WorldWideScience

Sample records for junction regulates helicase

  1. Combinatorial regulation of meiotic holliday junction resolution in C. elegans by HIM-6 (BLM helicase, SLX-4, and the SLX-1, MUS-81 and XPF-1 nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Agostinho

    Full Text Available Holliday junctions (HJs are cruciform DNA structures that are created during recombination events. It is a matter of considerable importance to determine the resolvase(s that promote resolution of these structures. We previously reported that C. elegans GEN-1 is a symmetrically cleaving HJ resolving enzyme required for recombinational repair, but we could not find an overt role in meiotic recombination. Here we identify C. elegans proteins involved in resolving meiotic HJs. We found no evidence for a redundant meiotic function of GEN-1. In contrast, we discovered two redundant HJ resolution pathways likely coordinated by the SLX-4 scaffold protein and also involving the HIM-6/BLM helicase. SLX-4 associates with the SLX-1, MUS-81 and XPF-1 nucleases and has been implicated in meiotic recombination in C. elegans. We found that C. elegans [mus-81; xpf-1], [slx-1; xpf-1], [mus-81; him-6] and [slx-1; him-6] double mutants showed a similar reduction in survival rates as slx-4. Analysis of meiotic diakinesis chromosomes revealed a distinct phenotype in these double mutants. Instead of wild-type bivalent chromosomes, pairs of "univalents" linked by chromatin bridges occur. These linkages depend on the conserved meiosis-specific transesterase SPO-11 and can be restored by ionizing radiation, suggesting that they represent unresolved meiotic HJs. This suggests the existence of two major resolvase activities, one provided by XPF-1 and HIM-6, the other by SLX-1 and MUS-81. In all double mutants crossover (CO recombination is reduced but not abolished, indicative of further redundancy in meiotic HJ resolution. Real time imaging revealed extensive chromatin bridges during the first meiotic division that appear to be eventually resolved in meiosis II, suggesting back-up resolution activities acting at or after anaphase I. We also show that in HJ resolution mutants, the restructuring of chromosome arms distal and proximal to the CO still occurs, suggesting that

  2. Combinatorial regulation of meiotic holliday junction resolution in C. elegans by HIM-6 (BLM) helicase, SLX-4, and the SLX-1, MUS-81 and XPF-1 nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinho, Ana; Meier, Bettina; Sonneville, Remi; Jagut, Marlène; Woglar, Alexander; Blow, Julian; Jantsch, Verena; Gartner, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Holliday junctions (HJs) are cruciform DNA structures that are created during recombination events. It is a matter of considerable importance to determine the resolvase(s) that promote resolution of these structures. We previously reported that C. elegans GEN-1 is a symmetrically cleaving HJ resolving enzyme required for recombinational repair, but we could not find an overt role in meiotic recombination. Here we identify C. elegans proteins involved in resolving meiotic HJs. We found no evidence for a redundant meiotic function of GEN-1. In contrast, we discovered two redundant HJ resolution pathways likely coordinated by the SLX-4 scaffold protein and also involving the HIM-6/BLM helicase. SLX-4 associates with the SLX-1, MUS-81 and XPF-1 nucleases and has been implicated in meiotic recombination in C. elegans. We found that C. elegans [mus-81; xpf-1], [slx-1; xpf-1], [mus-81; him-6] and [slx-1; him-6] double mutants showed a similar reduction in survival rates as slx-4. Analysis of meiotic diakinesis chromosomes revealed a distinct phenotype in these double mutants. Instead of wild-type bivalent chromosomes, pairs of "univalents" linked by chromatin bridges occur. These linkages depend on the conserved meiosis-specific transesterase SPO-11 and can be restored by ionizing radiation, suggesting that they represent unresolved meiotic HJs. This suggests the existence of two major resolvase activities, one provided by XPF-1 and HIM-6, the other by SLX-1 and MUS-81. In all double mutants crossover (CO) recombination is reduced but not abolished, indicative of further redundancy in meiotic HJ resolution. Real time imaging revealed extensive chromatin bridges during the first meiotic division that appear to be eventually resolved in meiosis II, suggesting back-up resolution activities acting at or after anaphase I. We also show that in HJ resolution mutants, the restructuring of chromosome arms distal and proximal to the CO still occurs, suggesting that CO initiation

  3. Dissection of the functional domains of an archaeal holliday junction helicase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Ye; Chu, Mingzhu; Li, Yansheng

    2012-01-01

    Helicases and nucleases form complexes that play very important roles in DNA repair pathways some of which interact with each other at Holliday junctions. In this study, we present in vitro and in vivo analysis of Hjm and its interaction with Hjc in Sulfolobus. In vitro studies employed Hjm from ...

  4. Helicase and Polymerase Move Together Close to the Fork Junction and Copy DNA in One-Nucleotide Steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjula Pandey

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available By simultaneously measuring DNA synthesis and dNTP hydrolysis, we show that T7 DNA polymerase and T7 gp4 helicase move in sync during leading-strand synthesis, taking one-nucleotide steps and hydrolyzing one dNTP per base-pair unwound/copied. The cooperative catalysis enables the helicase and polymerase to move at a uniformly fast rate without guanine:cytosine (GC dependency or idling with futile NTP hydrolysis. We show that the helicase and polymerase are located close to the replication fork junction. This architecture enables the polymerase to use its strand-displacement synthesis to increase the unwinding rate, whereas the helicase aids this process by translocating along single-stranded DNA and trapping the unwound bases. Thus, in contrast to the helicase-only unwinding model, our results suggest a model in which the helicase and polymerase are moving in one-nucleotide steps, DNA synthesis drives fork unwinding, and a role of the helicase is to trap the unwound bases and prevent DNA reannealing.

  5. Sgs1 regulates gene conversion tract lengths and crossovers independently of its helicase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yi-Chen; Paffett, Kimberly S; Amit, Or; Clikeman, Jennifer A; Sterk, Rosa; Brenneman, Mark A; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2006-06-01

    RecQ helicases maintain genome stability and suppress tumors in higher eukaryotes through roles in replication and DNA repair. The yeast RecQ homolog Sgs1 interacts with Top3 topoisomerase and Rmi1. In vitro, Sgs1 binds to and branch migrates Holliday junctions (HJs) and the human RecQ homolog BLM, with Top3alpha, resolves synthetic double HJs in a noncrossover sense. Sgs1 suppresses crossovers during the homologous recombination (HR) repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Crossovers are associated with long gene conversion tracts, suggesting a model in which Sgs1 helicase catalyzes reverse branch migration and convergence of double HJs for noncrossover resolution by Top3. Consistent with this model, we show that allelic crossovers and gene conversion tract lengths are increased in sgs1Delta. However, crossover and tract length suppression was independent of Sgs1 helicase activity, which argues against helicase-dependent HJ convergence. HJs may converge passively by a "random walk," and Sgs1 may play a structural role in stimulating Top3-dependent resolution. In addition to the new helicase-independent functions for Sgs1 in crossover and tract length control, we define three new helicase-dependent functions, including the suppression of chromosome loss, chromosome missegregation, and synthetic lethality in srs2Delta. We propose that Sgs1 has helicase-dependent functions in replication and helicase-independent functions in DSB repair by HR.

  6. Telomeric protein TRF2 protects Holliday junctions with telomeric arms from displacement by the Werner syndrome helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nora, Gerald J; Buncher, Noah A; Opresko, Patricia L

    2010-07-01

    WRN protein loss causes Werner syndrome (WS), which is characterized by premature aging as well as genomic and telomeric instability. WRN prevents telomere loss, but the telomeric protein complex must regulate WRN activities to prevent aberrant telomere processing. Telomere-binding TRF2 protein inhibits telomere t-loop deletion by blocking Holliday junction (HJ) resolvase cleavage activity, but whether TRF2 also modulates HJ displacement at t-loops is unknown. In this study, we used multiplex fluorophore imaging to track the fate of individual strands of HJ substrates. We report the novel finding that TRF2 inhibits WRN helicase strand displacement of HJs with telomeric repeats in duplex arms, but unwinding of HJs with a telomeric center or lacking telomeric sequence is unaffected. These data, together with results using TRF2 fragments and TRF2 HJ binding assays, indicate that both the TRF2 B- and Myb domains are required to inhibit WRN HJ activity. We propose a novel model whereby simultaneous binding of the TRF2 B-domain to the HJ core and the Myb domain to telomeric arms promote and stabilize HJs in a stacked arm conformation that is unfavorable for unwinding. Our biochemical study provides a mechanistic basis for the cellular findings that TRF2 regulates WRN activity at telomeres.

  7. Regulation of DEAH/RHA Helicases by G-Patch Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Robert-Paganin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA helicases from the DEAH/RHA family are present in all the processes of RNA metabolism. The function of two helicases from this family, Prp2 and Prp43, is regulated by protein partners containing a G-patch domain. The G-patch is a glycine-rich domain discovered by sequence alignment, involved in protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interaction. Although it has been shown to stimulate the helicase’s enzymatic activities, the precise role of the G-patch domain remains unclear. The role of G-patch proteins in the regulation of Prp43 activity has been studied in the two biological processes in which it is involved: splicing and ribosome biogenesis. Depending on the pathway, the activity of Prp43 is modulated by different G-patch proteins. A particular feature of the structure of DEAH/RHA helicases revealed by the Prp43 structure is the OB-fold domain in C-terminal part. The OB-fold has been shown to be a platform responsible for the interaction with G-patch proteins and RNA. Though there is still no structural data on the G-patch domain, in the current model, the interaction between the helicase, the G-patch protein, and RNA leads to a cooperative binding of RNA and conformational changes of the helicase.

  8. Holliday junction trap shows how cells use recombination and a junction-guardian role of RecQ helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Chen, Li-Tzu; Mei, Qian; Ma, Chien-Hui; Halliday, Jennifer A; Lin, Hsin-Yu; Magnan, David; Pribis, John P; Fitzgerald, Devon M; Hamilton, Holly M; Richters, Megan; Nehring, Ralf B; Shen, Xi; Li, Lei; Bates, David; Hastings, P J; Herman, Christophe; Jayaram, Makkuni; Rosenberg, Susan M

    2016-11-01

    DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) underpins cell survival and fuels genome instability, cancer, and evolution. However, the main kinds and sources of DNA damage repaired by HR in somatic cells and the roles of important HR proteins remain elusive. We present engineered proteins that trap, map, and quantify Holliday junctions (HJs), a central DNA intermediate in HR, based on catalytically deficient mutant RuvC protein of Escherichia coli. We use RuvCDefGFP (RDG) to map genomic footprints of HR at defined DNA breaks in E. coli and demonstrate genome-scale directionality of double-strand break (DSB) repair along the chromosome. Unexpectedly, most spontaneous HR-HJ foci are instigated, not by DSBs, but rather by single-stranded DNA damage generated by replication. We show that RecQ, the E. coli ortholog of five human cancer proteins, nonredundantly promotes HR-HJ formation in single cells and, in a novel junction-guardian role, also prevents apparent non-HR-HJs promoted by RecA overproduction. We propose that one or more human RecQ orthologs may act similarly in human cancers overexpressing the RecA ortholog RAD51 and find that cancer genome expression data implicate the orthologs BLM and RECQL4 in conjunction with EME1 and GEN1 as probable HJ reducers in such cancers. Our results support RecA-overproducing E. coli as a model of the many human tumors with up-regulated RAD51 and provide the first glimpses of important, previously elusive reaction intermediates in DNA replication and repair in single living cells.

  9. RNA helicase Belle/DDX3 regulates transgene expression in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Pang-Kuo; Huang, Yi-Chun; Poulton, John S; Leake, Nicholas; Palmer, William H; Vera, Daniel; Xie, Gengqiang; Klusza, Stephen; Deng, Wu-Min

    2016-04-01

    Belle (Bel), the Drosophila homolog of the yeast DEAD-box RNA helicase DED1 and human DDX3, has been shown to be required for oogenesis and female fertility. Here we report a novel role of Bel in regulating the expression of transgenes. Abrogation of Bel by mutations or RNAi induces silencing of a variety of P-element-derived transgenes. This silencing effect depends on downregulation of their RNA levels. Our genetic studies have revealed that the RNA helicase Spindle-E (Spn-E), a nuage RNA helicase that plays a crucial role in regulating RNA processing and PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA) biogenesis in germline cells, is required for loss-of-bel-induced transgene silencing. Conversely, Bel abrogation alleviates the nuage-protein mislocalization phenotype in spn-E mutants, suggesting a competitive relationship between these two RNA helicases. Additionally, disruption of the chromatin remodeling factor Mod(mdg4) or the microRNA biogenesis enzyme Dicer-1 (Dcr-1) also alleviates the transgene-silencing phenotypes in bel mutants, suggesting the involvement of chromatin remodeling and microRNA biogenesis in loss-of-bel-induced transgene silencing. Finally we show that genetic inhibition of Bel function leads to de novo generation of piRNAs from the transgene region inserted in the genome, suggesting a potential piRNA-dependent mechanism that may mediate transgene silencing as Bel function is inhibited.

  10. Multiple functions of DDX3 RNA helicase in gene regulation, tumorigenesis, and viral infection

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 is a multifunctional protein involved in all aspects of RNA metabolism, including transcription, splicing, mRNA nuclear export, translation, RNA decay and ribosome biogenesis. In addition, DDX3 is also implicated in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, Wnt-β-catenin signaling, tumorigenesis, and viral infection. Notably, recent studies suggest that DDX3 is a component of anti-viral innate immune signaling pathways. Indeed, DDX3 contributes to enhance the induction ...

  11. Topoisomerase IIIalpha and Bloom's helicase can resolve a mobile double Holliday junction substrate through convergent branch migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Jody L; Wu, Jianhong; Hsieh, Tao-Shih

    2006-07-25

    It has long been suspected that a double Holliday junction (dHJ) could be resolved by a topoisomerase partnered with a helicase by convergent branch migration of the HJs. Genetic analysis of yeast TOP3 and SGS1 has lent considerable evidence to the notion that the protein products of these genes are involved in just such a process, although biochemical analysis of the metabolism of a dHJ has been hindered by the lack of a substrate that adequately replicates the endogenous structure. We have synthesized a dHJ substrate that recapitulates many of the features of an endogenous dHJ and represents a much earlier intermediate in the resolution pathway. Here, we show that Drosophila topoisomerase IIIalpha (Topo IIIalpha) and Blm (a homolog of Sgs1) are capable of resolving this substrate to non-cross-over products and that this activity is stimulated by replication protein A (RPA). We investigated the ability of other Drosophila topoisomerases to perform this reaction in concert with Blm and RPA and discovered that this resolution activity is unique to Topo IIIalpha. Examination of the mechanism of resolution reveals that Topo IIIalpha, Blm, and RPA resolve this substrate by convergent migration of the two HJs toward each other, collapsing the dHJ. This mechanism stands in contrast to classic resolvase activities that use a structure-specific endonuclease to cleave the HJs.

  12. Topoisomerase IIIα and Bloom’s helicase can resolve a mobile double Holliday junction substrate through convergent branch migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Jody L.; Wu, Jianhong; Hsieh, Tao-shih

    2006-01-01

    It has long been suspected that a double Holliday junction (dHJ) could be resolved by a topoisomerase partnered with a helicase by convergent branch migration of the HJs. Genetic analysis of yeast TOP3 and SGS1 has lent considerable evidence to the notion that the protein products of these genes are involved in just such a process, although biochemical analysis of the metabolism of a dHJ has been hindered by the lack of a substrate that adequately replicates the endogenous structure. We have synthesized a dHJ substrate that recapitulates many of the features of an endogenous dHJ and represents a much earlier intermediate in the resolution pathway. Here, we show that Drosophila topoisomerase IIIα (Topo IIIα) and Blm (a homolog of Sgs1) are capable of resolving this substrate to non-cross-over products and that this activity is stimulated by replication protein A (RPA). We investigated the ability of other Drosophila topoisomerases to perform this reaction in concert with Blm and RPA and discovered that this resolution activity is unique to Topo IIIα. Examination of the mechanism of resolution reveals that Topo IIIα, Blm, and RPA resolve this substrate by convergent migration of the two HJs toward each other, collapsing the dHJ. This mechanism stands in contrast to classic resolvase activities that use a structure-specific endonuclease to cleave the HJs. PMID:16849422

  13. Allosteric regulation of helicase core activities of the DEAD-box helicase YxiN by RNA binding to its RNA recognition motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samatanga, Brighton; Andreou, Alexandra Z; Klostermeier, Dagmar

    2017-01-23

    DEAD-box proteins share a structurally similar core of two RecA-like domains (RecA_N and RecA_C) that contain the conserved motifs for ATP-dependent RNA unwinding. In many DEAD-box proteins the helicase core is flanked by ancillary domains. To understand the regulation of the DEAD-box helicase YxiN by its C-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM), we investigated the effect of RNA binding to the RRM on its position relative to the core, and on core activities. RRM/RNA complex formation substantially shifts the RRM from a position close to the RecA_C to the proximity of RecA_N, independent of RNA contacts with the core. RNA binding to the RRM is communicated to the core, and stimulates ATP hydrolysis and RNA unwinding. The conformational space of the core depends on the identity of the RRM-bound RNA. Allosteric regulation of core activities by RNA-induced movement of ancillary domains may constitute a general regulatory mechanism of DEAD-box protein activity.

  14. Translational control by the DEAD Box RNA helicase belle regulates ecdysone-triggered transcriptional cascades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Ihry

    Full Text Available Steroid hormones act, through their respective nuclear receptors, to regulate target gene expression. Despite their critical role in development, physiology, and disease, however, it is still unclear how these systemic cues are refined into tissue-specific responses. We identified a mutation in the evolutionarily conserved DEAD box RNA helicase belle/DDX3 that disrupts a subset of responses to the steroid hormone ecdysone during Drosophila melanogaster metamorphosis. We demonstrate that belle directly regulates translation of E74A, an ets transcription factor and critical component of the ecdysone-induced transcriptional cascade. Although E74A mRNA accumulates to abnormally high levels in belle mutant tissues, no E74A protein is detectable, resulting in misregulation of E74A-dependent ecdysone response genes. The accumulation of E74A mRNA in belle mutant salivary glands is a result of auto-regulation, fulfilling a prediction made by Ashburner nearly 40 years ago. In this model, Ashburner postulates that, in addition to regulating secondary response genes, protein products of primary response genes like E74A also inhibit their own ecdysone-induced transcription. Moreover, although ecdysone-triggered transcription of E74A appears to be ubiquitous during metamorphosis, belle-dependent translation of E74A mRNA is spatially restricted. These results demonstrate that translational control plays a critical, and previously unknown, role in refining transcriptional responses to the steroid hormone ecdysone.

  15. Translational control by the DEAD Box RNA helicase belle regulates ecdysone-triggered transcriptional cascades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Ihry

    Full Text Available Steroid hormones act, through their respective nuclear receptors, to regulate target gene expression. Despite their critical role in development, physiology, and disease, however, it is still unclear how these systemic cues are refined into tissue-specific responses. We identified a mutation in the evolutionarily conserved DEAD box RNA helicase belle/DDX3 that disrupts a subset of responses to the steroid hormone ecdysone during Drosophila melanogaster metamorphosis. We demonstrate that belle directly regulates translation of E74A, an ets transcription factor and critical component of the ecdysone-induced transcriptional cascade. Although E74A mRNA accumulates to abnormally high levels in belle mutant tissues, no E74A protein is detectable, resulting in misregulation of E74A-dependent ecdysone response genes. The accumulation of E74A mRNA in belle mutant salivary glands is a result of auto-regulation, fulfilling a prediction made by Ashburner nearly 40 years ago. In this model, Ashburner postulates that, in addition to regulating secondary response genes, protein products of primary response genes like E74A also inhibit their own ecdysone-induced transcription. Moreover, although ecdysone-triggered transcription of E74A appears to be ubiquitous during metamorphosis, belle-dependent translation of E74A mRNA is spatially restricted. These results demonstrate that translational control plays a critical, and previously unknown, role in refining transcriptional responses to the steroid hormone ecdysone.

  16. Melting of duplex DNA in the absence of ATP by NS3 helicase domain through specific interaction with a single-strand/double-strand junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Kimberly A.; Cameron, Craig E.; Raney, Kevin D.

    2016-01-01

    Helicases unwind double-stranded nucleic acids, remove secondary structures from single-stranded nucleic acids, and remove proteins bound to nucleic acids. For many helicases, the mechanisms for these different functions share the ability to translocate with a directional bias as a result of ATP binding and hydrolysis. The nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) is an essential enzyme expressed by the hepatitis C virus (HCV) and is known to catalyze the unwinding of both DNA and RNA substrates in a 3′-to-5′ direction. We investigated the role of nucleic acid binding in the unwinding mechanism by examining ATP-independent unwinding. We observed that even in the absence of ATP, NS3 helicase domain (NS3h) unwound duplexes only when they contained a 3′-tail (i.e., 3′-to-5′ directionality). Blunt-ended duplexes and 5′-tailed duplexes were not melted even in the presence of a large excess concentration of the protein. NS3h was found to diffuse rapidly along single-stranded DNA at a rate of 30 nt2·s−1. Upon encountering an appropriate single-strand/double-strand (ss/ds) junction, NS3h slowly melted the duplex under conditions with excess protein concentration relative to DNA concentration. When a biotin-streptavidin block was placed into the ssDNA region, no melting of DNA was observed, suggesting that NS3h must diffuse along the ssDNA, and that the streptavidin blocked the diffusion. We conclude that the specific interaction between NS3h and the ss/dsDNA junction, coupled with diffusion allows binding energy to melt duplex DNA with a directional bias. Alternatively, we found that the full-length NS3 protein did not exhibit strict directionality and was dependent on duplex DNA length. NS3 was able to unwind the duplex even in the presence of the biotin-streptavidin block. We propose a non-canonical model of unwinding for NS3 in which the enzyme binds directly to the duplex via protein-protein interactions to melt the substrate. PMID:26091150

  17. Multiple functions of DDX3 RNA helicase in gene regulation, tumorigenesis and viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YASUO eARIUMI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 is a multifunctional protein involved in all aspects of RNA metabolism, including transcription, splicing, mRNA nuclear export, translation, RNA decay and ribosome biogenesis. In addition, DDX3 is also implicated in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, Wnt-ß-catenin signaling, tumorigenesis, and viral infection. Notably, recent studies suggest that DDX3 is a component of anti-viral innate immune signaling pathways. Indeed, DDX3 contributes to enhance the induction of anti-viral mediators, interferon regulatory factor (IRF 3 and type I interferon (IFN. However, DDX3 seems to be an important target for several viruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1, hepatitis C virus (HCV, hepatitis B virus (HBV, and poxvirus. DDX3 interacts with HIV-1 Rev or HCV Core protein and modulates its function. At least, DDX3 is required for both HIV-1 and HCV replication. Therefore, DDX3 could be a novel therapeutic target for the development of drug against HIV-1 and HCV.

  18. Multiple functions of DDX3 RNA helicase in gene regulation, tumorigenesis, and viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariumi, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    The DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 is a multifunctional protein involved in all aspects of RNA metabolism, including transcription, splicing, mRNA nuclear export, translation, RNA decay and ribosome biogenesis. In addition, DDX3 is also implicated in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, Wnt-β-catenin signaling, tumorigenesis, and viral infection. Notably, recent studies suggest that DDX3 is a component of anti-viral innate immune signaling pathways. Indeed, DDX3 contributes to enhance the induction of anti-viral mediators, interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 3 and type I IFN. However, DDX3 seems to be an important target for several viruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and poxvirus. DDX3 interacts with HIV-1 Rev or HCV Core protein and modulates its function. At least, DDX3 is required for both HIV-1 and HCV replication. Therefore, DDX3 could be a novel therapeutic target for the development of drug against HIV-1 and HCV.

  19. Xp54 and related (DDX6-like) RNA helicases: roles in messenger RNP assembly, translation regulation and RNA degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Andrew; Sommerville, John

    2006-01-01

    The DEAD-box RNA helicase Xp54 is an integral component of the messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particles of Xenopus oocytes. In oocytes, several abundant proteins bind pre-mRNA transcripts to modulate nuclear export, RNA stability and translational fate. Of these, Xp54, the mRNA-masking protein FRGY2 and its activating protein kinase CK2α, bind to nascent transcripts on chromosome loops, whereas an Xp54-associated factor, RapA/B, binds to the mRNP complex in the cytoplasm. Over-expression, mutation and knockdown experiments indicate that Xp54 functions to change the conformation of mRNP complexes, displacing one subset of proteins to accommodate another. The sequence of Xp54 is highly conserved in a wide spectrum of organisms. Like Xp54, Drosophila Me31B and Caenorhabditis CGH-1 are required for proper meiotic development, apparently by regulating the translational activation of stored mRNPs and also for sorting certain mRNPs into germplasm-containing structures. Studies on yeast Dhh1 and mammalian rck/p54 have revealed a key role for these helicases in mRNA degradation and in earlier remodelling of mRNP for entry into translation, storage or decay pathways. The versatility of Xp54 and related helicases in modulating the metabolism of mRNAs at all stages of their lifetimes marks them out as key regulators of post-transcriptional gene expression. PMID:16769775

  20. Evolutionarily conserved roles of the dicer helicase domain in regulating RNA interference processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, Mary Anne; Chan, Jessica M; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-10-10

    The enzyme Dicer generates 21-25 nucleotide RNAs that target specific mRNAs for silencing during RNA interference and related pathways. Although their active sites and RNA binding regions are functionally conserved, the helicase domains have distinct activities in the context of different Dicer enzymes. To examine the evolutionary origins of Dicer helicase functions, we investigated two related Dicer enzymes from the thermophilic fungus Sporotrichum thermophile. RNA cleavage assays showed that S. thermophile Dicer-1 (StDicer-1) can process hairpin precursor microRNAs, whereas StDicer-2 can only cleave linear double-stranded RNAs. Furthermore, only StDicer-2 possesses robust ATP hydrolytic activity in the presence of double-stranded RNA. Deletion of the StDicer-2 helicase domain increases both StDicer-2 cleavage activity and affinity for hairpin RNA. Notably, both StDicer-1 and StDicer-2 could complement the distantly related yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe lacking its endogenous Dicer gene but only in their full-length forms, underscoring the importance of the helicase domain. These results suggest an in vivo regulatory function for the helicase domain that may be conserved from fungi to humans.

  1. Structure, regulation and function of gap junctions in liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Michaël; Decrock, Elke; Wang, Nan; Leybaert, Luc; da Silva, Tereza Cristina; Veloso Alves Pereira, Isabel; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Gap junctions are a specialized group of cell-to-cell junctions that mediate direct intercellular communication between cells. They arise from the interaction of 2 hemichannels of adjacent cells, which in turn are composed of 6 connexin proteins. In liver, gap junctions are predominantly found in hepatocytes and play critical roles in virtually all phases of the hepatic life cycle, including cell growth, differentiation, liver-specific functionality and cell death. Liver gap junctions are directed through a broad variety of mechanisms ranging from epigenetic control of connexin expression to posttranslational regulation of gap junction activity. This paper reviews established and novel aspects regarding the architecture, control and functional relevance of liver gap junctions. PMID:27001459

  2. HrpA, a DEAH-box RNA helicase, is involved in global gene regulation in the Lyme disease spirochete.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydan Salman-Dilgimen

    Full Text Available Spirochetes causing Lyme borreliosis are obligate parasites that can only be found in a tick vector or a vertebrate host. The ability to survive in these two disparate environments requires up and downregulation of specific genes by regulatory circuits that remain largely obscure. In this work on the Lyme spirochete, B. burgdorferi, we show that a disruption of the hrpA gene, which encodes a putative RNA helicase, results in a complete loss in the ability of the spirochetes to infect mice by needle inoculation. Studies of protein expression in culture by 2D gels revealed a change in the expression of 33 proteins in hrpA clones relative to the wild-type parent. Quantitative characterization of protein expression by iTRAQ analysis revealed a total of 187 differentially regulated proteins in an hrpA background: 90 downregulated and 97 upregulated. Forty-two of the 90 downregulated and 65 of the 97 upregulated proteins are not regulated under any conditions by the previously reported regulators in B. burgdorferi (bosR, rrp2, rpoN, rpoS or rrp1. Downregulated and upregulated proteins also fell into distinct functional categories. We conclude that HrpA is part of a new and distinct global regulatory pathway in B. burgdorferi gene expression. Because an HrpA orthologue is present in many bacteria, its participation in global regulation in B. burgdorferi may have relevance in other bacterial species where its function remains obscure. We believe this to be the first report of a role for an RNA helicase in a global regulatory pathway in bacteria. This finding is particularly timely with the recent growth of the field of RNA regulation of gene expression and the ability of RNA helicases to modulate RNA structure and function.

  3. The pif1 helicase, a negative regulator of telomerase, acts preferentially at long telomeres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane A Phillips

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase, the enzyme that maintains telomeres, preferentially lengthens short telomeres. The S. cerevisiae Pif1 DNA helicase inhibits both telomerase-mediated telomere lengthening and de novo telomere addition at double strand breaks (DSB. Here, we report that the association of the telomerase subunits Est2 and Est1 at a DSB was increased in the absence of Pif1, as it is at telomeres, suggesting that Pif1 suppresses de novo telomere addition by removing telomerase from the break. To determine how the absence of Pif1 results in telomere lengthening, we used the single telomere extension assay (STEX, which monitors lengthening of individual telomeres in a single cell cycle. In the absence of Pif1, telomerase added significantly more telomeric DNA, an average of 72 nucleotides per telomere compared to the 45 nucleotides in wild type cells, and the fraction of telomeres lengthened increased almost four-fold. Using an inducible short telomere assay, Est2 and Est1 no longer bound preferentially to a short telomere in pif1 mutant cells while binding of Yku80, a telomere structural protein, was unaffected by the status of the PIF1 locus. Two experiments demonstrate that Pif1 binding is affected by telomere length: Pif1 (but not Yku80 -associated telomeres were 70 bps longer than bulk telomeres, and in the inducible short telomere assay, Pif1 bound better to wild type length telomeres than to short telomeres. Thus, preferential lengthening of short yeast telomeres is achieved in part by targeting the negative regulator Pif1 to long telomeres.

  4. Ezrin Binds to DEAD-Box RNA Helicase DDX3 and Regulates Its Function and Protein Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Haydar; Sajwan, Kamal P; Selvanathan, Saravana P; Marsh, Benjamin J; Pai, Amrita V; Kont, Yasemin Saygideger; Han, Jenny; Minas, Tsion Z; Rahim, Said; Erkizan, Hayriye Verda; Toretsky, Jeffrey A; Üren, Aykut

    2015-09-01

    Ezrin is a key regulator of cancer metastasis that links the extracellular matrix to the actin cytoskeleton and regulates cell morphology and motility. We discovered a small-molecule inhibitor, NSC305787, that directly binds to ezrin and inhibits its function. In this study, we used a nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC-MS-MS)-based proteomic approach to identify ezrin-interacting proteins that are competed away by NSC305787. A large number of the proteins that interact with ezrin were implicated in protein translation and stress granule dynamics. We validated direct interaction between ezrin and the RNA helicase DDX3, and NSC305787 blocked this interaction. Downregulation or long-term pharmacological inhibition of ezrin led to reduced DDX3 protein levels without changes in DDX3 mRNA. Ectopic overexpression of ezrin in low-ezrin-expressing osteosarcoma cells caused a notable increase in DDX3 protein levels. Ezrin inhibited the RNA helicase activity of DDX3 but increased its ATPase activity. Our data suggest that ezrin controls the translation of mRNAs preferentially with a structured 5' untranslated region, at least in part, by sustaining the protein level of DDX3 and/or regulating its function. Therefore, our findings suggest a novel function for ezrin in regulation of gene translation that is distinct from its canonical role as a cytoskeletal scaffold at the cell membrane.

  5. RNA helicases

    OpenAIRE

    Owttrim, George W.

    2013-01-01

    Similar to proteins, RNA molecules must fold into the correct conformation and associate with protein complexes in order to be functional within a cell. RNA helicases rearrange RNA secondary structure and RNA-protein interactions in an ATP-dependent reaction, performing crucial functions in all aspects of RNA metabolism. In prokaryotes, RNA helicase activity is associated with roles in housekeeping functions including RNA turnover, ribosome biogenesis, translation and small RNA metabolism. In...

  6. Regulation of Tight Junctions in Upper Airway Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kojima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mucosal barrier of the upper respiratory tract including the nasal cavity, which is the first site of exposure to inhaled antigens, plays an important role in host defense in terms of innate immunity and is regulated in large part by tight junctions of epithelial cells. Tight junction molecules are expressed in both M cells and dendritic cells as well as epithelial cells of upper airway. Various antigens are sampled, transported, and released to lymphocytes through the cells in nasal mucosa while they maintain the integrity of the barrier. Expression of tight junction molecules and the barrier function in normal human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs are affected by various stimuli including growth factor, TLR ligand, and cytokine. In addition, epithelial-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP, which is a master switch for allergic inflammatory diseases including allergic rhinitis, enhances the barrier function together with an increase of tight junction molecules in HNECs. Furthermore, respiratory syncytial virus infection in HNECs in vitro induces expression of tight junction molecules and the barrier function together with proinflammatory cytokine release. This paper summarizes the recent progress in our understanding of the regulation of tight junctions in the upper airway epithelium under normal, allergic, and RSV-infected conditions.

  7. Central role of the Holliday junction helicase RuvAB in vlsE recombination and infectivity of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Lin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Antigenic variation plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of many infectious bacteria and protozoa including Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease. VlsE, a 35 kDa surface-exposed lipoprotein, undergoes antigenic variation during B. burgdorferi infection of mammalian hosts, and is believed to be a critical mechanism by which the spirochetes evade immune clearance. Random, segmental recombination between the expressed vlsE gene and adjacent vls silent cassettes generates a large number of different VlsE variants within the infected host. Although the occurrence and importance of vlsE sequence variation is well established, little is known about the biological mechanism of vlsE recombination. To identify factors important in antigenic variation and vlsE recombination, we screened transposon mutants of genes known to be involved in DNA recombination and repair for their effects on infectivity and vlsE recombination. Several mutants, including those in BB0023 (ruvA, BB0022 (ruvB, BB0797 (mutS, and BB0098 (mutS-II, showed reduced infectivity in immunocompetent C3H/HeN mice. Mutants in ruvA and ruvB exhibited greatly reduced rates of vlsE recombination in C3H/HeN mice, as determined by restriction fragment polymorphism (RFLP screening and DNA sequence analysis. In severe combined immunodeficiency (C3H/scid mice, the ruvA mutant retained full infectivity; however, all recovered clones retained the 'parental' vlsE sequence, consistent with low rates of vlsE recombination. These results suggest that the reduced infectivity of ruvA and ruvB mutants is the result of ineffective vlsE recombination and underscores the important role that vlsE recombination plays in immune evasion. Based on functional studies in other organisms, the RuvAB complex of B. burgdorferi may promote branch migration of Holliday junctions during vlsE recombination. Our findings are consistent with those in the accompanying article by Dresser et al., and together

  8. Mcm10 regulates DNA replication elongation by stimulating the CMG replicative helicase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lõoke, Marko; Maloney, Michael F.; Bell, Stephen P.

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the Mcm2–7 replicative DNA helicase is the committed step in eukaryotic DNA replication initiation. Although Mcm2–7 activation requires binding of the helicase-activating proteins Cdc45 and GINS (forming the CMG complex), an additional protein, Mcm10, drives initial origin DNA unwinding by an unknown mechanism. We show that Mcm10 binds a conserved motif located between the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide fold (OB-fold) and A subdomain of Mcm2. Although buried in the interface between these domains in Mcm2–7 structures, mutations predicted to separate the domains and expose this motif restore growth to conditional-lethal MCM10 mutant cells. We found that, in addition to stimulating initial DNA unwinding, Mcm10 stabilizes Cdc45 and GINS association with Mcm2–7 and stimulates replication elongation in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, we identified a lethal allele of MCM10 that stimulates initial DNA unwinding but is defective in replication elongation and CMG binding. Our findings expand the roles of Mcm10 during DNA replication and suggest a new model for Mcm10 function as an activator of the CMG complex throughout DNA replication. PMID:28270517

  9. Testosterone regulates tight junction proteins and influences prostatic autoimmune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jing; Mostaghel, Elahe A; Vakar-Lopez, Funda; Montgomery, Bruce; True, Larry; Nelson, Peter S

    2011-06-01

    Testosterone and inflammation have been linked to the development of common age-associated diseases affecting the prostate gland including prostate cancer, prostatitis, and benign prostatic hypertrophy. We hypothesized that testosterone regulates components of prostate tight junctions which serve as a barrier to inflammation, thus providing a connection between age- and treatment-associated testosterone declines and prostatic pathology. We examined the expression and distribution of tight junction proteins in prostate biospecimens from mouse models and a clinical study of chemical castration, using transcript profiling, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy. We determined that low serum testosterone is associated with reduced transcript and protein levels of Claudin 4 and Claudin 8, resulting in defective tight junction ultrastructure in benign prostate glands. Expression of Claudin 4 and Claudin 8 was negatively correlated with the mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate caused by testosterone deprivation. Testosterone suppression also induced an autoimmune humoral response directed toward prostatic proteins. Testosterone supplementation in castrate mice resulted in re-expression of tight junction components in prostate epithelium and significantly reduced prostate inflammatory cell numbers. These data demonstrate that tight junction architecture in the prostate is related to changes in serum testosterone levels, and identify an androgen-regulated mechanism that potentially contributes to the development of prostate inflammation and consequent pathology.

  10. A temperature-sensitive allele of a putative mRNA splicing helicase down-regulates many cell wall genes and causes radial swelling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howles, Paul A; Gebbie, Leigh K; Collings, David A; Varsani, Arvind; Broad, Ronan C; Ohms, Stephen; Birch, Rosemary J; Cork, Ann H; Arioli, Tony; Williamson, Richard E

    2016-05-01

    The putative RNA helicase encoded by the Arabidopsis gene At1g32490 is a homolog of the yeast splicing RNA helicases Prp2 and Prp22. We isolated a temperature-sensitive allele (rsw12) of the gene in a screen for root radial swelling mutants. Plants containing this allele grown at the restrictive temperature showed weak radial swelling, were stunted with reduced root elongation, and contained reduced levels of cellulose. The role of the protein was further explored by microarray analysis. By using both fold change cutoffs and a weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA) to investigate coexpression of genes, we found that the radial swelling phenotype was not linked to genes usually associated with primary cell wall biosynthesis. Instead, the mutation has strong effects on expression of secondary cell wall related genes. Many genes potentially associated with secondary walls were present in the most significant WGCNA module, as were genes coding for arabinogalactans and proteins with GPI anchors. The proportion of up-regulated genes that possess introns in rsw12 was above that expected if splicing was unrelated to the activity of the RNA helicase, suggesting that the helicase does indeed play a role in splicing in Arabidopsis. The phenotype may be due to a change in the expression of one or more genes coding for cell wall proteins.

  11. Topology and regulation of the human eIF4A/4G/4H helicase complex in translation initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marintchev, Assen; Edmonds, Katherine A.; Marintcheva, Boriana; Hendrickson, Elthea; Oberer, Monika; Suzuki, Chikako; Herdy, Barbara; Sonenberg, Nahum; Wagner, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Summary The RNA helicase eIF4A plays a key role in unwinding of mRNA and scanning during translation initiation. Free eIF4A is a poor helicase and requires the accessory proteins eIF4G and eIF4H. However, the structure of the helicase complex and the mechanisms of stimulation of eIF4A activity have remained elusive. Here we report the topology of the eIF4A/4G/4H helicase complex, which is built from multiple experimentally observed domain-domain contacts. Remarkably, some of the interactions are continuously rearranged during the ATP binding/hydrolysis cycle of the helicase. We show that the accessory proteins modulate the affinity of eIF4A for ATP by interacting simultaneously with both helicase domains and promoting either the closed, ATP-bound conformation or the open, nucleotide-free conformation. The topology of the complex and the spatial arrangement of the RNA-binding surfaces offer insights into their roles in stimulation of helicase activity and the mechanisms of mRNA unwinding and scanning. PMID:19203580

  12. An O island 172 encoded RNA helicase regulates the motility of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmei Xu

    Full Text Available Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC O157:H7 is a major cause of zoonotic food- and water-borne intestinal infections worldwide with clinical consequences ranging from mild diarrhoea to hemolytic uraemic syndrome. The genome of EHEC O157:H7 contains many regions of unique DNA that are referred to as O islands including the Shiga toxin prophages and pathogenicity islands encoding key virulence factors. However many of these O islands are of unknown function. In this study, genetic analysis was conducted on OI-172 which is a 44,434 bp genomic island with 27 open reading frames. Comparative genome analysis showed that O1-72 is a composite island with progressive gain of genes since O157:H7 evolved from its ancestral O55:H7. A partial OI-172 island was also found in 2 unrelated E. coli strains and 2 Salmonella strains. OI-172 encodes several putative helicases, one of which (Z5898 is a putative DEAH box RNA helicase. To investigate the function of Z5898, a deletion mutant (EDL933ΔZ5898 was constructed in the O157:H7 strain EDL933. Comparative proteomic analysis of the mutant with the wild-type EDL933 found that flagellin was down-regulated in the Z5898 mutant. Motility assay showed that EDL933ΔZ5898 migrated slower than the wild-type EDL933 and electron microscopy found no surface flagella. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR revealed that the fliC expression of EDL933ΔZ5898 was significantly lower while the expression of its upstream regulator gene, fliA, was not affected. Using a fliA and a fliC promoter - green fluorescent protein fusion contruct, Z5898 was found to affect only the fliC promoter activity. Therefore, Z5898 regulates the flagella based motility by exerting its effect on fliC. We conclude that OI-172 is a motility associated O island and hereby name it the MAO island.

  13. RNA Helicase DDX5 Regulates MicroRNA Expression and Contributes to Cytoskeletal Reorganization in Basal Breast Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Daojing; Huang, Jing; Hu, Zhi

    2011-11-15

    RNA helicase DDX5 (also p68) is involved in all aspects of RNA metabolism and serves as a transcriptional co-regulator, but its functional role in breast cancer remains elusive. Here, we report an integrative biology study of DDX5 in breast cancer, encompassing quantitative proteomics, global MicroRNA profiling, and detailed biochemical characterization of cell lines and human tissues. We showed that protein expression of DDX5 increased progressively from the luminal to basal breast cancer cell lines, and correlated positively with that of CD44 in the basal subtypes. Through immunohistochemistry analyses of tissue microarrays containing over 200 invasive human ductal carcinomas, we observed that DDX5 was upregulated in the majority of malignant tissues, and its expression correlated strongly with those of Ki67 and EGFR in the triple-negative tumors. We demonstrated that DDX5 regulated a subset of MicroRNAs including miR-21 and miR-182 in basal breast cancer cells. Knockdown of DDX5 resulted in reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and reduction of cellular proliferation. The effects were accompanied by upregulation of tumor suppressor PDCD4 (a known miR-21 target); as well as upregulation of cofilin and profilin, two key proteins involved in actin polymerization and cytoskeleton maintenance, as a consequence of miR-182 downregulation. Treatment with miR-182 inhibitors resulted in morphologic phenotypes resembling those induced by DDX5 knockdown. Using bioinformatics tools for pathway and network analyses, we confirmed that the network for regulation of actin cytoskeleton was predominantly enriched for the predicted downstream targets of miR-182. Our results reveal a new functional role of DDX5 in breast cancer via the DDX5→miR-182→actin cytoskeleton pathway, and suggest the potential clinical utility of DDX5 and its downstream MicroRNAs in the theranostics of breast cancer.

  14. The interdomain interface in bifunctional enzyme protein 3/4A (NS3/4A) regulates protease and helicase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Cihan; Mukherjee, Sourav; Hanson, Alicia M; Frick, David N; Schiffer, Celia A

    2013-12-01

    Hepatitis C (HCV) protein 3/4A (NS3/4A) is a bifunctional enzyme comprising two separate domains with protease and helicase activities, which are essential for viral propagation. Both domains are stable and have enzymatic activity separately, and the relevance and implications of having protease and helicase together as a single protein remains to be explored. Altered in vitro activities of isolated domains compared with the full-length NS3/4A protein suggest the existence of interdomain communication. The molecular mechanism and extent of this communication was investigated by probing the domain-domain interface observed in HCV NS3/4A crystal structures. We found in molecular dynamics simulations that the two domains of NS3/4A are dynamically coupled through the interface. Interestingly, mutations designed to disrupt this interface did not hinder the catalytic activities of either domain. In contrast, substrate cleavage and DNA unwinding by these mutants were mostly enhanced compared with the wild-type protein. Disrupting the interface did not significantly alter RNA unwinding activity; however, the full-length protein was more efficient in RNA unwinding than the isolated protease domain, suggesting a more direct role in RNA processing independent of the interface. Our findings suggest that HCV NS3/4A adopts an "extended" catalytically active conformation, and interface formation acts as a switch to regulate activity. We propose a unifying model connecting HCV NS3/4A conformational states and protease and helicase function, where interface formation and the dynamic interplay between the two enzymatic domains of HCV NS3/4A potentially modulate the protease and helicase activities in vivo. © 2013 The Protein Society.

  15. Canonical Wnt Signaling Regulates Atrioventricular Junction Programming and Electrophysiological Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillers, Benjamin S; Chiplunkar, Aditi; Aly, Haytham; Valenta, Tomas; Basler, Konrad; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Efimov, Igor R; Boukens, Bastiaan J; Rentschler, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Proper patterning of the atrioventricular canal (AVC) is essential for delay of electrical impulses between atria and ventricles, and defects in AVC maturation can result in congenital heart disease. Objective To determine the role of canonical Wnt signaling in the myocardium during AVC development. Methods and Results We utilized a novel allele of β-catenin that preserves β-catenin’s cell adhesive functions but disrupts canonical Wnt signaling, allowing us to probe the effects of Wnt loss of function independently. We show that loss of canonical Wnt signaling in the myocardium results in tricuspid atresia with hypoplastic right ventricle associated with loss of AVC myocardium. In contrast, ectopic activation of Wnt signaling was sufficient to induce formation of ectopic AV junction-like tissue as assessed by morphology, gene expression, and electrophysiologic criteria. Aberrant AVC development can lead to ventricular preexcitation, a characteristic feature of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. We demonstrate that postnatal activation of Notch signaling downregulates canonical Wnt targets within the AV junction. Stabilization of β-catenin protein levels can rescue Notch-mediated ventricular preexcitation and dysregulated ion channel gene expression. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that myocardial canonical Wnt signaling is an important regulator of AVC maturation and electrical programming upstream of Tbx3. Our data further suggests that ventricular preexcitation may require both morphologic patterning defects, as well as myocardial lineage reprogramming, to allow robust conduction across accessory pathway tissue. PMID:25599332

  16. Models for the Binary Complex of Bacteriophage T4 Gp59 Helicase Loading Protein. GP32 Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Protein and Ternary Complex with Pseudo-Y Junction DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinerman, Jennifer M. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Dignam, J. David [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Mueser, Timothy C. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)

    2012-04-05

    The bacteriophage T4 gp59 helicase assembly protein (gp59) is required for loading of gp41 replicative helicase onto DNA protected by gp32 single-stranded DNA-binding protein. The gp59 protein recognizes branched DNA structures found at replication and recombination sites. Binding of gp32 protein (full-length and deletion constructs) to gp59 protein measured by isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrates that the gp32 protein C-terminal A-domain is essential for protein-protein interaction in the absence of DNA. Sedimentation velocity experiments with gp59 protein and gp32ΔB protein (an N-terminal B-domain deletion) show that these proteins are monomers but form a 1:1 complex with a dissociation constant comparable with that determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) studies indicate that the gp59 protein is a prolate monomer, consistent with the crystal structure and hydrodynamic properties determined from sedimentation velocity experiments. SAXS experiments also demonstrate that gp32ΔB protein is a prolate monomer with an elongated A-domain protruding from the core. Moreover, fitting structures of gp59 protein and the gp32 core into the SAXS-derived molecular envelope supports a model for the gp59 protein-gp32ΔB protein complex. Our earlier work demonstrated that gp59 protein attracts full-length gp32 protein to pseudo-Y junctions. A model of the gp59 protein-DNA complex, modified to accommodate new SAXS data for the binary complex together with mutational analysis of gp59 protein, is presented in the accompanying article (Dolezal, D., Jones, C. E., Lai, X., Brister, J. R., Mueser, T. C., Nossal, N. G., and Hinton, D. M. (2012) J. Biol. Chem. 287, 18596–18607).

  17. Rad53-Mediated Regulation of Rrm3 and Pif1 DNA Helicases Contributes to Prevention of Aberrant Fork Transitions under Replication Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Emma Rossi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Replication stress activates the Mec1ATR and Rad53 kinases. Rad53 phosphorylates nuclear pores to counteract gene gating, thus preventing aberrant transitions at forks approaching transcribed genes. Here, we show that Rrm3 and Pif1, DNA helicases assisting fork progression across pausing sites, are detrimental in rad53 mutants experiencing replication stress. Rrm3 and Pif1 ablations rescue cell lethality, chromosome fragmentation, replisome-fork dissociation, fork reversal, and processing in rad53 cells. Through phosphorylation, Rad53 regulates Rrm3 and Pif1; phospho-mimicking rrm3 mutants ameliorate rad53 phenotypes following replication stress without affecting replication across pausing elements under normal conditions. Hence, the Mec1-Rad53 axis protects fork stability by regulating nuclear pores and DNA helicases. We propose that following replication stress, forks stall in an asymmetric conformation by inhibiting Rrm3 and Pif1, thus impeding lagging strand extension and preventing fork reversal; conversely, under unperturbed conditions, the peculiar conformation of forks encountering pausing sites would depend on active Rrm3 and Pif1.

  18. Drosophila RSK negatively regulates bouton number at the neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Matthias; Raabe, Thomas; Heisenberg, Martin; Sendtner, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Ribosomal S6 kinases (RSKs) are growth factor-regulated serine-threonine kinases participating in the RAS-ERK signaling pathway. RSKs have been implicated in memory formation in mammals and flies. To characterize the function of RSK at the synapse level, we investigated the effect of mutations in the rsk gene on the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) in Drosophila larvae. Immunostaining revealed transgenic expressed RSK in presynaptic regions. In mutants with a full deletion or an N-terminal partial deletion of rsk, an increased bouton number was found. Restoring the wild-type rsk function in the null mutant with a genomic rescue construct reverted the synaptic phenotype, and overexpression of the rsk-cDNA in motoneurons reduced bouton numbers. Based on previous observations that RSK interacts with the Drosophila ERK homologue Rolled, genetic epistasis experiments were performed with loss- and gain-of-function mutations in Rolled. These experiments provided evidence that RSK mediates its negative effect on bouton formation at the Drosophila NMJ by inhibition of ERK signaling.

  19. Holliday junction resolution: regulation in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Joao; West, Stephen C

    2014-07-01

    Holliday junctions (HJs) can be formed between sister chromatids or homologous chromosomes during the recombinational repair of DNA lesions. A variety of pathways act upon HJs to remove them from DNA, in events that are critical for appropriate chromosome segregation. Despite the identification and characterization of multiple enzymes involved in HJ processing, the cellular mechanisms that regulate and implement pathway usage have only just started to be delineated. A conserved network of core cell-cycle kinases and phosphatases modulate HJ metabolism by exerting spatial and temporal control over the activities of two structure-selective nucleases: yeast Mus81-Mms4 (human MUS81-EME1) and Yen1 (human GEN1). These regulatory cycles operate to establish the sequential activation of HJ processing enzymes, implementing a hierarchy in pathway usage that ensure the elimination of chromosomal interactions which would otherwise interfere with chromosome segregation. Mus81-Mms4/EME1 and Yen1/GEN1 emerge to define a special class of enzymes, evolved to satisfy the cellular need of safeguarding the completion of DNA repair when on the verge of chromosome segregation. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Down-regulation in human cancers of DRHC, a novel helicase-like gene from 17q25.1 that inhibits cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, H; Yabe, A; Mine, N; Mikami, I; Fujiwara, H; Terada, Y; Hirano, A; Tsuneizumi, M; Yokota, T; Emi, M

    2003-04-10

    Frequent observations of allelic loss in chromosomal band 17q25.1 in a variety of human cancers have suggested that one or more tumor suppressor genes are normally present in this region. Moreover, a locus responsible for hereditary focal non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (tylosis oesophageal cancer; TOC), a condition associated with esophageal cancer, has been mapped to the same band. During efforts to sequence, by shot-gun methods, a 1 Mb target region that we had defined as the DNA segment harboring the putative tumor suppressor gene(s) involved in these events, we identified a novel cDNA, DRHC (down-regulated in human cancers), that showed reduced expression in 28 of 95 (29%) cell lines derived from a variety of human cancers. The full-length cDNA, 6275 bp long, was expressed predominantly in thymus and brain. The predicted 1942-amino-acid product exhibited significant sequence homology to yeast enzymes belonging to the DEAD-helicase superfamily, and appeared to be a Uvr/Rep helicase with a DEXDc consensus domain. Transfection of a DRHC expression vector inhibited growth of cancer cells in liquid medium or soft agar. The results suggest that loss of expression of DRHC may play a role in human carcinogenesis.

  1. Human regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1 (RTEL1) is required for the nuclear and cytoplasmic trafficking of pre-U2 RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertzer, Michael; Jouravleva, Karina; Perderiset, Mylene; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Le Guen, Tangui; Bardoni, Barbara; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Revy, Patrick; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo

    2015-02-18

    Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome (HHS) is a severe form of Dyskeratosis congenita characterized by developmental defects, bone marrow failure and immunodeficiency and has been associated with telomere dysfunction. Recently, mutations in Regulator of Telomere ELongation helicase 1 (RTEL1), a helicase first identified in Mus musculus as being responsible for the maintenance of long telomeres, have been identified in several HHS patients. Here we show that RTEL1 is required for the export and the correct cytoplasmic trafficking of the small nuclear (sn) RNA pre-U2, a component of the major spliceosome complex. RTEL1-HHS cells show abnormal subcellular partitioning of pre-U2, defects in the recycling of ribonucleotide proteins (RNP) in the cytoplasm and splicing defects. While most of these phenotypes can be suppressed by re-expressing the wild-type protein in RTEL1-HHS cells, expression of RTEL1 mutated variants in immortalized cells provokes cytoplasmic mislocalizations of pre-U2 and other RNP components, as well as splicing defects, thus phenocopying RTEL1-HHS cellular defects. Strikingly, expression of a cytoplasmic form of RTEL1 is sufficient to correct RNP mislocalizations both in RTEL1-HHS cells and in cells expressing nuclear mutated forms of RTEL1. This work unravels completely unanticipated roles for RTEL1 in RNP trafficking and strongly suggests that defects in RNP biogenesis pathways contribute to the pathology of HHS. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Regulation of neuronal axon specification by glia-neuron gap junctions in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingfeng; Zhang, Albert; Jin, Yishi; Yan, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Axon specification is a critical step in neuronal development, and the function of glial cells in this process is not fully understood. Here, we show that C. elegans GLR glial cells regulate axon specification of their nearby GABAergic RME neurons through GLR-RME gap junctions. Disruption of GLR-RME gap junctions causes misaccumulation of axonal markers in non-axonal neurites of RME neurons and converts microtubules in those neurites to form an axon-like assembly. We further uncover that GLR-RME gap junctions regulate RME axon specification through activation of the CDK-5 pathway in a calcium-dependent manner, involving a calpain clp-4. Therefore, our study reveals the function of glia-neuron gap junctions in neuronal axon specification and shows that calcium originated from glial cells can regulate neuronal intracellular pathways through gap junctions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19510.001 PMID:27767956

  3. Endothelial Cell Junctional Adhesion Molecules: Role and Regulation of Expression in Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reglero-Real, Natalia; Colom, Bartomeu; Bodkin, Jennifer Victoria; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial cells line the lumen of all blood vessels and play a critical role in maintaining the barrier function of the vasculature. Sealing of the vessel wall between adjacent endothelial cells is facilitated by interactions involving junctionally expressed transmembrane proteins, including tight junctional molecules, such as members of the junctional adhesion molecule family, components of adherence junctions, such as VE-Cadherin, and other molecules, such as platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule. Of importance, a growing body of evidence indicates that the expression of these molecules is regulated in a spatiotemporal manner during inflammation: responses that have significant implications for the barrier function of blood vessels against blood-borne macromolecules and transmigrating leukocytes. This review summarizes key aspects of our current understanding of the dynamics and mechanisms that regulate the expression of endothelial cells junctional molecules during inflammation and discusses the associated functional implications of such events in acute and chronic scenarios. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. A Cold-Inducible DEAD-Box RNA Helicase from Arabidopsis thaliana Regulates Plant Growth and Development under Low Temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuelin Liu

    Full Text Available DEAD-box RNA helicases comprise a large family and are involved in a range of RNA processing events. Here, we identified one of the Arabidopsis thaliana DEAD-box RNA helicases, AtRH7, as an interactor of Arabidopsis COLD SHOCK DOMAIN PROTEIN 3 (AtCSP3, which is an RNA chaperone involved in cold adaptation. Promoter:GUS transgenic plants revealed that AtRH7 is expressed ubiquitously and that its levels of the expression are higher in rapidly growing tissues. Knockout mutant lines displayed several morphological alterations such as disturbed vein pattern, pointed first true leaves, and short roots, which resemble ribosome-related mutants of Arabidopsis. In addition, aberrant floral development was also observed in rh7 mutants. When the mutants were germinated at low temperature (12°C, both radicle and first leaf emergence were severely delayed; after exposure of seedlings to a long period of cold, the mutants developed aberrant, fewer, and smaller leaves. RNA blots and circular RT-PCR revealed that 35S and 18S rRNA precursors accumulated to higher levels in the mutants than in WT under both normal and cold conditions, suggesting the mutants are partially impaired in pre-rRNA processing. Taken together, the results suggest that AtRH7 affects rRNA biogenesis and plays an important role in plant growth under cold.

  5. A Cold-Inducible DEAD-Box RNA Helicase from Arabidopsis thaliana Regulates Plant Growth and Development under Low Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuelin; Tabata, Daisuke; Imai, Ryozo

    2016-01-01

    DEAD-box RNA helicases comprise a large family and are involved in a range of RNA processing events. Here, we identified one of the Arabidopsis thaliana DEAD-box RNA helicases, AtRH7, as an interactor of Arabidopsis COLD SHOCK DOMAIN PROTEIN 3 (AtCSP3), which is an RNA chaperone involved in cold adaptation. Promoter:GUS transgenic plants revealed that AtRH7 is expressed ubiquitously and that its levels of the expression are higher in rapidly growing tissues. Knockout mutant lines displayed several morphological alterations such as disturbed vein pattern, pointed first true leaves, and short roots, which resemble ribosome-related mutants of Arabidopsis. In addition, aberrant floral development was also observed in rh7 mutants. When the mutants were germinated at low temperature (12°C), both radicle and first leaf emergence were severely delayed; after exposure of seedlings to a long period of cold, the mutants developed aberrant, fewer, and smaller leaves. RNA blots and circular RT-PCR revealed that 35S and 18S rRNA precursors accumulated to higher levels in the mutants than in WT under both normal and cold conditions, suggesting the mutants are partially impaired in pre-rRNA processing. Taken together, the results suggest that AtRH7 affects rRNA biogenesis and plays an important role in plant growth under cold.

  6. Regulation of Gap Junction Dynamics by UNC-44/ankyrin and UNC-33/CRMP through VAB-8 in C. elegans Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingfeng Meng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gap junctions are present in both vertebrates and invertebrates from nematodes to mammals. Although the importance of gap junctions has been documented in many biological processes, the molecular mechanisms underlying gap junction dynamics remain unclear. Here, using the C. elegans PLM neurons as a model, we show that UNC-44/ankyrin acts upstream of UNC-33/CRMP in regulation of a potential kinesin VAB-8 to control gap junction dynamics, and loss-of-function in the UNC-44/UNC-33/VAB-8 pathway suppresses the turnover of gap junction channels. Therefore, we first show a signal pathway including ankyrin, CRMP, and kinesin in regulating gap junctions.

  7. Regulation of gene expression by the BLM helicase correlates with the presence of G-quadruplex DNA motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Giang Huong; Tang, Weiliang; Robles, Ana I;

    2014-01-01

    Bloom syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by genetic instability and cancer predisposition, and caused by mutations in the gene encoding the Bloom syndrome, RecQ helicase-like (BLM) protein. To determine whether altered gene expression might be responsible for pathological...... features of Bloom syndrome, we analyzed mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression in fibroblasts from individuals with Bloom syndrome and in BLM-depleted control fibroblasts. We identified mRNA and miRNA expression differences in Bloom syndrome patient and BLM-depleted cells. Differentially expressed m...... dysfunction, and other features observed in Bloom syndrome individuals. BLM binds to G-quadruplex (G4) DNA, and G4 motifs were enriched at transcription start sites (TSS) and especially within first introns (false discovery rate ≤ 0.001) of differentially expressed mRNAs in Bloom syndrome compared with normal...

  8. A membrane fusion protein αSNAP is a novel regulator of epithelial apical junctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayden G Naydenov

    Full Text Available Tight junctions (TJs and adherens junctions (AJs are key determinants of the structure and permeability of epithelial barriers. Although exocytic delivery to the cell surface is crucial for junctional assembly, little is known about the mechanisms controlling TJ and AJ exocytosis. This study was aimed at investigating whether a key mediator of exocytosis, soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (NSF attachment protein alpha (αSNAP, regulates epithelial junctions. αSNAP was enriched at apical junctions in SK-CO15 and T84 colonic epithelial cells and in normal human intestinal mucosa. siRNA-mediated knockdown of αSNAP inhibited AJ/TJ assembly and establishment of the paracellular barrier in SK-CO15 cells, which was accompanied by a significant down-regulation of p120-catenin and E-cadherin expression. A selective depletion of p120 catenin effectively disrupted AJ and TJ structure and compromised the epithelial barrier. However, overexpression of p120 catenin did not rescue the defects of junctional structure and permeability caused by αSNAP knockdown thereby suggesting the involvement of additional mechanisms. Such mechanisms did not depend on NSF functions or induction of cell death, but were associated with disruption of the Golgi complex and down-regulation of a Golgi-associated guanidine nucleotide exchange factor, GBF1. These findings suggest novel roles for αSNAP in promoting the formation of epithelial AJs and TJs by controlling Golgi-dependent expression and trafficking of junctional proteins.

  9. SlDEAD31, a Putative DEAD-Box RNA Helicase Gene, Regulates Salt and Drought Tolerance and Stress-Related Genes in Tomato.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingku Zhu

    Full Text Available The DEAD-box RNA helicases are involved in almost every aspect of RNA metabolism, associated with diverse cellular functions including plant growth and development, and their importance in response to biotic and abiotic stresses is only beginning to emerge. However, none of DEAD-box genes was well characterized in tomato so far. In this study, we reported on the identification and characterization of two putative DEAD-box RNA helicase genes, SlDEAD30 and SlDEAD31 from tomato, which were classified into stress-related DEAD-box proteins by phylogenetic analysis. Expression analysis indicated that SlDEAD30 was highly expressed in roots and mature leaves, while SlDEAD31 was constantly expressed in various tissues. Furthermore, the expression of both genes was induced mainly in roots under NaCl stress, and SlDEAD31 mRNA was also increased by heat, cold, and dehydration. In stress assays, transgenic tomato plants overexpressing SlDEAD31 exhibited dramatically enhanced salt tolerance and slightly improved drought resistance, which were simultaneously demonstrated by significantly enhanced expression of multiple biotic and abiotic stress-related genes, higher survival rate, relative water content (RWC and chlorophyll content, and lower water loss rate and malondialdehyde (MDA production compared to wild-type plants. Collectively, these results provide a preliminary characterization of SlDEAD30 and SlDEAD31 genes in tomato, and suggest that stress-responsive SlDEAD31 is essential for salt and drought tolerance and stress-related gene regulation in plants.

  10. SlDEAD31, a Putative DEAD-Box RNA Helicase Gene, Regulates Salt and Drought Tolerance and Stress-Related Genes in Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingku; Chen, Guoping; Dong, Tingting; Wang, Lingling; Zhang, Jianling; Zhao, Zhiping; Hu, Zongli

    2015-01-01

    The DEAD-box RNA helicases are involved in almost every aspect of RNA metabolism, associated with diverse cellular functions including plant growth and development, and their importance in response to biotic and abiotic stresses is only beginning to emerge. However, none of DEAD-box genes was well characterized in tomato so far. In this study, we reported on the identification and characterization of two putative DEAD-box RNA helicase genes, SlDEAD30 and SlDEAD31 from tomato, which were classified into stress-related DEAD-box proteins by phylogenetic analysis. Expression analysis indicated that SlDEAD30 was highly expressed in roots and mature leaves, while SlDEAD31 was constantly expressed in various tissues. Furthermore, the expression of both genes was induced mainly in roots under NaCl stress, and SlDEAD31 mRNA was also increased by heat, cold, and dehydration. In stress assays, transgenic tomato plants overexpressing SlDEAD31 exhibited dramatically enhanced salt tolerance and slightly improved drought resistance, which were simultaneously demonstrated by significantly enhanced expression of multiple biotic and abiotic stress-related genes, higher survival rate, relative water content (RWC) and chlorophyll content, and lower water loss rate and malondialdehyde (MDA) production compared to wild-type plants. Collectively, these results provide a preliminary characterization of SlDEAD30 and SlDEAD31 genes in tomato, and suggest that stress-responsive SlDEAD31 is essential for salt and drought tolerance and stress-related gene regulation in plants.

  11. DEAD/H BOX 3 (DDX3) helicase binds the RIG-I adaptor IPS-1 to up-regulate IFN-beta-inducing potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Misako; Seya, Tsukasa

    2010-04-01

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLR) are members of the DEAD box helicases, and recognize viral RNA in the cytoplasm, leading to IFN-beta induction through the adaptor IFN-beta promoter stimulator-1 (IPS-1) (also known as Cardif, mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein or virus-induced signaling adaptor). Since uninfected cells usually harbor a trace of RIG-I, other RNA-binding proteins may participate in assembling viral RNA into the IPS-1 pathway during the initial response to infection. We searched for proteins coupling with human IPS-1 by yeast two-hybrid and identified another DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box helicase, DDX3 (DEAD/H BOX 3). DDX3 can bind viral RNA to join it in the IPS-1 complex. Unlike RIG-I, DDX3 was constitutively expressed in cells, and some fraction of DDX3 is colocalized with IPS-1 around mitochondria. The 622-662 a.a DDX3 C-terminal region (DDX3-C) directly bound to the IPS-1 CARD-like domain, and the whole DDX3 protein also associated with RLR. By reporter assay, DDX3 helped IPS-1 up-regulate IFN-beta promoter activation and knockdown of DDX3 by siRNA resulted in reduced IFN-beta induction. This activity was conserved on the DDX3-C fragment. DDX3 only marginally enhanced IFN-beta promoter activation induced by transfected TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) or I-kappa-B kinase-epsilon (IKKepsilon). Forced expression of DDX3 augmented virus-mediated IFN-beta induction and host cell protection against virus infection. Hence, DDX3 is an antiviral IPS-1 enhancer.

  12. Gap Junctions in the Ventral Hippocampal-Medial Prefrontal Pathway Are Involved in Anxiety Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Timothy J.; Kloth, Alexander D.; Hsueh, Brian; Runkle, Matthew B.; Kane, Gary A.; Wang, Samuel S.-H.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent but little is known about their underlying mechanisms. Gap junctions exist in brain regions important for anxiety regulation, such as the ventral hippocampus (vHIP) and mPFC, but their functions in these areas have not been investigated. Using pharmacological blockade of neuronal gap junctions combined with electrophysiological recordings, we found that gap junctions play a role in theta rhythm in the vHIP and mPFC of adult mice. Bilateral infusion of neuronal gap junction blockers into the vHIP decreased anxiety-like behavior on the elevated plus maze and open field. Similar anxiolytic effects were observed with unilateral infusion of these drugs into the vHIP combined with contralateral infusion into the mPFC. No change in anxious behavior was observed with gap junction blockade in the unilateral vHIP alone or in the bilateral dorsal HIP. Since physical exercise is known to reduce anxiety, we examined the effects of long-term running on the expression of the neuronal gap junction protein connexin-36 among inhibitory interneurons and found a reduction in the vHIP. Despite this change, we observed no alteration in theta frequency or power in long-term runners. Collectively, these findings suggest that neuronal gap junctions in the vHIP–mPFC pathway are important for theta rhythm and anxiety regulation under sedentary conditions but that additional mechanisms are likely involved in running-induced reduction in anxiety. PMID:25411496

  13. The Rho target PRK2 regulates apical junction formation in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Sean W; Magalhaes, Ana; Hall, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Rho GTPases regulate multiple signaling pathways to control a number of cellular processes during epithelial morphogenesis. To investigate the downstream pathways through which Rho regulates epithelial apical junction formation, we screened a small interfering RNA (siRNA) library targeting 28 known Rho target proteins in 16HBE human bronchial epithelial cells. This led to the identification of the serine-threonine kinase PRK2 (protein kinase C-related kinase 2, also called PKN2). Depletion of PRK2 does not block the initial formation of primordial junctions at nascent cell-cell contacts but does prevent their maturation into apical junctions. PRK2 is recruited to primordial junctions, and this localization depends on its C2-like domain. Rho binding is essential for PRK2 function and also facilitates PRK2 recruitment to junctions. Kinase-dead PRK2 acts as a dominant-negative mutant and prevents apical junction formation. We conclude that PRK2 is recruited to nascent cell-cell contacts through its C2-like and Rho-binding domains and promotes junctional maturation through a kinase-dependent pathway.

  14. Tight junction regulates epidermal calcium ion gradient and differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurasawa, Masumi; Maeda, Tetsuo; Oba, Ai; Yamamoto, Takuya [Pola Chemical Industries Inc., 560 Kashio-cho, Totsuka-ku, Yokohama 244-0812 (Japan); Sasaki, Hiroyuki, E-mail: sasakih@jikei.ac.jp [Division of Fine Morphology, Core Research Facilities, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8461 (Japan); The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Infomatics, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We disrupted epidermal tight junction barrier in reconstructed epidermis. {yields} It altered Ca{sup 2+} distribution and consequentially differentiation state as well. {yields} Tight junction should affect epidermal homeostasis by maintaining Ca{sup 2+} gradient. -- Abstract: It is well known that calcium ions (Ca{sup 2+}) induce keratinocyte differentiation. Ca{sup 2+} distributes to form a vertical gradient that peaks at the stratum granulosum. It is thought that the stratum corneum (SC) forms the Ca{sup 2+} gradient since it is considered the only permeability barrier in the skin. However, the epidermal tight junction (TJ) in the granulosum has recently been suggested to restrict molecular movement to assist the SC as a secondary barrier. The objective of this study was to clarify the contribution of the TJ to Ca{sup 2+} gradient and epidermal differentiation in reconstructed human epidermis. When the epidermal TJ barrier was disrupted by sodium caprate treatment, Ca{sup 2+} flux increased and the gradient changed in ion-capture cytochemistry images. Alterations of ultrastructures and proliferation/differentiation markers revealed that both hyperproliferation and precocious differentiation occurred regionally in the epidermis. These results suggest that the TJ plays a crucial role in maintaining epidermal homeostasis by controlling the Ca{sup 2+} gradient.

  15. Dissection of neuronal gap junction circuits that regulate social behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Heeun; Levy, Sagi; Flavell, Steven W.; Mende, Fanny; Latham, Richard; Zimmer, Manuel; Bargmann, Cornelia I.

    2017-01-01

    A hub-and-spoke circuit of neurons connected by gap junctions controls aggregation behavior and related behavioral responses to oxygen, pheromones, and food in Caenorhabditis elegans. The molecular composition of the gap junctions connecting RMG hub neurons with sensory spoke neurons is unknown. We show here that the innexin gene unc-9 is required in RMG hub neurons to drive aggregation and related behaviors, indicating that UNC-9–containing gap junctions mediate RMG signaling. To dissect the circuit in detail, we developed methods to inhibit unc-9–based gap junctions with dominant-negative unc-1 transgenes. unc-1(dn) alters a stomatin-like protein that regulates unc-9 electrical signaling; its disruptive effects can be rescued by a constitutively active UNC-9::GFP protein, demonstrating specificity. Expression of unc-1(dn) in RMG hub neurons, ADL or ASK pheromone-sensing neurons, or URX oxygen-sensing neurons disrupts specific elements of aggregation-related behaviors. In ADL, unc-1(dn) has effects opposite to those of tetanus toxin light chain, separating the roles of ADL electrical and chemical synapses. These results reveal roles of gap junctions in a complex behavior at cellular resolution and provide a tool for similar exploration of other gap junction circuits. PMID:28143932

  16. Fibroblast growth factor signaling potentiates VE-cadherin stability at adherens junctions by regulating SHP2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunihiko Hatanaka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The fibroblast growth factor (FGF system plays a critical role in the maintenance of vascular integrity via enhancing the stability of VE-cadherin at adherens junctions. However, the precise molecular mechanism is not well understood. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the detailed mechanism of FGF regulation of VE-cadherin function that leads to endothelial junction stabilization. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In vitro studies demonstrated that the loss of FGF signaling disrupts the VE-cadherin-catenin complex at adherens junctions by increasing tyrosine phosphorylation levels of VE-cadherin. Among protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs known to be involved in the maintenance of the VE-cadherin complex, suppression of FGF signaling reduces SHP2 expression levels and SHP2/VE-cadherin interaction due to accelerated SHP2 protein degradation. Increased endothelial permeability caused by FGF signaling inhibition was rescued by SHP2 overexpression, indicating the critical role of SHP2 in the maintenance of endothelial junction integrity. CONCLUSIONS: These results identify FGF-dependent maintenance of SHP2 as an important new mechanism controlling the extent of VE-cadherin tyrosine phosphorylation, thereby regulating its presence in adherens junctions and endothelial permeability.

  17. Regulation of Tight Junction Permeability by Intestinal Bacteria and Dietary Components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulluwishewa, D.; Anderson, R.C.; McNabb, W.C.; Moughan, P.J.; Wells, J.; Roy, N.C.

    2011-01-01

    The human intestinal epithelium is formed by a single layer of epithelial cells that separates the intestinal lumen from the underlying lamina propria. The space between these cells is sealed by tight junctions (TJ), which regulate the permeability of the intestinal barrier. TJ are complex protein s

  18. Regulation of Tight Junction Permeability by Intestinal Bacteria and Dietary Components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulluwishewa, D.; Anderson, R.C.; McNabb, W.C.; Moughan, P.J.; Wells, J.; Roy, N.C.

    2011-01-01

    The human intestinal epithelium is formed by a single layer of epithelial cells that separates the intestinal lumen from the underlying lamina propria. The space between these cells is sealed by tight junctions (TJ), which regulate the permeability of the intestinal barrier. TJ are complex protein

  19. The Rho Target PRK2 Regulates Apical Junction Formation in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, Sean W.; Magalhaes, Ana; Hall, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Rho GTPases regulate multiple signaling pathways to control a number of cellular processes during epithelial morphogenesis. To investigate the downstream pathways through which Rho regulates epithelial apical junction formation, we screened a small interfering RNA (siRNA) library targeting 28 known Rho target proteins in 16HBE human bronchial epithelial cells. This led to the identification of the serine-threonine kinase PRK2 (protein kinase C-related kinase 2, also called PKN2). Depletion of...

  20. Regulating cell-cell junctions from A to Z.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Jeff

    2016-04-25

    Epithelial sheets often present a "cobblestone" appearance, but the mechanisms underlying the dynamics of this arrangement are unclear. In this issue, Choi et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201506115) show that afadin and ZO-1 regulate tension and maintain zonula adherens architecture in response to changes in contractility.

  1. Gap junctions in cells of the immune system: structure, regulation and possible functional roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Sáez

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Gap junction channels are sites of cytoplasmic communication between contacting cells. In vertebrates, they consist of protein subunits denoted connexins (Cxs which are encoded by a gene family. According to their Cx composition, gap junction channels show different gating and permeability properties that define which ions and small molecules permeate them. Differences in Cx primary sequences suggest that channels composed of different Cxs are regulated differentially by intracellular pathways under specific physiological conditions. Functional roles of gap junction channels could be defined by the relative importance of permeant substances, resulting in coordination of electrical and/or metabolic cellular responses. Cells of the native and specific immune systems establish transient homo- and heterocellular contacts at various steps of the immune response. Morphological and functional studies reported during the last three decades have revealed that many intercellular contacts between cells in the immune response present gap junctions or "gap junction-like" structures. Partial characterization of the molecular composition of some of these plasma membrane structures and regulatory mechanisms that control them have been published recently. Studies designed to elucidate their physiological roles suggest that they might permit coordination of cellular events which favor the effective and timely response of the immune system.

  2. RecQ Helicases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolai Balle; Hickson, Ian D

    2013-01-01

    The RecQ family of DNA helicases is highly conserved throughout -evolution, and is important for the maintenance of genome stability. In humans, five RecQ family members have been identified: BLM, WRN, RECQ4, RECQ1 and RECQ5. Defects in three of these give rise to Bloom's syndrome (BLM), Werner...

  3. SlDEAD31, a Putative DEAD-Box RNA Helicase Gene, Regulates Salt and Drought Tolerance and Stress-Related Genes in Tomato

    OpenAIRE

    Mingku Zhu; Guoping Chen; Tingting Dong; Lingling Wang; Jianling Zhang; Zhiping Zhao; Zongli Hu

    2015-01-01

    The DEAD-box RNA helicases are involved in almost every aspect of RNA metabolism, associated with diverse cellular functions including plant growth and development, and their importance in response to biotic and abiotic stresses is only beginning to emerge. However, none of DEAD-box genes was well characterized in tomato so far. In this study, we reported on the identification and characterization of two putative DEAD-box RNA helicase genes, SlDEAD30 and SlDEAD31 from tomato, which were class...

  4. Binding of the Fkh1 Forkhead Associated Domain to a Phosphopeptide within the Mph1 DNA Helicase Regulates Mating-Type Switching in Budding Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoinette M Dummer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fkh1 protein has roles in cell-cycle regulated transcription as well as a transcription-independent role in recombination donor preference during mating-type switching. The conserved FHA domain of Fkh1 regulates donor preference by juxtaposing two distant regions on chromosome III to promote their recombination. A model posits that this Fkh1-mediated long-range chromosomal juxtaposition requires an interaction between the FHA domain and a partner protein(s, but to date no relevant partner has been described. In this study, we used structural modeling, 2-hybrid assays, and mutational analyses to show that the predicted phosphothreonine-binding FHA domain of Fkh1 interacted with multiple partner proteins. The Fkh1 FHA domain was important for its role in cell-cycle regulation, but no single interaction partner could account for this role. In contrast, Fkh1's interaction with the Mph1 DNA repair helicase regulated donor preference during mating-type switching. Using 2-hybrid assays, co-immunoprecipitation, and fluorescence anisotropy, we mapped a discrete peptide within the regulatory Mph1 C-terminus required for this interaction and identified two threonines that were particularly important. In vitro binding experiments indicated that at least one of these threonines had to be phosphorylated for efficient Fkh1 binding. Substitution of these two threonines with alanines (mph1-2TA specifically abolished the Fkh1-Mph1 interaction in vivo and altered donor preference during mating-type switching to the same degree as mph1Δ. Notably, the mph1-2TA allele maintained other functions of Mph1 in genome stability. Deletion of a second Fkh1-interacting protein encoded by YMR144W also resulted in a change in Fkh1-FHA-dependent donor preference. We have named this gene FDO1 for Forkhead one interacting protein involved in donor preference. We conclude that a phosphothreonine-mediated protein-protein interface between Fkh1-FHA and

  5. Irsogladine maleate regulates gap junctional intercellular communication-dependent epithelial barrier in human nasal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Ryo; Nomura, Kazuaki; Kakuki, Takuya; Takano, Ken-Ichi; Kohno, Takayuki; Konno, Takumi; Sawada, Norimasa; Himi, Tetsuo; Kojima, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    The airway epithelium of the human nasal mucosa acts as the first physical barrier that protects against inhaled substances and pathogens. Irsogladine maleate (IM) is an enhancer of gastric mucosal protective factors via upregulation of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). GJIC is thought to participate in the formation of functional tight junctions. However, the effects of IM on GJIC and the epithelial barrier in human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs) remain unknown. To investigate the effects of IM on GJIC and the tight junctional barrier in HNECs, primary cultures of HNECs transfected with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT-HNECs) were treated with IM and the GJIC inhibitors oleamide and 18β-GA. Some cells were pretreated with IM before treatment with TLR3 ligand poly(I:C) to examine whether IM prevented the changes via TLR3-mediated signal pathways. In hTERT-HNECs, GJIC blockers reduced the expression of tight junction molecules claudin-1, -4, -7, occludin, tricellulin, and JAM-A. IM induced GJIC activity and enhanced the expression of claudin-1, -4, and JAM-A at the protein and mRNA levels with an increase of barrier function. GJIC blockers prevented the increase of the tight junction proteins induced by IM. Furthermore, IM prevented the reduction of JAM-A but not induction of IL-8 and TNF-α induced by poly(I:C). In conclusion, IM can maintain the GJIC-dependent tight junctional barrier via regulation of GJIC in upper airway nasal epithelium. Therefore, it is possible that IM may be useful as a nasal spray to prevent the disruption of the epithelial barrier by viral infections and exposure to allergens in human nasal mucosa.

  6. Frequent Disruption of Chromodomain Helicase DNA-Binding Protein 8 (CHD8 and Functionally Associated Chromatin Regulators in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan A. Damaschke

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal expression and function of chromatin regulators results in the altered chromatin structure seen in cancer. The chromatin regulator CTCF, its cofactor CHD8, and antagonistic paralogue BORIS have wide-ranging effects on gene regulation. Their concurrent expression and regulation was examined in benign, localized, and metastatic prostate cancer (PCa arrays with extended follow-up using an automated quantitative imaging system, VECTRA. Epithelial staining was quantified and compared against a range of clinicopathologic variables. CHD8 expression was decreased in HGPIN, localized, and metastatic PCa compared to benign (P < .001. CHD8 promoter hypermethylation, assessed by Quantitative Pyrosequencing, occurred in over 45% of primary cancers in this population as well as the TGCA database. Treatment of cell lines with the demethylating agent 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine reinduced expression. An interesting dichotomy for CHD8 was observed within primary cancers, with higher nuclear protein expression associated with adverse clinical outcomes including extracapsular extension (P = .007, presence of metastases (P = .025 and worse PSA-recurrence free survival (P = .048. CHD8 outperformed Gleason score and predicted biochemical failure within intermediate grade prostate cancers. The BORIS/CTCF expression ratio increased in localized (P = .03 and metastatic PCa (P = .006 and was associated with higher Gleason score (P = .02, increased tumor volume (P = .02 and positive margins (P = .04. Per cell heterogeneity of expression revealed all protein expression to be more heterogeneous in cancerous tissue (both P < .001, especially high grade (P < .01. In the first detailed analysis in cancer, a marked loss of CHD8 expression and increased BORIS/CTCF ratio indicate frequent disruption of CTCF and its effector genes in PCa.

  7. Modulation of junction tension by tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes regulates cell-cell contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosveld, Floris; Guirao, Boris; Wang, Zhimin; Rivière, Mathieu; Bonnet, Isabelle; Graner, François; Bellaïche, Yohanns

    2016-02-15

    Tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes play crucial roles in tissue proliferation. Furthermore, de-regulation of their functions is deleterious to tissue architecture and can result in the sorting of somatic rounded clones minimizing their contact with surrounding wild-type (wt) cells. Defects in the shape of somatic clones correlate with defects in proliferation, cell affinity, cell-cell adhesion, oriented cell division and cortical contractility. Combining genetics, live-imaging, laser ablation and computer simulations, we aim to analyze whether distinct or similar mechanisms can account for the common role of tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes in cell-cell contact regulation. In Drosophila epithelia, the tumor suppressors Fat (Ft) and Dachsous (Ds) regulate cell proliferation, tissue morphogenesis, planar cell polarity and junction tension. By analyzing the evolution over time of ft mutant cells and clones, we show that ft clones reduce their cell-cell contacts with the surrounding wt tissue in the absence of concomitant cell divisions and over-proliferation. This contact reduction depends on opposed changes of junction tensions in the clone bulk and its boundary with neighboring wt tissue. More generally, either clone bulk or boundary junction tension is modulated by the activation of Yorkie, Myc and Ras, yielding similar contact reductions with wt cells. Together, our data highlight mechanical roles for proto-oncogene and tumor suppressor pathways in cell-cell interactions.

  8. A synaptic nidogen: Developmental regulation and role of nidogen-2 at the neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smyth Neil

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The skeletal neuromuscular junction is a useful model for elucidating mechanisms that regulate synaptogenesis. Developmentally important intercellular interactions at the neuromuscular junction are mediated by the synaptic portion of a basal lamina that completely ensheaths each muscle fiber. Basal laminas in general are composed of four main types of glycosylated proteins: laminins, collagens IV, heparan sulfate proteoglycans and nidogens (entactins. The portion of the muscle fiber basal lamina that passes between the motor nerve terminal and postsynaptic membrane has been shown to bear distinct isoforms of the first three of these. For laminins and collagens IV, the proteins are deposited by the muscle; a synaptic proteoglycan, z-agrin, is deposited by the nerve. In each case, the synaptic isoform plays key roles in organizing the neuromuscular junction. Here, we analyze the fourth family, composed of nidogen-1 and -2. Results In adult muscle, nidogen-1 is present throughout muscle fiber basal lamina, while nidogen-2 is concentrated at synapses. Nidogen-2 is initially present throughout muscle basal lamina, but is lost from extrasynaptic regions during the first three postnatal weeks. Neuromuscular junctions in mutant mice lacking nidogen-2 appear normal at birth, but become topologically abnormal as they mature. Synaptic laminins, collagens IV and heparan sulfate proteoglycans persist in the absence of nidogen-2, suggesting the phenotype is not secondary to a general defect in the integrity of synaptic basal lamina. Further genetic studies suggest that synaptic localization of each of the four families of synaptic basal lamina components is independent of the other three. Conclusion All four core components of the basal lamina have synaptically enriched isoforms. Together, they form a highly specialized synaptic cleft material. Individually, they play distinct roles in the formation, maturation and maintenance of the

  9. Gap Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  10. Gap junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2012-07-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1853-1872, 2012.

  11. Critical role of gap junction coupled KATP channel activity for regulated insulin secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan V Rocheleau

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic beta-cells secrete insulin in response to closure of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP channels, which causes membrane depolarization and a concomitant rise in intracellular Ca2+ (Cai. In intact islets, beta-cells are coupled by gap junctions, which are proposed to synchronize electrical activity and Cai oscillations after exposure to stimulatory glucose (>7 mM. To determine the significance of this coupling in regulating insulin secretion, we examined islets and beta-cells from transgenic mice that express zero functional KATP channels in approximately 70% of their beta-cells, but normal KATP channel density in the remainder. We found that KATP channel activity from approximately 30% of the beta-cells is sufficient to maintain strong glucose dependence of metabolism, Cai, membrane potential, and insulin secretion from intact islets, but that glucose dependence is lost in isolated transgenic cells. Further, inhibition of gap junctions caused loss of glucose sensitivity specifically in transgenic islets. These data demonstrate a critical role of gap junctional coupling of KATP channel activity in control of membrane potential across the islet. Control via coupling lessens the effects of cell-cell variation and provides resistance to defects in excitability that would otherwise lead to a profound diabetic state, such as occurs in persistent neonatal diabetes mellitus.

  12. Critical role of gap junction coupled KATP channel activity for regulated insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheleau, Jonathan V; Remedi, Maria S; Granada, Butch; Head, W Steven; Koster, Joseph C; Nichols, Colin G; Piston, David W

    2006-02-01

    Pancreatic beta-cells secrete insulin in response to closure of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels, which causes membrane depolarization and a concomitant rise in intracellular Ca2+ (Cai). In intact islets, beta-cells are coupled by gap junctions, which are proposed to synchronize electrical activity and Cai oscillations after exposure to stimulatory glucose (>7 mM). To determine the significance of this coupling in regulating insulin secretion, we examined islets and beta-cells from transgenic mice that express zero functional KATP channels in approximately 70% of their beta-cells, but normal KATP channel density in the remainder. We found that KATP channel activity from approximately 30% of the beta-cells is sufficient to maintain strong glucose dependence of metabolism, Cai, membrane potential, and insulin secretion from intact islets, but that glucose dependence is lost in isolated transgenic cells. Further, inhibition of gap junctions caused loss of glucose sensitivity specifically in transgenic islets. These data demonstrate a critical role of gap junctional coupling of KATP channel activity in control of membrane potential across the islet. Control via coupling lessens the effects of cell-cell variation and provides resistance to defects in excitability that would otherwise lead to a profound diabetic state, such as occurs in persistent neonatal diabetes mellitus.

  13. ADAMTS-10 and -6 differentially regulate cell-cell junctions and focal adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Stuart A.; Mularczyk, Ewa J.; Singh, Mukti; Massam-Wu, Teresa; Kielty, Cay M.

    2016-01-01

    ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6 are homologous metalloproteinases with ill-defined roles. ADAMTS10 mutations cause Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS), implicating it in fibrillin microfibril biology since some fibrillin-1 mutations also cause WMS. However little is known about ADAMTS6 function. ADAMTS10 is resistant to furin cleavage, however we show that ADAMTS6 is effectively processed and active. Using siRNA, over-expression and mutagenesis, it was found ADAMTS6 inhibits and ADAMTS10 is required for focal adhesions, epithelial cell-cell junction formation, and microfibril deposition. Either knockdown of ADAMTS6, or disruption of its furin processing or catalytic sites restores focal adhesions, implicating its enzyme activity acts on targets in the focal adhesion complex. In ADAMTS10-depleted cultures, expression of syndecan-4 rescues focal adhesions and cell-cell junctions. Recombinant C-termini of ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6, both of which induce focal adhesions, bind heparin and syndecan-4. However, cells overexpressing full-length ADAMTS6 lack heparan sulphate and focal adhesions, whilst depletion of ADAMTS6 induces a prominent glycocalyx. Thus ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6 oppositely affect heparan sulphate-rich interfaces including focal adhesions. We previously showed that microfibril deposition requires fibronectin-induced focal adhesions, and cell-cell junctions in epithelial cultures. Here we reveal that ADAMTS6 causes a reduction in heparan sulphate-rich interfaces, and its expression is regulated by ADAMTS10. PMID:27779234

  14. Basolateral junction proteins regulate competition for the follicle stem cell niche in the Drosophila ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronen, Maria R; Schoenfelder, Kevin P; Klein, Allon M; Nystul, Todd G

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial stem cells are routinely lost or damaged during adult life and must therefore be replaced to maintain homeostasis. Recent studies indicate that stem cell replacement occurs through neutral competition in many types of epithelial tissues, but little is known about the factors that determine competitive outcome. The epithelial follicle stem cells (FSCs) in the Drosophila ovary are regularly lost and replaced during normal homeostasis, and we show that FSC replacement conforms to a model of neutral competition. In addition, we found that FSCs mutant for the basolateral junction genes, lethal giant larvae (lgl) or discs large (dlg), undergo a biased competition for niche occupancy characterized by increased invasion of neighboring FSCs and reduced loss. Interestingly, FSCs mutant for a third basolateral junction gene, scribble (scrib), do not exhibit biased competition, suggesting that Lgl and Dlg regulate niche competition through a Scrib-independent process. Lastly, we found that FSCs have a unique cell polarity characterized by broadly distributed adherens junctions and the lack of a mature apical domain. Collectively, these observations indicate that Lgl and Dlg promote the differentiation of FSC progeny to a state in which they are less prone to invade the neighboring niche. In addition, we demonstrate that the neutral drift model can be adapted to quantify non-neutral behavior of mutant clones.

  15. Basolateral junction proteins regulate competition for the follicle stem cell niche in the Drosophila ovary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria R Kronen

    Full Text Available Epithelial stem cells are routinely lost or damaged during adult life and must therefore be replaced to maintain homeostasis. Recent studies indicate that stem cell replacement occurs through neutral competition in many types of epithelial tissues, but little is known about the factors that determine competitive outcome. The epithelial follicle stem cells (FSCs in the Drosophila ovary are regularly lost and replaced during normal homeostasis, and we show that FSC replacement conforms to a model of neutral competition. In addition, we found that FSCs mutant for the basolateral junction genes, lethal giant larvae (lgl or discs large (dlg, undergo a biased competition for niche occupancy characterized by increased invasion of neighboring FSCs and reduced loss. Interestingly, FSCs mutant for a third basolateral junction gene, scribble (scrib, do not exhibit biased competition, suggesting that Lgl and Dlg regulate niche competition through a Scrib-independent process. Lastly, we found that FSCs have a unique cell polarity characterized by broadly distributed adherens junctions and the lack of a mature apical domain. Collectively, these observations indicate that Lgl and Dlg promote the differentiation of FSC progeny to a state in which they are less prone to invade the neighboring niche. In addition, we demonstrate that the neutral drift model can be adapted to quantify non-neutral behavior of mutant clones.

  16. RecQ Helicases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolai Balle; Hickson, Ian D

    2013-01-01

    The RecQ family of DNA helicases is highly conserved throughout -evolution, and is important for the maintenance of genome stability. In humans, five RecQ family members have been identified: BLM, WRN, RECQ4, RECQ1 and RECQ5. Defects in three of these give rise to Bloom's syndrome (BLM), Werner's...... a perturbed S-phase. Finally BLM also plays a role in the suppression and/or resolution of ultra-fine anaphase DNA bridges that form between sister-chromatids during mitosis....

  17. Differences in regulation of tight junctions and cell morphology between VHL mutations from disease subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isanova Bella

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In von Hippel-Lindau (VHL disease, germline mutations in the VHL tumor suppressor gene cause clear cell renal carcinomas, hemangioblastomas, and pheochromocytomas. The VHL gene product is part of an ubiquitin E3 ligase complex and hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-α is a key substrate, although additional VHL functions have been described. A genotype-phenotype relationship exists in VHL disease such that specific VHL mutations elicit certain subsets of these tumors. Here, we examine VHL genotype-phenotype correlations at the cellular level, focusing on the regulation of tight junctions and cell morphology. Methods Wild-type and various mutant VHL proteins representing VHL disease subtypes were stably expressed in 3 VHL-negative renal carcinoma cell lines. Using these cell lines, the roles of various VHL-associated cellular functions in regulation of cell morphology were investigated. Results As a whole, type 1 mutants varied greatly from type 2 mutants, demonstrating high levels of HIF-2α, cyclin D1 and α5 integrin, lower p27 levels, and a spindly, fibroblastic cellular appearance. Type 2 mutations demonstrated an epithelial morphology similar to wild-type VHL in the majority of the renal cell lines used. Knockdown of p27 in cells with wild-type VHL led to perturbations of both epithelial morphology and ZO-1 localization to tight junctions. ZO-1 localization correlated well with VHL disease subtypes, with greater mislocalization observed for genotypes associated with a higher risk of renal carcinoma. HIF-2α knockdown in 786-O partially restored ZO-1 localization, but did not restore an epithelial morphology. Conclusion VHL has both HIF-α dependent and HIF-α independent functions in regulating tight junctions and cell morphology that likely impact the clinical phenotypes seen in VHL disease.

  18. Regulation of vascular endothelial junction stability and remodeling through Rap1-Rasip1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Christopher W; Ye, Weilan

    2014-01-01

    The ability of blood vessels to sense and respond to stimuli such as fluid flow, shear stress, and trafficking of immune cells is critical to the proper function of the vascular system. Endothelial cells constantly remodel their cell-cell junctions and the underlying cytoskeletal network in response to these exogenous signals. This remodeling, which depends on regulation of the linkage between actin and integral junction proteins, is controlled by a complex signaling network consisting of small G proteins and their various downstream effectors. In this commentary, we summarize recent developments in understanding the small G protein RAP1 and its effector RASIP1 as critical mediators of endothelial junction stabilization, and the relationship between RAP1 effectors and modulation of different subsets of endothelial junctions.   The vasculature is a dynamic organ that is constantly exposed to a variety of signaling stimuli and mechanical stresses. In embryogenesis, nascent blood vessels form via a process termed vasculogenesis, wherein mesodermally derived endothelial precursor cells aggregate into cords, which subsequently form a lumen that permits trafficking of plasma and erythrocytes. (1)(,) (2) Angiogenesis occurs after establishment of this primitive vascular network, where new vessels sprout from existing vessels, migrate into newly expanded tissues, and anastomose to form a functional and complex circulatory network. (1)(,) (2) In the mouse, this process occurs through the second half of embryogenesis and into postnatal development in some tissues, such as the developing retinal vasculature. (3) Further, angiogenesis occurs in a variety of pathological conditions, such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, wound healing, and tumor growth. (1)(,) (2)(,) (4) Both vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are driven through signaling by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and therapeutic

  19. Mitochondrial helicases and mitochondrial genome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamann, Maria Diget; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Kulikowicz, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    Helicases are essential enzymes that utilize the energy of nucleotide hydrolysis to drive unwinding of nucleic acid duplexes. Helicases play roles in all aspects of DNA metabolism including DNA repair, DNA replication and transcription. The subcellular locations and functions of several helicases...... have been studied in detail; however, the roles of specific helicases in mitochondrial biology remain poorly characterized. This review presents important recent advances in identifying and characterizing mitochondrial helicases, some of which also operate in the nucleus....

  20. Mechanical tugging force regulates the size of cell–cell junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhijun; Tan, John L.; Cohen, Daniel M.; Yang, Michael T.; Sniadecki, Nathan J.; Ruiz, Sami Alom; Nelson, Celeste M.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2010-01-01

    Actomyosin contractility affects cellular organization within tissues in part through the generation of mechanical forces at sites of cell–matrix and cell–cell contact. While increased mechanical loading at cell–matrix adhesions results in focal adhesion growth, whether forces drive changes in the size of cell–cell adhesions remains an open question. To investigate the responsiveness of adherens junctions (AJ) to force, we adapted a system of microfabricated force sensors to quantitatively report cell–cell tugging force and AJ size. We observed that AJ size was modulated by endothelial cell–cell tugging forces: AJs and tugging force grew or decayed with myosin activation or inhibition, respectively. Myosin-dependent regulation of AJs operated in concert with a Rac1, and this coordinated regulation was illustrated by showing that the effects of vascular permeability agents (S1P, thrombin) on junctional stability were reversed by changing the extent to which these agents coupled to the Rac and myosin-dependent pathways. Furthermore, direct application of mechanical tugging force, rather than myosin activity per se, was sufficient to trigger AJ growth. These findings demonstrate that the dynamic coordination of mechanical forces and cell–cell adhesive interactions likely is critical to the maintenance of multicellular integrity and highlight the need for new approaches to study tugging forces. PMID:20463286

  1. Opening of DNA double strands by helicases. Active versus passive opening

    CERN Document Server

    Betterton, M D

    2002-01-01

    Helicase opening of double-stranded nucleic acids may be "active" (the helicase directly destabilizes the dsNA to promote opening) or "passive" (the helicase binds ssNA available due to a thermal fluctuation which opens part of the dsNA). We describe helicase opening of dsNA, based on helicases which bind single NA strands and move towards the double-stranded region, using a discrete ``hopping'' model. The interaction between the helicase and the junction where the double strand opens is characterized by an interaction potential. The form of the potential determines whether the opening is active or passive. We calculate the rate of passive opening for the helicase PcrA, and show that the rate increases when the opening is active. Finally, we examine how to choose the interaction potential to optimize the rate of strand separation. One important result is our finding that active opening can increase the unwinding rate by 7 fold compared to passive opening.

  2. The Carboxyl Tail of Connexin32 Regulates Gap Junction Assembly in Human Prostate and Pancreatic Cancer Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoch, Parul; Mitra, Shalini; Ray, Anuttoma; Kelsey, Linda; Roberts, Brett J.; Wahl, James K.; Johnson, Keith R.; Mehta, Parmender P.

    2015-01-01

    Connexins, the constituent proteins of gap junctions, are transmembrane proteins. A connexin (Cx) traverses the membrane four times and has one intracellular and two extracellular loops with the amino and carboxyl termini facing the cytoplasm. The transmembrane and the extracellular loop domains are highly conserved among different Cxs, whereas the carboxyl termini, often called the cytoplasmic tails, are highly divergent. We have explored the role of the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32, a Cx expressed in polarized and differentiated cells, in regulating gap junction assembly. Our results demonstrate that compared with the full-length Cx32, the cytoplasmic tail-deleted Cx32 is assembled into small gap junctions in human pancreatic and prostatic cancer cells. Our results further document that the expression of the full-length Cx32 in cells, which express the tail-deleted Cx32, increases the size of gap junctions, whereas the expression of the tail-deleted Cx32 in cells, which express the full-length Cx32, has the opposite effect. Moreover, we show that the tail is required for the clustering of cell-cell channels and that in cells expressing the tail-deleted Cx32, the expression of cell surface-targeted cytoplasmic tail alone is sufficient to enhance the size of gap junctions. Our live-cell imaging data further demonstrate that gap junctions formed of the tail-deleted Cx32 are highly mobile compared with those formed of full-length Cx32. Our results suggest that the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32 is not required to initiate the assembly of gap junctions but for their subsequent growth and stability. Our findings suggest that the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32 may be involved in regulating the permeability of gap junctions by regulating their size. PMID:25548281

  3. Managing the complexity of communication: regulation of gap junctions by post-translational modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Callø, Kirstine; von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    expression by transcription and translation is of great importance, the trafficking, channel activity and degradation are also under tight control. The function of connexins can be regulated by several post translational modifications, which affect numerous parameters; including number of channels, open......Gap junctions are comprised of connexins that form cell-to-cell channels which couple neighboring cells to accommodate the exchange of information. The need for communication does, however, change over time and therefore must be tightly controlled. Although the regulation of connexin protein...... probability, single channel conductance or selectivity. The most extensively investigated post translational modifications are phosphorylations, which have been documented in all mammalian connexins. Besides phosphorylations, some connexins are known to be ubiquitinated, SUMOylated, nitrosylated, hydroxylated...

  4. DDX3, a DEAD box RNA helicase with tumor growth-suppressive property and transcriptional regulation activity of the p21waf1/cip1 promoter, is a candidate tumor suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chi-Hong; Chen, Chun-Ming; Cheng, Pei-Lin; Shih, Jing-Wen; Tsou, Ann-Ping; Lee, Yan-Hwa Wu

    2006-07-01

    DDX3 is a DEAD box RNA helicase with diverse biological functions. Using colony formation assay, our results revealed that DDX3 inhibited the colony formation ability of various tumor cells, and this inhibition might be due to a reduced growth rate caused by DDX3. Additionally, we identified p21(waf1/cip1), a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, as a target gene of DDX3, and the up-regulation of p21(waf1/cip1) expression accounted for the colony-suppressing activity of DDX3. Moreover, DDX3 exerted its transactivation function on p21(waf1/cip1) promoter through an ATPase-dependent but helicase-independent mechanism, and the four Sp1 sites located within the -123 to -63 region, relative to the transcription start site of p21(waf1/cip1) promoter, were essential for the response to DDX3. Furthermore, DDX3 interacted and cooperated with Sp1 to up-regulate the promoter activity of p21(waf1/cip1). To determine the relevance of DDX3 in clinical cancers, the expression profile of DDX3 in various tumors was also examined. A declined expression of DDX3 mRNA and protein was found in approximately 58% to 73% of hepatoma specimens, which led to the reduction of p21(waf1/cip1) expression in a manner independent of p53 status. Additionally, an alteration of subcellular localization from nuclei to cytoplasm was also observed in >70% of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma samples. Because DDX3 exhibits tumor suppressor functions, such as a growth-suppressive property and transcriptional activation of the p21(waf1/cip1) promoter, and is inactivated through down-regulation of gene expression or alteration of subcellular localization in tumor cells, all these features together suggest that DDX3 might be a candidate tumor suppressor.

  5. Gap junctional regulation of pressure, fluid force, and electrical fields in the epigenetics of cardiac morphogenesis and remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Akiko; Nishii, Kiyomasa; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa

    2015-05-15

    Epigenetic factors of pressure load, fluid force, and electrical fields that occur during cardiac contraction affect cardiac development, morphology, function, and pathogenesis. These factors are orchestrated by intercellular communication mediated by gap junctions, which synchronize action potentials and second messengers. Misregulation of the gap junction protein connexin (Cx) alters cardiogenesis, and can be a pathogenic factor causing cardiac conduction disturbance, fatal arrhythmia, and cardiac remodeling in disease states such as hypertension and ischemia. Changes in Cx expression can occur even when the DNA sequence of the Cx gene itself is unaltered. Posttranslational modifications might reduce arrhythmogenic substrates, improve cardiac function, and promote remodeling in a diseased heart. In this review, we discuss the epigenetic features of gap junctions that regulate cardiac morphology and remodeling. We further discuss potential clinical applications of current knowledge of the structure and function of gap junctions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Gap junction proteins: master regulators of the planarian stem cell response to tissue maintenance and injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, T Harshani; Oviedo, Néstor J

    2013-01-01

    Gap junction (GJ) proteins are crucial mediators of cell-cell communication during embryogenesis, tissue regeneration and disease. GJ proteins form plasma membrane channels that facilitate passage of small molecules across cells and modulate signaling pathways and cellular behavior in different tissues. These properties have been conserved throughout evolution, and in most invertebrates GJ proteins are known as innexins. Despite their critical relevance for physiology and disease, the mechanisms by which GJ proteins modulate cell behavior are poorly understood. This review summarizes findings from recent work that uses planarian flatworms as a paradigm to analyze GJ proteins in the complexity of the whole organism. The planarian model allows access to a large pool of adult somatic stem cells (known as neoblasts) that support physiological cell turnover and tissue regeneration. Innexin proteins are present in planarians and play a fundamental role in controlling neoblast behavior. We discuss the possibility that GJ proteins participate as cellular sensors that inform neoblasts about local and systemic physiological demands. We believe that functional analyses of GJ proteins will bring a complementary perspective to studies that focus on the temporal expression of genes. Finally, integrating functional studies along with molecular genetics and epigenetic approaches would expand our understanding of cellular regulation in vivo and greatly enhance the possibilities for rationally modulating stem cell behavior in their natural environment. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The communicating junctions, roles and dysfunctions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein tyrosine phosphatase σ targets apical junction complex proteins in the intestine and regulates epithelial permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, Ryan; Guo, Cong-Hui; Persaud, Avinash; Muise, Aleixo; Rotin, Daniela

    2014-01-14

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)σ (PTPRS) was shown previously to be associated with susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). PTPσ(-/-) mice exhibit an IBD-like phenotype in the intestine and show increased susceptibility to acute models of murine colitis. However, the function of PTPσ in the intestine is uncharacterized. Here, we show an intestinal epithelial barrier defect in the PTPσ(-/-) mouse, demonstrated by a decrease in transepithelial resistance and a leaky intestinal epithelium that was determined by in vivo tracer analysis. Increased tyrosine phosphorylation was observed at the plasma membrane of epithelial cells lining the crypts of the small bowel and colon of the PTPσ(-/-) mouse, suggesting the presence of PTPσ substrates in these regions. Using mass spectrometry, we identified several putative PTPσ intestinal substrates that were hyper-tyrosine-phosphorylated in the PTPσ(-/-) mice relative to wild type. Among these were proteins that form or regulate the apical junction complex, including ezrin. We show that ezrin binds to and is dephosphorylated by PTPσ in vitro, suggesting it is a direct PTPσ substrate, and identified ezrin-Y353/Y145 as important sites targeted by PTPσ. Moreover, subcellular localization of the ezrin phosphomimetic Y353E or Y145 mutants were disrupted in colonic Caco-2 cells, similar to ezrin mislocalization in the colon of PTPσ(-/-) mice following induction of colitis. Our results suggest that PTPσ is a positive regulator of intestinal epithelial barrier, which mediates its effects by modulating epithelial cell adhesion through targeting of apical junction complex-associated proteins (including ezrin), a process impaired in IBD.

  8. ROCK activity regulates functional tight junction assembly during blastocyst formation in porcine parthenogenetic embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongwoo Kwon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein serine/threonine kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1 and ROCK2 are Rho subfamily GTPase downstream effectors that regulate cell migration, intercellular adhesion, cell polarity, and cell proliferation by stimulating actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Inhibition of ROCK proteins affects specification of the trophectoderm (TE and inner cell mass (ICM lineages, compaction, and blastocyst cavitation. However, the molecules involved in blastocyst formation are not known. Here, we examined developmental competence and levels of adherens/tight junction (AJ/TJ constituent proteins, such as CXADR, OCLN, TJP1, and CDH1, as well as expression of their respective mRNAs, after treating porcine parthenogenetic four-cell embryos with Y-27632, a specific inhibitor of ROCK, at concentrations of 0, 10, 20, 100 µM for 24 h. Following this treatment, the blastocyst development rates were 39.1, 20.7, 10.0, and 0% respectively. In embryos treated with 20 µM treatment, expression levels of CXADR, OCLN, TJP1, and CDH1 mRNA and protein molecules were significantly reduced (P < 0.05. FITC-dextran uptake assay revealed that the treatment caused an increase in TE TJ permeability. Interestingly, the majority of the four-cell and morula embryos treated with 20 µM Y-27643 for 24 h showed defective compaction and cavitation. Taken together, our results indicate that ROCK activity may differentially affect assembly of AJ/TJs as well as regulate expression of genes encoding junctional proteins.

  9. DEAD-box helicase DDX27 regulates 3′ end formation of ribosomal 47S RNA and stably associates with the PeBoW-complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellner, Markus; Rohrmoser, Michaela [Department of Molecular Epigenetics, Helmholtz Center Munich, Center for Integrated Protein Science Munich (CIPSM), Marchioninistr. 25, Munich 81377 (Germany); Forné, Ignasi [Adolf Butenandt Institute, Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Center for Integrated Protein Science Munich (CIPSM), Schillerstr. 44, Munich 80336 (Germany); Voss, Kirsten; Burger, Kaspar; Mühl, Bastian; Gruber-Eber, Anita [Department of Molecular Epigenetics, Helmholtz Center Munich, Center for Integrated Protein Science Munich (CIPSM), Marchioninistr. 25, Munich 81377 (Germany); Kremmer, Elisabeth [Institute of Molecular Immunology, Helmholtz Center Munich, Marchioninistr. 25, Munich 81377 (Germany); Imhof, Axel [Adolf Butenandt Institute, Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Center for Integrated Protein Science Munich (CIPSM), Schillerstr. 44, Munich 80336 (Germany); Eick, Dirk, E-mail: eick@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Department of Molecular Epigenetics, Helmholtz Center Munich, Center for Integrated Protein Science Munich (CIPSM), Marchioninistr. 25, Munich 81377 (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    PeBoW, a trimeric complex consisting of pescadillo (Pes1), block of proliferation (Bop1), and the WD repeat protein 12 (WDR12), is essential for processing and maturation of mammalian 5.8S and 28S ribosomal RNAs. Applying a mass spectrometric analysis, we identified the DEAD-box helicase DDX27 as stably associated factor of the PeBoW-complex. DDX27 interacts with the PeBoW-complex via an evolutionary conserved F×F motif in the N-terminal domain and is recruited to the nucleolus via its basic C-terminal domain. This recruitment is RNA-dependent and occurs independently of the PeBoW-complex. Interestingly, knockdown of DDX27, but not of Pes1, induces the accumulation of an extended form of the primary 47S rRNA. We conclude that DDX27 can interact specifically with the Pes1 and Bop1 but fulfils critical function(s) for proper 3′ end formation of 47S rRNA independently of the PeBoW-complex. - Highlights: • DEAD-box helicase DDX27 is a new constituent of the PeBoW-complex. • The N-terminal F×F motif of DDX27 interacts with the PeBoW components Pes1 and Bop1. • Nucleolar anchoring of DDX27 via its basic C-terminal domain is RNA dependent. • Knockdown of DDX27 induces a specific defect in 3′ end formation of 47S rRNA.

  10. Viral hijacking of a replicative helicase loader and its implications for helicase loading control and phage replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hood, Iris V.; Berger, James M.

    2016-05-31

    Replisome assembly requires the loading of replicative hexameric helicases onto origins by AAA+ ATPases. How loader activity is appropriately controlled remains unclear. Here, we use structural and biochemical analyses to establish how an antimicrobial phage protein interferes with the function of theStaphylococcus aureusreplicative helicase loader, DnaI. The viral protein binds to the loader’s AAA+ ATPase domain, allowing binding of the host replicative helicase but impeding loader self-assembly and ATPase activity. Close inspection of the complex highlights an unexpected locus for the binding of an interdomain linker element in DnaI/DnaC-family proteins. We find that the inhibitor protein is genetically coupled to a phage-encoded homolog of the bacterial helicase loader, which we show binds to the host helicase but not to the inhibitor itself. These findings establish a new approach by which viruses can hijack host replication processes and explain how loader activity is internally regulated to prevent aberrant auto-association.

  11. Putative SF2 helicases of the early-branching eukaryote Giardia lamblia are involved in antigenic variation and parasite differentiation into cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargantini, Pablo R; Serradell, Marianela C; Torri, Alessandro; Lujan, Hugo D

    2012-11-28

    Regulation of surface antigenic variation in Giardia lamblia is controlled post-transcriptionally by an RNA-interference (RNAi) pathway that includes a Dicer-like bidentate RNase III (gDicer). This enzyme, however, lacks the RNA helicase domain present in Dicer enzymes from higher eukaryotes. The participation of several RNA helicases in practically all organisms in which RNAi was studied suggests that RNA helicases are potentially involved in antigenic variation, as well as during Giardia differentiation into cysts. An extensive in silico analysis of the Giardia genome identified 32 putative Super Family 2 RNA helicases that contain almost all the conserved RNA helicase motifs. Phylogenetic studies and sequence analysis separated them into 22 DEAD-box, 6 DEAH-box and 4 Ski2p-box RNA helicases, some of which are homologs of well-characterized helicases from higher organisms. No Giardia putative helicase was found to have significant homology to the RNA helicase domain of Dicer enzymes. Additionally a series of up- and down-regulated putative RNA helicases were found during encystation and antigenic variation by qPCR experiments. Finally, we were able to recognize 14 additional putative helicases from three different families (RecQ family, Swi2/Snf2 and Rad3 family) that could be considered DNA helicases. This is the first comprehensive analysis of the Super Family 2 helicases from the human intestinal parasite G. lamblia. The relative and variable expression of particular RNA helicases during both antigenic variation and encystation agrees with the proposed participation of these enzymes during both adaptive processes. The putatives RNA and DNA helicases identified in this early-branching eukaryote provide initial information regarding the biological role of these enzymes in cell adaptation and differentiation.

  12. Caveolin-1 modulates cardiac gap junction homeostasis and arrhythmogenecity by regulating cSrc tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai-Chien; Rutledge, Cody A; Mao, Mao; Bakhshi, Farnaz R; Xie, An; Liu, Hong; Bonini, Marcelo G; Patel, Hemal H; Minshall, Richard D; Dudley, Samuel C

    2014-08-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed significant association of caveolin-1 (Cav1) gene variants with increased risk of cardiac arrhythmias. Nevertheless, the mechanism for this linkage is unclear. Using adult Cav1(-/-) mice, we revealed a marked reduction in the left ventricular conduction velocity in the absence of myocardial Cav1, which is accompanied with increased inducibility of ventricular arrhythmias. Further studies demonstrated that loss of Cav1 leads to the activation of cSrc tyrosine kinase, resulting in the downregulation of connexin 43 and subsequent electric abnormalities. Pharmacological inhibition of cSrc mitigates connexin 43 downregulation, slowed conduction, and arrhythmia inducibility in Cav1(-/-) animals. Using a transgenic mouse model with cardiac-specific overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE8/8), we demonstrated that, on enhanced cardiac renin-angiotensin system activity, Cav1 dissociated from cSrc because of increased Cav1 S-nitrosation at Cys(156), leading to cSrc activation, connexin 43 reduction, impaired gap junction function, and subsequent increase in the propensity for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Renin-angiotensin system-induced Cav1 S-nitrosation was associated with increased Cav1-endothelial nitric oxide synthase binding in response to increased mitochondrial reactive oxidative species generation. The present studies reveal the critical role of Cav1 in modulating cSrc activation, gap junction remodeling, and ventricular arrhythmias. These data provide a mechanistic explanation for the observed genetic link between Cav1 and cardiac arrhythmias in humans and suggest that targeted regulation of Cav1 may reduce arrhythmic risk in cardiac diseases associated with renin-angiotensin system activation. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. The oligomeric Rep protein of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) is a likely replicative helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Malik, Punjab Singh; Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Islam, Mohammad Nurul; Kaliappan, Kosalai; Mukherjee, Sunil Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Geminiviruses replicate by rolling circle mode of replication (RCR) and the viral Rep protein initiates RCR by the site-specific nicking at a conserved nonamer (TAATATT downward arrow AC) sequence. The mechanism of subsequent steps of the replication process, e.g. helicase activity to drive fork-elongation, etc. has largely remained obscure. Here we show that Rep of a geminivirus, namely, Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), acts as a replicative helicase. The Rep-helicase, requiring > or =6 nt space for its efficient activity, translocates in the 3'-->5' direction, and the presence of forked junction in the substrate does not influence the activity to any great extent. Rep forms a large oligomeric complex and the helicase activity is dependent on the oligomeric conformation ( approximately 24mer). The role of Rep as a replicative helicase has been demonstrated through ex vivo studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in planta analyses in Nicotiana tabacum. We also establish that such helicase activity is not confined to the MYMIV system alone, but is also true with at least two other begomoviruses, viz., Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) and Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV).

  14. Afadin regulates puncta adherentia junction formation and presynaptic differentiation in hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisaku Toyoshima

    Full Text Available The formation and remodeling of mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses in the stratum lucidum of the hippocampus are implicated in the cellular basis of learning and memory. Afadin and its binding cell adhesion molecules, nectin-1 and nectin-3, together with N-cadherin, are concentrated at puncta adherentia junctions (PAJs in these synapses. Here, we investigated the roles of afadin in PAJ formation and presynaptic differentiation in mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses. At these synapses in the mice in which the afadin gene was conditionally inactivated before synaptogenesis by using nestin-Cre mice, the immunofluorescence signals for the PAJ components, nectin-1, nectin-3 and N-cadherin, disappeared almost completely, while those for the presynaptic components, VGLUT1 and bassoon, were markedly decreased. In addition, these signals were significantly decreased in cultured afadin-deficient hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, the interevent interval of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents was prolonged in the cultured afadin-deficient hippocampal neurons compared with control neurons, indicating that presynaptic functions were suppressed or a number of synapse was reduced in the afadin-deficient neurons. Analyses of presynaptic vesicle recycling and paired recordings revealed that the cultured afadin-deficient neurons showed impaired presynaptic functions. These results indicate that afadin regulates both PAJ formation and presynaptic differentiation in most mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses, while in a considerable population of these neurons, afadin regulates only PAJ formation but not presynaptic differentiation.

  15. Afadin Regulates Puncta Adherentia Junction Formation and Presynaptic Differentiation in Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshima, Daisaku; Mandai, Kenji; Maruo, Tomohiko; Supriyanto, Irwan; Togashi, Hideru; Inoue, Takahito; Mori, Masahiro; Takai, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    The formation and remodeling of mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses in the stratum lucidum of the hippocampus are implicated in the cellular basis of learning and memory. Afadin and its binding cell adhesion molecules, nectin-1 and nectin-3, together with N-cadherin, are concentrated at puncta adherentia junctions (PAJs) in these synapses. Here, we investigated the roles of afadin in PAJ formation and presynaptic differentiation in mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses. At these synapses in the mice in which the afadin gene was conditionally inactivated before synaptogenesis by using nestin-Cre mice, the immunofluorescence signals for the PAJ components, nectin-1, nectin-3 and N-cadherin, disappeared almost completely, while those for the presynaptic components, VGLUT1 and bassoon, were markedly decreased. In addition, these signals were significantly decreased in cultured afadin-deficient hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, the interevent interval of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents was prolonged in the cultured afadin-deficient hippocampal neurons compared with control neurons, indicating that presynaptic functions were suppressed or a number of synapse was reduced in the afadin-deficient neurons. Analyses of presynaptic vesicle recycling and paired recordings revealed that the cultured afadin-deficient neurons showed impaired presynaptic functions. These results indicate that afadin regulates both PAJ formation and presynaptic differentiation in most mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses, while in a considerable population of these neurons, afadin regulates only PAJ formation but not presynaptic differentiation. PMID:24587018

  16. Laminin and Matrix metalloproteinase 11 regulate Fibronectin levels in the zebrafish myotendinous junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Molly H; Alrowaished, Sarah S; Goody, Michelle F; Crawford, Bryan D; Henry, Clarissa A

    2016-01-01

    Remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cell adhesion as well as signaling between cells and their microenvironment. Despite the importance of tightly regulated ECM remodeling for normal muscle development and function, mechanisms underlying ECM remodeling in vivo remain elusive. One excellent paradigm in which to study ECM remodeling in vivo is morphogenesis of the myotendinous junction (MTJ) during zebrafish skeletal muscle development. During MTJ development, there are dramatic shifts in the primary components comprising the MTJ matrix. One such shift involves the replacement of Fibronectin (Fn)-rich matrix, which is essential for both somite and early muscle development, with laminin-rich matrix essential for normal function of the myotome. Here, we investigate the mechanism underlying this transition. We show that laminin polymerization indirectly promotes Fn downregulation at the MTJ, via a matrix metalloproteinase 11 (Mmp11)-dependent mechanism. Laminin deposition and organization is required for localization of Mmp11 to the MTJ, where Mmp11 is both necessary and sufficient for Fn downregulation in vivo. Furthermore, reduction of residual Mmp11 in laminin mutants promotes a Fn-rich MTJ that partially rescues skeletal muscle architecture. These results identify a mechanism for Fn downregulation at the MTJ, highlight crosstalk between laminin and Fn, and identify a new in vivo function for Mmp11. Taken together, our data demonstrate a novel signaling pathway mediating Fn downregulation. Our data revealing new regulatory mechanisms that guide ECM remodeling during morphogenesis in vivo may inform pathological conditions in which Fn is dysregulated.

  17. Regulation of gap-junction protein connexin 43 by β-adrenergic receptor stimulation in rat cardiomyocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi XIA; Kai-zheng GONG; Ming XU; You-yi ZHANG; Ji-hong GUO; Yao SONG; Ping ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim:β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) agonists are among the most potent factors regulating cardiac electrophysiological properties.Connexin 43 (Cx43),the predominant gap-junction protein in the heart,has an indispensable role in modulating cardiac electric activities by affecting gap-junction function.The present study investigates the effects of short-term stimulation of β-AR subtypes on Cx43 expression and gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) function.Methods:The level of Cx43 expression in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCM) was detected by a Western blotting assay.The GJIC function was evaluated by scrape loading/dye transfer assay.Results:Stimulation of β-AR by the agonist isoproterenol for 5 min induces the up-regulation of nonphosphorylated Cx43 protein level,but not total Cx43.Selective β2-AR inhibitor ICI 118551,but not β-AR inhibitor CGP20712,could fully abolish the effect.Moreover,pretreatment with both protein kinase A inhibitor H89 and G,protein inhibitor pertussis toxin also inhibited the isoproterenol-induced increase of nonphosphorylated Cx43 expression.Isoproterenol-induced up-regulation of nonphosphorylated Cx43 is accompanied with enhanced GJIC function.Conclusion:Taken together,β2-AR stimulation increases the expression of nonphosphorylated Cx43,thereby enhancing the gating function of gap junctions in cardiac myocytes in both a protein kinase A-and G1-dependent manner.

  18. Vitamin D3 regulates the formation and degradation of gap junctions in androgen-responsive human prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Kelsey

    Full Text Available 1α-25(OH2 vitamin D3 (1-25D, an active hormonal form of Vitamin D3, is a well-known chemopreventive and pro-differentiating agent. It has been shown to inhibit the growth of several prostate cancer cell lines. Gap junctions, formed of proteins called connexins (Cx, are ensembles of cell-cell channels, which permit the exchange of small growth regulatory molecules between adjoining cells. Cell-cell communication mediated by gap junctional channels is an important homeostatic control mechanism for regulating cell growth and differentiation. We have investigated the effect of 1-25D on the formation and degradation of gap junctions in an androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP, which expresses retrovirally-introduced Cx32. Connexin32 is expressed by the luminal and well-differentiated cells of normal prostate and prostate tumors. Our results document that 1-25D enhances the expression of Cx32 and its subsequent assembly into gap junctions. Our results further show that 1-25D prevents androgen-regulated degradation of Cx32, post-translationally, independent of androgen receptor (AR-mediated signaling. Finally, our findings document that formation of gap junctions sensitizes Cx32-expressing LNCaP cells to the growth inhibitory effects of 1-25D and alters their morphology. These findings suggest that the growth-inhibitory effects of 1-25D in LNCaP cells may be related to its ability to modulate the assembly of Cx32 into gap junctions.

  19. DP97, a DEAD box DNA/RNA helicase, is a target gene-selective co-regulator of the constitutive androstane receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, Yuichiro, E-mail: ykanno@phar.toho-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toho University, Chiba (Japan); Serikawa, Takafumi; Inajima, Jun; Inouye, Yoshio [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toho University, Chiba (Japan)

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DP97 interacts with nuclear receptor CAR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DP97 enhances CAR-mediated transcriptional activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DP97 synergistically enhances transactivity of CAR by the co-expression of SRC-1 or PGC1{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DP97 is a gene-selective co-activator for hCAR. -- Abstract: The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) plays a key role in the expression of xenobiotic/steroid and drug metabolizing enzymes and their transporters. In this study, we demonstrated that DP97, a member of the DEAD box DNA/RNA helicase protein family, is a novel CAR-interacting protein. Using HepG2 cells expressing human CAR in the presence of tetracycline, we showed that knockdown of DP97 with small interfering RNAs suppressed tetracycline-inducible mRNA expression of CYP2B6 and UGT1A1 but not CYP3A4. Thus, DP97 was found to be a gene (or promoter)-selective co-activator for hCAR. DP97-mediated CAR transactivation was synergistically enhanced by the co-expression of SRC-1 or PGC1{alpha}, therefore it might act as mediator between hCAR and appropriate co-activators.

  20. A recessive founder mutation in regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1, RTEL1, underlies severe immunodeficiency and features of Hoyeraal Hreidarsson syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bari J Ballew

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dyskeratosis congenita (DC is a heterogeneous inherited bone marrow failure and cancer predisposition syndrome in which germline mutations in telomere biology genes account for approximately one-half of known families. Hoyeraal Hreidarsson syndrome (HH is a clinically severe variant of DC in which patients also have cerebellar hypoplasia and may present with severe immunodeficiency and enteropathy. We discovered a germline autosomal recessive mutation in RTEL1, a helicase with critical telomeric functions, in two unrelated families of Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ ancestry. The affected individuals in these families are homozygous for the same mutation, R1264H, which affects three isoforms of RTEL1. Each parent was a heterozygous carrier of one mutant allele. Patient-derived cell lines revealed evidence of telomere dysfunction, including significantly decreased telomere length, telomere length heterogeneity, and the presence of extra-chromosomal circular telomeric DNA. In addition, RTEL1 mutant cells exhibited enhanced sensitivity to the interstrand cross-linking agent mitomycin C. The molecular data and the patterns of inheritance are consistent with a hypomorphic mutation in RTEL1 as the underlying basis of the clinical and cellular phenotypes. This study further implicates RTEL1 in the etiology of DC/HH and immunodeficiency, and identifies the first known homozygous autosomal recessive disease-associated mutation in RTEL1.

  1. Close the Gap : a study on the regulation of Connexin43 gap junctional communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeijl, Leonie van

    2009-01-01

    Gap junctions are groups of transmembrane channels that connect the cytoplasms of adjacent cells to mediate the diffusion of small molecules, such as ions, metabolites, second messengers and small peptides. The building blocks of gap junctions are connexin proteins. The most ubiquitous and best stu

  2. Eya1 protein phosphatase regulates tight junction formation in lung distal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hashash, Ahmed H K; Turcatel, Gianluca; Varma, Saaket; Berika, Mohamed; Al Alam, Denise; Warburton, David

    2012-09-01

    Little is known about the regulatory mechanisms underlying lung epithelial tight junction (TJ) assembly, which is inextricably linked to the preservation of epithelial polarity, and is highly coordinated by proteins that regulate epithelial cell polarity, such as aPKCζ. We recently reported that Eya1 phosphatase functions through aPKCζ-Notch1 signaling to control cell polarity in the lung epithelium. Here, we have extended these observations to TJ formation to demonstrate that Eya1 is crucial for the maintenance of TJ protein assembly in the lung epithelium, probably by controlling aPKCζ phosphorylation levels, aPKCζ-mediated TJ protein phosphorylation and Notch1-Cdc42 activity. Thus, TJs are disassembled after interfering with Eya1 function in vivo or during calcium-induced TJ assembly in vitro. These effects are reversed by reintroduction of wild-type Eya1 or partially inhibiting aPKCζ in Eya1siRNA cells. Moreover, genetic activation of Notch1 rescues Eya1(-/-) lung epithelial TJ defects. These findings uncover novel functions for the Eya1-aPKCζ-Notch1-Cdc42 pathway as a crucial regulatory mechanism of TJ assembly and polarity of the lung epithelium, providing a conceptual framework for future mechanistic and translational studies in this area.

  3. Classical swine fever virus down-regulates endothelial connexin 43 gap junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Hsiang-Jung; Liu, Pei-An; Yeh, Hung-I; Wang, Chi-Young

    2010-07-01

    Classical swine fever is a contagious disease of pigs characterized by fatal hemorrhagic fever. Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) induces the expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulant factors of vascular endothelial cells and establishes a long-term infection. This study aimed to understand the effect of CSFV on endothelial connexin 43 (Cx43) expression and gap junctional intercellular coupling (GJIC). Porcine aortic endothelial cells were infected with CSFV at different multiplicity of infection for 48 h. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR, immunoconfocal microscopy, and Western blotting showed that the transcription and translation of Cx43 were reduced, and this was associated with an attenuation of GJIC. This decrease occurred in a time-dependent manner. An ERK inhibitor (PD98059), a JNK inhibitor (SP600125), and proteasome/lysosome inhibitors all significantly reversed the reduction in Cx43 protein levels without any influence on the titer of progeny virus. In addition, CSFV activated ERK and JNK in a time-dependent manner and down-regulated Cx43 promoter activity, mainly through decreased AP2 binding. This effect was primarily caused by the replication of CSFV rather than a consequence of cytokines being induced by CSFV infection of endothelial cells.

  4. Mutational analysis of Bloom helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Xu Guang

    2010-01-01

    DNA helicases are biomolecular motors that convert the chemical energy derived from the hydrolysis of nucleotide triphosphate (usually ATP) into mechanical energy to unwind double-stranded DNA. The unwinding of double-stranded DNA is an essential process for DNA replication, repair, recombination, and transcription. Mutations in human RecQ helicases result in inherent human disease including Bloom's syndrome, Werner's syndrome, and Rothmund-Thomson syndrome. Bloom's syndrome (BS) is a rare human autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a strong predisposition to a wide range of cancers commonly affecting the general population. In order to understand the molecular basis of BS pathology and the mechanism underlying the function of Bloom helicase, we have analyzed BS-causing missense mutations by a combination of structural modeling, site-directed mutagenesis, and biochemical and biophysical approaches. Here, we describe the methods and protocols for measuring ATPase, ATP and DNA binding, DNA strand annealing, and DNA unwinding activities of Bloom protein and its mutant variants. These approaches should be applicable and useful for studying other helicases.

  5. Phosphorylation on Ser-279 and Ser-282 of connexin43 regulates endocytosis and gap junction assembly in pancreatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kristen E.; Mitra, Shalini; Katoch, Parul; Kelsey, Linda S.; Johnson, Keith R.; Mehta, Parmender P.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating the assembly of connexins (Cxs) into gap junctions are poorly understood. Using human pancreatic tumor cell lines BxPC3 and Capan-1, which express Cx26 and Cx43, we show that, upon arrival at the cell surface, the assembly of Cx43 is impaired. Connexin43 fails to assemble, because it is internalized by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Assembly is restored upon expressing a sorting-motif mutant of Cx43, which does not interact with the AP2 complex, and by expressing mutants that cannot be phosphorylated on Ser-279 and Ser-282. The mutants restore assembly by preventing clathrin-mediated endocytosis of Cx43. Our results also document that the sorting-motif mutant is assembled into gap junctions in cells in which the expression of endogenous Cx43 has been knocked down. Remarkably, Cx43 mutants that cannot be phosphorylated on Ser-279 or Ser-282 are assembled into gap junctions only when connexons are composed of Cx43 forms that can be phosphorylated on these serines and forms in which phosphorylation on these serines is abolished. Based on the subcellular fate of Cx43 in single and contacting cells, our results document that the endocytic itinerary of Cx43 is altered upon cell–cell contact, which causes Cx43 to traffic by EEA1-negative endosomes en route to lysosomes. Our results further show that gap-junctional plaques formed of a sorting motif–deficient mutant of Cx43, which is unable to be internalized by the clathrin-mediated pathway, are predominantly endocytosed in the form of annular junctions. Thus the differential phosphorylation of Cx43 on Ser-279 and Ser-282 is fine-tuned to control Cx43’s endocytosis and assembly into gap junctions. PMID:23363606

  6. Differential regulation of the Hippo pathway by adherens junctions and apical-basal cell polarity modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chih-Chao; Graves, Hillary K; Moya, Ivan M; Tao, Chunyao; Hamaratoglu, Fisun; Gladden, Andrew B; Halder, Georg

    2015-02-10

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and cell polarity complexes are key players in the establishment and maintenance of apical-basal cell polarity. Loss of AJs or basolateral polarity components promotes tumor formation and metastasis. Recent studies in vertebrate models show that loss of AJs or loss of the basolateral component Scribble (Scrib) cause deregulation of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway and hyperactivation of its downstream effectors Yes-associated protein (YAP) and Transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ). However, whether AJs and Scrib act through the same or independent mechanisms to regulate Hippo pathway activity is not known. Here, we dissect how disruption of AJs or loss of basolateral components affect the activity of the Drosophila YAP homolog Yorkie (Yki) during imaginal disc development. Surprisingly, disruption of AJs and loss of basolateral proteins produced very different effects on Yki activity. Yki activity was cell-autonomously decreased but non-cell-autonomously elevated in tissues where the AJ components E-cadherin (E-cad) or α-catenin (α-cat) were knocked down. In contrast, scrib knockdown caused a predominantly cell-autonomous activation of Yki. Moreover, disruption of AJs or basolateral proteins had different effects on cell polarity and tissue size. Simultaneous knockdown of α-cat and scrib induced both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous Yki activity. In mammalian cells, knockdown of E-cad or α-cat caused nuclear accumulation and activation of YAP without overt effects on Scrib localization and vice versa. Therefore, our results indicate the existence of multiple, genetically separable inputs from AJs and cell polarity complexes into Yki/YAP regulation.

  7. Down-regulation of membrana granulosa cell gap junctions is correlated with irreversible commitment to resume meiosis in golden Syrian hamster oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racowsky, C; Baldwin, K V; Larabell, C A; DeMarais, A A; Kazilek, C J

    1989-08-01

    One of the currently popular hypotheses for the regulation of meiotic resumption in mammalian oocytes proposes that the preovulatory surge of luteinizing hormone causes down-regulation of follicular gap junctions, which in turn disrupts transfer of a meiotic arrester from the somatic cells into the oocyte. The present study has investigated this hypothesis by examining the integrity of membrana granulosa cell gap junctions during the period of irreversible commitment to maturation of golden Syrian hamster oocytes in vivo. Our results have revealed a significant progressive decrease in the fractional area of cell surface occupied by gap junction membrane with increasing percentage of oocytes irreversibly committed to mature (1.946% and 0.921% fractional gap junction area at 0% and 100% oocytes irreversibly committed to mature, respectively, P less than 0.05). This net loss of membrana granulosa cell gap junctions from the cell surface was accompanied by a significant decrease in density of gap junction particles, whether they were arranged in rectilinear or non-rectilinear packing patterns. Furthermore, the number of gap junction particles per unit area of surface membrane scanned also underwent a significant progressive decrease with increasing percentage of oocytes irreversibly committed to mature. These data with the hamster are consistent with the hypothesis that down-regulation of membrana granulosa cell gap junctions may be of central importance in the regulation of gonadotropic stimulation of meiotic resumption in mammalian oocytes.

  8. The Dissolution of Double Holliday Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bizard, Anna H; Hickson, Ian D

    2014-01-01

    as "double Holliday junction dissolution." This reaction requires the cooperative action of a so-called "dissolvasome" comprising a Holliday junction branch migration enzyme (Sgs1/BLM RecQ helicase) and a type IA topoisomerase (Top3/TopoIIIα) in complex with its OB (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding......) fold containing accessory factor (Rmi1). This review details our current knowledge of the dissolution process and the players involved in catalyzing this mechanistically complex means of completing homologous recombination reactions....

  9. A simple device for dielectric spectroscopy of polymers with temperature regulation close to 300 K based on a Peltier junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raihane, A.; Tourbot, R.; Ladieu, F.; L'Hôte, D.

    2012-04-01

    We present a simple thermostat device for performing dielectric spectroscopy measurements on polymers close to their glass transition temperature. By using a vacuum chamber containing a Peltier junction with its regulator, we show that a very simple setup yields a temperature accuracy which is good enough for accurate studies of polymer dielectric properties. This technique is also more cost effective than standard setups using cryogenic fluids.

  10. NMII forms a contractile transcellular sarcomeric network to regulate apical cell junctions and tissue geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Seham; Fujita, Tomoki; Millis, Bryan A; Kozin, Elliott; Ma, Xuefei; Kawamoto, Sachiyo; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Hisa, Yasuo; Conti, Mary Anne; Adelstein, Robert S; Sakaguchi, Hirofumi; Kachar, Bechara

    2013-04-22

    Nonmuscle myosin II (NMII) is thought to be the master integrator of force within epithelial apical junctions, mediating epithelial tissue morphogenesis and tensional homeostasis. Mutations in NMII are associated with a number of diseases due to failures in cell-cell adhesion. However, the organization and the precise mechanism by which NMII generates and responds to tension along the intercellular junctional line are still not known. We discovered that periodic assemblies of bipolar NMII filaments interlace with perijunctional actin and α-actinin to form a continuous belt of muscle-like sarcomeric units (∼400-600 nm) around each epithelial cell. Remarkably, the sarcomeres of adjacent cells are precisely paired across the junctional line, forming an integrated, transcellular contractile network. The contraction/relaxation of paired sarcomeres concomitantly impacts changes in apical cell shape and tissue geometry. We show differential distribution of NMII isoforms across heterotypic junctions and evidence for compensation between isoforms. Our results provide a model for how NMII force generation is effected along the junctional perimeter of each cell and communicated across neighboring cells in the epithelial organization. The sarcomeric network also provides a well-defined target to investigate the multiple roles of NMII in junctional homeostasis as well as in development and disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. RNA helicase HEL-1 promotes longevity by specifically activating DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Mihwa; Seo, Keunhee; Hwang, Wooseon; Koo, Hee Jung; Hahm, Jeong-Hoon; Yang, Jae-Seong; Han, Seong Kyu; Hwang, Daehee; Kim, Sanguk; Jang, Sung Key; Lee, Yoontae; Nam, Hong Gil; Lee, Seung-Jae V

    2015-08-01

    The homeostatic maintenance of the genomic DNA is crucial for regulating aging processes. However, the role of RNA homeostasis in aging processes remains unknown. RNA helicases are a large family of enzymes that regulate the biogenesis and homeostasis of RNA. However, the functional significance of RNA helicases in aging has not been explored. Here, we report that a large fraction of RNA helicases regulate the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans. In particular, we show that a DEAD-box RNA helicase, helicase 1 (HEL-1), promotes longevity by specifically activating the DAF-16/forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factor signaling pathway. We find that HEL-1 is required for the longevity conferred by reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling (IIS) and is sufficient for extending lifespan. We further show that the expression of HEL-1 in the intestine and neurons contributes to longevity. HEL-1 enhances the induction of a large fraction of DAF-16 target genes. Thus, the RNA helicase HEL-1 appears to promote longevity in response to decreased IIS as a transcription coregulator of DAF-16. Because HEL-1 and IIS are evolutionarily well conserved, a similar mechanism for longevity regulation via an RNA helicase-dependent regulation of FOXO signaling may operate in mammals, including humans.

  12. DNA mechanics as a tool to probe helicase and translocase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionnet, Timothée; Dawid, Alexandre; Bigot, Sarah; Barre, François-Xavier; Saleh, Omar A; Heslot, François; Allemand, Jean-François; Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    Helicases and translocases are proteins that use the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to move along or pump nucleic acid substrates. Single molecule manipulation has proved to be a powerful tool to investigate the mechanochemistry of these motors. Here we first describe the basic mechanical properties of DNA unraveled by single molecule manipulation techniques. Then we demonstrate how the knowledge of these properties has been used to design single molecule assays to address the enzymatic mechanisms of different translocases. We report on four single molecule manipulation systems addressing the mechanism of different helicases using specifically designed DNA substrates: UvrD enzyme activity detection on a stretched nicked DNA molecule, HCV NS3 helicase unwinding of a RNA hairpin under tension, the observation of RecBCD helicase/nuclease forward and backward motion, and T7 gp4 helicase mediated opening of a synthetic DNA replication fork. We then discuss experiments on two dsDNA translocases: the RuvAB motor studied on its natural substrate, the Holliday junction, and the chromosome-segregation motor FtsK, showing its unusual coupling to DNA supercoiling.

  13. Regulation of gap junction channels by infectious agents and inflammation in the CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eCastellano

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gap junctions are conglomerates of intercellular channels that connect the cytoplasm of two or more cells, and facilitate the transfer of second messengers, small peptides and RNA resulting in metabolic and electrical coordination. In general, loss of gap junctional communication (GJC has been associated with cellular damage and inflammation resulting in compromise of physiological functions. Recently, it has become evident that gap junction channels also play a critical role in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases and associated inflammation. Several pathogens use the transfer of intracellular signals through GJ channels to spread infection and toxic signals that amplify inflammation to neighboring cells. Thus, identification of the mechanisms by which several infectious agents alter GJC could result in new potential therapeutic approaches to reduce inflammation and their pathogenesis.

  14. The RNA helicase/transcriptional co-regulator, p68 (DDX5), stimulates expression of oncogenic protein kinase, Polo-like kinase-1 (PLK1), and is associated with elevated PLK1 levels in human breast cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, R Sumanth; Nicol, Samantha M; Quinlan, Philip R; Thompson, Alastair M; Meek, David W; Fuller-Pace, Frances V

    2014-01-01

    p68 (DDX5) acts both as an ATP-dependent RNA helicase and as a transcriptional co-activator of several cancer-associated transcription factors, including the p53 tumor suppressor. p68 is aberrantly expressed in a high proportion of cancers, but the oncogenic drive for, or the consequences of, these expression changes remain unclear. Here we show that elevated p68 expression in a cohort of human breast cancers is associated significantly with elevated levels of the oncogenic protein kinase, Polo-like kinase-1 (PLK1). Patients expressing detectable levels of both p68 and PLK1 have a poor prognosis, but only if they also have mutation in the TP53 gene (encoding p53), suggesting that p68 can regulate PLK1 levels in a manner that is suppressed by p53. In support of this hypothesis, we show that p68 stimulates expression from the PLK1 promoter, and that silencing of endogenous p68 expression downregulates endogenous PLK1 gene expression. In the absence of functional p53, p68 stimulates the expression of PLK1 both at basal levels and in response to the clinically relevant drug, etoposide. In keeping with a role as a transcriptional activator/co-activator, chromatin immuno-precipitation analysis shows that p68 is associated with the PLK1 promoter, irrespective of the p53 status. However, its recruitment is stimulated by etoposide in cells lacking p53, suggesting that p53 can oppose association of p68 with the PLK1 promoter. These data provide a model in which p68 and p53 interplay regulates PLK1 expression, and which describes the behavior of these molecules, and the outcome of their interaction, in human breast cancer. PMID:24626184

  15. Connexin26 regulates assembly and maintenance of cochlear gap junction macromolecular complex for normal hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Kazusaku; Fukunaga, Ichiro; Hatakeyama, Kaori; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary deafness affects about 1 in 2000 children and GJB2 gene mutation is most frequent cause for this disease in the world. GJB2 encodes connexin26 (Cx26), a component in cochlear gap junction. Recently, we found macromolecular change of gap junction plaques with two different types of Cx26 mutation as major classification of clinical case, one is a model of dominant negative type, Cx26R75W+ and the other is conditional gene deficient mouse, Cx26f/fP0Cre as a model for insufficiency of gap junction protein [6]. Gap junction composed mainly of Cx26 and Cx30 in wild type mice formed large planar gap junction plaques (GJP). In contrast, Cx26R75W+ and Cx26f/fP0Cre showed fragmented small round GJPs around the cell border. In Cx26f/fP0Cre, some of the cells with Cx26 expression due to their cellular mosaicism showed normal large GJP with Cx26 and Cx30 only at the cell junction site between two Cx26 positive cells. These indicate that bilateral Cx26 expressions from both adjacent cells are essential for the formation of the cochlear linear GJP, and it is not compensated by other cochlear Connexins such as Connexin30. In the present study, we demonstrated a new molecular pathology in most common hereditary deafness with different types of Connexin26 mutations, and this machinery can be a new target for drag design of hereditary deafness.

  16. Regulation of connexin43 gap junctional communication by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zeijl, Leonie; Ponsioen, Bas; Giepmans, Ben N G; Ariaens, Aafke; Postma, Friso R; Várnai, Péter; Balla, Tamas; Divecha, Nullin; Jalink, Kees; Moolenaar, Wouter H

    2007-01-01

    Cell-cell communication through connexin43 (Cx43)-based gap junction channels is rapidly inhibited upon activation of various G protein coupled receptors; however, the mechanism is unknown. We show that Cx43-based cell-cell communication is inhibited by depletion of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosp

  17. Protein kinase C-dependent regulation of connexin43 gap junctions and hemichannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrøm, Jette Skov; Stroemlund, Line Waring; Nielsen, Morten Schak

    2015-01-01

    and allow transport of molecules such as fluorescent dyes and ATP. A range of phosphorylated amino acids have been detected in the C-terminus of Cx43 and their physiological role has been intensively studied both in the gap junctional form of Cx43 and in its hemichannel configuration. We present the current...

  18. MicroRNA Intercellular Transfer and Bioelectrical Regulation of Model Multicellular Ensembles by the Gap Junction Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Javier; Meseguer, Salvador; Mafe, Salvador

    2017-08-17

    We have studied theoretically the microRNA (miRNA) intercellular transfer through voltage-gated gap junctions in terms of a biophysically grounded system of coupled differential equations. Instead of modeling a specific system, we use a general approach describing the interplay between the genetic mechanisms and the single-cell electric potentials. The dynamics of the multicellular ensemble are simulated under different conditions including spatially inhomogeneous transcription rates and local intercellular transfer of miRNAs. These processes result in spatiotemporal changes of miRNA, mRNA, and ion channel protein concentrations that eventually modify the bioelectrical states of small multicellular domains because of the ensemble average nature of the electrical potential. The simulations allow a qualitative understanding of the context-dependent nature of the effects observed when specific signaling molecules are transferred through gap junctions. The results suggest that an efficient miRNA intercellular transfer could permit the spatiotemporal control of small cellular domains by the conversion of single-cell genetic and bioelectric states into multicellular states regulated by the gap junction interconnectivity.

  19. The Role of Aquaporin and Tight Junction Proteins in the Regulation of Water Movement in Larval Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Raymond W. M.; Kumai, Yusuke; Perry, Steve F.

    2013-01-01

    Teleost fish living in freshwater are challenged by passive water influx; however the molecular mechanisms regulating water influx in fish are not well understood. The potential involvement of aquaporins (AQP) and epithelial tight junction proteins in the regulation of transcellular and paracellular water movement was investigated in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio). We observed that the half-time for saturation of water influx (Ku) was 4.3±0.9 min, and reached equilibrium at approximately 30 min. These findings suggest a high turnover rate of water between the fish and the environment. Water influx was reduced by the putative AQP inhibitor phloretin (100 or 500 μM). Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy revealed that AQP1a1 protein was expressed in cells on the yolk sac epithelium. A substantial number of these AQP1a1-positive cells were identified as ionocytes, either H+-ATPase-rich cells or Na+/K+-ATPase-rich cells. AQP1a1 appeared to be expressed predominantly on the basolateral membranes of ionocytes, suggesting its potential involvement in regulating ionocyte volume and/or water flux into the circulation. Additionally, translational gene knockdown of AQP1a1 protein reduced water influx by approximately 30%, further indicating a role for AQP1a1 in facilitating transcellular water uptake. On the other hand, incubation with the Ca2+-chelator EDTA or knockdown of the epithelial tight junction protein claudin-b significantly increased water influx. These findings indicate that the epithelial tight junctions normally act to restrict paracellular water influx. Together, the results of the present study provide direct in vivo evidence that water movement can occur through transcellular routes (via AQP); the paracellular routes may become significant when the paracellular permeability is increased. PMID:23967101

  20. The role of aquaporin and tight junction proteins in the regulation of water movement in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond W M Kwong

    Full Text Available Teleost fish living in freshwater are challenged by passive water influx; however the molecular mechanisms regulating water influx in fish are not well understood. The potential involvement of aquaporins (AQP and epithelial tight junction proteins in the regulation of transcellular and paracellular water movement was investigated in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio. We observed that the half-time for saturation of water influx (K(u was 4.3±0.9 min, and reached equilibrium at approximately 30 min. These findings suggest a high turnover rate of water between the fish and the environment. Water influx was reduced by the putative AQP inhibitor phloretin (100 or 500 μM. Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy revealed that AQP1a1 protein was expressed in cells on the yolk sac epithelium. A substantial number of these AQP1a1-positive cells were identified as ionocytes, either H⁺-ATPase-rich cells or Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase-rich cells. AQP1a1 appeared to be expressed predominantly on the basolateral membranes of ionocytes, suggesting its potential involvement in regulating ionocyte volume and/or water flux into the circulation. Additionally, translational gene knockdown of AQP1a1 protein reduced water influx by approximately 30%, further indicating a role for AQP1a1 in facilitating transcellular water uptake. On the other hand, incubation with the Ca²⁺-chelator EDTA or knockdown of the epithelial tight junction protein claudin-b significantly increased water influx. These findings indicate that the epithelial tight junctions normally act to restrict paracellular water influx. Together, the results of the present study provide direct in vivo evidence that water movement can occur through transcellular routes (via AQP; the paracellular routes may become significant when the paracellular permeability is increased.

  1. Three Structure-Selective Endonucleases Are Essential in the Absence of BLM Helicase in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Sabrina L Andersen; H Kenny Kuo; Daniel Savukoski; Brodsky, Michael H.; Jeff Sekelsky

    2011-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms in mitotically proliferating cells avoid generating crossovers, which can contribute to genome instability. Most models for the production of crossovers involve an intermediate with one or more four-stranded Holliday junctions (HJs), which are resolved into duplex molecules through cleavage by specialized endonucleases. In vitro studies have implicated three nuclear enzymes in HJ resolution: MUS81-EME1/Mms4, GEN1/Yen1, and SLX4-SLX1. The Bloom syndrome helicase, BLM, pla...

  2. Reappraising social emotions: the role of inferior frontal gyrus, temporo-parietal junction and insula in interpersonal emotion regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eGrecucci

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have reported the effect of emotion regulation strategies on both individual and social decision making, however the effect of regulation on socially driven emotions independent of decisions is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the neural effects of using reappraisal to both up- and down-regulate socially driven emotions. Participants played the Dictator Game in the role of recipient while undergoing fMRI, and concurrently applied the strategies of either up-regulation (reappraising the proposer’s intentions as more negative, down-regulation (reappraising the proposer’s intentions as less negative, as well as a baseline ‘look’ condition. Results showed that regions responding to the implementation of reappraisal (effect of strategy, that is, regulating regions were the inferior and middle frontal gyrus, temporo parietal junction and insula bilaterally. Importantly, the middle frontal gyrus activation correlated with the frequency of regulatory strategies in daily life, with the insula activation correlating with the perceived ability to reappraise the emotions elicited by the social situation. Regions regulated by reappraisal (effect of regulation, that is, regulated regions were the striatum, the posterior cingulate and the insula, showing increased activation for the up-regulation and reduced activation for down-regulation, both compared to the baseline condition. When analyzing the separate effects of partners’ behavior, selfish behavior produced an activation of the insula, not observed when subjects were treated altruistically. Here we show for the first time that interpersonal emotion regulation strategies can strongly affect neural responses when experiencing socially driven emotions. Clinical implications of these findings are also discussed to understand how the way we interpret others’ intentions may affect the way we emotionally react.

  3. Human RECQ5β, a protein with DNA helicase and strand-annealing activities in a single polypeptide

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Patrick L.; Liu, Yilun; Jiricny, Josef; West, Stephen C.; Janscak, Pavel

    2004-01-01

    Proteins belonging to the highly conserved RecQ helicase family are essential for the maintenance of genomic stability. Here, we describe the biochemical properties of the human RECQ5β protein. Like BLM and WRN, RECQ5β is an ATP-dependent 3′–5′ DNA helicase that can promote migration of Holliday junctions. However, RECQ5β required the single-stranded DNA-binding protein RPA in order to mediate the efficient unwinding of oligonucleotide-based substrates. Surprisingly, we found that RECQ5β poss...

  4. Homeostatic regulation of the PI(4,5)P2-Ca(2+) signaling system at ER-PM junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Lun; Liou, Jen

    2016-08-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2)-Ca(2+) signaling system is important for cell activation in response to various extracellular stimuli. This signaling system is initiated by receptor-induced hydrolysis of PI(4,5)P2 in the plasma membrane (PM) to generate the soluble second messenger inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). IP3 subsequently triggers the release of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) store to the cytosol to activate Ca(2+)-mediated responses, such as secretion and proliferation. The consumed PM PI(4,5)P2 and ER Ca(2+) must be quickly restored to sustain signaling responses, and to maintain the homeostasis of PI(4,5)P2 and Ca(2+). Since phosphatidylinositol (PI), the precursor lipid for PM PI(4,5)P2, is synthesized in the ER membrane, and a Ca(2+) influx across the PM is required to refill the ER Ca(2+) store, efficient communications between the ER and the PM are critical for the homeostatic regulation of the PI(4,5)P2-Ca(2+) signaling system. This review describes the major findings that established the framework of the PI(4,5)P2-Ca(2+) signaling system, and recent discoveries on feedback control mechanisms at ER-PM junctions that sustain the PI(4,5)P2-Ca(2+) signaling system. Particular emphasis is placed on the characterization of ER-PM junctions where efficient communications between the ER and the PM occur, and the activation mechanisms of proteins that dynamically localize to ER-PM junctions to provide the feedback control during PI(4,5)P2-Ca(2+) signaling, including the ER Ca(2+) sensor STIM1, the extended synaptotagmin E-Syt1, and the PI transfer protein Nir2. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon.

  5. Helicase-like transcription factor (Hltf regulates G2/M transition, Wt1/Gata4/Hif-1a cardiac transcription networks, and collagen biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Helmer

    Full Text Available HLTF/Hltf regulates transcription, remodels chromatin, and coordinates DNA damage repair. Hltf is expressed in mouse brain and heart during embryonic and postnatal development. Silencing Hltf is semilethal. Seventy-four percent of congenic C57BL/6J Hltf knockout mice died, 75% within 12-24 hours of birth. Previous studies in neonatal (6-8 hour postpartum brain revealed silencing Hltf disrupted cell cycle progression, and attenuated DNA damage repair. An RNA-Seq snapshot of neonatal heart transcriptome showed 1,536 of 20,000 total transcripts were altered (p < 0.05 - 10 up- and 1,526 downregulated. Pathway enrichment analysis with MetaCore™ showed Hltf's regulation of the G2/M transition (p=9.726E(-15 of the cell cycle in heart is nearly identical to its role in brain. In addition, Brca1 and 12 members of the Brca1 associated genome surveillance complex are also downregulated. Activation of caspase 3 coincides with transcriptional repression of Bcl-2. Hltf loss caused downregulation of Wt1/Gata4/Hif-1a signaling cascades as well as Myh7b/miR499 transcription. Hltf-specific binding to promoters and/or regulatory regions of these genes was authenticated by ChIP-PCR. Hif-1a targets for prolyl (P4ha1, P4ha2 and lysyl (Plod2 collagen hydroxylation, PPIase enzymes (Ppid, Ppif, Ppil3 for collagen trimerization, and lysyl oxidase (Loxl2 for collagen-elastin crosslinking were downregulated. However, transcription of genes for collagens, fibronectin, Mmps and their inhibitors (Timps was unaffected. The collective downregulation of genes whose protein products control collagen biogenesis caused disorganization of the interstitial and perivascular myocardial collagen fibrillar network as viewed with picrosirius red-staining, and authenticated with spectral imaging. Wavy collagen bundles in control hearts contrasted with collagen fibers that were thin, short and disorganized in Hltf null hearts. Collagen bundles in Hltf null hearts were tangled and

  6. Nonmuscle Myosin II helps regulate synaptic vesicle mobility at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Xinping

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the mechanistic details of the vesicle transport process from the cell body to the nerve terminal are well described, the mechanisms underlying vesicle traffic within nerve terminal boutons is relatively unknown. The actin cytoskeleton has been implicated but exactly how actin or actin-binding proteins participate in vesicle movement is not clear. Results In the present study we have identified Nonmuscle Myosin II as a candidate molecule important for synaptic vesicle traffic within Drosophila larval neuromuscular boutons. Nonmuscle Myosin II was found to be localized at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction; genetics and pharmacology combined with the time-lapse imaging technique FRAP were used to reveal a contribution of Nonmuscle Myosin II to synaptic vesicle movement. FRAP analysis showed that vesicle dynamics were highly dependent on the expression level of Nonmuscle Myosin II. Conclusion Our results provide evidence that Nonmuscle Myosin II is present presynaptically, is important for synaptic vesicle mobility and suggests a role for Nonmuscle Myosin II in shuttling vesicles at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. This work begins to reveal the process by which synaptic vesicles traverse within the bouton.

  7. Gap Junction-Mediated Signaling from Motor Neurons Regulates Motor Generation in the Central Circuits of Larval Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Teruyuki; Kohsaka, Hiroshi; Nose, Akinao

    2017-02-22

    In this study, we used the peristaltic crawling of Drosophila larvae as a model to study how motor patterns are regulated by central circuits. We built an experimental system that allows simultaneous application of optogenetics and calcium imaging to the isolated ventral nerve cord (VNC). We then investigated the effects of manipulating local activity of motor neurons (MNs) on fictive locomotion observed as waves of MN activity propagating along neuromeres. Optical inhibition of MNs with halorhodopsin3 in a middle segment (A4, A5, or A6), but not other segments, dramatically decreased the frequency of the motor waves. Conversely, local activation of MNs with channelrhodopsin2 in a posterior segment (A6 or A7) increased the frequency of the motor waves. Since peripheral nerves mediating sensory feedback were severed in the VNC preparation, these results indicate that MNs send signals to the central circuits to regulate motor pattern generation. Our results also indicate segmental specificity in the roles of MNs in motor control. The effects of the local MN activity manipulation were lost in shaking-B(2) (shakB(2) ) or ogre(2) , gap-junction mutations in Drosophila, or upon acute application of the gap junction blocker carbenoxolone, implicating electrical synapses in the signaling from MNs. Cell-type-specific RNAi suggested shakB and ogre function in MNs and interneurons, respectively, during the signaling. Our results not only reveal an unexpected role for MNs in motor pattern regulation, but also introduce a powerful experimental system that enables examination of the input-output relationship among the component neurons in this system.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Motor neurons are generally considered passive players in motor pattern generation, simply relaying information from upstream interneuronal circuits to the target muscles. This study shows instead that MNs play active roles in the control of motor generation by conveying information via gap junctions to the

  8. Maximum likelihood q-estimator reveals nonextensivity regulated by extracellular potassium in the mammalian neuromuscular junction

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, A J; Santos, D O C; Lima, R F

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated the existence of nonextensivity in neuromuscular transmission [Phys. Rev. E 84, 041925 (2011)]. In the present letter, we propose a general criterion based on the q-calculus foundations and nonextensive statistics to estimate the values for both scale factor and q-index using the maximum likelihood q-estimation method (MLqE). We next applied our theoretical findings to electrophysiological recordings from neuromuscular junction (NMJ) where spontaneous miniature end plate potentials (MEPP) were analyzed. These calculations were performed in both normal and high extracellular potassium concentration, [K+]o. This protocol was assumed to test the validity of the q-index in electrophysiological conditions closely resembling physiological stimuli. Surprisingly, the analysis showed a significant difference between the q-index in high and normal [K+]o, where the magnitude of nonextensivity was increased. Our letter provides a general way to obtain the best q-index from the q-Gaussian distrib...

  9. The Junctional Adhesion Molecule-B regulates JAM-C-dependent melanoma cell metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcangeli, Marie-Laure; Frontera, Vincent; Bardin, Florence; Thomassin, Jeanne; Chetaille, Bruno; Adams, Susanne; Adams, Ralf H; Aurrand-Lions, Michel

    2012-11-16

    Metastasis is a major clinical issue and results in poor prognosis for most cancers. The Junctional Adhesion Molecule-C (JAM-C) expressed by B16 melanoma and endothelial cells has been involved in metastasis of tumor cells through homophilic JAM-C/JAM-C trans-interactions. Here, we show that JAM-B expressed by endothelial cells contributes to murine B16 melanoma cells metastasis through its interaction with JAM-C on tumor cells. We further show that this adhesion molecular pair mediates melanoma cell adhesion to primary Lung Microvascular Endothelial Cells and that it is functional in vivo as demonstrated by the reduced metastasis of B16 cells in Jam-b deficient mice.

  10. EM structure of a helicase-loader complex depicting a 6:2 binding sub-stoichiometry from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yen-Chen [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Naveen, Vankadari [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Molecular Cell Biology, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, and Graduate Institute of Life Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Chwan-Deng, E-mail: hsiao@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Molecular Cell Biology, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, and Graduate Institute of Life Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2016-04-22

    During DNA replication, bacterial helicase is recruited as a complex in association with loader proteins to unwind the parental duplex. Previous structural studies have reported saturated 6:6 helicase-loader complexes with different conformations. However, structural information on the sub-stoichiometric conformations of these previously-documented helicase-loader complexes remains elusive. Here, with the aid of single particle electron-microscopy (EM) image reconstruction, we present the Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 helicase-loader (DnaC-DnaI) complex with a 6:2 binding stoichiometry in the presence of ATPγS. In the 19 Å resolution EM map, the undistorted and unopened helicase ring holds a robust loader density above the C-terminal RecA-like domain. Meanwhile, the path of the central DNA binding channel appears to be obstructed by the reconstructed loader density, implying its potential role as a checkpoint conformation to prevent the loading of immature complex onto DNA. Our data also reveals that the bound nucleotides and the consequently induced conformational changes in the helicase hexamer are essential for active association with loader proteins. These observations provide fundamental insights into the formation of the helicase-loader complex in bacteria that regulates the DNA replication process. - Highlights: • Helicase-loader complex structure with 6:2 sub-stoichiometry is resolved by EM. • Helicase hexamer in 6:2 sub-stoichiometry is constricted and un-opened. • 6:2 binding ratio of helicase-loader complex could act as a DNA loading checkpoint. • Nucleotides stabilize helicase-loader complex at low protein concentrations.

  11. The gap junction as a "Biological Rosetta Stone": implications of evolution, stem cells to homeostatic regulation of health and disease in the Barker hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosko, James E

    2011-03-01

    The discovery of the gap junction structure, its functions and the family of the "connexin" genes, has been basically ignored by the major biological disciplines. These connexin genes code for proteins that organize to form membrane-associated hemi-channels, "connexons", co-join with the connexons of neighboring cells to form gap junctions. Gap junctions appeared in the early evolution of the metazoan. Their fundamental functions, (e.g., to synchronize electrotonic and metabolic functions of societies of cells, and to regulate cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis), were accomplished via integrating the extra-cellular triggering of intra-cellular signaling, and therefore, regulating gene expression. These functions have been documented by genetic mutations of the connexin genes and by chemical modulation of gap junctions. Via genetic alteration of connexins in knock-out and transgenic mice, as well as inherited connexin mutations in various human syndromes, the gap junction has been shown to be directly linked to many normal cell functions and multiple diseases, such as birth defects, reproductive, neurological disorders, immune dysfunction and cancer. Specifically, the modulation of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), either by increasing or decreasing its functions by non-mutagenic chemicals or by oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes in normal or "initiated" stem cells and their progenitor cells, can have a major impact on tumor promotion or cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy. The overview of the roles of the gap junction in the evolution of the metazoan and its potential in understanding a "systems" view of human health and aging and the diseases of aging will be attempted.

  12. Regulation of Hemichannels and Gap Junction Channels by Cytokines in Antigen-Presenting Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo J. Sáez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autocrine and paracrine signals coordinate responses of several cell types of the immune system that provide efficient protection against different challenges. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs coordinate activation of this system via homocellular and heterocellular interactions. Cytokines constitute chemical intercellular signals among immune cells and might promote pro- or anti-inflammatory effects. During the last two decades, two membrane pathways for intercellular communication have been demonstrated in cells of the immune system. They are called hemichannels (HCs and gap junction channels (GJCs and provide new insights into the mechanisms of the orchestrated response of immune cells. GJCs and HCs are permeable to ions and small molecules, including signaling molecules. The direct intercellular transfer between contacting cells can be mediated by GJCs, whereas the release to or uptake from the extracellular milieu can be mediated by HCs. GJCs and HCs can be constituted by two protein families: connexins (Cxs or pannexins (Panxs, which are present in almost all APCs, being Cx43 and Panx1 the most ubiquitous members of each protein family. In this review, we focus on the effects of different cytokines on the intercellular communication mediated by HCs and GJCs in APCs and their impact on purinergic signaling.

  13. Brr2p RNA helicase with a split personality: insights into structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Daniela; Beggs, Jean D

    2010-08-01

    RNA helicases are involved in many cellular processes. Pre-mRNA splicing requires eight different DExD/H-box RNA helicases, which facilitate spliceosome assembly and remodelling of the intricate network of RNA rearrangements that are central to the splicing process. Brr2p, one of the spliceosomal RNA helicases, stands out through its unusual domain architecture. In the present review we highlight the advances made by recent structural and biochemical studies that have important implications for the mechanism and regulation of Brr2p activity. We also discuss the involvement of human Brr2 in retinitis pigmentosa, a degenerative eye disease, and how its functions in splicing might connect to the molecular pathology of the disease.

  14. Mutations in the consensus helicase domains of the Werner syndrome gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Chang-En; Oshima, Junko; Wijsman, E.M. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disease with a complex phenotype that is suggestive of accelerated aging. WS is caused by mutations in a gene, WRN, that encodes a predicted 1,432-amino-acid protein with homology to DNA and RNA helicases. Previous work identified four WS mutations in the 3{prime} end of the gene, which resulted in predicted truncated protein products of 1,060-1,247 amino acids but did not disrupt the helicase domain region (amino acids 569-859). Here, additional WS subjects were screened for mutations, and the intron-exon structure of the gene was determined. A total of 35 exons were defined, with the coding sequences beginning in the second exon. Five new WS mutations were identified: two nonsense mutations at codons 369 and 889; a mutation at a splice-junction site, resulting in a predicted truncated protein of 760 amino acids; a 1-bp deletion causing a frameshift; and a predicted truncated protein of 391 amino acids. Another deletion is >15 kb of genomic DNA, including exons 19-23; the predicted protein is 1,186 amino acids long. Four of these new mutations either partially disrupt the helicase domain region or result in predicted protein products completely missing the helicase region. These results confirm that mutations in the WRN gene are responsible for WS. Also, the location of the mutations indicates that the presence or absence of the helicase domain does not influence the WS phenotype and suggests that WS is the result of complete loss of function of the WRN gene product. 63 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  15. Postsynaptic actin regulates active zone spacing and glutamate receptor apposition at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunk, Aline D; Akbergenova, Yulia; Cho, Richard W; Lee, Jihye; Walldorf, Uwe; Xu, Ke; Zhong, Guisheng; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Littleton, J Troy

    2014-07-01

    Synaptic communication requires precise alignment of presynaptic active zones with postsynaptic receptors to enable rapid and efficient neurotransmitter release. How transsynaptic signaling between connected partners organizes this synaptic apparatus is poorly understood. To further define the mechanisms that mediate synapse assembly, we carried out a chemical mutagenesis screen in Drosophila to identify mutants defective in the alignment of active zones with postsynaptic glutamate receptor fields at the larval neuromuscular junction. From this screen we identified a mutation in Actin 57B that disrupted synaptic morphology and presynaptic active zone organization. Actin 57B, one of six actin genes in Drosophila, is expressed within the postsynaptic bodywall musculature. The isolated allele, act(E84K), harbors a point mutation in a highly conserved glutamate residue in subdomain 1 that binds members of the Calponin Homology protein family, including spectrin. Homozygous act(E84K) mutants show impaired alignment and spacing of presynaptic active zones, as well as defects in apposition of active zones to postsynaptic glutamate receptor fields. act(E84K) mutants have disrupted postsynaptic actin networks surrounding presynaptic boutons, with the formation of aberrant actin swirls previously observed following disruption of postsynaptic spectrin. Consistent with a disruption of the postsynaptic actin cytoskeleton, spectrin, adducin and the PSD-95 homolog Discs-Large are all mislocalized in act(E84K) mutants. Genetic interactions between act(E84K) and neurexin mutants suggest that the postsynaptic actin cytoskeleton may function together with the Neurexin-Neuroligin transsynaptic signaling complex to mediate normal synapse development and presynaptic active zone organization.

  16. JNK signaling regulates E-cadherin junctions in germline cysts and determines primordial follicle formation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wanbao; Wang, Ye; Wang, Zhengpin; Xin, Qiliang; Wang, Yijing; Feng, Lizhao; Zhao, Lihua; Wen, Jia; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Chao; Xia, Guoliang

    2016-05-15

    Physiologically, the size of the primordial follicle pool determines the reproductive lifespan of female mammals, while its establishment largely depends on a process of germline cyst breakdown during the perinatal period. The mechanisms regulating this process are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling is crucial for germline cyst breakdown and primordial follicle formation. JNK was specifically localized in oocytes and its activity increased as germline cyst breakdown progressed. Importantly, disruption of JNK signaling with a specific inhibitor (SP600125) or knockdown technology (Lenti-JNK-shRNAs) resulted in significantly suppressed cyst breakdown and primordial follicle formation in cultured mouse ovaries. Our results show that E-cadherin is intensely expressed in germline cysts, and that its decline is necessary for oocyte release from the cyst. However, inhibition of JNK signaling leads to aberrantly enhanced localization of E-cadherin at oocyte-oocyte contact sites. WNT4 expression is upregulated after SP600125 treatment. Additionally, similar to the effect of SP600125 treatment, WNT4 overexpression delays cyst breakdown and is accompanied by abnormal E-cadherin expression patterns. In conclusion, our results suggest that JNK signaling, which is inversely correlated with WNT4, plays an important role in perinatal germline cyst breakdown and primordial follicle formation by regulating E-cadherin junctions between oocytes in mouse ovaries. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Purification and crystallization of Kokobera virus helicase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Colibus, Luigi; Speroni, Silvia [Department of Genetics and Microbiology, University of Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Coutard, Bruno [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolécules Biologiques, UMR 6098 CNRS et Université Aix-Marseille I et II, ESIL, Campus de Luminy, 13288 Marseille CEDEX 09 (France); Forrester, Naomi L.; Gould, Ernest [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (formerly Institute of Virology), Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3SR (United Kingdom); Canard, Bruno [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolécules Biologiques, UMR 6098 CNRS et Université Aix-Marseille I et II, ESIL, Campus de Luminy, 13288 Marseille CEDEX 09 (France); Mattevi, Andrea, E-mail: mattevi@ipvgen.unipv.it [Department of Genetics and Microbiology, University of Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2007-03-01

    Kokobera virus is a mosquito-borne flavivirus belonging, like West Nile virus, to the Japanese encephalitis virus serocomplex. Crystals of the Kokobera virus helicase domain were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and exhibit a diffraction limit of 2.3 Å. Kokobera virus is a mosquito-borne flavivirus belonging, like West Nile virus, to the Japanese encephalitis virus serocomplex. The flavivirus genus is characterized by a positive-sense single-stranded RNA genome. The unique open reading frame of the viral RNA is transcribed and translated as a single polyprotein which is post-translationally cleaved to yield three structural and seven nonstructural proteins, one of which is the NS3 gene that encodes a C-terminal helicase domain consisting of 431 amino acids. Helicase inhibitors are potential antiviral drugs as the helicase is essential to viral replication. Crystals of the Kokobera virus helicase domain were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to space group P3{sub 1}21 (or P3{sub 2}21), with unit-cell parameters a = 88.6, c = 138.6 Å, and exhibit a diffraction limit of 2.3 Å.

  18. Sox4 mediates Tbx3 transcriptional regulation of the gap junction protein Cx43

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogerd, C.J.; Wong, L.Y.; van den Boogaard, M.; Bakker, M.A.J.; Tessadori, F.; Bakkers, J.; 't Hoen, P.A.C.; Moorman, A.F.; Christoffels, V.M.; Barnett, P.

    2011-01-01

    Tbx3, a T-box transcription factor, regulates key steps in development of the heart and other organ systems. Here, we identify Sox4 as an interacting partner of Tbx3. Pull-down and nuclear retention assays verify this interaction and in situ hybridization reveals Tbx3 and Sox4 to co-localize

  19. Two highly similar DEAD box proteins, OsRH2 and OsRH34, homologous to eukaryotic initiation factor 4AIII, play roles of the exon junction complex in regulating growth and development in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Kai; Sie, Yi-Syuan; Chen, Yu-Fu; Huang, Tian-Sheng; Lu, Chung-An

    2016-04-12

    The exon junction complex (EJC), which contains four core components, eukaryotic initiation factor 4AIII (eIF4AIII), MAGO/NASHI (MAGO), Y14/Tsunagi/RNA-binding protein 8A, and Barentsz/Metastatic lymph node 51, is formed in both nucleus and cytoplasm, and plays important roles in gene expression. Genes encoding core EJC components have been found in plants, including rice. Currently, the functional characterizations of MAGO and Y14 homologs have been demonstrated in rice. However, it is still unknown whether eIF4AIII is essential for the functional EJC in rice. This study investigated two DEAD box RNA helicases, OsRH2 and OsRH34, which are homologous to eIF4AIII, in rice. Amino acid sequence analysis indicated that OsRH2 and OsRH34 had 99 % identity and 100 % similarity, and their gene expression patterns were similar in various rice tissues, but the level of OsRH2 mRNA was about 58-fold higher than that of OsRH34 mRNA in seedlings. From bimolecular fluorescence complementation results, OsRH2 and OsRH34 interacted physically with OsMAGO1 and OsY14b, respectively, which indicated that both of OsRH2 and OsRH34 were core components of the EJC in rice. To study the biological roles of OsRH2 and OsRH34 in rice, transgenic rice plants were generated by RNA interference. The phenotypes of three independent OsRH2 and OsRH34 double-knockdown transgenic lines included dwarfism, a short internode distance, reproductive delay, defective embryonic development, and a low seed setting rate. These phenotypes resembled those of mutants with gibberellin-related developmental defects. In addition, the OsRH2 and OsRH34 double-knockdown transgenic lines exhibited the accumulation of unspliced rice UNDEVELOPED TAPETUM 1 mRNA. Rice contains two eIF4AIII paralogous genes, OsRH2 and OsRH34. The abundance of OsRH2 mRNA was about 58-fold higher than that of OsRH34 mRNA in seedlings, suggesting that the OsRH2 is major eIF4AIII in rice. Both OsRH2 and OsRH34 are core components of the EJC

  20. The potential utility of tight junction regulation in celiac disease: focus on larazotide acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaleghi, Shahryar; Ju, Josephine M; Lamba, Abhinav; Murray, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common chronic immune disease triggered by gluten. Gliadin peptides pass through the epithelial layers, either paracellularly or transcellularly, to launch a potent adaptive immune response in the lamina propria. This aberrant immune response leads to diverse gastrointestinal and extra-gastrointestinal symptoms. Currently, the only treatment for CD is a strict lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD), which can be challenging. An early effect of gluten in CD is an increase in gut permeability. Larazotide acetate, also known as AT-1001, is a synthetic peptide developed as a permeability regulator primarily targeting CD. In vitro studies indicate that larazotide acetate is capable of inhibiting the actin rearrangement caused by gliadin and clinical studies have been conducted using this peptide as a therapy for CD.

  1. Gap Junctions Contribute to the Regulation of Walking-Like Activity in the Adult Mudpuppy (Necturus Maculatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, Igor; Fox, Lyle; Shen, Jun; Han, Yingchun; Cheng, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Although gap junctions are widely expressed in the developing central nervous system, the role of electrical coupling of neurons and glial cells via gap junctions in the spinal cord in adults is largely unknown. We investigated whether gap junctions are expressed in the mature spinal cord of the mudpuppy and tested the effects of applying gap junction blocker on the walking-like activity induced by NMDA or glutamate in an in vitro mudpuppy preparation. We found that glial and neural cells in the mudpuppy spinal cord expressed different types of connexins that include connexin 32 (Cx32), connexin 36 (Cx36), connexin 37 (Cx37), and connexin 43 (Cx43). Application of a battery of gap junction blockers from three different structural classes (carbenexolone, flufenamic acid, and long chain alcohols) substantially and consistently altered the locomotor-like activity in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, these blockers did not significantly change the amplitude of the dorsal root reflex, indicating that gap junction blockers did not inhibit neuronal excitability nonselectively in the spinal cord. Taken together, these results suggest that gap junctions play a significant modulatory role in the spinal neural networks responsible for the generation of walking-like activity in the adult mudpuppy.

  2. Gap Junctions Contribute to the Regulation of Walking-Like Activity in the Adult Mudpuppy (Necturus Maculatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Lavrov

    Full Text Available Although gap junctions are widely expressed in the developing central nervous system, the role of electrical coupling of neurons and glial cells via gap junctions in the spinal cord in adults is largely unknown. We investigated whether gap junctions are expressed in the mature spinal cord of the mudpuppy and tested the effects of applying gap junction blocker on the walking-like activity induced by NMDA or glutamate in an in vitro mudpuppy preparation. We found that glial and neural cells in the mudpuppy spinal cord expressed different types of connexins that include connexin 32 (Cx32, connexin 36 (Cx36, connexin 37 (Cx37, and connexin 43 (Cx43. Application of a battery of gap junction blockers from three different structural classes (carbenexolone, flufenamic acid, and long chain alcohols substantially and consistently altered the locomotor-like activity in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, these blockers did not significantly change the amplitude of the dorsal root reflex, indicating that gap junction blockers did not inhibit neuronal excitability nonselectively in the spinal cord. Taken together, these results suggest that gap junctions play a significant modulatory role in the spinal neural networks responsible for the generation of walking-like activity in the adult mudpuppy.

  3. Cholinergic regulation of the evoked quantal release at frog neuromuscular junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolsky, Eugeny E; Vyskočil, František; Bukharaeva, Ella A; Samigullin, Dmitry; Magazanik, Lev G

    2004-01-01

    The effects of cholinergic drugs on the quantal contents of the nerve-evoked endplate currents (EPCs) and the parameters of the time course of quantal release (minimal synaptic latency, main modal value of latency histogram and variability of synaptic latencies) were studied at proximal, central and distal regions of the frog neuromuscular synapse. Acetylcholine (ACh, 5 × 10−4 m), carbachol (CCh, 1 × 10−5 m) or nicotine (5 × 10−6 m) increased the numbers of EPCs with long release latencies mainly in the distal region of the endplate (90–120 μm from the last node of Ranvier), where the synchronization of transmitter release was the most pronounced. The parameters of focally recorded motor nerve action potentials were not changed by either ACh or CCh. The effects of CCh and nicotine on quantal dispersion were reduced substantially by 5 × 10−7 m (+)tubocurarine (TC). The muscarinic agonists, oxotremorine and the propargyl ester of arecaidine, as well as antagonists such as pirenzepine, AF-DX 116 and methoctramine, alone or in combination, did not affect the dispersion of the release. Muscarinic antagonists did not block the dispersion action of CCh. Cholinergic drugs either decreased the quantal content mo (muscarinic agonist, oxotremorine M, and nicotinic antagonist, TC), or decreased mo and dispersed the release (ACh, CCh and nicotine). The effects on mo were not related either to the endplate region or to the initial level of release dispersion. It follows that the mechanisms regulating the amount and the time course of transmitter release are different and that, among other factors, they are altered by presynaptic nicotinic receptors. PMID:15254150

  4. Structural mechanisms of human RecQ helicases WRN and BLM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken eKitano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The RecQ family DNA helicases WRN (Werner syndrome protein and BLM (Bloom syndrome protein play a key role in protecting the genome against deleterious changes. In humans, mutations in these proteins lead to rare genetic diseases associated with cancer predisposition and accelerated aging. WRN and BLM are distinguished from other helicases by possessing signature tandem domains toward the C terminus, referred to as the RecQ C-terminal (RQC and helicase-and-ribonuclease D-C-terminal (HRDC domains. Although the precise function of the HRDC domain remains unclear, the previous crystal structure of a WRN RQC-DNA complex visualized a central role for the RQC domain in recognizing, binding and unwinding DNA at branch points. In particular, a prominent hairpin structure (the β-wing within the RQC winged-helix motif acts as a scalpel to induce the unpairing of a Watson-Crick base pair at the DNA duplex terminus. A similar RQC-DNA interaction was also observed in the recent crystal structure of a BLM-DNA complex. I review the latest structures of WRN and BLM, and then provide a docking simulation of BLM with a Holliday junction. The model offers an explanation for the efficient branch migration activity of the RecQ family toward recombination and repair intermediates.

  5. Breast cancer cell migration is regulated through junctional adhesion molecule-A-mediated activation of Rap1 GTPase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McSherry, Elaine A

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: The adhesion protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates epithelial cell morphology and migration, and its over-expression has recently been linked with increased risk of metastasis in breast cancer patients. As cell migration is an early requirement for tumor metastasis, we sought to identify the JAM-A signalling events regulating migration in breast cancer cells. METHODS: MCF7 breast cancer cells (which express high endogenous levels of JAM-A) and primary cultures from breast cancer patients were used for this study. JAM-A was knocked down in MCF7 cells using siRNA to determine the consequences for cell adhesion, cell migration and the protein expression of various integrin subunits. As we had previously demonstrated a link between the expression of JAM-A and beta1-integrin, we examined activation of the beta1-integrin regulator Rap1 GTPase in response to JAM-A knockdown or functional antagonism. To test whether JAM-A, Rap1 and beta1-integrin lie in a linear pathway, we tested functional inhibitors of all three proteins separately or together in migration assays. Finally we performed immunoprecipitations in MCF7 cells and primary breast cells to determine the binding partners connecting JAM-A to Rap1 activation. RESULTS: JAM-A knockdown in MCF7 breast cancer cells reduced adhesion to, and migration through, the beta1-integrin substrate fibronectin. This was accompanied by reduced protein expression of beta1-integrin and its binding partners alphaV- and alpha5-integrin. Rap1 activity was reduced in response to JAM-A knockdown or inhibition, and pharmacological inhibition of Rap1 reduced MCF7 cell migration. No additive anti-migratory effect was observed in response to simultaneous inhibition of JAM-A, Rap1 and beta1-integrin, suggesting that they lie in a linear migratory pathway. Finally, in an attempt to elucidate the binding partners putatively linking JAM-A to Rap1 activation, we have demonstrated the formation of a complex between

  6. Breast cancer cell migration is regulated through junctional adhesion molecule-A-mediated activation of Rap1 GTPase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McSherry, Elaine A

    2011-03-23

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The adhesion protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates epithelial cell morphology and migration, and its over-expression has recently been linked with increased risk of metastasis in breast cancer patients. As cell migration is an early requirement for tumor metastasis, we sought to identify the JAM-A signalling events regulating migration in breast cancer cells. METHODS: MCF7 breast cancer cells (which express high endogenous levels of JAM-A) and primary cultures from breast cancer patients were used for this study. JAM-A was knocked down in MCF7 cells using siRNA to determine the consequences for cell adhesion, cell migration and the protein expression of various integrin subunits. As we had previously demonstrated a link between the expression of JAM-A and β1-integrin, we examined activation of the β1-integrin regulator Rap1 GTPase in response to JAM-A knockdown or functional antagonism. To test whether JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin lie in a linear pathway, we tested functional inhibitors of all three proteins separately or together in migration assays. Finally we performed immunoprecipitations in MCF7 cells and primary breast cells to determine the binding partners connecting JAM-A to Rap1 activation. RESULTS: JAM-A knockdown in MCF7 breast cancer cells reduced adhesion to, and migration through, the β1-integrin substrate fibronectin. This was accompanied by reduced protein expression of β1-integrin and its binding partners αV- and α5-integrin. Rap1 activity was reduced in response to JAM-A knockdown or inhibition, and pharmacological inhibition of Rap1 reduced MCF7 cell migration. No additive anti-migratory effect was observed in response to simultaneous inhibition of JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin, suggesting that they lie in a linear migratory pathway. Finally, in an attempt to elucidate the binding partners putatively linking JAM-A to Rap1 activation, we have demonstrated the formation of a complex between JAM-A, AF

  7. Breast cancer cell migration is regulated through junctional adhesion molecule-A-mediated activation of Rap1 GTPase

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McSherry, Elaine A

    2011-03-23

    Abstract Introduction The adhesion protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates epithelial cell morphology and migration, and its over-expression has recently been linked with increased risk of metastasis in breast cancer patients. As cell migration is an early requirement for tumor metastasis, we sought to identify the JAM-A signalling events regulating migration in breast cancer cells. Methods MCF7 breast cancer cells (which express high endogenous levels of JAM-A) and primary cultures from breast cancer patients were used for this study. JAM-A was knocked down in MCF7 cells using siRNA to determine the consequences for cell adhesion, cell migration and the protein expression of various integrin subunits. As we had previously demonstrated a link between the expression of JAM-A and β1-integrin, we examined activation of the β1-integrin regulator Rap1 GTPase in response to JAM-A knockdown or functional antagonism. To test whether JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin lie in a linear pathway, we tested functional inhibitors of all three proteins separately or together in migration assays. Finally we performed immunoprecipitations in MCF7 cells and primary breast cells to determine the binding partners connecting JAM-A to Rap1 activation. Results JAM-A knockdown in MCF7 breast cancer cells reduced adhesion to, and migration through, the β1-integrin substrate fibronectin. This was accompanied by reduced protein expression of β1-integrin and its binding partners αV- and α5-integrin. Rap1 activity was reduced in response to JAM-A knockdown or inhibition, and pharmacological inhibition of Rap1 reduced MCF7 cell migration. No additive anti-migratory effect was observed in response to simultaneous inhibition of JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin, suggesting that they lie in a linear migratory pathway. Finally, in an attempt to elucidate the binding partners putatively linking JAM-A to Rap1 activation, we have demonstrated the formation of a complex between JAM-A, AF-6

  8. Limited portability of G-patch domains in regulators of the Prp43 RNA helicase required for pre-mRNA splicing and ribosomal RNA maturation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Daipayan; McDaniel, Peter M; Rymond, Brian C

    2015-05-01

    The Prp43 DExD/H-box protein is required for progression of the biochemically distinct pre-messenger RNA and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) maturation pathways. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Spp382/Ntr1, Sqs1/Pfa1, and Pxr1/Gno1 proteins are implicated as cofactors necessary for Prp43 helicase activation during spliceosome dissociation (Spp382) and rRNA processing (Sqs1 and Pxr1). While otherwise dissimilar in primary sequence, these Prp43-binding proteins each contain a short glycine-rich G-patch motif required for function and thought to act in protein or nucleic acid recognition. Here yeast two-hybrid, domain-swap, and site-directed mutagenesis approaches are used to investigate G-patch domain activity and portability. Our results reveal that the Spp382, Sqs1, and Pxr1 G-patches differ in Prp43 two-hybrid response and in the ability to reconstitute the Spp382 and Pxr1 RNA processing factors. G-patch protein reconstitution did not correlate with the apparent strength of the Prp43 two-hybrid response, suggesting that this domain has function beyond that of a Prp43 tether. Indeed, while critical for Pxr1 activity, the Pxr1 G-patch appears to contribute little to the yeast two-hybrid interaction. Conversely, deletion of the primary Prp43 binding site within Pxr1 (amino acids 102-149) does not impede rRNA processing but affects small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) biogenesis, resulting in the accumulation of slightly extended forms of select snoRNAs, a phenotype unexpectedly shared by the prp43 loss-of-function mutant. These and related observations reveal differences in how the Spp382, Sqs1, and Pxr1 proteins interact with Prp43 and provide evidence linking G-patch identity with pathway-specific DExD/H-box helicase activity.

  9. EM structure of a helicase-loader complex depicting a 6:2 binding sub-stoichiometry from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Chen; Naveen, Vankadari; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng

    2016-04-22

    During DNA replication, bacterial helicase is recruited as a complex in association with loader proteins to unwind the parental duplex. Previous structural studies have reported saturated 6:6 helicase-loader complexes with different conformations. However, structural information on the sub-stoichiometric conformations of these previously-documented helicase-loader complexes remains elusive. Here, with the aid of single particle electron-microscopy (EM) image reconstruction, we present the Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 helicase-loader (DnaC-DnaI) complex with a 6:2 binding stoichiometry in the presence of ATPγS. In the 19 Å resolution EM map, the undistorted and unopened helicase ring holds a robust loader density above the C-terminal RecA-like domain. Meanwhile, the path of the central DNA binding channel appears to be obstructed by the reconstructed loader density, implying its potential role as a checkpoint conformation to prevent the loading of immature complex onto DNA. Our data also reveals that the bound nucleotides and the consequently induced conformational changes in the helicase hexamer are essential for active association with loader proteins. These observations provide fundamental insights into the formation of the helicase-loader complex in bacteria that regulates the DNA replication process.

  10. The eIF4AIII RNA helicase is a critical determinant of human cytomegalovirus replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziehr, Ben; Lenarcic, Erik; Cecil, Chad; Moorman, Nathaniel J., E-mail: nmoorman@med.unc.edu

    2016-02-15

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) was recently shown to encode a large number of spliced mRNAs. While the nuclear export of unspliced viral transcripts has been extensively studied, the role of host mRNA export factors in HCMV mRNA trafficking remains poorly defined. We found that the eIF4AIII RNA helicase, a component of the exon junction complex, was necessary for efficient virus replication. Depletion of eIF4AIII limited viral DNA accumulation, export of viral mRNAs from the nucleus, and the production of progeny virus. However eIF4AIII was dispensable for the association of viral transcripts with ribosomes. We found that pateamine A, a natural compound that inhibits both eIF4AI/II and eIF4AIII, has potent antiviral activity and inhibits HCMV replication throughout the virus lytic cycle. Our results demonstrate that eIF4AIII is required for efficient HCMV replication, and suggest that eIF4A family helicases may be a new class of targets for the development of host-directed antiviral therapeutics. - Highlights: • The host eIF4AIII RNA helicase is required for efficient HCMV replication. • Depleting eIF4AIII inhibited the nuclear export of HCMV mRNAs. • HCMV mRNAs did not require eIF4AIII to associate with polyribosomes. • The eIF4A family helicases may be new targets for host-directed antiviral drugs.

  11. Synthesis and SAR studies of 5-(pyridin-4-yl)-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-amine derivatives as potent inhibitors of Bloom helicase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenthal, Andrew S; Dexheimer, Thomas S; Gileadi, Opher;

    2013-01-01

    complementary strands of duplex DNA as well as atypical DNA structures such as Holliday junctions. Mutations of the BLM gene can result in Bloom syndrome, an autosomal recessive disorder associated with cancer predisposition. BLM-deficient cells exhibit increased sensitivity to DNA damaging agents indicating...... and related analogs, which possess potent BLM inhibition and exhibit selectivity over related helicases. Moreover, these compounds demonstrated cellular activity by inducing sister chromatid exchanges, a hallmark of Bloom syndrome.......Human cells utilize a variety of complex DNA repair mechanisms in order to combat constant mutagenic and cytotoxic threats from both exogenous and endogenous sources. The RecQ family of DNA helicases, which includes Bloom helicase (BLM), plays an important function in DNA repair by unwinding...

  12. Human RECQ helicases: roles in cancer, aging, and inherited disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorova JM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Julia M Sidorova,1,* Raymond J Monnat Jr,1,2,* 1Department of Pathology, 2Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA *The authors contributed equally to this review Abstract: DNA helicases use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to disrupt DNA base pairing and displace proteins from DNA in order to facilitate replication, recombination, transcription, and repair. This article focuses on the human RECQ helicases, five DNA-dependent helicases that play key roles in cellular physiology and disease. Loss of function of three RECQ helicases causes the cancer predisposition syndromes Bloom syndrome, Werner syndrome, and Rothmund–Thomson and related syndromes. We summarize recent work on these syndromes and proteins and discuss disease pathogenesis in light of RECQ helicase biochemical activities and in vivo functions. Keywords: ATP-dependent DNA helicase, Bloom syndrome, Werner syndrome, Rothmund–Thomson syndrome, DNA replication, DNA repair, genetic instability, cancer predisposition syndrome

  13. CMTM3 (CKLF-Like Marvel Transmembrane Domain 3) Mediates Angiogenesis by Regulating Cell Surface Availability of VE-Cadherin in Endothelial Adherens Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrifi, Ihsan; Louzao-Martinez, Laura; Brandt, Maarten; van Dijk, Christian G M; Burgisser, Petra; Zhu, Changbin; Kros, Johan M; Duncker, Dirk J; Cheng, Caroline

    2017-06-01

    Decrease in VE-cadherin adherens junctions reduces vascular stability, whereas disruption of adherens junctions is a requirement for neovessel sprouting during angiogenesis. Endocytosis plays a key role in regulating junctional strength by altering bioavailability of cell surface proteins, including VE-cadherin. Identification of new mediators of endothelial endocytosis could enhance our understanding of angiogenesis. Here, we assessed the function of CMTM3 (CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain 3), which we have previously identified as highly expressed in Flk1(+) endothelial progenitor cells during embryonic development. Using a 3-dimensional coculture of human umbilical vein endothelial cells-GFP (green fluorescent protein) and pericytes-RFP (red fluorescent protein), we demonstrated that siRNA-mediated CMTM3 silencing in human umbilical vein endothelial cells impairs angiogenesis. In vivo CMTM3 inhibition by morpholino injection in developing zebrafish larvae confirmed that CMTM3 expression is required for vascular sprouting. CMTM3 knockdown in human umbilical vein endothelial cells does not affect proliferation or migration. Intracellular staining demonstrated that CMTM3 colocalizes with early endosome markers EEA1 (early endosome marker 1) and Clathrin(+) vesicles and with cytosolic VE-cadherin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Adenovirus-mediated CMTM3 overexpression enhances endothelial endocytosis, shown by an increase in Clathrin(+), EEA1(+), Rab11(+), Rab5(+), and Rab7(+) vesicles. CMTM3 overexpression enhances, whereas CMTM3 knockdown decreases internalization of cell surface VE-cadherin in vitro. CMTM3 promotes loss of endothelial barrier function in thrombin-induced responses, shown by transendothelial electric resistance measurements in vitro. In this study, we have identified a new regulatory function for CMTM3 in angiogenesis. CMTM3 is involved in VE-cadherin turnover and is a regulator of the cell surface pool of VE-cadherin. Therefore

  14. Characterization of the Caenorhabditis elegans HIM-6/BLM helicase: unwinding recombination intermediates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Jung

    Full Text Available Mutations in three human RecQ genes are implicated in heritable human syndromes. Mutations in BLM, a RecQ gene, cause Bloom syndrome (BS, which is characterized by short stature, cancer predisposition, and sensitivity to sunlight. BLM is a RecQ DNA helicase that, with interacting proteins, is able to dissolve various DNA structures including double Holliday junctions. A BLM ortholog, him-6, has been identified in Caenorhabditis elegans, but little is known about its enzymatic activities or its in vivo roles. By purifying recombinant HIM-6 and performing biochemical assays, we determined that the HIM-6 has DNA-dependent ATPase activity HIM-6 and helicase activity that proceeds in the 3'-5' direction and needs at least five 3' overhanging nucleotides. HIM-6 is also able to unwind DNA structures including D-loops and Holliday junctions. Worms with him-6 mutations were defective in recovering the cell cycle arrest after HU treatment. These activities strongly support in vivo roles for HIM-6 in processing recombination intermediates.

  15. Characterization of the Neisseria meningitidis Helicase RecG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyene, Getachew Tesfaye; Balasingham, Seetha V.; Frye, Stephan A.; Namouchi, Amine; Homberset, Håvard; Kalayou, Shewit; Riaz, Tahira

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) is a Gram-negative oral commensal that opportunistically can cause septicaemia and/or meningitis. Here, we overexpressed, purified and characterized the Nm DNA repair/recombination helicase RecG (RecGNm) and examined its role during genotoxic stress. RecGNm possessed ATP-dependent DNA binding and unwinding activities in vitro on a variety of DNA model substrates including a Holliday junction (HJ). Database searching of the Nm genomes identified 49 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the recGNm including 37 non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs), and 7 of the nsSNPs were located in the codons for conserved active site residues of RecGNm. A transient reduction in transformation of DNA was observed in the Nm ΔrecG strain as compared to the wildtype. The gene encoding recGNm also contained an unusually high number of the DNA uptake sequence (DUS) that facilitate transformation in neisserial species. The differentially abundant protein profiles of the Nm wildtype and ΔrecG strains suggest that expression of RecGNm might be linked to expression of other proteins involved in DNA repair, recombination and replication, pilus biogenesis, glycan biosynthesis and ribosomal activity. This might explain the growth defect that was observed in the Nm ΔrecG null mutant. PMID:27736945

  16. A Novel Egr-1-Agrin Pathway and Potential Implications for Regulation of Synaptic Physiology and Homeostasis at the Neuromuscular Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryen MacDonald

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic transmission requires intricate coordination of the components involved in processing of incoming signals, formation and stabilization of synaptic machinery, neurotransmission and in all related signaling pathways. Changes to any of these components cause synaptic imbalance and disruption of neuronal circuitry. Extensive studies at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ have greatly aided in the current understanding of synapses and served to elucidate the underlying physiology as well as associated adaptive and homeostatic processes. The heparan sulfate proteoglycan agrin is a vital component of the NMJ, mediating synaptic formation and maintenance in both brain and muscle, but very little is known about direct control of its expression. Here, we investigated the relationship between agrin and transcription factor early growth response-1 (Egr-1, as Egr-1 regulates the expression of many genes involved in synaptic homeostasis and plasticity. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, cell culture with cell lines derived from brain and muscle, and animal models, we show that Egr-1 binds to the AGRN gene locus and suppresses its expression. When compared with wild type (WT, mice deficient in Egr-1 (Egr-1−/− display a marked increase in AGRN mRNA and agrin full-length and cleavage fragment protein levels, including the 22 kDa, C-terminal fragment in brain and muscle tissue homogenate. Because agrin is a crucial component of the NMJ, we explored possible physiological implications of the Egr-1-agrin relationship. In the diaphragm, Egr-1−/− mice display increased NMJ motor endplate density, individual area and area of innervation. In addition to increased density, soleus NMJs also display an increase in fragmented and faint endplates in Egr-1−/− vs. WT mice. Moreover, the soleus NMJ electrophysiology of Egr-1−/− mice revealed increased quantal content and motor testing showed decreased movement and limb muscle strength compared with

  17. A Novel Egr-1-Agrin Pathway and Potential Implications for Regulation of Synaptic Physiology and Homeostasis at the Neuromuscular Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Ryen; Barbat-Artigas, Sebastien; Cho, Chulmin; Peng, Huashan; Shang, Jijun; Moustaine, Ayman; Carbonetto, Salvatore; Robitaille, Richard; Chalifour, Lorraine E; Paudel, Hemant

    2017-01-01

    Synaptic transmission requires intricate coordination of the components involved in processing of incoming signals, formation and stabilization of synaptic machinery, neurotransmission and in all related signaling pathways. Changes to any of these components cause synaptic imbalance and disruption of neuronal circuitry. Extensive studies at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) have greatly aided in the current understanding of synapses and served to elucidate the underlying physiology as well as associated adaptive and homeostatic processes. The heparan sulfate proteoglycan agrin is a vital component of the NMJ, mediating synaptic formation and maintenance in both brain and muscle, but very little is known about direct control of its expression. Here, we investigated the relationship between agrin and transcription factor early growth response-1 (Egr-1), as Egr-1 regulates the expression of many genes involved in synaptic homeostasis and plasticity. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), cell culture with cell lines derived from brain and muscle, and animal models, we show that Egr-1 binds to the AGRN gene locus and suppresses its expression. When compared with wild type (WT), mice deficient in Egr-1 (Egr-1-/-) display a marked increase in AGRN mRNA and agrin full-length and cleavage fragment protein levels, including the 22 kDa, C-terminal fragment in brain and muscle tissue homogenate. Because agrin is a crucial component of the NMJ, we explored possible physiological implications of the Egr-1-agrin relationship. In the diaphragm, Egr-1-/- mice display increased NMJ motor endplate density, individual area and area of innervation. In addition to increased density, soleus NMJs also display an increase in fragmented and faint endplates in Egr-1-/- vs. WT mice. Moreover, the soleus NMJ electrophysiology of Egr-1-/- mice revealed increased quantal content and motor testing showed decreased movement and limb muscle strength compared with WT. This study provides

  18. Interaction of c-Src with gap junction protein connexin-43. Role in the regulation of cell-cell communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, B N; Hengeveld, T; Postma, F R; Moolenaar, W H

    2001-01-01

    Cell-cell communication via connexin-43 (Cx43)-based gap junctions is transiently inhibited by certain mitogens, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms are incompletely understood. Our previous studies have implicated the c-Src tyrosine kinase in mediating transient closure of Cx43-based gap junct

  19. Multiple Functions of Nuclear DNA Helicase Ⅱ (RNA helicase A) in Nucleic Acid Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suisheng ZHANG; Frank GROSSE

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear DNA helicase Ⅱ(NDH Ⅱ),or RNA helicase A(RHA),was initially discovered in mammals by conventional protein purification methods.Molecular cloning identified apparent sequence homologies between NDH Ⅱ and a Drosophila protein named maleless(MLE),the latter being essential for the Drosophila X-chromosome dosage compensation.Increasing amounts of evidence suggest that NDH Ⅱ is involved in multiple aspects of cellular and viral DNA and RNA metabolism.Moreover the functions of NDH Ⅱ may have potential clinical implications related to viral infection,autoimmune diseases,or even tumorigenesis.

  20. Ablation of CD11c(hi) dendritic cells exacerbates Japanese encephalitis by regulating blood-brain barrier permeability and altering tight junction/adhesion molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Hossain, Ferdaus Mohd Altaf; Patil, Ajit Mahadev; Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Seong Bum; Uyangaa, Erdenebelig; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, John-Hwa; Kim, Bumseok; Kim, Koanhoi; Eo, Seong Kug

    2016-10-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE), characterized by extensive neuroinflammation following infection with neurotropic JE virus (JEV), is becoming a leading cause of viral encephalitis due to rapid changes in climate and demography. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in restricting neuroinvasion of peripheral leukocytes and virus, thereby regulating the progression of viral encephalitis. In this study, we explored the role of CD11c(hi) dendritic cells (DCs) in regulating BBB integrity and JE progression using a conditional depletion model of CD11c(hi) DCs. Transient ablation of CD11c(hi) DCs resulted in markedly increased susceptibility to JE progression along with highly increased neuro-invasion of JEV. In addition, exacerbated JE progression in CD11c(hi) DC-ablated hosts was closely associated with increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-β, IL-6, and TNF-α) and CC chemokines (CCL2, CCL3, CXCL2) in the brain. Moreover, our results revealed that the exacerbation of JE progression in CD11c(hi) DC-ablated hosts was correlated with enhanced BBB permeability and reduced expression of tight junction and adhesion molecules (claudin-5, ZO-1, occluding, JAMs). Ultimately, our data conclude that the ablation of CD11c(hi) DCs provided a subsidiary impact on BBB integrity and the expression of tight junction/adhesion molecules, thereby leading to exacerbated JE progression. These findings provide insight into the secondary role of CD11c(hi) DCs in JE progression through regulation of BBB integrity and the expression of tight junction/adhesion molecules.

  1. RNA helicase DDX3 is a regulatory subunit of casein kinase 1 in Wnt-beta-catenin signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruciat, C.M.; Dolde, C.; de Groot, R.E.; Ohkawara, B.; Reinhard, C.; Korswagen, H.C.; Niehrs, C.

    2013-01-01

    Casein kinase 1 (CK1) members play key roles in numerous biological processes. They are considered "rogue" kinases, because their enzymatic activity appears unregulated. Contrary to this notion, we have identified the DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 as a regulator of the Wnt-beta-catenin network, where i

  2. Transforming growth factor-β3 regulates cell junction restructuring via MAPK-mediated mRNA destabilization and Smad-dependent protein degradation of junctional adhesion molecule B (JAM-B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Lui, Wing-Yee

    2015-06-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-B (JAM-B) is found between Sertoli cells at the blood-testis barrier (BTB) as well as between Sertoli and germ cells at the apical ectoplasmic specializations (ES) in the testis. The expression of JAM-B is tightly regulated to modulate the passage of spermatocytes across the BTB as well as the release of mature spermatozoa from the seminiferous epithelium. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) family is implicated in the regulation of testicular cell junction dynamics during spermatogenesis. This study aims to investigate the effects of TGF-β3 on the expression of JAM-B as well as the underlying mechanisms on how TGF-β3 regulates JAM-B expression to facilitate the disassembly of the BTB and apical ES. Our results revealed that TGF-β3 suppresses JAM-B at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. Inhibitor, siRNA knockdown and co-immunoprecipitation have shown that TGF-β3 induces JAM-B protein degradation via ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Immunofluorescence staining further confirmed that blockage of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway could abrogate TGF-β3-induced loss of JAM-B at the cell-cell interface. siRNA knockdown and immunofluorescence staining also demonstrated that activation of Smad signaling is required for TGF-β3-induced JAM-B protein degradation. In addition, TGF-β3 reduces JAM-B mRNA levels, at least in part, via post-transcriptional regulation. mRNA stability assay has confirmed that TGF-β3 promotes the degradation of JAM-B transcript and TGF-β3-mediated mRNA destabilization requires the activation of ERK1/2 and p54 JNK signal cascades. Taken together, TGF-β3 significantly downregulates JAM-B expression via post-transcriptional and post-translational modulation and results in the disruption of BTB and apical ES.

  3. Structural basis of Zika virus helicase in recognizing its substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongliang Tian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The recent explosive outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV infection has been reported in South and Central America and the Caribbean. Neonatal microcephaly associated with ZIKV infection has already caused a public health emergency of international concern. No specific vaccines or drugs are currently available to treat ZIKV infection. The ZIKV helicase, which plays a pivotal role in viral RNA replication, is an attractive target for therapy. We determined the crystal structures of ZIKV helicase-ATP-Mn2+ and ZIKV helicase-RNA. This is the first structure of any flavivirus helicase bound to ATP. Comparisons with related flavivirus helicases have shown that although the critical P-loop in the active site has variable conformations among different species, it adopts an identical mode to recognize ATP/Mn2+. The structure of ZIKV helicase-RNA has revealed that upon RNA binding, rotations of the motor domains can cause significant conformational changes. Strikingly, although ZIKV and dengue virus (DENV apo-helicases share conserved residues for RNA binding, their different manners of motor domain rotations result in distinct individual modes for RNA recognition. It suggests that flavivirus helicases could have evolved a conserved engine to convert chemical energy from nucleoside triphosphate to mechanical energy for RNA unwinding, but different motor domain rotations result in variable RNA recognition modes to adapt to individual viral replication.

  4. XPD helicase speeds through a molecular traffic jam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Ilya J; Greene, Eric C

    2009-09-11

    Helicases and other DNA translocases must travel along crowded substrates. In this issue, Honda et al. (2009) report that the archaeal XPD helicase can bypass a single-stranded DNA-binding protein without either molecule being ejected from the DNA.

  5. Nucleolin inhibits G4 oligonucleotide unwinding by Werner helicase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred E Indig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Werner protein (WRNp, a member of the RecQ helicase family, is strongly associated with the nucleolus, as is nucleolin (NCL, an important nucleolar constituent protein. Both WRNp and NCL respond to the effects of DNA damaging agents. Therefore, we have investigated if these nuclear proteins interact and if this interaction has a possible functional significance in DNA damage repair. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report that WRNp interacts with the RNA-binding protein, NCL, based on immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescent co-localization in live and fixed cells, and direct binding of purified WRNp to nucleolin. We also map the binding region to the C-terminal domains of both proteins. Furthermore, treatment of U2OS cells with 15 µM of the Topoisomerase I inhibitor, camptothecin, causes the dissociation of the nucleolin-Werner complex in the nucleolus, followed by partial re-association in the nucleoplasm. Other DNA damaging agents, such as hydroxyurea, Mitomycin C, and aphidicolin do not have these effects. Nucleolin or its C-terminal fragment affected the helicase, but not the exonuclease activity of WRNp, by inhibiting WRN unwinding of G4 tetraplex DNA structures, as seen in activity assays and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that nucleolin may regulate G4 DNA unwinding by WRNp, possibly in response to certain DNA damaging agents. We postulate that the NCL-WRNp complex may contain an inactive form of WRNp, which is released from the nucleolus upon DNA damage. Then, when required, WRNp is released from inhibition and can participate in the DNA repair processes.

  6. Implanted neural progenitor cells regulate glial reaction to brain injury and establish gap junctions with host glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaverón, Rocío; Matarredona, Esperanza R; de la Cruz, Rosa R; Macías, David; Gálvez, Victoria; Pastor, Angel M

    2014-04-01

    Transplantation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) in the lesioned brain is able to restore morphological and physiological alterations induced by different injuries. The local microenvironment created at the site of grafting and the communication between grafted and host cells are crucial in the beneficial effects attributed to the NPC implants. We have previously described that NPC transplantation in an animal model of central axotomy restores firing properties and synaptic coverage of lesioned neurons and modulates their trophic factor content. In this study, we aim to explore anatomical relationships between implanted NPCs and host glia that might account for the implant-induced neuroprotective effects. Postnatal rat subventricular zone NPCs were isolated and grafted in adult rats after transection of the medial longitudinal fascicle. Brains were removed and analyzed eight weeks later. Immunohistochemistry for different glial markers revealed that NPC-grafted animals displayed significantly greater microglial activation than animals that received only vehicle injections. Implanted NPCs were located in close apposition to activated microglia and reactive astrocytes. The gap junction protein connexin43 was present in NPCs and glial cells at the lesion site and was often found interposed within adjacent implanted and glial cells. Gap junctions were identified between implanted NPCs and host astrocytes and less frequently between NPCs and microglia. Our results show that implanted NPCs modulate the glial reaction to lesion and establish the possibility of communication through gap junctions between grafted and host glial cells which might be involved in the restorative effects of NPC implants.

  7. Novel subcellular localization of the DNA helicase Twinkle at the kinetochore complex during mitosis in neuronal-like progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uittenbogaard, Martine; Chiaramello, Anne

    2016-03-01

    During mitosis, the kinetochore, a multi-protein structure located on the centromeric DNA, is responsible for proper segregation of the replicated genome. More specifically, the outer kinetochore complex component Ndc80/Hec1 plays a critical role in regulating microtubule attachment to the spindle for accurate sister chromatid segregation. In addition, DNA helicases play a key contribution for precise and complete disjunction of sister chromatids held together through double-stranded DNA catenations until anaphase. In this study, we focused our attention on the nuclear-encoded DNA helicase Twinkle, which functions as an essential helicase for replication of mitochondrial DNA. It regulates the copy number of the mitochondrial genome, while maintaining its integrity, two processes essential for mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetic functions. Although the majority of the Twinkle protein is imported into mitochondria, a small fraction remains cytosolic with an unknown function. In this study, we report a novel expression pattern of Twinkle during chromosomal segregation at distinct mitotic phases. By immunofluorescence microscopy, we found that Twinkle protein colocalizes with the outer kinetochore protein HEC1 as early as prophase until late anaphase in neuronal-like progenitor cells. Thus, our collective results have revealed an unexpected cell cycle-regulated expression pattern of the DNA helicase Twinkle, known for its role in mtDNA replication. Therefore, its recruitment to the kinetochore suggests an evolutionary conserved function for both mitochondrial and nuclear genomic inheritance.

  8. Mechanisms of HCV NS3 helicase monitored by optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    As one of the essential enzymes for viral genome replication, the hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase is one of the best characterized RNA helicases to date in understanding the mechanistic cycles in a helicase-catalyzed strand separation reaction. Recently, single-molecule studies on NS3, in particular the use of optical tweezers with sub-base pair spatial resolution, have allowed people to examine the potential elementary steps of NS3 in unwinding the double-stranded RNA fueled by ATP binding and hydrolysis. In this chapter, I detail the essential technical elements involved in conducting a high-resolution optical tweezers study of NS3 helicase, starting from the purification of the recombinant helicase protein from E. coli to setting up a high-resolution single-molecule experiment using optical tweezers.

  9. Rictor/mTORC2 regulates blood-testis barrier dynamics via its effects on gap junction communications and actin filament network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Ka-Wai; Mruk, Dolores D; Lee, Will M; Cheng, C Yan

    2013-03-01

    In the mammalian testis, coexisting tight junctions (TJs), basal ectoplasmic specializations, and gap junctions (GJs), together with desmosomes near the basement membrane, constitute the blood-testis barrier (BTB). The most notable feature of the BTB, however, is the extensive network of actin filament bundles, which makes it one of the tightest blood-tissue barriers. The BTB undergoes restructuring to facilitate the transit of preleptotene spermatocytes at stage VIII-IX of the epithelial cycle. Thus, the F-actin network at the BTB undergoes cyclic reorganization via a yet-to-be explored mechanism. Rictor, the key component of mTORC2 that is known to regulate actin cytoskeleton, was shown to express stage-specifically at the BTB in the seminiferous epithelium. Its expression was down-regulated at the BTB in stage VIII-IX tubules, coinciding with BTB restructuring at these stages. Using an in vivo model, a down-regulation of rictor at the BTB was also detected during adjudin-induced BTB disruption, illustrating rictor expression is positively correlated with the status of the BTB integrity. Indeed, the knockdown of rictor by RNAi was found to perturb the Sertoli cell TJ-barrier function in vitro and the BTB integrity in vivo. This loss of barrier function was accompanied by changes in F-actin organization at the Sertoli cell BTB in vitro and in vivo, associated with a loss of interaction between actin and α-catenin or ZO-1. Rictor knockdown by RNAi was also found to impede Sertoli cell-cell GJ communication, disrupting protein distribution (e.g., occludin, ZO-1) at the BTB, illustrating that rictor is a crucial BTB regulator.

  10. Role of Myoendothelial Gap Junctions in the Regulation of Human Coronary Artery Smooth Muscle Cell Differentiation by Laminar Shear Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongqi Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Smooth muscle cells may dedifferentiate into the synthetic phenotype and promote atherosclerosis. Here, we explored the role of myoendothelial gap junctions in phenotypic switching of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs co-cultured with human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs exposed to shear stress. Methods: HCASMCs and HCAECs were seeded on opposite sides of Transwell inserts, and HCAECs were exposed to laminar shear stress of 12 dyn/cm2 or 5 dyn/cm2. The myoendothelial gap junctions were evaluated by using a multi-photon microscope. Results: In co-culture with HCAECs, HCASMCs exhibited a contractile phenotype, and maintained the expression of differentiation markers MHC and H1-calponin. HCASMCs and HCAECs formed functional intercellular junctions, as evidenced by colocalization of connexin(Cx40 and Cx43 on cellular projections inside the Transwell membrane and biocytin transfer from HCAECs to HCASMCs. Cx40 siRNA and 18-α-GA attenuated protein expression of MHC and H1-calponin in HCASMCs. Shear stress of 5 dyn/cm2 increased Cx43 and decreased Cx40 expression in HCAECs, and partly inhibited biocytin transfer from HCAECs to HCASMCs, which could be completely blocked by Cx43 siRNA or restored by Cx40 DNA transfected into HCAECs. The exposure of HCAECs to shear stress of 5 dyn/cm2 promoted HCASMC phenotypic switching, manifested by morphological changes, decrease in MHC and H1-calponin expression, and increase in platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB release, which was partly rescued by Cx43 siRNA or Cx40 DNA or PDGF receptor signaling inhibitor. Conclusions: The exposure of HCAECs to shear stress of 5 dyn/cm2 caused the dysfunction of Cx40/Cx43 heterotypic myoendothelial gap junctions, which may be replaced by homotypic Cx43/Cx43 channels, and induced HCASMC transition to the synthetic phenotype associated with the activation of PDGF receptor signaling, which may contribute to shear stress

  11. Mechanism of DNA loading by the DNA repair helicase XPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu-Aruxandei, Diana; Petrovic-Stojanovska, Biljana; Penedo, J Carlos; White, Malcolm F; Naismith, James H

    2016-04-07

    The xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) helicase is a component of the transcription factor IIH complex in eukaryotes and plays an essential role in DNA repair in the nucleotide excision repair pathway. XPD is a 5' to 3' helicase with an essential iron-sulfur cluster. Structural and biochemical studies of the monomeric archaeal XPD homologues have aided a mechanistic understanding of this important class of helicase, but several important questions remain open. In particular, the mechanism for DNA loading, which is assumed to require large protein conformational change, is not fully understood. Here, DNA binding by the archaeal XPD helicase from Thermoplasma acidophilum has been investigated using a combination of crystallography, cross-linking, modified substrates and biochemical assays. The data are consistent with an initial tight binding of ssDNA to helicase domain 2, followed by transient opening of the interface between the Arch and 4FeS domains, allowing access to a second binding site on helicase domain 1 that directs DNA through the pore. A crystal structure of XPD from Sulfolobus acidocaldiarius that lacks helicase domain 2 has an otherwise unperturbed structure, emphasizing the stability of the interface between the Arch and 4FeS domains in XPD.

  12. Mechanism of DNA loading by the DNA repair helicase XPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu-Aruxandei, Diana; Petrovic-Stojanovska, Biljana; Penedo, J. Carlos; White, Malcolm F.; Naismith, James H.

    2016-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) helicase is a component of the transcription factor IIH complex in eukaryotes and plays an essential role in DNA repair in the nucleotide excision repair pathway. XPD is a 5′ to 3′ helicase with an essential iron–sulfur cluster. Structural and biochemical studies of the monomeric archaeal XPD homologues have aided a mechanistic understanding of this important class of helicase, but several important questions remain open. In particular, the mechanism for DNA loading, which is assumed to require large protein conformational change, is not fully understood. Here, DNA binding by the archaeal XPD helicase from Thermoplasma acidophilum has been investigated using a combination of crystallography, cross-linking, modified substrates and biochemical assays. The data are consistent with an initial tight binding of ssDNA to helicase domain 2, followed by transient opening of the interface between the Arch and 4FeS domains, allowing access to a second binding site on helicase domain 1 that directs DNA through the pore. A crystal structure of XPD from Sulfolobus acidocaldiarius that lacks helicase domain 2 has an otherwise unperturbed structure, emphasizing the stability of the interface between the Arch and 4FeS domains in XPD. PMID:26896802

  13. Mutator Phenotype and DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in BLM Helicase-Deficient Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tetsuya; Yasui, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS), an autosomal recessive disorder of the BLM gene, predisposes sufferers to various cancers. To investigate the mutator phenotype and genetic consequences of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in BS cells, we developed BLM helicase-deficient human cells by disrupting the BLM gene. Cells with a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) due to homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) can be restored with or without site-directed DSB induction. BLM cells exhibited a high frequency of spontaneous interallelic HR with crossover, but noncrossover events with long-tract gene conversions also occurred. Despite the highly interallelic HR events, BLM cells predominantly produced hemizygous LOH by spontaneous deletion. These phenotypes manifested during repair of DSBs. Both NHEJ and HR appropriately repaired DSBs in BLM cells, resulting in hemizygous and homozygous LOHs, respectively. However, the magnitude of the LOH was exacerbated in BLM cells, as evidenced by large deletions and long-tract gene conversions with crossover. BLM helicase suppresses the elongation of branch migration and crossover of double Holliday junctions (HJs) during HR repair, and a deficiency in this enzyme causes collapse, abnormal elongation, and/or preferable resolution to crossover of double HJs, resulting in a large-scale LOH. This mechanism underlies the predisposition for cancer in BS. PMID:27601585

  14. Mutator Phenotype and DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in BLM Helicase-Deficient Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tetsuya; Yasui, Manabu; Honma, Masamitsu

    2016-12-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS), an autosomal recessive disorder of the BLM gene, predisposes sufferers to various cancers. To investigate the mutator phenotype and genetic consequences of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in BS cells, we developed BLM helicase-deficient human cells by disrupting the BLM gene. Cells with a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) due to homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) can be restored with or without site-directed DSB induction. BLM cells exhibited a high frequency of spontaneous interallelic HR with crossover, but noncrossover events with long-tract gene conversions also occurred. Despite the highly interallelic HR events, BLM cells predominantly produced hemizygous LOH by spontaneous deletion. These phenotypes manifested during repair of DSBs. Both NHEJ and HR appropriately repaired DSBs in BLM cells, resulting in hemizygous and homozygous LOHs, respectively. However, the magnitude of the LOH was exacerbated in BLM cells, as evidenced by large deletions and long-tract gene conversions with crossover. BLM helicase suppresses the elongation of branch migration and crossover of double Holliday junctions (HJs) during HR repair, and a deficiency in this enzyme causes collapse, abnormal elongation, and/or preferable resolution to crossover of double HJs, resulting in a large-scale LOH. This mechanism underlies the predisposition for cancer in BS. Copyright © 2016 Suzuki et al.

  15. Evidence that a RecQ helicase slows senescence by resolving recombining telomeres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Y Lee

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available RecQ helicases, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sgs1p and the human Werner syndrome protein, are important for telomere maintenance in cells lacking telomerase activity. How maintenance is accomplished is only partly understood, although there is evidence that RecQ helicases function in telomere replication and recombination. Here we use two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE and telomere sequence analysis to explore why cells lacking telomerase and Sgs1p (tlc1 sgs1 mutants senesce more rapidly than tlc1 mutants with functional Sgs1p. We find that apparent X-shaped structures accumulate at telomeres in senescing tlc1 sgs1 mutants in a RAD52- and RAD53-dependent fashion. The X-structures are neither Holliday junctions nor convergent replication forks, but instead may be recombination intermediates related to hemicatenanes. Direct sequencing of examples of telomere I-L in senescing cells reveals a reduced recombination frequency in tlc1 sgs1 compared with tlc1 mutants, indicating that Sgs1p is needed for tlc1 mutants to complete telomere recombination. The reduction in recombinants is most prominent at longer telomeres, consistent with a requirement for Sgs1p to generate viable progeny following telomere recombination. We therefore suggest that Sgs1p may be required for efficient resolution of telomere recombination intermediates, and that resolution failure contributes to the premature senescence of tlc1 sgs1 mutants.

  16. Mechanistic insight into the interaction of BLM helicase with intra-strand G-quadruplex structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sujoy; Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Savitsky, Pavel; Sturzenegger, Andreas; Huttner, Diana; Janscak, Pavel; Hickson, Ian D.; Gileadi, Opher; Rothenberg, Eli

    2014-11-01

    Bloom syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the RecQ family helicase BLM that is associated with growth retardation and predisposition to cancer. BLM helicase has a high specificity for non-canonical G-quadruplex (G4) DNA structures, which are formed by G-rich DNA strands and play an important role in the maintenance of genomic integrity. Here we used single-molecule FRET to define the mechanism of interaction of BLM helicase with intra-stranded G4 structures. We show that the activity of BLM is substrate dependent, and highly regulated by a short-strand DNA (ssDNA) segment that separates the G4 motif from double-stranded DNA. We demonstrate cooperativity between the RQC and HRDC domains of BLM during binding and unfolding of the G4 structure, where the RQC domain interaction with G4 is stabilized by HRDC binding to ssDNA. We present a model that proposes a unique role for G4 structures in modulating the activity of DNA processing enzymes.

  17. Structural basis for the function of DEAH helicases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Yangzi; Andersen, Gregers Rom; Nielsen, Klaus Hvid

    2010-01-01

    DEAH helicases participate in pre‐messenger RNA splicing and ribosome biogenesis. The structure of yeast Prp43p‐ADP reveals the homology of DEAH helicases to DNA helicases and the presence of an oligonucleotide‐binding motif. A β‐hairpin from the second RecA domain is wedged between two carboxy......‐terminal domains and blocks access to the occluded RNA binding site formed by the RecA domains and a C‐terminal domain. ATP binding and hydrolysis are likely to induce conformational changes in the hairpin that are important for RNA unwinding or ribonucleoprotein remodelling. The structure of Prp43p provides...

  18. Roles of the linker region of RNA helicase A in HIV-1 RNA metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xing

    Full Text Available RNA helicase A (RHA promotes multiple steps in HIV-1 production including transcription and translation of viral RNA, annealing of primer tRNA(Lys3 to viral RNA, and elevating the ratio of unspliced to spliced viral RNA. At its amino terminus are two double-stranded RNA binding domains (dsRBDs that are essential for RHA-viral RNA interaction. Linking the dsRBDs to the core helicase domain is a linker region containing 6 predicted helices. Working in vitro with purified mutant RHAs containing deletions of individual helices reveals that this region may regulate the enzyme's helicase activity, since deletion of helix 2 or 3 reduces the rate of unwinding RNA by RHA. The biological significance of this finding was then examined during HIV-1 production. Deletions in the linker region do not significantly affect either RHA-HIV-1 RNA interaction in vivo or the incorporation of mutant RHAs into progeny virions. While the partial reduction in helicase activity of mutant RHA containing a deletion of helices 2 or 3 does not reduce the ability of RHA to stimulate viral RNA synthesis, the promotion of tRNA(Lys3 annealing to viral RNA is blocked. In contrast, deletion of helices 4 or 5 does not affect the ability of RHA to promote tRNA(Lys3 annealing, but reduces its ability to stimulate viral RNA synthesis. Additionally, RHA stimulation of viral RNA synthesis results in an increased ratio of unspliced to spliced viral RNA, and this increase is not inhibited by deletions in the linker region, nor is the pattern of splicing changed within the ∼ 4.0 kb or ∼ 1.8 kb HIV-1 RNA classes, suggesting that RHA's effect on suppressing splicing is confined mainly to the first 5'-splice donor site. Overall, the differential responses to the mutations in the linker region of RHA reveal that RHA participates in HIV-1 RNA metabolism by multiple distinct mechanisms.

  19. Mutations altering the interplay between GkDnaC helicase and DNA reveal an insight into helicase unwinding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hua Lo

    Full Text Available Replicative helicases are essential molecular machines that utilize energy derived from NTP hydrolysis to move along nucleic acids and to unwind double-stranded DNA (dsDNA. Our earlier crystal structure of the hexameric helicase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkDnaC in complex with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA suggested several key residues responsible for DNA binding that likely play a role in DNA translocation during the unwinding process. Here, we demonstrated that the unwinding activities of mutants with substitutions at these key residues in GkDnaC are 2-4-fold higher than that of wild-type protein. We also observed the faster unwinding velocities in these mutants using single-molecule experiments. A partial loss in the interaction of helicase with ssDNA leads to an enhancement in helicase efficiency, while their ATPase activities remain unchanged. In strong contrast, adding accessory proteins (DnaG or DnaI to GkDnaC helicase alters the ATPase, unwinding efficiency and the unwinding velocity of the helicase. It suggests that the unwinding velocity of helicase could be modulated by two different pathways, the efficiency of ATP hydrolysis or protein-DNA interaction.

  20. LL5beta: a regulator of postsynaptic differentiation identified in a screen for synaptically enriched transcripts at the neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Masashi; Kummer, Terrance T; Eglen, Stephen J; Sanes, Joshua R

    2005-04-25

    In both neurons and muscle fibers, specific mRNAs are concentrated beneath and locally translated at synaptic sites. At the skeletal neuromuscular junction, all synaptic RNAs identified to date encode synaptic components. Using microarrays, we compared RNAs in synapse-rich and -free regions of muscles, thereby identifying transcripts that are enriched near synapses and that encode soluble membrane and nuclear proteins. One gene product, LL5beta, binds to both phosphoinositides and a cytoskeletal protein, filamin, one form of which is concentrated at synaptic sites. LL5beta is itself associated with the cytoplasmic face of the postsynaptic membrane; its highest levels border regions of highest acetylcholine receptor (AChR) density, which suggests a role in "corraling" AChRs. Consistent with this idea, perturbing LL5beta expression in myotubes inhibits AChR aggregation. Thus, a strategy designed to identify novel synaptic components led to identification of a protein required for assembly of the postsynaptic apparatus.

  1. Bloom Syndrome Helicase Promotes Meiotic Crossover Patterning and Homolog Disjunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatkevich, Talia; Kohl, Kathryn P; McMahan, Susan; Hartmann, Michaelyn A; Williams, Andrew M; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2017-01-09

    In most sexually reproducing organisms, crossover formation between homologous chromosomes is necessary for proper chromosome disjunction during meiosis I. During meiotic recombination, a subset of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired as crossovers, with the remainder becoming noncrossovers [1]. Whether a repair intermediate is designated to become a crossover is a highly regulated decision that integrates several crossover patterning processes, both along chromosome arms (interference and the centromere effect) and between chromosomes (crossover assurance) [2]. Because the mechanisms that generate crossover patterning have remained elusive for over a century, it has been difficult to assess the relationship between crossover patterning and meiotic chromosome behavior. We show here that meiotic crossover patterning is lost in Drosophila melanogaster mutants that lack the Bloom syndrome helicase. In the absence of interference and the centromere effect, crossovers are distributed more uniformly along chromosomes. Crossovers even occur on the small chromosome 4, which normally never has meiotic crossovers [3]. Regulated distribution of crossovers between chromosome pairs is also lost, resulting in an elevated frequency of homologs that do not receive a crossover, which in turn leads to elevated nondisjunction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Reappraising social emotions: the role of inferior frontal gyrus, temporo- parietal junction and insula in interpersonal emotion regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grecucci, A.; Giorgetta, C.; Bonini, N.; Sanfey, A.G.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have reported the effect of emotion regulation (ER) strategies on both individual and social decision-making, however, the effect of regulation on socially driven emotions independent of decisions is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the neural effects of using re

  3. Phospho-regulated Drosophila adducin is a determinant of synaptic plasticity in a complex with Dlg and PIP2 at the larval neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Ji Hau Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Adducin is a ubiquitously expressed actin- and spectrin-binding protein involved in cytoskeleton organization, and is regulated through phosphorylation of the myristoylated alanine-rich C-terminal kinase (MARCKS-homology domain by protein kinase C (PKC. We have previously shown that the Drosophila adducin, Hu-li tai shao (Hts, plays a role in larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ growth. Here, we find that the predominant isoforms of Hts at the NMJ contain the MARCKS-homology domain, which is important for interactions with Discs large (Dlg and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2. Through the use of Proximity Ligation Assay (PLA, we show that the adducin-like Hts isoforms are in complexes with Dlg and PIP2 at the NMJ. We provide evidence that Hts promotes the phosphorylation and delocalization of Dlg at the NMJ through regulation of the transcript distribution of the PAR-1 and CaMKII kinases in the muscle. We also show that Hts interactions with Dlg and PIP2 are impeded through phosphorylation of the MARCKS-homology domain. These results are further evidence that Hts is a signaling-responsive regulator of synaptic plasticity in Drosophila.

  4. Neuregulin1 displayed on motor axons regulates terminal Schwann cell-mediated synapse elimination at developing neuromuscular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Il; Li, Yue; Mikesh, Michelle; Smith, Ian; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Schwab, Markus H; Thompson, Wesley J

    2016-01-26

    Synaptic connections in the nervous system are rearranged during development and in adulthood as a feature of growth, plasticity, aging, and disease. Glia are implicated as active participants in these changes. Here we investigated a signal that controls the participation of peripheral glia, the terminal Schwann cells (SCs), at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) in mice. Transgenic manipulation of the levels of membrane-tethered neuregulin1 (NRG1-III), a potent activator of SCs normally presented on motor axons, alters the rate of loss of motor inputs at NMJs during developmental synapse elimination. In addition, NMJs of adult transgenic mice that expressed excess axonal NRG1-III exhibited continued remodeling, in contrast to the more stable morphologies of controls. In fact, synaptic SCs of these adult mice with NRG1-III overexpression exhibited behaviors evident in wild type neonates during synapse elimination, including an affinity for the postsynaptic myofiber surface and phagocytosis of nerve terminals. Given that levels of NRG1-III expression normally peak during the period of synapse elimination, our findings identify axon-tethered NRG1 as a molecular determinant for SC-driven neuromuscular synaptic plasticity.

  5. Origin and evolution of the RIG-I like RNA helicase gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nie Pin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The DExD/H domain containing RNA helicases such as retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5 are key cytosolic pattern recognition receptors (PRRs for detecting nucleotide pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs of invading viruses. The RIG-I and MDA5 proteins differentially recognise conserved PAMPs in double stranded or single stranded viral RNA molecules, leading to activation of the interferon system in vertebrates. They share three core protein domains including a RNA helicase domain near the C terminus (HELICc, one or more caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARDs and an ATP dependent DExD/H domain. The RIG-I/MDA5 directed interferon response is negatively regulated by laboratory of genetics and physiology 2 (LGP2 and is believed to be controlled by the mitochondria antiviral signalling protein (MAVS, a CARD containing protein associated with mitochondria. Results The DExD/H containing RNA helicases including RIG-I, MDA5 and LGP2 were analysed in silico in a wide spectrum of invertebrate and vertebrate genomes. The gene synteny of MDA5 and LGP2 is well conserved among vertebrates whilst conservation of the gene synteny of RIG-I is less apparent. Invertebrate homologues had a closer phylogenetic relationship with the vertebrate RIG-Is than the MDA5/LGP2 molecules, suggesting the RIG-I homologues may have emerged earlier in evolution, possibly prior to the appearance of vertebrates. Our data suggest that the RIG-I like helicases possibly originated from three distinct genes coding for the core domains including the HELICc, CARD and ATP dependent DExD/H domains through gene fusion and gene/domain duplication. Furthermore, presence of domains similar to a prokaryotic DNA restriction enzyme III domain (Res III, and a zinc finger domain of transcription factor (TF IIS have been detected by bioinformatic analysis. Conclusion The RIG-I/MDA5 viral surveillance system

  6. Augmented cell death with Bloom syndrome helicase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Hideo; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Kasahara, Kimiko; Yamada, Taketo; Kondo, Naomi

    2011-01-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is a rare autosomal genetic disorder characterized by lupus-like erythematous telangi-ectasias of the face, sun sensitivity, infertility, stunted growth, upper respiratory infection, and gastrointestinal infections commonly associated with decreased immuno-globulin levels. The syndrome is associated with immuno-deficiency of a generalized type, ranging from mild and essentially asympto-matic to severe. Chromosomal abnormalities are hallmarks of the disorder, and high frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges and quadriradial configurations in lymphocytes and fibroblasts are diagnostic features. BS is caused by mutations in BLM, a member of the RecQ helicase family. We determined whether BLM deficiency has any effects on cell growth and death in BLM-deficient cells and mice. BLM-deficient EB-virus-transformed cell lines from BS patients and embryonic fibroblasts from BLM-/- mice showed slower growth than wild-type cells. BLM-deficient cells showed abnormal p53 protein expression after irradiation. In BLM-/- mice, small body size, reduced number of fetal liver cells and increased cell death were observed. BLM deficiency causes the up-regulation of p53, double-strand break and apoptosis, which are likely observed in irradiated control cells. Slow cell growth and increased cell death may be one of the causes of the small body size associated with BS patients.

  7. DNA-conjugated gold nanoparticles based colorimetric assay to assess helicase activity: a novel route to screen potential helicase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Jashmini; Mojumdar, Aditya; Parisse, Pietro; Onesti, Silvia; Casalis, Loredana

    2017-03-01

    Helicase are essential enzymes which are widespread in all life-forms. Due to their central role in nucleic acid metabolism, they are emerging as important targets for anti-viral, antibacterial and anti-cancer drugs. The development of easy, cheap, fast and robust biochemical assays to measure helicase activity, overcoming the limitations of the current methods, is a pre-requisite for the discovery of helicase inhibitors through high-throughput screenings. We have developed a method which exploits the optical properties of DNA-conjugated gold nanoparticles (AuNP) and meets the required criteria. The method was tested with the catalytic domain of the human RecQ4 helicase and compared with a conventional FRET-based assay. The AuNP-based assay produced similar results but is simpler, more robust and cheaper than FRET. Therefore, our nanotechnology-based platform shows the potential to provide a useful alternative to the existing conventional methods for following helicase activity and to screen small-molecule libraries as potential helicase inhibitors.

  8. DNA-conjugated gold nanoparticles based colorimetric assay to assess helicase activity: a novel route to screen potential helicase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Jashmini; Mojumdar, Aditya; Parisse, Pietro; Onesti, Silvia; Casalis, Loredana

    2017-01-01

    Helicase are essential enzymes which are widespread in all life-forms. Due to their central role in nucleic acid metabolism, they are emerging as important targets for anti-viral, antibacterial and anti-cancer drugs. The development of easy, cheap, fast and robust biochemical assays to measure helicase activity, overcoming the limitations of the current methods, is a pre-requisite for the discovery of helicase inhibitors through high-throughput screenings. We have developed a method which exploits the optical properties of DNA-conjugated gold nanoparticles (AuNP) and meets the required criteria. The method was tested with the catalytic domain of the human RecQ4 helicase and compared with a conventional FRET-based assay. The AuNP-based assay produced similar results but is simpler, more robust and cheaper than FRET. Therefore, our nanotechnology-based platform shows the potential to provide a useful alternative to the existing conventional methods for following helicase activity and to screen small-molecule libraries as potential helicase inhibitors. PMID:28287182

  9. RECQL5 has unique strand annealing properties relative to the other human RecQ helicase proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadka, Prabhat; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2016-01-01

    The RecQ helicases play important roles in genome maintenance and DNA metabolism (replication, recombination, repair, and transcription). Five different homologs are present in humans, three of which are implicated in accelerated aging genetic disorders: Rothmund Thomson (RECQL4), Werner (WRN), and Bloom (BLM) syndromes. While the DNA helicase activities of the 5 human RecQ helicases have been extensively characterized, much less is known about their DNA double strand annealing activities. Strand annealing is an important integral enzymatic activity in DNA metabolism, including DNA repair. Here, we have characterized the strand annealing activities of all five human RecQ helicase proteins and compared them. Interestingly, the relative strand annealing activities of the five RecQ proteins are not directly (inversely) related to their helicase activities. RECQL5 possesses relatively strong annealing activity on long or small duplexed substrates compared to the other RecQs. Additionally, the strand annealing activity of RECQL5 is not inhibited by the presence of ATP, unlike the other RecQs. We also show that RECQL5 efficiently catalyzes annealing of RNA to DNA in vitro in the presence or absence of ATP, revealing a possible new function for RECQL5. Additionally, we investigate how different known RecQ interacting proteins, RPA, Ku, FEN1 and RAD51, regulate their strand annealing activity. Collectively, we find that the human RecQ proteins possess differential DNA double strand annealing activities and we speculate on their individual roles in DNA repair. This insight is important in view of the many cellular DNA metabolic actions of the RecQ proteins and elucidates their unique functions in the cell.

  10. The ouabain-sensitive isoform of Na+-pump regulates vascular gap junctions via interaction with the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger in membrane microdomain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matchkov, Vladimir; Nilsson, Holger; Aalkjær, Christian

    Ouabain, an inhibitor of the Na+-pump, has been shown to inhibit intercellular communication. We have recently shown that gap junctions between vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are regulated through an interaction between a ouabain-sensitive isoform of the Na+-pump and the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger...... electrical coupling was evaluated in functional studies. SMCs were electrically uncoupled when the ouabain-sensitive Na+-pump was inhibited by 10 mM ouabain. Inhibition of the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger with 1 mM SEA0400 also uncoupled the SMCs. Depletion of [Na+]i and clamping [Ca2+]i at low levels prevented......+-exchanger-1 and connexin-43. The α3 Na+-pump subunit was not associated with these proteins but co-immunoprecipitated with caveolin-1. Based on these experiments we suggest that α2 Na+ -pump subunit is involved in regulation of the intercellular communication via interaction with the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger-1...

  11. A Rad53 Independent Function of Rad9 Becomes Crucial for Genome Maintenance in the Absence of the RecQ Helicase Sgs1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ida; Bentsen, Iben Bach; Andersen, Anni Hangaard;

    2013-01-01

    The conserved family of RecQ DNA helicases consists of caretaker tumour suppressors, that defend genome integrity by acting on several pathways of DNA repair that maintain genome stability. In budding yeast, Sgs1 is the sole RecQ helicase and it has been implicated in checkpoint responses......, replisome stability and dissolution of double Holliday junctions during homologous recombination. In this study we investigate a possible genetic interaction between SGS1 and RAD9 in the cellular response to methyl methane sulphonate (MMS) induced damage and compare this with the genetic interaction between...... SGS1 and RAD24. The Rad9 protein, an adaptor for effector kinase activation, plays well-characterized roles in the DNA damage checkpoint response, whereas Rad24 is characterized as a sensor protein also in the DNA damage checkpoint response. Here we unveil novel insights into the cellular response...

  12. Evidence for a functional dimeric form of the PcrA helicase in DNA unwinding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, Ye; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Ren, Hua; Wang, Peng-Ye; Zhang, Xing-Dong; Qian, Min; Pan, Bing-Yi; Xi, Xu Guang

    2008-01-01

    .... The first crystal structures of helicases were obtained with PcrA. Based on structural and biochemical studies, it was proposed and then generally believed that PcrA is a monomeric helicase that unwinds DNA by an inchworm mechanism...

  13. Engineered holliday junctions as single-molecule reporters for protein-DNA interactions with application to a MerR-family regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Susanta K; Andoy, Nesha May; Benítez, Jaime J; Chen, Peng R; Kong, Jason S; He, Chuan; Chen, Peng

    2007-10-17

    Protein-DNA interactions are essential for gene maintenance, replication, and expression. Characterizing how proteins interact with and change the structure of DNA is crucial in elucidating the mechanisms of protein function. Here, we present a novel and generalizable method of using engineered DNA Holliday junctions (HJs) that contain specific protein-recognition sequences to report protein-DNA interactions in single-molecule FRET measurements, utilizing the intrinsic structural dynamics of HJs. Because the effects of protein binding are converted to the changes in the structure and dynamics of HJs, protein-DNA interactions that involve small structural changes of DNA can be studied. We apply this method to investigate how the MerR-family regulator PbrR691 interacts with DNA for transcriptional regulation. Both apo- and holo-PbrR691 bind the stacked conformers of the engineered HJ, change their structures, constrain their conformational distributions, alter the kinetics, and shift the equilibrium of their structural dynamics. The information obtained maps the potential energy surfaces of HJ before and after PbrR691 binding and reveals the protein actions that force DNA structural changes for transcriptional regulation. The ability of PbrR691 to bind both HJ conformers and still allow HJ structural dynamics also informs about its conformational flexibility that may have significance for its regulatory function. This method of using engineered HJs offers quantification of the changes both in structure and in dynamics of DNA upon protein binding and thus provides a new tool to elucidate the correlation of structure, dynamics, and function of DNA-binding proteins.

  14. A biochemically active MCM-like helicase in Bacillus cereus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Martin; Gulati, Gaurav; Shin, Jae-Ho; Opara, Rejoice; McSweeney, Elizabeth; Sekedat, Matt; Long, Stephen; Kelman, Zvi; Jeruzalmi, David

    2009-01-01

    The mini-chromosome maintenance (MCM) proteins serve as the replicative helicases in archaea and eukaryotes. Interestingly, an MCM homolog was identified, by BLAST analysis, within a phage integrated in the bacterium Bacillus cereus (Bc). BcMCM is only related to the AAA region of MCM-helicases; the typical amino-terminus is missing and is replaced by a segment with weak homology to primases. We show that BcMCM displays 3′→5′ helicase and ssDNA-stimulated ATPase activity, properties that arise from its conserved AAA domain. Isolated BcMCM is a monomer in solution but likely forms the functional oligomer in vivo. We found that the BcMCM amino-terminus can bind ssDNA and harbors a zinc atom, both hallmarks of the typical MCM amino-terminus. No BcMCM-catalyzed primase activity could be detected. We propose that the divergent amino-terminus of BcMCM is a paralog of the corresponding region of MCM-helicases. A divergent amino terminus makes BcMCM a useful model for typical MCM-helicases since it accomplishes the same function using an apparently unrelated structure. PMID:19474351

  15. Intravital FRAP Imaging using an E-cadherin-GFP Mouse Reveals Disease- and Drug-Dependent Dynamic Regulation of Cell-Cell Junctions in Live Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Erami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions play a prominent role in maintaining the epithelial architecture. The disruption or deregulation of these adhesions in cancer can lead to the collapse of tumor epithelia that precedes invasion and subsequent metastasis. Here we generated an E-cadherin-GFP mouse that enables intravital photobleaching and quantification of E-cadherin mobility in live tissue without affecting normal biology. We demonstrate the broad applications of this mouse by examining E-cadherin regulation in multiple tissues, including mammary, brain, liver, and kidney tissue, while specifically monitoring E-cadherin mobility during disease progression in the pancreas. We assess E-cadherin stability in native pancreatic tissue upon genetic manipulation involving Kras and p53 or in response to anti-invasive drug treatment and gain insights into the dynamic remodeling of E-cadherin during in situ cancer progression. FRAP in the E-cadherin-GFP mouse, therefore, promises to be a valuable tool to fundamentally expand our understanding of E-cadherin-mediated events in native microenvironments.

  16. Intravital FRAP Imaging using an E-cadherin-GFP Mouse Reveals Disease- and Drug-Dependent Dynamic Regulation of Cell-Cell Junctions in Live Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erami, Zahra; Herrmann, David; Warren, Sean C.; Nobis, Max; McGhee, Ewan J.; Lucas, Morghan C.; Leung, Wilfred; Reischmann, Nadine; Mrowinska, Agata; Schwarz, Juliane P.; Kadir, Shereen; Conway, James R.W.; Vennin, Claire; Karim, Saadia A.; Campbell, Andrew D.; Gallego-Ortega, David; Magenau, Astrid; Murphy, Kendelle J.; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Law, Andrew M.; Walters, Stacey N.; Grey, Shane T.; Croucher, David R.; Zhang, Lei; Herzog, Herbert; Hardeman, Edna C.; Gunning, Peter W.; Ormandy, Christopher J.; Evans, T.R. Jeffry; Strathdee, Douglas; Sansom, Owen J.; Morton, Jennifer P.; Anderson, Kurt I.; Timpson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions play a prominent role in maintaining the epithelial architecture. The disruption or deregulation of these adhesions in cancer can lead to the collapse of tumor epithelia that precedes invasion and subsequent metastasis. Here we generated an E-cadherin-GFP mouse that enables intravital photobleaching and quantification of E-cadherin mobility in live tissue without affecting normal biology. We demonstrate the broad applications of this mouse by examining E-cadherin regulation in multiple tissues, including mammary, brain, liver, and kidney tissue, while specifically monitoring E-cadherin mobility during disease progression in the pancreas. We assess E-cadherin stability in native pancreatic tissue upon genetic manipulation involving Kras and p53 or in response to anti-invasive drug treatment and gain insights into the dynamic remodeling of E-cadherin during in situ cancer progression. FRAP in the E-cadherin-GFP mouse, therefore, promises to be a valuable tool to fundamentally expand our understanding of E-cadherin-mediated events in native microenvironments. PMID:26725115

  17. 17β estradiol regulation of connexin 43-based gap junction and mechanosensitivity through classical estrogen receptor pathway in osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells.

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Jian

    2013-04-01

    Connexin 43 (Cx43) plays an essential role in osteocyte mechanotransduction. Although estrogen involves in the adaptive responses of bone cells to mechanical loadings, its effects on osteocytic Cx43-based gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) remain obscure. We found that 17β estradiol (E2) up-regulated Cx43, and enhanced GJIC in osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells in fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) assay. Combination of E2 pre-treatment and oscillating fluid flow (OFF) further enhanced Cx43 expression and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, comparing to E2 or OFF treatment alone. Both blocking of classical estrogen receptors (ERα/β) by fulvestrant and ERα knockdown by small interfering RNA inhibited E2-mediated Cx43 increase, while a GPR30-specific agonist G-1 failed to promote Cx43 expression. Our results suggest that the presence of E2 enhanced Cx43-based GJIC mainly via ERα/β pathway, and sensitized osteocytes to mechanical loading. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Remodeling of cardiac gap junctions and arrhythmias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhi-Bin; Sheng, Juan-Juan

    2011-12-25

    In the heart, gap junctions mediate electrical and chemical coupling between adjacent cardiomyocytes, forming the cell-to-cell pathways for orderly spread of the wave of electrical excitation responsible for a functional syncytium. Three principal connexins are expressed in cardiomyocytes, connexin 43 (CX43), CX40, and CX45. CX43 predominates in ventricular muscle cells. Most of the gap junctions, assembled from CX43, are located at the intercalated discs, often with larger junctional plaques at the disc periphery. The gap junctions are rarely distributed to the sides of the cardiomyocyte. The ischemia-reperfusion, cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes mellitus induce gap junction remodeling. The gap junction remodeling induced by above-mentioned diseases shows similar characteristics, including down-regulation of CX43, reduction in gap junction plaque size, increased heterogeneity and lateralization of gap junction distribution, and dephosphorylation of CX43. The elevated angiotensin II concentration in local myocardium may play an important role in the gap junction remodeling. The down-regulation of CX43 and lateralization of gap junction distribution alter anisotropic spread of the impulse of ventricular myocardium. The dephosphorylation of CX43 not only reduces electrical conductance, but also decreases permeability of chemicals between cardiomyocytes. The lateralization of gap junctions may increase the number of hemichannels formed by CX43. The opening of hemichannels induces ATP efflux and Na(+) influx, which forms a delayed after-depolarization. The gap junction remodeling in pathological condition produces arrhythmia substrate in the ventricles. In this review, the current knowledge on the relationship between the remodeling of cardiac gap junctions and arrhythmias were summarized.

  19. An antiviral response directed by PKR phosphorylation of the RNA helicase A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J Sadler

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase R (PKR is a key regulator of the innate immune response. Activation of PKR during viral infection culminates in phosphorylation of the alpha subunit of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2alpha to inhibit protein translation. A broad range of regulatory functions has also been attributed to PKR. However, as few additional PKR substrates have been identified, the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, PKR is shown to interact with an essential RNA helicase, RHA. Moreover, RHA is identified as a substrate for PKR, with phosphorylation perturbing the association of the helicase with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA. Through this mechanism, PKR can modulate transcription, as revealed by its ability to prevent the capacity of RHA to catalyze transactivating response (TAR-mediated type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 gene regulation. Consequently, HIV-1 virions packaged in cells also expressing the decoy RHA peptides subsequently had enhanced infectivity. The data demonstrate interplay between key components of dsRNA metabolism, both connecting RHA to an important component of innate immunity and delineating an unanticipated role for PKR in RNA metabolism.

  20. Bloom syndrome helicase in meiosis: Pro-crossover functions of an anti-crossover protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatkevich, Talia; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2017-09-01

    The functions of the Bloom syndrome helicase (BLM) and its orthologs are well characterized in mitotic DNA damage repair, but their roles within the context of meiotic recombination are less clear. In meiotic recombination, multiple repair pathways are used to repair meiotic DSBs, and current studies suggest that BLM may regulate the use of these pathways. Based on literature from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster, and Caenorhabditis elegans, we present a unified model for a critical meiotic role of BLM and its orthologs. In this model, BLM and its orthologs utilize helicase activity to regulate the use of various pathways in meiotic recombination by continuously disassembling recombination intermediates. This unwinding activity provides the meiotic program with a steady pool of early recombination substrates, increasing the probability for a DSB to be processed by the appropriate pathway. As a result of BLM activity, crossovers are properly placed throughout the genome, promoting proper chromosomal disjunction at the end of meiosis. This unified model can be used to further refine the complex role of BLM and its orthologs in meiotic recombination. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Gap junctions and connexin-interacting proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N G

    2004-01-01

    Gap junctions form channels between adjacent cells. The core proteins of these channels are the connexins. Regulation of gap junction communication (GJC) can be modulated by connexin-associating proteins, such as regulatory protein phosphatases and protein kinases, of which c-Src is the best-studied

  2. Gap junctions and connexin-interacting proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N G

    2004-01-01

    Gap junctions form channels between adjacent cells. The core proteins of these channels are the connexins. Regulation of gap junction communication (GJC) can be modulated by connexin-associating proteins, such as regulatory protein phosphatases and protein kinases, of which c-Src is the

  3. Gap junctions and connexin-interacting proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N G

    2004-01-01

    Gap junctions form channels between adjacent cells. The core proteins of these channels are the connexins. Regulation of gap junction communication (GJC) can be modulated by connexin-associating proteins, such as regulatory protein phosphatases and protein kinases, of which c-Src is the best-studied

  4. A model for DNA helicase mechanism based on a flashing ratchet

    CERN Document Server

    Garai, Ashok; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2007-01-01

    Helicases are molecular motors that consume energy supplied by chemical reactions to unwind double-stranded nucleic acids (like DNA and RNA) and to translocate along one of the single-strands. Motivated by the recent claims, based on experimental observations on the helicase NS3 of hepatitis C virus (HCV), that monomeric helicases are governed by a Brownian ratchet mechanism, here we develope a quantitative model. Our Brownian ratchet model, which is a somewhat new reformulation of the Betterton-J\\"ulicher theory of helicases, is generic two-state model and is applicable to all helicases which follow the Brownian ratchet mechanism. We illustrate the predictive power of the model by calculating some experimentally testable motor properties of a few monomeric helicases. Speficically, we predict the speed of unwinding of the double-stranded DNA and fluctuations around the average drift of the helicase. Our predictions are in excellent quantitative agreement with the corresponding experimental data.

  5. Emerging Importance of Helicases in Plant Stress Tolerance: Characterization of Oryza sativa Repair Helicase XPB2 Promoter and Its Functional Validation in Tobacco under Multiple Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikwar, Shailendra; Srivastava, Vineet K; Gill, Sarvajeet S; Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Genetic material always remains at the risk of spontaneous or induced damage which challenges the normal functioning of DNA molecule, thus, DNA repair is vital to protect the organisms against genetic damage. Helicases, the unique molecular motors, are emerged as prospective molecules to engineer stress tolerance in plants and are involved in nucleic acid metabolism including DNA repair. The repair helicase, XPB is an evolutionary conserved protein present in different organisms, including plants. Availability of few efficient promoters for gene expression in plants provoked us to study the promoter of XPB for better understanding of gene regulation under stress conditions. Here, we report the in silico analysis of novel stress inducible promoter of Oryza sativa XPB2 (OsXPB2). The in vivo validation of functionality/activity of OsXPB2 promoter under abiotic and hormonal stress conditions was performed by Agrobacterium-mediated transient assay in tobacco leaves using OsXPB2::GUS chimeric construct. The present research revealed that OsXPB2 promoter contains cis-elements accounting for various abiotic stresses (salt, dehydration, or cold) and hormone (Auxin, ABA, or MeJA) induced GUS expression/activity in the promoter-reporter assay. The promoter region of OsXPB2 contains CACG, GTAACG, CACGTG, CGTCA CCGCCGCGCT cis acting-elements which are reported to be salt, dehydration, cold, MeJA, or ABA responsive, respectively. Functional analysis was done by Agrobacterium-mediated transient assay using agroinfiltration in tobacco leaves, followed by GUS staining and fluorescence quantitative analyses. The results revealed high induction of GUS activity under multiple abiotic stresses as compared to mock treated control. The present findings suggest that OsXPB2 promoter is a multi-stress inducible promoter and has potential applications in sustainable crop production under abiotic stresses by regulating desirable pattern of gene expression.

  6. MCM Paradox: Abundance of Eukaryotic Replicative Helicases and Genomic Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitali Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a crucial component of DNA replication licensing system, minichromosome maintenance (MCM 2–7 complex acts as the eukaryotic DNA replicative helicase. The six related MCM proteins form a heterohexamer and bind with ORC, CDC6, and Cdt1 to form the prereplication complex. Although the MCMs are well known as replicative helicases, their overabundance and distribution patterns on chromatin present a paradox called the “MCM paradox.” Several approaches had been taken to solve the MCM paradox and describe the purpose of excess MCMs distributed beyond the replication origins. Alternative functions of these MCMs rather than a helicase had also been proposed. This review focuses on several models and concepts generated to solve the MCM paradox coinciding with their helicase function and provides insight into the concept that excess MCMs are meant for licensing dormant origins as a backup during replication stress. Finally, we extend our view towards the effect of alteration of MCM level. Though an excess MCM constituent is needed for normal cells to withstand stress, there must be a delineation of the threshold level in normal and malignant cells. This review also outlooks the future prospects to better understand the MCM biology.

  7. MCM Paradox: Abundance of Eukaryotic Replicative Helicases and Genomic Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mitali; Singh, Sunita; Pradhan, Satyajit; Narayan, Gopeshwar

    2014-01-01

    As a crucial component of DNA replication licensing system, minichromosome maintenance (MCM) 2-7 complex acts as the eukaryotic DNA replicative helicase. The six related MCM proteins form a heterohexamer and bind with ORC, CDC6, and Cdt1 to form the prereplication complex. Although the MCMs are well known as replicative helicases, their overabundance and distribution patterns on chromatin present a paradox called the "MCM paradox." Several approaches had been taken to solve the MCM paradox and describe the purpose of excess MCMs distributed beyond the replication origins. Alternative functions of these MCMs rather than a helicase had also been proposed. This review focuses on several models and concepts generated to solve the MCM paradox coinciding with their helicase function and provides insight into the concept that excess MCMs are meant for licensing dormant origins as a backup during replication stress. Finally, we extend our view towards the effect of alteration of MCM level. Though an excess MCM constituent is needed for normal cells to withstand stress, there must be a delineation of the threshold level in normal and malignant cells. This review also outlooks the future prospects to better understand the MCM biology.

  8. 21-Benzylidene Digoxin: A Proapoptotic Cardenolide of Cancer Cells That Up-Regulates Na,K-ATPase and Epithelial Tight Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Sayonarah C.; Pessoa, Marco T. C.; Neves, Luiza D. R.; Alves, Silmara L. G.; Silva, Luciana M.; Santos, Herica L.; Oliveira, Soraya M. F.; Taranto, Alex G.; Comar, Moacyr; Gomes, Isabella V.; Santos, Fabio V.; Paixão, Natasha; Quintas, Luis E. M.; Noël, François; Pereira, Antonio F.; Tessis, Ana C. S. C.; Gomes, Natalia L. S.; Moreira, Otacilio C.; Rincon-Heredia, Ruth; Varotti, Fernando P.; Blanco, Gustavo; Villar, Jose A. F. P.; Contreras, Rubén G.; Barbosa, Leandro A.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiotonic steroids are used to treat heart failure and arrhythmia and have promising anticancer effects. The prototypic cardiotonic steroid ouabain may also be a hormone that modulates epithelial cell adhesion. Cardiotonic steroids consist of a steroid nucleus and a lactone ring, and their biological effects depend on the binding to their receptor, Na,K-ATPase, through which, they inhibit Na+ and K+ ion transport and activate of several intracellular signaling pathways. In this study, we added a styrene group to the lactone ring of the cardiotonic steroid digoxin, to obtain 21-benzylidene digoxin (21-BD), and investigated the effects of this synthetic cardiotonic steroid in different cell models. Molecular modeling indicates that 21-BD binds to its target Na,K-ATPase with low affinity, adopting a different pharmacophoric conformation when bound to its receptor than digoxin. Accordingly, 21-DB, at relatively high µM amounts inhibits the activity of Na,K-ATPase α1, but not α2 and α3 isoforms. In addition, 21-BD targets other proteins outside the Na,K-ATPase, inhibiting the multidrug exporter Pdr5p. When used on whole cells at low µM concentrations, 21-BD produces several effects, including: 1) up-regulation of Na,K-ATPase expression and activity in HeLa and RKO cancer cells, which is not found for digoxin, 2) cell specific changes in cell viability, reducing it in HeLa and RKO cancer cells, but increasing it in normal epithelial MDCK cells, which is different from the response to digoxin, and 3) changes in cell-cell interaction, altering the molecular composition of tight junctions and elevating transepithelial electrical resistance of MDCK monolayers, an effect previously found for ouabain. These results indicate that modification of the lactone ring of digoxin provides new properties to the compound, and shows that the structural change introduced could be used for the design of cardiotonic steroid with novel functions. PMID:25290152

  9. 21-Benzylidene digoxin: a proapoptotic cardenolide of cancer cells that up-regulates Na,K-ATPase and epithelial tight junctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayonarah C Rocha

    Full Text Available Cardiotonic steroids are used to treat heart failure and arrhythmia and have promising anticancer effects. The prototypic cardiotonic steroid ouabain may also be a hormone that modulates epithelial cell adhesion. Cardiotonic steroids consist of a steroid nucleus and a lactone ring, and their biological effects depend on the binding to their receptor, Na,K-ATPase, through which, they inhibit Na+ and K+ ion transport and activate of several intracellular signaling pathways. In this study, we added a styrene group to the lactone ring of the cardiotonic steroid digoxin, to obtain 21-benzylidene digoxin (21-BD, and investigated the effects of this synthetic cardiotonic steroid in different cell models. Molecular modeling indicates that 21-BD binds to its target Na,K-ATPase with low affinity, adopting a different pharmacophoric conformation when bound to its receptor than digoxin. Accordingly, 21-DB, at relatively high µM amounts inhibits the activity of Na,K-ATPase α1, but not α2 and α3 isoforms. In addition, 21-BD targets other proteins outside the Na,K-ATPase, inhibiting the multidrug exporter Pdr5p. When used on whole cells at low µM concentrations, 21-BD produces several effects, including: 1 up-regulation of Na,K-ATPase expression and activity in HeLa and RKO cancer cells, which is not found for digoxin, 2 cell specific changes in cell viability, reducing it in HeLa and RKO cancer cells, but increasing it in normal epithelial MDCK cells, which is different from the response to digoxin, and 3 changes in cell-cell interaction, altering the molecular composition of tight junctions and elevating transepithelial electrical resistance of MDCK monolayers, an effect previously found for ouabain. These results indicate that modification of the lactone ring of digoxin provides new properties to the compound, and shows that the structural change introduced could be used for the design of cardiotonic steroid with novel functions.

  10. Synthesis and SAR studies of 5-(pyridin-4-yl)-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-amine derivatives as potent inhibitors of Bloom helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Andrew S; Dexheimer, Thomas S; Gileadi, Opher; Nguyen, Giang H; Chu, Wai Kit; Hickson, Ian D; Jadhav, Ajit; Simeonov, Anton; Maloney, David J

    2013-10-15

    Human cells utilize a variety of complex DNA repair mechanisms in order to combat constant mutagenic and cytotoxic threats from both exogenous and endogenous sources. The RecQ family of DNA helicases, which includes Bloom helicase (BLM), plays an important function in DNA repair by unwinding complementary strands of duplex DNA as well as atypical DNA structures such as Holliday junctions. Mutations of the BLM gene can result in Bloom syndrome, an autosomal recessive disorder associated with cancer predisposition. BLM-deficient cells exhibit increased sensitivity to DNA damaging agents indicating that a selective BLM inhibitor could be useful in potentiating the anticancer activity of these agents. In this work, we describe the medicinal chemistry optimization of the hit molecule following a quantitative high-throughput screen of >355,000 compounds. These efforts lead to the identification of ML216 and related analogs, which possess potent BLM inhibition and exhibit selectivity over related helicases. Moreover, these compounds demonstrated cellular activity by inducing sister chromatid exchanges, a hallmark of Bloom syndrome.

  11. Cdc45 (cell division cycle protein 45) guards the gate of the Eukaryote Replisome helicase stabilizing leading strand engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petojevic, Tatjana; Pesavento, James J.; Costa, Alessandro; Liang, Jingdan; Wang, Zhijun; Berger, James M.; Botchan, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication licensing is now understood to be the pathway that leads to the assembly of double hexamers of minichromosome maintenance (Mcm2–7) at origin sites. Cell division control protein 45 (Cdc45) and GINS proteins activate the latent Mcm2–7 helicase by inducing allosteric changes through binding, forming a Cdc45/Mcm2-7/GINS (CMG) complex that is competent to unwind duplex DNA. The CMG has an active gate between subunits Mcm2 and Mcm5 that opens and closes in response to nucleotide binding. The consequences of inappropriate Mcm2/5 gate actuation and the role of a side channel formed between GINS/Cdc45 and the outer edge of the Mcm2–7 ring for unwinding have remained unexplored. Here we uncover a novel function for Cdc45. Cross-linking studies trace the path of the DNA with the CMG complex at a fork junction between duplex and single strands with the bound CMG in an open or closed gate conformation. In the closed state, the lagging strand does not pass through the side channel, but in the open state, the leading strand surprisingly interacts with Cdc45. Mutations in the recombination protein J fold of Cdc45 that ablate this interaction diminish helicase activity. These data indicate that Cdc45 serves as a shield to guard against occasional slippage of the leading strand from the core channel. PMID:25561522

  12. The putative RNA helicase HELZ promotes cell proliferation, translation initiation and ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe A Hasgall

    Full Text Available The hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF is a key component of the cellular adaptation mechanisms to hypoxic conditions. HIFα subunits are degraded by prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain (PHD enzyme-dependent prolyl-4-hydroxylation of LxxLAP motifs that confer oxygen-dependent proteolytic degradation. Interestingly, only three non-HIFα proteins contain two conserved LxxLAP motifs, including the putative RNA helicase with a zinc finger domain HELZ. However, HELZ proteolytic regulation was found to be oxygen-independent, supporting the notion that a LxxLAP sequence motif alone is not sufficient for oxygen-dependent protein destruction. Since biochemical pathways involving RNA often require RNA helicases to modulate RNA structure and activity, we used luciferase reporter gene constructs and metabolic labeling to demonstrate that HELZ overexpression activates global protein translation whereas RNA-interference mediated HELZ suppression had the opposite effect. Although HELZ interacted with the poly(A-binding protein (PABP via its PAM2 motif, PABP was dispensable for HELZ function in protein translation. Importantly, downregulation of HELZ reduced translational initiation, resulting in the disassembly of polysomes, in a reduction of cell proliferation and hypophosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6.

  13. A noncanonical PWI domain in the N-terminal helicase-associated region of the spliceosomal Brr2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absmeier, Eva; Rosenberger, Leonie; Apelt, Luise; Becke, Christian; Santos, Karine F; Stelzl, Ulrich; Wahl, Markus C

    2015-04-01

    The spliceosomal RNA helicase Brr2 is required for the assembly of a catalytically active spliceosome on a messenger RNA precursor. Brr2 exhibits an unusual organization with tandem helicase units, each comprising dual RecA-like domains and a Sec63 homology unit, preceded by a more than 400-residue N-terminal helicase-associated region. Whereas recent crystal structures have provided insights into the molecular architecture and regulation of the Brr2 helicase region, little is known about the structural organization and function of its N-terminal part. Here, a near-atomic resolution crystal structure of a PWI-like domain that resides in the N-terminal region of Chaetomium thermophilum Brr2 is presented. CD spectroscopic studies suggested that this domain is conserved in the yeast and human Brr2 orthologues. Although canonical PWI domains act as low-specificity nucleic acid-binding domains, no significant affinity of the unusual PWI domain of Brr2 for a broad spectrum of DNAs and RNAs was detected in band-shift assays. Consistently, the C. thermophilum Brr2 PWI-like domain, in the conformation seen in the present crystal structure, lacks an expanded positively charged surface patch as observed in at least one canonical, nucleic acid-binding PWI domain. Instead, in a comprehensive yeast two-hybrid screen against human spliceosomal proteins, fragments of the N-terminal region of human Brr2 were found to interact with several other spliceosomal proteins. At least one of these interactions, with the Prp19 complex protein SPF27, depended on the presence of the PWI-like domain. The results suggest that the N-terminal region of Brr2 serves as a versatile protein-protein interaction platform in the spliceosome and that some interactions require or are reinforced by the PWI-like domain.

  14. Three-dimensional structure of N-terminal domain of DnaB helicase and helicase-primase interactions in Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Kashav

    Full Text Available Replication initiation is a crucial step in genome duplication and homohexameric DnaB helicase plays a central role in the replication initiation process by unwinding the duplex DNA and interacting with several other proteins during the process of replication. N-terminal domain of DnaB is critical for helicase activity and for DnaG primase interactions. We present here the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD of H. pylori DnaB (HpDnaB helicase at 2.2 A resolution and compare the structural differences among helicases and correlate with the functional differences. The structural details of NTD suggest that the linker region between NTD and C-terminal helicase domain plays a vital role in accurate assembly of NTD dimers. The sequence analysis of the linker regions from several helicases reveals that they should form four helix bundles. We also report the characterization of H. pylori DnaG primase and study the helicase-primase interactions, where HpDnaG primase stimulates DNA unwinding activity of HpDnaB suggesting presence of helicase-primase cohort at the replication fork. The protein-protein interaction study of C-terminal domain of primase and different deletion constructs of helicase suggests that linker is essential for proper conformation of NTD to interact strongly with HpDnaG. The surface charge distribution on the primase binding surface of NTDs of various helicases suggests that DnaB-DnaG interaction and stability of the complex is most probably charge dependent. Structure of the linker and helicase-primase interactions indicate that HpDnaB differs greatly from E.coli DnaB despite both belong to gram negative bacteria.

  15. Gap junctions - guards of excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroemlund, Line Waring; Jensen, Christa Funch; Qvortrup, Klaus; Delmar, Mario; Nielsen, Morten Schak

    2015-06-01

    Cardiomyocytes are connected by mechanical and electrical junctions located at the intercalated discs (IDs). Although these structures have long been known, it is becoming increasingly clear that their components interact. This review describes the involvement of the ID in electrical disturbances of the heart and focuses on the role of the gap junctional protein connexin 43 (Cx43). Current evidence shows that Cx43 plays a crucial role in organizing microtubules at the intercalated disc and thereby regulating the trafficking of the cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5 to the membrane.

  16. Diurnal variation of tight junction integrity associates inversely with matrix metalloproteinase expression in Xenopus laevis corneal epithelium: implications for circadian regulation of homeostatic surface cell desquamation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan F Wiechmann

    Full Text Available The corneal epithelium provides a protective barrier against pathogen entrance and abrasive forces, largely due to the intercellular junctional complexes between neighboring cells. After a prescribed duration at the corneal surface, tight junctions between squamous surface cells must be disrupted to enable them to desquamate as a component of the tissue homeostatic renewal. We hypothesize that matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs are secreted by corneal epithelial cells and cleave intercellular junctional proteins extracellularly at the epithelial surface. The purpose of this study was to examine the expression of specific MMPs and tight junction proteins during both the light and dark phases of the circadian cycle, and to assess their temporal and spatial relationships in the Xenopus laevis corneal epithelium.Expression of MMP-2, tissue inhibitor of MMP-2 (TIMP-2, membrane type 1-MMP (MT1-MMP and the tight junction proteins occludin and claudin-4 were examined by confocal double-label immunohistochemistry on corneas obtained from Xenopus frogs at different circadian times. Occludin and claudin-4 expression was generally uniformly intact on the surface corneal epithelial cell lateral membranes during the daytime, but was frequently disrupted in small clusters of cells at night. Concomitantly, MMP-2 expression was often elevated in a mosaic pattern at nighttime and associated with clusters of desquamating surface cells. The MMP-2 binding partners, TIMP-2 and MT1-MMP were also localized to surface corneal epithelial cells during both the light and dark phases, with TIMP-2 tending to be elevated during the daytime.MMP-2 protein expression is elevated in a mosaic pattern in surface corneal epithelial cells during the nighttime in Xenopus laevis, and may play a role in homeostatic surface cell desquamation by disrupting intercellular junctional proteins. The sequence of MMP secretion and activation, tight junction protein cleavage, and subsequent surface

  17. Myosin light chain kinase inhibitor ML7 improves vascular endothelial dysfunction via tight junction regulation in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaowen; Wang, Xiaobian; Wan, Yufeng; Zhou, Qing; Zhu, Huaqing; Wang, Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) is an important factor in the initiation and development of atherosclerosis (AS). Previous studies have demonstrated that endothelial permeability is increased in diet‑induced AS. However, the precise underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. The present study aimed to analyze whether the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML7 is able to improve VED and AS by regulating the expression of the tight junction (TJ) proteins zona occludens (ZO)‑1 and occludin via mechanisms involving MLCK and MLC phosphorylation in high‑fat diet‑fed rabbits. New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: Control group, AS group and ML7 group. The rabbits were fed a standard diet (control group), a high‑fat diet (AS group) or a high‑fat diet supplemented with 1 mg/kg/day ML7 (ML7 group). After 12 weeks, endothelium‑dependent relaxation and endothelium‑independent relaxation were measured using high-frequency ultrasound. Administration of a high‑fat diet significantly increased the levels of serum lipids and inflammatory markers in the rabbits in the AS group, as compared with those in the rabbits in the control group. Furthermore, a high‑fat diet contributed to the formation of a typical atherosclerotic plaque, as well as an increase in endothelial permeability and VED. These symptoms of AS were significantly improved following treatment with ML7, as demonstrated in the ML7 group. Hematoxylin & eosin and immunohistochemical staining indicated that ML7 was able to decrease the expression of MLCK and MLC phosphorylation in the arterial wall of rabbits fed a high‑fat diet. A similar change was observed for the TJ proteins ZO‑1 and occludin. In addition, western blot analysis demonstrated that ML7 increased the expression levels of occludin in the precipitate, but reduced its expression in the supernatant of lysed aortas. These results indicated that occludin, which is a dynamic protein at the TJ

  18. Heteroduplex DNA position defines the roles of the Sgs1, Srs2, and Mph1 helicases in promoting distinct recombination outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchel, Katrina; Lehner, Kevin; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-01-01

    The contributions of the Sgs1, Mph1, and Srs2 DNA helicases during mitotic double-strand break (DSB) repair in yeast were investigated using a gap-repair assay. A diverged chromosomal substrate was used as a repair template for the gapped plasmid, allowing mismatch-containing heteroduplex DNA (hDNA) formed during recombination to be monitored. Overall DSB repair efficiencies and the proportions of crossovers (COs) versus noncrossovers (NCOs) were determined in wild-type and helicase-defective strains, allowing the efficiency of CO and NCO production in each background to be calculated. In addition, the products of individual NCO events were sequenced to determine the location of hDNA. Because hDNA position is expected to differ depending on whether a NCO is produced by synthesis-dependent-strand-annealing (SDSA) or through a Holliday junction (HJ)-containing intermediate, its position allows the underlying molecular mechanism to be inferred. Results demonstrate that each helicase reduces the proportion of CO recombinants, but that each does so in a fundamentally different way. Mph1 does not affect the overall efficiency of gap repair, and its loss alters the CO-NCO by promoting SDSA at the expense of HJ-containing intermediates. By contrast, Sgs1 and Srs2 are each required for efficient gap repair, strongly promoting NCO formation and having little effect on CO efficiency. hDNA analyses suggest that all three helicases promote SDSA, and that Sgs1 and Srs2 additionally dismantle HJ-containing intermediates. The hDNA data are consistent with the proposed role of Sgs1 in the dissolution of double HJs, and we propose that Srs2 dismantles nicked HJs.

  19. Heteroduplex DNA position defines the roles of the Sgs1, Srs2, and Mph1 helicases in promoting distinct recombination outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Mitchel

    Full Text Available The contributions of the Sgs1, Mph1, and Srs2 DNA helicases during mitotic double-strand break (DSB repair in yeast were investigated using a gap-repair assay. A diverged chromosomal substrate was used as a repair template for the gapped plasmid, allowing mismatch-containing heteroduplex DNA (hDNA formed during recombination to be monitored. Overall DSB repair efficiencies and the proportions of crossovers (COs versus noncrossovers (NCOs were determined in wild-type and helicase-defective strains, allowing the efficiency of CO and NCO production in each background to be calculated. In addition, the products of individual NCO events were sequenced to determine the location of hDNA. Because hDNA position is expected to differ depending on whether a NCO is produced by synthesis-dependent-strand-annealing (SDSA or through a Holliday junction (HJ-containing intermediate, its position allows the underlying molecular mechanism to be inferred. Results demonstrate that each helicase reduces the proportion of CO recombinants, but that each does so in a fundamentally different way. Mph1 does not affect the overall efficiency of gap repair, and its loss alters the CO-NCO by promoting SDSA at the expense of HJ-containing intermediates. By contrast, Sgs1 and Srs2 are each required for efficient gap repair, strongly promoting NCO formation and having little effect on CO efficiency. hDNA analyses suggest that all three helicases promote SDSA, and that Sgs1 and Srs2 additionally dismantle HJ-containing intermediates. The hDNA data are consistent with the proposed role of Sgs1 in the dissolution of double HJs, and we propose that Srs2 dismantles nicked HJs.

  20. Aβ(1-42) oligomer-induced leakage in an in vitro blood-brain barrier model is associated with up-regulation of RAGE and metalloproteinases, and down-regulation of tight junction scaffold proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Wenbin; Cao, Lan; Liu, Lumei; Zhang, Chunyan; Kalionis, Bill; Tai, Xiantao; Li, Yaming; Xia, Shijin

    2015-07-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that abnormal deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in the brain is responsible for endothelial cell damage and consequently leads to blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage. However, the mechanisms underlying BBB disruption are not well described. We employed an monolayer BBB model comprising bEnd.3 cell and found that BBB leakage was induced by treatment with Aβ(1-42), and the levels of tight junction (TJ) scaffold proteins (ZO-1, Claudin-5, and Occludin) were decreased. Through comparisons of the effects of the different components of Aβ(1-42), including monomer (Aβ(1-42)-Mono), oligomer (Aβ(1-42)-Oligo), and fibril (Aβ(1-42)-Fibril), our data confirmed that Aβ(1-42)-Oligo is likely to be the most important damage factor that results in TJ damage and BBB leakage in Alzheimer's disease. We found that the incubation of bEnd.3 cells with Aβ(1-42) significantly up-regulated the level of receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE). Co-incubation of a polyclonal antibody to RAGE and Aβ(1-42)-Oligo in bEnd.3 cells blocked RAGE suppression of Aβ(1-42)-Oligo-induced alterations in TJ scaffold proteins and reversed Aβ(1-42)-Oligo-induced up-regulation of RAGE, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9. Furthermore, we found that these effects induced by Aβ(1-42)-Oligo treatment were effectively suppressed by knockdown of RAGE using small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection. We also found that GM 6001, a broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor, partially reversed the Aβ(1-42)-Oligo-induced inhibitor effects in bEnd.3 cells. Thus, these results suggested that RAGE played an important role in Aβ-induced BBB leakage and alterations of TJ scaffold proteins, through a mechanism that involved up-regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9.

  1. 病原微生物对紧密连接蛋白的调控%Regulation of pathogens on tight junction protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张瑞丽; 王千秋

    2014-01-01

    Tight junctions are the structural and functional base of blood brain barrier and enteric epithelial barrier.Alterations of tight junctions play an important role in pathogens invading the body through paracellular penetration.The article reviews the progress on the effect of pathogens on the structure and function of tight junctions of blood brain barrier and enteric epithelial barrier.%紧密连接是血脑屏障及肠上皮屏障的结构和分子基础,其结构和功能改变是多种病原微生物从细胞旁路侵入机体的先决条件.此文分别就病原微生物如何调节血脑屏障及肠上皮屏障紧密连接结构,进而调节其功能方面的研究进展作一综述.

  2. Inhibition of RNA Helicases of ssRNA+ Virus Belonging to Flaviviridae, Coronaviridae and Picornaviridae Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Briguglio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many viral pathogens encode the motor proteins named RNA helicases which display various functions in genome replication. General strategies to design specific and selective drugs targeting helicase for the treatment of viral infections could act via one or more of the following mechanisms: inhibition of the NTPase activity, by interferences with ATP binding and therefore by limiting the energy required for the unwinding and translocation, or by allosteric mechanism and therefore by stabilizing the conformation of the enzyme in low helicase activity state; inhibition of nucleic acids binding to the helicase; inhibition of coupling of ATP hydrolysis to unwinding; inhibition of unwinding by sterically blocking helicase translocation. Recently, by in vitro screening studies, it has been reported that several benzotriazole, imidazole, imidazodiazepine, phenothiazine, quinoline, anthracycline, triphenylmethane, tropolone, pyrrole, acridone, small peptide, and Bananin derivatives are endowed with helicase inhibition of pathogen viruses belonging to Flaviviridae, Coronaviridae, and Picornaviridae families.

  3. microRNAs targeting DEAD-box helicases are involved in salinity stress response in rice (Oryza sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macovei Anca

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rice (Oryza sativa L., one of the most important food crop in the world, is considered to be a salt-sensitive crop. Excess levels of salt adversely affect all the major metabolic activities, including cell wall damage, cytoplasmic lysis and genomic stability. In order to cope with salt stress, plants have evolved high degrees of developmental plasticity, including adaptation via cascades of molecular networks and changes in gene expression profiles. Posttranscriptional regulation, through the activity of microRNAs, also plays an important role in the plant response to salinity conditions. MicroRNAs are small endogenous RNAs that modulate gene expression and are involved in the most essential physiological processes, including plant development and adaptation to environmental changes. Results In the present study, we investigated the expression profiles of osa-MIR414, osa-MIR408 and osa-MIR164e along with their targeted genes, under salinity stress conditions in wild type and transgenic rice plants ectopically expressing the PDH45 (Pea DNA Helicase gene. The present miRNAs were predicted to target the OsABP (ATP-Binding Protein, OsDSHCT (DOB1/SK12/helY-like DEAD-box Helicase and OsDBH (DEAD-Box Helicase genes, included in the DEAD-box helicase family. An in silico characterization of the proteins was performed and the miRNAs predicted targets were validated by RLM-5′RACE. The qRT-PCR analysis showed that the OsABP, OsDBH and OsDSHCT genes were up-regulated in response to 100 and 200 mM NaCl treatments. The present study also highlighted an increased accumulation of the gene transcripts in wild type plants, with the exception of the OsABP mRNA which showed the highest level (15.1-fold change compared to control in the transgenic plants treated with 200 mM NaCl. Salinity treatments also affected the expression of osa-MIR414, osa-MIR164e and osa-MIR408, found to be significantly down-regulated, although the changes in mi

  4. Molecular electronic junction transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Gemma C.; Herrmann, Carmen; Ratner, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Whenasinglemolecule,oracollectionofmolecules,isplacedbetween two electrodes and voltage is applied, one has a molecular transport junction. We discuss such junctions, their properties, their description, and some of their applications. The discussion is qualitative rather than quantitative, and f...

  5. Deficiency of Bloom syndrome helicase activity is radiomimetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, David P; Topaloglu, Ozlem; Zhang, Yonggang; Bunz, Fred

    2008-11-01

    Bloom syndrome is caused by homozygous mutations in BLM, which encodes a RecQ DNA helicase. Patient-derived cells deficient in BLM helicase activity exhibit genetic instability--apparent cytogenetically as sister chromatid exchanges--and activated DNA damage signaling. In this report, we show that BLM-knockout colorectal cancer cells exhibited endogenous, ATM-dependent double-strand DNA break responses similar to those recently observed in Bloom syndrome patient-derived cells. Xenograft tumors established from BLM-deficient cancer cells were not radiosensitive, but exhibited growth impairment that was comparable to that of wild type tumors treated with a single, high dose of ionizing radiation. These results suggest that pharmacological inhibitors of BLM would have a radiomimetic effect and that transient inhibition of BLM activity might be a viable strategy for anticancer therapy.

  6. Transcriptional mechanisms coordinating tight junction assembly during epithelial differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Felix J; Schmidt-Ott, Kai M

    2017-06-01

    Epithelial tissues form a selective barrier via direct cell-cell interactions to separate and establish concentration gradients between the different compartments of the body. Proper function and formation of this barrier rely on the establishment of distinct intercellular junction complexes. These complexes include tight junctions, adherens junctions, desmosomes, and gap junctions. The tight junction is by far the most diverse junctional complex in the epithelial barrier. Its composition varies greatly across different epithelial tissues to confer various barrier properties. Thus, epithelial cells rely on tightly regulated transcriptional mechanisms to ensure proper formation of the epithelial barrier and to achieve tight junction diversity. Here, we review different transcriptional mechanisms utilized during embryogenesis and disease development to promote tight junction assembly and maintenance of intercellular barrier integrity. We focus particularly on the Grainyhead-like transcription factors and ligand-activated nuclear hormone receptors, two central families of proteins in epithelialization. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  7. The RNA helicase Rm62 cooperates with SU(VAR3-9 to re-silence active transcription in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joern Boeke

    Full Text Available Gene expression is highly dynamic and many genes show a wide range in expression over several orders of magnitude. This regulation is often mediated by sequence specific transcription factors. In addition, the tight packaging of DNA into chromatin can provide an additional layer of control resulting in a dynamic range of gene expression covering several orders of magnitude. During transcriptional activation, chromatin barriers have to be eliminated to allow an efficient progression of the RNA polymerase. This repressive chromatin structure has to be re-established quickly after it has been activated in order to tightly regulate gene activity. We show that the DExD/H box containing RNA helicase Rm62 is targeted to a site of rapid induction of transcription where it is responsible for an increased degree of methylation at H3K9 at the heat shock locus after removal of the heat shock stimulus. The RNA helicase interacts with the well-characterized histone methyltransferase SU(VAR3-9 via its N-terminus, which provides a potential mechanism for the targeting of H3K9 methylation to highly regulated genes. The recruitment of SU(VAR3-9 through interaction with a RNA helicase to a site of active transcription might be a general mechanism that allows an efficient silencing of highly regulated genes thereby enabling a cell to fine tune its gene activity over a wide range.

  8. Structure of the eukaryotic replicative CMG helicase and pumpjack motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zuanning; Bai, Lin; Sun, Jingchuan; Georgescu, Roxana; Liu, Jun; O’Donnell, Michael E.; Li, Huilin

    2016-01-01

    The CMG helicase is composed of Cdc45, Mcm2-7 and GINS. Here we report the structure of the S. cerevisiae CMG determined by cryo-EM at a resolution of 3.7–4.8 Å. The structure reveals that GINS and Cdc45 scaffold the N-tier of the helicase while enabling motion of the AAA+ C-tier. CMG exists in two alternating conformations, compact and extended, suggesting that the helicase functions like an inchworm. The N-terminal regions of the Mcm2-7, braced by Cdc45-GINS, form a rigid platform upon which the AAA+ C-domains make longitudinal motions, nodding up and down like an oil rig pumpjack makes nodding motions attached to a stable platform. The Mcm ring is remodeled in CMG relative to the inactive Mcm2-7 double-hexamer. The Mcm5 winged helix domain is inserted into the central channel, blocking entry of dsDNA, and supporting a steric exclusion DNA unwinding model. PMID:26854665

  9. The hexameric structure of the human mitochondrial replicative helicase Twinkle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Millán, Pablo; Lázaro, Melisa; Cansız-Arda, Şirin; Gerhold, Joachim M; Rajala, Nina; Schmitz, Claus-A; Silva-Espiña, Cristina; Gil, David; Bernadó, Pau; Valle, Mikel; Spelbrink, Johannes N; Solà, Maria

    2015-04-30

    The mitochondrial replicative helicase Twinkle is involved in strand separation at the replication fork of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Twinkle malfunction is associated with rare diseases that include late onset mitochondrial myopathies, neuromuscular disorders and fatal infantile mtDNA depletion syndrome. We examined its 3D structure by electron microscopy (EM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and built the corresponding atomic models, which gave insight into the first molecular architecture of a full-length SF4 helicase that includes an N-terminal zinc-binding domain (ZBD), an intermediate RNA polymerase domain (RPD) and a RecA-like hexamerization C-terminal domain (CTD). The EM model of Twinkle reveals a hexameric two-layered ring comprising the ZBDs and RPDs in one layer and the CTDs in another. In the hexamer, contacts in trans with adjacent subunits occur between ZBDs and RPDs, and between RPDs and CTDs. The ZBDs show important structural heterogeneity. In solution, the scattering data are compatible with a mixture of extended hexa- and heptameric models in variable conformations. Overall, our structural data show a complex network of dynamic interactions that reconciles with the structural flexibility required for helicase activity.

  10. Properties of DnaB helicase in [lambda] DNA replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    A tailed nicked-circle DNA substrate was used to measure the rapid replication fork (RF) movement catalyzed by E. Coli DnaB helicase and DNA polymerase III holoenzyme (pol III HE) (DnaB-RFs) (30 DnaB hexamers/substrate). The DnaB RFs can efficiently utilize the DNA substrate (60% in 5 min at 30C), and the forks move at a rapid rate (550-780 bp/sec at 30C). The DnaB-RFs have an average maximal processivity of 40,000 nt, and addition of either SSB or primase increase the processivity (150,000 nt + SSB, 70,000-140,000 nt + primase). However, SSB and primase do not affect the rate of fork movement or the amount of substrate utilized in the assay. The [lambda] SS proteins are effective at transferring DnaB onto the DNA substrate (8 DnaB hexamers/substrate). The [lambda] SS proteins do not change the rate of RF movement or the amount of substrate utilized. However, the amount of synthesis measured in the assay is [approximately]2-fold higher in the presence of the [lambda] SS proteins. Therefore, the [lambda] SS proteins increase the processivity of DnaB at the RF (100,000 nt). The [lambda] SS proteins do not appear to play a role in elongation because the processivity of the RF in the presence of SSB and primase is equivalent to the processivity of the [lambda] SS-RFs. [lambda] P protein blocks DnaB helicase activity if added to the RF assay prior to initiation or during elongation. DnaB helicase is more resistant to P inhibition, if the helicase is allowed to bind to the substrate prior to addition of [lambda] P or if primase and rNTPs are included in the assay. These results suggest that the conformation of the RF complex (DNA or nucleoprotein structure) blocks the attack of P on DnaB helicase. The heat shock proteins may play an auxiliary role in mediating the effects of [lambda] P if the concentration of P protein in the cells are high.

  11. Dynamic changes of connexin-43, gap junctional protein, in outer layers of cumulus cells are regulated by PKC and PI 3-kinase during meiotic resumption in porcine oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, M; Maeda, T; Terada, T

    2001-04-01

    Mammalian oocytes are surrounded by numerous layers of cumulus cells, and the loss of gap junctional communication in the outer layers of cumulus cells induces meiotic resumption in oocytes. In this study, we investigated the dynamic changes in the gap junctional protein connexin-43 in cumulus cells during the meiotic resumption of porcine oocytes. The amount of connexin-43 in all layers of cumulus cells recovered from cumulus-oocyte complexes was increased after 4-h cultivation. However, at 12-h cultivation, the positive signal for connexin-43 immunoreactivity was markedly reduced in the outer layers of cumulus cells. When these reductions of connexin-43 were blocked by protein kinase C (PKC) or phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase inhibitor, networks of filamentous bivalents (i.e., advanced chromosomal status) were undetectable in the germinal vesicle of the oocyte. After 28-h cultivation, when the majority of oocytes were reaching the metaphase I (MI) stage, the connexin-43 in the inner layers of cumulus cells was phosphorylated, regardless of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation. These results suggest that the initiation of meiotic resumption, namely, the formation of networks of filamentous bivalents in germinal vesicle, is associated with the reduction of gap junctional protein connexin-43 in the outer layers of cumulus cells via the PKC and/or PI 3-kinase pathway. Moreover, the connexin-43 in the inner layers of cumulus cells is phosphorylated during meiotic progression beyond the MI stage, regardless of MAP kinase activation in cumulus cells surrounding the oocyte.

  12. Changes in barrier health status of the gill for grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) during valine deficiency: Regulation of tight junction protein transcript, antioxidant status and apoptosis-related gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lin; Luo, Jian-Bo; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Wu, Pei; Jiang, Jun; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of dietary valine on tight junction protein transcription, antioxidant status and apoptosis on grass carp gills (Ctenopharyngodon idella). Fish were fed six different experimental diets containing graded levels of valine (4.3, 8.0, 10.6, 13.1, 16.7, 19.1 g/kg). The results indicated that valine deficiency decreased Claudin b, Claudin 3, Occludin and ZO-1 transcription and increased Claudin 15 expression in the fish gill (P valine deficiency and valine supplementation did not have a significant effect on Claudin c and Claudin 12 expression in grass carp gills (P > 0.05). Valine deficiency also disrupted antioxidant status in the gill by decreasing anti-superoxide radicals and hydroxyl radical capacity, glutathione contents and the activities and mRNA levels of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) (P valine deficiency induced DNA fragmentation via the up-regulation of Caspase 3, Caspase 8 and Caspase 9 expressions (P valine deficiency impaired the structural integrity of fish gill by disrupted fish antioxidant defenses and regulating the expression of tight junction protein, cytokines, antioxidant enzymes, NF-κB p65, IκBα, TOR, Nrf2, Keap1 and apoptosis-related genes in the fish gill.

  13. Gap junction communication in myelinating glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nualart-Marti, Anna; Solsona, Carles; Fields, R Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Gap junction communication is crucial for myelination and axonal survival in both the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS). This review examines the different types of gap junctions in myelinating glia of the PNS and CNS (Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes respectively), including their functions and involvement in neurological disorders. Gap junctions mediate intercellular communication among Schwann cells in the PNS, and among oligodendrocytes and between oligodendrocytes and astrocytes in the CNS. Reflexive gap junctions mediating transfer between different regions of the same cell promote communication between cellular compartments of myelinating glia that are separated by layers of compact myelin. Gap junctions in myelinating glia regulate physiological processes such as cell growth, proliferation, calcium signaling, and participate in extracellular signaling via release of neurotransmitters from hemijunctions. In the CNS, gap junctions form a glial network between oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. This transcellular communication is hypothesized to maintain homeostasis by facilitating restoration of membrane potential after axonal activity via electrical coupling and the re-distribution of potassium ions released from axons. The generation of transgenic mice for different subsets of connexins has revealed the contribution of different connexins in gap junction formation and illuminated new subcellular mechanisms underlying demyelination and cognitive defects. Alterations in metabolic coupling have been reported in animal models of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX) and Pelizaeus-Merzbarcher-like disease (PMLD), which are caused by mutations in the genes encoding for connexin 32 and connexin 47 respectively. Future research identifying the expression and regulation of gap junctions in myelinating glia is likely to provide a better understanding of myelinating glia in nervous system function, plasticity, and disease. This

  14. Crystal structure of the Bloom's syndrome helicase indicates a role for the HRDC domain in conformational changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newman, Joseph A; Savitsky, Pavel; Allerston, Charles K;

    2015-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome helicase (BLM) is a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases, which play key roles in the maintenance of genome integrity in all organism groups. We describe crystal structures of the BLM helicase domain in complex with DNA and with an antibody fragment, as well as SAXS...

  15. DMPD: Toll-like receptors and RNA helicases: two parallel ways to trigger antiviralresponses. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16762830 Toll-like receptors and RNA helicases: two parallel ways to trigger antivi...-like receptors and RNA helicases: two parallel ways to trigger antiviralresponses. PubmedID 16762830 Title ...Toll-like receptors and RNA helicases: two parallel ways to trigger antiviralresp

  16. Mechanistic insight into the interaction of BLM helicase with intra-strand G-quadruplex structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatterjee, Sujoy; Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Savitsky, Pavel;

    2014-01-01

    Bloom syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the RecQ family helicase BLM that is associated with growth retardation and predisposition to cancer. BLM helicase has a high specificity for non-canonical G-quadruplex (G4) DNA structures, which are formed by G-rich DNA...

  17. A role for the fission yeast Rqh1 helicase in chromosome segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Win, Thein Z; Mankouri, Hocine W; Hickson, Ian D;

    2005-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Rqh1 protein is a member of the RecQ DNA helicase family. Members of this protein family are mutated in several human genome instability syndromes, including Bloom, Werner and Rothmund-Thomson syndromes. RecQ helicases participate in recombination repair of stalled...

  18. Coupling dTTP Hydrolysis with DNA Unwinding by the DNA Helicase of Bacteriophage T7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Satapathy, Ajit K.; Kulczyk, Arkadiusz W.; Ghosh, Sharmistha; Oijen, Antoine M. van; Richardson, Charles C.

    2011-01-01

    The DNA helicase encoded by gene 4 of bacteriophage T7 assembles on single-stranded DNA as a hexamer of six identical subunits with the DNA passing through the center of the toroid. The helicase couples the hydrolysis of dTTP to unidirectional translocation on single-stranded DNA and the unwinding o

  19. Coupling dTTP Hydrolysis with DNA Unwinding by the DNA Helicase of Bacteriophage T7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Satapathy, Ajit K.; Kulczyk, Arkadiusz W.; Ghosh, Sharmistha; Oijen, Antoine M. van; Richardson, Charles C.

    2011-01-01

    The DNA helicase encoded by gene 4 of bacteriophage T7 assembles on single-stranded DNA as a hexamer of six identical subunits with the DNA passing through the center of the toroid. The helicase couples the hydrolysis of dTTP to unidirectional translocation on single-stranded DNA and the unwinding

  20. The XPB and XPD DNA helicases are components of the p53-mediated apoptosis pathway.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X.W. Wang (Xin Wei); W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.D. Coursen; M.K. Gibson (Michael); S.E. Lupold; K. Forrester; G. Xu; L. Elmore; H. Yeh; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); C.C. Harris

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe molecular pathway of p53-dependent apoptosis (programmed cell death) is poorly understood. Because p53 binds to the basal transcription-repair complex TFIIH and modulates its DNA helicase activities, we hypothesized that TFIIH DNA helicases XPB and XPD are members of the p53-mediated

  1. Lateral junction dynamics lead the way out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrndt, Martin; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2014-02-01

    Epithelial cell layers need to be tightly regulated to maintain their integrity and correct function. Cell integration into epithelial sheets is now shown to depend on the N-WASP-regulated stabilization of cortical F-actin, which generates distinct patterns of apical-lateral contractility at E-cadherin-based cell-cell junctions.

  2. The Werner syndrome helicase/exonuclease processes mobile D-loops through branch migration and degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia L Opresko

    Full Text Available RecQ DNA helicases are critical for preserving genome integrity. Of the five RecQ family members identified in humans, only the Werner syndrome protein (WRN possesses exonuclease activity. Loss of WRN causes the progeroid disorder Werner syndrome which is marked by cancer predisposition. Cellular evidence indicates that WRN disrupts potentially deleterious intermediates in homologous recombination (HR that arise in genomic and telomeric regions during DNA replication and repair. Precisely how the WRN biochemical activities process these structures is unknown, especially since the DNA unwinding activity is poorly processive. We generated biologically relevant mobile D-loops which mimic the initial DNA strand invasion step in HR to investigate whether WRN biochemical activities can disrupt this joint molecule. We show that WRN helicase alone can promote branch migration through an 84 base pair duplex region to completely displace the invading strand from the D-loop. However, substrate processing is altered in the presence of the WRN exonuclease activity which degrades the invading strand both prior to and after release from the D-loop. Furthermore, telomeric D-loops are more refractory to disruption by WRN, which has implications for tighter regulation of D-loop processing at telomeres. Finally, we show that WRN can recognize and initiate branch migration from both the 5' and 3' ends of the invading strand in the D-loops. These findings led us to propose a novel model for WRN D-loop disruption. Our biochemical results offer an explanation for the cellular studies that indicate both WRN activities function in processing HR intermediates.

  3. Differential distribution of tight junction proteins suggests a role for tanycytes in blood-hypothalamus barrier regulation in the adult mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullier, Amandine; Bouret, Sebastien G; Prevot, Vincent; Dehouck, Bénédicte

    2010-04-01

    The median eminence is one of the seven so-called circumventricular organs. It is located in the basal hypothalamus, ventral to the third ventricle and adjacent to the arcuate nucleus. This structure characteristically contains a rich capillary plexus and features a fenestrated endothelium, making it a direct target of blood-borne molecules. The median eminence also contains highly specialized ependymal cells called tanycytes, which line the floor of the third ventricle. It has been hypothesized that one of the functions of these cells is to create a barrier that prevents substances in the portal capillary spaces from entering the brain. In this paper, we utilize immunohistochemistry to study the expression of tight junction proteins in the cells that compose the median eminence in adult mice. Our results indicate that tanycytes of the median eminence express occludin, ZO-1, and claudin 1 and 5, but not claudin 3. Remarkably, these molecules are organized as a continuous belt around the cell bodies of the tanycytes that line the ventral part of the third ventricle. In contrast, the tanycytes at the periphery of the arcuate nucleus do not express claudin 1 and instead exhibit a disorganized expression pattern of occludin, ZO-1, and claudin 5. Consistent with these observations, permeability studies using peripheral or central injections of Evans blue dye show that only the tanycytes of the median eminence are joined at their apices by functional tight junctions, whereas tanycytes located at the level of the arcuate nucleus form a permeable layer. In conclusion, this study reveals a unique expression pattern of tight junction proteins in hypothalamic tanycytes, which yields new insights into their barrier properties.

  4. The stardust family protein MPP7 forms a tripartite complex with LIN7 and DLG1 that regulates the stability and localization of DLG1 to cell junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, Joanna; Brimer, Nicole; Lyons, Charles; Vande Pol, Scott B

    2007-03-30

    MPP7, a previously uncharacterized member of the p55 Stardust family of membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) proteins, was found in a tripartite complex with DLG1 and LIN7A or LIN7C. MPP7 dimerizes with all three LIN7 family members (LIN7A, -B, and -C) through interaction of the single L27 domain of LIN7 with the carboxyl-terminal L27 domain of MPP7, thereby stabilizing both proteins. The dimer of MPP7 with LIN7A or LIN7C associates with DLG1 through an interaction requiring the amino-terminal L27 domain of MPP7. The amino-terminal L27 domain of MPP7 is not sufficient for interaction with DLG1 but interacts efficiently only if MPP7 is in a complex with LIN7A or -C. Thus the specificity of interaction of DLG1 with the LIN7-MPP7 complex is determined by L27 interactions with both MPP7 and LIN7. The tripartite complex forms in a ratio of 1:1:1 and localizes to epithelial adherens junctions in a manner dependent upon MPP7. Expression of MPP7 stabilizes DLG1 in an insoluble compartment. Expression of MPP7 deleted of the PDZ or Src homology 3 domain redistributes MPP7, DLG1, and LIN7 out of adherens junctions and into the soluble cytoplasmic fraction without changing the localization of E-cadherin. Thus, the stability and localization of DLG1 to cell-cell junctions are complex functions determined by the expression and association of particular Stardust family members together with particular LIN7 family members.

  5. CRISPR-Mediated Drug-Target Validation Reveals Selective Pharmacological Inhibition of the RNA Helicase, eIF4A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Chu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Targeting translation initiation is an emerging anti-neoplastic strategy that capitalizes on de-regulated upstream MAPK and PI3K-mTOR signaling pathways in cancers. A key regulator of translation that controls ribosome recruitment flux is eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF 4F, a hetero-trimeric complex composed of the cap binding protein eIF4E, the scaffolding protein eIF4G, and the RNA helicase eIF4A. Small molecule inhibitors targeting eIF4F display promising anti-neoplastic activity in preclinical settings. Among these are some rocaglate family members that are well tolerated in vivo, deplete eIF4F of its eIF4A helicase subunit, have shown activity as single agents in several xenograft models, and can reverse acquired resistance to MAPK and PI3K-mTOR targeted therapies. Herein, we highlight the power of using genetic complementation approaches and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing for drug-target validation ex vivo and in vivo, linking the anti-tumor properties of rocaglates to eIF4A inhibition.

  6. Investigating the cellular localisation of DEAD box helicase DDX3

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    DDX3 is an RNA helicase that has been shown to have a range of nuclear and cytoplasmic functions, including transcription, translation, splicing and mRNA export. DDX3 has also been shown to play a role in innate immune signalling and tumorigenesis. DDX3 is targeted by multiple viruses: HIV, HCV , HBV and Vaccinia Virus have all been shown to interact with DDX3; either using DDX3 to replicate or inhibiting DDX3’s function in antiviral signalling. Human DDX3 was reported to be exported from the...

  7. Characterization of recombinant malarial RecQ DNA helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntornthiticharoen, Pattra; Srila, Witsanu; Chavalitshewinkoon-Petmitr, Porntip; Limudomporn, Paviga; Yamabhai, Montarop

    2014-08-01

    RecQ DNA gene of multi-drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum K1 (PfRecQ1) was cloned, and the recombinant C-terminal-decahistidine-tagged PfRecQ1 was expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme could efficiently unwind partial duplex DNA substrate in a 3' to 5' direction. The malarial RecQ1 could not unwind substrates with both 5' and 3' overhangs, those with a 5' overhang, or blunt-ended DNA duplexes. Unwinding of DNA helicase activity was driven by the hydrolysis of ATP. The drug inhibitory effects of six compounds indicated that only doxorubicin and daunorubicin could inhibit the unwinding activity.

  8. Control strategies for reducing consumption and pollutant emission on isolated junctions: field results; Enjeux de la regulation aux carrefours pour reduire la consommation et la polution: resultats experimentaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Midenet, S.; Boillot, F.; Pierrelee, J.C. [Institut National de Recherche sur les Transports et leur Securite, INRETS, Lab. Genie des Reseaux de Transports et Informatique Avancee, GRETIA, 94 - Arcueil (France)

    2000-07-01

    We present experimental results dealing with traffic light control strategies for reducing CO{sub 2} emission and fuel consumption on isolated intersection. The experimental site, located near Paris, is a 400 meter area centred on an isolated junction that has been equipped with video sensors (for queue lengths and other spatial traffic measurements). A complete control device enables to actually control the junction traffic lights from our INRETS laboratory. A model has been designed to estimate emission and consumption mean costs based on video traffic measurements. The model's coefficients have been calibrated with real life kinematics profiles and corresponding instantaneous emission measurements, provided by INRETS-LTE; we ended up with coefficients for diesel, catalyst gasoline and non-catalyst gasoline passenger cars. An 8 months experimental period in 1998-1999 led to constitute a large database of one-hour traffic measurement samples, that cover the usual traffic condition ranges for each strategy applied on field. The consumption and emission costs for each strategy, along with comparative benefits have been computed on this basis. We show that the CRONOS adaptive real-time strategy based on waiting time minimization leads to important benefits on the part of the cost that is related to stops and waiting time: 14 % on average for CO{sub 2} emission. This benefit remains significant on the total cost (around 4 % for CO{sub 2}) and noticeable whatever the traffic conditions. (authors)

  9. Carbachol ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal epithelial tight junction damage by down-regulating NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ying [Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care Medicine and Emergency Medicine Center, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, Hubei Province, People' s Republic of China (China); Li, Jianguo, E-mail: 2010lijianguo@sina.cn [Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care Medicine and Emergency Medicine Center, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, Hubei Province, People' s Republic of China (China)

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol reduced the lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol ameliorated the lipopolysaccharide-induced ileal tight junction damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol prevented the LPS-induced NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol exerted its beneficial effects in an {alpha}7 nicotinic receptor-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Carbachol is a cholinergic agonist that protects the intestines after trauma or burn injury. The present study determines the beneficial effects of carbachol and the mechanisms by which it ameliorates the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with 10 mg/kg LPS. Results showed that the gut barrier permeability was reduced, the ultrastructural disruption of tight junctions (TJs) was prevented, the redistribution of zonula occludens-1 and claudin-2 proteins was partially reversed, and the nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-{kappa}{beta}) and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) activation in the intestinal epithelium were suppressed after carbachol administration in LPS-exposed rats. Pretreatment with the {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}7nAchR) antagonist {alpha}-bungarotoxin blocked the protective action of carbachol. These results suggested that carbachol treatment can protect LPS-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. Carbachol exerts its beneficial effect on the amelioration of the TJ damage by inhibiting the NF-{kappa}{beta} and MLCK pathways in an {alpha}7nAchR-dependent manner.

  10. TNF-α regulates the proteolytic degradation of ST6Gal-1 and endothelial cell-cell junctions through upregulating expression of BACE1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiao; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Yan; Chen, Linmu; Yu, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelial cells are two critical steps in atherosclerosis development, and emerging evidence suggests that protein sialylation is involved in these processes. However, the mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains incompletely elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that treatment with the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α disrupted vascular endothelial cell-cell tight junctions and promoted monocyte endothelial cell adhesion. Western blotting and Sambucus nigra lectin (SNA) blotting analyses revealed that TNF-α treatment decreased α-2, 6-sialic acid transferase 1 (ST6Gal-I) levels and downregulated VE-Cadherin α-2, 6 sialylation. Further analysis demonstrated that TNF-α treatment upregulated β-site amyloid precursor protein enzyme 1 (BACE1) expression, thus resulting in sequential ST6Gal-I proteolytic degradation. Furthermore, our results revealed that PKC signaling cascades were involved in TNF-α-induced BACE1 upregulation. Together, these results indicated that the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α impairs endothelial tight junctions and promotes monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion by upregulating BACE1 expression through activating PKC signaling and sequentially cleaving ST6Gal-I. Thus, inhibition of BACE1 expression may be a new approach for treating atherosclerosis. PMID:28091531

  11. Presynaptic spike broadening reduces junctional potential amplitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, A N; Przysiezniak, J; Acosta-Urquidi, J; Basarsky, T A

    1989-08-24

    Presynaptic modulation of action potential duration may regulate synaptic transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Such synaptic plasticity is brought about by modifications to membrane currents at presynaptic release sites, which, in turn, lead to changes in the concentration of cytosolic calcium available for mediating transmitter release. The 'primitive' neuromuscular junction of the jellyfish Polyorchis penicillatus is a useful model of presynaptic modulation. In this study, we show that the durations of action potentials in the motor neurons of this jellyfish are negatively correlated with the amplitude of excitatory junctional potentials. We present data from in vitro voltage-clamp experiments showing that short duration voltage spikes, which elicit large excitatory junctional potentials in vivo, produce larger and briefer calcium currents than do long duration action potentials, which elicit small excitatory junctional potentials.

  12. The impaired intestinal mucosal immune system by valine deficiency for young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) is associated with decreasing immune status and regulating tight junction proteins transcript abundance in the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jian-Bo; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Wu, Pei; Jiang, Jun; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of dietary valine on the growth, intestinal immune response, tight junction proteins transcript abundance and gene expression of immune-related signaling molecules in the intestine of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). Six iso-nitrogenous diets containing graded levels of valine (4.3-19.1 g kg(-)(1) diet) were fed to the fish for 8 weeks. The results showed that percentage weight gain (PWG), feed intake and feed efficiency of fish were the lowest in fish fed the valine-deficient diet (P valine deficiency decreased lysozyme, acid phosphatase activities and complement 3 content in the intestine (P valine deficiency significantly decreased transcript of Occludin, Claudin b, Claudin c, Claudin 3, and ZO-1 (P valine did not have a significant effect on expression of Claudin 12 in the intestine of grass carp (P > 0.05). In conclusion, valine deficiency decreased fish growth and intestinal immune status, as well as regulated gene expression of tight junction proteins, NF-κB P65, IκBα and TOR in the fish intestine. Based on the quadratic regression analysis of lysozyme activity or PWG, the dietary valine requirement of young grass carp (268-679 g) were established to be 14.47 g kg(-1) diet (4.82 g 100 g(-1) CP) or 14.00 g kg(-1) diet (4.77 g 100 g(-1) CP), respectively.

  13. Baicalin Protects against TNF-α-Induced Injury by Down-Regulating miR-191a That Targets the Tight Junction Protein ZO-1 in IEC-6 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Ren; Chen, Jian; Wu, Qihui; Kuang, Zaoyuan

    2017-04-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) plays an important role in the developing process of inflammatory bowel disease. Tight junction protein zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), one of epithelial junctional proteins, maintains the permeability of intestinal barrier. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanism of the protective effect of baicalin on TNF-α-induced injury and ZO-1 expression in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We found that baicalin pretreatment significantly improved cell viability and cell migration following TNF-α stimulation. miR-191a inhibitor increased the protective effect of baicalin on cell motility injured by TNF-α. In addition, miR-191a down-regulated the mRNA and protein level of its target gene ZO-1. TNF-α stimulation increased miR-191a expression, leading to the decline of ZO-1 mRNA and protein. Moreover, pretreatment with baicalin reversed TNF-α induced decrease of ZO-1 and increase of miR-191a, miR-191a inhibitor significantly enhanced ZO-1 protein expression restored by baicalin. These results indicate that baicalin exerts a protective effect on IEC-6 (rat small intestinal epithelial cells) cells against TNF-α-induced injury, which is at least partly via inhibiting the expression of miR-191a, thus increasing ZO-1 mRNA and protein levels.

  14. Outer Membrane Vesicles and Soluble Factors Released by Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and Commensal ECOR63 Enhance Barrier Function by Regulating Expression of Tight Junction Proteins in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Carina-Shianya; Badia, Josefa; Bosch, Manel; Giménez, Rosa; Baldomà, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal epithelial layer forms a physical and biochemical barrier that maintains the segregation between host and intestinal microbiota. The integrity of this barrier is critical in maintaining homeostasis in the body and its dysfunction is linked to a variety of illnesses, especially inflammatory bowel disease. Gut microbes, and particularly probiotic bacteria, modulate the barrier integrity by reducing gut permeability and reinforcing tight junctions. Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is a good colonizer of the human gut with proven therapeutic efficacy in the remission of ulcerative colitis in humans. EcN positively modulates the intestinal epithelial barrier through upregulation and redistribution of the tight junction proteins ZO-1, ZO-2 and claudin-14. Upregulation of claudin-14 has been attributed to the secreted protein TcpC. Whether regulation of ZO-1 and ZO-2 is mediated by EcN secreted factors remains unknown. The aim of this study was to explore whether outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by EcN strengthen the epithelial barrier. This study includes other E. coli strains of human intestinal origin that contain the tcpC gene, such as ECOR63. Cell-free supernatants collected from the wild-type strains and from the derived tcpC mutants were fractionated into isolated OMVs and soluble secreted factors. The impact of these extracellular fractions on the epithelial barrier was evaluated by measuring transepithelial resistance and expression of several tight junction proteins in T-84 and Caco-2 polarized monolayers. Our results show that the strengthening activity of EcN and ECOR63 does not exclusively depend on TcpC. Both OMVs and soluble factors secreted by these strains promote upregulation of ZO-1 and claudin-14, and down-regulation of claudin-2. The OMVs-mediated effects are TcpC-independent. Soluble secreted TcpC contributes to the upregulation of ZO-1 and claudin-14, but this protein has no effect on the transcriptional

  15. Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We review the giant tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in ferromagnetic-insulator-ferromagnetic junctions discovered in recent years, which is the magnetoresistance (MR) associated with the spin-dependent tunneling between two ferromagnetic metal films separated by an insulating thin tunnel barrier. The theoretical and experimental results including junction conductance, magnetoresistance and their temperature and bias dependences are described.

  16. Stacked Josephson Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Find; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2010-01-01

    Long Josephson junctions have for some time been considered as a source of THz radiation. Solitons moving coherently in the junctions is a possible source for this radiation. Analytical computations of the bunched state and bunching-inducing methods are reviewed. Experiments showing THz radiation...

  17. Three structure-selective endonucleases are essential in the absence of BLM helicase in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Sabrina L; Kuo, H Kenny; Savukoski, Daniel; Brodsky, Michael H; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2011-10-01

    DNA repair mechanisms in mitotically proliferating cells avoid generating crossovers, which can contribute to genome instability. Most models for the production of crossovers involve an intermediate with one or more four-stranded Holliday junctions (HJs), which are resolved into duplex molecules through cleavage by specialized endonucleases. In vitro studies have implicated three nuclear enzymes in HJ resolution: MUS81-EME1/Mms4, GEN1/Yen1, and SLX4-SLX1. The Bloom syndrome helicase, BLM, plays key roles in preventing mitotic crossover, either by blocking the formation of HJ intermediates or by removing HJs without cleavage. Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants that lack Sgs1 (the BLM ortholog) and either Mus81-Mms4 or Slx4-Slx1 are inviable, but mutants that lack Sgs1 and Yen1 are viable. The current view is that Yen1 serves primarily as a backup to Mus81-Mms4. Previous studies with Drosophila melanogaster showed that, as in yeast, loss of both DmBLM and MUS81 or MUS312 (the ortholog of SLX4) is lethal. We have now recovered and analyzed mutations in Drosophila Gen. As in yeast, there is some redundancy between Gen and mus81; however, in contrast to the case in yeast, GEN plays a more predominant role in responding to DNA damage than MUS81-MMS4. Furthermore, loss of DmBLM and GEN leads to lethality early in development. We present a comparison of phenotypes occurring in double mutants that lack DmBLM and either MUS81, GEN, or MUS312, including chromosome instability and deficiencies in cell proliferation. Our studies of synthetic lethality provide insights into the multiple functions of DmBLM and how various endonucleases may function when DmBLM is absent.

  18. Three structure-selective endonucleases are essential in the absence of BLM helicase in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina L Andersen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available DNA repair mechanisms in mitotically proliferating cells avoid generating crossovers, which can contribute to genome instability. Most models for the production of crossovers involve an intermediate with one or more four-stranded Holliday junctions (HJs, which are resolved into duplex molecules through cleavage by specialized endonucleases. In vitro studies have implicated three nuclear enzymes in HJ resolution: MUS81-EME1/Mms4, GEN1/Yen1, and SLX4-SLX1. The Bloom syndrome helicase, BLM, plays key roles in preventing mitotic crossover, either by blocking the formation of HJ intermediates or by removing HJs without cleavage. Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants that lack Sgs1 (the BLM ortholog and either Mus81-Mms4 or Slx4-Slx1 are inviable, but mutants that lack Sgs1 and Yen1 are viable. The current view is that Yen1 serves primarily as a backup to Mus81-Mms4. Previous studies with Drosophila melanogaster showed that, as in yeast, loss of both DmBLM and MUS81 or MUS312 (the ortholog of SLX4 is lethal. We have now recovered and analyzed mutations in Drosophila Gen. As in yeast, there is some redundancy between Gen and mus81; however, in contrast to the case in yeast, GEN plays a more predominant role in responding to DNA damage than MUS81-MMS4. Furthermore, loss of DmBLM and GEN leads to lethality early in development. We present a comparison of phenotypes occurring in double mutants that lack DmBLM and either MUS81, GEN, or MUS312, including chromosome instability and deficiencies in cell proliferation. Our studies of synthetic lethality provide insights into the multiple functions of DmBLM and how various endonucleases may function when DmBLM is absent.

  19. Immunity decreases, antioxidant system damages and tight junction changes in the intestine of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) during folic acid deficiency: Regulation of NF-κB, Nrf2 and MLCK mRNA levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2016-04-01

    This investigation used the same growth trial as the previous study, which showed that folic acid deficiency retarded growth in young grass carp (the percent weight gain of Groups 1-6 were 102.32 ± 3.41%, 137.25 ± 10.48%, 179.78 ± 3.95%, 164.33 ± 3.21%, 143.35 ± 8.12% and 115.28 ± 2.66%) [1]. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dietary folic acid on the immune response, antioxidant status and tight junctions in the intestine of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). A total of 540 young grass carp were fed diets containing graded levels of folic acid at 0.10, 0.47, 1.03, 1.48, 1.88 and 3.12 mg kg(-1) diet for 8 weeks. The results indicated that acid phosphatase and lysozyme activities, and the complement component 3 content in the proximal intestine (PI), mid intestine (MI) and distal intestine (DI) were decreased with folic acid deficiency (0.1 mg kg(-1)) (P Folic acid deficiency (0.1 mg kg(-1)) up-regulated interleukin 1β, interleukin 8, tumor necrosis factor α, nuclear factor κB p65 (NF-κB p65), IκB kinase α (IKK-α), IKK-β and IKK-γ gene expression, meanwhile down-regulated interleukin 10, transforming growth factor β, IκB and target of rapamycin gene expression in the PI, MI and DI (P folic acid deficiency decreased fish intestinal innate immune function may be partly contributed to the regulation of NF-κB p65 pathway. Moreover, the activities and corresponding gene expression of glutathione content, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione s-transferases and glutathione reductase in fish intestine were depressed by deficient folic acid diet (0.1 mg kg(-1)) (P folic acid deficiency (0.1 mg kg(-1)) down-regulated NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) gene expression, up-regulated Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1a (Keap1a) and Keap1b gene expression in fish intestine (P folic acid diet damaged fish intestinal antioxidant capacity partly by regulating Nrf2/Keap1 pathway

  20. Genome-Wide Analysis of the RNA Helicase Gene Family in Gossypium raimondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The RNA helicases, which help to unwind stable RNA duplexes, and have important roles in RNA metabolism, belong to a class of motor proteins that play important roles in plant development and responses to stress. Although this family of genes has been the subject of systematic investigation in Arabidopsis, rice, and tomato, it has not yet been characterized in cotton. In this study, we identified 161 putative RNA helicase genes in the genome of the diploid cotton species Gossypium raimondii. We classified these genes into three subfamilies, based on the presence of either a DEAD-box (51 genes, DEAH-box (52 genes, or DExD/H-box (58 genes in their coding regions. Chromosome location analysis showed that the genes that encode RNA helicases are distributed across all 13 chromosomes of G. raimondii. Syntenic analysis revealed that 62 of the 161 G. raimondii helicase genes (38.5% are within the identified syntenic blocks. Sixty-six (40.99% helicase genes from G. raimondii have one or several putative orthologs in tomato. Additionally, GrDEADs have more conserved gene structures and more simple domains than GrDEAHs and GrDExD/Hs. Transcriptome sequencing data demonstrated that many of these helicases, especially GrDEADs, are highly expressed at the fiber initiation stage and in mature leaves. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a genome-wide analysis of the RNA helicase gene family in cotton.

  1. DDX3 RNA helicase is required for HIV-1 Tat function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda-Inoue, Mariko; Kuroki, Misao; Ariumi, Yasuo

    2013-11-22

    Host RNA helicase has been involved in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication, since HIV-1 does not encode an RNA helicase. Indeed, DDX1 and DDX3 DEAD-box RNA helicases are known to be required for efficient HIV-1 Rev-dependent RNA export. However, it remains unclear whether DDX RNA helicases modulate the HIV-1 Tat function. In this study, we demonstrate, for the first time, that DDX3 is required for the HIV-1 Tat function. Notably, DDX3 colocalized and interacted with HIV-1 Tat in cytoplasmic foci. Indeed, DDX3 localized in the cytoplasmic foci P-bodies or stress granules under stress condition after the treatment with arsenite. Importantly, only DDX3 enhanced the Tat function, while various distinct DEAD-box RNA helicases including DDX1, DDX3, DDX5, DDX17, DDX21, and DDX56, stimulated the HIV-1 Rev-dependent RNA export function, indicating a specific role of DDX3 in Tat function. Indeed, the ATPase-dependent RNA helicase activity of DDX3 seemed to be required for the Tat function as well as the colocalization with Tat. Furthermore, the combination of DDX3 with other distinct DDX RNA helicases cooperated to stimulate the Rev but not Tat function. Thus, DDX3 seems to interact with the HIV-1 Tat and facilitate the Tat function.

  2. Characterization of virus strains resistant to the herpes virus helicase-primase inhibitor ASP2151 (Amenamevir).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chono, Koji; Katsumata, Kiyomitsu; Kontani, Toru; Shiraki, Kimiyasu; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2012-08-15

    ASP2151 is an antiherpes agent targeting the helicase-primase complex of herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1, HSV-2, and varicella-zoster virus (VZV). We characterized the ASP2151-resistant HSV-1 and HSV-2 variants or mutants based on findings from sequencing analysis, growth, pathogenicity, and susceptibility testing, identifying several single base-pair substitutions resulting in amino acid changes in the helicase and primase subunit of ASP2151-resistant mutants. Amino acid alterations in the helicase subunit were clustered near helicase motif IV in the UL5 helicase gene of both HSV-1 and HSV-2, while the primase subunit substitution associated with reduced susceptibility, R367H, was found in ASP2151-resistant HSV-1 mutants. However, while susceptibility in the ASP2151-resistant HSV mutants to existing antiherpes agents was equivalent to that in wild-type HSV strains, ASP2151-resistant HSV mutants showed attenuated in vitro growth capability and in vivo pathogenicity compared with the parent strains. Taken together, our present findings demonstrated that important amino acid substitutions associated with reduced susceptibilities of HSV-1 and HSV-2 to ASP2151 exist in both the helicase and primase subunits of the helicase-primase complex, and that mutations in this complex against ASP2151 might confer defects in viral replication and pathogenicity.

  3. The ouabain-sensitive isoform of Na+-pump regulates vascular gap junctions via interaction with the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger in membrane microdomain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matchkov, Vladimir; Nilsson, Holger; Aalkjær, Christian

    leading to increases in [Ca2+]i in discrete areas near the plasma membrane. This suggests close association of these transport proteins in microdomains. Using PCR and co-immunoprecipitation we aimed to test this hypothesis in SMCs from mesenteric small arteries and in A7r5 cell line. Intercellular...... electrical coupling was evaluated in functional studies. SMCs were electrically uncoupled when the ouabain-sensitive Na+-pump was inhibited by 10 mM ouabain. Inhibition of the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger with 1 mM SEA0400 also uncoupled the SMCs. Depletion of [Na+]i and clamping [Ca2+]i at low levels prevented...... leading to local [Ca2+]i transients near the membrane which block the closely associated connexin-43 containing gap junctions....

  4. Impact of age-associated cyclopurine lesions on DNA repair helicases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Khan

    Full Text Available 8,5' cyclopurine deoxynucleosides (cPu are locally distorting DNA base lesions corrected by nucleotide excision repair (NER and proposed to play a role in neurodegeneration prevalent in genetically defined Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP patients. In the current study, purified recombinant helicases from different classifications based on sequence homology were examined for their ability to unwind partial duplex DNA substrates harboring a single site-specific cPu adduct. Superfamily (SF 2 RecQ helicases (RECQ1, BLM, WRN, RecQ were inhibited by cPu in the helicase translocating strand, whereas helicases from SF1 (UvrD and SF4 (DnaB tolerated cPu in either strand. SF2 Fe-S helicases (FANCJ, DDX11 (ChlR1, DinG, XPD displayed marked differences in their ability to unwind the cPu DNA substrates. Archaeal Thermoplasma acidophilum XPD (taXPD, homologue to the human XPD helicase involved in NER DNA damage verification, was impeded by cPu in the non-translocating strand, while FANCJ was uniquely inhibited by the cPu in the translocating strand. Sequestration experiments demonstrated that FANCJ became trapped by the translocating strand cPu whereas RECQ1 was not, suggesting the two SF2 helicases interact with the cPu lesion by distinct mechanisms despite strand-specific inhibition for both. Using a protein trap to simulate single-turnover conditions, the rate of FANCJ or RECQ1 helicase activity was reduced 10-fold and 4.5-fold, respectively, by cPu in the translocating strand. In contrast, single-turnover rates of DNA unwinding by DDX11 and UvrD helicases were only modestly affected by the cPu lesion in the translocating strand. The marked difference in effect of the translocating strand cPu on rate of DNA unwinding between DDX11 and FANCJ helicase suggests the two Fe-S cluster helicases unwind damaged DNA by distinct mechanisms. The apparent complexity of helicase encounters with an unusual form of oxidative damage is likely to have important consequences in

  5. SIRT7 and the DEAD-box helicase DDX21 cooperate to resolve genomic R loops and safeguard genome stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chenlin; Hotz-Wagenblatt, Agnes; Voit, Renate; Grummt, Ingrid

    2017-08-08

    R loops are three-stranded nucleic acid structures consisting of an RNA:DNA heteroduplex and a "looped-out" nontemplate strand. As aberrant formation and persistence of R loops block transcription elongation and cause DNA damage, mechanisms that resolve R loops are essential for genome stability. Here we show that the DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp)-box RNA helicase DDX21 efficiently unwinds R loops and that depletion of DDX21 leads to accumulation of cellular R loops and DNA damage. Significantly, the activity of DDX21 is regulated by acetylation. Acetylation by CBP inhibits DDX21 activity, while deacetylation by SIRT7 augments helicase activity and overcomes R-loop-mediated stalling of RNA polymerases. Knockdown of SIRT7 leads to the same phenotype as depletion of DDX21 (i.e., increased formation of R loops and DNA double-strand breaks), indicating that SIRT7 and DDX21 cooperate to prevent R-loop accumulation, thus safeguarding genome integrity. Moreover, DDX21 resolves estrogen-induced R loops on estrogen-responsive genes in breast cancer cells, which prevents the blocking of transcription elongation on these genes. © 2017 Song et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  6. Phosphorylation of threonine 204 of DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 by cyclin B/cdc2 in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Takeshi; Kurihara, Yoshiko; Fukumura, Junko

    2007-05-11

    DDX3 is a DEAD-box RNA helicase involved in human immunodeficiency virus mRNA export and translation. Previously, we reported that DDX3 is required for cyclin A expression. To examine whether DDX3 is regulated at the post-transcriptional level, we determined the phosphorylation sites of hamster DDX3 in vitro. Threonine 204 (Thr204) is a conserved amino acid residue of DDX3 homologues in yeast, frog, hamster, and human that is located within motif Q of DEAD-box RNA helicases. A Thr204 to Glu204 DDX3 mutant protein lost its function, suggesting that phosphorylation at Thr204 affects DDX3 function. Thr204 was phosphorylated by cyclin B/cdc2. Thr323 in motif Ib was also phosphorylated by cyclin B/cdc2 kinase. We propose a novel function of cyclin B/cdc2 kinase in mitosis, which is to cause a loss of DDX3 function to repress cyclin A expression and to decrease ribosome biogenesis and translation during mitosis.

  7. Knockdown of cellular RNA helicase DDX3 by short hairpin RNAs suppresses HIV-1 viral replication without inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, Musarat; Hu, Jiajie; Wu, Xiaoyun; Fu, Qiong; Yang, Yalin; Liu, Qingzhen; Guo, Deyin

    2008-07-01

    The targeting of a cellular co-factor, rather than the HIV-1-specific RNAs, by small interfering RNAs holds promise as the rapid mutational ability of the HIV-1 genome may obviate the potential clinical use of RNAi against this virus. The DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 is an essential Rev co-factor in the CRM1-Rev-RRE complex that promotes the export of unspliced and single-spliced HIV-1 RNAs from the nucleus to cytoplasm. In this report, human DDX3 was targeted by specific short hairpin RNAs, and the down-regulation of cell's endogenous DDX3 suppressed the nuclear export of unspliced HIV-1 RNAs but did not affect the cell viability. We further showed that the knockdown of cellular DDX3 could effectively inhibit the replication of HIV-1. Therefore, the current results suggest that the RNA helicase DDX3 may become a potential target by RNAi for future genetic therapy of HIV/AIDS.

  8. A novel function for the DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX-23 in primary microRNA processing in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yu-De; Chen, Hsin-Kai; Huang, Tao; Chan, Shih-Peng

    2016-01-15

    Primary microRNAs (pri-miRNAs) are cleaved by the nuclear RNase III Drosha to produce hairpin-shaped precursor miRNAs (pre-miRNAs). In humans, this process is known to be facilitated by the DEAD-box helicases p68 (DDX5) and p72 (DDX17). In this study, we performed a candidate-based RNAi screen in C. elegans to identify DEAD/H-box proteins involved in miRNA biogenesis. In a let-7(mg279) sensitized genetic background, knockdown of a homolog of yeast splicing factor Prp28p, DDX-23, or a homolog of human helicases p68 and p72, DDX-17, enhanced let-7 loss-of-function phenotypes, suggesting that these helicases play a role in let-7 processing and/or function. In both ddx-23(RNAi) and ddx-17(RNAi), levels of mature let-7 were decreased while pri-let-7 was found to accumulate, indicating that the helicases likely act at the level of pri-let-7 processing. DDX-23 and DDX-17 were also required for the biogenesis of other known heterochronic miRNAs, including lin-4 and the let-7 family members miR-48, miR-84 and miR-241. Their function was not confined to the heterochronic pathway, however, since they were both necessary for down-regulation of cog-1 by the spatial patterning miRNA, lsy-6. Here, we present a novel function for C. elegans DDX-23 in pri-miRNA processing, and also suggest a conserved role for DDX-17 in this process.

  9. Gap junction intercellular communication and benzene toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivedal, Edgar; Witz, Gisela; Leithe, Edward

    2010-03-19

    Aberrant regulation of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) has been linked to several human diseases, including cancer and abnormal hematopoietic development. Benzene exposure has been shown to cause hematotoxicity and leukemia, but the underlying mechanisms involved remain unclear. We have observed that several metabolites of benzene have the ability to block gap junction intercellular communication. The ring-opened trans,trans-muconaldehyde (MUC) was found to be the most potent inhibitor of gap junction channels. MUC was found to induce cross-linking of the gap junction protein connexin43, which seemed to be responsible for the induced inhibition of GJIC. Glutaraldehyde, which has a similar molecular structure as MUC, was found to possess similar effects on gap junctions as MUC, while the mono-aldehyde formaldehyde shows lower potency, both as a connexin cross-linker, and as an inhibitor of GJIC. Both glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde have previously been associated with induction of leukemia and disturbance of hematopoiesis. Taken together, the data support a possible link between the effect of MUC on gap junctions, and the toxic effects of benzene. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of SUV3 Helicase in Maintaining Mitochondrial Homeostasis in Human Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khidr, Lily; Wu, Guikai; Davila, Antonio; Procaccio, Vincent; Wallace, Douglas; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2008-01-01

    In yeast mitochondria, RNA degradation takes place through the coordinated activities of ySuv3 helicase and yDss1 exoribonuclease (mtEXO), whereas in bacteria, RNA is degraded via RNaseE, RhlB, PNPase, and enolase. Yeast lacking the Suv3 component of the mtEXO form petits and undergo a toxic accumulation of omega intron RNAs. Mammalian mitochondria resemble their prokaryotic origins by harboring a polyadenylation-dependent RNA degradation mechanism, but whether SUV3 participates in regulating RNA turnover in mammalian mitochondria is unclear. We found that lack of hSUV3 in mammalian cells subsequently yielded an accumulation of shortened polyadenylated mtRNA species and impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis. This suggests that SUV3 may serve in part as a component of an RNA degradosome, resembling its yeast ancestor. Reduction in the expression levels of oxidative phosphorylation components correlated with an increase in reactive oxygen species generation, whereas membrane potential and ATP production were decreased. These cumulative defects led to pleiotropic effects in mitochondria such as decreased mtDNA copy number and a shift in mitochondrial morphology from tubular to granular, which eventually manifests in cellular senescence or cell death. Thus, our results suggest that SUV3 is essential for maintaining proper mitochondrial function, likely through a conserved role in mitochondrial RNA regulation. PMID:18678873

  11. Role of SUV3 helicase in maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khidr, Lily; Wu, Guikai; Davila, Antonio; Procaccio, Vincent; Wallace, Douglas; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2008-10-03

    In yeast mitochondria, RNA degradation takes place through the coordinated activities of ySuv3 helicase and yDss1 exoribonuclease (mtEXO), whereas in bacteria, RNA is degraded via RNaseE, RhlB, PNPase, and enolase. Yeast lacking the Suv3 component of the mtEXO form petits and undergo a toxic accumulation of omega intron RNAs. Mammalian mitochondria resemble their prokaryotic origins by harboring a polyadenylation-dependent RNA degradation mechanism, but whether SUV3 participates in regulating RNA turnover in mammalian mitochondria is unclear. We found that lack of hSUV3 in mammalian cells subsequently yielded an accumulation of shortened polyadenylated mtRNA species and impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis. This suggests that SUV3 may serve in part as a component of an RNA degradosome, resembling its yeast ancestor. Reduction in the expression levels of oxidative phosphorylation components correlated with an increase in reactive oxygen species generation, whereas membrane potential and ATP production were decreased. These cumulative defects led to pleiotropic effects in mitochondria such as decreased mtDNA copy number and a shift in mitochondrial morphology from tubular to granular, which eventually manifests in cellular senescence or cell death. Thus, our results suggest that SUV3 is essential for maintaining proper mitochondrial function, likely through a conserved role in mitochondrial RNA regulation.

  12. Cooperation of DNA-PKcs and WRN helicase in the maintenance of telomeric D-loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusumoto-Matsuo, Rika; Opresko, Patricia L; Ramsden, Dale;

    2010-01-01

    and in vivo interaction at the telomere between WRN and DNA-PKcs, the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK. The results show that DNA-PKcs selectively stimulates WRN helicase but not WRN exonuclease in vitro, affecting that WRN helicase unwinds and promotes the release of the full-length invading strand of a telomere...... D-loop model substrate. In addition, the length of telomeric G-tails decreases in DNA-PKcs knockdown cells, and this phenotype is reversed by overexpression of WRN helicase. These results suggest that WRN and DNA-PKcs may cooperatively prevent G-tail shortening in vivo.......Werner syndrome is an inherited human progeriod syndrome caused by mutations in the gene encoding the Werner Syndrome protein, WRN. It has both 3'-5' DNA helicase and exonuclease activities, and is suggested to have roles in many aspects of DNA metabolism, including DNA repair and telomere...

  13. Taking a molecular motor for a spin: helicase mechanism studied by spin labeling and PELDOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu-Aruxandei, Diana; Petrovic-Stojanovska, Biljana; Schiemann, Olav; Naismith, James H.; White, Malcolm F.

    2016-01-01

    The complex molecular motions central to the functions of helicases have long attracted attention. Protein crystallography has provided transformative insights into these dynamic conformational changes, however important questions about the true nature of helicase configurations during the catalytic cycle remain. Using pulsed EPR (PELDOR or DEER) to measure interdomain distances in solution, we have examined two representative helicases: PcrA from superfamily 1 and XPD from superfamily 2. The data show that PcrA is a dynamic structure with domain movements that correlate with particular functional states, confirming and extending the information gleaned from crystal structures and other techniques. XPD in contrast is shown to be a rigid protein with almost no conformational changes resulting from nucleotide or DNA binding, which is well described by static crystal structures. Our results highlight the complimentary nature of PELDOR to crystallography and the power of its precision in understanding the conformational changes relevant to helicase function. PMID:26657627

  14. Equivalent Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyadjiev, T. L.; Semerdjieva, E. G.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2008-01-01

    The magnetic field dependences of critical current are numerically constructed for a long Josephson junction with a shunt-or resistor-type microscopic inhomogeneities and compared to the critical curve of a junction with exponentially varying width. The numerical results show that it is adequate to replace the distributed inhomogeneity of a long Josephson junction by an inhomogeneity localized at one of its ends, which has certain technological advantages. It is also shown that the critical curves of junctions with exponentially varying width and inhomogeneities localized at the ends are unaffected by the mixed fluxon-antifluxon distributions of the magnetic flow. This fact may explain the improvement of the spectra of microwave radiation noted in the literature.

  15. Homologous DNA strand exchange activity of the human mitochondrial DNA helicase TWINKLE

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, Doyel; Patel, Gayatri; Smita S Patel

    2016-01-01

    A crucial component of the human mitochondrial DNA replisome is the ring-shaped helicase TWINKLE—a phage T7-gene 4-like protein expressed in the nucleus and localized in the human mitochondria. Our previous studies showed that despite being a helicase, TWINKLE has unique DNA annealing activity. At the time, the implications of DNA annealing by TWINKLE were unclear. Herein, we report that TWINKLE uses DNA annealing function to actively catalyze strand-exchange reaction between the unwinding su...

  16. The role of Rap1 in cell-cell junction formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, M.R.H.

    2008-01-01

    Both epithelial and endothelial cells form cell-cell junctions at the cell-cell contacts to maintain tissue integrity. Proper regulation of cell-cell junctions is required for the organisation of the tissue and to prevent leakage of blood vessels. In endothelial cells, the cell-cell junctions are

  17. Quantum Junction Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Jiang

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO 2); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  18. Deficiency of dietary niacin impaired gill immunity and antioxidant capacity, and changes its tight junction proteins via regulating NF-κB, TOR, Nrf2 and MLCK signaling pathways in young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shun-Quan; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the effects of dietary niacin on gill immunity, tight junction proteins, antioxidant system and related signaling molecules mRNA expression, young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) were fed six diets containing graded levels of niacin (3.95-55.01 mg/kg diet) for 8 weeks. The study indicated that niacin deficiency decreased lysozyme and acid phosphatase activities, and complement 3 content, and caused oxidative damage that might be partly due to the decreased copper, zinc superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase activities and reduced glutathione content in fish gills (P niacin-deficient diet group. Conversely, the mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 8, interferon γ2, and interleukin 1β), signaling molecules (nuclear factor kappa B p65, IκB kinase α, IκB kinase β, IκB kinase γ, Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1b, myosin light chain kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) were significantly increased (P niacin-deficient diet. Interestingly, the varying niacin levels of 3.95-55.01 mg/kg diet had no effect on the mRNA level of Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1a, Claudin-c and -12 in fish gills (P > 0.05). In conclusion, niacin deficiency decreased gill immunity, impaired gill antioxidant system, as well as regulated mRNA expression of gill tight junction proteins and related signaling molecules of fish.

  19. Shh and Gli3 regulate formation of the telencephalic-diencephalic junction and suppress an isthmus-like signaling source in the forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rash, Brian G; Grove, Elizabeth A

    2011-11-15

    In human holoprosencephaly (HPE), the forebrain does not separate fully into two hemispheres. Further, the border between the telencephalon and diencephalon, the telencephalic/diencephalic junction (TDJ), is often indistinct, and the ventricular system can be blocked at the third ventricle, creating a forebrain 'holosphere'. Mice deficient in Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) have previously been described to show HPE and associated cyclopia. Here we report that the third ventricle is blocked in Shh null mutants, similar to human HPE, and that characteristic telencephalic and diencephalic signaling centers, the cortical hem and zona limitans intrathalamica (ZLI), are merged, obliterating the TDJ. The resulting forebrain holosphere comprises Foxg1-positive telencephalic- and Foxg1-negative diencephalic territories. Loss of one functional copy of Gli3 in Shh nulls rescues ventricular collapse and substantially restores the TDJ. Characteristic regional gene expression patterns are rescued on the telencephalic side of the TDJ but not in the diencephalon. Further analysis of compound Shh;Gli3 mutants revealed an unexpected type of signaling center deregulation. In Shh;Gli3 mutants, adjacent rings of Fgf8 and Wnt3a expression are induced in the diencephalon at the ZLI, reminiscent of the Fgf8/Wnt1-expressing isthmic organizer. Neither Shh nor Gli3 single mutants show this forebrain double ring of Fgf/Wnt expression; thus both Shh and Gli3 are independently required to suppress it. Adjacent tissue is not respecified to a midbrain/hindbrain fate, but shows overgrowth, consistent with ectopic mitogen expression. Our observations indicate that the separation of the telencephalon and diencephalon depends on interactions between Shh and Gli3, and, moreover, demonstrate that both Shh and Gli3 suppress a potential Fgf/Wnt signaling source in the forebrain. That optional signaling centers are actively repressed in normal development is a striking new insight into the processes of vertebrate

  20. XPD Helicase Structures and Activities: Insights into the Cancer and Aging Phenotypes from XPD Mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tainer, John; Fan, Li; Fuss, Jill O.; Cheng, Quen J.; Arvai, Andrew S.; Hammel, Michal; Roberts, Victoria A.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Tainer, John A.

    2008-06-02

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  1. ARCPHdb: A comprehensive protein database for SF1 and SF2 helicase from archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moukhtar, Mirna; Chaar, Wafi; Abdel-Razzak, Ziad; Khalil, Mohamad; Taha, Samir; Chamieh, Hala

    2017-01-01

    Superfamily 1 and Superfamily 2 helicases, two of the largest helicase protein families, play vital roles in many biological processes including replication, transcription and translation. Study of helicase proteins in the model microorganisms of archaea have largely contributed to the understanding of their function, architecture and assembly. Based on a large phylogenomics approach, we have identified and classified all SF1 and SF2 protein families in ninety five sequenced archaea genomes. Here we developed an online webserver linked to a specialized protein database named ARCPHdb to provide access for SF1 and SF2 helicase families from archaea. ARCPHdb was implemented using MySQL relational database. Web interfaces were developed using Netbeans. Data were stored according to UniProt accession numbers, NCBI Ref Seq ID, PDB IDs and Entrez Databases. A user-friendly interactive web interface has been developed to browse, search and download archaeal helicase protein sequences, their available 3D structure models, and related documentation available in the literature provided by ARCPHdb. The database provides direct links to matching external databases. The ARCPHdb is the first online database to compile all protein information on SF1 and SF2 helicase from archaea in one platform. This database provides essential resource information for all researchers interested in the field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. XPD Helicase Structures And Activities: Insights Into the Cancer And Aging Phenotypes From XPD Mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, L.; Fuss, J.O.; Cheng, Q.J.; Arvai, A.S.; Hammel, M.; Roberts, V.A.; Cooper, P.K.; Tainer, J.A.

    2009-05-18

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  3. BLM helicase facilitates telomere replication during leading strand synthesis of telomeres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosiyatrakul, Settapong T.

    2015-01-01

    Based on its in vitro unwinding activity on G-quadruplex (G4) DNA, the Bloom syndrome–associated helicase BLM is proposed to participate in telomere replication by aiding fork progression through G-rich telomeric DNA. Single molecule analysis of replicated DNA (SMARD) was used to determine the contribution of BLM helicase to telomere replication. In BLM-deficient cells, replication forks initiating from origins within the telomere, which copy the G-rich strand by leading strand synthesis, moved slower through the telomere compared with the adjacent subtelomere. Fork progression through the telomere was further slowed in the presence of a G4 stabilizer. Using a G4-specific antibody, we found that deficiency of BLM, or another G4-unwinding helicase, the Werner syndrome-associated helicase WRN, resulted in increased G4 structures in cells. Importantly, deficiency of either helicase led to greater increases in G4 DNA detected in the telomere compared with G4 seen genome-wide. Collectively, our findings are consistent with BLM helicase facilitating telomere replication by resolving G4 structures formed during copying of the G-rich strand by leading strand synthesis. PMID:26195664

  4. period-1 encodes an ATP-dependent RNA helicase that influences nutritional compensation of the Neurospora circadian clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emerson, Jillian M.; Bartholomai, Bradley M.; Ringelberg, Carol; Baker, Scott E.; Loros, Jennifer J.; Dunlap, Jay C.

    2015-12-22

    Mutants in the period-1 (prd-1) gene, characterized by a recessive allele, display a reduced growth rate and period lengthening of the developmental cycle controlled by the circadian clock. We refined the genetic location of prd-1 and used whole genome sequencing to find the mutation defining it, confirming the identity of prd-1 by rescuing the mutant circadian phenotype via transformation. PRD-1 is an RNA helicase whose orthologs, DDX5 and DDX17 in humans and Dbp2p in yeast, are implicated in various processes including transcriptional regulation, elongation, and termination, 23 ribosome biogenesis, and RNA decay. Although prdi-1smutantssiois an ATP-dependent RNA helicase, member of a sub-family display a long period (~25 hrs) circadian developmental cycle, they interestingly display a wild type period when the core circadian oscillator is tracked using a frq-luciferase transcriptional fusion under conditions of limiting nutritional carbon; the core oscillator runs with a long period under glucose-sufficient conditions. Thus PRD-1 clearly impacts the circadian oscillator and is not only part of a metabolic oscillator ancillary to the core clock. PRD-1 is an essential protein and its expression is neither light-regulated nor clock-regulated. However, it is transiently induced by glucose; in the presence of sufficient glucose PRD-1 is in the nucleus until glucose runs out which elicits its disappearance from the nucleus. Because circadian period length is carbon concentration-dependent, prd­-1 may be formally viewed as clock mutant with defective nutritional compensation of circadian period length.

  5. ATP-dependent recruitment of export factor Aly/REF onto intronless mRNAs by RNA helicase UAP56.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Ichiro; Ohno, Mutsuhito

    2008-01-01

    Loading of export factors onto mRNAs is a key step in gene expression. In vertebrates, splicing plays a role in this process. Specific protein complexes, exon junction complex and transcription/export complex, are loaded onto mRNAs in a splicing-dependent manner, and adaptor proteins such as Aly/REF in the complexes in turn recruit mRNA exporter TAP-p15 onto the RNA. By contrast, how export factors are recruited onto intronless mRNAs is largely unknown. We previously showed that Aly/REF is preferentially associated with intronless mRNAs in the nucleus. Here we show that Aly/REF could preferentially bind intronless mRNAs in vitro and that this binding was stimulated by RNA helicase UAP56 in an ATP-dependent manner. Consistently, an ATP binding-deficient UAP56 mutant specifically inhibited mRNA export in Xenopus oocytes. Interestingly, ATP activated the RNA binding activity of UAP56 itself. ATP-bound UAP56 therefore bound to both RNA and Aly/REF, and as a result ATPase activity of UAP56 was cooperatively stimulated. These results are consistent with a model in which ATP-bound UAP56 chaperones Aly/REF onto RNA, ATP is then hydrolyzed, and UAP56 dissociates from RNA for the next round of Aly/REF recruitment. Our finding provides a mechanistic insight into how export factors are recruited onto mRNAs.

  6. AAA-ATPase FIDGETIN-LIKE 1 and Helicase FANCM Antagonize Meiotic Crossovers by Distinct Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloe Girard

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic crossovers (COs generate genetic diversity and are critical for the correct completion of meiosis in most species. Their occurrence is tightly constrained but the mechanisms underlying this limitation remain poorly understood. Here we identified the conserved AAA-ATPase FIDGETIN-LIKE-1 (FIGL1 as a negative regulator of meiotic CO formation. We show that Arabidopsis FIGL1 limits CO formation genome-wide, that FIGL1 controls dynamics of the two conserved recombinases DMC1 and RAD51 and that FIGL1 hinders the interaction between homologous chromosomes, suggesting that FIGL1 counteracts DMC1/RAD51-mediated inter-homologue strand invasion to limit CO formation. Further, depleting both FIGL1 and the previously identified anti-CO helicase FANCM synergistically increases crossover frequency. Additionally, we showed that the effect of mutating FANCM on recombination is much lower in F1 hybrids contrasting from the phenotype of inbred lines, while figl1 mutation equally increases crossovers in both contexts. This shows that the modes of action of FIGL1 and FANCM are differently affected by genomic contexts. We propose that FIGL1 and FANCM represent two successive barriers to CO formation, one limiting strand invasion, the other disassembling D-loops to promote SDSA, which when both lifted, leads to a large increase of crossovers, without impairing meiotic progression.

  7. Scaffolding protein SPIDR/KIAA0146 connects the Bloom syndrome helicase with homologous recombination repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Li; Han, Jinhua; Liu, Ting; Dong, Shunli; Xie, Feng; Chen, Hongxia; Huang, Jun

    2013-06-25

    The Bloom syndrome gene product, BLM, is a member of the highly conserved RecQ family. An emerging concept is the BLM helicase collaborates with the homologous recombination (HR) machinery to help avoid undesirable HR events and to achieve a high degree of fidelity during the HR reaction. However, exactly how such coordination occurs in vivo is poorly understood. Here, we identified a protein termed SPIDR (scaffolding protein involved in DNA repair) as the link between BLM and the HR machinery. SPIDR independently interacts with BLM and RAD51 and promotes the formation of a BLM/RAD51-containing complex of biological importance. Consistent with its role as a scaffolding protein for the assembly of BLM and RAD51 foci, cells depleted of SPIDR show increased rate of sister chromatid exchange and defects in HR. Moreover, SPIDR depletion leads to genome instability and causes hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents. We propose that, through providing a scaffold for the cooperation of BLM and RAD51 in a multifunctional DNA-processing complex, SPIDR not only regulates the efficiency of HR, but also dictates the specific HR pathway.

  8. The DEAD-box RNA helicase Vasa functions in embryonic mitotic progression in the sea urchin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Mamiko; Wessel, Gary M

    2011-06-01

    Vasa is a broadly conserved ATP-dependent RNA helicase that functions in the germ line of organisms from cnidarians to mammals. Curiously, Vasa is also present in the somatic cells of many animals and functions as a regulator of multipotent cells. Here, we report a mitotic function of Vasa revealed in the sea urchin embryo. We found that Vasa protein is present in all blastomeres of the early embryo and that its abundance oscillates with the cell cycle. Vasa associates with the spindle and the separating sister chromatids at metaphase, and then quickly disappears after telophase. Inhibition of Vasa protein synthesis interferes with proper chromosome segregation, arrests cells at M-phase, and delays overall cell cycle progression. Cdk activity is necessary for the proper localization of Vasa, implying that Vasa is involved in the cyclin-dependent cell cycle network, and Vasa is required for the efficient translation of cyclinB mRNA. Our results suggest an evolutionarily conserved role of Vasa that is independent of its function in germ line determination.

  9. Conserved requirement for DEAD-box RNA helicase Gemin3 in Drosophila oogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cauchi Ruben J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DEAD-box RNA helicase Gemin3 is an essential protein since its deficiency is lethal in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In addition to playing a role in transcriptional regulation and RNA silencing, as a core member of the SMN (survival of motor neurons complex, Gemin3 is required for the biogenesis of spliceosomal snRNPs (small nuclear ribonucleoproteins, and axonal mRNA metabolism. Studies in the mouse and C. elegans revealed that loss of Gemin3 function has a negative impact on ovarian physiology and development. Findings This work reports on the generation and characterisation of gemin3 mutant germline clones in Drosophila adult females. Gemin3 was found to be required for the completion of oogenesis and its loss led to egg polarity defects, oocyte mislocalisation, and abnormal chromosome morphology. Canonical Cajal bodies were absent in the majority of gemin3 mutant egg chambers and histone locus bodies displayed an atypical morphology. snRNP distribution was perturbed so that on gemin3 loss, snRNP cytoplasmic aggregates (U bodies were only visible in wild type. Conclusions These findings establish a conserved requirement for Gemin3 in Drosophila oogenesis. Furthermore, in view of the similarity to the phenotypes described previously in smn mutant germ cells, the present results confirm the close functional relationship between SMN and Gemin3 on a cellular level.

  10. DNA replication restart and cellular dynamics of Hef helicase/nuclease protein in Haloferax volcanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestini, Roxane; Delpech, Floriane; Myllykallio, Hannu

    2015-11-01

    Understanding how frequently spontaneous replication arrests occur and how archaea deal with these arrests are very interesting and challenging research topics. Here we will described how genetic and imaging studies have revealed the central role of the archaeal helicase/nuclease Hef belonging to the XPF/MUS81/FANCM family of endonucleases in repair of arrested replication forks. Special focus will be on description of a recently developed combination of genetic and imaging tools to study the dynamic localization of a functional Hef::GFP (Green Fluorescent Protein) fusion protein in the living cells of halophilic archaea Haloferax volcanii. As Archaea provide an excellent and unique model for understanding how DNA replication is regulated to allow replication of a circular DNA molecule either from single or multiple replication origins, we will also summarize recent studies that have revealed peculiar features regarding DNA replication, particularly in halophilic archaea. We strongly believe that fundamental knowledge of our on-going studies will shed light on the evolutionary history of the DNA replication machinery and will help to establish general rules concerning replication restart and the key role of recombination proteins not only in bacteria, yeast and higher eukaryotes but also in archaea.

  11. Molecular and cellular functions of the FANCJ DNA helicase defective in cancer and in Fanconi Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Brosh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The FANCJ DNA helicase is mutated in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer as well as the progressive bone marrow failure disorder Fanconi anemia (FA. FANCJ is linked to cancer suppression and DNA double strand break (DSB repair through its direct interaction with the hereditary breast cancer associated gene product, BRCA1. FANCJ also operates in the FA pathway of interstrand cross-link (ICL repair and contributes to homologous recombination (HR. FANCJ collaborates with a number of DNA metabolizing proteins implicated in DNA damage detection and repair, and plays an important role in cell cycle checkpoint control. In addition to its role in the classical FA pathway, FANCJ is believed to have other functions that are centered on alleviating replication stress. FANCJ resolves G-quadruplex (G4 DNA structures that are known to affect cellular replication and transcription, and potentially plays a role in the preservation and functionality of chromosomal structures such as telomeres. Recent studies suggest that FANCJ helps to maintain chromatin structure and preserve epigenetic stability by facilitating smooth progression of the replication fork when it encounters DNA damage or an alternate DNA structure such as a G4. Ongoing studies suggest a prominent but still not well-understood role of FANCJ in transcriptional regulation, chromosomal structure and function, and DNA damage repair to maintain genomic stability. This review will synthesize our current understanding of the molecular and cellular functions of FANCJ that are critical for chromosomal integrity.

  12. Study on waterway regulation in near-dam reach downstream the Yanzhou hydro-junction%艳洲枢纽下游近坝段航道整治研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯小香; 张明

    2015-01-01

    The descent of low water level downstream hydro⁃junction is an important cause for shallow chan⁃nel, also an important unfavorable factor for ship lock safe navigation and waterway grade improvement. In this pa⁃per, the navigation⁃obstructing characteristics and the causes of low water level change in near⁃dam reach down⁃stream Yanzhou hydro⁃junction in Lishui River were analyzed, then the 2⁃D flow mathematical model was employed to study the shoal regulation problem in waterway grade improvement, including regulation scheme, effect and influ⁃ence on low water level. The results indicate that:the river bed gradient in near⁃dam downstream the Yanzhou hydro⁃junction is high, and the height of low water is concentrate, with obvious“scarp”and“steep gradient”phenome⁃non, and thus the dredging method is an appropriate way to achieve the design depth;when the channel regulation plan in Lishui River is implemented, the lowest navigation water level downstream the Yanzhou existing ship lock may largely descend, and need reduce its lowest navigation water level.%枢纽下游的枯水位下降问题是航道出浅的重要原因,也是影响船闸通航、制约航道等级提升的重要因素。在分析澧水艳洲枢纽下游近坝段碍航特性、枯水位变化及原因的基础上,采用二维平面水流数学模型研究了澧水航道升级整治过程艳洲枢纽下游近坝段的浅滩整治问题,包括工程整治方案、整治效果及对枯水位的影响。结果表明:艳洲枢纽下游近坝段河床比降大、枯水位落差集中,具有明显的“陡坎”及“陡比降”现象,若仅以疏浚方式进行航道整治,则将引起艳洲枢纽船闸下游的枯水位明显下降,在艳洲枢纽船闸改扩建中下游设计最低通航水位的确定应充分考虑枢纽下游高等级航道整治工程的影响。

  13. RNA helicase DDX3 is a regulatory subunit of casein kinase 1 in Wnt-β-catenin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruciat, Cristina-Maria; Dolde, Christine; de Groot, Reinoud E A; Ohkawara, Bisei; Reinhard, Carmen; Korswagen, Hendrik C; Niehrs, Christof

    2013-03-22

    Casein kinase 1 (CK1) members play key roles in numerous biological processes. They are considered "rogue" kinases, because their enzymatic activity appears unregulated. Contrary to this notion, we have identified the DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 as a regulator of the Wnt-β-catenin network, where it acts as a regulatory subunit of CK1ε: In a Wnt-dependent manner, DDX3 binds CK1ε and directly stimulates its kinase activity, and promotes phosphorylation of the scaffold protein dishevelled. DDX3 is required for Wnt-β-catenin signaling in mammalian cells and during Xenopus and Caenorhabditis elegans development. The results also suggest that the kinase-stimulatory function extends to other DDX and CK1 members, opening fresh perspectives for one of the longest-studied protein kinase families.

  14. Molecular architecture of the recombinant human MCM2-7 helicase in complex with nucleotides and DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boskovic, Jasminka; Bragado-Nilsson, Elisabeth; Saligram Prabhakar, Bhargav

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication is a key biological process that involves different protein complexes whose assembly is rigorously regulated in a successive order. One of these complexes is a replicative hexameric helicase, the MCM complex, which is essential for the initiation and elongation phases of replication....... After the assembly of a double heterohexameric MCM2-7 complex at replication origins in G1, the 2 heterohexamers separate from each other and associate with Cdc45 and GINS proteins in a CMG complex that is capable of unwinding dsDNA during S phase. Here, we have reconstituted and characterized...... the purified human MCM2-7 (hMCM2-7) hexameric complex by co-expression of its 6 different subunits in insect cells. The conformational variability of the complex has been analyzed by single particle electron microscopy in the presence of different nucleotide analogs and DNA. The interaction with nucleotide...

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions: structure, function and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeke, Emmanuel; Dingsdale, Hayley; Parker, Tony; Voronina, Svetlana; Tepikin, Alexei V

    2016-06-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-plasma membrane (PM) junctions are contact sites between the ER and the PM; the distance between the two organelles in the junctions is below 40 nm and the membranes are connected by protein tethers. A number of molecular tools and technical approaches have been recently developed to visualise, modify and characterise properties of ER-PM junctions. The junctions serve as the platforms for lipid exchange between the organelles and for cell signalling, notably Ca(2+) and cAMP signalling. Vice versa, signalling events regulate the development and properties of the junctions. Two Ca(2+) -dependent mechanisms of de novo formation of ER-PM junctions have been recently described and characterised. The junction-forming proteins and lipids are currently the focus of vigorous investigation. Junctions can be relatively short-lived and simple structures, forming and dissolving on the time scale of a few minutes. However, complex, sophisticated and multifunctional ER-PM junctions, capable of attracting numerous protein residents and other cellular organelles, have been described in some cell types. The road from simplicity to complexity, i.e. the transformation from simple 'nascent' ER-PM junctions to advanced stable multiorganellar complexes, is likely to become an attractive research avenue for current and future junctologists. Another area of considerable research interest is the downstream cellular processes that can be activated by specific local signalling events in the ER-PM junctions. Studies of the cell physiology and indeed pathophysiology of ER-PM junctions have already produced some surprising discoveries, likely to expand with advances in our understanding of these remarkable organellar contact sites. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  16. DEAD-box RNA helicase Belle/DDX3 and the RNA interference pathway promote mitotic chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pek, Jun Wei; Kai, Toshie

    2011-07-19

    During mitosis, faithful inheritance of genetic material is achieved by chromosome segregation, as mediated by the condensin I and II complexes. Failed chromosome segregation can result in neoplasm formation, infertility, and birth defects. Recently, the germ-line-specific DEAD-box RNA helicase Vasa was demonstrated to promote mitotic chromosome segregation in Drosophila by facilitating robust chromosomal localization of Barren (Barr), a condensin I component. This mitotic function of Vasa is mediated by Aubergine and Spindle-E, which are two germ-line components of the Piwi-interacting RNA pathway. Faithful segregation of chromosomes should be executed both in germ-line and somatic cells. However, whether a similar mechanism also functions in promoting chromosome segregation in somatic cells has not been elucidated. Here, we present evidence that belle (vasa paralog) and the RNA interference pathway regulate chromosome segregation in Drosophila somatic cells. During mitosis, belle promotes robust Barr chromosomal localization and chromosome segregation. Belle's localization to condensing chromosomes depends on dicer-2 and argonaute2. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicated that Belle interacts with Barr and Argonaute2 and is enriched at endogenous siRNA (endo-siRNA)-generating loci. Our results suggest that Belle functions in promoting chromosome segregation in Drosophila somatic cells via the endo-siRNA pathway. DDX3 (human homolog of belle) and DICER function in promoting chromosome segregation and hCAP-H (human homolog of Barr) localization in HeLa cells, indicating a conserved function for those proteins in human cells. Our results suggest that the RNA helicase Belle/DDX3 and the RNA interference pathway perform a common role in regulating chromosome segregation in Drosophila and human somatic cells.

  17. Humanized-VH/VHH that inhibit HCV replication by interfering with the virus helicase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phalaphol, Aninthita; Thueng-In, Kanyarat; Thanongsaksrikul, Jeeraphong; Poungpair, Ornnuthchar; Bangphoomi, Kunan; Sookrung, Nitat; Srimanote, Potjanee; Chaicumpa, Wanpen

    2013-12-01

    NS3 helicase is a pivotal enzyme involved in the early and late phases of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. The primary sequence and tertiary structure of this virus enzyme differ from human helicase to a certain extent; thus this virus protein has potential as a novel anti-HCV target. In this study, recombinant C-terminal NS3 protein of HCV genotype 3a with endowed helicase activity was produced and used as antigen by selecting VH/V(H)H display phage clones from an established humanized-camel single domain antibody library that bound specifically to HCV helicase. The VH/V(H)H derived from phage transfected Escherichia coli clones were linked molecularly to a cell penetrating peptide, i.e., penetratin (PEN). The cell penetrable VH/V(H)H (transbodies) could reduce the amounts of the HCV RNA released into the cell culture fluid and inside Huh7 cells infected with pJFH1 replicon with a greater effect on the former compared to the latter. Regions and residues of the helicase bound by the transbodies were determined by phage mimotope searching and multiple alignments as well as homology modeling and molecular docking. The epitope of one transbody (PEN-V(H)H9) encompassed residues 588RLKPTLHGPTPLLYRLGA605 of the domain 3 necessary for helicase activity while another transbody (PEN-VH59) interacted with the areas covering the phenylalanine loop and arginine clamp of the domain 2 which are important for the proper folding of the enzyme as well as nucleic acid substrate binding. Although the molecular mechanisms of the prototypic transbodies on NS3 helicase need further investigation, these transbodies have high potential as novel, safe and mutation tolerable anti-HCV agents.

  18. DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 connects CRM1-dependent nuclear export and translation of the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA through its N-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Alvaro; Rojas-Araya, Bárbara; Pereira-Montecinos, Camila; Dellarossa, Alessandra; Toro-Ascuy, Daniela; Prades-Pérez, Yara; García-de-Gracia, Francisco; Garcés-Alday, Andrea; Rubilar, Paulina S; Valiente-Echeverría, Fernando; Ohlmann, Théophile; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo

    2016-05-01

    DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 is a host factor essential for HIV-1 replication and thus, a potential target for novel therapies aimed to overcome viral resistance. Previous studies have shown that DDX3 promotes nuclear export and translation of the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA. Although the function of DDX3 during both processes requires its catalytic activity, it is unknown whether other domains surrounding the helicase core are involved. Here, we show the involvement of the N- and C-terminal domains of DDX3 in the regulation of HIV-1 unspliced mRNA translation. Our results suggest that the intrinsically disordered N-terminal domain of DDX3 regulates its functions in translation by acting prior to the recruitment of the 43S pre-initiation complex onto the viral 5'-UTR. Interestingly, this regulation was conserved in HIV-2 and was dependent on the CRM1-dependent nuclear export pathway suggesting a role of the RNA helicase in interconnecting nuclear export with ribosome recruitment of the viral unspliced mRNA. This specific function of DDX3 during HIV gene expression could be exploited as an alternative target for pharmaceutical intervention.

  19. Glial connexins and gap junctions in CNS inflammation and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielian, Tammy

    2008-08-01

    Gap junctions facilitate direct cytoplasmic communication between neighboring cells, facilitating the transfer of small molecular weight molecules involved in cell signaling and metabolism. Gap junction channels are formed by the joining of two hemichannels from adjacent cells, each composed of six oligomeric protein subunits called connexins. Of paramount importance to CNS homeostasis are astrocyte networks formed by gap junctions, which play a critical role in maintaining the homeostatic regulation of extracellular pH, K+, and glutamate levels. Inflammation is a hallmark of several diseases afflicting the CNS. Within the past several years, the number of publications reporting effects of cytokines and pathogenic stimuli on glial gap junction communication has increased dramatically. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent observations characterizing the consequences of inflammatory stimuli on homocellular gap junction coupling in astrocytes and microglia as well as changes in connexin expression during various CNS inflammatory conditions.

  20. RECQL4 helicase has oncogenic potential in sporadic breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Arvind; Agarwal, Devika; Abdel-Fatah, Tarek Ma; Lu, Huiming; Croteau, Deborah L; Moseley, Paul; Aleskandarany, Mohammed A; Green, Andrew R; Ball, Graham; Rakha, Emad A; Chan, Stephen Yt; Ellis, Ian O; Wang, Lisa L; Zhao, Yongliang; Balajee, Adayabalam S; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2016-03-01

    RECQL4 helicase is a molecular motor that unwinds DNA, a process essential during DNA replication and DNA repair. Germ-line mutations in RECQL4 cause type II Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS), characterized by a premature ageing phenotype and cancer predisposition. RECQL4 is widely considered to be a tumour suppressor, although its role in human breast cancer is largely unknown. As the RECQL4 gene is localized to chromosome 8q24, a site frequently amplified in sporadic breast cancers, we hypothesized that it may play an oncogenic role in breast tumourigenesis. To address this, we analysed large cohorts for gene copy number changes (n = 1977), mRNA expression (n = 1977) and protein level (n = 1902). Breast cancer incidence was also explored in 58 patients with type II RTS. DNA replication dynamics and chemosensitivity was evaluated in RECQL4-depleted breast cancer cells in vitro. Amplification or gain in gene copy number (30.6%), high-level mRNA expression (51%) and high levels of protein (23%) significantly associated with aggressive tumour behaviour, including lymph node positivity, larger tumour size, HER2 overexpression, ER-negativity, triple-negative phenotypes and poor survival. RECQL4 depletion impaired the DNA replication rate and increased chemosensitivity in cultured breast cancer cells. Thus, although recognized as a 'safe guardian of the genome', our data provide compelling evidence that RECQL4 is tumour promoting in established breast cancers. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. The C-terminal domain of the Bloom syndrome DNA helicase is essential for genomic stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noonan James P

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bloom syndrome is a rare cancer-prone disorder in which the cells of affected persons have a high frequency of somatic mutation and genomic instability. Bloom syndrome cells have a distinctive high frequency of sister chromatid exchange and quadriradial formation. BLM, the protein altered in BS, is a member of the RecQ DNA helicase family, whose members share an average of 40% identity in the helicase domain and have divergent N-terminal and C-terminal flanking regions of variable lengths. The BLM DNA helicase has been shown to localize to the ND10 (nuclear domain 10 or PML (promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies, where it associates with TOPIIIα, and to the nucleolus. Results This report demonstrates that the N-terminal domain of BLM is responsible for localization of the protein to the nuclear bodies, while the C-terminal domain directs the protein to the nucleolus. Deletions of the N-terminal domain of BLM have little effect on sister chromatid exchange frequency and chromosome stability as compared to helicase and C-terminal mutations which can increase SCE frequency and chromosome abnormalities. Conclusion The helicase activity and the C-terminal domain of BLM are critical for maintaining genomic stability as measured by the sister chromatid exchange assay. The localization of BLM into the nucleolus by the C-terminal domain appears to be more important to genomic stability than localization in the nuclear bodies.

  2. Single-molecule imaging reveals a common mechanism shared by G-quadruplex–resolving helicases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippana, Ramreddy; Hwang, Helen; Opresko, Patricia L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Myong, Sua

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplex (GQ) is a four stranded DNA secondary structure that arises from a guanine rich sequence. Stable formation of GQ in genomic DNA can be counteracted by the resolving activity of specialized helicases including RNA helicase AU (associated with AU rich elements) (RHAU) (G4 resolvase 1), Bloom helicase (BLM), and Werner helicase (WRN). However, their substrate specificity and the mechanism involved in GQ unfolding remain uncertain. Here, we report that RHAU, BLM, and WRN exhibit distinct GQ conformation specificity, but use a common mechanism of repetitive unfolding that leads to disrupting GQ structure multiple times in succession. Such unfolding activity of RHAU leads to efficient annealing exclusively within the same DNA molecule. The same resolving activity is sufficient to dislodge a stably bound GQ ligand, including BRACO-19, NMM, and Phen-DC3. Our study demonstrates a plausible biological scheme where different helicases are delegated to resolve specific GQ structures by using a common repetitive unfolding mechanism that provides a robust resolving power. PMID:27407146

  3. Identification and analysis of hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase inhibitors using nucleic acid binding assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sourav; Hanson, Alicia M; Shadrick, William R; Ndjomou, Jean; Sweeney, Noreena L; Hernandez, John J; Bartczak, Diana; Li, Kelin; Frankowski, Kevin J; Heck, Julie A; Arnold, Leggy A; Schoenen, Frank J; Frick, David N

    2012-09-01

    Typical assays used to discover and analyze small molecules that inhibit the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 helicase yield few hits and are often confounded by compound interference. Oligonucleotide binding assays are examined here as an alternative. After comparing fluorescence polarization (FP), homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF®; Cisbio) and AlphaScreen® (Perkin Elmer) assays, an FP-based assay was chosen to screen Sigma's Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) for compounds that inhibit NS3-DNA complex formation. Four LOPAC compounds inhibited the FP-based assay: aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) (IC50=1.4 μM), suramin sodium salt (IC50=3.6 μM), NF 023 hydrate (IC50=6.2 μM) and tyrphostin AG 538 (IC50=3.6 μM). All but AG 538 inhibited helicase-catalyzed strand separation, and all but NF 023 inhibited replication of subgenomic HCV replicons. A counterscreen using Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) revealed that none of the new HCV helicase inhibitors were specific for NS3h. However, when the SSB-based assay was used to analyze derivatives of another non-specific helicase inhibitor, the main component of the dye primuline, it revealed that some primuline derivatives (e.g. PubChem CID50930730) are up to 30-fold more specific for HCV NS3h than similarly potent HCV helicase inhibitors.

  4. Mcm10 coordinates the timely assembly and activation of the replication fork helicase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Arnaiz, Patricia; Bruck, Irina; Kaplan, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Mcm10 is an essential replication factor that is required for DNA replication in eukaryotes. Two key steps in the initiation of DNA replication are the assembly and activation of Cdc45–Mcm2–7-GINS (CMG) replicative helicase. However, it is not known what coordinates helicase assembly with helicase activation. We show in this manuscript, using purified proteins from budding yeast, that Mcm10 directly interacts with the Mcm2–7 complex and Cdc45. In fact, Mcm10 recruits Cdc45 to Mcm2–7 complex in vitro. To study the role of Mcm10 in more detail in vivo we used an auxin inducible degron in which Mcm10 is degraded upon addition of auxin. We show in this manuscript that Mcm10 is required for the timely recruitment of Cdc45 and GINS recruitment to the Mcm2–7 complex in vivo during early S phase. We also found that Mcm10 stimulates Mcm2 phosphorylation by DDK in vivo and in vitro. These findings indicate that Mcm10 plays a critical role in coupling replicative helicase assembly with helicase activation. Mcm10 is first involved in the recruitment of Cdc45 to the Mcm2–7 complex. After Cdc45–Mcm2–7 complex assembly, Mcm10 promotes origin melting by stimulating DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2, which thereby leads to GINS attachment to Mcm2–7. PMID:26582917

  5. The human myotendinous junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, A B; Larsen, M; Mackey, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is a specialized structure in the musculotendinous system, where force is transmitted from muscle to tendon. Animal models have shown that the MTJ takes form of tendon finger-like processes merging with muscle tissue. The human MTJ is largely unknown and has never ...

  6. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowik, Ł.; Mélin, T., E-mail: thierry.melin@isen.iemn.univ-lille1.fr [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie, CNRS-UMR8520, Avenue Poincaré, F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Nguyen-Tran, T.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, CNRS-UMR7647, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-11-28

    Semiconductor junctions are the basis of electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate junctions formed from highly doped (N{sub D}≈10{sup 20}−10{sup 21}cm{sup −3}) silicon nanocrystals (NCs) in the 2–50 nm size range, using Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments with single charge sensitivity. We show that the charge transfer from doped NCs towards a two-dimensional layer experimentally follows a simple phenomenological law, corresponding to formation of an interface dipole linearly increasing with the NC diameter. This feature leads to analytically predictable junction properties down to quantum size regimes: NC depletion width independent of the NC size and varying as N{sub D}{sup −1/3}, and depleted charge linearly increasing with the NC diameter and varying as N{sub D}{sup 1/3}. We thus establish a “nanocrystal counterpart” of conventional semiconductor planar junctions, here however valid in regimes of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements.

  7. Dietary phenylalanine-improved intestinal barrier health in young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) is associated with increased immune status and regulated gene expression of cytokines, tight junction proteins, antioxidant enzymes and related signalling molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lin; Li, Wen; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Jiang, Jun; Tang, Ling; Wu, Pei; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2015-08-01

    The present work evaluated the effects of dietary phenylalanine (Phe) on the intestinal immune response, tight junction proteins transcript abundance, and the gene expression of immune- and antioxidant-related signalling molecules in the intestine. In addition, the dietary Phe (and Phe + Tyr) requirement of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) was also estimated. Fish were fed fish meal-casein-gelatin based diets (302.3 g crude protein kg(-1)) containing 3.4 (basal diet), 6.1, 9.1, 11.5, 14.0 and 16.8 g Phe kg(-1) with a fixed amount of 10.7 g tyrosine kg(-1) for 8 weeks. The results showed that Phe deficiency or excess Phe reduced the lysozyme and acid phosphatase activities and complement C 3 content in the intestine (P 0.05). Gene expression of interleukin-10 (IL-10), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), target of rapamycin (TOR) and inhibitor of nuclear factor κBα (IκBα) in proximal intestine (PI), mid intestine (MI) and distal intestine (DI) increased as dietary Phe increased up to 6.1, 9.1, 11.5 and 14.0 g kg(-1), respectively (P < 0.05). However, interleukin-8 (IL-8), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nuclear factor-κB p65 (NF-κB p65) mRNA levels showed opposite tendencies. In addition, the mRNA level of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was significantly lower in the intestinal tissue of the group fed a diet with Phe levels of 16.8 g kg(-1) than in those of other groups (P < 0.05). The expression of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) gene was increased as dietary Phe increased up to 9.1 g kg(-1) (P < 0.05). In conclusion, Phe improved intestinal immune status, and regulated gene expression of cytokines, tight junction proteins, antioxidant enzymes, NF-κB p65, IκBα, TOR, and Nrf2 in the fish intestine. Based on the quadratic regression analysis of lysozyme activity at a 95% maximum, the dietary Phe requirement of young grass carp (256-629 g) was estimated to be 8.31 g kg(-1), corresponding to 2.75 g 100 g(-1) protein.

  8. DMPD: Toll-like receptors, RIG-I-like RNA helicases and the antiviral innate immuneresponse. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17667934 Toll-like receptors, RIG-I-like RNA helicases and the antiviral innate imm...g) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Toll-like receptors, RIG-I-like RNA helicases and the antiviral innate immune...response. PubmedID 17667934 Title Toll-like receptors, RIG-I-like RNA helicases a

  9. Junction trees of general graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofei WANG; Jianhua GUO

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,we study the maximal prime subgraphs and their corresponding structure for any undirected graph.We introduce the notion of junction trees and investigate their structural characteristics,including junction properties,induced-subtree properties,running-intersection properties and maximum-weight spanning tree properties.Furthermore,the characters of leaves and edges on junction trees are discussed.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecG binds and unwinds model DNA substrates with a preference for Holliday junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegeye, Ephrem Debebe; Balasingham, Seetha V; Laerdahl, Jon K; Homberset, Håvard; Tønjum, Tone

    2012-08-01

    The RecG enzyme, a superfamily 2 helicase, is present in nearly all bacteria. Here we report for the first time that the recG gene is also present in the genomes of most vascular plants as well as in green algae, but is not found in other eukaryotes or archaea. The precise function of RecG is poorly understood, although ample evidence shows that it plays critical roles in DNA repair, recombination and replication. We further demonstrate that Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecG (RecG(Mtb)) DNA binding activity had a broad substrate specificity, whereas it only unwound branched-DNA substrates such as Holliday junctions (HJs), replication forks, D-loops and R-loops, with a strong preference for the HJ as a helicase substrate. In addition, RecG(Mtb) preferentially bound relatively long (≥40 nt) ssDNA, exhibiting a higher affinity for the homopolymeric nucleotides poly(dT), poly(dG) and poly(dC) than for poly(dA). RecG(Mtb) helicase activity was supported by hydrolysis of ATP or dATP in the presence of Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Cu(2+) or Fe(2+). Like its Escherichia coli orthologue, RecG(Mtb) is also a strictly DNA-dependent ATPase.

  11. Substrate specific stimulation of NEIL1 by WRN but not the other human RecQ helicases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popuri, Venkateswarlu; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2010-01-01

    protein (WRN), one of the five human RecQ helicases, stimulates NEIL1 DNA glycosylase activity on oxidative DNA lesions. The goal of this study was to extend this observation and analyze the interaction between NEIL1 and all five human RecQ helicases. The DNA substrate specificity of the interaction...

  12. Purification and characterization of Rad3 ATPase/DNA helicase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harosh, I; Naumovski, L; Friedberg, E C

    1989-12-05

    The Rad3 ATPase/DNA helicase was purified to physical homogeneity from extracts of yeast cells containing overexpressed Rad3 protein. The DNA helicase can unwind duplex regions as short as 11 base pairs in a partially duplex circular DNA substrate and does so by a strictly processive mechanism. On partially duplex linear substrates, the enzyme has a strict 5'----3' polarity with respect to the single strand to which it binds. Nicked circular DNA is not utilized as a substrate, and the enzyme requires single-stranded gaps between 5 and 21 nucleotides long to unwind oligonucleotide fragments from partially duplex linear molecules. The enzyme also requires duplex regions at least 11 base pairs long when these are present at the ends of linear molecules. Rad3 DNA helicase activity is inhibited by the presence of ultraviolet-induced photoproducts in duplex regions of partially duplex circular molecules.

  13. Development of chemical inhibitors of the SARS coronavirus: viral helicase as a potential target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, Young-Sam; Jeong, Yong-Joo

    2012-11-15

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was the first pandemic in the 21st century to claim more than 700 lives worldwide. However, effective anti-SARS vaccines or medications are currently unavailable despite being desperately needed to adequately prepare for a possible SARS outbreak. SARS is caused by a novel coronavirus, and one of its components, a viral helicase, is emerging as a promising target for the development of chemical SARS inhibitors. In the following review, we describe the characterization, family classification, and kinetic movement mechanisms of the SARS coronavirus (SCV) helicase-nsP13. We also discuss the recent progress in the identification of novel chemical inhibitors of nsP13 in the context of our recent discovery of the strong inhibition of the SARS helicase by natural flavonoids, myricetin and scutellarein. These compounds will serve as important resources for the future development of anti-SARS medications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Rad53 independent function of Rad9 becomes crucial for genome maintenance in the absence of the Recq helicase Sgs1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Nielsen

    Full Text Available The conserved family of RecQ DNA helicases consists of caretaker tumour suppressors, that defend genome integrity by acting on several pathways of DNA repair that maintain genome stability. In budding yeast, Sgs1 is the sole RecQ helicase and it has been implicated in checkpoint responses, replisome stability and dissolution of double Holliday junctions during homologous recombination. In this study we investigate a possible genetic interaction between SGS1 and RAD9 in the cellular response to methyl methane sulphonate (MMS induced damage and compare this with the genetic interaction between SGS1 and RAD24. The Rad9 protein, an adaptor for effector kinase activation, plays well-characterized roles in the DNA damage checkpoint response, whereas Rad24 is characterized as a sensor protein also in the DNA damage checkpoint response. Here we unveil novel insights into the cellular response to MMS-induced damage. Specifically, we show a strong synergistic functionality between SGS1 and RAD9 for recovery from MMS induced damage and for suppression of gross chromosomal rearrangements, which is not the case for SGS1 and RAD24. Intriguingly, it is a Rad53 independent function of Rad9, which becomes crucial for genome maintenance in the absence of Sgs1. Despite this, our dissection of the MMS checkpoint response reveals parallel, but unequal pathways for Rad53 activation and highlights significant differences between MMS- and hydroxyurea (HU-induced checkpoint responses with relation to the requirement of the Sgs1 interacting partner Topoisomerase III (Top3. Thus, whereas earlier studies have documented a Top3-independent role of Sgs1 for an HU-induced checkpoint response, we show here that upon MMS treatment, Sgs1 and Top3 together define a minor but parallel pathway to that of Rad9.

  15. Biophysical Characterization of G-Quadruplex Recognition in the PITX1 mRNA by the Specificity Domain of the Helicase RHAU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel O Ariyo

    Full Text Available Nucleic acids rich in guanine are able to fold into unique structures known as G-quadruplexes. G-quadruplexes consist of four tracts of guanylates arranged in parallel or antiparallel strands that are aligned in stacked G-quartet planes. The structure is further stabilized by Hoogsteen hydrogen bonds and monovalent cations centered between the planes. RHAU (RNA helicase associated with AU-rich element is a member of the ATP-dependent DExH/D family of RNA helicases and can bind and resolve G-quadruplexes. RHAU contains a core helicase domain with an N-terminal extension that enables recognition and full binding affinity to RNA and DNA G-quadruplexes. PITX1, a member of the bicoid class of homeobox proteins, is a transcriptional activator active during development of vertebrates, chiefly in the anterior pituitary gland and several other organs. We have previously demonstrated that RHAU regulates PITX1 levels through interaction with G-quadruplexes at the 3'-end of the PITX1 mRNA. To understand the structural basis of G-quadruplex recognition by RHAU, we characterize a purified minimal PITX1 G-quadruplex using a variety of biophysical techniques including electrophoretic mobility shift assays, UV-VIS spectroscopy, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, small angle X-ray scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Our biophysical analysis provides evidence that the RNA G-quadruplex, but not its DNA counterpart, can adopt a parallel orientation, and that only the RNA can interact with N-terminal domain of RHAU via the tetrad face of the G-quadruplex. This work extends our insight into how the N-terminal region of RHAU recognizes parallel G-quadruplexes.

  16. Unraveling the Fanconi anaemia-DNA repair connection through DNA helicase and translocase activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, L H

    2005-08-16

    How the Fanconi anaemia (FA) chromosome stability pathway functions to cope with interstrand crosslinks and other DNA lesions has been elusive, even after FANCD1 proved to be BRCA2, a partner of Rad51 in homologous recombination. The identification and characterization of two new Fanconi proteins having helicase motifs, FANCM and FANCJ/BRIP1/BACH1, implicates the FANC nuclear core complex as a participant in recognizing or processing damaged DNA, and the BRIP1 helicase as acting independently of this complex.

  17. Paracellular drug absorption enhancement through tight junction modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Lemmer, Hendrik Jacobus Righard; Josias H. Hamman

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Inclusion of absorption-enhancing agents in dosage forms is one approach to improve the bioavailability of active pharmaceutical ingredients with low membrane permeability. Tight junctions are dynamic protein structures that form a regulated barrier for movement of molecules through the intercellular spaces across the intestinal epithelium. Some drug absorption enhancers are capable of loosening tight junctions and thereby facilitate paracellular absorption of drug molecules. ...

  18. Holliday junction resolvases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Haley D M; West, Stephen C

    2014-09-02

    Four-way DNA intermediates, called Holliday junctions (HJs), can form during meiotic and mitotic recombination, and their removal is crucial for chromosome segregation. A group of ubiquitous and highly specialized structure-selective endonucleases catalyze the cleavage of HJs into two disconnected DNA duplexes in a reaction called HJ resolution. These enzymes, called HJ resolvases, have been identified in bacteria and their bacteriophages, archaea, and eukaryotes. In this review, we discuss fundamental aspects of the HJ structure and their interaction with junction-resolving enzymes. This is followed by a brief discussion of the eubacterial RuvABC enzymes, which provide the paradigm for HJ resolvases in other organisms. Finally, we review the biochemical and structural properties of some well-characterized resolvases from archaea, bacteriophage, and eukaryotes. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  19. Wireless Josephson Junction Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Laura

    2015-03-01

    We report low temperature, microwave transmission measurements on a wireless two- dimensional network of Josephson junction arrays composed of superconductor-insulator -superconductor tunnel junctions. Unlike their biased counterparts, by removing all electrical contacts to the arrays and superfluous microwave components and interconnects in the transmission line, we observe new collective behavior in the transmission spectra. In particular we will show emergent behavior that systematically responds to changes in microwave power at fixed temperature. Likewise we will show the dynamic and collective response of the arrays while tuning the temperature at fixed microwave power. We discuss these spectra in terms of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition and Shapiro steps. We gratefully acknowledge the support Prof. Steven Anlage at the University of Maryland and Prof. Allen Goldman at the University of Minnesota. Physics and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

  20. Identification of the DEAD box RNA helicase DDX3 as a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerma van Voss, Marise R; Vesuna, Farhad; Trumpi, Kari; Brilliant, Justin; Berlinicke, Cynthia; de Leng, Wendy; Kranenburg, Onno; Offerhaus, G Johan; Bürger, Horst; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J; Raman, Venu

    2015-09-29

    Identifying druggable targets in the Wnt-signaling pathway can optimize colorectal cancer treatment. Recent studies have identified a member of the RNA helicase family DDX3 (DDX3X) as a multilevel activator of Wnt signaling in cells without activating mutations in the Wnt-signaling pathway. In this study, we evaluated whether DDX3 plays a role in the constitutively active Wnt pathway that drives colorectal cancer. We determined DDX3 expression levels in 303 colorectal cancers by immunohistochemistry. 39% of tumors overexpressed DDX3. High cytoplasmic DDX3 expression correlated with nuclear β-catenin expression, a marker of activated Wnt signaling. Functionally, we validated this finding in vitro and found that inhibition of DDX3 with siRNA resulted in reduced TCF4-reporter activity and lowered the mRNA expression levels of downstream TCF4-regulated genes. In addition, DDX3 knockdown in colorectal cancer cell lines reduced proliferation and caused a G1 arrest, supporting a potential oncogenic role of DDX3 in colorectal cancer. RK-33 is a small molecule inhibitor designed to bind to the ATP-binding site of DDX3. Treatment of colorectal cancer cell lines and patient-derived 3D cultures with RK-33 inhibited growth and promoted cell death with IC50 values ranging from 2.5 to 8 μM. The highest RK-33 sensitivity was observed in tumors with wild-type APC-status and a mutation in CTNNB1. Based on these results, we conclude that DDX3 has an oncogenic role in colorectal cancer. Inhibition of DDX3 with the small molecule inhibitor RK-33 causes inhibition of Wnt signaling and may therefore be a promising future treatment strategy for a subset of colorectal cancers.

  1. The DNA repair endonuclease XPG interacts directly and functionally with the WRN helicase defective in Werner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trego, Kelly S.; Chernikova, Sophia B.; Davalos, Albert R.; Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Finger, L. David; Ng, Cliff; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Yannone, Steven M.; Tainer, John A.; Campisi, Judith; Cooper, Priscilla K.

    2011-04-20

    XPG is a structure-specific endonuclease required for nucleotide excision repair (NER). XPG incision defects result in the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum, whereas truncating mutations of XPG cause the severe postnatal progeroid developmental disorder Cockayne syndrome. We show that XPG interacts directly with WRN protein, which is defective in the premature aging disorder Werner syndrome, and that the two proteins undergo similar sub-nuclear redistribution in S-phase and co-localize in nuclear foci. The co-localization was observed in mid- to late-S-phase, when WRN moves from nucleoli to nuclear foci that have been shown to contain protein markers of both stalled replication forks and telomeric proteins. We mapped the interaction between XPG and WRN to the C-terminal domains of each and show that interaction with the C-terminal domain of XPG strongly stimulates WRN helicase activity. WRN also possesses a competing DNA single-strand annealing activity that, combined with unwinding, has been shown to coordinate regression of model replication forks to form Holliday junction/chicken foot intermediate structures. We tested whether XPG stimulated WRN annealing activity and found that XPG itself has intrinsic strand annealing activity that requires the unstructured R- and C-terminal domains, but not the conserved catalytic core or endonuclease activity. Annealing by XPG is cooperative, rather than additive, with WRN annealing. Taken together, our results suggest a novel function for XPG in S-phase that is at least in part carried out coordinately with WRN, and which may contribute to the severity of the phenotypes that occur upon loss of XPG.

  2. Production and characterisation of Epstein-Barr virus helicase-primase complex and its accessory protein BBLF2/3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierry, Eric; Brennich, Martha; Round, Adam; Buisson, Marlyse; Burmeister, Wim P; Hutin, Stephanie

    2015-10-01

    The helicase-primase complex is part of the lytic DNA replication machinery of herpesviruses, but up to now, almost nothing is known about its structure. For Epstein-Barr virus it consists in the helicase BBLF4, the primase BSLF1 and the accessory protein BBLF2/3. The accessory protein shows only weak sequence homology within the herpesvirus family but may be related to an inactive B-family polymerase. BSLF1 belongs to the archaeo-eukaryotic primase family, whereas the helicase BBLF4 has been related either to Dda helicases of caudovirales or to Pif1 helicases. We produced the helicase-primase complex in insect cells using a baculovirus coding for all three proteins simultaneously. The soluble monomeric helicase-primase complex containing the three proteins with 1:1:1 stoichiometry showed ATPase activity, which is strongly stimulated in the presence of ssDNA oligomers. Furthermore, we expressed BBLF2/3 as soluble monomeric protein and performed small-angle X-ray scattering experiments which yielded an envelope whose shape is compatible with B-family polymerases.

  3. Yeast as a model system to study RecQ helicase function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashton, Thomas M; Hickson, Ian David

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the highly conserved RecQ helicase, BLM, cause the rare cancer predisposition disorder, Bloom's syndrome. The orthologues of BLM in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe are SGS1 and rqh1(+), respectively. Studies in these yeast species have revealed a plethora...

  4. Telomere and ribosomal DNA repeats are chromosomal targets of the bloom syndrome DNA helicase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paric Enesa

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bloom syndrome is one of the most cancer-predisposing disorders and is characterized by genomic instability and a high frequency of sister chromatid exchange. The disorder is caused by loss of function of a 3' to 5' RecQ DNA helicase, BLM. The exact role of BLM in maintaining genomic integrity is not known but the helicase has been found to associate with several DNA repair complexes and some DNA replication foci. Results Chromatin immunoprecipitation of BLM complexes recovered telomere and ribosomal DNA repeats. The N-terminus of BLM, required for NB localization, is the same as the telomere association domain of BLM. The C-terminus is required for ribosomal DNA localization. BLM localizes primarily to the non-transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal DNA repeat where replication forks initiate. Bloom syndrome cells expressing the deletion alleles lacking the ribosomal DNA and telomere association domains have altered cell cycle populations with increased S or G2/M cells relative to normal. Conclusion These results identify telomere and ribosomal DNA repeated sequence elements as chromosomal targets for the BLM DNA helicase during the S/G2 phase of the cell cycle. BLM is localized in nuclear bodies when it associates with telomeric repeats in both telomerase positive and negative cells. The BLM DNA helicase participates in genomic stability at ribosomal DNA repeats and telomeres.

  5. Human RecQL4 helicase plays critical roles in prostate carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Yanrong; Meador, Jarah A; Calaf, Gloria M

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-associated deaths among men in the western countries. Here, we report that human RecQL4 helicase, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of a subset of cancer-prone Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, is highly elevated in metastatic prostate cancer c...

  6. Identification of the DEAD box RNA helicase DDX3 as a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerma van Voss, Marise R.; Vesuna, Farhad; Trumpi, Kari; Brilliant, Justin; Berlinicke, Cynthia; de Leng, Wendy; Kranenburg, OW; Offerhaus, Johan G.; Bürger, Horst; van der Wall, E.; van Diest, Paul J.; Raman, Venu

    2015-01-01

    Identifying druggable targets in the Wnt-signaling pathway can optimize colorectal cancer treatment. Recent studies have identified a member of the RNA helicase family DDX3 (DDX3X) as a multilevel activator of Wnt signaling in cells without activating mutations in the Wnt-signaling pathway. In this

  7. FBH1 helicase disrupts RAD51 filaments in vitro and modulates homologous recombination in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simandlova, Jitka; Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Payne, Miranda J;

    2013-01-01

    filaments on DNA through its ssDNA translocase function. Consistent with this, a mutant mouse embryonic stem cell line with a deletion in the FBH1 helicase domain fails to limit RAD51 chromatin association and shows hyper-recombination. Our data are consistent with FBH1 restraining RAD51 DNA binding under...

  8. Interaction between the helicases genetically linked to Fanconi anemia group J and Bloom's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhasini, Avvaru N; Rawtani, Nina A; Wu, Yuliang

    2011-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) and Fanconi anemia (FA) are autosomal recessive disorders characterized by cancer and chromosomal instability. BS and FA group J arise from mutations in the BLM and FANCJ genes, respectively, which encode DNA helicases. In this work, FANCJ and BLM were found to interact...

  9. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of the BLM Helicase Modulates Chromosome Stability in Human Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Giang Huong; Dexheimer, Thomas S; Rosenthal, Andrew S;

    2013-01-01

    The Bloom's syndrome protein, BLM, is a member of the conserved RecQ helicase family. Although cell lines lacking BLM exist, these exhibit progressive genomic instability that makes distinguishing primary from secondary effects of BLM loss problematic. In order to be able to acutely disable BLM f...

  10. Physical and functional interactions between Werner syndrome helicase and mismatch-repair initiation factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saydam, Nurten; Kanagaraj, Radhakrishnan; Dietschy, Tobias;

    2007-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a severe recessive disorder characterized by premature aging, cancer predisposition and genomic instability. The gene mutated in WS encodes a bi-functional enzyme called WRN that acts as a RecQ-type DNA helicase and a 3'-5' exonuclease, but its exact role in DNA metabolism...

  11. Telomere and ribosomal DNA repeats are chromosomal targets of the bloom syndrome DNA helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schawalder, James; Paric, Enesa; Neff, Norma F

    2003-10-27

    Bloom syndrome is one of the most cancer-predisposing disorders and is characterized by genomic instability and a high frequency of sister chromatid exchange. The disorder is caused by loss of function of a 3' to 5' RecQ DNA helicase, BLM. The exact role of BLM in maintaining genomic integrity is not known but the helicase has been found to associate with several DNA repair complexes and some DNA replication foci. Chromatin immunoprecipitation of BLM complexes recovered telomere and ribosomal DNA repeats. The N-terminus of BLM, required for NB localization, is the same as the telomere association domain of BLM. The C-terminus is required for ribosomal DNA localization. BLM localizes primarily to the non-transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal DNA repeat where replication forks initiate. Bloom syndrome cells expressing the deletion alleles lacking the ribosomal DNA and telomere association domains have altered cell cycle populations with increased S or G2/M cells relative to normal. These results identify telomere and ribosomal DNA repeated sequence elements as chromosomal targets for the BLM DNA helicase during the S/G2 phase of the cell cycle. BLM is localized in nuclear bodies when it associates with telomeric repeats in both telomerase positive and negative cells. The BLM DNA helicase participates in genomic stability at ribosomal DNA repeats and telomeres.

  12. PLGA nanoparticle formulation of RK-33 an RNA helicase inhibitor against DDX3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, Guus Martinus; Khan, Raheela; Heerma van Voss, Marise Rosa; Tantravedi, Saritha; Korz, Dorian; Kato, Yoshinori; Raman, Venu

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The DDX3 helicase inhibitor RK-33 is a newly developed anticancer agent that showed promising results in preclinical research (Bol et al. EMBO Mol Med, 7(5):648-649, 2015). However, due to the physicochemical and pharmacological characteristics of RK-33, we initiated development of alter

  13. Ciprofloxacin is an inhibitor of the Mcm2-7 replicative helicase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Nicholas; Bochman, Matthew L.; Seguin, Sandlin; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Seibel, William L.; Schwacha, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Most currently available small molecule inhibitors of DNA replication lack enzymatic specificity, resulting in deleterious side effects during use in cancer chemotherapy and limited experimental usefulness as mechanistic tools to study DNA replication. Towards development of targeted replication inhibitors, we have focused on Mcm2-7 (minichromosome maintenance protein 2–7), a highly conserved helicase and key regulatory component of eukaryotic DNA replication. Unexpectedly we found that the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin preferentially inhibits Mcm2-7. Ciprofloxacin blocks the DNA helicase activity of Mcm2-7 at concentrations that have little effect on other tested helicases and prevents the proliferation of both yeast and human cells at concentrations similar to those that inhibit DNA unwinding. Moreover, a previously characterized mcm mutant (mcm4chaos3) exhibits increased ciprofloxacin resistance. To identify more potent Mcm2-7 inhibitors, we screened molecules that are structurally related to ciprofloxacin and identified several that compromise the Mcm2-7 helicase activity at lower concentrations. Our results indicate that ciprofloxacin targets Mcm2-7 in vitro, and support the feasibility of developing specific quinolone-based inhibitors of Mcm2-7 for therapeutic and experimental applications. PMID:24001138

  14. Metabolic and Phenotypic Differences between Mice Producing a Werner Syndrome Helicase Mutant Protein and Wrn Null Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumailley, Lucie; Garand, Chantal; Dubois, Marie Julie; Johnson, F Brad; Marette, André; Lebel, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-family DNA helicase, WRN. Mice lacking part of the helicase domain of the WRN orthologue exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including metabolic abnormalities and a shorter mean life span. In contrast, mice lacking the entire Wrn protein (i.e. Wrn null mice) do not exhibit a premature aging phenotype. In this study, we used a targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to identify serum metabolites that are differentially altered in young Wrn helicase mutant and Wrn null mice. An antibody-based quantification of 43 serum cytokines and markers of cardiovascular disease risk complemented this study. We found that Wrn helicase mutants exhibited elevated and decreased levels, respectively, of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18. Wrn helicase mutants also exhibited an increase in serum hydroxyproline and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, markers of extracellular matrix remodeling of the vascular system and inflammation in aging. We also observed an abnormal increase in the ratio of very long chain to short chain lysophosphatidylcholines in the Wrn helicase mutants underlying a peroxisome perturbation in these mice. Remarkably, the Wrn mutant helicase protein was mislocalized to the endoplasmic reticulum and the peroxisomal fractions in liver tissues. Additional analyses with mouse embryonic fibroblasts indicated a severe defect of the autophagy flux in cells derived from Wrn helicase mutants compared to wild type and Wrn null animals. These results indicate that the deleterious effects of the helicase-deficient Wrn protein are mediated by the dysfunction of several cellular organelles.

  15. Metabolic and Phenotypic Differences between Mice Producing a Werner Syndrome Helicase Mutant Protein and Wrn Null Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Aumailley

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-family DNA helicase, WRN. Mice lacking part of the helicase domain of the WRN orthologue exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including metabolic abnormalities and a shorter mean life span. In contrast, mice lacking the entire Wrn protein (i.e. Wrn null mice do not exhibit a premature aging phenotype. In this study, we used a targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to identify serum metabolites that are differentially altered in young Wrn helicase mutant and Wrn null mice. An antibody-based quantification of 43 serum cytokines and markers of cardiovascular disease risk complemented this study. We found that Wrn helicase mutants exhibited elevated and decreased levels, respectively, of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18. Wrn helicase mutants also exhibited an increase in serum hydroxyproline and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, markers of extracellular matrix remodeling of the vascular system and inflammation in aging. We also observed an abnormal increase in the ratio of very long chain to short chain lysophosphatidylcholines in the Wrn helicase mutants underlying a peroxisome perturbation in these mice. Remarkably, the Wrn mutant helicase protein was mislocalized to the endoplasmic reticulum and the peroxisomal fractions in liver tissues. Additional analyses with mouse embryonic fibroblasts indicated a severe defect of the autophagy flux in cells derived from Wrn helicase mutants compared to wild type and Wrn null animals. These results indicate that the deleterious effects of the helicase-deficient Wrn protein are mediated by the dysfunction of several cellular organelles.

  16. Gap Junctions: The Claymore for Cancerous Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailar Nakhlband

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gap junctions play an important role in the cell proliferation in mammalian cells as well as carcinogenesis. However, there are controversial issues about their role in cancer pathogenesis. This study was designed to evaluate genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of Carbenoxolone (CBX as a prototype of inter-cellular gap junction blocker in MCF7 and BT20 human breast cancer cells. Methods: The MCF7and BT20 human breast cancer cell lines were cultivated, and treated at designated confluency with different doses of CBX. Cellular cytotoxicity was examined using standard colorimetric assay associated with cell viability tests. Gene expression evaluation was carried out using real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: MCF7 and BT20 cells were significantly affected by CBX in a dose dependent manner in cell viability assays. Despite varying expression of genes, down regulation of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes was observed in these cells. Conclusion: Based upon this investigation, it can be concluded that CBX could affect both low and high proliferative types of breast cancer cell lines and disproportionate down regulation of both pre- and anti-apoptotic genes may be related to interacting biomolecules, perhaps via gap junctions.

  17. The crystal structure of a replicative hexameric helicase DnaC and its complex with single-stranded DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Yu-Hua; Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Chen, Wei-Ti; Huang, Cheng-Yang; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng

    2008-01-01

    DNA helicases are motor proteins that play essential roles in DNA replication, repair and recombination. In the replicative hexameric helicase, the fundamental reaction is the unwinding of duplex DNA; however, our understanding of this function remains vague due to insufficient structural information. Here, we report two crystal structures of the DnaB-family replicative helicase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkDnaC) in the apo-form and bound to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The GkDnaC–...

  18. RNA helicase YTHDC2 promotes cancer metastasis via the enhancement of the efficiency by which HIF-1α mRNA is translated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Atsushi; Tanikawa, Kenya; Tsunetomi, Mai; Takai, Kaori; Ikeda, Hiroto; Konno, Junpei; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Maeda, Hideki; Kutomi, Goro; Okita, Kenji; Mori, Mitsuru; Sahara, Hiroeki

    2016-06-28

    YTH domain containing 2 (YTHDC2) is a member of the DExD/H-box family of ATP-dependent RNA helicases. We previously found that YTHDC2 expression is up-regulated in several human cancer cells. In this study, we demonstrate novel roles for YTHDC2 in metastasis of colon tumor cells via translation-dependent pathway. Knockdown of YTHDC2 attenuated protein expression of metastasis-related genes, such as hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α), and inhibited metastasis of colon tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. To confirm that YTHDC2 promotes translation initiation by unwinding the 5'-untranslated region (5'UTR) of mRNA, we constructed a firefly luciferase reporter containing the 5'UTR of the HIF-1α mRNA and showed reduction in luciferase activity in YTHDC2-silenced cells. Furthermore, we examined expression levels of YTHDC2 by immunohistochemical staining in human colon cancer tissues from 72 patients and found a significantly positive correlation between YTHDC2 expression and the tumor stage, including metastasis. In conclusion, these results suggest that the RNA helicase YTHDC2 contributes to colon tumor metastasis by promoting translation of HIF-1α and that YTHDC2 is potentially a diagnostic marker and target gene for treating colon cancer patients.

  19. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  20. An Important Member of Tight Junctions: Claudins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Demirpence

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tight junction (TJs, the most apically located of the intercellular junctional complexes, inhibits solute and water flow through the paracellular space, termed the %u201Cbarrier%u201D function. TJs participate in signal transduction mechanisms that regulate epithelial cell proliferation, gene expression, differentiation and morphogenesis. The claudin family of transmembrane proteins localized to the TJ. Loss of expression of Claudin causes of suppression TJs function. Recent studies have shown that altered levels of the different claudins may be related to invasion and progression of carcinoma cells in several primary neoplasms. A better knowledge of the mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis will likely result in the development of novel approaches for the diagnosis and therapy.

  1. The B. subtilis Accessory Helicase PcrA Facilitates DNA Replication through Transcription Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrikh, Christopher N; Brewer, Bonita J; Merrikh, Houra

    2015-06-01

    In bacteria the concurrence of DNA replication and transcription leads to potentially deleterious encounters between the two machineries, which can occur in either the head-on (lagging strand genes) or co-directional (leading strand genes) orientations. These conflicts lead to replication fork stalling and can destabilize the genome. Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells possess resolution factors that reduce the severity of these encounters. Though Escherichia coli accessory helicases have been implicated in the mitigation of head-on conflicts, direct evidence of these proteins mitigating co-directional conflicts is lacking. Furthermore, the endogenous chromosomal regions where these helicases act, and the mechanism of recruitment, have not been identified. We show that the essential Bacillus subtilis accessory helicase PcrA aids replication progression through protein coding genes of both head-on and co-directional orientations, as well as rRNA and tRNA genes. ChIP-Seq experiments show that co-directional conflicts at highly transcribed rRNA, tRNA, and head-on protein coding genes are major targets of PcrA activity on the chromosome. Partial depletion of PcrA renders cells extremely sensitive to head-on conflicts, linking the essential function of PcrA to conflict resolution. Furthermore, ablating PcrA's ATPase/helicase activity simultaneously increases its association with conflict regions, while incapacitating its ability to mitigate conflicts, and leads to cell death. In contrast, disruption of PcrA's C-terminal RNA polymerase interaction domain does not impact its ability to mitigate conflicts between replication and transcription, its association with conflict regions, or cell survival. Altogether, this work establishes PcrA as an essential factor involved in mitigating transcription-replication conflicts and identifies chromosomal regions where it routinely acts. As both conflicts and accessory helicases are found in all domains of life, these results are

  2. The B. subtilis Accessory Helicase PcrA Facilitates DNA Replication through Transcription Units.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher N Merrikh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In bacteria the concurrence of DNA replication and transcription leads to potentially deleterious encounters between the two machineries, which can occur in either the head-on (lagging strand genes or co-directional (leading strand genes orientations. These conflicts lead to replication fork stalling and can destabilize the genome. Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells possess resolution factors that reduce the severity of these encounters. Though Escherichia coli accessory helicases have been implicated in the mitigation of head-on conflicts, direct evidence of these proteins mitigating co-directional conflicts is lacking. Furthermore, the endogenous chromosomal regions where these helicases act, and the mechanism of recruitment, have not been identified. We show that the essential Bacillus subtilis accessory helicase PcrA aids replication progression through protein coding genes of both head-on and co-directional orientations, as well as rRNA and tRNA genes. ChIP-Seq experiments show that co-directional conflicts at highly transcribed rRNA, tRNA, and head-on protein coding genes are major targets of PcrA activity on the chromosome. Partial depletion of PcrA renders cells extremely sensitive to head-on conflicts, linking the essential function of PcrA to conflict resolution. Furthermore, ablating PcrA's ATPase/helicase activity simultaneously increases its association with conflict regions, while incapacitating its ability to mitigate conflicts, and leads to cell death. In contrast, disruption of PcrA's C-terminal RNA polymerase interaction domain does not impact its ability to mitigate conflicts between replication and transcription, its association with conflict regions, or cell survival. Altogether, this work establishes PcrA as an essential factor involved in mitigating transcription-replication conflicts and identifies chromosomal regions where it routinely acts. As both conflicts and accessory helicases are found in all domains of life

  3. Mixing in T-junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jacobus B.W.; van der Wal, S.

    1996-01-01

    The transport processes that are involved in the mixing of two gases in a T-junction mixer are investigated. The turbulent flow field is calculated for the T-junction with the k- turbulence model by FLOW3D. In the mathematical model the transport of species is described with a mixture fraction

  4. Gap junctions in developing thalamic and neocortical neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niculescu, Dragos; Lohmann, Christian

    2014-12-01

    The presence of direct, cytoplasmatic, communication between neurons in the brain of vertebrates has been demonstrated a long time ago. These gap junctions have been characterized in many brain areas in terms of subunit composition, biophysical properties, neuronal connectivity patterns, and developmental regulation. Although interesting findings emerged, showing that different subunits are specifically regulated during development, or that excitatory and inhibitory neuronal networks exhibit various electrical connectivity patterns, gap junctions did not receive much further interest. Originally, it was believed that gap junctions represent simple passageways for electrical and biochemical coordination early in development. Today, we know that gap junction connectivity is tightly regulated, following independent developmental patterns for excitatory and inhibitory networks. Electrical connections are important for many specific functions of neurons, and are, for example, required for the development of neuronal stimulus tuning in the visual system. Here, we integrate the available data on neuronal connectivity and gap junction properties, as well as the most recent findings concerning the functional implications of electrical connections in the developing thalamus and neocortex.

  5. The Werner and Bloom syndrome proteins help resolve replication blockage by converting (regressed) holliday junctions to functional replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machwe, Amrita; Karale, Rajashree; Xu, Xioahua; Liu, Yilun; Orren, David K

    2011-08-16

    Cells cope with blockage of replication fork progression in a manner that allows DNA synthesis to be completed and genomic instability minimized. Models for resolution of blocked replication involve fork regression to form Holliday junction structures. The human RecQ helicases WRN and BLM (deficient in Werner and Bloom syndromes, respectively) are critical for maintaining genomic stability and thought to function in accurate resolution of replication blockage. Consistent with this notion, WRN and BLM localize to sites of blocked replication after certain DNA-damaging treatments and exhibit enhanced activity on replication and recombination intermediates. Here we examine the actions of WRN and BLM on a special Holliday junction substrate reflective of a regressed replication fork. Our results demonstrate that, in reactions requiring ATP hydrolysis, both WRN and BLM convert this Holliday junction substrate primarily to a four-stranded replication fork structure, suggesting they target the Holliday junction to initiate branch migration. In agreement, the Holliday junction binding protein RuvA inhibits the WRN- and BLM-mediated conversion reactions. Importantly, this conversion product is suitable for replication with its leading daughter strand readily extended by DNA polymerases. Furthermore, binding to and conversion of this Holliday junction are optimal at low MgCl(2) concentrations, suggesting that WRN and BLM preferentially act on the square planar (open) conformation of Holliday junctions. Our findings suggest that, subsequent to fork regression events, WRN and/or BLM could re-establish functional replication forks to help overcome fork blockage. Such a function is highly consistent with phenotypes associated with WRN- and BLM-deficient cells.

  6. Functional consequences of heterogeneous gap junction channel formation and its influence in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, G Trevor; Burt, Janis M

    2005-06-10

    The capacity of multiple connexins to hetero-oligomerize into functional heterogeneous gap junction channels has been demonstrated in vivo, in vitro, and in nonmammalian expression systems. These heterogeneous channels display gating activity, channel conductances, selectivity and regulatory behaviors that are sometimes not predicted by the behaviors of the corresponding homogeneous channels. Such observations suggest that heteromerization of gap junction proteins offers an efficient cellular strategy for finely regulating cell-to-cell communication. The available evidence strongly indicates that heterogeneous gap junction assembly is important to normal growth and differentiation, and may influence the appearance of several disease states. Definitive evidence that heterogeneous gap junction channels differentially regulate electrical conduction in excitable cells is absent. This review examines the prevalence, regulation, and implications of gap junction channel hetero-oligomerization.

  7. DNA secondary structure of the released strand stimulates WRN helicase action on forked duplexes without coordinate action of WRN exonuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Byungchan, E-mail: bbccahn@mail.ulsan.ac.kr [Department of Life Sciences, University of Ulsan, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Bohr, Vilhelm A. [Laboratory of Molecular Gerontology, Biomedical Research Center, National Institute on Aging, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} In this study, we investigated the effect of a DNA secondary structure on the two WRN activities. {yields} We found that a DNA secondary structure of the displaced strand during unwinding stimulates WRN helicase without coordinate action of WRN exonuclease. {yields} These results imply that WRN helicase and exonuclease activities can act independently. -- Abstract: Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive premature aging disorder characterized by aging-related phenotypes and genomic instability. WS is caused by mutations in a gene encoding a nuclear protein, Werner syndrome protein (WRN), a member of the RecQ helicase family, that interestingly possesses both helicase and exonuclease activities. Previous studies have shown that the two activities act in concert on a single substrate. We investigated the effect of a DNA secondary structure on the two WRN activities and found that a DNA secondary structure of the displaced strand during unwinding stimulates WRN helicase without coordinate action of WRN exonuclease. These results imply that WRN helicase and exonuclease activities can act independently, and we propose that the uncoordinated action may be relevant to the in vivo activity of WRN.

  8. Candidate tumor suppressor DDX3 RNA helicase specifically represses cap-dependent translation by acting as an eIF4E inhibitory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, J-W; Tsai, T-Y; Chao, C-H; Wu Lee, Y-H

    2008-01-24

    DDX3 is a human RNA helicase with plethoric functions. Our previous studies have indicated that DDX3 is a transcriptional regulator and functions as a tumor suppressor. In this study, we use a bicistronic reporter to demonstrate that DDX3 specifically represses cap-dependent translation but enhances hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site-mediated translation in vivo in a helicase activity-independent manner. To elucidate how DDX3 modulates translation, we identified translation initiation factor eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) as a DDX3-binding partner. Interestingly, DDX3 utilizes a consensus eIF4E-binding sequence YIPPHLR to interact with the functionally important dorsal surface of eIF4E in a similar manner to other eIF4E-binding proteins. Furthermore, cap affinity chromatography analysis suggests that DDX3 traps eIF4E in a translationally inactive complex by blocking interaction with eIF4G. Point mutations within the consensus eIF4E-binding motif in DDX3 impair its ability to bind eIF4E and result in a loss of DDX3's regulatory effects on translation. All these features together indicate that DDX3 is a new member of the eIF4E inhibitory proteins involved in translation initiation regulation. Most importantly, this DDX3-mediated translation regulation also confers the tumor suppressor function on DDX3. Altogether, this study demonstrates regulatory roles and action mechanisms for DDX3 in translation, cell growth and likely viral replication.

  9. Rab11 helps maintain apical crumbs and adherens junctions in the Drosophila embryonic ectoderm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah F Roeth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tissue morphogenesis and organogenesis require that cells retain stable cell-cell adhesion while changing shape and moving. One mechanism to accommodate this plasticity in cell adhesion involves regulated trafficking of junctional proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we explored trafficking of junctional proteins in two well-characterized model epithelia, the Drosophila embryonic ectoderm and amnioserosa. We find that DE-cadherin, the transmembrane protein of adherens junctions, is actively trafficked through putative vesicles, and appears to travel through both Rab5-positive and Rab11-positive structures. We manipulated the functions of Rab11 and Rab5 to examine the effects on junctional stability and morphogenesis. Reducing Rab11 function, either using a dominant negative construct or loss of function alleles, disrupts integrity of the ectoderm and leads to loss of adherens junctions. Strikingly, the apical junctional regulator Crumbs is lost before AJs are destabilized, while the basolateral protein Dlg remains cortical. Altering Rab5 function had less dramatic effects, not disrupting adherens junction integrity but affecting dorsal closure. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We contrast our results with what others saw when disrupting other trafficking regulators, and when disrupting Rab function in other tissues; together these data suggest distinct mechanisms regulate junctional stability and plasticity in different tissues.

  10. Defining functional interactions during biogenesis of epithelial junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, J. C.; Bruche, S.; Pizarro, L.; Maimari, N.; Pogglioli, T.; Tomlinson, C.; Lees, J.; Zalivina, I.; Wheeler, A.; Alberts, A.; Russo, A.; Braga, V. M. M.

    2016-01-01

    In spite of extensive recent progress, a comprehensive understanding of how actin cytoskeleton remodelling supports stable junctions remains to be established. Here we design a platform that integrates actin functions with optimized phenotypic clustering and identify new cytoskeletal proteins, their functional hierarchy and pathways that modulate E-cadherin adhesion. Depletion of EEF1A, an actin bundling protein, increases E-cadherin levels at junctions without a corresponding reinforcement of cell–cell contacts. This unexpected result reflects a more dynamic and mobile junctional actin in EEF1A-depleted cells. A partner for EEF1A in cadherin contact maintenance is the formin DIAPH2, which interacts with EEF1A. In contrast, depletion of either the endocytic regulator TRIP10 or the Rho GTPase activator VAV2 reduces E-cadherin levels at junctions. TRIP10 binds to and requires VAV2 function for its junctional localization. Overall, we present new conceptual insights on junction stabilization, which integrate known and novel pathways with impact for epithelial morphogenesis, homeostasis and diseases. PMID:27922008

  11. The connexin43 carboxyl terminus and cardiac gap junction organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palatinus, Joseph A; Rhett, J Matthew; Gourdie, Robert G

    2012-08-01

    The precise spatial order of gap junctions at intercalated disks in adult ventricular myocardium is thought vital for maintaining cardiac synchrony. Breakdown or remodeling of this order is a hallmark of arrhythmic disease of the heart. The principal component of gap junction channels between ventricular cardiomyocytes is connexin43 (Cx43). Protein-protein interactions and modifications of the carboxyl-terminus of Cx43 are key determinants of gap junction function, size, distribution and organization during normal development and in disease processes. Here, we review data on the role of proteins interacting with the Cx43 carboxyl-terminus in the regulation of cardiac gap junction organization, with particular emphasis on Zonula Occludens-1. The rapid progress in this area suggests that in coming years we are likely to develop a fuller understanding of the molecular mechanisms causing pathologic remodeling of gap junctions. With these advances come the promise of novel approach to the treatment of arrhythmia and the prevention of sudden cardiac death. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Communicating junctions, composition, structure and characteristics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Metallic Junction Thermoelectric Device Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzik, Adam J.; Choi, Sang H.

    2017-01-01

    Thermoelectric junctions made of semiconductors have existed in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) for deep space missions, but are currently being adapted for terrestrial energy harvesting. Unfortunately, these devices are inefficient, operating at only 7% efficiency. This low efficiency has driven efforts to make high-figure-of-merit thermoelectric devices, which require a high electrical conductivity but a low thermal conductivity, a combination that is difficult to achieve. Lowered thermal conductivity has increased efficiency, but at the cost of power output. An alternative setup is to use metallic junctions rather than semiconductors as thermoelectric devices. Metals have orders of magnitude more electrons and electronic conductivities higher than semiconductors, but thermal conductivity is higher as well. To evaluate the viability of metallic junction thermoelectrics, a two dimensional heat transfer MATLAB simulation was constructed to calculate efficiency and power output. High Seebeck coefficient alloys, Chromel (90%Ni-10%Cr) and Constantan (55%Cu-45%Ni), produced efficiencies of around 20-30%. Parameters such as the number of layers of junctions, lateral junction density, and junction sizes for both series- and parallel-connected junctions were explored.

  13. Mitotic phosphorylation of Bloom helicase at Thr182 is required for its proteasomal degradation and maintenance of chromosomal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharat, S S; Tripathi, V; Damodaran, A P; Priyadarshini, R; Chandra, S; Tikoo, S; Nandhakumar, R; Srivastava, V; Priya, S; Hussain, M; Kaur, S; Fishman, J B; Sengupta, S

    2016-02-25

    Mutations in Bloom helicase (BLM) lead to Bloom Syndrome (BS). BS is characterized by multiple clinical manifestations including predisposition to a wide spectrum of cancers. Studies have revealed the mechanism of BLM recruitment after stalled replication and its role during the repair of DNA damage. We now provide evidence that BLM undergoes K48-linked ubiquitylation and subsequent degradation during mitosis due to the E3 ligase, Fbw7α. Fbw7α carries out its function after GSK3β- and CDK2/cyclin A2-dependent phosphorylation events on Thr171 and Ser175 of BLM which lies within a well-defined phosphodegron, a sequence which is conserved in all primates. Phosphorylation on BLM Thr171 and Ser175 depends on prior phosphorylation at Thr182 by Chk1/Chk2. Thr182 phosphorylation not only controls BLM ubiquitylation and degradation during mitosis but is also a determinant for its localization on the ultrafine bridges. Consequently lack of Thr182 phosphorylation leads to multiple manifestations of chromosomal instability including increased levels of DNA damage, lagging chromatin, micronuclei formation, breaks and quadriradials. Hence Thr182 phosphorylation on BLM has two functions-it regulates BLM turnover during mitosis and also helps to maintain the chromosomal stability.

  14. RNA helicase Belle (DDX3) is essential for male germline stem cell maintenance and division in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotov, Alexei A; Olenkina, Oxana M; Kibanov, Mikhail V; Olenina, Ludmila V

    2016-06-01

    The present study showed that RNA helicase Belle (DDX3) was required intrinsically for mitotic progression and survival of germline stem cells (GSCs) and spermatogonial cells in the Drosophila melanogaster testes. We found that deficiency of Belle in the male germline resulted in a strong germ cell loss phenotype. Early germ cells are lost through cell death, whereas somatic hub and cyst cell populations are maintained. The observed phenotype is related to that of the human Sertoli Cell-Only Syndrome caused by the loss of DBY (DDX3) expression in the human testes and results in a complete lack of germ cells with preservation of somatic Sertoli cells. We found the hallmarks of mitotic G2 delay in early germ cells of the larval testes of bel mutants. Both mitotic cyclins, A and B, are markedly reduced in the gonads of bel mutants. Transcription levels of cycB and cycA decrease significantly in the testes of hypomorph bel mutants. Overexpression of Cyclin B in the germline partially rescues germ cell survival, mitotic progression and fertility in the bel-RNAi knockdown testes. Taken together, these results suggest that a role of Belle in GSC maintenance and regulation of early germ cell divisions is associated with the expression control of mitotic cyclins.

  15. Molecular architecture of the recombinant human MCM2-7 helicase in complex with nucleotides and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskovic, Jasminka; Bragado-Nilsson, Elisabeth; Saligram Prabhakar, Bhargrav; Yefimenko, Igor; Martínez-Gago, Jaime; Muñoz, Sergio; Méndez, Juan; Montoya, Guillermo

    2016-09-16

    DNA replication is a key biological process that involves different protein complexes whose assembly is rigorously regulated in a successive order. One of these complexes is a replicative hexameric helicase, the MCM complex, which is essential for the initiation and elongation phases of replication. After the assembly of a double heterohexameric MCM2-7 complex at replication origins in G1, the 2 heterohexamers separate from each other and associate with Cdc45 and GINS proteins in a CMG complex that is capable of unwinding dsDNA during S phase. Here, we have reconstituted and characterized the purified human MCM2-7 (hMCM2-7) hexameric complex by co-expression of its 6 different subunits in insect cells. The conformational variability of the complex has been analyzed by single particle electron microscopy in the presence of different nucleotide analogs and DNA. The interaction with nucleotide stabilizes the complex while DNA introduces conformational changes in the hexamer inducing a cylindrical shape. Our studies suggest that the assembly of GINS and Cdc45 to the hMCM2-7 hexamer would favor conformational changes on the hexamer bound to ssDNA shifting the cylindrical shape of the complex into a right-handed spiral conformation as observed in the CMG complex bound to DNA.

  16. The Ded1/DDX3 subfamily of DEAD-box RNA helicases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak; Jankowsky, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, the orthologs of the DEAD-box RNA helicase Ded1p from yeast and DDX3 from human form a well-defined subfamily that is characterized by high sequence conservation in their helicase core and their N- and C- termini. Individual members of this Ded1/DDX3 subfamily perform multiple functions in RNA metabolism in both nucleus and cytoplasm. Ded1/DDX3 subfamily members have also been implicated in cellular signaling pathways and are targeted by diverse viruses. In this review, we discuss the considerable body of work on the biochemistry and biology of these proteins, including the recently discovered link of human DDX3 to tumorigenesis.

  17. RecQ Helicase-catalyzed DNA Unwinding Detected by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing-Dong ZHANG; Shuo-Xing DOU; Ping XIE; Peng-Ye WANG; Xu Guang XI

    2005-01-01

    A fluorometric assay was used to study the DNA unwinding kinetics induced by Escherichia coli RecQ helicase. This assay was based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer and carried out on stopped-flow, in which DNA unwinding was monitored by fluorescence emission enhancement of fluorescein resulting from helicase-catalyzed DNA unwinding. By this method, we determined the DNA unwinding rate of RecQ at different enzyme concentrations. We also studied the dependences of DNA unwinding magnitude and rate on magnesium ion concentration. We showed that this method could be used to determine the polarity of DNA unwinding. This assay should greatly facilitate further study of the mechanism for RecQcatalyzed DNA unwinding.

  18. A Co-Opted DEAD-Box RNA helicase enhances tombusvirus plus-strand synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Kovalev

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Replication of plus-strand RNA viruses depends on recruited host factors that aid several critical steps during replication. In this paper, we show that an essential translation factor, Ded1p DEAD-box RNA helicase of yeast, directly affects replication of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV. To separate the role of Ded1p in viral protein translation from its putative replication function, we utilized a cell-free TBSV replication assay and recombinant Ded1p. The in vitro data show that Ded1p plays a role in enhancing plus-strand synthesis by the viral replicase. We also find that Ded1p is a component of the tombusvirus replicase complex and Ded1p binds to the 3'-end of the viral minus-stranded RNA. The data obtained with wt and ATPase deficient Ded1p mutants support the model that Ded1p unwinds local structures at the 3'-end of the TBSV (-RNA, rendering the RNA compatible for initiation of (+-strand synthesis. Interestingly, we find that Ded1p and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, which is another host factor for TBSV, play non-overlapping functions to enhance (+-strand synthesis. Altogether, the two host factors enhance TBSV replication synergistically by interacting with the viral (-RNA and the replication proteins. In addition, we have developed an in vitro assay for Flock house virus (FHV, a small RNA virus of insects, that also demonstrated positive effect on FHV replicase activity by the added Ded1p helicase. Thus, two small RNA viruses, which do not code for their own helicases, seems to recruit a host RNA helicase to aid their replication in infected cells.

  19. Molecular insights into DNA interference by CRISPR-associated nuclease-helicase Cas3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Bei; Shin, Minsang; Sun, Jiali; Jung, Che-Hun; Bolt, Edward L; van der Oost, John; Kim, Jeong-Sun

    2014-11-18

    Mobile genetic elements in bacteria are neutralized by a system based on clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins. Type I CRISPR-Cas systems use a "Cascade" ribonucleoprotein complex to guide RNA specifically to complementary sequence in invader double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), a process called "interference." After target recognition by Cascade, formation of an R-loop triggers recruitment of a Cas3 nuclease-helicase, completing the interference process by destroying the invader dsDNA. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of CRISPR interference, we analyzed crystal structures of Cas3 from the bacterium Thermobaculum terrenum, with and without a bound ATP analog. The structures reveal a histidine-aspartate (HD)-type nuclease domain fused to superfamily-2 (SF2) helicase domains and a distinct C-terminal domain. Binding of ATP analog at the interface of the SF2 helicase RecA-like domains rearranges a motif V with implications for the enzyme mechanism. The HD-nucleolytic site contains two metal ions that are positioned at the end of a proposed nucleic acid-binding tunnel running through the SF2 helicase structure. This structural alignment suggests a mechanism for 3' to 5' nucleolytic processing of the displaced strand of invader DNA that is coordinated with ATP-dependent 3' to 5' translocation of Cas3 along DNA. In agreement with biochemical studies, the presented Cas3 structures reveal important mechanistic details on the neutralization of genetic invaders by type I CRISPR-Cas systems.

  20. Cellular defects caused by hypomorphic variants of the Bloom syndrome helicase gene BLM

    OpenAIRE

    Shastri, Vivek M.; Schmidt, Kristina H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Bloom syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by extraordinary cancer incidence early in life and an average life expectancy of ~27 years. Premature stop codons in BLM , which encodes a DNA helicase that functions in DNA double‐strand‐break repair, make up the vast majority of Bloom syndrome mutations, with only 13 single amino acid changes identified in the syndrome. Sequencing projects have identified nearly one hundred single nucleotide variants in BLM...

  1. Identification and analysis of hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase inhibitors using nucleic acid binding assays

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Sourav; Alicia M Hanson; Shadrick, William R.; Ndjomou, Jean; Sweeney, Noreena L.; Hernandez, John J.; Bartczak, Diana; Li, Kelin; Frankowski, Kevin J.; Heck, Julie A.; Arnold, Leggy A.; Schoenen, Frank J.; Frick, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Typical assays used to discover and analyze small molecules that inhibit the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 helicase yield few hits and are often confounded by compound interference. Oligonucleotide binding assays are examined here as an alternative. After comparing fluorescence polarization (FP), homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF®; Cisbio) and AlphaScreen® (Perkin Elmer) assays, an FP-based assay was chosen to screen Sigma’s Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) for c...

  2. Viruses and the human DEAD-box helicase DDX3: inhibition or exploitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Martina

    2011-04-01

    Human DDX3 is a DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp)-box RNA helicase that appears to be a prime target for viral manipulation. While two viruses that manifest major global health threats, HIV and HCV (hepatitis C virus), utilize DDX3 for their replication, other viruses inhibit DDX3's newly identified function in innate antiviral signalling. This review discusses the role of DDX3 in antiviral immunity and its inhibition or exploitation by different viruses.

  3. Viruses and the human DEAD-box helicase DDX3: inhibition or exploitation?

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Human DDX3 is a DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp)-box RNA helicase that appears to be a prime target for viral manipulation. While two viruses that manifest major global health threats, HIV and HCV (hepatitis C virus), utilize DDX3 for their replication, other viruses inhibit DDX3’s newly identified function in innate antiviral signalling. This review discusses the role of DDX3 in antiviral immunity and its inhibition or exploitation by different viruses.

  4. Evolution of the DEAD box helicase family in chicken: chickens have no DHX9 ortholog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Haruko; Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Takaki, Hiromi; Hikono, Hirokazu; Seya, Tsukasa

    2015-10-01

    Viral RNA represents a pattern molecule that can be recognized by RNA sensors in innate immunity. Humans and mice possess cytoplasmic DNA/RNA sensors for detecting viral replication. There are a number of DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp; DExD/H) box-type helicases in mammals, among which retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA50) are indispensable for RNA sensing; however, they are functionally supported by a number of sensors that directly bind viral RNA or replicative RNA intermediates to convey signals to RIG-I and MDA5. Some DEAD box helicase members recognize DNA irrespective of the origin. These sensors transmit IFN-inducing signals through adaptors, including mitochondrial antiviral signaling. Viral double-stranded RNAs are reportedly sensed by the helicases DDX1, DDX21, DHX36, DHX9, DDX3, DDX41, LGP2 and DDX60, in addition to RIG-I and MDA5, and induce type I IFNs, thereby blocking viral replication. Humans and mice have all nucleic acid sensors listed here. In the RNA sensing system in chicken, it was found in the present study that most DEAD box helicases are conserved; however, DHX9 is genetically deficient in addition to reported RIG-I. Based on the current genome databases, similar DHX9 deficiency was observed in ducks and several other bird species. Because chicken, but not duck, was found to be deficient in RIG-I, the RNA-sensing system of chicken lacks RIG-I and DHX9 and is thus more fragile than that of duck or mammal. DHX9 may generally compensate for the function of RIG-I and deficiency of DHX9 possibly participates in exacerbations of viral infection such as influenza in chickens.

  5. Replication of proto-RNAs sustained by ligase-helicase cycle in oligomer world

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Daisuke; Narikiyo, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    A mechanism of the replication of proto-RNAs in oligomer world is proposed. The replication is carried out by a minimum cycle which is sustained by a ligase and a helicase. We expect that such a cycle actually worked in the primordial soup and can be constructed in vitro. By computer simulation the products of the replication acquires diversity and complexity. Such diversity and complexity are the bases of the evolution.

  6. Control of helicase loading in the coupled DNA replication and recombination systems of bacteriophage T4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branagan, Amy M; Klein, Jenny A; Jordan, Christian S; Morrical, Scott W

    2014-01-31

    The Gp59 protein of bacteriophage T4 promotes DNA replication by loading the replicative helicase, Gp41, onto replication forks and recombination intermediates. Gp59 also blocks DNA synthesis by Gp43 polymerase until Gp41 is loaded, ensuring that synthesis is tightly coupled to unwinding. The distinct polymerase blocking and helicase loading activities of Gp59 likely involve different binding interactions with DNA and protein partners. Here, we investigate how interactions of Gp59 with DNA and Gp32, the T4 single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein, are related to these activities. A previously characterized mutant, Gp59-I87A, exhibits markedly reduced affinity for ssDNA and pseudo-fork DNA substrates. We demonstrate that on Gp32-covered ssDNA, the DNA binding defect of Gp59-I87A is not detrimental to helicase loading and translocation. In contrast, on pseudo-fork DNA the I87A mutation is detrimental to helicase loading and unwinding in the presence or absence of Gp32. Other results indicate that Gp32 binding to lagging strand ssDNA relieves the blockage of Gp43 polymerase activity by Gp59, whereas the inhibition of Gp43 exonuclease activity is maintained. Our findings suggest that Gp59-Gp32 and Gp59-DNA interactions perform separate but complementary roles in T4 DNA metabolism; Gp59-Gp32 interactions are needed to load Gp41 onto D-loops, and other nucleoprotein structures containing clusters of Gp32. Gp59-DNA interactions are needed to load Gp41 onto nascent or collapsed replication forks lacking clusters of Gp32 and to coordinate bidirectional replication from T4 origins. The dual functionalities of Gp59 allow it to promote the initiation or re-start of DNA replication from a wide variety of recombination and replication intermediates.

  7. Isolation and Characterization of Pepper Genes Interacting with the CMV-P1 Helicase Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoomi Choi

    Full Text Available Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV is a destructive pathogen affecting Capsicum annuum (pepper production. The pepper Cmr1 gene confers resistance to most CMV strains, but is overcome by CMV-P1 in a process dependent on the CMV-P1 RNA1 helicase domain (P1 helicase. Here, to identify host factors involved in CMV-P1 infection in pepper, a yeast two-hybrid library derived from a C. annuum 'Bukang' cDNA library was screened, producing a total of 76 potential clones interacting with the P1 helicase. Beta-galactosidase filter lift assay, PCR screening, and sequencing analysis narrowed the candidates to 10 genes putatively involved in virus infection. The candidate host genes were silenced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants that were then inoculated with CMV-P1 tagged with the green fluorescent protein (GFP. Plants silenced for seven of the genes showed development comparable to N. benthamiana wild type, whereas plants silenced for the other three genes showed developmental defects including stunting and severe distortion. Silencing formate dehydrogenase and calreticulin-3 precursor led to reduced virus accumulation. Formate dehydrogenase-silenced plants showed local infection in inoculated leaves, but not in upper (systemic leaves. In the calreticulin-3 precursor-silenced plants, infection was not observed in either the inoculated or the upper leaves. Our results demonstrate that formate dehydrogenase and calreticulin-3 precursor are required for CMV-P1 infection.

  8. Staphylococcal SCCmec elements encode an active MCM-like helicase and thus may be replicative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mir-Sanchis, Ignacio [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Roman, Christina A. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Misiura, Agnieszka [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Abbott Lab., North Chicago, IL (United States); Pigli, Ying Z. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Boyle-Vavra, Susan [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Pediatrics; Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). MRSA Research Center; Rice, Phoebe A. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    2016-08-29

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a public-health threat worldwide. Although the mobile genomic island responsible for this phenotype, staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC), has been thought to be nonreplicative, we predicted DNA-replication-related functions for some of the conserved proteins encoded by SCC. We show that one of these, Cch, is homologous to the self-loading initiator helicases of an unrelated family of genomic islands, that it is an active 3'-to-5' helicase and that the adjacent ORF encodes a single-stranded DNA–binding protein. Our 2.9-Å crystal structure of intact Cch shows that it forms a hexameric ring. Cch, like the archaeal and eukaryotic MCM-family replicative helicases, belongs to the pre–sensor II insert clade of AAA+ ATPases. Additionally, we found that SCC elements are part of a broader family of mobile elements, all of which encode a replication initiator upstream of their recombinases. Replication after excision would enhance the efficiency of horizontal gene transfer.

  9. Non-B DNA Secondary Structures and Their Resolution by RecQ Helicases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the canonical B-form structure first described by Watson and Crick, DNA can adopt a number of alternative structures. These non-B-form DNA secondary structures form spontaneously on tracts of repeat sequences that are abundant in genomes. In addition, structured forms of DNA with intrastrand pairing may arise on single-stranded DNA produced transiently during various cellular processes. Such secondary structures have a range of biological functions but also induce genetic instability. Increasing evidence suggests that genomic instabilities induced by non-B DNA secondary structures result in predisposition to diseases. Secondary DNA structures also represent a new class of molecular targets for DNA-interactive compounds that might be useful for targeting telomeres and transcriptional control. The equilibrium between the duplex DNA and formation of multistranded non-B-form structures is partly dependent upon the helicases that unwind (resolve these alternate DNA structures. With special focus on tetraplex, triplex, and cruciform, this paper summarizes the incidence of non-B DNA structures and their association with genomic instability and emphasizes the roles of RecQ-like DNA helicases in genome maintenance by resolution of DNA secondary structures. In future, RecQ helicases are anticipated to be additional molecular targets for cancer chemotherapeutics.

  10. Structural insights into the mechanism of the DEAH-box RNA helicase Prp43

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauchert, Marcel J; Fourmann, Jean-Baptiste; Lührmann, Reinhard; Ficner, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    The DEAH-box helicase Prp43 is a key player in pre-mRNA splicing as well as the maturation of rRNAs. The exact modus operandi of Prp43 and of all other spliceosomal DEAH-box RNA helicases is still elusive. Here, we report crystal structures of Prp43 complexes in different functional states and the analysis of structure-based mutants providing insights into the unwinding and loading mechanism of RNAs. The Prp43•ATP-analog•RNA complex shows the localization of the RNA inside a tunnel formed by the two RecA-like and C-terminal domains. In the ATP-bound state this tunnel can be transformed into a groove prone for RNA binding by large rearrangements of the C-terminal domains. Several conformational changes between the ATP- and ADP-bound states explain the coupling of ATP hydrolysis to RNA translocation, mainly mediated by a β-turn of the RecA1 domain containing the newly identified RF motif. This mechanism is clearly different to those of other RNA helicases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21510.001 PMID:28092261

  11. Novel benzoxazole inhibitor of dengue virus replication that targets the NS3 helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Chelsea M; Grosenbach, Douglas W; Berhanu, Aklile; Dai, Dongcheng; Jones, Kevin F; Cardwell, Kara B; Schneider, Christine; Yang, Guang; Tyavanagimatt, Shanthakumar; Harver, Chris; Wineinger, Kristin A; Page, Jessica; Stavale, Eric; Stone, Melialani A; Fuller, Kathleen P; Lovejoy, Candace; Leeds, Janet M; Hruby, Dennis E; Jordan, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the predominant mosquito-borne viral pathogen that infects humans with an estimated 50 to 100 million infections per year worldwide. Over the past 50 years, the incidence of dengue disease has increased dramatically and the virus is now endemic in more than 100 countries. Moreover, multiple serotypes of DENV are now found in the same geographic region, increasing the likelihood of more severe forms of disease. Despite extensive research, there are still no approved vaccines or therapeutics commercially available to treat DENV infection. Here we report the results of a high-throughput screen of a chemical compound library using a whole-virus assay that identified a novel small-molecule inhibitor of DENV, ST-610, that potently and selectively inhibits all four serotypes of DENV replication in vitro. Sequence analysis of drug-resistant virus isolates has identified a single point mutation, A263T, in the NS3 helicase domain that confers resistance to this compound. ST-610 inhibits DENV NS3 helicase RNA unwinding activity in a molecular-beacon-based helicase assay but does not inhibit nucleoside triphosphatase activity based on a malachite green ATPase assay. ST-610 is nonmutagenic, is well tolerated (nontoxic) in mice, and has shown efficacy in a sublethal murine model of DENV infection with the ability to significantly reduce viremia and viral load compared to vehicle controls.

  12. Imaging of cervicothoracic junction trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wongwaisayawan S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sirote Wongwaisayawan,1 Ruedeekorn Suwannanon,2 Rathachai Kaewlai11Department of Radiology, Ramathibodi Hospital and Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, ThailandAbstract: Cervicothoracic junction trauma is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in trauma patients. Imaging has played an important role in identifying injuries and guiding appropriate, timely therapy. Computed tomography is currently a method of choice for diagnosing cervicothoracic junction trauma, in which the pattern of injuries often suggests possible mechanisms and potential injuries. In this article, the authors describe and illustrate common and uncommon injuries that can occur in the cervicothoracic junction.Keywords: cervicothoracic junction, cervical spine, trauma, imaging, radiology

  13. Critical roles of RNA helicase DDX3 and its interactions with eIF4E/PABP1 in stress granule assembly and stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Jing-Wen; Wang, Wei-Ting; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Kuo, Chu-Yun; Li, Hao-Kang; Wu Lee, Yan-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Upon environmental insults, SGs (stress granules) aid cell survival by serving as sites of translational silencing. RNA helicase DDX3 was reported to associate with SGs. However, its role in SG physiology remains undefined. We have demonstrated previously that DDX3 acts as an eIF4E (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E)-inhibitory protein to suppress translation. In the present study, we indentified the SG marker PABP1 [poly(A)-binding protein 1] as another direct interaction partner of DDX3. We established various stimuli as novel stressors that direct DDX3 with eIF4E and PABP1 into SGs, but not to processing bodies. Interestingly, down-regulation of DDX3 interfered with SG assembly, led to nuclear accumulation of PABP1 and reduced cell viability following stress. Conversely, supplementation with a shRNA (short hairpin RNA)-resistant DDX3 restored SG formation, the translocation of PABP1 into SGs and cell survival. Notably, the SG-inducing capacity of DDX3 is independent of its ATPase and helicase activities, but mapped to the eIF4E-binding region. Moreover, the eIF4E-binding-defective mutant DDX3 was impaired in its SG-inducing ability and protective effect on cell survival under adverse conditions. All together, the present study has characterized DDX3 as a pivotal SG-nucleating factor and illustrates co-ordinative roles for DDX3, eIF4E and PABP1 in integrating environmental stress with translational regulation.

  14. DDX3, a DEAD box RNA helicase, is deregulated in hepatitis virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma and is involved in cell growth control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, P-C; Chi, C-W; Chau, G-Y; Li, F-Y; Tsai, Y-H; Wu, J-C; Wu Lee, Y-H

    2006-03-30

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths worldwide and is highly correlated with hepatitis virus infection. Our previous report shows that a DEAD box RNA helicase, DDX3, is targeted and regulated by hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein, which implicates the involvement of DDX3 in HCV-related HCC development. In this study, the potential role of DDX3 in hepatocarcinogenesis is investigated by examining its expression in surgically excised human HCC specimens. Here we report the differential deregulation of DDX3 expression in hepatitis virus-associated HCC. A significant downregulation of DDX3 expression is found in HCCs from hepatitis B virus (HBV)-positive patients, but not from HCV-positive ones, compared to the corresponding nontumor tissues. The expression of DDX3 is differentially regulated by the gender and, moreover, there is a tendency that the downregulation of DDX3 expression in HCCs is more frequent in males than in females. Genetic knockdown of DDX3 with small interfering RNAs (siRNA) in a nontransformed mouse fibroblast cell line, NIH-3T3, results in a premature entry to S phase and an enhancement of cell growth. This enhanced cell cycle progression is linked to the upregulation of cyclin D1 and the downregulation of p21(WAF1) in the DDX3 knockdown cells. In addition, constitutive reduction of DDX3 expression increases the resistance of NIH-3T3 cells to serum depletion-induced apoptosis and enhances the ras-induced anchorage-independent growth, indicating the involvement of DDX3 in cell growth control. These findings together with the previous study suggest that the deregulation of DDX3, a DEAD box RNA helicase with cell growth-regulatory functions, is involved in HBV- and HCV-associated pathogenesis.

  15. Demonstrated Anomalous Pancreaticobiliary Ductal Junction

    OpenAIRE

    Koçkar, Cem; ?ENOL, Altu?; BA?TÜRK, Abdulkadir; AYDIN, Bünyamin; Cüre, Erkan

    2015-01-01

    Anomalies of the pancreaticobiliary junction are rare. Clinically anomalies of the pancreaticobiliary junction are uncommonly symptomatic but may present themselves with associated conditions ranging from benign acute abdominal pain to carcinomas. A 52 years old man was admitted to gastroenterology service with complaints of fever, nausea, vomiting and recurrent epigastric pain. He was diagnosed with biliary pancreatitis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreato-graphy was performed. Papilla ...

  16. Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wild, Georg Hermann

    2012-03-04

    We report on the fabrication of superconductor/insulator/ferromagnetic metal/superconductor (Nb/AlO{sub x}/Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18}/Nb) Josephson junctions (SIFS JJs) with high critical current densities, large normal resistance times area products, and high quality factors. For these junctions, a transition from 0- to {pi}-coupling is observed for a thickness d{sub F}=6 nm of the ferromagnetic Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18} interlayer. The magnetic field dependence of the critical current of the junctions demonstrates good spatial homogeneity of the tunneling barrier and ferromagnetic interlayer. Magnetic characterization shows that the Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18} has an out-of-plane anisotropy and large saturation magnetization indicating negligible dead layers at the interfaces. A careful analysis of Fiske modes up to about 400 GHz provides valuable information on the junction quality factor and the relevant damping mechanisms. Whereas losses due to quasiparticle tunneling dominate at low frequencies, at high frequencies the damping is explained by the finite surface resistance of the junction electrodes. High quality factors of up to 30 around 200 GHz have been achieved. They allow to study the junction dynamics, in particular the switching probability from the zero-voltage into the voltage state with and without microwave irradiation. The experiments with microwave irradiation are well explained within semi-classical models and numerical simulations. In contrast, at mK temperature the switching dynamics without applied microwaves clearly shows secondary quantum effects. Here, we could observe for the first time macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson junctions with a ferromagnetic interlayer. This observation excludes fluctuations of the critical current as a consequence of an unstable magnetic domain structure of the ferromagnetic interlayer and affirms the suitability of SIFS Josephson junctions for quantum information processing.

  17. Coordinated function of cellular DEAD-box helicases in suppression of viral RNA recombination and maintenance of viral genome integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chingkai Chuang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The intricate interactions between viruses and hosts include an evolutionary arms race and adaptation that is facilitated by the ability of RNA viruses to evolve rapidly due to high frequency mutations and genetic RNA recombination. In this paper, we show evidence that the co-opted cellular DDX3-like Ded1 DEAD-box helicase suppresses tombusviral RNA recombination in yeast model host, and the orthologous RH20 helicase functions in a similar way in plants. In vitro replication and recombination assays confirm the direct role of the ATPase function of Ded1p in suppression of viral recombination. We also present data supporting a role for Ded1 in facilitating the switch from minus- to plus-strand synthesis. Interestingly, another co-opted cellular helicase, the eIF4AIII-like AtRH2, enhances TBSV recombination in the absence of Ded1/RH20, suggesting that the coordinated actions of these helicases control viral RNA recombination events. Altogether, these helicases are the first co-opted cellular factors in the viral replicase complex that directly affect viral RNA recombination. Ded1 helicase seems to be a key factor maintaining viral genome integrity by promoting the replication of viral RNAs with correct termini, but inhibiting the replication of defective RNAs lacking correct 5' end sequences. Altogether, a co-opted cellular DEAD-box helicase facilitates the maintenance of full-length viral genome and suppresses viral recombination, thus limiting the appearance of defective viral RNAs during replication.

  18. Significance of monoclonal antibodies against the conserved epitopes within non-structural protein 3 helicase of hepatitis C virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixin Bian

    Full Text Available Nonstructural protein 3 (NS3 of hepatitis C virus (HCV, codes for protease and helicase carrying NTPase enzymatic activities, plays a crucial role in viral replication and an ideal target for diagnosis, antiviral therapy and vaccine development. In this study, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs to NS3 helicase were characterized by epitope mapping and biological function test. A total of 29 monoclonal antibodies were produced to the truncated NS3 helicase of HCV-1b (T1b-rNS3, aa1192-1459. Six mAbs recognized 8/29 16mer peptides, which contributed to identify 5 linear and 1 discontinuous putative epitope sequences. Seven mAbs reacted with HCV-2a JFH-1 infected Huh-7.5.1 cells by immunofluorescent staining, of which 2E12 and 3E5 strongly bound to the exposed linear epitope (1231PTGSGKSTK(1239 (EP05 or core motif (1373IPFYGKAI(1380 (EP21, respectively. Five other mAbs recognized semi-conformational or conformational epitopes of HCV helicase. MAb 2E12 binds to epitope EP05 at the ATP binding site of motif I in domain 1, while mAb 3E5 reacts with epitope EP21 close to helicase nucleotide binding region of domain 2. Epitope EP05 is totally conserved and EP21 highly conserved across HCV genotypes. These two epitope peptides reacted strongly with 59-79% chronic and weakly with 30-58% resolved HCV infected blood donors, suggesting that these epitopes were dominant in HCV infection. MAb 2E12 inhibited 50% of unwinding activity of NS3 helicase in vitro. Novel monoclonal antibodies recognize highly conserved epitopes at crucial functional sites within NS3 helicase, which may become important antibodies for diagnosis and antiviral therapy in chronic HCV infection.

  19. Human Enterovirus Nonstructural Protein 2CATPase Functions as Both an RNA Helicase and ATP-Independent RNA Chaperone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjie Xia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available RNA helicases and chaperones are the two major classes of RNA remodeling proteins, which function to remodel RNA structures and/or RNA-protein interactions, and are required for all aspects of RNA metabolism. Although some virus-encoded RNA helicases/chaperones have been predicted or identified, their RNA remodeling activities in vitro and functions in the viral life cycle remain largely elusive. Enteroviruses are a large group of positive-stranded RNA viruses in the Picornaviridae family, which includes numerous important human pathogens. Herein, we report that the nonstructural protein 2CATPase of enterovirus 71 (EV71, which is the major causative pathogen of hand-foot-and-mouth disease and has been regarded as the most important neurotropic enterovirus after poliovirus eradication, functions not only as an RNA helicase that 3'-to-5' unwinds RNA helices in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP-dependent manner, but also as an RNA chaperone that destabilizes helices bidirectionally and facilitates strand annealing and complex RNA structure formation independently of ATP. We also determined that the helicase activity is based on the EV71 2CATPase middle domain, whereas the C-terminus is indispensable for its RNA chaperoning activity. By promoting RNA template recycling, 2CATPase facilitated EV71 RNA synthesis in vitro; when 2CATPase helicase activity was impaired, EV71 RNA replication and virion production were mostly abolished in cells, indicating that 2CATPase-mediated RNA remodeling plays a critical role in the enteroviral life cycle. Furthermore, the RNA helicase and chaperoning activities of 2CATPase are also conserved in coxsackie A virus 16 (CAV16, another important enterovirus. Altogether, our findings are the first to demonstrate the RNA helicase and chaperoning activities associated with enterovirus 2CATPase, and our study provides both in vitro and cellular evidence for their potential roles during viral RNA replication. These findings

  20. Electronic thermometry in tunable tunnel junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-03-15

    A tunable tunnel junction thermometry circuit includes a variable width tunnel junction between a test object and a probe. The junction width is varied and a change in thermovoltage across the junction with respect to the change in distance across the junction is determined. Also, a change in biased current with respect to a change in distance across the junction is determined. A temperature gradient across the junction is determined based on a mathematical relationship between the temperature gradient, the change in thermovoltage with respect to distance and the change in biased current with respect to distance. Thermovoltage may be measured by nullifying a thermoelectric tunneling current with an applied voltage supply level. A piezoelectric actuator may modulate the probe, and thus the junction width, to vary thermovoltage and biased current across the junction. Lock-in amplifiers measure the derivatives of the thermovoltage and biased current modulated by varying junction width.

  1. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  2. Octagonal Defects at Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskólski, W.; Pelc, M.; Chico, Leonor; Ayuela, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate knee-shaped junctions of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes. Two dissimilar octagons appear at such junctions; one of them can reconstruct into a pair of pentagons. The junction with two octagons presents two degenerate localized states at Fermi energy (EF). The reconstructed junction has only one state near EF, indicating that these localized states are related to the octagonal defects. The inclusion of Coulomb interaction splits the localized states in the junction with two octagons, yielding an antiferromagnetic system. PMID:24089604

  3. Drosophila PATJ supports adherens junction stability by modulating Myosin light chain activity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sen, Arnab; Nagy-Zsvér-Vadas, Zsanett; Krahn, Michael P

    2012-01-01

    ... (Pals1-associated tight junction protein) was not per se crucial for the maintenance of apical-basal polarity in Drosophila melanogaster epithelial cells but rather regulated Myosin localization and phosphorylation...

  4. Paracellin-1, a renal tight junction protein required for paracellular Mg2+ resorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, DB; Lu, Y; Choate, KA; Velazquez, H; Al-Sabban, E; Praga, M; Casari, C; Bettinelli, A; Colussi, C; Rodriguez-Soriano, J; McCredie, D; Milford, D; Sanjad, S; Lifton, RP

    1999-01-01

    Epithelia permit selective and regulated flux from apical to basolateral surfaces by transcellular passage through cells or paracellular flux between cells. Tight junctions constitute the barrier to paracellular conductance; however, Little is known about the specific molecules that mediate paracell

  5. Genome-wide comparative in silico analysis of the RNA helicase gene family in Zea mays and Glycine max: a comparison with Arabidopsis and Oryza sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ruirui; Zhang, Shizhong; Huang, Jinguang; Zheng, Chengchao

    2013-01-01

    RNA helicases are enzymes that are thought to unwind double-stranded RNA molecules in an energy-dependent fashion through the hydrolysis of NTP. RNA helicases are associated with all processes involving RNA molecules, including nuclear transcription, editing, splicing, ribosome biogenesis, RNA export, and organelle gene expression. The involvement of RNA helicase in response to stress and in plant growth and development has been reported previously. While their importance in Arabidopsis and Oryza sativa has been partially studied, the function of RNA helicase proteins is poorly understood in Zea mays and Glycine max. In this study, we identified a total of RNA helicase genes in Arabidopsis and other crop species genome by genome-wide comparative in silico analysis. We classified the RNA helicase genes into three subfamilies according to the structural features of the motif II region, such as DEAD-box, DEAH-box and DExD/H-box, and different species showed different patterns of alternative splicing. Secondly, chromosome location analysis showed that the RNA helicase protein genes were distributed across all chromosomes with different densities in the four species. Thirdly, phylogenetic tree analyses identified the relevant homologs of DEAD-box, DEAH-box and DExD/H-box RNA helicase proteins in each of the four species. Fourthly, microarray expression data showed that many of these predicted RNA helicase genes were expressed in different developmental stages and different tissues under normal growth conditions. Finally, real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that the expression levels of 10 genes in Arabidopsis and 13 genes in Zea mays were in close agreement with the microarray expression data. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a comparative genome-wide analysis of the RNA helicase gene family in Arabidopsis, Oryza sativa, Zea mays and Glycine max. This study provides valuable information for understanding the classification and putative functions of

  6. Endocytosis and Recycling of Tight Junction Proteins in Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Utech

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A critical function of the epithelial lining is to form a barrier that separates luminal contents from the underlying interstitium. This barrier function is primarily regulated by the apical junctional complex (AJC consisting of tight junctions (TJs and adherens junctions (AJs and is compromised under inflammatory conditions. In intestinal epithelial cells, proinflammatory cytokines, for example, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, induce internalization of TJ proteins by endocytosis. Endocytosed TJ proteins are passed into early and recycling endosomes, suggesting the involvement of recycling of internalized TJ proteins. This review summarizes mechanisms by which TJ proteins under inflammatory conditions are internalized in intestinal epithelial cells and point out comparable mechanism in nonintestinal epithelial cells.

  7. Gap junction modulation by extracellular signaling molecules: the thymus model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves L.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Gap junctions are intercellular channels which connect adjacent cells and allow direct exchange of molecules of low molecular weight between them. Such a communication has been described as fundamental in many systems due to its importance in coordination, proliferation and differentiation. Recently, it has been shown that gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC can be modulated by several extracellular soluble factors such as classical hormones, neurotransmitters, interleukins, growth factors and some paracrine substances. Herein, we discuss some aspects of the general modulation of GJIC by extracellular messenger molecules and more particularly the regulation of such communication in the thymus gland. Additionally, we discuss recent data concerning the study of different neuropeptides and hormones in the modulation of GJIC in thymic epithelial cells. We also suggest that the thymus may be viewed as a model to study the modulation of gap junction communication by different extracellular messengers involved in non-classical circuits, since this organ is under bidirectional neuroimmunoendocrine control.

  8. Modelling of Dual-Junction Solar Cells including Tunnel Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelaziz Amine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Monolithically stacked multijunction solar cells based on III–V semiconductors materials are the state-of-art of approach for high efficiency photovoltaic energy conversion, in particular for space applications. The individual subcells of the multi-junction structure are interconnected via tunnel diodes which must be optically transparent and connect the component cells with a minimum electrical resistance. The quality of these diodes determines the output performance of the solar cell. The purpose of this work is to contribute to the investigation of the tunnel electrical resistance of such a multi-junction cell through the analysis of the current-voltage (J-V characteristics under illumination. Our approach is based on an equivalent circuit model of a diode for each subcell. We examine the effect of tunnel resistance on the performance of a multi-junction cell using minimization of the least squares technique.

  9. Testicular cell junction: a novel target for male contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nikki P Y; Wong, Elissa W P; Mruk, Dolores D; Cheng, C Yan

    2009-01-01

    Even though various contraceptive methods are widely available, the number of unwanted pregnancies is still on the rise in developing countries, pressurizing the already resource limited nations. One of the major underlying reasons is the lack of effective, low cost, and safe contraceptives for couples. During the past decade, some studies were performed using animal models to decipher if the Sertoli-germ cell junction in the testis is a target for male fertility regulation. Some of these study models were based on the use of hormones and/or chemicals to disrupt the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis (e.g., androgen-based implants or pills) and others utilized a panel of chemical entities or synthetic peptides to perturb spermatogenesis either reversibly or non-reversibly. Among them, adjudin, a potential male contraceptive, is one of the compounds exerting its action on the unique adherens junctions, known as ectoplasmic specializations, in the testis. Since the testis is equipped with inter-connected cell junctions, an initial targeting of one junction type may affect the others and these accumulative effects could lead to spermatogenic arrest. This review attempts to cover an innovative theme on how male infertility can be achieved by inducing junction instability and defects in the testis, opening a new window of research for male contraceptive development. While it will still take much time and effort of intensive investigation before a product can reach the consumable market, these findings have provided hope for better family planning involving men.

  10. Gap junctions in the control of vascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Xavier F; Duling, Brian R

    2009-02-01

    Direct intercellular communication via gap junctions is critical in the control and coordination of vascular function. In the cardiovascular system, gap junctions are made up of one or more of four connexin proteins: Cx37, Cx40, Cx43, and Cx45. The expression of more than one gap-junction protein in the vasculature is not redundant. Rather, vascular connexins work in concert, first during the development of the cardiovascular system, and then in integrating smooth muscle and endothelial cell function, and in coordinating cell function along the length of the vessel wall. In addition, connexin-based channels have emerged as an important signaling pathway in the astrocyte-mediated neurovascular coupling. Direct electrical communication between endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells via gap junctions is thought to play a relevant role in the control of vasomotor tone, providing the signaling pathway known as endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). Consistent with the importance of gap junctions in the regulation of vasomotor tone and arterial blood pressure, the expression of connexins is altered in diseases associated with vascular complications. In this review, we discuss the participation of connexin-based channels in the control of vascular function in physiologic and pathologic conditions, with a special emphasis on hypertension and diabetes.

  11. Flocculation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by RNA/DNA helicase Sen1p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vikash; Azad, Gajendra Kumar; Sariki, Santhosh Kumar; Tomar, Raghuvir S

    2015-10-07

    The Nrd1-Nab3-Sen1 (NNS) complex terminates transcription of non-coding RNA genes and mediates degradation of the produced transcript by the nuclear exosome. The NNS complex also represses some stress response genes, by stimulating premature termination. A well-characterized stress response in yeast is flocculation, where cells aggregate to form flocs under expression of lectin-encoding genes designated as FLOs. In this study, we demonstrated the role of the NNS complex and Rrp6p in the expression of flocculation genes: FLO1, FLO5, FLO9, and FLO10. Furthermore, a deletion mutant of the RNA processing machinery (RNT1), and SEN1 mutants that are unable to interact with Rnt1p, exhibit a flocculation phenotype. In summary, we have identified a cooperative role of Rnt1p, Rrp6p and the NNS complex in the repression of FLO genes.

  12. Pea p68, a DEAD-box helicase, provides salinity stress tolerance in transgenic tobacco by reducing oxidative stress and improving photosynthesis machinery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Tuteja

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The DEAD-box helicases are required mostly in all aspects of RNA and DNA metabolism and they play a significant role in various abiotic stresses, including salinity. The p68 is an important member of the DEAD-box proteins family and, in animal system, it is involved in RNA metabolism including pre-RNA processing and splicing. In plant system, it has not been well characterized. Here we report the cloning and characterization of p68 from pea (Pisum sativum and its novel function in salinity stress tolerance in plant. RESULTS: The pea p68 protein self-interacts and is localized in the cytosol as well as the surrounding of cell nucleus. The transcript of pea p68 is upregulated in response to high salinity stress in pea. Overexpression of p68 driven by constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus-35S promoter in tobacco transgenic plants confers enhanced tolerances to salinity stress by improving the growth, photosynthesis and antioxidant machinery. Under stress treatment, pea p68 overexpressing tobacco accumulated higher K+ and lower Na+ level than the wild-type plants. Reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation was remarkably regulated by the overexpression of pea p68 under salinity stress conditions, as shown from TBARS content, electrolyte leakage, hydrogen peroxide accumulation and 8-OHdG content and antioxidant enzyme activities. CONCLUSIONS: To the best of our knowledge this is the first direct report, which provides the novel function of pea p68 helicase in salinity stress tolerance. The results suggest that p68 can also be exploited for engineering abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants of economic importance.

  13. Sgs1's roles in DNA end resection, HJ dissolution, and crossover suppression require a two-step SUMO regulation dependent on Smc5/6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez-López, Marcelino; Villoria, María Teresa; Esteras, Miguel; Jarmuz, Adam; Torres-Rosell, Jordi; Clemente-Blanco, Andres; Aragon, Luis

    2016-06-01

    The RecQ helicase Sgs1 plays critical roles during DNA repair by homologous recombination, from end resection to Holliday junction (HJ) dissolution. Sgs1 has both pro- and anti-recombinogenic roles, and therefore its activity must be tightly regulated. However, the controls involved in recruitment and activation of Sgs1 at damaged sites are unknown. Here we show a two-step role for Smc5/6 in recruiting and activating Sgs1 through SUMOylation. First, auto-SUMOylation of Smc5/6 subunits leads to recruitment of Sgs1 as part of the STR (Sgs1-Top3-Rmi1) complex, mediated by two SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs) on Sgs1 that specifically recognize SUMOylated Smc5/6. Second, Smc5/6-dependent SUMOylation of Sgs1 and Top3 is required for the efficient function of STR. Sgs1 mutants impaired in recognition of SUMOylated Smc5/6 (sgs1-SIMΔ) or SUMO-dead alleles (sgs1-KR) exhibit unprocessed HJs at damaged replication forks, increased crossover frequencies during double-strand break repair, and severe impairment in DNA end resection. Smc5/6 is a key regulator of Sgs1's recombination functions.

  14. The helicase and ATPase activities of RECQL4 are compromised by mutations reported in three human patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Borch; Dunn, Christopher A; Keijzers, Guido

    2012-01-01

    RECQL4 is one of five members of the human RecQ helicase family, and is implicated in three syndromes displaying accelerating aging, developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to cancer. In this study, we purified three variants of RECQL4 carrying previously reported patient mutations....... These three mutant proteins were analyzed for the known biochemical activities of RECQL4: DNA binding, unwinding of duplex DNA, ATP hydrolysis and annealing of simplex DNA. Further, the mutant proteins were evaluated for stability and recruitment to sites of laser-induced DNA damage. One mutant was helicase...... a consistent pattern of functional deficiency and provide further support for a helicase-dependent cellular function of RECQL4 in addition to its N-terminus-dependent role in initiation of replication, a function that may underlie the phenotype of RECQL4-linked disease....

  15. Structure of the gap junction channel and its implications for its biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Shoji; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2011-04-01

    Gap junctions consist of arrays of intercellular channels composed of integral membrane proteins called connexin in vertebrates. Gap junction channels regulate the passage of ions and biological molecules between adjacent cells and, therefore, are critically important in many biological activities, including development, differentiation, neural activity, and immune response. Mutations in connexin genes are associated with several human diseases, such as neurodegenerative disease, skin disease, deafness, and developmental abnormalities. The activity of gap junction channels is regulated by the membrane voltage, intracellular microenvironment, interaction with other proteins, and phosphorylation. Each connexin channel has its own property for conductance and molecular permeability. A number of studies have tried to reveal the molecular architecture of the channel pore that should confer the connexin-specific permeability/selectivity properties and molecular basis for the gating and regulation. In this review, we give an overview of structural studies and describe the structural and functional relationship of gap junction channels.

  16. Mutational analysis of an archaeal minichromosome maintenance protein exterior hairpin reveals critical residues for helicase activity and DNA binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brewster Aaron S

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mini-chromosome maintenance protein (MCM complex is an essential replicative helicase for DNA replication in Archaea and Eukaryotes. While the eukaryotic complex consists of six homologous proteins (MCM2-7, the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus has only one MCM protein (ssoMCM, six subunits of which form a homohexamer. We have recently reported a 4.35Å crystal structure of the near full-length ssoMCM. The structure reveals a total of four β-hairpins per subunit, three of which are located within the main channel or side channels of the ssoMCM hexamer model generated based on the symmetry of the N-terminal Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (mtMCM structure. The fourth β-hairpin, however, is located on the exterior of the hexamer, near the exit of the putative side channels and next to the ATP binding pocket. Results In order to better understand this hairpin's role in DNA binding and helicase activity, we performed a detailed mutational and biochemical analysis of nine residues on this exterior β-hairpin (EXT-hp. We examined the activities of the mutants related to their helicase function, including hexamerization, ATPase, DNA binding and helicase activities. The assays showed that some of the residues on this EXT-hp play a role for DNA binding as well as for helicase activity. Conclusions These results implicate several current theories regarding helicase activity by this critical hexameric enzyme. As the data suggest that EXT-hp is involved in DNA binding, the results reported here imply that the EXT-hp located near the exterior exit of the side channels may play a role in contacting DNA substrate in a manner that affects DNA unwinding.

  17. The Q Motif Is Involved in DNA Binding but Not ATP Binding in ChlR1 Helicase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Ding

    Full Text Available Helicases are molecular motors that couple the energy of ATP hydrolysis to the unwinding of structured DNA or RNA and chromatin remodeling. The conversion of energy derived from ATP hydrolysis into unwinding and remodeling is coordinated by seven sequence motifs (I, Ia, II, III, IV, V, and VI. The Q motif, consisting of nine amino acids (GFXXPXPIQ with an invariant glutamine (Q residue, has been identified in some, but not all helicases. Compared to the seven well-recognized conserved helicase motifs, the role of the Q motif is less acknowledged. Mutations in the human ChlR1 (DDX11 gene are associated with a unique genetic disorder known as Warsaw Breakage Syndrome, which is characterized by cellular defects in genome maintenance. To examine the roles of the Q motif in ChlR1 helicase, we performed site directed mutagenesis of glutamine to alanine at residue 23 in the Q motif of ChlR1. ChlR1 recombinant protein was overexpressed and purified from HEK293T cells. ChlR1-Q23A mutant abolished the helicase activity of ChlR1 and displayed reduced DNA binding ability. The mutant showed impaired ATPase activity but normal ATP binding. A thermal shift assay revealed that ChlR1-Q23A has a melting point value similar to ChlR1-WT. Partial proteolysis mapping demonstrated that ChlR1-WT and Q23A have a similar globular structure, although some subtle conformational differences in these two proteins are evident. Finally, we found ChlR1 exists and functions as a monomer in solution, which is different from FANCJ, in which the Q motif is involved in protein dimerization. Taken together, our results suggest that the Q motif is involved in DNA binding but not ATP binding in ChlR1 helicase.

  18. In vivo mapping of the functional regions of the DEAD-box helicase Vasa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnoush Dehghani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The maternally expressed Drosophila melanogaster DEAD-box helicase Vasa (Vas is necessary for many cellular and developmental processes, including specification of primordial germ cells (pole cells, posterior patterning of the embryo, piRNA-mediated repression of transposon-encoded mRNAs, translational activation of gurken (grk mRNA, and completion of oogenesis itself. Vas protein accumulates in the perinuclear nuage in nurse cells soon after their specification, and then at stage 10 Vas translocates to the posterior pole plasm of the oocyte. We produced a series of transgenic constructs encoding eGFP-Vas proteins carrying mutations affecting different regions of the protein, and analyzed in vivo which Vas functions each could support. We identified novel domains in the N- and C-terminal regions of the protein that are essential for localization, transposon repression, posterior patterning, and pole cell specification. One such functional region, the most C-terminal seven amino acids, is specific to Vas orthologues and is thus critical to distinguishing Vas from other closely related DEAD-box helicases. Surprisingly, we also found that many eGFP-Vas proteins carrying mutations that would be expected to abrogate DEAD-box helicase function localized to the nuage and posterior pole, and retained the capacity to support oogenesis, although they did not function in embryonic patterning, pole cell specification, grk activation, or transposon repression. We conclude from these experiments that Vas, a multifunctional protein, uses different domains and different molecular associations to carry out its various cellular and developmental roles.

  19. Two steps forward, one step back: determining XPD helicase mechanism by single-molecule fluorescence and high-resolution optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, Maria

    2014-08-01

    XPD-like helicases constitute a prominent DNA helicase family critical for many aspects of genome maintenance. These enzymes share a unique structural feature, an auxiliary domain stabilized by an iron-sulphur (FeS) cluster, and a 5'-3' polarity of DNA translocation and duplex unwinding. Biochemical analyses alongside two single-molecule approaches, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and high-resolution optical tweezers, have shown how the unique structural features of XPD helicase and its specific patterns of substrate interactions tune the helicase for its specific cellular function and shape its molecular mechanism. The FeS domain forms a duplex separation wedge and contributes to an extended DNA binding site. Interactions within this site position the helicase in an orientation to unwind the duplex, control the helicase rate, and verify the integrity of the translocating strand. Consistent with its cellular role, processivity of XPD is limited and is defined by an idiosyncratic stepping kinetics. DNA duplex separation occurs in single base pair steps punctuated by frequent backward steps and conformational rearrangements of the protein-DNA complex. As such, the helicase in isolation mainly stabilizes spontaneous base pair opening and exhibits a limited ability to unwind stable DNA duplexes. The presence of a cognate ssDNA binding protein converts XPD into a vigorous helicase by destabilizing the upstream dsDNA as well as by trapping the unwound strands. Remarkably, the two proteins can co-exist on the same DNA strand without competing for binding. The current model of the XPD unwinding mechanism will be discussed along with possible modifications to this mechanism by the helicase interacting partners and unique features of such bio-medically important XPD-like helicases as FANCJ (BACH1), RTEL1 and CHLR1 (DDX11). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Bloom Helicase and DNA Topoisomerase IIIα Are Involved in the Dissolution of Sister Chromatids

    OpenAIRE

    Seki, Masayuki; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Seki, Takahiko; Kato, Genta; Tada, Shusuke; TAKAHASHI, Yuriko; Yoshimura, Akari; Kobayashi, Takayuki; Aoki, Ayako; Otsuki, Makoto; Felix A Habermann; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Ishii, Yutaka; Enomoto, Takemi

    2006-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is an autosomal disorder characterized by predisposition to a wide variety of cancers. The gene product whose mutation leads to BS is the RecQ family helicase BLM, which forms a complex with DNA topoisomerase IIIα (Top3α). However, the physiological relevance of the interaction between BLM and Top3α within the cell remains unclear. We show here that Top3α depletion causes accumulation of cells in G2 phase, enlargement of nuclei, and chromosome gaps and breaks that occur ...

  1. The RNA Helicase eIF4A Is Required for Sapovirus Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosmillo, Myra; Sweeney, Trevor R; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Leen, Eoin; Curry, Stephen; Goodfellow, Ian; Cho, Kyoung-Oh

    2016-05-15

    The eukaryotic initiation factor 4A (eIF4A) is a DEAD box helicase that unwinds RNA structure in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of mRNAs. Here, we investigated the role of eIF4A in porcine sapovirus VPg-dependent translation. Using inhibitors and dominant-negative mutants, we found that eIF4A is required for viral translation and infectivity, suggesting that despite the presence of a very short 5' UTR, eIF4A is required to unwind RNA structure in the sapovirus genome to facilitate virus translation. Copyright © 2016 Hosmillo et al.

  2. DDX3 DEAD-Box RNA Helicase Is Required for Hepatitis C Virus RNA Replication▿

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    DDX3, a DEAD-box RNA helicase, binds to the hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. However, the role(s) of DDX3 in HCV replication is still not understood. Here we demonstrate that the accumulation of both genome-length HCV RNA (HCV-O, genotype 1b) and its replicon RNA were significantly suppressed in HuH-7-derived cells expressing short hairpin RNA targeted to DDX3 by lentivirus vector transduction. As well, RNA replication of JFH1 (genotype 2a) and release of the core into the culture supern...

  3. Human PIF1 helicase supports DNA replication and cell growth under oncogenic-stress

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Unwinding duplex DNA is a critical processing step during replication, repair and transcription. Pif1 are highly conserved non-processive 5′->3′ DNA helicases with well-established roles in maintenance of yeast genome stability. However, the function of the sole member of Pif1 family in humans remains unclear. Human PIF1 is essential for tumour cell viability, particularly during replication stress, but is dispensable in non-cancerous cells and Pif1 deficient mice. Here we report that suppres...

  4. Small molecule functional analogs of peptides that inhibit lambda site-specific recombination and bind Holliday junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjit, Dev K; Rideout, Marc C; Nefzi, Adel; Ostresh, John M; Pinilla, Clemencia; Segall, Anca M

    2010-08-01

    Our lab has isolated hexameric peptides that are structure-selective ligands of Holliday junctions (HJ), central intermediates of several DNA recombination reactions. One of the most potent of these inhibitors, WRWYCR, has shown antibacterial activity in part due to its inhibition of DNA repair proteins. To increase the therapeutic potential of these inhibitors, we searched for small molecule inhibitors with similar activities. We screened 11 small molecule libraries comprising over nine million individual compounds and identified a potent N-methyl aminocyclic thiourea inhibitor that also traps HJs formed during site-specific recombination reactions in vitro. This inhibitor binds specifically to protein-free HJs and can inhibit HJ resolution by RecG helicase, but only showed modest growth inhibition of bacterial with a hyperpermeable outer membrane; nonetheless, this is an important step in developing a functional analog of the peptide inhibitors. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute inactivation of the replicative helicase in human cells triggers MCM8-9-dependent DNA synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Nishimura, Kohei; Minocherhomji, Sheroy

    2017-01-01

    (DSBs). Remarkably, these cells maintain some DNA synthesis in the absence of MCM2, and this requires the MCM8-9 complex, a paralog of the MCM2-7 replicative helicase. We show that MCM8-9 functions in a homologous recombination-based pathway downstream from RAD51, which is promoted by DSB induction....... This RAD51/MCM8-9 axis is distinct from the recently described RAD52-dependent DNA synthesis pathway that operates in early mitosis at common fragile sites. We propose that stalled replication forks can be restarted in S phase via homologous recombination using MCM8-9 as an alternative replicative helicase....

  6. Chemical control over the energy-level alignment in a two-terminal junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Li; Franco, Carlos; Crivillers, Núria; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Cao, Liang; Sangeeth, C. S. Suchand; Rovira, Concepció; Veciana, Jaume; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-07-01

    The energy-level alignment of molecular transistors can be controlled by external gating to move molecular orbitals with respect to the Fermi levels of the source and drain electrodes. Two-terminal molecular tunnelling junctions, however, lack a gate electrode and suffer from Fermi-level pinning, making it difficult to control the energy-level alignment of the system. Here we report an enhancement of 2 orders of magnitude of the tunnelling current in a two-terminal junction via chemical molecular orbital control, changing chemically the molecular component between a stable radical and its non-radical form without altering the supramolecular structure of the junction. Our findings demonstrate that the energy-level alignment in self-assembled monolayer-based junctions can be regulated by purely chemical modifications, which seems an attractive alternative to control the electrical properties of two-terminal junctions.

  7. The role of gap junctions in inflammatory and neoplastic disorders (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Pui; Laxton, Victoria; Srivastava, Saurabh; Chan, Yin Wah Fiona; Tse, Gary

    2017-03-01

    Gap junctions are intercellular channels made of connexin proteins, mediating both electrical and biochemical signals between cells. The ability of gap junction proteins to regulate immune responses, cell proliferation, migration, apoptosis and carcinogenesis makes them attractive therapeutic targets for treating inflammatory and neoplastic disorders in different organ systems. Alterations in gap junction profile and expression levels are observed in hyperproliferative skin disorders, lymphatic vessel diseases, inflammatory lung diseases, liver injury and neoplastic disorders. It is now recognized that the therapeutic effects mediated by traditional pharmacological agents are dependent upon gap junction communication and may even act by influencing gap junction expression or function. Novel strategies for modulating the function or expression of connexins, such as the use of synthetic mimetic peptides and siRNA technology are considered.

  8. Control over Rectification in Supramolecular Tunneling Junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wimbush, K.S.; Wimbush, Kim S.; Reus, William F.; van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard; Reinhoudt, David; Whitesides, George M.; Nijhuis, C.A.; Velders, Aldrik

    2010-01-01

    In complete control: The magnitude of current rectification in well-defined supramolecular tunneling junctions can be controlled by changing the terminal functionality (red spheres) of dendrimers (gray spheres) immobilized on a supramolecular platform (see picture). Junctions containing biferrocene

  9. Nano-Molecular Junctions on STM Tips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Huang∗; Jianshu Yang

    2011-01-01

    We present a technique for building metal-organic-metal junctions, which contain ten or fewer conjugated molecules between each of such junction, and the investigations of the I-V response of these junctions. The junctions are made by self assembling thiolated molecules onto gold coated tips for use in scanning tunneling microscopy. We show that this easy technique probes the qualitative properties of the molecules. Current-voltage characteristics of a Tour wire and a new molecular rectifier are presented.

  10. Nano-Molecular Junctions on STM Tips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Huang; Jianshu Yang

    2011-01-01

    We present a technique for building metal-organic-metal junctions, which contain ten or fewer conjugated molecules between each of such junction, and the investigations of the I-V response of these junctions.The junctions are made by self assembling thiolated molecules onto gold coated tips for use in scanning tunneling microscopy. We show that this easy technique probes the qualitative properties of the molecules. Currentvoltage characteristics of a Tour wire and a new molecular rectifier are presented.

  11. Current noise in tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, Moritz; Grabert, Hermann [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Strasse 3, 79104, Freiburg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    We study current fluctuations in tunnel junctions driven by a voltage source. The voltage is applied to the tunneling element via an impedance providing an electromagnetic environment of the junction. We use circuit theory to relate the fluctuations of the current flowing in the leads of the junction with the voltage fluctuations generated by the environmental impedance and the fluctuations of the tunneling current. The spectrum of current fluctuations is found to consist of three parts: a term arising from the environmental Johnson-Nyquist noise, a term due to the shot noise of the tunneling current and a third term describing the cross-correlation between these two noise sources. Our phenomenological theory reproduces previous results based on the Hamiltonian model for the dynamical Coulomb blockade and provides a simple understanding of the current fluctuation spectrum in terms of circuit theory and properties of the average current. Specific results are given for a tunnel junction driven through a resonator. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Josephson tunnel junction microwave attenuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V. P.; Shitov, S. V.; Shchukin, A. V.

    1993-01-01

    A new element for superconducting electronic circuitry-a variable attenuator-has been proposed, designed, and successfully tested. The principle of operation is based on the change in the microwave impedance of a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Josephson tunnel junction when dc bias...

  13. Stability of large-area molecular junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Hylke B.; Kronemeijer, Auke J.; Harkema, Jan; van Hal, Paul A.; Smits, Edsger C. P.; de Leeuw, Dago M.; Blom, Paul W. M.

    The stability of molecular junctions is crucial for any application of molecular electronics. Degradation of molecular junctions when exposed to ambient conditions is regularly observed. In this report the stability of large-area molecular junctions under ambient conditions for more than two years

  14. Soliton bunching in annular Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vernik, I.V; Lazarides, Nickos; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    1996-01-01

    By studying soliton (fluxon) motion in long annular Josephson junctions it is possible to avoid the influence of the boundaries and soliton-soliton collisions present in linear junctions. A new experimental design consisting of a niobium coil placed on top of an annular junction has been used...

  15. Long Range Magnetic Interaction between Josephson Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    1995-01-01

    A new model for magnetic coupling between long Josephson junctions is proposed. The coupling mechanism is a result of the magnetic fields outside the junctions and is consequently effective over long distances between junctions. We give specific expressions for the form and magnitude of the inter...

  16. Dynamics of pi-junction interferometer circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornkev, V.K.; Mozhaev, P.B.; Borisenko, I.V.;

    2002-01-01

    The pi-junction superconducting circuit dynamics was studied by means of numerical simulation technique. Parallel arrays consisting of Josephson junctions of both 0- and pi-type were studied as a model of high-T-c grain-boundary Josephson junction. The array dynamics and the critical current...

  17. Dynamics of pi-junction interferometer circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornkev, V.K.; Mozhaev, P.B.; Borisenko, I.V.

    2002-01-01

    The pi-junction superconducting circuit dynamics was studied by means of numerical simulation technique. Parallel arrays consisting of Josephson junctions of both 0- and pi-type were studied as a model of high-T-c grain-boundary Josephson junction. The array dynamics and the critical current...

  18. Chloroplast- or Mitochondria-Targeted DEAD-Box RNA Helicases Play Essential Roles in Organellar RNA Metabolism and Abiotic Stress Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazala Nawaz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The yields and productivity of crops are greatly diminished by various abiotic stresses, including drought, cold, heat, and high salinity. Chloroplasts and mitochondria are cellular organelles that can sense diverse environmental stimuli and alter gene expression to cope with adverse environmental stresses. Organellar gene expression is mainly regulated at posttranscriptional levels, including RNA processing, intron splicing, RNA editing, RNA turnover, and translational control, during which a variety of nucleus-encoded RNA-binding proteins (RBPs are targeted to chloroplasts or mitochondria where they play essential roles in organellar RNA metabolism. DEAD-box RNA helicases (RHs are enzymes that can alter RNA structures and affect RNA metabolism in all living organisms. Although a number of DEAD-box RHs have been found to play important roles in RNA metabolism in the nucleus and cytoplasm, our understanding on the roles of DEAD-box RHs in the regulation of RNA metabolism in chloroplasts and mitochondria is only at the beginning. Considering that organellar RNA metabolism and gene expression are tightly regulated by anterograde signaling from the nucleus, it is imperative to determine the functions of nucleus-encoded organellar RBPs. In this review, we summarize the emerging roles of nucleus-encoded chloroplast- or mitochondria-targeted DEAD-box RHs in organellar RNA metabolism and plant response to diverse abiotic stresses.

  19. Roles of gap junctions, connexins and pannexins in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanthini eMylvaganam

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced gap junctional communication (GJC between neurons is considered a major factor underlying the neuronal synchrony driving seizure activity. In addition, the hippocampal sharp wave ripple complexes, associated with learning and seizures, are diminished by GJC blocking agents. Although gap junctional blocking drugs inhibit experimental seizures, they all have other nonspecific actions. Besides interneuronal GJC between dendrites, inter-axonal and inter-glial GJC is also considered important for seizure generation. Interestingly, in most studies of cerebral tissue from animal seizure models and from human patients with epilepsy, there is up-regulation of glial, but not neuronal gap junctional mRNA and protein. Significant changes in the expression and post-translational modification of the astrocytic connexin Cx43, and Panx1 were observed in an in vitro Co++ seizure model, further supporting a role for glia in seizure-genesis, although the reasons for this remain unclear. Further suggesting an involvement of astrocytic GJC in epilepsy, is the fact that the expression of astrocytic Cx mRNAs (Cxs 30 and 43 is several fold higher than that of neuronal Cx mRNAs (Cxs 36 and 45, and the number of glial cells outnumber neuronal cells in mammalian hippocampal and cortical tissue. Pannexin expression is also increased in both animal and human epileptic tissues. Specific Cx43 mimetic peptides, Gap 27 and SLS, inhibit the docking of astrocytic connexin Cx43 proteins from forming intercellular gap junctions, diminishing spontaneous seizures. Besides GJs, Cx membrane hemichannels in glia and Panx membrane channels in neurons and glia are also inhibited by gap junctional pharmacological blockers. Although there is no doubt that connexin-based gap junctions and hemichannels, and pannexin-based membrane channels are related to epilepsy, the specific details of how they are involved and how we can modulate their function for therapeutic purposes remain to

  20. Enhancement of microhomology-mediated genomic rearrangements by transient loss of mouse Bloom syndrome helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanishi, Ayako; Yusa, Kosuke; Horie, Kyoji; Tokunaga, Masahiro; Kusano, Kohji; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji

    2013-09-01

    Bloom syndrome, an autosomal recessive disorder of the BLM gene, confers predisposition to a broad spectrum of early-onset cancers in multiple tissue types. Loss of genomic integrity is a primary hallmark of such human malignancies, but many studies using disease-affected specimens are limited in that they are retrospective and devoid of an appropriate experimental control. To overcome this, we devised an experimental system to recapitulate the early molecular events in genetically engineered mouse embryonic stem cells, in which cells undergoing loss of heterozygosity (LOH) can be enriched after inducible down-regulation of Blm expression, with or without site-directed DNA double-strand break (DSB) induction. Transient loss of BLM increased the rate of LOH, whose breakpoints were distributed along the chromosome. Combined with site-directed DSB induction, loss of BLM synergistically increased the rate of LOH and concentrated the breakpoints around the targeted chromosomal region. We characterized the LOH events using specifically tailored genomic tools, such as high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization and high-density single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping, revealing that the combination of BLM suppression and DSB induction enhanced genomic rearrangements, including deletions and insertions, whose breakpoints were clustered in genomic inverted repeats and associated with junctional microhomologies. Our experimental approach successfully uncovered the detailed molecular mechanisms of as-yet-uncharacterized loss of heterozygosities and reveals the significant contribution of microhomology-mediated genomic rearrangements, which could be widely applicable to the early steps of cancer formation in general.

  1. Actin-interacting protein 1 controls assembly and permeability of intestinal epithelial apical junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Susana; Baranwal, Somesh; Ivanov, Andrei I

    2015-05-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and tight junctions (TJs) are crucial regulators of the integrity and restitution of the intestinal epithelial barrier. The structure and function of epithelial junctions depend on their association with the cortical actin cytoskeleton that, in polarized epithelial cells, is represented by a prominent perijunctional actomyosin belt. The assembly and stability of the perijunctional cytoskeleton is controlled by constant turnover (disassembly and reassembly) of actin filaments. Actin-interacting protein (Aip) 1 is an emerging regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, playing a critical role in filament disassembly. In this study, we examined the roles of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of AJs and TJs in human intestinal epithelium. Aip1 was enriched at apical junctions in polarized human intestinal epithelial cells and normal mouse colonic mucosa. Knockdown of Aip1 by RNA interference increased the paracellular permeability of epithelial cell monolayers, decreased recruitment of AJ/TJ proteins to steady-state intercellular contacts, and attenuated junctional reassembly in a calcium-switch model. The observed defects of AJ/TJ structure and functions were accompanied by abnormal organization and dynamics of the perijunctional F-actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, loss of Aip1 impaired the apico-basal polarity of intestinal epithelial cell monolayers and inhibited formation of polarized epithelial cysts in 3-D Matrigel. Our findings demonstrate a previously unanticipated role of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of intestinal epithelial junctions and early steps of epithelial morphogenesis.

  2. Bloom syndrome helicase stimulates RAD51 DNA strand exchange activity through a novel mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugreev, Dmitry V; Mazina, Olga M; Mazin, Alexander V

    2009-09-25

    Loss or inactivation of BLM, a helicase of the RecQ family, causes Bloom syndrome, a genetic disorder with a strong predisposition to cancer. Although the precise function of BLM remains unknown, genetic data has implicated BLM in the process of genetic recombination and DNA repair. Previously, we demonstrated that BLM can disrupt the RAD51-single-stranded DNA filament that promotes the initial steps of homologous recombination. However, this disruption occurs only if RAD51 is present in an inactive ADP-bound form. Here, we investigate interactions of BLM with the active ATP-bound form of the RAD51-single-stranded DNA filament. Surprisingly, we found that BLM stimulates DNA strand exchange activity of RAD51. In contrast to the helicase activity of BLM, this stimulation does not require ATP hydrolysis. These data suggest a novel BLM function that is stimulation of the RAD51 DNA pairing. Our results demonstrate the important role of the RAD51 nucleoprotein filament conformation in stimulation of DNA pairing by BLM.

  3. Clinical features of Bloom syndrome and function of the causative gene, BLM helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Hideo; Kondo, Naomi

    2004-05-01

    Bloom syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by growth deficiency, unusual facies, sun-sensitive telangiectatic erythema, immunodeficiency and predisposition to cancer. The causative gene for Bloom syndrome is BLM, which encodes the BLM RecQ helicase homolog protein. The first part of this review describes a long-term follow-up study of two Bloom syndrome siblings. Subsequently, the focus is placed on the functional domains of BLM. Laboratory diagnosis of Bloom syndrome by detecting mutations in BLM is laborious and impractical, unless there are common mutations in a population. Immunoblot and immunohistochemical analyses for the detection of the BLM protein using a polyclonal BLM antibody, which are useful approaches for clinical diagnosis of Bloom syndrome, are also described. In addition, a useful adjunct for the diagnosis of Bloom syndrome in terms of the BLM function is investigated, since disease cells must have the defective BLM helicase function. This review also discusses the nuclear localization signal of BLM, the proteins that interact with BLM and tumors originating from Bloom syndrome.

  4. Requirement of DDX3 DEAD box RNA helicase for HIV-1 Rev-RRE export function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedavalli, Venkat S R K; Neuveut, Christine; Chi, Ya-Hui; Kleiman, Lawrence; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2004-10-29

    A single transcript in its unspliced and spliced forms directs the synthesis of all HIV-1 proteins. Although nuclear export of intron-containing cellular transcripts is restricted in mammalian cells, HIV-1 has evolved the viral Rev protein to overcome this restriction for viral transcripts. Previously, CRM1 was identified as a cellular cofactor for Rev-dependent export of intron-containing HIV-1 RNA. Here, we present evidence that Rev/CRM1 activity utilizes the ATP-dependent DEAD box RNA helicase, DDX3. We show that DDX3 is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein, which binds CRM1 and localizes to nuclear membrane pores. Knockdown of DDX3 using either antisense vector or dominant-negative mutants suppressed Rev-RRE-function in the export of incompletely spliced HIV-1 RNAs. Plausibly, DDX3 is the human RNA helicase which functions in the CRM1 RNA export pathway analogously to the postulated role for Dbp5p in yeast mRNA export.

  5. Structural basis for targeting of human RNA helicase DDX3 by poxvirus protein K7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Shun-Ichiro; Schröder, Martina; Khan, Amir R

    2009-11-11

    Poxviruses are DNA viruses that express numerous proteins to subvert the host immune response. Vaccinia virus protein K7 adopts a Bcl-2 fold and displays structural and functional similarities to Toll-like receptor antagonist A52. Both proteins interact with IRAK2 and TRAF6 and suppress TLR-dependent NF-kappaB activation. However, unlike A52, K7 also forms a complex with RNA helicase DDX3 and antagonizes interferon-beta promoter induction. We have narrowed the K7 binding site to an N-terminal peptide motif of DDX3 ahead of its core RNA-helicase domains. The crystal structure of full-length K7 in complex with the DDX3 peptide reveals a thumblike projection of tandem phenalyalanine residues of DDX3 into a deep hydrophobic cleft. Mutagenesis of these phenylalanines abolishes the effects of DDX3 on interferon-beta promoter induction. The structure of K7-DDX3 reveals a novel binding mode by a viral Bcl-2 protein that antagonizes a key pathway in innate immunity.

  6. Homology Model-Based Virtual Screening for the Identification of Human Helicase DDX3 Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazi, Roberta; Tintori, Cristina; Brai, Annalaura; Botta, Lorenzo; Selvaraj, Manikandan; Garbelli, Anna; Maga, Giovanni; Botta, Maurizio

    2015-11-23

    Targeting cellular cofactors instead of viral enzymes represents a new strategy to combat infectious diseases, which should help to overcome the problem of viral resistance. Recently, it has been revealed that the cellular ATPase/RNA helicase X-linked DEAD-box polypeptide 3 (DDX3) is an essential host factor for the replication of several viruses such as HIV, HCV, JEV, Dengue, and West Nile. Accordingly, a drug targeting DDX3 could theoretically inhibit all viruses that are dependent on this host factor. Herein, for the first time, a model of hDDX3 in its closed conformation, which binds the viral RNA was developed by using the homology module of Prime through the Maestro interface of Schrodinger. Next, a structure-based virtual screening protocol was applied to identify DDX3 small molecule inhibitors targeting the RNA binding pocket. As a result, an impressive hit rate of 40% was obtained with the identification of 10 active compounds out of the 25 tested small molecules. The best poses of the active ligands highlighted the crucial residues to be targeted for the inhibition of the helicase activity of DDX3. The obtained results confirm the reliability of the constructed DDX3/RNA model and the proposed computational strategy for investigating novel DDX3 inhibitors.

  7. Real-time electrochemical monitoring of isothermal helicase-dependent amplification of nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivlehan, Francine; Mavré, François; Talini, Luc; Limoges, Benoît; Marchal, Damien

    2011-09-21

    We described an electrochemical method to monitor in real-time the isothermal helicase-dependent amplification of nucleic acids. The principle of detection is simple and well-adapted to the development of portable, easy-to-use and inexpensive nucleic acids detection technologies. It consists of monitoring a decrease in the electrochemical current response of a reporter DNA intercalating redox probe during the isothermal DNA amplification. The method offers the possibility to quantitatively analyze target nucleic acids in less than one hour at a single constant temperature, and to perform at the end of the isothermal amplification a DNA melt curve analysis for differentiating between specific and non-specific amplifications. To illustrate the potentialities of this approach for the development of a simple, robust and low-cost instrument with high throughput capability, the method was validated with an electrochemical system capable of monitoring up to 48 real-time isothermal HDA reactions simultaneously in a disposable microplate consisting of 48-electrochemical microwells. Results obtained with this approach are comparable to that obtained with a well-established but more sophisticated and expensive fluorescence-based method. This makes for a promising alternative detection method not only for real-time isothermal helicase-dependent amplification of nucleic acid, but also for other isothermal DNA amplification strategies.

  8. CTXφ Replication Depends on the Histone-Like HU Protein and the UvrD Helicase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriel Martínez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Vibrio cholerae bacterium is the agent of cholera. The capacity to produce the cholera toxin, which is responsible for the deadly diarrhea associated with cholera epidemics, is encoded in the genome of a filamentous phage, CTXφ. Rolling-circle replication (RCR is central to the life cycle of CTXφ because amplification of the phage genome permits its efficient integration into the genome and its packaging into new viral particles. A single phage-encoded HUH endonuclease initiates RCR of the proto-typical filamentous phages of enterobacteriaceae by introducing a nick at a specific position of the double stranded DNA form of the phage genome. The rest of the process is driven by host factors that are either essential or crucial for the replication of the host genome, such as the Rep SF1 helicase. In contrast, we show here that the histone-like HU protein of V. cholerae is necessary for the introduction of a nick by the HUH endonuclease of CTXφ. We further show that CTXφ RCR depends on a SF1 helicase normally implicated in DNA repair, UvrD, rather than Rep. In addition to CTXφ, we show that VGJφ, a representative member of a second family of vibrio integrative filamentous phages, requires UvrD and HU for RCR while TLCφ, a satellite phage, depends on Rep and is independent from HU.

  9. Somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes is independent of the Bloom's syndrome DNA helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, S Z; Liu, Y; German, J; Green, N S

    1998-05-01

    Immunoglobulin gene somatic mutation leads to antibody affinity maturation through the introduction of multiple point mutations in the antigen binding site. No genes have as yet been identified that participate in this process. Bloom's syndrome (BS) is a chromosomal breakage disorder with a mutator phenotype. Most affected individuals exhibit an immunodeficiency of undetermined aetiology. The gene for this disorder, BLM, has recently been identified as a DNA helicase. If this gene were to play a role in immunoglobulin mutation, then people with BS may lack normally mutated antibodies. Since germ-line, non-mutated immunoglobulin genes generally produce low affinity antibodies, impaired helicase activity might be manifested as the immunodeficiency found in BS. Therefore, we asked whether BLM is specifically involved in immunoglobulin hypermutation. Sequences of immunoglobulin variable (V) regions were analysed from small unsorted blood samples obtained from BS individuals and compared with germ-line sequences. BS V regions displayed the normal distribution of mutations, indicating that the defect in BS is not related to the mechanism of somatic mutation. These data strongly argue against BLM being involved in this process. The genetic approach to identifying the genes involved in immunoglobulin mutation will require further studies of DNA repair- and immunodeficient individuals.

  10. Octagonal Defects at Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Jaskólski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate knee-shaped junctions of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes. Two dissimilar octagons appear at such junctions; one of them can reconstruct into a pair of pentagons. The junction with two octagons presents two degenerate localized states at Fermi energy (EF. The reconstructed junction has only one state near EF, indicating that these localized states are related to the octagonal defects. The inclusion of Coulomb interaction splits the localized states in the junction with two octagons, yielding an antiferromagnetic system.

  11. Fabrication of high quality ferromagnetic Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weides, M. [Institute for Solid State Research, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany) and CNI-Center of Nanoelectronic Systems for Information Technology, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)]. E-mail: m.weides@fz-juelich.de; Tillmann, K. [Institute for Solid State Research, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Kohlstedt, H. [Institute for Solid State Research, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); CNI-Center of Nanoelectronic Systems for Information Technology, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Department of Material Science and Engineering and Department of Physics, University of Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    We present ferromagnetic Nb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ni{sub 60}Cu{sub 40}/Nb Josephson junctions (SIFS) with an ultrathin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tunnel barrier. The junction fabrication was optimized regarding junction insulation and homogeneity of current transport. Using ion-beam-etching and anodic oxidation we defined and insulated the junction mesas. The additional 2 nm thin Cu-layer below the ferromagnetic NiCu (SINFS) lowered interface roughness and ensured very homogeneous current transport. A high yield of junctional devices with j {sub c} spreads less than 2% was obtained.

  12. Conserved helicase domain of human RecQ4 is required for strand annealing-independent DNA unwinding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, Marie L; Ghosh, Avik K; Kulikowicz, Tomasz;

    2010-01-01

    provide the first evidence that human RecQ4's unwinding is independent of strand annealing, and that it does not require the presence of excess ssDNA. Moreover, we demonstrate that a point mutation of the conserved lysine in the Walker A motif abolished helicase activity, implying that not the N...

  13. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the DDX3 RNA helicase domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodamilans, Bernardo; Montoya, Guillermo

    2007-04-01

    DDX3 is a human RNA helicase that is involved in RNA processing and important human diseases. This enzyme belongs to the DEAD-box protein family, the members of which are characterized by the presence of nine conserved motifs including the Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp motif that defines the family. DDX3 has two distinct domains: an ATP-binding domain in the central region of the protein and a helicase domain in the carboxy-terminal region. The helicase domain of DDX3 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Crystallization experiments yielded crystals that were suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis. The final crystallization conditions were a reservoir solution consisting of 2 M ammonium sulfate, 0.1 M imidazole pH 6.4 plus 5 mM spermine tetrahydrochloride and a protein solution containing 10 mM HEPES, 500 mM ammonium sulfate pH 8.0. The crystals of the helicase domain belong to the monoclinic space group P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 43.85, b = 60.72, c = 88.39 A, alpha = gamma = 90, beta = 101.02 degrees , and contained three molecules per asymmetric unit. These crystals diffracted to a resolution limit of 2.2 A using synchrotron radiation at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and the Swiss Light Source (SLS).

  14. Residues in the central β-hairpin of the DNA helicase of bacteriophage T7 are important in DNA unwinding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Satapathy, Ajit K.; Kochaniak, Anna B.; Mukherjee, Sourav; Crampton, Donald J.; Oijen, Antoine van; Richardson, Charles C.

    2010-01-01

    The ring-shaped helicase of bacteriophage T7 (gp4), the product of gene 4, has basic β-hairpin loops lining its central core where they are postulated to be the major sites of DNA interaction. We have altered multiple residues within the β-hairpin loop to determine their role during dTTPase-driven

  15. Identification of myricetin and scutellarein as novel chemical inhibitors of the SARS coronavirus helicase, nsP13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mi-Sun; Lee, June; Lee, Jin Moo; Kim, Younggyu; Chin, Young-Won; Jee, Jun-Goo; Keum, Young-Sam; Jeong, Yong-Joo

    2012-06-15

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an infectious disease with a strong potential for transmission upon close personal contact and is caused by the SARS-coronavirus (CoV). However, there are no natural or synthetic compounds currently available that can inhibit SARS-CoV. We examined the inhibitory effects of 64 purified natural compounds against the activity of SARS helicase, nsP13, and the hepatitis C virus (HCV) helicase, NS3h, by conducting fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based double-strand (ds) DNA unwinding assay or by using a colorimetry-based ATP hydrolysis assay. While none of the compounds, examined in our study inhibited the DNA unwinding activity or ATPase activity of human HCV helicase protein, we found that myricetin and scutellarein potently inhibit the SARS-CoV helicase protein in vitro by affecting the ATPase activity, but not the unwinding activity, nsP13. In addition, we observed that myricetin and scutellarein did not exhibit cytotoxicity against normal breast epithelial MCF10A cells. Our study demonstrates for the first time that selected naturally-occurring flavonoids, including myricetin and scultellarein might serve as SARS-CoV chemical inhibitors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Yeast Mph1 helicase dissociates Rad51-made D-loops: implications for crossover control in mitotic recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Rohit; Satory, Dominik; Dray, Eloïse; Papusha, Almas; Scheller, Jürgen; Kramer, Wilfried; Krejci, Lumir; Klein, Hannah; Haber, James E; Sung, Patrick; Ira, Grzegorz

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotes possess mechanisms to limit crossing over during homologous recombination, thus avoiding possible chromosomal rearrangements. We show here that budding yeast Mph1, an ortholog of human FancM helicase, utilizes its helicase activity to suppress spontaneous unequal sister chromatid exchanges and DNA double-strand break-induced chromosome crossovers. Since the efficiency and kinetics of break repair are unaffected, Mph1 appears to channel repair intermediates into a noncrossover pathway. Importantly, Mph1 works independently of two other helicases-Srs2 and Sgs1-that also attenuate crossing over. By chromatin immunoprecipitation, we find targeting of Mph1 to double-strand breaks in cells. Purified Mph1 binds D-loop structures and is particularly adept at unwinding these structures. Importantly, Mph1, but not a helicase-defective variant, dissociates Rad51-made D-loops. Overall, the results from our analyses suggest a new role of Mph1 in promoting the noncrossover repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

  17. RecF recombination pathway in Escherichia coli cells lacking RecQ, UvrD and HelD helicases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buljubašić, Maja; Repar, Jelena; Zahradka, Ksenija; Dermić, Damir; Zahradka, Davor

    2012-04-01

    In recBCD sbcB sbcC(D) mutants of Escherichia coli homologous recombination proceeds via RecF pathway, which is thought to require RecQ, UvrD and HelD helicases at its initial stage. It was previously suggested that depletion of all three helicases totally abolishes the RecF pathway. The present study (re)examines the roles of these helicases in transductional recombination, and in recombinational repair of UV-induced DNA damage in the RecF pathway. The study has employed the ΔrecBCD ΔsbcB sbcC201 and ΔrecBCD sbcB15 sbcC201 strains, carrying combinations of mutations in recQ, uvrD, and helD genes. We show that in ΔrecBCD ΔsbcB sbcC201 strains, recombination requires exclusively the RecQ helicase. In ΔrecBCD sbcB15 sbcC201 strains, RecQ may be partially substituted by UvrD helicase. The HelD helicase is dispensable for recombination in both backgrounds. Our results also suggest that significant portion of recombination events in the RecF pathway is independent of RecQ, UvrD and HelD. These events are initiated either by RecJ nuclease alone or by RecJ nuclease associated with an unknown helicase. Inactivation of exonuclease VII by a xseA mutation further decreases the requirement for helicase activity in the RecF pathway. We suggest that elimination of nucleases acting on 3' single-strand DNA ends reduces the necessity for helicases in initiation of recombination.

  18. Transitions of protein traffic from cardiac ER to junctional SR

    OpenAIRE

    Sleiman, Naama H.; McFarland, Timothy P.; Jones, Larry R.; Cala, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    The junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (jSR) is an important and unique ER subdomain in the adult myocyte that concentrates resident proteins to regulate Ca2+ release. To investigate cellular mechanisms for sorting and trafficking proteins to jSR, we overexpressed canine forms of junctin (JCT) or triadin (TRD) in adult rat cardiomyocytes. Protein accumulation over time was visualized by confocal fluorescence microscopy using species-specific antibodies. Newly synthesized JCTdog and TRDdog appe...

  19. Selective permeability of gap junction channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Gary S; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter R

    2004-03-23

    Gap junctions mediate the transfer of small cytoplasmic molecules between adjacent cells. A family of gap junction proteins exist that form channels with unique properties, and differ in their ability to mediate the transfer of specific molecules. Mutations in a number of individual gap junction proteins, called connexins, cause specific human diseases. Therefore, it is important to understand how gap junctions selectively move molecules between cells. Rules that dictate the ability of a molecule to travel through gap junction channels are complex. In addition to molecular weight and size, the ability of a solute to transverse these channels depends on its net charge, shape, and interactions with specific connexins that constitute gap junctions in particular cells. This review presents some data and interpretations pertaining to mechanisms that govern the differential transfer of signals through gap junction channels.

  20. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2016-05-01

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron-phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

  1. Electron transport in molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Chengjun

    This thesis addresses the electron transport in molecular junctions, focusing on the energy level alignment and correlation effects. Various levels of theory have been applied to study the structural and electronic effects in different molecular junctions, starting from the single particle density...... charge position are in quantitative agreement with the experiments, while pure DFT is not. This is the consequence of the accurate energy level alignment, where the DFT+∑ method corrects the self-interaction error in the standard DFT functional and uses a static image charge model to include the image...... charge effect on the energy level renormalization. Additionally, the gating of the 4,4’-bipyridine (44BP) molecule contacted to either Ni or Au electrodes has been investigated. Here it is found that the gating mechanism is conceptually different between two cases. In the case of Ni contacts where...

  2. How coherent are Josephson junctions?

    CERN Document Server

    Paik, Hanhee; Bishop, Lev S; Kirchmair, G; Catelani, G; Sears, A P; Johnson, B R; Reagor, M J; Frunzio, L; Glazman, L; Schoelkopf, R J

    2011-01-01

    Attaining sufficient coherence is a requirement for realizing a large-scale quantum computer. We present a new implementation of a superconducting transmon qubit that is strongly coupled to a three-dimensional superconducting cavity. We observe a reproducible increase in the coherence times of qubit (both $T_1$ and $T_2$ > 10 microseconds) and cavity ($T_{cav}$ ~ 50 microseconds) by more than an order of magnitude compared to the current state-of-art superconducting qubits. This enables the study of the stability and quality of Josephson junctions at precisions exceeding one part per million. Surprisingly, we see no evidence for $1/f$ critical current noise. At elevated temperatures, we observe the dissipation due to a small density (< 1 - 10 ppm) of thermally-excited quasiparticles. The results suggest that the overall quality of Josephson junctions will allow error rates of a few $10^{-4}$, approaching the error correction threshold.

  3. Morphogenesis of rat myotendinous junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curzi, Davide; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Falcieri, Elisabetta; Burattini, Sabrina

    2013-10-01

    Myotendinous junction (MTJ) is the highly specialized complex which connects the skeletal muscle to the tendon for transmitting the contractile force between the two tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate the MTJ development and rat EDL was chosen as a model. 1, 15, 30 day animals were considered and the junctions were analyzed by light and electron microscopy. The MTJ interface architecture increased during the development, extending the interaction between muscle and tendon. 1-day-old rats showed disorganized myofibril bundles, spread cytosol and incomplete rough endoplasmic reticulum, features partially improved in 15-day-old rats, and completely developed in 30-day-old animals. These findings indicate that muscle-tendon interface displays, during rat lifetime, numerically increased and longer tendon interdigitations, correlated with an improved organization of both tissues and with a progressive acquirement of full functionality.

  4. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perroni, C. A.; Ninno, D.; Cataudella, V.

    2016-09-01

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron-vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions.

  5. Connexin 43 ubiquitination determines the fate of gap junctions: restrict to survive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Rodrigues, Teresa M; Catarino, Steve; Pinho, Maria J; Pereira, Paulo; Girao, Henrique

    2015-06-01

    Connexins (Cxs) are transmembrane proteins that form channels which allow direct intercellular communication (IC) between neighbouring cells via gap junctions. Mechanisms that modulate the amount of channels at the plasma membrane have emerged as important regulators of IC and their de-regulation has been associated with various diseases. Although Cx-mediated IC can be modulated by different mechanisms, ubiquitination has been described as one of the major post-translational modifications involved in Cx regulation and consequently IC. In this review, we focus on the role of ubiquitin and its effect on gap junction intercellular communication.

  6. Genotoxic stress inhibits Ewing sarcoma cell growth by modulating alternative pre-mRNA processing of the RNA helicase DHX9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidaleo, Marco; Svetoni, Francesca; Volpe, Elisabetta; Miñana, Belén; Caporossi, Daniela; Paronetto, Maria Paola

    2015-10-13

    Alternative splicing plays a key role in the DNA damage response and in cancer. Ewing Sarcomas (ES) are aggressive tumors caused by different chromosomal translocations that yield in-frame fusion proteins driving transformation. RNA profiling reveals genes differentially regulated by UV light irradiation in two ES cell lines exhibiting different sensitivity to genotoxic stress. In particular, irradiation induces a new isoform of the RNA helicase DHX9 in the more sensitive SK-N-MC cells, which is targeted to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), causing its downregulation. DHX9 protein forms a complex with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and EWS-FLI1 to enhance transcription. Silencing of DHX9 in ES cells sensitizes them to UV treatment and impairs recruitment of EWS-FLI1 to target genes, whereas DHX9 overexpression protects ES cells from genotoxic stress. Mechanistically, we found that UV light irradiation leads to enhanced phosphorylation and decreased processivity of RNAPII in SK-N-MC cells, which in turn causes inclusion of DHX9 exon 6A. A similar effect on DHX9 splicing was also elicited by treatment with the chemotherapeutic drug etoposide, indicating a more general mechanism of regulation in response to DNA damage. Our data identify a new NMD-linked splicing event in DHX9 with impact on EWS-FLI1 oncogenic activity and ES cell viability.

  7. Chaos induced by coupling between Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Azemtsa-Donfack, H.; Botha, A. E.

    2015-02-01

    It is found that, in a stack of intrinsic Josephson junctions in layered high temperature superconductors under external electromagnetic radiation, the chaotic features are triggered by interjunction coupling, i.e., the coupling between different junctions in the stack. While the radiation is well known to produce chaotic effects in the single junction, the effect of interjunction coupling is fundamentally different and it can lead to the onset of chaos via a different route to that of the single junction. A precise numerical study of the phase dynamics of intrinsic Josephson junctions, as described by the CCJJ+DC model, is performed. We demonstrate the charging of superconducting layers, in a bias current interval corresponding to a Shapiro step subharmonic, due to the creation of a longitudinal plasma wave along the stack of junctions. With increase in radiation amplitude chaotic behavior sets in. The chaotic features of the coupled Josephson junctions are analyzed by calculations of the Lyapunov exponents. We compare results for a stack of junctions to the case of a single junction and prove that the observed chaos is induced by the coupling between the junctions. The use of Shapiro step subharmonics may allow longitudinal plasma waves to be excited at low radiation power.

  8. Active zone stability: insights from fly neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Tian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The presynaptic active zone is a dynamic structure that orchestrates regulated release of neurotransmitters. Developmental and aging processes, and changes in neuronal network activity can all modulate the number, size and composition of active zone and thereby synaptic efficacy. However, very little is known about the mechanism that controls the structural stability of active zone. By studying a model synapse, the Drosophila neuromuscular junction, our recent work shed light on how two scaffolding proteins at the active zone regulate active zone stability by promoting a localized dephosphorylation event at the nerve terminal. Here we discuss the major insights from our findings and their implications for future research.

  9. Bloom Helicase and DNA Topoisomerase IIIα Are Involved in the Dissolution of Sister Chromatids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Masayuki; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Seki, Takahiko; Kato, Genta; Tada, Shusuke; Takahashi, Yuriko; Yoshimura, Akari; Kobayashi, Takayuki; Aoki, Ayako; Otsuki, Makoto; Habermann, Felix A.; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Ishii, Yutaka; Enomoto, Takemi

    2006-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is an autosomal disorder characterized by predisposition to a wide variety of cancers. The gene product whose mutation leads to BS is the RecQ family helicase BLM, which forms a complex with DNA topoisomerase IIIα (Top3α). However, the physiological relevance of the interaction between BLM and Top3α within the cell remains unclear. We show here that Top3α depletion causes accumulation of cells in G2 phase, enlargement of nuclei, and chromosome gaps and breaks that occur at the same position in sister chromatids. The transition from metaphase to anaphase is also inhibited. All of these phenomena except cell lethality are suppressed by BLM gene disruption. Taken together with the biochemical properties of BLM and Top3α, these data indicate that BLM and Top3α execute the dissolution of sister chromatids. PMID:16880537

  10. Acquisition of full-length viral helicase domains by insect retrotransposon-encoded polypeptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina eLazareva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent metagenomic studies in insects identified many sequences unexpectedly closely related to plant virus genes. Here we describe a new example of this kind, insect R1 LINEs with an additional C-terminal domain in their open reading frame 2. This domain is similar to NTPase/helicase (SF1H domains, which are found in replicative proteins encoded by plant viruses of the genus Tobamovirus. We hypothesize that the SF1H domain could be acquired by LINEs, directly or indirectly, upon insect feeding on virus-infected plants. Possible functions of this domain in LINE transposition and involvement in LINEs counteraction the silencing-based cell defense against retrotransposons are discussed.

  11. Pyrimidine pool imbalance induced by BLM helicase deficiency contributes to genetic instability in Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabosseau, Pauline; Buhagiar-Labarchède, Géraldine; Onclercq-Delic, Rosine; Lambert, Sarah; Debatisse, Michelle; Brison, Olivier; Amor-Guéret, Mounira

    2011-06-28

    Defects in DNA replication are associated with genetic instability and cancer development, as illustrated in Bloom syndrome. Features of this syndrome include a slowdown in replication speed, defective fork reactivation and high rates of sister chromatid exchange, with a general predisposition to cancer. Bloom syndrome is caused by mutations in the BLM gene encoding a RecQ helicase. Here we report that BLM deficiency is associated with a strong cytidine deaminase defect, leading to pyrimidine pool disequilibrium. In BLM-deficient cells, pyrimidine pool normalization leads to reduction of sister chromatid exchange frequency and is sufficient for full restoration of replication fork velocity but not the fork restart defect, thus identifying the part of the Bloom syndrome phenotype because of pyrimidine pool imbalance. This study provides new insights into the molecular basis of control of replication speed and the genetic instability associated with Bloom syndrome. Nucleotide pool disequilibrium could be a general phenomenon in a large spectrum of precancerous and cancer cells.

  12. The DEAD-box helicase DDX3 supports the assembly of functional 80S ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Rene; Golbik, Ralph P; Behrens, Sven-Erik

    2012-06-01

    The DEAD-box helicase DDX3 has suggested functions in innate immunity, mRNA translocation and translation, and it participates in the propagation of assorted viruses. Exploring initially the role of DDX3 in the life cycle of hepatitis C virus, we observed the protein to be involved in translation directed by different viral internal ribosomal entry sites. Extension of these studies revealed a general supportive role of DDX3 in translation initiation. DDX3 was found to interact in an RNA-independent manner with defined components of the translational pre-initiation complex and to specifically associate with newly assembling 80S ribosomes. DDX3 knock down and in vitro reconstitution experiments revealed a significant function of the protein in the formation of 80S translation initiation complexes. Our study implies that DDX3 assists the 60S subunit joining process to assemble functional 80S ribosomes.

  13. The role of the DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 in mRNA metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2013-01-01

    DDX3 belongs to the DEAD-box proteins, a large family of ATP-dependent RNA helicases that participate in all aspects of RNA metabolism. Human DDX3 is a component of several messenger ribonucleoproteins that are found in the spliceosome, the export and the translation initiation machineries but also in different cytoplasmic mRNA granules. DDX3 has been involved in several cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, apoptosis, cancer, innate immune response, and also as a host factor for viral replication. Interestingly, not all these functions require the catalytic activities of DDX3 and thus, the precise roles of this apparently multifaceted protein remain largely obscure. The aim of this review is to provide a rapid and critical overview of the structure and functions of DDX3 with a particular emphasis on its role during mRNA metabolism.

  14. DDX3 DEAD-box RNA helicase is required for hepatitis C virus RNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariumi, Yasuo; Kuroki, Misao; Abe, Ken-ichi; Dansako, Hiromichi; Ikeda, Masanori; Wakita, Takaji; Kato, Nobuyuki

    2007-12-01

    DDX3, a DEAD-box RNA helicase, binds to the hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. However, the role(s) of DDX3 in HCV replication is still not understood. Here we demonstrate that the accumulation of both genome-length HCV RNA (HCV-O, genotype 1b) and its replicon RNA were significantly suppressed in HuH-7-derived cells expressing short hairpin RNA targeted to DDX3 by lentivirus vector transduction. As well, RNA replication of JFH1 (genotype 2a) and release of the core into the culture supernatants were suppressed in DDX3 knockdown cells after inoculation of the cell culture-generated HCVcc. Thus, DDX3 is required for HCV RNA replication.

  15. An integrated disposable device for DNA extraction and helicase dependent amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalanabis, Madhumita; Do, Jaephil; ALMuayad, Hussam; Zhang, Jane Y; Klapperich, Catherine M

    2010-04-01

    Here we report the demonstration of an integrated microfluidic chip that performs helicase dependent amplification (HDA) on samples containing live bacteria. Combined chip-based sample preparation and isothermal amplification are attractive for world health applications, since the need for instrumentation to control flow rate and temperature changes are reduced or eliminated. Bacteria lysis, nucleic acid extraction, and DNA amplification with a fluorescent reporter are incorporated into a disposable polymer cartridge format. Smart passive fluidic control using a flap valve and a hydrophobic vent (with a nanoporous PTFE membrane) with a simple on-chip mixer eliminates multiple user operations. The device is able to detect as few as ten colony forming units (CFU) of E. coli in growth medium.

  16. The DNA helicase Pfh1 promotes fork merging at replication termination sites to ensure genome stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinacher, Roland; Osman, Fekret; Dalgaard, Jacob Z.; Lorenz, Alexander; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    Bidirectionally moving DNA replication forks merge at termination sites composed of accidental or programmed DNA–protein barriers. If merging fails, then regions of unreplicated DNA can result in the breakage of DNA during mitosis, which in turn can give rise to genome instability. Despite its importance, little is known about the mechanisms that promote the final stages of fork merging in eukaryotes. Here we show that the Pif1 family DNA helicase Pfh1 plays a dual role in promoting replication fork termination. First, it facilitates replication past DNA–protein barriers, and second, it promotes the merging of replication forks. A failure of these processes in Pfh1-deficient cells results in aberrant chromosome segregation and heightened genome instability. PMID:22426535

  17. The role of RecQ helicases in non-homologous end-joining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keijzers, Guido; Maynard, Scott; Shamanna, Raghavendra A

    2014-01-01

    -strand break repair. Double-strand breaks can be repaired by homologous recombination (HR) using sister chromatids as templates to facilitate precise DNA repair, or by an HR-independent mechanism known as non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) (error-prone). NHEJ is a non-templated DNA repair process, in which DNA...... termini are directly ligated. Canonical NHEJ requires DNA-PKcs and Ku70/80, while alternative NHEJ pathways are DNA-PKcs and Ku70/80 independent. This review discusses the role of RecQ helicases in NHEJ, alternative (or back-up) NHEJ (B-NHEJ) and microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ) in V...

  18. The helicase senataxin suppresses the antiviral transcriptional response and controls viral biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew S.; Rialdi, Alexander; Ho, Jessica Sook Yuin; Tilove, Micah; Martinez-Gil, Luis; Moshkina, Natasha P.; Peralta, Zuleyma; Noel, Justine; Melegari, Camilla; Maestre, Ana; Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Madrenas, Joaquín; Heinz, Sven; Benner, Chris; Young, John A. T.; Feagins, Alicia R.; Basler, Christopher; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Becherel, Olivier J.; Lavin, Martin F.; van Bakel, Harm; Marazzi, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The human helicase senataxin (SETX) is implicated in the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS4) and ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Here, we reveal a role for SETX in controlling the antiviral response. Cells depleted for SETX and AOA2 patient-derived SETX-deficient cells exhibit increased expression of antiviral mediators in response to infection. Mechanistically, we propose a model whereby SETX attenuates RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) activity at genes stimulated upon viral sensing, thus controlling the magnitude of the host response to pathogens and the biogenesis of numerous RNA viruses (e. g. Influenza A virus and West Nile virus). Our data indicate a potentially causal link between SETX inborn errors, susceptibility to infection and development of neurologic disorders. PMID:25822250

  19. RNA helicase DDX3: a novel therapeutic target in Ewing sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilky, B A; Kim, C; McCarty, G; Montgomery, E A; Kammers, K; DeVine, L R; Cole, R N; Raman, V; Loeb, D M

    2016-05-19

    RNA helicase DDX3 has oncogenic activity in breast and lung cancers and is required for translation of complex mRNA transcripts, including those encoding key cell-cycle regulatory proteins. We sought to determine the expression and function of DDX3 in sarcoma cells, and to investigate the antitumor activity of a novel small molecule DDX3 inhibitor, RK-33. Utilizing various sarcoma cell lines, xenografts and human tissue microarrays, we measured DDX3 expression at the mRNA and protein levels, and evaluated cytotoxicity of RK-33 in sarcoma cell lines. To study the role of DDX3 in Ewing sarcoma, we generated stable DDX3-knockdown Ewing sarcoma cell lines using DDX3-specific small hairpin RNA (shRNA), and assessed oncogenic activity. DDX3-knockdown and RK-33-treated Ewing sarcoma cells were compared with wild-type cells using an isobaric mass-tag quantitative proteomics approach to identify target proteins impacted by DDX3 inhibition. Overall, we found high expression of DDX3 in numerous human sarcoma subtypes compared with non-malignant mesenchymal cells, and knockdown of DDX3 by RNA interference inhibited oncogenic activity in Ewing sarcoma cells. Treatment with RK-33 was preferentially cytotoxic to sarcoma cells, including chemotherapy-resistant Ewing sarcoma stem cells, while sparing non-malignant cells. Sensitivity to RK-33 correlated with DDX3 protein expression. Growth of human Ewing sarcoma xenografts expressing high DDX3 was inhibited by RK-33 treatment in mice, without overt toxicity. DDX3 inhibition altered the Ewing sarcoma cellular proteome, especially proteins involved in DNA replication, mRNA translation and proteasome function. These data support further investigation of the role of DDX3 in sarcomas, advancement of RK-33 to Ewing sarcoma clinical trials and development of RNA helicase inhibition as a novel anti-neoplastic strategy.

  20. Physics and Applications of NIS Junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullom, J N

    2001-08-24

    This paper reviews the physics and applications of Normal-Insulator-Superconductor (NIS) tunnel junctions. The current-voltage properties of NIS junctions are diode-like with a strong temperature dependence. Hence, these structures can be used as sensitive thermometers at temperatures well below the energy gap, {Delta}, of the superconducting electrode. For junction voltages comparable to {Delta}/q, current flow removes energy from the normal electrode. This property has been exploited to build refrigerators capable of cooling thin-film circuits from 0.3 K to 0.1 K. Calorimeters and bolometers for the detection of X-rays and millimeter-wave radiation, respectively, have successfully been built from NIS junctions. NIS junctions have also been used to probe the superconducting state. Finally, recent ideas for the use of NIS junctions as simple circuit elements are described.

  1. Algorithms for Junctions in Directed Acyclic Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, Carlos Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Given a pair of distinct vertices u, v in a graph G, we say that s is a junction of u, v if there are in G internally vertex disjoint directed paths from s to u and from s to v. We show how to characterize junctions in directed acyclic graphs. We also consider the two problems in the following and derive efficient algorithms to solve them. Given a directed acyclic graph G and a vertex s in G, how can we find all pairs of vertices of G such that s is a junction of them? And given a directed acyclic graph G and k pairs of vertices of G, how can we preprocess G such that all junctions of k given pairs of vertices could be listed quickly? All junctions of k pairs problem arises in an application in Anthropology and we apply our algorithm to find such junctions on kinship networks of some brazilian indian ethnic groups.

  2. Pfh1 Is an Accessory Replicative Helicase that Interacts with the Replisome to Facilitate Fork Progression and Preserve Genome Integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin R McDonald

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Replicative DNA helicases expose the two strands of the double helix to the replication apparatus, but accessory helicases are often needed to help forks move past naturally occurring hard-to-replicate sites, such as tightly bound proteins, RNA/DNA hybrids, and DNA secondary structures. Although the Schizosaccharomyces pombe 5'-to-3' DNA helicase Pfh1 is known to promote fork progression, its genomic targets, dynamics, and mechanisms of action are largely unknown. Here we address these questions by integrating genome-wide identification of Pfh1 binding sites, comprehensive analysis of the effects of Pfh1 depletion on replication and DNA damage, and proteomic analysis of Pfh1 interaction partners by immunoaffinity purification mass spectrometry. Of the 621 high confidence Pfh1-binding sites in wild type cells, about 40% were sites of fork slowing (as marked by high DNA polymerase occupancy and/or DNA damage (as marked by high levels of phosphorylated H2A. The replication and integrity of tRNA and 5S rRNA genes, highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes, and nucleosome depleted regions were particularly Pfh1-dependent. The association of Pfh1 with genomic integrity at highly transcribed genes was S phase dependent, and thus unlikely to be an artifact of high transcription rates. Although Pfh1 affected replication and suppressed DNA damage at discrete sites throughout the genome, Pfh1 and the replicative DNA polymerase bound to similar extents to both Pfh1-dependent and independent sites, suggesting that Pfh1 is proximal to the replication machinery during S phase. Consistent with this interpretation, Pfh1 co-purified with many key replisome components, including the hexameric MCM helicase, replicative DNA polymerases, RPA, and the processivity clamp PCNA in an S phase dependent manner. Thus, we conclude that Pfh1 is an accessory DNA helicase that interacts with the replisome and promotes replication and suppresses DNA damage at hard

  3. Molecular junctions: can pulling influence optical controllability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Shane M; Smeu, Manuel; Franco, Ignacio; Ratner, Mark A; Seideman, Tamar

    2014-08-13

    We suggest the combination of single molecule pulling and optical control as a way to enhance control over the electron transport characteristics of a molecular junction. We demonstrate using a model junction consisting of biphenyl-dithiol coupled to gold contacts. The junction is pulled while optically manipulating the dihedral angle between the two rings. Quantum dynamics simulations show that molecular pulling enhances the degree of control over the dihedral angle and hence over the transport properties.

  4. Loss models for long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, O. H.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    1984-01-01

    A general model for loss mechanisms in long Josephson junctions is presented. An expression for the zero-field step is found for a junction of overlap type by means of a perturbation method. Comparison between analytic solution and perturbation result shows good agreement.......A general model for loss mechanisms in long Josephson junctions is presented. An expression for the zero-field step is found for a junction of overlap type by means of a perturbation method. Comparison between analytic solution and perturbation result shows good agreement....

  5. Abundance of gap junctions at glutamatergic mixed synapses in adult Mosquitofish spinal cord neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L Serrano-Velez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dye-coupling, whole-mount immunohistochemistry for gap junction channel protein connexin 35 (Cx35, and freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling (FRIL reveal an abundance of electrical synapses/gap junctions at glutamatergic mixed synapses in the 14th spinal segment that innervates the adult male gonopodium of Western Mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis (Mosquitofish.To study gap junctions’ role in fast motor behavior, we used a minimally-invasive neural-tract-tracing technique to introduce gap junction-permeant or -impermeant dyes into deep muscles controlling the gonopodium of the adult male Mosquitofish, a teleost fish that rapidly transfers (complete in 50 of the 62 gap junctions at mixed synapses are in the 14th spinal segment.Our results support and extend studies showing gap junctions at mixed synapses in spinal cord segments involved in control of genital reflexes in rodents, and they suggest a link between mixed synapses and fast motor behavior. The findings provide a basis for studies of specific roles of spinal neurons in the generation/regulation of sex-specific behavior and for studies of gap junctions’ role in regulating fast motor behavior. Finally, the CoPA IN provides a novel candidate neuron for future studies of gap junctions and neural control of fast motor behaviors.

  6. DHT deficiency perturbs the integrity of the rat seminiferous epithelium by disrupting tight and adherens junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasa, Agnieszka; Marchlewicz, Mariola; Wenda-Różewicka, Lidia; Wiszniewska, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    In rats with a DHT deficiency induced by finasteride, morphological changes in the seminiferous epithelium were observed. The structural alterations were manifested by the premature germ cells sloughing into the lumen of seminiferous tubules. The etiology of this disorder could be connected with intercellular junctions disintegration. We showed in the immunohistochemical study the changes in expression of some proteins building tight and adherens junctions. The depression of N-cadherin, β-catenin and occludin immunoexpressions could be the reason for the release of immature germ cells from the seminiferous epithelium. However, the observed increase of the immunohistochemical reaction intensity of vinculin, one of the cadherin/catenin complex regulators, could be insufficient to maintain the proper function of adherens junctions. The hormonal imbalance appears to influence the pattern of expression of junctional proteins in the seminiferous epithelium. It could lead to untimely germ cells sloughing, and ultimately could impair fertility.

  7. RSPO1/beta-Catenin Signaling Pathway Regulates Oogonia Differentiation and Entry into Meiosis in the Mouse Fetal Ovary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chassot, A.A.; Gregoire, E.P.; Lavery, R.; Taketo, M.M.; de Rooij, D.G.; Adams, I.R.; Chaboissier, M.C.

    2011-01-01

    Differentiation of germ cells into male gonocytes or female oocytes is a central event in sexual reproduction. Proliferation and differentiation of fetal germ cells depend on the sex of the embryo. In male mouse embryos, germ cell proliferation is regulated by the RNA helicase Mouse Vasa homolog

  8. The DDX3 subfamily of the DEAD box helicases: divergent roles as unveiled by studying different organisms and in vitro assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, A; Rinkevich, B

    2007-01-01

    DDX3 (or Ded1p), the highly conserved subfamily of the DEAD-box RNA helicase family (40 members in humans), plays important roles in RNA metabolism. DDX3X and DDX3Y, the two human paralogous genes of this subfamily of proteins, have orthologous candidates in a diverse range of eukaryotes, from yeast and plants to animals. While DDX3Y, which is essential for normal spermatogenesis, is translated only in the testes, DDX3X protein is ubiquitously expressed, involved in RNA transcription, RNA splicing, mRNA transport, translation initiation and cell cycle regulation. Studies of recent years have revealed that DDX3X participates in HIV and hepatitis C viral infections, and in hepatocellular carcinoma, a complication of hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections. In the urochordates (i.e., Botryllus schlosseri) and in diverse invertebrate phyla (represented by model organisms such as: Drosophila, Hydra, Planaria), DDX3 proteins (termed also PL10) are involved in developmental pathways, highly expressed in adult undifferentiated soma and germ cells and in some adult and embryo's differentiating tissues. As the mechanistic and functional knowledge of DDX3 proteins is limited, we suggest assembling the available data on DDX3 proteins, from all studied organisms and in vitro assays, depicting a unified mechanistic scheme for DDX3 proteins' functions. Understanding the diverse functions of DDX3 in multicellular organisms may be particularly important for effective strategies of drug design.

  9. RNA helicase Spn-E is required to maintain Aub and AGO3 protein levels for piRNA silencing in the germline of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryazansky, Sergei S; Kotov, Alexei A; Kibanov, Mikhail V; Akulenko, Natalia V; Korbut, Alina P; Lavrov, Sergei A; Gvozdev, Vladimir A; Olenina, Ludmila V

    2016-09-01

    Germline-specific RNA helicase Spindle-E (Spn-E) is known to be essential for piRNA silencing in Drosophila that takes place mainly in the perinuclear nuage granules. Loss-of-function spn-E mutations lead to tandem Stellate genes derepression in the testes and retrotransposon mobilization in the ovaries. However, Spn-E functions in the piRNA pathway are still obscure. Analysis of total library of short RNAs from the testes of spn-E heterozygous flies revealed the presence of abundant piRNA ping-pong pairs originating from Su(Ste) transcripts. The abundance of these ping-pong pairs were sharply reduced in the library from the testes of spn-E mutants. Thus we found that ping-pong mechanism contributed to Su(Ste) piRNA generation in the testes. The lack of Spn-E caused a significant drop of protein levels of key ping-pong participants, Aubergine (Aub) and AGO3 proteins of PIWI subfamily, in the germline of both males and females, but did not disrupt of their assembly in nuage granules. We found that observed decline of the protein expression was not caused by suppression of aub and ago3 transcription as well as total transcription, indicating possible contribution of Spn-E to post-transcriptional regulation.

  10. The RNA-mediated, asymmetric ring regulatory mechanism of the transcription termination Rho helicase decrypted by time-resolved nucleotide analog interference probing (trNAIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Emilie; Schwartz, Annie; Nollmann, Marcello; Margeat, Emmanuel; Boudvillain, Marc

    2014-08-01

    Rho is a ring-shaped, ATP-dependent RNA helicase/translocase that dissociates transcriptional complexes in bacteria. How RNA recognition is coupled to ATP hydrolysis and translocation in Rho is unclear. Here, we develop and use a new combinatorial approach, called time-resolved Nucleotide Analog Interference Probing (trNAIP), to unmask RNA molecular determinants of catalytic Rho function. We identify a regulatory step in the translocation cycle involving recruitment of the 2'-hydroxyl group of the incoming 3'-RNA nucleotide by a Rho subunit. We propose that this step arises from the intrinsic weakness of one of the subunit interfaces caused by asymmetric, split-ring arrangement of primary RNA tethers around the Rho hexamer. Translocation is at highest stake every seventh nucleotide when the weak interface engages the incoming 3'-RNA nucleotide or breaks, depending on RNA threading constraints in the Rho pore. This substrate-governed, 'test to run' iterative mechanism offers a new perspective on how a ring-translocase may function or be regulated. It also illustrates the interest and versatility of the new trNAIP methodology to unveil the molecular mechanisms of complex RNA-based systems.

  11. ruvA Mutants that resolve Holliday junctions but do not reverse replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharoglu, Zeynep; Bradley, Alison Sylvia; Le Masson, Marie; Tsaneva, Irina; Michel, Bénédicte

    2008-03-07

    RuvAB and RuvABC complexes catalyze branch migration and resolution of Holliday junctions (HJs) respectively. In addition to their action in the last steps of homologous recombination, they process HJs made by replication fork reversal, a reaction which occurs at inactivated replication forks by the annealing of blocked leading and lagging strand ends. RuvAB was recently proposed to bind replication forks and directly catalyze their conversion into HJs. We report here the isolation and characterization of two separation-of-function ruvA mutants that resolve HJs, based on their capacity to promote conjugational recombination and recombinational repair of UV and mitomycin C lesions, but have lost the capacity to reverse forks. In vivo and in vitro evidence indicate that the ruvA mutations affect DNA binding and the stimulation of RuvB helicase activity. This work shows that RuvA's actions at forks and at HJs can be genetically separated, and that RuvA mutants compromised for fork reversal remain fully capable of homologous recombination.

  12. The RecA/RAD51 protein drives migration of Holliday junctions via polymerization on DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Matthew J; Mazina, Olga M; Bugreev, Dmitry V; Mazin, Alexander V

    2011-04-19

    The Holliday junction (HJ), a cross-shaped structure that physically links the two DNA helices, is a key intermediate in homologous recombination, DNA repair, and replication. Several helicase-like proteins are known to bind HJs and promote their branch migration (BM) by translocating along DNA at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Surprisingly, the bacterial recombinase protein RecA and its eukaryotic homologue Rad51 also promote BM of HJs despite the fact they do not bind HJs preferentially and do not translocate along DNA. RecA/Rad51 plays a key role in DNA double-stranded break repair and homologous recombination. RecA/Rad51 binds to ssDNA and forms contiguous filaments that promote the search for homologous DNA sequences and DNA strand exchange. The mechanism of BM promoted by RecA/RAD51 is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that cycles of RecA/Rad51 polymerization and dissociation coupled with ATP hydrolysis drives the BM of HJs.

  13. ruvA Mutants that resolve Holliday junctions but do not reverse replication forks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Baharoglu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available RuvAB and RuvABC complexes catalyze branch migration and resolution of Holliday junctions (HJs respectively. In addition to their action in the last steps of homologous recombination, they process HJs made by replication fork reversal, a reaction which occurs at inactivated replication forks by the annealing of blocked leading and lagging strand ends. RuvAB was recently proposed to bind replication forks and directly catalyze their conversion into HJs. We report here the isolation and characterization of two separation-of-function ruvA mutants that resolve HJs, based on their capacity to promote conjugational recombination and recombinational repair of UV and mitomycin C lesions, but have lost the capacity to reverse forks. In vivo and in vitro evidence indicate that the ruvA mutations affect DNA binding and the stimulation of RuvB helicase activity. This work shows that RuvA's actions at forks and at HJs can be genetically separated, and that RuvA mutants compromised for fork reversal remain fully capable of homologous recombination.

  14. Rational drug discovery of HCV helicase inhibitor: Improved docking accuracy with multiple seedings of Autodock Vina and in situ minimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, SeeKhai; Othman, Rozana; Yusof, Rohana; Heh, ChoonHan

    2016-11-30

    Hepatitis C is a significant cause for end-stage liver diseases and liver transplantation which affects approximate 3% of the global populations. Despite the present of several direct antiviral agents in the treatment of hepatitis C, the standard treatment for HCV is accompanied by several drawbacks such as adverse side effects, high pricing of medications and the rapid emerging rate of resistant HCV variants. To discover potential inhibitors for HCV helicase through an optimized in silico approach. In this study, a homology model (HCV Genotype 3 helicase) was used as the target and screened through a benzopyran-based virtual library. Multiple-seedings of Autodock Vina and in situ minimizations were to account the non-deterministic nature of Autodock Vina search algorithm and binding site flexibility respectively. ADME/T and interaction analysis were also done on the top hits via FAFDRUG3 web server and Discovery Studio 4.5. We developed an improved flow for virtual screening through implementing multiple-seeding screening approach and in situ minimization in the study. With the new docking protocol, the redocked standards have shown better RMSD value in reference to their native conformations. 10 benzopyran-liked compounds with satisfactory physicochemical properties were discovered to be a potential inhibitor of HCV helicase. ZINC38649350 was identified as the most potential inhibitor. 10 potential HCV helicase inhibitors were discovered via a new docking optimization protocol with better docking accuracy. These findings could contribute to the discovery of novel HCV antivirals and serves as an alternative approach of in silico rational drug discovery.

  15. Essential and distinct roles of the F-box and helicase domains of Fbh1 in DNA damage repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinagawa Hideo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are induced by exogenous insults such as ionizing radiation and chemical exposure, and they can also arise as a consequence of stalled or collapsed DNA replication forks. Failure to repair DSBs can lead to genomic instability or cell death and cancer in higher eukaryotes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe fbh1 gene encodes an F-box DNA helicase previously described to play a role in the Rhp51 (an orthologue of S. cerevisiae RAD51-dependent recombinational repair of DSBs. Fbh1 fused to GFP localizes to discrete nuclear foci following DNA damage. Results To determine the functional roles of the highly conserved F-box and helicase domains, we have characterized fbh1 mutants carrying specific mutations in these domains. We show that the F-box mutation fbh1-fb disturbs the nuclear localization of Fbh1, conferring an fbh1 null-like phenotype. Moreover, nuclear foci do not form in fbh1-fb cells with DNA damage even if Fbh1-fb is targeted to the nucleus by fusion to a nuclear localization signal sequence. In contrast, the helicase mutation fbh1-hl causes the accumulation of Fbh1 foci irrespective of the presence of DNA damage and confers damage sensitivity greater than that conferred by the null allele. Additional mutation of the F-box alleviates the hypermorphic phenotype of the fbh1-hl mutant. Conclusion These results suggest that the F-box and DNA helicase domains play indispensable but distinct roles in Fbh1 function. Assembly of the SCFFbh1 complex is required for both the nuclear localization and DNA damage-induced focus formation of Fbh1 and is therefore prerequisite for the Fbh1 recombination function.

  16. Structure and associated DNA-helicase activity of a general transcription initiation factor that binds to RNA polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopta, M; Burton, Z F; Greenblatt, J

    1989-10-05

    RAP30/74 is a heteromeric general transcription initiation factor which binds to RNA polymerase II. Here we report that preparations of RAP30/74 contain an ATP-dependent DNA helicase whose probable function is to melt the DNA at transcriptional start sites. The sequence of the RAP30 subunit of RAP30/74 indicates that RAP30 may be distantly related to bacterial sigma factors.

  17. Zebrafish P54 RNA helicases are cytoplasmic granule residents that are required for development and stress resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Zampedri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Stress granules are cytoplasmic foci that directly respond to the protein synthesis status of the cell. Various environmental insults, such as oxidative stress or extreme heat, block protein synthesis; consequently, mRNA will stall in translation, and stress granules will immediately form and become enriched with mRNAs. P54 DEAD box RNA helicases are components of RNA granules such as P-bodies and stress granules. We studied the expression, in cytoplasmic foci, of both zebrafish P54 RNA helicases (P54a and P54b during development and found that they are expressed in cytoplasmic granules under both normal conditions and stress conditions. In zebrafish embryos exposed to heat shock, some proportion of P54a and P54b helicases move to larger granules that exhibit the properties of genuine stress granules. Knockdown of P54a and/or P54b in zebrafish embryos produces developmental abnormalities restricted to the posterior trunk; further, these embryos do not form stress granules, and their survival upon exposure to heat-shock conditions is compromised. Our observations fit the model that cells lacking stress granules have no resilience or ability to recover once the stress has ended, indicating that stress granules play an essential role in the way organisms adapt to a changing environment.

  18. Structure of the frequency-interacting RNA helicase: a protein interaction hub for the circadian clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad, Karen S.; Hurley, Jennifer M.; Widom, Joanne; Ringelberg, Carol S.; Loros, Jennifer J.; Dunlap, Jay C.; Crane, Brian R.

    2016-06-23

    In the Neurospora crassa circadian clock, a protein complex of frequency (FRQ), casein kinase 1a (CK1a), and the FRQ-interacting RNA Helicase (FRH) rhythmically represses gene expression by the white-collar complex (WCC). FRH crystal structures in several conformations and bound to ADP/RNA reveal differences between FRH and the yeast homolog Mtr4 that clarify the distinct role of FRH in the clock. The FRQ-interacting region at the FRH N-terminus has variable structure in the absence of FRQ. A known mutation that disrupts circadian rhythms (R806H) resides in a positively charged surface of the KOW domain, far removed from the helicase core. Here, we show that changes to other similarly located residues modulate interactions with the WCC and FRQ. A V142G substitution near the N-terminus also alters FRQ and WCC binding to FRH, but produces an unusual short clock period. Finally, these data support the assertion that FRH helicase activity does not play an essential role in the clock, but rather FRH acts to mediate contacts among FRQ, CK1a and the WCC through interactions involving its N-terminus and KOW module.

  19. Host competence and helicase activity differences exhibited by West Nile viral variants expressing NS3-249 amino acid polymorphisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley A Langevin

    Full Text Available A single helicase amino acid substitution, NS3-T249P, has been shown to increase viremia magnitude/mortality in American crows (AMCRs following West Nile virus (WNV infection. Lineage/intra-lineage geographic variants exhibit consistent amino acid polymorphisms at this locus; however, the majority of WNV isolates associated with recent outbreaks reported worldwide have a proline at the NS3-249 residue. In order to evaluate the impact of NS3-249 variants on avian and mammalian virulence, multiple amino acid substitutions were engineered into a WNV infectious cDNA (NY99; NS3-249P and the resulting viruses inoculated into AMCRs, house sparrows (HOSPs and mice. Differential viremia profiles were observed between mutant viruses in the two bird species; however, the NS3-249P virus produced the highest mean peak viral loads in both avian models. In contrast, this avian modulating virulence determinant had no effect on LD50 or the neurovirulence phenotype in the murine model. Recombinant helicase proteins demonstrated variable helicase and ATPase activities; however, differences did not correlate with avian or murine viremia phenotypes. These in vitro and in vivo data indicate that avian-specific phenotypes are modulated by critical viral-host protein interactions involving the NS3-249 residue that directly influence transmission efficiency and therefore the magnitude of WNV epizootics in nature.

  20. ATP-competitive, marine derived natural products that target the DEAD box helicase, eIF4A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillotson, Joseph; Kedzior, Magdalena; Guimarães, Larissa; Ross, Alison B; Peters, Tara L; Ambrose, Andrew J; Schmidlin, Cody J; Zhang, Donna D; Costa-Lotufo, Letícia V; Rodríguez, Abimael D; Schatz, Jonathan H; Chapman, Eli

    2017-09-01

    Activation of translation initiation is a common trait of cancer cells. Formation of the heterotrimeric eukaryotic initiation factor F (eIF4F) complex is the rate-limiting step in 5' m7GpppN cap-dependent translation. This trimeric complex includes the eIF4E cap binding protein, the eIF4G scaffolding protein, and the DEAD box RNA helicase eIF4A. eIF4A is an ATP-dependent helicase and because it is the only enzyme in the eIF4F complex, it has been shown to be a potential therapeutic target for a variety of malignancies. To this end, we have used a simple ATPase biochemical screen to survey several hundred marine and terrestrial derived natural products. Herein, we report the discovery of two natural products from marine sources, elisabatin A (1) and allolaurinterol (2), which show low µM inhibition of eIF4A ATPase activity. Enzymological analyses revealed 1 and 2 to be ATP-competitive, and cellular evaluations showed reasonable cytotoxicity against A549 (lung cancer) and MDA-MA-468 (breast cancer) cell lines. However, only compound 2 showed potent inhibition of helicase activity congruent with its ATPase inhibitory activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Binding Affinities among DNA Helicase-Primase, DNA Polymerase, and Replication Intermediates in the Replisome of Bacteriophage T7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huidong; Tang, Yong; Lee, Seung-Joo; Wei, Zeliang; Cao, Jia; Richardson, Charles C

    2016-01-15

    The formation of a replication loop on the lagging strand facilitates coordinated synthesis of the leading- and lagging-DNA strands and provides a mechanism for recycling of the lagging-strand DNA polymerase. As an Okazaki fragment is completed, the loop is released, and a new loop is formed as the synthesis of a new Okazaki fragment is initiated. Loop release requires the dissociation of the complex formed by the interactions among helicase, DNA polymerase, and DNA. The completion of the Okazaki fragment may result in either a nick or a single-stranded DNA region. In the replication system of bacteriophage T7, the dissociation of the polymerase from either DNA region is faster than that observed for the dissociation of the helicase from DNA polymerase, implying that the replication loop is released more likely through the dissociation of the lagging-strand DNA from polymerase, retaining the polymerase at replication fork. Both dissociation of DNA polymerase from DNA and that of helicase from a DNA polymerase · DNA complex are much faster at a nick DNA region than the release from a ssDNA region. These results suggest that the replication loop is released as a result of the nick formed when the lagging-strand DNA polymerase encounters the previously synthesized Okazaki fragment, releasing lagging-strand DNA and retaining DNA polymerase at the replication fork for the synthesis of next Okazaki fragment.

  2. Shot noise in YBCO bicrystal Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Constantinian, K.Y.; Ovsyannikov, G.A.; Borisenko, I.V.;

    2003-01-01

    We measured spectral noise density in YBCO symmetric bicrystal Josephson junctions on sapphire substrates at bias voltages up to 100 mV and T 4.2 K. Normal state resistance of the Josephson junctions, R-N = 20-90 Omega and ICRN up to 2.2 mV have been observed in the experimental samples. Noise...

  3. Inhibition of Rho and Rac geranylgeranylation by atorvastatin is critical for preservation of endothelial junction integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbing Xiao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small GTPases (guanosine triphosphate, GTP are involved in many critical cellular processes, including inflammation, proliferation, and migration. GTP loading and isoprenylation are two important post-translational modifications of small GTPases, and are critical for their normal function. In this study, we investigated the role of post-translational modifications of small GTPases in regulating endothelial cell inflammatory responses and junctional integrity. METHODS AND RESULTS: Confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVECs treated with atorvastatin demonstrated significantly decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS-mediated IL-6 and IL-8 generation. The inhibitory effect of atorvastatin (Atorva was attenuated by co-treatment with 100 µM mevalonate (MVA or 10 µM geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP, but not by 10 µM farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP. Atorvastatin treatment of HUVECs produced a time-dependent increase in GTP loading of all Rho GTPases, and induced the translocation of small Rho GTPases from the cellular membrane to the cytosol, which was reversed by 100 µM MVA and 10 µM GGPP, but not by 10 µM FPP. Atorvastatin significantly attenuated thrombin-induced HUVECs permeability, increased VE-cadherin targeting to cell junctions, and preserved junction integrity. These effects were partially reversed by GGPP but not by FPP, indicating that geranylgeranylation of small GTPases plays a major role in regulating endothelial junction integrity. Silencing of small GTPases showed that Rho and Rac, but not Cdc42, play central role in HUVECs junction integrity. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, our studies show that post-translational modification of small GTPases plays a vital role in regulating endothelial inflammatory response and endothelial junction integrity. Atorvastatin increased GTP loading and inhibited isoprenylation of small GTPases, accompanied by reduced inflammatory response and preserved cellular junction integrity.

  4. Tight junction disruption: Helicobacter pylori and dysregulation of the gastric mucosal barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Tyler J; Scott, Kathleen E; Fox, James G; Hagen, Susan J

    2015-10-28

    Long-term chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a risk factor for gastric cancer development. In the multi-step process that leads to gastric cancer, tight junction dysfunction is thought to occur and serve as a risk factor by permitting the permeation of luminal contents across an otherwise tight mucosa. Mechanisms that regulate tight junction function and structure in the normal stomach, or dysfunction in the infected stomach, however, are largely unknown. Although conventional tight junction components are expressed in gastric epithelial cells, claudins regulate paracellular permeability and are likely the target of inflammation or H. pylori itself. There are 27 different claudin molecules, each with unique properties that render the mucosa an intact barrier that is permselective in a way that is consistent with cell physiology. Understanding the architecture of tight junctions in the normal stomach and then changes that occur during infection is important but challenging, because most of the reports that catalog claudin expression in gastric cancer pathogenesis are contradictory. Furthermore, the role of H. pylori virulence factors, such as cytotoxin-associated gene A and vacoulating cytotoxin, in regulating tight junction dysfunction during infection is inconsistent in different gastric cell lines and in vivo, likely because non-gastric epithelial cell cultures were initially used to unravel the details of their effects on the stomach. Hampering further study, as well, is the relative lack of cultured cell models that have tight junction claudins that are consistent with native tissues. This summary will review the current state of knowledge about gastric tight junctions, normally and in H. pylori infection, and make predictions about the consequences of claudin reorganization during H. pylori infection.

  5. Shear zone junctions: Of zippers and freeways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passchier, Cees W.; Platt, John P.

    2017-02-01

    Ductile shear zones are commonly treated as straight high-strain domains with uniform shear sense and characteristic curved foliation trails, bounded by non-deforming wall rock. Many shear zones, however, are branched, and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting shape can be complicated and lead to unusual shear sense arrangement and foliation geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone triple junctions with three joining branches and transport direction at a high angle to the branchline, only eight basic types of junction are thought to be stable and to produce significant displacement. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense in all three branches. The other types show joining or separating behaviour of shear zone branches similar to the action of a zipper. Such junctions may have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch (closing zipper junction), or a single shear zone that splits to form two branches, (opening zipper junction). All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic foliation patterns and deflection of markers in the wall rock. Closing zipper junctions are unusual, since they form a non-active zone with opposite deflection of foliations in the wall rock known as an extraction fault or wake. Shear zipper junctions can form domains of overprinting shear sense along their flanks. A small and large field example are given from NE Spain and Eastern Anatolia. The geometry of more complex, 3D shear zone junctions with slip parallel and oblique to the branchline is briefly discussed.

  6. Junction conditions of cosmological perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Tomita, K

    2004-01-01

    The behavior of perturbations is studied in cosmological models which consist of two different homogeneous regions connected in a spherical shell boundary. The junction conditions for the metric perturbations and the displacements of the shell boundary are analyzed and the surface densities of the perturbed energy and momentum in the shell are derived, using Mukohyama's gauge-invariant formalism and the Israel discontinuity condition. In both homogeneous regions the perturbations of scalar, vector and tensor types are expanded using the 3-dimensional harmonic functions, but the model coupling among them is caused in the shell by the inhomogeneity. By treating the perturbations with odd and even parities separately, it is found, however, that we can have consistent displacements and surface densities for given metric parturbations

  7. 紧密连接蛋白Occludin在鼻息肉中的表达及调节%Expression and regulation of tight junction protein Occludin in nasal polyps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈曦; 郭洁波; 张涵; 左可军; 韦轶; 史剑波; 李华斌; 许庚

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the possible role of tight junction protein Occludin in nasal polyps.Methods The expression of Claudin-1,Occludin and ZO-1 in nasal polyps (n =20) and healthy uncinate mucosa (n =15) were examined using immunohistochemical staining,real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot analysis.The regulatory effects of proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ,IL-13,IL-17,TGF-β,TGF-α) on the expression of Occludin in cultured human nasal epithelial cells were investigated.Results The immunohistochemical results showed that Claudin-1,Occludin and ZO-1 were detected both in the nasal polyp group and the control group.The expression sites were the cell membrane and cytoplasm of nasal mucosa epithelial cells.The mean optical density of Claudin1,Occludin and ZO-1 were 0.187 ± 0.076,0.172 ± 0.109 and 0.098 ± 0.035 respectively in the nasal polyp group and were significantly lower than those in the control group (0.312 ± 0.101,0.220 ± 0.069 and 0.233 ± 0.093 respectively),the differences were significant (t =9.345,t =3.301,t =13.323,all P < 0.01).RT-PCR results showed that the relative expression of Occludin mRNA was 0.000 117 ± 0.000 035 in the nasal polyp group and was significantly lower than that in the control group(0.000 464 ±0.000 134),and the difference was significant (Z =-5.0,P < 0.01).There was no statistically significant difference in the relative expression of Claudin-1 and ZO-1 mRNA between the nasal polyp group and the control group(P > 0.05).After the cultured human nasal epithelial cells were stimulated by IL-13,IL-17,IFN-γ and other proinflammatory cytokines,the relative expression of Occludin mRNA was 0.631 ± 0.039,0.581 ± 0.029 and 0.648 ± 0.040,respectively.Compared with the unstimulated control group,the differences were statistically significant (t =16.299,24.669 and 14.995 respectively,all P < 0.05).Western blot analyse showed that the relative grayscale in the above proinflammatory cytokines

  8. A conserved helicase processivity factor is needed for conjugation and replication of an integrative and conjugative element.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Thomas

    Full Text Available Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs are agents of horizontal gene transfer and have major roles in evolution and acquisition of new traits, including antibiotic resistances. ICEs are found integrated in a host chromosome and can excise and transfer to recipient bacteria via conjugation. Conjugation involves nicking of the ICE origin of transfer (oriT by the ICE-encoded relaxase and transfer of the nicked single strand of ICE DNA. For ICEBs1 of Bacillus subtilis, nicking of oriT by the ICEBs1 relaxase NicK also initiates rolling circle replication. This autonomous replication of ICEBs1 is critical for stability of the excised element in growing cells. We found a conserved and previously uncharacterized ICE gene that is required for conjugation and replication of ICEBs1. Our results indicate that this gene, helP (formerly ydcP, encodes a helicase processivity factor that enables the host-encoded helicase PcrA to unwind the double-stranded ICEBs1 DNA. HelP was required for both conjugation and replication of ICEBs1, and HelP and NicK were the only ICEBs1 proteins needed for replication from ICEBs1 oriT. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we measured association of HelP, NicK, PcrA, and the host-encoded single-strand DNA binding protein Ssb with ICEBs1. We found that NicK was required for association of HelP and PcrA with ICEBs1 DNA. HelP was required for association of PcrA and Ssb with ICEBs1 regions distal, but not proximal, to oriT, indicating that PcrA needs HelP to progress beyond nicked oriT and unwind ICEBs1. In vitro, HelP directly stimulated the helicase activity of the PcrA homologue UvrD. Our findings demonstrate that HelP is a helicase processivity factor needed for efficient unwinding of ICEBs1 for conjugation and replication. Homologues of HelP and PcrA-type helicases are encoded on many known and putative ICEs. We propose that these factors are essential for ICE conjugation, replication, and genetic stability.

  9. Homotypic gap junctional communication associated with metastasis increases suppression increases with PKA kinase activity and is unaffected by P13K inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loss of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) between cancer cells is a common characteristic of malignant transformation. This communication is mediated by connexin proteins that make up the functional units of gap junctions. Connexins are highly regulated at the protein level and phosp...

  10. Connexins: a myriad of functions extending beyond assembly of gap junction channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mroue Rana M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Connexins constitute a large family of trans-membrane proteins that allow intercellular communication and the transfer of ions and small signaling molecules between cells. Recent studies have revealed complex translational and post-translational mechanisms that regulate connexin synthesis, maturation, membrane transport and degradation that in turn modulate gap junction intercellular communication. With the growing myriad of connexin interacting proteins, including cytoskeletal elements, junctional proteins, and enzymes, gap junctions are now perceived, not only as channels between neighboring cells, but as signaling complexes that regulate cell function and transformation. Connexins have also been shown to form functional hemichannels and have roles altogether independent of channel functions, where they exert their effects on proliferation and other aspects of life and death of the cell through mostly-undefined mechanisms. This review provides an updated overview of current knowledge of connexins and their interacting proteins, and it describes connexin modulation in disease and tumorigenesis.

  11. Connexins: a myriad of functions extending beyond assembly of gap junction channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dbouk, Hashem A; Mroue, Rana M; El-Sabban, Marwan E; Talhouk, Rabih S

    2009-03-12

    Connexins constitute a large family of trans-membrane proteins that allow intercellular communication and the transfer of ions and small signaling molecules between cells. Recent studies have revealed complex translational and post-translational mechanisms that regulate connexin synthesis, maturation, membrane transport and degradation that in turn modulate gap junction intercellular communication. With the growing myriad of connexin interacting proteins, including cytoskeletal elements, junctional proteins, and enzymes, gap junctions are now perceived, not only as channels between neighboring cells, but as signaling complexes that regulate cell function and transformation. Connexins have also been shown to form functional hemichannels and have roles altogether independent of channel functions, where they exert their effects on proliferation and other aspects of life and death of the cell through mostly-undefined mechanisms. This review provides an updated overview of current knowledge of connexins and their interacting proteins, and it describes connexin modulation in disease and tumorigenesis.

  12. Pharmacology of gap junctions. New pharmacological targets for treatment of arrhythmia, seizure and cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salameh, Aida; Dhein, Stefan

    2005-12-20

    Intercellular communication in many organs is maintained via intercellular gap junction channels composed of connexins, a large protein family with a number of isoforms. This gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) allows the propagation of action potentials (e.g., in brain, heart), and the transfer of small molecules which may regulate cell growth, differentiation and function. The latter has been shown to be involved in cancer growth: reduced GJIC often is associated with increased tumor growth or with de-differentiation processes. Disturbances of GJIC in the heart can cause arrhythmia, while in brain electrical activity during seizures seems to be propagated via gap junction channels. Many diseases or pathophysiological conditions seem to be associated with alterations of gap junction protein expression. Thus, depending on the target disease opening or closure of gap junctions may be of interest, or alteration of connexin expression. GJIC can be affected acutely by changing gap junction conductance or--more chronic--by altering connexin expression and membrane localisation. This review gives an overview on drugs affecting GJIC.

  13. The expanding functions of cellular helicases: the tombusvirus RNA replication enhancer co-opts the plant eIF4AIII-like AtRH2 and the DDX5-like AtRH5 DEAD-box RNA helicases to promote viral asymmetric RNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Kovalev

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Replication of plus-strand RNA viruses depends on recruited host factors that aid several critical steps during replication. Several of the co-opted host factors bind to the viral RNA, which plays multiple roles, including mRNA function, as an assembly platform for the viral replicase (VRC, template for RNA synthesis, and encapsidation during infection. It is likely that remodeling of the viral RNAs and RNA-protein complexes during the switch from one step to another requires RNA helicases. In this paper, we have discovered a second group of cellular RNA helicases, including the eIF4AIII-like yeast Fal1p and the DDX5-like Dbp3p and the orthologous plant AtRH2 and AtRH5 DEAD box helicases, which are co-opted by tombusviruses. Unlike the previously characterized DDX3-like AtRH20/Ded1p helicases that bind to the 3' terminal promoter region in the viral minus-strand (-RNA, the other class of eIF4AIII-like RNA helicases bind to a different cis-acting element, namely the 5' proximal RIII(- replication enhancer (REN element in the TBSV (-RNA. We show that the binding of AtRH2 and AtRH5 helicases to the TBSV (-RNA could unwind the dsRNA structure within the RIII(- REN. This unique characteristic allows the eIF4AIII-like helicases to perform novel pro-viral functions involving the RIII(- REN in stimulation of plus-strand (+RNA synthesis. We also show that AtRH2 and AtRH5 helicases are components of the tombusvirus VRCs based on co-purification experiments. We propose that eIF4AIII-like helicases destabilize dsRNA replication intermediate within the RIII(- REN that promotes bringing the 5' and 3' terminal (-RNA sequences in close vicinity via long-range RNA-RNA base pairing. This newly formed RNA structure promoted by eIF4AIII helicase together with AtRH20 helicase might facilitate the recycling of the viral replicases for multiple rounds of (+-strand synthesis, thus resulting in asymmetrical viral replication.

  14. Coordinate transformation in the model of long Josephson junctions: geometrically equivalent Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semerdzhieva, E. G.; Boyadzhiev, T. L.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2005-10-01

    The transition from the model of a long Josephson junction of variable width to the model of a junction with a coordinate-dependent Josephson current amplitude is effected through a coordinate transformation. This establishes the correspondence between the classes of Josephson junctions of variable width and quasi-one-dimensional junctions with a variable thickness of the barrier layer. It is shown that for a junction of exponentially varying width the barrier layer of the equivalent quasi-one-dimensional junction has a distributed resistive inhomogeneity that acts as an attractor for magnetic flux vortices. The curve of the critical current versus magnetic field for a Josephson junction with a resistive microinhomogeneity is constructed with the aid of a numerical simulation, and a comparison is made with the critical curve of a junction of exponentially varying width. The possibility of replacing a distributed inhomogeneity in a Josephson junction by a local inhomogeneity at the end of the junction is thereby demonstrated; this can have certain advantages from a technological point of view.

  15. Atomically Abrupt Topological p-n Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Hwan; Jin, Kyung-Hwan; Kho, Byung Woo; Park, Byeong-Gyu; Liu, Feng; Kim, Jun Sung; Yeom, Han Woong

    2017-08-24

    Topological insulators (TI's) are a new class of quantum matter with extraordinary surface electronic states, which bear great potential for spintronics and error-tolerant quantum computing. In order to put a TI into any practical use, these materials need to be fabricated into devices whose basic units are often p-n junctions. Interesting electronic properties of a 'topological' p-n junction were proposed theoretically such as the junction electronic state and the spin rectification. However, the fabrication of a lateral topological p-n junction has been challenging because of materials, process, and fundamental reasons. Here, we demonstrate an innovative approach to realize a p-n junction of topological surface states (TSS's) of a three-dimensional (3D) topological insulator (TI) with an atomically abrupt interface. When a ultrathin Sb film is grown on a 3D TI of Bi2Se3 with a typical n-type TSS, the surface develops a strongly p-type TSS through the substantial hybridization between the 2D Sb film and the Bi2Se3 surface. Thus, the Bi2Se3 surface covered partially with Sb films bifurcates into areas of n- and p-type TSS's as separated by atomic step edges with a lateral electronic junction of as short as 2 nm. This approach opens a different avenue toward various elect