WorldWideScience

Sample records for jump rope program

  1. Self-concept responses of children to participation in an eight-week precision jump-rope program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, B D; Vaccaro, P; Benedict, G J

    1985-12-01

    Two measures of self-concept were administered to 11 children, aged from 9 to 11 yr., before and after 8 wk. of participation in a guided exercise program of precision rope jumping. Despite the fact that the children evidenced as a group high self-concept at the outset, a significant improvement on this measure appeared after the jump-rope regimen. This psychological change was noted while there was no alteration in the physiological indices of body composition and cardiovascular fitness.

  2. Strawberry Shortcake and Other Jumping Rope Ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Polly K.; Taylor, Michaell K.

    Information, guidelines, and activities for jumping rope are given. A short history of jumping rope explains how it evolved from a spring ritual for men to a play activity involving mostly young girls. Physical and cultural reasons are given as to why jumping rope has been more a sport for girls than for boys. Research studies are noted which show…

  3. Strawberry Shortcake and Other Jumping Rope Ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Polly K.; Taylor, Michaell K.

    Information, guidelines, and activities for jumping rope are given. A short history of jumping rope explains how it evolved from a spring ritual for men to a play activity involving mostly young girls. Physical and cultural reasons are given as to why jumping rope has been more a sport for girls than for boys. Research studies are noted which show…

  4. The aerodynamics of jumping rope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristoff, Jeffrey; Stone, Howard

    2011-03-01

    We present the results of a combined theoretical and experimental investigation of the motion of a rotating string that is held at both ends (i.e. a jump rope). In particular, we determine how the surrounding fluid affects the shape of the string at high Reynolds numbers: the string bends toward the axis of rotation, thereby reducing its total drag. We derive a pair of coupled non-linear differential equations that describe the shape, the numerical solution of which compares well with asymptotic approximations and experiments. Implications for successful skipping will be discussed.

  5. Rope Jumping: A Preliminary Developmental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickstrom, Ralph L.

    The basic movement pattern used in skilled individual rope jumping performance was determined and used as a model against which to evaluate the rope jumping form used by children at various levels of skills development. The techniques of adults and nursery school children were filmed and analyzed. The specific causes of unsuccessful attempts were…

  6. Team Sports--Jump Roping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebraska State Dept. of Education, Lincoln.

    Rope skipping contributes to the development of agility, coordination, rhythm, and endurance. It is practical and fun for both sexes. A high degree of motor ability, excellent timing, precision of movement, cooperation, perseverance, and concentration are required. This guide describes rope skipping variations and games, including chants and songs…

  7. Jumping Rope at Day of Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Sarah Dastugue, 11, leaps in the air as Libby Knox, 9, swings a jump rope. The children were participants in Nickelodeon's Worldwide Day of Play celebration at Stennis Space Center (SSC) on Oct. 1. On the day of the event, children all over the world participate in physical activities as part of the celebration.

  8. Teaching Jump Rope to Children with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Lauren J.; Schedlin, Haley; Pierce, Tristan

    2009-01-01

    This article presents strategies for jumping rope for children with visual impairments. Giving choices related to the types of rope and the use of mats is important. In addition, using appropriate instructional strategies and modifications will make jumping rope a skill that the children will enjoy and will lead to their involvement in other…

  9. The effects of rope or weighted rope jump training on strength, coordination and proprioception in adolescent female volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, D; Duzgun, I; Baltaci, G; Karacan, S; Colakoglu, F

    2011-06-01

    The aim was to assess the effects of a 12-week "rope jumping" and "weighted rope jumping" training programs on functional parameters including multi-joint coordination and proprioception, strength, endurance in adolescent female volleyball players. Pretest posttest experimental design. Weighted Rope Training group (N.=9; 15±1 years), Rope Training group (N.=9; 14.1±1.3 years) and Controls (N.=7; 14.4±1.3 years). Motor coordination, proprioception, strength and endurance of the lower extremities with concentric and eccentric performances in closed kinetic chain on multi joint system assessed by the Monitorized Squat system. Absolute average error (cm) and the standard deviation for coordination and proprioception, Peak Force (N), Total Work (Nm), Average Power (Nm/s), Maximal Speed for strength and endurance tests were calculated. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney U test were utilized. Weighted rope jump group had significant decrease for the deviation results of coordination on the concentric and eccentric phases for both legs (PRope jump and weighted rope jump groups had significantly lower results on non visible second movement deviation (PRope Training group in comparison to controls (PRope Training and control groups improved in concentric maximal speed (PRope Training group (Prope jump to training programs improves joint repositioning and coordination. Weighted Rope Training group got greater gains for coordination and eccentric endurance parameters for lower extremities in a closed kinetic chain.

  10. Jump Rope Skills for Fun and Fitness in Grades K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michiels Hernandez, Barbara L.; Gober, Donna; Boatwright, Douglas; Strickland, George

    2009-01-01

    A jump rope is a remarkable piece of exercise equipment. It is inexpensive and easy to store, and it can be used by a wide variety of age groups to improve cardiovascular fitness, increase agility, and tone the body's muscles all at the same time. Consequently, the teaching of jump rope skills is highly suitable for physical education classes in…

  11. Jump Rope Training: Balance and Motor Coordination in Preadolescent Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trecroci, Athos; Cavaggioni, Luca; Caccia, Riccardo; Alberti, Giampietro

    2015-12-01

    General physical practice and multidimensional exercises are essential elements that allow young athletes to enhance their coordinative traits, balance, and strength and power levels, which are linked to the learning soccer-specific skills. Jumping rope is a widely-used and non-specific practical method for the development of athletic conditioning, balance and coordination in several disciplines. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a short-term training protocol including jumping rope (JR) exercises on motor abilities and body balance in young soccer players. Twenty-four preadolescent soccer players were recruited and placed in two different groups. In the Experimental group (EG), children performed JR training at the beginning of the training session. The control group (CG), executed soccer specific drills. Harre circuit test (HCT) and Lower Quarter Y balance test (YBT-LQ) were selected to evaluate participant's motor ability (e.g. ability to perform rapidly a course with different physical tasks such as somersault and passages above/below obstacles ) and to assess unilateral dynamic lower limb balance after 8 weeks of training. Statistical analysis consisted of paired t-test and mixed analysis of variance scores to determine any significant interactions. Children who performed jumping rope exercises showed a significant decrease of 9% (p 0.05, ES = 0.05-0.2) from pre- to post-training. A training-by-group interaction was found for the composite score in both legs (p 0.14). Our findings demonstrated that JR practice within regular soccer training enhanced general motor coordination and balance in preadolescent soccer players. Therefore, the inclusion of JR practice within regular soccer training session should encouraged to improve children's motor skills. Key pointsPerforming jumping rope exercises within a regular soccer program can be an additional method to improve balance and motor coordination.The performance improvement in the

  12. The effects of dance music jump rope exercise on pulmonary function and body mass index after music jump rope exercise in overweight adults in 20’s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, KyoChul

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a dance music jump rope exercise on changes Pulmonary Function and body mass index in female overweight subjects in their 20’s. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly assigned to the dance music jump rope exercise group and the stationary cycle exercise group. All subjects have conducted the exercises three times a week for four weeks. Pulmonary function was evaluated using a spirometer, and body mass index was evaluated using an InBody 3.0. [Results] The findings of this study showed significant improvements in the voluntary capacity and body mass index of the experimental groups. Vital capacity was higher in the music jump rope exercise group than the stationary cycle exercise group, and body mass index was lower in the music jump rope exercise group than the stationary cycle exercise group. [Conclusion] This study showed that the dance music jump rope exercise can be used to improve vital capacity and body mass index. PMID:28878460

  13. The effects of dance music jump rope exercise on pulmonary function and body mass index after music jump rope exercise in overweight adults in 20's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, KyoChul

    2017-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a dance music jump rope exercise on changes Pulmonary Function and body mass index in female overweight subjects in their 20's. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly assigned to the dance music jump rope exercise group and the stationary cycle exercise group. All subjects have conducted the exercises three times a week for four weeks. Pulmonary function was evaluated using a spirometer, and body mass index was evaluated using an InBody 3.0. [Results] The findings of this study showed significant improvements in the voluntary capacity and body mass index of the experimental groups. Vital capacity was higher in the music jump rope exercise group than the stationary cycle exercise group, and body mass index was lower in the music jump rope exercise group than the stationary cycle exercise group. [Conclusion] This study showed that the dance music jump rope exercise can be used to improve vital capacity and body mass index.

  14. Timing perception and motor coordination on rope jumping in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Yi; Liaw, Lih-Jiun; Liang, Jing-Min; Hung, Wei-Tso; Guo, Lan-Yuen; Wu, Wen-Lan

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate timing perception ability and motor coordination in children with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) while rope jumping at different rates. Rope jumping at (1) a constant tempo of 100 for 15 s (RJ-C) and (2) two randomly permutated tempos (80, 100, or 120) for 15 s (RJ-V). The "timing variation while jumping", "timing variation while whirling", and "hand-foot deviation time" in each rope jumping cycle were recorded, to assess the time estimation ability. 10 children with ADHD (9.65 ± 1.27 years) and 10 children without ADHD (9.93 ± 1.54 years) were recruited. The ADHD group showed greater variation in time between the foot jumping and the rope whirling tasks. Also, the median value of hand-foot deviation time was greater in the ADHD group (3.34 ms) than in the control group (1.75 ms). In RJ-V, the control group was able to modify their pace and respond to the target speed in the post-phase, while the ADHD group could not. Impaired timing perception leads to less accurate performance during rope jumping for ADHD children. The findings also reveal that poor hand-foot coordination results in poor control of simultaneous movements of the upper and lower limbs during rope jumping. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Jump Rope Training: Balance and Motor Coordination in Preadolescent Soccer Players

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trecroci, Athos; Cavaggioni, Luca; Caccia, Riccardo; Alberti, Giampietro

    2015-01-01

    ... to the learning soccer-specific skills. Jumping rope is a widely-used and non-specific practical method for the development of athletic conditioning, balance and coordination in several disciplines...

  16. Possibility of stretch-shortening cycle movement training using a jump rope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaguchi, Kazuyoshi; Sugiura, Hiroki; Demura, Shinichi

    2014-03-01

    Although jumping rope has been said to be a typical stretch-shortening cycle movement (SSC) from the dynamic analysis of muscle contraction, there are few research reports that focus on this point. Recently, the function of SSC of the legs with respect to the jumping movement has been evaluated using the rebound jump index (RJ-index). This study aimed to examine the possibility of using rope jumping in SSC training by comparing the RJ-index of the rebound jump (standard value) and the 2 different methods of rope jumping. The subjects included 76 healthy young men. Most subjects were involved in routine sports training 2-3 times per week. They performed the rebound jump (5 consecutive vertical jumps) and both a basic and a double-under jump with the jump rope, according to each participant's individual style (rhythm or timing). The RJ-index was calculated using the ground contact time and the jump height. The reliabilities of the RJ-index in the basic (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.85) and double-under jump (0.92) were high, and the RJ-index of the latter (1.34 ± 0.24) was significantly higher than that of the former (0.60 ± 0.21). In the case of a group with inferior SSC ability, the RJ-index of the rebound jump only showed a significant correlation with the double-under but not with the basic jump. When using the RJ-index (1.97 ± 0.38) of the rebound jump as a criterion, the double-under-using about 70% of the SSC ability-may be effective for reinforcement of SSC ability.

  17. Female recreational athletes demonstrate different knee biomechanics from male counterparts during jumping rope and turning activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanikawa, Hidenori; Matsumoto, Hideo; Harato, Kengo; Kiriyama, Yoshimori; Suda, Yasunori; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Nagura, Takeo

    2014-01-01

    A variety of athletic exercises are performed in sports training or rehabilitation after knee injuries. However, it remains unclear whether males and females exhibit similar joint loading during the various athletic motions. The purpose of this study was to identify gender differences in knee biomechanics during the athletic motions. Three-dimensional knee kinematics and kinetics were investigated in 20 recreational athletes (10 males and 10 females) while jumping rope, backward running, side running, side-to-side running, side-to-forward running, inside turning, and outside turning. The strengths of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles, the knee joint force, the knee joint angle, and the knee joint moment were compared between males and females using one-tailed t tests. Peak knee anterior force was greater in female recreational athletes than in their male counterparts during jumping rope, side-to-forward running, inside turning, and outside turning. Female subjects displayed greater peak knee abduction angles and greater peak knee flexion moments while jumping rope compared to their male counterparts. There were no significant differences between the sexes in knee kinematics and kinetics in the frontal and transverse planes during running and turning motions. Female recreational athletes exhibited significantly different knee biomechanics compared with male counterparts during jumping rope and turning motions.

  18. The Impact of Rope Jumping Exercise on Physical Fitness of Visually Impaired Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao-Chien; Lin, Shih-Yen

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of rope jumping exercise on the health-related physical fitness of visually impaired students. The participants' physical fitness was examined before and after the training. The exercise intensity of the experimental group was controlled with Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) (values…

  19. The Impact of Rope Jumping Exercise on Physical Fitness of Visually Impaired Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao-Chien; Lin, Shih-Yen

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of rope jumping exercise on the health-related physical fitness of visually impaired students. The participants' physical fitness was examined before and after the training. The exercise intensity of the experimental group was controlled with Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) (values…

  20. Predicting changes in high-intensity intermittent running performance with acute responses to short jump rope workouts in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, Martin; Rabbani, Alireza; Beigi, Hamid Taghi

    2014-09-01

    The aims of the present study were to 1) examine whether individual HR and RPE responses to a jump rope workout could be used to predict changes in high-intensity intermittent running performance in young athletes, and 2) examine the effect of using different methods to determine a smallest worthwhile change (SWC) on the interpretation of group-average and individual changes in the variables. Before and after an 8-week high-intensity training program, 13 children athletes (10.6 ± 0.9 yr) performed a high-intensity running test (30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test, VIFT) and three jump rope workouts, where HR and RPE were collected. The SWC was defined as either 1/5(th) of the between-subjects standard deviation or the variable typical error (CV). After training, the large ~9% improvement in VIFT was very likely, irrespective of the SWC. Standardized changes were greater for RPE (very likely-to-almost certain, ~30-60% changes, ~4-16 times >SWC) than for HR (likely-to-very likely, ~2-6% changes, ~1-6 times >SWC) responses. Using the CV as the SWC lead to the smallest and greatest changes for HR and RPE, respectively. The predictive value for individual performance changes tended to be better for HR (74-92%) than RPE (69%), and greater when using the CV as the SWC. The predictive value for no-performance change was low for both measures (jump rope workouts can predict substantial improvements in high-intensity running performance at the individual level. Using the CV of test measures as the SWC might be the better option. Key pointsDecreased HR and RPE responses to short jump rope workouts can be confidently used to track improvements in high-intensity intermittent running performance in children familiarized with this exercise mode. Rope jumping is a particularly convenient exercise, since it can be performed in a restricted space and allows the testing of a large number of athletes simultaneously.We recommend using the CV of the measures (i.e., 3 and 4% for HR and RPE

  1. Relationship Between Jump Rope Double Unders and Sprint Performance in Elementary Schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaguchi, Kazuyoshi; Demura, Shinichi; Omoya, Masashi

    2015-11-01

    According to dynamic analyses of muscle contraction, jump rope is a typical stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) movement. It has been reported that the relationship with SSC is higher in double unders than in single unders (basic jumps); however, the relationship between jump rope and sprint performances has not been extensively studied. To clarify this relationship in elementary schoolchildren, we compared the sprint speed and SSC ability of children who were grouped according to gender and ability. The subjects were 143 elementary fifth and sixth graders (78 boys, 65 girls). The consecutive maximal number of double unders, reactivity index (index of SSC ability) by Myotest, and 20-m sprint time were measured. According to the mean of jump rope records, the children were divided into a superior ability group (more than average + 0.5 SD) and an inferior ability group (less than average - 0.5 SD) for each gender. In both genders, a significant difference was found in the 20-m sprint time between the inferior and superior ability groups. The times for the superior ability groups (boys, 3.75 ± 0.23 seconds; girls, 4.02 ± 0.24 seconds) were excellent compared with the inferior ability groups (boys, 4.17 ± 0.32 seconds; girls, 4.23 ± 0.21 seconds). This effect size was higher in boys (1.44) than in girls (0.93). The reactivity index in the superior ability group was excellent compared with that in the inferior ability group. In conclusion, children who perform better in double unders are also faster during a 20-m sprint run. This tendency may be higher in boys. Classic jump rope training, such as double unders, should be effective as elementary plyometrics for improving the sprint ability of children.

  2. Predicting changes in high-intensity intermittent running performance with acute responses to short jump rope workouts in children

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buchheit, Martin; Rabbani, Alireza; Beigi, Hamid Taghi

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to 1) examine whether individual HR and RPE responses to a jump rope workout could be used to predict changes in high-intensity intermittent running performance in young athletes, and 2...

  3. THE EFFECT OF ROPE JUMPING TRAINING OF DIFFERENT SPEEDS ON ANAEROBIC POWER

    OpenAIRE

    ŞAHİN, Gülşah

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effect of rope jumpingtraining on anaerobic vertical, horizontal, mean and peak power of rope jumpingat different speeds in trained females. The study was comprised of 20 trainedfemales as the low-speed jumping group (n=10, mean age 21.4±2.3 years, body weight54.30±6.03 kg, height 161.30±6.99 cm) and the high-speed jumping group (n=10,mean age 21±1.8 years, body weight: 56.50±5.91 kg, height 163.20±7.02 cm). Thejumping speed was adjusted using a ...

  4. Wire rope improvement program. Final report. [For draglines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alzheimer, J.M.; Anderson, W.E.; Beeman, G.H.; Dudder, G.B.; Erickson, R.; Glaeser, W.A.; Jentgen, R.L.; Rice, R.R.; Strope, L.A.

    1981-09-01

    Activities in five major areas were undertaken during the WRIP: experiments using PNL-developed bend-over-sheave fatigue test machines to generate data on which to base a model for predicting large-diameter rope performance from that of small-diameter ropes; bend-over-sheave fatigue testing to determine differences in rope failure rates at varying rope loads; analyses to determine how wire ropes actually fail; development of a load sensor to record and quantity operational loads on drag and hoist ropes; and technology transfer activities to disseminate useful program findings to coal mine operators. Data obtained during the 6-year program support are included. High loads on wire ropes are damaging. As an adjunct, however, potentially useful countermeasures to high loads were identified. Large-diameter rope bend-over-sheave performance can be predicted from small-diameter rope test behavior, over some ranges.

  5. Biometric hoof evaluation of athletic horses of show jumping, barrel, long rope and polo modalities

    OpenAIRE

    Sampaio,Breno Fernandes Barreto; Zúccari,Carmem Estefânia Serra Neto; Shiroma,Monica Yurie Machado; Bertozzo,Beatriz Ramos; Leonel,Ellen Cristina Rivas; Surjus,Ricardo da Silva; Gomes,Monique Maitê Malho; Costa e Silva,Eliane Vianna da

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate, through biometry, the forelimb hoof of horses participating in show jumping, barrel, long rope and polo competitions. Thirty subjects were assessed in relation to each competition (total of 120 animals). The linear measurements (cm) included the dorsal length of the toe; medial and lateral lengths of the quarter; medial and lateral heights of the quarter; lateral and medial lengths of the heel; medial and lateral heights of the heel; hoof length; hoof width; frog...

  6. Jump Rope Training: Balance and Motor Coordination in Preadolescent Soccer Players

    OpenAIRE

    Trecroci, Athos; Cavaggioni, Luca; Caccia, Riccardo; Alberti, Giampietro

    2015-01-01

    General physical practice and multidimensional exercises are essential elements that allow young athletes to enhance their coordinative traits, balance, and strength and power levels, which are linked to the learning soccer-specific skills. Jumping rope is a widely-used and non-specific practical method for the development of athletic conditioning, balance and coordination in several disciplines. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a short-term training protocol incl...

  7. Jump Rope Training: Balance and Motor Coordination in Preadolescent Soccer Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athos Trecroci, Luca Cavaggioni, Riccardo Caccia, Giampietro Alberti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available General physical practice and multidimensional exercises are essential elements that allow young athletes to enhance their coordinative traits, balance, and strength and power levels, which are linked to the learning soccer-specific skills. Jumping rope is a widely-used and non-specific practical method for the development of athletic conditioning, balance and coordination in several disciplines. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a short-term training protocol including jumping rope (JR exercises on motor abilities and body balance in young soccer players. Twenty-four preadolescent soccer players were recruited and placed in two different groups. In the Experimental group (EG, children performed JR training at the beginning of the training session. The control group (CG, executed soccer specific drills. Harre circuit test (HCT and Lower Quarter Y balance test (YBT-LQ were selected to evaluate participant’s motor ability (e.g. ability to perform rapidly a course with different physical tasks such as somersault and passages above/below obstacles and to assess unilateral dynamic lower limb balance after 8 weeks of training. Statistical analysis consisted of paired t-test and mixed analysis of variance scores to determine any significant interactions. Children who performed jumping rope exercises showed a significant decrease of 9% (p 0.05, ES = 0.05-0.2 from pre- to post-training. A training-by-group interaction was found for the composite score in both legs (p 0.14. Our findings demonstrated that JR practice within regular soccer training enhanced general motor coordination and balance in preadolescent soccer players. Therefore, the inclusion of JR practice within regular soccer training session should encouraged to improve children’s motor skills.

  8. Effects of rope-jump training on the os calcis stiffness index of postpubescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Mark G; Lutz, Bob

    2002-12-01

    The specific aims of the study were to 1) determine what effects dose-dependent rope jumping had on os calcis stiffness index (OCSI) and 2) determine whether OCSI values measured by quantitative ultrasound (QUS) were dependent or independent of the values of bone mineral content (BMC) determined by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at the lumbar spine and proximal femur (femoral neck; greater trochanter). Upon study entry, girls were randomly assigned to either one of two treatment groups (high volume; low volume) or a control group. Thirty-seven high school girls were recruited to participate in the study. QUS and DXA measurements were made at baseline and at 4-month follow-up. Students in the high-volume and low-volume groups jumped rope for 10 and 5 min, respectively. The follow-up mean OCSI values for the high-volume, low-volume, and control conditions were 103.95 +/- 12.55, 102.09 +/- 12.70, and 99.05 +/- 9.84, respectively. A statistically significant difference (P = 0.033) was identified between the high-volume and control groups. Baseline and follow-up OCSI values were significantly correlated with baseline and follow-up BMC measures of the femoral neck (r = 0.60, r = 0.59), greater trochanter (r = 0.47, r = 0.40), and lumbar spine (r = 0.56, r = 0.56). High-volume rope jumping increases the OCSI more than the control condition in postpubescent girls. Furthermore, the OCSI measured by QUS is moderately related to proximal femur and lumbar spine BMC measured by DXA.

  9. ACL injury while jumping rope in a patient with an unintended increase in the tibial slope after an opening wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kwang Am; Lee, Su Chan; Hwang, Seung Hyun; Song, Moon Bok

    2009-08-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) is an accepted surgical technique for the treatment of medial compartmental arthrosis of the knee in younger patients. Compared to total knee arthroplasty, HTO may be a good choice in patients who wish to continue with heavy labor and/or impact sports. Based on the rehabilitation protocol after HTO, impact sports, such as running, jumping rope, and full sports activities, are generally permitted 6 months postoperatively. Jumping rope is an excellent form of aerobic exercise, and when done properly, jumping rope can lead to a dramatic improvement in rehabilitation and full sports activities. However, an adequate evaluation should be performed prior to initiating impact sports. We present the case of a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament that occurred in a patient with an unintended increase in the tibial slope after an opening wedge HTO who was jumping rope.

  10. Aerobic Requirements for and Heart Rate Responses to Variations in Rope Jumping Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Ken; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Highly skilled ropejumpers can maintain their exercise intensity by varying their jumping technique. Research on heart rate responses and aerobic requirements of different jumping techniques is discussed. Methodology and data are reported. (Author/JL)

  11. Principal components analysis to characterise fatigue-related changes in technique: Application to double under jump rope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Olivia; Moull, Kimberly; Fischer, Steven

    2017-07-01

    The upper extremities play an important role in managing the rope-turning technique required to perform continuous double unders. However, acute adaptions in this technique may occur as a jumper fatigues. The purpose of this study was to examine how turning technique is adapted with fatigue. Three-dimensional kinematic data of the upper extremity were collected from 10 trained athletes as they performed consecutive double unders to volitional fatigue. Time series wrist, elbow and shoulder joint angles were calculated where joint angle waveforms representing 10 unique trials from the beginning ("fresh") and end ("fatigued") of the continuous jumping protocol for all participants were analysed using principal component analysis. Participants reported stopping due to cardiovascular and shoulder muscular fatigue. From a kinematics perspective, with fatigue athletes used a more internally rotated range of motion at the shoulder, which we believe prompted a series of more distal adaptions in order to maintain rope turning, preserving consecutive double under performance. The presence of a maladaptive adaptation at the shoulder may increase the risk of developing shoulder injuries. Coaches should consider helping jumpers develop appropriate shoulder muscle endurance such that they can continue to maximise their training and proficiency, while protecting against potential fatigue-related maladaptation.

  12. Wire rope improvement program. Fiscal years 1979 to 1980. Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgenstern, M.H.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Anderson, W.E.; Beeman, G.H.; Rice, R.C.; Strope, L.A.; Werry, E.V.

    1980-08-01

    This report describes the work performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and its subcontractor Battelle Columbus Laboratories on the Wire Rope Improvement Program during FY-1979 and the first half of FY80. The program, begun in 1975 by the US Bureau of Mines, was transferred to the US Department of Energy (DOE) on October 1, 1978. Since that time, the DOE's Division of Solid Fuels Mining and Preparation has sponsored the program. To address identified problems and provide information from which behavior of large-diameter wire rope could be better understood, efforts in the following areas were undertaken: large-diameter rope testing, small-diameter rope testing, data analysis and evaluation, wear and failure analysis, load sensor development, and technology transfer. Wire ropes 3/4 in., 1-1/2 in., and 3 in. in diameter were tested in bend-over sheave fatigue. Attempts were made to correlate fatigue life of these ropes. Limited field rope data were available to compare with test results. The modes of failure and wear in laboratory ropes were compared with those seen previously in field ropes. A load sensor was designed and ordered in FY79. It will be connected to the drag rope and jewelry of working draglines during the summer of FY80. Technology transfer was achieved through disseminating written materials, conducting seminars, holding a national symposium, and filming of selected field operations.

  13. Jumping Good Fun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Susan B.

    2010-01-01

    Jumping rope is an activity that can be fun and enjoyable for all students. It requires minimal activity space, can be performed individually or in small groups, and is an inexpensive way to engage students in a lifelong physical activity. Jumping rope is commonly used by coaches and athletes for training purposes to improve aerobic endurance,…

  14. Jumping Good Fun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Susan B.

    2010-01-01

    Jumping rope is an activity that can be fun and enjoyable for all students. It requires minimal activity space, can be performed individually or in small groups, and is an inexpensive way to engage students in a lifelong physical activity. Jumping rope is commonly used by coaches and athletes for training purposes to improve aerobic endurance,…

  15. GENETIC PROGRAMMING TO PREDICT SKI-JUMP BUCKET SPILLWAY SCOUR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AZAMATHULLA H. MD; GHANI A. AB; ZAKARIA N. A; LAI S. H; CHANG C. K; LEOW C. S; ABUHASAN Z

    2008-01-01

    Researchers in the past had noticed that application of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) in place of conventional statistics on the basis of data mining techniques predicts more accurate results in hydraulic predictions. Mostly these works pertained to applications of ANN. Recently, another tool of soft computing, namely, Genetic Programming (GP) has caught the attention of researchers in civil engineering computing. This article examines the usefulness of the GP based approach to predict the relative scour depth downstream of a common type of ski-jump bucket spillway. Actual field measurements were used to develop the GP model. The GP based estimations were found to be equally and more accurate than the ANN based ones, especially, when the underlying cause-effect relationship became more uncertain to model.

  16. EFFECTS OF ELECTROSTIMULATION AND PLYOMETRIC TRAINING PROGRAM COMBINATION ON JUMP HEIGHT IN TEENAGE ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio J. Martínez-López

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of eight- week (2 days/week training periods of plyometric exercises (PT and neuromuscular electrostimulation (EMS on jump height in young athletes. Squat jump (SJ, counter movement jump (CMJ and drop jump (DJ were performed to assess the effects of the training protocols 98 athletes (100 & 200m and 100m & 110m hurdles voluntarily took part in this study, 51 males (52% and 47 females (48%, 17.91 ± 1.42 years old, and 5.16 ± 2.56 years of training experience. The participants were randomly assigned to four different groups according to the frequency and the timing of the stimulation. Analysis of covariance was used to analyze the effects of every training program on jump height. Our findings suggest that compared to control (Plyometrics (PT only, the combination of 150Hz EMS + PT simultaneously combined in an 8 week (2days/week training program, we could observe significant jump height improvements in the different types of strength: explosive, explosive-elastic, and explosive-elastic-reactive. The combination of PT after < 85 Hz EMS did not show any jump height significant increase in sprinters. In conclusion, an eight week training program (with just two days per week of EMS combined with plyometric exercises has proven useful for the improvement of every kind of vertical jump ability required for sprint and hurdles disciplines in teenage athletes

  17. Kinematic characteristics of motor patterns in rope skipping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique da Silva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Rope skipping seems to be an easy task to be performed. However, careful analysis of this motor skill shows how complex the execution of this task is. The objective of this study was to examine kinematic variables of jump patterns as a function of skipping frequency. Eight male university students performed a sequence of 30 rope jumps using two jump patterns (alternating support of the feet and simultaneous support of the feet at three skipping frequencies (1.5, 1.7,1.9 Hz. Frequencies were determined with a digital metronome and the rope was turned by the student himself. Rope jumping performance was recorded with two digital cameras for 3Danalysis. Passive markers were attached to the rope and to the ankle, knee and hip joints forcollection of the following dependent variables: continuous relative phase, time interval betweenthe loss of contact of the feet with the ground and cross of the rope under the feet of the volunteer,jump height, and rope height. ANOVA showed that for the pattern with alternating support ofthe feet the jump is executed at a lower height. In addition, analysis of the time interval revealeda delay in the withdrawal of the feet for crossing the rope in the case of the jump pattern with simultaneous support of the feet.

  18. The training program in basic gymnastics jumps at the stage of initial training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Zaplatynska

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: improving of the technical training of girls that are engaged in rhythmic gymnastics at the stage of initial training. Materials and Methods: for the development of a training program for jumping in athletes who are engaged in rhythmic gymnastics at the stage of initial training conducted analysis of scientific literature. Results: it was determined that the absorption of the rhythmic structure of elements greatly accelerates and facilitates the process of studying in a cyclic (athletics and acyclic sports (judo, wrestling. This is a prerequisite for the development of the training program of the jumps through assimilation rates their performance. These various methods of influence on the development of sense of rhythmic gymnasts at the stage of initial preparation and learning the rhythmic structure of the basic jumps. Conclusions: the program of teaching basic jumping for gymnasts at the stage of initial training, a variety of methods of influence on the development of sense of rhythm and learning the rhythmic structure of the elements was developed. The project of the training session for the development of a sense of rhythm and learning the rhythmic structure of the basic jumps was developed.

  19. Efficacy of a 3 month training program on the jump-landing technique in jump-landing sports. Design of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhagen Evert

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the relatively high rate of injuries to the lower extremity due to jump-landing movement patterns and the accompanied high costs, there is need for determining potential preventive programs. A program on the intervention of jump-landing technique is possibly an important preventative measure since it appeared to reduce the incidence of lower extremity injuries. In real life situations, amateur sports lack the infrastructure and funds to have a sports physician or therapist permanently supervising such a program. Therefore the current prevention program is designed so that it could be implemented by coaches alone. Objective The objective of this randomized controlled trial is to evaluate the effect of a coach supervised intervention program targeting jump-landing technique on the incidence of lower extremity injuries. Methods Of the 110 Flemish teams of the elite division, 24 teams are included and equally randomized to two study groups. An equal selection of female and male teams with allocation to intervention and control group is obtained. The program is a modification of other prevention programs previously proven to be effective. All exercises in the current program are adjusted so that a more progressive development in the exercise is presented. Both the control and intervention group continue with their normal training routine, while the intervention group carries out the program on jump-landing technique. The full intervention program has a duration of three months and is performed 2 times a week during warm-up (5-10 min. Injuries are registered during the entire season. Discussion The results of this study can give valuable information on the effect of a coach supervised intervention program on jump-landing technique and injury occurrence. Results will become available in 2011. Trial registration Trial registration number: NTR2560

  20. Estimation of hydraulic jump on corrugated bed using artificial neural networks and genetic programming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akram ABBASPOUR; Davood FARSADIZADEH; Mohammad Ali GHORBANI

    2013-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) and genetic programming (GP) have recently been used for the estimation of hydraulic data. In this study, they were used as alternative tools to estimate the characteristics of hydraulic jumps, such as the free surface location and energy dissipation. The dimensionless hydraulic parameters, including jump depth, jump length, and energy dissipation, were determined as functions of the Froude number and the height and length of corrugations. The estimations of the ANN and GP models were found to be in good agreement with the measured data. The results of the ANN model were compared with those of the GP model, showing that the proposed ANN models are much more accurate than the GP models.

  1. The mechanics of trick roping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Pierre-Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Trick roping evolved from humble origins as a cattle-catching tool into a sport that delights audiences the world over with its complex patterns or ``tricks,'' such as the Merry-Go-Round , the Wedding-Ring, the Spoke-Jumping, the Texas Skip... Its implement is the lasso, a length of rope with a small loop (``honda'') at one end through which the other end is passed to form a large loop. Here, we study the physics of the simplest rope trick, the Flat Loop, in which the motion of the lasso is forced by a uniform circular motion of the cowboy's/cowgirl's hand in a horizontal plane. To avoid accumulating twist in the rope, the cowboy/cowgirl rolls it between his/her thumb and forefinger while spinning it. The configuration of the rope is stationary in a reference frame that rotates with the hand. Exploiting this fact we derive a dynamical ``string'' model in which line tension is balanced by the centrifugal force and the rope's weight. Using a numerical continuation method, we calculate the steady shapes of a lasso with a fixed honda, examine their stability, and determine a bifurcation diagram exhibiting coat-hanger shapes and whirling modes in addition to flat loops. We then extend the model to a honda with finite sliding friction by using matched asymptotic expansions to determine the structure of the boundary layer where bending forces are significant, thereby obtaining a macroscopic criterion for frictional sliding of the honda. We compare our theoretical results with high-speed videos of a professional trick roper and experiments performed using a laboratory ``robo-cowboy.'' Finally, we conclude with a practical guidance on how to spin a lasso in the air based on the results of our analysis. With the support of Univ. Paris Sud (Lab. FAST/CNRS) and UPMC (d'Alembert/CNRS).

  2. Kinematic characteristics of motor patterns in rope skipping

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz Henrique da Silva; Ana Maria Pellegrini

    2009-01-01

    Rope skipping seems to be an easy task to be performed. However, careful analysis of this motor skill shows how complex the execution of this task is. The objective of this study was to examine kinematic variables of jump patterns as a function of skipping frequency. Eight male university students performed a sequence of 30 rope jumps using two jump patterns (alternating support of the feet and simultaneous support of the feet) at three skipping frequencies (1.5, 1.7,1.9 Hz). Frequencies were...

  3. How far can Tarzan jump?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Hiroyuki

    2012-11-01

    The tree-based rope swing is a popular recreational facility, often installed in outdoor areas. Hanging from a rope, users drop from a high platform and then swing at great speed like ‘Tarzan’, finally jumping ahead to land on the ground. The question naturally arises, how far can Tarzan jump using the swing? In this paper, I present an introductory analysis of the mechanics of the Tarzan swing, a large pendulum-like swing with Tarzan himself attached as weight. This enables determination of how much further forward Tarzan can jump using a given swing apparatus. The discussion is based on elementary mechanics and is, therefore, expected to provide rich opportunities for investigations using analytic and numerical methods.

  4. How far can Tarzan jump?

    CERN Document Server

    Shima, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    The tree-based rope swing is a popular recreation facility, often installed in outdoor areas, giving pleasure to thrill-seekers. In the setting, one drops down from a high platform, hanging from a rope, then swings at a great speed like "Tarzan", and finally jumps ahead to land on the ground. The question now arises: How far can Tarzan jump by the swing? In this article, I present an introductory analysis of the Tarzan swing mechanics, a big pendulum-like swing with Tarzan himself attached as weight. The analysis enables determination of how farther forward Tarzan can jump using a given swing apparatus. The discussion is based on elementary mechanics and, therefore, expected to provide rich opportunities for investigations using analytic and numerical methods.

  5. Coronal Magnetic Flux Ropes in Quadrupolar Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingzhi; Hu, Youqiu; Wang, Jingxiu

    Using a 2.5-D, time-dependent ideal MHD model in spherical coordinates, we carry out a numerical study of the equilibrium properties of coronal magnetic flux ropes in a quadrupolar background magnetic field. For such a flux rope system, a catastrophic occurs: the flux rope is detached from the photosphere and jumps to a finite altitude with a vertical current sheet below. There is a transversal current sheet formed above the rope, and the whole system stays in quasi-equilibrium. We argue that the additional Lorentz force provided by the transversal current sheet on the flux rope plays an important role in keeping the system in quasi-equilibrium in the corona.

  6. Muscular strength and jumping performance after handball training versus physical education program for pre-adolescent children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxyzoglou, Nikolaos; Kanioglou, Aggelos; Rizos, Stelios; Mavridis, George; Kabitsis, Christos

    2007-06-01

    The purpose was to compare a 6-mo. specific handball training program and a typical physical education program on various strength and jumping skills. The participants (M age= 13.7 yr., SD= 1.5) were divided into the Handball Group (n=51) and the Physical Education Group (n=70). The latter performed 3 sessions/ week (60 min.) including ball-handling drills, horizontal and vertical jump shots, fast break, and several defensive skills. The former performed the program provided by the Ministry of Education including track and field and other team sport drills. Analyses of covariance showed that the handball group displayed greater improvement in explosive strength of upper limbs, jumping performance, maximum isometric force of right grip, and 10-m running velocity. Handball training can significantly improve pre-adolescent performance with upper and lower limbs. Inclusion of specific handball drills in the physical education program is recommended.

  7. Effects of an electrostimulation training program on strength, jumping, and kicking capacities in soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billot, Maxime; Martin, Alain; Paizis, Christos; Cometti, Carole; Babault, Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    The present study investigated the influence of a 5-week electrostimulation (EMS) training program on muscular strength, kicking velocity, sprint, and vertical jump performance in soccer players. Twenty amateur soccer players participated in the study, 10 in the electrostimulated group and the remaining 10 in a control group. Electrostimulation was applied on the quadriceps muscles over 5 weeks. Subjects were tested before, during (wk-3), and after (wk-5) the EMS training program. Maximal voluntary contraction using different contraction mode (i.e., eccentric, concentric, and isometric), vertical jump height, sprint running for 10 m, and ball speed were examined. We observed an increase in isometric and eccentric maximal knee extension torques and also a gain in ball speed performance without run up at wk-3. After 5 weeks of EMS training, eccentric, isometric, and concentric torques and ball speed had significantly improved. It appeared appropriate to conduct EMS training during at least 3 weeks to observe beneficial effects in specific soccer skills such as ball speed.

  8. Optimal control for unknown discrete-time nonlinear Markov jump systems using adaptive dynamic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiangnan; He, Haibo; Zhang, Huaguang; Wang, Zhanshan

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we develop and analyze an optimal control method for a class of discrete-time nonlinear Markov jump systems (MJSs) with unknown system dynamics. Specifically, an identifier is established for the unknown systems to approximate system states, and an optimal control approach for nonlinear MJSs is developed to solve the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation based on the adaptive dynamic programming technique. We also develop detailed stability analysis of the control approach, including the convergence of the performance index function for nonlinear MJSs and the existence of the corresponding admissible control. Neural network techniques are used to approximate the proposed performance index function and the control law. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, three simulation studies, one linear case, one nonlinear case, and one single link robot arm case, are used to validate the performance of the proposed optimal control method.

  9. Comparative Analysis of Plyometric Training Program and Dynamic Stretching on Vertical Jump and Agility in Male Collegiate Basketball Player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Shaji

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to compare, analyze the individual and combined effect of plyometric training program and dynamic stretching on vertical jump and agility. The subjects included 45, healthy male collegiate basketball players between the ages of 18-25. All subjects were tested in the vertical jump and agility using the Sergeant Jump test and T-test respectively prior to starting the dynamic stretching and plyometric training program. The subjects then completed a four week plyometric training program and were retested. Univariate ANOVA was conducted to analyze the change scores (post – pre in the independent variables by group (plyometric, dynamic stretching and combined with pre scores as covariates. The Univariate ANOVA revealed a significant group effect for Sergeant Jump test F = 12.95, P = 0.000 for Dynamic stretching group, F = 12.55, P = 0.000 for Plyometric training group and F = 15.11, P = 0.000 for combined group. The combined group reveled, maximum increase in the height when compared with the pretest scores. For the T-Test agility scores a significant group effect was found F = 2.00, P = 0.043 for Plyometric training group, F = 9.14, P = 0.000 for combined group while dynamic stretching group F = 2.11, P = 0.088 reveled non significant results. The findings suggested that two days of plyometric training a week in combination with dynamic stretching for four weeks is sufficient enough to show improvements in vertical jump height and agility. The results also suggest that two days of plyometric training and dynamic stretching are equally effective in improving vertical jump height. In contrast dynamic stretching two days a week for four weeks was not sufficient enough to show improvements in agility while plyometric training was sufficient.

  10. Jump for the Sun II: can a Monthly Program Change Girls' and Women's Attitudes about Stem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Mary

    The Environmental Institute of the Jump for the Sun II program was designed to change middle school girls' and teachers' attitudes about doing science and who does science and to increase interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The institute consisted of an intensive, 2-week summer congress followed by monthly sessions during the academic year. Female-friendly learning environments were created for middle school students and in-service educators, focusing on topics such as life expectancies, solid waste production, transportation gridlock, beach erosion, and biodiversity. In both 1998 and 1999, one group of participants completed the program, which was quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated. The quantitative results showed that the program did not improve girls' attitudes in any of the major categories under study; however, the posttest results indicated that in-service educators' attitudes improved significantly in three of the four categories (science experiences, perceptions of science and scientists, and science attitudes). The qualitative results indicated that the program positively affected some of the girls and in-service educators.

  11. Liquid rope coiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.M. Ribe; M. Habibi; D. Bonn

    2012-01-01

    A thin stream or rope of viscous fluid falling from a sufficient height onto a surface forms a steadily rotating helical coil. Tabletop laboratory experiments in combination with a numerical model for slender liquid ropes reveal that finite-amplitude coiling can occur in four distinct regimes (visco

  12. Kinematic analysis of rope skipper's stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab Ghani, Nor Atikah; Rambely, Azmin Sham

    2014-06-01

    There are various kinds of jumping that can be done while performing rope skipping activity. This activity was always associated with injury. But, if the rope skipper can perform the activity in a right way, it is believed that the injury might be reduced. The main purpose of this paper is to observe the stability of rope skipper from a biomechanics perspective, which are the centre of mass, angle at the ankle, knee and hip joints and also the trajectory for the ipsilateral leg between the two types of skip which is one leg and two legs. Six healthy, physically active subject, two males and four females (age: 8.00±1.25 years, weight: 17.90±6.85 kg and height: 1.22±0.08 m) participated in this study. Kinematic data of repeated five cycles of rope skipping activity was captured by using Vicon Nexus system. Based on the data collected, skipping with two legs shows more stable behavior during preparation, flight and landing phases. It is concluded that landing on the balls of the feet, lowering the trajectory positions of the feet from the ground as well as flexion of each joint which would reduce the injury while landing.

  13. Distribution of wire deformation within strands of wire ropes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jun; GE Shi-rong; ZHANG De-kun

    2008-01-01

    Using ANSYS software, we developed a modeling program for several kinds of wire ropes with metal cores and built a geometric model for the 6x19 IWS wire rope. Through proper grid partitioning, a finite element model for calculating the deformation of wire rope was obtained. Completely constraining one end of the wire rope and applying an axial force to the other end, we established the boundary conditions for solving the model. In addition, we numerically simulated the stress and deformation of the wire, obtaining the deformation distribution of each wire within the wire rope under different laying directions.At the end, a tensile test of the 6x19 IWS wire rope was carried out and the results of simulation and experiment compared.

  14. Downward catastrophe of solar magnetic flux ropes

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Quanhao; Hu, Youqiu; Liu, Rui

    2016-01-01

    2.5D time-dependent ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models in Cartesian coordinates were used in previous studies to seek MHD equilibria involving a magnetic flux rope embedded in a bipolar, partially open background field. As demonstrated by these studies, the equilibrium solutions of the system are separated into two branches: the flux rope sticks to the photosphere for solutions at the lower branch but is suspended in the corona for those at the upper branch. Moreover, a solution originally at the lower branch jumps to the upper, as the related control parameter increases and reaches a critical value, and the associated jump is here referred to as upward catastrophe. The present paper advances these studies in three aspects. First, the magnetic field is changed to be force-free. The system still experiences an upward catastrophe with an increase in each control parameter. Secondly, under the force-free approximation, there also exists a downward catastrophe, characterized by a jump of a solution from the u...

  15. Understanding the Physics of Bungee Jumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Andre; Uylings, Peter; Kedzierska, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    Changing mass phenomena like the motion of a falling chain, the behaviour of a falling elastic bar or spring, and the motion of a bungee jumper surprise many a physicist. In this article we discuss the first phase of bungee jumping, when the bungee jumper falls, but the bungee rope is still slack. In instructional material this phase is often…

  16. Understanding the physics of bungee jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heck, A.; Uylings, P.; Kędzierska, E.

    2010-01-01

    Changing mass phenomena like the motion of a falling chain, the behaviour of a falling elastic bar or spring, and the motion of a bungee jumper surprise many a physicist. In this article we discuss the first phase of bungee jumping, when the bungee jumper falls, but the bungee rope is still slack.

  17. Programmed electromyographic activity and negative incremental muscle stiffness in monkeys jumping downward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyhre-Poulsen, P; Laursen, A M

    1984-05-01

    We trained monkeys to jump down from different heights, and recorded electromyograms (e.m.g.s) in arm muscles, and ground reaction forces. The landing movements were also recorded by high-speed cinematography. The e.m.g. of the triceps began about 80 ms before landing. The initial burst lasted until about 20 ms after ground contact and was succeeded by bursts of gradually declining amplitude. These discharges were not of reflex origin, because when the monkey was deceived by a collapsible platform, they were time-locked to the expected, not to the true landing. The amplitude of the e.m.g. in the triceps increased with the height of the jump, indicating adaptive control. The timing of the e.m.g. pattern was assumed to be programmed before take off, because it was unaffected by extinction of the light during the fall. The vertical ground reaction force produced by the arms had an inflexion on its rising phase which arose from the very rapid stretch of the muscles which control the wrist. Then came a sharp peak produced mainly by stretch of the triceps. The inflexion and the sharp peak were probably produced by short-range stiffness of the muscles of the upper arm. The torque acting on the elbow joint, and the elbow joint stiffness were calculated from the ground reaction forces and the movement of the arm. The torque was high at impact and gradually declined during the landing. The force produced by the triceps increased sharply, then decreased while it continued to lengthen. Thus, the elbow joint showed high initial stiffness, which then decreased, and finally became negative. This dynamic relation between length and tension was very different from the static length-tension characteristic of skeletal muscles. The observed behaviour of the muscles presumably takes advantage of the resistance of the musculo-skeletal system to transient forces. The observed negative stiffness occurs only during submaximal contractions. We propose that the segmented pattern in the e

  18. The Effect of Depth Jumps and Weight Training on Leg Strength and Vertical Jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clutch, David; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Two experiments examined the results of depth jumping programs to determine: (1) whether certain depth jumping routines, when combined with weight training, are better than others; and (2) the effect of depth jumping on athletes already in training. Results indicated that depth jumping is effective, but no more so than regular jumping routines.…

  19. Comparative Training Responses to Rope Skipping and Jogging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyze, Michael T.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This study compared physiological adaptations of 26 sedentary volunteers to six-week programs of jogging and rope skipping in order to test whether 10 minutes of rope skipping is equal to 30 minutes of jogging for improved cardiovascular efficiency. Results are discussed. (Author/MT)

  20. Jump-Starting Youth Community Leadership: An Evaluation of a Leadership Development Program for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender & Ally Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Diaz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The GLSEN Jump-Start National Student Leadership Team, a leadership development program for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT, and ally youth designed to promote direct action community organizing and community engagement. This article examines the benefits of the program for youth’s socio-political development. Data came from a multi-year evaluation that examined changes over time (baseline, immediately post-program, and one-year follow-up in community engagement between a program group (n = 103 and a comparison group of youth (n = 47. Results indicate that the program may support LGBT and ally youth’s socio-political development and have positive implications for their development as community leaders, but these benefits may not be sustained after program completion. Implications for further research and program development for LGBT youth are explored.

  1. Understanding the physics of bungee jumping

    OpenAIRE

    Heck, A; Uylings, P.; Kędzierska, E.

    2010-01-01

    Changing mass phenomena like the motion of a falling chain, the behaviour of a falling elastic bar or spring, and the motion of a bungee jumper surprise many a physicist. In this article we discuss the first phase of bungee jumping, when the bungee jumper falls, but the bungee rope is still slack. In instructional material this phase is often considered a free fall, but when the mass of the bungee rope is taken into account, the bungee jumper reaches acceleration greater than g. This result i...

  2. Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boris Filippov; Olesya Martsenyuk; Abhishek K. Srivastava; Wahab Uddin

    2015-03-01

    In the early 1990s, it was found that the strongest disturbances of the space–weather were associated with huge ejections of plasma from the solar corona, which took the form of magnetic clouds when moved from the Sun. It is the collisions of the magnetic clouds with the Earth's magnetosphere that lead to strong, sometimes catastrophic changes in space–weather. The onset of a coronal mass ejection (CME) is sudden and no reliable forerunners of CMEs have been found till date. The CME prediction methodologies are less developed compared to the methods developed for the prediction of solar flares. The most probable initial magnetic configuration of a CME is a flux rope consisting of twisted field lines which fill the whole volume of a dark coronal cavity. The flux ropes can be in stable equilibrium in the coronal magnetic field for weeks and even months, but suddenly they lose their stability and erupt with high speed. Their transition to the unstable phase depends on the parameters of the flux rope (i.e., total electric current, twist, mass loading, etc.), as well as on the properties of the ambient coronal magnetic field. One of the major governing factors is the vertical gradient of the coronal magnetic field, which is estimated as decay index (). Cold dense prominence material can be collected in the lower parts of the helical flux tubes. Filaments are, therefore, good tracers of the flux ropes in the corona, which become visible long before the beginning of the eruption. The perspectives of the filament eruptions and following CMEs can be estimated by a comparison of observed filament heights with calculated decay index distributions. The present paper reviews the formation of magnetic flux ropes, their stable and unstable phases, eruption conditions, and also discusses their physical implications in the solar corona.

  3. Pulsating Reconnection in the interaction of Two Magnetic Fux Ropes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekelman, W. N.; DeHaas, T.; Daughton, W. S.; Van Compernolle, B.

    2015-12-01

    Two flux ropes (dia = 7 cm, ds= 3 cm, L = 10m, Irope = 300 A/rope) are generated by using a mask in front of a high emissivity cathode (n = 4X1012 cm3, Te-rope = 8.5 eV) in a background magnetoplasma (He, Boz= 330 G, n=1.0X1012 cm3, Te = 4 eV) in the LAPD device at UCLA. The ropes are kink unstable ( I > 250 A) but not violently so. All three components of the magnetic field were measured with small (1 mm dia) 3-axis probes sensitive to and the plasma potential measured with an emissive probe. These were measured at over 42,000 locations in the volume containing the ropes and 7000 time steps (δτ = .33 μs). The total electric field and parallel resistivity as well as the Quasi Seperatrix layer (QSL) were derived from the data. The flux ropes periodically collide as they rotate about when another and kink. Each time this happens a strong QSL (Q<400) forms and the resistivity jumps to over a hundred times the classical value at locations within the QSL and also on the gradient of the rope current. The QSL formation and 3D electric fields are presented as a function of space and time. The reconnection rate is directly evaluated by integrating the electric field along field lines as well as the energy deposition . The data indicate that there is more than one process causing the enhanced resistivity. The reconnection rate cannot be explained by conventional 2D theories.

  4. Evaluation of Jump into Action: A Program to Reduce the Risk of Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus in School Children on the Texas-Mexico Border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, J. David; Lira, Juanita; Kingery, Paul M.; Smith, D. W.; Lane, Dorothy; Goodway, Jackie

    1998-01-01

    Evaluated Jump into Action, a non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM)-prevention program that encouraged students to eat well and exercise regularly to reduce NIDDM risks. Surveys of predominantly Hispanic fifth graders and their teachers at Texas-Mexico border schools indicated that the program increased NIDDM-prevention knowledge and…

  5. Effects of a Whole-Body Electrostimulation Program on Strength, Sprinting, Jumping, and Kicking Capacity in Elite Soccer Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Filipovic, Marijke Grau, Heinz Kleinöder, Philipp Zimmer, Wildor Hollmann, Wilhelm Bloch

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of a 14-week dynamic Whole-Body Electrostimulation (WB-EMS training program on muscular strength, soccer relevant sprint, jump and kicking velocity performance in elite soccer players during competitive season. Twenty-two field-players were assigned to 2 groups: WB-EMS group (EG, n = 12, jump-training group (TG, n = 10. The training programs were conducted twice a week concurrent to 6-7 soccer training sessions during the 2nd half of the season. Participants were tested before (baseline, during (wk-7 and after (wk-14. Blood serum samples for analyzing IGF-1 and CK were taken before each testing, 15-30min post and 24h post the training program. Our findings of the present study were that a 14-week in-season WB-EMS program significant increased one-leg maximal strength (1RM at the leg press machine (1.99 vs. 1.66 kg/kg, p = 0.001, and improved linear sprinting (5m: 1.01 vs. 1.04s, p=0.039, sprinting with direction changes (3.07 vs. 3.25s, p = 0.024, and vertical jumping performance (SJ: 38.8 vs. 35.9cm p = 0.021 as well as kicking velocity (1step: 93.8 vs. 83.9 km·h-1, p < 0.001. The TG showed no changes in strength and performance. The EG revealed significantly increased CK levels 24h post training and yielded significantly higher CK levels compared to the TG. IGF-1 serum levels neither changed in the EG nor in the TG. The results give first hints that two sessions of a dynamic WB-EMS training in addition to 6-7 soccer sessions per week can be effective for significantly enhancing soccer relevant performance capacities in professional players during competitive season.

  6. Jumping Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    We propose an alternative paradigm to the conjectured Miransky scaling potentially underlying the physics describing the transition from the conformally broken to the conformally restored phase when tuning certain parameters such as the number of flavors in gauge theories. According to the new...... paradigm the physical scale and henceforth also the massive spectrum of the theory jump at the lower boundary of the conformal window. In particular we propose that a theory can suddenly jump from a Quantum Chromodynamics type spectrum, at the lower boundary of the conformal window, to a conformal one...... without particle interpretation. The jumping scenario, therefore, does not support a near-conformal dynamics of walking type. We will also discuss the impact of jumping dynamics on the construction of models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking....

  7. Mechanical Rope and Cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-04-01

    factors, singly or in combinations. These factors may include tensile load, bend radius, crushing load, bearing pressure, dynamic conditions, fatigue... bearing pressures imposed upon rope in service generally are not determined readily and the few systems available for measuring these parameters are of...C111ARACTcs-V13COUS (normal); gummy ; caked 1. Good Normal amount as in new lope. A. Good C.rrasy and flrxihle. Well lubricated. 2. Fair Lubricant

  8. Sliding rope paradox

    CERN Document Server

    Silagadze, Z K

    2010-01-01

    A simple mechanical problem is considered which we believe will help students to familiarize some concepts of mechanics of variable mass systems. Meanwhile they can even learn some thrilling physics of bungee jumping.

  9. Wire ropes tension, endurance, reliability

    CERN Document Server

    Feyrer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this book is to present the methods used to calculate the most important parameters for ropes, and to explain how they are applied on the basis of numerous sample calculations. The book, based on the most important chapters of the German book DRAHTSEILE, has been updated to reflect the latest developments, with the new edition especially focusing on computational methods for wire ropes. Many new calculations and examples have also been added to facilitate the dimensioning and calculation of mechanical characteristics of wire ropes. This book offers a valuable resource for all those working with wire ropes, including construction engineers, operators and supervisors of machines and installations involving wire ropes.

  10. Long Jump

    CERN Document Server

    Dorobantu, V

    2012-01-01

    When the laws of Physics are taken seriously, the sports can benefit in getting better results, as was the case of the high jump in Flop style, so that the athlete sprints diagonally towards the bar,then curve and leap backwards over it. The jumper, in this case, has the center of mass under the bar, fact which allows improvement of the performance.

  11. The construction of the program control with probability one for stochastic dynamic systems with jumps

    CERN Document Server

    Karachanskaya, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Investigate the stochastic dynamic non-linear system with the Wiener and the Poisson perturbations. For such systems we construct the program control with probability one, which allows this system to move on the given trajectory. In this case the control program is solution of the algebraic system of linear equations. Considered algorithm is based on the first integral theory for stochastic differential equations system.

  12. A Reconnecting Flux Rope Dynamo

    OpenAIRE

    Baggaley, Andrew W.; Barenghi, Carlo F.; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined in thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow modeling turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into...

  13. Safe use of mine winding ropes, volume 3: rope terminations.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Borrello, M

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available and evaluating a less labour intensive, less skill dependent termination with better efficiencies. The work carried out here investigated the applicability of resin and white metal cappings as rope terminations on South African mines....

  14. CONDITION MONITORING AND FAULT DIAGNOSIS FOR TENSION UNBALANCE OF ROPES IN MULTI-ROPE FRICTION WINDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨兆建; 王勤贤; 任芳

    1997-01-01

    This paper analyzes the reasons of the tension unbalance of the ropes in multi-rope friction winder, introduces the method of an on-line monitoring rope tensions with a testing device developed by authors, and proposes the criteria of the fault diagnosis and the method of adjustment for the tension unbalance of the ropes, which is important to the theoretical study on the tension unbalance of the ropes and the maintenance of multi-rope winder.

  15. On sphere-filling ropes

    CERN Document Server

    Gerlach, Henryk

    2010-01-01

    What is the longest rope on the unit sphere? Intuition tells us that the answer to this packing problem depends on the rope's thickness. For a countably infinite number of prescribed thickness values we construct and classify all solution curves. The simplest ones are similar to the seamlines of a tennis ball, others exhibit a striking resemblance to Turing patterns in chemistry, or to ordered phases of long elastic rods stuffed into spherical shells.

  16. Discard criteria for mine winder ropes.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zyl, M

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available to be able to establish and propose proper discard criteria for broken wires in non-spin ropes. The discard criteria for broken wires in SABS0293 were based on a 10% reduction in strength of a rope. An expectation was therefore created that by complying... with these discard criteria, a rope would not fail as long as the rope loads did not exceed 90% of the new rope breaking strength. However, it is shown in this report that rope strands with "allowable" broken wires could fail at loads considerably lower than 90...

  17. 30 CFR 77.1431 - Minimum rope strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Hoisting Wire Ropes § 77.1431 Minimum rope strength. At installation, the nominal strength (manufacturer's published catalog strength) of wire ropes used for hoisting shall meet the minimum rope strength values...=Static Load×4.0 (b) Friction drum ropes. For rope lengths less than 4,000 feet: Minimum Value=Static Load...

  18. 30 CFR 57.19021 - Minimum rope strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Hoisting Wire Ropes § 57.19021 Minimum rope strength. At installation, the nominal strength (manufacturer's published catalog strength) of wire ropes used for hoisting shall meet the minimum rope strength values...=Static Load×4.0. (b) Friction drum ropes. For rope lengths less than 4,000 feet: Minimum Value=Static...

  19. Experimental Snap Loading of Synthetic Ropes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Hennessey

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Large tensile forces, known as snap loads, can occur when a slack rope becomes taut. Such forces may damage the rope or masses connected to it. Experiments are described in which one end of a rope is attached to the top of a drop tower and the bottom end is attached to a weight. The weight is raised to a certain height and then released. The force at the top of the rope and the acceleration of the weight are recorded during the first snap load that occurs. Repeated drop tests are performed on each rope. The effects of the type of rope, drop height, drop weight, whether the rope has been subjected to static precycling, and the number of previous dynamic tests are examined. A mathematical model is proposed for the rope force as a function of the displacement and velocity of the weight.

  20. Physics of Magnetic Flux Ropes

    CERN Document Server

    Priest, E R; Lee, L C

    1990-01-01

    The American Geophysical Union Chapman Conference on the Physics of Magnetic Flux Ropes was held at the Hamilton Princess Hotel, Hamilton, Bermuda on March 27–31, 1989. Topics discussed ranged from solar flux ropes, such as photospheric flux tubes, coronal loops and prominences, to flux ropes in the solar wind, in planetary ionospheres, at the Earth's magnetopause, in the geomagnetic tail and deep in the Earth's magnetosphere. Papers presented at that conference form the nucleus of this book, but the book is more than just a proceedings of the conference. We have solicited articles from all interested in this topic. Thus, there is some material in the book not discussed at the conference. Even in the case of papers presented at the conference, there is generally a much more detailed and rigorous presentation than was possible in the time allowed by the oral and poster presentations.

  1. A Reconnecting Flux Rope Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Baggaley, Andrew W; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined in thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow modeling turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy release in reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3, consistent with the Solar corona heating by nanoflares.

  2. Reconnecting flux-rope dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggaley, Andrew W.; Barenghi, Carlo F.; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-11-01

    We develop a model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multiscale model of turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. This model can be viewed as an implementation of the asymptotic limit Rm→∞ for a continuous magnetic field, where magnetic dissipation is strongly localized to small regions of strong-field gradients. We investigate the kinetic-energy release into heat mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux-rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy release in reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3 , consistent with the solar corona heating by nanoflares.

  3. Reconnecting flux-rope dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggaley, Andrew W; Barenghi, Carlo F; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-11-01

    We develop a model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multiscale model of turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. This model can be viewed as an implementation of the asymptotic limit R_{m}-->infinity for a continuous magnetic field, where magnetic dissipation is strongly localized to small regions of strong-field gradients. We investigate the kinetic-energy release into heat mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux-rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy release in reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3 , consistent with the solar corona heating by nanoflares.

  4. Changing the functional state of the pupils of high classes during the passage of obstacles rope park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozina Zh.L.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of training in rope parks on parameters of heart rate and reaction rate high school students. A measurement of heart rate monitor using the continuous recording of heart rate «Polar» during the rope obstacles Park students. Also, the reaction rate was measured before and after passing obstacles rope park students on the program "Psychodiagnostics". In the study involved 42 student of 10th class of the Kharkiv school N140. Research conducted at the park Kharkov «S-Park." Found that the passage of rope barriers provides functional load, which corresponds to the average load of aerobic capacity. Heart rate during the obstacle is in the range 130-150 beatsmin-1. Passing the rope stages has stimulating effect on the functional status of school children, as evidenced by the increasing speed of complex reactions. Classes in rope parks can be used more widely in the system of physical education.

  5. Learning the Ropes with Electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Sarah; Rex, Ted

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a lesson plan that uses materials such as rope, drinking water, and straws in a classroom activity to teach elementary students about electrical circuits in a "hands on/minds on" fashion. Students first experiment with bulbs, wires, and switches, then they do an activity with simulating electricity through a circuit…

  6. Learning the Ropes with Electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Sarah; Rex, Ted

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a lesson plan that uses materials such as rope, drinking water, and straws in a classroom activity to teach elementary students about electrical circuits in a "hands on/minds on" fashion. Students first experiment with bulbs, wires, and switches, then they do an activity with simulating electricity through a circuit…

  7. Understanding the physics of bungee jumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, André; Uylings, Peter; Kędzierska, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    Changing mass phenomena like the motion of a falling chain, the behaviour of a falling elastic bar or spring, and the motion of a bungee jumper surprise many a physicist. In this article we discuss the first phase of bungee jumping, when the bungee jumper falls, but the bungee rope is still slack. In instructional material this phase is often considered a free fall, but when the mass of the bungee rope is taken into account, the bungee jumper reaches acceleration greater than g. This result is contrary to the usual experience with free falling objects and therefore hard to believe for many a person, even an experienced physicist. It is often a starting point for heated discussions about the quality of the experiments and the physics knowledge of the experimentalist, or it may even prompt complaints about the quality of current physics education. But experiments do reveal the truth and students can do them supported by information and communication technology (ICT) tools. We report on a research project done by secondary school students and use their work to discuss how measurements with sensors, video analysis of self-recorded high-speed video clips and computer modelling allow study of the physics of bungee jumping.

  8. 30 CFR 75.1431 - Minimum rope strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Hoisting and Mantrips Wire Ropes § 75.1431 Minimum rope... used for hoisting shall meet the minimum rope strength values obtained by the following formulas in...) For rope lengths 3,000 feet or greater: Minimum Value=Static Load×4.0 (b) Friction drum ropes. For...

  9. Do children create standardized playgrounds? A study on the gap-crossing affordances of jumping stones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongeneel, Douwe; Withagen, Rob; Zaal, Frank T. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    One point of critique on playgrounds is their omnipresent standardization the distances between, for example, jumping stones or the ropes in a climbing net tend to be equal. Although current psychological literature suggests that nonstandardized playgrounds are beneficial for the children's motor

  10. Effects of in-season short-term aerobic and high-intensity interval training program on repeated sprint ability and jump performance in handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermassi, Souhail; Ingebrigtsen, Jørgen; Schwesig, René; Fieseler, Georg; Delank, Karl S; Chamari, Karim; Shephard, Roy J; Chelly, Mohamed S

    2016-11-16

    This study examined the effects of a 7-week in-season aerobic and high-intensity interval-training program on performance tests linked to successful handball play (e.g., repeated sprint and jumping ability). Thirty participants (age 17.0 ± 1.2 years, body mass 81.1 ± 3.4 kg, height 1.82± 0.07 m) performed a Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1), a squat (SJ) and a countermovement jump test (CMJ), as well as a repeated sprint ability test (RSA). From this, maximal aerobic speed (MAS, reached at the end of the Yo-Yo IR1), jumping ability, best time in a single sprint trial (RSAbest), total time (RSATT) and the performance decrement (RSAdec) during all sprints were calculated. Later, subjects were randomly assigned to a control group (CG; n=15) performing their normal training schedule (5 weekly sessions of ~90 min of handball training) or an experimental group (EG; n=15). The EG performed two 30 min sessions per week of high-intensity aerobic exercises at 100-130% of MAS in addition to their normal training schedule. Demonstrated a significant improvement in MAS (d=4.1), RSAbest (d=1.9), RSATT (d=1.5) and RSAdec (d=2.3) after the training period. Also, significant interaction effects (time x group) were found for all parameters as the EG significantly improved performances in all tests after training. The greatest interaction effects were observed in MAS (2=0.811) and CMJ (2=0.759). No relevant changes in test performances were found in the CG (mean d=-0.02). These results indicate that individually speed controlled aerobic and interval training is effective for improving specific handball performance.

  11. MECHANICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF DYNAMIC CLIMBING ROPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojan Burnik

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Climbing rope is certainly one of the most important pieces of climbing equipment. On market there are many manufacturers of dynamic climbing ropes and even more of their products. All the ropes meet the requirements of the standards, which ensure that the ropes are safe enough for use in climbing. However the requirements are set only under certain conditions. In reality climbing ropes are exposed to various conditions that are many times different to those set by the standards. Consequently there are many different falls, which lead to very different loads of impact. By using appropriate method of testing rope samples made by three different manufacturers we discovered that there are differences between all three manufacturers. This leads us to a suggestion that standards should be improved.

  12. The ancient art of laying rope

    CERN Document Server

    Bohr, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We describe a hitherto overlooked geometrical property of helical structures and show how it accounts for the early art of ropemaking. Helices have a maximum number of rotations that can be added to them - and we show that it is a geometrical feature, not a material property. This geometrical insight explains why nearly identically appearing rope can be made from very different materials and it is also the reason behind the unyielding nature of ropes. The necessity for the rope to be stretched while being laid, known from Egyptian tomb scenes, follows straightforwardly, as does the function of the top, an old tool for laying ropes.

  13. Self-organization in magnetic flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Vyacheslav S.

    2014-06-01

    This cross-disciplinary special issue on 'Self-organization in magnetic flux ropes' follows in the footsteps of another collection of manuscripts dedicated to the subject of magnetic flux ropes, a volume on 'Physics of magnetic flux ropes' published in the American Geophysical Union's Geophysical Monograph Series in 1990 [1]. Twenty-four years later, this special issue, composed of invited original contributions highlighting ongoing research on the physics of magnetic flux ropes in astrophysical, space and laboratory plasmas, can be considered an update on our state of understanding of this fundamental constituent of any magnetized plasma. Furthermore, by inviting contributions from research groups focused on the study of the origins and properties of magnetic flux ropes in a variety of different environments, we have attempted to underline both the diversity of and the commonalities among magnetic flux ropes throughout the solar system and, indeed, the universe. So, what is a magnetic flux rope? The answer will undoubtedly depend on whom you ask. A flux rope can be as narrow as a few Larmor radii and as wide as the Sun (see, e.g., the contributions by Heli Hietala et al and by Angelous Vourlidas). As described below by Ward Manchester IV et al , they can stretch from the Sun to the Earth in the form of interplanetary coronal mass ejections. Or, as in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment described by David Schaffner et al , they can fit into a meter-long laboratory device tended by college students. They can be helical and line-tied (see, e.g., Walter Gekelman et al or J Sears et al ), or toroidal and periodic (see, e.g., John O'Bryan et al or Philippa Browning et al ). They can form in the low plasma beta environment of the solar corona (Tibor Török et al ), the order unity beta plasmas of the solar wind (Stefan Eriksson et al ) and the plasma pressure dominated stellar convection zones (Nicholas Nelson and Mark Miesch). In this special issue, Setthivoine You

  14. Risk, Jumps, and Diversification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Law, Tzuo Hann; Tauchen, George

    We test for price discontinuities, or jumps, in a panel of high-frequency intraday returns for forty large-cap stocks and an equiweighted index from these same stocks. Jumps are naturally classified into two types: common and idiosyncratic. Common jumps affect all stocks, albeit to varying degree...

  15. Jumping in Arithmetic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Albert

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study a new relation between sentences: the jump relation. The idea of the jump relation is based on an analysis of Feferman's Theorem that the inconsistency of a theory U is interpretable over U. The jump relation is based on a converse of Feferman's Theorem: if a sentence is inter

  16. DNA analysis of natural fiber rope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Mignon; Murphy, Terence M

    2009-01-01

    When rope is found at a crime scene, the type of fiber is currently identified through its microscopic characteristics. However, these characteristics may not always unambiguously distinguish some types of rope from others. If rope samples contain cells from the plants of origin, then DNA analysis may prove to be a better way to identify the type of rope obtained from a crime scene. The objective of this project was to develop techniques of DNA analysis that can be used to differentiate between ropes made from Cannabis sativa L. (hemp), Agave sisalana Perrine (sisal), Musa textilis Née (abaca, "Manila hemp"), Linum usitatissimum L. (flax), and Corchorus olitorus L. (jute). The procedures included extracting the DNA from the rope, performing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the extracted DNA as a template, and analyzing the DNA products. A primer pair for PCR, chosen from within a chloroplast gene for the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, was designed to be specific for plant DNA and complementary to the genes from all five plants. The resulting PCR fragments were approximately 771 base pairs long. The PCR fragments, distinguished through base sequence analysis or restriction enzyme analysis, could be used to identify the five different rope types. The procedure provides a useful addition to visual methods of comparing rope samples.

  17. 30 CFR 56.19021 - Minimum rope strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personnel Hoisting... published catalog strength) of wire ropes used for hoisting shall meet the minimum rope strength values...=Static Load×4.0 (b) Friction drum ropes. For rope lengths less than 4,000 feet: Minimum Value=Static Load...

  18. The "Owl Trail"--A Sensory Awareness Rope Trail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Robert B.

    1978-01-01

    Constructed and experienced by students engaged in an outdoor education class at East Stroudsburg State College in Pennsylvania, the "Owl Trail" is a self guided rope trail (600 yards in length) employing such devices as sensory corrals, bridges, and "go to" ropes (ropes attached to the main rope which provide side trip…

  19. Steerable Miniature Jumping Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Kovac, Mirko; Schlegel, Manuel; Zufferey, Jean-Christophe; Floreano, Dario

    2010-01-01

    Jumping is used in nature by many small animals to locomote in cluttered environments or in rough terrain. It offers small systems the benefit of overcoming relatively large obstacles at a low energetic cost. In order to be able to perform repetitive jumps in a given direction, it is important to be able to upright after landing, steer and jump again. In this article, we review and evaluate the uprighting and steering principles of existing jumping robots and present a novel spherical robot w...

  20. Optimal Ski Jump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebilas, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Consider a skier who goes down a takeoff ramp, attains a speed "V", and jumps, attempting to land as far as possible down the hill below (Fig. 1). At the moment of takeoff the angle between the skier's velocity and the horizontal is [alpha]. What is the optimal angle [alpha] that makes the jump the longest possible for the fixed magnitude of the…

  1. Estimation of Jump Tails

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Todorov, Victor

    We propose a new and flexible non-parametric framework for estimating the jump tails of Itô semimartingale processes. The approach is based on a relatively simple-to-implement set of estimating equations associated with the compensator for the jump measure, or its "intensity", that only utilizes ...

  2. Cool and hot flux ropes, their helicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nindos, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    We will review recent indirect and direct evidence for the existence of magnetic flux ropes in the solar atmosphere. Magnetic flux ropes may appear as S-shaped or reverse S-shaped (sigmoidal) structures in regions that are likely to erupt, and may also show in nonlinear force-free field extrapolations that use data from photospheric vector magnetograms as boundary condition. The availability of high sensitivity data recorded with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution in hot EUV wavelengths by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has revealed the existence of coherent structures identified as hot flux ropes. In this presentation, we will review the properties of both cool and hot flux ropes with an emphasis on the frequency of their occurrence in large flares and on their magnetic helicity content.

  3. The finite element modeling of spiral ropes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Wu

    2014-01-01

    Accurate understanding the behavior of spiral rope is complicated due to their complex geometry and complex contact conditions between the wires. This study proposed the finite element models of spiral ropes subjected to tensile loads. The parametric equations developed in this paper were implemented for geometric modeling of ropes. The 3D geometric models with different twisting manner, equal diameters of wires were generated in details by using Pro/ENGINEER software. The results of the present finite element analysis were on an acceptable level of accuracy as compared with those of theoretical and experimental data. Further development is ongoing to analysis the equivalent stresses induced by twisting manner of cables. The twisting manner of wires was important to spiral ropes in the three wire layers and the outer twisting manner of wires should be contrary to that of the second layer, no matter what is the first twisting manner of wires.

  4. Safe use of mine winding rope, volume 2: recommendations for changes in rope safety factors.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hecker, GFK

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available The steering committee on factors of safety of winder ropes has appointed a working group to draw up a set of proposals for changing the regulations governing the required rope strength in the Minerals Act. Certain research projects have been...

  5. Numerical Simulations of a Flux Rope Ejection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P. Pagano; D. H. Mackay; S. Poedts

    2015-03-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most violent phenomena observed on the Sun. One of the most successful models to explain CMEs is the flux rope ejection model, where a magnetic flux rope is expelled from the solar corona after a long phase along which the flux rope stays in equilibrium while magnetic energy is being accumulated. However, still many questions are outstanding on the detailed mechanism of the ejection and observations continuously provide new data to interpret and put in the context. Currently, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) are providing new insights into the early phase of CME evolution. In particular, observations show the ejection of magnetic flux ropes from the solar corona and how they evolve into CMEs. However, these observations are difficult to interpret in terms of basic physical mechanisms and quantities, thus, we need to compare equivalent quantities to test and improve our models. In our work, we intend to bridge the gap between models and observations with our model of flux rope ejection where we consistently describe the full life span of a flux rope from its formation to ejection. This is done by coupling the global non-linear force-free model (GNLFFF) built to describe the slow low- formation phase, with a full MHD simulation run with the software MPI-AMRVAC, suitable to describe the fast MHD evolution of the flux rope ejection that happens in a heterogeneous regime. We also explore the parameter space to identify the conditions upon which the ejection is favoured (gravity stratification and magnetic field intensity) and we produce synthesised AIA observations (171 Å and 211 Å). To carry this out, we run 3D MHD simulation in spherical coordinates where we include the role of thermal conduction and radiative losses, both of which are important for determining the temperature distribution of the solar corona during a CME. Our model of flux

  6. Quantum Walk with Jumps

    CERN Document Server

    Lavička, H; Kiss, T; Lutz, E; Jex, I

    2011-01-01

    We analyze a special class of 1-D quantum walks (QWs) realized using optical multi-ports. We assume non-perfect multi-ports showing errors in the connectivity, i.e. with a small probability the multi- ports can connect not to their nearest neighbor but to another multi-port at a fixed distance - we call this a jump. We study two cases of QW with jumps where multiple displacements can emerge at one timestep. The first case assumes time-correlated jumps (static disorder). In the second case, we choose the positions of jumps randomly in time (dynamic disorder). The probability distributions of position of the QW walker in both instances differ significantly: dynamic disorder leads to a Gaussian-like distribution, while for static disorder we find two distinct behaviors depending on the parity of jump size. In the case of even-sized jumps, the distribution exhibits a three-peak profile around the position of the initial excitation, whereas the probability distribution in the odd case follows a Laplace-like discre...

  7. Jumping on water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho-Young

    2016-11-01

    Water striders can jump on water as high as they can jump on land. Quick jumps allow them to avoid sudden dangers such as predators' attacks, and therefore understanding how they make such a dramatic motion for survival can shed light on the ultimate level of semi-aquatic motility achievable through evolution. However, the mechanism of their vertical jumping from a water surface has eluded hydrodynamic explanations so far. By observing movements of water strider legs and theoretically analyzing their dynamic interactions with deforming liquid-air interface, we have recently found that different species of jumping striders always tune their leg rotation speed with a force just below that required to break the water surface to reach the maximum take-off velocity. Here, we start with discussing the fundamental theories of dynamics of floating and sinking of small objects. The theories then enable us to analyze forces acting on a water strider while it presses down the water surface to fully exploit the capillary force. We further introduce a 68-milligram at-scale robotic insect capable of jumping on water without splash, strikingly similar to the real strider, by utilizing the water surface just as a trampoline.

  8. Development of three dimensional Eulerian numerical procedure toward plate-mantle simulation: accuracy test by the fluid rope coiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuichi, M.; Kameyama, M.; Kageyama, A.

    2007-12-01

    Reproducing a realistic plate tectonics with mantle convection simulation is one of the greatest challenges in computational geophysics. We have developed a three dimensional Eulerian numerical procedure toward plate-mantle simulation, which includes a finite deformation of the plate in the mantle convection. Our method, combined with CIP-CSLR (Constrained Interpolation Profile method-Conservative Semi-Lagrangian advection scheme with Rational function) and ACuTE method, enables us to solve advection and force balance equations even with a large and sharp viscosity jump, which marks the interface between the plates and surrounding upper mantle materials. One of the typical phenomena represented by our method is a fluid rope coiling event, where a stream of viscous fluid is poured onto the bottom plane from a certain height. This coiling motion is due to delicate balances between bending, twisting and stretching motions of fluid rope. In the framework of the Eulerian scheme, the fluid rope and surrounding air are treated as a viscosity profile which differs by several orders of magnitude. Our method solves the complex force balances of the fluid rope and air, by a multigrid iteration technique of ACuTE algorithm. In addition, the CIP-CSLR advection scheme allows us to obtain a deforming shape of the fluid rope, as a low diffusive solution in the Eulerian frame of reference. In this presentation, we will show the simulation result of the fluid rope coiling as an accuracy test for our simulation scheme, by comparing with the simplified numerical solution for thin viscous jet.

  9. Knots, splices and rope-work an illustrated handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Verrill, A Hyatt

    2006-01-01

    This treasury of practical and ornamental knots ranges from easy half-hitches and bow-lines to intricate rope-work projects, such as rope buckles and cask slings. Detailed instructions accompany the 148 drawings.

  10. A helically distorted MHD flux rope model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, Michael L.; Montgomery, David

    1990-01-01

    A flux rope model is proposed which has a variable degree of helical distortion from axisymmetry. The basis for this suggestion is a series of numerical and analytical investigations of magnetohydrodynamic states which result when an axial electric current is directed down on dc magnetic field. The helically distorted states involve a flow velocity and seem to be favored because of their lower rate of energy dissipation. Emphasis is on the magnetometer and particle energy analyzer traces that might be characteristic of such flux ropes. It is shown that even a fractionally small helical distortion may considerably alter the traces in minimum-variance coordinates. In short, what may be fairly common MHD processes can render a flux rope almost unrecognizable under standard diagnostics, even if the departures from axisymmetry are not great.

  11. Develop discard criteria for non-spin wire ropes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hecker, GFK

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial project objective was to correlate the level of internal broken wire indications, obtained using a magnetic rope test instrument, with rope strength loss and then to propose a given indication level at which non-spin ropes...

  12. Rope culture of the kelp Laminaria groenlandica in Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, R.J.; Calvin, N.I.

    1981-02-01

    This paper is an account of rope culture of the brown seaweed or kelp, Laminaria groenlandica, in Alaska. It describes the placement of the ropes, time of first appearance of young L. groenlandica, size of the plants at various ages, and other life history features applicable to the use of rope for the culture of seaweeds in Alaska. (Refs. 3).

  13. Roping in uncertainty – measuring the tensile strength of steel wire ropes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bergh, Riaan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Bergh_2016.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 3019 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Bergh_2016.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Roping in uncertainty – measuring... the tensile strength of steel wire ropes Riaan Bergh 27 September 2016 2Presentation outline The test environment Why test? The detail The outcome The process 3Why do we test new ropes? Riaan Bergh - September 2016 - rbergh@csir.co.za - 011-482 1300 Theory...

  14. Spinning hydraulic jump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abderrahmane, Hamid; Kasimov, Aslan

    2013-11-01

    We report an experimental observation of a new symmetry breaking of circular hydraulic jump into a self-organized structure that consists of a spinning polygonal jump and logarithmic-spiral waves of fluid elevation downstream. The waves are strikingly similar to spiral density waves in galaxies. The fluid flow exhibits counterparts of salient morphological features of galactic flows, in particular the outflow from the center, jets, circum-nuclear rings, gas inflows toward the galactic center, and vortices. The hydrodynamic instability revealed here may have a counterpart that plays a role in the formation and sustainability of spiral arms in galaxies.

  15. Technology transfer of winder ropes research

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zyl, M

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available been produced. These reports either had some bearing on the new rope load factors that were included in the South African regulations, or were produced as a result of the changes introduced to the regulations. In total, the reports consist of more than...

  16. Technology transfer of winder ropes research

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zyl, M

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available on these "privately" sponsored investigations were made available to the research effort. By the year 2000, more than 100 research reports had been produced. These reports either had some bearing on the new rope load factors that were included in the regulations...

  17. The ancient art of laying rope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Olsen, Kasper

    2011-01-01

    We describe a geometrical property of helical structures and show how it accounts for the early art of rope-making. Helices have a maximum number of rotations that can be added to them — and it is shown that this is a geometrical feature, not a material property. This geometrical insight explains...

  18. Coronal Magnetic Flux Rope Equilibria and Magnetic Helicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Using a 2.5-dimensional (2.5-D) ideal MHD model, this paper ana lyzes the equilibrium properties of coronal magnetic flux ropes in a bipolar ambient magnetic field. It is found that the geometrical features of the magnetic flux rope,including the height of the rope axis, the half-width of the rope, and the length of the vertical current sheet below the rope, are determined by a single magnetic parameter, the magnetic helicity, which is the sum of the self-helicity of the rope and the mutual helicity between the rope field and the ambient magnetic field. All the geometrical parameters increase monotonically with increasing magnetic helicity.The implication of this result in solar active phenomena is briefly discussed.

  19. Efeitos de um programa de exercícios no desempenho de crianças nos testes de flexibilidade e impulsão vertical Effects of an exercise program on children's flexibility and vertical jump performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Henrique Constantino Coledam

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Esse estudo investigou o efeito de um programa de exercícios na flexibilidade e impulsão vertical de escolares. 61 crianças (30 meninos foram divididas em Grupo Controle Masculino (GCM, Grupo Intervenção Masculino (GIM, Grupo Controle Feminino (GCF e Grupo Intervenção Feminino (GIF. O GIM e GIF foram submetidos a um programa de exercícios durante as aulas de Educação Física Escolar com duração de 12 semanas. Foram realizados os testes de "sentar-e-alcançar" e impulsão vertical anteriormente às 12 semanas e após o término deste programa. Os resultados indicaram que o GIF e o GIM aumentaram significativamente o desempenho nos testes de impulsão vertical e "sentar-e-alcançar" após o programa de intervenção (P0,05. O programa de intervenção utilizado nesse estudo foi eficiente em aumentar a flexibilidade e impulsão vertical de crianças.This study investigated the effects of an exercise training program on flexibility and vertical jump performance in children at scholar age. 61 Children (30 boys were divided in male control group (MCG, male intervention group (MIG, female control group (FCG and female intervention group (FIG. MIG and FIG were submitted to an exercise training program during physical education classes for 12 weeks. The "sit-and-reach" and vertical jump tests were performed before and after 12 weeks of the exercise training program. The results demonstrated that MIG and FIG groups significantly increased the performance on vertical jump as well as the "sit-and-reach" tests after the exercise training program (P0,05. The exercise program used in this study was efficient to increase flexibility and vertical jump performance in children.

  20. Slippage power transmission technology on the wire rope%钢丝绳上滑移输电技术的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭伟; 张维钧

    2012-01-01

    According to the actual project demand, the paper designs an electric cable trolley which is able to glide freely on the wire rope. The trolley features novel style, and its structure has a function of preventing wire rope to jump from the slot of wheel. Electric cable trolley can only glide on the wire rope under haulage cable' s dragging. Slippage power transmission technology on the wire rope is based on the electric cable trolley which is able to transmit power to the long-distance equipment which moves in the three-dimensional space and is dragged by wire ropes.%为了满足特定的工程需要,设计了一种能在钢丝绳上滑移的电缆小车,该电缆小车型式新颖,结构上具备防止钢丝绳脱槽的功能,电缆小车在牵引绳的牵引下拖拽着电缆只能沿承载它的钢丝绳方向运动.以该电缆小车为基础的钢丝绳上滑移输电技术能实现向被钢丝绳牵引并作空间移动的设备进行长距离输电.

  1. MHD Forces in Quasi-Static Evolution, Catastrophe, and ``Failed'' Eruption of Solar Flux Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, James

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the first unified theoretical model of flux rope dynamics---a single set of flux-rope equations in ideal MHD---to describe as one dynamical process the quasi-static evolution, catastrophic transition to eruption, cessation (``failure'') of eruption, and the post-eruption quasi-equilibria. The model is defined by the major radial {\\it and} minor radial equations of motion including pressure. The initial equilibrium is a flux rope in a background plasma with pressure $p_c(Z)$ and an overlying magnetic field $B_c(Z)$. The flux rope is initially force-free, but theevolution is not required to be force- free. A single quasi-static control parameter, the rate of increase in poloidal flux, is used for the entire process. As this parameter is slowly increased, the flux rope rises, following a sequence of quasi-static equilibria. As the apex of the flux rope rises past a critical height $Z_{crt}$, it expands on a dynamical (Alfvénic) timescale. The eruption rapidly ceases, as the stored magnetic energy of eruption is exhausted, and a new equilibrium is established at height $Z_1 > Z_{crt}$. The calculated velocity profile resembles the observed velocity profiles in ``failed'' eruptions including a damped oscillation. In the post-eruption equilibria, the outward hoop force is balanced by the tension of the toroidal self magnetic field and pressure gradient force. Thus, the flux rope does not evolve in a force-free manner. The flux rope may also expand without reaching a new equilibrium, provided a sufficient amount of poloidal flux is injected on the timescale of eruption. This scenario results in a full CME eruption. It is shown that the minor radial expansion critically couples the evolution of the toroidal self-field and pressure gradient force. No parameter regime is found in which the commonly used simplifications---near-equilibrium minor radial expansion, force-free expansion, and constant aspect ratio $R/a$ (e.g., the torus instability equation

  2. Catalogue of best practices for the ropes and winders of deep shaft sinking operations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zyl, M

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of the catalogue of best practices is to ensure the safety of the winding ropes. It therefore addresses aspects that will influence rope loads, rope strength, rope deterioration and the condition assessment of the winding ropes...

  3. Moral Relativism on the Ropes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabler, Mel; Gabler, Norma

    1987-01-01

    Finds that most current public school sex education programs and all values clarification programs are based on moral relativism and are intellectually indefensible because they are (1) methodologically defective, (2) present tautologies instead of values, (3) depend on circular reasoning, and (4) undemocratic. (NKA)

  4. Rope Climbing Robot with Surveillance Capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanza Zafar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past different engineers and researcher developed robots capable of climbing for various purposes. In this paper we have developed a robot capable of rope climbing in both horizontal and vertical direction. Furthermore, the robot has the ability to perform surveillance using a camera mounted on top of the robot. The quality of the transmitted video from the camera to the computer is clear and stable. Hence the developed robot is a good choice for surveillance purposes. In addition, it can be used to traverse floors of a building. It uses an IR sensor to sense strips attached at each floor. Once the strips are sensed, a dropping mechanism is activated in which a specific object is dropped to the targeted floor or location. The robot can work in automatic mode or manual through RF signals from an RF transmitter. Finally the robot is cost effective compared to many other developed robots for rope climbing.

  5. Undular Hydraulic Jump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Castro-Orgaz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The transition from subcritical to supercritical flow when the inflow Froude number Fo is close to unity appears in the form of steady state waves called undular hydraulic jump. The characterization of the undular hydraulic jump is complex due to the existence of a non-hydrostatic pressure distribution that invalidates the gradually-varied flow theory, and supercritical shock waves. The objective of this work is to present a mathematical model for the undular hydraulic jump obtained from an approximate integration of the Reynolds equations for turbulent flow assuming that the Reynolds number R is high. Simple analytical solutions are presented to reveal the physics of the theory, and a numerical model is used to integrate the complete equations. The limit of application of the theory is discussed using a wave breaking condition for the inception of a surface roller. The validity of the mathematical predictions is critically assessed using physical data, thereby revealing aspects on which more research is needed

  6. Structural ropes development for the E-ELT structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajuelo, Eugenio; Gómez, José Ramón; Ronquillo, Bernardo; Brunetto, Enzo; Koch, Franz

    2008-07-01

    The European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) structural rope system will be integrated in a mechanical structure, which can be made of mild steel and/or composite material. The following critical problems shall be solved by the rope system: matching of differential thermal expansion and tensioning forces calibration and control. The structural rope system consists of ropes, thermal compensation and tension control devices, and mechanical interfaces with the telescope structure. The objective of this study is to provide solutions to stabilize slender structural elements located in the upper part of the E-ELT Altitude Structure and increase global mode frequencies of the upper part of the E-ELT Altitude Structure. An appropriate rope system is developed to avoid local mode shapes and loss of stiffness that could lead to the failure of the whole structure under operational loads. The pre-tension level of the ropes needs to be controlled before operation to reach that objective.

  7. The sagging rope sign: a critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, N M; Harrison, M H; Keret, D

    1983-05-01

    Certain features of the sagging rope sign recently analysed by Apley and Weintroub (1981) are examined in detail. Evidence is presented to show that the line is a radiological shadow cast by the lateral edge of a severely deformed femoral head rather than a condensation of the spongiosa within the neck. An explanation is offered to explain the common association of the presence of this radiological sign with premature epiphysial fusion.

  8. Suprathermal Charged Particle Acceleration by Small-scale Flux Ropes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zank, G. P.; le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    We consider different limits of our recently developed kinetic transport theory to investigate the potential of super-Alvenic solar wind regions containing several small-scale flux ropes to explain the acceleration of suprathermal ions to power-law spectra as observations show. Particle acceleration is modeled in response to flux-rope activity involving contraction, merging (reconnection), and collisions in the limit where the particle gyoradius is smaller than the characteristic flux-rope scale length. The emphasis is mainly on the statistical variance in the electric fields induced by flux-rope dynamics rather than on the mean electric field induced by multiple flux ropes whose acceleration effects are discussed elsewhere. Our steady-state analytical solutions suggest that particle drift acceleration by flux ropes, irrespective of whether displaying incompressible or compressible behavior, can yield power laws asymptotically at higher energies whereas an exponential spectral rollover results asymptotically when field-aligned guiding center motion acceleration occur by reconnection electric fields from merging flux ropes. This implies that at sufficiently high particle energies, drift acceleration might dominate. We also expect compressive flux ropes to yield harder power-law spectra than incompressible flux ropes. Preliminary results will be discussed to illustrate how particle acceleration might be affected when both diffusive shock and small-scale flux acceleration occur simultaneously at interplanetary shocks.

  9. Flux ropes in the magnetic solar convection zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorch, S. B. F.

    2006-01-01

    In this contribution results are presented on how twisted magnetic flux ropes interact with a magnetized model envelope similar to the solar convection zone. Both the flux ropes and the atmosphere are modelled as idealized 2.5-dimensional concepts using high resolution numerical MHD simulations (on...... of the magnetic flux ropes interact with the magnetic field in the atmosphere in a manner that depends, among other things, on the polarity and strength of the atmospheric field. The results include limits on the necessary and possible twist and polarity of solar magnetic flux ropes....

  10. Ridge jump process in Iceland

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Eastward ridge jumps bring the volcanic zones of Iceland back to the centre of the hotspot in response to the absolute westward drift of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Mantellic pulses triggers these ridge jumps. One of them is occurring in Southern Iceland, whereas the exact conditions of the last ridge jump in Northern Iceland remain controversial. The diachronous evolution of these two parts of Iceland may be related to the asymmetric plume-ridge interaction when comparing Northern and Southern I...

  11. and the CMJ jump height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Struzik Artur

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: The elastic potential energy accumulated in the musculotendinous units during the countermovement phase of a jump adds up to the energy supplied by the contracting muscles used in the take-off phase. Consequently, the total mechanical energy used during the jump may reach higher values. Stiffness represents a quantitative measure of a body’s elastic properties. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish the relationship between leg stiffness and the countermovement jump height.

  12. Simulating Idealized Flux Ropes with the Flux Rope Insertion Method: A Parameter Space Exploration of Currents and Topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savcheva, Antonia; Tassev, Svetlin; DeLuca, Edward E.; Gibson, Sarah; Fan, Yuhong

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of the 3D magnetic filed structure at the time of major solar eruptions is vital to the understanding of the space weather effects of these eruptions. Multiple data-constrained techniques that reconstruct the 3D coronal field based on photospheric magnetograms have been used to achieve this goal. In particular, we have used the flux rope insertion method to obtain the coronal magnetic field of multiple regions containing flux ropes or sheared arcades based on line-of-sight magnetograms and X-ray and EUV observations of coronal loops. For the purpose of developing statistical measures of the goodness of fit of these models to the observations, here we present our modeling of flux ropes based on synthetic magnetograms obtained from aFan & Gibson emerging flux rope simulation. The goal is to study the effect of of different input flux rope parameters on the geometry of currents, field line connectivity, and topology, in a controled setting. For this purpose we create a large grid of models with the flux rope insertion method with different combinations of axial and poloidal flux, which give us different morphology of the flux rope. We create synthetic images of these flux ropes in AIA passbands with the FORWARD forward-fitting code. The present parametric study will later be used to get a better handle on the initial condition for magnetofrictional and MHD simulations of observed regions containing flux ropes, such as sigmoids and polar-crown filaments.

  13. New constructions of wire ropes for the industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ŠŠaderová Jana

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available The wire ropes are used in different industrial fields. Their construction depends on the type of equipment and its purpose. Most frequently we meet with ropes at different transport and hoisting equipments and very freqently in the civil industry. For users characteristics are important which must meet requirements of the individual regulations and standards of the selection of wire ropes for the concrete equipment. The most important is the factor of safety being safeguarded by the corresponding bearing capacity of the rope. The service life of rope is interesting for the user, too, because of having an influence on the economy of the equipment on which the rope is working. These problems are solved by the grant project at our department . We are aimed at questions of the optimization of construction of wire rope with regard to their geometric construction and service life. Respectively on the basis of elaborated computer software eightstrand ropes of parallel construction were disigned and produced at the Drôtov ň a Hlohovec. The results of the fatigue tests confirmed their better qualitative properties, longer service life and economy advantages for users, too. Their using is possible and suitable on the new hoisting eguipment on the surface, in the undeground and in the hole drilling industry. By the application of the computer technique is also possible to improve the parametres of six-strands` construction of rope, the classic and parallel constructions, especially their bearing capacity. This fact follows from the knowledge that for the production of rope we use calculated diameters of wires, which secure better utilization of the metal cross-section of the wire ropes.

  14. Initial Steps in Creating a Developmentally Valid Tool for Observing/Assessing Rope Jumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberton, Mary Ann; Thompson, Gregory; Langendorfer, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Valid motor development sequences show the various behaviors that children display as they progress toward competence in specific motor skills. Teachers can use these sequences to observe informally or formally assess their students. While longitudinal study is ultimately required to validate developmental sequences, there are earlier,…

  15. Exploring Lightning Jump Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronis, Themis; Carey, Larry D.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Schultz, Elise; Calhoun, Kristin; Goodman, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    This study is concerned with the characteristics of storms exhibiting an abrupt temporal increase in the total lightning flash rate (i.e., lightning jump, LJ). An automated storm tracking method is used to identify storm "clusters" and total lightning activity from three different lightning detection systems over Oklahoma, northern Alabama and Washington, D.C. On average and for different employed thresholds, the clusters that encompass at least one LJ (LJ1) last longer, relate to higher Maximum Expected Size of Hail, Vertical Integrated Liquid and lightning flash rates (area-normalized) than the clusters that did not exhibit any LJ (LJ0). The respective mean values for LJ1 (LJ0) clusters are 80 min (35 min), 14 mm (8 mm), 25 kg per square meter (18 kg per square meter) and 0.05 flash per min per square kilometer (0.01 flash per min per square kilometer). Furthermore, the LJ1 clusters are also characterized by slower decaying autocorrelation functions, a result that implies a less "random" behavior in the temporal flash rate evolution. In addition, the temporal occurrence of the last LJ provides an estimate of the time remaining to the storm's dissipation. Depending of the LJ strength (i.e., varying thresholds), these values typically range between 20-60 min, with stronger jumps indicating more time until storm decay. This study's results support the hypothesis that the LJ is a proxy for the storm's kinematic and microphysical state rather than a coincidental value.

  16. More Puddle Jumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attari, Babak; Weislogel, Mark; Wollman, Andrew; Chen, Yongkang; Snyder, Trevor

    2016-11-01

    Large droplets and puddles jump spontaneously from sufficiently hydrophobic surfaces during routine drop tower tests. The simple low-cost passive mechanism can in turn be used as an experimental device to investigate dynamic droplet phenomena for drops up to 10,000 times larger than their normal terrestrial counterparts. We provide or confirm quick and qualitative design guides for such 'drop shooters' as employed in drop tower tests including relationships to predict droplet ejection durations and velocities as functions of drop volume, surface texture, surface contour, wettability pattern, drop volume, and fluid properties including contact angle. The latter are determined via profile image comparisons with numerical equilibrium interface computations. Water drop volumes of 0.04 to 400 mL at ejection speeds of -0.007 to 0.12 m/s are demonstrated. An example application of the puddle jump method is made to the classic problem of regime mapping for low-gravity phase change heat transfer for large impinging drops. Many other candidate problems might be identified.

  17. Research of x-ray nondestructive detector for high-speed running conveyor belt with steel wire ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junfeng; Miao, Changyun; Wang, Wei; Lu, Xiaocui

    2008-03-01

    An X-ray nondestructive detector for high-speed running conveyor belt with steel wire ropes is researched in the paper. The principle of X-ray nondestructive testing (NDT) is analyzed, the general scheme of the X-ray nondestructive testing system is proposed, and the nondestructive detector for high-speed running conveyor belt with steel wire ropes is developed. The hardware of system is designed with Xilinx's VIRTEX-4 FPGA that embeds PowerPC and MAC IP core, and its network communication software based on TCP/IP protocol is programmed by loading LwIP to PowerPC. The nondestructive testing of high-speed conveyor belt with steel wire ropes and network transfer function are implemented. It is a strong real-time system with rapid scanning speed, high reliability and remotely nondestructive testing function. The nondestructive detector can be applied to the detection of product line in industry.

  18. Flux ropes in the magnetic solar convection zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorch, S. B. F.

    2006-01-01

    In this contribution results are presented on how twisted magnetic flux ropes interact with a magnetized model envelope similar to the solar convection zone. Both the flux ropes and the atmosphere are modelled as idealized 2.5-dimensional concepts using high resolution numerical MHD simulations (on...

  19. POST OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY EDEMA AFTER ATTEMPTED NYLON ROPE SUICIDAL HANGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Survival after nylon rope suicidal hanging is a rare occurance . We describe here a patient who attempted suicide by nylon rope hanging and developed post obstructive pulmonary edema was managed successfully . Patient recovered completely with ventilatory support in next 60 hours without any neurological deficit.This case highlights an unusual complication of hanging and its recovery.

  20. Synthetic radio views on simulated solar flux ropes

    CERN Document Server

    Kuznetsov, Alexey; Xia, Chun

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we produce synthetic radio views on simulated flux ropes in the solar corona, where finite-beta magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations serve to mimic the flux rope formation stages, as well as their stable endstates. These endstates represent twisted flux ropes where balancing Lorentz forces, gravity and pressure gradients determine the full thermodynamic variation throughout the flux rope. The obtained models are needed to quantify radiative transfer in radio bands, and allow us to contrast weak to strong magnetic field conditions. Field strengths of up to 100 G in the flux rope yield the radio views dominated by optically thin free-free emission. The forming flux rope shows clear morphological changes in its emission structure as it deforms from an arcade to a flux rope, both on disk and at the limb. For an active region filament channel with a field strength of up to 680 G in the flux rope, gyroresonance emission (from the third-fourth gyrolayers) can be detected and even dominates over free-...

  1. Muscle Activity during Unilateral Vs. Bilateral Battle Rope Exercises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calatayud, J.; Martin, F.; Colado, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Calatayud, J, Martin, F, Colado, JC, Benitez, JC, Jakobsen, MD, and Andersen, LL. Muscle activity during unilateral vs. bilateral battle rope exercises. J Strength Cond Res 29(10): 2854-2859, 2015High training intensity is important for efficient strength gains. Although battle rope training is m...

  2. Deterioration mechanisms of drum winder ropes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zyl, M

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available degradation will not increase the susceptibility of wires to fatigue crack initiation, it is postulated that high contact stresses will generate their own problems (like split wires) if left unchecked. An alternative approach to the pulling in of back ends... is proposed in the section on contact stresses to minimise the adverse effects of contact stresses: Pull in back ends much more frequent in the beginning of the service life of a rope. The analysis and measurement of bending stresses in triangular strand...

  3. The modelling and analysis of the mechanics of ropes

    CERN Document Server

    Leech, C M

    2014-01-01

    This book considers the modelling and analysis of the many types of ropes, linear fibre assemblies. The construction of these structures is very diverse and in the work these are considered from the modelling point of view. As well as the conventional twisted structures, braid and plaited structures and parallel assemblies are modelled and analysed, first for their assembly and secondly for their mechanical behaviour. Also since the components are assemblies of components, fibres into yarns, into strands, and into ropes the hierarchical nature of the construction is considered. The focus of the modelling is essentially toward load extension behaviour but there is reference to bending of ropes, encompassed by the two extremes, no slip between the components and zero friction resistance to component slip. Friction in ropes is considered both between the rope components, sliding, sawing and scissoring, and within the components, dilation and distortion, these latter modes being used to model component set, the p...

  4. Mechanical properties of steel rope wires -– quality test assurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslava Dečmanová

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the mechanical properties of wires of steel ropes by tests in accordance with rule in operation and valid regulation.There are specified values of minimal and maximum capacity or strenghts and values of minimal bendings and torsion in them. Minimalvalues of bendings and torsion are rated wire strenght, diameter and surface treatment dependent. It is suitable to use the calculationof irregularity coefficient of steel wires strenght for quality assessment of steel ropes which put into practice soviet authors Žitkovand Pospechov. Statistical methods make possible to review the quality of steel ropes from the test results of their wires on capacity,bending and torsion. In the paper we evaluate and compare the quality of two steel ropes with triangular strands, we appear fromprotocols about their tests in the accredited testing station of steel ropes of our workstation.

  5. Hydraulic jumps in a channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonn, D.; Andersen, Anders Peter; Bohr, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of hydraulic jumps with flow predominantly in one direction, created either by confining the flow to a narrow channel with parallel walls or by providing an inflow in the form of a narrow sheet. In the channel flow, we find a linear height profile upstream of the jump as expected...

  6. A COMPARISON OF PAIRS FIGURE SKATERS IN REPEATED JUMPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Sands

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Trends in pairs figure skating have shown that increasingly difficult jumps have become an essential aspect of high-level performance, especially in the latter part of a competitive program. We compared a repeated jump power index in a 60 s repeated jump test to determine the relationship of repeated jump test to competitive rank and to measure 2D hip, knee, and ankle angles and angular velocities at 0, 20, 40, and 60 s. Eighteen National Team Pairs Figure Skaters performed a 60 s repeated jump test on a large switch-mat with timing of flight and ground durations and digital video recording. Each 60-s period was divided into 6, 10-s intervals, with power indexes (W/kg calculated for each 10-s interval. Power index by 10-s interval repeated measures ANOVAs (RMANOVA showed that males exceeded females at all intervals, and the highest power index interval was during 10 to 20 s for both sexes. RMANOVAs of angles and angular velocities showed main effects for time only. Power index and jumping techniques among figure skaters showed rapid and steady declines over the test duration. Power index can predict approximately 50% of competitive rank variance, and sex differences in jumping technique were rare

  7. Electrostatic charging of jumping droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Preston, Daniel J.; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2013-09-01

    With the broad interest in and development of superhydrophobic surfaces for self-cleaning, condensation heat transfer enhancement and anti-icing applications, more detailed insights on droplet interactions on these surfaces have emerged. Specifically, when two droplets coalesce, they can spontaneously jump away from a superhydrophobic surface due to the release of excess surface energy. Here we show that jumping droplets gain a net positive charge that causes them to repel each other mid-flight. We used electric fields to quantify the charge on the droplets and identified the mechanism for the charge accumulation, which is associated with the formation of the electric double layer at the droplet-surface interface. The observation of droplet charge accumulation provides insight into jumping droplet physics as well as processes involving charged liquid droplets. Furthermore, this work is a starting point for more advanced approaches for enhancing jumping droplet surface performance by using external electric fields to control droplet jumping.

  8. Jump conditions in transonic equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guazzotto, L.; Betti, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Jardin, S. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    In the present paper, the numerical calculation of transonic equilibria, first introduced with the FLOW code in Guazzotto et al.[Phys. Plasmas 11, 604 (2004)], is critically reviewed. In particular, the necessity and effect of imposing explicit jump conditions at the transonic discontinuity are investigated. It is found that 'standard' (low-{beta}, large aspect ratio) transonic equilibria satisfy the correct jump condition with very good approximation even if the jump condition is not explicitly imposed. On the other hand, it is also found that high-{beta}, low aspect ratio equilibria require the correct jump condition to be explicitly imposed. Various numerical approaches are described to modify FLOW to include the jump condition. It is proved that the new methods converge to the correct solution even in extreme cases of very large {beta}, while they agree with the results obtained with the old implementation of FLOW in lower-{beta} equilibria.

  9. Safe use of mine winding ropes, volume 4: studies towards a code of practice for rope condition assessment.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Borrello, M

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation was the verification of the code of Practice for Rope Condition Assessment. Ropes were meant to be discarded according to the discard criteria as outlined in the code and then tested by the CSIR. The results...

  10. Choice of jumping strategy in two standard jumps, squat and countermovement jump--effect of training background or inherited preference?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Susanne; Voigt, M; Simonsen, Erik Bruun

    1999-01-01

    Six male subjects, three professional ballet dancers and three elite volleyball players, performed maximal vertical jumps from 1) a static preparatory position (squat jump), 2) starting with a countermovement (countermovement jump) and 3) a specific jump for ballet and for volleyball, respectively....... The jumps were recorded on highspeed film (500 Hz) combined with registration of ground reaction forces, and net joint moments were calculated by inverse dynamics. The purpose was to investigate the choice of strategy in two standard jumps, squat jump and countermovement jump. The volleyball jump...... was performed with a sequential strategy and the ballet jump was performed with a simultaneous strategy. In the two standard jumps, the choice of strategy was individual and not related to training background. This was additionally confirmed in a test of seven ballet dancers and seven volleyball players....

  11. Frequency Jump Detection and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    CUMULATIVE SUM JUMP DETECTION The Cumulative Sum ( CUSUM ) is a classic change-point analysis technique that uses the cumulative sum of the...sum and y is the average of the data. The CUSUM slope indicates the value of the data with respect to the overall average. A flat cumulative sum...sudden change in the CUSUM slope indicates a jump in the data. The CUSUM plot for a data set having a single jump will have a V or inverted V shape

  12. ROPE: Recoverable Order-Preserving Embedding of Natural Language

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widemann, David P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wang, Eric X. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Thiagarajan, Jayaraman J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-02-11

    We present a novel Recoverable Order-Preserving Embedding (ROPE) of natural language. ROPE maps natural language passages from sparse concatenated one-hot representations to distributed vector representations of predetermined fixed length. We use Euclidean distance to return search results that are both grammatically and semantically similar. ROPE is based on a series of random projections of distributed word embeddings. We show that our technique typically forms a dictionary with sufficient incoherence such that sparse recovery of the original text is possible. We then show how our embedding allows for efficient and meaningful natural search and retrieval on Microsoft’s COCO dataset and the IMDB Movie Review dataset.

  13. Realized Jump Risk and Equity Return in China

    OpenAIRE

    Guojin Chen; Xiaoqun Liu; Peilin Hsieh; Xiangqin Zhao

    2014-01-01

    We utilize the realized jump components to explore a new jump (including nonsystematic jump and systematic jump) risk factor model. After estimating daily realized jumps from high-frequency transaction data of the Chinese A-share stocks, we calculate monthly jump size, monthly jump standard deviation, and monthly jump arrival rate and then use those monthly jump factors to explain the return of the following month. Our empirical results show that the jump tail risk can explain the equity retu...

  14. Rook Jumping Maze Design Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neller, Todd W.; Fisher, Adrian; Choga, Munyaradzi T.; Lalvani, Samir M.; McCarty, Kyle D.

    We define the Rook Jumping Maze, provide historical perspective, and describe a generation method for such mazes. When applying stochastic local search algorithms to maze design, most creative effort concerns the definition of an objective function that rates maze quality. We define and discuss several maze features to consider in such a function definition. Finally, we share our preferred design choices, make design process observations, and note the applicability of these techniques to variations of the Rook Jumping Maze.

  15. Evaluation of international and local magnetic rope testing instrument defect detection capabilities and resolution, particularly in respect of low rotation, multi-layer rope constructions.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dohm, M

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available which in turn resulted in safer hoisting practices. Unfortunately in-service rope failures still occurred. This report describes the evaluation of international and local magnetic rope testing instrument defect detection capabilities and resolutions....

  16. Studying the Formation and Evolution of Eruptive Magnetic Flux Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Mark

    2017-08-01

    Solar magnetic eruptions are dramatic sources of solar activity, and dangerous sources of space weather hazards. Many of these eruptions take the form of magnetic flux ropes, i.e., magnetic fieldlines wrapping around a core magnetic flux tube. Investigating the processes which form these flux ropes both prior to and during eruption, and investigating their evolution after eruption, can give us a critical window into understanding the sources of and processes involved in these eruptions. This presentation will discuss modeling and observational investigations into these various phases of flux rope formation, eruption, and evolution, and will discuss how these different explorations can be used to develop a more complete picture of erupting flux rope dynamics.

  17. Pre-Stressed Rope Reinforced Anti-Sliding Pile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jun; WANG Chenghua

    2006-01-01

    Pre-stressed rope reinforced anti-sliding pile is a composite anti-sliding structure. It is made up of pre-stressed rope and general anti-sliding pile. It can bring traditional anti-sliding pile's retaining performance into full play, and to treat with landslide fast and economically. The difference between them is that the pre-stressed rope will transfix the whole anti-sliding pile through a prearranged pipe in this structure. The working mechanics, the design method and economic benefit are studied. The results show that the pre-stressed rope reinforced anti-sliding pile can treat with the small and middle landslides or high slopes well and possess the notable advantage of technology and economic.

  18. Plasma Flows Associated with Two Kink-Unstable Flux Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHaas, Timothy; Gekelman, W.; Van Compernolle, B.

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic flux ropes are self-organized, magnetized plasma structures embedded in an ambient medium. Their structure consists of helical field lines which vary in pitch due to the electric current flowing along a background magnetic field.1 Multiple braided flux ropes have been observed in the solar corona, and their unraveling is theorized to be the signature of magnetic reconnection.2 Two flux ropes (L=10 m, A=7 cm2, J=10 amp/cm2) were created in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA (Bo=330 G, no = 1012 cm-3, Te=4eV, Ar). The flux ropes are highly kink unstable, which cause the ropes to twist and oscillate at frequencies associated with shear Alfven waves. Through the use of a six-faced Mach probe, volumetric data was taken to determine the three-dimensional plasma flow. Volumetric b-field information was also obtained through use of a three-axis magnetic probe. The data collected from these probes is laden with Lorentzian pulses, a characteristic of deterministic chaos.3 The flux ropes are shown to twist, interact, then merge; while the plasma flows are shown to spiral around the two flux ropes in a singular O-point. A quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) forms as the flux ropes collide and the magnetic field lines reconnect. The relationship between flow and reconnection sites is explored. 1Gekelman, W. et al. ApJ 753, 131 2Cirtain, J.W. et al. Nature 493, 501-503 (2013) 3Maggs, J.E. et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 185003 (2011)

  19. Effects of slackline training on balance, jump performance & muscle activity in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donath, L; Roth, R; Rueegge, A; Groppa, M; Zahner, L; Faude, O

    2013-12-01

    The study investigated the effects of slackline training (rope balancing) on balance, jump performance and muscle activity in children. Two primary-school classes (intervention, n=21, INT: age: 10.1 (SD 0.4) y, weight: 33.1 (4.5) kg; control, n=13, CON: age: 10.0 (SD 0.4) y, weight: 34.7 (7.4) kg) participated. Training was performed within 6 weeks, 5 times per week for 10 min each day. Balance (static and dynamic stance), countermovement jumps, reverse balancing on beams (3, 4.5 and 6 cm width), slackline standing (single- and double-limb) and electromyographic activity (soleus, gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior) were examined. INT significantly improved single- and double-limb slackline standing (double limb: 5.1 (3.4) s-17.2 (14.4) s; right leg: 8.2 (5.8) s-38.3 (36.0) s; left leg: 10.6 (5.8) s-49.0 (56.3) s; pJump performance remained unchanged (p=0.28, ηp²=0.04). In conclusion, daily slackline training results in large slackline-specific balance improvements. Transfer effects to static and dynamic stance, reverse balancing or jumping performance seemed to be restricted. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Unsteady wandering magnetic field lines, turbulence and laboratory flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrator, T.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.; Liu, D.; Pulliam, D.; Lazarian, A.

    2011-12-01

    We describe earth bound laboratory experiment investigations of patchy, unsteady, bursty, patchy magnetic field structures that are unifying features of magnetic reconnection and turbulence in helio, space and astro physics. Macroscopic field lines occupy cross sectional areas, fill up three dimensional (3D) volumes as flux tubes. They contain mass with Newtonian dynamics that follow magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) equations of motion. Flux rope geometry can be ubiquitous in laminar reconnection sheet geometries that are themselves unstable to formation of secondary "islands" that in 3D are really flux ropes. Flux ropes are ubiquitous structures on the sun and the rest of the heliosphere. Understanding the dynamics of flux ropes and their mutual interactions offers the key to many important astrophysical phenomena, including magnetic reconnection and turbulence. We describe laboratory investigations on RSX, where 3D interaction of flux ropes can be studied in great detail. We use experimental probes inside the the flux ropes to measure the magnetic and electric fields, current density, density, temperatures, pressure, and electrostatic and vector plasma potentials. Macroscopic magnetic field lines, unsteady wandering characteristics, and dynamic objects with structure down to the dissipation scale length can be traced from data sets in a 3D volume. Computational approaches are finally able to tackle simple 3D systems and we sketch some intriguing simulation results that are consistent with 3D extensions of typical 2D cartoons for magnetic reconnection and turbulence.

  1. Effect of Tension on Friction Coefficient Between Lining and Wire Rope with Low Speed Sliding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Yu-xing; ZHU Zhen-cai; CHEN Guo-an; CAO Guo-hua

    2007-01-01

    In order to obtain the exact friction coefficient between lining and wire rope, the tension of wire rope is studied as a factor which affects this coefficient. A mechanical model of a wire rope subjected to axial load was established to determine the torque of the wire rope. The contact motion between lining and wire rope was regarded as a screw rotation and the axial force of the lining resulting from the torque of the wire rope was analyzed. Theoretical formulas relating tension of the wire rope and the friction coefficient was obtained. Experiments between lining and wire rope with low sliding speed were carried out with friction tester made by us. Experimental results show that increment of the friction coefficient is proportional to that of the tension of the wire rope with a low sliding speed. The experimental results agree with the theoretical calculation; the errors are less than 6%, which proves the validity of the theoretical model.

  2. Test-retest reliability of jump execution variables using mechanography: A comparison of jump protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanography during the vertical jump test allows for evaluation of force-time variables reflecting jump execution, which may enhance screening for functional deficits that reduce physical performance and determining mechanistic causes underlying performance changes. However, utility of jump mechan...

  3. Gravity current jump conditions, revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungarish, Marius; Hogg, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Consider the flow of a high-Reynolds-number gravity current of density ρc in an ambient fluid of density ρa in a horizontal channel z ∈ [ 0 , H ] , with gravity in - z direction. The motion is often modeled by a two-layer formulation which displays jumps (shocks) in the height of the interface, in particular at the leading front of the dense layer. Various theoretical models have been advanced to predict the dimensionless speed of the jump, Fr = U /√{g' h } ; g' , h are reduced gravity and jump height. We revisit this problem and using the Navier-Stokes equations, integrated over a control volume embedding the jump, derive balances of mass and momentum fluxes. We focus on understanding the closures needed to complete this model and we show the vital need to understand the pressure head losses over the jump, which we show can be related to the vorticity fluxes at the boundaries of the control volume. Our formulation leads to two governing equations for three dimensionless quantities. Closure requires one further assumption, depending on which we demonstrate that previous models for gravity current fronts and internal bores can be recovered. This analysis yield new insights into existing results, and also provides constraints for potential new formulae.

  4. Coalescence-induced nanodroplet jumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyeongyun; Xu, Chenyu; Sotelo, Jesus; Chun, Jae Min; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Enright, Ryan; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2016-10-01

    Water vapor condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces has received much attention in recent years due to the ability of such surfaces to shed microscale water droplets via coalescence-induced droplet jumping, resulting in heat transfer, anti-icing, and self-cleaning performance enhancement. Here we report the coalescence-induced removal of water nanodroplets (R ≈500 nm ) from superhydrophobic carbon nanotube (CNT) surfaces. The two-droplet coalescence time is measured for varying droplet Ohnesorge numbers, confirming that coalescence prior to jumping is governed by capillary-inertial dynamics. By varying the conformal hydrophobic coating thickness on the CNT surface, the minimum jumping droplet radius is shown to increase with increasing solid fraction and decreasing apparent advancing contact angle, allowing us to explore both hydrodynamic limitations stemming from viscous dissipation and surface adhesion limitations. We find that, even for the smallest nanostructure length scale (≤100 nm) and lowest surface adhesions, nonideal surface interactions and the evolved droplet morphology play defining roles in limiting the minimum size for jumping on real surfaces. The outcomes of this work demonstrate the ability to passively shed nanometric water droplets, which has the potential to further increase the efficiency of systems that can harness jumping droplets for a wide range of energy and water applications.

  5. A comparison of pairs figure skaters in repeated jumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, William A; Kimmel, Wendy L; McNeal, Jeni R; Murray, Steven Ross; Stone, Michael H

    2012-01-01

    Trends in pairs figure skating have shown that increasingly difficult jumps have become an essential aspect of high-level performance, especially in the latter part of a competitive program. We compared a repeated jump power index in a 60 s repeated jump test to determine the relationship of repeated jump test to competitive rank and to measure 2D hip, knee, and ankle angles and angular velocities at 0, 20, 40, and 60 s. Eighteen National Team Pairs Figure Skaters performed a 60 s repeated jump test on a large switch-mat with timing of flight and ground durations and digital video recording. Each 60-s period was divided into 6, 10-s intervals, with power indexes (W/kg) calculated for each 10-s interval. Power index by 10-s interval repeated measures ANOVAs (RMANOVA) showed that males exceeded females at all intervals, and the highest power index interval was during 10 to 20 s for both sexes. RMANOVAs of angles and angular velocities showed main effects for time only. Power index and jumping techniques among figure skaters showed rapid and steady declines over the test duration. Power index can predict approximately 50% of competitive rank variance, and sex differences in jumping technique were rare. Key pointsThe repeated jumps test can account for about 50% of the variance in pairs ranks.Changes in technique are largely due to fatigue, but the athletes were able to maintain a maximum flexion knee angle very close to the desired 90 degrees. Changes in angular velocity and jump heights occurred as expected, again probably due to fatigue.As expected from metabolic information, the athletes' power indexes peak around 20s and decline thereafter. Coaches should be aware of this time as a boundary beyond which fatigue becomes more manifest, and use careful choreographic choices to provide rest periods that are disguised as less demanding skating elements to afford recovery.The repeated jumps test may be a helpful off-ice test of power-endurance for figure skaters.

  6. Mechanically induced ankle inversion during human walking and jumping.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, P.H.J.A.; Grüneberg, C.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2002-01-01

    A new method to study sudden ankle inversions during human walking and jumping is presented. Ankle inversions of 25 degrees were elicited using a box containing a trap door. During the gait task, subjects walked at a speed of 4 km/h. At a pre-programmed delay after left heel strike, an electromagnet

  7. Mechanically induced ankle inversion during human walking and jumping.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, P.H.J.A.; Grüneberg, C.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2002-01-01

    A new method to study sudden ankle inversions during human walking and jumping is presented. Ankle inversions of 25 degrees were elicited using a box containing a trap door. During the gait task, subjects walked at a speed of 4 km/h. At a pre-programmed delay after left heel strike, an electromagnet

  8. Coronal Flux Rope Equilibria in Closed Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Wang; You-Qiu Hu

    2003-01-01

    Using a 2.5-dimensional ideal MHD model in Cartesian coordinates, weinvestigate the equilibrium properties of coronal magnetic flux ropes in backgroundmagnetic fields that are completely closed. The background fields are produced by adipole, a quadrupole, and an octapole, respectively, located below the photosphereat the same depth. A magnetic flux rope is then launched from below the photo-sphere, and its magnetic properties, i.e., the annular magnetic flux φp and the axialmagnetic flux φz, are controlled by a single emergence parameter. The whole sys-tem eventually evolves into equilibrium, and the resultant flux rope is characterizedby three geometrical parameters: the height of the rope axis, the half-width of therope, and the length of the vertical current sheet below the rope. It is found thatthe geometrical parameters increase monotonically and continuously with increasingφ p and φz: no catastrophe occurs. Moreover, there exists a steep segment in theprofiles of the geometrical parameters versus either φp or φz, and the faster thebackground field decays with height, the larger both the gradient and the growthamplitude within the steep segment will be.

  9. Determining the axis orientation of cylindrical magnetic flux rope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Zhaojin; Wan, Weixing; Shen, Chao; Zhang, Tielong; Lui, Anthony; Wang, Yuming; Dunlop, malcolm; Zhang, Yongcun; Zong, Qiugang

    2013-04-01

    We develop a new simple method for inferring the orientation of a magnetic flux rope, which is assumed to be a time-independent cylindrically symmetric structure via the direct single-point analysis of magnetic field structure. The model tests demonstrate that, for the cylindrical flux rope regardless of whether it is force-free or not, the method can consistently yield the axis orientation of the flux rope with higher accuracy and stability than the minimum variance analysis of the magnetic field and the Grad-Shafranov reconstruction technique. Moreover, the radial distance to the axis center and the current density can also be estimated consistently. Application to two actual flux transfer events observed by the four satellites of the Cluster mission demonstrates that the method is more appropriate to be used for the inner part of flux rope, which might be closer to the cylindrical structure, showing good agreement with the results obtained from the optimal Grad-Shafranov reconstruction and the least squares technique of Faraday's law, but fails to produce such agreement for the outer satellite that grazes the flux rope. Therefore, the method must be used with caution.

  10. Alzheimer's Deaths Jump 55 Percent: CDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165941.html Alzheimer's Deaths Jump 55 Percent: CDC More patients also ... News) -- As more baby boomers age, deaths from Alzheimer's disease have jumped 55 percent, and in a ...

  11. Inherent enumerability of strong jump-traceability

    CERN Document Server

    Diamondstone, David; Turetsky, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We show that every strongly jump-traceable set obeys every benign cost function. Moreover, we show that every strongly jump-traceable set is computable from a computably enumerable strongly jump-traceable set. This allows us to generalise properties of c.e.\\ strongly jump-traceable sets to all such sets. For example, the strongly jump-traceable sets induce an ideal in the Turing degrees; the strongly jump-traceable sets are precisely those that are computable from all superlow Martin-L\\"{o}f random sets; the strongly jump-traceable sets are precisely those that are a base for $\\text{Demuth}_{\\text{BLR}}$-randomness; and strong jump-traceability is equivalent to strong superlowness.

  12. Model for polygonal hydraulic jumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Erik Andreas; Watanabe, Shinya; Bohr, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    ) near the free surface in the jump region. The model consists of mass conservation and radial force balance between hydrostatic pressure and viscous stresses on the roller surface. In addition, we consider the azimuthal force balance, primarily between pressure and viscosity, but also including...

  13. Jumping property of Lyapunov values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛锐; 王铎

    1996-01-01

    A sufficient condition for fcth Lyapunov value to be zero for planar polynomial vector fields is given, which extends the result of "jumping property’ of Lyapunov values obtained by Wang Duo to more general cases. A concrete example that the origin cannot be weak focus of order 1, 2, 4, 5, 8 is presented.

  14. Mussel Spat Ropes Assist Redfin Bully Gobiomorphus huttoni Passage through Experimental Culverts with Velocity Barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D. Tonkin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of mussel spat rope for enabling the passage of redfin bully Gobiomorphus huttoni through culverts, which create velocity barriers, was trialled in the laboratory. No fish were able to access the un-roped control pipes whereas 52% successfully negotiated the pipes in the rope treatments. The success of fish ascending treatment pipes suggests mussel spat rope may be effective for enabling the passage of this and other similar fish species through otherwise impassable culverts with velocity barriers.

  15. A jump forwards with mathematics and physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Heck; P. Uylings

    2011-01-01

    We jump on human body motions such as bouncing on a jumping stick, hopping, and making kangaroo jumps. Students can record the movements with a digital camera and use their video clips to investigate the motions with suitable video analysis and modelling software. We discuss some mathematical models

  16. Mesopause jumps at Antarctic latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübken, Franz-Josef; Höffner, Josef; Becker, Erich; Latteck, Ralph; Murphy, Damian

    2016-04-01

    Recent high resolution temperature measurements by resonance lidar at Davis (69°S) occasionally showed a sudden mesopause altitude increase by ˜5 km and an associated mesopause temperature decrease by ˜10 K. We present further observations which are closely related to this 'mesopause jump', namely the increase of mean height of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) observed by a VHF radar, very strong westward winds in the upper mesosphere measured by an MF radar, and relatively large eastward winds in the stratosphere taken from reanalysis. We compare to similar observations in the Northern Hemisphere, namely at ALOMAR (69°N) where such mesopause jumps have never been observed. We present a detailed explanation of mesopause jumps. They occur only when stratospheric winds are moderately eastward and mesospheric winds are very large (westward). Under these conditions, gravity waves with comparatively large eastward phase Speeds can pass the stratosphere and propagate to the lower thermosphere because their vertical wavelengths in the mesosphere are rather large which implies reduced dynamical stability. When finally breaking in the lower thermosphere, these waves drive an enhanced residual circulation that causes a cold and high-altitude mesopause. The conditions for a mesopause jump occur only in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) and are associated with the late breakdown of the polar vortex. Mesopause jumps are primarily, but not only, observed prior and close to solstice. We also show that during the onset of PMSE in the SH, stratospheric zonal winds are still eastward (up to 30 m/s), and that the onset is not closely related to the Transition of the stratospheric circulation.

  17. Sagging rope sign in achondroplasia is different from Perthes disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chang-Wug; Shingade, Viraj Uttamrao; Song, Hae-Ryong; Suh, Seung-Woo; Hong, Jun-Seok; Lee, Seok-Hyun

    2005-01-01

    The "sagging rope" sign is a radiopaque line seen on radiographs of hips with Perthes disease. The main purpose of this study was to determine the incidence, cause, and importance of this sign in achondroplasia and to reveal how it differs from in Perthes disease. Serial radiograms, along with two- and three-dimensional CT images were studied in 42 patients with achondroplasia. The sign was observed bilaterally in all patients. Evaluation of CT images revealed spherical heads with the presence of circumferential overhang in all hips. This circumferential overhang seen on three-dimensional CT images corresponded to the sagging rope sign on plain radiographs. The presence of the sagging rope sign in bilateral hips is a characteristic feature of achondroplasia. It usually appears before epiphyseal closure. Its cause, incidence, and nature differ from in Perthes disease, and its presence does not carry a negative prognosis in achondroplasia.

  18. Magneto-inductive Sensors for Metallic Ropes in Lift Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo CANOVA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an innovative system for the contemporary, selective and reliable control of integrity of multiple rope plants is presented. The system is based on magneto-inductive technology and is composed by a magnetic detector connected to an acquisition system. The core of the detector is constituted by an array of Hall sensors properly placed inside the instrument. After a brief introduction to the Non Destructive Techniques applied to the control of metallic ropes, the first part paper deals with the design and behavior of the detector and the acquisition system. In the second part of the paper a performance analysis for different rope size and experimental results on an elevator plants is presented and discussed.

  19. MESSENGER observations of flux ropes in Mercury's magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBraccio, Gina A.; Slavin, James A.; Imber, Suzanne M.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Raines, Jim M.; Jackman, Caitriona M.; Boardsen, Scott A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; McNutt, Ralph L.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2015-09-01

    We report an investigation of magnetic reconnection in Mercury's magnetotail conducted with MESSENGER Magnetometer and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer measurements during seven "hot seasons" when the periapsis of the spacecraft orbit is on Mercury's dayside. Flux ropes are formed in the cross-tail current sheet by reconnection. We have analyzed 49 flux ropes observed between 1.7 RM and 2.8 RM (where RM is Mercury's radius, or 2440 km) down the tail from the center of the planet, for which minimum variance analysis indicates that the spacecraft passed near the central axis of the structure. An average Alfvén speed of 465 km s-1 is measured in the plasma sheet surrounding these flux ropes. Under the assumption that the flux ropes moved at the local Alfvén speed, the mean duration of 0.74±0.15 s determined for these structures implies a typical diameter of ~345 km, or ~0.14 RM, which is comparable to a proton gyroradius in the plasma sheet of ~380 km. We successfully fit the magnetic signatures of 16 flux ropes to a force-free model. The mean radius and core field determined in this manner were ~450 km, or ~0.18 RM, and ~40 nT, respectively. A superposed epoch analysis of the magnetic field during these events shows variations similar to those observed at Earth, including the presence of a post-plasmoid plasma sheet, filled with disconnected magnetic flux, but the timescales are 40 times shorter at Mercury. The results of this flux rope survey indicate that intense magnetic reconnection occurs frequently in the cross-tail current layer of this small but extremely dynamic magnetosphere.

  20. Measurements of Magnetic Helicity within Two Interacting Flux Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehaas, Timothy; Gekelman, Walter

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic helicity (HM) has become a useful tool in the exploration of astrophysical plasmas. Its conservation in the MHD limit (and even some fluid approaches) constrains the global behavior of large plasma structures. One such astrophysical structure is a magnetic flux rope: a rope-like, current-carrying plasma embedded in an external magnetic field. Bundles of these ropes are commonly observed extending from the solar surface and can be found in the near-earth environment. In this well-diagnosed experiment (3D measurements of ne, Te, Vp, B, J, E, uflow) , two magnetic flux ropes were generated in the Large Plasma Device at UCLA. These ropes were driven kink-unstable, commencing complex motion. As they interact, helicity conservation is broken in regions of reconnection, turbulence, and instabilities. The changes in helicity can be visualized as 1) the transport of helicity (ϕB +E × A) and 2) the dissipation of the helicity (-2EB). Magnetic helicity is observed to have a negative sign and its counterpart, cross helicity, a positive one. These qualities oscillate 8% peak-to-peak. As the ropes move and the topology of the field lines change, a quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) is formed. The volume averaged HM and the largest value of Q both oscillate but not in phase. In addition to magnetic helicity, similar quantities such as self-helicity, mutual-helicity, vorticity, and canonical helicity are derived and will be presented. This work is supported by LANL-UC research Grant and done at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, which is funded by DOE and NSF.

  1. ISEE 3 observations of plasmoids with flux rope magnectic topologies

    OpenAIRE

    Slavin, J.; Owen, C.; KUZNETSOVA, M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports new evidence for the existence of plasmoids with force‐free flux rope magnetic topologies. Motivated by the fact that force‐free magnetic flux ropes have intense axial fields at their centers, the ISEE 3 observations have been searched for plasma sheet intervals in which the magnetic field intensity exceeds that in the lobes by ≥10% for a minute or longer. A total of 39 “high field regions” were found which met this simple criterion. Further examination showed that they nea...

  2. Are There Different Populations of Flux Ropes in the Solar Wind?

    OpenAIRE

    Janvier, Miho; Démoulin, Pascal; Dasso, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Flux ropes are twisted magnetic structures, which can be detected by in situ measurements in the solar wind. However, different properties of detected flux ropes suggest different types of flux-rope population. As such, are there different populations of flux ropes? The answer is positive, and is the result of the analysis of four lists of flux ropes, including magnetic clouds (MCs), observed at 1 AU. The in situ data for the four lists have been fitted with the same cylindrical force-free fi...

  3. Jumps of the eta invariant

    CERN Document Server

    Farber, M S; Farber, Michael S.; Levine, Jerome P.

    1994-01-01

    We study the eta-invariant, defined by Atiyah-Patodi-Singer a real valued invariant of an oriented odd-dimensional Riemannian manifold equipped with a unitary representation of its fundamental group. When the representation varies analytically, the corresponding eta-invariant may have an integral jump, known also as the spectral flow. The main result of the paper establishes a formula for this spectral jump in terms of the signatures of some homological forms, defined naturally by the path of representations. These signatures may also be computed by means of a spectral sequence of Hermitian forms,defined by the deformation data. Our theorem on the spectral jump has a generalization to arbitrary analytic families of self-adjoint elliptic operators. As an application we consider the problem of homotopy invariance of the rho-invariant. We give an intrinsic homotopy theoretic definition of the rho-invariant, up to indeterminacy in the form of a locally constant function on the space of unitary representations. In...

  4. Role of steel wire ropes in mine safety

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Peake, A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Today there are an estimated 2 300 steel wire ropes installed in roughly 200 underground mines in South Africa. These mines employ more than 280 000 workers underground and hoist several millions of tonnes of rock to the surface every month...

  5. Magnetic Flux Ropes from the Sun to 1 AU*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krall, J.; Yurchyshyn, V. B.; St. Cyr, O. C.; Chen, J.

    2004-12-01

    Any practical model of the dynamics of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and its interplanetary counterpart (ICME) must conform to available observational constraints from sun and to the earth; the upcoming STEREO mission will add significantly to those constraints. We present model/data comparisons for specific CME/ICME events near the sun (using coronagraph image data) and in the heliosphere (using in situ measurements) to show that the flux rope model of Chen and Krall[1-2] provides an accurate physics-based characterization of flux-rope CMEs over this range. We further show that quantitative results, such as the field energy required for eruption, depend on specific aspects of the flux rope geometry, such as the ratio (length/width) of the elliptical shape traced out by the flux-rope axis. It is this geometry that will be determined, for the first time, by STEREO. [1] Chen, J. 1996, JGR, 101, 27499 [2] Krall, J. et al., 2000, ApJ, 539, 964 *Work supported by ONR, NASA and NSF

  6. Safe use of mine winding rope, volume 1: executive summary.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hecker, GFK

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available The current South African regulations for sizing of mine winder ropes were introduced during 1956, based mainly on circumstantial evidence. A more rational approach was required to meet the demands for improved guarantees of safety and for more...

  7. Thermoelectric power of a single-walled carbon nanotubes rope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fang; Hu, Lijun; Zhou, Haiqing; Qiu, Caiyu; Yang, Huaichao; Chen, Minjiang; Lu, Jianglei; Sun, Lianfeng

    2013-02-01

    In this work, a rope of single-walled carbon nanotubes is prepared by using a diamond wire drawing die. At atmospheric condition, the electrical conductance and the thermoelectric voltage of single-walled carbon nanotubes rope have been investigated with the hot-side temperature ranging from 292 to 380 K, and cold-side temperature at 292 K. For different temperatures in the range of 292 to 380 K at hot-side, the current-voltage curves are almost parallel to each other, indicating that the electrical conductance does not change. The dynamic characteristics of voltage at positive, zero and negative current bias demonstrate that a thermoelectric voltage is induced with a direction from hot- to cold-side. The induced thermoelectric voltage shows linear dependence on the temperature difference between hot- and cold-side. The thermoelectric power of single-walled carbon nanotubes rope is found to be positive and has a value about 17.8 +/- 1.0 microV/K. This result suggests the hole-like carriers in single-walled carbon nanotubes rope. This study will pave the way for single-walled carbon nanotubes based thermoelectric devices.

  8. Counterstreaming electrons in small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, H. Q.; Zhao, G. Q.; Wang, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes (SIMFRs) are commonly observed by spacecraft at 1 AU, and their origin still remains disputed. We investigated the counterstreaming suprathermal electron (CSE) signatures of 106 SIMFRs measured by Wind during 1995-2005. We found that 79 (75%) of the 106 flux ropes contain CSEs, and the percentages of counterstreaming vary from 8% to 98%, with a mean value of 51%. CSEs are often observed in magnetic clouds (MCs), and this indicates these MCs are still attached to the Sun at both ends. CSEs are also related to heliospheric current sheets (HCSs) and the Earth's bow shock. We divided the SIMFRs into two categories: The first category is far from HCSs, and the second category is in the vicinity of HCSs. The first category has 57 SIMFRs, and only 7 of 57 ropes have no CSEs. This ratio is similar to that of MCs. The second category has 49 SIMFRs; however, 20 of the 49 events have no CSEs. This ratio is larger than that of MCs. These two categories have different origins. One category originates from the solar corona, and most ropes are still connected to the Sun at both ends. The other category is formed near HCSs in the interplanetary space.

  9. A HOT FLUX ROPE OBSERVED BY SDO/AIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aparna, V.; Tripathi, Durgesh, E-mail: aparnav@iucaa.in [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag—4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India)

    2016-03-01

    A filament eruption was observed on 2010 October 31 in the images recorded by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) in its Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) channels. The filament showed a slow-rise phase followed by a fast rise and was classified to be an asymmetric eruption. In addition, multiple localized brightenings which were spatially and temporally associated with the slow-rise phase were identified, leading us to believe that the tether-cutting mechanism initiated the eruption. An associated flux rope was detected in high-temperature channels of AIA, namely 94 and 131 Å, corresponding to 7 and 11 MK plasma respectively. In addition, these channels are also sensitive to cooler plasma corresponding to 1–2 MK. In this study, we have applied the algorithm devised by Warren et al. to remove cooler emission from the 94 Å channel to deduce only the high-temperature structure of the flux rope and to study its temporal evolution. We found that the flux rope was very clearly seen in the clean 94 Å channel image corresponding to Fe xviii emission, which corresponds to a plasma at a temperature of 7 MK. This temperature matched well with that obtained using Differential Emission Measure analysis. This study provides important constrains in the modeling of the thermodynamic structure of the flux ropes in coronal mass ejections.

  10. Pull-pull position control of dual motor wire rope transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Quan; Jiao, Zongxia; Yan, Liang; Yu, Qian; Shang, Yaoxing

    2016-08-01

    Wire rope transmission is very efficient because of the small total moving object mass. The wire rope could only transmit pulling force. Therefore it has to be kept in a tightened state during transmission; in high speed applications the dynamic performance depends on the rope's stiffness, which can be adjusted by the wire rope tension. To improve the system dynamic performance output, this paper proposes a novel pull-pull method based on dual motors connected by wire ropes, for precise, high speed position control applications. The method can regulate target position and wire rope tension simultaneously. Wire ropes remain in a pre-tightening state at all times, which prevents the influence of elasticity and reduces the position tracking error in the changing direction process. Simulations and experiments were conducted; the results indicate that both position precision and superior dynamic performance can be synchronously achieved. The research is relevant to space craft precision pointing instruments.

  11. Dynamic Response of Parallel Hoisting System under Drive Deviation between Ropes with Time-Varying Length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Cao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic responses of parallel hoisting system with time-varying length and rigid guidance under drive deviation are investigated considering tension and torsion characteristics of the ropes. The variable-domain three-node elements of rope are employed and the corresponding differential algebraic equations (DAEs are derived using Lagrange’s equations of the first kind. The slack situation of the rope is considered, and the dynamic equations which are systems of DAEs are transformed to ordinary differential equations (ODEs. The dynamic responses of tension, torsion, and acceleration are analyzed considering radius’ error of the drums, which indicates that the drive deviation between ropes can cause large influence on the tension difference and even cause one of the ropes to slack. However, the torsion of the corresponding rope is active. And unreasonable discordance between ropes should be controlled for the design and manufacture of drum on super deep parallel hoisting system.

  12. Price jumps on European stock markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Hanousek

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the dynamics of price jumps and the impact of the European debt crisis using the high-frequency data reported by selected stock exchanges on the European continent during the period January 2008 to June 2012. We employ two methods to identify price jumps: Method 1 minimizes the probability of false jump detection (the Type-II Error-Optimal price jump indicator and Method 2 maximizes the probability of successful jump detection (the Type-I Error-Optimal price jump indicator. We show that individual stock markets exhibited differences in price jump intensity before and during the crisis. We also show that in general the variance of price jump intensity could not be distinguished as different in the pre-crisis period from that during the crisis. Our results indicate that, contrary to common belief, the intensity of price jumps does not uniformly increase during a period of financial distress. However, there do exist differences in price jump dynamics across stock markets and investors have to model emerging and mature markets differently to properly reflect their individual dynamics.

  13. Mechanical discrete simulator of the electro-mechanical lift with n:1 roping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, F. J.; Herrera, I.

    2016-05-01

    The design process of new products in lift engineering is a difficult task due to, mainly, the complexity and slenderness of the lift system, demanding a predictive tool for the lift mechanics. A mechanical ad-hoc discrete simulator, as an alternative to ‘general purpose’ mechanical simulators is proposed. Firstly, the synthesis and experimentation process that has led to establish a suitable model capable of simulating accurately the response of the electromechanical lift is discussed. Then, the equations of motion are derived. The model comprises a discrete system of 5 vertically displaceable masses (car, counterweight, car frame, passengers/loads and lift drive), an inertial mass of the assembly tension pulley-rotor shaft which can rotate about the machine axis and 6 mechanical connectors with 1:1 suspension layout. The model is extended to any n:1 roping lift by setting 6 equivalent mechanical components (suspension systems for car and counterweight, lift drive silent blocks, tension pulley-lift drive stator and passengers/load equivalent spring-damper) by inductive inference from 1:1 and generalized 2:1 roping system. The application to simulate real elevator systems is proposed by numeric time integration of the governing equations using the Kutta-Meden algorithm and implemented in a computer program for ad-hoc elevator simulation called ElevaCAD.

  14. Δ-matroid and jump system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh N. Kabadi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of Δ-matroid is a nontrivial, proper generalization of the concept of matroid and has been further generalized to the concept of jump system. In this paper, we show that jump systems are, in some sense, equivalent to Δ-matroids. Using this equivalence and the Δ-matroid theory, we give simple proofs and extensions of many of the results on jump systems.

  15. Time change, jumping measure and Feller measure

    OpenAIRE

    He, Ping

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we shall investigate some potential theory for time change of Markov processes. Under weak duality, it is proved that the jumping measure and Feller measure are actually independent of time change, and the jumping measure of a time changed process induced by a PCAF supported on $V$ coincides with the sum of the Feller measure on $V$ and the trace of the original jumping measure on $V$.

  16. Dynamic jump intensities and risk premiums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Ornthanalai, Chayawat; Jacobs, Kris

    2012-01-01

    We build a new class of discrete-time models that are relatively easy to estimate using returns and/or options. The distribution of returns is driven by two factors: dynamic volatility and dynamic jump intensity. Each factor has its own risk premium. The models significantly outperform standard...... models without jumps when estimated on S&P500 returns. We find very strong support for time-varying jump intensities. Compared to the risk premium on dynamic volatility, the risk premium on the dynamic jump intensity has a much larger impact on option prices. We confirm these findings using joint...... estimation on returns and large option samples....

  17. Laminar circular hydraulic jumps without separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Ratul; Tomar, Gaurav; Govindarajan, Rama

    2009-11-01

    The traditional inviscid criterion for the occurrence of a planar, standing hydraulic jump is to have the Froude number decrease downstream and go through a value of 1 at some location. Here, upstream propagating, small-amplitude, long, non-dispersive gravity waves are trapped, and non-linear steepening is said to result in a near-discontinuous height profile, but it is not clear how. Such a condition on the Froude number is shown in the present axisymmetric Navier-Stokes computations to hold for a circular jump as well. The relevance of non-linear steepening to a circular jump is therefore a question we wish to answer. In circular jumps, moreover, a region of recirculation is usually observed underneath the jump, underlining the importance of viscosity in this process. This led Tani (J. Phys. Soc. Japan, 1949) to hypothesise that boundary-layer separation was the cause of the circular jump. This hypothesis has been debated extensively and the possibility of circular jumps without separation hinted at. In our simulations, we are able to obtain circular hydraulic jumps without any flow separation. This, and the necessity or otherwise of viscosity in jump formation will be discussed.

  18. A Molecular Jump Mechanism of Water Reorientation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Damien Laage; James T. Hynes

    2006-01-01

    .... This water reorientation mechanism involves large-amplitude angular jumps, rather than the commonly accepted sequence of small diffusive steps, and therefore calls for reinterpretation of many...

  19. Kinematics and Kinetics of Squats, Drop Jumps and Imitation Jumps of Ski Jumpers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Carole A; Keller, Melanie; Ammann, Fabian; Hübner, Klaus; Lindorfer, Julia; Taylor, William R; Lorenzetti, Silvio

    2016-03-01

    Squats, drop jumps, and imitation jumps are commonly used training exercises in ski jumping to enhance maximum force, explosive force, and sport-specific skills. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the kinetics and kinematics of training exercises in ski jumping and to find objective parameters in training exercises that most correlate with the competition performance of ski jumpers. To this end, barbell squats, drop jumps, and imitation jumps were measured in a laboratory environment for 10 elite ski jumpers. Force and motion data were captured, and the influence of maximum vertical force, force difference, vertical take-off velocity, knee moments, knee joint power, and a knee valgus/varus index was evaluated and correlated with their season jump performance. The results indicate that, especially for the imitation jumps, a good correlation exists between the vertical take-off velocity and the personal jump performance on the hill (R = 0.718). Importantly, however, the more the athletes tended toward a valgus knee alignment during the measured movements, the worse their performance (R = 0.729 imitation jumps; R = 0.685 squats). Although an evaluation of the athletes' lower limb alignment during competitive jumping on the hill is still required, these preliminary data suggest that performance training should additionally concentrate on improving knee alignment to increase ski jumping performance.

  20. Ethics in radiology: wait lists queue jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Natalie; Reid, Lynette; MacSwain, Sarah; Clarke, James R

    2013-08-01

    Education in ethics is a requirement for all Royal College residency training programs as laid out in the General Standards of Accreditation for residency programs in Canada. The ethical challenges that face radiologists in clinical practice are often different from those that face other physicians, because the nature of the physician-patient interaction is unlike that of many other specialties. Ethics education for radiologists and radiology residents will benefit from the development of teaching materials and resources that focus on the issues that are specific to the specialty. This article is intended to serve as an educational resource for radiology training programs to facilitate teaching ethics to residents and also as a continuing medical education resource for practicing radiologists. In an environment of limited health care resources, radiologists are frequently asked to expedite imaging studies for patients and, in some respects, act as gatekeepers for specialty care. The issues of wait lists, queue jumping, and balancing the needs of individuals and society are explored from the perspective of a radiologist.

  1. A Novel Ropes-DrivenWideband Piezoelectric Vibration Energy Harvester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel piezoelectric vibration energy harvester (PVEH in which a high-frequency generating beam (HFGB is driven by an array of low-frequency driving beams (LFDBs using ropes. Two mechanisms based on frequency upconversion and multimodal harvesting work together to broaden the frequency bandwidth of the proposed vibration energy harvester (VEH. The experimental results show that the output power of generating beam (GB remains unchanged with the increasing number of driving beams (DBs, compared with the traditional arrays of beams vibration energy harvester (AB-VEH, and the output power and bandwidth behavior can be adjusted by parameters such as acceleration, rope margin, and stiffness of LFDBs, which shows the potential to achieve unlimited wideband vibration energy-harvesting for a variable environment.

  2. Magnetic field generation from shear flow in flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrator, T. P.; Sears, J.; Gao, K.; Klarenbeek, J.; Yoo, C.

    2012-10-01

    In the Reconnection Scaling Experiment (RSX) we have measured out of plane quadrupole magnetic field structure in situations where magnetic reconnection was minimal. This quadrupole out of plane magnetic signature has historically been presumed to be the smoking gun harbinger of reconnection. On the other hand, we showed that when flux ropes bounced instead of merging and reconnecting, this signature could evolve. This can follow from sheared fluid flows in the context of a generalized Ohms Law. We reconstruct a shear flow model from experimental data for flux ropes that have been experimentally well characterized in RSX as screw pinch equilibria, including plasma ion and electron flow, with self consistent profiles for magnetic field, pressure, and current density. The data can account for the quadrupole field structure.

  3. Design aspects of a deployable tensegrity-hollow-rope footbridge

    OpenAIRE

    Rhode-Barbarigos, Landolf; BEL HADJ ALI, Nizar; Motro, René; Smith, Ian F. C.

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Tensegrity structures are composed of cables and struts in a pre-stressed self-equilibrium. Although tensegrity first appeared in the 1950s, it is seldom used in civil engineering. This paper focuses on the design aspects of a deployable tensegrity-hollow-rope footbridge. Deployment is usually not a critical design case for traditional deployable structures. However, for tensegrity systems deployment may be critical due to the actuation required. In this paper, deploym...

  4. The sagging rope sign in Perthes' disease and allied disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apley, A G; Wientroub, S

    1981-02-01

    The sagging rope sign is the term used to describe the radiographic appearances which sometimes occur after Perthes' disease. It is severe examples of that disease and indicates damage to the growth plate with a marked metaphysial reaction. The same appearance follows severe epiphysitis after forcible reduction of a congenitally dislocated hip, and certain rare epiphysial dysplasias. The origin and significance of the sign are discussed.

  5. Electroencephalographic recordings during parachute jump sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, P; Jouffray, L; Rodi, M; Gottesmann, C

    1980-04-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings of experienced parachutists were done by means of telemetry before, during, and after jumps of up to 3500m. During free-fall and after stabilization, alpha rhythm was recorded from several alpha reactive subjects when they closed their eyes. No pathological EEG recordings were obtained during the different phases of the jump.

  6. Jump Detection in the Danish Stock Market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høg, Esben

    2002-01-01

    It is well known in financial economics that stock market return data are often modelled by a diffusion process with some regular drift function. Occasionally, however, sudden changes or jumps occur in the return data. Wavelet scaling methods are used to detect jumps and cusps in stock market...

  7. Separation and pattern formation in hydraulic jumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Tomas; Ellegaard, C.; Hansen, A. Espe;

    1998-01-01

    We present theory and experiments on the circular hydraulic jump in the stationary regime. The theory can handle the situation in which the fluid flows over an edge far away from the jump. In the experiments the external height is controlled, and a series of transitions in the flow structure appe...

  8. Internal hydraulic jumps with large upstream shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Kelly; Helfrich, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Internal hydraulic jumps in approximately two-layered flows with large upstream shear are investigated using numerical simulations. The simulations allow continuous density and velocity profiles, and a jump is forced to develop by downstream topography, similar to the experiments conducted by Wilkinson and Wood (1971). High shear jumps are found to exhibit significantly more entrainment than low shear jumps. Furthermore, the downstream structure of the flow has an important effect on the jump properties. Jumps with a slow upper (inactive) layer exhibit a velocity minimum downstream of the jump, resulting in a sub-critical downstream state, while flows with the same upstream vertical shear and a larger barotropic velocity remain super-critical downstream of the jump. A two-layer theory is modified to account for the vertical structure of the downstream density and velocity profiles and entrainment is allowed through a modification of the approach of Holland et al. (2002). The resulting theory can be matched reasonably well with the numerical simulations. However, the results are very sensitive to how the downstream vertical profiles of velocity and density are incorporated into the layered model, highlighting the difficulty of the two layer approximation when the shear is large.

  9. Strong jump traceability and Demuth randomness

    CERN Document Server

    Greenberg, Noam

    2011-01-01

    We solve the covering problem for Demuth randomness, showing that a computably enumerable set is computable from a Demuth random set if and only if it is strongly jump-traceable. We show that on the other hand, the class of sets which form a base for Demuth randomness is a proper subclass of the class of strongly jump-traceable sets.

  10. The Whole Elephant: A Synoptic View of Liquid Rope Coiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribe, Neil

    2016-11-01

    Liquid rope coiling is the instability that occurs when e.g. a thin stream of honey is poured onto toast. While we now have a fine-grained understanding of each of the four principal coiling modes (viscous, gravitational, inertio-gravitational and inertial), we still lack a global view of how the modes cohere to form a larger whole. Using a numerical continuation procedure, I determine how the dimensionless coiling frequency depends on the dimensionless fall height and flow rate, for several values of the dimensionless nozzle diameter. Starting with the onset of coiling, I propose a purely geometrical definition of the critical surface between coiling and no coiling as the locus of points where the radius a1 of the rope at the contact point is just equal to the coil radius R. Coiling with a1 > R is impossible because the rope would intersect itself. I characterize the asymptotic limits of the critical surface as well as the structure of the supercritical volume inside that surface. The procedure reveals a new mode of coiling onset that has not yet been identified.

  11. PERBANDINGAN JUMP SHOOT DENGAN AWALAN DAN TANPA AWALAN TERHADAP PENINGKATAN KETEPATAN SHOOTING DALAM PERMAINAN BOLABASKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gusti Ngurah Agung Cahya Prananta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of  jump-shoot technique step jump shoot and still jump shoot in a game is still questionable,  because many different assumptions arise. One opinion stated that step jump shoot was more effective and the other stated that and still jump shoot was more efective. Therefore it is necessary to do research on the analysis of the results of step jump shoot and and still jump shoot to improve the accuracy of shooting in a basketball. The experimental research had been conducted on 20samples of people whowere selected randomly from the men's basketball club of the Faculty of Physical Educationand Health of Teacher Training Institute PGRI Bali. Samples were divided into two groups each  consisting of 10 people. Group I was given training step  jump shoot four sets of 10 reps  and Group II training still jump shoot four sets of 10 reps. The data before and after treatment were tested by SPSS computer program. The data were normally distributed and homogeneous so further tested using pairedt-test to compare the average values?? before and after training between each group, while the independent t-test was used to determine differences in mean values?? between the two groups. Paired t-test resulted the obtained data were significantly increased in both treatment groups p=0,001 in Group I and p=0,000 in Group II (p <0.05. Results of independent t-test found that both groups before training did not differ significantly p=0,926 (p>0.05 and after training both groups equally improve the accuracy of shooting because p=0,133 (p>0.05. It was concluded that botht raining improved the shooting accuracy and there was no difference between the effect of step jumps hoot and still jump shoot toward the shooting accuracy. It was suggested to improve the shooting accuracy in basketball used step jump shoot training and still jump shoot training four sets of 10 reps with a training frequency of 4 times a week for 6 weeks

  12. Do the legs of magnetic clouds contain twisted flux-rope magnetic fields?

    OpenAIRE

    Owens, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) characterised primarily by a smooth rotation in the magnetic field direction indicative of the presence of a magnetic flux rope. Energetic particle signatures suggest MC flux ropes remain magnetically connected to the Sun at both ends, leading to widely used model of global MC structure as an extended flux rope, with a loop-like axis stretching out from the Sun into the heliosphere and back to the Sun. The tim...

  13. Effect of Finite Larmor Radius on the Cosmic Ray Penetration into an Interplanetary Magnetic Flux Rope

    OpenAIRE

    Kubo, Yuki; Shimazu, Hironori

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a mechanism for cosmic ray penetration into an interplanetary magnetic flux rope, particularly the effect of the finite Larmor radius and magnetic field irregularities. First, we derive analytical solutions for cosmic ray behavior inside a magnetic flux rope, on the basis of the Newton-Lorentz equation of a particle, to investigate how cosmic rays penetrate magnetic flux ropes under an assumption of there being no scattering by small-scale magnetic field irregularities. Next, we pe...

  14. Multi-year investigation of flux ropes in the Martian ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, M. L.; Brain, D.; Halekas, J. S.; Eastwood, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    A magnetic flux rope is a collection of twisted magnetic field lines capable of transporting plasma from one region to another. Several studies report the occurrence of magnetic flux ropes in the Martian ionosphere [Cloutier et al., 1999; Vignes et al., 2004; Eastwood et al., 2008; Brain et al., 2010; Morgan et al., 2011]. Observations of a flux rope transporting ionospheric plasma away from Mars indicate that flux ropes could be an important means of atmospheric loss. Interestingly, there are at least three suggested flux rope formation mechanisms at Mars; the first is similar to Venus type events where the flux rope is formed via a shear related instability that occurs by interaction with the solar wind [Cloutier et al., 1999; Vignes et al., 2004]. The second mechanism is similar to plasmoid creation in the Earth's magnetotail, where the flux rope is created when the crustal fields stretch and shear due to interaction with the solar wind [Brain et al., 2010; Morgan et al., 2011]. The third flux rope formation mechanism is based on the identification of flux ropes near current sheets on the night side of Mars and likely created via collisionless magnetic reconnection [Eastwood et al., 2008]. Previous statistical surveys suggest that all three of these formation mechanisms are continuously active at Mars, but have had difficulty differentiating the three populations of flux ropes due to the spacecraft orbit or lack of events. We conducted a larger statistical study of the Martian flux ropes using two years of the MGS magnetic field and suprathermal electron datasets in the circular mapping orbit at ~400km. The purpose of this study is to collect a large dataset of events to characterize the flux rope formation mechanisms and study the relationship to solar cycle.

  15. Are There Different Populations of Flux Ropes in the Solar Wind?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janvier, M.; Démoulin, P.; Dasso, S.

    2014-07-01

    Flux ropes are twisted magnetic structures that can be detected by in-situ measurements in the solar wind. However, different properties of detected flux ropes suggest different types of flux-rope populations. As such, are there different populations of flux ropes? The answer is positive and is the result of the analysis of four lists of flux ropes, including magnetic clouds (MCs), observed at 1 AU. The in-situ data for the four lists were fitted with the same cylindrical force-free field model, which provides an estimate of the local flux-rope parameters such as its radius and orientation. Since the flux-rope distributions have a broad dynamic range, we went beyond a simple histogram analysis by developing a partition technique that uniformly distributes the statistical fluctuations across the radius range. By doing so, we found that small flux ropes with radius Rlaw distribution in contrast to the larger flux ropes (identified as MCs), which have a Gaussian-like distribution. Next, from four CME catalogs, we estimated the expected flux-rope frequency per year at 1 AU. We found that the predicted numbers are similar to the frequencies of MCs observed in-situ. However, we also found that small flux ropes are at least ten times too abundant to correspond to CMEs, even to narrow ones. Investigating the different possible scenarios for the origin of these small flux ropes, we conclude that these twisted structures can be formed by blowout jets in the low corona or in coronal streamers.

  16. The Effects of Peer-Administered Token Reinforcement on Jump Rope Behaviors of Elementary Physical Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alstot, Andrew E.

    2012-01-01

    Token economies have a long research and applied history within clinical settings and classroom education (Kazdin, 1982). However, despite reported successes in improving physical activity behaviors (Alstot, 2012), research examining token reinforcement implemented specifically in physical education is virtually nonexistent. Therefore, the purpose…

  17. Stochastic stability properties of jump linear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiangbo; Loparo, Kenneth A.; Ji, Yuandong; Chizeck, Howard J.

    1992-01-01

    Jump linear systems are defined as a family of linear systems with randomly jumping parameters (usually governed by a Markov jump process) and are used to model systems subject to failures or changes in structure. The authors study stochastic stability properties in jump linear systems and the relationship among various moment and sample path stability properties. It is shown that all second moment stability properties are equivalent and are sufficient for almost sure sample path stability, and a testable necessary and sufficient condition for second moment stability is derived. The Lyapunov exponent method for the study of almost sure sample stability is discussed, and a theorem which characterizes the Lyapunov exponents of jump linear systems is presented.

  18. A review on the basketball jump shot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Victor H A; Rodacki, André L F; Satern, Miriam N

    2015-06-01

    The ability to shoot an effective jump shot in the sport of basketball is critical to a player's success. In an attempt to better understand the aspects related to expert performance, researchers have investigated successful free throws and jump shots of various basketball players and identified movement variables that contribute to their success. The purpose of this study was to complete a systematic review of the scientific literature on the basketball free throw and jump shot for the purpose of revealing the critical components of shooting that coaches, teachers, and players should focus on when teaching, learning, practising, and performing a jump shot. The results of this review are presented in three sections: (a) variables that affect ball trajectory, (b) phases of the jump shot, and

  19. Usefulness of the jump-and-reach test in assessment of vertical jump performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Hans-Joachim; Chagas, Mauro H; Szmuchrowski, Leszek A; Araujo, Silvia R; Campos, Carlos E; Giannetti, Marcus R

    2010-02-01

    The objective was to estimate the reliability and criterion-related validity of the Jump-and-Reach Test for the assessment of squat, countermovement, and drop jump performance of 32 male Brazilian professional volleyball players. Performance of squat, countermovement, and drop jumps with different dropping heights was assessed on the Jump-and-Reach Test and the measurement of flight time, then compared across different jump trials. The very high reliability coefficients of both assessment methods and the lower correlation coefficients between scores on the assessments indicate a very high consistency of each method but only moderate covariation, which means that they measure partly different items. As a consequence, the Jump-and-Reach Test has good ecological validity in situations when reaching height during the flight phase is critical for performance (e.g., basketball and volleyball) but only limited accuracy for the assessment of vertical impulse production with different jump techniques and conditions.

  20. EFFECTS OF PLYOMETRIC VERSUS PILATES EXERCISES ON THE MUSCULAR ABILITY AND COMPONENTS OF JUMPING TO VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS: A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandipkumar Parekh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ability to jump plays an effective and important role in volleyball, Because jump skills are greatly complicated that it is nearly the outcome of vertical force and horizontal speed besides harmony and synchronization of the work of arms and feet. There is also total harmony related to the skill and plan achievement during attack and block. The purpose of this study was to examine the Effect of Plyometric VS. Pilates Exercises on the Muscular Ability and Components of Jumping in Volleyball Players. Study Design: Experimental design. Methods: 30 subjects were selected randomly from the population using simple random sampling procedure and were divided into two equal groups. Group A was given plyomeric training and Group B was given Pilate training. Outcome measures were taken before and after the Program Schedule of 3 Sessions alternately in 1 week for 6week. Outcome measures: Vertical Jump height, Block jump, and the attack jump, Agility T test, Results: In Group-A (plyometric and Group-B (Pilate, all data was expressed as mean ± , SD and was statistically analyzed using paired ‘t’ test and independent ‘t’ test to determine the statistical difference among the parameters at 0.5% level of significance. Statistical data of agility t test, vertical jump height, the Block jump, and the attack jump in volley ball players showed that, there was no significantly difference between groups. And both were effective with p<0.05; i.e 95% of significance. Conclusion: In this study, we concluded that both groups (A & B were effective in agility t test, improving vertical jump height, the Block jump, and the attack jump in volley ball players. But we recommend use of plyomertic training in volleyball players.

  1. Jumping from the Brooklyn Bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, R J; Pizzi, W F; Richman, H; Tiefenbrun, J

    1987-07-01

    In an attempt to identify factors contributing to survival of free fall and impact, we evaluated the records of four patients who survived a jump from the Brooklyn Bridge into the East River in New York Harbor between 1977 and 1985. All four patients were male and ranged in age from 22 to 67 years. They had free falls of between 41.0 and 48.8 meters. All of the patients were brought to the hospital within 24 minutes of entering the water. Three of the four had emergency surgical treatment and the fourth patient had only minor injuries. All four patients survived the suicide attempts. The length of the hospital stay ranged from two to 26 days.

  2. Do the Legs of Magnetic Clouds Contain Twisted Flux-rope Magnetic Fields?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) characterized primarily by a smooth rotation in the magnetic field direction indicative of the presence of a magnetic flux rope. Energetic particle signatures suggest MC flux ropes remain magnetically connected to the Sun at both ends, leading to widely used model of global MC structure as an extended flux rope, with a loop-like axis stretching out from the Sun into the heliosphere and back to the Sun. The time of flight of energetic particles, however, suggests shorter magnetic field line lengths than such a continuous twisted flux rope would produce. In this study, two simple models are compared with observed flux rope axis orientations of 196 MCs to show that the flux rope structure is confined to the MC leading edge. The MC “legs,” which magnetically connect the flux rope to the Sun, are not recognizable as MCs and thus are unlikely to contain twisted flux rope fields. Spacecraft encounters with these non-flux rope legs may provide an explanation for the frequent observation of non-MC ICMEs.

  3. The force‐free configuration of flux ropes in geomagnetotail: Cluster observations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, Y. Y; Shen, C; Zhang, Y. C; Rong, Z. J; Li, X; Dunlop, M; Ma, Y. H; Liu, Z. X; Carr, C. M; Rème, H

    2014-01-01

    Unambiguous knowledge of magnetic field structure and the electric current distribution is critical for understanding the origin, evolution, and related dynamic properties of magnetic flux ropes (MFRs...

  4. Energetic Ion Acceleration by Small-scale Solar Wind Flux Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.; Zank, G. P.; Khabarova, O.

    2015-09-01

    We consider different limits of our recently developed kinetic transport theory to investigate the potential of supersonic solar wind regions containing several small-scale flux ropes to explain the acceleration of suprathermal ions to power-law spectra as observations show. Particle acceleration is modeled in response to flux-rope activity involving contraction, merging (reconnection), and collisions in the limit where the particle gyoradius is smaller than the characteristic flux-rope scale length. The emphasis is mainly on the statistical variance in the electric fields induced by flux-rope dynamics rather than on the mean electric field induced by multiple flux ropes whose acceleration effects are discussed elsewhere. Our steady-state analytical solutions suggest that ion drift acceleration by flux ropes, irrespective of whether displaying incompressible or compressible behavior, can yield power laws asymptotically at higher energies whereas an exponential spectral rollover results asymptotically when field-aligned guiding center motion acceleration occur by reconnection electric fields from merging flux ropes. This implies that at sufficiently high particle energies, drift acceleration might dominate. We also expect compressive flux ropes to yield harder power-law spectra than incompressible flux ropes.

  5. Are There Different Populations of Flux Ropes in the Solar Wind?

    CERN Document Server

    Janvier, Miho; Dasso, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Flux ropes are twisted magnetic structures, which can be detected by in situ measurements in the solar wind. However, different properties of detected flux ropes suggest different types of flux-rope population. As such, are there different populations of flux ropes? The answer is positive, and is the result of the analysis of four lists of flux ropes, including magnetic clouds (MCs), observed at 1 AU. The in situ data for the four lists have been fitted with the same cylindrical force-free field model, which provides an estimation of the local flux-rope parameters such as its radius and orientation. Since the flux-rope distributions have a large dynamic range, we go beyond a simple histogram analysis by developing a partition technique that uniformly distributes the statistical fluctuations over the radius range. By doing so, we find that small flux ropes with radius R<0.1 AU have a steep power-law distribution in contrast to the larger flux ropes (identified as MCs), which have a Gaussian-like distributio...

  6. Signal Acquisition and Processing in the Magnetic Defectoscopy of Steel Wire Ropes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Jovičić

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The system that resolves the problem of wire rope defects using a magnetic method of inspection is presented in this paper. Implementation of the system should provide for full monitoring of wire rope condition, according to the prescribed international standards. The purpose of this system, in addition to identifying defects in the rope, is to determine to what extent damage has been done. The measurement procedure provides for a better understanding of the defects that occur, as well as the rejection criteria of used ropes, that way increasing their security. Hardware and software design of appliance for recording defects and test results are presented in this paper.

  7. DO THE LEGS OF MAGNETIC CLOUDS CONTAIN TWISTED FLUX-ROPE MAGNETIC FIELDS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owens, M. J. [Space and Atmospheric Electricity Group, Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Earley Gate, P.O. Box 243, Reading RG6 6BB (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-20

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) characterized primarily by a smooth rotation in the magnetic field direction indicative of the presence of a magnetic flux rope. Energetic particle signatures suggest MC flux ropes remain magnetically connected to the Sun at both ends, leading to widely used model of global MC structure as an extended flux rope, with a loop-like axis stretching out from the Sun into the heliosphere and back to the Sun. The time of flight of energetic particles, however, suggests shorter magnetic field line lengths than such a continuous twisted flux rope would produce. In this study, two simple models are compared with observed flux rope axis orientations of 196 MCs to show that the flux rope structure is confined to the MC leading edge. The MC “legs,” which magnetically connect the flux rope to the Sun, are not recognizable as MCs and thus are unlikely to contain twisted flux rope fields. Spacecraft encounters with these non-flux rope legs may provide an explanation for the frequent observation of non-MC ICMEs.

  8. Towards a Data-Optimized Coronal Magnetic Field Model (DOC-FM): Simulating Flux Ropes with the Flux Rope Insertion Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmasse, K.; DeLuca, E. E.; Savcheva, A. S.; Gibson, S. E.; Fan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the 3D magnetic filed structure at the time of major solar eruptions is vital or understanding of the space weather effects of these eruptions. Multiple data-constrained techniques that reconstruct the 3D coronal field based on photospheric magnetograms have been used to achieve this goal. In particular, we have used the flux rope insertion method to obtain the coronal magnetic field of multiple regions containing flux ropes or sheared arcades based on line-of-sight magnetograms and X-ray and EUV observations of coronal loops. For the purpose of developing statistical measures of the goodness of fit of these models to the observations, here we present our modeling of flux ropes based on synthetic magnetograms obtained from Fan & Gibson emerging flux rope simulation. The goal is to reproduce the flux rope structure from a given time step of the MHD simulations based only on the photospheric magnetogram and synthetic forward modeled coronal emission obtained from the same step of the MHD simulation. For this purpose we create a large grid of models with the flux rope insertion method with different combinations of axial and poloidal flux, which give us different morphology of the flux rope. Then we compare the synthetic coronal emission with the shape of the current distribution and field lines from the models to come up with a best fit. This fit is then tested using the statistical methods developed by our team.

  9. Bilateral contact ground reaction forces and contact times during plyometric drop jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Nick B; Stock, Christopher G; Scurr, Joanna C

    2010-10-01

    Drop jumping (DJ) is used in training programs aimed to improve lower extremity explosive power. When performing double-leg drop jumps, it is important to provide an equal stimulus to both legs to ensure balanced development of the lower legs. The aim of this study was to bilaterally analyze the ground reactions forces and temporal components of drop jumping from 3 heights. Ten recreationally active male subjects completed 3 bounce-drop jumps from 3 starting heights (0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 m). Two linked force platforms were used to record left- and right-leg peak vertical force, time to peak force, average force, ground contact time, impulse and time differential. Between-height and between-leg comparisons for each variable were made using a multivariate analysis of variance with post hoc Wilcoxon tests (p vertical forces and temporal components occur; however, shorter contact times were found at the lower heights.

  10. Jumping without using legs: the jump of the click-beetles (Elateridae is morphologically constrained.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gal Ribak

    Full Text Available To return to their feet, inverted click-beetles (Elateridae jump without using their legs. When a beetle is resting on its dorsal side, a hinge mechanism is locked to store elastic energy in the body and releases it abruptly to launch the beetle into the air. While the functional morphology of the jumping mechanism is well known, the level of control that the beetle has over this jumping technique and the mechanical constraints governing the jumps are not entirely clear. Here we show that while body rotations in air are highly variable, the jumps are morphologically constrained to a constant "takeoff" angle (79.9°±1.56°, n = 9 beetles that directs 98% of the jumping force vertically against gravity. A physical-mathematical model of the jumping action, combined with measurements from live beetle, imply that the beetle may control the speed at takeoff but not the jumping angle. In addition, the model shows that very subtle changes in the exact point of contact with the ground can explain the vigorous rotations of the body seen while the beetle is airborne. These findings suggest that the evolution of this unique non-legged jumping mechanism resulted in a jumping technique that is capable of launching the body high into the air but it is too constrained and unstable to allow control of body orientation at landing.

  11. Realized Jump Risk and Equity Return in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We utilize the realized jump components to explore a new jump (including nonsystematic jump and systematic jump risk factor model. After estimating daily realized jumps from high-frequency transaction data of the Chinese A-share stocks, we calculate monthly jump size, monthly jump standard deviation, and monthly jump arrival rate and then use those monthly jump factors to explain the return of the following month. Our empirical results show that the jump tail risk can explain the equity return. For the large capital-size stocks, large cap stock portfolios, and index, one-month lagged jump risk factor significantly explains the asset return variation. Our results remain the same even when we add the size and value factors in the robustness tests.

  12. Twisted versus braided magnetic flux ropes in coronal geometry. II. Comparative behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, C.; Yeates, A. R.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: Sigmoidal structures in the solar corona are commonly associated with magnetic flux ropes whose magnetic field lines are twisted about a mutual axis. Their dynamical evolution is well studied, with sufficient twisting leading to large-scale rotation (writhing) and vertical expansion, possibly leading to ejection. Here, we investigate the behaviour of flux ropes whose field lines have more complex entangled/braided configurations. Our hypothesis is that this internal structure will inhibit the large-scale morphological changes. Additionally, we investigate the influence of the background field within which the rope is embedded. Methods: A technique for generating tubular magnetic fields with arbitrary axial geometry and internal structure, introduced in part I of this study, provides the initial conditions for resistive-MHD simulations. The tubular fields are embedded in a linear force-free background, and we consider various internal structures for the tubular field, including both twisted and braided topologies. These embedded flux ropes are then evolved using a 3D MHD code. Results: Firstly, in a background where twisted flux ropes evolve through the expected non-linear writhing and vertical expansion, we find that flux ropes with sufficiently braided/entangled interiors show no such large-scale changes. Secondly, embedding a twisted flux rope in a background field with a sigmoidal inversion line leads to eventual reversal of the large-scale rotation. Thirdly, in some cases a braided flux rope splits due to reconnection into two twisted flux ropes of opposing chirality - a phenomenon previously observed in cylindrical configurations. Conclusions: Sufficiently complex entanglement of the magnetic field lines within a flux rope can suppress large-scale morphological changes of its axis, with magnetic energy reduced instead through reconnection and expansion. The structure of the background magnetic field can significantly affect the changing morphology of a

  13. Bubble visualization in a simulated hydraulic jump

    CERN Document Server

    Witt, Adam; Shen, Lian

    2013-01-01

    This is a fluid dynamics video of two- and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations carried out at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory. A transient hydraulic jump is simulated using OpenFOAM, an open source numerical solver. A Volume of Fluid numerical method is employed with a realizable k-epsilon turbulence model. The goal of this research is to model the void fraction and bubble size in a transient hydraulic jump. This fluid dynamics video depicts the air entrainment characteristics and bubble behavior within a hydraulic jump of Froude number 4.82.

  14. Influence of Plyometrics on Jump Capabilities in Technical and Aesthetical Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mlsnová Gabriela

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to examine the effect of plyometric exercises on explosive strength of lower extremities in girls performing of technical and aesthetical sports. Experiment was carried out on three groups; artistic gymnasts (VG, n = 15; age = 12.4 ± 0.7 years, fitness girls (VF, n = 15; age = 13.8 ± 1.9 years and dancers (VD, n = 15; age = 13.8 ± 2 years. To check, the control group of general population was involved in the study (VK, n = 15; age = 13.9 ± 1.5 years. Following tests on jump ergometer Fitro Jumper were carried out at the beginning and at the end of experimental period: countermovement jump without and with arms swing and 10- second series of repeated vertical jumps. Plyometric program consisted of two plyometric units a week during thirty weeks. The results show that higher improvement in all evaluated tests achieved the group of fitness. In the countermovement jump without arm swing was observed improvement height of the jump 3.4 ± 1.4 cm (p ˂ 0.00001, in the countermovement jump with arm swing 5.7 ± 1.5 cm (p ˂ 0.00001, in difference of height of the jump between countermovement jump with and without arms swing 2.3 ± 1 cm (p ˂ 0.00001, in ten second series of repeated vertical jumps without arms swing in the height of jump 4.2 ± 1.6 cm (p ˂ 0.00001 and in power in active take off phase 8.8 ± 2.2 W.kg-1 (p ˂ 0.00001. Based on finding the study and in coherence with data from literature, we can conclude the effect of plyometric exercises was effective in combination with specific-strength training. Jumping ability is limiting factor of sport performance in technical and aesthetical sports and implementation of plyometric exercises to the training is highly recommend. The high level of jump capabilities can improve the quality and technique of performance complex acrobatic elements and dance leaps thereby increasing overall evaluation of performance in selected sports.

  15. High-Resolution Observations of a Flux Rope with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun

    2015-10-01

    We report the observations of a flux rope at transition region temperatures with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) on 30 August 2014. Initially, magnetic flux cancellation continually took place and a filament was activated. Then the bright material from the filament moved southward and tracked out several fine structures. These fine structures were twisted and tangled with each other, and appeared as a small flux rope at 1330 Å, with a total twist of about 4π. Afterwards, the flux rope underwent a counterclockwise (viewed top-down) unwinding motion around its axis. Spectral observations of C ii 1335.71 Å at the southern leg of the flux rope revealed Doppler redshifts of 6 - 24 km s^{-1} at the western side of the axis, which is consistent with the counterclockwise rotation motion. We suggest that the magnetic flux cancellation initiates reconnection and activation of the flux rope. The stored twist and magnetic helicity of the flux rope are transported into the upper atmosphere by the unwinding motion in the late stage. The small-scale flux rope (width of 8.3^'') had a cylindrical shape with helical field lines, similar to the morphology of the large-scale CME core (width of 1.54 {R}_{⊙}) on 2 June 1998. This similarity shows the presence of flux ropes of different scales on the Sun.

  16. Feeling the Tug: Creative Use of Ropes and Felt Board to Promote Family Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, Rick A.; Lykke, Debra B.; Duhl, Bunny S.

    2006-01-01

    Experiential metaphor has been used in marriage and family therapy for many years. One example of metaphor application involves the use of ropes and felt board to identify and explore relationships in families. In this case, the mother of a son who was socially isolated is treated by a marriage and family therapy intern, using ropes and felt board…

  17. Relating to Older People Evaluation (ROPE): A Measure of Self-Reported Ageism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Katie E.; Palmore, Erdman

    2008-01-01

    The Relating to Older People Evaluation (ROPE) is a 20-item questionnaire that measures positive and negative ageist behaviors that people may engage in during everyday life. In this article, we report the first findings from several administrations of the ROPE along with initial psychometric information on the instrument. Respondents were college…

  18. The Crown Bite Jumping Herbst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Reuel

    2003-01-01

    The Crown Bite Jumping Herbst Appliance is evaluated and combined with Straight Wire Arch Fixed Orthodontics in treatment of Class II, Division I malocclusions. This article will evaluate a combined orthodontic approach of "straightening teeth" and an orthognathic approach of "moving jaws or making skeletal changes." Orthodontic treatment cannot be accomplished well without establishing a healthy temporomandibular joint. This is defined by Keller as a joint that is "noiseless, painless and has a normal range of motion without deviation and deflection." It is not prudent to separate orthodontic treatment as its own entity without being aware of the changes in the temporomandibular joint before, during and after treatment. In other words, "If you're doing orthodontics you're doing TMJ treatment." One should treat toward a healthy, beautiful face asking, "Will proposed treatment achieve this goal?" Treatment should be able to be carried out in an efficient manner, minimizing treatment time, be comfortable and affordable for the patient, and profitable for the dentist. The finished treatment should meet Andrews' Six Keys of Occlusion, or Loudon's Twelve Commandments. Above all, do no harm to the patient. We think that a specific treatment plan can embrace these tenets. The focus will be to show Class II treatment using a modified Herbst Appliance and fixed straight wire orthodontics.

  19. Volatility jumps and their economic determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caporin, Massimiliano; Rossi, Eduardo; Santucci de Magistris, Paolo

    that there is a positive probability of jumps in volatility. A common factor in the volatility jumps is shown to be related to a set of financial covariates (such as variance risk premium, S&P500 volume, credit-default swap, and federal fund rates). The credit-default swap on US banks and variance risk premium have...... predictive power on expected jump moves, thus confirming the common interpretation that sudden and large increases in equity volatility can be anticipated by credit deterioration of the US bank sector as well as changes in the market expectations of future risks. Finally, the model is extended to incorporate...... the credit-default swap and the variance risk premium in the dynamics of the jump size and intensity....

  20. Aerodynamics of ski jumping flight and its control: II. Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungil; Lee, Hansol; Kim, Woojin; Choi, Haecheon

    2015-11-01

    In a ski jumping competition, it is essential to analyze the effect of various posture parameters of a ski jumper to achieve a longer flight distance. For this purpose, we conduct a large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flow past a model ski jumper which is obtained by 3D scanning a ski jumper's body (Mr. Chil-Ku Kang, member of the Korean national team). The angle of attack of the jump ski is 30° and the Reynolds number based on the length of the jump ski is 540,000. The flow statistics including the drag and lift coefficients in flight are in good agreements with our own experimental data. We investigate the flow characteristics such as the flow separation and three-dimensional vortical structures and their effects on the drag and lift. In addition to LES, we construct a simple geometric model of a ski jumper where each part of the ski jumper is modeled as a canonical bluff body such as the sphere, cylinder and flat plate, to find its optimal posture. The results from this approach will be compared with those by LES and discussed. Supported by NRF program (2014M3C1B1033848, 2014R1A1A1002671).

  1. Theoretical coupling longitudinal-transverse model and experimental verification of transverse vibration of rope for multi-rope friction hoisting system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Juan Wu Ziming Kou

    2016-01-01

    Using the mass of time-varying length balance rope focused on the hoisting conveyance, the coupling longi- tudinal-transverse model of mine friction hoist was established by using of the Hamilton's principle...

  2. Deterioration of Synthetic Fiber Rope during Marine Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-31

    essential to establish such changes and to 3.27 determine their effect on subsequent constitutive behavior of the filaments involved. Future Plans Further...explore the fatigue behavior of higher order rope structures, both in theory and in experiment, The approach being taken is to consider fatigue failure...of Pneumatic Tires, Edited by S. Clark, N.B.S. Monograp 12,2, Washington, D.C. (1971). 6.3 Treloar , L.R.G. and Riding, G., A Theory of the Stresm

  3. Jump Horse Safety: Reconciling Public Debate and Australian Thoroughbred Jump Racing Data, 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruse, Karen; Davison, Aidan; Bridle, Kerry

    2015-10-22

    Thoroughbred jump racing sits in the spotlight of contemporary welfare and ethical debates about horse racing. In Australia, jump racing comprises hurdle and steeplechase races and has ceased in all but two states, Victoria and South Australia. This paper documents the size, geography, composition, and dynamics of Australian jump racing for the 2012, 2013, and 2014 seasons with a focus on debate about risks to horses. We found that the majority of Australian jump racing is regional, based in Victoria, and involves a small group of experienced trainers and jockeys. Australian jump horses are on average 6.4 years of age. The jump career of the majority of horses involves participating in three or less hurdle races and over one season. Almost one quarter of Australian jump horses race only once. There were ten horse fatalities in races over the study period, with an overall fatality rate of 5.1 fatalities per 1000 horses starting in a jump race (0.51%). There was significant disparity between the fatality rate for hurdles, 0.75 fatalities per 1000 starts (0.075%) and steeplechases, 14 fatalities per 1000 starts (1.4%). Safety initiatives introduced by regulators in 2010 appear to have significantly decreased risks to horses in hurdles but have had little or no effect in steeplechases. Our discussion considers these Animals 2015, 5 1073 data in light of public controversy, political debate, and industry regulation related to jump horse safety.

  4. Jump Horse Safety: Reconciling Public Debate and Australian Thoroughbred Jump Racing Data, 2012–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Ruse

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Thoroughbred jump racing sits in the spotlight of contemporary welfare and ethical debates about horse racing. In Australia, jump racing comprises hurdle and steeplechase races and has ceased in all but two states, Victoria and South Australia. This paper documents the size, geography, composition, and dynamics of Australian jump racing for the 2012, 2013, and 2014 seasons with a focus on debate about risks to horses. We found that the majority of Australian jump racing is regional, based in Victoria, and involves a small group of experienced trainers and jockeys. Australian jump horses are on average 6.4 years of age. The jump career of the majority of horses involves participating in three or less hurdle races and over one season. Almost one quarter of Australian jump horses race only once. There were ten horse fatalities in races over the study period, with an overall fatality rate of 5.1 fatalities per 1000 horses starting in a jump race (0.51%. There was significant disparity between the fatality rate for hurdles, 0.75 fatalities per 1000 starts (0.075% and steeplechases, 14 fatalities per 1000 starts (1.4%. Safety initiatives introduced by regulators in 2010 appear to have significantly decreased risks to horses in hurdles but have had little or no effect in steeplechases. Our discussion considers these Animals 2015, 5 1073 data in light of public controversy, political debate, and industry regulation related to jump horse safety.

  5. Portfolio Selection with Jumps under Regime Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a continuous-time version of the mean-variance portfolio selection model with jumps under regime switching. The portfolio selection is proposed and analyzed for a market consisting of one bank account and multiple stocks. The random regime switching is assumed to be independent of the underlying Brownian motion and jump processes. A Markov chain modulated diffusion formulation is employed to model the problem.

  6. Load carrying capacity of shear wall t-connections reinforced with high strength wire ropes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henrik B.; Bryndom, Thor; Larsen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, U-bar loop connections with keyed joints have been used in vertical shear connections between precast concrete wall elements. However, in the recent years, connections with looped high strength wire ropes instead of U-bar loops have proven to be a much more construction......-friendly solution. The wire ropes have no bending stiffness and therefore allow for an easier vertical installation of the wall elements. During the last 10 – 15 years, a number of shear tests on plane wire rope connections have been carried out. However, to the best knowledge of the authors, tests on wire rope...... connections for assembly of precast elements in different planes, such as T- and L-connections, have not yet been published. This paper presents the results of a large test series recently conducted at the University of Southern Denmark to study the shear behaviour of high strength wire rope T...

  7. Load Carrying Capacity of Shear Wall T-Connections Reinforced with High Strength Wire Ropes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Bryndum, Thor; Larsen, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, U-bar loop connections with keyed joints have been used in vertical shear connections between precast concrete wall elements. However, in the recent years, connections with looped high strength wire ropes instead of U-bar loops have proven to be a much more construction......-friendly solution. The wire ropes have no bending stiffness and therefore allow for an easier vertical installation of the wall elements. During the last 10 – 15 years, a number of shear tests on plane wire rope connections have been carried out. However, to the best knowledge of the authors, tests on wire rope...... connections for assembly of precast elements in different planes, such as T- and L-connections, have not yet been published. This paper presents the results of a large test series recently conducted at the University of Southern Denmark to study the shear behaviour of high strength wire rope T...

  8. Multiple Triangulation Analysis: another approach to determine the orientation of magnetic flux ropes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.-Z. Zhou

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Another approach (Multiple Triangulation Analysis, MTA is presented to determine the orientation of magnetic flux rope, based on 4-point measurements. A 2-D flux rope model is used to examine the accuracy of the MTA technique in a theoretical way. It is found that the precision of the estimated orientation is dependent on both the spacecraft separation and the constellation path relative to the flux rope structure. However, the MTA error range can be shown to be smaller than that of the traditional MVA technique. As an application to real Cluster data, several flux rope events on 26 January 2001 are analyzed using MTA, to obtain their orientations. The results are compared with the ones obtained by several other methods which also yield flux rope orientation. The estimated axis orientations are shown to be fairly close, suggesting the reliability of the MTA method.

  9. Preschool-aged children's jumps: imitation performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labiadh, Lazhar; Ramanantsoa, Marie-Martine; Golomer, Eveline

    2010-04-01

    Imitative behavior underlaid by perception and action links during children's development in complex locomotor skills has been the object of relatively few studies. In order to explore children's motor coordination modes, 130 children divided into five age groups from 3.5 to 7.5 years were instructed to imitate jumping tasks in spontaneous motor situation and in various imitative contexts by an adult providing verbal orders and gestural demonstrations. Their conformity to the model, stability and variability scores were coded from a video analysis when they performed jumps with obstacles. To evaluate their postural-motor control level, the durations of the preparatory phase and jumping flights were also timed. Results showed that all age groups generated the demonstrator's goal but not necessarily the same coordination modes of jumping. In imitation with temporal proximity, the model helped the youngest age groups to adopt his coordination modes and stabilized only the oldest age groups' performances starting from 5.5 years old, without effect on learning imitation. Differences between the youngest and oldest children in the jump duration suggested that the reproduction of a complex motor activity such as jumping with a one foot take-off would require resolution and adjustment of main postural stability.

  10. Magnetic Flux Rope Identification and Characterization from Observationally Driven Solar Coronal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowder, Chris; Yeates, Anthony

    2017-09-01

    Formed through magnetic field shearing and reconnection in the solar corona, magnetic flux ropes are structures of twisted magnetic field, threaded along an axis. Their evolution and potential eruption are of great importance for space weather. Here we describe a new methodology for the automated detection of flux ropes in simulated magnetic fields, utilizing field-line helicity. Our Flux Rope Detection and Organization (FRoDO) code, which measures the magnetic flux and helicity content of pre-erupting flux ropes over time, as well as detecting eruptions, is publicly available. As a first demonstration, the code is applied to the output from a time-dependent magnetofrictional model, spanning 1996 June 15–2014 February 10. Over this period, 1561 erupting and 2099 non-erupting magnetic flux ropes are detected, tracked, and characterized. For this particular model data, erupting flux ropes have a mean net helicity magnitude of 2.66× {10}43 Mx2, while non-erupting flux ropes have a significantly lower mean of 4.04× {10}42 Mx2, although there is overlap between the two distributions. Similarly, the mean unsigned magnetic flux for erupting flux ropes is 4.04× {10}21 Mx, significantly higher than the mean value of 7.05× {10}20 Mx for non-erupting ropes. These values for erupting flux ropes are within the broad range expected from observational and theoretical estimates, although the eruption rate in this particular model is lower than that of observed coronal mass ejections. In the future, the FRoDO code will prove to be a valuable tool for assessing the performance of different non-potential coronal simulations and comparing them with observations.

  11. Relationship between jump landing kinematics and peak ACL force during a jump in downhill skiing: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, D; van den Bogert, A J; Nachbauer, W

    2014-06-01

    Recent data highlight that competitive skiers face a high risk of injuries especially during off-balance jump landing maneuvers in downhill skiing. The purpose of the present study was to develop a musculo-skeletal modeling and simulation approach to investigate the cause-and-effect relationship between a perturbed landing position, i.e., joint angles and trunk orientation, and the peak force in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) during jump landing. A two-dimensional musculo-skeletal model was developed and a baseline simulation was obtained reproducing measurement data of a reference landing movement. Based on the baseline simulation, a series of perturbed landing simulations (n = 1000) was generated. Multiple linear regression was performed to determine a relationship between peak ACL force and the perturbed landing posture. Increased backward lean, hip flexion, knee extension, and ankle dorsiflexion as well as an asymmetric position were related to higher peak ACL forces during jump landing. The orientation of the trunk of the skier was identified as the most important predictor accounting for 60% of the variance of the peak ACL force in the simulations. Teaching of tactical decisions and the inclusion of exercise regimens in ACL injury prevention programs to improve trunk control during landing motions in downhill skiing was concluded. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Impact of Androstenone on Leash Pulling and Jumping Up in Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenna Pirner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Dogs are relinquished to shelters due to behavioral problems, such as leash pulling and jumping up. Interomones are chemical cues produced by one species that elicit a response in a different species. We reported earlier that androstenone, a swine sex pheromone, acts as an interomone to reduce barking in dogs. Here we report two models using 10 dogs/study: a dog jumping and a dog walking model. For the leash-pulling model, each time the dog pulled on the leash the walker either did nothing (NOT, or sprayed the dog with water (H2O, androstenone + water (ANH, androstenone 0.1 µg/mL (AND1, or androstenone 1.0 µg/mL (AND2. The number of pulls during each walk was counted. For the jumping up model, each time the dog jumped the researcher did nothing (NOT, or sprayed the dog with H2O, ANH, AND1, or AND2. The number of jumps and the time between jumps were recorded. In Study 1, ANH, AND1, and AND2 each reduced leash pulling more than NOT and H2O (p< 0.01. In Study 2, all treatments were effective in reducing jumping up behavior. Androstenone reduced jumping up, but not beyond that elicited by a spray of water alone. We conclude that androstenone in multiple delivery vehicles reduced leash pulling. The burst of air intended as a disruptive stimulus in the correction sprays may be too harsh for more sensitive dogs, and as such use of these sprays is cautioned in these animals. For other dogs, this interomone can be used to stop some behavior immediately or as a part of a training program to reduce undesirable behavior.

  13. Atomic jump frequencies in intermetallic compounds studied using perturbed angular correlation of gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse, Randal Leslie

    Atomic jump frequencies were determined in a variety of intermetallic compounds through analysis of nuclear relaxation of spectra measured using the nuclear hyperfine technique, perturbed angular correlation (PAC) of gamma rays. Observed at higher temperatures, this relaxation is attributed to fluctuations in the orientation or magnitude of electric field gradients (EFG) at nuclei of 111In/Cd probe atoms as the atoms make diffusive jumps. Jump frequencies were obtained by fitting dynamically relaxed PAC spectra using either an empirical relaxation function or using ab initio relaxation models created using the program PolyPacFit. Jump frequency activation enthalpies were determined from measurements over a range of temperatures. Diffusion was studied in the following systems: 1) Pseudo-binary alloys having the L12 crystal structure such as In3(La1-xPrx). The goal was to see how jump frequencies were affected by random disorder. 2) The family of layered phases, LanCoIn3n+2 ( n=0,1,2,3…∞). The goal was to see how jump frequencies varied with the spacing of Co layers, which were found to block diffusion. 3) Phases having the FeGa3 structure. The goal was to analyze dynamical relaxation for probe atoms having multiple inequivalent jump vectors. 4) Phases having the tetragonal Al4Ba structure. The goal was to search for effects in the PAC spectra caused by fluctuations in magnitudes of EFGs without fluctuations in orientations. Ab initio relaxation models were developed to simulate and fit dynamical relaxation for PAC spectra of FeGa3, and several phases with the Al4Ba structure in order to determine underlying microscopic jump frequencies. In the course of this work, site preferences also were observed for 111In/Cd probe atoms in several FeGa 3 and Al4Ba phases.

  14. Performance analysis of jump-gliding locomotion for miniature robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyasagar, A; Zufferey, Jean-Christohphe; Floreano, Dario; Kovač, M

    2015-03-26

    Recent work suggests that jumping locomotion in combination with a gliding phase can be used as an effective mobility principle in robotics. Compared to pure jumping without a gliding phase, the potential benefits of hybrid jump-gliding locomotion includes the ability to extend the distance travelled and reduce the potentially damaging impact forces upon landing. This publication evaluates the performance of jump-gliding locomotion and provides models for the analysis of the relevant dynamics of flight. It also defines a jump-gliding envelope that encompasses the range that can be achieved with jump-gliding robots and that can be used to evaluate the performance and improvement potential of jump-gliding robots. We present first a planar dynamic model and then a simplified closed form model, which allow for quantification of the distance travelled and the impact energy on landing. In order to validate the prediction of these models, we validate the model with experiments using a novel jump-gliding robot, named the 'EPFL jump-glider'. It has a mass of 16.5 g and is able to perform jumps from elevated positions, perform steered gliding flight, land safely and traverse on the ground by repetitive jumping. The experiments indicate that the developed jump-gliding model fits very well with the measured flight data using the EPFL jump-glider, confirming the benefits of jump-gliding locomotion to mobile robotics. The jump-glide envelope considerations indicate that the EPFL jump-glider, when traversing from a 2 m height, reaches 74.3% of optimal jump-gliding distance compared to pure jumping without a gliding phase which only reaches 33.4% of the optimal jump-gliding distance. Methods of further improving flight performance based on the models and inspiration from biological systems are presented providing mechanical design pathways to future jump-gliding robot designs.

  15. Jump Horse Safety: Reconciling Public Debate and Australian Thoroughbred Jump Racing Data, 2012–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruse, Karen; Davison, Aidan; Bridle, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary This paper documents the dynamics of Australian thoroughbred jump racing in the 2012, 2013, and 2014 seasons with the aim of informing debate about risks to horses and the future of this activity. We conclude that the safety of Australian jump racing has improved in recent years but that steeplechases are considerably riskier for horses than hurdle races. Abstract Thoroughbred jump racing sits in the spotlight of contemporary welfare and ethical debates about horse racing. In Australia, jump racing comprises hurdle and steeplechase races and has ceased in all but two states, Victoria and South Australia. This paper documents the size, geography, composition, and dynamics of Australian jump racing for the 2012, 2013, and 2014 seasons with a focus on debate about risks to horses. We found that the majority of Australian jump racing is regional, based in Victoria, and involves a small group of experienced trainers and jockeys. Australian jump horses are on average 6.4 years of age. The jump career of the majority of horses involves participating in three or less hurdle races and over one season. Almost one quarter of Australian jump horses race only once. There were ten horse fatalities in races over the study period, with an overall fatality rate of 5.1 fatalities per 1000 horses starting in a jump race (0.51%). There was significant disparity between the fatality rate for hurdles, 0.75 fatalities per 1000 starts (0.075%) and steeplechases, 14 fatalities per 1000 starts (1.4%). Safety initiatives introduced by regulators in 2010 appear to have significantly decreased risks to horses in hurdles but have had little or no effect in steeplechases. Our discussion considers these data in light of public controversy, political debate, and industry regulation related to jump horse safety. PMID:26506396

  16. Jumping to conclusions in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans SL

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Simon L Evans,1 Bruno B Averbeck,2 Nicholas Furl31School of Psychology, University of Sussex, Brighton, East Sussex, UK; 2Laboratory of Neuropsychology, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; 3Department of Psychology, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey, UKAbstract: Schizophrenia is a mental disorder associated with a variety of symptoms, including hallucinations, delusions, social withdrawal, and cognitive dysfunction. Impairments on decision-making tasks are routinely reported: evidence points to a particular deficit in learning from and revising behavior following feedback. In addition, patients tend to make hasty decisions when probabilistic judgments are required. This is known as “jumping to conclusions” (JTC and has typically been demonstrated by presenting participants with colored beads drawn from one of two “urns” until they claim to be sure which urn the beads are being drawn from (the proportions of colors vary in each urn. Patients tend to make early decisions on this task, and there is evidence to suggest that a hasty decision-making style might be linked to delusion formation and thus be of clinical relevance. Various accounts have been proposed regarding what underlies this behavior. In this review, we briefly introduce the disorder and the decision-making deficits associated with it. We then explore the evidence for each account of JTC in the context of a wider decision-making deficit and then go on to summarize work exploring JTC in healthy controls using pharmacological manipulations and functional imaging. Finally, we assess whether JTC might have a role in therapy.Keywords: ketamine, decision making, delusions, fMRI, urn task

  17. Reconnection Experiments with Flux Ropes near 3D Magnetic Nulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrublevskis, A.; Egedal, J.; Le, A.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection has been predominantly investigated in two dimensions. However, depending on the topology and geometry of the magnetic field, a rich collection of magnetic reconnection scenarios is possible in 3D including reconnection at magnetic nulls. Nulls have been reported in the solar corona [1] and in Earth's magnetosphere [2], yet there are a limited number of laboratory observations. At the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) we have implemented a new magnetic geometry with a pair of 3D null points in the background toroidal field. We form a flux rope along the background field and observe it to rapidly restructure and rewire as the nulls develop. We can adjust the topology of the configuration from one where a field line connects the nulls to one where the nulls are no longer linked. A suit of diagnostics will be deployed and results presented for the dynamics of the flux rope. [1] Fletcher et al., Astrophys. J. 554, 451(2001) [2] Xiao et al., Nat. Phys. 2, 478 (2006)

  18. Degradation of common polymer ropes in a sublittoral marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welden, Natalie A; Cowie, Phillip R

    2017-05-15

    Contamination by microplastic particles and fibres has been observed in sediment and animals sampled from the Firth of Clyde, West Scotland. In addition to microplastics released during clothes washing, a probable source is polymer ropes in abandoned, lost and discarded fishing and recreational sailing gear. The fragmentation of polypropylene, polyethylene, and nylon exposed to benthic conditions at 10m depth over 12months was monitored using changes in weight and tensile properties. Water temperature and light levels were continuously monitored. The degree of biofouling was measured using chlorophyll a, the weight of attached macroalgae, and colonising fauna. Results indicate microplastic fibres and particles may be formed in benthic environments despite reduced photodegradation. Polypropylene, Nylon, and polyethylene lost an average of 0.39%, 1.02%, and 0.45% of their mass per month respectively. Microscope images of the rope surface revealed notable surface roughening believed to be caused by abrasion by substrate and the action of fouling organisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Research on wire rope deformation distribution of WR-CVT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wu; Guo, Wei; Zhang, Chuanwei; Lu, Zhengxiong; Xu, Xiaobin

    2017-07-01

    A wire rope continuously variable transmissions (WR-CVT) has been introduced in the paper, in view of its less research, this paper mainly studied the deformation distribution of 6×7+IWS bending wire rope. The results shown that in the same section, half of the side strands are in a stretched state and half are in a compressed state. When the transmission ratio i=2.35, the maximum deformation and the minimum deformation are decrease when section U1 to U2, U3 transition. Wire deformation distribution when the transmission ratio i=0.42 is similar to that of i=0.2.35. Wire deformation amount and the deformation difference decrease as the transmission ratio decreases, this shows that the increase in the bending radius of the wire will make the wire deformation more uniform, and the reduction of the deformation difference will also reduce the wear. This study provides a basis for the study of fatigue and wears failure of WR-CVT components.

  20. A biomechanical comparison of the vertical jump, power clean, and jump squat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Sasho James; Lavers, Robert J; Wallace, Brendan B

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the kinetics, kinematics, and muscle activation patterns of the countermovement jump, the power clean, and the jump squat with the expectation of gaining a better understanding of the mechanism of transfer from the power clean to the vertical jump. Ground reaction forces, electromyography, and joint angle data were collected from 20 trained participants while they performed the three movements. Relative to the power clean, the kinematics of the jump squat were more similar to those of the countermovement jump. The order in which the ankle, knee, and hip began extending, as well as the subsequent pattern of extension, was different between the power clean and countermovement jump. The electromyography data demonstrated significant differences in the relative timing of peak activations in all muscles, the maximum activation of the rectus femoris and biceps femoris, and in the activation/deactivation patterns of the vastus medialis and rectus femoris. The greatest rate of force development during the upward phase of these exercises was generated during the power clean (17,254 [Formula: see text]), which was significantly greater than both the countermovement jump (3836 [Formula: see text]) and jump squat (3517 [Formula: see text]) conditions (P < .001, [Formula: see text]).

  1. The effect of wind on jumping distance in ski jumping--fairness assessed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virmavirta, Mikko; Kivekäs, Juha

    2012-09-01

    The special wind compensation system recently adopted by Fédération Internationale de Ski (FIS; International Ski Federation) to consider the effects of changing wind conditions has caused some controversy. Here, the effect of wind on jumping distance in ski jumping was studied by means of computer simulation and compared with the wind compensation factors used by FIS during the World Cup season 2009/2010. The results showed clearly that the effect of increasing head/tail wind on jumping distance is not linear: +17.4 m/-29.1 m, respectively, for a wind speed of 3 m/s. The linear formula used in the trial period of the wind compensation system was found to be appropriate only for a limited range of jumping distances as the gradient of the landing slope slows down the rate of distance change in long jumps.

  2. Dynamic field of elastic displacements in a rope which is reeled up on the drum at lifting of loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Ostapenko

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The boundary-value problem about construction of the displacement waves and the strain waves arising in ropes of elevating devices, such as lifts, mine lifts and so on is considered. The rope at lifting of loads is reeled up on a drum. In a case when the friction coefficient of a rope about a drum is not too big, occurs frictional sliding a rope on a drum. Therefore the behavior of a rope on a drum is described by the telegraph equation. The behavior of a hanging part of a rope is described by the wave equation. It means, that in different parts of a rope the displacements are solutions of the different equations. That is from this point of view the rope is shared on two zones. Thus owing to reeling of a rope on a drum the border which shares these two zones is a variable. In such model the waves not only reflect from ending points of a rope. There is also their reflection and refraction on moving border of the sharing of zones. Is developed methods for obtaining of exact solutions for the boundary-value problems with mobile borders for both the wave and telegraph equations. They are based on maintenance of a continuity of the displacements in points of reflection of waves. The exact solution of such problem is obtained for the case of sagging a rope prior to the beginning of rise.

  3. Dynamic Contact between a Wire Rope and a Pulley Using Absolute Nodal Coordinate Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoichiro Takehara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wire rope and pulley devices are used in various machines. To use these machines more safely, it is necessary to analyze the behavior of the contact between them. In this study, we represent a wire rope by a numerical model of a flexible body. This flexible body is expressed in the absolute nodal coordinate formulation (ANCF, and the model includes the normal contact force and the frictional force between the wire rope and the pulley. The normal contact force is expressed by spring-damper elements, and the frictional force is expressed by the Quinn method. The advantage of the Quinn method is that it reduces the numerical problems associated with the discontinuities in Coulomb friction at zero velocity. By using the numerical model, simulations are performed, and the validity of this model is shown by comparing its results with those of an experiment. Through numerical simulations, we confirm the proposed model for the contact between the wire rope and the pulley. We confirmed that the behavior of the wire rope changes when both the bending elastic modulus of the wire rope and the mass added to each end of the wire rope are changed.

  4. Damage-Induced Stresses and Remaining Service Life Predictions of Wire Ropes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Vukelic

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wire ropes in marine applications often encounter relatively fast and noticeable wear, a result of the fatigue to which they are exposed coupled with harsh operational conditions. This paper addresses some of the aspects of fatigue damage that occur in wire ropes. Using the finite element method, stress and fatigue analysis of three different design types (6 × 7, 7 × 7, 8 × 7 of wire rope is performed. The size of the wire rope cross-section area is varied in order to simulate the progressive damage of the wires so that consequential stress levels and remaining fatigue life can be numerically predicted. The aim was to provide a better understanding of the mechanical behavior of damaged wire ropes under various conditions, since an appropriate choice of wire rope design could then be made from engineering and economic points of view. Additionally, potential failures can be predicted, resulting in effective maintenance and the avoidance of potential risks of rope failure, especially important regarding economical and safety aspects of transportation in the marine industry.

  5. Finite element analysis on the wire breaking rule of 1×7IWS steel wire rope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzheng Du

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking the wire rope of 1×7+IWS structure as the research object, the influences of the number of broken wires on the stress distribution under the same axial load were simulated and analysed, and it also explored the rule of wire breaking of steel wire ropes. Based on the SolidWorks software, the three-dimensional model of the wire rope was established. Importing the model into the ABAQUS, the finite element model of the steel wire rope was established. Firstly 5000 N axial tension was placed on the rope, the stress distribution was simulated and analysed, and the steel wire with the largest stress distribution was found out. Then one steel wire was truncated with the load unchanged, and the finite element simulation was carried out again, and repeated the steps several times. The results show that, with the increase of the number of broken wires, the Von-Mises stress of the wire rope increases sharply, and the stress distribution is concentrated on the rest of the unbroken wires, which brings great challenges to the safety of the wire rope.

  6. Filtering and control of stochastic jump hybrid systems

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Xiuming; Zheng, Wei Xing

    2016-01-01

    This book presents recent research work on stochastic jump hybrid systems. Specifically, the considered stochastic jump hybrid systems include Markovian jump Ito stochastic systems, Markovian jump linear-parameter-varying (LPV) systems, Markovian jump singular systems, Markovian jump two-dimensional (2-D) systems, and Markovian jump repeated scalar nonlinear systems. Some sufficient conditions are first established respectively for the stability and performances of those kinds of stochastic jump hybrid systems in terms of solution of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Based on the derived analysis conditions, the filtering and control problems are addressed. The book presents up-to-date research developments and novel methodologies on stochastic jump hybrid systems. The contents can be divided into two parts: the first part is focused on robust filter design problem, while the second part is put the emphasis on robust control problem. These methodologies provide a framework for stability and performance analy...

  7. A locust-inspired miniature jumping robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Valentin; Gvirsman, Omer; Ben Hanan, Uri; Weiss, Avi; Ayali, Amir; Kosa, Gabor

    2015-11-25

    Unmanned ground vehicles are mostly wheeled, tracked, or legged. These locomotion mechanisms have a limited ability to traverse rough terrain and obstacles that are higher than the robot's center of mass. In order to improve the mobility of small robots it is necessary to expand the variety of their motion gaits. Jumping is one of nature's solutions to the challenge of mobility in difficult terrain. The desert locust is the model for the presented bio-inspired design of a jumping mechanism for a small mobile robot. The basic mechanism is similar to that of the semilunar process in the hind legs of the locust, and is based on the cocking of a torsional spring by wrapping a tendon-like wire around the shaft of a miniature motor. In this study we present the jumping mechanism design, and the manufacturing and performance analysis of two demonstrator prototypes. The most advanced jumping robot demonstrator is power autonomous, weighs 23 gr, and is capable of jumping to a height of 3.35 m, covering a distance of 1.37 m.

  8. Mechanical jumping power in young athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitasalo, J T; Osterback, L; Alen, M; Rahkila, P; Havas, E

    1987-09-01

    Mechanical jumping power was determined for 286 young male athletes representing six sports events and ranging in calendar and skeletal ages from 8.8 to 17.1 and from 7.8 to 18.1 years, respectively. The subjects performed successive maximal vertical jumps on a contact mat for 30 s. The number of jumps and their cumulative flight time after 15 and 30 s were used for calculations of mechanical power. The jumping performances of the young athletes were found to be reproducible from the age of 10-12 years in respect to the angular displacement of the knee and duration of contact. Absolute mechanical power, as well as power related to body weight, increased with calendar and skeletal ages. Of the anthropometric characteristics, the circumference of the thigh and body weight showed the highest correlation with mechanical power; subjects with the greatest thigh circumference and body weight having the lowest mechanical power. The subjects were divided into 'power' (track and field, gymnastics) and 'endurance' (skiing, orienteering) groups. The former reached higher mechanical power values than the latter. Mechanical power for the second 15-s jumping period was on average 4.7% lower than for the first. The events did not differ from each other in respect of the decrease in power.

  9. The formation and launch of a coronal mass ejection flux rope: a narrative based on observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, T. A.; DeForest, C. E., E-mail: howard@boulder.swri.edu [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    We present a data-driven narrative of the launch and early evolution of the magnetic structure that gave rise to the coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2008 December 12. The structure formed on December 7 and launched early on December 12. We interpret this structure as a flux rope based on prelaunch morphology, postlaunch magnetic measurements, and the lack of large-scale magnetic reconnection signatures at launch. We ascribe three separate onset mechanisms to the complete disconnection of the flux rope from the Sun. It took 19 hr for the flux rope to be fully removed from the Sun, by which time the segment that first disconnected was around 40 R {sub ☉} away. This implies that the original flux rope was stretched or broken; we provide evidence for a possible bisection. A transient dark arcade was observed on the Sun that was later obscured by a bright arcade, which we interpret as the strapping field stretching and magnetically reconnecting as it disconnected from the coronal field. We identify three separate structures in coronagraph images to be manifestations of the same original flux rope, and we describe the implications for CME interpretation. We cite the rotation in the central flux rope vector of the magnetic clouds observed in situ by ACE/Wind and STEREO-B as evidence of the kink instability of the eastern segment of the flux rope. Finally, we discuss possible alternative narratives, including multiple prelaunch magnetic structures and the nonflux rope scenario. Our results support the view that, in at least some CMEs, flux rope formation occurs before launch.

  10. Behavioral and Physiological Responses of Calves to Marshalling and Roping in a Simulated Rodeo Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Michelle; Keeley, Tamara; Lefebvre, Anne-Cecile; Phillips, Clive J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Rodeos often include a calf roping event, where calves are first lassoed by a rider on a horse, who then dismounts, ties the calves’ legs, lifts it from the ground and releases it back to the floor. We tested whether calves that were familiar to the roping experience stress during the roping event, and found increased concentrations of stress hormones in their blood after the roping. We also found increased concentrations of stress hormones in the blood of calves that had never been roped before but were just marshelled across the arena by the horse and rider. We conclude that the roping event in rodeos is stressful for both experienced and naïve calves. Abstract Rodeos are public events at which stockpeople face tests of their ability to manage cattle and horses, some of which relate directly to rangeland cattle husbandry. One of these is calf roping, in which a calf released from a chute is pursued by a horse and rider, who lassoes, lifts and drops the calf to the ground and finally ties it around the legs. Measurements were made of behavior and stress responses of ten rodeo-naïve calves marshalled by a horse and rider, and ten rodeo-experienced calves that were roped. Naïve calves marshalled by a horse and rider traversed the arena slowly, whereas rodeo-experienced calves ran rapidly until roped. Each activity was repeated once after two hours. Blood samples taken before and after each activity demonstrated increased cortisol, epinephrine and nor-epinephrine in both groups. However, there was no evidence of a continued increase in stress hormones in either group by the start of the repeated activity, suggesting that the elevated stress hormones were not a response to a prolonged effect of the initial blood sampling. It is concluded that both the marshalling of calves naïve to the roping chute by stockpeople and the roping and dropping of experienced calves are stressful in a simulated rodeo calf roping event. PMID:27136590

  11. A rope-net support system for the liquid scintillator detector for the SNO+ experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bialek, A., E-mail: abialek@snolab.ca [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Chen, M. [Queen' s University, Kingston (Canada); Cleveland, B. [SNOLAB, Lively (Canada); Gorel, P.; Hallin, A. [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Harvey, P.J.; Heise, J. [Queen' s University, Kingston (Canada); Kraus, C. [Laurentian University, Sudbury (Canada); Krauss, C.B. [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Lawson, I. [SNOLAB, Lively (Canada); Ng, C.J.; Pinkney, B. [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Rogowsky, D.M. [Rogowsky Engineering Ltd, AECOM Canada Ltd (Canada); Sibley, L.; Soluk, R.; Soukup, J. [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Vázquez-Jáuregui, E. [SNOLAB, Lively (Canada); Laurentian University, Sudbury (Canada)

    2016-08-11

    The detector for the SNO+ experiment consists of 780 000 kg of liquid scintillator contained in an acrylic vessel that is surrounded by water. A mechanical system has been installed to counteract the 1.25 MN of buoyant force on the acrylic and prevent the vessel from moving. The system is a rope net, designed using a Finite Element Analysis to calculate the amount of stress on the acrylic induced by the ropes, hydrostatic pressures and gravity. A dedicated test was performed to measure strains in the acrylic arising from the complex geometry of the knots in the rope system. The ratio between measured and FEA calculated strains was 1.3.

  12. Design of strain tension sensor of steel wire rope used in the coal mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Jin, Huawei

    2016-01-01

    According to the dynamic tension testing requirements of the multi-rope winder rope, this paper designs the sensor used to measure the tension of steel wire rope directly. The sensor uses the strain shear measuring principle, and has many features with small size, big measuring range, easy to install, don't change the structure of connected devices and so on. Application of the finite element analysis software makes the structure of the sensor optimized, and then enhance the static and dynamic performance of the sensor.

  13. Movement analysis on steel wire rope of continuous conveyor with disc-tube assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUAN Li-jun; SHI Shu-lin; REN Li-yi

    2004-01-01

    The steel wire rope of continuous conveyor with disc-tube assembly is droved by the driving wheel. When the driving wheel rotates, the gear is combined to the connection disc in turn, promoting the connection disc to move in succession. Turning the whirling torque of driving wheel into the straight-line traction force. When the steel wire rope is winded by the driving wheel some winded along the circumference, others winded along the straight line. Used motion subject law, this article analyses the change of the velocity and the acceleration of the steel wire rope in the straight movement, and observe the mathematics' model of velocity and acceleration.

  14. Nonlinear regimes on polygonal hydraulic jumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    This work extends previous leading and higher order results on the polygonal hydraulic jump in the framework of inertial lubrication theory. The rotation of steady polygonal jumps is observed in the transition from one wavenumber to the next one, induced by a change in height of an external obstacle near the outer edge. In a previous publication, the study of stationary polygons is considered under the assumption that the reference frame rotates with the polygons when the number of corners change, in order to preserve their orientation. In this research work I provide a Hamiltonian approach and the stability analysis of the nonlinear oscillator that describe the polygonal structures at the jump interface, in addition to a perturbation method that enables to explain, for instance, the diversity of patterns found in experiments. GRASP, Institute of Physics, University of Liege, Belgium.

  15. Aerodynamic Jump for Long Rod Penetrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark L. Bundy

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic jump for a non-spinning kinetic energy penetrator is neither a discontinuous change in the ,direction of motion at the origin of free night, nor is it the converse, i.e. a cumulativer~direc4on over a domain of infinite extent. Rather aerodynamic jump, for such a projectile, is a localised redirection of the centre of gravity motion, caused ~ the force of lift due to yaw over ther4latively short region from entry into free flight until the yaw reaches its first maximum. The primary objective of this paper is to provide answtfrs to the questions like what is aerodynamic jump, what liauses it, !lnd wh~t aspects df the flight trajectory does it refer to, or account for .

  16. Planarity of 3,4-jump Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏二玲; 刘颜佩

    2004-01-01

    For a graph G of size ε≥1 and its edge-induced subgraphs H1 and H2 of size γ(1 < γ < ε), H1 is said to be obtained from H2 by an edge jump if there exist four distinct vertices u, v, ω and x in G such that (u,v)∈E(H2), (ω,x)∈E(G) - E(H2) and H1=H2 - (u, v) + (ω, x). In this article, the γ-jump graphs(r≥3) are discussed. A graph H is said to be an γ-jump graph of G if its vertices correspond to the edge induced graph of size γ in G and two vertices are adjacent if and only if one of the two corresponding subgraphs can be obtained from the other by an edge jump. For k≥2, the k-th iterated γ-jump graph Jrk(G) is defined as Jγ(Jγk-1 (G)), where Jγ1 (G) = Jγ(G). An infinite sequence {Gi} of graphs is planar if every graph Gi is planar. It is shown that there does not exist a graph G for which the sequence {J3k(G)} is planar, where k is any positive integer. Meanwhile, lim gen(J3k(G)) =∞, where gen(G) denotes the genus of a graph G, if the sequence k→∞J3k(G) is defined for every positive integer k. As for the 4-jump graph of a graph G,{J4k(G)} is planar if and only if G = C5. For γ≥5, whether the fix graph of the sequence {Jγk(G))exists is determined.

  17. Flux Rope Formation Preceding Coronal Mass Ejection Onset

    CERN Document Server

    Green, L M

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the evolution of a sigmoidal (S shaped) active region toward eruption, which includes a coronal mass ejection (CME) but leaves part of the filament in place. The X-ray sigmoid is found to trace out three different magnetic topologies in succession: a highly sheared arcade of coronal loops in its long-lived phase, a bald-patch separatrix surface (BPSS) in the hours before the CME, and the first flare loops in its major transient intensity enhancement. The coronal evolution is driven by photospheric changes which involve the convergence and cancellation of flux elements under the sigmoid and filament. The data yield unambiguous evidence for the existence of a BPSS, and hence a flux rope, in the corona prior to the onset of the CME.

  18. Hydroelectric System Response to Part Load Vortex Rope Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alligné, S.; Nicolet, C.; Bégum, A.; Landry, C.; Gomes, J.; Avellan, F.

    2016-11-01

    The prediction of pressure and output power fluctuations amplitudes on Francis turbine prototype is a challenge for hydro-equipment industry since it is subjected to guarantees to ensure smooth and reliable operation of the hydro units. The European FP7 research project Hyperbole aims to setup a methodology to transpose the pressure fluctuations induced by the cavitation vortex rope on the reduced scale model to the prototype generating units. A Francis turbine unit of 444MW with a specific speed value of v = 0.29, is considered as case study. A SIMSEN model of the power station including electrical system, controllers, rotating train and hydraulic system with transposed draft tube excitation sources is setup. Based on this model, a frequency analysis of the hydroelectric system is performed to analyse potential interactions between hydraulic excitation sources and electrical components.

  19. Spectral Analysis of Diffusions with Jump Boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Kolb, Martin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider one-dimensional diffusions with constant coefficients in a finite interval with jump boundary and a certain deterministic jump distribution. We use coupling methods in order to identify the spectral gap in the case of a large drift and prove that that there is a threshold drift above which the bottom of the spectrum no longer depends on the drift. As a Corollary to our result we are able to answer two questions concerning elliptic eigenvalue problems with non-local boundary conditions formulated previously by Iddo Ben-Ari and Ross Pinsky.

  20. Aerodynamic Jump for Long Rod Penetrators

    OpenAIRE

    Mark L. Bundy

    2000-01-01

    Aerodynamic jump for a non-spinning kinetic energy penetrator is neither a discontinuous change in the ,direction of motion at the origin of free night, nor is it the converse, i.e. a cumulativer~direc4on over a domain of infinite extent. Rather aerodynamic jump, for such a projectile, is a localised redirection of the centre of gravity motion, caused ~ the force of lift due to yaw over ther4latively short region from entry into free flight until the yaw reaches its first maximum. The primary...

  1. Neuromuscular Responses of Elite Skaters During Different Roller Figure Skating Jumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantoja Patrícia Dias

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to describe the neuromuscular activity of elite athletes who performed various roller figure skating jumps, to determine whether the muscle activation is greater during jumps with more rotations and in which phase the muscles are more active. This study also aimed to analyze if there is any difference in the muscle activity pattern between female and male skaters. Four elite skaters were evaluated, and each participated in two experimental sessions. During the first session, anthropometric data were collected, and the consent forms were signed. For the second session, neuromuscular data were collected during jumps, which were performed with skates at a rink. The following four roller figure skating jumps were evaluated: single Axel, double Axel, double Mapes and triple Mapes. The neuromuscular activity of the following seven muscles was obtained with an electromyograph which was fixed to the waist of each skater with a strap: biceps femoris, lateral gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, vastus medialis and gluteus maximus. The signal was transmitted wirelessly to a laptop. During the roller figure skating jumps, the lateral gastrocnemius, rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris and gluteus maximus, showed more activation during the jumps with more rotations, and the activation mainly occurred during the propulsion and flight phases. Female skaters demonstrated higher muscle activities in tibialis anterior, vastus lateralis, vastus medialis and gluteus maximus during the landing phase of the triple Mapes, when compared to their male counterparts. The results obtained in this study should be considered when planning training programs with specific exercises that closely resemble the roller figure skating jumps. This may be important for the success of elite skaters in competitions.

  2. Strength of precast concrete shear joints reinforced with high-strength wire ropes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Henrik B.; Hoang, Linh Cao; Hagsten, Lars German

    2017-01-01

    This paper concerns the in-plane shear strength of connections between precast concrete wall elements reinforced with looped high-strength wire ropes. The looped wire ropes are pre-installed in so-called ‘wire boxes’ which function as shear keys. Although only a small amount of research...... on the shear strength of such connections can be found in the literature, this type of connection is increasingly being used because wire ropes are much more construction-friendly than traditional U-bars. A rigid plastic upper bound model for the shear strength of wall connections reinforced with looped wire...... ropes that are pre-installed in wire boxes is presented along with test results on the shear strength of connections with double-wire boxes. It is shown that the plastic solution agrees well with both the obtained test results and results from previously conducted tests....

  3. Interpretation of damages in hoisting ropes based on the testing device with three sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langebrake, F.; Fuchs, D.; Sindern, W.; Spas, W. [DMT-Gesellschaft fuer Foerderung und Transport, Bochum (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    The compulsion for cost-effective hoisting led to the concentration of few heavy-loaded Koepe hoists. The heavy load demands a lot of operational safety of the component parts that are subjected to high-level static and dynamic stresses. The DMT-Institute of Hoisting and Transport has developed suitable test methods to record reliably damage of the ropes. Apart from the visual inspection, non-destructive test methods are used to obtain information about wire breaks, cross section losses by corrosion or wear and the rope diameter. The assessment of the test results considers the rope stresses, operational conditions and damage developments that were derived from previous running ropes. 3 refs., 11 figs.

  4. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of rope-guided conveyances in two typical kinds of shaft layouts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renyuan Wu

    Full Text Available The behavior of rope-guided conveyances is so complicated that the rope-guided hoisting system hasn't been understood thoroughly so far. In this paper, with user-defined functions loaded, ANSYS FLUENT 14.5 was employed to simulate lateral motion of rope-guided conveyances in two typical kinds of shaft layouts. With rope-guided mine elevator and mine cages taken into account, results show that the lateral aerodynamic buffeting force is much larger than the Coriolis force, and the side aerodynamic force have the same order of magnitude as the Coriolis force. The lateral aerodynamic buffeting forces should also be considered especially when the conveyance moves along the ventilation air direction. The simulation shows that the closer size of the conveyances can weaken the transverse aerodynamic buffeting effect.

  5. Dynamic High-speed Knotting of a Rope by a Manipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Yamakawa

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we suggest an entirely new strategy for the dexterous manipulation of a linear flexible object, such as rope or a cable, with a high-speed manipulator. We deal with a flexible rope as one example of the linear flexible object. The strategy involves manipulating the object at high-speed. By moving the robot at high-speed, we can assume that the dynamic behaviour of the flexible rope can be obtained by performing algebraic calculations of the high- speed robot motion. Based on this assumption, we derive a dynamic deformation model of the flexible rope and confirm the validity of the proposed model. Then we perform a simulation of dynamic, high-speed knotting based on the proposed model. We also discuss the possibility of forming the knot based on a simple analysis model. Finally, we show experimental results demonstrating dynamic, high-speed knotting with a high-speed manipulator.

  6. Load Carrying Capacity of Keyed Joints Reinforced with High Strength Wire Rope Loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    Vertical shear connections between precast concrete wall elements are usually made as keyed joints reinforced with overlapping U-bars. The overlapping U-bars form a cylindrical core in which the locking bar is placed and the connection is subsequently grouted with mortar. A more construction...... friendly shear connection can be obtained by replacing the U-bars with high strength looped wire ropes. The wire ropes have the advantage of being flexible (they have virtually no bending stiffness) which makes installation of wall elements much easier. The looped wire ropes are usually pre-installed in so...... the shear capacity of wire loop connections. Tests have shown that the shear capacity of such joints – due to the relatively high tensile strength of the wire ropes - is more prone to be governed by fracture of the joint mortar in combination with yielding of the locking bar. To model this type of failure...

  7. Recovery Outline: New Mexico Jumping Mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this recovery outline is to provide an interim strategy to guide the conservation and recovery of the New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (jumping mouse)...

  8. High-resolution Observations of a Flux Rope with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ting; ZHANG, JUN

    2015-01-01

    We report the observations of a flux rope at transition region temperatures with the \\emph{Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph} (IRIS) on 30 August 2014. Initially, magnetic flux cancellation constantly took place and a filament was activated. Then the bright material from the filament moved southward and tracked out several fine structures. These fine structures were twisted and tangled with each other, and appeared as a small flux rope at 1330 {\\AA}, with a total twist of about 4$\\pi$. Af...

  9. The expected imprint of flux rope geometry on suprathermal electrons in magnetic clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Owens, Mathew James; Crooker, N. U.; Horbury, T. S.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic clouds are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections characterized by a smooth rotation in the magnetic field direction, which is interpreted as a signature of a magnetic flux rope. Suprathermal electron observations indicate that one or both ends of a magnetic cloud typically remain connected to the Sun as it moves out through the heliosphere. With distance from the axis of the flux rope, out toward its edge, the magnetic field winds more tightly about the axis and electrons...

  10. Advanced signal processing methods applied to guided waves for wire rope defect detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Peter W.; Rostami, Javad

    2016-02-01

    Steel wire ropes, which are usually composed of a polymer core and enclosed by twisted wires, are used to hoist heavy loads. These loads are different structures that can be clamshells, draglines, elevators, etc. Since the loading of these structures is dynamic, the ropes are working under fluctuating forces in a corrosive environment. This consequently leads to progressive loss of the metallic cross-section due to abrasion and corrosion. These defects can be seen in the forms of roughened and pitted surface of the ropes, reduction in diameter, and broken wires. Therefore, their deterioration must be monitored so that any unexpected damage or corrosion can be detected before it causes fatal accident. This is of vital importance in the case of passenger transportation, particularly in elevators in which any failure may cause a catastrophic disaster. At present, the widely used methods for thorough inspection of wire ropes include visual inspection and magnetic flux leakage (MFL). Reliability of the first method is questionable since it only depends on the operators' eyes that fails to determine the integrity of internal wires. The later method has the drawback of being a point by point and time-consuming inspection method. Ultrasonic guided wave (UGW) based inspection, which has proved its capability in inspecting plate like structures such as tubes and pipes, can monitor the cross-section of wire ropes in their entire length from a single point. However, UGW have drawn less attention for defect detection in wire ropes. This paper reports the condition monitoring of a steel wire rope from a hoisting elevator with broken wires as a result of corrosive environment and fatigue. Experiments were conducted to investigate the efficiency of using magnetostrictive based UGW for rope defect detection. The obtained signals were analyzed by two time-frequency representation (TFR) methods, namely the Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT) and the Wavelet analysis. The location of

  11. THE MODEL CHARACTERISTICS OF JUMP ACTIONS STRUCTURE OF HIGH PERFORMANCE FEMALE VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stech M.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to develop generalized and individual models of the jump actions of skilled female volleyball players. The main prerequisite for the development of the jump actions models were the results of our earlier studies of factor structure of jump actions of 10 sportswomen of the Polish volleyball team "Gedania" (Premier League in the preparatory and competitive periods of the annual cycle of preparation. The athletes age was 22.0 +- 2.9 years, the sports experience - 8.1 +- 3.1 years, body height - 181.9 +- 8.4 years and body weight - 72.8 +- 10.8 kg. Mathematical and statistical processing of the data (the definition of M ± SD and significant differences between the samples was performed using a standard computer program "STATISTICA 7,0". Based on the analysis of the factor structure of 20 jump actions of skilled women volleyball players determined to within 5 of the most informative indexes and their tentative values recommended for the formation of a generalized model of this structure. Comparison of individual models of jump actions of skilled women volleyball players with their generalized models in different periods of preparation can be used for the rational choice of means and methods for the increasing of the training process efficiency.

  12. Jumping on the Social Media Bandwagon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Should a school district jump on the social media bandwagon? Yes! Social media provide a low-cost way to communicate school district priorities, influence decision makers, and tell its story without filters. Equally important, social media are where constituents are spending a lot of their time. With more than 800 million members, Facebook is an…

  13. Jumping on the Social Media Bandwagon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Should a school district jump on the social media bandwagon? Yes! Social media provide a low-cost way to communicate school district priorities, influence decision makers, and tell its story without filters. Equally important, social media are where constituents are spending a lot of their time. With more than 800 million members, Facebook is an…

  14. Jumping-droplet electrostatic energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Preston, Daniel J.; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2014-07-01

    Micro- and nanoscale wetting phenomena have been an active area of research due to its potential for improving engineered system performance involving phase change. With the recent advancements in micro/nanofabrication techniques, structured surfaces can now be designed to allow condensing coalesced droplets to spontaneously jump off the surface due to the conversion of excess surface energy into kinetic energy. In addition to being removed at micrometric length scales (˜10 μm), jumping water droplets also attain a positive electrostatic charge (˜10-100 fC) from the hydrophobic coating/condensate interaction. In this work, we take advantage of this droplet charging to demonstrate jumping-droplet electrostatic energy harvesting. The charged droplets jump between superhydrophobic copper oxide and hydrophilic copper surfaces to create an electrostatic potential and generate power during formation of atmospheric dew. We demonstrated power densities of ˜15 pW/cm2, which, in the near term, can be improved to ˜1 μW/cm2. This work demonstrates a surface engineered platform that promises to be low cost and scalable for atmospheric energy harvesting and electric power generation.

  15. DISCONTINUOUS FLOW OF TURBID DENSITY CURRENTS Ⅱ. INTERNAL HYDRAULIC JUMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiahua FAN

    2005-01-01

    Traveling and stationary internal hydraulic jumps in density currents with positive or negative entrainment coefficients were analyzed based on simple assumptions. An expression of internal hydraulic jumps with entrainment coefficients was derived. Experimental data, published in literature, of stationary internal hydraulic jumps in turbid, thermal and saline density currents including measured values of water entrainment were used to compare with theory. Comparison was also made of traveling internal hydraulic jumps between measured data and theory.

  16. Flux rope proxies and fan-spine structures in active region NOAA 11897

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Y J; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    Employing the high-resolution observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), we statistically investigate flux rope proxies in NOAA AR 11897 from 14-Nov-2013 to 19-Nov-2013 and display two fan-spine structures in this AR. For the first time, we detect flux rope proxies of NOAA 11897 for total 30 times in 4 different locations. These flux rope proxies were either tracked in both lower and higher temperature wavelengths or only detected in hot channels. Specially, none of these flux rope proxies was observed to erupt, but just faded away gradually. In addition to these flux rope proxies, we firstly detect a secondary fan-spine structure. It was covered by dome-shaped magnetic fields which belong to a larger fan-spine topology. These new observations imply that considerable amounts of flux ropes can exist in an AR and the complexity of AR magnetic configuration is far beyond our imagination.

  17. The expected imprint of flux rope geometry on suprathermal electrons in magnetic clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Owens

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic clouds are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections characterized by a smooth rotation in the magnetic field direction, which is interpreted as a signature of a magnetic flux rope. Suprathermal electron observations indicate that one or both ends of a magnetic cloud typically remain connected to the Sun as it moves out through the heliosphere. With distance from the axis of the flux rope, out toward its edge, the magnetic field winds more tightly about the axis and electrons must traverse longer magnetic field lines to reach the same heliocentric distance. This increased time of flight allows greater pitch-angle scattering to occur, meaning suprathermal electron pitch-angle distributions should be systematically broader at the edges of the flux rope than at the axis. We model this effect with an analytical magnetic flux rope model and a numerical scheme for suprathermal electron pitch-angle scattering and find that the signature of a magnetic flux rope should be observable with the typical pitch-angle resolution of suprathermal electron data provided ACE's SWEPAM instrument. Evidence of this signature in the observations, however, is weak, possibly because reconnection of magnetic fields within the flux rope acts to intermix flux tubes.

  18. Catastrophe of coronal magnetic flux ropes in fully open magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Guoqiang(李国强); HU; Youqiu(胡友秋)

    2002-01-01

    The catastrophe of coronal magnetic flux ropes is closely related to solar explosive phenomena, such as prominence eruptions, coronal mass ejections, and two-ribbon solar flares. Using a 2-dimensional, 3-component ideal MHD model in Cartesian coordinates, numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the equilibrium property of a coronal magnetic flux rope which is embedded in a fully open background magnetic field. The flux rope emerges from the photosphere and enters the corona with its axial and annular magnetic fluxes controlled by a single "emergence parameter". For a flux rope that has entered the corona, we may change its axial and annular fluxes artificially and let the whole system reach a new equilibrium through numerical simulations. The results obtained show that when the emergence parameter, the axial flux, or the annular flux is smaller than a certain critical value, the flux rope is in equilibrium and adheres to the photosphere. On the other hand, if the critical value is exceeded, the flux rope loses equilibrium and erupts freely upward, namely, a catastrophe takes place. In contrast with the partly-opened background field, the catastrophic amplitude is infinite for the case of fully-opened background field.

  19. Tensile Property Analysis and Prediction Model Building for Coir Rope Reinforced Unsaturated Polyester Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Yao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Because of the light weight and environmental advantages of natural fibers, an increasing amount of natural fibers have been used to replace synthetic fibers in reinforced unsaturated polyester (UPE. Because of the impact property advantage of coir fibers, coir toughened UPE composites can achieve excellent impacting toughness, but at the cost of a lower tensile performance. In order to get the better comprehensive performance, the tensile strength must be maintained in a higher level, so coir ropes as an appropriate reinforced form were added to UPE matrix. The different weight-percent contents for the coir rope addition were set to achieve coir rope reinforced UPE composites with different coir contents. The tensile test results showed increasing tensile strength with the increased content of coir ropes. To reasonably and accurately predict the composite performance, taking the original performance prediction model based on a continuous reinforced fiber composite (using the Classical Mixed Law as a reference and assuming each coir rope was ideally continuous fiber, the destructive principle of coir rope reinforced UPE composite under the action of tensile load was analyzed and the tensile failure mechanics model was improved. According to the experimental proof, the new model can be proven to have higher precision accuracy, which can provide new train of thought for the building of the theoretical models for natural fiber reinforced composites, thus guiding the actual production application.

  20. High-resolution Observations of a Flux Rope with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ting

    2015-01-01

    We report the observations of a flux rope at transition region temperatures with the \\emph{Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph} (IRIS) on 30 August 2014. Initially, magnetic flux cancellation constantly took place and a filament was activated. Then the bright material from the filament moved southward and tracked out several fine structures. These fine structures were twisted and tangled with each other, and appeared as a small flux rope at 1330 {\\AA}, with a total twist of about 4$\\pi$. Afterwards, the flux rope underwent a counter-clockwise (viewed top-down) unwinding motion around its axis. Spectral observations of C {\\sc ii} 1335.71 {\\AA} at the southern leg of the flux rope showed that Doppler redshifts of 6$-$24 km s$^{-1}$ appeared at the western side of the axis, which is consistent with the counter-clockwise rotation motion. We suggest that the magnetic flux cancellation initiates reconnection and some activation of the flux rope. The stored twist and magnetic helicity of the flux rope are transpor...

  1. Multiple flux rope events at the magnetopause observations by TC-1 on 18 March 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Xiao

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available From 23:10 to 23:50 UT on 18 March 2004, the Double Star TC-1 spacecraft detected eight flux ropes at the outbound crossing of the southern dawnside magnetopause. A notable guide field existed inside all ropes. In the mean time the Cluster spacecraft were staying in the magnetosheath and found that the events occurred under the condition of southward IMF Bz and dominant negative IMF By. There are six ropes that appeared quasi-periodically, with a repeated period being approximately 1-4 min. The last flux rope lasts for a longer time interval with a larger peak in the BN variations; it can thus be referred to as a typical FTE. The 18 March 2004 event is quite similar to the multiple flux rope event observed by Cluster on 26 January 2001 at the northern duskside high-latitude magnetopause. A detailed comparison of these two events is made in the paper. Preliminary studies imply that both of these multiple flux ropes events seem to be produced by component reconnection at the dayside low-latitude magnetopause.

  2. Behavioral and Physiological Responses of Calves to Marshalling and Roping in a Simulated Rodeo Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Sinclair

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rodeos are public events at which stockpeople face tests of their ability to manage cattle and horses, some of which relate directly to rangeland cattle husbandry. One of these is calf roping, in which a calf released from a chute is pursued by a horse and rider, who lassoes, lifts and drops the calf to the ground and finally ties it around the legs. Measurements were made of behavior and stress responses of ten rodeo-naïve calves marshalled by a horse and rider, and ten rodeo-experienced calves that were roped. Naïve calves marshalled by a horse and rider traversed the arena slowly, whereas rodeo-experienced calves ran rapidly until roped. Each activity was repeated once after two hours. Blood samples taken before and after each activity demonstrated increased cortisol, epinephrine and nor-epinephrine in both groups. However, there was no evidence of a continued increase in stress hormones in either group by the start of the repeated activity, suggesting that the elevated stress hormones were not a response to a prolonged effect of the initial blood sampling. It is concluded that both the marshalling of calves naïve to the roping chute by stockpeople and the roping and dropping of experienced calves are stressful in a simulated rodeo calf roping event.

  3. Option Valuation with Observable Volatility and Jump Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Feunou, Bruno; Jeon, Yoontae

    Under very general conditions, the total quadratic variation of a jump-diffusion process can be decomposed into diffusive volatility and squared jump variation. We use this result to develop a new option valuation model in which the underlying asset price exhibits volatility and jump intensity dy...

  4. Determination of jumps for functions via derivative Gabor series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ying-ying; SHI Xian-liang

    2009-01-01

    Recently, Shi Xianliang and Hu Lan published the method of concentration factors for determination of jumps of functions via MCM conjugate wavelets. Usually, it is difficult to calculate the Hilbert transform of general window functions. The aim of this paper is to discuss determination of jumps for functions based on derivative Gabor series. The results will simplify the calculation of jump values.

  5. Slow Rise and Partial Eruption of a Double-Decker Filament. II. Modeling by a Double Flux Rope Equilibrium

    CERN Document Server

    Kliem, Bernhard; Titov, Viacheslav S; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A; Liu, Rui; Liu, Chang; Wang, Haimin

    2014-01-01

    Force-free equilibria containing two vertically arranged magnetic flux ropes of like chirality and current direction are considered as a model for split filaments/prominences and filament-sigmoid systems. Such equilibria are constructed analytically through an extension of the methods developed in Titov & D\\'emoulin (1999) and numerically through an evolutionary sequence including shear flows, flux emergence, and flux cancellation in the photospheric boundary. It is demonstrated that the analytical equilibria are stable if an external toroidal (shear) field component exceeding a threshold value is included. If this component decreases sufficiently, then both flux ropes turn unstable for conditions typical of solar active regions, with the lower rope typically being unstable first. Either both flux ropes erupt upward, or only the upper rope erupts while the lower rope reconnects with the ambient flux low in the corona and is destroyed. However, for shear field strengths staying somewhat above the threshold...

  6. A Markov chain analysis of the effectiveness of drum-buffer-rope material flow management in job shop environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Rabbani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The theory of constraints is an approach for production planning and control, which emphasizes on the constraints in the system to increase throughput. The theory of constraints is often referred to as Drum-Buffer-Rope developed originally by Goldratt. Drum-Buffer-Rope uses the drum or constraint to create a schedule based on the finite capacity of the first bottleneck. Because of complexity of the job shop environment, Drum-Buffer-Rope material flow management has very little attention to job shop environment. The objective of this paper is to apply the Drum-Buffer-Rope technique in the job shop environment using a Markov chain analysis to compare traditional method with Drum-Buffer-Rope. Four measurement parameters were considered and the result showed the advantage of Drum-Buffer-Rope approach compared with traditional one.

  7. The numerical research of runner cavitation effects on spiral vortex rope in draft tube of Francis turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.; Zhou, L. J.; Wang, Z. W.

    2015-12-01

    The spiral cavitating vortex rope developed in the draft tube of Francis turbine under part load condition maybe causes serious pressure fluctuations and power swings, which threatens the safety and stability of the power plant operations. Many works have been performed to explore the mechanisms of it. In this paper, the runner cavitation and spiral vortex rope under part load conditions were studied to investigate the relations of runner cavitation and the spiral vortex rope. The results proved the existence of obvious interaction between them. The swirl flow at the runner outlet plays an important role in the formation of vortex rope. And the periodic procession of vortex rope in turn intensifies the uneven pressure distribution near the runner outlet and causes the asymmetric cavitation on the runner blades, which then give rise to the modification of swirl flow at the runner blades and thereby affects the characteristics of vortex rope.

  8. Aerodynamics of ski jumping flight and its control: I. Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Daehan; Bang, Kyeongtae; Kim, Heesu; Ahn, Eunhye; Choi, Haecheon

    2015-11-01

    In a ski jumping competition, it is essential to analyze the effect of various posture parameters of a ski jumper to achieve a longer flight distance. For this purpose, we construct a model of a ski jumper by using three-dimensional surface data obtained by scanning a ski jumper's body (Mr. Chil-Ku Kang, member of the Korean national team). An experiment on this model is conducted in a wind tunnel. We consider four posture parameters (forward leaning angle, ski opening angle, ski rolling angle, and ski spacing) and measure the drag and lift forces for various flight postures at various angles of attack (α = 0° - 40°) and Reynolds numbers (Re = 5.4 × 105 - 1.6 × 106) based on the length of the jump ski. Then, we derive optimum values of posture parameters for maximum lift-to-drag ratio using a response surface method. We also conduct a full-scale wind tunnel experiment with members of the Korean national team and confirm the results obtained from the experiment on the model. Supported by the NRF program (2014M3C1B1033848).

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF MUSICAL CADENCE INTO AQUATIC JUMPING JACKS KINEMATICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário J. Costa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the relationships between the head-out aquatic exercise "Jumping jacks" kinematics and the musical cadence in healthy and fit subjects. Five young women, with at least one year of experience conducting head- out aquatic programs were videotaped in the frontal plane, with a pair of cameras providing a double projection (above and below the water surface. Subjects performed an incremental protocol of five bouts (120 b·min-1, 135 b·min-1, 150 b·min-1, 165 b·min-1 and 180 b·min-1 with 16 full cycles of the "Jumping jacks" exercise. Data processing and calculation of upper limbs' (i.e. hands, lower limbs' (i.e. feet and center of mass' 2D linear velocity and displacement were computed with the software Ariel Performance Analysis System and applying the 2D-DLT algorithm. Subjects decreased the cycle period during the incremental protocol. Significant and negative relationships with the musical cadence were verified for the center of mass and upper limbs vertical displacement. On the other hand, for the lower limbs lateral velocity, a significant and positive relationship was observed. It is concluded that expert and fit subjects increase the lower limb's velocity to maintain the range of motion, while the upper limb's displacement is reduced to coupe the music cadence.

  10. Lift-off dynamics in a simple jumping robot

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, Jeffrey; Wiesenfeld, Kurt; Goldman, Daniel I

    2012-01-01

    We study vertical jumping in a simple robot comprising an actuated mass-spring arrangement. The actuator frequency and phase are systematically varied to find optimal performance. Optimal jumps occur above and below (but not at) the robot's resonant frequency $f_0$. Two distinct jumping modes emerge: a simple jump which is optimal above $f_0$ is achievable with a squat maneuver, and a peculiar stutter jump which is optimal below $f_0$ is generated with a counter-movement. A simple dynamical model reveals how optimal lift-off results from non-resonant transient dynamics.

  11. Dynamics of Coalescence-Induced Jumping Water Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N

    2013-01-01

    This fluid dynamics video shows the different interaction mechanisms of coalescence-induced droplet jumping during condensation on a nanostructured superhydrophobic surface. High speed imaging was used to show jumping behavior on superhydrophobic copper oxide and carbon nanotube surfaces. Videos demonstrating multi-jumping droplets, jumping droplet return to the surface, and droplet-droplet electrostatic repulsions were analyzed. Experiments using external electric fields in conjunction with high speed imaging in a custom built experimental chamber were used to show that all coalescence-induced jumping droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces become positively charged upon leaving the surface, which is detailed in the video.

  12. Risk-Sensitive Control of Pure Jump Process on Countable Space with Near Monotone Cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suresh Kumar, K., E-mail: suresh@math.iitb.ac.in; Pal, Chandan, E-mail: cpal@math.iitb.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Department of Mathematics (India)

    2013-12-15

    In this article, we study risk-sensitive control problem with controlled continuous time pure jump process on a countable space as state dynamics. We prove multiplicative dynamic programming principle, elliptic and parabolic Harnack’s inequalities. Using the multiplicative dynamic programing principle and the Harnack’s inequalities, we prove the existence and a characterization of optimal risk-sensitive control under the near monotone condition.

  13. Slipping Magnetic Reconnection of Flux-rope Structures as a Precursor to an Eruptive X-class Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Yang, Kai; Hou, Yijun; Zhang, Jun

    2016-10-01

    We present the quasi-periodic slipping motion of flux-rope structures prior to the onset of an eruptive X-class flare on 2015 March 11, obtained by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The slipping motion occurred at the north part of the flux rope and seemed to successively peel off the flux rope. The speed of the slippage was 30-40 km s-1, with an average period of 130 ± 30 s. The Si iv λ1402.77 line showed a redshift of 10-30 km s-1 and a line width of 50-120 km s-1 at the west legs of slipping structures, indicative of reconnection downflow. The slipping motion lasted about 40 minutes, and the flux rope started to rise up slowly at the late stage of the slippage. Then an X2.1 flare was initiated, and the flux rope was impulsively accelerated. One of the flare ribbons swept across a negative-polarity sunspot, and the penumbral segments of the sunspot decayed rapidly after the flare. We studied the magnetic topology at the flaring region, and the results showed the existence of a twisted flux rope, together with quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) structures binding the flux rope. Our observations imply that quasi-periodic slipping magnetic reconnection occurs along the flux-rope-related QSLs in the preflare stage, which drives the later eruption of the flux rope and the associated flare.

  14. Mussel Spat Ropes Assist Redfin Bully Gobiomorphus huttoni Passage through Experimental Culverts with Velocity Barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam A.H. Wright

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of mussel spat rope for enabling the passage of redfin bully Gobiomorphus huttoni through culverts, which create velocity barriers, was trialled in the laboratory. No fish were able to access the un-roped control pipes whereas 52% successfully negotiated the pipes in the rope treatments. The success of fish ascending treatment pipes suggests mussel spat rope may be effective for enabling the passage of this and other similar fish species through otherwise impassable culverts with velocity barriers.

  15. Effect of early training on the jumping technique of horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, Susana; Bobbert, Maarten F; Back, Willem; Barneveld, Ab; van Weeren, P Rene

    2005-03-01

    To investigate the effects of early training for jumping by comparing the jumping technique of horses that had received early training with that of horses raised conventionally. 40 Dutch Warmblood horses. The horses were analyzed kinematically during free jumping at 6 months of age. Subsequently, they were allocated into a control group that was raised conventionally and an experimental group that received 30 months of early training starting at 6 months of age. At 4 years of age, after a period of rest in pasture and a short period of training with a rider, both groups were analyzed kinematically during free jumping. Subsequently, both groups started a 1-year intensive training for jumping, and at 5 years of age, they were again analyzed kinematically during free jumping. In addition, the horses competed in a puissance competition to test maximal performance. Whereas there were no differences in jumping technique between experimental and control horses at 6 months of age, at 4 years, the experimental horses jumped in a more effective manner than the control horses; they raised their center of gravity less yet cleared more fences successfully than the control horses. However, at 5 years of age, these differences were not detected. Furthermore, the experimental horses did not perform better than the control horses in the puissance competition. Specific training for jumping of horses at an early age is unnecessary because the effects on jumping technique and jumping capacity are not permanent.

  16. Biomechanical Analysis of the Jump Shot in Basketball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Struzik Artur

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Basketball players usually score points during the game using the jump shot. For this reason, the jump shot is considered to be the most important element of technique in basketball and requires a high level of performance. The aim of this study was to compare the biomechanical characteristics of the lower limbs during a jump shot without the ball and a countermovement jump without an arm swing. The differences between variables provide information about the potential that an athlete can utilise during a game when performing a jump shot. The study was conducted among 20 second-league basketball players by means of a Kistler force plate and the BTS SMART system for motion analysis. The variables measured included the take-off time, mean power, peak power, relative mean power, jump height, maximum landing force and calculated impact ratio. Surprisingly, more advantageous variables were found for the jump shot. This finding suggests a very high performance level in the jump shot in the studied group and a maximum utilisation of their motor abilities. Both types of jumps were characterised by high mean and peak power values and average heights. The high forces at landing, which result in considerable impact ratios, may have prompted the studied group to land softly. Use of the countermovement jump without an arm swing is recommended to assess and predict the progression of player’s jumping ability

  17. Scaled Jump in Gravity-Reduced Virtual Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, MyoungGon; Cho, Sunglk; Tran, Tanh Quang; Kim, Seong-Pil; Kwon, Ohung; Han, JungHyun

    2017-04-01

    The reduced gravity experienced in lunar or Martian surfaces can be simulated on the earth using a cable-driven system, where the cable lifts a person to reduce his or her weight. This paper presents a novel cable-driven system designed for the purpose. It is integrated with a head-mounted display and a motion capture system. Focusing on jump motion within the system, this paper proposes to scale the jump and reports the experiments made for quantifying the extent to which a jump can be scaled without the discrepancy between physical and virtual jumps being noticed by the user. With the tolerable range of scaling computed from these experiments, an application named retargeted jump is developed, where a user can jump up onto virtual objects while physically jumping in the real-world flat floor. The core techniques presented in this paper can be extended to develop extreme-sport simulators such as parasailing and skydiving.

  18. Evolution of a typical ion-scale magnetic flux rope caused by thermal pressure enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, W.-L.; Nakamura, T. K. M.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Russell, C. T.; Pollock, C.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Ergun, R. E.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Giles, B. L.

    2017-02-01

    With high time-resolution field and plasma measurements by the Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft, interior fine structures of two ion-scale magnetic flux ropes ( 5 and 11 ion inertial length radius) separated by 14 s are resolved. These two ion-scale flux ropes (FR1 and FR2) show non-frozen-in ion behavior and consist of a strong axial magnetic field at the reversal of the negative-then-positive bipolar field component. The negative bipolar field component of the FR2 is found to be depressed, where magnetic pressure and total pressure decrease, but ion and electron thermal pressures increase, a feature akin to a crater-like flux rope. The pressure enhancement is due to the magnetosheath plasma feeding into the flux rope along the field lines. Magnetic field draping and energetic electrons are also observed in the trailing part of the FR2. The ratio of perpendicular and parallel currents indicates that the FR1 appears force-free but the FR2 seems not. Moreover, the FR2 is time-dependent as a result of a low correlation coefficient (CC = 0.75) for the derivation of the deHoffmann-Teller frame using the direct measured electric fields, while the FR1 is in quasi-steady conditions (CC = 0.94). It is concluded that the crater formation within the FR2 can be interpreted by the analytical flux rope simulation as the evolution of typical flux rope to crater-like one due to the thermal pressure enhancement, which could be induced by the depression of transverse magnetic fields of the flux rope.

  19. Hooked flare ribbons and flux-rope related QSL footprints

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jie; Aulanier, Guillaume; Schmieder, Brigitte; Pariat, Etienne; Li, Hui

    2016-01-01

    We studied the magnetic topology of active region 12158 on 2014 September 10 and compared it with the observations before and early in the flare which begins at 17:21 UT (SOL2014-09-10T17:45:00). Our results show that the sigmoidal structure and flare ribbons of this active region observed by SDO/AIA can be well reproduced from a Grad-Rubin non linear force free field extrapolation method. Various inverse-S and -J shaped magnetic field lines, that surround a coronal flux rope, coincide with the sigmoid as observed in different extreme ultraviolet wavelengths, including its multi-threaded curved ends. Also, the observed distribution of surface currents in the magnetic polarity where it was not prescribed is well reproduced. This validates our numerical implementation and set-up of the Grad-Rubin method. The modeled double inverse-J shaped Quasi-Separatrix Layer (QSL) footprints match the observed flare ribbons during the rising phase of the flare, including their hooked parts. The spiral-like shape of the latt...

  20. Shear behavior of concrete beams externally prestressed with Parafil ropes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Ghallab

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Although extensive work has been carried out investigating the use of external prestressing system for flexural strengthening, a few studies regarding the shear behavior of externally prestressed beams can be found. Five beams, four of them were externally strengthened using Parafil rope, were loaded up to failure to investigate the effect of shear span/depth ratio, external prestressing force and concrete strength on their shear behavior. Test results showed that the shear span to depth ratio has a significant effect on both the shear strength and failure mode of the strengthened beams and the presence of external prestressing force increased the ultimate load of the tested beams by about 75%. Equations proposed by different codes for both the conventional reinforced concrete beams and for ordinary prestressed beams were used to evaluate the obtained experimental results. In general, codes equations showed a high level of conservatism in predicting the shear strength of the beams. Also, using the full strength rather than half of the concrete shear strength in the Egyptian code PC-method improves the accuracy of the calculated ultimate shear strength.

  1. Capture of Trojans by Jumping Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvorny, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Jupiter Trojans are thought to be survivors of a much larger population of planetesimals that existed in the planetary region when planets formed. They can provide important constraints on the mass and properties of the planetesimal disk, and its dispersal during planet migration. Here we tested a possibility that the Trojans were captured during the early dynamical instability among the outer planets (aka the Nice model), when the semimajor axis of Jupiter was changing as a result of scattering encounters with an ice giant. The capture occurs in this model when Jupiter's orbit and its Lagrange points become radially displaced in a scattering event and fall into a region populated by planetesimals (that previously evolved from their natal transplanetary disk to ~5 AU during the instability). Our numerical simulations of the new capture model, hereafter jump capture, satisfactorily reproduce the orbital distribution of the Trojans and their total mass. The jump capture is potentially capable of explaining the ...

  2. Sex Differences in Countermovement Jump Phase Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. McMahon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The countermovement jump (CMJ is commonly used to explore sex differences in neuromuscular function, but previous studies have only reported gross CMJ measures or have partly examined CMJ phase characteristics. The purpose of this study was to explore differences in CMJ phase characteristics between male and female athletes by comparing the force-, power-, velocity-, and displacement-time curves throughout the entire CMJ, in addition to gross measures. Fourteen men and fourteen women performed three CMJs on a force platform from which a range of kinetic and kinematic variables were calculated via forward dynamics. Jump height (JH, reactive strength index modified, relative peak concentric power, and eccentric and concentric displacement, velocity, and relative impulse were all greater for men (g = 0.58–1.79. Relative force-time curves were similar between sexes, but relative power-, velocity-, and displacement-time curves were greater for men at 90%–95% (immediately before and after peak power, 47%–54% (start of eccentric phase and 85%–100% (latter half of concentric phase, and 65%–87% (bottom of countermovement and initial concentric phase of normalized jump time, respectively. The CMJ distinguished between sexes, with men demonstrating greater JH through applying a larger concentric impulse and, thus, achieving greater velocity throughout most of the concentric phase, including take-off.

  3. Quantum jumps of a fluxonium qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vool, U.; Pop, I. M.; Sliwa, K.; Abdo, B.; Brecht, T.; Shankar, S.; Hatridge, M.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Mirrahimi, M.; Glazman, L.; Devoret, M. H.

    2014-03-01

    The fluxonium qubit has recently been shown to have energy relaxation time (T1) of the order of 1 ms, limited by quasiparticle dissipation. With the addition of a Josephson Parametric Converter (JPC) to the experiment, trajectories corresponding to quantum jumps between the ground and 1st excited state can be measured, thus allowing the observation of the qubit decay in real time instead of that of an ensemble average. Our measurement fidelity with the JPC is in excess of 98% for an acquisition time of 5 us and we can thus continuously monitor the quantum jumps of the qubit in equilibrium with its environment in a time much shorter than its average relaxation time. We observe in our sample a jump statistics that varies from being completely Poissonian with a long (500 us) mean time in the ground state to being highly non-Poissonian with short (100 us) mean time in the ground state. The changes between these regimes occur on time scales of seconds, minutes and even hours. We have studied this effect and its relation to quasiparticle dynamics by injecting quasiparticles with a short intense microwave pulse and by seeding quasiparticle-trapping vortices with magnetic field. Work supported by: IARPA, ARO, and NSF.

  4. INFLUENCE OF PROGRAMMED EXERCISE ON THE MOTOR ABILITIES OF PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Stanojević

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The research was conducted on a sample of 36 examinees consisting of male children of preschool institutions in Niš, aged five and six ± 6 months. The main objective of the research was to determine the adaptive processes influenced by programmed exercise on the development of motor skills of preschool children. The aim was to provide the conditions for the establishment of rational procedures for optimal planning, programming and control of the motor exercise of preschool children. The assessment of the examinees was measured by motor tests based on the experience with adult counterparts and modified for young children. The study examined four motor dimensions: agility (running with direction shift, repetitive strength (lateral hops over the rope, flexibility (bend on the bench and explosive strength (standing long jump. The data obtained by these tests, using the method of multivariate and univariate analysis of variance, showed that at the end of the programmed exercise, there has been a statistically significant increase in motor abilities in the final measurement as compared to the initial.

  5. POTENTIAL FOR NON-CONTACT ACL INJURY BETWEEN STEP-CLOSE-JUMP AND HOP-JUMP TASKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-I Wang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare the kinematics and kinetics during the landing of hop-jump and step-close-jump movements in order to provide further inferring that the potential risk of ACL injuries. Eleven elite male volleyball players were recruited to perform hop-jump and step-close-jump tasks. Lower extremity kinematics and ground reaction forces during landing in stop-jump tasks were recorded. Lower extremity kinetics was calculated by using an inverse dynamic process. Step-close-jump tasks demonstrated smaller peak proximal tibia anterior shear forces during the landing phase. In step-close-jump tasks, increasing hip joint angular velocity during initial foot-ground contact decreased peak posterior ground reaction force during the landing phase, which theoretically could reduce the risk of ACL injury

  6. An Efficient Interpolation Technique for Jump Proposals in Reversible-Jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Farr, Will M

    2011-01-01

    Selection among alternative theoretical models given an observed data set is an important challenge in many areas of physics and astronomy. Reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) is an extremely powerful technique for performing Bayesian model selection, but it suffers from a fundamental difficulty: it requires jumps between model parameter spaces, but cannot retain a memory of the favored locations in more than one parameter space at a time. Thus, a naive jump between parameter spaces is unlikely to be accepted in the MCMC algorithm and convergence is correspondingly slow. Here we demonstrate an interpolation technique that uses samples from single-model MCMCs to propose inter-model jumps from an approximation to the single-model posterior of the target parameter space. The interpolation technique, based on a kD-tree data structure, is adaptive and efficient in arbitrary dimensions. We show that our technique leads to dramatically improved convergence over naive jumps in an RJMCMC, and compare it ...

  7. An efficient interpolation technique for jump proposals in reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, W M; Mandel, I; Stevens, D

    2015-06-01

    Selection among alternative theoretical models given an observed dataset is an important challenge in many areas of physics and astronomy. Reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) is an extremely powerful technique for performing Bayesian model selection, but it suffers from a fundamental difficulty and it requires jumps between model parameter spaces, but cannot efficiently explore both parameter spaces at once. Thus, a naive jump between parameter spaces is unlikely to be accepted in the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm and convergence is correspondingly slow. Here, we demonstrate an interpolation technique that uses samples from single-model MCMCs to propose intermodel jumps from an approximation to the single-model posterior of the target parameter space. The interpolation technique, based on a kD-tree data structure, is adaptive and efficient in modest dimensionality. We show that our technique leads to improved convergence over naive jumps in an RJMCMC, and compare it to other proposals in the literature to improve the convergence of RJMCMCs. We also demonstrate the use of the same interpolation technique as a way to construct efficient 'global' proposal distributions for single-model MCMCs without prior knowledge of the structure of the posterior distribution, and discuss improvements that permit the method to be used in higher dimensional spaces efficiently.

  8. Effects of fishing rope strength on the severity of large whale entanglements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Amy R; Robbins, Jooke; Landry, Scott; McKenna, Henry A; Kraus, Scott D; Werner, Timothy B

    2016-04-01

    Entanglement in fixed fishing gear affects whales worldwide. In the United States, deaths of North Atlantic right (Eubalaena glacialis) and humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) have exceeded management limits for decades. We examined live and dead whales entangled in fishing gear along the U.S. East Coast and the Canadian Maritimes from 1994 to 2010. We recorded whale species, age, and injury severity and determined rope polymer type, breaking strength, and diameter of the fishing gear. For the 132 retrieved ropes from 70 cases, tested breaking strength range was 0.80-39.63 kN (kiloNewtons) and the mean was 11.64 kN (SD 8.29), which is 26% lower than strength at manufacture (range 2.89-53.38 kN, mean = 15.70 kN [9.89]). Median rope diameter was 9.5 mm. Right and humpback whales were found in ropes with significantly stronger breaking strengths at time of manufacture than minke whales (Balaenoptera acuturostrata) (19.30, 17.13, and 10.47 mean kN, respectively). Adult right whales were found in stronger ropes (mean 34.09 kN) than juvenile right whales (mean 15.33 kN) and than all humpback whale age classes (mean 17.37 kN). For right whales, severity of injuries increased since the mid 1980s, possibly due to changes in rope manufacturing in the mid 1990s that resulted in production of stronger ropes at the same diameter. Our results suggest that broad adoption of ropes with breaking strengths of ≤ 7.56 kN (≤ 1700 lbsf) could reduce the number of life-threatening entanglements for large whales by at least 72%, and yet could provide sufficient strength to withstand the routine forces involved in many fishing operations. A reduction of this magnitude would achieve nearly all the mitigation legally required for U.S. stocks of North Atlantic right and humpback whales. Ropes with reduced breaking strength should be developed and tested to determine the feasibility of their use in a variety of fisheries.

  9. Temperature evolution of magnetic flux rope in a failed solar eruption

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Hongqiang; Cheng, Xin; Chen, Yao; Liu, Rui; Wang, Yuming; Li, Bo

    2014-01-01

    In this presentation, we report for the first time the detailed temperature evolution process of the magnetic flux rope in a failed solar eruption. Occurred on January 05, 2013, the flux rope was impulsively accelerated to a speed of ~ 400 km/s in the first minute, then decelerated and came to a complete stop in two minutes. The failed eruption resulted in a large-size high-lying (~ 100 Mm above the surface) high-temperature "fire ball" sitting in the corona for more than two hours. The time evolution of the thermal structure of the flux rope was revealed through the differential emission measure analysis technique, which produced temperature maps using observations of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board Solar Dynamic Observatory. The average temperature of the flux rope steadily increased from ~ 5 MK to ~ 10 MK during the first nine minutes of the evolution, which was much longer than the rise time (about three minutes) of the associated soft X-ray flare. We suggest that the flux rope be heated by the ...

  10. Key technique of a detection sensor for coal mine wire ropes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hong-yao; XU Zhao; HUA Gang; TIAN Jie; ZHOU Bing-bing; LU Yan-hong; CHEN Feng-jun

    2009-01-01

    Wire ropes, employed extensively in coal mine hoists and transportation systems are subject to damage due to wear,corrosion and fatigue. The extent of damage and the carrying capacity of ropes are closely related to the sense of safety by staff and equipments. Magnetic flux leakage detection method (MFL), as an effective method, is these days widely used in detection of bro-ken strands of wire ropes. In order to improve the accuracy of detection of flaws in wire ropes by magnetic flux leakage (MFL), the effect of the distance between a sensor and the surface of a wire rope (i.e., lift-off) on detection by magnetic flux leakage was in-vestigated. An analysis of the main principles for the choice of lift-off is described by us and a new method that improves the struc-ture of the detector is proposed from the point of view of the design of a magnetic circuit, to restrain the impact of fluctuations of sensor lift-off. The effect of this kind of method is validated by simulation and computation. The results show that the detection sensitivity is markedly increased by this method. Furthermore, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be increased by over 28%. This method will lend itself to offer reliable scientific information to optimize the structure of excitation devices and improve the accu-racy of MFL detection.

  11. The Mechanics and Trajectory Control in Locust Jumping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Longbao Han; Zhouyi Wang; Aihong Ji; Zhendong Dai

    2013-01-01

    Locusts (Locusta migratoria manilensis) are characterised by their flying ability and abiding jump ability.Research on the jumping mechanics and behavior of locusts plays an important role in elucidating the mechanism of hexapod locomotion.The jump gestures of locusts were observed using high-speed video camera at 250 fps.The reaction forces of the hindlegs were measured using two three-dimensional sensors,in case the two hindlegs attached on separated sensor plates.The jump gestures and reaction forces were used to illustrate the locust jumping mechanism.Results show that the trajectory control is achieved by rapid rolling and yawing movements of the locust body,caused by the forelegs,midlegs and hindlegs in different jumping phases.The final jump trajectory was not determined until hind tarsi left platform.The horizontal co-impulse between two hindlegs might play a key role in jump stability and accuracy.Besides,the angle between two hindlegs affects the control of jump trajectory but has a little effect on the elevation angle of a jump,which is controlled mechanically by the initial position of the hindlegs.This research lays the groundwork for the probable design and development of biomimetic robotics.

  12. A plasma β transition within a propagating flux rope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savani, N. P. [George Mason University, Faifax, VA (United States); Vourlidas, A.; Linton, M. G. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Shiota, D. [Computational Astrophysics Laboratory, Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kusano, K. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Lugaz, N. [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Rouillard, A. P. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Plantologie, Universit de Toulouse (UPS) (France)

    2013-12-20

    We present a 2.5 dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of a magnetic flux rope (FR) propagating in the heliosphere and investigate the cause of the observed sharp plasma β transition. Specifically, we consider a strong internal magnetic field and an explosive fast start, such that the plasma β is significantly lower in the FR than in the sheath region that is formed ahead. This leads to an unusual FR morphology in the first stage of propagation, while the more traditional view (e.g., from space weather simulations like Enlil) of a pancake-shaped FR is observed as it approaches 1 AU. We investigate how an equipartition line, defined by a magnetic Weber number, surrounding a core region of a propagating FR, can demarcate a boundary layer where there is a sharp transition in the plasma β. The substructure affects the distribution of toroidal flux, with the majority of the flux remaining in a small core region that maintains a quasi-cylindrical structure. We quantitatively investigate a locus of points where the kinetic energy density of the relative inflow field is equal to the energy density of the transverse magnetic field (i.e., effective tension force). The simulation provides compelling evidence that at all heliocentric distances the distribution of toroidal magnetic flux away from the FR axis is not linear, with 80% of the toroidal flux occurring within 40% of the distance from the FR axis. Thus, our simulation displays evidence that the competing ideas of a pancaking structure observed remotely can coexist with a quasi-cylindrical magnetic structure seen in situ.

  13. Load carrying capacity of keyed joints reinforced with high strength wire rope loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henrik B.; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2015-01-01

    Vertical shear connections between precast concrete wall elements are usually made as keyed joints reinforced with overlapping U-bars. The overlapping U-bars form a cylindrical core in which the locking bar is placed and the connection is subsequently grouted with mortar. A more construction...... friendly shear connection can be obtained by replacing the U-bars with high strength looped wire ropes. The wire ropes have the advantage of being flexible (they have virtually no bending stiffness) which makes installation of wall elements much easier. The looped wire ropes are usually pre-installed in so......-called wire boxes which are embedded in the precast wall elements. Once the joint is grouted with mortar, the boxes will function as shear keys and the overlapping wire loops will function as transverse reinforcement that replaces the U-bars. This paper presents a rigid-plastic upper bound model to determine...

  14. Load Carrying Capacity of Keyed Joints Reinforced with High Strength Wire Rope Loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    Vertical shear connections between precast concrete wall elements are usually made as keyed joints reinforced with overlapping U-bars. The overlapping U-bars form a cylindrical core in which the locking bar is placed and the connection is subsequently grouted with mortar. A more construction...... friendly shear connection can be obtained by replacing the U-bars with high strength looped wire ropes. The wire ropes have the advantage of being flexible (they have virtually no bending stiffness) which makes installation of wall elements much easier. The looped wire ropes are usually pre-installed in so......-called wire boxes which are embedded in the precast wall elements. Once the joint is grouted with mortar, the boxes will function as shear keys and the overlapping wire loops will function as transverse reinforcement that replaces the U-bars. This paper presents a rigid-plastic upper bound model to determine...

  15. Comparison of CME radial velocities from a flux rope model and an ice cream cone model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T.; Moon, Y.; Na, H.

    2011-12-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) on the Sun are the largest energy release process in the solar system and act as the primary driver of geomagnetic storms and other space weather phenomena on the Earth. So it is very important to infer their directions, velocities and three-dimensional structures. In this study, we choose two different models to infer radial velocities of halo CMEs since 2008 : (1) an ice cream cone model by Xue et al (2005) using SOHO/LASCO data, (2) a flux rope model by Thernisien et al. (2009) using the STEREO/SECCHI data. In addition, we use another flux rope model in which the separation angle of flux rope is zero, which is morphologically similar to the ice cream cone model. The comparison shows that the CME radial velocities from among each model have very good correlations (R>0.9). We will extending this comparison to other partial CMEs observed by STEREO and SOHO.

  16. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF ACROMIOCLAVICULAR JOINT DISLOCATION BY TIGHT ROPE TECHNIQUE (ARTHREX®)

    Science.gov (United States)

    GÓmez Vieira, Luis Alfredo; Visco, Adalberto; Daneu Fernandes, Luis Filipe; GÓmez Cordero, Nicolas Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Presenting the arthroscopic treatment by Tight Rope - Arthrex® system for acute acromioclavicular dislocation and to evaluate results obtained with this procedure. Methods: Between August 2006 and May 2007, 10 shoulders of 10 patients with acute acromioclavicular dislocation were submitted to arthroscopic repair using the Tight Rope - Arthrex® system. Minimum follow-up was 12 months, with a mean of 15 months. Age ranged from 26 to 42, mean 34 years. All patients were male. Radiology evaluation was made by trauma series x-ray. The patients were assisted in the first month weekly and after three months after the procedure. Clinical evaluation was based on the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) criteria. Results: All patients were satisfied after the arthroscopic procedure and the mean UCLA score was 32,5. Conclusion: The arthroscopic treatment by Tight Rope – Arthrex® system for acute acromioclavicular dislocation showed to be an efficient technique. PMID:26998453

  17. Magnetar Giant Flares in Multipolar Magnetic Fields --- I. Fully and Partially Open Eruptions of Flux Ropes

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    We propose a catastrophic eruption model for magnetar's enormous energy release during giant flares, in which a toroidal and helically twisted flux rope is embedded within a force-free magnetosphere. The flux rope stays in stable equilibrium states initially and evolves quasi-statically. Upon the loss of equilibrium point is reached, the flux rope cannot sustain the stable equilibrium states and erupts catastrophically. During the process, the magnetic energy stored in the magnetosphere is rapidly released as the result of destabilization of global magnetic topology. The magnetospheric energy that could be accumulated is of vital importance for the outbursts of magnetars. We carefully establish the fully open fields and partially open fields for various boundary conditions at the magnetar surface and study the relevant energy thresholds. By investigating the magnetic energy accumulated at the critical catastrophic point, we find that it is possible to drive fully open eruptions for dipole dominated background...

  18. Continuous micron-scaled rope engineering using a rotating multi-nozzle electrospinning emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunchen; Gao, Chengcheng; Chang, Ming-Wei; Ahmad, Zeeshan; Li, Jing-Song

    2016-10-01

    Electrospinning (ES) enables simple production of fibers for broad applications (e.g., biomedical engineering, energy storage, and electronics). However, resulting structures are predominantly random; displaying significant disordered fiber entanglement, which inevitably gives rise to structural variations and reproducibility on the micron scale. Surface and structural features on this scale are critical for biomaterials, tissue engineering, and pharmaceutical sciences. In this letter, a modified ES technique using a rotating multi-nozzle emitter is developed and utilized to fabricate continuous micron-scaled polycaprolactone (PCL) ropes, providing control on fiber intercalation (twist) and structural order. Micron-scaled ropes comprising 312 twists per millimeter are generated, and rope diameter and pitch length are regulated using polymer concentration and process parameters. Electric field simulations confirm vector and distribution mechanisms, which influence fiber orientation and deposition during the process. The modified fabrication system provides much needed control on reproducibility and fiber entanglement which is crucial for electrospun biomedical materials.

  19. Mechanical Properties of Coir Rope-Glass Fibers Reinforced Polymer Hybrid Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.Bakri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural fiber composites have been developed and taken more attention in the last decades. Coir fiber is the natural fiber which has been used as reinforcement of composites. This fiber is hybridized with glass fiber for reinforcement composite. In this paper, coir rope and glass fibers were combined as reinforcement into hybrid composites with unsaturated polyester resin as matrix. The composition of fibers and matrix into hybrid composites are used 30:70 (volume fraction with unsaturated polyester. Volume fractions of coir rope mat and glass fiber mat in hybrid composites are 10:20, 15:15 and 20:10 respectively. The mechanical properties of the coir rope-glass fiber composite hybrid were described in this paper. Their properties include tensile strength, tensile modulus, flexural strength, flexural modulus, impact energy and impact strength. Fractography of tensile composite hybrid is also analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscope.

  20. Topology of magnetic flux ropes and formation of fossil flux transfer events and boundary layer plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L. C.; Ma, Z. W.; Fu, Z. F.; Otto, A.

    1993-01-01

    A mechanism for the formation of fossil flux transfer events and the low-level boundary layer within the framework of multiple X-line reconnection is proposed. Attention is given to conditions for which the bulk of magnetic flux in a flux rope of finite extent has a simple magnetic topology, where the four possible connections of magnetic field lines are: IMF to MSP, MSP to IMF, IMF to IMF, and MSP to MSP. For a sufficient relative shift of the X lines, magnetic flux may enter a flux rope from the magnetosphere and exit into the magnetosphere. This process leads to the formation of magnetic flux ropes which contain a considerable amount of magnetosheath plasma on closed magnetospheric field lines. This process is discussed as a possible explanation for the formation of fossil flux transfer events in the magnetosphere and the formation of the low-latitude boundary layer.

  1. Promoting balance and jumping skills in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wai-Yi; Ju, Yun-Huei

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in balance and qualitative and quantitative jumping performances by 20 children with Down syndrome (3 to 6 years) on jumping lessons. 30 typical children ages 3 to 6 years were recruited as a comparison group. Before the jumping lesson, a pretest was given subjects for balance and jumping skill measures based on the Motor Proficiency and Motor Skill Inventory, respectively. Subjects with Down syndrome received 3 sessions on jumping per week for 6 weeks but not the typical children. Then, a posttest was administered to all subjects. Analysis of covariance showed the pre- and posttest differences on scores for floor walk, beam walk, and horizontal and vertical jumping by subjects with Down syndrome were significantly greater than those for the typical children.

  2. Theoretical Modeling of Internal Hydraulic Jump in Density Currents

    CERN Document Server

    Firoozabadi, Bahar; Aryanfar, Asghar; Afshin, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an analytical framework for internal hydraulic jumps. Density jumps or internal hydraulic jumps occur when a supper critical flow of water discharges into a stagnant layer of water with slightly different density. The approach used here is control volume method which is also used to analyze ordinary hydraulic jumps. The important difference here is that entrainment is taken into account. Using conservation equations with the aid of some simplifying assumptions we come to an equation that gives jump downstream height as function of jump upstream characteristics and the entrainment. To determine the magnitude of downstream height we use an experimental equation for calculating the entrainment. Finally we verify our framework by comparing the height that we gain from the derived equation with some experimental data.

  3. A-jump in horizontal inverted semicircular open channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M.H. Rashwan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The hydraulic jump is a transitional state from supercritical to subcritical flow. The phenomenon of the hydraulic jump has been widely studied because of its frequent occurrence in nature and because of its uses in many practical applications. In the present study the momentum principle is used to derive an equation expressed the hydraulic jump (A-jump occurred in a short horizontal reach of an inverted semicircular open channel. The derived equation indicates that the initial water depth and the tail water depth (conjugate depths are functions of the critical water depth. Various elements of the hydraulic jump are expressed in dimensionless case. The procedure of dimensionless ratios described in the present paper can be used to determine various elements of A-jump in an inverted semicircular channel when either the discharge and the relative initial depth (or tail water depth is known or the discharge and the relative dissipated energy are known.

  4. A Jump-Diffusion Model with Stochastic Volatility and Durations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Wei; Pelletier, Denis

    Market microstructure theories suggest that the durations between transactions carry information about volatility. This paper puts forward a model featuring stochastic volatility, stochastic conditional duration, and jumps to analyze high frequency returns and durations. Durations affect price...... jumps in two ways: as exogenous sampling intervals, and through the interaction with volatility. We adopt a bivariate Ornstein-Ulenbeck process to model intraday volatility and conditional duration. We develop a MCMC algorithm for the inference on irregularly spaced multivariate processes with jumps....... The algorithm provides smoothed estimates of the latent variables such as spot volatility, conditional duration, jump times, and jump sizes. We apply this model to IBM data and find that volatility and conditional duration are interdependent. We also find that jumps play an important role in return variation...

  5. Non-Uniqueness of the Geometry of Interplanetary Magnetic Flux Ropes Obtained from Model-Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marubashi, K.; Cho, K.-S.

    2015-12-01

    Since the early recognition of the important role of interplanetary magnetic flux ropes (IPFRs) to carry the southward magnetic fields to the Earth, many attempts have been made to determine the structure of the IPFRs by model-fitting analyses to the interplanetary magnetic field variations. This paper describes the results of fitting analyses for three selected solar wind structures in the latter half of 2014. In the fitting analysis a special attention was paid to identification of all the possible models or geometries that can reproduce the observed magnetic field variation. As a result, three or four geometries have been found for each of the three cases. The non-uniqueness of the fitted results include (1) the different geometries naturally stemming from the difference in the models used for fitting, and (2) an unexpected result that either of magnetic field chirality, left-handed and right-handed, can reproduce the observation in some cases. Thus we conclude that the model-fitting cannot always give us a unique geometry of the observed magnetic flux rope. In addition, we have found that the magnetic field chirality of a flux rope cannot be uniquely inferred from the sense of field vector rotation observed in the plane normal to the Earth-Sun line; the sense of rotation changes depending on the direction of the flux rope axis. These findings exert an important impact on the studies aimed at the geometrical relationships between the flux ropes and the magnetic field structures in the solar corona where the flux ropes were produced, such studies being an important step toward predicting geomagnetic storms based on observations of solar eruption phenomena.

  6. Determining the Intrinsic CME Flux Rope Type Using Remote-sensing Solar Disk Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmerio, E.; Kilpua, E. K. J.; James, A. W.; Green, L. M.; Pomoell, J.; Isavnin, A.; Valori, G.

    2017-02-01

    A key aim in space weather research is to be able to use remote-sensing observations of the solar atmosphere to extend the lead time of predicting the geoeffectiveness of a coronal mass ejection (CME). In order to achieve this, the magnetic structure of the CME as it leaves the Sun must be known. In this article we address this issue by developing a method to determine the intrinsic flux rope type of a CME solely from solar disk observations. We use several well-known proxies for the magnetic helicity sign, the axis orientation, and the axial magnetic field direction to predict the magnetic structure of the interplanetary flux rope. We present two case studies: the 2 June 2011 and the 14 June 2012 CMEs. Both of these events erupted from an active region, and despite having clear in situ counterparts, their eruption characteristics were relatively complex. The first event was associated with an active region filament that erupted in two stages, while for the other event the eruption originated from a relatively high coronal altitude and the source region did not feature a filament. Our magnetic helicity sign proxies include the analysis of magnetic tongues, soft X-ray and/or extreme-ultraviolet sigmoids, coronal arcade skew, filament emission and absorption threads, and filament rotation. Since the inclination of the post-eruption arcades was not clear, we use the tilt of the polarity inversion line to determine the flux rope axis orientation and coronal dimmings to determine the flux rope footpoints, and therefore, the direction of the axial magnetic field. The comparison of the estimated intrinsic flux rope structure to in situ observations at the Lagrangian point L1 indicated a good agreement with the predictions. Our results highlight the flux rope type determination techniques that are particularly useful for active region eruptions, where most geoeffective CMEs originate.

  7. Magnetar giant flares in multipolar magnetic fields. II. Flux rope eruptions with current sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lei [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China); Yu, Cong, E-mail: muduri@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: cyu@ynao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Object, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2014-11-20

    We propose a physical mechanism to explain giant flares and radio afterglows in terms of a magnetospheric model containing both a helically twisted flux rope and a current sheet (CS). With the appearance of a CS, we solve a mixed boundary value problem to get the magnetospheric field based on a domain decomposition method. We investigate properties of the equilibrium curve of the flux rope when the CS is present in background multipolar fields. In response to the variations at the magnetar surface, it quasi-statically evolves in stable equilibrium states. The loss of equilibrium occurs at a critical point and, beyond that point, it erupts catastrophically. New features show up when the CS is considered. In particular, we find two kinds of physical behaviors, i.e., catastrophic state transition and catastrophic escape. Magnetic energy would be released during state transitions. This released magnetic energy is sufficient to drive giant flares, and the flux rope would, therefore, go away from the magnetar quasi-statically, which is inconsistent with the radio afterglow. Fortunately, in the latter case, i.e., the catastrophic escape, the flux rope could escape the magnetar and go to infinity in a dynamical way. This is more consistent with radio afterglow observations of giant flares. We find that the minor radius of the flux rope has important implications for its eruption. Flux ropes with larger minor radii are more prone to erupt. We stress that the CS provides an ideal place for magnetic reconnection, which would further enhance the energy release during eruptions.

  8. Sprint and vertical jump performances are not affected by six weeks of static hamstring stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazett-Jones, David M; Gibson, Mark H; McBride, Jeffrey M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether 6 weeks of static hamstring stretching effects range of motion (ROM), sprint, and vertical jump performances in athletes. Twenty-one healthy division III women's track and field athletes participated in the study. Subjects were tested for bilateral knee ROM; 55-m sprint time; and vertical jump height before, at 3 weeks, and after the 6-week flexibility program. Subjects were randomly assigned to treatment and control groups and warmed up with a 10-minute jog on a track before a hamstring stretching protocol. The stretching protocol consisted of four repetitions held for 45 seconds, 4 days per week. Four variables (left and right leg ROM, 55-m sprint time, vertical jump) were analyzed using a repeated-measures analysis of variance design. No significant differences (P stretching and control groups. Six weeks of a static hamstring stretching protocol did not improve knee ROM or sprint and vertical jump performances in women track and field athletes. The use of static stretching should be restricted to post practice or competition because of the detrimental effects reported throughout the literature. Based on the current investigation, it does not seem that chronic static stretching has a positive or negative impact on athletic performance. Thus, the efficacy of utilizing this practice is questionable and requires further investigation.

  9. Robust Stabilization for Uncertain Linear Delay Markow Jump System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟麦英; 汤兵勇; 黄小原

    2001-01-01

    Markov jump linear systems are defined as a family of linear systems with randomly Markov jumping parameters and are used to model systems subject to failures or changes in structure. The robust stabilization problem of jump linear delay system with umcerratnty was studied. By using of linear matrix inequalities, the existence conditions of robust stabilizing and the state feedback controller designing methods are also presented and proved. Finally, an illustrated example shows the effectiveness of this approach.

  10. Approximation of Jump Diffusions in Finance and Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola Bruti-Liberati; Eckhard Platen

    2006-01-01

    In finance and economics the key dynamics are often specified via stochastic differential equations (SDEs) of jump-diffusion type. The class of jump-diffusion SDEs that admits explicit solutions is rather limited. Consequently, discrete time approximations are required. In this paper we give a survey of strong and weak numerical schemes for SDEs with jumps. Strong schemes provide pathwise approximations and therefore can be employed in scenario analysis, filtering or hedge simulation. Weak sc...

  11. Times and Sizes of Jumps in the Mexican Interest Rate

    OpenAIRE

    José Antonio Núñez Mora; Arturo Lorenzo Valdés

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the role of jumps in a continuous-time short-term interest rate model for Mexico. A filtering algorithm provides estimates of jumps times and sizes in the time series of Mexican cetes for the 1998-2006 period. The empirical results indicate that the inclusion of jumps in the diffusion model represents a better alternative than not to include them.

  12. Multiobjective Optimization Methodology A Jumping Gene Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, KS

    2012-01-01

    Complex design problems are often governed by a number of performance merits. These markers gauge how good the design is going to be, but can conflict with the performance requirements that must be met. The challenge is reconciling these two requirements. This book introduces a newly developed jumping gene algorithm, designed to address the multi-functional objectives problem and supplies a viably adequate solution in speed. The text presents various multi-objective optimization techniques and provides the technical know-how for obtaining trade-off solutions between solution spread and converg

  13. Planar jumping-drop thermal diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreyko, Jonathan B.; Zhao, Yuejun; Chen, Chuan-Hua

    2011-12-01

    Phase-change thermal diodes rectify heat transport much more effectively than solid-state ones, but are limited by either the gravitational orientation or one-dimensional configuration. Here, we report a planar phase-change diode scalable to large areas with an orientation-independent diodicity of over 100, in which water/vapor is enclosed by parallel superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic plates. The thermal rectification is enabled by spontaneously jumping dropwise condensate which only occurs when the superhydrophobic surface is colder than the superhydrophilic surface.

  14. Investigation into the effects of steel wire rope specimen length on breaking force

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    O'Brien, TM

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available rope Table 2 summarizes the results of the tests conducted on ropes with no cut wires. Note that of the ten specimens tested, three results were discarded due to end cap failures. Similarly, certificate number 225888 was conducted in the 15 MN... the general trend in the data. It is interesting to note that the line through the specimens that failed at the end cap suggest a similar decrease in strength of the specimen with length to the acceptable tests. 19 BF = -2.143L + 1951.149 R2 = 0.791 BF...

  15. Effects of Strand Lay Direction and Crossing Angle on Tribological Behavior of Winding Hoist Rope

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang-dong Chang; Yu-xing Peng; Zhen-cai Zhu; Xian-sheng Gong; Zhang-fa Yu; Zhen-tao Mi; Chun-ming Xu

    2017-01-01

    Friction and wear behavior exists between hoisting ropes that are wound around the drums of a multi-layer winding hoist. It decreases the service life of ropes and threatens mine safety. In this research, a series of experiments were conducted using a self-made test rig to study the effects of the strand lay direction and crossing angle on the winding rope’s tribological behavior. Results show that the friction coefficient in the steady-state period shows a decreasing tendency with an increas...

  16. Laboratory Performance Of Evaporative Cooler Using Jute Fiber Ropes As Cooling Media

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, R K; S.P.S. Rajput

    2014-01-01

    Evaporative coolers use a variety of cooling media like wood wool, cellulose, aspen. This paper analyses the performance of jute fiber ropes as alternative cooling media. They are capable of retaining high moisture and have a large wetted surface area. Hot and dry air is allowed to flow over the wet jute rope bank tightly held between two plates which are integral part of two tanks. The inlet conditions of air varied from 30.5 0C dry bulb temperature and 52 % relative humidity to ...

  17. Inhomogeneous superconductivity in quasi-one dimensional organic conductors and ropes of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellafi, B.; Haddad, S.; Sfar, I.; Charfi-Kaddour, S.

    2009-03-01

    It has been reported that, in quasi-one dimensional organic conductors, superconductivity may coexist macroscopically with non-superconducting states giving rise to an inhomogeneous phase. We investigate, based on the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory, the effect of disorder on the stability of the superconducting phase in such a mixed state. We also focus on the interplay between superconductivity and disorder in ropes of carbon nanotubes. We show that the superconducting transition temperature in quasi-one organic conductors is reduced by disorder but does not obey the Abrikosov-Gorkov law. However, and contrary to what is expected, disorder can further superconductivity in ropes of carbon nanotubes.

  18. In-Situ TEM-STM Observations of SWCNT Ropes/Tubular Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, F.; Lebron-Colon, M.; Ferreira, P. J.; Fonseca, L. F.; Meador, M. A.; Marin, C.

    2010-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) prepared by the HiPco process were purified using a modified gas phase purification technique. A TEM-STM holder was used to study the morphological changes of SWCNT ropes as a function of applied voltage. Kink formation, buckling behavior, tubular transformation and eventual breakdown of the system were observed. The tubular formation was attributed to a transformation from SWCNT ropes to multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) structures. It is likely mediated by the patching and tearing mechanism which is promoted primarily by the mobile vacancies generated due to current-induced heating and, to some extent, by electron irradiation.

  19. Quantifying show jumping horse rider expertise using IMUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, M; Doyle, J; Cahill, E; Caulfield, B; McCarthy Persson, U

    2010-01-01

    Horse rider ability has long been measured using horse performance, competition results and visual observation. Scientific methods of measuring rider ability on the flat are emerging such as measuring position angles and harmony of the horse-rider system. To date no research has quantified rider ability in show jumping. Kinematic analysis and motion sensors have been used in sports other than show jumping to measure the quality of motor control patterns in humans. The aim of this study was to quantify rider ability in show jumping using body-mounted IMUs. Preliminary results indicate that there are clear differences in experienced and novice riders during show jumping.

  20. Distance perception in the spiny mouse Acomys cahirinus: vertical jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, M; Skolnick, A J; Hernandez, T P; Tobach, E

    1992-12-01

    Acomys cahirinus, a precocial muroid, that has shown precise jumping in the natural habitat, did not jump from 25 cm in a laboratory situation. To investigate this further, A. cahirinus were observed jumping from platforms at two different heights, onto different sized checkered substrates and from a visual cliff. Adult animals discriminated between platforms that were 6.4 cm and 25.4 cm above the substrate and between small and large checkered patterns on the floor. Most adult animals and neonates jumped down on the shallow side of the visual cliff. Animals developed individual patterns of jumping over a series of trials, with some jumping often, some rarely, and others jumping only from the low platform. Good distance perception was indicated when they did not jump from heights, and by their making appropriate postural adjustment when they did jump from heights and landed without mishap. Different spacing of trials indicated that height was a more effective stimulus for animals which had all four conditions on the same day, while floor pattern was more effective for animals with each of the four conditions on a separate day.

  1. Long memory behavior of returns after intraday financial jumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behfar, Stefan Kambiz

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, characterization of intraday financial jumps and time dynamics of returns after jumps is investigated, and will be analytically and empirically shown that intraday jumps are power-law distributed with the exponent 1 finance, it is important to be able to distinguish between jumps and continuous sample path price movements, and this can be achieved by introducing a statistical test via calculating sums of products of returns over small period of time. In the case of having jump, the null hypothesis for normality test is rejected; this is based on the idea that returns are composed of mixture of normally-distributed and power-law distributed data (∼ 1 /r 1 + μ). Probability of rejection of null hypothesis is a function of μ, which is equal to one for 1 high returns after jumps are the effect; we show that returns caused by jump decay as power-law distribution. To test this idea empirically, we average over the time dynamics of all days; therefore the superposed time dynamics after jump represent a power-law, which indicates that there is a long memory with a power-law distribution of return after jump.

  2. Biomechanics research in ski jumping, 1991-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwameder, Hermann

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, I review biomechanics research in ski jumping with a specific focus on publications presented between 1991 and 2006 on performance enhancement, limiting factors of the take-off, specific training and conditioning, aerodynamics, and safety. The first section presents a brief description of ski jumping phases (in-run, take-off, early flight, stable flight, and landing) regarding the biomechanical and functional fundamentals. The most important and frequently used biomechanical methods in ski jumping (kinematics, ground reaction force analyses, muscle activation patterns, aerodynamics) are summarized in the second section. The third section focuses on ski jumping articles and research findings published after the establishment of the V-technique in 1991, as the introduction of this technique has had a major influence on performance enhancement, ski jumping regulations, and the construction of hill profiles. The final section proposes topics for future research in the biomechanics of ski jumping, including: take-off and early flight and the relative roles of vertical velocity and forward somersaulting angular momentum; optimal jumping patterns utilizing the capabilities of individual athletes; development of kinematic and kinetic feedback systems for hill jumps; comparisons of simulated and hill jumps; effect of equipment modifications on performance and safety enhancement.

  3. Competitive Lotka-Volterra Population Dynamics with Jumps

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, Jianhai; Yin, Geroge; Yuan, Chenggui

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers competitive Lotka-Volterra population dynamics with jumps. The contributions of this paper are as follows. (a) We show stochastic differential equation (SDE) with jumps associated with the model has a unique global positive solution; (b) We discuss the uniform boundedness of $p$th moment with $p>0$ and reveal the sample Lyapunov exponents; (c) Using a variation-of-constants formula for a class of SDEs with jumps, we provide explicit solution for 1-dimensional competitive Lotka-Volterra population dynamics with jumps, and investigate the sample Lyapunov exponent for each component and the extinction of our $n$-dimensional model.

  4. pH jump induced α-helix folding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donten M. L.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available pH can be used to impact the folding equilibrium of peptides and proteins. This fact is utilized, similarly to temperature jumps, in pH jump experiments employing laser time-resolved spectroscopy to study the function and structural dynamics of these molecules. Here the application of pH jumps in folding experiments was investigated. Experiments with poly-L-glutamic acid alpha-helix formation shown the critical aspects of pH jump experiments and yielded direct information about the folding kinetics monitored with the amide I IR band.

  5. Effect of drop jump technique on the reactive strength index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Struzik Artur

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The basic drill of plyometric training aimed at improving lower limb power and jump height is a drop jump. This exercise can be performed using different techniques, which substantially affects jump variables. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the values of the reactive strength index (RSI for countermovement drop jumps (CDJs and bounce drop jumps (BDJs. The study was carried out in a group of 8 male youth basketball players. The tests were conducted using the AMTI BP600900 force plate to measure ground reaction forces and the Noraxon MyoMotion system to record kinematic data. Each player performed two CDJs and two BDJs from the height of 15, 30, 45 and 60 cm. The RSI was calculated as a ratio of jump height and contact time. Moreover, the RSI was determined for the amortization and take-off phases separately. Significant differences (p < 0.05 between RSI values for CDJs and BDJs were recorded for jumps from 30, 45 and 60 cm. Differences in RSI values for jumps from 15 cm were not significant. Furthermore, CDJ height values were significantly higher (p < 0.05 than the values recorded for BDJs. Times of contact, amortization and take-off during BDJs were significantly shorter (p < 0.05 than the respective values obtained for CDJs. Therefore, the use of the RSI to monitor plyometric training should be based on the drop jump technique that is commonly performed by basketball players.

  6. Development of a Minimally Actuated Jumping-Rolling Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanhtam Ho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents development of a hybrid mobile robot in order to take advantage of both rolling and jumping locomotion on the ground. According to the unique design of the mechanism, the robot is able to execute both jumping and rolling skilfully by using only one DC motor. Changing the centre of gravity enables rolling of the robot and storage of energy is utilized for jumping. Mechanism design and control logic are validated by computer simulation. Simulation results show that the robot can jump nearly 1.3 times its diameter and roll at the speed of 3.3 times its diameter per second.

  7. Scented guide ropes as a method to enhance brown treesnake (Boiga irregularis) trap capture success on Guam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, L.C.; Savidge, J.A.; Rodda, G.H.; Yackel Adams, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    Current methods for controlling the invasive Brown Treesnake (Boiga irregularis) on Guam include a modified minnow trap with a live mouse lure. We investigated the effects on capture success of augmenting these traps with scented guide ropes leading to trap entrances. Initial screening of scent preferences was based on time spent in scented and unscented arms of a Y-maze. Preferences of large and small snakes were scored for six different prey scents (live and carrion gecko, skink, and mouse). Large snakes spent more time in the maze arm scented with live gecko and carrion gecko, whereas small snakes spent more time in the arm scented with carrion mouse and carrion gecko. After the laboratory study, a pilot trapping session was conducted in the field using three treatments (live mouse-scented ropes, carrion gecko-scented ropes, and carrion mouse-scented ropes) and two controls (traps with unscented guide ropes and those with no ropes attached). Contrary to laboratory results, live mouse-scented ropes were most effective. We conducted a second trapping session using live mouse-scented ropes as well as the two controls used in the pilot study. For snakes of below-average to average condition, the number of captures for traps with live mouse-scented ropes was higher than for traps with no ropes. However, for snakes of above-average condition, there were no differences in capture rates between trap treatments. Overall, treatment effects were weaker than latent individual heterogeneity and the influence of snake body size, with large snakes trapped more readily. ?? 2011 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

  8. Flux-Rope Twist in Eruptive Flares and CMEs: Due to Zipper and Main-Phase Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, E. R.; Longcope, D. W.

    2017-01-01

    The nature of three-dimensional reconnection when a twisted flux tube erupts during an eruptive flare or coronal mass ejection is considered. The reconnection has two phases: first of all, 3D "zipper reconnection" propagates along the initial coronal arcade, parallel to the polarity inversion line (PIL); then subsequent quasi-2D "main-phase reconnection" in the low corona around a flux rope during its eruption produces coronal loops and chromospheric ribbons that propagate away from the PIL in a direction normal to it. One scenario starts with a sheared arcade: the zipper reconnection creates a twisted flux rope of roughly one turn (2π radians of twist), and then main-phase reconnection builds up the bulk of the erupting flux rope with a relatively uniform twist of a few turns. A second scenario starts with a pre-existing flux rope under the arcade. Here the zipper phase can create a core with many turns that depend on the ratio of the magnetic fluxes in the newly formed flare ribbons and the new flux rope. Main phase reconnection then adds a layer of roughly uniform twist to the twisted central core. Both phases and scenarios are modeled in a simple way that assumes the initial magnetic flux is fragmented along the PIL. The model uses conservation of magnetic helicity and flux, together with equipartition of magnetic helicity, to deduce the twist of the erupting flux rope in terms the geometry of the initial configuration. Interplanetary observations show some flux ropes have a fairly uniform twist, which could be produced when the zipper phase and any pre-existing flux rope possess small or moderate twist (up to one or two turns). Other interplanetary flux ropes have highly twisted cores (up to five turns), which could be produced when there is a pre-existing flux rope and an active zipper phase that creates substantial extra twist.

  9. Exploiting knowledge of jump-up and jump-down frequencies to determine the parameters of a Duffing oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlan, Roszaidi; Brennan, Michael J.; Kovacic, Ivana; Mace, Brian R.; Burrow, Stephen G.

    2016-08-01

    This work concerns the application of certain non-linear phenomena - jump frequencies in a base-excited Duffing oscillator - to the estimation of the parameters of the system. First, approximate analytical expressions are derived for the relationships between the jump-up and jump-down frequencies, the damping ratio and the cubic stiffness coefficient. Then, experimental results, together with the results of numerical simulations, are presented to show how knowledge of these frequencies can be exploited.

  10. Changes in Drop-Jump Landing Biomechanics During Prolonged Intermittent Exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitz, Randy J; Cone, John C.; Tritsch, Amanda J.; Pye, Michele L.; Montgomery, Melissa M.; Henson, Robert A.; Shultz, Sandra J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: As injury rates rise in the later stages of sporting activities, a better understanding of lower extremity biomechanics in the later phases of gamelike situations may improve training and injury prevention programs. Hypothesis: Lower extremity biomechanics of a drop-jump task (extracted from a principal components analysis) would reveal factors associated with risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury during a 90-minute individualized intermittent exercise protocol (IEP) and for 1...

  11. Jump dynamics due to jump datum of compressible viscous Navier-Stokes flows in a bounded plane domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweon, Jae Ryong

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, when the initial density has a jump across an interior curve in a bounded domain, we show unique existence, piecewise regularity and jump discontinuity dynamics for the density and the velocity vector governed by the Navier-Stokes equations of compressible viscous barotropic flows. A critical difficulty is in controlling the gradient of the pressure across the jump curve. This is resolved by constructing a vector function associated with the pressure jump value on the convecting curve and extending it to the whole domain.

  12. Jumping and Landing Techniques in Elite Women’s Volleyball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Mark D.; Hass, Chris J.; Brunt, Denis; Bennett, Gregg R.

    2004-01-01

    Volleyball has become one of the most widely played participant sports in the world. Participation requires expertise in many physical skills and performance is often dependent on an individual’s ability to jump and land. The incidence of injury in volleyball is similar to the rates reported for sports that are considered more physical contact sports. Though the most common source of injury in volleyball is the jump landing sequence, little research exists regarding the prevalence of jumping and landing techniques. The purpose of this study was to quantify the number of jumps performed by female volleyball players in competitive matches and to determine the relative frequency of different jump-landing techniques. Videotape recordings of two matches among four volleyball teams were analyzed for this study. Each activity was categorized by jump type (offensive spike or defensive block) and phase (jump or landing). Phase was subcategorized by foot use patterns (right, left, or both). Each of the players averaged nearly 22 jump-landings per game. Foot use patterns occurred in unequal amounts (p < 0.001) with over 50% of defensive landings occurring on one foot. Coaches, physical educators, and recreation providers may utilize the findings of this inquiry to help prevent injuries in volleyball. Key Points The incidence of injury in volleyball is nearly equivalent to injury rates reported for ice hockey and soccer. Most injuries in volleyball occur during the jump landing sequence, but few data exist regarding jump landing techniques for elite female players. Our data indicate that the vast majority of jumps utilize two feet, but approximately half of landings occur with only one foot. Coaches, physical educators, and recreation providers may utilize the findings of this inquiry to prevent possible injuries in athletes, students, or those who participate in volleyball for recreational purposes. PMID:24497818

  13. Neuromuscular function during drop jumps in young and elderly males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piirainen, Jarmo M; Linnamo, Vesa; Sippola, Niina; Avela, Janne

    2012-12-01

    The Hoffman reflex (H-reflex), indicating alpha-motoneuron pool activity, has been shown to be task - and in resting conditions - age dependent. How aging affects H-reflex activity during explosive movements is not clear at present. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of aging on H-reflexes during drop jumps, and its possible role in drop jump performance. Ten young (26.8 ± 2.7 years) and twenty elderly (64.2 ± 2.7 years) subjects participated in the study. Maximal drop jump performance and soleus H-reflex response (H/M jump) 20 ms after ground contact were measured in a sledge ergometer. Maximal H-reflex, maximal M-wave, Hmax/Mmax-ratio and H-reflex excitability curves were measured during standing rest. Although in young the H-reflex response (Hmax/Mmax) was 6.5% higher during relaxed standing and 19.7% higher during drop jumps (H jump/M jump) than in the elderly group, these differences were not statistically significant. In drop jumps, the elderly subjects had lower jumping height (30.4%, p push-off force (18.0%, p push-off time (31.0% p push-off force (r = 0.833, p push-off time (r = -0.857, p strategies in drop jumps. However, it does not fully explain age related differences in jumping performance, since age related differences in H-reflex activity were non-significant. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Chasing maximal performance: a cautionary tale from the celebrated jumping frogs of Calaveras County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astley, H C; Abbott, E M; Azizi, E; Marsh, R L; Roberts, T J

    2013-11-01

    Maximal performance is an essential metric for understanding many aspects of an organism's biology, but it can be difficult to determine because a measured maximum may reflect only a peak level of effort, not a physiological limit. We used a unique opportunity provided by a frog jumping contest to evaluate the validity of existing laboratory estimates of maximum jumping performance in bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana). We recorded video of 3124 bullfrog jumps over the course of the 4-day contest at the Calaveras County Jumping Frog Jubilee, and determined jump distance from these images and a calibration of the jump arena. Frogs were divided into two groups: 'rental' frogs collected by fair organizers and jumped by the general public, and frogs collected and jumped by experienced, 'professional' teams. A total of 58% of recorded jumps surpassed the maximum jump distance in the literature (1.295 m), and the longest jump was 2.2 m. Compared with rental frogs, professionally jumped frogs jumped farther, and the distribution of jump distances for this group was skewed towards long jumps. Calculated muscular work, historical records and the skewed distribution of jump distances all suggest that the longest jumps represent the true performance limit for this species. Using resampling, we estimated the probability of observing a given jump distance for various sample sizes, showing that large sample sizes are required to detect rare maximal jumps. These results show the importance of sample size, animal motivation and physiological conditions for accurate maximal performance estimates.

  15. An analytical study on the static vertical stiffness of wire rope isolators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaji, P. S.; Rahman, M. E.; Ho, Lau Hieng [Curtin University Sarawak, Miri (Malaysia); Moussa, Leblouba [University of Sharjah, Sharjah (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-01-15

    The vibrations caused by earthquake ground motions or the operations of heavy machineries can affect the functionality of equipment and cause damages to the hosting structures and surrounding equipment. A Wire rope isolator (WRI), which is a type of passive isolator known to be effective in isolating shocks and vibrations, can be used for vibration isolation of lightweight structures and equipment. The primary advantage of the WRI is that it can provide isolation in all three planes and in any orientation. The load-supporting capability of the WRI is identified from the static stiffness in the loading direction. Static stiffness mainly depends on the geometrical and material properties of the WRI. This study develops an analytical model for the static stiffness in the vertical direction by using Castigliano's second theorem. The model is validated by using the experimental results obtained from a series of monotonic loading tests. The flexural rigidity of the wire ropes required in the model is obtained from the transverse bending test. Then, the analytical model is used to conduct a parametric analysis on the effects of wire rope diameter, width, height, and number of turns (loops) on vertical stiffness. The wire rope diameter influences stiffness more than the other geometric parameters. The developed model can be accurately used for the evaluation and design of WRIs.

  16. Different buckling regimes in direct electrospinning: A comparative approach to rope buckling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shariatpanahi, S.P.; Etesami, Z.; Iraji zad, A.; Bonn, D.; Ejtehadi, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of direct electrospinning is the key to control fiber morphologies that are critical for the development of new electrospinning methods and novel materials. Here, we propose the theory for direct electrospinning based on theories for (liquid) "rope coiling" and experimenta

  17. The Evolution of Writhe in Kink-Unstable Flux Ropes and Erupting Filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Torok, Tibor; Berger, Mitchell A; Linton, Mark G; Demoulin, Pascal; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia

    2014-01-01

    The helical kink instability of a twisted magnetic flux tube has been suggested as a trigger mechanism for solar filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In order to investigate if estimations of the pre-eruptive twist can be obtained from observations of writhe in such events, we quantitatively analyze the conversion of twist into writhe in the course of the instability, using numerical simulations. We consider the line tied, cylindrically symmetric Gold-Hoyle flux rope model and measure the writhe using the formulae by Berger and Prior which express the quantity as a single integral in space. We find that the amount of twist converted into writhe does not simply scale with the initial flux rope twist, but depends mainly on the growth rates of the instability eigenmodes of higher longitudinal order than the basic mode. The saturation levels of the writhe, as well as the shapes of the kinked flux ropes, are very similar for considerable ranges of initial flux rope twists, which essentially preclu...

  18. Fine-scale Structures of Flux Ropes Tracked by Erupting Material

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ting

    2013-01-01

    We present the Solar Dynamics Observatory observations of two flux ropes respectively tracked out by material from a surge and a failed filament eruption on 2012 July 29 and August 04. For the first event, the interaction between the erupting surge and a loop-shaped filament in the east seems to "peel off" the filament and add bright mass into the flux rope body. The second event is associated with a C-class flare that occurs several minutes before the filament activation. The two flux ropes are respectively composed of 85$\\pm$12 and 102$\\pm$15 fine-scale structures, with an average width of about 1$\\arcsec$.6. Our observations show that two extreme ends of the flux rope are rooted in the opposite polarity fields and each end is composed of multiple footpoints (FPs) of the fine-scale structures. The FPs of the fine-scale structures are located at network magnetic fields, with magnetic fluxes from 5.6$\\times10^{18}$ Mx to 8.6$\\times10^{19}$ Mx. Moreover, almost half of the FPs show converging motion of smaller...

  19. Two-dimensional numerical simulation of flow around three-stranded rope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinxin; Wan, Rong; Huang, Liuyi; Zhao, Fenfang; Sun, Peng

    2016-08-01

    Three-stranded rope is widely used in fishing gear and mooring system. Results of numerical simulation are presented for flow around a three-stranded rope in uniform flow. The simulation was carried out to study the hydrodynamic characteristics of pressure and velocity fields of steady incompressible laminar and turbulent wakes behind a three-stranded rope. A three-cylinder configuration and single circular cylinder configuration are used to model the three-stranded rope in the two-dimensional simulation. The governing equations, Navier-Stokes equations, are solved by using two-dimensional finite volume method. The turbulence flow is simulated using Standard κ-ɛ model and Shear-Stress Transport κ-ω (SST) model. The drag of the three-cylinder model and single cylinder model is calculated for different Reynolds numbers by using control volume analysis method. The pressure coefficient is also calculated for the turbulent model and laminar model based on the control surface method. From the comparison of the drag coefficient and the pressure of the single cylinder and three-cylinder models, it is found that the drag coefficients of the three-cylinder model are generally 1.3-1.5 times those of the single circular cylinder for different Reynolds numbers. Comparing the numerical results with water tank test data, the results of the three-cylinder model are closer to the experiment results than the single cylinder model results.

  20. Simulating the formation of a sigmoidal flux rope in AR10977 from SOHO/MDI magnetograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibb, G. P. S.; Mackay, D. H.; Meyer, K. A. [University of St Andrews, School of Mathematics and Statistics, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Green, L. M. [University College London, Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-20

    The modeling technique of Mackay et al. is applied to simulate the coronal magnetic field of NOAA active region AR10977 over a seven day period (2007 December 2-10). The simulation is driven with a sequence of line-of-sight component magnetograms from SOHO/MDI and evolves the coronal magnetic field though a continuous series of non-linear force-free states. Upon comparison with Hinode/XRT observations, results show that the simulation reproduces many features of the active region's evolution. In particular, it describes the formation of a flux rope across the polarity inversion line during flux cancellation. The flux rope forms at the same location as an observed X-ray sigmoid. After five days of evolution, the free magnetic energy contained within the flux rope was found to be 3.9 × 10{sup 30} erg. This value is more than sufficient to account for the B1.4 GOES flare observed from the active region on 2007 December 7. At the time of the observed eruption, the flux rope was found to contain 20% of the active region flux. We conclude that the modeling technique proposed in Mackay et al.—which directly uses observed magnetograms to energize the coronal field—is a viable method to simulate the evolution of the coronal magnetic field.

  1. Is flux rope a necessary condition for the progenitor of coronal mass ejections?

    CERN Document Server

    Ouyang, Y; Chen, P F

    2015-01-01

    A magnetic flux rope structure is believed to exist in most coronal mass ejections (CMEs). However, it has been long debated whether the flux rope exists before eruption or is formed during eruption via magnetic reconnection. The controversy has been continuing because of our lack of routine measurements of the magnetic field in the pre-eruption structure, such as solar filaments. However, recently an indirect method was proposed to infer the magnetic field configuration based on the sign of helicity and the bearing direction of the filament barbs. In this paper, we apply this method to two erupting filament events, one on 2014 September 2 and the other on 2011 March 7, and find that the first filament is supported by a magnetic flux rope and the second filament is supported by a sheared arcade, i.e., the first one is an inverse-polarity filament and the second one is a normal-polarity filament. With the identification of the magnetic configurations in these two filaments, we stress that a flux rope is not a ...

  2. Extending "the Rubber Rope": Convergent Series, Divergent Series and the Integrating Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, Mark

    2013-01-01

    A well-known mathematical puzzle regarding a worm crawling along an elastic rope is considered. The resulting generalizations provide examples for use in a teaching context including applications of series summation, the use of the integrating factor for the solution of differential equations, and the evaluation of definite integrals. A number of…

  3. Evaluation of arthroscopic stabilization of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation using the TightRope system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sallakh, Sameh A

    2012-01-16

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of the arthroscopic treatment of acute acromioclavicular dislocation using the TightRope system (Arthrex, Naples, Florida). Between January 2006 and May 2007, ten shoulders in 10 patients with acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation (Rockwood types IV and V) underwent arthroscopic acromioclavicular joint stabilization using the TightRope. Average patient age was 30 years (range, 22-42 years), and mean follow-up was 24 months (range, 18-30 months). Follow-up occurred at 2 and 6 weeks, 3 months, and then every 6 months postoperatively. The shoulders were evaluated radiologically by comparing the acromioclavicular joint with the normal side and clinically by assessing the pain, function, and range of joint motion using the Constant score.Ten patients returned to work without pain 10 to 12 weeks postoperatively. Average Constant score was 96.3 (range, 94-99) at last follow-up. Because of technical error, 1 patient experienced TightRope fixation failure on the coracoid side, and the acromioclavicular joint was redislocated, which was treated by an open technique. The 10 patients were satisfied with their functional results and cosmetic appearance.The arthroscopic treatment of acute acromioclavicular dislocation using the TightRope is a minimally invasive surgical technique that has been proven effective for the treatment of these lesions. It is characterized by less morbidity, less hospitalization, excellent cosmoses, and early rehabilitation. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocations treated by the GraftRope device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Jonas S; Aagaard, Knut E; Lunsjö, Karl

    2015-04-01

    Surgical treatment of chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocations is challenging, and no single procedure can be considered to be the gold standard. In 2010, the GraftRope method (Arthrex Inc., Naples, FL) was introduced in a case series of 10 patients, showing good clinical results and no complications. We wanted to evaluate the GraftRope method in a prospective consecutive series. 8 patients with chronic Rockwood type III-V acromioclavicular joint dislocations were treated surgically using the GraftRope method. The patients were clinically evaluated and a CT scan was performed to assess the integrity of the repair. In 4 of the 8 patients, loss of reduction was seen within the first 6 weeks postoperatively. A coracoid fracture was the reason in 3 cases and graft failure was the reason in 1 case. In 3 of the 4 patients with intact repairs, the results were excellent with no subjective shoulder disability 12 months postoperatively. It was our intention to include 30 patients in this prospective treatment series, but due to the high rate of complications the study was discontinued prematurely. Based on our results and other recent reports, we cannot recommend the GraftRope method as a treatment option for chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocations.

  5. Research of Broken Wire Rope Detection System Based on LabVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-ge Gao

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we introduce how to detect broken wires in steel rope based on wavelet transform and virtual instrument technology. By means of the powerful data analysis function of virtual instrument and wavelet transform, the singularity of wires can be found and it could help to improve ability of locating broken wires and determining breakage grade.

  6. Practical Applications of Cables and Ropes in the ISS Countermeasures System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlik, Randall G.; Moore, Cherice; Williams, Antony

    2017-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) uses exercise countermeasures on the International Space Station (ISS) to maintain crew health and combat the negative effects of long-duration spaceflight on the human body. Most ISS exercise countermeasures system (CMS) equipment rely heavily on the use of textile and wire ropes to transmit resistive loads and provide stability in a microgravity environment. For a variety of reasons, including challenges in simulating microgravity environments for testing and limits on time available for life cycle testing, the textiles and wire ropes have contributed significantly to on-orbit planned and unplanned maintenance time. As a result, continued ground testing and on-orbit experience since the first expedition on the ISS in 2000 provide valuable data and lessons learned in materials selection, applications, and design techniques to increase service life of these ropes. This paper will present a review of the development and failure history of textile and wire ropes for four exercise countermeasure systems-the Treadmill with Vibration Isolation and Stabilization (TVIS) System, Cycle Ergometer with Vibration Isolation and Stabilization (CEVIS) System, Interim Resistive Exercise Device (IRED), and the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED)-to identify lessons learned in order to improve future systems. These lessons learned, paired with thorough testing on the ground, offer a forward path towards reduced maintenance time and up-mass for future space missions.

  7. Modeling financial contagion using mutually exciting jump processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aït-Sahalia, Y.; Cacho-Diaz, J.; Laeven, R.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a model designed to capture the dynamics of asset returns, with periods of crises that are characterized by contagion. In the model, a jump in one region of the world increases the intensity of jumps both in the same region (self-excitation) as well as in other regions (mutual

  8. Modeling financial contagion using mutually exciting jump processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aït-Sahalia, Y.; Cacho-Diaz, J.; Laeven, R.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a model to capture the dynamics of asset returns, with periods of crises that are characterized by contagion. In the model, a jump in one region of the world increases the intensity of jumps both in the same region (self-excitation) as well as in other regions (cross-excitation),

  9. How Can We Tell if Frogs Jump Further?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Gordon B.; Tom, Brian D. M.

    2011-01-01

    How effective is training frogs to jump? This is perhaps the most frequent question in biology that is subjected to statistical analysis: does a treatment make a difference? One can examine whether there is indeed a training effect, by first assuming the opposite. That is, the authors assume that training has no effect on the mean distance jumped.…

  10. Jump Tails, Extreme Dependencies, and the Distribution of Stock Returns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Todorov, Viktor

    We provide a new framework for estimating the systematic and idiosyncratic jump tail risks in financial asset prices. The theory underlying our estimates are based on in-fill asymptotic arguments for directly identifying the systematic and idiosyncratic jumps, together with conventional long...

  11. The Triple Jump: Assessing Problem Solving in Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Ethna C.; Trimble, Peter; Smyth, Joe

    1998-01-01

    Describes an attempt to assess a final-year course in psychiatry using the Triple Jump. In this course, students on placement in psychiatric units perfect psychiatry skills that were acquired during the previous year by direct contact with patients. The Triple Jump is used to assess problem-solving skills in management strategy on cases. (PVD)

  12. Feller Property for a Special Hybrid Jump-Diffusion Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinying Tong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the stochastic stability for a hybrid jump-diffusion model, where the switching here is a phase semi-Markovian process. We first transform the process into a corresponding jump-diffusion with Markovian switching by the supplementary variable technique. Then we prove the Feller and strong Feller properties of the model under some assumptions.

  13. A time inhomogeneous Cox-Ingersoll-Ross diffusion with jumps

    CERN Document Server

    Hoepfner, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    We consider a time inhomogeneous Cox-Ingersoll-Ross diffusion with positive jumps. We exploit a branching property to prove existence of a unique strong solution under a restrictive condition on the jump measure. We give Laplace transforms for the transition probabilities, with an interpretation in terms of limits of mixtures over Gamma laws.

  14. How Can We Tell if Frogs Jump Further?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Gordon B.; Tom, Brian D. M.

    2011-01-01

    How effective is training frogs to jump? This is perhaps the most frequent question in biology that is subjected to statistical analysis: does a treatment make a difference? One can examine whether there is indeed a training effect, by first assuming the opposite. That is, the authors assume that training has no effect on the mean distance jumped.…

  15. Tuning Superhydrophobic Nanostructures to Enhance Jumping-Droplet Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulroe, Megan; Srijanto, Bernadeta; Collier, Patrick; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    It was recently discovered that condensation growing on a nanostructured superhydrophobic surface can spontaneously jump off the surface when two or more droplets coalesce together. The minimum droplet size for jumping to occur is of order 10 microns, but it is unclear whether this is the true lower limit of jumping droplets or simply a limitation of current superhydrophobic surfaces. Here, we analyze the dynamics of jumping droplets on six different superhydrophobic surfaces where the topography of the nanopillars was systematically varied. The critical diameter for jumping to occur was observed to be highly dependent upon the height and diameter of the nanopillars; surfaces with very tall and slender nanopillars enabled jumping droplets at a smaller critical size of order 1 micron. An energetic model of the incipient growth of condensate shows that the nanostructure topology affects the rate of increase of a growing droplet's apparent contact angle, with jumping being enabled at very large angles. These findings indicate that the true upper limit to the performance of jumping-droplet condensers has not yet been reached and can be further improved using advanced nanofabrication techniques.

  16. Empirical likelihood inference for diffusion processes with jumps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the empirical likelihood inference for the jump-diffusion model. We construct the confidence intervals based on the empirical likelihood for the infinitesimal moments in the jump-diffusion models. They are better than the confidence intervals which are based on the asymptotic normality of point estimates.

  17. A Safe and Effective Modification of Thomson's Jumping Ring Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waschke, Felix; Strunz, Andreas; Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2012-01-01

    The electrical circuit of the jumping ring experiment based on discharging a capacitor is optimized. The setup is scoop proof at 46 V and yet the ring jumps more than 9 m high. The setup is suitable for both lectures and student laboratory work in higher education. (Contains 1 table, 8 figures and 3 footnotes.)

  18. Could the deep squat jump predict weightlifting performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizcaya, Francisco J; Viana, Oscar; del Olmo, Miguel Fernandez; Acero, Rafael Martin

    2009-05-01

    This research was carried out with the aim of describing the deep squat jump (DSJ) and comparing it with the squat (SJ) and countermovement (CMJ) jumps, to introduce it as a strength testing tool in the monitoring and control of training in strength and power sports. Forty-eight male subjects (21 weightlifters, 12 triathletes, and 15 physical education students) performed 3 trials of DSJ, SJ, and CMJ with a 1-minute rest among them. For the weightlifters, snatch and clean and jerk results during the Spanish Championship 2004 and the 35th EU Championships 2007 were collected to study the relationship among vertical jumps and weightlifters' performance. A 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significant differences between groups in the vertical jumps, with the highest jumps for the weightlifters and the lowest for the triathletes. An ANOVA for repeated measures (type of jump) showed better results for DSJ and CMJ than SJ in all groups. A linear regression analysis was performed to determine the association between weightlifting and vertical jump performances. Correlations among the weightlifting performance and the vertical jumps were also calculated and determined using Pearson r. Results have shown that both CMJ and DSJ are strongly correlated with weightlifting ability. Therefore, both measures can be useful for coaches as a strength testing tool in the monitoring and control of training in weightlifting.

  19. Evaluation of Metabolic Stress between Jumping at Different Cadences on the Digi-Jump Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Thomas S; Navalta, James W; Callahan, Zachary J

    The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) recommends that healthy adults achieve a minimum of thirty minutes of moderate intensity aerobic exercise five days per week. While cycling, walking, and jogging are commonly observed methods of achieving these recommendations, another option may be repetitive jumping. The purpose of this study was to examine the metabolic responses between repetitive jumping at a cadence of 120 jumps per minute (JPMs) vs. 100 JPMs when utilizing the Digi-Jump machine. Twenty-eight subjects completed two jumping trials, one at 120 JPMs and one at 100 JPMs. Subjects jumped until volitional exhaustion, or for a maximum of fifteen minutes. Oxygen uptake (VO2), heart rate (HR), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were assessed each minute of each exercise trial. RPE was differentiated, in that subjects reported perceived exertion of their total body, their upper-leg, and their lower leg. Results of this study indicated that there was no significant difference between the two trials for VO2, HR, or total body RPE. Differences were reported between trials for peak and average RER, with the 120 JPM trial eliciting a lower RER for both (peak: 1.08 ± .087 vs. 1.17 ± .1 p=.000; average: .99 ± .076 vs. 1.04 ± .098 p=.002), peak upper leg RPE (120: 15.29 ± 3.89 vs. 100: 16.75 ± 2.52 p=.022), and average lower leg RPE (120: 15.04 ± 2.55 vs. 100: 13.94 ± 2.02 p=.019). Also, there was a significant difference in exercise duration between the trials, with subjects able to exercise longer during the 120 JPM trial (12.4 ± 3.42 mins vs. 9.68 ± 4.31 mins p=.000). These data indicate that while the physiological stress may not be different between the two trials as indicated by VO2 and HR, the 120 JPM trial appears less strenuous as evidenced by RER values and by subjects' ability to exercise longer at that cadence.

  20. Four weeks of optimal load ballistic resistance training at the end of season attenuates declining jump performance of women volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Robert U; Rogers, Ryan A; Volek, Jeff S; Häkkinen, Keijo; Kraemer, William J

    2006-11-01

    Anecdotal and research evidence is that vertical jump performance declines over the competitive volleyball season. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a short period of ballistic resistance training would attenuate this loss. Fourteen collegiate women volleyball players were trained for 11 weeks with periodized traditional and ballistic resistance training. There was a 5.4% decrease (p ballistic training period (midseason to end of season), but values were not different from start to end of season. These changes in overall jump performance were reflective of changes in underlying neuromuscular performance variables: in particular, power output and peak velocity during loaded jump squats, countermovement jumps, and drop jumps. During the first 7 weeks of traditional heavy resistance training, it appears that the neuromuscular system is depressed, perhaps by the combination of training, game play, and skills practice precluding adequate recovery. Introduction of a novel training stimulus in the form of ballistic jump squats and reduction of heavy resistance training of the leg extensors stimulated a rebound in performance, in some cases to exceed the athlete's ability at the start of the season. Periodization of in-season training programs similar to that used in this study may provide volleyball players with good vertical jump performance for the crucial end-of-season games.

  1. Combining Diffusive Shock Acceleration with Acceleration by Contracting and Reconnecting Small-scale Flux Ropes at Heliospheric Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, J. A.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O. V.

    2016-08-01

    Computational and observational evidence is accruing that heliospheric shocks, as emitters of vorticity, can produce downstream magnetic flux ropes and filaments. This led Zank et al. to investigate a new paradigm whereby energetic particle acceleration near shocks is a combination of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) with downstream acceleration by many small-scale contracting and reconnecting (merging) flux ropes. Using a model where flux-rope acceleration involves a first-order Fermi mechanism due to the mean compression of numerous contracting flux ropes, Zank et al. provide theoretical support for observations that power-law spectra of energetic particles downstream of heliospheric shocks can be harder than predicted by DSA theory and that energetic particle intensities should peak behind shocks instead of at shocks as predicted by DSA theory. In this paper, a more extended formalism of kinetic transport theory developed by le Roux et al. is used to further explore this paradigm. We describe how second-order Fermi acceleration, related to the variance in the electromagnetic fields produced by downstream small-scale flux-rope dynamics, modifies the standard DSA model. The results show that (i) this approach can qualitatively reproduce observations of particle intensities peaking behind the shock, thus providing further support for the new paradigm, and (ii) stochastic acceleration by compressible flux ropes tends to be more efficient than incompressible flux ropes behind shocks in modifying the DSA spectrum of energetic particles.

  2. The hydraulic jump and ripples in liquid helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolley, E. [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique de l' ENS, associe au CNRS et aux Universites Paris 6 et Paris 7, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France)]. E-mail: rolley@lps.ens.fr; Guthmann, C. [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique de l' ENS, associe au CNRS et aux Universites Paris 6 et Paris 7, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Pettersen, M.S. [Washington and Jefferson College, 60 S. Lincoln St., Washington, PA 15301 (United States)

    2007-05-01

    We have studied the characteristics of the circular hydraulic jump using liquid helium. Surprisingly, the radius of the jump does not change at the superfluid transition. We think that the flow is still dissipative below the lambda point because the velocity exceeds the critical one. The jump radius R{sub j} is compared with various models. In our parameter range, we find that the jump can be treated as a shock, and that capillary effects are important. Below the superfluid transition, we observed a standing capillary wave between the impact of the jet and the jump. Assuming that the superfluid flow can be described with an effective viscosity, we calculate the wave vector and thus obtain the value of the liquid thickness, which is in reasonable agreement with predictions. However, the spatial variation of the wave amplitude depends much more strongly on temperature than we calculate.

  3. THE ROLE OF A FLUX ROPE EJECTION IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION OF A SOLAR FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishida, Keisuke; Shibata, Kazunari [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Nishizuka, Naoto, E-mail: nishida@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the dynamic evolution of a three-dimensional (3D) flux rope eruption and magnetic reconnection process in a solar flare by simply extending the two-dimensional (2D) resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulation model of solar flares with low β plasma to a 3D model. We succeeded in reproducing a current sheet and bi-directional reconnection outflows just below the flux rope during the eruption in our 3D simulations. We calculated four cases of a strongly twisted flux rope and a weakly twisted flux rope in 2D and 3D simulations. The time evolution of a weakly twisted flux rope in the 3D simulation shows behaviors similar to those of the 2D simulation, while a strongly twisted flux rope in the 3D simulation clearly shows a different time evolution from the 2D simulation except for the initial phase evolution. The ejection speeds of both strongly and weakly twisted flux ropes in 3D simulations are larger than in the 2D simulations, and the reconnection rates in 3D cases are also larger than in the 2D cases. This indicates positive feedback between the ejection speed of a flux rope and the reconnection rate even in the 3D simulation, and we conclude that the plasmoid-induced reconnection model can be applied to 3D. We also found that small-scale plasmoids are formed inside a current sheet and make it turbulent. These small-scale plasmoid ejections have a role in locally increasing the reconnection rate intermittently as observed in solar flares, coupled with a global eruption of a flux rope.

  4. Radio Diagnostics of Electron Acceleration Sites During the Eruption of a Flux Rope in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, Eoin P.; Vilmer, Nicole; Gallagher, Peter T.

    2016-12-01

    Electron acceleration in the solar corona is often associated with flares and the eruption of twisted magnetic structures known as flux ropes. However, the locations and mechanisms of such particle acceleration during the flare and eruption are still subject to much investigation. Observing the exact sites of particle acceleration can help confirm how the flare and eruption are initiated and how they evolve. Here we use the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly to analyze a flare and erupting flux rope on 2014 April 18, while observations from the Nançay Radio Astronomy Facility allow us to diagnose the sites of electron acceleration during the eruption. Our analysis shows evidence of a pre-formed flux rope that slowly rises and becomes destabilized at the time of a C-class flare, plasma jet, and the escape of ≳75 keV electrons from the rope center into the corona. As the eruption proceeds, continued acceleration of electrons with energies of ˜5 keV occurs above the flux rope for a period over 5 minutes. At the flare peak, one site of electron acceleration is located close to the flare site, while another is driven by the erupting flux rope into the corona at speeds of up to 400 km s-1. Energetic electrons then fill the erupting volume, eventually allowing the flux rope legs to be clearly imaged from radio sources at 150-445 MHz. Following the analysis of Joshi et al. (2015), we conclude that the sites of energetic electrons are consistent with flux rope eruption via a tether cutting or flux cancellation scenario inside a magnetic fan-spine structure. In total, our radio observations allow us to better understand the evolution of a flux rope eruption and its associated electron acceleration sites, from eruption initiation to propagation into the corona.

  5. Characterization of Monkeypox virus infection in African rope squirrels (Funisciurus sp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falendysz, Elizabeth; Lopera, Juan G.; Doty, Jeffrey B.; Nakazawa, Yoshinori J.; Crill, Colleen; Lorenzsonn, Faye; Kalemba, Lem's N.; Ronderos, Monica; Meija, Andres; Malekani, Jean M.; Karem, Kevin L.; Caroll, Darrin; Osorio, Jorge E.; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2017-01-01

    Monkeypox (MPX) is a zoonotic disease endemic in Central and West Africa and is caused by Monkeypox virus (MPXV), the most virulent Orthopoxvirus affecting humans since the eradication of Variola virus (VARV). Many aspects of the MPXV transmission cycle, including the natural host of the virus, remain unknown. African rope squirrels (Funisciurus spp.) are considered potential reservoirs of MPXV, as serosurveillance data in Central Africa has confirmed the circulation of the virus in these rodent species [1,2]. In order to understand the tissue tropism and clinical signs associated with infection with MPXV in these species, wild-caught rope squirrels were experimentally infected via intranasal and intradermal exposure with a recombinant MPXV strain from Central Africa engineered to express the luciferase gene. After infection, we monitored viral replication and shedding via in vivo bioluminescent imaging, viral culture and real time PCR. MPXV infection in African rope squirrels caused mortality and moderate to severe morbidity, with clinical signs including pox lesions in the skin, eyes, mouth and nose, dyspnea, and profuse nasal discharge. Both intranasal and intradermal exposures induced high levels of viremia, fast systemic spread, and long periods of viral shedding. Shedding and luminescence peaked at day 6 post infection and was still detectable after 15 days. Interestingly, one sentinel animal, housed in the same room but in a separate cage, also developed severe MPX disease and was euthanized. This study indicates that MPXV causes significant pathology in African rope squirrels and infected rope squirrels shed large quantities of virus, supporting their role as a potential source of MPXV transmission to humans and other animals in endemic MPX regions.

  6. Confined partial filament eruption and its reformation within a stable magnetic flux rope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Kayshap, Pradeep; Uddin, Wahab [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak, Nainital 263 002, Uttarakhand (India); Srivastava, Abhishek K.; Dwivedi, B. N. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India); Filippov, Boris [Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chandra, Ramesh [Department of Physics, D.S.B. Campus, Kumaun University, Nainital 263 002, Uttarakhand (India); Choudhary, Debi Prasad, E-mail: navin@aries.res.in, E-mail: njoshi98@gmail.com [California State University Northridge, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We present observations of a confined partial eruption of a filament on 2012 August 4, which restores its initial shape within ≈2 hr after eruption. From the Global Oscillation Network Group Hα observations, we find that the filament plasma turns into dynamic motion at around 11:20 UT from the middle part of the filament toward the northwest direction with an average speed of ≈105 km s{sup –1}. A little brightening underneath the filament possibly shows the signature of low-altitude reconnection below the filament eruptive part. In Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 171 Å images, we observe an activation of right-handed helically twisted magnetic flux rope that contains the filament material and confines it during its dynamical motion. The motion of cool filament plasma stops after traveling a distance of ≈215 Mm toward the northwest from the point of eruption. The plasma moves partly toward the right foot point of the flux rope, while most of the plasma returns after 12:20 UT toward the left foot point with an average speed of ≈60 km s{sup –1} to reform the filament within the same stable magnetic structure. On the basis of the filament internal fine structure and its position relative to the photospheric magnetic fields, we find filament chirality to be sinistral, while the activated enveloping flux rope shows a clear right-handed twist. Thus, this dynamic event is an apparent example of one-to-one correspondence between the filament chirality (sinistral) and the enveloping flux rope helicity (positive). From the coronal magnetic field decay index, n, calculation near the flux rope axis, it is evident that the whole filament axis lies within the domain of stability (i.e., n < 1), which provides the filament stability despite strong disturbances at its eastern foot point.

  7. Effects of isometric scaling on vertical jumping performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten F Bobbert

    Full Text Available Jump height, defined as vertical displacement in the airborne phase, depends on vertical takeoff velocity. For centuries, researchers have speculated on how jump height is affected by body size and many have adhered to what has come to be known as Borelli's law, which states that jump height does not depend on body size per se. The underlying assumption is that the amount of work produced per kg body mass during the push-off is independent of size. However, if a big body is isometrically downscaled to a small body, the latter requires higher joint angular velocities to achieve a given takeoff velocity and work production will be more impaired by the force-velocity relationship of muscle. In the present study, the effects of pure isometric scaling on vertical jumping performance were investigated using a biologically realistic model of the human musculoskeletal system. The input of the model, muscle stimulation over time, was optimized using jump height as criterion. It was found that when the human model was miniaturized to the size of a mouse lemur, with a mass of about one-thousandth that of a human, jump height dropped from 40 cm to only 6 cm, mainly because of the force-velocity relationship. In reality, mouse lemurs achieve jump heights of about 33 cm. By implication, the unfavourable effects of the small body size of mouse lemurs on jumping performance must be counteracted by favourable effects of morphological and physiological adaptations. The same holds true for other small jumping animals. The simulations for the first time expose and explain the sheer magnitude of the isolated effects of isometric downscaling on jumping performance, to be counteracted by morphological and physiological adaptations.

  8. Effects of isometric scaling on vertical jumping performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Maarten F

    2013-01-01

    Jump height, defined as vertical displacement in the airborne phase, depends on vertical takeoff velocity. For centuries, researchers have speculated on how jump height is affected by body size and many have adhered to what has come to be known as Borelli's law, which states that jump height does not depend on body size per se. The underlying assumption is that the amount of work produced per kg body mass during the push-off is independent of size. However, if a big body is isometrically downscaled to a small body, the latter requires higher joint angular velocities to achieve a given takeoff velocity and work production will be more impaired by the force-velocity relationship of muscle. In the present study, the effects of pure isometric scaling on vertical jumping performance were investigated using a biologically realistic model of the human musculoskeletal system. The input of the model, muscle stimulation over time, was optimized using jump height as criterion. It was found that when the human model was miniaturized to the size of a mouse lemur, with a mass of about one-thousandth that of a human, jump height dropped from 40 cm to only 6 cm, mainly because of the force-velocity relationship. In reality, mouse lemurs achieve jump heights of about 33 cm. By implication, the unfavourable effects of the small body size of mouse lemurs on jumping performance must be counteracted by favourable effects of morphological and physiological adaptations. The same holds true for other small jumping animals. The simulations for the first time expose and explain the sheer magnitude of the isolated effects of isometric downscaling on jumping performance, to be counteracted by morphological and physiological adaptations.

  9. Dynamics and stability of directional jumps in the desert locust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvirsman, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Locusts are known for their ability to jump large distances to avoid predation. The jump also serves to launch the adult locust into the air in order to initiate flight. Various aspects of this important behavior have been studied extensively, from muscle physiology and biomechanics, to the energy storage systems involved in powering the jump, and more. Less well understood are the mechanisms participating in control of the jump trajectory. Here we utilise video monitoring and careful analysis of experimental directional jumps by adult desert locusts, together with dynamic computer simulation, in order to understand how the locusts control the direction and elevation of the jump, the residual angular velocities resulting from the jump and the timing of flapping-flight initiation. Our study confirms and expands early findings regarding the instrumental role of the initial body position and orientation. Both real-jump video analysis and simulations based on our expanded dynamical model demonstrate that the initial body coordinates of position (relative to the hind-legs ground-contact points) are dominant in predicting the jumps’ azimuth and elevation angles. We also report a strong linear correlation between the jumps’ pitch-angular-velocity and flight initiation timing, such that head downwards rotations lead to earlier wing opening. In addition to offering important insights into the bio-mechanical principles of locust jumping and flight initiation, the findings from this study will be used in designing future prototypes of a bio-inspired miniature jumping robot that will be employed in animal behaviour studies and environmental monitoring applications. PMID:27703846

  10. Dynamics and stability of directional jumps in the desert locust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Gvirsman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Locusts are known for their ability to jump large distances to avoid predation. The jump also serves to launch the adult locust into the air in order to initiate flight. Various aspects of this important behavior have been studied extensively, from muscle physiology and biomechanics, to the energy storage systems involved in powering the jump, and more. Less well understood are the mechanisms participating in control of the jump trajectory. Here we utilise video monitoring and careful analysis of experimental directional jumps by adult desert locusts, together with dynamic computer simulation, in order to understand how the locusts control the direction and elevation of the jump, the residual angular velocities resulting from the jump and the timing of flapping-flight initiation. Our study confirms and expands early findings regarding the instrumental role of the initial body position and orientation. Both real-jump video analysis and simulations based on our expanded dynamical model demonstrate that the initial body coordinates of position (relative to the hind-legs ground-contact points are dominant in predicting the jumps’ azimuth and elevation angles. We also report a strong linear correlation between the jumps’ pitch-angular-velocity and flight initiation timing, such that head downwards rotations lead to earlier wing opening. In addition to offering important insights into the bio-mechanical principles of locust jumping and flight initiation, the findings from this study will be used in designing future prototypes of a bio-inspired miniature jumping robot that will be employed in animal behaviour studies and environmental monitoring applications.

  11. Different training schedules influence platelet aggregation in show jumping horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannetto, C; Arfuso, F; Fazio, F; Giudice, E; Pietro, S Di; Bruschetta, D; Piccione, G

    2017-03-28

    Depending on the intensity, duration and type of physical exercise, equine metabolism has to adapt to nervous, cardiovascular, endocrine and respiratory system requirements. In horses, exercise and training are known to have considerable effects on the mechanisms of hemostatic system involving platelet activity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different training schedules on platelet aggregation in 15 Italian Saddle jumping horses. Animals were divided into three equal groups: Group A was subjected to a high intensity-training program; group B to a light training program, group C included sedentary horses. From each animal, blood samples were collected by jugular venipuncture at rest on the 1st, 3rd and 5th days, and afterwards, once a week, for a total of 5 weeks data recording, in order to assess the maximum degree of platelet aggregation and the initial velocity of aggregation (slope) platelet aggregation. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed a significant effect of the different training schedules on studied parameters. The results revealed a different degree of platelet aggregation and a different initial velocity of platelet aggregation that changes during the different training schedules in horses that could represent a different protective endothelial mechanism. These findings could have an important role for a clearer knowledge of the physiological reference values of platelet aggregation and for a better interpretation of these variations during the training.

  12. Jumping Jupiter can explain Mercury's orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Roig, Fernando; DeSouza, Sandro Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The orbit of Mercury has large values of eccentricity and inclination that cannot be easily explained if this planet formed on a circular and coplanar orbit. Here, we study the evolution of Mercury's orbit during the instability related to the migration of the giant planets in the framework of the jumping Jupiter model. We found that some instability models are able to produce the correct values of Mercury's eccentricity and inclination, provided that relativistic effects are included in the precession of Mercury's perihelion. The orbital excitation is driven by the fast change of the normal oscillation modes of the system corresponding to the perihelion precession of Jupiter (for the eccentricity), and the nodal regression of Uranus (for the inclination).

  13. The Voter Model and Jump Diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Majmudar, Jimit; Baumgaertner, Bert O; Tyson, Rebecca C

    2015-01-01

    Opinions, and subsequently opinion dynamics, depend not just on interactions among individuals, but also on external influences such as the mass media. The dependence on local interactions, however, has received considerably more attention. In this paper, we use the classical voter model as a basis, and extend it to include external influences. We show that this new model can be understood using the theory of jump diffusion processes. We derive results pertaining to fixation probability and expected consensus time of the process, and find that the contribution of an external influence significantly dwarfs the contribution of the node-to-node interactions in terms of driving the social network to eventual consensus. This result suggests the potential importance of ``macro-level'' phenomena such as the media influence as compared to the ``micro-level'' local interactions, in modelling opinion dynamics.

  14. CAPTURE OF TROJANS BY JUMPING JUPITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesvorny, David [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut St., Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Vokrouhlicky, David [Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Morbidelli, Alessandro [Departement Cassiopee, University of Nice, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, Nice, F-06304 (France)

    2013-05-01

    Jupiter Trojans are thought to be survivors of a much larger population of planetesimals that existed in the planetary region when planets formed. They can provide important constraints on the mass and properties of the planetesimal disk, and its dispersal during planet migration. Here, we tested a possibility that the Trojans were captured during the early dynamical instability among the outer planets (aka the Nice model), when the semimajor axis of Jupiter was changing as a result of scattering encounters with an ice giant. The capture occurs in this model when Jupiter's orbit and its Lagrange points become radially displaced in a scattering event and fall into a region populated by planetesimals (that previously evolved from their natal transplanetary disk to {approx}5 AU during the instability). Our numerical simulations of the new capture model, hereafter jump capture, satisfactorily reproduce the orbital distribution of the Trojans and their total mass. The jump capture is potentially capable of explaining the observed asymmetry in the number of leading and trailing Trojans. We find that the capture probability is (6-8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} for each particle in the original transplanetary disk, implying that the disk contained (3-4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} planetesimals with absolute magnitude H < 9 (corresponding to diameter D = 80 km for a 7% albedo). The disk mass inferred from this work, M{sub disk} {approx} 14-28 M{sub Earth}, is consistent with the mass deduced from recent dynamical simulations of the planetary instability.

  15. Hydraulic jumps within pyroclastic density currents and their sedimentary record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douillet, G.; Mueller, S.; Kueppers, U.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    This contribution presents a complete and comprehensive formulation of the hydraulic jump phenomenon and reviews sedimentary structures that may be associated with them. Beginning from the general fluid phenomenon, we then focus on examples from pyroclastic density currents in order to infer dynamic parameters on the parent flows. A hydraulic jump is a fluid dynamics phenomenon that corresponds to the sudden increase of the thickness of a flow accompanied by a decrease of its velocity and/or density. A hydraulic jump is the expression of the transition of the flow from two different flow regimes: supercritical to subcritical. This entrains a change in the energy balance between kinetic energy and gravity potential energy. Recently, the terms of 'pneumatic jumps' have been used for similar phenomenon driven within a gas phase, and granular jumps for dense granular flows. It is thought that such strong changes in the flow conditions may leave characteristic structures in the sedimentary record. Indeed, the main variables influencing the sedimentation rate are the flow velocity, particle concentration and turbulence level, all of them strongly affected by a hydraulic jump. Structures deposited by hydraulic/pneumatic jumps have been called cyclic steps and chute and pool structures. Chute and pools represent the record of a single supercritical to subcritical transition, whereas cyclic steps are produced by stable trains of hydraulic jumps and subsequent re-accelerations. Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are gas and pyroclasts flows. As such, they can be subjected to granular and pneumatic jumps and their deposit have often been interpreted as containing records of jumps. Steep sided truncations covered by lensoidal layers have been interpreted as the record of internal jumps within density stratified flows. Fines-depleted breccias at breaks in slope are thought to result from the enhanced turbulence at a jump of the entire flow. Sudden increases in thickness of

  16. Numerical investigation of a turbulent hydraulic jump: Interface statistics and air entrainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Milad; Kim, Dokyun; Mani, Ali; Moin, Parviz

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study is to develop an understanding of formation of bubbles due to turbulence/interface interactions and nonlinear surface wave phenomena. As a model problem a statistically stationary turbulent hydraulic jump has been considered. Turbulent hydraulic jump with an inflow Froude number of 2 and Reynolds number of 88000-based on inflow height-has been numerically simulated. Based on typical air- water systems, a density ratio of 831 has been selected for our calculations. A refined level-set method is employed to track the detailed dynamics of the interface evolution. Comparison of flow statistics with experimental results of Murzyn et al. (Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 2005) will be presented. The probability density function of principal curvatures of the air- water interface and curvature distribution patterns in the chaotic regions are investigated. The importance of liquid impact events in bubble generation will be discussed. Supported by the Office of Naval Research, with Dr. Pat Purtell, program manager.

  17. Effectiveness of an Individualized Training Based on Force-Velocity Profiling during Jumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Reyes, Pedro; Samozino, Pierre; Brughelli, Matt; Morin, Jean-Benoît

    2017-01-01

    Ballistic performances are determined by both the maximal lower limb power output (Pmax) and their individual force-velocity (F-v) mechanical profile, especially the F-v imbalance (FVimb): difference between the athlete's actual and optimal profile. An optimized training should aim to increase Pmax and/or reduce FVimb. The aim of this study was to test whether an individualized training program based on the individual F-v profile would decrease subjects' individual FVimb and in turn improve vertical jump performance. FVimb was used as the reference to assign participants to different training intervention groups. Eighty four subjects were assigned to three groups: an “optimized” group divided into velocity-deficit, force-deficit, and well-balanced sub-groups based on subjects' FVimb, a “non-optimized” group for which the training program was not specifically based on FVimb and a control group. All subjects underwent a 9-week specific resistance training program. The programs were designed to reduce FVimb for the optimized groups (with specific programs for sub-groups based on individual FVimb values), while the non-optimized group followed a classical program exactly similar for all subjects. All subjects in the three optimized training sub-groups (velocity-deficit, force-deficit, and well-balanced) increased their jumping performance (12.7 ± 5.7% ES = 0.93 ± 0.09, 14.2 ± 7.3% ES = 1.00 ± 0.17, and 7.2 ± 4.5% ES = 0.70 ± 0.36, respectively) with jump height improvement for all subjects, whereas the results were much more variable and unclear in the non-optimized group. This greater change in jump height was associated with a markedly reduced FVimb for both force-deficit (57.9 ± 34.7% decrease in FVimb) and velocity-deficit (20.1 ± 4.3%) subjects, and unclear or small changes in Pmax (−0.40 ± 8.4% and +10.5 ± 5.2%, respectively). An individualized training program specifically based on FVimb (gap between the actual and optimal F-v profiles of

  18. Effects of Foam Rolling on Vertical Jump Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Jones

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Foam rolling is a popular activity utilized by strength and conditioning coaches as it is believed to increase muscle length and break up fibrous adhesions located in connective tissue. However, there is little research investigating the effects of foam rolling on athletic performance. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of lower body foam rolling on vertical jump performance. Methods: Twenty males (age 24.05 ± 2.02 years; height 177.43 ± 6.31 cm; mass 81.41 ± 8.76 kg volunteered to participate. Subjects completed three days of testing, separated by at least twenty-four hours. Day one consisted of baseline vertical jumps on a force plate, followed by familiarization with foam rolling and control protocols. Subjects returned on days two and three and performed 30-second bouts of lower body foam rolling or mimicked foam rolling movements on a skateboard followed by vertical jumps on a force plate. The highest jump from each day was used for statistical analyses. Results: Repeated measures ANOVAs revealed no significant differences in Jump height, impulse, relative ground reaction force, or take-off velocity between conditions. Conclusion: 30-second bouts of lower body foam rolling do not improve vertical jump performance. Keywords: Dynamic Warm-Up, Foam Rolling, Vertical Jump

  19. Condensed droplet jumping: Capillary to inertial energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enright, Ryan; Miljkovic, Nenad; Morris, Michael; Wang, Evelyn

    2013-03-01

    When condensed droplets coalesce on a superhydrophobic nanostructured surface, the resulting droplet can jump from the surface due to the release of excess surface energy. This behavior has been shown to follow a simple inertial-capillary scaling. However, questions remain regarding the nature of the energy conversion process linking the excess surface energy of the system before coalescence and the kinetic energy of the jumping droplet. Furthermore, the primary energy dissipation mechanisms limiting this jumping behavior remain relatively unexplored. In this work, we present new experimental data from a two-camera setup capturing the trajectory of jumping droplets on nanostructured surfaces with a characteristic surface roughness length scale on the order of 10 nm. Coupled with a model developed to capture the main details of the bridging flow during coalescence, our findings suggest that: 1. the excess surface energy available for jumping is a fraction of that suggested by simple scaling due to incomplete energy transfer, 2. internal viscous dissipation is not a limiting factor on the jumping process at droplet sizes on the order of 10 μm and 3. jumping performance is strongly affected by forces associated with the external flow and fields around the droplet. This work suggests bounds on the heat transfer performance of superhydrophobic condensation surfaces.

  20. Aerial jumping in the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Daphne; Bierman, Hilary S

    2013-01-01

    Many fishes are able to jump out of the water and launch themselves into the air. Such behavior has been connected with prey capture, migration and predator avoidance. We found that jumping behavior of the guppy Poecilia reticulata is not associated with any of the above. The fish jump spontaneously, without being triggered by overt sensory cues, is not migratory and does not attempt to capture aerial food items. Here, we use high speed video imaging to analyze the kinematics of the jumping behavior P. reticulata. Fish jump from a still position by slowly backing up while using its pectoral fins, followed by strong body trusts which lead to launching into the air several body lengths. The liftoff phase of the jump is fast and fish will continue with whole body thrusts and tail beats, even when out of the water. This behavior occurs when fish are in a group or in isolation. Geography has had substantial effects on guppy evolution, with waterfalls reducing gene flow and constraining dispersal. We suggest that jumping has evolved in guppies as a behavioral phenotype for dispersal.

  1. Aerial jumping in the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphne Soares

    Full Text Available Many fishes are able to jump out of the water and launch themselves into the air. Such behavior has been connected with prey capture, migration and predator avoidance. We found that jumping behavior of the guppy Poecilia reticulata is not associated with any of the above. The fish jump spontaneously, without being triggered by overt sensory cues, is not migratory and does not attempt to capture aerial food items. Here, we use high speed video imaging to analyze the kinematics of the jumping behavior P. reticulata. Fish jump from a still position by slowly backing up while using its pectoral fins, followed by strong body trusts which lead to launching into the air several body lengths. The liftoff phase of the jump is fast and fish will continue with whole body thrusts and tail beats, even when out of the water. This behavior occurs when fish are in a group or in isolation. Geography has had substantial effects on guppy evolution, with waterfalls reducing gene flow and constraining dispersal. We suggest that jumping has evolved in guppies as a behavioral phenotype for dispersal.

  2. ±800 kV云广特高压直流金属回线断路器跳跃现象原因分析与控制策略优化%Analysis and Optimization of the Control Program for MRTB Jump of ±800 kV Yunnan-Guangdong UHVDC System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李德荣; 黄剑湘

    2015-01-01

    ±800 kV 云广特高压直流工程具有大地回线运行方式和金属回线运行方式两种正常运行方式。金属回线断路器(metallic return transfer breaker,MRTB)的稳定运行决定以上两种运行方式能否转换成功,直接影响直流输电工程的安全稳定运行。以±800 kV云广特高压直流工程实际运行过程中发生的MRTB跳跃现象为切入点,深入分析该断路器发生跳跃现象的主要原因,并有针对性地提出了解决跳跃现象的方案。所提方案已通过试验室和工程现场试验验证,均得到良好的效果,并且对以后多回直流建设具有推广应用参考和工程经验借鉴的价值。%Yun-Guang ± 800 kV UHVDC project has two ways to run in a normal operation mode, including ground return operation mode and metallic return operation mode. Metallic return transfer breaker’s (MRTB) steady operation determines whether the two ways can have a successful conversion, which directly affect the safe and steady operation of the DC transmission project. The phenomenon of“MRTB jump”happened in the Yun-Guang ± 800 kV UHVDC project which in actual operation is taken as the main point, in-depth analysis of the main reason for the phenomenon of MRTB jump is made, and the program to solve the problem is pertinently proposed. The program has been verified by the test in laboratory and at the project site, and the solution has reference value for promotion and application and could be the example of engineering for the future construction of multi-circuit HVDC.

  3. Optimizing the Distribution of Leg Muscles for Vertical Jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jeremy D; Bobbert, Maarten F; van Soest, Arthur J; Gribble, Paul L; Kistemaker, Dinant A

    2016-01-01

    A goal of biomechanics and motor control is to understand the design of the human musculoskeletal system. Here we investigated human functional morphology by making predictions about the muscle volume distribution that is optimal for a specific motor task. We examined a well-studied and relatively simple human movement, vertical jumping. We investigated how high a human could jump if muscle volume were optimized for jumping, and determined how the optimal parameters improve performance. We used a four-link inverted pendulum model of human vertical jumping actuated by Hill-type muscles, that well-approximates skilled human performance. We optimized muscle volume by allowing the cross-sectional area and muscle fiber optimum length to be changed for each muscle, while maintaining constant total muscle volume. We observed, perhaps surprisingly, that the reference model, based on human anthropometric data, is relatively good for vertical jumping; it achieves 90% of the jump height predicted by a model with muscles designed specifically for jumping. Alteration of cross-sectional areas-which determine the maximum force deliverable by the muscles-constitutes the majority of improvement to jump height. The optimal distribution results in large vastus, gastrocnemius and hamstrings muscles that deliver more work, while producing a kinematic pattern essentially identical to the reference model. Work output is increased by removing muscle from rectus femoris, which cannot do work on the skeleton given its moment arm at the hip and the joint excursions during push-off. The gluteus composes a disproportionate amount of muscle volume and jump height is improved by moving it to other muscles. This approach represents a way to test hypotheses about optimal human functional morphology. Future studies may extend this approach to address other morphological questions in ethological tasks such as locomotion, and feature other sets of parameters such as properties of the skeletal

  4. Optimizing the Distribution of Leg Muscles for Vertical Jumping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D Wong

    Full Text Available A goal of biomechanics and motor control is to understand the design of the human musculoskeletal system. Here we investigated human functional morphology by making predictions about the muscle volume distribution that is optimal for a specific motor task. We examined a well-studied and relatively simple human movement, vertical jumping. We investigated how high a human could jump if muscle volume were optimized for jumping, and determined how the optimal parameters improve performance. We used a four-link inverted pendulum model of human vertical jumping actuated by Hill-type muscles, that well-approximates skilled human performance. We optimized muscle volume by allowing the cross-sectional area and muscle fiber optimum length to be changed for each muscle, while maintaining constant total muscle volume. We observed, perhaps surprisingly, that the reference model, based on human anthropometric data, is relatively good for vertical jumping; it achieves 90% of the jump height predicted by a model with muscles designed specifically for jumping. Alteration of cross-sectional areas-which determine the maximum force deliverable by the muscles-constitutes the majority of improvement to jump height. The optimal distribution results in large vastus, gastrocnemius and hamstrings muscles that deliver more work, while producing a kinematic pattern essentially identical to the reference model. Work output is increased by removing muscle from rectus femoris, which cannot do work on the skeleton given its moment arm at the hip and the joint excursions during push-off. The gluteus composes a disproportionate amount of muscle volume and jump height is improved by moving it to other muscles. This approach represents a way to test hypotheses about optimal human functional morphology. Future studies may extend this approach to address other morphological questions in ethological tasks such as locomotion, and feature other sets of parameters such as properties of

  5. A Self-Consistent Numerical Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Model of Helmet Streamer and Flux-Rope Interactions: Initiation and Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.; Guo, W. P.

    1997-01-01

    We present results for an investigation of the interaction of a helmet streamer arcade and a helical flux-rope emerging from the sub-photosphere. These results are obtained by using a three-dimensional axisymmetric, time-dependent ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. Because of the physical nature of the flux-rope, we investigate two types of flux-ropes; (1) high density flux-rope (i.e. flux-rope without cavity), and (2) low density flux rope (i.e. flux-rope with cavity). When the streamer is disrupted by the flux-rope, it will evolve into a configuration resembling the typical observed loop-like Coronal Mass Ejection (CMES) for both cases. The streamer-flux rope system with cavity is easier to be disrupted and the propagation speed of the CME is faster than the streamer-flux rope system without cavity. Our results demonstrate that magnetic buoyancy force plays an important role in disrupting the streamer.

  6. Optimisation of testing cycles in heavy-duty mine haulage ropes, especially three-layered flattened wire ropes; Optimierung von Pruefzyklen bei hochbelasteten Bergbau-Foerderseilen, insbesondere bei dreilagigen Flachlitzenseilen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronau, O. [Deutsche Montan Technologie GmbH, Bochum (Germany). Car Synergies Division

    2003-07-01

    In three-layered flattened wire ropes, which are common in mine haulage systems in coal mines, only part of the wires can be inspected by the visual method, so magnetic induction testing is employed as well. The project aimed at reducing inspection requirements without impairing the safety standard. Random sampling of flattened wire ropes have shown that this is possible, provided that fatigue and corrosion curves of the cable can be made comparable with the diagrams of magnetic induction tests. Monitoring of the strength reduction of these ropes must be possible throughout the whole rope life. The project focused on the following tasks: Assessment and description of the haulage systems and operating conditions (haulage equipment, mine climate, number of hoists per day, etc.); Inspection of the geometries of new and worn-out ropes and calculation of rupture forces and residual rupture forces; Modification of existing measuring and storage instruments, if possible in explosion-proof construction; Development of software for assessing the residual fracture force of haulage ropes.

  7. Jumping numbers and ordered tree structures on the dual graph

    CERN Document Server

    Hyry, Eero

    2010-01-01

    Let R be a two-dimensional regular local ring having an algebraically closed residue field and let a be a complete ideal of finite colength in R. In this article we investigate the jumping numbers of a by means of the dual graph of the minimal log resolution of the pair (X,a). Our main result is a combinatorial criterium for a positive rational number to be a jumping number. In particular, we associate to each jumping number certain ordered tree structures on the dual graph.

  8. Nonstandard analysis and jump conditions for converging shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baty, Roy S.; Farassat, F.; Tucker, Don H.

    2008-06-01

    Nonstandard analysis is an area of modern mathematics that studies abstract number systems containing both infinitesimal and infinite numbers. This article applies nonstandard analysis to derive jump conditions for one-dimensional, converging shock waves in a compressible, inviscid, perfect gas. It is assumed that the shock thickness occurs on an infinitesimal interval and the jump functions in the thermodynamic and fluid dynamic parameters occur smoothly across this interval. Predistributions of the Heaviside function and the Dirac delta measure are introduced to model the flow parameters across a shock wave. The equations of motion expressed in nonconservative form are then applied to derive unambiguous relationships between the jump functions for the flow parameters.

  9. [Autogenic training in psychophysiological preparation for parachute jumps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnikov, M M

    1978-01-01

    The efficiency of specific psychophysiological preparation--autogenic training--to parachute jumps was measured in two groups of cadets (test subjects and controls). Hetero- and autogenic training was carried out according to a scheme specially developed for this type of activity. The study of questionnaires and physiological data demonstrated that the specific psychophysiological preparation by means of autogenic training for a certain type of activity helped to develop active self-control over one's own state and emotions, alleviated tension, arrested adverse neurotic manifestations (sleep disturbances, depression, anxiety), contributed to the feeling of confidence in the successful completion of the jump and promoted positive tuning towards subsequent jumps.

  10. Stochastic mutualism model with Lévy jumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qun; Jiang, Daqing; Shi, Ningzhong; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we consider a stochastic mutualism model with Lévy jumps. First of all, we show that the positive solution of the system is stochastically ultimate bounded. Then under a simple assumption, we establish sufficient and necessary conditions for the stochastic permanence and extinction of the system. The results show an important property of the Lévy jumps: they are unfavorable for the permanence of the species. Moreover, when there are no Lévy jumps, we show that there is a unique ergodic stationary distribution of the corresponding system under certain conditions. Some numerical simulations are introduced to validate the theoretical results.

  11. RESEARCH ON JUMPING SEQUENCE PLANNING ISSUES OF HOPPING ROBOTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUZhuang-zhi; ZHUJian-ying

    2004-01-01

    The wheeled or crawled robots often suffer from big obstacles or ditches, so a hopping robot needs to fit the tough landform in the field environments. In order to jump over obstacles rapidly, a jumping sequence must be generated based on the landform information from sensors or user input. The planning method for planar mobile robots is compared with that of hopping robots. Several factors can change the planning result. Adjusting these coefficients, a heuristic searching algorithm for the jumping sequence is developed on a simplified landform. Calculational result indicates that the algorithm can achieve safety and efficient control sequences for a desired goal.

  12. Jump-Down Performance Alterations after Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschke, M. F.; Kofman, I. S.; Cerisano, J. M.; Fisher, E. A.; Peters, B. T.; Miller, C. A.; Harm, D. L.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Successful jump performance requires functional coordination of visual, vestibular, and somatosensory systems, which are affected by prolonged exposure to microgravity. Astronauts returning from space flight exhibit impaired ability to coordinate effective landing strategies when jumping from a platform to the ground. This study compares jump strategies used by astronauts before and after flight, changes to those strategies within a test session, and recoveries in jump-down performance parameters across several postflight test sessions. These data were obtained as part of an ongoing interdisciplinary study (Functional Task Test, FTT) designed to evaluate both astronaut postflight functional performance and related physiological changes. METHODS: Seven astronauts from short-duration (Shuttle) and three from long-duration (International Space Station) flights performed 3 two-footed jumps from a platform 30 cm high onto a force plate that measured the ground reaction forces and center-of-pressure displacement from the landings. Neuromuscular activation data were collected from the medial gastrocnemius and anterior tibialis of both legs using surface electromyography electrodes. Two load cells in the platform measured the load exerted by each foot during the takeoff phase of the jump. Data were collected in 2 preflight sessions, on landing day (Shuttle only), and 1, 6, and 30 days after flight. RESULTS: Postural settling time was significantly increased on the first postflight test session and many of the astronauts tested were unable to maintain balance on their first jump landing but recovered by the third jump, showing a learning progression in which performance improvements could be attributed to adjustments in takeoff or landing strategy. Jump strategy changes were evident in reduced air time (time between takeoff and landing) and also in increased asymmetry in foot latencies on takeoff. CONCLUSIONS: The test results revealed significant decrements

  13. Detection of weak frequency jumps for GNSS onboard clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinming; Gong, Hang; Ou, Gang

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a weak frequency jump detection method is developed for onboard clocks in global navigation satellite systems (GNSS). A Kalman filter is employed to facilitate the onboard real-time processing of atomic clock measurements, whose N-step prediction residuals are used to construct the weak frequency jump detector. Numerical simulations show that the method can successfully detect weak frequency jumps. The detection method proposed in this paper is helpful for autonomous integrity monitoring of GNSS satellite clocks, and can also be applied to other frequency anomalies with an appropriately modified detector.

  14. Jump diffusion models and the evolution of financial prices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Annibal; de Castro, Marcio T.; da Silva, Sergio; Gleria, Iram

    2011-08-01

    We analyze a stochastic model to describe the evolution of financial prices. We consider the stochastic term as a sum of the Wiener noise and a jump process. We point to the effects of the jumps on the return time evolution, a central concern of the econophysics literature. The presence of jumps suggests that the process can be described by an infinitely divisible characteristic function belonging to the De Finetti class. We then extend the De Finetti functions to a generalized nonlinear model and show the model to be capable of explaining return behavior.

  15. Influence of stretching on warm up in jump and speed

    OpenAIRE

    Gálvez Ruiz, Pablo; Tapia Flores, A; Jurado Lavanant, A

    2013-01-01

    El objetivo del estudio es determinar si la realización de estiramientos pasivos, incluidos como parte del calentamiento, influyen en el rendimiento de la fuerza explosiva, en este caso en varios tests de salto vertical: Squat Jump (SJ), Countermouvement Jump (CMJ) y Reactive Jump (RJ); y también en un test de velocidad de 30 metros (mts.) con salida lanzada de 5 mts. Para ello, 9 jugadores del Málaga Club de Fútbol de categoría juvenil (18,22 ± 0,441 años) realizaron 2 protocolos de...

  16. Asymptotic Distribution of the Jump Change-Point Estimator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changchun TAN; Huifang NIU; Baiqi MIAO

    2012-01-01

    The asymptotic distribution of the change-point estimator in a jump changepoint model is considered.For the jump change-point model Xi =a + θI{[nTo] < i ≤n} + εi,where εi (i =1,…,n) are independent identically distributed random variables with Eεi=0 and Var(εi) < oo,with the help of the slip window method,the asymptotic distribution of the jump change-point estimator (T) is studied under the condition of the local alternative hypothesis.

  17. Quantum jumps induced by matter-wave fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, J M; Zippilli, S; Morigi, G

    2010-01-01

    We theoretically study the occurrence of quantum jumps in the resonance fluorescence of a trapped atom. Here, the atom is laser cooled in a configuration of level such that the occurrence of a quantum jump is associated to a change of the vibrational center-of-mass motion by one phonon. The statistics of the occurrence of the dark fluorescence period is studied as a function of the physical parameters and the corresponding features in the spectrum of resonance fluorescence are identified. We discuss the information which can be extracted on the atomic motion from the observation of a quantum jump in the considered setup.

  18. Rate Theory for Correlated Processes: Double Jumps in Adatom Diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, J.; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Sethna, J.

    1997-01-01

    We study the rate of activated motion over multiple barriers, in particular the correlated double jump of an adatom diffusing on a missing-row reconstructed platinum (110) surface. We develop a transition path theory, showing that the activation energy is given by the minimum-energy trajectory...... which succeeds in the double jump. We explicitly calculate this trajectory within an effective-medium molecular dynamics simulation. A cusp in the acceptance region leads to a root T prefactor for the activated rate of double jumps. Theory and numerical results agree....

  19. Short-term effects of complex and contrast training in soccer players' vertical jump, sprint, and agility abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maio Alves, José Manuel Vilaça; Rebelo, António Natal; Abrantes, Catarina; Sampaio, Jaime

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the short-term effects of complex and contrast training (CCT) on vertical jump (squat and countermovement jump), sprint (5 and 15 m), and agility (505 Agility Test) abilities in soccer players. Twenty-three young elite Portuguese soccer players (age 17.4 +/- 0.6 years) were divided into 2 experimental groups (G1, n = 9, and G2, n = 8) and 1 control group (G3, n = 6). Groups G1 and G2 have done their regular soccer training along with a 6-week strength training program of CCT, with 1 and 2 training sessions.wk, respectively. G3 has been kept to their regular soccer training program. Each training session from the CCT program was organized in 3 stations in which a general exercise, a multiform exercise, and a specific exercise were performed. The load was increased by 5% from 1 repetition maximum each 2 weeks. Obtained results allowed identifying (a) a reduction in sprint times over 5 and 15 m (9.2 and 6.2% for G1 and 7.0 and 3.1%, for G2; p < 0.05) and () an increase on squat and jump (12.6% for G1 and 9.6% for G2; p < 0.05). The results suggested that the CCT induced the performance increase in 5 and 15 m sprint and in squat jump. Vertical jump and sprint performances after CCT program were not influenced by the number of CCT sessions per week (1 or 2 sessions.wk). From the obtained results, it was suggested that the CCT is an adequate training strategy to develop soccer players' muscle power and speed.

  20. Jumping improves hip and lumbar spine bone mass in prepubescent children: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, R K; Bauer, J J; Snow, C M

    2001-01-01

    .9%) but were not different at the spine. Our data indicate that jumping at ground reaction forces of eight times body weight is a safe, effective, and simple method of improving bone mass at the hip and spine in children. This program could be easily incorporated into physical education classes.

  1. INFLUENCE ANALYSIS OF ELASTIC DEFORMATIONS OF THE TRACK CABLE ON EFFORTS IN THE HAULING ROPE OF AERIAL ROPEWAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Raksha

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To estimate influence of elastic deformations of the track cable arising at movement of cars, on effort in a hauling rope of the aerial ropeway. Methodology. The method of consecutive approaches was used for research influence of elastic deformations of a track cable on effort in a hauling rope. Thus, definition of a tension of a track cable was carried out with use of the technique based on principles of modular configuration, the essence of which consists in formation of mathematical model by a combination of blocks of the formulas describing balance of the track cable on supports. Findings. The research has shown that influence of elastic deformations of a track cable on effort in a hauling rope was insignificant (less than 1 %. That points to possibility not to consider change of the track cable length, caused by its elastic properties, when modeling loading of elements of system «drive – traction rope – tension device». Also it has been found that use of the tension device of a track cable increased influence of its elastic properties on loading of rope system elements. At the same time the elastic component of the track cable tension in the test flight does not depend on a car position in the adjacent span, but only determines by the parameters of the rope system. Originality. The possibility of excluding the changes of track cable length caused by its elastic properties, when modeling loading of elements of system «drive – traction rope – tension device» was proved. Practical value. The use of these techniques and the results will simplify the mathematical model of loading of elements of the cable system and the system «drive – traction rope – tension device» as a whole.

  2. Aeromechanics of the Spider Cricket Jump: How to Jump 60+ Times Your Body Length and Still Land on Your Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Emily; Deshler, Nicolas; Gorman, David; Neves, Catarina; Mittal, Rajat

    2015-11-01

    Flapping, gliding, running, crawling and swimming have all been studied extensively in the past and have served as a source of inspiration for engineering designs. In the current project, we explore a mode of locomotion that straddles ground and air: jumping. The subject of our study is among the most proficient of long-jumpers in Nature: the spider cricket of the family Rhaphidophoridae, which can jump more than 60 times its body length. Despite jumping this immense distance, these crickets usually land on their feet, indicating an ability to control their posture during ``flight.'' We employ high-speed videogrammetry, to examine the jumps and to track the crickets' posture and appendage orientation throughout their jumps. Simple aerodynamic models are developed to predict the aerodynamic forces and moment on the crickets during `flight`. The analysis shows that these wingless insects employ carefully controlled and coordinated positioning of the limbs during flight so as to increase jump distance and to stabilize body posture during flight. The principles distilled from this study could serve as an inspiration for small jumping robots that can traverse complex terrains.

  3. USEFULNESS AND METABOLIC IMPLICATIONS OF A 60-SECOND REPEATED JUMPS TEST AS A PREDICTOR OF ACROBATIC JUMPING PERFORMANCE IN GYMNASTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferran Antoni Rodriguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gymnastics floor exercises are composed of a set of four to five successive acrobatic jumps usually called a �series�. The aims of the study were: 1 to relate the acrobatic gymnastics performance of these series with a repeated jumps test of similar duration (R60, 2 to study the relation between R60 and physiological parameters (heart rate and blood lactate, and the performance obtained in different kinds of jumps, 3 to confirm whether R60, executed without a damped jumping technique, can be considered an anaerobic lactic power test. Twenty male and twenty-four female gymnasts performed three repeated jumps tests for 5 s (R5, 10 s (R10 and 60 s (R60 and vertical jumps, such as drop jumps (DJ, squat jumps (SJ and countermovement jumps (CMJ. We assessed heart rate (HR and blood lactate during R10 and R60. The average values of the maximal blood lactate concentration (Lmax after R10 (males = 2.5±0.6 mmol.l-1; females = 2.1±0.8 mmol.l-1 confirm that anaerobic glycolysis is not activated to a high level. In R60, the Lmax (males = 7.5±1.7 mmol.l-1; females = 5.9±2.1 mmol.l-1 that was recorded does not validate R60 as an anaerobic lactic power test. We confirmed the relation between the average power obtained in R60 (R60Wm and the acrobatic performance on the floor. The inclusion in the multiple regression equation of the best power in DJ and the best flight-contact ratio (FC in R5 confirms the influence of other non-metabolic components on the variability in R60 performance, at least in gymnasts.

  4. Simulations of Emerging Magnetic Flux. II. The Formation of Unstable Coronal Flux Ropes and the Initiation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, James E.; Linton, Mark G.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the emergence of a twisted convection zone flux tube into a pre-existing coronal dipole field. As in previous simulations, following the partial emergence of the sub-surface flux into the corona, a combination of vortical motions and internal magnetic reconnection forms a coronal flux rope. Then, in the simulations presented here, external reconnection between the emerging field and the pre-existing dipole coronal field allows further expansion of the coronal flux rope into the corona. After sufficient expansion, internal reconnection occurs beneath the coronal flux rope axis, and the flux rope erupts up to the top boundary of the simulation domain (approximately 36 Mm above the surface).We find that the presence of a pre-existing field, orientated in a direction to facilitate reconnection with the emerging field, is vital to the fast rise of the coronal flux rope. The simulations shown in this paper are able to self-consistently create many of the surface and coronal signatures used by coronal mass ejection (CME) models. These signatures include surface shearing and rotational motions, quadrupolar geometry above the surface, central sheared arcades reconnecting with oppositely orientated overlying dipole fields, the formation of coronal flux ropes underlying potential coronal field, and internal reconnection which resembles the classical flare reconnection scenario. This suggests that proposed mechanisms for the initiation of a CME, such as "magnetic breakout," are operating during the emergence of new active regions.

  5. Investigation of the Plunging Pressure Pulsation in a Swirling Flow with Precessing Vortex Rope in a Straight Diffuser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntean, S.; Tănasă, C.; Bosioc, A. I.; Moş, D. C.

    2016-11-01

    The paper investigates an unexpected feature of the unsteady pressure field resulting from the self-induced instability of the decelerated swirling flow in a straight diffuser. Firstly, the self-induced instability is experimentally investigated on the swirl generator test rig. As a result, the asynchronous (rotating) pressure pulsation associated with the rotating vortex rope of 15 Hz and it second harmonic are discriminated. Also, a low frequency synchronous (plunging) pulsation around of 2.5 Hz is identified based on unsteady pressure field measured at the wall and LDV measurement of the velocity components in the flow. The low frequency plunging pressure fluctuations is superimposed on the rotating pressure pulsations associated with the vortex rope. The numerical simulations are performed to explore the vortex rope dynamics. The numerical results are compared against experimental data to assess the accuracy of the models. Next, the pressure pulsation dynamics is correlated with the time evolution of the vortex rope. The main conclusion emerging from the analysis of the vortex rope evolution in time is that the cycle with low frequency is responsible for the plunging (synchronous) pressure fluctuations superimposed over the rotating (asynchronous) pressure field associated with the precession of the vortex rope.

  6. The modified forced-swim test in rats: influence of rope- or straw-suspension on climbing behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, H; Tsuda, A; Ida, Y; Tanaka, M

    1988-01-01

    We modified Porsolt's forced-swim test by suspending ropes or straws above the water in order to investigate a possible relationship between immobility and perceived escape responses from water. In this modified test, it was demonstrated clearly that rats reduced their duration of immobility and attempted to climb up the suspended ropes or straws. Most rats which had remained immobile during a 5-min test period in the forced-swim test, exhibited such climbing responses within 5-10 min of rope-suspension. Despite the suspension of ropes, however, some rats showed immobile postures and did not respond to the rope. On the other hand, straws were used in order to produce sliding and prevent climbing when the animals attempted to climb. There were no differences in immobility during either rope- or straw-suspension. It seems that the climbing behavior displayed by forced-swimming rats is due to a "pseudo-escape" effect produced by the suspension of an object above the water. The present findings were interpreted as further evidence for the notion that immobility in forced-swimming rats does not necessarily imply "behavioral despair," but rather an emotional reaction to an inescapable stressor.

  7. [Effects of Reactive Jump Training in Handball Players Regarding Jump Height and Power Development in the Triceps Surae Muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensing, N; Westermann, A; Möller, D; von Piekartz, H

    2015-12-01

    Studies have shown changes in the technical and physical demands in modern handball. The game has increased considerably in speed, power and dynamics. Jump training has, therefore, become ever more important in the training of the athletes. These developments contribute to the fact that handball is now one of the most injury-prone types of sport, with the lower extremities being most frequently affected. Reactive jump training is not only used in training by now, but also increasingly in injury prevention. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of reactive jump training with handball players. 21 regional league handball players were randomly divided into an intervention group (n = 12) and a control group (n = 9). The intervention group completed a six-week reactive jump training programme while the control group went through a non-specific training programme. Jump height (squat and counter movement jump), isokinetic and isometric maximum power as well as muscle activity served as measuring parameters. A comparison of the intervention and control groups revealed that the reactive jump training led to significant improvements in jump height. The isometric and isokinetic maximum power measurements and the electromyographic activities of the triceps surae muscle demonstrated an improvement in the values within the intervention group. However, this improvement was not significant compared with the control group. Likewise both jumps correlated with the muscle activity of the soleus muscle as shown by electromyography. A moderate correlation was noticed between the isokinetic maximum power measurement and the electromyographic activity of the soleus and gastrocnemius medialis muscles. Furthermore, the correlations of the isometric and isokinetic maximum power meas-urements resulted in a strong correlation coefficient. This study revealed a significant increase in jump height after reactive jump training. There was no significant difference in

  8. Testability Synthesis for Jumping Carry Adders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-In Henry Chen

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis for testability ensures that the synthesized circuit is testable by exploring the fundamental relationship between don't care and redundancy. With the exploration of the relationship, redundancy removal can be applied to improve the testability, reduce the area and improve the speed of a synthesized circuit. The test generation problems have been adequately solved, therefore an innovative testability synthesis strategy is necessary for achieving the maximum fault coverage and area reduction for maximum speed. This paper presents a testability synthesis methodology applicable to a top–down design method based on the identification and removal of redundant faults. Emphasis has been placed on the testability synthesis of a high-speed binary jumping carry adder. A synthesized 32-bit testable adder implemented by a 1.2 μm CMOS technology performs addition in 4.09 ns. Comparing with the original synthesized circuit, redundancy removal yields a 100% testable design with a 15% improvement in speed and a 25% reduction in area.

  9. Vortex jump behavior in coupled nanomagnetic heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.; Phatak, C., E-mail: cd@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Petford-Long, A. K. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, 2220 Campus Drive, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Heinonen, O. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3112 (United States)

    2014-11-24

    The spin configuration and magnetic behavior in patterned nanostructures can be controlled by manipulating the interplay between the competing energy terms. This in turn requires fundamental knowledge of the magnetic interactions at the local nanometer scale. Here, we report on the spin structure and magnetization behavior of patterned discs containing exchange coupled ferromagnetic layers with additional exchange bias to an antiferromagnetic layer. The magnetization reversal was explored by direct local visualization of the domain behavior using in-situ Lorentz transmission electron microscopy, from which quantitative magnetic induction maps were reconstructed. The roles of the main competing energy terms were elucidated and the reversal mechanism was identified as a coupled phenomenon of incoherent rotation in the exchange-biased layer and localized vortex nucleation and discontinuous propagation in the free layer, including an anomalous jump in the trajectory. The observations were supported by micromagnetic simulations and modeled phase shift simulations. The work presented here provides fundamental insights into opportunities for macroscopic control of the energy landscape of magnetic heterostructures for functional applications.

  10. A jumping shape memory alloy under heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuiyuan; Omori, Toshihiro; Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Yong; Nagasako, Makoto; Ruan, Jingjing; Kainuma, Ryosuke; Ishida, Kiyohito; Liu, Xingjun

    2016-02-16

    Shape memory alloys are typical temperature-sensitive metallic functional materials due to superelasticity and shape recovery characteristics. The conventional shape memory effect involves the formation and deformation of thermally induced martensite and its reverse transformation. The shape recovery process usually takes place over a temperature range, showing relatively low temperature-sensitivity. Here we report novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys. Their stress-strain and shape recovery behaviors are clearly different from the conventional shape memory alloys. In this study, although the Cu-12.2Al-4.3Fe-6.6Mn and Cu-12.9Al-3.8Fe-5.6Mn alloys possess predominantly L2(1) parent before deformation, the 2H martensite stress-induced from L2(1) parent could be retained after unloading. Furthermore, their shape recovery response is extremely temperature-sensitive, in which a giant residual strain of about 9% recovers instantly and completely during heating. At the same time, the phenomenon of the jumping of the sample occurs. It is originated from the instantaneous completion of the reverse transformation of the stabilized 2H martensite. This novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys have great potentials as new temperature-sensitive functional materials.

  11. Triple jump examinations for dental student assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navazesh, Mahvash; Rich, Sandra K; Chopiuk, Nasrin Bahari; Keim, Robert G

    2013-10-01

    The triple jump examination (TJE) attempts to assess a higher level of learning with demand for analysis, critical thinking, and resolution of problems presented by written scenarios based on patient care situations. The purpose of this study was to examine the internal consistency, scale reliability, and interrater reliability of the TJE used at the Ostrow School of Dentistry, University of Southern California. On the sample of 2,227 examinations administered by seventy-seven raters across a three-year time period, the Cronbach's coefficient alpha for internal consistency of the overall TJE was found to be good (a=0.869). The internal consistency of the three subscales was found to be acceptable (a=0.731), good (a=0.820), and good (a=0.820). Average and single measures intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for scale reliability were significant at p<0.001, indicating strong interrater reliability. There were no statistically significant differences (p≤0.05) in the mean scores assigned on the TJE between rater groups defined by rater experience level with the TJE. A very high level of agreement among rater pairs was also observed. Across the entire three-year study period, with over 19,152 ratings, the seventy-seven raters were in general agreement 99.5 percent of the time and in exact agreement 77.2 percent of the time.

  12. New technologies in the Physical Education class. A positive experience with the digital video recording and vertical jump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Rojano Ortega

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the Basic Competences is to highlight the essential learning of the Secondary School Curriculum. The fourth Basic Competence introduces in the Secondary School Program the use of the Information and Communication Technologies as an essential element to be informed, to learn and to communicate. To that effect, this article tries to bring the new technologies to the Physical Education Class, specifically to the analysis of the vertical jump. This jump has been traditionally evaluated with the Sargent’s test but this test has some errors which derive from the measuring process. Nowadays there are new very precise instruments often used in sports for the analysis of the vertical jump, but their high prices make it difficult to introduce them in the school. With this article we want to show that the digital video recording and the video edition programs constitute a very appropriate way to evaluate the vertical jump because it causes in the students great interest and implication.

  13. SOLUTION TO BSDE WITH NONHOMOGENEOUS JUMPS UNDER LOCALLY LIPSCHITZIAN CONDITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the existence and uniqueness of the solution to a quasilinear backward stochastic differential equation with Poisson jumps. By introducing a series of approximate equations, we can show that BSDE has a unique adapted solution.

  14. Spontaneous Jumping of Coalescing Drops on a Superhydrophobic Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreyko, Jonathan; Chen, Chuan-Hua

    2009-11-01

    When micrometric drops coalesce in-plane on a superhydrophobic surface, a surprising out-of-plane jumping motion was observed. Such jumping motion triggered by drop coalescence was reproduced on a Leidenfrost surface. High-speed imaging revealed that this jumping motion results from the elastic interaction of the bridged drops with the superhydrophobic/Leidenfrost surface. Experiments on both the superhydrophobic and Leidenfrost surfaces compare favorably to a simple scaling model relating the kinetic energy of the merged drop to the surface energy released upon coalescence. The spontaneous jumping motion on water repellent surfaces enables the autonomous removal of water condensate independently of gravity; this process is highly desirable for sustained dropwise condensation.

  15. Spontaneous Jumping of Coalescing Drops on a Superhydrophobic Surface

    CERN Document Server

    Boreyko, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    When micrometric drops coalesce in-plane on a superhydrophobic surface, a surprising out-of-plane jumping motion was observed. Such jumping motion triggered by drop coalescence was reproduced on a Leidenfrost surface. High-speed imaging revealed that this jumping motion results from the elastic interaction of the bridged drops with the superhydrophobic/Leidenfrost surface. Experiments on both the superhydrophobic and Leidenfrost surfaces compare favorably to a simple scaling model relating the kinetic energy of the merged drop to the surface energy released upon coalescence. The spontaneous jumping motion on water repellent surfaces enables the autonomous removal of water condensate independently of gravity; this process is highly desirable for sustained dropwise condensation.

  16. Jump Testing and the Speed of Market Adjustment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben B.

    Asymptotic properties of jump tests rely on the property that any jump occurs within a single time interval no matter what the observation frequency is. Market microstructure effects in relation to news-induced revaluation of the underlying variable is likely to make this an unrealistic assumption...... for high-frequency transaction data. To capture these microstructure effects, this paper suggests a model in which market prices adjust gradually to jumps in the underlying effcient price. A case study illustrates the empirical relevance of the model, and the performance of different jump tests...... is investigated here and in a simulation study. Evidence indicates that tests based on the largest of scaled price increments perform better than tests comparing measures of variability. Resolving the matter by testing at lower frequencies turns out to be less straightforward....

  17. Stick-jump mode in surface droplet dissolution

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, Erik; Zhang, Xuehua; Zandvliet, Harold J W; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    The analogy between evaporating surface droplets in air to dissolving long-chain alcohol droplets in water is worked out. We show that next to the three known modi for surface droplet evaporation or dissolution (constant contact angle mode, constant contact radius mode, and stick-slide mode), a fourth mode exists for small droplets on supposedly smooth substrates, namely the stick-jump mode: intermittent contact line pinning causes the droplet to switch between sticking and jumping during the dissolution. We present experimental data and compare them to theory to predict the dissolution time in this stick-jump mode. We also explain why these jumps were easily observed for microscale droplets but not for larger droplets.

  18. METRIC TESTS CHARACTERISTIC FOR ESTIMATING JUMPING FOR VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toplica Stojanović

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available With goal to establish metric tests characteristics for estimating jumping for volleyball players, it was organized a pilot research on pattern of 23 volleyball players from cadet team and 23 students from high-school. For needs of this research four tests are valid for estimation, jump in block with left and right leg and jump in spike with left and right leg. Each test has been taken three times, so that we could with test-re test method determine their reliability, and with factor analysis their validity. Data were processed by multivariate analysis (item analysis, factor analysis from statistical package „Statistica 6.0 for windows“. On the results of research and discussion we can say that the tests had high coefficient of reliability, as well as factor validity, and these tests can be used to estimate jumping for volleyball players.

  19. Bird Flu Strain May Have Jumped from Cat to Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162717.html Bird Flu Strain May Have Jumped From Cat to ... would be the first known transmission of this bird flu strain from cat to human, officials said. ...

  20. Spontaneous azimuthal breakout and instability at the circular hydraulic jump

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, Arnab K; Basu, Abhik; Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K

    2015-01-01

    We consider a shallow, two-dimensional flow of a liquid in which the radial and the azimuthal dynamics are coupled to each other. The steady and radial background flow of this system creates an axially symmetric circular hydraulic jump. On this background we apply time-dependent perturbations of the matter flow rate and the azimuthal flow velocity, with the latter strongly localized at the hydraulic jump. The perturbed variables depend spatially on both the radial and azimuthal coordinates. Linearization of the perturbations gives a coupled system of wave equations. The characteristic equations extracted from these wave equations show that under a marginally stable condition a spontaneous breaking of axial symmetry occurs at the position of the hydraulic jump. Departure from the marginal stability shows further that a linear instability develops in the azimuthal direction, resulting in an azimuthal transport of liquid at the hydraulic jump. The time for the growth of azimuthal instability is scaled by viscosi...

  1. The fluid dynamics of swimming by jumping in copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Houshuo; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Copepods swim either continuously by vibrating their feeding appendages or erratically by repeatedly beating their swimming legs resulting in a series of small jumps. The two swimming modes generate different hydrodynamic disturbances and therefore expose the swimmers differently to rheotactic...... limited and temporally ephemeral owing to jump-impulsiveness and viscous decay. In contrast, continuous steady swimming generates two well-extended long-lasting momentum jets both in front of and behind the swimmer, as suggested by the well-known steady stresslet model. Based on the observed jump-swimming...... kinematics of a small copepod Oithona davisae, we further showed that jump-swimming produces a hydrodynamic disturbance with much smaller spatial extension and shorter temporal duration than that produced by a same-size copepod cruising steadily at the same average translating velocity. Hence, small copepods...

  2. The fluid dynamics of swimming by jumping in copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Houshuo; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Copepods swim either continuously by vibrating their feeding appendages or erratically by repeatedly beating their swimming legs resulting in a series of small jumps. The two swimming modes generate different hydrodynamic disturbances and therefore expose the swimmers differently to rheotactic...... limited and temporally ephemeral owing to jump-impulsiveness and viscous decay. In contrast, continuous steady swimming generates two well-extended long-lasting momentum jets both in front of and behind the swimmer, as suggested by the well-known steady stresslet model. Based on the observed jump-swimming...... kinematics of a small copepod Oithona davisae, we further showed that jump-swimming produces a hydrodynamic disturbance with much smaller spatial extension and shorter temporal duration than that produced by a same-size copepod cruising steadily at the same average translating velocity. Hence, small copepods...

  3. Jump diffusion models and the evolution of financial prices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, Annibal; Castro, Marcio T. de [Institute of Physics, University of Brasilia (Brazil); Silva, Sergio da [Department of Economics, Federal University of Santa Catarina (Brazil); Gleria, Iram, E-mail: iram@pq.cnpq.br [Institute of Physics, Federal University of Alagoas (Brazil)

    2011-08-08

    We analyze a stochastic model to describe the evolution of financial prices. We consider the stochastic term as a sum of the Wiener noise and a jump process. We point to the effects of the jumps on the return time evolution, a central concern of the econophysics literature. The presence of jumps suggests that the process can be described by an infinitely divisible characteristic function belonging to the De Finetti class. We then extend the De Finetti functions to a generalized nonlinear model and show the model to be capable of explaining return behavior. -- Highlights: → We analyze a stochastic model to describe the evolution of financial prices. → The stochastic term is considered as a sum of the Wiener noise and a jump process. → The process can be described by an infinitely divisible characteristic function belonging to the De Finetti class. → We extend the De Finetti functions to a generalized nonlinear model.

  4. Practical Applications of Cables and Ropes in the ISS Countermeasures System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Cherice; Svetlik, Randall; Williams, Antony

    2017-01-01

    As spaceflight durations have increased over the last four decades, the effects of weightlessness on the human body are far better understood, as are the countermeasures. A combination of aerobic and resistive exercise devices contribute to countering the losses in muscle strength, aerobic fitness, and bone strength of today's astronauts and cosmonauts that occur during their missions on the International Space Station. Creation of these systems has been a dynamically educational experience for designers and engineers. The ropes and cables in particular have experienced a wide range of challenges, providing a full set of lessons learned that have already enabled improvements in on-orbit reliability by initiating system design improvements. This paper examines the on-orbit experience of ropes and cables in several exercise devices and discusses the lessons learned from these hardware items, with the goal of informing future system design.

  5. Particle Acceleration At Small-Scale Flux Ropes In The Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zank, G. P.; Hunana, P.; Mostafavi, P.; le Roux, J. A.; Li, G.; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O.; Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Decker, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    An emerging paradigm for the dissipation of magnetic turbulence in the supersonic solar wind is via localized small-scale reconnection processes, essentially between quasi-2D interacting magnetic islands or flux roped. Charged particles trapped in merging magnetic islands can be accelerated by the electric field generated by magnetic island merging and the contraction of magnetic islands. We discuss the basic physics of particle acceleration by single magnetic islands and describe how to incorporate these ideas in a distributed "sea of magnetic islands". We describe briefly some observations, selected simulations, and then introduce a transport approach for describing particle acceleration at small-scale flux ropes. We discuss particle acceleration in the supersonic solar wind and extend these ideas to particle acceleration at shock waves. These models are appropriate to the acceleration of both electrons and ions. We describe model predictions and supporting observations.

  6. Quantitative Inspection of Remanence of Broken Wire Rope Based on Compressed Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juwei; Tan, Xiaojiang

    2016-01-01

    Most traditional strong magnetic inspection equipment has disadvantages such as big excitation devices, high weight, low detection precision, and inconvenient operation. This paper presents the design of a giant magneto-resistance (GMR) sensor array collection system. The remanence signal is collected to acquire two-dimensional magnetic flux leakage (MFL) data on the surface of wire ropes. Through the use of compressed sensing wavelet filtering (CSWF), the image expression of wire ropes MFL on the surface was obtained. Then this was taken as the input of the designed back propagation (BP) neural network to extract three kinds of MFL image geometry features and seven invariant moments of defect images. Good results were obtained. The experimental results show that nondestructive inspection through the use of remanence has higher accuracy and reliability compared with traditional inspection devices, along with smaller volume, lighter weight and higher precision. PMID:27571077

  7. New Catalytic Proportions for Syntheses of SWNT Bundles (Ropes) and Its Characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Tong; DAI Jian-feng

    2006-01-01

    The single-walled carbon nanotube(SWNT) bundles and ropes have been prepared by using the anode arc discharge plasma to evaporate the graphite rods which contain Fe,Co and Ni powders as catalyst in He atmosphere. Many purifying methods are used for the products. It indicates that the synthesis of SWNTs has been greatly affected by the preparation parameters of catalyzer,the buffer gas and its pressure,the arc current intensity,etc. The optimal condition for preparing SWNTs in our case has been proposed. The forming mechanism of the SWNTs bundles and ropes is also studied qualitatively. The evaporated single graphite sheet tends to reduce its active energy.

  8. Solar prominences embedded in flux ropes: morphological features and dynamics from 3D MHD simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Terradas, J; Luna, M; Oliver, R; Ballester, J L; Wright, A N

    2015-01-01

    The temporal evolution of a solar prominence inserted in a three-dimensional magnetic flux rope is investigated numerically. Using the model of Titov Demoulin (1999) under the regime of weak twist, the cold and dense prominence counteracts gravity by modifying the initially force-free magnetic configuration. In some cases a quasi-stationary situation is achieved after the relaxation phase, characterized by the excitation of standing vertical oscillations. These oscillations show a strong attenuation with time produced by the mechanism of continuum damping due to the inhomogeneous transition between the prominence and solar corona. The characteristic period of the vertical oscillations does not depend strongly on the twist of the flux rope. Nonlinearity is the responsible for triggering the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability associated to the vertical oscillations and that eventually produces horizontal structures. Contrary to other configurations in which the longitudinal axis of the prominence is permeated by a pe...

  9. On the Role of Repetitive Magnetic Reconnections in Evolution of Magnetic Flux Ropes in Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Bhattacharyya, R.; Joshi, Bhuwan; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.

    2016-10-01

    Parker's magnetostatic theorem, extended to astrophysical magnetofluids with large magnetic Reynolds number, supports ceaseless regeneration of current sheets and, hence, spontaneous magnetic reconnections recurring in time. Consequently, a scenario is possible where the repeated reconnections provide an autonomous mechanism governing emergence of coherent structures in astrophysical magnetofluids. In this work, such a scenario is explored by performing numerical computations commensurate with the magnetostatic theorem. In particular, the computations explore the evolution of a flux rope governed by repeated reconnections in a magnetic geometry resembling bipolar loops of solar corona. The revealed morphology of the evolution process—including onset and ascent of the rope, reconnection locations, and the associated topology of the magnetic field lines—agrees with observations, and thus substantiates physical realizability of the advocated mechanism.

  10. Unsteady hydraulic simulation of the cavitating part load vortex rope in Francis turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brammer, J.; Segoufin, C.; Duparchy, F.; Lowys, P. Y.; Favrel, A.; Avellan, F.

    2017-04-01

    For Francis turbines at part load operation a helical vortex rope is formed due to the swirling nature of the flow exiting the runner. This vortex creates pressure fluctuations which can lead to power swings, and the unsteady loading can lead to fatigue damage of the runner. In the case that the vortex rope cavitates there is the additional risk that hydro-acoustic resonance can occur. It is therefore important to be able to accurately simulate this phenomenon to address these issues. In this paper an unsteady, multi-phase CFD model was used to simulate two part-load operating points, for two different cavitation conditions. The simulation results were validated with test-rig data, and showed very good agreement. These results also served as an input for FEA calculations and fatigue analysis, which are presented in a separate study.

  11. Quantitative Inspection of Remanence of Broken Wire Rope Based on Compressed Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juwei Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Most traditional strong magnetic inspection equipment has disadvantages such as big excitation devices, high weight, low detection precision, and inconvenient operation. This paper presents the design of a giant magneto-resistance (GMR sensor array collection system. The remanence signal is collected to acquire two-dimensional magnetic flux leakage (MFL data on the surface of wire ropes. Through the use of compressed sensing wavelet filtering (CSWF, the image expression of wire ropes MFL on the surface was obtained. Then this was taken as the input of the designed back propagation (BP neural network to extract three kinds of MFL image geometry features and seven invariant moments of defect images. Good results were obtained. The experimental results show that nondestructive inspection through the use of remanence has higher accuracy and reliability compared with traditional inspection devices, along with smaller volume, lighter weight and higher precision.

  12. Ion‐scale secondary flux ropes generated by magnetopause reconnection as resolved by MMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, T. D.; Cassak, P. A.; Gershman, D. J.; Haggerty, C.; Malakit, K.; Shay, M. A.; Mistry, R.; Øieroset, M.; Russell, C. T.; Slavin, J. A.; Argall, M. R.; Avanov, L. A.; Burch, J. L.; Chen, L. J.; Dorelli, J. C.; Ergun, R. E.; Giles, B. L.; Khotyaintsev, Y.; Lavraud, B.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Moore, T. E.; Nakamura, R.; Paterson, W.; Pollock, C.; Strangeway, R. J.; Torbert, R. B.; Wang, S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract New Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) observations of small‐scale (~7 ion inertial length radius) flux transfer events (FTEs) at the dayside magnetopause are reported. The 10 km MMS tetrahedron size enables their structure and properties to be calculated using a variety of multispacecraft techniques, allowing them to be identified as flux ropes, whose flux content is small (~22 kWb). The current density, calculated using plasma and magnetic field measurements independently, is found to be filamentary. Intercomparison of the plasma moments with electric and magnetic field measurements reveals structured non‐frozen‐in ion behavior. The data are further compared with a particle‐in‐cell simulation. It is concluded that these small‐scale flux ropes, which are not seen to be growing, represent a distinct class of FTE which is generated on the magnetopause by secondary reconnection. PMID:27635105

  13. Barbell deadlift training increases the rate of torque development and vertical jump performance in novices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Brennan J; Stock, Matt S; Shields, JoCarol E; Luera, Micheal J; Munayer, Ibrahim K; Mota, Jacob A; Carrillo, Elias C; Olinghouse, Kendra D

    2015-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 10 weeks of barbell deadlift training on rapid torque characteristics of the knee extensors and flexors. A secondary aim was to analyze the relationships between training-induced changes in rapid torque and vertical jump performance. Fifty-four subjects (age, mean ± SD = 23 ± 3 years) were randomly assigned to a control (n = 20) or training group (n = 34). Subjects in the training group performed supervised deadlift training twice per week for 10 weeks. All subjects performed isometric strength testing of the knee extensors and flexors and vertical jumps before and after the intervention. Torque-time curves were used to calculate rate of torque development (RTD) values at peak and at 50 and 200 milliseconds from torque onset. Barbell deadlift training induced significant pre- to post-increases of 18.8-49.0% for all rapid torque variables (p knee flexors (r = 0.30-0.37, p torque capacities in both the knee extensors and flexors. Changes in rapid torque were associated with improvements in vertical jump height, suggesting a transfer of adaptations from deadlift training to an explosive, performance-based task. Professionals may use these findings when attempting to design effective, time-efficient resistance training programs to improve explosive strength capacities in novices.

  14. The Effect of an Altitude Training Camp on Swimming Start Time and Loaded Squat Jump Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Amador; Štirn, Igor; Padial, Paulino; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; De la Fuente, Blanca; Calderón, Carmen; Bonitch-Góngora, Juan; Tomazin, Katja; Strumbelj, Boro; Strojnik, Vojko; Feriche, Belén

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of an altitude training (AT) camp on swimming start time and loaded squat jump performance. To accomplish this goal, 13 international swimmers (8 women, 5 men) were allocated to both the control (Sea Level Training, SLT) and experimental conditions (AT, 2320 m above sea level) that were separated by a one year period. All tests (15 m freestyle swimming start and loaded squat jumps with additional loads of 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of swimmers' body weight) were performed before and after a concurrent 3-week strength and endurance training program prescribed by the national coach. Following the SLT camp, significant impairments in swimming start times to 10 (+3.1%) and 15 m (+4.0%) were observed (P camp (-0.89%; P > 0.05). Trivial changes in peak velocity were obtained during the loaded squat jump after both training periods (effect sizes: effectiveness of power-oriented resistance training in the development of explosive actions.

  15. Perfection of coordination with the help of jump exercises on trampoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boloban V.N.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to work out methodic of sportsmen’s coordination perfection with the help of jumps on trampoline. Material: in the research 259 1st and 2nd year students (age 17-19 years participated. The students were representatives of game and cyclic kinds of sports, sport gymnastic and martial arts. Among them there were 99 sportsmen with sport degrees. Results: we gave the definition of the term - coordination training. The students’ sensor-motor coordination was confidently improved by means of the worked out methodic realization. The methodic included program of jump exercises on trampoline. We achieved positive dynamic of static-kinetic and static-dynamic balance as well as increased the quality of mastering of exercises with complex coordination. Conclusions: the methodic of sportsmen’s coordination training with the help of jump exercises on trampoline was worked out, considering specificity of kinds of sports and sportsmen’s qualification. This methodic improves sensor-motor coordination and is the basis of technical training and technical fitness.

  16. Detection of Dew-Point by substantial Raman Band Frequency Jumps (A new Method)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    Detection of Dew-Point by substantial Raman Band Frequency Jumps (A new Method). See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/jumps.pdf......Detection of Dew-Point by substantial Raman Band Frequency Jumps (A new Method). See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/jumps.pdf...

  17. Fundamental Studies of Jumping-Drop Thermal Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-29

    Reverse mode with liquid trapped by the colder superhydrophilic surface. ............... 2 Figure 2. Fabrication of the jumping-drop thermal diode...mode, Figure 1b), liquid water is trapped by it and no phase-change heat transfer takes place; heat mainly escapes through ineffective conduction...self- propelled jumping drops returning the working fluid from the colder superhydrophobic surface; (b) Reverse mode with liquid trapped by the colder

  18. ANALYSIS OF INCOMPLETE STOCK MARKET WITH JUMP-DIFFUSION UNCERTAINTY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuli Chao; Indrajit Bardhan

    2002-01-01

    This paper studies incomplete stock market that includes discontinuous priceprocesses. The discontinuity is modeled by very general point processes admitting onlystochastic intensities. Prices are driven by jump-diffusion uncertainty and have randombut predictable jumps. The space of risk-neutral measures that are associated with themarket is identified and related to fictitious completions. The construction of replicatingportfolios is discussed, and convex duality methods are used to prove existence of optimalconsumption and investment policies for a problem of utility maximization.

  19. Nonlinear H∞ filtering for interconnected Markovian jump systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xiaomei; Zheng Yufan

    2006-01-01

    The problem of nonlinear H∞ filtering for interconnected Markovian jump systems is discussed. The aim of this note is the design of a nonlinear Markovian jump filter such that the resulting error system is exponentially meansquare stable and ensures a prescribed H∞ performance. A sufficient condition for the solvability of this problem is given in terms of linear matrix inequalities(LMIs). A simulation example is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed design approach.

  20. Psycho-physiological response in an automatic parachute jump

    OpenAIRE

    Clemente Suárez, Vicente Javier; Robles Pérez, José Juan; Fernández Lucas, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Parachute jump is an extreme activity that elicits an intense stress response that affects jumpers' body systems being able to put them at risk. The present research analysed modifications in blood oxygen saturation (BOS), heart rate (HR), cortisol, glucose, lactate, creatine kinase (CK), muscles strength, cortical arousal, autonomic modulation, pistol magazine reload time (PMRT) and state anxiety before and after an automatic open parachute jump in 38 male Spanish soldiers (25.6 ± 5.9 years)...

  1. Gravity-free hydraulic jumps and metal femtocups

    OpenAIRE

    Govindarajan, Rama; Mathur, Manikandan; DasGupta, Ratul; Selvi, N. R.; John, Neena Susan; Kulkarni, G. U.

    2006-01-01

    Hydraulic jumps created by gravity are seen every day in the kitchen sink. We show that at small scales a circular hydraulic jump can be created in the absence of gravity, by surface tension. The theory is motivated by our experimental finding of a height discontinuity in spreading submicron molten metal droplets created by pulsed-laser ablation. By careful control of initial conditions, we show that this leads to solid femtolitre cups of gold, silver, copper, niobium and tin.

  2. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic of Hydraulic Jumps in Spillways

    OpenAIRE

    Jonsson, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focus on the complex natural phenomena of hydraulic jumps using the numerical method Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). A hydraulic jump is highly turbulent and associated with turbulent energy dissipation, air entrainment, surface waves and spray and strong dissipative processes. It can be found not only in natural streams and in engineered open channels, but also in your kitchen sink at home. The dissipative features are utilized in hydropower spillways and stilling basins t...

  3. Gravity-free hydraulic jumps and metal femtoliter cups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Manikandan; DasGupta, Ratul; Selvi, N R; John, Neena Susan; Kulkarni, G U; Govindarajan, Rama

    2007-04-20

    Hydraulic jumps created by gravity are seen everyday in the kitchen sink. We show that at small scales a circular hydraulic jump can be created in the absence of gravity by surface tension. The theory is motivated by our experimental finding of a height discontinuity in spreading submicron molten metal droplets created by pulsed-laser ablation. By careful control of initial conditions, this leads to solid femtoliter cups of gold, silver, copper, niobium, and tin.

  4. On the Spectral Gap of Brownian Motion with Jump Boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Kolb, Martin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider the Brownian motion with jump boundary and present a new proof of a recent result of Li, Leung and Rakesh concerning the exact convergence rate in the one-dimensional case. Our methods are different and mainly probabilistic relying on coupling methods adapted to the special situation under investigation. Moreover, we answer a question raised by Ben-Ari and Pinsky concerning the dependence of the spectral gap on the jump distribution in a multi-dimensional setting.

  5. Forecasting Exchange Rate Volatility in the Presence of Jumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch, Thomas; Christensen, Bent Jesper; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard

    of exchange rate futures options, allowingcalculation of option implied volatility. We find that implied volatility is an informationallyefficient but biased forecast of future realized exchange rate volatility. Furthermore,we show that log-normality is an even better distributional approximation...... for impliedvolatility than for realized volatility in this market. Finally, we show that the jump componentof future realized exchange rate volatility is to some extent predictable, and thatoption implied volatility is the dominant forecast of the future jump component....

  6. A drop jumps to weightlessness: a lecture demo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, V. V.; Varaksina, E. I.; Saranin, V. A.

    2017-04-01

    The paper discusses the lecture demonstration of the phenomenon in which a drop lying on a solid unwettable substrate jumps when making the transition to weightlessness. An elementary theory of the phenomenon is given. A jump speed estimate is obtained for small and large drops. The natural vibrational frequency of a flying drop is determined. A full-scale model of Einstein’s elevator is described. Experimental and theoretical results are found to agree satisfactorily.

  7. Importance sampling for jump processes and applications to finance

    OpenAIRE

    Badouraly Kassim, Laetitia; Lelong, Jérôme; Loumrhari, Imane

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Adaptive importance sampling techniques are widely known for the Gaussian setting of Brownian driven diffusions. In this work, we want to extend them to jump processes. Our approach relies on a change of the jump intensity combined with the standard exponential tilting for the Brownian motion. The free parameters of our framework are optimized using sample average approximation techniques. We illustrate the efficiency of our method on the valuation of financial derivat...

  8. Temperature Jump Pyrolysis Studies of RP 2 Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-09

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 December 2016 – 11 January 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Temperature Jump Pyrolysis Studies of RP-2 Fuel...Rev. 8- 98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 1 TEMPERATURE JUMP PYROLYSIS STUDIES OF RP-2 FUEL Owen Pryor1, Steven D. Chambreau2, Ghanshyam L...Mixture Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. PA Clearance 17026 4 RP-2 Pyrolysis /Combustion Chemistries? • Recent

  9. Observations of Magnetic Flux-rope Oscillation During the Precursor Phase of a Solar Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guiping; Zhang, Jie

    2016-07-01

    What is the pre-cursor of a solar eruption is a key question in solar physics for both understanding the physical mechanism and predicting solar eruptions. In this letter, we present the finding of flux rope oscillation as well as significant plasma heating before the onset of an X1.6 GOES X-ray flare and the eruption of a fast CME on 10 September 2014. This precursor oscillation, lasting for about 13 min and occurring in a sigmoidal structure as seen from SDO/AIA and Hinode XRT, was identified based on the IRIS spectrum observations at the coronal emission line of Fe XXI with wavelength of 1354.08 A and formation temperature of 9.1 MK. The IRIS slit was situated at a fixed position almost vertical to the main axis of the sigmoid, which had a length of about 243 arcsec or 1.8x10^{5} km. The vertical velocity oscillation was in the range from -5 to 11 km s^{-1} with a period T of ˜290 s. Our analysis, based on sigmoid temperature, density, length and magnetic field strength, indicates that the oscillation is best described by the fast magnetoacoustic standing kink mode. We conjecture that the pre-cursor oscillation was caused by the interaction of an unstable magnetic flux rope with the overlaying constraining magnetic field, as manifested by a localized plasma heating. The flux rope was subsequently erupted when the main flare reconnection was triggered in the possible current sheet underneath the magnetic flux rope.

  10. Advanced Fibers, Anti-Friction Materials and Jackets for Navy Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-20

    Zylon (polybenzoxazole or PBO) and Vectran (a liquid crystal polymer or LCP). Single fibers have been tested extensively, using a custom designed device...important since we want to use the BOB rope from Cortland Cable and apply a single treatment to a mix of Vectran and Spectra. Zylon : - few results, but no...on Vectran, Spectra and Zylon using equivalent testing parameters. Even though a large amount of data was collected on Kevlar fibers with various

  11. Spatial distribution of Mercury's flux ropes and reconnection fronts: MESSENGER observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W. J.; Fu, S. Y.; Slavin, J. A.; Raines, J. M.; Zong, Q. G.; Poh, G. K.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2016-08-01

    We perform a statistical study of flux ropes and reconnection fronts based on MErcury Surface, Space ENviroment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) magnetic field and plasma observations to study the implications for the spatial distribution of reconnection sites in Mercury's near magnetotail. The results show important differences of temporal and spatial distributions as compared to Earth. We have surveyed the plasma sheet crossings between -2 RM and -3 RM downtail from the planet, i.e., the location of Near-Mercury Neutral Line (NMNL). Plasma sheets were defined to be regions with β ≥ 0.5. Using this definition, 39 flux ropes and 86 reconnection fronts were identified in the plasma sheet. At Mercury, the distributions of flux ropes and reconnection fronts show clear dawn-dusk asymmetry with much higher occurrence rate on the dawnside plasma sheet than on the duskside. This suggests that magnetic reconnection in Mercury's magnetotail occurs more frequently in the dawnside than in the duskside plasma sheet, which is different than the observations in Earth's magnetotail showing more reconnection signatures in the duskside plasma sheet. The distribution of plasma sheet thickness shows that plasma sheet near the midnight is the thinnest part and does not show obvious asymmetry. Thus, the reasons that cause magnetic reconnection to preferentially occur on the dawnside of the magnetotail at Mercury may not be the plasma sheet thickness and require further study. The peak occurrence rates of flux ropes and reconnection fronts in Mercury's plasma sheet are ~ 60 times higher than that of Earth's values, which we interpret to be due to the highly variable magnetospheric conditions at Mercury. Such higher occurrence rate of magnetic reconnection would generate more plasma flows in the dawnside plasma sheet than in the duskside. These plasma flows would mostly brake and initiate the substorm dipolarization on the postmidnight sector at Mercury rather than the

  12. The Grad-Shafranov Reconstruction of Toroidal Magnetic Flux Ropes: First Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Hu,Qiang; Linton, M. G.; Wood, B. E.; Riley, P.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.

    2017-01-01

    This article completes and extends a recent study of the Grad-Shafranov (GS) reconstruction in toroidal geometry, as applied to a two and a half dimensional configurations in space plasmas with rotational symmetry. A further application to the benchmark study of an analytic solution to the toroidal GS equation with added noise shows deviations in the reconstructed geometry of the flux rope configuration, characterized by the orientation of the rotation axis, the major radius, and the impact p...

  13. Quasi-Static Evolution, Catastrophe, and Failed Eruption of Solar Flux Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-30

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6794--16-9710 Quasi-Static Evolution , Catastrophe, and “Failed” Eruption of Solar Flux...TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Quasi-Static Evolution , Catastrophe... evolution of solar flux ropes subject to slowly increasing magnetic energy, encompassing quasi-static evolution , “catastrophic” transition to an eruptive

  14. On the Characteristics of Footpoints of Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes during the Eruption

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, X; Ding, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the footpoints of four erupted magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) that appear as sigmoidal hot channels prior to the eruptions in the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly high temperaure passbands. The simultaneous Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager observations disclose that one footpoint of the MFRs originates in the penumbra or penumbra edge with a stronger magnetic field, while the other in the moss region with a weaker magnetic field. The significant deviation of the axis of the MFRs from t...

  15. Direct observations of magnetic flux rope formation during a solar coronal mass ejection

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Hongqiang; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Yao; Cheng, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most spectacular eruptive phenomena in the solar atmosphere. It is generally accepted that CMEs are results of eruptions of magnetic flux ropes (MFRs). However, a heated debate is on whether MFRs pre-exist before the eruptions or they are formed during the eruptions. Several coronal signatures, \\textit{e.g.}, filaments, coronal cavities, sigmoid structures and hot channels (or hot blobs), are proposed as MFRs and observed before the eruption, which suppor...

  16. Magnetar giant flares in multipolar magnetic fields. I. Fully and partially open eruptions of flux ropes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lei [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China); Yu, Cong, E-mail: muduri@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: cyu@ynao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Object, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2014-04-01

    We propose a catastrophic eruption model for the enormous energy release of magnetars during giant flares, in which a toroidal and helically twisted flux rope is embedded within a force-free magnetosphere. The flux rope stays in stable equilibrium states initially and evolves quasi-statically. Upon the loss of equilibrium, the flux rope cannot sustain the stable equilibrium states and erupts catastrophically. During the process, the magnetic energy stored in the magnetosphere is rapidly released as the result of destabilization of global magnetic topology. The magnetospheric energy that could be accumulated is of vital importance for the outbursts of magnetars. We carefully establish the fully open fields and partially open fields for various boundary conditions at the magnetar surface and study the relevant energy thresholds. By investigating the magnetic energy accumulated at the critical catastrophic point, we find that it is possible to drive fully open eruptions for dipole-dominated background fields. Nevertheless, it is hard to generate fully open magnetic eruptions for multipolar background fields. Given the observational importance of the multipolar magnetic fields in the vicinity of the magnetar surface, it would be worthwhile to explore the possibility of the alternative eruption approach in multipolar background fields. Fortunately, we find that flux ropes may give rise to partially open eruptions in the multipolar fields, which involve only partial opening of background fields. The energy release fractions are greater for cases with central-arcaded multipoles than those with central-caved multipoles that emerged in background fields. Eruptions would fail only when the centrally caved multipoles become extremely strong.

  17. Helicity Transformation under the Collision and Merging of Magnetic Flux Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehaas, Timothy

    2016-10-01

    A magnetic flux rope is a tube-like, current carrying plasma embedded in an external magnetic field. The magnetic field lines resemble threads in a rope, which vary in pitch according to radius. Flux ropes are ubiquitous in astrophysical plasmas, and bundles of these structures play an important role in the dynamics of the space environment. They are observed in the solar atmosphere and near-earth environment where they are seen to twist, merge, tear, and writhe. In this MHD context, their global dynamics are bound by rules of magnetic helicity conservation, unless, under a non-ideal process, helicity is transformed through magnetic reconnection, turbulence, or localized instabilities. These processes are tested under experimental conditions in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD). The device is a twenty-meter long, one-meter diameter, cylindrical vacuum vessel designed to generate a highly reproducible, magnetized plasma. Reliable shot-to-shot repetition of plasma parameters and over four hundred diagnostic ports enable the collection of volumetric datasets (measurements of ne, Te, Vp, B, J, E, uflow) as two kink-unstable flux ropes form, move, collide, and merge. Similar experiments on the LAPD have utilized these volumetric datasets, visualizing magnetic reconnection through a topological quasi-separatrix layer, or QSL. This QSL is shown to be spatially coincident with the reconnection rate, ∫ E . dl , and oscillates (although out of phase) with global helicity. Magnetic helicity is observed to have a negative sign and its counterpart, cross helicity, a positive one. These quantities oscillate 8% peak-to-peak, and the changes in helicity are visualized as 1) the transport of helicity (ϕB + E × A) and 2) the dissipation of the helicity - 2 E . B . This work is supported by LANL-UC research Grant and done at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, which is funded by DOE and NSF.

  18. Dynamic Jump Intensities and Risk Premiums in Crude Oil Futures and Options Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Jacobs, Kris; Li, Bingxin

    2016-01-01

    and dynamic jump intensities in these markets. Allowing for jumps is crucial for modeling crude oil futures and futures options, and we find evidence in favor of time-varying jump intensities. During crisis periods, jumps occur more frequently. The properties of the jump processes implied by the option data......Options on crude oil futures are the most actively traded commodity options. We develop a class of computationally efficient discrete-time jump models that allow for closed-form option valuation, and we use crude oil futures and options data to investigate the economic importance of jumps...

  19. Electric-Field-Enhanced Jumping-Droplet Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Preston, Daniel; Enright, Ryan; Limia, Alexander; Wang, Evelyn

    2013-11-01

    When condensed droplets coalesce on a superhydrophobic surface, the resulting droplet can jump due to the conversion of surface energy into kinetic energy. This frequent out-of-plane droplet jumping has the potential to enhance condensation heat and mass transfer. In this work, we demonstrated that these jumping droplets accumulate positive charge that can be used to further increase condensation heat transfer via electric fields. We studied droplet jumping dynamics on silanized nanostructured copper oxide surfaces. By characterizing the droplet trajectories under various applied external electric fields (0 - 50 V/cm), we show that condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces results in a buildup of negative surface charge (OH-) due to dissociated water ion adsorption on the superhydrophobic coating. Consequently, the opposite charge (H3O +) accumulates on the coalesced jumping droplet. Using this knowledge, we demonstrate electric-field-enhanced jumping droplet condensation whereby an external electric field opposes the droplet vapor flow entrainment towards the condensing surface to increase the droplet removal rate and overall surface heat transfer by 100% when compared to state-of-the-art dropwise condensing surfaces. This work not only shows significant condensation heat transfer enhancement through the passive charging of condensed droplets, but promises a low cost approach to increase efficiency for applications such as atmospheric water harvesting and dehumidification.

  20. Kinematic structure at the early flight position in ski jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodičar, Janez; Coh, Milan; Jošt, Bojan

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of our research was to establish the variability of correlation between the length of the jumps and selected multi-item kinematic variables (n=9) in the early flight phase technique of ski jumping. This study was conducted on a sample of elite Slovenian ski jumpers (N=29) who participated in the experiment on a jumping hill in Hinterzarten, Germany (HS95m) on the 20(th) of August, 2008. The highest and most significant correlations (p=0.01) with the length of the ski jump were found in the multi-item variable height of flying, which was also expressed with the highest level of stability of the explained total variance (TV) on the first factor (TV=69.13%). The most important characteristic of the aerodynamic aspect of early flight was the variable angle between the body chord and the horizontal axis with significantly high correlations (pski and left leg (TV=50.13%), had an explained common variance on the first factor greater than 50% of total variance. The results indicated that some kinematic parameters of ski jumping early flight technique were more important for success considering the length of the jump.