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Sample records for junior cross-country skiers

  1. Characteristics of injuries among young cross-country skiers.

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    Boguszewski Dariusz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop information about injuries in cadet and junior cross-country skiers. Material and methods. Fifty female (n=21 and male (n=29 competitors from Podhale were in research group. Skiers completed questionnaire. The questions concerned the location of injuries, types of injuries, methods of treatments and rehabilitation and recovery exercises. Results. The most frequent injury in the research group was bruises, cuts and sprains and muscle strain. Few people had suffered broken bones and muscle ruptures. The most of the skiers suffered knee injuries. As a treatment PRICEMM procedure has been introduced. The main method of recovery was rest from training. Conclusions. No correlation was found epidemiology of injuries and the treatment, gender, age, level of sport and the number of starts of the season. Sports training and recovery should be similar In each group (female and male competitors. Players starting considerably more likely to devote less time to treatment and improvement of injury.

  2. The evolution of champion cross-country-skier training: From lumberjacks to professional athletes

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    Sandbakk, Øyvind

    2017-01-01

    Competitive cross-country (XC) skiing has traditions extending back to the mid-19th century and was included as a men’s event in the first Winter Games in 1924. Since then, tremendous improvements in equipment, track preparation, and knowledge about training have prompted greater increases in XC-skiing speeds than in any other Olympic sport. In response, this commentary focuses on how the training of successful XC skiers has evolved, with interviews and training data from surviving Norwegian ...

  3. The Evolution of Champion Cross-Country-Skier Training: From Lumberjacks to Professional Athletes.

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    Sandbakk, Øyvind

    2017-02-01

    Competitive cross-country (XC) skiing has traditions extending back to the mid-19th century and was included as a men's event in the first Winter Games in 1924. Since then, tremendous improvements in equipment, track preparation, and knowledge about training have prompted greater increases in XC-skiing speeds than in any other Olympic sport. In response, this commentary focuses on how the training of successful XC skiers has evolved, with interviews and training data from surviving Norwegian world and Olympic XC champions as primary sources. Before 1970, most male champion XC skiers were lumberjacks who ran or skied long distances to and from felling areas while working long days in the woods. In addition, they trained as much as possible, with increased intensity during the autumn, while less work but more ski-specific training and competitions were done during the winter. Until the 1970s, few XC skiers were women, whom coaches believed tolerated less training than men did. Today's XC skiers are less physically active, but the influence of both science and the systematic approaches of former athletes and coaches have gradually taught XC skiers to adopt smarter, more goal-oriented training practices. Although the very high VO 2 max of world-class XC skiers has remained the same since the 1960s, new events in modern XC skiing have additionally required superior upper-body power, high-speed techniques, and tactical flexibility. These elements also emerge in the training of today's best skiers; women's physiological capacities and training routines especially seem to have improved dramatically.

  4. Changes in physical performance parameters during and after moderate altitude training in elite cross country skiers

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    Jensen, Kurt; Höög, Martina; Willis, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Olympic cross country skiing competitions in 2014 will be held in Sochi, Russia at an altitude of approximately 1500m. Although moderate, this altitude is known to reduce performance in highly trained endurance athletes. It is also known that individuals react differently during...... altitude exposure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate performance changes during and after three weeks of training in moderate altitude in elite skiers. METHOD: Four male and three female skiers were tested on a roller skiing treadmill using the classic technique at sea level (NORM1), after 3 and 20...... and the WVO2max decreased 8.9% and 9.1%, respectively (P0.05). In contrast, the average power output (322±87W) during the “all out” test increased 3.4±2.7% 10 days after the altitude training (P

  5. Factors that Influence the Performance of Elite Sprint Cross-Country Skiers.

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    Hébert-Losier, Kim; Zinner, Christoph; Platt, Simon; Stöggl, Thomas; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2017-02-01

    Sprint events in cross-country skiing are unique not only with respect to their length (0.8-1.8 km), but also in involving four high-intensity heats of ~3 min in duration, separated by a relatively short recovery period (15-60 min). Our aim was to systematically review the scientific literature to identify factors related to the performance of elite sprint cross-country skiers. Four electronic databases were searched using relevant medical subject headings and keywords, as were reference lists, relevant journals, and key authors in the field. Only original research articles addressing physiology, biomechanics, anthropometry, or neuromuscular characteristics and elite sprint cross-country skiers and performance outcomes were included. All articles meeting inclusion criteria were quality assessed. Data were extracted from each article using a standardized form and subsequently summarized. Thirty-one articles met the criteria for inclusion, were reviewed, and scored an average of 66 ± 7 % (range 56-78 %) upon quality assessment. All articles except for two were quasi-experimental, and only one had a fully-experimental research design. In total, articles comprised 567 subjects (74 % male), with only nine articles explicitly reporting their skiers' sprint International Skiing Federation points (weighted mean 116 ± 78). A similar number of articles addressed skating and classical techniques, with more than half of the investigations involving roller-skiing assessments under laboratory conditions. A range of physiological, biomechanical, anthropometric, and neuromuscular characteristics was reported to relate to sprint skiing performance. Both aerobic and anaerobic capacities are important qualities, with the anaerobic system suggested to contribute more to the performance during the first of repeated heats; and the aerobic system during subsequent heats. A capacity for high speed in all the following instances is important for the performance of sprint cross-country

  6. A Comparison of Frontal Theta Activity During Shooting among Biathletes and Cross-Country Skiers before and after Vigorous Exercise.

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    Harri Luchsinger

    Full Text Available Previous studies using electroencephalography (EEG to monitor brain activity have linked higher frontal theta activity to more focused attention and superior performance in goal-directed precision tasks. In biathlon, shooting performance requires focused attention after high-intensity cross-country skiing.To compare biathletes (serving as experts and cross-country skiers (novices and examine the effect of vigorous exercise on frontal theta activity during shooting.EEG frontal theta (4-7 Hz activity was compared between nine biathletes and eight cross-country skiers at comparable skiing performance levels who fired 100 shots on a 5-m indoor shooting range in quiescent condition followed by 20 shots after each of five 6-min high-intensity roller skiing sessions in the skating technique on a treadmill.Biathletes hit 80±14% and 81±10% before and after the roller skiing sessions, respectively. For the cross-country skiers these values were significantly lower than for the biathletes and amounted to 39±13% and 44±11% (p<0.01. Biathletes had on average 6% higher frontal theta activity during shooting as compared to cross-country skiers (F1,15 = 4.82, p = 0.044, but no significant effect of vigorous exercise on frontal theta activity in either of the two groups were found (F1,15 = 0.14, p = 0.72.Biathletes had significantly higher frontal theta activity than cross-country skiers during shooting, indicating higher focused attention in biathletes. Vigorous exercise did not decrease shooting performance or frontal theta activity during shooting in biathletes and cross-country skiers.

  7. Using Bilateral Functional and Anthropometric Tests to Define Symmetry in Cross-Country Skiers

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    Björklund Glenn

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the symmetry of anthropometry and muscle function in cross-country skiers and their association to vertical jumping power. Twenty cross-country skiers were recruited (21.7 ± 3.8 yrs, 180.6 ± 7.6 cm, 73.2 ± 7.6 kg. Anthropometric data was obtained using an iDXA scan. VO2max was determined using the diagonal stride technique on a ski treadmill. Bilateral functional tests for the upper and lower body were the handgrip and standing heel-rise tests. Vertical jump height and power were assessed with a counter movement jump. Percent asymmetry was calculated using a symmetry index and four absolute symmetry index levels. At a group level the upper body was more asymmetrical with regard to lean muscle mass (p = 0.022, d = 0.17 and functional strength (p = 0.019, d = 0.51 than the lower body. At an individual level the expected frequencies for absolute symmetry level indexes showed the largest deviation from zero for the heel-rise test (χ2 = 16.97, p = 0.001, while the leg lean mass deviated the least (χ2 = 0.42, p = 0.517. No relationships were observed between absolute symmetry level indexes of the lower body and counter movement jump performance (p > 0.05. As a group the skiers display a more asymmetrical upper body than lower body regarding muscle mass and strength. Interestingly at the individual level, despite symmetrical lean leg muscle mass the heel-rise test showed the largest asymmetry. This finding indicates a mismatch in muscle function for the lower body.

  8. Using Bilateral Functional and Anthropometric Tests to Define Symmetry in Cross-Country Skiers.

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    Björklund, Glenn; Alricsson, Marie; Svantesson, Ulla

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the symmetry of anthropometry and muscle function in cross-country skiers and their association to vertical jumping power. Twenty cross-country skiers were recruited (21.7 ± 3.8 yrs, 180.6 ± 7.6 cm, 73.2 ± 7.6 kg). Anthropometric data was obtained using an iDXA scan. VO 2max was determined using the diagonal stride technique on a ski treadmill. Bilateral functional tests for the upper and lower body were the handgrip and standing heel-rise tests. Vertical jump height and power were assessed with a counter movement jump. Percent asymmetry was calculated using a symmetry index and four absolute symmetry index levels. At a group level the upper body was more asymmetrical with regard to lean muscle mass (p = 0.022, d = 0.17) and functional strength (p = 0.019, d = 0.51) than the lower body. At an individual level the expected frequencies for absolute symmetry level indexes showed the largest deviation from zero for the heel-rise test (χ2 = 16.97, p = 0.001), while the leg lean mass deviated the least (χ2 = 0.42, p = 0.517). No relationships were observed between absolute symmetry level indexes of the lower body and counter movement jump performance (p > 0.05). As a group the skiers display a more asymmetrical upper body than lower body regarding muscle mass and strength. Interestingly at the individual level, despite symmetrical lean leg muscle mass the heel-rise test showed the largest asymmetry. This finding indicates a mismatch in muscle function for the lower body.

  9. Prediction of performance in Vasaloppet through long lasting ski- ergometer and rollerski tests in cross-country skiers

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    Mygind, Erik; Wulff, Kristian; Jensen, Mads Rosenkilde

    2015-01-01

    -ergometer and Rollerski field tests correlate strongly with performance in Vasaloppet and therefore might be useful test tools for recreational skiers who wish to participate in long lasting c-c competitions. Keywords: Cross-country ski training, Upper body, Exercise intensity, Field test, Body composition blood lactate......The main purpose was to investigate if long lasting cross-country (c-c) test procedures could predict performance time in ‘Vasaloppet’ and secondly the effect of a 16 weeks training period on a 90 min double poling performance test. 24 moderate trained c-c skiers participated in the study...... and completed Vasaloppet. All skiers carried out pre and post training tests in a 90 minutes ski-ergometer double poling test and a 120 minutes rollerski field test on a closed paved circuit. 19 skiers provided detailed training logs that could sufficiently establish their training preparation for Vasaloppet...

  10. Biomechanical analysis of double poling in elite cross-country skiers.

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    Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Lindinger, Stefan; Stöggl, Thomas; Eitzlmair, Erich; Müller, Erich

    2005-05-01

    To further the understanding of double poling (DP) through biomechanical analysis of upper and lower body movements during DP in cross-country (XC) skiing at racing speed. Eleven elite XC skiers performed DP at 85% of their maximal DP velocity (V85%) during roller skiing at 1 degrees inclination on a treadmill. Pole and plantar ground reaction forces, joint angles (elbow, hip, knee, and ankle), cycle characteristics, and electromyography (EMG) of upper and lower body muscles were analyzed. 1) Pole force pattern with initial impact force peak and the following active force peak (PPF) correlated to V85%, (r = 0.66, P biomechanical aspects. Future research should further investigate the relationship between biomechanical and physiological variables and elaborate training models to improve DP performance.

  11. Gender differences in the physiological responses and kinematic behaviour of elite sprint cross-country skiers.

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    Sandbakk, Oyvind; Ettema, Gertjan; Leirdal, Stig; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2012-03-01

    Gender differences in performance by elite endurance athletes, including runners, track cyclists and speed skaters, have been shown to be approximately 12%. The present study was designed to examine gender differences in physiological responses and kinematics associated with sprint cross-country skiing. Eight male and eight female elite sprint cross-country skiers, matched for performance, carried out a submaximal test, a test of maximal aerobic capacity (VO(2max)) and a shorter test of maximal treadmill speed (V (max)) during treadmill roller skiing utilizing the G3 skating technique. The men attained 17% higher speeds during both the VO(2max) and the V (max) tests (P differences that were reduced to 9% upon normalization for fat-free body mass. Furthermore, the men exhibited 14 and 7% higher VO(2max) relative to total and fat-free body mass, respectively (P gender groups. At the same absolute speed, men employed 11% longer cycles at lower rates, and at peak speed, 21% longer cycle lengths (P gender differences in performance and VO(2max) than those reported for comparable endurance sports. These differences reflect primarily the higher VO(2max) and lower percentage of body fat in men, since no gender differences in the ability to convert metabolic rate into work rate and speed were observed. With regards to kinematics, the gender difference in performance was explained by cycle length, not by cycle rate.

  12. The elite cross-country skier provides unique insights into human exercise physiology.

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    Holmberg, H-C

    2015-12-01

    Successful cross-country skiing, one of the most demanding of endurance sports, involves considerable physiological challenges posed by the combined upper- and lower-body effort of varying intensity and duration, on hilly terrain, often at moderate altitude and in a cold environment. Over the years, this unique sport has helped physiologists gain novel insights into the limits of human performance and regulatory capacity. There is a long-standing tradition of researchers in this field working together with coaches and athletes to improve training routines, monitor progress, and refine skiing techniques. This review summarizes research on elite cross-country skiers, with special emphasis on the studies initiated by Professor Bengt Saltin. He often employed exercise as a means to learn more about the human body, successfully engaging elite endurance athletes to improve our understanding of the demands, characteristics, and specific effects associated with different types of exercise. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The Training Characteristics of the World's Most Successful Female Cross-Country Skier.

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    Solli, Guro S; Tønnessen, Espen; Sandbakk, Øyvind

    2017-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the training characteristics of the most successful female cross-country skier ever during the best period of her career. The participant won six gold medals at the Olympic Games, 18 gold medals at the World Championship, and 110 World Cup victories. Day-to-day training diary data, interviews, and physiological tests were analyzed. Training data was systemized by training form (endurance, strength, and speed), intensity [low- (LIT), moderate- (MIT), and high-intensity training (HIT)], and mode (running, cycling, and skiing/roller skiing), followed by a division into different periodization phases. Specific sessions utilized in the various periodization periods and the day-to-day periodization of training, in connection with altitude camps and tapering toward major championships, were also analyzed. Following a 12-year nonlinear increase in training load, the annual training volume during the five consecutive successful years stabilized at 937 ± 25 h, distributed across 543 ± 9 sessions. During these 5 years, total training time was distributed as 90.6% endurance-, 8.0% strength-, and 1.4% speed-training, with endurance-training time consisting of 92.3 ± 0.3% LIT, 2.9 ± 0.5% MIT, and 4.8 ± 0.5% HIT. Total LIT-time consisted of 21% warm-up, 14% sessions 90 min. While the total number of LIT sessions remained stable across phases (32 sessions), total LIT-time was reduced from GP (76 h/month) to SP (68 h/month) and CP (55 h/month). MIT-time decreased from GP (2.8 h/month) to SP (2.2 h/month) and CP (1 h/month). HIT-time increased from GP (2.8 h/month) to SP (3.2 h/month) and CP (4.7 h/month). Altitude training accounted for 18-25% of annual training volume and performed across relatively short training camps (≤16 days) with a clear reduction of HIT training, but increased total and LIT volume compared to sea-level training. Training before international championships included a 2-week increase in LIT and strength

  14. The Training Characteristics of the World's Most Successful Female Cross-Country Skier

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    Guro S. Solli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study was to investigate the training characteristics of the most successful female cross-country skier ever during the best period of her career. The participant won six gold medals at the Olympic Games, 18 gold medals at the World Championship, and 110 World Cup victories. Day-to-day training diary data, interviews, and physiological tests were analyzed. Training data was systemized by training form (endurance, strength, and speed, intensity [low- (LIT, moderate- (MIT, and high-intensity training (HIT], and mode (running, cycling, and skiing/roller skiing, followed by a division into different periodization phases. Specific sessions utilized in the various periodization periods and the day-to-day periodization of training, in connection with altitude camps and tapering toward major championships, were also analyzed. Following a 12-year nonlinear increase in training load, the annual training volume during the five consecutive successful years stabilized at 937 ± 25 h, distributed across 543 ± 9 sessions. During these 5 years, total training time was distributed as 90.6% endurance-, 8.0% strength-, and 1.4% speed-training, with endurance-training time consisting of 92.3 ± 0.3% LIT, 2.9 ± 0.5% MIT, and 4.8 ± 0.5% HIT. Total LIT-time consisted of 21% warm-up, 14% sessions <90 min, and 65% long-duration sessions >90 min. While the total number of LIT sessions remained stable across phases (32 sessions, total LIT-time was reduced from GP (76 h/month to SP (68 h/month and CP (55 h/month. MIT-time decreased from GP (2.8 h/month to SP (2.2 h/month and CP (1 h/month. HIT-time increased from GP (2.8 h/month to SP (3.2 h/month and CP (4.7 h/month. Altitude training accounted for 18–25% of annual training volume and performed across relatively short training camps (≤16 days with a clear reduction of HIT training, but increased total and LIT volume compared to sea-level training. Training before international championships

  15. Biomechanical characteristics and speed adaptation during kick double poling on roller skis in elite cross-country skiers.

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    Göpfert, Caroline; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Stöggl, Thomas; Müller, Erich; Lindinger, Stefan Josef

    2013-06-01

    Recent developments in cross-country ski racing should promote the use of kick double poling. This technique, however, has not been the focus in athletes' training and has barely been investigated. The aims of the present study were to develop a function-based phase definition and to analyse speed adaptation mechanisms for kick double poling in elite cross-country skiers. Joint kinematics and pole/plantar forces were recorded in 10 athletes while performing kick double poling at three submaximal roller skiing speeds. A speed increase was associated with increases in cycle length and rate, while absolute poling and leg push-off durations shortened. Despite maintained impulses of force, the peak and average pole/leg forces increased. During double poling and leg push-off, ranges of motion of elbow flexion and extension increased (p push-off showed high variability among elite skiers, thus illustrating important aspects for technique training.

  16. Analysis of classical time-trial performance and technique-specific physiological determinants in elite female cross-country skiers

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    Øyvind Sandbakk

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the contribution of performance on uphill, flat, and downhill sections to overall performance in an international 10-km classical time-trial in elite female cross-country skiers, as well as the relationships between performance on snow and laboratory-measured physiological variables in the double poling (DP and diagonal (DIA techniques. Ten elite female cross-country skiers were continuously measured by a global positioning system device during an international 10-km cross-country skiing time-trial in the classical technique. One month prior to the race, all skiers performed a 5-min submaximal and 3-min self-paced performance test while roller skiing on a treadmill, both in the DP and DIA techniques. The time spent on uphill (r=0.98 and flat (r=0.91 sections of the race correlated most strongly with the overall 10-km performance (both p<0.05. Approximately 56% of the racing time was spent uphill, and stepwise multiple regression revealed that uphill time explained 95.5% of the variance in overall performance (p<0.001. Distance covered during the 3-min roller-skiing test and body-mass normalized peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak in both techniques showed the strongest correlations with overall time-trial performance (r=0.66-0.78, with DP capacity tending to have greatest impact on the flat and DIA capacity on uphill terrain (all p<0.05. Our present findings reveal that the time spent uphill most strongly determine classical time-trial performance, and that the major portion of the performance differences among elite female cross-country skiers can be explained by variations in technique-specific aerobic power.

  17. Pole lengths influence O2-cost during double poling in highly trained cross-country skiers.

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    Carlsen, Camilla Høivik; Rud, Bjarne; Myklebust, Håvard; Losnegard, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    In elite cross-country skiing, double poling is used in different terrain. This study compared O 2 -cost and kinematics during double poling with four different pole lengths [self-selected (SS), SS - 5 cm, SS + 5 cm, SS + 10 cm] at Low versus Moderate incline. Thirteen highly trained male cross-country skiers (mean ± SD 23 ± 3 years; 182 ± 4 cm; 77 ± 6 kg) completed eight submaximal trials with roller skis on a treadmill at two conditions: "Low incline" (1.7°; 4.5 m s -1 ) and "Moderate incline" (4.5°; 2.5 m s -1 ) with each of the four pole lengths. O 2 -cost and 3D body kinematics were assessed in each trial. In Low incline, SS + 10 cm induced a lower O 2 -cost than all the other pole lengths [P size (ES) 0.5-0.8], whereas no differences were found between the remaining pole lengths (P > 0.05; ES 0.2-0.4). In Moderate incline, significant differences between all pole lengths were found for O 2 -cost, with SS - 5 cm > SS > SS + 5 cm > SS + 10 cm (P differences in O 2 -cost between SS and the other pole lengths were greater in Moderate incline than Low incline (SS - 5 cm; 1.5%, ES 0.8, SS + 5 cm; 1.3%, ES 1.0, and SS + 10 cm; 1.9%, ES 1.0, all P difference was found in cycle, poling or reposition times between pole lengths. However, at both conditions a smaller total vertical displacement of center of mass was observed with SS + 10 cm compared to the other pole lengths. Increasing pole length from SS - 5 cm to SS + 10 cm during double poling induced lower O 2 -cost and this advantage was greater in Moderate compared to Low incline.

  18. Effects of exercise on the markers of iron status in serum of cross-country skiers

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    J Malczewska-Lenczowska

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aim was to assess the within-subject, day-to-day variability for ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR concentrations in serum of 6 female and 8 male cross-country skiers aged 16-18 years under a regular training regimen throughout 8 consecutive days. The concentrations of iron status variables and creatine kinase (CK activities were adjusted to plasma volume changes. Mean ferritin concentrations were 30.6 • 1.142[sup]±1[/sup] and 22.6 • 1.167[sup]±1[/sup] μg/l for men and women, respectively, the average within-subject, mean day-to-day variability coefficients (CV being 13.4% in men and 15.2% in women. Mean sTfR was 2.14 • 1.050[sup]±1[/sup] and 2.62 • 1.047[sup]±1[/sup] mg/l, respectively, and mean day-to-day CV 6.5% and 4.6%. Mean CV for sTfR/logFerr were 6.0% and 7.4%, respectively. Neither index correlated with training loads or CK activities. Thus, the training performed once daily had no significant effect on ferritin concentrations on the following morning, so ferritin alone may prove insufficient in detecting iron deficiency in endurance athletes. The low variability of sTfR under endurance loads made it useful in detecting iron deficiency together with ferritin and the sTfR/logFerr index. Adjusting the concentrations of ferritin and sTfR by changes in plasma volume might be recommendable for endurance athletes.

  19. "Living high - training low" vs. "living high - training high": erythropoietic responses and performance of adolescent cross-country skiers.

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    Christoulas, K; Karamouzis, M; Mandroukas, K

    2011-03-01

    To determine and compare the erythropoietic response and exercise performance of adolescent cross-country skiers, as a result of "living high-training high" (HH) and "living high-training low" (HL). Nine female and six male adolescent cross-country skiers volunteered to participate in separate trials. In the first trial (HH), the skiers lived and trained for 21 days at 1550-2050 m, while in the second trial (HL) they trained near sea level (450-500 m) but resided at 1550 m. All participants underwent maximal cycle ergometer tests for the determination of VO2max and cardiorespiratory parameters via an open circuit system at sea level before ascent to altitude, and 1-2 days after descent from altitude. Blood samples were drawn prior to and immediately after maximal cycle exercise testing, at sea level prior to ascent, on days 1 (D1) and 21 (D21) at altitude (1740 m), and 1-2 days post-altitude, for the determination of serum erythropoietin (EPO) concentration, haemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Ht), and red blood cell (RBC) volume. The results showed that both boys and girls cross-country skiers, significantly improved their sea level VO2max after 21 days of living at moderate altitude and training near sea level. The present study demonstrates that living at moderate altitude, 1550-2050 m and training low, near sea level (450-500 m) significantly increases VO2max and RBC mass for both boys and girls. Results indicate that applying the training concept "living high - training low" in adolescent athletes may improve their endurance performance.

  20. Aerobic power and lean mass are indicators of competitive sprint performance among elite female cross-country skiers

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    Carlsson T

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tomas Carlsson, Michail Tonkonogi, Magnus Carlsson School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, SwedenAbstract: The purpose of this study was to establish the optimal allometric models to predict International Ski Federation’s ski-ranking points for sprint competitions (FISsprint among elite female cross-country skiers based on maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max and lean mass (LM. Ten elite female cross-country skiers (age: 24.5±2.8 years [mean ± SD] completed a treadmill roller-skiing test to determine V̇O2max (ie, aerobic power using the diagonal stride technique, whereas LM (ie, a surrogate indicator of anaerobic capacity was determined by dual-emission X-ray anthropometry. The subjects’ FISsprint were used as competitive performance measures. Power function modeling was used to predict the skiers’ FISsprint based on V̇O2max, LM, and body mass. The subjects’ test and performance data were as follows: V̇O2max, 4.0±0.3 L min-1; LM, 48.9±4.4 kg; body mass, 64.0±5.2 kg; and FISsprint, 116.4±59.6 points. The following power function models were established for the prediction of FISsprint: 3.91×105 ∙ VO -6.00 2max and 6.95×1010 ∙ LM-5.25; these models explained 66% (P=0.0043 and 52% (P=0.019, respectively, of the variance in the FISsprint. Body mass failed to contribute to both models; hence, the models are based on V̇O2max and LM expressed absolutely. The results demonstrate that the physiological variables that reflect aerobic power and anaerobic capacity are important indicators of competitive sprint performance among elite female skiers. To accurately indicate performance capability among elite female skiers, the presented power function models should be used. Skiers whose V̇O2max differs by 1% will differ in their FISsprint by 5.8%, whereas the corresponding 1% difference in LM is related to an FISsprint difference of 5.1%, where both differences are in favor of the skier with

  1. Expert model for the evaluation of potential competition performance in cross-country skiers exemplified by two evaluated athletes

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    J Pustovrh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present research was to obtain information on potential competition performance in cross-country skiers by the method of expert modelling. On the basis of expert knowledge, a model of potential performance (MFMPS was constructed in the form of a decision tree, encompassing motor, functional, morphological, psychological, and sociological subspaces. For all base variables, normalisers were determined, and for all nodes in the MFMPS model, decision rules were determined according to the method applying dependent determination of weights. Potential competition performance of the sample of 14 subjects measured – cross-country skiers in the age of 17 and 18 years was assessed at all levels in the MFMPS model by means of the SMMS program. At the highest levels of the MFMPS model, the correlation between the scores of the variables and the criterion variable SLO_FIS was established by means of the Pearson correlation coefficient. The validity of the MFMPS model  by means of which 81% of the variance of the criterion variable was explained – was established. The model laid out in this way allows us to search for current weak and good points in the preparation status of an athlete, on which the direction and correction of the transformation process is based. In this way, objective longitudinal monitoring of the development of the athlete's potential is also ensured.

  2. Fibre characteristics and enzyme levels of arm and leg muscles in elite cross-country skiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Erik

    1995-01-01

    in TRI than VAS, while the oxidative enzyme activities (CS and HAD) were significantly lower in TRI as compared with VAS. From all independent variables, only the maximal aerobic power was related significantly to performance time. The difference in maximal aerobic power between the skiers could explain...

  3. Seasonal variations in body composition, maximal oxygen uptake, and gas exchange threshold in cross-country skiers.

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    Polat, Metin; Korkmaz Eryılmaz, Selcen; Aydoğan, Sami

    2018-01-01

    In order to ensure that athletes achieve their highest performance levels during competitive seasons, monitoring their long-term performance data is crucial for understanding the impact of ongoing training programs and evaluating training strategies. The present study was thus designed to investigate the variations in body composition, maximal oxygen uptake (VO 2max ), and gas exchange threshold values of cross-country skiers across training phases throughout a season. In total, 15 athletes who participate in international cross-country ski competitions voluntarily took part in this study. The athletes underwent incremental treadmill running tests at 3 different time points over a period of 1 year. The first measurements were obtained in July, during the first preparation period; the second measurements were obtained in October, during the second preparation period; and the third measurements were obtained in February, during the competition period. Body weight, body mass index (BMI), body fat (%), as well as VO 2max values and gas exchange threshold, measured using V-slope method during the incremental running tests, were assessed at all 3 time points. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS 20 package software. Significant differences between the measurements were assessed using Friedman's twoway variance analysis with a post hoc option. The athletes' body weights and BMI measurements at the third point were significantly lower compared with the results of the second measurement ( p exchange threshold, running speed at the gas exchange threshold, VO 2max , amount of oxygen consumed at gas exchange threshold level (VO 2GET ), maximal heart rate (HR max ), and heart rate at gas exchange threshold level (HR GET ) values did not significantly differ between the measurement time points ( p >0.05). VO 2max and gas exchange threshold values recorded during the third measurements, the timing of which coincided with the competitive season of the cross-country skiers

  4. The Effect of Creatin and Carnitine Supplementation on 5 kmClassic and 10 km Free Styles Race Performance of Cross Country Skiers

    OpenAIRE

    Ebru ÇETİN

    2004-01-01

    This İnvestigation examined the effect of creatin and carnitine supplementation on 5 km classic and 10 km free styles race performance of competitive cross country skiers.Eighteen highly trained (12 male and 6 female) cross country skiers aged 13-16 years seperated into 3 equal groups. All groups participated in the 5 km classic and 10 km free races styles in Erciyes at 2200m altitude ski center before the carnitine and creatine loading. After the race subjects were seperated into carnitine, ...

  5. The effect of aging on pacing strategies of cross-country skiers and the role of performance level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidis, Pantelis Theodoros; Villiger, Elias; Rosemann, Thomas; Knechtle, Beat

    2018-01-01

    The participation of master cross-country (XC) skiers in training and competition has increased during the last decades; however, little is known yet about whether these athletes differ from their younger counterparts in aspects of performance such as pacing. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the combined effect of age and performance (race time) on pacing in cross-country (XC) skiing. We analyzed all finishers ( n  = 79,722) in 'Vasaloppet' from 2012 to 2017, the largest cross-country skiing race in the world, classified according to their race time into 10 groups: 3-4 h, 4-5 h, ..., 12-13 h. A trivial main effect of sex on total pace range was observed ( p  < 0.001, η 2  = 0.002), where women (44.1 ± 10.2%) had larger total pace range than men (40.9 ± 11.8%). A large main effect of performance group on total pace range was shown ( p  < 0.001, η 2  = 0.160), where the smallest total pace range was 21.8 ± 1.9% (3-4 h group) and the largest 50.1 ± 9.9% (10-11 h group). A trivial sex×performance group interaction on total pace range was found ( p  < 0.001, η 2  = 0.001) with the largest sex difference in pacing shown in 9-10 h group. A trivial and small main effect of age was found in women ( p  < 0.001, η 2  = 0.005) and men ( p  < 0.001, η 2  = 0.011), respectively, where the masters had smaller total pace range than their younger counterparts. A trivial age group×performance group interaction on total pace range was observed in both women ( p  < 0.001, η 2  = 0.008) and men ( p  < 0.001, η 2  = 0.006) with smaller differences among age groups in the faster performance groups. In summary, master XC skiers adopted a relatively even pacing independently from their race time and the differences in pacing from the younger XC skiers were more pronounced in the slower masters. These findings suggest that exercise attenuates the decline of performance in

  6. Seasonal variations in VO2max, O2-cost, O2-deficit, and performance in elite cross-country skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losnegard, Thomas; Myklebust, Håvard; Spencer, Matt; Hallén, Jostein

    2013-07-01

    Long-term effects of training are important information for athletes, coaches, and scientists when associating changes in physiological indices with changes in performance. Therefore, this study monitored changes in aerobic and anaerobic capacities and performance in a group of elite cross-country skiers during a full sport season. Thirteen men (age, 23 ± 2 years; height, 182 ± 6 cm; body mass, 76 ± 8 kg; V2 roller ski skating VO2max, 79.3 ± 4.4 ml·kg·min or 6.0 ± 0.5 L·min) were tested during the early, middle, and late preparation phase: June (T1), August (T2), and October (T3); during the competition phase: January/February (T4); and after early precompetition phase: June (T5). O2-cost during submaximal efforts, V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak, accumulated oxygen deficit (ΣO2-deficit), and performance during a 1,000-m test were determined in the V2 ski skating technique on a roller ski treadmill. Subjects performed their training on an individual basis, and detailed training logs were categorized into different intensity zones and exercise modes. Total training volume was highest during the summer months (early preseason) and decreased toward and through the winter season, whereas the volume of high-intensity training increased (all p size; ES = 0.63-1.37, moderate to large, all p country skiers induced no significant changes in V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak but improved performance, O2-cost, and ΣO2-deficit.

  7. The Impact of Endurance Training on Functional Parameters During the Preparation Phase among Cross-Country Skiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žiška Peter

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the study, we have tried to demonstrate the effect of endurance training on changes in functional parameters during the preparation phase (12-week mesocycle among cross-country skiers. The group consisted of 10 male cross-country skiers (age: 21.4 ±5 year who completed control (1st 6 week mesocycle and experimental period (2nd 6 week mesocycle.We focused on the following time-varying parameters: changes in maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max, the level of aerobic (AeT and anaerobic thresholds (AT, maximum heart rate (HRmax and performance on the running treadmill. The intra-individual monitoring of each athlete revealed statistical significance of VO2max (mid_VO2max = 69.48 ± 5.72 l.kg-1.min-1, post_ VO2max = 70.96 ± 5.67 ml.kg-1.min-1; p≤0.05 and the level of AT (mid_AT = 86.2 ± 5.43 %, post_AT = 87.8 ± 5.59 %; p≤0.01 the performance on the running treadmill (mid_t = 14:54 ± 1:43 min., post_t = 15:30 ± 1:50 min.; p≤0.05.The significant changes were recorded in the AeT(pre_AeT = 70.3 ± 7.56 %, mid_AeT = 72.5 ± 7.59 %; p≤0.05 in theHRmax(pre_HRmax = 190 ± 8.04 bpm, mid_HRmax = 189 bpm, post_HRmax = 188 ± 7.34 bpm; p = n.s. during control period. We assume that the significant differences occurred as a result of adaptation changes due to training stimuli, which were induced by changes in functional parameters. Increased training volume in zone lower level of oxygen regime (A1, upper level of oxygen regime (A2 and upper level of lactate tolerance(T2 during experimental period elicited changes which reflected the increase functional parameters and performance on the running treadmill compared to that of control period.

  8. Body Composition and Dietary Intake of Elite Cross-country Skiers Members of the Greek National Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Sousana K; Gouvianaki, Anna; Grammatikopoulou, Maria G; Maraki, Zoi; Pagkalos, Ioannis G; Malliaropoulos, Nikolaos; Hassapidou, Maria N; Maffulli, Nicola

    2012-12-01

    To assess the anthropometric characteristics and dietary intake of the Greek national cross-country skiing team. Thirty-three athletes (10 females aged 20 ± 5 years; 23 males aged 20 ± 6 years old) participated in the study. All athletes were members of the Greek national ski team, and they had been selected to take part in the Winter Olympics, World Ski Championships, European Ski Championships or other international events, according to their performance. Body composition was estimated by bioelectrical impedance (BIA) and skinfold thickness. The athletes recorded their physical activity and dietary intake for 3 training days, and on a competition day. The female skiers had 14.2±1.9% body fat, the men 11.0±1.5% body fat. Female athletes consumed a diet of 1988±319 Kcal during training days and 2011±330 Kcal during competition days. Male athletes consumed 2255±790 Kcal and 2125±639 Kcal respectively. These values are below those recommended for highly active people. During the training period, carbohydrate, fat and protein contributed to 44.5±7.1%, 39.2±5.3% and 16.1±3.7% of the total energy intake (EI) respectively for the males, and to 52.8±5.6%, 33.0±3.7% and 14.3±2.5% of the EI of the women. Between training and competition days, men demonstrated an increased carbohydrate and reduced fat consumption when competing (PGreek national cross-country ski team could put the athletes at risk of nutritional deficiencies, and possibly compromise their athletic performance.

  9. Are gender differences in upper-body power generated by elite cross-country skiers augmented by increasing the intensity of exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegge, Ann Magdalen; Myhre, Kenneth; Welde, Boye; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Sandbakk, Øyvind

    2015-01-01

    In the current study, we evaluated the impact of exercise intensity on gender differences in upper-body poling among cross-country skiers, as well as the associated differences in aerobic capacity, maximal strength, body composition, technique and extent of training. Eight male and eight female elite skiers, gender-matched for level of performance by FIS points, carried out a 4-min submaximal, and a 3-min and 30-sec maximal all-out test of isolated upper-body double poling on a Concept2 ski ergometer. Maximal upper-body power and strength (1RM) were determined with a pull-down exercise. In addition, body composition was assessed with a DXA scan and training during the previous six months quantified from diaries. Relative to the corresponding female values (defined as 100%), the power output produced by the men was 88%, 95% and 108% higher during the submaximal, 3-min and 30-sec tests, respectively, and peak power in the pull-down strength exercise was 118% higher (all Pgender differences in upper-body power among cross-country skiers augmented as the intensity of exercise increased. The gender differences observed here are greater than those reported previously for both lower- and whole-body sports and coincided with greater peak aerobic capacity and maximal upper-body strength, relatively more muscle mass in the upper-body, and more extensive training of upper-body strength and endurance among the male skiers.

  10. How Do World-Class Nordic Combined Athletes Differ From Specialized Cross-Country Skiers and Ski Jumpers in Sport-Specific Capacity and Training Characteristics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandbakk, Øyvind; Rasdal, Vegard; Bråten, Steinar; Moen, Frode; Ettema, Gertjan

    2016-10-01

    To compare sport-specific laboratory capacities and the annual training of world-class Nordic combined (NC) athletes with specialized ski jumpers (SJ) and cross-country (XC) skiers. Five world-class athletes from each sports discipline were compared. Ski jump imitations were performed on a 3-dimensional force plate in NC athletes and SJ, whereas XC skiing characteristics were obtained from submaximal and maximal roller ski skating on a treadmill in NC athletes and XC skiers. In addition, anthropometrics and annual training characteristics were determined. NC athletes demonstrated 9% higher body mass and showed 17% lower vertical speed in the ski jump imitation than SJ (all P ski-jumping-specific sessions and outdoor ski jumps compared with SJ. NC athletes performed 31% less endurance training, mainly caused by lower amounts of low- and moderate-intensity training in the classical technique, whereas high-intensity strength and speed training and endurance training in the skating technique did not differ substantially from XC skiers. To simultaneously optimize endurance, explosive, and technical capacities in 2 different disciplines, world-class NC athletes train approximately two-thirds of the XC skier's endurance training volume and perform one-half of the ski-jump-specific training compared with SJ. Still, the various laboratory capacities differed only 10-17% compared with SJ and XC skiers.

  11. Sports injuries in Finnish elite cross-country skiers, swimmers, long-distance runners and soccer players

    OpenAIRE

    Ristolainen, Leena

    2011-01-01

    In sports with different exercise-loading characteristics, acute and overuse injury profiles and gender differences in injuries were investigated. In addition, trainingrelated risk factors for overuse injuries in endurance athletes were studied. This twelve-month retrospective questionnaire study comprised Finnish elite crosscountry skiers (n=149), swimmers (n=154), long-distance runners (n=143) and soccer players (n=128) aged 15–35 years. Questionnaires were sent to the athlet...

  12. Assessment of ventilatory thresholds from heart rate variability in five incremental treadmill tests in cross country skiers

    OpenAIRE

    Mendia Iztueta, Ibai

    2014-01-01

    Incremental treadmill tests are widely used in the field of exercise physiology for the assessment of Ventilatory Thresholds for clinical and sport oriented issues. The assessment of Ventilatory Thresholds (VTs) from Heart Rate Variability (HRV) is a relatively new approach with increasing popularity because it is a non-invasive and economical method. Nevertheless, this has not been used in Cross Country (XC) Skiing, an endurance sport where the knowledge of VTs holds special importance. The ...

  13. The physiological and biomechanical differences between double poling and G3 skating in world class cross-country skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandbakk, Øyvind; Leirdal, Stig; Ettema, Gertjan

    2015-03-01

    The current study compared differences in cycle characteristics, energy expenditure and peak speed between double poling (DP) and G3 skating. Eight world class male sprint skiers performed a 5-min submaximal test at 16 km h(-1) and an incremental test to exhaustion at a 5% incline during treadmill roller skiing with two different techniques: DP where all propulsion comes from poling, and G3 skating where leg skating is added to each double poling movement. Video analyses determined cycle characteristics; respiratory parameters and blood lactate concentration determined the physiological responses. G3 skating resulted in 16% longer cycle lengths at 16% lower cycle rates, whereas oxygen uptake was independent of technique during submaximal roller skiing. The corresponding advantages for G3 skating during maximal roller skiing were reflected in 14% higher speed, 30% longer cycle length at 16% lower cycle rate and 11% higher peak oxygen uptake (all p skating. This was done by major increases in cycle lengths at slightly lower cycle rates and a higher aerobic energy delivery. However, the oxygen uptake for a given submaximal speed was not affected by technique although higher cycle rate was used in DP.

  14. The Association Analysis between ACE and ACTN3 Genes Polymorphisms and Endurance Capacity in Young Cross-Country Skiers: Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mägi, Agnes; Unt, Eve; Prans, Ele; Raus, Liina; Eha, Jaan; Veraksitš, Alar; Kingo, Külli; Kõks, Sulev

    2016-06-01

    Endurance performance depends on the integration of several phenotypic traits influenced by multiple environmental and genetic factors. Objectives of the study were: (1) to examine the genotypic frequencies of the ACE I/D, ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms and endurance performance-related phenotypes, (2) to evaluate the dynamics of endurance performance parameters during a 5-year period in relation to ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes in Estonian young skiers. Determination of VO2peak was performed in 58 skiers aged 15-19 years (41 males, 17 females) during a 5-year period. The control group consisted of 322 healthy non-athletic subjects (145 males, 177 females). The study groups were genotyped for the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X variants. Frequencies of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes were significantly higher (p = 0.047 and p = 0.003, respectively) and the RX genotype was lower (p = 0.008) in young male skiers compared with controls. A significant relationship was found between change (Δ) of training volume and ΔVO2peak (mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) (r = 0.475, p = 0.002). No significant main effect was detected between VO2peak (mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) dynamics (comparison with the previous age group data) and ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes interactions (F = 0.571, p = 0.770 and F = 0.650 and p = 0.705, respectively) in all young skiers. Study results indicated a significantly higher frequency of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group. Significant genotype-related differences in dynamics of VO2peak during a 5-year period were not found. In the future, longitudinal research including different gene variants may contribute to a better understanding of the nature of endurance performance. Key pointsSignificantly higher prevalence of the ACE ID and the ACTN3 RR genotypes were found among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group, which may be an advantage for the explosive speed and power

  15. Cross-Country Skiing Injuries and Training Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, Kyle B

    2015-01-01

    Cross-country skiing is a low injury-risk sport that has many health benefits and few long-term health risks. Some concern exists that cross-country skiing may be associated with a higher incidence of atrial fibrillation; however, mortality rates among skiers are lower than those among the general population. While continuing to emphasize aerobic and anaerobic training, training methods also should promote ski-specific strength training to increase maximum force and its rate of delivery and to build muscular endurance to maintain that power through a race. Multiple tests are available to monitor training progress. Which tests are most appropriate depends on the specific events targeted. In addition to laboratory-based tests, there also are many simpler, more cost-effective tests, such as short time trials, that can be used to monitor training progress and predict performance particularly at the junior skier level where access and cost may be more prohibitive.

  16. The Association Analysis between ACE and ACTN3 Genes Polymorphisms and Endurance Capacity in Young Cross-Country Skiers: Longitudinal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Mägi, Eve Unt, Ele Prans, Liina Raus, Jaan Eha, Alar Veraksitš, Külli Kingo, Sulev Kõks

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Endurance performance depends on the integration of several phenotypic traits influenced by multiple environmental and genetic factors. Objectives of the study were: (1 to examine the genotypic frequencies of the ACE I/D, ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms and endurance performance-related phenotypes, (2 to evaluate the dynamics of endurance performance parameters during a 5-year period in relation to ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes in Estonian young skiers. Determination of VO2peak was performed in 58 skiers aged 15-19 years (41 males, 17 females during a 5-year period. The control group consisted of 322 healthy non-athletic subjects (145 males, 177 females. The study groups were genotyped for the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X variants. Frequencies of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes were significantly higher (p = 0.047 and p = 0.003, respectively and the RX genotype was lower (p = 0.008 in young male skiers compared with controls. A significant relationship was found between change (Δ of training volume and ΔVO2peak (mL·kg-1·min-1 (r = 0.475, p = 0.002. No significant main effect was detected between VO2peak (mL·kg-1·min-1 dynamics (comparison with the previous age group data and ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes interactions (F = 0.571, p = 0.770 and F = 0.650 and p = 0.705, respectively in all young skiers. Study results indicated a significantly higher frequency of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group. Significant genotype-related differences in dynamics of VO2peak during a 5-year period were not found. In the future, longitudinal research including different gene variants may contribute to a better understanding of the nature of endurance performance.

  17. Gender differences in sport injury risk and types of inju-ries: a retrospective twelve-month study on cross-country skiers, swimmers, long-distance runners and soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristolainen, Leena; Heinonen, Ari; Waller, Benjamin; Kujala, Urho M; Kettunen, Jyrki A

    2009-01-01

    This twelve months survey compared injury risk and injury types by genders (312 females, 262 males) in 15- to 35-year-old cross-country skiers, swimmers, long- distance runners and soccer players. More male than female athletes reported at least one acute injury (44% vs. 35%, p gender differences in either of these comparisons. After adjustment for sport event males were at increased risk for posterior thigh overuse injuries compared to females (relative risk (RR) 5.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3 to 26.4, p difference between the sexes in overuse injury to the ankle persisted (female 0.11 vs. male 0.02 injuries/1000 exposure hours, p difference was found in such injuries when calculated per 1000 exposure hours. In conclusion, we found some gender differences in sport-related injuries, but most of these differences seemed to be explained at least in part by differences in the amount of training. Key pointsOnly a few sport injury studies have compared in-jury rates between the sexesOverall gender-related risk for acute and overuse injuries in top-level athletes between the sexes was smallSome gender differences in the specific anatomical locations of injuries as well as in specific injuries in sports were foundSome of these differences seem to be explained by the differences in the amount of training.

  18. THE ROLE OF ATTENTION IN ADJUSTING THE BEHAVIOR OF JUNIOR SKIERS

    OpenAIRE

    Grosu Teodor Vlad; Grosu Florina Emilia; Dumitrescu Marin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of study: Through this study we want to show the specific notion of leadership in sports training. Modeling the training process in sport training can be achieved by applying neuro - linguistic techniques, mental training techniques. Methods: We have applied the following test methods: AP2 - focusing attention, AD-distributive attention, MA-spiritual observation. Findings and results: The study took place in groups of junior practitioners of skiing. Tests were applied to partici...

  19. Vliv pravidelného tréninku na tělesné složení mladých lyžařů běžců ve vztahu k motorické výkonnosti v porovnání s normální populací Effect of regular training on body composition and physical performance in young cross-country skiers: As compared with normal controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Růžena Randáková

    2005-02-01

    říd obecně. Stejně tak mohou přispět k řešení problematiky reakce dětského a dospívajícího organismu na speciální a specifickou tréninkovou zátěž z hlediska změn tělesného složení, resp. distribuce tělesných tekutin a změn ve struktuře svalové hmoty, a z hlediska změn fyziologického profilu. Studie je součástí dlouhodobého sledování mladých lyžařů běžců v Laboratoři sportovní motoriky FTVS UK v Praze. The aim of this study was to determine body composition parameters and level of physical performance together with evaluation of changes in body composition and in the level of physical performance under the influence of regular training performed during a preparatory training period in a group of young cross-country skiers (both genders, pupils of sport primary school, and the participants of ski-clubs between the ages of 12–15 years (n = 81, as compared with normal controls (n = 49. The multi-frequency BIA method (B. I. A. 2000M, Data Input, Germany was used for determination of body composition. The level of physical performance was estimated through basic motor tests. Results from the present study indicate the positive effect of systematic regular training performed through the special cross-country skiing sport primary school. Firstly for cultivation of young elite cross-country skiers, resp. sport talents for high performance, and secondly as a factor influencing the body composition and the level of physical performance in children and youth with regular physical activity via ultra physical education lessons. Regular cross-country skiing training seems to be favorably influenced by BC related to physical performance in children and youth. Hence, regular training functions also as a means of prevention of overweight or obesity-affected health and psychological, social, economic and other complications in youth, as in those of adult age. The results from this study can provide valuable feedback affecting the improving of

  20. The skier: his characteristics and preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    William A. Leuschner; Roscoe B. Herrington

    1971-01-01

    Skiers are young and becoming younger, with increasing proportions of unmarried and female skiers. Many are students and roughly half of the remainder earn their livings as professionals (doctor, lawyer, teacher). Skiers have higher-than average incomes. Most skiers never go away overnight to ski and seldom travel great distances. Forty percent of the skiers have skied...

  1. Cross-country skiing movement factorization to explore relationships between skiing economy and athletes' skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, B; Zoppirolli, C; Boccia, G; Bortolan, L; Schena, F

    2018-02-01

    We investigated the relationships between the biomechanics of the double poling (DP) technique in cross-country skiing, its economy, and athletes' skill. To this aim, skiers' motion has been factorized into components through principal component analysis (PCA). Eight high-level (HL) and eight regional level (RL) male cross-country skiers performed a 5-minute submaximal DP trial while roller skiing on a treadmill at 14 km h -1 and 2° incline. Whole-body kinematics was recorded with a motion capture system. PCA was applied to markers coordinates to extract principal movements (PM k ), which were ranked by their variance. Energy cost (EC) of locomotion was calculated from ergospirometric measurements. Results showed that 96.7%±0.6% of total skiing pattern variance can be described with the first three PM k. (Shoulder and trunk flexion-extension are described PM 1 and PM 2 and elbow flexion-extension are mainly represented in PM 2 and PM 3. The variance of further components, consisting of residual movements (eg, slow postural changes or high-frequency vibrations), was greater for the RL than the HL skiers (4.0%±0.5% vs 2.6%±0.3%; P<.001) and was positively correlated with EC (R 2 =.646; P<.001). PCA permitted to describe the biomechanics of the DP technique through a limited set of principal movements. Skiing skills and economy appeared to be related to a skier's ability to simplify movement complexity, suggesting that an efficient skier is better able to reduce superfluous movement components during DP. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Using the power balance model to simulate cross-country skiing on varying terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxnes, John F; Sandbakk, Oyvind; Hausken, Kjell

    2014-01-01

    The current study adapts the power balance model to simulate cross-country skiing on varying terrain. We assumed that the skier's locomotive power at a self-chosen pace is a function of speed, which is impacted by friction, incline, air drag, and mass. An elite male skier's position along the track during ski skating was simulated and compared with his experimental data. As input values in the model, air drag and friction were estimated from the literature based on the skier's mass, snow conditions, and speed. We regard the fit as good, since the difference in racing time between simulations and measurements was 2 seconds of the 815 seconds racing time, with acceptable fit both in uphill and downhill terrain. Using this model, we estimated the influence of changes in various factors such as air drag, friction, and body mass on performance. In conclusion, the power balance model with locomotive power as a function of speed was found to be a valid tool for analyzing performance in cross-country skiing.

  3. Energy system contributions and determinants of performance in sprint cross-country skiing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, E; Björklund, G; Holmberg, H-C

    2017-01-01

    To improve current understanding of energy contributions and determinants of sprint-skiing performance, 11 well-trained male cross-country skiers were tested in the laboratory for VO2max , submaximal gross efficiency (GE), maximal roller skiing velocity, and sprint time-trial (STT) performance...... during the STT was predicted from the submaximal relationships for GE against velocity and incline, allowing computation of metabolic rate and O2 deficit. The skiers completed the STT in 232 ± 10 s (distributed as 55 ± 3% DP and 45 ± 3% DS) with a mean power output of 324 ± 26 W. The anaerobic energy......-skiing has demonstrated an anaerobic energy contribution of 18%, with GE being the strongest predictor of performance....

  4. Glycogen resynthesis rate following cross-country skiing is closely correlated to skeletal muscle glycogen content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Nielsen, Joachim; Saltin, Bengt

    on an optimal glycogen resynthesis rate before a subsequent exercise session. The purpose of present study was to evaluate the glycogen resynthesis rate in elite cross-country (cc) skiers, following exhaustive exercise, and to examine the role of muscular glycogen content on the resynthesis rate. METHOD: Ten...... as 4h and 22h after the race and analyzed for glycogen content. Figure 1. Correlation between muscle glycogen resynthesis rate and glycogen content after and in the rocery period after exercise. Line indicate best fit of all the data points (r2 = 0.41, p

  5. Blood profiles in elite cross-country skiers: a 6-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morkeberg, J; Saltin, B; Belhage, B

    2009-01-01

    the introduction of an enlarged blood testing program, the mean [Hb] values were lowered to close to normal levels, but over the last 2-3 years there has been a small elevation and an increase in OFF-model scores, which may indicate a change in the manipulations used to elevate the [Hb]....

  6. Motor abilities and anthropometrics in youth cross-country skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöggl, R; Müller, E; Stöggl, T

    2015-02-01

    The purposes were to validate whether general motor abilities and anthropometrics are determinants of youth cross-country (XC) skiing performance; evaluate gender-specific differences; and to establish noninvasive diagnostics. Fifty-one youth XC skiers (34 boys; 13.8 ± 0.6 years and 17 girls; 13.4 ± 0.9 years) performed motor skill and laboratory tests, and anthropometric data were collected and correlated with XC skiing performance. Anthropometrics and maturity status were related to boys but not to girls XC skiing performance. Push-ups and 20-m sprint were correlated to XC skiing performance in both boys and girls. XC skiing performance of boys was predominantly influenced by upper body and trunk strength capacities (medicine ball throw, push-ups, and pull-ups) and jumping power (standing long and triple jump), whereas XC skiing of girls was mainly influenced by aerobic capacities (3000-m run). Laboratory measures did not reveal greater correlations to XC skiing performance compared with simple test concepts of speed, strength, and endurance. Maturity was a major confounding variable in boys but not girls. Use of noninvasive simple test concepts for determination of upper body strength, speed, and endurance represent practicable support for ski clubs, schools, or skiing federations in the guidance and evaluation of young talent, being aware of the effect of maturity especially in boys. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The Russians Are the Fastest in Marathon Cross-Country Skiing: The “Engadin Ski Marathon”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelis Theodoros Nikolaidis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that athletes from a specific region or country are dominating certain sports disciplines such as marathon running or Ironman triathlon; however, little relevant information exists on cross-country skiing. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the aspect of region and nationality in one of the largest cross-country skiing marathons in Europe, the “Engadin Ski Marathon.” All athletes (n=197,125 who finished the “Engadin Ski Marathon” between 1998 and 2016 were considered. More than two-thirds of the finishers (72.5% in women and 69.6% in men were Swiss skiers, followed by German, Italian, and French athletes in both sexes. Most of the Swiss finishers were from Canton of Zurich (20.5%, Grisons (19.2%, and Berne (10.3%. Regarding performance, the Russians were the fastest and the British the slowest. Considering local athletes, finishers from Canton of Uri and Glarus were the fastest and those from Canton of Geneva and Basel the slowest. Based on the findings of the present study, it was concluded that local athletes were not the fastest in the “Engadin Ski Marathon.” Future studies need to investigate other cross-country skiing races in order to find the nationalities and regions of the fastest cross-country skiers.

  8. Metabolic rate and gross efficiency at high work rates in world class and national level sprint skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandbakk, Øyvind; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Leirdal, Stig; Ettema, Gertjan

    2010-06-01

    The present study investigated metabolic rate (MR) and gross efficiency (GE) at moderate and high work rates, and the relationships to gross kinematics and physical characteristics in elite cross-country skiers. Eight world class (WC) and eight national level (NL) male sprint cross-country skiers performed three 5-min stages using the skating G3 technique, whilst roller skiing on a treadmill. GE was calculated by dividing work rate by MR. Work rate was calculated as the sum of power against gravity and frictional rolling forces. MR was calculated using gas exchange and blood lactate values. Gross kinematics, i.e. cycle length (CL) and cycle rate (CR) were measured by video analysis. Furthermore, the skiers were tested for time to exhaustion (TTE), peak oxygen uptake (VO(2peak)), and maximal speed (V(max)) on the treadmill, and maximal strength in the laboratory. Individual performance level in sprint skating was determined by FIS points. WC skiers did not differ in aerobic MR, but showed lower anaerobic MR and higher GE than NL skiers at a given speed (all P higher V(max) and TTE (all P better technique and to technique-specific power.

  9. A reappraisal of success factors for Olympic cross-country skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandbakk, Øyvind; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2014-01-01

    Cross-country (XC) skiing has been an Olympic event since the first Winter Games in Chamonix, France, in 1924. Due to more effective training and tremendous improvements in equipment and track preparation, the speed of Olympic XC-ski races has increased more than that of any other Olympic endurance sport. Moreover, pursuit, mass-start, and sprint races have been introduced. Indeed, 10 of the 12 current Olympic competitions in XC skiing involve mass starts, in which tactics play a major role and the outcome is often decided in the final sprint. Accordingly, reappraisal of the success factors for performance in this context is required. The very high aerobic capacity (VO2max) of many of today's world-class skiers is similar that of their predecessors. At the same time, the new events provide more opportunities to profit from anaerobic capacity, upper-body power, high-speed techniques, and "tactical flexibility." The wide range of speeds and slopes involved in XC skiing requires skiers to continuously alternate between and adapt different subtechniques during a race. This technical complexity places a premium on efficiency. The relative amounts of endurance training performed at different levels of intensity have remained essentially constant during the past 4 decades. However, in preparation for the Sochi Olympics in 2014, XC skiers are performing more endurance training on roller skis on competition-specific terrain, placing greater focus on upper-body power and more systematically performing strength training and skiing at high speeds than previously.

  10. Speed and heart-rate profiles in skating and classical cross-country skiing competitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolger, Conor M; Kocbach, Jan; Hegge, Ann Magdalen; Sandbakk, Øyvind

    2015-10-01

    To compare the speed and heart-rate profiles during international skating and classical competitions in male and female world-class cross-country skiers. Four male and 5 female skiers performed individual time trials of 15 km (men) and 10 km (women) in the skating and classical techniques on 2 consecutive days. Races were performed on the same 5-km course. The course was mapped with GPS and a barometer to provide a valid course and elevation profile. Time, speed, and heart rate were determined for uphill, flat, and downhill terrains throughout the entire competition by wearing a GPS and a heart-rate monitor. Times in uphill, flat, and downhill terrain were ~55%, 15-20%, and 25-30%, respectively, of the total race time for both techniques and genders. The average speed differences between skating and classical skiing were 9% and 11% for men and women, respectively, and these values were 12% and 15% for uphill, 8% and 13% for flat (all P skating and classical, respectively, with corresponding numbers of 11% and 14% for uphill, 6% and 11% for flat, and 4% and 5% for downhill terrain (all P skating and classical techniques and between the 2 genders were found on uphill terrain. Therefore, these speed differences could not be explained by variations in exercise intensity.

  11. Spinal injuries in skiers and snowboarders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarazi, F; Dvorak, M F; Wing, P C

    1999-01-01

    Spinal injuries are among the most devastating injuries associated with recreational sports. Snowboarding spinal injury patterns have not been described. During two seasons (1994 to 1995 and 1995 to 1996), 34 skiers and 22 snowboarders suffered serious spinal injuries (fracture or neurologic deficit or both) at two ski areas in British Columbia, Canada. Ski patrol records, the Provincial Trauma Database, and hospital records were reviewed. Injury rates were based on computerized lift-ticket data and a population estimate of 15% snowboarders (ski patrol observation). The incidence of spinal injury among skiers was 0.01 per 1000 skier-days, and among snowboarders was 0.04 per 1000 snowboarder-days. Mean age was 34.5 years for skiers and 22.4 years for snowboarders. Seventy percent of the skiers were men, whereas all of the snowboarders were men. Jumping (intentional jump > 2 meters) was the cause of injury in 20% of skiers and 77% of snowboarders. Neither age nor sex accounted for any significant portion of this difference. The rate of spinal injuries among snowboarders is fourfold that among skiers. Although jumping is the primary cause of injury, it is an intrinsic element of snowboarding. Until research defines effective injury-prevention strategies, knowledge of the risk of snowboarding should be disseminated and techniques for safe jumping should be taught.

  12. Velocity distribution of women's 30-km cross-country skiing during Olympic Games from 2002-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Wlodzimierz S; Dancewicz-Nosko, Dorota; Giovanis, Vasilios

    2017-12-01

    Within several investigated endurance sport disciplines the distribution of load of the best competitors has a manner of evenly or slightly rising velocity values. Unfortunately many other competitors have usually diminishing values or when they are very poor they have evenly values. The aim of this study was to investigate distribution of velocity within 30-km cross-country female skiers. Cross-country skiing runs were investigated of Olympic Games 2002-2014 (Salt Lake City, Turin, Vancouver, Sochi). At every race two 15 km or three 10 km loops of the same vertical profile were taken into account. The competitors were divided onto: A - winners, B - medallists, C - competitors who obtained places 4 to 10 at the finish line (medium runners), D - competitors who obtained places 11 to 30 at the finish line (poor runners). Velocity data presented on the web pages of several institutions were utilized. The competitors had their velocity distributed in a manner with usually diminishing values. While comparing velocity of sequential loops with the mean velocity the difference for the poor runners reached the value of almost 6 %, which was too high. There was significant (usually negative) correlation coefficient between values of velocity deviation for the first and second loops and the mean value of velocity for the entire distance for the better runners and mixed, i.e. positive and negative values for the poorer runners. It was postulated investigations of velocity distribution should be introduced in coaching in order to inform competitors about their running. This advise is especially important for the poorer runners. Up to now cross country skiers run for themselves. It should be discussed whether the tactics used by road and track runners, i.e. running with pace makers, can be introduced in cross country skiing. Also the use of a drone during training can be used in order to maintain proper pace.

  13. Injury risk factors among telemark skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuggy, M L; Ong, R

    2000-01-01

    We performed a population survey of telemark skiers over two ski seasons to determine specific risk factors for injury. The survey inquired about the skier's sex, experience, equipment used, injuries, and number of days skied in each season. The respondents completed the surveys whether or not they were injured while skiing. We received 677 responses from telemark skiing clubs, with 19,962 skier-days of data. The number of self-reported injuries was 178, for an overall self-reported injury rate of 8.9 per 1000 skier-days. Knee injuries (N = 48) were the most common injury (27%), followed by thumb (N = 32, 18%) and shoulder (N = 21, 12%) injuries. Specific risk factors for injury were identified with multivariate regression and survival analysis. The skill level of the skier had a significant injury-sparing effect, as did the use of plastic telemark boots. The protective effect of the plastic boots was likely due to the increased stability they provided compared with traditional leather boots. There were fewer knee injuries with the recently available releasable bindings for telemark skis. Sex and age had no significant impact on injury rates in this study population. As all reported deaths associated with telemark sking were due to environmental hazards, skiers must continue to pay close attention to these hazards in the backcountry.

  14. Using the power balance model to simulate cross-country skiing on varying terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moxnes JF

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available John F Moxnes,1 Øyvind Sandbakk,2 Kjell Hausken31Department for Protection, Norwegian Defence Research Establishment, Kjeller, Norway; 2Center for Elite Sports Research, Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; 3Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, NorwayAbstract: The current study adapts the power balance model to simulate cross-country skiing on varying terrain. We assumed that the skier’s locomotive power at a self-chosen pace is a function of speed, which is impacted by friction, incline, air drag, and mass. An elite male skier’s position along the track during ski skating was simulated and compared with his experimental data. As input values in the model, air drag and friction were estimated from the literature based on the skier's mass, snow conditions, and speed. We regard the fit as good, since the difference in racing time between simulations and measurements was 2 seconds of the 815 seconds racing time, with acceptable fit both in uphill and downhill terrain. Using this model, we estimated the influence of changes in various factors such as air drag, friction, and body mass on performance. In conclusion, the power balance model with locomotive power as a function of speed was found to be a valid tool for analyzing performance in cross-country skiing.Keywords: air drag, efficiency, friction coefficient, speed, locomotive power

  15. Aortic Dissection Type A in Alpine Skiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Schachner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients and Methods. 140 patients with aortic dissection type A were admitted for cardiac surgery. Seventy-seven patients experienced their dissection in the winter season (from November to April. We analyzed cases of ascending aortic dissection associated with alpine skiing. Results. In 17 patients we found skiing-related aortic dissections. Skiers were taller (180 (172–200 cm versus 175 (157–191 cm, and heavier (90 (68–125 kg versus 80 (45–110 kg, than nonskiers. An extension of aortic dissection into the aortic arch, the descending thoracic aorta, and the abdominal aorta was found in 91%, 74%, and 69%, respectively, with no significant difference between skiers and nonskiers. Skiers experienced RCA ostium dissection requiring CABG in 17.6% while this was true for 5% of nonskiers (. Hospital mortality of skiers was 6% versus 13% in nonskiers (. The skiers live at an altitude of 170 (0–853 m.a.s.l. and experience their dissection at 1602 (1185–3105; m.a.s.l. In 82% symptom start was during recreational skiing without any trauma. Conclusion. Skiing associated aortic dissection type A is usually nontraumatic. The persons affected live at low altitudes and practice an outdoor sport at unusual high altitude at cold temperatures. Postoperative outcome is good.

  16. Aortic Dissection Type A in Alpine Skiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachner, Thomas; Fischler, Nikolaus; Dumfarth, Julia; Bonaros, Nikolaos; Krapf, Christoph; Schobersberger, Wolfgang; Grimm, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Patients and Methods. 140 patients with aortic dissection type A were admitted for cardiac surgery. Seventy-seven patients experienced their dissection in the winter season (from November to April). We analyzed cases of ascending aortic dissection associated with alpine skiing. Results. In 17 patients we found skiing-related aortic dissections. Skiers were taller (180 (172–200) cm versus 175 (157–191) cm, P = 0.008) and heavier (90 (68–125) kg versus 80 (45–110) kg, P = 0.002) than nonskiers. An extension of aortic dissection into the aortic arch, the descending thoracic aorta, and the abdominal aorta was found in 91%, 74%, and 69%, respectively, with no significant difference between skiers and nonskiers. Skiers experienced RCA ostium dissection requiring CABG in 17.6% while this was true for 5% of nonskiers (P = 0.086). Hospital mortality of skiers was 6% versus 13% in nonskiers (P = 0.399). The skiers live at an altitude of 170 (0–853) m.a.s.l. and experience their dissection at 1602 (1185–3105; P < 0.001) m.a.s.l. In 82% symptom start was during recreational skiing without any trauma. Conclusion. Skiing associated aortic dissection type A is usually nontraumatic. The persons affected live at low altitudes and practice an outdoor sport at unusual high altitude at cold temperatures. Postoperative outcome is good. PMID:23971024

  17. Biomechanical comparison of the double-push technique and the conventional skate skiing technique in cross-country sprint skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöggl, Thomas; Müller, Erich; Lindinger, Stefan

    2008-09-01

    The aims of the study were to: (1) adapt the "double-push" technique from inline skating to cross-country skiing; (2) compare this new skiing technique with the conventional skate skiing cross-country technique; and (3) test the hypothesis that the double-push technique improves skiing speed in a short sprint. 13 elite skiers performed maximum-speed sprints over 100 m using the double-push skate skiing technique and using the conventional "V2" skate skiing technique. Pole and plantar forces, knee angle, cycle characteristics, and electromyography of nine lower body muscles were analysed. We found that the double-push technique could be successfully transferred to cross-country skiing, and that this new technique is faster than the conventional skate skiing technique. The double-push technique was 2.9 +/- 2.2% faster (P push technique had a longer cycle length and a lower cycle rate, and it was characterized by higher muscle activity, higher knee extension amplitudes and velocities, and higher peak foot forces, especially in the first phase of the push-off. Also, the foot was more loaded laterally in the double-push technique than in the conventional skate skiing technique.

  18. A simulation of cross-country skiing on varying terrain by using a mathematical power balance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxnes, John F; Sandbakk, Oyvind; Hausken, Kjell

    2013-01-01

    The current study simulated cross-country skiing on varying terrain by using a power balance model. By applying the hypothetical inductive deductive method, we compared the simulated position along the track with actual skiing on snow, and calculated the theoretical effect of friction and air drag on skiing performance. As input values in the model, air drag and friction were estimated from the literature, whereas the model included relationships between heart rate, metabolic rate, and work rate based on the treadmill roller-ski testing of an elite cross-country skier. We verified this procedure by testing four models of metabolic rate against experimental data on the treadmill. The experimental data corresponded well with the simulations, with the best fit when work rate was increased on uphill and decreased on downhill terrain. The simulations predicted that skiing time increases by 3%-4% when either friction or air drag increases by 10%. In conclusion, the power balance model was found to be a useful tool for predicting how various factors influence racing performance in cross-country skiing.

  19. Determinants of a simulated cross-country skiing sprint competition using V2 skating technique on roller skis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkola, Jussi; Laaksonen, Marko; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Vesterinen, Ville; Nummela, Ari

    2010-04-01

    The present study investigated the performance-predicting factors of a simulated cross-country (XC) skiing sprint competition on roller skis, on a slow surface. Sixteen elite male XC skiers performed a simulated sprint competition (4 x 850 m heat with a 20-minute recovery) using V2 skating technique on an indoor tartan track. Heat velocities, oxygen consumption, and peak lactate were measured during or after the heats. Maximal skiing velocity was measured by performing a 30-m speed test. Explosive and maximal force production in the upper body was determined by bench press (BP). Subjects also performed maximal anaerobic skiing test (MAST) and the 2 x 2-km double poling (DP) test. The maximal velocity of MAST (VMAST) and velocities at 3 (V3), 5 (V5), 7 (V7) mmol.L lactate levels in MAST were determined. In the 2 x 2-km test, DP economy (VO2SUBDP) and maximal 2-km DP velocity (VDP2KM) were determined. The best single performance-predicting factors for the sprint performance were VDP2KM (r = 0.73, p < 0.01), V7 (r = 0.70, p < 0.01), and VO2SUBDP (r = -0.70, p < 0.01). Faster skiers in sprint simulation had a higher absolute VO2 (L.min) (p < 0.05-0.01) during sprint heats, and higher anaerobic skiing power (VMAST, p < 0.05) and better anaerobic skiing economy (V3, V5, V7, p < 0.05-0.001) than slower skiers. Faster skiers were also stronger in BP, with regard to both absolute (p < 0.01) and relative (p < 0.05) values. In addition, anaerobic characteristics seem to be of importance at the beginning of the XC skiing sprint competition, whereas the aerobic characteristics become more important as the XC skiing sprint competition progressed. This study indicates that sprint skiers should emphasize sport-specific upper body training, and training skiing economy at high speeds.

  20. Nordic (cross-country) skiing injuries in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, E; Asquith, J

    1987-03-02

    A retrospective study of 88 nordic skiing injuries from the 1984 and 1985 skiing seasons in Australia is presented. To our knowledge, this is the largest study to date of such injuries. These injuries are compared with alpine skiing injuries from the same medical clinic for the 1985 skiing season. There was a much lower incidence of injury from nordic skiing; however, when injuries did occur, they tended to be more serious than those of alpine skiing and frequently required immediate evacuation to hospital for treatment. As the nordic skier is relatively isolated from medical services, these findings need to be considered in the future planning of rescue services for such skiers.

  1. Alterations in aerobic energy expenditure and neuromuscular function during a simulated cross-country skiathlon with the skating technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Nicolas; Mourot, Laurent; Zoppirolli, Chiara; Andersson, Erik; Willis, Sarah J; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2015-04-01

    Here, we tested the hypothesis that aerobic energy expenditure (AEE) is higher during a simulated 6-km (2 loops of 3-km each) "skiathlon" than during skating only on a treadmill and attempted to link any such increase to biomechanical and neuromuscular responses. Six elite male cross-country skiers performed two pre-testing time-trials (TT) to determine their best performances and to choose an appropriate submaximal speed for collection of physiological, biomechanical and neuromuscular data during two experimental sessions (exp). Each skier used, in randomized order, either the classical (CL) or skating technique (SK) for the first 3-km loop, followed by transition to the skating technique for the second 3-km loop. Respiratory parameters were recorded continuously. The EMG activity of the triceps brachii (TBr) and vastus lateralis (VLa) muscles during isometric contractions performed when the skiers were stationary (i.e., just before the first loop, during the transition, and after the second loop); their corresponding activity during dynamic contractions; and pole and plantar forces during the second loop were recorded. During the second 3-km of the TT, skating speed was significantly higher for the SK-SK than CL-SK. During this second loop, AEE was also higher (+1.5%) for CL-SKexp than SK-SKexp, in association with higher VLa EMG activity during both isometric and dynamic contractions, despite no differences in plantar or pole forces, poling times or cycle rates. Although the underlying mechanism remains unclear, during a skiathlon, the transition between the sections of classical skiing and skating alters skating performance (i.e., skiing speed), AEE and neuromuscular function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun (Part II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duoos, Bridget A.

    2012-01-01

    Part I of Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun, which was published in last issue, discussed how to select cross-country ski equipment, dress for the activity and the biomechanics of the diagonal stride. Part II focuses on teaching the diagonal stride technique and begins with a progression of indoor activities. Incorporating this fun,…

  3. The validity of vignettes in cross country health studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pozzoli, Dario; Gupta, Nabanita Datta; Kristensen, Nicolai

    Cross-country comparisons of subjective assessments may be ham-pered by sub-population speci.c response style. To correct for this, the use of vignettes has become increasingly popular - notably within cross-country health studies. However, the validity of vignettes as a means to re-scale across ...... that the assumption of RC is not innocous and that our extended model improves the fit and significantly changes the cross-country rankings of health vis-á-vis the standard Chopit model.......Cross-country comparisons of subjective assessments may be ham-pered by sub-population speci.c response style. To correct for this, the use of vignettes has become increasingly popular - notably within cross-country health studies. However, the validity of vignettes as a means to re-scale across...

  4. Heart rate profiles and energy cost of locomotion during cross-country skiing races.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mognoni, P; Rossi, G; Gastaldelli, F; Canclini, A; Cotelli, F

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare heart rate responses and speed in two cross-country skiing races, which were run by seven male and seven female subjects by using classic and free style. Heart rates and skiing velocities were analyzed over flat, uphill and downhill sections, which were run from one to three times. Heart rates were higher in uphill sections than in flat sections; a steady-state heart rate was never reached in the downhill section. When the same uphill section was repeated, the heart rate tended to increase but the speed to decrease. Oxygen uptake (VO2) was calculated from heart rate:VO2 ratio, measured during uphill walking with the aid of poles. The mean (SD) energy cost of locomotion (i.e., the ratio between net VO2 and speed) was 162.1 (9.4) ml.km(-1).kg(-1) and 147.7 (7.1) ml.km(-1).kg(-1) when male subjects ran the flat section after first downhill by using classic and free style, respectively. Females had lower values for VO2 and speed, but similar energy costs. In general, the variability of the energy cost of locomotion in skiers of a similar competitive level is of the same order as that found in uphill walking on a treadmill.

  5. The effects of skiing velocity on mechanical aspects of diagonal cross-country skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Erik; Pellegrini, Barbara; Sandbakk, Oyvind; Stüggl, Thomas; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2014-09-01

    Cycle and force characteristics were examined in 11 elite male cross-country skiers using the diagonal stride technique while skiing uphill (7.5°) on snow at moderate (3.5 ± 0.3 m/s), high (4.5 ± 0.4 m/s), and maximal (5.6 ± 0.6 m/s) velocities. Video analysis (50 Hz) was combined with plantar (leg) force (100 Hz), pole force (1,500 Hz), and photocell measurements. Both cycle rate and cycle length increased from moderate to high velocity, while cycle rate increased and cycle length decreased at maximal compared to high velocity. The kick time decreased 26% from moderate to maximal velocity, reaching 0.14 s at maximal. The relative kick and gliding times were only altered at maximal velocity, where these were longer and shorter, respectively. The rate of force development increased with higher velocity. At maximal velocity, sprint-specialists were 14% faster than distance-specialists due to greater cycle rate, peak leg force, and rate of leg force development. In conclusion, large peak leg forces were applied rapidly across all velocities and the shorter relative gliding and longer relative kick phases at maximal velocity allow maintenance of kick duration for force generation. These results emphasise the importance of rapid leg force generation in diagonal skiing.

  6. Do Maximal Roller Skiing Speed and Double Poling Performance Predict Youth Cross-Country Skiing Performance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Stöggl, Erich Müller, Thomas Stöggl

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the current study were to analyze whether specific roller skiing tests and cycle length are determinants of youth cross-country (XC skiing performance, and to evaluate sex specific differences by applying non-invasive diagnostics. Forty-nine young XC skiers (33 boys; 13.8 ± 0.6 yrs and 16 girls; 13.4 ± 0.9 yrs performed roller skiing tests consisting of both shorter (50 m and longer durations (575 m. Test results were correlated with on snow XC skiing performance (PXC based on 3 skating and 3 classical distance competitions (3 to 6 km. The main findings of the current study were: 1 Anthropometrics and maturity status were related to boys’, but not to girls’ PXC; 2 Significant moderate to acceptable correlations between girls’ and boys’ short duration maximal roller skiing speed (double poling, V2 skating, leg skating and PXC were found; 3 Boys’ PXC was best predicted by double poling test performance on flat and uphill, while girls’ performance was mainly predicted by uphill double poling test performance; 4 When controlling for maturity offset, boys’ PXC was still highly associated with the roller skiing tests. The use of simple non-invasive roller skiing tests for determination of PXC represents practicable support for ski clubs, schools or skiing federations in the guidance and evaluation of young talent.

  7. Identification of Cross-Country Skiing Movement Patterns Using Micro-Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale Chapman

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the potential of micro-sensors for use in the identification of the main movement patterns used in cross-country skiing. Data were collected from four elite international and four Australian athletes in Europe and in Australia using a MinimaxXTM unit containing accelerometer, gyroscope and GPS sensors. Athletes performed four skating techniques and three classical techniques on snow at moderate velocity. Data from a single micro-sensor unit positioned in the centre of the upper back was sufficient to visually identify cyclical movement patterns for each technique. The general patterns for each technique were identified clearly across all athletes while at the same time distinctive characteristics for individual athletes were observed. Differences in speed, snow condition and gradient of terrain were not controlled in this study and these factors could have an effect on the data patterns. Development of algorithms to process the micro-sensor data into kinematic measurements would provide coaches and scientists with a valuable performance analysis tool. Further research is needed to develop such algorithms and to determine whether the patterns are consistent across a range of different speeds, snow conditions and terrain, and for skiers of differing ability.

  8. Cross-country Evidence on the Demand for Money

    OpenAIRE

    Serletis , Apostolos; Vaccaro , Jason

    2006-01-01

    In this article we examine money demand issues using cross-country data, for 48 countries over the 1980-1995 period. In particular, we investigate conventional money demand functions, for both narrow and broad aggregates, and the role that institutions, financial structure and financial development may have in the demand for money. On the basis of possible heterogeneity within the cross-country data set, we exploit Bayesian classification and finite mixture models to partition the data based ...

  9. Automatic Classification of the Sub-Techniques (Gears Used in Cross-Country Ski Skating Employing a Mobile Phone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Stöggl

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the current study was to develop and validate an automatic algorithm for classification of cross-country (XC ski-skating gears (G using Smartphone accelerometer data. Eleven XC skiers (seven men, four women with regional-to-international levels of performance carried out roller skiing trials on a treadmill using fixed gears (G2left, G2right, G3, G4left, G4right and a 950-m trial using different speeds and inclines, applying gears and sides as they normally would. Gear classification by the Smartphone (on the chest and based on video recordings were compared. Formachine-learning, a collective database was compared to individual data. The Smartphone application identified the trials with fixed gears correctly in all cases. In the 950-m trial, participants executed 140 ± 22 cycles as assessed by video analysis, with the automatic Smartphone application giving a similar value. Based on collective data, gears were identified correctly 86.0% ± 8.9% of the time, a value that rose to 90.3% ± 4.1% (P < 0.01 with machine learning from individual data. Classification was most often incorrect during transition between gears, especially to or from G3. Identification was most often correct for skiers who made relatively few transitions between gears. The accuracy of the automatic procedure for identifying G2left, G2right, G3, G4left and G4right was 96%, 90%, 81%, 88% and 94%, respectively. The algorithm identified gears correctly 100% of the time when a single gear was used and 90% of the time when different gears were employed during a variable protocol. This algorithm could be improved with respect to identification of transitions between gears or the side employed within a given gear.

  10. Automatic Classification of the Sub-Techniques (Gears) Used in Cross-Country Ski Skating Employing a Mobile Phone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöggl, Thomas; Holst, Anders; Jonasson, Arndt; Andersson, Erik; Wunsch, Tobias; Norström, Christer; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to develop and validate an automatic algorithm for classification of cross-country (XC) ski-skating gears (G) using Smartphone accelerometer data. Eleven XC skiers (seven men, four women) with regional-to-international levels of performance carried out roller skiing trials on a treadmill using fixed gears (G2left, G2right, G3, G4left, G4right) and a 950-m trial using different speeds and inclines, applying gears and sides as they normally would. Gear classification by the Smartphone (on the chest) and based on video recordings were compared. Formachine-learning, a collective database was compared to individual data. The Smartphone application identified the trials with fixed gears correctly in all cases. In the 950-m trial, participants executed 140 ± 22 cycles as assessed by video analysis, with the automatic Smartphone application giving a similar value. Based on collective data, gears were identified correctly 86.0% ± 8.9% of the time, a value that rose to 90.3% ± 4.1% (P < 0.01) with machine learning from individual data. Classification was most often incorrect during transition between gears, especially to or from G3. Identification was most often correct for skiers who made relatively few transitions between gears. The accuracy of the automatic procedure for identifying G2left, G2right, G3, G4left and G4right was 96%, 90%, 81%, 88% and 94%, respectively. The algorithm identified gears correctly 100% of the time when a single gear was used and 90% of the time when different gears were employed during a variable protocol. This algorithm could be improved with respect to identification of transitions between gears or the side employed within a given gear. PMID:25365459

  11. Cross-country learning in public procurement : An exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, Kimberly; Senden, Shirin; Telgen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    All countries use public procurement to some degree to further policy objectives such as sustainability, innovation, fighting fraud and corruption, value for taxpayers’ money etc. Countries may learn from past successes and failures in other countries while implementing these policies: cross-country

  12. Maximum Power Training and Plyometrics for Cross-Country Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebben, William P.

    2001-01-01

    Provides a rationale for maximum power training and plyometrics as conditioning strategies for cross-country runners, examining: an evaluation of training methods (strength training and maximum power training and plyometrics); biomechanic and velocity specificity (role in preventing injury); and practical application of maximum power training and…

  13. Cross-Country Evidence on Teacher Performance Pay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woessmann, Ludger

    2011-01-01

    The general-equilibrium effects of performance-related teacher pay include long-term incentive and teacher-sorting mechanisms that usually elude experimental studies but are captured in cross-country comparisons. Combining country-level performance-pay measures with rich PISA-2003 international achievement micro data, this paper estimates…

  14. Human Capital and Cross-Country Comparison of Inequality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.A. Viaene (Jean-Marie); I. Zilcha (Itzhak)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe paper studies the effects of cross-country differences in the production process of human capital on income distribution and growth. Our overlapping gen- erations economy has the following features: (1) consumers are heterogenous with respect to parental human capital and wealth; (2)

  15. Cross-Country Private Saving Heterogeneity and Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Castro Campos, M.; Kool, C.J.M.; Muysken, J.

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by the dominant role of cross-country heterogeneity in private saving in the creation of Eurozone imbalances over the past decade, we empirically investigate the determinants of private saving for a sample of 30 OECD countries over the period 1990-2010. In addition to standard

  16. Perceived safety among off-piste & backcountry skiers

    OpenAIRE

    Berget, Håkon

    2012-01-01

    Survival in avalanche terrain is about being in the right place at the right time, i.e. taking the right decisions regarding avalanche danger. Psychological research has shown that emotions like fear and safety (absence of fear) influence our decisions. Perceived safety might therefore be an important part of the human factor in avalanche accidents. Few studies have examined perceived safety from a skier`s perspective. The aim of this study was to develop a scale for assessing perceived safet...

  17. Cross-country VFR crashes: pilot and contextual factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare, David; Owen, Douglas

    2002-04-01

    General Aviation (GA) cross-country crashes, particularly those involving weather, continue to be a major source of fatalities, with a fatality rate more than four times greater than for GA crashes in general. There has been much speculation and little solid evidence on the causes of these crashes. We have designed a program of laboratory and database research into the causes of cross-country weather-related crashes including an analysis of air crashes in New Zealand between 1988 and 2000. There were 1308 reported occurrences in this period. We examined in detail 77 crashes where it could be determined that the aircraft was on a cross-country flight. In our first analysis we compared the characteristics of crashes that occurred in response to externally driven failures with crashes where the aircraft continued to be flown at the pilot's discretion up until the point of the crash. Clear differences were found for visibility, altitude, crash severity, and for several pilot characteristics. These differences are highly consistent with those found for previous research on pilot characteristics and crash involvement. In the second analysis we made comparisons between the weather-related and nonweather-related crashes in the discretionary control group and between subcategories of weather-related crashes. These data show that weather-related crashes occur further into the flight and closer to the planned destination than other kinds of cross-country crashes in GA. Pilots involved in these crashes are younger and have more recent flight time than pilots involved in other crashes. Their increased involvement cannot be explained simply by exposure (flight-time) but must be due to other factors.

  18. Does financial literacy improve financial inclusion? Cross country evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Grohmann, Antonia; Klühs, Theres; Menkhoff, Lukas

    2017-01-01

    While financial inclusion is typically addressed by improving the financial infrastructure we show that financial literacy, representing the demand-side of financial markets, also has a beneficial effect. We study this effect at the cross-country level, which allows to consider institutional variation. Regarding "access to finance", financial infrastructure and financial literacy are mainly substitutes. However, regarding the "use of financial services", the effect of higher financial literac...

  19. Human Capital and Cross-Country Comparison of Inequality

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Marie Viaene; Itzhak Zilcha

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe paper studies the effects of cross-country differences in the production process of human capital on income distribution and growth. Our overlapping gen- erations economy has the following features: (1) consumers are heterogenous with respect to parental human capital and wealth; (2) intergenerational transfers take place via parental education and, public investments in education financed by taxes (possibly, with a level determined by majority voting); (3) due to investment i...

  20. Credit channels in Europe: a cross-country investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.J. DE BONDT

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The work provides an economic analysis of the monetary transmission mechanism in Europe. The author reviews the literature on the money and credit view before describing cross-country differences in credit channel indicators and examining the existence of credit channels by distinguishing between households and firms. The relative importance of a bank lending and balance sheet channel is discussed by assessing impulse response functions from a vector error correction model.

  1. The cross-country implications of alternative climate policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Aijun; Du, Nan; Wei, Qian

    2014-01-01

    Because of worldwide growing concerns about global climate change, great interest has been expressed in the potential of alternative climate policies to reduce global carbon emissions. In this paper, we compare cross-country implications of alternative climate policies, including unilateral and multilateral climate policies. Our main findings are as follows. Firstly, there are large differences in cross-country effects of alternative unilateral climate policies, when the same given carbon emission reductions are achieved in each abating country respectively. Meanwhile, cross-border externalities undermine efficiency of unilateral climate policies. Secondly, there are significant differences in cross-country implications of alternative multilateral climate policies, when the same global emission reductions are allocated in several different ways among abating countries. Thirdly, it is difficult to reach a stable global climate treaty, since any abating country has the incentive to argue for small carbon emission reductions. Finally, multilateral climate policies can reduce the negative impacts of cross-border externalities, but cannot cure all cross-border externalities. Looking ahead, it will be a great policy challenge for the world to reduce carbon emissions in a cost-effective way. - highlights: • We compare impacts of unilateral climate policies across countries. • We compare effects of alternative multilateral climate policies. • We explore whether cross-border externalities disappear under multilateral climate policies

  2. Transference of 3D accelerations during cross country mountain biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdermid, Paul W; Fink, Philip W; Stannard, Stephen R

    2014-06-03

    Investigations into the work demands of Olympic format cross country mountain biking suggest an incongruent relationship between work done and physiological strain experienced by participants. A likely but unsubstantiated cause is the extra work demand of muscle damping of terrain/surface induced vibrations. The purpose of this study was to describe the relationship between vibration mechanics and their interaction with terrain, bicycle and rider during a race pace effort on a cross country mountain bike track, on both 26″ and 29″ wheels. Participants completed one lap of a cross country track using 26″ and 29″ wheels, at race pace. Power, cadence, speed, heart rate and geographical position were sampled and logged every second for control purposes. Tri-axial accelerometers located on the bicycle and rider, recorded accelerations (128Hz) and were used to quantify vibrations experienced during the whole lap and over terrain sections (uphill and downhill). While there were no differences in power output (p=0.3062) and heart rate (p=0.8423), time to complete the lap was significantly (p=0.0061) faster on the 29″ wheels despite increased vibrations in the larger wheels (p=0.0020). Overall accelerometer data (RMS) showed location differences (pbike-body compared to those experienced at the lower back and head. The reduction in accelerations at both the lower back and head are imperative for injury prevention and demonstrates an additional non-propulsive, muscular, challenge to riding. Stress was greatest during downhill sections as acceleration differences between locations were greater when compared to uphill sections, and thus possibly prevent the recovery processes that may occur during non-propulsive load. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Corruption costs lives: evidence from a cross-country study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; An, Lian; Xu, Jing; Baliamoune-Lutz, Mina

    2018-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of corruption on health outcomes by using cross-country panel data covering about 150 countries for the period of 1995 to 2012. We employ ordinary least squares (OLS), fixed-effects and two-stage least squares (2SLS) estimation methods, and find that corruption significantly increases mortality rates, and reduces life expectancy and immunization rates. The results are consistent across different regions, gender, and measures of corruption. The findings suggest that reducing corruption can be an effective method to improve health outcomes.

  4. Stress fractures in elite cross-country athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laker, Scott R; Saint-Phard, Deborah; Tyburski, Mark; Van Dorsten, Brent

    2007-04-01

    This retrospective and comparative survey investigates an unusual number of stress fractures seen within a Division I college cross-country team. An anonymous questionnaire-designed to observe factors known to increase stress fracture incidence-was distributed to members of the current and previous seasons' teams. Running surface, sleep hours, intake of calcium, and shoe type were among the factors investigated. Eleven lower extremity stress fractures were found in nine athletes. Athletes with stress fractures reported significantly fewer workouts per week on the new track. All other study parameters had no statistically significant effect on stress fractures in these athletes.

  5. Physiological and anthropometric characteristics of top-level youth cross-country cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornasiero, Alessandro; Savoldelli, Aldo; Modena, Roberto; Boccia, Gennaro; Pellegrini, Barbara; Schena, Federico

    2018-04-01

    In the literature there is a lack of data about the development of top level athletes in cross-country mountain biking (XCO). The purpose of this study was to analyze anthropometric and physiological characteristics of some of the best XCO bikers aged between 13 and 16. The study involved 45 bikers (26 males and 19 females) belonging to a youth national team. The evaluations, consisting of anthropometric measures, incremental cycling tests (VO 2max , PPO, P@RCP), and 30 s Wingate Tests (PMax, PMean), were conducted over a lapse of 4 years. Our findings showed in bikers, already at young age, a specific athletic profile advantageous for XCO performance. At the age of 16, just before entering the junior category and competing at international level, male and female bikers showed physiological values normalized to the body mass comparable to those reported in literature for high level athletes (VO 2max >70 and >60 ml/kg/min, PPO >6.5 and >5.5 W/kg, respectively in males and females). The production of high power-to-weight ratios and high peaks of anaerobic power attests the presence of highly developed aerobic and anaerobic systems in young XCO cyclists reflecting the high physiological demand of this sport.

  6. Recording injuries among World Cup skiers and snowboarders: a methodological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flørenes, T W; Nordsletten, L; Heir, S; Bahr, R

    2011-04-01

    No long-term injury surveillance programs exist for competitive skiing or snowboarding. The objective of this study was, therefore, to compare different methods to record injuries among World Cup athletes in alpine, freestyle, and cross-country skiing, snowboarding, ski jumping and Nordic combined. Information regarding injuries sustained during the 2006-2007 winter season was recorded through three separate and independent systems: prospective injury reports by technical delegates (TD) from the International Ski Federation, prospective medical team registration by selected teams, and retrospective athlete interviews at the end of the season. A total of 100 unique injuries to 602 World Cup athletes were identified from any of the three recording methods. Of these, 91% were registered through the athlete interviews, 47% by the medical team registration and 27% by the TD reports. Only 20 injuries (20%) were captured by all three methods. A total of 64 time-loss injuries were registered. The interviews captured 60 (94%), the medical team registration 39 (61%), and the TD reports 23 (36%) time-loss injuries, while 18 (28%) were registered by all three systems. Retrospective interviews with athletes/coaches regarding injuries during the last 6 months gave the most complete picture of injuries to World Cup skiers and snowboarders. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. A cross-country Exchange Market Pressure (EMP) dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mohit; Patnaik, Ila; Felman, Joshua; Shah, Ajay

    2017-06-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article titled - "An exchange market pressure measure for cross country analysis" (Patnaik et al. [1]). In this article, we present the dataset for Exchange Market Pressure values (EMP) for 139 countries along with their conversion factors, ρ (rho). Exchange Market Pressure, expressed in percentage change in exchange rate, measures the change in exchange rate that would have taken place had the central bank not intervened. The conversion factor ρ can interpreted as the change in exchange rate associated with $1 billion of intervention. Estimates of conversion factor ρ allow us to calculate a monthly time series of EMP for 139 countries. Additionally, the dataset contains the 68% confidence interval (high and low values) for the point estimates of ρ 's. Using the standard errors of estimates of ρ 's, we obtain one sigma intervals around mean estimates of EMP values. These values are also reported in the dataset.

  8. The attitude of the faculty of sport and physical education students toward cross-country running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhas Irina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The syllabus of the track and field subject at the Faculty of Sport and Physical Education includes cross-country running - running in nature. The main objective of this study was to determine the structure and intensity of students' attitude toward the cross-country running. Besides, the objective was to check the connection of the students' attitude towards the cross-country running and the achieved results of cross-country running, as well as of doing sport and recreational running. The sample comprised 69 students of the second year of studies who attended the cross-country running classes. For measuring the attitude toward the cross-country running, the Connotative differential instrument was used consisting of 15 pairs of opposite adjectives presented in a form of seven-part bipolar scale grouped into three dimensions: affective, cognitive and conative. This instrument was applied within an extensive questionnaire which included questions about doing sports, jogging, as well as the results of cross-country running at the end of the teaching period. The descriptive analysis has shown that students have a positive attitude of moderate intensity toward cross-country running, observed through all three dimensions of attitude. The correlation analysis between the dimensions of attitude toward cross country running and the results achieved at cross country running showed that the correlations are negative and statistically significant, suggesting that if the result of running is better, the students' attitude toward cross country running is more positive. Competitive sport is not connected with the quality of attitude toward cross-country running. The results obtained by the study give grounds for assuming that, given that attitudes are an important component of the motivational aspect of personality, it can be expected that the students' positive attitude toward cross country running would contribute to cross country running application in

  9. Inventive Activity of Researchers: Cross-Country Rating Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Ivanovna Volkova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the study of the research capacity of the country and regions has become more active not only from the point of view of their leading components (personnel, financial, information, organizational, material-and-technical ones but also from the perspective of the assessment of productivity and effectiveness of researchers’ work. In the cross-country analysis, the certain highly aggregative parameters, which values, as a rule, are not in favour of Russia, are used. At the same time, at profound studying of this topic, these estimates cannot represent correctly the real trends of inventive activity in the scientific and technological sphere of the country and its regions. Moreover, the measurement of the researchers’ creative potential realization is carried out mainly through the assessment systems of their printing activity. Little attention is paid to the problem of the rating assessments of the researchers’ inventive and patent activity and its products from a cross-country perspective (especially to the detailed ones as well as to its institutional determinants. Therefore, the authors have chosen this subject-matter of the research. Its empirical basis is the statistical materials of both the national database and those which are recognized by the world scientific community. This research has both theoretical and methodological orientations. The purpose is the development of methodological and methodical tools of the research and assessment of researchers’ inventive activity including methodological support of cross-country comparative assessments. The authors have based the hypothesis on their previous research: in the conditions of the decreasing level of financial security, continuous reduction of a number of researchers, institutional restrictions and contradictions, the inventive activity of national researchers is still exist, and in a number of its leading parameters is implemented at the level of the advanced

  10. Assessment of Heart Rate Variability Thresholds from Incremental Treadmill Tests in Five Cross-Country Skiing Techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibai Mendia-Iztueta

    Full Text Available The assessment of heart rate variability (HRV thresholds (HRVTs as an alternative of Ventilatory thresholds (VTs is a relatively new approach with increasing popularity which has not been conducted in cross-country (XC skiing yet. The main purpose of the present study was to assess HRVTs in the five main XC skiing-related techniques, double poling (DP, diagonal striding (DS, Nordic walking (NW, V1 skating (V1, and V2 skating (V2.Ten competitive skiers completed these incremental treadmill tests until exhaustion with a minimum of one to two recovery days in between each test. Ventilatory gases, HRV and poling frequencies were measured. The first HRV threshold (HRVT1 was assessed using two time-domain analysis methods, and the second HRV threshold (HRVT2 was assessed using two non-time varying frequency-domain analysis methods. HRVT1 was assessed by plotting the mean successive difference (MSD and standard deviation (SD of normalized R-R intervals to workload. HRVT1 was assessed by plotting high frequency power (HFP and the HFP relative to respiratory sinus arrhythmia (HFPRSA with workload. HRVTs were named after their methods (HRVT1-SD; HRVT1-MSD; HRVT2-HFP; HRVT2-HFP-RSA. The results showed that the only cases where the proposed HRVTs were good assessors of VTs were the HRVT1-SD of the DS test, the HRVT1-MSD of the DS and V2 tests, and the HRVT2-HFP-RSA of the NW test. The lack of a wider success of the assessment of HRVTs was reasoned to be mostly due to the high entrainment between the breathing and poling frequencies. As secondary finding, a novel Cardiolocomotor coupling mode was observed in the NW test. This new Cardiolocoomtor coupling mode corresponded to the whole bilateral poling cycle instead of corresponding to each poling action as it was reported to the date by the existing literature.

  11. Impact of the initial classic section during a simulated cross-country skiing skiathlon on the cardiopulmonary responses during the subsequent period of skate skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourot, Laurent; Fabre, Nicolas; Andersson, Erik; Willis, Sarah J; Hébert-Losier, Kim; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess potential changes in the performance and cardiorespiratory responses of elite cross-country skiers following transition from the classic (CL) to the skating (SK) technique during a simulated skiathlon. Eight elite male skiers performed two 6 km (2 × 3 km) roller-skiing time trials on a treadmill at racing speed: one starting with the classic and switching to the skating technique (CL1-SK2) and another employing the skating technique throughout (SK1-SK2), with continuous monitoring of gas exchanges, heart rates, and kinematics (video). The overall performance times in the CL1-SK2 (21:12 ± 1:24) and SK1-SK2 (20:48 ± 2:00) trials were similar, and during the second section of each performance times and overall cardiopulmonary responses were also comparable. However, in comparison with SK1-SK2, the CL1-SK2 trial involved significantly higher increases in minute ventilation (V̇E, 89.8 ± 26.8 vs. 106.8 ± 17.6 L·min(-1)) and oxygen uptake (V̇O2; 3.1 ± 0.8 vs 3.5 ± 0.5 L·min(-1)) 2 min after the transition as well as longer time constants for V̇E, V̇O2, and heart rate during the first 3 min after the transition. This higher cardiopulmonary exertion was associated with ∼3% faster cycle rates. In conclusion, overall performance during the 2 time trials did not differ. The similar performance times during the second sections were achieved with comparable mean cardiopulmonary responses. However, the observation that during the initial 3-min post-transition following classic skiing cardiopulmonary responses and cycle rates were slightly higher supports the conclusion that an initial section of classic skiing exerts an impact on performance during a subsequent section of skate skiing.

  12. Bilateral femoral supracondylar stress fractures in a cross country runner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kate; Fahey, Mark

    2008-08-01

    Several high-risk factors lead to stress fractures. They include excessive training in athletes leading to overuse injuries, nutritional deficiencies, and endocrine disorders. While stress fractures are common, bilateral stress fractures are rarely seen. Few cases have been reported of bilateral femoral stress fractures in young athletes. This article presents a case of a 14-year-old cross country runner with a bilateral femoral supracondylar stress fracture. He presented with bilateral supracondylar stress fractures from running. The patient followed a strict vegan diet, but his parents stated that, to their knowledge, he was getting adequate protein and calcium. Treatment consisted of decreased activity to pain-free levels with acetaminophen for pain. Low-impact conditioning such as swimming and bicycling was allowed. Hamstring and quadricep stretching was suggested. Nutritional consultation was obtained to ensure appropriate nutrition on a vegan diet. At 1-month follow-up, he was pain free and allowed to proceed with a gradual return to running activities. In this case, the onset of a new workout routine was intolerable for this patient's low bone density, causing insufficiency fractures. Appropriate vegan diets were not associated with stress fracture in our literature review. He may have had an inadequate diet prior to this injury. As in this case, full recovery can be made after this rest period, and the patient may return to his or her original activity safely. In young athletes, diet and nutrition must be kept in mind.

  13. Perceptions of perioperative nursing competence: a cross-country comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Brigid M; Harbeck, Emma B; Falk-Brynhildsen, Karin; Nilsson, Ulrica; Jaensson, Maria

    2018-01-01

    Throughout many countries, professional bodies rely on yearly self-assessment of competence for ongoing registration; therefore, nursing competence is pivotal to safe clinical practice. Our aim was to describe and compare perioperative nurses' perceptions of competence in four countries, while examining the effect of specialist education and years of experience in the operating room. We conducted a secondary analysis of cross-sectional surveys from four countries including; Australia, Canada, Scotland, and Sweden. The 40-item Perceived Perioperative Competence Scale-Revised (PPCS-R), was used with a total sample of 768 respondents. We used a factorial design to examine the influence of country, years of experience in the operating room and specialist education on nurses' reported perceived perioperative competence. Regardless of country origin, nurses with specialist qualifications reported higher perceived perioperative competence when compared to nurses without specialist education. However, cross-country differences were dependent on nurses' number of years of experience in the operating room. Nurses from Sweden with 6-10 years of experience in the operating room reported lower perceived perioperative competence when compared to Australian nurses. In comparing nurses with > 10 years of experience, Swedish nurses reported significantly lower perceived perioperative competence when compared to nurses from Australia, Canada and Scotland. Researchers need to consider educational level and years of experience in the perioperative context when examining constructs such as competence.

  14. A cross-country Exchange Market Pressure (EMP dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Desai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the research article titled - “An exchange market pressure measure for cross country analysis” (Patnaik et al. [1]. In this article, we present the dataset for Exchange Market Pressure values (EMP for 139 countries along with their conversion factors, ρ (rho. Exchange Market Pressure, expressed in percentage change in exchange rate, measures the change in exchange rate that would have taken place had the central bank not intervened. The conversion factor ρ can interpreted as the change in exchange rate associated with $1 billion of intervention. Estimates of conversion factor ρ allow us to calculate a monthly time series of EMP for 139 countries. Additionally, the dataset contains the 68% confidence interval (high and low values for the point estimates of ρ’s. Using the standard errors of estimates of ρ’s, we obtain one sigma intervals around mean estimates of EMP values. These values are also reported in the dataset.

  15. Zipf rank approach and cross-country convergence of incomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jia; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Urošević, Branko; Stanley, H. Eugene; Podobnik, Boris

    2011-05-01

    We employ a concept popular in physics —the Zipf rank approach— in order to estimate the number of years that EU members would need in order to achieve "convergence" of their per capita incomes. Assuming that trends in the past twenty years continue to hold in the future, we find that after t≈30 years both developing and developed EU countries indexed by i will have comparable values of their per capita gross domestic product {\\cal G}_{i,t} . Besides the traditional Zipf rank approach we also propose a weighted Zipf rank method. In contrast to the EU block, on the world level the Zipf rank approach shows that, between 1960 and 2009, cross-country income differences increased over time. For a brief period during the 2007-2008 global economic crisis, at world level the {\\cal G}_{i,t} of richer countries declined more rapidly than the {\\cal G}_{i,t} of poorer countries, in contrast to EU where the {\\cal G}_{i,t} of developing EU countries declined faster than the {\\cal G}_{i,t} of developed EU countries, indicating that the recession interrupted the convergence between EU members. We propose a simple model of GDP evolution that accounts for the scaling we observe in the data.

  16. Information systems for mental health in six low and middle income countries: cross country situation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhaya, Nawaraj; Jordans, Mark J D; Abdulmalik, Jibril; Ahuja, Shalini; Alem, Atalay; Hanlon, Charlotte; Kigozi, Fred; Kizza, Dorothy; Lund, Crick; Semrau, Maya; Shidhaye, Rahul; Thornicroft, Graham; Komproe, Ivan H; Gureje, Oye

    2016-01-01

    Research on information systems for mental health in low and middle income countries (LMICs) is scarce. As a result, there is a lack of reliable information on mental health service needs, treatment coverage and the quality of services provided. With the aim of informing the development and implementation of a mental health information sub-system that includes reliable and measurable indicators on mental health within the Health Management Information Systems (HMIS), a cross-country situation analysis of HMIS was conducted in six LMICs (Ethiopia, India, Nepal, Nigeria, South Africa and Uganda), participating in the 'Emerging mental health systems in low and middle income countries' (Emerald) research programme. A situation analysis tool was developed to obtain and chart information from documents in the public domain. In circumstances when information was inadequate, key government officials were contacted to verify the data collected. In this paper we compare the baseline policy context, human resources situation as well as the processes and mechanisms of collecting, verifying, reporting and disseminating mental health related HMIS data. The findings suggest that countries face substantial policy, human resource and health governance challenges for mental health HMIS, many of which are common across sites. In particular, the specific policies and plans for the governance and implementation of mental health data collection, reporting and dissemination are absent. Across sites there is inadequate infrastructure, few HMIS experts, and inadequate technical support and supervision to junior staff, particularly in the area of mental health. Nonetheless there are also strengths in existing HMIS where a few mental health morbidity, mortality, and system level indicators are collected and reported. Our study indicates the need for greater technical and resources input to strengthen routine HMIS and develop standardized HMIS indicators for mental health, focusing in

  17. [Fractures of the lower leg in professional skiers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mückley, T; Kruis, C; Schütz, T; Brucker, P; Bühren, V

    2004-03-01

    Fractures of the lower leg due to skiing accidents remain an important concern. Few studies have focussed on the special demands of professional athletes who sustain these injuries. We present our experience with three cases of lower leg fractures in competitive professional downhill skiers and discuss management and treatment concepts. We performed limited reamed compression nailing in all the patients presented because it offers the advantages of high mechanical stability and optimized fragment apposition. Plate osteosynthesis of the fibula is not required in most typical fractures. All patients resumed ski training. Two of them returned to World Cup. Only one achieved her pre-injury World Cup level of performance and success. In conclusion, a successful return for professional skiers with lower leg fractures is feasible using an optimized treatment strategy.

  18. Expo Junior

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Fort de son succès Expo Juniors revient du 22 au 23 novembre 2014 - Papa & Maman Noël seront présents ! Nous avons le plaisir de  proposer à nos membres des billets d'entrées  à un tarif préférentiel, au prix de CHF 10.- l'unité au lieu de CHF 18.- (gratuit pour les enfants de 0 à 4 ans). Des centaines d’ateliers répartis en 3 villages : Sports & Loisirs, Jeux & Jouets, Éducation & Vie pratique. Cet événement propose aux familles aussi d'autres thèmes : tourisme, idées cadeaux, mode, bien-être, beauté, décoration, ainsi que des services destinés aux familles. Parades, attractions, castings, défilés de mode, dédicaces, séances photos avec Papa Noël, ainsi que de nombre...

  19. 14 CFR 61.93 - Solo cross-country flight requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Solo cross-country flight requirements. 61... Solo cross-country flight requirements. (a) General. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a student pilot must meet the requirements of this section before— (i) Conducting a solo cross...

  20. Cross-country differences in stock market development : a cultural view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Eelke de; Semenov, Radislav

    2002-01-01

    Although during the last decades the importance of stock markets has increased in all OECD countries, the cross-country differences appear to be remarkably stable. In this paper we relate the factors determining cross-country differences in stock market activity to deeply rooted norms and values in

  1. External validation of the use of vignettes in cross-country health studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Kristensen, Nicolai; Pozzoli, Dario

    2010-01-01

    Cross-country comparisons of subjective assessments are rendered difficult if not impossible because of sub-population specific response style. To correct for this, the use of vignettes has become increasingly popular, notably within cross-country health studies. However, the validity of vignette...... and vignettes. Our results indicate that the assumption of RC is not innocuous and that our extended model relaxing this assumption improves the fit and significantly changes the cross-country rankings of health vis-a-vis the standard Chopit model.......Cross-country comparisons of subjective assessments are rendered difficult if not impossible because of sub-population specific response style. To correct for this, the use of vignettes has become increasingly popular, notably within cross-country health studies. However, the validity of vignettes...

  2. External Validation of the Use of Vignettes in Cross-Country Health Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Kristensen, Nicolai; Pozzoli, Dario

    Cross-country comparisons of subjective assessments are rendered difficult if not impossible because of sub-population specific response style. To correct for this, the use of vignettes has become increasingly popular, notably within cross-country health studies. However, the validity of vignette...... and vignettes. Our results indicate that the assumption of RC is not innocuous and that our extended model relaxing this assumption improves the fit and significantly changes the cross-country rankings of health vis-à-vis the standard Chopit model.......Cross-country comparisons of subjective assessments are rendered difficult if not impossible because of sub-population specific response style. To correct for this, the use of vignettes has become increasingly popular, notably within cross-country health studies. However, the validity of vignettes...

  3. External validation of the use of vignettes in cross-country health studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Nabanita Datta; Kristensen, Nicolai; Pozzoli, Dario

    Cross-country comparisons of subjective assessments are rendered difficult if not impossible because of sub-population specific response style. To correct for this, the use of vignettes has become increasingly popular, notably within cross-country health studies. However, the validity of vignette...... and vignettes. Our results indicate that the assumption of RC is not innocous and that our extended model relaxing this assumption improves the fit and significantly changes the cross-country rankings of health vis-\\'{a}-vis the standard Chopit model.......Cross-country comparisons of subjective assessments are rendered difficult if not impossible because of sub-population specific response style. To correct for this, the use of vignettes has become increasingly popular, notably within cross-country health studies. However, the validity of vignettes...

  4. How Hinge Positioning in Cross-Country Ski Bindings Affect Exercise Efficiency, Cycle Characteristics and Muscle Coordination during Submaximal Roller Skiing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolger, Conor M.; Sandbakk, Øyvind; Ettema, Gertjan; Federolf, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of the current study were to 1) test if the hinge position in the binding of skating skis has an effect on gross efficiency or cycle characteristics and 2) investigate whether hinge positioning affects synergistic components of the muscle activation in six lower leg muscles. Eleven male skiers performed three 4-min sessions at moderate intensity while cross-country ski-skating and using a klapskate binding. Three different positions were tested for the binding’s hinge, ranging from the front of the first distal phalange to the metatarsal-phalangeal joint. Gross efficiency and cycle characteristics were determined, and the electromyographic (EMG) signals of six lower limb muscles were collected. EMG signals were wavelet transformed, normalized, joined into a multi-dimensional vector, and submitted to a principle component analysis (PCA). Our results did not reveal any changes to gross efficiency or cycle characteristics when altering the hinge position. However, our EMG analysis found small but significant effects of hinge positioning on muscle coordinative patterns (P skating klapskates. Finally, the within-subject results of the EMG analysis suggested that in addition to the between-subject effects, further forms of muscle coordination patterns appear to be employed by some, but not all participants. PMID:27203597

  5. How Hinge Positioning in Cross-Country Ski Bindings Affect Exercise Efficiency, Cycle Characteristics and Muscle Coordination during Submaximal Roller Skiing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor M Bolger

    Full Text Available The purposes of the current study were to 1 test if the hinge position in the binding of skating skis has an effect on gross efficiency or cycle characteristics and 2 investigate whether hinge positioning affects synergistic components of the muscle activation in six lower leg muscles. Eleven male skiers performed three 4-min sessions at moderate intensity while cross-country ski-skating and using a klapskate binding. Three different positions were tested for the binding's hinge, ranging from the front of the first distal phalange to the metatarsal-phalangeal joint. Gross efficiency and cycle characteristics were determined, and the electromyographic (EMG signals of six lower limb muscles were collected. EMG signals were wavelet transformed, normalized, joined into a multi-dimensional vector, and submitted to a principle component analysis (PCA. Our results did not reveal any changes to gross efficiency or cycle characteristics when altering the hinge position. However, our EMG analysis found small but significant effects of hinge positioning on muscle coordinative patterns (P < 0.05. The changed patterns in muscle activation are in alignment with previously described mechanisms that explain the effects of hinge positioning in speed-skating klapskates. Finally, the within-subject results of the EMG analysis suggested that in addition to the between-subject effects, further forms of muscle coordination patterns appear to be employed by some, but not all participants.

  6. Epidemiology and risk factors of humerus fractures among skiers and snowboarders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissell, Benjamin T; Johnson, Robert J; Shafritz, Adam B; Chase, Derek C; Ettlinger, Carl F

    2008-10-01

    The incidence of humerus fractures while participating in snowboarding and skiing is undefined. Very little is known about the risk factors associated with these fractures. Snowboarders are at increased risk for sustaining humerus fractures when compared with skiers. In addition, the types of fractures, laterality, and risk factors differ between the 2 groups. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. At a major ski area clinic, 318 humerus fractures were evaluated over 34 seasons. Radiographs were classified according to the AO and Neer systems. Patient data were analyzed and compared with that of a control population of uninjured skiers and snowboarders to determine incidence and risk factors. The incidence of humerus fractures among snowboarders (0.062 per 1000 snowboarder days) was significantly higher than that of skiers (0.041 per 1000, P Jumping was involved in 28.3% of humerus fractures among snowboarders and in 5.4% among skiers. Skiers with humerus fractures were more skilled, older, and fell less frequently than controls. Snowboarders were less skilled, younger, and fell at a similar rate compared with controls. Snowboarders are at significantly higher risk of sustaining humerus fractures than skiers. In skiers, humerus fractures show no laterality and most often involve the proximal humerus. In contrast, snowboarders more often fracture the left humerus at the diaphysis.

  7. Skiing in the Great Lakes States: the industry and the skier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William A. Leuschner

    1970-01-01

    Describes the skiers and ski areas in the Midwest. Analyzes market structure for the industry, the factors associated with financial success, the impact of spending on local economies, and the potential of ski area investment. Includes ski area financial statements.

  8. New Evidence on Cross-Country Differences in Job Satisfaction Using Anchoring Vignettes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Nicolai; Johansson, Edvard

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents results on cross-country comparison of job satisfaction across seven EU countries taking into account that people in different countries may perceive subjective questions differently. We apply a chopit model approach where the threshold parameters in an ordered probit model...... somewhat lower while workers from the Netherlands are found to have the highest level of job satisfaction. These results suggest that cultural di¤erences in the way people perceive subjective questions about satisfaction make simple cross-country comparison misleading....

  9. Causes of corruption: a survey of cross-country analyses and extended results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellegrini, L.; Gerlagh, R.

    2008-01-01

    We survey and assess the empirical literature on the sources of corruption Thanks to the improved availability of data, we are able to produce an improved cross-country econometric model to test well-established and more recent hypotheses jointly. We do not find that the common law system, or a past

  10. SME Financing in Europe: Cross-Country Determinant of Bank Loan Maturity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeter-Kant, J.; Hernandez-Canovas, G.

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the influence of cross-country differences on bank loan maturity for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), using a sample of 3366 SMEs from 19 European countries. It analyses a country's legal and institutional environment while controlling for banking structure, economic

  11. Identifying Social Trust in Cross-Country Analysis: Do We Really Measure the Same?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torpe, Lars; Lolle, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Many see trust as an important social resource for the welfare of individuals as well as nations. It is therefore important to be able to identify trust and explain its sources. Cross-country survey analysis has been an important tool in this respect, and often one single variable is used to identify social trust understood as trust in strangers,…

  12. Kinematics of cross-country sit skiing during a Paralympic race

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardi, Marco; Janssen, Thomas; Bortolan, Lorenzo; Pellegrini, Barbara; Fischer, Gabriela; Schena, Federico

    The study had three purposes: to verify a hypothesized speed decrease during the 15km cross-country sit skiing (CCSS) race; documenting this possible fatigue effect (speed decrease), to evaluate changes among the four laps in kinematics parameters (cycle speed, cycle duration, cycle length, duty

  13. SME Financing in Europe: Cross-Country Determinants of Debt Maturity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeter-Kant, Johanna; Hernandez-Canovas, Gines

    2006-01-01

    We examine the influence of cross country differences on debt maturity for small and medium size enterprises (SMEs) using a sample of 3366 SMEs from 19 European countries. We analyze a country's legal environment, institutional environment, banking structure and economic situation while controlling

  14. Decomposing cross-country differences in Quality Adjusted Life Expectancy: The impact of value sets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Heijink (Richard); P.H.M. Van Baal (Pieter); M. Oppe (Mark); A.H.E. Koolman (Xander); G. Westert (Gert)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The validity, reliability and cross-country comparability of summary measures of population health (SMPH) have been persistently debated. In this debate, the measurement and valuation of nonfatal health outcomes have been defined as key issues. Our goal was to quantify and

  15. Decomposing cross-country differences in quality adjusted life expectancy: the impact of value sets.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijink, R.; Baal, P. van; Oppe, M.; Koolman, X.; Westert, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The validity, reliability and cross-country comparability of summary measures of population health (SMPH) have been persistently debated. In this debate, the measurement and valuation of nonfatal health outcomes have been defined as key issues. Our goal was to quantify and

  16. Decomposing cross-country differences in quality adjusted life expectancy : The impact of value sets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijink, R.; Van Baal, P.; Oppe, M.; Koolman, X.; Westert, G.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The validity, reliability and cross-country comparability of summary measures of population health (SMPH) have been persistently debated. In this debate, the measurement and valuation of nonfatal health outcomes have been defined as key issues. Our goal was to quantify and decompose

  17. Neuro-Linguistic Programming: Improving Rapport between Track/Cross Country Coaches and Significant Others

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, David Jay

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the background information and the components of N.L.P., being eye movements, use of predicates, and posturing, as they apply to improving rapport and empathy between track/cross country coaches and their significant others in the arena of competition to help alleviate the inherent stressors.

  18. Winter Atomiades 2014: CERN skiers win 31 medals!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2014-01-01

    The 12th Winter Atomiades took place at Flachau, Austria, from 8 to 15 March 2014. The event, organised by the Association of the Sports Communities of the European Research Institutes (see here), brought together 18 research centres, including CERN, AIT, ESRF, PSI and many others, with a total of about 280 participants.   Lots of fun and a great result for the 13 CERN skiers at the 2014 Winter Atomiades in Flachau, Austria. From left to right and from bottom to top: Lennart Jirden (PH), Anna Lipniacka (PH), Guillaume Michet (DGS), Vera Chetvertkova (TE), Thierry Boileau (external), Jean-Louis Grenard (EN), Clement Bovet (EN), Marc Tavlet (BE), Rob Knoops (PH), Giuseppe Lo Presti (IT), Simone Campana (IT), Sylviane Gander (external) and Javier Pablos (TE).   The team of 13 athletes from six different CERN departments won 31 medals across all disciplines, in a spirit of fun and fair play. CERN came second in the general ranking of all participating institutes! The next Winter Atomiades...

  19. Safety knowledge and risk behaviour of injured and uninjured young skiers and snowboarders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macnab, A J; Cadman, R E; Greenlaw, J V

    1998-09-01

    Earlier studies of ski injury indicated that youths were at increased risk of injury, that males were most likely to injure the head or face, and that females were most likely to injure the knee. To obtain information about safety knowledge and risk behaviour that might contribute to injury among young skiers and snow-boarders. Survey of knowledge and behaviour in injured and noninjured cohorts. Blackcomb Mountain, Whistler, British Columbia. A total of 863 noninjured and 118 injured skiers and snowboarders aged five to 17 years using Blackcomb during 1993/94. Skier Knowledge Inventory Questionnaire. The injured cohort had less knowledge of the Skiers Responsibility Code. In both groups, almost half had had no lessons, 31% had had bindings adjusted by nonprofessionals and chair lift safety bars were used one ride in four by children age 13 to 17 years. The injuried cohort wore helmets slightly less often. Both groups regularly skied through the trees (60% to 70%), and one-thirds had skied on closed runs. Excessive speed was identified as the major cause of injury. Skiers did not recognize jumping as contributing to injury. Lack of knowledge of safety rules was more prevalent among the injured cohort. Skiing without due care - including skiing through tress, skiing on closed runs, skiing with excessive speed and jumping, particularly by snowboarders - were identified as potential causes of injury.

  20. Cross-country differences in productivity: the role of allocation and selection

    OpenAIRE

    Bartelsman, Eric J.; Haltiwanger, John; Scarpetta, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    This paper combines different strands of the productivity literature to investigate the effect of idiosyncratic (firm-level) policy distortions on aggregate outcomes. On the one hand, a growing body of empirical research has been relating cross-country differences in key economic outcomes, such as productivity or output per capita, to differences in policies and institutions that shape the business environment. On the other hand, a branch of empirical research has attempted to shed light on t...

  1. Armenia; The Road to Sustained Rapid Growth-Cross-Country Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Garbis Iradian

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the growth determinants and the economic policy challenges that Armenia faces to sustain the rapid growth of the past two years. The paper also seeks to answer the following two questions: Why has Armenia performed relatively better than other transition economies? What are the roles of macroeconomic policies and the level of financial intermediation in explaining growth differences? The paper also draws upon past cross-country experiences by estimating panel regressions o...

  2. The impact of training process on the stress tests results of women cross country skiing representation.

    OpenAIRE

    Fusková, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Title: The impact of training process on the stress tests results of women cross country skiing representation. Aim: The aim of this thesis is the comparison of the results of stress tests carried out preparatory period before and after the preparation period and whether the results were influenced by the applied training process. Methods: In this thesis was used background research of professional publications, content analyzes of documents and comparison of the results of stress tests and c...

  3. [Few injuries among Swedish telemark skiers, but equipment requires careful consideration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdsson, Ulf; Adolphson, Per

    2003-04-17

    A study of the incidence and predisposing factors for telemark injuries was carried out in a population of 504 active Swedish skiers, who reported 17,383 skiing days, during 2 seasons in northern Sweden. This is on an average 17 skiing days per person and season. The average age was 33 years. 90 skiers reported 113 injuries in 103 accidents, thus they reported 6.5 injuries per 1000 skiing days. The most common injury location was the knee, followed by, in decreasing order, trunk, thumb and ankle injuries. Skiers who used binding lifters had an increased risk, while more rigid plastic ski boots and increased skiing skill had a preventing effect. The releasable bindings need refinement to fulfil the desired effect.

  4. Gender differences in power production, energetic capacity and efficiency of elite cross‑country skiers during whole‑body, upper‑body, and arm poling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegge, Ann Magdalen; Bucher, Elias; Ettema, Gertjan; Faude, Oliver; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Sandbakk, Øyvind

    2016-02-01

    To characterize gender differences in power output, energetic capacity and exercise efficiency during whole-body (WP), upper-body (UP), and arm poling (AP). Ten male and ten female elite cross-country skiers, matched for international performance level, completed three incremental submaximal tests and a 3-min self-paced performance test on a Concept2 SkiErg. Power output, cardiorespiratory and kinematic variables were monitored. Body composition was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The men demonstrated 87, 97 and 103% higher power output, and 51, 65 and 71% higher VO2peak (L min(−1)) than the women during WP, UP and AP, respectively, while utilizing ~10% more of their running VO2max in all modes (all P lean mass in the whole body, upper body and arms (all P production and peak aerobic capacity increased sequentially from WP to UP to AP, coinciding with a greater portion of the muscle mass in the arms of the men. Although the men and women employed each poling technique differently, the estimated efficiency of double poling was independent of gender.

  5. The relationship between evaluative concerns and sport competition state anxiety among youth skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, S R; Martin, K A; Widmeyer, W N

    2000-05-01

    Thirty-four youth competitive skiers (mean age = 13.74 years) completed measures of social evaluative concern and competitive anxiety. Consistent with past research, regression analyses showed that cognitive anxiety was related to performance-specific evaluative concerns. However, contrary to current conceptualizations of sport competition anxiety, somatic anxiety was correlated with concerns about evaluation of other non-performance aspects of ski racing. Competitive skiers were most concerned about parents' and friends' evaluations of their performance, and other competitors' and friends' evaluations of their skiing in general. These findings are discussed in relation to the theory and management of sport competition state anxiety.

  6. Swedish skiers knowledge, experience and attitudes towards off-piste skiing and avalanches

    OpenAIRE

    Mårtensson, Stefan; Wikberg, Per-Olov; Palmgren, Petter

    2013-01-01

    The winter of 2012/2013 was the most accident-prone season in the Swedish avalanche history with a total of seven dead Swedes. In April 2013 the Swedish Mountain Safety Council initiated a web-based survey aimed towards Swedish skiers. The aim was to identify the target group's knowledge, experience and attitudes towards off-piste skiing and avalanches. Respondents were asked to answer a total of 28 questions. 1047 Swedish off-piste skiers answered, and we analysed them in more detail. The Sw...

  7. Effects of an 8-Week Body-Weight Neuromuscular Training on Dynamic Balance and Vertical Jump Performances in Elite Junior Skiing Athletes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Jacopo A; La Torre, Antonio; Banfi, Giuseppe; Bonato, Matteo

    2018-04-01

    Vitale, JA, La Torre, A, Banfi, G, and Bonato, M. Effects of an 8-week body-weight neuromuscular training on dynamic balance and vertical jump performances in elite junior skiing athletes: a randomized controlled trial. J Strength Cond Res 32(4): 911-920, 2018-The aim of the present randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effects of an 8-week neuromuscular training program focused on core stability, plyometric, and body-weight strengthening exercises on dynamic postural control and vertical jump performance in elite junior skiers. Twenty-four Italian elite junior male skiers were recruited and randomized to either an experimental group (EG), performing neuromuscular warm-up exercises, (EG; n = 12; age 18 ± 1 years; body mass 66 ± 21 kg; height 1.70 ± 0.1 m) or a control group (CG) involved in a standard warm-up (CG; n = 12; age 18 ± 1 years; body mass 62 ± 14 kg; height 1.73 ± 0.1 m). lower quarter Y-Balance Test (YBT), countermovement jump (CMJ), and drop jump (DJ) at baseline (PRE) and at the end (POST) of the experimental procedures were performed. No significant differences between EG and CG were observed at baseline. Results showed that EG achieved positive effects from PRE to POST measures in the anterior, posteromedial, posterolateral directions, and composite score of YBT for both lower limbs, whereas no significant differences were detected for CG. Furthermore, 2-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni's multiple comparisons test did not reveal any significant differences in CMJ and DJ for both EG and CG. The inclusion of an 8-week neuromuscular warm-up program led to positive effects in dynamic balance ability but not in vertical jump performance in elite junior skiers. Neuromuscular training may be an effective intervention to specifically increase lower limb joint awareness and postural control.

  8. Cross-country differences in the association between diabetes and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin; Lankarani, Reza Moghani; Lankarani, Maryam Moghani

    2014-01-06

    This study tested possible cross-country differences in the associations between diabetes and activities of daily living (ADLs), and possible confounding / mediating effects of socio-economic status, obesity, and exercise. Data came from Research on Early Life and Aging Trends and Effects (RELATE). The study included a total number of 25,372 community sample of adults who were 40 years or older. We used data from community based surveys in seven countries including China, Mexico, Barbados, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, and Uruguay. Demographics (age and gender), socio-economic status (education and income), obesity, exercise, and ADL (bath, dress, toilet, transfer, heavy, shopping, meals) were measured. Self-reported data on physician diagnosis of diabetes was the independent variable. We tested if diabetes is associated with ADL, before and after adjusting for socio-economics, obesity, and exercise in each country. Based on Model I (age and gender adjusted model), diabetes was associated with limitation in at least one ADL in Mexico, Barbados, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, and Uruguay, but not China. Based on Model II that also controlled for education and income, education explained the association between diabetes and limitation in ADL in Mexico and Uruguay. Based on Model III that also controlled for exercise and obesity, in Cuba and Brazil, exercise explained the link between diabetes and limitation in performing ADLs. Thus, the link between diabetes and ADL was independent of our covariates only in Chile and Barbados. There are cross-country differences in the link between diabetes and limitation in ADL. There are also cross-country differences in how socio-economic status, obesity, and exercise explain the above association.

  9. Alcohol affordability and alcohol demand: cross-country trends and panel data estimates, 1975 to 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jon P

    2014-04-01

    Relatively little is known about cross-country differences in alcohol affordability or factors that determine differences in affordability over time. This information is potentially important for alcohol policy, especially policies that focus on higher taxes or prices to reduce total alcohol consumption. This study estimates cross-country alcohol consumption relationships using economic models incorporating income and prices and alternative models based on alcohol affordability. The data and analysis are restricted to higher income countries. Data for alcohol consumption per capita (ages 15+) are analyzed for 2 samples: first, 17 countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development for the period 1975 to 2000; second, 22 countries in the European Union for the period from 2000 to 2008. Panel data models are utilized, with country and time fixed-effects to control for confounding influences. In economic demand models, covariates are real per capita income and real alcohol price indices. In affordability models, income is divided by prices to yield an index of alcohol affordability. Analysis of data trends reveals that much of the increase in affordability is due to rising real incomes, and not falling real prices. Economic models of demand perform slightly better statistically, but differences are not substantial as income and affordability are highly correlated. For both samples, exogenous rates of growth of alcohol consumption are negative. Price and income elasticities, on average, are within the range of prior estimates. Affordability elasticities are between 0.21 and 0.25. Although alcohol affordability is a valid concept statistically, its use in policy discussions tends to hide underlying causes of changes in affordability. A better approach is a comparison and analysis of trends and cross-country differences in real incomes and real alcohol prices together with the affordability index. Country-level analysis of income and price

  10. Effects of Pelvic and Core Strength Training on High School Cross-Country Race Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Anne W; Goedeke, Maggie K; Cunningham, Saengchoy R; Rockwell, Derek E; Lehecka, Bryan J; Manske, Robert C; Smith, Barbara S

    2017-08-01

    Clark, AW, Goedeke, MK, Cunningham, SR, Rockwell, DE, Lehecka, BJ, Manske, RC, and Smith, BS. Effects of pelvic and core strength training on high school cross-country race times. J Strength Cond Res 31(8): 2289-2295, 2017-There is only limited research examining the effect of pelvic and core strength training on running performance. Pelvic and core muscle fatigue is believed to contribute to excess motion along frontal and transverse planes which decreases efficiency in normal sagittal plane running motions. The purpose of this study was to determine whether adding a 6-week pelvic and core strengthening program resulted in decreased race times in high school cross-country runners. Thirty-five high school cross-country runners (14-19 years old) from 2 high schools were randomly assigned to a strengthening group (experimental) or a nonstrengthening group (control). All participants completed 4 standardized isometric strength tests for hip abductors, adductors, extensors, and core musculature in a test-retest design. The experimental group performed a 6-week pelvic and core strengthening program along with their normal training. Participants in the control group performed their normal training without additional pelvic and core strengthening. Baseline, 3-week, and 6-week race times were collected using a repeated measures design. No significant interaction between experimental and control groups regarding decreasing race times and increasing pelvic and core musculature strength occurred over the 6-week study period. Both groups increased strength and decreased overall race times. Clinically significant findings reveal a 6-week pelvic and core stability strengthening program 3 times a week in addition to coach led team training may help decrease race times.

  11. Physical training of 30–40 years old tourists skiers to ski sports hiking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Toporkov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: compare the test results obtained at different stages of physical training of tourists skiers, immediately after passing of the ski sports hiking of the third category of complexity and 14 days after hiking. Determine the effectiveness of the designed program to improve the physical readiness of 30–40 years old tourists skiers. Material and Methods: 14 people aged 30 to 40 years old who have a different experience in water, hiking and mountain as well as ski-sport hiking took part in research. Analysis of scientific and methodical literature, pedagogical observations, pedagogical experiment, methods of mathematical statistics is used. Results: the test results of 30–40 years old tourists skiers which are the participants in the experimental group received at different stages of preparation and preparatory period and the results after passing ski sports hiking of the third category of complexity are processed. Their comparative analysis is held. Conclusions: it was found that the developed training program can effectively influence the physical readiness of tourists skiers, as well as all functions and systems that contribute to the successful passage of ski sports categorized hike.

  12. Determinants of the Strength of Auditing and Reporting Standards: a Cross-Country Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pran Krishansing Boolaky

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Our study addresses the research gap regarding the absence of an empirical cross-country study on the determinants of the strength of auditing and reporting standards (SARS. Using data on 133 countries at various stages of development, we examine the role of environmental factors that influence a country’s strength of auditing and reporting standards. Our empirical results confirm that institutional infrastructure, financial market development and higher education and training jointly influence a country’s strength of auditing and reporting standards. We obtain qualitatively similar subsample results when we partition countries on the basis of economic development.

  13. The effect of mountain bike wheel size on Cross-Country performance

    OpenAIRE

    Hurst, Howard Thomas; Atkins, Stephen; Metcalfe, John; Sinclair, Jonathan Kenneth; Rylands, Lee

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of different wheel size diameters on indicators of cross-country mountain bike time trial performance. Nine competitive male mountain bikers (age 34.7 ± 10.7 years; stature 177.7 ± 5.6 cm; body mass 73.2 ± 8.6 kg) performed 1 lap of a 3.48 km mountain bike (MTB) course as fast as possible on 26″, 27.5″ and 29″ wheeled MTB. Time (s), mean power (W), cadence (revs · min−1) and velocity (km · h−1) were recorded for the whole lap and during...

  14. The Happy Few. Cross-Country Evidence on Social Capital and Life Satisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    2003-01-01

    I examine why the populations of certain countries are so much more satisfied with their lives than the rest of the world. In cross-country analyses, income per capita, economic uncertainty and expectations for the future are robust predictors of happiness while a social capital measure emerges...... strongly and robustly associated with happiness. Moreover, the effect of investing in social capital is remarkably strong compared to the alternatives. I conclude that the populations in a few Northern European countries are probably the happiest in the world because of their high levels of social capital...

  15. Are greenhouse gas emissions and cognitive skills related? Cross-country evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omanbayev, Bekhzod; Salahodjaev, Raufhon; Lynn, Richard

    2018-01-01

    Are greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) and cognitive skills (CS) related? We attempt to answer this question by exploring this relationship, using cross-country data for 150 countries, for the period 1997-2012. After controlling for the level of economic development, quality of political regimes, population size and a number of other controls, we document that CS robustly predict GHG. In particular, when CS at a national level increase by one standard deviation, the average annual rate of air pollution changes by nearly 1.7% (slightly less than one half of a standard deviation). This significance holds for a number of robustness checks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bilateral Anterior Knee Pain in a High School Cross-Country Runner: An Atypical Etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, James

    2017-09-01

    Anterior knee pain is a common complaint found in distance runners, and can be the end result of a variety of benign processes. A 17-year-old female cross-country runner presented to a sports medicine clinic with insidious onset of bilateral patellofemoral pain (PFP). In the workup of the significant quadriceps weakness discovered on her initial examination, a principal contributing cause of her PFP, she was found to have a form of spinal muscular atrophy, an uncommon neurodegenerative disease that typically requires multidisciplinary medical care. Her case provides a good example for clinicians to consider, at times, an in-depth assessment of the root causes of benign conditions.

  17. Decomposing cross-country differences in quality adjusted life expectancy: the impact of value sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijink, Richard; van Baal, Pieter; Oppe, Mark; Koolman, Xander; Westert, Gert

    2011-06-23

    The validity, reliability and cross-country comparability of summary measures of population health (SMPH) have been persistently debated. In this debate, the measurement and valuation of nonfatal health outcomes have been defined as key issues. Our goal was to quantify and decompose international differences in health expectancy based on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). We focused on the impact of value set choice on cross-country variation. We calculated Quality Adjusted Life Expectancy (QALE) at age 20 for 15 countries in which EQ-5D population surveys had been conducted. We applied the Sullivan approach to combine the EQ-5D based HRQoL data with life tables from the Human Mortality Database. Mean HRQoL by country-gender-age was estimated using a parametric model. We used nonparametric bootstrap techniques to compute confidence intervals. QALE was then compared across the six country-specific time trade-off value sets that were available. Finally, three counterfactual estimates were generated in order to assess the contribution of mortality, health states and health-state values to cross-country differences in QALE. QALE at age 20 ranged from 33 years in Armenia to almost 61 years in Japan, using the UK value set. The value sets of the other five countries generated different estimates, up to seven years higher. The relative impact of choosing a different value set differed across country-gender strata between 2% and 20%. In 50% of the country-gender strata the ranking changed by two or more positions across value sets. The decomposition demonstrated a varying impact of health states, health-state values, and mortality on QALE differences across countries. The choice of the value set in SMPH may seriously affect cross-country comparisons of health expectancy, even across populations of similar levels of wealth and education. In our opinion, it is essential to get more insight into the drivers of differences in health-state values across populations. This

  18. Decomposing cross-country differences in quality adjusted life expectancy: the impact of value sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oppe Mark

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The validity, reliability and cross-country comparability of summary measures of population health (SMPH have been persistently debated. In this debate, the measurement and valuation of nonfatal health outcomes have been defined as key issues. Our goal was to quantify and decompose international differences in health expectancy based on health-related quality of life (HRQoL. We focused on the impact of value set choice on cross-country variation. Methods We calculated Quality Adjusted Life Expectancy (QALE at age 20 for 15 countries in which EQ-5D population surveys had been conducted. We applied the Sullivan approach to combine the EQ-5D based HRQoL data with life tables from the Human Mortality Database. Mean HRQoL by country-gender-age was estimated using a parametric model. We used nonparametric bootstrap techniques to compute confidence intervals. QALE was then compared across the six country-specific time trade-off value sets that were available. Finally, three counterfactual estimates were generated in order to assess the contribution of mortality, health states and health-state values to cross-country differences in QALE. Results QALE at age 20 ranged from 33 years in Armenia to almost 61 years in Japan, using the UK value set. The value sets of the other five countries generated different estimates, up to seven years higher. The relative impact of choosing a different value set differed across country-gender strata between 2% and 20%. In 50% of the country-gender strata the ranking changed by two or more positions across value sets. The decomposition demonstrated a varying impact of health states, health-state values, and mortality on QALE differences across countries. Conclusions The choice of the value set in SMPH may seriously affect cross-country comparisons of health expectancy, even across populations of similar levels of wealth and education. In our opinion, it is essential to get more insight into the drivers

  19. Performance of oil industry cross-country pipelines in Western Europe: statistical summary of reported spillages, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Waal, A.; Hayward, P.; Panisi, C.; Groenhof, J.

    This report presents statistical data relating to spillages from oil industry cross-country pipelines during the calendar year 1979, with comments and comparisons for the five year period 1975-1979. (Copyright (c) CONCAWE 1980.)

  20. The effect of mountain bike wheel size on cross-country performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Howard Thomas; Sinclair, Jonathan; Atkins, Stephen; Rylands, Lee; Metcalfe, John

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of different wheel size diameters on indicators of cross-country mountain bike time trial performance. Nine competitive male mountain bikers (age 34.7 ± 10.7 years; stature 177.7 ± 5.6 cm; body mass 73.2 ± 8.6 kg) performed 1 lap of a 3.48 km mountain bike (MTB) course as fast as possible on 26″, 27.5″ and 29″ wheeled MTB. Time (s), mean power (W), cadence (revs · min -1 ) and velocity (km · h -1 ) were recorded for the whole lap and during ascent and descent sections. One-way repeated measure ANOVA was used to determine significant differences. Results revealed no significant main effects for any variables by wheel size during all trials, with the exception of cadence during the descent (F (2, 16)  = 8.96; P = .002; P 2  = .53). Post hoc comparisons revealed differences lay between the 26″ and 29″ wheels (P = .02). The findings indicate that wheel size does not significantly influence performance during cross-country when ridden by trained mountain bikers, and that wheel choice is likely due to personal choice or sponsorship commitments.

  1. Renewable electricity consumption in the EU-27: Are cross-country differences diminishing?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maza, Adolfo; Hierro, Maria; Villaverde, Jose [University of Cantabria, Department of Economics, Avda. de los Castros s/n, 39005 Santander (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    The aim of this paper is to analyse cross-country differences for shares of renewable electricity in the EU-27 for the period 1996-2005. We carry out a standard convergence analysis and then examine the evolution of the entire distribution, namely the external shape, intra-distributional dynamics and ergodic distribution. Our main results are as follows. First, there has been a clear convergence pattern for renewable electricity shares across countries. Second, the shape of the distribution has varied significantly over time, with more countries positioned around the mean in 2005 than in 1996. Third, the analysis shows that intra-distributional mobility has been relatively high, especially in those countries with the highest share in the initial year of our sample. Fourth, in spite of this, large cross-country differences will likely persist for RES-E shares in the hypothetical long-term equilibrium, which implies that a major impulse to national RES-E support policies will be necessary in the coming years to shorten this gap. (author)

  2. Cross-country differences in basal and stress-induced cortisol secretion in older adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana N Souza-Talarico

    Full Text Available Several studies have emphasized the association between socioeconomic status (SES and inadequate response of the biological stress system. However, other factors related to SES are rarely considered, such as cultural values, social norms, organization, language and communication skills, which raises the need to investigate cross-country differences in stress response. Although some studies have shown differences in cortisol levels between immigrants and natives, there is no cross-country evidence regarding cortisol levels in country-native elders. This is particularly important given the high prevalence of stress-related disorders across nations during aging. The current study examined basal diurnal and reactive cortisol levels in healthy older adults living in two different countries.Salivary cortisol of 260 older adults from Canada and Brazil were analyzed. Diurnal cortisol was measured in saliva samples collected at home throughout two working days at awakening, 30 min after waking, 1400 h, 1600 h and before bedtime. Cortisol reactivity was assessed in response to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST in both populations.Our results showed that even under similar health status, psychological and cognitive characteristics, Brazilian elders exhibited higher basal and stress-induced cortisol secretion compared to the Canadian participants.These findings suggest that country context may modulate cortisol secretion and could impact the population health.

  3. Predisposing Risk Factors and Stress Fractures in Division I Cross Country Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffin, Kaci L; Knight, Kathy B; Bass, Martha A; Valliant, Melinda W

    2017-11-11

    The purpose of this study was to explore factors associated with increased stress fractures in collegiate cross country runners. Participants in this study were 42 male and female cross country runners at a Division I university. Each athlete completed a questionnaire regarding smoking status, vitamin/mineral intake, previous stress fracture history, birth control usage, menstrual status, and demographic information. Nutritional assessment via a 3-day food record and measurements of whole body, lumbar spine, and hip bone mineral densities (BMD) were also conducted on each athlete. Results indicated that 40% of the female and 35% of the male runners reported a history of stress fracture, and that all of these did not meet the recommended daily energy intake or adequate intakes for calcium or Vitamin D required for their amount of training. Two-tailed t-test found statistically higher incidences of lumbar spine BMD in males and females whose daily calcium and Vitamin D intakes were below minimum requirements as well as for women whose caloric intake was below the required level. When data on the lumbar spine was evaluated, 31% of participants (31.8% of the male and 30% of the female runners) were identified as having osteopenia and 4.8% with osteoporosis. Results warrant a need for future longitudinal studies.

  4. Cross-country differences in basal and stress-induced cortisol secretion in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Talarico, Juliana N; Plusquellec, Pierrich; Lupien, Sonia J; Fiocco, Alexandra; Suchecki, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have emphasized the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and inadequate response of the biological stress system. However, other factors related to SES are rarely considered, such as cultural values, social norms, organization, language and communication skills, which raises the need to investigate cross-country differences in stress response. Although some studies have shown differences in cortisol levels between immigrants and natives, there is no cross-country evidence regarding cortisol levels in country-native elders. This is particularly important given the high prevalence of stress-related disorders across nations during aging. The current study examined basal diurnal and reactive cortisol levels in healthy older adults living in two different countries. Salivary cortisol of 260 older adults from Canada and Brazil were analyzed. Diurnal cortisol was measured in saliva samples collected at home throughout two working days at awakening, 30 min after waking, 1400 h, 1600 h and before bedtime. Cortisol reactivity was assessed in response to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) in both populations. Our results showed that even under similar health status, psychological and cognitive characteristics, Brazilian elders exhibited higher basal and stress-induced cortisol secretion compared to the Canadian participants. These findings suggest that country context may modulate cortisol secretion and could impact the population health.

  5. Medial tibial stress syndrome in high school cross-country runners: incidence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plisky, Melody S; Rauh, Mitchell J; Heiderscheit, Bryan; Underwood, Frank B; Tank, Robert T

    2007-02-01

    Prospective cohort. To determine (1) the cumulative seasonal incidence and overall injury rate of medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) and (2) risk factors for MTSS with a primary focus on the relationship between navicular drop values and MTSS in high school cross-country runners. MTSS is a common injury among runners. However, few studies have reported the injury rate and risk factors for MTSS among adolescent runners. Data collected included measurement of bilateral navicular drop and foot length, and a baseline questionnaire regarding the runner's height, body mass, previous running injury, running experience, and orthotic or tape use. Runners were followed during the season to determine athletic exposures (AEs) and occurrence of MTSS. The overall injury rate for MTSS was 2.8/1000 AEs. Although not statistically different, girls had a higher rate (4.3/1000 AEs) than boys (1.7/1000 AEs) (P = .11). Logistic regression modeling indicated that only gender and body mass index (BMI) were significantly associated with the occurrence of MTSS. However, when controlled for orthotic use, only BMI was associated with risk of MTSS. No significant associations were found between MTSS and navicular drop or foot length. Our findings suggest that navicular drop may not be an appropriate measure to identify runners who may develop MTSS during a cross-country season; thus, additional studies are needed to identify appropriate preseason screening tools.

  6. Preventive osteopathic manipulative treatment and stress fracture incidence among collegiate cross-country athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumm, Lynn F; Janiski, Carrie; Balawender, Jenifer L; Feinstein, Adam

    2013-12-01

    Stress fractures are common among athletes, particularly distance runners, with many theories regarding the etiologic process of stress fractures and various studies identifying risk factors or suggesting preventive techniques. To our knowledge, no previous studies have discussed the possible causative effects of somatic dysfunction or the preventive capabilities of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT). To apply a preventive OMT protocol for cross-country athletes to reduce the incidence of stress fractures. Cohort study. Examinations of cross-country athletes at an NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) Division I university were performed by supervising physician-examiners and first- and second-year osteopathic medical students during several consecutive academic years. Athletes re-enrolled in the study each year they continued to be eligible. The intervention included osteopathic structural examination and OMT that focused on somatic dysfunction identified in the pelvis, sacrum, and lower extremities. More than 1800 participant examinations were performed on 124 male and female participants by 3 supervising physician-examiners and 141 osteopathic medical students over the course of 5 consecutive academic years (2004-2005 to 2008-2009). Data from these academic years were compared with data from the previous 8 academic years (1996-1997 to 2003-2004). An average of 20 new participants enrolled yearly. The number of annual stress fractures per team ranged from 0 to 6 for male participants and 1 to 6 for female participants. The cumulative annual incidence of stress fractures for male participants demonstrated a statistically significant decrease from 13.9% (20 of 144) before intervention to 1.0% (1 of 105) after intervention, resulting in a 98.7% relative reduction in stress-fracture diagnosis (P=.019). The cumulative annual incidence for female participants showed a minimal decrease from 12.9% (23 of 178) before intervention to 12.0% (17 of 142) after

  7. Combining snow depth and innovative skier flow measurements in order to improve snow grooming techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmagnola, Carlo Maria; Albrecht, Stéphane; Hargoaa, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    In the last decades, ski resort managers have massively improved their snow management practices, in order to adapt their strategies to the inter-annual variability in snow conditions and to the effects of climate change. New real-time informations, such as snow depth measurements carried out on the ski slopes by grooming machines during their daily operations, have become available, allowing high saving, efficiency and optimization gains (reducing for instance the groomer fuel consumption and operation time and the need for machine-made snow production). In order to take a step forward in improving the grooming techniques, it would be necessary to keep into account also the snow erosion by skiers, which depends mostly on the snow surface properties and on the skier attendance. Today, however, most ski resort managers have only a vague idea of the evolution of the skier flows on each slope during the winter season. In this context, we have developed a new sensor (named Skiflux) able to measure the skier attendance using an infrared beam crossing the slopes. Ten Skiflux sensors have been deployed during the 2016/17 winter season at Val Thorens ski area (French Alps), covering a whole sector of the resort. A dedicated software showing the number of skier passages in real time as been developed as well. Combining this new Skiflux dataset with the snow depth measurements from grooming machines (Snowsat System) and the snow and meteorological conditions measured in-situ (Liberty System from Technoalpin), we were able to create a "real-time skiability index" accounting for the quality of the surface snow and its evolution during the day. Moreover, this new framework allowed us to improve the preparation of ski slopes, suggesting new strategies for adapting the grooming working schedule to the snow quality and the skier attendance. In the near future, this work will benefit from the advances made within the H2020 PROSNOW project ("Provision of a prediction system allowing

  8. Foreign aid and poverty reduction in sub-Saharan Africa: A cross-country investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GT Ijaiya

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The continuous increase in the rate of poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa can be linked to the inadequate management and use of international financial assistance such as foreign aid. Using a cross-country data, this paper examines the relationship between foreign aid and poverty reduction in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. The result obtained indicates that foreign aid has no significant influence on poverty reduction in SSA, because of the countries’ weak economic management evidenced by high levels of corruption, bad governance, and political and economic instability. To improve the performance of foreign aid directed at poverty reduction, the paper suggests the implementation of measures directed at good governance, macroeconomic and political stability.Incentives in Nigeria’s food manufacturing industries and their impact on output and prices

  9. Energy efficiency in Norway (1997). Cross Country Comparison on Energy Efficiency Indicators - Phase 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alm, Leif Kristian

    2000-02-01

    This is the national report for Norway in phase 5 of the SAVE project 'Cross country comparison of energy efficiency indicators'. The report deals with energy use and energy efficiency in Norway the last 20 years, with a special emphasis on the period after 1990. A detailed sector analysis has been done, applying Laspeyres indices to attribute changes in energy use to either activity, structure or intensity (efficiency). Aggregating sectors, we have found a total efficiency improvement of maximum 7-8 TWH from 1990 to 1997. This corresponds to a saving of 0.5% per year. In the same period, final energy use per Gross Domestic Product (GDP) was reduced by approx 2.4% per year. Thereby most of the reduction in final energy intensity can not be attributed to increased energy efficiency. Almost all data are taken from official Norwegian statistics (Statistics Norway). (author)

  10. The Impact of Governance on the Research Performance of European Universities in Cross-Country Comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedláček Jan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article concentrates on the impact of selected aspects of governance - the level of autonomy and the involvement of stakeholders in the internal governance of a university - on the research performance of universities measured by indicators of international university rankings in cross-country comparisons. The analyses are geographically situated in Europe. They follow two paths which are from the theoretical point of view based on the concepts of the principal-agent problem and stakeholder theory. Using linear regression, the author identifies statistically significant aspects of governance and compares them with results of previous studies. The findings serve as a basis for a discussion regarding how to create appropriate conditions for universities in order to improve their prospects for international success in research. The limitations of the results relating to the data, methodology and their application in the European context are discussed and general recommendations are formulated.

  11. Decoupling Economic Growth and Energy Use. An Empirical Cross-Country Analysis for 10 Manufacturing Sectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulder, P. [International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg (Austria); De Groot, H.L.F. [Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2004-07-01

    This paper provides an empirical analysis of decoupling economic growth and energy use and its various determinants by exploring trends in energy- and labour productivity across 10 manufacturing sectors and 14 OECD countries for the period 1970-1997. We explicitly aim to trace back aggregate developments in the manufacturing sector to developments at the level of individual subsectors. A cross-country decomposition analysis reveals that in some countries structural changes contributed considerably to aggregate manufacturing energy-productivity growth and, hence, to decoupling, while in other countries they partly offset energy-efficiency improvements. In contrast, structural changes only play a minor role in explaining aggregate manufacturing labour-productivity developments. Furthermore, we find labour-productivity growth to be higher on average than energy-productivity growth. Over time, this bias towards labour-productivity growth is increasing in the aggregate manufacturing sector, while it is decreasing in most manufacturing subsectors.

  12. Explaining Cross-Country Differences in Attitudes Towards Immigration in the EU-15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Munch, Jakob Roland; Schroll, Sanne

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we use data from the first two rounds of the European Social Survey to analyze the extent to which differences in average attitudes towards immigration across the EU-15 countries may be explained by differences in socioeconomic characteristics and individually perceived consequences...... of immigration, using an extension of a decomposition technique developed by Fairlie (2005). We find that despite the significant effects of socioeconomic characteristics on attitudes, differences in the distributions of these characteristics can only explain a modest share of the cross-country variation...... in average attitudes. A larger part can be explained by differences in perceived consequences of immigration, but the main part is still left unexplained. Apart from providing useful input for policy makers working in the area of immigration policy, this raises a number of questions for further research...

  13. Explaining Cross-Country Differences in Attitudes towards Immigration in the EU-15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Munch, Jakob Roland; Schroll, Sanne

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we use data from the first two rounds of the European Social Survey to analyze the extent to which differences in average attitudes towards immigration across the EU-15 countries may be explained by differences in socioeconomic characteristics and individually perceived consequences...... of immigration, using an extension of a decomposition technique developed by Fairlie (2005). We find that despite the significant effects of socioeconomic characteristics on attitudes, differences in the distributions of these characteristics can only explain a modest share of the cross-country variation...... in average attitudes. A larger part can be explained by differences in perceived consequences of immigration, but the main part is still left unexplained. Apart from providing useful input for policy makers working in the area of immigration policy, this raises a number of questions for further research...

  14. Explaining Cross-Country Differences in Attitudes Towards Immigration in the EU-15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Munch, Jakob Roland; Skaksen, Jan Rose

    In this paper, we use data from the first two rounds of the European Social Survey to analyse the extent to which differences in average attitudes towards immigration across the EU-15 countries may be explained by differences in socioeconomic characteristics and individually perceived consequences...... of immigration, using an extension of a decomposition technique developed by Fairlie (2005). We find that despite the significant effects of socioeconomic characteristics on attitudes, differences in the distributions of these characteristics can only explain a modest share of the cross-country variation...... in average attitudes. A larger part can be explained by differences in perceived consequences of immigration, but the main part is still left unexplained. Apart from providing useful input for policy makers working in the area of immigration policy, this raises a number of questions for further research...

  15. Energy efficiency in Norway (1996). Cross Country Comparison on Energy Efficiency Indicators, Phase 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alm, Leif Kristian

    1998-12-01

    This is the national report for Norway in phase 4 of the SAVE project 'Cross country comparison of energy efficiency indicators'. The report deals with energy use and energy efficiency in Norway the last 20 years, with a special emphasis on the period after 1990. Final energy use per Gross Domestic Product (GDP) was reduced by approx 2.3% per year from 1990 to 1996. Doing detailed sector analysis we are applying Laspeyres indices to attribute changes in energy use to either activity, structure or intensity. Calculating an aggregate intensity index from the sector intensities gives an average intensity reduction of 0.4% per year. Thereby most of the reduction in final energy per unit GDP are due to structural changes, and not technical improvements. Almost all data are taken from official Norwegian statistics (Statistics Norway). (author)

  16. Research of Obstacle Recognition Technology in Cross-Country Environment for Unmanned Ground Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yibing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Being aimed at the obstacle recognition problem of unmanned ground vehicles in cross-country environment, this paper uses monocular vision sensor to realize the obstacle recognition of typical obstacles. Firstly, median filtering algorithm is applied during image preprocessing that can eliminate the noise. Secondly, image segmentation method based on the Fisher criterion function is used to segment the region of interest. Then, morphological method is used to process the segmented image, which is preparing for the subsequent analysis. The next step is to extract the color feature S, color feature a and edge feature “verticality” of image are extracted based on the HSI color space, the Lab color space, and two value images. Finally multifeature fusion algorithm based on Bayes classification theory is used for obstacle recognition. Test results show that the algorithm has good robustness and accuracy.

  17. Association between earthquake events and cholera outbreaks: a cross-country 15-year longitudinal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Steven A; Turner, Elizabeth L; Thielman, Nathan M

    2013-12-01

    Large earthquakes can cause population displacement, critical sanitation infrastructure damage, and increased threats to water resources, potentially predisposing populations to waterborne disease epidemics such as cholera. Problem The risk of cholera outbreaks after earthquake disasters remains uncertain. A cross-country analysis of World Health Organization (WHO) cholera data that would contribute to this discussion has yet to be published. A cross-country longitudinal analysis was conducted among 63 low- and middle-income countries from 1995-2009. The association between earthquake disasters of various effect sizes and a relative spike in cholera rates for a given country was assessed utilizing fixed-effects logistic regression and adjusting for gross domestic product per capita, water and sanitation level, flooding events, percent urbanization, and under-five child mortality. Also, the association between large earthquakes and cholera rate increases of various degrees was assessed. Forty-eight of the 63 countries had at least one year with reported cholera infections during the 15-year study period. Thirty-six of these 48 countries had at least one earthquake disaster. In adjusted analyses, country-years with ≥10,000 persons affected by an earthquake had 2.26 times increased odds (95 CI, 0.89-5.72, P = .08) of having a greater than average cholera rate that year compared to country-years having earthquake. The association between large earthquake disasters and cholera infections appeared to weaken as higher levels of cholera rate increases were tested. A trend of increased risk of greater than average cholera rates when more people were affected by an earthquake in a country-year was noted. However these findings did not reach statistical significance at traditional levels and may be due to chance. Frequent large-scale cholera outbreaks after earthquake disasters appeared to be relatively uncommon.

  18. Sense of Place in Tourism and Leisure: the Case of Touring Skiers in Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Roult

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of sense of place has become central in understanding various modern phenomena in leisure. Tourism promoters in outdoor recreation now emphasize opportunities to bond with nature, with ‘wild’ landscapes or with the authentic value of a destination. However, studying this tourism and recreation issue from the standpoint of ‘place’, which draws upon notions of attendance, identification and social and individual meaning, is lacking in modern studies. This paper, based on a quantitative approach using a questionnaire survey administered to touring skiers in Quebec (n=829, thus aims to present the links between various practice settings and the perceived meaning and identification that skiers attach to their practice sites.

  19. Trunk Strength Characteristics of Elite Alpine Skiers - A Comparison with Physically Active Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hildebrandt Carolin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Core muscle imbalances and weak trunk strength are relevant for injury prevention and performance. Information regarding core strength requirements and ideal flexion/extension ratios in alpine skiing is limited. We aimed to compare trunk strength capacities in elite alpine skiers with those of a matched control group. The concentric maximal trunk flexion and extension of 109 elite skiers and 47 active controls were measured at 150°/s in a ballistic mode using the CON-TREX® TP 1000 test system. The relative flexion peak torque was higher in male ski racers (p = 0.003; 2.44 ± 0.30 Nm/kg than in the controls (2.32 ± 0.42 Nm/kg. The relative peak torque for extension was 4.53 ± 0.65 Nm/kg in ski racers and 4.11 ± 0.52 Nm/kg in the controls (p = 0.001. Female athletes were significantly stronger in both, relative flexion force (p = 0.006; skiers 2.05 ± 0.22 Nm/kg; controls 1.74 ± 0.28 Nm/kg and relative extension force (p = 0.001; skiers 3.55 ± 0.53 Nm/kg; controls 3.14 ± 0.48 Nm/kg. No significant differences were found in the ratios of flexion to extension forces in females and males. Ski racers are engaged in extensive strength training for both leg and trunk muscles, which explains the higher peak values. Both groups indicated a low ratio from 0.54-0.59, which represents high trunk extensor muscles strength relative to flexor muscles.

  20. Changes in the Balance Performance of Polish Recreational Skiers after Seven Days of Alpine Skiing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojtyczek Beata

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Alpine skiing is one of the most popular leisure time winter sporting activities. Skiing imposes high requirements concerning physical fitness, particularly regarding balance abilities. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the changes in balance performance of recreational skiers after a seven-day ski camp. A total of 78 students - 24 women and 54 men - participated in the study. The ski course was held in accordance with the official program of the Polish Ski Federation. The study sample was comprised of 43 beginners and 35 intermediate skiers. All students were tested with the MFT S3-Check, the day before and the day after the ski camp. The test system consisted of an unstable uniaxial platform, with an integrated sensor and corresponding software. Changes in balance performance (sensory and stability index were evaluated using paired t-tests. Additionally, changes in sensory and stability categories, which were based on the norm data, were analyzed. Female and male participants showed significantly better sensory and stability indices after skiing. Considerable changes from weak or very weak to average or good balance categories could be seen after skiing for both sexes. Regarding skiing experience, both beginners and intermediate skiers improved their sensory and stability indices significantly after skiing. Hence, recreational alpine skiing resulted in better balance performance regardless of sex or skiing experience. Skiing as an outdoor activity offers the opportunity to improve balance performance with a positive impact on everyday life activities.

  1. Skier and Snowboarder Motivations and Knowledge Related to Voluntary Environmental Programs at an Alpine Ski Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Christopher M.; Needham, Mark D.

    2011-11-01

    Many alpine ski areas have recently adopted voluntary environmental programs (VEPs) such as using recycling, renewable energy, and biofuels to help reduce their environmental impacts. Studies have addressed the performance of these VEPs in mitigating environmental impacts of this industry, but little is known about visitor awareness and perceptions of these programs. This article addresses this knowledge gap by exploring skier and snowboarder knowledge of VEPs at a ski area and the influence of these programs on their motivations to visit this area currently and behavioral intentions to visit again in the future. Data were obtained from an onsite survey at the Mt. Bachelor ski area in Oregon, USA ( n = 429, 89.7% response rate). Few skiers and snowboarders were knowledgeable of VEPs at this area and fewer than 20% were motivated to visit on their current trip because of these programs. Other attributes such as scenery, snow conditions, and access were more important for influencing visitation. Up to 38% of skiers and snowboarders, however, intend to visit this ski area more often if it adopts and promotes more VEPs. Managers can use these results to inform communication and marketing of their environmental programs and performance to visitors. Additional implications for management and future research are discussed.

  2. An Inverse Relative Age Effect in Male Alpine Skiers at the Absolute Top Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerke, Øyvind; Pedersen, Arve Vorland; Aune, Tore K; Lorås, Håvard

    2017-01-01

    The Relative Age Effect (RAE) can be described as the advantage of being born early after a certain cut-off date within a group of selection. The effect has been found across a wide range of sports and is particularly evident in pre-elite sports and team sports with a high selection pressure. At the absolute top level in team elite sports, the advantage of being relatively older has been reported to disappear, and even reverse, so that the relatively younger athletes are advantaged. In order to further examine such a reversal of the RAE, we investigated the performance of the overall top 50 skiers each year in the alpine World Cup, over a period of 20 years, among men ( N = 234) and women ( N = 235). The data indicated that the relatively younger male athletes at the absolute top level had accumulated, on average, more World Cup points compared to the relatively older skiers. No such effect was observed among the female skiers. This finding suggest the existence of a reversed relative age effect in male elite alpine skiing.

  3. An Inverse Relative Age Effect in Male Alpine Skiers at the Absolute Top Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øyvind Bjerke

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Relative Age Effect (RAE can be described as the advantage of being born early after a certain cut-off date within a group of selection. The effect has been found across a wide range of sports and is particularly evident in pre-elite sports and team sports with a high selection pressure. At the absolute top level in team elite sports, the advantage of being relatively older has been reported to disappear, and even reverse, so that the relatively younger athletes are advantaged. In order to further examine such a reversal of the RAE, we investigated the performance of the overall top 50 skiers each year in the alpine World Cup, over a period of 20 years, among men (N = 234 and women (N = 235. The data indicated that the relatively younger male athletes at the absolute top level had accumulated, on average, more World Cup points compared to the relatively older skiers. No such effect was observed among the female skiers. This finding suggest the existence of a reversed relative age effect in male elite alpine skiing.

  4. ASSOCIATION OF ISOMETRIC STRENGTH OF HIP AND KNEE MUSCLES WITH INJURY RISK IN HIGH SCHOOL CROSS COUNTRY RUNNERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luedke, Lace E; Heiderscheit, Bryan C; Williams, D S Blaise; Rauh, Mitchell J

    2015-11-01

    High school cross country runners have a high incidence of overuse injuries, particularly to the knee and shin. As lower extremity strength is modifiable, identification of strength attributes that contribute to anterior knee pain (AKP) and shin injuries may influence prevention and management of these injuries. To determine if a relationship existed between isometric hip abductor, knee extensor and flexor strength and the incidence of AKP and shin injury in high school cross country runners. Sixty-eight high school cross country runners (47 girls, 21 boys) participated in the study. Isometric strength tests of hip abductors, knee extensors and flexors were performed with a handheld dynamometer. Runners were prospectively followed during the 2014 interscholastic cross country season for occurrences of AKP and shin injury. Bivariate logistic regression was used to examine risk relationships between strength values and occurrence of AKP and shin injury. During the season, three (4.4%) runners experienced AKP and 13 (19.1%) runners incurred a shin injury. Runners in the tertiles indicating weakest hip abductor (chi-square = 6.140; p=0.046), knee extensor (chi-square = 6.562; p=0.038), and knee flexor (chi-square = 6.140; p=0.046) muscle strength had a significantly higher incidence of AKP. Hip and knee muscle strength was not significantly associated with shin injury. High school cross country runners with weaker hip abductor, knee extensor and flexor muscle strength had a higher incidence of AKP. Increasing hip and knee muscle strength may reduce the likelihood of AKP in high school cross country runners. 2b.

  5. Cross-country Differences in Reporting Practices – the Case of Provisions for Liabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Klimczak

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the study was to explore and compare reporting practices on provisions for liabilities in different countries. Methodology: The research was limited to the types of provisions that are addressed in the International Accounting Standard 37 - Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets. For the purpose of the study, financial statements of the biggest public companies in Great Britain, Germany and Poland have been chosen to be taken into consideration. The following detailed issues have been explored: - Presentation of the types of provisions in a statement of financial position and additional notes to a financial statement, - Presentation of the amounts of provisions made, used, and reversed during a given period and the effects of changes in the discount rate, - Scope and quality of descriptions of the nature of obligations presented by entities. The results of the analysis have been viewed from two perspectives - the areas of compliance and non-compliance of reporting on provisions with IFRS have been identified and a comparison of the extent of compliance with particular requirements between companies from different countries has been developed. Findings: The results of the analysis have revealed that companies from selected countries demonstrate different levels of compliance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS. Substantial differences in the scope and the quality of descriptive disclosures on provisions have been also identified. Originality/value: The study contributes to the research on cross-country differences in reporting practices and indicates the need for a further analysis of the underlying determinants

  6. Achilles tendon adaptation in cross-country runners across a competitive season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, L E; Lucero, A; Mauntel, T C; Kennedy, M; Walker, N; Marshall, S W; Padua, D A; Berkoff, D J

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC) is an imaging tool used to quantify tendon structural integrity. UTC has quantified Achilles tendon (AT) acute response to load in athletes; however, AT response to cumulative load over a season is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate AT response across a four-month competitive season in collegiate cross-country (XC) runners. Participants (n=21; male=9, female=12; age=19.8±1.2 years; height=171.9±8.9 cm; weight=60.2±8.5 kg) were imaged using the UTC device with a 10-MHz linear-array transducer mounted in a tracking device. The device captures images at 0.2 mm intervals along the AT. UTC algorithms quantified the stability of pixel brightness over every 17 contiguous transverse images into four echo types (I-IV). A total of 168 scans (n=21, bilateral limbs) were performed monthly across the four-month season (Aug=M1, Sep=M2, Oct=M3, Nov=M4). Echo-type percentages (%) were calculated from each scan. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) linear regression models evaluated echo-type % change (β) over the season (M1=reference). Type I increased from M1 to M4 (β=9.10, Presilience to a competitive season of repetitive loading in highly trained runners. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Corruption costs lives: a cross-country study using an IV approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lio, Mon-Chi; Lee, Ming-Hsuan

    2016-04-01

    This study quantitatively estimates the effects of corruption on five major health indicators by using recent cross-country panel data covering 119 countries for the period of 2005-2011. The corruption indicators provided by the World Bank and Transparency International are used, and both the two-way fixed effect and the two-stage least squares approaches are employed for our estimation. The estimation results show that, in general, corruption is negatively associated with a country's health outcomes. A lower level of corruption or a better control of corruption in a country can lead to longer life expectancy, a lower infant mortality rate and a lower under-five mortality rate for citizens. However, our estimation finds no significant association between corruption and individual diseases including human immunodeficiency virus prevalence and tuberculosis incidence. The findings suggest that corruption reduction itself is an effective method to promote health. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Do GCI indicators predict SME creation? A Western Balkans cross-country comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fëllënza Lushaku

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In early stages SMEs were seen as insignificant supplement to large business supply, whereas today they have a very important social and economic role, because of their contribution to job creation. These contributions are very valuable in times of crises and rising unemployment. In Kosovo and the Western Balkan countries, including countries such as Albania, Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina, the development of SMEs can contribute in facing many challenges, effects of inequality, high level of unemployment and demographic challenges. In addition, SME development can contribute to strengthening the competitiveness and productivity, while also promoting the growth of income per capita. Besides the positive perception the creation of small and medium enterprises has, it is also indispensable to consider their extinction rate, being the most affected category of businesses, especially in the initial stages. It is proved that the net SME creation and cross-country differences in the relationship between new businesses and extinct businesses, can serve as a recommendation for policy makers in order to create a favorable climate for small and medium enterprises. GCI indicators that measures global competitiveness are used to determine if the climate of competitiveness predicts the development of SMEs.

  9. Is it possible to develop a cross-country test of social interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Brett; Atler, Karen; Fisher, Anne G

    2017-11-01

    The Evaluation of Social Interaction (ESI) is used in Asia, Australia, North America and Europe. What is considered to be appropriate social interaction, however, differs amongst countries. If social interaction varies, the relative difficulty of the ESI items and types of social exchange also could vary, resulting in differential item functioning (DIF) and test bias in the form of differential test functioning (DTF). Yet, because the ESI scoring criteria are designed to account for culture, the ESI should be free of DIF and DTF. The purpose, therefore, was to determine whether the ESI demonstrates DIF or DTF related to country. A retrospective, descriptive, cross-sectional study of 9811 participants 2-102 years, 55% female, from 12 countries was conducted using many-facet Rasch analyses. DIF analyses compared paired item and social exchange type values by country against a critical effect size (±0.55 logit). DTF analyses compared paired ESI measures by country to 95% confidence intervals. All paired social exchange types and 98.3% of paired items differed by less than ±0.55 logit. All persons fell within 95% confidence intervals. Minimal DIF resulted in no test bias, supporting the cross-country validity of the ESI.

  10. Cardiovascular and metabolic adaptations in horses competing in cross-country events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, A; Riber, C; Santisteban, R; Rubio, M D; Agüera, E I; Castejón, F M

    1999-01-01

    The cardiovascular and metabolic response to two cross-country events (CC*: preliminary level and CC*** advanced level) were analysed in 8 male eventing horses (4 Anglo-Hunter and 4 Anglo-Arabian). This study focused on the establishment of the main metabolic pathways involved in the muscle energy resynthesis during the competitions. Heart rate (HR) was recorded throughout the CC events. Jugular venous blood samples were withdrawn before the warm-up period, immediately after the competitions and at 5 and 10 min in the recuperation period. The following haematological parameters were studied: red blood cells (RBC), packed cell volume (PCV), haemoglobin concentration (Hb), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC), white blood cells (WBC), and number and percentages of lymphocytes (LYM) and granulocytes and monocytes (GRAN). One fraction of blood was centrifuged and, in plasma, lactate (LA), total plasma protein (TPP) and the rate of LA disappearance were determined. The competitions induced significant increases in RBC, Hb, PCV, MCV and TPP. Plasma LA response exceeded the anaerobic threshold of 4 mmol/l, reaching a maximum level of 13.3 mmol/l. HR ranged from 140 to more than 200 bpm, peaking at 230 bpm, revealing a limitation in the oxygen supply to the working muscles. It was concluded that muscle energy resynthesis during a CC event is provided both through oxidative processes and glycolysis with LA formation. Therefore, both stamina and power exercises are required for eventing horses.

  11. Global digital divide: determinants of cross-country ICT development with special reference to Southeast Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbra Toria Nipo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Information and communication technology (ICT tools are regarded as imperative not only for enabling the economy to grow at a healthy rate, but also for elevating the socioeconomic conditions and standards of the society. In concurrence with the widespread diffusion of ICT, lies the phenomenon called digital divide – a complex issue pertaining to unequal access, use and applications of ICT among countries and peoples. This paper attempts to measure the contribution of conventional factors such as affordability, infrastructure, trade openness and urbanization, with added emphasis on the role of financial development in explaining cross-country development of ICT among Southeast Asian countries. Using panel data for 4 countries for the period 1994 – 2011, findings of this study revealed that GDP is the most significant determinant in explaining digital divide – consistent with findings from previous research efforts. Financial development also appear significant in most models adopted in all three ICT tools, implying the need for these countries to improve their financial markets to avoid falling further behind in promoting a digitally inclusive society.

  12. The impact of the fourth industrial revolution: a cross-country/region comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxin Liao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The fourth industrial revolution stimulates the advances of science and technology, in which the Internet of Things (IoT and its supporting technologies serve as backbones for Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS and smart machines are used as the promoters to optimize production chains. Such advancement goes beyond the organizational and territorial boundaries, comprising agility, intelligence, and networking. This scenario triggers governmental efforts that aim at defining guidelines and standards. The speed and complexity of the transition to the new digitalization era in a globalized environment, however, does not yet allow a common and coordinated understanding of the impacts of the actions undertaken in different countries and regions. The aim of this paper, therefore, is to bridge this gap through a systematic literature review that identifies the most influential public policies and evaluates their existing differences. This cross-country/region comparison provides a worldwide panorama of public policies' durations, main objectives, available funding, areas for action, focused manufacturing sectors, and prioritized technologies. Findings of this review can be used as the basis to analyse the position of a country against the existing challenges imposed towards its own industrial infrastructure and also to coordinate its public policies.

  13. Cross-Country Variation in Adult Skills Inequality: Why Are Skill Levels and Opportunities so Unequal in Anglophone Countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andy; Green, Francis; Pensiero, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    This article examines cross-country variations in adult skills inequality and asks why skills in Anglophone countries are so unequal. Drawing on the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development's recent Survey of Adult Skills and other surveys, it investigates the differences across countries and country groups in inequality in both…

  14. Lessons from a comparative (cross-country) study using conjoint analysis: Why not use all the information?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blunch, Niels Johan

    Re-examination of data from two comparative (cross-country) studies using conjoint analysis shows that significant improvement can be achieved by using two often neglected kinds of a priori information: Knowledge of the expected order of preferences for the various levels of one or more attributes...

  15. Muscle size, quality, and body composition: characteristics of division I cross-country runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Erica J; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Melvin, Malia N; Wingfield, Hailee L; Trexler, Eric T; Walker, Nina

    2015-02-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between muscle cross-sectional area (mCSA), echo intensity (EI), and body composition of Division I cross-country runners. The secondary purpose was to examine differences in these variables in athletes stratified based on stress-fracture (SFx) history. Thirty-six athletes were stratified based on sex and SFx history. A panoramic scan vastus lateralis was performed using a GE Logiq-e B-mode ultrasound. Echo intensity and mCSA were determined from the scan using a grayscale imaging software (ImageJ). Body composition measures were determined using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. For females, mCSA was significantly correlated with left leg lean mass (LM; R = 0.54) and EI (R = -0.57). Lean mass was significantly correlated with bone mineral density (BMD; R = 0.58) and bone mineral content (BMC; R = 0.56), whereas BMC was also correlated with leg LM (R = 0.72). For males, mCSA was significantly correlated with leg LM (R = 0.66), BMD (R = 0.50), and BMC (R = 0.54). Leg LM was significantly correlated with BMD (R = 0.53) and BMC (R = 0.77). Personal best times for males were significantly correlated with fat mass (R = 0.489) and %fat (R = 0.556) for the 10- and 5-km races, respectively. Female and male athletes with a history of SFx were not significantly different across any variables when compared with athletes with no history. These correlations suggest that more muscle mass may associate with higher BMD and BMC for stronger bone structure. Modifications in training strategies to include heavy resistance training and plyometrics may be advantageous for preventing risk factors associated with SFx reoccurrence.

  16. Coproducing flood risk management through citizen involvement: insights from cross-country comparison in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannelore Mees

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Across Europe, citizens are increasingly expected to participate in the implementation of flood risk management (FRM, by engaging in voluntary-based activities to enhance preparedness, implementing property-level measures, and so forth. Although citizen participation in FRM decision making is widely addressed in academic literature, citizens' involvement in the delivery of FRM measures is comparatively understudied. Drawing from public administration literature, we adopted the notion of "coproduction" as an analytical framework for studying the interaction between citizens and public authorities, from the decision-making process through to the implementation of FRM in practice. We considered to what extent coproduction is evident in selected European Union (EU member states, drawing from research conducted within the EU project STAR-FLOOD (Strengthening and Redesigning European Flood Risk Practices towards Appropriate and Resilient Flood Risk Governance Arrangements. On the basis of a cross-country comparison between Flanders (Belgium, England (United Kingdom, France, the Netherlands, and Poland, we have highlighted the varied forms of coproduction and reflected on how these have been established within divergent settings. Coproduction is most prominent in discourse and practice in England and is emergent in France and Flanders. By contrast, FRM in the Netherlands and Poland remains almost exclusively reliant on governmental protection measures and thereby consultation-based forms of coproduction. Analysis revealed how these actions are motivated by different underlying rationales, which in turn shape the type of approaches and degree of institutionalization of coproduction. In the Netherlands, coproduction is primarily encouraged to increase societal resilience, whereas public authorities in the other countries also use it to improve cost-efficiency and redistribute responsibilities to its beneficiaries.

  17. Environmental policies and risk finance in the green sector: Cross-country evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criscuolo, Chiara; Menon, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed description of venture capital investment in the green sector across 29 countries over the period 2005–2010, and identifies the role that policies might play in explaining observed cross-country differences. The analysis is based on a deal-level database of businesses seeking financing, combined with indicators of renewable policies and government R&D expenditures. The econometric analysis relates the number of deals and their volumes in a country to deployment and supply policies using count data and limited dependent variable (Tobit) models. The results suggest that both supply side policies and environmental deployment policies, designed with a long-term perspective of creating a market for environmental technologies, are associated with higher levels of venture capital relative to more short-term fiscal policies. When focusing on policies related to renewable energy generation, the results confirm the positive association of generous feed-in tariffs (FITs) with venture capital investment. However, in the solar sector excessively generous FITs tend to discourage investment, perhaps reflecting a lack of credibility over the longer term. Thus, both sets of results point to long-term policy stability, sustainability and credibility as important policy features to ensure Venture capital backing of innovative and risky ventures in a country's green sector. -- Highlights: •Risk-finance in the green sector is likely to face more challenges than in other hi-tech sectors. •Supply and deployment policies are associated with more investments relative to fiscal policies. •FITs have a positive effect, but in the solar sector very generous FITs discourage investments

  18. Implementing US GDP in Chained Prices for Cross-country GDP Growth and Sectoral Comparisons: Application to Selected ASEAN Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Dumagan, Jesus C.

    2008-01-01

    GDP in constant prices of ASEAN countries suffers from substitution bias by ignoring relative price changes and makes GDP growth and shares dependent on the base year. These analytical deficiencies led the US since the mid-1990s to convert GDP from constant to chained prices. Thus, cross-country comparisons in constant prices are analytically shaky even with the same base year. Therefore, this paper implements US GDP in chained prices in Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Thailand to allev...

  19. Performance of European cross-country oil pipelines. Statistical summary of reported spillages in 2006 and since 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larive, J.F.

    2008-08-01

    Since 1971 CONCAWE has been collecting data on spillages from cross-country oil pipelines in Europe. The information is collated in an annual report which includes an analysis of the human and environmental consequences and of the underlying causes of such incidents. CONCAWE report 7/08 covers the results for the year 2006 and includes an analysis of the accumulated data for the whole 36-year period from 1971 to 2006

  20. Performance of European cross-country oil pipelines. Statistical summary of reported spillages in 2006 and since 1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larive, J.F. [CONCAWE, Brussels (Belgium)

    2008-08-15

    Since 1971 CONCAWE has been collecting data on spillages from cross-country oil pipelines in Europe. The information is collated in an annual report which includes an analysis of the human and environmental consequences and of the underlying causes of such incidents. CONCAWE report 7/08 covers the results for the year 2006 and includes an analysis of the accumulated data for the whole 36-year period from 1971 to 2006.

  1. Balance-related exercise as a preparation to cross-country skiing practice in visually impaired children

    OpenAIRE

    Chmelíčková, Hana

    2008-01-01

    Title: Balance-related excercise as a preparation to cross-country skiing practice in visually impaired children. Objectives of the Thesis: The goal of this thesis is to test the possibilitiy of implementation of selected balance- related excercise in visually impaired children. Method: The testing pool consisted of six pupils attending the Special school for Visually Impaired Children between 14 and 15 years of age. Over the period of ten weeks, selected exercise geared towards the cross-cou...

  2. The effect of helmet use on injury severity and crash circumstances in skiers and snowboarders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagel, Brent; Pless, I Barry; Goulet, Claude; Platt, Robert; Robitaille, Yvonne

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of helmet use on non-head-neck injury severity and crash circumstances in skiers and snowboarders. We used a matched case-control study over the November 2001 to April 2002 winter season. 3295 of 4667 injured skiers and snowboarders reporting to the ski patrol at 19 areas in Quebec with non-head, non-neck injuries agreed to participate. Cases included those evacuated by ambulance, admitted to hospital, with restriction of normal daily activities (NDAs) >6 days, with non-helmet equipment damage, fast self-reported speed, participating on a more difficult run than usual, and jumping-related injury. Controls were injured participants without severe injuries or high-energy crash circumstances and were matched to cases on ski area, activity, day, age, and sex. Conditional logistic regression was used to relate each outcome to helmet use. There was no evidence that helmet use increased the risk of severe injury or high-energy crash circumstances. The results suggest that helmet use in skiing and snowboarding is not associated with riskier activities that lead to non-head-neck injuries.

  3. Erythropoietin, 2,3 DPG, oxygen transport capacity, and altitude training in adolescent Alpine skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Hee Jeong; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Kim, Jin Hae; Ohno, Hideki; Kim, Chang Keun

    2012-01-01

    Rapid growth during adolescence caused by metabolic changes and their metabolic response to anaerobic and aerobic exercise differs considerably from that in adults and this is especially true in the responses to stresses, such as altitude exposure. However, there is little information on the suitability of exercise training at altitude for young athletes. Six male Korean adolescent alpine skiers (13-17 yr), with a skiing career of 3-5 yr, participated in the study. All subjects were exposed to an altitude of 2700 m (8858 ft) for 5 wk and altitude exposure consisted of 6 d/wk of training (4-5 h/d), with living quarters at 2100 m (-6890 ft) (Tignes, France). The 5 wk of ski training at altitude were maintained at the same level (the same number of slalom and giant slalom skiing trials) as at sea level. There was a significant increase in oxygen transport capacity, despite decreased erythropoietin (EPO) production (-31%) after altitude training. Red blood cell (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), and 2,3 DPG concentrations increased significantly during altitude exposure and after return to sea level. Results indicate that applying altitude training in adolescent skiers may improve their endurance performance. However, EPO production during altitude training needs to be evaluated in larger future studies.

  4. Variants in the dopamine-4-receptor gene promoter are not associated with sensation seeking in skiers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia J Thomson

    Full Text Available Sensation seeking is a personality trait that has been associated with disinhibited behaviours including substance use and gambling, but also with high-risk sport practices including skydiving, paragliding, and downhill skiing. Twin studies have shown that sensation seeking is moderately heritable, and candidate genes encoding components involved in dopaminergic transmission have been investigated as contributing to this type of behaviour. To determine whether variants in the regulatory regions of the dopamine-4-receptor gene (DRD4 influenced sport-specific sensation seeking, we analyzed five polymorphisms (-1106T/C, -906T/C, -809G/A, -291C/T, 120-bp duplication in the promoter region of the gene in a cohort of skiers and snowboarders (n = 599 that represented a broad range of sensation seeking behaviours. We grouped subjects by genotype at each of the five loci and compared impulsive sensation seeking and domain-specific (skiing sensation seeking between groups. There were no significant associations between genotype(s and general or domain-specific sensation seeking in the skiers and snowboarders, suggesting that while DRD4 has previously been implicated in sensation seeking, the promoter variants investigated in this study do not contribute to sensation seeking in this athlete population.

  5. Variants in the dopamine-4-receptor gene promoter are not associated with sensation seeking in skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Cynthia J; Rajala, Amelia K; Carlson, Scott R; Rupert, Jim L

    2014-01-01

    Sensation seeking is a personality trait that has been associated with disinhibited behaviours including substance use and gambling, but also with high-risk sport practices including skydiving, paragliding, and downhill skiing. Twin studies have shown that sensation seeking is moderately heritable, and candidate genes encoding components involved in dopaminergic transmission have been investigated as contributing to this type of behaviour. To determine whether variants in the regulatory regions of the dopamine-4-receptor gene (DRD4) influenced sport-specific sensation seeking, we analyzed five polymorphisms (-1106T/C, -906T/C, -809G/A, -291C/T, 120-bp duplication) in the promoter region of the gene in a cohort of skiers and snowboarders (n = 599) that represented a broad range of sensation seeking behaviours. We grouped subjects by genotype at each of the five loci and compared impulsive sensation seeking and domain-specific (skiing) sensation seeking between groups. There were no significant associations between genotype(s) and general or domain-specific sensation seeking in the skiers and snowboarders, suggesting that while DRD4 has previously been implicated in sensation seeking, the promoter variants investigated in this study do not contribute to sensation seeking in this athlete population.

  6. Supinated forearm is correlated with the onset of medial epicondylitis in professional slalom water-skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Donato; Di Donato, Sigismondo Luca; Balato, Giovanni; D'Addona, Alessio; Schonauer, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    prolonged and laborious activities involving wrists and forearms has been long associated with the onset of epicondylitis. Slalom water-skiing can be included in this category. The purpose of the study is to analyse the correlation between the pronated or supinated position of forearms during water-skiing practice and the presence respectively of lateral and medial epicondylitis. sixty-six pro and semi-pro slalom water-skiers were enrolled in the study. A questionnaire was submitted to each athlete. Diagnosis of lateral or medial epicondylitis was made through anamnesis and clinical exam by an expert orthopaedic surgeon. Chi-squared were performed for categorical variables, and Mann-Whitney U test for continuous ones. from 116 upper limbs examined, we observed 15 (12.9%) cases of lateral epicondylitis, 30 (25.9%) cases of medial epicondylitis, 10 (8.6%) were affected by both lateral and medial epicondylitis. Lateral and medial epicondylitis were associated (95% C.I.=2,489-26,355; P=epicondylitis (95% C.I.=1,529-9,542; P=0.003). slalom water-skiing can be considered a high-risk sport for epicondylitis. In slalom water-skiers there is a correlation between development of lateral and medial epicondylitis in the same upper limb. Supinated position of forearms is strongly associated with the diagnosis of medial epicondylitis.

  7. Analyzing Spatial Behavior of Backcountry Skiers in Mountain Protected Areas Combining GPS Tracking and Graph Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Taczanowska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mountain protected areas (PAs aim to preserve vulnerable environments and at the same time encourage numerous outdoor leisure activities. Understanding the way people use natural environments is crucial to balance the needs of visitors and site capacities. This study aims to develop an approach to evaluate the structure and use of designated skiing zones in PAs combining Global Positioning System (GPS tracking and analytical methods based on graph theory. The study is based on empirical data (n = 609 GPS tracks of backcountry skiers collected in Tatra National Park (TNP, Poland. The physical structure of the entire skiing zones system has been simplified into a graph structure (structural network; undirected graph. In a second step, the actual use of the area by skiers (functional network; directed graph was analyzed using a graph-theoretic approach. Network coherence (connectivity indices: β, γ, α, movement directions at path segments, and relative importance of network nodes (node centrality measures: degree, betweenness, closeness, and proximity prestige were calculated. The system of designated backcountry skiing zones was not evenly used by the visitors. Therefore, the calculated parameters differ significantly between the structural and the functional network. In particular, measures related to the actually used trails are of high importance from the management point of view. Information about the most important node locations can be used for planning sign-posts, on-site maps, interpretative boards, or other tourist infrastructure.

  8. Sports activity after surgical treatment of intra-articular tibial plateau fractures in skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loibl, Markus; Bäumlein, Martin; Massen, Felix; Gueorguiev, Boyko; Glaab, Richard; Perren, Thomas; Rillmann, Paavo; Ryf, Christian; Naal, Florian D

    2013-06-01

    Tibial plateau fractures occur frequently while participating in winter sports, but there is no information on whether skiers can resume sports and recreational activities after internal fixation of these fractures. Skiers can resume low-impact sports activity after internal fixation of tibial plateau fractures. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 103 patients were surveyed by postal questionnaires to determine their sports activities at a mean of 7.8 ± 1.8 years after internal fixation of intra-articular tibial plateau fractures. The survey also included the Lysholm score, the Tegner activity scale, and a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain. At the time of the survey, 88% of the patients were engaged in sports activities (rate of return to sports, 88%), and 53% continued to participate in downhill skiing. The median number of different activities declined from 5 (range, 1-17) preoperatively to 4 (range, 0-11) postoperatively (P Sports frequency and duration per week did not change: 3 (range, 1-7) preoperatively versus 3 (range, 0-7) postoperatively (P = .275) and 4 hours (range, 1-16 hours) preoperatively versus 3.5 hours (range, 0-15 hours) postoperatively (P = .217), respectively. Median values of all outcome scores declined: Lysholm score, 100 (range, 85-100) preoperatively versus 94.5 (range, 37-100) postoperatively (P sports at the time of follow-up compared with the ability before the accident was rated as "similar" by 57 patients (62.0%) and as "worse" by 35 patients (38.0%). The more severe fracture types, B3 and C3 according to the AO classification system, were associated with poorer outcomes related to return to sports and functional scores. A large percentage of skiers with surgically treated intra-articular tibial plateau fractures cannot continue to participate in downhill skiing; however, the majority could resume an active lifestyle for several years after the trauma. Fracture type seems to be an important factor influencing physical

  9. A Coupled Snow Operations-Skier Demand Model for the Ontario (Canada) Ski Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Marc; Scott, Daniel; Steiger, Robert; Rutty, Michelle; Johnson, Peter; Vilella, Marc

    2016-04-01

    The multi-billion dollar global ski industry is one of the tourism subsectors most directly impacted by climate variability and change. In the decades ahead, the scholarly literature consistently projects decreased reliability of natural snow cover, shortened and more variable ski seasons, as well as increased reliance on snowmaking with associated increases in operational costs. In order to develop the coupled snow, ski operations and demand model for the Ontario ski region (which represents approximately 18% of Canada's ski market), the research utilized multiple methods, including: a in situ survey of over 2400 skiers, daily operations data from ski resorts over the last 10 years, climate station data (1981-2013), climate change scenario ensemble (AR5 - RCP 8.5), an updated SkiSim model (building on Scott et al. 2003; Steiger 2010), and an agent-based model (building on Pons et al. 2014). Daily snow and ski operations for all ski areas in southern Ontario were modeled with the updated SkiSim model, which utilized current differential snowmaking capacity of individual resorts, as determined from daily ski area operations data. Snowmaking capacities and decision rules were informed by interviews with ski area managers and daily operations data. Model outputs were validated with local climate station and ski operations data. The coupled SkiSim-ABM model was run with historical weather data for seasons representative of an average winter for the 1981-2010 period, as well as an anomalously cold winter (2012-13) and the record warm winter in the region (2011-12). The impact on total skier visits and revenues, and the geographic and temporal distribution of skier visits were compared. The implications of further climate adaptation (i.e., improving the snowmaking capacity of all ski areas to the level of leading resorts in the region) were also explored. This research advances system modelling, especially improving the integration of snow and ski operations models with

  10. Pronounced limb and fibre type differences in subcellular lipid droplet content and distribution in elite skiers before and after exhaustive exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Han-Chow E; Nielsen, Joachim; Saltin, Bengt; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Ørtenblad, Niels

    2017-09-01

    Although lipid droplets in skeletal muscle are an important energy source during endurance exercise, our understanding of lipid metabolism in this context remains incomplete. Using transmission electron microscopy, two distinct subcellular pools of lipid droplets can be observed in skeletal muscle - one beneath the sarcolemma and the other between myofibrils. At rest, well-trained leg muscles of cross-country skiers contain 4- to 6-fold more lipid droplets than equally well-trained arm muscles, with a 3-fold higher content in type 1 than in type 2 fibres. During exhaustive exercise, lipid droplets between the myofibrils but not those beneath the sarcolemma are utilised by both type 1 and 2 fibres. These findings provide insight into compartmentalisation of lipid metabolism within skeletal muscle fibres. Although the intramyocellular lipid pool is an important energy store during prolonged exercise, our knowledge concerning its metabolism is still incomplete. Here, quantitative electron microscopy was used to examine subcellular distribution of lipid droplets in type 1 and 2 fibres of the arm and leg muscles before and after 1 h of exhaustive exercise. Intermyofibrillar lipid droplets accounted for 85-97% of the total volume fraction, while the subsarcolemmal pool made up 3-15%. Before exercise, the volume fractions of intermyofibrillar and subsarcolemmal lipid droplets were 4- to 6-fold higher in leg than in arm muscles (P exercise, intermyofibrillar lipid droplet volume fraction was 53% lower (P = 0.0082) in both fibre types in arm, but not leg muscles. This reduction was positively associated with the corresponding volume fraction prior to exercise (R 2  = 0.84, P exercise-induced change in the subsarcolemmal pool could be detected. These findings indicate clear differences in the subcellular distribution of lipid droplets in the type 1 and 2 fibres of well-trained arm and leg muscles, as well as preferential utilisation of the intermyofibrillar pool

  11. Contextualising case studies in entrepreneurship: A tandem approach to conducting a longitudinal cross-country case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chetty, S. K.; Partanen, J.; Rasmussen, Erik Stavnsager

    2014-01-01

    Using predictive and effectuation logics as a framework, this research note explains how case study research was conducted to demonstrate rigour and relevance. The study involves a longitudinal cross-country case study on small and medium-sized firm growth and networks undertaken by research teams...... in three countries (Finland, Denmark and New Zealand) involving 33 firms. This research note outlines the implications of this research and provides valuable guidance and reflections upon opportunities for future research regarding the conduct of contextual studies in entrepreneurship without compromising...

  12. Characteristics of functional tension of qualified skiers when passing rises of different difficulty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Khmelnytska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: studying of main functional changes in organism of qualified female skiers when passing rises of different difficulty. Materials: 12 female skiers of combined team of Ukraine of 21-34 years’ age were tested. Pedagogic observation included: speed metering (system of GPS- navigation, pulse metering (telemetric register of heart beats rate Polar RS800. In process of ski track passing we registered content of exhaled air (radio-telemetric gas-analytic complex MetaMax 3B, Cortex. Sportswomen fulfilled control passing of competition 6 km distance (2 circles, 3 km each in classic style on ski rollers. Ski track was determined by coach. In the course of track’s passing we registered indicators of speed and track profile with discreteness 1 sec. Assessment of special workability and realization of functional potentials was determined by characteristics of external breathing at the end of each rise. Results: it was found that the highest correlation belonged to the following indicators: frequency of breathing (r = 0.38; oxygen consumption (r = 0.29; ventilation equivalent by О 2(r = 0.68. We detected high interconnection between length of distance and ventilation equivalent by СО 2 (r=0.61. It was determined that factors of organism’s anaerobic efficiency change according to relief of track. They increase on rises and reduce on descends. With it increase on long rises is much higher than on middle size rises. Conclusions: effectiveness of different difficulty rises’ overcoming depends on potentials of anaerobic mechanisms and their realization that, to certain extent, influence on sport efficiency.

  13. Pupil Behavior in Junior Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydell, D.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of the exploratory study reported here was to investigate the nature of children's behavior in unstreamed, informal, junior classrooms where the children sit in small groups and the incidence of private teacher talk to small groups and individual children is high. (Author)

  14. 300 Junior Novel Anticipation Guides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polette, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    In this book, the author has created reproducible anticipation guides to 300 popular junior novels (grades 4-8) ranging from classics like Ben and Me and Cricket in Times Square to the current award winner, Kira, Kira. The book consists of 300 reproducible sets of open ended values questions to pique the interest of readers. Librarians and…

  15. Junior College Faculty Job Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Joanne

    Some of the research done to date concerning job satisfaction of junior college faculty is reviewed in this "Brief." Part I of the "Brief" describes four frameworks that have been applied to the analysis of job satisfaction: the traditional approach, the two-factor approach, the need hierarchy, and the cognitive dissonance approach. Part II…

  16. Junior PC-Kørekort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansbøl, Mikala; Mathiasen, Helle

    udviklingsprojekt med forsøg med DANSK IT's Junior PC-kørekort® som metode og redskab til at evaluere og dokumentere elevernes IT-kompetencer. Projektet blev gennemført i perioden fra 2002-2003 og afsluttet i foråret 2003. Rapporten er baseret på kvalitative case studier af elever og læreres arbejde med Junior PC......-kørekort® prøverne. DANSK IT's Junior PC-kørekort® kan betragtes som et forsøg på at etablere en bestemt fælleskulturel tilgang til elevernes IT-kompetencer i folkeskolen. Ud fra et situeret læringsperspektiv problematiserer rapporten anvendelsen af de standardiserede prøver som metode til at dokumentere og evaluere...... elevernes IT-kompetencer. Rapporten (2MB) fylder 80 sider ekskl. bilag. Bemærk, at forskningsrapporten handler om Dansk IT's Junior PC-kørekort - ikke at forveksle med det IT-bevis for folkeskolens elever, som Undevisningsministeriet har udviklet. Dette IT-bevis koncept skiftede navn i januar 2004, hvor...

  17. Holography in the Junior High.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszkiewicz, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Examines the use of holography in the art technology program of a junior high school. Characterizing holography as a valuable artistic experience and discovery experience and stressing the importance of student interest and involvement, the author discusses the necessary equipment for the project and includes two diagrams of a holographic setup.…

  18. Engineering movement of qualified skiers-racers skating style in the current development of ski races

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Kotliar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: analysis of technique of skiing skating style of leading sportsmen of the world. Material and Methods: research was conducted by means of analysis of video data and кинограмм of of skilled racing cross-country ski and biathlon of leading countries of the world. Results: the analysis of dynamic descriptions of technique of the same name ski motions educed the row of factors, from that sportsmen, what applied «Double Push» in the technique of skiing, increase speed of passing of short segments on 4-6%. Conclusions: implementation of «Double Push» can useful for racing cross-country ski and biathlon on competitions on a sprint, on rollers-ski and at implementation of short accelerations on distance, and also on a finish

  19. READINESS PROFILE OF JUNIOR CYCLISTS DETERMINED BY LEIPZIG TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovan Zlatković

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to define the readiness profile of junior cyclists determined by the Leipzig test. The second aim was to find out if there were differences in functional performance among cyclists in different disciplines, such as: road cyclists, mountain bikers and sprinters. All cyclists (n=18 were tested with Leipzig test protocol on a bicycle ergometer by increasing the load by 40W per minute, pedalling cadence 90- 100rev/min. The hearth rate was measured at the beginning and at the end of the test, together with the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max. The results have shown that the maximal oxygen uptake among national junior cyclists in all disciplines was VO2max 56.42±5.82 ml•min-1kg-1, among mountain biking cyclist VO2max was 61.43±4.94, sprinters VO2max 56.78±3.33 and for cross-country cyclists VO2max 53.37±7.82. The statistical analysis of the functional performance results has snown that between subsamples of cyclists there were no significant differences on general level. However, the partial analysis has snown that there is a statistically significant difference between the groups in the hart rate values on an anaerobic threshold (F value 4.547, p=0.032. In conclusion, the tested cyclists were prepared using general training methods even if they had competitions in different disciplines. Therefore, the level of readiness shows that the training process for young cyclists which is used in Serbia is not specific for the competition level and discipline.

  20. Double-push skating versus V2 and V1 skating on uphill terrain in cross-country skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöggl, Thomas; Kampel, Wolfgang; Müller, Erich; Lindinger, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    The aims of the study were a) to compare the double-push skating technique with the V2 and the V1 skating techniques on an uphill terrain by a kinematic and kinetic analysis, b) to provide kinetic and kinematic data of the V1 technique at maximal skiing speeds, and c) to test the hypotheses that the double-push skating technique is faster compared with the V2 and the V1 skating techniques. Six elite skiers performed maximum speed sprints over a 60-m uphill section (7 degrees -10 degrees) using the double-push, the V2, and the V1 techniques. Pole and plantar forces and cycle characteristics were analyzed. The double-push skating technique was approximately 4.3% faster (P push and the V2 techniques demonstrated longer cycle lengths, lower cycle rates (both P push technique compared with the V2 technique (all P values push technique compared with the other two techniques (P push techniques compared with the V2 technique stress the mechanical advantage of those techniques on uphill terrain. Because of larger cycle lengths, lower cycle rate, longer recovery times, and equal poling frequency, the double-push technique might be seen as more economic on steep uphills compared with the V1 technique. From a tactical point of view compared with the V1 technique, the double-push technique needs less space due to less lateral displacement, and no technique transitions are necessary when entering and leaving an uphill section.

  1. A Comparison between Alpine Skiing, Cross-Country Skiing and Indoor Cycling on Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Stöggl, Christoph Schwarzl, Edith E. Müller, Masaru Nagasaki, Julia Stöggl, Peter Scheiber, Martin Schönfelder, Josef Niebauer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Since physical inactivity especially prevails during winter months, we set out to identify outdoor alternatives to indoor cycling (IC by comparing the metabolic and cardiorespiratory responses during alpine skiing (AS, cross-country skiing (XCS and IC and analyse the effects of sex, age and fitness level in this comparison. Twenty one healthy subjects performed alpine skiing (AS, cross-country skiing (XCS, and IC. Oxygen uptake (VO2, total energy expenditure (EE, heart rate (HR, lactate, blood glucose and rate of perceived exertion (RPE were determined during three 4-min stages of low, moderate and high intensity. During XCS and IC VO2max and EE were higher than during AS. At least 2½ hours of AS are necessary to reach the same EE as during one hour of XCS or IC. HR, VO2, lactate, and RPEarms were highest during XCS, whereas RPEwhole-body was similar and RPElegs lower than during AS and IC, respectively. Weight adjusted VO2 and EE were higher in men than in women while fitness level had no effect. Male, fit and young participants were able to increase their EE and VO2 values more pronounced. Both AS and XCS can be individually tailored to serve as alternatives to IC and may thus help to overcome the winter activity deficit. XCS was found to be the most effective activity for generating a high EE and VO2 while AS was the most demanding activity for the legs.

  2. The Question of Queue: Implications for -Best Practice- in Cross-country Transport of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The 'Standard Contract' authorized by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Section 302(a)) provides that priority for acceptance of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) shall be based on the date of its discharge from civilian nuclear reactors. Through 2007, about 2,100 discharges of about 58,000 metric tons have created a priority ranking (or 'queue') for US DOE spent fuel acceptance and transport. Since 1982, consideration of the task of large-scale, cross-country SNF transport (by the National Academies and others) has led to several recommendations for 'best practice' in such an unprecedented campaign. Many of these recommendations, however, are inconsistent with the acceptance priority established by the Standard Contract, and in fact cannot be implemented under its provisions. This paper considers the SNF acceptance rankings established by the Standard Contract, and the barrier these place on best practice cross-country transport of the nation's inventory of SNF. Using a series of case studies, the paper explores the challenge of best practice transport from selected shipment origins under current arrangements. The case studies support preliminary conclusions regarding the inconsistency between best practice SNF transport and the Standard Contract acceptance queue, with reference to particular origins sites and their utility owners. The paper concludes with a suggestion for resolving the inconsistencies, and recommended next steps in the inquiry. (authors)

  3. The impact of uphill cycling and bicycle suspension on downhill performance during cross-country mountain biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdermid, Paul W; Fink, Philip W; Miller, Matthew C; Stannard, Stephen

    2017-07-01

    Non-propulsive work demand has been linked to reduced energetic economy of cross-country mountain biking. The purpose of this study was to determine mechanical, physiological and performance differences and observe economy while riding a downhill section of a cross-country course prior to and following the metabolic "load" of a climb at race pace under two conditions (hardtail and full suspension) expected to alter vibration damping mechanics. Participants completed 1 lap of the track incorporating the same downhill section twice, under two conditions (hardtail and full suspension). Performance was determined by time to complete overall lap and specific terrain sections. Power, cadence, heart rate and oxygen consumption were sampled and logged every second while triaxial accelerometers recorded accelerations (128 Hz) to quantify vibration. No differences between performance times (P = 0.65) or power outputs (P = 0.61) were observed while physiological demand of loaded downhill riding was significantly greater (P  0.05) measures. This study showed minimal advantage of a full suspension bike in our trial, with further investigations over a full race distance warranted.

  4. A cross-country study of cigarette prices and affordability: evidence from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostova, Deliana; Chaloupka, Frank J; Yurekli, Ayda; Ross, Hana; Cherukupalli, Rajeev; Andes, Linda; Asma, Samira

    2014-01-01

    To describe the characteristics of two primary determinants of cigarette consumption: cigarette affordability and the range of prices paid for cigarettes (and bidis, where applicable) in a set of 15 countries. From this cross-country comparison, identify places where opportunities may exist for reducing consumption through tax adjustments. Self-response data from 45,838 smokers from 15 countries, obtained from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) 2008-2011. Using self-response data on individual cigarette expenditure and consumption, we construct a measure of the average cigarette price smokers pay for manufactured cigarettes (and bidis, where applicable) in 15 countries. We use these prices to evaluate cigarette affordability and the range of prices available in each country. These survey-derived measures of cigarette price and affordability are uniquely suited for cross-country comparison because they represent each country's distinctive mix of individual consumption characteristics such as brand choice, intensity of consumption, and purchasing behavior. In this sample of countries, cigarettes are most affordable in Russia, which has the most room for tobacco tax increase. Affordability is also relatively high in Brazil and China for cigarettes, and in India and Bangladesh for bidis. Although the affordability of cigarettes in India is relatively low, the range of cigarette prices paid is relatively high, providing additional evidence to support the call for simplifying the existing tax structure and reducing the width of price options. China has both high affordability and wide price ranges, suggesting multiple opportunities for reducing consumption through tax adjustments.

  5. Quantification of brake data acquired with a brake power meter during simulated cross-country mountain bike racing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew C; Fink, Philip W; Macdermid, Paul W; Stannard, Stephen R

    2018-01-17

    There is currently a dearth of information describing cycling performance outside of propulsive and physiological variables. The aim of the present study was to utilise a brake power meter to quantify braking during a multi-lap cross-country mountain bike time trial and to determine how braking affects performance. A significant negative association was determined between lap time and brake power (800.8 ± 216.4 W, mean ± SD; r = -0.446; p  0.05) which was attributed to decreased brake work (p < 0.05) and brake time (p < 0.05) in both the front and rear brakes by the final lap. A multiple regression model incorporating braking and propulsion was able to explain more of the variance in lap time (r 2  = 0.935) than propulsion alone (r 2  = 0.826). The present study highlights that riders' braking contributes to mountain bike performance. As riders repeat a cross-country mountain bike track, they are able to change braking, which in turn can counterbalance a reduction in power output. Further research is required to understand braking better.

  6. Effect of pain-free range exercise on shoulder pain and range of motion in an amateur skier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] This study prescribed pain-free range exercises for a female amateur skier who complained of limitations in her shoulder range of motion, and pain caused by protective spasms; the tester evaluated the effects of such exercise on pain. [Subject and Methods] A 23-year-old female who complained of pain of 3 weeks in duration in the right glenohumoral and scapulothoracic joints was enrolled. [Results] After pain-free range exercises, the visual analog pain score was 2 and the shoulder flexion and abduction angles improved compared to the initial values. [Conclusion] Thus, this study suggests muscle-strengthening exercises within the pain-free range, rather than simple pain treatments, as therapy for acute muscle injuries in skiers.

  7. The Effects of a 10-day Altitude Training Camp at 1828 Meters on Varsity Cross-Country Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diebel, Sebastian R; Newhouse, Ian; Thompson, David S; Johnson, Vineet B K

    2017-01-01

    Altitude training has been shown to alter blood lactate (BL) levels due to alterations resulting from acclimatization. This study aims to estimate the impact of altitude training on BL changes immediately following an incremental treadmill test and during recovery before and after 10-day altitude training at approximately 1828 meters. Eight varsity cross-country runners performed an incremental treadmill test (ITT), pre and post-altitude training. Resting and post-warm-up BL values were recorded. During ITT, heart rate (HR), oxygen saturation (SpO2), and time to exhaustion were monitored. BL was also measured post-ITT at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 minutes. The average of all BL values was higher following altitude intervention (8.8 ± 4.6 mmol/L) compared to pre-intervention (7.4 ± 3.3 mmol/L). These differences were statistically significant ( t (6) = -2.40, p = .026). BL immediately (0 minutes) after the ITT was higher following the altitude intervention (13.6 ± 3.6 mmol/L) compared to pre-intervention (9.7 ± 3.8 mmol/L) and was statistically significant ( t (7) = -3.30, p = .006). Average HR during the ITT was lower following the altitude intervention (176.9 ± 11.1 bpm) compared to pre (187 ± 9.5 bpm), these differences were statistically significant ( t (28)= 18.07, p= altitude intervention at 1828 meters may benefit varsity cross-country runners. The higher post-exercise BL may be attributed to more anaerobic contributions. Lower HR may suggest a larger stroke volume and/or more efficient O2 carrying capacity.

  8. The effectiveness of front fork systems at damping accelerations during isolated aspects specific to cross-country mountain biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdermid, Paul W; Miller, Matthew C; Fink, Philip W; Stannard, Stephen R

    2017-11-01

    Cross-country mountain bike suspension reportedly enhances comfort and performance through reduced vibration and impact exposure. This study analysed the effectiveness of three different front fork systems at damping accelerations during the crossing of three isolated obstacles (stairs, drop, and root). One participant completed three trials on six separate occasions in a randomised order using rigid, air-sprung, and carbon leaf-sprung forks. Performance was determined by time to cross obstacles, while triaxial accelerometers quantified impact exposure and damping response. Results identified significant main effect of fork type for performance time (p < 0.05). The air-sprung and leaf-sprung forks were significantly slower than the rigid forks for the stairs (p < 0.05), while air-sprung suspension was slower than the rigid for the root protocol (p < 0.05). There were no differences for the drop protocol (p < 0.05). Rigid forks reduced overall exposure (p < 0.05), specifically at the handlebars for the stairs and drop trials. More detailed analysis presented smaller vertical accelerations at the handlebar for air-sprung and leaf-sprung forks on the stairs (p < 0.05), and drop (p < 0.05) but not the root. As such, it appears that the suspension systems tested were ineffective at reducing overall impact exposure at the handlebar during isolated aspects of cross-country terrain features which may be influenced to a larger extent by rider technique.

  9. A resposta de frequência cardíaca durante as competições de "mountain bike cross-country" Heart rate response during mountain bike cross-country races

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Pereira Costa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a resposta de frequência cardíaca (FC durante as competições de "Cross-country" Olímpico (XCO. Quatorze "mountain bikers" foram separados em dois grupos: elite (n = 6; 26,5 ± 3,6 anos; 69,1 ± 2,1 kg; 174,0 ± 1,2 cm; 5,9 ± 0,9 % G; 9,0 ± 1,3 anos de treinamento e amadores (n = 8; 25,6 ± 7,7 anos; 67,7 ± 7,0 kg; 175,5 ± 5,5 cm; 5,8 ± 2,1 % G; 8,3 ± 5,7 anos de treinamento. Os participantes foram submetidos a um teste progressivo para a identificação dos limiares metabólicos e seus respectivos valores de frequência cardíaca (FC em cada zona de intensidade de esforço. Após intervalo mínimo de quatro dias os atletas da categoria elite foram avaliados através de monitores de FC durante a etapa brasileira da Copa do Mundo de XCO. Após 15 dias, todos os atletas foram avaliados no Campeonato Brasileiro de XCO. Os resultados indicaram que em ambas as competições, a média percentual da FC foi correspondente a 91-92 % da FCmáx. Nas competições, os atletas permaneceram durante diferentes tempos percentuais nas zonas de intensidade de esforço sendo 10,0-14,8% no domínio leve; 23,1-30,1% moderado e 55,1-66,9% intenso. Assim, este estudo apresenta que as competições de XCO são realizadas em alta intensidade, principalmente após a largada.The aim of this study was to verify and describe the intensity profile of cross-country mountain-biking races using heart rate (HR recorded during races. Fourteen mountain bikers participated in two groups: elite (n = 6; 26.5 ± 3.6 years old; 69.1 ± 2.1 kg; 174.0 ± 1.2 cm; 5.9 ± 0.9 % BF; 9.0 ± 1.3 years of training and amateurs (n = 8; 25.6 ± 7.7 years; 67.7 ± 7.0 kg; 175.5 ± 5.5 cm; 5.8 ± 2.1 % BF; 8.3 ± 5.7 years of training. Each cyclist was submitted to an incremental exercise test to determine the metabolic thresholds and the HR values at each threshold. After four days, only the athletes of elite category were tested during Brazilian

  10. THE COMPARISON OF PHYSICAL ABILITIES BETWEEN ALPINE SKIING SKIERS' AND TENNIS PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanis Vassilis.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research was the physical abilities diagnosis of Alpine skiing skiers and tennis players, as well the comparison of these before and after the ski period. The sample of 54 individuals emanated from two teams of different sports: skiing (N = 28 and tennis (N = 26, while the level was advancing for both. For the diagnosis and the comparison of physical abilities used four tests of Alpine skiing on dry ground the same day of December 2008 and April 2009 respectively: 30m flight start, eight continuous jumping, slalom on "folder", jumping up and down on a step with height 40cm x 40sec. The statistical analysis done with SPSS 18 program, included controls t - test, p=bilateral, for dependent samples and correlation analysis at significance level a= 0.05 with freedom degrees df = N - 1. In conclusion, in the present research the ski team (men and women presented the improvement afterwards the season in 2 of 4 tests and in the corresponding physical abilities (explosive force, t = 2,970, p < .01 and agility t = 3.533, p < .00, while also the tennis team (men and women presented improvement in 2 of 4 tests (explosive force, t = 2,397, p < .02 and anaerobic ability, t = 3.192, p < .00. Finally the common characteristic of the two teams was the performance improvement in the explosive force and their decreased attribution in speed.

  11. Living high-training low: effect on erythropoiesis and maximal aerobic performance in elite Nordic skiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robach, P.; Schmitt, L.; Brugniaux, J.V.

    2006-01-01

    The "living high-training low" model (Hi-Lo) may improve aerobic performance in athletes, and the main mechanism of this improvement is thought to be augmented erythropoiesis. A positive effect of Hi-Lo has been demonstrated previously by using altitudes of 2,000-3,000 m. Since the rate...... of erythropoiesis is altitude-dependent, we tested whether a higher altitude (3,500 m) during Hi-Lo increases erythropoiesis and maximal aerobic performance. Nordic skiers trained for 18 days at 1,200 m, while sleeping at 1,200 m in ambient air (control group, n = 5) or in hypoxic rooms (Hi-Lo, n = 6; 3 x 6 days......(2max)), respectively. Erythropoietin and soluble transferrin receptor responses were higher during Hi-Lo, whereas reticulocytes did not change. In POST (vs. before): hematological parameters were similar to basal levels, as well as red blood cell volume, being 2.68 +/- 0.83 l (vs. 2.64+/-0.54 l...

  12. Mechanics of turning and jumping and skier speed are associated with injury risk in men's World Cup alpine skiing: a comparison between the competition disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilgien, Matthias; Spörri, Jörg; Kröll, Josef; Crivelli, Philip; Müller, Erich

    2014-05-01

    In alpine ski racing, there is limited information about skiers' mechanical characteristics and their relation to injury risk, in particular for World Cup (WC) competitions. Hence, current findings from epidemiological and qualitative research cannot be linked to skiers' mechanics. This study was undertaken to investigate whether recently reported differences in numbers of injuries per 1000 runs for competition disciplines can be explained by differences in the skiers' mechanics. During seven giant slalom, four super-G and five downhill WC competitions, mechanical characteristics of a forerunner were captured using differential global navigation satellite technology and a precise terrain surface model. Finally, the discipline-specific skiers' mechanics were compared with the respective number of injuries per hour skiing. While the number of injuries per hour skiing was approximately equal for all disciplines, kinetic energy, impulse, run time, turn radius and turn speed were significantly different and increased from giant slalom to super-G and downhill. Turn ground reaction forces were largest for giant slalom, followed by super-G and downhill. The number of jumps was doubled from super-G to downhill. Associating the number of injuries per hour in WC skiing with skiers' mechanical characteristics, injuries in super-G and downhill seem to be related to increased speed and jumps, while injuries in giant slalom may be related to high loads in turning. The reported differences in the number of injuries per 1000 runs might be explained by a bias in total exposure time per run and thus potentially by emerged fatigue.

  13. Head injuries in snowboarders compared with head injuries in skiers. A prospective analysis of 1076 patients from 1994 to 1999 in Niigata, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, O; Takaba, M; Saito, T; Endo, S

    2001-01-01

    We investigated snowboarding-related head injury cases and skiing-related head injury cases during five ski seasons at one resort area. There were 634 snowboarding-related head injuries and 442 skiing-related head injuries. The number of snowboarding head injuries increased rapidly over the study period. More male snowboarders than female snowboarders suffered head injuries. For both snowboarders and skiers, head injuries frequently occurred on the easy and middle slopes. Falls were the most frequent causes of injury in both groups. Jumping was a more frequent cause of injury in the snowboarders (30%) than in the skiers (2.5%). Injury to the occipital region predominated in the snowboarders as compared with the skiers. There were 49 organic lesions in 37 snowboarders and 46 organic lesions in 33 skiers. Subdural hematoma was frequent in the snowboarding head injury group, and fracture was frequent in the skiing head injury group compared with the snowboarding group (not significant). Subdural hematoma was likely to be caused by a fall rather than by a collision, and bone fracture was likely to be caused by a collision rather than by a fall. Four snowboarders and one skier died as a result of their head injuries. Our data suggest that snowboarding head injuries may be prevented by protection of the occipital region and refraining from jumping by beginners.

  14. HIV/AIDS health care challenges for cross- country migrants in low- and middle-income countries: a scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suphanchaimat R

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rapeepong Suphanchaimat,1,2 Angkana Sommanustweechai,1 Chiraporn Khitdee,1 Chompoonut Thaichinda,1 Kanang Kantamaturapoj,3 Pattara Leelahavarong,4 Pensom Jumriangrit,1 Thitikorn Topothai,1 Thunthita Wisaijohn,1 Weerasak Putthasri1 1International Health Policy Program (IHPP, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, Thailand; 2Banphai Hospital, Khon Kaen, Thailand; 3Department of Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Mahidol University, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand; 4Health Intervention and Technology Assessment Program, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, Thailand Introduction: HIV/AIDS has been one of the world's most important health challenges in recent history. The global solidarity in responding to HIV/AIDS through the provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART and encouraging early screening has been proved successful in saving lives of infected populations in past decades. However, there remain several challenges, one of which is how HIV/AIDS policies keep pace with the growing speed and diversity of migration flows. This study therefore aimed to examine the nature and the extent of HIV/AIDS health services, barriers to care, and epidemic burdens among cross-country migrants in low- and middle-income countries. Methods: A scoping review was undertaken by gathering evidence from electronic databases and gray literature from the websites of relevant international initiatives. The articles were reviewed according to the defined themes: epidemic burdens of HIV/AIDS, barriers to health services and HIV/AIDS risks, and the operational management of the current health systems for HIV/AIDS. Results: Of the 437 articles selected for an initial screening, 35 were read in full and mapped with the defined research questions. A high HIV/AIDS infection rate was a major concern among cross-country migrants in many regions, in particular sub-Saharan Africa. Despite a large number of studies reported in Africa, fewer studies were found in

  15. Junior High Career Planning: What Students Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardick, Angela D.; Bernes, Kerry B.; Magnusson, Kris C.; Witko, Kim D.

    2004-01-01

    This research used "The Comprehensive Career Needs Survey" to assess the career counselling needs of 3,562 junior high students in Southern Alberta. This article examines junior high students' responses regarding their perceptions of (a) the relevance of career planning, (b) who they would approach for help with career planning, and (c)…

  16. Performance of oil industry cross-country pipelines in Western Europe. Statistical summary of reported spillages: 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Waal, A.; Baradat, Y.

    1979-01-01

    CONCAWE's annual report on oil industry cross-country pipelines in Western Europe shows that in 1978 the pipeline network reached a combined length of 18,500 kilometres and transported 594 million cubic metres of crude oil and refined products. The gross spillage amounted to 3639 m/sup 3/, that is 0.000613 percent or about 6.1 parts per million of the total quantity transported. The net spillage loss was 1,377 m/sup 3/ since 2,262 m/sup 3/ were recovered at site. There were 15 spillage incidents reported during 1978, all of which were directly related to pipelines (none to pump-stations). In 4 incidents the oil spilled was completely recovered, and in 10 cases clean-up was completed within one week of the discovery of the spillage. No contamination of potable water sources was reported. The causes of the spillages are attributed to corrosion (7 incidents), third party activities (4), mechanical failure (3) and natural hazards, i.e. excessive rainfall (1). The report also gives a comparison for the five-year period 1974 to 1978.

  17. Performance of oil industry cross-country pipelines in Western Europe. Statistical summary of reported spillages, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Waal, A.; Baradat, Y.

    1979-01-01

    CONCAW's annual report on oil industry cross-country pipelines in Western Europe shows that in 1978 the pipeline network reached a combined length of 18,500 kilometers and transported 594 million cubic meters of crude oil and refined products. The gross spillage amounted to 3639 m/sup 3/, that is 0.000613% or about 6.1 ppM of the total quantity transported. The new spillage loss was 1377 m/sup 3/ since 2262 m/sup 3/ were recovered at site. There were 15 spillage incidents reported during 1978, all of which were directly related to pipelines (none to pump-stations). In 4 incidents the oil spilled was completely recovered, and in 10 cases clean-up was completed within one week of the discovery of the spillage. No contamination of potable water sources was reported. The causes of the spillages are attributed to corrosion (7 incidents), third party activities (4), mechanical failure (3) and natural hazards, i.e., excessive rainfall (1). The report also gives a comparison for the five-year period 1974-1978.

  18. Performance of oil industry cross-country pipelines in Western Europe, statistical summary of reported spillages - 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Waal, A.; Baradat, Y.

    CONCAWE's annual report on oil industry cross-country pipelines in Western Europe shows that in 1978 the pipeline network reached a combined length of 18,500 kilometers and transported 594 million cubic meters of crude oil and refined products. The gross spillage amounted to 3639 cu. m, that is 0.000613 per cent or about 6.1 parts per million of the total quantity transported. The net spillage loss was 1,377 cu. m since 2,262 cu. m were recovered at site. There were 15 spillage incidents reported during 1978, all of which were directly related to pipelines (none to pump-stations). In 4 incidents the oil spilled was completely recovered, and in 10 cases clean-up was completed within one week of the discovery of the spillage. No contamination of potable water sources was reported. The causes of the spillages are attributed to corrosion (7 incidents), third party activities (4), mechanical failure (3) and natural hazards, i.e. excessive rainfall (1). The report also gives a comparison for the five-year period 1974-1978. (Copyright (c) CONCAWE 1979.)

  19. Performance differences when using 26- and 29-inch-wheel bikes in Swiss National Team cross-country mountain bikers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Thomas; Müller, Beat; Maier, Thomas; Wehrlin, Jon Peter

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the effect of bike type - the 26-inch-wheel bike (26" bike) and the 29-inch-wheel bike (29" bike) - on performance in elite mountain bikers. Ten Swiss National Team athletes (seven males, three females) completed six trials with individual start on a simulated cross-country course with 35 min of active recovery between trials (three trials on a 26" bike and three trials on a 29" bike, alternate order, randomised start-bike). The course consisted of two separate sections expected to favour either the 29" bike (section A) or the 26" bike (section B). For each trial performance, power output, cadence and heart rate were recorded and athletes' experiences were documented. Mean overall performance (time: 304 ± 27 s vs. 311 ± 29 s; P < 0.01) and performance in sections A (P < 0.001) and B (P < 0.05) were better when using the 29" bike. No significant differences were observed for power output, cadence or heart rate. Athletes rated the 29" bike as better for performance in general, passing obstacles and traction. The 29" bike supports superior performance for elite mountain bikers, even on sections supposed to favour the 26" bike.

  20. Marketization in Long-Term Care: A Cross-Country Comparison of Large For-Profit Nursing Home Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Charlene; Jacobsen, Frode F; Panos, Justin; Pollock, Allyson; Sutaria, Shailen; Szebehely, Marta

    2017-01-01

    This article presents cross-country comparisons of trends in for-profit nursing home chains in Canada, Norway, Sweden, United Kingdom, and the United States. Using public and private industry reports, the study describes ownership, corporate strategies, costs, and quality of the 5 largest for-profit chains in each country. The findings show that large for-profit nursing home chains are increasingly owned by private equity investors, have had many ownership changes over time, and have complex organizational structures. Large for-profit nursing home chains increasingly dominate the market and their strategies include the separation of property from operations, diversification, the expansion to many locations, and the use of tax havens. Generally, the chains have large revenues with high profit margins with some documented quality problems. The lack of adequate public information about the ownership, costs, and quality of services provided by nursing home chains is problematic in all the countries. The marketization of nursing home care poses new challenges to governments in collecting and reporting information to control costs as well as to ensure quality and public accountability. PMID:28634428

  1. Influence of wheel size on muscle activity and tri-axial accelerations during cross-country mountain biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Howard Thomas; Sinclair, Jonathan; Atkins, Stephen; Rylands, Lee; Metcalfe, John

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of different mountain bike wheel diameters on muscle activity and whether larger diameter wheels attenuate muscle vibrations during cross-country riding. Nine male competitive mountain bikers (age 34.7 ± 10.7 years; stature 177.7 ± 5.6 cm; body mass 73.2 ± 8.6 kg) participated in the study. Riders performed one lap at race pace on 26, 27.5 and 29 inch wheeled mountain bikes. sEMG and acceleration (RMS) were recorded for the full lap and during ascent and descent phases at the gastrocnemius, vastus lateralis, biceps brachii and triceps brachii. No significant main effects were found by wheel size for each of the four muscle groups for sEMG or acceleration during the full lap and for ascent and descent (P > .05). When data were analysed between muscle groups, significant differences were found between biceps brachii and triceps brachii (P biking. However, more activity was observed in the biceps brachii during 26 inch wheel descending. This is possibly due to an increased need to manoeuvre the front wheel over obstacles.

  2. Performance of European cross-country oil pipelines. Statistical summary of reported spillages in 2009 and since 1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, P.M.; Dubois, J.; Gambardella, F.; Sanchez-Garcia, E.; Uhlig, F.

    2011-05-15

    CONCAWE has collected 39 years of spillage data on European cross-country oil pipelines. At about 35,000 km the inventory covered currently includes the vast majority of such pipelines in Europe, transporting around 870 million m3 per year of crude oil and oil products. This report covers the performance of these pipelines in 2009 and a full historical perspective since 1971. The performance over the whole 39 years is analysed in various ways including gross and net spillage volumes and spillage causes grouped into five main categories: mechanical failure, operational, corrosion, natural hazard and third party. The rate of inspections by in line tools (intelligence pigs) is also reported. 5 spillage incidents were reported in 2009, corresponding to 0.14 spillages per 1000 km of line, well below the 5-year average of 0.28 and the long-term running average of 0.53, which has been steadily decreasing over the years from a value of 1.2 in the mid 70s. There were no fires, fatalities or injuries connected with these spills. 4 incidents were due to mechanical failure and 1 was connected to past third party activities. Over the long term, third party activities remain the main cause of spillage incidents although mechanical failures have increased in recent years, a trend that needs to be scrutinised in years to come.

  3. Performance of European cross-country oil pipelines. Statistical summary of reported spillages in 2007 and since 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-11-01

    CONCAWE has collected 37 years of spillage data on European cross-country oil pipelines. At over 35,000 km the inventory covered currently includes the vast majority of such pipelines in Europe, transporting around 800 million m3 per year of crude oil and oil products. This report covers the performance of these pipelines in 2007 and a full historical perspective since 1971. The performance over the whole 37 years is analysed in various ways including gross and net spillage volumes and spillage causes grouped into five main categories: mechanical failure, operational, corrosion, natural hazard and third party. The rate of inspections by intelligence pigs is also reported. 9 spillage incidents were reported in 2007, corresponding to 0.28 spillages per 1000 km of line, just under the 5-year average and well below the long-term running average of 0.55, which has been steadily decreasing over the years from a value of 1.2 in the mid 70s. There were no fires, fatalities or injuries connected with these spills. 1 incident was due to mechanical failure, 2 incidents to corrosion and 6 were connected to third party activities. Over the long term, third party activities is the main cause of spillage incidents.

  4. Performance of European cross-country oil pipelines. Statistical summary of reported spillages in 2010 and since 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, P.M.; Dubois, J.; Gambardella, F.; Sanchez-Garcia, E.; Uhlig, F.

    2011-12-01

    CONCAWE has collected 40 years of spillage data on European cross-country oil pipelines. At about 35,000 km the inventory covered currently includes the vast majority of such pipelines in Europe, transporting around 800 million m3 per year of crude oil and oil products. This report covers the performance of these pipelines in 2010 and a full historical perspective since 1971. The performance over the whole 40 years is analysed in various ways, including gross and net spillage volumes, and spillage causes grouped into five main categories: mechanical failure, operational, corrosion, natural hazard and third party. The rate of inspections by in-line tools (intelligence pigs) is also reported. 4 spillage incidents were reported in 2010, corresponding to 0.12 spillages per 1000 km of line, well below the 5-year average of 0.25 and the long-term running average of 0.52, which has been steadily decreasing over the years from a value of 1.2 in the mid-70s. There were no fires, fatalities or injuries connected with these spills. 2 incidents were due to mechanical failure, 1 to external corrosion, and 1 was connected to past third party activities. Over the long term, third party activities remain the main cause of spillage incidents although mechanical failures have increased in recent years, a trend that needs to be scrutinised in years to come.

  5. Performance of European cross-country oil pipelines. Statistical summary of reported spillages in 2010 and since 1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, P.M.; Dubois, J.; Gambardella, F.; Sanchez-Garcia, E.; Uhlig, F.

    2011-12-15

    CONCAWE has collected 40 years of spillage data on European cross-country oil pipelines. At about 35,000 km the inventory covered currently includes the vast majority of such pipelines in Europe, transporting around 800 million m3 per year of crude oil and oil products. This report covers the performance of these pipelines in 2010 and a full historical perspective since 1971. The performance over the whole 40 years is analysed in various ways, including gross and net spillage volumes, and spillage causes grouped into five main categories: mechanical failure, operational, corrosion, natural hazard and third party. The rate of inspections by in-line tools (intelligence pigs) is also reported. 4 spillage incidents were reported in 2010, corresponding to 0.12 spillages per 1000 km of line, well below the 5-year average of 0.25 and the long-term running average of 0.52, which has been steadily decreasing over the years from a value of 1.2 in the mid-70s. There were no fires, fatalities or injuries connected with these spills. 2 incidents were due to mechanical failure, 1 to external corrosion, and 1 was connected to past third party activities. Over the long term, third party activities remain the main cause of spillage incidents although mechanical failures have increased in recent years, a trend that needs to be scrutinised in years to come.

  6. Performance of European cross-country oil pipelines. Statistical summary of reported spillages in 2007 and since 1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-11-15

    CONCAWE has collected 37 years of spillage data on European cross-country oil pipelines. At over 35,000 km the inventory covered currently includes the vast majority of such pipelines in Europe, transporting around 800 million m3 per year of crude oil and oil products. This report covers the performance of these pipelines in 2007 and a full historical perspective since 1971. The performance over the whole 37 years is analysed in various ways including gross and net spillage volumes and spillage causes grouped into five main categories: mechanical failure, operational, corrosion, natural hazard and third party. The rate of inspections by intelligence pigs is also reported. 9 spillage incidents were reported in 2007, corresponding to 0.28 spillages per 1000 km of line, just under the 5-year average and well below the long-term running average of 0.55, which has been steadily decreasing over the years from a value of 1.2 in the mid 70s. There were no fires, fatalities or injuries connected with these spills. 1 incident was due to mechanical failure, 2 incidents to corrosion and 6 were connected to third party activities. Over the long term, third party activities is the main cause of spillage incidents.

  7. Performance of European cross-country oil pipelines. Statistical summary of reported spillages in 2008 and since 1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, P.M.; Dubois, J.; Gambardella, F.; Uhlig, F.

    2010-06-15

    CONCAWE has collected 38 years of spillage data on European cross-country oil pipelines. At over 35,000 km the inventory covered currently includes the vast majority of such pipelines in Europe, transporting around 780 million m{sup 3} per year of crude oil and oil products. This report covers the performance of these pipelines in 2008 and a full historical perspective since 1971. The performance over the whole 38 years is analysed in various ways including gross and net spillage volumes and spillage causes grouped into five main categories: mechanical failure, operational, corrosion, natural hazard and third party. The rate of inspections by in line tools (intelligence pigs) is also reported. 12 spillage incidents were reported in 2008, corresponding to 0.34 spillages per 1000 km of line, somewhat above the 5-year average of 0.28 but well below the long-term running average of 0.54, which has been steadily decreasing over the years from a value of 1.2 in the mid 70s. There were no fires, fatalities or injuries connected with these spills. 7 incidents were due to mechanical failure, 1 incident to corrosion and 4 were connected to third party activities. Over the long term, third party activities remain the main cause of spillage incidents although mechanical failures have increased in recent years, a trend that needs to be scrutinised in years to come.

  8. Performance of European cross-country oil pipelines. Statistical summary of reported spillages in 2009 and since 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, P.M.; Dubois, J.; Gambardella, F.; Sanchez-Garcia, E.; Uhlig, F.

    2011-05-01

    CONCAWE has collected 39 years of spillage data on European cross-country oil pipelines. At about 35,000 km the inventory covered currently includes the vast majority of such pipelines in Europe, transporting around 870 million m3 per year of crude oil and oil products. This report covers the performance of these pipelines in 2009 and a full historical perspective since 1971. The performance over the whole 39 years is analysed in various ways including gross and net spillage volumes and spillage causes grouped into five main categories: mechanical failure, operational, corrosion, natural hazard and third party. The rate of inspections by in line tools (intelligence pigs) is also reported. 5 spillage incidents were reported in 2009, corresponding to 0.14 spillages per 1000 km of line, well below the 5-year average of 0.28 and the long-term running average of 0.53, which has been steadily decreasing over the years from a value of 1.2 in the mid 70s. There were no fires, fatalities or injuries connected with these spills. 4 incidents were due to mechanical failure and 1 was connected to past third party activities. Over the long term, third party activities remain the main cause of spillage incidents although mechanical failures have increased in recent years, a trend that needs to be scrutinised in years to come.

  9. Beta-alanine supplementation improves jumping power and affects severe-intensity performance in professional alpine skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Micah; Bieri, Kathrin; Hoppeler, Hans; Norman, Barbara; Vogt, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Supplementation with beta-alanine may have positive effects on severe-intensity, intermittent, and isometric strength-endurance performance. These could be advantageous for competitive alpine skiers, whose races last 45 to 150 s, require metabolic power above the aerobic maximum, and involve isometric muscle work. Further, beta-alanine supplementation affects the muscle force-frequency relationship, which could influence explosiveness. We explored the effects of beta-alanine on explosive jump performance, severe exercise energy metabolism, and severe-intensity ski-like performance. Nine male elite alpine skiers consumed 4.8 g/d beta-alanine or placebo for 5 weeks in a double-blind fashion. Before and after, they performed countermovement jumps (CMJ), a 90-s cycling bout at 110% VO2max (CLT), and a maximal 90-s box jump test (BJ90). Beta-alanine improved maximal (+7 ± 3%, d = 0.9) and mean CMJ power (+7 ± 2%, d = 0.7), tended to reduce oxygen deficit (-3 ± 8%, p = .06) and lactate accumulation (-12 ± 31%) and enhance aerobic energy contribution (+1.3 ± 2.9%, p = .07) in the CLT, and improved performance in the last third of BJ90 (+7 ± 4%, p = .02). These effects were not observed with placebo. Beta-alanine supplementation improved explosive and repeated jump performance in elite alpine skiers. Enhanced muscle contractility could possibly explain improved explosive and repeated jump performance. Increased aerobic energy production could possibly help explain repeated jump performance as well.

  10. A Tailored Web-based Advice Tool for Skiers and Snowboarders: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemler, Ellen; Gouttebarge, Vincent

    2018-01-17

    Being active in sports has many positive health effects. The direct effects of engaging in regular physical activity are particularly apparent in the prevention of several chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, hypertension, obesity, depression, and osteoporosis. Besides the beneficial health effects of being active, sports participation is unfortunately also associated with a risk of injuries. In the case of many sports injuries (eg, winter sports) preventive measures are not compulsory, which means that a behavioral change in sports participants is necessary to increase the use of effective measures, and subsequently prevent or reduce injuries in sports. The evidence-based Wintersportklaar online intervention has been developed to stimulate injury preventive behavior among skiers and snowboarders. In this article, the design of the effectiveness study will be described. A randomized controlled trial with a follow-up period of four months during the winter sport season will be conducted. The participants consist of inexperienced skiers and snowboarders. At baseline, skiers and snowboarders in the intervention and control groups are asked to report the injury preventive measures they usually take during their preparation for their winter sport holiday. One and three months after baseline, skiers and snowboarders are asked to report retrospectively in detail what measures they took regarding injury prevention during their current winter sport preparation and winter sport holiday. Descriptive analyses (mean, standard deviation, frequency, range) are conducted for the different baseline variables in both study groups. To evaluate the success of the randomization, baseline values are analyzed for differences between the intervention and control groups (chi square, independent T tests and/or Mann-Whitney test). Chi square tests and/or logistic regression analyses are used to analyze behavioral change according to the intention to treat

  11. Cross-Country Evidence on Teacher Performance Pay. Program on Education Policy and Governance Working Papers Series. PEPG 10-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woessmann, Ludger

    2010-01-01

    The general-equilibrium effects of performance-related teacher pay include long-term incentive and teacher-sorting mechanisms that usually elude experimental studies but are captured in cross-country comparisons. Combining country-level performance-pay measures with rich PISA-2003 international achievement microdata, this paper estimates…

  12. Low Schooling for Girls, Slower Growth for All? Cross-Country Evidence on the Effect of Gender Inequality in Education on Economic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Klasen, Stephan

    2002-01-01

    Using cross-country and panel regressions, this article investigates how gender inequality in education affects long-term economic growth. Such inequality is found to have an effect on economic growth that is robust to changes in specifications and controls for potential endogeneities. The results suggest that gender inequality in education directly affects economic growth by lowering the ...

  13. Factors associated with dying at the place of wish: a cross-country comparison of cancer patients with the EURO SENTI-MELC Study 2009-2010.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ko, W.; Miccinesi, G.; Beccaro, M.; Vanthomme, K.; Donker, G.A.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.; Alonso, T.V.A.V; Deliens, L.; Block, L. van den

    2013-01-01

    Aims: 1) To study demographic and clinical factors associated with dying at a preferred place for cancer patients 2) To study cross-country differences in the intensity of factors Methods: A mortality follow-back study was undertaken in 2009-2010 via representative nationwide networks of general

  14. CARIES PREVENTION AMONG JUNIOR SCHOOLCHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.К. Matelo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biennial program of controlled tooth brushing performed econdary school among junior schoolchildren from Minsk secondary school № 166 proved to be highly effective. Decrease in caries increment has been shown on the average up to 50%. No credible differences between remineralising defluorinated toothpastes or pastes enriched with aminofluoride (F = 500 ppm and sodium fluoride  (F = 1000 ppm efficacy were found in this study. Credibility of the results was determined by comparison with similar study conducted on a bigger population of children. Though anti-caries effect of the same tooth-pastes in a bigger-scale study was lower — within 30%. Such difference can be explained by a different level of motivation and discipline of participants.Key words: schoolchildren, dental caries prevention, toothpastes. (Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. — 2011; 10 (6: 48–51

  15. Is inequality at the heart of it? Cross-country associations of income inequality with cardiovascular diseases and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daniel; Kawachi, Ichiro; Hoorn, Stephen Vander; Ezzati, Majid

    2008-04-01

    Despite a number of cross-national studies that have examined the associations between income inequality and broad health outcomes such as life expectancy and all-cause mortality, investigations of the cross-country relations between income inequality and cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity, mortality, and risk factors are sparse. We analyzed the cross-national relations between income inequality and age-standardized mean body mass index (BMI), serum total cholesterol, systolic blood pressure (SBP), obesity prevalence, smoking impact ratio (SIR), and age-standardized and age-specific disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) and mortality rates from coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke, controlling for multiple country-level factors and specifying 5- to 10-year lag periods. In multivariable analyses primarily limited to industrialized countries, countries in the middle and highest (vs. lowest) tertiles of income inequality had higher absolute age-standardized obesity prevalences in both sexes. Higher income inequality was also related to higher mean SBP in both sexes, and higher SIR in women. In analyses of larger sets of countries with available data, positive associations were observed between higher income inequality and mean BMI, obesity prevalence, and CHD DALYs and mortality rates. Associations with stroke outcomes were inverse, yet became positive with the inclusion of eastern bloc and other countries in recent economic/political transition. China was also identified to be an influential data point, with the positive associations with stroke mortality rates becoming attenuated with its inclusion. Overall, our findings are compatible with harmful effects of income inequality at the national scale on CVD morbidity, mortality, and selected risk factors, particularly BMI/obesity. Future studies should consider income inequality as an independent contributor to variations in CVD burden globally.

  16. Seasonal variation of VO 2 max and the VO2-work rate relationship in elite Alpine skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Micah A; Breil, Fabio A; Lehmann, Andrea D; Hoppeler, Hans; Vogt, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Alpine ski performance relates closely to both anaerobic and aerobic capacities. During their competitive season, skiers greatly reduce endurance and weight training, and on-snow training becomes predominant. To typify this shift, we compared exhaustive ramp cycling and squat (SJ) and countermovement jumping (CMJ) performance in elite males before and after their competitive season. In postseason compared with preseason: 1) maximal oxygen uptake (VO 2 max) normalized to bodyweight was higher (55.2 +/- 5.2 vs 52.7 +/- 3.6 mL x kg(-1) x min(-1), P jump height was greater in SJ (47.4 +/- 4.4 vs 44.7 +/- 4.3 cm, P skiing seemingly provides an ample cardiovascular training stimulus for skiers to maintain their aerobic capacities during the racing season. We conclude that aerobic fitness and leg explosiveness can be maintained in-season but may be compromised by heavy or excessive preseason training. In addition, ramp test V O2/W slope analysis could be useful for monitoring both positive and negative responses to training.

  17. Teacher Pupil Contact in Junior Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydell, D.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of the exploratory study reported here was to examine the nature of teacher-pupil contact in informal junior classrooms in terms of the teacher's method of talking to children and the teacher's conversational approach. (Author/RK)

  18. The Community Junior College: An Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rarig, Emory W., Jr., Ed.

    This annotated bibliography on the junior college is arranged by topic: research tools, history, functions and purposes, organization and administration, students, programs, personnel, facilities, and research. It covers publications through the fall of 1965 and has an author index. (HH)

  19. Junior High School Pupils' Perceptions of Air

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cce

    Abstract. The study examined Junior High School (JHS) pupils' ideas of the concept air. The ... Stavy (1991) reported that students in his physics class had ... Research studies found that even after having been taught the particulate theory and.

  20. The diagnosis and comparison of physical abilities of skiers and footballers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilios Giovanis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this research was to diagnose the physical abilities such as speed, strength, agility and endurance of alpine skiers and footballers through the same country tests. Also, the purpose was to compare the performance and test results of the above tested against one another. Methods: The sample of 58 individuals came from two groups of men of different sports: skiing (n = 29 aged 18-26 (20.97 ± 2.08 years and football (n = 29 aged 18-25 (21, 28 ± 1.56 years, while the level in each group was the advanced and the beginner respectively. Until the trials, the ski and football teams had a training program exercising physical abilities and skills three days a week for the specialties and one day a week the select skiing session and the compulsory football session according to the curriculum. In order to diagnose and compare the physical abilities of ski students and football students, the following four tests of Alpine skiing on dry ground were used after the ski season on this day in April 2014: A Route speed test (route 20m with flight start. B Explosive power tests of the lower limbs (eightfold with alternating tossing of feet. C Agility Tests (Slalom's track on a "folder" 5m x 5m. D Anaerobic test (jumping obstacle 20cm height for 60sec. Results: In the skiing specialty we have a great correlation between speed tests and other physical abilities and agility with endurance (r = -0,72. In football specialty there was a great correlation between speed and power tests (r = - 0.65 and agility with the power (r = - 0.69. In optional skiing, we have a moderate correlation between the tests, while in the A year football students the correlation between speed and strength (r = - 0.81 is distinguished. Conclusions: It is noteworthy that the students of the first year of football as well as the specialists do not have as good results in endurance as compared to the students of the skiing, even though the football game lasts 90 minutes

  1. Cold-Water Immersion Cooling Rates in Football Linemen and Cross-Country Runners With Exercise-Induced Hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godek, Sandra Fowkes; Morrison, Katherine E; Scullin, Gregory

    2017-10-01

      Ideal and acceptable cooling rates in hyperthermic athletes have been established in average-sized participants. Football linemen (FBs) have a small body surface area (BSA)-to-mass ratio compared with smaller athletes, which hinders heat dissipation.   To determine cooling rates using cold-water immersion in hyperthermic FBs and cross-country runners (CCs).   Cohort study.   Controlled university laboratory.   Nine FBs (age = 21.7 ± 1.7 years, height = 188.7 ± 4 cm, mass = 128.1 ± 18 kg, body fat = 28.9% ± 7.1%, lean body mass [LBM] = 86.9 ± 19 kg, BSA = 2.54 ± 0.13 m 2 , BSA/mass = 201 ± 21.3 cm 2 /kg, and BSA/LBM = 276.4 ± 19.7 cm 2 /kg) and 7 CCs (age = 20 ± 1.8 years, height = 176 ± 4.1 cm, mass = 68.7 ± 6.5 kg, body fat = 10.2% ± 1.6%, LBM = 61.7 ± 5.3 kg, BSA = 1.84 ± 0.1 m 2 , BSA/mass = 268.3 ± 11.7 cm 2 /kg, and BSA/LBM = 298.4 ± 11.7 cm 2 /kg).   Participants ingested an intestinal sensor, exercised in a climatic chamber (39°C, 40% relative humidity) until either target core temperature (T gi ) was 39.5°C or volitional exhaustion was reached, and were immediately immersed in a 10°C circulated bath until T gi declined to 37.5°C. A general linear model repeated-measures analysis of variance and independent t tests were calculated, with P LBM/mass (r = 0.72, P LBM (r = -0.72, P 11 minutes) than smaller, leaner athletes (7.7 minutes). Cooling rates varied widely from 0.332°C·min -1 in a small runner to only 0.101°C·min -1 in a lineman, supporting the use of rectal temperature for monitoring during cooling.

  2. Substantial injuries influence ranking position in young elite athletes of athletics, cross-country skiing and orienteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rosen, P; Heijne, A

    2018-04-01

    The relationship between injury and performance in young athletes is scarcely studied. The aim of this study was therefore to explore the association between injury prevalence and ranking position among adolescent elite athletes. One hundred and sixty-two male and female adolescent elite athletes (age range 15-19), competing in athletics (n = 59), cross-country skiing (n = 66), and orienteering (n = 37), were monitored weekly over 22-47 weeks using a web-based injury questionnaire. Ranking lists were collected. A significant (P = .003) difference was found in the seasonal substantial injury prevalence across the ranked athletes over the season, where the top-ranked (median 3.6%, 25-75th percentiles 0%-14.3%) and middle-ranked athletes (median 2.3%, 25-75th percentiles 0%-10.0%) had a lower substantial injury prevalence compared to the low-ranked athletes (median 11.3%, 25-75th percentiles 2.5%-27.1%), during both preseason (P = .002) and competitive season (P = .031). Athletes who improved their ranking position (51%, n = 51) reported a lower substantial injury prevalence (median 0%, 25-75th percentiles 0%-10.0%) compared to those who decreased (49%, n = 49) their ranking position (md 6.7%, 25-75th percentiles 0%-22.5%). In the top-ranked group, no athlete reported substantial injury more than 40% of all data collection time points compared to 9.6% (n = 5) in the middle-ranked, and 17.3% (n = 9) in the low-ranked group. Our results provide supporting evidence that substantial injuries, such as acute and overuse injuries leading to moderate or severe reductions in training or sports performance, influence ranking position in adolescent elite athletes. The findings are crucial to stakeholders involved in adolescent elite sports and support the value of designing effective preventive interventions for substantial injuries. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A systematic assessment of the current capacity to act in nutrition in West Africa: cross-country similarities and differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Sodjinou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although it is widely accepted that lack of capacity is one of the barriers to scaling up nutrition in West Africa, there is a paucity of information about what capacities exist and the capacities that need to be developed to accelerate progress toward improved nutrition outcomes in the region. Objective: To systematically assess the current capacity to act in nutrition in the West Africa region and explore cross-country similarities and differences. Design: Data were collected from 13 West African countries through interviews with government officials, key development partners, tertiary-level training institutions, and health professional schools. The assessment was based on a conceptual framework of four interdependent levels (tools; skills; staff and infrastructure; and structures, systems and roles. In each of the surveyed countries, we assessed capacity assets and gaps at individual, organizational, and systemic levels. Results: Important similarities and differences in capacity assets and gaps emerged across all the surveyed countries. There was strong momentum to improve nutrition in nearly all the surveyed countries. Most of the countries had a set of policies on nutrition in place and had set up multisectoral, multi-stakeholder platforms to coordinate nutrition activities, although much remained to be done to improve the effectiveness of these platforms. Many initiatives aimed to reduce undernutrition were ongoing in the region, but there did not seem to be clear coordination between them. Insufficient financial resources to implement nutrition activities were a major problem in all countries. The bulk of financial allocations for nutrition was provided by development partners, even though some countries, such as Niger, Nigeria, and Senegal, had a national budget line for nutrition. Sporadic stock-outs of nutrition supplies were reported in most of the countries as a result of a weak logistic and supply chain system. They

  4. Comparisons of sediment losses from a newly constructed cross-country natural gas pipeline and an existing in-road pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela J. Edwards; Bridget M. Harrison; Daniel J. Holz; Karl W.J. Williard; Jon E. Schoonover

    2014-01-01

    Sediment loads were measured for about one year from natural gas pipelines in two studies in north central West Virginia. One study involved a 1-year-old pipeline buried within the bed of a 25-year-old skid road, and the other involved a newly constructed cross-country pipeline. Both pipelines were the same diameter and were installed using similar trenching and...

  5. Evaluating the predictability of distance race performance in NCAA cross country and track and field from high school race times in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusa, Jamie L

    2017-12-30

    Successful recruiting for collegiate track & field athletes has become a more competitive and essential component of coaching. This study aims to determine the relationship between race performances of distance runners at the United States high school and National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) levels. Conditional inference classification tree models were built and analysed to predict the probability that runners would qualify for the NCAA Division I National Cross Country Meet and/or the East or West NCAA Division I Outdoor Track & Field Preliminary Round based on their high school race times in the 800 m, 1600 m, and 3200 m. Prediction accuracies of the classification trees ranged from 60.0 to 76.6 percent. The models produced the most reliable estimates for predicting qualifiers in cross country, the 1500 m, and the 800 m for females and cross country, the 5000 m, and the 800 m for males. NCAA track & field coaches can use the results from this study as a guideline for recruiting decisions. Additionally, future studies can apply the methodological foundations of this research to predicting race performances set at different metrics, such as national meets in other countries or Olympic qualifications, from previous race data.

  6. Barriers facing junior doctors in rural practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Deborah M

    2005-01-01

    Early postgraduate, or junior doctors, are still required to practise in rural and remote communities, and they continue to face numerous issues and difficulties. Within the hospital setting, exposure to rural practice appears to be very limited during internship, and also to some extent, during the second postgraduate year and beyond. This is a major issue for those required to undertake country relieving, rural terms or who will be bonded to rural and remote practice for several years after internship. This research investigated the current issues and difficulties faced by junior doctors, required to undertake rural and remote practice in Queensland, Australia. An exploratory study was undertaken. Primary data were collected through semi-structured interviews held with key stakeholders. Stakeholders included: directors of clinical training; medical educators; junior doctors; rural practitioners; academic rural practitioners; and medical administrators. Of the 23 people approached, a total of 19 agreed to be interviewed. The response rate was 82.6%. Similar to the issues identified in the literature, there are currently a number of barriers influencing the ability of junior doctors to practise competently and confidently when undertaking practice in rural and remote communities. Minimal clinical experience, lack of supervision and on-site support, inadequate orientation and uninformed expectations, limited access to relevant education, and the influence of isolation, results in an overall lack of preparation both professionally and personally. When asked, respondents supported the identification of core skills and knowledge, and integration of these and other issues affecting rural practice, into their hospital-based programs. Current hospital-based education and training programs were not adequately preparing junior doctors for rural and remote practice. It was commented that orientation and education, with a rural emphasis, could assist junior doctors in their

  7. Rates of insufficiency and deficiency of vitamin D levels in elite professional male and female skiers: A chronobiologic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Jacopo Antonino; Lombardi, Giovanni; Cavaleri, Luca; Graziani, Rosa; Schoenhuber, Herbert; Torre, Antonio La; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2018-04-01

    Vitamin D is essential for the maintenance and promotion of musculoskeletal health, for the functioning of the immune, cardiovascular and reproductive systems, and its main action is to keep calcium and phosphate plasmatic physiological concentrations at intestinal, renal and bony level. Vitamin D affects several parameters related to physical performance too and a particularly high percentage of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency in professional athletes has been observed. Several variables are able to impair the synthesis of 25(OH)D in athletes, specifically both genetic and environmental factors, but the most probable explanation for the deficient/insufficient vitamin D levels is the insufficient ultraviolet B light (UVB) exposure during winter. To confirm this, the existence of a circannual rhythm of vitamin D in professional soccer players, highlighting a peak in summer and lowest values in winter regardless the period of the season, has been documented. Nonetheless, from what we are aware of, no other study adopted a chronobiologic approach to better understand and describe the circannual variations of serum 25(OH)D in other sport disciplines. Therefore, we studied serum vitamin D in a cohort of top-level professional skiers, during a period of three consecutive competitive seasons (2015, 2016 and 2017), in order to evaluate, with a rhythmometric approach, the vitamin D behavior along the year. The study population was composed by 152 professional Italian alpine skiers of FISI (Winter Sport Italian Federation), 63 females and 89 males (mean age: 24.1 ± 3.2 years) and a total of 298 blood drawings were carried out to determine plasma 25(OH)D. Vitamin D data were compared between genders and then processed with the population mean cosinor tests to evaluate the presence of a circannual rhythm, both for female and male athletes. In total, 77 skiers (50.7%) showed, at least once during the three competitive seasons, an insufficient level of 25(OH)D and

  8. Features of construction of the training process skiers aged 17-18 years to compete in different styles of skiing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Sidorova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to the improvement of precompetitive preparation of skiers, taking into account the need to participate in competitions of different styles of skiing. The experiment included 20 athletes aged 17-18 years. Isolated model characteristics of athletes who successfully perform classic and skating style of movement. The range of indicators of physical fitness of athletes, which is the norm for this level of qualification. The technique of constructing precompetitive preparation of athletes on the basis of a combination of style of movement. It was established experimentally that the combination of training sessions during the day improves athletic performance in racing classic and skating style. In this case, primary and secondary occupation to carry out a different style of skiing with a change of their rotation on the next day.

  9. Junior Sport and the Evolution of Sport Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedentop, Daryl

    2002-01-01

    Addresses junior sport and sport culture in New Zealand, recommending that it receive serious consideration for its crucial role in the future of New Zealand's sport culture. The paper presents three goals for junior sport programs (educative, public health, and elite development), describes characteristics of junior sport (e.g., youth want to…

  10. Comparisons of Perceived Training Doses in Champion Collegiate-Level Male and Female Cross-country Runners and Coaches over the Course of a Competitive Season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Kyle R

    2017-10-17

    Session rating of perceived exertion (sRPE) is a practical tool for coaches to assess internal training load of their athletes. In a sport like cross-country running, that is individual in nature, but has a team training and competition component, information about the association between external and internal load is lacking. Furthermore, there is a need for studies that examine perception of training doses across multiple training cycles including the competitive season as well as between male and female athletes. Session RPE, duration, and training load (TL RPE  = sRPE × duration) of 25 highly trained male and female cross-country runners and their coaches were recorded for every training session (110 days) throughout a collegiate cross-country season. Intensity (sRPE), duration, and TL RPE were compared between coaches and runners by gender separately. Training sessions were also analyzed by those intended by the coaches to be easy, moderate, and hard as well as by training period. Data from 3024 training sessions were collected, 62% of which were considered "easy," 18% "moderate," and 20% "hard." Men and women rated coach-intended easy sessions significantly harder during each month of the season (effect size (ES) > 2.9, p sessions significantly higher than coaches (ES ≥ 1.0, p ≤ 0.002), whereas females rated hard intensity sessions significantly lower than coaches (ES > 0.5, p sessions (ES  0.05) or females and coach's moderate sessions (ES  0.05). Training intensity and TL RPE tended to increase throughout the season (p > 0.05), with a significant increase in moderate and hard intensity sessions in the last training period (p training throughout the cross-country season. Given the success of the athletes in this study, these results show how a simple system for monitoring training such as the sRPE method may improve control of training variables and provide a useful tool for coaches to evaluate training load placed on

  11. The Variants Within the COL5A1 Gene are Associated with Reduced Risk of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in Skiers

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    Stępień-Słodkowska Marta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the association of the BstUI RFLP C/T (rs 12722 and DpnII RFLP C/T (rs 13946 COL5A1 polymorphisms, individually and as haplotypes, with anterior cruciate ligament ruptures in recreational skiers. Subjects were 138 male recreational skiers with surgically diagnosed primary anterior cruciate ligament ruptures. The control group consisted of 183 apparently healthy male recreational skiers, who were without any self-reported history of ligament or tendon injury. DNA was extracted from buccal cells donated by the subjects and genotyping was carried out using real-time PCR. The genotype distributions for both polymorphisms met Hardy- Weinberg expectations in both groups. There were no significant differences in genotype distribution of allele frequencies of COL5A1 BstUI RFLP C/T and COL5A1 DpnII RFLP C/T polymorphisms between the ACL rupture and control groups. The T-T (BstUI RFLP T, DpnII RFLP T haplotype was the most common (55.6%. The haplotype T-C was not present in any of the subjects. There was an underrepresentation tendency of the C-T haplotype in the study group compared to controls under recessive mode of inheritance. Higher frequency of the COL5A1 BstUI RFLP C/T and COL5A1DpnII RFLP C/T polymorphisms haplotype is associated with reduced risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury in a group of apparently healthy male recreational skiers.

  12. Correlating continuous assessment scores to junior secondary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the relationship between continuous assessment scores and junior secondary school certificate examination(JSCE) final scores in Imo State. A sample of four hundred students were purposively selected from thirty eight thousand students who took the 1997 JSCE in Imo State. The data used were ...

  13. Skills training of junior medical students

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-11-02

    Nov 2, 2013 ... Peer tutors enjoyed and benefited from this teaching method without it negatively affecting their own learning. Discussion. ... addressing the problem of skills training of junior medical students where there is a shortage of trained clinical teachers. AJHPE 2013 ... [1] Informal peer teaching usually takes place.

  14. Reproductive Health Knowledge And Practices Among Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A cross sectional survey of the reproductive health knowledge and practices of 412 junior secondary school pupils from 12 schools in Enugu State, Nigeria was undertaken using a uniform set of structured self-administered questionnaire. Results: The results revealed that while the pupils demonstrated fair ...

  15. HUMANITIES IN A JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KNIGHT, BONNIE M.

    A HUMANITIES COURSE HAS BEEN DEVELOPED FOR ACADEMICALLY ABLE SEVENTH-GRADE STUDENTS IN BRANCIFORTE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL IN SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA. IN A TWO-PERIOD DAILY TIME BLOCK, STUDENTS LEARN ENGLISH, LITERATURE, AND LATIN, AND INVESTIGATE TOPICS IN ARCHEOLOGY, CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY, LINGUISTICS, PSYCHOLOGY, PHILOSOPHY, GREEK LITERATURE AND…

  16. Report: Immersion French at Meriden Junior School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marie-Josee

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the French immersion program at Meriden Junior School, an Anglican school for girls from pre-Kindergarten to Year 12 in Sydney. Four teachers (one of whom is the coordinator) and three assistants are involved in the program. They include six French native speakers and one non-French-born teacher who speaks…

  17. Junior High School Pupils' Perceptions of Air

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cce

    learning of science at the basic level. ... Stavy (1991) reported that students in his physics class had ... In a cross-level study of junior secondary, senior secondary and .... interview guide consisted of the items culled from Section B of the test.

  18. Cross-country variation in additive effects of socio-economics, health behaviors, and comorbidities on subjective health of patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin

    2014-02-21

    This study explored cross-country differences in the additive effects of socio-economic characteristics, health behaviors and medical comorbidities on subjective health of patients with diabetes. The study analyzed data from the Research on Early Life and Aging Trends and Effects (RELATE). The participants were 9,179 adults with diabetes who were sampled from 15 countries (i.e. China, Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, United States, Mexico, Argentina, Barbados, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Uruguay, India, Ghana, South Africa, and Russia). We fitted three logistic regressions to each country. Model I only included socio-economic characteristics (i.e. age, gender, education and income). In Model II, we also included health behaviors (i.e. smoking, drinking, and exercise). Model III included medical comorbidities (i.e. hypertension, respiratory disease, heart disease, stroke, and arthritis), in addition to the previous blocks. Our models suggested cross-country differences in the additive effects of socio-economic characteristics, health behaviors and comorbidities on perceived health of patients with diabetes. Comorbid heart disease was the only condition that was consistently associated with poor subjective health regardless of country. Countries show different profiles of social and behavioral determinants of subjective health among patients with diabetes. Our study suggests that universal programs that assume that determinants of well-being are similar across different countries may be over-simplistic. Thus instead of universal programs that use one protocol for health promotion of patients in all countries, locally designed interventions should be implemented in each country.

  19. Automatic Classification of Sub-Techniques in Classical Cross-Country Skiing Using a Machine Learning Algorithm on Micro-Sensor Data

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    Ole Marius Hoel Rindal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The automatic classification of sub-techniques in classical cross-country skiing provides unique possibilities for analyzing the biomechanical aspects of outdoor skiing. This is currently possible due to the miniaturization and flexibility of wearable inertial measurement units (IMUs that allow researchers to bring the laboratory to the field. In this study, we aimed to optimize the accuracy of the automatic classification of classical cross-country skiing sub-techniques by using two IMUs attached to the skier’s arm and chest together with a machine learning algorithm. The novelty of our approach is the reliable detection of individual cycles using a gyroscope on the skier’s arm, while a neural network machine learning algorithm robustly classifies each cycle to a sub-technique using sensor data from an accelerometer on the chest. In this study, 24 datasets from 10 different participants were separated into the categories training-, validation- and test-data. Overall, we achieved a classification accuracy of 93.9% on the test-data. Furthermore, we illustrate how an accurate classification of sub-techniques can be combined with data from standard sports equipment including position, altitude, speed and heart rate measuring systems. Combining this information has the potential to provide novel insight into physiological and biomechanical aspects valuable to coaches, athletes and researchers.

  20. Research Resources Survey: Radiology Junior Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Votaw, John R

    2015-07-01

    To assess resources available to junior faculty in US academic radiology departments for research mentorship and funding opportunities and to determine if certain resources are more common in successful programs. An anonymous survey covering scientific environment and research mentorship and was sent to vice-chairs of research of radiology departments. Results were evaluated to identify practices of research programs with respect to mentorship, resources, and opportunities. Academy of Radiology Research's 2012 National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants and awards list was used to determine if environment and practices correlate with funding. There was a 51% response rate. A greater fraction of clinical faculty gets promoted from assistant to associate professor than research faculty. Research faculty overall submits more funding applications. Most programs support start-up costs and K-awards. Over half of the departments have a vice-chair for faculty development, and most have formal mentorship programs. Faculty members are expected to teach, engage in service, publish, and apply for and get research funding within 3 years of hire. Top-tier programs as judged by NIH awards have a combination of MDs who devote >50% effort to research and PhD faculty. Key factors holding back both clinical and research junior faculty development were motivation, resources, and time, although programs reported high availability of resources and support at the department level. Better marketing of resources for junior faculty, effort devoted to mentoring clinical faculty in research, and explicit milestones/expectations for achievement could enhance junior faculty success, promote interest in the clinician–scientist career path for radiologists, and lead to greater research success.

  1. Junior Leader Training Development in Operational Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    UNITS Successful operational units do not arise without tough, realistic, and challenging training. Field Manual (FM) 7-0, Training Units and D...operations. The manual provides junior leaders with guidance on how to conduct training and training management. Of particular importance is the definition...1 Relation htp between ADDIE and the Anny Training Management Model. The Army Training Management Model and ADDIE process appear in TRADOC PAM 350

  2. Examining Container Port Resources and Environments to Enhance Competitiveness: A Cross-Country Study from Resource-Based and Institutional Perspectives1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuksoo CHO

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyze the competitiveness of container ports using a cross-country analysis with theoretical foundations. Tangible and intangible resources are discussed as determinants of container port competitiveness using the resource-based view and the institutional theory. This study analyzes the relationships among six variables: container port competitiveness, traffic volume, quality of infrastructure, linear shipping connectivity, operating efficiency, and institutional influence. This study retrieved country-level data on different indicators and countries from several trade and maritime databases. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM is used to test various hypotheses and to evaluate the casual relationships among six variables. Additionally, Ordinary Least Squares (OLS regression is used to test the moderating effects of institutional influence.

  3. Assessing the Personal Financial Problems of Junior Enlisted Personnel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buddin, Richard

    2002-01-01

    .... Surveys of military personnel show that, particularly for junior personnel, financial problems constitute a major source of stress, subordinate only to increased workload and family separation...

  4. Alpine skiing: Effects of mental training program of junior representatives of the Czech republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Hřebíčková

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Qualitative evaluation case study deals with the implementation of mental skills training program conducted with the Czech national junior alpine skiing team over a period of an annual training cycle and evaluation of its effects by one of the members of the team. The concept of the study is based on current findings of sport psychology in the field of mental training in alpine skiing and other sports. The theoretical framework of the study is the socio-cognitive psychological paradigm (Bandura, 1986, 1997 and cognitive-behavioral approach. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the work is a qualitative evaluation of a program involving relaxation, concentration and imaginative techniques and goal setting by one of its participants. METHODS: Evaluation is carried out through semi-structured interview with the participant. The interview was analyzed in a scientific software Atlas.ti 6.2. The method of creating clusters were used for analysis. RESULTS: From the participants answers we understand the subjectively perceived benefit of the program based on understanding of the possibility of influencing the mental part of his performance. The racer presents that he learned the practical application of certain techniques of the mental preparation, particularly imagery and the mental plan of the race, which contributed to better coping with the race situation. The racer achieved the improvement in his FIS ranking standings in all the disciplines over the monitored season. Research findings are used in the proposal of practical recommendations for mental preparation in the training of top and performing skiers. CONCLUSION: An important factor in the success of the mental skills training program is cooperation of all interested participants, that are athlete, coach and psychologist. With applying the psychological techniques the key factors are mental support, encouragement, and development of confidence of the athlete in his own abilities. A well

  5. Impact of lowering ski binding settings on the outcome of the self-release test of ski bindings among female recreational skiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posch M

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Markus Posch,1 Martin Burtscher,1 Alois Schranz,2 Katja Tecklenburg,2 Kenneth Helle,2 Gerhard Ruedl1 1Department of Sport Science, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria; 2Medalp Sportclinic, Imst, Austria Background and purpose: The ability to successfully self-release the ski binding can prevent skiing-related injuries of the lower extremities. Failure of binding release associated with a knee injury is significantly higher among females compared to males. The International Standards Organization ISO 11088 standard for binding setting values allows a lowering by 15% upon request of the skier. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of lowered ski binding settings by 15% on the outcome of the self-release test among female recreational skiers. Materials and methods: In this randomized single-blinded study, a cohort of 20 females (24.5±2.7 years performed the self-release test in the laboratory thrice with each leg under two conditions: 1 with an actual ISO 11088 setting and 2 with a setting lowered by 15%. For each attempt, torques calculated via the force plate were normalized to torques measured by a binding adjustment system (relative release torque, RRT. Results: Among 240 trials in total, more females were significantly able to self-release their ski bindings with lowered binding settings when compared to their actual ISO settings (53% vs 9%, p<0.001. Thirteen females (65% were able to release their bindings at least once with both legs with lowered binding settings compared to only three females (15% with their actual binding settings (p<0.001. Mean RRT of all failure of binding release trials significantly differed between lowered and actual binding settings (58.6%±22.2% vs 50.5%±20.4%, p=0.003. Conclusion: Four times more females were able to self-release their ski bindings at least once with both legs with a 15% lowered binding setting compared to their normal ISO 11088 setting. The fact that the ISO standard

  6. Disorganized junior doctors fail the MRCP (UK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Adrian G; Khan, Khalid M; Hussain, Walayat; Tweed, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Career progression during undergraduate and early postgraduate years is currently determined by successfully passing examinations. Both academic factors (secondary school examination results, learning style and training opportunities) and non-academic factors (maturity, ethnic origin, gender and motivation) have been identified as predicting examination outcome. Few studies have examined organization skills. Disorganized medical students are more likely to perform poorly in end-of-year examinations but this observation has not been examined in junior doctors. This study asked whether organization skills relate to examination outcome amongst junior doctors taking the clinical Part II examination for the Membership of the Royal College of Physicians (Practical Assessment of Clinical Examination Skills). The study was conducted prospectively at four consecutive clinical courses that provided clinical teaching and practice to prepare trainees for the examination. Arrival time at registration for the course was the chosen surrogate for organization skills. Trainees were advised that they should arrive promptly at 8.00 a.m. for registration and it was explained that the course would start at 8.30 a.m. Recorded arrival times were compared with the pass lists published by the Royal College of Physicians. The mean arrival time was 8.17 a.m. A total of 81 doctors (53.3%) passed the examination with a mean arrival time of 8.14 a.m. However, 71 doctors failed the exam and arrived, on average, six minutes later than doctors who passed (p?=?0.006). Better-prepared junior doctors were more likely to pass the final examination. Arriving on time represents a composite of several skills involved in the planning of appropriate travel arrangements and is therefore a valid marker of organization skills and preparation. This novel study has shown that good time-keeping skills are positively associated with examination outcome.

  7. HIV/AIDS health care challenges for cross-country migrants in low- and middle-income countries: a scoping review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suphanchaimat, Rapeepong; Sommanustweechai, Angkana; Khitdee, Chiraporn; Thaichinda, Chompoonut; Kantamaturapoj, Kanang; Leelahavarong, Pattara; Jumriangrit, Pensom; Topothai, Thitikorn; Wisaijohn, Thunthita; Putthasri, Weerasak

    2014-01-01

    Introduction HIV/AIDS has been one of the world’s most important health challenges in recent history. The global solidarity in responding to HIV/AIDS through the provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and encouraging early screening has been proved successful in saving lives of infected populations in past decades. However, there remain several challenges, one of which is how HIV/AIDS policies keep pace with the growing speed and diversity of migration flows. This study therefore aimed to examine the nature and the extent of HIV/AIDS health services, barriers to care, and epidemic burdens among cross-country migrants in low-and middle-income countries. Methods A scoping review was undertaken by gathering evidence from electronic databases and gray literature from the websites of relevant international initiatives. The articles were reviewed according to the defined themes: epidemic burdens of HIV/AIDS, barriers to health services and HIV/AIDS risks, and the operational management of the current health systems for HIV/AIDS. Results Of the 437 articles selected for an initial screening, 35 were read in full and mapped with the defined research questions. A high HIV/AIDS infection rate was a major concern among cross-country migrants in many regions, in particular sub-Saharan Africa. Despite a large number of studies reported in Africa, fewer studies were found in Asia and Latin America. Barriers of access to HIV/AIDS services comprised inadequate management of guidelines and referral systems, discriminatory attitudes, language differences, unstable legal status, and financial hardship. Though health systems management varied across countries, international partners consistently played a critical role in providing support for HIV/AIDS services to uninsured migrants and refugees. Conclusion It was evident that HIV/AIDS health care problems for migrants were a major concern in many developing nations. However, there was little evidence suggesting if the current

  8. Supporting the use of theory in cross-country health services research: a participatory qualitative approach using Normalisation Process Theory as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Catherine A; Mair, Frances S; Dowrick, Christopher; Brún, Mary O'Reilly-de; Brún, Tomas de; Burns, Nicola; Lionis, Christos; Saridaki, Aristoula; Papadakaki, Maria; Muijsenbergh, Maria van den; Weel-Baumgarten, Evelyn van; Gravenhorst, Katja; Cooper, Lucy; Princz, Christine; Teunissen, Erik; Mareeuw, Francine van den Driessen; Vlahadi, Maria; Spiegel, Wolfgang; MacFarlane, Anne

    2017-08-21

    To describe and reflect on the process of designing and delivering a training programme supporting the use of theory, in this case Normalisation Process Theory (NPT), in a multisite cross-country health services research study. Participatory research approach using qualitative methods. Six European primary care settings involving research teams from Austria, England, Greece, Ireland, The Netherlands and Scotland. RESTORE research team consisting of 8 project applicants, all senior primary care academics, and 10 researchers. Professional backgrounds included general practitioners/family doctors, social/cultural anthropologists, sociologists and health services/primary care researchers. Views of all research team members (n=18) were assessed using qualitative evaluation methods, analysed qualitatively by the trainers after each session. Most of the team had no experience of using NPT and many had not applied theory to prospective, qualitative research projects. Early training proved didactic and overloaded participants with information. Drawing on RESTORE's methodological approach of Participatory Learning and Action, workshops using role play, experiential interactive exercises and light-hearted examples not directly related to the study subject matter were developed. Evaluation showed the study team quickly grew in knowledge and confidence in applying theory to fieldwork.Recommendations applicable to other studies include: accepting that theory application is not a linear process, that time is needed to address researcher concerns with the process, and that experiential, interactive learning is a key device in building conceptual and practical knowledge. An unanticipated benefit was the smooth transition to cross-country qualitative coding of study data. A structured programme of training enhanced and supported the prospective application of a theory, NPT, to our work but raised challenges. These were not unique to NPT but could arise with the application of any

  9. To Assess Sleep Quality among Pakistani Junior Physicians (House ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sleep deprivation among junior physicians (house officers) is of growing concern. In developed countries, duty hours are now mandated, but in developing countries, junior physicians are highly susceptible to develop sleep impairment due to long working hours, on‑call duties and shift work schedule. Aim: We ...

  10. Poor interpretation of chest X-rays by junior doctors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Janus Mølgaard; Gerke, Oke; Karstoft, Jens

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Studies targeting medical students and junior doctors have shown that their radiological skills are insufficient. Despite the widespread use of chest X-ray; however, a study of Danish junior doctors' skills has not previously been performed. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 22...

  11. Multiple Intelligences Profiles of Junior Secondary School Students in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmiyati, Nuri; Rasyid, Muhammad Amin; Rahman, M. Asfah; Arsyad, Azhar; Dirawan, Gufran Darma

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the Multiple Intelligences profiles of the students at junior secondary school in Makassar. The Multiple Intelligences Inventory was used to identify the dominant intelligence among the students. The sample of this research was 302 junior secondary schools students in Makassar Indonesia who willing to participated…

  12. Parental Resources and the Transition to Junior High.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grolnick, Wendy S.; Kurowski, Carolyn O.; Dunlap, Kelly G.; Hevey, Cheryl

    2000-01-01

    This study examined whether maternal resources of involvement and autonomy support might buffer children against the negative effects of the transition to junior high. School, cognitive, and personal involvement were examined. Findings highlight the importance of the home environment in children's coping with the transition to junior high.…

  13. Theorizing Food Sharing Practices in a Junior High Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Mary

    2013-01-01

    This reflective essay analyzes interactions where food was shared between a teacher and her junior high school students. The author describes the official uses of food in junior high school classrooms and in educational contexts in general. The author then theorizes these interactions, suggesting other semiotic, dialogic, and culturally encoded…

  14. Attitude of Junior Secondary School Students towards the Study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of girls' education in Science subjects, as it exists in Ghana with reference to J.S.S. pupils' attitude to Science. Using a stratified random sample of junior secondary school students from public and private schools, the study investigated the attitudes of junior secondary school students towards the study of science. Data were ...

  15. Potential benefits of student- and junior doctor-led textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Zeshan U; Lattey, Katherine; Bryne, Patrick; Rodrigues, Mark; Ross, Michael; Maxwell, Simon

    2015-06-01

    Medical textbooks are an important teaching supplement. Few have junior doctors or medical students ('juniors') as primary contributors. However, the strengths of junior-led face-to-face teaching are now well-established, and we hypothesized that similar advantages would be transferrable to a textbook setting. Juniors were approached to contribute to an independently published medical textbook, with senior clinicians recruited in parallel to ensure factual accuracy. Juniors directed every aspect of textbook writing and the production process. The published book stressed that it was an open collaboration with readers, inviting them to get in touch to evaluate the text and suggest ideas for new titles. Of 75 respondents, 93 % awarded the first textbook in the series 4 or 5 out of 5 for overall quality. Five other titles have been released, with seven more in development. Over 100 juniors are currently involved, with two students progressing from reviewers to editors after less than a year of mentorship. Juniors can be a motivated, dynamic, innovative group, capable of significant contributions to the medical textbook literature. This initiative has generated a sustainable infrastructure to facilitate junior-led publishing, and has the capacity for expansion to accommodate new initiatives and ideas.

  16. Professional Training of Junior Medical Staff: European Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliasova, Yuliia

    2017-01-01

    The article covers current problems of professional training of junior medical staff. The main disadvantages of Ukrainian system of medical education that impede the intention of improving quality of professional training of junior medical staff have been analyzed. European experience in organizing medical education, namely, in Great Britain,…

  17. Sexuality Education in Junior High Schools in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, N.; Shinohara, H.; Tashiro, M.; Suzuki, S.; Hirose, H.; Ikeya, H.; Ushitora, K.; Komiya, A.; Watanabe, M.; Motegi, T.; Morioka, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to determine via responses to three questionnaire surveys how sexuality education programs are conducted at junior high schools in Japan. Study 1 examined the practice of sexuality education in schools, Study 2 investigated junior high school students' (age 12-13 and 14-15 years) knowledge of sexuality, and Study 3 examined…

  18. Exploring the relationship between cigarette prices and smoking among adults: a cross-country study of low- and middle-income nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostova, Deliana; Tesche, Jean; Perucic, Anne-Marie; Yurekli, Ayda; Asma, Samira

    2014-01-01

    Evidence on the relationship between cigarette prices and adult smoking in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is relatively limited. This study offers new descriptive evidence on this relationship using data from a set of 13 LMICs. We use Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) cross-country data from approximately 200,000 participants aged 15 and older. Estimates on the relationship between prices and adult smoking were obtained from logit models of smoking participation and ordinary least squares models of conditional cigarette demand. Higher prices were associated with lower demand across countries, in terms of both smoking prevalence and daily number of cigarettes smoked among smokers. Our estimates suggest that the total price elasticity of cigarette demand in LMICs is approximately -0.53. We find that higher socioeconomic status (SES), represented through wealth and education effects is associated with lower chance of smoking overall, but among existing smokers, it may be associated with a larger number of cigarettes smoked. After controlling for a set of individual demographic and country characteristics, cigarette prices retain a significant role in shaping cigarette demand across LMICs. Because higher SES is associated with a reduced chance of smoking overall but also with increased daily consumption among current smokers, optimal tobacco tax policies in LMICs may face an added need to accommodate to shifting SES structures within the populations of these countries.

  19. Energy efficiency in Germany 2000. Analysis based on the ODYSSEE database from the SAVE project 'Cross-country comparison on energy efficiency indicators'. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichhammer, W.; Schlomann, B.

    2001-02-01

    The German national report for the SAVE project 'Cross-country Comparison on Energy Efficiency Indicators' represents the recent energy efficiency trends in Germany based on the indicators extracted from the ODYSSEE database. For the second time, the 2000 country report only includes the development of energy consumption and efficiency in Germany after the unification, i.e. for the period 1991 to 1999. The year 1990 unfortunately could not be considered because most of the economic and energy consumption data for Germany (especially the revised National Accounts) are only available since 1991. The results for Western Germany since 1970 are described in the former country reports (Eichhammer et al., 1998). The report starts with a review on data collection and the recent trends in the general context of energy efficiency, i.e. economic and energy consumption development, energy and environmental policy and energy price trends. Afterwards, the energy efficiency trends are described both at the level of the whole economy (Chapter 3) and at sectoral level (Chapter 4 to 8). (orig.)

  20. Service user and caregiver involvement in mental health system strengthening in low- and middle-income countries: a cross-country qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempp, H; Abayneh, S; Gurung, D; Kola, L; Abdulmalik, J; Evans-Lacko, S; Semrau, M; Alem, A; Thornicroft, G; Hanlon, C

    2018-02-01

    The aims of this paper are to: (i) explore the experiences of involvement of mental health service users, their caregivers, mental health centre heads and policy makers in mental health system strengthening in three low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) (Ethiopia, Nepal and Nigeria); (ii) analyse the potential benefits and barriers of such involvement; and (iii) identify strategies required to achieve greater service user and caregiver participation. A cross-country qualitative study was conducted, interviewing 83 stakeholders of mental health services. Our analysis showed that service user and caregiver involvement in the health system strengthening process was an alien concept for most participants. They reported very limited access to direct participation. Stigma and poverty were described as the main barriers for involvement. Several strategies were identified by participants to overcome existing hurdles to facilitate service user and caregiver involvement in the mental health system strengthening process, such as support to access treatment, mental health promotion and empowerment of service users. This study suggests that capacity building for service users, and strengthening of user groups would equip them to contribute meaningfully to policy development from informed perspectives. Involvement of service users and their caregivers in mental health decision-making is still in its infancy in LMICs. Effective strategies are required to overcome existing barriers, for example making funding more widely available for Ph.D. studies in participatory research with service users and caregivers to develop, implement and evaluate approaches to involvement that are locally and culturally acceptable in LMICs.

  1. The impact of health care resources, socioeconomic status, and demographics on life expectancy: a cross-country study in three Southeast Asian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Moon Fai

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to examine the impact of health care resources, socioeconomic status, and demographic changes on life expectancy in Indonesia, Philippines, and Vietnam. This was a cross-country study to collect annual data (1980-2008) from each target country. Life expectancy was the dependent variable and health care resources, socioeconomic status, and demographics were the 3 main determinants. Structural equation modeling was employed, and the results indicate that the availability of more health care resources (Indonesia: coefficient = .47, P = .008; Philippines: coefficient = .48, P = .017; Vietnam: coefficient = .48, P = .004) and higher levels of socioeconomic advantages (Indonesia: coefficient = .41, P = .014; Vietnam: coefficient = .34, P = .026) are more likely to increase life expectancy. In contrast, demographic changes are more likely to increase life expectancy because of the wide range of health care resources. These findings suggest that more effort, particularly during economic downturns, should be put into removing the barriers that impede access to health care services and increasing preventive care for the population that currently has less access to health care in communities where there is a shortage of medical resources. © 2013 APJPH.

  2. Moore I postero-medial articular tibial fracture in alpine skiers: Surgical management and return to sports activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Vincent; Pailhé, Régis; Sharma, Akash; Rouchy, René-Christopher; Cognault, Jérémy; Rubens-Duval, Brice; Saragaglia, Dominique

    2016-06-01

    Over the past 10 years, like many authors, we observed an increasing number of Moore I tibial plateau fractures related to alpine skiing for which the surgeon may face difficult choices regarding surgical approach and fixation means. Some authors have recently been suggesting a posterior approach associated to open reduction and osteosynthesis by a buttress plate. But in our knowledge there is no specific study on sports activity recovery after Moore I tibial fractures. The aim of this work was to assess sports activities and clinical outcomes after surgically treated Moore I tibial plateau fractures in an athletic population of skiers. We conducted a prospective case series between 2012 and 2014. This included fifteen patients aged 39.6±7 years whom presented with a Moore I tibial plateau fracture during a skiing accident. 12 cases (80%) presented with an associated tibial spine fracture. Treatment consisted of a standard antero-medial approach, with a medial para patellar arthrotomy to allow direct visualisation of articular reduction and spinal fixation. Two or three 6.5mm long cancellous bone screws were placed antero-posteriorly so as to ensure perfect compression of the fracture site. Radiological and functional results were assessed by an independent observer (Lysholm-Tegner, UCLA, KOOS scores) at the longest follow-up. Mean follow-up was 18.2±6 months (12-28). An immediate postoperative anatomical reduction was achieved in all cases and remained stable in time. At last follow-up Lysholm mean score was 85±14 points (59-100), UCLA score was 7.3±1.6 (4-10) and Tegner score was 4.6±1.3 (3-6). Mean KOOS score was 77±15 (54-97). 87% of patients had resumed their skiing activity and 93% were satisfied or very satisfied from their post-operative surgical outcome. We observed no pseudarthrosis or secondary varus displacement. In our series 87% of patients had resumed back to their sporting activities. Surgical management of Moore I tibial plateau fractures by

  3. Career Progression of Junior Professional Officers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper S. E.; Carbonaro J.; Hoffheins, B; Collins, T.

    2015-07-12

    The U.S. Support Program to IAEA Safeguards (USSP) has funded more than 25 Junior Professional Officer (JPO) positions in the IAEA Department of Safeguards since 2005. JPOs are college graduates with zero to two years’ work experience who work alongside experienced IAEA staff members for one to two years and assist with basic, yet essential work while obtaining valuable experience. They contribute to equipment development, testing, integration, open source information collection and analysis, and software and database development. This paper will study the trends in career progression for the JPOs who have completed assignments with the IAEA in the Department of Safeguards. Brookhaven National Laboratory, in its role in managing the USSP, has compiled information that can be analyzed for this purpose.

  4. Pygmalion Effect on Junior English Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurong Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pygmalion Effect, or Robert Rosenthal Effect, was proved by the famous American psychologist Robert Rosenthal and Jacobson in 1968. Pygmalion Effect, as a matter of fact, is a psychological suggestion, which believes that people can accept the influence and suggestion given by the people whom very much they admire, like, believe, and respect. This effect was first applied in the field of management and medication. What’s more, remarkable achievements have been accomplished on human resource management. Robert Rosenthal put it into education through an experiment called Pygmalion in the Classroom, which aroused widely attention in the education sector. This thesis mainly focuses on the application of Pygmalion effect in English teaching, especially junior English teaching in China. If we can make good use of the Pygmalion Effect to conduct teaching and have positive expectations to students, it will improve teaching greatly.

  5. Using reduced rank regression methods to identify dietary patterns associated with obesity: a cross-country study among European and Australian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huybrechts, Inge; Lioret, Sandrine; Mouratidou, Theodora; Gunter, Marc J; Manios, Yannis; Kersting, Mathilde; Gottrand, Frederic; Kafatos, Anthony; De Henauw, Stefaan; Cuenca-García, Magdalena; Widhalm, Kurt; Gonzales-Gross, Marcela; Molnar, Denes; Moreno, Luis A; McNaughton, Sarah A

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to examine repeatability of reduced rank regression (RRR) methods in calculating dietary patterns (DP) and cross-sectional associations with overweight (OW)/obesity across European and Australian samples of adolescents. Data from two cross-sectional surveys in Europe (2006/2007 Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence study, including 1954 adolescents, 12-17 years) and Australia (2007 National Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey, including 1498 adolescents, 12-16 years) were used. Dietary intake was measured using two non-consecutive, 24-h recalls. RRR was used to identify DP using dietary energy density, fibre density and percentage of energy intake from fat as the intermediate variables. Associations between DP scores and body mass/fat were examined using multivariable linear and logistic regression as appropriate, stratified by sex. The first DP extracted (labelled 'energy dense, high fat, low fibre') explained 47 and 31 % of the response variation in Australian and European adolescents, respectively. It was similar for European and Australian adolescents and characterised by higher consumption of biscuits/cakes, chocolate/confectionery, crisps/savoury snacks, sugar-sweetened beverages, and lower consumption of yogurt, high-fibre bread, vegetables and fresh fruit. DP scores were inversely associated with BMI z-scores in Australian adolescent boys and borderline inverse in European adolescent boys (so as with %BF). Similarly, a lower likelihood for OW in boys was observed with higher DP scores in both surveys. No such relationships were observed in adolescent girls. In conclusion, the DP identified in this cross-country study was comparable for European and Australian adolescents, demonstrating robustness of the RRR method in calculating DP among populations. However, longitudinal designs are more relevant when studying diet-obesity associations, to prevent reverse causality.

  6. Cost Analyses in the US and Japan: A Cross-Country Comparative Analysis Applied to the PRONOUNCE Trial in Non-Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Lisa M; Rajan, Narayan; Winfree, Katherine; Davey, Peter; Ball, Mark; Knox, Hediyyih; Graham, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    Health technology assessment is not required for regulatory submission or approval in either the United States (US) or Japan. This study was designed as a cross-country evaluation of cost analyses conducted in the US and Japan based on the PRONOUNCE phase III lung cancer trial, which compared pemetrexed plus carboplatin followed by pemetrexed (PemC) versus paclitaxel plus carboplatin plus bevacizumab followed by bevacizumab (PCB). Two cost analyses were conducted in accordance with International Society For Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research good research practice standards. Costs were obtained based on local pricing structures; outcomes were considered equivalent based on the PRONOUNCE trial results. Other inputs were included from the trial data (e.g., toxicity rates) or from local practice sources (e.g., toxicity management). The models were compared across key input and transferability factors. Despite differences in local input data, both models demonstrated a similar direction, with the cost of PemC being consistently lower than the cost of PCB. The variation in individual input parameters did affect some of the specific categories, such as toxicity, and impacted sensitivity analyses, with the cost differential between comparators being greater in Japan than in the US. When economic models are based on clinical trial data, many inputs and outcomes are held consistent. The alterable inputs were not in and of themselves large enough to significantly impact the results between countries, which were directionally consistent with greater variation seen in sensitivity analyses. The factors that vary across jurisdictions, even when minor, can have an impact on trial-based economic analyses. Eli Lilly and Company.

  7. Barriers and facilitators to care for the terminally ill: a cross-country case comparison study of Canada, England, Germany, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Christopher A; Howell, Doris; Zakus, David; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-02-01

    Why do many patients not die at their preferred location? Analyze system-level characteristics influencing the ability to implement best practices in delivering care for terminally ill adults (barriers and facilitators). Cross-country comparison study from a "most similar-most different" perspective, triangulating evidence from a scoping review of the literature, document analyses, and semi-structured key informant interviews. Case study of Canada, England, Germany, and the United States. While similar with regard to leading causes of death, patient needs, and potential avenues to care, different models of service provision were employed in the four countries studied. Although hospice and palliative care services were generally offered with standard care along the disease continuum and in various settings, and featured common elements such as physical, psycho-social, and spiritual care, outcomes (access, utilization, etc.) varied across jurisdictions. Barriers to best practice service provision included legislative (including jurisdictional), regulatory (e.g. education and training), and financial issues as well as public knowledge and perception ("giving up hope") challenges. Advance care planning, dedicated and stable funding toward hospice and palliative care, including caregiver benefits, population aging, and standards of practice and guidelines to hospice and palliative care, were identified as facilitators. Successful implementation of effective and efficient best practice approaches to care for the terminally ill, such as shared care, requires concerted action to align these system-level characteristics; many factors were identified as being essential but not sufficient. Policy implementation needs to be tailored to the respective health-care system(s), monitored, and fine-tuned.

  8. Cross-Country Differences in the Additive Effects of Socioeconomics, Health Behaviors and Medical Comorbidities on Disability among Older Adults with Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin

    2015-01-01

    Patients with heart disease experience limited activities of daily living (ADL). This is a cross-country comparison of the additive effects of Socioeconomics, health behaviors, and the number of medical comorbidities on disability among patients with heart disease. The current study used a cross-sectional design. Data came from the Research on Early Life and Aging Trends and Effects (RELATE). The current analysis utilized data on elderly individuals (age ≥60 y) from 13 countries. The outcome was any ADL limitation (i.e. bathing, dressing, using toilet, transferring, lifting heavy things, shopping, and eating meals). Socioeconomics (i.e. age, gender, education, and income), health behaviors (i.e. exercise, smoking, and drinking), and number of chronic medical conditions (i.e. hypertension, respiratory, arthritis, stroke, and diabetes) were entered into country-specific logistic regressions, considering at least one limitation in ADL as the main outcome. Number of comorbid medical conditions and age were positively associated with disability in 85% of the countries. Physical activity and drinking were linked to disability in 54%and 31% of countries, respectively. Higher education and income were associated with lower disability in 31% and 23% of the countries, respectively. Female gender was associated with higher disability only in 15% of the countries. Smoking was not associated with disability, while the effects of socioeconomics, drinking, exercise, and medical comorbidities were controlled. Determinants of disability depend on the country; accordingly, locally designed health promotion interventions may be superior to the universal interventions for patients with heart disease. Medical comorbidities, however, should be universally diagnosed and treated.

  9. Patients' initial steps to cancer diagnosis in Denmark, England and Sweden: what can a qualitative, cross-country comparison of narrative interviews tell us about potentially modifiable factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArtney, John; Malmström, Marlene; Overgaard Nielsen, Trine; Evans, Julie; Bernhardson, Britt-Marie; Hajdarevic, Senada; Chapple, Alison; Eriksson, Lars E; Locock, Louise; Rasmussen, Birgit; Vedsted, Peter; Tishelman, Carol; Andersen, Rikke Sand; Ziebland, Sue

    2017-11-19

    To illuminate patterns observed in International Cancer Benchmarking Programme studies by extending understanding of the various influences on presentation and referral with cancer symptoms. Cross-country comparison of Denmark, England and Sweden with qualitative analysis of in-depth interview accounts of the prediagnostic process in lung or bowel cancer. 155 women and men, aged between 35 and 86 years old, diagnosed with lung or bowel cancer in 6 months before interview. Participants recruited through primary and secondary care, social media and word of mouth. Interviews collected by social scientists or nurse researchers during 2015, mainly in participants' homes. Participants reported difficulties in interpreting diffuse bodily sensations and symptoms and deciding when to consult. There were examples of swift referrals by primary care professionals in all three countries. In all countries, participants described difficulty deciding if and when to consult, highlighting concerns about access to general practitioner appointments and overstretched primary care services, although this appears less prominent in the Swedish data. It was not unusual for there to be more than one consultation before referral and we noted two distinct patterns of repeated consultation: (1) situations where the participant left the primary care consultation with a plan of action about what should happen next; (2) participants were unclear about under which conditions to return to the doctors. This second pattern sometimes extended over many weeks during which patients described uncertainty, and sometimes frustration, about if and when they should return and whether there were any other feasible investigations. The latter pattern appeared more evident in the interviews in England and Denmark than Sweden. We suggest that if clear action plans, as part of safety netting, were routinely used in primary care consultations then uncertainty, false reassurance and the inefficiency and distress

  10. Reducing fat and sodium content in pork sausage | Junior | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reducing fat and sodium content in pork sausage. Jonhny De Azevedo Maia Junior, Fábio Da Costa Henry, Felipe Roberto Ferreira Amaral Do Valle, Meire Lelis Leal Martins, Célia Raquel Quirino, Rafael Dos Santos Costa ...

  11. Transforming Junior Leader Development: Developing the Next Generation of Pentathletes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haynes, Kenneth G

    2007-01-01

    .... The convergence of Full Spectrum Operations, Network Centric Warfare, and Krulak's "Three Block War" have facilitated an urgent need for junior leaders that are more capable, adaptive, and mature...

  12. Gender and Acquisition of Science Process Skills among Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender and Acquisition of Science Process Skills among Junior Secondary ... for the effective learning of science even at the primary or basic level of education. ... and that activity-based methods of instruction be employed in teaching Basic ...

  13. On Stimulating English Learning Motivation of Junior Middle School Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱梦萱

    2016-01-01

    Learning motivation plays an important role in students’ English learning process. This thesis first introduces the definition and classification of motivation and then puts forward some measures and strategies that can foster and motivate junior middle school students’ learning motivation.

  14. Personality Dimensions of Gifted and Talented Junior High Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Howard S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Compared to a peer group of average abilities, gifted and talented junior high school students appeared more outgoing, participating, insightful, fast-learning, intellectually adaptable, conscientious, persistent, and moralistic, thus indicating significant between-group differences. (SB)

  15. A Study on Coping Patterns of Junior College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Ramya, N.; Parthasarathy, R.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the coping patterns followed by the junior college students. Further, an extensive effort was done to study the gender differences in coping patterns used by the students. This study was conducted in Christ College, Bangalore and on the first and second-year students of pre-university studying in either of the branches (Bachelor of Arts, Science, or Commerce). A total of 120 samples were collected from study population of junior college students usin...

  16. Gordon Ramsay's Politeness Strategies in Masterchef and Masterchef Junior Us

    OpenAIRE

    Safa, Annisa Friska; Kurniawan, Eri

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to investigate the types of politeness strategies that are performed by Gordon Ramsay in judging the Masterchef US and Masterchef Junior US contestants' dishes and to reveal whether Gordon Ramsay performs any different politeness strategies between the Master chef and Masterchef Junior contestants. The data spring from Gordon Ramsay utterances, taken from the elimination test of two episodes of Masterchef season 4 (episode 9 and 12) and the elimination test of two episodes ...

  17. A magnetic skier

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Swiss downhill ski champ Dominique Gisin will be the guest of Swiss-German TV show Sportpanorama, to be broadcast on Channel 2 of Schweizer Fernsehen (SF2) on 19 July. The idea behind the show is to "fix it" for guests to do something they have always wanted but never had the opportunity to do. Where other sportsmen and women might have chosen acrobatics or bungee-jumping, this young champion asked to visit CERN ! When asked about the reasons for her choice, she replied: "It’s always been a dream of mine! When I was at high school, physics was one of my main subjects. I heard a lot about CERN and all the experiments they do there. So I was very curious to see it all in real life. I am very excited about this first visit." And her interest in physics doesn’t stop there: "If I hadn’t done well in sport, I would have gone on with physics. I really enjoyed studying, but it was too much on top of the skiing. I had to make a...

  18. Technical characteristics of elite junior men and women race walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, B; Bissas, A; Drake, A

    2014-12-01

    Successful coaching in race walking requires a thorough understanding of the biomechanical principles underlying this unique form of gait. The purpose of this study was to analyze elite male and female junior race walkers and identify key kinematic variables. Twenty junior men and 20 junior women were videoed as they competed over 10 km in the 8th European Cup Race Walking. Three-dimensional kinematic data were obtained using motion analysis software (SIMI, Munich). Step length and cadence were correlated with speed in both sexes, and greater step lengths were the kinematic reason for junior men's faster walking speeds. While cadence did not differ between junior men and junior women, there was a difference in proportion of step time spent in contact. There were some differences between genders for upper body joint angles (e.g., elbow) but there were few differences within lower limb joint angles. Although some technical aspects (e.g., pelvic and shoulder girdle rotation) appeared undeveloped, it was noteworthy that most athletes achieved full knee extension at initial contact in accordance with the rules. However, in many athletes flight times were evident that might present problems during the transition to the higher standards of senior competition. There was a large range of ability among both sexes and coaches are advised to ensure that technical development continues during the transition to senior competition.

  19. Has ADVANCE Affected Senior Compared to Junior Women Scientists Differently?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Substantial evidence exists to demonstrate that the NSF ADVANCE Inititiative has made a positive impact upon institutions. Since it began in 2001, ADVANCE has changed the conversation, policies, and practices in ways to remove obstacles and systemic barriers preventing success for academic women scientists and engineers. Results from ADVANCE projects on campuses have facilitated consensus nationally about policies and practices that institutions may implement to help to alleviate issues, particularly for junior women scientists.Although getting women into senior and leadership positions in STEM constituted an initial impetus for ADVANCE, less emphasis was placed upon the needs of senior women scientists. Surveys of academic women scientists indicate that the issues faced by junior and senior women scientists differ significantly. The focus of ADVANCE on junior women in many ways seemed appropriate--the senior cohort of women scinetists is fed by the junior cohort of scientists; senior women serve as mentors, role models, and leaders for the junior colleagues, while continuing to struggle to achieve full status in the profession. This presentation will center on the differences in issues faced by senior compared to junior women scientists to explore whether a next step for ADVANCE should be to address needs of senior academic women scientists.

  20. A cross-country comparison of intensive care physicians’ beliefs about their transfusion behaviour: A qualitative study using the theoretical domains framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Rafat

    2012-09-01

    , and believing that guideline is important for other professionals, and Motivation and goals (opposing beliefs about the importance of restrictive transfusion and compatibility with other goals, were also identified in this study. Similar to the UK study, the Theory of Planned Behaviour, Social Cognitive Theory, Operant Learning Theory, Action Planning, and Knowledge-Attitude-Behaviour model were identified as potentially relevant theories and models for further study. Personal project analysis was added to the Canadian study to explore the Motivation and goals domain in further detail. Conclusions A wide range of beliefs was identified by the Canadian ICU physicians as likely to influence their transfusion behaviour. We were able to demonstrate similar though not identical results in a cross-country comparison. Designing targeted behaviour-change interventions based on unique beliefs identified by physicians from two countries are more likely to encourage restrictive transfusion in ICU physicians in respective countries. This needs to be tested in future prospective clinical trials.

  1. A cross-country comparison of intensive care physicians' beliefs about their transfusion behaviour: a qualitative study using the Theoretical Domains Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Rafat; Tinmouth, Alan T; Francis, Jill J; Brehaut, Jamie C; Born, Jennifer; Stockton, Charlotte; Stanworth, Simon J; Eccles, Martin P; Cuthbertson, Brian H; Hyde, Chris; Grimshaw, Jeremy M

    2012-09-21

    professionals), and Motivation and goals (opposing beliefs about the importance of restrictive transfusion and compatibility with other goals), were also identified in this study. Similar to the UK study, the Theory of Planned Behaviour, Social Cognitive Theory, Operant Learning Theory, Action Planning, and Knowledge-Attitude-Behaviour model were identified as potentially relevant theories and models for further study. Personal project analysis was added to the Canadian study to explore the Motivation and goals domain in further detail. A wide range of beliefs was identified by the Canadian ICU physicians as likely to influence their transfusion behaviour. We were able to demonstrate similar though not identical results in a cross-country comparison. Designing targeted behaviour-change interventions based on unique beliefs identified by physicians from two countries are more likely to encourage restrictive transfusion in ICU physicians in respective countries. This needs to be tested in future prospective clinical trials.

  2. A cross-country comparison of intensive care physicians’ beliefs about their transfusion behaviour: A qualitative study using the theoretical domains framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    guideline is important for other professionals), and Motivation and goals (opposing beliefs about the importance of restrictive transfusion and compatibility with other goals), were also identified in this study. Similar to the UK study, the Theory of Planned Behaviour, Social Cognitive Theory, Operant Learning Theory, Action Planning, and Knowledge-Attitude-Behaviour model were identified as potentially relevant theories and models for further study. Personal project analysis was added to the Canadian study to explore the Motivation and goals domain in further detail. Conclusions A wide range of beliefs was identified by the Canadian ICU physicians as likely to influence their transfusion behaviour. We were able to demonstrate similar though not identical results in a cross-country comparison. Designing targeted behaviour-change interventions based on unique beliefs identified by physicians from two countries are more likely to encourage restrictive transfusion in ICU physicians in respective countries. This needs to be tested in future prospective clinical trials. PMID:22999460

  3. Epistaxis management: current understanding amongst junior doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, R; Nash, R; Liu, Z-W; Singh, A

    2016-03-01

    Epistaxis is a common and potentially life-threatening emergency. This survey assesses understanding and confidence in epistaxis management amongst current junior doctors. A cross-sectional study was conducted of foundation year one and two doctors based at three National Health Service trusts within a single region of the UK, assessing basic understanding and procedural confidence. A total of 111 foundation doctors completed this survey. The average duration of undergraduate exposure to otolaryngology was 8.1 days. Forty-one per cent of respondents stated that they would apply pressure to the nasal bones to control epistaxis. Seventy-five per cent lacked confidence in their ability to manage epistaxis. Those with two weeks or more of undergraduate exposure to otolaryngology were more confident than those with one week or less of exposure (p epistaxis management, with patient safety implications. Confidence is associated with the duration of undergraduate exposure to otolaryngology. A minimum emergency safe competency should be a priority during foundation training if not achieved in UK medical schools.

  4. Breakfast Composition in Junior High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Devi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adolescence is a time of rapid development that requires higher nutrient intake levels than in adulthood. However the habit of skipping breakfast has become very popular among adolescents. Skipping breakfast has negative effects such as difficulty in concentrating, growth impairment and decrease academic performance. Therefore, this study was conducted to identify the breakfast composisition of early adolescents in Jatinangor, Sumedang, Indonesia. Methods: A cross sectional study with non-probability sampling method, was conducted in a junior high school Jatinangor during the month of July 2013. Ninety six participants were included in this study. All the participants underwent an interview about the food intake for breakfast in seven days using eating pattern recall guidelines. Results: Overall, 37% of the respondents skipped breakfast. The mean of total calories among the adolescents who consumed breakfast was 286.06 (187.89 kcal. The amount of carbohydrate, fat and protein consumed was 29.23 (19.93 gram, 13.93 (13.29 gram and 8.78 (6.11 gram accordingly. The main reason for adolescent to skip breakfast was lack of time. Conclusions: Majority of the respondents have their breakfast before they go to school. Overall, the total calories comsumed is sufficient however the amount of protein consumed is low.

  5. Junior empresa: un modelo empresarial diferente = Junior enterprise: a different business model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Jiménez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen ¿Quién no está harto ya de oír cómo está el mercado laboral? Nos bombardean con un ruido de fondo incesante, como si graduarnos no fuese suficiente reto. Bueno, ¿y qué? Un grupo de estudiantes de la Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería y Diseño Industrial de la Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (ETSIDI-UPM nos hemos unido y hemos creado nuestra propia Junior Empresa, un modelo empresarial diferente, innovador, que nos permite revertir todos los beneficios en aprendizaje. ¿Quién ha dicho que tengamos que dejarnos vencer por un sistema laboral obsoleto? Abstract Are you tired of hearing how difficult it is to get a job? They are filling our minds with a non-stop background noise, as if getting a degree was an insufficient challenge. So what? Well, some students from the Superior Technical School of Engineering and Industrial Design from the Technical University of Madrid (ETSIDIUPM have come together and created our own Junior Enterprise, a different business model, an innovative canvas, which allows us to transform all the benefits into learning. Who said our destiny is being crushed by an obsolete labour market?

  6. Bullying and harassment – Are junior doctors always the victims?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyhsen, C.M.; Patel, P.; O'Connell, J.E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: NHS staff have the right to work in an environment free from bullying, harassment and violence. There should be good team-working with colleagues from all disciplines. Reports of bullying experienced by junior doctors resulted in mandatory annual GMC surveys regarding the quality of training. This led to medical trainees being surveyed more than any other staff. Radiographers informally reported bullying and harassment (B&H) incidents involving trainees. This survey aims to quantify the issue. Methods: Online survey of general and CT radiographers at a large acute hospital in the North East of England addressing incidents involving junior doctors and occurring in the preceding 12 months. Results: The survey was completed by 86% (44/51) general and 5/7 CT radiographers. Overall 45% experienced bullying, 92% had their own/witnessed a colleague's opinion being ignored and 57% were the target of loud verbal abuse/anger or witnessed colleagues being treated in that way. Several radiographers reported 5 or more B&H incidents. 26 radiographers (51%) were shouted at/ridiculed in theatre, 4 feeling unsafe/physically threatened. Junior doctors regularly queried the need to supervise CT contrast injections on call. Free text comments highlighted that doctors rarely introduced themselves to radiology staff. Conclusion: Radiographers report significant incidents of B&H involving junior doctors, who do not always seem to appreciate radiation exposure legislation, patient safety protocols or respect the seniority of highly trained radiographers. Measures introduced subsequently include guidance for radiographers, a dedicated radiology e-learning package for trainees and classroom sessions for foundation doctors and final year undergraduate students. - Highlights: • Bullying and harassment of radiographers is a persistent problem. • Some radiographers reported feeling physically threatened in theatre. • Some junior doctors do not respect radiation exposure

  7. The Junior Faculty Laboratory: an innovative model of peer mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kimberly S; Hastings, S Nicole; Purser, Jama L; Whitson, Heather E

    2011-12-01

    Mentoring in academic medicine has been shown to contribute to the success of junior faculty, resulting in increased productivity, career satisfaction, and opportunities for networking. Although traditional dyadic mentoring, involving one senior faculty member and one junior protégé, is the dominant model for mentoring in the academic environment, there is increasing recognition that the sharing of knowledge, skills, and experiences among peers may also contribute to the career development of junior faculty. The authors describe the structure, activities, and outcomes of the Junior Faculty Laboratory (JFL), a self-organized, flexible, and dynamic peer-mentoring model within the Duke University Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development. As an innovative mentoring model, JFL is entirely peer driven, and its activities are determined by the real-time needs of members. In contrast to some other peer-mentoring models, JFL lacks senior faculty input or a structured curriculum, members are multidisciplinary, meeting times are project driven rather than preset, and participation in collaborative projects is optional based on the interests and needs of group members. Additionally, JFL was not formed as a substitute for, but as a complement to, the dyadic mentoring relationships enjoyed by its members. The model, now in its fifth year, has demonstrated success and sustainability. The authors present the JFL as an innovative, mentoring model that can be reproduced by other junior faculty seeking to foster collegial relationships with peers while simultaneously enhancing their career development.

  8. Perceived Injury Risk among Junior Cricketers: A Cross Sectional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna J. Gamage

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how junior athletes perceive injury risks when participating in sport and the environment they play in is an important component of injury prevention. This study investigates how Sri Lankan junior cricketers (n = 365, aged 11–14 years, boys perceive injury risks associated with playing cricket. The study used a Sri Lankan modification of an Australian junior cricket injury risk perception survey that considered playing cricket versus other sports, different cricket playing positions and roles, and different ground conditions. The risk of playing cricket was considered to be greater than that for cycling, but lower than that for rugby and soccer. Fast-bowlers, batters facing fast-bowlers, fielding close in the field, and wicket-keeping without a helmet were perceived to pose greater risks of injury than other scenarios. Playing on hard, bumpy and/or wet ground conditions were perceived to have a high risk opposed to playing on a grass field. Fielding in the outfield and wicket-keeping to fast-bowlers whilst wearing a helmet were perceived as low risk actions. The risk perceptions of junior cricketers identified in this study, do not necessarily reflect the true injury risk in some instances. This information will inform the development of injury prevention education interventions to address these risk perceptions in junior cricketers.

  9. Stronger vection in junior high school children than in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, Nobu; Imura, Tomoko; Tamura, Rio; Seno, Takeharu

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that even elementary school-aged children (7 and 11 years old) experience visually induced perception of illusory self-motion (vection) (Lepecq et al., 1995, Perception, 24, 435-449) and that children of a similar age (mean age = 9.2 years) experience more rapid and stronger vection than do adults (Shirai et al., 2012, Perception, 41, 1399-1402). These findings imply that although elementary school-aged children experience vection, this ability is subject to further development. To examine the subsequent development of vection, we compared junior high school students' (N = 11, mean age = 14.4 years) and adults' (N = 10, mean age = 22.2 years) experiences of vection. Junior high school students reported significantly stronger vection than did adults, suggesting that the perceptual experience of junior high school students differs from that of adults with regard to vection and that this ability undergoes gradual changes over a relatively long period of development.

  10. Evaluating Junior Secondary Science Textbook Usage in Australian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Christine V.

    2016-08-01

    A large body of research has drawn attention to the importance of providing engaging learning experiences in junior secondary science classes, in an attempt to attract more students into post-compulsory science courses. The reality of time and resource constraints, and the high proportion of non-specialist science teachers teaching science, has resulted in an overreliance on more transmissive pedagogical tools, such as textbooks. This study sought to evaluate the usage of junior secondary science textbooks in Australian schools. Data were collected via surveys from 486 schools teaching junior secondary (years 7-10), representing all Australian states and territories. Results indicated that most Australian schools use a science textbook in the junior secondary years, and textbooks are used in the majority of science lessons. The most highly cited reason influencing choice of textbook was layout/colour/illustrations, and electronic technologies were found to be the dominant curricula material utilised, in addition to textbooks, in junior secondary science classes. Interestingly, the majority of respondents expressed high levels of satisfaction with their textbooks, although many were keen to stress the subsidiary role of textbooks in the classroom, emphasising the textbook was `one' component of their teaching repertoire. Importantly, respondents were also keen to stress the benefits of textbooks in supporting substitute teachers, beginning teachers, and non-specialist science teachers; in addition to facilitating continuity of programming and staff support in schools with high staff turnover. Implications from this study highlight the need for high quality textbooks to support teaching and learning in Australian junior secondary science classes.

  11. The roles of games in teaching and learning of mathematics in junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The roles of games in teaching and learning of mathematics in junior secondary schools. ... The research seeks to enhance the status of games in teaching mathematics in junior secondary schools curriculum ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  12. Marketing advisors and their role for junior gas producers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maffitt, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    The role of marketing advisors in the new deregulated natural gas industry was discussed. These producer-oriented marketing consultants are specialists in providing affordable marketing services to junior gas producers on an 'as-needed' basis. The most important service provided by marketing advisors is helping the client identify management problems, analyze such problems and recommend solutions. Accordingly, the marketing advisor should be independent and objective, with no conflict of interests. He/she should be prepared to invest a lot of time and effort in providing the junior producer with a customized diagnosis of its marketing problems. 5 refs., 3 figs

  13. Marketing advisors and their role for junior gas producers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maffitt, D.W. [Phoenix Gas Marketing Consultants Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1997-05-01

    The role of marketing advisors in the new deregulated natural gas industry was discussed. These producer-oriented marketing consultants are specialists in providing affordable marketing services to junior gas producers on an `as-needed` basis. The most important service provided by marketing advisors is helping the client identify management problems, analyze such problems and recommend solutions. Accordingly, the marketing advisor should be independent and objective, with no conflict of interests. He/she should be prepared to invest a lot of time and effort in providing the junior producer with a customized diagnosis of its marketing problems. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Group Versus Individual Counseling: A Junior College Study. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aughinbaugh, Lorine A.

    Increases in junior college enrollment, coupled with a shortage of qualified guidance personnel, have forced many colleges to rely more heavily on group than on individual counseling for students. In the fall of 1965, students entering American River College were randomly assigned to either group or individual sessions, or not assigned, and these…

  15. Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Testing for Indonesia Junior High School Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Bor-Chen; Daud, Muslem; Yang, Chih-Wei

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a curriculum-based multidimensional computerized adaptive test that was developed for Indonesia junior high school Biology. In adherence to the Indonesian curriculum of different Biology dimensions, 300 items was constructed, and then tested to 2238 students. A multidimensional random coefficients multinomial logit model was…

  16. Plugging into Pop at the Junior High Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Dick

    1979-01-01

    Describes a junior high music program in Ridgewood, New Jersey, which capitalizes on student interest in popular music through courses in rock music history, pop music choral concerts, and facilities offering modern music production and performance equipment. This article is part of a theme issue on popular music. (SJL)

  17. Empathy, Self-Esteem and Creativity among Junior Ballet Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliopuska, Mirja

    This study examined the effect of the active pursuit of ballet as a hobby on personality. The study group consisted of 62 members of the junior ballet of the Finnish National Opera, ranging in age from 9 to 17 with the majority under 14. The dancers were given four self-esteem questionnaires which measured empathy, creativity, and other…

  18. The Effect of Teachers' Emotions on Chinese Junior English Learners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JiangLiqin

    2004-01-01

    The study intends to investigate the effect of teachers' emotions on Chinese Junior English learners. It is very common to see that in many primary schools, Chinese English teachers tend to play games with children, teach songs and the like,leading the Chinese young English beginners to the door to English world with great enthusiasm. But after children enter

  19. PROCEDURE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF COMMUNITY JUNIOR COLLEGES IN ARKANSAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas State Commission on Coordination of Higher Educational Finance, Little Rock.

    CRITERIA FOR ESTABLISHMENT OF JUNIOR COLLEGE DISTRICTS IN ARKANSAS INCLUDE (1) A PROJECTED ENROLLMENT OF AT LEAST 300 FULL TIME EQUIVALENT STUDENTS IN THE THIRD YEAR OF OPERATION, (2) ASSESSED VALUATION ADEQUATE TO PROVIDE FROM LOCAL PROPERTY TAXES ONE-THIRD OF THE ANNUAL OPERATING COST AND THE TOTAL DEBT SERVICE REQUIREMENTS FOR CAPITAL OUTLAY,…

  20. An analysis of the performance of Black African junior provincial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    been investigated. 1. It was found that these processes were effective in increasing participation of senior black provincial players between. 1996 and 2008. There were ... players were performing at junior provincial level but have not been afforded the ..... batsmen have performed consistently well between 2004 and 2010.

  1. Women in Academic Medicine: Measuring Stereotype Threat Among Junior Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassiotto, Magali; Hamel, Elizabeth Otto; Ku, Manwai; Correll, Shelley; Grewal, Daisy; Lavori, Philip; Periyakoil, V J; Reiss, Allan; Sandborg, Christy; Walton, Gregory; Winkleby, Marilyn; Valantine, Hannah

    2016-03-01

    Gender stereotypes in science impede supportive environments for women. Research suggests that women's perceptions of these environments are influenced by stereotype threat (ST): anxiety faced in situations where one may be evaluated using negative stereotypes. This study developed and tested ST metrics for first time use with junior faculty in academic medicine. Under a 2012 National Institutes of Health Pathfinder Award, Stanford School of Medicine's Office of Diversity and Leadership, working with experienced clinicians, social scientists, and epidemiologists, developed and administered ST measures to a representative group of junior faculty. 174 School of Medicine junior faculty were recruited (62% women, 38% men; 75% assistant professors, 25% instructors; 50% white, 40% Asian, 10% underrepresented minority). Women reported greater susceptibility to ST than did men across all items including ST vulnerability (p gender identification (p women reported lower beliefs in advancement (p = 0.021); however, they had similar career interest and identification, felt just as connected to colleagues, and were equally likely to pursue careers outside academia (all p > 0.42). Innovative ST metrics can provide a more complete picture of academic medical center environments. While junior women faculty are susceptible to ST, they may not yet experience all of its consequences in their early careers. As such, ST metrics offer a tool for evaluating institutional initiatives to increase supportive environments for women in academic medicine.

  2. Announcement of the Diagnostics 2016 Junior Scientists Travel Award

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    With the goal of recognizing outstanding contributions to the field of medical diagnostics by early-career investigators, including assistant professors, postdoctoral students and PhD students, and assisting them in attending international conferences in 2016, early this year Diagnostics accepted nominations for the Junior Scientists Travel Award 2016.

  3. Evaluation of English Language Textbooks Used in the Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study sought to establish the readability, comprehensibility, availability and the level of integration of English language and Literature in English in the English language textbooks in use in Lagos State junior secondary schools. Three hundred students and 60 teachers were selected from 20 schools in Lagos State.

  4. An Institutional Autopsy of St. Augustine Junior College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumadue, Richard T.

    2009-01-01

    Institutional autopsies can teach much about why learning centers fail the test of time. St. Augustine Junior College in north Florida, the brainchild of Dr. George Apel, was begun in 1942 and ended seven years later in 1949. The purposes of the short-lived college are identified for discussion in this paper. Also identified are the reasons for…

  5. Effect of Painting Series Package on the Performances of Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the effect of Painting Series Package on the performance of Junior Secondary School Cultural and Creative Arts in Ogbomoso, Nigeria. Gender influence on the students' performances was also examined. Sample comprised 60 students drawn purposively from two secondary schools.

  6. Self-Esteem of Junior High and High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kimberly E.

    The purpose of this thesis was to investigate the self-esteem of junior high and high school students. The independent variables investigated were quality of family life, birth order, family size, maternal employment, grade level and family structure. The dependent variables were the self-esteem scores from the following sub-scales of the Texas…

  7. Recurrent Respiratory Infections and Psychological Problems in Junior School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelmanson, Igor A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recurrent respiratory infections (RRI) are among most common diseases in school-aged children. Little is known about possible associations between RRI and children psychological well-being. Aim: To study possible associations between RRI in junior school pupils and their emotional/behavioural characteristics. Methods: The RRI group…

  8. [Stop the compulsive PhD trajectory for junior doctors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevers, J C Hans

    2014-01-01

    It has become the rule rather than the exception that junior doctors in training spend 3-4 years on a research project, culminating in a thesis. Without a PhD, clinical career prospects within and outside academia look rather bleak. Here I argue that PhD degrees should be pursued only by the most talented and motivated young clinicians.

  9. Music and Careers for the Junior High Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Bruce

    The curriculum guide describes an exemplary project designed to provide junior high school students with an opportunity to explore careers related to the world of music. The units present objectives, activities, and resources related to the following occupations: pop music artist, professional musician (union), instrumental and vocal music…

  10. Migration intentions among Portuguese junior doctors: Results from a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Pedro; Alves, Hélio

    2017-12-01

    Migration of health personnel during periods of economic crisis represents a challenge for policymakers in origin and destination countries. Portugal is going through a period of economic hardship and much has been speculated about an increase in junior doctors' migration during this period. Using a questionnaire administered to a sample of Portuguese junior doctors who were still in the general residency (1st-year after medical school), we aim at determining the prevalence of migration intentions among Portuguese junior doctors and to identify the most important drivers of career choice for those who are considering emigrating in the near future. In our sample, 55% of Portuguese junior doctors are considering working abroad in the coming 10 years. Several variables were associated with an intention to work abroad: female sex (odds ratio [OR] 0.559; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.488-0.640), the National Medical Exam score (OR 0.978; 95% CI 0.961-0.996;), having studied abroad (OR 1.756; 95% CI 1.086-2.867) and considering income and research opportunities as key factors for future specialty choice (OR 1.356; 95% CI 1.132-1.626; OR 2.626; 95% CI 1.228-4.172). Our study warns of the shortages the country may face due to doctors' migration and the main factors behind migration intentions in Portugal. Developing physician retention strategies is a priority to appropriately address these factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Teaching mathematics creatively in the junior secondary classes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper tried to emphasize the importance of teaching mathematics with creativity in the Junior Secondary classes (JS1-3) of our education system. It was established that a mathematically creative environment like the mathematics laboratory will enhance the teaching and learning of mathematics in schools. In this study ...

  12. The Influence of Gender on Junior Secondary School Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is on the influence of gender on junior secondary school student's attitude towards mathematics in Ovia North East local government area of Edo state. The descriptive survey design was employed for the study. The population of the study comprised of all the JSS3 students, a total of Three Thousand Six Hundred ...

  13. Sex-Differences in Attitudes towards Mathematics of Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated junior secondary school pupils' attitudes towards mathematics. In addition, it investigated gender differences in attitudes towards the subject. The purposive sampling method was used to select nine schools in the Cape Coast Municipality, involving 581 pupils. Questionnaires on attitudes towards ...

  14. The status of basic technology in Cross River State Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study was to ascertain the status of basic technology in Cross River State junior secondary schools. Descriptive survey design was adopted for the study. The study was guided by three (3) research questions. The population for the study comprised of one hundred and twelve (112) basic technology ...

  15. CAI and Its Application in Rural Junior English Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Superiority in developing students' listening, speaking, etc. This thesis explores how to provide a better environment for English teaching in rural junior school with the aid of multimedia and find some ways to improve teaching efficiency. In recent years, using multimedia is the direction of reform and mainstream in English teaching. Compared…

  16. Fitness and body composition profiling of elite junior South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. The aim of this study was to describe the body composition, strength and speed characteristics of elite junior South African rugby players. Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Field study. Subjects. Rugby players (16 and 18 years old, N = 174) selected for the South African Rugby Union National Green Squad.

  17. readability of comprehension passages in junior high school (jhs)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CHARLES

    ... to enhance readability. Key Words: readability formulas, comprehension passages, Junior High School, .... Index has a manual version but in this study the electronic version was used. The ..... probably the majority of the people heard the news by word of mouth. A critical look ..... The Journal of Tourism Studies 9.2: 49-60.

  18. Fitness profile of elite junior South African badminton players | van ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to establish the fitness profile of the elite junior badminton players in South Africa through the measurement and description of their body composition, aerobic power, muscular characteristics, speed, flexibility and agility. Eight elite male and seven elite female badminton players between the ...

  19. IS YOUR DISTRICT READY TO START A JUNIOR COLLEGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PATTERSON, DOW

    TO DETERMINE IF A DISTRICT IS READY TO ESTABLISH A JUNIOR COLLEGE, CERTAIN QUESTIONS MUST BE ANSWERED--(1) ARE THERE ENOUGH HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES TO WARRANT THE PROGRAM WITHOUT UNDUE TAXATION. (2) WILL THE COLLEGE BE ABLE TO OFFER THE USUAL PROGRAMS OF TRANSFER, VOCATIONAL TRAINING, GUIDANCE, AND GENERAL EDUCATION. (3) SHOULD IT BE AN EXTENSION OF…

  20. Selection of Learning Media Mathematics for Junior School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widodo, Sri Adi; Wahyudin

    2018-01-01

    One of the factors that determine the success of mathematics learning is the learning media used. Learning media can help students to create mathematical abstract mathematics that is abstract. In addition to media, meaningful learning is a learning that is adapted to the students' cognitive development. According to Piaget, junior high school…

  1. Vertical Integration at Junior and Intermediate Levels. School Research Newsletter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, Inger, Ed.; Hanse, Mona-Britt, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a rapid growth of interest in Sweden in vertically integrated classes in compulsory schools, especially at junior high school and intermediate grade levels. This development is supported in various ways by the curriculum, partly because it puts more emphasis than previous curricula on the occurrence of teaching…

  2. A survey of perceived hindrances to junior secondary school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated situations which Junior Secondary Schools (JSS) teachers perceived as hindrances to their teaching functions. A 30-item questionnaire with a 5-point scale was used to collect data from 116 science teachers who taught in private and public schools. The schools were based in rural and urban ...

  3. development and validation of an instrument for assessing junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. BARTH EKWEME

    school Mathematics classroom environment as it affects teaching and learning of Mathematics in Enugu. State. ... plays a significant role in computer technology. ... classroom. The main purpose of this study was to develop and validate an instrument for assessing junior secondary school Mathematics classroom learning ...

  4. Analysis of Daily Life Time in Women's Junior College Students

    OpenAIRE

    樫村, 修生

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was understand the correlationship between the energy expenditure of living activity and body structure or physical fitness in the students of a women's junior college. The resulut were as follows; It was shown that the physical activites in the daily life was necessary for prevention of obesity in the students.

  5. Head Impact Exposure in Junior and Adult Australian Football Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Hecimovich

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study measured and compared the frequency, magnitude, and distribution of head impacts sustained by junior and adult Australian football players, respectively, and between player positions over a season of games. Twelve junior and twelve adult players were tracked using a skin-mounted impact sensor. Head impact exposure, including frequency, magnitude, and location of impacts, was quantified using previously established methods. Over the collection period, there were no significant differences in the impact frequency between junior and adult players. However, there was a significant increase in the frequency of head impacts for midfielders in both grades once we accounted for player position. A comparable amount of head impacts in both junior and adult players has implications for Australian football regarding player safety and medical coverage as younger players sustained similar impact levels as adult players. The other implication of a higher impact profile within midfielders is that, by targeting education and prevention strategies, a decrease in the incidence of sports-related concussion may result.

  6. Literacy in Community Colleges. Junior College Resource Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarrington, Roger; And Others

    This series of Junior College Resource Reviews focuses on the community college's role in literacy development. After Roger Yarrington's overview of the topic, Robert McCabe and Susan Skidmore consider "The Literacy Crisis and American Education." In light of the changing nature of work and the severe decline in the communication skills of youth,…

  7. Sex-Differences in Attitudes towards Mathematics of Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cce

    The study investigated junior secondary school pupils' attitudes towards mathematics. ... They attributed this to their low interest and confidence in learning ... aspirations performed better in mathematics and science than those who did not .... The questionnaire items were hand delivered to respondents on the days that ...

  8. Sex-Differences in Attitudes towards Mathematics of Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cce

    Abstract. The study investigated junior secondary school pupils' attitudes towards mathematics. In addition, it investigated gender differences in attitudes towards the subject. The purposive sampling method was used to select nine schools in the Cape Coast. Municipality, involving 581 pupils. Questionnaires on attitudes ...

  9. Heart-Rate Variability During Deep Sleep in World-Class Alpine Skiers: A Time-Efficient Alternative to Morning Supine Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzig, David; Testorelli, Moreno; Olstad, Daniela Schäfer; Erlacher, Daniel; Achermann, Peter; Eser, Prisca; Wilhelm, Matthias

    2017-05-01

    It is increasingly popular to use heart-rate variability (HRV) to tailor training for athletes. A time-efficient method is HRV assessment during deep sleep. To validate the selection of deep-sleep segments identified by RR intervals with simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) recordings and to compare HRV parameters of these segments with those of standard morning supine measurements. In 11 world-class alpine skiers, RR intervals were monitored during 10 nights, and simultaneous EEGs were recorded during 2-4 nights. Deep sleep was determined from the HRV signal and verified by delta power from the EEG recordings. Four further segments were chosen for HRV determination, namely, a 4-h segment from midnight to 4 AM and three 5-min segments: 1 just before awakening, 1 after waking in supine position, and 1 in standing after orthostatic challenge. Training load was recorded every day. A total of 80 night and 68 morning measurements of 9 athletes were analyzed. Good correspondence between the phases selected by RR intervals vs those selected by EEG was found. Concerning root-mean-squared difference of successive RR intervals (RMSSD), a marker for parasympathetic activity, the best relationship with the morning supine measurement was found in deep sleep. HRV is a simple tool for approximating deep-sleep phases, and HRV measurement during deep sleep could provide a time-efficient alternative to HRV in supine position.

  10. TOEFL Junior® Design Framework. TOEFL Junior® Research Report. TOEFL JR-02. ETS Research Report No. RR-15-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Youngsoon; Wolf, Mikyung Kim; Hauck, Maurice C.; Mollaun, Pamela; Rybinski, Paul; Tumposky, Daniel; Wang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the theoretical and empirical foundations of the "TOEFL Junior"® assessment and its development process. The TOEFL Junior test was developed to address the increasing need for objective measures of English language proficiency for young adolescent learners, who are being introduced to English as a second or foreign…

  11. Social skills and loneliness in junior high school students

    OpenAIRE

    Kanayama, Motoharu; Ono, Masahiko; Ohashi, Tsutomu; Tsujimoto, Yuichi; Oi, Shizuyo; Matsui, Kayoko; Tsujimoto, Ikuhiro; Yoshida, Hatsuko

    2003-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the relationship between social skills and loneliness, and to contribute to prevention and intervention of loneliness in junior high school students. Questionnaires were administered to 83 students (45 males and 38 females). Correlation analysis showed that loneliness score was negatively related to the scores of peer reinforcement, social initiation, conflict resolution and assertion skills, and also positively related to the score of withdrawal beh...

  12. Multidisciplinary Mentoring Programs to Enhance Junior Faculty Research Grant Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freel, Stephanie A; Smith, Paige C; Burns, Ebony N; Downer, Joanna B; Brown, Ann J; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2017-10-01

    Junior faculty face challenges in establishing independent research careers. Declining funding combined with a shift to multidisciplinary, collaborative science necessitates new mentorship models and enhanced institutional support. Two multidisciplinary mentorship programs to promote grant success for junior faculty were established at the Duke University School of Medicine beginning in 2011. These four-month programs-the Path to Independence Program (PtIP) for National Institutes of Health (NIH) R applicants and the K Club for NIH K applicants-use multiple senior faculty mentors and professional grant-writing staff to provide a 20-hour joint curriculum comprising a series of lectures, hands-on workshops, career development counseling, peer groups, and an internal study section. In March 2016, the authors analyzed the success rate for all NIH grants submitted by participants since program enrollment. In a 2015 postprogram survey, participants rated their feelings of support and competency across six skill factors. From October 2011 to March 2016, the programs engaged 265 senior faculty mentors, 145 PtIP participants, and 138 K Club participants. Success rates for NIH grant applications were 28% (61 awards/220 decisions) for PtIP participants-an increase over the 2010 Duke University junior faculty baseline of 11%-and 64% (38/59) for K Club participants. Respondents reported significantly increased feelings of support and self-ratings for each competency post program. The authors plan to expand the breadth of both the mentorship pool and faculty served. Broad implementation of similar programs elsewhere could bolster success, satisfaction, and retention of junior faculty investigators.

  13. Structuring Naval Special Warfare junior officer professional military education

    OpenAIRE

    Donovan, Thomas A.

    2007-01-01

    Naval Special Warfare does not currently have a designated career path for an officer that requires professional military education (PME) for SEAL junior officers after the rank of Ensign (O-1) and before the rank of Lieutenant Commander (O-4). There currently is interest in this subject matter at the Naval Special Warfare Command and Center. SEAL officers increasingly hold key leadership positions and influence critical decisions in the execution of national strategy. This growing respo...

  14. Junior Officer Competency Model: Research Results and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    equal numbers of positive and nega- tive behavioral events, so that variation in this fifty-fifty distribution reflected the information volunteered ...represent effective bahavior . The early piloting of the ALPE produced a number of examples of this phenomena. Second, and more significantly, the junior...deficiencies of experienced NCOs , Get a senior officer to change an inappropriate order 6. Job Involvement Volunteer for new assignments Personally

  15. Logistics Junior Officer Development in a Period of Persistent Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    JUNIOR OFFICER DEVELOPMENT IN A PERIOD OF PERSISTENT CONFLICT 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...have less time 38Respondent 10 Email, March 30, 2012. 39Major General Edward C. Cardon , “Thoughts for SAMS Students,”(lecture, Marshall Auditorium...www.amazon.com/John-C.-Maxwell (accessed 18 April 2013). Lectures: Cardon , Edward. “Thoughts for SAMS Students.” Address to School of Advanced Military

  16. Antecedents of Overtime Work: The Case of Junior Academics

    OpenAIRE

    Frei, Irina; Grund, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Despite the ongoing public debate about precarious working conditions in academia, there is only little evidence on working hours and overtime work for the group of (non-tenured) junior academics. By using unique longitudinal survey data on the occupational situation and careers of doctoral students and doctorate holders in STEM fields in Germany, we explore potential antecedents of overtime. We find that overtime hours are less pronounced among firm employees holding a doctorate and among po...

  17. Differences in Physical Capacity Between Junior and Senior Australian Footballers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Stephen J; Watsford, Mark L; Austin, Damien J; Spurrs, Rob W; Pine, Matthew J; Rennie, Michael J

    2017-11-01

    Kelly, SJ, Watsford, ML, Austin, DJ, Spurrs, RW, Pine, MJ, and Rennie, MJ. Differences in physical capacity between junior and senior Australian footballers. J Strength Cond Res 31(11): 3059-3066, 2017-The purpose of this study was to profile and compare anthropometric and physical capacities within elite junior and senior Australian football (AF) players of various chronological ages and stages of athletic development. Seventy-nine players, including junior and senior AF players from one professional club, were profiled using 11 assessments. Junior players were divided into 2 groups based on chronological age (under 16 and 18 years) and senior players according to years since drafted to a professional AF team (1-2 years, 3-7 years, and 8+ years). Parametric data were assessed using a 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), whereas nonparametric data were assessed using a Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA. The magnitude difference between players was measured using the Hopkins' effect size (ES). Significant differences were evident between under-16 players and all senior player groups for anthropometric (p = 0.001-0.019/ES = 1.25-2.13), absolute strength (p = 0.001-0.01/ES = 1.82-4.46), and relative strength (p = 0.001-0.027/ES = 0.84-3.55). The under-18 players displayed significantly lower absolute strength (p = 0.001-0.012/ES = 1.82-3.79) and relative strength (p = 0.001-0.027/ES = 0.85-4.00) compared with the 3-7 and 8+ players. Significant differences were evident between the under-16 players and senior player groups for explosive jumping and throwing tests (p = 0.001-0.017/ES = 1.03-2.99). Minimal differences were evident between all player groups for running assessments; however, the under-16 players were significantly slower compared with the 8+ players for the 3-km time trial (p senior AF players.

  18. IMPLEMENTASI PROGRAM JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT BE ENTREPRENEURIAL PADA MATA PELAJARAN KEWIRAUSAHAAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arifiyah Arifiyah

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to describe and analyze the implementation of Junior Achievement Be Entrepreneurial program on entrepreneurship subjects in SMA Negeri 3 Semarang. The approach used is qualitative, descriptive methods, and case study research design. The collection of data through observation, interviews and document study. The results showed that the activities of the program before learning that socialization programs, training of trainers and teachers, and planning. Implementation of learning for 8 sessions consist of an introduction to the program, the pre-test, materials, post-test, and questionnaire. Criteria for graduation students follow a program of pre-test and post-test, attendance, student workbook, business plan proposal, and questionnaires with graduation status and succes succes complete and certified. After the implementation of learning there are extra-curricular activities or activities outside class called weekly meetings for the preparation of student company competition. Results graduation are 95.93% and achievements gained from regional, national, and Asia-Pacific. The material taught include the motivation of entrepreneurship, business ideas, who my customers, what is my superiority, business ethics, and business plans. Learning strategy use of small group discussions. Parties directly invol ved, namely students, teachers and trainers, while the other parties involved, namely the Junior Achievement Indonesia, the school, the Department of Education and Citi Bank. Conclusion Junior Achievement Be Entrepreneurial program that is good, decent, and can be disseminated.

  19. Changing the Culture of Science Communication Training for Junior Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankston, Adriana; McDowell, Gary S.

    2018-01-01

    Being successful in an academic environment places many demands on junior scientists. Science communication currently may not be adequately valued and rewarded, and yet communication to multiple audiences is critical for ensuring that it remains a priority in today’s society. Due to the potential for science communication to produce better scientists, facilitate scientific progress, and influence decision-making at multiple levels, training junior scientists in both effective and ethical science communication practices is imperative, and can benefit scientists regardless of their chosen career path. However, many challenges exist in addressing specific aspects of this training. Principally, science communication training and resources should be made readily available to junior scientists at institutions, and there is a need to scale up existing science communication training programs and standardize core aspects of these programs across universities, while also allowing for experimentation with training. We propose a comprehensive core training program be adopted by universities, utilizing a centralized online resource with science communication information from multiple stakeholders. In addition, the culture of science must shift toward greater acceptance of science communication as an essential part of training. For this purpose, the science communication field itself needs to be developed, researched and better understood at multiple levels. Ultimately, this may result in a larger cultural change toward acceptance of professional development activities as valuable for training scientists. PMID:29904538

  20. [Risk of injury in and adolescent and junior competitive karate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Rath, R; Miltner, O; Mamarvar, M; Mumme, T

    2005-12-01

    Increasing professionalism in competitive karate has led to a specific injury pattern. The aim of our study was to investigate the injury pattern in junior competitive karate and to evaluate the prophylactic effect of fist padding. During the 4 (th) Junior World Championships of the World Karate Confederation (WKC) 2004 235 karate fights were observed and injury-related data were recorded. Fist padding was used in 183 fights, 52 fights were carried out without. In 22 % of all fights we saw an injury. Most of them were mild injuries of the head and face: 32 bruises of the face (13 with epistaxis), 7 facial lacerations and 3 concussions (mild brain injury). 14 fights were stopped due to an injury. Only in the category male 18 - 20 years a higher rate of injuries was seen without fist padding (shobu ippon) compared to shobu sanbon (with fist padding). The injury pattern of junior competitive karate is comparable to senior karate. Fist padding does not generally reduce the incidence or severity of injuries.

  1. Musculoskeletal Injuries and Training Patterns in Junior Elite Orienteering Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Roos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Findings about the relation between musculoskeletal injuries and training patterns in orienteering athletes are sparse. Therefore, the musculoskeletal injuries and training patterns of 31 Swiss elite orienteering athletes aged 18-19 years were analyzed in a retrospective study. Individual training diaries and medical records were used to assess training data and injury history, respectively. Group comparisons and a multiple linear regression (MLR were performed for statistical analysis. The junior elite orienteering athletes performed 7.38 ± 2.00 training sessions weekly, with a total duration of 455.75 ± 98.22 minutes. An injury incidence rate (IIR of 2.18 ± 2.13 injuries per 1000 hours of training was observed. The lower extremity was affected in 93% of all injuries, and the knee (33% was the most commonly injured location. The MLR revealed that gender and six training variables explained 60% of the variance in the injury severity index in this study. Supported by the low IIR in the observed age group, the training protocol of the junior elite orienteering athletes was generally adequate. In comparison to elite track, marathon, and orienteering athletes, the junior elite athletes performed less high-intensity interval training (HIIT. However, more frequent HIIT seems to be a protective factor against injuries.

  2. Changing the Culture of Science Communication Training for Junior Scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankston, Adriana; McDowell, Gary S

    2018-01-01

    Being successful in an academic environment places many demands on junior scientists. Science communication currently may not be adequately valued and rewarded, and yet communication to multiple audiences is critical for ensuring that it remains a priority in today's society. Due to the potential for science communication to produce better scientists, facilitate scientific progress, and influence decision-making at multiple levels, training junior scientists in both effective and ethical science communication practices is imperative, and can benefit scientists regardless of their chosen career path. However, many challenges exist in addressing specific aspects of this training. Principally, science communication training and resources should be made readily available to junior scientists at institutions, and there is a need to scale up existing science communication training programs and standardize core aspects of these programs across universities, while also allowing for experimentation with training. We propose a comprehensive core training program be adopted by universities, utilizing a centralized online resource with science communication information from multiple stakeholders. In addition, the culture of science must shift toward greater acceptance of science communication as an essential part of training. For this purpose, the science communication field itself needs to be developed, researched and better understood at multiple levels. Ultimately, this may result in a larger cultural change toward acceptance of professional development activities as valuable for training scientists.

  3. NIR tracking assists sports medicine in junior basketball training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paeglis, Roberts; Bluss, Kristaps; Rudzitis, Andris; Spunde, Andris; Brice, Tamara; Nitiss, Edgars

    2011-07-01

    We recorded eye movements of eight elite junior basketball players. We hypothesized that a more stable gaze is correlated to a better shot rate. Upon preliminary testing we invited male juniors whose eyes could be reliably tracked in a game situation. To these ends, we used a head-mounted video-based eye tracker. The participants had no record of ocular or other health issues. No significant differences were found between shots made with and without the tracker cap, Paired samples t-test yielded p= .130 for the far and p=..900 > .050 for the middle range shots. The players made 40 shots from common far and middle range locations, 5 and 4 meters respectively for aged 14 years As expected, a statistical correlation was found between gaze fixation (in milliseconds) for the far and middle range shot rates, r=.782, p=.03. Notably, juniors who fixated longer before a shot had a more stable fixation or a lower gaze dispersion (in tracker's screen pixels), r=-.786, p=.02. This finding was augmented by the observation that the gaze dispersion while aiming at the basket was less (i.e., gaze more stable) in those who were more likely to score. We derived a regression equation linking fixation duration to shot success. We advocate infra-red eye tracking as a means to monitor player selection and training success.

  4. Perspectives on the working hours of Australian junior doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Nicholas J; Bonning, Michael; Mitchell, Rob

    2014-01-01

    The working hours of junior doctors have been a focus of discussion in Australia since the mid-1990s. Several national organizations, including the Australian Medical Association (AMA), have been prominent in advancing this agenda and have collected data (most of which is self-reported) on the working hours of junior doctors over the last 15 years. Overall, the available data indicate that working hours have fallen in a step-wise fashion, and AMA data suggest that the proportion of doctors at high risk of fatigue may be declining. It is likely that these changes reflect significant growth in the number of medical graduates, more detailed specifications regarding working hours in industrial agreements, and a greater focus on achieving a healthy work-life balance. It is notable that reductions in junior doctors' working hours have occurred despite the absence of a national regulatory framework for working hours. Informed by a growing international literature on working hours and their relation to patient and practitioner safety, accreditation bodies such as the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care (ACSQHC) and the Australian Medical Council (AMC) are adjusting their standards to encourage improved work and training practices.

  5. Prediction of Tennis Performance in Junior Elite Tennis Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Kramer, Barbara C.H. Huijgen, Marije T. Elferink-Gemser, Chris Visscher

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Predicting current and future tennis performance can lead to improving the development of junior tennis players. The aim of this study is to investigate whether age, maturation, or physical fitness in junior elite tennis players in U13 can explain current and future tennis performance. The value of current tennis performance for future tennis performance is also investigated. A total of 86 junior elite tennis players (boys, n = 44; girls, n = 42 U13 (aged: 12.5 ± 0.3 years, and followed to U16, took part in this study. All players were top-30 ranked on the Dutch national ranking list at U13, and top-50 at U16. Age, maturation, and physical fitness, were measured at U13. A principal component analysis was used to extract four physical components from eight tests (medicine ball throwing overhead and reverse, ball throwing, SJ, CMJas, Sprint 5 and 10 meter, and the spider test. The possible relationship of age, maturation, and the physical components; “upper body power”, “lower body power”, “speed”, and “agility” with tennis performance at U13 and U16 was analyzed. Tennis performance was measured by using the ranking position on the Dutch national ranking list at U13 and U16. Regression analyses were conducted based on correlations between variables and tennis performance for boys and girls, separately. In boys U13, positive correlations were found between upper body power and tennis performance (R2 is 25%. In girls, positive correlations between maturation and lower body power with tennis performance were found at U13. Early maturing players were associated with a better tennis performance (R2 is 15%. In girls U16, only maturation correlated with tennis performance (R2 is 13%; later-maturing girls at U13 had better tennis performances at U16. Measuring junior elite tennis players at U13 is important for monitoring their development. These measurements did not predict future tennis performance of junior elite tennis players three

  6. Performance and anthropometric characteristics of prospective elite junior Australian footballers: a case study in one junior team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, James P; Pearce, Alan J; Koehn, Stefan; Carlson, John S

    2008-04-01

    The aim of the study was to compare anthropometric and physical performance data of players who were selected for a Victorian elite junior U18 Australian rules football squad. Prior to the selection of the final training squad, 54 players were assessed using a battery of standard anthropometric and physical performance tests. Multivariate analysis (MANOVA) showed significant (pcharacteristics can be observed that discriminate between players selected and non-selected, and demonstrates the value of physical fitness testing within the talent identification process of junior (16-18 years) players for squad and/or team selection. Based on MANOVA results, the findings from this study suggest team selection appeared to be related to a generally higher performance across the range of tests. Further, age was not a confounding variable as players selected tended to be younger than those non-selected. These findings reflect the general consensus that, in state-based junior competition, there is evidence of promoting overall player development, selecting those who are generally able to fulfil a range of positions and selecting players on their potential.

  7. RELEVANCE OF USE OF MULTIMEDIA IN ORDER TO PREVENT JUNIOR PUPILS’ AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V. Oleksiuk

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the problem of aggressive behaviour of junior pupils and reasons for its occurrence. There are determined advantages of multimedia use in the prevention of aggressive behaviour of junior pupils and described types of multimedia, which should be used to work with pupils. Problem of aggressive behaviour of junior pupils become one of the main problems of our society. As noted by the most researchers, one of the cause of aggressive behaviour of junior pupils is media, the use of video games, watching movies, cartoons that provoke aggression. One of the important areas of prevention of aggressive behaviour of junior pupils is competence improvement of teachers, social workers and psychologists on the use of multimedia in social and educational classes for junior pupils.

  8. Mapping of Junior High School Students’ Social Relation Problem and the Needed Assisting Model

    OpenAIRE

    Arbin Janu Setiyowati; Marthen Pali; Bambang Budi Wiyono; Triyono

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to describe Junior High School students’ social relation problem and the needed assisting model. This research used descriptive design with survey method. The subjects of this research were Junior High School students in the three cities in East Java. This research used purposive sampling as well. The data was collected by using questionnaire. The data analysis was conducted descriptively. This research found that Junior High School students’ social relation problems includ...

  9. Publishing the pamphlet of radiation education for junior high school students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamezawa, Chika; Kamogawa, Masashi; Kanai, Yuko; Nishiura, Shingo; Banda, Kiyomi; Arakawa, Etsuo

    2014-01-01

    We made supplementary materials of the radiation education as a pamphlet for junior high school students along the government course guidelines for junior high school pressed by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The pamphlet was published as booklet and calendar. For teachers at junior high schools, a pdf file of the booklet was also appended. The pamphlet focused natural phenomenon and latest researches in the radiation science. Many pictures in the booklet could help students to study the radiation science visually. For 100 days since March 2012 published day, 4119 booklets had been distributed to junior high schools and other schools of applicants, free of charge. (author)

  10. Capturing the Policy that Air Force Raters Use When Writing Performance Appraisals on Junior Officers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stephens, Owen

    2001-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between four dimensions of performance leadership, task performance, interpersonal facilitation, and job dedication and overall performance by junior officers in the Air Force...

  11. JS3P: junior staff programme pilot project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretrel, H.; Tregoures, N.; Bessiron, V.; Dehoyos, A.; Delvallee, I.; Brisson, N.; Debayle, C.; Dubreuil, M.; Nicaise, G.; Perignon, J.P.; Richard, J.; Reinke, N.; Kaulard, J.; Burgener, M.; Keesmann, S.; Schramm, B.; Seubert, A.; Sternkopf, J.; Thuma, G.; Weber, S.; Smidts, O.; Maillet, E.; Bucalossi, A.; Van haesendonck, M.; Uyttenhove, W.; Mertens, J.

    2006-01-01

    Concept: The objective of the project is to allow junior staff members from the European Technical Safety Organisations (TSOs), IRSN, GRS and AVN, to work together with the final goal of creating a junior staff network, based on technical, cultural and personal interests. These projects are to show junior staff members at a very early stage during their career the need for European collaborations. They are also a tool to explore new subjects of co-operation. It is an initiative that should strengthen the links between the organisations and contribute to establishing the future of nuclear safety in Europe. A JS3P (Junior Staff Programme Pilot Project) is a project done jointly by 'junior' staff members from the three TSOs, where experience of 'seniors' is also integrated when needed. Compared to other collaborative activities, it has certain specific features. The JS3P favours staff exchanges, and technical meetings of several days should be planned during a project in order to encourage people to work together. Technical objectives are shared and the work is done jointly (reports, articles). The team involved in the JS3P should be as small as possible to favour its efficiency. The JS3P is short and easy to realize. Its duration is fixed to a maximum of about 12 months with the option to be prolonged. Typical topics are bibliographic work, comparison issues, scientific surveys, benchmark exercises and prospective investigations on innovative ideas. They can be linked to existing joint projects and then form a smaller module integrated into the large project. Topics may concern prospective issues, tentatively investigating new topics that can be seen as exploratory co-operation projects. Subjects may also concern research issues that are not a priority but that deserve to be investigated as new attractive topics. The JS3P is defined and managed by junior staff members. It is approved by a management board committee and supervised by a technical steering committee

  12. [Stress at work and well-being in junior residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Klaghofer, Richard; Buddeberg, Claus

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated the workplace experiences of junior physicians in their first year of residency, and the impact of these experiences on their physical and psychological well-being. In a prospective longitudinal study 518 junior physicians (54.4% women, 45.6% men) were investigated twice within two years with regard to individual and institutional determinants of career development. Gender-relevant workplace experiences, i. e. effort-reward imbalance, and their relation to physical and psychological well-being, i. e. anxiety and depression, as well as life satisfaction were evaluated. The workplace experiences revealed three significant gender-specific results: Women residents received less mentoring, had more positive social relationships at work, and showed a higher over-commitment than their male colleagues. Both men and women residents reported significantly worse physical and psychological well-being as well as life satisfaction after their first year of residency (T2) compared to the time directly before their graduation from medical school (T1). The junior physicians' life satisfaction scores are significantly lower than those of the normal population. 7-10% of the respondents showed anxiety scores above cut-off, and 1-4% depression scores above cut-off. Personality traits such as a high sense of coherence and low expressiveness are protective factors for well-being and life satisfaction. Insufficient leadership of senior residents and unclear hierarchical structures as well as stress at work and over-commitment are risk factors for the development of symptoms of anxiety and/or depression. The reported results are consistent with the psychosocial stress model by Karasek and Theorell as well as with the model of effort-reward imbalance of Siegrist.

  13. [The comprehensive approach to the rehabilitative treatment of junior athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanenko, N P; Levitskaya, T E; Tsekhmeistruk, E A; Tren'kaeva, N A; Tyulyupo, S V; Dostovalova, O V; Kremeno, S V; Shakhova, S S; Chekcheeva, V D

    The objective of the present study was the development of the comprehensive program for the medico-psychological follow-up of the male and female junior athletes (rhythmic gymnastics) with the purpose of stabilizing their hormonal and emotional status, as well as improving sport performances based on the use of modern hardware-software technologies. The comprehensive examination of 72 female athletes at the mean age of 11.5±0.6 years attending R. Kuznetsov specialized school of rhythmic gymnastics of the Olympic reserve in the city of Seversk has been undertaken on the basis of Tomsk Research Institute of Balneology and Physiotherapy, the branch of Siberian Federal Research and Clinical Centre. The program of comprehensive medical psychological rehabilitation for the junior athletes of either sex engaged in sportive activities requiring precise technical actions has been elaborated. The method of the combined therapeutic treatment included physical exercises therapy, manual massage, dry carbonic bathtubs, psychological activities with the application of biological feedback trainings and cognitive trainings; it was intended for the correction of the hormonal status and the improvement of the psycho-emotional conditions of the athletes. The combined treatment based on the use of the modern hardware-software technologies was shown to promote the restoration and development of the psychophysical and psychological qualities of the male and female junior athletes indispensable for the maintenance of their high readiness for the efficient sports activities at the subsequent stages of the training cycle. In addition, such treatment enhances the adaptation resources of the athletes.

  14. Academic achievement of junior high school students with sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fijri Auliyanti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Sleep disorders are prevalent in adolescents and may influence their academic achievement. To date, no study has been done in Indonesia on academic achievement in students with sleep disorders and its related factors. Objective To assess for relationships between academic achievement and related factors, including gender, motivation and learning strategies, IQ level, maternal educational level, socioeconomic status, family structure, after-hours education program, presence of TV/computer in the bedroom, sleep duration during school days, as well as bedtime and wakeup time difference in junior high school students with sleep disorders. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed from January to March 2013. Subjects were students from five junior high schools in Jakarta who fulfilled the criteria for sleep disorders based on the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children questionnaire. Results There were 111 study subjects. The prevalence of sleep disorders was 39.7%, mostly in difficulties initiating and maintaining sleep (70.2%. Below-average academic achievement was seen in 47.6% of subjects. Factors significantly related to below-average academic achievement were after-hours education program (prevalence ratio 5.6; 95%CI 1.36 to 23.18; P = 0.017, average IQ level (prevalence ratio 3.26; 95%CI 1.38 to 7.71; P = 0.007, and male gender (prevalence ratio 2.68; 95%CI 1.06 to 6.78; P = 0.037. Conclusion Among junior high school students with sleep disorders, factors related to below-average academic achievement are afterhours education program (more than 2 types, the average IQ level, and male gender.

  15. Bollasina Receives 2013 James R. Holton Junior Scientist Award: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollasina, Massimo A.

    2014-08-01

    I am deeply honored to have been selected as this year's recipient of the James R. Holton Junior Scientist Award, and I receive it with heartfelt gratitude and humility. I clearly remember Peter Webster's call announcing the amazing news and how I literally remained speechless and overwhelmed. I would like to express my sincere appreciation to the Atmospheric Sciences section of AGU and the members of the award committee. I am even more appreciative to have been presented this award handed by two outstanding scientists—Peter Webster and Bill Lau—who have remarkably contributed to our understanding of the Asian monsoon and tropical climate, my area of expertise.

  16. A Multifaceted Mentoring Program for Junior Faculty in Academic Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mary M; Sandborg, Christy I; Hudgins, Louanne; Sanford, Rania; Bachrach, Laura K

    2016-01-01

    The departure of physician-scientists from education and research into clinical practice is a growing challenge for the future of academic medicine. Junior faculty face competing demands for clinical productivity, teaching, research, and work-life integration, which can undermine confidence in the value of an academic career. Mentorship is important to foster career development and satisfaction in junior faculty. The goals of this academic pediatrics department were to develop, implement, and evaluate a multifaceted pediatric mentoring program to promote retention and satisfaction of junior faculty. Program elements included one-on-one mentor-mentee meetings, didactic workshops, grant review assistance, and facilitated peer-group mentoring. Program effectiveness was assessed using annual surveys of mentees and structured mentee exit interviews, as well as retention data for assistant professors. The mentees were instructors and assistant professors in the department of pediatrics. Seventy-nine mentees participated in the program from 2007 through 2014. The response rate from seven annual surveys was 84%. Sixty-nine percent of mentees felt more prepared to advance their careers, 81% had a better understanding of the criteria for advancement, 84% were satisfied with the program, and 95% found mentors accessible. Mentees who exited the program reported they most valued the one-on-one mentoring and viewed the experience positively regardless of promotion. Retention of assistant professors improved after initiation of the program; four of 13 hired from 2002 to 2006 left the institution, whereas 18 of 18 hired from 2007 to 2014 were retained. This multifaceted mentoring program appeared to bolster satisfaction and enhance retention of junior pediatric faculty. Mentees reported increased understanding of the criteria for promotion and viewed the program as a positive experience regardless of career path. Individual mentor-mentee meetings were needed at least twice yearly

  17. The educational value of ward rounds for junior trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faidon-Marios Laskaratos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ward round (WR is a complex task and medical teachers are often faced with the challenge of finding a balance between service provision and clinical development of learners. The educational value of WRs is an under-researched area. This short communication aims to evaluate the educational role of WRs for junior trainees and provides insight into current practices. It also identifies obstacles to effective teaching/training in this setting and provides suggestions for improving the quality of WR teaching.

  18. CAREER TRANSITION FROM JUNIOR TO SENIOR IN BASKETBALL PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Lorenzo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to investigate what factors affect basketball players in the transition from junior and amateur to senior and professional sport respectively. The study was a qualitative research which uses a semi-structured interview to get the data. There were interviewed five Spanish basketball players who were starting playing in a team of Basketball Club Association (C.B.A.. The results showed that the participants face several changes both in the sport and in the life outside sport. At the same time, the results indicated the existence of several coping strategies that help the player in his career transition.

  19. Is international junior success a reliable predictor for international senior success in elite combat sports?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pingwei; De Bosscher, Veerle; Pion, Johan; Weissensteiner, Juanita R; Vertonghen, Jikkemien

    2018-05-01

    Currently in the literature, there is a dearth of empirical research that confirms whether international junior success is a reliable predictor for future international senior success. Despite the uncertainty of the junior-senior relationship, federations and coaches still tend to use junior success as a predictor for long-term senior success. A range of former investigations utilising a retrospective lens has merely focused on success that athletes attained at junior level competitions. Success that was achieved at senior-level competitions but at a junior age was relatively ignored. This study explored to what extent international senior success can be predicted based on success that athletes achieved in either international junior level competitions (i.e. junior medalists) or senior competitions at a junior age (i.e. early achievers). The sample contains 4011 international male and female athletes from three combat sports (taekwondo, wrestling and boxing), who were born between 1974 and 1990 and participated in both international junior and senior-level competitions between 1990 and 2016. Gender and sport differences were compared. The results revealed that 61.4% of the junior medalists and 90.4% of the early achievers went on to win international medals at a senior age. Among the early achievers, 92.2% of the taekwondo athletes, 68.4% of the wrestling athletes and 37.9% of the boxing athletes could be reliably "predicted" to win international senior medals. The findings demonstrate that specific to the three combat sports examined, international junior success appears to be an important predictor to long-term international senior success.

  20. Decomposing Cross-Country Differences in Skills:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albæk, Karsten; Rosdahl, Anders

    2017-01-01

    This paper performs multivariate analysis of skill differences in the Nordic countries as assessed by OECD’s PIACC survey of adults aged 16-65. We decompose the differences in average skills between Finland and each of the three Scandinavian countries into a component that is due to different skill...... levels in subgroups of the population and a component that is due to differences in the composition of subgroups. The decompositions show that the high Finnish average skill level compared to the three Scandinavian countries can be attributed the low share of immigrants in Finland and to high scores...... among Finns with high school and less than high school education. The Finnish average score is pulled substantially downwards as a consequence of the low numeracy skill level among older Finns, which is consistent with an increase in the quantity or quality of Finnish education over time, relative...

  1. SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY VALUES: A CROSS COUNTRY COMPARISON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CATANA DOINA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This empirical study aims at finding out how similar and/or different are the future Romanian and Slovenian managers in assessing the importance of organizations social responsibility values. The assumption of the research is that most of most of students in engineering and business will hold middle management position in the near future. The sample consists of 727 undergraduate and graduate students levels from Romania and Slovenia, two former socialist countries. The data has been collected between 2008 and 2009 in the framework of GLOBE student project , using a section of GLOBE III questionnaire, about the importance of CSR related values in critical decisions. The findings concern the similarities and significant differences between: 1 whole Romanian and Slovenian samples; 2 Romanian and Slovenian students in engineering; 3 Romanian and Slovenian students in business. Our findings revealed a trend toward convergence in the importance given to decisions effect on contribution to the economic welfare of the nation and local community, as well as on employees professional growth and development and on environment. The biggest difference between the groups concerns the decisions effect on firm profitability (the Romanians considering this value as more important in critical decisions than the Slovenians. The students in engineering proved to be a more homogeneous group, showing convergence in assessing the importance of eight out of fifteen social responsibility values. The biggest difference concerns the decisions effect on firm profitability (Romanians consider it as having higher importance in critical decisions than the Slovenians. Comparison of students in business revealed convergence in assessing the importance of employees professional growth and development and decisions effect on environment. The biggest positive difference concerns the same value of decisions effect on firm profitability. The Romanians are well behind Slovenians in realizing the importance of decisions effect on relationships with important partners of the organization, ethical considerations and decisions effect on long term competitive ability of the organization.

  2. Does decision documentation help junior designers rationalize their decisions? A comparative multiple-case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesch, U. van; Avgeriou, P.; Tang, A.

    Software architecture design is challenging, especially for junior software designers. Lacking practice and experience, junior designers need process support in order to make rational architecture decisions. In this paper, we present the results of a comparative multiple-case study conducted to find

  3. A Longitudinal Study of Physical Fitness in Elite Junior Tennis Players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, Tamara; Huijgen, Barbara C. H.; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T.; Visscher, Chris

    Purpose: To analyze how physical fitness (PF) improves in elite junior tennis players related to age, maturity, and performance level. Methods: Elite junior tennis players (n = 113 boys, n = 83 girls) divided by performance level were monitored longitudinally from U14 to U16. Maturity, upper and

  4. First aid and basic life support of junior doctors: A prospective study in Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, E.C.T.H.; Severien, I.; Metz, J.C.; Berden, H.J.J.M.; Biert, J.

    2006-01-01

    According to the Dutch medical education guidelines junior doctors are expected to be able to perform first aid and basic life support. A prospective study was undertaken to assess the level of first aid and basic life support (BLS) competence of junior doctors at the Radboud University Nijmegen

  5. Examination of Turkish Junior High-School Students' Perceptions of the General Problem-Solving Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekici, Didem Inel

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine Turkish junior high-school students' perceptions of the general problem-solving process. The Turkish junior high-school students' perceptions of the general problem-solving process were examined in relation to their gender, grade level, age and their grade point with regards to the science course identified in the…

  6. Collaboration with Sport Psychologists as Viewed by Female Volleyball Junior Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrebski, Wojciech; Rutkowska, Katarzyna

    2008-01-01

    Study aim: To determine the need of female junior volleyball players to collaborate with a psychologist, considering previous sport career of those players. Material and methods: A group of 78 female volleyball players aged 14-17 years from 7 top Polish junior teams participated in the study. They were requested to fill questionnaires on their…

  7. Emotional Labour, Training Stress, Burnout, and Depressive Symptoms in Junior Doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Mary E.; Creed, Peter A.; Searle, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Junior doctors are at risk of work-related burnout and mental health problems due to training workload demands and responsibilities. This study investigated the predictors of work-related burnout and depressive symptoms in junior doctors. Participants were 349 Australian doctors in postgraduate years 1-4, who completed a web-based survey assessing…

  8. Improving Junior High School Students' Mathematical Analogical Ability Using Discovery Learning Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarif, Samsul

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the influence of discovery learning method towards the mathematical analogical ability of junior high school's students. This is a research using factorial design 2x2 with ANOVA-Two ways. The population of this research included the entire students of SMPN 13 Jakarta (State Junior High School 13 of Jakarta)…

  9. English Cooperative Learning Mode in a Rural Junior High School in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiyan; Peng, Wen; Sun, Liuhua

    2017-01-01

    Cooperative learning is one of the most recognized and fruitful research areas in modern education practice. It has been widely used in many countries as an effective teaching strategy to improve class efficiency and students' comprehensive language ability since the 1990's. This paper takes JA Junior High School, a rural junior high school in…

  10. Adolescent Views of Time Management: Rethinking the School Day in Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Paris S.; Strom, Robert D.; Sindel-Arrington, Tricia

    2016-01-01

    Junior high school presents a significant increase in time demands both for study and for social relationships. The students (N = 240) in grades 7 and 8 at a junior high school anonymously completed online the Time Management Poll concerning their own use of time and the way their school managed time. The 20 items in the poll allowed them to…

  11. An Assessment of Campus Police Departments across Mississippi's Public Community and Junior Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, Brad D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to provide an assessment of campus police departments throughout the 15 public community and junior colleges in Mississippi. This research could provide Mississippi community and junior college administrators the opportunity to observe and appraise the overall safety of their respective campuses in comparison to safety…

  12. 75 FR 36659 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Brain Power! The NIDA Junior Scientist Program and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... of the Brain Power! Program's ability to: Increase students' knowledge about the biology of the brain... Request; Brain Power! The NIDA Junior Scientist Program and the Companion Program, Brain Power! Challenge.... Proposed Collection: Title: Brain Power! The NIDA Junior Scientist Program, for grades K-5, and the...

  13. Traditional-Aged College Juniors' Career Planning Self-Efficacy: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Dawn C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this single-site case study was to explore and describe traditional-age college juniors' reports of self-efficacy (Bandura, 1997) regarding Career Planning (Barker & Kellen, 1998). More specifically, the career planning confidence levels of college juniors enrolled in a required career development course at a private business…

  14. Card Games and Algebra Tic Tacmatics on Achievement of Junior Secondary II Students in Algebraic Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpube, Nnaemeka Michael; Anugwo, M. N.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the Card Games and Algebra tic-Tacmatics on Junior Secondary II Students' Achievement in Algebraic Expressions. Three research questions and three null hypotheses guided the study. The study adopted the pre-test, post-test control group design. A total of two hundred and forty (240) Junior Secondary School II students were…

  15. Effects of Music on Physical Activity Rates of Junior High School Physical Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Lindsey; Barney, David C.; Prusak, Keven A.; Pennington, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Music is an everyday occurrence in a person's life. Music is heard in the workplace, in homes, and in the mall. Music can also be heard as a person exercises. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of music on junior high students (n = 305) step counts and time in activity in junior high school physical education classes.…

  16. The Junior High School Integrated Science: The Actual Teaching Process in the Perspective of an Ethnographer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu-Gyamfi, Kenneth; Ampiah, Joseph Ghartey

    2016-01-01

    Science education at the Basic School (Primary and Junior High School) serves as the foundation upon which higher levels of science education are pivoted. This ethnographic study sought to investigate the teaching of Integrated Science at the Junior High School (JHS) level in the classrooms of two science teachers in two schools of differing…

  17. The formation of logic thinking of junior schoolchildren during some extracurricular activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efimov Vladimir Fedorovich

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the topical issue of formation of junior schoolchildren's mathematical abilities, discloses the modern scientific concept of General and specific mathematical abilities. The structure of mathematical abilities, analyzed the specificity of extra-curricular activities, which under favorable conditions accompanies the intellectual development of junior schoolchildren.

  18. Business Studies Academic Performance Differences of Secondary School Juniors in Akwa Ibom State of Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udoukpong, Bassey E.; Emah, Ime E.; Umoren, Shirley E.

    2012-01-01

    The research examined the differences in the academic performance in Business Studies of a sampled secondary school junior students in Akwa Ibom State of Nigeria. A sample of 290 (138 male and 152 female) Junior Secondary Three (9th grade) students was surveyed. The students' variables' being examined vis-à-vis academic performance in Business…

  19. Guidelines for Professional Training of Junior Medical Staff in the Context of European Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnova, Myroslava

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with outlining guidelines for improving professional training of junior medical staff based on European experience. Consequently, guidelines and recommendations on enhancing the efficiency of medical education in general and junior medical specialists' professional training, in particular, published by European Union of Medical…

  20. Will Aesthetics English Comic Books Make Junior High School Students Fall in Love with English Reading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Mei-Ju; Hsu, Yung-Hung; Chen, Ching-Chi

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the effects of Aesthetics English comic books on EFL junior high school students' vocabulary acquisition, reading comprehension, and English learning motivation. The participants in this study were 28 eighth graders from one class in a public junior high school in Pingtung in Taiwan. After ten weeks…

  1. Developing Teaching Materials PISA-Based for Mathematics and Science of Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somakim; Suharman, Andi; Madang, Kodri; Taufiq

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to develop valid and practical teaching materials for mathematics and science lesson PISA-based for junior high school students and to determine potential effects on students in scientific activity. Subjects of this study were students of Junior High School 9 Palembang (SMP Negeri 9 Palembang). The method used in this study is…

  2. A Structural and Functional Model for Forming Management Skills in Junior Schoolchildren

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knissarina, Malika M.; Valikhanov, Sharidyar A.; Medeubayeva, Kenzhekhan T.; Zhazykova, Makpal K.; Rakhmetova, Bazar A.; Seytenova, Salima S.; Abil, Akmaral S.; Mukhangaliyeva, Shnargul Ai.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze theoretically and simulate the formation of management skills in junior schoolchildren. The authors classified junior schoolchildren's management skills, defined psychological and pedagogical principles of their formation. Empirically obtained results of questionnaires for teachers and parents (n=550)…

  3. Using Simulation to Train Junior Psychiatry Residents to Work with Agitated Patients: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigman, Daniel; Young, Meredith; Chalk, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This article examines the benefit and feasibility of introducing a new, simulation-based learning intervention for junior psychiatry residents. Method: Junior psychiatry residents were invited to participate in a new simulation-based learning intervention focusing on agitated patients. Questionnaires were used to explore the success of…

  4. Competition Efficiency Analysis of Croatian Junior Wrestlers in European Championship

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    Kristijan Slacanac

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Croatian junior wrestler won a bronze medal at the European Championship 2016 year. Considering the potential of our wrestlers there is an obvious need of technical and tactical analysis so our juniors and seniors U23 wrestlers would be able to achieve even better results. Match analysis were conducted by LongoMatch 0.20.1. Seven matches of Croatian wrestlers were analysed. Time parameters, score efficiency, technical efficiency and tactical structure were observed and analysed from the aspect of attack and defence phase and successful/unsuccessful techniques. This paper shows descriptive parameters and competitor efficiency were calculated. The results show a great number of positive score in a standing position in relation to parterre position. The parameters of competitive efficiency (0.49 points per minute show better attacking efficiency (1.32 points per minute in relation to defence efficiency (0.83 points per minute. Croatian wrestlers achieve less score per minute in relation with elite wrestlers, but it is visible a significant progress in technical and tactical efficiency in relation in the past three year. According to place realization of technique, Croatian wrestlers realized more technique in the center, while opponents realized technique in the zone and moving to the zone. Further analysis of efficiency and individualisation training will improve efficiency of Croatian national wrestlers.

  5. Refractive Errors in State Junior High School Students in Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabila Tasyakur Nikmah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uncorrected refractive error is one of the avoidable causes of vision impairment in children and adults. Vision problem in children has been shown to affect their psychological and academic performance. This study aims at identifying and gaining more insights on the characteristic of the refractive errors in state junior high school students in Bandung to avoid uncorrected refractive errors. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in September–November 2015 in state junior high schools in Bandung, West Java, Indonesia. Sample was selected using multistage random sampling technique. Children were examined using tumbling E examination; then students with visual acuity worse than 6/12 underwent Snellen Chart test, refractometry without pupil dilatation, correction with trial lens, then was followed by direct ophthalmoscopy. Results: From a total of 435 children who completed all the examination, 80 children (18.39% had refractive errors; consisted of 151 eyes (94.38% with myopia and 9 eyes (5.62% with astigmatism. Refractive errors were found to be more common in female children (73.7% than male children (26.3%. Among those with refractive errors, 45 children (56.3% did not use any corrective glasses before the examination. Conclusions: Routine refractive error test in vision screening examination is needed for students. It is equally important to raise more awareness toward eye disease in community.

  6. Why are junior doctors deterred from choosing a surgical career?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Mary E; Creed, Peter A; Searle, Judy

    2012-05-01

    To identify the reasons why interns would not choose a surgical career. This qualitative study used semi-structured telephone interviews to explore the future career choices of 41 junior doctors (14 men, 27 women). Doctors were asked to identify specialties they would not take up, and state why this was the case. Thirty (73.2%) of the 41 interns nominated surgery as a specialty they would not choose. Themes relating to reasons for not wanting to pursue a surgical career included the lifestyle associated with surgery (66.7%), the culture within the surgical work environment (53.3%), the lack of interest in performing surgical work (36.7%), and the training requirements associated with surgery (33.3%). Both sexes had similar reasons for not wanting to choose a surgical career; but additionally, women referred to the male domination of surgery, and the difficulty and inflexibility of the training program as deterrents. Efforts are needed to promote interest in surgery as a career especially for women, to improve the surgical work environment so that medical students and junior doctors have exposure to positive role models and surgical placements, and to provide a more flexible approach to surgical training.

  7. Assessment of Turkish junior male physicians’ exposure to mobbing behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Bayram; Cetin, Mehmet; Cimen, Mesut; Yildiran, Nuri

    2012-01-01

    Aim To determine the extent of Turkish junior male physicians’ exposure to mobbing behavior and its correlation with physicians' characteristics. Methods The study included physicians recruited for compulsory military service in April 2009. No sampling method was used, questionnaires were delivered to all physicians, and 278 of 292 (95%) questionnaires were returned. We used Leymann Inventory of Psychological Terror including 45 items for data collection and structural equation model for data analysis. Results A total of 87.7% of physicians experienced mobbing behavior. Physicians who worked more than 40 hours a week, single physicians, physicians working in university hospitals and private hospitals, and physicians who did not have occupational commitment were more exposed to mobbing (P Mobbing was not associated with specialty status, service period, age, and personality variables (P > 0.05). All goodness-of- fit indices of the model were acceptable (χ2 = 1.449, normed fit index = 0.955, Tucker Lewis index = 0.980, comparative fit index = 0.985, and root mean square error of approximation = 0.040). Conclusions Workplace mobbing is a critical problem for junior male physicians in Turkey. We suggest an introduction of a reporting system and education activities for physicians in high-risk groups. PMID:22911529

  8. Assessment of Turkish junior male physicians' exposure to mobbing behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Bayram; Cetin, Mehmet; Cimen, Mesut; Yildiran, Nuri

    2012-08-01

    To determine the extent of Turkish junior male physicians' exposure to mobbing behavior and its correlation with physicians' characteristics. The study included physicians recruited for compulsory military service in April 2009. No sampling method was used, questionnaires were delivered to all physicians, and 278 of 292 (95%) questionnaires were returned. We used Leymann Inventory of Psychological Terror including 45 items for data collection and structural equation model for data analysis. A total of 87.7% of physicians experienced mobbing behavior. Physicians who worked more than 40 hours a week, single physicians, physicians working in university hospitals and private hospitals, and physicians who did not have occupational commitment were more exposed to mobbing (PMobbing was not associated with specialty status, service period, age, and personality variables (P>0.05). All goodness-of- fit indices of the model were acceptable (χ(2)=1.449, normed fit index=0.955, Tucker Lewis index=0.980, comparative fit index=0.985, and root mean square error of approximation=0.040). Workplace mobbing is a critical problem for junior male physicians in Turkey. We suggest an introduction of a reporting system and education activities for physicians in high-risk groups.

  9. The importance of the junior company for an andragogy learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Silva Franco

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Andragogy is a form of teaching and learning initially aimed at the adult public, and its assumptions are directed at providing greater autonomy and participation of this public in their learning. It can be considered as a counterpoint to the traditional pedagogical aspect, which covers a methodological format, essentially applied to children, but has its model present in several higher education institutions, in which the teacher has the central role of decision making on how and what to teach This article aims to analyze, from the perceptions exposed by participants of a Junior Company, how the learning experience of the students in this organization can be related to the principles of andragogic learning. Based on the analysis of the six interviews carried out, it was verified that the experience in the junior company gives its members a greater autonomy regarding their learning, a greater comprehension and applicability of the course, as well as a better use of their baggage of particular experiences. With this study, we intend to contribute with reflections on the possibilities of improvement and development of the learning process in higher education, especially in the teaching field of Administration.

  10. Teaching English through Online Games for Junior High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sastika Seli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Teaching language is an attractive activity both for the teacher and for the acceptor. They can interact together in this act. Teaching English is a challenge for the teachers to make the students interest in English because as we know English is not the first language for some countries in this world including Indonesia. There are various ways and ideas to teach English so that it can be fun and interest to be taught and to be learnt. But those ways and ideas also should be an up date method and also use a modern technology to be implemented. Along with the development of modern technology, the teachers should involve with it and make it as a part of English teaching tools. Two of the famous and sophisticated tools are computer and the internet. These things have a close relation to be urgent equipment for people. In this article, the writer wants to purpose the use of online games as a way to teach English for junior high school. Te article aims to give another teaching alternative in attracting the junior high school students to learn English in funny and enjoyable way. Through online games they do not only can play the various games but also indirectly they do the exercises of English skills.

  11. Physiological profile of senior and junior England international amateur boxers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marcus S

    2006-01-01

    Despite worldwide popularity of amateur boxing, research focussed on the physiological demands of the sport is limited. The physiological profile of Senior and Junior England international amateur boxers is presented. A gradual (8 to 21-days) and rapid (0 to 7-days) phase of body weight reduction was evident with 2.2 ± 0.3 % of the 7.0 ± 0. 8 % weight loss occurring over the final 24-hours. An increase in body weight >4% was observed following a recovery period. High urine osmolality values (> 1000 mOsm·kg(-1)) were recorded during training and competition. High post-competition blood lactate values (>13.5 mmol·l(-1)) highlighted the need for a well-developed anaerobic capacity and the importance of not entering the ring in a glycogen depleted state. The aerobic challenge of competition was demonstrated by maximum heart rate values being recorded during 'Open' sparring. Mean body fat values of 9-10% were similar to those reported for other weight classified athletes. Normal resting values were reported for hematocrit (Senior 48 ± 2 % and Junior 45 ± 2 %), haemoglobin (Senior 14.7 ± 1.0 g·dl(-1) and Junior 14.5 ± 0.8 g·dl(-1)), bilirubin (Senior 15.3 ± 6.2 µmol·l-1(-1)) and ferritin (Senior 63.3 ± 45.7 ng·ml(-1)). No symptoms associated with asthma or exercise-induced asthma was evident. A well- developed aerobic capacity was reflected in the Senior VO2max value of 63.8 ± 4.8 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1). Senior lead hand straight punching force (head 1722 ± 700 N and body 1682 ± 636 N) was lower than the straight rear hand (head 2643 ± 1273 N and body 2646 ± 1083 N), lead hook (head 2412 ± 813 N and body 2414 ± 718 N) and rear hook (head 2588 ± 1040 N and body 2555 ± 926 N). It was concluded that amateur boxing performance is dependent on the interplay between anaerobic and aerobic energy systems. Current weight making methods may lead to impaired substrate availability, leading to reduced competitive performance and an increased risk to a boxers

  12. PHYSIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF SENIOR AND JUNIOR ENGLAND INTERNATIONAL AMATEUR BOXERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus S. Smith

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite worldwide popularity of amateur boxing, research focussed on the physiological demands of the sport is limited. The physiological profile of Senior and Junior England international amateur boxers is presented. A gradual (8 to 21-days and rapid (0 to 7-days phase of body weight reduction was evident with 2.2 ± 0.3 % of the 7.0 ± 0. 8 % weight loss occurring over the final 24-hours. An increase in body weight >4% was observed following a recovery period. High urine osmolality values (> 1000 mOsm·kg-1 were recorded during training and competition. High post-competition blood lactate values (>13.5 mmol·l-1 highlighted the need for a well-developed anaerobic capacity and the importance of not entering the ring in a glycogen depleted state. The aerobic challenge of competition was demonstrated by maximum heart rate values being recorded during 'Open' sparring. Mean body fat values of 9-10% were similar to those reported for other weight classified athletes. Normal resting values were reported for hematocrit (Senior 48 ± 2 % and Junior 45 ± 2 %, haemoglobin (Senior 14.7 ± 1.0 g·dl-1 and Junior 14.5 ± 0.8 g·dl-1, bilirubin (Senior 15.3 ± 6.2 µmol·l-1-1 and ferritin (Senior 63.3 ± 45.7 ng·ml-1. No symptoms associated with asthma or exercise-induced asthma was evident. A well- developed aerobic capacity was reflected in the Senior VO2max value of 63.8 ± 4.8 ml·kg-1·min-1. Senior lead hand straight punching force (head 1722 ± 700 N and body 1682 ± 636 N was lower than the straight rear hand (head 2643 ± 1273 N and body 2646 ± 1083 N, lead hook (head 2412 ± 813 N and body 2414 ± 718 N and rear hook (head 2588 ± 1040 N and body 2555 ± 926 N. It was concluded that amateur boxing performance is dependent on the interplay between anaerobic and aerobic energy systems. Current weight making methods may lead to impaired substrate availability, leading to reduced competitive performance and an increased risk to a boxers health

  13. Junior nursing students' experiences of vertical violence during clinical rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sandra P; Burk, Renee

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal violence is a form of workplace violence, a phenomenon that is prevalent in the nursing profession. Research has revealed a variety of negative peer-to-peer behaviors that lower morale and lead to turnover. However, little research has been conducted on "eating our young" (violence occurring between individuals with unequal power, such as staff nurse and student). We propose "vertical violence" as the appropriate term when abusive registered nurse (RN) behavior is directed towards students. We report a content analysis of stories written by junior nursing students about incidents of injustice perpetrated by staff RNs during their clinical experiences. Four levels of injustice were described. Nursing leadership, both in hospitals and educational institutions, must become engaged in efforts to eradicate vertical violence towards students.

  14. Using Project Portfolio Management in a Junior Enterprise Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RIBEIRO, D. M.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Junior Enterprises have their own particularities in managing of their projects. Scarcity of resources and lack of experience of its members are critics and typical factors in the daily life of these companies. However, these and other variables such as the time for return on investment, project complexity and runtime of the project, must be taken into consideration in the prioritization of the outstanding portfolio projects to maximize desired outcomes. The Portfolio Management aims to provide the company a better allocation of resources in an environment with multiple projects going simultaneously. The model proposed here seeks a link between projects and organizational strategy. In this Paper also are presented the results of applying the model on Upe consultoria JR.

  15. Modern approaches to forming value orientations of junior pupils nowadays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmyla Matsuk

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A number of approaches to the formation of value orientations of primary school children today is outlined in the article. One of the most important tasks of the school in terms of national revival of Ukraine appears education of harmonious, spiritually rich and nationally conscious personality. Educating of the current generation needs serious updating of educational content, development of a wide spectrum of problems associated with the formation of ideological orientations of a personality, development and activity, independence, consciousness, self-consciousness. The solution of the abovementioned problem is possible subject to optimize management of process education through the humanization of education that will ensure the establishment of priority of human values in society.Key words: values, value orientations, training and education, junior pupils, patriotism, identity, dignity, courage, duty, responsibility, tolerance.

  16. SWIMMING CLASSES IN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ OPINION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Bielec

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of modern physical education is not only to develop motor abilities of the students, but most of all prevent them from epidemic youth diseases such as obesity or postural defects. Positive attitudes to swimming as a long-life physical activity, instilled in adolescence should be beneficial in adult life. The group of 130 boys and 116 girls of 7th grade junior high school (mean age 14.6 was asked in the survey to present their opinion of obligatory swimming lessons at school. Students of both sexes claimed that they liked swimming classes because they could improve their swimming skills (59% of answers and because of health-related character of water exercises (38%. 33% of students regarded swimming lessons as boring and monotonous, and 25% of them complained about poor pool conditions like chlorine smell, crowded lanes, too low temperature. Majority of the surveyed students saw practical role of swimming in saving others life.

  17. [RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN JUNIOR AND SENIOR DOCTORS: A BUBERIAN MODEL].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pougnet, Richard; Pougnet, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Doctors in training work in services under the supervision of senior doctors. These professional relationships may lead to frustrations, or ill-being at work. Indeed doctors are often very busy with care and can hardly communicate. The purpose of this article is to propose ways to think in its ethical dimension this relationship, by learning from Martin Buber's ideas. He thought a philosophy of relationship in two word pairs: I-Thou and I-It. This thought can be useful in the context of the médical relationship and mentorship. Indeed we can see our colleague as a person or only as a caregiver. We offer a relationship model according to buberian thought, between junior and senior doctor caring about the same patients.

  18. Senior physiotherapy students as standardised patients for junior students enhances self-efficacy and satisfaction in both junior and senior students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrusiak, Allison M; Isles, Rosemary; Chang, Angela T; Choy, Nancy L Low; Toppenberg, Rowena; McCook, Donna; Smith, Michelle D; O'Leary, Karina; Brauer, Sandra G

    2014-05-23

    Standardised patients are used in medical education to expose students to clinical contexts and facilitate transition to clinical practice, and this approach is gaining momentum in physiotherapy programs. Expense and availability of trained standardised patients are factors limiting widespread adoption, and accessing clinical visits with real patients can be challenging. This study addressed these issues by engaging senior students as standardised patients for junior students. It evaluated how this approach impacted self-reported constructs of both the junior and senior students. Learning activities for undergraduate physiotherapy students were developed in five courses (Neurology, Cardiorespiratory and three Musculoskeletal courses) so that junior students (Year 2 and 3) could develop skills and confidence in patient interview, physical examination and patient management through their interaction with standardised patients played by senior students (Year 4). Surveys were administered before and after the interactions to record junior students' self-reported confidence, communication, preparedness for clinic, and insight into their abilities; and senior students' confidence and insight into what it is like to be a patient. Satisfaction regarding this learning approach was surveyed in both the junior and senior students. A total of 253 students completed the surveys (mean 92.5% response rate). Across all courses, junior students reported a significant (all P Senior students demonstrated a significant improvement in their confidence in providing feedback and insight into their own learning (P senior students as standardised patients resulted in positive experiences for both junior and senior students across a variety of physiotherapy areas, activities, and stages within a physiotherapy program. These findings support the engagement of senior students as standardised patients to enhance learning within physiotherapy programs, and may have application across other

  19. Arterial stiffness in junior high school students: Longitudinal observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Hisakazu; Inoue, Fumio; Kosaka, Kitaro; Asano, Hiroaki; Yoshii, Kengo

    2018-02-01

    Early atherosclerotic change is found even in childhood, and there is an urgent need to clarify the factors causing childhood atherosclerosis and take preventive measures. Early detection of the contributing risk factors is crucial to facilitate preventive measures. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a widely used technique for the assessment of atherosclerosis in children. Lifestyle questionnaire, brachio-ankle PWV (baPWV) and anthropometric data were obtained from junior high school students in an urban area of Japan between 2006 and 2008, from seventh to ninth grades. Mean baPWV increased from 867.4 ± 99.5 m/s to 944.5 ± 117.5 m/s in boys, and from 864.0 ± 99.5 m/s to 923.0 ± 101.3 m/s in girls. Obese students had higher baPWV than non-obese students in both genders across each grade. On logistic regression analysis of ninth grade student data, high baPWV was dependent on systolic blood pressure (SBP), time watching television (TV) and symptoms of depression and anxiety, whereas low baPWV was dependent on time playing video games, light exercise, sleep and indoor play, as well as good friendship and motivation. Systolic blood pressure, time watching TV, and symptoms of depression and anxiety may contribute to arterial stiffness and be related to obesity in junior high school students. © 2017 The Authors Pediatrics International published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japan Pediatric Society.

  20. Practical examples and discussion in junior high school biological delivery classes

    OpenAIRE

    石井, 照久; ISHII, Teruhisa

    2013-01-01

    Practical examples of the delivery class in junior high school biological education were reported. In 2006-2012, author did 13 times of delivery class in 5 junior high schools in Akita Prefecture. The contents of the delivery classes were‘‘Observation of animals in river’’, ‘‘Marine ecology’’, ‘‘Ecological problems’’ and ‘‘cells and DNA’’. In this report, these contents were discussed in regard to new course of education in Japan. Also, better delivery class in junior high school biological e...

  1. Accuracy of navigated pedicle screw insertion by a junior spine surgeon without spinal surgery experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hironori; Kotani, Toshiaki; Motegi, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Tetsuharu; Koshi, Takana; Nagahara, Ken; Minami, Syohei

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate pedicle screw placement accuracy during navigated surgery by a junior spine surgeon who had no spinal surgery experience. A junior spine surgeon with no spinal surgery experience implanted a total of 137 pedicle screws by using a navigation system. Postoperative computerized tomography was performed to evaluate screw placement, and the pedicle perforation rate was 2.2%. There were no neurologic or vascular complications related to the pedicle screws. The results demonstrated that pedicle screws can be placed safely and effectively by a junior spine surgeon who has no spinal surgery experience when instructed by a senior spine surgeon. The results of this study suggest that navigation can be used as a surgical training tool for junior spine surgeons. (author)

  2. Acculturation, adaptation and multiculturalism among immigrant adolescents in junior vocational education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geel, Mitch van

    2009-01-01

    This thesis deals with the adaptation and acculturation of immigrant adolescents in junior vocational education. The adaptation of immigrant adolescents fits the notion of an 'immigrant paradox'. Maintaining aspects of the ethnic culture was found positively related to immigrant adolescents'

  3. Bringing the Microcomputer into the Junior High: A Success Story from Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Benjamin S.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the introduction of an Apple II microcomputer into Miami Lakes (Florida) Junior High School and its success in generating enthusiasm among teachers, students, parents, and the community. (Author/RW)

  4. Attitude and perception of junior resident doctors' regarding antibiotic resistance – A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourabh Aggarwal

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Most of the junior residents believe that antibiotic resistance is an emerging problem in their hospital as also nationally. There is a large unmet need of providing education to these residents.

  5. On Strategies of Improving Junior High School Students' Oral English Ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗茜

    2015-01-01

    With the increasingly frequent international exchanges,English,as an international language,has been attached greater importance.The oral English ability of junior high school students plays an indispensable role in their everyday study and social interaction,and it is the present junior school study that can lay a solid foundation for their future study and life. Therefore,to comprehensively improve their oral English ability is in urgent need and of paramount significance.This paper focuses on analyzing the external and internal factors influencing the cultivation of junior high school students' oral English ability,and put forwards the corresponding cultivating strategies of the oral English ability of junior high school students.

  6. On Strategies of Improving Junior High School Students’ Oral English Ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗茜

    2015-01-01

    With the increasingly frequent international exchanges,English,as an international language,has been attached greater importance.The oral English ability of junior high school students plays an indispensable role in their everyday study and social interaction,and it is the present junior school study that can lay a solid foundation for their future study and life.Therefore,to comprehensively improve their oral English ability is in urgent need and of paramount significance.This paper focuses on analyzing the external and internal factors influencing the cultivation of junior high school students’oral English ability,and put forwards the corresponding cultivating strategies of the oral English ability of junior high school students.

  7. Earth Science Principles Pertinent to the General Education Programs in Junior High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Kenneth Tyrone

    1970-01-01

    Presents the procedures, and findings of a study designed to identify principles in astronomy, geology, meterology, oceanography and physical geography pertinent to general education programs in junior high schools. (LC)

  8. Does decision documentation help junior designers rationalize their decisions? A comparative multiple-case study

    OpenAIRE

    Heesch, U. van; Avgeriou, P.; Tang, A.

    2013-01-01

    Software architecture design is challenging, especially for junior software designers. Lacking practice and experience, junior designers need process support in order to make rational architecture decisions. In this paper, we present the results of a comparative multiple-case study conducted to find out if decision viewpoints from van Heesch et al. (2012, in press) can provide such a support. The case study was conducted with four teams of software engineering students working in industrial s...

  9. Early diagnosis of junior school age children’s posture disorders

    OpenAIRE

    N.S. Razumeiko

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: to describe specificities of early diagnosis method for junior school age children’s posture disorders. Material: in pedagogic experiment 156 junior school age children (boys and girls of 7-10 years’ age) participated. All children had no experience of training in sport circles. For determination of uniformity of the tested we fulfilled experts’ examination for presence or absence of external signs of posture disorders in frontal plane. The children’s examination was conducted by qua...

  10. MOTIVES OF JUNIOR VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS TO START AND CONTINUE VOLLEYBALL AND THEIR EXPECTATIONS FOR THE FUTURE

    OpenAIRE

    BİNBOĞA, Meltem; KILIÇ, İbrahim; GÖKDEMİR, Kadir

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The goal of this research is to analyze the reasons why junior volleyball players start and continue volleyball and their expectations from future. The study sample includes 359 sportsmen that have participated in the finals of Turkey Junior Volleyball championship in 2010-2011 volleyball seasons in Afyonkarahisar and Isparta cities. Data collection tool of the research is a survey made of three scales and personal features. Reliability analysis, frequency and percenta...

  11. Assessment of junior doctors? admission notes: do they follow what they learn?

    OpenAIRE

    Barnawi, Rashid A.; Ghurab, Abdulaziz M.; Balubaid, Hassan K.; Alfaer, Sultan S.; Hanbazazah, Kamal A.; Bukhari, Mohammed F.; Hamed, Omayma A.; Bakhsh, Talal M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess the completeness of history-taking and physical-examination notes of junior doctors at King Abdulaziz University Hospital per the approach they learned in medical school. Methods In this retrospective study, we reviewed 860 admission notes written by 269 junior doctors (interns and residents) in an academic tertiary-care medical centre in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, over a two-month period. Notes were evaluated for completeness using a checklist developed with reference to rele...

  12. Personality, passion, self-esteem and psychological well-being among junior elite athletes in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Bauger, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Personality research among athletes seems to have obtained less interest in recent years after much focus until the 1990s. This decline was obviously a result of ill conducted “personology” research, and a greater focus on psychological state versus trait in the sport psychology community. The present study explored personality dimensions, as measured by the Junior Temperament and Character Inventory, passion, self-esteem, and well-being among junior elite athletes. In addition, the athletes ...

  13. Predictive Factors of Exercise Behaviors of Junior High School Students in Chonburi Province

    OpenAIRE

    Tanida Julvanichpong

    2016-01-01

    Exercise has been regarded as a necessary and important aspect to enhance physical performance and psychology health. Body weight statistics of students in junior high school students in Chonburi Province beyond a standard risk of obesity. Promoting exercise among Junior high school students in Chonburi Province, essential knowledge concerning factors influencing exercise is needed. Therefore, this study aims to (1) determine the levels of perceived exercise behavior, exercise behavior in the...

  14. GORDON RAMSAY’S POLITENESS STRATEGIES IN MASTERCHEF AND MASTERCHEF JUNIOR US

    OpenAIRE

    Annisa Friska Safa; Eri Kurniawan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This research aims to investigate the types of politeness strategies that are performed by Gordon Ramsay in judging the Masterchef US and Masterchef Junior US contestants’ dishes and to reveal whether Gordon Ramsay performs any different politeness strategies between the Master chef and Masterchef Junior contestants. The data spring from Gordon Ramsay utterances, taken from the elimination test of two episodes of Masterchef season 4 (episode 9 and 12) and the elimination test of ...

  15. Study of Female Junior Officer Retention and Promotion in the U.S. Navy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    thesis uses multivariate analytical techniques to examine the effects of demographics, pre- commissioning factors, and job performance on the retention ...JUNIOR OFFICER RETENTION AND PROMOTION IN THE U.S. NAVY by David J. Mundell March 2016 Thesis Advisor: Simona Tick Co-Advisor: Steve...3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE STUDY OF FEMALE JUNIOR OFFICER RETENTION AND PROMOTION IN THE U.S. NAVY 5

  16. THE SCORE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN ELITE EUROPEN JUNIOR AND SENIOR WOMEN GYMNASTS

    OpenAIRE

    Erceg, Tina; Delaš Kalinski, Sunčica; Milić, Mirjana

    2014-01-01

    Artistic gymnastics is generally determined by the rules of the gymnastics Code of Points and long-term processes of learning gymnastics skills. Though intensive, the career of women gymnasts is relatively short, so with the goal of prolonging it the International Gymnastics Federation (FIG-a) prescribes junior women gymnasts should apply easier dismounts than senior gymnasts. The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics of junior routines (N=88) and their differences in relatio...

  17. Investigation of junior school student myopia in high-altitude Tibetan areas in Qinghai Province

    OpenAIRE

    Xia Han; Hai-Ling Miao; Dan Huang

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To know the rate of students' myopia in junior school and factors affecting its occurrence in high altitude Tibetan areas in Qinghai, and provide basis for the prevention of myopia. METHODS: Totally 2 209 junior school students were extracted as respondent with stratified cluster sampling method. The gender, age, ethnicity, grade, eye behavior, physical activity and parental visual conditions were collected by self-made questionnaire, and the curvature of the cornea, anterior chamber dep...

  18. Radiation education to the elementary and junior high school students in Aomori prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Susumu; Okamura, Yasuharu; Sakata, Misaki; Miyakawa, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    In 2006, Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) began 'the delivery lesson on radiation' in order to promote understanding of radiation for the elementary and junior high schools students. Currently, 'the delivery lesson on radiation' is aimed mainly for the junior high school students. About 1800 students per year take the lesson. We will report the effects and tasks of 'the delivery lesson on radiation' based on the results of the questionnaire filled out before and after the lesson. (author)

  19. Comparing Matchplay Characteristics and Physical Demands of Junior and Professional Tennis Athletes in the Era of Big Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie A. Kovalchik, Machar Reid

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Differences in the competitive performance characteristics of junior and professional tennis players are not well understood. The present study provides a comprehensive comparative analysis of junior and professional matchplay. The study utilized multiple large-scale datasets covering match, point, and shot outcomes over multiple years of competition. Regression analysis was used to identify differences between junior and professional matchplay. Top professional men and women were found to play significantly more matches, sets, and games compared to junior players of an equivalent ranking. Professional players had a greater serve advantage, men winning 4 and women winning 2 additional percentage points on serve compared to juniors. Clutch ability in break point conversion was 6 to 8 percentage points greater for junior players. In general, shots were more powerful and more accurate at the professional level with the largest differences observed for male players on serve. Serving to the center of the court was more than two times more common for junior players on first serve. While male professionals performed 50% more total work in a Grand Slam match than juniors, junior girls performed 50% more work than professional women. Understanding how competitiveness, play demands, and the physical characteristics of shots differ between junior and professional tennis players can help set realistic expectations and developmentally appropriate training for transitioning players.

  20. Comparing Matchplay Characteristics and Physical Demands of Junior and Professional Tennis Athletes in the Era of Big Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchik, Stephanie A; Reid, Machar

    2017-12-01

    Differences in the competitive performance characteristics of junior and professional tennis players are not well understood. The present study provides a comprehensive comparative analysis of junior and professional matchplay. The study utilized multiple large-scale datasets covering match, point, and shot outcomes over multiple years of competition. Regression analysis was used to identify differences between junior and professional matchplay. Top professional men and women were found to play significantly more matches, sets, and games compared to junior players of an equivalent ranking. Professional players had a greater serve advantage, men winning 4 and women winning 2 additional percentage points on serve compared to juniors. Clutch ability in break point conversion was 6 to 8 percentage points greater for junior players. In general, shots were more powerful and more accurate at the professional level with the largest differences observed for male players on serve. Serving to the center of the court was more than two times more common for junior players on first serve. While male professionals performed 50% more total work in a Grand Slam match than juniors, junior girls performed 50% more work than professional women. Understanding how competitiveness, play demands, and the physical characteristics of shots differ between junior and professional tennis players can help set realistic expectations and developmentally appropriate training for transitioning players.

  1. A surgical career for New Zealand junior doctors? Factors influencing this choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jason; Sathanathan, Janarthanan; Naden, Gill; Child, Stephen

    2009-08-07

    To discover the level of interest in a surgical career amongst junior doctors and trainee interns in the Auckland region. Secondary aims are to identify the factors that influence career choice as well as the timing of career choice. An anonymous and structured questionnaire was distributed to all trainee interns and junior doctors in their first to fifth postgraduate years in the Auckland region. Questions were based on basic demographics, level of training, career preference and factors from previous experiences in surgery that may have influenced their career choice. Total of 87 replies with 36% expressed interest in surgery whereas 64% were interested in non-surgical specialties. Top three factors influencing career choice were similar in both groups: Lifestyle, career ambitions and family. Personal interest, practical hands-on and positive previous experiences were the top reasons why junior doctors chose surgery. Poor lifestyle, lacking of interest, limited future part-time work and previous negative experiences were the top reasons why junior doctors did not choose surgery. A significantly (pcareers earlier. Career aspirations of New Zealand junior doctors were similar to findings reported overseas. To promote surgery amongst junior doctors and medical students, attention should be paid to the key factors which may influence career choice. By improving working conditions and have better surgical education with good mentoring, team atmosphere and opportunities for early exposure will hopefully allow better recruitment and training of future surgeons.

  2. Computer games to teach hygiene: an evaluation of the e-Bug junior game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, David; Kostkova, Patty; Weinberg, Julius; Lazareck, Lisa; Weerasinghe, Dasun; Lecky, Donna M; McNulty, Cliodna A M

    2011-06-01

    Handwashing, respiratory hygiene and antibiotic resistance remain major public health concerns. In order to facilitate an effective outcome when teaching the basic principles of hand and respiratory hygiene, educational interventions should first target school children. As computer games are ubiquitous in most children's lives, e-Bug developed computer games targeted at teaching children handwashing, respiratory hygiene and antibiotic resistance. The games were designed for two target audiences: junior school children (9-12 year olds); and senior school children (13-15 year olds). Between May and August 2009, the finalized junior game underwent an evaluation in three UK schools (in Glasgow, Gloucester and London), involving 62 children in the schools and ∼ 1700 players accessing the junior game online. The e-Bug junior game consists of a number of levels of play, each of which promotes a set of learning outcomes (LOs). These LOs, complementary to those in the e-Bug packs, are expressed through the game mechanics (the rules of the game) rather than through story or dialogue. Although the junior game's evaluation demonstrated a statistically significant change in the knowledge for only a small number of given LOs, because many children had the required knowledge already before playing the game, this is e-Bug's first statistical study on the junior game and the first comprehensive evaluation of its kind. Future work includes a re-examination of the quiz-style questionnaires utilized in this study and an exploration of the potential knowledge change acquired strictly through engagement.

  3. [An investigation of occupational stress, social support, and happiness of junior civil servants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingfeng

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the current status of occupational stress, social support, and happiness in junior civil servants in northern Zhejiang Province, China, and to investigate the relationship between occupational stress, social support and happiness. A total of 360 junior civil servants from below-county-level administrative organizations in Huzhou, Jiaxing, and Hangzhou were surveyed using the job stress questionnaire and social support rating scale for civil servants. The total average score of occupational stress in junior civil servants was 2.52 ± 0.48, indicating a moderate level of occupational stress; career prospects topped the rank list of sources of occupational stress with a score of 2.90 ± 0.60; different generations showed significant differences in the sources and total average scores of occupational stress, with the scores of the 1980s, 1990s, 1970s, 1950s, and 1960s groups decreasing in the same order (Phappiness among the junior civil servants were relatively low, with scores of 38.43 ± 8.38 and 76.88 ± 12.77, respectively; different generations also showed significant differences, with the scores of 1980s, 1990s, 1970s, 1950s, and 1960s groups increasing in the same order (Phappiness than males (Phappiness of junior civil servants (r=0.405~0.571, Phappiness of junior civil servants.

  4. Artictis and creative development of junior schoolchildren during the labor education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Леся Василівна Старовойт

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with a topical problem of artistic and creative development of junior schoolchildren during labor process. There were considered the diverse aspects of problem of personal creative activity. The special attention was paid to importance of combining labor, creation and artistic activity in educational process. On the base of experimental research there was considered the modern state of artistic and creative development of pupils in elementary school. By analysis of the theory and practice of artistic and creative development of junior schoolchildren during labor education there was determined inexpediency of excessive reproductive approach to the labor activity of children that impedes emotional, spiritual and esthetic development transforming the work of children into the boring and ineffective one. There was determined the criteria of artistic and creative development of junior schoolchildren during the labor education. During the study there were defined principles that reveal content, essence and nature of creation. There were defined peculiarities of artistic and creative development of junior schoolchildren at the lessons of labor education and distinguished the main sings that characterize mechanism of creative activity of junior schoolchildren. There was grounded pedagogical expediency of artistic and creative approach to the work with junior schoolchildren

  5. Interprofessional collaboration between junior doctors and nurses in the general ward setting: A qualitative exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Charmaine J; Zhou, Wen T; Chan, Sally W-C; Liaw, Sok Y

    2018-01-01

    To explore the collaboration experiences of junior physicians and nurses in the general ward setting. Junior physicians and nurses do not always work collaboratively and this could affect the quality of patient care. The understanding of the issues affecting junior physicians and nurses working together is needed to inform strategies to improve interprofessional collaboration. Nineteen junior physicians and nurses were interviewed in 2012 and 2013. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. Junior physicians and nurses acknowledged the importance of working collaboratively to achieve better patient care, but they are struggling to cope due to heavy clinical workload, organisational constraints and differing power relationships. Nurses have to take on more responsibilities in the decision-making process of patients' care to foster effective interprofessional collaboration. The study calls for educational and organisational strategies to improve interprofessional collaboration between junior physicians and nurses. Nurse leaders should ensure that ward nurses are given a designated time to participate in ward rounds with physicians and have access to a communication tool that assists them in contributing proactively in the decision-making process of patient care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Relationships between academic performance of medical students and their workplace performance as junior doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Sandra E; Celenza, Antonio; Puddey, Ian B; Lake, Fiona

    2014-07-30

    Little recent published evidence explores the relationship between academic performance in medical school and performance as a junior doctor. Although many forms of assessment are used to demonstrate a medical student's knowledge or competence, these measures may not reliably predict performance in clinical practice following graduation. This descriptive cohort study explores the relationship between academic performance of medical students and workplace performance as junior doctors, including the influence of age, gender, ethnicity, clinical attachment, assessment type and summary score measures (grade point average) on performance in the workplace as measured by the Junior Doctor Assessment Tool. There were two hundred participants. There were significant correlations between performance as a Junior Doctor (combined overall score) and the grade point average (r = 0.229, P = 0.002), the score from the Year 6 Emergency Medicine attachment (r = 0.361, P gender or ethnicity on the overall combined score of performance of the junior doctor. Performance on integrated assessments from medical school is correlated to performance as a practicing physician as measured by the Junior Doctor Assessment Tool. These findings support the value of combining undergraduate assessment scores to assess competence and predict future performance.

  7. Cross-Country Individual Participant Analysis of 4.1 Million Singleton Births in 5 Countries with Very High Human Development Index Confirms Known Associations but Provides No Biologic Explanation for 2/3 of All Preterm Births.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, David M; Larson, Jim; Jacobsson, Bo; Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Norman, Jane E; Martin, James N; D'Alton, Mary; Castelazo, Ernesto; Howson, Chris P; Sengpiel, Verena; Bottai, Matteo; Mayo, Jonathan A; Shaw, Gary M; Verdenik, Ivan; Tul, Nataša; Velebil, Petr; Cairns-Smith, Sarah; Rushwan, Hamid; Arulkumaran, Sabaratnam; Howse, Jennifer L; Simpson, Joe Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth is the most common single cause of perinatal and infant mortality, affecting 15 million infants worldwide each year with global rates increasing. Understanding of risk factors remains poor, and preventive interventions have only limited benefit. Large differences exist in preterm birth rates across high income countries. We hypothesized that understanding the basis for these wide variations could lead to interventions that reduce preterm birth incidence in countries with high rates. We thus sought to assess the contributions of known risk factors for both spontaneous and provider-initiated preterm birth in selected high income countries, estimating also the potential impact of successful interventions due to advances in research, policy and public health, or clinical practice. We analyzed individual patient-level data on 4.1 million singleton pregnancies from four countries with very high human development index (Czech Republic, New Zealand, Slovenia, Sweden) and one comparator U.S. state (California) to determine the specific contribution (adjusting for confounding effects) of 21 factors. Both individual and population-attributable preterm birth risks were determined, as were contributors to cross-country differences. We also assessed the ability to predict preterm birth given various sets of known risk factors. Previous preterm birth and preeclampsia were the strongest individual risk factors of preterm birth in all datasets, with odds ratios of 4.6-6.0 and 2.8-5.7, respectively, for individual women having those characteristics. In contrast, on a population basis, nulliparity and male sex were the two risk factors with the highest impact on preterm birth rates, accounting for 25-50% and 11-16% of excess population attributable risk, respectively (pbirth within each country lacks a plausible biologic explanation, and 63% of difference between countries cannot be explained with known factors; thus, research is necessary to elucidate the underlying

  8. How Information Literate Are Junior and Senior Class Biology Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffl, Iris

    2018-03-01

    Information literacy—i.e. obtaining, evaluating and using information—is a key element of scientific literacy. However, students are frequently equipped with poor information literacy skills—even at university level—as information literacy is often not explicitly taught in schools. Little is known about students' information skills in science at junior and senior class level, and about teachers' competences in dealing with information literacy in science class. This study examines the information literacy of Austrian 8th, 10th and 12th grade students. Information literacy is important for science education in Austria, because it is listed as a basic competence in Austria's science standards. Two different aspects of information literacy are examined: obtaining information and extracting information from texts. An additional research focus of this study is teachers' competences in diagnosing information skills. The results reveal that students mostly rely on online sources for obtaining information. However, they also use books and consult with people they trust. The younger the students, the more they rely on personal sources. Students' abilities to evaluate sources are poor, especially among younger students. Although teachers claim to use information research in class, their ability to assess their students' information competences is limited.

  9. Successful ADVANCE Initiatives for Junior Women Faculty in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riskin, Eve

    2015-01-01

    The NSF ADVANCE program was designed to transform university policies, procedures, and practices so that women faculty could advance in STEM faculty careers, obtain tenure, and ultimately become academic leaders. The results have been impressive. The most recent data from the American Society of Engineering Education (Fall 2013) show that the average percentage of women faculty in U.S. Colleges of Engineering is now 14.5%; it was just 9% when ADVANCE started in 2001.This talk will describe programs to support and promote junior women faculty that have been successful in recruiting and retaining women in STEM. These programs include mentoring, professional development, and work/life balance initiatives. Suggestions will be made for ways to disseminate low-cost successful ADVANCE programs to other institutions so that they can successfully support their own women faculty in STEM. One effort is the University of Washington's LEAD-it-Yourself! online toolkit that will enable other universities to run their own leadership workshops for department chairs and deans.

  10. Introducing Nine-Point Circle to Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiangga, S.; Azizah, M. A. N.; Rini, R. N. K.; Hidayanti, A. N.

    2018-01-01

    The concept of circles is an ancient concept that has appeared since Ancient Egypt from which this concept gives many significant contributions in mathematics’ development until now. Nevertheless, the concept of circles hides many uncover mysterious features that are of applications in mathematics. One of the mysterious features is the Nine-Point Circle. This Nine-point circle is also known as Euler’s circle, six-point circle, Feuerbach’s circle, the twelve-point circle, and many others. Because of these different names, there have been misunderstand among mathematicians about the Nine-Point Circle’s history. Besides, the discussion of Nine-Point Circle can be used to be an initial material to explain elementary geometry topic in junior high school’s level curriculum of 2013. Therefore, this concept needs to be delivered to the students as a geometry introduction. A possible form of the integration historical aspect of Nine-point circle is suggested in this paper as well as its importance in the curriculum of 2013.

  11. Is there a risk profile for the vulnerable junior doctor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, D; Buttrey, S; Carberry, C; Lydon, S; O'Connor, P

    2016-08-01

    Mental ill health is prevalent among doctors, especially those in the early stages of postgraduate training. However, a paucity of research has examined factors predictive of psychological distress in this population. To report the findings from a multi-centre survey of mental health among junior doctors in Ireland, and assess the extent to which moderator variables (e.g., age, academic performance, nationality, etc.) alter the levels of psychological distress caused by internship. An online, anonymous, questionnaire was distributed to all interns in the Republic of Ireland in January 2012. A total of 270 interns responded to the survey (45.0 % response rate), with 48.5 % of the respondents having a score indicative of psychological distress. A regression model found that nationality, academic performance, intern training network, rating of work stressors, home stressors, and work-life balance were associated with differing levels of mental health as measured by the General Health Questionnaire-12. There is a need to consider moderator variables when examining mental health in healthcare populations to avoid drawing overly simplistic conclusions. Interns in Ireland reported particularly high levels of psychological distress compared to other studies of mental health among healthcare populations.

  12. Nutrition status of junior elite Canadian female soccer athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Jennifer C; Stuart-Hill, Lynneth; Martin, Steven; Gaul, Catherine

    2011-12-01

    Adolescent female team-sport athletes are faced with the challenge of meeting nutrition requirements for growth and development, as well as sport performance. There is a paucity of evidence describing the dietary adequacy of this population in respect to these physiological demands. Therefore, the aim of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the nutrition status of junior elite female soccer athletes. A total of 33 athletes (15.7 ± 0.7 yr) completed anthropometric assessment, 4-day food records analyzed for macro- and micronutrient intake, and hematological analysis. Energy expenditure was estimated using predictive equations. Mean sum of 7 skinfolds was 103.1 ± 35.2 mm, and body-mass index was 22.7 ± 2.7. Mean energy intake was 2,079 ± 460 kcal/day, and estimated energy expenditure was 2,546 ± 190 kcal/day. Of the athletes, 51.5% consumed nutrition status may affect soccer performance and physiological growth and development. More research is needed to understand the unique nutrition needs of this population and inform sport nutrition practice and research.

  13. Mountain and Cold Weather Warfighting: Critical Capability for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-22

    guidance, and sage advice. His extensive and detailed understanding of mountain warfare, the former Soviet Union and Afghanistan, and his knowledge ...not brooding about the grimness of nature, they are apt to exult in their mastery of it…Most adults are excellent cross-country skiers . Even the...training apparatus had not prepared them for such conditions. The Finns moved well cross-country in the snow and cold. They were proficient skiers

  14. Evaluation and Report on Consumer and Homemaking Program in Depressed Areas. Utterback Junior High School Program. Wakefield Junior High School Program. June and July, 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noon, Madeline Estella; Hanson, Connie

    The document describes the consumer and home economics summer programs for grade 7 and grade 8 girls in two junior high schools. The programs provided opportunities to learn basic sewing and cooking skills, as well as personal improvement such as grooming, hygiene, posture, and modeling. A number of field trips to supplement the class instruction…

  15. The development of mini project interactive media on junior statistical materials (developmental research in junior high school)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauziah, D.; Mardiyana; Saputro, D. R. S.

    2018-05-01

    Assessment is an integral part in the learning process. The process and the result should be in line, regarding to measure the ability of learners. Authentic assessment refers to a form of assessment that measures the competence of attitudes, knowledge, and skills. In fact, many teachers including mathematics teachers who have implemented curriculum based teaching 2013 feel confuse and difficult in mastering the use of authentic assessment instruments. Therefore, it is necessary to design an authentic assessment instrument with an interactive mini media project where teacher can adopt it in the assessment. The type of this research is developmental research. The developmental research refers to the 4D models development, which consist of four stages: define, design, develop and disseminate. The research purpose is to create a valid mini project interactive media on statistical materials in junior high school. The retrieved valid instrument based on expert judgment are 3,1 for eligibility constructions aspect, and 3,2 for eligibility presentation aspect, 3,25 for eligibility contents aspect, and 2,9 for eligibility didactic aspect. The research results obtained interactive mini media projects on statistical materials using Adobe Flash so it can help teachers and students in achieving learning objectives.

  16. Junior doctor psychiatry placements in hospital and community settings: a phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Sharon; Crampton, Paul E S; Schwarzlose, Cathleen; Kumar, Namita; Cornwall, Peter L

    2017-09-27

    The proportion of junior doctors required to complete psychiatry placements in the UK has increased, due in part to vacant training posts and psychiatry career workforce shortages, as can be seen across the world. The aim of this study was to understand the lived experience of a Foundation Year 1 junior doctor psychiatry placement and to understand how job components influence attitudes. The study was conducted using a cross-sectional qualitative phenomenological approach. Hospital and community psychiatry department settings in the North East of England, UK. In total, 14 Foundation Year 1 junior doctors were interviewed including seven men and seven women aged between 23 and 34 years. The majority had completed their medical degree in the UK and were White British. The lived experience of a junior doctor psychiatry placement was understood by three core themes: exposure to patient recovery, connectedness with others in the healthcare team and subjective interpretations of psychiatry. The experiences were moderated by instances of role definition, reaction to the specialty and the organisational fit of the junior doctor capacity in the specialty. The study reinforces and adds to the literature by identifying connectedness as being important for both job satisfaction and morale, which is currently damaged within the junior doctor population. The study provides in-depth insights into the lived experience of psychiatry placements and can be taken forward by educationalists to ensure the placements are meaningful experiences for junior doctors by developing role definition, belonging, structure and psychiatric care responsibility. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Occupational factors for mood and anxiety disorders among junior medical doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pougnet, R; Di Costanzo, Laurence Pougnet; Kerrien, Margaux; Jousset, D; Loddé, B; Dewitte, J D; Garlantézec, R

    2015-09-09

    Junior doctors are exposed to multiple occupational risks. The aim of this study was to assess the risk factors and protective factors for mood and anxiety disorders among junior doctors. We conducted a cross-sectional study via an anonymous online questionnaire between October 2011 and June 2012. All the junior doctors in our faculty were included. The questionnaire inquired about demographic and health data. It contained four validated scales: the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), the Spielberger anxiety questionnaire, the WHO quality of life (WHO - QOL) questionnaire and the Job Content Questionnaire. Finally, it sought to clarify the conditions of professional practice and the interactions between university programmes and junior doctorate students (change of specialty, pregnancy, leave of absence, etc.). 192 juniors doctors participated in the study, 68.2% of whom were women. Out of the group, 13.0% presented a depressive syndrome, while 28.7% presented an anxiety disorder, 32.8% were experiencing Job Strain and 29.7% Iso Strain. The risk factor for anxiety was competition between junior doctors: OR=4.23 (1.06 ‒ 16.82). The protective factors for mood disorders were the help provided by senior physicians and the respect shown by patients: OR=0.21 (0.06-0.74) and 0.20 (0.06-0.75), respectively. This study demonstrated the impact of the relationships with senior physicians and patients on junior doctors' health at work. Consequently, prevention should not be focused uniquely on work organization, but should increase physicians' awareness of the importance of this relationship.

  18. Psychophysiological responses of junior orienteers under competitive pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Robazza

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine psychobiosocial states, cognitive functions, endocrine responses (i.e., salivary cortisol and chromogranin A, and performance under competitive pressure in orienteering athletes. The study was grounded in the individual zones of optimal functioning (IZOF and biopsychosocial models. Fourteen junior orienteering athletes (7 girls and 7 boys, ranging in age from 15 to 20 years (M = 16.93, SD = 1.77 took part in a two-day competitive event. To enhance competitive pressure, emphasis was placed on the importance of the competition and race outcome. Psychophysiological and performance data were collected at several points before, during, and after the races. Results showed that an increase in cortisol levels was associated with competitive pressure and reflected in higher perceived exertion (day 1, r = .32; day 2, r = .46, higher intensity of dysfunctional states (day 1, r = .59; day 2, r = .55, lower intensity of functional states (day 1, r = -.36; day 2, r = -.33, and decay in memory (day 1, r = -.27; day 2, r = -.35, visual attention (day 1, r = -.56; day 2, r = -.35, and attention/mental flexibility (day 1, r = .16; day 2, r = .26 tasks. The second day we observed better performance times, lower intensity of dysfunctional states, lower cortisol levels, improved visual attention and attention/mental flexibility (p < .050. Across the two competition days, chromogranin A levels were higher (p < .050 on the most difficult loops of the race in terms of both physical and psychological demands. Findings suggest emotional, cognitive, psychophysiological, and performance variables to be related and to jointly change across different levels of cognitive and physical load. Overall results are discussed in light of the IZOF and biopsychosocial models. The procedure adopted in the study also supports the feasibility of including additional cognitive load for possible practical applications.

  19. Harmonization of European neurology education: the junior doctor's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macerollo, Antonella; Struhal, Walter; Sellner, Johann

    2013-10-29

    The objective of this article, written by executives of the European Association of Young Neurologists and Trainees (EAYNT), is to illustrate the status quo of neurology training in Europe and give an outlook on ongoing efforts and prospects for junior neurologists. The European Union is an economic and political union that currently encompasses 27 member states with more than 500 million inhabitants (or 7.3% of the world population) (interested readers are referred to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Union). Countries of the European Union act as a single market with free movement of citizens, goods, services, and finances. As a consequence, a diploma and postgraduate training obtained in one EU country will be automatically recognized by all other EU member states. At the Lisbon European Council in March 2000, the Heads of State or Government signed a treaty that expresses their ambition of making Europe "the most competitive and dynamic knowledge-based economy in the world, capable of sustainable economic growth with more and better jobs and greater social cohesion" (www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisbon_Strategy). More than 1.6 million physicians in all the different medical specialties are represented by the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS). The UEMS was founded in 1958 and the objectives include the study, promotion, and harmonization of the highest level of training of medical specialists, medical practice, and health care within the European Union. The European Board of Neurology (UEMS-EBN; www.uems-neuroboard.org) is in charge of the implementation of the UEMS policy regarding neurology.

  20. Psychophysiological responses of junior orienteers under competitive pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robazza, Claudio; Izzicupo, Pascal; D'Amico, Maria Angela; Ghinassi, Barbara; Crippa, Maria Chiara; Di Cecco, Vincenzo; Ruiz, Montse C; Bortoli, Laura; Di Baldassarre, Angela

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine psychobiosocial states, cognitive functions, endocrine responses (i.e., salivary cortisol and chromogranin A), and performance under competitive pressure in orienteering athletes. The study was grounded in the individual zones of optimal functioning (IZOF) and biopsychosocial models. Fourteen junior orienteering athletes (7 girls and 7 boys), ranging in age from 15 to 20 years (M = 16.93, SD = 1.77) took part in a two-day competitive event. To enhance competitive pressure, emphasis was placed on the importance of the competition and race outcome. Psychophysiological and performance data were collected at several points before, during, and after the races. Results showed that an increase in cortisol levels was associated with competitive pressure and reflected in higher perceived exertion (day 1, r = .32; day 2, r = .46), higher intensity of dysfunctional states (day 1, r = .59; day 2, r = .55), lower intensity of functional states (day 1, r = -.36; day 2, r = -.33), and decay in memory (day 1, r = -.27; day 2, r = -.35), visual attention (day 1, r = -.56; day 2, r = -.35), and attention/mental flexibility (day 1, r = .16; day 2, r = .26) tasks. The second day we observed better performance times, lower intensity of dysfunctional states, lower cortisol levels, improved visual attention and attention/mental flexibility (p competition days, chromogranin A levels were higher (p < .050) on the most difficult loops of the race in terms of both physical and psychological demands. Findings suggest emotional, cognitive, psychophysiological, and performance variables to be related and to jointly change across different levels of cognitive and physical load. Overall results are discussed in light of the IZOF and biopsychosocial models. The procedure adopted in the study also supports the feasibility of including additional cognitive load for possible practical applications.

  1. Traditional versus internet bullying in junior high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofin, Rosa; Avitzour, Malka

    2012-11-01

    To examine the prevalence of traditional and Internet bullying and the personal, family, and school environment characteristics of perpetrators and victims. Students (12-14 years old) in 35 junior high schools were randomly selected from the Jerusalem Hebrew (secular and religious) and Arab educational system (n = 2,610). Students answered an anonymous questionnaire, addressing personal, family, and school characteristics. Traditional bullying and Internet bullying for perpetrators and victims were categorized as either occurring at least sometimes during the school year or not occurring. Twenty-eight percent and 8.9 % of students were perpetrators of traditional and Internet bullying, respectively. The respective proportions of victims were 44.9 and 14.4 %. Traditional bullies presented higher Odds Ratios (ORs) for boys, for students with poor social skills (those who had difficulty in making friends, were influenced by peers in their behavior, or were bored), and for those who had poor communication with their parents. Boys and girls were equally likely to be Internet bullies and to use the Internet for communication and making friends. The OR for Internet bullying victims to be Internet bullying perpetrators was 3.70 (95 % confidence interval 2.47-5.55). Victims of traditional bullying felt helpless, and victims of traditional and Internet bullying find school to be a frightening place. There was a higher OR of Internet victimization with reports of loneliness. Traditional bully perpetrators present distinctive characteristics, while Internet perpetrators do not. Victims of traditional and Internet bullying feel fear in school. Tailored interventions are needed to address both types of bullying.

  2. Computer-aided detection (CAD) in mammography: Does it help the junior or the senior radiologist?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balleyguier, Corinne; Kinkel, Karen; Fermanian, Jacques; Malan, Sebastien; Djen, Germaine; Taourel, Patrice; Helenon, Olivier

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the impact of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system on the ability of a junior and senior radiologist to detect breast cancers on mammograms, and to determine the potential of CAD as a teaching tool in mammography. Methods: Hundred biopsy-proven cancers and 100 normal mammograms were randomly analyzed by a CAD system. The sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of the CAD system were calculated. In the second phase, to simulate daily practice, 110 mammograms (97 normal or with benign lesions, and 13 cancers) were examined independently by a junior and a senior radiologist, with and without CAD. Interpretations were standardized according to BI-RADS classification. Sensitivity, Specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV) were calculated for each session. Results: For the senior radiologist, Se slightly improved from 76.9 to 84.6% after CAD analysis (NS) (one case of clustered microcalcifications case overlooked by the senior radiologist was detected by CAD). Sp, PPV and PNV did not change significantly. For the junior radiologist, Se improved from 61.9 to 84.6% (significant change). Three cancers overlooked by the junior radiologist were detected by CAD. Sp was unchanged. Conclusion: CAD mammography proved more useful for the junior than for the senior radiologist, improving sensitivity. The CAD system may represent a useful educational tool for mammography

  3. Which non-technical skills do junior doctors require to prescribe safely? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearden, Effie; Mellanby, Edward; Cameron, Helen; Harden, Jeni

    2015-12-01

    Prescribing errors are a major source of avoidable morbidity and mortality. Junior doctors write most in-hospital prescriptions and are the least experienced members of the healthcare team. This puts them at high risk of error and makes them attractive targets for interventions to improve prescription safety. Error analysis has shown a background of complex environments with multiple contributory conditions. Similar conditions in other high risk industries, such as aviation, have led to an increased understanding of so-called human factors and the use of non-technical skills (NTS) training to try to reduce error. To date no research has examined the NTS required for safe prescribing. The aim of this review was to develop a prototype NTS taxonomy for safe prescribing, by junior doctors, in hospital settings. A systematic search identified 14 studies analyzing prescribing behaviours and errors by junior doctors. Framework analysis was used to extract data from the studies and identify behaviours related to categories of NTS that might be relevant to safe and effective prescribing performance by junior doctors. Categories were derived from existing literature and inductively from the data. A prototype taxonomy of relevant categories (situational awareness, decision making, communication and team working, and task management) and elements was constructed. This prototype will form the basis of future work to create a tool that can be used for training and assessment of medical students and junior doctors to reduce prescribing error in the future. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. Using medical knowledge sources on handheld computers--a qualitative study among junior doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelson, Christian; Wårdh, Inger; Strender, Lars-Erik; Nilsson, Gunnar

    2007-09-01

    The emergence of mobile computing could have an impact on how junior doctors learn. To exploit this opportunity it is essential to understand their information seeking process. To explore junior doctors' experiences of using medical knowledge sources on handheld computers. Interviews with five Swedish junior doctors. A qualitative manifest content analysis of a focus group interview followed by a qualitative latent content analysis of two individual interviews. A focus group interview showed that users were satisfied with access to handheld medical knowledge sources, but there was concern about contents, reliability and device dependency. Four categories emerged from individual interviews: (1) A feeling of uncertainty about using handheld technology in medical care; (2) A sense of security that handhelds can provide; (3) A need for contents to be personalized; (4) A degree of adaptability to make the handheld a versatile information tool. A theme was established to link the four categories together, as expressed in the Conclusion section. Junior doctors' experiences of using medical knowledge sources on handheld computers shed light on the need to decrease uncertainty about clinical decisions during medical internship, and to find ways to influence the level of self-confidence in the junior doctor's process of decision-making.

  5. The Physiological Profile of Junior Soccer Players at SSBB Surabaya Bhakti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashirudin, M.; Kusnanik, N. W.

    2018-01-01

    Soccer players are required to have good physical fitness in order to achieve optimum accomplishment; physical fitness stands as the foundation of technical and tactical proficiency as well as the mental maturity during the matches. The purpose of this study was to identify the physiological profile of junior soccer players of SSB Surabaya Bhakti age 16-17. The research was conducted at 20 junior soccer players. This research was quantitative with descriptive analysis. Data were collected by testing of physiological (anaerobic power and capacity including explosive leg power, speed, agility; aerobic capacity: cardiovascular endurance). Data was analyzed using percentage. The result showed that the percentage of explosive leg power of junior soccer players were 30% (good category), speed was 85% (average category), right agility was 90% (average category), left agility was 75% (average category). On the other hand, the aerobic power and capacity of the junior soccer players in this study was 50% (average category). The conclusion of this research is that the physiological profile of junior soccer players at SSB Surabaya Bhakti age 16-17 was majority in average category.

  6. Junior High School Students’ Perception about Simple Environmental Problem as an Impact of Problem based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapilouw, M. C.; Firman, H.; Redjeki, S.; Chandra, D. T.

    2017-09-01

    Environmental problem is a real problem that occur in student’s daily life. Junior high school students’ perception about environmental problem is interesting to be investigated. The major aim of this study is to explore junior high school students’ perception about environmental problems around them and ways to solve the problem. The subject of this study is 69 Junior High School Students from two Junior High School in Bandung. This study use two open ended question. The core of first question is environmental problem around them (near school or house). The core of second question is the way to prevent or to solve the problem. These two question are as an impact of problem based learning in science learning. There are two major findings in this study. The first finding, based on most students’ perception, plastic waste cause an environmental problem. The second finding, environmental awareness can be a solution to prevent environmental pollution. The third finding, most student can classify environmental pollution into land, water and air pollution. We can conclude that Junior High School Students see the environmental problem as a phenomenon and teacher can explore environmental problem to guide the way of preventing and resolving environmental problem.

  7. Junior medical officer recruitment: challenges and lessons from the Northern Territory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Robert; Sathianathan, Vino

    2007-06-01

    To examine the influence of newspaper and Internet advertising, word-of-mouth endorsement and student experience in attracting applicants for junior medical officer positions in the Northern Territory. A retrospective study. Fifty-four applicants for junior medical officer positions. Proportion of applicants who reported newspaper advertising, Internet advertising, word of mouth or personal experience in attracting their application for an intern or resident medical officer position. Nineteen per cent of applicants saw the newspaper advertisement and 52% of the Internet advertisement. Eighty-seven per cent of applicants were influenced by word-of-mouth endorsement and 52% by student experience in the Northern Territory or Indigenous health. These results suggest that word-of-mouth endorsement has the greatest influence in attracting applicants for junior medical officer positions in Northern Territory hospitals.

  8. Scientific reasoning profile of junior secondary school students on the concept of static fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariana, N.; Siahaan, P.; Utari, S.

    2018-05-01

    Scientific reasoning is one of the most important ability. This study aims to determine the profile of scientific reasoning of junior high school students about the concept of static fluid. This research uses a descriptive method with a quantitative approach to get an idea about the scientific reasoning of One Roof Junior Secondary School Student Kotabaru Reteh in Riau. The technique of collecting data is done by test of scientific reasoning. Scientific reasoning capability refers to Furtak’s EBR (Evidence Based Reasoning) scientific reasoning indicator that contains the components of claims, data, evidence, and rules. The result obtained on each element of scientific reasoning is 35% claim, 23% data, 21% evidence and 17% rule. The conclusions of this research that scientific reasoning of Satu Atap Junior Secondary School student Kotabaru Reteh, Riau Province still in the low category.

  9. [Changes in academic motivation among elementary and junior high school students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Takuma; Sakurai, Shigeo

    2013-02-01

    This study examined changes in academic motivation among elementary and junior high school students. Based on self-determination theory (Ryan & Deci, 2000a), we focused on changes in autonomous and controlled motivation. In Study 1, we examined inter-individual changes in academic motivation among 5th to 9th grade students (N = 1 572) through a cross-sectional study. In Study 2, we examined intra-individual changes in academic motivation among students (N = 128) who were in transition from elementary to junior high school through a longitudinal study. All participants completed the Academic Motivation Scale (Nishimura, Kawamura, & Sakurai, 2011) that measured autonomous and controlled motivation. The results revealed that autonomous motivation decreased in the students from elementary to junior high school, while controlled motivation increased during the same period. This is a unique finding because a prior study conducted in a Western culture suggested that both motivations decrease gradually in school.

  10. MEANS OF ORIENTEERING IN EDUCATION OF JUNIOR SCHOOLCHILDREN WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Mayorkina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of the adapted methods of basic training in orienteering (BTIO on the correction of physical fitness and mental development of junior schoolchildren with intellectual disability (ID.Methods. The following methods were used: theoretical analysis of literature, generalization, «forming» experiment, mathematical statistics, testing of physical qualities, psychological testing and pedagogical observation.Results and scientific novelty. The conditions of basic training in orienteering for junior schoolchildren with intellectual disability are determined wherein the correction of physical fitness and mental functions through the means of orienteering will be the most effective. Methods of basic training were substantiated and adapted for the capabilities of junior schoolchildren with ID. The author has defined the effect of orienteering exercises on the development of speed-andstrength qualities, overall endurance, movement speed, coordination; fine motor skills; stability, volume and switching of attention, volume of picturesque and verbal memory, representational thought and verbal-logical thinking; volitional qualities.The study has revealed wholesome influence of orienteering on correction of physical fitness and mental functions of schoolchildren of 9–10 years with intellectual disability.Practical significance. The results could be used for education of junior schoolchildren with ID during extra classes in special (correctional schools of Type-7 and during remedial classes (remedial and developing teaching in schools of general education. The results could also be applied for training of teachers of additional education. The adapted methods of BTIO for junior schoolchildren with ID could be used for normally developing children of younger age. Practical recommendations on the organization and conditions of orienteering exercises for junior schoolchildren with ID, games and intellectual

  11. The TROJAN Project: Creating a Customized International Orthopedic Training Program for Junior Doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalraiya, Ashish; Buddhdev, Pranai

    2015-03-03

    Musculoskeletal problems account for a vast proportion of presentations encountered by doctors globally, with figures ranging from 15-36%. However, the time medical schools allocate to learning orthopedics is by no means proportional to this. This study aims to bridge this gap by developing an international orthopedic teaching program tailored to the specific knowledge and skills required by junior doctors in different countries. This prospective study asked fifty junior doctors, who had recently completed an orthopedics job, what three orthopedic teaching topics taught retrospectively would have benefitted their clinical practice. The most requested topics were used to design educational workshops for junior doctors and these consequently comprised the TROJAN (Teaching Requested by Orthopaedic Juniors And Novices) training program. Data was collected from twenty-five junior doctors in KwaZulu-Natale State, South Africa, and twenty-five in London, UK. It is therefore in these two countries that the TROJAN program was subsequently made available. Participants who selected topics were within two years of graduating medical school and had worked an orthopedic or Accident and Emergency job within the last year. 49% of topics chosen by SA doctors were practical skills such as wrist and ankle fracture reduction techniques, and management of open fractures. The most requested topic by UK doctors (11 out of 25) was management of neck of femur fractures. This is rationalized by the fact South African doctors require more hands-on responsibility in their daily practice whereas in the UK greater emphasis is placed on optimizing patients for theatre and making sound management plans. TROJAN currently develops orthopedic skills and knowledge in junior doctors in South Africa and United Kingdom with teaching customized based upon location. Feedback has been exceptionally positive with every candidate thus far rating the usefulness of TROJAN as the highest option, very useful.

  12. Contrasting Perspectives Of Junior versus Senior NASA ISS Flight Controllers On Leadership And Cultural Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, James L.; Boyd, J. E.; Saylor, S.; Kanas, N.

    2007-01-01

    NASA flight controllers have always worked in a very demanding environment, but the International Space Station (ISS) poses even more challenges than prior missions. A recent NASA/Ames survey by Parke and Orasanu of NASA/Johnson flight controllers uncovered concerns about communications problems between American personnel and their international counterparts. To better understand these problems, we interviewed 14 senior and 12 junior ISS flight controllers at NASA/Johnson about leadership and cultural challenges they face and strategies for addressing these challenges. The qualitative interview data were coded and tabulated. Here we present quantitative analyses testing for differences between junior and senior controllers. Based on nonparametric statistical tests comparing responses across groups, the senior controllers were significantly more aware of the impact of working in dispersed teams, the context of constant change, and the upcoming multilateral challenges, while junior controllers were more aware of language and cultural issues. We consider our findings in light of other studies of controllers and other known differences between senior and junior controllers. For example, the fact that senior controllers had their formative early experience controlling pre-ISS short-duration Shuttle missions seems to have both positive and negative aspects, which are supported by our data. Our findings may also reflect gender differences, but we cannot unconfound this effect in our data because all the senior respondents were males. Many of the junior-senior differences are not only due to elapsed time on the job, but also due to a cohort effect. The findings of this study should be used for training curricula tailored differently for junior and senior controllers.

  13. Use of multimedia messaging system (MMS) by junior doctors for scan image transmission in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Ji Min; Lim, Kim Zhuan; Ng, Wai Hoe

    2012-02-01

    Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS) is used by neurosurgical residents to transmit scan images to the attending neurosurgeon in conjunction with telephone consultation. This service has been well received by the attending neurosurgeons, who felt that after viewing scan images on their phones, they felt increased confidence in clinical decision making and that it reduced the need for recall to the hospital. The use of MMS can be extended to junior doctors making referrals from regional hospitals with no neurosurgical cover. This study aims to validate the competency of non-neurosurgically trained junior doctors in selecting optimal images to transmit via MMS to the attending neurosurgeon on call. Ten junior doctors with no formal neurosurgical training and five neurosurgical residents were interviewed. They were shown the full complement of images together with relevant clinical history and assessment. They were then asked to make the radiological diagnosis and then select two images for MMS transmission to the attending neurosurgeon that they thought would best aid the neurosurgeon in clinical decision making. The attending neurosurgeon was asked to comment, on each image, whether his management plan would differ if he was shown the entire series of the images. All the images chosen are deemed appropriate, and the decision made based on the MMS images would be similar if the entire series of images were available to the neurosurgeon. However, 7 of 10 junior doctors were unable to read magnetic resonance images of lumbar spine. There was no significant difference in the images chosen by the neurosurgical residents and the junior doctors. It is feasible and safe for junior doctors to utilize MMS to transmit computed tomographic images to a neurosurgeon while making an urgent referral. The images selected are representative of the disease pathology and facilitate clinical decision making. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Online video-based resistance training improves the physical capacity of junior basketball athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klusemann, Markus J; Pyne, David B; Fay, Tristan S; Drinkwater, Eric J

    2012-10-01

    Junior basketball athletes require a well-designed resistance training program to improve their physical development. Lack of expert supervision and resistance training in junior development pathways may be overcome by implementing an online video-based program. The aim of this study was to compare the magnitude of improvement (change) in physical performance and strength and functional movement patterns of junior basketball athletes using either a fully supervised or an online video-based resistance training program. Thirty-eight junior basketball athletes (males, n = 17; age, 14 ± 1 year; height, 1.79 ± 0.10 m; mass, 67 ± 12 kg; females, n = 21; age, 15 ± 1 year; height, 1.70 ± 0.07 m; mass, 62 ± 8 kg) were randomly assigned into a supervised resistance training group (SG, n = 13), video training group (VG, n = 13) or control group (CG, n = 12) and participated in a 6-week controlled experimental trial. Pre- and posttesting included measures of physical performance (20-m sprint, step-in vertical jump, agility, sit and reach, line drill, and Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1), strength (15 s push-up and pull-up), and functional movement screening (FMS). Both SG and VG achieved 3-5% ± 2-4% (mean ± 90% confidence limits) greater improvements in several physical performance measures (vertical jump height, 20-m sprint time, and Yo-Yo endurance performance) and a 28 ± 21% greater improvement in push-up strength compared with the CG. The SG attained substantially larger gains in FMS scores over both the VG (12 ± 10%) and CG (13 ± 8%). Video-based training appears to be a viable option to improve physical performance and strength in junior basketball athletes. Qualified supervision is recommended to improve functional movement patterns in junior athletes.

  15. Single-site robotic cholecystectomy and robotics training: should we start in the junior years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayabe, Reed I; Parrish, Aaron B; Dauphine, Christine E; Hari, Danielle M; Ozao-Choy, Junko J

    2018-04-01

    It has become increasingly important to expose surgical residents to robotic surgery as its applications continue to expand. Single-site robotic cholecystectomy (SSRC) is an excellent introductory case to robotics. Resident involvement in SSRC is known to be feasible. Here, we sought to determine whether it is safe to introduce SSRC to junior residents. A total of 98 SSRC cases were performed by general surgery residents between August 2015 and August 2016. Cases were divided into groups based on resident level: second- and third-years (juniors) versus fourth- and fifth-years (seniors). Patient age, gender, race, body mass index, and comorbidities were recorded. The number of prior laparoscopic cholecystectomies completed by participating residents was noted. Outcomes including operative time, console time, rate of conversion to open cholecystectomy, and complication rate were compared between groups. Juniors performed 54 SSRC cases, whereas seniors performed 44. There were no significant differences in patient age, gender, race, body mass index, or comorbidities between the two groups. Juniors had less experience with laparoscopic cholecystectomy. There was no significant difference in mean operative time (92.7 min versus 98.0 min, P = 0.254), console time (48.7 min versus 50.8 min, P = 0.639), or complication rate (3.7% versus 2.3%, P = 0.68) between juniors and seniors. SSRC is an excellent way to introduce general surgery residents to robotics. This study shows that with attending supervision, SSRC is feasible and safe for both junior and senior residents with very low complication rates and no adverse effect on operative time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Educational Progression in Ghana: Gender and Spatial Variations in Longitudinal Trajectories of Junior High School Completion Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansong, David; Alhassan, Mustapha

    2016-01-01

    Completion of junior high school is a critical milestone in every Ghanaian child's educational trajectory and a critical step toward the transition to higher education. However, the rate of children completing junior high school still lags behind most educational indicators in Ghana. Far more attention is paid to ensuring that students enroll in…

  17. Integrating Information and Communication Technology in English Language Teaching: A Case Study of Selected Junior Secondary Schools in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafuraga, Mbizo; Moremi, Mbiganyi

    2017-01-01

    The paper discusses how Information and Communication Technology (ICT) could be integrated in the teaching of English Language in Botswana Junior Secondary Schools. It does so by exploring opportunities and challenges faced by teachers of English Language and the students they teach. Fifty five (55) teachers in eleven (11) Junior Secondary Schools…

  18. A Comparative Study of Recent Trends and Characteristics of Students Entering American Junior Colleges, 1968-72.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Robert H.; Scott, Craig S.

    Recent changes in the background characteristics and attributes of students entering American junior colleges are compared with those of students entering colleges offering baccalaureate and graduate degrees. Comparisons are also made between students entering private and public junior colleges. The characteristics and attributes are: Level of…

  19. Adaptability of the In-Use Textbooks to Students in Rural Junior Middle School in Henan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Daohuan

    2013-01-01

    In Henan province, and through out China, both students in cities and countrysides are using the same textbooks for junior high schools. This phenomenon unavoidably resulted in the fact that it is difficult for students in rural junior high school to understand the contents in textbooks. In order to investigate whether the learning difficulty…

  20. Evaluation of Some Approved Basic Science and Technology Textbooks in Use in Junior Secondary Schools in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwafor, C. E.; Umoke, C. C.

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the content adequacy and readability of approved basic science and technology textbooks in use in junior secondary schools in Nigeria. Eight research questions guided the study. The sample of the study consisted of six (6) approved basic science and technology textbooks, 30 Junior Secondary Schools randomly…

  1. Professional approaches in clinical judgements among senior and junior doctors: implications for medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilhammar Ewa

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical experience has traditionally been highly valued in medical education and clinical healthcare. On account of its multi-faceted nature, clinical experience is mostly difficult to articulate, and is mainly expressed in clinical situations as professional approaches. Due to retirement, hospitals in Scandinavia will soon face a substantial decrease in the number of senior specialist doctors, and it has been discussed whether healthcare will suffer an immense loss of experienced-based knowledge when this senior group leaves the organization. Both senior specialists and junior colleagues are often involved in clinical education, but the way in which these two groups vary in professional approaches and contributions to clinical education has not been so well described. Cognitive psychology has contributed to the understanding of how experience may influence professional approaches, but such studies have not included the effect of differences in position and responsibilities that junior and senior doctors hold in clinical healthcare. In the light of the discussion above, it is essential to describe the professional approaches of senior doctors in relation to those of their junior colleagues. This study therefore aims to describe and compare the professional approaches of junior and senior doctors when making clinical judgements. Methods Critical incident technique was used in interviews with nine senior doctors and nine junior doctors in internal medicine. The interviews were subjected to qualitative content analysis. Result Senior and junior doctors expressed a variety of professional approaches in clinical judgement as follows: use of theoretical knowledge, use of prior experience of cases and courses of events, use of ethical and moral values, meeting and communicating with the patient, focusing on available information, relying on their own ability, getting support and guidance from others and being directed by the

  2. A pilot survey of junior doctors' confidence in tasks related to broad aspects of competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Deborah J; Skaarup, Anne Marie; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    Medical authorities and society are recommending that postgraduate medical education prepare physicians for broad aspects of competence. The most effective ways to prepare physicians for these are not known. The aim of this pilot study was to survey junior doctors' growth in confidence in different...... useful in facilitating learning of the tasks. These results suggest that growth of confidence in the physician roles proceeds at different rates during postgraduate training. Additional research is needed to identify effective ways for junior doctors to learn broad aspects of competence. Longitudinal...

  3. Preparing prospective physics teachers to teach integrated science in junior high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiyanto; Hartono; Nugroho, S. E.

    2018-03-01

    The physics education study program especially prepares its students to teach physics in senior high school, however in reality many its graduates have become science teachers in junior high school. Therefore introducing integrated science to prospective physics teachers is important, because based on the curriculum, science in the junior high school should be taught integratedly. This study analyzed integrated science teaching materials that developed by prospective physics teachers. Results from this study showed that majority of the integration materials that developed by the prospective physics teachers focused on topic with an overlapping concept or theme as connecting between two or three subjects.

  4. Discriminating Talent Identified Junior Australian Footballers Using a Fundamental Gross Athletic Movement Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Carl T.; Banyard, Harry G.; McKeown, Ian; Fransen, Job; Robertson, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Talent identification (TID) is a pertinent component of the sports sciences, affording practitioners the opportunity to target developmental interventions to a select few; optimising financial investments. However, TID is multi-componential, requiring the recognition of immediate and prospective performance. The measurement of athletic movement skill may afford practitioners insight into the latter component given its augmented relationship with functional sport specific qualities. It is currently unknown whether athletic movement skill is a discriminant quality in junior Australian football (AF). This study aimed to discriminate talent identified junior AF players from their non-talent identified counterparts using a fundamental gross athletic movement assessment. From a total of 50 under 18 (U18) AF players; two groups were classified a priori based on selection level; talent identified (n = 25; state academy representatives) and non-talent identified (n = 25; state-based competition representatives). Players performed a fundamental gross athletic movement assessment based on the Athletic Ability Assessment (AAA), consisting of an overhead squat, double lunge (left and right legs), single leg Romanian deadlift (left and right legs), and a push up (six movement criterions). Movements were scored across three assessment points using a three-point scale (resulting in a possible score of nine for each movement). A multivariate analysis of variance revealed significant between group effects on four of the six movement criterions (d = 0.56 – 0.87; p = 0.01 – 0.02). Binary logistic regression models and a receiver operating characteristic curve inspection revealed that the overhead squat score provided the greatest group discrimination (β(SE) = -0.89(0.44); p talent identified and non-talent identified groups, respectively. Results support the integration of this assessment into contemporary talent identification approaches in junior AF, as it may provide coaches

  5. Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids: Prevalence, Knowledge, and Attitudes in Junior and Senior High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetkemeier, Maurie J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Reports a survey of junior and senior high school students that investigated the prevalence of anabolic-androgenic steroid use and examined gender, sports participation, and illicit drug use. Results indicated the prevalence of steroid use was 3.3%. Steroid use was greater for males, users of other drugs, and strength trainers. (SM)

  6. Structural Equation Modeling for Studying Adaptation of the Students with Disabilities in Inclusive Junior High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li Ju

    2014-01-01

    This research explored the factors of the adaptation for the children with disabilities studying in inclusive junior high schools. The subjects were recruited from the Special Needs Education Longitudinal Study of Taiwan. The result of the Confirmatory Factor Analyses reflects that there are two, three and five observed variables included in the…

  7. Evaluation of West-Austrian junior athletes' knowledge regarding doping in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürhapter, Christina; Blank, Cornelia; Leichtfried, Veronika; Mair-Raggautz, Maria; Müller, David; Schobersberger, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    An important factor while developing efficient doping prevention strategies is to identify relevant target groups, to evaluate the state of knowledge about this topic as well as to evaluate motivations behind using prohibited substances. Measures to prevent doping substances abuse have to be supported in early stages of childhood. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the knowledge of Tyrolean junior athletes about doping in sport. Next to the knowledge, their attitudes in regard to doping practices have also been a focus of this project. Within a prospective cross-sectional study, Tyrolean junior athletes aged between 14 and 19 years (n = 408) were anonymously questioned by distributing questionnaires in three Tyrolean sport schools as well as two Tyrolean sport-training centers. To collect the data, an anonymous questionnaire with close-ended questions was used. Next to sociodemographic data, questions also evaluated the knowledge about prohibited substances as well as attitudes and behaviors towards doping. The concept was set up based on contents of comparable studies and publications. The knowledge about doping among junior athletes was moderate. The consumer behavior of the young athletes on the other hand has turned out to be satisfactory. Nevertheless, the overall knowledge especially regarding potential negative side effects of doping agents is poor. To incorporate an effective doping-prevention strategy, improved education, particularly in terms of side effects, is clearly needed. To achieve sustainable doping-prevention effects, focus has to be generally set on education within the frame of junior competitive sport.

  8. Chinese Junior High School Students' Perceptions of Geographic Fieldwork: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Daihu; Wang, Ziying; Xu, Di; Wang, Chuanbing; Deng, Zhengzheng

    2013-01-01

    After nearly ten years of implementation of the first junior high school geography standards, Chinese geography educators have been increasingly incorporating fieldwork into their geography teaching. This study examined student perceptions of fieldwork from an international perspective by reviewing student fieldwork reports and administering a…

  9. Career Calling as a Personal Resource Moderator between Environmental Demands and Burnout in Australian Junior Doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, Peter A.; Rogers, Mary E.; Praskova, Anna; Searle, Judy

    2014-01-01

    We surveyed 355 junior doctors (first 4 years of post-university training; 69% female, mean age = 28 years) from multiple hospital and practice locations and used an online questionnaire to assess their training-related demands (academic stress, concern about training debt, and hours worked), academic burnout, and personal resources…

  10. To Work or Play? Junior Age Non-Fiction as Objects of Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Gemma

    2001-01-01

    Examines change and variation in the design of non-fiction texts which have a junior-age readership. Argues that different forms of presentation of non-fiction offer different ways of reading non-fiction texts, which as yet are neither fully described nor recognized. Suggests that non-fiction texts can be more or less firmly orientated towards…

  11. The Online Expectations of College-Bound Juniors and Seniors. E-Expectations Report, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel-Levitz, Inc, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Noel-Levitz, OmniUpdate, CollegeWeekLive, and NRCCUA[R] (National Research Center for College & University Admissions) conducted a survey of 2,000 college-bound juniors and seniors about their expectations for college Web sites, mobile usage, e-mail, and social media. Among the findings: (1) More than 50 percent of students said the Web played a…

  12. Junior staffing changes and the temporal ecology of adverse incidents in acute psychiatric wards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowers, L.; Jeffery, D.; Simpson, A.; Daly, C.; Warren, J.; Nijman, H.L.I.

    2007-01-01

    Aim. This paper reports in examination of the relationship between adverse incident rates, the arrival of new junior staff on wards, and days of the week oil acute Psychiatric wards. Background. Incidents of violence, absconding and self-harm in acute inpatient services pose risks to patients and

  13. A Rasch Analysis of the Junior Metacognitive Awareness Inventory with Singapore Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Hoi Kwan

    2018-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the 2 versions of the Junior Metacognitive Awareness Inventory were examined with Singapore student samples. Other than 2 misfitting items and an underutilized response scale, Rasch analysis demonstrated that the instruments have good measurement precision, and no differential item functioning was detected across…

  14. The Impact of a Junior Faculty Fellowship Award on Academic Advancement and Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Maureen T; Sullivan, Amy M; Chinchilla, Manuel; Dale, Margaret L; Emans, S Jean; Nadelson, Carol Cooperman; Notman, Malkah Tolpin; Tarbell, Nancy J; Zigler, Corwin M; Shore, Eleanor G

    2017-08-01

    Academic faculty experience barriers to career development and promotion. In 1996, Harvard Medical School (HMS) initiated an intramural junior faculty fellowship to address these obstacles. The authors sought to understand whether receiving a fellowship was associated with more rapid academic promotion and retention. Junior faculty fellowship recipients and all other instructor and assistant professors at HMS between 1996 and 2011 were identified. Using propensity score modeling, the authors created a matched comparison group for the fellowship recipients based on educational background, training, academic rank, department, hospital affiliation, and demographics. Time to promotion and time to leaving were assessed by Kaplan-Meier curves. A total of 622 junior faculty received fellowships. Faculty who received fellowships while instructors (n = 480) had shorter times to promotion to assistant professor (P Women instructors advanced more quickly than matched controls, while male instructors' rates of promotions did not differ. Fellowships to support junior faculty were associated with shorter times to promotion for instructors and more sustained faculty retention for both instructors and assistant professors. This suggests that relatively small amounts of funding early in faculty careers can play a critical role in supporting academic advancement and retention.

  15. Barriers to accessing ATLS provider course for junior doctors at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Barriers to accessing ATLS provider course for junior doctors at a major university hospital in South Africa. ... South African Journal of Surgery ... Subgroup analysis comparing the reasons for PGY1s vs PGY2s demonstrated that not being able to secure a place on course was more common among PGY2s [19% vs 33%, ...

  16. Teaching of Cultural Concepts in Botswana Junior Secondary Schools Design and Technology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moalosi, Richie

    2011-01-01

    This research explored the extent to which cultural concepts stipulated in Botswana Design and Technology curriculum are taught by teachers at junior secondary schools, a topic on which there is little previous research. The pinnacle of good product innovation is when it is grounded on sensitive cultural analysis of the society's culture. However,…

  17. Evaluation of a Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation Curriculum for Junior and Senior High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderschmidt, Hannelore Falk

    An adaptation of the standard American Heart Association training program was utilized to teach secondary school students cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) procedures. Students, at both junior and senior high levels, were randomly assigned to practice and no-practice groups, of ten students each. All were taught CPR procedures didactically, but…

  18. Continuity or Change? Gender, Family, and Academic Work for Junior Faculty in Ontario Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, Sandra; Webber, Michelle; Smyth, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 40 or so years, women's share of faculty positions in Canada and elsewhere has increased considerably, if not yet reaching parity. Yet working in the gendered university remains problematic. This article uses data from a qualitative research project in which 38 junior academics were interviewed about their responses to being on the…

  19. Key Elements of a Good Mathematics Lesson as Seen by Japanese Junior High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebaeguin, Marlon; Stephens, Max

    2016-01-01

    This study makes a comparison between what literature on Japanese Lesson Study suggests are key elements of a good mathematics lesson and what junior high school mathematics teachers in Japan value in planning their lessons. The teachers' strong consensus in their endorsements of these key elements explains why Japanese teachers strongly support…

  20. Prevalence and correlates of job stress among junior doctors in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence and correlates of job stress among junior doctors in the ... Journal Home > Vol 14, No 2 (2016) > ... Descriptive statistics were generated. ... 61.3% were males, 59% had spent less than 5 years in medical practice, and 34.8% were ...