WorldWideScience

Sample records for junior college astronomy

  1. COMPREHENSIVE JUNIOR COLLEGES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NIKITAS, CHRISTUS M.; AND OTHERS

    TO MEET THE STATE'S HIGHER EDUCATION NEEDS, THE NEW HAMPSHIRE JUNIOR COLLEGE COMMISSION DEVELOPED A PLAN OF (1) GRADUAL AND SELECTIVE CONVERSION OF THE STATE'S TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS TO COMPREHENSIVE JUNIOR COLLEGES, (2) SELECTIVE ADDITION OF 2-YEAR PROGRAMS AT THE STATE COLLEGES AND INSTITUTES, AND (3) ESTABLISHMENT OF A STATE…

  2. Teaching History in the Junior College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    1989-01-01

    Recommends techniques for teaching history in the junior college. Discusses subject matter to be taught, the psychology of learning, and the philosophy of teaching history. Addresses the special needs of the junior college classroom. Outlines criteria to be followed in teaching history. (RW)

  3. Foreign Languages at Tarrant County Junior College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jane

    Even during the 1970's when diminished national interest in foreign language study was reflected in declining enrollments at most colleges, Tarrant County Junior College (TCJC) was able to maintain a vigorous language program by emphasizing oral communication and developing a flexible curriculum. Since 1975, the college has offered its preparatory…

  4. A Senior Partner in the Junior College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Fe Community Coll., Gainesville, FL.

    The development and current status of the student personnel program at Sante Fe Junior College is described. Statements of purpose and philosophy are amplified through an outline of the needs and characteristics of Santa Fe students and a description of the elements of the program as they relate to specific needs and characteristics. The elements…

  5. Santa Fe Junior College, Gainesville, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudill, Rowlett and Scott, Architects, Houston, TX.

    The design of Santa Fe Junior College is examined, beginning with the development of an educational philosophy. Subsequent design decisions are based largely upon this philosophy which emphasizes the development of the individual student and the fulfillment of his needs. Further, the need for flexibility is recognized and is an important aspect of…

  6. Public Relations for Community/Junior Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodress, Fred A.

    This monograph is a practical manual on public relations (PR) for community and junior colleges, containing numerous suggestions and recommendations for establishing and operating an effective public relations effort while avoiding PR pitfalls. An overview of the history of public relations in academe, the rationale underlying today's PR programs…

  7. A Study of the 1968 Graduates of Manatee Junior College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stivers, Earl R.

    This study of the 1968 graduates of Manatee Junior College, Florida, showed that: (1) it is not necessary to be in the top 40% of grade 12 to succeed in junior college, (2) students in the lowest percentiles at entrance can earn a degree, (3) the average candidate for a degree should expect to spend more than four terms at the junior college, (4)…

  8. General Education in Occupational Education Programs Offered by Junior Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegman, Robert R.

    This report, directed toward junior college board members, presidents, deans, department heads, and teachers, as well as legislators, attempts to stimulate thought and action to improve general education in occupational programs offered by junior colleges. Following a review of the unsatisfactory status of present curricula, a rationale and…

  9. Skynet Junior Scholars: Bringing Astronomy to Deaf and Hard of Hearing Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Kate; Williamson, Kathryn; Gartner, Constance; Hoette, Vivian L.; Heatherly, Sue Ann

    2016-01-01

    Skynet Junior Scholars (SJS), funded by the National Science Foundation, aims to engage middle school youth from diverse audiences in investigating the universe with research quality robotic telescopes. SJS project development goals include: 1) Online access to optical and radio telescopes, data analysis tools, and professional astronomers, 2) An age-appropriate web-based interface for controlling remote telescopes, 3) Inquiry-based standards-aligned instructional modules. From an accessibility perspective, the goal of the Skynet Junior Scholars project is to facilitate independent access to the project by all youth including those with blindness or low vision and those who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.Deaf and Hard of Hearing (DHH) students have long been an underserved population within STEM fields, including astronomy. Two main barriers include: (1) insufficient corpus of American Sign Language (ASL) for astronomy terminology, and (2) DHH education professionals who lack astronomy background. A suite of vocabulary, accessible hands-on activities, and interaction with trained professionals, are critical for enhancing the background experiences of DHH youth, as they may come to an astronomy lesson lacking the basic "incidental learning" that is often taken for granted with hearing peers (for example, from astronomy in the media).A collaboration between the Skynet Junior Scholars (SJS) project and the Wisconsin School for the Deaf is bringing astronomy to the DHH community in an accessible way for the first time. We follow a group of seven DHH youth over one semester as they interact with the SJS tools and curriculum to understand how they assimilate astronomy experiences and benefit from access to telescopes both directly (on school campus and at Yerkes Observatory) and through Skynet's robotic telescope network (optical and radio telescopes, inquiry-based modules, data analysis tools, and professional astronomers). We report on our first findings of resources and

  10. Tarrant County Junior College District, Exploring America's Communities. Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant County Junior Coll. District, Ft. Worth, TX.

    In 1996, Tarrant County Junior College District participated in the American Association of Community Colleges' Exploring America's Communities project, which works to strengthen the teaching and learning of American history, literature, and culture at U.S. community colleges. The primary goals included the following: (1) to develop an inclusive,…

  11. Student Characteristics and Change at Napa Junior College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMillan, Thomas F.

    At Napa Junior College (California), to test the relationship between college attendance and personality change, 100 volunteers were measured in their first year by the STEP Reading Exam and the ACE Psychological Exam. California Psychological Inventory (CPI) showed a significant range in personality traits from high to low ability students. The…

  12. An Institutional Autopsy of St. Augustine Junior College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumadue, Richard T.

    2009-01-01

    Institutional autopsies can teach much about why learning centers fail the test of time. St. Augustine Junior College in north Florida, the brainchild of Dr. George Apel, was begun in 1942 and ended seven years later in 1949. The purposes of the short-lived college are identified for discussion in this paper. Also identified are the reasons for…

  13. The EDO: New Man on the Junior College Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Lab. for Higher Education, Durham, NC.

    The Educational Development Officer (EDO) is a new kind of college administrator, a full-time catalyst for change. In the Junior and Community College Division of the National Laboratory for Higher Education (NLHE), the EDO has been defined as an innovation-minded professional who questions existing practices, works constantly for constructive…

  14. About English Listening Teaching of Junior College Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童心; 李雪

    2011-01-01

    @@ 1、The listening current situation by junior college students Listening is a significant and essential area of development in the native language and in a second language.But nowadays, most of junior college students listening level are very poor.They lack a sense of the importance of learning English and lack confidence to study English well.Class time is limited, and sometimes students listen without a clear aim, therefore, we attain low effect.Teachers always ignore explaining listening skills and fostering general ana- lyzing ability, so in the course of time, it is harm to cultivate stu- dents' communicative capacity.

  15. Accounting Boot Camp for College Juniors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myring, Mark; Wrege, William; Van Alst, Lucinda

    2008-01-01

    We describe a day-long introduction to new accounting majors, which we call a boot camp. Boot camp it is an effort to make juniors more aware of their identity, career purposes and learning resources that are now parts of their world, much of which is not covered explicitly in the accounting curriculum. This paper provides an overview of the…

  16. Graphic Novels in Community and Junior College Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Although the growth in popularity of graphic novels among readers of all ages and the expansion of graphic novels in both public and academic libraries has been well defined in library literature, the inclusion of graphic novels in community and junior college libraries has received little attention. The purpose of this article is to begin the…

  17. A New Resource for College Distance Education Astronomy Laboratory Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Nicole P.; Cook, Stephen P.; Muise, Amy Smith

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces a set of distance education astronomy laboratory exercises for use by college students and instructors and discusses first usage results. This General Astronomy Education Source exercise set contains eight two-week projects designed to guide students through both core content and mathematical applications of general…

  18. A study on coping patterns of junior college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramya N

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to examine the coping patterns followed by the junior college students. Further, an extensive effort was done to study the gender differences in coping patterns used by the students. This study was conducted in Christ College, Bangalore and on the first and second-year students of pre-university studying in either of the branches (Bachelor of Arts, Science, or Commerce. A total of 120 samples were collected from study population of junior college students using the random sampling method. The sample comprised, 40 students from each group of Arts, Science, and Commerce, including both of the sexes. The tools such as, socio-demographic data sheet and coping checklist, were used. The study findings revealed that majority of the students adopted emotion- and problem-focused coping strategies. Most of the female students adopted emotion-focused coping strategies, whereas the male students mostly used problem-focused coping strategies.

  19. Folklore in the Junior College Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonergan, David; McHone-Chase, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Many community colleges are located near rural areas where significant folkloric research could be done. Community college librarians may be pleasantly surprised to find many of the standard folkloric resources on their reference shelves. In addition, folklorists may be professors of English, anthropology, history, sociology, art, or music, who…

  20. The Transfer Function Is Alive and Well at the Private/Independent Junior College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Pam Brown

    1986-01-01

    Reports on an examination of the transfer function a sample of 10 private/independent junior colleges. Reviews data obtained through analyses of college catalogs and available descriptive information and through survey research focusing on college goals. Reveals evidence of the private/independent junior college's commitment to the transfer…

  1. The Final Report on the Tarrant County Junior College Phase of the Social Science Demonstration Project Sponsored by the American Association of Junior Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Robert M.

    An account of Tarrant Count Junior College's participation in the American Association of Junior Colleges' Social Science Demonstration Project was presented. The purpose of the project was to involve introductory sociology students in the use of the community as a laboratory to enliven the teaching-learning experience and develop in students a…

  2. Joliet Junior College and the 2015 International Year of Light's Cosmic Light Theme

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Cruz, Noella L.

    2015-01-01

    We teach "Descriptive Astronomy" and "Life in the Universe" courses for non-science majors at Joliet Junior College, Joliet IL. We also occasionally present planetarium shows at the college's planetarium. In 2015, we plan to highlight the "Cosmic Light" theme of the 2015 International Year of Light through some of our teaching and outreach activities. For several years, together with our students, we have participated in the Globe at Night light pollution program. In 2015, we plan to continue our participation in this program and we will continue to encourage our students to participate on their own from other locations. We will present a live planetarium show on Light Pollution in Spring 2015 as part of the college's Brown Bag Lecture Series. We plan to develop and present one or two live planetarium presentations that focus on studying astronomical objects across the electromagnetic spectrum during 2015. Also in Spring 2015, we plan to include projects that highlight the International Year of Light in our Descriptive Astronomy course offerings. Our poster will provide details of these "Cosmic Light" activities.

  3. Teaching English Composition in a Junior College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishin, Alex

    Composition instruction in Japan's two-year colleges must build on the English learned in earlier education and undo the problems created by the grammar-translation method. In addition, it must often develop creativity and critical-thinking skills not commonly taught in the Japanese educational system. One teacher's approach is to stress…

  4. Marketing Effectiveness in Community and Junior Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scigliano, Virginia L.; Scigliano, John A.

    A nationwide survey of a random sample of 210 two-year colleges was conducted in 1979 to test the hypothesis that administrative adherence to sound marketing practices will lead to higher enrollments. Survey participants were asked to respond to 15 items adapted from Philip Kotler's Marketing Audit, a recognized scale of marketing effectiveness…

  5. ZTF Undergraduate Astronomy Institute at Caltech and Pomona College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penprase, Bryan Edward; Bellm, Eric Christopher

    2017-01-01

    From the new Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF), an NSF funded project based at Caltech, comes a new initiative for undergraduate research known as the Summer Undergraduate Astronomy Institute. The Institute brings together 15-20 students from across the world for an immersive experience in astronomy techniques before they begin their summer research projects. The students are primarly based at Caltech in their SURF program but also includes a large cohort of students enrolled in research internships at Pomona College in nearby Claremont CA. The program is intended to introduce students to research techniques in astronomy, laboratory and computational technologies, and to observational astronomy. Since many of the students are previously computer science or physics majors with little astronomy experience, this immersive experience has been extremely helpful for enabling students to learn about the terminologies, techniques and technologies of astronomy. The field trips to the Mount Wilson and Palomar telescopes deepen their knowledge and excitement about astronomy. Lectures about astronomical research from Caltech staff scientists and graduate students also provide context for the student research. Perhaps more importantly, the creation of a cohort of like-minded students, and the chance to reflect about careers in astronomy and research, give these students opportunities to consider themselves as future research scientists and help them immensely as they move forward in their careers. We discuss some of the social and intercultural aspects of the experience as well, as our cohorts typically include international students from many countries and several students from under-represented groups in science.

  6. The NASA Center for Astronomy Education (CAE): 2007 College Astronomy Teaching Excellence Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissenden, Gina; Prather, E. E.; Slater, T. F.; Greene, W. M.; Thaller, M.

    2006-12-01

    Since 2003 the NASA Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) has been devoted to the professional development of introductory college astronomy faculty with a special focus on faculty teaching at community colleges. As part of our efforts CAE conducts 2-day and 3-day Teaching Excellence Workshops. In Tier I (introductory) Workshops, the overarching goal is for participants to become familiar with learner-centered teaching and assessment materials, as well as how to implement them in their college introductory astronomy courses. To accomplish this goal, participants learn how to create productive learning environments by reviewing research on the nature of teaching and learning; setting course goals and objectives; and using interactive lectures, peer instruction, engaging demonstrations, collaborative groups, tutorials, and ranking tasks. Participants also learn how to create more effective multiple-choice tests. In Tier II (advanced) Workshops, the overarching goal is to help past workshop participants with their obstacles to implementing a learner-centered introductory college astronomy course. Workshop participants work to understand how students learn while engaged in learner-centered activities and what the role of the instructor is in the learner-centered class. CAE regional workshops are held at community colleges around the country, NASA Research Centers, and in conjunction with professional society meetings, such as the American Astronomical Society and the American Association of Physics Teachers, and also through the infrastructure of the National Science Foundation's Summer Chautauqua Workshop program. The NASA Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) is a partnership with the Univ. of Arizona Conceptual Astronomy & Physics Education Research (CAPER) Team. CAE is supported by NASA JPL's Navigator Public Engagement program (consisting of several space telescopes--including SIM PlanetQuest, the Terrestrial Planet Finder, the Keck Interferometer, and the Large

  7. A New Resource for College Distance Education Astronomy Laboratory Exercises

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, Nicole P; Muise, Amy Smith

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces a set of distance education astronomy laboratory exercises for use by college students and instructors and discuss first usage results. This General Astronomy Education Source (GEAS) exercise set contains eight two-week projects designed to guide students through both core content and mathematical applications of general astronomy material. Projects are divided between hands-on activities and computer-aided analyses of modern astronomical data. The suite of online resources includes student and instructor guides, laboratory report templates, learning objectives, video tutorials, plotting tools, and web-based applications that allow students to analyze both images and spectra of astronomical objects. A pilot usage study indicates that distance learners using these materials perform as well or better than a comparison cohort of on-campus students. We are actively seeking collaborators to use these resources in astronomy courses and other educational venues.

  8. Traditional-Aged College Juniors' Career Planning Self-Efficacy: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Dawn C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this single-site case study was to explore and describe traditional-age college juniors' reports of self-efficacy (Bandura, 1997) regarding Career Planning (Barker & Kellen, 1998). More specifically, the career planning confidence levels of college juniors enrolled in a required career development course at a private business…

  9. Current Planning for the Development of Public Junior Colleges in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munns, Earle Dee

    This report of 38 studies from 22 states includes the analysis and synthesis of statements of policy and program scop", conclusions and recommendations, needs for services, criteria for establishing new junior colleges, and procedures for improving state-wide coordination. Twelve conclusions are presented regarding the role of junior colleges in…

  10. An Assessment of Campus Police Departments across Mississippi's Public Community and Junior Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, Brad D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to provide an assessment of campus police departments throughout the 15 public community and junior colleges in Mississippi. This research could provide Mississippi community and junior college administrators the opportunity to observe and appraise the overall safety of their respective campuses in comparison to safety…

  11. How Singapore Junior College Science Teachers Address Curriculum Reforms: A Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Patrick; Pyvis, David

    2012-01-01

    Using grounded theory research methodology, a theory was developed to explain how Singapore junior college science teachers implement educational reforms underpinning the key initiatives of the "Thinking Schools, Learning Nation" policy. The theory suggests Singapore junior college science teachers "deal with" implementing curriculum reforms by…

  12. Student Understanding of Gravity in Introductory College Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Kathryn E.; Willoughby, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-four free-response questions were developed to explore introductory college astronomy students' understanding of gravity in a variety of contexts, including in and around Earth, throughout the solar system, and in hypothetical situations. Questions were separated into three questionnaires, each of which was given to a section of…

  13. Student Understanding of Gravity in Introductory College Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Kathryn E.; Willoughby, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-four free-response questions were developed to explore introductory college astronomy students' understanding of gravity in a variety of contexts, including in and around Earth, throughout the solar system, and in hypothetical situations. Questions were separated into three questionnaires, each of which was given to a section of…

  14. THE CARE AND FEEDING OF THE COMMUNITY JUNIOR COLLEGE, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL JUNIOR COLLEGE ADMINISTRATIVE TEAMS INSTITUTE (7TH, DAYTONA BEACH, AUGUST 13-15, 1967).

    Science.gov (United States)

    WIEGMAN, ROBERT R.

    THIS CONFERENCE WAS ORGANIZED AROUND A 2-PART THEME, CONSISTING OF (1) THE JUNIOR COLLEGE'S COMMUNITY AND PUBLIC RELATIONS AND (2) SUPPORT FOR INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT, WITH EMPHASIS ON PRIVATE SOURCES OF FUNDS. SPECIFIC TOPICS INCLUDED PUBLICITY, THE IMAGE OF THE COLLEGE IN PRINT, COMMUNITY RELATIONS, THE MACHINERY FOR DEVELOPMENT, GIFTS, AND…

  15. The Inequality of Self-Efficacy between Junior College and Traditional University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Higher education research highlights the difficulties students face when transitioning from a junior college to a traditional university. This study explored a gap between junior vs. traditional university students' academic self-efficacy beliefs. This study also controlled for the effects of the student role-identity and academic performance on…

  16. Junior and Community College Research, Texas, 1977-78. The Seventh Annual Report to the Texas Association of Junior and Community College Instructional Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, R. Eugene, Ed.

    The first of three studies presented in this report investigated the role of the academic dean/dean of instruction as related to the effectiveness of educational leadership in junior colleges. Using the Educational Administrative Style Diagnosis Test and the Educational Administrative Appropriateness Test, 60 deans, representing 47 Texas community…

  17. Assessment of Teaching Approaches in an Introductory Astronomy College Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, William R.

    In recent years, there have been calls from the astronomy education research community for the increased use of learner-centered approaches to teaching, and systematic assessments of various teaching approaches using such tools as the Astronomy Diagnostic Test 2.0 (ADT 2.0). The research presented is a response to both calls. The ADT 2.0 was used in a modified form to obtain baseline assessments of introductory college astronomy classes that were taught in a traditional, mostly didactic manner. The ADT 2.0 (modified) was administered both before and after the completion of the courses. The courses were then altered to make modest use of learner-centered lecture tutorials. The ADT 2.0 (modified) was again administered before and after completion of the modified courses. Overall, the modest learner-centered approach showed mixed statistical results, with an increase in effect size (from medium to large), but no change in normalized gain index (both were low). Additionally, a mathematically rigorous approach showed no statistically significant improvements in conceptual understanding compared with a mathematically nonrigorous approach. This study will interpret the results from a variety of perspectives. The overall implementation of the lecture tutorials and their implications for teaching will also be discussed.

  18. How Are Community, Technical, and Junior Colleges Putting Technology to Work for Their Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHart, A. Robert; And Others

    1987-01-01

    In these four technology-related articles, Robert DeHart examines uses of satellite technology; Jack Pirkey describes televised instruction at Tarrant County Junior College (Texas); Baxter Hood focuses on occupational curriculum development at York Technical College (South Carolina); and Richard Schinoff considers computer-based student services…

  19. Tarrant County Junior College: Its Economic Impact in Its Service Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant County Junior Coll. District, Ft. Worth, TX.

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects--both economic and educational--of Tarrant County Junior College (TCJC) on the community around it. The study, conducted in 1969-70, involved all students and employees of the college (the questionnaires used are included as appendices of this study). Direct economic influences on the area…

  20. Community and Junior College Concern for and Services Provided to Part-Time Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Paul L.

    A questionnaire was mailed to a random sample (n=395) of public, private (including proprietary) and church-related community and junior colleges for the purpose of identifying the nature of part-time students in such institutions, the extent to which they participate in or are included in college programs and activities, and the various ways in…

  1. Modesto Junior College's Student Success Plan: A Model for Student Success/PFE Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKuin, Kathleen

    This is a report on the student success model designed by Modesto Junior College (MJC) (California) in conjunction with the state-established Partnership for Excellence (PFE) program goals. The PFE program addresses goals of the community college's mission along with more direct emphasis on transfer programs, degrees and certificates awarded,…

  2. Modesto Junior College's Student Success Plan: A Model for Student Success/PFE Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKuin, Kathleen

    This is a report on the student success model designed by Modesto Junior College (MJC) (California) in conjunction with the state-established Partnership for Excellence (PFE) program goals. The PFE program addresses goals of the community college's mission along with more direct emphasis on transfer programs, degrees and certificates awarded,…

  3. The Relationship of Size to Current Expense of Education in California Single-College Public Junior College Districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrom, William Albert

    This study was an investigation of unit costs during the 1966-67 school year for single-college, California public junior college districts. The relationships between institutional size and total current expense of education, expenditures in seven major budget classifications, and expenditures in certain combinations of budgetary classes were…

  4. Research and Education in Physics and Astronomy at Haverford College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollub, Jerry

    2010-02-01

    This talk focuses on special features of research and education in physics and astronomy at Haverford. These include: (a) The involvement of students in research for many decades, both locally and at national facilities. At least 60 students have been co-authors of scientific papers in the last 30 years, of which many contain significant new science. (b) A noteworthy Astronomy program that has produced a surprising number of active astronomers, many of whom have been recognized by national awards. (c) A physics senior seminar that helps students to make the transition from an undergraduate education to the world of graduate education or work. (d) A network of interdisciplinary interactions and concentrations that enables the physics program to appeal to students with broad interests, e.g. in biology, computer science, education, or engineering. (e) A tradition of outreach courses to students not majoring in science. (f) Curricular coordination with neighboring Bryn Mawr College. (g) Notable laboratory courses that prepare students for research and independent learning. )

  5. Topic Outlines in Microbiology: An Instructor's Guide for Junior and Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Society for Microbiology, Washington, DC.

    This resource guide presents subject matter organized in outline form for four topical areas: introductory microbiology; medical microbiology; microbial genetics; and microbial physiology. The first two units comprise the two most frequently taught microbiology courses in community and junior colleges. The outlines for microbial genetics and…

  6. Employment Realities of Recent Junior/Community College and University Graduates and Premature Leavers with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Mary; Fichten, Catherine; Nguyen, Mai Nhu; Budd, Jillian; Barile, Maria; Asuncion, Jennison; Tibbs, Anthony; Jorgensen, Shirley

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the current descriptive and comparative study is to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the employment realities of recent junior/community college and university graduates and premature leavers (i.e., those who drop out before completing their program of study) with disabilities. We investigate the following research…

  7. Languages for Communication Workshops, 1988: Tarrant County Junior College, Northeast Campus. Final Project Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jane; Lively, Madeleine

    In summer 1988, Tarrant County Junior College, Northeast Campus, conducted a series of eight 16-hour workshops and three 32-hour workshops for high school teachers of foreign languages. The workshops were intended primarily as in-service training to help foreign language teachers: (1) improve their oral proficiency in the language they teach; (2)…

  8. Computer-Based Acquisitions Procedures at Tarrant County Junior College District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, John, Ed.

    1974-01-01

    The computer-based procedures described in this report form the basis of book acquisitions performed by the Automation and Technical Services Division in serving the Learning Resources Centers of the multi-campus Tarrant County Junior College District. The procedures, which are off-line in a batch mode, have been operational since 1968. Since 1970…

  9. Languages for Children at Tarrant County Junior College: A Ten-Year Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jane

    In response to requests of adult students for foreign language instruction for their kindergarten and elementary school aged children, and after researching the availability of such instruction in the area, Tarrant County Junior College developed a series of nonsequential courses of 12 lessons each on common topics such as parts of the body, the…

  10. User Study of an Online Library Catalog: Tarrant County Junior College District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayland, Sharon

    1982-01-01

    Describes a study of the newly implemented online library catalog system at the Tarrant County Junior College District libraries, conducted to determine how heavily terminals were used and by whom, use of search aids, and user satisfaction. Describes the catalog and study purposes, procedures, and results. Includes recommendations. (CBC)

  11. Follow-Up Study of Santa Fe Junior College Graduates 1968-1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Fe Community Coll., Gainesville, FL.

    Characteristics, experiences, attitudes, and present status of 1968-70 Santa Fe Junior College (SFJC) graduates were determined along with existing differences between those now attending school full-time and those not doing so. A questionnaire was mailed to 1202 graduates; 666 (55%) responded. The results concentrate on four areas: demographic…

  12. Generalized File Management Systems: Their Implication for a California Junior College Data Base System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedrick, Robert John

    Criteria to use in evaluating data processing efficiency, factors of file and record definitions, convenience of use for non-programmers, report generating capabilities, and customer support for generalized file management systems for use by the California junior colleges are indicated by the author. The purchase of such a system at the state…

  13. Profiling of Junior College Football Players and Differences between Position Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Lockie

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study profiled junior college football players. Sixty-two subjects completed vertical jump (VJ; height and peak power, standing broad jump (SBJ, 36.58 m sprint, pro-agility shuttle, three-cone drill, and maximal-repetition bench press and front squat. The sample included 2 quarterbacks (QB, 7 running backs (RB, 13 wide receivers (WR, 1 tight end (TE, 18 defensive backs (DB, 8 linebackers (LB, and 13 offensive and defensive linemen (LM. To investigate positional differences, subjects were split into skill (SK; WR, DB, big skill (BSK; QB, RB, TE, LB, and LM groups. A one-way ANOVA determined between-group differences. LM were taller and heavier than SK and BSK players. The SK and BSK groups were faster than LM in the 0–36.58 m sprint, pro-agility shuttle, and three-cone drill (p ≤ 0.009. The SK group had greater VJ height and SBJ distance; LM generated greater VJ peak power (p ≤ 0.022. There were no between-group differences in the strength endurance tests. Compared to Division I data, junior college players were smaller, slower, and performed worse in jump tests. Positional differences in junior college football are typical to that of established research. Junior college players should attempt to increase body mass, and improve speed and lower-body power.

  14. A Historial Analysis of Vocational Education: Land-Grant Colleges to California Junior Colleges, 1862-1940.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comm, Walter

    To analyze the history of vocational education and the major influences which have affected its development in the California junior colleges, this study examined the 78 years between the passage of the first Morrill Act and the beginning of World War II. Emphasis was given to legislation and the major social and economic elements that affected…

  15. High School and Community College Astronomy Research Seminar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, Russell M.; Boyce, Pat; Buchheim, Robert; Collins, Dwight; Freed, Rachel; Harshaw, Richard; Johnson, Jolyon; Kenney, John; Wallen, Vera

    2016-06-01

    For the past decade, Cuesta College has held an Astronomy Research Seminar. Teams of high school and community college students, with guidance from instructors and advanced amateur astronomers, have made astronomical observations, reduced their data, and submitted their research results to appropriate journals. A variety of projects, using modest-aperture telescopes equipped with low-cost instruments, are within reach of motivated students. These include double star astrometry, variable star photometry, and exoplanet transit timing. Advanced scientific knowledge and mastery of sophisticated experimental skills are not required when the students are immersed within a supportive community of practice. The seminar features self-paced, online learning units, an online textbook (the Small Telescope Astronomical Research Handbook), and a supportive website sponsored by the Institute for Student Astronomical Research (www.In4StAR.org). There are no prerequisites for the seminar. This encourages everyone—including underrepresented minorities and persons with disabilities—to participate. Each participant contributes as their time, talents, and experience dictates, thus replicating the modern, professional research team. Our spring 2015 seminar was the largest yet. Volunteer assistant instructors provided local in-person leadership, while the entire seminar met online for PowerPoint presentations on proposed projects and final research results. Some 37 students from eight schools finished the seminar as coauthors of 19 papers published in the January 2016 volume of the Journal of Double Star Observations. Robotic telescopes devoted to student research are coming online at both Concordia University and the Boyce Astronomical Robotic Observatory, as is a central online sever that will provide students with uniform, cost-free reduction and analysis software. The seminar has motivated many of its graduates to pursue careers in science, engineering, and medicine, often with

  16. Improving Introductory Astronomy Education in American Colleges and Universities: A Review of Recent Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, William H.; Slater, Timothy F.

    2011-11-01

    Over the past 15 years, professional astronomers, their societies, and associated funding agencies have collaborated to improve astronomy teaching and learning at the introductory undergraduate level. Many nonscience majors and preservice teachers enroll in these introductory astronomy courses, thus meriting the focused attention. In this review of recent developments, issues, approaches, and resources, we describe and document key instructional assets that have been made available to college and university faculty who wish to enhance their teaching of introductory astronomy. We find that although faculty support has progressed intermittently, there exist numerous programs and resources that faculty can access to increase student engagement and learning in astronomy. As funding support for these various instructional assets have waxed and waned, the professional societies have served as vital anchors and agents for advancing the profession of astronomy education at the introductory undergraduate level. Our findings, though focused on astronomy education, can be applied to the practice of introductory undergraduate education throughout the Earth and space sciences.

  17. Does Marketing Really Work for Community and Junior Colleges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollar, Douglas

    1985-01-01

    Describes a study of the marketing orientations found in two-year colleges and their relationship to enrollment trends within these institutions. Reviews the diversity of marketing approaches employed nationwide. Sees enrollment trends affected by sound marketing management organizations, sensitive marketing intelligence systems, and efficient…

  18. Economic Choices: China after Mao. High School and Junior College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford Univ., CA. Stanford Program on International and Cross Cultural Education.

    This unit, developed for high school and community college students, has a two-fold purpose: to introduce students to free market and planned economic systems, and to examine China's recent efforts to supplement its planned economy with market mechanisms. The unit is appropriate for a variety of courses, including economics, social studies,…

  19. Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Seymour, Percy

    2014-01-01

    With a blend of exciting discoveries and important scientific theory,this innovative and readable introduction to astronomy is ideal for anyone who wants to understand what we know about the universe,and how we know it. Each chapter starts with details of a method of jow astronomers over time have observed the world,and then uses this as a springboard to discuss what they discovered,and why this was important for understanding the cosmos. The last chapter,on dark matter,also focuses on the many things we don''t yet know - reminding us that astronomy,like this book,is a fast-paced and fascinati

  20. Changes in Student Views of Religion and Science in a College Astronomy Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, Harry L.; Brickhouse, Nancy W.; Dagher, Zoubeida; Letts, William J., IV

    2002-01-01

    A cautious introduction of the dialogue between science and religion into a college astronomy course provoked diverse reactions from the 340 students in the course. Reports that approximately half of the students in the class engaged with the issue of science and religion to some extent and that there were few negative reactions to this…

  1. Evaluation of a College Freshman Diversity Research Program in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremmel, Michael J.; Garner, S. M.; Schmidt, S. J.; Wisniewski, J. P.; Agol, E.

    2014-01-01

    Graduate students in the astronomy department at the University of Washington began the Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) after recognizing that underrepresented students in STEM fields are not well retained after their transition from high school. Pre-MAP is a research and mentoring program that begins with a keystone seminar where they learn astronomical research techniques that they apply to research projects conducted in small groups. Students also receive one-on-one mentoring and peer support for the duration of the academic year and beyond. Successful Pre-MAP students have declared astronomy and physics majors, expanded their research projects beyond the fall quarter, presented posters at the UW Undergraduate Research Symposium, and received research fellowships and summer internships. Here we examine the success of the program in attracting underrepresented minorities and in facilitating better STEM retention and academic performance among incoming UW students. We use the University of Washington Student Database to study both the performance of Pre-MAP students and the overall UW student body over the past 8 years. We show that Pre-MAP students are generally more diverse than the overall UW population and also come in with a variety of different math backgrounds, which we show to be an important factor on STEM performance for the overall UW population. We find that that Pre-MAP students are both more academically successful and more likely to graduate in STEM fields than their UW peers, regardless of initial math placement.

  2. Essays on Eclipses, Transits and Occultations as Teaching Tools in the Introductory Astronomy College Course

    CERN Document Server

    Dcruz, Noella L

    2014-01-01

    We occasionally include projects in our learner-centered introductory astronomy college course to enable non-science major students explore some astronomical concepts in more detail than otherwise. Such projects also highlight ongoing or upcoming astronomical events. We hope that students will feel more interested in astronomy through projects tied to astronomical events. In Spring 2012, we offered short essays focused on eclipses, transits and occultations to promote the rare transit of Venus that occurred on June 5th, 2012. We asked students to write two short essays from three that were offered. The essays contained descriptive and conceptual parts. They were meant to serve as teaching tools. 62% of 106 essays from 55 students earned A, B or C grades. 21% of 47 feedback survey respondents felt the essays increased their interest in astronomy. 49% of respondents felt that the essays were not educationally beneficial and should not be offered again. The most common written response to our survey indicated th...

  3. The prevalence and related factors of depressive symptoms among junior college nursing students: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C-J; Chen, Y-C; Sung, H-C; Hsieh, T-C; Lee, M-S; Chang, C-Y

    2015-10-01

    Nursing students have particularly experienced stressful lives during nursing education. This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate depressive symptoms and related factors in junior college nursing students. A total of 625 nursing students from a junior college in Taiwan were assessed by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Adolescent Depression Inventory, Situational Anxiety Scale and the Taiwanese-Chinese version of Stress in Nursing Students Scale. The results showed that (1) the prevalence of depressive symptoms among junior college nursing students was 32.6%; (2) depressive symptoms are significantly related to grade point average, interest in nursing, interest in their clinical placement, career planning after graduation, overeating as a stress-relief strategy, sleep problems, stress, and anxiety; and (3) anxiety, sleep quality, and stress are three major variables that can significantly predict depressive symptoms. Psychological factors may influence young nursing students' willingness to seek assistance from teachers. These factors should be considered when designing strategies to promote their emotional health and well-being. Nursing educators can plan appropriate strategies tailored to junior college nursing students' problems and needs, which thereby may facilitate learning experience and prevent depressive symptoms.

  4. Differences in Men's and Women's ESL Writing at the Junior College Level: Consequences for Research on Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Lori A.

    1998-01-01

    A study of features of men's and women's English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) compositions (linguistic accuracy, readability, conformity to assignment guidelines) among a group of junior college students in Quebec found the two groups' writing of comparable linguistic quality. Superior marks received by women were found attributable to the way they…

  5. Strategies for Proficiency in Second Language Acquisition: Tarrant County Junior College, Northeast Campus. Final Project Evaluation Report, 1989.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jane; Lively, Madeleine

    In response to the needs of teachers for assistance in developing second language speaking and instructional skills, Tarrant County Junior College, Northeast Campus, designed a series of 10 16-hour workshops for teachers of foreign languages for summer 1989. The "Strategies for Proficiency Workshops" were intended primarily as in-service training…

  6. An Examination of the Teaching Strategies Practiced by the Full-Time Teaching Faculty at Manatee Junior College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, Roy H.

    A random sample (n=25) of full-time faculty at Manatee Junior College (Florida) were surveyed by open-ended questionnaire to determine what instructional techniques were being used and to ascertain if the faculty had acquired minimal training in teaching methods and learning theories. A total of 16 different teaching strategies were identified. Of…

  7. Millimeter wavelength spectroscopy of trace atmospheric constituents from the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguenin, G. R.; Irvine, W. M.

    1978-01-01

    The Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory system, located in western Massachusetts, is described. It is suggested that high sensitivity in the three-millimeter wavelength band facilitates detection and monitoring of a number of trace molecules in the earth's atmosphere as well as astonomical observation at radio wavelengths. Line formation and radiative transfer in the earth's atmosphere are discussed, and the receiver sensitivity is considered.

  8. Teachers and Tea-Fetchers – What the Future Holds for Japan's Junior College Graduates: Female student perceptions of the status, purpose, and value of a Junior College education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WALKER, Patricia

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Throughout Japan, enrolments in junior colleges, previously the higher education destination of choice for nearly 500 000 women a year at their peak in 1990, has plummeted recently to half that number. It is therefore of interest to investigate the quality of experience and post-graduation aspirations of the decreasing numbers of women who have elected to take up the short- term route. This study investigates the mission of the junior college in the 21st century, the quality and status of the courses, the extent to which they prepare women for their career goals, and the value of the exit qualification in the employment market. In an intensive period of fieldwork in a small college on the Tokyo/Yokohama borders in the summer of 2005 the views of students and their tutors were elicited. It was found that, on the whole, high numbers of women were resigned to the gendered roles for which they have been socialized throughout their life course but that a growing minority were resolved to use their junior college degree to open up possibilities for further study and enter an arena where their economic outcomes could be expanded.

  9. Expansion of Instruction in Foreign Languages: A Report on the 1987 Language Development Workshop and Internship at Tarrant County Junior College Northeast Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jane

    In response to the need of local schools for assistance in introducing language study at the elementary and junior high school level, Tarrant County (Texas) Junior College (TCJC), Northeast Campus, designed a 5-week program in language development and methodology for prospective teachers that was designed primarily to develop skills in oral…

  10. Faculty and Administrator's Perceptions of the Utilization of the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC) Program Review and Planning Rubrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, David H.

    2014-01-01

    California community colleges have been inconsistent in their efforts to meet the program review and planning accreditation standards established by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC). To assist colleges in their effort to meet the accreditation standards and to improve educational quality, the ACCJC developed the…

  11. Creation and Implementation of a Faculty Learning Community as a Model for Professional Development: Addressing the Needs of the General Education Faculty at a Private Junior College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty-Pearson, Julie

    2012-01-01

    At San Joaquin Valley College, a culture of cultivating student learning through assessment was created in response to the Western Association of Schools and Colleges-Accrediting Commission of Community and Junior Colleges requirements for Fall 2012. In General Education, promoting and developing this culture has been more difficult with faculty…

  12. Conference Report on the Annual Conference of the New York State Association of Junior Colleges (21st, Niagara Falls, April 26-27, 1968).

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Association of Junior Colleges.

    This report examines four areas of faculty involvement in junior college activities. (1) In college governance, faculties are told to (a) look to self-government first and then, if necessary, turn to outside organizations, (b) seek a "golden mean" between communalism and instrumentalism, and (c) seek mutual equality, trust, and respect…

  13. GUIDELINES FOR HOSPITALITY EDUCATION IN JUNIOR COLLEGES, A MANUAL FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF PROGRAMS FOR CAREERS IN THE HOTEL-MOTEL, RESTAURANT, AND INSTITUTIONAL INDUSTRIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALMARODE, RICHARD L.

    THIS REPORT DISCUSSES JUNIOR COLLEGE PROGRAMS TO MEET THE NEEDS OF STUDENTS AND INDUSTRY. THE STUDENTS RECEIVE BOTH EDUCATION AND TRAINING, WHILE INDUSTRY RECEIVES COMPETENT EMPLOYEES. BEFORE DEVELOPING THIS OCCUPATIONAL PROGRAM, THE COLLEGE SHOULD SURVEY LOCAL INDUSTRY NEEDS, OPPORTUNITIES FOR ON-THE-JOB TRAINING, POSSIBILITIES OF PART-TIME WORK…

  14. Development and Calibration of a Concept Inventory to Measure Introductory College Astronomy and Physics Students' Understanding of Newtonian Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Kathryn Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The topic of Newtonian gravity offers a unique vantage point from which to investigate and encourage conceptual change because it is something with which everyone has daily experience, and because it is taught in two courses that reach a wide variety of students--introductory-level college astronomy ("Astro 101") and physics ("Phys…

  15. Development and Calibration of a Concept Inventory to Measure Introductory College Astronomy and Physics Students' Understanding of Newtonian Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Kathryn Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The topic of Newtonian gravity offers a unique vantage point from which to investigate and encourage conceptual change because it is something with which everyone has daily experience, and because it is taught in two courses that reach a wide variety of students--introductory-level college astronomy ("Astro 101") and physics ("Phys…

  16. A Follow-up Study on the Characteristics and Opinions of Students Enrolled in Occupational Education Programs or in University-Parallel Programs at Tarrant County Junior College District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant County Junior Coll. District, Ft. Worth, TX.

    To measure the success of the recently opened Tarrant County Junior College, a follow-up study was conducted to determine personal characteristics of students, their opinions of their studies at this school, and their post-Tarrant County Junior College activities. Surveys were designed for a group of students who had taken at least one…

  17. The Hartnell Astronomy Short Course: Bolstering the Scientific Research Preparation of Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metevier, A. J.; Joggerst, C. C.; Moth, P.; Lotz, J.; Pollack, L.; Noeske, K.; Lopez, L.; Laver, C.; Rubin, K.; Ammons, M.; Laird, E.; Newton, A.

    2010-12-01

    Community college students who express an interest in science and engineering have excellent learning opportunities in the classroom, but rarely have access to forefront research experiences. To address this need, we developed the Hartnell Astronomy Short Course to provide Hartnell community college students with an authentic research experience on their home campus. Hartnell is a federally designated Hispanic Serving Institution, and thus draws a population of students that are underrepresented in the sciences. The one-week, intensive short course centered on an innovative inquiry activity in which student investigators used telescope images and spectra to study their own questions about fundamental galaxy properties, the differences between "normal" and "active" galaxies, and evidence for dark matter, with guidance from instructor-advisors. We supported the inquiry activity with lectures and laboratory activities on light and spectra, cosmology, and extragalactic topics, as well as community-building and career-oriented activities. Over the four years in which the short course was taught (2004 - 2007), over 60 students were served.

  18. Organizational Structure in Multi-Campus Community Junior Colleges/Districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Nai-Kwang

    The administrative structures and functions of multi-campus colleges/districts of the same size as the Community College of Denver (CCD) were investigated to determine the positive and negative aspects of multi-campus colleges vs. separate independent colleges and of centralization vs. decentralization of 38 administrative functions. A survey of…

  19. The Elements of Item Response Theory and its Framework in Analyzing Introductory Astronomy College Student Misconceptions. I. Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Favia, Andrej; Thorpe, Geoffrey L

    2013-01-01

    This is the first in a series of papers that analyze college student beliefs in realms where common astronomy misconceptions are prevalent. Data was collected through administration of an inventory distributed at the end of an introductory college astronomy course. In this paper, we present the basic mathematics of item response theory (IRT), and then we use it to explore concepts related to galaxies. We show how IRT determines the difficulty of each galaxy topic under consideration. We find that the concept of galaxy spatial distribution presents the greatest challenge to students of all the galaxy topics. We also find and present the most logical sequence to teach galaxy topics as a function of the audience's age.

  20. Functional Analysis and Preliminary Specifications for a Single Integrated Central Computer System for Secondary Schools and Junior Colleges. A Feasibility and Preliminary Design Study. Interim Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computation Planning, Inc., Bethesda, MD.

    A feasibility analysis of a single integrated central computer system for secondary schools and junior colleges finds that a central computing facility capable of serving 50 schools with a total enrollment of 100,000 students is feasible at a cost of $18 per student per year. The recommended system is a multiprogrammed-batch operation. Preliminary…

  1. EXCELLENCE IN TERMINAL EDUCATION, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL JUNIOR COLLEGE ADMINISTRATIVE TEAMS INSTITUTE (3RD, DAYTONA BEACH, JULY 29-AUGUST 2, 1963).

    Science.gov (United States)

    WIEGMAN, ROBERT R.

    THIS DOCUMENT IS A COMPILATION OF FOUR ADDRESSES AND FOUR PANEL PRESENTATIONS CONCERNING JUNIOR COLLEGE TERMINAL EDUCATION. CONSIDERATION WAS GIVEN TO THE NATURE AND PURPOSES OF TERMINAL EDUCATION, THE ROLES OF GENERAL AND SPECIALIZED EDUCATION, AND DESCRIPTIONS OF PROGRAMS RELATED TO TERMINAL EDUCATION AT THE NATIONAL, STATE, AND LOCAL LEVELS.…

  2. Using Solar Dynamics Observatory Data in the Classroom to Do Real Science -- A Community College Astronomy Laboratory Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Deborah K.; Hildreth, S.; Lee, S.; Dave, T.; Scherrer, P. H.

    2013-07-01

    A partnership between Stanford University and Chabot Community College (Hayward, CA) has developed a series of laboratory exercises using SDO (AIA, HMI) data, targeted for community college students in an introductory astronomy lab class. The labs lead students to explore what SDO can do via online resources and videos. Students investigate their chosen solar events, generate their own online videos, prepare their own hypotheses relating to the events, and explore outcomes. Final assessment should be completed by the end of summer 2013. Should the labs prove valuable, they may be adapted for high school use.

  3. Community/Junior College Alumni: Initiative, Influence, and Impact. A National Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, J. E.; And Others

    The development, operation, and benefits of community college alumni organizations are examined by four speakers. After J.E. McCracken's introduction to the topic, Thomas Ten Hoeve describes the alumni association at Butler County College and examines the role of the association in helping the college maintain updated files on former students and…

  4. Establishing Astronomy in the Curriculum at a Teacher Preparation College: Some Successes and Some Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, L. M.; Borkovitz, D.

    1999-12-01

    At Wheelock College, a liberal arts college in Boston which prepares students for careers in elementary and early childhood teaching and social work, we are developing science and mathematics courses designed to prepare our students for their work with children while teaching them adult-level math and science. Our students arrive with varying skill levels and, often, a great deal of math and science anxiety. We must address the anxiety in order for the students to make progress as learners and, eventually, teachers of math and science. Two courses have been notable successes. A one-semester course entitled The Solar System has become a staple in the curriculum. Major topics covered include finding our way around the sky, the nature of light and color, the size and scale of the solar system, and the causes of the Earth’s seasons and the phases of the moon. Students report that it changes their minds about how science can be taught by modeling a style of teaching which is more interactive than the way they were taught. In the graduate school, astronomy is the focus for a course entitled Teaching and Learning. Co-taught by an education faculty member and an astronomer, the course immerses students in learning a new content area and asks them to consider their own learning process. Observations play an important role here, with students keeping journals of their own sky observations. We also describe two challenges. One is the establishment of more advanced courses; although an astrophysics class has been offered twice to overwhelmingly positive student reviews, it is not easy to “sell”. The other challenge is the establishment of an introductory level course in stars and galaxies for non-science majors. This work has been supported in part by a grant from the DUE of the National Science Foundation.

  5. Lens Inquiry: An Astronomy Lab for Non-science Majors at Hartnell Community College

    CERN Document Server

    Putnam, Nicole M; McGrath, Elizabeth J; Lai, David K; Moth, Pimol

    2010-01-01

    We describe a three hour inquiry activity involving converging lenses and telescopes as part of a semester-long astronomy lab course for non-science majors at Hartnell Community College in Salinas, CA. Students were shown several short demonstrations and given the chance to experiment with the materials, after which there was a class discussion about the phenomena they observed. Students worked in groups of 2-4 to design their own experiments to address a particular question of interest to them and then presented their findings to the class. An instructor-led presentation highlighted the students' discoveries and the lab's content goals, followed by a short worksheet-based activity that guided them in applying their new knowledge to build a simple telescope using two converging lenses. The activity was successful in emphasizing communication skills and giving students opportunities to engage in the process of science in different ways. One of the biggest challenges in designing this activity was covering all ...

  6. Factors influencing student nurses' career choices after preceptorship in a five-year junior nursing college in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Whei-Mei; Chuang, Shu-Hui

    2008-05-01

    This study was conducted to explore the influence factors of a preceptorship in career choices following student nurses' graduations. A total number of 326 student nurses in their fifth year of junior nursing college were selected as participants. A validated and reliable questionnaire was used in this study. Data were analyzed by the Statistical Package for the Social Science (SPSS) for windows for percentage, mean, standard deviation, and Pearson's correlation. The results showed that: (1) the first five factors influencing student nurses' career choices were good unit environment, nurse's professional role, self-professional knowledge deficiency, nurse's professional knowledge, and patient's and family's good feedback; (2) the correlation between the chosen field of practice and willingness to work after graduation showed a strong relationship in all areas. Notably, the preceptorship had an impact on student nurses selecting a nursing career. These results can give nurse educators guidance in preparing student nurses as they enter the work force.

  7. A study to assess the knowledge about sexual health among male students of junior colleges of an urban area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayant Ramchandra Kalkute

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sexuality is an important part of personality of adolescents. The age of sexual debut is falling globally. The subject of adolescent sexuality is taboo in most societies. Since 2007 sexual health education program has been banned in six states including Maharashtra and Karnataka. This may lead to misconceptions about sexual heath knowledge and practices among young people. Objective: The aim was to assess the knowledge about sexual health among male students of junior colleges of an urban area and to evaluate the change in their knowledge after imparting sexual health education. Settings and Design: Pre-post-intervention study. Materials and Methods: All 245 male students of 11 th standard of all three educational streams of two junior colleges were included in the study. The data analysis was performed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences 18. Results: Science students had "adequate" knowledge about sexual health when compared to arts and commerce students (P = 0.004. Students whose parents were unskilled and semiskilled by occupation had "inadequate" knowledge about sexual health when compared with students whose parents were skilled by occupation (P < 0.05. Education of parents had positive effect on the knowledge about sexual health of students (P = 0.062. In posttest, the knowledge about sexual health of students was found to have increased significantly when compared to pretest. The mean posttest score was 12.61 (standard deviation [SD] 3.12, which was significantly higher than the mean pretest score of 6.34 (SD 3.23 (P < 0.001. Students from nuclear families had "adequate" knowledge about sexual health when compared to students from joint families (P = 0.158 Conclusion: Imparting knowledge about sexual health in adolescent age will be beneficial to the students in avoiding risky sexual behavior. Such educational programs must be given due importance to achieve desirable behavior change among them.

  8. The Countermeasure Analysis of the Five-year Junior College Students' Moral Education%五年制大专生德育工作对策探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    昝彪

    2014-01-01

    五年制大专是大专教育的一种特有教育模式。五年制大专学生入学年龄小、心理不成熟、适应环境慢,加之学校重视不够、德育目标不明、社会认同不高等因素影响了他们在大学校园健康成长和认真学习。本文从五年制大专管理现状和学生心理特点入手,针对五年制大专学生德育工作存在的问题,提出了几点对策,希望对从事五年制大专德育工作的同行有一定的帮助。%The five-year junior college is a special educational model of higher education. The five-year college students are en-rolled at a young age, and they are psychologically immature, so they can slowly adapt to the environment, coupled with inade-quate attention of the colleges, their moral education goal is un-clear, and social recognition is low, etc. All these factors affect their personal growth and academic study. Starting from the man-agement of the five-year junior colleges and psychological char-acteristics of students,and focusing on the problems in the moral education of the five-year junior colleges, this thesis proposes some countermeasures, hoping this will help teachers who work in the field of moral education of the five-year junior colleges.

  9. A Behavioral Learning System in Foreign Languages at Tarrant County Junior College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jane

    1975-01-01

    Since students enter a community college with varying backgrounds and educational preparation, one college uses self-paced individualized instruction in foreign languages. Activities include large and small group meetings, conferences with peer tutors and such materials as cassette tapes, slides and videotapes. Students proceed through modules at…

  10. Second Language Acquisition by Children: A Review of Twelve Years at Tarrant County Junior College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jane; Lively, Madeleine

    The history and organization of a community college program in French, Spanish, and German language instruction for gifted elementary school children are described. The collaborative effort of the college and school districts, funded by the Federal Government and the Gifted Students Institute, provided 21 elementary teachers with methods training…

  11. Influences of Teaching Methods and Personality on Junior College Students in Macroeconomic Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Saul Z.; Carr, Glenna D.

    1979-01-01

    Results of a study indicate that beginning courses in college economics should be taught with fewer lectures and more student involvement. Current events and group activities should be an integral part of classes. (Author/KC)

  12. Development and analysis of spectroscopic learning tools and the light and spectroscopy concept inventory for introductory college astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardar, Erin M.

    Electromagnetic radiation is the fundamental carrier of astronomical information. Spectral features serve as the fingerprints of the universe, revealing many important properties of objects in the cosmos such as temperature, elemental compositions, and relative motion. Because of its importance to astronomical research, the nature of light and the electromagnetic spectrum is by far the most universally covered topic in astronomy education. Yet, to the surprise and disappointment of instructors, many students struggle to understand underlying fundamental concepts related to light and spectroscopic phenomena. This dissertation describes research into introductory college astronomy students' understanding of light and spectroscopy concepts, through the development and analysis of both instructional materials and an assessment instrument. The purpose of this research was two-fold: (1) to develop a novel suite of spectroscopic learning tools that enhance student understanding of light and spectroscopy and (2) to design and validate a Light and Spectroscopy Concept Inventory (LSCI) with the sensitivity to distinguish the relative effectiveness of various teaching interventions within the context of introductory college astronomy. Through a systematic investigation that included multiple rounds of clinical interviews, open-ended written surveys, and multiple-choice testing, introductory college astronomy students' commonly held misconceptions and reasoning difficulties were explored for concepts relating to: (1) The nature of the electromagnetic spectrum, including the interrelationships of wavelength, frequency, energy, and speed; (2) interpretation of Doppler shift; (3) properties of blackbody radiation; and (4) the connection between spectral features and underlying physical processes. These difficulties guided the development of instructional materials including six unique "homelab" exercises, a binocular spectrometer, a spectral analysis software tool, and the 26

  13. COUNSELING TECHNIQUES WITH POTENTIAL DROP-OUT STUDENTS IN JUNIOR COLLEGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KUNHART, WILLIAM E.; ROLEDER, GEORGE

    AN ATTITUDE QUESTIONNAIRE PREVIOUSLY FOUND TO BE SUCCESSFUL IN IDENTIFYING POTENTIAL DROPOUTS WAS COMPLETED BY 450 PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS AT MOUNT SAN ANTONIO COLLEGE. THOSE IDENTIFIED AS POTENTIAL DROPOUTS (N-186) WERE RANDOMLY ASSIGNED TO GROUPS OF 62 SUBJECTS. IN THREE 1-HOUR GROUP COUNSELING SESSIONS, ONE GROUP WAS SUBMITTED TO A DIRECTIVE…

  14. Instructional Objectives for Junior College Courses in Nursing: Medical Surgical Nursing I; and Obstetrics Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Leslie, Comp.

    These instructional objectives have been selected from materials used at Golden West College (California). These objectives are offered simply as samples that may be used where they correspond to the skills, abilities, and attitudes instructors want their students to acquire. These objectives may also serve as models for assisting instructors to…

  15. One Paradigm for Vocational-Technical Counseling (Santa Fe Junior College Workshop, Gainsville, Florida, June 1969).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Fe Community Coll., Gainesville, FL.

    The purpose of this summer workshop was to enhance communication channels between the public school and college personnel, to acquaint public school personnel with resources for enlarging their counseling programs, and to expand upon the concept of vocational counseling. Presentations included (1) "New Dimensions/Problems in Secondary School…

  16. Instructional Objectives for a Junior College Course in Human Anatomy-Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Leslie, Comp.

    These instructional objectives, written by Norman E. Rich, have been selected from materials used at Golden West College (California). These objectives are offered simply as samples that may be used where they correspond to the skills, abilities, and attitudes instructors want their students to acquire. These objectives may also serve as models…

  17. TeachAstronomy.com - Digitizing Astronomy Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardegree-Ullman, Kevin; Impey, C. D.; Austin, C.; Patikkal, A.; Paul, M.; Ganesan, N.

    2013-06-01

    Teach Astronomy—a new, free online resource—can be used as a teaching tool in non-science major introductory college level astronomy courses, and as a reference guide for casual learners and hobbyists. Digital content available on Teach Astronomy includes: a comprehensive introductory astronomy textbook by Chris Impey, Wikipedia astronomy articles, images from Astronomy Picture of the Day archives and (new) AstroPix database, two to three minute topical video clips by Chris Impey, podcasts from 365 Days of Astronomy archives, and an RSS feed of astronomy news from Science Daily. Teach Astronomy features an original technology called the Wikimap to cluster, display, and navigate site search results. Development of Teach Astronomy was motivated by steep increases in textbook prices, the rapid adoption of digital resources by students and the public, and the modern capabilities of digital technology. This past spring semester Teach Astronomy was used as content supplement to lectures in a massive, open, online course (MOOC) taught by Chris Impey. Usage of Teach Astronomy has been steadily growing since its initial release in August of 2012. The site has users in all corners of the country and is being used as a primary teaching tool in at least four states.

  18. Expectations Of Majlis Amanah Rakyat (MARA Stakeholders On The Ulul Albab Curriculum At A MARA Junior Science College (MRSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umi Kalthom Abdul Manaf

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Ulul Albab is an educational programme of integration between the existing programmes in MARA Junior Science College (MRSM with the religious school programme including Tahfiz Al-Quran. MRSM Ulul Albab education programme is designed to produce professional experts, entrepreneurs and technocrats that are well versed in the field of religion-based Al-Quran and Sunnah as Ulul Albab generation. This study aims to explore stakeholders' expectations on the Ulul Albab programme in MRSM Kota Putra, Besut Terengganu towards students' sahsiah. The methodology used was qualitative in nature in the form of semi-structured interviews conducted with the four MARA stakeholders. Validity and reliability of data were done through several techniques employed such as member checking, rich thick description, clarification of researcher biases, peer review and debriefing, and external audit. The findings from this study indicate that inculcation of akhlak is fundamental in human capital development. This is the case because stakeholders believe that the main intention of the programme is to develop an Ulul Albab generation who are not only knowledgeable and skilled but also possess good qualities namely devotion, noble, responsible and committed to religion, nation and state. Aside from that, findings also showed that teaching and learning that is based on love is fundamental in fostering good akhlak.  

  19. Inquiring Astronomy: Incorporating Student-Centered Pedagogical Techniques in an Introductory College Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Debbie A.; Burrows, Andrea C.

    2017-01-01

    Increases in student-centered pedagogy have been more prevalent in K-12 education than in collegiate undergraduate science education. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of using student-centered pedagogy advocated in K-12 education on introductory astronomy students' content knowledge, interest, and recall of content taught in…

  20. Education and public outreach on gravitational-wave astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, M.; Bradaschia, C.; Audley, H.; Barke, S.; Blair, D. G.; Christensen, N.; Danzmann, K.; Freise, A.; Gerberding, O.; Knispel, B.; Lieser, M.; Mandel, I.; Moore, T.; Stuver, A.; Whiting, B.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we summarise the presentations given during the "Education and Public Outreach on Gravitational-Wave Astronomy" parallel session at the GR-20/Amaldi conference, held in Warsaw, July 2013. The talks presented demonstrate the wide range of education and public outreach activities being undertaken in the field of gravitational-wave astronomy—across science festivals, science education centers, junior schools and high schools, colleges and universities, via both face-to-face delivery and (increasingly) the internet and social media.

  1. [An examination of the relationships among career decision-making self-efficacy, vocational motives, and vocational indecision: a study of women's junior college students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, T

    2001-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine a causal model leading to the tendency of women's junior college students to delay vocational decisions. The model assumes that Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy (CDMSE) determines vocational motives, which in turn affect the tendency. A questionnaire was administered to 431, 199 first-year and 232 second-year, women's junior college students. CDMSE was measured with self-efficacy for self-appraisal and occupational information-gathering, and vocational motives were self-improvement, interpersonal, and status motives. Results showed that self-efficacy for self-appraisal influenced self-improvement motive for both first-year and second-year students. Self-improvement motive and the self-efficacy then influenced vocational indecision among second-year students. Self-efficacy for information-gathering influenced vocational indecision among first-year students. These findings suggest that college vocational guidance should take self-efficacy and vocational motives into account.

  2. Influencing Factors of Career Planning Education for Graduate from Junior College Student to University Student in Independent College%独立院校专升本职业规划教育的影响因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭立青; 朱性海; 李静超

    2013-01-01

      本文通过对独立学院专升本学生职业规划的现状分析,讨论影响专升本学生职业规划教育的主要影响因素,为提高学生职业生涯规划的能力寻找途径。%  This article analyzes the status quo of career planning for graduate from junior college student to university student in independent colleges, discusses the main influencing factors of career planning education, giving the approach to improving students' ability in career planning.

  3. Compendium of Practical Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Günter D.; Augensen, H. J.; Heintz, W. D.

    The Compendium of Practical Astronomy is a revised and enlarged English version of the fourth edition of G. Roth's famous handbook for stargazers. In three volumes 28 carefully edited articles aimed especially at amateur astronomers and students and teachers of astronomy in high schools and colleges cover the length and breadth of practical astronomy. Volume 1 contains information on modern instrumentation and reduction techniques, including spherical astronomy, error estimations, telescope mountings, astrophotography, and more. Volume 2 covers the planetary system, with contributions on artificial satellites, comets, the polar aurorae, and the effects of the atmophere on observational data. Volume 3 is devoted to stellar objects, variable stars and binary stars in particular, the Milky Way and Galaxies. An introduction to the astronomical literature and a comprehensive chapter on astronomy education and instructional aids make the Compendium a useful complement to any college library.

  4. International Asteroid Search Campaign: An Educational Outreach Program in Astronomy for High Schools and Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. P.; Juliano, D.; Davis, J. W.; Holmes, R. E.; Devore, H.; Raab, H.; Pennypacker, C. R.; White, G. L.; Gould, A.

    2008-03-01

    The International Asteroid Search Campaign is an Internet-based program for high schools and colleges. Schools receive images, analyzed by students searching for asteroids and NEOs. Students have 71 asteroid discoveries and 1376 NEO observations.

  5. 当前师范专科生休闲教育策略探讨%Exploration on the Strategies of Leisure Education for the Current Junior Normal College Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯艳丽

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the effectiveness of leisure educa-tion for the current junior normal college students, we should strive to construct a complete ecological system for leisure educa-tion, starting from the government, schools, families, the society and junior normal college students themselves.%为了提高当前师范专科生休闲教育的实效性,我们必须从政府、学校、家庭、社会以及师范专科生自身出发,努力构建休闲教育的完整生态系统。

  6. The Self-efficacy of Junior Faculty in Independent Colleges%独立学院青年教师自我效能感及其提升策略研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢乔昕

    2016-01-01

    Due to the uncertainty of the development of the independent college and the stage of the career, the self-efficacy of junior faculty of independent colleges has its characteristics. The influencing factors of the self-efficacy of junior faculty in independ-ent colleges are mainly from two aspects:the independent college and the teachers. According to the analytical results, the cultiva-tion system of junior faculty should be improved, attribution guidance should be enhanced and the scientific evaluation system and effective incentive mechanism should be established for improving the self-efficacy of junior faculty in independent colleges.%由于独立学院发展以及职业生涯所处阶段的不确定性,独立学院青年教师自我效能感培养具有其特殊性。独立学院青年教师自我效能感的主要影响因素来源于独立学院与教师自身两方面。要提升独立学院青年教师自我效能感,可通过构建完善青年教师培养体系、加强归因指导、建立科学评价机制和有效的激励机制等多方面措施入手。

  7. Preservice Science Teachers' Beliefs about Astronomy Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Gulbin; Akcay, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate preservice science teachers' conceptual understanding of astronomy concepts. Qualitative research methods were used. The sample consists of 118 preservice science teachers (40 freshmen, 31 sophomores, and 47 juniors). The data were collected with Astronomy Conceptual Questionnaire (ACQ) that includes 13…

  8. The Introductory Advertising Course: Organization, Content, Textbooks and Testing; Proceedings of the Association for Education in Journalism-Junior College Journalism Association Advertising Workshop (Ft. Collins, Colorado, August, 1973).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Jerry R., Ed.; Bowers, Thomas A., Ed.

    This report describes the proceedings of the Association for Education in Journalism--Junior College Journalism Association Advertising Workshop, held at Fort Collins, Colorado, with the general objective of organizing an introductory advertising course. The specific objectives of the workshop were to determine the content, textbooks, and types of…

  9. Improvement of Instruction in Critical Foreign Languages: A Report on the 1987 Languages for Communication Workshops at Tarrant County Junior College Northeast Campus (Hurst, Texas, July 13-August 6, 1987).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jane; And Others

    Since 1985, Tarrant County Junior College, Northeast Campus, in Hurst, Texas has offered workshops and classes for secondary school teachers of foreign languages. The series of 10 16-hour workshops held during summer 1987 were intended primarily as in-service training for secondary school foreign language teachers and secondarily as a retraining…

  10. A Brief History of Publishing Papers on Astronomy Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    While some research had been done on K-12 and planetarium astronomy teaching from the 1930's to the 1980's, the growth of research on college physics education offered astronomy education researchers a model for examining techniques for teaching introductory college astronomy survey "Astronomy 101" courses as well. This early research…

  11. Handbook of Practical Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Roth, Günter D

    2009-01-01

    With amateurs, students, and teachers of astronomy in high schools and colleges particularly in mind, the Handbook of Practical Astronomy is an essential source to demonstrate trends and variety of astronomical observations. The book presents the substance of celestial bodies for the amateur observer: the planets, the stars, and the galaxies. The sun is the local link to the other stars, the nexus of cosmic evolution. The solar system is made up by the sun and all the celestial bodies orbit it. This system is of special interest for the observing amateur. The Handbook of Practial Astronomy spans astronomy, education and computing. Like many other fields of science, astronomy has become digitized and data rich in recent years. Besides the references at the end of each chapter, there are the notes in the margins with astronomical news and observing highlights on the web.

  12. The Role of Assessment in the Development of the College Introductory Astronomy Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissenden, Gina; Slater, Timothy F.; Mathieu, Robert D.; National InstituteScience Education Nise College Level-One Team

    What is assessment? Why do it? Why do it in a particular way? This document addresses these important questions and provides a practical "how-to" guide for doing assessment. Assessment drives student learning; it is thus imperative that instructors conduct assessment in a manner that is well aligned with the instructor's goals for the course. This requires (a) that course goals be formalized, and (b) that the instructor have knowledge of various classroom assessment techniques and the kinds of course goals to which each of these assessment techniques is best suited. We briefly present several Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) that can be used to help instructors evaluate the extent to which course goals are being achieved, to help guide students toward desired learning outcomes, and to improve student self-evaluation of understanding. In addition, we outline a practical, generalized model for course development with which we demonstrate how to do assessment. For an on-line, user-friendly guide and resource to classroom assessment in college science courses, the reader is invited to visit the Field-Tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) developed by the National Institute for Science Education (http://www.wcer.wisc.edu/nise/cl1/flag).

  13. Curricular Derivatives in Undergraduate Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, L. K.

    2002-12-01

    With faculty positions becoming increasingly competitive, the smaller or specialized universities and colleges have become more attractive to the new Ph.D. graduate and post-doc interested in a career in teaching and research. However, the limitations of smaller research resources, and a more limited curricula, and higher teaching loads can make the smaller school less attractive and the position challenging. Nevertheless, smaller institutions can offer greater flexibility in educational innovation, including unique curricula, than larger schools with inherently greater administrative mass. Even without astronomy degree programs or without substantial research facilities, the smaller, private or specialized school environment can provide opportunities to develop courses tailored to the strengths of the school, and to student interests, and more importantly, to the energetic efforts of junior faculty. The author's advocacy for and development of new curricula at a small institution are presented, along with several descriptive examples. Unique aspects of these courses are also characterized in their suitability for research projects, educational outreach and other applications.

  14. Student Attitudes Towards Public Funding Of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stine, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Research in astronomy is strongly dependent on public (taxpayer) dollars. In this study we examine the attitudes of college students toward funding of astronomy projects. A survey was given to 269 college students prior to taking an introductory astronomy course. Students were given a short test designed to examine misconceptions about astronomy. They were then asked about their willingness to support public funding for astronomy projects. Students with fundamental misconceptions about mundane topics such as the cause of the seasons and phases of the moon were less than half as likely to support public funding of astronomy projects. Results are also reported showing the relationship between a willingness to fund projects and whether the students had experiences including reading books or magazines on astronomy, exposure to astronomy in high school, and using a telescope.

  15. Clinical competencies and index system of junior college nursing students%护理大专毕业生应具备的临床能力指标体系的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李惠艳

    2011-01-01

    Objective To identify the clinical competencies of junior college nursing students, so as to provide bases for training goals and evaluating junior college nursing students. Methods Delphi method was used in this study, and the clinical competencies were identified through two rounds of expert consultation. Results The clinical competencies that junior college nursing students should have included three first - level indicators and 29 secondary - level indicators. The first - level indicators were clinical nursing abilities, nursing management and scientific abilities, nursing occupation quality. Conclusion The coefficients of experts'enthusiasm, the extent of authority, the concentration and harmonization of experts'opinions are relatively high, so the evaluation criteria system is reliable and can provide guidance for junior college nursing students training.%目的 探讨护理大专毕业生应具备的临床能力,为护理大专生培养目标的制定、临床能力的评价提供依据.方法 应用德尔菲法就护理大专毕业生应具备的临床能力进行2轮函询.结果 护理大专毕业生应具备的临床能力包括临床护理能力、护理管理与科研能力、护理职业素质3个一级指标及29个二级指标.结论 专家积极性、权威程度及专家意见的集中程度和对指标评价结果的一致程度均较高,显示研究结果可信程度较高,可以为护理大专毕业生的培养提供指导.

  16. The Exploration Based on Hierarchy of Needs Theory in the Management of the Five-year Junior College Students%基于需要层次理论的五年制专科学生管理探究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩张娜

    2011-01-01

    This paper proceeds with the characteristics of tile five - year junior college students, analyzes me relation between the needs of the five -year junior college student and Maslow's hierarchy theory of needs, and makes use it to the students'management work. It will meet the students' longing needs, esteem needs and selfactualization needs through physiological needs, safety needs, love and bethe various measures , and will promote the continuous improvement of the five -year junior college students' management work.%从五年一贯制专科学生的特点入手,分析了五年制专科学生需要与马斯洛的需要层次理论的对应关系,并将其应用到学生管理工作中,通过各种管理措施满足学生生理需要、安全需要、归属和爱的需要、尊重需要和自我实现的需要,促进五年制专科学生管理工作的不断完善。

  17. Social Studies: Economics, International Relations, and Political Science. Latin American Curriculum Units for Junior and Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glade, William P.; Baldwin, Emily

    These three self-contained units of study will help community college students learn about the economics, international relations, and politics of Latin America. Each unit can be used independently and contains introductory notes for instructors, student materials, and a bibliography. Students are expected to read and discuss the reading…

  18. Early Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Hugh

    The earliest investigations that can be called scientific are concerned with the sky: they are the beginnings of astronomy. Many early civilizations produced astronomical texts, and several cultures that left no written records left monuments and artifacts-ranging from rock paintings to Stonehenge-that show a clear interest in astronomy. Civilizations in China, Mesopotamia, India and Greece had highly developed astronomies, and the astronomy of the Mayas was by no means negligible. Greek astronomy, as developed by the medieval Arab philosophers, evolved into the astronomy of Copernicus. This displaced the earth from the central stationary position that almost all earlier astronomies had assumed. Soon thereafter, in the first decades of the seventeenth century, Kepler found the true shape of the planetary orbits and Galileo introduced the telescope for astronomical observations.

  19. 大专护生评判性思维的调查及相关因素分析%Investigation of critical thinking and analysis of its relevant factors of junior college nursing student

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祁俊菊; 杨红; 王瑞敏; 杜秋华; 兰丁; 李佟玲

    2011-01-01

    目的 测评大专护生评判性思维能力并分析其影响因素,为改革护理专业大专的课程设置及教学策略提供参考依据.方法 采用评判性思维测量表(CTS)对我校护理专业94名大专学生进行问卷调查.结果 大专护生CTS总分平均为81.81分,说明具有正性评判性思维能力;其评判性思维能力与曾在班委或学生会任职和兼职呈负相关.结论 学校应在人才培养、课程设置和教学方法等方面深化改革,进一步培养和强化护生评判性思维的能力.%Objective To investigate critical thinking of junior college nursing student and analyze the relevant factors, so as to provide basis for curriculum reform and teaching strategy in nursing college. Methods 94junior college nursing students were surveyed with Critical Thinking Scale (CTS). Results Average score of CTS of junior college nursing students was 81.81, indicating positively critical thinking skills. Critical thinking skill was negatively associated with attendance of class committee or student union. Conclusions Colleges should promote reform of student cultivation, curriculum settings and teaching method, and develop and intensify critical thinking of the students.

  20. Teaching of Astronomy at Teresa Martin College. (Breton Title: Ensino de Astronomia Nas Faculdades Teresa Martin.) Enseñanza de la Astronomia en la Facultad Teresa Martin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo Sobreira, Paulo Henrique

    2005-12-01

    Courses with exclusive Astronomy contents did not exist at (FATEMA) Teresa Martin College's program until the end of 2002. In 2001, a series of educational experiments started in courses and classes of Astronomy at Mathematics and Geography departments. This actions culminated with the insertion of Teaching of Astronomy as a study theme in the course of Independent Studies for Mathematics professors in 2005. Até o final de 2002 inexistiam na grade curricular das Faculdades Integradas Teresa Martin (FATEMA) cadeiras com conteúdos exclusivos de Astronomia. A partir do ano de 2001 iniciou-se uma série de experiências educacionais através de modelos de cursos e de aulas de Astronomia nos Departamentos de Matemática e de Geografia, o que culminou com a inserção do Ensino de Astronomia como temática da disciplina de Estudos Independentes para o curso de Licenciatura em Matemática, em 2005. Hasta el final de 2002 no había en el currículo dela Facultad TeresaMartín (FATEMA) en San Pablo - SP, Brasil, disciplinas con contenidos exclusivos de Astronomía. A partir del año 2001 comenzó una secuencia de experimentos educacionales de carrera y de clases de Astronomía en los Departamentos de Matemática y Geografía, culminando en la implantación de clases de Enseñanza dela Astronomíaenla Licenciaturaen Matemática, en el año de 2003, y de la cátedra de extensión en Cosmografía parala Licenciaturaen Geografía.

  1. Research on teaching astronomy in the planetarium

    CERN Document Server

    Slater, Timothy F

    2017-01-01

    From a noted specialist in astronomy education and outreach, this Brief provides an overview of the most influential discipline-based science education research literature now guiding contemporary astronomy teaching. In recent years, systematic studies of effective and efficient teaching strategies have provided a solid foundation for enhancing college-level students’ learning in astronomy. Teaching astronomy and planetary science at the college-level was once best characterized as professor-centered, information-download lectures. Today, astronomy faculty are striving to drastically improve the learning environment by using innovative teaching approaches.  Uniquely, the authors have organized this book around strands of commonly employed astronomy teaching strategies to help readers, professors, and scholars quickly access the most relevant work while, simultaneously, avoiding the highly specialized, technical vocabulary of constructivist educational pedagogies unfamiliar to most astronomy professors. F...

  2. The "Well-Futured" College: Reaching for Tommorrow--Today. Southern Association of Community and Junior Colleges Occasional Paper, Volume 3, Number 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Harold G.

    Much of the current crisis in education has its roots in an inability of colleges to get beyond a "now-oriented" approach to problems within the educational system. It is time for the educational focus to be directed toward anticipating alternative futures since the application of selected perspectives and procedures drawn from the field of…

  3. General Education Earth, Astronomy and Space Science College Courses Serve as a Vehicle for Improving Science Literacy in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, E.

    2011-10-01

    Every year approximately 500,000 undergraduate college students take a general education Earth, Astronomy and Space Science (EASS) course in the Unites States. For the majority of these students this will be their last physical science course in life. This population of students is incredibly important to the science literacy of the United States citizenry and to the success of the STEM career pipeline. These students represent future scientists, technologists, business leaders, politicians, journalists, historians, artists, and most importantly, policy makers, parents, voters, and teachers. A significant portion of these students are taught at minority serving institutions and community colleges and often are from underserved and underrepresented groups, such as women and minorities. Members of the Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) at the University of Arizona have been developing and conducting research on the effectiveness of instructional strategies and materials that are explicitly designed to challenge students' naïve ideas and intellectually engage their thinking at a deep level in the traditional lecture classroom. The results of this work show that dramatic improvement in student understanding can be made from increased use of interactive learning strategies. These improvements are shown to be independent of institution type or class size, but appear to be strongly influenced by the quality of the instructor's implementation. In addition, we find that the positive effects of interactive learning strategies apply equally to men and women, across ethnicities, for students with all levels of prior mathematical preparation and physical science course experience, independent of GPA, and regardless of primary language. These results powerfully illustrate that all students can benefit from the effective implementation of interactive learning strategies.

  4. A Study on the Characteristics of the Difficulties in Career Decision-Making of Higher Vocational and Junior College Stu%重庆市高职高专学生职业决策困难特点研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃江霞; 冯静; 李亮靓

    2011-01-01

    by the method of questionnaire,this paper made a preliminary study and analysis on the current situation and traits of the Difficulties in Career Decision-Making of Higher Vocational and Junior College Students in Chongqing,and then proposed some suggesti%本研究采用问卷调查法,对重庆市高职高专院校学生职业决策困难的现状和特点进行了初步调查和分析,并据此提出开展高职高专学生职业指导教育方面的建议。

  5. Expo Junior

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Fort de son succès Expo Juniors revient du 22 au 23 novembre 2014 - Papa & Maman Noël seront présents ! Nous avons le plaisir de  proposer à nos membres des billets d'entrées  à un tarif préférentiel, au prix de CHF 10.- l'unité au lieu de CHF 18.- (gratuit pour les enfants de 0 à 4 ans). Des centaines d’ateliers répartis en 3 villages : Sports & Loisirs, Jeux & Jouets, Éducation & Vie pratique. Cet événement propose aux familles aussi d'autres thèmes : tourisme, idées cadeaux, mode, bien-être, beauté, décoration, ainsi que des services destinés aux familles. Parades, attractions, castings, défilés de mode, dédicaces, séances photos avec Papa Noël, ainsi que de nombre...

  6. Greek astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Heath, Sir Thomas L

    2011-01-01

    Astronomy as a science began with the Ionian philosophers, with whom Greek philosophy and mathematics also began. While the Egyptians and Babylonians had accomplished much of astronomical worth, it remained for the unrivalled speculative genius of the Greeks, in particular, their mathematical genius, to lay the foundations of the true science of astronomy. In this classic study, a noted scholar discusses in lucid detail the specific advances made by the Greeks, many of whose ideas anticipated the discoveries of modern astronomy.Pythagoras, born at Samos about 572 B.C., was probably the first

  7. How to Increase Correct Learning of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojaev, Alisher S.

    Astronomy is the most popular and attractive among the sciences. Undoubtedly the importance of exact knowledge of astronomy is becoming more and more important. However the level of teaching of astronomy at schools lyceums colleges and even universities especially in the FSU countries is far to be satisfactorily. Moreover some astronomy related information in the mass media (TV newspapersetc.) has often an incorrect statements. We see the key role of astronomical organizations and each of astronomers in an application of the correct knowledge in the curriculum popularization and control of the astronomical presentations in the mass media. The wide spreading of the Internet recently having place particularly in Uzbekistan gives a new possibilities for increase the learning of astronomy utilize the remote education tools open new frontiers for wide popularization of astronomy. The arrangement of practical excursions public lectures and presentations of the news in astronomy held in UBAI is discussed. Some other idea to improve are given.

  8. Fundamental Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Karttunen, Hannu; Oja, Heikki; Poutanen, Markku; Donner, Karl Johan

    2007-01-01

    Fundamental Astronomy gives a well-balanced and comprehensive introduction to the topics of classical and modern astronomy. While emphasizing both the astronomical concepts and the underlying physical principles, the text provides a sound basis for more profound studies in the astronomical sciences. The fifth edition of this successful undergraduate textbook has been extensively modernized and extended in the parts dealing with the Milky Way, extragalactic astronomy and cosmology as well as with extrasolar planets and the solar system (as a consequence of recent results from satellite missions and the new definition by the International Astronomical Union of planets, dwarf planets and small solar-system bodies). Furthermore a new chapter on astrobiology has been added. Long considered a standard text for physical science majors, Fundamental Astronomy is also an excellent reference and entrée for dedicated amateur astronomers.

  9. Astronomy Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, A.; Madsen, C.

    2003-07-01

    Astronomers communicate all the time, with colleagues of course, but also with managers and administrators, with decision makers and takers, with social representatives, with the news media, and with the society at large. Education is naturally part of the process. Astronomy communication must take into account several specificities: the astronomy community is rather compact and well organized world-wide; astronomy has penetrated the general public remarkably well with an extensive network of associations and organizations of aficionados all over the world. Also, as a result of the huge amount of data accumulated and by necessity for their extensive international collaborations, astronomers have pioneered the development of distributed resources, electronic communications and networks coupled to advanced methodologies and technologies, often much before they become of common world-wide usage. This book is filling up a gap in the astronomy-related literature by providing a set of chapters not only of direct interest to astronomy communication, but also well beyond it. The experts contributing to this book have done their best to write in a way understandable to readers not necessarily hyperspecialized in astronomy nor in communication techniques while providing specific detailed information, as well as plenty of pointers and bibliographic elements. This book will be very useful for researchers, teachers, editors, publishers, librarians, computer scientists, sociologists of science, research planners and strategists, project managers, public-relations officers, plus those in charge of astronomy-related organizations, as well as for students aiming at a career in astronomy or related space science. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-1345-0

  10. Education and National Condition of General Medical Training on Physicians with Junior College Diplomas%专科层次的全科医学教育与国情

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐江荣; 郭化山; 乌建平

    2011-01-01

    我国农村社区卫生人才短缺,总体素质不高,特别是全科医学人才严重匮乏.利用专科层次全科医学教育"短、平、快"的特点,推行全科医学教育普及和充实农村社区基层医疗人才队伍,能够满足基层民众健康医疗的需求,符合现阶段的我国国情.专科层次的全科医学教育人才培养模式对创建中国特色的全科人才培养之路具有积极与深远的意义.%Because of the shortage of medical personnel in rural communities and the low level of the overall quality,especially the severe shortage of general medical personnel, universal implementation of general medical education and enrichment of the primary health care personnel in rural communities according to the fastness of training of junior college-leveled physicians can meet the needs of the primary health care for the public, which is in line with the current situation of our country. The training model for general medical personnel of junior college levels has a positive and far - reaching significance for cultivating talents on general medicine in a special Chinese way.

  11. Empiricism of English listening instruction based on metacognitive strategy training in a junior college%基于元认知策略培训的高职英语听力教学实证研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔颖

    2012-01-01

    以深圳信息职业技术学院应用外语学院09级商务英语专业学生为研究对象,进行为期十二周的听力元认知策略培训。实证研究结果表明:元认知策略培训能够促进高职英语专业学生对元认知知识的掌握和应用,但对学生听力水平的促进作用短期内并不明显。%This paper is designed to present the results of an empirical study of English listening instruction based on metacognitive strategy training in a junior college.A 12-week English listening instruction based on metacognitive strategy training was carried out.The results show that metacognitive strategy training can help English majors in junior colleges grasp and apply metacognitive knowledge,while the influence on listening ability is not obvious within a short time.

  12. Colonial American Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeomans, Donald K.

    2007-12-01

    While a foundation of German scientific methods enabled the rapid growth of North American Astronomy in the nineteenth century, during the seventeenth and most of the eighteenth centuries, the colonial men of science looked only to the English mother country for scientific patronage and guidance. An essay on fundamental astronomy appeared in one of the annual colonial almanacs as early as 1656, telescopic observations were made about 1660 and the first original colonial astronomical work was published by Thomas Danforth on the comet of 1664. By 1671 the Copernican ideas were so espoused at Harvard College that a physics class refused to read a Ptolemaic textbook when it was assigned to them by a senior instructor. At least in the Cambridge-Boston area, contemporary colonialist had access to the most recent scientific publications from the mother country. Observations of the great comet of 1680 by the Almanac maker, John Foster, reached Isaac Newton and were used and gratefully acknowledged in his Principia. During the seventeenth century the colonial interest in astronomy was more intense than it was for other sciences but colonists still occupied a position in the scientific backwater when compared with contemporary European scientists. Nevertheless, the science of astronomy was successfully transplanted from England to North America in the seventeenth century.

  13. Analysis of Individual "Test Of Astronomy STandards" (TOAST) Item Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Stephanie J.; Schleigh, Sharon Price; Stork, Debra J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of valid and reliable strategies to efficiently determine the knowledge landscape of introductory astronomy college students is an effort of great interest to the astronomy education community. This study examines individual item response rates from a widely used conceptual understanding survey, the Test Of Astronomy Standards…

  14. John Brozovsky appointed Wayne E. Leininger Junior Faculty Fellow

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    John Brozovsky, associate professor of accounting and information systems in the Pamplin College of Business at Virginia Tech, has been appointed the Wayne E. Leininger Junior Faculty Fellow by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

  15. Minoan Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Mary; Henriksson, Göran

    Of the three great cultures of the ancient eastern Mediterranean — the Babylonian, Egyptian, and Minoan — we have considerable knowledge of the astronomy of the first two through their documents (see relevant sections of this Handbook). Very little written material, however, has survived from Minoan Crete, but the evidence of other impressive archaeological discoveries implies that the inhabitants were on a par with their neighbors and had made similar advances in astronomy. In lieu of written sources, we have used the methods of archaeoastronomy to recover as much as possible about Minoan astronomy. In short, these are measuring the orientations of walls and their opposite horizons at a representative selection of monuments, analyzing the measurements statistically, and comparing the results with digital reconstruction of the positions of significant celestial bodies for the time when the walls were built.

  16. Astronomy Allies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flewelling, Heather; Alatalo, Katherine A.

    2017-01-01

    Imagine you are a grad student, at your first conference, and a prominent senior scientist shows interest in your work, and he makes things get way too personal? What would you do? Would you report it? Or would you decide, after a few other instances of harassment, that maybe you shouldn't pursue astronomy? Harassment is under-reported, the policies can be difficult to understand or hard to find, and it can be very intimidating as a young scientist to report it to the proper individuals. The Astronomy Allies Program is designed to help you with these sorts of problems. We are a group of volunteers that will help by doing the following: provide safe walks home during the conference, someone to talk to confidentially, as an intervener, as a resource to report harassment. The Allies are a diverse group of scientists committed to acting as mentors, advocates, and liaisons. The Winter 2015 AAS meeting was the first meeting that had Astronomy Allies, and Astronomy Allies provided a website for information, as well as a twitter, email, and phone number for anyone who needs our help or would like more information. We posted about the Astronomy Allies on the Women In Astronomy blog, and this program resonates with many people: either they want to help, or they have experienced harassment in the past and don't want to see it in the future. Harassment may not happen to most conference participants, but it's wrong, it's against the AAS anti-harassment policy ( http://aas.org/policies/anti-harassment-policy ), it can be very damaging, and if it happens to even one person, that is unacceptable. We intend to improve the culture at conferences to make it so that harassers feel they can't get away with their unprofessional behavior.

  17. Astronomy essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Brass, Charles O

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Astronomy includes the historical perspective of astronomy, sky basics and the celestial coordinate systems, a model and the origin of the solar system, the sun, the planets, Kepler'

  18. A survey on reproductive health of junior college students in a Nanjing university%南京某大学一年级学生生殖健康状况调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴晓丽; 张锦文; 胡晨

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the current situation of reproductive health in the junior college students of a Nanjing university. Methods: We used a random cluster sampling to recruit the junior college students in Nanjing City and investigated their reproductive health related knowledge, attitude and behaviors, and the related factors. Results: Most of junior college students (90.5% ) showed a relatively acceptance to the premarital sex. 16.0% of them had had sexual experiences. The students had some general contraceptive knowledges, but the knowledge about the detailed usage of the methods was relatively limited. 70. 7% of those with sexual experience reported the consistent use of condom in each sexual engagement, but the rate of induced abortion was as high as 64.7% in the girl students who had had sex. The related factors to the premarital sex included the high educational levels of the parents, inharmonious parental relation, urban residence, and the divorced families or single - parent family. The proportion of the only child in the group with sexual experience was lower than that in the group without sexual experience. The students got access to the reproductive knowledges from TV/newspaper/books, peer friends, senior family members, internet/media and school courses in decreasing order. Conclusions; The junior college students showed a relatively high tolerance of premarital sex, but their reproductive knowledge was limited and the rate of unexpected pregnancy was high. The family characteristics had some effect on the premarital sex of the students. It is recommended that the universities should strengthen the reproductive health education.%目的:了解大学低年级学生生殖健康状况.方法:采用整群随机抽样法抽取南京市某统招高校一年级大学生,调查他们生殖健康相关的知信行发生状况及相关因素.结果:90.5%的大学生对于婚前性行为态度较宽容;知晓避孕方法的较多,但是对于避孕措施的

  19. A cognition and demand survey on chemotherapeutic self-protection knowledge among junior college and college nursing students before starting their internship in a tumor hopspital from Sichuan province%对四川省某肿瘤专科医院护生实习前化疗防护认知及需求情况的调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗蕾; 缪艳; 易勇

    2013-01-01

    目的 了解本科及专科护生在实习前对化疗防护的认知及需求情况.方法 参考美国职业安全健康管理局(OSHA)抗肿瘤药物的使用和防护要求自行设计调查问卷,对四川省某肿瘤医院192名本科及专科护生在实习前进行问卷调查.结果 实习前护生化疗防护知识普遍缺乏,本、专科护生对化疗药物污染、化疗废弃物处理方法的认知和需求,以及获取化疗防护知识途径方面的差异均有统计学意义(x2值分别为25.608,27.587,50.718,53.251,54.173,66.088;P <0.05);专科护生认知水平相对较低、对化疗前防护认知需求较高,从医学网站和杂志上获取知识少;两组护生希望获取化疗防护知识的教学方式上比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 肿瘤护理课程体系与教学方式有待于进一步完善,护生在实习前需系统化培训化疗防护知识,重点加强对专科护生的培训.%Objective To investigate the situation of cognition and demand for the chemotherapeutic self-protection knowledge among junior college and college nursing students before starting their internship.Methods To design questionnaire according to the U.S.Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations on the usage and protection requirements of anti-tumor drag,and to conduct a questionnaire survey of 192 junior college and college nursing students in our hospital before starting their internship.Results Before starting their internship,the students were lack of the chemotherapeutic selfprotection knowledge generally.There were significant differences between junior college nursing students and college nursing students in the situation of cognition and demand for chemotherapy contamination,in chemotherapy waste disposal methods,as well as ways to get chemotherapeutic self-protection knowledge (x2 =25.608,27.587,50.718,53.251,54.173,66.088 ; P < 0.05).Compared with college nursing students,junior college nursing

  20. Empiricism of writing strategies of English majors in a junior college%高职英语专业学生英语写作策略实证研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭晓丽

    2012-01-01

    本文以135名高职英语专业学生为研究对象,采用问卷调查的方法调查高职英语专业学生英语写作策略使用情况。研究表明:补偿策略和记忆策略的使用频率最高,不同年级、性别的受试者在写作策略使用上没有显著性差异,高分组与中分组和低分组之间存在显著性差异,但其频率均在"使用情况一般"的范畴内,只有元认知写作策略进入回归方程,对英语成绩有一定的预测作用。因此,高职英语专业学生的英语写作策略亟待提高。%The present study is based on a questionnaire investigation with 135 English majors in one of the junior colleges on their use of writing strategies.The results are presented with high frequency in the use of compensation strategy and memory strategy;there are no significant differences in the use of writing strategies among male and female students and students from different grades,but the significant difference does exist between good language learners and medium-and-low language learners;only metacognitive writing strategy has entered into the regression equation,which means it is directly related to one’s English performance.In conclusion,the use of writing strategy is rather weak and there is much room for improvement for English majors in the junior college.

  1. 沉浸式教学法在专科商务英语教学中的应用%Application of Immersive Method in the Teaching of Business English in Junior College

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨硕

    2015-01-01

    中国经济的快速发展以及经济全球化的趋势使得市场对商务英语专业的人才需求日益增加,而现有的教学过程中,英语的日常会话与商务英语专业知识结合并不紧密,这点在专科院校的商务英语教学中表现的尤其明显,专科学生相对英语能力较差,因此在面对商务英语学习时往往力不从心,而沉浸式教学法可以为学生提供良好的英语语境,将"商务"和"英语"更好地融合,从而将注意力集中于商务知识的学习,对商务英语人才培养具有特殊的价值和意义.%Along with the rapid development of China's economy, as well as the trend of economic globalization, the market demands more talents who are specialized in business English. Nowadays, the daily English conversation and the specialized knowledge of business English are not closely combined in the teaching process,which is especially common in the English teaching of junior colleges.The students of junior colleges with poor ability in English often fall short when leaning business English.The Immersive method provides the learners with a favorable English context which preferably combines "business" and"English".Thus, it focuses on the acquisition of business knowledge, and has a special value and significance for the cultivation of business English talents.

  2. Chaco astronomies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín López, Alejandro

    2015-08-01

    This presentation discusses the result of 18 years of ethnographic and ethnohistorical studies on Chaco astronomies. The main features of the systems of astronomical knowledge of the Chaco Aboriginal groups will be discussed. In particular we will discuss the relevance of the Milky Way, the role of the visibility of the Pleiades, the ways in which the celestial space is represented, the constitution of astronomical orientations in geographic space, etc. We also address a key feature of their vision of the cosmos: the universe is seen by these groups as a socio-cosmos, where humans and non-humans are related. These are therefore actually socio-cosmologies. We will link this to the theories of Chaco Aboriginal groups about power and political relations.We will discuss how the study of Aboriginal astronomies must be performed along with the studies about astronomies of Creole people and European migrants, as well as anthropological studies about the science teaching in the formal education system and by the mass media. In this form we will discuss the relevance of a very complex system of interethnic relations for the conformation of these astronomical representations and practices.We will also discuss the general methodological implications of this case for the ethnoastronomy studies. In particular we will talk about the advantages of a study of regional scope and about the key importance of put in contact the ethnoastronomy with contemporary issues in social sciences.We also analyze the importance of ethnoastronomy studies in relation to studies of sociology of science, especially astronomy. We also study the potential impact on improving formal and informal science curricula and in shaping effective policies to protect the tangible and intangible astronomical heritage in a context of respect for the rights of Aboriginal groups.

  3. Fundamental astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Kröger, Pekka; Oja, Heikki; Poutanen, Markku; Donner, Karl

    2017-01-01

    Now in its sixth edition this successful undergraduate textbook gives a well-balanced and comprehensive introduction to the topics of classical and modern astronomy. While emphasizing both the astronomical concepts and the underlying physical principles, the text provides a sound basis for more profound studies in the astronomical sciences. The chapters on galactic and extragalactic astronomy as well as cosmology were extensively modernized in the previous edition. In this new edition they have been further revised to include more recent results. The long chapter on the solar system has been split into two parts: the first one deals with the general properties, and the other one describes individual objects. A new chapter on exoplanets has been added to the end of the book next to the chapter on astrobiology. In response to the fact that astronomy has evolved enormously over the last few years, only a few chapters of this book have been left unmodified. Long considered a standard text for physical science maj...

  4. Correlation of meta moods and clinical behaviors of junior college nursing students%大专护生元情绪与临床实践行为相关性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘大媛; 潘义英; 向登翠; 陈华

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the correlations between meta moods and clinical behavior of junior college nursing students and provide a scientific basis for improving students' ability of clinical practice.Method The trait meta mood scale(TMMS)and nursing students' clinical practice evaluation scale were used in the study among 120 junior college nursing students.Results The total scores on TMMS and the clinical behavior were(3.45±0.43)and(2.96±0.39),respectively.The scores on the three dimensions of meta moods were positively correlated with 7 dimensions of clinical behaviors and the total score(P<0.01 or P<0.05).Conclusions The meta moods of college nursing students are at high level and their clinical behaviors are at medium level.Teachers and nursing administrators should help students regulate and manage their emotions in order to promote their ability of clinical practice.%目的:了解大专护生元情绪与临床实践行为现状,并探讨两者之间的相关性,为提高护生的临床实践能力提供科学依据。方法采用特质性元情绪量表(trait meta-mood scale,TMMS)和护生临床实践行为评价量表对120名大专护生进行测评。结果大专护生TMMS总得分为(3.45±0.43)分;临床实践行为总得分为(2.96±0.39)分;元情绪3个维度及总分与临床实践行为7个维度及总分均呈正相关(P<0.01,P<0.05)。结论大专实习护生元情绪处于高水平,临床实践行为处于中等水平。带教老师和护理管理者应帮助实习护生对情绪进行调节和管理,以促进其临床实践能力的发展。

  5. 低年级大学生网络成瘾及成瘾倾向状况调查%An epidemiological survey of internet addiction and internet addiction tendencies among junior college students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵静; 齐玉龙; 梅翠竹

    2012-01-01

    目的:调查低年级大学生网络成瘾及成瘾倾向,了解其心理健康状况及所采取的应对方式,为大学生网络成瘾的早期干预提供依据.方法:分层抽取安徽某大学一、二年级大学生190名,使用、和进行自填式问卷调查.结果:调查对象网络成瘾检出率为5.3%,其中男生8.1%,女生3.9%,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);二年级为8.9%,高于一年级1.1%(P0.05);二年级为19.8%,高于一年级13.5%(P>0.05).网络成瘾组及倾向组与正常组比较,SCL-90总分及各因子分均高于正常组(P<0.01);在应对方式上,网络成瘾组与正常组在消极应对上差异有统计学意义(P<0.01),积极应对上差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论:低年级大学生网络成瘾及倾向者心理健康水平较低,且倾向于使用消极的应对方式.%Objective: To explore the cunent status of internet addiction and addiction tendencies of junior college students, and to study the status of the irmental health and the coping styles, so as to provide the basis for the early intervention for junior college students. Methods: Using stratified cluster random sanpling method, 190 college students of Anhui Province were investigated with " CIAS-R"," Symptom Check Scale List-90" and" Trait Coping Style Questionnaire". Results: Among all students surveyed 5. 3% of intemet users were diagnosed with internet addiction, including 8. 1% male students and 3. 9% female students. There was no significant difference between them(P >0. 05). It was higher in sophcmores(8. 9% ) than in freshmen(1. 1% ) (P 0. 05). There was 19. 8% of sophcmores, compared with 13. 5% of freshnen with no significance between them( P > 0. 05). Intemet addiction group and addiction tendency group, compared with normal group had significant differences in the total scores of all factors of SCL-90(P 0.05). Conclusions: internet addiction and addiction tendencies anong junior college students have lowermental healti and tend to use the

  6. Radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Alder, Berni

    1975-01-01

    Methods in Computational Physics, Volume 14: Radio Astronomy is devoted to the role of the digital computer both as a control device and as a calculator in addressing problems related to galactic radio noise. This volume contains four chapters and begins with a technical description of the hardware and the special data-handling problems of using radioheliography, with an emphasis on a selection of observational results obtained with the Culgoora radioheliograph and their significance to solar physics and to astrophysics in general. The subsequent chapter examines interstellar dispersion, i

  7. Elementary astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, J.

    2006-08-01

    In developing nations such as Mexico, basic science education has scarcely improved. There are multiple reasons for this problem; they include poor teacher training and curricula that are not challenging for students. I shall suggest ways in which astronomy can be used to improve basic education, it is so attractive that it can be employed to teach how to read and write, learn a second language, mathematics, physics, as well as geography. If third world nations do not teach science in an adequate way, they will be in serious problems when they will try to achieve a better standard of living for their population. I shall also address informal education, it is by this means that most adults learn and keep up to date with subjects that are not their specialty. If we provide good outreach programs in developing nations we can aid adult training; astronomy is ideal since it is particularly multidisciplinary. In particular radio and television programs are useful for popularization since they reach such wide audiences.

  8. LGBT Workplace Climate in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudi, B. S.; Danner, R.; Dixon, W. V.; Henderson, C. B.; Kay, L. E.

    2013-01-01

    The AAS Working Group on LGBTIQ Equality (WGLE) held a town hall meeting at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage to explore the workplace climate for LGBTIQ individuals working in Astronomy and related fields. Topics of discussion included anti-discrimination practices, general workplace climate, and pay and benefit policies. Four employment sectors were represented: industry, the federal government, private colleges, and public universities. We will summarize and expand on the town hall discussions and findings of the panel members.

  9. On the Application of Educational Wisdom to Class Man-agement of Polytechnic Schools and Junior Colleges%论教育智慧在中、高职班级管理中的运用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏云柯

    2016-01-01

    Educational wisdom is an important reflection of teach-ers' ability and quality, and it embodies teachers' observation, the depth and flexibility of thinking, the determination of the will and so on. In practical education, every teacher needs to face the test:they have to face the various characteristics of the students in polytechnic schools and junior colleges with the complicated problems. They can use educational wisdom to solve difficult problems, thus more appropriately managing class affairs. From several aspects, the research elaborates the training and experi-ence of educational wisdom and the application of educational wisdom in the actual class management: an overview of educa-tional wisdom;manifestation of educational wisdom;the use of e-ducational wisdom; efficacy and problems needing attention in class management of polytechnic schools and junior colleges.%教育智慧是教师能力和素质的一种重要体现,体现出教师观察的敏锐性、思维的深刻性和灵活性、意志的果断性等。在实际的教育工作中,面临中、高职各式性格的学生和纷繁复杂的问题,能够运用教育智慧解决棘手的问题,从而较妥当地管理班级事务是每位教师需要面对的考验。本研究从教育智慧概述,教育智慧的表现方式,中、高职班级管理中教育智慧的运用、功效及需要注意的问题几个方面去阐述教育智慧的培养和历练以及在实际班级管理中的运用。

  10. 构建大学物理实验低年级本科生创新实践能力培育平台探究%Exploration on Innovative and Practical Abilities TrainingPlatform of Junior Undergraduates Based on College Physics Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张凤琴; 林晓珑; 王丹

    2015-01-01

    General idea,implement measures and effectives have been expounded in this paper about innova-tive and practical abilities training platform of junior undergraduates based on college physics experiment.%阐述了构建大学物理实验低年级本科生创新实践能力培育平台建设的总体思路和实施措施以及所取得的成效。

  11. Active Astronomy Roadshow Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laycock, Silas; Oram, Kathleen; Alabre, Dayana; Douyon, Ralph; UMass Lowell Haiti Development Studies Center

    2016-01-01

    College-age Haitian students working with advisors and volunteers from UMass Lowell in 2015 developed and tested an activity-based K-8 curriculum in astronomy, space, and earth science. Our partner school is located in Les Cayes, Haiti a city where only 65% of children attend school, and only half of those will complete 6th grade. Astronomy provides an accessible and non-intimidating entry into science, and activity-based learning contrasts with the predominant traditional teaching techniques in use in Haiti, to reach and inspire a different cohort of learners. Teachers are predominantly women in Haiti, so part of the effort involves connecting them with scientists, engineers and teacher peers in the US. As a developing nation, it is vital for Haitian (as for all) children to grow up viewing women as leaders in science. Meanwhile in the US, few are aware of the reality of getting an education in a 3rd world nation (i.e. most of the world), so we also joined with teachers in Massachusetts to give US school children a peek at what daily life is like for their peers living in our vibrant but impoverished neighbor. Our Haitian partners are committed to helping their sister-schools with curriculum and educator workshops, so that the overall quality of education can rise, and not be limited to the very few schools with access to resources. We will describe the activites, motivation, and and the lessons learned from our first year of the project.

  12. EXCELLENCE IN CONTINUING EDUCATION, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL JUNIOR COLLEGE ADMINISTRATIVE TEAMS INSTITUTE (6TH, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, AUGUST 7-9, 1966).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee.

    THE GROWING INTEREST IN CONTINUING EDUCATION ON THE LOCAL, STATE, AND NATIONAL LEVELS APPEARS RELATED TO (1) THE IMPROVING EDUCATIONAL LEVEL OF THE GENERAL POPULATION, (2) THE CHANGING AND INCREASINGLY COMPLEX WORLD, (3) INCREASING LEISURE, AND (4) THE RISING STANDARD OF LIVING. RESEARCH INDICATES THAT (1) FEW COLLEGES EMPLOY ADULT EDUCATION…

  13. Journalism and Student Publications in American Junior Colleges; A Directory of Programs and Personnel with Selective Interpretation and Recommendations. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaver, Frank

    The directory presents data defining the scope of journalism instruction in the nation's two-year colleges. Entries for each institution are given alphabetically within states and include: journalism courses offered; journalism instructors and their background, experience, and responsibilities; student publications produced and pertinent…

  14. Measuring the Relationship between Stellar Scintillation and Altitude: A Simple Discovery-Based Observational Exercise Used in College Level Non-Major Astronomy Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Russell D.

    2013-01-01

    A simple naked eye observational exercise is outlined that teaches non-major astronomy students basic observational and critical thinking skills but does not require complex equipment or extensive knowledge of the night sky. Students measure the relationship between stellar scintillation and the altitude of a set of stars. Successful observations…

  15. 高职英语专业学生英语元认知阅读策略调查研究%Metacognitive reading strategies of English majors at junior college

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张贝贝

    2012-01-01

    本文以高职英语专业学生为研究对象,采用问卷调查方法对元认知英语阅读策略的使用情况进行了实证性研究,利用探索性因子分析得出四种元认知阅读策略,分别为:制定计划、策略选择、自我评价和自我监控。研究表明高职英语专业学生能有意识地使用这四种元认知阅读策略,但整体的元认知策略使用水平中等,教师可以通过相关的学习策略培训提高学生的元认知策略运用水平。%The present study is based on an investigation with 72 English majors in one of the junior colleges on their use of metacognitive reading strategies.An exploratory factor analysis has yielded four types of metacognitive reading strategies,which are planning,choosing strategies,self-evaluating and self-monitoring.The results are presented with low frequency in the use of metacognitive reading strategies.However,the students’ use of metacognitive strategies in English reading can be improved through relevant training provided by the teacher.

  16. Teaching and Learning Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay; Percy, John

    2009-07-01

    Preface; Part I. Astronomy in the Curriculum Around the World: Preface; 1. Why astronomy is useful and should be included in the school curriculum John R. Percy; 2. Astronomy and mathematics education Rosa M. Ros; 3. Astronomy in the curriculum around the world; 4. Engaging gifted science students through astronomy Robert Hollow; 5. Poster highlights: astronomy in the curriculum around the world; Part II. Astronomy Education Research: Preface; 6. Astronomy education research down under John M. Broadfoot and Ian S. Ginns; 7. A contemporary review of K-16 astronomy education research Janelle M. Bailey and Timothy F. Slater; 8. Implementing astronomy education research Leonarda Fucili; 9. The Astronomy Education Review: report on a new journal Sidney C. Wolff and Andrew Fraknoi; 10. Poster highlights: astronomy education research; Part III. Educating Students: Preface; 11. Textbooks for K-12 astronomy Jay M. Pasachoff; 12. Distance/internet astronomy education David H. McKinnon; 13. Educating students with robotic telescopes - open discussion; 14. Poster highlights - educating students; Part IV. Educating teachers: Preface; 15. Pre-service astronomy education of teachers Mary Kay Hemenway; 16. In-service education of teachers Michèle Gerbaldi; 17. Poster highlights: educating teachers; Part V. Astronomy and Pseudoscience: Preface; 18. Astronomy, pseudoscience and rational thinking Jayant V. Narlikar; 19. Astronomical pseudosciences in North America John R. Percy and Jay M. Pasachoff; Part VI. Astronomy and Culture: Preface; 20. Teaching astronomy in other cultures: archeoastronomy Julieta Fierro; 21. Poster highlights: astronomy and culture; Part VII. Astronomy in Developing Countries: Preface; 22. Astronomy Curriculum for developing countries Case Rijsdijk; 23. Science education resources for the developing countries James C. White II; Part VIII. Public Outreach in Astronomy: Preface; 24. What makes informal education programs successful? Nahide Craig and Isabel

  17. Binocular astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Tonkin, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Binoculars have, for many, long been regarded as an “entry level” observational tool, and relatively few have used them as a serious observing instrument. This is changing! Many people appreciate the relative comfort of two-eyed observing, but those who use binoculars come to realize that they offer more than comfort. The view of the stars is more aesthetically pleasing and therefore binocular observers tend to observe more frequently and for longer periods. Binocular Astronomy, 2nd Edition, extends its coverage of small and medium binoculars to large and giant (i.e., up to 300mm aperture) binoculars and also binoviewers, which brings the work into the realm of serious observing instruments. Additionally, it goes far deeper into the varying optical characteristics of binoculars, giving newcomers and advanced astronomers the information needed to make informed choices on purchasing a pair. It also covers relevant aspects of the physiology of binocular (as in “both eyes”) observation. The first edition ...

  18. Astronomy in the City for Astronomy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Rosa M.; Garc, Beatriz

    2016-10-01

    Astronomy is part of our culture. Astronomy cannot be isolated in a classroom, it has to be integrated in the normal life of teachers and students. ``Astronomy in the city'' is an important part of NASE (Network for Astronomy School Education) (Ros & Hemenway 2012). In each NASE course we introduce a ``working group session'' chaired by a local expert in cultural astronomy. The chair introduces several examples of astronomy in their city and after that, the participants have the opportunity to discuss and mention several similar examples. After this session all participants visit one or two sites proposed and introduced by the chair. After more than 5 years using this method we visited and discovered several examples of astronomy in the city: •Astronomy in ancient typical clothes. •Archaeological temples oriented according to the sunrise or set. •Petroglyphs with astronomical meaning. •Astronomy in monuments. •Sundials. •Oriented Colonial churches. •Astronomy in Souvenirs. In any case, teachers and students discover that Astronomy is part of their everyday life. They can take into account the Sun's path when they park their car or when they take a bus ``what is the best part in order to be seat in the shadow during the journey?'' The result is motivation to go with ``open eyes'' when they are in the street and they try to get more and more information about their surroundings. In summary, one of the main activities is to introduce local cultural aspects in NASE astronomy courses. The participants can discover a new approach to local culture from an astronomical point of view.

  19. Innovation in Astronomy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Ros, Rosa M.; Pasachoff, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Preface; Part I. General Strategies for Effective Teaching: Introduction; 1. Main objectives of SpS2; 2. Learning astronomy by doing astronomy; 3. Hands-on Universe-Europe; 4. Life on Earth in the atmosphere of the Sun; 5. A model of teaching astronomy to pre-service teachers; 6. How to teach, learn about, and enjoy astronomy; 7. Clickers: a new teaching tool of exceptional promise; 8. Educational opportunities in pro-am collaboration; 9. Teaching history of astronomy to second-year engineering students; 10. Teaching the evolution of stellar and Milky Way concepts through the ages; 11. Educational efforts of the International Astronomical Union; 12. Astronomy in culture; 13. Light pollution: a tool for astronomy education; 14. Astronomy by distance learning; 15. Edible astronomy demonstrations; 16. Amateur astronomers as public outreach partners; 17. Does the Sun rotate around Earth or Earth rotate around the Sun?; 18. Using sounds and sonifications for astronomy outreach; 19. Teaching astronomy and the crisis in science education; 20. Astronomy for all as part of a general education; Poster abstracts; Part II. Connecting Astronomy with the Public: Introduction; 21. A status report from the Division XII working group; 22. Outreach using media; 23. Astronomy podcasting; 24. IAU's communication strategy, hands-on science communication, and the communication of the planet definition discussion; 25. Getting a word in edgeways: the survival of discourse in audiovisual astronomy; 26. Critical evaluation of the new Hall of Astronomy; 27. Revitalizing astronomy teaching through research on student understanding; Poster abstracts; Part III. Effective Use of Instruction and Information Technology: Introduction; 28. ESO's astronomy education program; 29. U.S. student astronomy research and remote observing projects; 30. Global network of autonomous observatories dedicated to student research; 31. Remote telescopes in education: report of an Australian study; 32. Visualizing

  20. An Online Tutor for Astronomy: The GEAS Self-Review Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Nicole P.; Muise, Amy Smith

    2015-01-01

    We introduce an interactive online resource for use by students and college instructors in introductory astronomy courses. The General Education Astronomy Source (GEAS) online tutor guides students developing mastery of core astronomical concepts and mathematical applications of general astronomy material. It contains over 12,000 questions, with…

  1. An Online Tutor for Astronomy: The GEAS Self-Review Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Nicole P.; Muise, Amy Smith

    2015-01-01

    We introduce an interactive online resource for use by students and college instructors in introductory astronomy courses. The General Education Astronomy Source (GEAS) online tutor guides students developing mastery of core astronomical concepts and mathematical applications of general astronomy material. It contains over 12,000 questions, with…

  2. Solar Fireworks - Integrating an Exhibit on Solar Physics and Space Science into the Science and Astronomy Curriculum of High-School and College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denker, C.; Wang, H.; Conod, K. D.; Wintemberg, T.; Calderon, I.

    2005-05-01

    Astronomers at The Newark Museum's Alice and Leonard Dreyfuss Planetarium teamed up with the New Jersey Institute of Technology's (NJIT) Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research (CSTR) and the Big Bear Solar Observatory in presenting Solar Fireworks. The exhibit opened on May 15, 2004 and features two exhibition kiosks with interactive touch screen displays, where students and other visitors can take "virtual tours" in the fields of solar physics, solar activity, Sun-Earth connection, and geo-sciences. Planetarium and museum visits are an integral part of the introductory physics and astronomy classes at NJIT and the exhibition has been integrated in the astronomy curriculum. For example, NJIT students of the Astronomy Club and regular astronomy courses were closely involved in the design and development of the exhibit. The exhibit is the latest addition to the long-running natural science exhibit "Dynamic Earth: Revealing Nature's Secrets" at the museum. More than 30,000 people per year attend various programs offered by the planetarium including public shows, more than a dozen programs for school groups, after school activities, portable planetarium outreach, outdoor sky watches, solar observing and other family events. More than 1,000 high school students visited the planetarium in 2004. The exhibit is accompanied by a yearly teacher workshop (the first one was held on October 18-20, 2004) to enhance the learning experience of classes visiting the Newark Museum. The planetarium and museum staff has been working with teachers of Newark high schools and has presented many workshops for educators on a wide range of topics from astronomy to zoology. At the conclusion of the exhibit in December 2005, the exhibit will go "on the road" and will be made available to schools or other museums. Finally, the exhibit will find its permanent home at the new office complex of CSTR at NJIT. Acknowledgements: Solar Fireworks was organized by The Newark Museum and the New Jersey

  3. Laboratory Experiments in Physics for Modern Astronomy With Comprehensive Development of the Physical Principles

    CERN Document Server

    Golden, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    This book presents experiments which will teach physics relevant to astronomy. The astronomer, as instructor, frequently faces this need when his college or university has no astronomy department and any astronomy course is taught in the physics department. The physicist, as instructor, will find this intellectually appealing when faced with teaching an introductory astronomy course. From these experiments, the student will acquire important analytical tools, learn physics appropriate to astronomy, and experience instrument calibration and the direct gathering and analysis of data. Experiments that can be performed in one laboratory session as well as semester-long observation projects are included. This textbook is aimed at undergraduate astronomy students.

  4. A Historical Introduction to Women in Astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Andrea K.; Bracher, Katherine

    1992-01-01

    Looks at the careers of several women astronomers and how the opportunities, work, and self-images of women in astronomy have changed over the past two centuries, in conjunction with a discussion of the role of women's colleges. The women include Caroline Lucretia Herschel, Maria Mitchell, Williamina Fleming, Annie Cannon, Antonia Maury, Henrietta…

  5. Astronomy in the City for Astronomy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Rosa Maria; García, Beatriz

    2015-08-01

    Astronomy is part of our culture. Astronomy cannot be isolated in a classroom, it has to be integrated in the normal life of teachers and students. “Astronomy in the city” is an important part of NASE (Network for Astronomy School Education). In each NASE course we introduce a “working group session” chaired by a local expert in cultural astronomy. The chair introduces several examples of astronomy in their city and after that, the participants have the opportunity to discuss and mention several similar examples. After this session all participants visit one or two sites proposed and introduced by the chair.After more than 5 years using this method we visited and discovered several examples of astronomy in the city:• Astronomy in ancient typical cloths• Archeological temples oriented according the Sun rise or set.• Petroglyphs with astronomical meaning.• Astronomy in monuments.• Sundials.• Oriented Colonial churches• Astronomy in SouvenirsIn any case, teachers and students discover that Astronomy is part of their everyday life. They can take into account the Sun's path when they park their car or when they take a bus "what is the best part in order to be seat in the shadow during the journey?" The result is motivation to go with “open eyes” when they are in the street and they try to get more and more information about their surroundings.The most significant characteristic of NASE is that the ”Local NASE Working Group” (LWG) in each country continues with astronomy activities using our materials and new materials created by them. These LWG are integrated by 6 to 8 teachers and professors that participated actively in NASE courses. They maintains alive the program and increases the number of students which can learn through our didactical proposal. There are more than 25 LWG that teach and organize activities on astronomy (education and/or communication) in about 20 countries.In summary, one of the main activities is to introduce local

  6. Statistical methods in astronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Long, James P.; de Souza, Rafael S.

    2017-01-01

    We present a review of data types and statistical methods often encountered in astronomy. The aim is to provide an introduction to statistical applications in astronomy for statisticians and computer scientists. We highlight the complex, often hierarchical, nature of many astronomy inference problems and advocate for cross-disciplinary collaborations to address these challenges.

  7. Compendium of Practical Astronomy. Volume 1: Instrumentation and Reduction Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augensen, H. J.; Heintz, W. D.; Roth, Günter D.

    The Compendium of Practical Astronomy is a revised and enlarged English version of the fourth edition of G. Roth's famous handbook for stargazers. In three volumes 28 carefully edited articles, aimed especially at amateur astronomers and students and teachers of astronomy in high schools and colleges, cover the length and breadth of practical astronomy. Volume 1 contains information on modern instrumentation and reduction techniques, including spherical astronomy, error estimations, telescope mountings, astrophotography, and more. Volume 2 covers the planetary system, with contributions on artificial satellites, comets, the polar aurorae, and the effects of the atmosphere on observational data. Volume 3 is devoted to stellar objects, variable stars and binary stars in particular. An introduction to the astronomical literature and a comprehensive chapter on astronomy education and instructional aids make the Compendium a useful complement to any college library, in addition to its being essential reading for all practical astronomers.

  8. Compendium of Practical Astronomy. Volume 2: Earth and Solar System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augensen, H. J.; Heintz, W. D.; Roth, Günter D.

    The Compendium of Practical Astronomy is a revised and enlarged English version of the fourth edition of G. Roth's handbook for stargazers. In three volumes 28 carefully edited articles aimed especially at amateur astronomers and students and teachers of astronomy in high schools and colleges cover the length and breadth of practical astronomy. Volume 1 contains information on modern instrumentation and reduction techniques, including spherical astronomy, error estimations, telescope mountings, astrophotography, and more. Volume 2 covers the planetary system, with contributions on artificial satellites, comets, the polar aurorae, and the effects of the atmosphere on observational data. Volume 3 is devoted to stellar objects, variable stars and binary stars in particular. An introduction to the astronomical literature and a comprehensive chapter on astronomy education and instructional aids make the Compedium a useful complement to any college library.

  9. Compendium of Practical Astronomy. Volume 3: Stars and Stellar Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augensen, H. J.; Heintz, W. D.; Roth, Günter D.

    The Compendium of Practical Astronomy is a revised and enlarged English version of the fourth edition of G. Roth's famous handbook for stargazers. In three volumes 28 carefully edited articles aimed especially at amateur astronomers and students and teachers of astronomy in high schools and colleges cover the length and breadth of practical astronomy. Volume 1 contains information on modern instrumentation and reduction techniques, including spherical astronomy, error estimations, telescope mountings, astrophotography, and more. Volume 2 covers the planetary system, with contributions on artificial satellites, comets, the polar aurorae, and the effects of the atmophere on observational data. Volume 3 is devoted to stellar objects, variable stars and binary stars in particular, the Milky Way and Galaxies. An introduction to the astronomical literature and a comprehensive chapter on astronomy education and instructional aids make the Compendium a useful complement to any college library.

  10. 空间教学对专科护生自主学习能力影响的探讨%The study of the influence of space teaching on junior-college nursing students; autonomous learning ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈红涛; 董彩梅

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to assess the influence of space teaching on junior-college nursing students' autonomous learning ability.Methods Using random number table,two classes of junior-college nursing students of Grade 2012 were selected and divided into the experimental group (46 students) and the control group (47 students) according to their classes.Students in the control group received routine multimedia teaching.Students in the experimental group received space teaching based on the platform of World University City.The effect of space teaching on developing nursing students' autonomous learning ability was assessed with the help of their test results and the nursing students' autonomous learning ability evaluation form.Results After carrying out space teaching,the average grade,theoretical performance,total points,the total score of autonomous learning ability and the score of each dimension in the experimental group and the differences were remarkably higher than those of the control group (t value was 2.80,2.45,2.29 and 11.58).Conclusions Space teaching can assist in arousing nursing students' learning motivation and improving nursing students' independent learning ability.It can be used for reference and promoted.%目的 评价空间教学对专科护生自主学习能力的影响.方法 采用随机数表法抽取2012级全日制统招专科护理专业2个班护生,按班级设为实验组46人和对照组47人.对照组护生采用常规多媒体课件授课,实验组护生基于世界大学城平台实施空间教学,通过课程考核成绩和护理专业学生自主学习能力测评量表评价空间教学对培养护生自主学习能力的效果.结果 空间教学课程开展后实验组护生平时成绩、卷面理论成绩、总分、自主学习能力总分和各维度得分均显著高于对照组(t值分别为2.80,2.45,2.29和11.58),差异有统计学意义.结论 空间教学有助于激发护生学习动机,促进护生自主学习能力的提高,可以借鉴推广.

  11. Investigation on Professional Cognition of Freshmen from Clinical Medical Specialty of Junior College%临床医学专业专科新生专业认知调查分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任建立; 孟羽俊; 张丽丽

    2012-01-01

    目的 了解临床医学专业专科新生专业认知水平及其影响因素,为有针对性地开展专业认知教育提供思路和方法.方法 问卷调查2009级449名新入学的临床医学专业学生的一般情况、父母职业、生源地和临床医学专业相关的基本知识知晓情况,应用SPSS 16.0统计软件进行数据分析.结果 84.63%新生知道医生的基本素质、67.48%知道医学的目的、40.31%知道基层卫生服务趋势、40.09%知道高职与普通高教区别、37.42%知道医学的学习方法、32.29%知道医学模式与学科分类、新医改及全科医学的含义知晓率仅为21.16%和2.67%;其认知程度受父母职业及生源地影响(P<0.05),与性别、年龄没有明显关系(P>0.05).结论 临床医学专业新生专业认知度较低,有必要对临床医学专业新生进行专业认知教育,引导学生进行专业相关知识社会实践调查和参与卫生公益活动可能是提高学生专业认知的有效措施.%Objective To understand professional cognitive level of freshmen from clinical medicine specialty and its influencing factors,and provide new ideas and method on developing education of the professional cognition. Methods A questionnaire survey was performed among 449 freshmen from clinical medical specialty of junior college in 2009 about their common information, occupation of their parents and clinical medicine professional basic knowledge. The data was analyzed with SPS316.0. Results The ratios of the freshmen knowing the basic quality of the doctor, the medical purpose,the trend of primary health services, the difference of between vocational and general higher education, medical learning methods, medical model and classification, the meanings of the new medical reform and general medicine were 84. 63% ,67, 48%,40. 31%,40. 09% ,37. 42% , 32.29% ,2.67% and 21.16% ,respectively,and the cognitive abilities of the freshmen concerned with their parental

  12. Empiricism of PE club teaching mode in junior colleges%高职院校“俱乐部制”体育教学模式的实证研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何瑞映

    2012-01-01

    For exploring the effect of the P.E Club teaching mode is introduced to explore the effects of physical education in the junior college.The empiricist study wan carried out by different methods like literature,statistics,experiment and survey.taking group experiment to 100 students were taken into two groups to do an experiment and compare the two groups in physical fitness,psychological anxiety and self-training sense.The results showed that P.E Club teaching mode made physical fitness and psychological anxiety all better than otherwise.%为探索高职院校体育教学引入俱乐部制教学模式的效果。运用文献资料法、实验法、问卷调查法、数理统计法,对两组采用不同教学模式的(100名)学生进行分组教学实验,对比分析两组学生的体质、心理焦虑水平及其自主锻炼意识。研究显示:俱乐部制体育教学模式对学生体质提高、焦虑缓解的作用优于传统体育教学模式;俱乐部制体育教学模式对于培养学生课外锻炼意识具有积极作用;俱乐部制体育教学模式较传统教学模式更利于优化学生参与体育锻炼动机结构。

  13. Astronomy and Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, John M.

    The relationship between astronomy and politics is a complex but important part of understanding the practice of astronomy throughout history. This chapter explores some of the ways that astronomy, astrology, and politics have interacted, placing particular focus on the way that astronomy and astrology have been used for political purposes by both people in power and people who wish to influence a ruler's policy. Also discussed are the effects that politics has had on the development of astronomy and, in particular, upon the recording and preservation of astronomical knowledge.

  14. African Cultural Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Holbrook, Jarita C; Medupe, R. Thebe; Current Archaeoastronomy and Ethnoastronomy research in Africa

    2008-01-01

    Astronomy is the science of studying the sky using telescopes and light collectors such as photographic plates or CCD detectors. However, people have always studied the sky and continue to study the sky without the aid of instruments this is the realm of cultural astronomy. This is the first scholarly collection of articles focused on the cultural astronomy of Africans. It weaves together astronomy, anthropology, and Africa. The volume includes African myths and legends about the sky, alignments to celestial bodies found at archaeological sites and at places of worship, rock art with celestial imagery, and scientific thinking revealed in local astronomy traditions including ethnomathematics and the creation of calendars. Authors include astronomers Kim Malville, Johnson Urama, and Thebe Medupe; archaeologist Felix Chami, and geographer Michael Bonine, and many new authors. As an emerging subfield of cultural astronomy, African cultural astronomy researchers are focused on training students specifically for do...

  15. Investigation on AIDS/STD related knowledge, attitude and behavior among junior college students in medical college%医学院校低年级大学生AIDS/STD相关知识、态度及行为调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄翔; 陆杰灵; 苏国生

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the knowledge, attitude and behavior related to acquire immune deifciency syndrome and sexually transmitted disease (AIDS/STD) among junior college students in medical college, and to provide suggestion on the future health education on AIDS/STD and recruitment of low-risk blood donors for junior students. Methods The self-designed questionnaire and random sampling were used to investigate on freshmen whose number was 1 250 in a medical college. Results Respondents’ awareness rate of three major routes of AIDS transmission was from 79.67%to 91.79%. Nearly 9.20%of the respondents agree on the premarital sexual behavior. And about 18.7%of the students showed the fear to AIDS and they were reluctant to admit patients with AIDS. Conclusions The health education on AIDS/STD related knowledge should be made to be universal, and enhance sexual morality, safe sexual behavior and ethics training.%目的:研究了解医学院(校)低年级大学生的艾滋病/性病(AIDS/STD)相关知识、态度及行为的现状及性知识需求,为今后开展低年级大学生AIDS/STD的宣教和低危献血者的招募提供依据。方法自行设计问卷,采取随机抽样的方法对某医学院(校)大一新生1250人进行自填式问卷调查。结果被访者对AIDS三大主要传播途径知晓率为79.67%~91.79%;近9.20%的被访者对婚前性行为表示赞同;18.7%的学生表示对AIDS恐惧,并在将来的工作中不愿接收AIDS患者。结论普及AIDS/STD相关知识的宣教并增强性道德、安全性行为及职业道德的培养。

  16. Roster of Astronomy Departments with Enrollment and Degree Data, 2014: Results from the 2014 Survey of Enrollments and Degrees. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Starr; Mulvey, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate astronomy enrollments in the US continue to rise with junior and senior level enrollments exceeding the previous year's all-time high. The increasing undergraduate enrollments have produced 428 bachelor's in the 2013-14 academic year, also an all-time high. Undergraduate astronomy degree production will continue to rise given the…

  17. A Study of the Concept and Practical Experience of Partnership Cooperation Between College and Junior High/elementary Schools in Taiwan%台湾推动大学与中小学携手合作:理念、实践与对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜宝月; 欧用生; 张素贞

    2011-01-01

    本文对台湾因课程改革之需于2003—2006年推动的“大学与国中小学教师专业伙伴携手合作计划”进行解析。此计划的目标在于通过师资培育大学与中小学携手合作建立较长期专业发展伙伴关系来使课程理论与实务相结合,提升教学效果,展现课程改革的成效。文中深入探讨了台湾大学与中小学合作的的内涵及实施模式、限制与挑战,并的实践策略。%This paper discusses "the partnership program between college and junior high/elementary schools" between 2003-2006 that our country responded to curriculum reformation and has begun to program in Taiwan. The objective of the project is to facilitate the partnership relation between college and junior high/elementary schools through the support requests from junior high/elementary schools to teacher-training college or vice versa. We hope to combine curriculum theoretical with practical and to promote the effect of study and show the result of curriculum reformation. Therefore, we hope we can understand thoroughly and evaluate the advantages of this program, moreover, we can find out the tactic of partnership concepts and actions, and we can explore the concept and practice strategy of professional partnership program in Taiwan.

  18. Astronomy 101 in Washington State High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Julie H.; Garner, S.; Stetter, T.; McKeever, J.; Santo Pietro, V.

    2011-01-01

    The University of Washington in the High School (UWHS) program enables high schools to offer the 5 quarter credits Astronomy 101 (Astr 101) course for college credits. The credits are transferable to most colleges and universities. The course provides an alternative to advance placement courses and programs such as Washington's Running Start whereby high school students take courses at community colleges. Astr 101 focuses on stars, galaxies and the universe, as well as background topics such as gravitation, electromagnetic radiation and telescopes. The course satisfies the UW "natural world” and "quantitative/symbolic reasoning” distribution requirements. Students must pay a fee to enroll, but the credits cost less than half what they would cost for the course if taken on one of the UW campuses. The course can be offered as either one semester or full-year at the high school. Teachers who offer Astr 101 must be approved in advance by the UW Astronomy Department, and their syllabi and course materials approved also. Teachers receive orientation, professional development opportunities, classroom visits and support (special web site, answering questions, making arrangements for campus visits, planetarium visits) from astronomy department course coordinator. The UWHS Astr 101 program has produced positive outcomes for the astronomy department, the participating teachers and the students who complete the course. In this poster we will discuss our 5 years of experience with offering Astr 101, including benefits to the students, teachers, high schools, university and department, student outcomes, course assessments and resources for offering the course.

  19. Edible Astronomy Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowich, Donald A.

    2007-12-01

    Astronomy demonstrations with edible ingredients are an effective way to increase student interest and knowledge of astronomical concepts. This approach has been successful with all age groups from elementary school through college students - and the students remember these demonstrations after they are presented. In this poster I describe edible demonstrations I have created to simulate the expansion of the universe (using big-bang chocolate chip cookies); differentiation during the formation of the Earth and planets (using chocolate or chocolate milk with marshmallows, cereal, candy pieces or nuts); and radioactivity/radioactive dating (using popcorn). Other possible demonstrations include: plate tectonics (crackers with peanut butter and jelly); convection (miso soup or hot chocolate); mud flows on Mars (melted chocolate poured over angel food cake); formation of the Galactic disk (pizza); formation of spiral arms (coffee with cream); the curvature of Space (Pringles); constellations patterns with chocolate chips and chocolate chip cookies; planet shaped cookies; star shaped cookies with different colored frostings; coffee or chocolate milk measurement of solar radiation; Oreo cookie lunar phases. Sometimes the students eat the results of the astronomical demonstrations. These demonstrations are an effective teaching tool and can be adapted for cultural, culinary, and ethnic differences among the students.

  20. Astronomy Research Seminar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johson, Jolyon; Genet, Russell; Armstrong, James; Boyce, Grady; Boyce, Pat; Brewer, Mark; Buchheim, Robert; Carro, Joseph; Estrada, Reed; Estrada, Chris; Freed, Rachel; Gillette, Sean; Harshaw, Richard; Hollis, Thomas; Kenney, John; McGaughey, Seven; McNab, Christine; Mohanan, Kakkala; Sepulveda, Babs; Wallace, Dan; Wallen, Vera

    2015-05-01

    Traditional science lectures and labs are often enhanced through project- and team-based learning. Some students go beyond these classroom studies by conducting research, often under the guidance of university professors. A one-semester astronomy research seminar was initiated in 2006 in collaboration with the community of professional and amateur double star astronomers. The result was dozens of jointly-authored papers published in the Journal of Double Star Observations and the Annual Proceedings of the Society of Astronomical Sciences. This seminar, and its affiliated community, launched a series of conferences and books, providing students with additional forums to share their double star research. The original seminar, and its derivatives, enhanced educational careers through college admissions and scholarships. To expand the seminar's reach, it was restructured from a few teams at one school, to many teams, each from a different school. A volunteer from each school became an assistant instructor. Most of them were seminar veterans, experienced astronomers, or science teachers. The assistant instructors, in turn, recruited enthusiastic students for their teams. To avoid student and instructor overload, the seminar focused on its three deliverables: a formal proposal, published paper, and public PowerPoint presentation. Future seminars may offer other astronomical research options such as exoplanet transit or eclipsing binary photometry.

  1. Armenian Cultural Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmanyan, S. V.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    Cultural Astronomy is the reflection of sky events in various fields of nations' culture. In foreign literature this field is also called "Astronomy in Culture" or "Astronomy and Culture". Cultural astronomy is the set of interdisciplinary fields studying the astronomical systems of current or ancient societies and cultures. It is manifested in Religion, Mythology, Folklore, Poetry, Art, Linguistics and other fields. In recent years, considerable attention has been paid to this sphere, particularly international organizations were established, conferences are held and journals are published. Armenia is also rich in cultural astronomy. The present paper focuses on Armenian archaeoastronomy and cultural astronomy, including many creations related to astronomical knowledge; calendars, rock art, mythology, etc. On the other hand, this subject is rather poorly developed in Armenia; there are only individual studies on various related issues (especially many studies related to Anania Shirakatsi) but not coordinated actions to manage this important field of investigation.

  2. Astronomy in Argentina

    CERN Document Server

    Muriel, Hernán

    2013-01-01

    This article analyses the current state of Astronomy in Argentina and describes its origins. We briefly describe the institutions where astronomical research takes place, the observational facilities available, the training of staff and professionals, and the role of the institutions in scientific promotion. We also discuss the outreach of Astronomy towards the general public, as well as amateur activities. The article ends with an analysis of the future prospects of astronomy in Argentina.

  3. Why is Astronomy Important?

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, Marissa; Russo, Pedro; Bladon, Georgia; Christensen, Lars Lindberg

    2013-01-01

    Astronomy and related fields are at the forefront of science and technology; answering fundamental questions and driving innovation. Although blue-skies research like astronomy rarely contributes directly with tangible outcomes on a short time scale, the pursuit of this research requires cutting-edge technology and methods that can on a longer time scale, through their broader application make a difference. A wealth of examples show how the study of astronomy contributes to technology, econom...

  4. 提升专科层次全科医学师资整体素质的有效对策%Effective Countermeasures for Promoting the Overall Quality of General Medical Teachers for Physicians with Junior College Diplomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐江荣; 郭化山

    2011-01-01

    培养专科层次面向农村与社区的全科医学人才,师资是关键.为了提升专科层次全科医学师资整体素质,保证全科医学人才培养质量,采取"加强学习、组织培训、实行考评"的策略,促使全科医学教师从思维理念、道德品行、教学方法及全科医学理论知识与实践技能等素质方面得到全面提升.同时,根据全科医学专、兼职教师的不同教学特点,促使其对全科医学知识、技能与职业素质的有机融合,显著提高教学质量.该策略对建设一支高素质全科医学师资队伍,推动全科医学向深层次发展均具有重要作用.%As for training general medical talents with junior college diplomas for rural areas and communities, quality of the teachers is crucial. In order to promote the overall quality of general medical teachers and to ensure the quality of talents training , measures of learning strengthening, training arrangement and implementing evaluation are taken to comprehensively enhance the quality of the teachers from aspects including ideas , morality, teaching skills and their general medical knowledge and skills. At the same time, according to the different teaching characteristics of professional and part - time teachers on general medicine, strategies are taken to better integrate general medical knowledge , skills and professional quality, which in turn improve the teaching quality notahly. The strategies play a significant role in building a high - class training faculty and promoting the further development of general medicine.

  5. 新入学文理科专科护生的学习风格比较研究%Comparative study on learning styles of new nursing students in arts and sciences in junior college

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗霜

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To know about the learning styles and preference of nursing students in arts and sciences.Methods:The new nursing students in arts and sciences received the questionnaire by using the Kolb learning style scale.Results:The distribution of learning styles of nursing students in junior colleges were mainly based on divergence and assimilation,and the aggregation and adaptation style were less.There was difference in learning styles of students between in arts and sciences(P <0.05).The learning style of nursing students in arts was the divergent type.The learning style of nursing students in sciences was the assimilation model.Conclu-sion:The learning style of nursing students in Grade 1 is not suitable for the cultivation of talents.There are some differences in learning styles of students between in sciences and arts.Teachers should teach nursing students in arts and sciences in accordance with their aptitude,and according to the talents training requirements to guide students to shape professional related learning style.%[目的]了解文科、理科护理专业学生的学习风格和偏好。[方法]采用 Kolb 学习风格量表对新入学文科、理科护理专业学生进行问卷调查。[结果]专科学校护理专业学生的学习风格分布以发散型和同化型风格居多,聚合型和顺应型风格偏少;文科和理科护理学生的学习风格分布有差异(P <0.05),文科护生发散型最多,理科护生同化型最多。[结论]1年级护生的学习风格与人才培养目标不太适应,文理科护生的学习风格有一定差异,教师对文理科护生要因材施教,并根据人才培养要求有意识地引导学生塑造和本专业学习更匹配的学习风格。

  6. The IYA 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppelman, Michael; Gay, P. L.; Atkinson, N.; Flateau, D.; Lakdawalla, E.

    2009-01-01

    The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is a community project that brings the voices of the global astronomy community to the public over the Internet. We are publishing 1 podcast per day, 5 to 10 minutes in duration, for all 365 days of 2009. The podcast is made available through an RSS feed. The podcast episodes are recorded and listened to by people around the world. Topics covered include astronomy inspired art and literature, historic discoveries, spacecraft, IYA events as well as interviews and discussions about the science of astronomy. Some podcasts have a specific topic or theme based on The 365 Days of Astronomy Calendar, a daily calendar of astronomical events, themes and ideas created by the IYA. Although all the episodes will have a common intro and outtro that ties into the overall theme, each episode is completely different. Are you willing to contribute to the 365 Days of Astronomy podcast?We are looking for individuals, schools, companies and clubs to provide 5 - 10 minutes of audio for our daily podcast. Our goal is to encourage people to sign up for a particular day (or days) of 2009. We have a calendar of astronomical events to give ideas but the podcasts can be about virtually any astronomical topic. We are seeking a wide range of contributions, from simple concepts or how-tos to more in-depth discussions of complex concepts. We are expecting a wide range of contributions, from simple at-home "first light” podcasts to highly polished and professional recordings. We hope to sign up a wide range of participants including professional astronomers, K-12 classrooms, college students, science bloggers, podcasters and media companies. Visit 365DaysOfAstronomy.org for more information.

  7. A Pilot Astronomy Outreach Project in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Dipen; Mridha, Shahjahan; Afroz, Maqsuda

    2015-08-01

    In its strategic planning for the "Astronomy for Development Project," the International Astronomical Union (IAU) has ecognized, among other important missions, the role of astronomy in understanding the far-reaching possibilities for promoting global tolerance and citizenship. Furthermore, astronomy is deemed inspirational for careers in science and technology. The "Pilot Astronomy Outreach Project in Bangladesh"--the first of its kind in the country--aspires to fulfill these missions. As Bangladesh lacks resources to promote astronomy education in universities and schools, the role of disseminating astronomy education to the greater community falls on citizen science organizations. One such group, Anushandhitshu Chokro (AChokro) Science Organization, has been carrying out a successful public outreach program since 1975. Among its documented public events, AChokro organized a total solar eclipse campaign in Bangladesh in 2009, at which 15,000 people were assembled in a single open venue for the eclipse observation. The organization has actively pursued astronomy outreach to dispel public misconceptions about astronomical phenomena and to promote science. AChokro is currently working to build an observatory and Science Outreach Center around a recently-acquired 14-inch Scmidt-Cassegrain telescope and a soon-to-be-acquired new 16-inch reflector, all funded by private donations. The telescopes will be fitted with photometers, spectrometers, and digital and CCD cameras to pursue observations that would include sun spot and solar magnetic fields, planetary surfaces, asteroid search, variable stars and supernovae. The Center will be integrated with schools, colleges, and community groups for regular observation and small-scale research. Special educational and observing sessions for adults will also be organized. Updates on the development of the Center, which is expected to be functioning by the end of 2015, will be shared and feedback invited on the fostering of

  8. Documenting the Vocabulary of Astronomy Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Scott; Parrish, M.; Gay, P. L.

    2008-05-01

    Learning astronomy can be a life-long process, with the seeds of knowledge planted in K-12 classes blossoming in elective college courses to create adults who actively acquire astronomy content. One of the goals of many astronomy 101 courses is to prepare students to be intelligent consumers of mainstream astronomy content, including magazine articles, popular books, and online news. To meet this goal, astronomy educators need to understand what content is being presented in the media and what level vocabulary is being used. The most simplistic way to address this problem is to examine the topics covered and vocabulary used in mainstream astronomy blogs and news feeds. In this study we looked at a selection of prominent blogs and news feeds and we present a statistical study of the frequency different scientific terms are used and topics are addressed. To make this study possible, software to read in RSS feeds was created. This software had to meet the following design specifications: runs in a reasonable amount of time, removes all XML and HTML code from text, sees words with different capitalizations as the same word, ignores end of sentence or phrase punctuation without ignoring hyphens, and has an editable list of "common English words.” This code will be available after the conference at http://www.starstryder.com. Results of this study find that many of the primary topics of Astronomy 101 classes, such as the HR Diagram, are rarely mentioned in blogs and online news, while often de-emphasized topics, such as extra solar planets, cosmology, and high energy astrophysics, show up regularly.

  9. Teaching Astronomy with Podcasts of the APOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Robert M.

    2017-01-01

    The APOD website provides many excellent astronomy photos that are used to enhance introductory astronomy classes. For nearly six years, podcasts have been used to enhance learning in introductory astronomy classes at Harrisburg Area Community College. Daily 3-5 minute podcasts have been created and made available through iTunes to students in these classes at no charge. Students are asked to subscribe to the podcast collections and are quizzed on the images discussed throughout the semester. Because the images often focus on current findings in astronomy, the students are given instruction on findings that will not appear in their textbooks for several years. The students also receive a taste of some topics that may not be covered or that are just touched upon because of time limits in the classes. The podcasts have been used successfully with both traditional and fully online classes. The use of the podcasts enhances mobile learning as students can download and listen to the podcasts on their smartphones or tablets at their convenience. The student response to the podcasts has been excellent with some students noting that they continue to follow the website and podcasts even after they have completed the class. With mobile learning expanding, this is an excellent way to reach students and encourage them to further research the various topics in astronomy that are covered in the APOD images.

  10. Astronomy in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beet, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    Summarizes practical projects, science activities, and teaching aids usable in teaching of the astronomy section of physics courses at the pre-O, O and A-level stages. Indicates that the teacher interest is the decisive factor influencing introduction of astronomy into schools. (CC)

  11. Astronomy and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavinschi, M.

    2006-08-01

    Astronomy is, by definition, the sum of the material and spiritual values created by mankind and of the institutions necessary to communicate these values. Consequently, astronomy belongs to the culture of each society and its scientific progress does nothing but underline its role in culture. It is interesting that there is even a European society which bears this name "Astronomy for Culture" (SEAC). Its main goal is "the study of calendric and astronomical aspects of culture". Owning ancient evidence of astronomical knowledge, dating from the dawn of the first millennium, Romania is interested in this topic. But Astronomy has a much deeper role in culture and civilization. There are many aspects that deserve to be discussed. Examples? The progress of astronomy in a certain society, in connection with its evolution; the place held by the astronomy in literature and, generally, in art; the role of the SF in the epoch of super-mediatization; astronomy and belief; astronomy and astrology in the modern society, and so forth. These are problems that can be of interest for IAU, but the most important one could be her educational role, in the formation of the culture of the new generation, in the education of the population for the protection of our planet, in the ensuring of a high level of spiritual development of the society in the present epoch.

  12. Towards ``Astronomy for Development''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    The ambition of the IAU's decadal strategic plan is to use astronomy to stimulate development globally. The Office of Astronomy for Development was established in 2011 to implement this visionary plan. This talk will reflect on the past, present and future activities of the office, and describe the status of implementation of the plan at this halfway point in the 2010- decade.

  13. Joseph Henry and Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Joseph Henry (1797-1878) is best known for his work in electromagnetism and as the first secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. But he was also a pioneer solar physicist, an early advocate of US participation in astrophysics, and a facilitator of international cooperation in astronomy. This paper will briefly trace his role in the development of the US astronomical community from the time he taught astronomy at Princeton in the 1830s through his death, focusing on failed efforts to persuade US astronomers and patrons of astronomy that the best path for US astronomy should be astrophysics. He thought that the US could make a more significant contribution to astronomy science by striking out on a less travelled path rather than competing with the established European observatories.

  14. Popular Culture in the Junior College Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonergan, David; Ayers, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    Popular culture is extremely influential in both academe and society at large. However, formal disciplinary study of popular culture lags far behind that influence. Anthropology, film studies, history, musicology, and sociology are only some of the disciplines that frequently include popular culture as a research focus. This article advises on how…

  15. Popular Culture in the Junior College Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonergan, David; Ayers, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    Popular culture is extremely influential in both academe and society at large. However, formal disciplinary study of popular culture lags far behind that influence. Anthropology, film studies, history, musicology, and sociology are only some of the disciplines that frequently include popular culture as a research focus. This article advises on how…

  16. History of Astronomy in Portugal: Theories, Institutions and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Luis

    2014-01-01

    In Portugal, throughout its history, astronomy was developed in the context of the mathematical sciences. During the times of Portugal's Maritime Discoveries, astronomical navigation was based on spherical trigonometry, and therefore it was the mathematicians who taught astronomy to the pilots. During the 17th century, basic notions of astronomy were taught in mathematical courses in the University and in the main Jesuit colleges. This tradition continued in the 18th century, so it is no wonder that one of the most influent Portuguese astronomers during this period was the mathematician José Monteiro da Rocha. During the 19th century the new centres of science teaching, as the Polytechnic School in Lisbon, or the Polytechnic Academy in Oporto, developed astronomy teaching and research in the context of the mathematics subjects. The inheritors of these 19th century institutions, respectively the Faculties of Sciences of Lisbon and Oporto, upheld this tradition until the final decades of 20th century and continued to consider astronomy as a subject to be taught in their mathematics departments. This Meeting aims at outlining several perspectives on the history of astronomy in Portugal, particularly analysing its ties with mathematical sciences and astronomy applications. The Meeting is organised by the Museum of Science of the University of Lisbon (MCUL) with CMAF, CMUC, CMUP and the CIUHCT, and is included in CIM events. It is integrated in the commemorations of the International Year of Astronomy (IYA2009).

  17. Teaching Astronomy with Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Carmen; Impey, Chris David; Wenger, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Students today are expected to have access to computers and the Internet. Students young and old, in school and out of school, are interested in learning about astronomy, and have computers to use for this. Teach Astronomy is a website with a comprehensive digital astronomy textbook freely available to students and educators. In addition to the textbook, there are astronomy Wikipedia articles, image archives from Astronomy Picture of the Day and AstroPix, and video lectures covering all topics of astronomy. Teach Astronomy has a unique search tool called the wikimap that can be used to search through all of the resources on the site. Astronomy: State of the Art (ASOTA) is a massive, open, online course (MOOC). Over 18,000 students have enrolled over the past year and half. This MOOC has been presented in various forms. First, only to students on the web, with content released weekly on host site Udemy. Then to university students who met formally in the classroom for educational activities, but were also expected to watch lectures online on their own time. Presently, it is available online for students to go at their own pace. In the future it will be available in an extended format on a new host site, Coursera. ASOTA instructors use social media to interact with students. Students ask questions via the course host site, Udemy. Live question and answer sessions are conducted using Google Hangouts on Air, and interesting and relevant astronomy news, or supplementary educational content is shared via the ASOTA Facebook page. Teaching on the Internet may seem impersonal and impractical, but by learning to use all of these tools, instructors have the ability to interact with students, and keep them engaged.

  18. Astronomy and culture

    CERN Document Server

    Hetherington, Edith

    2009-01-01

    While astronomy is a burgeoning science, with tremendous increases in knowledge every year, it also has a tremendous past, one that has altered humanity's understanding of our place in the universe. The impact of astronomy on culture - whether through myths and stories, or through challenges to the intellectual status quo - is incalculable. This volume in the Greenwood Guides to the Universe series examines how human cultures, in all regions and time periods, have tried to make sense of the wonders of the universe. Astronomy and Culture shows students how people throughout time have struggled

  19. Astronomy in Ukraine

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlenko, Ya V; Vavilova, I B; Pavlenko, Ya.V.

    2005-01-01

    The current and prospective status of astronomical research in Ukraine is discussed. A brief history of astronomical research in Ukraine is presented and the system organizing scientific activity is described, including astronomy education, institutions and staff, awarding higher degrees/titles, government involvement, budgetary investments and international cooperation. Individuals contributing significantly to the field of astronomy and their accomplishments are mentioned. Major astronomical facilities, their capabilities, and their instrumentation are described. In terms of the number of institutions and personnel engaged in astronomy, and of past accomplishments, Ukraine ranks among major nations of Europe. Current difficulties associated with political, economic and technological changes are addressed and goals for future research activities presented.

  20. Discovering Astronomy Through Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannone, John C.

    2011-05-01

    The literature is replete with astronomical references. And much of that literature is poetry. Using this fact, not only can the teacher infuse a new appreciation of astronomy, but also, the student has the opportunity to rediscover history through astronomy. Poetry can be an effective icebreaker in the introduction of new topics in physics and astronomy, as well as a point of conclusion to a lecture. This presentation will give examples of these things from the ancient literature (sacred Hebraic texts), classical literature (Homer's Iliad and Odyssey), traditional poetry (Longfellow, Tennyson and Poe) and modern literature (Frost, Kooser, and others, including the contemporary work of this author).

  1. Islands of Astronomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey Baldacchino

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A global review of islands and their connections with astronomy throughout history up to the contemporary times suggests eight compelling, distinct yet interlocking reasons why islands have been and remain so important to astronomy and astronomers. Islands constitute favourable locations for various types of astronomy-related activities: from tracking satellites and monitoring significant celestial events, to providing exceptional locations to jurisdictions with mandated dark and unpolluted skies. They appeal for their favourable longitude and (especially southern latitude, as well as for their disposition towards the conditions that the scientific community may expect in an ideal world: relatively clear viewing conditions from a secure, self-contained platform that is, however, endowed with connectivity. This article is written as a contribution to the International Year of Astronomy (2009.

  2. Galactic radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Sofue, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    This book is a concise primer on galactic radio astronomy for undergraduate and graduate students, and provides wide coverage of galactic astronomy and astrophysics such as the physics of interstellar matter and the dynamics and structure of the Milky Way Galaxy and galaxies. Radio astronomy and its technological development have led to significant progress in galactic astronomy and contributed to understanding interstellar matter and galactic structures. The book begins with the fundamental physics of radio-wave radiation, i.e., black body radiation, thermal emission, synchrotron radiation, and HI and molecular line emissions. The author then gives overviews of ingredients of galactic physics, including interstellar matter such as the neutral (HI), molecular hydrogen, and ionized gases, as well as magnetic fields in galaxies. In addition, more advanced topics relevant to the Galaxy and galaxies are also contained here: star formation, supernova remnants, the Galactic Center and black holes, galactic dynamics...

  3. Astronomy, Astrology, and Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Dorian Gieseler

    Astronomy and astrology were combined with medicine for thousands of years. Beginning in Mesopotamia in the second millennium BCE and continuing into the eighteenth century, medical practitioners used astronomy/astrology as an important part of diagnosis and prescription. Throughout this time frame, scientists cited the similarities between medicine and astrology, in addition to combining the two in practice. Hippocrates and Galen based medical theories on the relationship between heavenly bodies and human bodies. In an enduring cultural phenomenon, parts of the body as well as diseases were linked to zodiac signs and planets. In Renaissance universities, astronomy and astrology were studied by students of medicine. History records a long tradition of astrologer-physicians. This chapter covers the topic of astronomy, astrology, and medicine from the Old Babylonian period to the Enlightenment.

  4. Cultural Astronomy in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Steven L.

    While Japan is known more for its contributions to modern astronomy than its archaeoastronomical sites, there is still much about the culture's heritage that is of interest in the study of cultural astronomy. This case study provides an overview of historical considerations necessary to understand the place of astronomy in Japanese society as well as methodological considerations that highlight traditional approaches that have at times been a barrier to interdisciplinary research. Some specific areas of study in the cultural astronomy of Japan are discussed including examples of contemporary research based on interdisciplinary approaches. Japan provides a fascinating background for scholars who are willing to go beyond their curiosity for sites of alignment and approach the culture with a desire to place astronomical iconography in social context.

  5. Astronomy @ Hale School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, William

    Earth in space is one of the teaching strands of the Western Australia science curriculum. I was able to beg some money from my school to set up an astronomy club and address some of the outcomes of the teaching statement. As a Pom, I thought teaching Astronomy here was going to be great. As a baby boomer mesmerized by the moon landings it came as a disappointment to find that my MTV students found Astronomy passé. Why aren?t students fascinated? Astronomy asks the fundamental life questions: * Where did everything come from? * How did it all get here? * Where is it all going to? * Why are all the science labs I've ever worked in hiding a dusty Tasco refractor or a half working Meade * How was I going to survive?

  6. Stamping through astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Dicati, Renato

    2013-01-01

    Stamps and other postal documents are an attractive vehicle for presenting astronomy and its development. Written with expertise and great enthusiasm, this unique book offers a historical and philatelic survey of astronomy and some related topics on space exploration. It contains more than 1300 color reproductions of stamps relating to the history of astronomy, ranging from the earliest observations of the sky to modern research conducted with satellites and space probes. Featured are the astronomers and astrophysicists who contributed to this marvelous story – not only Ptolemy, Copernicus, Kepler, Newton, Herschel, and Einstein but also hundreds of other minor protagonists who played an important role in the development of this, the most ancient yet the most modern of all the sciences. The book also examines in depth the diverse areas which have contributed to the history of astronomy, including the instrumentation, the theories, and the observations. Many stamps illustrate the beauty and the mystery of ce...

  7. 全科医学知识理论对专科医学生临床实践和就业导向的作用调查%Role of General Medical Knowledge and Theory to Junior Medical College Students in Clinical Practice and Employment Orientation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾坪; 何坪; 邓宇; 李曼霞; 周洪敏; 江敏; 周永芬; 吴建华

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the role of general medical knowledge and theory to junior medical college students in clinical practice and employment orientation.Methods Totally 50 graduating clinical medical students in junior medical colleges, recruited hy cluster sampling, were surveyed by questionnaires to understand their cognition, attitudes and interests to general practice, the function of general practice in clinical practice and their employment direction.Results Some 93.18% of the students thought that general practice study was helpful to clinical internship; 75.0% thought general practice knowledge could he used in clinical internship; 55.0% did not want to engage in community health service work, their reasons were lower incomes ( accounting for 36.36% ) and uncertain future ( accounting for 45.45% ).Conclusion The knowledge and theory teaching on general practice carried out for junior college students majoring in clinical medicine can improve the clinical application rate of general practice and the students' sense of professional belongings.%目的 评价全科医学知识理论对专科医学生临床实践与就业导向的作用.方法 整群抽取在渝高校应届临床医学专业毕业生50人,进行问卷调查,了解其对全科医学的认知态度及兴趣、全科医学对临床实践工作的作用及其就业去向.结果 93.18%的学生认为学习全科医学对临床实习有帮助,75.0%的学生在临床实习中运用全科医学知识.55.0%的学生不愿意从事社区全科医生工作,认为待遇较低和前途不明朗者分别占36.36%和45.45%.结论 结合我国社区卫生政策和工作实际,在临床医学专科生中开展全科医学知识理论教学,能提高全科医学的临床应用率和学生的专业归宿感.

  8. NASA thesaurus: Astronomy vocabulary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    A terminology of descriptors used by the NASA Scientific and Technical information effort to index documents in the area of astronomy is presented. The terms are listed in hierarchical format derived from the 1988 edition of the NASA Thesaurus Volume 1 -- Hierarchical Listing. Over 1600 terms are included. In addition to astronomy, space sciences covered include astrophysics, cosmology, lunar flight and exploration, meteors and meteorites, celestial mechanics, planetary flight and exploration, and planetary science.

  9. Conceptual frameworks in astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pundak, David

    2016-06-01

    How to evaluate students' astronomy understanding is still an open question. Even though some methods and tools to help students have already been developed, the sources of students' difficulties and misunderstanding in astronomy is still unclear. This paper presents an investigation of the development of conceptual systems in astronomy by 50 engineering students, as a result of learning a general course on astronomy. A special tool called Conceptual Frameworks in Astronomy (CFA) that was initially used in 1989, was adapted to gather data for the present research. In its new version, the tool included 23 questions, and five to six optional answers were given for each question. Each of the answers was characterized by one of the four conceptual astronomical frameworks: pre-scientific, geocentric, heliocentric and sidereal or scientific. The paper describes the development of the tool and discusses its validity and reliability. Using the CFA we were able to identify the conceptual frameworks of the students at the beginning of the course and at its end. CFA enabled us to evaluate the paradigmatic change of students following the course and also the extent of the general improvement in astronomical knowledge. It was found that the measure of the students’ improvement (gain index) was g = 0.37. Approximately 45% of the students in the course improved their understanding of conceptual frameworks in astronomy and 26% deepened their understanding of the heliocentric or sidereal conceptual frameworks.

  10. Bad Astronomy Goes Hollywood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plait, P.

    2003-05-01

    It can be argued that astronomy is the oldest of all the sciences, so you'd think that after all this time people would have a pretty good understanding of it. In reality, however, misconceptions about astronomy abound, and even basic concepts are misunderstood. There are many sources of these cosmic misconceptions, including incorrect textbooks, parents and/or teachers who don't understand astronomy and therefore spread misinformation, urban legends, and so on. Perhaps the most pervasive source of bad astronomy is Hollywood. Science fiction movies are enormously popular, but are commonly written and directed by people who don't have even a passing familiarity with astronomy. The smash hit "Armageddon" (the number one box office movie of 1998), for example, used vast quantities of incorrect astronomy in the plot. It reinforced such popular misconceptions as huge asteroids impacting the Earth with little warning, small meteorites being hot when they impact, air existing in space, and that a simple bomb can blow up an asteroid the size of a small moon (even when the bomb is buried only 800 feet deep!). However, movie scenes can be used as a hook that engages the student, helping them learn and remember the correct science. In this talk, I will light-heartedly discuss specific examples of common misinformation, using movie clips, diagrams, and a splash of common sense to show just where Hollywood gets it wrong, and what you can do to help students and the public get it right.

  11. Astronomy and Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Rosa M.

    There are many European countries where Astronomy does not appear as a specific course on the secondary school. In these cases Astronomy content can be introduced by means of other subjects. There are some astronomical topics within the subject of Physics but this talk concerns introducing Astronomy in Mathematics classes. Teaching Astronomy through Mathematics would result in more exposure than through Physics as Mathematics is more prevalent in the curriculum. Generally it is not easy to motivate students in Mathematics but they are motivated to find out more about the universe and Astronomy current events than appears in the media. This situation can be an excellent introduction to several mathematics topics. The teachers in secondary and high school can use this idea in order to present more attractive mathematics courses. In particular some different examples will be offered regarding * Angles and spherical coordinates considering star traces * Logarithms and visual magnitudes * Plane trigonometry related orbital movements * Spherical trigonometry in connection with ecliptic obliquity * Conic curves related to sundial at several latitudes Some students do not enjoy studying Mathematics but they can be attracted by practical situations using Applied Mathematics: Astronomy is always very attractive to teenagers.

  12. Exploring Metacogntive Visual Literacy Tasks for Teaching Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Timothy F.; Slater, S.; Dwyer, W.

    2010-01-01

    Undoubtedly, astronomy is a scientific enterprise which often results in colorful and inspirational images of the cosmos that naturally capture our attention. Students encountering astronomy in the college classroom are often bombarded with images, movies, simulations, conceptual cartoons, graphs, and charts intended to convey the substance and technological advancement inherent in astronomy. For students who self-identify themselves as visual learners, this aspect can make the science of astronomy come alive. For students who naturally attend to visual aesthetics, this aspect can make astronomy seem relevant. In other words, the visual nature that accompanies much of the scientific realm of astronomy has the ability to connect a wide range of students to science, not just those few who have great abilities and inclinations toward the mathematical analysis world. Indeed, this is fortunate for teachers of astronomy, who actively try to find ways to connect and build astronomical understanding with a broad range of student interests, motivations, and abilities. In the context of learning science, metacognition describes students’ self-monitoring, -regulation, and -awareness when thinking about learning. As such, metacognition is one of the foundational pillars supporting what we know about how people learn. Yet, the astronomy teaching and learning community knows very little about how to operationalize and support students’ metacognition in the classroom. In response, the Conceptual Astronomy, Physics and Earth sciences Research (CAPER) Team is developing and pilot-testing metacogntive tasks in the context of astronomy that focus on visual literacy of astronomical phenomena. In the initial versions, students are presented with a scientifically inaccurate narrative supposedly describing visual information, including images and graphical information, and asked to assess and correct the narrative, in the form of peer evaluation. To guide student thinking, students

  13. Astronomy Diagnostic Test Results Reflect Course Goals and Show Room for Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2007-01-01

    The results of administering the Astronomy Diagnostic Test (ADT) to introductory astronomy students at Henry Ford Community College over three years have shown gains comparable with national averages. Results have also accurately corresponded to course goals, showing greater gains in topics covered in more detail, and lower gains in topics covered…

  14. Evolution and Persistence of Students' Astronomy Career Interests: A Gender Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, Zoey; Sadler, Philip; Sonnert, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    This article uses U.S. survey data (N = 15,847) to characterize the evolution of student interest in an astronomy career in the period between middle school and the beginning of college. We find that middle school students have a relatively high interest in astronomy, which sharply declines with every phase of their education. However, many of the…

  15. Career Progression of Junior Professional Officers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper S. E.; Carbonaro J.; Hoffheins, B; Collins, T.

    2015-07-12

    The U.S. Support Program to IAEA Safeguards (USSP) has funded more than 25 Junior Professional Officer (JPO) positions in the IAEA Department of Safeguards since 2005. JPOs are college graduates with zero to two years’ work experience who work alongside experienced IAEA staff members for one to two years and assist with basic, yet essential work while obtaining valuable experience. They contribute to equipment development, testing, integration, open source information collection and analysis, and software and database development. This paper will study the trends in career progression for the JPOs who have completed assignments with the IAEA in the Department of Safeguards. Brookhaven National Laboratory, in its role in managing the USSP, has compiled information that can be analyzed for this purpose.

  16. Rescuing Middle School Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, L. A.; Janney, D.

    2010-12-01

    There is a crisis in education at the middle school level (Spellings, 2006). Recent studies point to large disparities in middle school performance in schools with high minority populations. The largest disparities exist in areas of math and science. Astronomy has a universal appeal for K-12 students but is rarely taught at the middle school level. When it is taught at all it is usually taught in isolation with few references in other classes such as other sciences (e.g. physics, biology, and chemistry), math, history, geography, music, art, or English. The problem is greatest in our most challenged school districts. With scores in reading and math below national averages in these schools and with most state achievement tests ignoring subjects like astronomy, there is little room in the school day to teach about the world outside our atmosphere. Add to this the exceedingly minimal training and education in astronomy that most middle school teachers have and it is a rare school that includes any astronomy teaching at all. In this presentation, we show how to develop and offer an astronomy education training program for middle school teachers encompassing a wide range of educational disciplines that are frequently taught at the middle school level. The prototype for this program was developed and launched in two of the most challenged and diverse school systems in the country; D.C. Public Schools, and Montgomery County (MD) Public Schools.

  17. Visualising Astronomy: "Other Worlds"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, R.

    2009-02-01

    The infrastructures that are built and used for astronomical research are financed by - and therefore must be justified to - our society. Astronomy has an innate appeal for people of all ages, partly because it concerns the fascinating, great questions "of life, the Universe and everything" and partly because much of the data obtained with telescopes can be presented as objects of stunning beauty. These are key facts when considering communicating astronomy with the public. This native advantage that astronomy has over many other sciences does not, however, relieve us of the obligation to explain what we are doing to the public at large. There are many reasons for doing this. They range from attracting bright young people into the subject to fuel future research endeavours to convincing decision-takers to allocate large sums of money to finance increasingly expensive and ambitious projects.

  18. Python in Astronomy 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenness, Tim; Robitaille, Thomas; Tollerud, Erik; Mumford, Stuart; Cruz, Kelle

    2016-04-01

    The second Python in Astronomy conference will be held from 21-25 March 2016 at the University of Washington eScience Institute in Seattle, WA, USA. Similarly to the 2015 meeting (which was held at the Lorentz Center), we are aiming to bring together researchers, Python developers, users, and educators. The conference will include presentations, tutorials, unconference sessions, and coding sprints. In addition to sharing information about state-of-the art Python Astronomy packages, the workshop will focus on improving interoperability between astronomical Python packages, providing training for new open-source contributors, and developing educational materials for Python in Astronomy. The meeting is therefore not only aimed at current developers, but also users and educators who are interested in being involved in these efforts.

  19. Astronomy education in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutawarakorn, Busaba; Soonthornthum, B.; Kirdkao, T.

    Thailand is one of the developing countries which pursues the goal to advance economy, technology as well as science. Education in Astronomy is considered as a supporting factor, since it is one of the basic sciences which can teach the young generation to understand and conserve their mother nature and at the same time helps to develop analytical thinking. The poster reports the present developments in astronomical education in Thailand which includes (1) current astronomy education in school and university; (2) educational activities outside school; (3) development of programs for teaching astronomy in school (including teacher training); (4) the access of educational resources via internet. Proposals for future development and collaborations will be presented and discussed.

  20. Astronomy Librarian - Quo Vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerstrom, Jill; Grothkopf, Uta

    "You don't look like a librarian" is a phrase we often hear in the astronomy department or observatory library. Astronomy librarians are a breed apart, and are taking on new and non-traditional roles as information technology evolves. This talk will explore the future of librarians and librarianship through the lens of some of the recent talks given at the sixth "Libraries and Information Services in Astronomy" conference held in Pune, India in February 2010. We will explore the librarian's universe, illustrating how librarians use new technologies to perform such tasks as bibliometrics, how we are re-fashioning our library spaces in an increasingly digital world and how we are confronting the brave new world of Open Access, to name but a few topics.

  1. Astronomy Librarians - Quo Vadis?

    CERN Document Server

    Lagerstrom, Jill

    2011-01-01

    "You don't look like a librarian" is a phrase we often hear in the astronomy department or observatory library. Astronomy librarians are a breed apart, and are taking on new and non-traditional roles as information technology evolves. This talk will explore the future of librarians and librarianship through the lens of the recent talks given at the sixth "Libraries and Information Services in Astronomy" conference held in Pune, India in February 2010. We will explore the librarian's universe, illustrating how librarians use new technologies to perform such tasks as bibliometrics, how we are re-fashioning our library spaces in an increasingly digital world and how we are confronting the brave new world of open access, to name but a few topics.

  2. Statistics in astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Feigelson, Eric D

    2009-01-01

    Perhaps more than other physical sciences, astronomy is frequently statistical in nature. The objects under study are inaccessible to direct manipulation in the laboratory, so the astronomer is restricted to observing a few external characteristics and inferring underlying properties and physics. Astronomy played a profound role in the historical development of statistics from the ancient Greeks through the 19th century. But the fields drifted apart in the 20th century as astronomy turned towards astrophysics and statistics towards human affairs. Today we see a resurgence in astrostatistical activity with the proliferation of survey mega-datasets and the need to link complicated data to nonlinear astrophysical models. Several contemporary astrostatistical challenges are outlined: heteroscedastic measurement errors, censoring and truncation in multivariate databases; time series analysis of variable objects including dynamical models of extrasolar planetary systems; treatments of faint sources and other Poisso...

  3. Student comprehension of mathematics through astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search, Robert

    The purpose of this study is to examine how knowledge of astronomy can enhance college-level learning situations involving mathematics. The fundamental symbiosis between mathematics and astronomy was established early in the 17th century when Johannes Kepler deduced the 3 basic laws of planetary motion. This mutually harmonious relationship between these sciences has been reinforced repeatedly in history. In the early 20th century, for example, astronomer Arthur Eddington used photographic evidence from a 1919 solar eclipse to verify Einstein's mathematical theory of relativity. This study was conducted in 5 undergraduate mathematics classes over the course of 2 years. An introductory course in ordinary differential equations, taught in Spring Semester 2013, involved 4 students. A similar course in Spring Semester 2014 involved 6 students, a Summer Semester 2014 Calculus II course involved 2 students, and a Summer 2015 Astronomy course involved 8 students. The students were asked to use Kepler's astronomical evidence to deduce mathematical laws normally encountered on an undergraduate level. They were also asked to examine the elementary mathematical aspects involved in a theoretical trajectory to the planet Neptune. The summer astronomy class was asked to draw mathematical conclusions about large numbers from the recent discoveries concerning the dwarf planet Pluto. The evidence consists primarily of videotaped PowerPoint presentations conducted by the students in both differential equations classes, along with interviews and tests given in all the classes. All presentations were transcribed and examined to determine the effect of astronomy as a generator of student understanding of mathematics. An analysis of the data indicated two findings: definite student interest in a subject previously unknown to most of them and a desire to make the mathematical connection to celestial phenomena.

  4. Lessons from Mayan Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Loeb, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    The Mayan culture collected exquisite astronomical data for over a millennium. However, it failed to come up with the breakthrough ideas of modern astronomy because the data was analyzed within a mythological culture of astrology that rested upon false but mathematically sophisticated theories about the Universe. Have we learned the necessary lessons to prevent our current scientific culture from resembling Mayan Astronomy? Clearly, data collection by itself is not a guarantee for good science as commonly assumed by funding agencies. A vibrant scientific culture should cultivate multiple approaches to analyzing existing data and to collecting new data.

  5. Astronomy and Poetry (overview)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samvelyan, David

    2016-12-01

    Through this work we have tried to show how astronomy penetrates into the poetry of different periods in time and in various poets' works all over the world. The following work has significant cognitive value, demonstrates and reveals the general nature of certain poets' astronomical ideas and provides a brief analysis in some cases. As a result, we have come to the conclusion that astronomy with all its components such as the sky, our solar system and phenomena such as these have always been a source of inspiration for those who create works of art, moreover some of them have even gained actual astronomical knowledge.

  6. A Course Connecting Astronomy to Art, History, and Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Don

    2015-01-01

    For the past 20 years the author has taught an Honors College course combining astronomy and the humanities. The purpose of this note is to give examples of methods that can be adapted to classroom use for topics including night sky paintings by Vincent van Gogh, Edvard Munch, and Claude Monet, historical events influenced by astronomical factors,…

  7. A Course Connecting Astronomy to Art, History, and Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Don

    2015-01-01

    For the past 20 years the author has taught an Honors College course combining astronomy and the humanities. The purpose of this note is to give examples of methods that can be adapted to classroom use for topics including night sky paintings by Vincent van Gogh, Edvard Munch, and Claude Monet, historical events influenced by astronomical factors,…

  8. Quickly Creating Interactive Astronomy Illustrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    An innate advantage for astronomy teachers is having numerous breathtaking images of the cosmos available to capture students' curiosity, imagination, and wonder. Internet-based astronomy image libraries are numerous and easy to navigate. The Astronomy Picture of the Day, the Hubble Space Telescope image archive, and the NASA Planetary…

  9. School-Based Extracurricular Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanger, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    The International Year of Astronomy in 2009 focused considerable public attention on Astronomy and generated valuable resources for educators. These activities are an effective vehicle for promoting Science to students and to the wider school community. The most engaging practical astronomy activities are best delivered with sustained support from…

  10. Teaching Astronomy in UK Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Paul; Roberts, Sarah; Newsam, Andy; Barclay, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This article attempts to summarise the good, bad and (occasionally) ugly aspects of teaching astronomy in UK schools. It covers the most common problems reported by teachers when asked about covering the astronomy/space topics in school. Particular focus is given to the GCSE Astronomy qualification offered by Edexcel (which is currently the…

  11. School-Based Extracurricular Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanger, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    The International Year of Astronomy in 2009 focused considerable public attention on Astronomy and generated valuable resources for educators. These activities are an effective vehicle for promoting Science to students and to the wider school community. The most engaging practical astronomy activities are best delivered with sustained support from…

  12. Quickly Creating Interactive Astronomy Illustrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    An innate advantage for astronomy teachers is having numerous breathtaking images of the cosmos available to capture students' curiosity, imagination, and wonder. Internet-based astronomy image libraries are numerous and easy to navigate. The Astronomy Picture of the Day, the Hubble Space Telescope image archive, and the NASA Planetary…

  13. Teaching Astronomy in UK Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Paul; Roberts, Sarah; Newsam, Andy; Barclay, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This article attempts to summarise the good, bad and (occasionally) ugly aspects of teaching astronomy in UK schools. It covers the most common problems reported by teachers when asked about covering the astronomy/space topics in school. Particular focus is given to the GCSE Astronomy qualification offered by Edexcel (which is currently the…

  14. A Community - Centered Astronomy Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Pat; Boyce, Grady

    2017-06-01

    The Boyce Research Initiatives and Education Foundation (BRIEF) is providing semester-long, hands-on, astronomy research experiences for students of all ages that results in their publishing peer-reviewed papers. The course in astronomy and double star research has evolved from a face-to-face learning experience with two instructors to an online - hybrid course that simultaneously supports classroom instruction at a variety of schools in the San Diego area. Currently, there are over 65 students enrolled in three community colleges, seven high schools, and one university as well as individual adult learners. Instructional experience, courseware, and supporting systems were developed and refined through experience gained in classroom settings from 2014 through 2016. Topics of instruction include Kepler's Laws, basic astrometry, properties of light, CCD imaging, use of filters for varying stellar spectral types, and how to perform research, scientific writing, and proposal preparation. Volunteer instructors were trained by taking the course and producing their own research papers. An expanded program was launched in the fall semester of 2016. Twelve papers from seven schools were produced; eight have been accepted for publication by the Journal of Double Observations (JDSO) and the remainder are in peer review. Three additional papers have been accepted by the JDSO and two more are in process papers. Three college professors and five advanced amateur astronomers are now qualified volunteer instructors. Supporting tools are provided by a BRIEF server and other online services. The server-based tools range from Microsoft Office and planetarium software to top-notch imaging programs and computational software for data reduction for each student team. Observations are performed by robotic telescopes worldwide supported by BRIEF. With this success, student demand has increased significantly. Many of the graduates of the first semester course wanted to expand their

  15. Como Prepararse a Tiempo para la Universidad: Un Manual para los Padres de Alumnos que Cursan la Escuela Intermedia (Getting Ready for College Early: A Handbook for Parents of Students in the Middle and Junior High School Years).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Education, Washington, DC. Office of Planning, Budget, and Evaluation.

    This Spanish language booklet, also available in English, provides "los cuatro pasos"--four steps that parents and children can take to ensure that students properly prepare for college. Step one discusses why it is important to go to college; reasons include better job opportunities, more earning potential, and the increased variety of jobs one…

  16. Tools of radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Thomas L; Hüttemeister, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    This 6th edition of “Tools of Radio Astronomy”, the most used introductory text in radio astronomy, has been revised to reflect the current state of this important branch of astronomy. This includes the use of satellites, low radio frequencies, the millimeter/sub-mm universe, the Cosmic Microwave Background and the increased importance of mm/sub-mm dust emission. Several derivations and presentations of technical aspects of radio astronomy and receivers, such as receiver noise, the Hertz dipole and  beam forming have been updated, expanded, re-worked or complemented by alternative derivations. These reflect advances in technology. The wider bandwidths of the Jansky-VLA and long wave arrays such as LOFAR and mm/sub-mm arrays such as ALMA required an expansion of the discussion of interferometers and aperture synthesis. Developments in data reduction algorithms have been included. As a result of the large amount of data collected in the past 20 years, the discussion of solar system radio astronomy, dust em...

  17. Physics and astronomy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moraal, H

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The chapter is about physics and astronomy. The chapter gives a background about the origins of physics in South Africa. After the CSIR was founded in 1945, physics emerged as a nationwide and unified discipline. The authors show how physics...

  18. Resources for Teaching Astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafton, Teresa; Suggett, Martin

    1991-01-01

    Resources that are available for teachers presenting astronomy in the National Curriculum are listed. Included are societies and organizations, resource centers and places to visit, planetaria, telescopes and binoculars, planispheres, star charts, night sky diaries, equipment, audiovisual materials, computer software, books, and magazines. (KR)

  19. Teaching Astronomy Using Tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloni, Mario; Christian, Wolfgang; Brown, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    A recent paper in this journal presented a set of innovative uses of video analysis for introductory physics using Tracker. In addition, numerous other papers have described how video analysis can be a meaningful part of introductory courses. Yet despite this, there are few resources for using video analysis in introductory astronomy classes. In…

  20. Division x: Radio Astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, Russ; Chapman, Jessica; Rendong, Nan; Carilli, Christopher; Giovannini, Gabriele; Hills, Richard; Hirabayashi, Hisashi; Jonas, Justin; Lazio, Joseph; Morganti, Raffaella; Rubio, Monica; Shastri, Prajval

    This triennium has seen a phenomenal investment in development of observational radio astronomy facilities in all parts of the globe at a scale that significantly impacts the international community. This includes both major enhancements such as the transition from the VLA to the EVLA in North

  1. Astronomy on the Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santascoy, J.

    2016-01-01

    Many of us are interested in increasing youth and minority involvement in the sciences. Using art that integrates images of space exploration with ethnic astronomical mythology may increase participation in astronomy in general, while also forming a bridge to underrepresented communities. This paper describes a freely available presentation of Carlos Callejo's Discover the Secrets of the Universe Through the Library for outreach.

  2. Teaching Astronomy Using Tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloni, Mario; Christian, Wolfgang; Brown, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    A recent paper in this journal presented a set of innovative uses of video analysis for introductory physics using Tracker. In addition, numerous other papers have described how video analysis can be a meaningful part of introductory courses. Yet despite this, there are few resources for using video analysis in introductory astronomy classes. In…

  3. 医学专升本学生时间管理倾向与自我监控的相关性研究%A correlative study on time management disposition and self-monitoring of medical students upgrading from junior college to university

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马俊卿

    2015-01-01

    目的:了解医学专升本学生时间管理倾向与自我监控的状况,并分析两者的相关性。方法采用青少年时间管理倾向量表和Snyder自我监控力量表个人反应问卷,对专升本406名学生进行调查和分析。结果1)医学专升本学生中生活在农村与生活在城镇的学生在时间效能感上的差异( t=2.223,P﹤0.05)、是否独生子女在时间管理倾向与时间效能感上的差异( t=-2.138,P﹤0.05;t=-2.616,P﹤0.05)、是否学生干部在时间监控感上的差异( t=2.731,P﹤0.05)有统计学意义;2)在各人口统计学特征上,高/低监控水平都存在统计学意义,有显著性差异(P﹤0.05);3)自我监控与时间监控感存在低度相关(r=0.104,P﹤0.05)。结论医学专升本学生自我监控水平的不同对时间管理倾向的影响不明显,但自我监控水平与时间监控观存在相关性。%Objective To know the status of time management disposition and self‐monitoring of medical students upgrading from junior college to university ,and to analyze the correlation between the two .Methods By Time Management Disposition Scale and Snyder self‐monitoring individuals reaction force form questionnaire , the investigation and analysis on the 406 students .Results 1)Medical students upgrading from junior college to univer‐sity of colleges and universities living in rural and urban in the time difference in efficacy ( t=2.223 ,P﹤0.05 ) , whether the child at the time management disposition and time management efficacy difference ( t= -2.138 ,P﹤0.05 ;t= -2.616 ,P﹤ 0.05 ) , whether the student leaders a sense of the difference in the time control ( t=2.731 ,P﹤0 .05 ) was statistically significant .2 )In each demographic characteristics ,high/low control level have statistically significant ,there were significant differences ( P﹤0.05 ) .3 )Self‐monitoring and low sense of time mo

  4. Strategies for Teaching Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, J.

    2000-12-01

    No matter whether you are teaching school children, undergraduates, or colleagues, a few key strategies are always useful. I will present and give examples for the following five key strategies for teaching astronomy. 1. Provide a Contextual Framework: It is much easier to learn new facts or concepts if they can be ``binned" into some kind of pre-existing mental framework. Unless your listeners are already familiar with the basic ideas of modern astronomy (such as the hierarchy of structure in the universe, the scale of the universe, and the origin of the universe), you must provide this before going into the details of how we've developed this modern picture through history. 2. Create Conditions for Conceptual Change: Many people hold misconceptions about astronomical ideas. Therefore we cannot teach them the correct ideas unless we first help them unlearn their prior misconceptions. 3. Make the Material Relevant: It's human nature to be more interested in subjects that seem relevant to our lives. Therefore we must always show students the many connections between astronomy and their personal concerns, such as emphasizing how we are ``star stuff" (in the words of Carl Sagan), how studying other planets helps us understand our own, and so on. 4. Limit Use of Jargon: The number of new terms in many introductory astronomy books is larger than the number of words taught in many first courses in foreign language. This means the books are essentially teaching astronomy in a foreign language, which is a clear recipe for failure. We must find ways to replace jargon with plain language. 5. Challenge Your Students: Don't dumb your teaching down; by and large, students will rise to meet your expectations, as long as you follow the other strategies and practice good teaching.

  5. Astronomy in the Classroom for Mature Lifelong Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, B. E.

    2010-08-01

    Mature adults are sometimes underserved by the professional astronomical community, which often focuses on K-12/undergraduate education and outreach. Mature adults hold as much interest and enthusiasm for astronomy as their younger cohorts, but often face a greater challenge in obtaining access to adult-level information that is more structured than sporadic public lectures or the occasional popular-science article. I present here my efforts to bring astronomy classes to the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at UC Berkeley. There are over 120 OLLIs on university and college campuses throughout the United States. These institutes provide adults, age 50 and above, with both a diverse curriculum of study and a stimulating community of peers. Teaching at OLLI has been a straightforward way so share astronomy with this segment of the public—outreach that could be replicated by astronomers at other universities and colleges with associated OLLIs. The OLLI classroom can be challenging because of the wide range of student educational backgrounds. However, teaching at OLLI is extremely rewarding because mature adults bring to the classroom a vast array of life experiences, great curiosity, and immense independence of thought. The OLLI also provides the unique opportunity to inspire other non-traditional astronomy outreach activities by building partnerships both with professors in other disciplines and with the students themselves, as adult students often have the resources and connections to call upon to further explore and share astronomy outside the classroom.

  6. Asynchronous, web-based course in astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spergel, M.

    The course described here is a general educational, non-prerequisite and non- mathematical college course in astronomy offered on the web. It consists of readings from the text plus other periodical sources both online and offline. The course also requires the student to utilize a virtual planetarium to perform exercises in viewing the sky. The students respond to conceptual, multiple-choice questions. This course gives the student a sense of the night sky through the use of computer simulations and night observation. The students learn to understand and express scientific ideas. In addition, since the course is enhanced in computer usage and writing, students also develop these important skills.

  7. Junior Professors Question Job Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lauren

    2007-01-01

    Female and minority faculty members rated their institutions less positively as places for junior professors to work than did their male and white counterparts, according to a new report. Young professors said institutional policies designed to help them succeed were important, but they were less satisfied that those policies were effective. Women…

  8. Improving Junior High Classroom Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmer, Edmund T.; And Others

    A field experiment was conducted to determine whether descriptive-correlational results from classroom management research could be implemented by junior high school teachers, and whether such implementation would result in improved classroom management. An experimental group (18 teachers) received management manuals developed by researchers, and…

  9. Holography in the Junior High.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszkiewicz, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Examines the use of holography in the art technology program of a junior high school. Characterizing holography as a valuable artistic experience and discovery experience and stressing the importance of student interest and involvement, the author discusses the necessary equipment for the project and includes two diagrams of a holographic setup.…

  10. Transportation Practices in Community College Athletics

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVetter, David; Kim, Hyun Duck

    2010-01-01

    Over 45,000 U.S. community college athletes were transported to events during 2005-2006. Transporting college athletes has been an overlooked risk management issue facing administrators. Team travel accidents have caused death, injury, liability claims, property loss, and grief. National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) member…

  11. College Governance: A Comparison of Faculty Evaluation in Public and Private Colleges with Implications for the Improvement of the Evaluation Process at Johnson and Wales College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Joseph E.

    This study focuses on selected factors in the evaluation of faculty members in: (1) colleges accredited by the Association of Independent Colleges and Schools; (2) public junior and senior colleges; and (3) Rhode Island colleges. Results of the study indicate that faculty evaluation schemes must follow the basic goals and philosophy of the…

  12. Freshman Seminars: Interdisciplinary Engagements in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemenway, M. K.

    2006-08-01

    The Freshman Seminar program at the University of Texas is designed to allow groups of fifteen students an engaging introduction to the University. The seminars introduce students to the resources of the university and allow them to identify interesting subjects for further research or future careers. An emphasis on oral and written communication by the students provides these first-year students a transition to college-level writing and thinking. Seminar activities include field trips to an art museum, a research library, and the Humanities Research Center rare book collection. This paper will report on two seminars, each fifteen weeks in length. In "The Galileo Scandal" students examine Galileo's struggle with the church (including a mock trial). They perform activities that connect his use of the telescope and observations to astronomical concepts. In "Astronomy and the Humanities" students analyze various forms of human expression that have astronomical connections (art, drama, literature, music, poetry, and science fiction); they perform hands-on activities to reinforce the related astronomy concepts. Evaluation of the seminars indicates student engagement and improvement in communication skills. Many of the activities could be used independently to engage students enrolled in standard introductory astronomy classes.

  13. Visuospatial astronomy education in immersive digital planetariums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, K. C.; Sahami, K.

    2008-06-01

    Even simple concepts in astronomy are notoriously difficult for the general public to understand. Many ideas involve three-dimensional (3D) spatial relationships among astronomical objects. However much of the traditional teaching materials used in astronomy education are two-dimensional (2D) in nature, while studies show that visualising mental rotations and perspective changes can be difficult for many. The simplifications that occur when explaining one phenomenon may lead to new misconceptions in other concepts. Properly constructed 3D simulations can provide students with the multiple perspectives necessary for understanding. As a venue for virtual astronomical environments, the new class of digital video planetariums that are appearing in museums and science centres have the potential to bridge the comprehension gap in astronomy learning. We describe a research project which aims to evaluate the effectiveness of visualisations in both immersive and non-immersive settings, by using freshmen undergraduate students from a four-year college. The retention of students over the course of a semester for this study means that student misconceptions can be tracked and recorded weekly via curriculum tests.

  14. The Astronomy Workshop: Web Tools for Astronomy Students at All Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes-Gehrke, Melissa N.; Hamilton, D.; Deming, G.

    2010-01-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu/) is a collection of over 20 interactive web tools that were developed under the direction of Doug Hamilton for use in undergraduate classes and by the general public. The goal of the website is to encourage students to learn about astronomy by exploiting their fascination with the internet. Two of the tools, Scientific Notation and Solar System Collisions, have instructor materials available to facilitate their use in undergraduate, high school, and junior high classes. The Scientific Notation web tool allows students to practice conversion, addition/subtraction, and multiplication/division with scientific notation, while the Solar System Collisions web tool explores the effects of impacts on the Earth and other solar system bodies. Some web tools allow students to explore our own solar system (Solar System Visualizer) and the Sun's past and future history (The Life of the Sun), Others allow students to experiment with changes in the solar system, such as to the tilt of the Earth (Earth's Seasons) and changing the properties of the planets in the solar system (Build Your Own Solar System).

  15. Fighting College Craziness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Michael Thompson, a psychologist who consults in K-12 schools, describes the high levels of anxiety he sees among high school juniors and seniors as they go through the college application process. Thompson believes the admissions process is a poor rite of passage to young adulthood because it focuses on the wrong questions. Parents and families…

  16. Astronomy Olympiad: An Initiative To Promote Astronomy Education In Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Suresh

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents National Astronomy Olympiad Program as a new initiative towards the development of astronomy education in Nepal by Nepal Astronomical Society (NASO).Innovoative components of the olympiad programs designed by NASO to engage both scince and non-science backgound people will be discussed in detail. It will discuss the first National Astronomy Olympiad 2014 and Second National Astronomy Olympiad 2015 in details. It will also present crowd funding, its effectiveness to outreach as well as collecting funds from around the world will be presented in brief. Proposed module of astronomy olympiad to promote astronnomy in the countries without formal astronomy education in high school like Nepal,will be presented in dedail. Possible strategry to strengthen such programs in developing nations and role of IAU to promote such educational program will be explored in detail.

  17. 改良式手术室技能综合实训在大专外科护理教学中的应用%Modified operating-room skill comprehensive practical training in surgical nursing teaching at junior colleges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张源慧; 李鹏

    2013-01-01

    目的探讨改良式手术室技能综合实训在大专外科护理学中的改革和实践体会。方法随机抽取40名大专护生为实验组,另抽取40名为对照组。对照组采取传统手术室技能综合实训教学法,实验组采取改良式手术室技能综合实训,实行参与式角色扮演教学,对2组护生进行手术室技能考核,并发放自制调查问卷,进行教学效果评价。结果手术室技能理论考核成绩两组无统计学差异;手术室技能操作考核成绩实验组高于对照组(P<0.05);实验组护生对改良式手术室技能综合实训效果评价各项指标同意率均在90%以上,参与式角色扮演实训教学法受到大专护生普遍欢迎及认可。结论改良式手术室技能综合实训有利于提高大专护生的技能操作水平和自主操作积极性,减轻教师实训压力,提高了实训教学质量。%Objective To explore educational reform and practice experience of modified operating room skill comprehensive practical training in surgical nursing practical training of junior colleges.Methods We randomly selected 36 student nurses of Class 2010 in a junior college as the experimental group and another 40 as the control group .The control group received the traditional operating room skill comprehensive practical training teaching methodology while the experimental group received modified operating room skill comprehensive practical training and practice participating roll play teaching.The two groups of student nurses were tested in operating room skills and surveyed with a self -designed questionnaire for evaluating the teaching effects .Results There was no significant difference in operating room skill theoretical test scores ( P <0 .05 ) , but the experimental group outperformed the control group in operating room skill test .The agreement percentage of each effect evaluation index for educational reform and practice of modified operating

  18. Astronomy and astrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarka, Philippe

    2011-06-01

    Astrology meets a large success in our societies, from the private to the political sphere as well as in the media, in spite of the demonstrated inaccuracy of its psychological as well as operational predictions. We analyse here the relations between astrology and astronomy, as well as the criticisms opposed by the latter to the former. We show that most of these criticisms are weak. Much stronger ones emerge from the analysis of the astrological practice compared to the scientific method, leading us to conclude to the non-scientificity of astrology. Then we return to the success of astrology, and from its analysis we propose a renewed (and prophylactic) rôle for astronomy in society.

  19. Bringing Students To Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Gilbert

    2013-05-01

    The Telescopes In Education (TIE) Program was the pioneer in robotic astronomy. The first users came online in the spring of 1993. The TIE program was dedicated to K-14 students with the hope of inspiring them to develop a greater appreciation for math, science, and engineering through their participation in astronomy. The program was very successful through 2005 when NASA felt there were enough robotic telescopes in the community to support the students into the future. During the 12 years of supported operations, TIE had over one hundred thousand student operations. TIE then started working with Universities in Australia to help move their students towards careers in the sciences and engineering. We discovered that students in the middle schools were the ones that should be focused on, to successfully bring them into the sciences and engineering. We have crafted a system that should be very successful in this endeavor.

  20. Tools of radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Thomas L; Hüttemeister, Susanne

    2009-01-01

    The recent years have seen breathtaking progress in technology, especially in the receiver and digital technologies relevant for radio astronomy, which has at the same time advanced to shorter wavelengths. This is the updated and completely revised 5th edition of the most used introductory text in radio astronomy. It presents a unified treatment of the entire field from centimeter to sub-millimeter wavelengths. Topics covered include instruments, sensitivity considerations, observational methods and interpretations of the data recorded with both single dishes and interferometers. This text is useful to both students and experienced practicing astronomers. Besides making major updates and additions throughout the book, the authors have re-organized a number of chapters to more clearly separate basic theory from rapidly evolving practical aspects. Further, problem sets have been added at the end of each chapter.

  1. Thread Safe Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Seaman, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Observational astronomy is the beneficiary of an ancient chain of apprenticeship. Kepler's laws required Tycho's data. As the pace of discoveries has increased over the centuries, so has the cadence of tutelage (literally, "watching over"). Naked eye astronomy is thousands of years old, the telescope hundreds, digital imaging a few decades, but today's undergraduates will use instrumentation yet unbuilt - and thus, unfamiliar to their professors - to complete their doctoral dissertations. Not only has the quickening cadence of astronomical data-taking overrun the apprehension of the science within, but the contingent pace of experimental design threatens our capacity to learn new techniques and apply them productively. Virtual technologies are necessary to accelerate our human processes of perception and comprehension to keep up with astronomical instrumentation and pipelined dataflows. Necessary, but not sufficient. Computers can confuse us as efficiently as they illuminate. Rather, as with neural pathways e...

  2. Division x: Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Russ; Chapman, Jessica; Rendong, Nan; Carilli, Christopher; Giovannini, Gabriele; Hills, Richard; Hirabayashi, Hisashi; Jonas, Justin; Lazio, Joseph; Morganti, Raffaella; Rubio, Monica; Shastri, Prajval

    2012-04-01

    This triennium has seen a phenomenal investment in development of observational radio astronomy facilities in all parts of the globe at a scale that significantly impacts the international community. This includes both major enhancements such as the transition from the VLA to the EVLA in North America, and the development of new facilities such as LOFAR, ALMA, FAST, and Square Kilometre Array precursor telescopes in Australia and South Africa. These developments are driven by advances in radio-frequency, digital and information technologies that tremendously enhance the capabilities in radio astronomy. These new developments foreshadow major scientific advances driven by radio observations in the next triennium. We highlight these facility developments in section 3 of this report. A selection of science highlight from this triennium are summarized in section 2.

  3. Complex Variables in Junior High School: The Role and Potential Impact of an Outreach Mathematician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Billy J.; Dwyer, Jerry F.; Wilhelm, Jennifer; Moskal, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Outreach mathematicians are college faculty who are trained in mathematics but who undertake an active role in improving primary and secondary education. This role is examined through a study where an outreach mathematician introduced the concept of complex variables to junior high school students in the United States with the goal of stimulating…

  4. Software systems for astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Conrad, Albert R

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the use and development of software for astronomy. It describes the control systems used to point the telescope and operate its cameras and spectrographs, as well as the web-based tools used to plan those observations. In addition, the book also covers the analysis and archiving of astronomical data once it has been acquired. Readers will learn about existing software tools and packages, develop their own software tools, and analyze real data sets.

  5. Astronomy on a Landfill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venner, Laura

    2008-09-01

    Engaging "K-to-Gray” audiences (children, families, and older adults) in astronomical activities is one of the main goals of the NJMC Center for Environmental and Scientific Education and the William D. McDowell Observatory located in Lyndhurst, NJ. Perched atop a closed and reclaimed municipal solid waste landfill, our new LEED - certified building (certification pending) and William D. McDowell observatory will assist in bringing the goals of IYA 2009 to the approximately 25,000 students and 15,000 adults that visit our site from the NY/NJ region each year. Diversifying our traditional environmental science offerings, we have incorporated astronomy into our repertoire with "The Sun Through Time” module, which includes storytelling, cultural astronomy, telescope anatomy, and other activities that are based on the electromagnetic spectrum and our current knowledge of the sun. These lessons have also been modified to bring astronomy to underserved communities, specifically those individuals that have dexterity or cognitive ability differences. The program is conducted in a classroom setting and is designed to meet New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards. With the installation of our new 20” telescope, students and amateur astronomers will be given the opportunity to perform rudimentary research. In addition, a program is in development that will allow individuals to measure local sky brightness and understand the effects of light pollution on astronomical viewing. Teaching astronomy in an urban setting presents many challenges. All individuals, regardless of ability level or location, should be given the opportunity to be exposed to the wonders of the universe and the MEC/CESE has been successful in providing those opportunities.

  6. TEAM Experience in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGruder, C. H., III; Tyson, N.; Williams, B.; Hackney, K.; Hackney, R.; Rudloff, M.; Scott, R.; Tyler, R.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of the project was to increase minority interest and appreciation of science using astronomy as a tool. This goal was achieved by inviting high school minority students and their teachers to the campus of Western Kentucky University to participate along with minority role models in team based learning experiences. All participants worked together in many hands-on activities and events centered around the exploration of space.

  7. Infrared spectroscopy in astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The use of infrared spectroscopy in astronomy has increased dramatically in the past ten years. The broad design considerations are discussed in terms of wavelength coverage and resolution. Three rough resolution ranges, lambda/Delta lambda of approximately 100, 1000 and 10,000, are identified in which various types of astronomical problems can be studied. Numerous existing systems are briefly discussed and references are given to more complete descriptions.

  8. Astronomy in the streets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebe, Fatoumata

    2015-08-01

    The Ephemerides Association was founded last year by a PhD student in Astronomy. The association is devoted to the promotion and advancement of knowledge of the universe through research and education.The main activities of the association are scientific meetings, the planning and realization of scientific projects, the support of the scientific activities of its members, and the dissemination of related information among members and other interested persons.The association targets the disadvantaged zones of the Paris suburbs.The main issue was how to bring astronomy in those places. In the suburbs, since most of the youth are poor, most leisure activities like cinema are out of your reach. Thus, mostly of them will play football or basketball outside.We decided to go to meet young people who find themselves together in the evening. We prepare the telescope as well as the fasicules to start the observation of the planets. The discussion finally lead to their career plans and aspirations. Astronomy has become a tool to address societal issues. We present our results after one year of activity.

  9. Radio astronomy from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woan, G.

    2011-04-01

    At frequencies below about 30 MHz, radio astronomy becomes increasingly difficult from the Earth's surface, mainly due to a combination of poor ionospheric seeing and strong terrestrial interference. The obvious move is to space, either as free-flying spacecraft or with a telescope located somewhere on the Moon. All the major space agencies have a renewed interest in the Moon as a site for exploration and science, and low-frequency radio astronomy is probably the strongest of the astronomical objectives put forward in these programmes. Although the Sun is a strong source of interference in extra-solar system work, it is also a prime target for study in itself. A constellation of satellites (as proposed for the SIRA mission) would be able to image both the Sun and the inner heliosphere over the entire low-frequency band. Here we investigate some of the advantages and limitations of astronomy at these very low frequencies, using space- and lunar-based antennas.

  10. Highlights of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hucht, Karel

    2008-02-01

    Preface Karel A. van der Hucht; Part I. Invited Discourses: Part II. Joint Discussions: 1. Particle acceleration - from Solar System to AGN Marian Karlicky and John C. Brown; 2. Pulsar emission and related phenomena Werner Becker, Janusz A. Gil and Bronislaw Rudak; 3. Solar activity regions and magnetic structure Debi Prasad Choudhary and Michal Sobotka; 4. The ultraviolet universe: Stars from birth to death Ana I. Gomez de Castro and Martin A. Barstow; 5. Calibrating the top of the stellar M-L relationship Claus Leitherer, Anthony F. J. Moat and Joachim Puls; 6. Neutron stars and black holes in star clusters Frederic A. Rasio; 7. The Universe at z > 6 Daniel Schaerer and Andrea Ferrara; 8. Solar and stellar activity cycles Klaus G. Strassmeier and Alexander Kosovichev; 9. Supernovae: One millennium after SN 1006 P. Frank Winkler, Wolfgang Hillebrandt and Brian P. Schmidt; 10. Progress in planetary exploration missions Guy J. Consolmagno; 11. Pre-solar grains as astrophysical tools Anja C. Andersen and John C. Lattanzio; 12. Long wavelength astrophysics T. Joseph W. Lazio and Namir E. Kassim; 13. Exploiting large surveys for galactic astronomy Christopher J. Corbally, Coryn A. L. Bailer-Jones, Sunetra Giridhar and Thomas H. Lloyd Evans; 14. Modeling dense stellar systems Alison I. Sills, Ladislav Subr and Simon F. Portegies Zwart; 15. New cosmology results from the Spitzer Space Telescope George Helou and David T. Frayer; 16. Nomenclature, precession and new models in fundamental astronomy Nicole Capitaine, Jan Vondrak & James L. Hilton; 17. Highlights of recent progress in seismology of the Sun and Sun-like stars John W. Leibacher and Michael J. Thompson; Part III. Special Sessions: SpS 1. Large astronomical facilities of the next decade Gerard F. Gilmore and Richard T. Schilizzi; SpS 2. Innovation in teaching and learning astronomy methods Rosa M. Ros and Jay M. Pasachoff; SpS 3. The Virtual Observatory in action: New science, new technology and next

  11. Does College Focus Matter? Explaining Differences in Performance among Community Colleges in North Carolina: A CAPSEE Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Michael; Kalleberg, Arne L.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of community colleges from their origins as junior colleges to institutions with dual missions to provide both academic and workforce preparation raises questions about the impact of a college's mission focus on its students' labor market success. We examine this question using data from the 58 colleges in the North Carolina…

  12. Indigenous Astronomies and Progress in Modern Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Ruggles, Clive

    2010-01-01

    From an anthropological point of view, the whole concept of a "path of progress" in astronomical discovery is anathema, since it implicitly downgrades other cultural perspectives, such as the many "indigenous cosmologies" that still exist in the modern world. By doing so, one risks provoking those who hold them and-as is most obvious in places such as Hawaii where the two "world-views" come into direct contact-reating avoidable resistance to that very progress. The problem is complicated by the existence of "fringe" and "new-age" views that are increasingly confused with, and even passed off as, indigenous perceptions. In a modern world where widespread public perceptions include many that are unscientific in the broadest sense of the term, I shall argue that there are actually a range of positive benefits for progress in scientific astronomy to be derived from the mutual awareness and comprehension of "genuine" cultural world-views whose goals-in common with those of modern science-are to make sense of the c...

  13. Skynet Junior Scholars: From Idea to Enactment--Tales from the Trenches II Implementation with Blind and Low Vision Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Jeremiah; Fahlberg, Tim; Hoette, Vivian L.; Mekeel, Tina; Meredith, Kate; Williamson, Kathryn; Hoette, B. Charles; Skynet Robotic Telescope Network, University of North Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Skynet Junior Scholars is an ambitious program that aims to:--Develop online tools that enable middle school and high school aged youth to use robotic optical and radio telescopes to do astronomy--Create an inquiry-based curriculum that promotes critical thinking and scientific habits of mind--Proactively incorporate Principles of Universal Design in all SJS development tasks to ensure access by blind/low vision and deaf/hard of hearing youth--Prepare 180 adult youth leaders from diverse backgrounds including 4-H leaders, museum educators, amateur astronomers and teachers to facilitate SJS activities in a variety of settings.In this paper we describe the work of staff and volunteers at the Wisconsin School for the Blind and Visually Impaired who have implemented SJS activities in school and camp environments, as well as ways in which they have empowered their students to take on leadership roles. Students from the Wisconsin School for the Blind and Visually Impaired planned and co-hosted a Magic of Astronomy (Harry Potter Themed) star party that incorporated topics learned as part of the SJS program; filters, exposure time, locating objects in the sky, as well as, how to make an image request from the Skynet network. Their experiences in successfully doing active astronomy will provide insight into how anyone can engage everyone in programs like Skynet Junior Scholars.Skynet Junior Scholars is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Numbers 1223687, 1223235 and 1223345.

  14. Astronomy Education for Physics Students

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. H. Fan; J. S. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; Y. Liu; H. G. Wang

    2011-03-01

    Astronomy is a very interesting subject for undergraduate students studying physics. In this paper, we report astronomy education for undergraduate students in the Physics Department of Guangzhou University, and how we are teaching astronomy to the students. Astrophysics has been rapidly developing since 1994, when the center for astrophysics was founded. Now, astrophysics has become a key subject in Guangdong Province, and the Astronomy Science and Technology Research Laboratory one of the key laboratories of the Department of Education of the Guangdong Province. Many undergraduate students, working under the tutorship of faculty members completed their thesis at the Center for Astrophysics in Guangzhou.

  15. Shaping Attitudes Toward Science in an Introductory Astronomy Class

    CERN Document Server

    Wittman, D

    2009-01-01

    At many universities, astronomy is a popular way for non-science majors to fulfill a general education requirement. Because general-education astronomy may be the only college-level science course taken by these students, it is the last chance to shape the science attitudes of these future journalists, teachers, politicians, and voters. I report on an attempt to measure and induce changes in science attitudes in my general-education astronomy course. I describe construction of the attitude survey, classroom activities designed to influence attitudes, and give numerical results indicating a significant improvement. In contrast, the literature on attitudes in introductory physics courses generally reports stagnation or decline. I briefly comment on some plausible explanations for this difference.

  16. Transmission of Babylonian Astronomy to Other Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alexander

    Babylonian astronomy and astrology were extensively transmitted to other civilizations in the second and first millennia BC. Greek astronomy in particular was largely shaped by knowledge of Babylonian observations and mathematical astronomy.

  17. Introductory Astronomy as a Measure of Grade Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Schombert, James

    2010-01-01

    We use four years of introductory astronomy scores to analyze the ability of the current population to perform college level work and measure the amount of grade inflation across various majors. Using an objective grading scale, one that is independent of grading curves, we find that 29% of intro astronomy students fail to meet minimal standards for college level work. Of the remaining students, 41% achieve satisfactory work, 30% achieve mastery of the topics. Intro astronomy scores correlate with SAT and college GPA. Sequential mapping of the objective grade scheme onto GPA finds that college grades are inflated by 0.2 for natural sciences majors, 0.3 for social sciences, professional schools and undeclared majors), 0.5 for humanities majors. It is unclear from the data whether grade inflation is due to easier grading curves or depression of course material. Experiments with student motivation tools indicates that poor student performance is due to deficiency in student abilities rather than social factors (...

  18. Teaching radio astronomy with Affordable Small Radio Telescope (ASRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Bhal Chandra

    A simple, easy to build and portable radio telescope, called Affordable Small Radio Telescope (ASRT), has been developed by the Radio Physics Laboratory (RPL), a radio astronomy teaching unit associated with the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (TIFR) and Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA), which are two premier astronomy institutes in India. ASRT consists of off-the-shelf available Direct to Home television dishes and is easy to assemble. Our design is scalable from simple very low cost telescope to more complex yet moderately costing instrument. ASRT provides a platform for demonstrating radio physics concepts through simple hands-on experiment as well as for carrying out solar monitoring by college/University students. The presentation will highlight the concept of ASRT and the different experiments that can be carried out using it. The solar monitoring observations will be discussed along-with details of methods for calibrating these measurements. The pedagogical usefulness of ASRT in introducing undergraduatephysics students to astrophysics, measurements and analysis methods used in radio astronomy will also be discussed. Use of ASRT in the last three years in the programs of RPL, namely the annual Radio Astronomy Winter School for College students (RAWSC) and Pulsar Observing for Students (POS) is also presented. This year a new program was initiated to form a virtual group of an ASRT community, which will not only share their measurements, but also think of improving the pedagogical usefulness of ASRT by innovative experiments. This initiative is presented with the best practices drawn from our experience in using ASRT as a tool for student training in space sciences. The talk will also point out future ideas in involving a larger body of students in simple radio astronomy experiments with the ASRT, which RPL is likely to nucleate as part of its mandate.

  19. Astronomy across cultures the history of non-Western astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Xiaochun, Sun

    2000-01-01

    Astronomy Across Cultures: A History of Non-Western Astronomy consists of essays dealing with the astronomical knowledge and beliefs of cultures outside the United States and Europe. In addition to articles surveying Islamic, Chinese, Native American, Aboriginal Australian, Polynesian, Egyptian and Tibetan astronomy, among others, the book includes essays on Sky Tales and Why We Tell Them and Astronomy and Prehistory, and Astronomy and Astrology. The essays address the connections between science and culture and relate astronomical practices to the cultures which produced them. Each essay is well illustrated and contains an extensive bibliography. Because the geographic range is global, the book fills a gap in both the history of science and in cultural studies. It should find a place on the bookshelves of advanced undergraduate students, graduate students, and scholars, as well as in libraries serving those groups.

  20. Dyslexia and Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneps, Matthew H.; Greenhill, L. J.; Rose, L. T.

    2007-12-01

    Dyslexia is a hereditary neurological disability that impairs reading. It is believed that anywhere from 5% to 20% of all people in the US may have dyslexia to a greater or lesser degree. Though dyslexia is common, it is a "silent disability" in the sense that it is not easy to tell which individuals suffer from dyslexia and which do not. There is a substantial body of evidence to suggest that people with dyslexia tend to do well in science. For example, Baruj Benacerraf, a Nobel laureate in medicine, is among those whose impairments have been documented and studied. Given that dyslexia was not diagnosed in schools prior to the late 1970's, many established science researchers may have dyslexia and be unaware of their impairment. Therefore, it would not be surprising to find that substantial numbers of scientists working in the fields of astronomy and astrophysics have dyslexia, and yet be unaware of the effects this disability has had on their research. A recently proposed theory by the authors suggests that there may be specific neurological reasons why those with dyslexia may be predisposed to science, and predicts that dyslexia may be associated with enhanced abilities for certain types of visual processing, with special implications for image processing. Our study, funded by the NSF, investigates this hypothesis in the context of astronomy and astrophysics. We expect this work will uncover and document challenges faced by scientists with dyslexia, but perhaps more importantly, lead to an understanding of the strengths these scientists bring to research. The program will serve as a clearing-house of information for scientists and students with dyslexia, and begin to provide mentoring for young people with dyslexia interested in astronomy. Scientists who have reason to believe they may have dyslexia are encouraged to contact the authors.

  1. Astrology as Cultural Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campion, Nicholas

    The practice of astrology can be traced in most if not all human societies, in most time periods. Astrology has prehistoric origins and flourishes in the modern world, where it may be understood as a form of ethnoastronomy - astronomy practiced by the people. The Western tradition, which originated in Mesopotamia and was developed in the Greek world, has been most studied by academics. However, India is also home to a tradition which has survived in a continuous lineage for 2,000 years. Complex systems of astrology also developed in China and Mesoamerica, while all other human societies appear to seek social and religious meaning in the stars.

  2. Applied Astronomy: Asteroid Prospecting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvis, M.

    2013-09-01

    In the age of asteroid mining the ability to find promising ore-bearing bodies will be valuable. This will give rise to a new discipline- "Applied Astronomy". Just as most geologists work in industry, not in academia, the same will be true of astronomers. Just how rare or common ore-rich asteroids are likely to be, and the skills needed to assay their value, are discussed here, with an emphasis on remote - telescopic - methods. Also considered are the resources needed to conduct extensive surveys of asteroids for prospecting purposes, and the cost and timescale involved. The longer-term need for applied astronomers is also covered.

  3. Robots in astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruch, John E. F.

    A development history and a development trends evaluation are presented for the growth of automation and robotics in industry and in observational astronomy, with a view to the distinctive problems of each field of application. Recent concepts concerning the astronomical use of robots as personal assistants are noted, and an effort is made to discern ways in which technology guides both methods and perceptions. Current programs for robotic and automated telescope development are noted, and it is argued that international standards should soon be formulated for this technology.

  4. Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Einstein's General Theory of Relativity is our best classical description of gravity, and informs modern astronomy and astrophysics at all scales: stellar, galactic, and cosmological. Among its surprising predictions is the existence of gravitational waves -- ripples in space-time that carry energy and momentum away from strongly interacting gravitating sources. In my talk, I will give an overview of the properties of this radiation, recent breakthroughs in computational physics allowing us to calculate the waveforms from galactic mergers, and the prospect of direct observation with interferometric detectors such as LIGO and LISA.

  5. Astronomy in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobouti, Y.

    2006-08-01

    Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan, Iran In spite of her renowned pivotal role in the advancement of astronomy on the world scale during 9th to 15th centuries, Iran's rekindled interest in modern astronomy is a recent happening. Serious attempts to introduce astronomy into university curricula and to develop it into a respectable and worthwhile field of research began in the mid 60's. The pioneer was Shiraz University. It should be credited for the first few dozens of astronomy- and astrophysics- related research papers in international journals, for training the first half a dozen of professional astronomers and for creating the Biruni Observatory. Here, I take this opportunity to acknowledge the valuable advice of Bob Koch and Ed Guinan, then of the University of Pennsylvania, in the course of the establishment of this observatory. At present the astronomical community of Iran consists of about 65 professionals, half university faculty members and half MS and PhD students. The yearly scientific contribution of its members has, in the past three years, averaged to about 15 papers in reputable international journals, and presently has a healthy growth rate. Among the existing observational facilities, Biruni Observatory with its 51 cm Cassegrain, CCD cameras, photometers and other smaller educational telescopes, is by far the most active place. Tusi Observatory of Tabriz University has 60 and 40 cm Cassegrains, and a small solar telescope. A number of smaller observing facilities exist in Meshed, Zanjan, Tehran, Babol and other places. The Astronomical Society of Iran (ASI), though some 30 years old, has expanded and institutionalized its activities since early 1990's. ASI sets up seasonal schools for novices, organizes annual colloquia and seminars for professionals and supports a huge body of amateur astronomers from among high school and university students. Over twenty of ASI members are also members of IAU and take active part in its

  6. Astronomy in the classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiteiro, Bárbara; Rodrigues, Berta

    2016-04-01

    The motivation of young students to science is much higher when the theoretical teaching is accompanied by practice and these are engaged in activities that involve real problems of their society and requiring a scientific basis for its discussion. Several activities such as collaboration on current scientific experiments, direct contact with scientists, participation in science competitions, visits to Science Museums, artistic and craft activities, the use of simulators and virtual laboratories, increase the degree of student satisfaction and motivate them in their learning processes. This poster shows some of Astronomy activities with students of schools Agrupamento de Escolas José Belchior Viegas within the Physics and Chemistry classes.

  7. Islamic Mathematical Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelle, Clemency

    A short survey on Islamic mathematical astronomy practiced during the period running from the eight century until the fifteenth is presented. Various pertinent themes, such as the translation of foreign scientific works and their impact on the tradition; the introduction, assimilation, and critique of the Ptolemaic model; and the role of observations, will be covered. In addition, the zīj, the dominant format for astronomical works, will be briefly explained as well as the legacy of the Islamic tradition of astral sciences to other cultures.

  8. A Partnership in Observational and Computational Astronomy (POCA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Donald K.; Brittain, S. D.; Cash, J. L.; Hartmann, D. H.; Howell, S. B.; King, J. R.; Leising, M. D.; Mayo, E. A.; Mighell, K. J.; Smith, D. M., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    A partnership has been established between South Carolina State University (SCSU, a Historically Black College/University), the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) and Clemson University (CU) under an award from NSF's "Partnerships in Astronomy and Astrophysics Research and Education (PAARE)" program. The mission of POCA is to develop an effective, long-term partnership that combines the strengths of the three institutions to increase the scientific and educational output of all the partners with special emphasis on enhancing diversity in the field of astronomy. Components of the program include enhancing faculty and student research in astronomy at SCSU, recruiting and retaining underrepresented minority students into the field, outreach through planetarium programs and museum exhibits and developing web based resources in astronomy education. Activities in the first year of the program are discussed. We have begun developing and testing several new astronomy laboratory exercises. Our first summer internship program has concluded successfully. With PAARE scholarship money, we are now supporting four physics majors at SCSU who have chosen the astronomy option (concentration) for their degree. SCSU undergraduates have acquired observing experience on the KPNO Mayall 4-meter telescope under the guidance of faculty and graduate students from CU. NOAO astronomers have collaborated with SCSU faculty to begin a research program that studies RV Tauri stars. Funds from PAARE are supporting follow-up research to a just-completed doctoral dissertation by E. A. Mayo described elsewhere in these proceedings. Future plans for graduate fellowships and related activities are discussed in addition to summer internships for POCA undergraduates at CU and NOAO. Support for this work was provided by the NSF PAARE program to South Carolina State University under award AST-0750814.

  9. Science and Mathematics in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolack, Edward

    2009-01-01

    A brief historical introduction to the development of observational astronomy will be presented. The close historical relationship between the successful application of mathematical concepts and advances in astronomy will be presented. A variety of simple physical demonstrations, hands-on group activities, and puzzles will be used to understand how the properties of light can be used to understand the contents of our universe.

  10. Science and Mathematics in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolack, Edward

    2009-01-01

    A brief historical introduction to the development of observational astronomy will be presented. The close historical relationship between the successful application of mathematical concepts and advances in astronomy will be presented. A variety of simple physical demonstrations, hands-on group activities, and puzzles will be used to understand how the properties of light can be used to understand the contents of our universe.

  11. Common Alternative Astronomical Conceptions Encountered in Junior Secondary Science Classes: Why Is This So?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaia, Lena; McKinnon, David H.

    This article investigates students' conceptions of certain astronomical phenomena. The 1,920 participants were drawn from junior secondary science classes in four Australian educational jurisdictions. Participants completed a modified version of the Astronomy Diagnostic Test to elicit information about their knowledge and understanding of certain astronomical phenomena and to identify any alternative conceptions that they held. Results showed that students exhibited many alternative conceptions about concepts that they should have covered in elementary school or in the first year of high school. Discussion centers on the extent to which school science takes account of the important construct of pedagogical content knowledge.

  12. Astronomy in Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mousli, A. T.

    2006-11-01

    Syria has been involved in the field of astronomy since 1997, when Prof. F.R. QUERCI, France, visited Syria and made a presentation on the International NORT project; (NORT: the Network of Oriental Robotic Telescope), which was a selected project of the sixth United Nations/ European Space Agency Workshop on Basic Space Science (document no. A/AC.105/657 dated 13/12/1996). NORT aims to establish a robotic telescope network on high mountain peaks around the Tropic of Cancer, from Morocco in the west to the desert of China in the east. The purposes for establishing this network are technical and educational. The General Organization of Remote Sensing (GORS) has carried out a pilot study using remote sensing techniques and has selected four sites in order to determine the best location for the astronomical observatory the within NORT programme. Following this project, GORS decided to establish an office for astronomical studies, one of the earliest works of GORS in astronomy was an initiative to establish a planetarium within the GORS campus, to accommodate approximately 120 observers. A contest to choose the best planetarium design, for the Arab World, took place at GORS.

  13. The Slacker Astronomy Podcast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, A.; Gay, P.; Searle, T.

    2005-05-01

    The Slacker Astronomy podcast is a weekly audio show about astronomy. Available in MP3 format, it is syndicated using RSS and XML feeds that make downloading snap. Each show presents a recent astronomical news item in an entertaining, humorous, and easy-to-understand manner that informs yet respects the intelligence of the listener. First launched on 05 Feb 14, the show has grown to over 5,000 weekly subscribers as of 05 April 01 without any formal publicity. Response has been over overwhelmingly positive, with strong reviews coming from other popular podcasts and coverage on the front page of the MSNBC.com science section. Our only consistent negative feedback is that the show is too short and too infrequent. This demonstrates a strong need to add content. We believe podcasting provides a unique mechanism to extend astronomical outreach to the younger generations and to those who lead busy lifestyles. Our formula is proving successful and we are looking for ways to quantify our impact and measure our demographic so that we can serve them better.

  14. Astronomy in Antarctica

    CERN Document Server

    Burton, Michael G

    2010-01-01

    Antarctica provides a unique environment for astronomy. The cold, dry and stable air found above the high plateau, as well as the pure ice below, offers new opportunities across the photon & particle spectrum. The summits of the plateau provide the best seeing conditions, the darkest skies and the most transparent atmosphere of any earth-based observing site. Astronomical activities are now underway at four plateau sites: the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, Concordia Station at Dome C, Kunlun Station at Dome A and Fuji Station at Dome F, in addition to long duration ballooning from the coastal station of McMurdo. Astronomy conducted includes optical, IR, THz & sub-mm, measurements of the CMBR, solar, as well as high energy astrophysics involving measurement of cosmic rays, gamma rays and neutrinos. Antarctica is also the richest source of meteorites on our planet. An extensive range of site testing measurements have been made over the high plateau. We summarise the facets of Antarctica that are dri...

  15. Astronomy books in Spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, Julieta

    Great cultures have created language. They have discovered its strength among other reasons for education. For a long time the Bible was one of the few books available in western culture, its influence is beyond any doubt. Many developing nations have no science books in their mother tongue. They might carry a few translations but these do not convey the local culture so it is harder for students to grasp the concepts and to build on what they know. Books, even if they are extremely simple, should be written in local languages because that will facilitate the conveying of knowledge and the creation of scientific culture. In the books examples that pertain to every day local life must be given, in particular examples that have to do with women. Women play a central role in developing nations by child bearing; if they become literate they will influence enormously the quality of their children's education, in particular their science comprehension. In Mexico a collection that includes astronomy books has recently been edited by the National Council for Culture and Arts. The books are small and light, which encourages middle-school students to carry them around and read them while traveling in public transportation, such as the subway. Every other page is a new subject, that carries illustrations, abstracts and conclusions. The astronomy books are on search for extraterrestrial life, the stars and the universe. These books are distributed nation-wide and are inexpensive. They have been written by Mexican astronomers.

  16. The Astronomy Genealogy Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenn, Joseph S.

    2014-01-01

    The Astronomy Genealogy Project, to be known as AstroGen, will list as many as possible of the world's astronomers with their academic parents (aka thesis advisors) and enable the reader to trace both academic ancestors and descendants. It will be very similar to the highly successful Mathematics Genealogy Project (MGP), available at http://genealogy.math.ndsu.nodak.edu. The MGP, which has been in operation since 1996, now contains the names of about 170,000 "mathematicians." These include many physicists and astronomers, as well as practitioners of related sciences. Mitchel Keller, the director of the MGP, has generously shared the software used in that project, and the American Astronomical Society (AAS) will host AstroGen, a project of the Historical Astronomy Division, on its website. We expect to start seeking entries soon, depending on the availability of computational assistance from the AAS IT department. We are seeking volunteers to help run the project. If you are interested, please contact me at joe.tenn@sonoma.edu.

  17. Women in Italian astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    This document gives some quantitative facts about the role of women in Italian astronomy. More than 26% of Italian IAU members are women: this is the largest fraction among the world leading countries in astronomy. Most of this high fraction is due to their presence in INAF, where women make up 32% of the research staff (289 out of 908) and 40% of the technical/administrative staff (173 out of 433); the percentage is slightly lower among permanent research staff (180 out of 599, about 30%). The presence of women is lower in the Universities (27 out of 161, about 17%, among staff). In spite of these (mildly) positive facts, we notice that similarly to other countries (e.g. USA and Germany) career prospects for Italian astronomers are clearly worse for women than for men. Within INAF, the fraction of women is about 35-40% among non-permanent position, 36% for Investigators, 17% for Associato/Primo Ricercatore, and only 13% among Ordinario/Dirigente di Ricerca. The situation is even worse at University (only 6% ...

  18. Challenges in Astronomy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Greve, Jean-Pierre

    2010-11-01

    Astronomy is an attractive subject for education. It deals with fascination of the unknown and the unreachable, yet is uses tools, concepts and insights from various fundamental sciences such as mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology. Because of this it can be well used for introducing sciences to young people and to raise their interest in further studies in that direction. It is also an interesting subject for teaching as its different aspects (observation techniques, theory, data sampling and analysis, modelling,?) offer various didactical approaches towards different levels of pupils, students and different backgrounds. And it gives great opportunities to teach and demonstrate the essence of scientific research, through tutorials and projects. In this paper we discuss some of the challenges education in general, and astronomy in particular, faces in the coming decades, given the major geophysical and technological changes that can be deducted from our present knowledge. This defines a general, but very important background in terms of educational needs at various levels, and in geographical distribution of future efforts of the astronomical community. Special emphasis will be given to creative approaches to teaching, to strategies that are successful (such as the use of tutorials with element from computer games), and to initiatives complementary to the regular educational system. The programs developed by the IAU will be briefly highlighted.

  19. Astronomy research in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingxiu

    Decades of efforts made by Chinese astronomers have established some basic facilities for astronomy observations, such as the 2.16-m optical telescope, the solar magnetic-field telescope, the 13.7-m millimeter-wave radio telescope etc. One mega-science project, the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST), intended for astronomical and astrophysical studies requiring wide fields and large samples, has been initiated and funded. To concentrate the efforts on mega-science projects, to operate and open the national astronomical facilities in a more effective way, and to foster the best astronomers and research groups, the National Astronomical Observatories (NAOs) has been coordinated and organizated. Four research centers, jointly sponsored by observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and universities, have been established. Nine principal research fields have received enhanced support at NAOs. They are: large-scale structure of universe, formation and evolution of galaxies, high-energy and cataclysmic processes in astrophysics, star formation and evolution, solar magnetic activity and heliogeospace environment, astrogeodynamics, dynamics of celestial bodies in the solar system and artificial bodies, space-astronomy technology, and new astronomical techniques and methods.

  20. Ancient Astronomy in Armenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsamian, Elma S.

    2007-08-01

    The most important discovery, which enriched our knowledge of ancient astronomy in Armenia, was the complex of platforms for astronomical observations on the Small Hill of Metzamor, which may be called an ancient “observatory”. Investigations on that Hill show that the ancient inhabitants of the Armenian Highlands have left us not only pictures of celestial bodies, but a very ancient complex of platforms for observing the sky. Among the ancient monuments in Armenia there is a megalithic monument, probably, being connected with astronomy. 250km South-East of Yerevan there is a structure Zorats Kar (Karahunge) dating back to II millennium B.C. Vertical megaliths many of which are more than two meters high form stone rings resembling ancient stone monuments - henges in Great Britain and Brittany. Medieval observations of comets and novas by data in ancient Armenian manuscripts are found. In the collection of ancient Armenian manuscripts (Matenadaran) in Yerevan there are many manuscripts with information about observations of astronomical events as: solar and lunar eclipses, comets and novas, bolides and meteorites etc. in medieval Armenia.

  1. Making Astronomy Accessible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grice, Noreen A.

    2011-05-01

    A new semester begins, and your students enter the classroom for the first time. You notice a student sitting in a wheelchair or walking with assistance from a cane. Maybe you see a student with a guide dog or carrying a Braille computer. Another student gestures "hello” but then continues hand motions, and you realize the person is actually signing. You wonder why another student is using an electronic device to speak. Think this can't happen in your class? According to the U.S. Census, one out of every five Americans has a disability. And some disabilities, such as autism, dyslexia and arthritis, are considered "invisible” disabilities. This means you have a high probability that one of your students will have a disability. As an astronomy instructor, you have the opportunity to reach a wide variety of learners by using creative teaching strategies. I will share some suggestions on how to make astronomy and your part of the universe more accessible for everyone.

  2. Classics in radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Woodruff Turner

    1982-01-01

    Radio techniques were the nrst to lead astronomy away from the quiescent and limited Universe revealed by traditional observations at optical wave­ lengths. In the earliest days of radio astronomy, a handful of radio physicists and engineers made one startling discovery after another as they opened up the radio sky. With this collection of classic papers and the extensive intro­ ductory material, the reader can experience these exciting discoveries, as well as understand the developing techniques and follow the motivations which prompted the various lines of inquiry. For instance he or she will follow in detail the several attempts to detect radio waves from the sun at the turn of the century; the unravelling by Jansky of a "steady hiss type static"; the incredible story of Reber who built a 9 meter dish in his backyard in 1937 and then mapped the Milky Way; the vital discoveries by Hey and colleagues of radio bursts from the Sun and of a discrete source in the constellation of Cygnus; the development of re...

  3. Atoms in astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    Aspects of electromagnetic radiation and atomic physics needed for an understanding of astronomical applications are explored. Although intended primarily for teachers, this brochure is written so that it can be distributed to students if desired. The first section, Basic Topics, is suitable for a ninth-grade general science class; the style is simple and repetitive, and no mathematics or physics background is required. The second section, Intermediate and Advanced Topics, requires a knowledge of the material in the first section and assumes a generally higher level of achievement and motivation on the part of the student. These latter topics might fit well into junior-level physics, chemistry, or earth-science courses. Also included are a glossary, a list of references and teaching aids, class exercises, and a question and answer section.

  4. International Year of Astronomy Events in a Small, Midwestern Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, C. E.

    2009-12-01

    Dickinson State University is a small, liberal arts college located in Southwestern North Dakota. With extremely dark skies and a safe, family-friendly nighttime environment, this rural location provides excellent opportunities for clear astronomical viewing. However, the university does not offer a physics or an astronomy major. Therefore, a concentrated effort was needed to develop a trained workforce of interested college students who could help manage public viewing sessions. Once oriented to the fundamentals of telescope viewing, this group of students offered numerous community-related activities to support the International Year of Astronomy. These efforts, designed to share the excitement of the universe with kids and adults alike, included a variety of events such as public presentations and star parties. The star parties were aided by the purchase of a 14” automated Cassegrain telescope funded by a grant from the North Dakota Space Grant Consortium.

  5. Teaching Astronomy Classes and Labs in a Smart Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugliucci, Nicole E.

    2017-01-01

    Saint Anselm College is a small liberal arts college in New Hampshire with an enrollment of approximately 1900 students. All students are required to take one science course with a laboratory component. Introduction to Astronomy is now being offered in regular rotation in the Department of Physics, taking advantage of the new "smart" classrooms with the technology and set up to encourage active learning. These classrooms seat 25 students and feature 5 "pods," each with their own screen that can be hooked up to a student computer or one of the iPads available to the professor. I will present how these classrooms are used for Introduction to Astronomy and related courses under development for active learning. Since the class requires a laboratory component and New Hampshire weather is notably unpredictable, the smart classroom offers an alternative using freely available computer simulations to allow for an alternative indoor laboratory experience.

  6. Mental Discipline, Curricular Reform, and the Decline of U.S. Astronomy Education, 1893-1920

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marché, Jordan D., II

    Nineteenth-century astronomy education rested on a powerful rationale of support within American liberal arts colleges and high schools. Descriptive astronomy was widely regarded as suitable for improving a student's "mental discipline." But the collapse of mental discipline pedagogy, along with concurrent efforts to standardize and reform secondary-level curricula, were responsible for a significant post-1900 decline in astronomical teaching. As a result, astronomy education was not broadly reinstated into secondary curricula until after the launch of Sputnik in 1957. This report demonstrates that changing relationships between disciplinary specialties and pedagogical theories provide no guarantee of sustained curricular success--a conclusion equally relevant to today's science educators.

  7. Junior High Career Planning: What Students Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardick, Angela D.; Bernes, Kerry B.; Magnusson, Kris C.; Witko, Kim D.

    2004-01-01

    This research used "The Comprehensive Career Needs Survey" to assess the career counselling needs of 3,562 junior high students in Southern Alberta. This article examines junior high students' responses regarding their perceptions of (a) the relevance of career planning, (b) who they would approach for help with career planning, and (c)…

  8. Junior High Norms for the Bender Gestalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grow, Richard T.

    1980-01-01

    Junior high students were tested to supply normative data supporting the Bender Gestalt. Subject's performance was not significantly related to sex or occupation of the family bread winner. These variables do not have to be controlled for in norming visual motor tests at the junior high level. (Author)

  9. Effective Management in Junior High Mathematics Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmer, Edmund T.

    Reporting on part of the data collected in the Junior High Classroom Organization Study, this document focuses on the mathematics subsample. Twenty-six mathematics teachers in 11 junior high schools were observed in two classes. The major purpose of this paper is to describe the classroom procedures and behaviors of teachers identified as…

  10. 南京某大学低年级学生性态度、行为和性健康知识的调查分析%A survey on the sexual attitude, behavior and health knowledge among junior college students in Nanjing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴晓丽; 吴江平; 王苏立; 李红啸; 杨莉; 梅士娟; 胡晨

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the sexual attitude, behavior and reproductive health knowledge in junior college students in Nanjing,and to provide advice of reproductive health education and service for universities. Method Questionnaire type survey on the sexual attitude, STD knowledge, and the demand on sexual service was conducted. Results Junior male students had an open sexual attitude than the female students and the percentage of boys (13.9%) with sexual experience was significantly higher than the girls (6.4% ) (x2 = 11.532,P<0.01). According to cognition of induced ovulation hazard, girls did better than boys (P<0.05). The awareness of AIDS in boys is better than girls (P<0.05). Contraception knowledge and sexual education was poor in both genders. No significant difference was found in the sexual health knowledge between boys and girls. Conclusion There is a need of sexual education, especially on the contraception methods and prevention of STD/AIDS, for the junior students in universities.%目的 了解低年级大学生性态度、行为和性健康知识状况,为高校开展生殖健康教育与服务提供参考.方法 参考以往同类型调查和项目自行设计问卷,调查内容包括性态度、性行为、生殖健康知识、性病知识的知晓率和对性健康知识和服务需求状况.结果 低年级大学生性态度性别差异大,男生性态度较开放,有性经历的男生(13.9%)明显多于女生(6.4%),差异有统计学意义(x2=11.532,P<0.01);对于人流危害的认识女生优于男生(P<0.05);对AIDS知识的知晓情况男生优于女生(P<0.05),但两者对避孕知识及性健康知识掌握均有所不足;男女生性健康知识的获取途径主要为互联网、媒体和同伴;男女生希望提供的服务均依次为知识教育、生殖健康咨询及性病/艾滋病防治知识、避孕方法.结论 对大学生进行性健康咨询、性知识教育、性病/艾滋病防治知识及避孕方法知识的教育非常迫切.

  11. Astronomy Enrollments and Degrees: Results from the 2012 Survey of Astronomy Enrollments and Degrees. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Patrick; Nicholson, Starr

    2014-01-01

    Interest in astronomy degrees in the U.S. remains strong, with astronomy enrollments at or near all-time highs for the 2012-13 academic year. The total number of students taking an introductory astronomy course at a degree-granting physics or astronomy department is approaching 200,000. Enrollments in introductory astronomy courses have been…

  12. Astronomy a visual guide

    CERN Document Server

    Garlick, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    Space has fascinated man and challenged scientists for centuries and astronomy is the oldest and one of the most dynamic of the sciences. Here is a book that will stimulate your curiosity and feed your imagination. Detailed and fascinating text is clearly and richly illustrated with fabulous, vibrant photographs and diagrams. This is a comprehensive guide to understanding and observing the night sky, from distant stars and galaxies to our neighbouring planets; from comets to shooting stars; from eclipses to black holes. With details of the latest space probes, a series of monthly sky maps to provide guidance for the amateur observer and the latest photos from space, this book brings the beauty and wonder of our universe into your living room and will have you reaching for the telescope!

  13. Astronomy for beginners

    CERN Document Server

    Becan, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    Astronomy For Beginners is a friendly and accessible guide to our universe, our galaxy, our solar system and the planet we call home. Each year as we cruise through space on this tiny blue-green wonder, a number of amazing and remarkable events occur. For example, like clockwork, we'll run head-on into asteroid and cometary debris that spreads shooting stars across our skies. On occasion, we'll get to watch the disk of the Moon passing the Sun, casting its shadow on the face of the Earth, and sometimes we'll get to watch our own shadow as it glides across the face of the Moon. The Sun's path w

  14. Astronomy of Nabta Playa

    Science.gov (United States)

    McK Mahille, J.; Schild, R.; Wendorf, F.; Brenmer, R.

    2007-07-01

    The repetitive orientation of megaliths, human burials, and cattle burials toward the northern regions of the sky reveals a very early symbolic connection to the heavens at Nabta Playa, Egypt. The groups of shaped stones facing north may have represented spirits of individuals who died on the trail or locally. A second piece of evidence for astronomy at Nabta Playa is the stone circle with its two sightlines toward the north and toward the rising sun at the June solstice. Finally, the five alignments of megaliths, which were oriented to bright stars in the fifth millennium, suggest an even more careful attention to the heavens. The "empty tombs" and deeply buried table rocks of the Complex Structures provide some of the greatest enigmas of Nabta Playa. The recurrent symbolism of the ceremonial centre involves issues that would have been of both practical and symbolic importance to the nomads: death, water, cattle, sun, and stars.

  15. Ancient Hawaiian Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    The Hawaiian Islands provide a cultural setting where the prominent place of astronomy within religious, navigational, and calendrical traditions is evident from a rich ethnohistoric record. The many hundreds of temple platforms and enclosures (heiau) whose remains survive across the archipelago have provided a natural focus for archaeoastronomers not only to examine orientations and structural alignments but to explore a range of issues relating to field method and practice in a context where spatially patterned archaeological data and ethnohistorical evidence exist in relatively fine balance. As archaeoastronomy has developed within the islands, it has become better integrated into archaeological investigations tackling questions of broader anthropological significance, one of the most fascinating being when, how, and why Polynesian chiefdoms became transformed into archaic states, something that happened here but nowhere else in Polynesia.

  16. Handbook of pulsar astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Lorimer, Duncan

    2005-01-01

    Radio pulsars are rapidly rotating highly magnetized neutron stars. Studies of these fascinating objects have provided applications in solid-state physics, general relativity, galactic astronomy, astrometry, planetary physics and even cosmology. Most of these applications and much of what we know about neutron stars are derived from single-dish radio observations using state-of-the-art receivers and data acquisition systems. This comprehensive 2004 book is a unique resource that brings together the key observational techniques, background information and a review of results, including the discovery of a double pulsar system. Useful software tools are provided which can be used to analyse example data, made available on a related website. This work will be of great value not only to graduate students but also to researchers wishing to carry out and interpret a wide variety of radio pulsar observations.

  17. Gravitational wave astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    In the past year, the LIGO-Virgo Collaboration announced the first secure detection of gravitational waves. This discovery heralds the beginning of gravitational wave astronomy: the use of gravitational waves as a tool for studying the dense and dynamical universe. In this talk, I will describe the full spectrum of gravitational waves, from Hubble-scale modes, through waves with periods of years, hours and milliseconds. I will describe the different techniques one uses to measure the waves in these bands, current and planned facilities for implementing these techniques, and the broad range of sources which produce the radiation. I will discuss what we might expect to learn as more events and sources are measured, and as this field matures into a standard part of the astronomical milieu.

  18. Vocabulary Development of Junior Teens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Nikonova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the communicative competence formation of young adolescents in the secondary school at the Russian language lessons. The author maintains that the key element of the above problem is the vocabulary development guaranteeing both comprehension and verbal expression formation – oral and written. The theoretical part of the research explores different word functions: nominal, communicative, text generating and semantic. The correlation between the mental development level and lexical semantic system formation is emphasized. The age specific features of junior teens are listed: rising interest to various life spheres and activi- ties, capability of formulating opinions and judgments, self-awareness, formation of values. The relationship complexity stimulates vocabulary development of 10 to 12 year-old children; however, the process requires peda- gogical facilitation.The monitoring of speech development proves the necessity of commutative competence formation of the fifth- and sixth-year pupils. The paper presents the model of communicative competence development and its approbation results received for the junior adolescents. 

  19. Vocabulary Development of Junior Teens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Nikonova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the communicative competence formation of young adolescents in the secondary school at the Russian language lessons. The author maintains that the key element of the above problem is the vocabulary development guaranteeing both comprehension and verbal expression formation – oral and written. The theoretical part of the research explores different word functions: nominal, communicative, text generating and semantic. The correlation between the mental development level and lexical semantic system formation is emphasized. The age specific features of junior teens are listed: rising interest to various life spheres and activi- ties, capability of formulating opinions and judgments, self-awareness, formation of values. The relationship complexity stimulates vocabulary development of 10 to 12 year-old children; however, the process requires peda- gogical facilitation.The monitoring of speech development proves the necessity of commutative competence formation of the fifth- and sixth-year pupils. The paper presents the model of communicative competence development and its approbation results received for the junior adolescents. 

  20. The Astronomy Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is a collection of interactive online educational tools developed for use by students, educators, professional astronomers, and the general public. The more than 20 tools in the Astronomy Workshop are rated for ease-of-use, and have been extensively tested in large university survey courses as well as more specialized classes for undergraduate majors and graduate students. Here we briefly describe the tools most relevant for the Professional Dynamical Astronomer. Solar Systems Visualizer: The orbital motions of planets, moons, and asteroids in the Solar System as well as many of the planets in exoplanetary systems are animated at their correct relative speeds in accurate to-scale drawings. Zoom in from the chaotic outer satellite systems of the giant planets all the way to their innermost ring systems. Orbital Integrators: Determine the orbital evolution of your initial conditions for a number of different scenarios including motions subject to general central forces, the classic three-body problem, and satellites of planets and exoplanets. Zero velocity curves are calculated and automatically included on relevant plots. Orbital Elements: Convert quickly and easily between state vectors and orbital elements with Changing the Elements. Use other routines to visualize your three-dimensional orbit and to convert between the different commonly used sets of orbital elements including the true, mean, and eccentric anomalies. Solar System Calculators: These tools calculate a user-defined mathematical expression simultaneously for all of the Solar System's planets (Planetary Calculator) or moons (Satellite Calculator). Key physical and orbital data are automatically accessed as needed.

  1. Alaska Athabascan stellar astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Stellar astronomy is a fundamental component of Alaska Athabascan cultures that facilitates time-reckoning, navigation, weather forecasting, and cosmology. Evidence from the linguistic record suggests that a group of stars corresponding to the Big Dipper is the only widely attested constellation across the Northern Athabascan languages. However, instruction from expert Athabascan consultants shows that the correlation of these names with the Big Dipper is only partial. In Alaska Gwich'in, Ahtna, and Upper Tanana languages the Big Dipper is identified as one part of a much larger circumpolar humanoid constellation that spans more than 133 degrees across the sky. The Big Dipper is identified as a tail, while the other remaining asterisms within the humanoid constellation are named using other body part terms. The concept of a whole-sky humanoid constellation provides a single unifying system for mapping the night sky, and the reliance on body-part metaphors renders the system highly mnemonic. By recognizing one part of the constellation the stargazer is immediately able to identify the remaining parts based on an existing mental map of the human body. The circumpolar position of a whole-sky constellation yields a highly functional system that facilitates both navigation and time-reckoning in the subarctic. Northern Athabascan astronomy is not only much richer than previously described; it also provides evidence for a completely novel and previously undocumented way of conceptualizing the sky---one that is unique to the subarctic and uniquely adapted to northern cultures. The concept of a large humanoid constellation may be widespread across the entire subarctic and have great antiquity. In addition, the use of cognate body part terms describing asterisms within humanoid constellations is similarly found in Navajo, suggesting a common ancestor from which Northern and Southern Athabascan stellar naming strategies derived.

  2. Applied Historical Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, F. Richard

    2014-01-01

    F. Richard Stephenson has spent most of his research career -- spanning more than 45 years -- studying various aspects of Applied Historical Astronomy. The aim of this interdisciplinary subject is the application of historical astronomical records to the investigation of problems in modern astronomy and geophysics. Stephenson has almost exclusively concentrated on pre-telescopic records, especially those preserved from ancient and medieval times -- the earliest reliable observations dating from around 700 BC. The records which have mainly interested him are of eclipses (both solar and lunar), supernovae, sunspots and aurorae, and Halley's Comet. The main sources of early astronomical data are fourfold: records from ancient and medieval East Asia (China, together with Korea and Japan); ancient Babylon; ancient and medieval Europe; and the medieval Arab world. A feature of Stephenson's research is the direct consultation of early astronomical texts in their original language -- either working unaided or with the help of colleagues. He has also developed a variety of techniques to help interpret the various observations. Most pre-telescopic observations are very crude by present-day standards. In addition, early motives for skywatching were more often astrological rather than scientific. Despite these drawbacks, ancient and medieval astronomical records have two remarkable advantages over modern data. Firstly, they can enable the investigation of long-term trends (e.g. in the terrestrial rate of rotation), which in the relatively short period covered by telescopic observations are obscured by short-term fluctuations. Secondly, over the lengthy time-scale which they cover, significant numbers of very rare events (such as Galactic supernovae) were reported, which have few -- if any-- counterparts in the telescopic record. In his various researches, Stephenson has mainly focused his attention on two specific topics. These are: (i) long-term changes in the Earth's rate of

  3. Interdisciplinary Astronomy Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerantzis, Nikolaos; Mitrouda, Aikaterini; Reizopoulou, Ioanna; Sidiropoulou, Eirini; Hatzidimitriou, Antonios

    2016-04-01

    On November 9th, 2015, three didactical hours were dedicated to Interdisciplinary Astronomy Activities (http://wp.me/p6Hte2-1I). Our students and their teachers formed three groups and in rotation, were engaged with the following activities: (a) viewing unique images of the Cosmos in the mobile planetarium STARLAB (http://www.planitario.gr/tholos-starlab-classic-standard.html), (b) watching the following videos: Journey to the end of the universe (https://youtu.be/Ufl_Nwbl8xs), Rosetta update (https://youtu.be/nQ9ivd7wv30), The Solar System (https://youtu.be/d66dsagrTa0), Ambition the film (https://youtu.be/H08tGjXNHO4) in the school's library. Students and teachers were informed about our solar system, the Rosetta mission, the universe, etc. and (c) tactile activities such as Meet our home and Meet our neighbors (http://astroedu.iau.org, http://nuclio.org/astroneighbours/resources) and the creation of planets' 3D models (Geology-Geography A' Class Student's book, pg.15). With the activities above we had the pleasure to join the Cosmic Light Edu Kit / International Year of Light 2015 program. After our Interdisciplinary Astronomy Activities, we did a "small" research: our students had to fill an evaluation about their educational gains and the results can be found here http://wp.me/p6Hte2-2q. Moreover, we discussed about Big Ideas of Science (http://wp.me/p3oRiZ-dm) and through the "big" impact of the Rosetta mission & the infinity of our universe, we print posters with relevant topics and place them to the classrooms. We thank Rosa Doran (Nuclio - President of the Executive Council) for her continuous assistance and support on innovative science teaching proposals. She is an inspiration.

  4. Astronomy Popularization via Sci-fi Movies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingkang

    2015-08-01

    It is astronomers’ duty to let more and more young people know a bit astronomy and be interested in astronomy and appreciate the beauty and great achievements in astronomy. One of the most effective methods to popularize astronomy to young people nowadays might be via enjoying some brilliant sci-fi movies related to astronomy with some guidance from astronomers. Firstly, we will introduce the basic information of our selective course “Appreciation of Sci-fi Movies in Astronomy” for the non-major astronomy students in our University, which is surely unique in China, then we will show its effect on astronomy popularization based on several rounds of teaching.

  5. Astronomy at the frontiers of science

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Astronomy is by nature an interdisciplinary activity: it involves mathematics, physics, chemistry and biology. Astronomers use (and often develop) the latest technology, the fastest computers and the most refined software.  In this book twenty-two leading scientists from nine countries talk about how astronomy interacts with these other sciences. They describe modern instruments used in astronomy and the relations between astronomy and technology, industry, politics and philosophy. They also discuss what it means to be an astronomer, the history of astronomy, and the place of astronomy in society today.   The book contains twenty chapters grouped in four parts: ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICS discusses the place of astronomy among various branches of (mostly high-energy) physics. ASTRONOMY IN SOCIETY describes not only the historical context of astronomy, but issues facing astronomers today, including funding, planning, worldwide collaboration and links with industry. THE TOOLS OF OBSERVATION AND THE PROFESSION OF AS...

  6. Institutional Research in the Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Robert V.

    Institutional research in the junior-community college is discussed as related to the following questions: (1) What is institutional research? (2) Why has there been such an emphasis on it in recent years?; (3) What should be the goals and guiding principles of a community college institutional research operation? (4) Where should the…

  7. Community Colleges Can Rescue the Bicentennial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilar, Jeremy W.

    1975-01-01

    Community colleges--with their link between culture and community--are natural places for citizen involvement in the American Bicentennial celebration. Activities already undertaken by some junior colleges include the recording of local histories, workshops for teachers, art shows, readers' theaters, and folk science lectures. (Author/NHM)

  8. Astronomy in the Elementary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaides, Ed

    1981-01-01

    Presents two sets of astronomy activities for elementary students: (1) constructing scale models of the solar system which depict relative distances and diameters, and (2) demonstrating the effects of factors responsible for the seasons. (WB)

  9. Essays on medieval computational astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Bergón, José Chabás

    2014-01-01

    In Essays on Medieval Computational Astronomy the authors provide examples of original and intelligent approaches and solutions given by medieval astronomers to the problems of their discipline, mostly presented in the form of astronomical tables.

  10. Women in Astronomy Workshop Report

    CERN Document Server

    Brough, Sarah; Brooks, Kate; Hopkins, Andrew; Maddison, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Here we report on the Women in Astronomy Workshop (http://asawomeninastronomy.org/meetings/wia2011/), which was held on 13 May 2011 in Sydney, Australia. The workshop was organised by the Astronomical Society of Australia's Chapter on Women in Astronomy, to discuss some of the issues that face women in astronomy and make recommendations to help support the success of women in Australian astronomy but came to broader conclusions that have value for the whole astronomical community. The workshop consisted of four sessions, with presentations by invited speakers on demographics, leadership, varied career paths, and how institutions & individuals can help. The workshop ended with a discussion panel that summarised the day's debate and presented a list of recommendations for the Australian astronomical community (both individuals and institutions) that are provided in this report.

  11. The role of self-efficacy and mental health in predicting critical thinking among nursing students from junior college%一般自我效能感和心理健康对护生评判性思维的预测作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱芬芬; 吴丽荣; 李稚琳

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of self-efficacy and mental health on critical thinking for nursing students from junior college. Method 524 nursing students was randomly selected by sampling method. They were surveyed by SCL-90 self-symptom evaluation scale,( General self efficacy scale, GSES) SEQ and revised critical thinking disposition inventory(CTDI). Result The total score of junior college students was (283. 93 + 34. 26). However, 47. 33% of the respondents didn't report a positive disposition towards critical thinking, and only 0. 38% reported strong critical thinking. Scores of SCL-90 factors were significantly higher than that of the national norm except for somatization and hostility factors(P<0. 01). Relationship analysis indicated that CTDI were correlated with SEQ positively (P<0. 01). And the total scores of SCL-90 negatively. Positive Symptom Distress Index, SEQ and anxiety were the predictors of critical thinking, explaining 32. 4% of the variance. Conclusion The nursing educators should pay attention to the mental health and cultivate the self-efficacy of students to improve their critical thinking.%目的 探讨大专护生一般自我效能感和心理健康对评判性思维的预测作用.方法 采用评判性思维量表、SCL-90症状自评量表和一般自我效能感量表对524名大专护生进行调查分析.结果 大专护生评判性思维总分为(283.93±34.26)分,其中47.33%的护生评判性思维未达到正性水平,强评判性思维者仅占0.38%;除躯体化和敌对两个因子外,大专护生SCL-90各因子得分均高于国内成人常模(P<0.01).评判性思维总分与一般自我效能感呈正相关(P<0.01),与SCL-90总均分呈负相关(P<0.01).回归分析显示:一般自我效能感可正向预测评判性思维,而焦虑和阳性症状可负向预测评判性思维,三者共解释总变量的32.4%.结论 一般自我效能感和心理健康对大专护生的评判性思维具有良好的预测

  12. A Guide for Developing Comprehensive Community College Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Frank P.

    Heretofore community colleges have adopted the facility standards of high schools or other colleges, or have devised their own. To establish flexible specifications especially for the junior college, based on the educational program, architectural feasibility, safety, student and faculty use, and possible future needs, a 6-man jury prepared a…

  13. Environmental Sustainability Practices in Selected Publicly Supported Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posey, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods research study was to examine the environmental sustainability practices used at publicly supported community, junior, and technical college campuses in the eleven states accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools' Commission on Colleges. The Sustainability Assessment Questionnaire was emailed…

  14. Environmental Sustainability Practices in Selected Publicly Supported Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posey, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods research study was to examine the environmental sustainability practices used at publicly supported community, junior, and technical college campuses in the eleven states accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools' Commission on Colleges. The Sustainability Assessment Questionnaire was emailed…

  15. The Music and the Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero, J A; Caballero, I

    2008-01-01

    What do Brian May (the Queen's lead guitarist), William Herschel and the Jupiter Symphony have in common? And a white dwarf, a piano and Lagartija Nick? At first glance, there is no connection between them, nor between the Music and the Astronomy. However, there are many revealing examples of musical Astronomy and astronomical Music. This four-page proceeding describes the sonorous poster that we showed during the VIII Scientific Meeting of the Spanish Astronomical Society.

  16. Scientific Data Mining in Astronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Borne, Kirk

    2009-01-01

    We describe the application of data mining algorithms to research problems in astronomy. We posit that data mining has always been fundamental to astronomical research, since data mining is the basis of evidence-based discovery, including classification, clustering, and novelty discovery. These algorithms represent a major set of computational tools for discovery in large databases, which will be increasingly essential in the era of data-intensive astronomy. Historical examples of data mining...

  17. News clippings for introductory astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrowsky, Matthew

    1999-09-01

    Most students entering our introductory astronomy course for nonscience majors arrive not merely lacking scientific facts-they also have misconceptions about the nature of science, and many have a handicapping ``science anxiety'' (in addition to math anxiety). So I have added a ``current science'' requirement to our introductory course. Each student must compile a file of five astronomy news articles taken from readily available sources.

  18. 通过“人际功能分析”探讨现代大中专生语言能力教学%On Discussing the Teaching of Junior College Students' and Secondary Specialized School Students' Linguistic Ex-pression Ability through Interpersonal Metafunction Per-spective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷园园

    2013-01-01

    Linguistic Expression is a kind of ability in the social life as it is used to display one's wisdom, eloquence and personal charm. It represents the characteristics of the opinion of the ad-dresser and the speaking technologies in it in turn influence the addresser ideologically. This thesis is an attempt to explore inter-personal metafunction though Martin Luther King's I have a Dream,in the framework of interpersonal meaning with Halli-dayan Systemic-Functional Linguistics (hereafter SFL), aiming to testify the operationality and practicability of Hallidayan SFL to-wards the teaching of Junior college students' and Secondary specialized school students' speaking ability.%  语言表达是人类交际中的一种重要活动,因为它可以彰显个人的智慧、雄辩能力以及魅力。语言在一定程度上不但用于传达演说者的观点和思想,其技巧及其运用会辅助观点和思想,对听众产生重要影响。本文主要采用人际功能的分析方法,分析马丁·路德·金的《我有一个梦想》。旨在探讨韩礼德系统功能语法对于提高现代大中专生语言能力教学的可操作性和实践性。

  19. CARIES PREVENTION AMONG JUNIOR SCHOOLCHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.К. Matelo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biennial program of controlled tooth brushing performed econdary school among junior schoolchildren from Minsk secondary school № 166 proved to be highly effective. Decrease in caries increment has been shown on the average up to 50%. No credible differences between remineralising defluorinated toothpastes or pastes enriched with aminofluoride (F = 500 ppm and sodium fluoride  (F = 1000 ppm efficacy were found in this study. Credibility of the results was determined by comparison with similar study conducted on a bigger population of children. Though anti-caries effect of the same tooth-pastes in a bigger-scale study was lower — within 30%. Such difference can be explained by a different level of motivation and discipline of participants.Key words: schoolchildren, dental caries prevention, toothpastes. (Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. — 2011; 10 (6: 48–51

  20. Astronomy at the Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roten, Robert; Constantin, A.; Christensen, E.; Dick, E.; Lapolla, J.; Nutter, A.; Corcoran, J.; DiDomenico, N.; Eskridge, B.; Saikin, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present here an energetic grass-roots outreach program run entirely by undergraduate physics and astronomy majors at James Madison University. Our "Team Awestronomy" takes Astronomy out to the Market, literally. Once a month, for eight months during the academic year, the group sets up a “scientific corner” at the Harrisonburg Farmers Market, offering people the chance to meet with astrophysicists (in the making) and discuss science. Our group members wear t-shirts with simple messages like “Ask me about the Sun,” “...about Black Holes and Mega-Masers” or “...about Big Bang” that initiate the dialog. We help our audience with observations of solar activity through our department’s Coronado telescope equipped with a safe H-alpha filter, sunspotters, and the incredibly simple yet durable and accurate handheld (Project Star) spectrometers, and invite them to the free Saturday Planetarium shows and the star parties hosted by our department on the JMU campus. The team is also prepared with a suite of fun activities aimed particularly at K-5 kids, e.g., building (and eating, after investigating out-gassing properties of) ”dirty comets,” making craters (in pans with flour or sand) and testing how different types of impactors (pebbles, ping-pong balls or even crumpled aluminum foil) affect crater formation, and demonstrations of shock wave created in supernova explosions. The main goals of this outreach program are: 1) to illustrate to people of all ages that science is a fun, creative, and exciting process; 2) to empower people to be curious and to ask questions; 3) to demonstrate that science is a viable career path chosen by many diverse individuals; and 4) to nurture a sense of wonder and awe for the Universe. While this outreach program is aimed at a very general audience, of an extremely wide range, we expect to produce a significant impact on K-12 students in general and in particular on the home-schooled kids. There is a relatively high

  1. Astronomy in India a historical perspective

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    India has a strong and ancient tradition of astronomy, which seamlessly merges with the current activities in Astronomy and Astrophysics in the country. While the younger generation of astronomers and students are reasonably familiar with the current facilities and the astronomical research, they might not have an equally good knowledge of the rich history of Indian astronomy. This particular volume, brought out as a part of the Platinum Jubilee Celebrations of Indian National Science Academy, concentrates on selected aspects of historical development of Indian astronomy in the form of six invited chapters. Two of the chapters – by Balachandra Rao and M.S. Sriram – cover ancient astronomy and the development of calculus in the ancient Kerela text Yuktibhasa. The other four chapters by B.V. Sreekantan, Siraj Hasan, Govind Swarup and Jayant Narlikar deal with the contemporary history of Indian astronomy covering space astronomy, optical astronomy, radio astronomy and developments in relativistic astrophysic...

  2. Large Databases in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalay, Alexander S.; Gray, Jim; Kunszt, Peter; Thakar, Anirudha; Slutz, Don

    The next-generation astronomy digital archives will cover most of the sky at fine resolution in many wavelengths, from X-rays through ultraviolet, optical, and infrared. The archives will be stored at diverse geographical locations. The intensive use of advanced data archives will enable astronomers to explore their data interactively. Data access will be aided by multidimensional spatial and attribute indices. The data will be partitioned in many ways. Small tag indices consisting of the most popular attributes will accelerate frequent searches. Splitting the data among multiple servers will allow parallel, scalable I/O and parallel data analysis. Hashing techniques will allow efficient clustering, and pair-wise comparison algorithms that should parallelize nicely. Randomly sampled subsets will allow debugging otherwise large queries at the desktop. Central servers will operate a data pump to support sweep searches touching most of the data. The anticipated queries will require special operators related to angular distances and complex similarity tests of object properties, like shapes, colors, velocity vectors, or temporal behaviors. These issues pose interesting data management challenges.

  3. Grab 'n' go astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    English, Neil

    2014-01-01

      Like everyone else, most amateur astronomers live busy lives. After a long day, the last thing you want as an observer is to have to lug out a large telescope and spend an hour getting it ready before it can be used. Maybe you are going somewhere sure to have dark skies, but you don’t necessarily want astronomy to dominate the trip. Or you are not quite committed to owning a large telescope, but curious enough to see what a smaller, portable setup can accomplish. These are times when a small “grab ’n’ go” telescope, or even a pair of binoculars, is the ideal in­strument. And this book can guide you in choosing and best utilizing that equipment.   What makes a telescope fall into the “grab ’n’ go” category? That’s easy – speed of setting up, ease of use, and above all, portability. This ambitious text is dedicated to those who love to or – because of their limited time – must observe the sky at a moment’s notice. Whether observing from the comfort of a backyard or while on busi...

  4. Gamma Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    The project has progressed successfully during this period of performance. The highlights of the Gamma Ray Astronomy teams efforts are: (1) Support daily BATSE data operations, including receipt, archival and dissemination of data, quick-look science analysis, rapid gamma-ray burst and transient monitoring and response efforts, instrument state-of-health monitoring, and instrument commanding and configuration; (2) On-going scientific analysis, including production and maintenance of gamma-ray burst, pulsed source and occultation source catalogs, gamma-ray burst spectroscopy, studies of the properties of pulsars and black holes, and long-term monitoring of hard x-ray sources; (3) Maintenance and continuous improvement of BATSE instrument response and calibration data bases; (4) Investigation of the use of solid state detectors for eventual application and instrument to perform all sky monitoring of X-Ray and Gamma sources with high sensitivity; and (5) Support of BATSE outreach activities, including seminars, colloquia and World Wide Web pages. The highlights of this efforts can be summarized in the publications and presentation list.

  5. The Concise Knowledge Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerke, Agnes Mary; Fowler, Alfred; Ellard Gore, John

    2011-01-01

    Preface; Section I. History Agnes M. Clerke: 1. From Hipparchus to Laplace; 2. A century of progress; Section II. Geometrical Astronomy and Astronomical Instruments A. Fowler: 1. The Earth and its rotation; 2. The Earth's revolution round the Sun; 3. How the positions of the heavenly bodies are defined; 4. The Earth's orbit; 5. Mean solar time; 6. The movements of the Moon; 7. Movements of planets, satellites, and comets; 8. Eclipses and occultations; 9. How to find our situation on the Earth; 10. The exact size and shape of the earth; 11. The distances and dimensions of the heavenly bodies; 12. The masses of celestial bodies; 13. Gravitational effects of Sun and moon upon the Earth; 14. Instrumental measurement of angles and time; 15. Telescopes; 16. Instruments of precision; 17. Astrophysical instruments; Section III. The Solar System Agnes M. Clerke: 1. The solar system as a whole; 2. The Sun; 3. The Sun's surroundings; 4. The interior planets; 5. The Earth and Moon; 6. The planet Mars; 7. The asteroids; 8. The planet Jupiter; 9. The Saturnian system; 10. Uranus and Neptune; 11. Famous comets; 12. Nature and origin of comets; 13. Meteorites and shooting stars; Section IV. The Sidereal Heavens J.E. Gore: 1. The stars and constellations; 2. Double, multiple, and coloured stars; 3. The distances and motions of the stars; 4. Binary stars; 5. Variable and temporary stars; 6. Clusters and nebulae; 7. The construction of the heavens; Index.

  6. Antarctic Cosmic Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duldig, Marc

    Cosmic ray observations related to Antarctica commenced in the austral summer of 1947-48 from sub-Antarctic Heard and Macquarie Islands and from the HMAS Wyatt Earp. Muon telescope observations from Mawson station Antarctica commenced in 1955. The International Geophysical Year was the impetus for the installation of a number of neutron monitors around Antarctica observing the lowest energy cosmic rays accessible by ground based instruments. In 1971 a new observatory was built at Mawson including the only underground muon telescope system at polar latitudes in either hemisphere. In the 1980s the South Pole Air Shower Experiment (SPASE) opened the highest energy cosmic ray window over Antarctica and this was followed by the in-ice neutrino experiment AMANDA. Over more than half a century cosmic ray astronomy has been undertaken from Antarctica and its surrounding regions and these observations have been critical to our growing understanding of nearby astrophysical structures. For example the Parker spiral magnetic field of the sun was confirmed through Mawson observations of a Solar flare induced Ground Level Enahncement in 1960 long before spacecraft were able to directly observe the interplanetary magnetic field. A summary of the Antarctic instrumental developments and the scientific advances that resulted will be presented.

  7. Astronomy and Atmospheric Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Les; Gaina, Alex

    2011-12-01

    The authors discusse the insuccess of the observation of the Total Eclipse of the Moon from 10 december 2011 in Romania and relate them with meteoconditions. Only a very short part of the last penumbral phase was observed, while the inital part and the totality was not observed due to very dense clouds. The change in color and brightness during this phase was signaled. Meanwhile, there is an area of science where clouds are of great use and interest. This area is Atmospheric optics, while the science which study clouds is meteorology. Clouds in combination with Solar and Moon light could give rise to a variety of strange, rare and unobvious phenomena in the atmosphere (sky), sometimes confused with Unidentified Flying Objects (UFO). The importance of meteorology for astronomy and atmospheric optics is underlined and an invitation to astronomers to use unfavourable days for athmospheric observations was sent. The web address of the site by Les Cowley, designed for atmospheric optics phenomena is contained in the text of the entry.

  8. The Internet Telescope: Remote Observing for the City Astronomy Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehret, Lor; Winters, Wayne; Coberly, Steven

    The Latin School of Chicago is a college preparatory day school that involves its students in a number of astronomy initiatives. Here we report on our high school students' use of the New Mexico Skies Internet telescope. Using a Web browser, our astronomy students are able to control a Celestron C-14 coupled with a CCD camera to image deep sky objects. In Chicago, using the Internet telescope teaches students how to request time on a shared instrument and how to plan an observing program, and it provides many varied independent study project and classroom options. Students use this instrument during our spring astronomy project week trip, when they travel to live and work at the New Mexico Skies Guest Observatory to learn observational astronomy, remote observing, and CCD imaging. Other remote observing programs that provide similar options are referenced, some with different or multiple instruments, some with limited access, and some with open access. Sample student images taken with the New Mexico Skies Internet telescope are included.

  9. Astronomy Teaching through the Humanities: Literature, the Visual Arts and More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraknoi, A.; Greenstein, George

    2004-12-01

    We will examine how the humanities -- the visual arts, science fiction, poetry, music, etc. -- can be used in teaching introductory astronomy courses for non-science majors. A number of instructors have found innovative ways to show how astronomy has a deep influence on other areas of human culture and how the humanities can illuminate our students' understanding of the universe. A few astronomers are also making original contributions at the interface of astronomy and the humanities. The panel of speakers for the session will consists of: Gregory Benford (U. of California, Irvine): Using Science Fiction to Teach Astronomy: Promise and Pitfalls William Hartmann (Planetary Science Institute): Science and Art in the Classroom Andrew Fraknoi (Foothill College & A.S.P.): The Humanities in the Astronomy Classroom: Activities and Projects George Greenstein (Amherst College) will be the session moderator. Time will be set aside for brief summaries of the poster papers associated with this session and for discussion. Participants will receive a resource guide to using the humanities for astronomy teaching.

  10. AstronomyCenter.org - A Digital Library for Astronomy 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, M.; Monahan, P.; Deustua, S.; Mason, B.

    2004-12-01

    The AAS is sponsoring the development of a digital collection of online resources for teaching introductory astronomy: astronomycenter.org. Astronomy Center is part of the ComPADRE project with the AIP and its member organizations (see Deustua et al. at this meeting). The goal of Astronomy Center is to build a portal that will be a broad collection of high-quality digital resources, a useful and inviting interface to search and browse the collection, and an online meeting place for faculty at a variety of institutions to gather and share information. The collection will be launched in early 2005 and will initially contain a few hundred resources, selected primarily by Astronomy Center staff. The collection will grow through user and author submissions. Meanwhile, resources will be peer-reviewed and featured on the site as the collection grows. We will present the astronomycenter.org site, the user interface, some resources in the collection, the peer review process, and how members of the community can get involved with Astronomy Center. This work was made possible by a NSF National Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Digital Library (NSDL) grant to the AAPT, AIP, and AAS.

  11. The Gresham Professors of Astronomy 1597-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrimplin, V.

    2016-01-01

    Gresham College is named after Sir Thomas Gresham (1519-1579), an English merchant and financier who worked for the four key Tudor monarchs, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary I, and Elizabeth I. He studied at Cambridge before going to Antwerp where he was a merchant as well as the financial agent of the crown—negotiating loans, and procuring funds and goods. Gresham also acted as ambassador and was well rewarded with a salary, lands, and a knighthood in 1559, becoming one of the richest men in England. Sadly, Sir Thomas's only son and legitimate heir died in 1564. As a result he left his vast fortune to the Corporation of London and the Mercers' Company for the purpose of founding a College in London. Seven professors were to be appointed to read lectures daily—in various subjects including astronomy. The first Gresham professor of astronomy (predating chairs in astronomy at Oxford and Cambridge) was appointed in 1597 and a continuous line of professors—and their lectures—has taken place ever since, up to the present day when lectures are both free and open to the public in London as well as being recorded and available globally via the internet.

  12. CREATIVE APPLICATION OF CASE-BASED TEACHING TO BIOCHEMISTRY IN JUNIOR COLLEGES%案例式教学法在专科医学生物化学教学中的创新应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐燕

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the application of case‐based teaching method to biochemistry to im‐prove students’ learning interest .Methods 200 nursing students who enrolled in this college in 2011 were randomly divided into the control group given lecture‐based learning method and the experimental group given case‐based teaching method as well as lecture‐based learning method .The teaching results were sur‐veyed through questionnaires given in class and theoretical examination result analysis .Results Over 95%of the surveyed students believed that case‐based teaching method can effectively stimulate students’ inter‐est and improve their learning ability and their ability of thinking .The scores of the experimental group were higher than those of the control group in terms of basic knowledge and comprehensive application( P< 0 .05 ) .Conclusion T he application of case‐based teaching method to biochemistry can achieved good teaching results in preclinical medicine instruction .%目的:探索将案例式教学法应用于专科医学生物化学教学的有效途径,提高学生学习医学基础知识的兴趣和靶向性。方法以2011级护理专业200名学生为研究对象,随机分组,对照组采用传统的LBL教学法,实验组采用传统教学和案例式教学相结合的方法。通过随堂调查问卷和理论成绩的SPSS分析来评价教学效果。结果超过95%的学生认为案例式教学法能够激发学习兴趣,提高学习能力和临床思维能力。两次理论成绩显示,实验组在基础知识的掌握程度和知识的综合运用方面均明显优于对照组,差异有统计学意义( P <0.05)。结论案例式教学法可以应用于生物化学教学,教学效果优于传统教学法,值得在其他基础医学教学中推广。

  13. Far Ultraviolet Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneborn, George; Rabin, Douglas M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) is studying a wide range of astronomical problems in the 905-1187 Angstrom wavelength region through the use of high resolution spectroscopy. The FUSE bandpass forms a nearly optimal complement to the spectral coverage provided by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), which extends down to approximately 1170 Angstroms. The photoionization threshold of atomic hydrogen (911 Angstroms) sets a natural short-wavelength limit for the FUV. FUSE was launched in June 1999 from Cape Canaveral, Florida, on a Delta II rocket into a 768 km circular orbit. Scientific observations started later that year. This spectral region is extremely rich in spectral diagnostics of astrophysical gases over a wide range of temperatures (100 K to over 10 million K). Important strong spectral lines in this wavelength range include those of neutral hydrogen, deuterium, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon (H I, D I, N I, O I, and Ar I), molecular hydrogen (H2), five-times ionized oxygen (O VI), and several ionization states of sulfur (S III - S VI). These elements are essential for understanding the origin and evolution of the chemical elements, the formation of stars and our Solar System, and the structure of galaxies, including our Milky Way. FUSE is one of NASA's Explorer missions and a cooperative project of NASA and the space agencies of Canada and France. These missions are smaller, more scientifically focused missions than the larger observatories, like Hubble and Chandra. FUSE was designed, built and operated for NASA by the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins University. Hundreds of astronomers world-wide are using FUSE for a wide range of scientific research. Some of the important scientific discoveries from the first two years of the mission are described.

  14. Introducing Astronomy into Mozambican Society

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, V A R M; Besteiro, A M A R; Geraldes, H; Maphossa, A M; Nhanonbe, F A; Uaissine, A J R

    2009-01-01

    Mozambique has been proposed as a host for one of the future Square Kilometre Array stations in Southern Africa. However, Mozambique does not possess a university astronomy department and only recently has there been interest in developing one. South Africa has been funding students at the MSc and PhD level, as well as researchers. Additionally, Mozambicans with Physics degrees have been funded at the MSc level. With the advent of the International Year of Astronomy, there has been a very strong drive, from these students, to establish a successful astronomy department in Mozambique. The launch of the commemorations during the 2008 World Space Week was very successful and Mozambique is to be used to motivate similar African countries who lack funds but are still trying to take part in the International Year of Astronomy. There hare been limited resources and funding, however there is a strong will to carry this momentum into 2009 and, with this, influence the Government to introduce Astronomy into its nationa...

  15. DPS Discovery Slide Sets for the Introductory Astronomy Instructor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, Bonnie K.; Jackson, Brian; Buxner, Sanlyn; Horst, Sarah; Brain, David; Schneider, Nicholas M.

    2016-10-01

    The DPS actively supports the E/PO needs of the society's membership, including those at the front of the college classroom. The DPS Discovery Slide Sets are an opportunity for instructors to put the latest planetary science into their lectures and for scientists to get their exciting results to college students.In an effort to keep the astronomy classroom apprised of the fast moving field of planetary science, the Division for Planetary Sciences (DPS) has developed "DPS Discoveries", which are 3-slide presentations that can be incorporated into college lectures. The slide sets are targeted at the Introductory Astronomy undergraduate level. Each slide set consists of three slides which cover a description of the discovery, a discussion of the underlying science, and a presentation of the big picture implications of the discovery, with a fourth slide that includes links to associated press releases, images, and primary sources. Topics span all subdisciplines of planetary science, and 26 sets are available in Farsi and Spanish. We intend for these slide sets to help Astronomy 101 instructors include new developments (not yet in their textbooks) into the broader context of the course. If you need supplemental material for your classroom, please checkout the archived collection: http://dps.aas.org/education/dpsdiscMore slide sets are now in development and will be available soon! In the meantime, we seek input, feedback, and help from the DPS membership to add fresh slide sets to the series and to connect the college classroom to YOUR science. It's easy to get involved - we'll provide a content template, tips and tricks for a great slide set, and pedagogy reviews. Talk to a coauthor to find out how you can disseminate your science or get involved in E/PO with your contributions.

  16. Astronomy for all

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen; Little, Irene

    2010-01-01

    Most people's reaction to their first view of Saturn through a telescope is simply "Wow!". This is true whether they are five years old or heading into their ninth decade. As professional astronomers for 25 years, first at Wellesley and Bentley College in Massachusetts and then at the University of Colorado, we found that experiencing this sense of wonder through the eyes of others was one of the best parts of the job. So when we retired in 1990, it seemed natural for us to continue communicating our enthusiasm about the universe to the public. The only question was: how?

  17. A National Workshop in the United States to Prepare New Faculty in Physics and Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krane, Kenneth S.

    2010-07-01

    Starting in 1996, newly hired college and university faculty in physics and astronomy from throughout the U.S. have been invited to attend a workshop to help them improve their teaching skills. More than 1000 faculty have participated, representing more than 25% of the new hires at all U. S. institutions that award a baccalaureate in physics or astronomy, from 4-year colleges through research universities. The workshops seek to improve physics teaching by introducing new faculty to instructional strategies and innovations that have been shown to be effective in a variety of contexts. Such a national mentoring workshop can effectively address a commonality of physics and astronomy teaching challenges that transcend institutional characters and types. Based on surveys of the participants (and their department chairs), we have found that a large fraction of the participants have become adopters of innovative teaching techniques and that they rate the workshops as the most significant cause of the improvements in their teaching.

  18. The Reusable Astronomy Portal (TRAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, T.; Rogers, A.; Wallace, G.

    2012-09-01

    The Reusable Astronomy Portal (TRAP) aims to provide a common platform for rapidly deploying Astronomy Archives to the web. TRAP is currently under development for both the VAO Data Discovery Portal and the MAST Multi-Mission Portal (Figure 1). TRAP consists of 2 major software packages: the TRAP Client and the TRAP Server. The TRAP framework allows developers to deploy the Server, connect to data resources, then focus on building custom tools for the Client. TRAP is built upon proven industry technologies including the Ext/JS JavaScript Component Library, Mono.NET Web Services, and JSON message based APIs. The multi-layered architecture of TRAP decouples each layer: Client, Service and Data Access, enabling each to evolve independently over time. Although currently deployed to provide astronomy science data access, the TRAP architecture is flexible enough to thrive in any distributed data environment.

  19. Astronomy education through interactive materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelzke, Marcos Rincon; Antunes de Macêdo, Josué

    2015-08-01

    This study presents results of a survey conducted at the Federal Institution of Education, Science and Technology in the North of Minas Gerais (IFNMG), and aimed to investigate the potentialities of the use of interactive materials in the teaching of astronomy. An advanced training course with involved learning activities about basic concepts of astronomy was offered to thirty-two Licenciate students in Physics, Mathematics and Biological Sciences, using the mixed methodology, combined with the three pedagogical moments. Among other aspects, the viability of the use of resources was noticed, involving digital technologies and interactive materials on teaching of astronomy, which may contribute to the broadening of methodological options for future teachers and meet their training needs.

  20. Scientific literacy: astronomy at school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangui, A.; Iglesias, M.; Quinteros, C.

    Models constructed by scientists to explain the world often incorporate their actual individual conceptions about different physical phenomena. Likewise, prospective teachers reach general science courses with preconstructed and consistent models of the universe surrounding them. In this project we present a series of basic questionings that make us reflect on the present situation of the teaching-learning relationship in astronomy within the framework of formal education for elementary school teachers. Our project main aims are: 1) to contribute to finding out the real learning situation of preservice elementary teachers, and 2) from these studies, to try and develop didactic tools that can contribute to improve their formal education in topics of astronomy. In spite of being of chief importance within the science teaching topics, mainly due to its interdisciplinarity and cultural relevance, researches in didactics of astronomy are not well represented in our research institutes. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  1. International Olympiad on Astronomy and Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soonthornthum, B.; Kunjaya, C.

    2011-01-01

    The International Olympiad on Astronomy and Astrophysics, an annual astronomy and astrophysics competition for high school students, is described. Examples of problems and solutions from the competition are also given. (Contains 3 figures.)

  2. International Olympiad on Astronomy and Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soonthornthum, B.; Kunjaya, C.

    2011-01-01

    The International Olympiad on Astronomy and Astrophysics, an annual astronomy and astrophysics competition for high school students, is described. Examples of problems and solutions from the competition are also given. (Contains 3 figures.)

  3. Astronomy and Shakespeare's Hamlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, P. D.

    1996-05-01

    Payne-Gaposchkin and others have suggested that Hamlet shows evidence of the Bard's awareness of the astronomical revolutions of the sixteenth century. I summarize major arguments and note that the play's themes recur in modern astronomy teaching and research: (1) The play amounts to a redefinition of universal order and humankind's position in it. (2) There is interplay between appearance and reality. Such a contrast is commonplace wherever superficial celestial appearances obscure underlying physical realities, the nature of which emerge as the tale unfolds. (3) The outermost sphere of the Ptolemaic and Copernican models seems to encase humanity, who are liberated by the reality of Digges' model and the implications advanced by Bruno. Similarly the oppressiveness of the castle interior is relieved by the observing platform which enables the heavens to be viewed in their true light. (4) Hamlet could be bounded in a nut-shell and count himself a king of infinite space, were it not that he has bad dreams. These concern the subversiveness of the new doctrine, for Hamlet refers to the infinite universe only hypothetically and in the presence of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, who are named for relatives of the Danish astronomer Brahe. (5) Hamlet, and Brahe and Bruno, have connections to the university at Wittenberg, as does the Copernican champion Rheticus. (6) Ways are needed to reveal both the truths of nature, and the true nature of Danish royalty. Those unaccustomed to science think that there is madness in Hamlet's method. In particular, `doubt' is advanced as a methodological principle of inquiry. (7) The impression of normalcy and propriety in the upper reaches of society is like the false impression of an encapsulating universe. In Hamlet this duality is dramatized tragically, whereas in King John (cf. BAAS 27, 1325, 1995) it is not; for by 1601 when the writing of Hamlet was probably completed, Shakespeare would have known of the martyrdom of Bruno the previous

  4. Multiverso: Rock'n'Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, J. A.

    2012-05-01

    In the last few years, there have been several projects involving astronomy and classical music. But have a rock band ever appeared at a science conference or an astronomer at a rock concert? We present a project, Multiverso, in which we mix rock and astronomy, together with poetry and video art (Caballero, 2010). The project started in late 2009 and has already reached tens of thousands people in Spain through the release of an album, several concert-talks, television, radio, newspapers and the internet.

  5. Practical astronomy with your calculator

    CERN Document Server

    Duffett-Smith, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Practical Astronomy with your Calculator, first published in 1979, has enjoyed immense success. The author's clear and easy to follow routines enable you to solve a variety of practical and recreational problems in astronomy using a scientific calculator. Mathematical complexity is kept firmly in the background, leaving just the elements necessary for swiftly making calculations. The major topics are: time, coordinate systems, the Sun, the planetary system, binary stars, the Moon, and eclipses. In the third edition there are entirely new sections on generalised coordinate transformations, nutr

  6. Advances in astronomy and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kopal, Zdenek

    1963-01-01

    Advances in Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 2 brings together numerous research works on different aspects of astronomy and astrophysics. This volume is composed of six chapters and begins with a summary of observational record on twilight extensions of the Venus cusps. The next chapter deals with the common and related properties of binary stars, with emphasis on the evaluation of their cataclysmic variables. Cataclysmic variables refer to an object in one of three classes: dwarf nova, nova, or supernova. These topics are followed by discussions on the eclipse phenomena and the eclipses i

  7. Astronomy, Space Science and Geopolitics

    CERN Document Server

    Courvoisier, Thierry J -L

    2010-01-01

    Astronomy has played a major part in the development of civilisations, not only through conceptual developments, but most importantly through the very practical gains obtained through the observation of Sun, Moon planets and stars. Space sciences, including astronomy, have also played a major role in the development of modern societies, as engine for most subsequent space technology developments. Present trends tend to decrease the role of science in space development. This trend should be reversed to give modern "societies" their independence in space related matters that permeate the lives of all inhabitants of the Earth.

  8. Informal Education: Slacker Astronomy Podcasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, A.

    2005-12-01

    Slacker Astronomy is a weekly podcast about astronomy begun in February, 2005. Each week we cover a recent astronomical news event. We present it with humor and silliness, yet we respect the intelligence of the audience and do not ``dumb it down." Since we are professional astronomers we often cover items ignored by traditional press. We currently have around 10,000 loyal weekly listeners. All our shows are rated for content and available to the public under the Creative Commons license. Both scripts and audio are also used as source material by parents, teachers and planetarium directors.

  9. Professional Astronomy without a Librarian

    CERN Document Server

    Andernach, H

    2002-01-01

    Virtually every ``serious'' place where professional astronomy is done has a librarian, even if shared with the physics or math department. Since its creation in 1994 of Departamento de Astronom\\'{i}a (DA) of Universidad de Guanajuato (UG) it was neither provided with a librarian, nor with proper space for its holdings, nor with a budget allowing institutional journal subscriptions. I describe my experience of now five years as ``amateur'' librarian, and present information on other small astronomy institutions in Mexico in a similar situation.

  10. Advances in astronomy and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kopal, Zdenek

    1968-01-01

    Advances in Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 6 brings together numerous research works on different aspects of astronomy and astrophysics. This volume is composed of five chapters, and starts with the description of improved methods for analyzing and classifying families of periodic orbits in a conservative dynamical system with two degrees of freedom. The next chapter describes the variation of fractional luminosity of distorted components of close binary systems in the course of their revolution, or the accompanying changes in radial velocity. This topic is followed by discussions on vari

  11. Astronomy 3.0 Style

    CERN Document Server

    Accomazzi, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Over the next decade we will witness the development of a new infrastructure in support of data-intensive scientific research, which includes Astronomy. This new networked environment will offer both challenges and opportunities to our community and has the potential to transform the way data are described, curated and preserved. Based on the lessons learned during the development and management of the ADS, a case is made for adopting the emerging technologies and practices of the Semantic Web to support the way Astronomy research will be conducted. Examples of how small, incremental steps can, in the aggregate, make a significant difference in the provision and repurposing of astronomical data are provided.

  12. Cubesat-based UV astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosch, Noah

    Development of UV astronomy can be traced to go in one main direction: launching even larger telescopes to ensure an as high as possible photon collecting area. This trend causes inevitably escalating mission costs and this, in the present environment of diminishing research budgets, is the main reason for not having as many UV astronomy missions as one would like. I propose an alternative paradigm based on developing UV missions based on the cubesat technology. This allows a very significant cost reduction by basing the platform on custom off-the-shelf (COTS) components, at the price of small collecting apertures. I discuss possible topics that could benefit from such an approach.

  13. Astronomy 3.0 Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accomazzi, A.

    2010-10-01

    Over the next decade, we will witness the development of a new infrastructure in support of data-intensive scientific research, which includes Astronomy. This new networked environment will offer both challenges and opportunities to our community and has the potential to transform the way data are described, curated and preserved. Based on the lessons learned during the development and management of the ADS, a case is made for adopting the emerging technologies and practices of the Semantic Web to support the way Astronomy research will be conducted. Examples of how small, incremental steps can, in the aggregate, make a significant difference in the provision and repurposing of astronomical data are provided.

  14. Advances in astronomy and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kopal, Zdenek

    1962-01-01

    Advances in Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 1 brings together numerous research works on different aspects of astronomy and astrophysics. This book is divided into five chapters and begins with an observational summary of the shock-wave theory of novae. The subsequent chapter provides the properties and problems of T tauri stars and related objects. These topics are followed by discussions on the structure and origin of meteorites and cosmic dust, as well as the models for evaluation of mass distribution in oblate stellar systems. The final chapter describes the methods of polarization mea

  15. Advances in astronomy and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kopal, Zdenek

    1966-01-01

    Advances in Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 4 brings together numerous research works on different aspects of astronomy and astrophysics. This volume is composed of five chapters, and starts with a description of objective prism and its application in space observations. The next chapter deals with the possibilities of deriving reliable models of the figure, density distribution, and gravity field of the Moon based on data obtained through Earth-bound telescopes. These topics are followed by a discussion on the ideal partially relativistic, partially degenerate gas in an exact manner. A ch

  16. Indian Astronomy: The Missing Link in Eurocentric History of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Shirin; Sharma, Deva

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive history of Astronomy should show in reasonable chronological order, the contributions from wherever they arise in the world, once they are reliably documented. However, the authors note that consistently, the extremely rich contributions from Ancient Indian scholars like Aryabatha and Bhramagupta are omitted in Eurocentric…

  17. Indian Astronomy: The Missing Link in Eurocentric History of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Shirin; Sharma, Deva

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive history of Astronomy should show in reasonable chronological order, the contributions from wherever they arise in the world, once they are reliably documented. However, the authors note that consistently, the extremely rich contributions from Ancient Indian scholars like Aryabatha and Bhramagupta are omitted in Eurocentric…

  18. Astronomy Education Project for Guangdong High Schools

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F. P. Pi; K. Y. Guan; J. Wang; H. G. Wang; Y. Liu; J. H. Fan

    2014-09-01

    Guangdong province is an active area in China for astronomy education and popularization. The current status and problems of astronomy education in high schools are reviewed. To tackle these problems, an astronomy education project for high school teachers and students was initiated by Guangzhou University in 2013. The purpose and key points of the projects are introduced in this paper.

  19. Blazing the Trail for Astronomy Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Janelle M.; Lombardi, Doug

    2015-01-01

    Education research has long considered student learning of topics in astronomy and the space sciences, but astronomy education research as a sub-field of discipline-based education research is relatively new. Driven by a growing interest among higher education astronomy educators in improving the general education, introductory science survey…

  20. The next US astronomy decadal survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Adam

    2017-07-01

    US astronomy decadal surveys advise government on how to optimize the scientific return on national investments in astronomy research. The 2020 survey will guide our community into the future, but current strains in an otherwise world-leading astronomy programme may affect this collective exercise.

  1. 基于计划行为理论的护理生从事老年护理工作意愿实证研究%An empirical study on the willingness to engage in elderly care among nursing students in junior college based on the theory of planned behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗艺; 曹小萍; 陈璐; 梁少英; 孟润堂

    2016-01-01

    目的:了解高职院校护理生从事老年护理工作的意愿,为培养护理专业人员提供依据。方法采用分层抽样法选取宁波市某高校不同护理专业和年级的1176名高职护理生,采用基于计划行为理论设计的问卷进行调查,分析其从事老年人群护理工作的意愿及行动计划。结果55.96%的护理生愿意从事老年护理工作,其行为态度、主观规范和知觉行为控制平均得分为(52.12±9.52)、(16.42±6.21)和(31.54±7.94)分。不同专业、年级、有无照顾老人经验、有无接受老年护理知识的护理生,从事老年护理工作的行为态度、主观规范和知觉行为控制差异均有统计学意义(P <0.05)。不同专业、有无照顾老人经验及有无接受老年护理知识的护理生,从事老年护理工作的行为意向差异有统计学意义(P <0.01)。从事老年护理工作的行为态度、主观规范、知觉行为控制及行为意向间均呈正相关(P <0.01)。行为态度、主观规范和知觉行为控制均进入回归方程,标准化回归系数分别为0.18、0.35和0.25。结论基于计划行为理论调查显示该地区在培养老年护理人才方面成效初显,高职护理生对从事老年护理工作有较好的职业意愿。%Objective To learn the willingness to engage in elderly care among nursing students in junior college in order to provide the basis for the training of geriatric nursing staff.Methods Totally 1 1 76 junior college nursing students in Ningbo were selected by stratified sampling method and were investigated with a questionnaire based on the theory of planned behavior.The willingness and plan to engage in elderly care among the students were analyzed.Results Fifty six percent of the nursing students would like to work in geriatric nursing.The average score of behavioral attitude,subjective norm,and perceived behavior control were

  2. Visual lunar and planetary astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Abel, Paul G

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of CCDs and webcams, the focus of amateur astronomy has to some extent shifted from science to art. The object of many amateur astronomers is now to produce “stunning images” that, although beautiful, are not intended to have scientific merit. Paul Abel has been addressing this issue by promoting visual astronomy wherever possible – at talks to astronomical societies, in articles for popular science magazines, and on BBC TV’s The Sky at Night.   Visual Lunar and Planetary Astronomy is a comprehensive modern treatment of visual lunar and planetary astronomy, showing that even in the age of space telescopes and interplanetary probes it is still possible to contribute scientifically with no more than a moderately priced commercially made astronomical telescope.   It is believed that imaging and photography is somehow more objective and more accurate than the eye, and this has led to a peculiar “crisis of faith” in the human visual system and its amazing processing power. But by anal...

  3. Exchange of astronomy teaching experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Rosa M.

    The Working Group of the European Association for Astronomy Education responsible for Teacher Training organises an annual Summer School for teachers under expert guidance. For a week the teachers participating can exchange experiences, increase their knowledge and discuss different ideas and perspectives. In general, the instructors are professional astronomers, professors and teachers from different countries. The papers presented offer very practical activities, paying special attention to didactic aspects, and take the form of general lectures to all 40 participants and workshops to reduced groups of 20 participants. There are also day and night observations, without expensive equipment or complicated procedures, that are easy to set up and based on topics that it is possible to use in the classroom. The Summer Schools promote a scientific astronomical education at all levels of astronomy teaching, reinforce the link between professional astronomers and teachers with experience of teaching astronomy, allow debates among the participants on their pedagogical activities already carried out in their own classroom and help them to organise activities outside it. Astronomy teachers need special training, access to specific research, to new educational materials and methods and the opportunity to exchange experiences. All these things are provided by the Summer School.

  4. Neutrino astronomy: Present and future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thomas McCauley

    2006-10-01

    I briefly review the present and future status of the burgeoning field of neutrino astronomy. I outline the astrophysics and particle physics goals, design, and performance of the various current and proposed neutrino telescopes. Also described are present results and future expectations.

  5. Problems and Projects from Astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, H. R.

    1991-01-01

    Describes activities to stimulate school astronomy programs. Topics include: counting stars; the Earth's centripetal force; defining astronomical time; three types of sundials; perceptions of star brightness; sunspots and solar radiation; stellar spectroscopy; number-crunching and the molecular structure of the atmosphere; the Earth-Moon common…

  6. Service Learning in Introductory Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orleski, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Service learning is a method of instruction where the students in a course use the course's content in a service project. The service is included as a portion of the students' course grades. During the fall semester 2010, service learning was incorporated into the Introduction to Astronomy course at Misericordia University. The class had…

  7. Service Learning in Introductory Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orleski, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Service learning is a method of instruction where the students in a course use the course's content in a service project. The service is included as a portion of the students' course grades. During the fall semester 2010, service learning was incorporated into the Introduction to Astronomy course at Misericordia University. The class had eight…

  8. Utrecht and Galactic Radio Astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woerden, H.

    Important roles in early Dutch Galactic radio astronomy were played by several Utrecht astronomers: Van de Hulst, Minnaert and Houtgast. The poster announcing the conference contained a number of pictures referring to scientific achievements of the Astronomical Institute Utrecht. One of these

  9. Astronomy Education Challenges in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Fady Beshara Morcos, Abd

    2015-08-01

    One of the major challenges in Egypt is the quality of education. Egypt has made significant progress towards achieving the Education for All and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Many associations and committees as education reform program and education support programs did high efforts in supporting scientific thinking through the scientific clubs. The current state of astronomical education in Egypt has been developed. Astronomy became a part in both science and geography courses of primary, preparatory and secondary stages. Nowadays the Egyptian National Committee for Astronomy, put on its shoulders the responsibility of revising of astronomy parts in the education courses, beside preparation of some training programs for teachers of different stages of educations, in collaboration with ministry of education. General lectures program has been prepared and started in public places , schools and universities. Many TV and Radio programs aiming to spread astronomical culture were presented. In the university stage new astronomy departments are established and astrophysics courses are imbedded in physics courses even in some private universities.

  10. Service Learning in Introductory Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orleski, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Service learning is a method of instruction where the students in a course use the course's content in a service project. The service is included as a portion of the students' course grades. During the fall semester 2010, service learning was incorporated into the Introduction to Astronomy course at Misericordia University. The class had eight…

  11. Astronomy and astronomers in Jules Verne's novels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovisier, Jacques

    2011-06-01

    Almost all the Voyages Extraordinaires written by Jules Verne refer to astronomy. In some of them, astronomy is even the leading theme. However, Jules Verne was basically not learned in science. His knowledge of astronomy came from contemporaneous popular publications and discussions with specialists among his friends or his family. In this article, I examine, from the text and illustrations of his novels, how astronomy was perceived and conveyed by Jules Verne, with errors and limitations on the one hand, with great respect and enthusiasm on the other hand. This informs us on how astronomy was understood by an ``honnête homme'' in the late 19th century.

  12. Afterschool Universe: Bringing Astronomy Down to Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthi, A.; Eyermann, S. E.; Mitchell, S. E.; Lochner, J. C.

    2008-11-01

    We discuss ``Afterschool Universe,'' an astronomy after-school program for middle-schoolers. The program explores basic astronomy concepts through engaging activities and takes participants on a journey through the universe beyond the solar system. By offering astronomy content in out-of-school-time where schedules are less constrained, we can engage students at this critical age in science they find naturally interesting. This is a timely effort for the International Year of Astronomy as it can be used to introduce new audiences to astronomy during a period when we are attempting to raise the profile and level of interest in the universe around us.

  13. Training in Astronomy for Physics Students

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. H. Fan

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we describe what we have done with regard to astronomy training for physics students. More and more students are interested in astronomy, they spend their summer holidays and spare time in observations and studying the observation data. Some students are familiar with using the telescope for observations, dealing with absorption line features achieved from the observations. Astronomy was selected as the key subject in Guangzhou city and Guangdong province, the laboratory for astronomy science and technology was selected as the key laboratory of Guangzhou city and that for the education department of Guangdong Province. We also provide a master degree programme for astronomy.

  14. Highlights of Astronomy, Vol. 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montmerle, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    Part I. Invited Discourses: 1. The Herschel view of star formation; 2. Past, present and future of Chinese astronomy; 3. The zoo of galaxies; 4. Supernovae, the accelerating cosmos, and dark energy; Part II. Joint Discussion: 5. Very massive stars in the local universe; 6. 3-D views of the cycling Sun in stellar context; 7. Ultraviolet emission in early-type galaxies; 8. From meteors and meteorites to their parent bodies: current status and future developments; 9. The connection between radio properties and high-energy emission in AGNs; 10. Space-time reference systems for future research; Part III. Special Sessions: 11. Origin and complexity of massive star clusters; 12. Cosmic evolution of groups and clusters of galaxies; 13. Galaxy evolution through secular processes; 14. New era for studying interstellar and intergalactic magnetic fields; 15. The IR view of massive stars: the main sequence and beyond; 16. Science with large solar telescopes; 17. The impact hazard: current activities and future plans; 18. Calibration of star-formation rate measurements across the electromagnetic spectrum; 19. Future large scale facilities; 20. Dynamics of the star-planet relations strategic plan and the Global Office of Astronomy for Development; 21. Strategic plan and the Global Office of Astronomy for Development; 22. Modern views of the interstellar medium; 23. High-precision tests of stellar physics from high-precision photometry; 24. Communicating astronomy with the public for scientists; 25. Data intensive astronomy; 26. Unexplained spectral phenomena in the interstellar medium; 27. Light pollution: protecting astronomical sites and increasing global awareness through education.

  15. Learner Reading Problems: A Case of Khoe Learners at Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Learner Reading Problems: A Case of Khoe Learners at Junior Secondary School. ... learners' reading ability of English at junior secondary school in Botswana. ... teachers' schemes and records of work to explore the subjects' reading skills.

  16. Exploring new possibilities of astronomy education and outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Kodai

    2015-08-01

    I investigate the influences of astronomy education and outreach activities on people in order to explore their potential benefits and contribution to society. This research is based on the astronomy education lessons I gave to 287 senior high school and junior high school students in Cambodia in November 2013. Before and after my lesson, I asked them to answer my questionnaires in Khmer, where they could also write free descriptions. Sentences in their free descriptions translated into Japanese are analyzed by means of a text mining method. By converting text data to various numbers using a text mining method, it is possible for us to do statistical analysis. I counted the number of question sentences and computed their rate with respect to the total number of sentences. The rate of question sentences in 9th and 12th grade students are 39% and 9%, respectively. This shows 9th grade students wonder why and how more frequently and appear to be more stimulated in their curiosity than 12th grade students. I counted the frequency of words in the free descriptions and examined high frequency words, to take a broad view of the characteristics of free description. The word ''world'' is the fourth highest frequency word among 369 words following the three words, ''the universe'', ''the earth'', and ''a star'', which frequently appear in the lesson in astronomy. The most sentences including the word “world” described amazement at the existence of so vast unknown world outside of what they had known until then. The frequency of sentences including the word ''world'' of 12th grade students is much higher (45%) than that (18%) of 9th grade students. A significant fraction of 12th grade students appears to have had a strong impact and changed their views of the world. It is found that my lesson and related activities inspired intellectual curiosity in many students, especially in 9th grade students. It is also found that a significant fraction of 12th grade students appear

  17. Understanding the Correlations Among Undergraduates’ Spatial Reasoning Skills and Their Ability to Learn Astronomy Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyer, Inge

    2012-01-01

    We tacitly assume that astronomy is a conceptual domain deeply entrenched in three dimensions and that learners need to utilize spatial thinking to develop understanding of the field. In particular, cognitive science generally views students’ spatial thinking abilities as something that can be enhanced through purposeful instruction, whereas aptitude and ability to learn complex ideas might be immutable. Yet, precise investigations into the underlying relationship between students’ spatial reasoning ability and their ability to learn astronomy content in college science classes are beginning to reveal insight into how students cognitively engage in learning astronomy. In support, researchers at the CAPER Center for Astronomy and Physics Education Research conducted a first-steps correlational study of 148 non-science majoring undergraduate students. Using a single group, multiple-measures, longitudinal study design, students’ cognition was measured for pretest and posttest gains in astronomy understanding using established assessment tools, including the Test Of Astronomy STandards (TOAST) over the duration of instruction. In the middle of the semester they were tested for spatial reasoning ability using a subset of reliable spatial thinking assessment tools from the Spatial Intelligence and Learning Center (SILC). Results suggest some instructional techniques can be predicted as successful a priori while others are as yet unresolved. This work was supported, in part, by the Wyoming Excellence in Higher Education Endowment.

  18. Promoting instructional change in new faculty: An evaluation of the physics and astronomy new faculty workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Charles

    2008-02-01

    An important finding of physics and astronomy education research (PAER) is that traditional, transmission-based instructional approaches are not effective in promoting meaningful student learning. Instead, PAER research suggests that physics and astronomy should be taught using more interactive instructional methods. These ways of teaching require significant changes in the way faculty think about teaching and learning and corresponding changes in their teaching behavior. Although the research base and corresponding pedagogies and strategies are well documented and widely available, widespread changes in physics and astronomy teaching at the college level has yet to occur. The Workshop for New Physics and Astronomy Faculty has been working to address this problem since 1996. This workshop, which is jointly administered by the American Association of Physics Teachers, the American Astronomical Society, and the American Physical Society, has attracted approximately 25% of all new physics and astronomy faculty each year to a four-day workshop designed to introduce new faculty to PAER-based instructional ideas and materials. This paper describes the impact of the Workshop as measured by surveys of Workshop participants and physics and astronomy department chairs. The results indicate that the Workshop is successful in meeting its goals and might be significantly contributing to the spread and acceptance of PAER-based instructional ideas and materials.

  19. 42 CFR 21.25 - Eligibility; junior assistant grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility; junior assistant grade. 21.25 Section... COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Appointment § 21.25 Eligibility; junior assistant grade. (a) Requirements; all candidates... for appointment in the grade of junior assistant: (1) Shall be a citizen of the United States; (2...

  20. The mass-luminosity relation in an introductory astronomy lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2016-11-01

    Exposing students in general education science courses of lower mathematical levels to experiments that make use of quantitative skills such as collecting and analyzing data is very important because they provide examples of how science is actually done. Experiments with relatively simple procedures that are also interesting and engaging which serve this purpose can be hard to find. This can especially be true for introductory college astronomy courses; however, courses of this type often do still have a laboratory component because most students, regardless of major, are required to take at least one laboratory science course. When required to work with data in a quantitative fashion, the difficulty students with lower mathematical skills often have is that any actual physical meaning of an experiment can become completely lost in a procedure that, to them, seems to be purely an exercise in complex mathematics and for which they have resorted to simply following by rote, from which, perhaps needless to say, they are likely to learn little or nothing. I have seen this happen numerous times and it has inspired me to focus on attempting to develop meaningful laboratory experiences for students of lower mathematical level courses, such as introductory astronomy and conceptual physics, that involve both the gathering and analysis of numerical data. What follows is a simple experiment of this type on the mass-luminosity relation for stars on the main sequence of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram that has proven useful for an introductory astronomy laboratory course.

  1. Teaching Astronomy And The Crisis In Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomb, N. R.; Stevenson, T. M.; Anderson, M. W. B.; Wyatt, G. G.

    2006-08-01

    In Australia as in many other countries the fraction of high school students voluntarily choosing to study the core sciences such as physics and chemistry has dropped in recent decades. There seems to be a number of reasons for this worrying trend including the perception that they are difficult subjects that lack relevance to the lives of the students. Family influence to choose courses that are believed to be more likely to lead to highly paid careers is also a major factor. Astronomy has a broad public appeal and escapes much of the negative feelings associated with most other scientific fields. Anecdotally and logically this allows astronomy to be used as a tool to stimulate students' scientific interest. While this is most evident at college level in the USA and at Australian universities, informal education centres can play an important role. Investment in public facilities and the provision of resources for astronomy outreach can be highly beneficial by engaging the imagination of the public. We will discuss activities offered at Sydney Observatory where public attendances have more than doubled in the last decade. These include a regular schools program and preliminary results from a survey of teachers' experiences and attitudes to their class visit will be given.

  2. Science Play: Using Theater in the Classroom to Teach Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Lara A.

    2007-12-01

    I present a new course on science plays and cosmology created in collaboration with the department of Theater and Dance at Amherst College. The course guides the student through our evolving view of cosmology, pausing to focus on pivotal moments in our understanding of the universe. In addition to these key ideas, the course examines a selection of plays which use astronomy or physics to delve into the scientific process, including plays by Brecht, Frayn, and Stoppard. After exploring major current topics in astrophysics at a non-technical level as well as the roles of the playwright, director and actor in giving life to the science play, the course culminates in a final project. In novel approach to evaluating scientific understanding, students are called upon to translate topics in cosmology to the stage. I will describe class exercises that were developed for this course and methods used in the class to explore ideas in Astronomy with the help of theater and movement. I provide a link to a list of resources and materials that can be used to determine how to incorporate theater into an introductory Astronomy course to increase student interest and enhance scientific understanding.

  3. The TSU Streaming Video Astronomy Course - II, Video Interface Design and Bandwidth Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, G. S.; Smith, W.

    2004-12-01

    Researchers are developing an on-line video astronomy course at Tennessee State University. Many factors are taken into account when designing a first year course for a broad audience. The initial target audience is students attending historically black colleges and universities, tribal colleges, and other minority institutions, without an astronomy course. The primary goal is to attract students into a course of study that could prepare them to enter the NASA workforce. A secondary goal is to serve the general student population. The question we try to address here is: How can we deliver the video components of such a course in a way that will take into account the innate learning styles of most students and the limited access to very high speed internet lines in smaller colleges? The design for the video information interface will be discussed. The effect of limited bandwidth on video size and other features of the presentation design is also analyzed.

  4. SEKOLAH TINGGI ASTRONOMI DI KOTA PARE-PARE TEMA ARSITEKTUR METAFORA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahibuddin Juddah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak— Kota Pare-Pare sebagai kota yang layak memiliki suatu fasilitas ilmu pengetahuan dan teknologi yang diperuntukkan bagi generasi-generasi muda penerus bangsa di kota Pare-Pare dalam hal ini fasilitas ilmu pengetahuan dan teknologi yang berkaitan dengan astronomi yakni Sekolah Tinggi Astronomi (Ilmu Perbintangan di Kota Pare-pare dengan tema Arsitektur Metafora. Pada bidang astronomi terdapat berbagai macam bentuk-bentuk fantastis yang dapat dijadikan lambang bentuk dalam arsitektur seperti bentuk rasi bintang, bentuk lintasan orbit planet dan bentuk-bentuk benda langit lainnya, begitu juga dengan bentuk-bentuk fenomena yang dihasilkannya. Dengan perwujudan bentuk-bentuk ini sebagai simbol pada gaya bangunan, baik bentuk bangunan, fungsi maupun penataan ruang di dalamnya, diharapkan pelaku kegiatan dalam bangunan merasakan maksud dan ekspresi dari bangunan. Kata Kunci : Sekolah Tinggi, Astronomi, Arsitektur Metafora Abstract—Pare- Pare as a city that deserves to have a facility of science and technology that is intended for younger generations in Pare - Pare in this case the facilities of science and technology relates to astronomy namely the College of Astronomy (Science Astrology in Pare- pare the theme of Architecture Metaphor. In the field of astronomy there are various kinds of fantastic shapes that can be used as the epitome of form in architecture such as the shape of constellations, planets orbit trajectory shapes and forms of other celestial bodies, as well as the forms of the phenomenon produces. The realization of these forms as a symbol on the style of the building, both buildings form, function and arrangement of space in it, it is hoped the perpetrators of activity in the building feel the intention and expression of the building Key word : High School, Astronomy, Metaphor Architecture

  5. College Bound: Americans' Attitudes about Paying for College. A Survey of Families with College-Bound High School Students on the Value of a College Education and Its Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallup & Robinson, Inc. Princeton, NJ.

    This study examined several aspects of family viewpoints regarding the financing of higher education. Data were collected via a telephone survey of 800 parents of college bound high school students and 300 college bound high school juniors and seniors. The survey examined attitudes in such areas as: the relative importance of financing college…

  6. Evaluation of the College Possible Program: Results from a Randomized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a randomized trial of the College Possible program, which provides two years of college preparatory work for high school juniors and seniors in Minneapolis and St. Paul. The trial involved 238 students, including 134 who were randomly selected for admission to the program. The results indicate that the College…

  7. Dialogistic Presence on Community College Websites in Nine Megastates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadinger, David

    2013-01-01

    Use of Internet websites as a communication tool by community college is nearly universal. Exactly what information, functions, and links are offered varies widely among institutions. Research has reported that high school juniors and seniors, prefer to find information on the Internet during their college search process, and Noel Levitz (2006,…

  8. Multimedia Astronomy Communication: Effectively Communicate Astronomy to the Desired Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Star Cartier, Kimberly Michelle; Wright, Jason

    2017-01-01

    A fundamental aspect of our jobs as scientists is communicating our work to others. In this, the field of astronomy holds the double-edged sword of ubiquitous fascination: the topic has been of interest to nearly the entire global population at some point in their lives, yet the learning curve is steep within any subfield and rife with difficult-to-synthesize details. Compounding this issue is the ever-expanding array of methods to reach people in today's Communications Era. Each communication medium has its own strengths and weaknesses, is appropriate in different situations, and requires its own specific skillset in order to maximize its functionality. Despite this, little attention is given to training astronomers in effective communication techniques, often relying on newcomers to simply pick up the ability by mimicking others and assuming that a firm grasp on the subject matter will make up for deficiencies in communication theory. This can restrict astronomers to a narrow set of communication methods, harming both the communicators and the audience who may struggle to access the information through those media.Whether writing a research paper to academic peers or giving an astronomy talk to a pubic audience, successfully communicating a scientific message requires more than just an expert grasp on the topic. A communicator must understand the makeup and prior knowledge of the desired audience, be able to break down the salient points of the topic into pieces that audience can digest, select and maximize upon a medium to deliver the message, and frame the message in a way that hooks the audience and compels further interest. In this work we synthesize the requirements of effective astronomy communication into a few key questions that every communicator needs to answer. We then discuss some of the most common media currently used to communicate astronomy, give both effective and poor examples of utilizing these media to communicate astronomy, and provide key

  9. Multiwavelength astronomy and big data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickaelian, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Two major characteristics of modern astronomy are multiwavelength (MW) studies (fromγ-ray to radio) and big data (data acquisition, storage and analysis). Present astronomical databases and archives contain billions of objects observed at various wavelengths, both galactic and extragalactic, and the vast amount of data on them allows new studies and discoveries. Astronomers deal with big numbers. Surveys are the main source for discovery of astronomical objects and accumulation of observational data for further analysis, interpretation, and achieving scientific results. We review the main characteristics of astronomical surveys, compare photographic and digital eras of astronomical studies (including the development of wide-field observations), describe the present state of MW surveys, and discuss the Big Data in astronomy and related topics of Virtual Observatories and Computational Astrophysics. The review includes many numbers and data that can be compared to have a possibly overall understanding on the Universe, cosmic numbers and their relationship to modern computational facilities.

  10. Academic Training: Gravitational Waves Astronomy

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 16, 17, 18 October from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Gravitational Waves Astronomy M. LANDRY, LIGO Hanford Observatory, Richland, USA Gravitational wave astronomy is expected to become an observational field within the next decade. First direct detection of gravitational waves is possible with existing terrestrial-based detectors, and highly probable with proposed upgrades. In this three-part lecture series, we give an overview of the field, including material on gravitional wave sources, detection methods, some details of interferometric detectors, data analysis methods, and current results from observational data-taking runs of the LIGO and GEO projects. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www...

  11. Astronarium - Filmography of Polish Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radajewski, Bogumił; Mikołajewski, Maciej; Czart, Krzysztof; Guz, Iwona; Rubaszewski, Adam; Stelmach, Tomasz

    2016-06-01

    ``Astronarium'' is a series of TV programs about astronomy and space research co-produced by the Polish Astronomical Society and Polish Television. It has been planned for three seasons and 34 episodes in total (8, 13 and 13 per season). The first season was presented in March and April 2015 and the second started in September 2015. The third one is planned for 2016. ``Astronarium'' has been broadcast on the nationwide channel TVP Regionalna, which later changed its name to TVP 3.

  12. 7 CFR 765.206 - Junior liens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Junior liens. 765.206 Section 765.206 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... determinations for future requests for assistance and may adversely impact such requests. (b) Conditions...

  13. Pygmalion Effect on Junior English Teaching

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yurong Wang; Li Lin

    2014-01-01

    .... This thesis mainly focuses on the application of Pygmalion effect in English teaching, especially junior English teaching in China. If we can make good use of the Pygmalion Effect to conduct teaching and have positive expectations to students, it will improve teaching greatly.

  14. Organizing and Managing the Junior High Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmer, Edmund T.; And Others

    This manual provides guidelines and activities for organizing and managing junior high school classes. The first five chapters are devoted to the topic of getting ready for the beginning of the school year; the last four chapters suggest guidelines and activities that are helpful in maintaining a management system. Chapter 1 deals with organizing…

  15. Mathematics for Junior High School. Supplementary Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. D.; And Others

    This is a supplementary SMSG mathematics text for junior high school students. Key ideas emphasized are structure of arithmetic from an algebraic viewpoint, the real number system as a progressing development, and metric and non-metric relations in geometry. Chapter topics include sets, projective geometry, open and closed paths, finite…

  16. DEVELOPING STUDENTS' READING ABILITIES IN JUNIOR SCHOOL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan Bixi

    2001-01-01

    In This Article, the writer focus on an over- all analysis of the present situation of the students' reading activities in junior middle school in the countryside and put forward some suggestions on improving the teaching arts to enhance the students' fast reading abilities . It provided some theoretical basis on the further improcement of students' reading abilities in the school

  17. Do junior doctors take sick leave?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkin, M R; Higton, A; Witcomb, M

    2003-09-01

    Nosocomial infections place a heavy burden on overstretched health services. An audit of junior doctors' sick leave behaviour was undertaken in 1993 and again in 2001. The object was to ascertain the level of common infectious illness and to investigate whether junior doctors were remaining at work inappropriately. The doctors were asked if any factors had influenced their decision to take sick leave or not. Between the two audits several initiatives have been introduced to improve the working conditions of junior doctors, including the New Deal to reduce hours of work. Eighty one junior doctors in a large teaching hospital participated in 1993 and 110 in 2001. The number reporting an infectious illness in the previous six months was similar (61.7% in 1993, 68.2% in 2001). There had been a significant increase in the percentage of infectious illness episodes for which the doctors took sick leave (15.1% in 1993, 36.8% in 2001, p work (72% in 1993, 68% in 2001). Consultant pressure was cited by 26% (1993) and 20% (2001). Use of the staff occupational health unit was minimal, with none of the ill doctors contacting the department in 1993 and only three in 2001. Overall, despite the reduction in the number of infectious doctors not taking sick leave, the majority remained at work. Fundamental changes are needed if potentially infected doctors are not to present a risk of iatrogenic infection.

  18. Curriculum Reviews: Middle/Junior High Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Richard

    1982-01-01

    Reviews "Pathways in Science" (Globe Book Company), designed as a complete middle/junior high school science program. Strengths (including sixth-grade readability) and weaknesses (indicating that limited process skill development may not challenge more capable students). Limited process skill development and the possibility for the program…

  19. Theme: Junior High and Middle School Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillison, John; And Others

    1994-01-01

    On the topic of agricultural education programs in middle/junior high schools, nine articles address developing self-concept, selecting materials, the benefits of agriscience contests, adopting new curricula, the role of Future Farmers of America in the development of adolescents, teaming science and agriculture, and the rationale for middle…

  20. Redskin Images. Roy Junior High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, William M.

    The school and self-improvement programs instituted at Roy Junior High School include the development of a self-performance evaluative instrument, the incorporation of a daily 15-minute reading session, the encouragement of dance and movement education through use of visiting professionals, and implementation of a self-esteem improvement mechanism…

  1. Nanotechnology Infrared Optics for Astronomy Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Howard A.; Frogel, Jay (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The program "Nanotechnology Infrared Optics for Astronomy Missions" will design and develop new, nanotechnology techniques for infrared optical devices suitable for use in NASA space missions. The proposal combines expertise from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, the Naval Research Laboratory, the Goddard Space Flight Center, and the Physics Department at the Queen Mary and Westfield College in London, now relocated to the University of Cardiff, Cardiff, Wales. The method uses individually tailored metal grids and layered stacks of metal mesh grids, both inductive (freestanding) and capacitive (substrate-mounted), to produce various kinds of filters. The program has the following goals: 1) Model FIR filter properties using electric-circuit analogs and near-field, EM diffraction calculations. 2) Prototype fabrication of meshes on various substrates, with various materials, and of various dimensions. 3) Test filter prototypes and iterate with the modeling programs. 4) Travel to related sites, including trips to Washington, D.C. (location of NRL and GSFC), London (location of QMW), Cardiff, Wales, and Rome (location of ISO PMS project headquarters). 5) Produce ancillary science, including both publication of testing on mesh performance and infrared astronomical science.

  2. Worldviews of Introductory Astronomy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Chrystin; Wallace, C. S.; Brissenden, G.; Prather, E. E.; Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS)

    2014-01-01

    As a part of a larger project to study introductory astronomy students’ worldviews and beliefs about the role of science in society, we examined students’ responses to a subset of questions designed to probe students’ worldviews and how they change after taking a general education, introductory astronomy course (Astro 101). Specifically, we looked at about 400 students’ choices for the top ten scientific discoveries in the past 150 years. We collected students’ rankings twice: Once at the start of their Astro 101 class and once at the end. We created a rubric that we used to categorize the responses and we established the inter-rater reliability of the rubric. Our results show that students preferentially answered with topics related to technology and health and medicine. The data also show that there was an increase, pre- to post-instruction, in the number of responses in the technology and health and medicine categories. We also saw a decrease in the number of responses in the science category. These results imply that an aspect of the course specifically implemented to broaden student’s views on science in relation to society was successful. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST-0847170, for the California-Arizona Minority Partnership for Astronomy Research and Education (CAMPARE) program. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

  3. Role of Early Family Configuration and Hours Worked on Student Success in Two-Year Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Robert A.; Passmore, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors that influence student success in two-year colleges, community colleges, or junior colleges. In determining the purpose of the study, a research framework is established to review the relationships between student success and biological children, marriage/co-habitation, early family configuration,…

  4. The Relationship Between Nutritional Knowledge and Eating Habits of Selected College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Patsy; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between nutritional knowledge and eating habits of college students. Data were collected from 1,930 college juniors and seniors on 69 college and university campuses in 25 states. The students were members of the national home economics honor society and non-home economics students, male…

  5. Role of Early Family Configuration and Hours Worked on Student Success in Two-Year Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Robert A.; Passmore, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors that influence student success in two-year colleges, community colleges, or junior colleges. In determining the purpose of the study, a research framework is established to review the relationships between student success and biological children, marriage/co-habitation, early family configuration,…

  6. Why are junior doctors reluctant to consult attending physicians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, Otto H

    2010-03-01

    A physician performs two tasks: making diagnoses and determining treatments. To reduce medical error, junior doctors are supposed to consult their supervisors when they face uncommon circumstances. However, recent research shows that junior doctors are reluctant to do so. This paper presents a model that explains (i) which junior doctors shy away from consulting; (ii) when junior doctors are reluctant; (iii) the importance of protocols in the medical sector; and (iv) when consulting is a sign of strength or a sign of weakness. Furthermore, I show that encouraging junior doctors to consult by investigating mishaps leads to another distortion: they will give too much weight to own assessments.

  7. Sustaining educational and public outreach programs in astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Clarkson, William I; Swift, Carrie M; Rasmussen, Eric J; Matzke, David; Murrell, Steven R; LoPresto, Michael C; Campbell, Timothy; Clubb, Robert; Salliotte, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    We advocate meaningful support of sustained education-outreach partnerships between regional metropolitan undergraduate institutions and astronomical clubs and societies. We present our experience as an example, in which we have grown a partnership between the University of Michigan-Dearborn (hereafter UM-D, a 4-year primarily undergraduate institution or PUI), Henry Ford College (hereafter HFC, a 2-year undergraduate college), and maintained a strong collaboration with the Ford Amateur Astronomy Club (FAAC), which is highly active in the Detroit Metropolitan Area. By allowing each organization to play to its strengths, we have developed a continuum of education-outreach efforts at all levels, with connecting tissue between the previously disparate efforts. To-date, faculty and staff effort on these initiatives has been nearly entirely voluntary and somewhat ad-hoc. Here we suggest an initiative to sustain the continuum of education-outreach for the long-term. There are two levels to the suggested initiative....

  8. The IAU Office of Astronomy for Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    The IAU Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD)†, established in March 2011 as part of the implementation of the IAU Strategic Plan, is currently located in South Africa and serves as a global coordinating centre for astronomy-for-development activities. In terms of structure the OAD is required to establish regional nodes (similar offices in different parts of the world which focus on a particular geographic or cultural region) and three task forces: (i) Astronomy for Universities and Research, (ii) Astronomy for Children and Schools, and (iii) Astronomy for the Public. This paper will describe the progress of the OAD towards the realisation of the vision `Astronomy for a better world'.

  9. Highlights of Astronomy, Volume 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hucht, Karel

    2007-08-01

    Preface Karel A. van der Hucht; Part I. Invited Discourses: Part II. Joint Discussions: 1. Particle acceleration - from Solar System to AGN Marian Karlicky and John C. Brown; 2. Pulsar emission and related phenomena Werner Becker, Janusz A. Gil and Bronislaw Rudak; 3. Solar activity regions and magnetic structure Debi Prasad Choudhary and Michal Sobotka; 4. The ultraviolet universe: Stars from birth to death Ana I. Gomez de Castro and Martin A. Barstow; 5. Calibrating the top of the stellar M-L relationship Claus Leitherer, Anthony F. J. Moat and Joachim Puls; 6. Neutron stars and black holes in star clusters Frederic A. Rasio; 7. The Universe at z > 6 Daniel Schaerer and Andrea Ferrara; 8. Solar and stellar activity cycles Klaus G. Strassmeier and Alexander Kosovichev; 9. Supernovae: One millennium after SN 1006 P. Frank Winkler, Wolfgang Hillebrandt and Brian P. Schmidt; 10. Progress in planetary exploration missions Guy J. Consolmagno; 11. Pre-solar grains as astrophysical tools Anja C. Andersen and John C. Lattanzio; 12. Long wavelength astrophysics T. Joseph W. Lazio and Namir E. Kassim; 13. Exploiting large surveys for galactic astronomy Christopher J. Corbally, Coryn A. L. Bailer-Jones, Sunetra Giridhar and Thomas H. Lloyd Evans; 14. Modeling dense stellar systems Alison I. Sills, Ladislav Subr and Simon F. Portegies Zwart; 15. New cosmology results from the Spitzer Space Telescope George Helou and David T. Frayer; 16. Nomenclature, precession and new models in fundamental astronomy Nicole Capitaine, Jan Vondrak & James L. Hilton; 17. Highlights of recent progress in seismology of the Sun and Sun-like stars John W. Leibacher and Michael J. Thompson; Part III. Special Sessions: SpS 1. Large astronomical facilities of the next decade Gerard F. Gilmore and Richard T. Schilizzi; SpS 2. Innovation in teaching and learning astronomy methods Rosa M. Ros and Jay M. Pasachoff; SpS 3. The Virtual Observatory in action: New science, new technology and next

  10. The Novice-Expert Continuum in Astronomy Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, T. G. K.; Blown, E. J.

    2012-03-01

    The nature of expertise in astronomy was investigated across a broad spectrum of ages and experience in China and New Zealand. Five hypotheses (capable of quantification and statistical analysis) were used to probe types of expertise identified by previous researchers: (a) domain-specific knowledge-skill in the use of scientific vocabulary and language and recognising relationships between concepts in linguistic and schematic forms; (b) higher-order theory in terms of conceptual structure and enriched scientific knowledge and reasoning; with an expectation of cultural similarity. There were 993 participants in all, age 3-80 years, including 68 junior school pupils; 68 pre-school pupils; 112 middle-school students; 109 high-school students; 79 physics undergraduates; 60 parents; 136 pre-service primary teachers; 131 pre-service secondary teachers; 72 primary teachers; 78 secondary teachers; 50 amateur astronomers and astronomy educators; and 30 astronomers and physicists; with approximately equal numbers of each group in both cultures; and of boys and girls in the case of children. For them, the methodology utilised Piagetian interviews with three media (verbal language, drawing, play-dough modelling), and for adults a questionnaire inviting responses in writing and drawing was used. The data from each group were categorised into ordinal scales and then analysed by means of Kolmogorov-Smirnov two-sample tests. The findings supported the hypotheses with evidence of all forms of expertise increasing with experience in both cultures (α level 0.05). The relative gains, overlaps and deficits in expertise across the novice-expert continuum are explored in detail.

  11. Julia and Python in Astronomy: Better Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbary, Kyle

    2016-03-01

    Astronomers love Python because it is open source, easy to learn, and has a tremendous ecosystem for scientific computing. The Julia programming language has many of those same characteristics. In this talk, I'll discuss the use of Julia in astronomy and the growing ecosystem of astronomy packages, particularly those managed by the JuliaAstro organization (http://JuliaAstro.github.io). Most importantly, I will highlight some areas ripe for collaboration between Python and Julia developers in astronomy.

  12. Cultural Astronomy in the Armenian Highland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmanyan, S. V.; Suvaryan, Yu. M.; Mickaelian, A. M. (Eds.)

    2016-12-01

    The book contains 29 articles of the Proceedings of the Young Scientists Conference "Cultural Astronomy in the Armenian Highland" held at the Armenian National Academy of Sciences on 20-23 June 2016. It consists of 4 main sections: "Introductory", "Cultural Astronomy", "Archaeoastronomy", "Scientific Tourism and Journalism, Astronomical Education and Amateur Astronomy". The book may be interesting to astronomers, culturologists, philologists, linguists, historians, archaeologists, art historians, ethnographers and to other specialists, as well as to students.

  13. Results from the Astronomy Diagnostic Test National Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, G. L.

    2001-12-01

    During 2000 and 2001, the validity and reliability of the Astronomy Diagnostic Test Version 2.0 (ADT 2.0) were formally investigated through the Astronomy Diagnostic Test National Project. The ADT 2.0 was administered as a pre-test to 5346 students and as a post-test to 3842 students. Student test results were collected from 97 classes that ranged in size from 4 to 320 students with 30 states represented. The 68 professors participating in the ADT National Project taught classes at universities (54%), 4-year colleges (27%), and 2-year colleges (19%). The database was analyzed for reliability at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. A pre-test value for Cronbach's alpha of 0.65 and post-test value of 0.76 demonstrate an acceptable degree of internal consistency. The average score for the 44 participating professors who completed the ADT as experts was 98%. Face and content validity were established by combining results from the experts with feedback from 60 student interviews. Student results from the National Project yielded an average score of 32.4% for the pre-test and 47.3% for the post-test. There is a gender discrepancy in favor of males that persists in both the pre-test (11% points) and the post-test (12% points) scores. The variations across geographic distribution and institution types were not significant. In addition to the 21 content items, the ADT 2.0 has 12 student background questions enabling instructors to have a better understanding of who takes introductory astronomy. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation through grants REC-0089239 (GD) and DGE-9714489 (BH).

  14. HOW TO LAUNCH A COMMUNITY COLLEGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANDERSON, HELEN J.

    TEN HIGH SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENTS IN DUPAGE COUNTY, ILLINOIS, HAVE SHOWN HOW TO PERSUADE TAXPAYERS FROM DIVERSE DISTRICTS TO VOTE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A JUNIOR COLLEGE. IN 1964, AFTER STUDYING THE STATE MASTER PLAN, THEY AND THE BOARD MEMBERS OF EACH DISTRICT HIRED A FIRM TO MAKE A FEASIBILITY STUDY. THE BOARDS SELECTED 19 CITIZENS FOR THE…

  15. Perspectives on the Community College: Essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, John; Cohen, Arthur M., Ed.

    The essays in this collection were written by John Lombardi during the 1970s while he was a resident scholar at the ERIC Clearinghouse for Junior Colleges. Following a foreword on Lombardi's life and work by a son and two daughters, John V., Mary Luciana, and Janice P. Lombardi, is an introduction by Arthur M. Cohen giving highlights of Lombardi's…

  16. Astronomy Education and Popularization in Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanackovic, O.

    2013-05-01

    Astronomy education at all levels (elementary and secondary schools, universities) in Serbia is reviewed. The attempts to introduce astronomy as an elective course in elementary schools and to reintroduce astronomy as a separate subject in secondary schools are discussed. The role of the Petnica Science Center is briefly described, as well as the participation of the Serbian team in the International Astronomy Olympiads. A special emphasis is put on recent changes introduced in the accredited study programs at all five Serbian state universities. The research projects performed in two main astronomical institutions in Serbia are outlined. The numerous amateur astronomical societies in Serbia are presented and their growing activities summarized.

  17. The Relationship between Preservice Science Teachers' Attitude toward Astronomy and Their Understanding of Basic Astronomy Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektasli, Behzat

    2016-01-01

    Turkish preservice science teachers have been taking a two-credit astronomy class during the last semester of their undergraduate program since 2010. The current study aims to investigate the relationship between preservice science teachers' astronomy misconceptions and their attitudes toward astronomy. Preservice science teachers were given an…

  18. Improving Astronomy Achievement and Attitude through Astronomy Summer Project: A Design, Implementation and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türk, Cumhur; Kalkan, Hüseyin; Iskeleli', Nazan Ocak; Kiroglu, Kasim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of an astronomy summer project implemented in different learning activities on elementary school students, pre-service elementary teachers and in-service teachers' astronomy achievement and their attitudes to astronomy field. This study is the result of a five-day, three-stage, science school,…

  19. Skynet Junior Scholars: From Idea to Enactment--Tales from the Trenches III. Implementing SJS in Out-of-School Time Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heatherly, Sue Ann; Elyea, Charlene; Goodman, Joel; Gurton, Suzanne; Hoette, Vivian L.; Holt, Geoff; Sanchez, Rick; Skynet Robotic Telescope Network, University of North Carolina

    2016-01-01

    The creators of Skynet Junior Scholars were ambitious to say the least when they set out to:- Develop online tools that enable middle school and high school aged youth to use robotic optical and radio telescopes to do astronomy- Create an inquiry-based curriculum that promotes critical thinking and scientific habits of mind- Proactively incorporate Principles of Universal Design in all SJS development tasks to ensure access by blind/low vision and deaf/hard of hearing youth- Prepare 180 adult youth leaders from diverse backgrounds including 4-H leaders, museum educators, amateur astronomers and teachers to facilitate SJS activities in a variety of settings.So, after three years of development, how is SJS actually working? In this paper we describe what it takes for a successful implementation of Skynet Junior Scholars, from the viewpoint of adult leaders in the trenches who work with youth at schools but in free-choice learning environments. What are the lessons learned in recruiting and engaging youth in observational astronomy projects when academic incentives like grades are no longer part of the equation? Stories and ideas will be presented from classroom teachers, informal educators and amateur astronomers who work with youth in this environment.Skynet Junior Scholars is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Numbers 1223687, 1223235 and 1223345.

  20. 护理专业大学生在中学生二手烟防控教育中的作用%Effect of college nursing students on the prevention and control of passive smoking among teenagers in junior high school

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐晓华; 唐悦; 陈晓晓; 梁涛

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨护理专业大学生对中学生进行被动吸烟控烟教育能否使青少年对二手烟的知信行得到提升。方法在北京市某中学选取91名初二学生,以护理专业本科毕业临床实习学生作为教育者,对他们进行控烟教育,在干预前后分别应用青少年与被动吸烟调查问卷进行调查,比较干预前后青少年被动吸烟的知识、态度和行为的不同。采用SPSS 18.0统计学软件进行数据的处理,计数资料采用χ2检验,等级资料采用秩和检验,以P<0.05为差异有统计学意义。结果研究对象基线被动吸烟率为58.2%,多形式干预后,中学生对被动吸烟的知识、态度、行为有所提升,对“吸烟危害健康”“被动吸烟危害健康”“吸入二手烟易导致心脏病”“低焦油卷烟危害小”的知晓率较干预前分别上升了11.0%,18.7%,15.3%,15.3%,差异有统计学意义(χ2值分别为6.852,13.401,4.321,4.397;P <0.05)。认为“成年人吸烟是正常行为”“吸烟前应征求周围人意见”“赞成公共场所禁烟”“总是、经常要求他人不在自己面前吸烟”“鼓励父母戒烟”的人数分别较干预前上升了20.8%,14.3%,17.5%,19.8%,16.5%,差异有统计学意义(χ2/Z值分别为8.126,4.604,5.660,-4.074,5.385;P<0.05)。结论护理专业大学生作为二手烟控烟教育者能提高中学生对被动吸烟相关知识的认识,使其对被动吸烟态度发生正向改变,促使其主动采取行为抵制被动吸烟。%Objective To study the effect of tobacco control education conducted by college nursing students on improving teenagers ’ knowledge, attitude, belief and practice to passive smoking .Methods Totals of 91 teenagers in junior high school were selected and educated by the college nursing students .Questionnaires were used to

  1. An Online Tutor for Astronomy: The GEAS Self-Review Library

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, Nicole P

    2015-01-01

    We introduce an interactive online resource for use by students and college instructors in introductory astronomy courses. The General Education Astronomy Source (GEAS) online tutor guides students developing mastery of core astronomical concepts and mathematical applications of general astronomy material. It contains over 12,000 questions, with linked hints and solutions. Students who master the material quickly can advance through the topics, while under-prepared or hesitant students can focus on questions on a certain topic for as long as needed, with minimal repetition. Students receive individual accounts for study and course instructors are provided with overview tracking information, by time and by topic, for entire cohorts of students. Diagnostic tools support self-evaluation and close collaboration between instructor and student, even for distance learners. An initial usage study shows clear trends in performance which increase with study time, and indicates that distance learners using these materia...

  2. A New Online Astronomy Resource for Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impey, C. D.; Hardegree-Ullman, K. K.; Patikkal, A.; Srinathan, A.; Austin, C. L.; Ganesan, N. K.; Guvenen, B. C.

    2013-01-01

    A new web site called "Teach Astronomy" (http://www.teachastronomy.com) has been created to serve astronomy instructors and their students, amateur astronomers, and members of the public interested in astronomy. The

  3. A New Online Astronomy Resource for Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impey, C. D.; Hardegree-Ullman, K. K.; Patikkal, A.; Srinathan, A.; Austin, C. L.; Ganesan, N. K.; Guvenen, B. C.

    2013-01-01

    A new web site called "Teach Astronomy" (http://www.teachastronomy.com) has been created to serve astronomy instructors and their students, amateur astronomers, and members of the public interested in astronomy. The

  4. Relative age effect in junior tennis (male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Agricola

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The issues of the age effect (the theory of the age influence have been shown in sport sciences since the 1980s. The theory of age effect works on the assumption that athletes born in the beginning of a calendar year are, particularly in children’s and junior age, more successful than athletes born in the end of the year. This fact has been proved by a number of research studies, mainly in ice hockey, soccer, and tennis but also in other sports. OBJECTIVE: The submitted contribution is aimed at verifying of the age effect in junior tennis. The research objective was to find out the distribution of birth date frequencies in a population of tennis players’ in individual months, quarters, and half-years in the observed period 2007–2011 and to check the significance of differences. METHODS: The research was conducted on male tennis players aged 13–14 (N = 239, participants of the World Junior Tennis Finals. From the methodological point of view, it was an intentional selection. The birth dates of individual tennis players were taken from official materials of the ITF, the research data were processed using Microsoft Excel. The personal data were processed with the approval of players and the hosting organization (ITF. RESULTS: Testing of the hypothesis on the significance of differences in the distribution of frequencies between individual quarters (Q1–Q4 has proved statistically relevant differences between Q1 and Q3, Q1 and Q4, Q2 and Q3, and Q2 and Q4; a statistically relevant difference has been also found in the distribution of frequencies between the first and second half of the year. On the basis of the results of the presented research, the age effect in the studied population of junior male tennis players can be regarded as significant. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the analysis of the research data confirm the conclusions of similar studies in other sports and prove that in the population of elite junior players

  5. Music and Astronomy Under the Stars 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowich, D.

    2010-08-01

    Bring telescopes to where the people are! Music and Astronomy Under the Stars is a three-year NASA-funded astronomy outreach program at community parks during and after music concerts and outdoor family events—such as a Halloween Stars-Spooky Garden Walk. While there have been many astronomy outreach activities and telescope observations at city sidewalks and parks, this program targets a completely different audience: music lovers who are attending summer concerts held in community parks. These music lovers who may never have visited a science museum, planetarium, or star party are exposed to telescope observations and astronomy information with no additional travel costs. Music and Astronomy Under the Stars increased awareness, engagement, and interest in astronomy at classical, pop, rock, and ethnic music concerts. This program includes solar observing before the concerts, telescope observations including a live image projection system, an astronomical video presentation, and astronomy banners/posters. Approximately 500-16,000 people attended each event and 25% to 50% of the people at each event participated in the astronomy program. This program also reached underrepresented and underserved groups (women, minorities, older adults). The target audience (Nassau and Suffolk Counties, New York) is 2,900,000 people, which is larger than combined population of Atlanta, Boston, Denver, Minneapolis, and San Francisco. Although eleven events were planned in 2009, two were canceled due to rain and our largest event, the NY Philharmonic in the Park (attended by 67,000 people in 2008), was cancelled for financial reasons. Our largest event in 2009 was the Tanglewood Music Festival, Lenox MA, attended by 16,000 people where over 5000 people participated in astronomy activities. The Amateur Observers' Society of New York assisted with the NY concerts and the Springfield STARS astronomy club assisted at Tanglewood. In 2009 over 15,000 people participated in astronomy

  6. Copernican Astronomy and Oceanic Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKittrick, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the relationships between the century long development of the “New Astronomy” (Copernicus’ axially rotating and solar orbiting earth, governed by Kepler’s laws of planetary motion) of the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries and the emerging astronomical navigation technologies of the fifteenth and sixteenth century Iberian oceanic explorers and their sixteenth and seventeenth century Protestant competitors. Since the first breakthroughs in Portuguese astronomical navigation in ascertaining latitude at sea were based upon the theories and observations of classically trained Ptolemaic astronomers and cosmographers, it can be argued that the new heliocentric astronomy was not necessary for future developments in early modern navigation. By examining the history of the concurrent revolutions in early modern navigation and astronomy and focusing upon commonalities, we can identify the period during which the old astronomy provided navigators with insufficient results - perhaps hastening the acceptance of the new epistemology championed by Galileo and rejected by Bellarmine. Even though this happened during the period of northern protestant ascendancy in exploration, its roots can be seen during pre-Copernican acceptance in both Lutheran and Catholic Europe. Copernican mathematics was used to calculate Reinhold’s Prutenic Tables despite the author’s ontological rejection of the heliocentric hypothesis. These tables became essential for ascertaining latitude at sea. Kepler’s Rudophine Tables gained even more widespread currency across Europe. His theories were influenced by Gilbert’s work on magnetism - a work partially driven by the requirements of English polar exploration. Sailors themselves never needed to accept a heliocentric cosmography, but the data they brought back to the metropolis undermined Ptolemy, as better data kept them alive at sea. This exchange between theoretician and user in the early modern period drove both

  7. Third-World Astronomy Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narlikar, Jayant V.

    Several developing countries of the Third World have been actively interested in astronomy, as is evidenced by the membership of the IAU. The enthusiasm of individual astronomers from these countries is, however, not matched by the resources available to them to pursue their interest in astronomy, in teaching as well as research, at an above-threshold level. Major problems requiring solutions are (I) isolation from the mainstream work, which leads to research work which is not quite relevant or realistic, and to teaching based on outdated knowledge; (II) lack of financial resources, leading to shortage of books and journals in the library, insufficient computing power, out-of-date instruments, as well as inability to participate in essential activities like schools, workshops, and major international conferences and symposia; and (III) lack of handson experience with state-of-the-art instrumentation that often leads to good scientists being turned away from astronomical observations towards abstract theories. Experience of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste, Italy and of the inter-university centres in India, like the IUCAA at Pune, has shown that limited resources can be made to go a long way by sharing, networking and intelligent use of communications technology. Based on the above experience, this proposal envisages setting up a Third World Astronomy Network (TWAN) under the auspices of the IAU, within the wider ICSU-umbrella with support from the UNESCO as well as participating nations. The TWAN will operate with a few key institutions as local nodal points of a wide network. The objectives of the proposed TWAN and the role of the Nodal Institutions (NIs) are spelled out in this proposal, along with the budgetary support required.

  8. Tunable Imaging Filters in Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Bland-Hawthorn, J

    2000-01-01

    While tunable filters are a recent development in night time astronomy, they have long been used in other physical sciences, e.g. solar physics, remote sensing and underwater communications. With their ability to tune precisely to a given wavelength using a bandpass optimized for the experiment, tunable filters are already producing some of the deepest narrowband images to date of astrophysical sources. Furthermore, some classes of tunable filters can be used in fast telescope beams and therefore allow for narrowband imaging over angular fields of more than a degree over the sky.

  9. Highlights of Astronomy, Vol. 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Ian

    2010-11-01

    Preface; Part I. Gruber Cosmology Prize Lecture; Part II. Invited Discourses; Part III. Joint Discussions: 1. Dark matter in early-type galaxies Léon V. E. Koopmans and Tommaso Treu; 2. Diffuse light in galaxy clusters Magda Arnaboldi and Ortwin Gerhard; 3. Neutron stars - timing in extreme environments Tomaso Belloni, Mariano Méndez and Chengmin Zhang; 4. Progress in understanding the physics of Ap and related stars Margarida Cunha; 5. Modelling the Milky Way in the age of Gaia Annie C. Robin; 6. Time and astronomy Pascale Defraigne; 7. Astrophysical outflows and associated accretion phenomena Elisabete M. de Gouveia Dal Pino and Alex C. Raga; 8. Hot interstellar matter in elliptical galaxies Dong-Woo Kim and Silvia Pellegrini; 9. Are the fundamental constants varying with time? Paolo Molaro and Elisabeth Vangioni; 10. 3D views on cool stellar atmospheres - theory meets observation K. N. Nagendra, P. Bonifacio and H. G. Ludwig; 11. New advances in helio- and astero-seismology; 12. The first galaxies - theoretical predictions and observational clues; 13. Eta Carinae in the context of the most massive stars Theodore R. Gull and Augusto Damineli; 14. The ISM of galaxies in the far-infrared and sub-millimetre; 15. Magnetic fields in diffuse media Elisabete M. de Gouveia Dal Pino and Alex Lazarian; 16. IHY global campaign - whole heliosphere interval; Part IV. Special Sessions: SpS 1. IR and sub-mm spectroscopy - a new tool for studying stellar evolution Glenn Wahlgren, Hans Käufl and Florian Kerber; SpS 2. The international year of astronomy Pedro Russo, Catherine Cesarsky and Lars Lindberg Christensen; SpS 3. Astronomy in Antarctica in 2009 Michael G. Burton; SpS 4. Astronomy education between past and future J. P. De Greve; SpS 5. Accelerating the rate of astronomical discovery Ray P. Norris; SpS 6. Planetary systems as potential sites for life Régis Courtin, Alan Boss and Michel Mayor; SpS 7. Young stars, brown dwarfs, and protoplanetary disks Jane Gregorio

  10. Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Hamidouche, M; Marcum, P; Krabbe, A

    2010-01-01

    We present one of the new generations of observatories, the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). This is an airborne observatory consisting of a 2.7-m telescope mounted on a modified Boeing B747-SP airplane. Flying at an up to 45,000 ft (14 km) altitude, SOFIA will observe above more than 99 percent of the Earth's atmospheric water vapor allowing observations in the normally obscured far-infrared. We outline the observatory capabilities and goals. The first-generation science instruments flying on board SOFIA and their main astronomical goals are also presented.

  11. Basic Concepts of Positional Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    This article describes and defines a number of basic concepts that are commonly used in archaeoastronomy and ethnoastronomy, sometimes in particular ways, and attempts to clarify some of the issues of confusion that frequently arise. It is aimed primarily at archaeologists and ethnographers entering or exploring the field and emphasizes the broad principles that are generally of importance to them, while trying to avoid unnecessary complications as well as technical details. It is not aimed at those studying historical sources from antiquity onward, who need a more sophisticated knowledge of positional astronomy, mathematically formulated. Further detail can be found in a variety of sources, including a number aimed specifically at archaeoastronomers.

  12. Observing Conditions for Submillimeter Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Radford, Simon J E

    2011-01-01

    Consistently superb observing conditions are crucial for achieving the scientific objectives of a telescope. Submillimeter astronomy is possible only at a few exceptionally dry sites, notably Mauna Kea, the Antarctic plateau, and the Chajnantor region in the high Andes east of San Pedro de Atacama in northern Chile. Long term measurements of 225 GHz and 350 \\mu m atmospheric transparency demonstrate all three locations enjoy significant periods of excellent observing conditions. Conditions on the Chajnantor plateau and at the South Pole are better more often than on Mauna Kea. Conditions are better during winter and at night. Near the summit of Cerro Chajnantor, conditions are better than on the Chajnantor plateau.

  13. The handy astronomy answer book

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, PhD, Charles

    2013-01-01

    From planetary movements and the exploration of our solar system to black holes and dark matter, this comprehensive reference simplifies all aspects of astronomy with an approachable question-and-answer format. With chapters broken into various astronomical studies—including the universe, galaxies, planets, and space exploration—this fully updated resource is an ideal companion for students, teachers, and amateur astronomers, answering more than 1,00 questions, such as Is the universe infinite? What would happen to you if you fell onto a black hole? What are the basic concepts of Einstein''s s

  14. Episodes from the Early History of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaboe, Asger

    The author does not attempt to give a general survey of early astronomy; rather, he chooses to present a few "episodes" and treats them in detail. However, first he provides the necessary astronomical background in his descriptive account of what you can see when you look at the sky with the naked eye, unblinkered by received knowledge, but with curiosity and wit. Chapter 1 deals with the arithmetical astronomy of ancient Mesopotamia where astronomy first was made an exact science. Next are treated Greek geometrical models for planetary motion, culminating in Ptolemy's equant models in his Almagest. Ptolemy does not assign them absolute size in this work, but, as is shown here, if we scale the models properly, they will yield good values, not only of the directions to the planets, but of the distances to them, as well. Thus one can immediately find the dimensions of the Copernican System from parameters in the Almagest - we have evidence that Copernicus did just that. Further, Islamic astronomers' modifications of Ptolemy's models by devices using only uniform circular motion are discussed, as are Copernicus's adoption of some of them. finally, it is made precise which bothersome problem was resolved by the heliocentric hypothesis, as it was by the Tychonic arrangement. Next, the Ptolemaic System, the first cosmological scheme to incorporate quantitative models, is described as Ptolemy himself did it in a recenlty recovered passage from his Planetary Hypotheses. Here he does assign absolute size to his models in order to fit them into the snugly nested spherical shells that made up his universe. This much maligned system was, in fact, a harmonious construct that remained the basis for how educated people thought of their world for a millennium and a half. Finally, after a brief review of the geometry of the ellipse, the author gives an elementary derivation of Kepler's equation, and shows how Kepler solved it, and further proves that a planet moves very nearly

  15. Astronomy Education in Morocco - New Project for Implementing Astronomy in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darhmaoui, H.; Loudiyi, K.

    2006-08-01

    Astronomy education in Morocco, like in many developing countries, is not well developed and lacks the very basics in terms of resources, facilities and research. In 2004, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) signed an agreement of collaboration with Al Akhawayn University in Ifrane to support the continued, long-term development of astronomy and astrophysics in Morocco. This is within the IAU program "Teaching for Astronomy Development" (TAD). The initial focus of the program concentrated exclusively on the University's Bachelor of Science degree program. Within this program, and during two years, we were successful in providing adequate astronomy training to our physics faculty and few of our engineering students. We also offered our students and community general astronomy background through courses, invited talks and extra curricular activities. The project is now evolving towards a wider scope and seeks promoting astronomy education at the high school level. It is based on modules from the Hands on Universe (HOU) interactive astronomy program. Moroccan students will engage in doing observational astronomy from their PCs. They will have access to a world wide network of telescopes and will interact with their peers abroad. Through implementing astronomy education at this lower age, we foresee an increasing interest among our youth not only in astronomy but also in physics, mathematics, and technology. The limited astronomy resources, the lack of teachers experience in the field and the language barrier are amongst the difficulties that we'll be facing in achieving the objectives of this new program.

  16. Dating With Super Junior-M

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    担心情人节没人陪?还在幻想能与谁约会?2009年2月14日,梦想照进现实,SJ-M将在上海举办“情人Superman-Super Junior-M 2009上海歌会”,化身你的甜蜜情人,与你一起共度浪漫情人节。

  17. Organizations and Strategies in Astronomy, volume 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, A.

    2003-10-01

    This book is the fourth volume under the title Organizations and Strategies in Astronomy (OSA). These OSA Books are intended to cover a large range of fields and themes. In practice, one could say that all aspects of astronomy-related life and environment are considered in the spirit of sharing specific expertise and lessons learned. This book offers a unique collection of chapters dealing with socio-dynamical aspects of the astronomy (and related space sciences) community: characteristics of organizations, society activities, strategies for development, operational techniques, observing practicalities, environmental constraints, educational policies, public outreach, journal and magazine profiles, publication studies, electronic-media problematics, research communication, evaluation and selection procedures, research indicators, national policies and specificities, expertise sharing, contemporary history, and so on. The experts contributing to this book have done their best to write in a way understandable to readers not necessarily hyperspecialized in astronomy while providing specific detailed information and sometimes enlightening 'lessons learned' sections. The book concludes with an updated bibliography of publications related to socio-astronomy and to the interactions of the astronomy community with the society at large. This book will be most usefully read by researchers, teachers, editors, publishers, librarians, sociologists of science, research planners and strategists, project managers, public-relations officers, plus those in charge of astronomy-related organizations, as well as by students aiming at a career in astronomy or related space science. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-1526-7

  18. Organizations and Strategies in Astronomy Vol. 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Andre

    2006-12-01

    This book is the seventh volume under the title Organizations and Strategies in Astronomy (OSA). The OSA series covers a large range of fields and themes: in practice, one could say that all aspects of astronomy-related life and environment are considered in the spirit of sharing specific expertise and lessons learned. The chapters of this book are dealing with socio-dynamical aspects of the astronomy (and related space sciences) community: characteristics of organizations, strategies for development, operational techniques, observing practicalities, journal and magazine profiles, public outreach, publication studies, relationships with the media, research communication, series of conferences, evaluation and selection procedures, research indicators, national specificities, contemporary history, and so on. The experts contributing to this volume have done their best to write in a way understandable to readers not necessarily hyperspecialized in astronomy while providing specific detailed information and sometimes enlightening 'lessons learned' sections. The book concludes with an updated bibliography of publications related to socio-astronomy and to the interactions of the astronomy community with the society at large. This volume will be most usefully read by researchers, editors, publishers, librarians, sociologists of science, research planners and strategists, project managers, public-relations officers, plus those in charge of astronomy-related organizations, as well as by students aiming at a career in astronomy or related space sciences.

  19. International co-operation in astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnaert, Marcel Gilles Jozef

    1955-01-01

    Scientific co-operation between the nations is found already in Antiquity and the Middle Ages and has proved a strong stimulus to the development of astronomy. Different forms of modern international co-operation in astronomy may be distinguished: (1) co-ordinated observations at widely separated st

  20. Space Astronomy in China: 2006-2008

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAN Weiqun

    2008-01-01

    In 2006 to 2008,the main activities in Chinese space astronomy focus on:(1)undertaking some missions set by CNSA,like HXMT,SMESE,wso/vv,SST,KUAFU,and so on;(2)drawing up a long-term plan of Chinese space astronomy.This paper summarizes in brief all these activities.

  1. The future of astronomy in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Elaine M.

    2017-09-01

    Australian astronomy has a bright future, thanks largely to recent government investments in major new telescopes, instruments and research centres. There are some short-term challenges as Australia's focus continues to shift from the current (mainly) national facilities for radio and optical astronomy to new multinational and global facilities.

  2. The cost of publishing in Danish astronomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorch, Bertil F.

    I investigate the cost of publishing in Danish astronomy on a fine scale, including all direct publication costs: The figures show how the annual number of publications with authors from Denmark in astronomy journals increased by a factor approximately four during 15 years (Elsevier’s Scopus...

  3. Encouraging Student Participation in Large Astronomy Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    Introductory astronomy is one of the most widely taught classes in the country and the majority of the students who take these classes are non-science majors. Because this demographic of students makes up the majority of astronomy enrollments, it is especially important as instructors that we do our best to make sure these students don't finish…

  4. Resources for Teaching Astronomy in UK Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Paul; Newsam, Andy; Roberts, Sarah; Mason, Tom; Baruch, John

    2012-01-01

    This article looks at a selection of resources currently available for use in the teaching of astronomy in UK schools. It is by no means an exhaustive list but it highlights a variety of free resources that can be used in the classroom to help engage students of all ages with astronomy and space science. It also lists several facilities with a…

  5. Resources for Teaching Astronomy in UK Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Paul; Newsam, Andy; Roberts, Sarah; Mason, Tom; Baruch, John

    2012-01-01

    This article looks at a selection of resources currently available for use in the teaching of astronomy in UK schools. It is by no means an exhaustive list but it highlights a variety of free resources that can be used in the classroom to help engage students of all ages with astronomy and space science. It also lists several facilities with a…

  6. Encouraging Student Participation in Large Astronomy Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    Introductory astronomy is one of the most widely taught classes in the country and the majority of the students who take these classes are non-science majors. Because this demographic of students makes up the majority of astronomy enrollments, it is especially important as instructors that we do our best to make sure these students don't finish…

  7. Weltall im Wandel. Die neue Astronomie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsässer, H.

    Contents: Alte und neue Astronomie. Die Sterne des Milchstraßensystems. Sternentstehung und interstellare Materie. Unser Sonnensystem und seine Geschichte. Interplanetarer Staub. Vom Sterben der Sterne. Arbeitsmittel der optischen Astronomie. Ein neues Zentrum astronomischer Forschung. Galaxien. Ursprung und Entwicklung des Weltalls.

  8. Astronomy all the time for everybody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigore, Valentin

    2015-08-01

    General contextCommunicating astronomy with the public must be done all year and with all community members using all the available methods to promote the all aspects of astronomy: education, science, research, new technologies, dark-sky protection, astrophotography, mythology, astropoetry, astro arts and music.An annual calendarTwo aspect must be taken in consideration when create a calendar of activity:- astronomical events (eclipses, meteor showers, comets, etc.)- international and local astronomical events: Global Astronomy Months, Astronomy Day, Globe at Night, ISAN, public activitiesCommunicating astronomy with the whole communityA description of the experience of the author organizing over 500 events in 30 years of activity including all the community members: general public, students, teachers, artists, authorities, people with disabilities, minor and adult prisoners, etc.An experience of seven years as TV producer of the astronomy TV show “Ùs and the Sky” is presented.Promotion of the activityThe relation with the mass-media is an important aspect communicating astronomy with the public.Mass-media between rating and correct information of the public.The role of the cooperation with the community in astronomy projectsA successful model: EURONEAR project

  9. Some Daytime Activities in Solar Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burin, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    This century's transits of Venus (2004, 2012) captured significant public attention, reminding us that the wonders of astronomy need not be confined to the night. And while nighttime telescope viewing gatherings (a.k.a. "star parties") are perennially popular, astronomy classes are typically held in the daytime. The logistics of…

  10. Junior doctors' knowledge of applied clinical anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Yuri; Morgan, Mia; Singh, Annika; Ellis, Harold

    2008-05-01

    This study examines the level of knowledge of applied clinical anatomy among junior doctors. A multiple-choice questionnaire was designed, which covered 15 areas of anatomical knowledge essential to clinical practice, for example, important surface landmarks and interpretation of radiographs. The questionnaire was completed by 128 individuals. They comprised anatomy demonstrators, preregistration house officers (PRHOs), senior house officers (SHOs) and specialist registrars (SpRs) across the range of medical and surgical specialities. Answers were scored and analyzed by group, allowing comparison not only between newly qualified PRHOs and more senior doctors, but also with anatomy demonstrators who had undergone more traditional anatomical training. The results reveal a wide variation of knowledge among junior doctors, with PRHOs scoring an average of 72.1%, SHOs 77.1%, SpRs 82.4%, and demonstrators 82.9%. This progression in knowledge up the clinical hierarchy may reflect clinical experience building upon the foundations laid in medical school, although with demonstrators topping the league table, it seems that intensive academic training is the most beneficial. With junior doctors' training in the UK currently in flux, these results highlight the need for training in clinical anatomy to hold an important place in the development of tomorrow's clinicians.

  11. Moments of astronomy education in Bucharest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Mircea V.; Stavinschi, Magda

    2008-09-01

    Selection from past astronomy education, activities, textbooks and curricula will be presented. Didactic aspects and comparison with physics education will be exemplified. The astronomy/science education along the time in Romania was roughly divided in four directions: very broad information texts for everybody, popular science, school textbooks, science fictions and astronomy/science literature, and exemplified using original texts. All categories were intended to extend literacy in science, but in different ways. The trends for different periods were outlined. The teaching of astronomy and astrophysics in high school and universities, with special attention to the Faculty of Physic from University of Bucharest are presented. Suggestions for future improvement of both related fields, physics and astronomy, will be one of the outcomes of our communication.

  12. Observing Projects in Introductory Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M. Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Introductory astronomy classes without laboratory components face a unique challenge of how to expose students to the process of science in the framework of a lecture course. As a solution to this problem small group observing projects are incorporated into a 40 student introductory astronomy class composed primarily of non-science majors. Students may choose from 8 observing projects such as graphing the motion of the moon or a planet, measuring daily and seasonal motions of stars, and determining the rotation rate of the Sun from sunspots. Each group completes two projects, requiring the students to spend several hours outside of class making astronomical observations. Clear instructions and a check-list style observing log help students with minimal observing experience to take accurate data without direct instructor assistance. Students report their findings in a lab report-style paper, as well as in a formal oral or poster presentation. The projects serve a double purpose of allowing students to directly experience concepts covered in class as well as providing students with experience collecting, analyzing, and presenting astronomical data.

  13. Astronomy with a home computer

    CERN Document Server

    Monks, Neale

    2005-01-01

    Here is a one-volume guide to just about everything computer-related for amateur astronomers! Today's amateur astronomy is inextricably linked to personal computers. Computer-controlled "go-to" telescopes are inexpensive. CCD and webcam imaging make intensive use of the technology for capturing and processing images. Planetarium software provides information and an easy interface for telescopes. The Internet offers links to other astronomers, information, and software. The list goes on and on. Find out here how to choose the best planetarium program: are commercial versions really better than freeware? Learn how to optimise a go-to telescope, or connect it to a lap-top. Discover how to choose the best webcam and use it with your telescope. Create a mosaic of the Moon, or high-resolution images of the planets... Astronomy with a Home Computer is designed for every amateur astronomer who owns a home computer, whether it is running Microsoft Windows, Mac O/S or Linux. It doesn't matter what kind of telescope you...

  14. Multiversos: Rock'n'Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, J. A.; Arias, A.; García, N.

    2011-11-01

    Imagine that you can use your fingers only for typing target coordinates at thetelescope, reduce images and spectra with IRAF, or write papers for Astronomy &Astrophysics, but you would never be able to play an electric guitar.Imagine that you love music, work in front of the computer always withheadphones, and dream of playing with your favourite rock band in a tumultuousconcert.Imagine that you are an astronomer who, after a "cosmic fluke", share stagewith the band which themes you have always hummed since you were a teenager.Imagine that you were born for rock, played a main role in the best Spanishalbum of the 90s (Omega, with Enrique Morente), and your songs arerutinary played by Radio 3, but you would never be able to detect an exoplanetor a galaxy at a high redshift.Imagine that you love Astronomy, try to see the Moon craters and Andromeda withyour small telescope through the light pollution of your city, and explain yourdaughter that Pluto is not a planet any longer. Imagine that you are a musician who, after a "cosmic fluke", give a talk justafter a Nobel laureate that discovered the cosmic microwave backgroundradiation.Such "cosmic flukes" sometimes happen. If you were not at the dinner of the SEA meeting and do not believe us, visithttp://www.myspace.com/antonioariasmultiverso or open the proceedings DVD andlisten "El ordenador simula el nacimiento de las estrella...".

  15. Academic Training: Gravitational Waves Astronomy

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 16, 17, 18 October from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Gravitational Waves Astronomy M. LANDRY, LIGO Hanford Observatory, Richland, USA Gravitational wave astronomy is expected to become an observational field within the next decade. First direct detection of gravitational waves is possible with existing terrestrial-based detectors, and highly probable with proposed upgrades. In this three-part lecture series, we give an overview of the field, including material on gravitional wave sources, detection methods, some details of interferometric detectors, data analysis methods, and current results from observational data-taking runs of the LIGO and GEO projects.ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern...

  16. Armenian Archaeoastronomy and Astronomy in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickaelian, Areg M.; Farmanyan, Sona V.

    2016-12-01

    A review is given on archaeoastronomy in Armenia and astronomical knowledge reflected in the Armenian culture. Astronomy in Armenia was popular since ancient times and Armenia is rich in its astronomical heritage, such as the names of the constellations, ancient observatories, Armenian rock art (numerous petroglyphs of astronomical content), ancient and medieval Armenian calendars, astronomical terms and names used in Armenian language since II-I millennia B.C., records of astronomical events by ancient Armenians (e.g. Halley's comet in 87 B.C., supernovae explosion in 1054), the astronomical heritage of the Armenian medieval great thinker Anania Shirakatsi's (612-685), medieval sky maps and astronomical devices by Ghukas (Luca) Vanandetsi (XVII-XVIII centuries) and Mkhitar Sebastatsi (1676-1749), etc. For systemization and further regular studies, we have created a webpage devoted to Armenian archaeoastronomical matters at Armenian Astronomical Society (ArAS) website. Issues on astronomy in culture include astronomy in ancient Armenian cultures, ethnoastronomy, astronomy in Armenian religion and mythology, astronomy and astrology, astronomy in folklore and poetry, astronomy in arts, astrolinguistics and astroheraldry. A similar webpage for Astronomy in Armenian Culture is being created at ArAS website and a permanent section "Archaeoastronomy and Astronomy in Culture" has been created in ArAS Electronic Newsletter. Several meetings on this topic have been organized in Armenia during 2007-2014, including the archaeoastronomical meetings in 2012 and 2014, and a number of books have been published. Several institutions are related to these studies coordinated by Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory (BAO) and researchers from the fields of astronomy, history, archaeology, literature, linguistics, etc. are involved.

  17. Gravitational wave astronomy - astronomy of the 21st century

    CERN Document Server

    Dhurandhar, S V

    2011-01-01

    An enigmatic prediction of Einstein's general theory of relativity is gravitational waves. With the observed decay in the orbit of the Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar agreeing within a fraction of a percent with the theoretically computed decay from Einstein's theory, the existence of gravitational waves was firmly established. Currently there is a worldwide effort to detect gravitational waves with interferometric gravitational wave observatories or detectors and several such detectors have been built or being built. The initial detectors have reached their design sensitivities and now the effort is on to construct advanced detectors which are expected to detect gravitational waves from astrophysical sources. The era of gravitational wave astronomy has arrived. This article describes the worldwide effort which includes the effort on the Indian front - the IndIGO project -, the principle underlying interferometric detectors both on ground and in space, the principal noise sources that plague such detectors, the as...

  18. Skynet Junior Scholars: From Idea to Enactment--Tales from the Trenches I. Implementation in 4-H settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnside, Jason; Feldman, Lynn; Gurton, Suzanne; Heatherly, Sue Ann; Hoette, Vivian L.; Murray, Jenny; Zastrow, Ginger

    2016-01-01

    The creators of Skynet Junior Scholars were ambitious to say the least when they set out to:- Develop online tools that enable middle school and high school aged youth to use robotic optical and radio telescopes to do astronomy- Create an inquiry-based curriculum that promotes critical thinking and scientific habits of mind- Proactively incorporate Principles of Universal Design in all SJS development tasks to ensure access by blind/low vision and deaf/hard of hearing youth- Prepare 180 adult youth leaders from diverse backgrounds including museum educators, amateur astronomers, teachers 4-H leaders to facilitate SJS activities in a variety of settings.After 3 years of development SJS is in full implementation mode. As of August, 2015, 105 youth leaders and leader supervisors from 24 states have completed professional development and many have formed SJS youth groups. In this paper we describe what it takes for a successful implementation of Skynet Junior Scholars in a 4-H setting, from the viewpoint of adult leaders in the trenches who have created novel implementation models to make SJS work in diverse environments from monthly 4-H meetings to immersive residential camps.4-H is the nation's largest positive youth development organization, with a membership of more than six million young people in the U.S. In 2003 the national organization formed a strong commitment to STEM education with the goal to "to engage one million new youth in a dynamic process of discovery and exploration in science, engineering and technology to prepare them to meet the challenges of the 21st century". Skynet Junior Scholars has formed a strong and growing partnership with state 4-H agencies in West Virginia and Wisconsin, with a goal of establishing SJS as a national 4-H curriculum.Skynet Junior Scholars is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Numbers 1223687, 1223235 and 1223345.

  19. Observers, Publications, and Surveys: Astronomy in the United States in 1849

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, Marc

    1999-01-01

    By the mid-19th century, astronomy in the United States was productive and growing. Information gathered by and at the behest of the Smithsonian Institution shows that the community consisted of approximately 50 individuals, including a significant number of military officers, and a dozen observatories. Americans were deeply involved in astronomical research, and the discipline was entrenched in the college curriculum. What the discipline lacked was an adequate publication vehicle to ensure refereed, rapid dissemination of observations.

  20. Kinesthetic Astronomy: Significant Upgrades to the Sky Time Lesson that Support Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, C. A.; Zawaski, M.

    2004-12-01

    This paper will report on a significant upgrade to the first in a series of innovative, experiential lessons we call Kinesthetic Astronomy. The Sky Time lesson reconnects students with the astronomical meaning of the day, year, and seasons. Like all Kinesthetic Astronomy lessons, it teaches basic astronomical concepts through choreographed bodily movements and positions that provide educational sensory experiences. They are intended for sixth graders up through adult learners in both formal and informal educational settings. They emphasize astronomical concepts and phenomenon that people can readily encounter in their "everyday" lives such as time, seasons, and sky motions of the Sun, Moon, stars, and planets. Kinesthetic Astronomy lesson plans are fully aligned with national science education standards, both in content and instructional practice. Our lessons offer a complete learning cycle with written assessment opportunities now embedded throughout the lesson. We have substantially strengthened the written assessment options for the Sky Time lesson to help students translate their kinesthetic and visual learning into the verbal-linguistic and mathematical-logical realms of expression. Field testing with non-science undergraduates, middle school science teachers and students, Junior Girl Scouts, museum education staff, and outdoor educators has been providing evidence that Kinesthetic Astronomy techniques allow learners to achieve a good grasp of concepts that are much more difficult to learn in more conventional ways such as via textbooks or even computer animation. Field testing of the Sky Time lesson has also led us to significant changes from the previous version to support student learning. We will report on the nature of these changes.

  1. Philippine Astronomy Convention 2009 Abstract: Program Offerings in Astronomy in the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, J. R. F.

    2009-03-01

    The formal academic programs in Astronomy of the Rizal Technological University are the first such programs in the Philippines. The Master of Science in Astronomy program is envisioned to provide the student with a wide range of knowledge in many areas of Astronomy, leaning towards the descriptive aspects of knowledge. The student will choose the field or research most suitable to his or her interests. Three of these researches done while enrolled in the program, and even researches completed before the student actually enrolled in the program, may be considered as his or her thesis. The program suits professionals in all persuasions who wish to study Astronomy either for professional advancement or plainly for the love of the science or for intellectual satisfaction. Non-science majors can enroll. In 2008, the RTU Graduate School decided to ladderize the MS program and the Graduate Diploma in Astronomy was designed. This program is suited for science educators, astronomy lecturers and entrepreneurs, members of astronomical societies, and plain astronomy enthusiasts who like to gain in-depth knowledge in the most important aspects of astronomy. A bachelor's degree in any field is required. The program can be finished in two semesters and one summer. If the student opts to continue in the MS in Astronomy program, all the courses he or she has earned in the Diploma will be credited. The Bachelor of Science in Astronomy Technology is an intensive baccalaureate degree program designed to prepare students to become future research scientists and technologists in the field of Astronomy. The BS in Astronomy Technology is a cross-fertilized program, integrating interrelated sciences, such as engineering, geology, remote sensing, physics, atmospheric and environmental science, biology and biochemistry, and even philosophy and entrepreneurship into the study. Thus, the B.S. in Astronomy Technology program gives the student excellent job opportunities in many fields.

  2. NASA Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors (AAA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backman, D. E.; Harman, P. K.; Clark, C.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors (AAA) is a three-part professional development (PD) program for high school physics and astronomy teachers. The AAA experience consists of: (1) blended-learning professional development composed of webinars, asynchronous content learning, and a series of hands-on workshops (2) a STEM immersion experience at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center's B703 science research aircraft facility in Palmdale, California, and (3) ongoing participation in the AAA community of practice (CoP) connecting participants with astrophysics and planetary science Subject Matter Experts (SMEs). The SETI Institute (SI) is partnering with school districts in Santa Clara and Los Angeles Counties during the AAA program's "incubation" period, calendar years 2016 through 2018. AAAs will be selected by the school districts based on criteria developed during spring 2016 focus group meetings led by the program's external evaluator, WestEd.. Teachers with 3+ years teaching experience who are assigned to teach at least 2 sections in any combination of the high school courses Physics (non-AP), Physics of the Universe (California integrated model), Astronomy, or Earth & Space Sciences are eligible. Partner districts will select at least 48 eligible applicants with SI oversight. WestEd will randomly assign selected AAAs to group A or group B. Group A will complete PD in January - June of 2017 and then participate in SOFIA science flights during fall 2017 (SOFIA Cycle 5). Group B will act as a control during the 2017-18 school year. Group B will then complete PD in January - June of 2018 and participate in SOFIA science flights in fall 2018 (Cycle 6). Under the current plan, opportunities for additional districts to seek AAA partnerships with SI will be offered in 2018 or 2019. A nominal two-week AAA curriculum component will be developed by SI for classroom delivery that will be aligned with selected California Draft Science Framework Disciplinary Core Ideas

  3. The York College observatory outreach program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglione, T.; Spergel, M.

    The primary mission of the York College Observatory Outreach Program is to im- prove minority participation in space science and space science education. We aim to achieve this goal by developing an urban observatory in central Queens: the York Col- lege Observatory (YCO). We concentrate our efforts in three main areas: academics, outreach and research. Academically, we utilize astronomy?s popular appeal to at- tract and retain students and to enhance existing science courses. We have also created a minor in Astronomy at York College, and are active members of the New York City Space Science Research Alliance, which has developed a City University major in Space Science. Our outreach efforts aim to increase the awareness of the general public through workshops for high school teachers, curriculum development for high schools and public open nights at the YCO. Our research program utilizes the radio and optical capabilities of the YCO and collaborations with other institutions.

  4. Music and Astronomy Under the Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowich, D.

    2008-11-01

    Bring telescope to where the people are! Music and Astronomy Under the Stars is a public astronomy outreach program at community parks during and after free summer music concerts and outdoor movie nights. This project also includes daytime activities because there are some afternoon concerts and daylight children's concerts, and observations using remotely operated telescopes in cloudy weather. While there have been many astronomy outreach activities and telescope observations at city sidewalks and parks, this program targets a completely different audience---music lovers who are attending free summer concerts held in community parks. The music lovers who may never have visited a science museum, planetarium, or star party will be exposed to telescope observations and astronomy information with no additional travel costs. This program will permit the entire community to participate in telescope observations and view astronomical video information to enhance the public appreciation of astronomy. This program will also reach underrepresented and underserved groups (women, minorities, older adults). The population base for the initial target audience (Nassau and Suffolk Counties, New York) is 2,500,000. My partners are the Amateur Observers' Society of New York (AOS) and the Towns of Oyster Bay, Hempstead, North Hempstead, and Huntington. Music and Astronomy Under the Stars is program that should continue beyond the International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) and can be expanded into a national program.

  5. Interactive Materials In The Teaching Of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macêdo, J. A.; Voelzke, M. R.

    2014-10-01

    This study presents results of a survey conducted at the Federal Institution of Education, Science and Technology in the North of Minas Gerais (IFNMG), and aimed to investigate the potentialities of the use of interactive materials in the teaching of astronomy. An advanced training course with involved learning activities about basic concepts of astronomy was offered to thirty-two Licenciate students in Physics, Mathematics and Biological Science. The following steps were to be taken: i) analysis of the pedagogical projects (PPC) of the licenciates at the IFNMG, research locus of its Campus Januária; ii) analysis of students' preconceptions about astronomy and digital technologies, identified by the application of an initial questionnaire; iii) preparation of the course taking into account the students' previous knowledge; iv) application of the education proposal developed under part-time presence modality, using various interactive tools; v) application and analysis of the final questionnaire. The test was conducted with the qualitative and quantitative methodology, combined with a content analysis. The results indicated that in the IFNMG only the licenciate-course in physics includes astronomy content diluted in various subjects of the curriculum; the rates of students prior knowledge in relation to astronomy was low; an evidence of meaningful learning of the concepts related to astronomy, and of viability of resource use involving digital technologies in the Teaching of astronomy, which may contribute to the broadening of methodological options of future teachers and meet their training needs.

  6. Solar Eclipses and the International Year of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    2009-05-01

    Solar eclipses capture the attention of millions of people in the countries from which they are visible and provide a major opportunity for public education, in addition to the scientific research and student training that they provide. The 2009 International Year of Astronomy began with an annular eclipse visible from Indonesia on 26 January, with partial phases visible also in other parts of southeast Asia. On 22 July, a major and unusually long total solar eclipse will begin at dawn in India and travel across China, with almost six minutes of totality visible near Shanghai and somewhat more visible from Japanese islands and from ships at sea in the Pacific. Partial phases will be visible from most of eastern Asia, from mid-Sumatra and Borneo northward to mid-Siberia. Eclipse activities include many scientific expeditions and much ecotourism to Shanghai, Hangzhou, and vicinity. My review article on "Eclipses as an Astrophysical Laboratory" will appear in Nature as part of their IYA coverage. Our planetarium presented teacher workshops and we made a film about solar research. Several new books about the corona or eclipses are appearing or have appeared. Many articles are appearing in astronomy magazines and other outlets. Eclipse interviews are appearing on the Planetary Society's podcast "365 Days of Astronomy" and on National Geographic Radio. Information about the eclipse and safe observation of the partial phases are available at http://www.eclipses.info, the Website of the International Astronomical Union's Working Group on Solar Eclipses and of its Program Group on Public Education at the Times of Eclipses of its Commission on Education and Development. The Williams College Expedition to the 2009 Eclipse in the mountains near Hangzhou, China, is supported in part by a grant from the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society. E/PO workshops were supported by NASA.

  7. Teaching Astronomy using a Flipped Classroom Model of Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Matthew; Impey, Chris D.; Rivera Chavez, Wendy

    2014-11-01

    Astronomy: State of the Art is a MOOC specifically developed to study student participation in an online learning environment. The project aims to serve multiple audiences of learners. For this project we focused on college students who use the online environment for lectures and quizzes but whose classroom time is devoted to hands-on activities and group work; this is the “flipped classroom” model.In spring 2014, Astronomy: State of the Art was co-convened with “The Physical Universe,” a Natural Sciences course taught at the University of Arizona that satisfies a General Education requirement for non-science majors. Using the same core material as Astronomy - State of the Art (with additional modules on the physics of radiation, atomic structure, energy, and gravity that are not necessary for the informal learners), the local course employed a “flipped” model where the students access lectures and podcasts online but are in a face-to-face classroom two times a week for labs and hands-on activities, lecture tutorials, group discussions, and other research-validated tools for enhancing learning. A flipped or hybrid model gives students flexibility, uses the online medium for the aspects of instruction where interaction with an instructor isn’t required, and optimizes the scarce resource of time in a large classroom.Final student grades were closely related to their attendance, however, performance in this class was not correlated with completion of the online video lectures, even though the quizzes were closely tied to the content of these videos. The course will next be taught using Coursera which allow instructors to more closely examine the relationship between students use of course materials and understanding of course topics. The eventual goal is to recruit undergraduates from anywhere in the United States and award them transferrable credit for completing the class.

  8. Discovering Astronomy: An Astro 101 e-book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawl, Stephen J.; Byrd, Gene; Deustua, Susana E.; LoPresto, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Discovering Astronomy, now available in its 6th edition as an eText, has many advantages and features for your students. We have partnered with etextink.com and WebAssign.net to produce an affordable set of cost-saving options for your students. Also available is the Discovering Astronomy Activity Manual, which provides students with an active-learning experience.Our etext is device independent and thus accessible through any web browser. Americans with Disabilities Act compatibility provides access for all students. Hotlinks to outside sites provide further information for interested students. Lecture demonstration videos of important concepts, made specifically for this new edition, are embedded within the text as appropriate. Students can highlight text, take notes, and bookmark locations within the text. Important terms are linked to the glossary. Search capabilities allow students to easily find what they want.Instructors can interact with their students directly through the etext once the class roster has been provided. For example, instructors can embed assignments into their students' etext and add their own notes and updates, which are immediately visible to their students.Updates can be quickly made by us as new findings become available. For example, updates from New Horizons were added at the time of the closest approach to Pluto, and an update on the recent announcement of current water on Mars was added the day of the announcement.We will present results of our own experience with college and high school students' use of Discovering Astronomy in online courses.Details of the book, a sample chapter, and other information are available at discoveringastronomy.weebly.com.

  9. Using Virtual Astronomical Observatory Tools for Astronomy 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mighell, Kenneth J.; Garmany, K.; Larson, K.; Eastwood, K. D.

    2009-01-01

    The Virtual Observatory provides several tools that are useful for educators. With these tools, instructors can easily provide real data to students in an environment that engages student curiosity and builds student understanding. In this poster we demonstrate how the tools Aladin and TOPCAT can be used to enhance astronomy education. The Aladin Sky Atlas is a Virtual Observatory portal from the CDS that displays images, superimposes catalogs, and provides interactive access to data. For illustration, we show an exercise for non-science majors in a college-level astronomy course that introduces students to the HR diagram of star clusters. After launching the pre-loaded Aladin applet, students select their own stars, connecting visual cues of brightness and color to the conceptual meaning behind a quantitative HR diagram. TOPCAT can be linked with Aladin on the desktop to let students analyze their data, perform calculations, and create professional-quality graphs. The basic exercise can be easily expanded to address other learning objectives and provides a launching point for students to access, visualize, and explore multi-wavelength data as they continue in astronomy. As a second example, we show an exercise that uses TOPCAT to do three-dimensional plotting of the positions of open and globular cluster to illustrate galactic structure. Detailed information is available at the following website: http://www.noao.edu/staff/mighell/nvoss2008/ . This research was done at the 2008 U.S. National Virtual Observatory Summer School which was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 3 - 11, 2008 and was sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

  10. Women's and Men's Career Choices in Astronomy and Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivie, Rachel; White, Susan; Chu, Raymond Y.

    2016-01-01

    The Longitudinal Study of Astronomy Graduate Students (LSAGS) arose from the 2003 Women in Astronomy Conference, where it was noted that a majority of young members of the American Astronomical Society were women. The astronomy community wishes to make every effort to retain young women in astronomy, so they commissioned a longitudinal study to be…

  11. Astronomy for teachers: A South African Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Witt, Aletha; West, Marion; Leeuw, Lerothodi; Gouws, Eldrie

    2015-08-01

    South Africa has nominated Astronomy as a “flagship science” and aims to be an international Astronomy hub through projects such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and the South African Large Telescope (SALT). These projects open up career opportunities in maths, science and engineering and therefore offers a very real door for learners to enter into careers in science and technology through Astronomy. However, the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Survey (TIMSS), the Global Competitiveness Report (GCR) and Annual National Assessment (ANA) have highlighted that South Africa’s Science and Mathematics education is in a critical condition and that South African learners score amongst the worst in the world in both these subjects. In South Africa Astronomy is generally regarded as the worst taught and most avoided Natural Science knowledge strand, and most teachers that specialised in Natural Sciences, never covered Astronomy in their training.In order to address these issues a collaborative project between the University of South Africa (UNISA) and the Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO) was initiated, which aims to assist teachers to gain more knowledge and skills so that they can teach Astronomy with confidence. By collaborating we aim to ensure that the level of astronomy development will be raised in both South Africa and the rest of Africa.With the focus on Teaching and Learning, the research was conducted within a quantitative paradigm and 600 structured questionnaires were administered to Natural Science teachers in Public primary schools in Gauteng, South Africa. This paper reports the findings of this research and makes recommendations on how to assist teachers to teach Astronomy with confidence.

  12. Organizations and Strategies in Astronomy, Volume 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, André

    2004-10-01

    This book is the fifth volume under the title Organizations and Strategies in Astronomy (OSA). These OSA Books are intended to cover a large range of fields and themes. In practice, one could say that all aspects of astronomy-related life and environment are considered in the spirit of sharing specific expertise and lessons learned. This book offers a unique collection of chapters dealing with socio-dynamical aspects of the astronomy (and related space sciences) community: characteristics of organizations, strategies for development, operational techniques, observing practicalities, educational policies, public outreach, publication studies, research communication, evaluation procedures, research indicators, national specificities, contemporary history, and so on. The experts contributing to this book have done their best to write in a way understandable to readers not necessarily hyperspecialized in astronomy while providing specific detailed information and sometimes enlightening ‘lessons learned’ sections. The book concludes with an updated bibliography of publications related to socio-astronomy and to the interactions of the astronomy community with the society at large. This book will be most usefully read by researchers, teachers, editors, publishers, librarians, sociologists of science, research planners and strategists, project managers, public-relations officers, plus those in charge of astronomy-related organizations, as well as by students aiming at a career in astronomy or related space science. The book includes a CD-ROM containing the visionary and fascinating work of L. Pešek as a space artist. "More than anything else, Organizations and Strategies in Astronomy is about change, recording where we've been and how we have evolved, and extrapolating to where we will be in the coming decades." Caty Pilachowski, outgoing President of the AAS

  13. Astronomy in the Digital Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisch, Bernard M.; Lindblom, J.; Terzian, Y.

    2006-12-01

    The Digital Universe is an Internet project whose mission is to provide free, accurate, unbiased information covering all aspects of human knowledge, and to inspire humans to learn, make use of, and expand this knowledge. It is planned to be a decades long effort, inspired by the Encyclopedia Galactica concept popularized by Carl Sagan, and is being developed by the non-profit Digital Universe Foundation. A worldwide network of experts is responsible for selecting content featured within the Digital Universe. The first publicly available content is the Encyclopedia of Earth, a Boston University project headed by Prof. Cutler Cleveland, which will be part of the Earth Portal. The second major content area will be an analogous Encyclopedia of the Cosmos to be part of the Cosmos Portal. It is anticipated that this will evolve into a major resource for astronomy education. Authors and topic editors are now being recruited for the Encyclopedia of the Cosmos.

  14. Academic Training: Astronomy from Space

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 14, 15, 16, 18 March from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Astronomy from Space by T. Courvoisier / Observatoire de Genève In the very wide field of High Energy astrophysics we will select a number of topics that range from the source of radiative energy in the deep potential well around Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes and the basics of accretion disks around compact objects to the description and (where possible) the understanding of binary systems including a compact object (neutron star or black hole), of Active Galactic Nuclei and of gamma ray bursts. The approach that is chosen aims at giving an understanding of the most important phenomenologies encountered in high energy astrophysics rather than a detailed knowledge of one specific topic. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  15. Random time series in Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Vaughan, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Progress in astronomy comes from interpreting the signals encoded in the light received from distant objects: the distribution of light over the sky (images), over photon wavelength (spectrum), over polarization angle, and over time (usually called light curves by astronomers). In the time domain we see transient events such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and other powerful explosions; we see periodic phenomena such as the orbits of planets around nearby stars, radio pulsars, and pulsations of stars in nearby galaxies; and persistent aperiodic variations (`noise') from powerful systems like accreting black holes. I review just a few of the recent and future challenges in the burgeoning area of Time Domain Astrophysics, with particular attention to persistently variable sources, the recovery of reliable noise power spectra from sparsely sampled time series, higher-order properties of accreting black holes, and time delays and correlations in multivariate time series.

  16. Astronomy and international science diplomacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Claus

    2015-08-01

    Since WW2, science has played an important, if sometimes overlooked, role in international relations and international diplomacy. The founding of CERN in 1954 and the more recent establishment of SESAME as a major research infrastructure in the Middle East are examples of this. The IAU has played its own role in the field of science diplomacy ranging from quietly fostering interaction between the antagonists of the Cold War period to the world-uniting initiative of the International Year of Astronomy. Beyond the IAU, yet still with clear links to it, we have seen ESO as an example as well as the more recent one of SKA as a vehicle for development and for strengthening international relations.

  17. Photonic Astronomy and Quantum Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Dravins, Dainis

    2015-01-01

    Quantum optics potentially offers an information channel from the Universe beyond the established ones of imaging and spectroscopy. All existing cameras and all spectrometers measure aspects of the first-order spatial and/or temporal coherence of light. However, light has additional degrees of freedom, manifest in the statistics of photon arrival times, or in the amount of photon orbital angular momentum. Such quantum-optical measures may carry information on how the light was created at the source, and whether it reached the observer directly or via some intermediate process. Astronomical quantum optics may help to clarify emission processes in natural laser sources and in the environments of compact objects, while high-speed photon-counting with digital signal handling enables multi-element and long-baseline versions of the intensity interferometer. Time resolutions of nanoseconds are required, as are large photon fluxes, making photonic astronomy very timely in an era of large telescopes.

  18. Linear regression in astronomy. I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Takashi; Feigelson, Eric D.; Akritas, Michael G.; Babu, Gutti Jogesh

    1990-01-01

    Five methods for obtaining linear regression fits to bivariate data with unknown or insignificant measurement errors are discussed: ordinary least-squares (OLS) regression of Y on X, OLS regression of X on Y, the bisector of the two OLS lines, orthogonal regression, and 'reduced major-axis' regression. These methods have been used by various researchers in observational astronomy, most importantly in cosmic distance scale applications. Formulas for calculating the slope and intercept coefficients and their uncertainties are given for all the methods, including a new general form of the OLS variance estimates. The accuracy of the formulas was confirmed using numerical simulations. The applicability of the procedures is discussed with respect to their mathematical properties, the nature of the astronomical data under consideration, and the scientific purpose of the regression. It is found that, for problems needing symmetrical treatment of the variables, the OLS bisector performs significantly better than orthogonal or reduced major-axis regression.

  19. Linear regression in astronomy. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Babu, Gutti J.

    1992-01-01

    A wide variety of least-squares linear regression procedures used in observational astronomy, particularly investigations of the cosmic distance scale, are presented and discussed. The classes of linear models considered are (1) unweighted regression lines, with bootstrap and jackknife resampling; (2) regression solutions when measurement error, in one or both variables, dominates the scatter; (3) methods to apply a calibration line to new data; (4) truncated regression models, which apply to flux-limited data sets; and (5) censored regression models, which apply when nondetections are present. For the calibration problem we develop two new procedures: a formula for the intercept offset between two parallel data sets, which propagates slope errors from one regression to the other; and a generalization of the Working-Hotelling confidence bands to nonstandard least-squares lines. They can provide improved error analysis for Faber-Jackson, Tully-Fisher, and similar cosmic distance scale relations.

  20. Random time series in astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Simon

    2013-02-13

    Progress in astronomy comes from interpreting the signals encoded in the light received from distant objects: the distribution of light over the sky (images), over photon wavelength (spectrum), over polarization angle and over time (usually called light curves by astronomers). In the time domain, we see transient events such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts and other powerful explosions; we see periodic phenomena such as the orbits of planets around nearby stars, radio pulsars and pulsations of stars in nearby galaxies; and we see persistent aperiodic variations ('noise') from powerful systems such as accreting black holes. I review just a few of the recent and future challenges in the burgeoning area of time domain astrophysics, with particular attention to persistently variable sources, the recovery of reliable noise power spectra from sparsely sampled time series, higher order properties of accreting black holes, and time delays and correlations in multi-variate time series.