, Paul B; Bennett, Gary; Cook, Jill

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of biological maturity on measures of running fitness and running performance in both training and competition in junior Australian football. Cross sectional observational. Fifty-two male junior players from five age groups (U11-U19) participated. Biological maturity was self-assessed based on Tanner's description of five pubertal stages (P1-P5) as well as objectively estimated from anthropometric measures and expressed as years to and from peak height velocity (Y-PHV). Running speed and aerobic fitness were measured using a 20m sprint and 20m multi-stage shuttle run respectively. Running movements during training and competition were analysed (n=197) using global positioning system technology, including total distance, peak speed, high-intensity running (HIR>14.4km/h) distance and number of sprints (>23km/h). Age groups included participants from a range of pubertal stages (U11: P1-2; U13: P2-4; U15: P2-5; U17: P4-5; U19: P5). Y-PHV was significantly correlated with 20m shuttle run (r=0.647), 20m sprint time (r=-0.773) and all distance and high intensity running variables (r=0.417-0.831). Incremental improvements across pubertal stages for speed, aerobic fitness and most GPS derived running variables were observed. Within age group comparisons between less and more mature players found significant differences for standing and sitting height, peak speed in training, and total distance, HIR and peak speed in matches. Functional running fitness and running performance in both training and competition environments improved with increasing biological maturity. More mature players in an age group, either chronologically, biologically or a combination of both, are at a performance advantage to those less mature. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Apps: a new medium for non-fiction innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Allen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Apps are now a dominant content medium: in the US people spend more time on apps than they do watching TV. Non-fiction content is being avidly consumed on mobile devices, but in a completely different way to the book model. This article explores three strands of potential that the app medium holds for non-fiction content, putting forward the case that apps have the power to further weave non-fiction into the fabric of society and life.

  13. Trashing the millenium: Subjectivity and technology in cyberpunk science fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Sey

    1992-05-01

    Full Text Available 'Cyberpunk’ science fiction is a self-proclaimed movement within the genre which began in the 1980s. As the name suggests, it is an extrapolative form of science fiction which combines an almost obsessional interest in machines (particularly information machines with an anarchic, amoral, streetwise sensibility This paper sketches the development of the movement and seeks to make qualified claims for the radical. potential of its fiction. Of crucial importance are the ways in which human subjectivity (viewed in psychoanalytic terms interacts with 'technological subjectivity' in cyberpunk, particularly with regard to implications of these interactions for oedipalization.

  14. Science, Science-Fiction and Things in Between

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, Gregory

    2000-04-01

    Science Fiction and Mysteries offer the opportunity to introduce the general reading audience to physicists with engaging personalities--ones who don't want to take over the world, don't leave the house with two different socks on, and aren't social misfits. The authors have written mystery and science fiction novels that foreground science in authentic fashion, including how scientists work and think. This method of reaching the public is overlooked in most earnest discussions of popularizing science, ignoring the fact that most laymen get their views of science through fictional forms--including those from journalists.

  15. Resistance is Fertile: Design Fictions in Dystopian Worlds

    OpenAIRE

    Dalton, Nick; Moreau, Rebecca; Adams, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Current work on design fiction has discussed their use for personal reflection, sharing with collaborators, forming a public ‘vision’ but with small numbers of participating readers. We wanted to explore a new way of using design fictions as a tool for discussion with a large global audiences via social authoring web sites. To achieve this, we wrote a highly read, science-fiction novel called I'm a Cyborg's Pet (The Thinking Girl's Guide to Surviving a Robot Apocalypse), on an online, social,...

  16. Nutraceuticals for older people: facts, fictions and gaps in knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Larrosa, Mar; García-Conesa, María Teresa; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2013-08-01

    In the last decades nutraceuticals have entered the health market as an easy and attractive means of preventing diseases. These products are of interest for an increasingly health-concerned society and may be especially relevant for preventing or delaying a number of age-related diseases, i.e. arthritis, cancer, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, cataracts, brain disorders, etc. Nutraceuticals are marketed in a variety of forms, composition and potential applications which have made their definition ambiguous and their use uncontrolled and poorly funded. Although epidemiological, animal and in vitro studies have given evidence of the potential benefits of some of these nutraceuticals or of their components, definitive proof of their effects in appropriate human clinical trials is still lacking in most cases, more critically among people above 65 years of age. We cover the well-established nutraceuticals (polyvitamins, omega-3 fatty acids, etc.) and will focus on many other 'novel' commercial nutraceuticals where the scientific evidence is more limited (food extracts, polyphenols, carotenoids, etc.). Solid scientific evidence has been reported only for a few nutraceuticals, which have some health claims approved by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). Further well-designed trials are needed to improve the current knowledge on the health benefits of nutraceuticals in the elderly. Overall, there are some facts, a lot of fiction and many gaps in the knowledge of nutraceutical benefits.

  17. Modelos de gestión de conflictos en serie de ficción televisiva (Conflict management models in television fiction series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Navarro-Abal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Television fiction series sometimes generate an unreal vision of life, especially among young people, becoming a mirror in which they can see themselves reflected. The series become models of values, attitudes, skills and behaviours that tend to be imitated by some viewers. The aim of this study was to analyze the conflict management behavioural styles presented by the main characters of television fiction series. Thus, we evaluated the association between these styles and the age and sex of the main characters, as well as the nationality and genre of the fiction series. 16 fiction series were assessed by selecting two characters of both sexes from each series. We adapted the Rahim Organizational Conflict Inventory-II for observing and recording the data. The results show that there is no direct association between the conflict management behavioural styles presented in the drama series and the sex of the main characters. However, associations were found between these styles and the age of the characters and the genre of the fiction series.

  18. YA Afro-American Fiction: An Update for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corson, Carolyn M.

    1987-01-01

    Includes annotated bibliographies of young adult books written in the 1980s by Black authors. Selections intended to interest Black teenagers represent both historical and contemporary realistic fiction. (NKA)

  19. Management development in education: fact or fiction – some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management development in education: fact or fiction – some preliminary findings. ... context can be changed by means of training programmes is a debatable issue. ... This research project does not claim that management dimensions of ...

  20. The Farfaring Imagination: Recent Fantasy and Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelms, Beth; Nelms, Ben

    1985-01-01

    Reviews books of fantasy and science fiction for young adults. Points out that fantasy exercises the imagination, helps readers clarify genuine problems, and allows for escape from everyday reality at the same time that it generates hope. (EL)

  1. Aliens among us: a representation of children in science fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bick, I J

    1989-01-01

    As a literary genre, science fiction has been largely ignored by psychoanalysis. Science fiction lends itself well to analytic interpretations since its structure embraces an attitude of "cognitive estrangement" (a term that defines the genre). Science fiction allows for the exploration of new and different permutations of seemingly ageless conflicts and concerns. One of the conflicts science fiction seems to address revolves about our fears regarding our children. These children become the "aliens" among us, as they seek to usurp parental power and authority. This issue is addressed through a study of two of Ray Bradbury's short stories. By manipulating the reader's experience of the "uncanny," Bradbury succeeds in tapping what appear to be prevalent and potent fears regarding children and, reflexively, the adults who produce them. Mechanisms involved in this play on "alienness" include projective identification of destructive aspects of the self, a resurgence of archaic superego forerunners constituted around primal scene material, and a reawakening of oedipal struggles.

  2. Passionate Virtue: Conceptions of Medical Professionalism in Popular Romance Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Medical romance fiction is a subgenre of popular romance fiction that features medical professionals in their work environment. This essay explores the way professionalism is portrayed in popular medical romance fiction written during the early twenty-first century, a period of significant disruption in both the public image and self-understanding of organized medicine. I analyze a selection of contemporary medical romance novels, published between 2008 and 2012, demonstrating that medical romance fiction is a form of public intervention in apparently insular debates over medical professionalism. I conclude that they promote "nostalgic professionalism," a vision of physicians as a select group of highly educated, self-regulated experts who provide, with a caring and altruistic attitude, a vitally important service to society, while at the same time generating implicit critiques of it.

  3. Does art imitate death? Depictions of suicide in fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pridmore, Saxby; Walter, Garry

    2013-02-01

    To determine whether fiction (narrative products) deals with the issue of suicide and, if so, what it tells us about suicide "drivers". Accounts of suicide in narrative products were sought through web-based lists, book club members, other active readers and a prize-winning film writer and producer. Seventy-one depictions of fictional suicidal events were identified. In 12 suicides, the author appeared to indicate that the death was directly or indirectly due to mental disorder. In 15 suicides, the motivation could not be determined by the reader, and in 44 cases the motivation was social/situational factors. Suicidal events are depicted in fiction, and the features are broadly similar to the features of suicide in the real world. Should it be determined that cultural influences, including fiction, are important in suicide, any preventive activities aimed at modifying cultural influences will need to consider all forms of narrative product.

  4. YA Afro-American Fiction: An Update for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corson, Carolyn M.

    1987-01-01

    Includes annotated bibliographies of young adult books written in the 1980s by Black authors. Selections intended to interest Black teenagers represent both historical and contemporary realistic fiction. (NKA)

  5. Literature as Window: Developing Interracial Understanding through Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriam, Allen H.

    1988-01-01

    Using Chinua Achebe's "Things Fall Apart" as a case study, demonstrates the evocative power of fiction to promote interracial understanding. Creative art, by appealing to the imagination, can evoke feelings and insights that make human relationships vivid and personal. (BJV)

  6. Science fiction comes into the classroom: Maelstrom II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Diaz, M. J.; Pizarro, A.; Bacas, P.; Garcia, J. P.; Perera, F.

    1992-01-01

    Science fiction can be used in the classroom as a helpful motivating strategy for teaching physics and chemistry. This article provides one example: Maelstrom II, written by Arthur C Clarke, is analysed from the viewpoint of mechanics

  7. Manipulating Our Futures: The Role of Science Fiction in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsky, Walt

    1979-01-01

    A rationale is presented for using science fiction in the English classroom, emphasizing that students like the genre and that it teaches them to analyze and interpret social and technological change. (SJL)

  8. Slash fiction and human mating psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Catherine; Symons, Don

    2004-02-01

    The stark contrasts between romance novels and pornography, both multibillion dollar global industries, underscore how different male and female erotic fantasies actually are. These differences reflect the different selection pressures males and females faced over human evolutionary history and highlight the utility of using unobtrusive measures to study aspects of human nature. Salmon & Symons (2001) examined slash (the depiction of a romantic or sexual relationship between typically heterosexual male television protagonists, such as Kirk and Spock from Star Trek) as an erotic genre, placing it in the context of romance and female sexual psychology. The topic is revisited here with attention also being paid to slash between two female television characters and the appeal to people of fiction in general.

  9. The architecture and fiction in level design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Ole Verner

    2006-01-01

     The architect's professional field has expanded with the new virtual medias There is a new set of rules different from the scenography of the film and different from the architecture of amusement parks. The new rules are fiction, interaction, complexity, and artificial intelligence...... the architect and designer approach the world of level design? What tools are necessary for creating a game flow in first-person shooter's level design? Is it possible to look at experienced architecture for the origin of Level design? And is it possible to establish a number of rules for creating a good or bad...... architecture in level design? We will look at two different games FarCry and Half-Life 2.   Keywords: World design, experience architecture, level design, game flow and gameplay....

  10. Astronomy. Science or culture? Fact and fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte Avilés, J. A.

    Astronomy is often said to be one of the oldest sciences of humanity. But this statement disregards the fact that the word “science”, as it is understood today, can hardly be used to describe the astronomical practices of, for example, the builders of megaliths or the ancient Egyptians. This type of astronomy, however, was always “culture” as it was closely linked to both religious and profane practices that led to better use of resources and greater understanding of the cosmos. Cultural astronomy, in its two branches of archaeoastronomy and ethnoastronomy, studies these practices. Since these are disciplines that lie somewhere between social sciences, especially archaeology and anthropology from which they obtain their epistemology, and classic astronomy, from which they obtain their mathematical tools, it is not always easy to carry out research in them. It is therefore often essential to start out by distinguishing between fact and fiction.

  11. Linking Science Fiction and Physics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Krista K.

    2016-05-01

    Generally, cohorts or learning communities enrich higher learning in students. Learning communities consist of conventionally separate groups of students that meet together with common academic purposes and goals. Types of learning communities include paired courses with concurrent student enrollment, living-learning communities, and faculty learning communities. This article discusses a learning community of 21 students that I created with a colleague in the English department. The community encompasses two general education courses: an algebra-based physics course entitled "Intro to Physics" and a literature course entitled "Science Fiction, Science Fact." Students must enroll in both of these courses during the same semester. Additionally, I highlight advantages to linking these courses through surveying the assignments and course materials that we used in our learning community. Figure 1 shows the topics that are covered in both physics and literature courses.

  12. Dating With Super Junior-M

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    担心情人节没人陪?还在幻想能与谁约会?2009年2月14日,梦想照进现实,SJ-M将在上海举办“情人Superman-Super Junior-M 2009上海歌会”,化身你的甜蜜情人,与你一起共度浪漫情人节。

  13. Aesthetic, Ethical and Empirical Readings: Revisiting Dystopian Fiction (I)

    OpenAIRE

    Brînduşa Nicolaescu

    2015-01-01

    Based on recent research in literary criticism, primarily a preoccupation for the literary response among the readers (students) in the academic milieu, this article attempts to propose different perspectives and discuss various levels of interpretation of dystopian fiction - going beyond the clichés that for instance have lead throughout the years to its confusion with the science fiction genre - reclaiming an increasing need for a specialized bibliography. We contend these literary works en...

  14. Probing the limits of reality: the metaphysics in science fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, John L.

    2003-01-01

    Science fiction provides a genre in which metaphysical questions concerning the ultimate structure of reality regularly arise. In addressing these questions, contemporary scientists tend to assume that the questions are of a scientific nature and should be handled solely by reference to our best theories. In this paper, it is argued that we cannot afford to neglect the role of conceptual analysis - a distinctively philosophical task - in thinking critically about the possibilities that science fiction claims to describe.

  15. EQUIVOCATION IN THE FOUNDATIONS OF LEIBNIZ’S INFINITESIMAL FICTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I address two different kinds of equivocations in reading Leibniz’s fictional infinite and infinitesimal. These equivocations form the background of a reductive reading of infinite and infinitesimal fictions either as ultimately finite or as something whose status can be taken together with any other mathematical object as such. The first equivocation is the association of a foundation of infinitesimals with their ontological status. I analyze this equivocation by criticizing...

  16. Junior doctors' knowledge of applied clinical anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Yuri; Morgan, Mia; Singh, Annika; Ellis, Harold

    2008-05-01

    This study examines the level of knowledge of applied clinical anatomy among junior doctors. A multiple-choice questionnaire was designed, which covered 15 areas of anatomical knowledge essential to clinical practice, for example, important surface landmarks and interpretation of radiographs. The questionnaire was completed by 128 individuals. They comprised anatomy demonstrators, preregistration house officers (PRHOs), senior house officers (SHOs) and specialist registrars (SpRs) across the range of medical and surgical specialities. Answers were scored and analyzed by group, allowing comparison not only between newly qualified PRHOs and more senior doctors, but also with anatomy demonstrators who had undergone more traditional anatomical training. The results reveal a wide variation of knowledge among junior doctors, with PRHOs scoring an average of 72.1%, SHOs 77.1%, SpRs 82.4%, and demonstrators 82.9%. This progression in knowledge up the clinical hierarchy may reflect clinical experience building upon the foundations laid in medical school, although with demonstrators topping the league table, it seems that intensive academic training is the most beneficial. With junior doctors' training in the UK currently in flux, these results highlight the need for training in clinical anatomy to hold an important place in the development of tomorrow's clinicians.

  17. Visionary medicine: speculative fiction, racial justice and Octavia Butler's 'Bloodchild'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasco, John Carlo; Anderson, Camille; DasGupta, Sayantani

    2016-12-01

    Medical students across the USA have increasingly made the medical institution a place for speculating racially just futures. From die-ins in Fall 2014 to silent protests in response to racially motivated police brutality, medical schools have responded to the public health crisis that is racial injustice in the USA. Reading science fiction may benefit healthcare practitioners who are already invested in imagining a more just, healthier futurity. Fiction that rewrites the future in ways that undermine contemporary power regimes has been termed 'visionary fiction'. In this paper, the authors introduce 'visionary medicine' as a tool for teaching medical students to imagine and produce futures that preserve health and racial justice for all. This essay establishes the connections between racial justice, medicine and speculative fiction by examining medicine's racially unjust past practices, and the intersections of racial justice and traditional science and speculative fiction. It then examines speculative fiction author Octavia Butler's short story 'Bloodchild' as a text that can introduce students of the medical humanities to a liberatory imagining of health and embodiment, one that does not reify and reinscribe boundaries of difference, but reimagines the nature of Self and Other, power and collaboration, agency and justice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. MYTH-REFERRED MOTIFS IN LEZGHIN FICTION: THE EURASIAN DISCOURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. ABDURAKHMANOVA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considered the topical issue of alterations incurred to myth-referred conceptions reflected in Lezghin fiction pieces in prose, and relation between one‟s own ethno-specific identity and alien ethnic identities in the framework of the Eurasian (identity perception of unique  ontributions of various ethnic groups into the cultural heritage. The main task the author set up is exploring a new paradigm of contemporary literature/ fiction once rooted in raising the actualized ethno-cultural selves, and intensifying the dialogue with the Russian and Western European literature/ fiction, while perceiving the specifics of reflecting the archaic and myth-referred conceptions in ethno-specific fiction pieces, and principles of introducing myth-referred elements into the wording. The study revealed in the samples of fiction pieces some fusion of ethno-cultural traditions proper for the Orient and West, as well as conventional stories and images newly interpreted by the contemporary Lezghin literature/ fiction.

  19. SWIMMING CLASSES IN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ OPINION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Bielec

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of modern physical education is not only to develop motor abilities of the students, but most of all prevent them from epidemic youth diseases such as obesity or postural defects. Positive attitudes to swimming as a long-life physical activity, instilled in adolescence should be beneficial in adult life. The group of 130 boys and 116 girls of 7th grade junior high school (mean age 14.6 was asked in the survey to present their opinion of obligatory swimming lessons at school. Students of both sexes claimed that they liked swimming classes because they could improve their swimming skills (59% of answers and because of health-related character of water exercises (38%. 33% of students regarded swimming lessons as boring and monotonous, and 25% of them complained about poor pool conditions like chlorine smell, crowded lanes, too low temperature. Majority of the surveyed students saw practical role of swimming in saving others life.

  20. The Value of Fictional Worlds (or Why 'The Lord of the Rings' is Worth Reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Harold

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Some works of fiction are widely held by critics to have little value, yet these works are not only popular but also widely admired in ways that are not always appreciated. In this paper I make use of Kendall Walton’s account of fictional worlds to argue that fictional worlds can and often do have value, including aesthetic value, that is independent of the works that create them. In the process, I critique Walton’s notion of fictional worlds and offer a defense of the study and appreciation of fictional worlds, as distinguished from the works of fiction with which they are associated.

  1. On Fiction Art:Narrative and Philosophy%叙事与哲学:小说艺术论

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐岱

    2013-01-01

    从中国作家莫言获得诺贝尔文学奖引发的不同声音中,我们能够解读出大众对早已从万人瞩目的中心走向无人喝彩的边缘的小说文类的一种在意。这为我们重新认识小说艺术在当今时代的文化价值,提供了一个有利的契机。事实表明,问题的关键在于“媒介时代”的“信息人”的去人性化。而迄今在小说学领域仍扮演着重要角色的叙述学,对此起到推波助澜的消极作用。为了促进小说艺术的发展,我们需要借助叙事哲学的力量,从关于故事的小说诗学中寻找新的路径。%It is easy to interpret from different voices of Mo Yan's winning Nobel Prize in Literature that Chinese readers tend to shift their attention from the central genre to that of the fringe fiction.Therefore, it provides us with a favorable opportunity to reevaluate the cultural value of fiction art in modern society, in which the depersonalization of the“information man” in media age being the core.Narrative, which plays an important role in fiction, unluckily exerts a negative influence on it.In order to promote the fiction development, it is essential for us to explore a new way in story-focused fiction poetics with the help of nar-rative philosophy.

  2. A Study of the 1968 Graduates of Manatee Junior College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stivers, Earl R.

    This study of the 1968 graduates of Manatee Junior College, Florida, showed that: (1) it is not necessary to be in the top 40% of grade 12 to succeed in junior college, (2) students in the lowest percentiles at entrance can earn a degree, (3) the average candidate for a degree should expect to spend more than four terms at the junior college, (4)…

  3. Fiction in Fact and Fact in Fiction in the Writing of Joyce Carol Oates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya L. Tromble

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Joyce Carol Oates draws extensively on news stories, as well as on elements of her own family’s past, to find inspiration for her works of fiction. She has written about the Chappaquiddick incident involving Ted Kennedy and the JonBenet Ramsay murder case. She has worked the Niagara Falls Love Canal environmental scandal into the framework of The Falls and taken inspiration from sordid events from her own family’s past in the beginning of The Gravedigger’s Daughter. However, in none of these examples does Oates purport to relate the precise real-life “facts” of the historical events. Indeed, for an author who believes in the multiplicity of truths such a task would be superfluous, if it was in fact possible, given what she perceives as the inherently “error-prone” nature of our species. “Language,” she writes in her essay “On Fiction in Fact,” “by its very nature tends to distort experience. With the best of intentions, in recalling the past, if even a dream of the previous night, we are already altering – one might say violating – the original experience, which may have been wordless and was certainly improvised.” In response to what she sees as the problematic nature of language, memory and the artificial nature of writing, Oates has cultivated a self-described “psychological realism” that seeks to depict a greater realm of truth beyond the world of facts, that is to say the truth of emotion and felt experience, “states of mind [which are] real enough – emotions, moods, shifting obsessions, beliefs – though immeasurable.” This article compares both fiction and non-fiction works by Oates – notably, A Widow’s Story, Sourland, The Falls – in a discussion of the fluctuating frontier between the two genres and the notion of psychological Truth that this tenuous relationship reveals.

  4. Fiction series in TVE between 1956 and 1989

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Canós Cerdá

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The change in the Spanish television landscape resulting from the loss of the monopoly of RTVE and the landing of private regional television and national channels, created a new context marked by competition between different private channels. In this scenario, there was a confluence of several factors that led to the launch of the national fiction production in our own country from the hands of a renewal of the genre with new creative and production systems (García de Castro, 2008:150. All this contrasts with the existence of certain gaps in research on the Spanish television fiction in years for the TVE television monopoly, as pioneer of today's fiction. Therefore, the presence of in-depth studies to clarify the trajectory of a fiction that will lay the foundation for self-produced fiction in Spain is necessary. This paper has as general objective an approach to the birth and evolution of serial fiction formats in TVE until the advent of private television, and the study of its distinctive features. This research can be understood under the phenomenological paradigm and is located within the television studies that focus specifically on the textual historicism (Ellis, 2007, in which the text is studied in relation to its historical context taking into account the influence of the period which the program was carried out when studying its meaning. It will be approached with a methodological pluralism that combines the qualitative method and historical method. The main technique used is the documentary observation of primary sources; mainly TV programs from the studied period. From the study of a significant sample of fiction programs produced and broadcast by Spanish public TV we can identify the traits that characterize them. Some of them still remain in the current TV series and another traits have been evolving in time.

  5. George Orwell and Modern Science Fiction: The Legacy of Big Brother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Fred

    1984-01-01

    Discusses George Orwell's lack of influence on modern science fiction and presents a selected annotated bibliography of modern science fiction materials depicting a wide variety of totalitarian societies. (MBR)

  6. Educating Junior Military Officers for the Information Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Corte Madera , CA: Waite Group Press, 1994), 27. 20 Shalikashvili, 16. 21 Department of Defense Joint Staff, Joint Doctrine for Information...Strategic Studies Institute, 7 March 1997. Petersen, John L. The Road to 2015. Corte Madera , CA: Waite Group Press, 1994. President’s Commission on

  7. The Revised Junior Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (JEPQ-R): Dutch replications of the full length, short, and abbreviated forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholte, R.H.J.; Bruyn, E.E.J. De

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the full-length, short and abbreviated forms of the Revised Junior Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (JEPQ-R) in a Dutch sample of 215 boys and 207 girls, aged 12–14. The reliability and concurrent validity of the scales of the full-length form (JEPQ-R, 81 items), short form (JEP

  8. Assessing the Five Factors of Personality in Adolescents: The Junior Version of the Spanish NEO-PI-R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortet, Generos; Ibanez, Manuel I.; Moya, Jorge; Villa, Helena; Viruela, Ana; Mezquita, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the development of a junior version of the Spanish (Castilian) NEO Personality Inventory-Revised (JS NEO) suitable for adolescents aged 12 to 18 years. The psychometric properties of the new JS NEO were investigated using two samples of 2,733 and 983 adolescents in Spain. The results showed that the adult NEO-PI-R factor…

  9. SWEDISH CRIME FICTION AS SOCIALLY INVOLVED LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Samsel-Chojnacka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Swedish crime novel has been transforming for many years to become more socially involved. The ambition of many writers is not only to entertain the readers but also to participating in the social debate, criticizing the political and economical system, focusing on important issues such as violence against women, exploitation of working class by the privileged ruling class, the problems of a modern family and the situation of immigrants. Since the moment when in the mid 60’s two journalists Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö decided to use popular literature to spread social matters many other Swedish writers have decided to follow their way. Some of them are journalists – like Liza Marklund, Börge Hellström and Anders Roslund or Stieg Larsson. Their novels as well as the ones written by Henning Mannkel on Kurt Wallander have become crucial evidence of changes of Swedish society in the past twenty years. Modern Swedish crime fiction illustrates the population in the model fashion that is the reason why it can become one of the interests of the sociology of literature.

  10. Design, fiction and the medical humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Christopher Gordon

    2016-12-01

    This paper sets out to explore the similarities between the developing discipline of speculative and critical design (SCD) and science fiction, and their relevance to the medical humanities. SCD looks beyond 'commercial design' to consider what sort of things we should, or should not, be designing in order to create preferable futures. It does so by extrapolating from current social, economic, political and scientific knowledge, designing artefacts, experiences and scenarios which communicate futures and alternative realities in tangible ways. By first outlying the relevance of SCD to the medical humanities, through its ability to imagine and visualise preferable healthcare futures, the paper will then discuss several recent design projects which focus on current and future ethical issues raised by emerging biotechnology. Through these projects, the paper will look at SCD's ability to provoke, engage and critique science and society, while also critically reflecting on the limitations of the evolving design discipline. Through the paper it is hoped that there can be an increased understanding of SCD and its ambitions, as well as its limitations, in order for SCD to better approach issues relating to health and wellbeing, along with other difficult and challenging issues which will affect all us today and into the (sci-fi) future. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Science Fiction and Ontologies of Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Vizmuller-Zocco

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of leadership in science fiction receives a particular analysis which is based on what can be termed transhumanist novels published in Italy between 2008 and 2013. The main purpose of this study is to answer the following question: What happens to (the nature of leadership in a technologically-driven society? Four novels form the backbone of the description of futuristic leadership. The four conclusions drawn from this analysis regarding the nature of leadership in a technologically-driven society point to a much greater need for leadership studies to pay attention to technological advances (and the philosophical underpinnings of, specifically, transhumanism. The impact of nano-bio-technology affecting the role of leaders, followers, goals, alignment, commitment has ontological repercussions on the manner in which (augmented and unaugmented humans deal with each other. If early augmented humans/cyborgs and any other sentient beings are in fact comparable to Giambattista Vico’s brutes, and if his corsi e ricorsi (ebbs and flows of human history can apply to non-human, sentient beings’ history, then the work is cut out for all disciplines, but especially for those which deal with ontologies of leadership.

  12. Teaching Geisha in History, Fiction, and Fantasy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Bardsley

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Artists skilled in performing classical music and dance, geisha are famous the world over as emblems of Japanese culture at its most erotic and exotic. Everything from novels and comedies to fashion and films document Euro-American fascination with geisha from the late 19th through the 20th centuries. Japanese essayists have long, and often ruefully, observed this foreign curiosity for the 'geisha gaaru'. Yet, the literature on geisha in Japan includes a range of works, too, including fiction, academic study, tips for would-be connoisseurs as well as memoirs and etiquette manuals penned by geisha themselves. Well into the twenty-first century, geisha still intrigue at home and abroad. Exploring multiple representations of geisha in an Asian Studies course easily engages students, but also challenges them to think critically. Not only do they learn about geisha past and present, but they also understand geisha studies as a field. Their study also explores the constructed nature of gender, leading to comparisons of Japan, the U.S., and a host of models of ideal femininity and masculinity. It is students’ involvement with learning how knowledge is produced, fantasies sustained, and questions asked and avoided, that makes teaching the geisha course rewarding.

  13. Systematic reviews: Separating fact from fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddaway, Neal R; Bilotta, Gary S

    2016-01-01

    The volume of scientific literature continues to expand and decision-makers are faced with increasingly unmanageable volumes of evidence to assess. Systematic reviews (SRs) are powerful tools that aim to provide comprehensive, transparent, reproducible and updateable summaries of evidence. SR methods were developed, and have been employed, in healthcare for more than two decades, and they are now widely used across a broad range of topics, including environmental management and social interventions in crime and justice, education, international development, and social welfare. Despite these successes and the increasing acceptance of SR methods as a 'gold standard' in evidence-informed policy and practice, misconceptions still remain regarding their applicability. The aim of this article is to separate fact from fiction, addressing twelve common misconceptions that can influence the decision as to whether a SR is the most appropriate method for evidence synthesis for a given topic. Through examples, we illustrate the flexibility of SR methods and demonstrate their suitability for addressing issues on environmental health and chemical risk assessment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Using fiction in the teaching of physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burko, Lior M.

    2016-03-01

    Fiction has been used in teaching since Plato told the story of Atlantis. However, relatively little use is made of it in teaching physics. We have created short stories that form the basis of case studies. One short story tells the story of a possible radioactive contamination on Earth because of the detonation by terrorists of a dirty bomb in a densely populated urban area. The short story discusses in what many would find an engaging way both the physics of radioactivity and the health aspects of radiation exposure and radiation sickness. Another case tells the story of a hypothetical future crewed mission to the Moon. The astronauts encounter a giant solar flare that would inevitably give the crew lethal dose of radiation. The astronauts do not have enough time to either abort the mission, or land on the Moon and seek shelter. There is, however, something they can do, but they do not think of think of it until it is too late to do anything about it, and being saved beccomes a matter of chance. This case discusses the history and future of lunar and space exploration, solar wind and space weather, and elements of planetary science. We describe some examples of short stories, and how we incorporate them in the teaching of physics and allied disciplines.

  15. Simulating fiction: individual differences in literature comprehension revealed with FMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabel D Nijhof

    Full Text Available When we read literary fiction, we are transported to fictional places, and we feel and think along with the characters. Despite the importance of narrative in adult life and during development, the neurocognitive mechanisms underlying fiction comprehension are unclear. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate how individuals differently employ neural networks important for understanding others' beliefs and intentions (mentalizing, and for sensori-motor simulation while listening to excerpts from literary novels. Localizer tasks were used to localize both the cortical motor network and the mentalizing network in participants after they listened to excerpts from literary novels. Results show that participants who had high activation in anterior medial prefrontal cortex (aMPFC; part of the mentalizing network when listening to mentalizing content of literary fiction, had lower motor cortex activity when they listened to action-related content of the story, and vice versa. This qualifies how people differ in their engagement with fiction: some people are mostly drawn into a story by mentalizing about the thoughts and beliefs of others, whereas others engage in literature by simulating more concrete events such as actions. This study provides on-line neural evidence for the existence of qualitatively different styles of moving into literary worlds, and adds to a growing body of literature showing the potential to study narrative comprehension with neuroimaging methods.

  16. Simulating fiction: individual differences in literature comprehension revealed with FMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhof, Annabel D; Willems, Roel M

    2015-01-01

    When we read literary fiction, we are transported to fictional places, and we feel and think along with the characters. Despite the importance of narrative in adult life and during development, the neurocognitive mechanisms underlying fiction comprehension are unclear. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate how individuals differently employ neural networks important for understanding others' beliefs and intentions (mentalizing), and for sensori-motor simulation while listening to excerpts from literary novels. Localizer tasks were used to localize both the cortical motor network and the mentalizing network in participants after they listened to excerpts from literary novels. Results show that participants who had high activation in anterior medial prefrontal cortex (aMPFC; part of the mentalizing network) when listening to mentalizing content of literary fiction, had lower motor cortex activity when they listened to action-related content of the story, and vice versa. This qualifies how people differ in their engagement with fiction: some people are mostly drawn into a story by mentalizing about the thoughts and beliefs of others, whereas others engage in literature by simulating more concrete events such as actions. This study provides on-line neural evidence for the existence of qualitatively different styles of moving into literary worlds, and adds to a growing body of literature showing the potential to study narrative comprehension with neuroimaging methods.

  17. STUDY ON THE CONTENT OF PHYSICAL TRAINING IN JUNIOR I BASKETBALL PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savu Cristian Florian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available STUDY ON THE CONTENT OF PHYSICAL TRAINING IN JUNIOR I BASKETBALL PLAYERS24 october 2015 back Current archive Domain:Sport de performanta Tags:sport training physical training physiological indicators Savu Cristian Florian Abstract Sports training must benefit from scientific progress of fundamental research, which he conducted on it considerably influence through concrete answers in getting sports performance. Sports training must be subjected to rational application of principles and objectives to ensure a successful and analysing progress in training. Research objectives: To assess the level of general and specific physical training of junior basketball players I in dependent on the objectives of the team and the game. Determine the program for general and specific physical training and operational resources necessary in the framework of the annual training and incorporation of periods of junior basketball players I. Experimental verification of the rationale and effectiveness of sports training methodology based on global and differentiated treatment of General and specific physical training of junior basketball players I. Studies and research will demonstrate that the level of physical preparation has baschetbalistilor is characterized by a rather large difference in age, the dependence of the athletes and team performance goals to which they belong. Contributing research: Investigation will show that the physical training of basketball is characterized by a pretty big difference, depending on the age of the athletes playing position and team performance objectives they belong. Today, basketball is trying to universalise game stations, where each athlete can perform tasks, skills and abilities of every post game in different situations. Our research is based on the scientific-methodical argument preparation and differentiated global players primarily in terms of physical preparation. Hypothesis paper: General and specific physical

  18. Simulating Fiction: Individual Differences in Literature Comprehension Revealed with fMRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, A.D.; Willems, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    When we read literary fiction, we are transported to fictional places, and we feel and think along with the characters. Despite the importance of narrative in adult life and during development, the neurocognitive mechanisms underlying fiction comprehension are unclear. We used functional magnetic re

  19. "Girls Who Do Things": The Protagonists of Robin McKinley's Fantasy Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Lynn Moss

    1996-01-01

    Suggests that in her novels of fairy tale/fantasy fiction for adolescents, Robin McKinley emphasizes the values found in most fantasy fiction, courage and honor. Also suggests she makes an important contribution to balancing gender roles in young adult fiction by portraying female characters who are physically strong, smart, and courageous. (RS)

  20. Thomas Hardy's Victorian Gothic: Reassessing Hardy's Fiction and His Gothic Sensibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Norma Walrath

    Proposing that Thomas Hardy's fiction exhibits strong Gothic sensibilities which offer insight into his artistic vision and add to the power of his fiction, creating a new form of the Gothic, a Victorian Gothic, this dissertation reassesses the Gothic strains in Hardy's fiction. The dissertation is in eight chapters: (1) Introduction to Hardy's…

  1. Teaching the Future: On the Use of Science Fiction in English Language Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Outlines the features of "pulpstyle" and its continuing influence on later science fiction. Considers some science fiction texts that explicitly address language issues. These ideas are related to practical techniques of using science fiction in the language classroom. (Author/VWL)

  2. Teaching and Learning Psychology through an Analysis of Social Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, William E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is designed to accompany an appearance by the author as a panelist during a session on science fiction and teaching methods at the I-CON 28 Science Fiction Convention held April 3-5, 2009, on Long Island (near New York City). The author describes how he employs social science fiction in an honors course at the university level to…

  3. Octavia Butler and Virginia Hamilton: Black Women Writers and Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Gregory Jerome; Brooks, Wanda M.

    2003-01-01

    Notes that African American literature has always had science fiction elements in its focus on narratives of the alienated and marginalized "other." Contends that Octavia Butler and Virginia Hamilton are two African American writers of science fiction who examine the connections between the stories of a culture and the genre of science fiction.…

  4. Multiple Intelligences Profiles of Junior Secondary School Students in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmiyati, Nuri; Rasyid, Muhammad Amin; Rahman, M. Asfah; Arsyad, Azhar; Dirawan, Gufran Darma

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the Multiple Intelligences profiles of the students at junior secondary school in Makassar. The Multiple Intelligences Inventory was used to identify the dominant intelligence among the students. The sample of this research was 302 junior secondary schools students in Makassar Indonesia who willing to participated…

  5. Interest Learning about English in Junior Middle School

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Shi-qin

    2015-01-01

    In modern time, interest learning play a more and more important role in the children’study. So the paper plays a key on the interest learning in junior middle school. And the paper mainly explores theoretical research, the reason of interest learning and the way to motivate junior middle students’interest learning in English learning.

  6. General Education in Occupational Education Programs Offered by Junior Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegman, Robert R.

    This report, directed toward junior college board members, presidents, deans, department heads, and teachers, as well as legislators, attempts to stimulate thought and action to improve general education in occupational programs offered by junior colleges. Following a review of the unsatisfactory status of present curricula, a rationale and…

  7. Holy sci-fi! where science fiction and religion intersect

    CERN Document Server

    Nahin, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Can a computer have a soul? Are religion and science mutually exclusive? Is there really such a thing as free will? If you could time travel to visit Jesus, would you (and should you)? For hundreds of years, philosophers, scientists, and science fiction writers have pondered these questions and many more. In Holy Sci-Fi!, popular writer Paul Nahin explores the fertile and sometimes uneasy relationship between science fiction and religion. With a scope spanning the history of religion, philosophy, and literature, Nahin follows religious themes in science fiction from Feynman to Foucault, and from Asimov to Aristotle. An intriguing journey through popular and well-loved books and stories, Holy Sci-Fi! shows how sci-fi has informed humanity's attitudes towards our faiths, our future, and ourselves.

  8. Writing Science Fiction Stories to Motivate Analysis of Journal Articles

    CERN Document Server

    Kontur, F J

    2014-01-01

    For many students, college physics courses have little or even negative impact on their beliefs about the connection between physics and the everyday world. One way to help students see this connection is to incorporate analysis of science articles into the course. For introductory courses, one might have students discuss newspaper articles related to science or articles from popular science magazines while articles from peer-reviewed journals might be more appropriate for honors-level or upper-division courses. In this work, I describe a project done in a two-semester upper-division electricity and magnetism course at the United States Air Force Academy in which students were required to use the science from a peer-reviewed journal article to write a science fiction story. Although others have utilized science fiction stories in physics courses, this is the first article to describe a project in which students write their own science fiction stories in a physics course.

  9. L Ron Hubbard's science fiction quest against psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshbein, Laura

    2016-12-01

    Layfayette Ronald Hubbard (1911-1986) was a colourful and prolific American writer of science fiction in the 1930s and 1940s. During the time between his two decades of productivity and his return to science fiction in 1980, Hubbard founded the Church of Scientology. In addition to its controversial status as a religion and its troubling pattern of intimidation and litigation directed towards its foes, Scientology is well known as an organised opponent to psychiatry. This paper looks at Hubbard's science fiction work to help understand the evolution of Scientology's antipsychiatry stance, as well as the alternative to psychiatry offered by Hubbard. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Redefining genderswap fan fiction: A Sherlock case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann McClellan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Using BBC Sherlock (2010– fan fiction as case study, this article looks at how fans use and understand such concepts as biological sex and gender in genderswap fan fiction, arguing that the label often minimizes the importance of the physical body in determining gender identity. The label genderswap, most often used to describe stories where characters have become differently sexed, reflects and reinforces common cultural misunderstandings about differences between sex and gender. By teasing out definitions of genderswap, sex, gender, cisgender, and transgender, the article analyzes what genderswap includes and excludes from discussions of gender and identity within contemporary fan fiction, ultimately arguing for a broader conceptual understanding that grounds the genre within contemporary transgender theory.

  11. Imagining the future: The Power of Climate Change Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhr Sullivan, S. M.; Kellagher, E.; Poppleton, K. L.

    2013-12-01

    Fiction has galvanized the public imagination around societal concerns throughout US history, on issues including slavery, worker abuse and animal cruelty. A growing body of fiction concerned with climate change, 'cli-fi', provides the opportunity for students to engage with climate science in more visceral and affective ways. The Inspiring Climate Education Excellence (ICEE) project ran a climate and energy book club from Spring 2012 through Winter 2013, in which educators, scientists and writers participated. The fictional works were intended for audiences ranging from youth through adult, with themes of dystopia, renewal, hope, oppression, and innovation. This presentation will describe the benefits, opportunities and caveats of using these works within science teaching contexts, highlight some of the works which stood out from the rest and provide an annotated bibliography of books which were included or considered.

  12. Science fiction as a culture of global innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas MICHAUD

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Science fiction participates to the creation of a global culture of innovation. It is diffused in most of the developed countries to promote technical innovation and has motivated a lot of actors of capitalism to imitate the utopian technologies represented in these very popular movies and novels. The stake of this article is to define the strategic habitus in a cultural environment constituted of multiple centers of Research and Development (R&D organized in network. The management of science fiction is necessary to optimize innovation at a global level. After the step of the ideological filtering of science fiction, the construction of discursive philters permits to manage productive systems with common and normalized cultural considerations. The approaches of sensemaking, storytelling and “strategy as discourse” are used at the theoretical level.

  13. The neuroaesthetics of prose fiction: pitfalls, parameters and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michael

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of neuroaesthetic studies on prose fiction. This is in contrast to the very many impressive studies that have been conducted in recent times on the neuroaesthetics of sister arts such as painting, music and dance. Why might this be the case, what are its causes and, of greatest importance, how can it best be resolved? In this article, the pitfalls, parameters and prospects of a neuroaesthetics of prose fiction will be explored. The article itself is part critical review, part methodological proposal and part opinion paper. Its aim is simple: to stimulate, excite and energize thinking in the discipline as to how prose fiction might be fully integrated in the canon of neuroaesthetics and to point to opportunities where neuroimaging studies on literary discourse processing might be conducted in collaborative work bringing humanists and scientists together.

  14. Science Fiction as a Manifestation of Culture in America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elizabeth Anne Hull

    2005-01-01

    Culture is broadly viewed as all the human activities that define us as a species.″Sturgeon's Law″ (that 90% of everything is inferior) is introduced to defend the study of fiction, and science fiction in particular, in higher education as a way of understanding ourselves better, and perhaps improving the world through the increased understanding of tomorrow's leaders.Several ways of reading particular works of science fiction are examined, like providing historical contexts for readers, close reading and structural analysis, and application of theories based on particular ideologies or from other disciplines in the social and political sciences (such as feminist theory, Marxist theory, psychological theory, etc.).A conclusion is drawn that for literary analysis, a hybrid methodology, one devised individually for each text, works best.

  15. Le style modal de la science-fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Boisset

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available La faiblesse de style dont souffrirait la science-fiction est en fait le signe que la science y est davantage discours du possible que description du réel. Un « style modal » va suspendre la valeur de vérité, et le style de la possibilité va décontextualiser les métaphores disponibles. En science-fiction, le processus métaphorique génère et structure la diégèse. Un exemple chez Iain M. Banks montre un dialogue quasi incompréhensible mettre à l’épreuve la signification comme possibilité. Les métaphores figées sont revitalisées par la décontextualisation de la fiction, dont le texte peut exploiter l’impertinence.

  16. The Availability of Access Features in Children's Non-Fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia R. Ladd

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the availability of access features in children's non-fiction as compared to their prevalence in adult non-fiction because such features are an important part of the research process increasingly demanded of younger and younger students in schools. Access features studied include: table of contents, index, bibliography, endnotes/footnotes, glossary, and suggestions for further reading list. This study found that children's non-fiction books were less likely to include bibliographies or endnotes, but more likely to include glossaries or suggested reading lists. Tables of contents and indexes were the two most popular access features in each section. Results are divided by Dewey Decimal Classification classes.

  17. Enhancing the Teaching of Astronomy with Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraknoi, A.

    2004-12-01

    Dozens of scientists and science educators with advanced degrees in science have been writing literate and scientifically reasonable science fiction stories in the last two decades, although these are often drowned out by the din of popular magic teenagers and space battle epics. The paper will give examples of stories and novels with good science, which can be used as a way of making astronomy concepts "come alive" for non-science majors. A list of science fiction authors with astronomy and physics degrees will be included. We will also have examples from a web-site devoted to astronomy in science fiction (see link) that has some 200 brief reviews of stories organized by 40 astronomy topics. We will discuss how instructors are using such stories for classroom and homework assignments.

  18. Junior football players' classification of runners as their teammates from 400-msec. video clips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Kylie A; Adams, Roger D; Canning, Colleen G

    2008-08-01

    It was hypothesized that a specialized gait recognition skill enables humans to distinguish the gait of familiar from unfamiliar individuals, and that this may have relevance in team sports. Runners seen for less than half a second can be classified as teammates or not by adult players, so it may be asked whether this skill would also be demonstrated by young team players. In the current study, junior football players (M age = 10.0 yr., SD = 0.8, N = 13) viewed 400-msec. video clips of runners sprinting past a fixed forward facing digital video camera and similarly showed teammate recognition scores significantly above chance. Given the variation among the junior players in this skill, it seems possible for researchers to assess whether improvement can be obtained with structured training for young team players, where running teammates are seen in peripheral vision during training drills.

  19. The Use of "Literary Fiction" to Promote Mentalizing Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, Maria Chiara; Mazza, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Empathy is a multidimensional process that incorporates both mentalizing and emotional sharing dimensions. Empathic competencies are important for creating interpersonal relationships with other people and developing adequate social behaviour. The lack of these social components also leads to isolation and exclusion in healthy populations. However, few studies have investigated how to improve these social skills. In a recent study, Kidd and Castano (2013) found that reading literary fiction increases mentalizing ability and may change how people think about other people's emotions and mental states. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of reading literary fiction, compared to nonfiction and science fiction, on empathic abilities. Compared to previous studies, we used a larger variety of empathy measures and utilized a pre and post-test design. In all, 214 healthy participants were randomly assigned to read a book representative of one of three literary genres (literary fiction, nonfiction, science fiction). Participants were assessed before and after the reading phase using mentalizing and emotional sharing tests, according to Zaki and Ochsner' s (2012) model. Comparisons of sociodemographic, mentalizing, and emotional sharing variables across conditions were conducted using ANOVA. Our results showed that after the reading phase, the literary fiction group showed improvement in mentalizing abilities, but there was no discernible effect on emotional sharing abilities. Our study showed that the reading processes can promote mentalizing abilities. These results may set important goals for future low-cost rehabilitation protocols for several disorders in which the mentalizing deficit is considered central to the disease, such as Autism Spectrum Disorders and Schizophrenia.

  20. The construction of fictional space in participatory design practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Christian

    2010-01-01

    the process through which participants in participatory design create a design space in which established conventions of everyday practice are altered or suspended. With inspiration from literary theory, it is argued that the production of fictional space may be understood in terms of participants practicing...... games of make-believe mediated by props. The motivation for discussing fictional space is traced through ongoing work on designing new exhibition spaces for museums. Through a case study from a participatory design session, it is explored how games of make-believe progress and the role of props...

  1. The Act of Fictional Communication in a Hermeneutic Pragmatics

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with fictional communication, as the act of an author in relation to a reader. Fictional discourse exhibits certain complexities that are not observable in other forms of discourse. For example, the author’s act is mediated for the reader by that set of persons called characters. This fact generates a range of relations, firstly the triad of author-reader, author-character, and reader-character. But closer observation reveals that this mediation may be such that it giv...

  2. The Emergence of Irish Gothic Fiction - Histories, Origins, Theories

    OpenAIRE

    Killeen, Jarlath

    2013-01-01

    Provides a new account of the emergence of Irish gothic fiction in mid-eighteenth century. This book provides a robustly theorised and thoroughly historicised account of the ‘beginnings’ of Irish gothic fiction, maps the theoretical terrain covered by other critics, and puts forward a new history of the emergence of the genre in Ireland. The main argument the book makes is that the Irish gothic should be read in the context of the split in Irish Anglican public opinion that opened in the...

  3. FISH and FICTION to detect chromosomal aberrations in lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giefing, Maciej; Siebert, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) is a powerful and robust technique allowing the visualization of target sequences like genes in interphase nuclei. It is widely used in routine diagnostics to identify cancer specific aberrations including lymphoma associated translocations or gene copy number changes in single tumor cells. By combining FISH with immunophenotyping-a technique called Fluorescence Immunophenotyping and Interphase Cytogenetic as a Tool for Investigation Of Neoplasia (FICTION)-it is moreover possible to identify a cell population of interest. Here we describe standard protocols for FISH and FICTION as used in our laboratory in diagnosis and research.

  4. Aesthetic, Ethical and Empirical Readings: Revisiting Dystopian Fiction (I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brînduşa Nicolaescu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on recent research in literary criticism, primarily a preoccupation for the literary response among the readers (students in the academic milieu, this article attempts to propose different perspectives and discuss various levels of interpretation of dystopian fiction - going beyond the clichés that for instance have lead throughout the years to its confusion with the science fiction genre - reclaiming an increasing need for a specialized bibliography. We contend these literary works entail peculiar ethical considerations and ultimately they require a specific methodology close to a psychonarratological approach, namely empirical.

  5. Using Science Fiction in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebofsky, L. A.; Lebofsky, N. R.

    2002-09-01

    At the University of Arizona, all non-science majors are required to take two Tier 1 and one Tier 2 General Education science classes. These are the only science classes that most of these students will take at the University. This includes all future K-8 certified teachers --- our future teachers of science. Improving reading comprehension in science and improving writing skills are two of the main requirements of the General Education classes. For my 150 -- 300 students (1 -- 2 classes per semester) I have chosen to use science fiction stories to meet part of these requirements. This assignment provides for assessment of students' writing in several ways: As an alternative assessment: connecting the course material to what they have read. As an alternative assessment: student knowledge of science and technology in general. This assignment also provides for assessment of their comprehension of the authors' application of science fact: Making students aware of how our science knowledge and technology have changed in the years since these books were written (30 -- 140 years ago). Students are required to turn in a short draft version of the assignment about halfway through the semester. They receive feedback on their format (i.e., following directions), appropriateness of chosen topics, spelling, grammar, etc. Books are chosen at a variety of reading levels to accommodate a range of proficiencies, including choices appropriate for students with limited proficiency in English and those with learning disabilities. The books that we are presently using and examples of student writing will be displayed. This work was supported in part with a grant from the Department of Education (AzTEC).

  6. Introduction: Victorian Fiction and the Material Imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Mills

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available How should we deal with the ‘stuff' in books? This is the question addressed in the lead articles of the Spring 2008 issue of 19, all of which focus on some aspect of the material in relation to Victorian fiction. Gas, rocks, jewellery, automata and the entire contents of houses are examined in essays that explore the material imagination of Dickens, Hardy, George Eliot and Thackeray, among others. Moving forward from the previous edition, which different types of collected object, here contributors examine how the material is brought into collision with literature. The phrase 'material imagination' can be traced to the work of Gaston Bachelard who identifies two types of imagination, the formal and the material. Whereas the former focuses on surfaces and the visual perception of images, the latter consists of '…this amazing need for penetration which, going beyond the attractions of the imagination of forms, thinks matter, dreams in it, lives in it, or, in other words, materializes the imaginary'. As Bachelard suggests, the material imagination involves more than just a focus on the representation of objects and the contributions to this edition explore such wide ranging subjects as the gender politics of ownership, dispossession, the body as object, the politics of collecting and display and the dichotomy between the material and immaterial. In addition, this edition features a forum on digitisation and materiality. We are particularly pleased to be able to make use of 19's digital publishing format to further debates about digital media. In the forum, five contributors respond to a series of questions about the nature of the virtual object. All five have worked or are working on nineteenth-century digitisation projects so they are uniquely placed to consider issues surrounding representation and the nature of digital space.

  7. The Realistic Fallacy, or: The Conception of Literary Narrative Fiction in Analytic Aesthetics

    OpenAIRE

    Jukka Mikkonen

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, my aim is to show that in Anglo-American analytic aesthetics, the conception of narrative fiction is in general realistic and that it derives from philosophical theories of fiction-making, the act of producing works of literary narrative fiction. I shall firstly broadly show the origins of the problem and illustrate how the so-called realistic fallacy – the view which maintains that fictions consist of propositions which represent the fictional world “as it is” – is committed t...

  8. Keeping Time Machinese and Teleporters in the Public Doman: Fiction as Prior Art for Patent Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H. Brean

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Works of fiction sometimes contain disclosures of inventions that operate as a bar to patentability, preventing inventors who actually make those inventions from subsequently patenting them. This is because the fictional disclosures effectively destroy the novelty of the inventions or render them obvious. Despite such disclosures, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office does not habitually or effectively search through fiction for pertinent prior art in its examinations. This paper explores the legal, economic, and pragmatic considerations if searching fiction is to become part of the patent examination process. Until recently, it was impracticable to search fiction in a manner that would accurately locate pertinent prior art. However, with the advent of the Google Book Search Project, fiction can be both effectively and efficiently searched for the first time in history. Ultimately, the strong public interest in keeping invalid patents from issuing requires that fictional prior art searching be incorporated into patent examinations.

  9. When Fiction Is Just as Real as Fact: No Differences in Reading Behavior between Stories Believed to be Based on True or Fictional Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Franziska; Withers, Peter; Hagoort, Peter; Willems, Roel M

    2017-01-01

    Experiments have shown that compared to fictional texts, readers read factual texts faster and have better memory for described situations. Reading fictional texts on the other hand seems to improve memory for exact wordings and expressions. Most of these studies used a "newspaper" vs. "literature" comparison. In the present study, we investigated the effect of reader's expectation to whether information is true or fictional with a subtler manipulation by labeling short stories as either based on true or fictional events. In addition, we tested whether narrative perspective or individual preference in perspective taking affects reading true or fictional stories differently. In an online experiment, participants (final N = 1,742) read one story which was introduced as based on true events or as fictional (factor fictionality). The story could be narrated in either 1st or 3rd person perspective (factor perspective). We measured immersion in and appreciation of the story, perspective taking, as well as memory for events. We found no evidence that knowing a story is fictional or based on true events influences reading behavior or experiential aspects of reading. We suggest that it is not whether a story is true or fictional, but rather expectations toward certain reading situations (e.g., reading newspaper or literature) which affect behavior by activating appropriate reading goals. Results further confirm that narrative perspective partially influences perspective taking and experiential aspects of reading.

  10. FICTION TEXT AS A MODEL OF PERSONFL UNIVERSUM, (METHOD OF MODELING AND THE PROBLEM OF DIFFERENTION OF FICTION AND OTHER TEXT TYPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Mikhailovna Erokhina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of ontology of fiction text still remains one of the unsolvable riddles in philology. Numerous definitions of fiction text, often associated only with method of creating a fiction text, in particular with principles of its form and structure or the language and style, are certainly an evidence of the interest aroused by the nature of fiction text. If we consider a fiction text as a single whole, we can note on the one hand that it is an embodiment of the content expressed by certain (linguistic signs, i.e. its nature lies in a sign system of coordinates. On the other hand, fiction text, like any other text, is a kind of one common informational message associated with perception of reality on a sensual and imagery level. From this point of view, the nature of fiction text lies outside the sign system and is a way of cognition through direct visual- sensual perception. The purpose of the article is to identify features and qualities of fiction text relevant to the common method of modeling and to identify differences in methods of modeling fiction texts depending on the type of literature (classical, mass etc..

  11. Distinguishing between Fictional and Non-fictional TV Contents in Special Educative Elementary Schools – Evaluation of a Manualised Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Castello

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning disabled students often show difficulties towards reality perception in television. Based on a theoretical model, specific features distinguishing between fictional and non-fictional contents were drawn on to evolve a manualised program for students by the end of german special educative elementary schools. Relying on one-to-one guided interviews, an evaluation of the program was realized by means of a 2x2 pre-post-control design (n = 57. Results show the effectiveness of the program regarding the confident use of distinctive features concerning several telecasts.

  12. Pygmalion Effect on Junior English Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurong Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pygmalion Effect, or Robert Rosenthal Effect, was proved by the famous American psychologist Robert Rosenthal and Jacobson in 1968. Pygmalion Effect, as a matter of fact, is a psychological suggestion, which believes that people can accept the influence and suggestion given by the people whom very much they admire, like, believe, and respect. This effect was first applied in the field of management and medication. What’s more, remarkable achievements have been accomplished on human resource management. Robert Rosenthal put it into education through an experiment called Pygmalion in the Classroom, which aroused widely attention in the education sector. This thesis mainly focuses on the application of Pygmalion effect in English teaching, especially junior English teaching in China. If we can make good use of the Pygmalion Effect to conduct teaching and have positive expectations to students, it will improve teaching greatly.

  13. PIXE technique applied to Almeida Junior materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascholati, Paulo R.; Rizzutto, Marcia A.; Neves, Graziela; Tabacniks, Manfredo H.; Moleiro, Guilherme F.; Dias, Flavia A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica]. E-mails: paschola@if.usp.br; rizzutto@if.usp.br; graziela@if.usp.br; tabacniks@if.usp.br; guimol@if.usp.br; fladias@if.usp.br; Mendonca, Valeria de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pinacoteca do Estado de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); E-mail: vmendonca@pinacoteca.org.br

    2007-07-01

    The Institute of Physics University of Sao Paulo in collaboration with the Pinacoteca do Estado of the State of Sao Paulo has a project to develop a data bank with information about the elementary composition of pigments of paintings and materials of its collection for future application as conservation and restoration as well as authenticity,. The project is beginning with the materials (palette, paint box and paint tubes) belonging to the painter Almeida Junior. Twenty-three spots on the palette were chosen with determined colors, and also the paint tubes present in the paint box. The PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) analysis of the spectra enabled to conclude that the red colors have predominant Hg and S suggesting Vermellion and the white one are consisted of Pb (Lead White). The analyzed tubes of same colors confirm the elements pigment present in the palette. (author)

  14. Career Progression of Junior Professional Officers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper S. E.; Carbonaro J.; Hoffheins, B; Collins, T.

    2015-07-12

    The U.S. Support Program to IAEA Safeguards (USSP) has funded more than 25 Junior Professional Officer (JPO) positions in the IAEA Department of Safeguards since 2005. JPOs are college graduates with zero to two years’ work experience who work alongside experienced IAEA staff members for one to two years and assist with basic, yet essential work while obtaining valuable experience. They contribute to equipment development, testing, integration, open source information collection and analysis, and software and database development. This paper will study the trends in career progression for the JPOs who have completed assignments with the IAEA in the Department of Safeguards. Brookhaven National Laboratory, in its role in managing the USSP, has compiled information that can be analyzed for this purpose.

  15. Just How Adult Is This Young Adult Book: Young Adult Books for the Junior High Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Charlotte

    1999-01-01

    Discusses young adult novels and presents a bibliography to acquaint librarians with titles and authors that are suitable for emerging young adult readers in grades five through nine. Subject categories include realistic fiction, in the news, historical fiction, short stories, legendary characters, mysteries, science fiction/fantasy/horror, and…

  16. Just How Adult Is This Young Adult Book: Young Adult Books for the Junior High Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Charlotte

    1999-01-01

    Discusses young adult novels and presents a bibliography to acquaint librarians with titles and authors that are suitable for emerging young adult readers in grades five through nine. Subject categories include realistic fiction, in the news, historical fiction, short stories, legendary characters, mysteries, science fiction/fantasy/horror, and…

  17. On the Development of Literary Periodical in the Age of New Media Based on the Case Study of the Public Number of Harvest and Fiction Monthly on Wechat%论新媒体时代文学期刊的发展--基于《收获》《小说月报》微信公众号的案例研究∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小凡

    2015-01-01

    In the age of new media, traditional development model of literary periodical is in a dilemma. As new media, the public platform of Wechat provides new opportunity for literary periodical to breakthrough marginalization and faultage with the characteristics of special users, interactive operation and sticky communication. Aiming to provide reference for literary periodical to construct refined and branding new digital platform, this paper takes Harvest and Fiction Monthly, the two traditional literary periodicals, for example to analyze the necessity of the combination and development of literary periodicals and new media and its trend.%新媒体时代,文学期刊的传统发展模式陷入了困境。微信公众平台作为一种新兴媒体,以其特殊用户群、交互式运作和宣传传播黏性等特点将为文学期刊突破边缘化、断层化提供了发展的新契机。本文以《收获》《小说月报》两大传统文学期刊微信公众号为案例,分析文学期刊与新媒体的结合与发展有其必要性及优势,旨在为文学期刊建设精品化、品牌化的新数字平台提供参考。

  18. All in the Family: Parents in Teen Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burner, Joyce

    1989-01-01

    Argues that realistic adolescent fiction is necessary so that teens will know they are not alone in their experiences, but that literature offering positive parenting and family models is also needed. Twenty-four books encompassing both genres are briefly reviewed. (CLB)

  19. Realistic Fiction and the Social Studies. Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell-Powell, Brenda, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Asserts that children's literature is an effective tool to access and present sophisticated social studies concepts in the elementary classroom. Maintains that realistic fiction can integrate the social sciences with philosophy and religion. Presents a bibliographic essay including children's books and teacher resources. (CFR)

  20. "Vraisemblance" and the Western Setting in Contemporary Science Fiction Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Lane

    Analyzing the setting of six recent "blockbuster" films, this study outlines numerous instances of the Western's influence on several contemporary science fiction films, "Star Wars,""Battlestar Galactica,""Star Trek: The Motion Picture,""The Black Hole,""The Empire Strikes Back," and "Battle beyond the Stars." The correspondence of this phenomenon…

  1. An analysis of mind style in the short fiction Chrysanthemums

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵海燕

    2015-01-01

    The paper selected John Steinbeck's short fiction The Chrysanthemums and focused on the analysis of Steinbeck and Elisa' mind style.It is hoped that the present research will provide a new perspective for reader s and critics in appreciating and analyzing characters in shortfiction.

  2. Narratives of Being There: Computer Games, Presence and Fictional Worlds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubbelman, T.

    2013-01-01

    Narrative game designer, or simply narrative designer, is a role in contemporary computer game development. The narrative designer is responsible for designing the player’s experience of a game’s fictional world. This study delves into the practice of narrative design from the perspective of

  3. A Question of Ethics: Themes in the Science Fiction Genre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNurlin, Kathleen Woitel

    1995-01-01

    Continues an article that began in the summer 1995 "Interdisciplinary Humanities." Examines ethical concerns about nuclear power, societal control, and prejudice articulated in science fiction literature. Authors studied include Ray Bradbury, Philip K. Dick, and Damon Knight. The earlier article covered literature concerned with ecology…

  4. "Shut My Mouth Wide Open": Realistic Fiction and Social Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Cynthia A.

    1999-01-01

    Shares the responses of seven urban, male, African-American fifth graders to contemporary realistic fiction, discussing how the tying of this literature to the events in the boys' lives had the potential to move them toward social action. The paper examines the following: literature as a catalyst, reader responses to texts, critical literacy, and…

  5. Shortcuts to Finding Short Stories: Searching Fiction Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Thomas, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the publication of short stories and problems of electronic access to them through online databases. Magazines that publish short stories and are indexed in databases are discussed, electronic access to university publications is described, online citations and abstracts are explained, and the future of fiction is considered. (four…

  6. Using Fairy Tales To Generate High Interest in Short Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Barbara J.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how fairy tales provide the vehicle by which students become genuinely engaged in reading and writing short fiction. Outlines a three-step process moving students from familiar stories, to variations on traditional tales, finally to new stories. Details how writing, revising, illustrating, and binding a fairy tale engages students. (PM)

  7. "Vraisemblance" and the Western Setting in Contemporary Science Fiction Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Lane

    Analyzing the setting of six recent "blockbuster" films, this study outlines numerous instances of the Western's influence on several contemporary science fiction films, "Star Wars,""Battlestar Galactica,""Star Trek: The Motion Picture,""The Black Hole,""The Empire Strikes Back," and…

  8. Effects of Realistic vs. Fictional Television Violence on Aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, Charles K.; Wood, Charles

    The relative effectiveness of real news violence and fictional entertainment violence was assessed in an experiment with pre-adolescents. One group saw a brief fight scene portrayed as a news story in a simulated TV newscast, while a second group saw the same scene presented as a movie preview during a commercial break. The primary dependent…

  9. Chemistry in Victorian Detective Fiction: "A Race with the Sun"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Last, Arthur M.

    2012-01-01

    The late-Victorian era provided aficionados of detective fiction with an abundance of short stories belonging to this literary genre. Many of these works contained some aspect of chemistry, either in the execution of a crime or in the identification of the perpetrator. In the example discussed in this article, the gas-phase reaction of hydrogen…

  10. Use of Ethnographic Fiction in Social Justice Graduate Counselor Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Rita Chi-Ying; Bemak, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Ethnographic fiction is a technique for educating counseling students about the relationship of social justice to counseling practice. Preliminary data indicate it is an effective tool, with counseling students (N = 48) reporting an increased understanding and appreciation of clients' life experiences from a holistic perspective. Furthermore,…

  11. Understanding History through the Visual Images in Historical Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngs, Suzette

    2012-01-01

    In the last ten years, historical fiction picturebooks have won numerous children's literature awards and have assumed a prominent role in the literacy landscape of elementary and middle school classrooms. Whether read in read-alouds, study groups, as a focus of genre study, or as a supplement to the social studies curriculum, historical fiction…

  12. The Religious Affordance of Fiction : A Semiotic Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidsen, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    A curious aspect of late modern religion is the emergence of fiction-based religions, such as Jediism, based on George Lucas’ Star Wars saga, and Tolkien spirituality, based on J.R.R. Tolkien’s literary mythology about Middle-earth. This article draws on narrative semiotics to explain why some

  13. Narrative Fiction and Expository Nonfiction Differentially Predict Verbal Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Raymond A.; Rain, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Although reading is known to be an important contributor to language abilities, it is not yet well established whether different text genres are uniquely associated with verbal abilities. We examined how exposure to narrative fiction and expository nonfiction predict language ability among university students. Exposure was measured both with…

  14. Use of Ethnographic Fiction in Social Justice Graduate Counselor Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Rita Chi-Ying; Bemak, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Ethnographic fiction is a technique for educating counseling students about the relationship of social justice to counseling practice. Preliminary data indicate it is an effective tool, with counseling students (N = 48) reporting an increased understanding and appreciation of clients' life experiences from a holistic perspective. Furthermore,…

  15. Patterns of Puffery: An Analysis of Non-Fiction Blurbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Blaise; La Barre, Kathryn

    2005-01-01

    The blurb is a paratextual element which has not previously been subjected to systematic analysis. We describe the nature and purpose of this publishing epiphenomenon, highlight some of the related marketing issues and ethical concerns and provide a statistical analysis of almost 2000 blurbs identified in a sample of 450 non-fiction books.…

  16. Realistic Fiction and the Social Studies. Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell-Powell, Brenda, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Asserts that children's literature is an effective tool to access and present sophisticated social studies concepts in the elementary classroom. Maintains that realistic fiction can integrate the social sciences with philosophy and religion. Presents a bibliographic essay including children's books and teacher resources. (CFR)

  17. Representations of Adoption in Contemporary Realistic Fiction for Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Sue Christian; Fuxa, Robin; Kander, Faryl; Hardy, Dana

    2017-01-01

    In this critical content analysis of thirty-seven contemporary realistic fiction books about adoption, the authors examine how adoption and adoptive families are depicted in young adult (YA) literature. The critical literacy theoretical frame brings into focus significant social implications of these depictions as the researchers illuminate and…

  18. "Shut My Mouth Wide Open": Realistic Fiction and Social Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Cynthia A.

    1999-01-01

    Shares the responses of seven urban, male, African-American fifth graders to contemporary realistic fiction, discussing how the tying of this literature to the events in the boys' lives had the potential to move them toward social action. The paper examines the following: literature as a catalyst, reader responses to texts, critical literacy, and…

  19. All in the Family: Parents in Teen Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burner, Joyce

    1989-01-01

    Argues that realistic adolescent fiction is necessary so that teens will know they are not alone in their experiences, but that literature offering positive parenting and family models is also needed. Twenty-four books encompassing both genres are briefly reviewed. (CLB)

  20. Topos of the cosmic space in science fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poutilo Oleg Olegovich

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the forms of cosmic space in science fiction, its characteristics and main trends of evolution. Cosmic space is seen as a dichotomy of “our” and “their”, though their interaction is complicated and full interiorization is impossible. The specificity of the described cosmic space is the absence of the traditional system of coordinates associated with the sides of the world. Authors have to resort to the use of “map-route”, describing the journey sequentially, from the point of view of a moving person. In this regard, in recent years there has been a tendency to reduce the role of images of cosmic space in science fiction novels. Their appearance in the works becomes a kind of stamp, a concession to the classical traditions of the genre. Once popular genres of strict science fiction or space opera inferior position to the other, recreating a far more convincing picture of the probable future of humanity - cyberpunk dystopia and post-apocalyptic fiction.

  1. Testimony, Documentary, Fiction: The Remedialisation of Stolen Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Lauge

    2017-01-01

    discourses and media from the feminist movement in the 1980s and until today, through which oral testimony and the losing part of the population’s “forgotten” memories are turned into docu-fiction and fictionalised documentary with the purpose of reading history against the grain and presenting memory...

  2. Narrative and Nature: Unsustainable Fictions in Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Noel

    2014-01-01

    Environmental education owes its very existence to a particular interpretation of reality. The author's purpose in this article is to examine critically the "selected fictions" on which that view of reality is based--to examine the ways in which perceptions of environmental problems and issues are "conditioned by our position in…

  3. A Question of Ethics: Themes in the Science Fiction Genre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNurlin, Kathleen Woitel

    1995-01-01

    Continues an article that began in the summer 1995 "Interdisciplinary Humanities." Examines ethical concerns about nuclear power, societal control, and prejudice articulated in science fiction literature. Authors studied include Ray Bradbury, Philip K. Dick, and Damon Knight. The earlier article covered literature concerned with ecology…

  4. Narrative Fiction and Expository Nonfiction Differentially Predict Verbal Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Raymond A.; Rain, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Although reading is known to be an important contributor to language abilities, it is not yet well established whether different text genres are uniquely associated with verbal abilities. We examined how exposure to narrative fiction and expository nonfiction predict language ability among university students. Exposure was measured both with…

  5. A Novel Approach: Historical Fiction in the Elementary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Bárbara C.

    2013-01-01

    Barbara Cruz describes how what began as a challenge (i.e., finding or justifying the time to spend on history instruction in an environment of high-stakes testing) turned into a rich learning experience for students using historical fiction. By designing experiences that were literacy centered but based in historical content, this group of…

  6. Understanding History through the Visual Images in Historical Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngs, Suzette

    2012-01-01

    In the last ten years, historical fiction picturebooks have won numerous children's literature awards and have assumed a prominent role in the literacy landscape of elementary and middle school classrooms. Whether read in read-alouds, study groups, as a focus of genre study, or as a supplement to the social studies curriculum, historical fiction…

  7. Historical Fiction, the Common Core, and Disciplinary Habits of Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwebel, Sara L.

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards call for the increased presence of nonfiction in the school curriculum and for students' exposure to narratives characterized by textual complexity. At first glance, these recommendations may discourage classroom teachers from continuing the longstanding instructional practice of using historical fiction to…

  8. Crossing Canonical Boundaries: Espionage Fiction in the Writing Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsee, Mickey

    One of the biggest complaints shared by writing teachers is that students lack a sense of self. Writing handbooks and teachers are full of advice and exercises pointed at assisting students in finding their voice, their persona as writers. One method that may assist writing students in finding that voice would introduce students to spy fiction.…

  9. Lying in Children's Fiction: Morality and the Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringrose, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    The telling of lies is significant in fiction written for children, and is often (though not in all cases) performed by child protagonists. Lying can be examined from at least three perspectives: philosophical, moral and aesthetic. The moral and the aesthetic are the most significant for children's literature. Morality has been subtly dealt with…

  10. Clio's New Clothes: Reinvigorating the History Classroom through Historical Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Gary R.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses public interest in historical novels and television programs. Argues that well-researched historical novels can be used in history classes to promote a deeper understanding of the past. Analyzes various types of historical fiction (e.g., historical romances and "alternative-path" stories) in terms of their historical integrity…

  11. Chemistry in Victorian Detective Fiction: "A Race with the Sun"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Last, Arthur M.

    2012-01-01

    The late-Victorian era provided aficionados of detective fiction with an abundance of short stories belonging to this literary genre. Many of these works contained some aspect of chemistry, either in the execution of a crime or in the identification of the perpetrator. In the example discussed in this article, the gas-phase reaction of hydrogen…

  12. Science Fiction: Popular Culture as Reading and Learning Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontell, Val

    Tools for teaching students how to question intelligently are badly needed. Science fiction provides many such tools in a variety of subjects by stimulating the imagination and thus motivating students to learn. Such vehicles are available at all grade levels. From Mark Twain and H.G. Wells to Anne McCaffrey and Isaac Asimov, novels and short…

  13. Lucinda Roy to read her poetry, fiction Tuesday night

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Lucinda Roy, Alumni Distinguished Professor of English in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences at Virginia Tech, will read from her poetry as well as her fiction as part of the university's ongoing Alumni Distinguished Professor/University Distinguished Professor Lecture Series.

  14. Science Fiction at the Far Side of Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Mikkel Willum

    2017-01-01

    This chapter explores the relationship between scientific discussions in evolutionary biology and the (re-)construction of fictional settings based upon evolutionary knowledge claims that are surrounded with controversy. Exploring Jean-Jacques Annaud’s problems with evolutionary reconstruction in...

  15. The neuroaesthetics of prose fiction : Pitfalls, parameters and prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burke, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/310522722

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of neuroaesthetic studies on prose fiction. This is in contrast to the very many impressive studies that have been conducted in recent times on the neuroaesthetics of sister arts such as painting, music and dance. Why might this be the case, what are its causes and, of greatest

  16. Exposure to Fictional Medical Television and Health: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Beth L.; Shensa, Ariel; Wessel, Charles; Hoffman, Robert; Primack, Brian A.

    2017-01-01

    Fictional medical television programs have long been a staple of television programming, and they remain popular today. We aimed to examine published literature assessing the influence of medical television programs on health outcomes. We conducted systematic literature searches in PubMed, PsychINFO and CINAHL. Selected studies had to be scholarly…

  17. Freeze, Wait, Reanimate: Cryonic Suspension and Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoffstall, Grant

    2010-01-01

    This essay takes as its chief point of departure Jacques Ellul's contention that imaginative treatments of malevolent technology in antitechnological science fiction, by way of inviting rejection, refusal, dismissal, or condemnation, conspire in facilitating human acceptance of and adjustment to technology as it otherwise presently is. The author…

  18. Science Fiction in Education: Case Studies from Classroom Implementations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrasidas, Charalambos; Avraamidou, Lucy; Theodoridou, Katerina; Themistokleous, Sotiris; Panaou, Petros

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript reports on findings from the implementation of the EU project "Science Fiction in Education" (Sci-Fi-Ed). The project provides teachers with tools, training, and guidance that will assist them in enhancing their teaching, making science more attractive to students, connecting it with real-life issues such as the…

  19. Science Fiction in Social Education: Exploring Consequences of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lance E.

    2013-01-01

    An NCSS Technology Position Statement and Guidelines, published in 2006 (an updated version is published in this issue of "Social Education"), affirms that social studies students should critically examine relations between technology and society. This article describes how teachers can use science fiction to introduce critical questions…

  20. Imagine That!: Science Fiction as a Learning Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontell, Val

    2003-01-01

    This article, based on a presentation made by the author at the 2003 California Library Association conference, provides examples of how librarians and teachers can use Science Fiction to provide catalysts for discussion in a variety of subjects; teach students how to question intelligently; and stimulate their imaginations, thus motivating them…

  1. Probing the Limits of Reality: The Metaphysics in Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, John L.

    2003-01-01

    Addresses metaphysical questions concerning the ultimate structure of reality and discusses scientific nature. Suggests that the world cannot afford to neglect the role of conceptual analysis in thinking critically about the possibilities that science fiction claims to describe. (Author/KHR)

  2. Developing Environmental Agency and Engagement through Young People's Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigger, Stephen; Webb, Jean

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the extent to which stories for young people encourage environmental engagement and a sense of agency. Our discussion is informed by the work of Paul Ricoeur (on hermeneutics and narrative), John Dewey (on primacy of experience) and John Macmurray (on personal agency in society). We understand fiction reading about place as…

  3. Fictionalized History in the Philippines: Five Narratives of Collective Amnesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Will P.

    2008-01-01

    The paper analyzes five historical fictions for children in the Batang Historyador (Young Historian) series which detail five periods in Philippine history. The books discuss the issues of child labor in precolonial Philippines, child labor and the right to education regardless of gender during the Spanish colonial period, child labor during the…

  4. Commodification of culture in fiction-induced tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipovšek Emilija

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the fiction-induced tourism, the illusion of the fictional world is maintained for the sake of the tourist in the real locations and thus it can be used to attract readership and cinephiles alike. Their desire to travel is based on the chronotope (Bakhtin, 1981 that is used as the background in their favourite books and films. Upon reading a book or seeing a film, the audience is inspired to visit the locations in a city where the plot took place. Thus the chronotope of the city featured in fiction develops palimpsestic features. If the flâneur experiences the city, its streets and inhabitants as he/she wanders aimlessly and translates afterwards all this into words in the urban narrative (Benjamin, 1968, then the tourist acts as a 'flâneur ranversé', while they walk the city and observe it in search of the places described in their favourite works of fiction. Moreover, the paper will consider some of the examples of the commodification of cultural products, including Harry Potter bookshop, guided walks and themed studio tours.

  5. Motivational climate, goal orientation, perceived sport ability, and enjoyment within Finnish junior ice hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaakkola, T; Ntoumanis, N; Liukkonen, J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relations among situational motivational climate, dispositional approach and avoidance achievement goals, perceived sport ability, and enjoyment in Finnish male junior ice hockey players. The sample comprised 265 junior B-level male players with a mean age of 17.03 years (SD = 0.63). Players filled questionnaires tapping their perceptions of coach motivational climate, achievement goals, perceived sport ability, and enjoyment. For the statistical analysis, players were divided into high and low perceived sport ability groups. Multigroup structural equation modeling (SEM) revealed an indirect path from task-involving motivational climate via task-approach goal to enjoyment. Additionally, SEM demonstrated four other direct associations, which existed in both perceived ability groups: from ego-involving motivational climate to ego-approach and ego-avoidance goals; from ego-approach goal to ego-avoidance goal; and from task-avoidance goal to ego-avoidance goal. Additionally, in the high perceived sport ability group, there was an association from task-involving motivational climate to enjoyment. The results of this study reveal that motivational climate emphasizing effort, personal development and improvement, and achievement goal mastering tasks are significant elements of enjoyment in junior ice hockey. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Star Excursion Balance Test performance and application in elite junior rugby union players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Garrett F; Delahunt, Eamonn; O'Sullivan, Eoghan; Fullam, Karl; Green, Brian S; Caulfield, Brian M

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate performance on selected reach directions of the Start Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) in an elite underage rugby union population, and determine if differences exist between the forward and back position units. This information may have implications for the application of this test in player injury prevention and management. Descriptive study. Gymnasium at an elite junior rugby union screening camp. 102 healthy male elite rugby union players (age = 17.9 ± 1.1 years, height = 1.83 ± 0.07 m, body mass = 90.5 ± 11.3 kg). Participants were assessed on the Anterior (A), Posterior-medial (PM), and Posterior-lateral (PL) reach directions of the SEBT. Normative data for SEBT performance in the A, PM and PL reach directions were established for an elite junior rugby union population. No significant differences in dynamic postural stability were observed between the forward and back position units. This study provides normative SEBT data on an elite junior rugby union population, which enables clinicians to compare player dynamic postural stability and has implications for use in the prevention and management of player injuries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Birth of the cool: a two-centuries decline in emotional expression in Anglophone fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Olivier; Acerbi, Alberto

    2016-12-02

    The presence of emotional words and content in stories has been shown to enhance a story's memorability, and its cultural success. Yet, recent cultural trends run in the opposite direction. Using the Google Books corpus, coupled with two metadata-rich corpora of Anglophone fiction books, we show a decrease in emotionality in English-speaking literature starting plausibly in the nineteenth century. We show that this decrease cannot be explained by changes unrelated to emotionality (such as demographic dynamics concerning age or gender balance, changes in vocabulary richness, or changes in the prevalence of literary genres), and that, in our three corpora, the decrease is driven almost entirely by a decline in the proportion of positive emotion-related words, while the frequency of negative emotion-related words shows little if any decline. Consistently with previous studies, we also find a link between ageing and negative emotionality at the individual level.

  8. The Status of Basic Technology in Cross River State Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    info

    Copyright © IAARR, 2007-2016: www.afrrevjo.net. Indexed African ... instructional materials for teaching basic technology in junior secondary school in. Cross River State and .... resource utilization. Conference paper, Nigeria Audio – visual.

  9. Variables that influence junior secondary school students‟ attitude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variables that influence junior secondary school students‟ attitude to agricultural ... and cluster) sampling techniques was employed to select a sample of 254 students. ... It was recommended that efforts be geared towards implementation of ...

  10. Strategies for Teaching Elementary and Junior High Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consuegra, Gerard F.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the applications of Piaget's theory of cognitive development to elementary and junior high school science teaching. Topics include planning concrete experiences, inductive and hypothetical deductive reasoning, measurement concepts, combinatorial logic, scientific experimentation and reflexive thinking. (SA)

  11. Teaching Human Sexuality in Junior High School: An Interdisciplinary Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Lucy; And Others

    1980-01-01

    An experimental sex education program designed for the junior high school adolescent is described. The program's goal is to affect primary prevention of adolescent pregnancy and other problems related to adolescent sexuality. (Author/JMF)

  12. PSI for Low-Enrollment Junior-Senior Physics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Charles P.; Young, Robert D.

    1976-01-01

    The administration of a Personalized System of Instruction (PSI) for junior-senior level courses in mechanics, electricity and magneturn, atomic physics, mathematical physics, physics and computers, astrophysics, and relativity is described. (CP)

  13. Profiles Junior high School West Java in Education Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NFN Nahadi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Descriptive studies have been conducted on the existing junior high profile in West Java on Education Learning Environment. The study was conducted by purposive sampling and descriptive done to get an idea about the profile of SMP in West Java implementation of the learning environment. in junior high school in West Java. Research conducted by distributing questionnaires, and observations based on the indicators developed. Based on this research, it is known that, PLH learning in junior high school in West Java has been in force since 2007 after the enactment of the Governor of West Java on environmental education for junior high school students in West Java. Learning that lasts generally implemented in conventional teacher, and it is without any innovations. It has made learning the essential condition runs well, but has not lasted optimally.

  14. John Brozovsky appointed Wayne E. Leininger Junior Faculty Fellow

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    John Brozovsky, associate professor of accounting and information systems in the Pamplin College of Business at Virginia Tech, has been appointed the Wayne E. Leininger Junior Faculty Fellow by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

  15. Effects of Cloze Instructional Approach on Junior Secondary School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of Cloze Instructional Approach on Junior Secondary School Students' ... comprehension achievement in English language using Owerri Educational Zone. ... basis for incorporating the cloze approach as a method of teaching reading ...

  16. Academic achievement of junior high school students with sleep disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Auliyanti, Fijri; Sekartini, Rini; Mangunatmadja, Irawan

    2016-01-01

    ... status, family structure, after-hours education program, presence of TV/computer in the bedroom, sleep duration during school days, as well as bedtime and wakeup time difference in junior high school...

  17. A Study of Junior Students'Cross- Culture Obstacles in English Reading Comprehension%A Study of Junior Students' Cross-Culture Obstacles in English Reading Comprehension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱雅琴

    2015-01-01

    This paper will research Junior students' cross-cultural obstacles in English reading from the perspective of culture background,Eliminating Junior students'cross-cultural barriers can improve intercultural communication competent.

  18. Errors in Junior English Writing:Resources and Strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Shu-ling

    2013-01-01

    The research on the common errors in junior English writings reflects the categories of errors, resources of errors, and how to do with errors in effective ways. Errors are divided into two types:intralingual errors and interlingual errors. The research finds that Chinese junior students depend heavily on their native language in English writing and finds out some effective strate-gies avoiding errors in writing.

  19. What makes work experience program in junior high school effective?

    OpenAIRE

    五島, 萌子; 重川, 純子

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the work experience program in junior high schools is spreading all over Japan in order that students get views on occupation and works. The purpose of this study is to clarify the value of this program and its determinants of effectiveness. We conducted interview survey to informantswho experienced the work experience programs in junior high school from 2000 to 2004. We have found that the followings are important to make the program more effective: adequacy interm and difficulty, ...

  20. Obesity prevention for junior high school students: An intervention programme

    OpenAIRE

    Topalidou,Anastasia; Dafopoulou, GM

    2013-01-01

    Background: Generally, schools are an important setting to provide programmes for obesity prevention for children because the vast majority of children attend school. This study investigates how an intervention programme in the school subject of Physical Education can help reduce obesity for junior high school students in combination with information on dietary and health matters in school and family. Materials and Methods: A quantitative study for junior high school students (N = 250) and a ...