WorldWideScience

Sample records for jujube ziziphus jujube

  1. Micropropagation of Jujube (Ziziphus jujuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khazaei

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Jujube (Ziziphus jujuba is one of the most important fruit trees in Asia which has been planted from 3,000 years ago in China for medicinal purposes. Jujube belongs to the Rhamnaceae family. The Jujube fruit is used in fresh and dry forms. The fruit is full of vitamin C and has anticancer and medicinal effects. This tree can grow on salty and dry lands in Iran. Therefore, increasing the cultivation area of Jujube can be effective for soil conservation. In the last 20years, cultivation of Jujube is is considerable in Iran specially in the South Khorasan Province and 98 % of total production of Jujube in Iran belongs to this province. The low rate of seed germination and low production of shootlets are the most important problems in Jujube proliferation, so micropropagation of this plant through tissue culture was considered. Materials and methods: In this study, Cangan ecotype of Jujube was used for multiple shoot regeneration. At the end of May, apical buds of shoots were cut from mature trees of the Research Collection of Jujube at Sarbishe, Birjand, South Khorasan Province in Iran. The buds were disinfected with 70% ethanol for 1 min and 2% sodium hypoclorite for 25 min. Then the buds were rinsed with distilled water for 25 min completely. Apical buds were placed on Murashige and Skoog (MS medium supplemented with different concentrations of BA (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2 mg/L in combination with IBA or NAA (0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4 mg/L. After one month, the shoots with 3-5 cm length were transferred to rooting media (1/2 MS + IBA or IAA : 0.5, 2, 5, 10 mg/L. The data were recorded after shooting and rooting and were analysed in the facorial experiment. Results and Discussion: The results of variance analysis and mean comparisons showed that there are differences between different levels of IBA and BA alone for the number of shoots and their length (P

  2. Scheduling irrigation for jujube ( Ziziphus jujuba Mill. ) | Zhang ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was performed to select suitable indicator for scheduling the irrigation of jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) grown in the Loess Plateau. The relationships between plant-based indicators and soil matrix potential as well as meteorological factors of jujube under deficit irrigation compared with well irrigation were ...

  3. Yields, Phenolic Profiles and Antioxidant Activities of Ziziphus jujube Mill. in Response to Different Fertilization Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing demand for more jujube (Ziziphus jujube Mill. production requires understanding the specific fertilization needs of jujube trees. This study was conducted to compare fruit yields, phenolic profiles and antioxidant activity of jujube in response to different fertilizers. Application of organic fertilizer appeared to enhance the phenolics and antioxidant activity accumulation of jujubes, compared to conventional fertilized jujubes. Amongst inorganic fertilizers, supplemental potassium as an individual nutrient improved the accumulation of phenolics in jujubes. Our results demonstrate that phenolics levels and antioxidant activity of jujube can be manipulated through fertilizer management and tracked by following proanthocyanidin concentrations. In a practical production context, the combination of organic fertilizers and inorganic fertilizers such as more supplemental individual potassium, and less supplemental individual nitrogen and phosphorus, might be the best management combination for achieving higher phenolic concentration, stronger antioxidant activity and a good harvest.

  4. Genetic Diversity Analysis of Iranian Jujube Ecotypes (Ziziphus spp. Using RAPD Molecular Marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Abbasi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill. is a valuable medicinal plant which is important in Iranian traditional medicines. Although the regional plants such as jujube play an important role in our economy, but they are forgotten in research and technology. Considering the economic and medicinal importance of jujube, the first step in breeding programs is determination of the genetic diversity among the individuals. 34 ecotypes of jujube, which have been collected from eight provinces of Iran, were used in this study. The genetic relationships of Iranian jujube ecotypes were analyzed using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD marker. Six out of 15 random decamer primers applied for RAPD analysis, showed an informative polymorphism. According to clustering analysis using UPGMA's methods, the ecotypes were classified into two major groups at the 0.81 level of genetic similarity. The highest value of similarity coefficient (0.92 was detected between Mazandaran and Golestan ecotypes and the most genetic diversity was observed in ecotypes of Khorasan-Jonoubi. The affinity of Khorasan-Jonoubi and Esfahan ecotypes indicated a possible common origin for the variation in these areas. Results indicated that RAPD analysis could be successfully used for the estimation of genetic diversity among Ziziphus ecotypes and it can be useful for further investigations.

  5. Contents Changes of Triterpenic Acids, Nucleosides, Nucleobases, and Saccharides in Jujube (Ziziphus jujuba) Fruit During the Drying and Steaming Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Sheng; Duan, Jin-Ao; Zhang, Ying; Qian, Dawei; Tang, Yuping; Zhu, Zhenhua; Wang, Hanqing

    2015-12-12

    Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba), a medicinal and edible plant, is widely consumed in Asian countries owing to the remarkable health activities of its fruits. To facilitate selection of the suitable processing method for jujube fruits, in this study their contents of triterpenic acids, nucleosides, nucleobases and saccharides after drying and steaming treatment were determined using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography coupled with evaporative light scattering detector methods. The results showed that except for sucrose, the content levels of most analytes were increasing in the jujube fruits during drying treatment at 45 °C. The levels of cyclic nucleotides such as adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, were significantly decreased after the fruits were steamed. Therefore, owing to the bioactivities of these components for human health, the dried fruits would be the better choice as medicinal material or functional food, and dried jujube fruit should not be further steamed.

  6. In Vivo Fast Induction of Homogeneous Autopolyploids via Callus in Sour Jujube (Ziziphus acidojujuba Cheng et Liu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Shi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Polyploidization has been demonstrated as a very effective approach in fruit tree improvement. Sour jujube (Ziziphus acidojujuba Cheng et Liu is a promising diploid wild, traditional fruit species (2n = 2x = 24 that is rich in vitamin C, which is the main rootstock of Chinese jujube (Z. jujuba Mill.. The novel method we developed for rapid in vivo induction of homogeneous autopolyploids (IVIHA via callus in Chinese jujube was first applied and further optimized in sour jujube. Under optimized conditions, an average of one pure autotetraploid shoot could be regenerated from one treated branch, thereby indicating a relatively high efficiency rate. A total of 9 pure autotetraploid genotypes were created, and one of these was released as a new cultivar named ‘Zhuguang’ in 2015. Moreover, unexpected octoploids and hexaploids were also simultaneously created and detected. The leaves of tetraploids were thicker, broader, and darker in color than those of the original diploids, whereas the leaf sizes of octoploids were much smaller compared to that of diploids. However, stoma size increased with the occurrence of ploidy, mainly from diploid to octoploid. The well grown ploidies of jujube included diploids, triploids, and tetraploids. Anatomical observation indicated that adventitious buds/shoots emerged from the callus that formed on the cut, which was then followed by the development of connective vascular tissues between the adventitious bud and the stock plant tissue. This study demonstrates the universality of the IVIHA method that was initially developed in Chinese jujube, as well as provides a foundation for high-efficiency pure polyploid induction in sour jujube.

  7. Physico-chemical, nutritional, and volatile composition and sensory profile of Spanish jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Francisca; Noguera-Artiaga, Luis; Burló, Francisco; Wojdyło, Aneta; Carbonell-Barrachina, Ángel A; Legua, Pilar

    2016-06-01

    Jujube fruit is eaten mostly fresh, but may be dried (Chinese dates and tea) or processed into confectionary recipes in bread, cakes, compotes, and candy. Given that the quality of jujube available on the market differs on account of various factors such as geographical environment, cultivar, processing conditions, and storage conditions, and that, for consumers, flavour and nutrition properties of jujube represent the major parameters in determining the quality of jujube, the main goal of this study were to determine the main physico-chemical properties of jujube fruits, sugars and organic acids profiles, protein, mineral constituents, volatile composition and sensory profile of jujube fruits. This would allow breeders to select cultivars with higher levels of nutrients and also enable increasing dietary intake by consumers. Investigations showed that jujube fruit weight ranged from 4.8 to 29.3 g fruit(-1) . Four sugars (glucose, fructose, sucrose and sorbitol) and four organic acids (citric, malic, ascorbic and succinic acids) were identified and quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography in jujube fruits. Potassium, calcium and magnesium were the major mineral constituents in jujube fruits. Fifteen volatiles compounds were found in the aroma profile of jujube fruits (nine were aldehydes, three terpenes, one ester, one ketone and one linear hydrocarbon). The results showed that Spanish jujube cultivars studied are a good source of vitamin C, and they have a low content of Na. The jujube cultivar with the most appreciated quality by consumers was GAL; the GAL fruits were sweet, crunchy, and had high intensities of jujube ID and apple flavour a long after-taste. Therefore, jujube grown in Spain has a great potential to be exploited for functional foods. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Comparison of drip, pipe and surge spring root irrigation for Jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill. fruit quality in the Loess plateau of China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Han Gao

    Full Text Available Loess Plateau is a typical rain-fed farming region, facing the threat of drought. Irrigation method is among the most important factors affecting jujube quality. This study investigated the response of Ziziphus jujuba Mill. cv. Lizao quality to three different irrigation methods (drip-, pipe- and surge spring root irrigation combining two water levels (20 m(3/hm(2 and 120 m(3/hm(2. The effects of the trials were evaluated by taking into account the physical-chemical characteristics of jujubes and the antioxidant activity. Concomitant to this, the concentration of some taste-related (viz. glucose, fructose, TSS and malic acid and health-related compounds/parameters (viz. catechin and epicatechin were generally much greater in jujube fruit treated with drip irrigation (120 m(3/hm(2. Different irrigation treatments had no significant effects on antioxidant capacity, total phenolics and proanthocyanidins (except for pipe irrigation 20 m(3/hm(2. The best compromise between quality and irrigation of jujube fruit was achieved with drip irrigation (120 m(3/hm(2.

  9. Genome-Wide Characterization of Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) Loci in Chinese Jujube and Jujube SSR Primer Transferability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jing; Zhao, Jin; Liu, Mengjun; Liu, Ping; Dai, Li; Zhao, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba), an economically important species in the Rhamnaceae family, is a popular fruit tree in Asia. Here, we surveyed and characterized simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in the jujube genome. A total of 436,676 SSR loci were identified, with an average distance of 0.93 Kb between the loci. A large proportion of the SSRs included mononucleotide, dinucleotide and trinucleotide repeat motifs, which accounted for 64.87%, 24.40%, and 8.74% of all repeats, respectively. Among the mononucleotide repeats, A/T was the most common, whereas AT/TA was the most common dinucleotide repeat. A total of 30,565 primer pairs were successfully designed and screened using a series of criteria. Moreover, 725 of 1,000 randomly selected primer pairs were effective among 6 cultivars, and 511 of these primer pairs were polymorphic. Sequencing the amplicons of two SSRs across three jujube cultivars revealed variations in the repeats. The transferability of jujube SSR primers proved that 35/64 SSRs could be transferred across family boundary. Using jujube SSR primers, clustering analysis results from 15 species were highly consistent with the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group (APGIII) System. The genome-wide characterization of SSRs in Chinese jujube is very valuable for whole-genome characterization and marker-assisted selection in jujube breeding. In addition, the transferability of jujube SSR primers could provide a solid foundation for their further utilization. PMID:26000739

  10. Effect of gamma irradiation on some physicochemical properties and bioactive compounds of jujube (Ziziphus jujuba var vulgaris) fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafabadi, Najmeh Shams; Sahari, Mohammad Ali; Barzegar, Mohsen; Esfahani, Zohreh Hamidi

    2017-01-01

    Interest in the protection of bioactive compounds and a safe alternative method for preservation of processed fruits and fruit juices has recently increased significantly throughout the world. There is a distinct lack of information on the profile of bioactive compounds in jujube fruit (e.g. organic acids, anthocyanins, and water-soluble vitamins) and their changes during processing (e.g. gamma irradiation). Therefore, in this study, the effect of gamma irradiation at different doses (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0 kGy) on some physicochemical properties and the bioactive compounds of jujube fruit was investigated. The total soluble solids (TSSs) values remained unaffected at various doses, while the level of total acidity (TA) showed a slight increase at doses ≥ 2.5 kGy (p ≤ 0.05). Irradiation up to 2.5 kGy caused a significant increase in the total monomeric anthocyanin and the total phenolic content (about 12% and 6%, respectively), but a significant decrease was observed in both parameters immediately after irradiation at 5 kGy. Moreover, irradiation treatment caused a significant decrease in L* value and a significant increase in a* and b* values (P ≤ 0.05); however, changes of color were slight until the dose of 5 kGy. Gamma irradiation up to 2.5 kGy had no significant effect on the concentration of malic, citric and succinic acids, while the level of ascorbic acid decreased significantly at all irradiation doses (0-5 kGy). Cyanidin-3, 5-diglucoside was determined as the major anthocyanin in the jujube fruit studied (about 68%), which was reduced significantly when 5 kGy of irradiation was applied (degradation percentage: 27%). The results demonstrated that vitamins C, B2 and B1 are the most water-soluble vitamins in jujube fruit, respectively. Vitamins C and B1 content significantly decreased at all applied doses (0-5 kGy), whereas B2 content at doses ≤ 2.5 kGy was not significantly affected. The results of this study indicate that gamma irradiation at

  11. Honeybee Foraging, Nectar Secretion, and Honey Potential of Wild Jujube Trees, Ziziphus nummularia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqarni, A S

    2015-06-01

    Ziziphus trees are of economic importance due to their aggregated value (source of fruits and timber) and are the most important melliferous plants in the Arabian Peninsula. Interaction between honeybees and Ziziphus nummularia was investigated by assessing foraging, flower phenology, nectar secretion, and honey potential. It is demonstrate that both the native Apis mellifera jemenitica Ruttner and the exotic Apis mellifera carnica Pollmann foraged on Z. nummularia flowers. Bee foraging for nectar and pollen was low (2 ± 0.7 workers/200 flowers/3 min) during early morning and increased to a peak in the afternoon (100 ± 15 workers/200 flowers/3 min). Remarkable foraging activity was recorded during high temperature (35°C) and low humidity (20%) conditions. Foraging for nectar collection was more distinct than that for pollen. The flowering of Z. nummularia was gradual, and was characterized by some flowers that opened and secreted nectar early before sunrise, whereas other flowers remained opened until sunrise. The flowers lasted 2 days, with 83% of nectar secreted in the first day. The peak of nectar secretion was recorded at noon under hot and dry conditions. The lowest amount of nectar was secreted during sunrise under mild temperature (24°C) and humidity (31%) conditions. Under optimum conditions, it is assumed that the average sugar mass was 0.321 ± 0.03 mg TSS/flower, while the total sugar mass was 27.65 ± 11 g/tree. The average honey production potential of tested Z. nummularia was approximately 2.998 kg/tree and 749.475 kg/ha in the main flowering season.

  12. Evaluation of Genetic Diversity in Collection from Iranian Jujube Ecotypes (Ziziphus spp. using ISSR-molecular Marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hajar shayesteh

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Jujube (Zizyphus jujuba Mill. as a valuable medicinal plant and adapted to different climatic conditions is widespread in many parts of Iran. Nowadays, beside the export of its fruit, jujube is also used as an herbal medicine to treat the diseases, so it has a high economic value. Study on genetic diversity is the first step to identify and preservation of germplasm. It is also considered as the basic principles of plant breeding. DNA markers seem to be the best way in determination of the genetic diversity. Inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR markers are highly polymorphic and combine most benefits of Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP to the generality of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD. Materials and Methods In order to study of the genetic diversity among 31 ecotypes collected from eight Jujube-rich provinces, including South Khorasan, Razavi Khorasan, Mazandaran, Golestan, Qom, Isfahan, Lorestan and Fars. Genomic DNA was extracted by CTAB method and polymerase chain reaction (PCR was performed with 13 ISSR primers in which six most efficient primers were selected. Cluster analysis based on Dice similarity coefficient and Unweighed Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean (UPGMA was carried out and POPGENe.3.2 software was used to determine the similarity of populations with each other. Results and Discussion 84 loci were amplified and 70 of them (83% revealed a proper polymorphism with the size between 200 and 2000 base pair. The average number of amplified and polymorphic bands per primer was 14 and 11.6 respectively. Primers with di-nucleotide repeats produced more polymorphic bands than ones with tri-nucleotide repeats. It seems that this is due to a higher frequency of sequences containing di-nucleotide repeats in intergenic regions and higher possibility of mutation revealed in more diversity in comparison to gene coding regions. Anchored primers with 1 or 2 nucleotides at

  13. The complex jujube genome provides insights into fruit tree biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng-Jun; Zhao, Jin; Cai, Qing-Le; Liu, Guo-Cheng; Wang, Jiu-Rui; Zhao, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Ping; Dai, Li; Yan, Guijun; Wang, Wen-Jiang; Li, Xian-Song; Chen, Yan; Sun, Yu-Dong; Liu, Zhi-Guo; Lin, Min-Juan; Xiao, Jing; Chen, Ying-Ying; Li, Xiao-Feng; Wu, Bin; Ma, Yong; Jian, Jian-Bo; Yang, Wei; Yuan, Zan; Sun, Xue-Chao; Wei, Yan-Li; Yu, Li-Li; Zhang, Chi; Liao, Sheng-Guang; He, Rong-Jun; Guang, Xuan-Min; Wang, Zhuo; Zhang, Yue-Yang; Luo, Long-Hai

    2014-10-28

    The jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.), a member of family Rhamnaceae, is a major dry fruit and a traditional herbal medicine for more than one billion people. Here we present a high-quality sequence for the complex jujube genome, the first genome sequence of Rhamnaceae, using an integrated strategy. The final assembly spans 437.65 Mb (98.6% of the estimated) with 321.45 Mb anchored to the 12 pseudo-chromosomes and contains 32,808 genes. The jujube genome has undergone frequent inter-chromosome fusions and segmental duplications, but no recent whole-genome duplication. Further analyses of the jujube-specific genes and transcriptome data from 15 tissues reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying some specific properties of the jujube. Its high vitamin C content can be attributed to a unique high level expression of genes involved in both biosynthesis and regeneration. Our study provides insights into jujube-specific biology and valuable genomic resources for the improvement of Rhamnaceae plants and other fruit trees.

  14. The Jujube Genome Provides Insights into Genome Evolution and the Domestication of Sweetness/Acidity Taste in Fruit Trees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Huang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill. belongs to the Rhamnaceae family and is a popular fruit tree species with immense economic and nutritional value. Here, we report a draft genome of the dry jujube cultivar 'Junzao' and the genome resequencing of 31 geographically diverse accessions of cultivated and wild jujubes (Ziziphus jujuba var. spinosa. Comparative analysis revealed that the genome of 'Dongzao', a fresh jujube, was ~86.5 Mb larger than that of the 'Junzao', partially due to the recent insertions of transposable elements in the 'Dongzao' genome. We constructed eight proto-chromosomes of the common ancestor of Rhamnaceae and Rosaceae, two sister families in the order Rosales, and elucidated the evolutionary processes that have shaped the genome structures of modern jujubes. Population structure analysis revealed the complex genetic background of jujubes resulting from extensive hybridizations between jujube and its wild relatives. Notably, several key genes that control fruit organic acid metabolism and sugar content were identified in the selective sweep regions. We also identified S-locus genes controlling gametophytic self-incompatibility and investigated haplotype patterns of the S locus in the jujube genomes, which would provide a guideline for parent selection for jujube crossbreeding. This study provides valuable genomic resources for jujube improvement, and offers insights into jujube genome evolution and its population structure and domestication.

  15. The Jujube Genome Provides Insights into Genome Evolution and the Domestication of Sweetness/Acidity Taste in Fruit Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian; Zhang, Chunmei; Zhao, Xing; Fei, Zhangjun; Wan, KangKang; Zhang, Zhong; Pang, Xiaoming; Yin, Xiao; Bai, Yang; Sun, Xiaoqing; Gao, Lizhi; Li, Ruiqiang; Zhang, Jinbo; Li, Xingang

    2016-12-01

    Jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) belongs to the Rhamnaceae family and is a popular fruit tree species with immense economic and nutritional value. Here, we report a draft genome of the dry jujube cultivar 'Junzao' and the genome resequencing of 31 geographically diverse accessions of cultivated and wild jujubes (Ziziphus jujuba var. spinosa). Comparative analysis revealed that the genome of 'Dongzao', a fresh jujube, was ~86.5 Mb larger than that of the 'Junzao', partially due to the recent insertions of transposable elements in the 'Dongzao' genome. We constructed eight proto-chromosomes of the common ancestor of Rhamnaceae and Rosaceae, two sister families in the order Rosales, and elucidated the evolutionary processes that have shaped the genome structures of modern jujubes. Population structure analysis revealed the complex genetic background of jujubes resulting from extensive hybridizations between jujube and its wild relatives. Notably, several key genes that control fruit organic acid metabolism and sugar content were identified in the selective sweep regions. We also identified S-locus genes controlling gametophytic self-incompatibility and investigated haplotype patterns of the S locus in the jujube genomes, which would provide a guideline for parent selection for jujube crossbreeding. This study provides valuable genomic resources for jujube improvement, and offers insights into jujube genome evolution and its population structure and domestication.

  16. New cultivars of jujube induced by mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, V.T.; Tuynh, N.V.

    1989-01-01

    Full text: Mutation breeding of jujube (Ziziphus mauritiana Lin.) received attention by the Food Crops Research Institute since 1978. Mutations can be directly released as new cultivars or indirectly as bud grafting source. N-methyl-N-nitroso urea (MNH) was used at a concentration of 0.02-0.04% for 12 h treatment of pre-germinated seeds of different jujube cultivars. Some useful mutants were selected and directly released as new cultivars to farmers. Of the selected mutants two cultivars, ''Ma hong'' and ''Dao tien'', are the most preferable and popularly grown in the country. ''Ma hong'' is a mutant of ''Gia Loc'', a very popular cultivar. Main useful traits of ''Gia Loc'' such as early maturing, two crops of fruits per year are maintained (harvest in December and August). ''Ma hong'' has round-formed, pink rose coloured, sweeter fruits and stable fruit yield in off-season (Aug.) as compared with oval-formed, yellow-coloured and sour fruit of ''Gia Loc''. ''Dao tien'' is a mutant of the local variety ''Thien Phien'' with quite different traits. The original cultivar is late maturing (harvested in Feb.) with one crop of fruit per year and has small fruits (mean wt. of fruit at harvest 20 g). ''Dao tien'' is one month earlier in maturing allowing two crops of fruit per year (harvested in Jan. and Nov.). Fruits are round-formed, bigger (mean wt. of fruit: 25 g) and more tasteful (peach-flavored and brittle). (author)

  17. Development and characterization of 38 polymorphic microsatellite markers from an economically important fruit tree, the Indian jujube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Chu-Ying; Chiang, Yu-Chung; Chen, Chih-Hsiung; Yen, Chung-Ruey; Lee, Sheue-Ru; Lin, Yu-Shium; Tsai, Chi-Chu

    2012-05-01

    A total of 38 polymorphic microsatellite loci of the Indian jujube (Ziziphus mauritiana), an economically important fruit tree, were developed to evaluate genetic diversity and aid in the identification of cultivars. The 38 microsatellite markers were isolated from the Indian jujube using a magnetic bead enrichment method, and polymorphisms were identified in 24 Indian jujube cultivars. The number of alleles ranged from two to 13, with expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.261 to 0.898. The polymorphism information content ranged from 0.248 to 0.889, with a mean of 0.616. Of these 38 simple sequence repeat loci, 20 loci from Z. jujuba (Chinese jujube) were successfully amplified using the simple sequence repeat primer sets. These polymorphic loci should be useful in further studies of the genetic diversity and the identification of cultivars of both the Indian jujube and the Chinese jujube.

  18. Improved irrigation scheduling for pear-jujube trees based on trunk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A suitable indicator for scheduling pear-jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) irrigation in China was developed based on trunk diameter fluctuations (TDF). Parameters derived from TDF responses to variations in soil matrix potential (Ψsoil) were compared under deficit and well irrigation. Maximum daily shrinkage (MDS) increased ...

  19. Robust model of fresh jujube soluble solids content with near ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A robust partial least square (PLS) calibration model with high accuracy and stability was established for the measurement of soluble solids content (SSC) of fresh jujube using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy technique. Fresh jujube samples were collected in different areas of Taigu and Taiyuan cities, central China in ...

  20. Analysis of Essential and Toxic Elements in Jujube Fruits Collected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop a simple and precise method for the determination of the levels of both essential and toxic elements in jujube collected from different locations in China. Methods: Dried jujube fruits collected were digested by optimized microwave procedure. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry ...

  1. Determination of Betaine in Jujube by Capillary Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Likun; Liu, Haixing; Peng, Xuewei

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents the determination of betaine content in jujube by high performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE) method. The borax solution was chosen as buffer solution, and its concentration was 40 mmol at a constant voltage of 20kV and injecting pressure time of 10s at 14°C. Linearity was kept in the concent ration range of 0.0113∼1.45mg of betaine with correlation coefficient of 0.9. The content of betaine in jujube was 85.91 mg/g (RSD = 16.6%) (n = 6). The recovery of betaine in jujube sample was in the range of 86.2% - 116.6% (n=3). This method is specific, simple and rapid and accurate, which is suitable for the detection of the content of betaine in jujube.

  2. Plant density affects light interception and yield in cotton grown as companion crop in young jujube plantations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, D.; Zhang, L.; Liu, Jianguo; Han, S.; Wang, Q.; Evers, J.B.; Liu, Jun; Werf, van der W.; Li, L.

    2014-01-01

    Tree-crop mixturesmayincreaseyieldandrevenueespeciallyduringtheearlyyearsoftreeplantations. Jujube isgrownwidelyinChinafortheirfruits,andcottonisgainingpopularityasanunderstorycropin young jujubeplantations.Thereisaneedforinformationonproductivityandoptimalplantingdensities of

  3. Extraction and determination of total flavonoids in jujube by alcohol extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Y. B.; Ru, X.; Yu, M.; Wang, S. W.; Lu, L.; Qiao, A. N.; Guo, A. Z.

    2017-12-01

    Jujube is a ripe fruit of Rhamnaceae. Its main active component is flavonoids, so the extraction and determination of total flavonoids in jujube will help to develop and utilize the medicinal value of jujube. In this study, the total flavonoids were extracted from jujube by alcohol extraction method. Through single factor investigation and orthogonal test, it was found that the total flavonoids content in jujube was the highest under the condition of 70°C, material ratio of 1:40, and extraction of 30 min by 70% ethanol. The content of total flavonoids in the extract of jujube was 1.57% at the wavelength of 510 nm by UV and rutin as the standard. The method was evaluated by methodological study, and it was determined that this method could be used as the detection of total flavonoids in jujube extraction.

  4. Induction of mutation in Jujube (Zizyphus jujuba Mill) using tissue culture combined with {sup 60}Coγ-ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, H. R. [Horticultural Research Institute, Shanghai Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Shanghai (China); Liu, Z. C. [Shanghai Agrobiological Gene Center, Shanghai (China); Ye, Z. W.; Su, M. S.; Jin, Y. F.

    2009-05-15

    In vivo and in vitro mutagenesis techniques were assayed to explore effects of irradiation in jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill) improvement. {sup 60}Co γ-ray irradiated seeds and shoot tips of a land race of jujube originating in Shangdong province of China were micropropagated up to M{sub 1}V{sub 4} generation on MS basal medium containing 2 mg/L BA and 0.4 mg/L IBA. The rooting MS medium contained 1 mg/L BA and 0.6 mg/L IAA, ZEA 1 mg/L, 2, 4-D 0.5 mg/L, and NAA 0.5 mg/L in different combinations. Adventitious buds were also produced from irradiated calli derived from leaf and hypocotyl fragments and the elongated adventitious buds rooted in vitro prior to green house transfer. Different doses (20 to 900Gy) were tested for in vitro explants as well as the jujube kernels irradiation. Six types of leaf shape and seven types of fruit shape mutations were observed and different ripening characters and growth habits were recorded in the orchard on putatively mutated mature trees. Even though there is a need for confirmation and molecular characterization, these mutations may be considered as a new and powerful way for jujube improvement in order to develop genotypes with promising value added traits. (author)

  5. Pyrosequencing Reveals Fungal Communities in the Rhizosphere of Xinjiang Jujube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi are important soil components as both decomposers and plant symbionts and play a major role in ecological and biogeochemical processes. However, little is known about the richness and structure of fungal communities. DNA sequencing technologies allow for the direct estimation of microbial community diversity, avoiding culture-based biases. We therefore used 454 pyrosequencing to investigate the fungal communities in the rhizosphere of Xinjiang jujube. We obtained no less than 40,488 internal transcribed spacer (ITS rDNA reads, the number of each sample was 6943, 6647, 6584, 6550, 6860, and 6904, and we used bioinformatics and multivariate statistics to analyze the results. The index of diversity showed greater richness in the rhizosphere fungal community of a 3-year-old jujube than in that of an 8-year-old jujube. Most operational taxonomic units belonged to Ascomycota, and taxonomic analyses identified Hypocreales as the dominant fungal order. Our results demonstrated that the fungal orders are present in different proportions in different sampling areas. Redundancy analysis (RDA revealed a significant correlation between soil properties and the abundance of fungal phyla. Our results indicated lower fungal diversity in the rhizosphere of Xinjiang jujube than that reported in other studies, and we hope our findings provide a reference for future research.

  6. Feasibility of Jujube peeling using novel infrared radiation heating technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infrared (IR) radiation heating has a promising potential to be used as a sustainable and effective method to eliminate the use of water and chemicals in the jujube-peeling process and enhance the quality of peeled products. The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of use IR he...

  7. Scheduling irrigation for jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-30

    Aug 30, 2010 ... indicators for diagnosing plant water information, but it is troublesome to measure leaf water potential using a pressure chamber (Turner, 1981). It is also difficult to achieve automatic and continuous records with the pressure chamber. Definition of threshold values of soil moisture for irrigation management ...

  8. [Research on functional diversity of microorganisms on jujube fruit surface in storage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Yuexia

    2009-10-01

    Disease during storage caused by microbial infection is a serious problem of jujube fruits. The aim of the study was to characterize the microbial diversity in stored jujube fruits. I used Biolog in experiment. The types of micro-plates were Filamentous Fungi micro-plate and Economicmicro-plate. There was much difference in microbial functional diversity on the surface of stored jujube fruit. The microbial functional diversity of stored 30 days was richer than it of stored 15 days. The diversity, homogeneity and average well color development of jujube used by fruit perservatives were lower than it not used by fruit preservatives. There were six kinds of the characteristic carbon. Our study firstly showed microbial diversity on the surface of stored jujube fruit. Biolog could be applied in the research on microbial functional diversity of fruit surface.

  9. Effect of Carbon Monoxide on Active Oxygen Metabolism of Postharvest Jujube

    OpenAIRE

    Shaoying Zhang; Qin Li; Yulan Mao

    2014-01-01

    To prolong the shelf life postharvest jujube, the effect of carbon monoxide (CO) on senescence of postharvest jujube in relation to active oxygen metabolism was investigated. Jujubes were fumigated with CO gas at 5, 10, 20 or 40μmol/L for 1 h, and then stored for 30 days at room temperature. Changes in membrane permeability, malonaldehyde (MDA), H2O2, O2•− content, and activities of active oxygen metabolism associated enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase...

  10. Shot-gun proteome and transcriptome mapping of the jujube floral organ and identification of a pollen-specific S-locus F-box gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruihong Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The flower is a plant reproductive organ that forms part of the fruit produced as the flowering season ends. While the number and identity of proteins expressed in a jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill. flower is currently unknown, integrative proteomic and transcriptomic analyses provide a systematic strategy of characterizing the floral biology of plants. We conducted a shotgun proteomic analysis on jujube flowers by using a filter-aided sample preparation tryptic digestion, followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. In addition, transcriptomics analyses were performed on HiSeq2000 sequencers. In total, 7,853 proteins were identified accounting for nearly 30% of the ‘Junzao’ gene models (27,443. Genes identified in proteome generally showed higher RPKM (reads per kilobase per million mapped reads values than undetected genes. Gene ontology categories showed that ribosomes and intracellular organelles were the most dominant classes and accounted for 17.0% and 14.0% of the proteome mass, respectively. The top-ranking proteins with iBAQ >1010 included non-specific lipid transfer proteins, histones, actin-related proteins, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, Bet v I type allergens, etc. In addition, we identified one pollen-specificity S-locus F-box-like gene located on the same chromosome as the S-RNase gene. Both of these may activate the behaviour of gametophyte self-incompatibility in jujube. These results reflected the protein profile features of jujube flowers and contributes new information important to the jujube breeding system.

  11. Effect of paste processing on residue levels of imidacloprid, pyraclostrobin, azoxystrobin and fipronil in winter jujube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wei; Zhao, Liuwei; Liu, Fengmao; Xue, Jiaying; Li, Huichen; Shi, Kaiwei

    2014-01-01

    The changes of imidacloprid, pyraclostrobin, azoxystrobin and fipronil residues were studied to investigate the carryover of pesticide residues in winter jujube during paste processing. A multi-residue analytical method for winter jujube was developed based on the QuEChERS approach. The recoveries for the pesticides were between 87.5% and 116.2%. LODs ranged from 0.002 to 0.1 mg kg(-1). The processing factor (Pf) is defined as the ratio of pesticide residue concentration in the paste to that in winter jujube. Pf was higher than 1 for the removal of extra water, and other steps were generally less than 1, indicating that the whole process resulted in lower pesticide residue levels in paste. Peeling would be the critical step for pesticide removal. Processing factors varied among different pesticides studied. The results are useful to address optimisation of the processing techniques in a manner that leads to considerable pesticide residue reduction.

  12. Antioxidant activity and phenolic content in genotypes of Indian jujube (Zizyphus mauritiana Lamk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmay Kumar Koley

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Indian jujube (Zizyphus mauritiana Lamk, an indigenous fruit crop of India has been widely used in traditional medicine for treating various kinds of diseases. Chinese jujube has been studied; however systematic study on Indian jujube is lacking. In this work, 12 commercial cultivars of Z. mauritiana were evaluated for their ascorbic acid (AA, total phenolics (TPH, flavonoids (TF, and total antioxidant activity (AOX. Results indicate that Indian jujube is a good source of ascorbic acid and total phenolics ranging from 19.54 to 99.49 mg/100 g and 172 to 328.6 mg GAE/100 g, respectively. Total AOX ranged from 7.41 to 13.93 and 8.01 to 15.13 μmol Trolox/g in FRAP and CUPRAC, respectively. Principal component analysis was performed to find a linear combination of the functional attributes which would account for most of the variance in the observed attributes. GGE biplots revealed that ZG-3, Elaichi and Gola, are promising genotypes in terms of total phenolics and flavonoids.

  13. Study on rapid propagation of Zanhuang Chinese jujube by tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yun; Wang Yu; Tian Yanting

    2002-01-01

    Zanhuang jujube is a very precious and rare variety of Chinese jujube. Its development was restricted by the under-developed propagate technique in history. The rapid propagation by tissue culture was studied and the optimum media were screened out. Through studying the condition of initial, proliferating, acclimatizing and rooting culture, 4 media, MS +6-BA 0.5 mg/L+IBA 0.1 mg/L, MS+6-BA 1.5 mg/L+IBA 0.1-0.2 mg/L, MS+KT 0.5 mg/L+NAA 0.2 mg/L and 1/2 MS+IBA 0.6 mg/L+NAA 0.2-0.3 mg/L were selected respectively

  14. Dew measurement and estimation of rain-fed jujube (Zizyphus jujube Mill) in a semi-arid loess hilly region of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xing; GAO Zhiyong; WANG Youke; Wang Zhi; JIN Shanshan

    2017-01-01

    Dew is an important water source for plants in arid and semi-arid regions.However,information on dew is scarce in such regions.In this study,we explored dew formation,amount,and duration of rain-fed jujube (Zi(w)phus jujube Mill) trees in a semi-arid loess hilly region of China (i.e.,Mizhi County).The data included dew intensity and duration,relative humidity,temperature,and wind speed measured from 26 July to 23 October,2012 and from 24 June to 17 October,2013 using a micro-climate system (including dielectric leaf wetness sensors,VP-3 Relative Humidity/Temperature Sensor,High Resolution Rain Gauge,and Davis Cup Anemometer).The results show that atmospheric conditions of relative humidity of >78% and dew point temperature of 1℃C-3℃C are significantly favorable to dew formation.Compared with the rainfall,dew was characterized by high frequency,strong stability,and long duration.Furthermore,heavy dew accounted for a large proportion of the total amount.The empirical models (i.e.,relative humidity model (RH model) and dew point depression model (DPD model)) for daily dew duration estimation performed well at 15-rain intervals,with low errors ranging between 1.29 and 1.60 h,respectively.But it should be noted that the models should be calibrated firstly by determining the optimal thresholds of relatively humidity for RH model and dew point depression for DPD model.For rain-fed jujube trees in the semi-arid loess hilly regions of China,the optimal threshold of relative humidity was 78%,and the optimal upper and lower thresholds of dew point depression were 1℃C and 5℃C,respectively.The study further demonstrates that dew is an important water resource that cannot be ignored for rain-fed jujube trees and may affect water balance at regional scales.

  15. Storage and recycling utilization of leaf-nitrogen of jujube tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Xiang; Hao Zhongning

    1991-01-01

    16 N-urea was foliarly applied on bearing or young jujube tree in autumn of 1987. The effects of leaf-nitrogen retranslocation in the trees, positions of the N stored, forms of reserved N, and reutilization of storage N in the next year were studied. The results were as follows: 15 N returned and stored in all parts of the tree following foliar application of 15 N-urea. Root could use the nitrogen not only absorbed from soil but also transported from leaves. The above-ground organs and roots of jujube tree played the same important roles on nitrogen storage in winter. The main forms of storage nitrogen were protein-N, which was 2-3 fold more than non-protein-N. The storage nitrogen existed in above-ground parts was used first in early spring, and that returned from leaves last year could be prior used for the developments of leaves, branchlets and infloresences. The relative distribution of nitrogen in floresence was more in bearing tree than in young tree. In the next year, 15 N was redistributed in branchlets, leaves, flowers, young fruits and perennial spurs in autumn. The 15 N transported out of the treated spurs reappeared in next spring and further transported to neighboring spurs. The local storage N was prior used for growth. There was 21.49% of fertilizer-N stored in the young jujube trees when treated foliarly with urea in autumn of 1987. After one years's use, there was still 18.91% of fertilizer-N existed in the trees, which indicated a characteristic of circulatory utilization of nitrogen for a long period and the reutilized nitrogen was mainly from jujube leaves and deciduous branchlets

  16. Combination of UV-C treatment and Metschnikowia pulcherrimas for controlling Alternaria rot in postharvest winter jujube fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dongqi; Zhu, Lixia; Hou, Xujie

    2015-01-01

    The potential of using antagonistic yeast Metschnikowia pulcherrimas alone or in combination with ultraviolet-C (UV-C) treatment for controlling Alternaria rot of winter jujube, and its effects on postharvest quality of fruit was investigated. The results showed that spore germination of Alternaria alternata was significantly inhibited by each of the 3 doses (1, 5, and 10 kJ m(-2) ) in vitro. In vivo, UV-C treatment (5 kJ m(-2) ) or antagonist yeast was capable of reducing the percentage of infected wounds and lesion diameter in artificially inoculated jujube fruits, however, in fruit treated with combination of UV-C treatment and M. pulcherrima, the percentage of infected wounds and lesion diameter was only 16.0% and 0.60 cm, respectively. The decay incidence on winter jujube fruits treated with the combination of UV-C treatment and M. pulcherrima was 23% after storage at 0 ± 1 °C for 45 d followed by 22 °C for 7 d. None of the treatments impaired quality parameters of jujube fruit. Thus, the combination of UV-C radiation and M. pulcherrima could be an alternative to synthetic fungicides for controlling postharvest Alternaria rot of winter jujube. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  17. Effects of postharvest salicylic acid dipping on Alternaria rot and disease resistance of jujube fruit during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jiankang; Yan, Jiaqi; Zhao, Yumei; Jiang, Weibo

    2013-10-01

    Considerable postharvest losses caused by Alternaria alternata often occur in Chinese jujube fruit, and synthetic fungicides have been widely used to protect the fruit from Alternaria rot. However, the potential harmfulness of fungicide residues to human health and the environment cannot be ignored. This study was conducted to develop an alternative approach for controlling postharvest disease by inducing fruit resistance with salicylic acid (SA) dipping. Disease incidence and lesion area in the jujube fruit inoculated with A. alternata were significantly inhibited by 2 and 2.5 mmol L(-1) SA dipping. Naturally infected decay rate and index in jujubes were also significantly reduced by SA dipping during long-term storage at 0°C. SA enhanced activities of the main defense-related enzymes including phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, peroxidase, chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase in the fruit during storage. SA strongly decreased catalase activity but increased superoxide dismutase activity and ascorbic acid content in jujubes. The beneficial effects of SA on fruit protection may be due to its ability to activate several highly coordinated defence-related systems in jujubes, instead of its fungicidal activity. The findings indicated that application of SA would offer an alternative approach that helps to control postharvest disease and maintain storage quality in fruits. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Production of granular activated carbon from food-processing wastes (walnut shells and jujube seeds) and its adsorptive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Wookeun; Kim, Jongho; Chung, Jinwook

    2014-08-01

    Commercial activated carbon is a highly effective absorbent that can be used to remove micropollutants from water. As a result, the demand for activated carbon is increasing. In this study, we investigated the optimum manufacturing conditions for producing activated carbon from ligneous wastes generated from food processing. Jujube seeds and walnut shells were selected as raw materials. Carbonization and steam activation were performed in a fixed-bed laboratory electric furnace. To obtain the highest iodine number, the optimum conditions for producing activated carbon from jujube seeds and walnut shells were 2 hr and 1.5 hr (carbonization at 700 degrees C) followed by 1 hr and 0.5 hr (activation at 1000 degrees C), respectively. The surface area and iodine number of activated carbon made from jujube seeds and walnut shells were 1,477 and 1,184 m2/g and 1,450 and 1,200 mg/g, respectively. A pore-distribution analysis revealed that most pores had a pore diameter within or around 30-40 angstroms, and adsorption capacity for surfactants was about 2 times larger than the commercial activated carbon, indicating that waste-based activated carbon can be used as alternative. Implications: Wastes discharged from agricultural and food industries results in a serious environmental problem. A method is proposed to convert food-processing wastes such as jujube seeds and walnut shells into high-grade granular activated carbon. Especially, the performance of jujube seeds as activated carbon is worthy of close attention. There is little research about the application ofjujube seeds. Also, when compared to two commercial carbons (Samchully and Calgon samples), the results show that it is possible to produce high-quality carbon, particularly from jujube seed, using a one-stage, 1,000 degrees C, steam pyrolysis. The preparation of activated carbon from food-processing wastes could increase economic return and reduce pollution.

  19. Effect of Chitosan Coating with Cinnamon Oil on the Quality and Physiological Attributes of China Jujube Fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yage; Lin, Hongbin; Cao, Dong; Xu, Qinglian; Han, Wenfeng; Wang, Ranran; Che, Zhenming; Li, Xihong

    2015-01-01

    Effects of chitosan coating with cinnamon oil on the physiological attributes and preservation quality of China jujube fruits during storage at 4°C for 60 days were investigated. Results indicated that weight loss and decay of jujube fruits were significantly reduced by chitosan-oil coating during the period of 60-day storage, which also exhibited a quite beneficial effect on maintaining the sensory quality for jujube fruits. Meanwhile, the contents of vitamin C and titratable acid decreased to 3.08 mg·g−1 and 0.342% for the fruits treated by chitosan-oil coating (1.0% + 0.10%), respectively. Polyphenol oxidase, superoxide dismutase, and peroxidase activities were 13.40 U·g−1, 14.53 U·g−1, and 63.6 U·g−1 at the end of storage, respectively. The contents of total soluble phenolics and MDA were 34.51 mg·g−1 and 19.43 μmol·g−1 for the combined coating treated samples and control fruits, respectively. These results suggested that the chitosan-oil coating might be recognized as one efficiency technology on the preservation quality of jujube fruits during the storage time. PMID:26495315

  20. Pesticides in persimmons, jujubes and soil from China: Residue levels, risk assessment and relationship between fruits and soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yihua; Li, Shiliang; Ni, Zhanglin; Qu, Minghua; Zhong, Donglian; Ye, Caifen; Tang, Fubin

    2016-01-15

    Extreme and uncontrolled usage of pesticides produces a number of problems for vegetation and human health. In this study, the existence of organophosphates (OPs), organochlorines (OCs), pyrethroids (PYs) and fungicides (FUs) were investigated in persimmons/jujubes and their planted soils, which were collected from China. One OP (dimethoate), three OCs (DDT, quintozene and aldrin), six PYs (bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate and deltamethrin) and two FUs (triadimefon and buprofezin) were found in 36.4% of persimmons and 70.8% of jujubes, with concentrations from 1.0 μg/kg to 2945.0 μg/kg. The most frequently detected pesticides in the two fruits were fenpropathrin in persimmons and cypermethrin in jujubes, with the detection frequencies of 30.0% and 22.7%, respectively. The residues of 4.5% (persimmon) and 25.0% (jujube) of samples were higher than the maximum residue limits (MRLs) of China. Compared with the fruits, more types of pesticides and higher residues were observed in their planted soils. The most frequently detected pesticides were HCH in persimmon soil and DDT in jujube soil, with the detection frequencies of 10.9% and 12.7%, respectively. For the tested samples, 39.1% of fruit samples and 63.0% of soil samples with multiple residues (containing more than two pesticides) were noted, even up to 8 residues in fruits and 14 residues in soils. Except for cyhalothrin, the other short-term risks for the tested pesticides in the fruits were below 10%, and the highest long-term risk was 14.13% for aldrin and dieldrin. There was no significant health risk for consumers via consumption of the two fruits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Storage temperature affects fruit quality attributes of Ber ( Ziziphus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fruit utilization is affected by quality attributes and shelf life. The quality of Jujube or Ber (Ziziphus mauritiana Lamk.) fruits after harvest depends on storage conditions used. In this study, different storage temperatures and durations were evaluated to determine the appropriate storage conditions of fresh fruits of Z.

  2. Research experiment on infiltration and runoff in Jujube land of northern Shaanxi Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Song

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To provide guidance for the efficient use of rainwater in Jujube forests of the northern Shaanxi Province, research on the processes of infiltration and runoff under field simulated rainfall were conducted. The process of infiltration and runoff-yield on sloping land was simulated with Richards equation and the water balance equation under different rainfall intensities and soil water content, in the north of Shaanxi province. It reached results via comparing with observation results: the mean relative error of the period cumulative infiltration was less than 3%, with a root mean squared error (RSME less than 0.3. The mean relative error of the period cumulative runoff was less than 12.5%, RSME < 0.4. The simulation results were reasonable; however, the simulation ponding time generally lagged behind measured ponding time probably because of spatial variation of saturated hydraulic conductivity and uneven rainfall.

  3. Effect of harvest, drying and storage on the bitterness, moisture, sugars, free amino acids and phenolic compounds of jujube fruit (Zizyphus jujuba cv. Junzao).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yunfeng; Ding, Tian; Wang, Wenjun; Xiang, Yanju; Ye, Xingqian; Li, Mei; Liu, Donghong

    2018-01-01

    The taste of dried jujube fruit when compared with fresh ones is less palatable, as it develops bitterness during drying and storage. Therefore, identifying the methods by which bitterness occurs is essential for developing strategies for processing and storage. Bitterness in fresh jujube fruit was negligible; however, it increased by 0.9-, 1.5- and 1.8-fold during drying and storage over 6 and 12 months. The moisture significantly decreased during harvesting and drying. Free amino acids, except proline and tyrosine, significantly decreased during drying and storage. Fructose, glucose and sucrose hardly changed during harvest, drying and storage. Titratable acidity, total phenolic and total flavonoids contents were stable during harvest and drying, but increased upon storage. Additionally, protocatechuic and ellagic acids were not detected in fresh jujube fruit, however, were found to increase during drying and storage. Bitterness in fresh jujube fruit tasted negligible because of meagre amount of phytochemicals, while the condensation effect of moisture reduction, the loss of free amino acids, and the formation of protocatechuic and ellagic acids could aggravate the bitterness of jujube fruit during drying and storage. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Characterization of volatile profile from ten different varieties of Chinese jujubes by HS-SPME/GC-MS coupled with E-nose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qinqin; Song, Jianxin; Bi, Jinfeng; Meng, Xianjun; Wu, Xinye

    2018-03-01

    Volatile profile of ten different varieties of fresh jujubes was characterized by HS-SPME/GC-MS (headspace solid phase micro-extraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) and E-nose (electronic nose). GC-MS results showed that a total of 51 aroma compounds were identified in jujubes, hexanoic acid, hexanal, (E)-2-hexenal, (Z)-2-heptenal, benzaldehyde and (E)-2-nonenal were the main aroma components with contributions that over 70%. Differentiation of jujube varieties was conducted by cluster analysis of GC-MS data and principal component analysis & linear discriminant analysis of E-nose data. Both results showed that jujubes could be mainly divided into two groups: group A (JZ, PDDZ, JSXZ and LWZZ) and group B (BZ, YZ, MZ, XZ and DZ). There were significant differences in contents of alcohols, acids and aromatic compounds between group A and B. GC-MS coupled with E-nose could be a fast and accurate method to identify the general flavor difference in different varieties of jujubes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Transcriptomic analysis reveals the metabolic mechanism of L-ascorbic acid in Ziziphus jujuba Mill.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmei eZhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill. is the most economically important member of the Rhamnaceae family and contains a high concentration of ascorbic acid (AsA. To explore the metabolic mechanism of AsA accumulation, we investigated the abundance of AsA in the fruit development stages, the leaf and flower of Z. jujuba cv Junzao, and the mature fruit of one type of wild jujube (Z. jujuba var. spinosa Hu, Yanchuan sour jujube. And the expression patterns of genes involved in AsA biosynthesis, degradation and recycling were analyzed. The result showed that AsA biosynthesis during early fruit development (the enlargement stage is the main reason for jujube high accumulation. The L-galactose pathway plays a predominant role in the biosynthesis of AsA during jujube fruit development, and the genes GMP1, GME1, GGP, and GaLDH involved in the determination of AsA concentration during fruit development and in different genotypes; the myo-inositol pathway along with the genes GME2 and GMP2 in the L-galactose pathway play a compensatory role in maintaining AsA accumulation during the ripening stage. These findings enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanism in regulating AsA accumulation for jujube.

  6. Ultrasound enhances calcium absorption of jujube fruit by regulating the cellular calcium distribution and metabolism of cell wall polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Huanhuan; Liu, Qiqi; Xu, Juan; Dong, Yu; Liu, Mengpei; Zong, Wei

    2017-12-01

    Ultrasound has been applied in fruit pre-washing processes. However, it is not sufficient to protect fruit from pathogenic infection throughout the entire storage period, and sometimes ultrasound causes tissue damage. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of calcium chloride (CaCl 2 , 10 g L -1 ) and ultrasound (350 W at 40 kHz), separately and in combination, on jujube fruit quality, antioxidant status, tissue Ca 2+ content and distribution along with cell wall metabolism at 20 °C for 6 days. All three treatments significantly maintained fruit firmness and peel color, reduced respiration rate, decay incidence, superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde and preserved higher enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase) and non-enzymatic (ascorbic acid and glutathione) antioxidants compared with the control. Moreover, the combined treatment was more effective in increasing tissue Ca 2+ content and distribution, inhibiting the generation of water-soluble and CDTA-soluble pectin fractions, delaying the solubilization of Na 2 CO 3 -soluble pectin and having lower activities of cell wall-modifying enzymes (polygalacturonase and pectate lyase) during storage. These results demonstrated that the combination of CaCl 2 and ultrasound has potential commercial application to extend the shelf life of jujube fruit by facilitating Ca 2+ absorption and stabilizing the cell wall structure. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Chemical composition, antioxidant capacity, and sensory quality of dried jujube fruits as affected by cultivar and drying method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojdyło, Aneta; Figiel, Adam; Legua, Pilar; Lech, Krzysztof; Carbonell-Barrachina, Ángel A; Hernández, Francisca

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different dying methods, such as convective drying (CD: 50, 60, 70 °C), vacuum-microwave drying (VMD: 120, 480, 480-120 W), a combination of convective pre-drying and vacuum-microwave finish drying [(CPD (60 °C)-VMFD (480-120 W)], and freeze-drying (FD) on key quality parameters of dried jujube fruits (cv. "GAL", "MSI", and "PSI"). The parameters studied included bioactive compounds (flavan-3-ols and flavonols, identified by LC-PDA-MS, and vitamin C), antioxidant capacity (ABTS and FRAP), and sensory attributes (e.g. hardness, jujube-ID, and sweetness). The best quality of the dried product (high contents of bioactive compounds and high intensity of key sensory attributes) was found in fruits treated by FD and VMD 480-120 W. The best cultivars were "PSI" and "GAL" from the point of view of bioactive content and sensory quality, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Chemical and volatile composition of jujube wines fermented by Saccharomyces cerevisiae with and without pulp contact and protease treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenye ZHANG

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study evaluated the chemical and volatile composition of jujube wines fermented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae A1.25 with and without pulp contact and protease treatment during fermentation. Yeast cell population, total reducing sugar and methanol contents had significant differences between nonextracted and extracted wine. The nonextracted wines had significantly higher concentrations of ethyl 9-hexadecenoate, ethyl palmitate and ethyl oleate than the extracted wines. Pulp contact also could enhance phenylethyl alcohol, furfuryl alcohol, ethyl palmitat and ethyl oleate. Furthermore, protease treatment can accelerate the release of fusel oils. The first principal component separated the wine from the extracted juice without protease from other samples based on the higher concentrations of medium-chain fatty acids and medium-chain ethyl esters. Sensory evaluation showed pulp contact and protease could improve the intensity and complexity of wine aroma due to the increase of the assimilable nitrogen.

  9. Alkali-corrosion synthesis and excellent DSSC performance of novel jujube-like hierarchical TiO2 microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jiajia; Li, Po; Wen, Xiaogang

    2018-04-01

    Novel jujube-like hierarchical TiO2 microspheres (HTMs) were synthesized by an alkali-corrosion process of titanium phosphate (Ti2O3(H2PO4)2 · 2H2O) microspheres. The hierarchical titanium phosphate microsphere (HTPM) intermediates consisting of nanoflakes with a thickness of 20 nm were firstly prepared by a facile hydrothermal method. After reacting with diluted NaOH at low temperature and atmospheric pressure, followed by subsequent acid washing and a calcination process, the HTPM intermediates were transformed to TiO2 with the microsphere morphology well retained, while the nanoflakes became porous, and some new nanowires were formed between the nanoflakes. Finally, HTMs consisting of porous nanoflakes and nanowires were obtained. The possible growth mechanisms of HTPMs and HTMs are discussed. The HTMs demonstrate high specific surface area and excellent light-scattering ability. The performance of the dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) of the HTMs synthesized under different conditions is studied, and a total conversion efficiency of up to 8.93% was obtained. The improved DSSC performance was attributed to the enhanced dye loading, light-scattering, and charge transporting ability of the HTMs with a unique hierarchical nanostructure.

  10. Effect of saline irrigation water on gas exchange and proline metabolism in ber (Ziziphus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagdi, D L; Bagri, G K

    2016-09-01

    An experiment was conducted in pots of 25 kg capacity to study the effect of saline irrigation (EC 0,5,10,15 and 20 dSm-1) prepared by mixing NaCl, NaSO4, CaCl and MgCl2 in 3:1 ratio of chloride and sulphate on gas exchange traits, membrane stability, chlorophyll stability index and osmolytic defense mechanism in Ziziphus rotundifolia and Ziziphus nummularia species of Indian jujube (Z.mauritiana). Result showed that net photosynthetic rate (PN), transpiration (e) and stomatal conductance were comparatively lower in Ziziphus nummularia, which further declined with increasing level of saline irrigation water. Chlorophyll stability and membrane stability also declined significantly in salt stress, with higher magnitude in Ziziphus nummularia. The activity of proline anabolic enzymes; Δ1-Pyrrolline-5-carboxylate reductase, Δ1-Pyrrolline-5-carboxylate synthetase and Ornithine-δ-aminotransferase were recorded higher in Ziziphus rotundifolia with decrease in proline dehydrogenase. The sodium content was observed higher in roots of Ziziphus rotundifolia and leaves of Ziziphus nummularia. Therefore, it is suggested that salt tolerance mechanism was more efficiently operative in Ziziphus rotundifolia owing to better management of physiological attributes, osmolytic defense mechanism and restricted translocation of sodium from root to leaves along with larger accumulation of potassium in its leaves.

  11. Nitrogen storage and distribution and reuse of 15N-urea applied in autumn on different branch leaves of winter Jujube (Zizyphus jujuba Mill. var. inermis Rehd) trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Dengchao; Jiang Yuanmao; Peng Futian; Zhang Xu; Sui Jing; He Naibo

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of foliage spraying with urea to augment the seasonal internal cycling of N in winter Jujube was studied. Different branches leaves of 6-year-old trees were painted with 5% abundance of 15 N-urea solution after fruit harvesting. Results showed that 15 N was detected in all the tree organs during the dormant season. In the following year 15 N was also detected in new growth organs (deciduous spurs, leaves and flowers). The treated branches and adjacent organs were the main sinks of Nitrogen in the dormant season. Ndff% in the treated branches was significantly decreased during dormant season. And a decrease of 59.13% was observed in the new growth branch treated and 60.05% in the perennial branches. Reserved nitrogen was reused for initial growth (leaves and deciduous spurs). 15 N stored in perennial organs also remobilized to sustain new growth of treated branches. It is different from the treated new growth branch, 15 N stored in the treated perennial branches is not only transported for new organs growth, but also for roots growth. (authors)

  12. Effect of novel bioactive edible coatings based on jujube gum and nettle oil-loaded nanoemulsions on the shelf-life of Beluga sturgeon fillets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharibzahedi, Seyed Mohammad Taghi; Mohammadnabi, Sara

    2017-02-01

    Effect of jujube gum (JG; 4, 8 and 12% wt)-based nanoemulsions (NEs) containing nettle essential oil (NEO; 2, 3.5 and 5% wt) as new edible coatings was investigated to preserve Beluga sturgeon fillets (BSFs) during 15 day-refrigerated storage at 4°C. Physical (weight loss, cooking loss, color and texture), chemical (pH, FFA, PV, TBARS and TVB-N), microbiological (total and psychrotrophic bacterial counts), and sensorial characteristics of BSFs were kinetically analyzed. Preliminary studies showed that the NEs formulated with NEO lower than 5% at all JG concentrations were able to form stable coating solutions owing to the highest short-term stability (>90%) and entrapment efficiency (94.4-98.3%). Edible NE coating formulated with 12% JG and 3.5% NEO as a novel antimicrobial and antioxidant biomaterial exhibited the lowest weight and cooking losses, pH changes, textural and color deterioration, lipid oxidation and microbial growth in BSFs refrigerated over a period of 15days (P<0.05). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of nucleosides and nucleobases in fruits of Ziziphus jujuba by UPLC-DAD-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Sheng; Duan, Jin-Ao; Tang, Yu-Ping; Zhu, Zhen-Hua; Qian, Ye-Fei; Yang, Nian-Yun; Shang, Er-Xin; Qian, Da-Wei

    2010-10-13

    The fruit of Ziziphus jujuba , named dazao in Chinese, has been utilized as food as well as crude drugs in China for thousands of years. To explore the profiles of the nucleosides and nucleobases in this fruit, an ultraperformance liquid chromatograph coupled with a photodiode array detector and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometer method (UPLC-DAD-MS) has been established and validated in this paper. The validated method was successfully applied for the simultaneous characterization and quantitation of 9 nucleosides and nucleobases in 49 dazao samples, which comprised 43 cultivars from 26 cultivation regions. Furthermore, principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to classify the samples on the basis of the contents of the nine analyzed compounds. The results showed that almost all of these dazao samples were rich in nucleosides and nucleobases, although their contents were obviously various, and the proposed method could serve as a prerequisite for quality control of jujube products.

  14. Analysis of Essential and Toxic Elements in Jujube Fruits Collected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ISSN: 1596-5996 (print); 1596-9827 (electronic). © Pharmacotherapy Group, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Benin, Benin City, 300001 Nigeria. All rights ... been used for human consumption and medicinal ... operation conditions were as follows: RF Power: 1.3kw ... The data were analysed using SPSS software.

  15. Density responses and spatial distribution of cotton yield and yield components in jujube (Zizyphus jujube)/cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) agroforestry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Qi; Han, Shuo; Zhang, Lizhen; Zhang, Dongsheng; Werf, van der Wopke; Evers, Jochem B.; Sun, Hongquan; Su, Zhicheng; Zhang, Siping

    2016-01-01

    Trees are the dominant species in agroforestry systems, profoundly affecting the performance of understory crops. Proximity to trees is a key factor in crop performance, but rather little information is available on the spatial distribution of yield and yield components of crop species under the

  16. Free radical scavenging activities of pigment extract from Hibiscus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2012-01-05

    Jan 5, 2012 ... molecules by getting electrons from them (Lien et al.,. 2008; Perry et al., ... of the filtrate was adjusted to 80% with 95% ethanol. The ..... Free Radical bio. Med. ... Antioxidant properties of banana flower of two cultivars in China using 2 ... total phenolic contents in peel and pulp of Chinese jujube (Ziziphus.

  17. Effect of Different Solvents on Total Phenolic Contents and Antioxidant Activity of Zizyphus jujube Miller Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamhossein Davarynejad

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Phenolic compounds have an ability to scavenge free radicals and cause the balance of reactive oxygen species (ROS in our body. This balance prevents atherosclerosis, coronary heart and cancer diseases. Butylated hydroxyl toluene (BHT is a well-known synthetic antioxidant, which is restricted to be used due to its probable toxic effects. Therefore, replacement of synthetic antioxidants with plant materials with high amounts of antioxidant activity, which protect the body from free radicals and many diseases caused by lipid peroxidation, is an appropriate option. ZiziphusjujubaMiller is one of the forty species belonging to Rhamnaceae family, which produces a great deal of industrial raw materials for horticultural, ornamental, food, and pharmaceutical industries. Antioxidants can be extracted by various solvents and extraction methods. Solvent extraction is the most common method used for separating natural antioxidants. Solvent properties undoubtedly play a key role in the extraction of antioxidative compounds. The type and yield of antioxidant extracted have been found to vary as affected by the solvent properties such as polarity, viscosity and vapor pressure. Therefore, it is difficult to develop a unified standard method for the extraction of antioxidants from all plant materials. Materials and Methods: Plant materials Fresh fruits were collected from Birjand, Iran, in late summer 2014. The samples were air dried under the shade at room temperature. Dried fruits were ground by using a mortar and pestle and were separately extracted by distilled water and organic solvents such as methanol, ethanol and acetone (50%, 90% and100% (v/v. After filtering through the Whatman paper #3 and removing the solvents (using a rotary evaporator (BUCHI V-850 and water (using a freeze dryer, (OPERON, FDB-5503, Korea, the dried extracts were stored in refrigerator for further analysis. Determination of Total Phenolic Content (TPC Samples were measured for TPCs colorimetrically using the Folin-Ciocalteu method with modification. Absorbance was read at 725 nm against blank using UV-Visible spectrophotometer (Cecil. UK.. A calibration curve was prepared using a standard solution of Gallic acid (0.2-1mg/ml. Results were expressed as mg Gallic acid/g dry extract (mg GA/g DE. Determination of Total Flavonoid Content (TFC. TFC was determined using the method of Huang et al. (13 with minor modifications. Absorption was measured at 430 nm using UV-VIS spectrophotometer (Cecil. UK.. TFC was determined using a standard curve with quercetin as the standard, and expressed as mg of quercetin equivalents (CE/g dry extract (mg QE/g DE. Determination of Total Anthocyanin Content (TAC. TAC was measured using a spectrophotometric differential pH method. Its absorbance was read at 510 and 700nm. Results were expressed as milligrams of cyanidin-3-glucoside (CY. equivalents per g of dry extract. Determination of Total Tannin Content. For determination of tannins in the sample extracts, vanillin–HCl method was used. The absorbance was read at 500 nm using UV–vis spectrophotometer. The content of tannins in the sample was expressed as mgcatechine equivalent (CE/100g sample. Determination of Antioxidant Activity. Antioxidant activity of the samples was determined using DPPH (2, 2-diphenyl-1-pic-rylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP. In the presence of antioxidant, FRAP assay reduced Fe3+-TPTZ (2, 4, 6-tris (2-pyridyl-5-triazine complex to Fe2+ - TPTZ at low pH. The absorbance of the mixture was measured by using spectrophotometric ally at 595 nm. The effect of antioxidant on DPPH radical was thought to be due to their hydrogen donating ability or radical scavenging activity. DPPH assay expressed as IC50 and percentage inhibition. Lower IC50 value indicates higher antioxidant activity. Results and Discussion: Efficiency of different solvent extractions depends on the matrix of plant materials as well as the type of extractable compounds. The correct selection of solvent can improve the extraction yield of antioxidants from plants matrices considerably. For this reason, in the present study, some selected types of solvent showed different results. For extraction of total phenol and flavonoid compound, acetone 50% was the best yield. In methanolic extract (50, 100%, the highest amounts of anthocyanin and total tannin were reported. In all extracts, water had the least efficiency in comparison with other solvents. High correlation was observed in total phenolic content and antioxidant activity which was determined by DPPH and FRAP assay. Acetone 50% was the most potent for scavenging free radicals and reducing a ferric-tripyridyltriazine, Fe (III-TPTZ, complex to ferrous, Fe (II in all extracts. Conclusions: The results of the present study indicated that polarity, selectivity, viscosity, and vapor pressure are important physicochemical properties that should be considered when selecting a suitable solvent for the extraction of bioactive compounds from plant materials.

  18. Protective effect of Ziziphus mauritiana leaf extract on carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    2005-09-13

    Sep 13, 2005 ... Short Communication. Protective effect of Ziziphus ... INTRODUCTION. Medicinal plants play a key role in the human health care. About 80% of the world .... McGraw Hill International Edition, London. Gregus Z, Kiwassen C ...

  19. Pretreatment of albino rats with aqueous leaf extract of Ziziphus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The effect of the aqueous extract of Ziziphus mauritiana leaf on hepatic lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione and total antioxidant status was studied in chronic alcohol-induced liver damage. Method: Alcohol-induced liver toxicity was created by oral administration of 40% alcohol solution (v/v, 1ml/100g) to rats for ...

  20. Antigiardial activity of glycoproteins and glycopeptides from Ziziphus honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Seif Eldin A; Kabashi, Ahmed S; Koko, Waleed S; Azim, M Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Natural honey contains an array of glycoproteins, proteoglycans and glycopeptides. Size-exclusion chromatography fractionated Ziziphus honey proteins into five peaks with molecular masses in the range from 10 to >200 kDa. The fractionated proteins exhibited in vitro activities against Giardia lamblia with IC50 values ≤ 25 μg/mL. Results indicated that honey proteins were more active as antiprotozoal agents than metronidazole. This study indicated the potential of honey proteins and peptides as novel antigiardial agents.

  1. Immunomodulatory, Cytotoxicity, and Antioxidant Activities of Roots of Ziziphus mauritiana

    OpenAIRE

    Afzal, Samina; Batool, Murium; Ch, Bashir Ahmad; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Uzair, Muhammad; Afzal, Khurram

    2017-01-01

    Aims: The study is conducted to evaluate the immunomodulatory, cytotoxicity, and antioxidant potential of Ziziphus mauritiana (Rhamnaceae). Phytochemical analysis of Z. mauritiana revealed the presence of alkaloids, anthraquinone glycoside, cardiac glycoside, saponin, tannin, and flavonoids. Methodology: The cytotoxicity of the plant Z. mauritiana was evaluated by brine shrimp lethality test. Antioxidant parameters such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), and ma...

  2. In vitro shoot multiplication of Ziziphus spina-christi by shoot tip culture

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-02-08

    Feb 8, 2010 ... Key words: Clonal propagation, cidir, shoot tip culture, Ziziphus spina-christi (L.) Desf. INTRODUCTION. Ziziphus spina-christi (L.) Desf., locally known as cidir, is a multipurpose tree species belonging to the botanical family Rhamnaceae. It is an important cultivated tree and one of the few truly native tree ...

  3. Physico-chemical analysis and antimicrobial potential of A pis dorsata, A pis mellifera and Z iziphus jujube honey samples from Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hira Fahim

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: Physico-chemical analysis of honey samples confirmed good quality of honey according to the standards set by European Union Commission and Codex Alimentarius Commission. Evaluation of these honey samples confirms antimicrobial potential of particular types of honeys indigenous to Pakistan.

  4. New robust sensitive fluorescence spectroscopy coupled with PLSR for estimation of quercetin in Ziziphus mucronata and Ziziphus sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Javid; Mabood, Fazal; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Ali, Liaqat; Rizvi, Tania Shamim; Jabeen, Farah; Gilani, Syed Abdullah; Shinwari, Shehla; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Alabri, Zahra Khalfan; Al Ghawi, Said Hamood Salim

    2018-04-01

    Flavonoids are natural antioxidants derived from plants and commonly found in a variety of foods to sequester free radicals. Quercetin, belonging to flavonol subclass of flavonoids, has received considerable attention because of its wide uses as a nutritional supplement as well as a phytochemical remedy for a number of diseases. In the current study, quantification of quercetin was carried out in two medicinally important flavonoid rich plant Ziziphus mucronata and Ziziphus sativa. Emission spectroscopy was utilized as a new method coupled with Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR) and the cross validation was done by UV-Visible spectroscopy. The results indicated the higher quercetin content in Z. mucronata (1.50 ± 0.034%) than Z. sativa (1.21 ± 0.052%), and were further verified through Folin-Ciocalteu Colorimetric method (Z. mucronata; 1.41 ± 0.26% and Z. sativa; 1.13 ± 0.136%). In this study the sensitivity was explained in term of slope i.e. Slope = 0.9973.

  5. Ziziphus mauritiana (masau) fruits fermentation in Zimbabwe: from black-box to starter culture development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyanga, L.K.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis reports on studies of microbiological and biochemical properties of masau (Ziziphus mauritiana) fruit fermentation and the development of starter cultures for the production of masau beverages.

    A survey to document the traditional processing

  6. Hepato-Protective Potential of Methanol Extract of Leaf of Ziziphus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The study was carried out to evaluate the hepatoprotective potential of the methanol leaf extract of Ziziphus mucronata (ZMLM). Method: The extract was prepared by soaking in 70% methanol/water and rotary evaporation. The phenol content of extract was then estimated. Twenty five adult male Sprague dawley ...

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Moisture Sorption Isotherms and Determination of Isosteric Heats of Sorption of Ziziphus Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amel Saad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Desorption and adsorption equilibrium moisture isotherms of Ziziphus spina-christi leaves were determined using the gravimetric-static method at 30, 40, and 50°C for water activity (aw ranging from 0.057 to 0.898. At a given aw, the results show that the moisture content decreases with increasing temperature. A hysteresis effect was observed. The experimental data of sorption were fitted by eight models (GAB, BET, Henderson-Thompson, modified-Chung Pfost, Halsey, Oswin, Peleg, and Adam and Shove. After evaluating the models according to several criteria, the Peleg and Oswin models were found to be the most suitable for describing the sorption curves. The net isosteric heats of desorption and adsorption of Ziziphus spina-christi leaves were calculated by applying the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to the sorption isotherms and an expression for predicting these thermodynamic properties was given.

  8. Ziziphus mauritiana (masau) fruits fermentation in Zimbabwe: from black-box to starter culture development

    OpenAIRE

    Nyanga, L.K.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis reports on studies of microbiological and biochemical properties of masau (Ziziphus mauritiana) fruit fermentation and the development of starter cultures for the production of masau beverages. A survey to document the traditional processing techniques was conducted using a questionnaire and focus group discussions in each of the three districts, i.e., Mudzi, Mt Darwin and Muzarabani in Zimbabwe. The survey results showed that the masau fruit is usually gathered by women and chi...

  9. Endophytic fungi associated with Ziziphus species from mountainous area of Oman and new records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAIFELDIN A.F. EL-NAGERABI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available El-Nagerabi SAF, Elshafie AE, AlKhanjari SS. 2013. Endophytic fungi associated with Ziziphus species from mountainous area of Oman and new records. Biodiversitas 14: 10-16. Ziziphus species of the family Rhamnaceae grow extensively in arid and semi-arid regions. It is possible that the endophytic fungi associated with this plant might enhance the host resistance to the environmental impacts. The endophytic fungal population inhabiting the healthy leaves of Z. spina-christi and Z. hajanensis plants were determined from April 2008 to October 2011. The endophytic fungal communities varied between the two species, and 45 fungal species, 18 sterile mycelia and 12 yeasts were isolated from Z. spina-christi, whereas 35 fungi, 11 sterile mycelia and 5 yeasts were recovered from Z. hajanensis indicating tissue and species-specificity and without any seasonal variation among the endophytes. These endophytes are new to Ziziphus plants and 45 species are new to the mycoflora of Oman, whereas 27 species are new to Arabian Peninsula. The genus Alternaria was the most prevalent (19-81% followed by Aspergillus (19-78%, Rhizopus stolonifer (78%, Mycelia sterilia (69%, yeasts (47%, Cladosporium (11-56%, Drechslera (14-53%, Curvularia (8-50%, Fusarium (6-33%, Ulocladium (41-31%, Penicillium (3-22%, Alysidium resine (11%, Trichocladium (6-11%, Anguillospora longissima, Bactrodesmium rahmii, Catenularia (8%, Helminthosporium sorghi (7%, Dendryphiella infuscans (6%, Hansfordia biophila (3-6%, Arthrinium, Dissophora, and Phoma sorghina (3%. The recovery of many fungal isolates, morphologically various sterile mycelia and yeasts suggests the high biodiversity of the endophytes invading these plants with strong evidence for future isolation of numerous fungal species through adopting more advanced molecular and DNA identification methods.

  10. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizae on growth and mineral nutrition of greenhouse propagated fruit trees from diverse geographic provenances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guissou, T.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Description of the subject. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi are known to promote plant growth by enhancing mineral uptake in nutrient deficient soils. These beneficial effects on plant growth may vary considerably between cultivars of a given species and between plant species originating from different locations. Objectives. The present experiment evaluated the response of three Sahelian fruit trees: néré (Parkia biglobosa [Jacq.] G.Don, tamarind (Tamarindus indica L., and jujube (Ziziphus mauritiana Lam., originating from five different geographic provenances, to mycorrhizal colonization, evaluate their respective mycorrhizal dependency (MD and analyze their leaf and stem mineral composition. Method. Trees were cultivated in a nursery on pre-sterilized soil substrate low in available P (2.18 μg·g-1 with or without inoculum of Glomus aggregatum (Schenck & Smith emend. Koske. The experiment was arranged in a factorial design for each fruit tree species separately: 5 provenances x 2 AM treatments (inoculated and non-inoculated [control] with 10 replicates per treatment. Plants were harvested six months after inoculation and different parameters were measured. Results. Overall, the results showed significant provenance variations in the plant response to mycorrhizal inoculation. Néré mycorrhizal plants, from two seed sources, tamarind and jujube plants from one seed source had significant higher dry weight and shoot height than those from other provenances. Jujube plants from 3 out of the 5 provenances showed significant higher MD. It then appears that seed provenance happened to be determinant even though AM-root colonization levels (80-90% do not vary much from one provenance to another. In all cases, the fruit trees benefited from AM fungi with increased N, P and K mineral uptake in aerial parts. In particular P uptake was proportional to MD concentration in AM-jujube plants. Conclusions. These results demonstrate the importance of

  11. Unified approach to catechin hetero-oligomers: first total synthesis of trimer EZ-EG-CA isolated from Ziziphus jujuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Takahisa; Ohmori, Ken; Takahashi, Haruko; Kusumi, Takenori; Suzuki, Keisuke

    2012-10-14

    A catechin hetero-trimer isolated from Ziziphus jujuba has been synthesized. Among three constituent monomers, (-)-epiafzelechin and (-)-epigallocatechin were prepared by de novo synthesis. Trimer formation relied on the unified approach to oligomers based on the bromo-capping and the orthogonal activation, reaching the reported structure of the natural product.

  12. Study of the mechanical properties of Ziziphus nummularia (ber) fibers for formation of fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Akshay; Mangal, R.; Bhojak, N.

    2018-05-01

    Ziziphus is the one of the most abundant plant of arid region of Rajasthan and rest part of desert land in world. There are a lots of research work going on and has been done on medical applications of this plant and it is playing very important role in economy of desert areas. In this paper our discussion will bring the attention its physical properties so that we can find the possibility of its applications in the various field of fiber reinforced composites which either can be used in such as interior & exterior part of automotive so it can reduce their overall weight, cost and improve its fuel efficiency without compromising in strength or can be used in flywheel technology for energy saving in automobiles or in building materials and so on. In this paper our approach is to extract the fiber from this plant, analyze the mechanical properties of the fiber and then discuss the various possibility of its application in appropriate field of composites. To find the possibility in FRC for Ziziphus fiber our next step is to compare it with other fibers whose composites have already been formed and studied.

  13. Physicochemical Characteristics of the Seed and Seed Oil of the Potentially Medicinal Plant Ziziphus oenoplia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Hosakatte Niranjana; Joseph, Kadanthottu Sebastian; Madiwal, Abhishek; Gerald, Dinesh Rajen; Badiger, Mahananda; Kolkar, Lakshmi; Hiremath, Reshma

    2017-11-02

    The proximate composition of seeds, physicochemical characteristics, and fatty acid profiles of Ziziphus oenoplia seed oil were determined in this study. The seeds possessed low moisture (4.54%) and high carbohydrate (42.96%) and protein content (40%), making the seed oil suitable for storage and consumption. The saponification value (197.80) of the seed oil makes it a promising source for the soap and shampoo industry. The iodine and saponification values are comparable to those of major edible seed oils such as groundnut and soybean. The high amount of monounsaturated fatty acids (53.41%), especially oleic acid (53.38%), present in the oil makes it a better source for a low-fat diet and may reduce the risk of various heart-related diseases.

  14. Complete chloroplast genome sequence of a major economic species, Ziziphus jujuba (Rhamnaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiuyue; Li, Shuxian; Bi, Changwei; Hao, Zhaodong; Sun, Congrui; Ye, Ning

    2017-02-01

    Ziziphus jujuba is an important woody plant with high economic and medicinal value. Here, we analyzed and characterized the complete chloroplast (cp) genome of Z. jujuba, the first member of the Rhamnaceae family for which the chloroplast genome sequence has been reported. We also built a web browser for navigating the cp genome of Z. jujuba ( http://bio.njfu.edu.cn/gb2/gbrowse/Ziziphus_jujuba_cp/ ). Sequence analysis showed that this cp genome is 161,466 bp long and has a typical quadripartite structure of large (LSC, 89,120 bp) and small (SSC, 19,348 bp) single-copy regions separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs, 26,499 bp). The sequence contained 112 unique genes, including 78 protein-coding genes, 30 transfer RNAs, and four ribosomal RNAs. The genome structure, gene order, GC content, and codon usage are similar to other typical angiosperm cp genomes. A total of 38 tandem repeats, two forward repeats, and three palindromic repeats were detected in the Z. jujuba cp genome. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) analysis revealed that most SSRs were AT-rich. The homopolymer regions in the cp genome of Z. jujuba were verified and manually corrected by Sanger sequencing. One-third of mononucleotide repeats were found to be erroneously sequenced by the 454 pyrosequencing, which resulted in sequences of 1-4 bases shorter than that by the Sanger sequencing. Analyzing the cp genome of Z. jujuba revealed that the IR contraction and expansion events resulted in ycf1 and rps19 pseudogenes. A phylogenetic analysis based on 64 protein-coding genes showed that Z. jujuba was closely related to members of the Elaeagnaceae family, which will be helpful for phylogenetic studies of other Rosales species. The complete cp genome sequence of Z. jujuba will facilitate population, phylogenetic, and cp genetic engineering studies of this economic plant.

  15. Macropropagation and micropropagation of Ziziphus spina-christi Macropropagação e micropropagação de Ziziphus spina-christi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hassan Assareh

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Christ's thorn (Ziziphus spina-christi (L. Desf. is a cross-pollinated plant with a wide range of genetic variability in nature and, for this reason, vegetative propagation assumes importance for improvement programs. The objective of this work was to evaluate cutting, T budding and tissue culture methods for this species. Shoots of 22-25 cm length were treated by two culture media and three shoot diameters for cutting trial. The T budding treatments consisted of three and five collection dates in spring and autumn, respectively. Tissue culture nodal segments bearing axillary buds were removed from shoots of mature trees at different seasons. Experiments to determine the best disinfectant chemical, appropriate conditions and materials to prevent phenolic compound exudation, explant characteristics, media type and cytokinin-auxin ratios were carried out. Successful rooting happened only on the sand beds and with cuttings greater than 8 mm diameter. The effects of T budding seasons on budtake percentage were significantly different. The best time for explant harvesting was mid of summer. Amount of rooting on media containing IBA as well as activated charcoal and disinfection with Ca(OCl2 at concentration of 5% for 20 minutes were the best treatments.Ziziphus spina-christi (L. Desf. é uma planta de polinização cruzada com grande variabilidade genética na natureza e, por isso, sua propagação vegetativa assume importância para o melhoramento genético. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar os métodos de estaquia, borbulhia em T e cultura de tecido na propagação vegetativa desta espécie. No ensaio de estaquia, partes aéreas da planta com 22-25 cm foram cultivadas em dois meios de cultura e com três diâmetros. O ensaio de borbulhia consistiu na coleta do material em três datas na primavera e em cinco datas no outono. Os segmentos nodais contendo gemas axilares foram removidos da parte aérea de árvores maduras, em diferentes esta

  16. Atividade alelopática do extrato de folhas Ziziphus joazeiro Mart. – Rhamnaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Esio Porto Diógenes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available O juazeiro (Ziziphus joazeiro Mart. é uma das espécies endêmicas da caatinga de grande importância econômica e ecológica. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o potencial alelopático do extrato de folhas de juazeiro (Ziziphus joazeiro Mart. em sementes de alface (Lactuca sativa L.. O experimento foi conduzido em delineamento inteiramente casualizado com 4 repetições e cinco tratamentos (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% e 100% de concentração do extrato bruto. O extrato bruto foi obtido por infusão (água fervida a 100°C sobre as folhas de Z. joazeiro. As características avaliadas foram percentagem de germinação, percentagem de plântulas normais e anormais, comprimento da parte aérea e radicular das plântulas de alface. Os resultados mostraram efeito alelopático do extrato dependendo da concentração. As maiores concentrações do extrato (100%, 75% e 50% reduziram a velocidade de germinação, o comprimento da raiz e aumentaram a percentagem de plântulas anormais de L. sativa. Normal 0 21 false false false PT-BR X-NONE X-NONE st1\\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabela normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;}

  17. Hypnotic effect of Coriandrum sativum, Ziziphus jujuba, Lavandula angustifolia and Melissa officinalis extracts in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Safaei, Azadeh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate hypnotic effect of Coriandrum sativum, Ziziphus jujuba, Lavandula angustifolia and Melissa officinalis hydroalcoholic extracts in mice to select the most effective ones for a combination formula. Three doses of the extracts (250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg of C. sativum and Z. jujuba and 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg of L. angustifolia and M. officinalis) were orally administered to male Swiss mice (20-25 g) and one hour later pentobarbital (50 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected to induce sleep. Onset of sleep and its duration were measured and compared. Control animals and reference group received vehicle (10 ml/kg, p.o.) and diazepam (3 mg/kg, i.p.), respectively. C. sativum and Z. jujuba failed to change sleep parameters. L. angustifolia at doses of 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg shortened sleep onset by 7.6%, 50% and 51.5% and prolonged sleep duration by 9.9%, 43.1% and 80.2%, respectively. Compared with control group the same doses of M. officinalis also decreased sleep onset by 24.7%, 27.5% and 51.2% and prolonged sleep duration by 37.9%, 68.7% and 131.7% respectively. Combinations of L. angustifolia and M. officinalis extracts showed additive effect and it is suggested that a preparation containing both extracts may be useful for insomnia. PMID:26779267

  18. METHODS FOR OVERCOMING SEED DORMANCY AND THE INITIAL GROWTH OF Ziziphus joazeiro Mart. IN DIFFERENT SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSENARA DAIANE DE SOUZA COSTA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the potential and importance of biodiversity of the Caatinga biome, studies on endemic species are relevant to conservation of its natural resources. The objectives of this work was to evaluate seed viability and physical methods for overcoming seed dormancy in juazeiro (Ziziphus joazeiro Mart. and assess the influence of different types of soil on the initial growth of juazeiro plants. The experiments were conducted in three stages. In the first stage, the viability of seeds from different lots was evaluated using the tetrazolium test. The second stage was conducted in a plant nursery, evaluating the application of physical processes (scarification with sandpaper and hammer in overcoming seed dormancy, and the initial growth of the plants. In the third step, the chlorophyll a and b contents, gas exchange and dry matter accumulation were evaluated in young juazeiro plants in three types of soil (Oxisol, Entisol and Vertisol. The results indicate that the viability of juazeiro seeds is greatly influenced by differences between the progenitor plants and by storage conditions, which enable a longevity of two years when stored at 22°C and 16% of relative humidity. The scarification methods with sandpaper and hammer are not efficient to reduce the time and uniform seed germination. The juazeiro plants have high growth potential in different edaphic environments, adapting well to soils of different textures and chemical compositions.

  19. Hepato-protective potential of methanol extract of leaf of Ziziphus mucronata (ZMLM) against dimethoate toxicity: biochemical and histological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwape, T E; Chaturvedi, P; Kamau, J M; George, S

    2013-09-01

    The leaves of Ziziphus mucronata are used locally as food and a health drink; the leaf paste can also be used in the treatment of boils. The root of the plant is usually used in the treatment of a wide range of pains. The study was carried out to evaluate the hepatoprotective potential of the methanol leaf extract of Ziziphus mucronata (ZMLM). The extract was prepared by soaking in 70% methanol/water and rotary evaporation. The phenol content of extract was then estimated. Twenty five adult male Sprague dawley rats (aged 21 weeks) were divided into five groups of five rats each and treated as follows; normal control (NC) received distilled water. Dimethoate control (DC) (received 6 mg/kg.bw.day(-1) dimethoate dissolved in distilled water). Experimental Groups (E1) received dimethoate (6mg/kg.bw) + ZMLM (100 mg/kg.bw(-1)); (E2) received dimethoate (6 mg/kg.bw) + ZMLM (200 mg/kg.bw(-1)) and (E3) received dimethoate (6 mg/kg.bw) + ZMLM (300 mg/kg.bw(-1)). In both the cases a normal control and dimethoate control were kept to compare the results. After 90 days, blood was collected and rats were sacrificed to collect the liver tissue for biochemical assays and histological estimations. The results of E1 did not show much change from the normal control group but was significantly different from the dimethoate control group (P≤ 0.05). The preventive effect which was tested in E2 and E3 proved that the extract could almost retain the normal condition in 90 days time. Histological observations also agreed with the results obtained in biochemical parameters. Ziziphus mucronata methanol leaf extract possesses a preventive effect against dimethoate induced oxidative stress as observed in male albino Sprague Dawley rats.

  20. [Optimization study on extraction technology of the seed of Ziziphus jujuba var. spinosa by orthogonal design with multi-targets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-liang; Zhang, Yu-jie; Chen, Ming-xia; Wang, Ze-feng

    2005-05-01

    To optimize extraction technology of the seed of Ziziphus jujuba var. spinosa with the targets of the total saponin, total jujuboside A and B and total flavonoids. In the method of one-way and orthogonal tests, ethanol concentration, amount of ethanol, extraction time and extraction times were the factors in orthogonal test, and each factor with three levels. Ethanol concentration and extraction times had significant effect on all the targets, other factors should be selected in accordance with production practice. The best extraction technology is to extract for three times with 8 fold ethanol solution (60%), and 1.5 h each time.

  1. [Determination of triterpenoic acids in fruits of Ziziphus jujuba using HPLC-MS with polymeric ODS column].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhou, An; Xie, Xiao-Mei

    2013-03-01

    A simple and sensitive method has been developed to simultaneously determine betunilic acid, oleanolic acid and ursolic acid in the fruits of Ziziphus jujuba from different regions by HPLC-MS. This HPLC assay was performed on PAH polymeric C18 bonded stationary phase column with mobile phase contained acetonitrile-water (90: 10) and with negative ESI detection mode. The developed approach was characterized by short time consumption for chromatographic separation, high sensitivity and good reliability so as to meet the requirements for rapid analysis of large-batch fruits of Z. jujuba from different habitats.

  2. Environ: E00128 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available C10906], D-Glucose [CPD:C00031], Sucrose [CPD:C00089], (Zizyphusarabinan | Zizyphus saponin...68] Same as: D06758 Rhamnaceae (buckthorn family) Jujube fruit Major component: Zizyphus saponin ...

  3. Drug: D06953 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 06739], Ginger [DR:D06744], Glycyrrhiza [DR:D04365], Ephedra herb [DR:D06791], Jujube [DR:D06758], Apricot kernel [DR:D06708] ... Therapeutic category: 5200 ... PubChem: 51091295 ...

  4. Diurnal variation in soil respiration under different land uses on Taihang Mountain, North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiuping; Zhang, Wanjun; Zhang, Bin; Yang, Qihong; Chang, Jianguo; Hou, Ke

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the diurnal variation in soil respiration under different land use types on Taihang Mountain, North China, and to understand its response to environmental factors (e.g., soil temperature and moisture) and forest management. Diurnal variations in soil respiration from plantations (Robinia pseudoacacia, Punica granatum, and Ziziphus jujuba), naturally regenerated forests (Vitex negundo var. heterophylla), grasslands (Bothriochloa ischaemum), and farmlands (winter wheat/summer maize) were measured using an LI-8100 automated soil CO2 flux system from May 2012 to April 2013. The results indicated that land use type had a significant effect on the diurnal variation of soil respiration. The diurnal soil respiration from farmlands was highest, followed by Ziziphus jujube, R. pseudoacacia, P. granatum, the lower soil CO2 efflux was found from B. ischaemum and V. negundo var. heterophylla. The diurnal soil respiration across different land use types was significantly affected by soil temperature and moisture, and their interaction. Precipitation-stimulated soil respiration increased more in soil with low water content and less in soil with high water content. The lower diurnal soil respiration from naturally regenerated forests suggests that naturally regenerated vegetation is the optimal vegetation type for reducing global warming.

  5. Inhibitory Effect of Crude Oil on Vegetative and Physiologic Performance of Seeds and Seedlings of Ziziphus, Prosopis, Acacia and Robinia Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Fayyaz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study the effect of crude oil (0 to 20% w/w, one of the main pollutants of current age, on physiological characteristics of Prosopis juliflora, Acacia victoria, Ziziphus spina-chrisi and Robinia pseudoacacia in seed and seedling stages based on a completely randomized design with 10 replications in each experimental unit has been studied. The results revealed that germination rate of Prosopis and Acacia was not affected by the pollutant, but the germination reduced in Ziziphus with more than 6 percent pollutant and 4% pollution led to full inhibition in Robinia. The ED50 based on radicle growth for Acacia, Prosopis, Ziziphus and Robinia was 6.9, 3.2, 3.6 and 2.7%, respectively. In seedling stage green leaf percentage, chlorophyll concentration, and efficiency of photosystem II decreased by increasing contamination. Increasing oil concentration stopped seedling growth of Robinia and reduced stem length in Acacia and Prosopis, but no significant difference was observed in the root length. The increase of oil pollution up to more than three percentages was associated with increased growth of shoot and root in Ziziphus. The difference in response pattern of different species to crude oil enables us to select species based on a variety of objects from bio monitoring to phytoremediation.

  6. Hydrophilic interaction ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for determination of nucleotides, nucleosides and nucleobases in Ziziphus plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Sheng; Duan, Jin-ao; Qian, Dawei; Wang, Hanqing; Tang, Yuping; Qian, Yefei; Wu, Dawei; Su, Shulan; Shang, Erxin

    2013-08-02

    In this study, a rapid and sensitive analytical method was developed for the determination of 20 nucleobases, nucleosides and nucleotides in Ziziphus plants at trace levels by using hydrophilic interaction ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-UHPLC-TQ-MS/MS) in multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. Under the optimized chromatographic conditions, good separation for 20 target compounds were obtained on a UHPLC Amide column with sub-2μm particles within 10min. The overall LODs and LOQs were between 0.11-3.12ngmL(-1) and 0.29-12.48ngmL(-1) for the 20 analytes, respectively. It is the first report about simultaneous analysis of nucleobases, nucleosides and nucleotides in medicinal plants using HILIC-UHPLC-TQ-MS/MS method, which affords good linearity, precision, repeatability and accuracy. The developed method was successfully applied to Ziziphus plant (Z. jujuba, Z. jujuba var. spinosa and Z. mauritiana) samples. The analysis showed that the fruits and leaves of Ziziphus plants are rich in nucleosides and nucleobases as well as nucleotides, and could be selected as the healthy food resources. Our results in present study suggest that HILIC-UHPLC-TQ-MS/MS method could be employed as a useful tool for quality assessment of the samples from the Ziziphus plants as well as other medicinal plants or food samples using nucleotides, nucleosides and nucleobases as markers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Phenolic content and antioxidant property of the bark extracts of Ziziphus mucronata Willd. subsp. mucronata Willd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olajuyigbe Olufunmiso O

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several plants traditionally used in treatment of a variety of infections in South Africa are reported in ethnobotanical surveys. Many of these plants including Ziziphus mucronata subsp. mucronata lack scientific reports to support their medicinal importance. Methods The antioxidant activities and phenolic contents of the acetone, ethanol and aqueous extracts of the stems of Z. mucronata subsp. mucronata were evaluated using in vitro standard methods. The total phenol, total flavonoids and proanthocyanidin content were determined spectrophotometrically. Quercetin, Tannic acid and catechin equivalents were used for these parameters. The antioxidant activities of the stem bark extracts of this plant were determined by ABTS, DPPH, and ferrous reducing antioxidant property (FRAP methods. Results The quantity of the phenolic compounds, flavonoids and proanthocyanidins detected differ significantly in the various extracts. The phenolics were significantly higher than the flavonoids and proanthocyanidin contents in all the extracts investigated. The ferric reducing ability and the radical scavenging activities of the extracts were very high and dose-dependent. The ethanol extract had the highest antioxidant activity, followed by the acetone extract while the aqueous extract was the least active. Reacting with ABTS, the 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50 were (0.0429 ± 0.04 mg/ml for aqueous, (0.0317 ± 0.04 mg/ml for acetone and (0.0306 ± 0.04 mg/ml for ethanol extracts while they inhibited DPPH radical with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 values of 0.0646 ± 0.02 mg/ml (aqueous, 0.0482 ± 0.02 mg/ml (acetone and 0.0422 ± 0.03 mg/ml (ethanol. Conclusions A correlation between the antioxidant activity and the total phenolic contents of the extracts indicated that phenolic compounds were the dominant contributors to the antioxidant activity of the plant. This study, therefore, demonstrated that Z. mucronata subsp. mucronata has

  8. Antioxidant and Antiglycating Constituents from Leaves of Ziziphus oxyphylla and Cedrela serrata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwan Ahmad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ziziphus oxyphylla and Cedrela Serrata plants have a folkloric use in Pakistan for treatments of different ailments, i.e., Jaundice, Hepatitis, Diabetes, and antimicrobial. Until now, none of the research studies have reported any phytochemical work on leaves of these two plants. This study aimed to isolate and perform phytochemical analysis in order to search for the constituent having the active role in treatment of the aforementioned ailments. A bioassay-guided fractionation and isolation procedure was used to isolate the concerned phytochemicals present in leaf extracts of Z. oxyphylla and C. serrata. The process involved the hyphenated techniques, i.e., Flash Chromatography, Semi-Preparative HPLC/DAD, UPLC/MS, and NMR in order to isolate and elucidate the structure of the phytochemicals. Seven compounds (1–7 were isolated and identified as flavonoids, more in particular glycosides of quercetin and kaempferol. They showed DPPH scavenging activity, compound 3 (isoquercitrin being the most active one with an IC50 of 10.8 µg/mL (positive control quercetin; IC50 3.6 µg/mL. The superoxide-radical scavenging and total antioxidant (ABTS assays indicated IC50 values ranging from 200 to 910 µg/mL and 170 to 320 µg/mL, respectively (positive control quercetin: 374 and 180 µg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, these compounds had low IC50 values for inhibition of protein glycation (AGEs inhibition, ranging from 530 to 818 µg/mL, comparable to aminoguanidine (510 µg/mL used as a positive control. This study resulted in the identification of seven flavonoid glycosides for the first time from the leaves of Z. oxyphylla and C. serrata with antioxidative and antiglycating activities.

  9. Pharmacognostical and phytochemical evaluation of the leaves of Ziziphus xylopyrus (Retz Willd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upendra B Gandagule

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The fruit decoction of Ziziphus xylopyrus (Retz Willd. is used toward increase sterility in woman intended birth control in some parts of Rajasthan, India. This plant is widely used in Turkish medicines as a potent sedative. One to two inches of the fresh stem bark of this species are chewed with 1-2 peppers, and the sap swallowed once a day for 5 days in the treatment of cough. Standardization is one of the challenges in herbal medicine. It is essential to evaluate the herbal plants scientifically and proper documentation should be made to know their medicinal properties. Materials and Methods: Leaf samples of Z. xylopyrus were studied as recommended by World Health Organization for morphological, microscopic, physicochemical, phytochemical, powder characteristics and other methods for standardization. Results: Morphologically the leaves are obovate or orbicular in shape, pinnate venation having aromatic odour and pungent taste. Microscopically leaves showed the presence of ground tissue, vascular strand, xylem and phloem. The crystals are mostly rosette type. Microscopic examination of powder showed the presence of stomata, covering trichomes, sclerenchyma, collenchyma, epidermal cells and vascular strands. Phytochemical screening of the plant part with various solvents revealed the presence of alkaloids, carbohydrates, steroids and sterol, glycosides, saponins, flavonoids, phenolic compounds, triterpenoids in it. Physicochemical parameters such as ash value extractive values were also determined and results showed that water soluble extractive value to be higher than alcohol soluble extractive value. Conclusion: Results may be helpful for further confirmation of selected species and in future these characters may be compared with the new batch of the same plant materials.

  10. Radioprotective effect of the extract of Ziziphus joazeiro and Anacardium occidentale on embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata submitted to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira, Williams N.; Silva, Luanna R.S.; Silva, Edvane B.; Silva, Ronaldo C.; Lacerda, Laila B.N.; Silva, Hianna A.M.F.; Santos, Mariana L.O.; Sa, Jose L.F.; Melo, Ana M.M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiations are energies that can be classified as non-ionizing and ionizing. This type of energy is propagated by a material medium and the vacuum. The important characteristic of ionizing radiation is the localized release of large amounts of energy. The biological effects of radiation result principally from damage to DNA, which is the critical target. Given these harmful effects caused by radiation highlights the importance of acquiring knowledge about the radioprotective substance, because they act to protect the living tissue, decreasing the damage he caused by the effects of radiation. In this study we investigated the radioprotective effect of extract hydroalcoholic of Ziziphus joazeiro and Anacardium occidentale on embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata. The embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata pigmented were divided into 18 groups of 100 specimens. The experimental groups were exposed to the extracts at a concentration of 200 ppm and then irradiated. For irradiation, we used a source of 60 Co (Gammacell of Radionics Labs. Dose rate = 4.359 Gy/h). The viability of the embryos was examined using a stereoscopic microscope and statistical analysis was performed using the test Student-Newman-Keuls and χ 2 . Our results showed that the extracts of hydroalcoholic Ziziphus joazeiro showed radioprotective effect and that the aqueous extract of the bark of Anacardium occidentale exhibited a reduction in its embryotoxic effect. (author)

  11. Radioprotective effect of the extract of Ziziphus joazeiro and Anacardium occidentale on embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata submitted to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, Williams N.; Silva, Luanna R.S.; Silva, Edvane B. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudos em Radioprotecao e Radioecologia; Silva, Ronaldo C. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Genetica; Lacerda, Laila B.N.; Silva, Hianna A.M.F.; Santos, Mariana L.O.; Sa, Jose L.F.; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de de Biofisica e Radiobiologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia

    2011-07-01

    Electromagnetic radiations are energies that can be classified as non-ionizing and ionizing. This type of energy is propagated by a material medium and the vacuum. The important characteristic of ionizing radiation is the localized release of large amounts of energy. The biological effects of radiation result principally from damage to DNA, which is the critical target. Given these harmful effects caused by radiation highlights the importance of acquiring knowledge about the radioprotective substance, because they act to protect the living tissue, decreasing the damage he caused by the effects of radiation. In this study we investigated the radioprotective effect of extract hydroalcoholic of Ziziphus joazeiro and Anacardium occidentale on embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata. The embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata pigmented were divided into 18 groups of 100 specimens. The experimental groups were exposed to the extracts at a concentration of 200 ppm and then irradiated. For irradiation, we used a source of {sup 60}Co (Gammacell of Radionics Labs. Dose rate = 4.359 Gy/h). The viability of the embryos was examined using a stereoscopic microscope and statistical analysis was performed using the test Student-Newman-Keuls and {chi}{sup 2}. Our results showed that the extracts of hydroalcoholic Ziziphus joazeiro showed radioprotective effect and that the aqueous extract of the bark of Anacardium occidentale exhibited a reduction in its embryotoxic effect. (author)

  12. Anticancer Potential of Aqueous Ethanol Seed Extract of Ziziphus mauritiana against Cancer Cell Lines and Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulika Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ziziphus mauritiana (Lamk. is a fruit tree that has folkloric implications against many ailments and diseases. In the present study, anticancer potential of seed extract of Ziziphus mauritiana in vitro against different cell lines (HL-60, Molt-4, HeLa, and normal cell line HGF by MTT assay as well as in vivo against Ehrich ascites carcinoma bearing Swiss albino mice was investigated. The extract was found to markedly inhibit the proliferation of HL-60 cells. Annexin and PI binding of treated HL-60 cells indicated apoptosis induction by extract in a dose-dependent manner. The cell cycle analysis revealed a prominent increase in sub Go population at concentration of 20 μg/ml and above. Agarose gel electrophoresis confirmed DNA fragmentation in HL-60 cells after 3 h incubation with extract. The extract also exhibited potent anticancer potential in vivo. Treatment of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma bearing Swiss albino mice with varied doses (100–800 mg/kg b.wt. of plant extract significantly reduced tumor volume and viable tumor cell count and improved haemoglobin content, RBC count, mean survival time, tumor inhibition, and percentage life span. The enhanced antioxidant status in extract-treated animals was evident from decline in levels of lipid peroxidation and increased levels of glutathione, catalase, and superoxide dismutase.

  13. Anti-Oxidant and Hepatoprotective Activities of Ziziphus mucronata Fruit Extract Against Dimethoate-Induced Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwape Tebogo Elvis

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The study was carried out to evaluate the hepatoprotective and antioxidant potential of Ziziphus mucronata (ZM fruit extract. Methods: The different types of fruit extract were prepared by soaking the dry powdered fruit in different solvents followed by rotary evaporation. Each extract was tested for its phenol content and antioxidant activities. An in vivo study was performed in Sprague- Dawley (SD rats. Thirty adult male SD rats (aged 21 weeks were divided into six groups of five rats each and treated as follows: The normal control (NC received distilled water while the dimethoate control (DC received 6 mg/kg.bw.day-1 dimethoate dissolved in distilled water. The experimental groups E1, E2, E3, and E0 received dimethoate (6 mg/kg.bw + ZMFM (100 mg/kg.bw-1, dimethoate (6 mg/kg.bw + ZMFM (200 mg/kg.bw-1, dimethoate (6 mg/kg.bw + ZMFM (300 mg/kg.bw-1, and ZMFM (300 mg/kg.bw-1 only. Both the normal control and the dimethoate control groups were used to compare the results. After 90 days, rats were sacrificed, blood was collected for biochemical assays, and livers were harvested for histological study. Results: High phenol content was estimated, and 2, 2- diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical (DPPH spectrophotometric, thin layer chromatography (TLC and 2, 2-Azobis-3-ethyl benzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS assays showed a high antioxidant activity among the extracts. The preventive effects observed in the E1, E2 and E3 groups proved that the extract could prevent dimethoate toxicity by maintaining normal reduced glutathione (GSH, vitamin C and E, superoxide dismutase, catalase, cholineasterase and lipid profiles. The preventive effect was observed to be dose dependent. The EO group showed no extractinduced toxicity. Histological observations agreed with the results obtained in the biochemical studies. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that ZM methanol fruit extract is capable of attenuating dimethoate-induced toxicity because of its

  14. Soil greenhouse gas fluxes from different tree species on Taihang Mountain, North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X. P.; Zhang, W. J.; Hu, C. S.; Tang, X. G.

    2014-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate seasonal variation of greenhouse gas fluxes from soils on sites dominated by plantation (Robinia pseudoacacia, Punica granatum, and Ziziphus jujube) and natural regenerated forests (Vitex negundo var. heterophylla, Leptodermis oblonga, and Bothriochloa ischcemum), and to identify how tree species, litter exclusion, and soil properties (soil temperature, soil moisture, soil organic carbon, total N, soil bulk density, and soil pH) explained the temporal and spatial variation in soil greenhouse gas fluxes. Fluxes of greenhouse gases were measured using static chamber and gas chromatography techniques. Six static chambers were randomly installed in each tree species. Three chambers were randomly designated to measure the impacts of surface litter exclusion, and the remaining three were used as a control. Field measurements were conducted biweekly from May 2010 to April 2012. Soil CO2 emissions from all tree species were significantly affected by soil temperature, soil moisture, and their interaction. Driven by the seasonality of temperature and precipitation, soil CO2 emissions demonstrated a clear seasonal pattern, with fluxes significantly higher during the rainy season than during the dry season. Soil CH4 and N2O fluxes were not significantly correlated with soil temperature, soil moisture, or their interaction, and no significant seasonal differences were detected. Soil organic carbon and total N were significantly positively correlated with CO2 and N2O fluxes. Soil bulk density was significantly negatively correlated with CO2 and N2O fluxes. Soil pH was not correlated with CO2 and N2O emissions. Soil CH4 fluxes did not display pronounced dependency on soil organic carbon, total N, soil bulk density, and soil pH. Removal of surface litter significantly decreased in CO2 emissions and CH4 uptakes. Soils in six tree species acted as sinks for atmospheric CH4. With the exception of Ziziphus jujube, soils in all tree

  15. Fenologia reprodutiva e sistema de polinização de Ziziphus joazeiro Mart. (Rhamnaceae: atuação de Apis mellifera e de visitantes florais autóctones como polinizadores Reproductive phenology and pollination system of Ziziphus joazeiro Mart. (Rhamnaceae: the role of Apis mellifera and autochthonous floral visitors as pollinators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarcila de Lima Nadia

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available (Fenologia reprodutiva e sistema de polinização de Ziziphus joazeiro Mart. (Rhamnaceae: atuação de Apis mellifera e de visitantes florais autóctones como polinizadores. Ziziphus joazeiro é uma espécie endêmica da Caatinga, com grande utilidade econômica, cuja biologia reprodutiva é pouco conhecida. Este estudo aborda a fenologia reprodutiva, a biologia floral e o sistema de polinização de Ziziphus joazeiro no Cariri Paraibano, Nordeste do Brasil. Os períodos de floração e de frutificação ocorreram no fim da estação seca e início da chuvosa, com picos nos meses de dezembro (floração e fevereiro (frutificação. As flores são do tipo disco, esverdeadas, duram cerca de 12 horas e possuem disco nectarífero largo e amarelo, o qual circunda o gineceu. Ocorre protandria associada a outro tipo de dicogamia, a heterodicogamia. Ziziphus joazeiro produz néctar em pequena quantidade (1 µl, com alta concentração de açúcares (75%. Os visitantes florais observados foram vespas, abelhas e moscas. Apis mellifera apresentou maior freqüência de visitas (77,5%, seguida pelo grupo das vespas (20,4%, ambos considerados polinizadores efetivos. As moscas e as outras espécies de abelhas apresentaram baixo percentual de visitas (2,1% e foram consideradas pilhadoras de néctar. A elevada taxa de desenvolvimento inicial de frutos por inflorescência pode sugerir alta eficiência dos polinizadores, uma vez que o mecanismo de dicogamia presente na espécie praticamente impede a ocorrência de autopolinização espontânea e de geitonogamia.(Reproductive phenology and pollination system of Ziziphus joazeiro Mart. (Rhamnaceae: the role of Apis mellifera and autochthonous floral visitors as pollinators. Ziziphus joazeiro is an endemic species of the Caatinga with great economic importance, whose reproductive biology is poorly understood. This paper analyses the reproductive phenology, floral biology and pollination system of Ziziphus joazeiro at

  16. Effect of gamma irradiation on the vitamins, phytochemicals, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties of Ziziphus mauritiana Lam. leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattak, Khanzadi Fatima; Rahman, Taj Ur

    2016-01-01

    Plant based food products and medicines are given more consideration for their efficacy, safety and synergistic effects. Radiation processing has been valuably used for microbial decontamination and value addition of the plant materials. The current study is about the effect of gamma irradiation on the quality attributes of Ziziphus mauritiana Lam. leaves. The leaves of the plant were irradiated at the dose levels of 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0 and 12.5 kGy. The irradiated and control samples were evaluated for vitamin, phytochemicals, antibacterial and DPPH scavenging activities. The results showed that gamma irradiation doses up to 12.5 kGy enhanced the levels of certain phytochemicals and augmented the biological activities. - Highlights: • Radiation treatments up to 12.5 kGy do not affect vitamin B1, B2 and B3 contents. • The irradiated samples showed enhanced antibacterial and DPPH scavenging activity. • Radiation treatment has beneficial effects on the selected phytochemicals. • Gamma irradiation increased the extraction yields of the plant leaves.

  17. Dormancy release and flowering time in Ziziphus jujuba Mill., a "direct flowering" fruit tree, has a facultative requirement for chilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Michal; Ransbotyn, Vanessa; Raveh, Eran; Barak, Simon; Tel-Zur, Noemi; Zaccai, Michele

    2016-03-15

    In deciduous fruit trees, the effect of chilling on flowering has mostly been investigated in the "indirect flowering" group, characterized by a period of rest between flower bud formation and blooming. In the present study, we explored the effects of chilling and chilling deprivation on the flowering of Ziziphus jujuba, a temperate deciduous fruit tree belonging to the "direct flowering" group, in which flower bud differentiation, blooming and fruit development occur after dormancy release, during a single growing season. Dormancy release, vegetative growth and flowering time in Z. jujuba cv. Ben-Li were assessed following several treatments of chilling. Chilling treatments quantitatively decreased the timing of vegetative bud dormancy release, thereby accelerating flowering, but had no effect on the time from dormancy release to flowering. Trees grown at a constant temperature of 25°C, without chilling, broke dormancy and flowered, indicating the facultative character of chilling in this species. We measured the expression of Z. jujuba LFY and AP1 homologues (ZjLFY and ZjAP1). Chilling decreased ZjLFY expression in dormant vegetative buds but had no effect on ZjAP1expression, which reached peak expression before dormancy release and at anthesis. In conclusion, chilling is not obligatory for dormancy release of Z. jujuba cv. Ben-Li vegetative buds. However, the exposure to chilling during dormancy does accelerate vegetative bud dormancy release and flowering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Profile of Elaeocarpus grandiflorus and Ziziphus mauritiana as identity plants of Salatiga and Tegal towns, Central Java Province, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahayu, E. S.; Dewi, N. K.; Bodijantoro, F. P. M. H.

    2018-03-01

    Elaeocarpus grandiflorus J.E. Smith (rejasa) and Ziziphus mauritiana Lamk. (bidara) are declared as identity flora of towns of Salatiga dan Tegal, respectively. The species is local rare. The study aimed to determine the population size, describe the morphology characteristics and propagation mechanisms, analyze the community knowledge about the plant utility, and identify the conservation and cultivation efforts. Explorative study was conducted from Mei to September 2016, through observations, interviews, and literatures reviews. Observation sample areas were determined purposively. Data were analyzed descriptively. Results showed that E. grandiflorus and Z. mauritiana had very limited number that were 20 and 30 trees respectively throughout Salatiga and Tegal region. Generative propagation through seed germination occurred in a low rate. The knowledge of community about the plants usefulness as well as their efforts of conservation and cultivation were low. Based on the results it was suggested to carry out some activities which could significantly increase the existence of the identity plants. The activities comprise introducing the figure and utility of plants to the wider community and improving breeding technique with an alternative method.

  19. Antiplasmodial effects of the aqueous ethanolic seed extract of Ziziphus mauritiana against Plasmodium berghei in Swiss albino mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulika Mishra

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ziziphus mauritiana is a fruit tree used traditionally since long back for wound healing, immunepotentiator, asthma, sedative, stomachic, styptic, as tonic etc. The present study determines the antiplasmodial effect of aqueous ethanolic seed extract against Chloroquine sensitive Plasmodium berghei berghei nk65 infection in Swiss albino mice. Based upon the acute toxicity data three different doses (100, 200, 400 mg/kg body weight of the plant extract was chosen to study the blood schizonticidal activity in early infection and in established infection and was compared with chloroquine. The Prophylactic activity was also assessed and compared with pyrimethamine. No mortality was observed in acute toxicity study however, above the dose of 1000 mg/kg animals showed the lethargic behaviour. In early infection, and in established infection the doses (100-400 mg/kg b.wt was found to cause significant (P<0.001 suppression of infection in a dose dependent manner as compared to control. Although, the activity was lower than standard chloroquine. Similarly, the extract at all the doses caused the suppression in repository activity but was lower than pyrimethamine. The mean survival time was also increased in mice by 14 and 17 days at the doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg respectively, whereas the control group sustained only for 7 days. Thus, the seed extract showed the effectiveness against plasmodium infection.

  20. Total Phenolics and Total Flavonoids Contents and Hypnotic Effect in Mice of Ziziphus mauritiana Lam. Seed Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aye Moh Moh San

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The seeds of Ziziphus mauritiana Lam. have been traditionally used for treatment of various complications including insomnia and anxiety. They are popularly used as sedative and hypnotic drugs in China, Korea, Myanmar, Vietnam, and other Asian countries. However, no scientific proof on hypnotic activity of Z. mauritiana seeds (ZMS was reported. In this study, the hypnotic activity of 50% ethanolic extract from ZMS was observed on the loss of righting reflex in mice using pentobarbital-induced sleep mice method. The contents of total phenolics and total flavonoids in the extract were also determined. The results showed that the 50% ethanolic extract from ZMS contained total phenolics  mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE/g extract and total flavonoids  mg quercetin equivalent (QE/g extract. Oral administration of the extract at the dose of 200 mg/kg significantly increased the sleeping time in mice intraperitoneally administered with sodium pentobarbital (50 mg/kg body weight. These results supported the traditional use of ZMS for the treatment of insomnia. The seeds of Z. mauritiana should be further developed as an alternative sedative and/or hypnotic product.

  1. Evaluation and Optimization of Downstream Process Parameters for Extraction of Betulinic Acid from the Bark of Ziziphus jujubae L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashyap Kumar Dubey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Present work investigated an apposite and efficient method for extraction of betulinic acid (BA from the bark of Ziziphus jujubae. Various extraction methods like stirring extraction, soxhlet extraction, ultrasonic extraction, and microwave assisted extraction (MAE were evaluated for increasing recovery percentage of BA. From the raffinate so obtained, BA was isolated. Thin layer chromatography (TLC was used to analyze the extract and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC for quantification. The results revealed that the percentage extraction of BA from Z. jujubae by MAE was more proficient. As recovery percentage of BA by MAE technique turned out to be maximum, by using response surface methodology (RSM, three process parameters (pH, temperature, and time were optimized by MAE and it was observed that the optimum parameters (pH 6.5, temp. 70.23°C, and time 3.5 min gave the maximum recovery of BA (0.44% w/w. To validate the RSM model, experiments were performed and the highest recovery of BA was found to be 0.4% w/w which is ±0.04% to the predicted value. Henceforth the extraction efficiency and the substantial saving of time by MAE was more capable than the other extraction techniques.

  2. Hydro-ethanolic leaf extract of Ziziphus abyssinica Hochst Ex A. Rich (Rhamnaceae) exhibits anti-nociceptive effects in murine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boakye-Gyasi, Eric; Henneh, Isaac Tabiri; Abotsi, Wonder Kofi Mensah; Ameyaw, Elvis Ofori; Woode, Eric

    2017-04-26

    Despite substantial advances in pain research and treatment, millions of people continue to suffer from pain and this has been attributed mainly to the unavailability of effective and safer analgesics. The use of plants as medicines is still widespread and plants constitute a large source of novel phytocompounds that might become leads for the discovery of newer, effective and safer alternatives. Various parts of Ziziphus abyssinica have been used in folk medicine in several African countries as painkillers. However, there is no report on the possible anti-nociceptive effects of this plant especially the leaves, hence the need for this current study. The possible anti-nociceptive activity of hydro-ethanolic leaf extract of Ziziphus abyssinica (EthE) was assessed in rodents using chemical (acetic acid, formalin and glutamate), thermal (tail-immersion test) and mechanical/inflammatory (carrageenan) models of nociception. EthE (30-300 mg/kg, p.o.) dose-dependently and significantly inhibited chemical-induced nociception with a maximum inhibition of 86.29 ± 2.27%, 76.34 ± 5.67%, 84.97 ± 5.35%, and 82.81 ± 5.97% respectively for acetic acid, formalin (phase 1), formalin (phase 2) and glutamate tests at its highest dose. EthE also dose-dependently and significantly increased reaction times in both tail-immersion and carrageenan-induced hypernociceptive tests. The activities of the extract in the various models were comparable with the effect of morphine hydrochloride and diclofenac sodium used as standard analgesic drugs. Oral administration of hydro-ethanolic leaf extract of Ziziphus abyssinica ameliorates nocifensive behaviours associated with chemical-, thermal- and mechanical/inflammatory - induced nociceptive pain.

  3. Hepatoprotective potential of ethanolic extract of Ziziphus oenoplia (L.) Mill roots against antitubercular drugs induced hepatotoxicity in experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Ch V; Rawat, A K S; Singh, Anil P; Singh, Arpita; Verma, Neeraj

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the hepatoprotective potential of ethanolic (50%) extract of Ziziphus oenoplia (L.) Mill (Z. oenoplia) root against isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RIF) induced liver damage in animal models. Five groups of six rats each were selected for the study. Ethanolic extract at a dose of 150 and 300 mg/kg as well as silymarin (100 mg/kg) were administered orally once daily for 21 d in INH + RIF treated groups. The serum levels of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), alkaline phosphatase (SALP), and bilirubin were estimated along with activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, and hepatic melondialdehyde formation. Histopathological analysis was carried out to assess injury to the liver. The considerably elevated serum enzymatic activities of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamate pyruvate transaminase, alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin due to INH + RIF treatment were restored towards normal in a dose dependent manner after the treatment with ethanolic extract of Z. oenoplia roots. Meanwhile, the decreased activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione S-transferase and glutathione peroxidase were also restored towards normal dose dependently. In addition, ethanolic extract also significantly prevented the elevation of hepatic melondialdehyde formation in the liver of INH + RIF intoxicated rats in a dose dependent manner. The biochemical observations were supplemented with histopathological examination of rat liver sections. The results of this study strongly indicate that ethanolic extract of Z. oenoplia has a potent hepatoprotective action against INH + RIF induced hepatic damage in rats. Copyright © 2012 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of gamma radiation on molluscicidal and antimicrobial action of leaf and stem bark of Ziziphus joazeiro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, Fabricio O.; Siqueira, Williams N.; Lima, Maira V.; Melo, Larissa S.A.; Luna Filho, Ricardo L.C.; Morais, Vinicius H.T.; Oliveira, Maria L.M.; Melo, Ana M.M.A.; Silva, Edvane B.

    2017-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a physical agent used in several areas of knowledge: in medicine for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, in the industry, it is apply in the generation of energy, sterilization of equipment and food, for example. Studies show that radiation can modify the molecular structure of substances of natural origin, potentiating or inactivating their function. The compounds derived from plants have received special attention because they constitute a form of medicinal therapy that has been growing notably in recent years. In addition, products of natural origin may also aid in the control of microbiological or animal vectors of parasites. Of the various species of plants being studied, Ziziphus joazeiro, popularly known as jua, native to the Caatinga, is commercially exploited for the manufacture of cosmetics and as anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anti influenza, fever and gastritis, bruises and has molluscicidal activity. Therefore, the objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of cobalt-60 gamma radiation on leaf and bark extracts of Z. joazeiro stem, evaluating possible changes in molluscicidal and antimicrobial action. For the experiments, the Z joazeiro extracts were irradiated with doses of 5, 7.5 and 10 kGy (Gammacell-Cobalt-60, dose rate 7.222 kGy/h). Adult mollusks (n = 60) and embryos (n = 1800) of Biomphalaria glabrata were distributed in the following groups: negative control 1 (water only); negative control 2 (extract only); positive control (CuCO_3); and three groups submitted to irradiated extracts. The antibacterial assay was performed with Gram-positive microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis) belonging to the collection of the Departamento de Antibioticos of the UFPE by disc diffusion method. Statistical analysis was perform by Student's t-test and chi-square test, with a confidence interval of 95%. The results showed that the ionizing radiation was not able

  5. Influence of gamma radiation on molluscicidal and antimicrobial action of leaf and stem bark of Ziziphus joazeiro; Influencia da radiacao gama sobre a acao moluscicida e antimicrobiana da folha e casca do caule de Ziziphus joazeiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Fabricio O.; Siqueira, Williams N.; Lima, Maira V.; Melo, Larissa S.A.; Luna Filho, Ricardo L.C.; Morais, Vinicius H.T.; Oliveira, Maria L.M.; Melo, Ana M.M.A.; Silva, Edvane B., E-mail: fabriciomendesbio@gmail.com, E-mail: williams.wns@gmail.com, E-mail: mairavasconceloslima@gmail.com, E-mail: larissamelo.pe@gmail.com, E-mail: ricardolclf@hotmail.com, E-mail: viniciushtmorais@hotmail.com, E-mail: mluizamarinho@gmail.com, E-mail: amdemelo@hotmail.com, E-mail: s, E-mail: fabriciomendesbio@gmail.com, E-mail: williams.wns@gmail.com, E-mail: edvborges@yahoo.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    Ionizing radiation is a physical agent used in several areas of knowledge: in medicine for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, in the industry, it is apply in the generation of energy, sterilization of equipment and food, for example. Studies show that radiation can modify the molecular structure of substances of natural origin, potentiating or inactivating their function. The compounds derived from plants have received special attention because they constitute a form of medicinal therapy that has been growing notably in recent years. In addition, products of natural origin may also aid in the control of microbiological or animal vectors of parasites. Of the various species of plants being studied, Ziziphus joazeiro, popularly known as jua, native to the Caatinga, is commercially exploited for the manufacture of cosmetics and as anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anti influenza, fever and gastritis, bruises and has molluscicidal activity. Therefore, the objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of cobalt-60 gamma radiation on leaf and bark extracts of Z. joazeiro stem, evaluating possible changes in molluscicidal and antimicrobial action. For the experiments, the Z joazeiro extracts were irradiated with doses of 5, 7.5 and 10 kGy (Gammacell-Cobalt-60, dose rate 7.222 kGy/h). Adult mollusks (n = 60) and embryos (n = 1800) of Biomphalaria glabrata were distributed in the following groups: negative control 1 (water only); negative control 2 (extract only); positive control (CuCO{sub 3}); and three groups submitted to irradiated extracts. The antibacterial assay was performed with Gram-positive microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis) belonging to the collection of the Departamento de Antibioticos of the UFPE by disc diffusion method. Statistical analysis was perform by Student's t-test and chi-square test, with a confidence interval of 95%. The results showed that the ionizing radiation

  6. Anti-staphylococcal properties of Eichhornia crassipes, Pistacia vera, and Ziziphus amole leaf extracts: Isolates from cattle and rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Morales, Andrea; Velázquez-Ordoñez, Valente; Khusro, Ameer; Salem, Abdelfattah Z M; Estrada-Zúñiga, María Elena; Salem, Mohamed Z M; Valladares-Carranza, Benjamin; Burrola-Aguilar, Cristina

    2017-12-01

    The desideratum aim of the present context was to assess the biopotency of methanolic extracts of Eichhornia crassipes (E. crassipes), Pistacia vera (P. vera), and Ziziphus amole (Z. amole) leaves against various staphylococcal strains, and to quantify the phenolics as well as saponin content in them. The antibacterial activity of various concentrations (62.5-1000 μg/mL) of plant extracts was tested against control clinical strains (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, S. aureus ATCC 29213, and S. aureus ATCC 43300), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA1 and MRSA2), oxacillin sensitive S. aureus (SOSA1 and SOSA2), and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus epidermidis (CoNS1, CoNS2, and CoNS3) using disc diffusion assay. Leaf extracts of the three plants exhibited pronounced growth inhibitory characteristics against staphylococci in a dose dependent manner. E. crassipes extract depicted the highest relative percentage inhibition values against control clinical strains (68.6 ± 0.5%), while P. vera (68.6 ± 0.3%) and Z. amole (74.79 ± 0.3%) extracts showed pronounced relative inhibition values against staphylococcal strains isolated from cattle. Total phenols and saponin content of leaf extracts were investigated by standard in vitro methods. The methanolic extracts of these plants were found to comprise substantial content of phenolics and saponin at varying levels. The highest value of phenolics was estimated in P. vera extract (60.0 ± 1.3 mg gallic acid/g extract), followed by Z. amole (33.6 ± 1.4 mg gallic acid/g extract), and E. crassipes (23.0 ± 1.3 mg gallic acid/g extract). Saponin content for P. vera, Z. amole, and E. crassipes extracts were estimated as 41.0 ± 1.3, 35.8 ± 1.3, and 25.0 ± 1.2 mg diosgenin/g extract, respectively. The outcome of this study suggested the exploitation of methanolic extract of P. vera, Z. amole, and E. crassipes leaves for their possible application in ethnomedicine, particularly as drugs preparation

  7. Antifungal activity of nettle (Urtica dioica L.), colocynth (Citrullus colocynthis L. Schrad), oleander (Nerium oleander L.) and konar (Ziziphus spina-christi L.) extracts on plants pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadizadeh, I; Peivastegan, B; Kolahi, M

    2009-01-01

    Anti-mycotic activity of the ethanol extracts from Nettle (Urtica dioica L.), Colocynth (Citrullus colocynthis L. Schrad), Konar (Ziziphus spina-christi L.) and Oleander (Nerium oleander L.) floral parts were screened in vitro against four important plant pathogenic fungi viz.; Alternaria alternate, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani and Rizoctonia solani using agar dilution bioassay. Extracts showed antifungal activity against all the tested fungi. Among the plants, Nettle and Colocynth were the most effective against A. alternate and R. solani while Oleander possesses the best inhibition on F. oxysporum and F. solani. Konar was the most effective extract by reducing the growth of Rizoctonia solani than other fungi. These results showed that extracts could be considered suitable alternatives to chemical additives for the control of fungal diseases in plants.

  8. Ziziphus mauritiana Lamk.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-03

    Sep 3, 2008 ... 1Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Africa University, Box 1320, Mutare, Zimbabwe. ... Indigenous fruits are essential for food security, health and nutrition ... deteriorate fast and cannot be kept for more than 10 days.

  9. Phytochemical analyses of Ziziphus jujuba Mill. var. spinosa seed by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bao; Yang, Hongshun; Chen, Feng; Hua, Yanglin; Jiang, Yueming

    2013-11-21

    Ziziphus jujuba Mill. var. spinosa (Z. jujuba) seeds have attracted much attention within the field of medicine due to their significant effects against disturbances of the central nervous system. Secondary metabolites composition is key to the influence of the pharmaceutical and commercial qualities of this plant. In this work, the phytochemical profile of Z. jujuba seeds was analysed by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The UPLC-MS/MS information identified the main secondary metabolites in Z. jujuba seeds, including flavonoid C-glycosides, triterpene acids and unsaturated fatty acids. The leading chemical identified by UPLC-MS/MS was betulinic acid, and oleic acid was the leading volatile from the GC-MS results. All the samples tested showed similar phytochemical profiles, but levels of the chemical compounds varied. Principal component analysis revealed the principal secondary metabolites that could define the differences in quality. It was confirmed that the combination of UPLC-MS/MS and GC-MS was an effective technique to demonstrate the pharmaceutical quality of Z. jujuba seeds.

  10. Characterization, antibacterial, and neurotoxic effect of Green synthesized nanosilver using Ziziphus spina Christi aqueous leaf extract collected from Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ansary, Afaf; Warsy, Arjumand; Daghestani, Maha; Merghani, Nada M.; Al-Dbass, Abeer; Bukhari, Wadha; Al-Ojayan, Badryah; Ibrahim, Eiman M.; Al-Qahtani, Asma M.; Shafi Bhat, Ramesa

    2018-02-01

    The current study aims to synthesize silver nanoparticles using Ziziphus spina Christi (ZSC) or (Sidr) aqueous leaf extract collected from Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using sidr leaves extract was successful. Production of silver nanoparticles was confirmed through UV-vis Spectrophotometer, particles size and zeta potential analysis, Infra-red spectroscopy, Scanning, and Transmission Electron Microscope (SEM and TEM). The UV-visible spectra showed that the absorption peak existed at 400 nm. SEM analysis showed that the synthesized AgNPs were spherical but in slightly aggregated form. TEM demonstrated different size range of 4-33 nm with an average size of 13. The element analysis profile showed silver signal together with oxygen, calcium, and potassium peaks which might be related to the plant structure. Biological effects of the synthesized AgNPs exhibit satisfactory inhibitory effect against ten tested microorganisms. It inhibited the growth of 5 gram-positive and five gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, AgNPs demonstrated a synergistic effect on the neurotoxicity induced in rat pups with orally administered methyl mercury (MeHg). The present study showed that AgNPs prepared from ZSC might be a promising antimicrobial agent for successful treatment of bacterial infection in intensive care units (ICU) especially in case of antibiotic resistance.

  11. Extracts Obtained from Pterocarpus angolensis DC and Ziziphus mucronata Exhibit Antiplasmodial Activity and Inhibit Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70 Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawanda Zininga

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Malaria parasites are increasingly becoming resistant to currently used antimalarial therapies, therefore there is an urgent need to expand the arsenal of alternative antimalarial drugs. In addition, it is also important to identify novel antimalarial drug targets. In the current study, extracts of two plants, Pterocarpus angolensis and Ziziphus mucronata were obtained and their antimalarial functions were investigated. Furthermore, we explored the capability of the extracts to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 function. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 are molecular chaperones whose function is to facilitate protein folding. Plasmodium falciparum the main agent of malaria, expresses two cytosol-localized Hsp70s: PfHsp70-1 and PfHsp70-z. The PfHsp70-z has been reported to be essential for parasite survival, while inhibition of PfHsp70-1 function leads to parasite death. Hence both PfHsp70-1 and PfHsp70-z are potential antimalarial drug targets. Extracts of P. angolensis and Z. mucronata inhibited the basal ATPase and chaperone functions of the two parasite Hsp70s. Furthermore, fractions of P. angolensis and Z. mucronata inhibited P. falciparum 3D7 parasite growth in vitro. The extracts obtained in the current study exhibited antiplasmodial activity as they killed P. falciparum parasites maintained in vitro. In addition, the findings further suggest that some of the compounds in P. angolensis and Z. mucronata may target parasite Hsp70 function.

  12. Bio-guided fractionation of methanol extract of Ziziphus mauritiana Lam. (bark and effect of the most active fraction on cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Simo Tagne

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the anticancer and antioxidant potential of methanol bark extract of Ziziphus mauritiana (Z. mauritiana, which is used by traditional healers to cure some cases of cancer in Cameroon. Methods: The methanol crude extract of Z. mauritiana has the antiproliferative activity on four cancer cell lines and its antioxidant activity. The extract was partitioned in five different solvents, and each fraction was tested. The effect of the most antiproliferative fraction on cell cycle was determined. Bio-guided fractionation was performed on the fraction with the highest antiproliferative and the highest antioxidant activities. Results: Z. mauritiana methanol extract was active on all tested cells, and showed promising antioxidant activity. All fractions except hexane fraction were active with the dichloromethane fraction being the most active and showed S and G2-M phase arrest (P<0.01 on cell cycle progression of NCI-H460 and MCF-7, respectively. Bio-guided fractionation of the dichloromethane fraction led to lupeol and betulinic acid. The greatest antioxidant activity was recorded with ethyl acetate fraction and its fractionation led to catechin and epigallocatechin. Conclusions: Overall, this study showed that Z. mauritiana barks has benefits as a chemoprevention agent cancer.

  13. Sharing information and collections on phytoplasmas: from QBOL to QBANK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertaccini, Assunta; Paltrinieri, Samanta; Makarova, Olga

    2011-01-01

    A total of 154 phytoplasma strains from 15 ribosomal groups were employed for barcode sequences production. Besides strains in periwinkle, 36 strains in natural infected plants such as napier grass, grapevine, plum, jujube, apple, pear, spartium, pine tree, hibiscus and erigeron were employed...

  14. Drug: D09063 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9], Jujube [DR:D06758], Ginger [DR:D06744], Glycyrrhiza [DR:D04365], Japanese angelica root [DR:D06768], Sac... D09063 Formula ... Drug Kigikenchuto Cinnamon bark [DR:D06712], Peony root [DR:D0673

  15. Drug: D06945 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available t [DR:D06739], Jujube [DR:D06758], Longgu [DR:D06799], Oyster shell [DR:D06790], Glycyrrhiza [DR:D04365], Ginger [DR:D06744] ... Therapeutic category: 5200 ... PubChem: 51091287 ...

  16. Drug: D06985 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 727], Pinellia tuber [DR:D06778], Scutellaria root [DR:D06688], Ginseng [DR:D06772], Jujube [DR:D06758], Glycyrrhiza [DR:D04365], Gin...ger [DR:D06744] ... Therapeutic category: 5200 ... PubChem: 51091327 ...

  17. Drug: D06956 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ycyrrhiza [DR:D04365], Ginger [DR:D06744], Immature orange [DR:D06706], (Atractylodes rhizome [DR:D06780] | ...703], Cinnamon bark [DR:D06712], Ephedra herb [DR:D06791], Jujube [DR:D06758], Gl

  18. [Characteristics of soil moisture variation in different land use types in the hilly region of the Loess Plateau, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Min; Zhao, Xi Ning; Gao, Xiao Dong; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Pu Te

    2018-03-01

    Soil water availability is a key factor restricting the ecological construction and sustainable land use in the loess hilly region. It is of great theoretical and practical significance to understand the soil moisture status of different land use types for the vegetation restoration and the effective utilization of land resources in this area. In this study, EC-5 soil moisture sensors were used to continuously monitor the soil moisture content in the 0-160 cm soil profile in the slope cropland, terraced fields, jujube orchard, and grassland during the growing season (from May to October) in the Yuanzegou catchment on the Loess Plateau, to investigate soil moisture dynamics in these four typical land use types. The results showed that there were differences in seasonal variation, water storage characteristics, and vertical distribution of soil moisture under different land use types in both the normal precipitation (2014) and dry (2015) years. The terraced fields showed good water retention capacity in the dry year, with the average soil moisture content of 0-60 cm soil layer in the growing season being 2.6%, 4.2%, and 1.8% higher than that of the slope cropland, jujube orchard, and grassland (all Pmoisture content of 0-60 cm soil layer in jujube orchard in the growing season was 2.9%, 3.8%, and 4.5% lower than that of slope cropland, terraced fields, and grassland, respectively (all Pmoisture in the surface layer (0-20 cm) and soil moisture in the middle layer (20-100 cm) under different land use types was large, and the trend for the similarity degree of soil moisture variation followed terraced fields > grassland > slope cropland > jujube orchard. The slope cropland in this area could be transformed into terraced fields to improve the utilization of precipitation and promote the construction of ecological agriculture. Aiming at resolving the severe water shortage in the rain-fed jujube orchard for the sustainable development of jujube orchard in the loess hilly

  19. Protective effect of bioactivity guided fractions of Ziziphus jujuba Mill. root bark against hepatic injury and chronic inflammation via inhibiting inflammatory markers and oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghuram Kandimalla

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The tribal communities of North Eastern India rely on herbal medicine to cure various disease conditions. Ziziphus jujuba Mill. (Rhamnaceae is one of such medicinal plants used for curing liver ailments, insomnia, anemia, diarrhea, diabetic complications, cancer and loss of appetite. The present study was aimed to describe the protective ability of Z. jujuba root bark against hepatic injury and chronic inflammation. Bioactivity guided fractionation of Z. jujuba methanol extract (ZJME was performed using different solvents of increasing polarity viz. hexane (ZJHF, chloroform (ZJCF, ethyl acetate (ZJEAF, water (ZJWF and residue (ZJMR. In vitro antioxidant results revealed that both ZJME and ZJWF possess strong antioxidant activity among all the fractions and mother extract tested. Further, ZJME and ZJWF showed significant protection against CCl4 intoxicated HepG2 cell lines by means of increased cell viability and decreased LDH levels compared to control group. ZJME at 200, 400 mg/kg and ZJWF at 50, 100 mg/kg inhibited the lipid peroxidation and significantly restored the liver function markers (AST, ALT, ALP, LDH, SOD and CAT and cytokine levels (TNF-α, Il-1β and Il-10 in CCl4 induced acute liver damage in rats. All the results were comparable with standard drug silymarin which was further confirmed by histopathology analysis of liver. Similarly, inflammation and increase inflammatory cytokines levels of carrageenan induced paw edema in rats have been refurbished to normal levels on par with the standard drug indomethacin. ZJWF demonstrated potent response than ZJME in all the biological tests conducted. The results of the study signify the ability of Z. jujuba root bark as good therapeutic agent for liver toxicity and chronic inflammation.

  20. Development and validation of an high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector method for the simultaneous determination of six phenolic compounds in abnormal savda munziq decoction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shuge; Liu, Wenxian; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Xuejia; Upur, Halmuart

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Given the high-effectiveness and low-toxicity of abnormal savda munziq (ASMQ), its herbal formulation has long been used in traditional Uyghur medicine to treat complex diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Settings and Design: ASMQ decoction by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a diode array detector was successfully developed for the simultaneous quality assessment of gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, caffeic acid, rutin, rosmarinic acid, and luteolin. The six phenolic compounds were separated on an Agilent TC-C18 reversed-phase analytical column (4.6 × 250 mm, 5 μm) by gradient elution using 0.3% aqueous formic acid (v/v) and 0.3% methanol formic acid (v/v) at 1.0 mL/min. Materials and Methods: The plant material was separately ground and mixed at the following ratios (10): Cordia dichotoma (10.6), Anchusa italic (10.6), Euphorbia humifusa (4.9), Adiantum capillus-veneris (4.9), Ziziphus jujube (4.9), Glycyrrhiza uralensis (7.1), Foeniculum vulgare (4.9), Lavandula angustifolia (4.9), Dracocephalum moldavica L. (4.9), and Alhagi pseudoalhagi (42.3). Statistical Analysis Used: The precisions of all six compounds were Highly significant linear correlations were found between component concentrations and specific chromatographic peak areas (R2 > 0.999). Results: The proposed method was successfully applied to determine the levels of six active components in ASMQ. Conclusions: Given the simplicity, precision, specificity, and sensitivity of the method, it can be utilized as a quality control approach to simultaneously determining the six phenolic compounds in AMSQ. PMID:25709227

  1. "Phloem sap analysis of Schleichera oleosa (Lour) Oken, Butea monosperma (Lam) Taub. and Ziziphus mauritiana (Lam) and hemolymph of Kerria lacca (Kerr) using HPLC and tandem mass spectrometry".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashishtha, Amit; Rathi, Brijesh; Kaushik, Sandeep; Sharma, K K; Lakhanpaul, Suman

    2013-10-01

    Females of lac insects especially of Kerria lacca (Kerr) secret a resin known as lac for their own protection, which has tremendous applications. Lac insect completes its lifecycle on several host taxa where it exclusively feeds on phloem sap but Schleichera oleosa (Lour.) Oken, Butea monosperma (Lam.) and Ziziphus mauritiana (Lam.) are its major hosts. Analysis of phloem sap constituents as well as hemolymph of lac insect is important because it ultimately gets converted into lac by insect intervention. Main phloem sap constituent's viz. sugars and free amino acids and hemolymph of lac insect were analyzed using HPLC and tandem mass spectrometry, respectively. The results were transformed to relative percentage of the total sugars and free amino acids analyzed in each sample for comparison among lac insect hemolymph and the phloem sap of the three different host taxa. Sucrose (58.9 ± 3.6-85.6 ± 0.9) and trehalose (62.3 ± 0.4) were the predominant sugars in phloem sap of three taxa and hemolymph of lac insect, respectively. Glutamic acid (33.1 ± 1.4-39.8 ± 1.4) was found to be main amino acid among the phloem sap of three taxa while tyrosine (61 ± 2.6) was the major amino acid in hemolymph of lac insect. The relative percentage of non-essential amino acids (60.8 %-69.9 %) was found to be more in all the three host taxa while essential amino acids (30.1 %-35.4 %) were present at a lower relative percentage. In contrast to this, the relative percentage of essential amino acids (81.9 %) was observed to be higher as compared to non-essential amino acids (17.7 %) in lac insect hemolymph. These results led to the detection of lac insect's endosymbionts. Moreover, this study revealed a clue regarding the importance of development of a synthetic diet for this insect so that a precise pathway of lac biosynthesis could be investigated for thorough understanding.

  2. Variabilidade genética em populações naturais de Ziziphus joazeiro Mart., por meio de marcadores moleculares RAPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itamara Bomfim Gois

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Os estudos de diversidade genética em populações naturais são imprescindíveis para a elaboração de estratégias de conservação. Assim, este trabalho foi realizado com o objetivo de caracterizar geneticamente, por meio de marcadores Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD, populações naturais de Ziziphus joazeiro Mart., localizadas na região do Baixo São Francisco sergipano. Foram empregados 20 oligonucleotídeos e, a partir do polimorfismo observado, foram estimadas a porcentagem de polimorfismo, a variabilidade genética e a similaridade genética (Sgij, por meio do coeficiente de Jaccard. O teste de Mantel foi realizado para avaliar a correlação entre a similaridade genética e a distância geográfica; sendo o fluxo gênico também estimado. O polimorfismo observado nas populações de Z. joazeiro variou de 58,1 a 66,5% e a similaridade genética, de 44 a 54%. A similaridade genética não está correlacionada com a distância geográfica, e os valores observados para o índice de diversidade genética de Nei, para o índice de Shannon e para os parâmetros HS, HT e GST foram considerados altos e semelhantes aos encontrados em outras espécies arbóreas. A porcentagem de locos polimórficos foi considerada baixa. Maior identidade genética foi encontrada entre as populações de Canindé do São Francisco e Santana do São Francisco; e a maior distância genética entre as populações de Canhoba e Canindé do São Francisco. O fluxo gênico foi maior que 1. Com base nos resultados, pode-se afirmar que há alta variabilidade genética entre as populações e que estas podem estar geneticamente estruturadas.

  3. Protective effects of long-term administration of Ziziphus jujuba fruit extract on cardiovascular responses in L-NAME hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohebbati, Reza; Bavarsad, Kosar; Rahimi, Maryam; Rakhshandeh, Hasan; Khajavi Rad, Abolfazl; Shafei, Mohammad Naser

    2018-01-01

    Ziziphus jujuba stimulates the release of nitric oxide (NO). Because NO is involved in cardiovascular regulations, in this study the effects of hydroalcoholic extract of Z. jujuba on cardiovascular responses in acute NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) hypertensive rats were evaluated. Rats were divided into 6 group (n=6): 1) saline, 2) L-NAME received (10mg/kg) intravenously, 3) sodium nitroprusside (SNP) (50µg/kg)+L-NAME group received SNP before L-NAME and 4-6) three groups of Z. jujuba (100, 200 and 400mg/kg) that treated for four weeks and on the 28 th day, L-NAME was injected. Femoral artery and vein were cannulated for recording cardiovascular responses and drug injection, respectively. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded continuously. Maximal changes (∆) of SBP, MAP and HR were calculated and compared to control and L-NAME groups. In L-NAME group, maximal ΔSBP (L-NAME: 44.15±4.0 mmHg vs control: 0.71±2.1 mmHg) and ΔMAP (L-NAME: 40.8±4.0 mmHg vs control: 0.57±1.6 mmHg) significantly increased (p0.05). All doses of Z. jujuba attenuated maximal ∆SBP and ∆MAP induced by L-NAME but only the lowest dose (100 mg/kg) had significant effects (ΔSBP: 20.36±5.6 mmHg vs L-NAME: 44.1±4.0 mmHg and ΔMAP: 20.8±4.5 mmHg vs L-NAME: 40.8±3.8 mmHg (pL-NAME group (p>0.05). Because long-term consumption of Z. jujuba extract, especially its lowest dose, attenuated cardiovascular responses induced by L-NAME, we suggest that Z. jujuba has potential beneficial effects in prevention of hypertension induced by NO deficiency.

  4. Intercropping With Fruit Trees Increases Population Abundance and Alters Species Composition of Spider Mites on Cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiqiang; Pan, Hongsheng; Wang, Dongmei; Liu, Bing; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Jianping; Lu, Yanhui

    2018-05-05

    With the recent increase in planting of fruit trees in southern Xinjiang, the intercropping of fruit trees and cotton has been widely adopted. From 2014 to 2016, a large-scale study was conducted in Aksu, an important agricultural area in southern Xinjiang, to compare the abundance and species composition of spider mites in cotton fields under jujube-cotton, apple-cotton, and cotton monocrop systems. The abundance of spider mites in cotton fields under both intercropping systems was generally higher than in the cotton monocrop. The species composition of spider mites also differed greatly between cotton intercropped with apple or jujube compared to the cotton monocrop. The relative proportion of Tetranychus truncates Ehara (Acari: Tetranychidae) in the species complex generally increased while that of another spider mite, Tetranychus dunhuangensis Wang (Acari: Tetranychidae), decreased under fruit tree-cotton systems. More attention should be paid to the monitoring and management of spider mites, especially T. truncates in this important region of China.

  5. Effects of butanol fraction of Ziziphus mucronata root ethanol extract on glucose homeostasis, serum insulin and other diabetes-related parameters in a murine model for type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohammed Auwal; Islam, Md Shahidul

    2017-12-01

    Ziziphus mucronata Willd (Rhamnaceae) is currently used in Nigerian traditional treatment of diabetes mellitus. However, detailed information on the antidiabetic potential of the plant parts is presently unknown. The present study investigated the antidiabetic effects of the butanol fraction of Z. mucronata root (ZMBF) in a type 2 diabetes (T2D) model of rats. T2D was induced in rats by feeding a 10% fructose solution ad libitum for two weeks followed by an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (40 mg/kg bw) and the animals were orally treated with ZMBF 150 or 300 mg/kg bw for five days a week for four weeks. Food and fluid intake, body weight changes and blood glucose levels were monitored during the experiment while other blood and organ specific diabetes-associated parameters were measured at the end of the experiment. After four-week treatment, significantly (p food and fluid intake, body weight gain, HOMA-β, HOMA-IR, serum fructosamine level, hepatic and renal function tests were not significantly (p > 0.05) affected by the treatment of ZMBF. Results of this study suggest that ZMBF treatment, at 300 mg/kg bw, possess antidiabetic activity, but could not ameliorate some diabetes-related parameters in type 2 diabetic rats.

  6. Drug: D06758 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available phus jujuba [TAX:326968] ... Same as: E00128 Therapeutic category: 5100 ... Rhamnaceae (buckthorn family) Jujube fruit Major component: Zizyphus saponin ... PubChem: 47208409 ... ...ctose [CPD:C00095 C10906], D-Glucose [CPD:C00031], Sucrose [CPD:C00089], (Zizyphusarabinan | Zizyphus sapo...nin I-III), Maslinic acid, Alphitolic acid [CPD:C16912], Jujuboside A [CPD:C17831],

  7. Effects of water collection and mulching combinations on water infiltration and consumption in a semiarid rainfed orchard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongchen; Zhao, Xining; Gao, Xiaodong; Ren, Kemeng; Wu, Pute

    2018-03-01

    Soil water and its efficient use are critical to sustainable productivity of rainfed orchards under the context of climate change in water-limited areas. Here, we combined micro-catchments for collecting hillslope runoff, named fish-scale pits, with mulches to examine water infiltration and water consumption of fruit trees using in situ soil moisture monitoring, the micro-lysimeter and sap flow methods via a two-year experiment in a rainfed jujube orchard on China's Loess Plateau. This experiment included four treatments: fish-scale pit with branch mulching (FB), fish-scale pit with straw mulching (FS), fish-scale pit without mulching (F), and bare land treatment (CK). The results showed that only about 50% of the rainfall infiltrated the soil for CK during the 2014 and 2015 growing seasons. The fish-scale pit without mulching experienced significantly increased rainfall infiltration by 41.38 and 27.30%, respectively, but also increased evaporation by 42.28 and 65.59%, respectively, compared to CK during the two growing seasons. The jujube transpiration significantly increased by 45.64-53.10% over CK, and the evaporation decreased by 42.47-53.50% when fish-scale pits were mulched with branches or straw. Taken together, the results show that the fish-scale pits and mulching combinations efficiently increased rainfall infiltration and jujube evapotranspiration in the experimental jujube orchard. The findings here provide an insight into the field water management for hillslope orchards in water-limited regions.

  8. Dehydration of core/shell fruits

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Y.; Yang, Xiaosong; Cao, Y.; Wang, Z.; Chen, B.; Zhang, Jian J.; Zhang, H.

    2015-01-01

    Dehydrated core/shell fruits, such as jujubes, raisins and plums, show very complex buckles and wrinkles on their exocarp. It is a challenging task to model such complicated patterns and their evolution in a virtual environment even for professional animators. This paper presents a unified physically-based approach to simulate the morphological transformation for the core/shell fruits in the dehydration process. A finite element method (FEM), which is based on the multiplicative decomposition...

  9. Chilling and heat requirements for flowering in temperate fruit trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liang; Dai, Junhu; Ranjitkar, Sailesh; Yu, Haiying; Xu, Jianchu; Luedeling, Eike

    2014-08-01

    Climate change has affected the rates of chilling and heat accumulation, which are vital for flowering and production, in temperate fruit trees, but few studies have been conducted in the cold-winter climates of East Asia. To evaluate tree responses to variation in chill and heat accumulation rates, partial least squares regression was used to correlate first flowering dates of chestnut (Castanea mollissima Blume) and jujube (Zizyphus jujube Mill.) in Beijing, China, with daily chill and heat accumulation between 1963 and 2008. The Dynamic Model and the Growing Degree Hour Model were used to convert daily records of minimum and maximum temperature into horticulturally meaningful metrics. Regression analyses identified the chilling and forcing periods for chestnut and jujube. The forcing periods started when half the chilling requirements were fulfilled. Over the past 50 years, heat accumulation during tree dormancy increased significantly, while chill accumulation remained relatively stable for both species. Heat accumulation was the main driver of bloom timing, with effects of variation in chill accumulation negligible in Beijing’s cold-winter climate. It does not seem likely that reductions in chill will have a major effect on the studied species in Beijing in the near future. Such problems are much more likely for trees grown in locations that are substantially warmer than their native habitats, such as temperate species in the subtropics and tropics.

  10. Chilling and heat requirements for flowering in temperate fruit trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liang; Dai, Junhu; Ranjitkar, Sailesh; Yu, Haiying; Xu, Jianchu; Luedeling, Eike

    2014-08-01

    Climate change has affected the rates of chilling and heat accumulation, which are vital for flowering and production, in temperate fruit trees, but few studies have been conducted in the cold-winter climates of East Asia. To evaluate tree responses to variation in chill and heat accumulation rates, partial least squares regression was used to correlate first flowering dates of chestnut ( Castanea mollissima Blume) and jujube ( Zizyphus jujube Mill.) in Beijing, China, with daily chill and heat accumulation between 1963 and 2008. The Dynamic Model and the Growing Degree Hour Model were used to convert daily records of minimum and maximum temperature into horticulturally meaningful metrics. Regression analyses identified the chilling and forcing periods for chestnut and jujube. The forcing periods started when half the chilling requirements were fulfilled. Over the past 50 years, heat accumulation during tree dormancy increased significantly, while chill accumulation remained relatively stable for both species. Heat accumulation was the main driver of bloom timing, with effects of variation in chill accumulation negligible in Beijing's cold-winter climate. It does not seem likely that reductions in chill will have a major effect on the studied species in Beijing in the near future. Such problems are much more likely for trees grown in locations that are substantially warmer than their native habitats, such as temperate species in the subtropics and tropics.

  11. Polyphenols from Ziziphus lotus grown in Tunesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qa'dan, F.

    2003-01-01

    Four monomeric and four oligomeric flavanoids have been identified from the root bark of Zizphus lotus traditionally used for the treatment of diabetes in Tunisian traditional medicine. Flavan-3-oles are (-)-epicatechin(1), (+)-catechin (2), (-)-epigallocatechin (3) and (+)-gallocatechin (4); proanthcyanidins are epicatechin-(4??8)-catechin (procyanidin B-1,5), catechin-(4??8)-catechin (procyanidin B-3, 6), catechin-(4??8)-epicatechin ( procyanidin B-4, 7) and gallocatechin-(4??8)-gallocatechin (prodelphinidin B-3, 8) were isolated. The reported compounds were established as their peracetate derivatives, on the basis of their chemical and spectral evidences. The spectral data of the peracetate derivative of the prodelphinidin(8a) are reported. (author) 19 refs

  12. FRUITS AND SIMILES AND METAPHORS ON FRUITS IN CLASSICAL TURKISH LITERATURE (DIVAN POETRY / DIVAN SIIRINDE MEYVELER VE MEYVELERDEN HAREKETLE YAPILAN TESBIH VE MECAZLAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Abdülkerim GÜLHAN

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We have surveyed 40 divans belonging differentcenturies and different regions in classical TurkishLiterature. Đn the works we have looked up, poets used fruitnames such as pear, quince, almond, hickory, apple, plum,filbert, peanut, date palm, jujube, oleaster, fig, coffee,watermelon, melon, apricot, cherry, lemon, pomegranate,peach, bitter orange, grape, morello, olive and mademetaphor regarding their trees, forms, tastes, colors, flowersand functions. Many characteristical features of “the lovedone” were given with word games on fruits.

  13. Antidepressant-like effects of Gan-Mai-Dazao-Tang via monoamine regulatory pathways on forced swimming test in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsiang-Ling; Lim, Swee-Ling; Lu, Kuan-Hung; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2018-01-01

    Depression is a highly prevalent and recurrent mental disorder that impacts all aspects of human life. Undesirable effects of the antidepressant drugs led to the development of complementary and alternative therapies. Gan-Mai-Da-Zao-Tang (, gān mài dà zǎo tang) is a traditional herbal formula commonly used for the treatment of depression, but lack of scientific proof on its mechanism. It consisted of Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch. (licorice), Triticum aestivum L. (wheat) and Zizphus jujuba Mill. (jujube). The objective of this study is to investigate the antidepressant effects of Gan-Mai-Dazao-Tang and its ingredients in rats exposed to forced swimming test (FST). The 72 of male Nerl: Wistar rats (8 weeks old) were randomized into control (10 mL/kg bw H 2 O), licorice (0.4 g/kg bw), wheat (1.6 g/kg bw), jujube (0.5 g/kg bw), Gan-Mai-Da-Zao-Tang (2.5 g/kg bw of licorice: wheat: jujube in ratio of 5:20:6) and Prozac (18 mg/kg bw) groups. Samples were administered by oral gavage for 21 days. FST was performed on 21st day, with 15 min for pretest followed by 5 min for real test. Then, the animals were sacrificed and brain tissues were collected for monoamines analyses. The Gan-Mai-Da-Zao-Tang (LWJ) showed significantly down-regulation of immobility time, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and DOPAC/dopamine (DA) turnover rates, and also enhanced the concentration of serotonin (5-HT) and DA in brain tissues, as compared with the control. The LWJ stated the potent antidepressant-like effect by modulating these monoamines concentration, while the licorice, wheat and jujube did not reported significant results as compared with control group. The positive control (Prozac) was noted with significantly reduction in body weight and appetite. In conclusion, the antidepressant-like effects of LWJ might be mediated by the regulation of monoamine neurotransmitters. Thus, it could beneficial in depression treatment as a complementary approach.

  14. Antidepressant-like effects of Gan-Mai-Dazao-Tang via monoamine regulatory pathways on forced swimming test in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Ling Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a highly prevalent and recurrent mental disorder that impacts all aspects of human life. Undesirable effects of the antidepressant drugs led to the development of complementary and alternative therapies. Gan-Mai-Da-Zao-Tang (甘麥大棗湯, gān mài dà zǎo tang is a traditional herbal formula commonly used for the treatment of depression, but lack of scientific proof on its mechanism. It consisted of Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch. (licorice, Triticum aestivum L. (wheat and Zizphus jujuba Mill. (jujube. The objective of this study is to investigate the antidepressant effects of Gan-Mai-Dazao-Tang and its ingredients in rats exposed to forced swimming test (FST. The 72 of male Nerl: Wistar rats (8 weeks old were randomized into control (10 mL/kg bw H2O, licorice (0.4 g/kg bw, wheat (1.6 g/kg bw, jujube (0.5 g/kg bw, Gan-Mai-Da-Zao-Tang (2.5 g/kg bw of licorice: wheat: jujube in ratio of 5:20:6 and Prozac (18 mg/kg bw groups. Samples were administered by oral gavage for 21 days. FST was performed on 21st day, with 15 min for pretest followed by 5 min for real test. Then, the animals were sacrificed and brain tissues were collected for monoamines analyses. The Gan-Mai-Da-Zao-Tang (LWJ showed significantly down-regulation of immobility time, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC and DOPAC/dopamine (DA turnover rates, and also enhanced the concentration of serotonin (5-HT and DA in brain tissues, as compared with the control. The LWJ stated the potent antidepressant-like effect by modulating these monoamines concentration, while the licorice, wheat and jujube did not reported significant results as compared with control group. The positive control (Prozac was noted with significantly reduction in body weight and appetite. In conclusion, the antidepressant-like effects of LWJ might be mediated by the regulation of monoamine neurotransmitters. Thus, it could beneficial in depression treatment as a complementary approach.

  15. “Who Began This Art? From Whence Did It Emerge?”: A Hermetic Frame Story on the Origins of Alchemy in Pseudo-Ibn Waḥshīya’s The Book of the Ziziphus Tree of the Furthest Boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Braun

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the context of a Hermetic frame story in the pseudepigraphical alchemical treatise The Book of the Ziziphus Tree of the Furthest Boundary (Kitāb Sidrat almuntahā. The treatise is attributed to a prominent figure in the Arabic occult sciences, Abū Bakr b. Waḥshīya (fl. first half of the 4th/10th century. It was written in the form of a dialogue between the protagonist, Ibn Waḥshīya, and an alchemist from the Islamic West, al-Maghribī al-Qamarī. The last section of the introductory dialogue between these two characters consists of a frame story on the origins of alchemy and a legend of discovery (Fundlegende that introduces a cosmogony and an allegorical depiction of the process of transmutation. Both the frame story and the legend of discovery abound in Hermetic motifs and topoi known from other Greek and Arabic alchemical treatises. The exposition of the different prevailing theories on the beginnings of alchemy reflects, moreover, historical phenomena, such as the Graeco-Arabic translation movement and the shu‘ūbīya controversy. Consistent with the literary tradition of the Arabic Hermetica, Ancient Egypt emerges in this treatise as the cradle of alchemy; however, I suggest that more than merely literary convention, such evocations express a genuine fascination with Ancient Egypt and its surviving material culture. In this respect, the littleknown genre of Arabic books on hidden treasure might shed new light on common Hermetic narratives and their circulation in Arabic occult literature.

  16. Storage temperature affects fruit quality attributes of Ber (Ziziphus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-03

    Sep 3, 2008 ... 2Department of Agricultural Research and Extension Services, Agronomy Research Institute, Box CY 550, Causeway, ... Fruit utilization is affected by quality attributes and shelf life. ... preserve fresh and dried fruits can ensure its availability ... Vitamin C was determined using titrimetric method with 2,6-.

  17. Traditional processing of masau fruits (Ziziphus mauritiana) in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyanga, L.K.; Nout, M.J.R.; Gadaga, T.H.; Boekhout, T.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    A survey of the traditional processing techniques of masau was conducted using a questionnaire and two focus group discussions in Mudzi, Mt. Darwin, and Muzarabani districts in Zimbabwe. Masau fruits form part of the family diet and generate additional income by selling at local markets. Surplus

  18. Antioxidant and antibacterial properties of Ziziphus mucronata and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sulphuric acid reagent, Fehling's solution, concentrated sulphuric acid, ferric chloride, Drangendorff's reagent, acetic anhydride, 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), p-iodonitrotetrazolium violet, Methods: Antibacterial activity was evaluated using ...

  19. Antioxidant, hypoglycemic and anti-diabetic activities of Ziziphus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2610 ... 1Department of Botany, Environment Program, Faculty of Biological Science, King ... International Pharmaceutical Abstract, Chemical Abstracts, Embase, Index Copernicus, EBSCO, African .... The extracts, fractions and drugs were orally.

  20. Ziziphus mauritiana leaf extract emulsion for skin rejuvenation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research May 2016; 15 (5): 929-936 ... this period, stability parameters, including liquefaction, phase separation, color, electrical ... Both active and placebo formulations changed skin elasticity and erythema ...

  1. Antidiarrhoeal activity of Ziziphus mauritiana root extract in rodents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A dose dependent decrease of gastrointestinal transit was observed with extracts (25 and 50 mg/kg) which also protected mice against castor oil induced dirrhoea and castor oil induced fluid accumulation, respectively. The presence of some of the phytochemicals in the root extract may be responsible for the observed ...

  2. Ziziphus mauritiana leaf extract emulsion for skin rejuvenation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During this period, stability parameters, including liquefaction, phase separation, color, electrical conductivity, centrifugation and pH were monitored at specified time intervals. Skin rejuvenation was evaluated using 13 healthy human volunteers over a period of 8 weeks. During this period, various skin parameters such as ...

  3. Categorization of ber varieties in relation to blooming period, fruit setting and harvesting time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharif, N.; Abbas, M.M.; Ishfaq, M.; Memon, N.U.N.

    2013-01-01

    Thirty four local Ber varieties were evaluated at Horticultural Research Institute AARI, Faisalabad, Horticultural Research Station Bahawalpur (Punjab) and Jujube Research Station, Tandojam (Sindh). Traits viz. total period of blooming (dates), peak period of blooming (dates), total period of fruit set (dates), peak period of fruit set (dates), total period of fruit harvest (dates), peak period of fruit harvest (dates), total flowering days, peak flowering days, total fruit setting days, peak fruit setting days, total harvesting days and peak harvesting days were studied. The results revealed significant differences in parameters studied except total period of blooming under Tandojam, Sindh conditions. Varieties were classified as early, mid and late season for both provinces. Local varieties had potential for further manipulation in terms of variety improvement to attract growers for extensive ber cultivations under changing global climatic scenario. (author)

  4. Induced mutation in tropical fruit trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-05-15

    This publication is based on an FAO/IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) and provides insight into the application of induced mutation and in vitro techniques for the improvement of well known fruit trees such as citrus, mango, avocado and papaya, as well as more exotic fruit trees such as litchi, annona, jujube, carambola, pitanga and jaboticaba. The latter are of particular importance due to their adaptation to harsh environments and their high potential as basic food and micronutrient providers for populations in poorer and more remote regions. The findings of the CRP show that application of radiation induced mutation techniques in tropical and subtropical fruit trees can contribute to improving nutritional balance food security, and to enhancing the economic status of growers.

  5. Induced mutation in tropical fruit trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-05-01

    This publication is based on an FAO/IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) and provides insight into the application of induced mutation and in vitro techniques for the improvement of well known fruit trees such as citrus, mango, avocado and papaya, as well as more exotic fruit trees such as litchi, annona, jujube, carambola, pitanga and jaboticaba. The latter are of particular importance due to their adaptation to harsh environments and their high potential as basic food and micronutrient providers for populations in poorer and more remote regions. The findings of the CRP show that application of radiation induced mutation techniques in tropical and subtropical fruit trees can contribute to improving nutritional balance food security, and to enhancing the economic status of growers

  6. Evaluation of effectiveness and safety of a herbal compound in primary insomnia symptoms and sleep disturbances not related to medical or psychiatric causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Giancarlo; Contaldi, Paola; Fogliame, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Sleep disturbances and related daytime activities impairment are common diseases nowadays. General practitioners are often the first health care professional asked to alleviate sleep disturbances and primary insomnia symptoms. Beyond a wide class of hypnotic drugs, botanicals can represent an alternative treatment for those kinds of symptoms. The scope of the present study is to evaluate safety and effectiveness of a herbal compound composed of valerian, hop, and jujube (Vagonotte ® ) on primary insomnia symptoms and sleep disturbances not related to medical or psychiatric causes. One hundred and twenty subjects with sleep disturbances symptoms were randomized in two branches of 60 persons each, receiving the herbal compound or placebo at dosage of two pills per day 30 minutes before their scheduled bedtime. All subjects were screened for precise items related to sleep quality and daytime activity at the beginning, after 10 days, and after 20 days of consecutive dietary supplement (or placebo) consumption. The participants remained blind to group assignment until all of them completed the trial. Sleep onset, numbers of nocturnal awakenings, and overall nocturnal slept time were assessed. A statistically significant difference between the two groups emerged. The group receiving the herbal compound showed a lower time of sleep onset compared to placebo group, the same result was obtained for total slept time and night awakenings frequency ( p Botanicals dietary supplement with relaxing and soothing properties can help practitioner to treat primary insomnia, especially when the risk/benefit profile of a patient does not sustain hypnotic drugs prescription. This clinical investigation on safety and effectiveness of a herbal compound made of valerian, hop, and jujube opens interesting perspectives on usage of herbal compound to manage primary insomnia. Further investigations could help in understanding herbal compounds' effectiveness on sleep disturbances.

  7. Evaluation of effectiveness and safety of a herbal compound in primary insomnia symptoms and sleep disturbances not related to medical or psychiatric causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmieri G

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Giancarlo Palmieri,1,2 Paola Contaldi,1 Giuseppe Fogliame1 1ANARDI Medical and Scientific Association, Scafati, Italy; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Niguarda Cà Granda Hospital, Milan, Italy Background and purpose: Sleep disturbances and related daytime activities impairment are common diseases nowadays. General practitioners are often the first health care professional asked to alleviate sleep disturbances and primary insomnia symptoms. Beyond a wide class of hypnotic drugs, botanicals can represent an alternative treatment for those kinds of symptoms. The scope of the present study is to evaluate safety and effectiveness of a herbal compound composed of valerian, hop, and jujube (Vagonotte® on primary insomnia symptoms and sleep disturbances not related to medical or psychiatric causes.Patients and methods: One hundred and twenty subjects with sleep disturbances symptoms were randomized in two branches of 60 persons each, receiving the herbal compound or placebo at dosage of two pills per day 30 minutes before their scheduled bedtime. All subjects were screened for precise items related to sleep quality and daytime activity at the beginning, after 10 days, and after 20 days of consecutive dietary supplement (or placebo consumption. The participants remained blind to group assignment until all of them completed the trial.Results: Sleep onset, numbers of nocturnal awakenings, and overall nocturnal slept time were assessed. A statistically significant difference between the two groups emerged. The group receiving the herbal compound showed a lower time of sleep onset compared to placebo group, the same result was obtained for total slept time and night awakenings frequency (p<0.001. Daily symptom improvement in subjects receiving the herbal compound showed significant reduction in tension and irritability, difficulty in concentration, and fatigue intensity, if compared to placebo scores (p<0.001. None of the 60 subjects in the verum group

  8. Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Using Leaf Extract of Ziziphus zizyphus and their Antimicrobial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa A. A. Aljabali

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: There is a growing need for the development of new methods for the synthesis of nanoparticles. The interest in such particles has raised concerns about the environmental safety of their production methods; (2 Objectives: The current methods of nanoparticle production are often expensive and employ chemicals that are potentially harmful to the environment, which calls for the development of “greener” protocols. Herein we describe the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs using plant extracts, which offers an alternative, efficient, inexpensive, and environmentally friendly method to produce well-defined geometries of nanoparticles; (3 Methods: The phytochemicals present in the aqueous leaf extract acted as an effective reducing agent. The generated AuNPs were characterized by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Scanning electron microscope (SEM, and Atomic Force microscopy (AFM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, UV-visible spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX, and thermogravimetric analyses (TGA; (4 Results and Conclusions: The prepared nanoparticles were found to be biocompatible and exhibited no antimicrobial or antifungal effect, deeming the particles safe for various applications in nanomedicine. TGA analysis revealed that biomolecules, which were present in the plant extract, capped the nanoparticles and acted as stabilizing agents.

  9. Overview of medicinal plants used for cardiovascular system disorders and diseases in ethnobotany of different areas in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baharvand-Ahmadi Babak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Today, cardiovascular diseases are the prominent cause of death in industrialized countries which include a variety of diseases such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia, thromboembolism, coronary heart disease, heart failure, etc. Recent research findings haveshown that not only the extent of cultivation and production of medicinal plants have not beenreduced, but also day-to-day production and consumption have increased. In traditional botanicalknowledge, herbal medicines are used for the treatment of cardiovascular disorders. In this study,we sought to gather and report medicinal plants used to treat these diseases in different regionsof Iran.Methods: The articles published about ethnobotanical study of cardiovascular diseases in variousregions of Iran, such as Arasbaran, Sistan, Kashan, Kerman, Isfahan Mobarakeh, Lorestan andIlam were prepared and summarized.Results: The results of ethnobotanical studies of various regions of Iran, such as Arasbaran, Sistan,Kashan, Kerman, Isfahan Mobarakeh, Lorestan and Ilam were gathered. The results showed thatsumac plants, barberry, yarrow, wild cucumber, horsetail, Eastern grape, hawthorn, wild rose,spinach, jujube, buckwheat, chamomile, chicory, thistle, Mary peas, nightshade, verbena, sorrel ,cherry, citrullus colocynthis, Peganum harmala, sesame and so many other plants are used for thetreatment of cardiovascular diseases and disorders.Conclusion: Herbal medicines are used effectively for some cardiovascular diseases. Rigoroustraining of patients to take precautions and drug interactions into account and to avoid thearbitrary use of medicinal plants is very important.

  10. A point mutation (L1015F) of the voltage-sensitive sodium channel gene associated with lambda-cyhalothrin resistance in Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) population from the transgenic Bt cotton field of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Congai; Gao, Xiwu

    2016-02-01

    In China, the green mirid bug, Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür), has caused severe economic damage to many kinds of crops, especially the cotton and jujubes. Pyrethroid insecticides have been widely used for controlling this pest in the transgenic Bt cotton field. Five populations of A. lucorum collected from cotton crops at different locations in China were evaluated for lambda-cyhalothrin resistance. The results showed that only the population collected from Shandong Province exhibited 30-fold of resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin. Neither PBO nor DEF had obvious synergism when compared the synergistic ratio between SS and RR strain which was originated from the Shandong population. Besides, there were no statistically significant differences (p>0.05) in the carboxylesterase, glutathione S-transferase, or 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase activities between the Shandong population and the laboratory susceptible strain (SS). The full-length sodium channel gene named AlVSSC encoding 2028 amino acids was obtained by RT-PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). One single point mutation L1015F in the AlVSSC was detected only in the Shandong population. Our results revealed that the L1015F mutation associated with pyrethroid resistance was identified in A. lucorum populations in China. These results will be useful for the rational chemical control of A. lucorum in the transgenic Bt cotton field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) is a new natural host of Hop stunt viroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elleuch, Amine; Hamdi, Imen; Ellouze, Olfa; Ghrab, Mohamed; Fkahfakh, Hatem; Drira, Noureddine

    2013-10-01

    Besides hop, Hop stunt viroid (HpSVd) infects many woody species including grapevine, citrus, peach, plum, apricot, almond, pomegranate, mulberry and jujube. Here, we report the first detection of HpSVd in pistachio (Pistacia vera L.). Samples corresponding to 16 pistachio cultivars were obtained from a nearby almond collection. From these samples, low molecular weight RNAs were extracted for double polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, northern-blot analysis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays. HpSVd was detected in 4 of the 16 pistachio cultivars in the first year and in 6 in the second, being also detected in the almond collection. Examination of the nucleotide sequences of pistachio and almond isolates revealed 13 new sequence variants. Sequences from pistachio shared 92-96 % similarity with the first reported HpSVd sequence (GenBank X00009), and multiple alignment and phylogenetic analyses showed that one pistachio isolate (HpSVdPis67Jabari) clustered with the plum group, whereas all the others clustered with the hop, and the recombinants plum-citrus and plum-Hop/cit3 groups. By identifying pistachio as a new natural host, we confirm that HpSVd is an ubiquitous and genetically variable viroid that infects many different fruit trees cultivated worldwide.

  12. Energy-conserving perennial agriculture for marginal land in southern Appalachia. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, G.

    1982-01-30

    USDA economists predict the end of surplus farm production in the US within this decade. More and more marginal land will be cropped to provide feed for the growing world population and to produce energy. Much of this potential cropland in Southern Appalachia is poorly suited to annual crops, such as corn. Perennial crops are much better suited to steep, rocky, and wet sites. Research was undertaken on the theoretical potentials of perennial species with high predicted yields of protein, carbohydrates, or oils. Several candidate staple perennial crops for marginal land in Southern Appalachia were identified, and estimates were made of their yields, energy input requirements, and general suitabilities. Cropping systems incorporating honeylocust, persimmon, mulberry, jujube, and beech were compared with corn cropping systems. It appears that these candidate staple perennials show distinct advantages for energy conservation and environmental preservation. Detailed economic analyses must await actual demonstration trials, but preliminary indications for ethanol conversion systems with honeylocust are encouraging. It is suggested that short-term loans to farmers undertaking this new type of agriculture would be appropriate to solve cash-flow problems.

  13. The Protective Effect of Whole Honey and Phenolic Extract on Oxidative DNA Damage in Mice Lymphocytes Using Comet Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ni; Wang, Yuan; Cao, Wei

    2017-12-01

    In this study, the antioxidant activity and the protective effect against hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage were assessed for five honeys of different botanical origin. Seven phenolic acids were detected in the honey samples. Ferulic acid was the most abundant phenolic acid detected in longan honey, jujube honey and buckwheat honey. Ellagic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and protocatechuic acid were the main phenolic acids detected in vitex honey. Of all honey samples tested, the highest total phenolic content and antioxidant activity were found in buckwheat honey, whereas the lowest total phenolic content and antioxidant activity were found in locust honey. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide induced a 62% increase in tail DNA in mice lymphocytes, and all studied honeys significantly inhibited this effect (P Phenolic extracts of honey displayed greater protective effects than whole honey in comet assay. The hydrogen peroxide-generated increase in 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was effectively inhibited by the honeys studied (P phenolic acids of honey can penetrate into lymphocytes and protect DNA from oxidative damage by scavenging hydrogen peroxide and/or chelating ferrous ions.

  14. Experimental investigations on a CRDI system assisted diesel engine fuelled with aluminium oxide nanoparticles blended biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Syed Aalam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were conducted to determine engine performance, exhaust emissions and combustion characteristics of a single cylinder, common rail direct injection (CRDI system assisted diesel engine using diesel with 25 percentage of zizipus jujube methyl ester blended fuel (ZJME25. Along with this ZJME25 aluminium oxide nanoparticles were added as additive in mass fractions of 25 ppm (AONP 25 and 50 ppm (AONP 50 with the help of a mechanical Homogenizer and an ultrasonicator. It was observed that aluminium oxide nanoparticles blended fuel exhibits a significant reduction in specific fuel consumption and exhaust emissions at all operating loads. At the full load, the magnitude of HC and smoke emission for the ZJME25 before the addition of aluminium oxide nanoparticles was 13.459 g/kW h and 79 HSU, whereas it was 8.599 g/kW h and 49 HSU for the AONP 50 blended ZJME25 fuel respectively. The results also showed a considerable enhancement in brake thermal efficiency and heat release rate due to the influence of aluminium oxide nanoparticles addition in biodiesel–diesel blend.

  15. Sensing the water content of honey from temperature-dependent electrical conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Wenchuan; Liu, Yi; Zhu, Xinhua; Zhuang, Hong

    2011-01-01

    In order to predict the water content in honey, electrical conductivity was measured on blossom honey types milk-vetch, jujube and yellow-locust with the water content of 18–37% between 5 and 40 °C. The regression models of electrical conductivity were developed as functions of water content and temperature. The results showed that increases in either water content or temperature resulted in an increase in the electrical conductivity of honey with greater changes at higher water content and/or higher temperature. The linear terms of water content and temperature, a quadratic term of water content, and the interaction effect of water content and temperature had significant influence on the electrical conductivity of honey (p < 0.0001). Regardless of blossom honey type, the linear coefficient of the determination of measured and calculated electrical conductivities was 0.998 and the range error ratio was larger than 100. These results suggest that the electrical conductivity of honey might be used to develop a detector for rapidly predicting the water content in blossom honey

  16. Yeasts and lactic acid bacteria microbiota from masau (Ziziphus mauritiana) fruits and their fermented fruit pulp in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyanga, L.K.; Nout, M.J.R.; Gadaga, T.H.; Theelen, R.M.C.; Boekhout, T.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    Masau are Zimbabwean wild fruits, which are usually eaten raw and/ or processed into products such as porridge, traditional cakes, mahewu and jam. Yeasts, yeast-like fungi, and lactic acid bacteria present on the unripe, ripe and dried fruits, and in the fermented masau fruits collected from

  17. Herbs with potential nephrotoxic effects according to traditional Persian medicine: Review and assessment of scientific evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolangi, Fatemeh; Memariani, Zahra; Bozorgi, Mahboubeh; Mozaffarpur, Seyyed Ali; Mirzapour, Mohaddeseh

    2018-04-03

    The increased use of herbal remedies particularly in patients with kidney diseases indicated the importance of studies which focused on nephrotoxic plants. The present study aimed to review and assess the kidney-damaging herbs mentioned in the Persian medicine [PM] books. The main PM books were searched for nephrotoxic herbs and their relevant reformers traditionally proposed for preventing renal damage. PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar were investigated for evaluation of the scientific evidence relating to the nephrotoxicity of herbs. A total of 64 plants with kidney damage potential and their reformer medicaments were recorded in 7 sources included in this review. Allium schoenoprasum and Marrubium vulgare were the most repeated and emphasized nephrotoxic plants in PM books, but there was not any relevant scientific evidence. Despite the lack of clinical studies, some evidence was found for 38% of plants that were related to renal damage. The most repeated reformers for reducing the renal side effects mainly consisted of gum tragacanth, gum Arabic, mastic gum, anise, jujube and honey and some evidence was found for their nephroprotective activities. The present study reviewed and assessed the herbs with adverse renal effects in the main PM books. Some evidence was in line with the potential nephrotoxicity of plants and their ‎reformers. Despite the lack of clinical research for evaluation of their renal damage, the herbs may be focused in term of their nephrotoxicity; and there is a need for further studies on the scientific basis of their nephrotoxicity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Application of foam column as green technology for concentration of saponins from sisal (Agave sisalana and Juá (Ziziphus joazeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. D. Ribeiro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Saponins, molecules classified as triterpenic or steroidal glycosides, are metabolites distributed in all the plant kingdom that can be used for the production of foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals, as well as in soil bioremediation. Saponins are normally extracted from natural resources with water, ethanol and/or methanol, and then concentrated by liquid-liquid partitioning with n-butanol. An alternative concentration method is with a foam column, by which the saponins can be concentrated via preferential adsorption at a gas-liquid interface. Therefore, the objective of this work was the use of a foam column for the concentration of saponins from juá and sisal, evaluating parameters such as: initial working volume in the column, saponin concentration in the extracts from juá and sisal, air flow rate, pH, Raschig rings loading and operation time. When a gradient air flow rate and 25 g of Raschig rings were used, 82.6% of the jua saponins loaded onto the system were recovered in a 3.46-fold concentrated solution after 9 h of operation. Regarding sisal saponins, a concentration factor of 1.98 was observed with 90.5% of saponin recovery during 4.5 h of operation.

  19. Ethyl p-coumarate exerts antifungal activity in vitro and in vivo against fruit Alternaria alternata via membrane-targeted mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wusun; Yuan, Shuzhi; Sun, Jing; Li, Qianqian; Jiang, Weibo; Cao, Jiankang

    2018-08-02

    The fungus Alternaria alternata can cause food contamination by black spot rot and food safety issues due to the production of mycotoxins. In particular, A. alternata can infect many fresh fruits and vegetables and lead to considerable postharvest decay during storage and processing. The use of plant-derived products in postharvest disease management may be an acceptable alternative to traditional chemical fungicides. The aim of this study was to assess the antifungal activity of ethyl p-coumarate (EpCA) against Alternaria alternata in vitro and in vivo, and to determine the underlying mechanism. Results indicated that EpCA exhibited pronounced antifungal activity against in vitro mycelial growth of A. alternata, with half-inhibition concentration of 176.8 μg/mL. Spore germination of the pathogen was inhibited by EpCA in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, in vivo test confirmed that both 100 and 800 μg/mL EpCA significantly reduced disease development of black spot rot in jujube fruit caused by A. alternata. The EpCA treatments increased plasma membrane permeability as great leakage of intercellular electrolytes, soluble proteins and sugars of A. alternata occurred during incubation. The EpCA treatments also caused increase of the influx of propidium iodide, a fluorescence dye binding nucleus DNA, into the affected spores, indicating the disrupted plasma membrane integrity. Observations of ultrastructure further evidenced the damage to plasma membrane and morphology of A. alternata caused by EpCA, which resulted in distortion, sunken and shrivelled of spores and mycelia of the pathogen. In addition, fluorometric assay by confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed that the EpCA treatments induced endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in the spores of A. alternata, with stronger and more stable accumulation of ROS at higher concentration of EpCA. Therefore, heavy oxidative damage to cellular membranes and organelles might happen as demonstrated

  20. Allelopathy by extracts of Caatinga species on melon seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreya Kalyana de Oliveira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The melon crop is of great socioeconomic importance in Brazil and some species from the Caatinga biome show allelopathic effects on other species. The aim of this study was to assess leaf and seed extracts of cumaru (Amburana cearensis (Allemao A.C. Sm., the jujube tree (Zizyphus joazeiro Mart., Jucá (Caesalpinia ferrea Mart. Ex. Tul. Var. Ferrea and mulungu (Erythrina velutina Willd. on the emergence of melon seeds (Cucumis melo L.. Leaves and seeds were used to produce extracts for each species at concentrations of a 1%, b 0.5% c 0.25%, d 0.125% and e 0% (control. The experiment was conducted with each extract type and its respective concentrations in a completely randomized design, with four replicates, each of 20 seeds. The percentage emergence and rate index, percentage of abnormal seedlings, seedling dry matter and seedling shoot and root length were assessed. Seed extracts of A. cearensis prevented melon germination, whereas the other extracts had no effect on this variable. Leaf extracts of A. cearensis and leaf and seed extracts of Z. joazeiro, C. ferrea and E. velutina resulted in abnormal melon seedlings. The percentage of abnormal melon seedlings exceeded 30% when treated with C. ferrea seed extract at the highest concentration. Most extracts did not affect seedling dry matter, but E. velutina leaf and seed extract increased the dry matter accumulation of melon seedlings and Z. joazeiro seed extract decreased dry matter accumulation at a concentration of 0.25%. The highest concentrations of mulungu and jucá leaf extracts promoted the shoot growth of melon seedlings. The extract from E. velutina seeds negatively affected root length compared to the control, similar to the effect of C. ferrea and E. velutina leaf extracts at the highest concentrations. Extracts of different organs of Caatinga plants can affect the emergence and characteristics related to seedling growth, depending on the concentration. Most extracts did not affect

  1. Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf. modulates antioxidant activity and human T-cell proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belarbi Meriem

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf. also known as Jujube, is a deciduous shrub which belongs to Rhamnaceae family. This plant is used in Algerian traditional medicine for its anti-diabetic, sedative, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and hypoglycaemic activities. In the present study, we determined the concentrations of different vitamins (vitamin A, C and E and fatty acids in root, stem, leaves, fruit pulp and seed of Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf. and assessed the effects of their aqueous extracts on antioxidant status and human T-cell proliferation. Methods Aqueous filtrates from different parts, i.e, root, leaf, stem, fruit pulp and seed, of Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf. were prepared. Vitamin C levels were determined by precipitating with 10% trichloroacetic acid and vitamin A and E were assessed by HPLC. Lipid composition of these extracts was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. Anti-oxidant capacity was evaluated by using anti-radical resistance kit [Kit Radicaux Libres (KRL@; Kirial International SA, Couternon, France]. T-cell blastogenesis was assessed by the incorporation of 3H-thymidine. IL-2 gene expression was evaluated by RT-qPCR. Results Our results show that fruit pulp contained higher vitamin A and C contents than other parts of the plant. Furthermore, the fruit pulp was the richest source of linoleic acid (18:2n-6, a precursor of n-6 fatty acids. Fruit seeds possessed higher vitamin C levels than leaves, roots and stem. The leaves were the richest source of vitamin E and linolenic acid (18:3n-3, a precursor of n-3 fatty acids. The antioxidant capacity of the different extracts, measured by KRL@ test, was as follows: pulp Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf. exerted immunosuppressive effects. Conclusion Seed extracts exerted the most potent immunosuppressive effects on T cell proliferation and IL-2 mRNA expression. The results of the present study are discussed in the light of their use to modulate the immune-mediated diseases.

  2. A new species in the genus Crisicoccus Ferris (Hemiptera: Coccomorpha: Pseudococcidae), with a key to Chinese species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiang-Tao; Wu, San-An

    2016-06-01

    A new mealybug, Crisicoccus ziziphus sp. nov. (Hemiptera: Coccomorpha: Pseudococcidae), collected on the leaves and twigs of Ziziphus jujuba (Rhamnaceae), is described from China. All the female developmental stages (adult, third-instar, second-instar and first-instar nymphs) are described and illustrated. Keys are provided to separate the female instars and to identify adult females of Crisicoccus species from China.

  3. jfewr ©2016 - jfewr Publications

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B.L. PENUEL

    Terminalia albida, Ziziphus spina-christi, Sena siamea, Annona senegalensis, Terminalia glaucescens, Guiera senegalensis, Tamarindus indica and Grewia venusta while the abundant grass species are: Cenchrus species, Sena obtusifolia, Sida acuta, Hibiscus asper, Tridax procumbens, Croton lobatus and Portulaca.

  4. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of Moringa oleifera Leaf Extract on Alcohol-induced Hepatotoxicity ... Effect of ethanol extract of Ziziphus mauritiana leaf on serum and hepatic lipid ... lam. leaf extracts against chronic ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity in rat liver

  5. Nemudzivhadi and Masoko Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cadewumi

    ANTIOXIDANT AND ANTIBACTERIAL PROPERTIES OF ZIZIPHUS MUCRONATA AND RICINUS COMMUNIS. LEAVES EXTRACTS. Vhutshilo Nemudzivhadi and Peter Masoko*. Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, University of Limpopo, Private Bag X1106, Sovenga,. 0727, South Africa.

  6. hematological and biochemical studies on the effect of some natural antioxidants pre-injection in irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashour, S.E.S.

    2011-01-01

    The present work was carried out in order to evaluate the biological activities of some natural antioxidants such as ziziphus and olive leaves extract as radioprotective agents on male albino rats treated with gamma irradiation. The results showed that the ethanolic extract of ziziphus and olive leaves have high content of phenolic and flavonoid compound. GC-MS showed that ethanolic extracts of ziziphus and olive leaves contains some important phenolic compounds include (Catechin, Chlorogenic,Zizyphine F, Luteolin and Succinylsulfathiazol), (Caffeic acid, Quercetin, Rutin, Diosmetine, Luteolin-7-glucoside and Oleuropein) respectively. γ-irradiation caused a significant decrease in body weight after 2 weeks as compared with control group. Administration of ethanolic extracts of olive and ziziphus leaves to normal rats exhibited a decrease in body weight after 2 weeks as compared with control group.The determination of different biological parameters showed a significant high level of ALT, AST, ALP, creatinine and urea in rat serum treated with gamma radiation. A significant depression in Hb, RBCs, HCT, MCV, WBC and PLT in rats after exposure to gamma radiation was noticed. The ethanolic extracts of ziziphus leaves and olive leaves application have been found to regulate the hematological parameters with narrow range around the normal level. A depressive effect of radiation was noticed on total protein, and albumin. Ethanolic extracts of olive and ziziphus leaves enhanced the accumulation of protein fraction.

  7. The Clinical Observation of Music Therapy in Combination Chinese Medicine in Treating Depression due to Malignant Tumor%五音疗法联合中药治疗恶性肿瘤抑郁症临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温微微; 刘东波; 殷德科

    2017-01-01

    Objective:To observe the clinical curative effect of music therapy in combination with Chinese medicine in treating depression due to malignant tumor.Methods:Sixty patients with depression due to malignant tumor were randomly divided into A treatment group,B control group,C control group,20 cases in each group.The ones in the treatment group A adopted music therapy in combination with Chinese medicine listening to the corresponding music according to different syndrome.once a day,24 minutes each time,and regarding 3 weeks as one course.At the same time,they took Chinese medicine decoction orally according to different types,one dose each day,400 Ml each time which was divided into two parts.The ones in the B control group were treated with Chinese medicine,such as Modified Danzhi Xiaoyao Powder (DZXYS) for syndrome of qi stagnation generating fire,Modified Celestial Emperor Heart-Supplementing Elixir for syndrome of heart-yin deficiency,Modified Spleen-Restoring Decoction for syndrome of heart-spleen deficiency,Modified Zishui Qinggan Yin (ZSQGY) for syndrome of liver-spleen yin deficiency,Modified Licorice and Wheat and Jujube Decoction for syndrome of mind confusion.The ones in the C control group were treated with 20 mg of Fluoxetine Capsules (made by Eli Lilly Suzhou Pharmaceutical Co.,Ltd.,J20130010) for oral administration,once a day.and 4 weeks were regarded as one course.After one month's treatment,the clinical curative effect was estimated.Results:The effective rate of A treatment group was 90.00%,while that of the B control group was 65%,that of the C control group was 60%;The difference in efficiency between A group and B control group and C control group was statistically significant(P < 0.05).The difference in efficiency between B control group and C control group was not statistically significant (P > 0.05).After the treatment,the improvements of HAMD score and Karnofsky score in A treatment group were all better than those of B control

  8. Mechanisms of Feeding Deterrence by Ziziphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-30

    number) e mechanism of feeding deterrence by ziziphins for sout rn armyworms ( Spodoptera eridania ; Lepidoptera:Noctuidae) was investigated using bo long... Spodoptera eridania , to investigate the mechanisms of feeding deterrence by ziziphins extracted from the leaves of • .Ziziphus jujuba. Evaluation...Videotape Analysis of Feeding Suppression in the Southern Armyworm ( Spodoptera eridania ; Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Produced by Extracts of the

  9. Chemical composition, rumen degradability, protein utilization and lactation response to selected tree leaves as substitute of cottonseed cake in the diet of dairy goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, N.A.; Habib, G.; Ullah, G.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of leaves from Grewia oppositifolia (G. oppositifolia) and Ziziphus mauritiana (Z. mauritiana) as a crude protein (CP) supplements to low quality diets of goats in Pakistan. Chemical composition and CP degradability of the tree leaves were

  10. Determining efficient extraction procedure of phytochemicals from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determining efficient extraction procedure of phytochemicals from the fruit paste of Ziziphus abyssinica and Tamarindus indica . ... Methodology and results: The methods used included cold and soxhlet extraction using methanol as the solvent and hot extraction using distilled water. To determine the efficiency in which ...

  11. Journal of Applied Biosciences - Vol 112 (2017)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determining efficient extraction procedure of phytochemicals from the fruit paste of Ziziphus abyssinica and Tamarindus indica. EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. M. O. Nyaberi, C. A. Onyango, F. M. Mathooko, J. M. Maina, M Makobe, 11045-11051.

  12. Pharmacological basis for medicinal use of Ziziphyus nummularia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Ziziphus nummularia crude extract (Zn.Cr) was investigated for antidiarrheal activity (50, 100 and 300 mg/kg) in terms of reduction diarrhea droppings as well as for antisecretory activity (300 and 1000 mg/kg) in castor-oil induced model in mice. The effect of the extract on potassium chloride (KCl, 80 mM)-induced ...

  13. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antioxidant and antibacterial properties of Ziziphus mucronata and Ricinus communis leaves extracts. Abstract PDF · Vol 12, No 3 (2015) - Articles In vitro immune-modulatory potential of crude extract of leaf of Albizia gummifera against stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear and raw cells. Abstract PDF. ISSN: 0189-6016.

  14. Formulation, evaluation and comparison of the herbal shampoo with the commercial shampoos

    OpenAIRE

    Khaloud Al Badi; Shah A. Khan

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to formulate a pure herbal shampoo and to evaluate and compare its physicochemical properties with the marketed synthetic and herbal shampoos. The herbal shampoo was formulated by adding the extracts of Acacia concinna, Sapindus mukorossi, Phyllanthus emblica, Ziziphus spina-christi and Citrus aurantifolia in different proportions to a 10% aqueous gelatin solution. Small amount of methyl paraben was added as a preservative and pH was adjusted with citric acid. Several tests su...

  15. Adaptive introductions: How multiple experiments and comparisons to wild populations provide insights into requirements for long-term introduction success of an endangered shrub

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric S. Menges

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Recovery of an imperiled plant species may require augmentation of existing populations or creation of new ones. Hundreds of such projects have been conducted over the last few decades, but there is a bias in the literature favoring successes over failures. In this paper, we evaluate a series of introductions that experimentally manipulated microhabitat and fire in an adaptive introduction framework. Between 2002 and 2012, we (and our collaborators carried out ten introductions and augmentations of Florida ziziphus Pseudoziziphus (Condalia, Ziziphus celata, a clonal shrub limited to very small populations and narrowly endemic to pyrogenic central Florida sandhills. Six of the introductions were designed as experiments to test hypotheses about how demographic performance was affected by microhabitat, fire, and propagule type. Introduced transplants had high survival (<90% annually, inconsistent growth, and little transition to reproduction, while introduced seeds had low germination and survival. Transplants were more efficient than seeds as translocation propagules. Shaded (vs. open sites supported generally higher transplant and seedling survival and seed germination percentages, but growth responses varied among experiments. Supplemental irrigation increased transplant survival and seed germination, but otherwise seedling and plant survival and growth were not significantly affected. Contrary to expectations based on wild populations, introduced propagules have not been more successful in unshaded sites, suggesting that Florida ziziphus has broader microhabitat preferences than hypothesized. Compared to wild plants, introduced plants had similar survival and responses to fire, slower growth, and more delayed flowering. Introduced plants had no clonal spread. While no introduced population has demonstrated a capacity for long-term viability, one augmented population has flowered and produced viable fruits. Given that Florida ziziphus genets are

  16. Antifungal activity of Brazilian medicinal plants involved in popular treatment of mycoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, M C S; Santos, P O; Barbosa, A M; de Mélo, D L F M; Alviano, C S; Antoniolli, A R; Alviano, D S; Trindade, R C

    2007-05-04

    A survey of medicinal plants used to treat common mycoses was done in the Curituba district, Sergipe State, Brazil. One hundred inhabitants were interviewed by health agents and traditional healers. Four different plants were the most cited (more than 50% of the citations): Ziziphus joazeiro, Caesalpinia pyramidalis, Bumelia sartorum and Hymenea courbaril. The aqueous extracts obtained following traditional methods and using different parts of these plants, were submitted to drop agar diffusion tests for primary antimicrobial screening. Only the water infusion extract of Ziziphus joazeiro and Caesalpinea pyramidalis presented a significant antifungal activity against Trichophyton rubrum, Candida guilliermondii, Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans and Fonsecaea pedrosoi, when compared to the antifungal agent amphotericin B. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the bioactive extracts was evaluated by the microdilution method. Best activity with a MIC of 6.5 microg/ml for both extracts was observed against Trichophyton rubrum and Candida guilliermondii. Ziziphus joazeiro and Caesalpinea pyramidalis extracts presented also low acute toxicity in murine models. The present study validates the folk use of these plant extracts and indicates that they can be effective potential candidates for the development of new strategies to treat fungal infections.

  17. Determination of trace elements in plant samples using XRF, PIXE and ICP-OES techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Hassan Elzain Hassan

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine trace element concentration (Ca, Cu, Cr, K,Fe, Mn,Sr, and Za) in some sudanese wild plants namely, Ziziphus Abyssinica and Grewia Tenax. X-ray fluorescence ( X RF), particle-induced x-ray emission ( PIXE) and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) techniques were used for element determination. A series of plants standard references materials were used to check the reliability of the different employed techniques as well as to estimate possible factors for correcting the concentration of some elements that deviated significantly from their actual concentration. The results showed that, X RF, PIXE and ICP-OES are equally competitive methods for measuring Ca,K, Fe, Sr and Zn elements. Unlikely to ICP-OES seems to be superior techniques tend to be appropriate methods for Cu determination in plant samples however, for Mn element PIXE and ICP-OES are advisable techniques for measuring this element rather than X RF method. On the other hand, ICP-OES seems to be the superior techniques over PIXE and X RF methods for Cr and Ni determination in plant samples. The effect of geographical location on trace elements concentration in plants has been examined through determination of element in different species of Grewia Tenax than collected from different location. Most of measured elements showed similarity indicating there is no significant impact of locations on the difference of element contents. In addition, two plants with different genetic families namely, Ziziphus Spina Christi and Ziziphus Abyssinica were collected from the same location and screened for their trace element content. It was found that there were no difference between the two plants for Ca, K, Cu, Fe, and Sr element. However, significant variations were observed for Mn and Zn concentrations implying the possibility of using of those two elements for plant taxonomy purposes.(Author)

  18. Adaptive introductions: How multiple experiments and comparisons to wild populations provide insights into requirements for long-term introduction success of an endangered shrub

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric S.Menges; Stacy A.Smith; Carl W.Weekley

    2016-01-01

    Recovery of an imperiled plant species may require augmentation of existing populations or creation of new ones.Hundreds of such projects have been conducted over the last few decades,but there is a bias in the literature favoring successes over failures.In this paper,we evaluate a series of introductions that experimentally manipulated microhabitat and fire in an adaptive introduction framework.Between 2002 and 2012,we (and our collaborators) carried out ten introductions and augmentations of Florida ziziphus Pseudoziziphus (Condalia,Ziziphus) celata,a clonal shrub limited to very small populations and narrowly endemic to pyrogenic central Florida sandhills.Six of the introductions were designed as experiments to test hypotheses about how demographic performance was affected by microhabitat,fire,and propagule type.Introduced transplants had high survival (<90% annually),inconsistent growth,and little transition to reproduction,while introduced seeds had low germination and survival.Transplants were more efficient than seeds as translocation propagules.Shaded (vs.open) sites supported generally higher transplant and seedling survival and seed germination percentages,but growth responses varied among experiments.Supplemental irrigation increased transplant survival and seed germination,but otherwise seedling and plant survival and growth were not significantly affected.Contrary to expectations based on wild populations,introduced propagules have not been more successful in unshaded sites,suggesting that Florida ziziphus has broader microhabitat preferences than hypothesized.Compared to wild plants,introduced plants had similar survival and responses to fire,slower growth,and more delayed flowering.Introduced plants had no clonal spread.While no introduced population has demonstrated a capacity for long-term viability,one augmented population has flowered and produced viable fruits.Given that Florida ziziphus genets are long-lived,low levels of sexual

  19. FLORÍSTICA E FITOSSOCIOLOGIA DO COMPONENTE LENHOSO DA MATA CILIAR DO RIACHO DE BODOCONGÓ, SEMIÁRIDO PARAIBANO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DILMA MARIA DE BRITO MELO TROVÃO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The gallery forest and other unequal vegetal areas of semiarid suffered the antropized influence but this first kind of vegetation has been less studied. The floristic composition and phytosociological study of the woody representatives in the riparian forest of the Bodocongó River, semi-arid of the Paraíba State, it was studied through of the insertion of four transects perpendicularly to the water body in and each transect were plotted three parcels with 10x20 m. It was used Mata Nativa II program to calculate phytosociological parameters. The analyzed vegetation was represented by 357 individuals belonged to 16 genera and 7 families. The species that presented the most number of individuals were: Prosopis juliflora (221, Croton sonderianus (52, Pithecellobium dulce (20 and Ziziphus joazeiro (14. Prosopis juliflora occurred in all studied areas demonstrating its aggressive characteristic and also showing the susceptibility of areas that passed by human influence to invader areas. The highest importance value of quantity of species (VI was Prosopis juliflora (49.22%, allowed for Ziziphus joazeiro, Croton sonderianus and Pithecellobium dulce. It was demonstrated that the bordering forest of Bodocongó River hasn't contain an expressive floristic composition that it is related probably to the influence and degradation resulting from human action.

  20. A preliminaryfloristic checklist of thal desert punjab, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaheen, H.; Qureshi, R.

    2014-01-01

    The floristic survey of the Thal desert, Punjab, Pakistan was carried out during 2010 to 2013. So far, 248 species distributed across 166 genera and 38 families were identified during the report period. Besides, one species viz., Themeda triandra was recorded for the first time from Pakistan. Of them, one fern, 4 monocots and 33 dicots families were determined. The most dominating family was Poaceae that contributed 52 species (21.49%), followed by Fabaceae (34 spp., 13.05%) and Amaranthaceae and Asteraceae (17 spp., 7.02% each). The largest genera were Euphorbia (6 spp.), Cyperus, Eragrostis and Solanum (5 spp. each), Mollugo, Heliotropium and Cenchrus (4 spp. each), Acacia, Prosopis, Tephrosia, Corchorus, Boerhavia and Ziziphus (3 spp. each). This checklist consists of updated systematic families and plants names that will provide a useful starting point for further ecological and bioprospective research of the area under study. (author)

  1. Desertification and its effect on the erosion of vegetation in the south-western region of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Salam, Magda Magdy; Elhakem, Abeer Hamdy

    2016-03-01

    This study was conducted in Jazan region of south-western Saudi Arabia. Vegetation cover, frequency, abundance and soil characteristics were analysed at three locations with different quantitative and descriptive vegetation characteristics. Plant species were classified into three primary communities dominated by Salvadora persic, Acacia tortilis and Ziziphus spini-Christi. The results indicated that the distribution of plant species is controlled by soil characteristics. Very limited water resources are also limiting factor in vegetation growth. Among the three studied sites, desert and coastal environments are affected by desertification. Rehabilitation of the degraded lands requires collaborative efforts and support from the different related governmental sectors. Ecological conservation and sustainable development must be adopted as tools of rehabilitation.

  2. Validation of botanical origins and geographical sources of some Saudi honeys using ultraviolet spectroscopy and chemometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Mohammad Javed; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmad; Khan, Khalid Ali; Adgaba, Nuru; El-Ahmady, Sherweit H; Gad, Haidy A; Roshan, Abdulrahman; Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Kolyali, Sevgi

    2018-02-01

    This study aims at distinguishing honey based on botanical and geographical sources. Different floral honey samples were collected from diverse geographical locations of Saudi Arabia. UV spectroscopy in combination with chemometric analysis including Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA), Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy (SIMCA) were used to classify honey samples. HCA and PCA presented the initial clustering pattern to differentiate between botanical as well as geographical sources. The SIMCA model clearly separated the Ziziphus sp. and other monofloral honey samples based on different locations and botanical sources. The results successfully discriminated the honey samples of different botanical and geographical sources validating the segregation observed using few physicochemical parameters that are regularly used for discrimination.

  3. Sensory and volatile profiles of monofloral honeys produced by native stingless bees of the brazilian semiarid region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ana Caroliny Vieira da; Sousa, Janaína Maria Batista; da Silva, Maria Aparecida Azevedo Pereira; Garruti, Deborah Dos Santos; Madruga, Marta Suely

    2018-03-01

    Monofloral honeys produced by stingless bees M. subnitida Ducke and M. scutellaris Latrelle in typical flowering of the Brazilian semi-arid Ziziphus juazeiro Mart (juazeiro), Croton heliotropiifolius Kunth (velame branco) and Mimosa arenosa willd Poir (jurema branca) were characterized in relation to volatile and sensorial profile. It identified 11 sensory descriptors and 96 volatile compounds. It was noticed a strong effect of flowering in sensorial profile and volatile of honeys. Juazeiro honey stood out with a higher characteristic aroma, taste sweet, caramel flavor and levels of aromatic aldehydes; jurema honey has been described with herb and beeswax aroma and the presence of sulfur compounds and ketones; volatile acids associated with acid taste, medicinal taste and clove aroma characterized the velame branco honey. These results demonstrate that the knowledge of the sensory and aroma profile of these honeys can contribute to characterization of its floral and geographical identity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Polyphenol content and antioxidant activity of fourteen wild edible fruits from Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamien-Meda, Aline; Lamien, Charles Euloge; Compaoré, Moussa M Y; Meda, Roland N T; Kiendrebeogo, Martin; Zeba, Boukare; Millogo, Jeanne F; Nacoulma, Odile G

    2008-03-06

    A total of fourteen (14) species of wild edible fruits from Burkina Faso were analyzed for their phenolic and flavonoid contents, and their antioxidant activities using the DPPH, FRAP and ABTS methods. The data obtained show that the total phenolic and total flavonoid levels were significantly higher in the acetone than in the methanol extracts.Detarium microcarpum fruit had the highest phenolic and the highest flavonoid content,followed by that of Adansonia digitata, Ziziphus mauritiana, Ximenia americana and Lannea microcarpa. Significant amounts of total phenolics were also detected in the other fruit species in the following order of decreasing levels: Tamarindus indica > Sclerocaryabirrea > Dialium guineense > Gardenia erubescens > Diospyros mespiliformis > Parkiabiglobosa > Ficus sycomorus > Vitellaria paradoxa. Detarium microcarpum fruit also showed the highest antioxidant activity using the three antioxidant assays. Fruits with high antioxidant activities were also found to possess high phenolic and flavonoid contents. There was a strong correlation between total phenolic and flavonoid levels and antioxidant activities.

  5. Polyphenol Content and Antioxidant Activity of Fourteen Wild Edible Fruits from Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odile G. Nacoulma

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A total of fourteen (14 species of wild edible fruits from Burkina Faso wereanalyzed for their phenolic and flavonoid contents, and their antioxidant activities usingthe DPPH, FRAP and ABTS methods. The data obtained show that the total phenolic andtotal flavonoid levels were significantly higher in the acetone than in the methanol extracts.Detarium microcarpum fruit had the highest phenolic and the highest flavonoid content,followed by that of Adansonia digitata, Ziziphus mauritiana, Ximenia americana andLannea microcarpa. Significant amounts of total phenolics were also detected in the otherfruit species in the following order of decreasing levels: Tamarindus indica > Sclerocaryabirrea > Dialium guineense > Gardenia erubescens > Diospyros mespiliformis > Parkiabiglobosa > Ficus sycomorus > Vitellaria paradoxa. Detarium microcarpum fruit alsoshowed the highest antioxidant activity using the three antioxidant assays. Fruits with highantioxidant activities were also found to possess high phenolic and flavonoid contents.There was a strong correlation between total phenolic and flavonoid levels and antioxidantactivities.

  6. Phytochemical, Antimicrobial, and Toxicological Evaluation of Traditional Herbs Used to Treat Sore Throat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arifa Mehreen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro antibacterial activities of 29 traditional medicinal plants used in respiratory ailments were assessed on multidrug resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria isolated from the sore throat patients and two reference strains. The methanolic, n-hexane, and aqueous extracts were screened by the agar well diffusion assay. Bioactive fractions of effective extracts were identified on TLC coupled with bioautography, while their toxicity was determined using haemolytic assay against human erythrocytes. Qualitative and quantitative phytochemical analysis of effective extracts was also performed. Methanolic extract of 18 plants showed antimicrobial activity against test strains. Adhatoda vasica (ZI = 17–21 mm, MIC: 7.12–62.5 μg/mL, Althaea officinalis (ZI = 16–20 mm, MIC: 15.62–31.25 μg/mL, Cordia latifolia (ZI = 16–20 mm, MIC: 12.62–62.5 μg/mL, Origanum vulgare (ZI = 20–22 mm, MIC: 3–15.62 μg/mL, Thymus vulgaris (ZI = 21–25 mm, MIC: 7.81–31.25 μg/mL, and Ziziphus jujuba (ZI = 14–20 mm, MIC: 7.81–31.25 μg/mL showed significant antibacterial activity. Alkaloid fractions of Adhatoda vasica, Cordia latifolia, and Origanum vulgare and flavonoid fraction of the Althaea officinalis, Origanum vulgare, Thymus Vulgaris, and Ziziphus jujuba exhibited antimicrobial activity. Effective plant extracts show 0.93–0.7% erythrocyte haemolysis. The results obtained from this study provide a scientific rationale for the traditional use of these herbs and laid the basis for future studies to explore novel antimicrobial compounds.

  7. Phytochemical, Antimicrobial, and Toxicological Evaluation of Traditional Herbs Used to Treat Sore Throat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehreen, Arifa; Waheed, Muzzamil; Liaqat, Iram; Arshad, Najma

    2016-01-01

    The in vitro antibacterial activities of 29 traditional medicinal plants used in respiratory ailments were assessed on multidrug resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria isolated from the sore throat patients and two reference strains. The methanolic, n-hexane, and aqueous extracts were screened by the agar well diffusion assay. Bioactive fractions of effective extracts were identified on TLC coupled with bioautography, while their toxicity was determined using haemolytic assay against human erythrocytes. Qualitative and quantitative phytochemical analysis of effective extracts was also performed. Methanolic extract of 18 plants showed antimicrobial activity against test strains. Adhatoda vasica (ZI = 17–21 mm, MIC: 7.12–62.5 μg/mL), Althaea officinalis (ZI = 16–20 mm, MIC: 15.62–31.25 μg/mL), Cordia latifolia (ZI = 16–20 mm, MIC: 12.62–62.5 μg/mL), Origanum vulgare (ZI = 20–22 mm, MIC: 3–15.62 μg/mL), Thymus vulgaris (ZI = 21–25 mm, MIC: 7.81–31.25 μg/mL), and Ziziphus jujuba (ZI = 14–20 mm, MIC: 7.81–31.25 μg/mL) showed significant antibacterial activity. Alkaloid fractions of Adhatoda vasica, Cordia latifolia, and Origanum vulgare and flavonoid fraction of the Althaea officinalis, Origanum vulgare, Thymus Vulgaris, and Ziziphus jujuba exhibited antimicrobial activity. Effective plant extracts show 0.93–0.7% erythrocyte haemolysis. The results obtained from this study provide a scientific rationale for the traditional use of these herbs and laid the basis for future studies to explore novel antimicrobial compounds. PMID:27429983

  8. Intoxicações por plantas em ruminantes e equídeos no Sertão Paraibano Plant poisonings in ruminants and equidae in the Sertão of Paraiba, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tales S. Assis

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Foi realizado um levantamento das intoxicações por plantas em 20 municípios do Sertão Paraibano, onde foram entrevistados 50 produtores e 11 médicos veterinários. De acordo com o levantamento realizado, Ipomoea asarifolia e Mascagnia rigida são as intoxicações mais importantes. Indigofera suffruticosa, as plantas cianogênicas (Sorghum vulgare, Piptadenia macrocarpa e Manihot spp., Mimosa tenuiflora, Aspidosperma pyrifolium e Crotalaria retusa são plantas importantes como causa de intoxicações na região. Os entrevistados relataram casos esporádicos de intoxicação por Ricinus communis, Enterolobium contortisiliquum, Prosopis juliflorae Brachiaria decumbens. Ziziphus joazeiro, Passiflora sp., Caesalpina ferrea e Crescentia cujete foram mencionadas como causa de abortos em ruminantes. Frutos de Crescentia cujete foram administrados a duas cabras prenhes causando mortalidade perinatal e abortos. As cascas de feijão (Phaseolus vulgaris e Vigna unguiculata e as folhas de Licania rigida (oiticica são associadas à sobrecarga ruminal em bovinos. As frutas de Mangifera indica (mangae Anacardium occidentale (cajú são responsabilizadas por causarem intoxicação etílica. Dalechampia sp. e Croton sp. foram citadas pelos entrevistados como possíveis plantas tóxicas, que ainda não tiveram sua toxicidade comprovada.A survey of plant poisoning in ruminants and equidae was conducted in 20 municipalities of the semiarid region of the Sertão Paraibano. Fifty farmers and 11 veterinary practitioners were interviewed. Ipomoea asarifolia and Mascagnia rigida are the most important poisonous plants in the region. Indigofera suffruticosa, the cianogenic plants (Sorghum vulgare, Piptadenia macrocarpa, and Manihot spp., Mimosa tenuiflora, Aspidosperma pyrifolium and Crotalaria retusa cause also important intoxications in the area. Sporadic outbreaks of poisonings by Ricinus communis, Enterolobium contortisiliquum, Prosopis juliflora and Brachiaria

  9. Fuelwood availability and use in the Richtersveld National Park, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Shackleton

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Concern has been voiced about the possible over-use of fuelwood from the riparian fringe by pastoralist herders in the Richtersveld National Park (RNP. This coincided with the current examination and modelling of the supply and use of ecosystem goods and services in the Gariep Basin as part of the Southern African Millennium Assessment (SAfMA. This paper reports on a study to index the current availability of deadwood within the riparian zone of RNP, its relationship with proximity to human habitation, and species preferences of the local herders. Deadwood availability was assessed per woody species and on the ground in 12 transects within the riparian fringe. Herders were interviewed regarding their species preferences, and the composition of woodpiles was examined. There was no relationship between the percentage of attached deadwood on the tree, or the percentage deadwood ground cover, and the distance from herder stockposts. Euclea pseudobenus and Tamarix usneoides were the dominant species in the riparian fringe. There was strong selection for Ziziphus mucronata as a fuelwood species and only marginal or random selection for E. pseudobenus. Tamarix usneoides and Prosopis sp. were abundant in the riparian zone, but were not used for fuelwood. There was a significant difference between species with respect to the mean proportion of the stem that was dead, the highest being Z. mucronata (± 28 % deadwood, followed by T. usneoides (± 12 %. Most of the Prosopis trees had no deadwood. Across all species, the mean percentage dead per tree was approximately 15 %. Additionally, detached deadwood covered just less than 9 % of ground area, averaged across all plots and transects. All the variables measured indicated that there seems to be little need for concern over the current fuelwood extraction activities of pastoralists within the RNP. There was no clear evidence of cutting of branches or deadwood. The abundance of both attached and detached

  10. Treatment of Insomnia With Traditional Chinese Herbal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amrinder; Zhao, Kaicun

    2017-01-01

    Insomnia is a condition with sleep problems and many people suffered from it. Chronic insomnia can last for long time and it will severely affect people's health and the quality of life. In conventional medicine, the most commonly used the medicine is benzodiazepine. It is effective but also has significant side effects. Patients try to use some kinds of alternative medicines. Chinese medicinal herbs and formulas have been used in the treatment of insomnia for more than 2000 years in China. In recent decades, Chinese herbal medicine has been widely used in the Western countries. Many clinical studies including randomized controlled clinical trials and research on pharmacological action mechanisms of the herbs for treatment of insomnia have been conducted. It is very important and very helpful to review the published research papers to gather the available information for a critical analysis. This chapter evaluated the data from both of clinical studies and pharmacological researches on the therapeutic formulas and on some key herbs used in the treatment of insomnia. Clinical studies showed a very wide spectrum of herbs that were used in clinical treatment of insomnia. This was due to different syndrome patterns happened with insomnia. This brought complexity and difficulties to identify which are the essential key herbs or formulas. It was found Suanzaoren decoction (Ziziphus spinose decoction ) is the most frequently used formula for the treatment of insomnia. Based on the clinical data, several herbs were identified as most frequently used sedative and hypnotic herbs in Chinese herbal medicine including Suanzaoren (Ziziphus spinose ), Fuling (Poria cocos ), and Gancao (Glycyrrhiza uralensis ). The underlying pharmacological action mechanisms discovered in the studies on some key herbs used in the treatment of insomnia were evaluated. The major pharmacological action mechanisms shared by most of the sedative herbs are to act through the neurotransmitter gamma

  11. Evaluation and comparison of polyphenols and bioactivities of wild edible fruits of North-West Himalaya, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himani Singh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate and compare the polyphenol contents, antioxidant, anti-elastase, anti-collagenase, anti-tyrosinase and anti-inflammatory activities of 13 wild edible fruits [Pyracantha crenulata, Berberis asiatica (B. asiatica, Ficus subincisa (F. subincisa, Morus serrata, Ziziphus nummularia, Leea asiatica (L. asiatica, Dendrobenthamia capitata, Ziziphus mauritiana, Prunus cerasoides, Ampelocissus latifolia (A. latifolia, Vitis jacquemontii, Morus alba and Grewia optiva] of North-West Himalayan Region of India. Methods: Fruits extracts were prepared with 80% aqueous acetone and evaluated for total phenolic contents (TPC and total flavonoid contents (TFC. Free radical scavenging activities [against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl, 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid, linoleate hydroperoxyl and superoxide radicals], ferric reducing ability, ferrous metal chelating capacity, anti-elastase, anti-collagenase, anti-tyrosinase and anti-inflammatory activities were determined by using various in vitro assays. Results: TPC varied from 58.83 to 4 496.39 mg gallic acid equivalents/100 g fruit weight (FW, being highest in A. latifolia and lowest in F. subincisa. TFC ranged from 108.00 to 1 963.75 mg catechin equivalents/100 g FW, standing highest in L. asiatica and lowest in Prunus cerasoides. A. latifolia and L. asiatica possessed the highest antioxidant activities while B. asiatica and L. asiatica owned uppermost anti-elastase and anti-collagenase activities, respectively. B. asiatica revealed the highest anti-tyrosinase activity and F. subincisa demonstrated the highest antiinflammatory activity. The present study revealed differential contribution of TPC and TFC in various antioxidant activities. However, no obvious relationship was visible between antielastase/anti-collagenase/anti-tyrosinase/anti-inflammatory activities and TPC/TFC, suggesting the role of individual or combination of specific phenolics and flavonoids

  12. Pollen analysis of natural honeys from the central region of Shanxi, North China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yan Song

    Full Text Available Based on qualitative and quantitative melissopalynological analyses, 19 Chinese honeys were classified by botanical origin to determine their floral sources. The honey samples were collected during 2010-2011 from the central region of Shanxi Province, North China. A diverse spectrum of 61 pollen types from 37 families was identified. Fourteen samples were classified as unifloral, whereas the remaining samples were multifloral. Bee-favoured families (occurring in more than 50% of the samples included Caprifoliaceae (found in 10 samples, Laminaceae (10, Brassicaceae (12, Rosaceae (12, Moraceae (13, Rhamnaceae (15, Asteraceae (17, and Fabaceae (19. In the unifloral honeys, the predominant pollen types were Ziziphus jujuba (in 5 samples, Robinia pseudoacacia (3, Vitex negundo var. heterophylla (2, Sophora japonica (1, Ailanthus altissima (1, Asteraceae type (1, and Fabaceae type (1. The absolute pollen count (i.e., the number of pollen grains per 10 g honey sample suggested that 13 samples belonged to Group I (<20,000 pollen grains, 4 to Group II (20,000-100,000, and 2 to Group III (100,000-500,000. The dominance of unifloral honeys without toxic pollen grains and the low value of the HDE/P ratio (i.e., honey dew elements/pollen grains from nectariferous plants indicated that the honey samples are of good quality and suitable for human consumption.

  13. In-vitro antimicrobial activity screening of some ethnoveterinary medicinal plants traditionally used against mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal tract complication in Tigray Region, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalayou, Shewit; Haileselassie, Mekonnen; Gebre-Egziabher, Gebremedhin; Tiku'e, Tsegay; Sahle, Samson; Taddele, Habtamu; Ghezu, Mussie

    2012-07-01

    To screen the antibacterial activity of nine ethnoveterinary plants traditionally used for the treatment of mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal complications. Hydroalcoholic exctracts of medicinal plants namely, Achyranthes aspera (A. aspera) L. (Family Asparagaceae), Ficus caria (F. caria) (Family Moraceae), Malvi parviflora (M. parviflora) (Family Malvaceae), Vernonia species (V. species) (local name Alakit, Family Asteraceae), Solanum hastifolium (S. hastifolium) (Family Solanaceae), Calpurinia aurea (C. aurea) (Ait) Benth (Family Fabaceae), Nicotiana tabacum (N. tabacum) L. (Family Solanaceae), Ziziphus spina-christi (Z. spina-christi) (Family Rhamnaceae), Croton macrostachys (C. macrostachys) (Family Euphorbiaceae), were screened against clinical bacterial isolates of veterinary importance from October 2007 to April 2009. The antibacterial activity was tested using disc diffusion at two concentrations (200 mg/mL and 100 mg/mL) and broth dilution methods using 70% methanol macerated leaf extracts. With the exception of S. hastifolium all plant extracts exhibited antibacterial activity. Among the medicinal plants tested C. aurea, C. macrostachyus, A. aspera, N. tabacum and vernonia species (Alakit) showed the most promising antimicrobial properties. It can be concluded that many of the tested plants have antibacterial activity and supports the traditional usage of the plants for mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal complications treatment. Further studies into their toxicity and phytochemistry is advocated.

  14. Participatory Selection of Tree Species for Agroforestry on Sloping Land in North Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun He

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The action research project reported in this article used a participatory approach to select trees for sloping-land agroforestry as a key strategy for forest ecosystem restoration and local livelihood development. It was the first such project in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea to use a participatory approach, empowering local user groups to develop their preferences for agroforestry species. Local knowledge of the multiple functions of agroforestry species ensured that the tree selection criteria included the value of timber, fruit, fodder, oil, medicines, fuelwood, and erosion control. Involving 67 farmers from 3 counties, this participatory selection process resulted in Prunus armeniaca, Castanea crenata, and Ziziphus jujuba being selected as the top 3 species for the development of sloping-land agroforestry in North Hwanghae Province. These trees embody what the region’s farmers value most: erosion control, production of fruit, and economic value. The participatory approach in agroforestry could help to meet both local needs for food security and the national objective of environmental conservation and has great potential for wide adaptation in North Korea and beyond.

  15. Broad Protein Spectrum in Stored Pollen of Three Stingless Bees from the Chaco Dry Forest in South America (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponini and Its Ecological Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Favio Gerardo Vossler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein content of pollen stored by three meliponine species was variable from 9.78% (less than half the value considered as optimal to brood development in Apis mellifera in type Capparis tweediana-C. speciosa to more than 26% in type Maytenus vitis-idaea and some Prosopis samples. This pollen of low protein value was occasionally foraged (only six out of 75 masses analyzed of G. argentina, but none in 86 masses of T. fiebrigi or in ten of M. orbignyi. However, it is likely that amino acid deficiencies of certain pollens are compensated by randomly foraging on a broad spectrum of pollen plants. The large amounts of pollen stored in their nests might also be important in compensating these deficiencies. The only sample studied for M. orbignyi showed a protein value greater than the one required for A. mellifera and was dominated by types Acacia praecox and Prosopis. As this species also prefers Solanum and other protein-rich pollen, more samples would need to be analyzed to establish whether protein requirements are high for this Melipona species. Pollen showing the highest protein content (>26% belonged to highly nectariferous plants well represented in meliponine and Apis honey such as Prosopis, Maytenus, and Ziziphus.

  16. Adsorption of an anionic dye on a novel low-cost mesoporous adsorbent: kinetic, thermodynamic and isotherm studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msaad, Asmaa; Belbahloul, Mounir; Zouhri, Abdeljalil

    2018-05-01

    Our activated carbon was prepared successfully using phosphoric acid as an activated agent. The activated carbon was characterized by Scanning Electron Micrograph (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett- Teller (BET), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The aim of our study is to evaluate the adsorption capacity of Methyl Orange (MO) on Ziziphus lotus activated carbon. Adsorption isotherms were studied according to Langmuir and Freundlich Model, and adsorption kinetics according to pseudo-first and second-order. Results show that the maximum adsorption was reached in the first 10min at ambient temperature with a yield of 96.31%. The Langmuir isotherm shows a correlation coefficient of 99.4 % higher than Freundlich model and the adsorption kinetic model follow a pseudo-second-order with a maximum adsorption capacity of 769.23 mg/g. FTIR and X-Ray spectroscopy indicate that our activated carbon has an amorphous structure with the presence of functional groups, where BET analysis revealed a high surface area of 553 mg/g, which facilitate the adsorption process

  17. Hymenopteran parasitoids associated with frugivorous larvae in a Brazilian caatinga-cerrado ecotone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, A R; Lopes-Mielezrski, G N; Lopes, E N; Querino, R B; Corsato, C D A; Giustolin, T A; Zucchi, R A

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate native species of parasitoids of frugivorous larvae and their associations with host plants in commercial guava orchards and in typical native dry forests of a caatinga-cerrado ecotone in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Nine species of parasitoids were associated with larvae of Anastrepha (Tephritidae) and Neosilba (Lonchaeidae) in fruit of Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae), Ziziphus joazeiro Mart. (Rhamnaceae), Spondias tuberosa Arruda (Anacardiaceae), Spondias dulcis Forst. (Anacardiaceae), Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels (Myrtaceae), and Randia armata (Sw.) DC. (Rubiaceae). Doryctobracon areolatus was the most abundant species, obtained from puparia of Anastrepha zenildae, An. sororcula, An. fraterculus, An. obliqua, and An. turpiniae. This is the first report of Asobara obliqua in Brazil and of As. anastrephae and Tropideucoila weldi in dry forests of Minas Gerais State. The number of species of parasitoids was higher in areas with greater diversity of cultivated species and lower pesticide use. The forest fragments adjacent to the orchards served as shelter for parasitoids of frugivorous larvae.

  18. The role of flowering plant species in the survival of blackflies (Diptera: Simuliidae along the lower Orange River, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Myburgh

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available This study is an investigation of the role that plants play in the survival of adult blackflies by providing shelter and carbohydrate food. A detailed phenological study of the 29 most abundant plant species in the Augrabies Falls National Park showed that throughout the year the percentage of plant species flowering was remarkably constant. It is therefore unlikely that the availability of carbohydrates would limit adult Simulium survival at any time of the year. Blackflies were recorded feeding on the flowers of Pappea capensis. Acacia karroo, A. mellifera, Tamarix usneoides, Ziziphus mucronata, Scholia afra and Sisyndite spartea. An additional survey showed that another 64 plant species flowered throughout the year, and these can be regarded as potential carbohydrate sources. Blackflies were observed sheltering in dense shrubs and trees that provide protection against predation and harsh environmental conditions. This study suggests that vegetated drainage lines are the means by which adult blackflies survive dispersal away from the river. It is concluded that carbohydrate scarcity cannot be considered a limiting factor to adult blackfly survival along the lower Orange River.

  19. Epicuticular waxes from caatinga and cerrado species and their efficiency against water loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Antonio F. M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the contents and chemical composition of the foliar epicuticular waxes of species from the caatinga (Aspidosperma pyrifolium, Capparis yco, Maytenus rigida and Ziziphus joazeiro and cerrado (Aristolochia esperanzae, Didymopanax vinosum, Strychnos pseudoquina and Tocoyena formosa were evaluated as to the resistance to water loss by means of an experimental device constructed for this purpose. In general, the waxes of the caatinga species investigated were more efficient against water loss than cerrado species. Increase of the thickness of the waxy deposits from 40 to 90m g.cm-2 had no significant effect on the resistance to water loss. The chemistry of the wax constituents was shown to be an important factor to determine the degree of resistance to evaporation. n-Alkanes and alcoholic triterpenes were the most efficient barriers, while hentriacontan-16-one (a ketone and ursolic acid (an acid triterpene revealed lowefficiency. The higher efficiency of the waxes of the leaves from caatinga species (mainly those of C. yco and Z. joazeiro is probably accounted for the predominance of n-alkanes in their composition. The lower efficiency of the waxes of A. pyrifolium (caatinga, T. formosa and A. esperanzae (both species from the cerrado is probably a consequence of the predominance of triterpenoids in the waxes of the two former species and hentriacontan-16-one in the latter.

  20. Characterization of biomasses available in the region of North-East India for production of biofuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasmal, Soumya; Goud, Vaibhav V.; Mohanty, Kaustubha

    2012-01-01

    The lignocellulosic materials are cheap and readily available either in the form of agricultural waste or forest residues. These materials can be used as a source for energy production either in the gaseous form (CO, H 2 etc) or in liquid form (ethanol, butanol etc) to meet the rising demand of energy. The reign of lignocellulosic materials for energy production is a proven fact in this era of energy research. The present study focuses on characterization of three biomass samples namely areca nut husk (Areca catheu), moj (Albizia lucida) and bonbogori (Ziziphus rugosa), available in the region of North-East India. Physical and chemical analysis of these lignocellulosic biomass samples were performed using X-ray diffraction techniques, thermogravimetric analysis, FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and CHNSO analysis. Maximum crystalinity was observed in areca nut husk fiber (63.84%) followed by moj (46.43%) and bonbogori (42.46%). The calorific values of all the biomasses were found within the range of 17 MJ/kg to 22 MJ/kg. All these properties combined together per se shows that areca nut husk, bonbogori and moj are potential sources for biofuel production. -- Highlights: ► Non-conventional biomasses were considered in this study. ► Complete characterization of these biomasses are reported. ► Maximum crystalinity was observed in areca nut husk fiber followed by moj and bonbogori. ► Results confirmed that these biomasses can be utilized for biofuel production.

  1. Aflatoxin biosynthesis control produced by Aspergillus flavus in layer hens feed during storage period of six months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, S M; Sultana, B; Iqbal, M

    2017-06-01

    Aflatoxins (AFTs) are a group of closely related toxins that are produced by different fungus species. Food and feed contamination with AFT is a worldwide health-related problem. As a result of fungal attack, the food and feed resulted in a principal socioeconomic loss and toxins produced in feed and food items harm the humans and animals in different ways. The anti-aflatoxigenic effect Psidium guajava, Ficus benghalensis, Gardenia radicans, Punica granatum and Ziziphus jujuba leaves were evaluated against aflatoxins (AFTs), produced by Aspergillus flavus in layer feed during storage. Among the investigated medicinal plant leaves, P. granatum showed highly promising anti-aflatoxigenic activity and completely inhibited the AFTs (B1 and B2) production over storage period without compromising the nutritive quality of feed (ash, protein, fat, fiber, Fe, Ca, P and K contents). Leaves of F. benghalensis and Z. jujuba were also effective however, higher concentration (15%) inhibited the AFTs production up to 99% and also maintained nutritive quality of feed. G. radicans was found least effective in controlling the AFTs production. Results revealed that all plant leaves were effective in controlling AFTs production in layer feed over the storage period of six months and these plants are potential candidate to replace the fungicides used to protect feed and other agricultural commodities from AFTs production during storage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Formulation, evaluation and comparison of the herbal shampoo with the commercial shampoos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaloud Al Badi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to formulate a pure herbal shampoo and to evaluate and compare its physicochemical properties with the marketed synthetic and herbal shampoos. The herbal shampoo was formulated by adding the extracts of Acacia concinna, Sapindus mukorossi, Phyllanthus emblica, Ziziphus spina-christi and Citrus aurantifolia in different proportions to a 10% aqueous gelatin solution. Small amount of methyl paraben was added as a preservative and pH was adjusted with citric acid. Several tests such as visual inspection, pH, wetting time, % of solid contents, foam volume and stability, surface tension, detergency, dirt dispersion etc, were performed to determine the physicochemical properties of both prepared and marketed shampoos. The formulated herbal shampoo was also evaluated for conditioning performance by administering a blind test to 20 student volunteers. The formulated herbal shampoo was clear and appealing. It showed good cleansing and detergency, low surface tension, small bubble size and good foam stability after 5 min. The prepared shampoo and commercial shampoos showed comparable results for % solid contents also. The score of the conditioning performance of the tress washed with herbal shampoo was found to be 3.0 out of 4, while the score of the marketed synthetic and herbal shampoo was 3.4 and 3.3 respectively. The results indicated the formulated shampoo is having excellent conditioning performance, at par with commercially available shampoo. However, further research and development is required to improve it's quality and safety.

  3. Utilização de recursos florais por abelhas (Hymenoptera, Apoidea em uma área de Caatinga (Itatim, Bahia, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguiar Cândida Maria Lima

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to identify important food resource plants used by bee species in a Caatinga area, as well as describe the local patterns of floral use by bees. A total of 1,145 foraging bees, belonging to 60 species, were captured while visiting 50 plant species. Melochia tomentosa L., Sida galheirensis Ulbr., Erythroxylon catingae P. Cowan, and Ziziphus cotinifolia Reiss. were the most frequently visited plants. Melochia tomentosa, Solanum paniculatum L. and S. galheirensis were visited by larger number of bee species. Some oligolectic bees were identified. Apis mellifera Linnaeus, 1758 and Trigona spinipes (Fabricius, 1793 had the largest trophic niche breadth (2.71 and 2.31. The trophic niche overlap was highest (0.52 between Xylocopa grisescens Lepeletier, 1841 and Frieseomelitta silvestrii (Friese, 1902. The low trophic niche overlap between Apis mellifera and native stingless bees seems to be the result of intensive exploration of only a few flower sources by Africanized bees, not frequently visited by meliponids.

  4. Test the Efficiency of some Plants in the Tolerant of Air Pollution within the City of Baghdad. Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israa M. Jasim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to monitor the ambient air pollution in several sites within Baghdad City of Iraq. The readings started from May 2016 to April 2017. The highest concentration of sulfur dioxide (SO2 was 2.28 ppmm-3 while nitrogen dioxide (NO2 was 3.68 ppmm-3 and suspended particulate matter was 585.1 μgm-3. This study also included estimating the value of the air pollution tolerance index (APTI for four plant's species Olea europaea L., Ziziphus spina-Christi (L. Desf, Albizia lebbeck(L. Benth. and Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. Were cultivated on the road sides. The study includes four biochemical parameters, total chlorophyll content, ascorbic acid content, pH and relative water content of plant leaves. The results show that combining variety of these parameters give more certain results than those of single parameter. These four estimated parameters have positive correlation with each other and with the values of the air pollution tolerance index in all plants studied.

  5. Examining the Spectral Separability of Prosopis glandulosa from Co-Existent Species Using Field Spectral Measurement and Guided Regularized Random Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyasha Mureriwa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The invasive taxa of Prosopis is rated the world’s top 100 unwanted species, and a lack of spatial data about the invasion dynamics has made the current control and monitoring methods unsuccessful. This study thus tests the use of in situ spectroscopy data with a newly-developed algorithm, guided regularized random forest (GRRF, to spectrally discriminate Prosopis from coexistent acacia species (Acacia karroo, Acacia mellifera and Ziziphus mucronata in the arid environment of South Africa. Results show that GRRF was able to reduce the high dimensionality of the spectroscopy data and select key wavelengths (n = 11 for discriminating amongst the species. These wavelengths are located at 356.3 nm, 468.5 nm, 531.1 nm, 665.2 nm, 1262.3 nm, 1354.1 nm, 1361.7 nm, 1376.9 nm, 1407.1 nm, 1410.9 nm and 1414.6 nm. The use of these selected wavelengths increases the overall classification accuracy from 79.19% and a Kappa value of 0.7201 when using all wavelengths to 88.59% and a Kappa of 0.8524 when the selected wavelengths were used. Based on our relatively high accuracies and ease of use, it is worth considering the GRRF method for reducing the high dimensionality of spectroscopy data. However, this assertion should receive considerable additional testing and comparison before it is accepted as a substitute for reliable high dimensionality reduction.

  6. Caractérisation des miels produits dans la région steppique de Djelfa en Algérie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mekious, S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of honeys produced in the region of Djelfa steppe land in Algeria. Description of the subject. This paper deals with the quality of honeys produced in the steppe areas of Algeria and discusses the possibility of their valorization. Objectives. The objective was to characterize and compare the physical and chemical quality of honeys and to determine their pollen composition according to their geographical origin in three areas of the Djelfa semi-arid region of Algeria. Method. Thirty-eight samples of honey produced in 11 localities in the north, centre and south of the Djelfa semi-arid steppe region were harvested in July for two consecutive years. Pollen analyses were performed and the following properties of the honey samples were determined: water content, pH level, electrical conductivity, color, hydroxymethylfurfural content, saccharase index, diastase index and carbohydrate profile. Results. The results of the pollen analyses identified 34 taxa of pollen. The most abundant pollens were from the Ziziphus lotus, which were present in 97.12% of the samples. The pollens from this shrub were dominant in 27 of the honey samples tested, with a pollen percentage of greater than 45%. Over 55% of the pollen frequencies found came from plants belonging to Asteracae, Brassicaceae, Cistaceae and more particularly to Euphorbia bupleuroides, Peganum harmala, Thapsia garganica, Echium sp. and Retama retam. Conclusions. The physicochemical parameters of the honey samples studied comply with European and international quality standards, which opens up perspectives for their valorization.

  7. Determination of the contents and distribution characteristics of REE in natural plants by NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.Q.; Sun, J.X.; Chen, H.M.; Guo, F.Q.

    1997-01-01

    The concentration of 8 REEs (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Yb and Lu) in 17 species of plants and their host soil, which were collected from a rare earth ore area located in the south of China, have been determined by INAA. The chondritic normalized REE patterns for different parts of plants (e.g., leaf, stem and root) and their host soils were studied. The results showed that the concentration levels of REE for most plants in the sampling area were elevated. Particularly, the leaves of the fern (Dicranopteris dichotoma) contain extremely high concentration of the total REE (675-3358 μg/g). Generally, these REE distribution patterns in every part of plants were very similar and reflected the characteristics of their host soils. However, the chondritic normalized REE patterns in some plants relative to the host soil revealed obvious fractionation, such as the depletion of the heavy REE (for fern, Citrus reticulata and Brassia campestris), the heavy REE enrichment (for Camellia sinensis, Camellia oleifera and Ziziphus) and the Ce positive anomaly (for Gardenia jasminoides). (author)

  8. Baseline data on wild flora of crop field boundaries in the agro-ecosystem of pothwar plateau, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarwar, M.; Hussain, I.; Anwar, M.; Ashraf, N.; Mirza, S.N.

    2017-01-01

    Wild flora along crop field boundaries in farmlands not only increases habitat heterogeneity but also serves multiple beneficial functions. We collected baseline data on wild flora bordering the crop fields of Pothwar plateau. Overall we selected four study sites including two sites of wheat-maize/millet and two of wheat-groundnut cropping system. We recorded 51 species of plants including 12 species of trees, 14 species of shrubs and 25 species of grasses/herbs. Two tree species namely Acacia modesta and Zizyphus mauritiana and two shrub species namely Calotropis procera and Ziziphus nummularia were common indicating their widespread presence in the area. Among herbs/grasses Abutilon indicum, Amaranthus spp., Cyperus rotundus and Erogrostis poroles were common at sites with wheat-maize/millet cropping pattern while Chenopodium album, Datura stramonium and Tribulus terrestris were common at sites with wheat-groundnut cropping system. The tree and shrub densities did not differ significantly among the study sites. Wheat-groundnut cropping system had higher populations/diversity/species of shrubs as compared to wheat-maize/millet cropping system. Density of grasses/herbs significantly differed across the study sites but there was no association of herb/grass density with cropping practice. (author)

  9. Diet of the Four-horned Antelope Tetracerus quadricornis (De Blainville, 1816 in the Churia Hills of Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar Kunwar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The food composition of the Four-horned Antelope Tetracerus quadricornis was studied in the Churia Hills of Nepal during summer, monsoon and the winter seasons of 2012–2013.  Microhistological technique was used to determine the diet.  The Four-horned Antelope was found to be a mixed feeder feeding on trees, shrubs, forbs, grasses and climbers.  Trees and shrubs contribute the major percentage of diet in all the three seasons.  The Gramineae family is consumed in highest proportion.  Mitragyna parvifolia, Bridelia retusa, Bambusa vulgaris, Hymenodictyon sp. and Ziziphus mauritiana are major tree species while Barleria cristata, Pogostemon benghalensis, Achyranthes sp., Clerodendrum viscosum are among shrubs.  Ageratum conyzoides and Blumea virens are the main forbs Eulaliopsis binata and Imperata cylindrica are the principal grass species.  Climber Trachelospermum lucidum is consumed in a small proportion.  Grasses in monsoon were consumed distinctly at a higher percentage than during the other two seasons.  The Four-horned Antelopes are concentrated feeders and browsers with a generalized feeding strategy. Similar studies need to be conducted in other landscapes and with sympatric and potential competitor species to understand its niche overlaps and degree of competition. 

  10. Wild food trees in Eastern Nuba Mountains, Sudan: Use diversity and threatening factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagwa Kamal-Eldin M. Salih

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in 2010 in Eastern Nuba Mountains, Sudan to investigate ethnobotanical food and non-food uses of 16 wild edible fruit producing trees. Quantitative and qualitative information was collected from 105 individuals distributed in 7 villages using a semi-structured questionnaire. Also gathering of data was done using a number of rapid rural appraisal techniques, including key informant interviews, group discussion, secondary data sources and direct observations. Data was analysed using fidelity level and informant consensus factor methods to reveal the cultural importance of species and use category. Utilizations for timber products were found of most community importance than food usages, especially during cultivated food abundance. Balanites aegyptiaca, Ziziphus spina-christi and Tamarindus indica fruits were asserted as most preferable over the others and of high marketability in most of the study sites. Harvesting for timber-based utilizations in addition to agricultural expansion and overgrazing were the principal threats to wild edible food producing trees in the area. The on and off prevailing armed conflict in the area make it crucial to conserve wild food trees which usually play a more significant role in securing food supply during emergency times, especially in times of famine and wars. Increasing the awareness of population on importance of wild food trees and securing alternative income sources, other than wood products, is necessary in any rural development programme aiming at securing food and sustaining its resources in the area.

  11. Ethnobotanical Study of Plants Used in the Management of HIV/AIDS-Related Diseases in Livingstone, Southern Province, Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazhila C. Chinsembu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Faced with critical shortages of staff, long queues, and stigma at public health facilities in Livingstone, Zambia, persons who suffer from HIV/AIDS-related diseases use medicinal plants to manage skin infections, diarrhoea, sexually transmitted infections, tuberculosis, cough, malaria, and oral infections. In all, 94 medicinal plant species were used to manage HIV/AIDS-related diseases. Most remedies are prepared from plants of various families such as Combretaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae, and Lamiaceae. More than two-thirds of the plants (mostly leaves and roots are utilized to treat two or more diseases related to HIV infection. Eighteen plants, namely, Achyranthes aspera L., Lannea discolor (Sond. Engl., Hyphaene petersiana Klotzsch ex Mart., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Capparis tomentosa Lam., Cleome hirta Oliv., Garcinia livingstonei T. Anderson, Euclea divinorum Hiern, Bridelia cathartica G. Bertol., Acacia nilotica Delile, Piliostigma thonningii (Schumach. Milne-Redh., Dichrostachys cinerea (L. Wight and Arn., Abrus precatorius L., Hoslundia opposita Vahl., Clerodendrum capitatum (Willd. Schumach., Ficus sycomorus L., Ximenia americana L., and Ziziphus mucronata Willd., were used to treat four or more disease conditions. About 31% of the plants in this study were administered as monotherapies. Multiuse medicinal plants may contain broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, since widely used plants easily succumb to the threats of overharvesting, they need special protocols and guidelines for their genetic conservation. There is still need to confirm the antimicrobial efficacies, pharmacological parameters, cytotoxicity, and active chemical ingredients of the discovered plants.

  12. Antibacterial and Anticandidal Activity of Essential Oils of some Medicinal Plants in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abed, Kawther F

    2007-01-01

    The antibacterial and anticandidal properties of essential oils obtained from 7 plant species used in traditional medicine in Saudi Arabia and other Middle East countries were evaluated for activity against test bacteria; Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans using an agar dilution method. Our results showed that oils from Azadirachta indica, Ziziphus spine, Matricaria chamomilla, Agrimonia eupatoria and Lupinus albus, even at the highest concentration did not inhibit any of the tested organisms. The essential oil extracted from Juniperus communis and Lavandula hybrida plants did not show any antibacterial activities. However, essential oil extracts from Juniperus communis and Lavandula hybrida exhibited varying degrees of growth inhibition of Candida albicans. The minimum inhibitory concentrations were 2.0%( v/v) of Juniper oil and 0.5% (v/v) for Lavender oil against Candida albicans. Our results suggest that the anticandidal properties of Juniper and Lavender oils may be further investigated to explore the possibility of using them in the treatment of candidal infections. (author)

  13. Effect of petroleum on decomposition of shrub-grass litters in soil in Northern Shaanxi of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxi; Liu, Zengwen; Yu, Qi; Luc, Nhu Trung; Bing, Yuanhao; Zhu, Bochao; Wang, Wenxuan

    2015-07-01

    The impacts of petroleum contamination on the litter decomposition of shrub-grass land would directly influence nutrient cycling, and the stability and function of ecosystem. Ten common shrub and grass species from Yujiaping oil deposits were studied. Litters from these species were placed into litterbags and buried in petroleum-contaminated soil with 3 levels of contamination (slight, moderate and serious pollution with petroleum concentrations of 15, 30 and 45 g/kg, respectively). A decomposition experiment was then conducted in the lab to investigate the impacts of petroleum contamination on litter decomposition rates. Slight pollution did not inhibit the decomposition of any litters and significantly promoted the litter decomposition of Hippophae rhamnoides, Caragana korshinskii, Amorpha fruticosa, Ziziphus jujuba var. spinosa, Periploca sepium, Medicago sativa and Bothriochloa ischaemum. Moderate pollution significantly inhibited litter decomposition of M. sativa, Coronilla varia, Artemisia vestita and Trrifolium repens and significantly promoted the litter decomposition of C. korshinskii, Z. jujuba var. spinosa and P. sepium. Serious pollution significantly inhibited the litter decomposition of H. rhamnoides, A. fruticosa, B. ischaemum and A. vestita and significantly promoted the litter decomposition of Z. jujuba var. spinosa, P. sepium and M. sativa. In addition, the impacts of petroleum contamination did not exhibit a uniform increase or decrease as petroleum concentration increased. Inhibitory effects of petroleum on litter decomposition may hinder the substance cycling and result in the degradation of plant communities in contaminated areas. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. In vivo screening and evaluation of four herbs against MRSA infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Najma; Mehreen, Arifa; Liaqat, Iram; Arshad, Muhammad; Afrasiab, Humera

    2017-11-23

    Recently, we reported high in vitro antibacterial efficacy of Althaea officinalis, Ziziphus jujuba, Cordia latifolia and Thymus vulgaris out of a total 21 plants against wide range of bacteria including MRSA. This study was therefore, designed to confirm efficacy of these four herbs against MRSA in an animal model. A pilot study was conducted to establish the dose of S. aureus (KY698020) required to induce clinical infection. Afterword, in main trial, efficacy of aforementioned plant extracts on the course of sore throat was checked by evaluating general health, gross lesion score, bacterial load and hematology in mice. Pilot study revealed that 40 μl dose of 10 7  CFU/ml could induce infection which persist upto 08 days post infection. Mice treated with T. vulgaris and Z. jujuba showed reduction in gross lesion score of both heart and lungs. Treatment with only some plants could significantly decrease bacterial load of throat (T. vulgaris) heart, blood and joint (C. latifolia, and T. vulagris). Hematological indicators confirmed in vivo control of MRSA infection in all treatment groups except A. officinalis. This is first report confirming in vivo anti-MRSA potential of C. latifolia and T. vulgaris and highlight the need to explore bioactive constituents of these plants. Moreover, previously reported in vitro antibacterial efficiency of A. officinalis could not be validated in current study.

  15. Ethnobotanical Study of Plants Used in the Management of HIV/AIDS-Related Diseases in Livingstone, Southern Province, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinsembu, Kazhila C

    2016-01-01

    Faced with critical shortages of staff, long queues, and stigma at public health facilities in Livingstone, Zambia, persons who suffer from HIV/AIDS-related diseases use medicinal plants to manage skin infections, diarrhoea, sexually transmitted infections, tuberculosis, cough, malaria, and oral infections. In all, 94 medicinal plant species were used to manage HIV/AIDS-related diseases. Most remedies are prepared from plants of various families such as Combretaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae, and Lamiaceae. More than two-thirds of the plants (mostly leaves and roots) are utilized to treat two or more diseases related to HIV infection. Eighteen plants, namely, Achyranthes aspera L., Lannea discolor (Sond.) Engl., Hyphaene petersiana Klotzsch ex Mart., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Capparis tomentosa Lam., Cleome hirta Oliv., Garcinia livingstonei T. Anderson, Euclea divinorum Hiern, Bridelia cathartica G. Bertol., Acacia nilotica Delile, Piliostigma thonningii (Schumach.) Milne-Redh., Dichrostachys cinerea (L.) Wight and Arn., Abrus precatorius L., Hoslundia opposita Vahl., Clerodendrum capitatum (Willd.) Schumach., Ficus sycomorus L., Ximenia americana L., and Ziziphus mucronata Willd., were used to treat four or more disease conditions. About 31% of the plants in this study were administered as monotherapies. Multiuse medicinal plants may contain broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, since widely used plants easily succumb to the threats of overharvesting, they need special protocols and guidelines for their genetic conservation. There is still need to confirm the antimicrobial efficacies, pharmacological parameters, cytotoxicity, and active chemical ingredients of the discovered plants.

  16. Índice de infestação e diversidade de moscas-das-frutas em hospedeiros exóticos e nativos no pólo de fruticultura de Anagé, BA Index of infestation and diversity of fruit-flies in exotic hosts native to the fruitculture area in Anagé, Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Falcão de Sá

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available As moscas-das-frutas (Diptera: Tephritidae são os principais entraves às exportações de manga nos pólos de fruticultura da Região Sudoeste da Bahia. O presente trabalho teve como objetivo estudar índices de infestação e a diversidade de moscas-das-frutas no pólo de fruticultura de Anagé, BA, visando obter subsídios para o manejo integrado dessas pragas na mangueira, na região. Os estudos foram realizados em 2004 e 2005, nos municípios de Anagé, Belo Campo e Caraíbas, BA, procedendo-se à coleta de frutos de 21 espécies vegetais, nativas e exóticas, e identificação das espécies de moscas associadas. Estimaram-se os índices de infestação em pupários/kg de fruto e pupários/fruto. Os maiores índices de infestação, em pupários/kg de fruto, ocorreram em serigüela (Spondias purpurea L. com 61,3, juá (Ziziphus joazeiro L., 38,3 e umbu (Spondias tuberosa L., 33,1, considerados hospedeiros primários de Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann e A. obliqua (Macquart. As maiores infestações em pupários/fruto ocorreram em serigüela (0,9; umbu (0,7 e cajarana (Spondias sp. (0,2. Com base no monitoramento larval, registra-se, para as condições do pólo de fruticultura de Anagé, a ocorrência das espécies Anastrepha fraterculus, A. obliqua, A. dissimilis, A. amita, A. distincta, A. sororcula, A. zenildae e Ceratitis capitata. Registram-se, pela primeira vez, as seguintes associações bitróficas: juá com A. fraterculus, A. obliqua, A. dissimilis e A. distincta; e umbu com A. amita e A. sororcula.Fruit-flies (Diptera: Tephritidae are the main hindrance for mango exportation in the fruitculture areas of the Southwestern Region of Bahia. The purpose of the present work was to study the indexes of infestation and diversity of fruit-flies in the fruitculture area of Anagé, BA, in order to obtain subsidies to the integrated management of these pests in mango, in this region. Studies were carried out in 2004 and 2005 in the

  17. Determining spatio-temporal distribution of bee forage species of Al-Baha region based on ground inventorying supported with GIS applications and Remote Sensed Satellite Image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adgaba, Nuru; Alghamdi, Ahmed; Sammoud, Rachid; Shenkute, Awraris; Tadesse, Yilma; Ansari, Mahammad J; Sharma, Deepak; Hepburn, Colleen

    2017-07-01

    In arid zones, the shortage of bee forage is critical and usually compels beekeepers to move their colonies in search of better forages. Identifying and mapping the spatiotemporal distribution of the bee forages over given area is important for better management of bee colonies. In this study honey bee plants in the target areas were inventoried following, ground inventory work supported with GIS applications. The study was conducted on 85 large plots of 50 × 50 m each. At each plot, data on species name, height, base diameter, crown height, crown diameter has been taken for each plant with their respective geographical positions. The data were stored, and processed using Trimble GPS supported with ArcGIS10 software program. The data were used to estimate the relative frequency, density, abundance and species diversity, species important value index and apicultural value of the species. In addition, Remotely Sensed Satellite Image of the area was obtained and processed using Hopfield Artificial Neural Network techniques. During the study, 182 species from 49 plant families were identified as bee forages of the target area. From the total number of species; shrubs, herbs and trees were accounting for 61%, 27.67%, and 11.53% respectively. Of which Ziziphus spina-christi , Acacia tortilis , Acacia origina , Acacia asak , Lavandula dentata , and Hypoestes forskaolii were the major nectar source plants of the area in their degree of importance. The average vegetation cover values of the study areas were low (GIS and satellite image processing techniques could be an important tool for characterizing and mapping the available bee forage resources leading to their efficient and sustainable utilization.

  18. In vitro antioxidant potential of medicinal plant extracts and their activities against oral bacteria based on Brazilian folk medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alviano, Wagner S; Alviano, Daniela S; Diniz, Cláudio G; Antoniolli, Angelo R; Alviano, Celuta S; Farias, Luiz M; Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora R; Souza, Margareth M G; Bolognese, Ana Maria

    2008-06-01

    This study aims to determine antibacterial activities of Cocos nucifera (husk fiber), Ziziphus joazeiro (inner bark), Caesalpinia pyramidalis (leaves), aqueous extracts and Aristolochia cymbifera (rhizomes) alcoholic extract against Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei. The antioxidant activity and acute toxicity of these extracts were also evaluated. The plant extracts antibacterial activity was evaluated in vitro and the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by the broth micro-dilution assay. The bacterial killing kinetic was also evaluated for all extracts. In addition, the antibacterial effect of the extracts was tested in vitro on artificial oral biofilms. The acute toxicity of each extract was determined in according to Lorke [Lorke D. A new approach to practical acute toxicity testing. Arch Toxicol 1983;54:275-87] and the antioxidant activity was evaluated by DPPH photometric assay [Mensor LL, Menezes FS, Leitão GG, Reis AS, Santos TC, Coube CS, et al. Screening of Brazilian plants extract for antioxidant activity by the use of DPPH free radical method. Phytother Res 2001;15:127-30]. MIC and the bactericidal concentrations were identical, for each evaluated extract. However, microbes of artificial biofilms were less sensitive to the extracts than the planktonic strains. A. cymbifera extract induced the highest bactericidal effect against all tested bacteria, followed by C. nucifera, Z. joazeiro and C. pyramidalis extracts, respectively. All extracts showed good antioxidant potential, being C. nucifera and C. pyramidalis aqueous extracts the most active ones. In conclusion, all oral bacteria tested (planktonic or in artificial biofilms) were more susceptible to, and rapidly killed in presence of A. cymbifera, C. pyramidalis and C. nucifera than Z. joazeiro extracts, respectively. Thus, these extracts may be of great interest for future studies about treatment of

  19. Farmers' perceptions towards agroforestry systems in North and South Kordofanstates, Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Eldin Mohammed Fadl

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted during 2010 and 2011 in North and South Kordofan States with objectives of to identify and assess the most important agroforestry systems, to characterize major tree species in different agroforestry system, to prioritize major constraints on agroforestry systems in the region, and to study the current status of gum Arabic trees and their contribution on farmers livelihood. Data were collected through community meeting, individual interviews and direct field observation. The common agroforestry systems in the region are scatter trees on farm land, followed by wind breaks and boundary planting. The important trees in the study area are Acacia senegal83%, followed by Fadherbia albida 46%, Ziziphus spina- christia43% and Balanites aegyptiaca 41%. The most important field crops that cultivated in agroforestry system are groundnuts, millet, sorghum, sesame and roselle. The environmental benefits of trees in farm which was identified by the respondents include protection of farm against wind erosion, improvement of the soil properties, improvement of the micro-climate and providing a source for income which was indicated by the majority of respondents. Across all sites 93% of respondents showed that gum Arabic have a significant contribution to their family income. The study recommended that a multi-purpose tree species such as Acacia senegal should be maintained for amelioration of soils fertility and increase crop productivity in the fragile ecosystems such as that of the study sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v4i2.12624 International Journal of Environment Vol.4(2 2015: 53-67

  20. THE SCIENTIFIC LETTERS OF LORENZO R. PARODI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Medan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Se identifican las especies vegetales y sus partes empleadas en las prácticas alimentarias de los indígenas tapiete del noreste de la provincia de Salta, Argentina, así como sus formas de recolección, elaboración, consumo y almacenamiento. La finalidad última de este trabajo es contribuir a la apreciación y registro de los conocimientos del pueblo tapiete sobre estos aspectos de su cultura. Se efectuaron cinco campañas al Chaco semiárido norte y a la ciudad de Tartagal, donde se obtuvieron los datos etnobotánicos a partir de 75 entrevistas realizadas a un total de 32 colaboradores tapiete calificados y ocasionales. Cada una de las plantas alimenticias indicadas fue colectada e identificada por los autores y depositadas en el Herbario Ruiz Leal (MERL. Se registra un total de 54 plantas nativas, pertenecientes a 23 familias botánicas, empleadas como alimento por los tapiete en 106 preparaciones culinarias o formas de consumo y 13 formas de conservación. Las principales especies en su alimentación son Anisocapparis speciosa, Prosopis aff. elata y Prosopis alba con seis usos cada una y Ziziphus mistol, Geoffroea decorticans y Funastrum clausum con cuatro aplicaciones. La mayoría de estos usos (55%; 59 no incluyen preparación alguna -se consumen crudos-, el 21 % (22 se consumen cocidos (hervidos o asados, mientras que sus usos en bebidas, condimentos y harinas representan una minoría de las aplicaciones (24%; 25. Se registra por vez primera el consumo alimenticio de las hojas de Passiflora mooreana y de P. cincinatta por etnias del Gran Chaco.

  1. RECURSOS VEGETALES Y PRÁCTICAS ALIMENTARIAS ENTRE INDÍGENAS TAPIETE DEL NORESTE DE LA PROVINCIA DE SALTA, ARGENTINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cecilia Montani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Se identifican las especies vegetales y sus partes empleadas en las prácticas alimentarias de los indígenas tapiete del noreste de la provincia de Salta, Argentina, así como sus formas de recolección, elaboración, consumo y almacenamiento. La finalidad última de este trabajo es contribuir a la apreciación y registro de los conocimientos del pueblo tapiete sobre estos aspectos de su cultura. Se efectuaron cinco campañas al Chaco semiárido norte y a la ciudad de Tartagal, donde se obtuvieron los datos etnobotánicos a partir de 75 entrevistas realizadas a un total de 32 colaboradores tapiete calificados y ocasionales. Cada una de las plantas alimenticias indicadas fue colectada e identificada por los autores y depositadas en el Herbario Ruiz Leal (MERL. Se registra un total de 54 plantas nativas, pertenecientes a 23 familias botánicas, empleadas como alimento por los tapiete en 106 preparaciones culinarias o formas de consumo y 13 formas de conservación. Las principales especies en su alimentación son Anisocapparis speciosa, Prosopis aff. elata y Prosopis alba con seis usos cada una y Ziziphus mistol, Geoffroea decorticans y Funastrum clausum con cuatro aplicaciones. La mayoría de estos usos (55%; 59 no incluyen preparación alguna -se consumen crudos-, el 21 % (22 se consumen cocidos (hervidos o asados, mientras que sus usos en bebidas, condimentos y harinas representan una minoría de las aplicaciones (24%; 25. Se registra por vez primera el consumo alimenticio de las hojas de Passiflora mooreana y de P. cincinatta por etnias del Gran Chaco.

  2. Medical Mucilage Used in Traditional Persian Medicine Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydarirad, Ghazaleh; Choopani, Rasool; Mehdi, Pasalar; Jafari, Jamileh Mahdavi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mucilage compounds are pharmaceutically important polysaccharides that have an extensive range of applications, including binding agents, thickeners, water retention agents, emulsion stabilizers, suspending agents, disintegrates, film formers, and gelling agents. A historical approach to medical science written by Iranian scholars could help in identifying excellent ideas and provide valuable information in this field for proper application. The aim of the current study was to introduce some mucilage uses derived from traditional Persian medicine (TPM). Methods: In this literature review, we assessed a few main traditional manuscripts of Iranian medicine, including the books Al Havi, Canon of Medicine, Qarabadine-kabir, Zakhireh-ye Khwarazm shahi, Tuhfat ul-Momineen and Makhzan-ul-Adwiah. The word “loab” in the aforementioned books were searched and all data about mucilage compounds were collected. Results: The use of medicinal plants containing mucilage in Iran dates back to ancient times. In traditional Persian manuscripts, mucilage is one of the most cited applications of medicinal plants for therapeutic objectives. There are various mucilage-producing plants in TPM such as Malva silvestris, Linum usitissimum, Althaea officinalis, Plantago psyllium, Descureania sophia and Ziziphus vulgaris. They have been used traditionally via oral or topical routes for respiratory, gastrointestinal, urinary, musculoskeletal, and genital systems as well as skin disorders. Certain applications are unique and promising for today’s chronic ailments. Conclusion: A scientific assessment of these valuable manuscripts would provide a better insight into the thoughts of the past sages and applicable for clinical use of the mucilage compounds. This may lead to research opportunities in the future. PMID:27840507

  3. Identification of the key weather factors affecting overwintering success of Apolygus lucorum eggs in dead host tree branches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongsheng Pan

    Full Text Available Understanding the effects of weather on insect population dynamics is crucial to simulate and forecast pest outbreaks, which is becoming increasingly important with the effects of climate change. The mirid bug Apolygus lucorum is an important pest on cotton, fruit trees and other crops in China, and primarily lays its eggs on dead parts of tree branches in the fall for subsequent overwintering. As such, the eggs that hatch the following spring are most strongly affected by ambient weather factors, rather than by host plant biology. In this study, we investigated the effects of three major weather factors: temperature, relative humidity and rainfall, on the hatching rate of A. lucorum eggs overwintering on dead branches of Chinese date tree (Ziziphus jujuba. Under laboratory conditions, rainfall (simulated via soaking was necessary for the hatching of overwintering A. lucorum eggs. In the absence of rainfall (unsoaked branches, very few nymphs successfully emerged under any of the tested combinations of temperature and relative humidity. In contrast, following simulated rainfall, the hatching rate of the overwintering eggs increased dramatically. Hatching rate and developmental rate were positively correlated with relative humidity and temperature, respectively. Under field conditions, the abundance of nymphs derived from overwintering eggs was positively correlated with rainfall amount during the spring seasons of 2009-2013, while the same was not true for temperature and relative humidity. Overall, our findings indicate that rainfall is the most important factor affecting the hatching rate of overwintering A. lucorum eggs on dead plant parts and nymph population levels during the spring season. It provides the basic information for precisely forecasting the emergence of A. lucorum and subsequently timely managing its population in spring, which will make it possible to regional control of this insect pest widely occurring in multiple crops in

  4. Identification of the key weather factors affecting overwintering success of Apolygus lucorum eggs in dead host tree branches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hongsheng; Liu, Bing; Lu, Yanhui; Desneux, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the effects of weather on insect population dynamics is crucial to simulate and forecast pest outbreaks, which is becoming increasingly important with the effects of climate change. The mirid bug Apolygus lucorum is an important pest on cotton, fruit trees and other crops in China, and primarily lays its eggs on dead parts of tree branches in the fall for subsequent overwintering. As such, the eggs that hatch the following spring are most strongly affected by ambient weather factors, rather than by host plant biology. In this study, we investigated the effects of three major weather factors: temperature, relative humidity and rainfall, on the hatching rate of A. lucorum eggs overwintering on dead branches of Chinese date tree (Ziziphus jujuba). Under laboratory conditions, rainfall (simulated via soaking) was necessary for the hatching of overwintering A. lucorum eggs. In the absence of rainfall (unsoaked branches), very few nymphs successfully emerged under any of the tested combinations of temperature and relative humidity. In contrast, following simulated rainfall, the hatching rate of the overwintering eggs increased dramatically. Hatching rate and developmental rate were positively correlated with relative humidity and temperature, respectively. Under field conditions, the abundance of nymphs derived from overwintering eggs was positively correlated with rainfall amount during the spring seasons of 2009-2013, while the same was not true for temperature and relative humidity. Overall, our findings indicate that rainfall is the most important factor affecting the hatching rate of overwintering A. lucorum eggs on dead plant parts and nymph population levels during the spring season. It provides the basic information for precisely forecasting the emergence of A. lucorum and subsequently timely managing its population in spring, which will make it possible to regional control of this insect pest widely occurring in multiple crops in summer.

  5. Enriched cultures of lactic acid bacteria from selected Zimbabwean fermented food and medicinal products with potential as therapy or prophylaxis against yeast infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alec Chabwinja

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the antifungal activity of crude cultures of putative strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB from a selection of Zimbabwean traditional and commercial food/ medicinal products against yeasts (strains of environmental isolates of Candida albicans and Rhodotorula spp.. Methods: Cultures of putative LAB from our selection of fermented products were enriched in de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe and isolated on de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe agar. Results: The crude microbial cultures from the products that showed high antifungal activities (zone of inhibition, mm were as follows: supernatant-free microbial pellet (SFMP from an extract of Melia azedarach leaves [(27.0 ± 2.5 mm] > cell-free culture supernatants (CFCS from Maaz Dairy sour milk and Mnandi sour milk [approximately (26.0 ± 1.8/2.5 mm] > CFCS and SFMP from Amansi hodzeko [(25.0 ± 1.5 mm] > CFCS from Parinari curatellifolia fruit [(24.0 ± 1.5 mm], SFMP from Parinari curatellifolia fruit [(24.0 ± 1.4 mm] and SFMP from mahewu [(20.0 ± 1.5 mm]. These cultures also showed high tolerance to acidic conditions (pH 4.0 and pH 5.0. However, culture from WAYA LGG (shown elsewhere to harbour antimicrobial activities showed no antifungal activity. The LAB could have inhibited yeasts by either competitive exclusion or the release of antimicrobial metabolites. Conclusions: Our cultures of LAB from a selection of Zimbabwean fermented products, especially Ziziphus mauritiana and fermented milk products have great potential for use as antifungal probiotics against yeast infections. Studies are ongoing to determine the exact mechanisms that are employed by the putative LAB to inhibit Candida albicans.

  6. Phenological observations on shrubs to predict weed emergence in turf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masin, Roberta; Zuin, Maria Clara; Zanin, Giuseppe

    2005-09-01

    Phenology is the study of periodic biological events. If we can find easily recognizable events in common plants that precede or coincide with weed emergences, these plants could be used as indicators. Weed seedlings are usually difficult to detect in turf, so the use of phenological indicators may provide an alternative approach to predict the time when a weed appears and consequently guide management decisions. A study was undertaken to determine whether the phenological phases of some plants could serve as reliable indicators of time of weed emergence in turf. The phenology of six shrubs (Crataegus monogyna Jacq., Forsythia viridissima Lindl., Sambucus nigra L., Syringa vulgaris L., Rosa multiflora Thunb., Ziziphus jujuba Miller) and a perennial herbaceous plant [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] was observed and the emergence dynamics of four annual weed species [Digitaria sanguinalis (L.) Scop., Eleusine indica (L.) Gaertner, Setaria glauca (L.) Beauv., Setaria viridis (L.) Beauv.] were studied from 1999 to 2004 in northern Italy. A correlation between certain events and weed emergence was verified. S. vulgaris and F. viridissima appear to be the best indicators: there is a quite close correspondence between the appearance of D. sanguinalis and lilac flowering and between the beginning of emergence of E. indica and the end of lilac flowering; emergences of S. glauca and S. viridis were predicted well in relation to the end of forsythia flowering. Base temperatures and starting dates required to calculate the heat unit sums to reach and complete the flowering phase of the indicators were calculated using two different methods and the resultant cumulative growing degree days were compared.

  7. Species choice, provenance and species trials among native Brazilian species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumond, M A

    1982-01-01

    Six papers from the conference are presented. Drumond, M.A., Potential of species native to the semi-arid tropics, 766-781, (Refs. 18), reports on Anadenanthera macrocarpa, Mimosa species, Schinopsis brasiliensis, Spondias tuberosa, Ziziphus joazeiro, Cnidoscolus phyllacanthus, Bursera leptophleos (leptophloeos), Tabebuia impetiginosa, Astronium urundeuva, and Mimosa caesalpinia. Monteiro, R.F.R., Speltz, R.M., Gurgel, J.T. do A.; Silvicultural performance of 24 provenances of Araucaria angustifolia in Parana, 814-824, (Refs. 8). Pires, C.L. da S., Kalil Filho, A.N., Rosa, P.R.F. da, Parente, P.R., Zanatto, A.C.S.; Provenance trials of Cordia alliodora in the State of Sao Paulo, 988-995, (Refs. 9). Nogueira, J.C.B., Siqueira, A.C.M.F., Garrido, M.A.O., Gurgel Garrido, L.M. do A., Rosa, P.R.F., Moraes, J.L. de, Zandarin, M.A., Gurgel Filho, O.A., Trials of some native species in various regions of the State of Sao Paulo, 1051-1063, (Refs. 9) describes Centrolobium tomentosum, Peltophorum dubium, Tabebuia vellosoi, Cariniana legalis, and Balfourodendron riedelianum. Batista, M.P., Borges, J.F., Franco, M.A.B.; Early growth of a native species in comparison with exotics in northeastern Para, Brazil, 1105-1110, (Refs. 3). Jacaranda copaia is compared with Gmelina arborea, Pinus caribaea various hondurensis, Eucalyptus deglupta, and E. urophylla. Lima, P.C.F., Souza, S.M. de, Drumond, M.A.; Trials of native forest species at Petrolina, Pernambuco, 1139-1148, (Refs. 8), deals with Anadenanthera macrocarpa, Piptadenia obliqua, Pithecellobium foliolosum, Astronium urundeuva, Schinopsis brasiliensis, Cassia excelsa, Caesalpinia pyramidalis, Parkia platycephala, Pseudobombax simplicifolium, Tabebuia impetiginosa, Caesalpinia ferrea, and Aspidosperma pyrifolium. 18 references.

  8. Characterisation of bio-aerosols during dust storm period in N-NW India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sudesh; Chauhan, M. S.; Sharma, Anupam

    Bio-investigations for pollen and spores were performed on dry free-fall dust and PM 10 aerosol samples, collected from three different locations separated by a distance of 600 km, situated in dust storm hit region of N-NW India. Presence of pollen of trees namely Prosopis ( Prosopis juliflora and Prosopis cinearia), Acacia, Syzygium, Pinus, Cedrus, Holoptelea and shrubs namely Ziziphus, Ricinus, Ephedra and members of Fabaceae, Oleaceae families was recorded but with varying proportions in the samples of different locations. Poaceae, Chenopodiaceae/Amaranthaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Brassicaceae and Cyperaceae (sedges) were some of the herb pollen identified in the samples. Among the fungal spores Nigrospora was seen in almost all samples. Nigrospora is a well known allergen and causes health problems. The concentration of trees and shrubs increases in the windward direction just as the climate changes from hot arid to semiarid. The higher frequency of grasses (Poaceae) or herbs could either be a result of the presence of these herbs in the sampling area and hence the higher production of pollen/spores or due to the resuspension from the exposed surface by the high-intensity winds. But we cannot ascertain the exact process at this stage. The overall similarity in the pollen and spore assemblage in our dust samples indicates a common connection or source(s) to the dust in this region. Presence of the pollen of the species of Himalayan origin in our entire samples strongly point towards a Himalayan connection, could be direct or indirect, to the bioaerosols and hence dust in N-NW India. In order to understand the transport path and processes involved therein, present study needs further extension with more number of samples and with reference to meteorological parameters.

  9. Determining spatio-temporal distribution of bee forage species of Al-Baha region based on ground inventorying supported with GIS applications and Remote Sensed Satellite Image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuru Adgaba

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In arid zones, the shortage of bee forage is critical and usually compels beekeepers to move their colonies in search of better forages. Identifying and mapping the spatiotemporal distribution of the bee forages over given area is important for better management of bee colonies. In this study honey bee plants in the target areas were inventoried following, ground inventory work supported with GIS applications. The study was conducted on 85 large plots of 50 × 50 m each. At each plot, data on species name, height, base diameter, crown height, crown diameter has been taken for each plant with their respective geographical positions. The data were stored, and processed using Trimble GPS supported with ArcGIS10 software program. The data were used to estimate the relative frequency, density, abundance and species diversity, species important value index and apicultural value of the species. In addition, Remotely Sensed Satellite Image of the area was obtained and processed using Hopfield Artificial Neural Network techniques. During the study, 182 species from 49 plant families were identified as bee forages of the target area. From the total number of species; shrubs, herbs and trees were accounting for 61%, 27.67%, and 11.53% respectively. Of which Ziziphus spina-christi, Acacia tortilis, Acacia origina, Acacia asak, Lavandula dentata, and Hypoestes forskaolii were the major nectar source plants of the area in their degree of importance. The average vegetation cover values of the study areas were low (<30% with low Shannon’s species diversity indices (H′ of 0.5–1.52 for different sites. Based on the eco-climatological factors and the variations in their flowering period, these major bee forage species were found to form eight distinct spatiotemporal categories which allow beekeepers to migrate their colonies to exploit the resources at different seasons and place. The Remote Sensed Satellite Image analysis confirmed the spatial

  10. Farmers’ perceptions towards agroforestry systems in Babanosa Area, West Kordofan State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Eldin Mohammed Fadl

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in Eltemada, Boli and Umghoghai villages at Babanosa area in El-salam locality, South Kordofan State during 2012 and 2013. The objectives were to (1 identify and assess the most important agroforestry systems, (2 to investigate the main factors that affecting the sustainability of the systems, (3 to determine the important field crops that cultivated with trees and (4 to evaluate the effect of the agroforestry systems on the yield of the traditional field crops. For accomplishment of these study 80 questioners was designed and distributed in the selected villages. After the data collection data was analyzed by using descriptive statistic. The results showed that the most important agroforestry systems in the study area are parkland cropping system (58%, boundary planting (26%, wind-breaks (13% and alley cropping (3%.The most important forest trees in the study area are Acacia senegal (32%, Ziziphus spina- christia (28%, Balanites aegeyptiaca (26%, Sclerocary birrea and Guera senegalensis (3%. The main field crops in the study area are groundnut (44%, sorghum (35% and roselle (21%. The results showed that yield of groundnut and sorghum is higher under agroforestry systems compared with the mono-cropping system. The results showed that the majority of respondents (70% prefer to cultivate field crops in agroforestry system, while (30% prefer to cultivate the field crops in a mono-cropping system. The cultivation methods used in the study area include shifting cultivation (52%, mono-cropping (36% and intercropping (12%.The majority of respondents (94% showed that trees improve soil fertility in their farm land. The benefits from trees in farm land include improvement of soil properties (36%, protecting the farm land from wind erosion (28%, improvement of micro-climate (24% and source of income which was indicated by (12% of the respondents. The study recommended that modern agroforestry system such as improved fallow system

  11. Spatially explicit multi-threat assessment of food tree species in Burkina Faso: A fine-scale approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Gaisberger

    Full Text Available Over the last decades agroforestry parklands in Burkina Faso have come under increasing demographic as well as climatic pressures, which are threatening indigenous tree species that contribute substantially to income generation and nutrition in rural households. Analyzing the threats as well as the species vulnerability to them is fundamental for priority setting in conservation planning. Guided by literature and local experts we selected 16 important food tree species (Acacia macrostachya, Acacia senegal, Adansonia digitata, Annona senegalensis, Balanites aegyptiaca, Bombax costatum, Boscia senegalensis, Detarium microcarpum, Lannea microcarpa, Parkia biglobosa, Sclerocarya birrea, Strychnos spinosa, Tamarindus indica, Vitellaria paradoxa, Ximenia americana, Ziziphus mauritiana and six key threats to them (overexploitation, overgrazing, fire, cotton production, mining and climate change. We developed a species-specific and spatially explicit approach combining freely accessible datasets, species distribution models (SDMs, climate models and expert survey results to predict, at fine scale, where these threats are likely to have the greatest impact. We find that all species face serious threats throughout much of their distribution in Burkina Faso and that climate change is predicted to be the most prevalent threat in the long term, whereas overexploitation and cotton production are the most important short-term threats. Tree populations growing in areas designated as 'highly threatened' due to climate change should be used as seed sources for ex situ conservation and planting in areas where future climate is predicting suitable habitats. Assisted regeneration is suggested for populations in areas where suitable habitat under future climate conditions coincides with high threat levels due to short-term threats. In the case of Vitellaria paradoxa, we suggest collecting seed along the northern margins of its distribution and considering assisted

  12. Indigenous knowledge of folk medicines among tribal minorities in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, northwestern Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Hassan; Aldosari, Ali; Ali, Ahmad; de Boer, Hugo J

    2015-05-26

    Mapping ethnomedicinal plants and associated indigenous knowledge of folk medicines can provide a comprehensive overview of individual herbs employed in health care. Reliance on medicinal plants in remote parts of northern Pakistan is high, especially among women, but no research has investigated specifically which plants are used. This study investigated indigenous knowledge of folk medicines among tribal minorities in selected sites in upper Swat, Buner and Chitral Districts in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province. Interviews were conducted with gender-specific focus groups using questionnaires and standardized data sheets, followed by forest walks in each of the visited areas. General medicinal herb use, preparations, storage, marketing and collection habits for each gender group were ascertained from the questionnaires. In total 168 women and 390 men were interviewed and provided information on 127 different shared medicinal species. Species use consensus among the informants ranged from 2.3% to 83.3%, with Cynodon dactylon, Avena sativa, Celtis australis, Datura stramonium, Solanum nigrum, Skimmia laureola, Spiraea nervosa, Ziziphus jujuba, Rumex hastatus, Plantago lanceolata, Lathyrus aphaca and Ficus palmata having the highest reported consensus. The survey also revealed that a number of medicinal species were exploited by the community for both marketing and personal use, and many of these species were reported as being rare, vulnerable or even endangered. The results revealed that women in all the three districts were important custodians of medicinal plant knowledge, but elder women in general and the women from Buner district in particular had a superior understanding of folk medicine. The forest walks revealed that women׳s traditional medicinal knowledge was based on a more limited diversity of plant species. People in tribal communities have an expressed interest in learning efficient techniques for medicinal plant collection, preparation, storage and

  13. Ethnopharmacological Survey of Medicinal Plants in Albaha Region, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awadh Ali, Nasser A; Al Sokari, Saeed Salah; Gushash, Ahmed; Anwar, Sirajudheen; Al-Karani, Khalid; Al-Khulaidi, Abdulwali

    2017-01-01

    been previously reported.The most used medicinal plants, according to their Use Index (UI) were Juniperus procera , Rumex nervosus , and Ziziphus spina-christi . Abbreviations Used: UI : Use Index, GI: Gastrointestinal tract, RD: Rheumatic disease, CVS: Cardiovascular diseases, UTI: Urinary tract infection, DM: Diabetes mellitus, RT: Respiratory infection, KSA: Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

  14. Medicinal flora of the Cholistan desert: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hmeed, M.; Ashraf, M.; Nawaz, T.; Naz, N.; Ahmad, M.S.A.; Al-Quriany, F.; Younis, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Cholistan desert can be divided into two distinct regions on the basis of topography, soil type and texture, and vegetation structure: the northern Lesser Cholistan and southern Greater Cholistan. The desert is characterized by large saline compacted areas with alluvial clay, sandy ridges and dunes, and semi-stabilized to frequently shifting dunes. The climate is subtropical, harsh, hot and arid, and influenced by seasonal monsoons. Vegetation cover on the sand dunes is comprised by a few tussock-forming grasses including Cenchrus ciliaris, Panicum turgidum and Lasiurus scindicus, along with perennial shrubs Calligonum polygonoides, Leptadenia pyrotechnica and Aerva javanica. Interdunal flats are dominated by grasses, mainly Cymbopogon jwarancusa, Sporobolus ioclados, Panicum antidotale, and Ochthochloa compressa, and tall shrubs Calligonum polygonoides and Capparis decidua. Vegetation of saline patches is specific, dominated by halophytes mainly belonging to family Chenopodiaceae (Amaranthaceae). Many plants of the Cholistan desert, including Neurada procumbens, Aerva javanica, Capparis decidua, Cleome brachycarpa, Dipterygium glaucum, Gisekia pharnacioides, Suaeda fruticosa, Achyranthes aspera, Aerva javanica, Alhagi maurorum, Calotropis procera, Capparis decidua, Zaleya pentandra, Mollugo cerviana, Ziziphus mauritiana, Boerhavia procumbens, Cressa cretica and Crotalaria burhia, are frequently used by the local inhabitants to cure chronic and acute diseases. A variety of medicinally important chemical compounds have been extracted and identified from the plants of the Cholistan desert, including terpenes and triterpenoids, sterols and steroids, phenolics, flavonoids, gums and resins, quinones, anthocyanidines, saponins, antioxidants and fatty acids. Habitat degradation, intensive agricultural practices and over exploitation of resources pose a serious threat to the diversity of ethno botanically important plant species. Allopathic medicines are generally

  15. Ethno veterinary uses of medicinal plants of district Karak, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattak, Noor Saeed; Nouroz, Faisal; Inayat Ur Rahman; Noreen, Shumaila

    2015-08-02

    In the study area, the traditional knowledge regarding the uses of local wild medicinal plants for treating diseases of domestic animals and birds is totally in the custody of elders of the existing community. The young ones are not much aware about such important practices. The main aim of the study was to document and to release this knowledge from the custody of elders and share with the community. Total 115 people between 20 and 80 years of age were interviewed and information was collected through semi-structured questionnaires. The data obtained were quantitatively analyzed using the use value (UV) formula. The collected specimens were pressed, dried, preserved, mounted on Herbarium sheets, identified properly and were submitted in the Herbarium, Department of Botany, Hazara University, Mansehra, Pakistan. With the co-ordination and cooperation of the local people, 46 plant species of 42 genera belonging to 31 families were collected, 3 were monocotyledons while 43 plant species belonged to dicotyledonae class. Considering taxonomic characteristics, it was confirmed that 12 trees, 10 shrubs and 22 herbs were commonly used by the local people in ethno veterinary practices. Two plants like Cistanche tubulosa and Cuscuta reflexa from family Orobanchaceae and family Cuscutaceae respectively lack chlorophyll and are parasites on host plants like Doedonia, Ziziphus, Calligonum and Calotropis. The powder of both plants showed great ethno veterinary value. The parts of 46 plant species commonly used for ethno veterinary practices were whole plants (32.60%), leaves (26.08%), fruits (17.39%), stems (13.04%) and roots (10.86%). Medicinal plants were administered through various routes i.e. oral (78.26%), skin (17.21%) and smoke (4.34%). The traditional knowledge of local plants of ethno veterinary values is mainly possessed by elders and transmitted from generation to generation with chances of elimination of such traditional knowledge due to less awareness. The present

  16. Intestinal digestibility of protein of adapted forages and by-products in Brazilian Northeast by three-steps technique Digestão intestinal da proteína de forrageiras e co-produtos da agroindústria produzidos no Nordeste Brasileiro por intermédio da técnica de três estágios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Gilson Lousada Regadas Filho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available It was aimed to estimate the intestinal digestibility (ID of rumen-undegradable protein (RUDP of several feeds by a three-steps procedure. The evaluated forages were algaroba (Prosopis juliflora, canafístula (Pithecellobium multiflorum, flor-de-seda (Calotropis procera, jitirana (Ipomea sp., juazeiro (Ziziphus joazeiro, mata-pasto (Senna obtusifolia, sabiá (Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia Benth, palma gigante (Opuntia ficus indica and xique-xique (Cereus gounellei, and the agroindustry byproducts were pineapple (Ananas comosus L., barbados cherry (Malpighia emarginata, cashew (Anacardium occidentale, coconut (Cocos nucifera L., melon (Cucumis melo, passion fruit (Passiflora eduli, grape (Vitis labrusca and anatto seeds (Bixa orellana L.. The feeds were incubated in rumen during 16 hours to determine the RUDP, and the residue was submitted to the digestion with pepsin solution during one hour, and pancreatic solution during 24 hours at 38ºC, those residues were analyzed for total nitrogen. The estimative of RUDP forage ranged from 13.37 to 83.6%, and the RUDP by-product ranged from 39.14 to 89.06%. The intestinal digestion of RUDP of the forages ranged from 26.09 to 80.68%, while for by-products varied from 22.26 to 76.82%. The sabiá was the forage that presented the highest intestinal digestibility and digestive rumen-undegradable protein (RUDPd, and the flor-de-seda, the lowest digestibility; while for by-products, melon and cashew presented, respectively, the highest values for DI and RUDP. The coconut presented the lowest values for ID and RUDPd. Although, some formulation systems of diets for ruminant consider that the RUDP present constant ID, the data obtained in this work suggest variation among the different feeds.A pesquisa objetivou estimar a digestibilidade intestinal (DI da proteína não-degradada no rúmen (PNDR de alimentos por intermédio da técnica de três estágios. As forragens avaliadas foram algaroba (Prosopis juliflora

  17. Valor de uso e estrutura da vegetação lenhosa às margens do riacho do Navio, Floresta, PE, Brasil Use-value and phytosociology of woody plants on the banks of the Riacho do Navio stream, Floresta, Pernambuco State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Serafim Feitosa Ferraz

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi realizado na mata ciliar do riacho do Navio, Floresta (8º35' 60"S; 38º34'05"W, PE e teve dois objetivos: (a estimar o valor de uso de espécies lenhosas consideradas úteis por moradores do local e (b relacionar o valor de uso das espécies aos seus parâmetros fitossociológicos, estimados a partir de dados de 16 parcelas de 20×30 m, estabelecidas em cinco fragmentos florestais mais bem conservados. Os maiores conhecedores das plantas e seus usos foram considerados informantes-chave e os demais entrevistados integraram a comunidade em geral. Foram identificadas oito categorias de uso: construção doméstica, construção rural, medicinal, alimentação, forragem, tecnologia, energético e outros usos não madeireiros. A vegetação do local foi caracterizada pela presença de Ziziphus joazeiro Mart., Crataeva tapia L., Lonchocarpus sericeus (Poir. DC., Tabebuia aurea (Silva Manso Benth. & Hook. F. ex S. Moore, Geoffroea spinosa Jacq., Schnopsis brasiliensis Engl., Sapindus saponaria L., Albizia inundata (Mart. Barneby & Grimes e Triplaris gardneriana Wedd. Os entrevistados atribuíram usos para 34 espécies entre as quais destacaram-se com maiores valores de uso a T. aurea, com 6,44 para os informantes-chave e 4,10 para a comunidade em geral; Anadenanthera colubrina (Vell. Benan. var. cebil (Griseb Altschul., 4,81 para os informantes-chave e 3,53 para a comunidade em geral e S. brasiliensis, 4,25 para os informantes-chave e 4,47 para a comunidade em geral. O maior número de espécies conhecidas é utilizado para forragem, embora o maior componente do valor de uso total tenha sido as construções rurais. Os parâmetros fitossociológicos estimados não apresentaram correlação com os valores de uso atribuídos às espécies. A importância das formações ciliares foi ressaltada não só para a conservação dos recursos hídricos e para o atendimento das necessidades da comunidade local, mas como garantia de perpetua

  18. PERCEPÇÃO AMBIENTAL DE VISITANTES DA RPPN SERRA DAS ALMAS, CRATEÚS/CE: A ESCOLHA DA ESPÉCIE GUARDA-CHUVA COMO POTENCIAL EDUCATIVO E DE GESTÃO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Rianne Santana Alves

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho se baseia em Dietz e Nagagata (1997 que propõe o direcionamento de programas em educação conservacionista aos visitantes e comunidades do entorno das áreas protegidas utilizando-se de espécies que proporcionam rápida identificação com as pessoas, também chamados de espécies guarda-chuva. Partindo da ideia do uso de espécies guarda-chuva como forma de contribuir para a conservação, foram utilizados questionários como ferramenta para o estudo da percepção de visitantes (professores e público variado quanto a possível espécie que poderia ser símbolo da RPPN. Os questionários (67 foram aplicados entre os meses de agosto à dezembro de 2010, período caracterizado como de extrema seca. Os resultados obtidos foram: I quanto ao perfil do visitante: a referente ao gênero (67% mulheres e faixa etária (entre 16 a 25 anos; b procedência (33% Crateús/CE, 43% Fortaleza/CE e 24% Buriti dos Montes/PI; c formação: professores com formação diversificada (pedagogia, ciências biológicas e química. Os resultados obtidos para a espécie guarda-chuva para a área foram: a espécies botânicas: plantas xerófilas e bromeliáceas, juazeiro (Ziziphus joazeiro. b espécies da fauna: macaco-prego (Cebus apella. Vale destacar que, dos entrevistados, 75% desconheciam a área e o animal mais preferido (macaco-prego era de fácil visualização em uma das trilhas da RPPN. Tais resultados possibilitam o uso didático da espécie escolhida junto aos visitantes e população do entorno visando se estimular a biofilia, buscando estabelecer aspectos perceptivos e de sensibilidade ambiental na referida comunidade. O resultado da percepção para a definição de uma espécie guarda-chuva foi confirmado com a literatura especializada quanto a maior preferência por espécies antropomórficas e que despertam sentimento de compaixão, neste caso o primata (Cebus apella. Logo podemos refletir à respeito dos benefícios da escolha de uma

  19. Inventorization of some ayurvedic plants and their ethnomedicinal use in Kakrajhore forest area of West Bengal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Soumyajit; Shaw, Rupa; Bala, Sanjay; Mazumdar, Asis

    2017-02-02

    & Young shoots (24%), Leaves (18%), Fruits (13%), and Seeds (10%). The most frequent happening ailments are asthma and bronchitis, constipation and dyspepsia, diarrhea, dysentery, ulcer, rheumatism, arthritis, fistula and piles troubles. Most of the Plants (88%) had more than a single therapeutic use. The most important plant species on the basis of use value were Smilex ovalifolia, Emblica officinalis, Curculigo orchioides, Croton roxburghii, Asparagus racemosus, Ziziphus nummularia, Ichnocarpus frutescens, Cisssus adnata, Buettneria herbacea, Litsea glutinosa, Vernonia anthelmintica and Chlorophytum borivilianum. There was a strong agreement among the informants related to the usage of the plants (ICF 0.65-0.93). As per the standard literature in Ayurveda, maximum numbers of documented species (33) are found to be used for 'digestive system disorder' which is analogous to ethnomedicinal use (30), followed by 'skin related problem' i.e. 13 and 20 respectively. Results show that people living around Kakrajhore forest area hold valuable knowledge of the uses of plant resources and some of the ayurvedic plants represent an important component in local livelihood. Though the Kakrajhore Forest area is rich in medicinal plant resources but the species are susceptible to be endangered by intense exploitation by human communities. More in-depth investigations are required for plants with high UV values on their possible phytochemical and pharmacological activity. Apart from this, sustainable management approach and proper conservation strategy for the area is recommended by involvement of local communities and forest department. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Pleistocene and Holocene Iberian flora: a complete picture and review

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Sampériz, Penélope

    2010-05-01

    diversity and nuclei of population expansion during climatic ameliorations of the Pleistocene. The floristic composition, location and structure of glacial tree populations and communities may have been a primary control on these developments and on the origin and composition of Holocene scenarios. Refugial populations would have been a source, but not the only one, for the early Lateglacial oak expansions for example. From Middle to Late Holocene, inertial, resilient, and rapid responses of vegetation to climatic change are described, any time with regional and local differences. The role of fire, pastoralism, agriculture and other anthropogenic disturbances such as mining during the Copper, Bronze, Iberic, and Roman times must be also considered as an important factor of the current vegetation distribution. In fact, the Iberian Peninsula constitutes a territory where climatic, geological, biogeographical and historical conditions have converged to produce environmental heterogeneity, large biological diversity and ecosystem richness. A note of singularity: in comparison with other Mediterranean peninsulas, Iberia was, doubtless, particularly suitable for the survival and permanence of sclerophyllous elements of any kind (including Ibero-Maghrebian scrubs such as Maytenus, Periploca, Ziziphus,Withania, Lycium, and Calicotome), currently, during the Holocene, and even during glacial stages of the Pleistocene. However, no macro-remains of these taxa have been documented until Late Holocene chronologies, but the survival of other thermophilous species, such as Olea, reveals the existence of glacial refugia in the southernmost areas of Iberia. Over all, and dealing with plant species, the Iberian Peninsula is a land of survival.

  1. Notas sobre la flora de Colombia y países vecinos, II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dugand Armando

    1968-09-01

                       Lonchocarpus dipteroneurus Pittier.                                                ∆Pterocarpus acapulcensis Rose. Rhamnaceae.                     Colubrina heteroneura (Griseb. StandI.                                                Ziziphus cyclocardia Blake.                                                ∆Ziziphus saeri Pittier. Simaroubaceae.                 Simaba ferruginea St. Hil. B. - Especies que ya habían sido anotadas anteriormente en la flora Colombiana:Boraginaceae.                     Tournefortia maculata Jacq.                                                Tournefortia volubilis L. Cactaceae.                           Acanthocereus sicariguensis Croiz. & Tamayo.                                                Pilosocereus lanuginosus (L. Byl. & Rowl. Celastraceae.                      Schaefferia frutescens Jacq. Convolvulaceae.                 Ipomoea incarnata (Vahl Choisy. Euphorbiaceae.                   *Chamaesyce sanmartensis (Rushy Dugand. Leguminosae- Faboideae.                           Flemingia strobilifera (L. R. Br.                                                Machaerium bondaense Pittier.                                                Pterocarpus floribundus Pittier. Leguminosae- Mimosoideae.                      Senegalia guacamayo Britt. & Killip. Loranthaceae.                     Phthirusa adunca (Mey. Maguire.