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Sample records for junction function size

  1. Diabetes Increases Cryoinjury Size with Associated Effects on Cx43 Gap Junction Function and Phosphorylation in the Mouse Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A. Palatinus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic patients develop larger myocardial infarctions and have an increased risk of death following a heart attack. The poor response to myocardial injury in the diabetic heart is likely related to the many metabolic derangements from diabetes that create a poor substrate in general for wound healing, response to injury and infection. Studies in rodents have implicated a role for the gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43 in regulating the injury response in diabetic skin wounds. In this study, we sought to determine whether diabetes alters Cx43 molecular interactions or intracellular communication in the cryoinjured STZ type I diabetic mouse heart. We found that epicardial cryoinjury size is increased in diabetic mice and this increase is prevented by preinjury insulin administration. Consistent with these findings, we found that intercellular coupling via gap junctions is decreased after insulin administration in diabetic and nondiabetic mice. This decrease in coupling is associated with a concomitant increase in phosphorylation of Cx43 at serine 368, a residue known to decrease channel conductance. Taken together, our results suggest that insulin regulates both gap junction-mediated intercellular communication and injury propagation in the mouse heart.

  2. Gap junctions: structure and function (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, W Howard; Martin, Patricia E M

    2002-01-01

    Gap junctions are plasma membrane spatial microdomains constructed of assemblies of channel proteins called connexins in vertebrates and innexins in invertebrates. The channels provide direct intercellular communication pathways allowing rapid exchange of ions and metabolites up to approximately 1 kD in size. Approximately 20 connexins are identified in the human or mouse genome, and orthologues are increasingly characterized in other vertebrates. Most cell types express multiple connexin isoforms, making likely the construction of a spectrum of heteromeric hemichannels and heterotypic gap junctions that could provide a structural basis for the charge and size selectivity of these intercellular channels. The precise nature of the potential signalling information traversing junctions in physiologically defined situations remains elusive, but extensive progress has been made in elucidating how connexins are assembled into gap junctions. Also, participation of gap junction hemichannels in the propagation of calcium waves via an extracellular purinergic pathway is emerging. Connexin mutations have been identified in a number of genetically inherited channel communication-opathies. These are detected in connexin 32 in Charcot Marie Tooth-X linked disease, in connexins 26 and 30 in deafness and skin diseases, and in connexins 46 and 50 in hereditary cataracts. Biochemical approaches indicate that many of the mutated connexins are mistargeted to gap junctions and/or fail to oligomerize correctly into hemichannels. Genetic ablation approaches are helping to map out a connexin code and point to specific connexins being required for cell growth and differentiation as well as underwriting basic intercellular communication.

  3. Functional oesophago-gastric junction imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barry P McMahon; Asbj(φ)rn M Drewes; Hans Gregersen

    2006-01-01

    Despite its role in disease there is still no definitive method to assess oesophago-gastric junction competence (OGJ). Traditionally the OGJ has been assessed using manometry with lower oesophageal sphincter pressure as the indicator. More recently this has been shown not to be a very reliable marker of sphincter function and competence against reflux.Disorders such as gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and to a lesser extend achalasia still effects a significant number of patients. This review looks at using a new technique known as impedance planimetry to profile the geometry and pressure in the OGJ during distension of a bag. The data gathered can be reconstructed into a dynamic representation of OGJ action. This has been shown to provide a useful representation of the OGJ and to show changes to the competence of the OGJ in terms of compliance and distensibility as a result of endoluminal therapy.

  4. Structure, regulation and function of gap junctions in liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Michaël; Decrock, Elke; Wang, Nan; Leybaert, Luc; da Silva, Tereza Cristina; Veloso Alves Pereira, Isabel; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Gap junctions are a specialized group of cell-to-cell junctions that mediate direct intercellular communication between cells. They arise from the interaction of 2 hemichannels of adjacent cells, which in turn are composed of 6 connexin proteins. In liver, gap junctions are predominantly found in hepatocytes and play critical roles in virtually all phases of the hepatic life cycle, including cell growth, differentiation, liver-specific functionality and cell death. Liver gap junctions are directed through a broad variety of mechanisms ranging from epigenetic control of connexin expression to posttranslational regulation of gap junction activity. This paper reviews established and novel aspects regarding the architecture, control and functional relevance of liver gap junctions. PMID:27001459

  5. Quantum decrease of capacitance in a nanometer-sized tunnel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untiedt, C.; Saenz, G.; Olivera, B.; Corso, M.; Sabater, C.; Pascual, J. I.

    2013-03-01

    We have studied the capacitance of the tunnel junction defined by the tip and sample of a Scanning Tunnelling Microscope through the measurement of the electrostatic forces and impedance of the junction. A decrease of the capacitance when a tunnel current is present has shown to be a more general phenomenon as previously reported in other systems. On another hand, an unexpected reduction of the capacitance is also observed when increasing the applied voltage above the work function energy of the electrodes to the Field Emission (FE) regime, and the decrease of capacitance due to a single FE-Resonance has been characterized. All these effects should be considered when doing measurements of the electronic characteristics of nanometer-sized electronic devices and have been neglected up to date. Spanish government (FIS2010-21883-C02-01, CONSOLIDER CSD2007-0010), Comunidad Valenciana (ACOMP/2012/127 and PROMETEO/2012/011)

  6. Junction size dependence of ferroelectric properties in e-beam patterned BaTiO{sub 3} ferroelectric tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, A. V.; Gupta, A. [Center for Materials for Information Technology, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Althammer, M. [Center for Materials for Information Technology, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akdademie der Wissenschaften, Garching 85748 (Germany); Rott, K.; Reiss, G. [Thin Films and Physics of Nanostructures, Department of Physics and Center for Spinelectronic Materials and Devices, Bielefeld University, Bielefeld 33615 (Germany)

    2015-09-21

    We investigate the switching characteristics in BaTiO{sub 3}-based ferroelectric tunnel junctions patterned in a capacitive geometry with circular Ru top electrode with diameters ranging from ∼430 to 2300 nm. Two different patterning schemes, viz., lift-off and ion-milling, have been employed to examine the variations in the ferroelectric polarization, switching, and tunnel electro-resistance resulting from differences in the pattering processes. The values of polarization switching field are measured and compared for junctions of different diameter in the samples fabricated using both patterning schemes. We do not find any specific dependence of polarization switching bias on the size of junctions in both sample stacks. The junctions in the ion-milled sample show up to three orders of resistance change by polarization switching and the polarization retention is found to improve with increasing junction diameter. However, similar switching is absent in the lift-off sample, highlighting the effect of patterning scheme on the polarization retention.

  7. Gap junction modulation and its implications for heart function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtenbach, Stefan; Kurtenbach, Sarah; Zoidl, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Gap junction communication (GJC) mediated by connexins is critical for heart function. To gain insight into the causal relationship of molecular mechanisms of disease pathology, it is important to understand which mechanisms contribute to impairment of gap junctional communication. Here, we present an update on the known modulators of connexins, including various interaction partners, kinases, and signaling cascades. This gap junction network (GJN) can serve as a blueprint for data mining approaches exploring the growing number of publicly available data sets from experimental and clinical studies.

  8. Gap junction modulation and its implications for heart function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eKurtenbach

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Gap junction communication mediated by connexins is critical for heart function. To gain insight into the causal relationship of molecular mechanisms of disease pathology, it is important to understand which mechanisms contribute to impairment of gap junctional communication. Here, we present an update on the known modulators of connexins, including various interaction partners, kinases and signaling cascades. This gap junction network can serve as a blueprint for data mining approaches exploring the growing number of publicly available data sets from experimental and clinical studies.

  9. Defining functional interactions during biogenesis of epithelial junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, J. C.; Bruche, S.; Pizarro, L.; Maimari, N.; Pogglioli, T.; Tomlinson, C.; Lees, J.; Zalivina, I.; Wheeler, A.; Alberts, A.; Russo, A.; Braga, V. M. M.

    2016-01-01

    In spite of extensive recent progress, a comprehensive understanding of how actin cytoskeleton remodelling supports stable junctions remains to be established. Here we design a platform that integrates actin functions with optimized phenotypic clustering and identify new cytoskeletal proteins, their functional hierarchy and pathways that modulate E-cadherin adhesion. Depletion of EEF1A, an actin bundling protein, increases E-cadherin levels at junctions without a corresponding reinforcement of cell–cell contacts. This unexpected result reflects a more dynamic and mobile junctional actin in EEF1A-depleted cells. A partner for EEF1A in cadherin contact maintenance is the formin DIAPH2, which interacts with EEF1A. In contrast, depletion of either the endocytic regulator TRIP10 or the Rho GTPase activator VAV2 reduces E-cadherin levels at junctions. TRIP10 binds to and requires VAV2 function for its junctional localization. Overall, we present new conceptual insights on junction stabilization, which integrate known and novel pathways with impact for epithelial morphogenesis, homeostasis and diseases. PMID:27922008

  10. Treatment with the gap junction modifier rotigaptide (ZP123) reduces infarct size in rats with chronic myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugan, Ketil; Marcussen, Niels; Kjølbye, Anne Louise;

    2006-01-01

    Treatment with non-selective drugs (eg, long-chain alcohols, halothane) that reduce gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) is associated with reduced infarct size after myocardial infarction (MI). Therefore, it has been suggested that gap junction intercellular communication stimulating ...

  11. Gap junctions in the control of vascular function.

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    Figueroa, Xavier F; Duling, Brian R

    2009-02-01

    Direct intercellular communication via gap junctions is critical in the control and coordination of vascular function. In the cardiovascular system, gap junctions are made up of one or more of four connexin proteins: Cx37, Cx40, Cx43, and Cx45. The expression of more than one gap-junction protein in the vasculature is not redundant. Rather, vascular connexins work in concert, first during the development of the cardiovascular system, and then in integrating smooth muscle and endothelial cell function, and in coordinating cell function along the length of the vessel wall. In addition, connexin-based channels have emerged as an important signaling pathway in the astrocyte-mediated neurovascular coupling. Direct electrical communication between endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells via gap junctions is thought to play a relevant role in the control of vasomotor tone, providing the signaling pathway known as endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). Consistent with the importance of gap junctions in the regulation of vasomotor tone and arterial blood pressure, the expression of connexins is altered in diseases associated with vascular complications. In this review, we discuss the participation of connexin-based channels in the control of vascular function in physiologic and pathologic conditions, with a special emphasis on hypertension and diabetes.

  12. Predictive model for the size of bubbles and droplets created in microfluidic T-junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Steijn, Volkert; Kleijn, Chris R; Kreutzer, Michiel T

    2010-10-07

    We present a closed-form expression that allows the reader to predict the size of bubbles and droplets created in T-junctions without fitting. Despite the wide use of microfluidic devices to create bubbles and droplets, a physically sound expression for the size of bubbles and droplets, key in many applications, did not yet exist. The theoretical foundation of our expression comprises three main ingredients: continuity, geometrics and recently gained understanding of the mechanism which leads to pinch-off. Our simple theoretical model explains why the size of bubbles and droplets strongly depends on the shape of a T-junction, and teaches how the shape can be tuned to obtain the desired size. We successfully validated our model experimentally by analyzing the formation of gas bubbles, as well as liquid droplets, in T-junctions with a wide variety of shapes under conditions typical to multiphase microfluidics.

  13. Ureteropelvic junction obstruction: the effect of pyeloplasty on renal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowling, K.J.; Harmon, E.P.; Ortenberg, J.; Polanco, E.; Evans, B.B.

    1988-11-01

    We studied preoperatively and postoperatively 41 children who underwent pyeloplasty for correction of unilateral ureteropelvic junction obstruction. Conventional radiological studies and quantitative radioiodine hippurate renal scans were obtained to assess the effect of pyeloplasty on the appearance of the kidney and its function. Analysis of the data suggests that the degree of improvement in renal function is related primarily to the age at which the surgical correction is accomplished and whether infection has occurred preoperatively.

  14. Influence of functional groups on charge transport in molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mowbray, Duncan; Jones, Glenn; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2008-01-01

    Using density functional theory (DFT), we analyze the influence of five classes of functional groups, as exemplified by NO2, OCH3, CH3, CCl3, and I, on the transport properties of a 1,4-benzenedithiolate (BDT) and 1,4-benzenediamine (BDA) molecular junction with gold electrodes. Our analysis...... demonstrates how ideas from functional group chemistry may be used to engineer a molecule's transport properties, as was shown experimentally and using a semiempirical model for BDA [Nano Lett. 7, 502 (2007)]. In particular, we show that the qualitative change in conductance due to a given functional group can...

  15. Size and voltage dependence of effective anisotropy in sub-100-nm perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

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    Piotrowski, Stephan K.; Bapna, Mukund; Oberdick, Samuel D.; Majetich, Sara A.; Li, Mingen; Chien, C. L.; Ahmed, Rizvi; Victora, R. H.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are investigated using a conductive atomic force microscope. The 1.23 -nm Co40Fe40B20 recording layer coercivity exhibits a size dependence which suggests single-domain behavior for diameters ≤100 nm. Focusing on devices with diameters smaller than 100 nm, we determine the effect of voltage and size on the effective device anisotropy Keff using two different techniques. Keff is extracted both from distributions of the switching fields of the recording and reference layers and from measurement of thermal fluctuations of the recording layer magnetization when a field close to the switching field is applied. The results from both sets of measurements reveal that Keff increases monotonically with decreasing junction diameter, consistent with the size dependence of the demagnetization energy density. We demonstrate that Keff can be controlled with a voltage down to the smallest size measured, 64 nm.

  16. Gap junction proteins are key drivers of endocrine function.

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    Meda, Paolo

    2017-03-08

    It has long been known that the main secretory cells of exocrine and endocrine glands are connected by gap junctions, made by a variety of connexin species that ensure their electrical and metabolic coupling. Experiments in culture systems and animal models have since provided increasing evidence that connexin signaling contributes to control the biosynthesis and release of secretory products, as well as to the life and death of secretory cells. More recently, genetic studies have further provided the first lines of evidence that connexins also control the function of human glands, which are central to the pathogenesis of major endocrine diseases. Here, we summarize the recent information gathered on connexin signaling in these systems, since the last reviews on the topic, with particular regard to the pancreatic beta cells which produce insulin, and the renal cells which produce renin. These cells are keys to the development of various forms of diabetes and hypertension, respectively, and combine to account for the exploding, worldwide prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Gap Junction Proteins edited by Jean Claude Herve. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanical tugging force regulates the size of cell–cell junctions

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    Liu, Zhijun; Tan, John L.; Cohen, Daniel M.; Yang, Michael T.; Sniadecki, Nathan J.; Ruiz, Sami Alom; Nelson, Celeste M.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2010-01-01

    Actomyosin contractility affects cellular organization within tissues in part through the generation of mechanical forces at sites of cell–matrix and cell–cell contact. While increased mechanical loading at cell–matrix adhesions results in focal adhesion growth, whether forces drive changes in the size of cell–cell adhesions remains an open question. To investigate the responsiveness of adherens junctions (AJ) to force, we adapted a system of microfabricated force sensors to quantitatively report cell–cell tugging force and AJ size. We observed that AJ size was modulated by endothelial cell–cell tugging forces: AJs and tugging force grew or decayed with myosin activation or inhibition, respectively. Myosin-dependent regulation of AJs operated in concert with a Rac1, and this coordinated regulation was illustrated by showing that the effects of vascular permeability agents (S1P, thrombin) on junctional stability were reversed by changing the extent to which these agents coupled to the Rac and myosin-dependent pathways. Furthermore, direct application of mechanical tugging force, rather than myosin activity per se, was sufficient to trigger AJ growth. These findings demonstrate that the dynamic coordination of mechanical forces and cell–cell adhesive interactions likely is critical to the maintenance of multicellular integrity and highlight the need for new approaches to study tugging forces. PMID:20463286

  18. Microinjection Technique for Assessment of Gap Junction Function.

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    Fridman, Michael D; Liu, Jun; Sun, Yu; Hamilton, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential for the proper function of many native mammalian tissues including neurons, cardiomyocytes, embryonic tissues, and muscle. Assessing these channels is therefore fundamental to understanding disease pathophysiology, developing therapies for a multitude of acquired and genetic conditions, and providing novel approaches to drug delivery and cellular communication. Microinjection is a robust, albeit difficult, technique, which provides considerable information that is superior to many of the simpler techniques due to its ability to isolate cells, quantify kinetics, and allow cross-comparison of multiple cell lines. Despite its user-dependent nature, the strengths of the technique are considerable and with the advent of new, automation technologies may improve further. This text describes the basic technique of microinjection and briefly discusses modern automation advances that can improve the success rates of this technique.

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions: structure, function and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeke, Emmanuel; Dingsdale, Hayley; Parker, Tony; Voronina, Svetlana; Tepikin, Alexei V

    2016-06-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-plasma membrane (PM) junctions are contact sites between the ER and the PM; the distance between the two organelles in the junctions is below 40 nm and the membranes are connected by protein tethers. A number of molecular tools and technical approaches have been recently developed to visualise, modify and characterise properties of ER-PM junctions. The junctions serve as the platforms for lipid exchange between the organelles and for cell signalling, notably Ca(2+) and cAMP signalling. Vice versa, signalling events regulate the development and properties of the junctions. Two Ca(2+) -dependent mechanisms of de novo formation of ER-PM junctions have been recently described and characterised. The junction-forming proteins and lipids are currently the focus of vigorous investigation. Junctions can be relatively short-lived and simple structures, forming and dissolving on the time scale of a few minutes. However, complex, sophisticated and multifunctional ER-PM junctions, capable of attracting numerous protein residents and other cellular organelles, have been described in some cell types. The road from simplicity to complexity, i.e. the transformation from simple 'nascent' ER-PM junctions to advanced stable multiorganellar complexes, is likely to become an attractive research avenue for current and future junctologists. Another area of considerable research interest is the downstream cellular processes that can be activated by specific local signalling events in the ER-PM junctions. Studies of the cell physiology and indeed pathophysiology of ER-PM junctions have already produced some surprising discoveries, likely to expand with advances in our understanding of these remarkable organellar contact sites. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  20. Treatment with the gap junction modifier rotigaptide (ZP123) reduces infarct size in rats with chronic myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, Ketil; Marcussen, Niels; Kjølbye, Anne Louise; Nielsen, Morten Schak; Hennan, James K; Petersen, Jørgen Søberg

    2006-02-01

    Treatment with non-selective drugs (eg, long-chain alcohols, halothane) that reduce gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) is associated with reduced infarct size after myocardial infarction (MI). Therefore, it has been suggested that gap junction intercellular communication stimulating compounds may increase infarct size. The antiarrhythmic peptide analogue rotigaptide (ZP123) increases cardiac gap junction intercellular communication and the purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of rotigaptide treatment on infarct size. Myocardial infarction was induced in male rats by ligation of the left anterior descending artery (LAD). Rats (n = 156) were treated with rotigaptide at three dose levels or vehicle from the onset of ischemia and for 3 weeks following LAD occlusion. Infarct size was determined using histomorphometry after 3 weeks treatment. Rotigaptide treatment producing steady state plasma levels of 0.8 +/- 0.1, 5.5 +/- 0.5, and 86 +/- 8 nmol/L had no effect on mortality, but reduced infarct size to 90 +/- 10% (P = 0.41), 67 +/- 7% (P = 0.005), and 82 +/- 7% (P = 0.13), respectively relative to vehicle-treated myocardial infarction rats (100 +/- 12%). In contrast to what was predicted, our data demonstrates that rotigaptide treatment was associated with a significant infarct size reduction. We conclude that whereas treatment with non-selective inhibitors of gap junction intercellular communication cause a reduction in infarct size, this information cannot be extrapolated to the effects of compounds that selectively increase gap junction intercellular communication.

  1. Volume-of-fluid simulations in microfluidic T-junction devices: Influence of viscosity ratio on droplet size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekouei, Mehdi; Vanapalli, Siva A.

    2017-03-01

    We used volume-of-fluid (VOF) method to perform three-dimensional numerical simulations of droplet formation of Newtonian fluids in microfluidic T-junction devices. To evaluate the performance of the VOF method we examined the regimes of drop formation and determined droplet size as a function of system parameters. Comparison of the simulation results with four sets of experimental data from the literature showed good agreement, validating the VOF method. Motivated by the lack of adequate studies investigating the influence of viscosity ratio (λ) on the generated droplet size, we mapped the dependence of drop volume on capillary number (0.001 1. In addition, we find that at a given capillary number, the size of droplets does not vary appreciably when λ 1. We develop an analytical model for predicting the droplet size that includes a viscosity-dependent breakup time for the dispersed phase. This improved model successfully predicts the effects of the viscosity ratio observed in simulations. Results from this study are useful for the design of lab-on-chip technologies and manufacture of microfluidic emulsions, where there is a need to know how system parameters influence the droplet size.

  2. Intestinal epithelial barrier function and tight junction proteins with heat and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dokladny, Karol; Zuhl, Micah N; Moseley, Pope L

    2016-01-01

    (passive hyperthermia) heat stress on tight junction barrier function in in vitro and in vivo (animals and humans) models. Our secondary focus is to review changes in tight junction proteins in response to exercise or hyperthermic conditions. Finally, we discuss some pharmacological or nutritional...... interventions that may affect the cellular mechanisms involved in maintaining homeostasis of the intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier during heat stress or exercise....

  3. The role of tight junctions in mammary gland function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelwagen, Kerst; Singh, Kuljeet

    2014-03-01

    Tight junctions (TJ) are cellular structures that facilitate cell-cell communication and are important in maintaining the three-dimensional structure of epithelia. It is only during the last two decades that the molecular make-up of TJ is becoming unravelled, with two major transmembrane-spanning structural protein families, called occludin and claudins, being the true constituents of the TJ. These TJ proteins are linked via specific scaffolding proteins to the cell's cytoskeleton. In the mammary gland TJ between adjacent secretory epithelial cells are formed during lactogenesis and are instrumental in establishing and maintaining milk synthesis and secretion, whereas TJ integrity is compromised during mammary involution and also as result of mastitis and periods of mammary inflamation (including mastitis). They prevent the paracellular transport of ions and small molecules between the blood and milk compartments. Formation of intact TJ at the start of lactation is important for the establishment of the lactation. Conversely, loss of TJ integrity has been linked to reduced milk secretion and mammary function and increased paracellular transport of blood components into the milk and vice versa. In addition to acting as a paracellular barrier, the TJ is increasingly linked to playing an active role in intracellular signalling. This review focusses on the role of TJ in mammary function of the normal, non-malignant mammary gland, predominantly in ruminants, the major dairy producing species.

  4. An investigation of the effect of grain size on some properties of intrinsic Josephson junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslan Çataltepe, Özden, E-mail: ozdenaslan@yahoo.com [Gedik University, Faculty of Engineering, Yakacık/Kartal, 34876, İstanbul (Turkey); Güven Özdemir, Zeynep [Yıldız Technical University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science and Arts, Davutpaşa Campus, Esenler 34210, İstanbul (Turkey); Onbaşli, Ülker [University of Marmara, Physics Department, Faculty of Science and Arts, Rıdvanpaşa cad.3.sok., 85/12, 34730, Göztepe, İstanbul (Turkey)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: ► Grain size, t, determined by SEM, has a key role for intrinsic Josephson Junctions. ► Supercurrent density and Josephson penetration depth are changed with variation of t. ► HgBa{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 8+x} (Hg-1223) consists of intrinsic Josephson junction array. ► The effect of t on electrodynamics parameters of Hg-1223 was investigated by SEM. -- Abstract: Some superconducting parameters of the high temperature superconductors, such as the plasma frequency and the critical transition temperature, depend on the oxygen content of the material. Since the oxygen content is effective on the grain size of the system, the under, optimally and over oxygen doped Hg-based copper oxide layered superconductors, which have the hole type superconductivity, have been investigated in this study. As is known that the concentration of hole type carriers is increased via optimally oxygen annealing. In other words, relatively higher values for the various critical parameters are achieved by the optimally oxygen doping procedure. In this work, the grain sizes of the oxygen annealed samples have been investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Moreover, the magnetization data obtained via Superconducting Interference Quantum Device (SQUID) has been utilized for calculation of critical current density, which is essential parameter for determining Josephson penetration depth. The Josephson penetration depths of the systems have been calculated by Lawrence–Doniach Model for high temperature superconductors. Since plasma frequency of the system is inversely proportional to Josephson penetration depth, the plasma frequencies of the various doping profiles have also been calculated for the high temperature superconductor investigated.

  5. Observation of quantum oscillation of work function in ultrathin-metal/semiconductor junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takhar, Kuldeep; Meer, Mudassar; Khachariya, Dolar; Ganguly, Swaroop; Saha, Dipankar, E-mail: dipankarsaha@iitb.ac.in [Applied Quantum Mechanics Laboratory, Centre of Excellence in Nanoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2015-09-15

    Quantization in energy level due to confinement is generally observed for semiconductors. This property is used for various quantum devices, and it helps to improve the characteristics of conventional devices. Here, the authors have demonstrated the quantum size effects in ultrathin metal (Ni) layers sandwiched between two large band-gap materials. The metal work function is found to oscillate as a function of its thickness. The thermionic emission current bears the signature of the oscillating work function, which has a linear relationship with barrier heights. This methodology allows direct observation of quantum oscillations in metals at room temperature using a Schottky diode and electrical measurements using source-measure-units. The observed phenomena can provide additional mechanism to tune the barrier height of metal/semiconductor junctions, which are used for various electronic devices.

  6. Functional consequences of heterogeneous gap junction channel formation and its influence in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, G Trevor; Burt, Janis M

    2005-06-10

    The capacity of multiple connexins to hetero-oligomerize into functional heterogeneous gap junction channels has been demonstrated in vivo, in vitro, and in nonmammalian expression systems. These heterogeneous channels display gating activity, channel conductances, selectivity and regulatory behaviors that are sometimes not predicted by the behaviors of the corresponding homogeneous channels. Such observations suggest that heteromerization of gap junction proteins offers an efficient cellular strategy for finely regulating cell-to-cell communication. The available evidence strongly indicates that heterogeneous gap junction assembly is important to normal growth and differentiation, and may influence the appearance of several disease states. Definitive evidence that heterogeneous gap junction channels differentially regulate electrical conduction in excitable cells is absent. This review examines the prevalence, regulation, and implications of gap junction channel hetero-oligomerization.

  7. Mixing at double-Tee junctions with unequal pipe sizes in water distribution systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipe flow mixing with various solute concentrations and flow rates at pipe junctions is investigated. The degree of mixing affects the spread of contaminants in a water distribution system. Many studies have been conducted on the mixing at the cross junctions. Yet a few have focu...

  8. Mixing at double-Tee junctions with unequal pipe sizes in water distribution systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Pipe flow mixing with various solute concentrations and flow rates at pipe junctions is investigated. The degree of mixing affects the spread of contaminants in a...

  9. Avoiding self-repulsion in density functional description of biased molecular junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, Roi [Department of Physical Chemistry and Lise Meitner Minerva-Center for Computational Quantum Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)], E-mail: roi.baer@huji.ac.il; Livshits, Ester [Department of Physical Chemistry and Lise Meitner Minerva-Center for Computational Quantum Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Neuhauser, Daniel [Department of Physical Chemistry and Lise Meitner Minerva-Center for Computational Quantum Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)], E-mail: dxn@chem.ucla.edu

    2006-10-26

    We examine the effects of self-repulsion on the predictions of charge distribution in biased molecular junctions by the local density functional theory methods. This is done using a functional with explicit long-range exchange term effects [R. Baer, D. Neuhauser, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 043002]. We discuss in detail the new density functional, pointing out some of the remaining difficulties in the theory. We find that in weakly coupled junctions (the typical molecular electronics case) local-density functionals fail to describe correctly the charge distribution in the intermediate bias regime.

  10. Structure of the gap junction channel and its implications for its biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Shoji; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2011-04-01

    Gap junctions consist of arrays of intercellular channels composed of integral membrane proteins called connexin in vertebrates. Gap junction channels regulate the passage of ions and biological molecules between adjacent cells and, therefore, are critically important in many biological activities, including development, differentiation, neural activity, and immune response. Mutations in connexin genes are associated with several human diseases, such as neurodegenerative disease, skin disease, deafness, and developmental abnormalities. The activity of gap junction channels is regulated by the membrane voltage, intracellular microenvironment, interaction with other proteins, and phosphorylation. Each connexin channel has its own property for conductance and molecular permeability. A number of studies have tried to reveal the molecular architecture of the channel pore that should confer the connexin-specific permeability/selectivity properties and molecular basis for the gating and regulation. In this review, we give an overview of structural studies and describe the structural and functional relationship of gap junction channels.

  11. Investigation on etch characteristics of nanometer-sized magnetic tunnel junction stacks using a HBr/Ar plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Ho; Xiao, Yu Bin; Kong, Seon Mi; Chung, Chee Won

    2011-07-01

    The etch characteristics of CoFeB magnetic films and magnetic-tunnel-junction (MTJ) stacks masked with Ti films were investigated using an inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching in a HBr/Ar gas mix. The etch rate, etch selectivity, and etch profile of the CoFeB films were obtained as a function of the HBr concentration. As the HBr gas was added to Ar, the etch rate of the CoFeB films, and the etch selectivity to the Ti hard mask, gradually decreased, but the etch profile of the CoFeB films was improved. The effects of the HBr concentration and etch parameters on the etch profile of the MTJ stacks with a nanometer-sized 70 x 100 nm2 pattern were explored. At 10% HBr concentration, low ICP RF power, and low DC-bias voltage, better etch profiles of the MTJ stacks were obtained without redeposition. It was confirmed that the protective layer containing hydrogen, and the surface bombardment of the Ar ions, played a key role in obtaining a steep sidewall angle in the etch profile. Fine-pattern transfer of the MTJ stacks with a high degree of anisotropy was achieved using a HBr/Ar gas chemistry.

  12. Tight junction-associated MARVEL proteins marveld3, tricellulin, and occludin have distinct but overlapping functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raleigh, David R; Marchiando, Amanda M; Zhang, Yong; Shen, Le; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Wang, Yingmin; Long, Manyuan; Turner, Jerrold R

    2010-04-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that occludin and tricellulin are important for tight junction barrier function, but in vivo data suggest that loss of these proteins can be overcome. The presence of a heretofore unknown, yet related, protein could explain these observations. Here, we report marvelD3, a novel tight junction protein that, like occludin and tricellulin, contains a conserved four-transmembrane MARVEL (MAL and related proteins for vesicle trafficking and membrane link) domain. Phylogenetic tree reconstruction; analysis of RNA and protein tissue distribution; immunofluorescent and electron microscopic examination of subcellular localization; characterization of intracellular trafficking, protein interactions, dynamic behavior, and siRNA knockdown effects; and description of remodeling after in vivo immune activation show that marvelD3, occludin, and tricellulin have distinct but overlapping functions at the tight junction. Although marvelD3 is able to partially compensate for occludin or tricellulin loss, it cannot fully restore function. We conclude that marvelD3, occludin, and tricellulin define the tight junction-associated MARVEL protein family. The data further suggest that these proteins are best considered as a group with both redundant and unique contributions to epithelial function and tight junction regulation.

  13. Connexins: a myriad of functions extending beyond assembly of gap junction channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mroue Rana M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Connexins constitute a large family of trans-membrane proteins that allow intercellular communication and the transfer of ions and small signaling molecules between cells. Recent studies have revealed complex translational and post-translational mechanisms that regulate connexin synthesis, maturation, membrane transport and degradation that in turn modulate gap junction intercellular communication. With the growing myriad of connexin interacting proteins, including cytoskeletal elements, junctional proteins, and enzymes, gap junctions are now perceived, not only as channels between neighboring cells, but as signaling complexes that regulate cell function and transformation. Connexins have also been shown to form functional hemichannels and have roles altogether independent of channel functions, where they exert their effects on proliferation and other aspects of life and death of the cell through mostly-undefined mechanisms. This review provides an updated overview of current knowledge of connexins and their interacting proteins, and it describes connexin modulation in disease and tumorigenesis.

  14. Connexins: a myriad of functions extending beyond assembly of gap junction channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dbouk, Hashem A; Mroue, Rana M; El-Sabban, Marwan E; Talhouk, Rabih S

    2009-03-12

    Connexins constitute a large family of trans-membrane proteins that allow intercellular communication and the transfer of ions and small signaling molecules between cells. Recent studies have revealed complex translational and post-translational mechanisms that regulate connexin synthesis, maturation, membrane transport and degradation that in turn modulate gap junction intercellular communication. With the growing myriad of connexin interacting proteins, including cytoskeletal elements, junctional proteins, and enzymes, gap junctions are now perceived, not only as channels between neighboring cells, but as signaling complexes that regulate cell function and transformation. Connexins have also been shown to form functional hemichannels and have roles altogether independent of channel functions, where they exert their effects on proliferation and other aspects of life and death of the cell through mostly-undefined mechanisms. This review provides an updated overview of current knowledge of connexins and their interacting proteins, and it describes connexin modulation in disease and tumorigenesis.

  15. Energy level alignment and quantum conductance of functionalized metal-molecule junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Chengjun; Strange, Mikkel; Markussen, Troels;

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of functional groups (CH3*4, OCH3, CH3, Cl, CN, F*4) on the electronic transport properties of 1,4-benzenediamine molecular junctions using the non-equilibrium Green function method. Exchange and correlation effects are included at various levels of theory, namely density func...

  16. Gap junctions in cells of the immune system: structure, regulation and possible functional roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Sáez

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Gap junction channels are sites of cytoplasmic communication between contacting cells. In vertebrates, they consist of protein subunits denoted connexins (Cxs which are encoded by a gene family. According to their Cx composition, gap junction channels show different gating and permeability properties that define which ions and small molecules permeate them. Differences in Cx primary sequences suggest that channels composed of different Cxs are regulated differentially by intracellular pathways under specific physiological conditions. Functional roles of gap junction channels could be defined by the relative importance of permeant substances, resulting in coordination of electrical and/or metabolic cellular responses. Cells of the native and specific immune systems establish transient homo- and heterocellular contacts at various steps of the immune response. Morphological and functional studies reported during the last three decades have revealed that many intercellular contacts between cells in the immune response present gap junctions or "gap junction-like" structures. Partial characterization of the molecular composition of some of these plasma membrane structures and regulatory mechanisms that control them have been published recently. Studies designed to elucidate their physiological roles suggest that they might permit coordination of cellular events which favor the effective and timely response of the immune system.

  17. Nucleolar function and size in cancer cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Derenzini, M; Trerè, D; Pession, A; Montanaro, L; Sirri, V.; Ochs, R. L.

    1998-01-01

    We have have studied the relationship between nucleolar function and size and cell doubling time in cancer cells. Seven human cancer cell lines characterized by different proliferation rates were used. Nucleolar functional activity was evaluated by measuring RNA polymerase I activity and expression of RNA polymerase I upstream binding factor (UBF), DNA topoisomerase I, and fibrillarin, three proteins involved in synthesis and processing of rRNA. Transcriptional activity of RNA polymerase I wa...

  18. Interfering amino terminal peptides and functional implications for heteromeric gap junction formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard David Veenstra

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Connexin43 (Cx43 is widely expressed in many different tissues of the human body. In cells of some organs, Cx43 is co-expressed with other connexins (Cx, including Cx46 and Cx50 in lens, Cx40 in atrium, Purkinje fibers, and the blood vessel wall, Cx45 in heart, and Cx37 in the ovary. Interactions with the co-expressed connexins may have profound functional implications. The abilities of Cx37, Cx45, Cx46, and Cx50 to function in heteromeric gap junction combinations with Cx43 are well documented. Different studies disagree regarding the ability of Cx43 and Cx40 to produce functional heteromeric gap junctions with each other. We review previous studies regarding the heteromeric interactions of Cx43. The possibility of negative functional interactions between the cytoplasmic pore-forming amino terminal (NT domains of these connexins was assessed using pentameric connexin sequence-specific NT domain (iNT peptides applied to cells expressing homomeric Cx40, Cx37, Cx45, Cx46, and Cx50 gap junctions. A Cx43 iNT peptide corresponding to amino acids 9 to 13 (Ac-KLLDK-NH2 specifically inhibited the electrical coupling of Cx40 gap junctions in a transjunctional (Vj voltage-dependent manner without affecting the function of homologous Cx37, Cx46, Cx50, and Cx45 gap junctions. A Cx40 iNT (Ac-EFLEE-OH peptide counteracted the Vj-dependent block of Cx40 gap junctions, whereas a similarly charged Cx50 iNT (Ac-EEVNE-OH peptide did not, suggesting that these NT domain interactions are not solely based on electrostatics. These data are consistent with functional Cx43 heteromeric gap junction formation with Cx37, Cx45, Cx46, and Cx50 and suggest that Cx40 uniquely experiences functional suppressive interactions with a Cx43 NT domain sequence. These findings present unique functional implications about the heteromeric interactions between Cx43 and Cx40 that may influence cardiac conduction in atrial myocardium and the specialized conduction system.

  19. Prediction of chaos in a Josephson junction by the Melnikov-function technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartuccelli, M.; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1986-01-01

    The Melnikov function for prediction of Smale horseshoe chaos is applied to the rf-driven Josephson junction. Linear and quadratic damping resistors are considered. In the latter case the analytic solution including damping and dc bias is used to obtain an improved threshold curve for the onset...

  20. Dc SQUIDs with sub-micron-sized Nb/HfTi/Nb Josephson junctions for operation in high magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, Joachim; Konovalenko, Konstantin; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter [Physikalisches Institut - Experimentalphysik II, Center for Collective Quantum Phenomena and their Applications, Universitaet Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 (Germany); Kieler, Oliver; Kohlmann, Johannes; Zorin, Alexander [Fachbereich 2.4 ' ' Quantenelektronik' ' , Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    We investigate the suitability of dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) for operation in high magnetic fields (up to B{approx}100 mT) at temperature T=4.2 K. The micro SQUIDs with superconductor (S)-normal metal (N)-superconductor (S) sub-micrometer Josephson junctions were realized using Nb electrodes and HfTi for the normal interlayer. Our fabrication technology combines e-beam lithography and chemical-mechanical polishing which enables junction sizes down to 200 nm x 200 nm, integrated into small superconductor rings with inner dimensions down to 0.5 {mu} m x 0.5 {mu} m. The characteristic voltage of the SNS junctions is typically 30-40 {mu}V with a McCumber parameter {beta}{sub C}<0.1, and a screening parameter of the SQUIDs {beta}{sub L}{approx}0.2. The SQUIDs where characterized by measurements of electric transport and noise (using a Nb dc SQUID amplifier) in a magnetically shielded environment as well as in high magnetic fields. The SQUIDs show very low flux noise which is a major prerequisite for their application as detectors for magnetic properties of nanoparticles.

  1. Autophagy enhances intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier function by targeting claudin-2 protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nighot, Prashant K; Hu, Chien-An Andy; Ma, Thomas Y

    2015-03-13

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation pathway and is considered to be an essential cell survival mechanism. Defects in autophagy are implicated in many pathological processes, including inflammatory bowel disease. Among the innate defense mechanisms of intestinal mucosa, a defective tight junction (TJ) barrier has been postulated as a key pathogenic factor in the causation and progression of inflammatory bowel disease by allowing increased antigenic permeation. The cross-talk between autophagy and the TJ barrier has not yet been described. In this study, we present the novel finding that autophagy enhances TJ barrier function in Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. Nutrient starvation-induced autophagy significantly increased transepithelial electrical resistance and reduced the ratio of sodium/chloride paracellular permeability. Nutrient starvation reduced the paracellular permeability of small-sized urea but not larger molecules. The role of autophagy in the modulation of paracellular permeability was confirmed by pharmacological induction as well as pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy. Consistent with the autophagy-induced reduction in paracellular permeability, a marked decrease in the level of the cation-selective, pore-forming TJ protein claudin-2 was observed after cell starvation. Starvation reduced the membrane presence of claudin-2 and increased its cytoplasmic, lysosomal localization. Therefore, our data show that autophagy selectively reduces epithelial TJ permeability of ions and small molecules by lysosomal degradation of the TJ protein claudin-2.

  2. Quantum size effects on spin-transfer torque in a double barrier magnetic tunnel junction with a nonmagnetic-metal (semiconductor) spacer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daqiq, Reza; Ghobadi, Nader

    2016-07-15

    We study the quantum size effects of an MgO-based double barrier magnetic tunnel junction with a nonmagnetic-metal (DBMTJ-NM) (semiconductor (DBMTJ-SC)) spacer on the charge current and the spin-transfer torque (STT) components using non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. The results show oscillatory behavior due to the resonant tunneling effect depending on the structure parameters. We find that the charge current and the STT components in the DBMTJ-SC demonstrate the magnitude enhancement in comparison with the DBMTJ-NM. The bias dependence of the STT components in a DBMTJ-NM shows different behavior in comparison with spin valves and conventional MTJs. Therefore, by choosing a specific SC spacer with suitable thickness in a DBMTJ the charge current and the STT components significantly increase so that one can design a device with high STT and faster magnetization switching. - Highlights: • The quantum size effects are studied in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions. • Spin torque (ST) components oscillate for increasing of middle spacer thicknesses. • Due to the resonant tunneling in the quantum well, oscillations have appeared. • By replacement a metal spacer with a semiconductor (ZnO) ST has increased. • The ST components vs. bias show gradually decreasing unlike spin valves or MTJs.

  3. Gap Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  4. Gap junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2012-07-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1853-1872, 2012.

  5. Modulation of Tight Junction Structure and Function by Kinases and Phosphatases Targeting Occludin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Johannes Dörfel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tight junctions (TJs typically represent the most apical contacts in epithelial and endothelial cell layers where they play an essential role in the separation of extracellular or luminal spaces from underlying tissues in the body. Depending on the protein composition, TJs define the barrier characteristics and in addition maintain cell polarity. Two major families of integral membrane proteins form the typical TJ strand network, the tight junction-associated MARVEL protein (TAMP family members occludin, tricellulin, and MarvelD3 as well as a specific set of claudins. Occludin was the first identified member of these tetraspanins and is now widely accepted as a regulator of TJ assembly and function. Therefore, occludin itself has to be tightly regulated. Phosphorylation of occludin appears to be of central importance in this context. Here we want to summarize current knowledge on the kinases and phosphatases directly modifying occludin, and their role in the regulation of TJ structure, function, and dynamics.

  6. Quantum size effects on spin-transfer torque in a double barrier magnetic tunnel junction with a nonmagnetic-metal (semiconductor) spacer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daqiq, Reza; Ghobadi, Nader

    2016-07-01

    We study the quantum size effects of an MgO-based double barrier magnetic tunnel junction with a nonmagnetic-metal (DBMTJ-NM) (semiconductor (DBMTJ-SC)) spacer on the charge current and the spin-transfer torque (STT) components using non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. The results show oscillatory behavior due to the resonant tunneling effect depending on the structure parameters. We find that the charge current and the STT components in the DBMTJ-SC demonstrate the magnitude enhancement in comparison with the DBMTJ-NM. The bias dependence of the STT components in a DBMTJ-NM shows different behavior in comparison with spin valves and conventional MTJs. Therefore, by choosing a specific SC spacer with suitable thickness in a DBMTJ the charge current and the STT components significantly increase so that one can design a device with high STT and faster magnetization switching.

  7. The caecocolonic junction in humans has a sphincteric anatomy and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faussone Pellegrini, M S; Manneschi, L I; Manneschi, L

    1995-01-01

    Sphincteric anatomy and function are present at the caecocolonic junction in several mammals. In humans, radiologists and endoscopists have respectively reported a circumferential contraction and a prominent ileocaecal fold at the border area between the caecum and the ascending colon. Anatomical findings on necropsy material failed to confirm its presence. Microscopic studies on surgical specimens showed the existence of muscular and innervational patterns different from those of adjacent areas. The aim of this work was to confirm the existence of a specialised fold at the caecocolonic junction in humans and to ascertain its role by carrying out a study of functional anatomy. Pancolonoscopies were performed on 100 patients and ileocaecal fold behaviour was observed before and after mechanical stimulation. Isolated ileocaecocolonic regions, surgically obtained, were filled with a fixative solution to study their macro and microscopic morphology after stimulation. Endoscopically, the ileocaecal fold was semilunar or circular in shape and spontaneous or evoked spasms occurred in 52 patients. A prominent circular fold could be seen in surgical specimens after stimulation. The entire muscle coat deeply penetrated this fold, showing the features characteristic of the ileocaecal junction. In particular, the inner portion of the circular muscle showed a peculiar arrangement and was thicker than elsewhere. These results show that in humans the caecocolonic junction is provided with a sphincter morphology and function. Little is known about its physiological relevance in ileal flow accommodation and caecal filling and emptying but it should not be underestimated with regard to some colonic motility disorders. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7489934

  8. Comparative study of size dependent four-point probe sheet resistance measurement on laser annealed ultra-shallow junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Lin, Rong; Hansen, Torben Mikael;

    2008-01-01

    In this comparative study, the authors demonstrate the relationship/correlation between macroscopic and microscopic four-point sheet resistance measurements on laser annealed ultra-shallow junctions (USJs). Microfabricated cantilever four-point probes with probe pitch ranging from 1.5 to 500 mu m...... have been used to characterize the sheet resistance uniformity of millisecond laser annealed USJs. They verify, both experimentally and theoretically, that the probe pitch of a four-point probe can strongly affect the measured sheet resistance. Such effect arises from the sensitivity (or "spot size......") of an in-line four-point probe. Their study shows the benefit of the spatial resolution of the micro four-point probe technique to characterize stitching effects resulting from the laser annealing process....

  9. Functional morphology and biomechanics of branch-stem junctions in columnar cacti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwager, Hannes; Masselter, Tom; Speck, Thomas; Neinhuis, Christoph

    2013-12-07

    Branching in columnar cacti features morphological and anatomical characteristics specific to the subfamily Cactoideae. The most conspicuous features are the pronounced constrictions at the branch-stem junctions, which are also present in the lignified vascular structures within the succulent cortex. Based on finite-element analyses of ramification models, we demonstrate that these indentations in the region of high flexural and torsional stresses are not regions of structural weakness (e.g. allowing vegetative propagation). On the contrary, they can be regarded as anatomical adaptations to increase the stability by fine-tuning the stress state and stress directions in the junction along prevalent fibre directions. Biomimetic adaptations improving the functionality of ramifications in technical components, inspired, in particular, by the fine-tuned geometrical shape and arrangement of lignified strengthening tissues of biological role models, might contribute to the development of alternative concepts for branched fibre-reinforced composite structures within a limited design space.

  10. Functional morphology and biomechanics of branch–stem junctions in columnar cacti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwager, Hannes; Masselter, Tom; Speck, Thomas; Neinhuis, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Branching in columnar cacti features morphological and anatomical characteristics specific to the subfamily Cactoideae. The most conspicuous features are the pronounced constrictions at the branch–stem junctions, which are also present in the lignified vascular structures within the succulent cortex. Based on finite-element analyses of ramification models, we demonstrate that these indentations in the region of high flexural and torsional stresses are not regions of structural weakness (e.g. allowing vegetative propagation). On the contrary, they can be regarded as anatomical adaptations to increase the stability by fine-tuning the stress state and stress directions in the junction along prevalent fibre directions. Biomimetic adaptations improving the functionality of ramifications in technical components, inspired, in particular, by the fine-tuned geometrical shape and arrangement of lignified strengthening tissues of biological role models, might contribute to the development of alternative concepts for branched fibre-reinforced composite structures within a limited design space. PMID:24132310

  11. Experimental and Theoretical Analysis of Nanotransport in Oligophenylene Dithiol Junctions as a Function of Molecular Length and Contact Work Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zuoti; Bâldea, Ioan; Smith, Christopher E; Wu, Yanfei; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2015-08-25

    We report the results of an extensive investigation of metal-molecule-metal tunnel junctions based on oligophenylene dithiols (OPDs) bound to several types of electrodes (M1-S-(C6H4)n-S-M2, with 1 ≤ n ≤ 4 and M1,2 = Ag, Au, Pt) to examine the impact of molecular length (n) and metal work function (Φ) on junction properties. Our investigation includes (1) measurements by scanning Kelvin probe microscopy of electrode work function changes (ΔΦ = ΦSAM - Φ) caused by chemisorption of OPD self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), (2) measurements of junction current-voltage (I-V) characteristics by conducting probe atomic force microscopy in the linear and nonlinear bias ranges, and (3) direct quantitative analysis of the full I-V curves. Further, we employ transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS) to estimate the energetic alignment εh = EF - EHOMO of the dominant molecular orbital (HOMO) relative to the Fermi energy EF of the junction. Where photoelectron spectroscopy data are available, the εh values agree very well with those determined by TVS. Using a single-level model, which we justify via ab initio quantum chemical calculations at post-density functional theory level and additional UV-visible absorption measurements, we are able to quantitatively reproduce the I-V measurements in the whole bias range investigated (∼1.0-1.5 V) and to understand the behavior of εh and Γ (contact coupling strength) extracted from experiment. We find that Fermi level pinning induced by the strong dipole of the metal-S bond causes a significant shift of the HOMO energy of an adsorbed molecule, resulting in εh exhibiting a weak dependence with the work function Φ. Both of these parameters play a key role in determining the tunneling attenuation factor (β) and junction resistance (R). Correlation among Φ, ΔΦ, R, transition voltage (Vt), and εh and accurate simulation provide a remarkably complete picture of tunneling transport in these prototypical molecular junctions.

  12. Neural progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone present hemichannel activity and form functional gap junctions with glial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío eTalaverón

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The postnatal subventricular zone lining the walls of the lateral ventricles contains neural progenitor cells (NPCs that generate new olfactory bulb interneurons. Communication via gap junctions between cells in the subventricular zone is involved in NPC proliferation and in neuroblast migration towards the olfactory bulb. Subventricular zone NPCs can be expanded in vitro in the form of neurospheres that can be used for transplantation purposes after brain injury. We have previously reported that neurosphere-derived NPCs form heterocellular gap junctions with host glial cells when they are implanted after mechanical injury. To analyze functionality of NPC-glial cell gap junctions we performed dye coupling experiments in co-cultures of subventricular zone NPCs with astrocytes or microglia. Neurosphere-derived cells expressed mRNA for at least the hemichannel/gap junction channel proteins connexin 26 (Cx26, Cx43, Cx45 and pannexin 1. Dye coupling experiments revealed that gap junctional communication occurred among neurosphere cells (incidence of coupling: 100%. Moreover, hemichannel activity was also detected in neurosphere cells as evaluated in time-lapse measurements of ethidium bromide uptake. Heterocellular coupling between NPCs and glial cells was evidenced in co-cultures of neurospheres with astrocytes (incidence of coupling: 91.0 ± 4.7% or with microglia (incidence of coupling: 71.9 ± 6.7%. Dye coupling in neurospheres and in co-cultures was inhibited by octanol, a gap junction blocker. Altogether, these results suggest the existence of functional hemichannels and gap junction channels in postnatal subventricular zone neurospheres. In addition, they demonstrate that subventricular zone-derived NPCs can establish functional gap junctions with astrocytes or microglia. Therefore, cell-cell communication via gap junctions and hemichannels with host glial cells might subserve a role in the functional integration of NPCs after implantation in

  13. Neural progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone present hemichannel activity and form functional gap junctions with glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaverón, Rocío; Fernández, Paola; Escamilla, Rosalba; Pastor, Angel M; Matarredona, Esperanza R; Sáez, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    The postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ) lining the walls of the lateral ventricles contains neural progenitor cells (NPCs) that generate new olfactory bulb interneurons. Communication via gap junctions between cells in the SVZ is involved in NPC proliferation and in neuroblast migration towards the olfactory bulb. SVZ NPCs can be expanded in vitro in the form of neurospheres that can be used for transplantation purposes after brain injury. We have previously reported that neurosphere-derived NPCs form heterocellular gap junctions with host glial cells when they are implanted after mechanical injury. To analyze functionality of NPC-glial cell gap junctions we performed dye coupling experiments in co-cultures of SVZ NPCs with astrocytes or microglia. Neurosphere-derived cells expressed mRNA for at least the hemichannel/gap junction channel proteins connexin 26 (Cx26), Cx43, Cx45 and pannexin 1 (Panx1). Dye coupling experiments revealed that gap junctional communication occurred among neurosphere cells (incidence of coupling: 100%). Moreover, hemichannel activity was also detected in neurosphere cells as evaluated in time-lapse measurements of ethidium bromide uptake. Heterocellular coupling between NPCs and glial cells was evidenced in co-cultures of neurospheres with astrocytes (incidence of coupling: 91.0 ± 4.7%) or with microglia (incidence of coupling: 71.9 ± 6.7%). Dye coupling in neurospheres and in co-cultures was inhibited by octanol, a gap junction blocker. Altogether, these results suggest the existence of functional hemichannels and gap junction channels in postnatal SVZ neurospheres. In addition, they demonstrate that SVZ-derived NPCs can establish functional gap junctions with astrocytes or microglia. Therefore, cell-cell communication via gap junctions and hemichannels with host glial cells might subserve a role in the functional integration of NPCs after implantation in the damaged brain.

  14. Neural progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone present hemichannel activity and form functional gap junctions with glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaverón, Rocío; Fernández, Paola; Escamilla, Rosalba; Pastor, Angel M.; Matarredona, Esperanza R.; Sáez, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    The postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ) lining the walls of the lateral ventricles contains neural progenitor cells (NPCs) that generate new olfactory bulb interneurons. Communication via gap junctions between cells in the SVZ is involved in NPC proliferation and in neuroblast migration towards the olfactory bulb. SVZ NPCs can be expanded in vitro in the form of neurospheres that can be used for transplantation purposes after brain injury. We have previously reported that neurosphere-derived NPCs form heterocellular gap junctions with host glial cells when they are implanted after mechanical injury. To analyze functionality of NPC-glial cell gap junctions we performed dye coupling experiments in co-cultures of SVZ NPCs with astrocytes or microglia. Neurosphere-derived cells expressed mRNA for at least the hemichannel/gap junction channel proteins connexin 26 (Cx26), Cx43, Cx45 and pannexin 1 (Panx1). Dye coupling experiments revealed that gap junctional communication occurred among neurosphere cells (incidence of coupling: 100%). Moreover, hemichannel activity was also detected in neurosphere cells as evaluated in time-lapse measurements of ethidium bromide uptake. Heterocellular coupling between NPCs and glial cells was evidenced in co-cultures of neurospheres with astrocytes (incidence of coupling: 91.0 ± 4.7%) or with microglia (incidence of coupling: 71.9 ± 6.7%). Dye coupling in neurospheres and in co-cultures was inhibited by octanol, a gap junction blocker. Altogether, these results suggest the existence of functional hemichannels and gap junction channels in postnatal SVZ neurospheres. In addition, they demonstrate that SVZ-derived NPCs can establish functional gap junctions with astrocytes or microglia. Therefore, cell-cell communication via gap junctions and hemichannels with host glial cells might subserve a role in the functional integration of NPCs after implantation in the damaged brain. PMID:26528139

  15. The effect of InAs quantum-dot size and interdot distance on GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs/Ge multi-junction tandem solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qu Xiaosheng; Zhang Sisi; Bao Hongyin; Xiong Liling

    2013-01-01

    A metamorphic GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs/Ge multi-junction solar cell with InAs quantum dots is investigated,and the analytical expression of the energy conversion efficiency on the multi-junction tandem solar cell is derived using the detailed balance principle and the Kronig-Penney model.The influences of interdot distance,quantum-dot size and the intermediate band location on the energy conversion efficiency are studied.This shows that the maximum efficiency,as a function of quantum-dot size and distance,is about 60.15% under the maximum concentration for only one InAs/GaAs subcell,and is even up to 39.69% for the overall cell.In addition,other efficiency factors such as current mismatch,the formation ofa quasicontinuum conduction band and concentrated light are examined.

  16. Claudin Loss-of-Function Disrupts Tight Junctions and Impairs Amelogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Bardet

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Claudins are a family of proteins that forms paracellular barriers and pores determining tight junctions (TJ permeability. Claudin-16 and -19 are pore forming TJ proteins allowing calcium and magnesium reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (TAL. Loss-of-function mutations in the encoding genes, initially identified to cause Familial Hypomagnesemia with Hypercalciuria and Nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC, were recently shown to be also involved in Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI. In addition, both claudins were expressed in the murine tooth germ and Claudin-16 knockout (KO mice displayed abnormal enamel formation. Claudin-3, an ubiquitous claudin expressed in epithelia including kidney, acts as a barrier-forming tight junction protein. We determined that, similarly to claudin-16 and claudin-19, claudin-3 was expressed in the tooth germ, more precisely in the TJ located at the apical end of secretory ameloblasts. The observation of Claudin-3 KO teeth revealed enamel defects associated to impaired TJ structure at the secretory ends of ameloblasts and accumulation of matrix proteins in the forming enamel. Thus, claudin-3 protein loss-of-function disturbs amelogenesis similarly to claudin-16 loss-of-function, highlighting the importance of claudin proteins for the TJ structure. These findings unravel that loss-of-function of either pore or barrier-forming TJ proteins leads to enamel defects. Hence, the major structural function of claudin proteins appears essential for amelogenesis.

  17. Fabrication of nano-sized magnetic tunnel junctions using lift-off process assisted by atomic force probe tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ku Youl; Min, Byoung-Chul; Ahn, Chiyui; Choi, Gyung-Min; Shin, Il-Jae; Park, Seung-Young; Rhie, Kungwon; Shin, Kyung-Ho

    2013-09-01

    We present a fabrication method for nano-scale magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs), employing e-beam lithography and lift-off process assisted by the probe tip of atomic force microscope (AFM). It is challenging to fabricate nano-sized MTJs on small substrates because it is difficult to use chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process. The AFM-assisted lift-off process enables us to fabricate nano-sized MTJs on small substrates (12.5 mm x 12.5 mm) without CMP process. The e-beam patterning has been done using bi-layer resist, the poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA)/ hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ). The PMMA/HSQ resist patterns are used for both the etch mask for ion milling and the self-aligned mask for top contact formation after passivation. The self-aligned mask buried inside a passivation oxide layer, is readily lifted-off by the force exerted by the probe tip. The nano-MTJs (160 nm x 90 nm) fabricated by this method show clear current-induced magnetization switching with a reasonable TMR and critical switching current density.

  18. A mechanism of gap junction docking revealed by functional rescue of a human-disease-linked connexin mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiang-Qun; Nakagawa, So; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Bai, Donglin

    2013-07-15

    Gap junctions are unique intercellular channels formed by the proper docking of two hemichannels from adjacent cells. Each hemichannel is a hexamer of connexins (Cxs) - the gap junction subunits, which are encoded by 21 homologous genes in the human genome. The docking of two hemichannels to form a functional gap junction channel is only possible between compatible Cxs, but the underlying molecular mechanism is unclear. On the basis of the crystal structure of the Cx26 gap junction, we developed homology models for homotypic and heterotypic channels from Cx32 and/or Cx26; these models predict six hydrogen bonds at the docking interface of each pair of the second extracellular domain (E2). A Cx32 mutation N175H and a human-disease-linked mutant N175D were predicted to lose the majority of the hydrogen bonds at the E2 docking-interface; experimentally both mutations failed to form morphological and functional gap junctions. To restore the lost hydrogen bonds, two complementary Cx26 mutants - K168V and K168A were designed to pair with the Cx32 mutants. When docked with Cx26K168V or K168A, the Cx32N175H mutant was successfully rescued morphologically and functionally in forming gap junction channels, but not Cx32 mutant N175Y. By testing more homotypic and heterotypic Cx32 and/or Cx26 mutant combinations, it is revealed that a minimum of four hydrogen bonds at each E2-docking interface are required for proper docking and functional channel formation between Cx26 and Cx32 hemichannels. Interestingly, the disease-linked Cx32N175D could be rescued by Cx26D179N, which restored five hydrogen bonds at the E2-docking interface. Our findings not only provide a mechanism for gap junction docking for Cx26 and Cx32 hemichannels, but also a potential therapeutic strategy for gap junction channelopathies.

  19. Human Amniotic Fluid Cells Form Functional Gap Junctions with Cortical Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Jezierski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The usage of stem cells is a promising strategy for the repair of damaged tissue in the injured brain. Recently, amniotic fluid (AF cells have received a lot of attention as an alternative source of stem cells for cell-based therapies. However, the success of this approach relies significantly on proper interactions between graft and host tissue. In particular, the reestablishment of functional brain networks requires formation of gap junctions, as a key step to provide sufficient intercellular communication. In this study, we show that AF cells express high levels of CX43 (GJA1 and are able to establish functional gap junctions with cortical cultures. Furthermore, we report an induction of Cx43 expression in astrocytes following injury to the mouse motor cortex and demonstrate for the first time CX43 expression at the interface between implanted AF cells and host brain cells. These findings suggest that CX43-mediated intercellular communication between AF cells and cortical astrocytes may contribute to the reconstruction of damaged tissue by mediating modulatory, homeostatic, and protective factors in the injured brain and hence warrants further investigation.

  20. N-glycosylation controls the function of junctional adhesion molecule-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David W; Tolbert, Caitlin E; Graham, David M; Wittchen, Erika; Bear, James E; Burridge, Keith

    2015-09-15

    Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is an adherens and tight junction protein expressed by endothelial and epithelial cells. JAM-A serves many roles and contributes to barrier function and cell migration and motility, and it also acts as a ligand for the leukocyte receptor LFA-1. JAM-A is reported to contain N-glycans, but the extent of this modification and its contribution to the protein's functions are unknown. We show that human JAM-A contains a single N-glycan at N185 and that this residue is conserved across multiple mammalian species. A glycomutant lacking all N-glycans, N185Q, is able to reach the cell surface but exhibits decreased protein half-life compared with the wild- type protein. N-glycosylation of JAM-A is required for the protein's ability to reinforce barrier function and contributes to Rap1 activity. We further show that glycosylation of N185 is required for JAM-A-mediated reduction of cell migration. Finally, we show that N-glycosylation of JAM-A regulates leukocyte adhesion and LFA-1 binding. These findings identify N-glycosylation as critical for JAM-A's many functions. © 2015 Scott et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  1. Giant Peltier Effect in a Submicron-Sized Cu-Ni/Au Junction with Nanometer-Scale Phase Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Atsushi; Kodzuka, Masaya; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Yuasa, Shinji; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Ando, Koji; Takanashi, Koki; Ohkubo, Tadakatsu; Hono, Kazuhiro; Fukushima, Akio

    2010-06-01

    We observed a giant Peltier effect in a submicron Cu-Ni/Au junction. The Peltier coefficient was evaluated to be 480 mV at room temperature from the balance between Joule heating and the Peltier cooling effect in the junction, which is 40 times that expected from the Seebeck coefficients of bulk Au and Cu-Ni alloy. This giant cooling effect lowered the inner temperature of the junction by 160 K. Microstructure analysis with a three-dimensional atom probe suggested that the giant Peltier effect possibly originated from nanometer-scale phase separation in the Cu-Ni layer.

  2. [Remodeling of cardiac gap junctions and arrhythmias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhi-Bin; Sheng, Juan-Juan

    2011-12-25

    In the heart, gap junctions mediate electrical and chemical coupling between adjacent cardiomyocytes, forming the cell-to-cell pathways for orderly spread of the wave of electrical excitation responsible for a functional syncytium. Three principal connexins are expressed in cardiomyocytes, connexin 43 (CX43), CX40, and CX45. CX43 predominates in ventricular muscle cells. Most of the gap junctions, assembled from CX43, are located at the intercalated discs, often with larger junctional plaques at the disc periphery. The gap junctions are rarely distributed to the sides of the cardiomyocyte. The ischemia-reperfusion, cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes mellitus induce gap junction remodeling. The gap junction remodeling induced by above-mentioned diseases shows similar characteristics, including down-regulation of CX43, reduction in gap junction plaque size, increased heterogeneity and lateralization of gap junction distribution, and dephosphorylation of CX43. The elevated angiotensin II concentration in local myocardium may play an important role in the gap junction remodeling. The down-regulation of CX43 and lateralization of gap junction distribution alter anisotropic spread of the impulse of ventricular myocardium. The dephosphorylation of CX43 not only reduces electrical conductance, but also decreases permeability of chemicals between cardiomyocytes. The lateralization of gap junctions may increase the number of hemichannels formed by CX43. The opening of hemichannels induces ATP efflux and Na(+) influx, which forms a delayed after-depolarization. The gap junction remodeling in pathological condition produces arrhythmia substrate in the ventricles. In this review, the current knowledge on the relationship between the remodeling of cardiac gap junctions and arrhythmias were summarized.

  3. The Werner and Bloom syndrome proteins help resolve replication blockage by converting (regressed) holliday junctions to functional replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machwe, Amrita; Karale, Rajashree; Xu, Xioahua; Liu, Yilun; Orren, David K

    2011-08-16

    Cells cope with blockage of replication fork progression in a manner that allows DNA synthesis to be completed and genomic instability minimized. Models for resolution of blocked replication involve fork regression to form Holliday junction structures. The human RecQ helicases WRN and BLM (deficient in Werner and Bloom syndromes, respectively) are critical for maintaining genomic stability and thought to function in accurate resolution of replication blockage. Consistent with this notion, WRN and BLM localize to sites of blocked replication after certain DNA-damaging treatments and exhibit enhanced activity on replication and recombination intermediates. Here we examine the actions of WRN and BLM on a special Holliday junction substrate reflective of a regressed replication fork. Our results demonstrate that, in reactions requiring ATP hydrolysis, both WRN and BLM convert this Holliday junction substrate primarily to a four-stranded replication fork structure, suggesting they target the Holliday junction to initiate branch migration. In agreement, the Holliday junction binding protein RuvA inhibits the WRN- and BLM-mediated conversion reactions. Importantly, this conversion product is suitable for replication with its leading daughter strand readily extended by DNA polymerases. Furthermore, binding to and conversion of this Holliday junction are optimal at low MgCl(2) concentrations, suggesting that WRN and BLM preferentially act on the square planar (open) conformation of Holliday junctions. Our findings suggest that, subsequent to fork regression events, WRN and/or BLM could re-establish functional replication forks to help overcome fork blockage. Such a function is highly consistent with phenotypes associated with WRN- and BLM-deficient cells.

  4. Software Functional Size: For Cost Estimation and More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Baris; Turetken, Oktay; Demirors, Onur

    Determining software characteristics that will effectively support project planning, execution, monitoring and closure remains to be one of the prevalent challenges software project managers face. Functional size measures were introduced to quantify one of the primary characteristics of software. Although functional size measurement methods have not been without criticisms, they have significant promises for software project management. In this paper, we explore the contributions of functional size measurement to project management. We identified diverse uses of functional size by performing a literature survey and investigating how functional size measurement can be incorporated into project management practices by mapping the uses of functional size to the knowledge areas defined in project management body of knowledge (PMBOK).

  5. Engineering of Droplet Manipulation in Tertiary Junction Microfluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-30

    in silico investigation of path selection by a single droplet inside a tertiary junction microchannel using oil-in-water as a model system. The...droplet was generated at a T-junction inside a microfluidic chip and its flow behaviour as a function of droplet size, streamline position, viscosity...investigation of path selection by a single droplet inside a tertiary- junction microchannel using oil-in-water as a model system. The droplet was generated at

  6. Necessary Conditions for Discontinuities of Multidimensional Size Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Cerri, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Some new results about multidimensional topological persistence are presented, proving that the discontinuity points of a k-dimensional size function are necessarily related to the pseudocritical values of the associated measuring function.

  7. Effects of mechanical strain on the function of Gap junctions in osteocytes are mediated through the prostaglandin EP2 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Priscilla P; Cheng, Benxu; Gu, Sumin; Sprague, Eugene; Bonewald, Lynda F; Jiang, Jean X

    2003-10-31

    Osteocytes embedded in the matrix of bone are thought to be mechanosensory cells that translate mechanical strain into biochemical signals that regulate bone modeling and remodeling. We have shown previously that fluid flow shear stress dramatically induces prostaglandin release and COX-2 mRNA expression in osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells, and that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) released by these cells functions in an autocrine manner to regulate gap junction function and connexin 43 (Cx43) expression. Here we show that fluid flow regulates gap junctions through the PGE2 receptor EP2 activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signaling. The expression of the EP2 receptor, but not the subtypes EP1,EP3, and EP4, increased in response to fluid flow. Application of PGE2 or conditioned medium from fluid flow-treated cells to non-stressed MLO-Y4 cells increased expression of the EP2 receptor. The EP2 receptor antagonist, AH6809, suppressed the stimulatory effects of PGE2 and fluid flow-conditioned medium on the expression of the EP2 receptor, on Cx43 protein expression, and on gap junction-mediated intercellular coupling. In contrast, the EP2 receptor agonist butaprost, not the E1/E3 receptor agonist sulprostone, stimulated the expression of Cx43 and gap junction function. Fluid flow conditioned medium and PGE2 stimulated cAMP production and PKA activity suggesting that PGE2 released by mechanically stimulated cells is responsible for the activation of cAMP and PKA. The adenylate cyclase activators, forskolin and 8-bromo-cAMP, enhanced intercellular connectivity, the number of functional gap junctions, and Cx43 protein expression, whereas the PKA inhibitor, H89, inhibited the stimulatory effect of PGE2 on gap junctions. These studies suggest that the EP2 receptor mediates the effects of autocrine PGE2 on the osteocyte gap junction in response to fluid flow-induced shear stress. These data support the hypothesis that the EP2 receptor, cAMP, and PKA are critical components

  8. Gap junction and hemichannel-independent actions of connexins on cell and tissue functions--an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jade Z; Jiang, Jean X

    2014-04-17

    Connexins, a family of transmembrane proteins, are components of both gap junction channels and hemichannels, which mediate the exchange of ions and small molecules between adjacent cells, and between the inside and outside of the cell, respectively. Substantial advancements have been made in the comprehension of the role of gap junctions and hemichannels in coordinating cellular events. In recent years, a plethora of studies demonstrate a role of connexin proteins in the regulation of tissue homeostasis that occurs independently of their channel activities. This is shown in the context of cell growth, adhesion, migration, apoptosis, and signaling. The major mechanisms of these channel-independent activities still remain to be discovered. In this review, we provide an updated overview on the current knowledge of gap junction- and hemichannel-independent functions of connexins, in particular, their effects on tumorigenesis, neurogenesis and disease development. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Functional lateralization of temporoparietal junction - imitation inhibition, visual perspective-taking and theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiesteban, Idalmis; Banissy, Michael J; Catmur, Caroline; Bird, Geoffrey

    2015-10-01

    Although neuroimaging studies have consistently identified the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) as a key brain region involved in social cognition, the literature is far from consistent with respect to lateralization of function. For example, during theory-of-mind tasks bilateral TPJ activation is found in some studies but only right hemisphere activation in others. Visual perspective-taking and imitation inhibition, which have been argued to recruit the same socio-cognitive processes as theory of mind, are associated with unilateral activation of either left TPJ (perspective taking) or right TPJ (imitation inhibition). The present study investigated the functional lateralization of TPJ involvement in the above three socio-cognitive abilities using transcranial direct current stimulation. Three groups of healthy adults received anodal stimulation over right TPJ, left TPJ or the occipital cortex prior to performing three tasks (imitation inhibition, visual perspective-taking and theory of mind). In contrast to the extant neuroimaging literature, our results suggest bilateral TPJ involvement in imitation inhibition and visual perspective-taking, while no effect of anodal stimulation was observed on theory of mind. The discrepancy between these findings and those obtained using neuroimaging highlight the efficacy of neurostimulation as a complementary methodological tool in cognitive neuroscience. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Intercellular junctions of the hen parathyroid gland. A freeze-fracture study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setoguti, T; Inoue, Y; Suematsu, T

    1982-01-01

    The fine structure of the intercellular junctions of the hen parathyroid gland was studied using freeze-fracture replicas and thin sections. In the conventional thin sections, desmosomes, intermediate junctions (maculae adherentes) and gap junctions were observed, and in the lanthanum-fixed sections, tight junctions (maculae occludentes) were demonstrated as well. In the freeze-fracture replicas, desmosomes, gap junctions, tight junctions and combination forms of gap and tight junctions occurred, but intermediate junctions were not identified. Junctional complexes (zonulae occludentes) were not encountered in any preparations. The gap junctions varied in size and shape; they ranged from irregularly shaped, minute assemblages of particles to large aggregations of a round or elliptic outline. Both the tight junctions and the combination forms of gap and tight junctions also exhibited a variety of shape and dimension, and, depending on the form of the tight junctional strands, they were classified into three types: type I consisted of a simple line of strands; type II consisted of a closed network of strands; and type III consisted of an open network of strands. The combination forms were more numerous than the typical tight junctions. The possible significance of these junctions is discussed in relation to the function of the parathyroid parenchymal cell. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:7174510

  11. Functional assessment of gap junctions in monolayer and three-dimensional cultures of human tendon cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma-Kuzniarska, Maria; Yapp, Clarence; Pearson-Jones, Thomas W.; Jones, Andrew K.; Hulley, Philippa A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Gap junction-mediated intercellular communication influences a variety of cellular activities. In tendons, gap junctions modulate collagen production, are involved in strain-induced cell death, and are involved in the response to mechanical stimulation. The aim of the present study was to investigate gap junction-mediated intercellular communication in healthy human tendon-derived cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). The FRAP is a noninvasive technique that allows quantitative measurement of gap junction function in living cells. It is based on diffusion-dependent redistribution of a gap junction-permeable fluorescent dye. Using FRAP, we showed that human tenocytes form functional gap junctions in monolayer and three-dimensional (3-D) collagen I culture. Fluorescently labeled tenocytes following photobleaching rapidly reacquired the fluorescent dye from neighboring cells, while HeLa cells, which do not communicate by gap junctions, remained bleached. Furthermore, both 18 β-glycyrrhetinic acid and carbenoxolone, standard inhibitors of gap junction activity, impaired fluorescence recovery in tendon cells. In both monolayer and 3-D cultures, intercellular communication in isolated cells was significantly decreased when compared with cells forming many cell-to-cell contacts. In this study, we used FRAP as a tool to quantify and experimentally manipulate the function of gap junctions in human tenocytes in both two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D cultures. PMID:24390370

  12. Modeling particle size distributions by the Weibull distribution function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Zhigang (Rogers Tool Works, Rogers, AR (United States)); Patterson, B.R.; Turner, M.E. Jr (Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States))

    1993-10-01

    A method is proposed for modeling two- and three-dimensional particle size distributions using the Weibull distribution function. Experimental results show that, for tungsten particles in liquid phase sintered W-14Ni-6Fe, the experimental cumulative section size distributions were well fit by the Weibull probability function, which can also be used to compute the corresponding relative frequency distributions. Modeling the two-dimensional section size distributions facilitates the use of the Saltykov or other methods for unfolding three-dimensional (3-D) size distributions with minimal irregularities. Fitting the unfolded cumulative 3-D particle size distribution with the Weibull function enables computation of the statistical distribution parameters from the parameters of the fit Weibull function.

  13. Energy level alignment and quantum conductance of functionalized metal-molecule junctions: density functional theory versus GW calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chengjun; Strange, Mikkel; Markussen, Troels; Solomon, Gemma C; Thygesen, Kristian S

    2013-11-14

    We study the effect of functional groups (CH3*4, OCH3, CH3, Cl, CN, F*4) on the electronic transport properties of 1,4-benzenediamine molecular junctions using the non-equilibrium Green function method. Exchange and correlation effects are included at various levels of theory, namely density functional theory (DFT), energy level-corrected DFT (DFT+Σ), Hartree-Fock and the many-body GW approximation. All methods reproduce the expected trends for the energy of the frontier orbitals according to the electron donating or withdrawing character of the substituent group. However, only the GW method predicts the correct ordering of the conductance amongst the molecules. The absolute GW (DFT) conductance is within a factor of two (three) of the experimental values. Correcting the DFT orbital energies by a simple physically motivated scissors operator, Σ, can bring the DFT conductances close to experiments, but does not improve on the relative ordering. We ascribe this to a too strong pinning of the molecular energy levels to the metal Fermi level by DFT which suppresses the variation in orbital energy with functional group.

  14. Acidic bile salts modulate the squamous epithelial barrier function by modulating tight junction proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Oshima, Tadayuki; Tomita, Toshihiko; Fukui, Hirokazu; Watari, Jiro; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Miwa, Hiroto

    2011-08-01

    Experimental models for esophageal epithelium in vitro either suffer from poor differentiation or complicated culture systems. An air-liquid interface system with normal human bronchial epithelial cells can serve as a model of esophageal-like squamous epithelial cell layers. Here, we explore the influence of bile acids on barrier function and tight junction (TJ) proteins. The cells were treated with taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), or deoxycholic acid (DCA) at different pH values, or with pepsin. Barrier function was measured by transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and the diffusion of paracellular tracers (permeability). The expression of TJ proteins, including claudin-1 and claudin-4, was examined by Western blotting of 1% Nonidet P-40-soluble and -insoluble fractions. TCA and GCA dose-dependently decreased TEER and increased paracellular permeability at pH 3 after 1 h. TCA (4 mM) or GCA (4 mM) did not change TEER and permeability at pH 7.4 or pH 4. The combination of TCA and GCA at pH 3 significantly decreased TEER and increased permeability at lower concentrations (2 mM). Pepsin (4 mg/ml, pH 3) did not have any effect on barrier function. DCA significantly decreased the TEER and increased permeability at pH 6, a weakly acidic condition. TCA (4 mM) and GCA (4 mM) significantly decreased the insoluble fractions of claudin-1 and claudin-4 at pH 3. In conclusion, acidic bile salts disrupted the squamous epithelial barrier function partly by modulating the amounts of claudin-1 and claudin-4. These results provide new insights for understanding the role of TJ proteins in esophagitis.

  15. Treatment with AICAR inhibits blastocyst development, trophectoderm differentiation and tight junction formation and function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Michele D; Edwards, Nicole A; Betts, Dean H; Watson, Andrew J

    2017-09-13

    What is the impact of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation on blastocyst formation, gene expression, and tight junction formation and function? AMPK activity must be tightly controlled for normal preimplantation development and blastocyst formation to occur. AMPK isoforms are detectable in oocytes, cumulus cells and preimplantation embryos. Cultured embryos are subject to many stresses that can activate AMPK. Two primary experiments were carried out to determine the effect of AICAR treatment on embryo development and maintenance of the blastocoel cavity. Embryos were recovered from superovulated mice. First, 2-cell embryos were treated with a concentration series (0-2000 μM) of AICAR for 48 h until blastocyst formation would normally occur. In the second experiment, expanded mouse blastocysts were treated for 9 h with 1000 μM AICAR. Outcomes measured included development to the blastocyst stage, cell number, blastocyst volume, AMPK phosphorylation, Cdx2 and blastocyst formation gene family expression (mRNAs and protein measured using quantitative RT-PCR, immunoblotting, immunofluorescence), tight junction function (FITC dextran dye uptake assay), and blastocyst ATP levels. The reversibility of AICAR treatment was assessed using Compound C (CC), a well-known inhibitor of AMPK, alone or in combination with AICAR. Prolonged treatment with AICAR from the 2-cell stage onward decreases blastocyst formation, reduces total cell number, embryo diameter, leads to loss of trophectoderm cell contacts and membrane zona occludens-1 staining, and increased nuclear condensation. Treatment with CC alone inhibited blastocyst development only at concentrations that are higher than normally used. AICAR treated embryos displayed altered mRNA and protein levels of blastocyst formation genes. Treatment of blastocysts with AICAR for 9 h induced blastocyst collapse, altered blastocyst formation gene expression, increased tight junction permeability and

  16. Cell size control - a mechanism for maintaining fitness and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, Teemu P; Caldez, Matias J; Kaldis, Philipp; Björklund, Mikael

    2017-09-01

    The maintenance of cell size homeostasis has been studied for years in different cellular systems. With the focus on 'what regulates cell size', the question 'why cell size needs to be maintained' has been largely overlooked. Recent evidence indicates that animal cells exhibit nonlinear cell size dependent growth rates and mitochondrial metabolism, which are maximal in intermediate sized cells within each cell population. Increases in intracellular distances and changes in the relative cell surface area impose biophysical limitations on cells, which can explain why growth and metabolic rates are maximal in a specific cell size range. Consistently, aberrant increases in cell size, for example through polyploidy, are typically disadvantageous to cellular metabolism, fitness and functionality. Accordingly, cellular hypertrophy can potentially predispose to or worsen metabolic diseases. We propose that cell size control may have emerged as a guardian of cellular fitness and metabolic activity. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  17. the evaluation of unstable lumbar-sacral junction with function x-rays ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... subjected to dynamic lumbar- sacral plain films as part of clinical evaluation. ... Key words: Lumbosacral spine, Dynamic radiography, Instability, Range of motion ... chronic low back pain studied were investigated for lumbosacral junction.

  18. Claudin-16 Deficiency Impairs Tight Junction Function in Ameloblasts, Leading to Abnormal Enamel Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardet, Claire; Courson, Frédéric; Wu, Yong; Khaddam, Mayssam; Salmon, Benjamin; Ribes, Sandy; Thumfart, Julia; Yamaguti, Paulo M; Rochefort, Gael Y; Figueres, Marie-Lucile; Breiderhoff, Tilman; Garcia-Castaño, Alejandro; Vallée, Benoit; Le Denmat, Dominique; Baroukh, Brigitte; Guilbert, Thomas; Schmitt, Alain; Massé, Jean-Marc; Bazin, Dominique; Lorenz, Georg; Morawietz, Maria; Hou, Jianghui; Carvalho-Lobato, Patricia; Manzanares, Maria Cristina; Fricain, Jean-Christophe; Talmud, Deborah; Demontis, Renato; Neves, Francisco; Zenaty, Delphine; Berdal, Ariane; Kiesow, Andreas; Petzold, Matthias; Menashi, Suzanne; Linglart, Agnes; Acevedo, Ana Carolina; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Müller, Dominik; Houillier, Pascal; Chaussain, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    Claudin-16 protein (CLDN16) is a component of tight junctions (TJ) with a restrictive distribution so far demonstrated mainly in the kidney. Here, we demonstrate the expression of CLDN16 also in the tooth germ and show that claudin-16 gene (CLDN16) mutations result in amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) in the 5 studied patients with familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC). To investigate the role of CLDN16 in tooth formation, we studied a murine model of FHHNC and showed that CLDN16 deficiency led to altered secretory ameloblast TJ structure, lowering of extracellular pH in the forming enamel matrix, and abnormal enamel matrix protein processing, resulting in an enamel phenotype closely resembling human AI. This study unravels an association of FHHNC owing to CLDN16 mutations with AI, which is directly related to the loss of function of CLDN16 during amelogenesis. Overall, this study indicates for the first time the importance of a TJ protein in tooth formation and underlines the need to establish a specific dental follow-up for these patients. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  19. The function of tight junctions in maintaining differences in lipid composition between the apical and the basolateral cell surface domains of MDCK cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meer, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068570368; Simons, K.

    1986-01-01

    Tight junctions in epithelial cells have been postulated to act as barriers inhibiting lateral diffusion of lipids and proteins between the apical and basolateral plasma membrane domains. To study the fence function of the tight junction in more detail, we have fused liposomes containing the

  20. Concept learning set-size functions for Clark's nutcrackers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Anthony A; Magnotti, John F; Katz, Jeffrey S; Leonard, Kevin; Kelly, Debbie M

    2016-01-01

    Same/Different abstract-concept learning by Clark's nutcrackers (Nucifraga columbiana) was tested with novel stimuli following learning of training set expansion (8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, and 1024 picture items). The resulting set-size function was compared to those from rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella), and pigeons (Columba livia). Nutcrackers showed partial concept learning following initial eight-item set learning, unlike the other species (Magnotti, Katz, Wright, & Kelly, 2015). The mean function for the nutcrackers' novel-stimulus transfer increased linearly as a function of the logarithm of training set size, which intersected its baseline function at the 128-item set size. Thus, nutcrackers on average achieved full concept learning (i.e., transfer statistically equivalent to baseline performance) somewhere between set sizes of 64 to 128 items, similar to full concept learning by monkeys. Pigeons required a somewhat larger training set (256 items) for full concept learning, but results from other experiments (initial training and transfer with 32- and 64-item set sizes) suggested carryover effects with smaller set sizes may have artificially prolonged the pigeon's full concept learning. We find it remarkable that these diverse species with very different neural architectures can fully learn this same/different abstract concept, and (at least under some conditions) do so with roughly similar sets sizes (64-128 items) and numbers of training exemplars, despite initial concept learning advantages (nutcrackers), learning disadvantages (pigeons), or increasing baselines (monkeys).

  1. Cataract-causing mutation of human connexin 46 impairs gap junction, but increases hemichannel function and cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Ren

    Full Text Available Connexin channels play a critical role in maintaining metabolic homeostasis and transparency of the lens. Mutations in connexin genes are linked to congenital cataracts in humans. The G143R missense mutation on connexin (Cx 46 was recently reported to be associated with congenital Coppock cataracts. Here, we showed that the G143R mutation decreased Cx46 gap junctional coupling in a dominant negative manner; however, it significantly increased gap junctional plaques. The G143R mutant also increased hemichannel activity, inversely correlated with the level of Cx46 protein on the cell surface. The interaction between cytoplasmic loop domain and C-terminus has been shown to be involved in gating of connexin channels. Interestingly, the G143R mutation enhanced the interaction between intracellular loop and Cx46. Furthermore, this mutation decreased cell viability and the resistance of the cells to oxidative stress, primarily due to the increased hemichannel function. Together, these results suggest that mutation of this highly conserved residue on the cytoplasmic loop domain of Cx46 enhances its interaction with the C-terminus, resulting in a reduction of gap junction channel function, but increased hemichannel function. This combination leads to the development of human congenital cataracts.

  2. Genomic and Proteomic Profiling Reveals Reduced Mitochondrial Function and Disruption of the Neuromuscular Junction Driving Rat Sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibebunjo, Chikwendu; Chick, Joel M.; Kendall, Tracee; Eash, John K.; Li, Christine; Zhang, Yunyu; Vickers, Chad; Wu, Zhidan; Clarke, Brian A.; Shi, Jun; Cruz, Joseph; Fournier, Brigitte; Brachat, Sophie; Gutzwiller, Sabine; Ma, QiCheng; Markovits, Judit; Broome, Michelle; Steinkrauss, Michelle; Skuba, Elizabeth; Galarneau, Jean-Rene; Gygi, Steven P.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, remain unclear. To identify molecular changes that correlated best with sarcopenia and might contribute to its pathogenesis, we determined global gene expression profiles in muscles of rats aged 6, 12, 18, 21, 24, and 27 months. These rats exhibit sarcopenia beginning at 21 months. Correlation of the gene expression versus muscle mass or age changes, and functional annotation analysis identified gene signatures of sarcopenia distinct from gene signatures of aging. Specifically, mitochondrial energy metabolism (e.g., tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation) pathway genes were the most downregulated and most significantly correlated with sarcopenia. Also, perturbed were genes/pathways associated with neuromuscular junction patency (providing molecular evidence of sarcopenia-related functional denervation and neuromuscular junction remodeling), protein degradation, and inflammation. Proteomic analysis of samples at 6, 18, and 27 months confirmed the depletion of mitochondrial energy metabolism proteins and neuromuscular junction proteins. Together, these findings suggest that therapeutic approaches that simultaneously stimulate mitochondrogenesis and reduce muscle proteolysis and inflammation have potential for treating sarcopenia. PMID:23109432

  3. Genomic and proteomic profiling reveals reduced mitochondrial function and disruption of the neuromuscular junction driving rat sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibebunjo, Chikwendu; Chick, Joel M; Kendall, Tracee; Eash, John K; Li, Christine; Zhang, Yunyu; Vickers, Chad; Wu, Zhidan; Clarke, Brian A; Shi, Jun; Cruz, Joseph; Fournier, Brigitte; Brachat, Sophie; Gutzwiller, Sabine; Ma, QiCheng; Markovits, Judit; Broome, Michelle; Steinkrauss, Michelle; Skuba, Elizabeth; Galarneau, Jean-Rene; Gygi, Steven P; Glass, David J

    2013-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, remain unclear. To identify molecular changes that correlated best with sarcopenia and might contribute to its pathogenesis, we determined global gene expression profiles in muscles of rats aged 6, 12, 18, 21, 24, and 27 months. These rats exhibit sarcopenia beginning at 21 months. Correlation of the gene expression versus muscle mass or age changes, and functional annotation analysis identified gene signatures of sarcopenia distinct from gene signatures of aging. Specifically, mitochondrial energy metabolism (e.g., tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation) pathway genes were the most downregulated and most significantly correlated with sarcopenia. Also, perturbed were genes/pathways associated with neuromuscular junction patency (providing molecular evidence of sarcopenia-related functional denervation and neuromuscular junction remodeling), protein degradation, and inflammation. Proteomic analysis of samples at 6, 18, and 27 months confirmed the depletion of mitochondrial energy metabolism proteins and neuromuscular junction proteins. Together, these findings suggest that therapeutic approaches that simultaneously stimulate mitochondrogenesis and reduce muscle proteolysis and inflammation have potential for treating sarcopenia.

  4. Human temporal-parietal junction spontaneously tracks others' beliefs: A functional near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Daniel C; Aparicio Betancourt, Mariana; Simon, Charline E

    2015-12-01

    Humans have the unique capacity to actively reflect on the thoughts, beliefs, and knowledge of others, but do we also track mental states spontaneously when observing other people? We asked this question by monitoring brain activity in belief-sensitive cortex using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) during free-viewing of social videos. More specifically, we identified a portion of the right temporal-parietal junction (rTPJ) selective for mental state processing using an established, explicit theory of mind task, and then analyzed the brain response in that region of interest (ROI) during free-viewing of video clips involving people producing goal-directed actions. We found a significant increase in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration in our rTPJ ROI during free-viewing for all of our test videos. Activity in this region was further modulated by the extent to which the knowledge state, or beliefs, of the protagonist regarding the location of an object contrasted with the reality of where the object was hidden. Open-ended questioning suggested our participants were not explicitly focusing on belief states of the characters during free-viewing. Further analyses ruled out lower-level details of the video clips or general attentional differences between conditions as likely explanations for the results. As such, these results call into question the traditional characterization of theory of mind as a resource intensive, deliberate process, and, instead, support an emerging view of theory of mind as a foundation for, rather than the pinnacle of, human social cognition.

  5. Renal pyramid echogenicity in ureteropelvic junction obstruction: correlation between altered echogenicity and differential renal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavhan, Govind; Daneman, Alan; Lim, Ruth; Traubici, Jeffrey [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Moineddin, Rahim [University of Toronto, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Toronto (Canada); Langlois, Valerie [University of Toronto, Division of Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Improvement in resolution and use of high-frequency transducers in US has enabled visualization of previously unreported changes in medullary pyramid echogenicity in children with obstructive hydronephrosis. To determine whether these unreported changes in echogenicity and morphology of the renal pyramids in ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction correlate with differential renal function (DRF) of the kidney as determined by technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine ({sup 99m}Tc-MAG3) scan. Renal sonograms in 60 children with UPJ obstruction were retrospectively reviewed. Children were divided into three groups based on the echogenicity of the pyramids: (1) normal echogenicity of the pyramids, (2) increased echogenicity of the pyramids with maintained corticomedullary differentiation (CMD), and (3) loss of CMD. DRF, as determined by {sup 99m}Tc-MAG3 scan, of the obstructed kidney of {>=}45% was considered normal and of {<=}44% was considered abnormal based on a published study correlating histological changes with DRF. Fisher's exact test was performed for assessing the association between DRF and altered echogenicity of the pyramids. In group 1, which consisted of 13 patients with normal pyramids on US, DRF was normal in 11 and abnormal in two. In group 2, which consisted of 33 patients with echogenic pyramids and preserved CMD, DRF was normal in 15 and abnormal in 18. In group 3, which consisted of 14 patients with complete loss of CMD, DRF was normal in 2 and abnormal in 12. There was a strong correlation between abnormal pyramids and DRF (P=0.0009). The risk ratio (RR) of DRF becoming abnormal for those kidneys with abnormal echogenicity of the pyramids with preserved CMD (group 2) compared to normal pyramid echogenicity (group 1) was 1.56 (95% CI 1.088-2.236). The RR of DRF becoming abnormal for those kidneys with loss of CMD (group 3) compared to normal pyramid echogenicity (group 1) was 5.571 (95% CI 1.530-20.294). We observed that in obstructed kidneys

  6. Dissection of the functional domains of an archaeal holliday junction helicase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Ye; Chu, Mingzhu; Li, Yansheng

    2012-01-01

    Helicases and nucleases form complexes that play very important roles in DNA repair pathways some of which interact with each other at Holliday junctions. In this study, we present in vitro and in vivo analysis of Hjm and its interaction with Hjc in Sulfolobus. In vitro studies employed Hjm from ...

  7. Prolonged measurement of lower oesophageal sphincter function in patients with intestinal metaplasia at the oesophagogastric junction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, C; Timmer, R; Breumelhof, R; Seldenrijk, CA; Smout, AJPM

    2001-01-01

    Background and aims-It has been shown that gastro-oesophageal reflux plays a role in the pathogenesis of intestinal metaplasia (IM) limited to the oesophagogastric junction (OGJ), similar to the pathogenesis of IM in long segments of columnar lined oesophagus. The aim of this study was to examine lo

  8. Gap junction blockers attenuate beta oscillations and improve forelimb function in hemiparkinsonian rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phookan, Sujoy; Sutton, Alexander C; Walling, Ian; Smith, Autumn; O'Connor, Katherine A; Campbell, Joannalee C; Calos, Megan; Yu, Wilson; Pilitsis, Julie G; Brotchie, Jonathan M; Shin, Damian S

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by akinesia, bradykinesia, resting tremors and postural instability. Although various models have been developed to explain basal ganglia (BG) pathophysiology in PD, the recent reports that dominant beta (β) oscillations (12-30Hz) in BG nuclei of PD patients and parkinsonian animals coincide with motor dysfunction has led to an emerging idea that these oscillations may be a characteristic of PD. Due to the recent realization of these oscillations, the cellular and network mechanism(s) that underlie this process remain ill-defined. Here, we postulate that gap junctions (GJs) can contribute to β oscillations in the BG of hemiparkinsonian rats and inhibiting their activity will disrupt neuronal synchrony, diminish these oscillations and improve motor function. To test this, we injected the GJ blockers carbenoxolone (CBX) or octanol in the right globus pallidus externa (GPe) of anesthetized hemiparkinsonian rats and noted whether subsequent changes in β oscillatory activity occurred using in vivo electrophysiology. We found that systemic treatment of 200mg/kg CBX attenuated normalized GPe β oscillatory activity from 6.10±1.29 arbitrary units (A.U.) (pre-CBX) to 2.48±0.87 A.U. (post-CBX) with maximal attenuation occurring 90.0±20.5min after injection. The systemic treatment of octanol (350mg/kg) also decreased β oscillatory activity in a similar manner to CBX treatment with β oscillatory activity decreasing from 3.58±0.89 (pre-octanol) to 2.57±1.08 after octanol injection. Next, 1μl CBX (200mg/kg) was directly injected into the GPe of anesthetized hemiparkinsonian rats; 59.2±19.0min after injection, β oscillations in this BG nucleus decreased from 3.62±1.17 A.U. to 1.67±0.62 A.U. Interestingly, we were able to elicit β oscillations in the GPe of naive non-parkinsonian rats by increasing GJ activity with 1μl trimethylamine (TMA, 500nM). Finally, we systemically injected CBX (200mg

  9. A cross-functional nanostructured platform based on carbon nanotube-Si hybrid junctions: where photon harvesting meets gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoni, F.; Pintossi, C.; Drera, G.; Pagliara, S.; Lanti, G.; Castrucci, P.; de Crescenzi, M.; Sangaletti, L.

    2017-03-01

    A combination of the functionalities of carbon nanotube (CNT)-Si hybrid heterojunctions is presented as a novel method to steer the efficiency of the photovoltaic (PV) cell based on these junctions, and to increase the selectivity and sensitivity of the chemiresistor gas sensor operated with the p-doped CNT layer. The electrical characteristics of the junctions have been tracked by exposing the devices to oxidizing (NO2) and reducing (NH3) molecules. It is shown that when used as PV cells, the cell efficiency can be reversibly steered by gas adsorption, providing a tool to selectively dope the p-type layer through molecular adsorption. Tracking of the current-voltage curve upon gas exposure also allowed to use these cells as gas sensors with an enhanced sensitivity as compared to that provided by a readout of the electrical signal from the CNT layer alone. In turn, the chemiresistive response was improved, both in terms of selectivity and sensitivity, by operating the system under illumination, as the photo-induced charges at the junction increase the p-doping of CNTs making them more sensitive to NH3 and less to NO2.

  10. Linking community size structure and ecosystem functioning using metabolic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvon-Durocher, Gabriel; Allen, Andrew P

    2012-11-05

    Understanding how biogeochemical cycles relate to the structure of ecological communities is a central research question in ecology. Here we approach this problem by focusing on body size, which is an easily measured species trait that has a pervasive influence on multiple aspects of community structure and ecosystem functioning. We test the predictions of a model derived from metabolic theory using data on ecosystem metabolism and community size structure. These data were collected as part of an aquatic mesocosm experiment that was designed to simulate future environmental warming. Our analyses demonstrate significant linkages between community size structure and ecosystem functioning, and the effects of warming on these links. Specifically, we show that carbon fluxes were significantly influenced by seasonal variation in temperature, and yielded activation energies remarkably similar to those predicted based on the temperature dependencies of individual-level photosynthesis and respiration. We also show that community size structure significantly influenced fluxes of ecosystem respiration and gross primary production, particularly at the annual time-scale. Assessing size structure and the factors that control it, both empirically and theoretically, therefore promises to aid in understanding links between individual organisms and biogeochemical cycles, and in predicting the responses of key ecosystem functions to future environmental change.

  11. Measuring Neuromuscular Junction Functionality in the SOD1(G93A) Animal Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzuto, Emanuele; Pisu, Simona; Musarò, Antonio; Del Prete, Zaccaria

    2015-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that leads to motor neuron degeneration, alteration in neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), muscle atrophy, and paralysis. To investigate the NMJ functionality in ALS we tested, in vitro, two innervated muscle types excised from SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice at the end-stage of the disease: the Soleus, a postural muscle almost completely paralyzed at that stage, and the diaphragm, which, on the contrary, is functional until death. To this aim we employed an experimental protocol that combined two types of electrical stimulation: the direct stimulation and the stimulation through the nerve. The technique we applied allowed us to determine the relevance of NMJ functionality separately from muscle contractile properties in SOD1(G93A) animal model. Functional measurements revealed that the muscle contractility of transgenic diaphragms is almost unaltered in comparison to control muscles, while transgenic Soleus muscles were severely compromised. In contrast, when stimulated via the nerve, both transgenic muscle types showed a strong decrease of the contraction force, a slowing down of the kinetic parameters, as well as alterations in the neurotransmission failure parameter. All together, these results confirm a severely impaired functionality in the SOD1(G93A) neuromuscular junctions.

  12. Functional expression of gap junction gene Cx43 and the myogenic differentiation of rhabdomyosarcoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林仲翔; 张志谦; 韩亚玲; C.C.G.Naus; K.R.Yu; H.Holtzer

    1995-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells express low levels of the gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43), and its mRNA, and display very weak gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) as detected by Cx43 immunofluorescence, slot-blot and dye-transfer methods. These cells grow rapidly and show aberrant and incomplete myogenic differentiation. To investigate the role of gap junctions in these cells, the expression of Cx43 with relation to cell growth and myogenic differentiation in RD single-cell subclones-RDL3 and RDL6 is studied. The subclone RDL3 grows slowly and displays better myogenic differentiation. The expression of Cx43, its mRNA and the GJIC in RDL3 is comparable to that in normal myoblasts. Another subclone RDL6 which grows rapidly, but is poorly differentiated, expresses very low levels of Cx43 and its mRNA, and very weak GJIC. By using the calcium phosphate precipitate transfection technique, a full-length cDNA-encoding Cx43 and a pSV2neo have been introduced into the RDL6 cells. Several stably

  13. Adipocytes in both brown and white adipose tissue of adult mice are functionally connected via gap junctions: implications for Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Shoshana; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Thi, Mia M; Hanani, Menachem; Scherer, Philipp E; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Spray, David C

    2014-11-01

    Adipose tissue serves as a host reservoir for the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative organism in Chagas disease. Gap junctions interconnect cells of most tissues, serving to synchronize cell activities including secretion in glandular tissue, and we have previously demonstrated that gap junctions are altered in various tissues and cells infected with T. cruzi. Herein, we examined the gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) expression in infected adipose tissues. Adipose tissue is the largest endocrine organ of the body and is also involved in other physiological functions. In mammals, it is primarily composed of white adipocytes. Although gap junctions are a prominent feature of brown adipocytes, they have not been explored extensively in white adipocytes, especially in the setting of infection. Thus, we examined functional coupling in both white and brown adipocytes in mice. Injection of electrical current or the dye Lucifer Yellow into adipocytes within fat tissue spread to adjacent cells, which was reduced by treatment with agents known to block gap junctions. Moreover, Cx43 was detected in both brown and white fat tissue. At thirty and ninety days post-infection, Cx43 was downregulated in brown adipocytes and upregulated in white adipocytes. Gap junction-mediated intercellular communication likely contributes to hormone secretion and other functions in white adipose tissue and to nonshivering thermogenesis in brown fat, and modulation of the coupling by T. cruzi infection is expected to impact these functions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. The tight junction protein JAM-A functions as coreceptor for rotavirus entry into MA104 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Flores, Jesús M; Silva-Ayala, Daniela; Espinoza, Marco A; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2015-01-15

    Several molecules have been identified as receptors or coreceptors for rotavirus infection, including glycans, integrins, and hsc70. In this work we report that the tight junction proteins JAM-A, occludin, and ZO-1 play an important role during rotavirus entry into MA104 cells. JAM-A was found to function as coreceptor for rotavirus strains RRV, Wa, and UK, but not for rotavirus YM. Reassortant viruses derived from rotaviruses RRV and YM showed that the virus spike protein VP4 determines the use of JAM-A as coreceptor.

  15. Characterization of the temporo-parietal junction by combining data-driven parcellation, complementary connectivity analyses, and functional decoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzdok, Danilo; Langner, Robert; Schilbach, Leonhard; Jakobs, Oliver; Roski, Christian; Caspers, Svenja; Laird, Angela R.; Fox, Peter T.; Zilles, Karl; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2016-01-01

    The right temporo-parietal junction (RTPJ) is consistently implicated in two cognitive domains, attention and social cognitions. We conducted multi-modal connectivity-based parcellation to investigate potentially separate functional modules within RTPJ implementing this cognitive dualism. Both task-constrained meta-analytic coactivation mapping and task-free resting-state connectivity analysis independently identified two distinct clusters within RTPJ, subsequently characterized by network mapping and functional forward/reverse inference. Coactivation mapping and resting-state correlations revealed that the anterior cluster increased neural activity concomitantly with a midcingulate–motor–insular network, functionally associated with attention, and decreased neural activity concomitantly with a parietal network, functionally associated with social cognition and memory retrieval. The posterior cluster showed the exact opposite association pattern. Our data thus suggest that RTPJ links two antagonistic brain networks processing external versus internal information. PMID:23689016

  16. Pharmacological modulation of gap junction function with the novel compound rotigaptide: a promising new principle for prevention of arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjølbye, Anne Louise; Haugan, Ketil; Hennan, James K; Petersen, Jørgen S

    2007-10-01

    Existing anti-arrhythmic therapy is hampered by lack of efficacy and unacceptable side effects. Thus, ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation remains the strongest predictor of in-hospital mortality in patients with myocardial infarction. In atrial fibrillation, rhythm control with conventional ion channel blockers provide no therapeutic benefit relative to rate control. Several lines of research indicate that impaired gap junctional cell-to-cell coupling between neighbouring cardiomyocytes is critical for the development of cardiac re-entry arrhythmias. Rotigaptide is the first drug that has been developed to prevent arrhythmias by re-establishing gap junctional intercellular communication. During conditions with acute cardiac ischaemia, rotigaptide effectively prevents induction of both ventricular and atrial tachyarrhythmia. Moreover, rotigaptide effectively prevents ischaemia reperfusion arrhythmias. At the cellular level, rotigaptide inhibits ischaemia-induced dephosphorylation of Ser297 and Ser368, which is considered important for the gating of connexin43 gap junction channels. No drug-related toxicity has been demonstrated at plasma concentrations 77,000 times above therapeutic concentrations. In rats and dogs, rotigaptide reduces infarct size following myocardial infarction. A series of phase I trials has been completed in which rotigaptide has been administered intravenously to ~200 healthy persons. No drug-related side effects have been demonstrated in healthy human beings. Clinical safety, tolerability and efficacy in patients with heart disease are being evaluated in ongoing clinical trials. Rotigaptide represents a pioneering pharmacological principle with a highly favourable preclinical and clinical safety profile, which makes this molecule a promising drug candidate for the prevention of cardiac arrhythmias.

  17. Characterization of magnetic tunnel junction test pads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Kjær, Daniel; Nielsen, Peter Folmer

    2015-01-01

    We show experimentally as well as theoretically that patterned magnetic tunnel junctions can be characterized using the current-in-plane tunneling (CIPT) method, and the key parameters, the resistance-area product (RA) and the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR), can be determined. The CIPT method...... on square tunnel junction pads with varying sizes and analyze the measured data using both the original and the modified CIPT model. Thus, we determine in which sample size range the modified CIPT model is needed to ensure validity of the extracted sample parameters, RA and TMR. In addition, measurements...... as a function of position on a square tunnel junction pad are used to investigate the sensitivity of the measurement results to probe misalignment....

  18. [Editorial introduction: from the structure and functions of the neuromuscular junction to the diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamori, Masaharu

    2011-07-01

    The neuromuscular junction has been recognized as a site for autoimmune and genetic disorders. Myasthenia gravis (MG) is mainly caused by postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) IgG1 antibodies that are directed against α-subunit 67-76 and 125-147 and activate complement. Thymic abnormalities are present in the autoimmune background. A proportion of MG patients without conformation-dependent AChR antibodies assayed by the cell-based method have muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) antibodies which are largely IgG4 and partially IgG1. MuSK is activated by Dok-7 and Lrp4 (agrin receptor) and contributes to AChR clustering at the postsynaptic membrane via various kinase cascades in collaboration with Wnt-MuSK/Frizzled-Dishevelled signaling. Rapsyn interacts with MuSK-linked chaperones to stabilize postsynaptic architecture and also contributes to AChR phosphorylation. MG-associated thymomas express antigens that trigger antibody responses which play a part in disease generation and modification. Among these, ryanodine receptor-1 (RyR1; acts on sarcoplasmic Ca2+ release) antibodies cause muscle contractile weakness. Transient receptor potential canonical-3 (TRPC3) antibodies are also detected in thymoma-associated MG patients; they may participate in muscle contractile weakness because TRPC3 acts on RyR1, and may also impair the refill of sarcoplasmic Ca2+ stores since TRPCs contribute to the receptor-operated Ca2+ influx via the phospholipase C (PLC)-diacylglycerol (DAG) pathway in cooperation with the store-operated, STIM1/Orai1-mediated Ca2+ influx and TRPCs-Homerl-IP3R interaction. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) is caused by reduced ACh quantal release that occurs mainly because of presynaptic P/Q-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channel (VGCC) antibodies. Physicians should be vigilant for LEMS because it may predict an underlying malignancy, particularly small-cell lung carcinoma; SOX-1 antibodies are usually present in these patients and are

  19. The serine protease-mediated increase in intestinal epithelial barrier function is dependent on occludin and requires an intact tight junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronaghan, Natalie J; Shang, Judie; Iablokov, Vadim; Zaheer, Raza; Colarusso, Pina; Dion, Sébastien; Désilets, Antoine; Leduc, Richard; Turner, Jerrold R; MacNaughton, Wallace K

    2016-09-01

    Barrier dysfunction is a characteristic of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Understanding how the tight junction is modified to maintain barrier function may provide avenues for treatment of IBD. We have previously shown that the apical addition of serine proteases to intestinal epithelial cell lines causes a rapid and sustained increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), but the mechanisms are unknown. We hypothesized that serine proteases increase barrier function through trafficking and insertion of tight junction proteins into the membrane, and this could enhance recovery of a disrupted monolayer after calcium switch or cytokine treatment. In the canine epithelial cell line, SCBN, we showed that matriptase, an endogenous serine protease, could potently increase TER. Using detergent solubility-based cell fractionation, we found that neither trypsin nor matriptase treatment changed levels of tight junction proteins at the membrane. In a fast calcium switch assay, serine proteases did not enhance the rate of recovery of the junction. In addition, serine proteases could not reverse barrier disruption induced by IFNγ and TNFα. We knocked down occludin in our cells using siRNA and found this prevented the serine protease-induced increase in TER. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), we found serine proteases induce a greater mobile fraction of occludin in the membrane. These data suggest that a functional tight junction is needed for serine proteases to have an effect on TER, and that occludin is a crucial tight junction protein in this mechanism.

  20. Deconstructing the brain’s moral network: dissociable functionality between the temporoparietal junction and ventro-medial prefrontal cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobbs, Dean; Dalgleish, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Research has illustrated that the brain regions implicated in moral cognition comprise a robust and broadly distributed network. However, understanding how these brain regions interact and give rise to the complex interplay of cognitive processes underpinning human moral cognition is still in its infancy. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine patterns of activation for ‘difficult’ and ‘easy’ moral decisions relative to matched non-moral comparators. This revealed an activation pattern consistent with a relative functional double dissociation between the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and ventro-medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Difficult moral decisions activated bilateral TPJ and deactivated the vmPFC and OFC. In contrast, easy moral decisions revealed patterns of activation in the vmPFC and deactivation in bilateral TPJ and dorsolateral PFC. Together these results suggest that moral cognition is a dynamic process implemented by a distributed network that involves interacting, yet functionally dissociable networks. PMID:23322890

  1. Deconstructing the brain's moral network: dissociable functionality between the temporoparietal junction and ventro-medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmanhall, Oriel; Mobbs, Dean; Dalgleish, Tim

    2014-03-01

    Research has illustrated that the brain regions implicated in moral cognition comprise a robust and broadly distributed network. However, understanding how these brain regions interact and give rise to the complex interplay of cognitive processes underpinning human moral cognition is still in its infancy. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine patterns of activation for 'difficult' and 'easy' moral decisions relative to matched non-moral comparators. This revealed an activation pattern consistent with a relative functional double dissociation between the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and ventro-medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Difficult moral decisions activated bilateral TPJ and deactivated the vmPFC and OFC. In contrast, easy moral decisions revealed patterns of activation in the vmPFC and deactivation in bilateral TPJ and dorsolateral PFC. Together these results suggest that moral cognition is a dynamic process implemented by a distributed network that involves interacting, yet functionally dissociable networks.

  2. Quantum conductance of 4,4-bipyridine molecular junctions: Role of electrode work function and local d band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauba, J.M.C.; Strange, Mikkel; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2008-01-01

    We present density-functional theory calculations for the geometry and conductance of 4,4-bipyridine (BPD) nanojunctions with Au and Pt electrodes. The fact that transport takes place via bipyridine's lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) suggests that the Au-BPD junction should have larger...... conductance than the Pt-BPD junction due to the smaller work function of Au as compared to Pt. On the other hand, coupling to the local d band is stronger in the case of Pt and this broadens the LUMO resonance. We find that these effects largely outbalance each other leading to conductances of 0.01G(0) and 0.......02G(0) for the Au and Pt contacts, respectively (G(0)=2e(2)/h is the conductance quantum). The effect of coupling to the electrodes is investigated by means of the group orbital which makes precise the concept of the local band. The construction allows us to explain and rationalize the first...

  3. Preparation of Micron-size Functional Fluorescent Microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Di-qiang; LIU Bai-ling; LI He; HU Jie

    2004-01-01

    As a kind of special functional microspheres, fluorescent polymer microspheres could be used in cell label and separation, blood flow assay, flow cytometer marking, chemical reaction assay,and in analyst of the transform and diffusion of particles in soil 1. However, one of the most important applications of fluorescent microspheres is in the high-throughput screening of drugs (HTS) 2. Through affinity interaction, radioactive ligands (latent drugs) are bound to fluorescent microspheres covered by receptor, and luminescence is produced by radioactivity, so ligands can be assayed and screened.In this study, we developed a technique for preparing micron-size fluorescent microspheres with different functional groups. The methods included the synthesis of micron-size polystyrene microspheres through the dispersion polymerization of styrene in different media such as ethanol,ethanol-water, and isopropanol; the functional polystyrene microspheres were prepared by introduction of functional monomers into the reaction system of styrene; the functional fluorescent microspheres were obtained by the way of dying functional microspheres in the fluorescent material's ethanol solvent.The average diameter of microspheres was in the range of 1~10 μm, and the distribution was normal distribution. The functional groups included -OH, -CHO, -COOH, -CONH2, and SO3H. The absorbing spectrum and exciting spectrum were tested, the results showed that the maximal absorbance of fluorescent microsphere was near 306.5 nm, and its maximal excitation was near 362 nm. The excitation spectrum of fluorescent material (DPO) and fluorescent microspheres were shown in figure 1, and it indicated that the developed fluorescent microspheres showed the same excitation behavior like DPO, which related to the fluorescent microspheres had stable luminescence property.

  4. Free flexural vibration of functionally graded size-dependent nanoplates

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, S; Thangavel, M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the linear free flexural vibration behaviour of functionally graded (FG) size-dependent nanoplates are investigated using the finite element method. The field variables are approximated by non-uniform rational B-splines. The size-dependent FG nanoplate is investigated by using Eringen's differential form of nonlocal elasticity theory. The material properties are assumed to vary only in the thickness direction and the effective properties for FG nanoplate are computed using Mori-Tanaka homogenization scheme. The accuracy of the present formulation is tested considering the problems for which solutions are available. A detailed numerical study is carried out to examine the effect of material gradient index, the characteristic internal length, the plate thickness, the plate aspect ratio and the boundary conditions on the global response of FG nanoplate.

  5. ROCK activity regulates functional tight junction assembly during blastocyst formation in porcine parthenogenetic embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongwoo Kwon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein serine/threonine kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1 and ROCK2 are Rho subfamily GTPase downstream effectors that regulate cell migration, intercellular adhesion, cell polarity, and cell proliferation by stimulating actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Inhibition of ROCK proteins affects specification of the trophectoderm (TE and inner cell mass (ICM lineages, compaction, and blastocyst cavitation. However, the molecules involved in blastocyst formation are not known. Here, we examined developmental competence and levels of adherens/tight junction (AJ/TJ constituent proteins, such as CXADR, OCLN, TJP1, and CDH1, as well as expression of their respective mRNAs, after treating porcine parthenogenetic four-cell embryos with Y-27632, a specific inhibitor of ROCK, at concentrations of 0, 10, 20, 100 µM for 24 h. Following this treatment, the blastocyst development rates were 39.1, 20.7, 10.0, and 0% respectively. In embryos treated with 20 µM treatment, expression levels of CXADR, OCLN, TJP1, and CDH1 mRNA and protein molecules were significantly reduced (P < 0.05. FITC-dextran uptake assay revealed that the treatment caused an increase in TE TJ permeability. Interestingly, the majority of the four-cell and morula embryos treated with 20 µM Y-27643 for 24 h showed defective compaction and cavitation. Taken together, our results indicate that ROCK activity may differentially affect assembly of AJ/TJs as well as regulate expression of genes encoding junctional proteins.

  6. Universal functional form of 1-minute raindrop size distribution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugerone, Katia; De Michele, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall remains one of the poorly quantified phenomena of the hydrological cycle, despite its fundamental role. No universal laws describing the rainfall behavior are available in literature. This is probably due to the continuous description of rainfall, which is a discrete phenomenon, made by drops. From the statistical point of view, the rainfall variability at particle size scale, is described by the drop size distribution (DSD). With this term, it is generally indicated as the concentration of raindrops per unit volume and diameter, as the probability density function of drop diameter at the ground, according to the specific problem of interest. Raindrops represent the water exchange, under liquid form, between atmosphere and earth surface, and the number of drops and their size have impacts in a wide range of hydrologic, meteorologic, and ecologic phenomena. DSD is used, for example, to measure the multiwavelength rain attenuation for terrestrial and satellite systems, it is an important input for the evaluation of the below cloud scavenging coefficient of the aerosol by precipitation, and is of primary importance to make estimates of rainfall rate through radars. In literature, many distributions have been used to this aim (Gamma and Lognormal above all), without statistical supports and with site-specific studies. Here, we present an extensive investigation of raindrop size distribution based on 18 datasets, consisting in 1-minute disdrometer data, sampled using Joss-Waldvogel or Thies instrument in different locations on Earth's surface. The aim is to understand if an universal functional form of 1-minute drop diameter variability exists. The study consists of three main steps: analysis of the high order moments, selection of the model through the AIC index and test of the model with the use of goodness-of-fit tests.

  7. Spin transfer torque in non-collinear magnetic tunnel junctions exhibiting quasiparticle bands: a non-equilibrium Green's function study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaya, Selvaraj Mathi

    2017-06-01

    A non-equilibrium Green's function formulation to study the spin transfer torque (STT) in non-collinear magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) exhibiting quasiparticle bands is developed. The formulation can be used to study the magnetoresistance and spin current too. The formulation is used to study the STT in model tunnel junctions exhibiting multiple layers and quasiparticle bands. The many body interaction that gives rise to quasiparticle bands is assumed to be a s - f exchange interaction at the electrode regions of the MTJ. The quasiparticle bands are obtained using a many body procedure and the single particle band structure is obtained using the tight binding model. The bias dependence of the STT as well as the influence of band occupancy and s - f exchange coupling strength on the STT are studied. We find from our studies that the band occupancy plays a significant role in deciding the STT and the s - f interaction strength too influences the STT significantly. Anomalous behavior in both the parallel and perpendicular components of the STT is obtained from our studies. Our results obtained for certain values of the band occupation are found to show the trend observed from the experimental measurements of STT.

  8. Nuclear export of RNA: Different sizes, shapes and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tobias; Ngo, Linh H; Wickramasinghe, Vihandha O

    2017-09-01

    Export of protein-coding and non-coding RNA molecules from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is critical for gene expression. This necessitates the continuous transport of RNA species of different size, shape and function through nuclear pore complexes via export receptors and adaptor proteins. Here, we provide an overview of the major RNA export pathways in humans, highlighting the similarities and differences between each. Its importance is underscored by the growing appreciation that deregulation of RNA export pathways is associated with human diseases like cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Size Functions for the Morphological Analysis of Melanocytic Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Massimo; Stanganelli, Ignazio

    2010-01-01

    Size Functions and Support Vector Machines are used to implement a new automatic classifier of melanocytic lesions. This is mainly based on a qualitative assessment of asymmetry, performed by halving images by several lines through the center of mass, and comparing the two halves in terms of color, mass distribution, and boundary. The program is used, at clinical level, with two thresholds, so that comparison of the two outputs produces a report of low-middle-high risk. Experimental results on 977 images, with cross-validation, are reported. PMID:20300598

  10. Size Functions for the Morphological Analysis of Melanocytic Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Ferri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Size Functions and Support Vector Machines are used to implement a new automatic classifier of melanocytic lesions. This is mainly based on a qualitative assessment of asymmetry, performed by halving images by several lines through the center of mass, and comparing the two halves in terms of color, mass distribution, and boundary. The program is used, at clinical level, with two thresholds, so that comparison of the two outputs produces a report of low-middle-high risk. Experimental results on 977 images, with cross-validation, are reported.

  11. Functional organization of the left inferior precentral sulcus: dissociating the inferior frontal eye field and the inferior frontal junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrfuss, J; Vogt, V L; Fiebach, C J; von Cramon, D Y; Tittgemeyer, M

    2012-02-15

    Two eye fields have been described in the human lateral frontal cortex: the frontal eye field (FEF) and the inferior frontal eye field (iFEF). The FEF has been extensively studied and has been found to lie at the ventral part of the superior precentral sulcus. Much less research, however, has focused on the iFEF. Recently, it was suggested that the iFEF is located at the dorsal part of the inferior precentral sulcus. A similar location was proposed for the inferior frontal junction area (IFJ), an area thought to be involved in cognitive control processes. The present study used fMRI to clarify the topographical and functional relationship of the iFEF and the IFJ in the left hemispheres of individual participants. The results show that both the iFEF and the IFJ are indeed located at the dorsal part of the inferior precentral sulcus. Nevertheless, the activations were spatially dissociable in every individual examined. The IFJ was located more towards the depth of the inferior precentral sulcus, close to the junction with the inferior frontal sulcus, whereas the iFEF assumed a more lateral, posterior and superior position. Furthermore, the results provided evidence for a functional double dissociation: the iFEF was activated only in a comparison of saccades vs. button presses, but not in a comparison of incongruent vs. congruent Stroop conditions, while the opposite pattern was found at the IFJ. These results provide evidence for a spatial and functional dissociation of two directly adjacent areas in the left posterior frontal lobe.

  12. MyosinV controls PTEN function and neuronal cell size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Michiel T; Parsons, Maddy; Downes, C Peter; Leslie, Nicholas R; Hindges, Robert; Eickholt, Britta J

    2009-10-01

    The tumour suppressor PTEN can inhibit cell proliferation and migration as well as control cell growth, in different cell types. PTEN functions predominately as a lipid phosphatase, converting PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) to PtdIns(4,5)P(2), thereby antagonizing PI(3)K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) and its established downstream effector pathways. However, much is unclear concerning the mechanisms that regulate PTEN movement to the cell membrane, which is necessary for its activity towards PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) (Refs 3, 4, 5). Here we show a requirement for functional motor proteins in the control of PI3K signalling, involving a previously unknown association between PTEN and myosinV. FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) measurements revealed that PTEN interacts directly with myosinV, which is dependent on PTEN phosphorylation mediated by CK2 and/or GSK3. Inactivation of myosinV-transport function in neurons increased cell size, which, in line with known attributes of PTEN-loss, required PI(3)K and mTor. Our data demonstrate a myosin-based transport mechanism that regulates PTEN function, providing new insights into the signalling networks regulating cell growth.

  13. Small molecule functional analogs of peptides that inhibit lambda site-specific recombination and bind Holliday junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjit, Dev K; Rideout, Marc C; Nefzi, Adel; Ostresh, John M; Pinilla, Clemencia; Segall, Anca M

    2010-08-01

    Our lab has isolated hexameric peptides that are structure-selective ligands of Holliday junctions (HJ), central intermediates of several DNA recombination reactions. One of the most potent of these inhibitors, WRWYCR, has shown antibacterial activity in part due to its inhibition of DNA repair proteins. To increase the therapeutic potential of these inhibitors, we searched for small molecule inhibitors with similar activities. We screened 11 small molecule libraries comprising over nine million individual compounds and identified a potent N-methyl aminocyclic thiourea inhibitor that also traps HJs formed during site-specific recombination reactions in vitro. This inhibitor binds specifically to protein-free HJs and can inhibit HJ resolution by RecG helicase, but only showed modest growth inhibition of bacterial with a hyperpermeable outer membrane; nonetheless, this is an important step in developing a functional analog of the peptide inhibitors. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The role of laminins in the organization and function of neuromuscular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Robert S; Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The synapse between motor neurons and skeletal muscle is known as the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Proper alignment of presynaptic and post-synaptic structures of motor neurons and muscle fibers, respectively, is essential for efficient motor control of skeletal muscles. The synaptic cleft between these two cells is filled with basal lamina. Laminins are heterotrimer extracellular matrix molecules that are key members of the basal lamina. Laminin α4, α5, and β2 chains specifically localize to NMJs, and these laminin isoforms play a critical role in maintenance of NMJs and organization of synaptic vesicle release sites known as active zones. These individual laminin chains exert their role in organizing NMJs by binding to their receptors including integrins, dystroglycan, and voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Disruption of these laminins or the laminin-receptor interaction occurs in neuromuscular diseases including Pierson syndrome and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS). Interventions to maintain proper level of laminins and their receptor interactions may be insightful in treating neuromuscular diseases and aging related degeneration of NMJs.

  15. Compact-sized high-modulation-efficiency silicon Mach-Zehnder modulator based on a vertically dipped depletion junction phase shifter for chip-level integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gyungock; Park, Jeong Woo; Kim, In Gyoo; Kim, Sanghoon; Jang, Ki-Seok; Kim, Sun Ae; Oh, Jin Hyuk; Joo, Jiho; Kim, Sanggi

    2014-04-15

    We present small-sized depletion-type silicon Mach-Zehnder (MZ) modulator with a vertically dipped PN depletion junction (VDJ) phase shifter based on a CMOS compatible process. The fabricated device with a 100 μm long VDJ phase shifter shows a VπLπ of ∼0.6  V·cm with a 3 dB bandwidth of ∼50  GHz at -2  V bias. The measured extinction ratios are 6 and 5.3 dB for 40 and 50  Gb/s operation under 2.5  Vpp differential drive, respectively. On-chip insertion loss is 3 dB for the maximum optical transmission. This includes the phase-shifter loss of 1.88  dB/100  μm, resulting mostly from the extra optical propagation loss through the polysilicon-plug structure for electrical contact, which can be readily minimized by utilizing finer-scaled lithography nodes. The experimental result indicates that a compact depletion-type MZ modulator based on the VDJ scheme can be a potential candidate for future chip-level integration.

  16. Evaluation of Renal Histopathological Changes, as a Predictor of Recoverability of Renal Function Following Pyeloplasty for Ureteropelvic Junction Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Pyeloplasty is a widely accepted treatment for ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO. However, the renal function recoverability after pyeloplasty is still a matter of debate. Different parameters have been used to predict renal functional recoverability after corrective surgery, with conflicting results. Objectives In this study, renal biopsy was carried on a series of cases of UPJO, during pyeloplasty, to study the extent of histological alterations in renal parenchyma, as a result of obstruction, and its predictive value in renal function recoverability after pyeloplasty. Patients and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the renal biopsy obtained during pyeloplasty in 53 adult patients. Histopathological changes were graded on a scale of 1 to 3, according to their severity, and compared with the differential renal function (DRF revealed on the preoperative and postoperative follow up diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA renal scan. A Fischer’s t test was used to evaluate statistical differences between values. Results This study showed a linear relationship between the severity of histological changes and renal function recovery, after pyeloplasty. Out of 24 obstructed renal units (ORU, with minimal histopathological changes (grade I, 21 ORU (87.5%, with > 35% DRF preoperatively, showed significant improvement in renal function after 12 months of pyeloplasty (P 0.05. Renal function deterioration after pyeloplasty was not observed in any of the cases. Conclusions The severity of pathological changes in renal parenchyma, due to UPJO, is a good predictor of renal function recoverability, after pyeloplasty. The ORUs, with DRF > 35%, usually have normal (grade I renal biopsy and might be expected to present better functional recoverability after pyeloplasty.

  17. Size dependence of complex refractive index function of growing nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, A.; Gurentsov, E.; Popova, E.; Priemchenko, K.

    2011-08-01

    The evidence of the change of the complex refractive index function E( m) of carbon and iron nanoparticles as a function of their size was found from two-color time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (TiRe-LII) measurements. Growing carbon particles were observed from acetylene pyrolysis behind a shock wave and iron particles were synthesized by pulse Kr-F excimer laser photo-dissociation of Fe(CO)5. The magnitudes of refractive index function were found through the fitting of two independently measured values of particle heat up temperature, determined by two-color pyrometry and from the known energy of the laser pulse and the E( m) variation. Small carbon particles of about 1-14 nm in diameter had a low value of E( m)˜0.05-0.07, which tends to increase up to a value of 0.2-0.25 during particle growth up to 20 nm. Similar behavior for iron particles resulted in E( m) rise from ˜0.1 for particles 1-3 nm in diameter up to ˜0.2 for particles >12 nm in diameter.

  18. Functional role of gap junctions in cytokine-induced leukocyte adhesion to endothelium in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Véliz, Loreto P.; González, Francisco G.; Duling, Brian R.; Sáez, Juan C.; Boric, Mauricio P.

    2008-01-01

    To assess the hypothesis that gap junctions (GJs) participate on leukocyte-endothelium interactions in the inflammatory response, we compared leukocyte adhesion and transmigration elicited by cytokine stimulation in the presence or absence of GJ blockers in the hamster cheek pouch and also in the cremaster muscle of wild-type (WT) and endothelium-specific connexin 43 (Cx43) null mice (Cx43e−/−). In the cheek pouch, topical tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α; 150 ng/ml, 15 min) caused a sustained increment in the number of leukocytes adhered to venular endothelium (LAV) and located at perivenular regions (LPV). Superfusion with the GJ blockers 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid (AGA; 75 μM) or 18-β-glycyrrhetinic acid (50 μM) abolished the TNF-α-induced increase in LAV and LPV; carbenoxolone (75 μM) or oleamide (100 μM) reduced LAV by 50 and 75%, respectively, and LPV to a lesser extent. None of these GJ blockers modified venular diameter, blood flow, or leukocyte rolling. In contrast, glycyrrhizin (75 μM), a non-GJ blocker analog of AGA, was devoid of effect. Interestingly, when AGA was removed 90 min after TNF-α stimulation, LAV started to rise at a similar rate as in control. Conversely, application of AGA 90 min after TNF-α reduced the number of previously adhered cells. In WT mice, intrascrotal injection of TNF-α (0.5 μg/0.3 ml) increased LAV (fourfold) and LPV (threefold) compared with saline-injected controls. In contrast to the observations in WT animals, TNF-α stimulation did not increase LAV or LPV in Cx43e−/− mice. These results demonstrate an important role for GJ communication in leukocyte adhesion and transmigration during acute inflammation in vivo and further suggest that endothelial Cx43 is key in these processes. PMID:18599597

  19. Structural and functional insights into the malaria parasite moving junction complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Vulliez-Le Normand

    Full Text Available Members of the phylum Apicomplexa, which include the malaria parasite Plasmodium, share many features in their invasion mechanism in spite of their diverse host cell specificities and life cycle characteristics. The formation of a moving junction (MJ between the membranes of the invading apicomplexan parasite and the host cell is common to these intracellular pathogens. The MJ contains two key parasite components: the surface protein Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1 and its receptor, the Rhoptry Neck Protein (RON complex, which is targeted to the host cell membrane during invasion. In particular, RON2, a transmembrane component of the RON complex, interacts directly with AMA1. Here, we report the crystal structure of AMA1 from Plasmodium falciparum in complex with a peptide derived from the extracellular region of PfRON2, highlighting clear specificities of the P. falciparum RON2-AMA1 interaction. The receptor-binding site of PfAMA1 comprises the hydrophobic groove and a region that becomes exposed by displacement of the flexible Domain II loop. Mutations of key contact residues of PfRON2 and PfAMA1 abrogate binding between the recombinant proteins. Although PfRON2 contacts some polymorphic residues, binding studies with PfAMA1 from different strains show that these have little effect on affinity. Moreover, we demonstrate that the PfRON2 peptide inhibits erythrocyte invasion by P. falciparum merozoites and that this strong inhibitory potency is not affected by AMA1 polymorphisms. In parallel, we have determined the crystal structure of PfAMA1 in complex with the invasion-inhibitory peptide R1 derived by phage display, revealing an unexpected structural mimicry of the PfRON2 peptide. These results identify the key residues governing the interactions between AMA1 and RON2 in P. falciparum and suggest novel approaches to antimalarial therapeutics.

  20. Size Bounds for Conjunctive Queries with General Functional Dependencies

    CERN Document Server

    Valiant, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    This paper resolves the main open question left by Gottlob, Lee, and Valiant (PODS 2009)[GLV09], establishing tight worst-case bounds for the size of the result Q(D) of a conjunctive query Q to a database D given an arbitrary set of functional dependencies. We show that the lower bound presented in [GLV09] in which the variables of the query are "colored" so as to yield a coloring number C(Q) for each query Q is, in fact, also an upper bound. To show this, we formalize the original intuition that each color used represents some possible entropy of that variable, and express the maximum possible size increase as a linear program that seeks to maximize how much more entropy is in the result of the query than the input. Although this linear program has exponentially many variables, we also show that we can decide in polynomial time whether the result can be any larger than the input database.

  1. Quantum Junction Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Jiang

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO 2); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  2. Lithosphere/Asthenosphere Structure beneath the Mendocino Triple Junction from the Analysis of Surface Wave, Ambient Noise, and Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K.; Zhai, Y.; Levander, A.; Porritt, R. W.; Allen, R. M.; Schmandt, B.; Humphreys, E.; O'Driscoll, L.

    2010-12-01

    We have developed a 3-D shear velocity model using finite-frequency Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion, PdS receiver functions, and ambient noise tomography to better understand the complex lithosphere/asthenosphere structures in the Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ) region. Using approximately 100 events (July 2007-December 2008) recorded by the stations of the Flexible Array Mendocino Experiment (FAME), the USArray Transportable Array (TA) network, and the Berkeley Digital Seismograph network, we have obtained the phase velocities (20-100s) from the finite-frequency Rayleigh wave tomography, which agrees well with the ambient noise tomography results (7-40 s, Porritt & Allen, 2010) in the overlapping period range. We subsequently inverted for a 3-D Vs model on a 0.25°x0.25° grid from the combined dispersion datasets, constrained by interface depths from the PdS receiver functions (Zhai & Levander, 2010). The resulting crustal and upper mantle Vs model (~150 km) reveals strong lateral heterogeneity in the subduction and transform regimes of the Mendocino Triple Junction region where the Gorda, Pacific, and North American plates intersect. The subducting Gorda slab is well-imaged as an eastward-dipping high-velocity anomaly to ~100 km depth. At the same depth to the east we observe a large-scale low velocity zone, which is the mantle wedge beneath the North American Plate. The southern edge of the Gorda plate (SEDGE) is imaged at 80-100 km depth and is in excellent agreement with measurements made from PdS receiver functions, body-wave tomography (Schmandt & Humphreys, 2010; Obrebski et al., 2010), and active source studies. At depths greater than 80 km, we interpret low velocities under the Cascadia subduction zone as the asthenosphere below the Gorda plate, in agreement with measured LAB depths from RFs. South of the SEDGE shallow strong low-velocities appear beneath the transform region, which we interpret as the asthenosphere in the slab-gap region left by

  3. Size and functional tuning of solid state nanopores by chemical functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussi, Valentina; Fanzio, Paola; Firpo, Giuseppe; Repetto, Luca; Valbusa, Ugo

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of using a simple functionalization procedure, based on an initial vapour-phase silanization, to control the size and functionality of solid state nanopores. The presented results show that, by varying the silanization time, it is possible to modify the efficiency of probe molecule attachment, thus shrinking the pore to the chosen size, while introducing a specific sensing selectivity. The proposed method allows us to tune the nanopore biosensor adapting it to the specific final application, and it can be efficiently applied when the pore initial diameter does not exceed a limit dimension related to the mean free path of the silane molecules at the working pressure.

  4. An atrial-fibrillation-linked connexin40 mutant is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and impairs the function of atrial gap-junction channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiguo Sun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Connexin40 (Cx40-containing gap-junction channels are expressed in the atrial myocardium and provide a low-resistance passage for rapid impulse propagation. A germline mutation in the GJA5 gene, which encodes Cx40, resulting in a truncated Cx40 (Q49X was identified in a large Chinese family with lone (idiopathic atrial fibrillation (AF. This mutation co-segregated with seven AF probands in an autosomal-dominant way over generations. To test the hypothesis that this Cx40 mutant affects the distribution and function of atrial gap junctions, we studied the Q49X mutant in gap-junction-deficient HeLa and N2A cells. The Q49X mutant, unlike wild-type Cx40, was typically localized in the cytoplasm and failed to form gap-junction plaques at cell-cell interfaces. When the Q49X mutant was co-expressed with Cx40 or Cx43, the mutant substantially reduced the gap-junction plaque formation of Cx40 and Cx43. Electrophysiological studies revealed no electrical coupling of cell pairs expressing the mutant alone and a significant decrease in the coupling conductance when the mutant was co-expressed with Cx40 or Cx43. Further colocalization experiments with the organelle residential proteins indicate that Q49X was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. These findings provide evidence that the Q49X mutant is capable of impairing gap-junction distribution and function of key atrial connexins, which might play a role in the predisposition to and onset of AF.

  5. Virally expressed connexin26 restores gap junction function in the cochlea of conditional Gjb2 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Q; Wang, Y; Chang, Q; Wang, J; Gong, S; Li, H; Lin, X

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in GJB2, which codes for the gap junction (GJ) protein connexin26 (Cx26), are the most common causes of human nonsyndromic hereditary deafness. We inoculated modified adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors into the scala media of early postnatal conditional Gjb2 knockout mice to drive exogenous Cx26 expression. We found extensive virally expressed Cx26 in cells lining the scala media, and intercellular GJ network was re-established in the organ of Corti of mutant mouse cochlea. Widespread ectopic Cx26 expression neither formed ectopic GJs nor affected normal hearing thresholds in wild-type (WT) mice, suggesting that autonomous cellular mechanisms regulate proper membrane trafficking of exogenously expressed Cx26 and govern the functional manifestation of them. Functional recovery of GJ-mediated coupling among the supporting cells was observed. We found that both cell death in the organ of Corti and degeneration of spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea of mutant mice were substantially reduced, although auditory brainstem responses did not show significant hearing improvement. This is the first report demonstrating that virally mediated gene therapy restored extensive GJ intercellular network among cochlear non-sensory cells in vivo. Such a treatment performed at early postnatal stages resulted in a partial rescue of disease phenotypes in the cochlea of the mutant mice.

  6. Density functional theory study on Herzberg-Teller contribution in Raman scattering from 4-aminothiophenol-metal complex and metal-4-aminothiophenol-metal junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shasha; Zhao, Xiuming; Li, Yuanzuo; Zhao, Xiaohong; Chen, Maodu

    2009-06-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations have been performed to investigate the Raman scattering spectra of metal-molecule complex and metal-molecule-metal junction architectures interconnected with 4-aminothiophenol (PATP) molecule. The simulated profiles of normal Raman scattering (NRS) spectra for the two complexes (Ag2-PATP and PATP-Au2) and the two junctions (Ag2-PATP-Au2 and Au2-PATP-Ag2) are similar to each other, but exhibit obviously different Raman intensities. Due to the lager static polarizabilities of the two junctions, which directly influence the ground state chemical enhancement in NRS spectra, the calculated normal Raman intensities of them are stronger than those of two complexes by the factor of 102. We calculate preresonance Raman scattering (RRS) spectra with incident light at 1064 nm, which is much lower than the S1 electronic transition energy of complexes and junctions. Ag2-PATP-Au2 and Au2-PATP-Ag2 junctions yield higher Raman intensities than those of Ag2-PATP and PATP-Au2 complexes, especially for b2 modes. This effect is mainly attributed to charge transfer (CT) between the metal gap and the PAPT molecule which results in the occurrence of CT resonance enhancement. The calculated pre-RRS spectra strongly depend on the electronic transition state produced by new structures. With excitation at 514.5 nm, the calculated pre-RRS spectra of two complexes and two junctions are stronger than those of with excitation at 1064 nm. A charge difference densities methodology has been used to visually describe chemical enhancement mechanism of RRS spectrum. This methodology aims at visualizing intermolecular CT which provides direct evidence of the Herzberg-Teller mechanism.

  7. Analysis of trafficking, stability and function of human connexin 26 gap junction channels with deafness-causing mutations in the fourth transmembrane helix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Ambrosi

    Full Text Available Human Connexin26 gene mutations cause hearing loss. These hereditary mutations are the leading cause of childhood deafness worldwide. Mutations in gap junction proteins (connexins can impair intercellular communication by eliminating protein synthesis, mis-trafficking, or inducing channels that fail to dock or have aberrant function. We previously identified a new class of mutants that form non-functional gap junction channels and hemichannels (connexons by disrupting packing and inter-helix interactions. Here we analyzed fourteen point mutations in the fourth transmembrane helix of connexin26 (Cx26 that cause non-syndromic hearing loss. Eight mutations caused mis-trafficking (K188R, F191L, V198M, S199F, G200R, I203K, L205P, T208P. Of the remaining six that formed gap junctions in mammalian cells, M195T and A197S formed stable hemichannels after isolation with a baculovirus/Sf9 protein purification system, while C202F, I203T, L205V and N206S formed hemichannels with varying degrees of instability. The function of all six gap junction-forming mutants was further assessed through measurement of dye coupling in mammalian cells and junctional conductance in paired Xenopus oocytes. Dye coupling between cell pairs was reduced by varying degrees for all six mutants. In homotypic oocyte pairings, only A197S induced measurable conductance. In heterotypic pairings with wild-type Cx26, five of the six mutants formed functional gap junction channels, albeit with reduced efficiency. None of the mutants displayed significant alterations in sensitivity to transjunctional voltage or induced conductive hemichannels in single oocytes. Intra-hemichannel interactions between mutant and wild-type proteins were assessed in rescue experiments using baculovirus expression in Sf9 insect cells. Of the four unstable mutations (C202F, I203T, L205V, N206S only C202F and N206S formed stable hemichannels when co-expressed with wild-type Cx26. Stable M195T hemichannels

  8. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowik, Ł.; Mélin, T., E-mail: thierry.melin@isen.iemn.univ-lille1.fr [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie, CNRS-UMR8520, Avenue Poincaré, F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Nguyen-Tran, T.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, CNRS-UMR7647, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-11-28

    Semiconductor junctions are the basis of electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate junctions formed from highly doped (N{sub D}≈10{sup 20}−10{sup 21}cm{sup −3}) silicon nanocrystals (NCs) in the 2–50 nm size range, using Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments with single charge sensitivity. We show that the charge transfer from doped NCs towards a two-dimensional layer experimentally follows a simple phenomenological law, corresponding to formation of an interface dipole linearly increasing with the NC diameter. This feature leads to analytically predictable junction properties down to quantum size regimes: NC depletion width independent of the NC size and varying as N{sub D}{sup −1/3}, and depleted charge linearly increasing with the NC diameter and varying as N{sub D}{sup 1/3}. We thus establish a “nanocrystal counterpart” of conventional semiconductor planar junctions, here however valid in regimes of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements.

  9. Control over Rectification in Supramolecular Tunneling Junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wimbush, K.S.; Wimbush, Kim S.; Reus, William F.; van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard; Reinhoudt, David; Whitesides, George M.; Nijhuis, C.A.; Velders, Aldrik

    2010-01-01

    In complete control: The magnitude of current rectification in well-defined supramolecular tunneling junctions can be controlled by changing the terminal functionality (red spheres) of dendrimers (gray spheres) immobilized on a supramolecular platform (see picture). Junctions containing biferrocene

  10. An Effect Size Measure for Raju's Differential Functioning for Items and Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Keith D.; Oshima, T. C.

    2015-01-01

    This study established an effect size measure for differential functioning for items and tests' noncompensatory differential item functioning (NCDIF). The Mantel-Haenszel parameter served as the benchmark for developing NCDIF's effect size measure for reporting moderate and large differential item functioning in test items. The effect size of…

  11. Identification of Human Junctional Adhesion Molecule 1 as a Functional Receptor for the Hom-1 Calicivirus on Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Sandoval-Jaime, Carlos; Parra, Gabriel I; Tin, Christine M; Jones, Ronald W; Soden, Jo; Barnes, Donna; Freeth, Jim; Smith, Alvin W; Green, Kim Y

    2017-02-14

    The Hom-1 vesivirus was reported in 1998 following the inadvertent transmission of the animal calicivirus San Miguel sea lion virus to a human host in a laboratory. We characterized the Hom-1 strain and investigated the mechanism by which human cells could be infected. An expression library of 3,559 human plasma membrane proteins was screened for reactivity with Hom-1 virus-like particles, and a single interacting protein, human junctional adhesion molecule 1 (hJAM1), was identified. Transient expression of hJAM1 conferred susceptibility to Hom-1 infection on nonpermissive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Virus infection was markedly inhibited when CHO cells stably expressing hJAM were pretreated with anti-hJAM1 monoclonal antibodies. Cell lines of human origin were tested for growth of Hom-1, and efficient replication was observed in HepG2, HuH7, and SK-CO15 cells. The three cell lines (of hepatic or intestinal origin) were confirmed to express hJAM1 on their surface, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9-mediated knockout of the hJAM1 gene in each line abolished Hom-1 propagation. Taken together, our data indicate that entry of the Hom-1 vesivirus into these permissive human cell lines is mediated by the plasma membrane protein hJAM1 as a functional receptor.IMPORTANCE Vesiviruses, such as San Miguel sea lion virus and feline calicivirus, are typically associated with infection in animal hosts. Following the accidental infection of a laboratory worker with San Miguel sea lion virus, a related virus was isolated in cell culture and named Hom-1. In this study, we found that Hom-1 could be propagated in a number of human cell lines, making it the first calicivirus to replicate efficiently in cultured human cells. Screening of a library of human cell surface membrane proteins showed that the virus could utilize human junctional adhesion molecule 1 as a receptor to enter cells and initiate replication. The Hom-1 virus presents a new

  12. Children's belief- and desire-reasoning in the temporoparietal junction: evidence for specialization from functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Lindsay C; Kovelman, Ioulia; Hu, Xiaosu; Wellman, Henry M

    2015-01-01

    Behaviorally, children's explicit theory of mind (ToM) proceeds in a progression of mental-state understandings: developmentally, children demonstrate accurate explicit desire-reasoning before accurate explicit belief-reasoning. Given its robust and cross-cultural nature, we hypothesize this progression may be paced in part by maturation/specialization of the brain. Neuroimaging research demonstrates that the right temporoparietal junction (TPJ) becomes increasingly selective for ToM reasoning as children age, and as their ToM improves. But this research has narrowly focused on beliefs or on undifferentiated mental-states. A recent ERP study in children included a critical contrast to desire-reasoning, and demonstrated that right posterior potentials differentiated belief-reasoning from desire-reasoning. Taken together, the literature suggests that children's desire-belief progression may be paced by specialization of the right TPJ for belief-reasoning specifically, beyond desire-reasoning. In the present study, we tested this hypothesis directly by examining children's belief- and desire-reasoning using functional near-infrared spectroscopy in conjunction with structural magnetic resonance imaging to pinpoint brain activation in the right TPJ. Results showed greatest activation in the right TPJ for belief-reasoning, beyond desire-reasoning, and beyond non-mental reasoning (control). Findings replicate and critically extend prior ERP results, and provide clear evidence for a specific neural mechanism underlying children's progression from understanding desires to understanding beliefs.

  13. Identification of Human Junctional Adhesion Molecule 1 as a Functional Receptor for the Hom-1 Calicivirus on Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav V. Sosnovtsev

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Hom-1 vesivirus was reported in 1998 following the inadvertent transmission of the animal calicivirus San Miguel sea lion virus to a human host in a laboratory. We characterized the Hom-1 strain and investigated the mechanism by which human cells could be infected. An expression library of 3,559 human plasma membrane proteins was screened for reactivity with Hom-1 virus-like particles, and a single interacting protein, human junctional adhesion molecule 1 (hJAM1, was identified. Transient expression of hJAM1 conferred susceptibility to Hom-1 infection on nonpermissive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells. Virus infection was markedly inhibited when CHO cells stably expressing hJAM were pretreated with anti-hJAM1 monoclonal antibodies. Cell lines of human origin were tested for growth of Hom-1, and efficient replication was observed in HepG2, HuH7, and SK-CO15 cells. The three cell lines (of hepatic or intestinal origin were confirmed to express hJAM1 on their surface, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9-mediated knockout of the hJAM1 gene in each line abolished Hom-1 propagation. Taken together, our data indicate that entry of the Hom-1 vesivirus into these permissive human cell lines is mediated by the plasma membrane protein hJAM1 as a functional receptor.

  14. Non-Equilibrium Green's Function Calculation for Electron Transport through Magnetic Tunnel Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Nobakht

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper non-equilibrium Green's function method –dependent electron transport through non magnetic layer (insulator has been studied in one dimension .electron transport in multi-layer (magnetic/non magnetic/ magneticlayers is studied as quantum .the result show increasing the binding strength of the electrical insulator transition probability density case , the electron density , broad levels of disruption increases. Broad band connection increases the levels of disruption to electrical insulation and show non- conductive insulating state to semiconductor stat and even conductor

  15. Fast endocytic recycling determines TRPC1-STIM1 clustering in ER-PM junctions and plasma membrane function of the channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Lorena Brito; Ong, Hwei Ling; Liu, Xibao; Ambudkar, Indu S

    2015-10-01

    Stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) senses depletion of ER-Ca2+ store and clusters in ER-PM junctions where it associates with and gates Ca2+ influx channels, Orai1 and TRPC1. Clustering of TRPC1 with STIM1 and Orai1 in these junctions is critical since Orai1-mediated Ca2+ entry triggers surface expression of TRPC1 while STIM1 gates the channel. Thus, plasma membrane function of TRPC1 depends on the delivery of the channel to the sites where STIM1 puncta are formed. This study examines intracellular trafficking mechanism(s) that determine plasma membrane expression and function of TRPC1 in cells where Orai1 and TRPC1 are endogenously expressed and contribute to Ca2+ entry. We report that TRPC1 is internalized by Arf6-dependent pathway, sorted to Rab5-containing early endosomes, and trafficked to ER-PM junctions by Rab4-dependent fast recycling. Overexpression of Arf6, or Rab5, but not the respective dominant negative mutants, induced retention of TRPC1 in early endosomes and suppressed TRPC1 function. Notably, cells expressing Arf6 or Rab5 displayed an inwardly rectifying ICRAC current that is mediated by Orai1 instead of TRPC1-associated ISOC, demonstrating that Orai1 function was not altered. Importantly, expression of Rab4, but not STIM1, with Rab5 rescued surface expression and function of TRPC1, restoring generation of ISOC. Together, these data demonstrate that trafficking via fast recycling endosomes determines TRPC1-STIM1 clustering within ER-PM junctions following ER-Ca2+ store depletion which is critical for the surface expression and function of the channel. Ca2+ influx mediated by TRPC1 modifies Ca2+-dependent physiological response of cells. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Accuracy of estimations of body-frame size as a function of sex and actual frame size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearns, J F; Broida, J P; Gayton, W F

    1988-02-01

    Body-frame size is an important factor in determining an optimal body weight for a given height. Previous studies have indicated that many individuals incorrectly estimate their body-frame size, and, as a result, incorrectly assess their ideal weight. The present study investigated the accuracy of estimation of body-frame size as a function of sex and actual frame size. The subjects were 66 men and 52 women participating in a community adult fitness program. Data indicated that medium-framed individuals were the most accurate in their estimations of body-frame size. Also, women were twice as likely to be accurate as were men. These results are interpreted to mean that most people assume they are medium-framed and that there is a sex difference in the way body-frame size is estimated.

  17. Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication: A Functional Biomarker to Assess Adverse Effects of Toxicants and Toxins, and Health Benefits of Natural Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upham, Brad L; Sovadinová, Iva; Babica, Pavel

    2016-12-25

    This protocol describes a scalpel loading-fluorescent dye transfer (SL-DT) technique that measures intercellular communication through gap junction channels, which is a major intercellular process by which tissue homeostasis is maintained. Interruption of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) by toxicants, toxins, drugs, etc. has been linked to numerous adverse health effects. Many genetic-based human diseases have been linked to mutations in gap junction genes. The SL-DT technique is a simple functional assay for the simultaneous assessment of GJIC in a large population of cells. The assay involves pre-loading cells with a fluorescent dye by briefly perturbing the cell membrane with a scalpel blade through a population of cells. The fluorescent dye is then allowed to traverse through gap junction channels to neighboring cells for a designated time. The assay is then terminated by the addition of formalin to the cells. The spread of the fluorescent dye through a population of cells is assessed with an epifluorescence microscope and the images are analyzed with any number of morphometric software packages that are available, including free software packages found on the public domain. This assay has also been adapted for in vivo studies using tissue slices from various organs from treated animals. Overall, the SL-DT assay can serve a broad range of in vitro pharmacological and toxicological needs, and can be potentially adapted for high throughput set-up systems with automated fluorescence microscopy imaging and analysis to elucidate more samples in a shorter time.

  18. Persistent Borna Disease Virus infection changes expression and function of astroglial gap junctions in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster-Patzlaff, Christiane; Hosseini, Seyed Mehdi; Reuss, Bernhard

    2007-12-12

    Neonatal Borna Disease Virus (BDV) infection of the Lewis rat brain leads to dentate gyrus (DG) degeneration, underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Since astroglial gap junction (GJ) coupling is known to influence neurodegenerative processes, the question arose whether persistent BDV infection influences astroglial connexins (Cx) Cx43 and Cx30 in the hippocampal formation (HiF) of Lewis rats. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis of forebrain (FB) samples revealed a virus dependent reduction of both Cx types 8 but not 4 weeks post infection (p.i.). Immunohistochemistry revealed an increase of Cx43 in the DG and a decrease in the CA3 region 4 and 8 weeks p.i. Cx30, which was detectable only 8 weeks p.i., revealed a BDV dependent increase in DG and CA3 regions. BDV dependent astrogliosis as revealed by immunodetection of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) correlated not with astroglial connexin expression. With regard to functional coupling as revealed by scrape loading, BDV infection resulted in increased spreading of the GJ permeant dye Lucifer yellow in primary hippocampal astroglial cultures, and in increased expression of Cx43 and Cx30 as revealed by immunocytochemistry. In conclusion, persistent BDV infection of the Lewis rat brain leads to changes in astroglial Cx expression both in vivo and in vitro and of functional coupling in vitro. Distribution and time course of these changes suggest them to be a direct result of neurodegeneration in the DG and an indirect effect of neuronal deafferentiation in the CA3 region.

  19. Functional implications of squamosal suture size in paranthropus boisei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzialo, Christine; Wood, Sarah A; Berthaume, Michael; Smith, Amanda; Dumont, Elizabeth R; Benazzi, Stefano; Weber, Gerhard W; Strait, David S; Grosse, Ian R

    2014-02-01

    It has been hypothesized that the extensively overlapping temporal and parietal bones of the squamosal sutures in Paranthropus boisei are adaptations for withstanding loads associated with feeding. Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to investigate the biomechanical effects of suture size (i.e., the area of overlap between the temporal and parietal bones) on stress, strain energy, and strain ratio in the squamosal sutures of Pan troglodytes and P. boisei (specimen OH 5) during biting. Finite element models (FEMs) of OH 5 and a P. troglodytes cranium were constructed from CT scans. These models contain sutures that approximate the actual suture sizes preserved in both crania. The FEM of Pan was then modified to create two additional FEMs with squamosal sutures that are 50% smaller and 25% larger than those in the original model. Comparisons among the models test the effect of suture size on the structural integrity of the squamosal suture as the temporal squama and parietal bone move relative to each other during simulated premolar biting. Results indicate that with increasing suture size there is a decreased risk of suture failure, and that maximum stress values in the OH 5 suture were favorable compared to values in the Pan model with the normal suture size. Strain ratios suggest that shear is an important strain regime in the squamosal suture. This study is consistent with the hypothesis that larger sutures help reduce the likelihood of suture failure under high biting loads. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Engineered Cx26 variants established functional heterotypic Cx26/Cx43 and Cx26/Cx40 gap junction channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karademir, Levent B; Aoyama, Hiroshi; Yue, Benny; Chen, Honghong; Bai, Donglin

    2016-05-15

    Gap junction (GJ) channels mediate direct intercellular communication and are composed of two docked hemichannels (connexin oligomers). It is well documented that the docking and formation of GJs are possible only between compatible hemichannels (or connexins). The mechanisms of heterotypic docking compatibility are not fully clear. We aligned the protein sequences of docking-compatible and -incompatible connexins with that of connexin26 (Cx26). We found that two docking hydrogen bond (HB)-forming residues on the second extracellular domain (E2) of Cx26 and their equivalent residues are well conserved within docking-compatible connexins, but different between docking-incompatible connexins. Replacing one or both of these residues of Cx26 into the corresponding residues in the docking incompatible connexins (K168V, N176H or K168V-N176H) increased the formation of morphological and functional heterotypic GJs with connexin43 (Cx43) or connexin40 (Cx40), indicating that these two residues are important for docking incompatibility between Cx26 and these connexins. Our homology structure models predict that both HBs and hydrophobic interactions at the E2 docking interface are important docking mechanisms in heterotypic Cx26 K168V-N176H/Cx43 GJs and probably other docking compatible connexins. Revealing the key residues and mechanisms of heterotypic docking compatibility will assist us in understanding why these putative docking residues are hotspots of disease-linked mutants. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  1. Nonequilibrium green function approach to elastic and inelastic spin-charge transport in topological insulator-based heterostructures and magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouzi, Farzad

    Current and future technological needs increasingly motivate the intensive scientific research of the properties of materials at the nano-scale. One of the most important domains in this respect at present concerns nano-electronics and its diverse applications. The great interest in this domain arises from the potential reduction of the size of the circuit components, maintaining their quality and functionality, and aiming at greater efficiency, economy, and storage characteristics for the corresponding physical devices. The aim of this thesis is to present a contribution to the analysis of the electronic charge and spin transport phenomena that occur at the quantum level in nano-structures. This thesis spans the areas of quantum transport theory through time-dependent systems, electron-boson interacting systems and systems of interest to spintronics. A common thread in the thesis is to develop the theoretical foundations and computational algorithms to numerically simulate such systems. In order to optimize the numerical calculations I resort to different techniques (such as graph theory in finding inverse of a sparse matrix, adaptive grids for integrations and programming languages (e.g., MATLAB and C++) and distributed computing tools (MPI, CUDA). Outline of the Thesis: After giving an introduction to the topics covered in this thesis in Chapter 1, I present the theoretical foundations to the field of non-equilibrium quantum statistics in Chapter 2. The applications of this formalism and the results are covered in the subsequent chapters as follows: Spin and charge quantum pumping in time-dependent systems: Covered in Chapters 3, 4 and 5, this topics was initially motivated by experiments on measuring voltage signal from a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) exposed to a microwave radiation in ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) condition. In Chapter 3 we found a possible explanation for the finite voltage signal measured from a tunnel junction consisting of only a single

  2. The connexin43 carboxyl terminus and cardiac gap junction organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palatinus, Joseph A; Rhett, J Matthew; Gourdie, Robert G

    2012-08-01

    The precise spatial order of gap junctions at intercalated disks in adult ventricular myocardium is thought vital for maintaining cardiac synchrony. Breakdown or remodeling of this order is a hallmark of arrhythmic disease of the heart. The principal component of gap junction channels between ventricular cardiomyocytes is connexin43 (Cx43). Protein-protein interactions and modifications of the carboxyl-terminus of Cx43 are key determinants of gap junction function, size, distribution and organization during normal development and in disease processes. Here, we review data on the role of proteins interacting with the Cx43 carboxyl-terminus in the regulation of cardiac gap junction organization, with particular emphasis on Zonula Occludens-1. The rapid progress in this area suggests that in coming years we are likely to develop a fuller understanding of the molecular mechanisms causing pathologic remodeling of gap junctions. With these advances come the promise of novel approach to the treatment of arrhythmia and the prevention of sudden cardiac death. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Communicating junctions, composition, structure and characteristics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Disorder and size effects in the envelope-function approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargam, T. G.; Capaz, R. B.; Koiller, Belita

    1997-10-01

    We investigate the validity and limitations of the envelope-function approximation (EFA), widely accepted for the description of the electronic states of semiconductor heterostructures. We consider narrow quantum wells of GaAs confined by AlxGa1-xAs barriers. Calculations performed within the tight-binding approximation using ensembles of supercells are compared to the EFA results. Results for miniband widths in superlattices obtained in different approximations are also discussed. The main source of discrepancy for narrow wells is the treatment of alloy disorder within the virtual crystal approximation. We also test the two key assumptions of the EFA: (a) that the electronic wave functions have Bloch symmetry with well-defined k--> in the alloy region; (b) that the periodic parts of the Bloch functions are the same throughout the heterostructure. We show that inaccuracies are mainly due to the former assumption.

  4. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Dvira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar

    2016-05-01

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects are factors that combine to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good), and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques that incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with examples illustrating the challenge of reaching control over vibrational heat conduction in molecules.

  5. Lifetimes and sizes from two-particle correlation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Heinz, Ulrich W; Wiedemann, Urs Achim; Wu Yuang Fang

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the Yano-Koonin-Podgoretsky (YKP) parametrization of the two-particle correlation function for azimuthally symmetric expanding sources. We derive model-independent expressions for the YKP fit parameters and discuss their physical interpretation. We use them to evaluate the YKP fit parameters and their momentum dependence for a simple model for the emission function and propose new strategies for extracting the source lifetime. Longitudinal expansion of the source can be seen directly in the rapidity dependence of the Yano-Koonin velocity.

  6. Combined application of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and functional electrical stimulation accelerates bone-tendon junction healing in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianzhong; Qu, Jin; Xu, Daqi; Zhang, Tao; Qin, Ling; Lu, Hongbin

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the combined use of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and functional electrical stimulation (FES) on patella-patellar tendon (PPT) junction healing using a partial patellectomy model in rabbits. LIPUS was delivered continuously starting day 3 postoperative until week 6. FES was applied on quadriceps muscles to induce tensile force to the repaired PPT junction 5 days per week for 6 weeks since week 7 postoperatively. Forty rabbits with partial patellectomy were randomly divided into four groups: control, LIPUS alone, FES alone, and LIPUS + FES groups. At week 12, the PPT complexes were harvested for histology, radiographs, peripheral quantitative computed tomography, and biomechanical testing. There was better remodeling of newly formed bone and fibrocartilage zone in the three treatment groups compared with the control group. LIPUS and/or FES treatments significantly increased the area and bone mineral content of new bone. The failure load and ultimate strength of PPT complex were also highly improved in the three treatment groups. More new bone formed and higher tensile properties were showed in the LIPUS + FES group compared with the LIPUS or FES alone groups. Early LIPUS treatment and later FES treatment showed the additive effects of accelerating PPT junction healing.

  7. Selective permeability of gap junction channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Gary S; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter R

    2004-03-23

    Gap junctions mediate the transfer of small cytoplasmic molecules between adjacent cells. A family of gap junction proteins exist that form channels with unique properties, and differ in their ability to mediate the transfer of specific molecules. Mutations in a number of individual gap junction proteins, called connexins, cause specific human diseases. Therefore, it is important to understand how gap junctions selectively move molecules between cells. Rules that dictate the ability of a molecule to travel through gap junction channels are complex. In addition to molecular weight and size, the ability of a solute to transverse these channels depends on its net charge, shape, and interactions with specific connexins that constitute gap junctions in particular cells. This review presents some data and interpretations pertaining to mechanisms that govern the differential transfer of signals through gap junction channels.

  8. Metallic Junction Thermoelectric Device Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzik, Adam J.; Choi, Sang H.

    2017-01-01

    Thermoelectric junctions made of semiconductors have existed in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) for deep space missions, but are currently being adapted for terrestrial energy harvesting. Unfortunately, these devices are inefficient, operating at only 7% efficiency. This low efficiency has driven efforts to make high-figure-of-merit thermoelectric devices, which require a high electrical conductivity but a low thermal conductivity, a combination that is difficult to achieve. Lowered thermal conductivity has increased efficiency, but at the cost of power output. An alternative setup is to use metallic junctions rather than semiconductors as thermoelectric devices. Metals have orders of magnitude more electrons and electronic conductivities higher than semiconductors, but thermal conductivity is higher as well. To evaluate the viability of metallic junction thermoelectrics, a two dimensional heat transfer MATLAB simulation was constructed to calculate efficiency and power output. High Seebeck coefficient alloys, Chromel (90%Ni-10%Cr) and Constantan (55%Cu-45%Ni), produced efficiencies of around 20-30%. Parameters such as the number of layers of junctions, lateral junction density, and junction sizes for both series- and parallel-connected junctions were explored.

  9. Linking functional traits and demographic rates in a subtropical tree community: the importance of size dependency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iida, Yoshiko; Kohyama, Takashi S; Swenson, Nathan G; Su, Sheng‐Hsin; Chen, Chien‐Teh; Chiang, Jyh‐Min; Sun, I‐Fang; Zuidema, Pieter

    2014-01-01

    .... Several functional traits have been shown to correlate with growth and mortality rates in trees, but less is known about how the relationships between functional traits and demographic rates change with tree size...

  10. Estimating Functions of Distributions Defined over Spaces of Unknown Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Wolpert

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider Bayesian estimation of information-theoretic quantities from data, using a Dirichlet prior. Acknowledging the uncertainty of the event space size m and the Dirichlet prior’s concentration parameter c, we treat both as random variables set by a hyperprior. We show that the associated hyperprior, P(c, m, obeys a simple “Irrelevance of Unseen Variables” (IUV desideratum iff P(c, m = P(cP(m. Thus, requiring IUV greatly reduces the number of degrees of freedom of the hyperprior. Some information-theoretic quantities can be expressed multiple ways, in terms of different event spaces, e.g., mutual information. With all hyperpriors (implicitly used in earlier work, different choices of this event space lead to different posterior expected values of these information-theoretic quantities. We show that there is no such dependence on the choice of event space for a hyperprior that obeys IUV. We also derive a result that allows us to exploit IUV to greatly simplify calculations, like the posterior expected mutual information or posterior expected multi-information. We also use computer experiments to favorably compare an IUV-based estimator of entropy to three alternative methods in common use. We end by discussing how seemingly innocuous changes to the formalization of an estimation problem can substantially affect the resultant estimates of posterior expectations.

  11. Non-functional requirements: size measurement and testing with COSMIC-FFP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassab, M.; Ormandjieva, O.; Daneva, M.; Abran, A.; Abran, A.; Dumke, R.; Mas, A.

    2007-01-01

    The non-functional requirements (NFRs) of software systems are well known to add a degree of uncertainty to process of estimating the cost of any project. This paper contributes to the achievement of more precise project size measurement through incorporating NFRs into the functional size quantifica

  12. Size effect on the magnetic and electronic properties of the monolayer lateral hetero-junction WS{sub 2}-MoS{sub 2} nanoribbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Yan-Ni [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Ankang University, Ankang, 725000 Shannxi (China); Xia, Ming-Gang [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Department of Optical Information Science and Technology, School of Science, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 710049 (China); Zhang, Sheng-Li, E-mail: zhangsl@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • The magnetic moment decreases in the order of N{sub z} = 2, 6 and 4 (the width of zigzag NRs) • The magnetic moment decreases with the increased r{sub z} (the number of the Mo-S chains,r{sub z} ≠ 0 and r{sub z} ≠ N{sub z}) at the same width N{sub z}. • The energy band varies with the increased N{sub A} (the width of armchair NRs) and r{sub A} (r{sub A} = 0∼ N{sub A}) at the same width N{sub A}. • The lowest band gap 0.150 eV and the highest one 0.581 eV can be obtained from the armchair WS2-MoS2 NRs, respectively. - Abstract: By using the VASP, we studied the magnetic and electronic properties of the monolayer lateral hetero-junction WS{sub 2}-MoS{sub 2}-nanoribbons (WS{sub 2}-MoS{sub 2}-NRs). Our results show that the NRs’ edge chirality and width affect significantly its magnetic and electronic properties. The monolayer lateral hetero-junction ZZ-WS{sub 2}-MoS{sub 2}-NRs(ZZ: zigzag) exhibitmetallic behavior and have considerable magnetic moment. Their magnetic moments decrease in the order of N{sub z} = 2, 6 and 4 (the width of NRs). While, the magnetic moment decreases with the increased r{sub z} (the number of the Mo-S chains, r{sub z} ≠ 0 and r{sub z} ≠ N{sub z}) at the same width N{sub z}. The N{sub A}-AC-WS{sub 2}-NR (AC: armchair) and N{sub A}-AC-WS{sub 2}-MoS{sub 2}-NR-1 (the number of the Mo-S chain is 1) show metallic behavior when N{sub A} = 3 (the width of NRs). The other monolayer lateral hetero-junction AC-WS{sub 2}-MoS{sub 2}-NRs remain the nonmagnetic and semiconductingbehavior as bulk. But they are indirect band-gap except for the N{sub A} = 3, r{sub A} = 2 (the number of the Mo-S chains) and N{sub A} = 7, r{sub A} = 0 when N{sub A} < 9. However they are direct band-gap when N{sub A} ≥ 9. Their lowest and highest band gaps are 0.150 eV and 0.581 eV, respectively. These unique magnetic and electronic properties will provide guidanceon the WS{sub 2}-MoS{sub 2} hetero-junction application in nanodevice.

  13. Development of an Innovative Intradermal siRNA Delivery System Using a Combination of a Functional Stearylated Cytoplasm-Responsive Peptide and a Tight Junction-Opening Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisako Ibaraki

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available As a new category of therapeutics for skin diseases including atopic dermatitis (AD, nucleic acids are gaining importance in the clinical setting. Intradermal administration is noninvasive and improves patients′ quality of life. However, intradermal small interfering RNA (siRNA delivery is difficult because of two barriers encountered in the skin: intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum and tight junctions in the stratum granulosum. Tight junctions are the major barrier in AD; therefore, we focused on functional peptides to devise an intradermal siRNA delivery system for topical skin application. In this study, we examined intradermal siRNA permeability in the tape-stripped (20 times back skin of mice or AD-like skin of auricles treated with 6-carboxyfluorescein-aminohexyl phosphoramidite (FAM-labeled siRNA, the tight junction modulator AT1002, and the functional cytoplasm-responsive stearylated peptide STR-CH2R4H2C by using confocal laser microscopy. We found that strong fluorescence was observed deep and wide in the epidermis and dermis of back skin and AD-like ears after siRNA with STR-CH2R4H2C and AT1002 treatment. After 10 h from administration, brightness of FAM-siRNA was significantly higher for STR-CH2R4H2C + AT1002, compared to other groups. In addition, we confirmed the nontoxicity of STR-CH2R4H2C as a siRNA carrier using PAM212 cells. Thus, our results demonstrate the applicability of the combination of STR-CH2R4H2C and AT1002 for effective intradermal siRNA delivery.

  14. Calculation method for particle mean diameter and particle size distribution function under dependent model algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Tang; Xiaogang Sun; Guibin Yuan

    2007-01-01

    In total light scattering particle sizing technique, the relationship among Sauter mean diameter D32, mean extinction efficiency Q, and particle size distribution function is studied in order to inverse the mean diameter and particle size distribution simply. We propose a method which utilizes the mean extinction efficiency ratio at only two selected wavelengths to solve D32 and then to inverse the particle size distribution associated with (Q) and D32. Numerical simulation results show that the particle size distribution is inversed accurately with this method, and the number of wavelengths used is reduced to the greatest extent in the measurement range. The calculation method has the advantages of simplicity and rapidness.

  15. Modeling on the size dependent properties of InP quantum dots: a hybrid functional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunseog; Jang, Hyosook; Lee, Junho; Jang, Eunjoo

    2013-05-01

    Theoretical calculations based on density functional theory were performed to provide better understanding of the size dependent electronic properties of InP quantum dots (QDs). Using a hybrid functional approach, we suggest a reliable analytical equation to describe the change of energy band gap as a function of size. Synthesizing colloidal InP QDs with 2-4 nm diameter and measuring their optical properties was also carried out. It was found that the theoretical band gaps showed a linear dependence on the inverse size of QDs and gave energy band gaps almost identical to the experimental values.

  16. From Bacteria to Whales: Using Functional Size Spectra to Model Marine Ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Julia L; Heneghan, Ryan F; Everett, Jason D; Trebilco, Rowan; Richardson, Anthony J

    2017-03-01

    Size-based ecosystem modeling is emerging as a powerful way to assess ecosystem-level impacts of human- and environment-driven changes from individual-level processes. These models have evolved as mechanistic explanations for observed regular patterns of abundance across the marine size spectrum hypothesized to hold from bacteria to whales. Fifty years since the first size spectrum measurements, we ask how far have we come? Although recent modeling studies capture an impressive range of sizes, complexity, and real-world applications, ecosystem coverage is still only partial. We describe how this can be overcome by unifying functional traits with size spectra (which we call functional size spectra) and highlight the key knowledge gaps that need to be filled to model ecosystems from bacteria to whales. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional traits shape size-dependent growth and mortality rates of dry forest tree species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prado-Junior, Jamir A.; Schiavini, Ivan; Vale, Vagner S.; Raymundo, Diego; Lopes, Sergio F.; Poorter, Lourens

    2016-01-01

    Aims

    Functional traits have emerged as an important tool to evaluate plant performance. However, the environmental conditions and ecological pressures that plants face change with their size, and the relationship between traits and plant performance should therefore be size-dependent, which

  18. Created-by-current states in long Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyadjiev, T. L.; Andreeva, O. Yu.; Semerdjieva, E. G.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2008-08-01

    Critical curves "critical current-external magnetic field" of long Josephson junctions with inhomogeneity and variable width are studied. We demonstrate the existence of regions of magnetic field where some fluxon states are stable only if the external current through the junction is different from zero. Position and size of such regions depend on the length of the junction, its geometry, parameters of inhomogeneity and form of the junction. The noncentral (left and right) pure fluxon states appear in the inhomogeneous Josephson junction with the increase in the junction length. We demonstrate new bifurcation points with change in width of the inhomogeneity and amplitude of the Josephson current through the inhomogeneity.

  19. Impact of penile size on male sexual function and role of penile augmentation surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaeer, Osama; Shaeer, Kamal

    2012-08-01

    Penile augmentation is an ongoing debate. Emerging evidence proves a relationship between dissatisfaction with penile size and sexual dysfunction. Despite a widespread belief of the value of penile size, and the prevalent complaint of a "small penis," penile augmentation still stands short of addressing the demand. This report highlights the studies added to medical literature on penile augmentation in 2011-2012, including data on normal penile dimensions and the expected dimensions for a normal person, determination of the prevalence of the dissatisfaction with penile size, its effect on erectile function, female partner's opinion of the value of penile size, as well as further experience with augmentation techniques.

  20. Modelling and validation of particle size distributions of supported nanoparticles using the pair distribution function technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamez-Mendoza, Liliana; Terban, Maxwell W.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Martinez-Inesta, Maria

    2017-04-13

    The particle size of supported catalysts is a key characteristic for determining structure–property relationships. It is a challenge to obtain this information accurately andin situusing crystallographic methods owing to the small size of such particles (<5 nm) and the fact that they are supported. In this work, the pair distribution function (PDF) technique was used to obtain the particle size distribution of supported Pt catalysts as they grow under typical synthesis conditions. The PDF of Pt nanoparticles grown on zeolite X was isolated and refined using two models: a monodisperse spherical model (single particle size) and a lognormal size distribution. The results were compared and validated using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) results. Both models describe the same trends in average particle size with temperature, but the results of the number-weighted lognormal size distributions can also accurately describe the mean size and the width of the size distributions obtained from STEM. Since the PDF yields crystallite sizes, these results suggest that the grown Pt nanoparticles are monocrystalline. This work shows that refinement of the PDF of small supported monocrystalline nanoparticles can yield accurate mean particle sizes and distributions.

  1. Proteomic and bioinformatic analysis of epithelial tight junction reveals an unexpected cluster of synaptic molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Vivian W

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zonula occludens, also known as the tight junction, is a specialized cell-cell interaction characterized by membrane "kisses" between epithelial cells. A cytoplasmic plaque of ~100 nm corresponding to a meshwork of densely packed proteins underlies the tight junction membrane domain. Due to its enormous size and difficulties in obtaining a biochemically pure fraction, the molecular composition of the tight junction remains largely unknown. Results A novel biochemical purification protocol has been developed to isolate tight junction protein complexes from cultured human epithelial cells. After identification of proteins by mass spectroscopy and fingerprint analysis, candidate proteins are scored and assessed individually. A simple algorithm has been devised to incorporate transmembrane domains and protein modification sites for scoring membrane proteins. Using this new scoring system, a total of 912 proteins have been identified. These 912 hits are analyzed using a bioinformatics approach to bin the hits in 4 categories: configuration, molecular function, cellular function, and specialized process. Prominent clusters of proteins related to the cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, and vesicular traffic have been identified. Weaker clusters of proteins associated with cell growth, cell migration, translation, and transcription are also found. However, the strongest clusters belong to synaptic proteins and signaling molecules. Localization studies of key components of synaptic transmission have confirmed the presence of both presynaptic and postsynaptic proteins at the tight junction domain. To correlate proteomics data with structure, the tight junction has been examined using electron microscopy. This has revealed many novel structures including end-on cytoskeletal attachments, vesicles fusing/budding at the tight junction membrane domain, secreted substances encased between the tight junction kisses, endocytosis of tight junction

  2. Mortality as a bivariate function of age and size in indeterminate growers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colchero, Fernando; Schaible, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    developed a model that treats age- and size-specific mortality as a bivariate process. This method facilitates the exploration of the underlying (unobserved) contributions of age and size to mortality. We show that, in theory, a population can show declining mortality with age and size while the underlying......Mortality in organisms that grow indefinitely, known as indeterminate growers, is thought to be driven primarily by size. However, a number of ageing mechanisms also act as functions of age. Thus, to explain mortality in these species, both size and age need to be explicitly modelled. Here we...... contribution of age, as a proxy for chronological deterioration, is of typical senescence; while a seemingly senescent population can have underlying age-related negative senescence, which is, however, overcome by negative underlying size effects. We show how inference about these unobserved processes can...

  3. Identification of MarvelD3 as a tight junction-associated transmembrane protein of the occludin family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balda Maria S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tight junctions are an intercellular adhesion complex of epithelial and endothelial cells, and form a paracellular barrier that restricts the diffusion of solutes on the basis of size and charge. Tight junctions are formed by multiprotein complexes containing cytosolic and transmembrane proteins. How these components work together to form functional tight junctions is still not well understood and will require a complete understanding of the molecular composition of the junction. Results Here we identify a new transmembrane component of tight junctions: MarvelD3, a four-span transmembrane protein. Its predicted transmembrane helices form a Marvel (MAL and related proteins for vesicle traffic and membrane link domain, a structural motif originally discovered in proteins involved in membrane apposition and fusion events, such as the tight junction proteins occludin and tricellulin. In mammals, MarvelD3 is expressed as two alternatively spliced isoforms. Both isoforms exhibit a broad tissue distribution and are expressed by different types of epithelial as well as endothelial cells. MarvelD3 co-localises with occludin at tight junctions in intestinal and corneal epithelial cells. RNA interference experiments in Caco-2 cells indicate that normal MarvelD3 expression is not required for the formation of functional tight junctions but depletion results in monolayers with increased transepithelial electrical resistance. Conclusions Our data indicate that MarvelD3 is a third member of the tight junction-associated occludin family of transmembrane proteins. Similar to occludin, normal expression of MarvelD3 is not essential for the formation of functional tight junctions. However, MarvelD3 functions as a determinant of epithelial paracellular permeability properties.

  4. Density-functional errors in ionization potential with increasing system size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittleton, Sarah R.; Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A.; Isborn, Christine M., E-mail: cisborn@ucmerced.edu [Chemistry and Chemical Biology, School of Natural Sciences, University of California, Merced, 5200 North Lake Road, Merced, California 95343 (United States); Johnson, Erin R., E-mail: erin.johnson@dal.ca [Chemistry and Chemical Biology, School of Natural Sciences, University of California, Merced, 5200 North Lake Road, Merced, California 95343 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Dalhousie University, 6274 Coburg Road, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada)

    2015-05-14

    This work investigates the effects of molecular size on the accuracy of density-functional ionization potentials for a set of 28 hydrocarbons, including series of alkanes, alkenes, and oligoacenes. As the system size increases, delocalization error introduces a systematic underestimation of the ionization potential, which is rationalized by considering the fractional-charge behavior of the electronic energies. The computation of the ionization potential with many density-functional approximations is not size-extensive due to excessive delocalization of the incipient positive charge. While inclusion of exact exchange reduces the observed errors, system-specific tuning of long-range corrected functionals does not generally improve accuracy. These results emphasize that good performance of a functional for small molecules is not necessarily transferable to larger systems.

  5. Anisotropic Magnetoresistance and Anisotropic Tunneling Magnetoresistance due to Quantum Interference in Ferromagnetic Metal Break Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolotin, Kirill; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Ralph, D

    2006-01-01

    We measure the low-temperature resistance of permalloy break junctions as a function of contact size and the magnetic field angle in applied fields large enough to saturate the magnetization. For both nanometer-scale metallic contacts and tunneling devices we observe large changes in resistance w...

  6. Novel room-temperature functional analogue and digital nanoelectronic circuits based on three-terminal ballistic junctions and planar quantum-wire transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J.; Wallin, D.; Brusheim, P.; Maximov, I.; Xu, H. Q.

    2008-03-01

    Three-Terminal ballistic junctions (TBJs) and planar quantum-wire transistors (QWTs) are emerging nanoelectronic devices with various novel electrical properties. In this work, we realize novel nanoelectronic analogue and digital circuits with TBJs and planar QWTs made on In0.75Ga0.25As/InP two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) material. First we show that a single TBJ can work as a frequency mixer or a phase detector. Second, we fabricate an integrated nanostructure containing two planar QWTs, which can be used as an RS flip-flop element. Third, we make a nanoelectronic circuit by the integration of two TBJs and two planar QWTs. This circuit shows the RS flip-flop functionalities with much larger noise margins in both high and low level inputs. All measurements in this work are done at room temperature.

  7. Novel room-temperature functional analogue and digital nanoelectronic circuits based on three-terminal ballistic junctions and planar quantum-wire transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, J; Wallin, D; Brusheim, P; Maximov, I; Xu, H Q [Division of Solid State Physics, Lund University, Box 118, S-22100 (Sweden)

    2008-03-15

    Three-Terminal ballistic junctions (TBJs) and planar quantum-wire transistors (QWTs) are emerging nanoelectronic devices with various novel electrical properties. In this work, we realize novel nanoelectronic analogue and digital circuits with TBJs and planar QWTs made on In{sub 0.75}Ga{sub 0.25}As/InP two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) material. First we show that a single TBJ can work as a frequency mixer or a phase detector. Second, we fabricate an integrated nanostructure containing two planar QWTs, which can be used as an RS flip-flop element. Third, we make a nanoelectronic circuit by the integration of two TBJs and two planar QWTs. This circuit shows the RS flip-flop functionalities with much larger noise margins in both high and low level inputs. All measurements in this work are done at room temperature.

  8. wrwyrggrywrw is a single-chain functional analog of the Holliday junction-binding homodimer, (wrwycr)2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rideout, Marc C; Naili, Ilham; Boldt, Jeffrey L; Flores-Fujimoto, America; Patra, Sukanya; Rostron, Jason E; Segall, Anca M

    2013-02-01

    DNA repair pathways in bacteria that use homologous recombination involve the formation and subsequent resolution of Holliday junction (HJ) intermediates. We have previously identified several hexameric peptides that bind to HJs and interfere with HJ processing enzymes in vitro. The peptide WRWYCR and its D-amino acid stereoisomer wrwycr, are potent antibacterial agents. These hexapeptides must form homodimers in order to interact stably with HJs, and inhibit bacterial growth, and this represents a potential limitation. Herein we describe a disulfide bond-independent inhibitor, WRWYRGGRYWRW and its D-stereoisomer wrwyrggrywrw. We have characterized these single-chain, linear analogs of the hexapeptides, and show that in addition to effectively binding to HJs, and inhibiting the activity of DNA repair enzymes that process HJs, they have equal or greater potency against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial growth. The analogs were also shown to cause DNA damage in bacteria, and disrupt the integrity of the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. Finally, we found that they have little toxicity toward several eukaryotic cell types at concentrations needed to inhibit bacterial growth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ballistic transport in InSb Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasco, John Jeffrey; Gill, Stephen; Car, Diana; Bakkers, Erik; Mason, Nadya

    We present transport measurements on Josephson junctions consisting of InSb nanowires contacted by Al at various junction lengths. Junction behavior as a function of gate voltage, electric field, and magnetic field is discussed. We show that short junctions behave as 1D quantum wires, exhibiting quantized conductance steps. In addition, we show how Josephson behavior changes as transport evolves from ballistic to diffusive as a function of contact spacing.

  10. An experimental study on the conversion between IFPUG and UCP functional size measurement units#

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan J.CUADRADO-GALLEGO; Alain ABRAN; Pablo RODRGUEZ-SORIA; Miguel A.LARA

    2014-01-01

    The use of functional size measurement (FSM) methods in software development organizations is growing during the years. Also, object oriented (OO) techniques have become quite a standard to design the software and, in particular, Use Cases is one of the most used techniques to specify functional requirements. Main FSM methods do not include specific rules to measure the software functionality from its Use Cases analysis. To deal with this issue some other methods like Kramer’s functional measurement method have been developed. Therefore, one of the main issues for those organizations willing to use OO functional measurement method in order to facilitate the use cases count procedure is how to convert their portfolio functional size from the previously adopted FSM method towards the new method. The objective of this research is to find a statistical relationship for converting the software functional size units measured by the International Function Point Users Group (IFPUG) function point analysis (FPA) method into Kramer-Smith’s use cases points (UCP) method and vice versa. Methodologies for a correct data gathering are proposed and results obtained are analyzed to draw the linear and non-linear equations for this correlation. Finally, a conversion factor and corresponding conversion intervals are given to establish the statistical relationship.

  11. Functional-dependent and size-dependent uptake of nanoparticles in PC12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, N; Matsui, Y; Nakayama, A; Yoneda, M [Department of Environment Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, 4 Kyotodaigaku Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 6158540 (Japan); Tsuda, A, E-mail: sakai@risk.env.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2011-07-06

    It is suggested that the uptake of nanoparticles is changed by the particle size or the surface modification. In this study, we quantified the uptake of nanoparticles in PC12 cells exposed Quantum Dots with different surface modification or fluorescent polystyrene particles with different particle size. The PC12 cells were exposed three types of the Quantum Dots (carboxyl base-functionalized, amino base-functionalized or non-base-functionalized) or three types of the fluorescent particles (22 nm, 100 nm or 1000 nm) for 3 hours. The uptake of the nanoparticles was quantified with a spectrofluorophotometer. The carboxyl base-functionalized Quantum Dots were considerably taken up by the cells than the non-base-functionalized Quantum Dots. Conversely, the amino base-functionalized Quantum Dots were taken up by the cells less frequently than the non-base-functionalized Quantum Dots. The particle number of the 22 nm-nanoparticles taken up by the cells was about 53 times higher than the 100 nm-particles. However, the particle weight of the 100 nm-particles taken up by the cells was higher than that of the 22 nm-nanoparticles. The 1000 nm-particles were adhered to the cell membrane, but they were little taken up by the cells. We concluded that nanoparticles can be taken up nerve cells in functional-dependent and size-dependent manners.

  12. Initial size of cleft does not correlate with size and function of nasal airway in adults with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Erika; Andlin-Sobocki, Anna; Mani, Maria; Holmström, Mats

    2011-06-01

    The noses of patients with clefts are often functionally inadequate. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlation between size of the maxillary cleft in infancy and size and function of the nasal airway in adults with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). This is a long-term follow up study including 53 patients with UCLP born between 1960 and 1987 and treated at the Cleft Lip and Palate Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. Lip repair was performed at 3-4 months of age followed by either a one-stage or a two-stage palatal closure. The size of the cleft was measured on infant maxillary dental casts. Nasal minimum cross-sectional area (cm(2)) and volume (cm(3)) (acoustic rhinometry), air flow resistance (Pa s/cm(3)) (rhinomanometry), peak inspiratory flow (l/min) (peak nasal inspiratory flow) and number of identified odours (Scandinavian odor-identification test) were assessed in adulthood. The size of the maxillary cleft varied considerably at infancy. The size of the nasal airway and its function on the cleft side in adulthood were reduced compared with the non-cleft side, but no correlations were found between size of the initial cleft in infancy and size and function of the nasal airway in adulthood. In adults born with UCLP, therefore, size of the maxillary cleft in infancy does not seem to affect size and function of the nasal airway in adulthood.

  13. Cytotoxicity of chitosan/streptokinase nanoparticles as a function of size: An artificial neural networks study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharifar, Hadi; Amani, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the size and toxicity of chitosan/streptokinase nanoparticles at various values of processing parameters was the aim of this study. For the first time, a comprehensive model could be developed to determine the cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles as a function of their size. Then, artificial neural networks were used for identifying main factors influencing self-assembly prepared nanoparticles size and cytotoxicity. Three variables included polymer concentration; pH and stirring time were used for a modeling study. A second modeling was performed to evaluate the influence of particles' size on toxicity. Experimentally data modeled using ANNs was validated against unseen data. The response surfaces generated from the software demonstrated that chitosan concentration is the dominant factor with a direct effect on size. Results also showed that the most important factor in determining the particles' toxicity is size--smaller particles showed more toxic effects, regardless of the effect of other input parameters. From the Clinical Editor: The understanding of toxicity of nanoparticles is of prime importance. In this article, the authors generated a model to visualize the relationship between nanoparticle size and its cellular toxicity, using chitosan/streptokinase nanoparticles. The data generated here would help the design of future nanoparticles of appropriate sizes for the application in the clinical setting.

  14. Molecular electronic junction transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Gemma C.; Herrmann, Carmen; Ratner, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Whenasinglemolecule,oracollectionofmolecules,isplacedbetween two electrodes and voltage is applied, one has a molecular transport junction. We discuss such junctions, their properties, their description, and some of their applications. The discussion is qualitative rather than quantitative, and f...

  15. Heart visualization based on hybrid transfer function using size and gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yong; Liu, Yixuan; Wang, Kuanquan

    2014-01-01

    Having the ability to visualize the heart clearly and precisely would be beneficial for pathology research, presurgical planning, and clinical approaches. Multi-dimensional transfer functions were employed to improve the overall performance of images. To provide a satisfactory visualization quality on the shape and boundaries of the heart, a new hybrid transfer function combining structure size with gradient was designed to highlight the area of the heart. Initially, a histogram of gradient and histogram of size was computed and then classification was performed for providing the spatial information. Finally, several hybrid strategies were presented for the design of the transfer function, including opacity and color. By experimental evaluation, the proposed hybrid transfer function visualized the cardiac outline and internal structure more clearly and easily.

  16. Effects of particle size distribution on some physical, chemical and functional properties of unripe banana flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savlak, Nazlı; Türker, Burcu; Yeşilkanat, Nazlıcan

    2016-12-15

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of particle size distribution on physical, chemical and functional properties of unripe banana flour for the first time. A pure triploid (AAA group) of Musa acuminata subgroup Cavendish (°Brix;0.2, pH;4.73, titratable acidity; 0.56g/100g malic acid, total solids; 27.42%) which was supplied from Gazipaşa, Antalya, Turkey from October 2014 to October 2015 was used. Size fractions of physical, functional and antioxidant properties. Particle size significantly effected color, water absorbtion index and wettability. L(∗) value decreased, a(∗) and b(∗) values decreased by increasing particle size (r(2)=-0.94, r(2)=0.72, r(2)=0.73 respectively). Particles under 212μm had the lowest rate of wettability (83.40s). A negative correlation between particle size and wettability (r(2)=-0.75) and positive correlation between particle size and water absorption index (r(2)=0.94) was observed.

  17. Effects of screen size on smartphone functionality and usability for stroke patients with hemiparalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Nam-Hae; Chang, Moonyoung

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The effect of screen size on smartphone functionality and usability for patients with stroke, considering both the non-dominant and dominant hand smartphone usage, was investigated in this study. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen patients with stroke participated in this study-five pre-non-dominant hand users and eight pre-dominant hand users. The smartphone screen sizes used were 4.2, 4.5, and 5.6 inches. Usability was assessed in terms of discomfort experienced during dragging operations, which was self-reported using a four-point Likert scale. Functionality was assessed in terms of completion time and the frequency of errors in the task requiring users to quickly touch numbers 0 through 9 in order on the keypad. [Results] For all three screen sizes, a significant difference between the dominant and non-dominant hands was found in usability, completion time, and frequency of errors. For dominant hand users, differences in usability and completion time were found among the three screen sizes. Among the three screen sizes, no difference in the frequency of errors was found in either of the groups. [Conclusion] This study will be useful as basic research on usability and functionality with stroke patients using only pre-non-dominant or pre-dominant hand.

  18. Assessment of left ventricular function by GPs using pocket-sized ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Mjølstad, Ole Christian; Snare, Sten Roar; Folkvord, Lasse; Helland, Frode; Grimsmo, Anders; Torp, Hans; Haraldseth, Olav; Haugen, Bjørn Olav

    2012-01-01

    Background Assessment of left ventricular (LV) function with echocardiography is mandatory in patients with suspected heart failure (HF). Objectives To investigate if GPs were able to evaluate the LV function in patients at risk of developing or with established HF by using pocket-sized ultrasound (pUS). Methods Feasibility study in general practice, seven GPs in three different Norwegian primary care centres participated. Ninety-two patients with reduced or at risk of developing reduced LV f...

  19. Pore size determination using normalized J-function for different hydraulic flow units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abedini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pore size determination of hydrocarbon reservoirs is one of the main challenging areas in reservoir studies. Precise estimation of this parameter leads to enhance the reservoir simulation, process evaluation, and further forecasting of reservoir behavior. Hence, it is of great importance to estimate the pore size of reservoir rocks with an appropriate accuracy. In the present study, a modified J-function was developed and applied to determine the pore radius in one of the hydrocarbon reservoir rocks located in the Middle East. The capillary pressure data vs. water saturation (Pc–Sw as well as routine reservoir core analysis include porosity (φ and permeability (k were used to develop the J-function. First, the normalized porosity (φz, the rock quality index (RQI, and the flow zone indicator (FZI concepts were used to categorize all data into discrete hydraulic flow units (HFU containing unique pore geometry and bedding characteristics. Thereafter, the modified J-function was used to normalize all capillary pressure curves corresponding to each of predetermined HFU. The results showed that the reservoir rock was classified into five separate rock types with the definite HFU and reservoir pore geometry. Eventually, the pore radius for each of these HFUs was determined using a developed equation obtained by normalized J-function corresponding to each HFU. The proposed equation is a function of reservoir rock characteristics including φz, FZI, lithology index (J*, and pore size distribution index (ɛ. This methodology used, the reservoir under study was classified into five discrete HFU with unique equations for permeability, normalized J-function and pore size. The proposed technique is able to apply on any reservoir to determine the pore size of the reservoir rock, specially the one with high range of heterogeneity in the reservoir rock properties.

  20. Muscle-specific function of the centronuclear myopathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy-associated dynamin 2 is required for proper lipid metabolism, mitochondria, muscle fibers, neuromuscular junctions and peripheral nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinelli, Elisa; Pereira, Jorge A; Suter, Ueli

    2013-11-01

    The ubiquitously expressed large GTPase Dynamin 2 (DNM2) plays a critical role in the regulation of intracellular membrane trafficking through its crucial function in membrane fission, particularly in endocytosis. Autosomal-dominant mutations in DNM2 cause tissue-specific human disorders. Different sets of DNM2 mutations are linked to dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type B, a motor and sensory neuropathy affecting primarily peripheral nerves, or autosomal-dominant centronuclear myopathy (CNM) presenting with primary damage in skeletal muscles. To understand the underlying disease mechanisms, it is imperative to determine to which degree the primary affected cell types require DNM2. Thus, we used cell type-specific gene ablation to examine the consequences of DNM2 loss in skeletal muscle cells, the major relevant cell type involved in CNM. We found that DNM2 function in skeletal muscle is required for proper mouse development. Skeletal muscle-specific loss of DNM2 causes a reduction in muscle mass and in the numbers of muscle fibers, altered muscle fiber size distributions, irregular neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) and isolated degenerating intramuscular peripheral nerve fibers. Intriguingly, a lack of muscle-expressed DNM2 triggers an increase of lipid droplets (LDs) and mitochondrial defects. We conclude that loss of DNM2 function in skeletal muscles initiates a chain of harmful parallel and serial events, involving dysregulation of LDs and mitochondrial defects within altered muscle fibers, defective NMJs and peripheral nerve degeneration. These findings provide the essential basis for further studies on DNM2 function and malfunction in skeletal muscles in health and disease, potentially including metabolic diseases such as diabetes.

  1. Status report on cross-organizational functional size measurement and cost estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daneva, Maia; Abran, A.; Bundschuh, M.; Dumke, R.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement is a fundamental part of any managed activity and functional size of software is the core to successful management of any software work of any magnitude [10,12,15,16]. It is crucial for estimating project team efforts and normalizing quality attributes such as defect rates, defect densit

  2. Power and Sample Size Calculations for Logistic Regression Tests for Differential Item Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhushan

    2014-01-01

    Logistic regression is a popular method for detecting uniform and nonuniform differential item functioning (DIF) effects. Theoretical formulas for the power and sample size calculations are derived for likelihood ratio tests and Wald tests based on the asymptotic distribution of the maximum likelihood estimators for the logistic regression model.…

  3. Early association of electrocardiogram alteration with infarct size and cardiac function after myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶则伟; 黄元伟; 夏强; 傅军; 赵志宏; 陆贤; BRUCEI.C.

    2004-01-01

    Objective:Myocardial infarction (MI) is the main cause of heart failure, but the relationship between the extent of MI and cardiac function has not been clearly determined.The present study was undertaken to investigate early changes in the electrocardiogram associated with infarct size and cardiac function after MI. Methods: MI was induced by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery in rats. Electrocardiograms, echocardiographs and hemodynamic parameters were assessed and myocardial infarct size was measured from mid-transverse sections stained with Masson's trichrome. Results:The sum of pathological Q wave amplitudes was strongly correlated with myocardial infarct size (r=0.920, P<0.0001), left ventricular ejection fraction (r=-0.868, P<0.0001) and left ventricular end diastolic pressure (r=0.835, P<0.0004).Furthermore, there was close relationship between MI size and cardiac function as assessed by left ventricular ejection fraction (r=-0.913, P<0.0001) and left ventricular end diastolic pressure (r=0.893, P<0.0001).Conclusion: The sum of pathological Q wave amplitudes after MI can be used to estimate the extent of MI as well as cardiac function.

  4. Soot Particle Size Distribution Functions in a Turbulent Non-Premixed Ethylene-Nitrogen Flame

    KAUST Repository

    Boyette, Wesley

    2017-02-21

    A scanning mobility particle sizer with a nano differential mobility analyzer was used to measure nanoparticle size distribution functions in a turbulent non-premixed flame. The burner utilizes a premixed pilot flame which anchors a C2H4/N2 (35/65) central jet with ReD = 20,000. Nanoparticles in the flame were sampled through a N2-filled tube with a 500- μm orifice. Previous studies have shown that insufficient dilution of the nanoparticles can lead to coagulation in the sampling line and skewed particle size distribution functions. A system of mass flow controllers and valves were used to vary the dilution ratio. Single-stage and two-stage dilution systems were investigated. A parametric study on the effect of the dilution ratio on the observed particle size distribution function indicates that particle coagulation in the sampling line can be eliminated using a two-stage dilution process. Carbonaceous nanoparticle (soot) concentration particle size distribution functions along the flame centerline at multiple heights in the flame are presented. The resulting distributions reveal a pattern of increasing mean particle diameters as the distance from the nozzle along the centerline increases.

  5. Early association of electrocardiogram alteration with infarct size and cardiac function after myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Ze-wei (陶则伟); HUANG Yuan-wei (黄元伟); XIA Qiang (夏强); FU Jun (傅军); ZHAO Zhi-hong (赵志宏); LU Xian (陆贤); BRUCE I.C.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Myocardial infarction (MI) is the main cause of heart failure, but the relationship between the extent of MI and cardiac function has not been clearly determined. The present study was undertaken to investigate early changes in the electrocardiogram associated with infarct size and cardiac function after MI. Methods: MI was induced by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery in rats. Electrocardiograms, echocardiographs and hemodynamic parameters were assessed and myocardial infarct size was measured from mid-transverse sections stained with Masson's trichrome. Results: The sum of pathological Q wave amplitudes was strongly correlated with myocardial infarct size (r = 0.920, P < 0.0001), left ventricular ejection fraction (r = (0.868, P < 0.0001) and left ventricular end diastolic pressure (r = 0.835, P < 0.0004). Furthermore, there was close relationship between MI size and cardiac function as assessed by left ventricular ejection fraction (r = (0.913, P < 0.0001) and left ventricular end diastolic pressure (r = 0.893, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: The sum of pathological Q wave amplitudes after MI can be used to estimate the extent of MI as well as cardiac function.

  6. Status report on cross-organizational functional size measurement and cost estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daneva, M.; Abran, A.; Bundschuh, M.; Dumke, R.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement is a fundamental part of any managed activity and functional size of software is the core to successful management of any software work of any magnitude [10,12,15,16]. It is crucial for estimating project team efforts and normalizing quality attributes such as defect rates, defect densit

  7. Using Structural Equation Modeling to Assess Functional Connectivity in the Brain: Power and Sample Size Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideridis, Georgios; Simos, Panagiotis; Papanicolaou, Andrew; Fletcher, Jack

    2014-01-01

    The present study assessed the impact of sample size on the power and fit of structural equation modeling applied to functional brain connectivity hypotheses. The data consisted of time-constrained minimum norm estimates of regional brain activity during performance of a reading task obtained with magnetoencephalography. Power analysis was first…

  8. Power and Sample Size Calculations for Logistic Regression Tests for Differential Item Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhushan

    2014-01-01

    Logistic regression is a popular method for detecting uniform and nonuniform differential item functioning (DIF) effects. Theoretical formulas for the power and sample size calculations are derived for likelihood ratio tests and Wald tests based on the asymptotic distribution of the maximum likelihood estimators for the logistic regression model.…

  9. The sequence of moderate-size earthquakes at the junction of the Ligurian basin and the Corsica margin (western Mediterranean): The initiation of an active deformation zone revealed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larroque, Christophe; Delouis, Bertrand; Sage, Françoise; Régnier, Marc; Béthoux, Nicole; Courboulex, Françoise; Deschamps, Anne

    2016-04-01

    A new seismically active zone is found in the southern part of the Ligurian basin, 80-km west of Corsica (western Mediterranean). The activity began in February 2011 with a foreshock (ML 4) and a mainshock (ML 5.3) 5 days later, followed by numerous aftershocks. We first analyze the fore- and mainshock in detail. We compare the results obtained using classical methods (linear location in a 1D medium and focal mechanisms from P and S polarities) and new approaches (non-linear location in a 3D medium and waveform modeling for determining the seismic moment and the focal mechanism). Both methods provided similar results for location, depth (in the range of 6-13 km) and focal mechanisms, which reveal reverse faulting with nodal planes oriented N-S and NE-SW. We then locate 27 of the aftershocks in the 3D model and find a 10-km-long NE-SW alignment with a depth between 7 and 16 km. In 2012 and 2013, three other moderate-size events (ML 3.8, 4 and 4.5) occurred and confirm that this zone is still active. The epicentral area is located in the oceanic domain of the Ligurian Basin. From analysis of the bathymetry and high-resolution multi-channel seismic profiles, no morphologic anomaly at surface and no inherited fault in the shallow ~ 4 km depth were imaged, which suggest that no significant deformation occurred in the area since 5 Ma. Thus, the structure(s) activated during the 2011-2013 sequence remain unknown. In light of these results, we point out a notable difference on both sides of the Ligurian Basin: the northern margin, close to the alpine chain, suffered strong earthquakes and large cumulated deformation since 5 Ma, while the southern margin, close to the Corsica-Sardinia continental block, is poorly deformed since 5 Ma.

  10. Planar Josephson tunnel junctions in a transverse magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monacoa, R.; Aarøe, Morten; Mygind, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, since the discovery of the Josephson effect in 1962, the magnetic diffraction pattern of planar Josephson tunnel junctions has been recorded with the field applied in the plane of the junction. Here we discuss the static junction properties in a transverse magnetic field where...... demagnetization effects imposed by the tunnel barrier and electrodes geometry are important. Measurements of the junction critical current versus magnetic field in planar Nb-based high-quality junctions with different geometry, size, and critical current density show that it is advantageous to use a transverse...

  11. Optical trapping of microparticles using silicon nitride waveguide junctions and tapered-waveguide junctions on an optofluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hong; Poon, Andrew W

    2012-10-01

    We study optical trapping of microparticles on an optofluidic chip using silicon nitride waveguide junctions and tapered-waveguide junctions. We demonstrate the trapping of single 1 μm-sized polystyrene particles using the evanescent field of waveguide junctions connecting a submicrometer-sized input-waveguide and a micrometer-sized output-waveguide. Particle trapping is localized in the vicinity of the junction. We also demonstrate trapping of one and two 1μm-sized polystyrene particles using tapered-waveguide junctions connecting a submicrometer-sized singlemode input-waveguide and a micrometer-sized multimode output-waveguide. Particle trapping occurs near the taper output end, the taper center and the taper input end, depending on the taper aspect ratio.

  12. Phase qubits fabricated with trilayer junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weides, M; Bialczak, R C; Lenander, M; Lucero, E; Mariantoni, Matteo; Neeley, M; O' Connell, A D; Sank, D; Wang, H; Wenner, J; Yamamoto, T; Yin, Y; Cleland, A N; Martinis, J, E-mail: martin.weides@nist.gov, E-mail: martinis@physics.ucsb.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    We have developed a novel Josephson junction geometry with minimal volume of lossy isolation dielectric, suitable for higher quality trilayer junctions implemented in qubits. The junctions are based on in situ deposited trilayers with thermal tunnel oxide, have micron-sized areas and a low subgap current. In qubit spectroscopy only a few avoided level crossings are observed, and the measured relaxation time of T{sub 1{approx}}400 ns is in good agreement with the usual phase qubit decay time, indicating low loss due to the additional isolation dielectric.

  13. Multimodal function optimization using minimal representation size clustering and its application to planning multipaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocaoğlu, C; Sanderson, A C

    1997-01-01

    A novel genetic algorithm (GA) using minimal representation size cluster (MRSC) analysis is designed and implemented for solving multimodal function optimization problems. The problem of multimodal function optimization is framed within a hypothesize-and-test paradigm using minimal representation size (minimal complexity) for species formation and a GA. A multiple-population GA is developed to identify different species. The number of populations, thus the number of different species, is determined by the minimal representation size criterion. Therefore, the proposed algorithm reveals the unknown structure of the multimodal function when a priori knowledge about the function is unknown. The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated on a number of multimodal test functions. The proposed scheme results in a highly parallel algorithm for finding multiple local minima. In this paper, a path-planning algorithm is also developed based on the MRSC_GA algorithm. The algorithm utilizes MRSC_GA for planning paths for mobile robots, piano-mover problems, and N-link manipulators. The MRSC_GA is used for generating multipaths to provide alternative solutions to the path-planning problem. The generation of alternative solutions is especially important for planning paths in dynamic environments. A novel iterative multiresolution path representation is used as a basis for the GA coding. The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated on a number of two-dimensional path-planning problems.

  14. MODELING PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTION IN HETEROGENEOUS POLYMERIZATION SYSTEMS USING MULTIMODAL LOGNORMAL FUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Ferrari

    Full Text Available Abstract This work evaluates the usage of the multimodal lognormal function to describe Particle Size Distributions (PSD of emulsion and suspension polymerization processes, including continuous reactions with particle re-nucleation leading to complex multimodal PSDs. A global optimization algorithm, namely Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO, was used for parameter estimation of the proposed model, minimizing the objective function defined by the mean squared errors. Statistical evaluation of the results indicated that the multimodal lognormal function could describe distinctive features of different types of PSDs with accuracy and consistency.

  15. Modeling fractal structure of city-size distributions using correlation function

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yanguang

    2011-01-01

    Zipf's law is one the most conspicuous empirical facts for cities, however, there is no convincing explanation for the scaling relation between rank and size and its scaling exponent. Based on the idea from general fractals and scaling, this paper proposes a dual competition hypothesis of city develop to explain the value intervals and the special value, 1, of the power exponent. Zipf's law and Pareto's law can be mathematically transformed into one another. Based on the Pareto distribution, a frequency correlation function can be constructed. By scaling analysis and multifractals spectrum, the parameter interval of Pareto exponent is derived as (0.5, 1]; Based on the Zipf distribution, a size correlation function can be built, and it is opposite to the first one. By the second correlation function and multifractals notion, the Pareto exponent interval is derived as [1, 2). Thus the process of urban evolution falls into two effects: one is Pareto effect indicating city number increase (external complexity), a...

  16. The dissolution rates of SiO2 nanoparticles as a function of particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrich, Tamara; Dybowska, Agnieszka; Schott, Jacques; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Oelkers, Eric H

    2012-05-01

    There is a critical need to better define the relationship among particle size, surface area, and dissolution rate for nanoscale materials to determine their role in the environment, their toxicity, and their technological utility. Although some previous studies concluded that nanoparticles dissolve faster than their bulk analogs, contradictory evidence suggests that nanoparticles dissolve more slowly. Furthermore, insufficient characterization of the nanoparticulate samples and the solution chemistry in past studies obscures the relationship between particle size, surface area, and dissolution rate. Here we report amorphous SiO(2) dissolution rates in aqueous solutions determined from complementary mixed-flow and closed reactor experiments at 6.9 ≥ pH ≥ 11.2 and 25 °C as a function of particle diameter from 25 to 177 nm. Experiments were performed at far-from-equilibrium conditions to isolate kinetic effects from those of changing the reaction driving force on overall dissolution rates. Measured far-from-equilibrium mass normalized dissolution rates are nearly independent of particle size, but corresponding BET surface area normalized rates decrease substantially with decreasing particle size. Combining these observations with existing established kinetic rate equations allows the prediction of nanoparticle dissolution rates as a function of both particle size and aqueous fluid saturation state.

  17. Intramale variation in sperm size: functional significance in a polygynous mammal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Ros-Santaella

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies concerning the relationships between sperm size and velocity at the intraspecific level are quite limited and often yielded contradictory results across the animal kingdom. Intramale variation in sperm size may represent a meaningful factor to predict sperm velocity, due to its relationship with the level of sperm competition among related taxa. Because sperm phenotype is under post-copulatory sexual selection, we hypothesized that a reduced intramale variation in sperm size is associated with sperm competitiveness in red deer. Our results show that low variation in sperm size is strongly related to high sperm velocity and normal sperm morphology, which in turn are good predictors of male fertility in this species. Furthermore, it is well known that the red deer show high variability in testicular mass but there is limited knowledge concerning the significance of this phenomenon at intraspecific level, even though it may reveal interesting processes of sexual selection. Thereby, as a preliminary result, we found that absolute testes mass is negatively associated with intramale variation in sperm size. Our findings suggest that sperm size variation in red deer is under a strong selective force leading to increase sperm function efficiency, and reveal new insights into sexual selection mechanisms.

  18. Size-dependent error of the density functional theory ionization potential in vacuum and solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A; Isborn, Christine M

    2015-12-28

    Density functional theory is often the method of choice for modeling the energetics of large molecules and including explicit solvation effects. It is preferable to use a method that treats systems of different sizes and with different amounts of explicit solvent on equal footing. However, recent work suggests that approximate density functional theory has a size-dependent error in the computation of the ionization potential. We here investigate the lack of size-intensivity of the ionization potential computed with approximate density functionals in vacuum and solution. We show that local and semi-local approximations to exchange do not yield a constant ionization potential for an increasing number of identical isolated molecules in vacuum. Instead, as the number of molecules increases, the total energy required to ionize the system decreases. Rather surprisingly, we find that this is still the case in solution, whether using a polarizable continuum model or with explicit solvent that breaks the degeneracy of each solute, and we find that explicit solvent in the calculation can exacerbate the size-dependent delocalization error. We demonstrate that increasing the amount of exact exchange changes the character of the polarization of the solvent molecules; for small amounts of exact exchange the solvent molecules contribute a fraction of their electron density to the ionized electron, but for larger amounts of exact exchange they properly polarize in response to the cationic solute. In vacuum and explicit solvent, the ionization potential can be made size-intensive by optimally tuning a long-range corrected hybrid functional.

  19. Size-dependent error of the density functional theory ionization potential in vacuum and solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A.; Isborn, Christine M., E-mail: cisborn@ucmerced.edu [Chemistry and Chemical Biology, School of Natural Sciences, University of California, Merced, 5200 North Lake Road, Merced, California 95343 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    Density functional theory is often the method of choice for modeling the energetics of large molecules and including explicit solvation effects. It is preferable to use a method that treats systems of different sizes and with different amounts of explicit solvent on equal footing. However, recent work suggests that approximate density functional theory has a size-dependent error in the computation of the ionization potential. We here investigate the lack of size-intensivity of the ionization potential computed with approximate density functionals in vacuum and solution. We show that local and semi-local approximations to exchange do not yield a constant ionization potential for an increasing number of identical isolated molecules in vacuum. Instead, as the number of molecules increases, the total energy required to ionize the system decreases. Rather surprisingly, we find that this is still the case in solution, whether using a polarizable continuum model or with explicit solvent that breaks the degeneracy of each solute, and we find that explicit solvent in the calculation can exacerbate the size-dependent delocalization error. We demonstrate that increasing the amount of exact exchange changes the character of the polarization of the solvent molecules; for small amounts of exact exchange the solvent molecules contribute a fraction of their electron density to the ionized electron, but for larger amounts of exact exchange they properly polarize in response to the cationic solute. In vacuum and explicit solvent, the ionization potential can be made size-intensive by optimally tuning a long-range corrected hybrid functional.

  20. Dual Interaction of JAM-C with JAM-B and αMβ2 Integrin: Function in Junctional Complexes and Leukocyte AdhesionD⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Lamagna, Chrystelle; Meda, Paolo; Mandicourt, Guillaume; Brown, James; Gilbert, Robert J C; Jones, E Yvonne; Kiefer, Friedemann; Ruga, Pilar; Imhof, Beat A.; Aurrand-Lions, Michel

    2005-01-01

    The junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs) have been recently described as interendothelial junctional molecules and as integrin ligands. Here we show that JAM-B and JAM-C undergo heterophilic interaction in cell-cell contacts and that JAM-C is recruited and stabilized in junctional complexes by JAM-B. In addition, soluble JAM-B dissociates soluble JAM-C homodimers to form JAM-B/JAM-C heterodimers. This suggests that the affinity of JAM-C monomers to form dimers is higher for JAM-B than for JAM...

  1. Channels Active in the Excitability of Nerves and Skeletal Muscles across the Neuromuscular Junction: Basic Function and Pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Barbara E.

    2008-01-01

    Ion channels are essential for the basic physiological function of excitable cells such as nerve, skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells. Mutations in genes that encode ion channels have been identified to cause various diseases and disorders known as channelopathies. An understanding of how individual ion channels are involved in the…

  2. Single-Molecule Break Junctions Based on a Perylene-Diimide Cyano-Functionalized (PDI8-CN2) Derivative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frisenda, R.; Parlato, L.; Barra, M.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.; Cassinese, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this letter, we report the single-molecule conductance properties of a cyano-functionalized perylene-diimide derivative (PDI8-CN 2 ) investigated with gold nano-electrodes. This molecule is of large interest for the fabrication of high-performance and air-stable n-type organic field-effect transi

  3. Channels Active in the Excitability of Nerves and Skeletal Muscles across the Neuromuscular Junction: Basic Function and Pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Barbara E.

    2008-01-01

    Ion channels are essential for the basic physiological function of excitable cells such as nerve, skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells. Mutations in genes that encode ion channels have been identified to cause various diseases and disorders known as channelopathies. An understanding of how individual ion channels are involved in the…

  4. Spurious finite-size instabilities in nuclear energy density functionals: Spin channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, A.; Tarpanov, D.; Davesne, D.; Navarro, J.

    2015-08-01

    Background: It has been recently shown that some Skyrme functionals can lead to nonconverging results in the calculation of some properties of atomic nuclei. A previous study has pointed out a possible link between these convergence problems and the appearance of finite-size instabilities in symmetric nuclear matter (SNM) around saturation density. Purpose: We show that the finite-size instabilities not only affect the ground-state properties of atomic nuclei, but they can also influence the calculations of vibrational excited states in finite nuclei. Method: We perform systematic fully-self consistent random phase approximation (RPA) calculations in spherical doubly magic nuclei. We employ several Skyrme functionals and vary the isoscalar and isovector coupling constants of the time-odd term s .Δ s . We determine critical values of these coupling constants beyond which the RPA calculations do not converge because the RPA stability matrix becomes nonpositive. Results: By comparing the RPA calculations of atomic nuclei with those performed for SNM we establish a correspondence between the critical densities in the infinite system and the critical coupling constants for which the RPA calculations do not converge. Conclusions: We find a quantitative stability criterion to detect finite-size instabilities related to the spin s .Δ s term of a functional. This criterion could be easily implemented in the standard fitting protocols to fix the coupling constants of the Skyrme functional.

  5. Sexual Functioning and Behavior of Men with Body Dysmorphic Disorder Concerning Penis Size Compared with Men Anxious about Penis Size and with Controls: A Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Veale, D; Miles, S; Read, J.; Troglia, A.; Wylie, K.R.; Muir, G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Little is known about the sexual functioning and behavior of men anxious about the size of their penis and the means that they might use to try to alter the size of their penis. Aim: To compare sexual functioning and behavior in men with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) concerning penis size and in men with small penis anxiety (SPA without BDD) and in a control group of men who do not have any concerns. Methods: An opportunistic sample of 90 men from the community were recru...

  6. Transcriptional mechanisms coordinating tight junction assembly during epithelial differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Felix J; Schmidt-Ott, Kai M

    2017-06-01

    Epithelial tissues form a selective barrier via direct cell-cell interactions to separate and establish concentration gradients between the different compartments of the body. Proper function and formation of this barrier rely on the establishment of distinct intercellular junction complexes. These complexes include tight junctions, adherens junctions, desmosomes, and gap junctions. The tight junction is by far the most diverse junctional complex in the epithelial barrier. Its composition varies greatly across different epithelial tissues to confer various barrier properties. Thus, epithelial cells rely on tightly regulated transcriptional mechanisms to ensure proper formation of the epithelial barrier and to achieve tight junction diversity. Here, we review different transcriptional mechanisms utilized during embryogenesis and disease development to promote tight junction assembly and maintenance of intercellular barrier integrity. We focus particularly on the Grainyhead-like transcription factors and ligand-activated nuclear hormone receptors, two central families of proteins in epithelialization. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  7. Kidney function and size in normal subjects before and during growth hormone administration for one week

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Jens; Orskov, H; Andersen, A R

    1981-01-01

    Kidney function and size were studied in seven normal male subjects before and after administration of highly purified human growth hormone for 1 week. Glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow (steady-state infusion technique with urinary collections using 125I-iothalamate and 131I......-hippuran) kidney size (ultrasonic scanning) and urinary excretion rates of albumin and beta 2-microglobulin (radioimmunoassays) were measured. Highly purified growth hormone was injected subcutaneously, 2 IU in the morning and 4 IU in the evening. Glomerular filtration rate increased from (mean +/- SEM) 114 +/- 5...... to 125 +/- 4 ml/min x 1.73 m2 (P less than 0.01) and renal plasma flow increased from 554 +/- 30 to 601 +/- 36 ml/min x 1.73 m2 (P less than 0.01). Kidney size and urinary excretion rates of albumin and beta 2-microglobulin did not change significantly. Our results show that raising plasma growth hormone...

  8. Polarizabilities of Intermediate Sized Lithium Clusters From Density-Functional Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Zope, Rajendra R; Pederson, Mark R

    2007-01-01

    We present a detailed investigation of static dipole polarizability of lithium clusters containing up to 22 atoms. We first build a database of lithium clusters by optimizing several candidate structures for the ground state geometry for each size. Full polarizability tensor is determined for about 5-6 isomers of each cluster size using the finite-field method. All calculations are performed using large Gaussian basis sets, and within the generalized gradient approximation to the density functional theory, as implemented in the NRLMOL suite of codes. The average polarizability per atom varies from 11 to 9 Angstrom^3, within the 8-22 size range, in general agreement with experimental results. While the average polarizability exhibits a relatively weak dependence on cluster conformation, significant changes in the degree of anisotropy of the polarizability tensor are observed. Interestingly, in addition to the expected even odd (0 and 1 $\\mu_B$) magnetic states, our results show several cases where clusters wit...

  9. Claudin-5 is restricted to the tight junction region of uterine epithelial cells in the uterus of pregnant/gravid squamate reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biazik, Joanna M; Thompson, Michael B; Murphy, Christopher R

    2008-05-01

    Claudin-5, a tight junctional protein associated with ion and size selectivity, has been found in the uterus of skinks. This study has generated critical information about the molecular assembly of the tight junction at various stages of the reproductive cycle in the skink uterus. Recent studies looking at tight junctional proteins found occludin expression in the tight junction region of uterine epithelial cells in the skink uterus; however, occludin did not disclose any further information about the ions and size of ions permeating across the paracellular pathway. A approximately 22-kDa claudin-5 band was detected in the uterus of the skinks present in this study and immunohistochemistry revealed that claudin-5 redistributes to the tight junction region of the lateral plasma membrane of uterine epithelial cells in late stage pregnancy/gravidity. This finding indicates that the tight junction becomes more assembled to precisely regulate ion and solute permeation in late stage pregnancy/gravidity. Claudin-5 with its functional role as a molecular sieve due to the formation of ion and size selective pores suggests that permeation of ions smaller than 0.8 kDa are restricted when claudin-5 is redistributed to the tight junction region of the later plasma membrane. This report is the first description of the molecular mechanisms that may be involved in regulating nutrient provision in the reptilian uterus.

  10. Functional properties of heteromeric P2X(1/5) receptors expressed in HEK cells and excitatory junction potentials in guinea-pig submucosal arterioles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surprenant, A; Schneider, D A; Wilson, H L; Galligan, J J; North, R A

    2000-07-01

    P2X receptors are ATP-gated cation channels; they form as homomers or heteromers from a family of seven related subunits. In particular, heteromeric channels comprising P2X(2) and P2X(3) subunits, or P2X(1) and P2X(5) subunits, show distinctive physiological and pharmacological properties in heterologous expression systems. There is substantial evidence that one of the native P2X receptors in sensory neurones corresponds to the P2X(2/3) heteromer, but there is no evidence for P2X(1/5) heteromers in native tissue. We recorded currents in response to activation of heteromeric P2X(1/5) receptors expressed in HEK293 cells to characterize further their functional properties. The ATP concentration-response curve had a threshold concentration of 1 nM, and a Hill slope of one. TNP-ATP was a weak partial agonist, and a non-competitive antagonist which inhibited maximal ATP currents by 60%. Increasing or decreasing pH from 7.3 shifted the ATP concentration-response curves to the right by fivefold and decreased the maximum current by 40%. Calcium permeability was lower than that observed for other P2X receptors (P(Ca)/P(Na) ratio=1.1). The nanomolar sensitivity of this receptor revealed a steady release of ATP from HEK293 cells, providing an extracellular concentration which ranged from 3 to 300 nM. Noradrenaline (0.3-30 microM) increased ATP-evoked currents by 35%; this facilitation occurred within 20 ms. We also recorded excitatory junction potentials (EJPs) from guinea-pig submucosal arterioles. EJPs were inhibited by suramin and PPADS (IC(50)s of 0.2 microM and 20 microM) but TNP-ATP (0.1-10 microM) inhibited EJPs by <30%. Noradrenaline (0.3-30 microM in the presence of phentolamine and propranolol) decreased EJPs in control preparations but facilitated EJPs by 5-20% in submucosal arterioles from reserpinized guinea-pigs. These properties are discussed in relation to P2X receptors underlying EJPs at autonomic neuroeffector junctions.

  11. Children’s Belief- and Desire-reasoning in the Temporopartietal Junction: Evidence for Specialization from Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Caroline Bowman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Behaviorally, children’s explicit theory-of-mind (ToM proceeds in a progression of mental-state understandings: developmentally, children demonstrate accurate explicit desire-reasoning before accurate explicit belief-reasoning. Given its robust and cross-cultural nature, we hypothesize this progression may be paced in part by maturation/specialization of the brain. Neuroimaging research demonstrates that the right temporoparietal junction (TPJ becomes increasingly selective for ToM reasoning as children age, and as their ToM improves. But this research has narrowly focused on beliefs or on undifferentiated mental-states. A recent ERP study in children included a critical contrast to desire-reasoning, and demonstrated that right posterior potentials differentiated belief-reasoning from desire-reasoning. Taken together, the literature suggests that children’s desire-belief progression may be paced by specialization of the right TPJ for belief-reasoning specifically, beyond desire-reasoning. In the present study, we tested this hypothesis directly by examining children’s belief- and desire-reasoning using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS in conjunction with structural MRI to pinpoint brain activation in the right TPJ. Results showed greatest activation in the right TPJ for belief-reasoning, beyond desire-reasoning, and beyond non-mental reasoning (control. Findings replicate and critically extend prior ERP results, and provide clear evidence for a specific neural mechanism underlying children’s progression from understanding desires to understanding beliefs.

  12. Functional significance of a hepta nucleotide motif present at the junction of Cucumber mosaic virus satellite RNA multimers in helper-virus dependent replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jang-Kyun; Kwon, Sun-Jung; Chaturvedi, Sonali; Choi, Soon Ho; Rao, A L N

    2013-01-20

    Satellite RNAs (satRNA) associated with Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) have been shown to generate multimers during replication. We have discovered that multimers of a CMV satRNA generated in the absence of its helper virus (HV) are characterized by the addition of a hepta nucleotide motif (HNM) at the monomer junctions. Here, we evaluated the functional significance of HNM in HV-dependent replication by ectopically expressing wild type and mutant forms of satRNA multimers in planta either in (+) or (-)-strand polarity. Comparative replication profiles revealed that (-)-strand multimers with complementary HNM (cHNM) are the preferred initial templates for HV-dependent replication than (-)-strand monomers and multimers lacking the cHNM. Further mutational analyses of the HNM accentuate that preservation of the sequence and native length of HNM is obligatory for efficient replication of satRNA. A model implicating the significance of HNM in HV-dependent production of monomeric and multimeric forms of satRNA is presented.

  13. Improvement of cardiac function and reversal of gap junction remodeling by Neuregulin-1β in volume-overloaded rats with heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Hui Wang; Xiao-Zhen Zhuo; Ya-Juan Ni; Min Gong; Ting-Zhong Wang; Qun Lu; Ai-Qun Ma

    2012-01-01

    Objective We performed experiments using Neuregulin-1β (NRG-1β) treatment to determine a mechanism for the protective role derived from its beneficial effects by remodeling gap junctions (GJs) during heart failure (HF). Methods Rat models of HF were established by aortocaval fistula. Forty-eight rats were divided randomly into the HF (HF, n = 16), NRG-1β treatment (NRG, n = 16), and sham operation (S, n = 16) group. The rats in the NRG group were administered NRG-1β (10 μg/kg per day) for 7 days via the tail vein, whereas the other groups were injected with the same doses of saline. Twelve weeks after operation, Connexin 43 (Cx43) expression in single myocytes obtained from the left ventricle was determined by immunocytochemistry. Total protein was extracted from frozen left ventricular tissues for immunoblotting assay, and the ultrastructure of myocytes was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Results Compared with the HF group, the cardiac function of rats in the NRG group was markedly improved, irregular distribution and deceased Cx43 expression were relieved. The ultrastructure of myocytes was seriously damaged in HF rats, and NRG-1β reduced these pathological damages. Conclusions Short-term NRG-1β treatment can rescue pump failure in experimental models of volume overload-induced HF, which is related to the recovery of GJs structure and the improvement of Cx43 expression.

  14. Right Hemisphere Remapping of Naming Functions Depends on Lesion Size and Location in Poststroke Aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M. Skipper-Kallal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of language network plasticity following left hemisphere stroke is foundational to the understanding of aphasia recovery and neural plasticity in general. Damage in different language nodes may influence whether local plasticity is possible and whether right hemisphere recruitment is beneficial. However, the relationships of both lesion size and location to patterns of remapping are poorly understood. In the context of a picture naming fMRI task, we tested whether lesion size and location relate to activity in surviving left hemisphere language nodes, as well as homotopic activity in the right hemisphere during covert name retrieval and overt name production. We found that lesion size was positively associated with greater right hemisphere activity during both phases of naming, a pattern that has frequently been suggested but has not previously been clearly demonstrated. During overt naming, lesions in the inferior frontal gyrus led to deactivation of contralateral frontal areas, while lesions in motor cortex led to increased right motor cortex activity. Furthermore, increased right motor activity related to better naming performance only when left motor cortex was lesioned, suggesting compensatory takeover of speech or language function by the homotopic node. These findings demonstrate that reorganization of language function, and the degree to which reorganization facilitates aphasia recovery, is dependent on the size and site of the lesion.

  15. Right Hemisphere Remapping of Naming Functions Depends on Lesion Size and Location in Poststroke Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipper-Kallal, Laura M.; Lacey, Elizabeth H.; Xing, Shihui

    2017-01-01

    The study of language network plasticity following left hemisphere stroke is foundational to the understanding of aphasia recovery and neural plasticity in general. Damage in different language nodes may influence whether local plasticity is possible and whether right hemisphere recruitment is beneficial. However, the relationships of both lesion size and location to patterns of remapping are poorly understood. In the context of a picture naming fMRI task, we tested whether lesion size and location relate to activity in surviving left hemisphere language nodes, as well as homotopic activity in the right hemisphere during covert name retrieval and overt name production. We found that lesion size was positively associated with greater right hemisphere activity during both phases of naming, a pattern that has frequently been suggested but has not previously been clearly demonstrated. During overt naming, lesions in the inferior frontal gyrus led to deactivation of contralateral frontal areas, while lesions in motor cortex led to increased right motor cortex activity. Furthermore, increased right motor activity related to better naming performance only when left motor cortex was lesioned, suggesting compensatory takeover of speech or language function by the homotopic node. These findings demonstrate that reorganization of language function, and the degree to which reorganization facilitates aphasia recovery, is dependent on the size and site of the lesion. PMID:28168061

  16. Chaotic dynamics of size dependent Timoshenko beams with functionally graded properties along their thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awrejcewicz, J.; Krysko, A. V.; Pavlov, S. P.; Zhigalov, M. V.; Krysko, V. A.

    2017-09-01

    Chaotic dynamics of microbeams made of functionally graded materials (FGMs) is investigated in this paper based on the modified couple stress theory and von Kármán geometric nonlinearity. We assume that the beam properties are graded along the thickness direction. The influence of size-dependent and functionally graded coefficients on the vibration characteristics, scenarios of transition from regular to chaotic vibrations as well as a series of static problems with an emphasis put on the load-deflection behavior are studied. Our theoretical/numerical analysis is supported by methods of nonlinear dynamics and the qualitative theory of differential equations supplemented by Fourier and wavelet spectra, phase portraits, and Lyapunov exponents spectra estimated by different algorithms, including Wolf's, Rosenstein's, Kantz's, and neural networks. We have also detected and numerically validated a general scenario governing transition into chaotic vibrations, which follows the classical Ruelle-Takens-Newhouse scenario for the considered values of the size-dependent and grading parameters.

  17. Size-dependent axisymmetric vibration of functionally graded circular plates in bifurcation/limit point instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashoori, A. R.; Vanini, S. A. Sadough; Salari, E.

    2017-04-01

    In the present paper, vibration behavior of size-dependent functionally graded (FG) circular microplates subjected to thermal loading are carried out in pre/post-buckling of bifurcation/limit-load instability for the first time. Two kinds of frequently used thermal loading, i.e., uniform temperature rise and heat conduction across the thickness direction are considered. Thermo-mechanical material properties of FG plate are supposed to vary smoothly and continuously throughout the thickness based on power law model. Modified couple stress theory is exploited to describe the size dependency of microplate. The nonlinear governing equations of motion and associated boundary conditions are extracted through generalized form of Hamilton's principle and von-Karman geometric nonlinearity for the vibration analysis of circular FG plates including size effects. Ritz finite element method is then employed to construct the matrix representation of governing equations which are solved by two different strategies including Newton-Raphson scheme and cylindrical arc-length method. Moreover, in the following a parametric study is accompanied to examine the effects of the several parameters such as material length scale parameter, temperature distributions, type of buckling, thickness to radius ratio, boundary conditions and power law index on the dimensionless frequency of post-buckled/snapped size-dependent FG plates in detail. It is found that the material length scale parameter and thermal loading have a significant effect on vibration characteristics of size-dependent circular FG plates.

  18. Tunable Magnetic Proximity Effects in Graphene Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazic, Predrag; Belashchenko, Kirill; Zutic, Igor

    2015-03-01

    The characteristic length of the magnetic proximity effects exceed the thickness of a graphene layer leading to an important, but typically overlooked, modifications of equilibrium and transport properties, as well as the implications for graphene spintronics. Using the first-principles studies that integrate a real space density functional theory (GPAW) with the state-of-the art boundary elements electrostatic code based on the Robin Hood method, we explore tunable electronic structure and magnetic proximity effects in the ferromagnet/insulator/graphene junctions. We show that the inclusion of a finite-size gate electrodes and van der Walls interaction lead to nontrivial effects that could also be important in other two-dimensional materials beyond graphene. Work supported by US ONR, NSF-DMR and Nebraska NSF MRSEC.

  19. Vestibular function and quality of life in vestibular schwannoma: does size matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith eWagner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS frequently suffer from disabling vestibular symptoms. This prospective follow-up study evaluates vestibular and auditory function and impairment of quality of life due to vertigo, dizziness and imbalance in patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma of different sizes before/ after microsurgical or radiosurgical treatment. Methods. 38 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma were included. 22 received microsurgery, 16 cyberknife radiosurgery. Two follow-ups took place after a median of 50 and 186.5 days. Patients received a standardized neuro-ophthalmological examination, electronystagmography with bithermal caloric testing, and pure-tone audiometry. Quality of life was evaluated with the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI. Patient data was grouped and analyzed according to the size of the VS (group 1: < 20mm vs group 2: ≥ 20mm. Results. In group 1, the median loss of vestibular function was +10.5% as calculated by Jongkees Formula (range –43;+52; group 2: median + 36%, range –56; +90. The median change of DHI scores was –9 in group 1 (range –68;30 and +2 in group 2 (–54;+20. Median loss of hearing was 4dB (-42;93 in group 1 and 12dB in group 2 (5;42.Conclusions. Loss of vestibular function in vestibular schwannoma clearly correlates with tumor size. However, loss of vestibular function was not strictly associated with a long-term deterioration of quality of life. This may be due to central compensation of vestibular deficits in long-standing large tumors. Loss of hearing before treatment was significantly influenced by the age of the patient but not by tumor size. At follow-up 1 and 2, hearing was significantly worse in those patients with a large VS and after microsurgical treatment.

  20. Functional unit size of the neurotoxin receptors on the voltage-dependent sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelides, K J; Nutter, T J; Elmer, L W; Kempner, E S

    1985-03-25

    Radiation inactivation was used in situ to determine the functional unit sizes of the neurotoxin receptors of the voltage-dependent sodium channel from rat brain. Frozen or lyophilized synaptosomes were irradiated with high energy electrons generated by a linear accelerator and assayed for [3H]saxitoxin, 125I-Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus (alpha-scorpion toxin), 125I-Centruroides suffusus suffusus (beta-scorpion toxin), and batrachotoxinin-A 20 alpha-[3H]benzoate binding activity. The functional unit size of the neurotoxin receptors determined in situ by target analysis are 220,000 for saxitoxin, 263,000 for alpha-scorpion toxin, and 45,000 for beta-scorpion toxin. Analysis of the inactivation curve for batrachotoxinin-A 20 alpha-benzoate binding to the channel yields two target sizes of Mr approximately 287,000 (50%) and approximately 51,000 (50%). The results are independent of the purity of the membrane preparation. Comparison of the radiation inactivation data with the protein composition of the rat brain sodium channel indicates that there are at least two functional components.

  1. Repeatability of cardiac-MRI-measured right ventricular size and function in congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Rowan; Salem, Yishay [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Shah, Amee; Lai, Wyman W. [Morgan Stanley Children' s Hospital of New York Presbyterian, New York, NY (United States); Nielsen, James C. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai Children' s Heart Center, Box 1201, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The measurement error for right ventricular (RV) size and function assessed by cardiac MRI (CMRI) in congenital heart disease has not been fully characterized. As CMRI parameters are being increasingly utilized to make clinical decisions, defining error in the clinical setting is critical. This investigation examines the repeatability of CMRI for RV size and function. Forty consecutive people with congenital heart disease involving the RV were retrospectively identified. Contouring of RV volumes was performed by two expert CMRI clinicians. The coefficient of variability and repeatability coefficients were calculated. Repeatability coefficients were multiplied by the mean value for each group studied to define a threshold beyond which measurement error was unlikely to be responsible. The variability for indexed RV end-diastolic volume = 3.2% and 3.3% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, respectively. The repeatability coefficients were 13.2% and 14.9% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, which yielded threshold values of 15.1 ml/m{sup 2} and 20.2 ml/m{sup 2}, respectively. For RV ejection fraction (EF), the repeatability coefficients for intra- and interobserver comparisons were 5.0% and 6.0%, which resulted in threshold values of 2.6 EF% and 3.0 EF%. The threshold values generated can be used during serial assessment of RV size and function. (orig.)

  2. Novel Nanoelectronic Device Applications Based on the Nonlinearity of Three-Terminal Ballistic Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie; Wallin, D.; Brusheim, P.; Maximov, I.; Wang, Z. G.; Xu, H. Q.

    2007-04-01

    Nanometer-scale electron devices containing three-terminal ballistic junctions are fabricated by electron-beam lithography on InP/InGaAs two-dimensional electron gas materials. Based on the intrinsic nonlinearity of the devices, frequency mixer, phase detector and RS flip-flop memory functioning at room temperature are successfully achieved. The devices have simple structure layout and small size, and are expected to function at high speed.

  3. Relationship of a hiatal hernia to the function of the body of the esophagus and the gastroesophageal junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMeester, T.R.; Lafontaine, E.; Joelsson, B.E.; Skinner, D.B.; Ryan, J.W.; O' Sullivan, G.C.; Brunsden, B.S.; Johnson, L.F.

    1981-10-01

    One hundred two patients referred to our Esophageal Function Laboratory without endoscopic evidence of esophagitis were divided into two groups on the basis of the presence of a hiatal hernia on endoscopic examination. Fifty-three patients had a hiatal hernia and 49 did not. Both groups and 30 normal volunteer subjects had esophageal manometry and 24 hour esophageal pH monitoring. The incompetency of the cardia in patients with a hiatal hernia was dependent upon loss of components responsible for the antireflux mechanism, mainly a decrease in distal esophageal sphincter pressure and a decrease in the length of the sphincter exposed to the positive-pressure environment of the abdomen. These deficiencies were not related to the presence of a hiatal hernia and were similar to those of patients with an incompetent cardia without a hiatal hernia. Patients with a hiatal hernia and an incompetent cardia had significantly more esophageal exposure to refluxed acid than without a hiatal hernia. On the basis of the number of reflux episodes that lasted 5 minutes or longer and radioisotope transit studies, this increased acid exposure was due to both a loss of competency of the cardia and poor esophageal clearance secondary to the presence of a hiatal hernia. Reduction of the hernia and anchoring the distal esophagus into the abdomen not only may improve the antireflux mechanism, but corrects the clearance abnormality as well. The presence of a hiatal hernia has a detrimental effect on the clearance function of the body of the esophagus and may aggravate the effects of gastroesophageal reflux due to an incompetent cardia.

  4. Size-controlled silver nanoparticles stabilized on thiol-functionalized MIL-53(Al) frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xinquan; Liu, Min; Zhang, Anfeng; Hu, Shen; Song, Chunshan; Zhang, Guoliang; Guo, Xinwen

    2015-05-01

    A postsynthetic modification method was used to prepare thiol-functionalized metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) by the amidation of mercaptoacetic acid with the amine group, which is present in the frameworks of NH2-MIL-53(Al). By doing this, the thiol group has been successfully grafted on the MOF, which perfectly combined the highly developed pore structures of the MOF with the strong coordination ability of the thiol group. The resulting thiol-functionalized MIL-53(Al) showed a significantly high adsorption capacity for heavy metal ions like Ag+ (182.8 mg g-1). Even more importantly, these grafted thiol groups can be used as anchoring groups for stabilizing metal nanoparticles (NPs) with controllable sizes. Taking silver as an example, monodispersed Ag NPs encapsulated in the cages of MIL-53(Al) have been prepared by using a two-step procedure. In addition, the particle size of the Ag NPs was adjustable to some extent by controlling the initial loading amount. The average size of the smallest Ag NPs is 3.9 +/- 0.9 nm, which is hard to obtain for Ag NPs because of their strong tendency to aggregate.A postsynthetic modification method was used to prepare thiol-functionalized metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) by the amidation of mercaptoacetic acid with the amine group, which is present in the frameworks of NH2-MIL-53(Al). By doing this, the thiol group has been successfully grafted on the MOF, which perfectly combined the highly developed pore structures of the MOF with the strong coordination ability of the thiol group. The resulting thiol-functionalized MIL-53(Al) showed a significantly high adsorption capacity for heavy metal ions like Ag+ (182.8 mg g-1). Even more importantly, these grafted thiol groups can be used as anchoring groups for stabilizing metal nanoparticles (NPs) with controllable sizes. Taking silver as an example, monodispersed Ag NPs encapsulated in the cages of MIL-53(Al) have been prepared by using a two-step procedure. In addition, the particle

  5. Modeling fractal structure of city-size distributions using correlation functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanguang Chen

    Full Text Available Zipf's law is one the most conspicuous empirical facts for cities, however, there is no convincing explanation for the scaling relation between rank and size and its scaling exponent. Using the idea from general fractals and scaling, I propose a dual competition hypothesis of city development to explain the value intervals and the special value, 1, of the power exponent. Zipf's law and Pareto's law can be mathematically transformed into one another, but represent different processes of urban evolution, respectively. Based on the Pareto distribution, a frequency correlation function can be constructed. By scaling analysis and multifractals spectrum, the parameter interval of Pareto exponent is derived as (0.5, 1]; Based on the Zipf distribution, a size correlation function can be built, and it is opposite to the first one. By the second correlation function and multifractals notion, the Pareto exponent interval is derived as [1, 2. Thus the process of urban evolution falls into two effects: one is the Pareto effect indicating city number increase (external complexity, and the other the Zipf effect indicating city size growth (internal complexity. Because of struggle of the two effects, the scaling exponent varies from 0.5 to 2; but if the two effects reach equilibrium with each other, the scaling exponent approaches 1. A series of mathematical experiments on hierarchical correlation are employed to verify the models and a conclusion can be drawn that if cities in a given region follow Zipf's law, the frequency and size correlations will follow the scaling law. This theory can be generalized to interpret the inverse power-law distributions in various fields of physical and social sciences.

  6. Modeling fractal structure of city-size distributions using correlation functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanguang

    2011-01-01

    Zipf's law is one the most conspicuous empirical facts for cities, however, there is no convincing explanation for the scaling relation between rank and size and its scaling exponent. Using the idea from general fractals and scaling, I propose a dual competition hypothesis of city development to explain the value intervals and the special value, 1, of the power exponent. Zipf's law and Pareto's law can be mathematically transformed into one another, but represent different processes of urban evolution, respectively. Based on the Pareto distribution, a frequency correlation function can be constructed. By scaling analysis and multifractals spectrum, the parameter interval of Pareto exponent is derived as (0.5, 1]; Based on the Zipf distribution, a size correlation function can be built, and it is opposite to the first one. By the second correlation function and multifractals notion, the Pareto exponent interval is derived as [1, 2). Thus the process of urban evolution falls into two effects: one is the Pareto effect indicating city number increase (external complexity), and the other the Zipf effect indicating city size growth (internal complexity). Because of struggle of the two effects, the scaling exponent varies from 0.5 to 2; but if the two effects reach equilibrium with each other, the scaling exponent approaches 1. A series of mathematical experiments on hierarchical correlation are employed to verify the models and a conclusion can be drawn that if cities in a given region follow Zipf's law, the frequency and size correlations will follow the scaling law. This theory can be generalized to interpret the inverse power-law distributions in various fields of physical and social sciences.

  7. A probability density function of liftoff velocities in mixed-size wind sand flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    With the discrete element method(DEM) ,employing the diameter distribution of natural sands sampled from the Tengger Desert,a mixed-size sand bed was produced and the particle-bed collision was simulated in the mixed-size wind sand movement. In the simulation,the shear wind velocity,particle diameter,incident velocity and incident angle of the impact sand particle were given the same values as the experimental results. After the particle-bed collision,we collected all the initial velocities of rising sand particles,including the liftoff angular velocities,liftoff linear velocities and their horizontal and vertical components. By the statistical analysis on the velocity sample for each velocity component,its probability density functions were obtained,and they are the functions of the shear wind velocity. The liftoff velocities and their horizontal and vertical components are distributed as an exponential density function,while the angular velocities are distributed as a normal density function.

  8. CRITICAL FACTORS IN OUTSOURCING OF ACCOUNTING FUNCTIONS IN MALAYSIAN SMALL MEDIUM-SIZED ENTERPRISES (SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magiswary Dorasamy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The challenges that business face in sustaining competitive advantage in the corporate world have become a major concern. Businesses are adopting cutting-edge technologies and best practices to cope with rapid, global changes. Various business functions are being reengineered for this purpose. Accounting functions play an important role in helping businesses to maintain competitive advantage. However, some small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs face problems handling fundamental accounting functions. This is predominantly because of their lack of expertise; accounting functions require not only knowledge of generally accepted accounting rules or tax regulations but also the expertise needed to apply the rules in a given business environment (Everaert, Sarens and Rommel, 2006. This paper offers some insight on the outsourcing of accounting functions as there is paucity of data in this area in the context of Malaysia. Essentially, it presents empirical evidence regarding Malaysian SMEs' accounting outsourcing practices. A survey of SMEs was conducted to identify the overall outsourcing landscape as it relates to accounting and third-party organisations. The factors that contribute to the decision to outsource accounting functions are analysed. The study reveals a significant relationship between outsourcing accounting functions and two contributing factors, risks and operation management.

  9. The Functionalization, Size Control and Properties of Metal-Organic Frameworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Hui; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt

    2016-01-01

    Recent years, Metal-Organic Framework (MOF) materials have drawn great attentions due to their potential applications in gas sorption/separation and luminescent sensing. In this dissertation, the recent progress of MOF materials is reviewed, with specific focus on the functionalization, size...... control and properties of MOF materials. A cationic MOF material was synthesized, and small hydrocarbons C1/C2 sorption/separation properties were studied. A MOF with both open metal sites and Lewis basic pyridyl sites was developed, and C2H2, CO2 and CH4 gas sorption/separation properties were explored....... A nanoscale MOF material with controllable size was realized whose morphology has been simulated base on the BFDH method, and the sensing of bacteria endospores was research in detail. We also report the synthesis and sensing of nitroaromatic explosives of a nanoscale MOF material....

  10. Gap junction communication in myelinating glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nualart-Marti, Anna; Solsona, Carles; Fields, R Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Gap junction communication is crucial for myelination and axonal survival in both the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS). This review examines the different types of gap junctions in myelinating glia of the PNS and CNS (Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes respectively), including their functions and involvement in neurological disorders. Gap junctions mediate intercellular communication among Schwann cells in the PNS, and among oligodendrocytes and between oligodendrocytes and astrocytes in the CNS. Reflexive gap junctions mediating transfer between different regions of the same cell promote communication between cellular compartments of myelinating glia that are separated by layers of compact myelin. Gap junctions in myelinating glia regulate physiological processes such as cell growth, proliferation, calcium signaling, and participate in extracellular signaling via release of neurotransmitters from hemijunctions. In the CNS, gap junctions form a glial network between oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. This transcellular communication is hypothesized to maintain homeostasis by facilitating restoration of membrane potential after axonal activity via electrical coupling and the re-distribution of potassium ions released from axons. The generation of transgenic mice for different subsets of connexins has revealed the contribution of different connexins in gap junction formation and illuminated new subcellular mechanisms underlying demyelination and cognitive defects. Alterations in metabolic coupling have been reported in animal models of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX) and Pelizaeus-Merzbarcher-like disease (PMLD), which are caused by mutations in the genes encoding for connexin 32 and connexin 47 respectively. Future research identifying the expression and regulation of gap junctions in myelinating glia is likely to provide a better understanding of myelinating glia in nervous system function, plasticity, and disease. This

  11. The 0 and pi contact array model of bicrystal junctions and interferometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornev, Victor K.; Soloviev, Igor I.; Klenov, Nikolai V.;

    2003-01-01

    simulation of the lumped Josephson junction circuits, e.g., PSCAN, WinS. The based on the model results for critical current dependence on applied magnetic field are compared with experimental data for the bicrictal junctions fabricated by dc sputtering at high pressure. Impact of no sinusoidal Josephson......The array model of the faceted bicrystal Josephson junctions has been developed more comprehensively. The facet size and the facet critical current dependence on. magnetic field are taken in to consideration. The model can be successfully used with high-performance software meant for numerical...... current-phase relation on the dc interferometer critical current as a function of magnetic field is analyzed as well....

  12. Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We review the giant tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in ferromagnetic-insulator-ferromagnetic junctions discovered in recent years, which is the magnetoresistance (MR) associated with the spin-dependent tunneling between two ferromagnetic metal films separated by an insulating thin tunnel barrier. The theoretical and experimental results including junction conductance, magnetoresistance and their temperature and bias dependences are described.

  13. Stacked Josephson Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Find; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2010-01-01

    Long Josephson junctions have for some time been considered as a source of THz radiation. Solitons moving coherently in the junctions is a possible source for this radiation. Analytical computations of the bunched state and bunching-inducing methods are reviewed. Experiments showing THz radiation...

  14. Functional and Pasting Properties of Lesser Known Nigerian Yams as a Function of Blanching Time and Particle Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.A. Okorie

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Effects of blanching time and particle size on functional and pasting characteristics of some lesser known Nigerian yams were investigated. Two varieties of lesser known yam Ighu and Ona belonging to Dioscorea dometorum species and two varieties of commonly used yams ozibo and okwanankata belonging to the D. rotunda and D. alata sp., respectively. The yams were processed by peeling, cubing, and blanching at 100ºC for 5 or 10 min, drying at 50ºC and subsequently milled to flours and fractionated to 40, 60, or 80 mesh sizes. Another batch of the tubers were processed similarly, but they were not subjected to a blanching treatment. Swelling capacity, water absorption capacities, bulk density, solubility and pasting characteristics were evaluated. The result showed that the lesser known yam Ighu exhibited significantly higher (p<0.05 hot and cold paste viscosities, solubility, water absorption and swelling capacities than the common yam varieties. Hot and Cold paste viscosities, solubility, water absorption and swelling capacities of flour generally increased as particle size decreased in all the test samples. While the bulk density was not affected by the blanching treatment, it decreased with decrease in particle size. The yam starches generally showed weak stability,but starch of the lesser known variety Ona suffered the least share thinning . Rate of retrogradation was found to be high in all the yam varieties but more pronounced in the lesser known yams Ighu and Ona. Ighu starch which exhibited the highest cold and hot paste viscosity showed the highest setback and index of gelatinization values. Industrial and culinary applications of the test yam varieties were suggested.

  15. SIZE AND FIELD OF ACTIVITY INFLUENCE ON WEB SITES FUNCTIONALITY FOR ROMANIAN COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarca Ioan

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The internet became an important part of the company’s informational system. In order to take advantage on the Internet’s interactive nature, a lot of companies have created their own websites. Companies use the website for numerous applications: to promote themselves, online shopping, and communication with targeted clients. This study reveals the fact that the company’s size and field of activity have influence on website’s functionality and interactivity. Small companies use the website to successfully compete corporations which do not have yet necessary stimulants to fully exploit the internet capacities.

  16. T型微通道内液滴尺寸的实验测定与关联%Experimental measurement and correlation of droplet size in T-junction microchannels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏丽娟; 朱春英; 付涛涛; 马友光

    2013-01-01

    利用高速摄像仪对不同深宽比的T型微通道内液滴尺寸进行了实验研究.分别采用3种不同尺寸(深度×宽度)的微通道:400 μ m× 400 μm、400 μ m×600 μm、400 μm×800 μm.以环己烷为分散油相,含0.3%表面活性剂十二烷基硫酸钠(SDS)的蒸馏水-甘油(质量分数分别为20%、40%、60%)溶液为连续相.考察了弹状流、过渡流和滴状流流型下微通道尺寸、两相流率、物性对液滴尺寸的影响.结果表明:液滴尺寸随微通道深宽比、连续相流率、黏度和毛细数的增加而减小,随分散相流率的增加而增加.用毛细数、两相流量比和通道深宽比对微通道内液滴尺寸进行了关联和预测,预测值与实验结果吻合良好.%A high-speed camera was used to visualize and determine the size of formed droplet for liquid-liquid two-phase flow in the T-junction microchannels with different aspect ratios. Microchannels with different dimensions of 400 μm×400 μn, 400 μm×600 μm, 400 μm×800 μm in depth and width were used in this work. Cyclohexane and deionized water with 0. 3% surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) -glycerol (20%, 40%, 60%) were used as the oil (dispersed) and water (continuous) phases, respectively. The effects of microchannel geometry, flow rates of both phases and physical properties of fluids on the size of droplet formed were investigated in the slug, transient and droplet regimes. The result showed that the droplet size decreased with increasing flow rate, viscosity and capillary number of the continuous phase, while it increased with increasing width of microchannels and flow rate of the dispersed phase. The correlations for predicting the size of formed droplet were proposed in taking capillary number, ratio of oil/water flow rates and aspect ratio of microchannels into account, and the calculated values by presented correlations agreed well with the experimental data.

  17. The effect of cluster size imbalance and covariates on the estimation performance of quadratic inference functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgate, Philip M; Braun, Thomas M

    2012-09-10

    Generalized estimating equations (GEE) are commonly used for the analysis of correlated data. However, use of quadratic inference functions (QIFs) is becoming popular because it increases efficiency relative to GEE when the working covariance structure is misspecified. Although shown to be advantageous in the literature, the impacts of covariates and imbalanced cluster sizes on the estimation performance of the QIF method in finite samples have not been studied. This cluster size variation causes QIF's estimating equations and GEE to be in separate classes when an exchangeable correlation structure is implemented, causing QIF and GEE to be incomparable in terms of efficiency. When utilizing this structure and the number of clusters is not large, we discuss how covariates and cluster size imbalance can cause QIF, rather than GEE, to produce estimates with the larger variability. This occurrence is mainly due to the empirical nature of weighting QIF employs, rather than differences in estimating equations classes. We demonstrate QIF's lost estimation precision through simulation studies covering a variety of general cluster randomized trial scenarios and compare QIF and GEE in the analysis of data from a cluster randomized trial. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Spurious finite-size instabilities in nuclear energy density functionals: spin channel

    CERN Document Server

    Pastore, A; Davesne, D; Navarro, J

    2015-01-01

    It has been recently shown, that some Skyrme functionals can lead to non-converging results in the calculation of some properties of atomic nuclei. A previous study has pointed out a possible link between these convergence problems and the appearance of finite-size instabilities in symmetric nuclear matter (SNM) around saturation density. We show that the finite-size instabilities not only affect the ground state properties of atomic nuclei, but they can also influence the calculations of vibrational excited states in finite nuclei. We perform systematic fully-self consistent Random Phase Approximation (RPA) calculations in spherical doubly-magic nuclei. We employ several Skyrme functionals and vary the isoscalar and isovector coupling constants of the time-odd term $\\mathbf{s}\\cdot \\Delta \\mathbf{s}$ . We determine critical values of these coupling constants beyond which the RPA calculations do not converge because RPA the stability matrix becomes non-positive.By comparing the RPA calculations of atomic nucl...

  19. Functional size of human visual area V1: a neural correlate of top-down attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Ashika; Kolbe, Scott C; Anderson, Andrew J; Egan, Gary F; Vidyasagar, Trichur R

    2014-06-01

    Heavy demands are placed on the brain's attentional capacity when selecting a target item in a cluttered visual scene, or when reading. It is widely accepted that such attentional selection is mediated by top-down signals from higher cortical areas to early visual areas such as the primary visual cortex (V1). Further, it has also been reported that there is considerable variation in the surface area of V1. This variation may impact on either the number or specificity of attentional feedback signals and, thereby, the efficiency of attentional mechanisms. In this study, we investigated whether individual differences between humans performing attention-demanding tasks can be related to the functional area of V1. We found that those with a larger representation in V1 of the central 12° of the visual field as measured using BOLD signals from fMRI were able to perform a serial search task at a faster rate. In line with recent suggestions of the vital role of visuo-spatial attention in reading, the speed of reading showed a strong positive correlation with the speed of visual search, although it showed little correlation with the size of V1. The results support the idea that the functional size of the primary visual cortex is an important determinant of the efficiency of selective spatial attention for simple tasks, and that the attentional processing required for complex tasks like reading are to a large extent determined by other brain areas and inter-areal connections.

  20. Nightside auroral zone and polar cap ion outflow as a function of substorm size and phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, G. R.; Ober, D. M.; Germany, G. A.; Lund, E. J.

    2004-02-01

    Because the high latitude ionosphere is an important source of plasma for the magnetosphere under active conditions, we have undertaken a study of the way ion outflow from the nightside auroral zone and polar cap respond to substorm activity. We have combined data from the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) on Polar with ion upflow measurements from the TEAMS instrument on the FAST spacecraft to construct a picture of ion upflow from these regions as a function of substorm size and as a function of time relative to substorm onset. We use data taken during solar minimum in the northern hemisphere between December 1996 and February 1997. We find that the total nightside auroral zone ion outflow rate (averaged over substorm phase) depends on the size of the substorm, increasing by about a factor of 10 for both O+ and H+ from the smallest to the largest substorms in our study. The combined outflow rate from both the polar cap and the nightside auroral zone goes up by a factor of 7 for both ions for the same change in conditions. Regardless of storm size, the nightside auroral zone outflow rate increases by about a factor of 2 after onset, reaching its peak level after about 20 min. These results indicate that the change in the nightside auroral zone ion outflow rate that accompanies substorm onset is not as significant as the change from low to high magnetic activity. As a consequence, the prompt increase in the near earth plasma sheet energy density of O+ and H+ ions that accompanies onset [, 1996] is likely due to local energization of ions already present rather than to the sudden arrival and energization of fresh ionospheric plasma.

  1. Electron transport in molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Chengjun

    This thesis addresses the electron transport in molecular junctions, focusing on the energy level alignment and correlation effects. Various levels of theory have been applied to study the structural and electronic effects in different molecular junctions, starting from the single particle density...... charge position are in quantitative agreement with the experiments, while pure DFT is not. This is the consequence of the accurate energy level alignment, where the DFT+∑ method corrects the self-interaction error in the standard DFT functional and uses a static image charge model to include the image...... charge effect on the energy level renormalization. Additionally, the gating of the 4,4’-bipyridine (44BP) molecule contacted to either Ni or Au electrodes has been investigated. Here it is found that the gating mechanism is conceptually different between two cases. In the case of Ni contacts where...

  2. Morphogenesis of rat myotendinous junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curzi, Davide; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Falcieri, Elisabetta; Burattini, Sabrina

    2013-10-01

    Myotendinous junction (MTJ) is the highly specialized complex which connects the skeletal muscle to the tendon for transmitting the contractile force between the two tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate the MTJ development and rat EDL was chosen as a model. 1, 15, 30 day animals were considered and the junctions were analyzed by light and electron microscopy. The MTJ interface architecture increased during the development, extending the interaction between muscle and tendon. 1-day-old rats showed disorganized myofibril bundles, spread cytosol and incomplete rough endoplasmic reticulum, features partially improved in 15-day-old rats, and completely developed in 30-day-old animals. These findings indicate that muscle-tendon interface displays, during rat lifetime, numerically increased and longer tendon interdigitations, correlated with an improved organization of both tissues and with a progressive acquirement of full functionality.

  3. Isoreticular Expansion of Metal-Organic Frameworks with Multiple Functionalities and Controlled Pore Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hexiang

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) are made by linking organic and inorganic molecular building blocks into extended structures through strong bonds. With a judicious choice of inorganic joints and various functional groups available in organic links, a large number of MOFs have been synthesized in the past decade. Along with the fast expansion of the family of MOFs, important applications emerge including hydrogen storage and carbon dioxide capture, both of which address the most pressing societal demand for clean and sustainable energy resources. Although numerous MOFs are now known and they have found widespread applications, the introduction of more than one kind of building block into their crystal structures remains challenging. One of the main objectives of this study is to demonstrate the successful incorporating of multiple functional groups into MOFs. Here, a new strategy has been developed to achieve the synthesis of a series of eighteen multivariate MOFs (MTV-MOFs) containing up to eight distinct functional groups, while their parent topologies were fully preserved. The backbone of these MTV-MOFs was found to be ordered, while the orientation, number, relative position and ratio of the functionalities along the backbone could be controlled by virtue of the unchanged length of the link and its unaltered connectivity. This strategy allows us to endow the pores of these MOFs with a new level of complexity which far exceeds any held by that of the original mono-functional MOFs---an aspect that makes it possible to fine-tune the pore environment of a porous crystal with favorable implications. Indeed, one member of these MTV-MOFs has already shown an 87% improvement of the hydrogen uptake while another member demonstrated a 400% increase in CO2 selectivity comparing to their mono-functional counterparts. Another goal of this study has been to maximize MOF porosity and pore size. There were three major obstacles against expanding the pore size of porous crystals

  4. Linking differential domain functions of the GS3 protein to natural variation of grain size in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hailiang; Sun, Shengyuan; Yao, Jialing; Wang, Chongrong; Yu, Sibin; Xu, Caiguo; Li, Xianghua; Zhang, Qifa

    2010-11-09

    Grain yield in many cereal crops is largely determined by grain size. Here we report the genetic and molecular characterization of GS3, a major quantitative trait locus for grain size. It functions as a negative regulator of grain size and organ size. The wild-type isoform is composed of four putative domains: a plant-specific organ size regulation (OSR) domain in the N terminus, a transmembrane domain, a tumor necrosis factor receptor/nerve growth factor receptor (TNFR/NGFR) family cysteine-rich domain, and a von Willebrand factor type C (VWFC) in the C terminus. These domains function differentially in grain size regulation. The OSR domain is both necessary and sufficient for functioning as a negative regulator. The wild-type allele corresponds to medium grain. Loss of function of OSR results in long grain. The C-terminal TNFR/NGFR and VWFC domains show an inhibitory effect on the OSR function; loss-of-function mutations of these domains produced very short grain. This study linked the functional domains of the GS3 protein to natural variation of grain size in rice.

  5. Predictive modelling of ferroelectric tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velev, Julian P.; Burton, John D.; Zhuravlev, Mikhail Ye; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    2016-05-01

    Ferroelectric tunnel junctions combine the phenomena of quantum-mechanical tunnelling and switchable spontaneous polarisation of a nanometre-thick ferroelectric film into novel device functionality. Switching the ferroelectric barrier polarisation direction produces a sizable change in resistance of the junction—a phenomenon known as the tunnelling electroresistance effect. From a fundamental perspective, ferroelectric tunnel junctions and their version with ferromagnetic electrodes, i.e., multiferroic tunnel junctions, are testbeds for studying the underlying mechanisms of tunnelling electroresistance as well as the interplay between electric and magnetic degrees of freedom and their effect on transport. From a practical perspective, ferroelectric tunnel junctions hold promise for disruptive device applications. In a very short time, they have traversed the path from basic model predictions to prototypes for novel non-volatile ferroelectric random access memories with non-destructive readout. This remarkable progress is to a large extent driven by a productive cycle of predictive modelling and innovative experimental effort. In this review article, we outline the development of the ferroelectric tunnel junction concept and the role of theoretical modelling in guiding experimental work. We discuss a wide range of physical phenomena that control the functional properties of ferroelectric tunnel junctions and summarise the state-of-the-art achievements in the field.

  6. Linking differential domain functions of the GS3 protein to natural variation of grain size in rice

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Hailiang; Sun, Shengyuan; Yao, Jialing; Wang, Chongrong; Yu, Sibin; Xu, Caiguo; Li, Xianghua; Zhang, Qifa

    2010-01-01

    Grain yield in many cereal crops is largely determined by grain size. Here we report the genetic and molecular characterization of GS3, a major quantitative trait locus for grain size. It functions as a negative regulator of grain size and organ size. The wild-type isoform is composed of four putative domains: a plant-specific organ size regulation (OSR) domain in the N terminus, a transmembrane domain, a tumor necrosis factor receptor/nerve growth factor receptor (TNFR/NGFR) family cysteine-...

  7. Forming a stone in pelviureteric junction obstruction: cause or effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasinou, Theodora; Bourdoumis, Andreas; Masood, Junaid

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To investigate a possible causal relationship for stone formation in pelviureteric junction obstruction and to outline management options. Materials and Methods A literature search and evidence synthesis was conducted via electronic databases in the English language using the key words pelviureteric junction obstruction; urolithiasis; hyperoxaluria; laparoscopic pyeloplasty; flexible nephroscopy; percutaneous nephrolithotomy, alone or in combination. Relevant articles were analysed to extract conclusions. Results Concomitant pelviureteric junction obstruction (PUJO) and renal lithiasis has been reported only scarcely in the literature. Although PUJO has been extensively studied throughout the years, the presence of calculi in such a patient has not received equal attention and there is still doubt surrounding the pathophysiology and global management. Conclusions Metabolic risk factors appear to play an important role, enough to justify metabolic evaluation in these patients. Urinary stasis and infection are well known factors predisposing to lithiasis and contribute to some extent. The choice for treatment is not always straightforward. Management should be tailored according to degree of obstruction, renal function, patient symptoms and stone size. Simultaneous treatment is feasible with the aid of minimally invasive operative techniques and laparoscopy in particular.

  8. Increased brain size in mammals is associated with size variations in gene families with cell signalling, chemotaxis and immune-related functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Monzón-Sandoval, Jimena; Urrutia, Araxi O; Gutiérrez, Humberto

    2014-01-22

    Genomic determinants underlying increased encephalization across mammalian lineages are unknown. Whole genome comparisons have revealed large and frequent changes in the size of gene families, and it has been proposed that these variations could play a major role in shaping morphological and physiological differences among species. Using a genome-wide comparative approach, we examined changes in gene family size (GFS) and degree of encephalization in 39 fully sequenced mammalian species and found a significant over-representation of GFS variations in line with increased encephalization in mammals. We found that this relationship is not accounted for by known correlates of brain size such as maximum lifespan or body size and is not explained by phylogenetic relatedness. Genes involved in chemotaxis, immune regulation and cell signalling-related functions are significantly over-represented among those gene families most highly correlated with encephalization. Genes within these families are prominently expressed in the human brain, particularly the cortex, and organized in co-expression modules that display distinct temporal patterns of expression in the developing cortex. Our results suggest that changes in GFS associated with encephalization represent an evolutionary response to the specific functional requirements underlying increased brain size in mammals.

  9. Microwave phase locking of Josephson-junction fluxon oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salerno, M.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm; Filatrella, G.;

    1990-01-01

    -dimensional functional map. Phase-locked states correspond to fixed points of the map. For junctions of in-line geometry, the existence and stability of such fixed points can be studied analytically. Study of overlap-geometry junctions requires the numerical inversion of a functional equation, but the results...

  10. Sexual Functioning and Behavior of Men with Body Dysmorphic Disorder Concerning Penis Size Compared with Men Anxious about Penis Size and with Controls: A Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Veale, MD, FRCPsych

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Men with BDD are more likely to have erectile dysfunction and less satisfaction with intercourse than controls but maintain their libido. Further research is required to develop and evaluate a psychological intervention for such men with adequate outcome measures. Veale D, Miles S, Read J, Troglia A, Wylie K, and Muir G. Sexual functioning and behavior of men with body dysmorphic disorder concerning penis size compared with men anxious about penis size and with controls: A cohort study. Sex Med 2015;3:147–155.

  11. Methotrexate carried in lipid core nanoparticles reduces myocardial infarction size and improves cardiac function in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranhão, Raul C; Guido, Maria C; de Lima, Aline D; Tavares, Elaine R; Marques, Alyne F; Tavares de Melo, Marcelo D; Nicolau, Jose C; Salemi, Vera Mc; Kalil-Filho, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (MI) is accompanied by myocardial inflammation, fibrosis, and ventricular remodeling that, when excessive or not properly regulated, may lead to heart failure. Previously, lipid core nanoparticles (LDE) used as carriers of the anti-inflammatory drug methotrexate (MTX) produced an 80-fold increase in the cell uptake of MTX. LDE-MTX treatment reduced vessel inflammation and atheromatous lesions induced in rabbits by cholesterol feeding. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of LDE-MTX on rats with MI, compared with commercial MTX treatment. Thirty-eight Wistar rats underwent left coronary artery ligation and were treated with LDE-MTX, or with MTX (1 mg/kg intraperitoneally, once/week, starting 24 hours after surgery) or with LDE without drug (MI-controls). A sham-surgery group (n=12) was also included. Echocardiography was performed 24 hours and 6 weeks after surgery. The animals were euthanized and their hearts were analyzed for morphometry, protein expression, and confocal microscopy. LDE-MTX treatment achieved a 40% improvement in left ventricular (LV) systolic function and reduced cardiac dilation and LV mass, as shown by echocardiography. LDE-MTX reduced the infarction size, myocyte hypertrophy and necrosis, number of inflammatory cells, and myocardial fibrosis, as shown by morphometric analysis. LDE-MTX increased antioxidant enzymes; decreased apoptosis, macrophages, reactive oxygen species production; and tissue hypoxia in non-infarcted myocardium. LDE-MTX increased adenosine bioavailability in the LV by increasing adenosine receptors and modulating adenosine catabolic enzymes. LDE-MTX increased the expression of myocardial vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF) associated with adenosine release; this correlated not only with an increase in angiogenesis, but also with other parameters improved by LDE-MTX, suggesting that VEGF increase played an important role in the beneficial effects of LDE-MTX. Overall effects of

  12. Pupil-size asymmetry is a physiologic trait related to gender, attentional function, and personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poynter, William D

    2016-12-14

    A small difference in the size of the two pupils is common in healthy individuals, a condition termed benign or physiologic anisocoria (BA). Past research indicates that BA is probably caused by asymmetry in sympathetic nervous system (SNS) function [e.g., Rosenberg (2008). Physiologic anisocoria: A manifestation of a physiologic sympathetic asymmetry. Neuro-Ophthalmology, 32, 147-149]. This study is the first to show that BA varies with psychological factors linked to brain asymmetry and autonomic arousal, including gender, attention, and personality. Males exhibited a more directional BA than females, consistent with greater hemispheric lateralization in males. BA also varied with a self-report measure of attentional function, consistent with evidence of hemispheric asymmetry in visuospatial attention networks. Finally, BA varied with personality traits linked to autonomic arousal. Individuals exhibiting higher Meanness and Boldness, and lower Empathy scores tended to show more directional BA. This link between personality traits and BA may be related to brain asymmetries in autonomic arousal and emotion-related processing. If future studies employing direct measures of lateralized brain activity confirm the link between BA and SNS asymmetries, this new metric may prove useful in discovering new relationships between brain organization and psychological function, and how these relationships vary across individuals.

  13. Statistical properties of the Green function in finite size for Anderson localization models with multifractal eigenvectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monthus, Cécile

    2017-03-01

    For Anderson localization models with multifractal eigenvectors on disordered samples containing N sites, we analyze in a unified framework the consequences for the statistical properties of the Green function. We focus in particular on the imaginary part of the Green function at coinciding points GxxI≤ft(E-\\text{i}η \\right) and study the scaling with the size N of the moments of arbitrary indices q when the broadening follows the scaling η =\\frac{c}{{{N}δ}} . For the standard scaling regime δ =1 , we find in the two limits c\\ll 1 and c\\gg 1 that the moments are governed by the anomalous exponents Δ (q) of individual eigenfunctions, without the assumption of strong correlations between the weights of consecutive eigenstates at the same point. For the non-standard scaling regimes 0function follows some Fréchet distribution in the typical region, while rare events are important to obtain the scaling of the moments. We describe the application to the case of Gaussian multifractality and to the case of linear multifractality.

  14. Absent activation in medial prefrontal cortex and temporoparietal junction but not superior temporal sulcus during the perception of biological motion in schizophrenia: a functional MRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashimoto N

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Naoki Hashimoto,1,2 Atsuhito Toyomaki,1 Masahiro Hirai,3 Tamaki Miyamoto,1 Hisashi Narita,1 Ryo Okubo,1 Ichiro Kusumi1 1Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan; 2Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA; 3Center for Development of Advanced Medical Technology, Jichi Medical University, Yakushiji, Shimotsuke, Tochigi, Japan Background: Patients with schizophrenia show disturbances in both visual perception and social cognition. Perception of biological motion (BM is a higher-level visual process, and is known to be associated with social cognition. BM induces activation in the “social brain network”, including the superior temporal sulcus (STS. Although deficits in the detection of BM and atypical activation in the STS have been reported in patients with schizophrenia, it remains unclear whether other nodes of the “social brain network” are also atypical in patients with schizophrenia.Purpose: We aimed to explore whether brain regions other than STS were involved during BM perception in patients with schizophrenia, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI.Methods and patients: Seventeen patients with schizophrenia, and 17 age- and sex- matched healthy controls, underwent fMRI scanning during a one-back visual task, containing three experimental conditions: (1 BM, (2 scrambled motion (SM, and (3 static condition. We used one-sample t-tests to examine neural responses selective to BM versus SM within each group, and two-sample t-tests to directly compare neural patterns to BM versus SM in schizophrenics versus controls.Results: We found significant activation in the STS region when BM was contrasted with SM in both groups, with no significant difference between groups. On the contrary, significant activation in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC and bilateral temporoparietal junction (TPJ was found only in the

  15. Equivalent Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyadjiev, T. L.; Semerdjieva, E. G.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2008-01-01

    The magnetic field dependences of critical current are numerically constructed for a long Josephson junction with a shunt-or resistor-type microscopic inhomogeneities and compared to the critical curve of a junction with exponentially varying width. The numerical results show that it is adequate to replace the distributed inhomogeneity of a long Josephson junction by an inhomogeneity localized at one of its ends, which has certain technological advantages. It is also shown that the critical curves of junctions with exponentially varying width and inhomogeneities localized at the ends are unaffected by the mixed fluxon-antifluxon distributions of the magnetic flow. This fact may explain the improvement of the spectra of microwave radiation noted in the literature.

  16. Performance of two-dimensional Doppler echocardiography for the assessment of infarct size and left ventricular function in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, E; Kanashiro, R M; Murad, N; Carvalho, A C C; Cravo, S L D; Campos, O; Tucci, P J F; Moises, V A

    2006-05-01

    Although echocardiography has been used in rats, few studies have determined its efficacy for estimating myocardial infarct size. Our objective was to estimate the myocardial infarct size, and to evaluate anatomic and functional variables of the left ventricle. Myocardial infarction was produced in 43 female Wistar rats by ligature of the left coronary artery. Echocardiography was performed 5 weeks later to measure left ventricular diameter and transverse area (mean of 3 transverse planes), infarct size (percentage of the arc with infarct on 3 transverse planes), systolic function by the change in fractional area, and diastolic function by mitral inflow parameters. The histologic measurement of myocardial infarction size was similar to the echocardiographic method. Myocardial infarct size ranged from 4.8 to 66.6% when determined by histology and from 5 to 69.8% when determined by echocardiography, with good correlation (r = 0.88; P echocardiography (r = -0.87; P rats.

  17. Rigorous buckling analysis of size-dependent functionally graded cylindrical nanoshells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiabin; Lim, C. W.; Zhou, Zhenhuan; Xu, Xinsheng; Sun, Wei

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents new analytical solutions for buckling of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and functionally graded (FG) cylindrical nanoshells subjected to compressive and thermal loads. The model applies Eringen's nonlocal differential constitutive relation to describe the size-dependence of nanoshells. Based on Reddy's higher-order shear deformation theory, governing equations are established and solved by separating the variables. The analysis first re-examines the classical buckling of single-walled CNTs. Accurate solutions are established, and it is found that the buckling stress decreases drastically when the nonlocal parameter reaches a certain value. For CNTs with constant wall-thickness, the buckling stress eventually decreases with enhanced size effect. By comparing with CNTs molecular dynamic simulations, the obtained nonlocal parameters are much smaller than those proposed previously. Subsequently, FG cylindrical nanoshells are analyzed, and it is concluded that similar behavior that has been observed for CNTs is also valid for FG cylindrical nanoshells. The paper further discusses in detail the effects of different geometric parameters, material distribution, and temperature field.

  18. Multi-Functional Carbon Fibre Composites using Carbon Nanotubes as an Alternative to Polymer Sizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozegic, T. R.; Anguita, J. V.; Hamerton, I.; Jayawardena, K. D. G. I.; Chen, J.-S.; Stolojan, V.; Ballocchi, P.; Walsh, R.; Silva, S. R. P.

    2016-11-01

    Carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRP) were introduced to the aerospace, automobile and civil engineering industries for their high strength and low weight. A key feature of CFRP is the polymer sizing - a coating applied to the surface of the carbon fibres to assist handling, improve the interfacial adhesion between fibre and polymer matrix and allow this matrix to wet-out the carbon fibres. In this paper, we introduce an alternative material to the polymer sizing, namely carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the carbon fibres, which in addition imparts electrical and thermal functionality. High quality CNTs are grown at a high density as a result of a 35 nm aluminium interlayer which has previously been shown to minimise diffusion of the catalyst in the carbon fibre substrate. A CNT modified-CFRP show 300%, 450% and 230% improvements in the electrical conductivity on the ‘surface’, ‘through-thickness’ and ‘volume’ directions, respectively. Furthermore, through-thickness thermal conductivity calculations reveal a 107% increase. These improvements suggest the potential of a direct replacement for lightning strike solutions and to enhance the efficiency of current de-icing solutions employed in the aerospace industry.

  19. Novel echocardiographic techniques to assess left atrial size, anatomy and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameli Matteo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE and speckle tracking echocardiography (STE have recently applied as imaging techniques to accurately evaluate left atrial (LA size, anatomy and function. 3DE and off-line quantification softwares, have allowed, in comparison to magnetic resonance imaging, the most time-efficient and accurate method of LA volume quantification. STE provides a non-Doppler, angle-independent and objective quantification of LA myocardial deformation. Data regarding feasibility, accuracy and clinical applications of LA analysis by 3DE and STE are rapidly gathering. This review describes the fundamental concepts of LA 3DE and STE, illustrates how to obtain respective measurements and discuss their recognized and emerging clinical applications.

  20. Explicit expressions of the Pietra index for the generalized function for the size distribution of income

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabia, José María; Jordá, Vanesa

    2014-12-01

    The importance of the Pietra index in socioeconomic systems and econophysics has been highlighted by Eliazar and Sokolov (2010). In this paper, we obtain closed expressions for the Pietra index for the generalized function for the size of income proposed by McDonald (1984). This family is composed of three classes of distributions: the generalized gamma distribution (GG), the generalized beta of the first kind (GB1) and the generalized beta of the second kind (GB2). For the different distributions, we obtain closed and simple expressions of the Pietra index, which can be easily computed. We also obtain the Pietra index for other relevant income models including finite mixtures of distributions and the κ-generalized distribution (Clementi et al., 2008). Finally, two empirical applications with real income data are given.

  1. Development of Small-sized Fluid Control Valve with Self-holding Function Using Permanent Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, Tetsuya; Dohta, Shujiro; Ueda, Hirofumi

    Recently, force feedback devices in virtual reality and power assisted nursing care systems have received much attention and active research. In such a control system, an actuator and a driving device such as a control valve are mounted on the human body. In this condition, the size and weight of the control valve become serious problems. At the same time, the valve should be operated with lower energy consumption because of using a limited electrical power. The typical electro magnetic solenoid valve drives its spool using a larger solenoid to open the valve. The complex construction of the valve for sealing makes its miniaturization and the fabrication of a low cost valve more difficult. In addition, the solenoid in the valve consumes more electrical power while the valve is kept opening. The purpose of our study is to develop a small-sized, lightweight, lower energy consumption and flexible control valve that can be safe enough to mount on the human body at a lower cost. In our pervious study, we proposed and tested the control valve that can open using a vibration motor. In this study, we propose and test a new type of fluid control valve with a self-holding function. The new valve uses a permanent magnet ball. It has a cylindrical magnet and two solenoids. The self-holding function of the valve is done as follows. When one side of the solenoid is stimulated by the current momentarily, the solenoid gives a repulsive force to the cylindrical magnet. The magnet moves toward the opposite side of the solenoid and is attracted to the iron core. Then, the magnet ball moves toward the cylindrical magnet and opens the orifice. The valve can keep open without electrical energy. As a result, the valve with the extremely lower energy consumption can be developed.

  2. Metal–Organic Frameworks (MOFs) as Multivalent Materials: Size Control and Surface Functionalization by Monovalent Capping Ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnaarts, Timon; Weinhart-Mejia, R.; Egberink, Richard J.M.; van Roosmalen, W.P.E.; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2015-01-01

    Control over particle size and composition are pivotal to tune the properties of metal organic frameworks (MOFs), for example, for biomedical applications. Particle-size control and functionalization of MIL-88A were achieved by using stoichiometric replacement of a small fraction of the divalent

  3. Determination of grain-size distribution function using two-dimensional Fourier transforms of tone-pulse-encoded images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, E. R.

    1988-01-01

    Microstructural images may be tone pulse encoded and subsequently Fourier transformed to determine the two-dimensional density of frequency components. A theory is developed relating the density of frequency components to the density of length components. The density of length components corresponds directly to the actual grain-size distribution function from which the mean grain shape, size, and orientation can be obtained.

  4. Determination of grain size distribution function using two-dimensional Fourier transforms of tone pulse encoded images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    Microstructural images may be tone pulse encoded and subsequently Fourier transformed to determine the two-dimensional density of frequency components. A theory is developed relating the density of frequency components to the density of length components. The density of length components corresponds directly to the actual grain size distribution function from which the mean grain shape, size, and orientation can be obtained.

  5. A New Technique to Recover Source-Time Functions of Intermediate-Sized Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plourde, A. P.; Bostock, M. G.

    2016-12-01

    Most studies of source-time functions (STFs) for intermediate-sized earthquakes remove propagation effects through seismogram deconvolution with a smaller earthquake known as an empirical Green's function (EGF). Improved stability over simple spectral division can be achieved through Projected Landweber Deconvolution (PLD) that imposes positivity and duration constraints. We investigate a new procedure for recovering STFs that does not assume an EGF, but instead the availability of two (or more) earthquakes that share a common Green's function. Under this condition one can show u2*s1 - u1*s2 = 0, where ui and si are the seismogram and STF for a given earthquake, respectively. This system can be augmented with a scaling constraint and written a Ax = z, where matrix A has a block-Toeplitz structure and x are the target STFs. We form an objective function from this linear system, which we minimize with a combined Newton and Conjugate-Gradient algorithm. As is the case in EGF deconvolution, success is dependent on proper constraints. In our time-domain implementation duration constraints are easily enforced by shortening x to the allowed duration prior to inversion, and removing the corresponding columns of A. During line searches we preserve positivity of the STFs by 'bending' the Newton direction as needed. If the magnitude-difference of the earthquakes make one a suitable EGF for the other, using PLD to obtain a starting model for the larger STF is a prudent approach. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this algorithm using synthetic tests and real examples, and we suggest such methods should improve our estimates for a variety of earthquake source parameters.

  6. Quantum size correction to the work function and the centroid of excess charge in positively ionized simple metal clusters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M. Payami

    2003-01-01

    In this work, we have shown the important role of the finite-size correction to the work function in predicting the correct position of the centroid of excess charge in positively charged simple metal...

  7. Density fractions versus size separates: Does physical fractionation isolate functional soil compartments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moni, Christophe; Hatton, Pierre-Joseph; Bernd, Zeller; Derrien, Delphine; Markus, Kleber

    2013-04-01

    Physical fractionation is a widely used methodology to study soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics, but concerns have been raised that the available fractionation methods do not well describe functional SOM pools. In the present communication we explore whether physical fractionation techniques isolate soil compartments meaningful and functionally relevant for the investigation of litter-derived nitrogen dynamics at the decadal time scale. We do so by performing aggregate density fractionation (ADF) and particle size-density fractionation (PSDF) on mineral soil samples from two European beech forests a decade after application of 15N labelled litter. Our approach consisted in representing the results of both fractionation procedures on a condensed scheme. First, principle component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the set of organic matter related data (including C and N contents, C/N ratio, δ13C) to two independent variables or principal components (PC) that accounted for the majority of the data variability. The second step consisted of resolving the plane defined by the two principal components into contour maps of 15N label incorporation among physical fractions from both fractionation procedures. By doing this, dynamics of litter derived N transformation can be visualized as trajectories in the PCA plane. Both density and size-based fractionation methods suggested that litter-derived nitrogen became increasingly associated with the mineral phase as decomposition progressed, within aggregates and onto mineral surfaces. However, scientists investigating specific aspects of litter-derived nitrogen dynamics are pointed towards ADF when adsorption and aggregation processes are of interest, whereas PSDF is the superior tool to research the fate of particulate organic matter (POM). Some methodological caveats were observed mainly for the PSDF procedure, the most important one being that fine fractions isolated after sonication can not be linked to any defined

  8. Preparation and formation mechanisms of metallic particles with controlled size, shape, structure and surface functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu

    Due to their excellent conductivity and chemical stability, particles of silver (Ag), gold (Au), copper (Cu) and their alloys are widely used in the electronic industry. Other unique properties extend their uses to the biomedical, optical and catalysis fields. All of these applications rely on particles with well controlled size, morphology, structure, and surface properties. Chemical precipitation from homogeneous solutions was selected as the synthetic route for the investigations described in this work. Based on the evaluation of key process parameters (temperature, reactant concentrations, reactant addition rate, mixing, etc.) the general formation mechanisms of metallic particles in various selected precipitation systems were investigated and elucidated. Five different systems for preparing particles with controlled size, morphology, structure and surface functionality are discussed. The first system involves the precipitation of Ag nanoparticles with spherical and anisotropic (platy or fiber-like) morphology. It will be shown that the formation of a stable Ag/Daxad complex has a significant impact on the reaction kinetics, and that the chromonic properties of Daxad molecules are responsible for the particle anisotropy. In the second system, Au-Ag core-shell nanoparticles were prepared in aqueous solution by a two-step precipitation process. The optical properties of these particles can be tailored by varying the thickness of the Ag shell. It was also determined that the stability of the bimetallic metallic sols depends on the Cl-ion concentration in solution. The third system discussed deals with preparation by the polyol process of well dispersed Cu nanospheres with high crystallinity and excellent oxidation resistance. We show that the heterogeneous nucleation (seeding) approach has significant merit in controlling particle size and uniformity. The functionalization of Au nanoparticle surfaces with glutathione molecules is discussed in the next section. The

  9. Electroplated Ni on the PN Junction Semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Joo; Uhm, Young Rang; Son, Kwang Jae; Kim, Jong Bum; Choi, Sang Moo; Park, Jong Han; Hong, Jintae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Nickel (Ni) electroplating was implemented by using a metal Ni powder in order to establish a Ni-63 plating condition on the PN junction semiconductor needed for production of betavoltaic battery. PN junction semiconductors with a Ni seed layer of 500 and 1000 A were coated with Ni at current density from 10 to 50 mA cm{sup 2}. The surface roughness and average grain size of Ni deposits were investigated by XRD and SEM techniques. The roughness of Ni deposit was increased as the current density was increased, and decreased as the thickness of Ni seed layer was increased.

  10. Cell junction proteins within the cochlea:A review of recent research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Wang; Bohua Hu; Shiming Yang

    2015-01-01

    Cell—cell junctions in the cochlea are highly complex and well organized. The role of these junctions is to maintain structural and functional integrity of the cochlea. In this review, we describe classification of cell junction-associated proteins identified within the cochlea and provide a brief overview of the function of these proteins in adherent junctions, gap junctions and tight junctions. Copyright © 2016, PLA General Hospital Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery. Production and hosting by Elsevier (Singapore) Pte Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

  11. Social network size and cognitive functioning in middle-aged adults : cross-sectional and longitudinal associations

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson Sörman, Daniel; Rönnlund, Michael; Sundström, Anna; Norberg, Margareta; Nilsson, Lars-Göran

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine relations between social network size and three cognitive abilities (episodic memory, semantic memory, visuospatial ability) in middle-aged adults. We analyzed cross-sectional data on social network size and cognitive functioning that were available for 804 participants aged 40–60 years. In addition, we examined 5- and 10-year follow-up measurements of cognitive functioning that were available for 604 and 255 participants, respectively. Cross-...

  12. Performance of two-dimensional Doppler echocardiography for the assessment of infarct size and left ventricular function in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nozawa E.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Although echocardiography has been used in rats, few studies have determined its efficacy for estimating myocardial infarct size. Our objective was to estimate the myocardial infarct size, and to evaluate anatomic and functional variables of the left ventricle. Myocardial infarction was produced in 43 female Wistar rats by ligature of the left coronary artery. Echocardiography was performed 5 weeks later to measure left ventricular diameter and transverse area (mean of 3 transverse planes, infarct size (percentage of the arc with infarct on 3 transverse planes, systolic function by the change in fractional area, and diastolic function by mitral inflow parameters. The histologic measurement of myocardial infarction size was similar to the echocardiographic method. Myocardial infarct size ranged from 4.8 to 66.6% when determined by histology and from 5 to 69.8% when determined by echocardiography, with good correlation (r = 0.88; P < 0.05; Pearson correlation coefficient. Left ventricular diameter and mean diastolic transverse area correlated with myocardial infarct size by histology (r = 0.57 and r = 0.78; P < 0.0005. The fractional area change ranged from 28.5 ± 5.6 (large-size myocardial infarction to 53.1 ± 1.5% (control and correlated with myocardial infarct size by echocardiography (r = -0.87; P < 0.00001 and histology (r = -0.78; P < 00001. The E/A wave ratio of mitral inflow velocity for animals with large-size myocardial infarction (5.6 ± 2.7 was significantly higher than for all others (control: 1.9 ± 0.1; small-size myocardial infarction: 1.9 ± 0.4; moderate-size myocardial infarction: 2.8 ± 2.3. There was good agreement between echocardiographic and histologic estimates of myocardial infarct size in rats.

  13. Gap junctional communication between the satellite cells of rat dorsal root ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, E; Wang, H J; Asai, Y; Tamaki, D; Amano, K; Mabuchi, Y; Herbert, D C; Soji, T

    2001-06-01

    Many studies have described the ultrastructure of the dorsal root ganglia in various embryonic and adult animals, but in spite of the efforts of many investigators the functional role of the satellite cells in this tissue is not clearly understood. In this study, we discuss the function of this cell type based on the concept of cell-to-cell interaction through gap junctions. Five male 60 day-old Wistar strain rats were used. All animals were anesthetized with pentobarbital and perfused with glutaraldehyde fixative, then the dorsal root ganglia in levels L4, L5 and L6 were taken from each rat. After postosmication, the specimens were prepared for observation by transmission electron microscopy. All nerve cells were completely surrounded by satellite cell cytoplasmic expansions. The boundaries between adjacent nerve cells and satellite cells were complicated due to the presence of perikaryal projections of nerve cells. Gap junctions which showed the typical trilamellar structure of plasma membranes were found mainly between satellite cell processes belonging to the same nerve cell. On the other hand, some gap junctions were found between the satellite cell projections belonging to different nerve cells. The size of the gap junctions ranged from 300 to 400 nm. No gap junctions were associated with the plasma membrane of any nerve cell. In conclusion, only satellite cells can share free transcellular exchange of cytoplasmic molecules such as ions, amino acids, sugars and several second messengers including cAMP and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate by way of gap junctions in dorsal root ganglia.

  14. Individual and species-specific traits explain niche size and functional role in spiders as generalist predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Dirk; Vogel, Esther; Knop, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The function of a predator within a community is greatly based on its trophic niche, that is the number and the strength of feeding links. In generalist predators, which feed on a wide range of prey, the size and position of the trophic niche is likely determined by traits such as hunting mode, the stratum they occur in, their body size and age. We used stable isotope analyses ((13)C and (15)N) to measure the trophic niche size of nine spider species within a forest hedge community and tested for species traits and individual traits that influence stable isotope enrichment, niche size and resource use. The spiders Enoplognatha, Philodromus, Floronia, and Heliophanus had large isotopic niches, which correspond to a more generalistic feeding behaviour. In contrast, Araneus, Metellina and Agelena, as top predators in the system, had rather narrow niches. We found a negative correlation between trophic position and niche size. Differences in trophic position in spiders were explained by body size, hunting modes and stratum, while niche size was influenced by hunting mode. In Philodromus, the size of the trophic niche increased significantly with age. Fitting spiders to functional groups according to their mean body size, hunting mode and their habitat domain resulted in largely separated niches, which indicates that these traits are meaningful for separating functional entities in spiders. Functional groups based on habitat domain (stratum) caught the essential functional differences between the species with species higher up in the vegetation feeding on flying insects and herb and ground species also preying on forest floor decomposers. Interestingly, we found a gradient from large species using a higher habitat domain and having a smaller niche to smaller species foraging closer to the ground and having a larger niche. This shows that even within generalist predators, such as spiders, there is a gradient of specialism that can be predicted by functional traits.

  15. Excitation Gaps of Finite-Sized Systems from Optimally Tuned Range-Separated Hybrid Functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronik, Leeor; Stein, Tamar; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Baer, Roi

    2012-05-08

    Excitation gaps are of considerable significance in electronic structure theory. Two different gaps are of particular interest. The fundamental gap is defined by charged excitations, as the difference between the first ionization potential and the first electron affinity. The optical gap is defined by a neutral excitation, as the difference between the energies of the lowest dipole-allowed excited state and the ground state. Within many-body perturbation theory, the fundamental gap is the difference between the corresponding lowest quasi-hole and quasi-electron excitation energies, and the optical gap is addressed by including the interaction between a quasi-electron and a quasi-hole. A long-standing challenge has been the attainment of a similar description within density functional theory (DFT), with much debate on whether this is an achievable goal even in principle. Recently, we have constructed and applied a new approach to this problem. Anchored in the rigorous theoretical framework of the generalized Kohn-Sham equation, our method is based on a range-split hybrid functional that uses exact long-range exchange. Its main novel feature is that the range-splitting parameter is not a universal constant but rather is determined from first principles, per system, based on satisfaction of the ionization potential theorem. For finite-sized objects, this DFT approach mimics successfully, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, the quasi-particle picture of many-body theory. Specifically, it allows for the extraction of both the fundamental and the optical gap from one underlying functional, based on the HOMO-LUMO gap of a ground-state DFT calculation and the lowest excitation energy of a linear-response time-dependent DFT calculation, respectively. In particular, it produces the correct optical gap for the difficult case of charge-transfer and charge-transfer-like scenarios, where conventional functionals are known to fail. In this perspective, we overview

  16. Accounting for Finite Size of Ions in Nanofluidic Channels Using Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Christopher; Gillespie, Dirk; Pennathur, Sumita

    2016-11-01

    The physics of nanofluidic devices are dominated by ion-wall interactions within the electric double layer (EDL). A full understanding of the EDL allows for better exploitation of micro and nanofluidic devices for applications such as biologic separations, desalination, and energy conversion, Although continuum theory is generally used to study the fluidics within these channels, in very confined geometries, high surface charge channels, or significant solute concentration systems, continuum theories such as Poisson-Boltzmann cease to be valid because the finite size of ions is not considered. Density functional theory (DFT) provides an accurate and efficient method for predicting the concentration of ions and the electrostatic potential near a charged wall because it accounts for more complex electrostatic and hard-sphere correlations. This subsequently allows for a better model for ion flux, fluid flow, and current in electrokinetic systems at high surface charge, confined geometries, and concentrated systems. In this work, we present a theoretical approach utilizing DFT to predict unique flow phenomena in nanofluidic, electrokinetic systems. CBET-1402736 from the National Science Foundation.

  17. Electrical-stress-induced transport and surface potential characterizations of metal/ TiO 2/metal planar junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haeri; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2011-03-01

    Electric-field-induced resistive switching (RS) phenomena in metal oxides have attracted considerable research interest due to their potential use in nonvolatile memory device applications. Intensive investigations have revealed that coupled electron ion dynamics play a key role the RS mechanism. Metal/single crystal junction can be an ideal model system to study how the ionic drift and diffusion can affect the resistance. We investigated transport and local electrical properties of Pt/ Ti O2 single crystal/Ti planar junctions with micron- sized gaps between the electrodes. Scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) showed that negative (positive) electrical stress to the Pt electrodes significantly reduced (hardly affected) the Pt/ Ti O2 contact resistance. The SKPM results also revealed that the electrical stress caused alteration of the local work function of Ti O2 . The comparative investigations of the transport and SKPM results suggested that the electrical stress induced redistribution of ions, resulting in the change of the junction resistance.

  18. Optical Measurement of Particle Size Distribution Function Using Downhill SIMPLEX Method; Theory and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Feng

    A new method is introduced for retrieving the particle size distribution function (PSDF) from optical measurements. Criteria are derived and demonstrated for assessing the validity of the multi-dimensional least-squares deconvolution results derived from experimental data. Using the covariance matrices C and the newly revealed B, stability of this deconvolution technique is discussed and compared with the linear inversion method. The relations of the variances of the PSDF parameters and the experimental errors have been derived and the effects and restrictions of the profiles for the PSDF have been discussed. All the theoretical predictions of this method are tested using Monte Carlo -simulated experimental data which consists of scattering and extinction measurements for water and soot particles, respectively. The results show that for water droplets of 1 μm mean diameter, the method is good for +/-25% random experiment error for scattering and +6% for extinction. The differences in the scattering and extinction results are explained using information content analysis. Experimental confirmation of this newly developed deconvolution technique was accomplished using multi-angle scattering measurements of a water droplet spray field. Sensitivity of the deconvolution to uncertainties in the index of refraction was determined using droplet compositions of water and laser-dye mixtures. The laser-dye concentration was varied to provide a variable and known imaginary term of the index of refraction. A range of discrete laser wavelengths was used for this study to span the wavelength range of the variations of the index of refraction. The application of this deconvolution method yield, in addition to the PSDF parameters, the real and imaginary terms of the index of refraction which agreed with the computed values. A method was developed and verified for the proper treatment of the variation with observation angle of the scattering volume of the experiment, and the results

  19. Demonstration of the Potential of Magnetic Tunnel Junctions for a Universal RAM Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, William J.

    2000-03-01

    Over the past four years, tunnel junctions with magnetic electrodes have emerged as promising devices for future magnetoresistive sensing and for information storage. This talk will review advances in these devices, focusing particularly on the use of magnetic tunnel junctions for magnetic random access memory (MRAM). Exchange-biased versions of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) in particular will be shown to have useful properties for forming magnetic memory storage elements in a novel cross-point architecture. Exchange-biased MTJ elements have been made with areas as small as 0.1 square microns and have shown magnetoresistance values exceeding 40 The potential of exchange-biased MTJs for MRAM has been most seriously explored in a demonstration experiment involving the integration of 0.25 micron CMOS technology with a special magnetic tunnel junction "back end." The magnetic back end is based upon multi-layer magnetic tunnel junction growth technology which was developed using research-scale equipment and one-inch size substrates. For the demonstration, the CMOS wafers processed through two metal layers were cut into one-inch squares for depositions of bottom-pinned exchange-biased magnetic tunnel junctions. The samples were then processed through four additional lithographic levels to complete the circuits. The demonstration focused attention on a number of processing and device issues that were addressed successfully enough that key performance aspects of MTJ MRAM were demonstrated in 1 K bit arrays, including reads and writes in less than 10 ns and nonvolatility. While other key issues remain to be addressed, these results suggest that MTJ MRAM might simultaneously provide much of the functionality now provided separately by SRAM, DRAM, and NVRAM.

  20. Intramale variation in sperm size: functional significance in a polygynous mammal

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Studies concerning the relationships between sperm size and velocity at the intraspecific level are quite limited and often yielded contradictory results across the animal kingdom. Intramale variation in sperm size may represent a meaningful factor to predict sperm velocity, due to its relationship with the level of sperm competition among related taxa. Because sperm phenotype is under post-copulatory sexual selection, we hypothesized that a reduced intramale variation in sperm size is associ...

  1. Quantum size correction to the work function and the centroid of excess charge in positively ionized simple metal clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Payami

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available  In this work, we have shown the important role of the finite-size correction to the work function in predicting the correct position of the centroid of excess charge in positively charged simple metal clusters with different values . For this purpose, firstly we have calculated the self-consistent Kohn-Sham energies of neutral and singly-ionized clusters with sizes in the framework of local spin-density approximation and stabilized jellium model (SJM as well as simple jellium model (JM with rigid jellium. Secondly, we have fitted our results to the asymptotic ionization formulas both with and without the size correction to the work function. The results of fittings show that the formula containing the size correction predict a correct position of the centroid inside the jellium while the other predicts a false position, outside the jellium sphere.

  2. Mortality as a bivariate function of age and size in indeterminate growers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colchero, Fernando; Schaible, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    developed a model that treats age- and size-specific mortality as a bivariate process. This method facilitates the exploration of the underlying (unobserved) contributions of age and size to mortality. We show that, in theory, a population can show declining mortality with age and size while the underlying...... be made using a simple Bayesian model, and how all of the mortality parameters are accurately retrieved. We then apply the methods to published datasets on water pythons and freshwater mussels and test different hypotheses regarding the effects of age and size on mortality. In both cases we found age...

  3. Claudin-4 Overexpression in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Is Associated with Hypomethylation and Is a Potential Target for Modulation of Tight Junction Barrier Function Using a C-Terminal Fragment of Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Litkouhi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Claudin-4, a tight junction (TJ protein and receptor for the C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE, is overexpressed in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC. Previous research suggests DNA methylation is a mechanism for claudin-4 overexpression in cancer and that C-CPE acts as an absorption-enhancing agent in claudin-4expressing cells. We sought to correlate claudin-4 overexpression in EOC with clinical outcomes and TJ barrier function, investigate DNA methylation as a mechanism for overexpression, and evaluate the effect of C-CPE on the TJ. METHODS: Claudin-4 expression in EOC was quantified and correlated with clinical outcomes. Claudin-4 methylation status was determined, and claudin-4-negative cell lines were treated with a demethylating agent. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing was used to calculate junctional (paracellular resistance (Rb in EOC cells after claudin-4 silencing and after C-CPE treatment. RESULTS: Claudin4 overexpression in EOC does not correlate with survival or other clinical endpoints and is associated with hypomethylation. Claudin-4 overexpression correlates with Rb and C-CPE treatment of EOC cells significantly decreased Rb in a dose- and claudin-4-dependent noncytotoxic manner. CONCLUSIONS: C-CPE treatment of EOC cells leads to altered TJ function. Further research is needed to determine the potential clinical applications of C-CPE in EOC drug delivery strategies.

  4. Performance of two-dimensional Doppler echocardiography for the assessment of infarct size and left ventricular function in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Nozawa E.; Kanashiro R.M.; Murad N.; Carvalho A.C.C.; Cravo S.L.D.; Campos O.; Tucci P.J.F.; Moises V.A.

    2006-01-01

    Although echocardiography has been used in rats, few studies have determined its efficacy for estimating myocardial infarct size. Our objective was to estimate the myocardial infarct size, and to evaluate anatomic and functional variables of the left ventricle. Myocardial infarction was produced in 43 female Wistar rats by ligature of the left coronary artery. Echocardiography was performed 5 weeks later to measure left ventricular diameter and transverse area (mean of 3 transverse planes), i...

  5. Effect of loading condition, specimen geometry, size-effect and softening function on double- fracture parameters of concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shailendra Kumar; S V Barai

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents numerical investigation of the influence of the specimen geometry, loading condition, size-effect and softening function of concrete on double- fracture parameters. The input data needed for computation of the double- fracture parameters are obtained from the well-known version of Fictitious Crack Model (FCM). FCM is developed for three standard specimens: three-point bend test, compact tension specimen and four-point bend test of size range 100–600 mm at relative size of initial crack length 0.3. The analysis of numerical results shows some interesting behaviour of double- fracture parameters.

  6. Improvement of regional myocardial blood flow and function and reduction of infarct size with ivabradine: protection beyond heart rate reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusch, Gerd; Skyschally, Andreas; Gres, Petra; van Caster, Patrick; Schilawa, Dustin; Schulz, Rainer

    2008-09-01

    Effects of the bradycardic agent ivabradine on regional blood flow, contractile function, and infarct size were studied in a pig model of myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion. Heart rate reduction by beta-blockade is associated with negative inotropism and unmasked alpha-adrenergic coronary vasoconstriction. Ivabradine is the only available bradycardic agent for clinical use. Anaesthetized pigs were subjected to 90 min controlled left anterior descending coronary artery hypoperfusion and 120 min reperfusion. Regional blood flow was measured with microspheres, regional function with sonomicrometry, and infarct size with triphenyl tetrazolium chloride staining. Pigs received placebo or ivabradine (0.6 mg/kg i.v.) before or during ischaemia or before reperfusion, respectively. Pre-treatment with ivabradine reduced infarct size from 35 +/- 4 (SEM) to 19 +/- 4% of area at risk (AAR). Ivabradine 15-20 min after the onset of ischaemia increased regional myocardial blood flow from 2.12 +/- 0.31 to 3.55 +/- 0.56 microL/beat/g and systolic wall thickening from 6.7 +/- 1.0 to 16.3 +/- 3.0%; infarct size was reduced from 12 +/- 4 to 2 +/- 1% of AAR. Ivabradine 5 min before reperfusion still reduced infarct size from 36 +/- 4 to 21 +/- 5% of AAR. The benefit of ivabradine on flow and function was eliminated by atrial pacing, but part of the reduction of infarct size by ivabradine was not. Ivabradine's protection goes beyond heart rate reduction.

  7. The human myotendinous junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, A B; Larsen, M; Mackey, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is a specialized structure in the musculotendinous system, where force is transmitted from muscle to tendon. Animal models have shown that the MTJ takes form of tendon finger-like processes merging with muscle tissue. The human MTJ is largely unknown and has never ...

  8. Molecular size of benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain in situ: evidence for a functional dimer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doble, A.; Iversen, L. L.

    1982-02-01

    Benzodiazepine tranquillizers such as diazepam and chlordiazepoxide interact with high-affinity binding sites in nervous tissue1,2. The correlation between the affinities of various benzodiazepines for these sites with their clinical potencies and activity in behavioural and electrophysiological tests in animals suggests that the sites represent the functional `receptor' whereby benzodiazepines exert their effects3. The intimate involvement of benzodiazepines with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and chloride channels raised the possibility that the benzodiazepine binding site (BDZ-R) may be a protein in the GABA receptor-effector complex4,5. GABA agonists enhance the affinity of BDZ-R for benzodiazepines6, although BDZ-R is distinct from the GABA receptor itself3. However, electrophysiological evidence suggests that the action of benzodiazepines is chloride channel, rather than receptor, directed7-10. Several attempts have been made to measure the molecular weight (Mr) of BDZ-R after solubilization from brain membranes: treatment with 1% Triton X-100 followed by assay of binding activity in solute fractions separated according to molecular weight suggested11 a value of ~200,000, photoaffinity labelling of BDZ-R with 3H-flunitrazepam (3H-FNZ) followed by more rigorous solubilization and gel chromatography indicated12,13 an apparent Mr of ~55,000 and a third approach14 a value of ~100,000. The measured molecular weight seems to depend critically on the solubilization procedure used. Chang et al.15 recently described the use of radiation inactivation to determine the size of BDZ-R in situ in calf brain membranes, and estimated a Mr, of 216,000. We have also used this approach; the results reported here indicate a Mr of between 90,000 and 100,000, but this is reduced to 60,000-63,000 in membranes pretreated with GABA, suggesting the disaggregation of a normally dimeric form.

  9. Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) as Multivalent Materials: Size Control and Surface Functionalization by Monovalent Capping Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnaarts, Timon; Mejia-Ariza, Raquel; Egberink, Richard J M; van Roosmalen, Wies; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2015-07-13

    Control over particle size and composition are pivotal to tune the properties of metal organic frameworks (MOFs), for example, for biomedical applications. Particle-size control and functionalization of MIL-88A were achieved by using stoichiometric replacement of a small fraction of the divalent fumarate by monovalent capping ligands. A fluorine-capping ligand was used to quantify the surface coverage of capping ligand at the surface of MIL-88A. Size control at the nanoscale was achieved by using a monovalent carboxylic acid-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-COOH) ligand at different concentrations. Finally, a biotin-carboxylic acid capping ligand was used to functionalize MIL-88A to bind fluorescently labeled streptavidin as an example towards bioapplications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Size-dependent accumulation of particles in lysosomes modulates dendritic cell function through impaired antigen degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seydoux, Emilie; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Nita, Izabela M; Balog, Sandor; Gazdhar, Amiq; Stumbles, Philip A; Petri-Fink, Alke; Blank, Fabian; von Garnier, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nanosized particles may enable therapeutic modulation of immune responses by targeting dendritic cell (DC) networks in accessible organs such as the lung. To date, however, the effects of nanoparticles on DC function and downstream immune responses remain poorly understood. Methods Bone marrow–derived DCs (BMDCs) were exposed in vitro to 20 or 1,000 nm polystyrene (PS) particles. Particle uptake kinetics, cell surface marker expression, soluble protein antigen uptake and degradation, as well as in vitro CD4+ T-cell proliferation and cytokine production were analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, co-localization of particles within the lysosomal compartment, lysosomal permeability, and endoplasmic reticulum stress were analyzed. Results The frequency of PS particle–positive CD11c+/CD11b+ BMDCs reached an early plateau after 20 minutes and was significantly higher for 20 nm than for 1,000 nm PS particles at all time-points analyzed. PS particles did not alter cell viability or modify expression of the surface markers CD11b, CD11c, MHC class II, CD40, and CD86. Although particle exposure did not modulate antigen uptake, 20 nm PS particles decreased the capacity of BMDCs to degrade soluble antigen, without affecting their ability to induce antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell proliferation. Co-localization studies between PS particles and lysosomes using laser scanning confocal microscopy detected a significantly higher frequency of co-localized 20 nm particles as compared with their 1,000 nm counterparts. Neither size of PS particle caused lysosomal leakage, expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress gene markers, or changes in cytokines profiles. Conclusion These data indicate that although supposedly inert PS nanoparticles did not induce DC activation or alteration in CD4+ T-cell stimulating capacity, 20 nm (but not 1,000 nm) PS particles may reduce antigen degradation through interference in the lysosomal compartment. These findings emphasize the

  11. Mechanisms shaping size structure and functional diversity of phytoplankton communities in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Trejos, Esteban; Brandt, Gunnar; Bruggeman, Jorn; Merico, Agostino

    2015-03-01

    The factors regulating phytoplankton community composition play a crucial role in structuring aquatic food webs. However, consensus is still lacking about the mechanisms underlying the observed biogeographical differences in cell size composition of phytoplankton communities. Here we use a trait-based model to disentangle these mechanisms in two contrasting regions of the Atlantic Ocean. In our model, the phytoplankton community can self-assemble based on a trade-off emerging from relationships between cell size and (1) nutrient uptake, (2) zooplankton grazing, and (3) phytoplankton sinking. Grazing `pushes' the community towards larger cell sizes, whereas nutrient uptake and sinking `pull' the community towards smaller cell sizes. We find that the stable environmental conditions of the tropics strongly balance these forces leading to persistently small cell sizes and reduced size diversity. In contrast, the seasonality of the temperate region causes the community to regularly reorganize via shifts in species composition and to exhibit, on average, bigger cell sizes and higher size diversity than in the tropics. Our results raise the importance of environmental variability as a key structuring mechanism of plankton communities in the ocean and call for a reassessment of the current understanding of phytoplankton diversity patterns across latitudinal gradients.

  12. Magic-T Junction using Microstrip/Slotline Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    U-yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward J.; Doiron, Terence

    2008-01-01

    among all four ports, and to strong parasitic couplings at the microstrip/slotline T junction, where four microstrip lines and a slotline are combined. The present improved broadband magic-T junction (see figure) includes a microstrip ring structure and two microstrip- to-slotline transitions. One of the microstrip/slotline transitions is a small T junction between the ring and a slotline; the other microstrip/slotline transition effects coupling between the slotline and port E. The smallness of the T junction and the use of minimum-size slotline terminations help to minimize radiation loss. An impedance-transformation network that includes multiple quarter-wavelength sections is used to increase the operating bandwidth and minimize the parasitic coupling around the microstrip/slotline T junction. As a result, the improved junction has greater bandwidth and lower phase imbalance at the sum and difference ports than did the prior junction.

  13. Lateral junction dynamics lead the way out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrndt, Martin; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2014-02-01

    Epithelial cell layers need to be tightly regulated to maintain their integrity and correct function. Cell integration into epithelial sheets is now shown to depend on the N-WASP-regulated stabilization of cortical F-actin, which generates distinct patterns of apical-lateral contractility at E-cadherin-based cell-cell junctions.

  14. Junction trees of general graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofei WANG; Jianhua GUO

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,we study the maximal prime subgraphs and their corresponding structure for any undirected graph.We introduce the notion of junction trees and investigate their structural characteristics,including junction properties,induced-subtree properties,running-intersection properties and maximum-weight spanning tree properties.Furthermore,the characters of leaves and edges on junction trees are discussed.

  15. Effects on heart function of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy in patients with cancer in the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction - a prospective cohort pilot study within a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Mikael; Alexandersson von Döbeln, Gabriella; Nilsson, Magnus; Winter, Reidar; Lundell, Lars; Tsai, Jon A; Kalman, Sigridur

    2015-01-13

    Neoadjuvant therapy for cancer of the esophagus or gastroesophageal (GE)-junction is well established. The pros and cons of chemoradiotherapy and chemotherapy are debated. Chemoradiotherapy might impair cardiac function eliciting postoperative morbidity. The aim of this pilot study was to describe acute changes in left ventricular function following chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy. Patients with esophageal and (GE)-junction cancer enrolled at our center into a multicenter trial comparing neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and chemotherapy were eligible. Patients were randomized to receive cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil with or without the addition of 40 Gy radiotherapy prior to surgery. Left ventricular function was evaluated using echocardiography and plasma N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide (NT-proBNP) before and after neoadjuvant treatment. The primary outcome measure was left ventricular global strain (GS). Clinical effects were assessed using repeated exercise tests. Linear mixed models were used to analyze the effects of treatment group, and the interaction between groups. 40 patients participated (chemoradiotherapy, n=17; chemotherapy, n=23). In the chemoradiotherapy group there was no change in left ventricular global strain but mitral annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSE) of the ventricular septum, early diastolic filling velocity (E-velocity), and the ratio of early to late ventricular filling velocities (E/A ratio) decreased significantly (p=0.02, p=0.01, and p=0.03, respectively). No changes were observed in the chemotherapy group. There was a trend towards an interaction effect for MAPSE sept and E (p=0.09 and p=0.09). NT-proBNP increased following chemoradiotherapy (p=0.05) but not after chemotherapy (p>0.99), and there was a trend towards an interaction effect (p=0.07). Working capacity decreased following neoadjuvant treatment (chemoradiotherapy p = 0.001, chemotherapy p=0.03) and was more pronounced after chemoradiotherapy with a trend

  16. Sec16 determines the size and functioning of the Golgi in the protist parasite, Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealey-Cardona, Marco; Schmidt, Katy; Demmel, Lars; Hirschmugl, Tatjana; Gesell, Tanja; Dong, Gang; Warren, Graham

    2014-06-01

    The Sec16 homologue in Trypanosoma brucei has been identified and characterized. TbSec16 colocalizes with COPII components at the single endoplasmic reticulum exit site (ERES), which is next to the single Golgi stack in the insect (procyclic) form of this organism. Depletion of TbSec16 reduces the size of the ERES and the Golgi, and slows growth and transport of a secretory marker to the cell surface; conversely, overexpression of TbSec16 increases the size of the ERES and Golgi but has no effect on growth or secretion. Together these data suggest that TbSec16 regulates the size of the ERES and Golgi and this size is set for optimal growth of the organism.

  17. Estimating the surface relaxivity as a function of pore size from NMR T2 distributions and micro-tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Francisco; Leiderman, Ricardo; Souza, Andre; Carneiro, Giovanna; Bagueira, Rodrigo

    2017-09-01

    In the present work, we formulate and solve an inverse problem to recover the surface relaxivity as a function of pore size. The input data for our technique are the T2 distribution measurement and the micro-tomographic image of the rock sample under investigation. We simulate the NMR relaxation signal for a given surface relaxivity function using the random walk method and rank different surface relaxivity functions according to the correlation of the resulting simulated T2 distributions with the measured T2 distribution. The optimization is performed using genetic algorithms and determines the surface relaxivity function whose corresponding simulated T2 distribution best matches the measured T2 distribution. In the proposed methodology, pore size is associated with a number of collisions in the random walk simulations. We illustrate the application of the proposed method by performing inversions from synthetic and laboratory input data and compare the obtained results with those obtained using the uniform relaxivity assumption.

  18. Temporal correlations and structural memory effects in break junction measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyarkuti, A.; Lauritzen, Kasper Primdal; Balogh, Zoltan Imre

    2017-01-01

    that correlations between the opening and subsequent closing traces may indicate structural memory effects in atomic-sized metallic and molecular junctions. Applying these methods on measured and simulated gold metallic contacts as a test system, we show that the surface diffusion induced flattening of the broken......-molecule junctions, we demonstrate pronounced contact memory effects and recovery of the molecule for junctions breaking before atomic chains are formed. However, if chains are pulled the random relaxation of the chain and molecule after rupture prevents opening-closing correlations....

  19. Soft nanostructuring of YBCO Josephson junctions by phase separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, D; Pettersson, H; Iandolo, B; Olsson, E; Bauch, T; Lombardi, F

    2010-12-08

    We have developed a new method to fabricate biepitaxial YBa2 Cu3 O7-δ (YBCO) Josephson junctions at the nanoscale, allowing junctions widths down to 100 nm and simultaneously avoiding the typical damage in grain boundary interfaces due to conventional patterning procedures. By using the competition between the superconducting YBCO and the insulating Y2 BaCuO5 phases during film growth, we formed nanometer sized grain boundary junctions in the insulating Y2 BaCuO5 matrix as confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Electrical transport measurements give clear indications that we are close to probing the intrinsic properties of the grain boundaries.

  20. Molecular size distribution of compost-derived humates as a function of concentration and different counterions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Claudia M B F; Piccolo, Alessandro; Mangrich, Antonio S

    2008-11-01

    Conformational changes in the structures of humic acids (HA) extracted from compost with varying degrees of maturity were monitored by high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC). The molecular size distribution of HA was compared in solutions containing sodium or ammonium counterions at pH 7 and pH 4.5. These findings indicate that the humates' molecular size depended not only on the nature of the counterions but also on their concentration in the solution. The physicochemical nature of sodium counterions determined smaller molecular sizes than those of the more hydrated ammonium counterions, at low concentrations of humates. Conversely, at higher humate concentrations, the more compact conformation of sodium humates produced larger molecular sizes than those of ammonium humates due to the aggregation of more hydrophobic surfaces in the sodium humates. Composting led to the degradation of labile microbial components with accumulation of hydrophobic constituents. This caused self-association of hydrophobic compounds into humic superstructures of larger molecular size over composting time. At lower pH, changes in conformational stability by the addition of acetic acid to humate solutions were explained by the supramolecular model of humified organic matter.

  1. Functional Implications of Species Differences in the Size and Morphology of the Isthmo Optic Nucleus (ION) in Birds

    OpenAIRE

    Cristián Gutiérrez-Ibáñez; Iwaniuk, Andrew N.; Lisney, Thomas J.; Macarena Faunes; Marín, Gonzalo J.; Wylie, Douglas R.

    2012-01-01

    In birds, there is a retinofugal projection from the brain to the retina originating from the isthmo optic nucleus (ION) in the midbrain. Despite a large number of anatomical, physiological and histochemical studies, the function of this retinofugal system remains unclear. Several functions have been proposed including: gaze stabilization, pecking behavior, dark adaptation, shifting attention, and detection of aerial predators. This nucleus varies in size and organization among some species, ...

  2. Finite Size Corrections to the Large Deviation Function of the Density in the One Dimensional Symmetric Simple Exclusion Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrida, Bernard; Retaux, Martin

    2013-09-01

    The symmetric simple exclusion process is one of the simplest out-of-equilibrium systems for which the steady state is known. Its large deviation functional of the density has been computed in the past both by microscopic and macroscopic approaches. Here we obtain the leading finite size correction to this large deviation functional. The result is compared to the similar corrections for equilibrium systems.

  3. Size-dependent accumulation of particles in lysosomes modulates dendritic cell function through impaired antigen degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seydoux E

    2014-08-01

    of BMDCs to degrade soluble antigen, without affecting their ability to induce antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell proliferation. Co-localization studies between PS particles and lysosomes using laser scanning confocal microscopy detected a significantly higher frequency of co-localized 20 nm particles as compared with their 1,000 nm counterparts. Neither size of PS particle caused lysosomal leakage, expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress gene markers, or changes in cytokines profiles. Conclusion: These data indicate that although supposedly inert PS nanoparticles did not induce DC activation or alteration in CD4+ T-cell stimulating capacity, 20 nm (but not 1,000 nm PS particles may reduce antigen degradation through interference in the lysosomal compartment. These findings emphasize the importance of performing in-depth analysis of DC function when developing novel approaches for immune modulation with nanoparticles. Keywords: polystyrene particles, nanoparticles, immune modulation, mouse dendritic cells, CD4+ T-cells

  4. Unique hue judgments as a function of test size in the fovea and at 20-deg temporal eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerger, Janice L.; Volbrecht, Vicki J.; Ayde, Corey J.

    1995-06-01

    Unique hue loci were measured for four observers in the fovea and at 20-deg temporal eccentricity as a function of test size. Eccentric measurements were made on the cone plateau following a rod bleach. The results indicate that unique yellow remains approximately invariant with respect to test size and retinal eccentricity, whereas unique blue and unique green shift to longer wavelengths with increasing test size. The locus of unique blue in the periphery reaches an asymptote at approximately the same wavelength as that from the foveal measurements, whereas unique green measured in the periphery is consistently at shorter wavelengths than in the fovea. In general, the data are best described by a model in which the short-wavelength-sensitive cone input to the two opponent-color channels decreases with decreasing test size and increasing retinal eccentricity.

  5. Effects of WC Particle Size and Co Content on the Graded Structure in Functionally Gradient WC-Co Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yigao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Functionally gradient WC-Co composites having a Co depleted surface zone and not comprising the h phase can be manufactured via carburizing process. During carburizing, besides carburizing process parameters, the microstructural parameters of WC-Co materials, such as WC grain size and Co content, also have significant influences on the formation of Co gradient structure. In this study, the effects of WC particle size and Co content on the gradient structure within gradient hardmetals have been studied, based on a series of carburizing experiments of WC-Co materials with different WC particle sizes and cobalt contents. The results show that both the thickness and the amplitude of the gradients within gradient WC-Co materials increase with increasing initial WC particle size and Co content of WC-Co alloys. The reason for this finding is discussed.

  6. Stand Composition, Tree Proximity and Size Have Minimal Effects on Leaf Function of Coexisting Aspen and Subalpine Fir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Aaron C; Barney, Trevor; St Clair, Samuel B

    2016-01-01

    Forest structural heterogeneity due to species composition, spatial relationships and tree size are widely studied patterns in forest systems, but their impacts on tree function are not as well documented. The objective of this study was to examine how stand composition, tree proximity relationships and tree size influence the leaf functional traits of aspen, an early successional species, and subalpine fir, a climax species. We measured foliar nutrients, nonstructural carbohydrates (aspen only), defense chemistry and xylem water potential of aspen and subalpine fir trees in three size classes growing in close proximity or independently from other trees under three stand conditions: aspen dominant, aspen-conifer mixed, and conifer dominant stands. Close proximity of subalpine fir to aspen reduced aspen's storage of starch in foliar tissue by 17% suggesting that competition between these species may have small effects on carbon metabolism in aspen leaves. Simple sugar (glucose + sucrose) concentrations in aspen leaves were slightly higher in larger aspen trees than smaller trees. However, no differences were found in stem water potential, foliar concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, or secondary defense chemicals of aspen or subalpine fir across the gradients of stand composition, tree proximity or tree size. These results suggest that mechanisms of coexistence allow both aspen and subalpine fir to maintain leaf function across a wide range of stand structural characteristics. For aspen, resource sharing through its clonal root system and high resource storage capacity may partially contribute to its functional stability in mixed aspen-conifer stands.

  7. Determination of plasma frequency, damping constant, and size distribution from the complex dielectric function of noble metal nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza Herrera, Luis J.; Arboleda, David Muñetón [Centro de Investigaciones Ópticas (CIOp), (CONICET La Plata-CIC) (Argentina); Schinca, Daniel C.; Scaffardi, Lucía B., E-mail: lucias@ciop.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigaciones Ópticas (CIOp), (CONICET La Plata-CIC) (Argentina); Departamento de Ciencias Básicas, Facultad de Ingeniería, UNLP (Argentina)

    2014-12-21

    This paper develops a novel method for simultaneously determining the plasma frequency ω{sub P}   and the damping constant γ{sub free} in the bulk damped oscillator Drude model, based on experimentally measured real and imaginary parts of the metal refractive index in the IR wavelength range, lifting the usual approximation that restricts frequency values to the UV-deep UV region. Our method was applied to gold, silver, and copper, improving the relative uncertainties in the final values for ω{sub p} (0.5%–1.6%) and for γ{sub free} (3%–8%), which are smaller than those reported in the literature. These small uncertainties in ω{sub p} and γ{sub free} determination yield a much better fit of the experimental complex dielectric function. For the case of nanoparticles (Nps), a series expansion of the Drude expression (which includes ω{sub p} and γ{sub free} determined using our method) enables size-dependent dielectric function to be written as the sum of three terms: the experimental bulk dielectric function plus two size corrective terms, one for free electron, and the other for bound-electron contributions. Finally, size distribution of nanometric and subnanometric gold Nps in colloidal suspension was determined through fitting its experimental optical extinction spectrum using Mie theory based on the previously determined dielectric function. Results are compared with size histogram obtained from Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)

  8. Holliday junction resolvases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Haley D M; West, Stephen C

    2014-09-02

    Four-way DNA intermediates, called Holliday junctions (HJs), can form during meiotic and mitotic recombination, and their removal is crucial for chromosome segregation. A group of ubiquitous and highly specialized structure-selective endonucleases catalyze the cleavage of HJs into two disconnected DNA duplexes in a reaction called HJ resolution. These enzymes, called HJ resolvases, have been identified in bacteria and their bacteriophages, archaea, and eukaryotes. In this review, we discuss fundamental aspects of the HJ structure and their interaction with junction-resolving enzymes. This is followed by a brief discussion of the eubacterial RuvABC enzymes, which provide the paradigm for HJ resolvases in other organisms. Finally, we review the biochemical and structural properties of some well-characterized resolvases from archaea, bacteriophage, and eukaryotes. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  9. Wireless Josephson Junction Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Laura

    2015-03-01

    We report low temperature, microwave transmission measurements on a wireless two- dimensional network of Josephson junction arrays composed of superconductor-insulator -superconductor tunnel junctions. Unlike their biased counterparts, by removing all electrical contacts to the arrays and superfluous microwave components and interconnects in the transmission line, we observe new collective behavior in the transmission spectra. In particular we will show emergent behavior that systematically responds to changes in microwave power at fixed temperature. Likewise we will show the dynamic and collective response of the arrays while tuning the temperature at fixed microwave power. We discuss these spectra in terms of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition and Shapiro steps. We gratefully acknowledge the support Prof. Steven Anlage at the University of Maryland and Prof. Allen Goldman at the University of Minnesota. Physics and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

  10. Turbulent Concentration of MM-Size Particles in the Protoplanetary Nebula: Scaled-Dependent Multiplier Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Hartlep, Thomas; Weston, B.; Estremera, Shariff Kareem

    2014-01-01

    The initial accretion of primitive bodies (asteroids and TNOs) from freely-floating nebula particles remains problematic. Here we focus on the asteroids where constituent particle (read "chondrule") sizes are observationally known; similar arguments will hold for TNOs, but the constituent particles in those regions will be smaller, or will be fluffy aggregates, and are unobserved. Traditional growth-bysticking models encounter a formidable "meter-size barrier" [1] (or even a mm-cm-size barrier [2]) in turbulent nebulae, while nonturbulent nebulae form large asteroids too quickly to explain long spreads in formation times, or the dearth of melted asteroids [3]. Even if growth by sticking could somehow breach the meter size barrier, other obstacles are encountered through the 1-10km size range [4]. Another clue regarding planetesimal formation is an apparent 100km diameter peak in the pre-depletion, pre-erosion mass distribution of asteroids [5]; scenarios leading directly from independent nebula particulates to this size, which avoid the problematic m-km size range, could be called "leapfrog" scenarios [6-8]. The leapfrog scenario we have studied in detail involves formation of dense clumps of aerodynamically selected, typically mm-size particles in turbulence, which can under certain conditions shrink inexorably on 100-1000 orbit timescales and form 10-100km diameter sandpile planetesimals. The typical sizes of planetesimals and the rate of their formation [7,8] are determined by a statistical model with properties inferred from large numerical simulations of turbulence [9]. Nebula turbulence can be described by its Reynolds number Re = L/eta sup(4/3), where L = ETA alpha sup (1/2) the largest eddy scale, H is the nebula gas vertical scale height, and a the nebula turbulent viscosity parameter, and ? is the Kolmogorov or smallest scale in turbulence (typically about 1km), with eddy turnover time t?. In the nebula, Re is far larger than any numerical simulation can

  11. Analysis of speedup as function of block size and cluster size for parallel feed-forward neural networks on a Beowulf cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörchen, Fabian

    2004-03-01

    The performance of feed-forward neural networks trained with the backpropagation algorithm on a dedicated Beowulf cluster is analyzed. The concept of training set parallelism is applied. A new model for run time and speedup prediction is developed. With the model the speedup and efficiency of one iteration of the neural networks can be estimated as a function of block size and cluster size. The model is applied to three example problems representing different applications and network architectures. The estimation of the model has a higher accuracy than traditional methods for run time estimation and can be efficiently calculated. Experiments show that speedup of one iteration does not necessarily translate to a shorter training time toward a given error level. To overcome this problem a heuristic extension to training set parallelism called weight averaging is developed. The results show that training in parallel should only be done on clusters with high performance network connections or a multiprocessor machine. A rule of thumb is given for how much network performance of the cluster is needed to achieve speedup of the training time for a neural network.

  12. Switching and Rectification in Carbon-Nanotube Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Andriotis, Antonis N.; Menon, Madhu; Chernozatonskii, Leonid

    2003-01-01

    Multi-terminal carbon-nanotube junctions are under investigation as candidate components of nanoscale electronic devices and circuits. Three-terminal "Y" junctions of carbon nanotubes (see Figure 1) have proven to be especially interesting because (1) it is now possible to synthesize them in high yield in a controlled manner and (2) results of preliminary experimental and theoretical studies suggest that such junctions could exhibit switching and rectification properties. Following the preliminary studies, current-versus-voltage characteristics of a number of different "Y" junctions of single-wall carbon nanotubes connected to metal wires were computed. Both semiconducting and metallic nanotubes of various chiralities were considered. Most of the junctions considered were symmetric. These computations involved modeling of the quantum electrical conductivity of the carbon nanotubes and junctions, taking account of such complicating factors as the topological defects (pentagons, heptagons, and octagons) present in the hexagonal molecular structures at the junctions, and the effects of the nanotube/wire interfaces. A major component of the computational approach was the use of an efficient Green s function embedding scheme. The results of these computations showed that symmetric junctions could be expected to support both rectification and switching. The results also showed that rectification and switching properties of a junction could be expected to depend strongly on its symmetry and, to a lesser degree, on the chirality of the nanotubes. In particular, it was found that a zigzag nanotube branching at a symmetric "Y" junction could exhibit either perfect rectification or partial rectification (asymmetric current-versus-voltage characteristic, as in the example of Figure 2). It was also found that an asymmetric "Y" junction would not exhibit rectification.

  13. Size-based emphysema cluster analysis on low attenuation area in 3D volumetric CT: comparison with pulmonary functional test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minho; Kim, Namkug; Lee, Sang Min; Seo, Joon Beom; Oh, Sang Young

    2015-03-01

    To quantify low attenuation area (LAA) of emphysematous regions according to cluster size in 3D volumetric CT data of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and to compare these indices with their pulmonary functional test (PFT). Sixty patients with COPD were scanned by a more than 16-multi detector row CT scanner (Siemens Sensation 16 and 64) within 0.75mm collimation. Based on these LAA masks, a length scale analysis to estimate each emphysema LAA's size was performed as follows. At first, Gaussian low pass filter from 30mm to 1mm kernel size with 1mm interval on the mask was performed from large to small size, iteratively. Centroid voxels resistant to the each filter were selected and dilated by the size of the kernel, which was regarded as the specific size emphysema mask. The slopes of area and number of size based LAA (slope of semi-log plot) were analyzed and compared with PFT. PFT parameters including DLco, FEV1, and FEV1/FVC were significantly (all p-value< 0.002) correlated with the slopes (r-values; -0.73, 0.54, 0.69, respectively) and EI (r-values; -0.84, -0.60, -0.68, respectively). In addition, the D independently contributed regression for FEV1 and FEV1/FVC (adjust R sq. of regression study: EI only, 0.70, 0.45; EI and D, 0.71, 0.51, respectively). By the size based LAA segmentation and analysis, we evaluated the Ds of area, number, and distribution of size based LAA, which would be independent factors for predictor of PFT parameters.

  14. Galaxy sizes as a function of environment at intermediate redshift from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Kelkar, Kshitija; Gray, Meghan E; Maltby, David; Vulcani, Benedetta; De Lucia, Gabriella; Poggianti, Bianca M; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    In order to assess whether the environment has a significant effect on galaxy sizes, we compare the mass--size relations of cluster and field galaxies in the $0.4 1$), with early-type/passive galaxies in higher density environments growing earlier. Such dependence disappears at lower redshifts. Therefore, if the reported difference at higher-$z$ is real, the growth of field galaxies has caught up with that of cluster galaxies by $z\\sim1$. Any putative mechanism responsible for galaxy growth has to account for the existence of environmental differences at high redshift and their absence (or weakening) at lower redshifts.

  15. Internal resonances in periodically modulated long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Mygind, Jesper; Ustinov, Alexey V.

    1995-01-01

    Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of long Josephson junctions with a periodic lattice of localized inhomogeneities are studied. The interaction between the moving fluxons and the inhomogeneities causes resonant steps in the IV-curve. Some of these steps are due to a synchronization to resonan...... into account the interaction between the resonance in the sub-junction and the magnetic flux density waves excited in the whole junction is given....... Fiske modes in the sub-junctions formed between the inhomogeneities. The voltage positions of the resonant steps oscillate as function of the applied magnetic field with a period corresponding to the inclusion of one magnetic flux quantum, Φ0=h/2e, per sub-junction. A qualitative explanation that takes...

  16. Design of Steerable Wavelets to Detect Multifold Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Püspöki, Zsuzsanna; Uhlmann, Virginie; Vonesch, Cédric; Unser, Michael

    2016-02-01

    We propose a framework for the detection of junctions in images. Although the detection of edges and key points is a well examined and described area, the multiscale detection of junction centers, especially for odd orders, poses a challenge in pattern analysis. The goal of this paper is to build optimal junction detectors based on 2D steerable wavelets that are polar-separable in the Fourier domain. The approaches we develop are general and can be used for the detection of arbitrary symmetric and asymmetric junctions. The backbone of our construction is a multiscale pyramid with a radial wavelet function where the directional components are represented by circular harmonics and encoded in a shaping matrix. We are able to detect M -fold junctions in different scales and orientations. We provide experimental results on both simulated and real data to demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  17. Low conductance of nickel atomic junctions in hydrogen atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuaishuai; Xie, Yi-Qun; Hu, Yibin

    2017-08-01

    The low conductance of nickel atomic junctions in the hydrogen environment is studied using the nonequilibrium Green's function theory combined with first-principles calculations. The Ni junction bridged by a H2 molecule has a conductance of approximately 0.7 G 0. This conductance is contributed by the anti-bonding state of the H2 molecule, which forms a bonding state with the 3 d orbitals of the nearby Ni atoms. In contrast, the Ni junction bridged by the two single H atoms has a conductance of approximately 1 G 0, which is weakly spin-polarized. The spin-up channels were found to contribute mostly to the conductance at a small junction gap, while the spin-down channels play a dominant role at a larger junction gap.

  18. Fixed-gap tunnel junction for reading DNA nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Pei; Ashcroft, Brian Alan; Song, Weisi; Zhang, Peiming; Biswas, Sovan; Qing, Quan; Yang, Jialing; Nemanich, Robert J; Bai, Jingwei; Smith, Joshua T; Reuter, Kathleen; Balagurusamy, Venkat S K; Astier, Yann; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Lindsay, Stuart

    2014-12-23

    Previous measurements of the electronic conductance of DNA nucleotides or amino acids have used tunnel junctions in which the gap is mechanically adjusted, such as scanning tunneling microscopes or mechanically controllable break junctions. Fixed-junction devices have, at best, detected the passage of whole DNA molecules without yielding chemical information. Here, we report on a layered tunnel junction in which the tunnel gap is defined by a dielectric layer, deposited by atomic layer deposition. Reactive ion etching is used to drill a hole through the layers so that the tunnel junction can be exposed to molecules in solution. When the metal electrodes are functionalized with recognition molecules that capture DNA nucleotides via hydrogen bonds, the identities of the individual nucleotides are revealed by characteristic features of the fluctuating tunnel current associated with single-molecule binding events.

  19. Finite size dependence of scaling functions of the three dimensional O(4) model in an external field

    CERN Document Server

    Engels, J

    2014-01-01

    We calculate universal finite size scaling functions for the order parameter and the longitudinal susceptibility of the three-dimensional O(4) model. The phase transition of this model is supposed to be in the same universality class as the chiral transition of two-flavor QCD. The scaling functions serve as a testing device for QCD simulations on small lattices, where, for example, pseudocritical temperatures are difficult to determine. In addition, we have improved the infinite volume limit parametrization of the scaling functions by using newly generated high statistics data for the 3d O(4) model in the high temperature region on an L=120 lattice.

  20. Functional polythiophene nanoparticles: Size-controlled electropolymerization and ion selective response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Si, P.C.; Chi, Qijin; Li, Z.S.

    2007-01-01

    polymerization to form polymer nanoparticles or clusters by which the size of the polymer nanoparticles can further be controlled electrochemically. The electropolymerization was monitored in situ by scanning tunneling microscopy to unravel the dynamics of the process and possible mechanisms. These are further...

  1. Pricing via functional size: a case study of 77 outsourced projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgens, H.; Gousios, G.; Van Deursen, A.

    2014-01-01

    A medium-sized west-European telecom company experienced a worsening trend in performance, indicating that the organization did not learn from history, in combination with much time and energy spent on preparation and review of project proposals. In order to create more transparency in the supplier

  2. Pharmacokinetics of inhaled monodisperse beclomethasone as a function of particle size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E. Esposito-Festen; P. Zanen (Pieter); H.A.W.M. Tiddens (Harm); J.-W.J. Lammers (Jan-Willem)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAims: For optimal efficacy, antiasthma drugs should be delivered to the desired region in the airways. To date, the optimal particle size for steroids in adults is not known. The aim of the study was to evaluate the pulmonary bioavailability for inhaled beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP)

  3. Quantum-Tuned Two-Junction Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xihua

    2011-01-01

    We report quantum-size-effect tuned tandem solar cells. Our two-junction photovoltaic devices employ light-absorbing material of a single composition and use two rationally-selected nanoparticle sizes to harvest the sun’s broad spectrum.

  4. Design of reduced size long counter with flat response function from few keV to 20 MeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazunga Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a reduced size neutron long counter with improved response function was designed using SuperMC simulation code. The main parts of the reduced size long counter are 3He proportional counter, cylindrical moderators made of polyethylene, chromium metal converter, neutron absorber material and outer aluminum cover. A 1.5 cm thick layer of chromium metal was embedded into the hydrogen-rich moderator to enhance response of the long counter at high neutron energies. The radius and length of the long counter was reduced to 15 cm and 35 cm, respectively. In this design we managed to obtain a flat response function from a few keV to 20 MeV energy range. The angular response function, determined at 0.5 MeV and 14 MeV neutron energies, confirmed that the reduced size long counter designed in this study is not significantly affected by in-scattered neutrons. The reduced size long counter is suitable for use as a standard transfer instrument for monitoring neutron fluence in mono-energetic neutron fields.

  5. Bivariate mass-size relation as a function of morphology as determined by Galaxy Zoo 2 crowdsourced visual classifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Melanie; Scarlata, Claudia; Fortson, Lucy; Willett, Kyle; Galloway, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the mass-size distribution evolves as a function of cosmic time and that this evolution is different between passive and star-forming galaxy populations. However, the devil is in the details and the precise evolution is still a matter of debate since this requires careful comparison between similar galaxy populations over cosmic time while simultaneously taking into account changes in image resolution, rest-frame wavelength, and surface brightness dimming in addition to properly selecting representative morphological samples.Here we present the first step in an ambitious undertaking to calculate the bivariate mass-size distribution as a function of time and morphology. We begin with a large sample (~3 x 105) of SDSS galaxies at z ~ 0.1. Morphologies for this sample have been determined by Galaxy Zoo crowdsourced visual classifications and we split the sample not only by disk- and bulge-dominated galaxies but also in finer morphology bins such as bulge strength. Bivariate distribution functions are the only way to properly account for biases and selection effects. In particular, we quantify the mass-size distribution with a version of the parametric Maximum Likelihood estimator which has been modified to account for measurement errors as well as upper limits on galaxy sizes.

  6. The social network-network: size is predicted by brain structure and function in the amygdala and paralimbic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Der Heide, Rebecca; Vyas, Govinda; Olson, Ingrid R

    2014-12-01

    The social brain hypothesis proposes that the large size of the primate neocortex evolved to support complex and demanding social interactions. Accordingly, recent studies have reported correlations between the size of an individual's social network and the density of gray matter (GM) in regions of the brain implicated in social cognition. However, the reported relationships between GM density and social group size are somewhat inconsistent with studies reporting correlations in different brain regions. One factor that might account for these discrepancies is the use of different measures of social network size (SNS). This study used several measures of SNS to assess the relationships SNS and GM density. The second goal of this study was to test the relationship between social network measures and functional brain activity. Participants performed a social closeness task using photos of their friends and unknown people. Across the VBM and functional magnetic resonance imaging analyses, individual differences in SNS were consistently related to structural and functional differences in three regions: the left amygdala, right amygdala and the right entorhinal/ventral anterior temporal cortex.

  7. Simultaneous size control and surface functionalization of titania nanoparticles through bioadhesion-assisted bio-inspired mineralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Jiafu; Yang Dong; Jiang Zhongyi, E-mail: zhyjiang@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin University, Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology (China); Jiang Yanjun [Hebei University of Technology, Department of Bioengineering, School of Chemical Engineering (China); Liang Yanpeng; Zhu Yuanyuan; Wang Xiaoli; Wang Huihui [Tianjin University, Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology (China)

    2012-09-15

    Simultaneous size control and surface functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) are often desired for their efficient applications in (bio)catalysis, drug and/or DNA delivery, and photonics, etc. In this study, a novel strategy 'bioadhesion-assisted bio-inspired mineralization (BABM)' was put forward to prepare titania nanoparticles (TiNPs) with tunable particle size and multiple surface functionality. Specifically, the initial formation and subsequent growth of TiNPs were enabled by arginine via bio-inspired mineralization, while the mineralization process was terminated through the addition of the pre-polymerized dopa (oligodopa). By adjusting the addition time of oligodopa, the size of TiNPs could be facilely tailored from ca. 30-350 nm; meanwhile, the surface of TiNPs could be functionalized by oligodopa through metal-catechol coordination interaction (a typical bioadhesion phenomenon). In other words, oligodopa coating could not only exquisitely control the size of TiNPs, but also render TiNPs surface multifunctional groups for secondary treatment such as conjugating proteins through amine-catechol adduct formation. Hopefully, this BABM approach will construct a versatile platform for green and facile synthesis of inorganic NPs, in particular transition metal oxide NPs.

  8. Anterior tooth root morphology and size in Neanderthals: taxonomic and functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cabec, Adeline; Gunz, Philipp; Kupczik, Kornelius; Braga, José; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2013-03-01

    Comparing modern humans and Neanderthals, we have previously shown that recent modern humans (RMH) and Neanderthals differ in anterior root lengths, and that this difference cannot be explained by group differences in overall mandibular size. Here, we first document the evolutionary changes of root size and shape of the anterior upper and lower dentition in a broad chronological and geographical framework. We then use the size and shape differences between RMH and Neanderthals to classify several isolated teeth from Kebara cave and Steinheim, and to interpret the anterior tooth roots of the Tabun C2 mandible. Our samples comprise permanent mandibular and maxillary incisors and canines from early Homo, Neanderthals, as well as extant and fossil modern humans (N = 359). In addition to root length, we measured cervical root diameter and area, total root volume, root pulp volume and root surface area from μCT scans. We quantified root shape variation using geometric morphometrics. Our results show that Neanderthals have not only significantly larger anterior roots than RMH overall, but also different root shapes for each tooth type. In the context of the 'teeth-as-tools' hypothesis, this could be an adaptation to better sustain high or frequent loads on the front teeth. We demonstrate that the two isolated incisors stored with the Steinheim skull are very likely recent. Tabun C2 shows an anterior dentition similar in size and shape to Neanderthals while its molar roots are non-Neanderthal. Two of the five isolated teeth from Kebara are classified as Neanderthals. Interestingly, early modern humans overlap with Neanderthals and RMH in root size and shape. Anterior roots of the Lower and Middle Pleistocene specimens are at least as large as Neanderthals, suggesting that Neanderthals retained a primitive pattern, which should prompt caution in the assessment of the earliest forms of modern humans.

  9. The role of population size, pleiotropy and fitness effects of mutations in the evolution of overlapping gene functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A

    2000-03-01

    Sheltered from deleterious mutations, genes with overlapping or partially redundant functions may be important sources of novel gene functions. While most partially redundant genes originated in gene duplications, it is much less clear why genes with overlapping functions have been retained, in some cases for hundreds of millions of years. A case in point is the many partially redundant genes in vertebrates, the result of ancient gene duplications in primitive chordates. Their persistence and ubiquity become surprising when it is considered that duplicate and original genes often diversify very rapidly, especially if the action of natural selection is involved. Are overlapping gene functions perhaps maintained because of their protective role against otherwise deleterious mutations? There are two principal objections against this hypothesis, which are the main subject of this article. First, because overlapping gene functions are maintained in populations by a slow process of "second order" selection, population sizes need to be very high for this process to be effective. It is shown that even in small populations, pleiotropic mutations that affect more than one of a gene's functions simultaneously can slow the mutational decay of functional overlap after a gene duplication by orders of magnitude. Furthermore, brief and transient increases in population size may be sufficient to maintain functional overlap. The second objection regards the fact that most naturally occurring mutations may have much weaker fitness effects than the rather drastic "knock-out" mutations that lead to detection of partially redundant functions. Given weak fitness effects of most mutations, is selection for the buffering effect of functional overlap strong enough to compensate for the diversifying force exerted by mutations? It is shown that the extent of functional overlap maintained in a population is not only independent of the mutation rate, but also independent of the average fitness

  10. Point correlation dimension can reveal functional changes caused by gap junction blockers in the 4-aminopyridine in vivo rat epilepsy model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardanhazy, Anett [Department of Neurology, University of Szeged, Semmelweis u. 6, Szeged H-6725 (Hungary); Molnar, Mark [Department of Psychophysiology, Institute for Psychology of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 398, Budapest H-1394 (Hungary)], E-mail: molnar@cogpsyphy.hu; Jardanhazy, Tamas [Department of Neurology, University of Szeged, Semmelweis u. 6, Szeged H-6725 (Hungary)], E-mail: jt@nepsy.szote.u-szeged.hu

    2009-04-15

    The contribution of gap junction (GJ) blockers to seizure initiation was reexamined by means of an analysis on nonlinear dynamics with point correlation dimension (PD2i) at as well as around the primary focus, and mirror focus in an already active 4-aminopyridine-induced in vivo epilepsy model. From the data base of the ECoGs of anesthetized adult rats treated with quinine, a selective blocker of Cx36, and in combination with an additional broad-spectrum GJ blocker, carbenoxolone, 14 cases of each condition were reexamined with a stationarity insensitive nonlinear PD2i method. The blockade of the Cx36 channels decreased the usual drop of the point correlation dimension at the beginning of the seizures, and this was enhanced by the additional use of the global blocker carbenoxolone. The so-called characteristic DC shift just prior to seizure onset denotes a low dimensional seizure event and the recognizable seizures display very variable, rapidly changing dynamics, as revealed by the PD2i analysis. This nonlinear PD2i analysis demonstrated that the different GJ blockers in the already active epileptic model helped seizure initiation, but exerted inhibitory effects on the seizure onset itself, acting differently on the local components of the network organization generating seizure discharges, possibly changing the coupling strengths and time delays in the GJ-s.

  11. A Point Mutation in the Exon Junction Complex Factor Y14 Disrupts Its Function in mRNA Cap Binding and Translation Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Tzu-Wei; Lee, Kuo-Ming; Lou, Yuan-Chao; Lu, Chia-Chen; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2016-04-15

    Eukaryotic mRNA biogenesis involves a series of interconnected steps mediated by RNA-binding proteins. The exon junction complex core protein Y14 is required for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and promotes translation. Moreover, Y14 binds the cap structure of mRNAs and inhibits the activity of the decapping enzyme Dcp2. In this report, we show that an evolutionarily conserved tryptophan residue (Trp-73) of Y14 is critical for its binding to the mRNA cap structure. A Trp-73 mutant (W73V) bound weakly to mRNAs and failed to protect them from degradation. However, this mutant could still interact with the NMD and mRNA degradation factors and retained partial NMD activity. In addition, we found that the W73V mutant could not interact with translation initiation factors. Overexpression of W73V suppressed reporter mRNA translation in vitro and in vivo and reduced the level of a set of nascent proteins. These results reveal a residue of Y14 that confers cap-binding activity and is essential for Y14-mediated enhancement of translation. Finally, we demonstrated that Y14 may selectively and differentially modulate protein biosynthesis.

  12. A novel junctional adhesion molecule A (CgJAM-A-L) from oyster (Crassostrea gigas) functions as pattern recognition receptor and opsonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Conghui; Wang, Mengqiang; Jiang, Shuai; Wang, Lingling; Chen, Hao; Liu, Zhaoqun; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2016-02-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule (JAM), a subfamily of immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) with a couple of immunoglobulin domains, can act as regulator in homeostasis and inflammation of vertebrates. In the present study, a structural homolog of JAM-A (designated CgJAM-A-L) was screened out from oyster, Crassostrea gigas, through a search of JAM-A D1 domain (N-terminal Ig domain in JAM-A). The cDNA of CgJAM-A-L was of 1188 bp encoding a predicted polypeptide of 395 amino acids. The immunoreactive area of CgJAM-A-L mainly distributed over the plasma membrane of hemocytes. After Vibro splendidus or tumor necrosis factor (CgTNF-1) stimulation, the mRNA transcripts of CgJAM-A-L in hemocytes increased significantly by 4.46-fold and 9.00-fold (p oyster hemocytes towards Gram-negative bacteria V. anguillarum and yeast P. pastoris were significantly enhanced after the incubation of rCgJAM-A-L, and even increased more significantly after the pre-incubation of rCgJAM-A-L with microbes (p oyster. Moreover, as the most primitive specie with homolog of JAMs, the information of CgJAM-A-L in oyster would provide useful clues for the evolutionary study of JAMs and immunoglobulins.

  13. Early Activation of MAPK p44/42 Is Partially Involved in DON-Induced Disruption of the Intestinal Barrier Function and Tight Junction Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springler, Alexandra; Hessenberger, Sabine; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Mayer, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), produced by the plant pathogens Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum, is one of the most common mycotoxins, contaminating cereal and cereal-derived products. Although worldwide contamination of food and feed poses health threats to humans and animals, pigs are particularly susceptible to this mycotoxin. DON derivatives, such as deepoxy-deoxynivalenol (DOM-1), are produced by bacterial transformation of certain intestinal bacteria, which are naturally occurring or applied as feed additives. Intestinal epithelial cells are the initial barrier against these food- and feed-borne toxins. The present study confirms DON-induced activation of MAPK p44/42 and inhibition of p44/42 by MAPK-inhibitor U0126 monoethanolate. Influence of DON and DOM-1 on transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), viability and expression of seven tight junction proteins (TJ), as well as the potential of U0126 to counteract DON-induced effects, was assessed. While DOM-1 showed no effect, DON significantly reduced TEER of differentiated IPEC-J2 and decreased expression of claudin-1 and -3, while leaving claudin-4; ZO-1, -2, and -3 and occludin unaffected. Inhibition of p44/42 counteracted DON-induced TEER decrease and restored claudin-3, but not claudin-1 expression. Therefore, effects of DON on TEER and claudin-3 are at least partially p44/42 mediated, while effects on viability and claudin-1 are likely mediated via alternative pathways. PMID:27618100

  14. Junction conditions of cosmological perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Tomita, K

    2004-01-01

    The behavior of perturbations is studied in cosmological models which consist of two different homogeneous regions connected in a spherical shell boundary. The junction conditions for the metric perturbations and the displacements of the shell boundary are analyzed and the surface densities of the perturbed energy and momentum in the shell are derived, using Mukohyama's gauge-invariant formalism and the Israel discontinuity condition. In both homogeneous regions the perturbations of scalar, vector and tensor types are expanded using the 3-dimensional harmonic functions, but the model coupling among them is caused in the shell by the inhomogeneity. By treating the perturbations with odd and even parities separately, it is found, however, that we can have consistent displacements and surface densities for given metric parturbations

  15. Effects of functional movement strength training on strength, muscle size, kinematics, and motor function in cerebral palsy: a 3-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Ah; You, Joshua H; Kim, Dong A; Lee, Min Jin; Hwang, Pil Woo; Lee, Nam Gi; Park, Jeong Joon; Lee, Dong Ryul; Kim, Hyun-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the long-term effects of comprehensive hand repetitive intensive strengthening training (CHRIST) on strength, morphological muscle size, kinematics, and associated motor functional changes in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Ten children (5 boys, 5 girls; age range, 6-11 years, mean age, 8.6 years) participated in the study. The children were classified according to the Manual Ability Classification System: 5 were Level II, 2 were Level III, and 3 were Level IV. Quantitative biomechanical measurements were performed to determine muscle strength, muscle size, kinematics (normalized jerk score), and motor function using a dynamometer, ultrasound, Vicon motion analysis, and standardized clinical tests (Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test, Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test, Functional Independence Measure, and Pediatric Motor Activity Log), respectively. Muscle strength, muscle size, kinematics, and motor function significantly improved after a 10-week intervention (3 times a week), and the long-term effects remained even at the 3-month follow-up. In conclusion, this is the first study highlighting the long-term efficacy of upper extremity strength training using the novel CHRIST system in children with CP, which will potentially open up new horizons for effective management in pediatric neurorehabilitation.

  16. Tight Junctions in Salivary Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga J. Baker

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial cell tight junctions (TJs consist of a narrow belt-like structure in the apical region of the lateral plasma membrane that circumferentially binds each cell to its neighbor. TJs are found in tissues that are involved in polarized secretions, absorption functions, and maintaining barriers between blood and interstitial fluids. The morphology, permeability, and ion selectivity of TJ vary among different types of tissues and species. TJs are very dynamic structures that assemble, grow, reorganize, and disassemble during physiological or pathological events. Several studies have indicated the active role of TJ in intestinal, renal, and airway epithelial function; however, the functional significance of TJ in salivary gland epithelium is poorly understood. Interactions between different combinations of the TJ family (each with their own unique regulatory proteins define tissue specificity and functions during physiopathological processes; however, these interaction patterns have not been studied in salivary glands. The purpose of this review is to analyze some of the current data regarding the regulatory components of the TJ that could potentially affect cellular functions of the salivary epithelium.

  17. Evaluation of different sized blood sampling tubes for thromboelastometry, platelet function, and platelet count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jo Bønding; Pistor-Riebold, Thea Unger; Knudsen, Ingrid Hell;

    2014-01-01

    count remained stable using a 3.6 mL tube during the entire observation period of 120 min (p=0.74), but decreased significantly after 60 min when using tubes smaller than 3.6 mL (pblood sampling tubes. Therefore, 1.8 mL tubes should...... be preferred for RoTEM® analyses in order to minimise the volume of blood drawn. With regard to platelet aggregation analysed by impedance aggregometry tubes of different size cannot be used interchangeably. If platelet count is determined later than 10 min after blood sampling using tubes containing citrate......Background: To minimise the volume of blood used for diagnostic procedures, especially in children, we investigated whether the size of sample tubes affected whole blood coagulation analyses. Methods: We included 20 healthy individuals for rotational thromboelastometry (RoTEM®) analyses...

  18. Multiobjective evolutionary optimization of the size, shape, and position parameters of radial basis function networks for function approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, J; Rojas, I; Ortega, J; Pomares, H; Fernandez, F J; Diaz, A F

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a multiobjective evolutionary algorithm to optimize radial basis function neural networks (RBFNNs) in order to approach target functions from a set of input-output pairs. The procedure allows the application of heuristics to improve the solution of the problem at hand by including some new genetic operators in the evolutionary process. These new operators are based on two well-known matrix transformations: singular value decomposition (SVD) and orthogonal least squares (OLS), which have been used to define new mutation operators that produce local or global modifications in the radial basis functions (RBFs) of the networks (the individuals in the population in the evolutionary procedure). After analyzing the efficiency of the different operators, we have shown that the global mutation operators yield an improved procedure to adjust the parameters of the RBFNNs.

  19. Impact of the timing of metoprolol administration during STEMI on infarct size and ventricular function

    OpenAIRE

    García Ruiz, José María; Fernández Jiménez, Rodrigo; García Álvarez, Ana; Pizarro, Gonzalo; Galán Arriola, Carlos; Fernández-Friera, Leticia; Mateos, Alonso; Nuño Ayala, Mario; Agüero, Jaume; Sánchez González, Javier; García Prieto, Jaime; López Melgar, Beatriz; Martínez Tenorio, Pedro; López Martín, Gonzalo J.; Macías, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Pre-reperfusion administration of intravenous (IV) metoprolol reduces infarct size in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). This study sought to determine how this cardioprotective effect is influenced by the timing of metoprolol therapy having either a long or short metoprolol bolus-to-reperfusion interval. We performed a post hoc analysis of the METOCARD-CNIC (effect of METOprolol of CARDioproteCtioN during an acute myocardial InfarCtion) trial, which randomized anterior STEMI...

  20. Impact of the Timing of Metoprolol Administration During STEMI on Infarct Size and Ventricular Function.

    OpenAIRE

    Mateos Rodríguez, Alonso

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pre-reperfusion administration of intravenous (IV) metoprolol reduces infarct size in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). OBJECTIVES This study sought to determine how this cardioprotective effect is influenced by the timing of metoprolol therapy having either a long or short metoprolol bolus-to-reperfusion interval. METHODS We performed a post hoc analysis of the METOCARD-CNIC (effect of METOprolol of CARDioproteCtioN during an acute myocardial Inf...

  1. Sustained inhibition of rat myometrial gap junctions and contractions by lindane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grindatti Carmen M

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gap junctions increase in size and abundance coincident with parturition, forming an intercellular communication network that permits the uterus to develop the forceful, coordinated contractions necessary for delivery of the fetus. Lindane, a pesticide used in the human and veterinary treatment of scabies and lice as well as in agricultural applications, inhibits uterine contractions in vitro, inhibits myometrial gap junctions, and has been associated with prolonged gestation length in rats. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether brief exposures to lindane would elicit sustained inhibition of rat uterine contractile activity and myometrial gap junction intercellular communication. Methods To examine effects on uterine contraction, longitudinal uterine strips isolated from late gestation (day 20 rats were exposed to lindane in muscle baths and monitored for changes in spontaneous phasic contractions during and after exposure to lindane. Lucifer yellow dye transfer between myometrial cells in culture was used to monitor gap junction intercellular communication. Results During a 1-h exposure, 10 micro M and 100 micro M lindane decreased peak force and frequency of uterine contraction but 1 micro M lindane did not. After removal of the exposure buffer, contraction force remained significantly depressed in uterine strips exposed to 100 micro M lindane, returning to less than 50% basal levels 5 h after cessation of lindane exposure. In cultured myometrial myocytes, significant sustained inhibition of Lucifer yellow dye transfer was observed 24 h after lindane exposures as brief as 10 min and as low as 0.1 micro M lindane. Conclusion Brief in vitro exposures to lindane have long-term effects on myometrial functions that are necessary for parturition, inhibiting spontaneous phasic contractions in late gestation rat uterus and gap junction intercellular communication in myometrial cell cultures.

  2. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  3. Growth and characterization of ZnO multipods on functional surfaces with different sizes and shapes of Ag particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Kamalianfar; S A Halim; Mahmoud Godarz Naseri; M Navasery; Fasih Ud Din; J A M Zahedi; Kasra Behzad

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional ZnO multipods are successfully synthesized on functional substrates using the vapor transport method in a quartz tube.The functional surfaces,which include two different distributions of Ag nanoparticles and a layer of commercial Ag nanowires,are coated onto silicon substrates before the growth of ZnO nanostructures.The structures and morphologies of the ZnO/Ag heterostructures are investigated using X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy.The sizes and shapes of the Ag particles affect the growth rates and initial nucleations of the ZnO structures,resulting in different numbers and shapes of multipods.They also influence the orientation and growth quality of the rods.The optical properties are studied by photoluminescence,UV-vis,and Raman spectroscopy.The results indicate that the surface plasmon resonance strongly depends on the sizes and shapes of the Ag particles.

  4. A two-level parallel direct search implementation for arbitrarily sized objective functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, S.A.; Shadid, N.; Moffat, H.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    In the past, many optimization schemes for massively parallel computers have attempted to achieve parallel efficiency using one of two methods. In the case of large and expensive objective function calculations, the optimization itself may be run in serial and the objective function calculations parallelized. In contrast, if the objective function calculations are relatively inexpensive and can be performed on a single processor, then the actual optimization routine itself may be parallelized. In this paper, a scheme based upon the Parallel Direct Search (PDS) technique is presented which allows the objective function calculations to be done on an arbitrarily large number (p{sub 2}) of processors. If, p, the number of processors available, is greater than or equal to 2p{sub 2} then the optimization may be parallelized as well. This allows for efficient use of computational resources since the objective function calculations can be performed on the number of processors that allow for peak parallel efficiency and then further speedup may be achieved by parallelizing the optimization. Results are presented for an optimization problem which involves the solution of a PDE using a finite-element algorithm as part of the objective function calculation. The optimum number of processors for the finite-element calculations is less than p/2. Thus, the PDS method is also parallelized. Performance comparisons are given for a nCUBE 2 implementation.

  5. Polyphosphonium-based ion bipolar junction transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsson, Erik O; Tybrandt, Klas; Berggren, Magnus

    2014-11-01

    Advancements in the field of electronics during the past few decades have inspired the use of transistors in a diversity of research fields, including biology and medicine. However, signals in living organisms are not only carried by electrons but also through fluxes of ions and biomolecules. Thus, in order to implement the transistor functionality to control biological signals, devices that can modulate currents of ions and biomolecules, i.e., ionic transistors and diodes, are needed. One successful approach for modulation of ionic currents is to use oppositely charged ion-selective membranes to form so called ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs). Unfortunately, overall IBJT device performance has been hindered due to the typical low mobility of ions, large geometries of the ion bipolar junction materials, and the possibility of electric field enhanced (EFE) water dissociation in the junction. Here, we introduce a novel polyphosphonium-based anion-selective material into npn-type IBJTs. The new material does not show EFE water dissociation and therefore allows for a reduction of junction length down to 2 μm, which significantly improves the switching performance of the ion transistor to 2 s. The presented improvement in speed as well the simplified design will be useful for future development of advanced iontronic circuits employing IBJTs, for example, addressable drug-delivery devices.

  6. Transmembrane potentials of canine AV junctional tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, W W

    1986-06-01

    The atrioventricular (AV) junction comprises the AV node, His bundle (HB), and specialized tissues proximal to the node called paranodal fibers (PNF). In the present study, an in vitro, dissection-exposed canine right atrial (RA), transitional fiber (TF), AV junctional preparation was used. The TF and PNF formed a pathway running along the base of the septal cusp of the tricuspid valve (SCTV). In the first experiment, impulses elicited at the RA were monitored to propagate sequentially through the TF, PNF, AV node, and then the HB. This functional evidence supports the concept that a conduction pathway connecting the RA and the AV node exists along the base of the SCTV. This internodal pathway is referred to as the septal cusp pathway. In another experiment, transmembrane potentials and Vmax were determined on each of the AV junctional tissues. Results showed that PNF had the lowest Vmax (2.5 V/sec), followed by AV node (7.0 V/sec) and HB (33 V/sec). This finding showed that PNF, and not the AV node, has the lowest Vmax, suggesting that the PNF has the lowest conductivity among the AV junctional tissues, and this study advances our understanding on the mechanism of AV conduction delay in dog hearts.

  7. A sea-state based source function for size- and composition-resolved marine aerosol production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Long

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A parameterization for the size- and composition-resolved production fluxes of nascent marine aerosol was developed from prior experimental observations and extrapolated to ambient conditions based on estimates of air entrainment by the breaking of wind-driven ocean waves. Production of particulate organic carbon (OCaer was parameterized based on Langmuir equilibrium-type association of organic matter to bubble plumes in seawater and resulting aerosol as constrained by measurements of aerosol produced from productive and oligotrophic seawater. This novel approach is the first to parameterize size- and composition-resolved aerosol production based on explicit evaluation of wind-driven air entrainment/detrainment fluxes and chlorophyll-a as a proxy for surfactants in surface seawater. Production fluxes were simulated globally with an eight aerosol-size-bin version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.5.07. Simulated production fluxes fell within the range of published estimates based on observationally constrained parameterizations. Because the parameterization does not consider contributions from spume drops, the simulated global mass flux (1.5×103 Tg y−1 is near the lower end of published estimates. The simulated production of aerosol number (1.4×106 cm−2 s−1 and OCaer (29 Tg C y−1 fall near the upper end of published estimates and suggest that primary marine aerosols may have greater influences on the physicochemical evolution of the troposphere, radiative transfer and climate, and associated feedbacks on the surface ocean than suggested by previous model studies.

  8. Using CPE Function to Size Capacitor Storage for Electric Vehicles and Quantifying Battery Degradation during Different Driving Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Cong Zhang; Haitao Min; Yuanbin Yu; Dai Wang; Justin Luke; Daniel Opila; Samveg Saxena

    2016-01-01

    Range anxiety and battery cycle life are two major factors which restrict the development of electric vehicles. Battery degradation can be reduced by adding supercapacitors to create a Hybrid Energy Storage System. This paper proposes a systematic approach to configure the hybrid energy storage system and quantifies the battery degradation for electric vehicles when using supercapacitors. A continuous power-energy function is proposed to establish supercapacitor size based on national househo...

  9. Using CPE Function to Size Capacitor Storage for Electric Vehicles and Quantifying Battery Degradation during Different Driving Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Cong Zhang; Haitao Min; Yuanbin Yu; Dai Wang; Justin Luke; Daniel Opila; Samveg Saxena

    2016-01-01

    Range anxiety and battery cycle life are two major factors which restrict the development of electric vehicles. Battery degradation can be reduced by adding supercapacitors to create a Hybrid Energy Storage System. This paper proposes a systematic approach to configure the hybrid energy storage system and quantifies the battery degradation for electric vehicles when using supercapacitors. A continuous power-energy function is proposed to establish supercapacitor size based on national househo...

  10. Creating Sub-50 Nm Nanofluidic Junctions in PDMS Microfluidic Chip via Self-Assembly Process of Colloidal Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xi; Syed, Abeer; Mao, Pan; Han, Jongyoon; Song, Yong-Ak

    2016-03-13

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is the prevailing building material to make microfluidic devices due to its ease of molding and bonding as well as its transparency. Due to the softness of the PDMS material, however, it is challenging to use PDMS for building nanochannels. The channels tend to collapse easily during plasma bonding. In this paper, we present an evaporation-driven self-assembly method of silica colloidal nanoparticles to create nanofluidic junctions with sub-50 nm pores between two microchannels. The pore size as well as the surface charge of the nanofluidic junction is tunable simply by changing the colloidal silica bead size and surface functionalization outside of the assembled microfluidic device in a vial before the self-assembly process. Using the self-assembly of nanoparticles with a bead size of 300 nm, 500 nm, and 900 nm, it was possible to fabricate a porous membrane with a pore size of ~45 nm, ~75 nm and ~135 nm, respectively. Under electrical potential, this nanoporous membrane initiated ion concentration polarization (ICP) acting as a cation-selective membrane to concentrate DNA by ~1,700 times within 15 min. This non-lithographic nanofabrication process opens up a new opportunity to build a tunable nanofluidic junction for the study of nanoscale transport processes of ions and molecules inside a PDMS microfluidic chip.

  11. Scattering form factors for self-assembled network junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, T.; Safran, S. A.; Sottmann, T.; Strey, R.

    2007-11-01

    The equilibrium microstructures in microemulsions and other self-assembled systems show complex, connected shapes such as symmetric bicontinuous spongelike structures and asymmetric bicontinuous networks formed by cylinders interconnected at junctions. In microemulsions, these cylinder network microstructures may mediate the structural transition from a spherical or globular phase to the bicontinuous microstructure. To understand the structural and statistical properties of such cylinder network microstructures as measured by scattering experiments, models are needed to extract the real-space structure from the scattering data. In this paper, we calculate the scattering functions appropriate for cylinder network microstructures. We focus on such networks that contain a high density of network junctions that connect the cylindrical elements. In this limit, the network microstructure can be regarded as an assembly of randomly oriented, closed packed network junctions (i.e., the cylinder scattering contributions are neglected). Accordingly, the scattering spectrum of the network microstructure can be calculated as the product of the junction number density, the junction form factor, which describes the scattering from the surface of a single junction, and a structure factor, which describes the local correlations of different junctions due to junction interactions (including their excluded volume). This approach is applied to analyze the scattering data from a bicontinuous microemulsion with equal volumes of water and oil. In a second approach, we included the cylinder scattering contribution in the junction form factor by calculating the scattering intensity of Y junctions to which three rods with spherical cross section are attached. The respective theoretical predictions are compared with results of neutron scattering measurements on a water-in-oil microemulsion with a connected microstructure.

  12. Magnetic domain wall engineering in a nanoscale permalloy junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junlin; Zhang, Xichao; Lu, Xianyang; Zhang, Jason; Yan, Yu; Ling, Hua; Wu, Jing; Zhou, Yan; Xu, Yongbing

    2017-08-01

    Nanoscale magnetic junctions provide a useful approach to act as building blocks for magnetoresistive random access memories (MRAM), where one of the key issues is to control the magnetic domain configuration. Here, we study the domain structure and the magnetic switching in the Permalloy (Fe20Ni80) nanoscale magnetic junctions with different thicknesses by using micromagnetic simulations. It is found that both the 90-° and 45-° domain walls can be formed between the junctions and the wire arms depending on the thickness of the device. The magnetic switching fields show distinct thickness dependencies with a broad peak varying from 7 nm to 22 nm depending on the junction sizes, and the large magnetic switching fields favor the stability of the MRAM operation.

  13. Electronic Structure of Silicon Nanocrystals as a Function of Particle Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Buuren, T. W. H.; Dinh, L. N.; Jimenez, I.; Chase, L. L.; Terminello, L. J.; Carlisle, J. A.; Callcott, T. A.; Grush, M.; Jia, J. J.; Ederer, D. L.; Himpsel, F. J.

    1997-03-01

    X-ray absorption, photoemission, and soft x-ray fluorescence were measured with synchrotron radiation on thin films of Si nanoclusters. These clusters were synthesized in situ by thermal evaporation of Si in an Ar buffer gas followed by subsequent exposure to atomic hydrogen to passivate the surface. The size distribution for these clusters were measured using STM and AFM and ranged from 1 - 10's of nanometers in mean diameter. Blue shifts of the conduction band as large as 0.38 eV were observed for clusters with a 1.5 nM mean diameter. Size related valence band shifts were also observed in the nanocrystals and are consistent with the conduction band shifts and were compared to recent theories predicting quantum confinement effects in the bandgap of silicon nanostructures. This work was supported by the OBES, DOE, at LLNL under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48, the NSF, and the Spanish Ministerio de Educacion y Ciencia. This work was done at the ALS, LBNL and SSRL which are supported by the Department of Energy.

  14. Holographic s-wave and p-wave Josephson junction with backreaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Qiang; Liu, Shuai

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we study the holographic models of s-wave and p-wave Josephoson junction away from probe limit in (3+1)-dimensional spacetime, respectively. With the backreaction of the matter, we obtained the anisotropic black hole solution with the condensation of matter fields. We observe that the critical temperature of Josephoson junction decreases with increasing backreaction. In addition to this, the tunneling current and condenstion of Josephoson junction become smaller as backreaction grows larger, but the relationship between current and phase difference still holds for sine function. Moreover, condenstion of Josephoson junction deceases with increasing width of junction exponentially.

  15. Holographic s-wave and p-wave Josephson junction with backreaction

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yong-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the holographic models of s-wave and p-wave Josephoson junction away from probe limit in (3+1)-dimensional spacetime, respectively. With the backreaction of the matter, we obtained the anisotropic black hole solution with the condensation of matter fields. We observe that the critical temperature of Josephoson junction decreases with increasing backreaction. In addition to this, the tunneling current and condenstion of Josephoson junction become smaller as backreaction grows larger, but the relationship between current and phase difference still holds for sine function. Moreover, condenstion of Josephoson junction deceases with increasing width of junction exponentially.

  16. The dose response relation for rat spinal cord paralysis analyzed in terms of the effective size of the functional subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamus-Górka, Magdalena; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Brahme, Anders; Lind, Bengt K.

    2008-11-01

    Radiobiological models for estimating normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) are increasingly used in order to quantify or optimize the clinical outcome of radiation therapy. A good NTCP model should fulfill at least the following two requirements: (a) it should predict the sigmoid shape of the corresponding dose-response curve and (b) it should accurately describe the probability of a specified response for arbitrary non-uniform dose delivery for a given endpoint as accurately as possible, i.e. predict the volume dependence. In recent studies of the volume effect of a rat spinal cord after irradiation with narrow and broad proton beams the authors claim that none of the existing NTCP models is able to describe their results. Published experimental data have been used here to try to quantify the change in the effective dose (D50) causing 50% response for different field sizes. The present study was initiated to describe the induction of white matter necrosis in a rat spinal cord after irradiation with narrow proton beams in terms of the mean dose to the effective volume of the functional subunit (FSU). The physically delivered dose distribution was convolved with a function describing the effective size or, more accurately, the sensitivity distribution of the FSU to obtain the effective mean dose deposited in it. This procedure allows the determination of the mean D50 value of the FSUs of a certain size which is of interest for example if the cell nucleus of the oligodendrocyte is the sensitive target. Using the least-squares method to compare the effective doses for different sizes of the functional subunits with the experimental data the best fit was obtained with a length of about 9 mm. For the non-uniform dose distributions an effective FSU length of 8 mm gave the optimal fit with the probit dose-response model. The method could also be used to interpret the so-called bath and shower experiments where the heterogeneous dose delivery was used in the

  17. Suppression of Andreev conductance in a topological insulator-superconductor nanostep junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi-Jie, Zheng; Jun-Tao, Song; Yu-Xian, Li

    2016-03-01

    When two three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs) are brought close to each other with their surfaces aligned, the surfaces form a line junction. Similarly, three TI surfaces, not lying in a single plane, can form an atomic-scale nanostep junction. In this paper, Andreev reflection in a TI-TI-superconductor nanostep junction is investigated theoretically. Because of the existence of edge states along each line junction, the conductance for a nanostep junction is suppressed. When the incident energy (ɛ) of an electron is larger than the superconductor gap (Δ), the Andreev conductance in a step junction is less than unity while for a plane junction it is unity. The Andreev conductance is found to depend on the height of the step junction. The Andreev conductance exhibits oscillatory behavior as a function of the junction height with the amplitude of the oscillations remaining unchanged when ɛ = 0, but decreasing for ɛ = Δ, which is different from the case of the plane junction. The height of the step is therefore an important parameter for Andreev reflection in nanostep junctions, and plays a role similar to that of the delta potential barrier in normal metal-superconductor plane junctions. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204065 and 11474085) and the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant Nos. A2013205168 and A2014205005).

  18. Boson Josephson Junction with Trapped Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, S.; Smerzi, A.; Fantoni, S.; Shenoy, S. R.

    We consider coherent atomic tunneling between two weakly coupled Bose-Einstein condensates at T=0 in a double-well trap. The condensate dynamics of the macroscopic amplitudes in the two wells is modeled by two Gross-Pitaevskii equations (GPE) coupled by a tunneling matrix element. Analytic elliptic function solutions are obtained for the time evolution of the inter-well fractional population imbalance z(t) (related to the condensate phase difference) of the Boson Josephson junction (BJJ). Surprisingly, the neutral-atom BJJ shows (non-sinusoidal generalizations of) effects seen in charged-electron superconductor Josephson junctions (SJJ). The BJJ elliptic-function behavior has a singular dependence on a GPE parameter ratio Λ at a critical ratio Λ=Λc, beyond which a novel 'macroscopic quantum self-trapping' effect sets in with a non-zero time-averaged imbalance ≠0.

  19. Non-Lagrangian theories from brane junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Ling [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Mitev, Vladimir [Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Mathematik und Inst. fuer Physik; Pomoni, Elli [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Taki, Masato [RIKEN Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan). Mathematical Physics Lab.; Yagi, Futoshi [International School of Advanced Studies (SISSA), Trieste (Italy); INFN, Trieste (Italy); Korea Institute for Advanced Study (KIAS), Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this article we use 5-brane junctions to study the 5D T{sub N} SCFTs corresponding to the 5D N=1 uplift of the 4D N=2 strongly coupled gauge theories, which are obtained by compactifying N M5 branes on a sphere with three full punctures. Even though these theories have no Lagrangian description, by using the 5-brane junctions proposed by Benini, Benvenuti and Tachikawa, we are able to derive their Seiberg-Witten curves and Nekrasov partition functions. We cross-check our results with the 5D superconformal index proposed by Kim, Kim and Lee. Through the AGTW correspondence, we discuss the relations between 5D superconformal indices and n-point functions of the q-deformed W{sub N} Toda theories.

  20. An Important Member of Tight Junctions: Claudins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Demirpence

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tight junction (TJs, the most apically located of the intercellular junctional complexes, inhibits solute and water flow through the paracellular space, termed the %u201Cbarrier%u201D function. TJs participate in signal transduction mechanisms that regulate epithelial cell proliferation, gene expression, differentiation and morphogenesis. The claudin family of transmembrane proteins localized to the TJ. Loss of expression of Claudin causes of suppression TJs function. Recent studies have shown that altered levels of the different claudins may be related to invasion and progression of carcinoma cells in several primary neoplasms. A better knowledge of the mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis will likely result in the development of novel approaches for the diagnosis and therapy.

  1. Electron transport in doped fullerene molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Milanpreet; Sawhney, Ravinder Singh; Engles, Derick

    The effect of doping on the electron transport of molecular junctions is analyzed in this paper. The doped fullerene molecules are stringed to two semi-infinite gold electrodes and analyzed at equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions of these device configurations. The contemplation is done using nonequilibrium Green’s function (NEGF)-density functional theory (DFT) to evaluate its density of states (DOS), transmission coefficient, molecular orbitals, electron density, charge transfer, current, and conductance. We conclude from the elucidated results that Au-C16Li4-Au and Au-C16Ne4-Au devices behave as an ordinary p-n junction diode and a Zener diode, respectively. Moreover, these doped fullerene molecules do not lose their metallic nature when sandwiched between the pair of gold electrodes.

  2. Association diastolic function by echo and infarct size by magnetic resonance imaging after STEMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søholm, Helle; Lønborg, Jacob; Andersen, Mads J

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction is a predictor of increased morbidity and mortality; however, little is known about diastolic function and the degree of myocardial damage after myocardial infarction (MI). The aim was to assess the association between diastolic dysfunction ...

  3. A Monte Carlo Study Investigating Missing Data, Differential Item Functioning, and Effect Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Phyllis

    2009-01-01

    The use of polytomous items in assessments has increased over the years, and as a result, the validity of these assessments has been a concern. Differential item functioning (DIF) and missing data are two factors that may adversely affect assessment validity. Both factors have been studied separately, but DIF and missing data are likely to occur…

  4. A simulation study provided sample size guidance for differential item functioning (DIF) studies using short scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, Neil W; Fayers, Peter M; Aaronson, Neil K;

    2009-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) analyses are increasingly used to evaluate health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instruments, which often include relatively short subscales. Computer simulations were used to explore how various factors including scale length affect analysis of DIF by ordinal...

  5. Size-extensive wave functions for quantum Monte Carlo: A linear scaling generalized valence bond approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fracchia, F.; Filippi, C.; Amovilli, C.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new class of multideterminantal Jastrow–Slater wave functions constructed with localized orbitals and designed to describe complex potential energy surfaces of molecular systems for use in quantum Monte Carlo (QMC). Inspired by the generalized valence bond formalism, we elaborate a coup

  6. Prediction of spatially variable unsaturated hydraulic conductivity using scaled particle-size distribution functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nasta, P.; Romano, N.; Assouline, S; Vrugt, J.A.; Hopmans, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous scaling of soil water retention and hydraulic conductivity functions provides an effective means to characterize the heterogeneity and spatial variability of soil hydraulic properties in a given study area. The statistical significance of this approach largely depends on the number of s

  7. Functional implications of species differences in the size and morphology of the isthmo optic nucleus (ION) in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Ibáñez, Cristián; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Lisney, Thomas J; Faunes, Macarena; Marín, Gonzalo J; Wylie, Douglas R

    2012-01-01

    In birds, there is a retinofugal projection from the brain to the retina originating from the isthmo optic nucleus (ION) in the midbrain. Despite a large number of anatomical, physiological and histochemical studies, the function of this retinofugal system remains unclear. Several functions have been proposed including: gaze stabilization, pecking behavior, dark adaptation, shifting attention, and detection of aerial predators. This nucleus varies in size and organization among some species, but the relative size and morphology of the ION has not been systematically studied. Here, we present a comparison of the relative size and morphology of the ION in 81 species of birds, representing 17 different orders. Our results show that several orders of birds, besides those previously reported, have a large, well-organized ION, including: hummingbirds, woodpeckers, coots and allies, and kingfishers. At the other end of the spectrum, parrots, herons, waterfowl, owls and diurnal raptors have relatively small ION volumes. ION also appears to be absent or unrecognizable is several taxa, including one of the basal avian groups, the tinamous, which suggests that the ION may have evolved only in the more modern group of birds, Neognathae. Finally, we demonstrate that evolutionary changes in the relative size and the cytoarchitectonic organization of ION have occurred largely independent of phylogeny. The large relative size of the ION in orders with very different lifestyles and feeding behaviors suggest there is no clear association with pecking behavior or predator detection. Instead, our results suggest that the ION is more complex and enlarged in birds that have eyes that are emmetropic in some parts of the visual field and myopic in others. We therefore posit that the ION is involved in switching attention between two parts of the retina i.e. from an emmetropic to a myopic part of the retina.

  8. Functional implications of species differences in the size and morphology of the isthmo optic nucleus (ION in birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristián Gutiérrez-Ibáñez

    Full Text Available In birds, there is a retinofugal projection from the brain to the retina originating from the isthmo optic nucleus (ION in the midbrain. Despite a large number of anatomical, physiological and histochemical studies, the function of this retinofugal system remains unclear. Several functions have been proposed including: gaze stabilization, pecking behavior, dark adaptation, shifting attention, and detection of aerial predators. This nucleus varies in size and organization among some species, but the relative size and morphology of the ION has not been systematically studied. Here, we present a comparison of the relative size and morphology of the ION in 81 species of birds, representing 17 different orders. Our results show that several orders of birds, besides those previously reported, have a large, well-organized ION, including: hummingbirds, woodpeckers, coots and allies, and kingfishers. At the other end of the spectrum, parrots, herons, waterfowl, owls and diurnal raptors have relatively small ION volumes. ION also appears to be absent or unrecognizable is several taxa, including one of the basal avian groups, the tinamous, which suggests that the ION may have evolved only in the more modern group of birds, Neognathae. Finally, we demonstrate that evolutionary changes in the relative size and the cytoarchitectonic organization of ION have occurred largely independent of phylogeny. The large relative size of the ION in orders with very different lifestyles and feeding behaviors suggest there is no clear association with pecking behavior or predator detection. Instead, our results suggest that the ION is more complex and enlarged in birds that have eyes that are emmetropic in some parts of the visual field and myopic in others. We therefore posit that the ION is involved in switching attention between two parts of the retina i.e. from an emmetropic to a myopic part of the retina.

  9. The hypothesis of neuronal interconnectivity as a function of brain size – A general organization principle of the human connectome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen eHänggi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Twenty years ago, Ringo and colleagues proposed that maintaining absolute connectivity in larger compared with smaller brains is computationally inefficient due to increased conduction delays in transcallosal information transfer and expensive with respect to the brain mass needed to establish these additional connections. Therefore, they postulated that larger brains are relatively stronger connected intrahemispherically and smaller brains interhemispherically, resulting in stronger functional lateralization in larger brains. We investigated neuronal interconnections in 138 large and small human brains using diffusion tensor imaging-based fiber tractography. We found a significant interaction between brain size and the type of connectivity. Structural intrahemispheric connectivity is stronger in larger brains, whereas interhemispheric connectivity is only marginally increased in larger compared with smaller brains. Although brain size and gender are confounded, this effect is gender-independent. Additionally, the ratio of interhemispheric to intrahemispheric connectivity correlates inversely with brain size. The hypothesis of neuronal interconnectivity as a function of brain size might account for shorter and more symmetrical interhemispheric transfer times in women and for empirical evidence that visual and auditory processing are stronger lateralized in men. The hypothesis additionally shows that differences in interhemispheric and intrahemispheric connectivity are driven by brain size and not by gender, a finding contradicting a recently published study. Our findings are also compatible with the idea that the more asymmetric a region is, the smaller the density of interhemispheric connections, but the larger the density of intrahemispheric connections. The hypothesis represents an organization principle of the human connectome that might be applied also to non-human animals as suggested by our cross-species comparison.

  10. Patterns of biomass allocation between foliage and woody structure: the effects of tree size and specific functional traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvanus Mensah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Biomass allocation is closely related to species traits, resources availability and competitive abilities, and therefore it is often used to capture resource utilisation within plants. In this study, we searched for patterns in biomass allocation between foliage and wood (stem plus branch, and how they changed with tree size (diameter, species identity and functional traits (leaf area and specific wood density. Using data on the aboveground biomass of 89 trees from six species in a Mistbelt forest (South Africa, we evaluated the leaf to wood mass ratio (LWR. The effects of tree size, species identity and specific traits on LWR were tested using Generalised Linear Models. Tree size (diameter was the main driver of biomass allocation, with 44.43 % of variance explained. As expected, LWR declined significantly with increasing tree diameter. Leaf area (30.17% explained variance and wood density (12.61% explained variance also showed significant effects, after size effect was accounted for. Results also showed clear differences among species and between groups of species. Per unit of wood mass, more biomass is allocated to the foliage in the species with the larger leaf area. Inversely, less biomass is allocated to the foliage in species with higher wood density. Moreover, with increasing diameter, lower wood density species tended to allocate more biomass to foliage and less biomass to stems and branches. Overall, our results emphasise the influence of plant size and functional traits on biomass allocation, but showed that neither tree diameter and species identity nor leaf area and wood density are the only important variables.

  11.   Adenosine-diphosphate (ADP) reduces infarct size and improves porcine heart function after myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bune, Laurids Touborg; Larsen, Jens Kjærgaard Rolighed; Thaning, Pia;

    2013-01-01

    (UTP) are both released during myocardial ischemia, influencing hemodynamics. Both mediate the release of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), which can reduce infarct size (IS). The objective of this study was to investigate whether exogenous ADP and UTP administration during reperfusion could reduce......Acute myocardial infarction continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Timely reperfusion can substantially improve outcomes and the administration of cardioprotective substances during reperfusion is therefore highly attractive. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and uridine-5-triphoshate...... myocardial IS and whether this correlated to t-PA release or improvements in hemodynamic responses. Hemodynamic variables and t-PA were measured in 22 pigs before, during, and after 45 min of left anterior coronary artery occlusion. During reperfusion, the pigs were randomized to 240 min of intracoronary...

  12. Using Triangular Function To Improve Size Of Population In Quantum Evolution Algorithm For Fractal Image Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Qorbani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fractal Image Compression is a well-known problem which is in the class of NP-Hard problems.Quantum Evolutionary Algorithm is a novel optimization algorithm which uses a probabilisticrepresentation for solutions and is highly suitable for combinatorial problems like Knapsack problem.Genetic algorithms are widely used for fractal image compression problems, but QEA is not used for thiskind of problems yet. This paper improves QEA whit change population size and used it in fractal imagecompression. Utilizing the self-similarity property of a natural image, the partitioned iterated functionsystem (PIFS will be found to encode an image through Quantum Evolutionary Algorithm (QEA methodExperimental results show that our method has a better performance than GA and conventional fractalimage compression algorithms.

  13. Distribution of trace elements in selected pulverized coals as a function of particle size and density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, C.L.; Zeng, T.; Che, J.; Ames, M.R.; Sarofim, A.F.; Olmez, I.; Huggins, Frank E.; Shah, N.; Huffman, G.P.; Kolker, A.; Mroczkowski, S.; Palmer, C.; Finkelman, R.

    2000-01-01

    Trace elements in coal have diverse modes of occurrence that will greatly influence their behavior in many coal utilization processes. Mode of occurrence is important in determining the partitioning during coal cleaning by conventional processes, the susceptibility to oxidation upon exposure to air, as well as the changes in physical properties upon heating. In this study, three complementary methods were used to determine the concentrations and chemical states of trace elements in pulverized samples of four US coals: Pittsburgh, Illinois No. 6, Elkhorn and Hazard, and Wyodak coals. Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) was used to measure the absolute concentration of elements in the parent coals and in the size- and density-fractionated samples. Chemical leaching and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy were used to provide information on the form of occurrence of an element in the parent coals. The composition differences between size-segregated coal samples of different density mainly reflect the large density difference between minerals, especially pyrite, and the organic portion of the coal. The heavy density fractions are therefore enriched in pyrite and the elements associated with pyrite, as also shown by the leaching and XAFS methods. Nearly all the As is associated with pyrite in the three bituminous coals studied. The sub-bituminous coal has a very low content of pyrite and arsenic; in this coal arsenic appears to be primarily organically associated. Selenium is mainly associated with pyrite in the bituminous coal samples. In two bituminous coal samples, zinc is mostly in the form of ZnS or associated with pyrite, whereas it appears to be associated with other minerals in the other two coals. Zinc is also the only trace element studied that is significantly more concentrated in the smaller (45 to 63 ??m) coal particles.

  14. Finite-size effects and scaling for the thermal QCD deconfinementphase transition within the exact color-singlet partition function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladrem, M.; Ait-El-Djoudi, A. [Ecole Normale Superieure-Kouba, Laboratoire de Physique des Particules et Physique Statistique, B.P. 92, Vieux-Kouba, Algiers (Algeria)

    2005-10-01

    We study the finite-size effects for the thermal quantum chromodynamics (QCD) deconfinement phase transition, and use a numerical finite-size scaling analysis to extract the scaling exponents characterizing its scaling behavior when approaching the thermodynamic limit (V{yields}{infinity}). For this, we use a simple model of coexistence of hadronic gas and color-singlet quark gluon plasma (QGP) phases in a finite volume. The color-singlet partition function of the QGP cannot be exactly calculated and is usually derived within the saddle-point approximation. When we try to do calculations with such an approximate color-singlet partition function, a problem arises in the limit of small temperatures and/or volumes VT{sup 3}<<1, requiring additional approximations if we want to carry out calculations. We propose in this work a method for an accurate calculation of any quantity of the finite system, without any approximation. By probing the behavior of some useful thermodynamic response functions on the whole range of temperature, it turns out that, in a finite-size system, all singularities in the thermodynamic limit are smeared out and the transition point is shifted away. A numerical finite-size scaling (FSS) analysis of the obtained data allows us to determine the scaling exponents of the QCD deconfinement phase transition. Our results expressing the equality between their values and the space dimensionality is a consequence of the singularity characterizing a first-order phase transition and agree very well with the predictions of other FSS theoretical approaches to a first-order phase transition and with the results of calculations using Monte Carlo methods in both lattice QCD and statistical physics models. (orig.)

  15. Subcellular Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Wallace F.

    2015-01-01

    All of the same conceptual questions about size in organisms apply equally at the level of single cells. What determines the size, not only of the whole cell, but of all of its parts? What ensures that subcellular components are properly proportioned relative to the whole cell? How does alteration in organelle size affect biochemical function? Answering such fundamental questions requires us to understand how the size of individual organelles and other cellular structures is determined. Knowledge of organelle biogenesis and dynamics has advanced rapidly in recent years. Does this knowledge give us enough information to formulate reasonable models for organelle size control, or are we still missing something? PMID:25957302

  16. Characteristics Of Basaltic Sand: Size, Shape, And Composition As A Function Of Transport Process And Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, R. A.; Needell, Z. A.; Rose, T. R.

    2012-04-01

    Overview: The chemical and physical characteristics of sedimentary material can provide valuable clues about transport processes, distance traveled, and provenance, all of which are aspects of Martian geography that we would like to better understand. For a typical sedimentary deposit on Earth, for example, it has been shown that the ratio of feldspar to quartz can be used to assess the maturity (or transport distance) of a terrestrial deposit, because feldspar is more vulnerable to weathering than quartz. Further, chemical analysis can also be used to determine potential sediment sources, and grain-size sorting can be used to distinguish aeolian sediments (typically well-sorted) from fluvial sediments (poorly sorted in high energy environments). It is also common to use the shapes of individual quartz particles to determine transport process and distance, all of which can help us better understand the history of a sample of sedimentary material and the geological processes that created and emplaced it. These traditional sedimentological concepts are now being applied to our interpretation of Martian surface materials. Sullivan et al. [2008], for example, used grain-size and shape to assess eolian processes and to qualify transport distances of deposits found at the Spirit landing site in Gusev Crater. Stockstill-Cahill et al. [62008 used variations in mineral abundances observed in multispectral data to determine the provenance of dark dunes found in Amazonis Planitia craters. While applying our understanding of terrestrial sedimentary materials to Martian surface materials is intuitively sound and logical, the problem is that most of our current understanding is based on sediments derived from felsic materials (e.g., granite) primarily because that is the composition of most of the landmass on the Earth. However, the Martian surface is composed primarily of mafic material, or basalt, which generates much different sedimentary particles as it weathers. Instead of

  17. A new chromatographic response function for use in size-exclusion chromatography optimization strategies: Application to complex organic mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Regina M B O; Duarte, Armando C

    2010-11-26

    A new chromatographic response function (CRF) is presented aiming at designing an optimal chromatographic separation protocol for assessing the molecular size distribution of complex organic mixtures, such as those of natural organic matter from different sources (atmospheric, aqueous, and terrestrial). This CRF can be applied to mixtures of unknown solutes, being well suited for describing separation processes of pair of peaks of highly unequal area, and also for overlapping and asymmetric peaks. The performance of the developed CRF was compared to that of an existing response function, using simulated chromatograms. The capability of the new function to qualify the resolution degree that it is attained under different chromatographic conditions was further assessed through a size-exclusion chromatography study of a variety of different organic compounds, via a two-level full factorial design. It was proved that this function is a reliable alternative to optimize simultaneously the composition of the mobile phase (pH, ionic strength, and organic modifier concentration) and the instrumental variables (flow rate).

  18. Ultrasonographic evaluation of Hashimoto's thyroiditis: Comparison of size and echo change with thyroid function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang Rae; Cho, Jae Hyun; Kim, Yun Jeong; Kim, Hyun Man; Park, Rae Woong; Suh, Jung Ho [Aju University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Byung Chul [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-15

    To demonstrate sonographic features of Hashimoto's thyroiditis according to the thyroid function. We reviewed 54 thyroid ultrasonographic examinations of untreated Hashimoto's thyroiditis. We reviewed thyroid ultrasonographic examinations and focused on the presence of ill-defined low echoic lesions and glandular enlargement. We performed another thyroid ultrasonographic examination of 14 healthy volunteers, in order to obtain normal size of thyroid gland. Comparison was made between these morphologic characteristics and functional stage of the disease. The mean diameter of thyroid gland was 2.16 {+-} 0.43 cm in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and 1.41 {+-} 0.42 cm in normal control group of the thyroid gland. There was no statistically significant relationship between thyroid function and size. There was morphologic abnormalities in 46 patients (85%). Among them, 7 patients revealed diffuse low echogenicity in the entire thyroid gland, 32 patients showed peripherally located, ill-defined focal hypoechoic lesion, and 7 patients showed solitary or multiple. well-defined nodular lesions. Decreased echogenicity of the thyroid gland was related to hypothyroid status. Hashimoto's thyroiditis has specific morphologue characteristics in ultrasonographic features, which are well correlated with thyroid function.

  19. Graphene junction field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Tzu-Min; Borsa, Tomoko; van Zeghbroeck, Bart

    2014-03-01

    We have demonstrated for the first time a novel graphene transistor gated by a graphene/semiconductor junction rather than an insulating gate. The transistor operates much like a semiconductor junction Field Effect Transistor (jFET) where the depletion layer charge in the semiconductor modulates the mobile charge in the channel. The channel in our case is the graphene rather than another semiconductor layer. An increased reverse bias of the graphene/n-silicon junction increases the positive charge in the depletion region and thereby reduces the total charge in the graphene. We fabricated individual graphene/silicon junctions as well as graphene jFETs (GjFETs) on n-type (4.5x1015 cm-3) silicon with Cr/Au electrodes and 3 μm gate length. As a control device, we also fabricated back-gated graphene MOSFETs using a 90nm SiO2 on a p-type silicon substrate (1019 cm-3) . The graphene was grown by APCVD on copper foil and transferred with PMMA onto the silicon substrate. The GjFET exhibited an on-off ratio of 3.75, an intrinsic graphene doping of 1.75x1012 cm-2, compared to 1.17x1013 cm-2 in the MOSFET, and reached the Dirac point at 13.5V. Characteristics of the junctions and transistors were measured as a function of temperature and in response to light. Experimental data and a comparison with simulations will be presented.

  20. Regulation of Gap Junction Dynamics by UNC-44/ankyrin and UNC-33/CRMP through VAB-8 in C. elegans Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingfeng Meng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gap junctions are present in both vertebrates and invertebrates from nematodes to mammals. Although the importance of gap junctions has been documented in many biological processes, the molecular mechanisms underlying gap junction dynamics remain unclear. Here, using the C. elegans PLM neurons as a model, we show that UNC-44/ankyrin acts upstream of UNC-33/CRMP in regulation of a potential kinesin VAB-8 to control gap junction dynamics, and loss-of-function in the UNC-44/UNC-33/VAB-8 pathway suppresses the turnover of gap junction channels. Therefore, we first show a signal pathway including ankyrin, CRMP, and kinesin in regulating gap junctions.

  1. Effects of PEG size on structure, function and stability of PEGylated BSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, Bitten; Fee, Conan J.; Westh, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    . In contrast, the thermal stability of BSA was affected by PEGylation. The apparent unfolding temperature Tmax measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) decreased with PEGylation, whereas the temperature of aggregation, Tagg, measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS) increased with PEGylation....... The unfolding temperature and the temperature of aggregation were both independent of the molecular weight of the PEG chain. Possible functional changes of BSA after PEGylation were measured by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC), where the binding of sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) to BSA and PEGylated BSA...... the present biophysical characterisation, it is concluded that after PEGylation BSA appears to be unaffected structurally (secondary and tertiary structure), slightly destabilised thermally (unfolding temperature), stabilised kinetically (temperature of aggregation) and has an altered functionality (binding...

  2. Mixing in T-junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jacobus B.W.; van der Wal, S.

    1996-01-01

    The transport processes that are involved in the mixing of two gases in a T-junction mixer are investigated. The turbulent flow field is calculated for the T-junction with the k- turbulence model by FLOW3D. In the mathematical model the transport of species is described with a mixture fraction

  3. Action of polystyrene nanoparticles of different sizes on lysosomal function and integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Fröhlich Eleonore; Meindl Claudia; Roblegg Eva; Ebner Birgit; Absenger Markus; Pieber Thomas R

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Data from environmental exposure to nanoparticles (NPs) suggest that chronic exposure may increase the incidence of lung, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Impairment of cell function by intracellular accumulation of NPs is also suspected. Many types of NPs have been detected in the endosomal-lysosomal system and, upon repeated exposure, alterations of the endosomal-lysosomal system may occur. To identify such effects we compared the effect of carboxyl polysty...

  4. Polar Behavior in a Magnetic Perovskite from A-Site Size Disorder: A Density Functional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D. J.; Park, Chul Hong

    2008-02-01

    We elucidate a mechanism for obtaining polar behavior in magnetic perovskites based on A-site disorder and demonstrate this mechanism by density functional calculations for the double perovskite (La,Lu)MnNiO6 with Lu concentrations at and below 50%. We show that this material combines polar behavior and ferromagnetism. The mechanism is quite general and may be applicable to a wide range of magnetic perovskites.

  5. Effects of PEG size on structure, function and stability of PEGylated BSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesner, Bitten; Fee, Conan J; Westh, Peter; Nielsen, Anders D

    2011-10-01

    The effects of PEGylation on the structural, thermal and functional stability of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated using BSA and 6 linear mono-PEGylated BSA compounds. The secondary and tertiary structure of BSA measured by circular dichroism (CD) was independent of PEGylation. In contrast, the thermal stability of BSA was affected by PEGylation. The apparent unfolding temperature T(max) measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) decreased with PEGylation, whereas the temperature of aggregation, T(agg), measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS) increased with PEGylation. The unfolding temperature and the temperature of aggregation were both independent of the molecular weight of the PEG chain. Possible functional changes of BSA after PEGylation were measured by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC), where the binding of sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) to BSA and PEGylated BSA was analysed. At 25°C, two distinct classes of binding sites (high affinity and low affinity) for BSA and one class of binding site (low affinity) for PEGylated BSA were identified. The binding isotherm was modelled assuming independence and thermodynamic equivalence of the sites within each class. From the present biophysical characterisation, it is concluded that after PEGylation BSA appears to be unaffected structurally (secondary and tertiary structure), slightly destabilised thermally (unfolding temperature), stabilised kinetically (temperature of aggregation) and has an altered functionality (binding profile). These biophysical characteristics are all independent of the molecular weight of the attached polymer chain.

  6. Anisotropic Magnetoresistance and Anisotropic Tunneling Magnetoresistance due to Quantum Interference in Ferromagnetic Metal Break Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolotin, Kirill; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Ralph, D

    2006-01-01

    We measure the low-temperature resistance of permalloy break junctions as a function of contact size and the magnetic field angle in applied fields large enough to saturate the magnetization. For both nanometer-scale metallic contacts and tunneling devices we observe large changes in resistance...... with the angle, as large as 25% in the tunneling regime. The pattern of magnetoresistance is sensitive to changes in bias on a scale of a few mV. We interpret the effect as a consequence of conductance fluctuations due to quantum interference....

  7. Human health no-effect levels of TiO2 nanoparticles as a function of their primary size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Alexis; Harkema, Jack R.; Andersen, Elisabeth W.; Owsianiak, Mikołaj; Vea, Eldbjørg B.; Jolliet, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    As engineered nanomaterials are increasingly introduced on the market into a broad range of commodities or nanoproducts, there is a need for operational, reliable tool, enabling to consistently assess the risks and impacts associated with the releases of nanoparticles. The lack of a developed metric that accurately represents their toxic effects while capturing the influence of the most relevant physicochemical properties is one of the major impediments. Here, we investigate the relationships between the toxic responses of nano-sized and micro-sized particles in in vivo toxicological studies and their physicochemical properties. Our results for TiO2 particles indicate statistically significant associations between the primary particle size and their toxicity responses for combined inhalation and ingestion exposure routes, although the numerical values should be considered with care due to the inability to encompass influences from other relevant physicochemical properties like surface coatings. These findings allow for expressing mass-based adverse effect levels as a continuous function of the primary size of particles. This meaningful, exploratory metric can thus be used for screening purposes and pave the way for reaching adaptive, robust risk assessments of nanomaterials, e.g. for setting up consistent threshold levels, as well as consistent life cycle assessments of nanoproducts. We provide examples of such applications.

  8. Retrieval of the particle size distribution function from the data of lidar sensing under the assumption of known refractive index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoilova, S V; Sviridenkov, M A; Penner, I E

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a method to retrieve the particle size distribution function from the data of vertical lidar sensing. We have used 462 data models obtained at the Zvenigorod AERONET site obtained in 2011-2012. For each laser shot, we considered both fine (with particle sizes in a range from 0.05 to 0.6 μm) and coarse aerosol fractions (from 0.6 to 10 μm), with emphasize on the coarse fraction. Our suggested method is a modification of the Tikhonov method. The Tikhonov method is not optimal for coarse particles because its stabilizer does not and cannot account for the presence of the coarse mode, i.e., existence of more than one maximum of the size distribution function. The components of the matrix Wu-1 located in quadrants II and IV are sensitive to the change of these parameters. Neglecting this fact will lead again to arbitrary estimates of the contribution of the coarse particles even for exact values on the main diagonal and the two diagonals adjacent to it. Our method allows the coarse fraction up to 2.5 μm to be determined unambiguously. For larger particles (>2.5  μm) we recommend using the available sets of the coefficients, but with the level of values to be determined.

  9. Nanoscale Morphology of PTB7 Based Organic Photovoltaics as a Function of Fullerene Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehling, John D; Baran, Derya; Sit, Joseph; Kassar, Thaer; Ameri, Tayebeh; Unruh, Tobias; Brabec, Christoph J; Moulé, Adam J

    2016-08-08

    High efficiency polymer:fullerene photovoltaic device layers self-assemble with hierarchical features from ångströms to 100's of nanometers. The feature size, shape, composition, orientation, and order all contribute to device efficiency and are simultaneously difficult to study due to poor contrast between carbon based materials. This study seeks to increase device efficiency and simplify morphology measurements by replacing the typical fullerene acceptor with endohedral fullerene Lu3N@PC80BEH. The metal atoms give excellent scattering contrast for electron beam and x-ray experiments. Additionally, Lu3N@PC80BEH has a lower electron affinity than standard fullerenes, which can raise the open circuit voltage of photovoltaic devices. Electron microscopy techniques are used to produce a detailed account of morphology evolution in mixtures of Lu3N@PC80BEH with the record breaking donor polymer, PTB7 and coated using solvent mixtures. We demonstrate that common solvent additives like 1,8-diiodooctane or chloronapthalene do not improve the morphology of endohedral fullerene devices as expected. The poor device performance is attributed to the lack of mutual miscibility between this particular polymer:fullerene combination and to co-crystallization of Lu3N@PC80BEH with 1,8-diiodooctane. This negative result explains why solvent additives mixtures are not necessarily a morphology cure-all.

  10. Nanoscale Morphology of PTB7 Based Organic Photovoltaics as a Function of Fullerene Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehling, John D.; Baran, Derya; Sit, Joseph; Kassar, Thaer; Ameri, Tayebeh; Unruh, Tobias; Brabec, Christoph J.; Moulé, Adam J.

    2016-08-01

    High efficiency polymer:fullerene photovoltaic device layers self-assemble with hierarchical features from ångströms to 100’s of nanometers. The feature size, shape, composition, orientation, and order all contribute to device efficiency and are simultaneously difficult to study due to poor contrast between carbon based materials. This study seeks to increase device efficiency and simplify morphology measurements by replacing the typical fullerene acceptor with endohedral fullerene Lu3N@PC80BEH. The metal atoms give excellent scattering contrast for electron beam and x-ray experiments. Additionally, Lu3N@PC80BEH has a lower electron affinity than standard fullerenes, which can raise the open circuit voltage of photovoltaic devices. Electron microscopy techniques are used to produce a detailed account of morphology evolution in mixtures of Lu3N@PC80BEH with the record breaking donor polymer, PTB7 and coated using solvent mixtures. We demonstrate that common solvent additives like 1,8-diiodooctane or chloronapthalene do not improve the morphology of endohedral fullerene devices as expected. The poor device performance is attributed to the lack of mutual miscibility between this particular polymer:fullerene combination and to co-crystallization of Lu3N@PC80BEH with 1,8-diiodooctane. This negative result explains why solvent additives mixtures are not necessarily a morphology cure-all.

  11. Hyphal responses of Neurospora crassa to micron-sized beads with functional chemical surface groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Marie; Edwards, Clive; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2011-02-01

    Filamentous fungi include serious plant and animal pathogens that explore their environment efficiently in order to penetrate the host. This environment is physically and chemically heterogeneous and the fungi rely on specific physical and chemical signals to find the optimal point/s of attack. This study presents a methodology to introduce distinct structures with dimensions similar to the hyphal diameter and specific chemical surface groups into a controllable environment in order to study the fungal response. We introduced 3.3 μm polystyrene beads covered with Epoxy surface groups into microfluidic channels made from PDMS by rapid replica molding. The experimental setup resulted in different areas with low and high densities of beads as well as densely packed patches. The observations of the fungus exploring the areas long-term showed that the growth parameters were altered significantly, compared with the values measured on agar. The fungus responded to both, the physical and chemical parameters of the beads, including temporary directional changes, increased branching angles, decreased branching distances, decreased apical extension velocities and occasional cell wall lysis. The wealth and magnitude of the observed responses indicates that the microfluidic structures provide a powerful platform for the investigation of micron-sized features on filamentous fungi.

  12. Gap-junction-mediated cell-to-cell communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, Jean-Claude; Derangeon, Mickaël

    2013-04-01

    Cells of multicellular organisms need to communicate with each other and have evolved various mechanisms for this purpose, the most direct and quickest of which is through channels that directly connect the cytoplasms of adjacent cells. Such intercellular channels span the two plasma membranes and the intercellular space and result from the docking of two hemichannels. These channels are densely packed into plasma-membrane spatial microdomains termed "gap junctions" and allow cells to exchange ions and small molecules directly. A hemichannel is a hexameric torus of junctional proteins around an aqueous pore. Vertebrates express two families of gap-junction proteins: the well-characterized connexins and the more recently discovered pannexins, the latter being related to invertebrate innexins ("invertebrate connexins"). Some gap-junctional hemichannels also appear to mediate cell-extracellular communication. Communicating junctions play crucial roles in the maintenance of homeostasis, morphogenesis, cell differentiation and growth control in metazoans. Gap-junctional channels are not passive conduits, as previously long regarded, but use "gating" mechanisms to open and close the central pore in response to biological stimuli (e.g. a change in the transjunctional voltage). Their permeability is finely tuned by complex mechanisms that have just begun to be identified. Given their ubiquity and diversity, gap junctions play crucial roles in a plethora of functions and their dysfunctions are involved in a wide range of diseases. However, the exact mechanisms involved remain poorly understood.

  13. Two new septate junctions in the phylum Coelenterata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C R; Flower, N E

    1980-04-01

    Freeze-fracture of fixed and unfixed tissue, lanthanum tracer and conventional thin-section studies have revealed 2 new types of septate junction in the class Anthozoa, phylum Coelenterata. These new junctions have the 15-18-nm intercellular spacing of all other described septate junctions and are found around the apical circumference of cells lining a lumen or outside edge. However, in freeze-fracture replicas and tangential views of lanthanum-impregnated tissue, they are seen to be quite different from other known septate junction types. One of the new junctions is found in endothelial tissue such as that lining the gut or the inside of the tentacles. In tangential view it is seen to consist of relatively short, straight, double septa, again with lateral projections. In feeeze-fracture of unfixed tissue, the junction consists of double rows of particles on the P face, the particles of one row being rounded, those of the other being elongated at right angles to the line of the septum. This dichotomy in particle size is unexpected, as the 2 halves of the septa as seen in tangential view are symmetrical. In freeze-fracture of fixed material the particle arrays remain on the P face and appear similar to those of unfixed material, but never as clear. In fixed tissue, some distortion had occurred and in extreme cases septa appear as a single broad jumbled row of particles. In this double septa junction, the rows of particles seen in freeze-fracture are occasionally seen to anastomose with a septum dividing into 2 and a third row of particles aligning with the 2 new septa to form their double particle rows. In both fixed and unfixed tissues, the E face of the junction consists of wide, shallow grooves. The second of the new junctions occurs in epithelial tissue, such as around the outer edge of sea-anemone tentacles, and consists of long wavy septa with lateral projections. In views where these projections appear longest, they arise predominantly from one side of the

  14. Regulation of Tight Junctions in Upper Airway Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kojima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mucosal barrier of the upper respiratory tract including the nasal cavity, which is the first site of exposure to inhaled antigens, plays an important role in host defense in terms of innate immunity and is regulated in large part by tight junctions of epithelial cells. Tight junction molecules are expressed in both M cells and dendritic cells as well as epithelial cells of upper airway. Various antigens are sampled, transported, and released to lymphocytes through the cells in nasal mucosa while they maintain the integrity of the barrier. Expression of tight junction molecules and the barrier function in normal human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs are affected by various stimuli including growth factor, TLR ligand, and cytokine. In addition, epithelial-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP, which is a master switch for allergic inflammatory diseases including allergic rhinitis, enhances the barrier function together with an increase of tight junction molecules in HNECs. Furthermore, respiratory syncytial virus infection in HNECs in vitro induces expression of tight junction molecules and the barrier function together with proinflammatory cytokine release. This paper summarizes the recent progress in our understanding of the regulation of tight junctions in the upper airway epithelium under normal, allergic, and RSV-infected conditions.

  15. Influence of puerarin, paeoniflorin, and menthol on structure and barrier function of tight junctions in MDCK and MDCK-MDR1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Menthol but not puerarin and paeoniflorin may enhance paracellular transport and improve drug penetration of the BBB by disrupting the structure and, thereby, weakening the barrier function of TJs.

  16. Are hummingbirds facultatively ammonotelic? Nitrogen excretion and requirements as a function of body size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhorter, Todd J; Powers, Donald R; Martínez Del Rio, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    Most birds are uricotelic. An exception to this rule may be nectar-feeding birds, which excrete significant amounts of ammonia under certain conditions. Although ammonia is toxic, because it is highly water soluble its excretion may be facilitated in animals that ingest and excrete large amounts of water. Bird-pollinated plants secrete carbohydrate- and water-rich floral nectars that contain exceedingly little protein. Thus, nectar-feeding birds are faced with the dual challenge of meeting nitrogen requirements while disposing of large amounts of water. The peculiar diet of nectar-feeding birds suggests two hypotheses: (1) these birds must have low protein requirements, and (2) when they ingest large quantities of water their primary nitrogen excretion product may be ammonia. To test these hypotheses, we measured maintenance nitrogen requirements (MNR) and total endogenous nitrogen losses (TENL) in three hummingbird species (Archilochus alexandri, Eugenes fulgens, and Lampornis clemenciae) fed on diets with varying sugar, protein, and water content. We also quantified the form in which the by-products of nitrogen metabolism were excreted. The MNR and TENL of the hummingbirds examined were exceptionally low. However, no birds excreted more than 50% of nitrogen as ammonia or more nitrogen as ammonia than urates. Furthermore, ammonia excretion was not influenced by either water or protein intake. The smallest species (A. alexandri) excreted a significantly greater proportion (>25%) of their nitrogenous wastes as ammonia than the larger hummingbirds ( approximately 4%). Our results support the hypothesis that nectar-feeding birds have low protein requirements but cast doubt on the notion that they are facultatively ammonotelic. Our data also hint at a possible size-dependent dichotomy in hummingbirds, with higher ammonia excretion in smaller species. Differences in proportionate water loads and/or postrenal modification of urine may explain this dichotomy.

  17. First-principle study of quantum confinement effect on small sized silicon quantum dots using density-functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anas, M. M.; Othman, A. P.; Gopir, G. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    Density functional theory (DFT), as a first-principle approach has successfully been implemented to study nanoscale material. Here, DFT by numerical basis-set was used to study the quantum confinement effect as well as electronic properties of silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs) in ground state condition. Selection of quantum dot models were studied intensively before choosing the right structure for simulation. Next, the computational result were used to examine and deduce the electronic properties and its density of state (DOS) for 14 spherical Si-QDs ranging in size up to ∼ 2 nm in diameter. The energy gap was also deduced from the HOMO-LUMO results. The atomistic model of each silicon QDs was constructed by repeating its crystal unit cell of face-centered cubic (FCC) structure, and reconstructed until the spherical shape obtained. The core structure shows tetrahedral (T{sub d}) symmetry structure. It was found that the model need to be passivated, and hence it was noticed that the confinement effect was more pronounced. The model was optimized using Quasi-Newton method for each size of Si-QDs to get relaxed structure before it was simulated. In this model the exchange-correlation potential (V{sub xc}) of the electrons was treated by Local Density Approximation (LDA) functional and Perdew-Zunger (PZ) functional.

  18. Aqueous solubility of a simple (single-carbon) organic molecule as a function of its size & dipole moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Malah, Kamal I

    2011-05-01

    The aqueous solubility of a single-carbon organic molecule as a function of its size & dipole moment was investigated. The molecular dipole moment was chosen to represent the polar character of a poly-atomic molecule. It is hypothesized here that at a given pH, temperature, and pressure, the solubility of a single-carbon organic molecule in water will be a function of its polar character; namely, dipole moment and of its molecular size. Different forms of the solubility function were tested; it was found that the solubility model, given by Eq. 1, which is based on the polar character and the molecular volume, adequately described the aqueous solubility of single-carbon organic moieties. The aqueous solubility of single-carbon organic solutes exhibits maximum at the condition of high polar character (large dipole moment) and low molecular volume. The general trend of the solubility of single-carbon organic solutes, based on the proposed model (Eq. 1) could be explained in terms of the trade-off between the driving force (degree of polar character of the solute) for solubilization versus the resistance to be solubilized as a result of the entropic effects which increase with increasing molecular volume of the organic moiety.

  19. Function-Space-Based Solution Scheme for the Size-Modified Poisson-Boltzmann Equation in Full-Potential DFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringe, Stefan; Oberhofer, Harald; Hille, Christoph; Matera, Sebastian; Reuter, Karsten

    2016-08-01

    The size-modified Poisson-Boltzmann (MPB) equation is an efficient implicit solvation model which also captures electrolytic solvent effects. It combines an account of the dielectric solvent response with a mean-field description of solvated finite-sized ions. We present a general solution scheme for the MPB equation based on a fast function-space-oriented Newton method and a Green's function preconditioned iterative linear solver. In contrast to popular multigrid solvers, this approach allows us to fully exploit specialized integration grids and optimized integration schemes. We describe a corresponding numerically efficient implementation for the full-potential density-functional theory (DFT) code FHI-aims. We show that together with an additional Stern layer correction the DFT+MPB approach can describe the mean activity coefficient of a KCl aqueous solution over a wide range of concentrations. The high sensitivity of the calculated activity coefficient on the employed ionic parameters thereby suggests to use extensively tabulated experimental activity coefficients of salt solutions for a systematic parametrization protocol.

  20. A p53-dependent response limits epidermal stem cell functionality and organismal size in mice with short telomeres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Flores

    Full Text Available Telomere maintenance is essential to ensure proper size and function of organs with a high turnover. In particular, a dwarf phenotype as well as phenotypes associated to premature loss of tissue regeneration, including the skin (hair loss, hair graying, decreased wound healing, are found in mice deficient for telomerase, the enzyme responsible for maintaining telomere length. Coincidental with the appearance of these phenotypes, p53 is found activated in several tissues from these mice, where is thought to trigger cellular senescence and/or apoptotic responses. Here, we show that p53 abrogation rescues both the small size phenotype and restitutes the functionality of epidermal stem cells (ESC of telomerase-deficient mice with dysfunctional telomeres. In particular, p53 ablation restores hair growth, skin renewal and wound healing responses upon mitogenic induction, as well as rescues ESCmobilization defects in vivo and defective ESC clonogenic activity in vitro. This recovery of ESC functions is accompanied by a downregulation of senescence markers and an increased proliferation in the skin and kidney of telomerase-deficient mice with critically short telomeres without changes in apoptosis rates. Together, these findings indicate the existence of a p53-dependent senescence response acting on stem/progenitor cells with dysfunctional telomeres that is actively limiting their contribution to tissue regeneration, thereby impinging on tissue fitness.

  1. Edge Artifacts in Point Spread Function-based PET Reconstruction in Relation to Object Size and Reconstruction Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Tsutsui

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: We evaluated edge artifacts in relation to phantom diameter and reconstruction parameters in point spread function (PSF-based positron emission tomography (PET image reconstruction.Methods: PET data were acquired from an original cone-shaped phantom filled with 18F solution (21.9 kBq/mL for 10 min using a Biograph mCT scanner. The images were reconstructed using the baseline ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM algorithm and the OSEM with PSF correction model. The reconstruction parameters included a pixel size of 1.0, 2.0, or 3.0 mm, 1-12 iterations, 24 subsets, and a full width at half maximum (FWHM of the post-filter Gaussian filter of 1.0, 2.0, or 3.0 mm. We compared both the maximum recovery coefficient (RCmax and the mean recovery coefficient (RCmean in the phantom at different diameters.Results: The OSEM images had no edge artifacts, but the OSEM with PSF images had a dense edge delineating the hot phantom at diameters 10 mm or more and a dense spot at the center at diameters of 8 mm or less. The dense edge was clearly observed on images with a small pixel size, a Gaussian filter with a small FWHM, and a high number of iterations. At a phantom diameter of 6-7 mm, the RCmax for the OSEM and OSEM with PSF images was 60% and 140%, respectively (pixel size: 1.0 mm; FWHM of the Gaussian filter: 2.0 mm; iterations: 2. The RCmean of the OSEM with PSF images did not exceed 100%.Conclusion: PSF-based image reconstruction resulted in edge artifacts, the degree of which depends on the pixel size, number of iterations, FWHM of the Gaussian filter, and object size.

  2. PhytoSFDM version 1.0.0: Phytoplankton Size and Functional Diversity Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Trejos, Esteban; Brandt, Gunnar; Smith, S. Lan; Merico, Agostino

    2016-11-01

    Biodiversity is one of the key mechanisms that facilitate the adaptive response of planktonic communities to a fluctuating environment. How to allow for such a flexible response in marine ecosystem models is, however, not entirely clear. One particular way is to resolve the natural complexity of phytoplankton communities by explicitly incorporating a large number of species or plankton functional types. Alternatively, models of aggregate community properties focus on macroecological quantities such as total biomass, mean trait, and trait variance (or functional trait diversity), thus reducing the observed natural complexity to a few mathematical expressions. We developed the PhytoSFDM modelling tool, which can resolve species discretely and can capture aggregate community properties. The tool also provides a set of methods for treating diversity under realistic oceanographic settings. This model is coded in Python and is distributed as open-source software. PhytoSFDM is implemented in a zero-dimensional physical scheme and can be applied to any location of the global ocean. We show that aggregate community models reduce computational complexity while preserving relevant macroecological features of phytoplankton communities. Compared to species-explicit models, aggregate models are more manageable in terms of number of equations and have faster computational times. Further developments of this tool should address the caveats associated with the assumptions of aggregate community models and about implementations into spatially resolved physical settings (one-dimensional and three-dimensional). With PhytoSFDM we embrace the idea of promoting open-source software and encourage scientists to build on this modelling tool to further improve our understanding of the role that biodiversity plays in shaping marine ecosystems.

  3. An Evaluation of Test and Physical Uncertainty of Measuring Vibration in Wooden Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dickow, Kristoffer Ahrens; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper a study of test and material uncertainty in modal analysis of certain wooden junctions is presented. The main structure considered here is a T-junction made from a particleboard plate connected to a spruce beam of rectangular cross section. The size of the plate is 1.2 m by 0...

  4. Properties of Particle Size Distribution from Milled White Nixtamalized Corn Kernels as a Function of Steeping Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Muñoz, J. L.; Zapata-Torrez, M.; Márquez-Herrera, A.; Sánchez-Sinencio, F.; Mendoza-Álvarez, J. G.; Meléndez-Lira, M.; Zelaya-Ángel, O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the particle size distribution (PSD) changes during nixtamalized corn kernels (NCK) as a function of the steeping time (ST). The process to obtain powder or corn flour from NCK was as follows: (i) the NCK with different STs were wet-milled in a stone mill, (ii) dehydrated by a Flash type dryer, and (iii) pulverized with a hammer mill and sieved with a 20 mesh. The powder was characterized by measuring the PSD percentage, calcium percentage (CP), peak viscosity at 90°C (PV), and crystallinity percentage (CP). The PSD of the powder as a function of ST was determined by sieving in Ro-TAP equipment. By sieving, five fractions of powder were obtained employing meshes 30, 40, 60, 80, and 100. The final weight of the PSD obtained from the sieving process follows a Gaussian profile with the maximum corresponding to the average particle obtained with mesh 60. The calcium percentage as a function of ST follows a behavior similar to the weight of the PSD. The study of crystallinity versus the mesh number shows that it decreases for smaller mesh number. A similar behavior is observed as steeping time increases, except around ST = 8 h where the gelatinization of starch is observed. The trend of increasing viscosity values of the powder samples occurs when increasing ST and decreasing particle size. The ST significantly changes the crystallinity and viscosity values of the powder and, in both cases, a minimum value is observed in the region 7–9 h. The experimental results show that the viscosity increases (decreases) if the particle size decreases (increases). PMID:27375921

  5. Properties of Particle Size Distribution from Milled White Nixtamalized Corn Kernels as a Function of Steeping Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Fernández-Muñoz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the particle size distribution (PSD changes during nixtamalized corn kernels (NCK as a function of the steeping time (ST. The process to obtain powder or corn flour from NCK was as follows: (i the NCK with different STs were wet-milled in a stone mill, (ii dehydrated by a Flash type dryer, and (iii pulverized with a hammer mill and sieved with a 20 mesh. The powder was characterized by measuring the PSD percentage, calcium percentage (CP, peak viscosity at 90°C (PV, and crystallinity percentage (CP. The PSD of the powder as a function of ST was determined by sieving in Ro-TAP equipment. By sieving, five fractions of powder were obtained employing meshes 30, 40, 60, 80, and 100. The final weight of the PSD obtained from the sieving process follows a Gaussian profile with the maximum corresponding to the average particle obtained with mesh 60. The calcium percentage as a function of ST follows a behavior similar to the weight of the PSD. The study of crystallinity versus the mesh number shows that it decreases for smaller mesh number. A similar behavior is observed as steeping time increases, except around ST = 8 h where the gelatinization of starch is observed. The trend of increasing viscosity values of the powder samples occurs when increasing ST and decreasing particle size. The ST significantly changes the crystallinity and viscosity values of the powder and, in both cases, a minimum value is observed in the region 7–9 h. The experimental results show that the viscosity increases (decreases if the particle size decreases (increases.

  6. SU-E-T-299: Small Fields Profiles Correction Through Detectors Spatial Response Functions and Field Size Dependence Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipuzzi, M; Garrigo, E; Venencia, C [Instituto de Radioterapia - Fundacion Marie Curie, Cordoba, Cordoba (Spain); Germanier, A [CEPROCOR, Cordoba, Cordoba (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To calculate the spatial response function of various radiation detectors, to evaluate the dependence on the field size and to analyze the small fields profiles corrections by deconvolution techniques. Methods: Crossline profiles were measured on a Novalis Tx 6MV beam with a HDMLC. The configuration setup was SSD=100cm and depth=5cm. Five fields were studied (200×200mm2,100×100mm2, 20×20mm2, 10×10mm2and 5×5mm2) and measured were made with passive detectors (EBT3 radiochromic films and TLD700 thermoluminescent detectors), ionization chambers (PTW30013, PTW31003, CC04 and PTW31016) and diodes (PTW60012 and IBA SFD). The results of passive detectors were adopted as the actual beam profile. To calculate the detectors kernels, modeled by Gaussian functions, an iterative process based on a least squares criterion was used. The deconvolutions of the measured profiles were calculated with the Richardson-Lucy method. Results: The profiles of the passive detectors corresponded with a difference in the penumbra less than 0.1mm. Both diodes resolve the profiles with an overestimation of the penumbra smaller than 0.2mm. For the other detectors, response functions were calculated and resulted in Gaussian functions with a standard deviation approximate to the radius of the detector in study (with a variation less than 3%). The corrected profiles resolve the penumbra with less than 1% error. Major discrepancies were observed for cases in extreme conditions (PTW31003 and 5×5mm2 field size). Conclusion: This work concludes that the response function of a radiation detector is independent on the field size, even for small radiation beams. The profiles correction, using deconvolution techniques and response functions of standard deviation equal to the radius of the detector, gives penumbra values with less than 1% difference to the real profile. The implementation of this technique allows estimating the real profile, freeing from the effects of the detector used for the

  7. Lyapunov Functions for a Class of Discrete SIRS Epidemic Models with Nonlinear Incidence Rate and Varying Population Sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the dynamical behaviors of a class of discrete SIRS epidemic models with nonlinear incidence rate and varying population sizes. The model is required to possess different death rates for the susceptible, infectious, recovered, and constant recruitment into the susceptible class, infectious class, and recovered class, respectively. By using the inductive method, the positivity and boundedness of all solutions are obtained. Furthermore, by constructing new discrete type Lyapunov functions, the sufficient and necessary conditions on the global asymptotic stability of the disease-free equilibrium and endemic equilibrium are established.

  8. Sizing of SRAM Cell with Voltage Biasing Techniques for Reliability Enhancement of Memory and PUF Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chip-Hong Chang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Static Random Access Memory (SRAM has recently been developed into a physical unclonable function (PUF for generating chip-unique signatures for hardware cryptography. The most compelling issue in designing a good SRAM-based PUF (SPUF is that while maximizing the mismatches between the transistors in the cross-coupled inverters improves the quality of the SPUF, this ironically also gives rise to increased memory read/write failures. For this reason, the memory cells of existing SPUFs cannot be reused as storage elements, which increases the overheads of cryptographic system where long signatures and high-density storage are both required. This paper presents a novel design methodology for dual-mode SRAM cell optimization. The design conflicts are resolved by using word-line voltage modulation, dynamic voltage scaling, negative bit-line and adaptive body bias techniques to compensate for reliability degradation due to transistor downsizing. The augmented circuit-level techniques expand the design space to achieve a good solution to fulfill several otherwise contradicting key design qualities for both modes of operation, as evinced by our statistical analysis and simulation results based on complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS 45 nm bulk Predictive Technology Model.

  9. Changes in the demographic size and functional structure of Romania’s towns (1966-2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Erdeli

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Like in the other Central-European countries, Romania’s industrial development model over 1950- 1989, focused on the accelerated and extensive socialist-type industrialisation, explosive urbanisation and the implementation of urban and rural planning schemes. It was a stage in which the national urban system expanded and consolidated. It might be said that the aim of post-war industrialisation and urbanisation was largely attained by a gradual transition from the traditional rural-agrarian society to the urban-industrial society of the 1990s. It was a stagewise evolution that took on different forms, had a dynamics of its own, and developed sociocultural particularities in the course of urbanisation. After 1989, reflected the urban system underwent a deep-going restructuring process that the country’s socio-political changes; urbanisation itself acquring new scope and breadth. This new stage of transition from the industrial to the services town-type mirrored the country’s socio-political transition. The industrial function preserved its importance even more than in the economically developed West European states, modern industry and technology being expected to provide the Romanian urban system a development that would enable it to integrate into the town system of Europe. The urban system is undergoing a process of restructuring now, the urban phenomenon acquiring new characteristics and dimensions. The industrial city – the representative type of urban settlement, is to be gradually replaced by the polifunctional and services town, as part of the country’s economic and social-political development targets for the beginning of the third millennium.

  10. Coherent Magnetic Switching in a Permalloy Submicron Junction

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Junlin; Lu, Xianyang; Zhang, Jason; Ling, Hua; Wu, Jing; Zhou, Yan; Xu, Yongbing

    2016-01-01

    This work provides a numerical micromagnetic study of the magnetic switching of a submicron magnetic junction in a Permalloy (Ni80Fe20) cross structure. The simulation results demonstrate that the magnetic domain at the junction can be controlled to switch coherently by the applied magnetic field. This coherent magnetic switching in the cross structure has been found to be reversible and the 2-bit information can be written in the magnetic junction. For information storage, this kind of device can also realize the function of a quaternary arithmetic unit. By varying the direction of the applied magnetic field, we have demonstrated that this magnetic junction could be the building block for a magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) or a quaternary magnetic arithmetic unit.

  11. The gap junction proteome and its relationship to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Dale W

    2010-02-01

    In recent years our understanding of connexins has advanced from viewing them simply as proteins with a surprisingly short lifespan that form gap junction channels. Connexins are now known to be multifaceted proteins at the core of many multiprotein complexes that link to structural junctional complexes and cytoskeletal elements, and also to the cellular machinery that facilitates their transport, assembly, function and internalization. Collectively, these connexin-binding proteins can be termed the 'gap junction proteome'. The mechanistic understanding of the gap junction proteome with regards to the dynamic life cycle of connexins has grown further in importance in light of the large number of human diseases attributed to connexin gene mutations and regulatory changes in connexin spatial localization and expression levels.

  12. Photoluminescence effects of graphitic core size and surface functional groups in carbon dots: COO− induced red-shift emission

    KAUST Repository

    Hola, Katerina

    2014-04-01

    We present a simple molecular approach to control the lipophilic/ hydrophilic nature of photoluminescent carbon dots (CDs) based on pyrolysis of alkyl gallate precursors. Depending on the gallic acid derivative used, CDs with different alkyl groups (methyl, propyl, lauryl) on the surface can be obtained by isothermal heating at 270 C. This precursor-derived approach allows not only the control of lipophilicity but also the length of the particular alkyl chain enables the control over both the size and photoluminescence (PL) of the prepared CDs. Moreover, the alkyl chains on the CDs surface can be readily converted to carboxylate groups via a mild base hydrolysis to obtain water dispersible CDs with a record biocompatibility. The observed differences in PL properties of CDs and time-resolved PL data, including contributions from carbogenic cores and surface functional group, are rationalized and discussed in detail using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Using CPE Function to Size Capacitor Storage for Electric Vehicles and Quantifying Battery Degradation during Different Driving Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Range anxiety and battery cycle life are two major factors which restrict the development of electric vehicles. Battery degradation can be reduced by adding supercapacitors to create a Hybrid Energy Storage System. This paper proposes a systematic approach to configure the hybrid energy storage system and quantifies the battery degradation for electric vehicles when using supercapacitors. A continuous power-energy function is proposed to establish supercapacitor size based on national household travel survey statistics. By analyzing continuous driving action in standard driving cycles and special driving phases (start up and acceleration, the supercapacitor size is calculated to provide a compromise between the capacitor size and battery degradation. Estimating the battery degradation after 10 years, the battery capacity loss value decreases 17.55% and 21.6%, respectively, under the urban dynamometer driving schedule and the US06. Furthermore, the battery lifespan of the continuous power-energy configured system is prolonged 28.62% and 31.39%, respectively, compared with the battery alone system.

  14. Preparation of stimuli-responsive functionalized latex nanoparticles: the effect of spiropyran concentration on size and photochromic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Amin; Mahdavian, Ali Reza; Salehi-Mobarakeh, Hamid

    2015-10-06

    Incorporation of photochromic compounds to polymer matrix through chemical bonding results in an enhancement of photoactivity and stabilization of optical properties. Here, spiropyran ethyl acrylate monomer (SPEA) was synthesized, and then photochromic particles bearing epoxy functional groups were prepared through semicontinuous emulsion copolymerization. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results depicted an increase in particle size and particle size distribution with the increase in SPEA monomer-surfactants ratio. Studies on photochromic properties by UV-vis analysis demonstrated a decrease in the absorption intensity despite the increase in SPEA content due to the enhancement in particle size. The prepared acrylic copolymer particles showed reasonable photostability, photoreversibility, and fast photoresponsivness according to the convenient test methods under UV/vis irradiation. DSC and DMTA analyses indicate an increase in Tg of the obtained copolymers with the increase in SPEA content. Finally, stimuli-responsive cellulosic papers were prepared by impregnation, and their photochromic behavior was investigated in dry and wet forms in various media under UV radiation. Morphology studies, due to stabilization of the photochromic copolymer on cellulose fibers, were conducted by SEM micrographs and showed good adhesion and compatibility between the two phases.

  15. Pore invasion dynamics during fluid front displacement in porous media determine functional pore size distribution and phase entrapment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moebius, F.; Or, D.

    2012-12-01

    Dynamics of fluid fronts in porous media shape transport properties of the unsaturated zone and affect management of petroleum reservoirs and their storage properties. What appears macroscopically as smooth and continuous motion of a displacement fluid front may involve numerous rapid interfacial jumps often resembling avalanches of invasion events. Direct observations using high-speed camera and pressure sensors in sintered glass micro-models provide new insights on the influence of flow rates, pore size, and gravity on invasion events and on burst size distribution. Fundamental differences emerge between geometrically-defined pores and "functional" pores invaded during a single burst (invasion event). The waiting times distribution of individual invasion events and decay times of inertial oscillations (following a rapid interfacial jump) are characteristics of different displacement regimes. An invasion percolation model with gradients and including the role of inertia provide a framework for linking flow regimes with invasion sequences and phase entrapment. Model results were compared with measurements and with early studies on invasion burst sizes and waiting times distribution during slow drainage processes by Måløy et al. [1992]. The study provides new insights into the discrete invasion events and their weak links with geometrically-deduced pore geometry. Results highlight factors controlling pore invasion events that exert strong influence on macroscopic phenomena such as front morphology and residual phase entrapment shaping hydraulic properties after the passage of a fluid front.

  16. Functional hydrophilic polystyrene beads with uniformly size and high cross-linking degree facilitated rapid separation of exenatide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Zhao, Lan; Zhang, Rongyue; Huang, Yongdong; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Kun; Wu, Xuexing; Zhang, Zhigang; Gong, Fangling; Su, Zhiguo; Ma, Guanghui

    2016-04-01

    A high cross-linking polystyrene(PSt)-based anion-exchange material with uniformly size, high ion exchange capacity, and high hydrophilicity was synthesized by a novel surface functionalization approach in this study. Uniformly sized PSt microspheres were prepared by the membrane emulsion polymerization strategy, and then modified by (1) conversing resid ual surface vinyl groups to epoxy groups followed by quaternization, and (2) decorating aromatic ring matrix including nitration, reduction and attachment of glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride. The 3-D morphology and porous features of microspheres were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The surface of the modified PSt became roughness but the particle size remained same. Meanwhile, FT-IR spectra and laser scanning confocal microscope (LCSM) indicated that the modification groups had been successfully covalently coated onto the PSt microspheres. Modified PSt microspheres showed greatly improved hydrophilicity and biocompatibility with 0.387mmol/mL ion exchange capacity (IEC). In the application evaluation procedure, exenatide can be purified from 42.9% (peptide crudes) to 88.6% by modified PSt column with 97.1% recovery yield. This modified PSt microspheres had a large potential in application for efficient separation of peptides.

  17. Integrated functions of Pax3 and Pax7 in the regulation of proliferation, cell size and myogenic differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte A Collins

    Full Text Available Pax3 and Pax7 are paired-box transcription factors with roles in developmental and adult regenerative myogenesis. Pax3 and Pax7 are expressed by postnatal satellite cells or their progeny but are down regulated during myogenic differentiation. We now show that constitutive expression of Pax3 or Pax7 in either satellite cells or C2C12 myoblasts results in an increased proliferative rate and decreased cell size. Conversely, expression of dominant-negative constructs leads to slowing of cell division, a dramatic increase in cell size and altered morphology. Similarly to the effects of Pax7, retroviral expression of Pax3 increases levels of Myf5 mRNA and MyoD protein, but does not result in sustained inhibition of myogenic differentiation. However, expression of Pax3 or Pax7 dominant-negative constructs inhibits expression of Myf5, MyoD and myogenin, and prevents differentiation from proceeding. In fibroblasts, expression of Pax3 or Pax7, or dominant-negative inhibition of these factors, reproduce the effects on cell size, morphology and proliferation seen in myoblasts. Our results show that in muscle progenitor cells, Pax3 and Pax7 function to maintain expression of myogenic regulatory factors, and promote population expansion, but are also required for myogenic differentiation to proceed.

  18. Heat Transport in Graphene Ferromagnet-Insulator-Superconductor Junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-Wei

    2011-01-01

    We study heat transport in a graphene ferromagnet-insulator-superconducting junction. It is found that the thermal conductance of the graphene ferromagnet-insulator-superconductor (FIS) junction is an oscillatory function of the barrier strength x in the thin-barrier limit. The gate potential U0 decreases the amplitude of thermal conductance oscillation. Both the amplitude and phase of the thermal conductance oscillation varies with the exchange energy Eh. The thermal conductance of a graphene FIS junction displays the usual exponential dependence on temperature, reflecting the s-wave symmetry of superconducting graphene.%@@ We study heat transport in a graphene ferromagnet-insulator-superconducting junction.It is found that the thermal conductance of the graphene ferromagnet-insulator-superconductor(FIS)junction is an oscillatory function of the barrier strength X in the thin-barrier limit.The gate potential Uo decreases the amplitude of thermal conductance oscillation.Both the amplitude and phase of the thermal conductance oscillation varies with the exchange energy Eh.The thermal conductance of a graphene FIS junction displays the usual exponential dependence on temperature, reflecting the s-wave symmetry of superconducting graphene.

  19. Turn-on and turn-off voltages of an avalanche p—n junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guoqing, Zhang; Dejun, Han; Changjun, Zhu; Xuejun, Zhai

    2012-09-01

    Characteristics of the turn-on and turn-off voltage of avalanche p—n junctions were demonstrated and studied. As opposed to existing reports, the differences between the turn-on and turn-off voltage cannot be neglected when the size of the p—n junction is in the order of microns. The difference increases inversely with the area of a junction, exerting significant influences on characterizing some parameters of devices composed of small avalanche junctions. Theoretical analyses show that the mechanism for the difference lies in the increase effect of the threshold multiplication factor at the turn-on voltage of a junction when the area of a junction decreases. Moreover, the “breakdown voltage" in the formula of the avalanche asymptotic current is, in essence, the avalanche turn-off voltage, and consequently, the traditional expression of the avalanche asymptotic current and the gain of a Geiger mode avalanche photodiode were modified.

  20. Constructing higher order DNA origami arrays using DNA junctions of anti-parallel/parallel double crossovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhipeng; Park, Seongsu; Yamashita, Naoki; Kawai, Kentaro; Hirai, Yoshikazu; Tsuchiya, Toshiyuki; Tabata, Osamu

    2016-06-01

    DNA origami provides a versatile method for the construction of nanostructures with defined shape, size and other properties; such nanostructures may enable a hierarchical assembly of large scale architecture for the placement of other nanomaterials with atomic precision. However, the effective use of these higher order structures as functional components depends on knowledge of their assembly behavior and mechanical properties. This paper demonstrates construction of higher order DNA origami arrays with controlled orientations based on the formation of two types of DNA junctions: anti-parallel and parallel double crossovers. A two-step assembly process, in which preformed rectangular DNA origami monomer structures themselves undergo further self-assembly to form numerically unlimited arrays, was investigated to reveal the influences of assembly parameters. AFM observations showed that when parallel double crossover DNA junctions are used, the assembly of DNA origami arrays occurs with fewer monomers than for structures formed using anti-parallel double crossovers, given the same assembly parameters, indicating that the configuration of parallel double crossovers is not energetically preferred. However, the direct measurement by AFM force-controlled mapping shows that both DNA junctions of anti-parallel and parallel double crossovers have homogeneous mechanical stability with any part of DNA origami.

  1. Radial junction amorphous silicon solar cells on PECVD-grown silicon nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Linwei; O'Donnell, Benedict; Foldyna, Martin; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2012-05-17

    Constructing radial junction hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells on top of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) represents a promising approach towards high performance and cost-effective thin film photovoltaics. We here develop an all-in situ strategy to grow SiNWs, via a vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism on top of ZnO-coated glass substrate, in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) reactor. Controlling the distribution of indium catalyst drops allows us to tailor the as-grown SiNW arrays into suitable size and density, which in turn results in both a sufficient light trapping effect and a suitable arrangement allowing for conformal coverage of SiNWs by subsequent a-Si:H layers. We then demonstrate the fabrication of radial junction solar cells and carry on a parametric study designed to shed light on the absorption and quantum efficiency response, as functions of the intrinsic a-Si:H layer thickness and the density of SiNWs. These results lay a solid foundation for future structural optimization and performance ramp-up of the radial junction thin film a-Si:H photovoltaics.

  2. Sample size requirements for studies of treatment effects on beta-cell function in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Lachin

    Full Text Available Preservation of β-cell function as measured by stimulated C-peptide has recently been accepted as a therapeutic target for subjects with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes. In recently completed studies conducted by the Type 1 Diabetes Trial Network (TrialNet, repeated 2-hour Mixed Meal Tolerance Tests (MMTT were obtained for up to 24 months from 156 subjects with up to 3 months duration of type 1 diabetes at the time of study enrollment. These data provide the information needed to more accurately determine the sample size needed for future studies of the effects of new agents on the 2-hour area under the curve (AUC of the C-peptide values. The natural log(x, log(x+1 and square-root (√x transformations of the AUC were assessed. In general, a transformation of the data is needed to better satisfy the normality assumptions for commonly used statistical tests. Statistical analysis of the raw and transformed data are provided to estimate the mean levels over time and the residual variation in untreated subjects that allow sample size calculations for future studies at either 12 or 24 months of follow-up and among children 8-12 years of age, adolescents (13-17 years and adults (18+ years. The sample size needed to detect a given relative (percentage difference with treatment versus control is greater at 24 months than at 12 months of follow-up, and differs among age categories. Owing to greater residual variation among those 13-17 years of age, a larger sample size is required for this age group. Methods are also described for assessment of sample size for mixtures of subjects among the age categories. Statistical expressions are presented for the presentation of analyses of log(x+1 and √x transformed values in terms of the original units of measurement (pmol/ml. Analyses using different transformations are described for the TrialNet study of masked anti-CD20 (rituximab versus masked placebo. These results provide the information needed to

  3. The Reproducibility and Absolute Values of Echocardiographic Measurements of Left Ventricular Size and Function in Children are Algorithm Dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margossian, Renee; Chen, Shan; Sleeper, Lynn A.; Tani, Lloyd Y.; Shirali, Girish; Golding, Fraser; Tierney, Elif Seda Selamet; Altmann, Karen; Campbell, Michael J.; Szwast, Anita; Sharkey, Angela; Radojewski, Elizabeth; Colan, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Several quantification algorithms for measuring left ventricular (LV) size and function are used in clinical and research settings. We investigated the effect of the measurement algorithm and beat averaging on the reproducibility of measurements of the LV and assessed the magnitude of agreement among the algorithms in children with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Methods Echocardiograms were obtained on 169 children from 8 clinical centers. Inter- and intra-reader reproducibility were assessed on measurements of LV volumes using biplane Simpson, modified Simpson (MS), and 5/6 x area x length (5/6AL) algorithms. Percent error (%error) was calculated as the inter- or intra-reader difference / mean x 100. Single beat measurements and the 3-beat average (3BA) were compared. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated to assess agreement. Results Single beat inter-reader reproducibility was lowest (%error was highest) using biplane Simpson; 5/6AL and MS were similar but significantly better than biplane Simpson (p 0.95 across measures, although absolute volume and mass values were systematically lower for biplane Simpson compared to MS and to 5/6AL. Conclusions The reproducibility of LV size and function measurements in children with DCM is highest using the 5/6AL algorithm, and can be further improved by using 3BA. However, values derived from different algorithms are not interchangeable. PMID:25728351

  4. Characterization of emulsification at flat microchannel Y junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steegmans, M.L.J.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    Y junctions with a large width-to-depth ratio were used for the emulsification of hexadecane in various ethanol¿water mixtures with different static interfacial tension and viscosity. The resulting droplets were monodisperse. To describe droplet size a force-balance model was derived and was found

  5. Functional divergence of the brain-size regulating gene MCPH1 during primate evolution and the origin of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Li, Ming; Lin, Qiang; Qi, Xuebin; Su, Bing

    2013-05-22

    One of the key genes that regulate human brain size, MCPH1 has evolved under strong Darwinian positive selection during the evolution of primates. During this evolution, the divergence of MCPH1 protein sequences among primates may have caused functional changes that contribute to brain enlargement. To test this hypothesis, we used co-immunoprecipitation and reporter gene assays to examine the activating and repressing effects of MCPH1 on a set of its down-stream genes and then compared the functional outcomes of a series of mutant MCPH1 proteins that carry mutations at the human- and great-ape-specific sites. The results demonstrate that the regulatory effects of human MCPH1 and rhesus macaque MCPH1 are different in three of eight down-stream genes tested (p73, cyclinE1 and p14ARF), suggesting a functional divergence of MCPH1 between human and non-human primates. Further analyses of the mutant MCPH1 proteins indicated that most of the human-specific mutations could change the regulatory effects on the down-stream genes. A similar result was also observed for one of the four great-ape-specific mutations. Collectively, we propose that during primate evolution in general and human evolution in particular, the divergence of MCPH1 protein sequences under Darwinian positive selection led to functional modifications, providing a possible molecular mechanism of how MCPH1 contributed to brain enlargement during primate evolution and human origin.

  6. Imaging of cervicothoracic junction trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wongwaisayawan S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sirote Wongwaisayawan,1 Ruedeekorn Suwannanon,2 Rathachai Kaewlai11Department of Radiology, Ramathibodi Hospital and Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, ThailandAbstract: Cervicothoracic junction trauma is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in trauma patients. Imaging has played an important role in identifying injuries and guiding appropriate, timely therapy. Computed tomography is currently a method of choice for diagnosing cervicothoracic junction trauma, in which the pattern of injuries often suggests possible mechanisms and potential injuries. In this article, the authors describe and illustrate common and uncommon injuries that can occur in the cervicothoracic junction.Keywords: cervicothoracic junction, cervical spine, trauma, imaging, radiology

  7. Demonstrated Anomalous Pancreaticobiliary Ductal Junction

    OpenAIRE

    Koçkar, Cem; ?ENOL, Altu?; BA?TÜRK, Abdulkadir; AYDIN, Bünyamin; Cüre, Erkan

    2015-01-01

    Anomalies of the pancreaticobiliary junction are rare. Clinically anomalies of the pancreaticobiliary junction are uncommonly symptomatic but may present themselves with associated conditions ranging from benign acute abdominal pain to carcinomas. A 52 years old man was admitted to gastroenterology service with complaints of fever, nausea, vomiting and recurrent epigastric pain. He was diagnosed with biliary pancreatitis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreato-graphy was performed. Papilla ...

  8. Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wild, Georg Hermann

    2012-03-04

    We report on the fabrication of superconductor/insulator/ferromagnetic metal/superconductor (Nb/AlO{sub x}/Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18}/Nb) Josephson junctions (SIFS JJs) with high critical current densities, large normal resistance times area products, and high quality factors. For these junctions, a transition from 0- to {pi}-coupling is observed for a thickness d{sub F}=6 nm of the ferromagnetic Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18} interlayer. The magnetic field dependence of the critical current of the junctions demonstrates good spatial homogeneity of the tunneling barrier and ferromagnetic interlayer. Magnetic characterization shows that the Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18} has an out-of-plane anisotropy and large saturation magnetization indicating negligible dead layers at the interfaces. A careful analysis of Fiske modes up to about 400 GHz provides valuable information on the junction quality factor and the relevant damping mechanisms. Whereas losses due to quasiparticle tunneling dominate at low frequencies, at high frequencies the damping is explained by the finite surface resistance of the junction electrodes. High quality factors of up to 30 around 200 GHz have been achieved. They allow to study the junction dynamics, in particular the switching probability from the zero-voltage into the voltage state with and without microwave irradiation. The experiments with microwave irradiation are well explained within semi-classical models and numerical simulations. In contrast, at mK temperature the switching dynamics without applied microwaves clearly shows secondary quantum effects. Here, we could observe for the first time macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson junctions with a ferromagnetic interlayer. This observation excludes fluctuations of the critical current as a consequence of an unstable magnetic domain structure of the ferromagnetic interlayer and affirms the suitability of SIFS Josephson junctions for quantum information processing.

  9. Integrin-specific hydrogels functionalized with VEGF for vascularization and bone regeneration of critical-size bone defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, José R; Clark, Amy Y; García, Andrés J

    2016-04-01

    Vascularization of bone defects is considered a crucial component to the successful regeneration of large bone defects. Although vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been delivered to critical-size bone defect models to augment blood vessel infiltration into the defect area, its potential to increase bone repair remains ambiguous. In this study, we investigated whether integrin-specific biomaterials modulate the effects of VEGF on bone regeneration. We engineered protease-degradable, VEGF-loaded poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels functionalized with either a triple-helical, α2 β1 integrin-specific peptide GGYGGGP(GPP)5 GFOGER(GPP)5 GPC (GFOGER) or an αv β3 integrin-targeting peptide GRGDSPC (RGD). Covalent incorporation of VEGF into the PEG hydrogel allowed for protease degradation-dependent release of the protein while maintaining VEGF bioactivity. When applied to critical-size segmental defects in the murine radius, GFOGER-functionalized VEGF-free hydrogels exhibited significantly increased vascular volume and density and resulted in a larger number of thicker blood vessels compared to RGD-functionalized VEGF-free hydrogels. VEGF-loaded RGD hydrogels increased vascularization compared to VEGF-free RGD hydrogels, but the levels of vascularization for these VEGF-containing RGD hydrogels were similar to those of VEGF-free GFOGER hydrogels. VEGF transiently increased bone regeneration in RGD hydrogels but had no effect at later time points. In GFOGER hydrogels, VEGF did not show an effect on bone regeneration. However, VEGF-free GFOGER hydrogels resulted in increased bone regeneration compared to VEGF-free RGD hydrogels. These findings demonstrate the importance of integrin-specificity in engineering constructs for vascularization and associated bone regeneration.

  10. In situ observations of meteor smoke particles (MSP during the Geminids 2010: constraints on MSP size, work function and composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rapp

    2012-12-01

    three lamp types. Taking into account these data along with simple model estimates as well as rigorous quantum chemical calculations, it is argued that constraints on MSP sizes, work function and composition can be inferred. Comparing the measured data to a simple model of the photoelectron currents, we tentatively conclude that we observed MSPs in the 0.5–3 nm size range with generally increasing particle size with decreasing altitude. Notably, this size information can be obtained because different MSP particle sizes are expected to result in different work functions which is both supported by simple classical arguments as well as quantum chemical calculations. Based on this, the MSP work function can be estimated to lie in the range from ~4–4.6 eV. Finally, electronic structure calculations indicate that the low work function of the MSP measured by ECOMA indicates that Fe and Mg hydroxide clusters, rather than metal silicates, are the major constituents of the smoke particles.

  11. Electronic thermometry in tunable tunnel junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-03-15

    A tunable tunnel junction thermometry circuit includes a variable width tunnel junction between a test object and a probe. The junction width is varied and a change in thermovoltage across the junction with respect to the change in distance across the junction is determined. Also, a change in biased current with respect to a change in distance across the junction is determined. A temperature gradient across the junction is determined based on a mathematical relationship between the temperature gradient, the change in thermovoltage with respect to distance and the change in biased current with respect to distance. Thermovoltage may be measured by nullifying a thermoelectric tunneling current with an applied voltage supply level. A piezoelectric actuator may modulate the probe, and thus the junction width, to vary thermovoltage and biased current across the junction. Lock-in amplifiers measure the derivatives of the thermovoltage and biased current modulated by varying junction width.

  12. Gap junction channels and cardiac impulse propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desplantez, Thomas; Dupont, Emmanuel; Severs, Nicholas J; Weingart, Robert

    2007-08-01

    The role of gap junction channels on cardiac impulse propagation is complex. This review focuses on the differential expression of connexins in the heart and the biophysical properties of gap junction channels under normal and disease conditions. Structural determinants of impulse propagation have been gained from biochemical and immunocytochemical studies performed on tissue extracts and intact cardiac tissue. These have defined the distinctive connexin coexpression patterns and relative levels in different cardiac tissues. Functional determinants of impulse propagation have emerged from electrophysiological experiments carried out on cell pairs. The static properties (channel number and conductance) limit the current flow between adjacent cardiomyocytes and thus set the basic conduction velocity. The dynamic properties (voltage-sensitive gating and kinetics of channels) are responsible for a modulation of the conduction velocity during propagated action potentials. The effect is moderate and depends on the type of Cx and channel. For homomeric-homotypic channels, the influence is small to medium; for homomeric-heterotypic channels, it is medium to strong. Since no data are currently available on heteromeric channels, their influence on impulse propagation is speculative. The modulation by gap junction channels is most prominent in tissues at the boundaries between cardiac tissues such as sinoatrial node-atrial muscle, atrioventricular node-His bundle, His bundle-bundle branch and Purkinje fibers-ventricular muscle. The data predict facilitation of orthodromic propagation.

  13. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  14. Obtained effect size as a function of sample size in approved antidepressants: a real-world illustration in support of better trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibertini, Michael; Nations, Kari R; Whitaker, John A

    2012-03-01

    The high failure rate of antidepressant trials has spurred exploration of the factors that affect trial sensitivity. In the current analysis, Food and Drug Administration antidepressant drug registration trial data compiled by Turner et al. is extended to include the most recently approved antidepressants. The expanded dataset is examined to further establish the likely population effect size (ES) for monoaminergic antidepressants and to demonstrate the relationship between observed ES and sample size in trials on compounds with proven efficacy. Results indicate that the overall underlying ES for antidepressants is approximately 0.30, and that the variability in observed ES across trials is related to the sample size of the trial. The current data provide a unique real-world illustration of an often underappreciated statistical truism: that small N trials are more likely to mislead than to inform, and that by aligning sample size to the population ES, risks of both erroneously high and low effects are minimized. The results in the current study make this abstract concept concrete and will help drug developers arrive at informed gate decisions with greater confidence and fewer risks, improving the odds of success for future antidepressant trials.

  15. Diets high in fermentable protein and fibre alter tight junction protein composition with minor effects on barrier function in piglet colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Jan F; Pieper, Robert; Zakrzewski, Silke S; Günzel, Dorothee; Schulzke, Joerg D; Van Kessel, Andrew G

    2014-03-28

    Protein fermentation end products may damage the colonic mucosa, which could be counteracted by dietary inclusion of fermentable carbohydrates (fCHO). Although fermentable crude protein (fCP) and fCHO are known to affect microbial ecology, their interactive effects on epithelial barrier function are unknown. In the present study, in a 2 × 2 factorial experiment, thirty-two weaned piglets were fed low-fCP/low-fCHO (14·5 % crude protein (CP)/14·5 % total dietary fibre (TDF)), low-fCP/high-fCHO (14·8 % CP/16·6 % TDF), high-fCP/low-fCHO (19·8 % CP/14·5 % TDF) and high-fCP/high-fCHO (20·1 % CP/18·0 % TDF) diets. After 21-23 d, samples of proximal and distal colonic mucosae were investigated in Ussing chambers with respect to the paracellular and transcytotic passages of macromolecules and epithelial ion transport. The high-fCHO diets were found to reduce the permeability of the distal colon to the transcytotic marker horseradish peroxidase (HRP, 44 kDa; P ion transport), transepithelial resistance (barrier function) and charge selectivity were largely unaffected in both the segments. However, the high-fCP diets were found to suppress the aldosterone-induced epithelial Na channel activity (P composition in a compensatory way, so that colonic transport and barrier properties were only marginally affected.

  16. Octagonal Defects at Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskólski, W.; Pelc, M.; Chico, Leonor; Ayuela, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate knee-shaped junctions of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes. Two dissimilar octagons appear at such junctions; one of them can reconstruct into a pair of pentagons. The junction with two octagons presents two degenerate localized states at Fermi energy (EF). The reconstructed junction has only one state near EF, indicating that these localized states are related to the octagonal defects. The inclusion of Coulomb interaction splits the localized states in the junction with two octagons, yielding an antiferromagnetic system. PMID:24089604

  17. Sizing Determination Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-01

    the other hand bring the tape- downward an6 forward so that it crosses the center of the lower jaw at a poiot just in front of the jaw/ neck junction...SCOTT S* ~ ,n.... ..~a- a - a SAVON USIO 9. I S S I . Height: 171.5 cm 2 . Weig.it: 146 lbs cAn 3- -Face Size - Adjustable Metric Tempate Circuference

  18. Impact of variety type and particle size distribution on starch enzymatic hydrolysis and functional properties of tef flours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abebe, Workineh; Collar, Concha; Ronda, Felicidad

    2015-01-22

    Tef grain is becoming very attractive in the Western countries since it is a gluten-free grain with appreciated nutritional advantages. However there is little information of its functional properties and starch digestibility and how they are affected by variety type and particle size distribution. This work evaluates the effect of the grain variety and the mill used on tef flour physico-chemical and functional properties, mainly derived from starch behavior. In vitro starch digestibility of the flours by Englyst method was assessed. Two types of mills were used to obtain whole flours of different granulation. Rice and wheat flours were analyzed as references. Protein molecular weight distribution and flour structure by SEM were also analyzed to justify some of the differences found among the cereals studied. Tef cultivar and mill type exhibited important effect on granulation, bulking density and starch damage, affecting the processing performance of the flours and determining the hydration and pasting properties. The color was darker although one of the white varieties had a lightness near the reference flours. Different granulation of tef flour induced different in vitro starch digestibility. The disc attrition mill led to higher starch digestibility rate index and rapidly available glucose, probably as consequence of a higher damaged starch content. The results confirm the adequacy of tef flour as ingredient in the formulation of new cereal based foods and the importance of the variety and the mill on its functional properties.

  19. Magnetoresistance of galfenol-based magnetic tunnel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobaut, B.; Vinai, G.; Castán-Guerrero, C.; Krizmancic, D.; Rafaqat, H.; Roddaro, S.; Rossi, G.; Panaccione, G.; Eddrief, M.; Marangolo, M.; Torelli, P.

    2015-12-01

    The manipulation of ferromagnetic layer magnetization via electrical pulse is driving an intense research due to the important applications that this result will have on memory devices and sensors. In this study we realized a magnetotunnel junction in which one layer is made of Galfenol (Fe1-xGax) which possesses one of the highest magnetostrictive coefficient known. The multilayer stack has been grown by molecular beam epitaxy and e-beam evaporation. Optical lithography and physical etching have been combined to obtain 20x20 micron sized pillars. The obtained structures show tunneling conductivity across the junction and a tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effect of up to 11.5% in amplitude.

  20. SAGE2Splice: unmapped SAGE tags reveal novel splice junctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byron Yu-Lin Kuo

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE not only is a method for profiling the global expression of genes, but also offers the opportunity for the discovery of novel transcripts. SAGE tags are mapped to known transcripts to determine the gene of origin. Tags that map neither to a known transcript nor to the genome were hypothesized to span a splice junction, for which the exon combination or exon(s are unknown. To test this hypothesis, we have developed an algorithm, SAGE2Splice, to efficiently map SAGE tags to potential splice junctions in a genome. The algorithm consists of three search levels. A scoring scheme was designed based on position weight matrices to assess the quality of candidates. Using optimized parameters for SAGE2Splice analysis and two sets of SAGE data, candidate junctions were discovered for 5%-6% of unmapped tags. Candidates were classified into three categories, reflecting the previous annotations of the putative splice junctions. Analysis of predicted tags extracted from EST sequences demonstrated that candidate junctions having the splice junction located closer to the center of the tags are more reliable. Nine of these 12 candidates were validated by RT-PCR and sequencing, and among these, four revealed previously uncharacterized exons. Thus, SAGE2Splice provides a new functionality for the identification of novel transcripts and exons. SAGE2Splice is available online at http://www.cisreg.ca.

  1. Effects of baclofen on the functional anatomy of the oesophago-gastric junction and proximal stomach in healthy volunteers and patients with GERD assessed by magnetic resonance imaging and high-resolution manometry: a randomised controlled double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcic, J; Schwizer, A; Kaufman, E; Forras-Kaufman, Z; Banerjee, S; Pal, A; Hebbard, G S; Boesiger, P; Fried, M; Steingoetter, A; Schwizer, W; Fox, M

    2014-11-01

    The mechanism of reflux protection may involve a 'flap valve' at the oesophago-gastric junction (OGJ). To assess the effects of baclofen, a gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor type-B (GABA-B) agonist known to suppress reflux events, on the 'functional anatomy' of the OGJ and proximal stomach after a large test meal. Twelve healthy volunteers (HVs) and 12 patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD); with erosive oesophagitis or pathological oesophageal acid exposure completed a randomised, double-blind, cross-over study. On 2 test days participants received 40-mg baclofen or placebo before ingestion of a large test meal. OGJ structure and function were assessed by high-resolution manometry (HRM) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using validated methods. Measurements of the oesophago-gastric angle were derived from three-dimensional models reconstructed from anatomic MRI images. Cine-MRI and HRM identified postprandial reflux events. Mixed model analysis and Wilcoxon rank signed tests assessed differences between participant groups and treatment conditions. In both HVs and GERD patients, baclofen reduced the frequency of postprandial reflux events. The oesophago-gastric insertion angle in GERD patients was reduced (-4.1 ± 1.8, P = 0.025), but was unchanged in healthy controls. In both study groups, baclofen augmented lower oesophageal sphincter (LES) pressure (HVs: +7.3 ± 1.8 mmHg, P anatomy' of the OGJ and proximal stomach in GERD patients, which may suppress reflux by means of a 'flap valve' mechanism. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. A thiourea-functionalized metal-organic macrocycle for the catalysis of Michael additions and prominent size-selective effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lu; Zhao, Liang; Zhou, Zhen; He, Cheng; Sun, Hui; Duan, Chunying

    2017-03-21

    A discrete tetranuclear thiourea-based metal-organic macrocycle (MOM) with a large size was constructed by a well-designed organic ligand and nickel(ii) ions via self-assembly. Incorporating thiourea groups as hydrogen-bond donors into a metal-organic complex system leads to a new approach for synthesizing functionalized heterogeneous catalysts, as this not only introduces coordination sites serving as chelators, but also overcomes the issues of self-association via intermolecular H-bonding, often occurring in homogeneous systems. The packing structure of this material formed a confined environment suitable for the access of substrate molecules dragged by the strong hydrogen-bond interactions from the thiourea groups, thus achieving a high catalytic performance in Michael additions of nitrostyrenes to nitroalkanes, with remarkable yields and size-selectivity in heterogeneous phase. Moreover, a comparison of the IR spectrum of Ni-SPT with the spectra of dimethyl malonate- and β-nitrostyrene-impregnated Ni-SPT indicated that both substrate molecules, β-nitrostyrene and dimethyl malonate, were able to access the cavity of the trimeric subunit.

  3. Sizing of rock fragmentation modeling due to bench blasting using adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system and radial basis function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karami Alireza; Afiuni-Zadeh Somaieh

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important characters of blasting,a basic step of surface mining,is rock fragmentation.It directly effects on the costs of drilling and economics of the subsequent operations of loading,hauling and crushing in mines.Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and radial basis function (RBF)show potentials for modeling the behavior of complex nonlinear processes such as those involved in fragmentation due to blasting of rocks.In this paper we developed ANFIS and RBF methods for modeling of sizing of rock fragmentation due to bench blasting by estimation of 80% passing size (K80) of Golgohar iron ore mine of Sir jan,Iran.Comparing the results of ANFIS and RBF models shows that although the statistical parameters RBF model is acceptable but the ANFIS proposed model is superior and also simpler because the ANFIS model is constructed using only two input parameters while seven input parameters used for construction of the RBF model.

  4. Controlling the cytotoxicity of CdSe magic-sized quantum dots as a function of surface defect density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anielle Christine Almeida; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa; da Luz, Felipe Andrés Cordero; Silva, Danielle Pereira; de Deus, Samantha Luara Vieira; Dantas, Noelio Oliveira

    2014-09-10

    Quantum dots are potentially very useful as fluorescent probes in biological systems. However, they are inherently cytotoxic because of their constituents. We controlled the cytotoxicity of CdSe magic-sized quantum dots (MSQDs) as a function of surface defect density by altering selenium (Se) concentration during synthesis. Higher Se concentrations reduced the cytotoxicity of the CdSe MSQDs and diminished mRNA expression of methallothionein because of the low cadmium ions (Cd(2+)) concentration adsorbed on the surface of the MSQDs. These results agree with luminescence spectra, which show that higher Se concentrations decrease the density of surface defects. Therefore, our results describe for the first time a simple way of controlling the cytotoxicity of CdSe MSQDs and making them safer to use as fluorescence probes in biological systems.

  5. Influence of coupling between junctions on breakpoint current in intrinsic Josephson junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Shukrinov, Yu M.; Mahfouzi, F.

    2006-01-01

    We study theoretically the current-voltage characteristics of intrinsic Josephson junctions in high-$T_c$ superconductors. An oscillation of the breakpoint current on the outermost branch as a function of coupling $\\alpha$ and dissipation $\\beta$ parameters is found. We explain this oscillation as a result of the creation of longitudinal plasma waves at the breakpoint with different wave numbers. We demonstrate the commensurability effect and predict a group behavior of the current-voltage ch...

  6. Numerical analysis of open-hole multilateral completions minimizes the risk of costly junction failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez-Rivera, Roberto; Martin, J. Wesley [TerraTek, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Begnaud, Bill J. [BHP Billiton Petroleum (Americas) Inc. (United States)

    2004-07-01

    This paper discusses the numerical (3D FEA) modeling of open hole, horizontal, multilateral junctions, to evaluate their mechanical stability under various conditions of junction length, junction orientation, in-situ stress, and rock strength, during drilling and production operations. The objective of the numerical analysis is to evaluate the risk of multilateral junction failure associated to changes in the above parameters for the prediction of minimum rock strength (UCS) required for placing the junction, and for minimizing the risk of junction failure, under various conditions of drawdown and depletion. Results provide clear guidelines for multilateral junction construction (i.e., multilateral geometry), placement (i.e., minimum required rock strength) and safe conditions of operation (i.e., drawdown and depletion). Results also provide critical conditions of drawdown and depletion as a function of rock strength. Furthermore, 3D FEA results show that because of the asymmetry in the junction geometry, the resulting bending moments that develop along the mother-bore and the lateral wellbores reduce the mechanical stability of the multilateral junction. This effect cannot be adequately represented by 2D plane-strain solutions. The discussed methodology will minimize the risk of junction failures resulting in considerable savings to the operator. (author)

  7. Modelling of Dual-Junction Solar Cells including Tunnel Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelaziz Amine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Monolithically stacked multijunction solar cells based on III–V semiconductors materials are the state-of-art of approach for high efficiency photovoltaic energy conversion, in particular for space applications. The individual subcells of the multi-junction structure are interconnected via tunnel diodes which must be optically transparent and connect the component cells with a minimum electrical resistance. The quality of these diodes determines the output performance of the solar cell. The purpose of this work is to contribute to the investigation of the tunnel electrical resistance of such a multi-junction cell through the analysis of the current-voltage (J-V characteristics under illumination. Our approach is based on an equivalent circuit model of a diode for each subcell. We examine the effect of tunnel resistance on the performance of a multi-junction cell using minimization of the least squares technique.

  8. Rab11 helps maintain apical crumbs and adherens junctions in the Drosophila embryonic ectoderm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah F Roeth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tissue morphogenesis and organogenesis require that cells retain stable cell-cell adhesion while changing shape and moving. One mechanism to accommodate this plasticity in cell adhesion involves regulated trafficking of junctional proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we explored trafficking of junctional proteins in two well-characterized model epithelia, the Drosophila embryonic ectoderm and amnioserosa. We find that DE-cadherin, the transmembrane protein of adherens junctions, is actively trafficked through putative vesicles, and appears to travel through both Rab5-positive and Rab11-positive structures. We manipulated the functions of Rab11 and Rab5 to examine the effects on junctional stability and morphogenesis. Reducing Rab11 function, either using a dominant negative construct or loss of function alleles, disrupts integrity of the ectoderm and leads to loss of adherens junctions. Strikingly, the apical junctional regulator Crumbs is lost before AJs are destabilized, while the basolateral protein Dlg remains cortical. Altering Rab5 function had less dramatic effects, not disrupting adherens junction integrity but affecting dorsal closure. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We contrast our results with what others saw when disrupting other trafficking regulators, and when disrupting Rab function in other tissues; together these data suggest distinct mechanisms regulate junctional stability and plasticity in different tissues.

  9. Cluster Size Statistic and Cluster Mass Statistic: Two Novel Methods for Identifying Changes in Functional Connectivity Between Groups or Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing, Alex; Schwarzbauer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Functional connectivity has become an increasingly important area of research in recent years. At a typical spatial resolution, approximately 300 million connections link each voxel in the brain with every other. This pattern of connectivity is known as the functional connectome. Connectivity is often compared between experimental groups and conditions. Standard methods used to control the type 1 error rate are likely to be insensitive when comparisons are carried out across the whole connectome, due to the huge number of statistical tests involved. To address this problem, two new cluster based methods – the cluster size statistic (CSS) and cluster mass statistic (CMS) – are introduced to control the family wise error rate across all connectivity values. These methods operate within a statistical framework similar to the cluster based methods used in conventional task based fMRI. Both methods are data driven, permutation based and require minimal statistical assumptions. Here, the performance of each procedure is evaluated in a receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis, utilising a simulated dataset. The relative sensitivity of each method is also tested on real data: BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) fMRI scans were carried out on twelve subjects under normal conditions and during the hypercapnic state (induced through the inhalation of 6% CO2 in 21% O2 and 73%N2). Both CSS and CMS detected significant changes in connectivity between normal and hypercapnic states. A family wise error correction carried out at the individual connection level exhibited no significant changes in connectivity. PMID:24906136

  10. Cluster size statistic and cluster mass statistic: two novel methods for identifying changes in functional connectivity between groups or conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing, Alex; Schwarzbauer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Functional connectivity has become an increasingly important area of research in recent years. At a typical spatial resolution, approximately 300 million connections link each voxel in the brain with every other. This pattern of connectivity is known as the functional connectome. Connectivity is often compared between experimental groups and conditions. Standard methods used to control the type 1 error rate are likely to be insensitive when comparisons are carried out across the whole connectome, due to the huge number of statistical tests involved. To address this problem, two new cluster based methods--the cluster size statistic (CSS) and cluster mass statistic (CMS)--are introduced to control the family wise error rate across all connectivity values. These methods operate within a statistical framework similar to the cluster based methods used in conventional task based fMRI. Both methods are data driven, permutation based and require minimal statistical assumptions. Here, the performance of each procedure is evaluated in a receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis, utilising a simulated dataset. The relative sensitivity of each method is also tested on real data: BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) fMRI scans were carried out on twelve subjects under normal conditions and during the hypercapnic state (induced through the inhalation of 6% CO2 in 21% O2 and 73%N2). Both CSS and CMS detected significant changes in connectivity between normal and hypercapnic states. A family wise error correction carried out at the individual connection level exhibited no significant changes in connectivity.

  11. Thigh muscle size and vascular function after blood flow-restricted elastic band training in older women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Tomohiro; Fukumura, Kazuya; Tomaru, Takanobu; Nakajima, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effect of elastic band training with blood flow restriction (BFR) on thigh muscle size and vascular function in older women. Older women were divided into three groups: low-intensity elastic band BFR training (BFR-Tr, n = 10), middleto high-intensity elastic band training (MH-Tr, n = 10), and no training (Ctrl, n = 10) groups. BFR-Tr and MH-Tr groups performed squat and knee extension exercises using elastic band, 2 days/week for 12 weeks. During BFR-Tr exercise session, subjects wore pressure cuffs around the most proximal region of both thighs. The following measurements were taken before (pre) and 3-5 days after (post) the final training session: MRI-measured muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) at mid-thigh, maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of knee extension, central systolic blood pressure (c-SBP), central-augmentation index (c-AIx), cardio-ankle vascular index testing (CAVI), ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI). Quadriceps muscle CSA (6.9%) and knee extension MVIC (13.7%) were increased (p muscle CSA as well as maximal muscle strength, but does not decrease vascular function in older women. PMID:27244884

  12. Measure Guideline: Optimizing the Configuration of Flexible Duct Junction Boxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beach, R.; Burdick, A.

    2014-03-01

    This measure guideline offers additional recommendations to heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system designers for optimizing flexible duct, constant-volume HVAC systems using junction boxes within Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) Manual D guidance (Rutkowski, H. Manual D -- Residential Duct Systems, 3rd edition, Version 1.00. Arlington, VA: Air Conditioning Contractors of America, 2009.). IBACOS used computational fluid dynamics software to explore and develop guidance to better control the airflow effects of factors that may impact pressure losses within junction boxes among various design configurations (Beach, R., Prahl, D., and Lange, R. CFD Analysis of Flexible Duct Junction Box Design. Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, submitted for publication 2013). These recommendations can help to ensure that a system aligns more closely with the design and the occupants' comfort expectations. Specifically, the recommendations described herein show how to configure a rectangular box with four outlets, a triangular box with three outlets, metal wyes with two outlets, and multiple configurations for more than four outlets. Designers of HVAC systems, contractors who are fabricating junction boxes on site, and anyone using the ACCA Manual D process for sizing duct runs will find this measure guideline invaluable for more accurately minimizing pressure losses when using junction boxes with flexible ducts.

  13. Characterization and comparison of synthetic immobile and mobile Holliday junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shida, T; Iwasaki, H; Shinagawa, H; Kyogoku, Y

    1996-04-01

    Eight synthetic Holliday junction (HJ) oligonucleotides containing an immobile or a mobile junction were characterized by gel electrophoresis, ultraviolet absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Four 24-mer deoxyribonucleotides formed stable immobile and mobile HJs in 0.1 M NaCl at 5 muM strand concentration at room temperature. However, the immobile HJ constructed from four 18-mers was less stable, and four 12-mers did not form the HJ structure under the conditions used. A comparison of the melting profiles of the HJs with those of the duplexes corresponding to the arms of four-way junctions indicated that the thermal stability of the HJ was similar to that of the individual arm and the cooperativity of the melting behavior of the HJ was relatively higher than that of the individual arm duplex. The Tms of the mobile HJs containing 4, 6, 8, and 10 base-pair homologous cores at junctions were essentially identical with that of the immobile HJ of the same size. There is a tendency that the HJ containing a larger homologous core region becomes more resistant to thermal denaturation. The addition of divalent metal cations, Mg2+ and Ca2+, to the solutions of the HJs raised their melting temperatures. The difference found for the CD spectra of the HJs which differ only in the arrangement of the HJ depended primarily upon the DNA sequence flanking the junction. The RuvC protein binds to the immobile and mobile HJs, regardless of the presence and the size of the homologous core at the junction.

  14. Magnetic tunnel junction based spintronic logic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyle, Andrew Paul

    The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) predicts that complimentary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) based technologies will hit their last generation on or near the 16 nm node, which we expect to reach by the year 2025. Thus future advances in computational power will not be realized from ever-shrinking device sizes, but rather by 'outside the box' designs and new physics, including molecular or DNA based computation, organics, magnonics, or spintronic. This dissertation investigates magnetic logic devices for post-CMOS computation. Three different architectures were studied, each relying on a different magnetic mechanism to compute logic functions. Each design has it benefits and challenges that must be overcome. This dissertation focuses on pushing each design from the drawing board to a realistic logic technology. The first logic architecture is based on electrically connected magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) that allow direct communication between elements without intermediate sensing amplifiers. Two and three input logic gates, which consist of two and three MTJs connected in parallel, respectively were fabricated and are compared. The direct communication is realized by electrically connecting the output in series with the input and applying voltage across the series connections. The logic gates rely on the fact that a change in resistance at the input modulates the voltage that is needed to supply the critical current for spin transfer torque switching the output. The change in resistance at the input resulted in a voltage margin of 50--200 mV and 250--300 mV for the closest input states for the three and two input designs, respectively. The two input logic gate realizes the AND, NAND, NOR, and OR logic functions. The three input logic function realizes the Majority, AND, NAND, NOR, and OR logic operations. The second logic architecture utilizes magnetostatically coupled nanomagnets to compute logic functions, which is the basis of

  15. Grain boundary and triple junction diffusion in nanocrystalline copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegner, M., E-mail: m.wegner@uni-muenster.de; Leuthold, J.; Peterlechner, M.; Divinski, S. V., E-mail: divin@uni-muenster.de [Institut für Materialphysik, Universität Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Straße 10, D-48149, Münster (Germany); Song, X., E-mail: xysong@bjut.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, 100124 Beijing (China); Wilde, G. [Institut für Materialphysik, Universität Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Straße 10, D-48149, Münster (Germany); Institute of Nanochemistry and Nanobiology, School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, 200444 Shanghai (China)

    2014-09-07

    Grain boundary and triple junction diffusion in nanocrystalline Cu samples with grain sizes, 〈d〉, of ∼35 and ∼44 nm produced by spark plasma sintering were investigated by the radiotracer method using the {sup 63}Ni isotope. The measured diffusivities, D{sub eff}, are comparable with those determined previously for Ni grain boundary diffusion in well-annealed, high purity, coarse grained, polycrystalline copper, substantiating the absence of a grain size effect on the kinetic properties of grain boundaries in a nanocrystalline material at grain sizes d ≥ 35 nm. Simultaneously, the analysis predicts that if triple junction diffusion of Ni in Cu is enhanced with respect to the corresponding grain boundary diffusion rate, it is still less than 500⋅D{sub gb} within the temperature interval from 420 K to 470 K.

  16. Neisseria gonorrhoeae breaches the apical junction of polarized epithelial cells for transmigration by activating EGFR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Vonetta L; Wang, Liang-Chun; Dawson, Valerie; Stein, Daniel C; Song, Wenxia

    2013-06-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae initiates infection at the apical surface of columnar endocervical epithelial cells in the female reproductive tract. These cells provide a physical barrier against pathogens by forming continuous apical junctional complexes between neighbouring cells. This study examines the interaction of gonococci (GC) with polarized epithelial cells. We show that viable GC preferentially localize at the apical side of the cell-cell junction in polarized endometrial and colonic epithelial cells, HEC-1-B and T84. In GC-infected cells, continuous apical junctional complexes are disrupted, and the junction-associated protein β-catenin is redistributed from the apical junction to the cytoplasm and to GC adherent sites; however, overall cellular levels remain unchanged. This redistribution of junctional proteins is associated with a decrease in the 'fence' function of the apical junction but not its 'gate' function. Disruption of the apical junction by removing calcium increases GC transmigration across the epithelial monolayer. GC inoculation induces the phosphorylation of both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and β-catenin, while inhibition of EGFR kinase activity significantly reduces both GC-induced β-catenin redistribution and GC transmigration. Therefore, the gonococcus is capable of weakening the apical junction and polarity of epithelial cells by activating EGFR, which facilitates GC transmigration across the epithelium.

  17. Endocytosis and Recycling of Tight Junction Proteins in Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Utech

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A critical function of the epithelial lining is to form a barrier that separates luminal contents from the underlying interstitium. This barrier function is primarily regulated by the apical junctional complex (AJC consisting of tight junctions (TJs and adherens junctions (AJs and is compromised under inflammatory conditions. In intestinal epithelial cells, proinflammatory cytokines, for example, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, induce internalization of TJ proteins by endocytosis. Endocytosed TJ proteins are passed into early and recycling endosomes, suggesting the involvement of recycling of internalized TJ proteins. This review summarizes mechanisms by which TJ proteins under inflammatory conditions are internalized in intestinal epithelial cells and point out comparable mechanism in nonintestinal epithelial cells.

  18. The distribution of work performed on a NIS junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Jaime Eduardo Vieira da Silva Moutinho; Ribeiro, Pedro; Kirchner, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    results are based on an equivalence between the dynamics of the NIS junction and that of an assembly of two-level systems subjected to a circularly polarised field, for which we can determine the work-characteristic function exactly. The average work dissipated by the NIS junction, as well as its...... fluctuations, are determined. From the work characteristic function, we also compute the work probability-distribution and show that it does not have a Gaussian character. Our results allow for a direct experimental test of the Crooks–Tasaki fluctuation relation.......We propose an experimental setup to measure the work performed in a normal-metal/insulator/superconducting (NIS) junction, subjected to a voltage change and in contact with a thermal bath. We compute the performed work and argue that the associated heat release can be measured experimentally. Our...

  19. Gap junctions in developing thalamic and neocortical neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niculescu, Dragos; Lohmann, Christian

    2014-12-01

    The presence of direct, cytoplasmatic, communication between neurons in the brain of vertebrates has been demonstrated a long time ago. These gap junctions have been characterized in many brain areas in terms of subunit composition, biophysical properties, neuronal connectivity patterns, and developmental regulation. Although interesting findings emerged, showing that different subunits are specifically regulated during development, or that excitatory and inhibitory neuronal networks exhibit various electrical connectivity patterns, gap junctions did not receive much further interest. Originally, it was believed that gap junctions represent simple passageways for electrical and biochemical coordination early in development. Today, we know that gap junction connectivity is tightly regulated, following independent developmental patterns for excitatory and inhibitory networks. Electrical connections are important for many specific functions of neurons, and are, for example, required for the development of neuronal stimulus tuning in the visual system. Here, we integrate the available data on neuronal connectivity and gap junction properties, as well as the most recent findings concerning the functional implications of electrical connections in the developing thalamus and neocortex.

  20. SOD Mimetic Improves the Function, Growth and Survival of Small Size Liver Grafts after Transplantation in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yi-Yao; Qian, Jian-Ming; Yao, Ai-Hua; Ma, Zhen-Yu; Qian, Xiao-Feng; Zha, Xiao-Min; Zhao, Yi; Ding, Qiang; Zhao, Jia; Wang, Shui; Wu, Jian

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Small-for-size syndrome (SFSS) may occur when graft volume is less than 45% of the standard liver volume, and it manifests as retarded growth and failure of the grafts and an increased mortality. However, its pathogenesis is poorly understood, and few effective interventions have been attempted. AIMS The present study aims to delineate the critical role of oxidant stress in SFSS and protective effects of a superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic, MnTBAP, on graft function, growth and survival in the recipient rats. METHODS Small size graft liver transplantation (SSGLT) was performed to determine the survival, graft injury and growth. MnTBAP was administered in SSGLT recipients (SSGLT+MnTBAP). RESULTS Serum ALT levels were sustained higher in SSGLT recipients, which were correlated with an increased apoptotic cell count and hepatocellular necrosis in liver sections. Malondialdehyde content, gene expression of TNF-α and IL-1β and DNA binding activity of NF-κB in the grafts were increased significantly in SSGLT recipients compared to sham-operated controls. Both phosphorylated p38 MAPK and nuclear c-jun were increased in SSGLT. All these changes were strikingly reversed by the administration of MnTBAP, with an increase in serum SOD activity. Moreover, in situ bromo-deoxyuridine incorporation demonstrated that graft regeneration in SSGLT+MnTBAP group was much profound than in the SSGLT group. Finally, the survival of recipients with MnTBAP treatments was significantly improved. CONCLUSIONS Enhanced oxidant stress with activation of the p38-c-Jun-NF-κB signaling pathway contributes to SFS-associated graft failure, retarded graft growth and poor survival. MnTBAP effectively reversed the pathologic changes in SFS-associated graft failure. PMID:22955229

  1. Endothelial Cell Junctional Adhesion Molecules: Role and Regulation of Expression in Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reglero-Real, Natalia; Colom, Bartomeu; Bodkin, Jennifer Victoria; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial cells line the lumen of all blood vessels and play a critical role in maintaining the barrier function of the vasculature. Sealing of the vessel wall between adjacent endothelial cells is facilitated by interactions involving junctionally expressed transmembrane proteins, including tight junctional molecules, such as members of the junctional adhesion molecule family, components of adherence junctions, such as VE-Cadherin, and other molecules, such as platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule. Of importance, a growing body of evidence indicates that the expression of these molecules is regulated in a spatiotemporal manner during inflammation: responses that have significant implications for the barrier function of blood vessels against blood-borne macromolecules and transmigrating leukocytes. This review summarizes key aspects of our current understanding of the dynamics and mechanisms that regulate the expression of endothelial cells junctional molecules during inflammation and discusses the associated functional implications of such events in acute and chronic scenarios. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Thermal Spin Transfer in Fe-MgO-Fe Tunnel Junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jia, X.; Xia, K.; Bauer, G.E.W.

    2011-01-01

    We compute thermal spin transfer (TST) torques in Fe-MgO-Fe tunnel junctions using a first principles wave-function-matching method. At room temperature, the TST in a junction with 3 MgO monolayers amounts to 10-7  J/m2/K, which is estimated to cause magnetization reversal for temperature difference

  3. Changes of junctions of endothelial cells in coronary sclerosis:A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Zi Zhang; Sun Lei

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the major cause of cardiovascular diseases, has been a leading contributor to morbidity and mortality in the United States and it has been on the rise globally. Endothelial cellecell junctions are critical for vascular integrity and maintenance of vascular function. Endothelial cell junctions dysfunction is the onset step of future coronary events and coronary artery dis-ease.

  4. Influence of Coupling between Junctions on Breakpoint Current in Intrinsic Josephson Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Mahfouzi, F.

    2007-04-01

    We study theoretically the current-voltage characteristics of intrinsic Josephson junctions in high-Tc superconductors. An oscillation of the breakpoint current on the outermost branch as a function of coupling α and dissipation β parameters is found. We explain this oscillation as a result of the creation of longitudinal plasma waves at the breakpoint with different wave numbers. We demonstrate the commensurability effect and predict a group behavior of the current-voltage characteristics for the stacks with a different number of junctions. A method to determine the wave number of longitudinal plasma waves from α and β dependence of the breakpoint current is suggested. We model the α and β dependence of the breakpoint current and obtain good agreement with the results of the simulation.

  5. Gap junctions - guards of excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroemlund, Line Waring; Jensen, Christa Funch; Qvortrup, Klaus; Delmar, Mario; Nielsen, Morten Schak

    2015-06-01

    Cardiomyocytes are connected by mechanical and electrical junctions located at the intercalated discs (IDs). Although these structures have long been known, it is becoming increasingly clear that their components interact. This review describes the involvement of the ID in electrical disturbances of the heart and focuses on the role of the gap junctional protein connexin 43 (Cx43). Current evidence shows that Cx43 plays a crucial role in organizing microtubules at the intercalated disc and thereby regulating the trafficking of the cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5 to the membrane.

  6. The adult abdominal neuromuscular junction of Drosophila: a model for synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebbar, Sarita; Hall, Rachel E; Demski, Sarah A; Subramanian, Aswati; Fernandes, Joyce J

    2006-09-01

    During its life cycle, Drosophila makes two sets of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), embryonic/larval and adult, which serve distinct stage-specific functions. During metamorphosis, the larval NMJs are restructured to give rise to their adult counterparts, a process that is integrated into the overall remodeling of the nervous system. The NMJs of the prothoracic muscles and the mesothoracic dorsal longitudinal (flight) muscles have been previously described. Given the diversity and complexity of adult muscle groups, we set out to examine the less complex abdominal muscles. The large bouton sizes of these NMJs are particularly advantageous for easy visualization. Specifically, we have characterized morphological attributes of the ventral abdominal NMJ and show that an embryonic motor neuron identity gene, dHb9, is expressed at these adult junctions. We quantified bouton numbers and size and examined the localization of synaptic markers. We have also examined the formation of boutons during metamorphosis and examined the localization of presynaptic markers at these stages. To test the usefulness of the ventral abdominal NMJs as a model system, we characterized the effects of altering electrical activity and the levels of the cell adhesion molecule, FasciclinII (FasII). We show that both manipulations affect NMJ formation and that the effects are specific as they can be rescued genetically. Our results indicate that both activity and FasII affect development at the adult abdominal NMJ in ways that are distinct from their larval and adult thoracic counterparts

  7. Genetic Ablation of Soluble TNF Does Not Affect Lesion Size and Functional Recovery after Moderate Spinal Cord Injury in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ditte Gry Ellman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI is followed by an instant increase in expression of the microglial-derived proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF within the lesioned cord. TNF exists both as membrane-anchored TNF (mTNF and as cleaved soluble TNF (solTNF. We previously demonstrated that epidural administration of a dominant-negative inhibitor of solTNF, XPro1595, to the contused spinal cord resulted in changes in Iba1 protein expression in microglia/macrophages, decreased lesion volume, and improved locomotor function. Here, we extend our studies using mice expressing mTNF, but no solTNF (mTNFΔ/Δ, to study the effect of genetic ablation of solTNF on SCI. We demonstrate that TNF levels were significantly decreased within the lesioned spinal cord 3 days after SCI in mTNFΔ/Δ mice compared to littermates. This decrease did, however, not translate into significant changes in other pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-5, IL-2, CXCL1, CCL2, or CCL5, despite a tendency towards increased IL-10 and decreased IL-1β, TNFR1, and TNFR2 levels in mTNFΔ/Δ mice. In addition, microglial and leukocyte infiltration, activation state (Iba1, CD11b, CD11c, CD45, and MHCII, lesion size, and functional outcome after moderate SCI were comparable between genotypes. Collectively, our data demonstrate that genetic ablation of solTNF does not significantly modulate postlesion outcome after SCI.

  8. Pallidal gap junctions-triggers of synchrony in Parkinson's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Bettina C; Heida, Tjitske; Zhao, Yan; van Gils, Stephan A; van Wezel, Richard J A

    2014-10-01

    Although increased synchrony of the neural activity in the basal ganglia may underlie the motor deficiencies exhibited in Parkinson's disease (PD), how this synchrony arises, propagates through the basal ganglia, and changes under dopamine replacement remains unknown. Gap junctions could play a major role in modifying this synchrony, because they show functional plasticity under the influence of dopamine and after neural injury. In this study, confocal imaging was used to detect connexin-36, the major neural gap junction protein, in postmortem tissues of PD patients and control subjects in the putamen, subthalamic nucleus (STN), and external and internal globus pallidus (GPe and GPi, respectively). Moreover, we quantified how gap junctions affect synchrony in an existing computational model of the basal ganglia. We detected connexin-36 in the human putamen, GPe, and GPi, but not in the STN. Furthermore, we found that the number of connexin-36 spots in PD tissues increased by 50% in the putamen, 43% in the GPe, and 109% in the GPi compared with controls. In the computational model, gap junctions in the GPe and GPi strongly influenced synchrony. The basal ganglia became especially susceptible to synchronize with input from the cortex when gap junctions were numerous and high in conductance. In conclusion, connexin-36 expression in the human GPe and GPi suggests that gap junctional coupling exists within these nuclei. In PD, neural injury and dopamine depletion could increase this coupling. Therefore, we propose that gap junctions act as a powerful modulator of synchrony in the basal ganglia. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  9. Left atrial size and function as predictors of new-onset of atrial fibrillation in patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper N; Dalsgaard, Morten; Greve, Anders M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Left atrial (LA) size and function change with chronically increased left ventricular (LV) filling pressures. It remains unclear whether these variations in LA parameters can predict new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS). METHODS: Data...... were obtained in asymptomatic patients with mild-to-moderate AS (2.5≤ transaortic Doppler velocity ≤4.0m/s), preserved LV ejection fraction (EF), no previous AF, and were enrolled in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study. Peak-aortic velocity, LA(max) volume & LA(min) volume were...... age was 66±9.7years, aortic valve area index 0.6±0.2cm(2)/m(2), LV mass 99.2±29.7g/m(2), LA(max) volume 34.6±12.0mL/m(2), LA(min) volume 17.9±9.3mL/m(2), LA-EF 50±15% and LA(con) volume 45±21mL/m(2). Baseline LA(min) volume predicted new-onset AF in Cox multivariable analysis (HR:2.3 [95%CI:1...

  10. Extended lifespan, reduced body size and leg skeletal muscle mass, and decreased mitochondrial function in clk-1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuhide; Noda, Yoshihiro; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Shirasawa, Takuji; Takahashi, Mayumi

    2014-10-01

    Mutational inactivation of clk-1, which encodes an enzyme necessary for the biosynthesis of coenzyme Q (CoQ), extends the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans. However, whether mammalian clk-1 regulates the lifespan of mice is not known because clk-1-deficiencies are embryonic lethal. Here, we investigated the lifespan of clk-1 transgenic mice (Tg96/I), which were rescued from embryonic lethality via the transgenic expression of mouse clk-1. Tg96/I mice lived longer and had smaller bodies than wild-type mice, but Tg96/I mice had CoQ levels equivalent to wild-type mice. The small-sized Tg96/I mice exhibited reduced whole-body oxygen consumption (VO2) during the dark period, and lean leg skeletal muscles with reduced mitochondrial VO2 and ATP content compared with wild-type mice. These findings indicate a close relationship between lifespan extension and decreased mitochondrial function, which was induced by the transgenic expression of clk-1, in leg skeletal muscles that exhibit high metabolic activity.

  11. Size-dependent effects of gold nanoparticles uptake on maturation and antitumor functions of human dendritic cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomić, Sergej; Ðokić, Jelena; Vasilijić, Saša; Ogrinc, Nina; Rudolf, Rebeka; Pelicon, Primož; Vučević, Dragana; Milosavljević, Petar; Janković, Srđa; Anžel, Ivan; Rajković, Jelena; Rupnik, Marjan Slak; Friedrich, Bernd; Colić, Miodrag

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are claimed as outstanding biomedical tools for cancer diagnostics and photo-thermal therapy, but without enough evidence on their potentially adverse immunological effects. Using a model of human dendritic cells (DCs), we showed that 10 nm- and 50 nm-sized GNPs (GNP10 and GNP50, respectively) were internalized predominantly via dynamin-dependent mechanisms, and they both impaired LPS-induced maturation and allostimulatory capacity of DCs, although the effect of GNP10 was more prominent. However, GNP10 inhibited LPS-induced production of IL-12p70 by DCs, and potentiated their Th2 polarization capacity, while GNP50 promoted Th17 polarization. Such effects of GNP10 correlated with a stronger inhibition of LPS-induced changes in Ca2+ oscillations, their higher number per DC, and more frequent extra-endosomal localization, as judged by live-cell imaging, proton, and electron microscopy, respectively. Even when released from heat-killed necrotic HEp-2 cells, GNP10 inhibited the necrotic tumor cell-induced maturation and functions of DCs, potentiated their Th2/Th17 polarization capacity, and thus, impaired the DCs' capacity to induce T cell-mediated anti-tumor cytotoxicity in vitro. Therefore, GNP10 could potentially induce more adverse DC-mediated immunological effects, compared to GNP50.

  12. Adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of nitroimidazole derivative on multiwalled carbon nanotube modified electrodes: influence of size and functionalization of nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jara-Ulloa, Paola; Canete-Rosales, Paulina; Nunez-Vergara, Luis J; Squella, Juan A., E-mail: asquella@ciq.uchile.c [University of Chile, Santiago (Chile). Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences Faculty. Bioelectrochemistry Lab.

    2011-07-01

    1-Methyl-4-nitro-2-bromine methylimidazole (4-NimMeBr), was electrochemically reduced on mercury, glassy carbon and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) modified electrodes. 4-NimMeBr was adsorbed on the MWCNT modified electrode thus permitting the implementation of an adsorptive stripping voltammetric (ASV) method. We have used 4-NimMeBr as a prototype electroactive nitro compound to study the effect of both the size of the nanotubes and its functionalization by oxidation. The oxidized MWCNT forms better dispersions than the non-oxidized, producing electrode surface with higher density of MWCNT as was determined by electrochemical mapping using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). Under the optimized conditions, the peak current was proportional to the concentration of 4-NimMeBr in the range of 10{sup -6} mol L{sup -1} to 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1} with detection and quantification limits of 4.41 x 10{sup -6} mol L{sup -1} and 6.21 x 10{sup -6} mol L{sup -1}, respectively. The sensibility of bare electrode was 0.01 {mu}A per mmol L{sup -1}, which was lower than the value of 5.34 and 6.97 mA per mmol L{sup -1} obtained using short and large oxidized MWCNT, respectively. (author)

  13. Functional Mesoporous Metal-Organic Frameworks for the Capture of Heavy Metal Ions and Size-Selective Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Qian-Rong; Yuan, Daqiang; Sculley, Julian; Li, Jian-Rong; Han, Zheng-Bo; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2010-12-20

    By using Zn₄O(CO₂)₆ as secondary building units (SBUs) and two extended ligands containing amino functional groups, TATAB and BTATB (TATAB = 4,4',4''-s-triazine-1,3,5-triyltri-p-aminobenzoate and BTATB = 4,4',4''-(benzene-1,3,5-triyltris(azanediyl))tribenzoate), two isostructural mesoporous metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) with cavities up to 2.73 nm, designated as PCN-100 and PCN-101 (PCN represents porous coordination network), have been synthesized. N₂ sorption isotherms of both PCN-100 and -101 showed typical type IV behavior, indicating their mesoporous nature. The TATAB ligand that comprises PCN-100 was employed to capture heavy metal ions (Cd(II) and Hg(II)) by constructing complexes within the pores with a possible coordination mode similar to that found in aminopyridinato complexes. This reveals that mesoporous materials such as PCN-100 can be applied in the elimination of heavy metal ions from waste liquid. In addition, both PCNs-100 and -101 exhibit size-selective catalytic activity toward the Knoevenagel condensation reaction.

  14. Dependence of the functional characteristics of thermomechanically processed titanium nickelide on the size of the structural elements of austenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakova-Vachiyan, K. A.; Ryklina, E. P.; Prokoshkin, S. D.; Dubinskii, S. M.

    2016-08-01

    Effect of the size of the elements of the mixed structure of B2 austenite, which consists of nanosized grains and subgrains of a polygonized substructure, on the functional properties of the Ti-50.7 at % Ni alloy preliminarily subjected to a low-temperature thermomechanical treatment (LTMT) and post-deformation annealing (PDA), has been investigated. The generation of the shape-memory effect (SME) and reversible two-way SME (TWSME) was performed using bending deformation. A maximum (for the Ti-Ni alloys) value of the recovery strain ɛr = 15.5 ± 0.5% has been obtained after annealing at 600°C for 1 h (recrystallized structure) and after LTMT + PDA at 430°C for 10 h (mixed nanocrystalline and nanosubgrain structure). The behavior of the parameters of the SME and TWSME in different structural states has been considered. A comparative study of the effect of the temperature and time of holding at a temperature upon the PDA on the formation of the microstructure and submicrostructure of the B2 austenite has been performed.

  15. Peltier Effect in Sub-micron-Size Metallic Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Akio; Yagami, Kojiro; Tulapurkar, Ashwin A.; Suzuki, Yoshishige; Kubota, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Yuasa, Shinji

    2005-01-01

    Resistance (R)-current (I) curves in trilayer CPP-GMR (current perpendicular to plane-giant magnetoresistance) elements show a parabolic baseline because of Joule heating, and abrupt jumps due to magnetization reversals. The bottom of the parabolic baseline shifts in one current direction for reasons that were previously unclear. Our study of the R-I characteristics of CPP elements with various structures showed (i) the shift in the R-I curve originates from Peltier cooling in the CPP elements; (ii) the cooling power per unit area of the CPP elements (˜105 W/cm2) is much greater than that of conventional thermoelectric materials (˜5 W/cm2).

  16. Gap junctions in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozental, R; Giaume, C; Spray, D C

    2000-04-01

    Synapses are classically defined as close connections between two nerve cells or between a neuronal cell and a muscle or gland cell across which a chemical signal (i.e., a neurotransmitter) and/or an electrical signal (i.e., current-carrying ions) can pass. The definition of synapse was developed by Charles Sherrington and by Ramon y Cajal at the beginning of this century and refined by John Eccles and Bernard Katz 50 years later; in this collection of papers, the definition of synapses is discussed further in the chapter by Mike Bennett. who provided the first functional demonstration of electrical transmission via gap junction channels between vertebrate neurons. As is evidenced by the range of topics covered in this issue, research dealing with gap junctions in the nervous system has expanded enormously in the past decade, major findings being that specific cell types in the brain expresses specific types of connexins and that expression patterns coincide with tissue compartmentalization and function and that these compartments change during development.

  17. Nano-Molecular Junctions on STM Tips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Huang∗; Jianshu Yang

    2011-01-01

    We present a technique for building metal-organic-metal junctions, which contain ten or fewer conjugated molecules between each of such junction, and the investigations of the I-V response of these junctions. The junctions are made by self assembling thiolated molecules onto gold coated tips for use in scanning tunneling microscopy. We show that this easy technique probes the qualitative properties of the molecules. Current-voltage characteristics of a Tour wire and a new molecular rectifier are presented.

  18. Nano-Molecular Junctions on STM Tips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Huang; Jianshu Yang

    2011-01-01

    We present a technique for building metal-organic-metal junctions, which contain ten or fewer conjugated molecules between each of such junction, and the investigations of the I-V response of these junctions.The junctions are made by self assembling thiolated molecules onto gold coated tips for use in scanning tunneling microscopy. We show that this easy technique probes the qualitative properties of the molecules. Currentvoltage characteristics of a Tour wire and a new molecular rectifier are presented.

  19. Current noise in tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, Moritz; Grabert, Hermann [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Strasse 3, 79104, Freiburg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    We study current fluctuations in tunnel junctions driven by a voltage source. The voltage is applied to the tunneling element via an impedance providing an electromagnetic environment of the junction. We use circuit theory to relate the fluctuations of the current flowing in the leads of the junction with the voltage fluctuations generated by the environmental impedance and the fluctuations of the tunneling current. The spectrum of current fluctuations is found to consist of three parts: a term arising from the environmental Johnson-Nyquist noise, a term due to the shot noise of the tunneling current and a third term describing the cross-correlation between these two noise sources. Our phenomenological theory reproduces previous results based on the Hamiltonian model for the dynamical Coulomb blockade and provides a simple understanding of the current fluctuation spectrum in terms of circuit theory and properties of the average current. Specific results are given for a tunnel junction driven through a resonator. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Josephson tunnel junction microwave attenuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V. P.; Shitov, S. V.; Shchukin, A. V.

    1993-01-01

    A new element for superconducting electronic circuitry-a variable attenuator-has been proposed, designed, and successfully tested. The principle of operation is based on the change in the microwave impedance of a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Josephson tunnel junction when dc bias...

  1. Charge transport in nanoscale junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-03

    Understanding the fundamentals of nanoscale charge transfer is pivotal for designing future nano-electronic devices. Such devices could be based on individual or groups of molecular bridges, nanotubes, nanoparticles, biomolecules and other 'active' components, mimicking wire, diode and transistor functions. These have operated in various environments including vacuum, air and condensed matter, in two- or three-electrode configurations, at ultra-low and room temperatures. Interest in charge transport in ultra-small device components has a long history and can be dated back to Aviram and Ratner's letter in 1974 (Chem. Phys. Lett. 29 277-83). So why is there a necessity for a special issue on this subject? The area has reached some degree of maturity, and even subtle geometric effects in the nanojunction and noise features can now be resolved and rationalized based on existing theoretical concepts. One purpose of this special issue is thus to showcase various aspects of nanoscale and single-molecule charge transport from experimental and theoretical perspectives. The main principles have 'crystallized' in our minds, but there is still a long way to go before true single-molecule electronics can be implemented. Major obstacles include the stability of electronic nanojunctions, reliable operation at room temperature, speed of operation and, last but not least, integration into large networks. A gradual transition from traditional silicon-based electronics to devices involving a single (or a few) molecule(s) therefore appears to be more viable from technologic and economic perspectives than a 'quantum leap'. As research in this area progresses, new applications emerge, e.g. with a view to characterizing interfacial charge transfer at the single-molecule level in general. For example, electrochemical experiments with individual enzyme molecules demonstrate that catalytic processes can be studied with nanometre resolution, offering a route towards optimizing biosensors at

  2. Manifestation of resonance-related chaos in coupled Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukrinov, Yu.M. [BLTP, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region, 141980 (Russian Federation); Hamdipour, M. [BLTP, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region, 141980 (Russian Federation); Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P.O. Box 45195-1159, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kolahchi, M.R. [Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P.O. Box 45195-1159, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Botha, A.E., E-mail: bothaae@unisa.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of South Africa, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria 0003 (South Africa); Suzuki, M. [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center and Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2012-11-01

    Manifestation of chaos in the temporal dependence of the electric charge is demonstrated through the calculation of the maximal Lyapunov exponent, phase–charge and charge–charge Lissajous diagrams and correlation functions. It is found that the number of junctions in the stack strongly influences the fine structure in the current–voltage characteristics and a strong proximity effect results from the nonperiodic boundary conditions. The observed resonance-related chaos exhibits intermittency. The criteria for a breakpoint region with no chaos are obtained. Such criteria could clarify recent experimental observations of variations in the power output from intrinsic Josephson junctions in high temperature superconductors.

  3. Manifestation of resonance-related chaos in coupled Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Hamdipour, M.; Kolahchi, M. R.; Botha, A. E.; Suzuki, M.

    2012-11-01

    Manifestation of chaos in the temporal dependence of the electric charge is demonstrated through the calculation of the maximal Lyapunov exponent, phase-charge and charge-charge Lissajous diagrams and correlation functions. It is found that the number of junctions in the stack strongly influences the fine structure in the current-voltage characteristics and a strong proximity effect results from the nonperiodic boundary conditions. The observed resonance-related chaos exhibits intermittency. The criteria for a breakpoint region with no chaos are obtained. Such criteria could clarify recent experimental observations of variations in the power output from intrinsic Josephson junctions in high temperature superconductors.

  4. Tunneling Conductance in Normal Metal/Insulator/Triplet Superconductor Junction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-Wei

    2005-01-01

    Tunneling conductance in normal metal/insulator/triplet superconductor junctions is studied theoretically as a function of the bias voltage at zero temperature and finite temperature. The results show there are zero-bias conductance peak, zero-bias conductance dip and double-minimum structures in the spectra for p-wave superconductor junctions. The existence of such structures in the conductance spectrum can be taken as evidence that the pairing symmetry of Sr2RuO4 is p-wave symmetry.

  5. Negative Differential Resistance in Atomic Carbon Chain-Graphene Junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安丽萍; 刘春梅; 刘念华

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of atomic carbon chain-graphene junctions by using the density-functionla theory combining with the non-equilibrium Green's functions. The results show that the transport properties are sensitively dependent on the contact geometry of carbon chain. From the calculated I-V curve we find negative differential resistance (NDR) in the two types of junctions. The NDR can be considered as a result of molecular orbitals moving related to the bias window.

  6. Quantitatively accurate calculations of conductance and thermopower of molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Jin, Chengjun; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2013-01-01

    ) connected to gold electrodes using first‐principles calculations. We find excellent agreement with experiments for both molecules when exchange–correlation effects are described by the many‐body GW approximation. In contrast, results from standard density functional theory (DFT) deviate from experiments......‐interaction errors and image charge effects. Finally, we show that the conductance and thermopower of the considered junctions are relatively insensitive to the metal–molecule bonding geometry. Our results demonstrate that electronic and thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions can be predicted from first‐principles...... calculations when exchange–correlation effects are taken properly into account....

  7. Nonlinear electrical properties of Si three-terminal junction devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fantao, Meng; Jie, Sun; Graczyk, Mariusz

    2010-01-01

    This letter reports on the realization and characterization of silicon three-terminal junction devices made in a silicon-on-insulator wafer. Room temperature electrical measurements show that the fabricated devices exhibit pronounced nonlinear electrical properties inherent to ballistic electron...... transport in a three-terminal ballistic junction (TBJ) device. The results show that room temperature functional TBJ devices can be realized in a semiconductor material other than high-mobility III-V semiconductor heterostructures and provide a simple design principle for compact silicon devices...

  8. Multiband model for tunneling in MgB2 junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, A.; Golubov, A.A.; Rogalla, H.; Dolgov, O.V.; Kortus, J.; Kong, Y.; Jepsen, O.; Andersen, O.K.

    2002-01-01

    A theoretical model for quasiparticle and Josephson tunneling in multiband superconductors is developed and applied to MgB2-based junctions. The gap functions in different bands in MgB2 are obtained from an extended Eliashberg formalism, using the results of band structure calculations. The temperat

  9. Design considerations for the Tandem Junction Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzen, W. T.; Carbajal, B. G.; Hardy, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    Structure and operation of the tandem junction cell (TJC) are described. The impact of using only back contacts is discussed. A model is presented which explains operation of the TJC in terms of transistor action. The model is applied to predict TJC performance as a function of physical parameters.

  10. Large negative differential conductance in single-molecule break junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perrin, Mickael L.; Frisenda, Riccardo; Koole, Max; Seldenthuis, Johannes S.; Gil, Jose A. Celis; Valkenier, Hennie; Hummelen, Jan C.; Renaud, Nicolas; Grozema, Ferdinand C.; Thijssen, Joseph M.; Dulic, Diana; van der Zant, Herre S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular electronics aims at exploiting the internal structure and electronic orbitals of molecules to construct functional building blocks(1). To date, however, the overwhelming majority of experimentally realized single-molecule junctions can be described as single quantum dots, where transport i

  11. Large negative differential conductance in single-molecule break junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perrin, Mickael L.; Frisenda, Riccardo; Koole, Max; Seldenthuis, Johannes S.; Gil, Jose A. Celis; Valkenier, Hennie; Hummelen, Jan C.; Renaud, Nicolas; Grozema, Ferdinand C.; Thijssen, Joseph M.; Dulic, Diana; van der Zant, Herre S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular electronics aims at exploiting the internal structure and electronic orbitals of molecules to construct functional building blocks(1). To date, however, the overwhelming majority of experimentally realized single-molecule junctions can be described as single quantum dots, where transport i

  12. Stability of large-area molecular junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Hylke B.; Kronemeijer, Auke J.; Harkema, Jan; van Hal, Paul A.; Smits, Edsger C. P.; de Leeuw, Dago M.; Blom, Paul W. M.

    The stability of molecular junctions is crucial for any application of molecular electronics. Degradation of molecular junctions when exposed to ambient conditions is regularly observed. In this report the stability of large-area molecular junctions under ambient conditions for more than two years

  13. Soliton bunching in annular Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vernik, I.V; Lazarides, Nickos; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    1996-01-01

    By studying soliton (fluxon) motion in long annular Josephson junctions it is possible to avoid the influence of the boundaries and soliton-soliton collisions present in linear junctions. A new experimental design consisting of a niobium coil placed on top of an annular junction has been used...

  14. Long Range Magnetic Interaction between Josephson Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    1995-01-01

    A new model for magnetic coupling between long Josephson junctions is proposed. The coupling mechanism is a result of the magnetic fields outside the junctions and is consequently effective over long distances between junctions. We give specific expressions for the form and magnitude of the inter...

  15. Dynamics of pi-junction interferometer circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornkev, V.K.; Mozhaev, P.B.; Borisenko, I.V.;

    2002-01-01

    The pi-junction superconducting circuit dynamics was studied by means of numerical simulation technique. Parallel arrays consisting of Josephson junctions of both 0- and pi-type were studied as a model of high-T-c grain-boundary Josephson junction. The array dynamics and the critical current...

  16. Dynamics of pi-junction interferometer circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornkev, V.K.; Mozhaev, P.B.; Borisenko, I.V.

    2002-01-01

    The pi-junction superconducting circuit dynamics was studied by means of numerical simulation technique. Parallel arrays consisting of Josephson junctions of both 0- and pi-type were studied as a model of high-T-c grain-boundary Josephson junction. The array dynamics and the critical current...

  17. Biophysical characteristics of gap junctions in vascular wall cells: implications for vascular biology and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.R. Brink

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available The role gap junction channels play in the normal and abnormal functioning of the vascular wall is the subject of much research. The biophysical properties of gap junctions are an essential component in understanding how gap junctions function to allow coordinated relaxation and contraction of vascular smooth muscle. This study reviews the properties thus far elucidated and relates those properties to tissue function. We ask how biophysical and structural properties such as gating, permselectivity, subconductive states and channel type (heteromeric vs homotypic vs heterotypic might affect vascular smooth muscle tone.

  18. Controllable 0-π Josephson junctions containing a ferromagnetic spin valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingrich, E. C.; Niedzielski, Bethany M.; Glick, Joseph A.; Wang, Yixing; Miller, D. L.; Loloee, Reza; Pratt, W. P., Jr.; Birge, Norman O.

    2016-06-01

    Superconductivity and ferromagnetism are antagonistic forms of order, and rarely coexist. Many interesting new phenomena occur, however, in hybrid superconducting/ferromagnetic systems. For example, a Josephson junction containing a ferromagnetic material can exhibit an intrinsic phase shift of π in its ground state for certain thicknesses of the material. Such `π-junctions' were first realized experimentally in 2001 (refs ,), and have been proposed as circuit elements for both high-speed classical superconducting computing and for quantum computing. Here we demonstrate experimentally that the phase state of a Josephson junction containing two ferromagnetic layers can be toggled between 0 and π by changing the relative orientation of the two magnetizations. These controllable 0-π junctions have immediate applications in cryogenic memory, where they serve as a necessary component to an ultralow power superconducting computer. Such a fully superconducting computer is estimated to be orders of magnitude more energy-efficient than current semiconductor-based supercomputers. Phase-controllable junctions also open up new possibilities for superconducting circuit elements such as superconducting `programmable logic', where they could function in superconducting analogues to field-programmable gate arrays.

  19. Generators of the auxiliary signals based on the Josephson junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Kychak

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and problem statement. Generators based on the Josephson junctions are advisable to use to ensure the generation of signals in the wavelength range from infrared to millimeter. It is necessary to build a dependence of the phase difference of the wave functions superconductor Josephson junctions from the parameters of the equivalent circuit of the resistive shunted tunnel junction. Solution of the problem. An analytical expression for calculating the dependence of the instantaneous voltage values from the parameters of the equivalent circuit resistive shunted Josephson junction is obtained. The dependence of the oscillation period from the parameters of the equivalent circuit elements is researched and a comparison of its values with the period of the output voltage of the generator based on three Josephson junctions is carried out. Conclusions. It is shown that the synchronization leads to decrement in the line width generation and increment the output voltage. Comparison of theoretical calculations and computer modeling shows that the differences do not exceed 25% and therefore they can be used for approximate calculations.

  20. Molecular mechanisms of gap junction mutations in myelinating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargiannidou, Irene; Markoullis, Kyriaki; Kleopa, Kleopas A

    2010-09-01

    There is an emerging group of neurological disorders that result from genetic mutations affecting gap junction proteins in myelinating cells. The X-linked form of Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT1X) is caused by numerous mutations in the GJB1 gene encoding the gap junction protein connexin32 (Cx32), which is expressed in both Schwann cells in the PNS and oligodendrocytes in the CNS. Patients with CMT1X present mainly with a progressive peripheral neuropathy, showing mixed axonal and demyelinating features. In many cases there is also clinical or subclinical involvement of the CNS with acute or chronic phenotypes of encephalopathy. Furthermore, mutations in the GJA12/GJC2 gene encoding the gap junction protein Cx47, which is expressed in oligodendrocytes, have been identified in families with progressive leukodystrophy, known as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease, as well as in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia. Recent studies have provided insights into the pattern of gap junction protein expression and function in CNS and PNS myelinating cells. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo disease models have clarified some of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these disorders. Here we provide an overview of the clinical, genetic, and neurobiological aspects of gap junction disorders affecting the nervous system.