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Sample records for junior cross-country skiers

  1. Endurance training and sprint performance in elite junior cross-country skiers.

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    Sandbakk, Øyvind; Welde, Boye; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between aerobic characteristics and sprint skiing performance, and the effects of high-intensity endurance training on sprint skiing performance and aerobic characteristics. Ten male and 5 female elite junior cross-country skiers performed an 8-week intervention training period. The intervention group (IG, n = 7) increased the volume of high-intensity endurance training performed in level terrain, whereas the control group (CG, n = 8) continued their baseline training. Before and after the intervention period, the skiers were tested for 1.5-km time-trial performance on roller skis outdoors in the skating technique. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO₂max) and oxygen uptake at the ventilatory threshold (VO₂VT) were measured during treadmill running. VO₂max and VO₂VT were closely related to sprint performance (r = ~0.75, both p cross-country skiing and highlights the positive effects of high-intensity endurance training in level terrain.

  2. Effects of intensity and duration in aerobic high-intensity interval training in highly trained junior cross-country skiers.

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    Sandbakk, Øyvind; Sandbakk, Silvana B; Ettema, Gertjan; Welde, Boye

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether a long duration of aerobic high-intensity interval training is more effective than shorter intervals at a higher intensity in highly trained endurance athletes. The sample comprised of 12 male and 9 female, national-level, junior cross-country skiers (age, 17.5 ± 0.4 years, maximal oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max): 67.4 ± 7.7 ml min kg), who performed 8-week baseline and 8-week intervention training periods on dry land. During the intervention period, a short-interval group (SIG, n = 7) added 2 weekly sessions with short duration intervals (2- to 4-minute bouts, total duration of 15-20 minutes), a long-interval group (LIG; n = 7) added 2 weekly sessions with long duration intervals (5- to 10-minute bouts, total duration of 40-45 minutes). The interval sessions were performed with the athletes' maximal sustainable intensity. A control group (CG; n = 7) added 2 weekly sessions with low-intensity endurance training at 65-74% of maximal heart rate. Before and after the intervention period, the skiers were tested for time-trial performance on 12-km roller-ski skating and 7-km hill run. V[Combining Dot Above]O2max and oxygen uptake at the ventilatory threshold (V[Combining Dot Above]O2VT) were measured during treadmill running. After the intervention training period, the LIG-improved 12-km roller ski, 7-km hill run, V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, and V[Combining Dot Above]O2VT by 6.8 ± 4.0%, 4.8 ± 2.6%, 3.7 ± 1.6%, and 5.8 ± 3.3%, respectively, from pre- to posttesting, and improved both performance tests and V[Combining Dot Above]O2VT when compared with the SIG and the CG (all p < 0.05). The SIG improved V[Combining Dot Above]O2max by 3.5 ± 3.2% from pre- to posttesting (p < 0.05), whereas the CG remained unchanged. As hypothesized, a long duration of aerobic high-intensity interval training improved endurance performance and oxygen uptake at the ventilatory threshold more than shorter intervals at a higher

  3. Skiing economy and efficiency in recreational and elite cross-country skiers.

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    Ainegren, Mats; Carlsson, Peter; Tinnsten, Mats; Laaksonen, Marko S

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare skiing economy and gross efficiency in cross-country skiers of different performance levels, ages and genders; male recreational skiers and elite senior and junior cross-country skiers of both genders. The skiers performed tests involving roller skiing on a treadmill using the gear 3 and diagonal stride techniques. The elite cross-country skiers were found to have better skiing economy and higher gross efficiency (5-18%) compared with the recreational skiers (p skiing economy and gross efficiency have a great influence on the differences in performance times between recreational and junior and senior elite cross-country skiers, as well as between individual skiers within the different categories. Thus, we recommend cross-country skiers at all performance levels to test not only V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak, but also skiing economy and efficiency.

  4. Characteristics of injuries among young cross-country skiers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boguszewski Dariusz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop information about injuries in cadet and junior cross-country skiers. Material and methods. Fifty female (n=21 and male (n=29 competitors from Podhale were in research group. Skiers completed questionnaire. The questions concerned the location of injuries, types of injuries, methods of treatments and rehabilitation and recovery exercises. Results. The most frequent injury in the research group was bruises, cuts and sprains and muscle strain. Few people had suffered broken bones and muscle ruptures. The most of the skiers suffered knee injuries. As a treatment PRICEMM procedure has been introduced. The main method of recovery was rest from training. Conclusions. No correlation was found epidemiology of injuries and the treatment, gender, age, level of sport and the number of starts of the season. Sports training and recovery should be similar In each group (female and male competitors. Players starting considerably more likely to devote less time to treatment and improvement of injury.

  5. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis among cross-country skiers in Sweden.

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    Fang, Fang; Hållmarker, Ulf; James, Stefan; Ingre, Caroline; Michaëlsson, Karl; Ahlbom, Anders; Feychting, Maria

    2016-03-01

    A highly increased risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been suggested among professional athletes. We aimed to examine whether long distance cross-country skiers have also a higher risk of ALS and whether the increased risk was modified by skiing performance. We followed 212,246 cross-country skiers in the Swedish Vasaloppet cohort and a random selection of 508,176 general Swedes not participating in the Vasaloppet during 1989-2010. The associations between cross-country skiing as well as skiing performance (i.e., type of race, finishing time and number of races) and the consequent risk of ALS were estimated through hazard ratios (HRs) derived from Cox model. During the study, 39 cases of ALS were ascertained among the skiers. The fastest skiers (100-150% of winner time) had more than fourfold risk of ALS (HR 4.31, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.78-10.4), as compared to skiers that finished at >180% of winner time. Skiers who participated >4 races during this period had also a higher risk (HR 3.13, 95% CI 1.37-7.17) than those participated only one race. When compared to the non-skiers, the fastest skiers still had a higher risk (HR 2.08, 95% CI 1.12-3.84), as skiers who had >4 races (HR 1.88, 95% CI 1.05-3.35), but those finishing at >180% of winner time had a lower risk (HR 0.46, 95% CI 0.24-0.87). In conclusion, long distance cross-country skiing is associated with a higher risk of ALS, but only among the best skiers; recreational skiers appear to have a largely reduced risk.

  6. Fitness Levels of University Cross-Country Skiers.

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    Ruhling, Robert O.; Storer, Thomas W.

    Dry-land training in preparation for competitive cross-country skiing proved to be effective in increasing athletes' aerobic capacity and physical fitness. Such training included bicycle racing, roller skiing, fartlek running, cross-country running, simulated ski walking on inclines, and interval training over hills. (JD)

  7. Blood profiles in elite cross-country skiers: a 6-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morkeberg, J; Saltin, B; Belhage, B

    2009-01-01

    Following the doping scandals at the World Championships in cross-country skiing in 2001, the International Ski Federation decided to generate individual blood profiles. From 2001 to 2007, 7081 blood samples from 1074 male and female elite cross-country skiers were collected and analyzed for hemo......Following the doping scandals at the World Championships in cross-country skiing in 2001, the International Ski Federation decided to generate individual blood profiles. From 2001 to 2007, 7081 blood samples from 1074 male and female elite cross-country skiers were collected and analyzed...... the introduction of an enlarged blood testing program, the mean [Hb] values were lowered to close to normal levels, but over the last 2-3 years there has been a small elevation and an increase in OFF-model scores, which may indicate a change in the manipulations used to elevate the [Hb]....

  8. Racing performance and incremental double poling test on treadmill in elite female cross-country skiers.

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    Fabre, Nicolas; Balestreri, Filippo; Leonardi, Allesandro; Schena, Fedrico

    2010-02-01

    The national Italian cross-country ski team has been evaluated on the basis of a new double poling cross-country roller skiing incremental test to exhaustion (DP) on a motorized driven treadmill. To verify the capacity of this specific test to predict performance, peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), oxygen uptake at anaerobic threshold (VO2Th), peak treadmill speed, and treadmill speed at anaerobic threshold (Speak and STh, respectively) were measured during the test and correlated with the level of performance of 10 world class Italian female cross-country skiers. The physiological data obtained were also compared with results of an incremental and maximal test carried out by the same athletes but with the diagonal stride (DS) technique. Peak heart rate (HRpeak), HRTh, and VO2Th were significantly higher during DS than during DP (p cross-country skiers' performance.

  9. Downhill turn techniques and associated physical characteristics in cross-country skiers.

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    Sandbakk, S Bucher; Supej, M; Sandbakk, Ø; Holmberg, H-C

    2014-08-01

    Three dominant techniques are used for downhill turning in cross-country skiing. In this study, kinematic, kinetic, and temporal characteristics of these techniques are described and related to skier strength and power. Twelve elite female cross-country skiers performed six consecutive turns of standardized geometry while being monitored by a Global Navigation Satellite System. Overall time was used as an indicator of performance. Skiing and turning parameters were determined from skier trajectories; the proportional use of each technique was determined from video analysis. Leg strength and power were determined by isometric squats and countermovement jumps on a force plate. Snow plowing, parallel skidding, and step turning were utilized for all turns. Faster skiers employed less snow plowing and more step turning, more rapid deceleration and earlier initiation of step turning at higher speed (r = 0.80-0.93; all P < 0.01). Better performance was significantly correlated to higher mean speed and shorter trajectory (r = 0.99/0.65; both P < 0.05) and to countermovement jump characteristics of peak force, time to peak force, and rate of force development (r = -0.71/0.78/-0.83; all P < 0.05). In conclusion, faster skiers used step turning to a greater extent and exhibited higher maximal leg power, which enabled them to combine high speeds with shorter trajectories during turns. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Discrimination between cross-country and downhill skiers by pulmonary and local 31PNMR evaluations.

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    Laurent, D; Reutenauer, H; Payen, J F; Favre-Juvin, A; Eterradossi, J; Lebas, J F; Rossi, A

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to correlate data on calf muscle metabolism using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with measurements of whole body maximal oxygen consumption and maximal power output, and to determine whether the combination of these data could be used to predict athletic ability. Experiments were performed in a 2.35 Tesla, 35 cm diameter electromagnet on the leg muscle of sedentary human subjects (N = 6) and groups of athletes trained for endurance (cross-country skiers, N = 7) or strength performance (downhill skiers, N = 5). The exercise protocol consisted of successive plantar flexions performed at graded fractions of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). The results obtained from NMR investigation (changes in content of inorganic phosphate: Pi, phosphocreatine: PC and muscle ATP, and intracellular pH) were then compared with those of maximal O2 consumption (VO2max) and maximal power (MP). When the data on athletes were compared with those obtained on sedentary subjects, the curves illustrating the relationship between the imposed load and the Pi/PC ratio were significantly shifted toward high output power for a given Pi/PC value. It also appeared from this study that specific training in force development (downhill skiing) induced a slighter decrease in PC level than for endurance (cross-country skiers) despite improvement in physical performance. A slight but significant intracellular acidification was observed in the muscles of sedentary subjects and downhill skiers for contraction at, respectively, 50% and 80% of MVC, but not in the skeletal muscles of cross-country skiers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Analysis of the pushing phase in Paralympic cross-country sit-skiers - Class LW10.

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    Gastaldi, Laura; Mauro, Stefano; Pastorelli, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Paralympic Cross-Country sit-skiers use adaptive equipment, with a resulting gesture similar to double poling techniques adopted by able-bodied skiers. Despite the similarity, a specific attention on the gesture performed by sit-skiers is needed. The paper focuses on the sledge kinematic and on inertia effect of upper body motion which is translated in a propulsive effect in the early stage of the pushing cycle. In particular a group of 7 elite sit skiers of class LW10 were recorded with a video-based markerless motion capture technique during 1 km sprint Paralympic race. A biomechanical model, consisting of 7 anatomical points and 4 technical ones, is used to track the kinematics from video-images, then body segments, joints of interest and relative angles are evaluated. In this paper we focus on the biomechanics of the poling cycle, in particular prior to the onset of pole plant. The aim was to evaluate the contribution of the upper body to the early stage of the propulsive action. To this porpoise body inertial forces for each athlete are calculated using kinematic data, then normalized with respect to the athlete's body mass. The results show that in LW10 sit-skiers an important sledge propulsion, prior to the onset of pole plant, is provided by the inertial effect, due to the upper body region (arms and forearms) motion.

  12. The Evolution of Champion Cross-Country-Skier Training: From Lumberjacks to Professional Athletes.

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    Sandbakk, Øyvind

    2017-02-01

    Competitive cross-country (XC) skiing has traditions extending back to the mid-19th century and was included as a men's event in the first Winter Games in 1924. Since then, tremendous improvements in equipment, track preparation, and knowledge about training have prompted greater increases in XC-skiing speeds than in any other Olympic sport. In response, this commentary focuses on how the training of successful XC skiers has evolved, with interviews and training data from surviving Norwegian world and Olympic XC champions as primary sources. Before 1970, most male champion XC skiers were lumberjacks who ran or skied long distances to and from felling areas while working long days in the woods. In addition, they trained as much as possible, with increased intensity during the autumn, while less work but more ski-specific training and competitions were done during the winter. Until the 1970s, few XC skiers were women, whom coaches believed tolerated less training than men did. Today's XC skiers are less physically active, but the influence of both science and the systematic approaches of former athletes and coaches have gradually taught XC skiers to adopt smarter, more goal-oriented training practices. Although the very high VO2max of world-class XC skiers has remained the same since the 1960s, new events in modern XC skiing have additionally required superior upper-body power, high-speed techniques, and tactical flexibility. These elements also emerge in the training of today's best skiers; women's physiological capacities and training routines especially seem to have improved dramatically.

  13. Prevalence, age at onset, and risk factors of self-reported asthma among Swedish adolescent elite cross-country skiers.

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    Eriksson, L M; Irewall, T; Lindberg, Anne; Stenfors, Nikolai

    2017-03-17

    The objective of the study was to compare the prevalence of self-reported physician-diagnosed asthma and age at asthma onset between Swedish adolescent elite skiers and a reference group and to assess risk factors associated with asthma. Postal questionnaires were sent to 253 pupils at the Swedish National Elite Sport Schools for cross-country skiing, biathlon, and ski-orienteering ("skiers") and a random sample of 500 adolescents aged 16-20, matched for sport school municipalities ("reference"). The response rate was 96% among the skiers and 48% in the reference group. The proportion of participants with self-reported physician-diagnosed asthma was higher among skiers than in the reference group (27 vs. 19%, p = 0.046). Female skiers reported a higher prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma compared to male skiers (34 vs. 20%, p = 0.021). The median age at asthma onset was higher among skiers (12.0 vs. 8.0 years; p < 0.001). Female sex, family history of asthma, nasal allergy, and being a skier were risk factors associated with self-reported physician-diagnosed asthma. Swedish adolescent elite cross-country skiers have a higher asthma prevalence and later age at asthma onset compared to a reference population. Being an adolescent elite skier is an independent risk factor associated with asthma. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Changes in technique and efficiency after high-intensity exercise in cross-country skiers.

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    Åsan Grasaas, Christina; Ettema, Gertjan; Hegge, Ann Magdalen; Skovereng, Knut; Sandbakk, Øyvind

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated changes in technique and efficiency after high-intensity exercise to exhaustion in elite cross-country skiers. Twelve elite male skiers completed 4 min submaximal exercise before and after a high-intensity incremental test to exhaustion with the G3 skating technique on a 5% inclined roller-ski treadmill. Kinematics and kinetics were monitored by instrumented roller skis, work rate was calculated as power against roller friction and gravity, aerobic metabolic cost was determined from gas exchange, and blood lactate values indicated the anaerobic contribution. Gross efficiency was the work rate divided by aerobic metabolic rate. A recovery period of 10 min between the incremental test and the posttest was included to allow the metabolic values to return to baseline. Changes in neuromuscular fatigue in upper and lower limbs before and after the incremental test were indicated by peak power in concentric bench press and squat-jump height. From pretest to posttest, cycle length decreased and cycle rate increased by approximately 5% (P ski forces did not change significantly. Oxygen uptake increased by 4%, and gross efficiency decreased from 15.5% ± 0.7% to 15.2% ± 0.5% from pretest to posttest (both P cross-country skiers demonstrated a less efficient technique and shorter cycle length during submaximal roller-ski skating after high-intensity exercise. However, there were no changes in ski forces or peak power in the upper and lower limbs that could explain these differences.

  15. Muscle activation characteristics in cross-country skiers with a history of anterior compartment pain.

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    Federolf, Peter; Bakker, Emily

    2012-11-01

    A large proportion of elite cross-country skiers suffer from chronic anterior compartment syndrome (CACS). This study used surface electromyograms (EMGs) to investigate whether differences existed in the activation characteristics of the tibialis anterior muscle between elite cross-country skiers with a history of anterior compartment pain (symptomatic group) and a pain-free control group. Based on self-reported pain symptoms, twelve young, national-level cross-country ski athletes were assigned to a symptomatic group (N = 5), a control group (N = 4), or analyzed individually if their diagnosis was not certain (N = 3). During skating, EMGs were recorded on five lower leg muscles. The relative increase in EMG power per step when increasing the effort level of skating was larger in the symptomatic group than in the control group for tibialis anterior (143 +/- 12% vs. 125 +/- 23%; Cohen's d = 1.17), peroneus longus (123 +/- 24% vs. 107 +/- 6%; d = 0.91), and gastrocnemius lateralis (167 +/- 51% vs. 117 +/- 12%; d = 1.64). The symptomatic group showed more power in the lower frequency bands of the tibialis anterior's EMG spectra (p 0.2). Within the step cycle, these differences appeared in the swing phase and in the gliding phase during single leg support. The observed differences in the EMG spectra may serve as an early identification of athletes who are at risk of developing CACS.

  16. Quadrupedal Locomotion-Respiration Entrainment and Metabolic Economy in Cross-Country Skiers.

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    Boldt, Kevin; Killick, Anthony; Herzog, Walter

    2016-02-01

    A 1:1 locomotion-respiration entrainment is observed in galloping quadrupeds, and is thought to improve running economy. However, this has not been tested directly in animals, as animals cannot voluntarily disrupt this entrainment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate metabolic economy in a human gait involving all four limbs, cross-country skiing, in natural entrainment and forced nonentrainment. Nine elite cross-country skiers roller skied at constant speed using the 2-skate technique. In the first and last conditions, athletes used the natural entrained breathing pattern: inhaling with arm recovery and exhaling with arm propulsion, and in the second condition, the athletes disentrained their breathing pattern. The rate of oxygen uptake (VO2) and metabolic rate (MR) were measured via expired gas analysis. Propulsive forces were measured with instrumented skis and poles. VO2 and MR increased by 4% and 5% respectively when skiers used the disentrained compared with the entrained breathing pattern. There were no differences in ski or pole forces or in timing of the gait cycle between conditions. We conclude that breathing entrainment reduces metabolic cost of cross-country skiing by approximately 4%. Further, this reduction is likely a result of the entrainment rather than alterations in gait mechanics.

  17. Effects of training and iron supplementation on iron status of cross-country skiers.

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    Pattini, A; Schena, F

    1990-12-01

    We have studied the effects of iron treatment on iron deficient cross-country skiers. Kind and duration of their daily training were also considered. Forty-eight athletes were divided in three balanced groups: Group A received 160 mg ferritinic iron/die, Group B received the same amount of iron and 1 gr of ascorbic acid and Group C was untreated. Blood samples were taken at the start, after two months and four months of supplementation. Hematological and iron status parameters were determined. Average training duration was 80 min a day. Running was the most frequent method of training but also roll and country skiing were commonly used. At the initial sample low serum ferritin values were found in all the three groups (Group A = 23.3 micrograms/l, Group B = 20.9 micrograms/l and Group C = 23.5 micrograms/l). After iron treatment serum ferritin increased in Groups A and B (+67.8% and +63.6% respectively) but was slightly reduced in Group C. Serum iron was unchanged and total iron binding capacity decreased following ferritin increase. Ascorbic acid failed to increase iron absorption in Group B. A significant reduction of haptoglobin (-14% and -9% in Group A and B respectively) was also documented. We conclude that cross-country skiers extensively use running in their training and it may be one of the cause of their poor iron status. Ferritinic iron treatment seems to be effective in replacing iron stores in cross-country skiers who underwent heavy training.

  18. Fibre characteristics and enzyme levels of arm and leg muscles in elite cross-country skiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Erik

    1995-01-01

    Performance tests and measurements of maximal aerobic capacity were performed during the competition period in elite cross-country skiers. Muscle biopsies were taken in the middle of January. Histochemical fibre typing, determination of fibre areas and number of capillaries as well as assays....... The FTa fibre area in TRI was significantly larger than in VAS. No differences were found in the number of capillaries per fibre in TRI (2.7) and VAS (2.5). The number of capillaries per area was significantly lower in TRI (373) as compared to VAS (422). The LDHtot enzyme level was significantly higher...

  19. [Injury risk of competitive, handicapped cross-country skiers in training nd competition].

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    Schmid, A; Hüring, H; Huber, G; Gösele, A; Hecker-Kube, H; Gruhn, O; Stinus, H; Birnesser, H; Keul, J

    1998-03-01

    Injuries caused by cross country skiing have been poorly investigated in handicapped athletes. The dynamic sliding shape of motion makes this sport to a suitable discipline for people with a deficit of locomotion. Visual handicapped people with a guide are able to improve their motoric skills, co-ordination, orientation and body self-consciousness in the track. Since handicapped athletes are performing in international competitions the training intensity to fulfill the requirements, but also the risk of overstrain induced injuries got increased, like in other high-performance sports. Our study examined injuries and overuse syndromes of the German National Team Ski Nordic during the Paralympics in Tignes/ Albertville (1992). Lillehammer (1994) and the training period in preparation for the Paralympics in Nagano (March 1998). The incidence and kind of injuries in the competitive handicapped cross country skier was comparable with non-handicapped athletes, but the injury pattern was different.

  20. The elite cross-country skier provides unique insights into human exercise physiology.

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    Holmberg, H-C

    2015-12-01

    Successful cross-country skiing, one of the most demanding of endurance sports, involves considerable physiological challenges posed by the combined upper- and lower-body effort of varying intensity and duration, on hilly terrain, often at moderate altitude and in a cold environment. Over the years, this unique sport has helped physiologists gain novel insights into the limits of human performance and regulatory capacity. There is a long-standing tradition of researchers in this field working together with coaches and athletes to improve training routines, monitor progress, and refine skiing techniques. This review summarizes research on elite cross-country skiers, with special emphasis on the studies initiated by Professor Bengt Saltin. He often employed exercise as a means to learn more about the human body, successfully engaging elite endurance athletes to improve our understanding of the demands, characteristics, and specific effects associated with different types of exercise.

  1. Gender differences in the physiological responses and kinematic behaviour of elite sprint cross-country skiers.

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    Sandbakk, Oyvind; Ettema, Gertjan; Leirdal, Stig; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2012-03-01

    Gender differences in performance by elite endurance athletes, including runners, track cyclists and speed skaters, have been shown to be approximately 12%. The present study was designed to examine gender differences in physiological responses and kinematics associated with sprint cross-country skiing. Eight male and eight female elite sprint cross-country skiers, matched for performance, carried out a submaximal test, a test of maximal aerobic capacity (VO(2max)) and a shorter test of maximal treadmill speed (V (max)) during treadmill roller skiing utilizing the G3 skating technique. The men attained 17% higher speeds during both the VO(2max) and the V (max) tests (P kinematics, the gender difference in performance was explained by cycle length, not by cycle rate.

  2. A Comparison of Frontal Theta Activity During Shooting among Biathletes and Cross-Country Skiers before and after Vigorous Exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri Luchsinger

    Full Text Available Previous studies using electroencephalography (EEG to monitor brain activity have linked higher frontal theta activity to more focused attention and superior performance in goal-directed precision tasks. In biathlon, shooting performance requires focused attention after high-intensity cross-country skiing.To compare biathletes (serving as experts and cross-country skiers (novices and examine the effect of vigorous exercise on frontal theta activity during shooting.EEG frontal theta (4-7 Hz activity was compared between nine biathletes and eight cross-country skiers at comparable skiing performance levels who fired 100 shots on a 5-m indoor shooting range in quiescent condition followed by 20 shots after each of five 6-min high-intensity roller skiing sessions in the skating technique on a treadmill.Biathletes hit 80±14% and 81±10% before and after the roller skiing sessions, respectively. For the cross-country skiers these values were significantly lower than for the biathletes and amounted to 39±13% and 44±11% (p<0.01. Biathletes had on average 6% higher frontal theta activity during shooting as compared to cross-country skiers (F1,15 = 4.82, p = 0.044, but no significant effect of vigorous exercise on frontal theta activity in either of the two groups were found (F1,15 = 0.14, p = 0.72.Biathletes had significantly higher frontal theta activity than cross-country skiers during shooting, indicating higher focused attention in biathletes. Vigorous exercise did not decrease shooting performance or frontal theta activity during shooting in biathletes and cross-country skiers.

  3. Changes in physical performance parameters during and after moderate altitude training in elite cross country skiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt; Höög, Martina; Willis, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Olympic cross country skiing competitions in 2014 will be held in Sochi, Russia at an altitude of approximately 1500m. Although moderate, this altitude is known to reduce performance in highly trained endurance athletes. It is also known that individuals react differently during...... moderate altitude training seems not to be related to any single parameter. One should not ignore individual differences in adaptation. REFERENCES 1. Ainegren, M. et al Engineering of Sport 7, Vol 2, 2008: p. 393-400. 2. Medbo, J.I.et al J.Appl.Physiol., 1988. 64: p. 50-60.......INTRODUCTION: The Olympic cross country skiing competitions in 2014 will be held in Sochi, Russia at an altitude of approximately 1500m. Although moderate, this altitude is known to reduce performance in highly trained endurance athletes. It is also known that individuals react differently during...... altitude exposure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate performance changes during and after three weeks of training in moderate altitude in elite skiers. METHOD: Four male and three female skiers were tested on a roller skiing treadmill using the classic technique at sea level (NORM1), after 3 and 20...

  4. Biomechanical analysis of the herringbone technique as employed by elite cross-country skiers.

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    Andersson, E; Stöggl, T; Pellegrini, B; Sandbakk, O; Ettema, G; Holmberg, H-C

    2014-06-01

    This investigation was designed to analyse the kinematics and kinetics of cross-country skiing at different velocities with the herringbone technique on a steep incline. Eleven elite male cross-country skiers performed this technique at maximal, high, and moderate velocities on a snow-covered 15° incline. They positioned their skis laterally (25 to 30°) with a slight inside tilt and planted their poles laterally (8 to 12°) with most leg thrust force exerted on the inside forefoot. Although 77% of the total propulsive force was generated by the legs, the ratio between propulsive and total force was approximately fourfold higher for the poles. The cycle rate increased with velocity (1.20 to 1.60 Hz), whereas the cycle length increased from moderate up to high velocity, but then remained the same at maximal velocity (2.0 to 2.3 m). In conclusion, with the herringbone technique, the skis were angled laterally without gliding, with the forces distributed mainly on the inside forefoot to enable grip for propulsion. The skiers utilized high cycle rates with major propulsion by the legs, highlighting the importance of high peak and rapid generation of leg forces.

  5. Prediction of performance in Vasaloppet through long lasting ski- ergometer and rollerski tests in cross-country skiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Erik; Wulff, Kristian; Jensen, Mads Rosenkilde;

    2015-01-01

    -ergometer and Rollerski field tests correlate strongly with performance in Vasaloppet and therefore might be useful test tools for recreational skiers who wish to participate in long lasting c-c competitions. Keywords: Cross-country ski training, Upper body, Exercise intensity, Field test, Body composition blood lactate......The main purpose was to investigate if long lasting cross-country (c-c) test procedures could predict performance time in ‘Vasaloppet’ and secondly the effect of a 16 weeks training period on a 90 min double poling performance test. 24 moderate trained c-c skiers participated in the study...... and completed Vasaloppet. All skiers carried out pre and post training tests in a 90 minutes ski-ergometer double poling test and a 120 minutes rollerski field test on a closed paved circuit. 19 skiers provided detailed training logs that could sufficiently establish their training preparation for Vasaloppet...

  6. Analysis of Classical Time-Trial Performance and Technique-Specific Physiological Determinants in Elite Female Cross-Country Skiers.

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    Sandbakk, Øyvind; Losnegard, Thomas; Skattebo, Øyvind; Hegge, Ann M; Tønnessen, Espen; Kocbach, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the contribution of performance on uphill, flat, and downhill sections to overall performance in an international 10-km classical time-trial in elite female cross-country skiers, as well as the relationships between performance on snow and laboratory-measured physiological variables in the double poling (DP) and diagonal (DIA) techniques. Ten elite female cross-country skiers were continuously measured by a global positioning system device during an international 10-km cross-country skiing time-trial in the classical technique. One month prior to the race, all skiers performed a 5-min submaximal and 3-min self-paced performance test while roller skiing on a treadmill, both in the DP and DIA techniques. The time spent on uphill (r = 0.98) and flat (r = 0.91) sections of the race correlated most strongly with the overall 10-km performance (both p skiing test and body-mass normalized peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) in both techniques showed the strongest correlations with overall time-trial performance (r = 0.66-0.78), with DP capacity tending to have greatest impact on the flat and DIA capacity on uphill terrain (all p cross-country skiers can be explained by variations in technique-specific aerobic power.

  7. The velocity and energy profiles of elite cross-country skiers executing downhill turns with different radii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandbakk, Oyvind; Bucher Sandbakk, Silvana; Supej, Matej; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the influence of turn radius on velocity and energy profiles when skidding and step turning during more and less effective downhill turns while cross-country skiing. Thirteen elite female cross-country skiers performed single turns with a 9- or 12-m radius using the skidding technique and a 12- or 15-m radius with step turning. Mechanical parameters were monitored using a real-time kinematic Global Navigation Satellite System and video analysis. Step turning was more effective during all phases of a turn, leading to higher velocities than skidding (P cross-country skiers when executing downhill turns of varying radii and can be used to assess the quality of such turns.

  8. Repeated double-poling sprint training in hypoxia by competitive cross-country skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiss, Raphael; Willis, Sarah; Born, Dennis-Peter; Sperlich, Billy; Vesin, Jean-Marc; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Millet, Grégoire P

    2015-04-01

    Repeated-sprint training in hypoxia (RSH) was recently shown to improve repeated-sprint ability (RSA) in cycling. This phenomenon is likely to reflect fiber type-dependent, compensatory vasodilation, and therefore, our hypothesis was that RSH is even more beneficial for activities involving upper body muscles, such as double poling during cross-country skiing. In a double-blinded fashion, 17 competitive cross-country skiers performed six sessions of repeated sprints (each consisting of four sets of five 10-s sprints, with 20-s intervals of recovery) either in normoxia (RSN, 300 m; FiO2, 20.9%; n = 8) or normobaric hypoxia (RSH, 3000 m; FiO2, 13.8 %; n = 9). Before (pre) and after (post) training, performance was evaluated with an RSA test (10-s all-out sprints-20-s recovery, until peak power output declined by 30%) and a simulated team sprint (team sprint, 3 × 3-min all-out with 3-min rest) on a double-poling ergometer. Triceps brachii oxygenation was measured by near-infrared spectroscopy. From pretraining to posttraining, peak power output in the RSA was increased (P sprints performed was enhanced in RSH (10.9 ± 5.2 vs 17.1 ± 6.8, P sprints throughout RSA rose more in RSH (P sprints improved by 11% ± 9% in RSH and 15% ± 7% in RSN. Our findings reveal greater improvement in the performance of repeated double-poling sprints, together with larger variations in the perfusion of upper body muscles in RSH compared with those in RSN.

  9. Analysis of classical time-trial performance and technique-specific physiological determinants in elite female cross-country skiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øyvind Sandbakk

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the contribution of performance on uphill, flat, and downhill sections to overall performance in an international 10-km classical time-trial in elite female cross-country skiers, as well as the relationships between performance on snow and laboratory-measured physiological variables in the double poling (DP and diagonal (DIA techniques. Ten elite female cross-country skiers were continuously measured by a global positioning system device during an international 10-km cross-country skiing time-trial in the classical technique. One month prior to the race, all skiers performed a 5-min submaximal and 3-min self-paced performance test while roller skiing on a treadmill, both in the DP and DIA techniques. The time spent on uphill (r=0.98 and flat (r=0.91 sections of the race correlated most strongly with the overall 10-km performance (both p<0.05. Approximately 56% of the racing time was spent uphill, and stepwise multiple regression revealed that uphill time explained 95.5% of the variance in overall performance (p<0.001. Distance covered during the 3-min roller-skiing test and body-mass normalized peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak in both techniques showed the strongest correlations with overall time-trial performance (r=0.66-0.78, with DP capacity tending to have greatest impact on the flat and DIA capacity on uphill terrain (all p<0.05. Our present findings reveal that the time spent uphill most strongly determine classical time-trial performance, and that the major portion of the performance differences among elite female cross-country skiers can be explained by variations in technique-specific aerobic power.

  10. Elite cross-country skiers do not reach their running VO2max during roller ski skating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losnegard, T; Hallén, J

    2014-08-01

    Cross-country skiers' VO2max is often measured during treadmill running. However, VO2max during treadmill skiing with the diagonal stride technique is higher, whereas it is lower during double poling, another classical style technique. How these values compare to VO2max during ski skating in elite cross country skiers is not known. Therefore, this study compared VO2max during treadmill uphill running and treadmill roller ski skating. Twenty-two males (21±2 years, 182±6 cm, 77±7 kg, VO2max running; 72.4±4.4 mL·kg-1·min-1) elite cross-country skiers and biathlon athletes underwent testing in both running and roller ski skating before (May) and at the end (October) of the preseason training. From May to October VO2max increased during running (3.1±4.5%, P=0.003, Effect size; ES=0.44, small) but not during roller ski skating (1.8±5.6%, P=0.13, ES=0.24, small). In May the subjects' VO2max during running was 1.7±4.7% higher compared to during roller ski skating (P=0.08, ES=0.24, small) while in October this difference was 3.0±5.0 % (PVO2max during roller ski skating than during running and this relationship does not change during the pre-season training period.

  11. Aerobic power and lean mass are indicators of competitive sprint performance among elite female cross-country skiers

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    Carlsson T

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tomas Carlsson, Michail Tonkonogi, Magnus Carlsson School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, SwedenAbstract: The purpose of this study was to establish the optimal allometric models to predict International Ski Federation’s ski-ranking points for sprint competitions (FISsprint among elite female cross-country skiers based on maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max and lean mass (LM. Ten elite female cross-country skiers (age: 24.5±2.8 years [mean ± SD] completed a treadmill roller-skiing test to determine V̇O2max (ie, aerobic power using the diagonal stride technique, whereas LM (ie, a surrogate indicator of anaerobic capacity was determined by dual-emission X-ray anthropometry. The subjects’ FISsprint were used as competitive performance measures. Power function modeling was used to predict the skiers’ FISsprint based on V̇O2max, LM, and body mass. The subjects’ test and performance data were as follows: V̇O2max, 4.0±0.3 L min-1; LM, 48.9±4.4 kg; body mass, 64.0±5.2 kg; and FISsprint, 116.4±59.6 points. The following power function models were established for the prediction of FISsprint: 3.91×105 ∙ VO -6.00 2max and 6.95×1010 ∙ LM-5.25; these models explained 66% (P=0.0043 and 52% (P=0.019, respectively, of the variance in the FISsprint. Body mass failed to contribute to both models; hence, the models are based on V̇O2max and LM expressed absolutely. The results demonstrate that the physiological variables that reflect aerobic power and anaerobic capacity are important indicators of competitive sprint performance among elite female skiers. To accurately indicate performance capability among elite female skiers, the presented power function models should be used. Skiers whose V̇O2max differs by 1% will differ in their FISsprint by 5.8%, whereas the corresponding 1% difference in LM is related to an FISsprint difference of 5.1%, where both differences are in favor of the skier with

  12. The modified Dmax method is reliable to predict the second ventilatory threshold in elite cross-country skiers.

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    Fabre, Nicolas; Balestreri, Filippo; Pellegrini, Barbara; Schena, Federico

    2010-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate, in elite cross-country skiers, the capacity of the DMAX lactate threshold method and its modified version (DMAX MOD) to accurately predict the second ventilatory threshold (VT2). Twenty-three elite cross-country skiers carried out an incremental roller-ski test on a motorized treadmill. Ventilation, heart rate (HR), and gas exchanges were continuously recorded during the test. Blood was sampled at the end of each 3-minute work stage for lactate concentration measurements. The VT2 was individually determined by visual analysis. The DMAX, DMAX MOD points also with the 4 mmol.L(-1) fixed lactate concentration value (4 mM) were determined by a computerized program. Paired t tests showed nonsignificant differences between HR at VT2 and HR at DMAX MOD, between HR at VT2 and HR at 4 mM, and between HR at DMAX MOD and HR at 4 mM. HR at DMAX was significantly lower than HR at VT2, DMAX MOD, and at 4 mM (pcross-country skiers.

  13. Airway inflammation, cough and athlete quality of life in elite female cross-country skiers: A longitudinal study.

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    Kennedy, M D; Davidson, W J; Wong, L E; Traves, S L; Leigh, R; Eves, N D

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a season of cross-country training and racing on airway inflammation, cough symptoms, and athlete quality of life in female skiers. Eighteen elite female skiers performed sputum induction and completed the Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ) and the Recovery-Stress Questionnaire (REST-Q) at three time points (T1 - May/Jun, T2 - Oct/Nov, T3 - Jan-Mar) during the year. No changes were observed between T1 and T2. However, an increase in sputum eosinophils and lymphocytes (P < 0.05) and a significant change in all three domains of the LCQ were observed between T1 and T3 (P < 0.05). A significant association was found between the total yearly hours of training and the change in the total cell count (r(2)  = 0.74; P = 0.006), and a number of other sputum cell counts between T1 and T3. No changes were observed for any domain of the REST-Q. The results of this study demonstrate that airway inflammation and cough symptoms are significantly increased in elite female cross-country skiers across a year of training and racing. The increase in airway inflammation is related to the total amount of training and is worse during the winter months when athletes are training and racing in cold, dry air.

  14. Spinal alignment, mobility of the hip and thoracic spine and prevalence of low back pain in young elite cross-country skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alricsson, Marie; Björklund, Glenn; Cronholm, Martin; Olsson, Oscar; Viklund, Peter; Svantesson, Ulla

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the association between spinal alignment, mobility of the hips and the thoracic spine and low back pain in adolescent cross-country skiers. Cohort of 51 elite cross-country skiers from a cross-country skiing high school in Sweden participated in the study. Sagittal spinal alignment, active range of motion in flexion, extension and rotation of the thoracic spine as well as passive and active extension of the hips were measured. The participants also completed a questionnaire regarding training, competition, skiing technique and occurrence of low back pain. A simple linear regression was calculated to predict pain score based on thoraco-lumbar relation, with a significant (Palignment seems to be related with low back pain among young elite cross-country skiers. This study shows that range of motion of the thoracic spine and hips do not have an effect on the prevalence of low back pain in this population.

  15. Blood lactate level responses and comparison with submaximal running and roller skiing in cross-country skiers.

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    Cetin, Ebru; Bilgin, Ulviye; Schurmann, Banu Can; Yarim, Imdat; Dölek, Burcu Ertas

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of 30-minute duration submaximal running and roller skiing exercises, which are among the most important aerobic exercise models in cross-country skiers, on lactic acid levels. The study group comprised 6 female and 4 male athletes (age: 16.87 +/- 1.87 years, body height: 168.35 +/- 5.66 cm, body weight: 56.83 +/- 7.1 kg) who competed in cross-country skiing at national and international level. All athletes participated in the study voluntarily. Measurements were performed three times as basal (1st measurement), immediately after exercise (2nd measurement) and 5 minutes after finishing exercise (3rd measurement).Statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS (version 11.5). A significant increase (P skiing exercises, according to percentage values, but the difference in fatigue levels between exercise types was not statistically significant.

  16. Possible asphyxiation from carbon dioxide of a cross-country skier in eastern California: a deadly volcanic hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, P M

    2000-01-01

    This report describes an incident in which exceedingly high levels of carbon dioxide may have contributed to the death of a skier in eastern California. A cross-country skier was found dead inside a large, mostly covered snow cave, 1 day after he was reported missing. The autopsy report suggests that the skier died of acute pulmonary edema consistent with asphyxiation; carbon dioxide measurements inside the hole in which he was found reached 70%. This area is known for having a high carbon dioxide flux attributed to degassing of a large body of magma (molten rock) 10 to 20 km beneath the ski area. The literature describes many incidents of fatal carbon dioxide exposures associated with volcanic systems in other parts of the world. We believe this case represents the first reported death associated with volcanically produced carbon dioxide in the United States. Disaster and wilderness medicine specialists should be aware of and plan for this potential health hazard associated with active volcanoes.

  17. Gender differences in endurance performance by elite cross-country skiers are influenced by the contribution from poling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandbakk, Ø; Ettema, G; Holmberg, H-C

    2014-02-01

    Greater gender differences have been found in exercise modes where the upper body is involved. Therefore, the present study investigated the influence of poling on gender differences in endurance performance by elite cross-country skiers. Initially, the performance of eight male and eight female sprint skiers was compared during four different types of exercise involving different degrees of poling: double poling (DP), G3 skating, and diagonal stride (DIA) techniques during treadmill roller skiing, and treadmill running (RUN). Thereafter, DP was examined for physiological and kinematic parameters. The relative gender differences associated with the DP, G3, DIA and RUN performances were approximately 20%, 17%, 14%, and 12%, respectively. Thus, the type of exercise exerted an overall effect on the relative gender differences (P < 0.05). In connection with DP, the men achieved 63%, 16%, and 8% higher VO2peak than the women in absolute terms and with normalization for total and fat-free body mass (all P < 0.05). The DP VO2peak in percentage of VO2max in RUN was higher in men (P < 0.05). The gender difference in DP peak cycle length was 23% (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the present investigation demonstrates that the gender difference in performance by elite sprint skiers is enhanced when the contribution from poling increases.

  18. Biomechanical characteristics and speed adaptation during kick double poling on roller skis in elite cross-country skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göpfert, Caroline; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Stöggl, Thomas; Müller, Erich; Lindinger, Stefan Josef

    2013-06-01

    Recent developments in cross-country ski racing should promote the use of kick double poling. This technique, however, has not been the focus in athletes' training and has barely been investigated. The aims of the present study were to develop a function-based phase definition and to analyse speed adaptation mechanisms for kick double poling in elite cross-country skiers. Joint kinematics and pole/plantar forces were recorded in 10 athletes while performing kick double poling at three submaximal roller skiing speeds. A speed increase was associated with increases in cycle length and rate, while absolute poling and leg push-off durations shortened. Despite maintained impulses of force, the peak and average pole/leg forces increased. During double poling and leg push-off, ranges of motion of elbow flexion and extension increased (p < 0.05) and were maintained for hip/knee flexion and extension. Cycle length increase was correlated to increases in average poling force (r = 0.71) and arm swing time (r = 0.88; both p < 0.05). The main speed adaptation was achieved by changes in double poling technique; however, leg push-off showed high variability among elite skiers, thus illustrating important aspects for technique training.

  19. Effects of upper-body sprint-interval training on strength and endurance capacities in female cross-country skiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandbakk, Kristine; Welde, Boye; Kruken, Andrea Hovstein; Baumgart, Julia; Ettema, Gertjan; Karlsen, Trine; Sandbakk, Øyvind

    2017-01-01

    This study compared the effects of adding upper-body sprint-intervals or continuous double poling endurance training to the normal training on maximal upper-body strength and endurance capacity in female cross-country skiers. In total, 17 female skiers (age: 18.1±0.8yr, body mass: 60±7 kg, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max): 3.30±0.37 L.min-1) performed an 8-week training intervention. Here, either two weekly sessions of six to eight 30-s maximal upper-body double poling sprint-intervals (SIG, n = 8) or 45–75 min of continuous low-to-moderate intensity double poling on roller skis (CG, n = 9) were added to their training. Before and after the intervention, the participants were tested for physiological and kinematical responses during submaximal and maximal diagonal and double poling treadmill roller skiing. Additionally, we measured maximal upper-body strength (1RM) and average power at 40% 1RM in a poling-specific strength exercise. SIG improved absolute VO2max in diagonal skiing more than CG (8% vs 2%, pstrength more than CG (18% vs 10%, pstrength and VO2max. PMID:28241030

  20. Seasonal variations in VO2max, O2-cost, O2-deficit, and performance in elite cross-country skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losnegard, Thomas; Myklebust, Håvard; Spencer, Matt; Hallén, Jostein

    2013-07-01

    Long-term effects of training are important information for athletes, coaches, and scientists when associating changes in physiological indices with changes in performance. Therefore, this study monitored changes in aerobic and anaerobic capacities and performance in a group of elite cross-country skiers during a full sport season. Thirteen men (age, 23 ± 2 years; height, 182 ± 6 cm; body mass, 76 ± 8 kg; V2 roller ski skating VO2max, 79.3 ± 4.4 ml·kg·min or 6.0 ± 0.5 L·min) were tested during the early, middle, and late preparation phase: June (T1), August (T2), and October (T3); during the competition phase: January/February (T4); and after early precompetition phase: June (T5). O2-cost during submaximal efforts, V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak, accumulated oxygen deficit (ΣO2-deficit), and performance during a 1,000-m test were determined in the V2 ski skating technique on a roller ski treadmill. Subjects performed their training on an individual basis, and detailed training logs were categorized into different intensity zones and exercise modes. Total training volume was highest during the summer months (early preseason) and decreased toward and through the winter season, whereas the volume of high-intensity training increased (all p testing sessions for 1,000 m time, O2-cost, and ΣO2-deficit (Cohen's d effect size; ES = 0.63-1.37, moderate to large, all p < 0.05). In general, the changes occurred between T1 and T3 with minor changes in the competitive season (T3 to T4). No significant changes were found in V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak across the year (ES = 0.17, trivial). In conclusion, the training performed by elite cross-country skiers induced no significant changes in V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak but improved performance, O2-cost, and ΣO2-deficit.

  1. The Impact of Endurance Training on Functional Parameters During the Preparation Phase among Cross-Country Skiers

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    Žiška Peter

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the study, we have tried to demonstrate the effect of endurance training on changes in functional parameters during the preparation phase (12-week mesocycle among cross-country skiers. The group consisted of 10 male cross-country skiers (age: 21.4 ±5 year who completed control (1st 6 week mesocycle and experimental period (2nd 6 week mesocycle.We focused on the following time-varying parameters: changes in maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max, the level of aerobic (AeT and anaerobic thresholds (AT, maximum heart rate (HRmax and performance on the running treadmill. The intra-individual monitoring of each athlete revealed statistical significance of VO2max (mid_VO2max = 69.48 ± 5.72 l.kg-1.min-1, post_ VO2max = 70.96 ± 5.67 ml.kg-1.min-1; p≤0.05 and the level of AT (mid_AT = 86.2 ± 5.43 %, post_AT = 87.8 ± 5.59 %; p≤0.01 the performance on the running treadmill (mid_t = 14:54 ± 1:43 min., post_t = 15:30 ± 1:50 min.; p≤0.05.The significant changes were recorded in the AeT(pre_AeT = 70.3 ± 7.56 %, mid_AeT = 72.5 ± 7.59 %; p≤0.05 in theHRmax(pre_HRmax = 190 ± 8.04 bpm, mid_HRmax = 189 bpm, post_HRmax = 188 ± 7.34 bpm; p = n.s. during control period. We assume that the significant differences occurred as a result of adaptation changes due to training stimuli, which were induced by changes in functional parameters. Increased training volume in zone lower level of oxygen regime (A1, upper level of oxygen regime (A2 and upper level of lactate tolerance(T2 during experimental period elicited changes which reflected the increase functional parameters and performance on the running treadmill compared to that of control period.

  2. Effect of cold conditions on double poling sprint performance of well-trained male cross-country skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggen, Øystein N; Waagaard, Silje H; Heidelberg, Cecilie T; Oksa, Juha

    2013-12-01

    This study compared the effects of cold (-14° C) and moderate environments (6° C) on double poling (DP) sprint performance. Wearing modern cross-country ski racing suits, 14 highly trained male cross-country skiers performed a test protocol on a DP ergometer, consisting of a standardized warm-up followed by a 30-second maximal sprint (DP30s) and a 2-minute maximal sprint (DP2min), and after an 8-minute recovery period, another DP30s and DP2min were performed. Finally, the participants performed an incremental DP test to exhaustion. We observed no difference between rectal temperature in cold and moderate conditions. Mean skin temperature (Tskin) was lower in the cold condition; the lowest values being 20.3° C at -14° C and 27.0° C at 6° C. Power output decreased between the first and the second DP30s under both conditions, but the reduction was 4.9% (p < 0.05) greater in the cold condition. Power output decreased by 4.8% (p < 0.05) between the first and second DP2min at -14° C, but we found no difference at 6° C. In the incremental test to exhaustion, there was a 7.2% (p < 0.05) reduction in peak power output and a 7.8% (p < 0.05) lower peak oxygen consumption at -14° C. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that DP sprint performance was lower at -14° C than at 6° C. Tskin and body temperature were lower at -14° C. This may indicate cooling of superficial musculature and may explain the reduced DP sprint performance observed in our study.

  3. [The application of the emulsified turpentine baths for the correction of the functional state of the cross-country skiers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnov, I O; Kuchin, A V; Loginova, T P; Varlamova, N G; Boiko, E R

    2016-01-01

    The baths with emulsified turpentine find the wide application in balneotherapy. They produce especially pronounced beneficial prophylactic effects in the patients presenting with microtrombosis and microvascular stasis. Moreover, these baths may be prescribed to improve microcirculation, increase the functional reserves and physical capacity in the athletes. At the same time, the current literature appears to contain no scientific publications on the application of emulsified turpentine baths for the restoration of the physical capacity of the professional ski runners. The lack of relevant information motivated the study reported in the present article. The main objective of the study involving 10 subjects was to evaluate the effectiveness of the modified emulsified turpentine baths as a method by which to restore and enhance the physical capacity of the professional cross-country skiers. The physical capacity of the athletes was evaluated from the results of the bicycle ergometer exercise test with the use of the «Oxycon Pro» system. The data obtained suggest that a course of the emulsified turpentine baths increases the activity of the cardiorespiratory system, improves the physical capacity, and enhances the functional reserves of the body in the anaerobic zone.

  4. Type of sport is related to injury profile: a study on cross country skiers, swimmers, long-distance runners and soccer players. A retrospective 12-month study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristolainen, L; Heinonen, A; Turunen, H; Mannström, H; Waller, B; Kettunen, J A; Kujala, U M

    2010-06-01

    This 12-month retrospective questionnaire compared the occurrence of sports injuries in 149 cross country skiers, 154 swimmers, 143 long-distance runners and 128 soccer players aged 15-35 years. Soccer had significantly more injuries (5.1 injuries/1000 exposure hour) than other sports (2.1-2.8, Psoccer players reported overuse injuries (59% vs 42%, P=0.005), locating typically in the foot in runners, soccer players and skiers. Swimmers reported overuse injuries in the shoulder more commonly than skiers (40% vs 1%, Psoccer and running the absence time from sport because of injuries was significantly longer than in skiing and swimming. No severe permanent disabilities occurred due to injury but seven women quit sports because of injury. In conclusion, type of loading is strictly associated with the anatomical location of an overuse injury as shown by the difference in shoulder injury incidence between swimmers and cross country skiers. In some sports, a significant proportion of acute injuries occur in other than the main event.

  5. Optimal V̇O2max-to-mass ratio for predicting 15 km performance among elite male cross-country skiers

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    Carlsson T

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tomas Carlsson,1,2 Magnus Carlsson,1,2 Daniel Hammarström,3 Bent R Rønnestad,3 Christer B Malm,2 Michail Tonkonogi1 1School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, 2Sports Medicine Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; 3The Lillehammer Research Center for Medicine and Exercise Physiology, Lillehammer University College, Lillehammer, Norway Abstract: The aim of this study was 1 to validate the 0.5 body-mass exponent for maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max as the optimal predictor of performance in a 15 km classical-technique skiing competition among elite male cross-country skiers and 2 to evaluate the influence of distance covered on the body-mass exponent for V̇O2max among elite male skiers. Twenty-four elite male skiers (age: 21.4±3.3 years [mean ± standard deviation] completed an incremental treadmill roller-skiing test to determine their V̇O2max. Performance data were collected from a 15 km classical-technique cross-country skiing competition performed on a 5 km course. Power-function modeling (ie, an allometric scaling approach was used to establish the optimal body-mass exponent for V̇O2max to predict the skiing performance. The optimal power-function models were found to be race speed = 8.83 • (V̇O2max m-0.530.66 and lap speed = 5.89 • (V̇O2max m-(0.49+0.018lap0.43e0.010age, which explained 69% and 81% of the variance in skiing speed, respectively. All the variables contributed to the models. Based on the validation results, it may be recommended that V̇O2max divided by the square root of body mass (mL • min-1 • kg-0.5 should be used when elite male skiers’ performance capability in 15 km classical-technique races is evaluated. Moreover, the body-mass exponent for V̇O2max was demonstrated to be influenced by the distance covered, indicating that heavier skiers have a more pronounced positive pacing profile (ie, race speed gradually decreasing throughout the race compared to that of lighter

  6. Contribution of Upper-Body Strength, Body Composition, and Maximal Oxygen Uptake to Predict Double Poling Power and Overall Performance in Female Cross-Country Skiers.

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    Østerås, Sindre; Welde, Boye; Danielsen, Jørgen; van den Tillaar, Roland; Ettema, Gertjan; Sandbakk, Øyvind

    2016-09-01

    Østerås, S, Welde, B, Danielsen, J, van den Tillaar, R, Ettema, G, and Sandbakk, Ø. Contribution of upper-body strength, body composition, and maximal oxygen uptake to predict double poling power and overall performance in female cross-country skiers. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2557-2564, 2016-Maximal oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max) is regarded as the most performance-differentiating physiological measure in cross-country (XC) skiing. In addition, upper-body strength and lean mass have been associated with double poling (DP) power in XC skiers. In this study, we tested upper-body maximal strength, lean mass, and V[Combining Dot Above]O2max's contributions to predict DP power production of different durations and the overall XC skiing performance level of elite female XC skiers. Thirteen skiers (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max: 64.9 ± 4.2 ml·kg·min) performed one 30-second and one 3-minute DP performance test using a ski ergometer. The International Ski Federation's (FIS) ranking points determined their overall XC skiing performance. The skiers performed three 1-repetition maximal strength tests in poling-specific exercises that isolated the elbow extension, shoulder extension, and trunk flexion movements. Body composition was determined by a DXA scan, and V[Combining Dot Above]O2max was tested in an incremental running test. Multiple regressions were used to predict power production in the 30-second and 3-minute tests and FIS points. The 2 best predictions of 30-second DP power were lean upper-body mass and maximal upper-body strength (with the 3 strength tests normalized and pooled together as one variable) (R = 0.84 and 0.81, p skiing performance (R = 0.43 and 0.40, p ≤ 0.05). Although the importance of upper-body strength and lean mass to predict DP power production and the overall XC skiing performance declines with the performance duration in female XC skiers, the importance of V[Combining Dot Above]O2max shows an opposite relationship.

  7. The Effect of Creatin and Carnitine Supplementation on 5 kmClassic and 10 km Free Styles Race Performance of Cross Country Skiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru ÇETİN

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This İnvestigation examined the effect of creatin and carnitine supplementation on 5 km classic and 10 km free styles race performance of competitive cross country skiers.Eighteen highly trained (12 male and 6 female cross country skiers aged 13-16 years seperated into 3 equal groups. All groups participated in the 5 km classic and 10 km free races styles in Erciyes at 2200m altitude ski center before the carnitine and creatine loading. After the race subjects were seperated into carnitine, creatine and control groups. Creatine supplementation was given with the dosege of 20gr divided 4 times per day and carnite wasgicen with the dossage of 2gr divided 3 times per day, for seven days.After the last race all results were analysed by repeated measure analysis of variance and SPSS statistical program.According to the study there were no significant effects of carnitin and creatin supplement on 5 km classic and 10 km free styles race performans as in groups. The increased performances which were reperted can be explained by 9 days aerobic, on competition course.

  8. Prediction of performance in Vasaloppet through long lasting ski- ergometer and rollerski tests in cross-country skiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Erik; Wulff, Kristian; Jensen, Mads Rosenkilde;

    2015-01-01

    and completed Vasaloppet. All skiers carried out pre and post training tests in a 90 minutes ski-ergometer double poling test and a 120 minutes rollerski field test on a closed paved circuit. 19 skiers provided detailed training logs that could sufficiently establish their training preparation for Vasaloppet....... Racing time in Vasaloppet correlated negatively with average work output (W/kg) at the pre ski-ergometer test (Figure 3A) (n = 24; r = -0.79; P ski performance was positively associated with ergometer performance. Likewise, a similar correlation was obtained after the 16 week training...... period between average post-test work output in the ski-ergometer and performance in Vasaloppet (n = 24; r = -0.76; P ski-ergometer tests. Pre-field-test time performance on rollerskies as measured...

  9. Changes in maximal double poling performance during and after moderate altitude training in elite cross country skiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höög, Martina; Jensen, Kurt; Willis, Sarah;

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2014, the Olympic cross-country ski competitions will be held in Sochi, Russia at approximately 1500m altitude. Even moderate altitude can have negative effects on performance in highly trained endurance athletes and individuals may adapt and react differently to altitude exposure...

  10. Effect of an intense period of competition on race performance and self-reported illness in elite cross-country skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, I S; Gleeson, M; Haugen, T A; Tønnessen, E

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether participating in a cross-country skiing stage race (Tour de Ski; TDS) affects subsequent illness incidence, training, and race performance. Self-reported training and illness data from 44 male and female elite cross-country skiers were included. In total, 127 years of data were collected (2-3 seasons per athlete). Illness incidence, training load, and performance in international competitions were calculated for athletes who did and did not participate in TDS. Forty-eight percent of athletes reported becoming ill during or in the days immediately after taking part in TDS vs 16% of athletes who did not participate. In both groups, illness incidence was somewhat lower for female athletes. For male athletes, race performance was significantly worse for 6 weeks following TDS vs 6 weeks before TDS. Furthermore, while female athletes who participated in TDS performed relatively better than controls in Olympics/World Championships, male athletes who participated in TDS typically performed worse in subsequent major championships. Participating in TDS appears to result in ∼ 3-fold increase in risk of illness in this period. Male athletes appear more prone to illness and also see a drop in race performance following TDS, possibly linked to differences in training load before and after the event.

  11. Characteristics and Prevention of Sports Injuries of Teenage Cross-country Skiers%青少年越野滑雪运动员运动损伤特征及预防

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李大同; 李美娜; 王国滨

    2015-01-01

    青少年越野滑雪运动员是我国越野滑雪事业的后备力量,承载着我国越野滑雪运动的未来和希望,出现运动损伤将破坏运动训练的系统性,影响青少年越野滑雪运动员的长远发展。如何避免运动损伤就成为青少年越野滑雪运动员提升训练质量、提高比赛成绩、保证竞技能力可持续发展的关键因素。运用文献资料法、专家访谈法、问卷调查法与数理统计法对我国部分青少年越野滑雪运动员和教练员进行了调查研究。通过调查结果,分析了青少年越野滑雪运动员的伤病特征和致伤原因,总结了常见损伤的发生规律,并从训练学角度提出了相应的预防措施。%Teenage cross-country skiers are the reserved power of Chinese cross-country skiing,which holds the fulture and hope of Chinese cross-country skiing. Sports injuries will damage the system of sports training,influencing the development of teenage cross-country skiers. How to avoid sports injuries has become the key factor of improving training quality,improving performacne,guaranteeing the sustainbale development of competitive ability for teenage cross-country skiers. Withe the methods of literature,expert interviews,investigations and mathematical statistics,part of Chinese teenage cross-country skiers and coaches were studied. By the results,analyzing the injury characteristics and reasons of teenage cross-country skiers,summarize the law of common injuries,and put forward prevention measures from the aspect of training.

  12. THE ROLE OF ATTENTION IN ADJUSTING THE BEHAVIOR OF JUNIOR SKIERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grosu Teodor Vlad

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of study: Through this study we want to show the specific notion of leadership in sports training. Modeling the training process in sport training can be achieved by applying neuro - linguistic techniques, mental training techniques. Methods: We have applied the following test methods: AP2 - focusing attention, AD-distributive attention, MA-spiritual observation. Findings and results: The study took place in groups of junior practitioners of skiing. Tests were applied to participants Ski Clubs Championship of Romania in April 2013, aged 11-15 years. The main objective of mental training through techniques neuro - linguistic is to support individual and group sporting activity in any situation: workout or competition in order to increase performance capacity. Other mental training objectives pursued in this study are: increasing attention and concentration reduce anxiety and stress. Conclusion: The results show us the profile of the junior skier. It will determine how we can apply the neuro-linguistic programming techniques for each skier.

  13. Cross-Country Skiing Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, John

    This book presents changes in cross country skiing which have taken place in the last several years and is directed toward both beginning and seasoned tour skiers. Discussed are the following topics: (1) the cross-country revolution (new fiberglass skis); (2) equipment (how to choose from the new waxless touring skis); (3) care of equipment; (4)…

  14. Cross-Country Skiing Injuries and Training Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, Kyle B

    2015-01-01

    Cross-country skiing is a low injury-risk sport that has many health benefits and few long-term health risks. Some concern exists that cross-country skiing may be associated with a higher incidence of atrial fibrillation; however, mortality rates among skiers are lower than those among the general population. While continuing to emphasize aerobic and anaerobic training, training methods also should promote ski-specific strength training to increase maximum force and its rate of delivery and to build muscular endurance to maintain that power through a race. Multiple tests are available to monitor training progress. Which tests are most appropriate depends on the specific events targeted. In addition to laboratory-based tests, there also are many simpler, more cost-effective tests, such as short time trials, that can be used to monitor training progress and predict performance particularly at the junior skier level where access and cost may be more prohibitive.

  15. The Association Analysis between ACE and ACTN3 Genes Polymorphisms and Endurance Capacity in Young Cross-Country Skiers: Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mägi, Agnes; Unt, Eve; Prans, Ele; Raus, Liina; Eha, Jaan; Veraksitš, Alar; Kingo, Külli; Kõks, Sulev

    2016-01-01

    Endurance performance depends on the integration of several phenotypic traits influenced by multiple environmental and genetic factors. Objectives of the study were: (1) to examine the genotypic frequencies of the ACE I/D, ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms and endurance performance-related phenotypes, (2) to evaluate the dynamics of endurance performance parameters during a 5-year period in relation to ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes in Estonian young skiers. Determination of VO2peak was performed in 58 skiers aged 15-19 years (41 males, 17 females) during a 5-year period. The control group consisted of 322 healthy non-athletic subjects (145 males, 177 females). The study groups were genotyped for the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X variants. Frequencies of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes were significantly higher (p = 0.047 and p = 0.003, respectively) and the RX genotype was lower (p = 0.008) in young male skiers compared with controls. A significant relationship was found between change (Δ) of training volume and ΔVO2peak (mL·kg-1·min-1) (r = 0.475, p = 0.002). No significant main effect was detected between VO2peak (mL·kg-1·min-1) dynamics (comparison with the previous age group data) and ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes interactions (F = 0.571, p = 0.770 and F = 0.650 and p = 0.705, respectively) in all young skiers. Study results indicated a significantly higher frequency of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group. Significant genotype-related differences in dynamics of VO2peak during a 5-year period were not found. In the future, longitudinal research including different gene variants may contribute to a better understanding of the nature of endurance performance. Key points Significantly higher prevalence of the ACE ID and the ACTN3 RR genotypes were found among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group, which may be an advantage for the explosive speed and power capacity in

  16. The Association Analysis between ACE and ACTN3 Genes Polymorphisms and Endurance Capacity in Young Cross-Country Skiers: Longitudinal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Mägi, Eve Unt, Ele Prans, Liina Raus, Jaan Eha, Alar Veraksitš, Külli Kingo, Sulev Kõks

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Endurance performance depends on the integration of several phenotypic traits influenced by multiple environmental and genetic factors. Objectives of the study were: (1 to examine the genotypic frequencies of the ACE I/D, ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms and endurance performance-related phenotypes, (2 to evaluate the dynamics of endurance performance parameters during a 5-year period in relation to ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes in Estonian young skiers. Determination of VO2peak was performed in 58 skiers aged 15-19 years (41 males, 17 females during a 5-year period. The control group consisted of 322 healthy non-athletic subjects (145 males, 177 females. The study groups were genotyped for the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X variants. Frequencies of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes were significantly higher (p = 0.047 and p = 0.003, respectively and the RX genotype was lower (p = 0.008 in young male skiers compared with controls. A significant relationship was found between change (Δ of training volume and ΔVO2peak (mL·kg-1·min-1 (r = 0.475, p = 0.002. No significant main effect was detected between VO2peak (mL·kg-1·min-1 dynamics (comparison with the previous age group data and ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes interactions (F = 0.571, p = 0.770 and F = 0.650 and p = 0.705, respectively in all young skiers. Study results indicated a significantly higher frequency of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group. Significant genotype-related differences in dynamics of VO2peak during a 5-year period were not found. In the future, longitudinal research including different gene variants may contribute to a better understanding of the nature of endurance performance.

  17. Scientific Identification of the Talents from Cross - Country Skiers%越野滑雪运动员的科学选材

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王韵博

    2011-01-01

    With the development and improvement of modem competitive sports, the scientific identification of athletic talents has increasingly become an important part of competitive sports. With the years of experi ence in identifying the cross country skiing talents, considering the sports characteristic, the paper summa rizes the principles and methods of scientific talent identification such as body shape, physiological function, physical quality, psychology index, coaches'evaluation, testing estimation, prediction, key ones determined by trial training. It strives for an ideas as reference about the scientific identification of cross country skiing talents.%随着现代竞技体育水平的不断发展、提高,运动员的科学选材越来越成为竞技体育中的一个重要组成部分。结合多年从事越野滑雪项目选材工作的实践经验,从越野滑雪运动项目的特点出发,总结出身体形态选材、机能选材、身体素质选材、心理类指标、教练员评价、测试评价、预测评价、试训与重点队员确定等越野滑雪运动员科学选材的原则方法,力求为越野滑雪运动员的科学选材提供思路和参考。

  18. GENDER DIFFERENCES IN SPORT INJURY RISK AND TYPES OF INJU-RIES: A RETROSPECTIVE TWELVE-MONTH STUDY ON CROSS-COUNTRY SKIERS, SWIMMERS, LONG-DISTANCE RUNNERS AND SOCCER PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Ristolainen

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This twelve months survey compared injury risk and injury types by genders (312 females, 262 males in 15- to 35-year-old cross-country skiers, swimmers, long- distance runners and soccer players. More male than female athletes reported at least one acute injury (44% vs. 35%, p < 0.05, and more male than female runners reported at least one overuse injury (69% vs. 51%, p < 0.05. When the incidence of acute and overuse injuries both separately and combined was calculated per 1000 training hours, per 1000 competition hours and all exposure hours combined we found no gender differences in either of these comparisons. After adjustment for sport event males were at increased risk for posterior thigh overuse injuries compared to females (relative risk (RR 5.8, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.3 to 26.4, p < 0.05 while females were at increased risk for overuse injuries in the ankle compared to males (RR 3.1, 95% CI 1.0 to 9.3, p < 0.05. After adjustment for exposure time (injuries/1000 exposure hours significance of the difference between the sexes in overuse injury to the ankle persisted (female 0.11 vs. male 0.02 injuries/1000 exposure hours, p < 0.05. Six athletes had an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injury, of whom four were female soccer players. After combining all reported acute and overuse ankle and knee injuries, the proportion of athletes with such injury was higher in the female compared to male soccer players (75% and 54% respectively; p < 0.05, but no difference was found in such injuries when calculated per 1000 exposure hours. In conclusion, we found some gender differences in sport-related injuries, but most of these differences seemed to be explained at least in part by differences in the amount of training

  19. Kinematics of cross-country ski racing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, B; Rundell, K W; Roy, B; Boulay, M R

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the evolution of skiing velocity, cycle length, and cycle rate in elite and subelite skiers during cross-country ski races. Senior male cross-country skiers engaged respectively in a 30-km skating race (N = 34) or a 50-km classical race (N = 27) were videotaped as they skied two different sections of 30 m, a 7 degrees uphill, and a flat section. In the skating race, most skiers used the offset technique on uphill and the 2-skate on flat, while the preferred techniques during the classical race were the diagonal stride for uphill and double-poling on flat. Results demonstrated that faster skiers had longer cycle lengths than slower skiers except for the flat sections of the classical race. Cycle rate was not different between skiers of different performance levels in any circumstances or races. Decreased velocity observed during the second half of the skating race was almost entirely due to a decrease in cycle length. We conclude that slower athletes should emphasize extending cycle length during their technical training. Therefore, skiers should place an emphasis on strength and power training to increase their kick and pole pushes and enhance cycle length.

  20. Evaluation of a specific test in cross-country skiing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Erik; Larsson, Benny; Klausen, Tom

    1991-01-01

    Six Danish male cross-country skiers were studied during the end-of-summer and winter seasons. Their maximal oxygen uptake was measured while running on a treadmill and using a ski ergometer incorporating the double-poling technique. Maximal oxygen uptake during treadmill running and double...

  1. Training for cross-country skiing and iron status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haymes, E M; Puhl, J L; Temples, T E

    1986-04-01

    Effects of iron supplements and training for cross-country skiing on hematological and iron status were studied in nine men and ten women from the U. S. Nordic ski team. Four men and five women received a multiple vitamin, multiple mineral supplement containing 18 mg iron for 8 months while five men and five women received a placebo. Fasting blood samples were taken from all skiers prior to supplementation (May) and in August, November, and January. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, plasma iron, total iron binding capacity (TIBC), percentage of transferrin saturation, serum ferritin, free erythrocyte porphyrin, and haptoglobin were measured on each sample. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, and TIBC were higher in November when both men and women skiers trained at altitude than in August. In January TIBC was further increased, haptoglobin was increased, hemoglobin for the men fell below May levels, and hematocrit returned to May levels. Skiers receiving iron had lower TIBC levels in November and January than the placebo group. Six women and two men had ferritin levels below 28 ng X ml-1, which suggests prelatent iron deficiency. Free erythrocyte porphyrin levels above 100 micrograms X dl-1 RBC were found in all skiers at some point during training. The results suggest that multivitamin, multimineral supplements containing iron have little effect on the iron status of cross-country skiers.

  2. Cross-Country Skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Guy E.

    1980-01-01

    The cross-country ski program offered at Clarkson College in New York is described, including a brief outline of the course, necessary equipment, and suggestions for developing a similar course at other campuses. (JMF)

  3. Cross-Country Trek

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    On August 8, 1998, Wu Qi and Yu Yan arrived at Beijing, the destination of a journey that had taken them more than three years. In travelling across 28 provinces, autonomous regions and municipalities, by foot, bus and train, these two young women from Guangzhou had covered a distance of 120,000 kJlometers, the first continuous cross-country journey accomplished by women. On the eve of International Women’s Day (March 8th) of 1995, Wu Qi and Yu Yan quit their jobs and started out on their cross-country

  4. An Analysis of Performance in Elite Young Cross-Country Skiing: Classical Style Vs Skate Skiing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco P.D. la Fuente

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The aim of this study was to assess the differences in the skiing performance of two skiing styles (classical style Vs. skate skiing, in a group of young high-level skiers. Approach: Four high-level male junior cross-country skiers from the Centre of Winter Sports of Aragon (Spain, were selected for this study that was developed during two competitions: 10 km free technique and 10 km classical technique performed in the same circuit and under the same conditions (snow quality, temperature, wind and relative humidity. Physiological variables, maximal and medium heart rate, blood lactate concentration (basal, final and during the recovery, after 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 min and medium skiing speed, were analyzed with GPS Garmin Forerruner 305® Heart Rate Pulse and Lactate Dr. Lange analyzer®. Normally distributed data (Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test and Shapiro-Wilk were statistically analyzed with one way ANOVA and t-Test for post-hoc comparisons (pResults: No significant differences have been recorded in the medium skiing speed, maximal and medium heart rate between the two styles. The peak heart rate was the same in both styles (188 bpm, although medium heart rate was lower in skate skiing vs. classical skiing (165 bpm Vs. 175 bpm. Blood lactate concentrations recorded significant differences during 4, 6, 8 and 10 min of recovery, being higher in free technique (12.7±1.7; 11.4±1.8; 10.4±1.4 and 8.9±1.6 mmol L-1 Vs. 8.7±1.3; 7.5±1.6; 6.3±1.3 and 5.6±1.1 mmol L-1, respectively. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that skate skiing generates a higher impact on the cross-country skier than classical skiing, due to higher blood lactate concentrations during 4, 6, 8 and 10 min of recovery. The own characteristics of the free technique may be the reason of the lower mean heart rate.

  5. Performance Diagnostic in Cross-Country Skiing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasser Benedikt A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Recreational cross-country skiers can benefit from a performance diagnostic when planning a training program. The aim of this study was to establish a simple test protocol to measure endurance capacity and provide training recommendations. Methods. The relationship between endurance performance and cross-country skiing technique was assessed using two tests. First, a lactate threshold test whereby running speed was determined on a treadmill at 4 mmol/l blood lactate concentration. Second, participants completed a variation of the Cooper test using skating technique on flat terrain to determine the distance covered in 12 min and maximum heart rate. Results. There was a correlative (r = 0.18 respectivelly R2 = 0.43 relationship of between the distance covered in the Cooper test and treadmill running speed at 4 mmol/l blood lactate concentration. Conclusions. The two tests allow recreational athletes to rank themselves with regards to their endurance capacity within a population. The relationship between distance covered and maximum heart rate can indicate whether future training should focus on technical or physical improvement.

  6. Biomechanical analysis of cross-country skiing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G A

    1992-09-01

    The development of new techniques for cross-country skiing based on skating movements has stimulated biomechanical research aimed at understanding the various movement patterns, the forces driving the motions, and the mechanical factors affecting performance. Research methods have evolved from two-dimensional kinematic descriptions of classic ski techniques to three-dimensional analyses involving measurement of the forces and energy relations of skating. While numerous skiing projects have been completed, most have focused on either the diagonal stride or the V1 skating technique on uphill terrain. Current understanding of skiing mechanics is not sufficiently complete to adequately assess and optimize an individual skier's technique.

  7. Effect of kinematic variables on performance in women during a cross-country ski race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundell, K W; McCarthy, J R

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of uphill cycle velocity, cycle length, and cycle rate in top U.S. female skiers during a multiple lap cross-country ski skating race. Eighteen female cross-country skiers served as subjects at the United States Women's 10-km Freestyle 1995 National Championships. The course consisted of two laps of the same 5-km loop. The selected filming section was an 11-12% uphill grade approximately 400 m long located at the 2.5- and 7.5-km mark. The video sector was approximately 12 m long at the conclusion of the climb. During the climb, the skating technique used by all skiers was the V-1. The results demonstrated that cycle length is positively related to cycle velocity during uphill ski skating and ultimately translates to faster race times by female cross-country ski racers. Lap 2 cycle velocity and cycle length demonstrated the strongest relationship to lap time and total race time. Moreover, cycle rate was not related to cycle velocity or lap race times and was not different between successful and less successful skiers. The slower climbing velocity noted during the latter half of the 10-km race was a consequence of a decreased cycle length and not cycle rate. This suggests that the degree of physical conditioning could be a factor in the ability to maintain cycle length and thus uphill cycle velocity.

  8. Vliv pravidelného tréninku na tělesné složení mladých lyžařů běžců ve vztahu k motorické výkonnosti v porovnání s normální populací Effect of regular training on body composition and physical performance in young cross-country skiers: As compared with normal controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Růžena Randáková

    2005-02-01

    říd obecně. Stejně tak mohou přispět k řešení problematiky reakce dětského a dospívajícího organismu na speciální a specifickou tréninkovou zátěž z hlediska změn tělesného složení, resp. distribuce tělesných tekutin a změn ve struktuře svalové hmoty, a z hlediska změn fyziologického profilu. Studie je součástí dlouhodobého sledování mladých lyžařů běžců v Laboratoři sportovní motoriky FTVS UK v Praze. The aim of this study was to determine body composition parameters and level of physical performance together with evaluation of changes in body composition and in the level of physical performance under the influence of regular training performed during a preparatory training period in a group of young cross-country skiers (both genders, pupils of sport primary school, and the participants of ski-clubs between the ages of 12–15 years (n = 81, as compared with normal controls (n = 49. The multi-frequency BIA method (B. I. A. 2000M, Data Input, Germany was used for determination of body composition. The level of physical performance was estimated through basic motor tests. Results from the present study indicate the positive effect of systematic regular training performed through the special cross-country skiing sport primary school. Firstly for cultivation of young elite cross-country skiers, resp. sport talents for high performance, and secondly as a factor influencing the body composition and the level of physical performance in children and youth with regular physical activity via ultra physical education lessons. Regular cross-country skiing training seems to be favorably influenced by BC related to physical performance in children and youth. Hence, regular training functions also as a means of prevention of overweight or obesity-affected health and psychological, social, economic and other complications in youth, as in those of adult age. The results from this study can provide valuable feedback affecting the improving of

  9. Skiers thumb - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thumb; Ulnar collateral ligament injury; Gamekeeper's thumb References Safran MA, Zachazewski J, Stone DA. Ulnar collateral ligament ... of the thumb (gamekeeper's or skier's thumb). In: Safran MA, Zachazewski J, Stone DA. Instructions for Sports ...

  10. Teaching Cross-Country Skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jonathan E.

    1984-01-01

    Cross-country skiing instruction can be done both inside and outside the gymnasium. This article provides activities to be performed inside to prepare students for skiing. Outside organization techniques and drills are suggested. A list of common errors is given. (DF)

  11. Multi-dimensional coordination in cross-country skiing analyzed using self-organizing maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Peter F; Bartlett, Roger; Lindinger, Stefan; Kennedy, Gavin

    2014-02-01

    This study sought to ascertain how multi-dimensional coordination patterns changed with five poling speeds for 12 National Standard cross-country skiers during roller skiing on a treadmill. Self-organizing maps (SOMs), a type of artificial neural network, were used to map the multi-dimensional time series data on to a two-dimensional output grid. The trajectories of the best-matching nodes of the output were then used as a collective variable to train a second SOM to produce attractor diagrams and attractor surfaces to study coordination stability. Although four skiers had uni-modal basins of attraction that evolved gradually with changing speed, the other eight had two or three basins of attraction as poling speed changed. Two skiers showed bi-modal basins of attraction at some speeds, an example of degeneracy. What was most clearly evident was that different skiers showed different coordination dynamics for this skill as poling speed changed: inter-skier variability was the rule rather than an exception. The SOM analysis showed that coordination was much more variable in response to changing speeds compared to outcome variables such as poling frequency and cycle length.

  12. Comparison of heart rate deflection and ventilatory threshold during a field cross-country roller-skiing test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Nicolas; Passelergue, Philippe; Bouvard, Marc; Perrey, Stéphane

    2008-11-01

    This study was to assess whether the point of deflection from linearity of heart rate (HRd) could be an accurate predictor of ventilatory threshold (VT2) during a specific cross-country roller-skiing (RS) test. Ten well-trained cross-country skiers performed a maximal and incremental RS test in the field and a standardized maximal and incremental treadmill running (TR) test in the laboratory. Values of oxygen uptake (VO2) and heart rate (HR) were continuously recorded during all exercises by a portable breath-by-breath gas exchange measurement system and a wireless Polar monitoring system, respectively. The VT2 and HRd points were individually determined by visual analysis during RS. Maximal VO2 (VO2 max) and HR were higher (p cross-country coaches and skiers to evaluate and control specific aerobic training loads.

  13. Metabolic rate and gross efficiency at high work rates in world class and national level sprint skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandbakk, Øyvind; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Leirdal, Stig; Ettema, Gertjan

    2010-06-01

    The present study investigated metabolic rate (MR) and gross efficiency (GE) at moderate and high work rates, and the relationships to gross kinematics and physical characteristics in elite cross-country skiers. Eight world class (WC) and eight national level (NL) male sprint cross-country skiers performed three 5-min stages using the skating G3 technique, whilst roller skiing on a treadmill. GE was calculated by dividing work rate by MR. Work rate was calculated as the sum of power against gravity and frictional rolling forces. MR was calculated using gas exchange and blood lactate values. Gross kinematics, i.e. cycle length (CL) and cycle rate (CR) were measured by video analysis. Furthermore, the skiers were tested for time to exhaustion (TTE), peak oxygen uptake (VO(2peak)), and maximal speed (V(max)) on the treadmill, and maximal strength in the laboratory. Individual performance level in sprint skating was determined by FIS points. WC skiers did not differ in aerobic MR, but showed lower anaerobic MR and higher GE than NL skiers at a given speed (all P < 0.05). Moreover, WC skiers skated with longer CL and had higher V(max) and TTE (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, the present study shows that WC skiers are more efficient than NL skiers, and it is proposed that this might be due to a better technique and to technique-specific power.

  14. Physiological Demands of Competitive Sprint and Distance Performance in Elite Female Cross-Country Skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Magnus; Carlsson, Tomas; Wedholm, Lars; Nilsson, Mattias; Malm, Christer; Tonkonogi, Michail

    2016-08-01

    Carlsson, M, Carlsson, T, Wedholm, L, Nilsson, M, Malm, C, and Tonkonogi, M. Physiological demands of competitive sprint and distance performance in elite female cross-country skiing. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2138-2144, 2016-The purpose was to investigate the relationship between elite females' competitive performance capability in sprint and distance cross-country skiing and the variables of gross efficiency (GE), work rate at the onset of blood-lactate accumulation (OBLA4mmol), maximal oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max), maximal speed (Vmax), and peak upper-body oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak). Ten elite female cross-country skiers (age 24.5 ± 2.8 years) completed treadmill roller-skiing tests to determine GE, OBLA4mmol, and V[Combining Dot Above]O2max using the diagonal-stride technique as well as Vmax and V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak using the double-poling technique. International Ski Federations ranking points for sprint (FISsprint) and distance (FISdist) races were used as competitive performance data. There were correlations between the FISsprint and the V[Combining Dot Above]O2max expressed absolutely (p = 0.0040), Vmax (p = 0.012), and V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak expressed absolutely (p cross-country skiing. In addition, the ability to generate a high Vmax indicates the performance in sprint races, whereas the skier's OBLA4mmol reflects the performance capability in distance races. Based on the results, when evaluating the performance capacity of elite female cross-country skiers, it is recommended to use physiological variables that reflect competitive performance.

  15. Using the power balance model to simulate cross-country skiing on varying terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxnes, John F; Sandbakk, Oyvind; Hausken, Kjell

    2014-01-01

    The current study adapts the power balance model to simulate cross-country skiing on varying terrain. We assumed that the skier's locomotive power at a self-chosen pace is a function of speed, which is impacted by friction, incline, air drag, and mass. An elite male skier's position along the track during ski skating was simulated and compared with his experimental data. As input values in the model, air drag and friction were estimated from the literature based on the skier's mass, snow conditions, and speed. We regard the fit as good, since the difference in racing time between simulations and measurements was 2 seconds of the 815 seconds racing time, with acceptable fit both in uphill and downhill terrain. Using this model, we estimated the influence of changes in various factors such as air drag, friction, and body mass on performance. In conclusion, the power balance model with locomotive power as a function of speed was found to be a valid tool for analyzing performance in cross-country skiing.

  16. Knee Injuries in Downhill Skiers

    OpenAIRE

    Shea, Kevin G.; Archibald-Seiffer, Noah; Murdock, Elizabeth; Grimm, Nathan L.; Jacobs, John C.; Willick, Stuart; Van Houten, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Background: Knee injuries account for approximately one third of injuries in skiers. Researchers have proposed several mechanisms of knee injury in skiers. However, the frequencies of these mechanisms have varied in different studies. Purpose: To identify the most common knee injury mechanisms in recreational downhill skiers and to assess injury frequencies across several demographics. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Over 6 ski seasons, 541 patients with acute knee inju...

  17. Energy system contributions and determinants of performance in sprint cross-country skiing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, E; Björklund, G; Holmberg, H-C

    2017-01-01

    To improve current understanding of energy contributions and determinants of sprint-skiing performance, 11 well-trained male cross-country skiers were tested in the laboratory for VO2max , submaximal gross efficiency (GE), maximal roller skiing velocity, and sprint time-trial (STT) performance....... The STT was repeated four times on a 1300-m simulated sprint course including three flat (1°) double poling (DP) sections interspersed with two uphill (7°) diagonal stride (DS) sections. Treadmill velocity and VO2 were monitored continuously during the four STTs and data were averaged. Supramaximal GE...... during the STT was predicted from the submaximal relationships for GE against velocity and incline, allowing computation of metabolic rate and O2 deficit. The skiers completed the STT in 232 ± 10 s (distributed as 55 ± 3% DP and 45 ± 3% DS) with a mean power output of 324 ± 26 W. The anaerobic energy...

  18. Community in Competition: The American Birkebeiner Cross-Country Ski Race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Donahue

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In modern times, few people use skis as transportation, but each year, millions of people in colder climates enjoy cross-country skiing for recreation and fitness. And those familiar with the Winter Olympics know that it is also a serious sport. Donahue is particularly interested in exploring the idea of the “train,” in which a large group of skiers bind together like a pack to harness group dynamics in the largest ski race in North America, the 50 kilometer American Birkebeiner, in Hayward, Wisconsin. The key to this race, implies Donahue, is knowing and deciding when to compete with and when to compete against.

  19. Cross-country skiing and postexercise heart-rate recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourot, Laurent; Fabre, Nicolas; Andersson, Erik; Willis, Sarah; Buchheit, Martin; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2015-01-01

    Postexercise heart-rate (HR) recovery (HRR) indices have been associated with running and cycling endurance-exercise performance. The current study was designed (1) to test whether such a relationship also exists in the case of cross-country skiing (XCS) and (2) to determine whether the magnitude of any such relationship is related to the intensity of exercise before obtaining HRR indices. Ten elite male cross-country skiers (mean ± SD; 28.2 ± 5.4 y, 181 ± 8 cm, 77.9 ± 9.4 kg, 69.5 ± 4.3 mL · min-1 · kg-1 maximal oxygen uptake [VO2max]) performed 2 sessions of roller-skiing on a treadmill: a 2 × 3-km time trial and the same 6-km at an imposed submaximal speed followed by a final 800-m time trial. VO2 and HR were monitored continuously, while HRR and blood lactate (BLa) were assessed during 2 min immediately after each 6-km and the 800-m time trial. The 6-km time-trial time was largely negatively correlated with VO2max and BLa. On the contrary, there was no clear correlation between the 800-m time-trial time and VO2, HR, or BLa. In addition, in no case was any clear correlation between any of the HRR indices and performance time or VO2max observed. These findings confirm that XCS performance is largely correlated with VO2max and the ability to tolerate high levels of BLa; however, postexercise HRR showed no clear association with performance. The homogeneity of the group of athletes involved and the contribution of the arms and upper body to the exercise preceding determination of HRR may explain this absence of a relationship.

  20. Motor abilities and anthropometrics in youth cross-country skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöggl, R; Müller, E; Stöggl, T

    2015-02-01

    The purposes were to validate whether general motor abilities and anthropometrics are determinants of youth cross-country (XC) skiing performance; evaluate gender-specific differences; and to establish noninvasive diagnostics. Fifty-one youth XC skiers (34 boys; 13.8 ± 0.6 years and 17 girls; 13.4 ± 0.9 years) performed motor skill and laboratory tests, and anthropometric data were collected and correlated with XC skiing performance. Anthropometrics and maturity status were related to boys but not to girls XC skiing performance. Push-ups and 20-m sprint were correlated to XC skiing performance in both boys and girls. XC skiing performance of boys was predominantly influenced by upper body and trunk strength capacities (medicine ball throw, push-ups, and pull-ups) and jumping power (standing long and triple jump), whereas XC skiing of girls was mainly influenced by aerobic capacities (3000-m run). Laboratory measures did not reveal greater correlations to XC skiing performance compared with simple test concepts of speed, strength, and endurance. Maturity was a major confounding variable in boys but not girls. Use of noninvasive simple test concepts for determination of upper body strength, speed, and endurance represent practicable support for ski clubs, schools, or skiing federations in the guidance and evaluation of young talent, being aware of the effect of maturity especially in boys.

  1. Biomechanical determinants of oxygen extraction during cross-country skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöggl, T; Björklund, G; Holmberg, H-C

    2013-02-01

    To determine the relationship of muscle activation, force production, and cycle characteristics to O(2) extraction during high- and lower-intensity double poling (DP), nine well-trained male cross-country skiers performed DP on a treadmill for 3 min at 90% VO(2peak) followed by 6 min at 70%. During the final minute at each workload, arterial, femoral, and subclavian venous blood were collected for determination of partial pressure of O(2), partial pressure of CO(2), pH, and lactate. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded from six upper and lower body muscles, leg and pole forces were measured, and cardiorespiratory variables were monitored continuously. O(2) extraction was associated with time point of peak pole force (PF(peak)), duration of recovery, EMG activity, and lower body use. Arm O(2) extraction was lower than in the legs at both intensities (P < 0.001) and was reduced to a lesser extent upon decreasing the workload (P < 0.05). Arm root-mean-square EMG was higher during the poling phase and entire cycle compared with the legs (P < 0.001). Blood lactate was higher in the subclavian than in femoral vein and artery (P < 0.001) and independent of intensity. O(2) extraction was correlated to low muscle activation, later PF(peak) , prolonged poling time, and extensive dynamic lower body use. Cycle rate and recovery time were associated with O(2) extraction during high-intensity exercise only.

  2. The Russians Are the Fastest in Marathon Cross-Country Skiing: The “Engadin Ski Marathon”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelis Theodoros Nikolaidis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that athletes from a specific region or country are dominating certain sports disciplines such as marathon running or Ironman triathlon; however, little relevant information exists on cross-country skiing. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the aspect of region and nationality in one of the largest cross-country skiing marathons in Europe, the “Engadin Ski Marathon.” All athletes (n=197,125 who finished the “Engadin Ski Marathon” between 1998 and 2016 were considered. More than two-thirds of the finishers (72.5% in women and 69.6% in men were Swiss skiers, followed by German, Italian, and French athletes in both sexes. Most of the Swiss finishers were from Canton of Zurich (20.5%, Grisons (19.2%, and Berne (10.3%. Regarding performance, the Russians were the fastest and the British the slowest. Considering local athletes, finishers from Canton of Uri and Glarus were the fastest and those from Canton of Geneva and Basel the slowest. Based on the findings of the present study, it was concluded that local athletes were not the fastest in the “Engadin Ski Marathon.” Future studies need to investigate other cross-country skiing races in order to find the nationalities and regions of the fastest cross-country skiers.

  3. Mechanical behaviour of cross-country ski racing poles during double poling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöggl, Thomas; Karlöf, Lars

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the behaviour of cross-country ski poles during double poling on a treadmill using three-dimensional kinematics. The results were compared with standard laboratory tests of the pole manufacturers. A total of 18 skiers were analysed at two speeds (85% and 95% of the maximal speed) at grades of 1.5% and 7%. Variables describing cycle characteristics, bending stiffness, bending behaviour, and trajectories of the pole markers were analysed. Triangular-shaped poles demonstrated the greatest stiffness and lowest variability in maximal bending. Softer poles demonstrated greater variability in bending behaviour and lost ground contact at high skiing speeds, which for some skiers resulted in failure to complete high-speed tests. Considerable variations in pole behaviour for similar poles between skiers were observed, which might be attributed to differences in technique, indicating that mechanical properties of the poles did not exclusively determine pole behaviour in the dynamic situation. The greatest magnitude of pole bending was in the middle part of the pole, which differed from the standard static pole analysis of the manufacturer. Increases in grade demonstrated the greatest effect on pole bending. Distinct differences from the pole manufacturers' laboratory measures were apparent, suggesting that basic pole testing might be adapted.

  4. A reappraisal of success factors for Olympic cross-country skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandbakk, Øyvind; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2014-01-01

    Cross-country (XC) skiing has been an Olympic event since the first Winter Games in Chamonix, France, in 1924. Due to more effective training and tremendous improvements in equipment and track preparation, the speed of Olympic XC-ski races has increased more than that of any other Olympic endurance sport. Moreover, pursuit, mass-start, and sprint races have been introduced. Indeed, 10 of the 12 current Olympic competitions in XC skiing involve mass starts, in which tactics play a major role and the outcome is often decided in the final sprint. Accordingly, reappraisal of the success factors for performance in this context is required. The very high aerobic capacity (VO2max) of many of today's world-class skiers is similar that of their predecessors. At the same time, the new events provide more opportunities to profit from anaerobic capacity, upper-body power, high-speed techniques, and "tactical flexibility." The wide range of speeds and slopes involved in XC skiing requires skiers to continuously alternate between and adapt different subtechniques during a race. This technical complexity places a premium on efficiency. The relative amounts of endurance training performed at different levels of intensity have remained essentially constant during the past 4 decades. However, in preparation for the Sochi Olympics in 2014, XC skiers are performing more endurance training on roller skis on competition-specific terrain, placing greater focus on upper-body power and more systematically performing strength training and skiing at high speeds than previously.

  5. Biomechanical and energetic determinants of technique selection in classical cross-country skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Barbara; Zoppirolli, Chiara; Bortolan, Lorenzo; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Zamparo, Paola; Schena, Federico

    2013-12-01

    Classical cross-country skiing can be performed using three main techniques: diagonal stride (DS), double poling (DP), and double poling with kick (DK). Similar to other forms of human and animal gait, it is currently unclear whether technique selection occurs to minimize metabolic cost or to keep some mechanical factors below a given threshold. The aim of this study was to find the determinants of technique selection. Ten male athletes roller skied on a treadmill at different slopes (from 0° to 7° at 10km/h) and speeds (from 6 to 18km/h at 2°). The technique preferred by skiers was gathered for every proposed condition. Biomechanical parameters and metabolic cost were then measured for each condition and technique. Skiers preferred DP for skiing on the flat and they transitioned to DK and then to DS with increasing slope steepness, when increasing speed all skiers preferred DP. Data suggested that selections mainly occur to remain below a threshold of poling force. Second, critically low values of leg thrust time may limit the use of leg-based techniques at high speeds. A small role has been identified for the metabolic cost of locomotion, which determined the selection of DP for flat skiing.

  6. Changes in physical performance parameters during and after moderate altitude training in elite cross country skiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt; Höög, Martina; Willis, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    and then grade every minute. Oxygen uptake (VO2) was measured continuously during submaximal and maximal exercise. Blood lactate concentrations were measured during the 1 min rest between submax stages and 2 min after the max test. Power at each submax and max stage were calculated from roller ski friction...... and body weight against gravity [1]. Each stage power was further used for calculations of power at VO2max, (WVO2max), work efficiency at submaximal loads (GE) and for the estimation of O2 cost at maximal work load (used to calculate accumulated O2 deficit (MOD)) [2]. RESULTS: At NORM1, the skiers’ body...... mass was 71.9±10.7kg and VO2max 214±12ml/min/kg0.73. The GE varied between 17.9-19.5% during the 3-5 submaximal loads, with no difference between conditions (P>0.05). Also, blood lactate accumulation after submaximal exercise loads showed no difference between conditions (PVO2max...

  7. Kinematics of cross-country sit skiing during a Paralympic race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Marco; Janssen, Thomas; Bortolan, Lorenzo; Pellegrini, Barbara; Fischer, Gabriela; Schena, Federico

    2013-02-01

    The study had three purposes: to verify a hypothesized speed decrease during the 15 km cross-country sit skiing (CCSS) race; documenting this possible fatigue effect (speed decrease), to evaluate changes among the four laps in kinematics parameters (cycle speed, cycle duration, cycle length, duty cycle (percentage ratio between pushing and total cycle duration), pole inclination, trunk inclination and shoulder-hand distance); to compare the kinematics parameters in cross-country sit skiers of different level. Video recordings were carried out during the 2006 Turin Winter Paralympic Games with two conventional digital video-cameras positioned on a flat and an uphill (8.3°) track, respectively. Better performing skiers (G1) had significantly higher speeds than worse performers (G2) both in the flat (6.54 ± 0.13 vs. 5.89 ± 0.50 ms(-1) and 5.55 ± 0.14 vs. 4.62 ± 0.22 ms(-1) in the first and last lap, respectively) and in the uphill track (3.67 ± 0.45 vs. 3.05 ± 0.59 ms(-1) and 3.20 ± 0.36 vs. 2.26 ± 0.36 ms(-1) in the first and last lap, respectively). The G1 athletes were able to maintain the high-speed better than the G2 over the entire race. Significant differences in cycle length and duty cycle between groups would be justified by the higher physical fitness of G1 skiers.

  8. Effects of speed on temporal patterns in classical style and freestyle cross-country skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Johnny; Tveit, Per; Eikrehagen, Olav

    2004-01-01

    The purpose was to study the adaptation to speed in the temporal patterns of the movement cycle and determine any differences in velocity, cycle rate and cycle length at the maximum speed level in the different classical style and freestyle cross-country skiing techniques. Eight skilled male cross-country skiers were filmed with a digital video camera in the sagittal plane while skiing on a flat cross-country ski track. The skiers performed three classical style techniques the diagonal stride, kick double poling and the double poling technique and four freestyle techniques paddle dance (gear 2), double dance (gear 3), single dance (gear 4) and combiskate (gear 5) at four different self-selected speed levels slow, medium, fast and their maximum. Cycle duration, cycle rate, cycle length, and relative and absolute cycle phase duration of the different techniques at the different speed levels were analysed by means of a video analysis system. The cycle rate in all tested classical and freestyle techniques was found to increase significantly (p skiing techniques. A minor, not significant, change in cycle length, and the significant increase in cycle rate with speed showed that the classical and freestyle cross-country skiing styles are dependent, to a large extent, on an increase in cycle rate for speed adaptation. A striking finding was the constant relative phase duration with speed, which indicates a simplified neural control of the speed adaptation in both cross-country skiing styles. For the practitioner, the knowledge about the importance of increasing cycle frequency rather than cycle length in the speed adaptation can be used to optimise a rapid increase in speed. The knowledge about the decrease in absolute phase duration, especially the thrust phase duration, points to the need for strength and technique training to enable force production at a high cycle rate and skiing speed. The knowledge that the relative phase duration stays constant with speed may be

  9. Biomechanical analysis of different starting strategies utilized during cross-country skiing starts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltmann, Victor Wennemar; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Pelttari, Pasi; Mikkola, Jussi; Häkkinen, Keijo; Ohtonen, Olli; Linnamo, Vesa

    2016-11-01

    The present study was designed to analyse and compare the kinetics and kinematics associated with three different starting strategies during classic cross-country ski racing. Inside a ski tunnel, 12 elite male skiers performed three sets of three 38 m starts. Each set included one start using: double poling only (DP), diagonal stride only (DIA) and freely chosen (FREE) (i.e. where subjects used the strategy or combination of strategies they felt was fastest) in random order. The first 18 m was performed on a series of force plates that measured horizontal and vertical forces followed by 20 m of a standard snow track. Additionally, cycle characteristics and joint angles were measured. DIA and FREE were faster over 38 m than DP (P skied faster when using only DIA for the entire 38 m. Furthermore, the sum duration and frequency of propulsive contacts over the first 18 m was less in DP than DIA and FREE (P < .01). In conclusion, differences between the starting strategies examined was especially pronounced during the initial cycles. Transition from DIA to DP during the start also slowed the skiers, but optimal timing for such a transition was not elucidated.

  10. Analysis of a simulated sprint competition in classical cross country skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöggl, T; Lindinger, S; Müller, E

    2007-08-01

    The objectives of this project were first to analyze the physiological response of a classical cross country (XC) skiing sprint competition, second, to examine the relationships of kinematic and physiological variables with sprint performance and third, to test the hypothesis that maximal speed in double poling (DP) and diagonal stride (DIAG) predicts sprint performance. Twelve elite skiers performed a treadmill-based simulation of a sprint competition that included two maximal speed tests (DP, DIAG), a test and three sprint heats over a 3.5-h period. VO(2), lactate, heart rate (HR) and kinematic variables were measured. Maximal DP and DIAG speed, the level of repeatedly produced lactate values and skiing technical aspects positively correlated with sprint performance. Fastest skiers produced longer cycle lengths in all techniques at equal poling frequency. VO(2) variables showed no correlation to sprint performance. VO(2), tidal volume (VT), and lactate decreased over the heats. XC-sprint performance in classical style depends on speed abilities, technique use, fatigue resistance, and anaerobic capacity. The relationship of maximal speed with sprint performance suggests (a) integrating maximal speed tests in XC sprint diagnostics and (b) emphasizing training models for XC skiing-specific speed abilities to improve performance in XC skiing sprint.

  11. Validation of physiological tests in relation to competitive performances in elite male distance cross-country skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Magnus; Carlsson, Tomas; Hammarström, Daniel; Tiivel, Toomas; Malm, Christer; Tonkonogi, Michail

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to establish which physiological test parameters reflects the distance performances in the Swedish National Championships in cross-country skiing (SNC) and the International Ski Federation's ranking points for distance performances (FISdist). The present study also aimed to create multiple regression models to describe skiing performance for the SNC distance races and International Ski Federation's (FIS) ranking. Twelve male, Swedish, national elite, cross-country skiers (maximal oxygen consumption [·VO₂max] = 5.34 ± 0.34 L·min⁻¹) volunteered to participate in the study. Their results in the 2008 SNC (15 km race [SNC15] and 30 km race [SNC30]) and FISdist points were used as performance data. On the week preceding the Championship, subjects completed a test battery consisting of 7 physiological tests: isokinetic knee extension peak torque (PT), vertical jumps (VJ), lactate threshold (LT), ·VO₂max, and 3 double poling tests of different durations (DP20, DP60, and DP360). Correlations were established using Pearson's correlation analysis, and models to describe skiing performance were created using standard multiple linear regression analysis. Significant correlations were found between the performance parameters and test parameters derived from LT, ·VO₂max, and DP60 tests. No correlations with any performance parameter were found for PT, VJ, DP20, and DP360 tests. For FISdist and SNC15, the models explain 81% and 78% of the variance in performance, respectively. No statistically valid regression model was found for SNC30. The results of this study imply that the physiological demands in male elite distance cross-country skiing performances are different in different events. To adequately evaluate a skier's performance ability in distance cross-country skiing, it is necessary to use test parameters and regression models that reflect the specific performance.

  12. Changes in performance and poling kinetics during cross-country sprint skiing competition using the double-poling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkola, Jussi; Laaksonen, Marko S; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Nummela, Ari; Linnamo, Vesa

    2013-11-01

    In this study, changes in skiing performance and poling kinetics during a simulated cross-country sprint skiing competition were investigated. Twelve elite male cross-country skiers performed simulated sprint competition (4 x 1,150 m heat with 20 min recovery between the heats) using the double-poling technique. Vertical and horizontal pole forces and cycle characteristics were measured using a force plate system (20-m long) during the starting spurt, racing speed, and finishing spurt of each heat. Moreover, heat and 20-m phase velocities were determined. Vertical and horizontal pole impulses as well as mean cycle length were calculated. The velocities of heats decreased by 2.7 +/- 1.7% (p = 0.003) over the simulated competition. The 20-m spurting velocity decreased by 16 +/- 5% (p < 0.002) and poling time increased by 18 +/- 9% (p < 0.003) in spurt phases within heats. Vertical and horizontal poling impulses did not change significantly during the simulation; however, the mean forces decreased (p < 0.039) (vertical by 24 +/- 11% and horizontal by 20 +/- 10%) within heats but not between the heats. Decreased heat velocities over the simulated sprint and spurting velocities within heats indicated fatigue among the skiers. Fatigue was also manifested by decreased pole force production and increased poling time.

  13. Dashing through the Snow--On Cross-Country Skis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, Roger

    1988-01-01

    A discussion of factors to consider when developing a cross-country area for skiing includes consideration of the components of a successful cross-country operation and how the sport can be effectively promoted. (JD)

  14. Autonomous system for cross-country navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stentz, Anthony; Brumitt, Barry L.; Coulter, R. C.; Kelly, Alonzo

    1993-05-01

    Autonomous cross-country navigation is essential for outdoor robots moving about in unstructured environments. Most existing systems use range sensors to determine the shape of the terrain, plan a trajectory that avoids obstacles, and then drive the trajectory. Performance has been limited by the range and accuracy of sensors, insufficient vehicle-terrain interaction models, and the availability of high-speed computers. As these elements improve, higher- speed navigation on rougher terrain becomes possible. We have developed a software system for autonomous navigation that provides for greater capability. The perception system supports a large braking distance by fusing multiple range images to build a map of the terrain in front of the vehicle. The system identifies range shadows and interpolates undersamples regions to account for rough terrain effects. The motion planner reduces computational complexity by investigating a minimum number of trajectories. Speeds along the trajectory are set to provide for dynamic stability. The entire system was tested in simulation, and a subset of the capability was demonstrated on a real vehicle. Results to date include a continuous 5.1 kilometer run across moderate terrain with obstacles. This paper begins with the applications, prior work, limitations, and current paradigms for autonomous cross-country navigation, and then describes our contribution to the area.

  15. Using the power balance model to simulate cross-country skiing on varying terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moxnes JF

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available John F Moxnes,1 Øyvind Sandbakk,2 Kjell Hausken31Department for Protection, Norwegian Defence Research Establishment, Kjeller, Norway; 2Center for Elite Sports Research, Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; 3Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, NorwayAbstract: The current study adapts the power balance model to simulate cross-country skiing on varying terrain. We assumed that the skier’s locomotive power at a self-chosen pace is a function of speed, which is impacted by friction, incline, air drag, and mass. An elite male skier’s position along the track during ski skating was simulated and compared with his experimental data. As input values in the model, air drag and friction were estimated from the literature based on the skier's mass, snow conditions, and speed. We regard the fit as good, since the difference in racing time between simulations and measurements was 2 seconds of the 815 seconds racing time, with acceptable fit both in uphill and downhill terrain. Using this model, we estimated the influence of changes in various factors such as air drag, friction, and body mass on performance. In conclusion, the power balance model with locomotive power as a function of speed was found to be a valid tool for analyzing performance in cross-country skiing.Keywords: air drag, efficiency, friction coefficient, speed, locomotive power

  16. Effects of eccentric cycle ergometry in alpine skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, M; Lüthy, F; Kroell, J; Müller, E; Hoppeler, H; Vogt, M

    2010-08-01

    Eccentric cycling, where the goal is to resist the pedals, which are driven by a motor, increases muscle strength and size in untrained subjects. We hypothesized that it could also be beneficial for athletes, particularly in alpine skiing, which involves predominantly eccentric contractions at longer muscle lengths. We investigated the effects of replacing part of regular weight training with eccentric cycling in junior male alpine skiers using a matched-pair design. Control subjects ( N=7) executed 1-h weight sessions 3 times per week, which included 4-5 sets of 4 leg exercises. The eccentric group ( N=8) performed only 3 sets, followed by continuous sessions on the eccentric ergometer for the remaining 20 min. After 6 weeks, lean thigh mass increased significantly only in the eccentric group. There was a groupxtime effect on squat-jump height favouring the eccentric group, which also experienced a 6.5% improvement in countermovement-jump height. The ability to finely modulate muscle force during variable eccentric cycling improved 50% (p=0.004) only in the eccentric group. Although eccentric cycling did not significantly enhance isometric leg strength, we believe it is beneficial for alpine skiers because it provides an efficient means for hypertrophy while closely mimicking the type of muscle actions encountered while skiing.

  17. A simulation of cross-country skiing on varying terrain by using a mathematical power balance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxnes, John F; Sandbakk, Oyvind; Hausken, Kjell

    2013-01-01

    The current study simulated cross-country skiing on varying terrain by using a power balance model. By applying the hypothetical inductive deductive method, we compared the simulated position along the track with actual skiing on snow, and calculated the theoretical effect of friction and air drag on skiing performance. As input values in the model, air drag and friction were estimated from the literature, whereas the model included relationships between heart rate, metabolic rate, and work rate based on the treadmill roller-ski testing of an elite cross-country skier. We verified this procedure by testing four models of metabolic rate against experimental data on the treadmill. The experimental data corresponded well with the simulations, with the best fit when work rate was increased on uphill and decreased on downhill terrain. The simulations predicted that skiing time increases by 3%-4% when either friction or air drag increases by 10%. In conclusion, the power balance model was found to be a useful tool for predicting how various factors influence racing performance in cross-country skiing.

  18. A simulation of cross-country skiing on varying terrain by using a mathematical power balance model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moxnes JF

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available John F Moxnes,1 Øyvind Sandbakk,2 Kjell Hausken31Department for Protection, Norwegian Defence Research Establishment, Kjeller, Norway; 2Human Movement Science Program, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; 3Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, NorwayAbstract: The current study simulated cross-country skiing on varying terrain by using a power balance model. By applying the hypothetical inductive deductive method, we compared the simulated position along the track with actual skiing on snow, and calculated the theoretical effect of friction and air drag on skiing performance. As input values in the model, air drag and friction were estimated from the literature, whereas the model included relationships between heart rate, metabolic rate, and work rate based on the treadmill roller-ski testing of an elite cross-country skier. We verified this procedure by testing four models of metabolic rate against experimental data on the treadmill. The experimental data corresponded well with the simulations, with the best fit when work rate was increased on uphill and decreased on downhill terrain. The simulations predicted that skiing time increases by 3%–4% when either friction or air drag increases by 10%. In conclusion, the power balance model was found to be a useful tool for predicting how various factors influence racing performance in cross-country skiing.Keywords: skiing, power balance, metabolic rate, work rate, air drag, friction coefficient

  19. Energy system contributions and determinants of performance in sprint cross-country skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, E; Björklund, G; Holmberg, H-C; Ørtenblad, N

    2017-04-01

    To improve current understanding of energy contributions and determinants of sprint-skiing performance, 11 well-trained male cross-country skiers were tested in the laboratory for VO2max , submaximal gross efficiency (GE), maximal roller skiing velocity, and sprint time-trial (STT) performance. The STT was repeated four times on a 1300-m simulated sprint course including three flat (1°) double poling (DP) sections interspersed with two uphill (7°) diagonal stride (DS) sections. Treadmill velocity and VO2 were monitored continuously during the four STTs and data were averaged. Supramaximal GE during the STT was predicted from the submaximal relationships for GE against velocity and incline, allowing computation of metabolic rate and O2 deficit. The skiers completed the STT in 232 ± 10 s (distributed as 55 ± 3% DP and 45 ± 3% DS) with a mean power output of 324 ± 26 W. The anaerobic energy contribution was 18 ± 5%, with an accumulated O2 deficit of 45 ± 13 mL/kg. Block-wise multiple regression revealed that VO2 , O2 deficit, and GE explained 30%, 15%, and 53% of the variance in STT time, respectively (all P < 0.05). This novel GE-based method of estimating the O2 deficit in simulated sprint-skiing has demonstrated an anaerobic energy contribution of 18%, with GE being the strongest predictor of performance. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A Guide to Equipment: Cross-Country Skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillette, Ned

    1980-01-01

    Discussed are guidelines for asking questions and selecting cross-country skis, boots, bindings, poles, and touring packs. To choose any type of cross-country gear, the strategy recommended is to match the equipment to the athelete's skiing style. (WB)

  1. Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun (Part II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duoos, Bridget A.

    2012-01-01

    Part I of Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun, which was published in last issue, discussed how to select cross-country ski equipment, dress for the activity and the biomechanics of the diagonal stride. Part II focuses on teaching the diagonal stride technique and begins with a progression of indoor activities. Incorporating this fun,…

  2. Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun (Part I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duoos, Bridget A.

    2011-01-01

    Cross-country skiing is a great activity for taking a physical education class outside during the cold winter months. It is also a diverse activity that appeals to students of all ages, and is an excellent cardio-respiratory activity to keep students active. This article has provided the first steps in preparing a cross-country skiing lesson in…

  3. Determinants of a simulated cross-country skiing sprint competition using V2 skating technique on roller skis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkola, Jussi; Laaksonen, Marko; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Vesterinen, Ville; Nummela, Ari

    2010-04-01

    The present study investigated the performance-predicting factors of a simulated cross-country (XC) skiing sprint competition on roller skis, on a slow surface. Sixteen elite male XC skiers performed a simulated sprint competition (4 x 850 m heat with a 20-minute recovery) using V2 skating technique on an indoor tartan track. Heat velocities, oxygen consumption, and peak lactate were measured during or after the heats. Maximal skiing velocity was measured by performing a 30-m speed test. Explosive and maximal force production in the upper body was determined by bench press (BP). Subjects also performed maximal anaerobic skiing test (MAST) and the 2 x 2-km double poling (DP) test. The maximal velocity of MAST (VMAST) and velocities at 3 (V3), 5 (V5), 7 (V7) mmol.L lactate levels in MAST were determined. In the 2 x 2-km test, DP economy (VO2SUBDP) and maximal 2-km DP velocity (VDP2KM) were determined. The best single performance-predicting factors for the sprint performance were VDP2KM (r = 0.73, p skiing power (VMAST, p skiing economy (V3, V5, V7, p skiing sprint competition, whereas the aerobic characteristics become more important as the XC skiing sprint competition progressed. This study indicates that sprint skiers should emphasize sport-specific upper body training, and training skiing economy at high speeds.

  4. Clinical and Laboratory Responses of Cross-Country Skiing for a 24-H World Record: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Niemelä, Jukka Juvonen, Päivikki Kangastupa, Onni Niemelä, Tatu Juvonen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The physiological consequences of ultra-endurance cross-country skiing in cold conditions are poorly known. We report here clinical, echocardiographic and laboratory findings from a 41-y old male elite skier in a world record trial for 24-h skiing. The athlete completed a total of 406.8 km outdoors with the temperature ranging between -24°C and –5°C during the 24-h period. Post exercise, notable increases from baseline values were observed in myoglobin (50-fold, creatinine kinase (30-fold and proBNP (6-fold, whereas troponin T or troponin I levels remained unchanged. At baseline, echocardiographic findings showed cardiac hypertrophy and after skiing, a 5% reduction of left-ventricular end-diastolic dimension. Increases in markers of kidney (creatinine and liver function (alanine aminotransferase, serum uric acid, C-reactive protein and white blood cell counts were also noted. In addition, electrolyte disturbances including hyponatremia, hypophosphatemia and hypocalcaemia were noted during the follow-up. The data indicates that a prolonged period of high-intensity skiing leads to muscle, heart and kidney affection and activation of inflammation even in an experienced elite skier. The observed health effects underscore the need for strict medical surveillance of participants in extreme sports with long duration.

  5. Aortic Dissection Type A in Alpine Skiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachner, Thomas; Fischler, Nikolaus; Dumfarth, Julia; Bonaros, Nikolaos; Krapf, Christoph; Schobersberger, Wolfgang; Grimm, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Patients and Methods. 140 patients with aortic dissection type A were admitted for cardiac surgery. Seventy-seven patients experienced their dissection in the winter season (from November to April). We analyzed cases of ascending aortic dissection associated with alpine skiing. Results. In 17 patients we found skiing-related aortic dissections. Skiers were taller (180 (172–200) cm versus 175 (157–191) cm, P = 0.008) and heavier (90 (68–125) kg versus 80 (45–110) kg, P = 0.002) than nonskiers. An extension of aortic dissection into the aortic arch, the descending thoracic aorta, and the abdominal aorta was found in 91%, 74%, and 69%, respectively, with no significant difference between skiers and nonskiers. Skiers experienced RCA ostium dissection requiring CABG in 17.6% while this was true for 5% of nonskiers (P = 0.086). Hospital mortality of skiers was 6% versus 13% in nonskiers (P = 0.399). The skiers live at an altitude of 170 (0–853) m.a.s.l. and experience their dissection at 1602 (1185–3105; P sport at unusual high altitude at cold temperatures. Postoperative outcome is good. PMID:23971024

  6. Identification of Cross-Country Skiing Movement Patterns Using Micro-Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale Chapman

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the potential of micro-sensors for use in the identification of the main movement patterns used in cross-country skiing. Data were collected from four elite international and four Australian athletes in Europe and in Australia using a MinimaxXTM unit containing accelerometer, gyroscope and GPS sensors. Athletes performed four skating techniques and three classical techniques on snow at moderate velocity. Data from a single micro-sensor unit positioned in the centre of the upper back was sufficient to visually identify cyclical movement patterns for each technique. The general patterns for each technique were identified clearly across all athletes while at the same time distinctive characteristics for individual athletes were observed. Differences in speed, snow condition and gradient of terrain were not controlled in this study and these factors could have an effect on the data patterns. Development of algorithms to process the micro-sensor data into kinematic measurements would provide coaches and scientists with a valuable performance analysis tool. Further research is needed to develop such algorithms and to determine whether the patterns are consistent across a range of different speeds, snow conditions and terrain, and for skiers of differing ability.

  7. The effects of skiing velocity on mechanical aspects of diagonal cross-country skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Erik; Pellegrini, Barbara; Sandbakk, Oyvind; Stüggl, Thomas; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2014-09-01

    Cycle and force characteristics were examined in 11 elite male cross-country skiers using the diagonal stride technique while skiing uphill (7.5°) on snow at moderate (3.5 ± 0.3 m/s), high (4.5 ± 0.4 m/s), and maximal (5.6 ± 0.6 m/s) velocities. Video analysis (50 Hz) was combined with plantar (leg) force (100 Hz), pole force (1,500 Hz), and photocell measurements. Both cycle rate and cycle length increased from moderate to high velocity, while cycle rate increased and cycle length decreased at maximal compared to high velocity. The kick time decreased 26% from moderate to maximal velocity, reaching 0.14 s at maximal. The relative kick and gliding times were only altered at maximal velocity, where these were longer and shorter, respectively. The rate of force development increased with higher velocity. At maximal velocity, sprint-specialists were 14% faster than distance-specialists due to greater cycle rate, peak leg force, and rate of leg force development. In conclusion, large peak leg forces were applied rapidly across all velocities and the shorter relative gliding and longer relative kick phases at maximal velocity allow maintenance of kick duration for force generation. These results emphasise the importance of rapid leg force generation in diagonal skiing.

  8. Identification of cross-country skiing movement patterns using micro-sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsland, Finn; Lyons, Keith; Anson, Judith; Waddington, Gordon; Macintosh, Colin; Chapman, Dale

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the potential of micro-sensors for use in the identification of the main movement patterns used in cross-country skiing. Data were collected from four elite international and four Australian athletes in Europe and in Australia using a MinimaxX™ unit containing accelerometer, gyroscope and GPS sensors. Athletes performed four skating techniques and three classical techniques on snow at moderate velocity. Data from a single micro-sensor unit positioned in the centre of the upper back was sufficient to visually identify cyclical movement patterns for each technique. The general patterns for each technique were identified clearly across all athletes while at the same time distinctive characteristics for individual athletes were observed. Differences in speed, snow condition and gradient of terrain were not controlled in this study and these factors could have an effect on the data patterns. Development of algorithms to process the micro-sensor data into kinematic measurements would provide coaches and scientists with a valuable performance analysis tool. Further research is needed to develop such algorithms and to determine whether the patterns are consistent across a range of different speeds, snow conditions and terrain, and for skiers of differing ability.

  9. The effectiveness of stretch-shortening cycling in upper-limb extensor muscles during elite cross-country skiing with the double-poling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoppirolli, Chiara; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Pellegrini, Barbara; Quaglia, Diego; Bortolan, Lorenzo; Schena, Federico

    2013-12-01

    This investigation was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of stretch-shortening cycling (SSC(EFF)) in upper-limb extensor muscles while cross-country skiing using the double-poling technique (DP). To this end, SSC(EFF) was analyzed in relation to DP velocity and performance. Eleven elite cross-country skiers performed an incremental test to determine maximal DP velocity (V(max)). Thereafter, cycle characteristics, elbow joint kinematics and poling forces were monitored on a treadmill while skiing at two sub-maximal and racing velocity (85% of V(max)). The average EMG activities of the triceps brachii and latissimus dorsi muscles were determined during the flexion and extension sub-phases of the poling cycle (EMG(FLEX), EMG(EXT)), as well as prior to pole plant (EMG(PRE)). SSC(EFF) was defined as the ratio of aEMG(FLEX) to aEMG(EXT). EMG(PRE) and EMG(FLEX) increased with velocity for both muscles (P < 0.01), as did SSC(EFF) (from 0.9 ± 0.3 to 1.3 ± 0.5 for the triceps brachii and from 0.9 ± 0.4 to 1.5 ± 0.5 for the latissimus dorsi) and poling force (from 253 ± 33 to 290 ± 36N; P < 0.05). Furthermore, SSC(EFF) was positively correlated to Vmax, to EMG(PRE) and EMG(FLEX) (P < 0.05). The neuromuscular adaptations made at higher velocities, when more poling force must be applied to the ground, exert a major influence on the DP performance of elite cross-country skiers.

  10. Gait models and mechanical energy in three cross-country skiing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Barbara; Zoppirolli, Chiara; Bortolan, Lorenzo; Zamparo, Paola; Schena, Federico

    2014-11-01

    Fluctuations in mechanical energy of the body center of mass (COM) have been widely analyzed when investigating different gaits in human and animal locomotion. We applied this approach to estimate the mechanical work in cross-country skiing and to identify the fundamental mechanisms of this particular form of locomotion. We acquired movements of body segments, skis, poles and plantar pressures for eight skiers while they roller skied on a treadmill at 14 km h(-1) and a 2 deg slope using three different techniques (diagonal stride, DS; double poling, DP; double poling with kick, DK). The work associated with kinetic energy (KE) changes of COM was not different between techniques; the work against gravity associated with potential energy (PE) changes was higher for DP than for DK and was lowest for DS. Mechanical work against the external environment was 0.87 J m(-1) kg(-1) for DS, 0.70 J m(-1) kg(-1) for DP and 0.79 J m(-1) kg(-1) for DK. The work done to overcome frictional forces, which is negligible in walking and running, was 17.8%, 32.3% and 24.8% of external mechanical work for DS, DP and DK, respectively. The pendulum-like recovery (R%) between PE and KE was ~45%, ~26% and ~9% for DP, DK and DS, respectively, but energy losses by friction are not accounted for in this computation. The pattern of fluctuations of PE and KE indicates that DS can be described as a 'grounded running', where aerial phases are substituted by ski gliding phases, DP can be described as a pendular gait, whereas DK is a combination of both.

  11. Biomechanical validation of a specific upper body training and testing drill in cross-country skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöggl, Thomas; Lindinger, Stefan; Müller, Erich

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a biomechanical validation of a double poling imitation drill on a rollerboard. Six elite cross-country skiers performed three imitation drill trials at maximal speed at 13 degrees inclination and in double poling on roller skis on a paved road of 3 degrees. Pole and strap forces, elbow and hip angles and EMG activity of eight upper body muscles were measured. Force curves showed similar characteristics, except for impact force occurring only at pole plant in double poling on roller skis. Double poling on a rollerboard includes an eccentric roll-down phase not appearing in double polling on roller skis. Forces on the rollerboard were similar to those on roller skis. Courses of the elbow angles indicated similar shapes, except for the angle at the start of the propulsion phase and, consequently, during flexion (p < 0.01). Propulsion time and cycle duration were longer and frequency lower on the rollerboard (all p < 0.001). Muscle activities were not significantly different, except for stronger biceps brachii (p < 0.01) and weaker erector spinae activation (p < 0.05) on the rollerboard. Muscle coordination patterns showed similar onset and offset points of each muscle and comparable activations in both activities, except for biceps brachii. Two movement strategies on the rollerboard were found, which led to small differences in measured variables. The biomechanical validity of double poling on a rollerboard can be judged as moderately high, being aware of the differences in some variables that might be considered in training sessions on the rollerboard, particularly when using intervals with high number of repetitions.

  12. Automatic Classification of the Sub-Techniques (Gears Used in Cross-Country Ski Skating Employing a Mobile Phone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Stöggl

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the current study was to develop and validate an automatic algorithm for classification of cross-country (XC ski-skating gears (G using Smartphone accelerometer data. Eleven XC skiers (seven men, four women with regional-to-international levels of performance carried out roller skiing trials on a treadmill using fixed gears (G2left, G2right, G3, G4left, G4right and a 950-m trial using different speeds and inclines, applying gears and sides as they normally would. Gear classification by the Smartphone (on the chest and based on video recordings were compared. Formachine-learning, a collective database was compared to individual data. The Smartphone application identified the trials with fixed gears correctly in all cases. In the 950-m trial, participants executed 140 ± 22 cycles as assessed by video analysis, with the automatic Smartphone application giving a similar value. Based on collective data, gears were identified correctly 86.0% ± 8.9% of the time, a value that rose to 90.3% ± 4.1% (P < 0.01 with machine learning from individual data. Classification was most often incorrect during transition between gears, especially to or from G3. Identification was most often correct for skiers who made relatively few transitions between gears. The accuracy of the automatic procedure for identifying G2left, G2right, G3, G4left and G4right was 96%, 90%, 81%, 88% and 94%, respectively. The algorithm identified gears correctly 100% of the time when a single gear was used and 90% of the time when different gears were employed during a variable protocol. This algorithm could be improved with respect to identification of transitions between gears or the side employed within a given gear.

  13. Automatic classification of the sub-techniques (gears) used in cross-country ski skating employing a mobile phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöggl, Thomas; Holst, Anders; Jonasson, Arndt; Andersson, Erik; Wunsch, Tobias; Norström, Christer; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2014-10-31

    The purpose of the current study was to develop and validate an automatic algorithm for classification of cross-country (XC) ski-skating gears (G) using Smartphone accelerometer data. Eleven XC skiers (seven men, four women) with regional-to-international levels of performance carried out roller skiing trials on a treadmill using fixed gears (G2left, G2right, G3, G4left, G4right) and a 950-m trial using different speeds and inclines, applying gears and sides as they normally would. Gear classification by the Smartphone (on the chest) and based on video recordings were compared. Formachine-learning, a collective database was compared to individual data. The Smartphone application identified the trials with fixed gears correctly in all cases. In the 950-m trial, participants executed 140 ± 22 cycles as assessed by video analysis, with the automatic Smartphone application giving a similar value. Based on collective data, gears were identified correctly 86.0% ± 8.9% of the time, a value that rose to 90.3% ± 4.1% (P < 0.01) with machine learning from individual data. Classification was most often incorrect during transition between gears, especially to or from G3. Identification was most often correct for skiers who made relatively few transitions between gears. The accuracy of the automatic procedure for identifying G2left, G2right, G3, G4left and G4right was 96%, 90%, 81%, 88% and 94%, respectively. The algorithm identified gears correctly 100% of the time when a single gear was used and 90% of the time when different gears were employed during a variable protocol. This algorithm could be improved with respect to identification of transitions between gears or the side employed within a given gear.

  14. Clinical and Laboratory Responses of Cross-Country Skiing for a 24-H World Record: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemelä, Markus; Juvonen, Jukka; Kangastupa, Päivikki; Niemelä, Onni; Juvonen, Tatu

    2015-12-01

    The physiological consequences of ultra-endurance cross-country skiing in cold conditions are poorly known. We report here clinical, echocardiographic and laboratory findings from a 41-y old male elite skier in a world record trial for 24-h skiing. The athlete completed a total of 406.8 km outdoors with the temperature ranging between -24°C and -5°C during the 24-h period. Post exercise, notable increases from baseline values were observed in myoglobin (50-fold), creatinine kinase (30-fold) and proBNP (6-fold), whereas troponin T or troponin I levels remained unchanged. At baseline, echocardiographic findings showed cardiac hypertrophy and after skiing, a 5% reduction of left-ventricular end-diastolic dimension. Increases in markers of kidney (creatinine) and liver function (alanine aminotransferase), serum uric acid, C-reactive protein and white blood cell counts were also noted. In addition, electrolyte disturbances including hyponatremia, hypophosphatemia and hypocalcaemia were noted during the follow-up. The data indicates that a prolonged period of high-intensity skiing leads to muscle, heart and kidney affection and activation of inflammation even in an experienced elite skier. The observed health effects underscore the need for strict medical surveillance of participants in extreme sports with long duration. Key pointsAn elite athlete was able to ski over 400 km during 24 hours with an outdoor temperature ranging between -5 °C and -24 °C.Several postrace abnormalities occurred in biomarkers of muscle, heart, kidney, liver and inflammation status.Serum troponins, specific markers of myocardial cell damage, remained stable.The report supports careful medical surveillance of participants in extreme sports with long duration.

  15. Human Capital and Cross-Country Comparison of Inequality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.A. Viaene (Jean-Marie); I. Zilcha (Itzhak)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe paper studies the effects of cross-country differences in the production process of human capital on income distribution and growth. Our overlapping gen- erations economy has the following features: (1) consumers are heterogenous with respect to parental human capital and wealth; (2)

  16. Cross Country Skiing: Special Olympics Sports Skills Instructional Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. Foundation, Washington, DC.

    The last of five booklets on specific sports instruction in Special Olympics presents information on teaching cross country skiing to mentally retarded persons. The approach uses goals, short term objectives, task analyzed activities, assessments and teaching suggestions for individualizing and integrating the sports skills instruction with other…

  17. Flow visualisation of downhill skiers using the lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Takeshi; Hong, Sungchan; Ijuin, Koichi

    2017-03-01

    In downhill alpine skiing, skiers often exceed speeds of 120 km h-1, with air resistance substantially affecting the overall race times. To date, studies on air resistance in alpine skiing have used wind tunnels and actual skiers to examine the relationship between the gliding posture and magnitude of drag and for the design of skiing equipment. However, these studies have not revealed the flow velocity distribution and vortex structure around the skier. In the present study, computational fluid dynamics are employed with the lattice Boltzmann method to derive the relationship between total drag and the flow velocity around a downhill skier in the full-tuck position. Furthermore, the flow around the downhill skier is visualised, and its vortex structure is examined. The results show that the total drag force in the downhill skier model is 27.0 N at a flow velocity of 15 m s-1, increasing to 185.8 N at 40 m s-1. From analysis of the drag distribution and the flow profile, the head, upper arms, lower legs, and thighs (including buttocks) are identified as the major sources of drag on a downhill skier. Based on these results, the design of suits and equipment for reducing the drag from each location should be the focus of research and development in ski equipment. This paper describes a pilot study that introduces undergraduate students of physics or engineering into this research field. The results of this study are easy to understand for undergraduate students.

  18. Corruption costs lives: evidence from a cross-country study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; An, Lian; Xu, Jing; Baliamoune-Lutz, Mina

    2017-02-14

    This paper investigates the effect of corruption on health outcomes by using cross-country panel data covering about 150 countries for the period of 1995 to 2012. We employ ordinary least squares (OLS), fixed-effects and two-stage least squares (2SLS) estimation methods, and find that corruption significantly increases mortality rates, and reduces life expectancy and immunization rates. The results are consistent across different regions, gender, and measures of corruption. The findings suggest that reducing corruption can be an effective method to improve health outcomes.

  19. Abortion and Crime: Cross-Country Evidence from Europe

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The publication of Donohue and Levitt (2001)’s paper on the impact of legalized abortion on the decline of crime in the US has created a wide debate in the literature. However, the vast majority of papers have been implemented in the US setting, and the few other works were single-country studies. In this research, we aim to provide new evidence on the abortion-crime link by examining this issue using a sample of 16 Western European countries. The cross-country investigation allows the exploi...

  20. Grade influences blood lactate kinetics during cross-country skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRoche, Dain P; Amann, Markus; Rundell, Kenneth W

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of level vs. graded skate skiing on capillary blood lactate (B(La)), heart rate (HR), oxygen consumption (V(O2)), and training intensity prescriptions. Eleven Nordic skiers completed 2 submaximal skate roller skiing treadmill protocols during which intensity was increased either by grade (G(inc)) or by speed (S(inc)). The protocols were compared for prethreshold BLa, HR, and V(O2) at lactate threshold (LT) and the HR/V(O2) relationship. Additionally, double-pole (primarily upper body) and skating (arms and legs combined) protocols were used to measure peak V(O2) and peak HR. Heart rate and V(O2) at LT were lower during G(inc) compared with S(inc) (154.9 +/- 6.8 b.min(-1) vs. 162.0 +/- 9.1 b.min(-1) and 46.3 +/- 2.8 ml.kg(-1).min(-1) vs. 49.1 +/- 1.6 ml.kg(-1).min(-1), respectively, both p skiing and its associated lower aerobic capacity increases B(La) when compared with level skiing. The leftward shift in the B(La) vs. intensity curve during uphill skiing should be recognized to properly prescribe training intensity as well as interpret laboratory results.

  1. Body Composition and Somatotype of Male and Female Nordic Skiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinning, Wayne E.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Anthropometric measurements (body composition and somatotype characteristics) for male and female Nordic skiers showed small values for measures of variance, suggesting that the subjects represented a select body type for the sport. (Author/MJB)

  2. A cross-country Exchange Market Pressure (EMP) dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mohit; Patnaik, Ila; Felman, Joshua; Shah, Ajay

    2017-06-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article titled - "An exchange market pressure measure for cross country analysis" (Patnaik et al. [1]). In this article, we present the dataset for Exchange Market Pressure values (EMP) for 139 countries along with their conversion factors, ρ (rho). Exchange Market Pressure, expressed in percentage change in exchange rate, measures the change in exchange rate that would have taken place had the central bank not intervened. The conversion factor ρ can interpreted as the change in exchange rate associated with $1 billion of intervention. Estimates of conversion factor ρ allow us to calculate a monthly time series of EMP for 139 countries. Additionally, the dataset contains the 68% confidence interval (high and low values) for the point estimates of ρ's. Using the standard errors of estimates of ρ's, we obtain one sigma intervals around mean estimates of EMP values. These values are also reported in the dataset.

  3. The attitude of the faculty of sport and physical education students toward cross-country running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhas Irina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The syllabus of the track and field subject at the Faculty of Sport and Physical Education includes cross-country running - running in nature. The main objective of this study was to determine the structure and intensity of students' attitude toward the cross-country running. Besides, the objective was to check the connection of the students' attitude towards the cross-country running and the achieved results of cross-country running, as well as of doing sport and recreational running. The sample comprised 69 students of the second year of studies who attended the cross-country running classes. For measuring the attitude toward the cross-country running, the Connotative differential instrument was used consisting of 15 pairs of opposite adjectives presented in a form of seven-part bipolar scale grouped into three dimensions: affective, cognitive and conative. This instrument was applied within an extensive questionnaire which included questions about doing sports, jogging, as well as the results of cross-country running at the end of the teaching period. The descriptive analysis has shown that students have a positive attitude of moderate intensity toward cross-country running, observed through all three dimensions of attitude. The correlation analysis between the dimensions of attitude toward cross country running and the results achieved at cross country running showed that the correlations are negative and statistically significant, suggesting that if the result of running is better, the students' attitude toward cross country running is more positive. Competitive sport is not connected with the quality of attitude toward cross-country running. The results obtained by the study give grounds for assuming that, given that attitudes are an important component of the motivational aspect of personality, it can be expected that the students' positive attitude toward cross country running would contribute to cross country running application in

  4. Inventive Activity of Researchers: Cross-Country Rating Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Ivanovna Volkova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the study of the research capacity of the country and regions has become more active not only from the point of view of their leading components (personnel, financial, information, organizational, material-and-technical ones but also from the perspective of the assessment of productivity and effectiveness of researchers’ work. In the cross-country analysis, the certain highly aggregative parameters, which values, as a rule, are not in favour of Russia, are used. At the same time, at profound studying of this topic, these estimates cannot represent correctly the real trends of inventive activity in the scientific and technological sphere of the country and its regions. Moreover, the measurement of the researchers’ creative potential realization is carried out mainly through the assessment systems of their printing activity. Little attention is paid to the problem of the rating assessments of the researchers’ inventive and patent activity and its products from a cross-country perspective (especially to the detailed ones as well as to its institutional determinants. Therefore, the authors have chosen this subject-matter of the research. Its empirical basis is the statistical materials of both the national database and those which are recognized by the world scientific community. This research has both theoretical and methodological orientations. The purpose is the development of methodological and methodical tools of the research and assessment of researchers’ inventive activity including methodological support of cross-country comparative assessments. The authors have based the hypothesis on their previous research: in the conditions of the decreasing level of financial security, continuous reduction of a number of researchers, institutional restrictions and contradictions, the inventive activity of national researchers is still exist, and in a number of its leading parameters is implemented at the level of the advanced

  5. Assessment of Heart Rate Variability Thresholds from Incremental Treadmill Tests in Five Cross-Country Skiing Techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibai Mendia-Iztueta

    Full Text Available The assessment of heart rate variability (HRV thresholds (HRVTs as an alternative of Ventilatory thresholds (VTs is a relatively new approach with increasing popularity which has not been conducted in cross-country (XC skiing yet. The main purpose of the present study was to assess HRVTs in the five main XC skiing-related techniques, double poling (DP, diagonal striding (DS, Nordic walking (NW, V1 skating (V1, and V2 skating (V2.Ten competitive skiers completed these incremental treadmill tests until exhaustion with a minimum of one to two recovery days in between each test. Ventilatory gases, HRV and poling frequencies were measured. The first HRV threshold (HRVT1 was assessed using two time-domain analysis methods, and the second HRV threshold (HRVT2 was assessed using two non-time varying frequency-domain analysis methods. HRVT1 was assessed by plotting the mean successive difference (MSD and standard deviation (SD of normalized R-R intervals to workload. HRVT1 was assessed by plotting high frequency power (HFP and the HFP relative to respiratory sinus arrhythmia (HFPRSA with workload. HRVTs were named after their methods (HRVT1-SD; HRVT1-MSD; HRVT2-HFP; HRVT2-HFP-RSA. The results showed that the only cases where the proposed HRVTs were good assessors of VTs were the HRVT1-SD of the DS test, the HRVT1-MSD of the DS and V2 tests, and the HRVT2-HFP-RSA of the NW test. The lack of a wider success of the assessment of HRVTs was reasoned to be mostly due to the high entrainment between the breathing and poling frequencies. As secondary finding, a novel Cardiolocomotor coupling mode was observed in the NW test. This new Cardiolocoomtor coupling mode corresponded to the whole bilateral poling cycle instead of corresponding to each poling action as it was reported to the date by the existing literature.

  6. Assessment of Heart Rate Variability Thresholds from Incremental Treadmill Tests in Five Cross-Country Skiing Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendia-Iztueta, Ibai; Monahan, Kristen; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Hynynen, Esa

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of heart rate variability (HRV) thresholds (HRVTs) as an alternative of Ventilatory thresholds (VTs) is a relatively new approach with increasing popularity which has not been conducted in cross-country (XC) skiing yet. The main purpose of the present study was to assess HRVTs in the five main XC skiing-related techniques, double poling (DP), diagonal striding (DS), Nordic walking (NW), V1 skating (V1), and V2 skating (V2).Ten competitive skiers completed these incremental treadmill tests until exhaustion with a minimum of one to two recovery days in between each test. Ventilatory gases, HRV and poling frequencies were measured. The first HRV threshold (HRVT1) was assessed using two time-domain analysis methods, and the second HRV threshold (HRVT2) was assessed using two non-time varying frequency-domain analysis methods. HRVT1 was assessed by plotting the mean successive difference (MSD) and standard deviation (SD) of normalized R-R intervals to workload. HRVT1 was assessed by plotting high frequency power (HFP) and the HFP relative to respiratory sinus arrhythmia (HFPRSA) with workload. HRVTs were named after their methods (HRVT1-SD; HRVT1-MSD; HRVT2-HFP; HRVT2-HFP-RSA). The results showed that the only cases where the proposed HRVTs were good assessors of VTs were the HRVT1-SD of the DS test, the HRVT1-MSD of the DS and V2 tests, and the HRVT2-HFP-RSA of the NW test. The lack of a wider success of the assessment of HRVTs was reasoned to be mostly due to the high entrainment between the breathing and poling frequencies. As secondary finding, a novel Cardiolocomotor coupling mode was observed in the NW test. This new Cardiolocoomtor coupling mode corresponded to the whole bilateral poling cycle instead of corresponding to each poling action as it was reported to the date by the existing literature.

  7. Zipf rank approach and cross-country convergence of incomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jia; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Urošević, Branko; Stanley, H. Eugene; Podobnik, Boris

    2011-05-01

    We employ a concept popular in physics —the Zipf rank approach— in order to estimate the number of years that EU members would need in order to achieve "convergence" of their per capita incomes. Assuming that trends in the past twenty years continue to hold in the future, we find that after t≈30 years both developing and developed EU countries indexed by i will have comparable values of their per capita gross domestic product {\\cal G}_{i,t} . Besides the traditional Zipf rank approach we also propose a weighted Zipf rank method. In contrast to the EU block, on the world level the Zipf rank approach shows that, between 1960 and 2009, cross-country income differences increased over time. For a brief period during the 2007-2008 global economic crisis, at world level the {\\cal G}_{i,t} of richer countries declined more rapidly than the {\\cal G}_{i,t} of poorer countries, in contrast to EU where the {\\cal G}_{i,t} of developing EU countries declined faster than the {\\cal G}_{i,t} of developed EU countries, indicating that the recession interrupted the convergence between EU members. We propose a simple model of GDP evolution that accounts for the scaling we observe in the data.

  8. General strength and kinetics: fundamental to sprinting faster in cross country skiing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöggl, T; Müller, E; Ainegren, M; Holmberg, H-C

    2011-12-01

    To determine relationships between general strength, maximal skiing speed (V(max)), pole and leg kinetics and kinematics, 16 male elite skiers underwent three V(max) tests in double poling, diagonal stride and V2 on a treadmill. The analyzed skiing speeds and leg and arm kinetics were among the highest ever recorded. Relationships between general strength exercises and V(max) were technique dependent. Power output in bench press and bench pull were related to V(max) in DP and diagonal stride, whereas each 1 repetition maximum was related to V2. Isometric squats were not associated with V(max) in all three techniques, whereas jump height and rate of force development during squat jump were. Analysis of kinetics and kinematics revealed that it was not exclusively the magnitude of applied forces during skiing, but the timing and proper instant of force application were major factors discriminating between faster and slower skiers. For all techniques, the faster skiers used different skiing strategies when approaching V(max) when compared with the slower skiers. General strength and power per se seem not to be major determinants of performance in elite skiers, whereas coordination of these capacities within the different and complex skiing movements seems to be the discriminating factor.

  9. Impact of the initial classic section during a simulated cross-country skiing skiathlon on the cardiopulmonary responses during the subsequent period of skate skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourot, Laurent; Fabre, Nicolas; Andersson, Erik; Willis, Sarah J; Hébert-Losier, Kim; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess potential changes in the performance and cardiorespiratory responses of elite cross-country skiers following transition from the classic (CL) to the skating (SK) technique during a simulated skiathlon. Eight elite male skiers performed two 6 km (2 × 3 km) roller-skiing time trials on a treadmill at racing speed: one starting with the classic and switching to the skating technique (CL1-SK2) and another employing the skating technique throughout (SK1-SK2), with continuous monitoring of gas exchanges, heart rates, and kinematics (video). The overall performance times in the CL1-SK2 (21:12 ± 1:24) and SK1-SK2 (20:48 ± 2:00) trials were similar, and during the second section of each performance times and overall cardiopulmonary responses were also comparable. However, in comparison with SK1-SK2, the CL1-SK2 trial involved significantly higher increases in minute ventilation (V̇E, 89.8 ± 26.8 vs. 106.8 ± 17.6 L·min(-1)) and oxygen uptake (V̇O2; 3.1 ± 0.8 vs 3.5 ± 0.5 L·min(-1)) 2 min after the transition as well as longer time constants for V̇E, V̇O2, and heart rate during the first 3 min after the transition. This higher cardiopulmonary exertion was associated with ∼3% faster cycle rates. In conclusion, overall performance during the 2 time trials did not differ. The similar performance times during the second sections were achieved with comparable mean cardiopulmonary responses. However, the observation that during the initial 3-min post-transition following classic skiing cardiopulmonary responses and cycle rates were slightly higher supports the conclusion that an initial section of classic skiing exerts an impact on performance during a subsequent section of skate skiing.

  10. Export Pricing and the Cross-Country Correlation of Stock Prices

    OpenAIRE

    Tervala, Juha

    2009-01-01

    This study analyses cross-country correlations of stock prices (values of firms) using the basic New Open Economy Macroeconomics model. We show that cross-country correlations of stock prices greatly depend on the currency of export pricing in the case of monetary shocks but not notably for temporary technology shocks. In the case of a money supply shock, the producer (local) currency pricing version of the model generates a negative (positive) cross-country correlation of stock prices.

  11. Information systems for mental health in six low and middle income countries: cross country situation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhaya, Nawaraj; Jordans, Mark J D; Abdulmalik, Jibril; Ahuja, Shalini; Alem, Atalay; Hanlon, Charlotte; Kigozi, Fred; Kizza, Dorothy; Lund, Crick; Semrau, Maya; Shidhaye, Rahul; Thornicroft, Graham; Komproe, Ivan H; Gureje, Oye

    2016-01-01

    Research on information systems for mental health in low and middle income countries (LMICs) is scarce. As a result, there is a lack of reliable information on mental health service needs, treatment coverage and the quality of services provided. With the aim of informing the development and implementation of a mental health information sub-system that includes reliable and measurable indicators on mental health within the Health Management Information Systems (HMIS), a cross-country situation analysis of HMIS was conducted in six LMICs (Ethiopia, India, Nepal, Nigeria, South Africa and Uganda), participating in the 'Emerging mental health systems in low and middle income countries' (Emerald) research programme. A situation analysis tool was developed to obtain and chart information from documents in the public domain. In circumstances when information was inadequate, key government officials were contacted to verify the data collected. In this paper we compare the baseline policy context, human resources situation as well as the processes and mechanisms of collecting, verifying, reporting and disseminating mental health related HMIS data. The findings suggest that countries face substantial policy, human resource and health governance challenges for mental health HMIS, many of which are common across sites. In particular, the specific policies and plans for the governance and implementation of mental health data collection, reporting and dissemination are absent. Across sites there is inadequate infrastructure, few HMIS experts, and inadequate technical support and supervision to junior staff, particularly in the area of mental health. Nonetheless there are also strengths in existing HMIS where a few mental health morbidity, mortality, and system level indicators are collected and reported. Our study indicates the need for greater technical and resources input to strengthen routine HMIS and develop standardized HMIS indicators for mental health, focusing in

  12. Physiological characteristics of elite prepubertal cross-country runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayers, N; Gutin, B

    1979-01-01

    Eight elite cross-country runners and eight normally active boys 8--11 years of age were studied. The runners were selected on the basis of success in regional and/or national championships. Two of them had the first to third fastest mile run times for their age groups in the U.S. for three years. Tests included submaximal and maximal treadmill runs, an anaerobic capacity bicycle test, a mile run, and various anthropometric measures. A best career mile run (BCM) was used for comparisons within the running group. At submaximal work levels of 5.6 and 7 mph (124, 161, and 187 meters/min) the values for heart rate (HR) and respiratory exchange ratio (R) were significantly lower for the runners than for the non-runners. The VO2max of the runners (56.6 ml kg min) was significantly higher than that of the non-runners (46.0 ml kg min). For all subjects combined, mile run time was highly correlated with percent VO2max and percent max HR at all submaximal running speeds (r greater than 0.8). The correlation coefficient between mile run time and VO2max was -0.88. Within the running group, however, BCM was unrelated to VO2max but was closely related to percent VO2max at 8 mph (213 meters/min) with 4 = 0.86, and to anaerobic capacity (r = -0.88). There were no significant differences between the groups in age, height, weight, max HR, and percent body fat. Thus the runners had higher aerobic and anaerobic capacities, and greater utilization of fat as an enrgy sustrate during submaximal work. Within the running group, anaerobic capacity and running economy were closely related to BCM time, whereas VO2max was not.

  13. External Validation of the Use of Vignettes in Cross-Country Health Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Kristensen, Nicolai; Pozzoli, Dario

    Cross-country comparisons of subjective assessments are rendered difficult if not impossible because of sub-population specific response style. To correct for this, the use of vignettes has become increasingly popular, notably within cross-country health studies. However, the validity of vignette...

  14. External validation of the use of vignettes in cross-country health studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Kristensen, Nicolai; Pozzoli, Dario

    2010-01-01

    Cross-country comparisons of subjective assessments are rendered difficult if not impossible because of sub-population specific response style. To correct for this, the use of vignettes has become increasingly popular, notably within cross-country health studies. However, the validity of vignette...

  15. External validation of the use of vignettes in cross-country health studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Nabanita Datta; Kristensen, Nicolai; Pozzoli, Dario

    Cross-country comparisons of subjective assessments are rendered difficult if not impossible because of sub-population specific response style. To correct for this, the use of vignettes has become increasingly popular, notably within cross-country health studies. However, the validity of vignette...

  16. Cross-country differences in stock market development : a cultural view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Eelke de; Semenov, Radislav

    2002-01-01

    Although during the last decades the importance of stock markets has increased in all OECD countries, the cross-country differences appear to be remarkably stable. In this paper we relate the factors determining cross-country differences in stock market activity to deeply rooted norms and values in

  17. Cross-country Differences in Stock Market Development: A Cultural View

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, E. de; Semenov, R.

    2002-01-01

    Although during the last decades the importance of stock markets has increased in all OECD countries, the cross-country differences appear to be remarkably stable. In this paper we relate the factors determining cross-country differences in stock market activity to deeply rooted norms and values in

  18. Innovative Training Method of Cross-country Skiers′Flexibility,Pliability and Stability---Functional Movement Screen(FMS) Applications to Training%越野滑雪运动员灵活性、柔韧性和稳定性训练方法的创新--功能性运动测试(FMS)在训练中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曲东海

    2013-01-01

    功能性运动测试是传统运动员身体机能和素质测试评价方法的拓展,在越野滑雪训练中应用方便快捷,且能起到重要作用。在越野滑雪训练中,通过功能性运动测试的筛查,能够及时发现越野滑雪运动员发生运动损伤的隐患,是运动损伤预防策略的有效手段。通过对功能性运动测试意义的探讨,提出跨栏架测试、直线弓箭步测试、直腿主动上抬测试、俯卧撑测试、旋转稳定性测试等功能性运动测试在越野滑雪项目中应用的具体方法,并提出提高灵活性、柔韧性和稳定性的具体训练方法,为提高越野滑雪运动员的竞技能力提供参考。%FMS is set to be used to expand traditional skiers'body function and quality test evaluation meth-ods , application in the cross -country skiing training is convenient and plays an important role .In the cross-country skiing training , by FMS, the sports injuries of cross -country skiers can be discovered timely .It is an effective means for sports injury prevention strategies .Discussing on the significance of FMS , the pa-per puts forward the specific methods of FMS application in the cross -country skiing which are hurdle test , forward lunge test , straight-leg raising test , push-up test and rotational stability test .And it puts forward the training methods of improving flexibility , pliability and stability , providing a reference to improve the competitive ability of cross -country skiers.

  19. How Hinge Positioning in Cross-Country Ski Bindings Affect Exercise Efficiency, Cycle Characteristics and Muscle Coordination during Submaximal Roller Skiing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor M Bolger

    Full Text Available The purposes of the current study were to 1 test if the hinge position in the binding of skating skis has an effect on gross efficiency or cycle characteristics and 2 investigate whether hinge positioning affects synergistic components of the muscle activation in six lower leg muscles. Eleven male skiers performed three 4-min sessions at moderate intensity while cross-country ski-skating and using a klapskate binding. Three different positions were tested for the binding's hinge, ranging from the front of the first distal phalange to the metatarsal-phalangeal joint. Gross efficiency and cycle characteristics were determined, and the electromyographic (EMG signals of six lower limb muscles were collected. EMG signals were wavelet transformed, normalized, joined into a multi-dimensional vector, and submitted to a principle component analysis (PCA. Our results did not reveal any changes to gross efficiency or cycle characteristics when altering the hinge position. However, our EMG analysis found small but significant effects of hinge positioning on muscle coordinative patterns (P < 0.05. The changed patterns in muscle activation are in alignment with previously described mechanisms that explain the effects of hinge positioning in speed-skating klapskates. Finally, the within-subject results of the EMG analysis suggested that in addition to the between-subject effects, further forms of muscle coordination patterns appear to be employed by some, but not all participants.

  20. How Hinge Positioning in Cross-Country Ski Bindings Affect Exercise Efficiency, Cycle Characteristics and Muscle Coordination during Submaximal Roller Skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolger, Conor M; Sandbakk, Øyvind; Ettema, Gertjan; Federolf, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of the current study were to 1) test if the hinge position in the binding of skating skis has an effect on gross efficiency or cycle characteristics and 2) investigate whether hinge positioning affects synergistic components of the muscle activation in six lower leg muscles. Eleven male skiers performed three 4-min sessions at moderate intensity while cross-country ski-skating and using a klapskate binding. Three different positions were tested for the binding's hinge, ranging from the front of the first distal phalange to the metatarsal-phalangeal joint. Gross efficiency and cycle characteristics were determined, and the electromyographic (EMG) signals of six lower limb muscles were collected. EMG signals were wavelet transformed, normalized, joined into a multi-dimensional vector, and submitted to a principle component analysis (PCA). Our results did not reveal any changes to gross efficiency or cycle characteristics when altering the hinge position. However, our EMG analysis found small but significant effects of hinge positioning on muscle coordinative patterns (P < 0.05). The changed patterns in muscle activation are in alignment with previously described mechanisms that explain the effects of hinge positioning in speed-skating klapskates. Finally, the within-subject results of the EMG analysis suggested that in addition to the between-subject effects, further forms of muscle coordination patterns appear to be employed by some, but not all participants.

  1. 14 CFR 61.93 - Solo cross-country flight requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... airship. A student pilot who is receiving training for cross-country flight in an airship must receive and... ascending and descending flight and altitude control; (11) Control of the airship solely by reference to...

  2. Indicator scarcity on cadastre and land registration in cross-country information sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Karin; Stubkjær, Erik

    2013-01-01

    A review of cross-country reporting on cadastre and landregistration systems summarized the state-of-the-art and found shortcomings in availability of indicators suited for qualitative and quantitative comparison purposes. Methodological issues concerning the specification of indicators...

  3. Dietary intake and thiamin, iron, and zinc status in elite Nordic skiers during different training periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogelholm, M; Rehunen, S; Gref, C G; Laakso, J T; Lehto, J; Ruokonen, I; Himberg, J J

    1992-12-01

    This study evaluated how different training periods affect dietary intake and biochemical indices of thiamin, iron, and zinc status in elite Nordic skiers. Subjects were 17 skiers and 39 controls, ages 18-38 yrs. Dietary data were collected by 7-day food records at 3-month intervals. Coefficient of variation (CV) was used to indicate magnitude of seasonal changes. Energy intake for the year (28 food record days) was 3,802 kcal/day (CV 19.1%) in male skiers, 2,754 kcal/day (CV 3.7%) in male controls, 2,812 kcal/day (CV 9.1%) in female skiers, and 2,013 kcal/day (CV 5.9%) in female controls. CVs for thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin C, calcium, magnesium, iron, and zinc intake were 14.1-23.9% (male skiers), 2.9-15.0% (male controls), 4.8-24.5% (female skiers), and 4.3-11.5% (female controls). Seasonal changes in energy, carbohydrate, and micronutrient intakes reflected energy expenditure in male endurance athletes particularly. Erythrocyte transketolase activation coefficients and serum ferritin and zinc concentrations did not differ between skiers and controls. Seasonal variations in these biochemical indices of nutritional status were of the same magnitude in skiers and controls, despite large changes in skiers' physical activity.

  4. The Impact of Public Policies on Skill Mismatch : cross-country analysis in OECD economies

    OpenAIRE

    Mauriès, Arthur-Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Governments aim at reducing skill mismatch because of the adverse effects that it can trigger at the individual and firm level as well as at the country level. Skill mismatch has been defined as a persistent phenomenon with long lasting cross-country differences (Mavromaras et al., 2013). This phenomenon could thus be explained by equivalent cross-country differences in national public policies. The purpose of this thesis is to test the impact of public policies on the probability of being sk...

  5. An inertial sensor-based system for spatio-temporal analysis in classic cross-country skiing diagonal technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasel, Benedikt; Favre, Julien; Chardonnens, Julien; Gremion, Gérald; Aminian, Kamiar

    2015-09-18

    The present study proposes a method based on ski fixed inertial sensors to automatically compute spatio-temporal parameters (phase durations, cycle speed and cycle length) for the diagonal stride in classical cross-country skiing. The proposed system was validated against a marker-based motion capture system during indoor treadmill skiing. Skiing movement of 10 junior to world-cup athletes was measured for four different conditions. The accuracy (i.e. median error) and precision (i.e. interquartile range of error) of the system was below 6 ms for cycle duration and ski thrust duration and below 35 ms for pole push duration. Cycle speed precision (accuracy) was below 0.1m/s (0.00 5m/s) and cycle length precision (accuracy) was below 0.15m (0.005 m). The system was sensitive to changes of conditions and was accurate enough to detect significant differences reported in previous studies. Since capture volume is not limited and setup is simple, the system would be well suited for outdoor measurements on snow.

  6. THE CHARACTERISTICS OF SWITZERLAND'S ALPINE SKIER'S RELATED TO THE FREQUENCY OF ACCIDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanis Vassilis

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to record the characteristics of Switzerland's alpine skier's in relation to the frequency of accidents. The formulation of the cases was based on the following questions: skiers with preparation of their physical fitness before the season and the warming-up before skiing have chances of skiing accidents or injuries? In this research 49 skiers participated (30 men and 19 women. The specimens came by recreational skiers (beginners - advanced and athletes in the following ski resorts in Switzerland: Adelboden, Lenk and San Bernardino. The research material came from analysis of completed questionnaires from 49 Swiss skiers. They have recorded four categories of factors: a individual factors b factors of preparation in the snow in relation to injuries c factors of preparation in dry ground in relation to injuries d factors of injuries. About 1 in 3 Swiss skier respondents had in the past, an accident in alpine skiing. In the Swiss population the number of advanced skiers is overriding, with a few years of training in skiing, however with several days training a year using a ski instructor teacher for warming up and individual form of learning. With regard to injured skiers, athletes are the ones that prevail. The skiers who had prepared themselves with a physical fitness preparation before the winter season had a greater percentage of accidents and injuries, while on the other hand had a reduced rate in relation to injuries or accidents during warm up. Swiss skiers usually had upper limb injuries (sprains and dislocations due to the fall of the skier. It is recommended that research be done with all the factors for the selection of the best methodology, preparation and adjustment of physical ability in the difficult environment of skiing with respect to accidents and injuries.

  7. Social Support and Recovery from Sport Injury: Elite Skiers Share Their Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Theresa

    2001-01-01

    Interviewed elite skiers who had recovered from serious injuries about stress associated with injury and the role of social support in recovery. Skiers needed various types of emotional, informational, and tangible support from the occurrence of injury through the return to full activity. Treatment team members, ski team members and home support…

  8. External Validation of the Use of Vignettes in Cross-Country Health Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Kristensen, Nicolai; Pozzoli, Dario

    Cross-country comparisons of subjective assessments are rendered difficult if not impossible because of sub-population specific response style. To correct for this, the use of vignettes has become increasingly popular, notably within cross-country health studies. However, the validity of vignettes...... as a means to re-scale across sample populations critically rests on the assumption of "response consistency" (RC): that vignettes and self-assessments are evaluated on the same scale. In this paper, we seek to test this assumption by applying objective measures of health along with subjective measures...

  9. External validation of the use of vignettes in cross-country health studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Kristensen, Nicolai; Pozzoli, Dario

    2010-01-01

    Cross-country comparisons of subjective assessments are rendered difficult if not impossible because of sub-population specific response style. To correct for this, the use of vignettes has become increasingly popular, notably within cross-country health studies. However, the validity of vignettes...... as a means to re-scale across sample sub-populations critically rests on the assumption of ''response consistency'' (RC): that vignettes and self-assessments are evaluated on the same scale. In this paper, we seek to test this assumption by applying objective measures of health along with subjective measures...

  10. External validation of the use of vignettes in cross-country health studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Nabanita Datta; Kristensen, Nicolai; Pozzoli, Dario

    Cross-country comparisons of subjective assessments are rendered difficult if not impossible because of sub-population specific response style. To correct for this, the use of vignettes has become increasingly popular, notably within cross-country health studies. However, the validity of vignettes...... as a means to re-scale across sample sub-populations critically rests on the assumption of "response consistency" (RC): that vignettes and self-assessments are evaluated on the same scale. In this paper we seek to test this assumption by applying objective measures of health along with subjective measures...

  11. The spirits of capitalism and socialism. A cross-country study of ideology

    OpenAIRE

    Bjørnskov, Christian; Paldam, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The World Values Survey contains an item on ownership, which is polled 200 times in 92 countries at the four waves of 1990, 1995, 2000 and 2005. It is developed into the CS-score that measures the aggregate mass support for capitalism and socialism. Four hypotheses are advanced and tested to explain the wide cross-country variation in the CS-score: (A1) It is partly due to the cross-country distribution of income, and consequently the West stands out as the most capitalist-minded area of the ...

  12. New Evidence on Cross-Country Differences in Job Satisfaction Using Anchoring Vignettes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Nicolai; Johansson, Edvard

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents results on cross-country comparison of job satisfaction across seven EU countries taking into account that people in different countries may perceive subjective questions differently. We apply a chopit model approach where the threshold parameters in an ordered probit model...... somewhat lower while workers from the Netherlands are found to have the highest level of job satisfaction. These results suggest that cultural di¤erences in the way people perceive subjective questions about satisfaction make simple cross-country comparison misleading....

  13. Glycogen resynthesis rate following cross-country skiing is closely correlated to skeletal muscle glycogen content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Nielsen, Joachim; Saltin, Bengt;

    -trial (classic style) on a competition cc track. During the first 4hrs of recovery, skiers received either water or carbohydrate (CHO), after which they all received CHO enriched food (1 g . kg-1 bw . h-1). Muscle biopsies were obtained in both arm and leg muscles before and immediately after the race, as well...... as 4h and 22h after the race and analyzed for glycogen content. Figure 1. Correlation between muscle glycogen resynthesis rate and glycogen content after and in the rocery period after exercise. Line indicate best fit of all the data points (r2 = 0.41, p

  14. 越野滑雪运动训练中常见问题与防治措施%Common Problems and Preventive Measures in the Training of Cross Country Skiing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈国光; 杨翠敏

    2015-01-01

    Because the time of training and competitions for cross country skiers is long, it is very easy for skiers to get sports injury or be tired of training and competitons, which will lead to decrease the desire of competitions and stress ability. According to the common injuries of waist and knee joints in the training and competitions, the methods of massage, physiotherapy, acupuncture and so on should be taken timely. For getting tired of training, decreasing the desire to compete and stress ability reducing, recover actively by changing training methods, adjusting the load, changing training environment, reset the training objectives, conditioning with traditional Chinese medicine, nutrition supplement and other means.%由于越野滑雪运动员训练与比赛的时间持续性长,极易出现运动性损伤,或者厌烦训练与比赛的心理状态,导致比赛欲望降低,应激能力下降.针对训练比赛中运动中常见的腰部、膝关节损伤,应采取按摩与理疗、针灸等方法给予及时的治疗;对厌烦训练、比赛欲望降低、应激能力下降等疲劳状态,采用改变训练方法、调整负荷,转换训练环境、重新设置训练目标,中药调理、营养补充等手段进行积极的恢复.

  15. Measurement error in cross-country productivity comparisons : Is more detailed data better?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inklaar, R.; Timmer, M.

    2009-01-01

    Relative productivity levels are used intensively in analyzing cross-country growth, but often based on crude measures and with little information on their reliability. In this paper, we provide a new framework to estimate purchasing power parities and productivity levels with associated standard er

  16. Characteristics of the Female Athlete Triad in Collegiate Cross-Country Runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sharon H.

    2007-01-01

    The Female Athlete Triad is a life-threatening syndrome defined by disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis. Objective and Participants: The author's purpose in this study was to examine female cross-country runners' (N = 300) calcium consumption, along with the prevalence of 2 components of the triad: disordered eating and menstrual…

  17. INFLUENCE OF TECHNOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF CROSS-COUNTRY GAS PIPELINE ON OPERATIONAL INDICES OF COMPRESSOR STATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Abrazovsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains an analysis that reveals an influence of technological parameters of a cross-country pipeline on operational indices of a compressor station. An actual dependence of the gas pipeline capacity and consumed power of the compressor station and real indices of power efficiency of gas compressor units have been determined in the paper.

  18. Fast and reliable obstacle detection and segmentation for cross-country navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, A.; Manduchi, R.; Rankin, A.; Matthies, L.

    2002-01-01

    Obstacle detection is one of the main components of the control system of autonomous vehicles. In the case of indoor/urban navigation, obstacles are typically defined as surface points that are higher than the ground plane. This characterization, however, cannot be used in cross-country and unstructured environments, where the notion of ground plane is often not meaningful.

  19. SME Financing in Europe: Cross-Country Determinants of Debt Maturity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeter-Kant, Johanna; Hernandez-Canovas, Gines

    2006-01-01

    We examine the influence of cross country differences on debt maturity for small and medium size enterprises (SMEs) using a sample of 3366 SMEs from 19 European countries. We analyze a country's legal environment, institutional environment, banking structure and economic situation while controlling

  20. Bank Competition and Stability : Cross-country Heterogeneity (Revised version of EBC DP 2011-019)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, T.H.L.; De Jonghe, O.G.; Schepens, G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: This paper documents large cross-country variation in the relationship between bank competition and bank stability and explores market, regulatory and institutional features that can explain this variation. We show that an increase in competition will have a larger impact on banks’ fragili

  1. Bank Competition and Stability : Cross-country Heterogeneity (Replaced by EBC DP 2012-026)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, T.H.L.; De Jonghe, O.G.; Schepens, G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper documents a large cross-country variation in the relationship between bank competition and stability and explores market, regulatory and institutional features that can explain this heterogeneity. Combining insights from the competition-stability and regulation-stability literatures, we d

  2. Measuring Statistics Anxiety: Cross-Country Validity of the Statistical Anxiety Scale (SAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesi, Francesca; Primi, Caterina; Carmona, Jose

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the research was to test the psychometric properties of the Italian version of the Vigil-Colet et al.'s Statistical Anxiety Scale (SAS), taking into account evidences based on (a) internal structure (factorial structure and cross-country invariance) and (b) relationships to other variables (the statistics anxiety's nomological network).…

  3. Neuro-Linguistic Programming: Improving Rapport between Track/Cross Country Coaches and Significant Others

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, David Jay

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the background information and the components of N.L.P., being eye movements, use of predicates, and posturing, as they apply to improving rapport and empathy between track/cross country coaches and their significant others in the arena of competition to help alleviate the inherent stressors.

  4. Differences in Sensation Seeking Between Alpine Skiers, Snowboarders and Ski Tourers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kopp, Mirjam Wolf, Gerhard Ruedl, Martin Burtscher

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite different injury rates and injury patterns previous personality related research in the field of downhill winter sports did not subdivide between different alpine slope users. In this study, we tried to find out whether the personality trait sensation seeking differs between skiers, snowboarders and ski tourers. In a cross-sectional survey 1185 persons (726 alpine skiers, 321 snowboarders and 138 ski tourers comparable in age and sex were electronically questioned with the sensation seeking scale (SSS-V comprising the four factors thrill and adventure seeking, experiences seeking, disinhibition and boredom susceptibility. Kruskal-Wallis Tests revealed a significantly higher total score of the SSS-V for snowboarders in comparison to alpine skiers and ski tourers (H(2 = 41.5, p < 0.001. Ski tourers and snowboarders scored significantly higher in the dimensions “thrill- and adventure-seeking” and “experience-seeking” than alpine skiers. Furthermore, snowboarders showed higher scores in “disinhibition” related to alpine skiers and ski tourers and “boredom susceptibility” compared to alpine skiers. Data show differences in the personality trait sensation seeking in people practising different winter sports. As snowboarders showed higher SS-scores compared to alpine skiers and ski tourers prevention and information programs might benefit from a selective approach focusing on special characteristics of the respective group.

  5. Expo Junior

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Fort de son succès Expo Juniors revient du 22 au 23 novembre 2014 - Papa & Maman Noël seront présents ! Nous avons le plaisir de  proposer à nos membres des billets d'entrées  à un tarif préférentiel, au prix de CHF 10.- l'unité au lieu de CHF 18.- (gratuit pour les enfants de 0 à 4 ans). Des centaines d’ateliers répartis en 3 villages : Sports & Loisirs, Jeux & Jouets, Éducation & Vie pratique. Cet événement propose aux familles aussi d'autres thèmes : tourisme, idées cadeaux, mode, bien-être, beauté, décoration, ainsi que des services destinés aux familles. Parades, attractions, castings, défilés de mode, dédicaces, séances photos avec Papa Noël, ainsi que de nombre...

  6. Effect of fatigue on double pole kinematics in sprint cross-country skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zory, Raphael; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Pellegrini, Barbara; Schena, Federico; Rouard, Annie

    2009-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of fatigue (physiological, mechanical, and muscular parameters) induced by a sprint simulation on kinematic parameters (cycle, phases, and joints angles) of the double pole technique. Eight elite skiers were tested for knee extensor strength and upper body power both before and after a three-bout simulation of sprint racing. They were video analyzed during the final part of the test track of bouts 1 and 3 using a digital camera. Results showed that skiers were in a fatigue state (decrease of the knee extensors voluntary force (-10.4+/-10.4%) and upper body power output (-11.1+/-8.7%) at the end of the sprint. During bout 3, the final spurt and cycle velocities decreased significantly (-7.5+/-12.3%; -13.2+/-9.5%; both p<.05). Angular patterns were only slightly modified between bouts 1 and 3 with trunk, hip, and pole angles being significantly greater for the third bout. The decrease of hip and trunk flexion and the lower inclination of the pole during the poling phase suggested a reduced effectiveness of the force application which could lead to a decrease in the cycle velocity.

  7. Skier triggering of backcountry avalanches with skilled route selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinickas, Alexandra; Haegeli, Pascal; Jamieson, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Jamieson (2009) provided numerical estimates for the baseline probabilities of triggering an avalanche by a backcountry skier making fresh tracks without skilled route selection as a function of the North American avalanche danger scale (i.e., hazard levels Low, Moderate, Considerable, High and Extreme). Using the results of an expert survey, he showed that triggering probabilities while skiing directly up, down or across a trigger zone without skilled route selection increase roughly by a factor of 10 with each step of the North American avalanche danger scale (i.e. hazard level). The objective of the present study is to examine the effect of skilled route selection on the relationship between triggering probability and hazard level. To assess the effect of skilled route selection on triggering probability by hazard level, we analysed avalanche hazard assessments as well as reports of skiing activity and triggering of avalanches from 11 Canadian helicopter and snowcat operations during two winters (2012-13 and 2013-14). These reports were submitted to the daily information exchange among Canadian avalanche safety operations, and reflect professional decision-making and route selection practices of guides leading groups of skiers. We selected all skier-controlled or accidentally triggered avalanches with a destructive size greater than size 1 according to the Canadian avalanche size classification, triggered by any member of a guided group (guide or guest). These operations forecast the avalanche hazard daily for each of three elevation bands: alpine, treeline and below treeline. In contrast to the 2009 study, an exposure was defined as a group skiing within any one of the three elevation bands, and consequently within a hazard rating, for the day (~4,300 ratings over two winters). For example, a group that skied below treeline (rated Moderate) and treeline (rated Considerable) in one day, would receive one count for exposure to Moderate hazard, and one count for

  8. Questions Students Ask: How Can a Downhill Skier Move Faster than a Sky Diver?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenti, Angelo, Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the relationship of gravity, coefficient of friction, surface area, and Newton's second law to explain the physics involved in downhill skiers being able to move faster than sky divers in free fall. (JM)

  9. One-dimensional V-Scope analysis of habituation to simulated cross-country skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candler, P D; Li, J C; Tipler, B J

    1995-07-01

    Responses to simulated cross-country skiing were measured using the V-Scope, a new telemetric ultrasound motion monitor. Ten young male adults performed a total of 45 minutes of distributed practice on a Nordic-Track ski simulator. Over a period of three 15-minute sessions cadence and velocity were unchanged. Step and stride lengths decreased significantly (p < 0.05) after the first 15-minute session and then remained unchanged. There were no left-right limb differences across all sessions indicating a normal gait. Response variability in velocity, step lengths and stride length was dramatically reduced after the first exposure period. This study demonstrates that the V-Scope system is a useful motion analysing device and, on the basis of the data presented in this preliminary investigation, at least two 15-minute habituation sessions are required for initial habituation to simulated cross-country skiing.

  10. Erythemal ultraviolet solar radiation doses received by young skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, María-Antonia; Cañada, Javier; Moreno, Juan Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Children are a special group since epidemiological evidence indicates that excessive exposure to sunlight at an early age increases the risk of skin cancer in later life. The purpose of this study is to quantify children's UV exposure when skiing, using dosimeters (VioSpor) placed on the shoulders of 10 participants. The children received a median daily Standard Erythema Dose of 2.1 within a range of 4.9-0.71, this being approximately 35% of the calculated 24 h ambient UV radiation on the horizontal plane. According to the results obtained, young skiers are exposed to UV radiation that can potentially cause skin damage and erythema and increase the risk of skin cancer in the course of a lifetime. These findings emphasise the need for adequate protective measures against solar radiation when skiing. The results also suggest that sun-protection campaigns should be undertaken aimed at children engaged in outdoor sports, including winter activities.

  11. Tax Capacity and Tax Effort : Extended Cross-Country Analysis from 1994 to 2009

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Tuan Minh; Moreno-Dodson, Blanca; Bayraktar, Nihal

    2012-01-01

    One of the important factors for economic development is the existence of an effective tax system. This paper deals with the concept and empirical estimation of countries' taxable capacity and tax effort. It employs a cross-country study from a sample of 110 developing and developed countries during 1994-2009. Taxable capacity refers to the predicted tax-to-gross domestic product ratio tha...

  12. Child Malnutrition and Mortality in Developing Countries: Evidence from a Cross-Country Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriele, Alberto; Schettino, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we propose and test an interpretative framework on the social and economic determinants of child malnutrition and child mortality, two key human development indicators. The paper is organized as follows. Section 1 illustrates the main economic and social factors causing child malnutrition and mortality. Section 2 identifies the main clusters of food insecure and vulnerable households and briefly describes their livelihood profiles. Section 3 exposes our cross-country estimatio...

  13. Does Gender Inequality Reduce Growth and Development? Evidence from Cross-Country Regressions

    OpenAIRE

    Klasen, Stephan

    2000-01-01

    Using cross-country and panel regressions, this paper investigates to what extent gender inequality in education and employment may reduce growth and development. The paper finds a considerable impact of gender inequality on economic growth which is robust to changes in specifications and controls for potential endogeneities. The results suggest that gender inequality in education has a direct impact on economic growth through lowering the average quality of human capital. In addition, econom...

  14. Potential of IMU Sensors in Performance Analysis of Professional Alpine Skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Gwangjae; Jang, Young Jae; Kim, Jinhyeok; Kim, Jin Hae; Kim, Hye Young; Kim, Kitae; Panday, Siddhartha Bikram

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis to identify a sensor location for an inertial measurement unit (IMU) on the body of a skier and propose the best location to capture turn motions for training. We also validate the manner in which the data from the IMU sensor on the proposed location can characterize ski turns and performance with a series of statistical analyses, including a comparison with data collected from foot pressure sensors. The goal of the study is to logically identify the ideal location on the skier's body to attach the IMU sensor and the best use of the data collected for the skier. The statistical analyses and the hierarchical clustering method indicate that the pelvis is the best location for attachment of an IMU, and numerical validation shows that the data collected from this location can effectively estimate the performance and characteristics of the skier. Moreover, placement of the sensor at this location does not distract the skier's motion, and the sensor can be easily attached and detached. The findings of this study can be used for the development of a wearable device for the routine training of professional skiers.

  15. Kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic adaptation to speed and resistance in double poling cross country skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Johnny; Tinmark, Fredrik; Halvorsen, Kjartan; Arndt, Anton

    2013-06-01

    This study incorporated variations in speed and the horizontal resistance acting upon elite female skiers during double poling (DP) on a treadmill and specifically analyzed biomechanical adaptations to these variations. Whole body kinematics and pole force data were recorded and used to calculate the moment of force acting on the shoulder and elbow joints. Data were obtained with a 3D optoelectronic system using reflective markers at given anatomical landmarks. Forces along the long axis of the right pole were measured with a piezoelectric force transducer. Surface electrodes were used to record EMG activity in the rectus femoris, rectus abdominis, latissimus dorsi and triceps brachii muscles. In a first set of recordings, the participants double poled with zero elevation at five different speeds from 8 to 17 km h(-1). In a second set of recordings, horizontal resistance was added by weights (0.4-1.9 kg) attached to a pulley system pulling the skier posteriorly during DP at 14 km h(-1). Results showed increasing relative duration of the thrust phase with increasing resistance, but not with speed. Significant kinematic differences occurred with increase in both speed and resistance. The mean (±SD) horizontal force components ranged between 1.7 (±1.3) and 2.8 (±1.1) percent (%) bodyweight (BW) in the speed adaptation and 3.1 (±0.6) and 4.0 (±1.3) % BW in the adaptation to horizontal resistance. Peak muscle activity showed a central to peripheral (proximo-distal) activation sequence. The temporal cycle phase pattern in the adaptation to speed and horizontal resistance differed.

  16. Differences in Sensation Seeking Between Alpine Skiers, Snowboarders and Ski Tourers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Martin; Wolf, Mirjam; Ruedl, Gerhard; Burtscher, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Despite different injury rates and injury patterns previous personality related research in the field of downhill winter sports did not subdivide between different alpine slope users. In this study, we tried to find out whether the personality trait sensation seeking differs between skiers, snowboarders and ski tourers. In a cross-sectional survey 1185 persons (726 alpine skiers, 321 snowboarders and 138 ski tourers comparable in age and sex) were electronically questioned with the sensation seeking scale (SSS-V) comprising the four factors thrill and adventure seeking, experiences seeking, disinhibition and boredom susceptibility. Kruskal-Wallis Tests revealed a significantly higher total score of the SSS-V for snowboarders in comparison to alpine skiers and ski tourers (H(2) = 41.5, p Ski tourers and snowboarders scored significantly higher in the dimensions "thrill- and adventure-seeking" and "experience-seeking" than alpine skiers. Furthermore, snowboarders showed higher scores in "disinhibition" related to alpine skiers and ski tourers and "boredom susceptibility" compared to alpine skiers. Data show differences in the personality trait sensation seeking in people practising different winter sports. As snowboarders showed higher SS-scores compared to alpine skiers and ski tourers prevention and information programs might benefit from a selective approach focusing on special characteristics of the respective group. Key pointsIt is the very first research trying to identify differences between different types of winter sport slope usersObtained results show higher sensation seeking scores in snowboardersThese results might stimulate new approaches in educational campaigns to reduce accident rates in winter sports.

  17. Serum ferritin and serum iron changes after cross-country and roller ski endurance races.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattini, A; Schena, F; Guidi, G C

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the variations induced in iron status parameters by four endurance races of different lengths. A comprehensive group of 48 healthy, non-iron deficient, endurance athletes were evaluated before and after four different cross-country and roller ski races: I = Skirollonga, roller ski race for individuals (n = 10), mean duration (MD) = 1 h 48 min; II = Marcialonga, cross-country ski race for individuals (n = 9) MD = 3 h 10 min; III = 12-h of Caldonazzo (Trento-Italy) roller ski relay race (n = 13) MD = 12 h; IV = 24-h of Pinzolo (Trento-Italy) cross-country ski relay race (n = 16) MD = 24 h. In the relays the MD includes both exercise and recovery times. Blood samples were taken before and after every race for the determination of the following haematological parameters: red blood count, haemoglobin, and packed cell volume, serum iron concentration [SI], serum ferritin concentration [FERR] and total iron binding capacity (TIBC). The results showed a constant significant increase of [FERR] after the races (+44.9% in I, +50.5% in II, +51.2% in III and +36.5% in IV, P less than 0.01) while [SI] increased only in the first two races (+28.2% in I and +19.7% in II, P less than 0.01) and showed a remarkable decrease in the longer races (-46.1% in III and -39% in IV, P less than 0.01). The TIBC increased in all the races (except II) to the same extent (range 10%-12%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Effects of Pelvic and Core Strength Training on High School Cross-Country Race Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Anne W; Goedeke, Maggie K; Cunningham, Saengchoy R; Rockwell, Derek E; Lehecka, Bryan J; Manske, Robert C; Smith, Barbara S

    2017-08-01

    Clark, AW, Goedeke, MK, Cunningham, SR, Rockwell, DE, Lehecka, BJ, Manske, RC, and Smith, BS. Effects of pelvic and core strength training on high school cross-country race times. J Strength Cond Res 31(8): 2289-2295, 2017-There is only limited research examining the effect of pelvic and core strength training on running performance. Pelvic and core muscle fatigue is believed to contribute to excess motion along frontal and transverse planes which decreases efficiency in normal sagittal plane running motions. The purpose of this study was to determine whether adding a 6-week pelvic and core strengthening program resulted in decreased race times in high school cross-country runners. Thirty-five high school cross-country runners (14-19 years old) from 2 high schools were randomly assigned to a strengthening group (experimental) or a nonstrengthening group (control). All participants completed 4 standardized isometric strength tests for hip abductors, adductors, extensors, and core musculature in a test-retest design. The experimental group performed a 6-week pelvic and core strengthening program along with their normal training. Participants in the control group performed their normal training without additional pelvic and core strengthening. Baseline, 3-week, and 6-week race times were collected using a repeated measures design. No significant interaction between experimental and control groups regarding decreasing race times and increasing pelvic and core musculature strength occurred over the 6-week study period. Both groups increased strength and decreased overall race times. Clinically significant findings reveal a 6-week pelvic and core stability strengthening program 3 times a week in addition to coach led team training may help decrease race times.

  19. The Happy Few. Cross-Country Evidence on Social Capital and Life Satisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    2003-01-01

    I examine why the populations of certain countries are so much more satisfied with their lives than the rest of the world. In cross-country analyses, income per capita, economic uncertainty and expectations for the future are robust predictors of happiness while a social capital measure emerges...... strongly and robustly associated with happiness. Moreover, the effect of investing in social capital is remarkably strong compared to the alternatives. I conclude that the populations in a few Northern European countries are probably the happiest in the world because of their high levels of social capital...

  20. The Happy Few. Cross-Country Evidence on Social Capital and Life Satisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    2003-01-01

    strongly and robustly associated with happiness. Moreover, the effect of investing in social capital is remarkably strong compared to the alternatives. I conclude that the populations in a few Northern European countries are probably the happiest in the world because of their high levels of social capital......I examine why the populations of certain countries are so much more satisfied with their lives than the rest of the world. In cross-country analyses, income per capita, economic uncertainty and expectations for the future are robust predictors of happiness while a social capital measure emerges...

  1. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF TWO SKIING SIMULATORS AS FUNCTIONAL TRAINING DEVICES FOR RECREATIONAL SKIERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto A. Panizzolo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to examine two ski simulators, Skimagic and Skier's Edge, and to evaluate their efficacy as functional training devices for skiers. Vertical ground reaction forces, knee flexion angle kinematics and muscles activity were recorded on these devices and compared with those measured in similar condition while skiing on snow. Five ski instructors performed three randomized testing sessions (snow, Skimagic and Skier's Edge. During the testing sessions, vertical ground reaction forces were recorded by means of pressure insoles in synchronisation with a portable data logger that collected values of knee flexion-extension and EMG activation of rectus femoris and vastus medialis. EMG activations and ground reaction forces measured while skiing on simulators were lower than on snow. Although less overall EMG activation was present on the simulators, the pattern of EMG activity was closer to real snow on Skimagic than on Skiers' Edge. Results of the present study suggested that the two devices are not effectively applicable for strength training. However, based on the recorded EMG patterns, the Skimagic treadmill is potentially suitable to act as a functional training device for recreational skiers provided that an increase of speed and slope on Skimagic could induce a closer matching of the studied biomechanical parameters with the snow skiing conditions.

  2. The effect of mountain bike wheel size on cross-country performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Howard Thomas; Sinclair, Jonathan; Atkins, Stephen; Rylands, Lee; Metcalfe, John

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of different wheel size diameters on indicators of cross-country mountain bike time trial performance. Nine competitive male mountain bikers (age 34.7 ± 10.7 years; stature 177.7 ± 5.6 cm; body mass 73.2 ± 8.6 kg) performed 1 lap of a 3.48 km mountain bike (MTB) course as fast as possible on 26″, 27.5″ and 29″ wheeled MTB. Time (s), mean power (W), cadence (revs · min(-1)) and velocity (km · h(-1)) were recorded for the whole lap and during ascent and descent sections. One-way repeated measure ANOVA was used to determine significant differences. Results revealed no significant main effects for any variables by wheel size during all trials, with the exception of cadence during the descent (F(2, 16) = 8.96; P = .002; P(2) = .53). Post hoc comparisons revealed differences lay between the 26″ and 29″ wheels (P = .02). The findings indicate that wheel size does not significantly influence performance during cross-country when ridden by trained mountain bikers, and that wheel choice is likely due to personal choice or sponsorship commitments.

  3. Renewable electricity consumption in the EU-27: Are cross-country differences diminishing?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maza, Adolfo; Hierro, Maria; Villaverde, Jose [University of Cantabria, Department of Economics, Avda. de los Castros s/n, 39005 Santander (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    The aim of this paper is to analyse cross-country differences for shares of renewable electricity in the EU-27 for the period 1996-2005. We carry out a standard convergence analysis and then examine the evolution of the entire distribution, namely the external shape, intra-distributional dynamics and ergodic distribution. Our main results are as follows. First, there has been a clear convergence pattern for renewable electricity shares across countries. Second, the shape of the distribution has varied significantly over time, with more countries positioned around the mean in 2005 than in 1996. Third, the analysis shows that intra-distributional mobility has been relatively high, especially in those countries with the highest share in the initial year of our sample. Fourth, in spite of this, large cross-country differences will likely persist for RES-E shares in the hypothetical long-term equilibrium, which implies that a major impulse to national RES-E support policies will be necessary in the coming years to shorten this gap. (author)

  4. Mathematical simulation of energy expenditure and recovery during sprint cross-country skiing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moxnes JF

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available John F Moxnes,1 Eldbjørg Dirdal Moxnes21Protection and Societal Security Division, Norwegian Defence Research Establishment, Kjeller, Norway; 2Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, NorwayPurpose: A cross-country sprint competition relies on maximal effort durations of 3–4 minutes. Significant anaerobic energy contribution is expected. Anaerobic energy contribution has been estimated in different sports to date from the accumulated O2 deficit. However, the O2-deficit model can be questioned. We investigate anaerobic energy contribution by applying other methods than the O2 deficit.Methods: Theoretical model development.Results: For sprint cross-country competitions, the anaerobic energy contribution was 20%–25% independent of the employed mathematical model. Recovery times of a minimum 20 minutes were found to be required after sprint races to be sure that the performance in subsequent heats was not influenced.Conclusion: The O2-deficit model gave anaerobic energy results in agreement with other models from the literature. Recovery times of a minimum 20 minutes were found to be required after sprint races to be sure that the performance in subsequent heats was not influenced.Keywords: aerobic, anaerobic, models, endurance sport, recovery

  5. Cross-country differences in basal and stress-induced cortisol secretion in older adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana N Souza-Talarico

    Full Text Available Several studies have emphasized the association between socioeconomic status (SES and inadequate response of the biological stress system. However, other factors related to SES are rarely considered, such as cultural values, social norms, organization, language and communication skills, which raises the need to investigate cross-country differences in stress response. Although some studies have shown differences in cortisol levels between immigrants and natives, there is no cross-country evidence regarding cortisol levels in country-native elders. This is particularly important given the high prevalence of stress-related disorders across nations during aging. The current study examined basal diurnal and reactive cortisol levels in healthy older adults living in two different countries.Salivary cortisol of 260 older adults from Canada and Brazil were analyzed. Diurnal cortisol was measured in saliva samples collected at home throughout two working days at awakening, 30 min after waking, 1400 h, 1600 h and before bedtime. Cortisol reactivity was assessed in response to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST in both populations.Our results showed that even under similar health status, psychological and cognitive characteristics, Brazilian elders exhibited higher basal and stress-induced cortisol secretion compared to the Canadian participants.These findings suggest that country context may modulate cortisol secretion and could impact the population health.

  6. Winter Atomiades 2014: CERN skiers win 31 medals!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2014-01-01

    The 12th Winter Atomiades took place at Flachau, Austria, from 8 to 15 March 2014. The event, organised by the Association of the Sports Communities of the European Research Institutes (see here), brought together 18 research centres, including CERN, AIT, ESRF, PSI and many others, with a total of about 280 participants.   Lots of fun and a great result for the 13 CERN skiers at the 2014 Winter Atomiades in Flachau, Austria. From left to right and from bottom to top: Lennart Jirden (PH), Anna Lipniacka (PH), Guillaume Michet (DGS), Vera Chetvertkova (TE), Thierry Boileau (external), Jean-Louis Grenard (EN), Clement Bovet (EN), Marc Tavlet (BE), Rob Knoops (PH), Giuseppe Lo Presti (IT), Simone Campana (IT), Sylviane Gander (external) and Javier Pablos (TE).   The team of 13 athletes from six different CERN departments won 31 medals across all disciplines, in a spirit of fun and fair play. CERN came second in the general ranking of all participating institutes! The next Winter Atomiades...

  7. COMPREHENSIVE JUNIOR COLLEGES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NIKITAS, CHRISTUS M.; AND OTHERS

    TO MEET THE STATE'S HIGHER EDUCATION NEEDS, THE NEW HAMPSHIRE JUNIOR COLLEGE COMMISSION DEVELOPED A PLAN OF (1) GRADUAL AND SELECTIVE CONVERSION OF THE STATE'S TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS TO COMPREHENSIVE JUNIOR COLLEGES, (2) SELECTIVE ADDITION OF 2-YEAR PROGRAMS AT THE STATE COLLEGES AND INSTITUTES, AND (3) ESTABLISHMENT OF A STATE…

  8. Relationship between Fiscal Subsidies and CO2 Emissions: Evidence from Cross-Country Empirical Estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacchidananda Mukherjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Countries disburse subsidies with various motivations, for example, to promote industrial development, facilitate innovation, support national champions, and ensure redistribution. The devolution of subsidies may however also encourage economic activities leading to climate change related concerns, reflected through higher greenhouse gases (GHGs emissions, if such activities are conducted beyond sustainable point. Through a cross-country empirical analysis involving 131 countries over 1990–2010, the present analysis observes that higher proportional devolution of budgetary subsidies leads to higher CO2 emissions. The countries with higher CO2 emissions are also characterized by higher per capita GDP, greater share of manufacturing sector in their GDP, and higher level of urbanization. In addition, the empirical findings underline the importance of the type of government subsidy devolution on CO2 emission pattern. The analysis underlines the importance of limiting provision of subsidies both in developed and developing countries.

  9. Explaining Cross-Country Differences in Attitudes towards Immigration in the EU-15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Munch, Jakob Roland; Schroll, Sanne

    2007-01-01

    in average attitudes. A larger part can be explained by differences in perceived consequences of immigration, but the main part is still left unexplained. Apart from providing useful input for policy makers working in the area of immigration policy, this raises a number of questions for further research......In this paper, we use data from the first two rounds of the European Social Survey to analyze the extent to which differences in average attitudes towards immigration across the EU-15 countries may be explained by differences in socioeconomic characteristics and individually perceived consequences...... of immigration, using an extension of a decomposition technique developed by Fairlie (2005). We find that despite the significant effects of socioeconomic characteristics on attitudes, differences in the distributions of these characteristics can only explain a modest share of the cross-country variation...

  10. Explaining Cross-Country Differences in Attitudes Towards Immigration in the EU-15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Munch, Jakob Roland; Skaksen, Jan Rose

    in average attitudes. A larger part can be explained by differences in perceived consequences of immigration, but the main part is still left unexplained. Apart from providing useful input for policy makers working in the area of immigration policy, this raises a number of questions for further research......In this paper, we use data from the first two rounds of the European Social Survey to analyse the extent to which differences in average attitudes towards immigration across the EU-15 countries may be explained by differences in socioeconomic characteristics and individually perceived consequences...... of immigration, using an extension of a decomposition technique developed by Fairlie (2005). We find that despite the significant effects of socioeconomic characteristics on attitudes, differences in the distributions of these characteristics can only explain a modest share of the cross-country variation...

  11. Energy efficiency in Norway (1996). Cross Country Comparison on Energy Efficiency Indicators, Phase 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alm, Leif Kristian

    1998-12-01

    This is the national report for Norway in phase 4 of the SAVE project 'Cross country comparison of energy efficiency indicators'. The report deals with energy use and energy efficiency in Norway the last 20 years, with a special emphasis on the period after 1990. Final energy use per Gross Domestic Product (GDP) was reduced by approx 2.3% per year from 1990 to 1996. Doing detailed sector analysis we are applying Laspeyres indices to attribute changes in energy use to either activity, structure or intensity. Calculating an aggregate intensity index from the sector intensities gives an average intensity reduction of 0.4% per year. Thereby most of the reduction in final energy per unit GDP are due to structural changes, and not technical improvements. Almost all data are taken from official Norwegian statistics (Statistics Norway). (author)

  12. Financial stress in emerging markets: Patterns, real effects, and cross-country spillovers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Stolbov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We extend the conventional approach to the construction of financial stress indices (FSI for emerging economies proposed by Balakrishnan et al. (2011. Based on the principal component analysis, our index accounts for developments in the residential real estate market, adopts distinctive indicators for the banking sector and sovereign debt risks, covering the period from February 2008 to September 2015 for 14 emerging economies. The FSIs accurately capture the periods of impaired financial intermediation. The hierarchical cluster analysis identifies five country groups, revealing similarities in the national structures of financial stress. We find an adverse impact of financial stress on economic activity in 9 countries. A Bayesian VAR model is also specified to test for cross-country spillovers of financial stress.

  13. Research of Obstacle Recognition Technology in Cross-Country Environment for Unmanned Ground Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yibing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Being aimed at the obstacle recognition problem of unmanned ground vehicles in cross-country environment, this paper uses monocular vision sensor to realize the obstacle recognition of typical obstacles. Firstly, median filtering algorithm is applied during image preprocessing that can eliminate the noise. Secondly, image segmentation method based on the Fisher criterion function is used to segment the region of interest. Then, morphological method is used to process the segmented image, which is preparing for the subsequent analysis. The next step is to extract the color feature S, color feature a and edge feature “verticality” of image are extracted based on the HSI color space, the Lab color space, and two value images. Finally multifeature fusion algorithm based on Bayes classification theory is used for obstacle recognition. Test results show that the algorithm has good robustness and accuracy.

  14. From Drivers to Athletes -- Modeling and Simulating Cross-Country Sking Marathons

    CERN Document Server

    Treiber, Martin; Kesting, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Traffic flow of athletes in classic-style cross-country ski marathons, with the Swedish Vasaloppet as prominent example, represents a non-vehicular system of driven particles with many properties of vehicular traffic flow such as unidirectional movement, the existence of lanes, and, moreover, severe traffic jams. We propose a microscopic acceleration and track-changing model taking into account different fitness levels, gradients, and interactions between the athletes in all traffic situations. The model is calibrated on microscopic data of the $\\textit{Vasaloppet 2012}$ Using the multi-model open-source simulator MovSim.org, we simulate all 15 000 participants of the Vasaloppet during the first ten kilometers.

  15. Explaining Cross-Country Differences in Attitudes Towards Immigration in the EU-15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Munch, Jakob Roland; Skaksen, Jan Rose

    In this paper, we use data from the first two rounds of the European Social Survey to analyse the extent to which differences in average attitudes towards immigration across the EU-15 countries may be explained by differences in socioeconomic characteristics and individually perceived consequences...... of immigration, using an extension of a decomposition technique developed by Fairlie (2005). We find that despite the significant effects of socioeconomic characteristics on attitudes, differences in the distributions of these characteristics can only explain a modest share of the cross-country variation...... in average attitudes. A larger part can be explained by differences in perceived consequences of immigration, but the main part is still left unexplained. Apart from providing useful input for policy makers working in the area of immigration policy, this raises a number of questions for further research...

  16. Association between earthquake events and cholera outbreaks: a cross-country 15-year longitudinal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Steven A; Turner, Elizabeth L; Thielman, Nathan M

    2013-12-01

    Large earthquakes can cause population displacement, critical sanitation infrastructure damage, and increased threats to water resources, potentially predisposing populations to waterborne disease epidemics such as cholera. Problem The risk of cholera outbreaks after earthquake disasters remains uncertain. A cross-country analysis of World Health Organization (WHO) cholera data that would contribute to this discussion has yet to be published. A cross-country longitudinal analysis was conducted among 63 low- and middle-income countries from 1995-2009. The association between earthquake disasters of various effect sizes and a relative spike in cholera rates for a given country was assessed utilizing fixed-effects logistic regression and adjusting for gross domestic product per capita, water and sanitation level, flooding events, percent urbanization, and under-five child mortality. Also, the association between large earthquakes and cholera rate increases of various degrees was assessed. Forty-eight of the 63 countries had at least one year with reported cholera infections during the 15-year study period. Thirty-six of these 48 countries had at least one earthquake disaster. In adjusted analyses, country-years with ≥10,000 persons affected by an earthquake had 2.26 times increased odds (95 CI, 0.89-5.72, P = .08) of having a greater than average cholera rate that year compared to country-years having cholera infections appeared to weaken as higher levels of cholera rate increases were tested. A trend of increased risk of greater than average cholera rates when more people were affected by an earthquake in a country-year was noted. However these findings did not reach statistical significance at traditional levels and may be due to chance. Frequent large-scale cholera outbreaks after earthquake disasters appeared to be relatively uncommon.

  17. Effects of carbohydrate dose and frequency on metabolism, gastrointestinal discomfort, and cross-country skiing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, B; Betts, J A; McGawley, K

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated carbohydrate ingestion of varied doses and frequencies during a simulated cross-country skiing time trial. Ten men and three women (age: 30 ± 7 years; V ˙ O 2 m a x : 59.6 ± 5.7 mL/kg/min) completed four, 30-km classic technique roller skiing time trials on a treadmill. A 1:1 maltodextrin-fructose carbohydrate solution was provided at high (2.4 g/min; HC) and moderate (1.2 g/min; MC) ingestion rates, each at high (six feeds; HF) and low (two feeds; LF) frequencies. In the LF trials, blood glucose was elevated following carbohydrate ingestion (at 4 and 19 km) but was reduced at 14 and 29 km compared with HF strategies (P ≤ 0.05). Gastrointestinal discomfort was higher in HC-LF compared with all other trials (P ≤ 0.05). Whole-body lipid oxidation was lower and carbohydrate oxidation was higher in LF compared with HF trials (P ≤ 0.05). While performance time was not significantly different between trials (140:11 ± 15:31, 140:43 ± 17:40, 139:12 ± 15:32 and 140:33 ± 17:46 min:s in HC-HF, HC-LF, MC-HF, and MC-LF, respectively; P > 0.05), it was improved with trial order (P  0.05). Altering carbohydrate dose or frequency does not affect cross-country ski performance. However, low-frequency carbohydrate ingestion resulted in poorer maintenance of euglycemia, reduced lipid oxidation, and increased gastrointestinal discomfort.

  18. Effect of ambient temperature on endurance performance while wearing cross-country skiing clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandsund, Mariann; Saursaunet, Vegard; Wiggen, Øystein; Renberg, Julie; Færevik, Hilde; van Beekvelt, Mireille C P

    2012-12-01

    This study assessed the effects of exposure to cold (-14 and -9 °C), cool (-4 and 1 °C) and moderate warm (10 and 20 °C) environments on aerobic endurance performance-related variables: maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2max)), running time to exhaustion (TTE), running economy and running speed at lactate threshold (LT). Nine male endurance athletes wearing cross-country ski racing suit performed a standard running test at six ambient temperatures in a climatic chamber with a wind speed of 5 m s(-1). The exercise protocol consisted of a 10-min warm-up period followed by four submaximal periods of 5 min at increasing intensities between 67 and 91 % of VO(2max) and finally a maximal test to exhaustion. During the time course mean skin temperature decreased significantly with reduced ambient temperatures whereas T (re) increased during all conditions. T (re) was lower at -14 °C than at -9 and 20 °C. Running economy was significantly reduced in warm compared to cool environments and was also reduced at 20 °C compared to -9 °C. Running speed at LT was significantly higher at -4 °C than at -9, 10 and 20 °C. TTE was significantly longer at -4 and 1 °C than at -14, 10 and 20 °C. No significant differences in VO(2max) were found between the various ambient conditions. The optimal aerobic endurance performance wearing a cross-country ski racing suit was found to be -4 and 1 °C, while performance was reduced under moderate warm (10 and 20 °C) and cold (-14 and -9 °C) ambient conditions.

  19. Potential of IMU Sensors in Performance Analysis of Professional Alpine Skiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Gwangjae; Jang, Young Jae; Kim, Jinhyeok; Kim, Jin Hae; Kim, Hye Young; Kim, Kitae; Panday, Siddhartha Bikram

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis to identify a sensor location for an inertial measurement unit (IMU) on the body of a skier and propose the best location to capture turn motions for training. We also validate the manner in which the data from the IMU sensor on the proposed location can characterize ski turns and performance with a series of statistical analyses, including a comparison with data collected from foot pressure sensors. The goal of the study is to logically identify the ideal location on the skier’s body to attach the IMU sensor and the best use of the data collected for the skier. The statistical analyses and the hierarchical clustering method indicate that the pelvis is the best location for attachment of an IMU, and numerical validation shows that the data collected from this location can effectively estimate the performance and characteristics of the skier. Moreover, placement of the sensor at this location does not distract the skier’s motion, and the sensor can be easily attached and detached. The findings of this study can be used for the development of a wearable device for the routine training of professional skiers. PMID:27043579

  20. Physical training of 30–40 years old tourists skiers to ski sports hiking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Toporkov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: compare the test results obtained at different stages of physical training of tourists skiers, immediately after passing of the ski sports hiking of the third category of complexity and 14 days after hiking. Determine the effectiveness of the designed program to improve the physical readiness of 30–40 years old tourists skiers. Material and Methods: 14 people aged 30 to 40 years old who have a different experience in water, hiking and mountain as well as ski-sport hiking took part in research. Analysis of scientific and methodical literature, pedagogical observations, pedagogical experiment, methods of mathematical statistics is used. Results: the test results of 30–40 years old tourists skiers which are the participants in the experimental group received at different stages of preparation and preparatory period and the results after passing ski sports hiking of the third category of complexity are processed. Their comparative analysis is held. Conclusions: it was found that the developed training program can effectively influence the physical readiness of tourists skiers, as well as all functions and systems that contribute to the successful passage of ski sports categorized hike.

  1. Snow instability evaluation in skier-triggered snow slab avalanches: combining failure initiation and crack propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaume, Johan; Reuter, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    Dry-snow slab avalanches start with a local failure in a weak snowpack layer buried below cohesive snow slab layers. If the size of the failed zone exceeds a critical size, rapid crack propagation occurs possibly followed by slab release if the slope is steep enough. The probability of skier-triggering a slab avalanche is generally characterized by classical stability indices that do not account for crack propagation. In this study, we propose a new model to evaluate the conditions for the onset of crack propagation in skier-triggered slab avalanches. For a given weak layer, the critical crack length characterizing crack propagation propensity was compared to the size of the area where the skier-induced stress exceeds the shear strength of the weak layer. The ratio between both length scales yields a stability criterion combining the processes of failure initiation and crack propagation. The critical crack length was calculated from a recently developed model based on numerical simulations. The skier-induced stress was computed from analytical solutions and finite element simulations to account for slab layering. A detailed sensitivity analysis was performed for simplified snow profiles to characterize the influence of snowpack properties and slab layering on crack propagation propensity. Finally, we applied our approach for manually observed snow profiles and compared our results to rutschblock stability tests.

  2. Differences in Motor Imagery Time when Predicting Task Duration in Alpine Skiers and Equestrian Riders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Magali; Collet, Christian; Champely, Stephane; Guillot, Aymeric

    2012-01-01

    Athletes' ability to use motor imagery (MI) to predict the speed at which they could perform a motor sequence has received little attention. In this study, 21 alpine skiers and 16 equestrian riders performed MI based on a prediction of actual performance time (a) after the course inspection, (b) before the start, and (c) after the actual…

  3. The Replacement Rate: An Imperfect Indicator of Pension Adequacy in Cross-Country Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chybalski, Filip; Marcinkiewicz, Edyta

    Pension systems are usually evaluated from the perspective of two basic criteria: pension adequacy and financial sustainability. The first criterion concerns the level of pension benefits and protection of the elderly from poverty. The second criterion applies to financial liquidity. This paper is primarily of methodological nature. We discuss the problem of measuring pension adequacy, focusing mainly on the replacement rate, which, defined in a number of ways, is the most common measure of pension adequacy. However, as we argue in this paper, it covers only one of its dimensions, namely consumption smoothing. Meanwhile, an equally important dimension, often discussed in the literature and included in most definitions of pension adequacy, is protection of old-age pensioners from poverty. Accordingly, we have proved the thesis that the replacement rate is not a sufficient measure of broadly understood pension adequacy in cross-country studies. Consequently, we have proposed alternative (or possibly complementary) measures called the synthetic pension adequacy indicators (SPAI1-3), defined in basic form as a quotient of relative median income and the at-risk-of-poverty rate. These indicators provide for both the above-mentioned dimensions of adequacy and, according to statistical analysis, also represent them very well. Moreover, the indicators, calculated separately for men and for women, enables evaluation of the third dimension of pension adequacy, namely gender-related differences in pension adequacy.

  4. Good Governance and Doing Business: Evidence from a Cross-Country Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina BOŢA-AVRAM

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this cross-country empirical analysis is to investigate the relationship between good governance, measured through six clusters of governance developed by the World Bank, and the quality of business environment, captured through the ranking on the ease of doing business, also assessed by the World Bank. This paper analyzes the influence of governance indicators on the ease of doing business using a classification of economies of all countries with population of more than 30,000 citizens, divided on income groups such as low income, lower middle income, upper middle income, high income non-OECD and high income OECD. The findings show the significant influence of some governance indicators such as ‘government effectiveness’ or ‘regulatory quality’ on the ease of doing business, for all countries, while ‘the rule of law’ and ‘control of corruption’ are very determining factors for the business environment especially for countries classified in high income categories. Moreover, this paper could represent an argument for the relevance of governance quality for the ease of doing business, highlighting the necessity to pay enough attention to ensuring good governance in order to provide effective development outcomes.

  5. Corruption costs lives: a cross-country study using an IV approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lio, Mon-Chi; Lee, Ming-Hsuan

    2016-04-01

    This study quantitatively estimates the effects of corruption on five major health indicators by using recent cross-country panel data covering 119 countries for the period of 2005-2011. The corruption indicators provided by the World Bank and Transparency International are used, and both the two-way fixed effect and the two-stage least squares approaches are employed for our estimation. The estimation results show that, in general, corruption is negatively associated with a country's health outcomes. A lower level of corruption or a better control of corruption in a country can lead to longer life expectancy, a lower infant mortality rate and a lower under-five mortality rate for citizens. However, our estimation finds no significant association between corruption and individual diseases including human immunodeficiency virus prevalence and tuberculosis incidence. The findings suggest that corruption reduction itself is an effective method to promote health. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. In-season dietary adequacy of trained male cross-country runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niekamp, R A; Baer, J T

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the dietary adequacy of 12 collegiate cross-country runners during a competitive season. Four-day diet records were collected twice during the season and analyzed for total daily energy, macronutrients, vitamin A, vitamin C, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folate, iron, magnesium, zinc, and calcium. Mean energy intake (3,248 +/- 590 kcal) was not significantly different from estimated mean energy expenditure (3,439 +/- 244 kcal). Week 8 mean prealbumin levels were within normal limits (26.8 +/- 2.8 mg/dl). Mean daily CHO intake was 497 +/- 134 g/day (61.2%). Three to four hours prior to competition a pre-race meal was consumed; it contained 82 +/- 47 g CHO. Postcompetition CHO intake was delayed an average 2.5 hr; at that time approximately 2.6 +/- 0.69 g CHO/kg body weight was consumed. The athletes appeared to demonstrate dietary adequacy with the exception of timing of postcompetition carbohydrate consumption.

  7. Short-term performance peaking in an elite cross-country mountain biker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rønnestad, Bent R; Hansen, Joar; Vegge, Geir; Mujika, Iñigo

    2016-08-01

    Endurance athletes usually achieve performance peaks with 2-4 weeks of overload training followed by 1-3weeks of tapering. With a tight competition schedule, this may not be appropriate. This case investigates the effect of a 7-day overload period including daily high-intensity aerobic training followed by a 5-day step taper between two competitions in an elite cross-country mountain biker. Pre-test peak oxygen consumption was 89 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), peak aerobic power 6.8 W·kg(-1), power output at 2 mmol·L(-1) blood lactate concentration 3.9 W·kg(-1), maximal isometric force 180 Nm and squat jump 21 cm. During overload, perceived leg well-being went from normal to very heavy. On day 1 after overload, vastus lateralis and vastus medialis EMGmean activity was reduced by 3% and 7%, respectively. Other baseline measurements were reduced by 3-7%. On day 4 of the taper, he felt that his legs were good and all measurements were 3-7% higher than before overload. On day 6 after the taper, his legs felt very good. This case shows that an elite mountain biker (11th in UCI World Cup one week prior to the pre-test) could achieve a rather large supercompensation by using a 12-day performance peaking protocol.

  8. European consumers’ interest toward nutritional information on wine labeling: A cross-country analysis*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annunziata Azzurra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores, through an empirical analysis European consumers’ interest toward nutritional information on wine labels, examining interest, knowledge and understanding of these information. In this regard, results from direct survey with a cross-country sample of 500 wine consumers (i.e. respondents drinking at least once a month living in Italy, France and Spain are presented and discussed. Preliminary results reveal that consumers are quite confused about the nutritional aspects of wine and tend to be interested in receiving nutritional information on wine labels. However, the interest expressed towards this kind of information differ from country to country and is influenced by other socio-demographic variables. Findings from current research should be valuable to contribute to the debate on updating international and national standards on wine labelling concerning nutrition. At the same time, the research provides a number of useful indications for policy makers in defining future development of wine nutritional labelling programs and in implementing strategies focused in enhancing efficacy and readability of labels.

  9. Global digital divide: determinants of cross-country ICT development with special reference to Southeast Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbra Toria Nipo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Information and communication technology (ICT tools are regarded as imperative not only for enabling the economy to grow at a healthy rate, but also for elevating the socioeconomic conditions and standards of the society. In concurrence with the widespread diffusion of ICT, lies the phenomenon called digital divide – a complex issue pertaining to unequal access, use and applications of ICT among countries and peoples. This paper attempts to measure the contribution of conventional factors such as affordability, infrastructure, trade openness and urbanization, with added emphasis on the role of financial development in explaining cross-country development of ICT among Southeast Asian countries. Using panel data for 4 countries for the period 1994 – 2011, findings of this study revealed that GDP is the most significant determinant in explaining digital divide – consistent with findings from previous research efforts. Financial development also appear significant in most models adopted in all three ICT tools, implying the need for these countries to improve their financial markets to avoid falling further behind in promoting a digitally inclusive society.

  10. Do GCI indicators predict SME creation? A Western Balkans cross-country comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fëllënza Lushaku

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In early stages SMEs were seen as insignificant supplement to large business supply, whereas today they have a very important social and economic role, because of their contribution to job creation. These contributions are very valuable in times of crises and rising unemployment. In Kosovo and the Western Balkan countries, including countries such as Albania, Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina, the development of SMEs can contribute in facing many challenges, effects of inequality, high level of unemployment and demographic challenges. In addition, SME development can contribute to strengthening the competitiveness and productivity, while also promoting the growth of income per capita. Besides the positive perception the creation of small and medium enterprises has, it is also indispensable to consider their extinction rate, being the most affected category of businesses, especially in the initial stages. It is proved that the net SME creation and cross-country differences in the relationship between new businesses and extinct businesses, can serve as a recommendation for policy makers in order to create a favorable climate for small and medium enterprises. GCI indicators that measures global competitiveness are used to determine if the climate of competitiveness predicts the development of SMEs.

  11. Heart rate responses and fluid balance of competitive cross-country hang gliding pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Darren P

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the physiological challenges of competitive cross-country hang gliding. Seventeen experienced male pilots (age=41+/-9 y; mean+/-SD) were fitted with a monitor that recorded heart rate and altitude at 0.5 Hz throughout a competitive flight. Fluid losses were evaluated by comparing pilot pre- and postflight mass. The pilots' displacement was 88.4+/-43.7 km in 145.5+/-49.4 min. Mean flight altitude was 1902+/-427 m (range=1363-2601 m) with a maximum altitude of 2925+/-682 m (1870-3831 m). The mean in-flight heart rate of the pilots was 112+/-11 bpm (64+/-6% predicted HRmax). For all except one subject, heart rate was highest while launching (165+/-12 bpm, 93+/-7% predicted HRmax), followed by landing (154+/-13 bpm, 87+/-7% predicted HRmax). No statistically significant relationship was observed between heart rate during the launch and reported measures of state anxiety. Heart rate was inversely related (PFluid loss during the flight was 1.32+/-0.70 L, which approximated 0.55 L/h, while mean in-flight fluid consumption was 0.39+/-0.44 L. Six pilots consumed no fluid during the flight. Even among experienced pilots, high heart rates are more a function of state anxiety than physical work demand. Fluid losses during flight are surprisingly moderate but pilots may still benefit from attending to fluid balance.

  12. Is it possible to develop a cross-country test of social interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Brett; Atler, Karen; Fisher, Anne G

    2017-11-01

    The Evaluation of Social Interaction (ESI) is used in Asia, Australia, North America and Europe. What is considered to be appropriate social interaction, however, differs amongst countries. If social interaction varies, the relative difficulty of the ESI items and types of social exchange also could vary, resulting in differential item functioning (DIF) and test bias in the form of differential test functioning (DTF). Yet, because the ESI scoring criteria are designed to account for culture, the ESI should be free of DIF and DTF. The purpose, therefore, was to determine whether the ESI demonstrates DIF or DTF related to country. A retrospective, descriptive, cross-sectional study of 9811 participants 2-102 years, 55% female, from 12 countries was conducted using many-facet Rasch analyses. DIF analyses compared paired item and social exchange type values by country against a critical effect size (±0.55 logit). DTF analyses compared paired ESI measures by country to 95% confidence intervals. All paired social exchange types and 98.3% of paired items differed by less than ±0.55 logit. All persons fell within 95% confidence intervals. Minimal DIF resulted in no test bias, supporting the cross-country validity of the ESI.

  13. Comparison of manually produced and automated cross country movement maps using digital image processing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, L. K.

    1985-01-01

    The Image-Based Information System (IBIS) was used to automate the cross country movement (CCM) mapping model developed by the Defense Mapping Agency (DMA). Existing terrain factor overlays and a CCM map, produced by DMA for the Fort Lewis, Washington area, were digitized and reformatted into geometrically registered images. Terrain factor data from Slope, Soils, and Vegetation overlays were entered into IBIS, and were then combined utilizing IBIS-programmed equations to implement the DMA CCM model. The resulting IBIS-generated CCM map was then compared with the digitized manually produced map to test similarity. The numbers of pixels comprising each CCM region were compared between the two map images, and percent agreement between each two regional counts was computed. The mean percent agreement equalled 86.21%, with an areally weighted standard deviation of 11.11%. Calculation of Pearson's correlation coefficient yielded +9.997. In some cases, the IBIS-calculated map code differed from the DMA codes: analysis revealed that IBIS had calculated the codes correctly. These highly positive results demonstrate the power and accuracy of IBIS in automating models which synthesize a variety of thematic geographic data.

  14. Bank Competition and Stability : Cross-country Heterogeneity (Revised version of CentER DP 2011-080)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, T.H.L.; De Jonghe, O.G.; Schepens, G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: This paper documents large cross-country variation in the relationship between bank competition and bank stability and explores market, regulatory and institutional features that can explain this variation. We show that an increase in competition will have a larger impact on banks’ fragili

  15. Cross-Country Variation in Adult Skills Inequality: Why Are Skill Levels and Opportunities so Unequal in Anglophone Countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andy; Green, Francis; Pensiero, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    This article examines cross-country variations in adult skills inequality and asks why skills in Anglophone countries are so unequal. Drawing on the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development's recent Survey of Adult Skills and other surveys, it investigates the differences across countries and country groups in inequality in both…

  16. Risk factors for cross-country horse falls at one-day events and at two-/three-day events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, J K; Singer, E R; Morgan, K L; Proudman, C J; French, N P

    2005-11-01

    The cross-country phase of eventing competitions has been associated with injuries and fatalities to horses and riders. A case-control study was carried out to identify variables that were associated with increased or decreased risk of a horse fall on the cross-country phase at event competitions. After initial analysis, the dataset was split according to the categories of one-day events as compared to two- or three-day events to establish whether significant risk factors varied between the different types of eventing competitions. Data were collected for 121 cases (horse falls) at one-day events, 59 cases at two- or three-day events and for their 540 matched controls. The data were analysed using conditional logistic regression. The variables of no previous refusals on the course, fences with a landing in water and the combined variable of the angle and the spread of the fence were significantly associated with the risk of a horse fall in both datasets. Additional risk factors for one-day event falls were: fences requiring a take-off from water, a drop landing, the rider's knowledge of their position before the cross-country phase and if the rider received cross-country tuition. Three-day event risk factors in the multivariable model included: the camber of the fence and participation in non-equestrian sports by the rider. This study identified variables that were significantly associated with an increase or a decrease in the risk of a horse fall during the cross-country phase of different types of eventing competitions. Some of these variables are modifiable and the results of this study have been reported to the governing body of the sport of eventing in the UK so that possible interventions might be considered.

  17. Combining snow depth and innovative skier flow measurements in order to improve snow grooming techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmagnola, Carlo Maria; Albrecht, Stéphane; Hargoaa, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    In the last decades, ski resort managers have massively improved their snow management practices, in order to adapt their strategies to the inter-annual variability in snow conditions and to the effects of climate change. New real-time informations, such as snow depth measurements carried out on the ski slopes by grooming machines during their daily operations, have become available, allowing high saving, efficiency and optimization gains (reducing for instance the groomer fuel consumption and operation time and the need for machine-made snow production). In order to take a step forward in improving the grooming techniques, it would be necessary to keep into account also the snow erosion by skiers, which depends mostly on the snow surface properties and on the skier attendance. Today, however, most ski resort managers have only a vague idea of the evolution of the skier flows on each slope during the winter season. In this context, we have developed a new sensor (named Skiflux) able to measure the skier attendance using an infrared beam crossing the slopes. Ten Skiflux sensors have been deployed during the 2016/17 winter season at Val Thorens ski area (French Alps), covering a whole sector of the resort. A dedicated software showing the number of skier passages in real time as been developed as well. Combining this new Skiflux dataset with the snow depth measurements from grooming machines (Snowsat System) and the snow and meteorological conditions measured in-situ (Liberty System from Technoalpin), we were able to create a "real-time skiability index" accounting for the quality of the surface snow and its evolution during the day. Moreover, this new framework allowed us to improve the preparation of ski slopes, suggesting new strategies for adapting the grooming working schedule to the snow quality and the skier attendance. In the near future, this work will benefit from the advances made within the H2020 PROSNOW project ("Provision of a prediction system allowing

  18. Coproducing flood risk management through citizen involvement: insights from cross-country comparison in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannelore Mees

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Across Europe, citizens are increasingly expected to participate in the implementation of flood risk management (FRM, by engaging in voluntary-based activities to enhance preparedness, implementing property-level measures, and so forth. Although citizen participation in FRM decision making is widely addressed in academic literature, citizens' involvement in the delivery of FRM measures is comparatively understudied. Drawing from public administration literature, we adopted the notion of "coproduction" as an analytical framework for studying the interaction between citizens and public authorities, from the decision-making process through to the implementation of FRM in practice. We considered to what extent coproduction is evident in selected European Union (EU member states, drawing from research conducted within the EU project STAR-FLOOD (Strengthening and Redesigning European Flood Risk Practices towards Appropriate and Resilient Flood Risk Governance Arrangements. On the basis of a cross-country comparison between Flanders (Belgium, England (United Kingdom, France, the Netherlands, and Poland, we have highlighted the varied forms of coproduction and reflected on how these have been established within divergent settings. Coproduction is most prominent in discourse and practice in England and is emergent in France and Flanders. By contrast, FRM in the Netherlands and Poland remains almost exclusively reliant on governmental protection measures and thereby consultation-based forms of coproduction. Analysis revealed how these actions are motivated by different underlying rationales, which in turn shape the type of approaches and degree of institutionalization of coproduction. In the Netherlands, coproduction is primarily encouraged to increase societal resilience, whereas public authorities in the other countries also use it to improve cost-efficiency and redistribute responsibilities to its beneficiaries.

  19. The Multidimensional Efficiency of Pension System: Definition and Measurement in Cross-Country Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chybalski, Filip

    The existing literature on the efficiency of pension system, usually addresses the problem between the choice of different theoretical models, or concerns one or few empirical pension systems. In this paper quite different approach to the measurement of pension system efficiency is proposed. It is dedicated mainly to the cross-country studies of empirical pension systems, however it may be also employed to the analysis of a given pension system on the basis of time series. I identify four dimensions of pension system efficiency, referring to: GDP-distribution, adequacy of pension, influence on the labour market and administrative costs. Consequently, I propose four sets of static and one set of dynamic efficiency indicators. In the empirical part of the paper, I use Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and cluster analysis to verify the proposed method on statistical data covering 28 European countries in years 2007-2011. I prove that the method works and enables some comparisons as well as clustering of analyzed pension systems. The study delivers also some interesting empirical findings. The main goal of pension systems seems to become poverty alleviation, since the efficiency of ensuring protection against poverty, as well as the efficiency of reducing poverty, is very resistant to the efficiency of GDP-distribution. The opposite situation characterizes the efficiency of consumption smoothing-this is generally sensitive to the efficiency of GDP-distribution, and its dynamics are sensitive to the dynamics of GDP-distribution efficiency. The results of the study indicate the Norwegian and the Icelandic pension systems to be the most efficient in the analyzed group.

  20. Seatbelt wearing rates in middle income countries: a cross-country analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecino-Ortiz, Andres I; Bishai, David; Chandran, Aruna; Bhalla, Kavi; Bachani, Abdulgafoor M; Gupta, Shivam; Slyunkina, Ekaterina; Hyder, Adnan A

    2014-10-01

    In settings with low seatbelt use prevalence, self-reported seatbelt use estimates often lack validity, and routine observational studies are scarce. In this paper, we aim to describe the prevalence of seatbelt use and associated factors in drivers and front-seat passengers across eight sites in four countries (Egypt, Mexico, Russia, Turkey) using observational studies as well as to produce estimates of country-level and site-level variance. As part of the Bloomberg Philanthropies Global Road Safety Program, data on driver and passenger seatbelt use across four middle-income countries was collected between October 2010 and May 2011 (n=122,931 vehicles). Logistic regression and Intraclass Correlation Coefficient analyses for sites- and country-level clustering were performed. We found high variability of seatbelt wearing rates ranging from 4 to 72% in drivers and 3-50% in front-seat passengers. Overall, average seatbelt wearing rates were low (under 60% in most sites). At the individual level, older and female drivers were more likely to wear seatbelts, as well as drivers of vehicles transiting at times of increased vehicle flow. We also found that 26-32% and 37-41% of the variance in seatbelt use among drivers and front-seat passengers respectively was explained by differences across sites and countries. Our results demonstrate that there is room for improvement on seatbelt use in middle-income countries and that standardized cross-country studies on road safety risk factors are feasible, providing valuable information for prevention and monitoring activities.

  1. Production activities and economic dependency by age and gender in Europe: A cross-country comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Bernhard; Prskawetz, Alexia; Freund, Inga

    2015-01-01

    We compare selected European countries using an economic dependency ratio which emphasizes the role of age-specific levels of production and consumption. Our analysis reveals large differences in the age- and gender-specific level and type of production activities across selected European countries and identifies possible strategies to adjust age-specific economic behaviour to an ageing population. The cross-country differences in economic dependency of children and elderly persons are largely determined by the age at which people enter, respectively exit, the labour market. The ability of the working age population to support children and elderly persons in turn is strongly influenced by the participation of women in paid work. We also provide a measure for the age-specific production and consumption in form of unpaid household work. The inclusion of unpaid household work leads to a decrease of the gender differences in production activities and indicates that the working age population supports children and elderly persons not only through monetary transfers but also through services produced by unpaid work (e.g. childcare, cooking, cleaning…). Given the available data, we cannot distinguish the age profile of consumption by gender and have to assume – in case of unpaid work - that each member of the household consumes the same. Hence, our results have to be regarded as a first approximation only. Our paper aims to argue that a reform of the welfare system needs to take into account not only public transfers but also private transfers, in particular the transfers in form of goods and services produced through unpaid household work. PMID:26110107

  2. The effect of squat depth on multiarticular muscle activation in collegiate cross-country runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsuch, Joshua; Long, Janey; Miller, Katie; Primeau, Kyle; Rutledge, Sarah; Sossong, Andrew; Durocher, John J

    2013-09-01

    The squat is a closed-chain lower body exercise commonly performed by many athletes. Muscle activity has been examined during partial and parallel squats in male weightlifters, but not in male and female runners. Therefore, this study measured muscle activity with surface electromyography (EMG) during partial and parallel squats in 20 Division I collegiate cross-country runners (10 males and 10 females) in a randomized crossover design. We hypothesized the parallel squat would increase extensor muscle activitation (i.e. hamstrings and erector spinae). Furthermore, we sought to determine if changes in muscle activity were different between males and females. Participants performed 6 repetitions using their 10 repetition maximum loads for each condition during EMG testing. EMG was performed on the right rectus femoris, biceps femoris, lumbar erector spinae, and lateral head of the gastrocnemius. Rectus femoris activity (0.18 ± 0.01 vs. 0.14 ± 0.01 mV) and erector spinae activity (0.16 ± 0.01 vs. 0.13 ± 0.01 mV) were significantly higher (p 0.05). During preliminary isokinetic testing, both male and female runners demonstrated deficient hamstrings-to-quadriceps ratios, which would not likely improve by performing parallel squats based on our EMG findings. Despite the reduced load of the parallel squat, rectus femoris and erector spinae activity were elevated. Thus, parallel squats may help runners to train muscles vital for uphill running and correct posture, while preventing injury by using lighter weights through a larger range of motion.

  3. Sense of Place in Tourism and Leisure: the Case of Touring Skiers in Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Roult

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of sense of place has become central in understanding various modern phenomena in leisure. Tourism promoters in outdoor recreation now emphasize opportunities to bond with nature, with ‘wild’ landscapes or with the authentic value of a destination. However, studying this tourism and recreation issue from the standpoint of ‘place’, which draws upon notions of attendance, identification and social and individual meaning, is lacking in modern studies. This paper, based on a quantitative approach using a questionnaire survey administered to touring skiers in Quebec (n=829, thus aims to present the links between various practice settings and the perceived meaning and identification that skiers attach to their practice sites.

  4. A cross-country review of strategies of the German development cooperation to strengthen human resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyss Kaspar

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent years have seen growing awareness of the importance of human resources for health in health systems and with it an intensifying of the international and national policies in place to steer a response. This paper looks at how governments and donors in five countries – Cameroon, Indonesia, Malawi, Rwanda and Tanzania – have translated such policies into action. More detailed information with regard to initiatives of German development cooperation brings additional depth to the range and entry doors of human resources for health initiatives from the perspective of donor cooperation. Methods This qualitative study systematically presents different approaches and stages to human resources for health development in a cross-country comparison. An important reference to capture implementation at country level was grey literature such as policy documents and programme reports. In-depth interviews along a predefined grid with national and international stakeholders in the five countries provided information on issues related to human resources for health policy processes and implementation. Results All five countries have institutional entities in place and have drawn up national policies to address human resources for health. Only some of the countries have translated policies into strategies with defined targets and national programmes with budgets and operational plans. Traditional approaches of supporting training for individual health professionals continue to dominate. In some cases partners have played an advocacy and technical role to promote human resources for health development at the highest political levels, but usually they still focus on the provision of ad hoc training within their programmes, which may not be in line with national human resources for health development efforts or may even be counterproductive to them. Countries that face an emergency, such as Malawi, have intensified their efforts within a

  5. An Inverse Relative Age Effect in Male Alpine Skiers at the Absolute Top Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerke, Øyvind; Pedersen, Arve Vorland; Aune, Tore K; Lorås, Håvard

    2017-01-01

    The Relative Age Effect (RAE) can be described as the advantage of being born early after a certain cut-off date within a group of selection. The effect has been found across a wide range of sports and is particularly evident in pre-elite sports and team sports with a high selection pressure. At the absolute top level in team elite sports, the advantage of being relatively older has been reported to disappear, and even reverse, so that the relatively younger athletes are advantaged. In order to further examine such a reversal of the RAE, we investigated the performance of the overall top 50 skiers each year in the alpine World Cup, over a period of 20 years, among men (N = 234) and women (N = 235). The data indicated that the relatively younger male athletes at the absolute top level had accumulated, on average, more World Cup points compared to the relatively older skiers. No such effect was observed among the female skiers. This finding suggest the existence of a reversed relative age effect in male elite alpine skiing.

  6. An Inverse Relative Age Effect in Male Alpine Skiers at the Absolute Top Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øyvind Bjerke

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Relative Age Effect (RAE can be described as the advantage of being born early after a certain cut-off date within a group of selection. The effect has been found across a wide range of sports and is particularly evident in pre-elite sports and team sports with a high selection pressure. At the absolute top level in team elite sports, the advantage of being relatively older has been reported to disappear, and even reverse, so that the relatively younger athletes are advantaged. In order to further examine such a reversal of the RAE, we investigated the performance of the overall top 50 skiers each year in the alpine World Cup, over a period of 20 years, among men (N = 234 and women (N = 235. The data indicated that the relatively younger male athletes at the absolute top level had accumulated, on average, more World Cup points compared to the relatively older skiers. No such effect was observed among the female skiers. This finding suggest the existence of a reversed relative age effect in male elite alpine skiing.

  7. Changes in the Balance Performance of Polish Recreational Skiers after Seven Days of Alpine Skiing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojtyczek Beata

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Alpine skiing is one of the most popular leisure time winter sporting activities. Skiing imposes high requirements concerning physical fitness, particularly regarding balance abilities. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the changes in balance performance of recreational skiers after a seven-day ski camp. A total of 78 students - 24 women and 54 men - participated in the study. The ski course was held in accordance with the official program of the Polish Ski Federation. The study sample was comprised of 43 beginners and 35 intermediate skiers. All students were tested with the MFT S3-Check, the day before and the day after the ski camp. The test system consisted of an unstable uniaxial platform, with an integrated sensor and corresponding software. Changes in balance performance (sensory and stability index were evaluated using paired t-tests. Additionally, changes in sensory and stability categories, which were based on the norm data, were analyzed. Female and male participants showed significantly better sensory and stability indices after skiing. Considerable changes from weak or very weak to average or good balance categories could be seen after skiing for both sexes. Regarding skiing experience, both beginners and intermediate skiers improved their sensory and stability indices significantly after skiing. Hence, recreational alpine skiing resulted in better balance performance regardless of sex or skiing experience. Skiing as an outdoor activity offers the opportunity to improve balance performance with a positive impact on everyday life activities.

  8. Performance of European cross-country oil pipelines. Statistical summary of reported spillages in 2006 and since 1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larive, J.F. [CONCAWE, Brussels (Belgium)

    2008-08-15

    Since 1971 CONCAWE has been collecting data on spillages from cross-country oil pipelines in Europe. The information is collated in an annual report which includes an analysis of the human and environmental consequences and of the underlying causes of such incidents. CONCAWE report 7/08 covers the results for the year 2006 and includes an analysis of the accumulated data for the whole 36-year period from 1971 to 2006.

  9. Performance of European cross-country oil pipelines. Statistical summary of reported spillages in 2006 and since 1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larive, J.F. [CONCAWE, Brussels (Belgium)

    2008-08-15

    Since 1971 CONCAWE has been collecting data on spillages from cross-country oil pipelines in Europe. The information is collated in an annual report which includes an analysis of the human and environmental consequences and of the underlying causes of such incidents. CONCAWE report 7/08 covers the results for the year 2006 and includes an analysis of the accumulated data for the whole 36-year period from 1971 to 2006.

  10. E-readiness and Entrepreneurship: A Cross Country Study of the Link between Technological Infrastructure and Entrepreneurial Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Constand, Richard L.; Gilbert, Arthur H.

    2011-01-01

    This current study focuses on the relationship between a country’s e-readiness environment and entrepreneurial activities. Many government policies assume there is a direct causal relationship between e-readiness and entrepreneurial activity and some past studies have reported evidence supporting such a link. In this paper, a cross country panel data analysis using three different measures of entrepreneurial activity and different measures of e-readiness examines this relationship. The result...

  11. A Comparison between Alpine Skiing, Cross-Country Skiing and Indoor Cycling on Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöggl, Thomas; Schwarzl, Christoph; Müller, Edith E; Nagasaki, Masaru; Stöggl, Julia; Scheiber, Peter; Schönfelder, Martin; Niebauer, Josef

    2016-03-01

    Since physical inactivity especially prevails during winter months, we set out to identify outdoor alternatives to indoor cycling (IC) by comparing the metabolic and cardiorespiratory responses during alpine skiing (AS), cross-country skiing (XCS) and IC and analyse the effects of sex, age and fitness level in this comparison. Twenty one healthy subjects performed alpine skiing (AS), cross-country skiing (XCS), and IC. Oxygen uptake (VO2), total energy expenditure (EE), heart rate (HR), lactate, blood glucose and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were determined during three 4-min stages of low, moderate and high intensity. During XCS and IC VO2max and EE were higher than during AS. At least 2½ hours of AS are necessary to reach the same EE as during one hour of XCS or IC. HR, VO2, lactate, and RPEarms were highest during XCS, whereas RPEwhole-body was similar and RPElegs lower than during AS and IC, respectively. Weight adjusted VO2 and EE were higher in men than in women while fitness level had no effect. Male, fit and young participants were able to increase their EE and VO2 values more pronounced. Both AS and XCS can be individually tailored to serve as alternatives to IC and may thus help to overcome the winter activity deficit. XCS was found to be the most effective activity for generating a high EE and VO2 while AS was the most demanding activity for the legs. Key pointsDuring cross-country skiing and indoor cycling VO2max and energy expenditure were higher than during alpine skiingApproximately 2½ hours of alpine skiing are necessary to reach the same energy expenditure of one hour of cross-country skiing or indoor cycling.Alpine skiing and cross-country skiing can be individually tailored to serve as sports alternatives in winter to activity deficit.By applying different skiing modes as parallel ski steering, carving long radii and short turn skiing, metabolic and cardiorespiratory response can be increased during alpine skiing.Male, fit and young

  12. Contextualising case studies in entrepreneurship: A tandem approach to conducting a longitudinal cross-country case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chetty, S. K.; Partanen, J.; Rasmussen, Erik Stavnsager

    2014-01-01

    Using predictive and effectuation logics as a framework, this research note explains how case study research was conducted to demonstrate rigour and relevance. The study involves a longitudinal cross-country case study on small and medium-sized firm growth and networks undertaken by research teams...... in three countries (Finland, Denmark and New Zealand) involving 33 firms. This research note outlines the implications of this research and provides valuable guidance and reflections upon opportunities for future research regarding the conduct of contextual studies in entrepreneurship without compromising...

  13. Impact of Prehospital Transportation on Survival in Skiers and Snowboarders with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hai; Samra, Navdeep S; Kalakoti, Piyush; Sharma, Kanika; Patra, Devi Prasad; Dossani, Rimal H; Thakur, Jai Deep; Disbrow, Elizabeth A; Phan, Kevin; Veeranki, Sreenivas P; Pabaney, Aqueel; Notarianni, Christina; Owings, John T; Nanda, Anil

    2017-08-01

    Prehospital helicopter use and its impact on outcomes in snowboarders and skiers incurring traumatic brain injury (TBI) is unknown. The present study investigates the association of helicopter transport with survival of snowboarders and skiers with TBI, in comparison with ground emergency medical services (EMS), by using data derived from the National Trauma Data Bank (2007-2014). Primary and secondary endpoints were defined as in-hospital survival and absolute risk reduction based upon number needed to transport (treat) respectively. Multivariable regression models including traditional logit model, model fitted with generalized estimating equations, and those incorporating results from propensity score matching methods were used to investigate the association of helicopter transport with survival compared with ground EMS. Of the 1018 snowboarders and skiers who met the criteria, 360 (35.4%) were transported via helicopters whereas 658 (64.6%) via ground EMS with a mortality rate of 1.7% and 1.5%, respectively. Multivariable log-binomial models demonstrated association of prehospital helicopter transport with increased survival (odds ratio 8.58; 95% confidence interval 1.09-67.64; P = 0.041; absolute risk reduction: 10.06%). This finding persisted after propensity score matching (odds ratio 24.73; 95% confidence interval 5.74-152.55; P < 0.001). The corresponding absolute risk reduction implies that approximately 10 patients need to be transported via helicopter to save 1 life. Based on our robust statistical analysis of retrospective data, our findings suggest prehospital helicopter transport improved survival in patients incurring TBI after snowboard- or ski-related falls compared with those transported via ground EMS. Policies directed at using helicopter services at remote winter resorts or ski or snowboarding locations should be implemented. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. How does corruption influence perceptions of the risk of nuclear accidents?: cross-country analysis after the 2011 Fukushima disaster in Japan.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamura, Eiji

    2011-01-01

    Japan’s 2011 natural disasters were accompanied by a devastating nuclear disaster in Fukushima. This paper used cross-country data obtained immediately after the Japanese disaster to explore how, and the extent to which, corruption affects the perception of citizens regarding the risk of nuclear accidents. Endogeneity bias was controlled for using instrumental variables. The cross-country analysis showed that citizens in less corrupt countries tend to perceive there to be a lower possibility ...

  15. The Social Determinants of Infant Mortality and Birth Outcomes in Western Developed Nations: A Cross-Country Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrianna Saada

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Infant mortality (IM and birth outcomes, key population health indicators, have lifelong implications for individuals, and are unequally distributed globally. Even among western industrialized nations, striking cross-country and within-country patterns are evident. We sought to better understand these variations across and within the United States of America (USA and Western Europe (WE, by conceptualizing a social determinants of IM/birth outcomes framework, and systematically reviewing the empirical literature on hypothesized social determinants (e.g., social policies, neighbourhood deprivation, individual socioeconomic status (SES and intermediary determinants (e.g., health behaviours. To date, the evidence suggests that income inequality and social policies (e.g., maternal leave policies may help to explain cross-country variations in IM/birth outcomes. Within countries, the evidence also supports neighbourhood SES (USA, WE and income inequality (USA as social determinants. By contrast, within-country social cohesion/social capital has been underexplored. At the individual level, mixed associations have been found between individual SES, race/ethnicity, and selected intermediary factors (e.g., psychosocial factors with IM/birth outcomes. Meanwhile, this review identifies several methodological gaps, including the underuse of prospective designs and the presence of residual confounding in a number of studies. Ultimately, addressing such gaps including through novel approaches to strengthen causal inference and implementing both health and non-health policies may reduce inequities in IM/birth outcomes across the western developed world.

  16. The impact of uphill cycling and bicycle suspension on downhill performance during cross-country mountain biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdermid, Paul W; Fink, Philip W; Miller, Matthew C; Stannard, Stephen

    2017-07-01

    Non-propulsive work demand has been linked to reduced energetic economy of cross-country mountain biking. The purpose of this study was to determine mechanical, physiological and performance differences and observe economy while riding a downhill section of a cross-country course prior to and following the metabolic "load" of a climb at race pace under two conditions (hardtail and full suspension) expected to alter vibration damping mechanics. Participants completed 1 lap of the track incorporating the same downhill section twice, under two conditions (hardtail and full suspension). Performance was determined by time to complete overall lap and specific terrain sections. Power, cadence, heart rate and oxygen consumption were sampled and logged every second while triaxial accelerometers recorded accelerations (128 Hz) to quantify vibration. No differences between performance times (P = 0.65) or power outputs (P = 0.61) were observed while physiological demand of loaded downhill riding was significantly greater (P  0.05) measures. This study showed minimal advantage of a full suspension bike in our trial, with further investigations over a full race distance warranted.

  17. Using micro-sensor data to quantify macro kinematics of classical cross-country skiing during on-snow training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsland, Finn; Mackintosh, Colin; Anson, Judith; Lyons, Keith; Waddington, Gordon; Chapman, Dale W

    2015-01-01

    Micro-sensors were used to quantify macro kinematics of classical cross-country skiing techniques and measure cycle rates and cycle lengths during on-snow training. Data were collected from seven national level participants skiing at two submaximal intensities while wearing a micro-sensor unit (MinimaxX™). Algorithms were developed identifying double poling (DP), diagonal striding (DS), kick-double poling (KDP), tucking (Tuck), and turning (Turn). Technique duration (T-time), cycle rates, and cycle counts were compared to video-derived data to assess system accuracy. There was good reliability between micro-sensor and video calculated cycle rates for DP, DS, and KDP, with small mean differences (Mdiff% = -0.2 ± 3.2, -1.5 ± 2.2 and -1.4 ± 6.2) and trivial to small effect sizes (ES = 0.20, 0.30 and 0.13). Very strong correlations were observed for DP, DS, and KDP for T-time (r = 0.87-0.99) and cycle count (r = 0.87-0.99), while mean values were under-reported by the micro-sensor. Incorrect Turn detection was a major factor in technique cycle misclassification. Data presented highlight the potential of automated ski technique classification in cross-country skiing research. With further refinement, this approach will allow many applied questions associated with pacing, fatigue, technique selection and power output during training and competition to be answered.

  18. A Comparison between Alpine Skiing, Cross-Country Skiing and Indoor Cycling on Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Stöggl, Christoph Schwarzl, Edith E. Müller, Masaru Nagasaki, Julia Stöggl, Peter Scheiber, Martin Schönfelder, Josef Niebauer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Since physical inactivity especially prevails during winter months, we set out to identify outdoor alternatives to indoor cycling (IC by comparing the metabolic and cardiorespiratory responses during alpine skiing (AS, cross-country skiing (XCS and IC and analyse the effects of sex, age and fitness level in this comparison. Twenty one healthy subjects performed alpine skiing (AS, cross-country skiing (XCS, and IC. Oxygen uptake (VO2, total energy expenditure (EE, heart rate (HR, lactate, blood glucose and rate of perceived exertion (RPE were determined during three 4-min stages of low, moderate and high intensity. During XCS and IC VO2max and EE were higher than during AS. At least 2½ hours of AS are necessary to reach the same EE as during one hour of XCS or IC. HR, VO2, lactate, and RPEarms were highest during XCS, whereas RPEwhole-body was similar and RPElegs lower than during AS and IC, respectively. Weight adjusted VO2 and EE were higher in men than in women while fitness level had no effect. Male, fit and young participants were able to increase their EE and VO2 values more pronounced. Both AS and XCS can be individually tailored to serve as alternatives to IC and may thus help to overcome the winter activity deficit. XCS was found to be the most effective activity for generating a high EE and VO2 while AS was the most demanding activity for the legs.

  19. Variants in the dopamine-4-receptor gene promoter are not associated with sensation seeking in skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Cynthia J; Rajala, Amelia K; Carlson, Scott R; Rupert, Jim L

    2014-01-01

    Sensation seeking is a personality trait that has been associated with disinhibited behaviours including substance use and gambling, but also with high-risk sport practices including skydiving, paragliding, and downhill skiing. Twin studies have shown that sensation seeking is moderately heritable, and candidate genes encoding components involved in dopaminergic transmission have been investigated as contributing to this type of behaviour. To determine whether variants in the regulatory regions of the dopamine-4-receptor gene (DRD4) influenced sport-specific sensation seeking, we analyzed five polymorphisms (-1106T/C, -906T/C, -809G/A, -291C/T, 120-bp duplication) in the promoter region of the gene in a cohort of skiers and snowboarders (n = 599) that represented a broad range of sensation seeking behaviours. We grouped subjects by genotype at each of the five loci and compared impulsive sensation seeking and domain-specific (skiing) sensation seeking between groups. There were no significant associations between genotype(s) and general or domain-specific sensation seeking in the skiers and snowboarders, suggesting that while DRD4 has previously been implicated in sensation seeking, the promoter variants investigated in this study do not contribute to sensation seeking in this athlete population.

  20. Variants in the dopamine-4-receptor gene promoter are not associated with sensation seeking in skiers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia J Thomson

    Full Text Available Sensation seeking is a personality trait that has been associated with disinhibited behaviours including substance use and gambling, but also with high-risk sport practices including skydiving, paragliding, and downhill skiing. Twin studies have shown that sensation seeking is moderately heritable, and candidate genes encoding components involved in dopaminergic transmission have been investigated as contributing to this type of behaviour. To determine whether variants in the regulatory regions of the dopamine-4-receptor gene (DRD4 influenced sport-specific sensation seeking, we analyzed five polymorphisms (-1106T/C, -906T/C, -809G/A, -291C/T, 120-bp duplication in the promoter region of the gene in a cohort of skiers and snowboarders (n = 599 that represented a broad range of sensation seeking behaviours. We grouped subjects by genotype at each of the five loci and compared impulsive sensation seeking and domain-specific (skiing sensation seeking between groups. There were no significant associations between genotype(s and general or domain-specific sensation seeking in the skiers and snowboarders, suggesting that while DRD4 has previously been implicated in sensation seeking, the promoter variants investigated in this study do not contribute to sensation seeking in this athlete population.

  1. Health status and health behaviors among citizen endurance Nordic skiers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Paul J; Bovard, Ralph S; Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Beebe, Timothy J; Wang, Zhen

    2017-07-24

    More than two-thirds of Americans are overweight or obese (69%) placing them at high risk for a wide array of chronic diseases. Physical activity anchors most approaches to obesity prevention and weight management, but physical activity levels remain low in the general US population. As a group, citizen athletes who compete in Nordic skiing events such as the American Birkebeiner participate in fitness cultures that promote physical activity. During October-November 2014, we emailed a 48 question online survey to 23,611 individuals who had participated in the American Birkebeiner ski event, the largest citizen ski race in North America. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize data. Binomial and student t test were used to compare binary and continuous outcomes to health behaviors of the US population. 5433 individuals responded. Obesity prevalence (BMI ≥30) was 3% and average BMI was 24. Skiers reported very good health (88%), higher fitness than peers (99%), freedom from depression (93%) low levels of smoking (3%), high consumption of fruits and vegetables, moderate alcohol use, and high levels of physical activity. Fifteen percent practiced all 4 healthy living characteristics known to reduce cardiovascular event risk. As a group, citizen endurance Nordic skiers enjoy low levels of obesity, below average BMI, and report lifestyle behaviors known to decrease obesity, promote health, and reduce cardiovascular disease risk. Future research should explore hypotheses that explain how the fitness cultures surrounding citizen athletic events support weight loss, cardiovascular fitness, and healthy lifestyle habits.

  2. A limit-cycle model of leg movements in cross-country skiing and its adjustments with fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cignetti, F; Schena, F; Mottet, D; Rouard, A

    2010-08-01

    Using dynamical modeling tools, the aim of the study was to establish a minimal model reproducing leg movements in cross-country skiing, and to evaluate the eventual adjustments of this model with fatigue. The participants (N=8) skied on a treadmill at 90% of their maximal oxygen consumption, up to exhaustion, using the diagonal stride technique. Qualitative analysis of leg kinematics portrayed in phase planes, Hooke planes, and velocity profiles suggested the inclusion in the model of a linear stiffness and an asymmetric van der Pol-type nonlinear damping. Quantitative analysis revealed that this model reproduced the observed kinematics patterns of the leg with adequacy, accounting for 87% of the variance. A rising influence of the stiffness term and a dropping influence of the damping terms were also evidenced with fatigue. The meaning of these changes was discussed in the framework of motor control.

  3. A Coupled Snow Operations-Skier Demand Model for the Ontario (Canada) Ski Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Marc; Scott, Daniel; Steiger, Robert; Rutty, Michelle; Johnson, Peter; Vilella, Marc

    2016-04-01

    The multi-billion dollar global ski industry is one of the tourism subsectors most directly impacted by climate variability and change. In the decades ahead, the scholarly literature consistently projects decreased reliability of natural snow cover, shortened and more variable ski seasons, as well as increased reliance on snowmaking with associated increases in operational costs. In order to develop the coupled snow, ski operations and demand model for the Ontario ski region (which represents approximately 18% of Canada's ski market), the research utilized multiple methods, including: a in situ survey of over 2400 skiers, daily operations data from ski resorts over the last 10 years, climate station data (1981-2013), climate change scenario ensemble (AR5 - RCP 8.5), an updated SkiSim model (building on Scott et al. 2003; Steiger 2010), and an agent-based model (building on Pons et al. 2014). Daily snow and ski operations for all ski areas in southern Ontario were modeled with the updated SkiSim model, which utilized current differential snowmaking capacity of individual resorts, as determined from daily ski area operations data. Snowmaking capacities and decision rules were informed by interviews with ski area managers and daily operations data. Model outputs were validated with local climate station and ski operations data. The coupled SkiSim-ABM model was run with historical weather data for seasons representative of an average winter for the 1981-2010 period, as well as an anomalously cold winter (2012-13) and the record warm winter in the region (2011-12). The impact on total skier visits and revenues, and the geographic and temporal distribution of skier visits were compared. The implications of further climate adaptation (i.e., improving the snowmaking capacity of all ski areas to the level of leading resorts in the region) were also explored. This research advances system modelling, especially improving the integration of snow and ski operations models with

  4. Engineering movement of qualified skiers-racers skating style in the current development of ski races

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Kotliar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: analysis of technique of skiing skating style of leading sportsmen of the world. Material and Methods: research was conducted by means of analysis of video data and кинограмм of of skilled racing cross-country ski and biathlon of leading countries of the world. Results: the analysis of dynamic descriptions of technique of the same name ski motions educed the row of factors, from that sportsmen, what applied «Double Push» in the technique of skiing, increase speed of passing of short segments on 4-6%. Conclusions: implementation of «Double Push» can useful for racing cross-country ski and biathlon on competitions on a sprint, on rollers-ski and at implementation of short accelerations on distance, and also on a finish

  5. A resposta de frequência cardíaca durante as competições de "mountain bike cross-country" Heart rate response during mountain bike cross-country races

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Pereira Costa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a resposta de frequência cardíaca (FC durante as competições de "Cross-country" Olímpico (XCO. Quatorze "mountain bikers" foram separados em dois grupos: elite (n = 6; 26,5 ± 3,6 anos; 69,1 ± 2,1 kg; 174,0 ± 1,2 cm; 5,9 ± 0,9 % G; 9,0 ± 1,3 anos de treinamento e amadores (n = 8; 25,6 ± 7,7 anos; 67,7 ± 7,0 kg; 175,5 ± 5,5 cm; 5,8 ± 2,1 % G; 8,3 ± 5,7 anos de treinamento. Os participantes foram submetidos a um teste progressivo para a identificação dos limiares metabólicos e seus respectivos valores de frequência cardíaca (FC em cada zona de intensidade de esforço. Após intervalo mínimo de quatro dias os atletas da categoria elite foram avaliados através de monitores de FC durante a etapa brasileira da Copa do Mundo de XCO. Após 15 dias, todos os atletas foram avaliados no Campeonato Brasileiro de XCO. Os resultados indicaram que em ambas as competições, a média percentual da FC foi correspondente a 91-92 % da FCmáx. Nas competições, os atletas permaneceram durante diferentes tempos percentuais nas zonas de intensidade de esforço sendo 10,0-14,8% no domínio leve; 23,1-30,1% moderado e 55,1-66,9% intenso. Assim, este estudo apresenta que as competições de XCO são realizadas em alta intensidade, principalmente após a largada.The aim of this study was to verify and describe the intensity profile of cross-country mountain-biking races using heart rate (HR recorded during races. Fourteen mountain bikers participated in two groups: elite (n = 6; 26.5 ± 3.6 years old; 69.1 ± 2.1 kg; 174.0 ± 1.2 cm; 5.9 ± 0.9 % BF; 9.0 ± 1.3 years of training and amateurs (n = 8; 25.6 ± 7.7 years; 67.7 ± 7.0 kg; 175.5 ± 5.5 cm; 5.8 ± 2.1 % BF; 8.3 ± 5.7 years of training. Each cyclist was submitted to an incremental exercise test to determine the metabolic thresholds and the HR values at each threshold. After four days, only the athletes of elite category were tested during Brazilian

  6. Desingning of the training process in regenerative microcycles for young skiers-racers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taran L.N.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research consisted in development of basic provisions for creation of training programs in regenerative microcycles for young skiers-racers. In work was used the analysis of scientific and methodical literature, studying and generalization of practical experience of trainers, the analysis of documents of planning and the accounting of training process. Trainers took part in questioning in number of 19 people. It is established that long and tiresome loadings cause longer regenerative reactions from young athletes. The maintenance of regenerative microcycles is made by training occupations with small loadings on size. At an all-preparatory stage means of the general and special physical preparation use in relation 60 % and 40 %, and at a special-preparatory stage and in the competitive period ‒ 50 % and 50 % respectively.

  7. An Examination of the Relationships between Motivation, Involvement and Intention to continuing Participation among Recreational Skiers

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    Charilaos Kouthouris

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the degree to which motivation and involvement can predict intention to continuing skiing participation, and additionally tested the degree to which involvement acted as a mediator on the relationship between motivation and intention. Two hundred and twenty four recreational skiers (58.2% males and 41.8% females from a major skiing resort in South Greece, participated in the study and filled the questionnaires measuring motivation (Manfredo et al., 1997, involvement (Kyle et al., 2004, and intentions to continuing participation (Ajzen, 1987. The results supported initial hypothesis since intention was significant predicted by motivation (R2=.21 and involvement (R2=. 46 respectively. Furthermore involvement dimensions, (attraction & centrality partially (not fully mediated the relationship between motivation and intention. Marketing implications of these results are discussed.

  8. Characteristics of functional tension of qualified skiers when passing rises of different difficulty

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    Khmelnytska J.K.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: studying of main functional changes in organism of qualified female skiers when passing rises of different difficulty. Materials: 12 female skiers of combined team of Ukraine of 21-34 years’ age were tested. Pedagogic observation included: speed metering (system of GPS- navigation, pulse metering (telemetric register of heart beats rate Polar RS800. In process of ski track passing we registered content of exhaled air (radio-telemetric gas-analytic complex MetaMax 3B, Cortex. Sportswomen fulfilled control passing of competition 6 km distance (2 circles, 3 km each in classic style on ski rollers. Ski track was determined by coach. In the course of track’s passing we registered indicators of speed and track profile with discreteness 1 sec. Assessment of special workability and realization of functional potentials was determined by characteristics of external breathing at the end of each rise. Results: it was found that the highest correlation belonged to the following indicators: frequency of breathing (r = 0.38; oxygen consumption (r = 0.29; ventilation equivalent by О 2(r = 0.68. We detected high interconnection between length of distance and ventilation equivalent by СО 2 (r=0.61. It was determined that factors of organism’s anaerobic efficiency change according to relief of track. They increase on rises and reduce on descends. With it increase on long rises is much higher than on middle size rises. Conclusions: effectiveness of different difficulty rises’ overcoming depends on potentials of anaerobic mechanisms and their realization that, to certain extent, influence on sport efficiency.

  9. HIV/AIDS health care challenges for cross- country migrants in low- and middle-income countries: a scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suphanchaimat R

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rapeepong Suphanchaimat,1,2 Angkana Sommanustweechai,1 Chiraporn Khitdee,1 Chompoonut Thaichinda,1 Kanang Kantamaturapoj,3 Pattara Leelahavarong,4 Pensom Jumriangrit,1 Thitikorn Topothai,1 Thunthita Wisaijohn,1 Weerasak Putthasri1 1International Health Policy Program (IHPP, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, Thailand; 2Banphai Hospital, Khon Kaen, Thailand; 3Department of Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Mahidol University, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand; 4Health Intervention and Technology Assessment Program, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, Thailand Introduction: HIV/AIDS has been one of the world's most important health challenges in recent history. The global solidarity in responding to HIV/AIDS through the provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART and encouraging early screening has been proved successful in saving lives of infected populations in past decades. However, there remain several challenges, one of which is how HIV/AIDS policies keep pace with the growing speed and diversity of migration flows. This study therefore aimed to examine the nature and the extent of HIV/AIDS health services, barriers to care, and epidemic burdens among cross-country migrants in low- and middle-income countries. Methods: A scoping review was undertaken by gathering evidence from electronic databases and gray literature from the websites of relevant international initiatives. The articles were reviewed according to the defined themes: epidemic burdens of HIV/AIDS, barriers to health services and HIV/AIDS risks, and the operational management of the current health systems for HIV/AIDS. Results: Of the 437 articles selected for an initial screening, 35 were read in full and mapped with the defined research questions. A high HIV/AIDS infection rate was a major concern among cross-country migrants in many regions, in particular sub-Saharan Africa. Despite a large number of studies reported in Africa, fewer studies were found in

  10. Cross-country comparisons of costs: the use of episode-specific transitive purchasing power parities with standardised cost categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyögg, Jonas; Tiemann, Oliver; Stargardt, Tom; Busse, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    International comparisons of healthcare costs are growing in importance for a number of different applications. The use of common approaches to converting costs such as GDP purchasing power parities (PPPs) often does not reflect price differences in healthcare in an appropriate manner. This means that new approaches need to be explored. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of using episode-specific PPPs (ESPPPs) to facilitate cross-country comparisons of healthcare costs and to compare this approach with other common approaches to conversion. Costs for five care episodes from hospitals in eight European countries were obtained from the EU HealthBASKET project. ESPPPs were created by using Fisher-type PPPs in combination with the Eltetö-Köves-Szulc method at the episode level. Differences in ESPPPs among the five care episodes were discussed and compared with other common conversion approaches. We found that ESPPPs-reflected prices and resource use more accurately than conventional conversion approaches such as GDP PPPs and medical care PPPs. This was particularly evident for labour-intensive care episodes in which other conversion approaches revealed problems in the way that labour input had not been considered appropriately. The results demonstrate that ESPPPs are preferable to other common conversion approaches when international healthcare cost comparisons are performed. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Influence of wheel size on muscle activity and tri-axial accelerations during cross-country mountain biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Howard Thomas; Sinclair, Jonathan; Atkins, Stephen; Rylands, Lee; Metcalfe, John

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of different mountain bike wheel diameters on muscle activity and whether larger diameter wheels attenuate muscle vibrations during cross-country riding. Nine male competitive mountain bikers (age 34.7 ± 10.7 years; stature 177.7 ± 5.6 cm; body mass 73.2 ± 8.6 kg) participated in the study. Riders performed one lap at race pace on 26, 27.5 and 29 inch wheeled mountain bikes. sEMG and acceleration (RMS) were recorded for the full lap and during ascent and descent phases at the gastrocnemius, vastus lateralis, biceps brachii and triceps brachii. No significant main effects were found by wheel size for each of the four muscle groups for sEMG or acceleration during the full lap and for ascent and descent (P > .05). When data were analysed between muscle groups, significant differences were found between biceps brachii and triceps brachii (P mountain biking. However, more activity was observed in the biceps brachii during 26 inch wheel descending. This is possibly due to an increased need to manoeuvre the front wheel over obstacles.

  12. Marketization in Long-Term Care: A Cross-Country Comparison of Large For-Profit Nursing Home Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Charlene; Jacobsen, Frode F; Panos, Justin; Pollock, Allyson; Sutaria, Shailen; Szebehely, Marta

    2017-01-01

    This article presents cross-country comparisons of trends in for-profit nursing home chains in Canada, Norway, Sweden, United Kingdom, and the United States. Using public and private industry reports, the study describes ownership, corporate strategies, costs, and quality of the 5 largest for-profit chains in each country. The findings show that large for-profit nursing home chains are increasingly owned by private equity investors, have had many ownership changes over time, and have complex organizational structures. Large for-profit nursing home chains increasingly dominate the market and their strategies include the separation of property from operations, diversification, the expansion to many locations, and the use of tax havens. Generally, the chains have large revenues with high profit margins with some documented quality problems. The lack of adequate public information about the ownership, costs, and quality of services provided by nursing home chains is problematic in all the countries. The marketization of nursing home care poses new challenges to governments in collecting and reporting information to control costs as well as to ensure quality and public accountability. PMID:28634428

  13. Marketization in Long-Term Care: A Cross-Country Comparison of Large For-Profit Nursing Home Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Charlene; Jacobsen, Frode F; Panos, Justin; Pollock, Allyson; Sutaria, Shailen; Szebehely, Marta

    2017-01-01

    This article presents cross-country comparisons of trends in for-profit nursing home chains in Canada, Norway, Sweden, United Kingdom, and the United States. Using public and private industry reports, the study describes ownership, corporate strategies, costs, and quality of the 5 largest for-profit chains in each country. The findings show that large for-profit nursing home chains are increasingly owned by private equity investors, have had many ownership changes over time, and have complex organizational structures. Large for-profit nursing home chains increasingly dominate the market and their strategies include the separation of property from operations, diversification, the expansion to many locations, and the use of tax havens. Generally, the chains have large revenues with high profit margins with some documented quality problems. The lack of adequate public information about the ownership, costs, and quality of services provided by nursing home chains is problematic in all the countries. The marketization of nursing home care poses new challenges to governments in collecting and reporting information to control costs as well as to ensure quality and public accountability.

  14. Research of level of psychological preparedness of 30–40 years old tourists skiers in the preparation period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Toporkov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: сompare the results of research of the psychological state of 30–40 years old tourists skiers at various stages of preparation period. Material and Methods: 14 people aged 30 to 40 years old who have a different experience in water, hiking and mountain as well as ski-sport hiking took part in research. Analysis of scientific and methodical literature, pedagogical observations, pedagogical experiment, methods of mathematical statistics is used. Results: the test results of 30–40 years old tourists skiers which are the participants in the experimental group received at different stages of preparation period and the results. Their comparative analysis is held. Conclusions: it was found that, at the stages of preparation period indicators of personal qualities and concentration had always risen, reaching the highest degree at the end of the experiment.

  15. READINESS PROFILE OF JUNIOR CYCLISTS DETERMINED BY LEIPZIG TEST

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    Jovan Zlatković

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to define the readiness profile of junior cyclists determined by the Leipzig test. The second aim was to find out if there were differences in functional performance among cyclists in different disciplines, such as: road cyclists, mountain bikers and sprinters. All cyclists (n=18 were tested with Leipzig test protocol on a bicycle ergometer by increasing the load by 40W per minute, pedalling cadence 90- 100rev/min. The hearth rate was measured at the beginning and at the end of the test, together with the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max. The results have shown that the maximal oxygen uptake among national junior cyclists in all disciplines was VO2max 56.42±5.82 ml•min-1kg-1, among mountain biking cyclist VO2max was 61.43±4.94, sprinters VO2max 56.78±3.33 and for cross-country cyclists VO2max 53.37±7.82. The statistical analysis of the functional performance results has snown that between subsamples of cyclists there were no significant differences on general level. However, the partial analysis has snown that there is a statistically significant difference between the groups in the hart rate values on an anaerobic threshold (F value 4.547, p=0.032. In conclusion, the tested cyclists were prepared using general training methods even if they had competitions in different disciplines. Therefore, the level of readiness shows that the training process for young cyclists which is used in Serbia is not specific for the competition level and discipline.

  16. The characteristics of directional cross-country sports skill and practice%定向越野运动技能的特征与练习方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高文强

    2014-01-01

    每一个运动项目练习和比赛的过程中,都需要我们对运动项目特征的研究和把握,从而更有针对性的实施训练。定向越野作为体能训练的有效方式之一,研究定向越野的运动技能特征,是提升练习有效性的重要工作。基于此,本文以定向越野运动技能的特征为研究的对象,结合定向越野的练习实践进行了分析。%Every movement in the process of project practice and competition, we need to study and grasp the sports features, all to the implementation of more targeted training. Directional cross-country as one of the effective ways of physical training, sports skill characteristics of directional cross-country research is an important work of ascension practice effectiveness. Based on this, this paper takes the characteristics of directional cross-country motor skil s as the research object, combining with the practice of directional cross-country practice are analyzed.

  17. Cross-Country Skiing as a Self-Efficacy Intervention with an Adolescent Female: An Innovative Application of Bandura's Theory to Therapeutic Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Daniel D.; Jones, Karna

    2001-01-01

    Used Bandura's theory of self-efficacy as a basis for designing a therapeutic recreation intervention (cross-country skiing) for an adolescent girl with severe depression and oppositional defiant disorder in a long-term residential treatment facility. The intervention facilitated increased self- confidence and helped her discover positive ways to…

  18. Low Schooling for Girls, Slower Growth for All? Cross-Country Evidence on the Effect of Gender Inequality in Education on Economic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Klasen, Stephan

    2002-01-01

    Using cross-country and panel regressions, this article investigates how gender inequality in education affects long-term economic growth. Such inequality is found to have an effect on economic growth that is robust to changes in specifications and controls for potential endogeneities. The results suggest that gender inequality in education directly affects economic growth by lowering the ...

  19. Task shifting from physicians to nurses in primary care in 39 countries: a cross-country comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Claudia B; Aiken, Linda H

    2016-12-01

    Primary care is in short supply in many countries. Task shifting from physicians to nurses is one strategy to improve access, but international research is scarce. We analysed the extent of task shifting in primary care and policy reforms in 39 countries. Cross-country comparative research, based on an international expert survey, plus literature scoping review. A total of 93 country experts participated, covering Europe, USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand (response rate: 85.3%). Experts were selected according to pre-defined criteria. Survey responses were triangulated with the literature and analysed using policy, thematic and descriptive methods to assess developments in country-specific contexts. Task shifting, where nurses take up advanced roles from physicians, was implemented in two-thirds of countries (N = 27, 69%), yet its extent varied. Three clusters emerged: 11 countries with extensive (Australia, Canada, England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Finland, Ireland, Netherlands, New Zealand and USA), 16 countries with limited and 12 countries with no task shifting. The high number of policy, regulatory and educational reforms, such as on nurse prescribing, demonstrate an evolving trend internationally toward expanding nurses' scope-of-practice in primary care. Many countries have implemented task-shifting reforms to maximise workforce capacity. Reforms have focused on removing regulatory and to a lower extent, financial barriers, yet were often lengthy and controversial. Countries early on in the process are primarily reforming their education. From an international and particularly European Union perspective, developing standardised definitions, minimum educational and practice requirements would facilitate recognition procedures in increasingly connected labour markets. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  20. Policy Measures to Support Palliative Care at Home: A Cross-Country Case Comparison in Three European Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maetens, Arno; Beernaert, Kim; Deliens, Luc; Aubry, Régis; Radbruch, Lukas; Cohen, Joachim

    2017-07-21

    The proportion of people in need of palliative care worldwide is rising, and the majority wish to receive this care at home. Many countries have created policy measures to support palliative care at home. To list and compare existing policy measures designed to support palliative care at home in addition to available primary care services in Belgium, France, and Germany. A cross-country case comparison based on expert consultation, governmental policy documents, and relevant scientific literature. All three countries have policy measures that allow informal caregivers to adapt their working patterns or take leave of absence to provide care without losing employee rights; however, only Belgium offers specific paid palliative care leave. All three countries offer various allowances to people who are dying at home and their caregivers. Cost-reductions for out-of-pocket expenses are available, based on the level of care dependency in Germany and on prognosis in Belgium, but are not provided in France. Mobile home support teams exist in all three countries and are free of charge for patients and caregivers; but only in Belgium and Germany, there are specialist multidisciplinary palliative home care teams. Belgium and Germany provide respite care for palliative patients. European countries with similar contextual characteristics offer comparable policy measures to support palliative care at home in addition to the available primary care services. However, important differences exist in the criteria for access and the extent of what is offered. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF ELDERLY RECREATIONAL ALPINE SKIERS OF DIFFERENT FITNESS AND SKIING ABILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Krautgasser

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We measured physiological responses of elderly recreational skiers of different fitness and skiing abilities. Six subjects (mean age: 61.2 ± 4.6 yrs; Wt: 76.8 ± 15.6 kg; Ht: 1.69 ± 0.10 m; BMI: 26.9 ± 5.0 were tested in a laboratory and during 30 and 75 min of recreational downhill skiing. Oxygen uptake (VO2, heart rate (HR, blood lactate (LA concentration, and diastolic (DBP and systolic (SBP blood pressure were used to estimate energy demands while skiing. During maximal testing in a laboratory, subjects achieved a mean maximal VO2max of 28.2 ± 7.5 ml.kg-1.min-1 and a mean HRpeak of 165 ± 4 bpm (98 ± 1% of HRmax. Mean maximal workload measured on a cycle ergometer was 2.2 ± 0.7 W.kg-1 with a mean LApeak of 7.4 ± 1 mmol.l-1. During field testing, mean VO2 during skiing was 12 ± 2 ml.kg-1.min-1 (45 ± 16% of VO2max. Skiing VO2peak was 19 ± 5 ml. kg-1.min-1 (72 ± 23% of VO2max was lower than VO2max in the lab (p = 0.04. Mean HR during skiing was 126 ± 2 bpm (77 ± 1% of HRmax from lab tests. Skiing HRpeak was 162 ± 2 bpm. This was not different from HRmax in the lab (p = 0.68. Mean LA after 30 and 75 min of skiing was not different (2.2 ± 0.8 mmol.l-1 and 2.0 ± 0.8, respectively, p = 0.71. Both LA samples during skiing were lower than lab tests (p < 0.0001. There was no difference for DBP between field and laboratory tests; however, SBP increased after 30 min of skiing to 171 ± 20 (p < 0.009 and 165 ± 17 (p < 0.003 after 75 min. These remained below the mean peak SBP determined in lab tests (218+31. Mean oxygen demand during 30 and 75 min of recreational skiing is only 45% of VO2max while mean HR is 77% of HRmax. This departure from linearity not often seen in typical aerobic activities suggests that alpine skiing requires a combination of aerobic and anaerobic activity. Blood LA remained low during skiing suggesting that elderly skiers may govern their intensity via signals closer to VO2 and LA compared to HR or BP.

  2. Junior Professors Question Job Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lauren

    2007-01-01

    Female and minority faculty members rated their institutions less positively as places for junior professors to work than did their male and white counterparts, according to a new report. Young professors said institutional policies designed to help them succeed were important, but they were less satisfied that those policies were effective. Women…

  3. Improving Junior High Classroom Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmer, Edmund T.; And Others

    A field experiment was conducted to determine whether descriptive-correlational results from classroom management research could be implemented by junior high school teachers, and whether such implementation would result in improved classroom management. An experimental group (18 teachers) received management manuals developed by researchers, and…

  4. Holography in the Junior High.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszkiewicz, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Examines the use of holography in the art technology program of a junior high school. Characterizing holography as a valuable artistic experience and discovery experience and stressing the importance of student interest and involvement, the author discusses the necessary equipment for the project and includes two diagrams of a holographic setup.…

  5. A systematic assessment of the current capacity to act in nutrition in West Africa: cross-country similarities and differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Sodjinou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although it is widely accepted that lack of capacity is one of the barriers to scaling up nutrition in West Africa, there is a paucity of information about what capacities exist and the capacities that need to be developed to accelerate progress toward improved nutrition outcomes in the region. Objective: To systematically assess the current capacity to act in nutrition in the West Africa region and explore cross-country similarities and differences. Design: Data were collected from 13 West African countries through interviews with government officials, key development partners, tertiary-level training institutions, and health professional schools. The assessment was based on a conceptual framework of four interdependent levels (tools; skills; staff and infrastructure; and structures, systems and roles. In each of the surveyed countries, we assessed capacity assets and gaps at individual, organizational, and systemic levels. Results: Important similarities and differences in capacity assets and gaps emerged across all the surveyed countries. There was strong momentum to improve nutrition in nearly all the surveyed countries. Most of the countries had a set of policies on nutrition in place and had set up multisectoral, multi-stakeholder platforms to coordinate nutrition activities, although much remained to be done to improve the effectiveness of these platforms. Many initiatives aimed to reduce undernutrition were ongoing in the region, but there did not seem to be clear coordination between them. Insufficient financial resources to implement nutrition activities were a major problem in all countries. The bulk of financial allocations for nutrition was provided by development partners, even though some countries, such as Niger, Nigeria, and Senegal, had a national budget line for nutrition. Sporadic stock-outs of nutrition supplies were reported in most of the countries as a result of a weak logistic and supply chain system. They

  6. Management and control after the special preparation of skiers-racing drivers on the stages of annual macrocycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorova T.V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In theory and the estimation of the special preparation of skiers-racing drivers is experimentally grounded on the stages of annual cycle of training. The norms of the special preparedness of sportsmen are certain depending on style of movement. The levels of the special preparedness of sportsmen are certain in the whole-year training. It is well-proven that an orientation on evaluation scales allows objectively to characterize the state of separate components of motive function of every sportsman. Also to range and group sportsmen on typological the features of preparedness. Technology of correction of orientation of the trainings loadings is recommended.

  7. 'How to know what you need to do': a cross-country comparison of maternal health guidelines in Burkina Faso, Ghana and Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker Ulrika

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Initiatives to raise the quality of care provided to mothers need to be given priority in Sub Saharan Africa (SSA. The promotion of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs is a common strategy, but their implementation is often challenging, limiting their potential impact. Through a cross-country perspective, this study explored CPGs for maternal health in Burkina Faso, Ghana, and Tanzania. The objectives were to compare factors related to CPG use including their content compared with World Health Organization (WHO guidelines, their format, and their development processes. Perceptions of their availability and use in practice were also explored. The overall purpose was to further the understanding of how to increase CPGs' potential to improve quality of care for mothers in SSA. Methods The study was a multiple case study design consisting of cross-country comparisons using document review and key informant interviews. A conceptual framework to aid analysis and discussion of results was developed, including selected domains related to guidelines' implementability and use by health workers in practice in terms of usability, applicability, and adaptability. Results The study revealed few significant differences in content between the national guidelines for maternal health and WHO recommendations. There were, however, marked variations in the format of CPGs between the three countries. Apart from the Ghanaian and one of the Tanzanian CPGs, the levels of both usability and applicability were assessed as low or medium. In all three countries, the use of CPGs by health workers in practice was perceived to be limited. Conclusion Our cross-country study suggests that it is not poor quality of content or lack of evidence base that constitute the major barrier for CPGs to positively impact on quality improvement in maternal care in SSA. It rather emphasises the need to prioritise the format of guidelines to increase their usability and

  8. Can cross country differences in return-to-work after chronic occupational back pain be explained? An exploratory analysis on disability policies in a six country cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anema, J R; Schellart, A J M; Cassidy, J D; Loisel, P; Veerman, T J; van der Beek, A J

    2009-12-01

    There are substantial differences in the number of disability benefits for occupational low back pain (LBP) among countries. There are also large cross country differences in disability policies. According to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) there are two principal policy approaches: countries which have an emphasis on a compensation policy approach or countries with an emphasis on an reintegration policy approach. The International Social Security Association initiated this study to explain differences in return-to-work (RTW) among claimants with long term sick leave due to LBP between countries with a special focus on the effect of different disability policies. A multinational cohort of 2,825 compensation claimants off work for 3-4 months due to LBP was recruited in Denmark, Germany, Israel, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United States. Relevant predictors and interventions were measured at 3 months, one and 2 years after the start of sick leave. The main outcome measure was duration until sustainable RTW (i.e. working after 2 years). Multivariate analyses were conducted to explain differences in sustainable RTW between countries and to explore the effect of different disability policies. Medical and work interventions varied considerably between countries. Sustainable RTW ranged from 22% in the German cohort up to 62% in the Dutch cohort after 2 years of follow-up. Work interventions and job characteristics contributed most to these differences. Patient health, medical interventions and patient characteristics were less important. In addition, cross-country differences in eligibility criteria for entitlement to long-term and/or partial disability benefits contributed to the observed differences in sustainable RTW rates: less strict criteria are more effective. The model including various compensation policy variables explained 48% of the variance. Large cross-country differences in sustainable RTW after chronic LBP are mainly

  9. Teaching History in the Junior College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    1989-01-01

    Recommends techniques for teaching history in the junior college. Discusses subject matter to be taught, the psychology of learning, and the philosophy of teaching history. Addresses the special needs of the junior college classroom. Outlines criteria to be followed in teaching history. (RW)

  10. Junior High Career Planning: What Students Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardick, Angela D.; Bernes, Kerry B.; Magnusson, Kris C.; Witko, Kim D.

    2004-01-01

    This research used "The Comprehensive Career Needs Survey" to assess the career counselling needs of 3,562 junior high students in Southern Alberta. This article examines junior high students' responses regarding their perceptions of (a) the relevance of career planning, (b) who they would approach for help with career planning, and (c)…

  11. Junior High Norms for the Bender Gestalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grow, Richard T.

    1980-01-01

    Junior high students were tested to supply normative data supporting the Bender Gestalt. Subject's performance was not significantly related to sex or occupation of the family bread winner. These variables do not have to be controlled for in norming visual motor tests at the junior high level. (Author)

  12. Effective Management in Junior High Mathematics Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmer, Edmund T.

    Reporting on part of the data collected in the Junior High Classroom Organization Study, this document focuses on the mathematics subsample. Twenty-six mathematics teachers in 11 junior high schools were observed in two classes. The major purpose of this paper is to describe the classroom procedures and behaviors of teachers identified as…

  13. Vocabulary Development of Junior Teens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Nikonova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the communicative competence formation of young adolescents in the secondary school at the Russian language lessons. The author maintains that the key element of the above problem is the vocabulary development guaranteeing both comprehension and verbal expression formation – oral and written. The theoretical part of the research explores different word functions: nominal, communicative, text generating and semantic. The correlation between the mental development level and lexical semantic system formation is emphasized. The age specific features of junior teens are listed: rising interest to various life spheres and activi- ties, capability of formulating opinions and judgments, self-awareness, formation of values. The relationship complexity stimulates vocabulary development of 10 to 12 year-old children; however, the process requires peda- gogical facilitation.The monitoring of speech development proves the necessity of commutative competence formation of the fifth- and sixth-year pupils. The paper presents the model of communicative competence development and its approbation results received for the junior adolescents. 

  14. Vocabulary Development of Junior Teens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Nikonova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the communicative competence formation of young adolescents in the secondary school at the Russian language lessons. The author maintains that the key element of the above problem is the vocabulary development guaranteeing both comprehension and verbal expression formation – oral and written. The theoretical part of the research explores different word functions: nominal, communicative, text generating and semantic. The correlation between the mental development level and lexical semantic system formation is emphasized. The age specific features of junior teens are listed: rising interest to various life spheres and activi- ties, capability of formulating opinions and judgments, self-awareness, formation of values. The relationship complexity stimulates vocabulary development of 10 to 12 year-old children; however, the process requires peda- gogical facilitation.The monitoring of speech development proves the necessity of commutative competence formation of the fifth- and sixth-year pupils. The paper presents the model of communicative competence development and its approbation results received for the junior adolescents. 

  15. 高校拓展性运动项目的队伍管理及其培养优化的研究--以东南大学定向越野队为个案%On the Team Management of University Directional Cross-country Sports and the Optimizing Development--Taking Southeat University Directional Cross-country Team as Study Case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

      定向越野运是一项集智慧、健身、娱乐、社交和军事为一体的新型体育运动项目,文章以东南大学定向越野队的队伍管理为研究对象,运用文献资料法、问卷调查法等研究方法,对其在人力资源管理、教学管理、训练管理、比赛管理、经费管理等方面进行全面的调查分析,为其他普通高校组建立定向越野队提出一些建设性的建议和对策,为定向越野运动在高校能够得到可持续发展提供依据。%The directional cross-country SPORT is a set unitying wisdom, fitness, entertainment, social and military as one type of new sport. The paper takes the southeast university directional cross-country team as the research object, through the methods of literature and questionnaire, does the survey and analysis on its human resources management, teaching management, training management, game management, funds management, tries to put forward some constructive Suggestions and countermeasures for directional cross-country sport in other ordinary universities and to provide basis for directional cross-country team sustainable development.

  16. CARIES PREVENTION AMONG JUNIOR SCHOOLCHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.К. Matelo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biennial program of controlled tooth brushing performed econdary school among junior schoolchildren from Minsk secondary school № 166 proved to be highly effective. Decrease in caries increment has been shown on the average up to 50%. No credible differences between remineralising defluorinated toothpastes or pastes enriched with aminofluoride (F = 500 ppm and sodium fluoride  (F = 1000 ppm efficacy were found in this study. Credibility of the results was determined by comparison with similar study conducted on a bigger population of children. Though anti-caries effect of the same tooth-pastes in a bigger-scale study was lower — within 30%. Such difference can be explained by a different level of motivation and discipline of participants.Key words: schoolchildren, dental caries prevention, toothpastes. (Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. — 2011; 10 (6: 48–51

  17. [Comparative analysis of gas exchange and cardiorespiratory systems reactions to increasing normobaric hypoxia and physical load of swimmers and skiers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivoshchekin, S G; Divert, V E; Mel'nikov, V N; Vodianitskiĭ, S N; Girenko, L A

    2013-01-01

    Qualification comparable groups of young men engaged in cyclic kinds of sports were tested with stepwise accruing loads on bicycle ergometer and 25-minute exponential increasing normobaric hypoxia to final concentration of 10% oxygen. Group of skiers, having the greatest values of the maximal oxygen consumption at muscular work, show the relaxed cardiorespiratory reactions and more falling of blood oxygen in the hypoxia. The swimmers, having restrictions of ventilatory function in the course of trainings, form preadaptation to hypoxia with changes of external respiration and gas exchange functions that allows at hypoxia to better oxygen sate the blood in lungs. The joint assessment of aerobic capacity at physical work and physiological reactions to hypoxia shows the direct relation between individual maximal oxygen consumption and the descent rate of blood oxygen saturation at accruing hypoxia that can be useful at an assessment of a sportsman functional state and its correction at training processes.

  18. A Review of Chinese Cross-country Skiing on Chinese Tournament of 2013 FIS Cross-country Skiing%从2013年国际雪联越野滑雪中国巡回赛看我国越野滑雪项目的发展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔英波; 左斌; 祖晓牧; 安林彬; 谷化铮; 张驰; 苏光宇

    2013-01-01

    By having the field study on Chinese Tournament of 2013 FIS Cross-country Skiing , the methods of statistics are used that there is a gap on performance , movement technology , psychological quality , culti-vating coaches and referees of Chinese cross -country skiing events .The paper puts forward some reasona-ble solutions, which should be able to connect issues globally ,develop Chinese cross -country skiing, im-prove the culture system of Chinese cross -country skiing coaches , the referees construction and the man-agement and monitoring system , establish integration training base of training , education and scientific re-search , strengthen the psychological stability training of Chinese biathlon , providing a theoretical communi-cation platform for the good and fast development of Chinese cross -country skiing .%通过对参加2013年国际雪联越野滑雪中国巡回赛的现场调研,运用数理统计等方法认为我国越野滑雪项目在比赛成绩、运动技术、运动员心理素质、教练员及裁判队伍的培养等方面还存在差距;提出与国际接轨,发展我国越野滑雪运动,完善我国越野滑雪教练员的培养体系,完善我国越野滑雪运动裁判员队伍建设,完善管理和监测体系,建立训练、教育、科研一体化训练基地,加强我国冬季两项运动心理稳定性的训练等合理的解决方案,为我国越野滑雪运动的快速、良好发展提供一个理论交流的平台。

  19. The frequency and the stride are the two restricted factor in Ieveling up the perfoumance of the traditional cross country skiing of Chinese skiers%步频、步幅是制约我国越野滑雪运动员传统技术成绩的重要因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨明

    2002-01-01

    应用摄像技术在比赛条件下拍摄了我国优秀越野滑雪运动员传统动作的技术录像,使用PEAK-5运动录像分析系统进行了解析分析,得到了传统技术的重要运动学参数,用因素分析法探讨了制约传统技术成绩的重要因素.结果表明高频率、短滑距、小步幅是影响滑行速度的重要因素.

  20. ACE基因Ⅰ/D多态性与中国越野滑雪运动员运动能力的相关性研究%Correlation of ACE Gene Ⅰ/D Polymorphism and Chinese Cross-country Skiers' Skiing Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽; 韩伟; 于英君

    2012-01-01

    杰出的运动能力与运动相关基因的多态性密切相关.采用PCR-RFLP方法测定30名越野滑雪运动员与30名普通大学生的基因的多态性.研究结果表明,对照组等位基因频率为Ⅰ=35%,D=65%,基因型频率为Ⅱ=20%,Ⅰ/D=30%,DD=50%,越野滑雪运动员等位基因频率为Ⅰ=51.7%,D =48.3%,基因型频率为Ⅱ=36.7%,Ⅰ/D=30%,DD=33.3%.经卡方检验符合Hardy-Weinberg遗传平衡定律,两组间基因型频率和等位基因频率有差异,Ⅱ基因型和Ⅰ等位基因的频率高于对照组(P<0.1).ACE基因Ⅰ/D多态性与中国黑龙江省越野滑运动员运动能力有相关性,提示可作为基因选材的指标.探讨中国越野滑雪运动员运动能力与ACE基因Ⅰ/D多态性的关联,为越野滑雪运动员的基因选材提供前期探讨性的理论依据与基础数据.

  1. 我国越野滑雪裁判员队伍发展现状及培养对策研究%Study on the DevelopingStatus and the Training Countermeasures of Cross-country Skiing in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李大同; 李美娜; 王国滨

    2015-01-01

    As the referee team of cross-country skiing growing,there are some problems needed to be solved in the growing process of cross-country skiing referees in our country. Cross-country skiing referees in China as the research objects,with the methods of documentation,expert interviews,questionnaires, mathematical statistics,study on the personnel structure,age structure,cultural structure of cross-country skiing referees,find the shortages and aspects needed to be strengthened of the referees of cross-country skiing,so that the level of our country cross-country skiing referees will be improved,and provide reserved talents for developingChinese cross-country skiing in the future and make a training for the referee team in China.%随着越野滑雪裁判队伍的逐渐壮大,我国越野滑雪裁判员在成长过程中也有一些急需解决的问题。以我国越野滑雪裁判员为研究对象,运用文献资料法、专家访谈、调查问卷、数理统计法对越野滑雪裁判员人员结构、年龄结构、文化结构等进行调查研究,找出越野滑雪裁判员不足和需要加强的方面,从而使我国越野滑雪裁判员水平得到提高,为今后发展我国越野滑雪提供人才储备,为我国裁判队伍做好培养工作。

  2. Examining Container Port Resources and Environments to Enhance Competitiveness: A Cross-Country Study from Resource-Based and Institutional Perspectives1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuksoo CHO

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyze the competitiveness of container ports using a cross-country analysis with theoretical foundations. Tangible and intangible resources are discussed as determinants of container port competitiveness using the resource-based view and the institutional theory. This study analyzes the relationships among six variables: container port competitiveness, traffic volume, quality of infrastructure, linear shipping connectivity, operating efficiency, and institutional influence. This study retrieved country-level data on different indicators and countries from several trade and maritime databases. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM is used to test various hypotheses and to evaluate the casual relationships among six variables. Additionally, Ordinary Least Squares (OLS regression is used to test the moderating effects of institutional influence.

  3. 越野环境中无人驾驶车的障碍目标识别%Obstacle Identification in Cross-Country Environment for Unmanned Ground Vehicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵一兵; 郭烈; 张明恒; 李琳辉

    2011-01-01

    针对无人驾驶车环境感知技术,基于D-S证据理论融合多传感器信息,旨在解决障碍物身份识别技术难点.基于CCD和激光传感器建立信息融合系统,并提取每种障碍物的5个特征证据,包括距离对比度特征、平行四边形特征、边缘形状特征、灰度纹理特征和颜色特征.再根据目标类型和环境加权系数选择经验公式,通过模糊插值法求取身份隶属度近似获得各特征对目标的相关系数构造基本概率赋值函数.最后制定Dempster组合规则,融合多传感器特征信息识别障碍身份.试验表明本文方法能够准确有效地获取基本概率赋值函数,D-S证据理论融合方法提高了障碍物身份识别的准确性和鲁棒性.%Autonomous navigation in cross-country environments presents many new challenges including obstacle perception for unmanned ground vehicle. A new method suitable for recognizing obstacle is proposed. The first step is to build the sensor fusion system by using sensors such as CCD and ladar, then to extract five different types of features, including distance contrast, parallelogram rate, edge-shape-factor, gray texture and HSV value. The experiment formula is selected according to the types of obstacle and weight efficiency to calculate basic probability assignment (BPA). The subordinatien to each event in identification framework is obtained by using the fuzzy interpolation. It is supposed that the subordination is equal to correlation coefficient in the formula. Finally, dempster rules are used to integrate sensors information and the obstacle is recognized based on the D-S theory of evidence. The test results indicate that the resolution of BPA is correct, thus improving the validity and robustness of cross-country environment perception based on the new method.

  4. Learner Reading Problems: A Case of Khoe Learners at Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Learner Reading Problems: A Case of Khoe Learners at Junior Secondary School. ... learners' reading ability of English at junior secondary school in Botswana. ... teachers' schemes and records of work to explore the subjects' reading skills.

  5. The efficiency of health care production in OECD countries: A systematic review and meta-analysis of cross-country comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varabyova, Yauheniya; Müller, Julia-Maria

    2016-03-01

    There has been an ongoing interest in the analysis and comparison of the efficiency of health care systems using nonparametric and parametric applications. The objective of this study was to review the current state of the literature and to synthesize the findings on health system efficiency in OECD countries. We systematically searched five electronic databases through August 2014 and identified 22 studies that analyzed the efficiency of health care production at the country level. We summarized these studies with view on their sample, methods, and utilized variables. We developed and applied a checklist of 14 items to assess the quality of the reviewed studies along four dimensions: reporting, external validity, bias, and power. Moreover, to examine the internal validity of findings we meta-analyzed the efficiency estimates reported in 35 models from ten studies. The qualitative synthesis of the literature indicated large differences in study designs and methods. The meta-analysis revealed low correlations between country rankings suggesting a lack of internal validity of the efficiency estimates. In conclusion, methodological problems of existing cross-country comparisons of the efficiency of health care systems draw into question the ability of these comparisons to provide meaningful guidance to policy-makers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 42 CFR 21.25 - Eligibility; junior assistant grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility; junior assistant grade. 21.25 Section... COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Appointment § 21.25 Eligibility; junior assistant grade. (a) Requirements; all candidates... for appointment in the grade of junior assistant: (1) Shall be a citizen of the United States; (2...

  7. Experience of technological and natural disasters and their impact on the perceived risk of nuclear accidents after the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan 2011: A cross-country analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamura, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    This paper uses cross-country data compiled immediately after the Fukushima nuclear accident to investigate how the experience of such disasters affects the perception of the risk of nuclear accidents. Estimation results show that the perceived risk of a nuclear accident is positively associated with experiencing technological disasters but not with that of natural disasters.

  8. Accounting Boot Camp for College Juniors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myring, Mark; Wrege, William; Van Alst, Lucinda

    2008-01-01

    We describe a day-long introduction to new accounting majors, which we call a boot camp. Boot camp it is an effort to make juniors more aware of their identity, career purposes and learning resources that are now parts of their world, much of which is not covered explicitly in the accounting curriculum. This paper provides an overview of the…

  9. 7 CFR 765.206 - Junior liens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Junior liens. 765.206 Section 765.206 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... determinations for future requests for assistance and may adversely impact such requests. (b) Conditions...

  10. Pygmalion Effect on Junior English Teaching

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yurong Wang; Li Lin

    2014-01-01

    .... This thesis mainly focuses on the application of Pygmalion effect in English teaching, especially junior English teaching in China. If we can make good use of the Pygmalion Effect to conduct teaching and have positive expectations to students, it will improve teaching greatly.

  11. Organizing and Managing the Junior High Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmer, Edmund T.; And Others

    This manual provides guidelines and activities for organizing and managing junior high school classes. The first five chapters are devoted to the topic of getting ready for the beginning of the school year; the last four chapters suggest guidelines and activities that are helpful in maintaining a management system. Chapter 1 deals with organizing…

  12. A Senior Partner in the Junior College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Fe Community Coll., Gainesville, FL.

    The development and current status of the student personnel program at Sante Fe Junior College is described. Statements of purpose and philosophy are amplified through an outline of the needs and characteristics of Santa Fe students and a description of the elements of the program as they relate to specific needs and characteristics. The elements…

  13. Mathematics for Junior High School. Supplementary Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. D.; And Others

    This is a supplementary SMSG mathematics text for junior high school students. Key ideas emphasized are structure of arithmetic from an algebraic viewpoint, the real number system as a progressing development, and metric and non-metric relations in geometry. Chapter topics include sets, projective geometry, open and closed paths, finite…

  14. DEVELOPING STUDENTS' READING ABILITIES IN JUNIOR SCHOOL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan Bixi

    2001-01-01

    In This Article, the writer focus on an over- all analysis of the present situation of the students' reading activities in junior middle school in the countryside and put forward some suggestions on improving the teaching arts to enhance the students' fast reading abilities . It provided some theoretical basis on the further improcement of students' reading abilities in the school

  15. Do junior doctors take sick leave?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkin, M R; Higton, A; Witcomb, M

    2003-09-01

    Nosocomial infections place a heavy burden on overstretched health services. An audit of junior doctors' sick leave behaviour was undertaken in 1993 and again in 2001. The object was to ascertain the level of common infectious illness and to investigate whether junior doctors were remaining at work inappropriately. The doctors were asked if any factors had influenced their decision to take sick leave or not. Between the two audits several initiatives have been introduced to improve the working conditions of junior doctors, including the New Deal to reduce hours of work. Eighty one junior doctors in a large teaching hospital participated in 1993 and 110 in 2001. The number reporting an infectious illness in the previous six months was similar (61.7% in 1993, 68.2% in 2001). There had been a significant increase in the percentage of infectious illness episodes for which the doctors took sick leave (15.1% in 1993, 36.8% in 2001, p work (72% in 1993, 68% in 2001). Consultant pressure was cited by 26% (1993) and 20% (2001). Use of the staff occupational health unit was minimal, with none of the ill doctors contacting the department in 1993 and only three in 2001. Overall, despite the reduction in the number of infectious doctors not taking sick leave, the majority remained at work. Fundamental changes are needed if potentially infected doctors are not to present a risk of iatrogenic infection.

  16. Foreign Languages at Tarrant County Junior College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jane

    Even during the 1970's when diminished national interest in foreign language study was reflected in declining enrollments at most colleges, Tarrant County Junior College (TCJC) was able to maintain a vigorous language program by emphasizing oral communication and developing a flexible curriculum. Since 1975, the college has offered its preparatory…

  17. Curriculum Reviews: Middle/Junior High Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Richard

    1982-01-01

    Reviews "Pathways in Science" (Globe Book Company), designed as a complete middle/junior high school science program. Strengths (including sixth-grade readability) and weaknesses (indicating that limited process skill development may not challenge more capable students). Limited process skill development and the possibility for the program…

  18. Theme: Junior High and Middle School Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillison, John; And Others

    1994-01-01

    On the topic of agricultural education programs in middle/junior high schools, nine articles address developing self-concept, selecting materials, the benefits of agriscience contests, adopting new curricula, the role of Future Farmers of America in the development of adolescents, teaming science and agriculture, and the rationale for middle…

  19. Santa Fe Junior College, Gainesville, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudill, Rowlett and Scott, Architects, Houston, TX.

    The design of Santa Fe Junior College is examined, beginning with the development of an educational philosophy. Subsequent design decisions are based largely upon this philosophy which emphasizes the development of the individual student and the fulfillment of his needs. Further, the need for flexibility is recognized and is an important aspect of…

  20. Redskin Images. Roy Junior High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, William M.

    The school and self-improvement programs instituted at Roy Junior High School include the development of a self-performance evaluative instrument, the incorporation of a daily 15-minute reading session, the encouragement of dance and movement education through use of visiting professionals, and implementation of a self-esteem improvement mechanism…

  1. Public Relations for Community/Junior Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodress, Fred A.

    This monograph is a practical manual on public relations (PR) for community and junior colleges, containing numerous suggestions and recommendations for establishing and operating an effective public relations effort while avoiding PR pitfalls. An overview of the history of public relations in academe, the rationale underlying today's PR programs…

  2. Why are junior doctors reluctant to consult attending physicians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, Otto H

    2010-03-01

    A physician performs two tasks: making diagnoses and determining treatments. To reduce medical error, junior doctors are supposed to consult their supervisors when they face uncommon circumstances. However, recent research shows that junior doctors are reluctant to do so. This paper presents a model that explains (i) which junior doctors shy away from consulting; (ii) when junior doctors are reluctant; (iii) the importance of protocols in the medical sector; and (iv) when consulting is a sign of strength or a sign of weakness. Furthermore, I show that encouraging junior doctors to consult by investigating mishaps leads to another distortion: they will give too much weight to own assessments.

  3. Using reduced rank regression methods to identify dietary patterns associated with obesity: a cross-country study among European and Australian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huybrechts, Inge; Lioret, Sandrine; Mouratidou, Theodora; Gunter, Marc J; Manios, Yannis; Kersting, Mathilde; Gottrand, Frederic; Kafatos, Anthony; De Henauw, Stefaan; Cuenca-García, Magdalena; Widhalm, Kurt; Gonzales-Gross, Marcela; Molnar, Denes; Moreno, Luis A; McNaughton, Sarah A

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to examine repeatability of reduced rank regression (RRR) methods in calculating dietary patterns (DP) and cross-sectional associations with overweight (OW)/obesity across European and Australian samples of adolescents. Data from two cross-sectional surveys in Europe (2006/2007 Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence study, including 1954 adolescents, 12-17 years) and Australia (2007 National Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey, including 1498 adolescents, 12-16 years) were used. Dietary intake was measured using two non-consecutive, 24-h recalls. RRR was used to identify DP using dietary energy density, fibre density and percentage of energy intake from fat as the intermediate variables. Associations between DP scores and body mass/fat were examined using multivariable linear and logistic regression as appropriate, stratified by sex. The first DP extracted (labelled 'energy dense, high fat, low fibre') explained 47 and 31 % of the response variation in Australian and European adolescents, respectively. It was similar for European and Australian adolescents and characterised by higher consumption of biscuits/cakes, chocolate/confectionery, crisps/savoury snacks, sugar-sweetened beverages, and lower consumption of yogurt, high-fibre bread, vegetables and fresh fruit. DP scores were inversely associated with BMI z-scores in Australian adolescent boys and borderline inverse in European adolescent boys (so as with %BF). Similarly, a lower likelihood for OW in boys was observed with higher DP scores in both surveys. No such relationships were observed in adolescent girls. In conclusion, the DP identified in this cross-country study was comparable for European and Australian adolescents, demonstrating robustness of the RRR method in calculating DP among populations. However, longitudinal designs are more relevant when studying diet-obesity associations, to prevent reverse causality.

  4. Cross-Country Differences in the Additive Effects of Socioeconomics, Health Behaviors and Medical Comorbidities on Disability among Older Adults with Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shervin Assari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with heart disease experience limited activities of daily living (ADL. This is a cross-country comparison of the additive effects of Socioeconomics, health behaviors, and the number of medical comorbidities on disability among patients with heart disease.Methods: The current study used a cross-sectional design. Data came from the Research on Early Life and Aging Trends and Effects (RELATE. The current analysis utilized data on elderly individuals (age ≥ 60 y from 13 countries. The outcome was any ADL limitation (i.e. bathing, dressing, using toilet, transferring, lifting heavy things, shopping, and eating meals. Socioeconomics (i.e. age, gender, education, and income, health behaviors (i.e. exercise, smoking, and drinking, and number of chronic medical conditions (i.e. hypertension, respiratory, arthritis, stroke, and diabetes were entered into country-specific logistic regressions, considering at least one limitation in ADL as the main outcome.Results: Number of comorbid medical conditions and age were positively associated with disability in 85% of the countries. Physical activity and drinking were linked to disability in 54% and 31% of countries, respectively. Higher education and income were associated with lower disability in 31% and 23% of the countries, respectively. Female gender was associated with higher disability only in 15% of the countries. Smoking was not associated with disability, while the effects of socioeconomics, drinking, exercise, and medical comorbidities were controlled.Conclusion: Determinants of disability depend on the country; accordingly, locally designed health promotion interventions may be superior to the universal interventions for patients with heart disease. Medical comorbidities, however, should be universally diagnosed and treated.

  5. Cost Analyses in the US and Japan: A Cross-Country Comparative Analysis Applied to the PRONOUNCE Trial in Non-Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Lisa M; Rajan, Narayan; Winfree, Katherine; Davey, Peter; Ball, Mark; Knox, Hediyyih; Graham, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    Health technology assessment is not required for regulatory submission or approval in either the United States (US) or Japan. This study was designed as a cross-country evaluation of cost analyses conducted in the US and Japan based on the PRONOUNCE phase III lung cancer trial, which compared pemetrexed plus carboplatin followed by pemetrexed (PemC) versus paclitaxel plus carboplatin plus bevacizumab followed by bevacizumab (PCB). Two cost analyses were conducted in accordance with International Society For Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research good research practice standards. Costs were obtained based on local pricing structures; outcomes were considered equivalent based on the PRONOUNCE trial results. Other inputs were included from the trial data (e.g., toxicity rates) or from local practice sources (e.g., toxicity management). The models were compared across key input and transferability factors. Despite differences in local input data, both models demonstrated a similar direction, with the cost of PemC being consistently lower than the cost of PCB. The variation in individual input parameters did affect some of the specific categories, such as toxicity, and impacted sensitivity analyses, with the cost differential between comparators being greater in Japan than in the US. When economic models are based on clinical trial data, many inputs and outcomes are held consistent. The alterable inputs were not in and of themselves large enough to significantly impact the results between countries, which were directionally consistent with greater variation seen in sensitivity analyses. The factors that vary across jurisdictions, even when minor, can have an impact on trial-based economic analyses. Eli Lilly and Company.

  6. Effect of compression stockings on physiological responses and running performance in division III collegiate cross-country runners during a maximal treadmill test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Brian C; Coughlin, Adam M; Hew-Butler, Tamara D; Goslin, Brian R

    2014-06-01

    There is a growing trend for runners to use compression stockings (CS) to improve performance. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of CS on physiological variables associated with running performance. Participants were 10 NCAA division III cross-country runners. The study used a randomized, crossover design with 2 conditions (with CS and without CS). Both conditions consisted of a maximal treadmill test that involved 3-minute stages of increasing speed and incline, separated by a minute and one-half walking recovery stage. Seven days later, the participants repeated the maximal test but switched CS condition. Heart rate, blood lactate (BLa), blood lactate threshold, maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), respiratory exchange ratio, rating of perceived exertion, and time to fatigue were measured. Before and during the maximal treadmill tests, the variables showed no significant difference (p ≤ 0.05) between the CS conditions. Blood lactate was lower while wearing CS when measured during recovery at the 1-minute (CS = 13.3 ± 2.9 mmol · L(-1), non-CS = 14.8 ± 2.8 mmol · L(-1), p = 0.03) and the 5-minute (CS = 11.0 ± 2.7 mmol · L(-1), non-CS = 12.8 ± 2.8 mmol · L(-1), p = 0.02) periods. Time to fatigue was longer without CS (CS = 23.570 ± 2.39 minutes, non-CS = 23.93 ± 2.49 minutes, p = 0.04). These findings suggest that CS may not improve running performance, but could lend credence to certain manufacturers' claims of improved recovery through lower BLa values after exercise.

  7. Relative age effect in junior tennis (male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Agricola

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The issues of the age effect (the theory of the age influence have been shown in sport sciences since the 1980s. The theory of age effect works on the assumption that athletes born in the beginning of a calendar year are, particularly in children’s and junior age, more successful than athletes born in the end of the year. This fact has been proved by a number of research studies, mainly in ice hockey, soccer, and tennis but also in other sports. OBJECTIVE: The submitted contribution is aimed at verifying of the age effect in junior tennis. The research objective was to find out the distribution of birth date frequencies in a population of tennis players’ in individual months, quarters, and half-years in the observed period 2007–2011 and to check the significance of differences. METHODS: The research was conducted on male tennis players aged 13–14 (N = 239, participants of the World Junior Tennis Finals. From the methodological point of view, it was an intentional selection. The birth dates of individual tennis players were taken from official materials of the ITF, the research data were processed using Microsoft Excel. The personal data were processed with the approval of players and the hosting organization (ITF. RESULTS: Testing of the hypothesis on the significance of differences in the distribution of frequencies between individual quarters (Q1–Q4 has proved statistically relevant differences between Q1 and Q3, Q1 and Q4, Q2 and Q3, and Q2 and Q4; a statistically relevant difference has been also found in the distribution of frequencies between the first and second half of the year. On the basis of the results of the presented research, the age effect in the studied population of junior male tennis players can be regarded as significant. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the analysis of the research data confirm the conclusions of similar studies in other sports and prove that in the population of elite junior players

  8. A cross-country comparison of intensive care physicians’ beliefs about their transfusion behaviour: A qualitative study using the theoretical domains framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Rafat

    2012-09-01

    , and believing that guideline is important for other professionals, and Motivation and goals (opposing beliefs about the importance of restrictive transfusion and compatibility with other goals, were also identified in this study. Similar to the UK study, the Theory of Planned Behaviour, Social Cognitive Theory, Operant Learning Theory, Action Planning, and Knowledge-Attitude-Behaviour model were identified as potentially relevant theories and models for further study. Personal project analysis was added to the Canadian study to explore the Motivation and goals domain in further detail. Conclusions A wide range of beliefs was identified by the Canadian ICU physicians as likely to influence their transfusion behaviour. We were able to demonstrate similar though not identical results in a cross-country comparison. Designing targeted behaviour-change interventions based on unique beliefs identified by physicians from two countries are more likely to encourage restrictive transfusion in ICU physicians in respective countries. This needs to be tested in future prospective clinical trials.

  9. Dating With Super Junior-M

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    担心情人节没人陪?还在幻想能与谁约会?2009年2月14日,梦想照进现实,SJ-M将在上海举办“情人Superman-Super Junior-M 2009上海歌会”,化身你的甜蜜情人,与你一起共度浪漫情人节。

  10. Junior doctors' knowledge of applied clinical anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Yuri; Morgan, Mia; Singh, Annika; Ellis, Harold

    2008-05-01

    This study examines the level of knowledge of applied clinical anatomy among junior doctors. A multiple-choice questionnaire was designed, which covered 15 areas of anatomical knowledge essential to clinical practice, for example, important surface landmarks and interpretation of radiographs. The questionnaire was completed by 128 individuals. They comprised anatomy demonstrators, preregistration house officers (PRHOs), senior house officers (SHOs) and specialist registrars (SpRs) across the range of medical and surgical specialities. Answers were scored and analyzed by group, allowing comparison not only between newly qualified PRHOs and more senior doctors, but also with anatomy demonstrators who had undergone more traditional anatomical training. The results reveal a wide variation of knowledge among junior doctors, with PRHOs scoring an average of 72.1%, SHOs 77.1%, SpRs 82.4%, and demonstrators 82.9%. This progression in knowledge up the clinical hierarchy may reflect clinical experience building upon the foundations laid in medical school, although with demonstrators topping the league table, it seems that intensive academic training is the most beneficial. With junior doctors' training in the UK currently in flux, these results highlight the need for training in clinical anatomy to hold an important place in the development of tomorrow's clinicians.

  11. Alpine skiing: Effects of mental training program of junior representatives of the Czech republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Hřebíčková

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Qualitative evaluation case study deals with the implementation of mental skills training program conducted with the Czech national junior alpine skiing team over a period of an annual training cycle and evaluation of its effects by one of the members of the team. The concept of the study is based on current findings of sport psychology in the field of mental training in alpine skiing and other sports. The theoretical framework of the study is the socio-cognitive psychological paradigm (Bandura, 1986, 1997 and cognitive-behavioral approach. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the work is a qualitative evaluation of a program involving relaxation, concentration and imaginative techniques and goal setting by one of its participants. METHODS: Evaluation is carried out through semi-structured interview with the participant. The interview was analyzed in a scientific software Atlas.ti 6.2. The method of creating clusters were used for analysis. RESULTS: From the participants answers we understand the subjectively perceived benefit of the program based on understanding of the possibility of influencing the mental part of his performance. The racer presents that he learned the practical application of certain techniques of the mental preparation, particularly imagery and the mental plan of the race, which contributed to better coping with the race situation. The racer achieved the improvement in his FIS ranking standings in all the disciplines over the monitored season. Research findings are used in the proposal of practical recommendations for mental preparation in the training of top and performing skiers. CONCLUSION: An important factor in the success of the mental skills training program is cooperation of all interested participants, that are athlete, coach and psychologist. With applying the psychological techniques the key factors are mental support, encouragement, and development of confidence of the athlete in his own abilities. A well

  12. A Study of the 1968 Graduates of Manatee Junior College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stivers, Earl R.

    This study of the 1968 graduates of Manatee Junior College, Florida, showed that: (1) it is not necessary to be in the top 40% of grade 12 to succeed in junior college, (2) students in the lowest percentiles at entrance can earn a degree, (3) the average candidate for a degree should expect to spend more than four terms at the junior college, (4)…

  13. Multiple Intelligences Profiles of Junior Secondary School Students in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmiyati, Nuri; Rasyid, Muhammad Amin; Rahman, M. Asfah; Arsyad, Azhar; Dirawan, Gufran Darma

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the Multiple Intelligences profiles of the students at junior secondary school in Makassar. The Multiple Intelligences Inventory was used to identify the dominant intelligence among the students. The sample of this research was 302 junior secondary schools students in Makassar Indonesia who willing to participated…

  14. Sexuality Education in Junior High Schools in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, N.; Shinohara, H.; Tashiro, M.; Suzuki, S.; Hirose, H.; Ikeya, H.; Ushitora, K.; Komiya, A.; Watanabe, M.; Motegi, T.; Morioka, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to determine via responses to three questionnaire surveys how sexuality education programs are conducted at junior high schools in Japan. Study 1 examined the practice of sexuality education in schools, Study 2 investigated junior high school students' (age 12-13 and 14-15 years) knowledge of sexuality, and Study 3 examined…

  15. Interest Learning about English in Junior Middle School

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Shi-qin

    2015-01-01

    In modern time, interest learning play a more and more important role in the children’study. So the paper plays a key on the interest learning in junior middle school. And the paper mainly explores theoretical research, the reason of interest learning and the way to motivate junior middle students’interest learning in English learning.

  16. General Education in Occupational Education Programs Offered by Junior Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegman, Robert R.

    This report, directed toward junior college board members, presidents, deans, department heads, and teachers, as well as legislators, attempts to stimulate thought and action to improve general education in occupational programs offered by junior colleges. Following a review of the unsatisfactory status of present curricula, a rationale and…

  17. A magnetic skier

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Swiss downhill ski champ Dominique Gisin will be the guest of Swiss-German TV show Sportpanorama, to be broadcast on Channel 2 of Schweizer Fernsehen (SF2) on 19 July. The idea behind the show is to "fix it" for guests to do something they have always wanted but never had the opportunity to do. Where other sportsmen and women might have chosen acrobatics or bungee-jumping, this young champion asked to visit CERN ! When asked about the reasons for her choice, she replied: "It’s always been a dream of mine! When I was at high school, physics was one of my main subjects. I heard a lot about CERN and all the experiments they do there. So I was very curious to see it all in real life. I am very excited about this first visit." And her interest in physics doesn’t stop there: "If I hadn’t done well in sport, I would have gone on with physics. I really enjoyed studying, but it was too much on top of the skiing. I had to make a...

  18. Pygmalion Effect on Junior English Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurong Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pygmalion Effect, or Robert Rosenthal Effect, was proved by the famous American psychologist Robert Rosenthal and Jacobson in 1968. Pygmalion Effect, as a matter of fact, is a psychological suggestion, which believes that people can accept the influence and suggestion given by the people whom very much they admire, like, believe, and respect. This effect was first applied in the field of management and medication. What’s more, remarkable achievements have been accomplished on human resource management. Robert Rosenthal put it into education through an experiment called Pygmalion in the Classroom, which aroused widely attention in the education sector. This thesis mainly focuses on the application of Pygmalion effect in English teaching, especially junior English teaching in China. If we can make good use of the Pygmalion Effect to conduct teaching and have positive expectations to students, it will improve teaching greatly.

  19. PIXE technique applied to Almeida Junior materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascholati, Paulo R.; Rizzutto, Marcia A.; Neves, Graziela; Tabacniks, Manfredo H.; Moleiro, Guilherme F.; Dias, Flavia A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica]. E-mails: paschola@if.usp.br; rizzutto@if.usp.br; graziela@if.usp.br; tabacniks@if.usp.br; guimol@if.usp.br; fladias@if.usp.br; Mendonca, Valeria de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pinacoteca do Estado de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); E-mail: vmendonca@pinacoteca.org.br

    2007-07-01

    The Institute of Physics University of Sao Paulo in collaboration with the Pinacoteca do Estado of the State of Sao Paulo has a project to develop a data bank with information about the elementary composition of pigments of paintings and materials of its collection for future application as conservation and restoration as well as authenticity,. The project is beginning with the materials (palette, paint box and paint tubes) belonging to the painter Almeida Junior. Twenty-three spots on the palette were chosen with determined colors, and also the paint tubes present in the paint box. The PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) analysis of the spectra enabled to conclude that the red colors have predominant Hg and S suggesting Vermellion and the white one are consisted of Pb (Lead White). The analyzed tubes of same colors confirm the elements pigment present in the palette. (author)

  20. Career Progression of Junior Professional Officers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper S. E.; Carbonaro J.; Hoffheins, B; Collins, T.

    2015-07-12

    The U.S. Support Program to IAEA Safeguards (USSP) has funded more than 25 Junior Professional Officer (JPO) positions in the IAEA Department of Safeguards since 2005. JPOs are college graduates with zero to two years’ work experience who work alongside experienced IAEA staff members for one to two years and assist with basic, yet essential work while obtaining valuable experience. They contribute to equipment development, testing, integration, open source information collection and analysis, and software and database development. This paper will study the trends in career progression for the JPOs who have completed assignments with the IAEA in the Department of Safeguards. Brookhaven National Laboratory, in its role in managing the USSP, has compiled information that can be analyzed for this purpose.

  1. Analysis on Fault Phase Selector for Cross Country Fault of Parallel Transmission Lines%平行线路跨线故障选相元件的动作分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐海洋; 宋国兵; 樊占峰

    2016-01-01

    同走廊架设平行线路广泛应用于输电系统中。与单回线故障相比,跨线故障的故障特征发生变化,因而传统选相元件存在错选故障相的风险。考虑平行线路之间的零序互感作用,提出分别利用戴维南等效和构造存在耦合的复合序网络计算跨线非接地故障和接地故障时故障点处的序电流,进而分析选相元件的动作情况。以两端无电气连接的同杆并架双回线为例,通过对不同跨线故障类型情况下序电流关系式的分析,得出了零序负序电流选相元件的选相情况在跨线非接地故障时仅与故障类型有关,在跨线接地故障时不仅与故障类型有关,而且与回线间互感作用的强弱及零序、正序等值阻抗的比值有关;相电流差突变量选相元件通常情况下能够正确选相的结论。PSCAD仿真结果验证了跨线故障分析方法及选相元件分析结果的正确性。%Parallel transmission lines on the same corridor are commonly used in the transmission system.When a cross country fault occurs,the traditional fault phase selector may not correctly identify the fault phases due to the changes of fault characteristics.An algorithm for the calculation of the sequence currents at the fault point is proposed according to Thevenin”s theorem and the sequence currents at the location of the protection relay are obtained with superposition principle.Finally,the formulas on the relation between sequence currents at the fault point are deduced.Based on the double-circuit transmission lines on the same tower without electrical connection at both ends,it is found that the applicability of the positive and negative sequence current phase selector is related to fault types under cross country non-earth fault conditions,while that under cross country earth fault conditions are related to fault types,mutual inductance as well as the ratio of equivalent zero sequence impedance and positive

  2. The Status of Basic Technology in Cross River State Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    info

    Copyright © IAARR, 2007-2016: www.afrrevjo.net. Indexed African ... instructional materials for teaching basic technology in junior secondary school in. Cross River State and .... resource utilization. Conference paper, Nigeria Audio – visual.

  3. Variables that influence junior secondary school students‟ attitude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variables that influence junior secondary school students‟ attitude to agricultural ... and cluster) sampling techniques was employed to select a sample of 254 students. ... It was recommended that efforts be geared towards implementation of ...

  4. Strategies for Teaching Elementary and Junior High Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consuegra, Gerard F.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the applications of Piaget's theory of cognitive development to elementary and junior high school science teaching. Topics include planning concrete experiences, inductive and hypothetical deductive reasoning, measurement concepts, combinatorial logic, scientific experimentation and reflexive thinking. (SA)

  5. Teaching Human Sexuality in Junior High School: An Interdisciplinary Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Lucy; And Others

    1980-01-01

    An experimental sex education program designed for the junior high school adolescent is described. The program's goal is to affect primary prevention of adolescent pregnancy and other problems related to adolescent sexuality. (Author/JMF)

  6. PSI for Low-Enrollment Junior-Senior Physics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Charles P.; Young, Robert D.

    1976-01-01

    The administration of a Personalized System of Instruction (PSI) for junior-senior level courses in mechanics, electricity and magneturn, atomic physics, mathematical physics, physics and computers, astrophysics, and relativity is described. (CP)

  7. Profiles Junior high School West Java in Education Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NFN Nahadi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Descriptive studies have been conducted on the existing junior high profile in West Java on Education Learning Environment. The study was conducted by purposive sampling and descriptive done to get an idea about the profile of SMP in West Java implementation of the learning environment. in junior high school in West Java. Research conducted by distributing questionnaires, and observations based on the indicators developed. Based on this research, it is known that, PLH learning in junior high school in West Java has been in force since 2007 after the enactment of the Governor of West Java on environmental education for junior high school students in West Java. Learning that lasts generally implemented in conventional teacher, and it is without any innovations. It has made learning the essential condition runs well, but has not lasted optimally.

  8. John Brozovsky appointed Wayne E. Leininger Junior Faculty Fellow

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    John Brozovsky, associate professor of accounting and information systems in the Pamplin College of Business at Virginia Tech, has been appointed the Wayne E. Leininger Junior Faculty Fellow by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

  9. Effects of Cloze Instructional Approach on Junior Secondary School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of Cloze Instructional Approach on Junior Secondary School Students' ... comprehension achievement in English language using Owerri Educational Zone. ... basis for incorporating the cloze approach as a method of teaching reading ...

  10. Academic achievement of junior high school students with sleep disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Auliyanti, Fijri; Sekartini, Rini; Mangunatmadja, Irawan

    2016-01-01

    ... status, family structure, after-hours education program, presence of TV/computer in the bedroom, sleep duration during school days, as well as bedtime and wakeup time difference in junior high school...

  11. A Study of Junior Students'Cross- Culture Obstacles in English Reading Comprehension%A Study of Junior Students' Cross-Culture Obstacles in English Reading Comprehension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱雅琴

    2015-01-01

    This paper will research Junior students' cross-cultural obstacles in English reading from the perspective of culture background,Eliminating Junior students'cross-cultural barriers can improve intercultural communication competent.

  12. Errors in Junior English Writing:Resources and Strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Shu-ling

    2013-01-01

    The research on the common errors in junior English writings reflects the categories of errors, resources of errors, and how to do with errors in effective ways. Errors are divided into two types:intralingual errors and interlingual errors. The research finds that Chinese junior students depend heavily on their native language in English writing and finds out some effective strate-gies avoiding errors in writing.

  13. What makes work experience program in junior high school effective?

    OpenAIRE

    五島, 萌子; 重川, 純子

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the work experience program in junior high schools is spreading all over Japan in order that students get views on occupation and works. The purpose of this study is to clarify the value of this program and its determinants of effectiveness. We conducted interview survey to informantswho experienced the work experience programs in junior high school from 2000 to 2004. We have found that the followings are important to make the program more effective: adequacy interm and difficulty, ...

  14. Obesity prevention for junior high school students: An intervention programme

    OpenAIRE

    Topalidou,Anastasia; Dafopoulou, GM

    2013-01-01

    Background: Generally, schools are an important setting to provide programmes for obesity prevention for children because the vast majority of children attend school. This study investigates how an intervention programme in the school subject of Physical Education can help reduce obesity for junior high school students in combination with information on dietary and health matters in school and family. Materials and Methods: A quantitative study for junior high school students (N = 250) and a ...

  15. Perfectionism and attitudes towards doping in junior athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Madigan, Daniel J.; Stoeber, Joachim; Passfield, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Recent theory and research suggest that perfectionism is a personal factor contributing to athletes’ vulnerability to doping (using banned substances/drugs to enhance sporting performance). So far, however, no study has examined what aspects of perfectionism suggest a vulnerability in junior athletes. Employing a cross-sectional design, this study examined perfectionism and attitudes towards doping in 129 male junior athletes (mean age 17.3 years) differentiating four aspects of perfectionism...

  16. "Junior Doctor Decision Making: Isn't that an Oxymoron?" A Qualitative Analysis of Junior Doctors' Ward-Based Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Stephanie; Mattick, Karen; Postlethwaite, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Unacceptable levels of adverse healthcare events, combined with changes to training, have put the spotlight on junior doctor decision-making. This study aimed to describe the decisions made by junior doctors and the contextual factors influencing how decisions were made and justified. Stimulated recall interviews with 20 junior doctors across five…

  17. "Junior Doctor Decision Making: Isn't that an Oxymoron?" A Qualitative Analysis of Junior Doctors' Ward-Based Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Stephanie; Mattick, Karen; Postlethwaite, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Unacceptable levels of adverse healthcare events, combined with changes to training, have put the spotlight on junior doctor decision-making. This study aimed to describe the decisions made by junior doctors and the contextual factors influencing how decisions were made and justified. Stimulated recall interviews with 20 junior doctors across five…

  18. Breakfast Composition in Junior High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Devi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adolescence is a time of rapid development that requires higher nutrient intake levels than in adulthood. However the habit of skipping breakfast has become very popular among adolescents. Skipping breakfast has negative effects such as difficulty in concentrating, growth impairment and decrease academic performance. Therefore, this study was conducted to identify the breakfast composisition of early adolescents in Jatinangor, Sumedang, Indonesia. Methods: A cross sectional study with non-probability sampling method, was conducted in a junior high school Jatinangor during the month of July 2013. Ninety six participants were included in this study. All the participants underwent an interview about the food intake for breakfast in seven days using eating pattern recall guidelines. Results: Overall, 37% of the respondents skipped breakfast. The mean of total calories among the adolescents who consumed breakfast was 286.06 (187.89 kcal. The amount of carbohydrate, fat and protein consumed was 29.23 (19.93 gram, 13.93 (13.29 gram and 8.78 (6.11 gram accordingly. The main reason for adolescent to skip breakfast was lack of time. Conclusions: Majority of the respondents have their breakfast before they go to school. Overall, the total calories comsumed is sufficient however the amount of protein consumed is low.

  19. Junior empresa: un modelo empresarial diferente = Junior enterprise: a different business model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Jiménez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Resumen¿Quién no está harto ya de oír cómo está el mercado laboral? Nos bombardean con un ruido de fondo incesante, como si graduarnos no fuese suficiente reto. Bueno, ¿y qué? Un grupo de estudiantes de la Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería y Diseño Industrial de la Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (ETSIDI-UPM nos hemos unido y hemos creado nuestra propia Junior Empresa, un modelo empresarial diferente, innovador, que nos permite revertir todos los beneficios en aprendizaje. ¿Quién ha dicho que tengamos que dejarnos vencer por un sistema laboral obsoleto?AbstractAre you tired of hearing how difficult it is to get a job? They are filling our minds with a non-stop background noise, as if getting a degree was an insufficient challenge. So what? Well, some students from the Superior Technical School of Engineering and Industrial Design from the Technical University of Madrid (ETSIDIUPM have come together and created our own Junior Enterprise, a different business model, an innovative canvas, which allows us to transform all the benefits into learning. Who said our destiny is being crushed by an obsolete labour market?

  20. Acute hormonal responses in elite junior weightlifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, W J; Fry, A C; Warren, B J; Stone, M H; Fleck, S J; Kearney, J T; Conroy, B P; Maresh, C M; Weseman, C A; Triplett, N T

    1992-02-01

    To date, no published studies have demonstrated resistance exercise-induced increases in serum testosterone in adolescent males. Furthermore, few data are available on the effects of training experience and lifting performance on acute hormonal responses to weightlifting in young males. Twenty-eight junior elite male Olympic-style weightlifters (17.3 +/- 1.4 yrs) volunteered for the study. An acute weightlifting exercise protocol using moderate to high intensity loads and low volume, characteristic of many weightlifting training sessions, was examined. The exercise protocol was directed toward the training associated with the snatch lift weightlifting exercise. Blood samples were obtained from a superficial arm vein at 7 a.m. (for baseline measurements), and again at pre-exercise, 5 min post-, and 15 min post-exercise time points for determination of serum testosterone, cortisol, growth hormone, plasma beta-endorphin, and whole blood lactate. The exercise protocol elicited significant (p less than or equal to 0.05) increases in each of the hormones and whole blood lactate compared to pre-exercise measures. While not being significantly older, subsequent analysis revealed that subjects with greater than 2 years training experience exhibited significant exercise-induced increases in serum testosterone from pre-exercise to 5 min post-exercise (16.2 +/- 6.2 to 21.4 +/- 7.9 nmol.l-1), while those with less than or equal to 2 years training showed no significant serum testosterone differences. None of the other hormones or whole blood lactate appear to be influenced by training experience.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Value-meaning Barriers in Research Activity of Junior Scientists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabalovskaya M.V.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Contents of value-meaning barriers are covered that acquire certain specifics in research activity and influence formation of meaning-forming research motivation of junior scientists. Such barriers were assumed to be conditioned by dissonance between dominating values and degree of their realization in junior researchers. Sample of respondents included 88 beginners: postgraduate students (n=65 and masters (n=23 of Tomsk high schools aged between 21 and 35 years. As research methods the expanded version of technique by M. Rokeach (proposed by M.S. Yanitsky and A.V. Seryy, methods of statistical analysis of results (frequency analysis, Mann-Whitney test were used. Relevant value orientations of junior scientists are presented. Gender differences in value-meaning domain are revealed. Differences in values in postgraduate students and masters were found. Dissonance in degree of fulfillment of terminal and instrumental values has been established that indicates disturbances of value-meaning domain of the personality of junior scientists. Results add to scientific ideas about value-meaning barriers in research activity of junior scientists.

  2. Perceived Injury Risk among Junior Cricketers: A Cross Sectional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna J. Gamage

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how junior athletes perceive injury risks when participating in sport and the environment they play in is an important component of injury prevention. This study investigates how Sri Lankan junior cricketers (n = 365, aged 11–14 years, boys perceive injury risks associated with playing cricket. The study used a Sri Lankan modification of an Australian junior cricket injury risk perception survey that considered playing cricket versus other sports, different cricket playing positions and roles, and different ground conditions. The risk of playing cricket was considered to be greater than that for cycling, but lower than that for rugby and soccer. Fast-bowlers, batters facing fast-bowlers, fielding close in the field, and wicket-keeping without a helmet were perceived to pose greater risks of injury than other scenarios. Playing on hard, bumpy and/or wet ground conditions were perceived to have a high risk opposed to playing on a grass field. Fielding in the outfield and wicket-keeping to fast-bowlers whilst wearing a helmet were perceived as low risk actions. The risk perceptions of junior cricketers identified in this study, do not necessarily reflect the true injury risk in some instances. This information will inform the development of injury prevention education interventions to address these risk perceptions in junior cricketers.

  3. The Independence of the Junior Scientist's Mind: At What Price?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoles, Giacinto

    2016-05-01

    When I was facing the daunting task of recounting my approximately 70 years of scientific career and some aspects of my personal life, I decided to write this autobiographical piece in a "different" way. After a section on the almost bare facts of my life (Section 1), I include several other parts, loosely connected in time, in each of which I make an almost self-contained point, decreasing in this way the need for consistency and coherence in the whole article. I discuss, for example, the importance of original ideas, the independence of junior colleagues, and my work with molecular beams and in nanomedicine. I end by acknowledging those I was lucky enough to learn from in my intellectual development as a research scientist and with a couple of recommendations that may be useful to my junior and not-so-junior colleagues.

  4. Internal Grant Review to Increase Grant Funding for Junior Investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Heather S; Brodsky, Martin B; Ewen, Joshua B; Bergey, Gregory K; Lloyd, Thomas E; Haughey, Norman J; Marvel, Cherie L

    2017-09-04

    Decreasing biomedical research support over the past decade has driven many talented young scientists to seek careers outside academia. In 2011, the Department of Neurology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine developed an internal grant review program (IGRP) to systematically review career development awards (CDAs) and research grants (e.g., R01s) for junior investigators prior to NIH submission. With IGRP implementation, we observed significant increases in the number of CDAs and R-grants awarded to junior investigators. Thus, internal grant review is an effective means for supporting junior faculty and help them retain their research roles within academia. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  5. A Study of Junior Students’ Cross-Culture Obstacles in English Reading Comprehension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱雅琴

    2015-01-01

    This paper will research Junior students’ cross cultural obstacles in English reading from the perspective o culture background,Eliminating Junior students’ cross-cultura barriers can improve intercultural communication competent.

  6. Evaluating Junior Secondary Science Textbook Usage in Australian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Christine V.

    2016-08-01

    A large body of research has drawn attention to the importance of providing engaging learning experiences in junior secondary science classes, in an attempt to attract more students into post-compulsory science courses. The reality of time and resource constraints, and the high proportion of non-specialist science teachers teaching science, has resulted in an overreliance on more transmissive pedagogical tools, such as textbooks. This study sought to evaluate the usage of junior secondary science textbooks in Australian schools. Data were collected via surveys from 486 schools teaching junior secondary (years 7-10), representing all Australian states and territories. Results indicated that most Australian schools use a science textbook in the junior secondary years, and textbooks are used in the majority of science lessons. The most highly cited reason influencing choice of textbook was layout/colour/illustrations, and electronic technologies were found to be the dominant curricula material utilised, in addition to textbooks, in junior secondary science classes. Interestingly, the majority of respondents expressed high levels of satisfaction with their textbooks, although many were keen to stress the subsidiary role of textbooks in the classroom, emphasising the textbook was `one' component of their teaching repertoire. Importantly, respondents were also keen to stress the benefits of textbooks in supporting substitute teachers, beginning teachers, and non-specialist science teachers; in addition to facilitating continuity of programming and staff support in schools with high staff turnover. Implications from this study highlight the need for high quality textbooks to support teaching and learning in Australian junior secondary science classes.

  7. Improving Oral English in Break Time in Junior High School

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴小丹

    2013-01-01

      Teachers have been paying more attention to oral English teaching in junior high school than ever before. Generally, teachers focus on teaching oral English in class, where they give preeminence to creating an environment in the classroom which approximates to the“real-life”communicative use of language (Yang Chaochun&Cheng Lian 2005). However, there are some limits teaching oral English in class. This essay puts forwards to provide input during the break time for students to acquire oral English unconsciously in junior high school to make up for the insufficiency.

  8. Poor interpretation of chest X-rays by junior doctors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Janus Mølgaard; Gerke, Oke; Karstoft, Jens;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Studies targeting medical students and junior doctors have shown that their radiological skills are insufficient. Despite the widespread use of chest X-ray; however, a study of Danish junior doctors' skills has not previously been performed. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 22...... diagnosis, the participant's confidence in the diagnosis was assessed on a five-point Likert scale. The diagnoses were divided into four groups: normal findings, chronic diseases, acute diseases and hyperacute diseases or conditions. RESULTS: A total of 22 doctors receiving basic clinical education (BCE...

  9. About English Listening Teaching of Junior College Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童心; 李雪

    2011-01-01

    @@ 1、The listening current situation by junior college students Listening is a significant and essential area of development in the native language and in a second language.But nowadays, most of junior college students listening level are very poor.They lack a sense of the importance of learning English and lack confidence to study English well.Class time is limited, and sometimes students listen without a clear aim, therefore, we attain low effect.Teachers always ignore explaining listening skills and fostering general ana- lyzing ability, so in the course of time, it is harm to cultivate stu- dents' communicative capacity.

  10. The Application of Inquiring Teaching to the Junior English Class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHUI Xin-yue

    2014-01-01

    As a teaching method against the giving-and-accepting pattern, the inquiring teaching in junior high school pays more attention to learners’understanding, feeling and experience in the course and emphasizes the cooperation and communica-tion among students and teachers. In this paper, it explores the advantages of inquiring teaching, which cultivate students ’interest in learning and ability of analyses, induction and application, compared with the traditional teaching.Besides, some suggestions are provided in English teaching of Junior high school.

  11. Factors Effecting Unemployment: A Cross Country Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurangzeb

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates macroeconomic determinants of the unemployment for India, China and Pakistan for the period 1980 to 2009. The investigation was conducted through co integration, granger causality and regression analysis. The variables selected for the study are unemployment, inflation, gross domestic product, exchange rate and the increasing rate of population. The results of regression analysis showed significant impact of all the variables for all three countries. GDP of Pakistan showed positive relation with the unemployment rate and the reason of that is the poverty level and underutilization of foreign investment. The result of granger causality showed that bidirectional causality does not exist between any of the variable for all three countries. Co integration result explored that long term relationship do exist among the variables for all the models. It is recommended that distribution of income needs to be improved for Pakistan in order to have positive impact of growth on the employment rate.

  12. Decomposing Cross-Country Differences in Skills:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albæk, Karsten; Rosdahl, Anders

    2017-01-01

    among Finns with high school and less than high school education. The Finnish average score is pulled substantially downwards as a consequence of the low numeracy skill level among older Finns, which is consistent with an increase in the quantity or quality of Finnish education over time, relative...

  13. SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY VALUES: A CROSS COUNTRY COMPARISON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CATANA DOINA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This empirical study aims at finding out how similar and/or different are the future Romanian and Slovenian managers in assessing the importance of organizations social responsibility values. The assumption of the research is that most of most of students in engineering and business will hold middle management position in the near future. The sample consists of 727 undergraduate and graduate students levels from Romania and Slovenia, two former socialist countries. The data has been collected between 2008 and 2009 in the framework of GLOBE student project , using a section of GLOBE III questionnaire, about the importance of CSR related values in critical decisions. The findings concern the similarities and significant differences between: 1 whole Romanian and Slovenian samples; 2 Romanian and Slovenian students in engineering; 3 Romanian and Slovenian students in business. Our findings revealed a trend toward convergence in the importance given to decisions effect on contribution to the economic welfare of the nation and local community, as well as on employees professional growth and development and on environment. The biggest difference between the groups concerns the decisions effect on firm profitability (the Romanians considering this value as more important in critical decisions than the Slovenians. The students in engineering proved to be a more homogeneous group, showing convergence in assessing the importance of eight out of fifteen social responsibility values. The biggest difference concerns the decisions effect on firm profitability (Romanians consider it as having higher importance in critical decisions than the Slovenians. Comparison of students in business revealed convergence in assessing the importance of employees professional growth and development and decisions effect on environment. The biggest positive difference concerns the same value of decisions effect on firm profitability. The Romanians are well behind Slovenians in realizing the importance of decisions effect on relationships with important partners of the organization, ethical considerations and decisions effect on long term competitive ability of the organization.

  14. Experimental Study on Physiological Predictors Reflecting the Performance in Cross-country Skiing%预测越野滑雪运动成绩生理学指标的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李忠堂; 阎智力

    2015-01-01

    Literature review and mathematical analysis were used in this paper .A treadmill test was taken to study physiology indicators reflecting the performance of cross-country skiing , aimming to explore whether parameters measured by treadmill test can predict cross-country skiing performance or not ,and trying to identify which indicators are better in predicting the cross-country ski .Metabolic gas measurements were used to measure and calculate anaerobic threshold (AT) ,threshold of decompensated metabolic acidosis (TDMA) ,the exercise intensi-ty where respiratory exchange ratio(RQ) reaches 1 and the peak oxygen uptake((V)O2 peak) at the same time onset of the blood lactic acid accumulation (OBLA ) ,percentage of maximum heart rate ,percentage of (V)O2 peak and oxygen uptake under different units ((V)O2 ml · kg -1 · min-1 ,(V)O2 ml · min-1 · kg -2/3 ,(V)O2 l · min-1 ) and other parameters .Pearson correlation co-efficient and the Spearman rank correlation coefficient were used for data analysis .Results :OBLA index is highly correlated with the male competition performance while RQ=1 is a bet-ter reflection of female athletes performance .It's better for male using l · min-1 unit to pre-dict match results ,while any of l · min-1 ,ml · min-1 · kg -2/3 or ml · kg -1 · min-1 units can be used for female athletes .Conclusions :Treadmill test can be used to predict the cross-coun-try skiing performance ,and cross-country skiing performance prediction for male and female athletes should use different parameters .%采用文献资料调研、实验和数理分析等方法 ,通过跑台运动实验对反映越野滑雪运动成绩的生理学指标进行了研究 ,目的是探究跑台运动实验所测指标能否用于预测越野滑雪的比赛成绩 ,并试图筛选出能够更好地预测越野滑雪比赛成绩的生理指标.运用气体代谢测试法分别对无氧阈(AT )、矢代偿性代谢性酸中毒阈值(TDMA )、呼吸商(RQ )= 1时运动

  15. Different Demotivators for Japanese Junior High and High School Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Yo

    2011-01-01

    Motivation has been studied throughout the field of language acquisition for the past 20 years. Demotivation has also been researched in Japan at primarily the university and high school level. To provide a deeper understanding of demotivation for Japanese junior and senior high school learners, this study explores the following three questions.…

  16. Junior Officer Competency Model: Research Results and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    34 Outstanding junior officers also speak enthusiastically about future challenges: -56- "".5% 10 "I agreed, because I had a chance to work with several...traits, skiils , knowledges, and ’ibaiiiries as to thev pertain to the job being analv zed. These characteristics llave been identified as being of nc.nt

  17. Recurrent Respiratory Infections and Psychological Problems in Junior School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelmanson, Igor A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recurrent respiratory infections (RRI) are among most common diseases in school-aged children. Little is known about possible associations between RRI and children psychological well-being. Aim: To study possible associations between RRI in junior school pupils and their emotional/behavioural characteristics. Methods: The RRI group…

  18. Spiritual beliefs among Chinese junior high school students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Lili; Jin Shenghua

    2006-01-01

    Objective:To explore the characteristics of the spiritual beliefs among junior high school students.Method:431 junior high school students are measured by Students' Basic Information Questionnaire (SBIQ) and Middle School Students'Spiritual Beliefs Questionnaire (MSSSBQ).Results:(1) The overall characteristics of the spiritual beliefs among junior high school students are as follows:social beliefs rank first,practical faith second,and supernatural beliefs last.The ranks of the seven beliefs from high to low are nationalism,political conviction,family's doctrine,life worship,religious beliefs,money/material and gods worship.(2) Boy students have higher political conviction and money/material faith than girl students.Girt students have higher religious beliefs than boy students.(3) On the beliefs of money/material and life worship,students in Grade 9 take the first place,Grade 8 second and Grade 7 last.(4) Non-student cadres have stronger money/material faith than cadres.(5) League members have higher political beliefs than non-members.(6)Students who are good at studies have stronger national faith than students who are average or poor at studies.Students who are poor at studies have stronger money/material faith than other students.Conclusion:The spiritual beliefs of junior high school students' are positive.

  19. Junior Secondary School Students' Conceptions about Plate Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Reece; Tomas, Louisa; Lewthwaite, Brian

    2017-01-01

    There are ongoing calls for research that identifies students' conceptions about geographical phenomena. In response, this study investigates junior secondary school students' (N = 95) conceptions about plate tectonics. Student response data was generated from semi-structured interviews-about-instances and a two-tiered multiple-choice test…

  20. Graphic Novels in Community and Junior College Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Although the growth in popularity of graphic novels among readers of all ages and the expansion of graphic novels in both public and academic libraries has been well defined in library literature, the inclusion of graphic novels in community and junior college libraries has received little attention. The purpose of this article is to begin the…

  1. The Design of the Junior High Management Improvement Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmer, Edmund T.; And Others

    This report provides a description of the experimental design, including the procedures, instrumentation, and sample, of the Junior High School Management Improvement Study. The research leading up to this study is briefly described along with the conceptualization of the management function of teaching and the development of training manuals for…

  2. Student Characteristics and Change at Napa Junior College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMillan, Thomas F.

    At Napa Junior College (California), to test the relationship between college attendance and personality change, 100 volunteers were measured in their first year by the STEP Reading Exam and the ACE Psychological Exam. California Psychological Inventory (CPI) showed a significant range in personality traits from high to low ability students. The…

  3. Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Testing for Indonesia Junior High School Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Bor-Chen; Daud, Muslem; Yang, Chih-Wei

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a curriculum-based multidimensional computerized adaptive test that was developed for Indonesia junior high school Biology. In adherence to the Indonesian curriculum of different Biology dimensions, 300 items was constructed, and then tested to 2238 students. A multidimensional random coefficients multinomial logit model was…

  4. Mathematics for Junior High School, Volume II (Part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. D.; And Others

    This is part two of a two-part SMSG mathematics text for junior high school students. Key ideas emphasized are structure of arithmetic from an algebraic viewpoint, the real number system as a progressing development, and metric and non-metric relations in geometry. Chapter topics include real numbers, similar triangles, variation, non-metric…

  5. Mathematics for Junior High School, Volume I (Part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. D.; And Others

    This is part two of a two-part SMSG mathematics text for junior high school students. Key ideas emphasized are structure of arithmetic from an algebraic viewpoint, the real number system as a progressing development, and metric and non-metric relations in geometry. Chapter topics include the rational number system; parallels, parallelograms,…

  6. An Institutional Autopsy of St. Augustine Junior College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumadue, Richard T.

    2009-01-01

    Institutional autopsies can teach much about why learning centers fail the test of time. St. Augustine Junior College in north Florida, the brainchild of Dr. George Apel, was begun in 1942 and ended seven years later in 1949. The purposes of the short-lived college are identified for discussion in this paper. Also identified are the reasons for…

  7. Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Testing for Indonesia Junior High School Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Bor-Chen; Daud, Muslem; Yang, Chih-Wei

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a curriculum-based multidimensional computerized adaptive test that was developed for Indonesia junior high school Biology. In adherence to the Indonesian curriculum of different Biology dimensions, 300 items was constructed, and then tested to 2238 students. A multidimensional random coefficients multinomial logit model was…

  8. CAI and Its Application in Rural Junior English Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Superiority in developing students' listening, speaking, etc. This thesis explores how to provide a better environment for English teaching in rural junior school with the aid of multimedia and find some ways to improve teaching efficiency. In recent years, using multimedia is the direction of reform and mainstream in English teaching. Compared…

  9. Tarrant County Junior College District, Exploring America's Communities. Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant County Junior Coll. District, Ft. Worth, TX.

    In 1996, Tarrant County Junior College District participated in the American Association of Community Colleges' Exploring America's Communities project, which works to strengthen the teaching and learning of American history, literature, and culture at U.S. community colleges. The primary goals included the following: (1) to develop an inclusive,…

  10. A Manual for Teaching English to Junior Middle School Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马晓燕; 郭鸿雁

    2012-01-01

    With the globalization of world economy, English learning becomes popular in every corner of every country. But there are many problems and difficulties in English teaching and learning, especially for the beginners. Therefore, the author of this paper designed this manual foe teaching her future students in junior middle school.

  11. Home Life Skills: Career Related Junior High Home Economics Courseguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aanenson, Gail; And Others

    Designed for use in integrating career education into a one-semester junior high school home economics course, this guide contains eleven home life skills activities and eighteen personal development activities to be integrated into units on foods, grooming and clothing, sewing, personal development, and child development. Student worksheets,…

  12. The Effect of Teachers' Emotions on Chinese Junior English Learners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JiangLiqin

    2004-01-01

    The study intends to investigate the effect of teachers' emotions on Chinese Junior English learners. It is very common to see that in many primary schools, Chinese English teachers tend to play games with children, teach songs and the like,leading the Chinese young English beginners to the door to English world with great enthusiasm. But after children enter

  13. The Development of a Suburban Junior High School Learning Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Janet W.

    The purpose of the study is to present a descriptive report of the difficulties and successes in the first eight months of the development of a Learning Center in Northwood Junior High School in Highland Park, Illinois. The report is intended to contribute information which will be helpful to others whose task it is to develop Learning Centers.…

  14. Mentoring Undergraduate Interdisciplinary Mathematics Research Students: Junior Faculty Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevertz, Jana L.; Kim, Peter S.; Wares, Joanna R.

    2017-01-01

    To be successful, junior faculty must properly manage their time in the face of expanding responsibilities. One such responsibility is supervising undergraduate research projects. Student research projects (either single or multi-student) can be undertaken as a full-time summer experience, or as a part-time academic year commitment. With many…

  15. Increasing mouthguards usage among junior rugby and basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalleh, G; Donovan, R J; Clarkson, J; March, K; Foster, M; Giles-Corti, B

    2001-06-01

    To evaluate a Western Australian mouthguard promotion campaign, launched at the start of the 1997/98 junior rugby union and junior basketball seasons, aimed at increasing mouthguard usage at competition and training. A quasi-experimental field design was used to assess the impact of the mouthguard campaign on behavioural change. Observational data were collected pre- and post-campaign on mouthguard usage by players present at a rugby and basketball competition event and at a training session. Junior Australian Rules Football players were used as a control group. Pre-post observational surveys showed a significantly greater increase in mouthguard usage in competition games among rugby union (77% to 84%) and basketball players (23% to 43%) compared with the control group (72% to 73%). All codes showed a post-campaign increase in mouthguard usage at training, but the intervention codes' increases were greater than the control's increase (rugby union: 29% to 40%; basketball: 11% to 36%; football: 34% to 40%). The campaign had a significant and substantial effect on behaviour and provides evidence of the benefits of leveraging a sponsorship to modify the behaviour of the target group. This campaign provides a model for promoting mouthguard usage in other sports among junior players.

  16. An Australian Evaluation of the Junior Eysenck Personality Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansford, B. C.; Neidhart, H.

    1977-01-01

    Using 463 fifteen year old girls from five girls' schools in the metropolitan area of Sydney, this study examines four aspects of the Junior Eysenck Personality Inventory that has been subject to criticism, namely the terminology used in certain JEPI items, item response rate ceilings, factorial structure of the inventory, and the relationship…

  17. The EDO: New Man on the Junior College Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Lab. for Higher Education, Durham, NC.

    The Educational Development Officer (EDO) is a new kind of college administrator, a full-time catalyst for change. In the Junior and Community College Division of the National Laboratory for Higher Education (NLHE), the EDO has been defined as an innovation-minded professional who questions existing practices, works constantly for constructive…

  18. Empathy, Self-Esteem and Creativity among Junior Ballet Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliopuska, Mirja

    This study examined the effect of the active pursuit of ballet as a hobby on personality. The study group consisted of 62 members of the junior ballet of the Finnish National Opera, ranging in age from 9 to 17 with the majority under 14. The dancers were given four self-esteem questionnaires which measured empathy, creativity, and other…

  19. Comparing Assessments within Junior Geography Textbooks Used in Mainland China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Daihu

    2013-01-01

    The 2001 Geography Standards for Junior Secondary Schools are the first national standards for geographic education since the founding of Communist China. The standards heralded several new ideas for geographic education, and textbook assessments are one important way for understanding their impact. This study examines the changes in assessments…

  20. Social Skills and the Junior High School Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Helle; LaBahn, Joyce; Regan, Kathleen

    This paper describes a program initiated by teacher-researchers to increase the use and knowledge of appropriate social skills with junior high school students while working in academic cooperative groups. The target groups comprised sixth, seventh, and eighth grade students in a predominantly middle class community in the Midwest. The students'…

  1. Mathematics for Junior High School, Volume II (Part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. D.; And Others

    This is part one of a two-part SMSG mathematics text for junior high school students. Key ideas emphasized are structure of arithmetic from an algebraic viewpoint, the real number system as a progressing development, and metric and non-metric relations in geometry. Chapter topics include number line and coordinates, equations, scientific notation,…

  2. Study on the cohesion and coherence in English teaching between junior middle school and vocational school

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范佳

    2012-01-01

      English in junior middle school is the basis of English in vocational school. As the current situation of vocational school students' English is unsatisfactory after they graduate from junior middle school and the study on the cohesion and coherence in English teaching between junior middle school and vocational school is a little. According to the current situation,this paper aims to search the ways of connecting junior middle school English teaching and vocational school English teaching. We can find the relationship between junior middle school English teaching and vocational school English teaching and the ways to help the vocational school students learn English wel .

  3. Managing the Junior Science & Humanities Symposium: Management and Operation of the Pacific Region Junior Science & Humanities Symposium, 2001-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This publication provides administrative, management, supervisory guidance, and other information necessary for successful conduct and support of grades 7-12 science symposia. Originally the text was developed as the operations manual for the Pacific Region Junior Science and Humanities Symposium (PJSHS). It contains information necessary to…

  4. TOEFL Junior® Design Framework. TOEFL Junior® Research Report. TOEFL JR-02. ETS Research Report No. RR-15-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Youngsoon; Wolf, Mikyung Kim; Hauck, Maurice C.; Mollaun, Pamela; Rybinski, Paul; Tumposky, Daniel; Wang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the theoretical and empirical foundations of the "TOEFL Junior"® assessment and its development process. The TOEFL Junior test was developed to address the increasing need for objective measures of English language proficiency for young adolescent learners, who are being introduced to English as a second or foreign…

  5. The Final Report on the Tarrant County Junior College Phase of the Social Science Demonstration Project Sponsored by the American Association of Junior Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Robert M.

    An account of Tarrant Count Junior College's participation in the American Association of Junior Colleges' Social Science Demonstration Project was presented. The purpose of the project was to involve introductory sociology students in the use of the community as a laboratory to enliven the teaching-learning experience and develop in students a…

  6. Improving Students’ English Reading Skills in Junior Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈阿亲

    2009-01-01

    Reading is an important way of communication.Through reading,people can be well ingformed.Therefore,reading plays a key role yn Junior English teaching.However,a lot of students in junior middle school are not skilled at reading.One of the problems is that they do not know how to read.This paper suggests the following effective reading shills:changing the traditional ways of reading,improving students’ skills of skimming and scanning,cultivating abilities of guessing and limited reading,enlarging the scope of reading,forming students’good habits of reading.By using these skills,students’speed of reading and reading comprehension can be improved.

  7. A study on coping patterns of junior college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramya N

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to examine the coping patterns followed by the junior college students. Further, an extensive effort was done to study the gender differences in coping patterns used by the students. This study was conducted in Christ College, Bangalore and on the first and second-year students of pre-university studying in either of the branches (Bachelor of Arts, Science, or Commerce. A total of 120 samples were collected from study population of junior college students using the random sampling method. The sample comprised, 40 students from each group of Arts, Science, and Commerce, including both of the sexes. The tools such as, socio-demographic data sheet and coping checklist, were used. The study findings revealed that majority of the students adopted emotion- and problem-focused coping strategies. Most of the female students adopted emotion-focused coping strategies, whereas the male students mostly used problem-focused coping strategies.

  8. Benefits Analysis of the Naval Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    Dimes, Cystic Fibrosis, Multiple Sclerosis , Heart, Lung, Junior Diabetes, Leukemia, United Way, MDA, Save the Earth Bremerton High School, WA Aiken...of the program from multiple perspectives. The overall perception of the benefits derived from the NJROTC program was positive. This positive...for the BSU Black Heritage Talent Show. The students you have assigned to coordinate ehese efforts have conducted themselves in a courteous and

  9. English vocabulary teaching in Chinese junior high schools

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jinghong

    2015-01-01

    Vocabulary learning is an important and indispensable part of the English language learning process. In this paper, the author tried to examine the vocabulary teaching practice in Chinese junior high schools. A questionnaire was used to investigate the problem from the perspectives of in-service teachers. Besides, the National English Curriculum (MOE, 2011) served as another important source of data in this study. The data revealed that progress has been made in English vocabulary teaching in...

  10. The Application of STM in Junior English Class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    强萍

    2013-01-01

      Along with the development of China's economy, English becomes more and more important in people's daily life. The English teaching methods used in each period are quite different. It has been a few decades since situational teaching method was put forward. The situational teaching method is one of the most popular teaching methods in Junior English class. Students will accept knowledge actively in efficient classroom learning in which language acquisition is carried out completely in full language environment.

  11. An Evaluation of Junior English Textbook-Go for It

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李嘉琪

    2015-01-01

    This paper evaluates the junior English textbook- Go for it to provide some references for teachers when they selecting coursebooks and hopefully helps them make proper decisions in the process of teaching.It is found that the coursebook is keeping up with the latest language teaching theories and is beneficial for developing students' communicative competence,while there are still some problems needs paying attention to.

  12. An Evaluation of Junior English Textbook-Go for It

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李嘉琪

    2015-01-01

    This paper evaluates the junior English textbook- Go for it to provide some references for teachers when they selecting coursebooks and hopefully helps them make proper decisions in the process of teaching.It is found that the coursebook is keeping up with the latest language teaching theories and is beneficial for developing students’ communicative competence,while there are still some problems needs paying attention to.

  13. Improving Junior Infantry Officer Leader Development and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    responsible for the critical role of professionally developing these young officers, and yet the junior officer was not a master of these developmental ...effectively balance his individual development or the long-term needs of the Army, with the immediate needs of their organizations . As a result...positive side, it allows infantry officers to experience more diverse, Army-wide, developmental experiences and assignments. This is good for developing

  14. Sport-specific factors predicting player retention in junior cricket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talpey, Scott; Croucher, Tom; Bani Mustafa, Ahmed; Finch, Caroline F

    2017-04-01

    Understanding factors that motivate young athletes to continue participation in sport can help key stakeholders cultivate an environment that fosters long-term participation. This investigation sought to determine the performance and participation factors that influenced continued participation in junior cricket. Administration-level data were collected each annual season across a seven-year period by a community-level junior cricket association in Australia and analysed to identify the performance and participation-based predictors of player retention. All players were males aged <16 years. Players were categorised according to whether they remained in (or departed from) the association at the end of each playing season. A multivariate logistic regression model with a stepwise variable selection was employed to identify significant independent predictors of player retention. The number of innings batted and overs bowled were significant participation-related contributors to junior cricket player retention. Performance factors such as the number of wickets taken and the number of runs scored also significantly influenced player retention. Finally, team age group, the number of previous seasons played and age were also significant factors in player retention. This demonstrates that sufficient opportunity for children to participate in the game and expression of skills competence are key factors for retention in cricket.

  15. NIR tracking assists sports medicine in junior basketball training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paeglis, Roberts; Bluss, Kristaps; Rudzitis, Andris; Spunde, Andris; Brice, Tamara; Nitiss, Edgars

    2011-07-01

    We recorded eye movements of eight elite junior basketball players. We hypothesized that a more stable gaze is correlated to a better shot rate. Upon preliminary testing we invited male juniors whose eyes could be reliably tracked in a game situation. To these ends, we used a head-mounted video-based eye tracker. The participants had no record of ocular or other health issues. No significant differences were found between shots made with and without the tracker cap, Paired samples t-test yielded p= .130 for the far and p=..900 > .050 for the middle range shots. The players made 40 shots from common far and middle range locations, 5 and 4 meters respectively for aged 14 years As expected, a statistical correlation was found between gaze fixation (in milliseconds) for the far and middle range shot rates, r=.782, p=.03. Notably, juniors who fixated longer before a shot had a more stable fixation or a lower gaze dispersion (in tracker's screen pixels), r=-.786, p=.02. This finding was augmented by the observation that the gaze dispersion while aiming at the basket was less (i.e., gaze more stable) in those who were more likely to score. We derived a regression equation linking fixation duration to shot success. We advocate infra-red eye tracking as a means to monitor player selection and training success.

  16. Musculoskeletal Injuries and Training Patterns in Junior Elite Orienteering Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Roos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Findings about the relation between musculoskeletal injuries and training patterns in orienteering athletes are sparse. Therefore, the musculoskeletal injuries and training patterns of 31 Swiss elite orienteering athletes aged 18-19 years were analyzed in a retrospective study. Individual training diaries and medical records were used to assess training data and injury history, respectively. Group comparisons and a multiple linear regression (MLR were performed for statistical analysis. The junior elite orienteering athletes performed 7.38 ± 2.00 training sessions weekly, with a total duration of 455.75 ± 98.22 minutes. An injury incidence rate (IIR of 2.18 ± 2.13 injuries per 1000 hours of training was observed. The lower extremity was affected in 93% of all injuries, and the knee (33% was the most commonly injured location. The MLR revealed that gender and six training variables explained 60% of the variance in the injury severity index in this study. Supported by the low IIR in the observed age group, the training protocol of the junior elite orienteering athletes was generally adequate. In comparison to elite track, marathon, and orienteering athletes, the junior elite athletes performed less high-intensity interval training (HIIT. However, more frequent HIIT seems to be a protective factor against injuries.

  17. Perfectionism and attitudes towards doping in junior athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, Daniel J; Stoeber, Joachim; Passfield, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Recent theory and research suggest that perfectionism is a personal factor contributing to athletes' vulnerability to doping (using banned substances/drugs to enhance sporting performance). So far, however, no study has examined what aspects of perfectionism suggest a vulnerability in junior athletes. Employing a cross-sectional design, this study examined perfectionism and attitudes towards doping in 129 male junior athletes (mean age 17.3 years) differentiating four aspects of perfectionism: perfectionistic strivings, perfectionistic concerns, parental pressure to be perfect, and coach pressure to be perfect. In the bivariate correlations, only parental pressure showed a positive relationship with positive doping attitudes. In a multiple regression analysis controlling for the overlap between the four aspects, perfectionistic strivings additionally showed a negative relationship. Moreover, a structural equation model examining the relationships between all variables suggested that coach pressure had a negative indirect effect on attitudes towards doping via perfectionistic strivings. The findings indicate that perceived parental pressure to be perfect may be a factor contributing to junior athletes' vulnerability to doping, whereas perfectionistic strivings may be a protective factor.

  18. Musculoskeletal Injuries and Training Patterns in Junior Elite Orienteering Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Lilian; Taube, Wolfgang; Zuest, Peter; Clénin, German; Wyss, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Findings about the relation between musculoskeletal injuries and training patterns in orienteering athletes are sparse. Therefore, the musculoskeletal injuries and training patterns of 31 Swiss elite orienteering athletes aged 18-19 years were analyzed in a retrospective study. Individual training diaries and medical records were used to assess training data and injury history, respectively. Group comparisons and a multiple linear regression (MLR) were performed for statistical analysis. The junior elite orienteering athletes performed 7.38 ± 2.00 training sessions weekly, with a total duration of 455.75 ± 98.22 minutes. An injury incidence rate (IIR) of 2.18 ± 2.13 injuries per 1000 hours of training was observed. The lower extremity was affected in 93% of all injuries, and the knee (33%) was the most commonly injured location. The MLR revealed that gender and six training variables explained 60% of the variance in the injury severity index in this study. Supported by the low IIR in the observed age group, the training protocol of the junior elite orienteering athletes was generally adequate. In comparison to elite track, marathon, and orienteering athletes, the junior elite athletes performed less high-intensity interval training (HIIT). However, more frequent HIIT seems to be a protective factor against injuries.

  19. RELEVANCE OF USE OF MULTIMEDIA IN ORDER TO PREVENT JUNIOR PUPILS’ AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V. Oleksiuk

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the problem of aggressive behaviour of junior pupils and reasons for its occurrence. There are determined advantages of multimedia use in the prevention of aggressive behaviour of junior pupils and described types of multimedia, which should be used to work with pupils. Problem of aggressive behaviour of junior pupils become one of the main problems of our society. As noted by the most researchers, one of the cause of aggressive behaviour of junior pupils is media, the use of video games, watching movies, cartoons that provoke aggression. One of the important areas of prevention of aggressive behaviour of junior pupils is competence improvement of teachers, social workers and psychologists on the use of multimedia in social and educational classes for junior pupils.

  20. Personality differences among junior postgraduate trainees in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinou, Eirini; Allan, Hayley; Vig, Stella

    2015-01-01

    An early understanding of the personality profiles of junior trainees may be valuable for supporting the professional and educational development of tomorrow's doctors. This study aims to describe the personality profile of junior trainees and to explore whether the personality profiles differed according to the level of training, specialty choice, or gender. The Mental Muscle Diagram Indicator was distributed electronically. South West London, Health Education England South London. A total of 157 junior trainees completed the personality questionnaire. Specifically, there were core surgical (n = 40), core medical (n = 24), and foundation trainees (n = 93). The preferential profile across all groups was Extroversion (E), Sensing (S), Feeling (F), and Perception (P). More foundation doctors favored an extrovert and sensing personality when compared with core trainees (72% vs 60.4% and 77.4% vs 57.5%, respectively). More core surgical trainees appeared to prefer Extroversion when compared with their medical counterparts (66.7% vs 54.2%). More core medical trainees favored an intuitive behavior when compared with their surgical colleagues (50% vs 35%). Significantly, more female trainees (83.3%) displayed an extrovert personality than male trainees (66.7%) did. According to the Mental Muscle Diagram Indicator analysis, this work shows that the more junior the trainees are in their career, the more they tend to enjoy human interaction and to favor acting before thinking. The most junior trainees tend to be slightly more interested in dealing with facts rather than ideas and favor a flexible approach of life. The reducing ratio of Extroversion and Sensing in the core trainees when compared with foundation doctors may suggest that clinical experience has an effect on personality. As trainees begin to progress, they may tend to reflect more on their practice and to start thinking about more long term. These results suggest that a greater understanding of their personality

  1. Impact of Quality of Life on the Reenlistment Intentions of Junior Enlisted United States Marines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    junior enlisted Marines, known as ’ Millenials ’ (born after 1981). As illustrated earlier in this thesis, the average age of junior enlisted Marines...is just over 21 years (born after 1980). Thus, many junior enlisted Marines studied in this thesis are likely to belong to the Millenial group...Wilcox (2001) found that, to Millenials , "the greatest appeal of the Marine Corps, and the one that makes the service unique, is ’Self- Improvement

  2. New records in aerobic power among octogenarian lifelong endurance athletes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scott Trappe; Erik Hayes; Andrew Galpin; Leonard Kaminsky; Bozena Jemiolo; William Fink; Todd Trappe; Anna Jansson; Thomas Gustafsson; Per Tesch

    2013-01-01

    ...). The endurance athletes were cross-country skiers, including a former Olympic champion and several national/regional champions, with a history of aerobic exercise and participation in endurance events...

  3. Junior faculty satisfaction in a large academic radiology department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Aine M; Cronin, Paul; Dunnick, N Reed

    2007-04-01

    Retention of academic faculty is a pressing issue for many radiology departments. The departure of junior faculty members to private practice may be driven in part by economics; however, the choice may be influenced by many other elements of faculty satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how satisfied junior (assistant professors and instructors) and senior (associate professors and professors) faculty in an academic radiology department are with respect to their work and to determine which factors most affected the decision to stay in academics. We conducted a survey of junior and senior faculty in the department of radiology. Questions included attitudes regarding work, home, and family issues. Among the 27 junior faculty (73%) who responded to the survey, 14 were instructors and 13 were assistant professors. Among the 11 senior faculty (21%) who responded to the survey, 3 were associate professors and 8 were professors. Academic radiology faculty are very happy with work and derive enjoyment and fulfillment from their work. The working week excluding call (average 52 hours) and including call (average 61 hours) was not regarded as too long. The average academic faculty works 72% clinical time (range 15% to 100%) and gets 0.96 day a week of professional development. Fifty-nine percent are funded at an average of 0.91 day a week. Forty-one percent are on tenure track, and of the remainder, 40% expressed a desire for tenure track. Fifty-five percent of faculty have mentors and 57% receive adequate mentoring. When it comes to teaching, 50% have enough time to teach juniors. Of the remainder, all but one cited high clinical workload as an impediment to teaching juniors. Forty-one percent of faculty reported not getting enough academic time. Fifty-nine percent felt pressure to publish and 34% felt pressure to obtain external funding. Seventy-six percent surveyed felt it has become more difficult to publish. The main reasons cited were increasing

  4. Junior faculty core curriculum to enhance faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillet, Ronnie; Holloway, Robert G; Gross, Robert A; Libby, Katie; Shapiro, Janine R

    2017-04-01

    Senior Instructors and Assistant Professors in their first academic appointment may not have all the tools for an efficient start to their careers. Although many institutions provide access to mentoring programs and seminars on faculty development, the timing and format of the offerings often conflict with ongoing responsibilities of the faculty, particularly clinical faculty. We established a collaboration between the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) and the University of Rochester Medical Center Office for Faculty Development with the goal of developing a week-long Junior Faculty Core Curriculum that would better suit faculty schedules. We convened focus groups and with their help, identified themes for inclusion in the course. Speakers were identified from among local senior faculty. University leadership was enlisted in promoting the course. Individual speakers and course content were evaluated daily, at the end of the week-long course, and 6 months later. Planning for subsequent years incorporated the feedback. Yearly evaluations and subsequent course modification continued. Junior faculty from nearly every department in the Medical Center were represented. There was high learner satisfaction and participation however several limitations were identified and addressed in subsequent years. The focus on principles and available resources, not specific skills or content was appropriate. Daily interactions among participants from a wide variety of departments fostered networking among faculty who may not otherwise have met and discussed common interests. The ultimate value of such an early, intensive faculty development program will depend on whether it equips junior faculty to organize, develop, and achieve their academic goals better than alternative formats. This will require further study.

  5. Academic achievement of junior high school students with sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fijri Auliyanti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Sleep disorders are prevalent in adolescents and may influence their academic achievement. To date, no study has been done in Indonesia on academic achievement in students with sleep disorders and its related factors. Objective To assess for relationships between academic achievement and related factors, including gender, motivation and learning strategies, IQ level, maternal educational level, socioeconomic status, family structure, after-hours education program, presence of TV/computer in the bedroom, sleep duration during school days, as well as bedtime and wakeup time difference in junior high school students with sleep disorders. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed from January to March 2013. Subjects were students from five junior high schools in Jakarta who fulfilled the criteria for sleep disorders based on the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children questionnaire. Results There were 111 study subjects. The prevalence of sleep disorders was 39.7%, mostly in difficulties initiating and maintaining sleep (70.2%. Below-average academic achievement was seen in 47.6% of subjects. Factors significantly related to below-average academic achievement were after-hours education program (prevalence ratio 5.6; 95%CI 1.36 to 23.18; P = 0.017, average IQ level (prevalence ratio 3.26; 95%CI 1.38 to 7.71; P = 0.007, and male gender (prevalence ratio 2.68; 95%CI 1.06 to 6.78; P = 0.037. Conclusion Among junior high school students with sleep disorders, factors related to below-average academic achievement are after-hours education program (more than 2 types, the average IQ level, and male gender. [Paediatr Indones. 2015;55:50-8.].

  6. Academic achievement of junior high school students with sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fijri Auliyanti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Sleep disorders are prevalent in adolescents and may influence their academic achievement. To date, no study has been done in Indonesia on academic achievement in students with sleep disorders and its related factors. Objective To assess for relationships between academic achievement and related factors, including gender, motivation and learning strategies, IQ level, maternal educational level, socioeconomic status, family structure, after-hours education program, presence of TV/computer in the bedroom, sleep duration during school days, as well as bedtime and wakeup time difference in junior high school students with sleep disorders. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed from January to March 2013. Subjects were students from five junior high schools in Jakarta who fulfilled the criteria for sleep disorders based on the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children questionnaire. Results There were 111 study subjects. The prevalence of sleep disorders was 39.7%, mostly in difficulties initiating and maintaining sleep (70.2%. Below-average academic achievement was seen in 47.6% of subjects. Factors significantly related to below-average academic achievement were after-hours education program (prevalence ratio 5.6; 95%CI 1.36 to 23.18; P = 0.017, average IQ level (prevalence ratio 3.26; 95%CI 1.38 to 7.71; P = 0.007, and male gender (prevalence ratio 2.68; 95%CI 1.06 to 6.78; P = 0.037. Conclusion Among junior high school students with sleep disorders, factors related to below-average academic achievement are afterhours education program (more than 2 types, the average IQ level, and male gender.

  7. The educational value of ward rounds for junior trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faidon-Marios Laskaratos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ward round (WR is a complex task and medical teachers are often faced with the challenge of finding a balance between service provision and clinical development of learners. The educational value of WRs is an under-researched area. This short communication aims to evaluate the educational role of WRs for junior trainees and provides insight into current practices. It also identifies obstacles to effective teaching/training in this setting and provides suggestions for improving the quality of WR teaching.

  8. DEVELOPMENT RESOURSES OF JUNIOR SCHOOLCHILD’S READING REQUIREMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Vladimirovna SMAKHTINA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considered an issue of rooting need for reading books in junior schoolchildren. This study refined the con-cepts of “need for reading books” and “resources for read-ing”. The author in the course of study revealed that the following may stand for such mental and educational re-sources: the reading skill shaped in children, their emo-tional perception of a piece of fiction, their identifying selves with a fiction piece’ character, extrinsic motivation to read the book. Family upbringing (namely, fostering in-family reading and a trendy reading have been considered for resources of social influence and ambient conditions.

  9. Physiological Profile of Senior and Junior England International Amateur Boxers

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Marcus S

    2006-01-01

    Despite worldwide popularity of amateur boxing, research focussed on the physiological demands of the sport is limited. The physiological profile of Senior and Junior England international amateur boxers is presented. A gradual (8 to 21-days) and rapid (0 to 7-days) phase of body weight reduction was evident with 2.2 ± 0.3 % of the 7.0 ± 0. 8 % weight loss occurring over the final 24-hours. An increase in body weight >4% was observed following a recovery period. High urine osmolality values (...

  10. CAREER TRANSITION FROM JUNIOR TO SENIOR IN BASKETBALL PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Lorenzo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to investigate what factors affect basketball players in the transition from junior and amateur to senior and professional sport respectively. The study was a qualitative research which uses a semi-structured interview to get the data. There were interviewed five Spanish basketball players who were starting playing in a team of Basketball Club Association (C.B.A.. The results showed that the participants face several changes both in the sport and in the life outside sport. At the same time, the results indicated the existence of several coping strategies that help the player in his career transition.

  11. The value of the post-take ward round: are new working patterns compromising junior doctor education?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chaponda, M; Borra, M; Beeching, NJ; Almond, DS; Williams, PS; Hammond, MA; Price, VA; Tarry, L; Taegtmeyer, M

    2009-01-01

    This prospective observational study assessed the impact of the changes in junior doctors' working hours and waiting-time initiatives on teaching and learning opportunities for junior doctors in acute medicine...

  12. Emotional Labour, Training Stress, Burnout, and Depressive Symptoms in Junior Doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Mary E.; Creed, Peter A.; Searle, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Junior doctors are at risk of work-related burnout and mental health problems due to training workload demands and responsibilities. This study investigated the predictors of work-related burnout and depressive symptoms in junior doctors. Participants were 349 Australian doctors in postgraduate years 1-4, who completed a web-based survey assessing…

  13. Junior High School Students' Career Plans for the Future: A Canadian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardick, Angela D.; Bernes, Kerry B.; Magnusson, Kris C.; Witko, Kim D.

    2006-01-01

    This study uses the Comprehensive Career Needs Survey to assess the career plans of junior high school students in Southern Alberta, Canada. Junior high students are asked (a) what they plan to do after they leave high school; (b) their confidence in finding an occupation they enjoy, obtaining training or education, and finding work in their…

  14. A Study of the Influencing Factors of English Extracurricular Reading for Junior Middle School Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张金盼

    2015-01-01

    Extracurricular reading as an extension of the junior middle school English teaching process,which can broaden the students’ horizons.In this dissertation,the influencing factors of the junior high school students’ extracurricular reading are described.According to these factors,corresponding improving measures are put forward to improve the level of learning English through English extracurricular reading.

  15. 42 CFR 21.42 - Examinations; junior assistant, assistant, or senior assistant grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Examinations; junior assistant, assistant, or senior assistant grade. 21.42 Section 21.42 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PERSONNEL COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Appointment § 21.42 Examinations; junior assistant...

  16. A study on fossilization of Interlanguage and Junior High English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何传丽

    2016-01-01

    English in junior high has been an essential part for students since it's a period toestablish basic English knowledge and skills. It's necessary for teachers to study English teaching. Interlanguage is an common phenomenon on English study. This article focus on the interlanguage, the fossilization of it and the impacts of interlanguage on the junior high English teaching.

  17. Will Aesthetics English Comic Books Make Junior High School Students Fall in Love with English Reading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Mei-Ju; Hsu, Yung-Hung; Chen, Ching-Chi

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the effects of Aesthetics English comic books on EFL junior high school students' vocabulary acquisition, reading comprehension, and English learning motivation. The participants in this study were 28 eighth graders from one class in a public junior high school in Pingtung in Taiwan. After ten weeks…

  18. Developing Teaching Materials PISA-Based for Mathematics and Science of Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somakim; Suharman, Andi; Madang, Kodri; Taufiq

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to develop valid and practical teaching materials for mathematics and science lesson PISA-based for junior high school students and to determine potential effects on students in scientific activity. Subjects of this study were students of Junior High School 9 Palembang (SMP Negeri 9 Palembang). The method used in this study is…

  19. The elementary discussion on the context teaching in junior middle school English vocabulary teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李斯琦

    2016-01-01

    vocabulary is the basis of English learning, and it plays a very important role in junior middle school English teaching. The meaning of words often needs to be determined by the context. This paper introduces the context theory and analyzes the application of context in English Vo?cabulary Teaching of junior high school.

  20. Assessment System for Junior High Schools in Taiwan to Select Environmental Education Facilities and Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Shyue-Yung; Chen, Wen-Te; Hsu, Wei-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Environmental education is essential for people to pursue sustainable development. In Taiwan, environmental education is taught to students until they graduate from junior high school. This study was conducted to establish an assessment system for junior high schools to select appropriate environmental education facilities and sites. A mix of…

  1. Does decision documentation help junior designers rationalize their decisions? A comparative multiple-case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesch, U. van; Avgeriou, P.; Tang, A.

    2013-01-01

    Software architecture design is challenging, especially for junior software designers. Lacking practice and experience, junior designers need process support in order to make rational architecture decisions. In this paper, we present the results of a comparative multiple-case study conducted to find

  2. Prevalence of Tobacco Use among Junior High and Senior High School Students in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping-Ling; Huang, Weigang; Chuang, Yi-Li; Warren, Charles W.; Jones, Nathan R.; Asma, Samira

    2008-01-01

    Background: Tobacco use is a major preventable cause of death in the world. This article describes and compares tobacco use prevalence for students attending junior high schools and senior high schools in Taiwan. Methods: This report uses data from the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS) completed among 4689 junior high school students and 4426…

  3. Traditional-Aged College Juniors' Career Planning Self-Efficacy: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Dawn C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this single-site case study was to explore and describe traditional-age college juniors' reports of self-efficacy (Bandura, 1997) regarding Career Planning (Barker & Kellen, 1998). More specifically, the career planning confidence levels of college juniors enrolled in a required career development course at a private business…

  4. Using Simulation to Train Junior Psychiatry Residents to Work with Agitated Patients: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigman, Daniel; Young, Meredith; Chalk, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This article examines the benefit and feasibility of introducing a new, simulation-based learning intervention for junior psychiatry residents. Method: Junior psychiatry residents were invited to participate in a new simulation-based learning intervention focusing on agitated patients. Questionnaires were used to explore the success of…

  5. The formation of logic thinking of junior schoolchildren during some extracurricular activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efimov Vladimir Fedorovich

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the topical issue of formation of junior schoolchildren's mathematical abilities, discloses the modern scientific concept of General and specific mathematical abilities. The structure of mathematical abilities, analyzed the specificity of extra-curricular activities, which under favorable conditions accompanies the intellectual development of junior schoolchildren.

  6. Adolescent Views of Time Management: Rethinking the School Day in Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Paris S.; Strom, Robert D.; Sindel-Arrington, Tricia

    2016-01-01

    Junior high school presents a significant increase in time demands both for study and for social relationships. The students (N = 240) in grades 7 and 8 at a junior high school anonymously completed online the Time Management Poll concerning their own use of time and the way their school managed time. The 20 items in the poll allowed them to…

  7. Collaboration with Sport Psychologists as Viewed by Female Volleyball Junior Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrebski, Wojciech; Rutkowska, Katarzyna

    2008-01-01

    Study aim: To determine the need of female junior volleyball players to collaborate with a psychologist, considering previous sport career of those players. Material and methods: A group of 78 female volleyball players aged 14-17 years from 7 top Polish junior teams participated in the study. They were requested to fill questionnaires on their…

  8. Current Planning for the Development of Public Junior Colleges in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munns, Earle Dee

    This report of 38 studies from 22 states includes the analysis and synthesis of statements of policy and program scop", conclusions and recommendations, needs for services, criteria for establishing new junior colleges, and procedures for improving state-wide coordination. Twelve conclusions are presented regarding the role of junior colleges in…

  9. The Inequality of Self-Efficacy between Junior College and Traditional University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Higher education research highlights the difficulties students face when transitioning from a junior college to a traditional university. This study explored a gap between junior vs. traditional university students' academic self-efficacy beliefs. This study also controlled for the effects of the student role-identity and academic performance on…

  10. Emotional Labour, Training Stress, Burnout, and Depressive Symptoms in Junior Doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Mary E.; Creed, Peter A.; Searle, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Junior doctors are at risk of work-related burnout and mental health problems due to training workload demands and responsibilities. This study investigated the predictors of work-related burnout and depressive symptoms in junior doctors. Participants were 349 Australian doctors in postgraduate years 1-4, who completed a web-based survey assessing…

  11. Business Studies Academic Performance Differences of Secondary School Juniors in Akwa Ibom State of Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udoukpong, Bassey E.; Emah, Ime E.; Umoren, Shirley E.

    2012-01-01

    The research examined the differences in the academic performance in Business Studies of a sampled secondary school junior students in Akwa Ibom State of Nigeria. A sample of 290 (138 male and 152 female) Junior Secondary Three (9th grade) students was surveyed. The students' variables' being examined vis-à-vis academic performance in Business…

  12. Card Games and Algebra Tic Tacmatics on Achievement of Junior Secondary II Students in Algebraic Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpube, Nnaemeka Michael; Anugwo, M. N.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the Card Games and Algebra tic-Tacmatics on Junior Secondary II Students' Achievement in Algebraic Expressions. Three research questions and three null hypotheses guided the study. The study adopted the pre-test, post-test control group design. A total of two hundred and forty (240) Junior Secondary School II students were…

  13. An Assessment of Campus Police Departments across Mississippi's Public Community and Junior Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, Brad D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to provide an assessment of campus police departments throughout the 15 public community and junior colleges in Mississippi. This research could provide Mississippi community and junior college administrators the opportunity to observe and appraise the overall safety of their respective campuses in comparison to safety…

  14. A pilot survey of junior doctors' confidence in tasks related to broad aspects of competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Anne Marie; Davis, Deborah; Ringsted, Charlotte Vibeke

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to survey junior doctors' growth in confidence in different physician roles. A total of 165 junior doctors in internal medicine completed a self-administered survey of confidence levels in physician roles. Confidence levels between training levels were compared....

  15. How Singapore Junior College Science Teachers Address Curriculum Reforms: A Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Patrick; Pyvis, David

    2012-01-01

    Using grounded theory research methodology, a theory was developed to explain how Singapore junior college science teachers implement educational reforms underpinning the key initiatives of the "Thinking Schools, Learning Nation" policy. The theory suggests Singapore junior college science teachers "deal with" implementing curriculum reforms by…

  16. The Effects of Cooperative Learning on Junior High School Students during Small Group Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Robyn M.

    2004-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of cooperative learning on junior high school students who worked in structured or unstructured cooperative groups. Two hundred and twenty-three junior high school students participated in the study and worked in three or four-person, mixed gender and achievement groups. The results show that the children in the…

  17. Collaboration with Sport Psychologists as Viewed by Female Volleyball Junior Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrebski, Wojciech; Rutkowska, Katarzyna

    2008-01-01

    Study aim: To determine the need of female junior volleyball players to collaborate with a psychologist, considering previous sport career of those players. Material and methods: A group of 78 female volleyball players aged 14-17 years from 7 top Polish junior teams participated in the study. They were requested to fill questionnaires on their…

  18. How to Use Communicative Language Teaching in Teaching of Spoken English in Junior Middle School

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    才项措

    2012-01-01

      Many students find themselves cannot use spoken English to communicate with others, and this phenomenon has been ap-pearing in each teaching stage, especially in junior middle schools. Therefore, this paper sates Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) might be used as an effective way to solve current problem in English teaching and Spoken English teaching in junior middle schools.

  19. Assessment System for Junior High Schools in Taiwan to Select Environmental Education Facilities and Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Shyue-Yung; Chen, Wen-Te; Hsu, Wei-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Environmental education is essential for people to pursue sustainable development. In Taiwan, environmental education is taught to students until they graduate from junior high school. This study was conducted to establish an assessment system for junior high schools to select appropriate environmental education facilities and sites. A mix of…

  20. The Transfer Function Is Alive and Well at the Private/Independent Junior College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Pam Brown

    1986-01-01

    Reports on an examination of the transfer function a sample of 10 private/independent junior colleges. Reviews data obtained through analyses of college catalogs and available descriptive information and through survey research focusing on college goals. Reveals evidence of the private/independent junior college's commitment to the transfer…

  1. Adolescent Views of Time Management: Rethinking the School Day in Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Paris S.; Strom, Robert D.; Sindel-Arrington, Tricia

    2016-01-01

    Junior high school presents a significant increase in time demands both for study and for social relationships. The students (N = 240) in grades 7 and 8 at a junior high school anonymously completed online the Time Management Poll concerning their own use of time and the way their school managed time. The 20 items in the poll allowed them to…

  2. Effects of Music on Physical Activity Rates of Junior High School Physical Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Lindsey; Barney, David C.; Prusak, Keven A.; Pennington, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Music is an everyday occurrence in a person's life. Music is heard in the workplace, in homes, and in the mall. Music can also be heard as a person exercises. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of music on junior high students (n = 305) step counts and time in activity in junior high school physical education classes.…

  3. Guidelines for Professional Training of Junior Medical Staff in the Context of European Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnova, Myroslava

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with outlining guidelines for improving professional training of junior medical staff based on European experience. Consequently, guidelines and recommendations on enhancing the efficiency of medical education in general and junior medical specialists' professional training, in particular, published by European Union of Medical…

  4. The Application of Communicative Language Teaching on Spoken English Teaching in Junior Middle School

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    才项措

    2012-01-01

    this paper displays the problems of Current English teaching in junior middle schools and points out the reasons which caused the problems, and it sates Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) might be used as an effective way to solve current problem in English teaching and Spoken English teaching in junior middle schools.

  5. A Structural and Functional Model for Forming Management Skills in Junior Schoolchildren

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knissarina, Malika M.; Valikhanov, Sharidyar A.; Medeubayeva, Kenzhekhan T.; Zhazykova, Makpal K.; Rakhmetova, Bazar A.; Seytenova, Salima S.; Abil, Akmaral S.; Mukhangaliyeva, Shnargul Ai.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze theoretically and simulate the formation of management skills in junior schoolchildren. The authors classified junior schoolchildren's management skills, defined psychological and pedagogical principles of their formation. Empirically obtained results of questionnaires for teachers and parents (n=550)…

  6. Antibody persistence after two vaccinations with either FSME-IMMUN® Junior or ENCEPUR® Children followed by third vaccination with FSME-IMMUN® Junior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prymula, Roman; Pöllabauer, Eva Maria; Pavlova, Borislava G; Löw-Baselli, Alexandra; Fritsch, Sandor; Angermayr, Rudolf; Geisberger, Alexander; Barrett, P Noel; Ehrlich, Hartmut J

    2012-06-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccination strategies to induce optimal seroprotection in children are under constant evaluation. This multi-center, randomized, controlled, phase III clinical study examined antibody persistence in children aged 1-11 y following two prospectively administered doses of either the FSME-IMMUN® Junior or Encepur Children® vaccines, as well as investigating the immunogenicity, safety and vaccine interchangeability of a third vaccination with FSME-IMMUN(®) Junior. A high level of antibody persistence was observed in all subjects 6 mo after the first of two vaccinations with either pediatric TBE vaccine. Based on both immunological tests and viral antigens used, slightly higher seropositivity rates and higher GMCs /GMTs were found in children vaccinated with FSME-IMMUN® Junior compared with those who received Encepur® Children. Seropositivity rates across all age strata combined six months after the first vaccination with FSME-IMMUN® 0.25 mL Junior were 95.1% as determined by Immunozym ELISA, 93.2% as determined by Enzygnost ELISA and 95.3% as determined by NT; compared with 62.6%, 80.5% and 91.0% respectively after vaccination with Encepur® Children. A third vaccination with FSME-IMMUN(®) Junior induced 100% seropositivity in both study groups and was well tolerated as demonstrated by the low rates of systemic and injection site reactions. Subjects who received either FSME-IMMUN Junior® or Encepur(®) Children vaccine for the first two vaccinations and FSME-IMMUN Junior® for the third showed a comparably strong immune response regardless of the previous TBE vaccine administered, demonstrating that two vaccinations with Encepur® Children can successfully be followed by a third vaccination with FSME-IMMUN Junior®.

  7. Refractive Errors in State Junior High School Students in Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabila Tasyakur Nikmah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uncorrected refractive error is one of the avoidable causes of vision impairment in children and adults. Vision problem in children has been shown to affect their psychological and academic performance. This study aims at identifying and gaining more insights on the characteristic of the refractive errors in state junior high school students in Bandung to avoid uncorrected refractive errors. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in September–November 2015 in state junior high schools in Bandung, West Java, Indonesia. Sample was selected using multistage random sampling technique. Children were examined using tumbling E examination; then students with visual acuity worse than 6/12 underwent Snellen Chart test, refractometry without pupil dilatation, correction with trial lens, then was followed by direct ophthalmoscopy. Results: From a total of 435 children who completed all the examination, 80 children (18.39% had refractive errors; consisted of 151 eyes (94.38% with myopia and 9 eyes (5.62% with astigmatism. Refractive errors were found to be more common in female children (73.7% than male children (26.3%. Among those with refractive errors, 45 children (56.3% did not use any corrective glasses before the examination. Conclusions: Routine refractive error test in vision screening examination is needed for students. It is equally important to raise more awareness toward eye disease in community.

  8. Growth and maturity status of elite British junior tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myburgh, Gillian K; Cumming, Sean P; Coelho E Silva, Manuel; Cooke, Karl; Malina, Robert M

    2016-10-01

    Growth and maturation impact the selection, development and progression of youth athletes. Individual differences in the growth and maturity may afford a performance advantage, clouding coaches and practitioners' perceptions regarding current ability and future potential. This may result in the exclusion of talented, yet less physically gifted athletes. Participants were 91 male (n = 47) and female (n = 44) elite British Junior tennis players, 8-17 years of age (12.5 ± 1.9 years). Height and body mass were measured and compared to growth charts; hand-wrist radiographs were taken. Skeletal age (SA) was estimated with the Fels method and contrasted to chronological age (CA). Mean height and body mass of individual players ranged between the 50th and 90th centiles for age and sex. Females were advanced in SA relative to CA (0.3-0.89 years.) from 8 years. Males were average to delayed in maturation from 8 to 12 years, but advanced in SA from 14 to 16 years (0.75-1.23 years). Individual differences in growth and maturation appear to contribute towards the selection of elite junior tennis players, with a bias towards males and females who are advanced in maturation and comparatively tall and heavy for their age. This has important implications for talent identification and development.

  9. Competition Efficiency Analysis of Croatian Junior Wrestlers in European Championship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristijan Slacanac

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Croatian junior wrestler won a bronze medal at the European Championship 2016 year. Considering the potential of our wrestlers there is an obvious need of technical and tactical analysis so our juniors and seniors U23 wrestlers would be able to achieve even better results. Match analysis were conducted by LongoMatch 0.20.1. Seven matches of Croatian wrestlers were analysed. Time parameters, score efficiency, technical efficiency and tactical structure were observed and analysed from the aspect of attack and defence phase and successful/unsuccessful techniques. This paper shows descriptive parameters and competitor efficiency were calculated. The results show a great number of positive score in a standing position in relation to parterre position. The parameters of competitive efficiency (0.49 points per minute show better attacking efficiency (1.32 points per minute in relation to defence efficiency (0.83 points per minute. Croatian wrestlers achieve less score per minute in relation with elite wrestlers, but it is visible a significant progress in technical and tactical efficiency in relation in the past three year. According to place realization of technique, Croatian wrestlers realized more technique in the center, while opponents realized technique in the zone and moving to the zone. Further analysis of efficiency and individualisation training will improve efficiency of Croatian national wrestlers.

  10. Physiological profile of senior and junior England international amateur boxers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marcus S

    2006-01-01

    Despite worldwide popularity of amateur boxing, research focussed on the physiological demands of the sport is limited. The physiological profile of Senior and Junior England international amateur boxers is presented. A gradual (8 to 21-days) and rapid (0 to 7-days) phase of body weight reduction was evident with 2.2 ± 0.3 % of the 7.0 ± 0. 8 % weight loss occurring over the final 24-hours. An increase in body weight >4% was observed following a recovery period. High urine osmolality values (> 1000 mOsm·kg(-1)) were recorded during training and competition. High post-competition blood lactate values (>13.5 mmol·l(-1)) highlighted the need for a well-developed anaerobic capacity and the importance of not entering the ring in a glycogen depleted state. The aerobic challenge of competition was demonstrated by maximum heart rate values being recorded during 'Open' sparring. Mean body fat values of 9-10% were similar to those reported for other weight classified athletes. Normal resting values were reported for hematocrit (Senior 48 ± 2 % and Junior 45 ± 2 %), haemoglobin (Senior 14.7 ± 1.0 g·dl(-1) and Junior 14.5 ± 0.8 g·dl(-1)), bilirubin (Senior 15.3 ± 6.2 µmol·l-1(-1)) and ferritin (Senior 63.3 ± 45.7 ng·ml(-1)). No symptoms associated with asthma or exercise-induced asthma was evident. A well- developed aerobic capacity was reflected in the Senior VO2max value of 63.8 ± 4.8 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1). Senior lead hand straight punching force (head 1722 ± 700 N and body 1682 ± 636 N) was lower than the straight rear hand (head 2643 ± 1273 N and body 2646 ± 1083 N), lead hook (head 2412 ± 813 N and body 2414 ± 718 N) and rear hook (head 2588 ± 1040 N and body 2555 ± 926 N). It was concluded that amateur boxing performance is dependent on the interplay between anaerobic and aerobic energy systems. Current weight making methods may lead to impaired substrate availability, leading to reduced competitive performance and an increased risk to a boxers

  11. Enhancing Junior Faculty Research Productivity through Multiinstitution Collaboration: Participants' Impressions of the School Psychology Research Collaboration Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, S. Craig; Wheeler, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    In addition to teaching and service responsibilities, junior faculty members are required to be productive researchers. Despite the demand on junior faculty to produce published research, studies suggest that they often do not receive adequate assistance with their research endeavors. Mentoring is an effective form of support for junior faculty…

  12. Risk of severe knee and hip osteoarthritis in relation to level of physical exercise: a prospective cohort study of long-distance skiers in Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Michaëlsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To complete long-distance ski races, regular physical exercise is required. This includes not only cross-country skiing but also endurance exercise during the snow-free seasons. The aim of this study was to determine whether the level of physical exercise is associated with future risk of severe osteoarthritis independent of previous diseases and injuries. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a cohort that consisted of 48 574 men and 5 409 women who participated in the 90 km ski race Vasaloppet at least once between 1989 and 1998. Number of performed races and finishing time were used as estimates of exercise level. By matching to the National Patient Register we identified participants with severe osteoarthritis, defined as arthroplasty of knee or hip due to osteoarthritis. With an average follow-up of 10 years, we identified 528 men and 42 women with incident osteoarthritis. The crude rate was 1.1/1000 person-years for men and 0.8/1000 person-years for women. Compared with racing once, participation in ≥ 5 races was associated with a 70% higher rate of osteoarthritis (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (HR 1.72, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.33 to 2.22. The association was dose-dependent with an adjusted HR of 1.09, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.13 for each completed race. A faster finishing time, in comparison with a slow finishing time, was also associated with an increased rate (adjusted HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.14 to 2.01. Contrasting those with 5 or more ski races and a fast finish time to those who only participated once with a slow finish time, the adjusted HR of osteoarthritis was 2.73, 95% CI 1.78 to 4.18. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Participants with multiple and fast races have an increased risk of subsequent arthroplasty of knee and hip due to osteoarthritis, suggesting that intensive exercise may increase the risk.

  13. PHYSIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF SENIOR AND JUNIOR ENGLAND INTERNATIONAL AMATEUR BOXERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus S. Smith

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite worldwide popularity of amateur boxing, research focussed on the physiological demands of the sport is limited. The physiological profile of Senior and Junior England international amateur boxers is presented. A gradual (8 to 21-days and rapid (0 to 7-days phase of body weight reduction was evident with 2.2 ± 0.3 % of the 7.0 ± 0. 8 % weight loss occurring over the final 24-hours. An increase in body weight >4% was observed following a recovery period. High urine osmolality values (> 1000 mOsm·kg-1 were recorded during training and competition. High post-competition blood lactate values (>13.5 mmol·l-1 highlighted the need for a well-developed anaerobic capacity and the importance of not entering the ring in a glycogen depleted state. The aerobic challenge of competition was demonstrated by maximum heart rate values being recorded during 'Open' sparring. Mean body fat values of 9-10% were similar to those reported for other weight classified athletes. Normal resting values were reported for hematocrit (Senior 48 ± 2 % and Junior 45 ± 2 %, haemoglobin (Senior 14.7 ± 1.0 g·dl-1 and Junior 14.5 ± 0.8 g·dl-1, bilirubin (Senior 15.3 ± 6.2 µmol·l-1-1 and ferritin (Senior 63.3 ± 45.7 ng·ml-1. No symptoms associated with asthma or exercise-induced asthma was evident. A well- developed aerobic capacity was reflected in the Senior VO2max value of 63.8 ± 4.8 ml·kg-1·min-1. Senior lead hand straight punching force (head 1722 ± 700 N and body 1682 ± 636 N was lower than the straight rear hand (head 2643 ± 1273 N and body 2646 ± 1083 N, lead hook (head 2412 ± 813 N and body 2414 ± 718 N and rear hook (head 2588 ± 1040 N and body 2555 ± 926 N. It was concluded that amateur boxing performance is dependent on the interplay between anaerobic and aerobic energy systems. Current weight making methods may lead to impaired substrate availability, leading to reduced competitive performance and an increased risk to a boxers health

  14. Using Project Portfolio Management in a Junior Enterprise Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RIBEIRO, D. M.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Junior Enterprises have their own particularities in managing of their projects. Scarcity of resources and lack of experience of its members are critics and typical factors in the daily life of these companies. However, these and other variables such as the time for return on investment, project complexity and runtime of the project, must be taken into consideration in the prioritization of the outstanding portfolio projects to maximize desired outcomes. The Portfolio Management aims to provide the company a better allocation of resources in an environment with multiple projects going simultaneously. The model proposed here seeks a link between projects and organizational strategy. In this Paper also are presented the results of applying the model on Upe consultoria JR.

  15. SWIMMING CLASSES IN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ OPINION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Bielec

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of modern physical education is not only to develop motor abilities of the students, but most of all prevent them from epidemic youth diseases such as obesity or postural defects. Positive attitudes to swimming as a long-life physical activity, instilled in adolescence should be beneficial in adult life. The group of 130 boys and 116 girls of 7th grade junior high school (mean age 14.6 was asked in the survey to present their opinion of obligatory swimming lessons at school. Students of both sexes claimed that they liked swimming classes because they could improve their swimming skills (59% of answers and because of health-related character of water exercises (38%. 33% of students regarded swimming lessons as boring and monotonous, and 25% of them complained about poor pool conditions like chlorine smell, crowded lanes, too low temperature. Majority of the surveyed students saw practical role of swimming in saving others life.

  16. Factors Affecting Junior High School Students' Interest in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumper, Ricardo

    2006-03-01

    We report the results of a study on students' interest in physics at the end of their compulsory schooling in Israel carried out in the framework of the ROSE Project. Factors studied were their opinions about science classes, their out-of-school experiences in physics, and their attitudes toward science and technology. Students' overall interest in physics was "neutral" (neither positive nor negative), with boys showing a higher interest than girls. We found a strong correlation between students' "neutral" interest in physics and their negative opinions about science classes. These findings raise serious questions about the implementation of changes made in the Israeli science curriculum in primary and junior high school, especially if the goal is to prepare the young generation for life in a scientific-technological era. A more in-depth analysis of the results led us to formulate curricular, behavioral, and organizational changes needed to reach this goal.

  17. BASES DO COMPROMETIMENTO ORGANIZACIONAL: UM ESTUDO COMPARATIVO EM EMPRESAS JUNIORES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José da Silva Feitosa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Nos últimos anos intensificaram-se os estudos referentes às bases do comprometimento organizacional, contempladas no modelo Meyer e Allen. Nessa perfectiva, o presente estudo objetiva verificar as bases afetiva, normativa e instrumental em duas empresas de consultoria. Para tanto, foi realizada uma pesquisa descritiva, de abordagem quantitativa. Os resultados apontam que a base afetiva se destacou em ambas as empresas, tanto em uma análise por gênero, quanto em uma perspectiva geral. Esse resultado pode estar relacionado à possibilidade de que os estudantes que ingressam em empresas juniores se entusiasmem com a oportunidade de aplicar seus conhecimentos e se comprometam de forma afetiva com a organização. No entanto, para testar essa relação sugere-se a realização de novos estudos.

  18. Biological maturity influences running performance in junior Australian football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastin, Paul B; Bennett, Gary; Cook, Jill

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of biological maturity on measures of running fitness and running performance in both training and competition in junior Australian football. Cross sectional observational. Fifty-two male junior players from five age groups (U11-U19) participated. Biological maturity was self-assessed based on Tanner's description of five pubertal stages (P1-P5) as well as objectively estimated from anthropometric measures and expressed as years to and from peak height velocity (Y-PHV). Running speed and aerobic fitness were measured using a 20m sprint and 20m multi-stage shuttle run respectively. Running movements during training and competition were analysed (n=197) using global positioning system technology, including total distance, peak speed, high-intensity running (HIR>14.4km/h) distance and number of sprints (>23km/h). Age groups included participants from a range of pubertal stages (U11: P1-2; U13: P2-4; U15: P2-5; U17: P4-5; U19: P5). Y-PHV was significantly correlated with 20m shuttle run (r=0.647), 20m sprint time (r=-0.773) and all distance and high intensity running variables (r=0.417-0.831). Incremental improvements across pubertal stages for speed, aerobic fitness and most GPS derived running variables were observed. Within age group comparisons between less and more mature players found significant differences for standing and sitting height, peak speed in training, and total distance, HIR and peak speed in matches. Functional running fitness and running performance in both training and competition environments improved with increasing biological maturity. More mature players in an age group, either chronologically, biologically or a combination of both, are at a performance advantage to those less mature. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Epidemiological Survey on Periodontal Disease in Junior High School Students in Niigata Prefecture Using the CPITN

    OpenAIRE

    原沢, 正昭; 矢野, 正敏; 小林, 清吾; 平川, 敬; 安藤, 雄一; 堀井, 欣一; 岸, 洋志; 高塚, 真理子; 原, 耕二; Harasawa, Masaaki; Yano, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Seigo; Hirakawa, Takashi; Ando, Yuichi; Horii, Kin-ichi

    1992-01-01

    A survey on the prevalence of periodontal disease was carried out on 360 8th grade students in three Junior High Schools in Niigata Prefecture, Shiozawa Junior High, Yahiko Junio High and Kurokawa Junior High. According to the partial recording of the CPITN, 6 index teeth (16, 11, ,26, 36, 31and 46 defined by FDI terminology) were examined at the time of the annual school-based dental examination. The results of this study showed that the percentages of the subjects having no sign of periodon...

  20. Physical structure of winter sports athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orvanová, E

    1987-01-01

    A review of the results concerning the body size, growth, maturation, shape, composition, and strength of ice hockey players, cross-country skiers, alpine skiers, ski jumpers and Nordic combined skiers is presented. The comparisons of the results in body height, weight, somatotypes, percent fat, LBM and hand grip from various authors are made. Also the differences between ice hockey players and skiers of all disciplines are shown. The review covers all the available results. It may be concluded that the elite athletes in each studied sport form a highly select group which has, from the biomechanical point of view, the best physical structure for their sport discipline.

  1. A Further Look at Manifest Anxiety of Urban Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benjamin F.

    1970-01-01

    Junior high school students, particularly Negroes, experience an excessive amount of inner conflict because they are lacking in social skills and confidence. These feelings of insecurity stem mainly from an awareness of social ostracism. (CK)

  2. Biomechanical analysis of the snatch technique in junior elite female weightlifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Sezgin; Harbili, Erbil

    2016-01-01

    The strength and technical competence of junior female lifters play a decisive role not only for their current but also adulthood performance. The objective of this study was to investigate the three-dimensional kinematics of the snatch technique in junior female weightlifters. Ten elite junior female weightlifters participated in the study. Two cameras operating at 50 fields per second were used to record the lifts. The heaviest successful lifts were selected for the kinematic analysis. The kinematical data were obtained using a motion analysis system. The duration of the first pull was significantly longer than that of the other phases (P snatch lifting of junior female weightlifters, the angular kinematics of lower limb joints, the linear kinematics and trajectory of the barbell and other energy characteristics are similar to and consistent with the values reported in literature for adult female weightlifters.

  3. Application of Interactive Approach to the Teaching of English Reading in Rural Junior High School

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玲

    2016-01-01

    This study shows that the application of interactive approach and the training of interactive reading strategy in rural junior high schools can help the students to improve their reading competence and it is worth to explore further such an approach.

  4. Acculturation, adaptation and multiculturalism among immigrant adolescents in junior vocational education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geel, Mitch van

    2009-01-01

    This thesis deals with the adaptation and acculturation of immigrant adolescents in junior vocational education. The adaptation of immigrant adolescents fits the notion of an 'immigrant paradox'. Maintaining aspects of the ethnic culture was found positively related to immigrant adolescents'

  5. Reducing Absences and Tardiness in a Junior Secondary Special Education Classroom: The SCOPE Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, N. E.; McLaughlin, T. F.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of a reinforcement program on the rate of attendance and tardiness was examined in an ABAC design across four male special education junior high students enrolled in a class for behavior and attendance problems. (Author)

  6. On Strategies of Improving Junior High School Students' Oral English Ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗茜

    2015-01-01

    With the increasingly frequent international exchanges,English,as an international language,has been attached greater importance.The oral English ability of junior high school students plays an indispensable role in their everyday study and social interaction,and it is the present junior school study that can lay a solid foundation for their future study and life. Therefore,to comprehensively improve their oral English ability is in urgent need and of paramount significance.This paper focuses on analyzing the external and internal factors influencing the cultivation of junior high school students' oral English ability,and put forwards the corresponding cultivating strategies of the oral English ability of junior high school students.

  7. On Strategies of Improving Junior High School Students’ Oral English Ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗茜

    2015-01-01

    With the increasingly frequent international exchanges,English,as an international language,has been attached greater importance.The oral English ability of junior high school students plays an indispensable role in their everyday study and social interaction,and it is the present junior school study that can lay a solid foundation for their future study and life.Therefore,to comprehensively improve their oral English ability is in urgent need and of paramount significance.This paper focuses on analyzing the external and internal factors influencing the cultivation of junior high school students’oral English ability,and put forwards the corresponding cultivating strategies of the oral English ability of junior high school students.

  8. An Evaluation of the English Achievement Test for Junior High School Graduation 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶译

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates the Achievement Test for Junior High School Graduation in reliability, validity and practicality, which is aimed to help junior English teachers to understand how to identify a useful test and develop their test writing skills as well as improve their teaching. The result suggests that the Achievement Test is a reasonably reliable and valid test though some of the listening items need to be improved. It is the ideal frame of evaluating language learning through language testing.

  9. An Analysis of Background Factors of School Non-Attendance in Junior High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    神田,信彦; 大木, 桃代

    2001-01-01

    This study explored the background effect of school non-attendance in junior high school students. Two hundred ninety-eight junior high school students completed a questionaire. It was consist of perceived control scale for children and items about their feelings for parents, classmates, teachers, classes, and so on. The results were as follows:(1)Desire for school non-attendance was controlled with High perceived control, perceived affective support from families and friends, and a feeling o...

  10. The short-form of the revised junior Eysenck personality questionnaire: A Bengali edition

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background: Personality measuring instrument plays an important role in many fields of human civilization and therefore, present study was aimed to find such an instrument for Bengali speaking juniors. Materials and Methods: Bengali translation of the short-form of the revised junior Eysenck personality questionnaire developed by Corulla was administered on a sample of 226 Bengali speaking students (99 boys and 127 girls) studying in class seven and eight taken from two urban and two rural sc...

  11. Reference Values and Gender Differences of the Functional Parameters in Romanian Elite Junior Tennis Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian NAGEL

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To establish the reference values and gender differences regarding fitness, strength, and time reaction of the Romanian elite junior tennis players. Material and Methods: Thirty four junior tennis players (19 male, 15 female with a mean age of 15 years were selected from the database of the Cardiopulmonary Effort Testing and Physical Performance Laboratory from Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, West University of Timisoara. To be included in the study, a tennis player had to belong to the Romanian Tennis Federation as a junior, be among the 50 best players in his/her category, and have no pathology at the evaluation moment. All subjects underwent functional evaluation by performing a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test, the counter movement jump test and complex opto-acoustic reaction test. Results: The functional performance are significantly different for males and females in all parameters studied, with male tennis players showing better performance than female tennis players. Conclusions: The mean values of functional parameters of the Romanian elite junior tennis players are lower than international competitive tennis athletes. There are significant gender differences in junior tennis players. We hope that the present study results provide useful reference values for coaches and physical trainers in order to improve functional performance of their junior tennis players.

  12. [An investigation of occupational stress, social support, and happiness of junior civil servants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingfeng

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the current status of occupational stress, social support, and happiness in junior civil servants in northern Zhejiang Province, China, and to investigate the relationship between occupational stress, social support and happiness. A total of 360 junior civil servants from below-county-level administrative organizations in Huzhou, Jiaxing, and Hangzhou were surveyed using the job stress questionnaire and social support rating scale for civil servants. The total average score of occupational stress in junior civil servants was 2.52 ± 0.48, indicating a moderate level of occupational stress; career prospects topped the rank list of sources of occupational stress with a score of 2.90 ± 0.60; different generations showed significant differences in the sources and total average scores of occupational stress, with the scores of the 1980s, 1990s, 1970s, 1950s, and 1960s groups decreasing in the same order (Phappiness among the junior civil servants were relatively low, with scores of 38.43 ± 8.38 and 76.88 ± 12.77, respectively; different generations also showed significant differences, with the scores of 1980s, 1990s, 1970s, 1950s, and 1960s groups increasing in the same order (Phappiness than males (Phappiness of junior civil servants (r=0.405~0.571, Phappiness of junior civil servants.

  13. Indicators of Psychical Stability Among Junior and Youth Track and Field National Team Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romualdas K. Malinauskas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with questions of psychical stability among junior and youth track and field national team candidates. Two methods were used to carry out the survey: The Competitive State Anxiety Inventory developed by Martens et al. and Athletes Psychical Stability Questionnaire developed by Milman. The random sample size consists of 81 junior and youth track and field national team candidates. Participants comprised 39 youth teams and 42 junior national team candidates. It was determined that, in comparison with the junior track and field national team candidates, anxiety of youth track and field national team candidates is lower (p<0.05. The psychical stability of youth track and field national team candidates, were found to be significantly higher than those of junior track and field national team candidates because it was found that youth track and field national team candidates scored higher (p <.05 than junior track and field national team candidates in following components of psychical stability: in precompetitive emotional stability and in self-regulation.

  14. Computer games to teach hygiene: an evaluation of the e-Bug junior game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, David; Kostkova, Patty; Weinberg, Julius; Lazareck, Lisa; Weerasinghe, Dasun; Lecky, Donna M; McNulty, Cliodna A M

    2011-06-01

    Handwashing, respiratory hygiene and antibiotic resistance remain major public health concerns. In order to facilitate an effective outcome when teaching the basic principles of hand and respiratory hygiene, educational interventions should first target school children. As computer games are ubiquitous in most children's lives, e-Bug developed computer games targeted at teaching children handwashing, respiratory hygiene and antibiotic resistance. The games were designed for two target audiences: junior school children (9-12 year olds); and senior school children (13-15 year olds). Between May and August 2009, the finalized junior game underwent an evaluation in three UK schools (in Glasgow, Gloucester and London), involving 62 children in the schools and ∼ 1700 players accessing the junior game online. The e-Bug junior game consists of a number of levels of play, each of which promotes a set of learning outcomes (LOs). These LOs, complementary to those in the e-Bug packs, are expressed through the game mechanics (the rules of the game) rather than through story or dialogue. Although the junior game's evaluation demonstrated a statistically significant change in the knowledge for only a small number of given LOs, because many children had the required knowledge already before playing the game, this is e-Bug's first statistical study on the junior game and the first comprehensive evaluation of its kind. Future work includes a re-examination of the quiz-style questionnaires utilized in this study and an exploration of the potential knowledge change acquired strictly through engagement.

  15. Artictis and creative development of junior schoolchildren during the labor education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Леся Василівна Старовойт

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with a topical problem of artistic and creative development of junior schoolchildren during labor process. There were considered the diverse aspects of problem of personal creative activity. The special attention was paid to importance of combining labor, creation and artistic activity in educational process. On the base of experimental research there was considered the modern state of artistic and creative development of pupils in elementary school. By analysis of the theory and practice of artistic and creative development of junior schoolchildren during labor education there was determined inexpediency of excessive reproductive approach to the labor activity of children that impedes emotional, spiritual and esthetic development transforming the work of children into the boring and ineffective one. There was determined the criteria of artistic and creative development of junior schoolchildren during the labor education. During the study there were defined principles that reveal content, essence and nature of creation. There were defined peculiarities of artistic and creative development of junior schoolchildren at the lessons of labor education and distinguished the main sings that characterize mechanism of creative activity of junior schoolchildren. There was grounded pedagogical expediency of artistic and creative approach to the work with junior schoolchildren

  16. Game and Training Load Differences in Elite Junior Australian Football

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brendan; Cook, Jill; Kidgell, Dawson J.; Gastin, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    Game demands and training practices within team sports such as Australian football (AF) have changed considerably over recent decades, including the requirement of coaching staff to effectively control, manipulate and monitor training and competition loads. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the differences in external and internal physical load measures between game and training in elite junior AF. Twenty five male, adolescent players (mean ±SD: age 17.6 ± 0.5 y) recruited from three elite under 18 AF clubs participated. Global positioning system (GPS), heart rate (HR) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) data were obtained from 32 game files during four games, and 84 training files during 19 training sessions. Matched-pairs statistics along with Cohen’s d effect size and percent difference were used to compare game and training events. Players were exposed to a higher physical load in the game environment, for both external (GPS) and internal (HR, Session-RPE) load parameters, compared to in-season training. Session time (d = 1.23; percent difference = 31.4% (95% confidence intervals = 17.4 – 45.4)), total distance (3.5; 63.5% (17.4 – 45.4)), distance per minute (1.93; 33.0% (25.8 – 40.1)), high speed distance (2.24; 77.3% (60.3 – 94.2)), number of sprints (0.94; 43.6% (18.9 – 68.6)), mean HR (1.83; 14.3% (10.5 – 18.1)), minutes spent above 80% of predicted HRmax (2.65; 103.7% (89.9 – 117.6)) and Session-RPE (1.22; 48.1% (22.1 – 74.1)) were all higher in competition compared to training. While training should not be expected to fully replicate competition, the observed differences suggest that monitoring of physical load in both environments is warranted to allow comparisons and evaluate whether training objectives are being met. Key points Physical loads, including intensity, are typically lower in training compared to competition in junior elite Australian football. Monitoring of player loads in team sports should include both

  17. Is there a risk profile for the vulnerable junior doctor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, D; Buttrey, S; Carberry, C; Lydon, S; O'Connor, P

    2016-08-01

    Mental ill health is prevalent among doctors, especially those in the early stages of postgraduate training. However, a paucity of research has examined factors predictive of psychological distress in this population. To report the findings from a multi-centre survey of mental health among junior doctors in Ireland, and assess the extent to which moderator variables (e.g., age, academic performance, nationality, etc.) alter the levels of psychological distress caused by internship. An online, anonymous, questionnaire was distributed to all interns in the Republic of Ireland in January 2012. A total of 270 interns responded to the survey (45.0 % response rate), with 48.5 % of the respondents having a score indicative of psychological distress. A regression model found that nationality, academic performance, intern training network, rating of work stressors, home stressors, and work-life balance were associated with differing levels of mental health as measured by the General Health Questionnaire-12. There is a need to consider moderator variables when examining mental health in healthcare populations to avoid drawing overly simplistic conclusions. Interns in Ireland reported particularly high levels of psychological distress compared to other studies of mental health among healthcare populations.

  18. Psychological predictors of sport injuries among junior soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, U; Ivarsson, A

    2011-02-01

    Previous researches have established models that specify psychological factors that could predict sport injuries. One example is Williams and Andersen's stress-injury model stressing factors such as anxiety, negative life stress and few coping resources. The purpose of the current study was to find psychological factors that could lead to an increased injury risk among junior soccer players, in addition to construct an empirical model of injury risk factors for soccer players. The participants were 108 male and female soccer players (m=17, 6) studying at soccer high schools in southwest Sweden. Five questionnaires were used, State Trait Anxiety Inventory, Sport Anxiety Scale, Life Events Survey for Collegiate Athletes, Athletic Coping Skills Inventory-28 and Swedish universities Scales of Personality. Injury record was collected by athletic trainers at the schools during a period of 8 months. The result suggested four significant predictors that together could explain 23% of injury occurrence. The main factors are life event stress, somatic trait anxiety, mistrust and ineffective coping. These findings partly support Williams and Andersen's stress-injury model and are organized into an empirical model. Recommendations are given to sport medicine teams and coaches concerning issues in sport injury prevention.

  19. Teaching Fables in the Junior Grades of Primary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Vidović

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to explore the ways in which fables can help pupils in the junior grades of primary school develop their oral and written skills. It is written from a cognitive perspective within literary studies, focusing on a study of animal characters and morals in fables and researching the cognitive operations that result in hybrid animal characters. It also focuses on the universal character of morals, which can be viewed as an outcome of the process of conceptual integration. Addressing the universal nature of the main characters appearing in fables, as well as the universal issues expressed in their morals, the article looks at several possibilities for follow-up classroom activities. By devising extra activities aimed at developing their pupils‘ language skills, teachers of Croatian and English can motivate pupils to apply the topics in fables to everyday situations, thus encouraging them to develop their language skills as well as their capacity for judgement, character identification and value formation.

  20. A cross-cultural study of stress responses and social support between Chinese and Japanese junior high school students.

    OpenAIRE

    鉄, 拳

    2013-01-01

    This comparative research’s objective is to demonstrate the relation between stress responses and social support in Japanese and Chinese junior high school students. The subjects were 602 Japanese students and 611 Chinese students. As a result, by comparison of the stress reaction, Japan was intentionally high and it was shown by comparison of social support that Chinese one is intentionally high. Lower than the score became a junior high school students of Japanese junior high school student...

  1. Vocabulary Learning Under New Curriculum ---Grade Nine student in a Junior high school%Vocabulary Learning Under New Curriculum ---Grade Nine student in a Junior high school

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨灿

    2011-01-01

    1. Introduction This thesis focuses on the real situation of vocabulary learning in a junior high school, located in countryside. First, this thesis will review some research conclusions on vocabulary learning. Then the author tries to explore the real situation of vocabulary learning in the high school, by analyzing the data collected from the questionnaire done by Grade Nine students.

  2. Evaluation and Report on Consumer and Homemaking Program in Depressed Areas. Utterback Junior High School Program. Wakefield Junior High School Program. June and July, 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noon, Madeline Estella; Hanson, Connie

    The document describes the consumer and home economics summer programs for grade 7 and grade 8 girls in two junior high schools. The programs provided opportunities to learn basic sewing and cooking skills, as well as personal improvement such as grooming, hygiene, posture, and modeling. A number of field trips to supplement the class instruction…

  3. Junior and Community College Research, Texas, 1977-78. The Seventh Annual Report to the Texas Association of Junior and Community College Instructional Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, R. Eugene, Ed.

    The first of three studies presented in this report investigated the role of the academic dean/dean of instruction as related to the effectiveness of educational leadership in junior colleges. Using the Educational Administrative Style Diagnosis Test and the Educational Administrative Appropriateness Test, 60 deans, representing 47 Texas community…

  4. THE CARE AND FEEDING OF THE COMMUNITY JUNIOR COLLEGE, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL JUNIOR COLLEGE ADMINISTRATIVE TEAMS INSTITUTE (7TH, DAYTONA BEACH, AUGUST 13-15, 1967).

    Science.gov (United States)

    WIEGMAN, ROBERT R.

    THIS CONFERENCE WAS ORGANIZED AROUND A 2-PART THEME, CONSISTING OF (1) THE JUNIOR COLLEGE'S COMMUNITY AND PUBLIC RELATIONS AND (2) SUPPORT FOR INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT, WITH EMPHASIS ON PRIVATE SOURCES OF FUNDS. SPECIFIC TOPICS INCLUDED PUBLICITY, THE IMAGE OF THE COLLEGE IN PRINT, COMMUNITY RELATIONS, THE MACHINERY FOR DEVELOPMENT, GIFTS, AND…

  5. Traditional versus internet bullying in junior high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofin, Rosa; Avitzour, Malka

    2012-11-01

    To examine the prevalence of traditional and Internet bullying and the personal, family, and school environment characteristics of perpetrators and victims. Students (12-14 years old) in 35 junior high schools were randomly selected from the Jerusalem Hebrew (secular and religious) and Arab educational system (n = 2,610). Students answered an anonymous questionnaire, addressing personal, family, and school characteristics. Traditional bullying and Internet bullying for perpetrators and victims were categorized as either occurring at least sometimes during the school year or not occurring. Twenty-eight percent and 8.9 % of students were perpetrators of traditional and Internet bullying, respectively. The respective proportions of victims were 44.9 and 14.4 %. Traditional bullies presented higher Odds Ratios (ORs) for boys, for students with poor social skills (those who had difficulty in making friends, were influenced by peers in their behavior, or were bored), and for those who had poor communication with their parents. Boys and girls were equally likely to be Internet bullies and to use the Internet for communication and making friends. The OR for Internet bullying victims to be Internet bullying perpetrators was 3.70 (95 % confidence interval 2.47-5.55). Victims of traditional bullying felt helpless, and victims of traditional and Internet bullying find school to be a frightening place. There was a higher OR of Internet victimization with reports of loneliness. Traditional bully perpetrators present distinctive characteristics, while Internet perpetrators do not. Victims of traditional and Internet bullying feel fear in school. Tailored interventions are needed to address both types of bullying.

  6. Harmonization of European neurology education: the junior doctor's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macerollo, Antonella; Struhal, Walter; Sellner, Johann

    2013-10-29

    The objective of this article, written by executives of the European Association of Young Neurologists and Trainees (EAYNT), is to illustrate the status quo of neurology training in Europe and give an outlook on ongoing efforts and prospects for junior neurologists. The European Union is an economic and political union that currently encompasses 27 member states with more than 500 million inhabitants (or 7.3% of the world population) (interested readers are referred to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Union). Countries of the European Union act as a single market with free movement of citizens, goods, services, and finances. As a consequence, a diploma and postgraduate training obtained in one EU country will be automatically recognized by all other EU member states. At the Lisbon European Council in March 2000, the Heads of State or Government signed a treaty that expresses their ambition of making Europe "the most competitive and dynamic knowledge-based economy in the world, capable of sustainable economic growth with more and better jobs and greater social cohesion" (www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisbon_Strategy). More than 1.6 million physicians in all the different medical specialties are represented by the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS). The UEMS was founded in 1958 and the objectives include the study, promotion, and harmonization of the highest level of training of medical specialists, medical practice, and health care within the European Union. The European Board of Neurology (UEMS-EBN; www.uems-neuroboard.org) is in charge of the implementation of the UEMS policy regarding neurology.

  7. Physiological profile of elite Iranian junior freestyle wrestlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Bahman; Curby, David G; Rahmani-Nia, Farhad; Moghadasi, Mehrzad

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to describe the physiological profile of elite Iranian junior freestyle wrestlers. Seventy elite wrestlers (age 19.8 +/- 0.9 years) who were invited to the national training camps, based on their top 10 national ranking, participated in this study. The physiological profile included body weight, flexibility (sit and reach test), maximal oxygen consumption (Bruce protocol), maximal anaerobic power of the legs (Wingate test), muscular endurance and strength (bench press, squat, pull-ups, push-ups, grip strength, and bent-knee sit-up test), speed (40-m sprint), agility (4 x 9-m shuttle run), and body composition (7-site skinfold). The major results (mean +/- SD) are as follows: body weight (kg): 77.5 +/- 19.8; flexibility (cm): 38.2 +/- 3.94; maximal oxygen consumption (ml kg(-1) min(-1)): 50.5 +/- 4.7; maximal anaerobic power of the legs (W): 455.5 +/- 87.6; 1-repetition maximum bench press (weight lifted kg body weight(-1)): 1.4 +/- 0.15; 1-repetition maximum squat (weight lifted kg body weight): 1.7 +/- 0.2; push-ups (n): 66.9 +/- 7.6; pull-ups (n): 31.6 +/- 9.7; grip strength (force in kg body weight kg(-1)) 1.02 +/- 0.11; bent-knee sit-ups (n): 66.5 +/- 8; speed (s): 5.07 +/- 0.17; agility (s): 8.7 +/- 0.25; and body fat (%): 10.6 +/- 3.8. The present study provides baseline physiological data that have been used in the prescription of individual training programs for these athletes. This information is also available to the coaches and can contribute to the general strategy employed by a wrestler and for a specific match.

  8. Physiological characteristics of well-trained junior sprint kayak athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Thiago Oliveira; Dascombe, Ben; Bullock, Nicola; Coutts, Aaron J

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to profile the physiological characteristics of junior sprint kayak athletes (n=21, VO2max 4.1±0.7 L/min, training experience 2.7±1.2 y) and to establish the relationship between physiological variables (VO2max, VO2 kinetics, muscle-oxygen kinetics, paddling efficiency) and sprint kayak performance. VO2max, power at VO2max, power:weight ratio, paddling efficiency, VO2 at lactate threshold, and whole-body and muscle oxygen kinetics were determined on a kayak ergometer in the laboratory. Separately, on-water time trials (TT) were completed over 200 m and 1000 m. Large to nearly perfect (-.5 to -.9) inverse relationships were found between the physiological variables and on-water TT performance across both distances. Paddling efficiency and lactate threshold shared moderate to very large correlations (-.4 to -.7) with 200- and 1000-m performance. In addition, trivial to large correlations (-.11 to -.5) were observed between muscle-oxygenation parameters, muscle and whole-body oxygen kinetics, and performance. Multiple regression showed that 88% of the unadjusted variance for the 200-m TT performance was explained by VO2max, peripheral muscle deoxygenation, and maximal aerobic power (Pkayak athletes possess a high level of relative aerobic fitness and highlight the importance of the peripheral muscle metabolism for sprint kayak performance, particularly in 200-m races, where finalists and nonfinalists are separated by very small margins. Such data highlight the relative aerobic-fitness variables that can be used as benchmarks for talent-identification programs or monitoring longitudinal athlete development. However, such approaches need further investigation.

  9. Symptomatic vergence disorders in junior high school children in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Darko-Takyi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Optometrists in Ghana are hampered in performing comprehensive binocular vision assessments, because of the lack of appropriate instruments leading to a paucity of data on vergence disorders and their association with asthenopia among Ghanaian school children.Aim: To establish the prevalence of symptomatic vergence disorders among junior high school (JHS children in Cape Coast Metropolis, Ghana, in their habitual (vision states and investigate if there were any associations between these disorders and specific asthenopic symptoms.Methods: A prospective cross-sectional school-based study using a multistage sample of 627 participants aged 12–17 years from JHSs in Cape Coast Metropolis. Participants completed a reliable asthenopic symptoms questionnaire and 220 participants who expressed two or more severe or very severe symptoms were selected for comprehensive binocular vision assessment in their habitual vision state.Results: The prevalence of symptomatic vergence disorders among JHS children in Cape Coast Metropolis was 14.8%. For specific symptomatic vergence disorders, the prevalence was: 1.4% basic esophoria, 1.4% basic exophoria, 8.6% convergence insufficiency, 1.8% convergence excess, 0.8% fusional vergence dysfunctions and 0.8% divergence excess. No participant had symptomatic divergence insufficiency. The study revealed significant associations between some specific symptomatic vergence disorders and specific asthenopic symptoms even though all of these asthenopic symptoms overlapped in other vergence disorders.Conclusion: Presenting complaints of specific asthenopic symptoms does not differentiate between specific types of vergence disorders. A comprehensive binocular vision assessment is vital in the diagnosis and management of these disorders to relieve asthenopia.

  10. Research on Target of Physiology and Biochemistry of Pre-competition Training of University Orientation Cross-country Athletes%高校定向越野运动员赛前训练生理生化指标研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋卫红; 戴江洪; 曹筋; 戴艳鹏; 郑盛; 罗辉

    2011-01-01

    为寻找和探索高校定向越野运动员赛前训练过程中机能评定指标体系,分别对9名参加湖南省定向越野锦标赛的运动员赛前训练过程中生理生化指标进行检测和分析,可发现在定向越野运动训练过程中,血液中红细胞压积、血红蛋白和红细胞计数的值变化不显著;血清中尿素氮变化趋势是先升后降;血氨发生了显著的变化,出现了先升高后降低的变化趋势;最大摄氧量明显升高。%In order to find and explore the index system of functional evaluation in pre-competition training of university orientation athletes,the physiological and biochemical index of nine athletes who attend orientation cross-country tournament of Hunan province is examined and measured in the process of pre-competition training.Results show: in the training process of orientation cross-country sport,the change of HCT、HB and Rbc is not so apparent;the change tendency of BUN in the athletes' serum is significantly different.It rises first and decreases later.Ammonia(BA) have taken place in a significant change,there has been increased after the first change in the trend of lowering;the athletes' maximal oxygen uptake increases dramatically.

  11. Academic Primer Series: Five Key Papers Fostering Educational Scholarship in Junior Academic Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Teresa M; Gottlieb, Michael; Fant, Abra L; Messman, Anne; Robinson, Daniel W; Cooney, Robert R; Papanagnou, Dimitrios; Yarris, Lalena M

    2016-09-01

    Scholarship is an essential part of academic success. Junior faculty members are often unfamiliar with the grounding literature that defines educational scholarship. In this article, the authors aim to summarize five key papers which outline education scholarship in the setting of academic contributions for emerging clinician educators. The authors conducted a consensus-building process to generate a list of key papers that describe the importance and significance of academic scholarship, informed by social media sources. They then used a three-round voting methodology, akin to a Delphi study, to determine the most useful papers. A summary of the five most important papers on the topic of academic scholarship, as determined by this mixed group of junior faculty members and faculty developers, is presented in this paper. These authors subsequently wrote a summary of these five papers and discussed their relevance to both junior faculty members and faculty developers. Five papers on education scholarship, deemed essential by the authors' consensus process, are presented in this paper. These papers may help provide the foundational background to help junior faculty members gain a grasp of the academic scholarly environment. This list may also inform senior faculty and faculty developers on the needs of junior educators in the nascent stages of their careers.

  12. Academic Primer Series: Five Key Papers Fostering Educational Scholarship in Junior Academic Faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa M. Chan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Scholarship is an essential part of academic success. Junior faculty members are often unfamiliar with the grounding literature that defines educational scholarship. In this article, the authors aim to summarize five key papers which outline education scholarship in the setting of academic contributions for emerging clinician educators. Methods: The authors conducted a consensus-building process to generate a list of key papers that describe the importance and significance of academic scholarship, informed by social media sources. They then used a three-round voting methodology, akin to a Delphi study, to determine the most useful papers. Results: A summary of the five most important papers on the topic of academic scholarship, as determined by this mixed group of junior faculty members and faculty developers, is presented in this paper. These authors subsequently wrote a summary of these five papers and discussed their relevance to both junior faculty members and faculty developers. Conclusion: Five papers on education scholarship, deemed essential by the authors’ consensus process, are presented in this paper. These papers may help provide the foundational background to help junior faculty members gain a grasp of the academic scholarly environment. This list may also inform senior faculty and faculty developers on the needs of junior educators in the nascent stages of their careers.

  13. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF TRAINING METHODOLOGY EFFICIENCY ON THE MOTOR SPHERE OF JUNIOR I DANCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigore Virgil

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to highlight the influence of the training methodology on the motor sphere of junior I dancers. This scientific approach has involved the organization of an experimental study in ”Two Step” Club of Bucharest. The research activity was conducted from January 2012 to November 2013, by investigating two groups of athletes, an experimental group and a control group; each group included 12 dancers, aged from 12 to 13, corresponding to sports classification category Junior I. The results of the research show that thanks to the training methodology applied to the Junior I dancers included in the experimental group, these ones improved their strength of abdominal and arms muscles, they had an increase of the spine and coxo-femoral joint mobility and they improved their strength under speed conditions as well.

  14. Stress management with adolescents at the junior high transition: an outcome evaluation of coping skills intervention.

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    Schinke, S P; Schilling, R F; Snow, W H

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports an outcome study of coping skills intervention to help adolescents manage stress associated with the transition from elementary school to junior high. In a randomized design, sixth grade students from four elementary schools were pretested, then two schools each were assigned to an intervention condition and to a control condition. Intervention condition subjects received eight sessions of instruction and practice in coping skills intervention. Following intervention, all subjects were posttested. At posttest and relative to control condition subjects, intervention condition subjects scored more positively on measures of problem solving, assertive direct refusals, adequacy of information about junior high school, ability to handle stress, ability to deal with peer pressure, and general readiness for junior high school.

  15. Features of vertical stability of junior school children with visual impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurchenko A. A.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The importance of vertical stability in the formation of the spatial organization of the body and correct posture for junior school children with visual impairments was determined. In a pilot study involved 23 children with low vision and 60 healthy children, aged 7-10 years old. To obtain the results was used the test of E.Y. Bondarevskogo. The features of orthograde posture of children with low vision and their healthy peers. Distinctive features in terms of retention of vertical posture and goniometric characteristics have been revealed. Found that junior school children with low vision by about 60-65% yield in the reported figures from their healthy peers. The visually impaired junior school children have significantly less ability to retain the static vertical posture than children with normal vision have been proved and verified.

  16. Junior doctor dementia champions in a district general hospital (innovative practice).

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    Wilkinson, Iain; Coates, Anna; Merrick, Sophie; Lee, Chooi

    2016-03-01

    Dementia is a common condition in the UK with around 25% of patients in acute hospitals having dementia. In the UK, there is national guidance on the assessment of cognitive impairment in acute hospitals. This article is a qualitative study of junior doctors' experiences as part of a dementia and delirium team involved in changing the care of patients with dementia in a hospital in the UK. It draws on data from a focus group and follow-up questionnaire in two hospital trusts. We examine what drives doctors to become involved in such projects and the effects of this experience upon them. We suggest a typology for getting junior doctors involved in projects generating change when working with patients with dementia. Being more actively involved in caring for and developing services for patients with dementia may represent the crossing of an educational threshold for these junior doctors.

  17. [Investigation of children with congenital cleft lip and palate by Eysenck personality questionnaire(Junior)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H Z; Hu, J F

    1998-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To approach the personality of the children suffering from congenital cleft lip and palate. METHODS: The subject were 50 children (aged 7 to 17) with congenital cleft lip and palate,and 50 normal children as control.Both groups were investigated by Eysenck personality questionnaire EPQ(Junior). RESULTS: According to the general quantitative table of EPQ(Junior),the abnormal cases in cleft group were significantly more than those in control(P<0.005),and also were the abnormal cases in the single quantitative or in the multiple quantitative tables of EPQ(Junior)(P<0.005) respectively. CONCLUSION: The poor personality in children with cleft lip and palate is correlated to the cleft condition.Therefore it is necessary to pay attention to the prevention of poor personality while the cleft lip and palate is treated.

  18. Junior doctors' views on reporting concerns about patient safety: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Patricia; Kocman, David; Carr, Sue; Tarrant, Carolyn

    2015-05-01

    Enabling healthcare staff to report concerns is critical for improving patient safety. Junior doctors are one of the groups least likely to engage in incident reporting. This matters both for the present and for the future, as many will eventually be in leadership positions. Little is known about junior doctors' attitudes towards formally reporting concerns. To explore the attitudes and barriers to junior doctors formally reporting concerns about patient safety to the organisations in which they are training. A qualitative study comprising three focus groups with 10 junior doctors at an Acute Teaching Hospital Trust in the Midlands, UK, conducted in 2013. Focus group discussions were transcribed verbatim and analysed using a thematic approach, facilitated by NVivo 10. Participants were supportive of the idea of playing a role in helping healthcare organisations become more aware of risks to patient safety, but identified that existing incident reporting systems could frustrate efforts to report concerns. They described barriers to reporting, including a lack of role modelling and senior leadership, a culture within medicine that was not conducive to reporting concerns, and a lack of feedback providing evidence that formal reporting was worthwhile. They reported a tendency to rely on informal ways of dealing with concerns as an alternative to engaging with formal reporting systems. If healthcare organisations are to be able to gather and learn from intelligence about risks to patient safety from junior doctors, this will require attention to the features of reporting systems, as well as the implications of hierarchies and the wider cultural context in which junior doctors work. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Obstetrics and gynaecology chief resident attitudes toward teaching junior residents under normal working conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Karen M; Savitski, Jennifer L; Bazan, Sara; Patterson, Laurene R; Kirven, Melissa

    2009-09-01

    This study aimed to identify factors that chief residents believe impact the teaching of junior residents under normal working conditions and the areas in which they believe education on the role of resident as teacher would be beneficial. Obstetrics and gynaecology (O&G) chief residents were asked to rate the importance of teaching various skills, how often conflict situations arose, and to identify training that would be helpful through a national web-based survey. An e-mail was sent to coordinators of the Residency Review Committee (RRC) O&G residency programmes with a request that they forward the link to their chief residents three times from January through March 2006. Responses were received from 204 postgraduate Year 4 (PGY4) residents (18% of all PGY4 residents) from 133 programmes (54% of all residency programmes) and 33 states. Teaching junior residents how to prioritise patient care and obtain critical information in an emergent situation was considered very to extremely important by 97%. Conflict situations with junior residents were reported to occur between one and five times by 41-58%; an additional 26-28% reported that these situations occurred six or more times. Residents felt it would be helpful to extremely helpful to have training in resolving conflicts that involved patient care (48-59%), as well as in resolving conflict among junior residents, communicating effectively with them and becoming an effective leader (65-78%). The skills that chief residents considered most important to teach junior residents involved direct patient care. Chief residents would like training in how to resolve conflict with, and among, junior residents, and in how to become an effective leader.

  20. Online video-based resistance training improves the physical capacity of junior basketball athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klusemann, Markus J; Pyne, David B; Fay, Tristan S; Drinkwater, Eric J

    2012-10-01

    Junior basketball athletes require a well-designed resistance training program to improve their physical development. Lack of expert supervision and resistance training in junior development pathways may be overcome by implementing an online video-based program. The aim of this study was to compare the magnitude of improvement (change) in physical performance and strength and functional movement patterns of junior basketball athletes using either a fully supervised or an online video-based resistance training program. Thirty-eight junior basketball athletes (males, n = 17; age, 14 ± 1 year; height, 1.79 ± 0.10 m; mass, 67 ± 12 kg; females, n = 21; age, 15 ± 1 year; height, 1.70 ± 0.07 m; mass, 62 ± 8 kg) were randomly assigned into a supervised resistance training group (SG, n = 13), video training group (VG, n = 13) or control group (CG, n = 12) and participated in a 6-week controlled experimental trial. Pre- and posttesting included measures of physical performance (20-m sprint, step-in vertical jump, agility, sit and reach, line drill, and Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1), strength (15 s push-up and pull-up), and functional movement screening (FMS). Both SG and VG achieved 3-5% ± 2-4% (mean ± 90% confidence limits) greater improvements in several physical performance measures (vertical jump height, 20-m sprint time, and Yo-Yo endurance performance) and a 28 ± 21% greater improvement in push-up strength compared with the CG. The SG attained substantially larger gains in FMS scores over both the VG (12 ± 10%) and CG (13 ± 8%). Video-based training appears to be a viable option to improve physical performance and strength in junior basketball athletes. Qualified supervision is recommended to improve functional movement patterns in junior athletes.