WorldWideScience

Sample records for judgment artistic creativity

  1. Variability of Creativity Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroff, Xavier; Besancon, Maud

    2008-01-01

    The Consensual Assessment Technique (CAT), developed by Amabile [Amabile, T.M. (1982). "Social psychology of creativity: A consensual assessment technique." "Journal of Personality and Social Psychology," 43, 997-1013], is frequently used to evaluate the creativity of productions. Judgments obtained with CAT are usually reliable and valid.…

  2. Artistic creativity, artistic production, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzucchi, Anna; Sinforiani, Elena; Boller, François

    2013-01-01

    This chapter reviews the changes produced by age on various aspects of artistic painting, particularly creativity and actual production. Aging in trained painters is often accompanied by a decline in creativity, which in turn is due to the cognitive decline related to aging. It has been argued, however, that aging does not cause a decline, but only changes in style and content. The two views are not mutually exclusive, and we present examples illustrating both aspects. We also show that, in addition to cognitive changes, impairment of sensory organs, especially vision, and of the bones and joints, may also produce marked changes in an artist's production and style. We conclude by showing that finding ways to induce creativity in persons who do not consider themselves artists can be a way of stimulating creativity and contribute to successful aging. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Creative Artist 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Precious

    Introduction. A group that must absorb the attention of the communication ... overwhelming impact of language is felt in the devolvement ... Competence includes such things as the user's judgment ..... unprecedented distortion of what others wish, would have made ... pressure, to satisfy some employment requirement, etc, at.

  4. Creativity in Savant Artists with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pring, Linda; Ryder, Nicola; Crane, Laura; Hermelin, Beate

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often display impairments in creativity, yet savant artists with ASD are reported to produce highly novel and original artistic outputs. To explore this paradox, we assessed nine savant artists with ASD, nine talented art students, nine non-artistically talented individuals with ASD, and nine…

  5. Creativity in Artistic Education: Introducing Artists into Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, Free; Lombaerts, Koen; De Mette, Tom; Buffel, Tine; Elias, Willem

    2012-01-01

    Despite a more prominent role of arts education in the school curriculum, artistic creativity does not occur to a great extent in primary school practice. More opportunities for teachers to strengthen their know-how in the field of artistic creativity can therefore be considered important. Arts education projects focus on pupils' development of…

  6. Visual artistic creativity and the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilman, Kenneth M; Acosta, Lealani Mae

    2013-01-01

    Creativity is the development of a new or novel understanding--insight that leads to the expression of orderly relationships (e.g., finding and revealing the thread that unites). Visual artistic creativity plays an important role in the quality of human lives, and the goal of this chapter is to describe some of the brain mechanisms that may be important in visual artistic creativity. The initial major means of learning how the brain mediates any activity is to understand the anatomy and physiology that may support these processes. A further understanding of specific cognitive activities and behaviors may be gained by studying patients who have diseases of the brain and how these diseases influence these functions. Physiological recording such as electroencephalography and brain imaging techniques such as PET and fMRI have also allowed us to gain a better understanding of the brain mechanisms important in visual creativity. In this chapter, we discuss anatomic and physiological studies, as well as neuropsychological studies of healthy artists and patients with neurological disease that have helped us gain some insight into the brain mechanisms that mediate artistic creativity. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Neural networks involved in artistic creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowatari, Yasuyuki; Lee, Seung Hee; Yamamura, Hiromi; Nagamori, Yusuke; Levy, Pierre; Yamane, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Miyuki

    2009-05-01

    Creativity has been proposed to be either the result of solely right hemisphere processes or of interhemispheric interactions. Little information is available, however, concerning the neuronal foundations of creativity. In this study, we introduced a new artistic task, designing a new tool (a pen), which let us quantitatively evaluate creativity by three indices of originality. These scores were analyzed in combination with brain activities measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The results were compared between subjects who had been formally trained in design (experts) and novice subjects. In the experts, creativity was quantitatively correlated with the degree of dominance of the right prefrontal cortex over that of the left, but not with that of the right or left prefrontal cortex alone. In contrast, in novice subjects, only a negative correlation with creativity was observed in the bilateral inferior parietal cortex. We introduced structure equation modeling to analyze the interactions among these four brain areas and originality indices. The results predicted that training exerts a direct effect on the left parietal cortex. Additionally, as a result of the indirect effects, the activity of the right prefrontal cortex was facilitated, and the left prefrontal and right parietal cortices were suppressed. Our results supported the hypothesis that training increases creativity via reorganized intercortical interactions. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Psychostimulants and Artistic, Musical, and Literary Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Iain

    2015-01-01

    This chapter explores links between psychostimulants and creativity in the arts. These links are set in the context of an overview of the association between mind-altering drugs in general and specific branches of the arts, particularly literature. The economic impact of the psychostimulants both historically and in today's world has been substantial and this is mirrored in the culture of the countries involved with the trade in these special commodities. As with other families of addictive drugs, the psychostimulants are sought out more frequently than is the norm by creative individuals who then may represent the drugs in their art or associate the drugs with their creativity. The creative process is outlined and it is noted that if a drug helps at all with creativity then the specific properties of the drug may link it to a particular stage of the creative process. Stimulants are particularly associated with the evaluation and elaboration stage of the creative process and in particular nicotine and caffeine have been used in this way by writers when putting words on paper. The ability of psychostimulants to boost convergent thinking is the main mechanism at work but this is at a cost as divergent thinking is diminished. The other findings of note in this review are that particular venues based around the consumption of a psychostimulants can act as a creative hub-café culture in Paris and Vienna and early modern Europe-and that particular drugs can come to define an artistic grouping as with the Beats and the group around Warhol who had a preference for amphetamine. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Painter 11 Creativity Digital Artist's Handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Sutton, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    Jeremy Sutton is one of the world’s premier Painter artists (www.JeremySutton.com and www.PaintboxJ.com), and in this brand new edition of his best-selling Painter Creativity: Digital Artist’s Handbook, he shows you the methods and techniques he’s developed over the years to perfect his art and earn him the title of Corel Painter Master. This edition has been completely revamped to cover all of the new features in Corel Painter 11 and the Wacom Intuos4 pen-tablet, including: .. *The new Hard Media brushes .. *Complete visual summary of all brushes, new and old, in Painter 11 .. *Revised and up

  10. The Dark Side of Creativity: Biological Vulnerability and Negative Emotions Lead to Greater Artistic Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinola, Modupe; Mendes, Wendy Berry

    2009-01-01

    Historical and empirical data have linked artistic creativity to depression and other affective disorders. This study examined how vulnerability to experiencing negative affect, measured with biological products, and intense negative emotions influenced artistic creativity. The authors assessed participants' baseline levels of an adrenal steroid (dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, or DHEAS), previously linked to depression, as a measure of affective vulnerability. They then manipulated emotional responses by randomly assigning participants to receive social rejection or social approval or to a nonsocial situation. Participants then completed artistic collages, which were later evaluated by artists. Results confirmed a person-by-situation interaction. Social rejection was associated with greater artistic creativity; however, the interaction between affective vulnerability (lower baseline DHEAS) and condition was significant, suggesting that situational triggers of negative affect were especially influential among those lower in DHEAS, which resulted in the most creative products. These data provide evidence of possible biological and social pathways to artistic creativity. PMID:18832338

  11. Artistic Representation: Promoting Student Creativity and Self-Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autry, Linda L.; Walker, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a qualitative study on the use of artistic representation to promote students' creativity and enhance their ability to self-reflect. The researchers used self-reflection articles about artistic representation and responses to a questionnaire at the end of the semester. Three overarching themes, as seen through the lens of the…

  12. [Artistic creativity in the light of Jungian analytical psychology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trixler, Mátyás; Gáti, Agnes; Tényi, Tamás

    2010-01-01

    C.G. Jung's analytical psychology points at important issues in the psychological understanding of creativity. The theories of the Collective Unconscious and the Archetypes contributed to important discoveries in the interpretation of artistic creativity. Jung was concerned to show the relevance of Analytical Psychology to the understanding of European Modernism. Our paper deals with a short Jungian interpretation of Csontvary's art, too.

  13. Artists, Creativity and Knowledge: A Challenge for Doctoral Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Maggi

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to extrapolate the difficulties and challenges posed by ideas about creativity principally in the context of doctoral theses in which the practices of dance play a prominent, if not, pivotal role. While resisting definitive transparency, creativity is a crucial marker as much for postgraduate scholars as it is for artists. The…

  14. The evolution of human artistic creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morriss-Kay, Gillian M

    2010-02-01

    groups both within Africa and during global dispersal, leading to the regional variety seen in both ancient and recent art. At all stages in the evolution of artistic creativity, stylistic change must have been due to rare, highly gifted individuals.

  15. Behind the Scenes of Artistic Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemi, Tatiana; Jensen, Julie Borup; Hersted, Lone

    Throughout the literature of creative learning, many assumptions and even stereotypes about the artists’ creativity are nurtured, often according to myths going back to the Romanticism. The authors have been investigating and describing outstanding artists’ creativity and learning/working processes...

  16. Behind the Scenes of Artistic Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemi, Tatiana; Jensen, Julie Borup; Hersted, Lone

    Throughout the literature of creative learning, many assumptions and even stereotypes about the artists’ creativity are nurtured, often according to myths going back to the Romanticism. The authors have been investigating and describing outstanding artists’ creativity and learning/working processes...

  17. A New Proposal on Analysis of Artistic Creativity through Introspection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre d’Argyll

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The genesis of the creative process in Art is currently conceived as the intellectual selection by the artist of fragments of memory from her/his personal, cultural and emotional experience. Interpretation of the artistic object has been systematically developed from an external perspective of art history, literature, and fine arts or of medicine and psychology. Recent neurological findings on the molecular nature of memory have revolutioned the knowledge of the mental process of memorization, remembrance and creative synthesis. A movement of scientists defends the necessity of new tools to access mental processes, inherently subjective, such as artistic creativity. In the light of those evidences, we propose a new approach to the artwork starting from a first-person analysis, namely introspection, which offers an interpretation of the genesis of the artwork from his/her own memory. The scientific, philosophical and social background on the neuropsychological processes guiding the creative activity is reviewed. Our purpose is to integrate the previous approaches from a wide multidisciplinary perspective, and to pose a new reflection on how the autobiographical and intertextual data from the artist are modeled in a dynamic way in the complex net of mental interactions up to reach the creation of an artwork, which highlights an original new vision on the reading of art. This insight from first-person analysis might complement and enrich other analyses external to the artist.

  18. Effects of Evaluation Expectation on Artistic Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Teresa M.

    Conditions are examined under which the imposition of an extrinsic constraint upon performance of an activity can lead to decrements in creativity. Female college students worked on an art activity either with or without the expectation of external evaluation. In addition, subjects were asked to focus upon either the creative or the technical…

  19. Mind, Machine, and Creativity: An Artist's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Harold Cohen is a renowned painter who has developed a computer program, AARON, to create art. While AARON has been hailed as one of the most creative AI programs, Cohen consistently rejects the claims of machine creativity. Questioning the possibility for AI to model human creativity, Cohen suggests in so many words that the human mind takes a different route to creativity, a route that privileges the relational, rather than the computational, dimension of cognition. This unique perspective on the tangled web of mind, machine, and creativity is explored by an application of three relational models of the mind to an analysis of Cohen's talks and writings, which are available on his website: www.aaronshome.com. PMID:25541564

  20. Mind, Machine, and Creativity: An Artist's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, Louise

    2014-06-01

    Harold Cohen is a renowned painter who has developed a computer program, AARON, to create art. While AARON has been hailed as one of the most creative AI programs, Cohen consistently rejects the claims of machine creativity. Questioning the possibility for AI to model human creativity, Cohen suggests in so many words that the human mind takes a different route to creativity, a route that privileges the relational, rather than the computational, dimension of cognition. This unique perspective on the tangled web of mind, machine, and creativity is explored by an application of three relational models of the mind to an analysis of Cohen's talks and writings, which are available on his website: www.aaronshome.com.

  1. Building Blocks: Enmeshing Technology and Creativity with Artistic Pedagogical Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Katherine J.; Perry, Beth; Edwards, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    Using the analogy of children's building blocks, the reader is guided through the results of a research study that explored the use of three Artistic Pedagogical Technologies (APTs). "Building blocks" was the major theme that emerged from the data. Sub-themes included developing community, enhancing creativity, and risk taking. The…

  2. Virtual Studio Practices: Visual Artists, Social Media and Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie Budge

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Artists’ practices are varied. Two extremes include the need for complete solitude when working and others who seek social environments such as collaborations in communal studio settings. In addition to these real life studio practices new technologies and social media have made it possible for artists to use virtual studio practices in the process of developing creative work. Working virtually offers a range of interesting benefits for creative practice. This article explores the author’s recent experiences in virtual studio practices in light of the literature on this topic and considers the implications for creativity. It highlights five specific benefits in using virtual studio practices and considers possible limitations of working in such a manner. In exploring virtual studio practices and arguing the case for such ways of working, this article contributes to research and understandings about creative practice by discussing one artist’s reflective experience of using virtual studio practices.

  3. The creativity in the artist-childhood relationship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Jean Abes

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This work searched to examine the manifestations of creativity in the artist-childhood relationship. Our reflection took for theorical basis authors/researchers like André Malraux, Howard Gardner and Charles Baudelaire in parallel with three novels of occidental literature: Gogol’s O retrato, Machado de Assis’ Um homem célebre and Cantiga de esponsais. Why the “genius is such the childhood refounded”, like said the poet of Flores do mal? This is the interrogation that started the exam of this relationship. This way, the research questioned the absolut supremacy of the racional doing in the artistic creation trying to show a variable degree of influence of the imagination, unconsciousness or of an intruder element indenpendently of the knowledge. There would be like this in childhood and in certain artists an incompletude that “shine a lapse” and would allow an “invention of the possible”.

  4. The history of artistic creativity in psychotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klavora, Vlasta Meden

    2008-06-01

    The article deals with the question of artistic creativity in psychotic patients, focussing particularly on why it occurs and how interest in it developed. One of the main motivations for carrying out this study was to explore the idea of the connection between genius and insanity, which was accepted by one of the most important pre-Freud psychiatrists of the 19th century, Cesare Lombroso. The article describes the history of the first exhibitions and collections of artistic creations of psychotic patients, of which the most important is the collection of Hans Prinzhorn. It also conveys the influence of Adolf Wölfli, psychotic patient, who was one of the most notable creators and influenced the concept of art brut at the beginning of the 20th century.

  5. BUILDING BLOCKS: ENMESHING TECHNOLOGY AND CREATIVITY WITH ARTISTIC PEDAGOGICAL TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J.JANZEN

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the analogy of children’s building blocks, the reader is guided through the results of a research study that explored the use of three Artistic Pedagogical Technologies (APTs. ‘Building blocks’ was the major theme that emerged from the data. Sub-themes included developing community, enhancing creativity, and risk taking. The discourse of the paper centers on how selected APTs stimulate interaction, create social presence, and help develop community in the online post-secondary classroom. Additional findings are discussed and implications are presented.

  6. The artist speaks. Sigmund Koch on aesthetics and creative work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, M B

    2001-05-01

    Sigmund Koch is widely recognized as a prime mover of the radical transformation of psychology from a discipline dominated by behaviorism and related views to a multivalenced set of inquiries into human mentality and functioning. It is less widely remarked that Koch saw aesthetic endeavors as standing at the center of human life and thus warranting psychologists' closest attention. Koch's interest in aesthetics and art making is evident in his writings from the mid-1950s to the mid-1970s on different states of mind, the notion of value properties, and the theory of definition. Koch's study of creative work in the latter decades of his life with artists of high accomplishment was guided by a set of methodological signposts for the study of creative work, contains formulations relevant to contemporary psychoaesthetics, and generates significant questions for further inquiry.

  7. Creative competence, artistic expression and art therapy: new psychoeducational horizons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Chacón-López

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of creative competence, through artistic expression is being forgotten in recent times. Moreover, new practices such as art therapy open the way from the field of psychotherapy to education to help fill these gaps by providing tools and strategies for both teachers and students for the integral development of individuals, promoting creativity and imagination, among others. This article discusses the importance of developing creative competence, through artistic expression and art therapy practices that have found benefits both in lifelong education, and clinical performance, helping to prevent or heal existing conditions, achieving improvement of individual and collective welfare. Resumen: El desarrollo de la competencia creativa, a través de la expresión artística está siendo olvidada en los últimos tiempos. Asimismo, nuevas prácticas como la arteterapia se abren camino, desde el ámbito de la psicoterapia al educativo, para ayudar suplir estas carencias, proporcionando herramientas y estrategias tanto al profesorado, como al alumnado, para conseguir el desarrollo integral de las personas, potenciando la creatividad y la imaginación, entre otras. Este artículo expone la importancia del desarrollo de la competencia creativa, a través de la expresión artística y de la arteterapia, prácticas que han constatado beneficios tanto en los procesos educativos a lo largo de la vida, como en la actuación clínica, ayudando a prevenir o curar patologías existentes, consiguiendo una mejora del bienestar individual y colectivo.

  8. Estimating Creativity with a Multiple-Measurement Approach within Scientific and Artistic Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnoli, Sergio; Corazza, Giovanni E.; Runco, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the structure and the composition of a newly developed multifaceted test battery for the measurement of creativity within scientific and artistic domains. By integrating existing procedures for the evaluation of creativity, the new battery promises to become a comprehensive assessment of creativity, encompassing both…

  9. Different brain structures associated with artistic and scientific creativity: a voxel-based morphometry study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Baoguo; Cao, Xiaoqing; Chen, Qunlin; Zhuang, Kaixiang; Qiu, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Creativity is the ability to produce original and valuable ideas or behaviors. In real life, artistic and scientific creativity promoted the development of human civilization; however, to date, no studies have systematically investigated differences in the brain structures responsible for artistic and scientific creativity in a large sample. Using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), this study identified differences in regional gray matter volume (GMV) across the brain between artistic and scientific creativity (assessed by the Creative Achievement Questionnaire) in 356 young, healthy subjects. The results showed that artistic creativity was significantly negatively associated with the regional GMV of the supplementary motor area (SMA) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). In contrast, scientific creativity was significantly positively correlated with the regional GMV of the left middle frontal gyrus (MFG) and left inferior occipital gyrus (IOG). Overall, artistic creativity was associated with the salience network (SN), whereas scientific creativity was associated with the executive attention network and semantic processing. These results may provide an effective marker that can be used to predict and evaluate individuals’ creative performance in the fields of science and art. PMID:28220826

  10. Creative Artist: A Journal of Theatre and Media Studies - Vol 10, No ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Creative Artist: A Journal of Theatre and Media Studies - Vol 10, No 1 (2016). Journal Home > Archives > Vol 10, No 1 (2016) ... Community theatre and development practices in Nyanza Region, Kenya · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE ...

  11. Turn-based evolution in a simplified model of artistic creative process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlstedt, Palle

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary computation has often been presented as a possible model for creativity in computers. In this paper, evolution is discussed in the light of a theoretical model of human artistic process, recently presented by the author. Some crucial differences between human artistic creativity...... and natural evolution are observed and discussed, also in the light of other creative processes occurring in nature. As a tractable way to overcome these limitations, a new kind of evolutionary implementation of creativity is proposed, based on a simplified version of the previously presented model......, and the results of initial experiments are presented and discussed. Artistic creativity is here modeled as an iterated turn-based process, alternating between a conceptual representation and a material representation of the work-to-be. Evolutionary computation is proposed as a heuristic solution to the principal...

  12. The Artists who Forged Themselves: Detecting Creativity in Art

    OpenAIRE

    Rajković, Milan; Milovanović, Miloš

    2015-01-01

    Creativity and the understanding of cognitive processes involved in the creative process are relevant to all of human activities. Comprehension of creativity in the arts is of special interest due to the involvement of many scientific and non scientific disciplines. Using digital representation of paintings, we show that creative process in painting art may be objectively recognized within the mathematical framework of self organization, a process characteristic of nonlinear dynamic systems a...

  13. Mind, Machine, and Creativity: An Artist's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Harold Cohen is a renowned painter who has developed a computer program, AARON, to create art. While AARON has been hailed as one of the most creative AI programs, Cohen consistently rejects the claims of machine creativity. Questioning the possibility for AI to model human creativity, Cohen suggests in so many words that the human mind takes a…

  14. Musical Creativity and the Subjective World of the Artist: the Context of Culture Creation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morshchakova Nataliia

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The problem of creating music in the light of postmodern artistic imitation of ideas is characterised by the compositional focus of attention to the expression of subjective meanings and ideas that actualizes the possibility of an intentional world of the artist, originality of creative thinking, the ability to specify and deepen semantic sphere-shaped piece. The personification of artistic meanings within subjective reality is related to the processes of objectification of artistic and aesthetic paradigms prevailing within the culture; defining the inner meaning of culture contextually, a creative person is able to understand the deep, concentrated essence of the cultural epoch or cultural form. A creator-man, who feels or is conscious of an internal impulse of culture, thinks contextually, creating new stories, images that outgrow the limits of the author’s subjective content, finding expression in interpreting the meanings of concepts.

  15. Artistic transmission in the Low Countries. De Grebber's creative imitation of Rubens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marloes W. Hemmer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article will focus on the transmission of artistic ideas and the importance of personal networks as an active force in shaping artistic phenomena. In this contribution I will concentrate on the transmission of Rubens’s artistic ideas and knowledge from the Southern to the Northern Netherlands, concentrating on the work of Pieter de Grebber. My contribution will emphasize how this young artist from Haarlem had access to Rubens’s artistic ideas and knowledge in a period that his work was not yet widely spread in the Northern Netherlands. It will give new insights into how networks and objects led to creative imitation with innovative results that constituted a vital contribution to history painting in the Northern Netherlands.

  16. Translating the Essence of Dance: Rendering Meaning in Artistic Inquiry of the Creative Arts Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manders, Elizabeth; Chilton, Gioia

    2013-01-01

    The authors used artistic inquiry to study intersubjectivity in a weekly, stimulated creative arts therapy studio experience for one year. They found that the conversion of meaning from the meta-verbal, imaginal, aesthetic language of dance and visual art into verbal and textual discourse required complex translational processes. Personal…

  17. Enhancing Children's Artistic and Creative Thinking and Drawing Performance through Appreciating Picture Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ching-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate methods of enhancing kindergarteners' artistic creative thinking and expressive drawing through an activity that involved appreciation of picture books. The study was conducted in a public kindergarten in southern Taiwan, with 27 children aged between 4 and 5. The researcher conducted the study in 16…

  18. Negotiating the Paradox of Creative Autonomy in the Making of Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kerry; Chan, Janet

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a longitudinal study of the making of artists within an Australian university art school. It investigates the ways in which creativity is conceptualized and expressed by art students. The study makes use of Pierre Bourdieu's concepts of habitus, field, and capital to theorize the development and…

  19. Negotiating the Paradox of Creative Autonomy in the Making of Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kerry; Chan, Janet

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a longitudinal study of the making of artists within an Australian university art school. It investigates the ways in which creativity is conceptualized and expressed by art students. The study makes use of Pierre Bourdieu's concepts of habitus, field, and capital to theorize the development and maintenance of…

  20. Negotiating the Paradox of Creative Autonomy in the Making of Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kerry; Chan, Janet

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a longitudinal study of the making of artists within an Australian university art school. It investigates the ways in which creativity is conceptualized and expressed by art students. The study makes use of Pierre Bourdieu's concepts of habitus, field, and capital to theorize the development and maintenance of…

  1. Bloggers and Webcomic Artists: Careers in Online Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liming, Drew

    2012-01-01

    The expansion of the Internet has created many new opportunities for people to share their talents. Many people share just for fun--but some do it for fun and money. Online, these artists can reach a global audience. The rapid growth of online media excites many people working in the field. This article describes careers for digital media workers.…

  2. Parallel Appearance of Compulsive Behaviors and Artistic Creativity in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juho Joutsa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A 55-year-old male with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease developed three behavioral changes under combination therapy with selegiline, cabergoline and levodopa. Co-existent behaviors included severe pathological gambling, punding and novel skills in writing poetry (published poetry books. Brain [18F]fluorodopa PET imaging showed decreased tracer uptake in the striatum contralateral to the predominant motor symptoms, consistent with the clinical diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease. Uptake in the ventral striatum was markedly high. Brain MRI before and after behavioral changes showed no pathological findings. The patient was diagnosed as having Parkinson’s disease together with DSM-IV criteria-fulfilling pathological gambling and punding-like stereotyped behavior. There are no established criteria for the classification of emerged artistic creativity, although there are descriptions of the phenomenon in the literature. Inspired by the case, we conducted a preliminary survey – including 290 patients with Parkinson’s disease – exploring the possible relationship between creativity and impulsive-compulsive behaviors. The case, supported by the results of the survey, adds to the cumulative evidence of the association between dopaminergic medication and enhanced creativity, and suggests a possible linkage between increased artistic creativity and impulsive-compulsive behaviors in Parkinson’s disease. Furthermore, it could be speculated that the high mesolimbic dopamine function might relate to the behavioral changes observed in this patient, and is suggestive of the overlapping neurobiological mechanisms of compulsive behaviors and artistic creativity.

  3. Mood disorders and patterns of creativity in British writers and artists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, K R

    1989-05-01

    Extremes in mood, thought and behavior--including psychosis--have been linked with artistic creativity for as long as man has observed and written about those who write, paint, sculpt or compose. The history of this long and fascinating association, as well as speculations about its reasons for being, have been discussed by several modern authors and investigators, including Koestler (1975), Storr (1976), Andreasen (1978), Becker (1978), Rothenberg (1979), Richards (1981), Jamison (in press) and Prentky (in press). The association between extreme states of emotion and mind and creativity not only is fascinating but also has significant theoretical, clinical, literary and societal-ethical implications. These issues, more thoroughly reviewed elsewhere (Jamison et al. 1980; Richards 1981; Jamison, in press), include the understanding of cognitive, perceptual, mood and behavioral changes common to manic, depressive and creative states; the potential ability to lessen the stigma of mental illness; effects of psychiatric treatment (for example, lithium) on creativity; and concerns raised about genetic research on mood disorders. The current study was designed to ascertain rates of treatment for affective illness in a sample of eminent British writers and artists; to study differences in subgroups (poets, novelists, playwrights, biographers, artists); to examine seasonal patterns of moods and productivity; and to inquire into the perceived role of very intense moods in the writers' and artists' work. One of the major purposes of this investigation was to look at possible similarities and dissimilarities between periods of intense creative activity and hypomania. Hypothesized similarities were based on the overlapping nature of mood, cognitive and behavioral changes associated with both; the episodic nature of both; and possible links between the durational, frequency and seasonal patterns of both experiences.

  4. A meta-analysis of personality in scientific and artistic creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, G J

    1998-01-01

    Theory and research in both personality psychology and creativity share an essential commonality: emphasis on the uniqueness of the individual. Both disciplines also share an emphasis on temporal consistency and have a 50-year history, and yet no quantitative review of the literature on the creative personality has been conducted. The 3 major goals of this article are to present the results of the first meta-analytic review of the literature on personality and creative achievement, to present a conceptual integration of underlying potential psychological mechanisms that personality and creativity have in common, and to show how the topic of creativity has been important to personality psychologists and can be to social psychologists. A common system of personality description was obtained by classifying trait terms or scales onto one of the Five-Factor Model (or Big Five) dimensions: neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. Effect size was measured using Cohen's d (Cohen, 1988). Comparisons on personality traits were made on 3 sets of samples: scientists versus nonscientists, more creative versus less creative scientists, and artists versus nonartists. In general, creative people are more open to new experiences, less conventional and less conscientious, more self-confident, self-accepting, driven, ambitious, dominant, hostile, and impulsive. Out of these, the largest effect sizes were on openness, conscientiousness, self-acceptance, hostility, and impulsivity. Further, there appears to be temporal stability of these distinguishing personality dimensions of creative people. Dispositions important to creative behavior are parsed into social, cognitive, motivational, and affective dimensions. Creativity like most complex behaviors requires an intra- as well as interdisciplinary view and thereby mitigates the historically disciplinocentric attitudes of personality and social psychologists.

  5. Disentangling the Impact of Artistic Creativity on Creative Thinking, Working Memory, Attention, and Intelligence: Evidence for Domain-Specific Relationships with a New Self-Report Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunke, Katrin; Meier, Beat

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to take a new look at the relationship between creativity and cognitive functioning. Based on models that have postulated domain- and sub-domain-structures for different forms of creativity, like scientific, technical or artistic creativity with cognitive functions as important basis, we developed a new questionnaire. The Artistic Creativity Domains Compendium (ACDC) assesses interest, ability and performance in a distinct way for different domains of artistic creativity. We present the data of 270 adults tested with the ACDC, standard tests of divergent and convergent thinking, and tests of cognitive functions. We present fine-grained analyses on the internal and external validity of the ACDC and on the relationships between creativity, working memory, attention, and intelligence. Our results indicate domain-specific associations between creativity and attention as well as working memory. We conclude that the ACDC is a valid instrument to assess artistic creativity and that a fine-grained analysis reveals distinct patterns of relationships between separate domains of creativity and cognition.

  6. The Concept of the Oceanic Feeling in Artistic Creativity and in the Analysis of Visual Artworks

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    For several decades now, psychoanalytically oriented writers on art have used the concept of the oceanic feeling to designate feelings of oneness, limitlessness, and mania in artistic creativity and aesthetic experiencing. In this article, I examine critically the most influential account of the oceanic feeling in aesthetics, provided by art pedagogue and art critic Anton Ehrenzweig. Following his points of emphasis, I elaborate on the structural, perceptual, and affective aspects of oceanic ...

  7. Adaptation and cognition. II. Experimental study of the homospatial process in artistic creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, A; Sobel, R S

    1981-07-01

    In a previously reported experimental study from an ongoing program of research on the creative process, the type of cognition designated as homospatial thinking was shown to function in the creation of literary metaphor. Homospatial thinking consists of actively conceiving two or more discrete entities occupying the same space, a conception leading to the articulation of new identities. Under experimental conditions involving facilitation of homospatial thinking through presentation of superimposed visual images, and control presentation of the same images separated and side by side, the superimposed presentation stimulated significantly more creative literary metaphors. In the currently reported experiment, the effect of such stimuli on creation in the visual arts was assessed. Forty-three artist subjects were randomly assigned either to a control group viewing three sets of slide photographs paired side by side on a projection screen or to an experimental group viewing the identical pairs of slide images superimposed on each other. Each subject created a pastel drawing stimulated by each of the three slide pairs. Resulting drawings were categorized according to the type of composition produced and quality of all drawings were independently rated by two internationally prominent artists. The primary results were that drawings produced in the superimposed slide condition which contained elements from both slides intermingled together were rated significantly more creative than a single element composition and also more creative than similar composition drawings stimulated by the separated slide condition (p less than .05). Production of a final drawing in which individual components are recognizable and intermingled together in response to the superimposed stimulus condition indicates the operation of homospatial thinking involving elements occupying the same space. Consequently, the results indicate a relationship between homospatial thinking and creative visual

  8. School and the Cultural-Heritage Environment: Pedagogical, Creative and Artistic Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicela Ivon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper explores the idea that learning, both in and out of school, is a cultural act, and that school and its cultural-heritage environment stamp their own characteristics on pupils. This implies that pupils gradually, with the help of teachers and other relevant adults from their close social environment, develop and adjust their behaviour and lifestyle to their cultural and civilisational milieu. An integrative approach to learning and teaching, through the concept of “learning-centred teaching”, can be instrumental in this regard (Terhart, 2001. This approach aims at linking cognitive, social and moral teachings. According to this teaching concept, pupils learn to appreciate the value of their cultural-heritage environment by living and reliving its experience, while freely and reflexively nterpreting and becoming active participants in the culture of those who “learn about life by living” (Terhart, 2001. The relationship between school and its cultural-heritage environment is discussed from a creative and artistic perspective in the second part of the paper. By visually stimulating artistic expression when learning about the culturalheritage and natural environment of school, and through the concept of “action-centred learning”, we explain how pupils can be motivated to learn and display creative-artistic expression, and how they can be actively involved in their communities (participating in organising art exhibitions in their neighbourhood, working in museum workshops, etc.. Pupils’ art projects, inspired by the historical, cultural and natural heritage of their environment, confirm that such projects are an effective way of encouraging pupils’ identity development and sensitivity towards the arts. They teach pupils about the importance of preserving cultural heritage, which is one of the basic principles in the upbringing of future participants and creators of new cultural values. Children’s artistic works

  9. Izmail Organization of National Union of Artists of Ukraine as a Leading Creative Community in Budjak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Kara

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the leading activities of Izmail Organization of National Union of Artists of Ukraine. It is presented the specialists in the field of painting, drawing, arts and crafts, restoration and conservation of paintings, including the church art. Regional identity and multiculturalism are the principal features of the creativity of the Union representatives, who have significant number of regional, national and international exhibitions. Patriotic component is an essential priority of the cultural events, provided by the Organization. They are aimed at respecting the history, language, rites and customs of ethnic groups living in Budjak.

  10. 'The artist's piece is already in the stone': constructing creativity in paleontology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Caitlin Donahue

    2015-02-01

    Laboratory technicians are typically portrayed as manual workers following routine procedures to produce scientific data. However, technicians in vertebrate paleontology laboratories often describe their work in terms of creativity and artistry. Fossil specimens undergo extensive preparation--including rock removal, damage repair, and reconstruction of missing parts--to become accessible to researchers. Technicians called 'fossil preparators' choose, apply, and sometimes invent these preparation methods. They have no formal training, no standard protocols, and few publications to consult on techniques. Despite the resulting diversity of people and practices, preparators and their work are usually absent from research publications, making them 'invisible technicians' in Steven Shapin's sense. But preparators reject the view of their work as predictable or simple; in particular, many preparators value art training, the aesthetics of prepared fossils, and the process of creative problem-solving in their work. Based on interviews and participant observation and drawing from literature in science studies, sociology of work, and anthropology of craft, I ask why these technicians compare themselves with artists and how this portrayal affects scientific practice and social order in laboratories. I argue that associating artistry and creativity with their work distances preparators from ideas of unskilled technical work and technicians' low status, thus improving their social role in the laboratory community and preserving their power over laboratory practices.

  11. Origins of Genius: Darwinian Perspectives on Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonton, Dean Keith

    This study of creative genius argues that creativity can best be understood as a Darwinian process of variation and selection. The artist or scientist generates a wealth of ideas, and then subjects these ideas to aesthetic or scientific judgment, selecting only those that have the best chance to survive and reproduce. The book draws on the latest…

  12. Imagery as a core process in the creativity of successful and awarded artists and scientists and its neurobiological correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Aurora eChavez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This perspective paper presents an integration of neuroimaging and phenomenological data obtained in a sample that included highly creative, internationally awarded scientists and/or artists. The cerebral blood flow (CBF was evaluated during the performance of standardized creativity tasks from the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT Verbal Form. The phenomenological data comprised both, their experiences and processes related to their creative careers and their experiences during the performance of the creative thinking tasks during the acquisition of the brain imaging data. Highly creative individuals presented a significantly higher activation of areas involved in motor imagery and described that their creative process is frequently triggered by the spontaneous and often surprising emergence of what is being named here as primordial imagery: a sudden, multimodal, multiintegrative, highly condensed representation that is germinative, unleashing insight and multiple associations and possibilities for meaning. As evidenced in creativity, imagery is a process through which we perceive our own minds, allowing us further symbolization and access to our thoughts, possibly facilitating neural pathways.

  13. PROFESSIONAL JUDGMENT AND CREATIVE ACCOUNTING UNDER IFRS IN EX-COMMUNIST COUNTRIES: CASE OF ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MEGAN Ovidiu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The accounting rules from each country evolve in time in order to respond the social, cultural and economical environment needs. After some communist countries (as Romania, Bulgaria, Poland, Hungary, Czech Republic, Slovenia, Estonia, Lithuania, s.o. joined the European Union an important number of local companies became to apply accounting regulation according with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS. This paper surveys the theoretical and empirical literature on the possible risks for companies management from ex-communist counties by applying (mandatory or voluntary International Financial Reporting Standards reporting regulation and professional judgment. Under the pressure of economic globalization all the ex-communist countries ware obliged to adopt International Financial Reporting Standards in the field of accounting. The main objective of this paper is to find out from the experience of different companies who already adopted IFRS which are the risks related to professional judgment application under IFRS on the financial statement users. As research methodology we integrated theoretical and empirical studies from accounting and law (especially from Romanian experience in order to contribute to the cross-fertilization of our field of interest. As final results of our paper we find that the biggest risk of applying professional judgment prescribed by IFRS in ex-communist countries is to appear different creative accounting techniques which influence in a negative way the decision-making process for the financial statements users. During worldwide financial crisis the majority of Romanian companies tried to use in the most appropriate way the professional judgment in order to arrange their financial reports and to save company's money (in relation with local government or to show higher performance (in relation with financial institutions for the fund-raising process We identified several motivations including the existence

  14. Creative development in music education: from artistic genius to collaborative work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Aróstegui Plaza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article makes a review of the literature on the role of creativity in musical education. The field of creativity and its role to play in developing the curriculum is becoming increasingly important. The emergence of this topic is likely due to the need of giving a response from education to a world in constant change and in directions difficult to predict at present. Among the different existing trends on creativity research, this article is based on constructivism and sociocultural theory, emphasizing on creativity and motivation through subjects’ activity and the importance of collaborative work to understand the processes and outcomes of creative and musical performance. In the end, the conclusion is that musical learning should be based on creativity and this, in turn, is learned through social interaction.

  15. Artists and Writers Colonies: Retreats, Residencies, and Respites for the Creative Mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Gail Hellund

    This directory serves as a guidebook for selecting the most appropriate destination for a writer or artist who needs time and seclusion to pursue or complete his or her work. The directory contains nearly 200 entries, alphabetically arranged and cross referenced in easy-to-read listings--listings include colonies for playwrights, screenwriters,…

  16. 如何培养幼儿的艺术创造性%How to Develop Children's Artistic Creativity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程海玉

    2014-01-01

    Develop children's artistic creativity, imagination should use child-centered, teacher-led approach, in teaching, to provide a broad space for the children, creating a good atmosphere of music, encourage children in this relaxed atmosphere creating a bold, free play, and fully display themselves and fully express themselves.%培养幼儿的艺术创造性、想象力要以幼儿为主体,教师为主导的方针,教学中要为幼儿提供广阔的活动空间,为其营造出一个良好的音乐氛围,鼓励幼儿在这种轻松的氛围下大胆创编、自由发挥,充分展示自我,充分表现自我。

  17. The Exploration of Value System of Artistic Creativity in Enterprise%企业艺术创意的价值体系探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟

    2015-01-01

    艺术创意和科技创新是驱动我国经济转型的双轮。企业艺术创意的现实意义就在于把艺术创意拓展到我国企业的战略层面,为我国经济转型、企业结构调整和消费结构升级服务。企业艺术创意既有自身的“生态价值”,即自己的话语体系,但也必须以技术作为支撑。技术是企业发挥艺术创意价值的基础和前提。艺术创意的价值体系包括价值的创造与开发、价值的捕捉与挖掘、价值的实现与最大化。%Artistic creativity and technique innovation are the two kinds of impetuses for Chinese economy transition. Once artistic creativity of enterprise become to be an important item in business strategy in China, it would make an obvious impact on Chinese domestic economy transition, restructuring of enterprise and upgrading of consumption structure. Artistic creativity of enterprise has its own value system, however, it is necessary to take technology as its support. Advanced technology is necessary for the value of artistic creativity. The value system of artistic creativity is realized by three steps: (1) creation and development, (2) exploration and deepening, (3) realization and maximizing.

  18. From Alexander von Humboldt to Frederic Edwin Church: Voyages of Scientific Exploration and Artistic Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Baron

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Article in English, Abstracts in Spanish, German and English.Stephen Jay Gould wrote recently that “when Church began to paint his great canvases, Alexander von Humboldt may well have been the world’s most famous and influential intellectual.” Humboldt’s influence in the case of the landscape artist Church is especially interesting. If we examine the precise relationship between the German explorer and his American admirer, we gain an insight into how Humboldt transformed Church’s life and signaled a new phase in the career of the artist. Church retraced Humboldt’s travels in Ecuador and in Mexico. If we compare the texts available to Church and the comparison of Church’s paintings and the texts and images of Humboldt’s works we can arrive at new perspectives on Humboldt’s extraordinary influence on American landscape painting in the nineteenth century.

  19. Artistic and Scientific Creative Behavior: Openness and the Mediating Role of Interests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrine, Nicholas E.; Brodersen, R. Marc

    2005-01-01

    The arts and sciences have been identified as two specific domains that are dependent upon the creative process. A total of 369 undergraduate students served as research participants in two separate studies. In the first study, participants (N = 238) completed a measure of Openness to Experience (NEO-PI; McCrae & Costa, 1999) and a…

  20. Professional Game Artists: An investigation into the primary considerations that impact upon their work, and the effects upon their creative practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Fee

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article represents the author’s preliminary research into an area of creative practice that he pursued for some 20 years, namely that of a full time professional computer game artist. Initially collaborating with academics as a part time lecturer and industrial consultant, for the past eight years his roles within academia have focused on developing pedagogical models of professional practice within games education. Through his interaction with students, employers and graduates, the author began to identify an area of keen personal interest – namely, the actual realities of being a professional game artist, and the potential consequences on creative practice. In identifying the constraints and influences that direct such an artist’s work, it is the intention that a broader discussion may then follow, exploring how such artists can protect their creative muse, when the evidence would suggest that many aspects of the games industry are an absolute anathema to individual expression. In addition to his own experiences and research, the author has drawn on interviews with other professionals from games development, as well as artists who work in other areas of professional artistic practice (such as Fine Art, Illustration, and Comics. In this way his intention is to identify the areas of practice common to other areas of art, while highlighting any of the more unique elements present specifically within games development itself. While there is a large body or research into game design principles and technologies, there is very little discussion that focuses on the very people that make them. It is the author’s hope that this article plays some small part in starting to redress this balance, and may help the reader to appreciate the challenges such artists face.

  1. ARTISTIC CREATIVITY OF THE KADIWÉU PEOPLE: AN INTERVIEW WITH BENILDA VERGÍLIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    fabiola iuvaro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to interweave the different views on the contemporary Indian art through the testimony of Benilda Vergílio, Kadiwéu’s Indian, graduated in Design at Dom Bosco Catholic University. The analysis it takes as backdrop the controversies surrounding the anthropological symbolic approaches that over time have had full control and subjugation in the study of art in the anthropological perspective. In this study, conducted by interview with the artist, it was emphasized the cognitive action of art in native context, showing that it is necessary to discuss the essence and meaning of indigenous art, without leaving aside their own speech.

  2. A Portrait of the Artist as a Very Young or Very Old Innovator: Creativity at the Extremes of the Life Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Galenson, David W.

    2004-01-01

    Orson Wells made Citizen Kane, his greatest movie, when he was 25 years old; Frank Lloyd Wright designed Fallingwater, his most famous house, when he was 70. Contrasts as great as this raise the question of whether there is a general explanation of when in their lives great innovators are most creative. For each of seven artistic disciplines, this paper examines a major innovation made by a very young artist, and another made by an old one, with the goal of understanding the role of the artis...

  3. [Virginia Woolf as an example of a mental disorder and artistic creativity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa C, Gustavo

    2005-11-01

    This is an attempt to evaluate the mental disorder that the novelist Virginia Woolf suffered, and to determine the relationship between her creativity and her insanity. What mostly characterizes her illness is the presence of typical phases of severely impairing depression and significant hypomania, culminating in suicide at the age of 59. This is a convincing life history of a bipolar II disorder, although the "broad bipolar spectrum" is less easy to define operational than bipolar disorder I. She was moderately stable as well as exceptionally productive from 1915 until she committed suicide in 1941. Virginia Woolf created little or nothing while she was unwell, and was productive between attacks. A detailed analysis of her own creativity over the years shows that her illnesses were the source of material for her novels.

  4. How artists create

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botella, Marion; Glaveanu, Vlad Petre; Zenasni, Franck;

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to identify the factors that artists consider important for their creativity and to reconstruct, from interviews, the stages of their creative activity. For this purpose, 27 interviews with professional artists were analyzed using a double approach. First, a quantitative analysi...

  5. Portrait Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekely, George

    2010-01-01

    Children's portraits begin as a search for faces in objects, later in drawings, photos and videos. From a child's first line, trekking across a page to the circle representing a round head, young artistic life begins as a search for a portrait. Picturing oneself and the face of others is a lifelong journey. As with other creative ideas in…

  6. Differences in Judgments of Creativity: How Do Academic Domain, Personality, and Self-Reported Creativity Influence Novice Judges’ Evaluations of Creative Productions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Tan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Intelligence assessment is often viewed as a narrow and ever-narrowing field, defined (as per IQ by the measurement of finely distinguished cognitive processes. It is instructive, however, to remember that other, broader conceptions of intelligence exist and might usefully be considered for a comprehensive assessment of intellectual functioning. This article invokes a more holistic, systems theory of intelligence—the theory of successful intelligence—and examines the possibility of including in intelligence assessment a similarly holistic measure of creativity. The time and costs of production-based assessments of creativity are generally considered prohibitive. Such barriers may be mitigated by applying the consensual assessment technique using novice raters. To investigate further this possibility, we explored the question: how much do demographic factors such as age and gender and psychological factors such as domain-specific expertise, personality or self-perceived creativity affect novices’ unidimensional ratings of creativity? Fifty-one novice judges from three undergraduate programs, majoring in three disparate expertise domains (i.e., visual art, psychology and computer science rated 40 child-generated Lego creatures for creativity. Results showed no differences in creativity ratings based on the expertise domains of the judges. However, judges’ personality and self-perception of their own everyday creativity appeared to influence the way they scored the creatures for creativity.

  7. 艺术类文化创意产业园的景观设计%Landscape Design for Creative Artistic Cultural Industrial Park

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晶晶

    2016-01-01

    在经济多元化的今天,创意和创新在当下人们的生活当中占据着重要的位置。创意经济已经显现出巨大的发展潜力,艺术类文化创意产业园的景观设计就属于其中之一。针对艺术类文化创意产业园的景观设计,要注重创意与创新,在追求经济效益的同时,讲究艺术性。%Creative and innovation play more important roles in people’s lives in diversified economy nowadays. Creative economy is proven to have huge development potential, which includes the landscape design for the creative artistic cultural industrial park. Thus, the landscape design for the creative artistic cultural industrial park should attach importance to creativeness and innovation, and artistry and economic benefit should be focused on at the same time.

  8. Creative Consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok Natarajan

    2013-01-01

    Consciousness is creative. That creativity expresses in myriad ways – as moments in time in which decades of progress can be achieved overnight, as organizational innovations of immense power for social accomplishment; as creative social values that further influence the evolution of organizations and society; as the creativity of individuality in the leader, genius, artist and inventor; as social creativity that converts raw human experience into civilization; as cultural creativity that tra...

  9. Creativity

    OpenAIRE

    Kieran, ML

    2016-01-01

    This piece is an accessible introduction to thinking philosophically about literary creativity. The article characterises literary creativity, outlines types of creativity, looks at the role of canonicity and tradition, considers inspiration, irrationality and links to mental illness, how to think of literary creativity as a craft and the role that character plays in being creative.

  10. Creativity

    OpenAIRE

    Kieran, ML

    2016-01-01

    This piece is an accessible introduction to thinking philosophically about literary creativity. The article characterises literary creativity, outlines types of creativity, looks at the role of canonicity and tradition, considers inspiration, irrationality and links to mental illness, how to think of literary creativity as a craft and the role that character plays in being creative.

  11. Creative Artist 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Precious

    the male folk by being force to marry a man she does not love. Sofola sees this as .... Talk like a big V.I.P. Talk like that you hear! (Shouts at him). (46) ... feel hurt for a crime both young people committed. These .... Servant: Yes, my Lord. Queen:.

  12. Creative Artist 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Precious

    make-up designs that washed-off straight away. Among ancient .... would begin to fade or wear off. By the .... Finally, a broad leaf from the “Uburu” tree is warmed on the fire and ... recuperating, a cause called 'ehi' would fall on the incised man.

  13. Creative Artist 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Precious

    is important here is that her treatment of the issues, which are referred to, as ... king circa 1440 A.D. The Queen Sisters reveals the intra-gender politics that takes place .... theory by providing a means for improving both the quality and equality.

  14. Creative Artist 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Precious

    It is in this sense that the Ekuechi Festival has been perceived as facekuerade ... sin, a weapon of the devil, mother of guilt, corruption of the ancient” (Tavris and Offir, .... This coming from a young man in 1990 without a credible source raises ...

  15. Creative Artist 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Precious

    stipulated 'special education' for all such Nigerian children for the purpose of ... free and equal with normal children, it is sad to observe that majority of these ... and discrimination and are denied equal opportunities to develop in a healthy ...

  16. Creative Artist 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Precious

    The first time I read Tracie Chima Utoh-Ezeajugh's Forest of Palm Trees ... and other sundry problems. This unity ... buttressing the need for multilateral tackling of issues as Utoh- ..... than Ifeoma; in Igbo letters “o” and “q” are different vowels. 4.

  17. Creative Artist 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Precious

    rich, and expanding; in marked contrast to the black colleges downtown. The cast I had to work with were therefore of mixed racial origins, but predominantly middle-class: its ignorance of .... cars, nor that of the city outside, grouping with rising.

  18. Photomontage technique for artists using stereograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Patrick K.

    1994-01-01

    With more and more holographers using Stereograms, existing photographic techniques can be employed for creative uses. Using stereograms gives the artist/holographer new increased creative possibilities with fewer restrictions in subject matter. Photomontage techniques increase these possibilities even more.

  19. Creativity with Bill Moyers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marantz, Paula

    1982-01-01

    Outlines the purpose and content of the television series "Creativity with Bill Moyers." Programs explore creativity by investigating the way artists and other innovators express themselves in their work and in solving problems. (AM)

  20. The development of artistic creativity of children and the possibility of applying art plays in the free time pedagogy (aimed at pre-school age)

    OpenAIRE

    HOIDEKROVÁ, Hana

    2012-01-01

    The work deals with the creativity of preschool children, using art plays in the education of free time. The theoretical part focuses on creativity, its elements and levels. It describes the creative process and the factors influencing creativity. It looks at why it is important to develop creativity, what are the methods and the development of creativity. Characterizes the development of creativity of children, and what enhances their creative thinking and perception. Furthermore, it defines...

  1. Artistic Education Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Trine; Jensen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    The literature of cultural economics generally finds that an artistic education has no significant impact on artists’ income and careers in the arts. In artists’ labor markets, indefinable features such as talent and artistic creativity apparently contribute more to success or higher rates...... of payment than education and training. In this article, we will readdress this question by looking at the artists’ survival in the arts occupations. We find it reasonable to expect than an artistic education can have a significant impact on artists’ careers because of the importance of technical skills......, networks and signaling effects. We analyze the question by using a unique longitudinal dataset for five different groups of artists in Denmark, using the Cox model to apply survival functions and semi-parametric analysis. The results show, among other things, that an artistic education has a significant...

  2. How artists create

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botella, Marion; Glaveanu, Vlad Petre; Zenasni, Franck

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to identify the factors that artists consider important for their creativity and to reconstruct, from interviews, the stages of their creative activity. For this purpose, 27 interviews with professional artists were analyzed using a double approach. First, a quantitative analysis...... of interviews and associated self-report questionnaires was performed. Second, a qualitative coding grid was applied to a representative subset of the interviews to uncover stages of activity and the interaction between creator and the material and social world. Results are discussed according...... to the multivariate approach and in light of activity theory and its emphasis on situated, goal-directed and meaningful action. Findings concerning the creative process and the factors involved are finally considered with respect to teaching creativity and art....

  3. Creativity and other Fundamentalisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielen, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The magic word these days is 'creativity'. And not just for artists: managers and policymakers alike demand creativity. Even family therapists and mediators urge us to find more creative solutions. Nowadays, creativity is all about positive morality. We expect nothing but good from it. But what rema

  4. Creativity and other Fundamentalisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielen, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The magic word these days is 'creativity'. And not just for artists: managers and policymakers alike demand creativity. Even family therapists and mediators urge us to find more creative solutions. Nowadays, creativity is all about positive morality. We expect nothing but good from it. But what rema

  5. Creativity and other Fundamentalisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielen, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The magic word these days is 'creativity'. And not just for artists: managers and policymakers alike demand creativity. Even family therapists and mediators urge us to find more creative solutions. Nowadays, creativity is all about positive morality. We expect nothing but good from it. But what

  6. Creative Consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Natarajan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Consciousness is creative. That creativity expresses in myriad ways – as moments in time in which decades of progress can be achieved overnight, as organizational innovations of immense power for social accomplishment; as creative social values that further influence the evolution of organizations and society; as the creativity of individuality in the leader, genius, artist and inventor; as social creativity that converts raw human experience into civilization; as cultural creativity that transforms human relationships into sources of rich emotional capacity; and as value-based educational creativity that can awaken and nurture young minds to develop and discover their own inherent capacity for knowledge in freedom. Through such moments do society and humanity evolve. Education is society’s most advanced institution for conscious social evolution. Values are the essence of society’s knowledge for highest accomplishment. Education that imparts values is an evolutionary social organization that can hasten the emergence of that creative consciousness.

  7. Creativity and dementia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmiero, Massimiliano; Di Giacomo, Dina; Passafiume, Domenico

    2012-08-01

    In these last years, creativity was found to play an important role for dementia patients in terms of diagnosis and rehabilitation strategies. This led us to explore the relationships between dementia and creativity. At the aim, artistic creativity and divergent thinking are considered both in non-artists and artists affected by different types of dementia. In general, artistic creativity can be expressed in exceptional cases both in Alzheimer's disease and Frontotemporal dementia, whereas divergent thinking decreases in dementia. The creation of paintings or music is anyway important for expressing emotions and well-being. Yet, creativity seems to emerge when the right prefrontal cortex, posterior temporal, and parietal areas are relatively intact, whereas it declines when these areas are damaged. However, enhanced creativity in dementia is not confirmed by controlled studies conducted in non-artists, and whether artists with dementia can show creativity has to be fully addressed. Future research directions are suggested.

  8. Growing up as a Young Artist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekely, George

    2012-01-01

    "Growing Up as a Young Artist" is an illustrated book assignment that involves researching family scrapbooks, photo albums and films, and inquiring about family anecdotes for clues to one's artistic roots. Students creatively reflect on their early memories of imaginative events, as each page is filled with memories of creative activities they…

  9. The appearance of the artist to the people: the creativity, personality and malady of Alexander Ivanov (1806-58).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Vladimir; Witztum, Eliezer

    2005-02-01

    Alexander Ivanov was an outstanding Russian painter who lived in the middle of the nineteenth century, during the romantic period. He did not accept romanticism but instead tried to create his own original style, an ambitious combination of spiritual profundity and a manner of execution unparalleled in Western European art. Ivanov's intention and style are best reflected in his major work The Appearance of Christ to the People, a picture on which he worked for over 20 years. He painted more than 400 sketches of the picture while attempting to bring his masterpiece to perfection. At the end of his life Ivanov became disillusioned, renounced his strong religious conviction and became suspicious. This study examines the influence of his background, life story and personality on the creative process. From a diagnostic perspective, Ivanov's personality featured obsessive, narcissistic and schizoid traits. In his final years he suffered from a delusional disorder.

  10. The Insider Artist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monthoux, Pierre Guillet de

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this article is to examine the similarities between creative business leadership and successful artists and to illustrate how the label “outside artist” is a romantic myth. Design/methodology/approach – Making use of four cases in classical music history, this study...

  11. How is the artist role affected when artists are participating in projects in work life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    In Sweden, during the last decade, the artist has come to function as a creative resource in workplaces. There are two organisations, Skiss (Contemporary Artist in the Contemporary Society) and Airis (Artist in Residence), that organise projects for artists and coworkers. These projects are intended to have a positive effect on the well-being of organisations and their employees through artistic means, and the artist often focuses on the social interaction between the employees in their work. The artists' work involves frequent interaction with coworkers. The aim of this article was to describe how visual artists' roles as artists are affected by their engagement in artistic and social projects at workplaces in Sweden. The focus in the article is on the social interaction between artists and employees. The study is a qualitative narrative interview study with fine artists participating in different projects in work life. Since the artist's intervention is usually directed towards social relations in the workplaces, a social perspective on well-being is from a micro-sociological point of view. The categories in the interviews were how the artists worked with the projects, how the social interaction between artists and coworkers worked out, and how the artists evaluated the projects in relation to their ambitions. The results show that, many times, the artistic projects promote well-being in organisations and to some extent benefit the artist, but that the ability of the artists to actually function as artists can be problematic.

  12. How is the artist role affected when artists are participating in projects in work life?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Stenberg

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In Sweden, during the last decade, the artist has come to function as a creative resource in workplaces. There are two organisations, Skiss (Contemporary Artist in the Contemporary Society and Airis (Artist in Residence, that organise projects for artists and coworkers. These projects are intended to have a positive effect on the well-being of organisations and their employees through artistic means, and the artist often focuses on the social interaction between the employees in their work. The artists’ work involves frequent interaction with coworkers. The aim of this article was to describe how visual artists’ roles as artists are affected by their engagement in artistic and social projects at workplaces in Sweden. The focus in the article is on the social interaction between artists and employees. The study is a qualitative narrative interview study with fine artists participating in different projects in work life. Since the artist's intervention is usually directed towards social relations in the workplaces, a social perspective on well-being is from a micro-sociological point of view. The categories in the interviews were how the artists worked with the projects, how the social interaction between artists and coworkers worked out, and how the artists evaluated the projects in relation to their ambitions. The results show that, many times, the artistic projects promote well-being in organisations and to some extent benefit the artist, but that the ability of the artists to actually function as artists can be problematic.

  13. Incorporating the Creative Subject

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Endrissat, Nada; Kärreman, Dan; Noppeney, Claus

    2017-01-01

    draw on a case study of a North American grocery chain that is known for employing art-school graduates and other creative talents in creative (store artist) and non-creative shop-floor positions. The study shows that the brand is partly built outside–in through association with employees who embody...

  14. Imaginación creadora y procesos artísticos desde el Réquiem de Mozart en psicología del arte. Creative imagination and artistic processes from the Mozart Requiem in psychology of art.

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera Santacruz, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Creative imagination and artistic processes from the Mozart Requiem in psychology of art. Resumen.  Desde la psicología del arte se han trabajado algunos enfoques en miras de estudiar las artes de una manera diferente; dos de estos enfoques están ligados a la imaginación creadora que impulsa al artista a crear y consolidar la idea para sus obras y, por otro lado, se encuentran los procesos artísticos que son aquellas pautas que se deben seguir los artistas una vez tienen la idea para poder es...

  15. Suicide among eminent artists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preti, A; Miotto, P

    1999-02-01

    To evaluate suicide risk by profession among eminent artists data from Garzanti's Encyclopedia, a broad biographical repertory, were used. Six categories in the visual and literary arts were compared: architects, painters, sculptors, writers, poets, and playwrights. Only people whose deaths occurred in the 1800s or 1900s were included since it is likely that underestimation of suicide has been lower in the more recent centuries. A total of 59 suicides were observed in a sample of 3,093 people: this corresponds to a ratio of 1.90%. Suicides were 51 among men (ratio 1.75%) and 8 among women (ratio 4.30%). The comparison by profession indicates that poets and writers exceed the mean suicide ratio of the sample. Painters and architects, conversely, have a clearly lower risk than the mean. Mean age of suicides was 44 yr. (SD = 12), with writers being slightly older (48 yr., SD = 12) than other artists. Artists who died of causes other than suicide reach a mean of 65 yr. (SD = 10). Suicide among artists seems to have a peculiar pattern, clearly different from the pattern of the general population, wherein suicide risk is higher among men and older people. Adverse financial circumstances and the stress attributed to rejection of personal products may contribute to the specific risk of suicide among artists. The link between mental disorders, such as manic-depression, which imply a higher risk of suicide, and creativeness is discussed as a contributing factor.

  16. Neurophysiological correlates of artistic image creation by representatives of artistic professions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dikaya L. A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The steadily increasing demand for artistic professions brings to the fore the task of studying the phenomenon of art by researching the unique capacity of the human brain to create works of art in different spheres of creative activity. So far, only a few studies have investigated creativity-related brain activity in representatives of the creative professions. The aim of the empirical research was to study the neurophysiological correlates of artistic image creation by representatives of the artistic professions. The participants were 60 right-handed females aged 23-27, divided into three groups— artists (23 people, actors (17 people, and specialists who do not work in an artistic field (20 people. The mono-typing technique was used to model the creative artistic process. EEG signals were recorded in a resting state, and during four stages of the creation of an artistic image (viewing of monotypes, frustration, image creation, and thinking over the details from 21 electrodes set on the scalp according to the International 10-20 System. We analyzed EEG coherence for each functional trial at theta (4.00–8.00 Hz, alpha1 (8.00–10.5 Hz, alpha2 (10.5–13.00 Hz, and beta (13.00– 35.00 Hz frequency bands. For statistical analysis, we used MANOVA and post hoc analysis. We found that the neurophysiological correlates of creating an artistic image are different at different stages of the creative process, and have different features for artists and actors. The actors primarily show dominance of right hemisphere activity, while close interaction of the hemispheres distinguishes the brains of the artists. The differences revealed in brain cortex functioning when artists or actors create an artistic image reflect different strategies of imaginative creative work by representatives of these professions.

  17. Cross-Dressing: Educators as Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author asserts that if Teaching Artists "must excel both as educators and artists, mastering the theory and practice of both fields, as well as the unique theory and practice that lies at their intersections" (Larson 13), then teachers who embrace the arts must master the creative process and experience what it is like to be…

  18. Scientifically artistic - artistically scientific

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2013-01-01

    From 5 to 7 June, two Austrian high-school classes met in Graz (Austria) for the Art&Science@School project. Launched by Michael Hoch from the CMS collaboration, the programme aims to show them another face of science through art.       On the first day, 62 teenagers from the BORG and GIBS schools attended a masterclass, where scientists from the CMS institute HEPHY (Vienna) provided information on colliders and detectors at CERN and explained the principles of high-energy physics. The students even had the chance to analyse real CERN data sets to “find” new particles. They also discovered the close link between science and art over the centuries and how contemporary artists visualise modern science and technology today. On the second day, under the supervision of art teachers, the students created an artwork from idea and concept to realisation and presentation. “I was completely amazed by the standard of the four artworks and by ...

  19. Epilepsy through the ages: An artistic point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, Lady Diana; Rizvi, Syed; Téllez-Zenteno, Jose Francisco

    2016-04-01

    The historical allure of epilepsy transcends academic circles and serves as fascinating critique of the state of the times-its values, judgments, mythos, and people. Immortalized and laid bare in artistic renderings of epilepsy are societal truths, at times both disparately grandiose and grotesque. During the middle ages and Renaissance, the European discourse on epilepsy assumed religious fervor. Epilepsy was considered a demonic machination and its cure an act of divine intercession. A similar theme is found in the artistic depiction of epilepsy from the Inca and Aztec civilizations of that time. After the 19th century drew to a close, the ascendency of empiricism coincided with waning creative interest in epilepsy, with few paintings or pieces to capture insightful perspectives on the illness. In this paper, we review the relationship between art and epilepsy and present two contemporary paintings that convey current western perceptions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Creativity and bipolar disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maçkalı, Zeynep; Gülöksüz, Sinan; Oral, Timuçin

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between creativity and bipolar disorder has been an intriguing topic since ancient times. Early studies focused on describing characteristics of creative people. From the last quarter of the twentieth century, researchers began to focus on the relationship between mood disorders and creativity. Initially, the studies were based on biographical texts and the obtained results indicated a relationship between these two concepts. The limitations of the retrospective studies led the researchers to develop systematic investigations into this area. The systematic studies that have focused on artistic creativity have examined both the prevalence of mood disorders and the creative process. In addition, a group of researchers addressed the relationship in terms of affective temperaments. Through the end of the 90's, the scope of creativity was widened and the notion of everyday creativity was proposed. The emergence of this notion led researchers to investigate the associations of the creative process in ordinary (non-artist) individuals. In this review, the descriptions of creativity and creative process are mentioned. Also, the creative process is addressed with regards to bipolar disorder. Then, the relationship between creativity and bipolar disorder are evaluated in terms of aforementioned studies (biographical, systematic, psychobiographical, affective temperaments). In addition, a new model, the "Shared Vulnerability Model" which was developed to explain the relationship between creativity and psychopathology is introduced. Finally, the methodological limitations and the suggestions for resolving these limitations are included.

  1. Artistic Photography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    This group of photographs were taken using various kinds of darkroom techniques. Employing techniques like partial exposure, tone separation, enlargement and travelling exposure allows photographers to achieve special effects, adding strength of expression and an artistic flavor to their works.

  2. Neuropsychiatry of creativity.

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we review in brief the development of ideas that over time have tried to explain why some individuals are more creative than others and what may be the neurobiological links underlying artistic creativity. We note associations with another unique human idea, that of genius. In particular, we discuss frontotemporal dementia and bipolar, cyclothymic mood disorder as clinical conditions that are helping to unravel the underlying neuroanatomy and neurochemistry of human creativity....

  3. Art and Design Blogs: A Socially-Wise Approach to Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budge, Kylie

    2012-01-01

    Many images of the "artist" or "designer" pervade the media and popular consciousness. Contemporary images of the artist and creativity that focus solely on the individual offer a very narrow depiction of the varying ways creativity occurs for artists and designers. These images do not capture the variety of creative processes and myriad ways…

  4. Art and Design Blogs: A Socially-Wise Approach to Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budge, Kylie

    2012-01-01

    Many images of the "artist" or "designer" pervade the media and popular consciousness. Contemporary images of the artist and creativity that focus solely on the individual offer a very narrow depiction of the varying ways creativity occurs for artists and designers. These images do not capture the variety of creative processes and myriad ways…

  5. [Creativity and mental illness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihmer, Zoltán; Gonda, Xénia; Rihmer, Annamária

    2006-01-01

    It has been known for a long time that people with salient social and artistic creativity suffer more frequently from psychiatric illnesses than the average population. In their review paper, the authors assess the Hungarian and international scientific literature regarding the association of creativity and psychopathology. They conclude that contrary to the concept prevailing in the first part of the 20th century about the strong association between schizophrenia and creativity, the results of empirical research now unambiguously suggest that prominent social and artistic creativity is associated primarily with affective, and more specifically with bipolar affective illnesses. In addition, we already know that as regards the development of creativity, it is not the given affective (depressive, manic, hypomanic) episode which is important, but the hyperthymic or cyclothymic temperament structure which also predisposes for affective illness.

  6. 5 CFR 551.209 - Creative professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... performance of work requiring invention, imagination, originality, or talent in a recognized field of artistic... performed must be “in a recognized field of artistic or creative endeavor,” including such fields as music..., imagination, originality, or talent” distinguishes the creative professions from work that primarily...

  7. Supermarket Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekely, George

    2010-01-01

    As soon as they graduate from arm-length viewing in shopping-cart seats, children take off to adventure in aisles, touching just about everything. Kids will pocket fallen signs and lug unusual, empty shelves and packaging materials in hopes of taking them home. Kids recognize and compliment supermarket artists--stock clerks who create container…

  8. Magician Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekely, George

    2009-01-01

    Magic shows represent an authentic children's play turned into an art lesson. School art should accurately represent the unique qualities of children's art, incorporating children's experiences as young artists. An art lesson in school should not look and feel entirely different than art made outside of school. Unlike specialized adult art…

  9. ASSOCIATIVE THINKING AS A MARKER OF THE CREATIVE MAKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Vladimirovna SEMESHKINA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article raises the question of the need to draw constructive attention to the creative and control capabilities of associative thinking in creative activities. Analyzed associative background in the search for the origins of the artistic image, metaphor, hyperbole, insight metamorphoses object of creativity in the work process of the artist, architect and designer. 

  10. Neuropsychiatry of creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mula, Marco; Hermann, Bruce; Trimble, Michael R

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we review in brief the development of ideas that over time have tried to explain why some individuals are more creative than others and what may be the neurobiological links underlying artistic creativity. We note associations with another unique human idea, that of genius. In particular, we discuss frontotemporal dementia and bipolar, cyclothymic mood disorder as clinical conditions that are helping to unravel the underlying neuroanatomy and neurochemistry of human creativity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Artist's statement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Baillie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available I am equally interested in the ‘childless mother’, the ‘allmother’, and in fantasies of maternity as I am in the actual experience. Along these lines, I think in particular of the artists Frida Kahlo, Tracey Emin and Tabitha Moses. I sometimes think that the reality of motherhood can hinder art making, and that being a ‘mother artist’ has nothing at all to do with having children.

  12. The Creative Unconscious and the Pictorial Sign

    OpenAIRE

    Helliwell, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Within The Creative Unconscious and Pictorial Sign I explore the dialogue that exists between social language and personal expression to understand how creativity is mediated. I consider how the involuntary inventiveness of artistic creativity and the structuring function of language come to negotiate what artists can experience and represent. My Doctoral practice attempts to question the influence of orthodox postmodernist views and allow sensual and direct experiences to be located within i...

  13. Schizotypy, creativity and mating success in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Nettle, Daniel; Clegg, Helen

    2005-01-01

    There is an evolutionary puzzle surrounding the persistence of schizophrenia, since it is substantially heritable and associated with sharply reduced fitness. However, some of the personality traits which are predictive of schizophrenia are also associated with artistic creativity. Geoffrey Miller has proposed that artistic creativity functions to attract mates. Here, we investigate the relationship between schizotypal personality traits, creative activity, and mating success in a large sampl...

  14. Subjective experience of the creative process

    OpenAIRE

    Kocjan, Maja

    2012-01-01

    The subject matter of this bachelor's thesis is the creative process. In the first section I present some theoretical knowledge about creativity and the creative process found in literature. The theme of the second section of my thesis is the subjective experience of the creative process. The source of information for this part are the testimonies of artists, in particular of the two world renowned painters – Vincent van Gogh and Francis Bacon. Their statements reveal how far the creative pr...

  15. Artistic education matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Bille, Trine

    2017-01-01

    The litterature of cultural economics generally finds that an artistic education has no significant impact on artists' income and careers in the arts. In our research, we have readressed this question by looking at the artist' survival in the arts occupations. The results show that an artistic...... education has a significant impact on artists' careers inthe arts and we find important industry differences....

  16. The Phenomenon of Child Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Vladimir T.

    2011-01-01

    Children's creativity is different from the creativity shown by adults. Discovery for others, which is what adults do, results in technological, scientific or artistic advances that then become part of the general culture. Discovery for oneself is more subjective, and results in a change in the person rather than in the culture. Although adults…

  17. Artistic transparency

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2016-01-01

    As the Arts@CERN programme testifies, CERN is no stranger to the collision of science and art. Just before Christmas, the Slovak artist Ján Zoričák exhibited his glass artworks at CERN, some of which make use of crystals from the OPAL experiment. We take a look at the artist, the science that inspired him and the techniques that he uses.   It took 10 months to create the 22 glass artworks in the exhibition, six of which make use of lead glass from the calorimeter of OPAL, one of the four main LEP experiments. Ján Zoričák has been a glass sculptor for several decades. In his capable hands, glass seems to take on a new energy, as he uses the contrast in temperature when glass heated for up to 48 hours at extremely high temperatures is exposed to a very cold source until it fractures. The resulting cracks break up the homogeneity and regularity of the glass and play with light and shadow, an effect that is majestically reinforced by finishing and polish...

  18. Creativity, Visualization Abilities, and Visual Cognitive Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhevnikov, Maria; Kozhevnikov, Michael; Yu, Chen Jiao; Blazhenkova, Olesya

    2013-01-01

    Background: Despite the recent evidence for a multi-component nature of both visual imagery and creativity, there have been no systematic studies on how the different dimensions of creativity and imagery might interrelate. Aims: The main goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between different dimensions of creativity (artistic and…

  19. Dreams and creativity--collaborative psychoanalytic work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, César A; Wellington, Augusta

    2002-01-01

    Walter Bonime's contributions to the understanding and interpretation of dreams highlight collaboration and creative effort as essential to achieve appropriate attunement and effective emotional growth. The authors incorporate the theoretical constructs and technical recommendations of Bonime into their clinical work with artists. They describe how creative psychoanalytic work with artists' dreams can promote productivity, spontaneity, emotional growth, and facilitate conflict resolution, functional regression, and affective regulation. Psychoanalytic theories on creativity and the creative personality are reviewed and case material is presented to illustrate some of the technical aspects of the collaborative interpretation of artists' dreams. The authors propose that the process of dream interpretation may also foster the functional regression characteristic of creative work and motivate artists to more freely create works of art. The critic's transference is defined, and with examples the authors show how the exploration of this transference may lead to decreased resistance by allowing a reparative experience to exist within the analytic setting.

  20. Creativity and Psychoactive Substance Use: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The role of psychoactive substance use in the research of artistic creation and creativity is a long-standing topic. Ever since the discovery of LSD, researchers have examined the relationship between the effects of chemical substances and the artistic creative process. The goal of the present study was to systematically review all published empirical publications and case reports in refereed journals that focused on the relationship between psychoactive substances and creativity/creative art...

  1. Take a Walk on the Wild Side, with Folk Artist Jack Barker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacruz, Elizabeth Manley

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the life and artwork of Jack Barker who became a folk artist after running a local gas station in Essex, Illinois. Explains that art educators view student interactions with folk artists like Barker as valuable because these artists embody a creative spirit and a thirst for knowledge about materials and processes. (CMK)

  2. Open Source And New Media Artists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katri Halonen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the open source method practiced within the new media art context. I present a case study on an international festival, PixelACHE 2005, which was organized by and for new media artists and served as a platform for demonstrations of new media projects and as a meeting place for experimental new media artists. In this article I discuss how new media artists adapted the open source ideology. Open source is seen both as a more liberal method of distribution and as an open joint creative process. I was particularly interested in what kind of motives the new media artists had for taking part in the PixelACHE festival and the joint artistic creative process. In my analysis, I found four different groups that have diverse motives for participating in open source art projects. One group contains the key persons who use the open source network as an important reference in their professional image. Members of the second and third group are new media artists who earn their main income in either the public or corporate sector and use open source projects as a learning platform. The fourth group comprises young enthusiasts who are seeking jobs and professional networking opportunities in the open source network.

  3. Artist's statement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Morgan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 1972. A new mother lives in a communal household. The group thinks that the state will wither away, capitalism too. When the group asks the mother to wean her baby, the better to share equally the responsibility of childrearing, the mother cries. The mother does not want to wean her child. The mother wants to be the primary caregiver. For the mother, this is the moment when the psychoanalytic enters the discourse, no Marx without Freud, no Lacan without Kristeva: in the new world, universal childcare will be necessary but not sufficient. The mother is Mary Kelly, the artist whose early career would cohere around soiled diapers, and whose practice has always been profoundly on the side of the maternal.

  4. Creative Technology and Rap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ien, Evelyn

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes how a linguistic form, rap, can evolve in tandem with technological advances and manifest human-machine creativity. Rather than assuming that the interplay between machines and technology makes humans robotic or machine-like, the paper explores how the pressure of executing artistic visions using technology can drive…

  5. Creative Technology and Rap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ien, Evelyn

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes how a linguistic form, rap, can evolve in tandem with technological advances and manifest human-machine creativity. Rather than assuming that the interplay between machines and technology makes humans robotic or machine-like, the paper explores how the pressure of executing artistic visions using technology can drive…

  6. Hiding in Plain Sight: Street artists online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Barbour

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Identity and privacy concerns related to social media are the subject of widespread academic enquiry and mass media reporting. Although in most circumstances academic research tends to present identity play and online self­presentation as positive, media reporting in Australia makes much of the risks of identity theft, privacy breaches and online predators. This research explores the phenomenological experience of creating an online persona, focusing particularly on street artists. For street artists, the threat of unwanted exposure has to be balanced with the positive implications of sharing their creative work outside its geographical and temporal constraints. I argue that street artists use complex persona­creation strategies in order to both protect and promote themselves. The two street artists discussed in this article experience their engagement with social media and digital networks in ways that offer new insight into the opportunities and problems associated with the presentation of a persona online.

  7. Thinking, Creativity, and Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSiano, Michael; DeSiano, Salvatore

    This document provides an introduction to the relationship between the current knowledge of focused and creative thinking and artificial intelligence. A model for stages of focused and creative thinking gives: problem encounter/setting, preparation, concentration/incubation, clarification/generation and evaluation/judgment. While a computer can…

  8. Brain Matters: Neuroscience and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Dean G.

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces a relationship between neuroscience and creativity for the sake of religious education. Citing creativity as a process that involves both originality and value, the writing articulates Howard Gardner's interplay between the talent of the person, the internal demands of a discipline, and the quality judgment of the field.…

  9. Brain Matters: Neuroscience and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Dean G.

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces a relationship between neuroscience and creativity for the sake of religious education. Citing creativity as a process that involves both originality and value, the writing articulates Howard Gardner's interplay between the talent of the person, the internal demands of a discipline, and the quality judgment of the field.…

  10. In the age of the teaching artist? What teaching artists are and do

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Ulvund

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The term teaching artist and the concept of teaching artistry developed in the USA in the 1970s, originating from artists performing this kind of work in New York City. Other terms, such as artist-teacher, creative agent, community artist, and others, are in use around the world. In Norway, the English term is often used; however, this author suggests the use of the Norwegian word “kunstnerlærer”. The review of recent research and literature, and observations of practice, recognizes the teaching artist as a professional artist working in and through the arts in an educational or community setting. Research in the practice field demonstrates that the teaching artist in programs and partnerships represent a new and effectual model for arts in education and community work, and a model acknowleding this is presented and discussed. The two first international teaching artist conferences (Oslo 2012, Brisbane 2014 confirm that a world community of teaching artists is emerging. However, the field has received relatively little attention from researchers, and the scholarship that does exist is limited to work in only a few countries. Coupled with the efficacy of the model, this study finds that there is a strong need for further exploration of ongoing and successful teaching artist practices, as well as a need for developing theory and concepts related to the competence needed by teaching artists. This article outlines a framework for teaching artistry and a definition of the teaching artist. In the context of the contemporary Norwegian arts and culture sector, the large potential in expanding teaching artistry practice are underscored.

  11. Madame Kara Walker, notre artiste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riché Deianne Richardson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available « Mon Ennemi, Mon Frère, Mon Bourreau, Mon Amour, » the epic exhibition at ARC/ Musée d’art moderne de la ville de Paris running from 20 June to 9 September, reveals the creative genius and vision of the artist Kara Walker, who was born in Stockton, California in 1969. The show is her most comprehensive one yet in Europe and includes the form that Walker has uniquely developed and for which she is best known, cut-out black silhouettes that are sometimes small and at other times gigantic and r...

  12. Half the Right People Network Density and Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Giuffre

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Social scientists investigating the attributes associated with creativity have for the most part confined their research to the study only of creative people. This re-search attempts to compare creativity with non-creativity by comparing creative with non-creative periods in the lives of three famously isolated creators (Emily Dickinson, Paul Gauguin, and Charlotte Brontë to argue that the social networks of the individuals are different during creative periods than during non-creative periods. By using the correspondence of each of the artists to construct social networks, it is possible to analyze the artist’s relationships with regard to density and betweenness and to compare those across creative and non-creative time pe-riods. The average network density of the first order zone network around each of the artists was 0.475 during periods of creativity. There was no correlation with a particular betweenness score.

  13. Creativity, visualization abilities, and visual cognitive style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhevnikov, Maria; Kozhevnikov, Michael; Yu, Chen Jiao; Blazhenkova, Olesya

    2013-06-01

    Despite the recent evidence for a multi-component nature of both visual imagery and creativity, there have been no systematic studies on how the different dimensions of creativity and imagery might interrelate. The main goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between different dimensions of creativity (artistic and scientific) and dimensions of visualization abilities and styles (object and spatial). In addition, we compared the contributions of object and spatial visualization abilities versus corresponding styles to scientific and artistic dimensions of creativity. Twenty-four undergraduate students (12 females) were recruited for the first study, and 75 additional participants (36 females) were recruited for an additional experiment. Participants were administered a number of object and spatial visualization abilities and style assessments as well as a number of artistic and scientific creativity tests. The results show that object visualization relates to artistic creativity and spatial visualization relates to scientific creativity, while both are distinct from verbal creativity. Furthermore, our findings demonstrate that style predicts corresponding dimension of creativity even after removing shared variance between style and visualization ability. The results suggest that styles might be a more ecologically valid construct in predicting real-life creative behaviour, such as performance in different professional domains. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  14. Parents’ Perception Concerning Artistic Practices in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen - Gabriela BOSTAN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research proposes to study concepts and practices aimed at school that have to support arts education as part of the key competence cultural awareness and expression. When we talk about this, we refer to the creative expression of ideas, experiences and emotions through a wide range of artistic means, among which we can mention music, performing arts, literature, visual arts, theatre, oratory, dance, painting, crafts, design and so on. The target group consists of parents of students in secondary education in many schools across the country. Research findings underline the need and importance of arts education in school in vision of parents. The artistic activities which take place in the school belong both in formal education when artistic elements are integrated within hours of the framework plan and the non-formal education, which takes place in the context of various thematic activities linked to historical events, cultural, local or in context of activities during the Week Otherwise program. Conceptions parents about art include references to creativity, personal development, imagination, discovery and development of talent child development expression and individual identity, variety of artistic experiences and means of expression, social skills, group work and interest in participating in cultural activities. In the view of parents, conceptualization of art being done through individual development of their children, relates to research and discovery of himself, awareness of behaviours existing (not necessarily artistic, accepting the impact that these have on becoming personal future of individuals and action to create patterns of behaviour and constructive thinking.

  15. Stable aesthetic standards delusion: changing 'artistic quality' by elaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian; Hesslinger, Vera M

    2014-01-01

    The present study challenges the notion that judgments of artistic quality are based on stable aesthetic standards. We propose that such standards are a delusion and that judgments of artistic quality are the combined result of exposure, elaboration, and discourse. We ran two experiments using elaboration tasks based on the repeated evaluation technique in which different versions of the Mona Lisa had to be elaborated deeply. During the initial task either the version known from the Louvre or an alternative version owned by the Prado was elaborated; during the second task both versions were elaborated in a comparative fashion. After both tasks multiple blends of the two versions had to be evaluated concerning several aesthetic key variables. Judgments of artistic quality of the blends were significantly different depending on the initially elaborated version of the Mona Lisa, indicating experience-based aesthetic processing, which contradicts the notion of stable aesthetic standards.

  16. Development of Creativity – An Investment to the Creative Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edita Dalia Rakauskaitė

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – Given the importance of the modern creative society, revealing the need for creativity in personality of education as a spiritual and intellectual elite exclusiveness, the role of visual expression, art, culture, historical knowledge and contemporary features, the teacher has the creator’s role of creativity in education in higher education institutions in Lithuania.Design/methodology/approach – Scientist literature reveals that creativity is the learner’s property and for that purpose, the universities adapt their original and innovative teaching and learning methods. Based on the case study, the author of this paper discusses the role of visual expression in fostering creativity, creative methods of education, and looks at Mykolas Romeris University subject’s called “Creativity ability and activities” curriculum.Findings – Creativity is not the exclusive property of talented people, but it is also available to each individual. Education and training can be an incentive and an obstacle to creativity. It is, therefore, necessary to create and adapt individual and original teaching and learning methods and an inquisitive society. A variety of methods is important in creative education. Education of art is the best way to reveal personal creativity. Teachers are artists, who provide a professional approach to their subject area. They are anexample of their life and work for a young person, the names of their famous universities in artistic creation, which is equivalent to faculty research scientists work.Research limitations/implications – The article provides an overview of only one subject in “Creativity ability and activities” methodology of creativity in the educational process. In addition, feedback of only one course student is included (N-90.Practical implications – In the creative process, students would see a positive selfassessment of their individual personality sides, understanding their own and other

  17. Artistic expression in teaching-learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, Barbara Backer

    2009-10-01

    The use of art to enhance teaching-learning in nursing has proven beneficial in the past. While there are variety of methods to utilize art in education that exist, the author discusses artistic expression, as described by the humanbecoming school of thought, being used for the first time during the final term of the senior year for nursing students. This artistic expression was part of a variety of assignments connected to the students' preceptor experiences. The author in this column demonstrates a profound coming to know and personal enlightenment through a reflective process that accentuates the importance of not only allowing, but encouraging creativity throughout a nursing curriculum.

  18. What grounds creativity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chessick, Richard D

    2005-01-01

    "Developmental or ordinary creativity" is distinguished from "genius creativity." The former offers pleasure or distraction. The latter sometimes offers this, but tarrying before the product of genius also brings a new understanding of one's culture, one's self, and even an experience of transcendence. The concepts of Heidegger and of Gadamer are applied to this distinction. All serious artists are seen as manifesting one or more of three aspects: (1) driven by creative genius from the biological furnace of the individual, (2) temporary regressions and exhaustion of ego function, and (3) an anxiety-driven process resting on a constitutional ability to shift levels of ego activities and compromise formations. Falling in love is discussed as another example of creative imagination based on the need to solve psychological discomfort either due to developmental or pathological problems. Creativity in psychoanalytic work is an important factor that needs to be explored in addition to the fact that every country seems to create the approach to psychoanalysis that it needs. Emotional illness is demonstrated as hindering and constricting creativity, not enhancing it as is the popular idea. Some seriously psychopathological artists are able to wall off the pathology and sublimate their conflicts into the production of art, but creativity requires a relatively intact ego; when the ego deteriorates, so does the creative product. An important spring to genius creativity is the nonrecognition of the extremely talented child, which leads to solitary activity and an immersion in ideas and fantasies that, if the person has the requisite talent, is manifested in the expression of truth and beauty through art.

  19. Creativity and destructiveness in art and psychoanalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Marsden, P. M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the creativity of the patient in analysis and compares it to that of the artist. Taking artists’ descriptions of their practices as its starting point, the paper suggests that the relationship between patient and analyst parallels that between artist and medium. Psychoanalysis and artistic process can both be seen in terms of a complex interplay between oneness and separateness in which aggression and destructiveness play an essential part. The paper includes a discussio...

  20. Schizotypy, creativity and mating success in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettle, Daniel; Clegg, Helen

    2006-03-07

    There is an evolutionary puzzle surrounding the persistence of schizophrenia, since it is substantially heritable and associated with sharply reduced fitness. However, some of the personality traits which are predictive of schizophrenia are also associated with artistic creativity. Geoffrey Miller has proposed that artistic creativity functions to attract mates. Here, we investigate the relationship between schizotypal personality traits, creative activity, and mating success in a large sample of British poets, visual artists, and other adults. We show that two components of schizotypy are positively correlated with mating success. For one component, this relationship is mediated by creative activity. Results are discussed in terms of the evolution of human creativity and the genesis of schizophrenia.

  1. Creativity, Psychoanalysis and Eugene O’Neill’s Creative Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Karim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available O’Neill is undisputedly one of the most autobiographical artists in modern literature. His creativity consistently moves around subjective exploration and autobiographical representation in his art. Therefore drama for him involves primarily dramatization of self and close relations such as mother, father and brother, and this association between life and art goes back to early amateur plays. This factor has exposed the artist to discreet psychoanalytic explorations and analysis. Clearly a depressive and predominantly oedipal pattern emerges in his writings that could be traced in the whole range of his plays. However, preoccupation with the self and pervasive obsession to dramatize peculiar relationships and psychic conditions create its own archeology of limitations in his art that have remained unaddressed so far. The study debates on creativity, psychoanalytic traditions of creativity, O’Neill’s creative process and highlights some of the limitations that pertain to representative and intellectual aspects of his art

  2. Artictis and creative development of junior schoolchildren during the labor education

    OpenAIRE

    Леся Василівна Старовойт

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with a topical problem of artistic and creative development of junior schoolchildren during labor process. There were considered the diverse aspects of problem of personal creative activity. The special attention was paid to importance of combining labor, creation and artistic activity in educational process. On the base of experimental research there was considered the modern state of artistic and creative development of pupils in elementary school. By analysis of the theor...

  3. Artictis and creative development of junior schoolchildren during the labor education

    OpenAIRE

    Старовойт, Леся Василівна

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with a topical problem of artistic and creative development of junior schoolchildren during labor process. There were considered the diverse aspects of problem of personal creative activity. The special attention was paid to importance of combining labor, creation and artistic activity in educational process. On the base of experimental research there was considered the modern state of artistic and creative development of pupils in elementary school. By analysis of the theor...

  4. A Pentagon of Creative Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasa Levickaitė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents five concepts of the creative economy based on creative economy theories and interpretations developed by five authors. John Howkins interpretation is based on the theory that the creative economy consists of fifteen creative industries (classified by the author. The creativity and economics is nothing new, but new is the relationship between them in its nature and extent. Broad interpretation of creativity led to the theory of creative class developed by Richard Florida. The creative class is a group of professionals, scientists and artists, whose existence creates economic, social and cultural dynamism, especially in urban areas. Richard Caves characterizes creative industries by seven economic properties and states that creative industries themselves are not unique, but sectors of the creative industries which are driven by creativity generate new approaches to business processes, new product supply and demand both in terms of economic and socio-economic development indicators of countries. Charles Landry has developed a concept of the creative city. The author argues that cities have the single most important resource - its people. Creativity substitutes the location, natural resources and access to the market, becoming a key engine in the dynamic growth of the city. This term is used to define a city where varied cultural activities are an integral part of economic and social functioning of the city. A theory developed by John Hartley is based on the concept of creative identities. The main factors behind the rapid growth of the creative industries worldwide are connected both to the technology and the economy. Digital revolution and economic environments in which this revolution took place has caused technological and communicational changes which have merged creating the conditions for the development of the creative economy. 

  5. Creativity Kills Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Susanne; Landgrebe, Jeanette; Sproedt, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    and entrepreneurial start-up phase into the efficiency-oriented scaling phase. Growth potential is highly dependent on private investors or the public innovation system which tend to be oblivious to the type of entrepreneur known as the creative, artistic-based the innovative entrepreneur, as the characteristic...... traits of such an entrepreneurial firm often entail a fuzzy product portfolio, which is not easily distinguished from the creative personality of the entrepreneur. Using the case of the Danish fashion entrepreneur Justian Kunz, whom we characterize as an innovative entrepreneur, we discuss...

  6. Artists-in-Labs: Processes of Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jill

    This book verifies the need for the arts and the sciences to work together in order to develop more creative and conceptual approaches to innovation and presentation. By blending ethnographical case studies, scientific viewpoints and critical essays, the focus of this research inquiry is the lab context. For scientists, the lab context is one of the most important educational experiences. For contemporary artists, laboratories are inspiring spaces to investigate, share know-how transfer and search for new collaboration potentials.

  7. 29 CFR 541.302 - Creative professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., originality or talent in a recognized field of artistic or creative endeavor as opposed to routine mental....” This includes such fields as music, writing, acting and the graphic arts. (c) The requirement of “invention, imagination, originality or talent” distinguishes the creative professions from work...

  8. Mental Imagery in Creative Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polland, Mark J.

    In order to investigate the relationship between mental imagery and creative problem solving, a study of 44 separate accounts reporting mental imagery experiences associated with creative discoveries were examined. The data included 29 different scientists, among them Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking, and 9 artists, musicians, and writers,…

  9. Emotional intelligence and emotional creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivcevic, Zorana; Brackett, Marc A; Mayer, John D

    2007-04-01

    Three studies examined the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and emotional creativity (EC) and whether each construct was predictive of creative behavior. It was hypothesized that the relationship between EI and EC corresponds to the relationship between cognitive intelligence and creative ability. Therefore, EI and EC were expected to be two distinct sets of abilities. Intercorrelations and confirmatory factor analyses supported the hypothesis. Furthermore, it was hypothesized that EC, but not EI, would correlate with behavioral creativity. Self-report measures of EC significantly correlated with laboratory and self-reported creativity measures in both studies, while ability measures of EC only correlated with self-reported artistic activity. EI was uncorrelated with creative behavior.

  10. Nadine Gordimer: The White Artist as A Sport of Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Temple-Thurston

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available This article applies principles of new historicism to show that A Sport of Nature can be read as Gordimer's attempt to persuade South African artists to reject mere protest art and to shift art beyond the trap of oppositional forces in South Africa's history today. The text calls instead—via fiction and the imagination—for a new post-apartheid art that will generate creative possibilities for a future South Africa. Gordimer's protagonist, Hillela Capran, is read as a metaphor for the white South African artist who, like Hillela, struggles for an authentic identity and meaningful role in the evolving history of South Africa. This paper asserts that A Sport of Nature boldly proposes the mutation necessary for the South African artist and people to resolve the political, personal, or artistic fragmentation, beckoning other artists along the path. Hope of its assured success, however, remains as elusive and unpredictable as any "sport of nature" must be.

  11. Frontal lobe neurology and the creative mind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Cruz De Souza

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Concepts from cognitive neuroscience strongly suggest that the prefrontal cortex (PFC plays a crucial role in the cognitive functions necessary for creative thinking. Functional imaging studies have repeatedly demonstrated the involvement of PFC in creativity tasks. Patient studies have demonstrated that frontal damage due to focal lesions or neurodegenerative diseases are associated with impairments in various creativity tasks.However, against all odds, a series of clinical observations has reported the facilitation of artistic production in patients with neurodegenerative diseases affecting PFC, such as frontotemporal dementia (FTD. An exacerbation of creativity in frontal diseases would challenge neuroimaging findings in controls and patients, as well as the theoretical role of prefrontal functions in creativity processes. To explore this paradox, we reported the history of a FTD patient who exhibited the emergence of visual artistic productions during the course of the disease. The patient produced a large amount of drawings, which have been evaluated by a group of professional artists who were blind to the diagnosis. We also reviewed the published clinical cases reporting a change in the artistic abilities in patients with neurological diseases.We attempted to reconcile these clinical observations to previous experimental findings by addressing several questions raised by our review. For instance, to what extent can the cognitive, conative and affective changes following frontal damage explain changes in artistic abilities? Does artistic exacerbation truly reflect increased creative capacities? These considerations could help to clarify the place of creativity - as it has been defined and explored by cognitive neuroscience - in artistic creation and may provide leads for future lesion studies.

  12. Reclaim your creative confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Tom; Kelley, David

    2012-12-01

    Most people are born creative. But over time, a lot of us learn to stifle those impulses. We become warier of judgment, more cautious more analytical. The world seems to divide into "creatives" and "noncreatives," and too many people resign themselves to the latter category. And yet we know that creativity is essential to success in any discipline or industry. The good news, according to authors Tom Kelley and David Kelley of IDEO, is that we all can rediscover our creative confidence. The trick is to overcome the four big fears that hold most of us back: fear of the messy unknown, fear of judgment, fear of the first step, and fear of losing control. The authors use an approach based on the work of psychologist Albert Bandura in helping patients get over their snake phobias: You break challenges down into small steps and then build confidence by succeeding on one after another. Creativity is something you practice, say the authors, not just a talent you are born with.

  13. Creativity and Creative Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Hunter, Craig A.

    2001-01-01

    A review of the linkage between knowledge, creativity, and design is presented and related to the best practices of multidisciplinary design teams. The discussion related to design and design teams is presented in the context of both the complete aerodynamic design community and specifically the work environment at the NASA Langley Research Center. To explore ways to introduce knowledge and creativity into the research and design environment at NASA Langley Research Center a creative design activity was executed within the context of a national product development activity. The success of the creative design team activity gave rise to a need to communicate the experience in a straightforward and managed approach. As a result the concept of creative potential its formulated and assessed with a survey of a small portion of the aeronautics research staff at NASA Langley Research Center. The final section of the paper provides recommendations for future creative organizations and work environments.

  14. Creativity and folk art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    2013-01-01

    of Ciocăneşti in northern Romania participated in 2 studies. Study 1 concerned the general stages of traditional egg decoration and their characteristics, and Study 2 took a closer look at variations associated with the activity path, the generalities and specificities of work, and how they could be accounted......This article explores creativity in craftwork using the case of Easter egg decoration, a folk art chosen for its traditional roots and diversity of artistic outcomes. This research contributes to the literature at (a) a theoretical level, by conceptualizing a pragmatist-inspired framework...... of creative activity; (b) a methodological level, by using, beside observation and interview, subjective cameras to record activity; and (c) an empirical level, considering the fact that creativity in folk art has often been a neglected topic. A total of 20 egg decorators of various ages from the village...

  15. Artistic Brain-Computer Interfaces: State-of-the-Art of Control Mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wadeson, Amy; Nijholt, Antinus; Nam, Chang S.

    2015-01-01

    Artistic BCI applications offer a new modality for humans to express themselves creatively. In this survey we reviewed the available literature on artistic BCIs by classifying four types of user control afforded by the available applications: selective control, passive control, direct control and co

  16. Artistic Brain-Computer Interfaces: State-of-the-Art of Control Mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wadeson, Amy; Nijholt, Antinus; Nam, Chang S.

    2015-01-01

    Artistic BCI applications offer a new modality for humans to express themselves creatively. In this survey we reviewed the available literature on artistic BCIs by classifying four types of user control afforded by the available applications: selective control, passive control, direct control and

  17. Artistic brain-computer interfaces: state-of-the-art of control mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wadeson, Amy; Nijholt, Anton; Nam, Chang S.

    2015-01-01

    Artistic BCI applications offer a new modality for humans to express themselves creatively. In this survey we reviewed the available literature on artistic BCIs by classifying four types of user control afforded by the available applications: selective control, passive control, direct control and co

  18. Artistic and Moral Imagination in "The Hundred Dresses" by Eleanor Estes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Claudia

    2002-01-01

    Argues that the story's two themes--a celebration of artistic creativity and a ringing denunciation of prejudice--are closely related through their reliance on the importance of imagination, both artistic and moral. Employs recent work in moral theory to analyze the way in which the resolution of Estes's story turns on the characters' growth in…

  19. There Can Be Only One: An Analysis of Operational Artists in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-05

    given. This creativity is the mark of the Operational Artist, fostered by experience and talent, and not bound by set doctrines or teachings .8 The art...request the means and construct the ways within his virtually autonomous theater of operations. A final example of the increased responsibility and...as an Operational Artist. The most critical analysis of GEN Westmoreland as an Operational Artist is his adjustments to the realities of a command

  20. Digital Technology and Creative Arts Career Patterns in the UK Creative Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comunian, Roberta; Faggian, Alessandra; Jewell, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we ask what role both digital and artistic human capital play in the creative economy by examining employment patterns of digital technology (DT) and creative arts and design (CAD) graduates. Using student micro-data collected by the Higher Education Statistical Agency (HESA) in the United Kingdom, we investigate the…

  1. Digital Technology and Creative Arts Career Patterns in the UK Creative Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comunian, Roberta; Faggian, Alessandra; Jewell, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we ask what role both digital and artistic human capital play in the creative economy by examining employment patterns of digital technology (DT) and creative arts and design (CAD) graduates. Using student micro-data collected by the Higher Education Statistical Agency (HESA) in the United Kingdom, we investigate the…

  2. Creativity in art and science: are there two cultures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Nancy C; Ramchandran, Kanchna

    2012-03-01

    The study of creativity is characterized by a variety of key questions, such as the nature of the creative process, whether there are multiple types of creativity, the relationship between high levels of creativity ("Big C") and everyday creativity ("little c"), and the neural basis of creativity. Herein we examine the question of the relationship between creativity in the arts and the sciences, and use functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore the neural basis of creativity in a group of "Big C" individuals from both domains using a word association protocol. The findings give no support for the notion that the artists and scientists represent "two cultures. " Rather, they suggest that very gifted artists and scientists have association cortices that respond in similar ways. Both groups display a preponderance of activation in brain circuits involved in higher-order socioaffective processing and Random Episodic Silent Thought /the default mode.

  3. Creatives Teaching Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustina, Charles; Sweet, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Creativity is very much in the forefront of current international economic news. As developing countries successfully vie with established economies for manufacturing and less-skilled jobs, the pressure is on the developed world to move on to the next economic break-through. Innovation and the creativity that drive it are seen as crucial to this…

  4. Contemporary Mamactivist Artists: A Forum on Maternal Activist Art for the Studies in the Maternal Special Issue on The Everyday Maternal Practice: Activist Structures in Creative Work, Summer 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie S. Loveless

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This special forum for Studies in the Maternal asks fourteen activist-mother-artists, or “mamactivists”, to respond to the following questions: (1 When and why did you start making activist/political work on the maternal? (2 What reception/reaction did you receive for the work? (3 What is the latest activist/political work you have made on the maternal? (4 What shifts do you see from this first work to this last work? and (5 Why is the maternal, in your opinion, important to activist, engaged, political art today? Responses highlight a range of geographic and cultural perspectives, as well as artistic strategies. One commonality between them is that they take the maternal not as a biological facticity, but a rich feminist site of political intervention.

  5. Memoirs of an Artist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mildred

    1987-01-01

    Chronicles the life of the author, a Black woman artist, from 1974 to 1979. The essay covers her years in Tampa from 1974-77, her Artist in Residency at Howard University from 1977-78, and her preparations in 1978-79 to leave for Paris, where she would live and work until 1985. (BJV)

  6. Tigers with Artistic Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Maureen

    2003-01-01

    Presents an art lesson used with sixth-grade students in which they painted their school mascot (a tiger) in the style of a famous artist. Explains that students selected an artist, such as Andrew Wyeth or Edvard Munch. Describes how the students created their tigers. (CMK)

  7. Near the Lake and around the Lake: Artists and Baikal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Tkacheva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article considers several aspects of how Lake Baikal influences artists’ work:Baikal as a theme for painting and exhibiting;Creative events at Baikal;Baikal as a place where artists live;Half-amateur paintings for sale.

  8. Contribution of artists in the formation of cinema space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skorik Elena

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the creative activity of artists from different eras, caused the birth and development of the cinema sphere. This study significantly expands our knowledge about the world history of cinematic art, its origins. It will also be of interest to the international cinema and art community for further multilateral study of the interaction of art and cinematic cultures.

  9. Autonomy of Artistic Expression for Adult Learners with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Graham C.

    2008-01-01

    When an art tutor adopts the role of assistant to a disabled artist it is difficult not to move from helping with the physical handling of materials on the one hand into the actual creative process on the other, thus influencing how the artwork looks. Ecas is an Edinburgh-based charity which promotes opportunities for physically disabled people to…

  10. Economic revitalization through the arts: the creative economy

    OpenAIRE

    Beate Becker

    2006-01-01

    Whether artists' lofts lure tourists or graphic designers enhance manufacturing, the benefits of the creative economy are everywhere. Today New England is learning the value of fully integrating this source of growth into economic-development agendas.

  11. Enhancing Cross-Cultural Participation through Creative Visual Exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodil, Kasper; Winschiers-Theophilus, Heike; Jensen, Kasper Løvborg

    2012-01-01

    Designers, like artists, fuse learned skills with intuition formed over their past experiences to unfold their creativity. Continuous interactions between the designers, their creations, and their informing and receiving environment lead to alignment and harmonisation. However, we observe that di...

  12. Costume and make up in cultural development | Abuku | Creative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Creative Artist: A Journal of Theatre and Media Studies ... in film or on stage, the audience can determine age, social status, personality, nationality, dislikes ... become effective tools for cultural promotion and development if well manipulated.

  13. Manageable creativity

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This article notes a perception in mainstream management theory and practice that creativity has shifted from being disruptive or destructive to 'manageable'. This concept of manageable creativity in business is reflected in a similar rhetoric in cultural policy, especially towards the creative industries. The article argues that the idea of 'manageable creativity' can be traced back to a 'heroic' and a 'structural' model of creativity. It is argued that the 'heroic' model of creativity is be...

  14. Ryoji Ikeda, Data Artist - Prix Ars Electronica Collide@CERN

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Koek, Ariane; Heuer, Rolf; Ikeda, Ryoji; Mr. Horst, Hoertner

    2014-01-01

    at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation, CERN. You are very warmly invited to the opening presentation of Data Artist, Ryoji Ikeda’s residency at CERN. Ryoji Ikeda, one of the world’s leading electronic composers and visual artists, is the new Prix Ars Electronica Collide@CERN award winner. Ryoji Ikeda and his science inspiration partner, Theoretical Physicist, Dr. Tom Melia will talk about their work in arts and science. They are at the beginning of their creative journey together at CERN. A little about Ryoji Ikeda – the new Prix Ars Electronica Collide@CERN artist in residence. Ryoji Ikeda focuses on the essential characteristics of sound itself and that of visuals as light by means of both mathematical precision and mathematical aesthetics. Ikeda has gained a reputation as one of the few international artists working convincingly across both visual ...

  15. Research Review: Doing Artistic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serig, Dan

    2012-01-01

    In this review, the author focuses on the pragmatic consideration: How do artists do artistic research? Artistic research in the context of this review is about the connections and relationships among three primary domains: (1) the arts; (2) higher education; and (3) arts education. Broadly stated, all artists do research when they do art--whether…

  16. [Visual art, creativity and dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, C; Allegri, R F; Martelli, M; Taragano, F; Rinalli, P

    2005-01-01

    Visual art is an expression of neurological function and how it organizes and interprets perception. The art is predominantly in the right hemisphere, in contrast, the left side, have inhibitory effects on artistic expression. In normal subjects, inhibitory and excitatory mechanisms could interact in a complex harmony, reflecting a paradoxical functional facilitation. Brain diseases such as dementia could change this harmony and then, alter the artistic abilities. Evaluate the art expression in the degenerative diseases. Artistic abilities of 3 painters with degenerative diseases were assessment. Patient 1: A 83 - year old right handed female, diagnosis: Alzheimer's disease. Artistic description: low productivity, simplified versions of earlier and alteration of the visuospatial organization. Patient 2: A 78-year-old right handed female, diagnosis: Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA); Artistic description: oversimplified drawings which maintaining overall spatial organization, without impair artistic skills. Patient 3: A 68 year-old right handed woman, diagnosis: Fronto-Temporal Dementia (FTD). Artistic description: Increased artistic activity, originality, freedom, utilization of intense colours with perseverative and repetitive copying of similar paintings of her own work. Visual art in Alzheimer's disease is a consequence of visuospatial and constructive disabilities. In contrast, the conservation of this cognitive functions and left asymmetrical involved, in FTD and PPA respectively, suggest artistic preservation, independently of the language injury. The disproportionate functional prevalence of the right over the left could lead to a release of novelty - seeking in art and can contribute to emergent creativity. These observations suggest an organization for art in the brain and proposed bases for further investigations in dementias.

  17. Creativity, brain, and art: biological and neurological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidel, Dahlia W

    2014-01-01

    Creativity is commonly thought of as a positive advance for society that transcends the status quo knowledge. Humans display an inordinate capacity for it in a broad range of activities, with art being only one. Most work on creativity's neural substrates measures general creativity, and that is done with laboratory tasks, whereas specific creativity in art is gleaned from acquired brain damage, largely in observing established visual artists, and some in visual de novo artists (became artists after the damage). The verb "to create" has been erroneously equated with creativity; creativity, in the classic sense, does not appear to be enhanced following brain damage, regardless of etiology. The turning to communication through art in lieu of language deficits reflects a biological survival strategy. Creativity in art, and in other domains, is most likely dependent on intact and healthy knowledge and semantic conceptual systems, which are represented in several pathways in the cortex. It is adversely affected when these systems are dysfunctional, for congenital reasons (savant autism) or because of acquired brain damage (stroke, dementia, Parkinson's), whereas inherent artistic talent and skill appear less affected. Clues to the neural substrates of general creativity and specific art creativity can be gleaned from considering that art is produced spontaneously mainly by humans, that there are unique neuroanatomical and neurofunctional organizations in the human brain, and that there are biological antecedents of innovation in animals.

  18. On the Cultivation of Students' Creative Thinking in the Education of Artistic Design%学生创造性思维在我院艺术设计教育中的培养

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯山

    2011-01-01

    大学艺术设计教育的重点应该从技术设计转为创意艺术设计,强调创造性思维的开发,突破单纯技艺传授的方式。着重培养学生的创造力,建立以培养创造型艺术设计人才为目标的教育体系。如何在艺术设计教学中有效地开发与挖掘学生的潜能、培养学生的创遣性思维,是现代高校教学改革项目中的一个重点课题。文章从平面艺术设计教学的实际出发,从三个方面探讨了如何培养学生的创造性思维。%Along with the rapid development of the undergraduate education of our college and the background of the big diversified information, the training of our creative talents with creative thinking has become one of the important links and one part in the process of teaching. But the years of teacher-training educational model of art dramatically restricts the cultivation of students' creative and original play. In this article, the author discusses how to train students' creative thinking from art design teaching reality in several aspects.

  19. [The mentally ill artist--a historical retrospect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergdolt, K

    1995-07-01

    The painting of the mentally ill has fascinated artists and their public throughout the 20th century. Yet the psychologically as well as art-historically interesting topic can be traced back over a long period in the history of Western culture. Aristotle emphasizes that all men who create great works, such as artists, philosophers, poets and politicians, are prone to melancholy, that excess of black gall which is characteristic of artists and depressive. Although Plato distinguished between creative and clinical mania, the topos of "genius and madness" prevails up to our century. The cult of melancholy is taken up bei Marsilio Ficino and becomes fashionable among the artists of the 16th and 17th centuries. During the Romantic period of the early 19th century the psychologically unstable or even sick intellectual and artist becomes the focus of attention. Artistic madness is glorified in an almost mystical fashion. However, disillusionment was soon to follow. Schopenhauer, Lombroso and many physicians stress the close relationship between genius and madness. However, they judge madness to be merely morbid and negative. During the 20th century the artists of the avantgarde show much interest in psychoanalysis and in the art of the mentally ill. The rise of National Socialism brought about a drastic break in the appraisal of the art of the mentally ill, which today is an acknowledged factor in contemporary art.

  20. Artistic profession: a potential risk factor for dopamine dysregulation syndrome in Parkinson's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwingenschuh, Petra; Katschnig, Petra; Saurugg, Ronald; Ott, Erwin; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2010-03-15

    A small proportion of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) develop a dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS). Management of such patients can be difficult; hence, early identification and careful monitoring of at-risk individuals are important. Based on four illustrative cases, we wish to draw attention to the risk of developing DDS in PD patients engaged in a creative and artistic profession, who compulsively abuse dopaminergic drugs to maintain or enhance their artistic creativity. Balancing the drug requirement for treating motor symptoms on one hand and improving creativity on the other hand has to be carefully evaluated and early neuropsychiatric intervention may be necessary. Apart from the known risk factors-young age at PD onset, male gender, heavy alcohol consumption, illegal drug use, and history of affective disorder-engagement in a creative or artistic profession may be an additional risk factor for developing DDS.

  1. The artist emerges: visual art learning alters neural structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Alexander; Alexander, Prescott; Fogelson, Sergey V; Li, Xueting; Lu, Zhengang; Kohler, Peter J; Riley, Enrico; Tse, Peter U; Meng, Ming

    2015-01-15

    How does the brain mediate visual artistic creativity? Here we studied behavioral and neural changes in drawing and painting students compared to students who did not study art. We investigated three aspects of cognition vital to many visual artists: creative cognition, perception, and perception-to-action. We found that the art students became more creative via the reorganization of prefrontal white matter but did not find any significant changes in perceptual ability or related neural activity in the art students relative to the control group. Moreover, the art students improved in their ability to sketch human figures from observation, and multivariate patterns of cortical and cerebellar activity evoked by this drawing task became increasingly separable between art and non-art students. Our findings suggest that the emergence of visual artistic skills is supported by plasticity in neural pathways that enable creative cognition and mediate perceptuomotor integration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Exploring the Domain Specificity of Creativity in Children: The Relationship between a Non-Verbal Creative Production Test and Creative Problem-Solving Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Ahmed; Maker, C. June; Lubart, Todd

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we explored whether creativity was domain specific or domain general. The relationships between students' scores on three creative problem-solving activities (math, spatial artistic, and oral linguistic) in the DISCOVER assessment (Discovering Intellectual Strengths and Capabilities While Observing Varied Ethnic Responses) and the…

  3. Effects of setting creative goals of different specificity on judged creativity of the product

    OpenAIRE

    Čorko, Irena; Vranić, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    The study examined the effect of setting creative goals of different specificity on judged creativity of the product. Female psychology students (N=47) were divided in 3 groups. Experimental task was to make a collage. Groups differed in the level of specificity of the given goal. Collages were judged by 11 judges using the consensual assessment technique. Factor analysis of these judgments confirmed 2 orthogonal factors: creativity and technical goodness. Results show that setting a specific...

  4. Artictis and creative development of junior schoolchildren during the labor education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Леся Василівна Старовойт

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with a topical problem of artistic and creative development of junior schoolchildren during labor process. There were considered the diverse aspects of problem of personal creative activity. The special attention was paid to importance of combining labor, creation and artistic activity in educational process. On the base of experimental research there was considered the modern state of artistic and creative development of pupils in elementary school. By analysis of the theory and practice of artistic and creative development of junior schoolchildren during labor education there was determined inexpediency of excessive reproductive approach to the labor activity of children that impedes emotional, spiritual and esthetic development transforming the work of children into the boring and ineffective one. There was determined the criteria of artistic and creative development of junior schoolchildren during the labor education. During the study there were defined principles that reveal content, essence and nature of creation. There were defined peculiarities of artistic and creative development of junior schoolchildren at the lessons of labor education and distinguished the main sings that characterize mechanism of creative activity of junior schoolchildren. There was grounded pedagogical expediency of artistic and creative approach to the work with junior schoolchildren

  5. Folklore, creativity, and cultural memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    This paper addresses the question of how folk art can be, simultaneously, a vehicle for cultural memory and cultural creativity. It takes the case of Romanian Easter egg decoration as a practice situated at the intersection between art, folklore, religion and a growing market, it order to unpack...... from an early age. At the core of this practice stands the depiction of patterned ornaments known as motifs. These ornaments are constitutive of identity and memory and their decorative features facilitate and encourage the creative expression of folk artists. Tradition in this sense is not by any...... means the opposite of creativity but the actual vehicle of creative activity and its understanding as a stable cultural system ‘engraved’ in collective memory needs to be challenged. The tradition of egg decoration in Romania is a living and evolving social practice that engages the self and community...

  6. Bipolar illness, creativity, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, A

    2001-01-01

    There have been in recent years increasing claims in both popular and professional literature for a connection between bipolar illness and creativity. A review of studies supporting this claim reveals serious flaws in sampling, methodology, presentation of results, and conclusions. Although there is therefore no evidence for etiological or genetic linkages, it is still necessary to explain interrelationships in those creative persons suffering from the illness. Examples of the work in progress of artists with bipolar disorder, Jackson Pollock and Edvard Munch, illustrate the use of healthy and adaptive creative cognition--janusian and homospatial processes--in the former's breakthrough conception during an improvement phase in treatment leading to the development of the Abstract Expressionist Movement and in the latter's transformation of an hallucination into his famous artwork "The Scream." Treatment options that do not produce cognitive effects are important for creative persons with bipolar disorder.

  7. Folklore, creativity, and cultural memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    This paper addresses the question of how folk art can be, simultaneously, a vehicle for cultural memory and cultural creativity. It takes the case of Romanian Easter egg decoration as a practice situated at the intersection between art, folklore, religion and a growing market, it order to unpack...... from an early age. At the core of this practice stands the depiction of patterned ornaments known as motifs. These ornaments are constitutive of identity and memory and their decorative features facilitate and encourage the creative expression of folk artists. Tradition in this sense is not by any...... means the opposite of creativity but the actual vehicle of creative activity and its understanding as a stable cultural system ‘engraved’ in collective memory needs to be challenged. The tradition of egg decoration in Romania is a living and evolving social practice that engages the self and community...

  8. Local Milieu in Developing China's Cultural and Creative Industry: The Case of Nanluoguxiang in Beijing

    OpenAIRE

    Jici Wang; Chun Zhang; Ching-Ning Wang; Ping Chen

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the role of creative milieu and cultural heritages in the development of Chinese cultural industry. Through case study of Beijing’s Nanluoguxiang, where several arts institutions and theaters concentrate, it depicts the birth and growth of a creative place for free artists in the institutional changing of Chinese cultural setting. Based on field survey data from artists, managers and visitors, it shows the spouting and growth of local creativities in a transitional econo...

  9. Rethinking Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Despite more than half a century of psychological research on creativity we are still far from a clear understanding of the creative process, its antecedents and consequences and, most of all, the ways in which we can effectively support creativity. This is primarily due to a narrow focus...... on creative individuals isolated from culture and society. Rethinking Creativity proposes a fundamental review of this position and argues that creativity is not only a psychological but a sociocultural phenomenon. This edited volume aims to relocate creativity from inside individual minds to the material...... literature on the topic. Chapters include reflections on the relationship between creativity and difference, creativity as a process of symbolic transformation, the role of apprenticeships and collaboration, the importance of considering materiality and affordances in creative work, and the power...

  10. 优化形象创意丰富表现情趣--论进一步提升公益广告传播效果的途径%On Public Service Advertising's Creative Techniques and Artistic Representation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    於贤德

    2015-01-01

    公益广告通过生动的艺术形象去展示生活中的真善美,鞭挞生活中的假恶丑,让受众在潜移默化之中受到感染和教育。而要进一步提升公益广告的宣传效果,就必须更好地遵循广告艺术的基本规律,更准确地把握形象感染的生动性与理论宣传的严肃性之间的内在关系,要求作品具有活泼的情调和丰富的趣味,能够对受众起到陶冶情操、激发活力、滋养情感、美化心灵的作用;还需要深入把握当代人的审美趣味和接受要求,把广而告之的传播途径,更为有效地转化为入眼入心、家喻户晓的传播效果,实现弘扬社会主义核心价值观的根本目的。%Public service advertising adopts the artistic techniques and promotion strategies of advertis-ing communication to display truth,virtue and beauty while condemning falsehood,vice and ugliness in daily life so as to persuade and educate audience through artistic images.Therefore,public service ads should be able to persuade through images by adopting the basic artistic representation forms,combining vivid images with serious messages.Public service ads must be both lively and meaningful so as to stimu-late,enrich and beautify audience's spiritual life.The contemporary audience's aesthetic tastes and recep-tion needs must be taken into account in creating public service ads to improve its effectiveness in promo-ting socialist core values.

  11. Creativity Ontology

    OpenAIRE

    Jordanous, Anna; Keller, Bill

    2012-01-01

    A set of concepts which each contribute to the meaning of creativity. Each component/factor represents an aspect which is a constituent part of creative activity or thought. The full Collection of CreativityComponents is a collective definition of Creativity.\\ud \\ud Based on a SKOS organisation of knowledge. \\ud \\ud See Jordanous and Keller 2012 (Weaving Creativity into the Semantic Web) for further details.

  12. Whose mind matters more--the agent or the artist? An investigation of ethical and aesthetic evaluations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelina Hawley-Dolan

    Full Text Available Theory of mind, the capacity for reasoning about mental states such as beliefs and intentions, represents a critical input to ethical and aesthetic evaluations. Did the agent cause harm on purpose? Were those brushstrokes intentional? The current study investigates theory of mind for moral and artistic judgments within the same paradigm. In particular, we target the role of intent for two kinds of judgments: "objective" judgments of quality and "subjective" judgments of preference or liking. First, we show that intent matters more for objective versus subjective judgments in the case of ethics and aesthetics. Second, we show that, overall, intent matters more for ethical versus aesthetic evaluations. These findings suggest that an "objective-subjective" dimension describes judgments across both domains, and that observers assign more weight to the mind of the moral agent than the mind of the artist when making the relevant evaluations.

  13. INTUITION AND CREATIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandr Viktorovich BONDARENKO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses modern approaches to the role of intuition as an important cognitive tool of creative pro-cesses; it considers the definition of «intuition» by the leading Russian philosophers and psychologists. Special attention is given to abstract-logical and spatial-figurative types of thinking. The article also touches upon the prob-lem of correlation between discursive (logical and illogi-cal in the learning process. It stresses the role of intuition in scientific and artistic creativity. It is concluded that intuition is a kind of overcoming sensual and rational levels in the cognition process, and thus, it is its highest level or one of the highest levels.

  14. Clinical Judgment: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Records, Nancy L.; Weiss, Amy L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the substantial body of research on clinical judgment and decision making in medicine and psychology and urges the incorporation of clinical judgment into the speech-language pathology field. The accuracy of clinical judgment, methods of its study, and suggestions for incorporating it into professional training are considered.…

  15. Judgments of brand similarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijmolt, THA; Wedel, M; Pieters, RGM; DeSarbo, WS

    This paper provides empirical insight into the way consumers make pairwise similarity judgments between brands, and how familiarity with the brands, serial position of the pair in a sequence, and the presentation format affect these judgments. Within the similarity judgment process both the

  16. Marking as Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Val

    2012-01-01

    An aspect of assessment which has received little attention compared with perennial concerns, such as standards or reliability, is the role of judgment in marking. This paper explores marking as an act of judgment, paying particular attention to the nature of judgment and the processes involved. It brings together studies which have explored…

  17. Marking as Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Val

    2012-01-01

    An aspect of assessment which has received little attention compared with perennial concerns, such as standards or reliability, is the role of judgment in marking. This paper explores marking as an act of judgment, paying particular attention to the nature of judgment and the processes involved. It brings together studies which have explored…

  18. Judgments of brand similarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijmolt, THA; Wedel, M; Pieters, RGM; DeSarbo, WS

    1998-01-01

    This paper provides empirical insight into the way consumers make pairwise similarity judgments between brands, and how familiarity with the brands, serial position of the pair in a sequence, and the presentation format affect these judgments. Within the similarity judgment process both the formatio

  19. Social Influences on Creativity: Interactive Effects of Reward and Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Teresa M.

    In a test of intrinsic motivation hypothesis of creativity, 60 undergraduate women did an artistic creativity task with either the expectation of receiving a reward or no expectation of reward. Reward was crossed with choice in task engagement, such that half of the reward Ss contracted to do the task in order to receive reward, and half simply…

  20. Creativity, brain, and art: biological and neurological considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidel, Dahlia W.

    2014-01-01

    Creativity is commonly thought of as a positive advance for society that transcends the status quo knowledge. Humans display an inordinate capacity for it in a broad range of activities, with art being only one. Most work on creativity’s neural substrates measures general creativity, and that is done with laboratory tasks, whereas specific creativity in art is gleaned from acquired brain damage, largely in observing established visual artists, and some in visual de novo artists (became artists after the damage). The verb “to create” has been erroneously equated with creativity; creativity, in the classic sense, does not appear to be enhanced following brain damage, regardless of etiology. The turning to communication through art in lieu of language deficits reflects a biological survival strategy. Creativity in art, and in other domains, is most likely dependent on intact and healthy knowledge and semantic conceptual systems, which are represented in several pathways in the cortex. It is adversely affected when these systems are dysfunctional, for congenital reasons (savant autism) or because of acquired brain damage (stroke, dementia, Parkinson’s), whereas inherent artistic talent and skill appear less affected. Clues to the neural substrates of general creativity and specific art creativity can be gleaned from considering that art is produced spontaneously mainly by humans, that there are unique neuroanatomical and neurofunctional organizations in the human brain, and that there are biological antecedents of innovation in animals. PMID:24917807

  1. Creativity, Brain, and Art: Biological and Neurological Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahlia W. Zaidel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Creativity is commonly thought of as a positive advance for society that transcends the status quo knowledge. Humans display an inordinate capacity for it in a broad range of activities, with art being only one. Most work on creativity’s neural substrates measures general creativity, and that is done with laboratory tasks, whereas specific creativity in art is gleaned from acquired brain damage, largely in observing established visual artists, and some in visual de novo artists (became artists after the damage. The verb to create has been erroneously equated with creativity; creativity, in the classic sense, does not appear to be enhanced following brain damage, regardless of etiology. The turning to communication through art in lieu of language deficits reflects a biological survival strategy. Creativity in art, and in other domains, is most likely dependent on intact and healthy knowledge and semantic conceptual systems, which are represented in several pathways in the cortex. It is adversely affected when these systems are dysfunctional, for congenital reasons (savant autism or because of acquired brain damage (stroke, dementia, Parkinson’s, whereas inherent artistic talent and skill appear less affected. Clues to the neural substrates of general creativity and specific art creativity can be gleaned from considering that art is produced spontaneously mainly by humans, that there are unique neuroanatomical and neurofunctional organizations in the human brain, and that there are biological antecedents of innovation in animals.

  2. Creativity, Schizotypicality, and Mystical Experience: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalica, Kerri; Hunt, Harry

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the commonalities and the differences between creativity and the schizophrenia spectrum. The variables measured were creativity, schizotypy, absorption, mystical experiences, spatial ability, balance, positive and negative presence, and neuroticism. Three community groups were recruited: 31 artists, 10 people with…

  3. Polygenic risk scores for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder predict creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Power, R.A.; Steinberg, S.; Bjornsdottir, G.; Rietveld, C.A.; Abdellaoui, A.; Nivard, M.M.; Johannesson, M.; Galesloot, T.E.; Hottenga, J.J.; Willemsen, G.; Cesarini, D.; Benjamin, D.J.; Magnusson, P.K.; Ullen, F.; Tiemeier, H.; Hofman, A.; Rooij, F.J. van; Walters, G.B.; Sigurdsson, E.; Thorgeirsson, T.E.; Ingason, A.; Helgason, A.; Kong, A.; Kiemeney, B.; Koellinger, P.; Boomsma, D.I.; Gudbjartsson, D.; Stefansson, H.; Stefansson, K.

    2015-01-01

    We tested whether polygenic risk scores for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder would predict creativity. Higher scores were associated with artistic society membership or creative profession in both Icelandic (P = 5.2 x 10(-6) and 3.8 x 10(-6) for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder scores, respectiv

  4. Reach for the Stars! Creative Engagement with Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martlew, Joan; Grogan, Deirdre

    2013-01-01

    Creativity is an area of great interest in the current context within the UK. It is fundamental to successful learning however somehow education removes our artistic and creative abilities and affects the development of important skills such as problem solving. This paper builds on the initial findings of an evaluation report conducted by a…

  5. Fostering the creative spirit in teaching-learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunkers, Sandra Schmidt

    2009-10-01

    This author describes creativity and the development of several curriculum projects fostering the creative spirit in the nursing academy as well as in other health sciences. It introduces Dr. Barbara Condon's column describing the use of artistic expression, framed by the humanbecoming school of thought, in a senior level nursing course at Briar Cliff University.

  6. [Edvard Munch: disease and genius of the great Norwegian artist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda C, Marcelo; Miranda C, Eva; Molina D, Matías

    2013-06-01

    Edvard Munch is one the most transcendental artists of all times. His work is innovative in terms of reflecting the grief, sadness, loneliness and the impact of death in human beings as no one did it before. Behind his work it is possible to find many clues given by Munch himself of the reason of his creativity: a childhood surrounded by death and sorrow, and the development of an affective disorder that led him to alcoholism and many hospitalizations due to psychotic episodes. In this review, we analyze Munch's life and his disease that undoubtedly contributed to his great artistic legacy.

  7. The Development of Future Technology Teachers’ Artistic-Projective Abilities: Foreign Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurach Mykola

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The necessity to form and develop future technology teachers’ creative abilities has been stressed in the article. The psychologic-pedagogical researches of the leading specialists from Europe, the USA and Japan in the field of creative work and creativity have been analyzed. The main problems of the creative artistic-projective abilities development have been determined based on the analysis and synthesis of foreign and native philosophic, pedagogical and psychological literature dedicated to characteristics of such notions as “creative work” and “creativity”. Approaches and conceptions providing students – future technology teachers – with creative activities have been singled out. The gist of psychological mechanism for forming teachers’ creative personality has been established and its basic features have been determined as a result of the world experience of the theory and methods of creative abilities development generalization. The main features are as follows: an independence and an inclination towards divergent behavior; flexibility of thinking and readiness for everything new; motivation for self-actualization; striving for self-expressing and ability to creative work; ability to find out how to set and solve the problems. It has been mentioned that the technology teachers’ artistic-projective activity requires their creative abilities development, which, in their turn, are formed on the ground of well-developed general and special (art, projective, technological, pedagogical potencies. Therefore, the effectiveness of the students’ art-projective knowledge and skills forming depends upon the extent their general, special and creative abilities have been developed. That is why skillful and pedagogically correct organization of future technology teachers’ artistic-projective activities will inevitably provide the higher qualitatively new level of their creative abilities and creativity.

  8. The Creative Stereotype Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Denis; Dunbar, Kevin N

    2016-01-01

    Because of its fundamental relevance to scientific innovation, artistic expression, and human ingenuity, creativity has long been the subject of systematic psychological investigation. Concomitantly, the far-reaching effects of stereotypes on various cognitive and social processes have been widely researched. Bridging these two literatures, we show in a series of two studies that stereotypes related to creativity can both enhance and diminish individuals' performance on a divergent thinking task. Specifically, Study 1 demonstrated that participants asked to take on a stereotypically uninhibited perspective performed significantly better on a divergent thinking task than those participants who took on a stereotypically inhibited perspective, and a control group. Relatedly, Study 2 showed that the same effect is found within-subjects, with divergent thinking significantly improving when participants invoke an uninhibited stereotype. Moreover, we demonstrate the efficacy of Latent Semantic Analysis as an objective measure of the originality of ideas, and discuss implications of our findings for the nature of creativity. Namely, that creativity may not be best described as a stable individual trait, but as a malleable product of context and perspective.

  9. The Creative Stereotype Effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Dumas

    Full Text Available Because of its fundamental relevance to scientific innovation, artistic expression, and human ingenuity, creativity has long been the subject of systematic psychological investigation. Concomitantly, the far-reaching effects of stereotypes on various cognitive and social processes have been widely researched. Bridging these two literatures, we show in a series of two studies that stereotypes related to creativity can both enhance and diminish individuals' performance on a divergent thinking task. Specifically, Study 1 demonstrated that participants asked to take on a stereotypically uninhibited perspective performed significantly better on a divergent thinking task than those participants who took on a stereotypically inhibited perspective, and a control group. Relatedly, Study 2 showed that the same effect is found within-subjects, with divergent thinking significantly improving when participants invoke an uninhibited stereotype. Moreover, we demonstrate the efficacy of Latent Semantic Analysis as an objective measure of the originality of ideas, and discuss implications of our findings for the nature of creativity. Namely, that creativity may not be best described as a stable individual trait, but as a malleable product of context and perspective.

  10. [The dishonest, the ignorant and the insane artists--psychopathography and other paths to soul of the artist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høyersten, J G

    2000-04-10

    Psychopathography is a specific kind of biography focusing on psychological and psychopathological aspects of the personality and their significance for creative activity, especially in famous persons. Psychopathography evolved as a discipline from the 1830's onwards, as a product of psychiatry emerging as a science, reflecting its reductionist and nosological approach. An illustration of this method is the analysis of the author E.T.A. Hoffmann, a prototypical representative of the German romanticism at the beginning of the century. Hoffmann himself expresses, in allegorical terms, the menacing, irrational and unconscious domains of the human soul. Romanticism may be seen as a forerunner of the psychoanalytic movement. Confronted with modernism in art, pathographic considerations were to a large extent based upon the object of art itself, often with arrogant and repudiating conclusions concerning the artist. Classical psychoanalysis has had a marked tendency to deduce a great deal about the personality of the artist or the writer solely from analysis of a picture or written text. The pathographic approach of the first century of scientific psychiatry has had a renaissance over the last 15-20 years: The ever increasing interest in affective syndromes has entailed a tendency to trace and identify affective pathology in artists and writers, deceased or alive, often emphasizing the affective dynamics of the creative process, aspects also noted by the classical pathographers. More recent studies of the creative personality may also present improved instruments for the study of the creative process.

  11. Young Artists@ CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    In view of 50th anniversary of CERN, about 20 young artists will be visiting CERN from 26 to 31 January to learn about the laboratory's research and the mysterious world of particle physics. The impressions they take home will be the main inspiration for the artwork they will then produce for an exhibition to be inaugurated in October 2004 as part of CERN's 50th anniversary celebration. We are looking for scientists who are interested in the Art-Science synergy and who can volunteer to discuss their work at CERN to these young artists during this week (25-31/01). Please contact renilde.vanden.broeck@cern.ch if you are interested. The project is called Young Artists@ CERN and for more information look at this website: http://www.hep.ucl.ac.uk/~andy/CERNart/

  12. Teaching Art and Design: Communicating Creative Practice through Embodied and Tacit Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budge, Kylie

    2016-01-01

    How do artists and designers teaching in universities communicate creative practice as they teach art/design? There is much discussion about the "mystery" of creativity, but little understanding of how teaching occurs in creative contexts. Understanding this topic better will develop greater knowledge within the academy of how art and…

  13. Democratizing Creativity: How Arts/Philosophy Can Contribute to the Question of Arts Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocavert, Carla

    2016-01-01

    This article critically deconstructs the 21st-century economization and massification of creativity. It extends the discussion of arts bias and the associated ideas that artistic creativity is institutionalized, elitist, and an obstruction to more profitable applications of creativity. A tension is thus highlighted between the historically…

  14. Update on artistic gymnastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overlin, Amy Jo F; Chima, Biljinder; Erickson, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Gymnastics continues to be one of the most popular and injury-prone sports in the United States. The National Collegiate Athletic Association cites women's artistic gymnastics as second only to spring football in its rate of injury during practices, and fourth overall when combining competition and practice injury rates. Because of the physical demands of the sport of gymnastics, a wide variety of injuries occur. This article reviews some of the most recent literature on the sport of artistic gymnastics. A broad differential may be required to diagnose correctly a presenting injury in a gymnast.

  15. Little Artists put on a Big Display

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    It has become a regular appointment for CERN people: the exhibition of naive and beautiful works made by young artists from the CERN nursery school. Physicists? Pianists? Teachers? They still don't know what they will be... some of them can hardly speak. But one thing's for sure CERN gives them the chance to discover and express their artistic aptitudes. And once a year they can proudly show their works to all CERN people. We are talking about children from le nursery school run by the CERN Staff Association, who are the creators of amazing works currently on display in the Main Building. To prepare for this very important appointment each class of young artists from 2 to 6 years old, have been hard at work for several months. Des élèves du Jardin d'enfants de 5 ans devant l'une de leurs oeuvres, un dinosaure en carton. Working together to express themselves in creative activities, such as drawing, pottery, music, musical movement, games, arts, and craftwork, children from all over the...

  16. Rethinking Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Despite more than half a century of psychological research on creativity we are still far from a clear understanding of the creative process, its antecedents and consequences and, most of all, the ways in which we can effectively support creativity. This is primarily due to a narrow focus...... on creative individuals isolated from culture and society. Rethinking Creativity proposes a fundamental review of this position and argues that creativity is not only a psychological but a sociocultural phenomenon. This edited volume aims to relocate creativity from inside individual minds to the material......, symbolic and social world of culture. It brings together eminent social and cultural psychologists who study dynamic, transformative and emergent phenomena, and invites them to conceptualise creativity in ways that depart from mainstream definitions and theoretical models existing in past and present...

  17. Stig Brøgger's Artists' Books

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørum, Tania; Hvis Kromann, Thomas

    Introduction and presentation of the many artist's books made by the Danish artist Stig Brøgger......Introduction and presentation of the many artist's books made by the Danish artist Stig Brøgger...

  18. Situative Creativity

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Creativity is crucial for the success of any company. IT support has been shown to foster creative processes, but still disregards characteristics that are typical for creative situations, such as the need for social, intuitive and face-to-face interaction. This thesis investigates requirements via interviews and explores and evaluates a novel concept for IT driven creativity support, based on a multi-touch tabletop display and coupled private mobile devices. Obwohl der Einsatz von IT erf...

  19. Landscapes. Artists' Workshop Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Penny; Roundhill, Clare

    This instructional resource, designed to be used by and with elementary level students, provides inspiration for landscape painting by presenting the work of six different artists. These include: "Fuji in Clear Weather" (Katsushika Hokusai, 1823-29); "The Tree of Life" (Gustav Klimt, c. 1905-1909); "The Waterlily…

  20. Physics for Animation Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, David; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2011-01-01

    Animation has become enormously popular in feature films, television, and video games. Art departments and film schools at universities as well as animation programs at high schools have expanded in recent years to meet the growing demands for animation artists. Professional animators identify the technological facet as the most rapidly advancing…

  1. Artists Draw a Blank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Františka+Tim Gilman

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The workspace for an artist, the studio, is sometimes seen as a laboratory-like condensation of a gallery or museum. These often-idealized white cubes like the blank page present concrete relations between space and time. From these an intentional simplification of the architecture can change behavior and perception within the space and our understanding of perception itself.

  2. Landscapes. Artists' Workshop Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Penny; Roundhill, Clare

    This instructional resource, designed to be used by and with elementary level students, provides inspiration for landscape painting by presenting the work of six different artists. These include: "Fuji in Clear Weather" (Katsushika Hokusai, 1823-29); "The Tree of Life" (Gustav Klimt, c. 1905-1909); "The Waterlily…

  3. The creative brain--revisiting concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Ambar

    2010-03-01

    Creativity is a complex neuro-psycho-philosophical phenomenon which is difficult to define literally. Fundamentally it involves the ability to understand and express novel orderly relationships. The creative process involves four stages--preparation, incubation, illumination and verification. A high level of general intelligence, domain specific knowledge and special skills are necessary pre-requisites. It is possible that in addition, some creative people might have architectural alternations of specific portions of the posterior neocortex. Associated with such pre-requisites, the process of creative innovation (incubation and illumination stages) necessitates the need for an ability of divergent thinking, a novelty seeking behavior, some degree of suppression of latent inhibition and a subtle degree of frontal dysfunction. The author hypothesizes that these features are often inter-linked and subtle frontally disinhibited behavior is conducive towards creativity by allowing uninterrupted flow of creative thought possessing and opening up new avenues towards problem solving. Perhaps the most essential feature of the creative brain is its degree of connectivity--both inter-hemispheric and intra-hemispheric. Connectivity correlates or binds together functions of apparently structurally isolated domains on brain modules sub-serving different functions. It is felt that creative cognition is a self rewarding process where divergent thinking would promote connectivity through development of new synapses. In addition, the phenomenon of synaesthesia has often been observed in creative visual artists. Creative innovation often occurs during low arousal states and creative people often manifests features of affective disorders. This suggests a role of neurotransmitters in creative innovation. Dopaminergic pathways are involved in the novelty seeking attitude of creative people while norepinephrine levels are depressed during discovery of novel orderly relationships. The

  4. Cognition and Emotions in the Creative Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnezda, Nicole M.

    2011-01-01

    Art teachers are most successful when they teach the whole child, with an awareness of the student inside as well as the work that is being produced outside. Therefore, when teaching students about their own creativity and that of artists they study, it is helpful to understand complex neurological and emotional operations that are active during…

  5. Creativity, Management, and the Minds of Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suojanen, Waino W.

    1976-01-01

    Describes recent neurophysical theories regarding the different functions of the brain's left hemisphere (linear, time-oriented, rational, and analytic) and right hemisphere (intuitive, artistic, and creative) and discusses their implications for management science. (Available from Office of Publications, Graduate School of Business…

  6. THE GIFT OF SATURN: CREATIVITY AND PSYCHOPATHOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Preti, Antonio

    1996-01-01

    1. Introduction: the difficult definition of creativity 2. Genius and madness 3. A broken mind: schizophrenia and the artistic temperment 4. The circular insanity: manic-depressive illness and the bipolar disorders 5. Mood disorders and achievement 6. An open conclusion 7. Related articles 8. Web sites 9. Glossary

  7. The Effect of Psychotropic Substances to the Creativity of Painters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diamanti A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Creativity is a central feature of Art, with painting being one of its creative expressions. Painting was used as a method of measuring creativity in clinical studies of the past that have examined the relationship between creativity and narcotics. Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation of creativity and the use of psychotropic substances. Furthermore, it was investigated, whether the use of psychotropic substances pushes artists to specific artistic writing. Materials and Methods. The research questions of the study were formed using the PICO method. Α systematic review of the bibliography followed in data bases, PubMed, ScienceDirect θαη Google Scholar. From the amounted articles the final selection was formed from twelve articles investigating the correlation of psychotropic substances and creativity in sub-study population consisted of painters. Results. Almost all studies showed changes in the expressive language of painters due to drug use, which led to expressionistic writing. The majority of the studies showed no significant positive connection between creativity and the use of psychotropic substances. Conclusions. The correlation of psychotropic substances and creativity seems to be influenced by the kind of visual writing used by the artist to produce a creative product.

  8. Kosovo’s history through artists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Shkodra

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Kosovo is a new state. For more than 100 years after Albania’s declaration of independence on 28 of November 1912, it remained outside its native ethnic lands. The tragic fate that followed after this date was imposed by the interests of Great Powers, Balkan political conjunctures, and greedy neighbors, which made Kosovo to be part of the borders of an unstable organization, artificial and fabricated badly as it was Yugoslavia, initially under monarchical regime and later under communist regime. Alone and isolated, under constant pressure of denationalization, violence, humiliation, and violation of ethnic national rights by Serbian ruling clique, denying its values in many fields, historical, anthropological, philological, civic, especially cultural and artistic, denied and ignored without any premises and conditions for future development. This is one of the reasons why today in our media, in our academic, university and wide intellectual and popular layers, - values, traditions, and cultural heritage should be made familiar and it is a duty for every specialist and art scholar, as there is a national and civic aspect. In this regard, the valuable assistance comes from artistic creativity of many painters in Albania, Europe and worldwide, who represent an important cultural and historical reality, sustainable and beneficial, with tremendous impacts in national identity and the forming of aesthetic and artistic awareness of generations. The research by its nature has been linked in particular with visioning (seeing, visiting of various works in art galleries, private galleries, private collections and artists’ studios, in archives and museums, in their original form, not book editions and duplication's, which has helped me to be clear in opinions about the works and their artistic values, especially colors, light shades, painting palette in general. While works of foreign authors that are outside Albania and Kosovo, in most cases I have

  9. ARTISTIC ACTIVITY AMONG THE ELDERLY AS A FORM OF LIFELONG LEARNING, BASED UPON THE OPINIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WROCŁAW’S UNIVERSITY OF THE THIRD AGE HANDICRAFT GROUP MEMBERS

    OpenAIRE

    Beata Działa

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with the topic of creativity and artistic activity among elderly people in the context of claims related to the idea of lifelong learning. It discusses the phenomenon of creativity and how senior citizens can benefit from it. The artistic activity of people in the age of late adulthood is also discussed in that context. In the last part of the text, theoretical claims are collated with what the artistic groups’ elderly members themselves said during a focus group interview

  10. Meta-Creativity: Being Creative about Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runco, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of meta-creativity is defined and explored, with examples drawn from the long and productive career of Arthur Cropley. "Meta-creativity" may sound like jargon, but then again, given how meta is used in the sciences (e.g., "meta-analysis," "meta-cognition"), it is a perfectly apt term. It is the best label…

  11. Receptivity and judgment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Nedelsky

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Both judgment and receptivity are important to optimal politics, and both are important to each other. In making this argument, I use an Arendtian conception of judgment and take mindfulness as an example of receptivity. I argue that receptivity offers a needed dimension to addressing the puzzles of what makes Arendtian judgment possible, and that judgment provides a necessary complement to receptivity for action in the world. Exploring this complementary relation between judgment and receptivity also reveals a surprising similarity between what each offers to the practice of politics, in particular to freedom and the possibility of transformation. At the same time, I argue, these important contributions to politics are best understood and realized if judgment and receptivity are thought of as distinct forms of relating to the world.

  12. Social judgments from faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Alexander; Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Dotsch, Ron

    2013-06-01

    People make rapid and consequential social judgments from minimal (non-emotional) facial cues. There has been rapid progress in identifying the perceptual basis of these judgments using data-driven, computational models. In contrast, our understanding of the neural underpinnings of these judgments is rather limited. Meta-analyses of neuroimaging studies find a wide range of seemingly inconsistent responses in the amygdala that co-vary with social judgments from faces. Guided by computational models of social judgments, these responses can be accounted by positing that the amygdala (and posterior face selective regions) tracks face typicality. Atypical faces, whether positively or negatively evaluated, elicit stronger responses in the amygdala. We conclude with the promise of data-driven methods for modeling neural responses to social judgments from faces.

  13. [The impact of mood alterations on creativity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janka, Zoltán

    2006-07-20

    Basic elements of artistic (and other) creativity are the technical-professional skill and knowledge, the special talent and ability and the willingness or motivation; one of which being absent results in partially realised creativity like juvenile, frustrated or abandoned types, respectively. Psychometric scales have been developed to measure everyday and eminent creativity, which show that creativity correlates with higher psychoticism, impulsivity and venturesomeness scores and with lower neuroticism and conformity scores of the personality test employed in a general population. Among the psychological components of creativity are the cognitive processes, mood, motivation, and personality traits. Regarding mood, a theory of "inverted U" has been proposed as elevation of mood facilitates creativity to a certain point after what extreme increase has an adverse effect on achievement. Analysing psychopathology and creativity among various professions, higher rates of psychopathology, especially affective symptoms, have been found in art-related professions. Examples of immortal poets, writers, painters, sculptors and composers, having created invaluable cultural treasures for mankind, illustrate that many of them showed signs of mood alterations (unipolar or bipolar affective disorder spectrum) which were expressed in their artistic products.

  14. Distributed creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    used within the literature and yet it has the potential to revolutionise the way we think about creativity, from how we define and measure it to what we can practically do to foster and develop creativity. Drawing on cultural psychology, ecological psychology and advances in cognitive science......This book challenges the standard view that creativity comes only from within an individual by arguing that creativity also exists ‘outside’ of the mind or more precisely, that the human mind extends through the means of action into the world. The notion of ‘distributed creativity’ is not commonly......, this book offers a basic framework for the study of distributed creativity that considers three main dimensions of creative work: sociality, materiality and temporality. Starting from the premise that creativity is distributed between people, between people and objects and across time, the book reviews...

  15. Story-Telling: A Method for Assessing Children's Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessey, Beth Ann; Amabile, Teresa M.

    1988-01-01

    The subjective judgment of observers was used to assess verbal creativity. Students, aged 5-10, told a story to accompany a picture series. Teachers rated the stories relative to one another. Interjudge reliability of the creativity measure was highly satisfactory. Two subsequent studies affirmed the results, with slightly lower interjudge…

  16. Motivated information processing, social tuning, and group creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bechtoldt, Myriam N.; De Dreu, Carsten K. W.; Nijstad, Bernard A.; Choi, Hoon-Seok

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which groups are creative has wide implications for their overall performance, including the quality of their problem solutions, judgments, and decisions. To further understanding of group creativity, we integrate the motivated information processing in groups model (De Dreu, Nijstad,

  17. Motivated information processing, social tuning, and group creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bechtoldt, M.N.; de Dreu, C.K.W.; Nijstad, B.A.; Choi, H.-S.

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which groups are creative has wide implications for their overall performance, including the quality of their problem solutions, judgments, and decisions. To further understanding of group creativity, we integrate the motivated information processing in groups model (De Dreu, Nijstad,

  18. Unleashing creativity: The role of left temporoparietal regions in evaluating and inhibiting the generation of creative ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayseless, Naama; Aharon-Peretz, Judith; Shamay-Tsoory, Simone

    2014-11-01

    Human creativity is thought to entail two processes. One is idea generation, whereby ideas emerge in an associative manner, and the other is idea evaluation, whereby generated ideas are evaluated and screened. Thus far, neuroimaging studies have identified several brain regions as being involved in creativity, yet only a handful of studies have examined the neural basis underlying these two processes. We found that an individual with left temporoparietal hemorrhage who had no previous experience as an artist developed remarkable artistic creativity, which diminished as the hemorrhage receded. We thus hypothesized that damage to the evaluation network of creativity during the initial hematoma had a releasing effect on creativity by "freeing" the idea generation system. In line with this hypothesis, we conducted a subsequent fMRI study showing that decreased left temporal and parietal activations among healthy individuals as they evaluated creative ideas selectively predicted higher creativity. The current studies provide converging multi-method evidence suggesting that the left temporoparietal area is part of a neural network involved in evaluating creativity, and that as such may act as inhibitors of creativity. We propose an explanatory model of creativity centered upon the key role of the left temporoparietal regions in evaluating and inhibiting creativity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Creative Cognition and Brain Network Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, Roger E.; Benedek, Mathias; Silvia, Paul J.; Schacter, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    Creative thinking is central to the arts, sciences, and everyday life. How does the brain produce creative thought? A series of recently published papers has begun to provide insight into this question, reporting a strikingly similar pattern of brain activity and connectivity across a range of creative tasks and domains, from divergent thinking to poetry composition to musical improvisation. This research suggests that creative thought involves dynamic interactions of large-scale brain systems, with the most compelling finding being that the default and executive control networks, which can show an antagonistic relationship, actually cooperate during creative cognition and artistic performance. These findings have implications for understanding how brain networks interact to support complex cognitive processes, particularly those involving goal-directed, self-generated thought. PMID:26553223

  20. Chaos, creativity, and substance abuse: the nonlinear dynamics of choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zausner, Tobi

    2011-04-01

    Artists create their work in conditions of disequilibrium, states of creative chaos that may appear turbulent but are capable of bringing forth new order. By absorbing information from the environment and discharging it negentropically as new work, artists can be modeled as dissipative systems. A characteristic of chaotic systems is a heightened sensitivity to stimuli, which can generate either positive experiences or negative ones that can lead some artists to substance abuse and misguided searches for a creative chaos. Alcohol and drug use along with inadequately addressed co-occurring emotional disorders interfere with artists' quest for the nonlinearity of creativity. Instead, metaphorically modeled by a limit cycle of addiction and then a spiral to disorder, the joys of a creative chaos become an elusive chimera for them rather than a fulfilling experience. Untreated mental illness and addiction to substances have shortened the lives of artists such as Vincent Van Gogh, Frida Kahlo, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, and Jackson Pollock, all of whom committed suicide. In contrast Edvard Munch and John Callahan, who chose to address their emotional problems and substance abuse, continued to live and remain creative. Choosing to access previously avoided moments of pain can activate the nonlinear power of self-transformation.

  1. Mistaking Judgments of the Agreeable and Judgments of Taste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Raven

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Critique of the Power of Judgment, Kant develops a rigorous formulation of aesthetic judgments, in which he makes a sharp distinction between judgments of taste and judgments of the agreeable (both of which are, I claim, types of aesthetic judgments if only to dismiss judgments of the agreeable as worthy objects of study. Kant is primarily concerned with judgments of taste, the main example of which is judging something to be beautiful (whether it be a work of art or a natural object. He asserts that such judgments are subjective, universal, necessary, disinterested, and do not presuppose a purpose. The other type of aesthetic judgment are judgments of the agreeable, “which are the kind of judgment expressed by saying simply that one likes something or finds it pleasing.” These are judgments of what, in Kant’s words, please “the senses in sensation” as opposed to pleasing ourcognition in reflection.

  2. [Aphasia and artistic creation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornyey, E

    1977-01-01

    An artist active drawing and waterpainting, most prominent in sculpture, suffered an apopleptic insult at 66 years of age. Right hemiparesis and severe motor aphasia remained but this with rare unexpected and sometimes rather complicated productions in spoken, and also in written language in spite of modest progress in writing exercise. His behaviour witnessed of the memory of remote and complicated stored material. Some months after the insult he resumed his artistic activity using his left hand and continued it principally in the same manner as before his illness. His drawing and water-painting displayed some uncertainty of lines and sometimes coarseness of the stain spots. His pieces of sculpture regained the quality of his earlier works, as proven already by the first statue he made after the insult. While it is generally accepted that the motor aphasia does not essentially affect the artistic production, even of high quality, in painting, this is the first instance which proves that the same holds true for sculpture. In this case the mechanisms inciting the finest innervation on the side of the cortical center of the left hand, can work with promptness. In motor aphasia the mechanisms indispensable for the correct realisation of the function are affected without a final extinction of the function itself. Motor asphasia is an instrumental disorder not necessarily accompanied by disturbances of the intelligence.

  3. The Hague Judgments Convention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Arnt

    2011-01-01

    The Hague Judgments Convention of 2005 is the first global convention on international jurisdiction and recognition and enforcement of judgments in civil and commercial matters. The author explains the political and legal background of the Convention, its content and certain crucial issues during...

  4. Judgments in Language Testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Charles Alderson

    2009-01-01

    Language testing is an area linguistics that combines the professional judgment and the nature of the of applied exercise of about language, learning, achievement of language learning with empirical data about students' performances and, by inference, their abilities. This paper addresses the relationship between judgments and empirical data in language testing by reporting on three studies.

  5. Directing Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darsø, Lotte; Ibbotson, Piers

    2008-01-01

    In this article we argue that leaders facing complex challenges can learn from the arts, specifically that leaders can learn by examining how theatre directors direct creativity through creative constraints. We suggest that perceiving creativity as a boundary phenomenon is helpful for directing it....... Like leaders, who are caught in paradoxical situations where they have to manage production and logistics simultaneously with making space for creativity and innovation, theatre directors need to find the delicate balance between on one hand renewal of perceptions, acting and interaction...... and on the other hand getting ready for the opening night. We conclude that the art of directing creativity is linked to developing competencies of conscious presence, attention and vigilance, whereas the craft of directing creativity concerns communication, framing and choice....

  6. Improbable Creativity

    OpenAIRE

    Dorin, Alan; Korb, Kevin B.

    2009-01-01

    We begin with a number of basic facts about creativity and a brief history of the idea. These provide criteria that any definition of the term should meet and help guide us to a new definition of creativity. This definition is independent of cultural appropriateness or the perceived value of creative objects, ideas which have encumbered previous investigations. We briefly defend our definition against some plausible objections and then explore the ways in which this new definition differs fro...

  7. In Search of the Creative Personality: Arnheim Award Address to Division 10 of the American Psychological Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helson, Ravenna

    1996-01-01

    Review of the research literature on the characteristics of creative individuals finds them to be concentrated in artistic and investigative occupations. Individuals in different arts and investigative fields differed considerably in personality traits, and more creative individuals did not differ from the less creative in the same ways across…

  8. Directing Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darsø, Lotte; Ibbotson, Piers

    2008-01-01

    In this article we argue that leaders facing complex challenges can learn from the arts, specifically that leaders can learn by examining how theatre directors direct creativity through creative constraints. We suggest that perceiving creativity as a boundary phenomenon is helpful for directing it....... Like leaders, who are caught in paradoxical situations where they have to manage production and logistics simultaneously with making space for creativity and innovation, theatre directors need to find the delicate balance between on one hand renewal of perceptions, acting and interaction...

  9. Artistic creation as stimulated by superimposed versus separated visual images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, R S; Rothenberg, A

    1980-11-01

    An experiment was performed to examine the role of homospatial thinking in visual art. Each of 43 university-level art students produced three drawing stimulated by pairs of slides. Subjects were randomly assigned to view the pairs either superimposed on one another or separated on the screen. Drawings were independently judged by two internationally noted artists. As predicted, drawings containing an element from each component image intermingled were higher in creative potential when stimulated by the superimposed presentation; however, when sketches from either condition did not clearly contain images from both slides, the separated image presentation yielded the more creative result. Although results favor the hypothesis in part, the overall ambiguity of the data illustrates some of the difficulties in studying creative thought processes under experimental conditions.

  10. Creativity--Current Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripple, Richard E., Ed.; Constas, Mark A., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Seven papers on creativity and creativity research are presented. Topics covered include ordinary creativity, cognitive views of creativity (creative teaching for creative learning), immunizing children against the negative effects of reward, creative leadership, creativity and instructional technology, heuristics for empirical research on…

  11. Status and mating success amongst visual artists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Helen; Nettle, Daniel; Miell, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    Geoffrey Miller has hypothesized that producing artwork functions as a mating display. Here we investigate the relationship between mating success and artistic success in a sample of 236 visual artists. Initially, we derived a measure of artistic success that covered a broad range of artistic behaviors and beliefs. As predicted by Miller's evolutionary theory, more successful male artists had more sexual partners than less successful artists but this did not hold for female artists. Also, male artists with greater artistic success had a mating strategy based on longer term relationships. Overall the results provide partial support for the sexual selection hypothesis for the function of visual art.

  12. Meals, art, and artistic value

    OpenAIRE

    John, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    The notion of a meal is explored in relation to questions of art status and artistic value. Meals are argued not to be works of art, but to have the capacity for artistic value. These claims are used to respond to Dominic Lopes?s arguments in Beyond Art that demote artistic value in favour of the values that emerge from specific kinds of art. A conception of artistic value that involves ?taking reflective charge? of the possibilities for goodness available in an activity is sketched.

  13. Polygenic risk scores for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder predict creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Robert A; Steinberg, Stacy; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Rietveld, Cornelius A; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Nivard, Michel M; Johannesson, Magnus; Galesloot, Tessel E; Hottenga, Jouke J; Willemsen, Gonneke; Cesarini, David; Benjamin, Daniel J; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Ullén, Fredrik; Tiemeier, Henning; Hofman, Albert; van Rooij, Frank J A; Walters, G Bragi; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir E; Ingason, Andres; Helgason, Agnar; Kong, Augustine; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Koellinger, Philipp; Boomsma, Dorret I; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Stefansson, Hreinn; Stefansson, Kari

    2015-07-01

    We tested whether polygenic risk scores for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder would predict creativity. Higher scores were associated with artistic society membership or creative profession in both Icelandic (P = 5.2 × 10(-6) and 3.8 × 10(-6) for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder scores, respectively) and replication cohorts (P = 0.0021 and 0.00086). This could not be accounted for by increased relatedness between creative individuals and those with psychoses, indicating that creativity and psychosis share genetic roots.

  14. Difficulties in the neuroscience of creativity: jazz improvisation and the scientific method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Malinda; Limb, Charles J

    2013-11-01

    Creativity is a fundamental and remarkable human capacity, yet the scientific study of creativity has been limited by the difficulty of reconciling the scientific method and creative processes. We outline several hurdles and considerations that should be addressed when studying the cognitive neuroscience of creativity and suggest that jazz improvisation may be one of the most useful experimental models for the study of spontaneous creativity. More broadly, we argue that studying creativity in a way that is both scientifically and ecologically valid requires collaboration between neuroscientists and artists. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  15. Good morning creativity: task reactivation during sleep enhances beneficial effect of sleep on creative performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Simone M; Strick, Madelijn; Bos, Maarten W; van Baaren, Rick B; Dijksterhuis, Ap

    2012-12-01

    Both scientists and artists have suggested that sleep facilitates creativity, and this idea has received substantial empirical support. In the current study, we investigate whether one can actively enhance the beneficial effect of sleep on creativity by covertly reactivating the creativity task during sleep. Individuals' creative performance was compared after three different conditions: sleep-with-conditioned-odor; sleep-with-control-odor; or sleep-with-no-odor. In the evening prior to sleep, all participants were presented with a problem that required a creative solution. In the two odor conditions, a hidden scent-diffuser spread an odor while the problem was presented. In the sleep-with-conditioned-odor condition, task reactivation during sleep was induced by means of the odor that was also presented while participants were informed about the problem. In the sleep-with-control-odor condition, participants were exposed to a different odor during sleep than the one diffused during problem presentation. In the no odor condition, no odor was presented. After a night of sleep with the conditioned odor, participants were found to be: (i) more creative; and (ii) better able to select their most creative idea than participants who had been exposed to a control odor or no odor while sleeping. These findings suggest that we do not have to passively wait until we are hit by our creative muse while sleeping. Task reactivation during sleep can actively trigger creativity-related processes during sleep and thereby boost the beneficial effect of sleep on creativity.

  16. Creativity Repositioned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan-Rabideau, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Creativity is the cultural capital of the twenty-first century. This article presents an argument for the arts to lead a new wave of education reform that repositions creativity as the centerpiece of an education that prepares a generation of change agents for doing good.

  17. Embodied creativity

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    By taking the view of embodied cognition summarised here, we may define embodied creative search, where sensory-motor faculties are used to navigate a geometric space, in direct metaphor to a search through a physical space. In this view, creative computation requires concepts to be represented in a manner at least sympathetic with the way humans perceive, act and introspect.

  18. Creative Futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feasey, Rosemary

    2003-01-01

    In 1999 the National Committee for Creativity and Culture in Education (NACCCE) produced a report called "All our futures." In many respects it was and still is a seminal report; it raises issues about creativity in education and offers serious messages for Government, schools and the inspection process. The author's research into teacher…

  19. Managing Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slavich, Barbara; Velikova, Silviya Svejenova

    2016-01-01

    This article aims at providing definitional clarity on creativity and a systematic understanding of its management in organizations. By drawing on the results of a content analysis of creativity definitions in 440 scholarly publications in the field of management between 1990 and 2014, this study...... clarifies how scholars in the management domain have defined the concept and identifies core categories shared by these definitions. It also brings together these conceptual categories into an integrative multilevel framework of relevance for managing creativity in organizations. The framework outlines...... a view of managing creativity, which involves managing interconnected processes as well as dualities, such as processes-outcomes, individuals-collectives, and permanent-temporary creativity units. Finally, it paves the way to new research frontiers for the domain....

  20. Selection in artistic gymnastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Olaru

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This study envisages the analysis of the specific aspects of the selection process in artistic gymnastics, focusing particularly onthe selection of Romania’s recent years. In our opinion, the shift to a cone of darkness of the artistic gymnastics, an extremelypopular sport in our country 20 years ago, is also based on and the orientation of children to other fields – unfortunately manyof them outside sports and physical activities in general. In the present study, we shall present the stages of the artisticgymnastics, as its importance in the subsequent performances has been proven a long time ago. The plethora of qualities andskills which are necessary to select a child for gymnastics and those that this sport develops when performed as a spare timeactivity. The case studied in this endeavour is the one of the main centers for gymnast recruitment in Romania; the attentionpaid by the trainers to the selection for this sport makes the data regarding the number of children involved to increase oncemore. This is a satisfactory fact as it is a well-known fact that a wide range primary selection sets a serious basis for thesecondary selection, and the third, respectively, envisaging the future performance and concurrently ensures the involvementof more children in a physical activity that will prepare them, both physically and mentally for a healthy life.

  1. Affectivating environments in creative work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    . Illustrations of these processes are offered from a study of craft creativity, more specifically the decoration of Easter eggs by Romanian folk artists in the historical region of Bucovina. Decorators learn their art through social interaction and observing their environment which is symbolically rich...... in ornaments commonly used for adorning houses, costumes, carpets, etc. This environment however is not only observed but ‘lived’ through by artisans, experienced emotionally since their work of decoration requires a strong bond with the materials and traditions specific for their community. Such a bond...... is primarily affective, not cognitive, as demonstrated by the fact that knowledge about the exact symbols of decoration is secondary to what artisans call ‘working with soul’, the quality of investing oneself into the artistic activity of decoration. This quality is considered in fact to be the characteristic...

  2. Original and Derived Judgment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kirsten; Foss, Nicolai Juul; Klein, Peter G.

    Recent work links entrepreneurship to the economic theory of firm using the Knightian concept of entrepreneurship as judgment. When judgment is complementary to other as-sets, and these assets or their services are traded in well-functioning markets, it makes sense for entrepreneurs to hire labor...... and own assets. The entrepreneur's role, then, is to arrange or organize the human and capital assets under his control. We extend this Knightian concept of the firm by developing a theory of delegation under Knightian uncertainty. What we call original judgment belongs exclusively to owners, but owners...... may delegate a wide range of decision rights to subordinates, who exercise derived judgment. We call these employees "proxy-entrepreneurs," and ask how the firm's or-ganizational structure — its formal and informal systems of rewards and punishments, rules for settling disputes and renegotiating...

  3. Reflections on artist organisations international

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coumans, Anke; Straatman, Bibi

    2015-01-01

    The Artist Organisations International conference, organised by Florian Malzacher, Jonas Staal and Joanna Warsza, took place in Berlin’s HAU theatre from 9 to 11 January 2015. The organisers emphasised how it seems that more and more activist artists are creating organisational structures that incre

  4. Bringing Artists into the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebur, Loretta

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the National Endowment for the Arts' program, Arts in Education. Explains that the most popular program is artist residencies in which an artist works directly with teachers and classes. Suggests that enthusiasm and planning are the most important elements of success with the program. Includes information on the application process,…

  5. The Artist-in-Residence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, James W.

    1977-01-01

    Institutions are bringing the professional artist into their instructional and cultural environments through five approaches: concert performances, extended performances, master classes, part-time residencies, and full-time residencies. The effect of each program on the artist and the college or university is examined. (Author/LBH)

  6. Academic Freedom and Artistic Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Academe, 1990

    1990-01-01

    The concluding statement by participants in the 1990 Wolf Trap Conference on Academic Freedom and Artistic Expression (Virginia, April 29-May 1) proposes policies to assist institutions in responding to issues of accountability, audience, and public funding arising from presentation of artistic works to the public in a manner that preserves…

  7. Clinical Judgment and Affective Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmer, Douglas C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Addressed the limitations of previous work on counselor clinical judgment in a study involving 20 counselors who were asked to make a series of judgments. Results suggested the judgment processes of experienced counselors making diagnoses of affective disorders differs depending on the type of judgment. (JAC)

  8. Clinical Judgment and Affective Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmer, Douglas C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Addressed the limitations of previous work on counselor clinical judgment in a study involving 20 counselors who were asked to make a series of judgments. Results suggested the judgment processes of experienced counselors making diagnoses of affective disorders differs depending on the type of judgment. (JAC)

  9. THE CHALLENGE OF SUPPORTING CREATIVE INDUSTRIES—SCOTTISH EXAMPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Markiewicz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to explore the idea of the supporting system for creative industries, which plays a pivotal role in today’s economy. Creative businesses, which range from individual musicians to companies dealing with publications, demand special attention and tailor-made support services. Therefore, in this article, the analysis is carried out based on the information gained in an in-depth interview and the supporting system for creative industries, which have been functioning in Scotland and the main barriers in providing support services.As shown by the research, a problem exists regarding a proper classification of creative industries, which causes difficulties in measuring them. Moreover, lumping creative businesses with artists to the same group results in criticism from artist communities as they feel that art is no longer being supported, only invested. This piece of research is a part of a research project, which aims at comparing the systems for supporting creative industries in Szczecin and in Glasgow. The empirical approach will be enriched by the theoretical discourse on policies shaping the environment of creative industries. This article, therefore, provides important knowledge concerning building effective system for supporting creative industries, both for scholars and practitioners (managers of business support organizations and policy makers. This knowledge and experience are especially needed in central and east European countries, where the awareness about creative industries is very low.

  10. Emancipation trough the Artistic Experience and the Meaning of Handicap as Instance of Otherness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robi Kroflič

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The key hypothesis of the article is that successful inter-mediation of art to vulnerable groups of people (including children depends on the correct identification of the nature of an artistic act and on the meaning that handicap—as an instance of otherness—has in the life of artists and spectators. A just access to the artistic experience is basically not the question of the distribution of artistic production (since if artistic object is principally accessible to all people, it will not reach vulnerable groups of spectators, but of ensuring artistic creativity and presentation. This presupposes a spectator as a competent being who is able to interact with the artistic object without our interpretative explanation and who is sensible to the instance of otherness (handicap is merely a specific form of otherness. The theory of emancipation from J. Ranciere, the theory of recognition from A. Honneth, and the theory of narration from P. Ricoeur and R. Kearney, as well as our experiences with a comprehensive inductive approach and artistic experience as one of its basic educational methods offer us a theoretical framework for such a model of art inter-mediation.

  11. Japanese New York: Migrant Artists and Self-Reinvention on the World-Stage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sooudi, O.K.

    2014-01-01

    This is an ethnography about middle class Japanese who migrate to New York City in the hope of realizing self-potential that they feel is unavailable to them in Japan. Often leaving conventional office jobs and other corporate work, they make dramatic and risky moves into creative careers as artists

  12. School of the Arts seeks arts organizations and artists for participation in ArtsFusion 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Louise

    2008-01-01

    Virginia Tech School of the Arts announces ArtsFusion 2008, a weeklong celebration of the arts throughout the New River Valley scheduled for April 12 through April 19. ArtsFusion 2008 is seeking participation by arts organizations and artists both on campus and throughout the New River Valley working in music, film, theatre, dance, creative writing, and the visual arts.

  13. Visualization-by-Sketching: An Artist's Interface for Creating Multivariate Time-Varying Data Visualizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, David; Keefe, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    We present Visualization-by-Sketching, a direct-manipulation user interface for designing new data visualizations. The goals are twofold: First, make the process of creating real, animated, data-driven visualizations of complex information more accessible to artists, graphic designers, and other visual experts with traditional, non-technical training. Second, support and enhance the role of human creativity in visualization design, enabling visual experimentation and workflows similar to what is possible with traditional artistic media. The approach is to conceive of visualization design as a combination of processes that are already closely linked with visual creativity: sketching, digital painting, image editing, and reacting to exemplars. Rather than studying and tweaking low-level algorithms and their parameters, designers create new visualizations by painting directly on top of a digital data canvas, sketching data glyphs, and arranging and blending together multiple layers of animated 2D graphics. This requires new algorithms and techniques to interpret painterly user input relative to data "under" the canvas, balance artistic freedom with the need to produce accurate data visualizations, and interactively explore large (e.g., terabyte-sized) multivariate datasets. Results demonstrate a variety of multivariate data visualization techniques can be rapidly recreated using the interface. More importantly, results and feedback from artists support the potential for interfaces in this style to attract new, creative users to the challenging task of designing more effective data visualizations and to help these users stay "in the creative zone" as they work.

  14. Alien Sunset (Artist Concept)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Our solitary sunsets here on Earth might not be all that common in the grand scheme of things. New observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have revealed that mature planetary systems -- dusty disks of asteroids, comets and possibly planets -- are more frequent around close-knit twin, or binary, stars than single stars like our sun. That means sunsets like the one portrayed in this artist's photo concept, and more famously in the movie 'Star Wars,' might be quite commonplace in the universe. Binary and multiple-star systems are about twice as abundant as single-star systems in our galaxy, and, in theory, other galaxies. In a typical binary system, two stars of roughly similar masses twirl around each other like pair-figure skaters. In some systems, the two stars are very far apart and barely interact with each other. In other cases, the stellar twins are intricately linked, whipping around each other quickly due to the force of gravity. Astronomers have discovered dozens of planets that orbit around a single member of a very wide stellar duo. Sunsets from these worlds would look like our own, and the second sun would just look like a bright star in the night sky. But do planets exist in the tighter systems, where two suns would dip below a planet's horizon one by one? Unveiling planets in these systems is tricky, so astronomers used Spitzer to look for disks of swirling planetary debris instead. These disks are made of asteroids, comets and possibly planets. The rocky material in them bangs together and kicks up dust that Spitzer's infrared eyes can see. Our own solar system is swaddled in a similar type of disk. Surprisingly, Spitzer found more debris disks around the tightest binaries it studied (about 20 stars) than in a comparable sample of single stars. About 60 percent of the tight binaries had disks, while the single stars only had about 20 percent. These snug binary systems are as close or closer than just three times the distance between Earth and

  15. Artists' advance: decreased upper alpha power while drawing in artists compared with non-artists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottlow, Mara; Praeg, Elke; Luethy, Christine; Jancke, Lutz

    2011-01-01

    Brain mechanisms associated with artistic talents or skills are still not well understood. This exploratory study investigated differences in brain activity of artists and non-artists while drawing previously presented perspective line-drawings from memory and completing other drawing-related tasks. Electroencephalography (EEG) data were analyzed for power in the frequency domain by means of a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). Low Resolution Brain Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) was applied to localize emerging significances. During drawing and related tasks, decreased power was seen in artists compared to non-artists mainly in upper alpha frequency ranges. Decreased alpha power is often associated with an increase in cognitive functioning and may reflect enhanced semantic memory performance and object recognition processes in artists. These assumptions are supported by the behavioral data assessed in this study and complement previous findings showing increased parietal activations in non-artists compared to artists while drawing. However, due to the exploratory nature of the analysis, additional confirmatory studies will be needed.

  16. The creative person as maverick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovacchini, P L

    1991-01-01

    The innate talents that are the essence of creativity are associated with a particular type of character structure. The child's creative potential has to be supported by the infantile milieu, which also happens to have a characteristic stamp. Within this context of personality configurations and developmental antecedents associated with creative ability, there can be considerable variation. I am not postulating a specific or stereotypic creative character. There are, however, certain qualities that can be found in various character types (and can even exist alongside psychopathology) that are often found in creative scientists and perhaps artists as well. I believe the maverick often possesses these character traits and many of the scientists I have had the opportunity of treating proudly considered themselves mavericks. The creative personality is characterized by paradoxes; these cast it in the maverick mold. Possessors of this personality belong and do not belong. They do not break the rules but bend them a little. They are nonconformists but not rebels. They display many features that do not seem to belong together. The paradoxical qualities that dominate the creator's personality and behavior are the outcome of a certain fluidity of character and ego boundaries. The creative process involves a broad range of functioning and traverses various levels of the psyche, frequently reaching down to the very earliest, primary-process-oriented parts of the self. Ego boundaries, in turn, can become quite fluid and permeable, even though they are ordinarily firmly established and well structured. It is this broad spectrum, a prominent feature of the creative process (Giovacchini, 1965, 1971, 1981), that has been often confused with psychopathology. These paradoxical elements are the outcome of an infantile environment that has provided considerable gratification. Again the early milieu of creative personalities may be extremely varied, but there has always been some

  17. Creative ICT

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Antony

    2014-01-01

    Promoting pupils' creativity when they use ICT, this book also encourages learning across core as well as foundation subjects. It includes: flexible activities for pupils to refer to as they work through the activities; helpful examples of work so pupils know what to aim for; additional support sheets that can be used by the pupil of the teacher; departure points for integrated studies; extension activities that will encourage further creativity.

  18. Fostering Creativity: A Multiple Intelligences Approach to Designing Learning in Undergraduate Fine Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Angela; Cripps, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Curriculum and pedagogy in undergraduate fine art can promote an approach to learning creativity that is more about being an artist than knowing about art. Lecturers can provide a road map for developing particular dispositions, in relation to student ideas and perceptions, to foster personalised creativity. This requires that lecturers have an…

  19. Ballet Doesn't Have to Be Boring: Engaging Students in the Creative Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheff, Helene

    2005-01-01

    For many years, the author has incorporated creative process into the way she teaches ballet class. The author shares the philosophical, practical, and artistic reasons for the creative process in ballet classes. She also shares the rationale and how this practice developed over time.

  20. Creative production by angry people peaks early on, decreases over time, and is relatively unstructured

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Baas; C.K.W. de Dreu; B.A. Nijstad

    2011-01-01

    Anecdotes and introspective reports from eminent scientists and artists aside, a systematic test of the putative creativity-enhancing effect of anger is missing. This article fills this void with three experiments examining creativity as a function of anger (vs. sad or a mood-neutral control state).

  1. Artists in Times of War

    OpenAIRE

    Zinn, Howard

    2007-01-01

    In his article, "Artists in Times of War," Howard Zinn examines the role of the artist during war time and finds that the transcendent nature of art not only shows us the beauty of everyday life, but can also go beyond everyday politics and media hype to critically address the problems of the day. In fact, Zinn suggests that it is the job of artists to "to think outside the boundaries of permissible thought and dare to say things that no one else will say." For Zinn, this is especially import...

  2. Dream screen phenomenon in psychotherapy and artistic work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarinen, Pirjo Irmeli

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this article is to offer a point on the meaning of the dream screen phenomenon in psychotherapy and artistic work. Some current theories of early ego development, the formation of the dream screen and dream imagery seem to match the theories of symbol formation, artistic and literary creativity. In actual dreaming, the dream screen can exist in the form of empty sheets of paper, but also in the form of a landscape, hills or mountains. The activation of the dream screen is presented in the light of the psychotherapy of two depressed patients. Dreams implying activation of the dream screen have been interpreted to signify a turning point during psychotherapy. Dream screen can be considered as a phenomenon with different elements. Examples of dream screen symbols in Aleksis Kivi's poems and in Paul Cézanne's paintings are presented.

  3. Women in the artistic professions : Contribution of sociology to the analysis of the processes of “social closure”

    OpenAIRE

    Danner, Magali

    2009-01-01

    International audience; The artistic professions evolved gradually towards intellectual professions. In this movement of intellectualization of creative activities, women who commonly practiced these professions in the Middle Ages lost their right during the XVIIth century. A historical perspective explains why men are strongly represent in these professions in the functions of experts, juries, artists, art critics, editors, producers, collectors, art merchants, historians… Since the professi...

  4. Intertwined artistic practices: critical remarks on collaboration across fields of knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Manuela Lopes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As an artist I pursue a transdisciplinary practice and my process evolves and takes place in time, in different contexts and through distinct materials. The collaboration between artists and scientists is no longer a surprise and is validated as a strategy by many differing authors. However, the proposed inquiry to reflect on the working relationships between artists, scientists and communicators of science, in the process of art production, became a challenging task. Through the analyses of the production of an art installation (The Therapy developed in the context of my PhD research during an artistic residency in neuroscience laboratories and a hospital, I devised an approach that touches issues of authorship and collaboration, and co-construction of knowledge and meaning in a relational network. In creative terms, the major conclusions are the development of several novel methods of research, the resulting artefacts and the practical materialization of these via the agency of installation.

  5. Bets and dillemas of artistic education at school: dance to debat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thérèse PÉREZ-ROUX

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available After having clarified the representations and practices of the French teachers of Physical Education about the dance, the article defines the stakes of an artistic education in the school in a double aesthetic and cultural aiming. Otherwise, it clarifies knowledge integrated in an artistic practice. This approach supposes to question various styles of dance from the fundamental ones which cross them and their specificities. The study proposes a integrative step making it possible to insert the pupils in an artistic creative process. With final, it is a question of including/understanding the shapes of articulation between technical-expression-creation, of redefining the role of the teacher and of approaching the artistic project in its dimensions formative, expressive and communicative.

  6. Original and Derived Judgment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kirsten; Foss, Nicolai Juul; Klein, Peter G.

    Recent work links entrepreneurship to the economic theory of firm using the Knightian concept of entrepreneurship as judgment. When judgment is complementary to other as-sets, and these assets or their services are traded in well-functioning markets, it makes sense for entrepreneurs to hire labor...... and own assets. The entrepreneur's role, then, is to arrange or organize the human and capital assets under his control. We extend this Knightian concept of the firm by developing a theory of delegation under Knightian uncertainty. What we call original judgment belongs exclusively to owners, but owners...... agreements, means of evaluating perform-ance, and so on — can be designed to encourage forms of proxy-entrepreneurship that increase firm value while discouraging actions that destroy value. Building on key ideas from the entrepreneurship literature, Austrian economics, and the economic theory of the firm we...

  7. Original and Derived Judgment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kirsten; Foss, Nicolai Juul; Klein, Peter G.

    2007-01-01

    Recent work links entrepreneurship to the economic theory of the firm, using the concept of entrepreneurship as judgment introduced by Frank Knight. When judgment is complementary to other assets, it makes sense for entrepreneurs to hire labour and to own assets. The entrepreneur's role, then......, is to arrange or organize the human and capital assets under his or her control. We extend this Knightian concept of the firm by developing a theory of delegation under Knightian uncetainty. What we call original judgment belongs exclusively to owners, but owners may delegate a wide range of decision rights...... be designed to encourage forms of proxy entrepreneurship that increase firm value while discouraging actions that destroy value. Building on key ideas from the entrepreneurship literature, Austrian economics and the economic theory of the firm, we develop a framework for analysing the trade-off between...

  8. [Creativity and psychiatric disorders: exploring a marginal area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thys, E; Sabbe, B; De Hert, M

    2012-01-01

    Creativity is an important human quality on which many of man’s achievements are based. To give a historical and cultural context, to facilitate meaningful scientific research into the link between creativity and psychiatric disorders. Review of relevant literature. The possibility of a link between creativity and psychiatric vulnerability was first discussed in antiquity. Modern interest in the subject stems from the romantic era and acquired a scientific aura in the 19th century. In the 20th century creativity and psychopathology became still further entangled as a result of the influence that mentally disturbed artists exerted on art. The history of the Prinzhorn collection illustrates many aspects of this interaction. Psychometric, psychodiagnostic and genetic research supports a link between creativity and psychiatric illness within the bipolar-psychotic continuum, with schizotypy/thymotypy as prototypes of creativity-related disorders. Evolutionary hypotheses connect the schizophrenia paradox to a survival advantage obtained as a result of enhanced creative ability. Neuro-aesthetics explains the neurologic correlates of the aesthetic experience on the basis of the features of the visual system. A specific challenge for scientific research in this complex and heterogeneous area is appropriate operationalisation of creativity and psychiatric illness within an truly artistic context. There is a continuing need for meaningful definitions and measurement instruments and for a multidisciplinary collaboration.

  9. Computational creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López de Mántaras Badia, Ramon

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available New technologies, and in particular artificial intelligence, are drastically changing the nature of creative processes. Computers are playing very significant roles in creative activities such as music, architecture, fine arts, and science. Indeed, the computer is already a canvas, a brush, a musical instrument, and so on. However, we believe that we must aim at more ambitious relations between computers and creativity. Rather than just seeing the computer as a tool to help human creators, we could see it as a creative entity in its own right. This view has triggered a new subfield of Artificial Intelligence called Computational Creativity. This article addresses the question of the possibility of achieving computational creativity through some examples of computer programs capable of replicating some aspects of creative behavior in the fields of music and science.Las nuevas tecnologías y en particular la Inteligencia Artificial están cambiando de forma importante la naturaleza del proceso creativo. Los ordenadores están jugando un papel muy significativo en actividades artísticas tales como la música, la arquitectura, las bellas artes y la ciencia. Efectivamente, el ordenador ya es el lienzo, el pincel, el instrumento musical, etc. Sin embargo creemos que debemos aspirar a relaciones más ambiciosas entre los ordenadores y la creatividad. En lugar de verlos solamente como herramientas de ayuda a la creación, los ordenadores podrían ser considerados agentes creativos. Este punto de vista ha dado lugar a un nuevo subcampo de la Inteligencia Artificial denominado Creatividad Computacional. En este artículo abordamos la cuestión de la posibilidad de alcanzar dicha creatividad computacional mediante algunos ejemplos de programas de ordenador capaces de replicar algunos aspectos relacionados con el comportamiento creativo en los ámbitos de la música y la ciencia.

  10. Creativity is linked to ambition across the bipolar spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sheri L; Murray, Greg; Hou, Sharon; Staudenmaier, Paige J; Freeman, Michael A; Michalak, Erin E

    2015-06-01

    Beyond evidence for an association, little is known about the mechanism linking creativity bipolar spectrum conditions. Theory suggests that ambition, which is heightened in bipolar disorder (BD) and associated with creativity in the general population, might be an important variable. The overarching aim of this project was to evaluate whether ambition is related to creativity among those with bipolar spectrum conditions. Across two studies, we examined correlations between a validated self-report measure of ambition, the WASSUP, and creativity. In Study One, 22 individuals diagnosed with BD who self-identified as highly creative completed the WASSUP and a measure of lifetime creative accomplishment. In Study Two, 221 undergraduates completed the WASSUP, a measure of mania risk (the Hypomanic Personality Scale, HPS) and a measure designed to assess creativity in business projects and tasks. In Study One, WASSUP scores were significantly elevated compared to normative levels in BD, and WASSUP scores were correlated with lifetime creative accomplishment within the artistic sample. In Study Two, mania risk was related to greater ambition and creativity, and ambition was also directly related to greater creativity. Both studies were limited by the reliance on self-reported ambition. Ambition could be one important component of creative success across the bipolar spectrum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. THE CREATIVE POTENTIAL OF MEDIA POETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Bobilewicz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the second half of the 20th century and at the beginning of the 21st century, in the period of rapid development of the mediasphere and various forms of media communication, a new type of creative artistic activity has emerged — interdisciplinary, multifacetedly interpreted media art. Media artists experimenting with various non-canonical forms, means of expression and the latest technology have created new language of artistic communication and a new model of an active, creative member of the audience — a co-creator. The article discusses the alternative paradigm of poetic work, that is media poetry, and its diversity in terms of genre (video poetry, poetic clip, holopoetry, clip-action, interactive media performance, computer poetry, etc.. Unconventional poetic forms, their structure, perception and interpretation are determined by various materials, a wide range of instruments (from a simple video camera, to a computer, to complex technologies and robotics, alternative outer and inner structures and the properties of visual and language systems. Experimental poetry, which can be placed at the border of various media spaces (visual, text, sound, virtual and multimedia, is analysed at different levels: the conceptual level, the level of the creative process, the method, the content plane and the expression plane. In the intermedia discourse media poetry functions in a cultural, communicative, semantic and aesthetic perspective, and in many others. The bringing of poetry into the field of media radically extends its boundaries. 

  12. Autistic savants. [correction of artistic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, C; Miller, B L; Cummings, J L; Goldberg, M; Mychack, P; Bottino, V; Benson, D F

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine common patterns in the lives and artwork of five artistic savants previously described and to report on the clinical, neuropsychological, and neuroimaging findings from one newly diagnosed artistic savant. The artistic savant syndrome has been recognized for centuries, although its neuroanatomic basis remains a mystery. The cardinal features, strengths, and weaknesses of the work of these six savants were analyzed and compared with those of children with autism in whom artistic talent was absent. An anatomic substrate for these behaviors was considered in the context of newly emerging theories related to paradoxical functional facilitation, visual thinking, and multiple intelligences. The artists had features of "pervasive developmental disorder," including impairment in social interaction and communication as well as restricted repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interest, and activities. All six demonstrated a strong preference for a single art medium and showed a restricted variation in artistic themes. None understood art theory. Some autistic features contributed to their success, including attention to visual detail, a tendency toward ritualistic compulsive repetition, the ability to focus on one topic at the expense of other interests, and intact memory and visuospatial skills. The artistic savant syndrome remains rare and mysterious in origin. Savants exhibit extraordinary visual talents along with profound linguistic and social impairment. The intense focus on and ability to remember visual detail contributes to the artistic product of the savant. The anatomic substrate for the savant syndrome may involve loss of function in the left temporal lobe with enhanced function of the posterior neocortex.

  13. Child's play: the creativity of older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capps, Donald

    2012-09-01

    In this article, I discuss Paul W. Pruyser's view presented in his article "An Essay on Creativity" (Pruyser in Bull Menninger Clin 43:294-353, 1979) that creative persons manifest early childhood qualities of playfulness, curiosity, and pleasure seeking and that adaptation is itself a form of creativity. I then discuss his article "Creativity in Aging Persons" (Pruyser in Bull Menninger Clin 51:425-435, 1987) in which he presents his view that aging itself is a potentially creative process, that creativity among older adults is not limited to the talented few, and that older adulthood has several specific features that are conducive to creativity. Significant among these features are object loss (especially involving human relationships) and functional loss (due to the vicissitudes of aging). Noting his particular emphasis on object loss and its role in late-life creativity, I focus on functional loss, and I emphasize the importance of adaptation in sustaining the creativity of older adults who experience such loss. I illustrate this adaptation by considering well-known painters who in late life suffered visual problems common to older adults. I suggest that in adapting to their visual problems these artists drew on the early childhood qualities (playfulness, curiosity and pleasure seeking) that all creative persons possess and that they are therefore illustrative for other older adults who are experiencing functional losses. I conclude with Erik H. Erikson's (Toys and reasons: stages in the ritualization of experience, W. W. Norton, New York, 1977) and Paul W. Pruyser's (Pastor Psychol 35:120-131, 1986) reflections on the relationship between seeing and hoping.

  14. Jazz and substance abuse: road to creative genius or pathway to premature death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolson, Gerald H Jerry; Cuyjet, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Jazz music and jazz musicians have often been linked for better or worse to the world of addictive substances. Many talented jazz musicians either had their careers sidetracked or prematurely ended due to their addiction to drugs and/or alcohol. The rigors of nightly performances, travel, and for many musicians a disapproving society exacted a toll that impacted the creativity of many artists of the genre. The fact that drug and alcohol use had a significant impact on the performance levels of numerous jazz musicians in the 1940's and 1950's has been much discussed, but more study of that impact is warranted. While recent research has provided new information regarding this challenging topic, there is still much to learn. Indeed, a number of questions for inquiry may be posed. Among those questions are the following: Was the work of these jazz artists truly inspired? Would their creative output have been enhanced had they not been addicted to substances? What was the impact of the addictive substances on their ability to function as creative artists and is there evidence to refute or verify that impact? Are there identifiable traits in certain artists that allowed them to be creative in spite of their addictions? This examination presents an evaluation of the evidence of the link between creativity and substance abuse especially as it relates to selected jazz artists during this time period and how they remained creative and actually prospered in their careers in spite of addictions to controlled substances.

  15. Cosmic Art: Artistic Expressions of the Universe in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papacosta, P.

    2013-04-01

    Students in some of the science classes at Columbia College Chicago are encouraged to use their artistic talents to express their fascination with, understanding of, or sense of mystery about the cosmos. These creative expressions have numerous educational benefits that reinforce the learning process. Furthermore, this type of assignment often improves the students' attitude towards science, instilling in them a life-long interest for learning. These projects also break down barriers between the disciplines, particularly those of science and art. In this paper, I describe the pedagogy and benefits of the art/science partnership in my science classes with examples of student artworks that depict cosmic phenomena.

  16. Creativity Awards: Great Expectations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, Mark; Sasser, Sheila; Koslow, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Given the creativity inherent in advertising, one useful measure of creativity may be the advertising creativity award. Although creativity awards have been used by academics, agencies, and clients as indicators of exemplary creative work, there is surprisingly little research as to what creative elements they actually represent. Senior agency…

  17. IBSE and Creativity Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnova, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Creativity plays a very important role in education. Most of educational systems support creativity as relevant competence for the 21st century. According to the findings of experts, teachers' creativity is important for the development of students' creativity. We introduce a theoretical base of creativity and styles of creativity. Based on our…

  18. Creativity Awards: Great Expectations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, Mark; Sasser, Sheila; Koslow, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Given the creativity inherent in advertising, one useful measure of creativity may be the advertising creativity award. Although creativity awards have been used by academics, agencies, and clients as indicators of exemplary creative work, there is surprisingly little research as to what creative elements they actually represent. Senior agency…

  19. Clinical Judgments of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Douglas N.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Investigated degree to which judges could simulate Basic Personality Inventory (BPI) responses of a clinically depressed patient group. Judgmental profiles of depressed patients indicated very high reliabilities across information conditions, a high association with actual profiles of clinically depressed patients, and differentiation from other…

  20. Benchmarking Judgmentally Adjusted Forecasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); L.P. de Bruijn (Bert)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractMany publicly available macroeconomic forecasts are judgmentally adjusted model-based forecasts. In practice, usually only a single final forecast is available, and not the underlying econometric model, nor are the size and reason for adjustment known. Hence, the relative weights given

  1. Benchmarking judgmentally adjusted forecasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); L.P. de Bruijn (Bert)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractMany publicly available macroeconomic forecasts are judgmentally-adjusted model-based forecasts. In practice usually only a single final forecast is available, and not the underlying econometric model, nor are the size and reason for adjustment known. Hence, the relative weights

  2. Benchmarking judgmentally adjusted forecasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); L.P. de Bruijn (Bert)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractMany publicly available macroeconomic forecasts are judgmentally-adjusted model-based forecasts. In practice usually only a single final forecast is available, and not the underlying econometric model, nor are the size and reason for adjustment known. Hence, the relative weights give

  3. ARTISTIC AND PRODUCTION FEATURES OF PORCELAIN SCULPTURE BY AUGUST SPIESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Екатерина Сергеевна Хмельницкая

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the identification and attribution of artistic production and features of porcelain sculpture created by the chief scultor of the Imperial Porcelain Factory in St. Petersburg August K. Spiess . Porcelain through creativity of Spies become so amazingly diverse, as it used to be in the XVIII century . Creative heritage of A. Spiess could be identified as a phenomenon that naturally associated with the broader social and cultural processes , typical for Russian art of the second half of the XIX century. However , in contrast to the next generation of sculptors , Spies activity does not go beyond the existence of porcelain production , and the sculptor has not sought to create works that can approve a porcelain sculpture in the eyes of a higher status.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2014-1-6

  4. Digital Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersson Brooks, Eva; Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a study exploring the outcomes from children’s play with technology in early childhood learning practices. The paper addresses questions related to how digital technology can foster creativity in early childhood learning environments. It consists of an analysis of children......’s interaction with the KidSmart furniture focusing on digital creativity potentials and play values suggested by the technology. The study applied a qualitative approach and included125 children (aged three to five), 10 pedagogues, and two librarians. The results suggests that educators should sensitively...... consider intervening when children are interacting with technology, and rather put emphasize into the integration of the technology into the environment and to the curriculum in order to shape playful structures for children’s digital creativity....

  5. Translational Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro

    2010-01-01

    A long-established approach to legal translation focuses on terminological equivalence making translators strictly follow the words of source texts. Recent research suggests that there is room for some creativity allowing translators to deviate from the source texts. However, little attention...... is given to genre conventions in source texts and the ways in which they can best be translated. I propose that translators of statutes with an informative function in expert-to-expert communication may be allowed limited translational creativity when translating specific types of genre convention....... This creativity is a result of translators adopting either a source-language or a target-language oriented strategy and is limited by the pragmatic principle of co-operation. Examples of translation options are provided illustrating the different results in target texts. The use of a target-language oriented...

  6. Calibrating Legal Judgments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Schauer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective to study the notion and essence of legal judgments calibration the possibilities of using it in the lawenforcement activity to explore the expenses and advantages of using it. Methods dialectic approach to the cognition of social phenomena which enables to analyze them in historical development and functioning in the context of the integrity of objective and subjective factors it determined the choice of the following research methods formallegal comparative legal sociological methods of cognitive psychology and philosophy. Results In ordinary life people who assess other peoplersaquos judgments typically take into account the other judgments of those they are assessing in order to calibrate the judgment presently being assessed. The restaurant and hotel rating website TripAdvisor is exemplary because it facilitates calibration by providing access to a raterrsaquos previous ratings. Such information allows a user to see whether a particular rating comes from a rater who is enthusiastic about every place she patronizes or instead from someone who is incessantly hard to please. And even when less systematized as in assessing a letter of recommendation or college transcript calibration by recourse to the decisional history of those whose judgments are being assessed is ubiquitous. Yet despite the ubiquity and utility of such calibration the legal system seems perversely to reject it. Appellate courts do not openly adjust their standard of review based on the previous judgments of the judge whose decision they are reviewing nor do judges in reviewing legislative or administrative decisions magistrates in evaluating search warrant representations or jurors in assessing witness perception. In most legal domains calibration by reference to the prior decisions of the reviewee is invisible either because it does not exist or because reviewing bodies are unwilling to admit using what they in fact know and employ. Scientific novelty for the first

  7. Encouraging Creativity in Mathematics and Science through Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munakata, Mika; Vaidya, Ashwin

    2012-01-01

    Based on the results of a survey of the science and mathematics students at our university, we observed that students do not consider mathematics and science to be creative endeavors, though the traditional artistic disciplines rank high in this regard. To address this problem in perception, the authors used photography as a means to encourage…

  8. Auteur Description: From the Director's Creative Vision to Audio Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szarkowska, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    In this report, the author follows the suggestion that a film director's creative vision should be incorporated into Audio description (AD), a major technique for making films, theater performances, operas, and other events accessible to people who are blind or have low vision. The author presents a new type of AD for auteur and artistic films:…

  9. Creativity...The Flowering Tornado, Art by Ginny Ruffner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2003-01-01

    Presents background information on the artist Ginny Ruffner who was a "flameworker." Includes information on the exhibition entitled "Creativity: The Flowering Tornado, Art by Ginny Ruffner" and the accompanying art pop-up book. Provides photographs of some of her artwork. (CMK)

  10. Encouraging Creativity in Mathematics and Science through Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munakata, Mika; Vaidya, Ashwin

    2012-01-01

    Based on the results of a survey of the science and mathematics students at our university, we observed that students do not consider mathematics and science to be creative endeavors, though the traditional artistic disciplines rank high in this regard. To address this problem in perception, the authors used photography as a means to encourage…

  11. Framing Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilesen, Simon; Helms, Niels Henrik

    2011-01-01

    This article outlines a way of understanding and modelling how it is possible to design for creative processes. The processes in question involve user-driven didactic design in a Danish project for developing e-learning designs to be used at small and medium sized enterprises (the ELYK-project). ......This article outlines a way of understanding and modelling how it is possible to design for creative processes. The processes in question involve user-driven didactic design in a Danish project for developing e-learning designs to be used at small and medium sized enterprises (the ELYK...

  12. Creative Commons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lone

    2006-01-01

    En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"......En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"...

  13. Creative Commons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lone

    2006-01-01

    En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"......En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"...

  14. Climate Change and Glacier Retreat: Scientific Fact and Artistic Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagre, D. B.

    2008-12-01

    Mountain glaciers continue to retreat rapidly over most of the globe. In North America, at Glacier National Park, Montana, recent research results from Sperry Glacier (2005-2007) indicate negative mass balances are now 3-4 times greater than in the 1950s. A geospatial model of glacier retreat in the Blackfoot-Jackson basin suggested all glaciers would be gone by 2030 but has proved too conservative. Accelerated glacier shrinkage since the model was developed has mirrored an increase in actual annual temperature that is almost twice the rate used in the model. The glaciers in Glacier National Park are likely to be gone well before 2030. A variety of media, curricula, and educational strategies have been employed to communicate the disappearance of the glaciers as a consequence of global warming. These have included everything from print media and television coverage to podcasts and wayside exhibits along roads in the park. However, a new thrust is to partner with artists to communicate climate change issues to new audiences and through different channels. A scientist-artist retreat was convened to explore the tension between keeping artistic products grounded in factually-based reality while providing for freedom to express artistic creativity. Individual artists and scientists have worked to create aesthetic and emotional images, using painting, poetry, music and photography, to convey core messages from research on mountain ecosystems. Finally, a traveling art exhibit was developed to highlight the photography that systematically documents glacier change through time. The aim was to select photographs that provide the most compelling visual experience for an art-oriented viewer and also accurately reflect the research on glacier retreat. The exhibit opens on January 11, 2009

  15. Transposing, Transforming and Transcending Tradition in Creative Digital Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prager, Phillip; Thomas, Maureen; Selsjord, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    and storytelling arts combine to create rich, complex, and engaging moving-image based artworks with wide appeal. It examines how dramatist and interactive media artist Maureen Thomas and 3D media artist and conservator Marianne Selsjord deploy creative digital technologies to transpose, transform, and transcend...... of the aspirations and approaches of 20th-century avant-garde artists, revealing these as a potent source of conceptual riches for the digital media creators of today and tomorrow.......How can digital media technologies, contemporary theories of creativity, and tradition combine to develop the aesthetics of computer-based art today and in the future? Through contextualised case-studies, this chapter investigates how games, information technologies, and traditional visual...

  16. Transposing, Transforming and Transcending Tradition in Creative Digital Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prager, Phillip; Thomas, Maureen; Selsjord, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    How can digital media technologies, contemporary theories of creativity, and tradition combine to develop the aesthetics of computer-based art today and in the future? Through contextualised case-studies, this chapter investigates how games, information technologies, and traditional visual...... and storytelling arts combine to create rich, complex, and engaging moving-image based artworks with wide appeal. It examines how dramatist and interactive media artist Maureen Thomas and 3D media artist and conservator Marianne Selsjord deploy creative digital technologies to transpose, transform, and transcend...... of the aspirations and approaches of 20th-century avant-garde artists, revealing these as a potent source of conceptual riches for the digital media creators of today and tomorrow....

  17. Musculoskeletal problems of performing artists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, J M; Panush, R S

    1994-02-01

    We have reviewed the frequency and variety of rheumatic problems among performing artists. For instrumentalists, injuries are related to the type of instrument played, the technique used and the effort expended in the quest for excellence. For dancers, musculoskeletal problems too reflect technique and effort. We should not be surprised at the frequency of these problems. Rheumatologists, as well as orthopaedic surgeons, physiotherapists, neurologists and other physicians, encounter performing artists as patients. We should be familiar with their problems and be able to knowledgeably diagnose and manage them. This may include observing the artist during actual performances. How is the instrument being held? What is the posture of the artist? What are the comments of the coach or teacher. What type of shoes does the ballerina wear? What movements in particular cause discomfort? These and similar observations will have direct bearing on the musculoskeletal problems of these artists. Published studies have related the variety, frequency and disabling nature of performance-related musculoskeletal problems. Unfortunately few if any of these are controlled, blinded or prospective. We need more and better information. We will want clear information about prevalence of problems, better definition of the musculoskeletal ailments, classification of the relationship of problems with performance and individual biomechanical features, information about response of specific problems to interventions, and data about the long-term consequences, if any, of these rheumatic problems to the musculoskeletal system. Artists as patients are unique. Minor problems can become potentially career-ending disabilities. Making music or performing dance may provide us with delightful entertainment but represents a source of livelihood to artists. Understanding their medical needs and enabling them to continue to perform is the challenge before us.

  18. The Image of Divinity in Children’s Perception. Social, Cultural and Artistic Influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian STOLERIU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This research is a case study on how children aged 6-15 years represent the image of Divinity. Previous works and studies of various researchers have shown that the way in which children perceive the image of God is influenced by a range of social and cultural factors that may be highlighted in the artistic creations of small drawers. Our work is a research applied on the artistic creations of a total of 100 Romanian children of different ages, from different social backgrounds. The diversity of artistic representations - besides the usual anthropomorphisms, symbolic or abstract images being also represented -, as the numerous ways of perceiving the image of God at this age, underlines the importance of educational, cultural, artistic and religious formation of children. However, our study tries to find out some explanations on how the social and cultural context to which children belong, or how the artistic and religious education influences their creativity, their imagination and social manifestation. In this respect, the study also aims to underline how society affects the creative personality of children, enhancing it or inhibiting it, and how a religious environment can define a certain type of perception in respect with the idea of divinity.

  19. Major Directions in Creativity Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatena, Joe

    Reviewed are major directions in creativity research in the following areas: theories of creativity; definitions; instruments to measure creativity; nurturing creativity; the disabled, disturbed, and disadvantaged; cross cultural patterns; creative imagination imagery; and measuring creative imagination imagery. (LS)

  20. Creative thinking

    OpenAIRE

    García Casas, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Portal web d'intercanvi d'idees creatives, confeccionat en tecnología JEE i Liferay com a gestor de continguts i gestor de portlets. Portal web de intercambio de ideas creativas, confeccionado en tecnología JEE y Liferay como gestor de contenidos y gestor de portlets.

  1. Design Creativity!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbill, Phyllis; Baum, Liesl

    2013-01-01

    Technology is revolutionizing the way the world works, and there seems to be no end in sight. Information is everywhere and easy to find, so today's students will need to know what to do with it to be prepared for the overly stimulating, technology-driven, problem-riddled world they will soon face. That's why critical- and creative-thinking skills…

  2. Framing Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilesen, Simon; Helms, Niels Henrik

    2011-01-01

    This article outlines a way of understanding and modelling how it is possible to design for creative processes. The processes in question involve user-driven didactic design in a Danish project for developing e-learning designs to be used at small and medium sized enterprises (the ELYK-project). ......This article outlines a way of understanding and modelling how it is possible to design for creative processes. The processes in question involve user-driven didactic design in a Danish project for developing e-learning designs to be used at small and medium sized enterprises (the ELYK......-project). After briefly discussing the concepts of creativity and innovation, the article outlines three levels of analysis. On a meta-level, a new model of quadruple helix innovation is introduced, providing a framework for interrelations between enterprise, government, knowledge institutions, and users...... (learners). On a meso-level, a four-field model is introduced. It is an operational model for user involvement in creativity and innovation processes, depicting and demarcating the changing roles of users and developers at different stages of the design process. On a micro-level, the design practise...

  3. Creative Punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, John

    1988-01-01

    Punishment given in a caring, supportive environment can assist children to learn some tasks more quickly, when used in conjunction with programmed positive reinforcement. The manner in which a punishment is implemented impacts its effectiveness. Two experiments are presented in which teachers used creative punishment to produce classroom behavior…

  4. Wise Creativity and Creative Wisdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoop, Hans Henrik

    2008-01-01

    This important new volume from Anna Craft, Howard Gardner and Guy Claxton focuses on the need to educate students for "wise creativity" - the ability to expand their perspectives and exercise their talents responsibly within their school communicaty and in the real world.......This important new volume from Anna Craft, Howard Gardner and Guy Claxton focuses on the need to educate students for "wise creativity" - the ability to expand their perspectives and exercise their talents responsibly within their school communicaty and in the real world....

  5. Judgments about Judgments: The Dissociation of Consideration Price and Transaction Commitment Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiszewski, Chris; Lichtenstein, Donald R.; Belyavsky, Julia

    2008-01-01

    There are many contexts in which people make judgments about prior judgments. For example, Internet shopping bots (e.g., NexTag.com) allow consumers to search for products and, if the price is too high, list a price at which they would consider making the purchase (i.e., base judgment). If the price drops to this level, the vendor generates an…

  6. The Oceanic Feeling in Painterly Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussi Antti Saarinen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The oceanic feeling is a frequent topic of discussion in both creativity research and aesthetics. Characterized by a sensation of self-boundary dissolution, the feeling has been reported to involve experiences of fusion with various objects, including works of art. In this article, I discuss the oceanic feeling in the specific context of painterly creativity. I begin by arguing that the oceanic feeling cannot be classified as an emotion, mood, or bodily feeling, in the established definitions of these terms. I then introduce philosopher Matthew Ratcliffe’s theory of existential feelings to help formulate a more accurate view of the oceanic feeling. Specifically, I suggest that oceanic feelings should be classified as shifts in existential feeling. In conclusion, I briefly discuss the implications of my account of the oceanic feeling for the more general pursuits of painterly creativity and artistic self-transformation.

  7. Applied Creativity: The Creative Marketing Breakthrough Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Philip A.

    2007-01-01

    Despite the increasing importance of personal creativity in today's business environment, few conceptual creativity frameworks have been presented in the marketing education literature. The purpose of this article is to advance the integration of creativity instruction into marketing classrooms by presenting an applied creative marketing…

  8. Arts and ageing; life expectancy of historical artists in the Low Countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshta Mirzada

    Full Text Available Practising arts has been linked to lowering stress, anxiety and blood pressure. These mechanisms are all known to affect the ageing process. Therefore, we examine the relation between long-term involvement in arts and life expectancy at age 50 (LE50, in a cohort of 12,159 male acoustic, literary and visual artists, who were born between 1700 and 1899 in the Low Countries. We compared the life expectancy at age 50 of the various artists with the elite and middle class of that time. In the birth cohorts before 1850, acoustic (LE50:14.5-19.5 and literary artists (LE50:17.8-20.8 had a similar life expectancy at age 50 compared to the elite (LE50:18.0-19.0. Only visual artists (LE50:15.5-17.1 had a lower life expectancy at age 50 compared to the elite at that time. For the most recent birth cohorts from 1850 through 1899, the comparison between artists and the elite reversed and acoustic and literary artist had a lower life expectancy at age 50, while visual artists enjoyed a similar life expectancy at age 50. Although artists belonged to the middle socioeconomic class and lived predominantly in urban areas with poor living conditions, they had a life expectancy similar to the elite population. This is in line with observed favourable effects of practicing arts on health in the short-term. From our historical analysis, we hypothesize several mechanisms through which artistic creativity could influence the ageing process and life expectancy. These hypotheses, however, should be formally tested before any definite conclusions on effects of arts on ageing can be drawn.

  9. Arts and ageing; life expectancy of historical artists in the Low Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzada, Fereshta; Schimberg, Anouk S; Engelaer, Frouke M; Bijwaard, Govert E; van Bodegom, David; Westendorp, Rudi G J; van Poppel, Frans W A

    2014-01-01

    Practising arts has been linked to lowering stress, anxiety and blood pressure. These mechanisms are all known to affect the ageing process. Therefore, we examine the relation between long-term involvement in arts and life expectancy at age 50 (LE50), in a cohort of 12,159 male acoustic, literary and visual artists, who were born between 1700 and 1899 in the Low Countries. We compared the life expectancy at age 50 of the various artists with the elite and middle class of that time. In the birth cohorts before 1850, acoustic (LE50:14.5-19.5) and literary artists (LE50:17.8-20.8) had a similar life expectancy at age 50 compared to the elite (LE50:18.0-19.0). Only visual artists (LE50:15.5-17.1) had a lower life expectancy at age 50 compared to the elite at that time. For the most recent birth cohorts from 1850 through 1899, the comparison between artists and the elite reversed and acoustic and literary artist had a lower life expectancy at age 50, while visual artists enjoyed a similar life expectancy at age 50. Although artists belonged to the middle socioeconomic class and lived predominantly in urban areas with poor living conditions, they had a life expectancy similar to the elite population. This is in line with observed favourable effects of practicing arts on health in the short-term. From our historical analysis, we hypothesize several mechanisms through which artistic creativity could influence the ageing process and life expectancy. These hypotheses, however, should be formally tested before any definite conclusions on effects of arts on ageing can be drawn.

  10. Teaching Synaesthesia as a Gateway to Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica D. Murgia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article encapsulates my experience of teaching creativity within a higher education curriculum. Creativity often eludes common understanding because it involves using different conceptual streams of thought, often times developing unconsciously and manifesting in the prized “eureka” moment. In 2009, I began explaining the neurological condition of synaesthesia and later introduced this phenomenology in a course designed to cultivate creativity to first year fashion design students. There are many challenges in teaching creativity. Through teaching this course, I discovered that the first challenge is making the students conscious of their own qualitative beliefs on creativity and art. The second is creating exercises to challenge and alter these beliefs, thus forming a new way of thinking and experiencing the world. The most resistance from my students arose when experimenting with non-representational art. They did not have a conscious framework for making and evaluating abstract art. Introducing synaesthesia, a neurologically-based condition that “merges” two or more sensory pathways in the brain, gave my students a framework for discovery. Understanding sensory modalities and ways in which these modalities can blended together in synaesthesia proved to be a gateway to creativity in many of my students. The scope of this article chronicles how I developed my teaching methodology, the results it created in my classroom, as well as its effects on my own artistic practice.

  11. Creativity and problem Solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Victor Valqui Vidal

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some modern and interdisciplinary concepts about creativity and creative processes of special relevance for Operational Research workers. Central publications in the area Creativity-Operational Research are shortly reviewed. Some creative tools and the Creative Problem Solving approach are also discussed. Finally, some applications of these concepts and tools are outlined. Some central references are presented for further study of themes related to creativity or creative tools.

  12. Creativity for Feist

    OpenAIRE

    Warner, Julian

    2013-01-01

    This paper develops an understanding of creativity to meet the requirements of the decision of the Supreme Court of the United States in Feist v. Rural (1991). The inclusion of creativity in originality, in a minimal degree of creativity, and in a creative spark below the level required for originality, is first established. Conditions for creativity are simultaneously derived. Clauses negatively implying creativity are then identified and considered. The clauses which imply creativity can be...

  13. Creativity and Problem Solving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents some modern and interdisciplinary concepts about creativity and creative processes of special relevance for Operational Research workers. Central publications in the area Creativity-Operational Research are shortly reviewed. Some creative tools and the Creative Problem Solving...... approach are also discussed. Finally, some applications of these concepts and tools are outlined. Some central references are presented for further study of themes related to creativity or creative tools....

  14. Creativity and Problem Solving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents some modern and interdisciplinary concepts about creativity and creative processes of special relevance for Operational Research workers. Central publications in the area Creativity-Operational Research are shortly reviewed. Some creative tools and the Creative Problem Solving...... approach are also discussed. Finally, some applications of these concepts and tools are outlined. Some central references are presented for further study of themes related to creativity or creative tools....

  15. Clinical versus actuarial judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, R M; Faust, D; Meehl, P E

    1989-03-31

    Professionals are frequently consulted to diagnose and predict human behavior; optimal treatment and planning often hinge on the consultant's judgmental accuracy. The consultant may rely on one of two contrasting approaches to decision-making--the clinical and actuarial methods. Research comparing these two approaches shows the actuarial method to be superior. Factors underlying the greater accuracy of actuarial methods, sources of resistance to the scientific findings, and the benefits of increased reliance on actuarial approaches are discussed.

  16. La représentation de l’artiste chez J.-K.Huysmans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momoko Fukuda

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The object of this article is to situate J.-K. Huysmans' En ménage in his work as a whole and more generally in the tradition of the "roman d'art" in 19th Century French literature. "Roman d'art" works, such as the Goncourt brothers' Manette Salomon or Zola's OEuvre, often focus on the incompatibility of the artist's creative force and his love for a woman. Even if a woman appears as a muse at first, she often becomes an obstacle to the vocation of the artist. Even though the artist is very important in Huysmans' novels, he does not directly treat the opposition between love and creation. If a woman brings problems, it is not because of her influence on the creativity of the artist, but due to a particular theme developed by Huysmans: how to assure material comfort without being disturbed by 21 Ibid., p. 474. Fukuda, La représentation de l'artiste chez J.-K.Huysmans Nordlit 28, 2011 62 female presence? This problem is exaggerated by the artistic profession, which involves working at home. Not being capable of doing housework, Huysmans' hero cannot live totally alone. André, the hero of En ménage, leaves his wife who has been unfaithful to begin a single life with a housemaid. In his relationships with his wife, his housemaid and his lover, all he worries about is his work environment. Nevertheless, he ends up creating nothing, not because of a woman, but because of his own mediocrity and laziness. In this "roman d'art" without a muse, André's character is typical of Huysmans' comical but harsh realism, which subverts the myth of the artist torn between love and creation.

  17. Rewarding Creativity: Transformative Use in the Jazz Idiom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R. Wilson

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A crayon drawing from a five-year-old child likely produces a copyrighted work. Notating or recording two measures of a three year-old child depressing piano keys, while not conventionally pleasing to the ear, may nevertheless be worthy of a copyright.1 The artistic merit of a work is not a factor in determining originality. Simply stated, an author satisfies copyright formalities when she affixes an original work of authorship in a tangible medium.2 Case law indicates that the threshold requirement for the originality element of a copyright is a showing of some "minimal level of creativity."3 Few could disagree that the low threshold requirement for originality encourages creativity. An inherent unfairness exists, however, when copyright law shuns creative artists from attaining a copyright.

  18. Verbal creativity in semantic variant primary progressive aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T.Q.; Miller, Z.A.; Adhimoolam, B.; Zackey, D.C.; Khan, B.K.; Ketelle, R.; Miller, B.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Emergence of visual and musical creativity in the setting of neurologic disease has been reported in patients with semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), also called semantic dementia (SD). It is hypothesized that loss of left anterior frontotemporal function facilitates activity of the right posterior hemispheric structures, leading to de novo creativity observed in visual artistic representation. We describe creativity in the verbal domain, for the first time, in three patients with svPPA. Methods Clinical presentations are carefully described in three svPPA patients exhibiting verbal creativity, including neuropsychology, neurologic exam, and structural MRI. Voxel based morphometry (VBM) was performed to quantify brain atrophy patterns in these patients against age-matched healthy controls. Results All three patients displayed new-onset creative writing behavior and produced extensive original work during the course of disease. Patient A developed interest in wordplay and generated a large volume of poetry. Patient B became fascinated with rhyming and punning. Patient C wrote and published a lifestyle guidebook. An overlap of their structural MR scans showed uniform sparing in the lateral portions of the language-dominant temporal lobe (superior and middle gyri) and atrophy in the medial temporal cortex (amygdala, limbic cortex). Conclusions New-onset creativity in svPPA may represent a paradoxical functional facilitation. A similar drive for production is found in visually artistic and verbally creative patients. Mirroring the imaging findings in visually artistic patients, verbal preoccupation and creativity may associate with medial atrophy in the language-dominant temporal lobe but sparing of lateral dominant temporal and non-dominant posterior cortices. PMID:24329034

  19. Verbal creativity in semantic variant primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Teresa Q; Miller, Zachary A; Adhimoolam, Babu; Zackey, Diana D; Khan, Baber K; Ketelle, Robin; Rankin, Katherine P; Miller, Bruce L

    2015-02-01

    Emergence of visual and musical creativity in the setting of neurologic disease has been reported in patients with semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), also called semantic dementia (SD). It is hypothesized that loss of left anterior frontotemporal function facilitates activity of the right posterior hemispheric structures, leading to de novo creativity observed in visual artistic representation. We describe creativity in the verbal domain, for the first time, in three patients with svPPA. Clinical presentations are carefully described in three svPPA patients exhibiting verbal creativity, including neuropsychology, neurologic exam, and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was performed to quantify brain atrophy patterns in these patients against age-matched healthy controls. All three patients displayed new-onset creative writing behavior and produced extensive original work during the course of disease. Patient A developed interest in wordplay and generated a large volume of poetry. Patient B became fascinated with rhyming and punning. Patient C wrote and published a lifestyle guidebook. An overlap of their structural MR scans showed uniform sparing in the lateral portions of the language-dominant temporal lobe (superior and middle gyri) and atrophy in the medial temporal cortex (amygdala, limbic cortex). New-onset creativity in svPPA may represent a paradoxical functional facilitation. A similar drive for production is found in visually artistic and verbally creative patients. Mirroring the imaging findings in visually artistic patients, verbal preoccupation and creativity may be associated with medial atrophy in the language-dominant temporal lobe, but sparing of lateral dominant temporal and non-dominant posterior cortices.

  20. Looking over the artist's shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordelia Sealy

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available What could materials science possibly have to do with revealing an artist's intentions? Intriguingly, art institutions and museums around the world are using a panoply of analysis techniques familiar to any materials scientist to reveal vital and previously hidden information about works of art. We often assume that a painting or statue we are looking at in a gallery or museum is just as it was when the artist created it. But thanks to the rigors of time, artifacts and paintings may deteriorate in subtle or not so subtle ways that can alter our perception of those works, as well as our understanding of their place in history. Or an artist may have reworked or even painted over a piece.

  1. Kadın Besteci Sorunu: Cinsiyet Rollerine ve Kadınların Yaratıcılıklarına İlişkin Yargılar Women Composer Question: Gender Roles and Judgments Regarding Women’s Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Gülçin ÖZKİŞİ

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the music history literature, musical creativity hasbeen always accounted to male artists, whereas women are mostlyaccepted as prominent and talented music performers. The scarcity ofwomen composers in musical canon is caused by several social,cultural and economic factors. The myth of female incapacity formusical creativity, which was rather a strong prejudice until the mid of20th century and women’s limited access to musical education in thearea of composition were among these factors. Women’s access tocomposition education and, affects of gender and gender roles to choiceof career and women composer question are analyzed in of social,cultural and philosophical contexts within historical back ground.Since the composition lives and works of women composers arediscussed in the context of gender, first of all, settled opinions ongender and gender roles are reviewed, and their effect on education andcareer selection has been searched. While women are considered asimportant music performers in the music history literature, the mostimportant reason for composition and musical creativity’s associationmore with men are considered to be the myth of women’s lack ofmusical creativity until the first half of 20th century and the limitationon women’s composition education. The historical and philosophicalbackground of the lack of women’s musical creativity has been reviewedfocusing on Europe within the framework of the 19th Centuryintellectuals’ approach towards the woman problem. Müzik tarihi literatüründe kadınlar, önemli müzik icracıları olarakkabul görürken, bestecilik ve müzikal yaratıcılık, daha çok erkeklerleilişkilendirilen bir alan olarak karşımıza çıkmaktadır. Besteciliközelinde, kadınların müzikal kanonda erkeklere oranla daha az yerbuluyor olmalarının sosyal, kültürel ve ekonomik birçok nedenimevcuttur. Bu nedenler arasında, 20. yüzyılın ilk yarısına dekkadınlara atfedilen m

  2. Real Vegan Cheese and the Artistic Critique of Biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Wilbanks

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on the case study of Real Vegan Cheese (RVC, a synthetic biology project housed in a community lab or “biohackerspace,” I argue that biohacking performs an “artistic critique” of the bioeconomy. Following Boltanski and Chiapello’s use of the term, the “artistic critique” pits values of autonomy and creativity against a view of capitalist production as standardized and alienating, represented (in the case of biotechnology by Monsanto’s monoculture GMOs. In this way, biohacking is depicted as liberating biotechnology from the constraints of corporate and academic institutions. Through the use of design fiction and a playful aesthetic, projects such as RVC demonstrate a more legitimate––with respect to the values of the artistic critique––mode of production for a new generation of biotechnology products, one that is portrayed as driven primarily by ethical and aesthetic values rather than the profit motive. This analysis highlights the role that aesthetic and affective strategies play in advancing particular sociotechnical visions, and the way that biohacking projects operate in symbiosis with incumbent institutions even as they define themselves in opposition to them. Finally, it suggests that biohacking has certain limitations when considered as a form of public engagement with science.

  3. Artistic creation as stimulated by superimposed versus combined-composite visual images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, A

    1986-02-01

    The creative role of homospatial thinking in visual art was assessed in an experiment with 39 highly talented young artists. In order to compare the creative effects of visual elements occupying the same space with identical elements arrayed in a combined foreground and background organization, superimposed slide images were presented to a randomly selected portion of the subject group, and the other portion of the subject group viewed the same slide images constructed into a figure-ground composite. Both groups produced three drawings stimulated by the slide stimuli, and these drawings were independently judged by three art experts. Results were that drawings produced by the group exposed to the superimposed images were rated higher in creative potential than those stimulated by the figure-ground controls. These results extend previous experimental findings of a tendency toward homospatial thinking in creative individuals in literature and visual art.

  4. From Artist-As-Leader to Leader-As-Artist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, V.M.

    2011-01-01

    Chapter 1 deals with the artistic critique of the 1960s in the Netherlands. It demonstrates that the processes of Boltanski and Chiapello’s theory of The New Spirit of Capitalism in France also apply to the Netherlands. I’ll describe the influence of the Experimental Group in Holland and the Dutch

  5. From Artist-As-Leader to Leader-As-Artist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, V.M.

    2011-01-01

    Chapter 1 deals with the artistic critique of the 1960s in the Netherlands. It demonstrates that the processes of Boltanski and Chiapello’s theory of The New Spirit of Capitalism in France also apply to the Netherlands. I’ll describe the influence of the Experimental Group in Holland and the Dutch B

  6. Creativity and the homospatial process. Experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, A

    1988-09-01

    Through empirical studies involving intensive and extensive interviewing of outstanding creative persons in literature, visual art, and science, a specific creative cognitive operation involving complex mental imagery was identified. This operation has been designated the "homospatial process" and defined as actively conceiving two or more discrete entities occupying the same space, a conception leading to the articulation of new identities. Four experimental assessments involving exposure to stimuli designed to evoke the homospatial process have been carried out with groups of talented persons as follows: (1) 43 writers produced short poetic metaphors in response to 10 different pairs of slide stimuli. Subjects were randomly assigned to view the pairs either superimposed upon one another, and thereby appearing to occupy the same spatial location, or separated and side by side on the screen as a control condition. (2) 46 writers were similarly divided and exposed for a shortened period of time to the same stimuli in order to encourage mental elaboration in the creation of poetic metaphors. (3) Drawings were created by 43 artists separated into a group exposed to three superimposed images and a control group exposed to the same component images side by side. (4) 39 artists were separated into a group exposed to three superimposed images and a control group exposed to the same images constructed into a single-image figure-ground display. Findings were that, in all four experiments, subjects' productions in response to the superimposed visual stimuli were rated significantly higher in creativity, by independent experts, than productions in response to the control condition. Therefore, the externalized representations of the homospatial process facilitated both literary and artistic creativity.

  7. Genetic and environmental influences on applied creativity: A reared-apart twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, Jaime A; Segal, Nancy L; Horwitz, Briana N

    2015-03-01

    Applied creativity involves bringing innovation to real-life activities. The first reared-apart twin study assessing genetic and environmental origins of applied creativity, via Draw-a-House (DAH) and Draw-a-Person (DAP) tasks, is presented. Participants included 69 MZA and 53 DZA twin pairs from the Minnesota Study of Twins Reared Apart. Drawings were evaluated by four artists and four non-artists. Genetic effects were demonstrated for the DAP (.38-.47), but not for the DAH. Creative personality showed genetic effects (.50), and modest, but significant correlations with scores on the two drawings (rs = .17-.26). Both genetic and nonshared environmental influences underlie variance in applied creativity. Individuals concerned with enhancing creativity among students and others may better understand individual differences in performance and training.

  8. Computational Beauty: Aesthetic Judgment at the Intersection of Art and Science

    CERN Document Server

    Spratt, Emily L

    2014-01-01

    In part one of the Critique of Judgment, Immanuel Kant wrote that "the judgment of taste...is not a cognitive judgment, and so not logical, but is aesthetic."\\cite{Kant} While the condition of aesthetic discernment has long been the subject of philosophical discourse, the role of the arbiters of that judgment has more often been assumed than questioned. The art historian, critic, connoisseur, and curator have long held the esteemed position of the aesthetic judge, their training, instinct, and eye part of the inimitable subjective processes that Kant described as occurring upon artistic evaluation. Although the concept of intangible knowledge in regard to aesthetic theory has been much explored, little discussion has arisen in response to the development of new types of artificial intelligence as a challenge to the seemingly ineffable abilities of the human observer. This paper examines the developments in the field of computer vision analysis of paintings from canonical movements with the history of Western ...

  9. Creative Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manelius, Anne-Mette; Beim, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Opsamling af diskussioner på konferencen og udstillingen Creative Systems i september/oktober 2007. Konferencen og Udstillingen Creative Systems sætter fokus på systemer som en positiv drivkraft i den kreative skabelsesproces. CINARK inviterede fire internationale kapaciteter, som indenfor hver...... deres felt har beskæftiget sig med udviklingen af systemer. Kieran Timberlake, markant amerikansk tegnestue; Mark West, Professor på University of Manitoba, Canada, og pioner indenfor anvendelse af tekstilforskalling til betonstøbninger; Matilda McQuaid, Arkitekturhistoriker og kurator på udstillingen...... om Extreme Textiles på amerikanske Cooper Hewit Design Museum, samt Professor Ludger Hovestadt, ved ETH, Zürich der fokuserer på udvikling og anvendelse af logaritmiske systemtilgange. Udstillingen diskuterede ud fra deres meget forskellige arbejder, det kreative potentiale i anvendelsen af systemer...

  10. Creativity: Sense and Nonsense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, John G.

    1976-01-01

    The difference between pseudo-creativity--creativity as often defined by educators and society in general--and genuine creativity is examined. Personal qualities which seem to be essential for creative production and the place of creativity in education are discussed. (RW)

  11. Understanding Creativity

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The discipline of economics has traditionally refused to study the behavior and achievements of specific individuals. Yet creativity - a primary source of the technological change that drives economic growth - is largely the domain of extraordinary individuals or small groups. For the first time in the history of the discipline, within the last decade economists have begun to study how these extraordinary individuals make their discoveries, and the results have been dramatic. Research done to...

  12. Creative Exploration

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Children are naturally curious and explore in order to make sense of the world; play and exploration are vital to their learning and development. Space and support for children to think, ask questions, make predictions, experiment, look for explanations and draw conclusions is essential in primary science. This ‘children’s science’ emerges naturally as they seek to learn about the world around them (Johnston 2008) and develop creative explanations of natural phenomena. Adopting such an explor...

  13. You Do What You Are: The Relationship between the Scale of Creative Attributes and Behavior and Vocational Interests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kathryn E.; Kneipp, Lee B.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has found relationships between measures of creativity and Vocational Interests, especially the artistic type. To partially examine the validity of a new self-report measure of creativity, 115 college students were administered the Vocational Preference Inventory (Form C) (VPI-C; Holland, 1985; Lowman & Schurman, 1982) and the…

  14. Opening up Openness to Experience: A Four-Factor Model and Relations to Creative Achievement in the Arts and Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Scott Barry

    2013-01-01

    Openness to experience is the broadest personality domain of the Big Five, including a mix of traits relating to intellectual curiosity, intellectual interests, perceived intelligence, imagination, creativity, artistic and aesthetic interests, emotional and fantasy richness, and unconventionality. Likewise, creative achievement is a broad…

  15. Opening up Openness to Experience: A Four-Factor Model and Relations to Creative Achievement in the Arts and Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Scott Barry

    2013-01-01

    Openness to experience is the broadest personality domain of the Big Five, including a mix of traits relating to intellectual curiosity, intellectual interests, perceived intelligence, imagination, creativity, artistic and aesthetic interests, emotional and fantasy richness, and unconventionality. Likewise, creative achievement is a broad…

  16. R.U.A.: Augmented Urban Reality. When the meeting turns into an artistic, collective and expanded territory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Amaral

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present discussion aims to investigate ways of making collaborative art configured as a field of a liquid geopolitical, appropriate “space-time” before a participatory model and shared networks, trough territories transformation processes, considering its cultural, ecological, political, social and technological implications, based on social creativity, collective action and contemporary artistic practices as thematic platforms for innovative urban interventions.

  17. Methodology of Artistic Identification on the Path of the Comprehension of Composer's Works in a Piano Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleshkina, Elena Anatolyevna; Scherbakova, Anna Iosifovna; Korsakova, Irina Anatolyevna; Slavina, Elena Vladimirovna; Kazakova, Irina Sergeevna

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to the reflection on the problem of the "immersion" in the artistic world of a composer's creative work in a piano class in the beginning of the 21st century. The wealth and diversity of the music material for piano players determine the new quality of understanding music and set high goals and objectives for a…

  18. The Power of the Arts: Evaluating a Community Artist-in-Residence Program through the Lens of Studio Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter-Doniger, Tracey; Berlinsky, Robin

    2017-01-01

    This article takes an analytical look at Engaging Creative Minds, a pilot community program geared to enrich learning of common core standards through a local artist-in-residence partnership with public schools. This program was designed to increase the level of engagement and student growth in classes that typically relied on rote memory and…

  19. "Digging Deep": Self-Study as a Reflexive Approach to Improving My Practice as an Artist, Researcher and Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lee

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I show how I enhanced my understanding of my practice as an artist, researcher and teacher using a self-study approach in my recently completed Master of Technology (M.Tech.) dissertation in Graphic Design. As part of my M.Tech. research, I conceptualised and developed a creative teaching tool that I named "PicTopics."…

  20. Nike Twins Seven Seven: Nigerian Batik Artist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDuke, Betty

    1987-01-01

    Chronicles the personal and professional life of Nike Twins Seven Seven (born 1951), a Nigerian batik artist, and her husband, Twins Seven Seven, a musician-artist, both of whom have received international acclaim. (BJV)

  1. Nike Twins Seven Seven: Nigerian Batik Artist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDuke, Betty

    1987-01-01

    Chronicles the personal and professional life of Nike Twins Seven Seven (born 1951), a Nigerian batik artist, and her husband, Twins Seven Seven, a musician-artist, both of whom have received international acclaim. (BJV)

  2. [Emancipation of the works of artists with psychiatric illness - Artistic reflections from the twentieth century and the Art Brut].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesznivy, Edit

    2015-01-01

    The study presents the emancipation of the artworks of psychiatric patients through the review of four centuries, focusing on some of the most important medical cultural and art historical stages of the period between the 18th and the 21st century, which is a particularly relevant era in this regard. It touches on the collections linked to psychiatrists and hospitals that were formed primarily on the basis of the researches that were analyzing the connection between creativity and mental illness. After that, the study discusses the ever-changing attitudes and preferences of artists' and major artistic movements towards psychosis and the pictorial world of the psychotic. With great care, it analyses the aesthetic category of the art brut, which is connected to the French painter Jean Dubuffet and was born in the middle of the 1940s, and the relationship between contemporary art and art brut. In connection with some of the most significant art brut collections and exhibitions, the works of a few classical and contemporary art brut artists are also discussed (Adolf Wolfli, Louis Soutter, Aloise Corbaz, August Walla ).

  3. Phenomenology of consciousness from apprehension to judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arecchi, F Tito

    2011-07-01

    We explore two different moments of human cognition, namely apprehension (A), whereby a coherent perception emerges by recruitment of large neuron groups and judgment (B), whereby memory retrieval of different (A) units coded in a suitable language and comparison of them leads to the formulation of a judgment. The first one has a duration around 1 sec (from 0.5 to 3 sec), it appears as an a-temporal present and its neural correlate is a wide synchronization in the EEG gamma band. It may be described as an interpretation of sensorial stimuli in terms of some stored algorithm, via a Bayes procedure. The second one entails the comparison of two apprehensions acquired at different times, coded in a given language, and retrieved by memory. It lasts around 3 sec and requires self-consciousness, as the judging agent must be well aware that he/she is the same one who faces the two coded apprehensions under scrutiny in order to extract a mutual relation. At variance with (A), (B) does not presuppose an algorithm, but it rather builds a new behavioural model by an inverse Bayes procedure. It will be shown how this build up of a novel model is related to creativity and free will.

  4. The Potential of Digital Tools in Art Lessons at Junior School Level to Improve Artistic Ability Using Tamazight Fonts

    OpenAIRE

    Aboalgasm, Aber; Ward, Rupert

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research is to explore how pupils in art classes can use creative digital art tools to redesign Tamazight fonts, in order to develop children’s artistic creativity, enable them to learn about a new culture, and to help the teacher assess the creativity of pupils in the art class. It can also help students to improve their talents in drawing. The study could relate to research in Libya among the Amazigh people (better known as Berber) and possibly the development of Tamazight f...

  5. An Artistic Analysis of Chicago

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu; Licong

    2014-01-01

    Chicago is Sandburg’s masterpiece. This thesis tries to analyze the poem from an artistic angle. It means to give a better understanding of Sandburg’s delight in violence and his membership in the industrial workers of the world.

  6. Artistic Understanding and Motivational Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekue, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to analyse artistic understanding in primary and secondary education and the relationship between this understanding and motivational characteristics such as goal orientation, engagement in art activities and attitude to art education at school, which determine (according to prior research) learners' academic achievement, in…

  7. Artistic Quest for Indonesian History

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>Masa Lalu-Masa Lupa The Past-The Forgotten Time BizArt October 26th -November 11th 2007 Indonesian art is rarely seen in China. Though some Indonesian artists are gaining reputations across South-East Asia, and cooperation with the art world in the Netherlands means some exposure in

  8. Redefining the Artist-Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daichendt, G. James

    2009-01-01

    "Artist-Teacher" is a powerful and frequently used term in the fields of art, museum studies, art history, and art education. Art educators typically use the term to describe their dual practice or to emphasize the importance of art production in relation to their teaching. In this article, the author reviews historical uses of the term…

  9. Catalytic creativity. The case of Linus Pauling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, J; Csikszentmihalyi, M

    2001-04-01

    This article illustrates how creativity is constituted by forces beyond the innovating individual, drawing examples from the career of the eminent chemist Linus Pauling. From a systems perspective, a scientific theory or other product is creative only if the innovation gains the acceptance of a field of experts and so transforms the culture. In addition to this crucial selective function vis-à-vis the completed work, the social field can play a catalytic role, fostering productive interactions between person and domain throughout a career. Pauling's case yields examples of how variously the social field contributes to creativity, shaping the individual's standards of judgment and providing opportunities, incentives, and critical evaluation. A formidable set of strengths suited Pauling for his scientific achievements, but examination of his career qualifies the notion of a lone genius whose brilliance carries the day.

  10. PERCEPTIONS REGARDING TREATMENTS AND CREATIVE ACCOUNTING POLICIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HERBEI (MOȚ IOANA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to present the students' perception on the accounting profiles and professional accountants regarding the forms of manifestations of creative accounting. The article is structured in the following part: introduction, literature review, methodology and research results, as well conclusions and limits on the research. Based on hypotheses, the target group was questioned about a number of issues related the tendency to resort to creative accounting practices. The respondents reject the idea of calling own initiatives to manipulate practices of accounting numbers and distortion the image regarding the financial statements and their performance. They believe that resorting to ethics in accounting is essential when on the basis of professional judgment are developed and substantiates the enterprise accounting policies. We specify that the introduction into the university curricula of creative accounting rate contributes to the acquisition of knowledge in the field, without follow the manipulation of accounting numbers and distortion of the entity's financial image

  11. Disgust as Embodied Moral Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnall, Simone; Haidt, Jonathan; Clore, Gerald L.; Jordan, Alexander H.

    2008-01-01

    How, and for whom, does disgust influence moral judgment? In 4 experiments participants made moral judgments while experiencing extraneous feelings of disgust. Disgust was induced in Experiment 1 by exposure to a bad smell, in Experiment 2 by working in a disgusting room, in Experiment 3 by recalling a physically disgusting experience, and in Experiment 4 through a video induction. In each case, the results showed that disgust can increase the severity of moral judgments relative to controls. Experiment 4 found that disgust had a different effect on moral judgment than did sadness. In addition, Experiments 2-4 showed that the role of disgust in severity of moral judgments depends on participants’ sensitivity to their own bodily sensations. Taken together, these data indicate the importance - and specificity - of gut feelings in moral judgments. PMID:18505801

  12. Pragmatic Aesthetics and the Autistic Artist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Kyle; Barnbaum, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    There are many prominent examples of artists with autism. However, even when confronted with evidence of these accomplished "autistic savants", pragmatic aesthetic theories cannot adequately account for the work of these accomplished artists as "artists". This article first examines the nature of autism and explores a prominent psychological…

  13. 76 FR 67208 - Artists' Canvas From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... COMMISSION Artists' Canvas From China Determination On the basis of the record\\1\\ developed in the subject... order on artists' canvas from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... 2011), entitled Artists' Canvas from China: Investigation No. 731-TA-1091 (Review). By order of...

  14. Clinical judgment and decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garb, Howard N

    2005-01-01

    When clinical psychologists make judgments, are they likely to be correct or incorrect? The following topics are reviewed: (a) methodological advances in evaluating the validity of descriptions of personality and psychopathology, (b) recent findings on the cognitive processes of clinicians, and (c) the validity of judgments and utility of decisions made by mental health professionals. Results from research on clinical judgment and decision making and their relationship to conflicts within the field of clinical psychology are discussed.

  15. Predication and judgment in Aquinas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Landim Filho

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I present an interpretation of Thomas Aquinas's theory of judgment (statement, examining semantic, epistemological and ontological aspects of this theory. Elements of judgment such as concepts, phantasms, predication (combination and division, reflection, affirmation, truth and falsity are explained. The article shows that this interpretation of Aquinas's theory of judgment may contribute to clarify fundamental distinctions (such as the distinctions between being, essence and existence of Aquinas's metaphysics.

  16. ARTISTIC ACTIVITY AMONG THE ELDERLY AS A FORM OF LIFELONG LEARNING, BASED UPON THE OPINIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WROCŁAW’S UNIVERSITY OF THE THIRD AGE HANDICRAFT GROUP MEMBERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Działa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the topic of creativity and artistic activity among elderly people in the context of claims related to the idea of lifelong learning. It discusses the phenomenon of creativity and how senior citizens can benefit from it. The artistic activity of people in the age of late adulthood is also discussed in that context. In the last part of the text, theoretical claims are collated with what the artistic groups’ elderly members themselves said during a focus group interview

  17. Creativity and Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    1980-01-01

    The article focuses on research on improving creativity, including early efforts to enhance, operationalize, and define creativity. Studies dealing with behavioral management of creativity are discussed, as are those concerning the effects of self-statements and cognition. (CL)

  18. Creativity, Personality and Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, James A., Jr.; Goad, Nancy A.

    1981-01-01

    Creativity is discussed in terms of H. Eysenck's personality theory. Creative persons are characterized by introversion, neuroticism, psychoticism, and moderate to high intelligence. The literature is reviewed on similarities and differences between creativity and pathology. (Author/DB)

  19. Creativity, Personality and Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, James A., Jr.; Goad, Nancy A.

    1981-01-01

    Creativity is discussed in terms of H. Eysenck's personality theory. Creative persons are characterized by introversion, neuroticism, psychoticism, and moderate to high intelligence. The literature is reviewed on similarities and differences between creativity and pathology. (Author/DB)

  20. Exploring the Domain Specificity of Creativity in Children: The Relationship between a Non-Verbal Creative Production Test and Creative Problem-Solving Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mohamed

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn this study, we explored whether creativity was domain specific or domain general. The relationships between students’ scores on three creative problem-solving activities (math, spa-tial artistic, and oral linguistic in the DIS-COVER assessment (Discovering Intellectual Strengths and Capabilities While Observing Varied Ethnic Responses and the TCT-DP (Test of Creative Thinking-Drawing Produc-tion, a non-verbal general measure of creativi-ty, were examined. The participants were 135 first and second graders from two schools in the Southwestern United States from linguisti-cally and culturally diverse backgrounds. Pearson correlations, canonical correlations, and multiple regression analyses were calcu-lated to describe the relationship between the TCT-DP and the three DISCOVER creative problem-solving activities. We found that crea-tivity has both domain-specific and domain-general aspects, but that the domain-specific component seemed more prominent. One im-plication of these results is that educators should consider assessing creativity in specific domains to place students in special programs for gifted students rather than relying only on domain-general measures of divergent think-ing or creativity.

  1. Science into art: A study of the creative process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchant, M. [Cosumnes River Coll., Folsom Lake Center, CA (United States); Sesko, S.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-03-14

    Objective was to examine the creative process, demonstrated by 5 student participants in a class at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena CA, from the germ of the creative idea through the final creative product. The students, drawn from classes sponsored by LLNL, were assigned the problem of representing ``big`` science, as practiced at LLNL, in a graphic, artistic, or multimedia product. As a result of this study, it was discovered that the process of creativity with these students was not linear in nature, nor did it strictly follow the traditional creativity 5-step schema of preparation, incubation, insight, evaluation, and elaboration. Of particular interest were several emergent themes of the creative process: spontaneous use of metaphor to describe the Laboratory; a general lack of interest in ``school`` science or mathematics by the American art students; a well developed sense of conscience; and finally, the symbolism inherent in the repeated use of a single artistic element. This use of the circle revealed a continuity of thinking and design perhaps related to the idealistic bias mentioned above.

  2. Associative processes in intuitive judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morewedge, Carey K; Kahneman, Daniel

    2010-10-01

    Dual-system models of reasoning attribute errors of judgment to two failures: the automatic operations of a 'System 1' generate a faulty intuition, which the controlled operations of a 'System 2' fail to detect and correct. We identify System 1 with the automatic operations of associative memory and draw on research in the priming paradigm to describe how it operates. We explain how three features of associative memory--associative coherence, attribute substitution and processing fluency--give rise to major biases of intuitive judgment. Our article highlights both the ability of System 1 to create complex and skilled judgments and the role of the system as a source of judgment errors.

  3. Art as an indicator of male fitness: does prenatal testosterone influence artistic ability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocchiola, Danae

    2014-05-28

    In his groundbreaking research, Geoffrey Miller (1999) suggests that artistic and creative displays are male-predominant behaviors and can be considered to be the result of an evolutionary advantage. The outcomes of several surveys conducted on jazz and rock musicians, contemporary painters, English writers (Miller, 1999), and scientists (Kanazawa, 2000) seem to be consistent with the Millerian hypothesis, showing a predominance of men carrying out these activities, with an output peak corresponding to the most fertile male period and a progressive decline in late maturity. One way to evaluate the sex-related hypothesis of artistic and cultural displays, considered as sexual indicators of male fitness, is to focus on sexually dimorphic traits. One of them, within our species, is the 2nd to 4th digit length (2D:4D), which is a marker for prenatal testosterone levels. This study combines the Millerian theories on sexual dimorphism in cultural displays with the digit ratio, using it as an indicator of androgen exposure in utero. If androgenic levels are positively correlated with artistic exhibition, both female and male artists should show low 2D:4D ratios. In this experiment we tested the association between 2D:4D and artistic ability by comparing the digit ratios of 50 artists (25 men and 25 women) to the digit ratios of 50 non-artists (25 men and 25 women). Both male and female artists had significantly lower 2D:4D ratios (indicating high testosterone) than male and female controls. These results support the hypothesis that art may represent a sexually selected, typically masculine behavior that advertises the carrier's good genes within a courtship context.

  4. Art as an Indicator of Male Fitness: Does Prenatal Testosterone Influence Artistic Ability?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danae Crocchiola

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In his groundbreaking research, Geoffrey Miller (1999 suggests that artistic and creative displays are male-predominant behaviors and can be considered to be the result of an evolutionary advantage. The outcomes of several surveys conducted on jazz and rock musicians, contemporary painters, English writers (Miller, 1999, and scientists (Kanazawa, 2000 seem to be consistent with the Millerian hypothesis, showing a predominance of men carrying out these activities, with an output peak corresponding to the most fertile male period and a progressive decline in late maturity. One way to evaluate the sex-related hypothesis of artistic and cultural displays, considered as sexual indicators of male fitness, is to focus on sexually dimorphic traits. One of them, within our species, is the 2nd to 4th digit length (2D:4D, which is a marker for prenatal testosterone levels. This study combines the Millerian theories on sexual dimorphism in cultural displays with the digit ratio, using it as an indicator of androgen exposure in utero. If androgenic levels are positively correlated with artistic exhibition, both female and male artists should show low 2D:4D ratios. In this experiment we tested the association between 2D:4D and artistic ability by comparing the digit ratios of 50 artists (25 men and 25 women to the digit ratios of 50 non-artists (25 men and 25 women. Both male and female artists had significantly lower 2D:4D ratios (indicating high testosterone than male and female controls. These results support the hypothesis that art may represent a sexually selected, typically masculine behavior that advertises the carrier's good genes within a courtship context.

  5. Recognizability of Individual Creative Style Within and Across Domains: Preliminary Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Gabora, Liane

    2010-01-01

    It is hypothesized that creativity arises from the self-mending capacity of an internal model of the world, or worldview. The uniquely honed worldview of a creative individual results in a distinctive style that is recognizable within and across domains. It is further hypothesized that creativity is domaingeneral in the sense that there exist multiple avenues by which the distinctiveness of one's worldview can be expressed. These hypotheses were tested using art students and creative writing students. Art students guessed significantly above chance both which painting was done by which of five famous artists, and which artwork was done by which of their peers. Similarly, creative writing students guessed significantly above chance both which passage was written by which of five famous writers, and which passage was written by which of their peers. These findings support the hypothesis that creative style is recognizable. Moreover, creative writing students guessed significantly above chance which of their pee...

  6. Personal exploration: Serendipity and intentionality as altering positions in a creative process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarit Mäkelä

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Artists and designers have recently begun to take an active role in contextualising the creative process in relation to their practice. Thus, understanding how the creative mind proceeds has been supplemented with knowledge obtained inside the creative process. In this way, the spheres of knowledge, material thinking and experience that are fostered through creative work have become entangled and embedded as elemental parts of the research process. This article is based on documentation and reflection of the author’s creative practice in contemporary ceramic art at the beginning of 2015. The article discusses how the creative process proceeds by alternating between two positions: serendipity and intentionality. By describing the different phases of the process, it reveals the interplay between the diverse range of activities and how these gradually construct the creative process

  7. Creative mistrust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenstein, Charles; Rosenberg, Beth

    2012-01-01

    Based on six years spent investigating worker health and safety conditions at U.S. Department of Energy sites that were formerly engaged in the production of nuclear weapons, the authors report on a set of common themes that emerged in their interviews with workers. The initial focus of the authors was on behavior-based safety programs and their investigation revealed deep-seated mistrust of management by workers. The authors discuss the importance of trust issues for worker training and suggest that "creative mistrust" should be cultivated in training programs.

  8. CREATIVE TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd. Ghofur

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this writing is asking English teachers to make a creative teaching, to endeavor increasing their quality in teaching learning process. In these cas the classroom teacher can choose the methods and materials according to the needs of the learners, the preferences teacher, and the constrainst of the school or educational setting and the methods is considered in terms of its links to more general linguistics, psychological, or educational traditions. Finally it will enable teachers to become better informed about the nature, strengths, and weaknesses of methods and approaches so they can better arrive at their own judgement and decisions.

  9. Creative systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    2007-01-01

    At udvikle systemer har altid været et væsentligt element i den arkitektoniske skabelsesproces. Systemer er ikke nødvendigvis begrænsninger, men kan ses som positive faktorer i skabelses og fremstillinsprocessen. Center for Industriel Arkitektur, Cinark, har afholdt en international konference, en...... workshop og en udstilling under overskriften; Creative Systems. Artiklen præsenterer de fire oplægsholdere Matilda McQuaid, Mark West, Stephen Kieran og Ludger Hovestadt og en række diskussionstemaer....

  10. Should artists be government supported activists?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Mazzucotelli

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Public art is a multifaceted field of inquiry; it encompasses a wide variety of creative expressions in the public realm. From memorials and historical monuments to contemporary installations and performance events, the possibilities are endless. Each public art program’s intention varies; definitions and generalizations are not commonly held. Some communities see public art as a way of enhancing or personalizing otherwise impersonal spaces. Others view it as a means to activate civic dialogue or provide a vehicle for the community to express its identity. The process of creating public art necessarily involves interaction among many interests; it is a cooperative, somewhat theaterlike production with many individuals playing a part in creating a common goal. As people of different perspectives and positions seek to make decisions cooperatively, the result can be dynamic, inviting, engaging, and sometimes contentious. Even if it is recognized that past expression of public art spoke universalist and modernist themes, recent practices of public art are characterized by a strong collaborative effort between public artist and the community and are intended both to design the physical appearance of the city and to rebuild the relationship that underpin urban life. In such a context the present paper try to trace changes in the aesthetic content of public art form and to relate those changes to the circumstances in which art is produced, evaluated and rewarded. More specifically it calls into question the new role artists are called to play in contemporary public art and it discusses a change in the relation between art and the society. As far as public art seems to make an explicit commitment to a relationship with the world, the present paper tries on the one hand to contextualize this shift and to discuss its apparent novelty compared to past art practices; on the other hand it seeks to enlighten risk and externalities related to the present

  11. Contributions of an artistic educational program for older people with early dementia: an exploratory qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullán, Ana M; Belver, Manuel H; Badía, Marta; Moreno, Carmen; Garrido, Eugenio; Gómez-Isla, José; Gonzalez-Ingelmo, Elena; Delgado, Juan; Serrano, Isabel; Herrero, Carmen; Manzanera, Paloma; Tejedor, Laura

    2013-07-01

    To describe a contemporary artistic educational program based on photographic cyanotype techniques and to present the results of the program carried out with older people with early dementia. We determined whether these people could participate in the program, their viewpoint about it, and what this program could contribute to their experience. Twenty-one people diagnosed with mild or moderate dementia participated in a series of artistic education workshops. While conducting the workshops, participant observation was carried out, and the participants' engagement was assessed. Upon completing the series, five focus groups were held with the participants with dementia, and another focus group with their professional caretakers. We observed the participants' high level of commitment to the activity and their interest in learning new things. We also observed the participants' satisfaction during the creative process and with their results. The artistic activities not only reinforced the feelings of capacity of the participants with early dementia but also transmitted a positive image of them. Dementia was not an obstacle to participation in the program, which was an opportunity for creativity, learning, enjoyment, and communication for people with dementia. In the authors' opinion, facilitating access to art and artistic education to people with early dementia can contribute to enforcing their rights and to improving the care system.

  12. Creative Turbulence: Experiments in Art and Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonda, Enrico; Dubois, R. Luke; Camnasio, Sara; Porfiri, Maurizio; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Lathrop, Daniel P.; Serrano, Daniel; Ranjan, Devesh

    2016-11-01

    Effective communication of basic research to non-experts is necessary to inspire the public and to justify support for science by the taxpayers. The creative power of art is particularly important to engage an adult audience, who otherwise might not be receptive to standard didactic material. Interdisciplinarity defines new trends in research, and works at the intersection of art and science are growing in popularity, even though they are often isolated experiments. We present a public-facing collaboration between physicists/engineers performing research in fluid dynamics, and audiovisual artists working in cutting-edge media installation and performance. The result of this collaboration is a curated exhibition, with supporting public programming. We present the artworks, the lesson learned from the interactions between artists and scientists, the potential outreach impact and future developments. This project is supported by the APS Public Outreach Mini Grant.

  13. Disturbing pasts: Memories, controversies and creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Wainwright

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This themed issue of the Open Arts Journal, ‘Disturbing pasts: Memories, controversies and creativity’, brings together a range of artists, curators, policy-makers and academics from around the world, who explore creative engagements with controversial and traumatic pasts in art practice, curating and museums. The material is presented in three parts: ‘Difficult Pasts and Public Space’ (writings on historical issues and museums, ‘Visual Investigations’ (artists’ statements and criticism, and ‘Collaborations’ (visual analysis and artist-scholar pairings of writings and original artworks. This collection was developed through a two-year international research project led by Leon Wainwright, which involved three consortia of researchers from universities throughout Europe, and focused on a major public event at the Museum of Ethnology Vienna/ Weltmuseum, Wien (November 2011. The project is funded by HERA (Humanities in the European Research Area, the European Science Foundation.

  14. Theory of Creative Advertising Creative and Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭晨

    2013-01-01

    with the rapid development of society, in people's daily life, advertising creative and media ideas gradual y occupied most of the people's life, and play a huge market driving force. This paper mainly analyzes the creative advertising creative and the media of different location and meaning, to explain the inner link between both.

  15. Improving moral judgments: philosophical considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalis, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304823244

    2010-01-01

    In contemporary moral psychology, an often-heard claim is that knowing how we make moral judgments can help us make better moral judgments. Discussions about moral development and improvement are often framed in terms of the question of which mental processes have a better chance of leading to good

  16. Modeling Rehabilitation Counselor Clinical Judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmer, Douglas C.; Leierer, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    Evaluate three proposed models of the rehabilitation counselor judgment process. Counselors made multiple judgments about clients whose information systematically varied across three dimensions. These data were then analyzed using path analytic techniques to determine which of the models was the best description of the process rehabilitation…

  17. Artistic explorations of the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eberhard E Fetz

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The symbiotic relationships between art and the brain begin with the obvious fact that brain mechanisms underlie the creation and appreciation of art. Conversely, many spectacular images of neural structures have remarkable aesthetic appeal. But beyond its fascinating forms, the many functions performed by brain mechanisms provide a profound subject for aesthetic exploration. Complex interactions in the tangled neural networks in our brain miraculously generate coherent behavior and cognition. Neuroscientists tackle these phenomena with specialized methodologies that limit the scope of exposition and are comprehensible to an initiated minority. Artists can perform an end run around this impasse by representing the brain’s many functions in a manner that can communicate to a wide and receptive audience. This paper explores the ways that brain mechanisms can provide a largely untapped subject for artistic exploration.

  18. Robustness of digital artist authentication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Robert; Nielsen, Morten

    In many cases it is possible to determine the authenticity of a painting from digital reproductions of the paintings; this has been demonstrated for a variety of artists and with different approaches. Common to all these methods in digital artist authentication is that the potential of the method...... is in focus, while the robustness has not been considered, i.e. the degree to which the data collection process influences the decision of the method. However, in order for an authentication method to be successful in practice, it needs to be robust to plausible error sources from the data collection....... In this paper we investigate the robustness of the newly proposed authenticity method introduced by the authors based on second generation multiresolution analysis. This is done by modelling a number of realistic factors that can occur in the data collection....

  19. Best in show [artists' book

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Philippa

    2011-01-01

    This limited edition artists' book explores the phenomenon of prize vegetable growing. Each replica seed packet is over-printed with data that relates to a current world record holder. Further facts appear on the back to help put the statistics into context. The book was produced for a 'call for entries' to submit books that responded to the theme of 'crop'. Concertina book – machine stitched. Printed inkjet, letterpress, typewriter.

  20. An Extraordinary Family of Artists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    ZHEJLANG Province is thehome of an entire family of artists.The father is GuoLinshan,the mother ji Xigui andtheir daughter is Guo Yi.They moldand paint lifelike porcelain andclay sculptures daily.Their exquis-ite china patterns and series of fishplates are unique and colorful.Eachfamily member has is or her ownspecial skill,character and experi-ence,but they share a common pur-suit-art.

  1. Moral judgment in episodic amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Carl F; Keven, Nazim; Kwan, Donna; Kurczek, Jake; Duff, Melissa C; Rosenbaum, R Shayna

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the role of episodic thought about the past and future in moral judgment, we administered a well-established moral judgment battery to individuals with hippocampal damage and deficits in episodic thought (insert Greene et al. 2001). Healthy controls select deontological answers in high-conflict moral scenarios more frequently when they vividly imagine themselves in the scenarios than when they imagine scenarios abstractly, at some personal remove. If this bias is mediated by episodic thought, individuals with deficits in episodic thought should not exhibit this effect. We report that individuals with deficits in episodic memory and future thought make moral judgments and exhibit the biasing effect of vivid, personal imaginings on moral judgment. These results strongly suggest that the biasing effect of vivid personal imagining on moral judgment is not due to episodic thought about the past and future. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The Genre of Judgment. Description and Difficulty in the Anthropology of Ethics

    OpenAIRE

    McKearney, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This is the accepted manuscript. It is currently embargoed pending publication. What part should description play in coming to judgment? Questions about genre have become more important in religious ethics as many seek to reform “thin” models of ethical arbitration by recourse to artistic, literary, and historical descriptions in their texts. In this book discussion, I explore what the consequences would be of pursuing this reform by turning to social anthropology—a discipline that relies ...

  3. An artistic look at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The Japanese artist Mariko Mori visited CERN on 25 May. She met several scientists and found the visit very inspiring. CERN is becoming increasingly popular among artists of all kinds, from filmmakers to photographers, illustrators etc. Mariko Mori is not new to science-inspired artistic works; in 2006 she made Tom Na H-iu, a 3.2 m high glass sculpture illuminated by an internal LED connected in real time to the Super-Kamiokande neutrino detector in Japan. "When I worked with Super-Kamiokande I already had Tom Na H-iu in my mind; this time I am visiting CERN for my personal research", says Mori. "The LHC is a fantastic instrument whose challenge is to find the reality that we don’t know yet. In a way, art is also about creating new reality, although using a completely different approach. For me it is very important to gather information on what the whole scientific world is searching and reaching for: the truth of our existence, the...

  4. Erich Fromm's productivity: creativity as exemplified by Joyce's blooming of Leopold and Molly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Valentina

    2005-01-01

    According to Erich Fromm, the productive character expresses what he called the life force in ways that are, by nature, artistic in quality. His valuing of the vital and the artistic, fueled by this life force in our potential to be human, serves as the cornerstone of his model of psychoanalysis. Gilbert Rose, author of Necessary Illusion: Art as "Witness", also has identified the parallel between analytic and artistic processes, building on the assumption that the therapeutic alliance and the aesthetic alliance are one and the same. In elaborating this assumption and extending the parallel between Rose and Fromm, I draw the conclusion that the qualities of relationships have an impact on one's ability to express oneself creatively, to live an artistic life--that is, to live productively. Psychoanalysis is, in practice, a process that is artistic, creative, and re-creative in nature. To the degree that authentic expression of emotionally charged implicit knowledge of the ineffable (the emotional life that resides deep in the bodymind) results in transformation and healing, the process is artistic in nature. This process is exemplified by examining the life and literary creations of James Joyce, especially Joyce's characters of Molly and Leopold Bloom in Ulysses.

  5. [Lars Hertervig and Carl Fredrik Hill--creativeness and mental illness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkildsen, Øivind; Farbu, Elisabeth

    2005-12-15

    It seems to be a correlation between creativity and mental illnesses like manic-depressive illness and schizophrenia. The reason for this is partly unknown, but neuropsychological investigations have proposed mechanisms which could help to explain this association. Lars Hertervig (1830-1902) and Carl Fredrik Hill (1849-1911) are two famous Scandinavian landscape painters from the end of the 19th century, both of whom suffered from mental illness. This paper describes the artistic development of the two painters and discusses this in relation to how brain diseases may influence creativity and artistic expression.

  6. Sea Changes - ACT : Artists and Scientists collaborating to promote ocean activism and conservation. (www.seachanges.org)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueker, T.

    2012-12-01

    We are a group of ocean scientists, artists, and educators working to publicize the urgent environmental problems facing our ocean environs, including overfishing, climate change and ocean acidification, and environmental degradation due to plastic and other forms of pollution. Our team leader, Kira Carrillo Corser, is an artist and educator known nationally for affecting policy and social change. Our collaboration results from the DNA of Creativity Project - the brainchild of Patricia Frischer, co-ordinator for the San Diego Visual Arts Network (http://dnaofc.weebly.com). The DNA of Creativity funded teams composed of artists and scientists with the goal of fusing the creative energies of both into projects that will enhance the public's perception of creativity, and make the complexities of art and science collaborations accessible to a new and larger audience. Sea Changes - ACT was funded initially by the DNA of Creativity Project. Our project goals are : 1) To entice people to participate in the joys of discovery of art AND science and 2) To motivate the public to work for real, committed and innovative change to protect our oceans. Part of our strategy for achieving our goals is to create a traveling art installation to illustrate the beauty of the oceans and to instill in our viewers the joys of discovery and creativity that we as scientists and artists pursue. And following this, to make the destructive changes occurring in the ocean and the future consequences more visible and understandable. We will develop lesson plans to integrate our ideas into the educational system and we are documenting our collaborative and creative process to inform future art-science collaborations. Finally, after emotionally connecting with our viewers to provide a means to ACT to make real and positive CHANGES for the future. Our project aims to build commitment and action for environmental conservation and stewardship as we combine scientific research with ways to take action

  7. Teaching for Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Allison Antink

    2012-01-01

    Science teachers are often content to leave creativity to the arts and humanities classes. Fostering creativity in science, if attempted at all, is a challenge often relegated to the gifted classroom. But not just the privileged few have the capacity to be creative. Simply restructuring existing lessons can help promote creativity in all science…

  8. Designing Creative Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Cochrane

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Designing creative learning environments involves not only facilitating student creativity, but also modeling creative pedagogical practice. In this paper we explore the implementation of a framework for designing creative learning environments using mobile social media as a catalyst for redefining both lecturer pedagogical practice, as well as redesigning the curriculum around student generated m-portfolios.

  9. Creativity for a Purpose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Hellen

    2011-01-01

    Creativity in primary science is even more important now than when it was first raised with the publication of the report "All our futures: creativity, culture and education." Creativity needs to involve both the teacher and the children. Exciting, creative and practical opportunities provided by the teacher will increase children's motivation and…

  10. Teaching for Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Allison Antink

    2012-01-01

    Science teachers are often content to leave creativity to the arts and humanities classes. Fostering creativity in science, if attempted at all, is a challenge often relegated to the gifted classroom. But not just the privileged few have the capacity to be creative. Simply restructuring existing lessons can help promote creativity in all science…

  11. Lay Theories of Creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritter, Simone; Rietzschel, Eric; Zedelius, Claire; Müller, Barbara; Schooler, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Creativity is of great appeal and importance to people, and they strive to understand creativity by developing lay theories. Such lay theories about creativity concern, for example, the characteristics of creative persons, such as the ‘mad genius’ idea, or environmental factors that contribute to

  12. Creativity for designers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an introduction to modern and interdisciplinary concepts related to creativity and creative processes. The selected topics are of special relevance to professionals of any kind in connection with their work as designers. Some useful creative tools and approaches are also...... outlined. Finally, practical recommendations to enhance and apply creative work in design are elaborated....

  13. Designing Creative Learning Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Cochrane; Laurent Antonczak

    2015-01-01

    Designing creative learning environments involves not only facilitating student creativity, but also modeling creative pedagogical practice. In this paper we explore the implementation of a framework for designing creative learning environments using mobile social media as a catalyst for redefining both lecturer pedagogical practice, as well as redesigning the curriculum around student generated m-portfolios.

  14. Domain-Specificity of Creativity: A Study on the Relationship Between Visual Creativity and Visual Mental Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmiero, Massimiliano; Nori, Raffaella; Aloisi, Vincenzo; Ferrara, Martina; Piccardi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Creativity refers to the capability to catch original and valuable ideas and solutions. It involves different processes. In this study the extent to which visual creativity is related to cognitive processes underlying visual mental imagery was investigated. Fifty college students (25 women) carried out: the Creative Synthesis Task, which measures the ability to produce creative objects belonging to a given category (originality, synthesis and transformation scores of pre-inventive forms, and originality and practicality scores of inventions were computed); an adaptation of Clark’s Drawing Ability Test, which measures the ability to produce actual creative artworks (graphic ability, esthetic, and creativity scores of drawings were assessed) and three mental imagery tasks that investigate the three main cognitive processes involved in visual mental imagery: generation, inspection and transformation. Vividness of imagery and verbalizer–visualizer cognitive style were also measured using questionnaires. Correlation analysis revealed that all measures of the creativity tasks positively correlated with the image transformation imagery ability; practicality of inventions negatively correlated with vividness of imagery; originality of inventions positively correlated with the visualization cognitive style. However, regression analysis confirmed the predictive role of the transformation imagery ability only for the originality score of inventions and for the graphic ability and esthetic scores of artistic drawings; on the other hand, the visualization cognitive style predicted the originality of inventions, whereas the vividness of imagery predicted practicality of inventions. These results are consistent with the notion that visual creativity is domain- and task-specific. PMID:26648904

  15. Usina do Trabalho do Ator: creative (misdirection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Andrade Pereira

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the creative process of the theatre group Usina do Trabalho do Ator – UTA – from the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. It presents an overview of some spectacles of the group since its creation, questioning the notion of actor/author, and staging as narrative. It also discusses the limits between reality and fiction in the spectacles of UTA. The analysis is basically guided by Walter Benjamin’s writings on experience, narration and tradition. It also deals with the concepts of artistic creation from French essayist Paul Valéry.

  16. Mastering openFrameworks creative coding demystified

    CERN Document Server

    Yanc, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This book gives clear and effective instructions, stuffed with practical examples, to build your own fun, stunning and highly-interactive openFrameworks applications. Each chapter is focused differently and has a new theme to it,This book targets visual artists, designers, programmers and those interested in creative coding by getting started with openFrameworks. This book will help you understand the capabilities of openFrameworks to help you create visually stunning and fully interactive applications. You should have a basic knowledge of object oriented programming, such as C++, Java, Python

  17. Beyond Oil on Canvas: New Media and Presentation Formats Challenge International Copyright Law’s Ability to Protect the Interests of the Contemporary Artist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Ann Torsen

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Current copyright laws in all jurisdictions are lacking explicit provisions for protecting many types of contemporary art. It remains unclear to what extent ideas should be copyrightable as art, if at all; or whether an artwork’s commercial nature provides a decisive factor regarding appropriation. Certain situations seem plainly inappropriate, such as artists needing to seek legal counsel in conjunction with creating their artwork: inappropriate in its financial extravagance and in its inevitable curb on creativity. As such, it is incumbent upon courts and legislatures to analyze the issue and to provide guidance. It is the author’s finding that strong moral rights and a vibrant public domain are not necessarily at odds with each other, especially when parties are open to communication. Laws operate to provide structure when parties do not make other arrangements amongst themselves; contracts between artists and galleries, artists and publishers, even artists and other artists may provide the highest degree of satisfaction for specific parties to a specific situation. Not surprisingly, parties with legal or business interests in art and parties with artistic interests in art would communicate better if they understood each other’s situations. Hopefully the issues will continue to be the focus of some thought on all platforms such that informed legal decisions can be made and artists can pursue and protect their creative productions, no matter their format.

  18. The Artist's Lens: Capturing the World in the Visible and Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, J. S.; Webley, P.; Dehn, J.

    2014-12-01

    We go about our daily lives with our primary sensory input in the visible spectrum. This is but only one of the many available spectra that artists and scientists alike can use to capture and analyze how the world works. Each artist's creative voice comes from individual experiences and their philosophy on how to portray the world around us. Adding infrared technology to the artist's toolkit creates a new opportunity to glimpse into our world through a different set of lenses. By using both the subjective artist's-eye and the critical scientist's mind, we gain unique yet complementary viewpoints when we observe the same physical processes. Using digital SLR and thermal imaging cameras, we will capture still imagery and high-definition videos, at multiple frames per second. We will present examples, such as heat loss in cold environments over time, analyses of different rock structures, and the significance of emissivity on infrared measurements. We will show how these two spectra, the visible and infrared, together provide a novel outreach tool to visualize artistic and scientific principles. Our aim is to cultivate the interest of students of all ages in the arts and geophysical sciences and allow us all to learn more about the world in which we live.

  19. Measuring Artistically Gifted Students' Attitudes toward Technology Using Modified Fennema Sherman Attitudes Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Dantzler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study measured artistically gifted students’ attitudes toward technology and compared them to their math/science peers. Researchers administered the English version of the Modified Fennema Sherman Attitudes Scales (M-FSAS to 149 students enrolled at a residential school (grades 7 – 12 for the artistically and math/science gifted (108 female, 41 male. Analyses revealed no multivariate difference between arts concentrations; however, there was a statistically significant multivariate difference between math/science students and arts students. Further univariate analyses indicated statistically significant differences in all areas except in the gender differences subscale. Math/science students had lower M-FSAS scores, which equate to stronger attitudes surrounding technology. Results suggest that artistically gifted students do not perceive technology as being as relevant to their lives as their math/science gifted peers. For this artistically gifted sample, these results potentially represent fewer career opportunities and creative outlets. Based on these results, educators should imbed into the curriculum opportunities for artistically gifted students to utilize technology for career-oriented purposes. Key Words:

  20. Experiments in Creative Climate Journalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintisch, E. S.

    2011-12-01

    Creative experiments in climate journalism are my aim during a one year fellowship at a university. The goal is to engage the audience's senses, mind, and hopefully, imagination in work about Earth's climate. The work is done in collaboration with students, artists, scientists, musicians and actors, all marshalled to explain how the warming planet works through engaging and innovative means. This session will feature video examples of using design or music to visualize climate data. A video using improvisational actors drinking Red Bull to bring the concept of climate sensitivity to life will be shown. A glossy card designed to spoof an airline safety instruction card will be displayed; its design explains geoengineering techniques and their risks. In doing this work I have benefitted from a fellowship at Massachusetts Institute for Technology, which has provided the precious gift of time and creative atmosphere. I am on leave from Science magazine. I will report on what has and hadn't worked in fostering new means of communicating science in an academic setting. The session will also explore the shifting role of the journalist in this new space. The challenges take me beyond simply using words as a medium between science and the public. I find myself as a convener or producer in engendering partnerships between scientists and great communicators like actors, sculptors or filmmakers.

  1. Creativity for Operational Researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents some modern and interdisciplinary concepts about creativity and creative processes specially related to problem solving. Central publications of Creativity- OR are brie y reviewed. Creative tools and approaches suitable to support OR work are also presented. Finally, the paper...... outlines the author's experiences using creative tools and approaches to: Facilitation of problem solving processes, strategy development in organisations, and design of optimisation systems for large scale and complex logistic systems....

  2. Creativity for Problem Solvers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents some modern and interdisciplinary concepts about creativity and creative processes specially related to problem solving. Central publications related to the theme are briefly reviewed. Creative tools and approaches suitable to support problem solving are also presented. Finally......, the paper outlines the author’s experiences using creative tools and approaches to: Facilitation of problem solving processes, strategy development in organisations, design of optimisation systems for large scale and complex logistic systems, and creative design of software optimisation for complex non...

  3. Creativity for Operational Researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents some modern and interdisciplinary concepts about creativity and creative processes specially related to problem solving. Central publications of Creativity- OR are brie y reviewed. Creative tools and approaches suitable to support OR work are also presented. Finally, the paper...... outlines the author's experiences using creative tools and approaches to: Facilitation of problem solving processes, strategy development in organisations, and design of optimisation systems for large scale and complex logistic systems....

  4. Creativity for Operational Researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents some modern and interdisciplinary concepts about creativity and creative processes specially related to problem solving. Central publications of Creativity-OR are briefly reviewed. Creative tools and approaches suitable to support OR work are also presented. Finally, the paper...... outlines the author's experiences using creative tools and approaches to: Facilitation of problem solving processes, strategy development in organisations, and design of optimisation systems for large scale and complex logistic systems....

  5. Brain illness and creativity: mechanisms and treatment risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Alice W

    2011-03-01

    Brain diseases and their treatment may help or hurt creativity in ways that shape quality of life. Increased creative drive is associated with bipolar disorder, depression, psychosis, temporal lobe epilepsy, frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson disease treatments, and autism. Creativity depends on goal-driven approach motivation from midbrain dopaminergic systems. Fear-driven avoidance motivation is of less aid to creativity. When serotonin and norepinephrine lower motivation and flexible behaviour, they can inhibit creativity. Hemispheric lateralization and frontotemporal connections must interact to create new ideas and conceptual schemes. The right brain and temporal lobe contribute skill in novelty detection, while the left brain and frontal lobe foster approach motivation and more easily generate new patterns of action from the novel perceptions. Genes and phenotypes that increase plasticity and creativity in tolerant environments with relaxed selection pressure may confer risk in rigorous environments. Few papers substantively address this important but fraught topic. Antidepressants (ADs) that inhibit fear-driven motivation, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, sometimes inhibit goal-oriented motivation as well. ADs that boost goal-directed motivation, such as bupropion, may remediate this effect. Benzodiazepines and alcohol may be counterproductive. Although dopaminergic agonists sometimes stimulate creativity, their doing so may inappropriately disinhibit behaviour. Dopamine antagonists may suppress creative motivation; lithium and anticonvulsant mood stabilizers may do so less. Physical exercise and REM sleep may help creativity. Art therapy and psychotherapy are not well studied. Preserving creative motivation can help creativity and other aspects of well-being in all patients, not just artists or researchers.

  6. Pentingnya Pengetahuan Anatomi untuk 3D Artist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Sugito Kurniawan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available No matter how far the current technological advances, anatomical knowledge will still be needed as a basis for making a good character design. Understanding anatomy will help us in the placement of the articulation of muscles and joints, thus more realistic modeling of 3d characters will be achieved in the form and movement. As a 3d character artist, anatomy should be able to inform in every aspect of our work. Each 3D/CG (Computer Graphics-artist needs to know how to use software applications, but what differentiates a 3d artist with a computer operator is an artistic vision and understanding of the basic shape of the human body. Artistic vision could not easily be taught, but a CG-artist may study it on their own from which so many reference sources may help understand and deepen their knowledge of anatomy.

  7. Pentingnya Pengetahuan Anatomi Untuk 3D Artist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Sugito Kurniawan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available No matter how far the current technological advances, anatomical knowledge will still be needed as a basis for making a good character design. Understanding anatomy will help us in the placement of the articulation of muscles and joints, thus more realistic modeling of 3d characters will be achieved in the form and movement. As a 3d character artist, anatomy should be able to inform in every aspect of our work. Each 3D/CG (Computer Graphics-artist needs to know how to use software applications, but what differentiates a 3d artist with a computer operator is an artistic vision and understanding of the basic shape of the human body. Artistic vision could not easily be taught, but a CG-artist may study it on their own from which so many reference sources may help understand and deepen their knowledge of anatomy.  

  8. Polygenic risk scores for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder predict creativity.

    OpenAIRE

    Power, Robert A.; Steinberg, Stacy; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Nivard, Michel M; Johannesson, Magnus; Galesloot, Tessel E.; Hottenga, Jouke J.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Cesarini, David; Benjamin, Daniel J.; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Ullén, Fredrik; Tiemeier, Henning

    2015-01-01

    To access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the page We tested whether polygenic risk scores for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder would predict creativity. Higher scores were associated with artistic society membership or creative profession in both Icelandic (P = 5.2 × 10(-6) and 3.8 × 10(-6) for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder scores, respectively) and replication cohorts (P = 0.0021 and 0.00086). This could not be accounted for by...

  9. Visual and Artistic Functions of Letters Khaghani’s Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. M. Zolfaghari

    Full Text Available The intensity of emotion and vibration of meaning in the poet's mind causes him to go beyond the ordinary language and through metaphors, similes and linguistic preparation he conveys intellectual and emotional meanings. He has a sharp eye and a sensitive spirit and creative temprement and by inventing new images shows the creativity and imagination in various arenas and attempts in the way of literary strength and creating personal style and this point more than anything else must be done by presenting images and newness. Perhaps in the sixth century, and especially in Azerbaijani school, more than other periods, poets have been looking for creating innovative style in eloquence. Their major attempts were mainly in imaging, it was a wide field that they have competed and it is natural that in this illustration the alphabet letters would be very helpful. Khaghani poetry as one of the greatest poets of this school has the perfect poetrical book of painting and meaning, and delicated pattern in new and different scientific, cultural and religious paintings and letters are a broad range of elements that put a new field in front of the poet and he is aware of the potential features of the letters and also the new images and the artistic creativity.This paper shows descriptive - analytical study of various aspects of Khaghani’s poetry and frequency of letters in the alphabet, authentic images based on alphabet, taken at different pseudo relevance of poetry in the context of multiple semantic and literal characters, making figures of speech based on literary characters, images and characters and the sense of connection . . . which has been shown in his poetry.Letter has double and even multiple uses in Khaghani poetic works (divan and more than the construction of words which is the real and common sense that is used as an artistic. There is a world in the heart of every letter, word and morpheme lies in the poet's point of view is the last and

  10. Incorporating characteristics of human creativity into an evolutionary art algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    DiPaola, Steve

    2010-01-01

    A perceived limitation of evolutionary art and design algorithms is that they rely on human intervention; the artist selects the most aesthetically pleasing variants of one generation to produce the next. This paper discusses how computer generated art and design can become more creatively human-like with respect to both process and outcome. As an example of a step in this direction, we present an algorithm that overcomes the above limitation by employing an automatic fitness function. The goal is to evolve abstract portraits of Darwin, using our 2nd generation fitness function which rewards genomes that not just produce a likeness of Darwin but exhibit certain strategies characteristic of human artists. We note that in human creativity, change is less choosing amongst randomly generated variants and more capitalizing on the associative structure of a conceptual network to hone in on a vision. We discuss how to achieve this fluidity algorithmically.

  11. An interview-based study of professional creative activity with inter-domain comparisons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre; Botella, Marion; Bourgeois, Samira;

    of cultural and contextual influences and three types of professional cultures that foster creativity will be discussed based on the systemic model of creativity (Feldman, Csikszentmihalyi & Gardner, 1994). In the end, practical suggestions to improve creativity and innovation management will be offered......From a cultural psychology perspective, culture exists not only at the level of national units but also at the more basic level of communities within nations. Professional groups are a good example of cultural communities. Creativity “uses” culture to “produce” culture (Glăveanu, 2011). Artists......, designers and scientists represent distinctive professional cultures associated with recognized forms of creative activity because the expression of creativity appears to be culture-specific (Bhawuk, 2003; Lubart, 1999; Weiner, 2000). The research presented here explores the main factors required...

  12. Transitions of Creatives?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjællegaard, Cecilie Bryld

    The degree of transferability of skills and knowledge from an creative occupation in the creative industries to the wider economy is a great point of discussion within research in the arts and cultural and creative industries. By applying human capital theory on the labor market for creatives......, this paper investigates the relationship between creative occupation and industry human capital and hourly wage after transitioning to a non-creative occupation and/ or industry. Further, it is investigated how the distance of the transition mediates the relationship between creative occupation and industry...... specific human capital and hourly wage. By making use of a matched employer-employee dataset from the Denmark from 1994 to 2007, wage equation are estimated. The results suggest that a transition from a creative occupation to a non-creative occupation results in an increase in the hourly wage...

  13. The Creative Soccer Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johan Torp Rasmussen, Ludvig; Østergaard, Lars Domino

    2016-01-01

    Creativity is essential in soccer due to the unpredictable and complex situations occurring in the game, where stereotypical play gradually loses its efficiency. Further, creativity is an important psychological factor for the development of soccer expertise, and valuing creativity increases...... satisfaction and well-being. Although creative players are highly desired by coaches, the subject of cultivating creativity is mostly ignored and traditional training settings may even hamper the players' creativity. The purpose of this article is to introduce a novel approach for enhancing soccer players......' creativity, The Creative Soccer Platform (TCSP), and to demonstrate the implications of applying it in youth soccer practice, by means of soccer-specific creativity exercises. TCSP encompasses four theoretically based didactic principles (task focus, parallel thinking, horizontal thinking, and no experienced...

  14. Cloze, Maze, and Teacher Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikulski, John J.; Pikulski, Edna C.

    1977-01-01

    When cloze and maze scores are compared with teacher judgment in establishing the independent, instructional, and fustration levels of students, both techniques tend to overestimate a child's ability. (HOD)

  15. Structural flexibility of moral judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, D L; Denton, K L; Vermeulen, S C; Carpendale, J I; Bush, A

    1991-12-01

    One of the central assumptions of Kohlberg's theory of moral development--that moral judgment is organized in structures of the whole--was examined. Thirty men and 30 women were given 2 dilemmas from Kohlberg's Moral Judgment Interview, a 3rd involving prosocial behavior, and a 4th involving impaired driving. Half the Ss responded to the prosocial and impaired-driving dilemmas from the perspective of a hypothetical character, and half responded from the perspective of the self. No sex or perspective differences in moral maturity were observed. Ss scored highest in moral maturity on Kohlberg's dilemmas, intermediate on the prosocial dilemma, and lowest on the impaired-driving dilemma. In partial support of Kohlberg's contention that his test assesses moral competence, there was a negative linear relationship between scores on his test and the proportion of Stage 2 judgments on the 2 other dilemmas. An interactional model of moral judgment is advanced.

  16. ARTISTIC VISUALIZATION OF TRAJECTORY DATA USING CLOUD MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapid advance of location acquisition technologies boosts the generation of trajectory data, which track the traces of moving objects. A trajectory is typically represented by a sequence of timestamped geographical locations. Data visualization is an efficient means to represent distributions and structures of datasets and reveal hidden patterns in the data. In this paper, we explore a cloud model-based method for the generation of stylized renderings of trajectory data. The artistic visualizations of the proposed method do not have the goal to allow for data mining tasks or others but instead show the aesthetic effect of the traces of moving objects in a distorted manner. The techniques used to create the images of traces of moving objects include the uncertain line using extended cloud model, stroke-based rendering of geolocation in varying styles, and stylistic shading with aesthetic effects for print or electronic displays, as well as various parameters to be further personalized. The influence of different parameters on the aesthetic qualities of various painted images is investigated, including step size, types of strokes, colour modes, and quantitative comparisons using four aesthetic measures are also involved into the experiment. The experimental results suggest that the proposed method is with advantages of uncertainty, simplicity and effectiveness, and it would inspire professional graphic designers and amateur users who may be interested in playful and creative exploration of artistic visualization of trajectory data.

  17. Computational Social Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Rob; Bown, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the development of computational models of creativity where social interactions are central. We refer to this area as computational social creativity. Its context is described, including the broader study of creativity, the computational modeling of other social phenomena, and computational models of individual creativity. Computational modeling has been applied to a number of areas of social creativity and has the potential to contribute to our understanding of creativity. A number of requirements for computational models of social creativity are common in artificial life and computational social science simulations. Three key themes are identified: (1) computational social creativity research has a critical role to play in understanding creativity as a social phenomenon and advancing computational creativity by making clear epistemological contributions in ways that would be challenging for other approaches; (2) the methodologies developed in artificial life and computational social science carry over directly to computational social creativity; and (3) the combination of computational social creativity with individual models of creativity presents significant opportunities and poses interesting challenges for the development of integrated models of creativity that have yet to be realized.

  18. Thinking About Thinking: Enhancing Creativity and Understanding in Operational Planners

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    correctly identified 96 per cent of the students whose products were rated by teachers as artistically creative.114 Similarly, the Life Experience...should also stress the mere exercise of thinking about what you know, or do not know, or what you understand or do not understand is not a futile... labour , think tanks, and the policy process. International Journal of Press/Politics 14, no. 1: 3-20. Scott, Ginamarie M., Devin C. Lonergan, and

  19. Judgments of paintings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Dragan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the structure of the judgements of paintings was investigated. In the preliminary study, the subjects were asked to describe their subjective experience of paintings producing a list of attributes. The set of 76 most frequent attributes was selected and transformed into a bipolar 7-step scale (e.g. beautiful-ugly, strong-weak, interesting-boring etc. In the central part of the study, 200 subjects judged paintings on 76 scales. The paintings were grouped into two subgroups, A (200 paintings and B (200 paintings. This part of the study was conducted in two steps. In the first step, 200 subjects judged one of the 200 paintings from the subgroup A (each painting was judged only by one subject, whereas in the second step the same 200 subjects judged 200 paintings from the subgroup B (each painting was judged only by one subject.. Two simple data matrices, A and B, and one complex matrix A + B (string out matrix: matrix B is continued under the matrix A were obtained. The factor analyses (Promax and Orthoblique rotation have shown the consistency of a four factor extraction for three matrices (A, B i A+B using both rotation methods: Evaluation (clever, balanced, interesting, etc., Potency (rich, dense, relaxing etc., Cognitive factor (clear, ordinary, stimulative, etc. and Dynamics (provoking, tense, creative.

  20. 'Killing the angel in the house': creativity, femininity and aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, R

    1998-08-01

    The author brings to bear an art historical perspective on the psychoanalytic understanding of creativity as an object relationship, proposing that the creative endeavour is determined by a wider, more complex network of internal and external object relationships than is usually assumed. The workings of tradition, language, contemporary practices, methods and materials are explored. Creative block is considered in the context of the determining relationships, with particular reference to the role of aggression. The position of the latter within psychoanalytic theories of creativity is surveyed and it is proposed that aggression has a pivotal place not primarily in instituting sublimation, reparation or reaction formation but simply because the processes of creativity demand it. Virginia Woolf's image of 'Killing the Angel in the House' is analysed and used to track the implications of gender, focusing on the concept of the muse. It is pointed out that traditionally, the fear, guilt and anxiety associated with aggressive creativity has been mediated by the muse, which is compared to the internal good object. Drawing on art history, artists' statements, and clinical material, the author illustrates the disparate means by which the presence of 'muse' can be internalised to infuse the relationships that constitute creativity.

  1. The Creative Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrge, Christian; Hansen, Søren

    This book is about introducing more creativity into general educational courses and cross-disciplinary activities. It is directed toward teachers at all levels in the educational system, but the Creative Platform is a general model, and thus the creative process will fundamentally be the same...... whether you consider thirdgrade teaching, human-resource development, or radical new thinking in product development in a company. The Creative Platform was developed at Aalborg University through a series of research-and-development activities in collaboration with educational institutions and private...... you can use in your work with the Creative Platform. This book is intended as an introduction on how to use the Creative Platform....

  2. CREATIVITY AS A SUCCESS FACTOR IN PROMOTIONAL ASPECT OF PRODUCTS IN PRODUCTION COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan Arapi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The creativity, as a general concept, is considered an activity which gives birth to something new that did not exist before. This topic can be affected also from the philosophical and physiological point of view. The psychology of creativity studies “Psychological Mechanism” from which stem the actions of creativity.In promotion terms there are different points of views that are considered to be an integral part of creativity in the field of product advertising.  First, there are people who estimate if the promotion is creative whereas on the other side the effect only in cases where you succeeded to sell the product. Second, there are people who consider their creativity or design of the promotion as their originality artistic or esthetical value.What constitutes the creativity in one of the elements of the promotion is distinguishing and entertaining idea of being different from the others, but the creative message must be short and clear. Advertisements or promotional campaigns that are creative rarely fail to transmit their message to the public consumer. In this case, the entire team that is engaged in planning and developing the promotional campaign must balance their attitudes around the creative idea.This research presents the development of ideas and designs of creative promotional spaces for Kosovar companies in cases of the advertisement of their new and existing products in the market. The methodology of this research will be descriptive and comparative between a few manufacturing Kosovar companies.

  3. Research on Judgment Aggregation Based on Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Dai

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Preference aggregation and judgment aggregation are two basic research models of group decision making. And preference aggregation has been deeply studied in social choice theory. However, researches of social choice theory gradually focus on judgment aggregation which appears recently. Judgment aggregation focuses on how to aggregate many consistent logical formulas into one, from the perspective of logic. We try to start with judgment aggregation model based on logic and then explore different solutions to problem of judgment aggregation.

  4. ЕMPATHY AS CONDITIONS OF HUMAN CREATIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara N. Matyukh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the history of aesthetics the problem of art creativity long time hasn't realized by the greater part of researchers in total of all its structural elements. It formed a rather paradoxical situation, because definition of aesthetics is always a part of it, such as art and – simultaneously – the issue is no science that reveals the essence of the person who creates the art. The purpose of this article is to study empathy as a special manifestation of human sensibility in the process flow of the creative act that reveals the essence of the artist's creative activity, developed sensuality is transformed into a work of art. Methodological and theoretical basis of the study was a combination of systemic, structural-functional and hermeneutic approaches; psychological and philosophical concepts of empathy problems and theoretical analysis of foreign and domestic literature in the field of philosophy, aesthetics, psychology. The scientific novelty of the research results is determined by the subject of study. The problem of art itself is in the field of modern aesthetic science, but in the context of its consideration of empathy reveals new theoretical aspects that deepen the level of processing and correcting the problem. Conclusions. Empathy, being a particular manifestation of human sensibility, is a necessary condition for creativity. After analyzing the nature of human creativity we came to the conclusion that the basis of the embodiment of sensibility of the artist in a work of art is a process of empathy. It is noted that the method of empathy is one of heuristic methods of creative activity, which is based on a process of empathy, i.e. identification of the object and the subject of creativity, "use", and creator inherent in any field of activity and is widely used in solving problems of art.

  5. The painful muse: migrainous artistic archetypes from visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguggia, Marco; Grassi, Enrico

    2014-05-01

    Neurological diseases which constituted traditionally obstacles to artistic creation can, in the case of migraine, be transformed by the artists into a source of inspiration and artistic production. These phenomena represent a chapter of a broader embryonic neurobiology of painting.

  6. Being an Artist Teacher: A Liberating Identity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Education as a liberating and democratic process remains an aim and belief in discourses within the field and beyond. The arts also have a tradition in which "artistic freedom" is valued even if what constitutes artistic freedom is contested. In this article an educational discourse in which dialogue is considered a means to personal and…

  7. In My Opinion: The Teaching Artist's Armament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Judith Lynne

    2004-01-01

    In 2003, the Arts Education Partnership's Second National Forum on Partnerships Improving Teaching in the Arts recommends that Teaching Artists be trained to be advocates and to speak publicly to education stakeholders about what they do. The author agrees. However, she believes that Teaching Artists must familiarize themselves with the available…

  8. Moving Image Artist Midi Onodera's Vidoodles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Midi Onodera

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available As an acknowledgement of Midi Onodera's long and productive career as a Canadian artist and filmmaker who has consistently demonstrated critical engagement with her subjects and her chosen media, we have invited her to be the guest artist-filmmaker for the inaugural issue of Imaginations: Journal of Cross-Cultural Image Studies.

  9. Contour Line Portraits: Excited about Artistic Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Kari Gertz

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a self-portrait project that encouraged students, boosted their self-confidence, and got them excited about their artistic abilities--while producing amazing results. This lesson effectively develops artistic ability by compelling students to see that drawing is quite simply breaking down objects into the…

  10. Artists-In-Schools Planning Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Dakota Arts Council, Sioux Falls.

    This planning guide provides artists, project directors, and representatives from schools and communities with practical suggestions for a successful residency. The manual describes the sponsor's responsibilities and role in conducting a successful Artists-In-Schools residency. Included are ideas for supplementing a residency program with teacher…

  11. The Artistic Glamour of Wuthering Heights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wenyan

    2012-01-01

    Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights is a classical masterpiece,known as"the most peculiar novel"in the English literature.The paper focuses on its structure and main idea,so as to reveal its thrilling artistic glamour and its artistic style.

  12. Eugene Dening: Young Artist from Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, James H.

    2009-01-01

    Eugene Dening, an emerging artist in Canada, recently earned his Bachelors degree at the Calvin College (Grand Rapids, MI). This essay on his artwork explores the value of art making to LGBT youth, those gay and lesbian artists who have influenced their work, and those queer and critical readings practices that one can apply to arts' viewing.…

  13. Eugene Dening: Young Artist from Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, James H.

    2009-01-01

    Eugene Dening, an emerging artist in Canada, recently earned his Bachelors degree at the Calvin College (Grand Rapids, MI). This essay on his artwork explores the value of art making to LGBT youth, those gay and lesbian artists who have influenced their work, and those queer and critical readings practices that one can apply to arts' viewing.…

  14. Dopaminergic Dysregulation, Artistic Expressiveness, and Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. López-Pousa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most frequent behavioral manifestations in Parkinson’s disease (PD are attributed to the dopaminergic dysregulation syndrome (DDS, which is considered to be secondary to the iatrogenic effects of the drugs that replace dopamine. Over the past few years some cases of patients improving their creative abilities after starting treatment with dopaminergic pharmaceuticals have been reported. These effects have not been clearly associated to DDS, but a relationship has been pointed out. Methods: Case study of a patient with PD. The evolution of her paintings along medication changes and disease advance has been analyzed. Results: The patient showed a compulsive increase of pictorial production after the diagnosis of PD was made. She made her best paintings when treated with cabergolide, and while painting, she reported a feeling of well-being, with loss of awareness of the disease and reduction of physical limitations. Conclusions: Dopaminergic antagonists (DA trigger a dopaminergic dysfunction that alters artistic creativity in patients having a predisposition for it. The development of these skills might be due to the dopaminergic overstimulation due to the therapy with DA, which causes a neurophysiological alteration that globally determines DDS.

  15. Creativity in language teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack C Richards

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available One quality among the many that characterize effective teachers is the ability to bring a creative disposition to teaching. In second language teaching, creativity has also been linked to levels of attainment in language learning. Many of the language tasks favored by contemporary language teaching methods are believed to release creativity in learners – particularly those involving studentcentred, interaction-based, and open-ended elements. Drawing on teacher narratives and conversations with teachers, the notion of creativity in language teaching is explored from three different perspectives: 1. the qualities creative teachers possess. 2. how teachers apply creativity in their teaching. 3. how creativity can be supported in the school. Examples illustrate how creative teachers’ conceptualize their approaches to teaching.

  16. The Creative Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrge, Christian; Hansen, Søren

    whether you consider thirdgrade teaching, human-resource development, or radical new thinking in product development in a company. The Creative Platform was developed at Aalborg University through a series of research-and-development activities in collaboration with educational institutions and private......This book is about introducing more creativity into general educational courses and cross-disciplinary activities. It is directed toward teachers at all levels in the educational system, but the Creative Platform is a general model, and thus the creative process will fundamentally be the same...... companies. It is a project in which the goal is to make a hands-on approach to a knowledge perspective on enhancing creativity. The underlying ambition of the Creative Platform is to make it easier to promote creativity. At www.uka.aau.dk/The+Creative+Platform, you can find extra materials and instructions...

  17. Bisociation of artistic and academic methodologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinrich, Falk

    This paper elaborates on the integration of academic and artistic methodologies within the field of art and technology. The term art and technology refers to a recognized research field and to higher education programmes, such as the BA program Art and Technology at Aalborg University. Art...... and discovery. Koestler proposes the concept of bisociation for academic discoveries and artistic revealings alike by looking at the results of this creation (work of art, scientific discovery). However, my question is, whether the blending of academic and artistic discourses and methodologies––being a second...... and codes by extrapolating from existing descriptions of relevant academic and artistic methodologies and their key assumptions such as artistic genius and knowledgeable scientist and tacit and explicit knowledge. The interplay between existing theories and between theories and the author’s own experience...

  18. The medico-artistic phenomenon and its implications for medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, G M; Albury, W R

    2010-01-01

    A better understanding of the relationship between medicine and art could have significant implications for the role of the creative arts in medical education. This study seeks to contribute to that understanding by providing an overview of the involvement of medical practitioners in artistic creation from the Renaissance to the present--based on historical material, statements published by medico-artists in professional journals, and an informal survey of members of a Medical Art Society. Our findings support the hypothesis that there are close links between medical practice and artistic creativity, and that individuals who engage in both forms of activity find the interaction beneficial. The implications of this hypothesis are that the inclusion of practical art training in the medical curriculum would not only enrich the experience of medical students during their education, but would also enhance their later wellbeing, both while they are engaged in medical practice and after they have retired. Although this study is preliminary, we believe that we have identified a consistent relationship which, if established, would have significant implications for medical education, and which therefore merits further investigation by psychological, sociological and educational researchers. The article concludes with some suggestions for further research.

  19. On Standard and Taste. Wittgenstein and Aesthetic Judgment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Cometti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The question of aesthetic judgment is related to a lot of paradoxes that have marked sustainably the reflection on arts, and even arts as such during their modern history. These paradoxes have found a first formulation, apparently clear, in the very famous Hume's essay: "On the standard of taste", but without to lead to a real resolution. In this paper, I would like to approach the question of Hume by starting from what Wittgenstein suggested about aesthetic judgment in his Cambridge lectures. To this end, I will try to give a wittgensteinian reading of Hume's essay, in order to show that though the question of aesthetic judgment makes certainly sense, the way of considering it - like the way Kant shall consider it later - can be regarded as typical of difficulties Wittgenstein tried to overcome in his investigations on rules. By giving an alternative formulation to this question, we should be able to examine differently the problems of the aesthetic judgment, to underline more precisely the originality of Wittgenstein's approach, and perhaps to better grasp what are its consequences, not only for a better comprehension of the relationship between Wittgenstein’s philosophy and art, but for the type of perplexity to which we must face everytime we meet the paradox inherent to the question of aesthetic appreciation as such: how can we conceive the very idea of a standard involving a normative meaning without making to faint what gives to a work of art its value. We shall see that Wittgenstein’s suggestions, though their contribution to a better understanding of this question is still affected by some ambiguities, are to be reconsidered under the light of his anti-essentialism, and that these ambiguities can be dissipated by dissociating, on one hand, what belongs to his own tastes or to his related thoughts and on the other hand what we can conceive through the ways which were opened by his philosophy beyond his personal inclinations. Despite

  20. Corporate creativity and innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Ericsson, Camilla; Dahlby, Tove

    2009-01-01

    This essay discusses organizational culture and focus on corporate creativity and innovation. The aim is to see which organizational factors that foster creativity and innovation in organizations. The essay will provide answer on how organizational culture can encourage creativity and innovation and how organizations can promote the rise of a creative work environment. The research design of this essay is a qualitative case study with interviews at Gotland Energi AB (GEAB). The interviews pro...

  1. Empirical Study on the Creative Accounting Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cernusca Lucian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to analyze the accounting professionals’ point of view as opposed to the students and master students’ one, regarding the creative accounting phenomenon existence and manifestation forms. In order to accomplish this objective, there has been used the poll/investigation, as a research method and the questionnaire, as a research instrument. Within the study, there is suggested the testing of more hypotheses that contribute to the clarifying of the aspects wished to be analyzed through the research. These hypotheses’ acceptance or rejection is based on the „chi-square“ (Karl Pearson statistical test and rank ordering method. Trying to elaborate a global conclusion of the questionnaire, there could be noticed the fact that over 50% from the questioned accounting students are not tempted to use the creative accounting practices and techniques in order to optimize the taxation without breaking the actual law regulations. At the opposite side, more than a half from the questioned accounting professionals would use these practices without breaking the law regulations that lead to the taxation’s optimization. The creative accounting has a negative connotation if the accurate image of the financial position and of the performance is not targeted because it represents the essential factor for elaborating and grounding the accounting policies. However, the positive side of the creative accounting is not excluded, given that one appeals to the „fair“ professional judgment of the accounting professionals and to the good faith of managers.

  2. Organizing Creativity : Creativity and Innovation under Constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caniëls, Marjolein C.J.; Rietzschel, Eric F.

    2015-01-01

    The best way of organizing creativity within organizations remains somewhat enigmatic to scholars, particularly when it comes to the role of constraints. On the one hand, creative organizations are often associated with freedom, autonomy, weak rules and few boundaries. On the other hand, several stu

  3. Organizing Creativity : Creativity and Innovation under Constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caniëls, Marjolein C.J.; Rietzschel, Eric F.

    2015-01-01

    The best way of organizing creativity within organizations remains somewhat enigmatic to scholars, particularly when it comes to the role of constraints. On the one hand, creative organizations are often associated with freedom, autonomy, weak rules and few boundaries. On the other hand, several

  4. What Happened to Autonomy? Visual art practices in the creative industries Era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. van Dillen (Anna)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstractThis thesis concerns the autonomy of visual artists in an era of a booming creative economy and simultaneously declining governmental support for the arts and culture. The research is particularly directed toward the concept of autonomy. On the one hand, there is social autonomy, whi

  5. Teaching originality? : Common habits behind creative production in science and arts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, M.; Baas, M.; Bjordam, T.K.

    2017-01-01

    Originality is a prerequisite for world-changing science and arts alike, but it cannot be taught. Or can it? Here, we show that a set of habits that are—surprisingly—shared among successful artists and scientists may catalyze creative output. We reveal three groups of such habits, each corresponding

  6. Repurposing "Lost," Discarded, or Forgotten Objects into a "Found" Treasure Trove of Creative Writing Instructional Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Through her years as an elementary teacher and now a university professor in teacher education, the author has developed many creative writing instructional ideas for use with all learners (i.e., elementary through graduate level). Resourcefulness and imaginative thinking proves invaluable to teaching artists' pedagogy in current economic…

  7. Teaching originality? Common habits behind creative production in science and arts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, Marten; Baas, Matthijs; Bjordam, Tone K.

    2017-01-01

    Originality is a prerequisite for world-changing science and arts alike, but it cannot be taught. Or can it? Here, we show that a set of habits that are—surprisingly—shared among successful artists and scientists may catalyze creative output. We reveal three groups of such habits, each

  8. Arts Education and Creativity Enhancement in Young Children in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Anna N. N.; He, Mavis W. J.; Ye, Shengquan Sam

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed at assessing Hong Kong young children's gains in creativity and their teachers' application of arts education after a one-year artists-teachers collaborative arts education project that involves various art forms (i.e. drama, visual arts and integrated). Participants included 790 young children, 217 parents and 65 teachers…

  9. Are They Getting It?: Creating Dance Assessments That Honor the Creative Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranicke, Michelle; Pruitt, Lara

    2012-01-01

    This article examines assessment of "intangible" concepts in dance education such as creativity, risk, originality, or artistic thinking. Through the development of assessment workshops for arts educators, conducted from 2009 through 2011 across the state of Illinois and supported by the Illinois Arts Council, the authors developed a…

  10. Leading by Design: A Collaborative and Creative Leadership Framework for Dance Integration in P-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Alison E.; Hellenbrand, Leah; McShane-Hellenbrand, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the Mentorship, Integrated Curriculum, Collaboration, and Scholarship (MICCS) framework as an applicable model for transformative, creative, and curriculum-based K-12 dance education and arts integration. Developed and practiced by the authors--an artist/educator, a classroom teacher, and an arts education scholar and former…

  11. Teaching originality? Common habits behind creative production in science and arts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, Marten; Baas, Matthijs; Bjordam, Tone K.

    2017-01-01

    Originality is a prerequisite for world-changing science and arts alike, but it cannot be taught. Or can it? Here, we show that a set of habits that are—surprisingly—shared among successful artists and scientists may catalyze creative output. We reveal three groups of such habits, each correspond

  12. Dream Logs: Dreams as a Creative Force in Freshman Composition and the Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalpin, Lila

    The keeping of a dream log can spark the imagination in freshman composition courses, giving students opportunities to be both creative artists and critics. With the emphasis more on using dreams than on interpreting them, students are free to explore the symbols and relevance of their dreams when creating written or musical compositions, films,…

  13. Leading by Design: A Collaborative and Creative Leadership Framework for Dance Integration in P-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Alison E.; Hellenbrand, Leah; McShane-Hellenbrand, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the Mentorship, Integrated Curriculum, Collaboration, and Scholarship (MICCS) framework as an applicable model for transformative, creative, and curriculum-based K-12 dance education and arts integration. Developed and practiced by the authors--an artist/educator, a classroom teacher, and an arts education scholar and former…

  14. Arts Education and Creativity Enhancement in Young Children in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Anna N. N.; He, Mavis W. J.; Ye, Shengquan Sam

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed at assessing Hong Kong young children's gains in creativity and their teachers' application of arts education after a one-year artists-teachers collaborative arts education project that involves various art forms (i.e. drama, visual arts and integrated). Participants included 790 young children, 217 parents and 65 teachers…

  15. Are They Getting It?: Creating Dance Assessments That Honor the Creative Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranicke, Michelle; Pruitt, Lara

    2012-01-01

    This article examines assessment of "intangible" concepts in dance education such as creativity, risk, originality, or artistic thinking. Through the development of assessment workshops for arts educators, conducted from 2009 through 2011 across the state of Illinois and supported by the Illinois Arts Council, the authors developed a clear model…

  16. Feminist Judgments as Teaching Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary Hunter

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses feminist judgments as a specific vehicle for teaching students to think critically about law. The analysis of appellate judgments forms a central plank of Anglo-Commonwealth and US jurisprudence and legal education. While academic scholarship generally offers various forms of commentary on decided cases, feminist judgment-writing projects have recently embarked on a new form of critical scholarship. Rather than critiquing judgments from a feminist perspective in academic essays, the participants in these projects have set out instead to write alternative judgments, as if they had been one of the judges sitting on the court at the time. After introducing the UK Feminist Judgments Project and describing what is ‘different’ about the judgments it has produced, the paper explains some of the ways in which these judgments have been used in UK law schools to teach critical thinking. The paper finally speculates on the potential production and application of feminist judgments or their equivalents beyond the common law context. Este artículo analiza las sentencias feministas como un vehículo específico para enseñar a los estudiantes a analizar el derecho desde un punto de vista crítico. El análisis de las sentencias de apelación constituye un elemento central de la jurisprudencia y la enseñanza del derecho en los países angloamericanos y de la Commonwealth. Mientras la comunidad académica ofrece generalmente diversas formas de comentario de casos resueltos, los proyectos de literatura judicial feminista se han embarcado recientemente en un nuevo sistema de crítica académica. En lugar de redactar ensayos académicos criticando las sentencias judiciales desde una perspectiva feminista, los participantes de estos proyectos se han propuesto redactar sentencias alternativas, como si hubieran sido uno de los jueces del tribunal en cuestión. Después de presentar el Proyecto de Sentencias Feministas del Reino Unido y

  17. Two pioneering artists visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    On Monday, 19 January, CERN physicists welcomed musician Tim Blake - progressive rock keyboard and theremin player - and architectural lighting designer Patrice Warrener - inventor of the Chromolithe Polychromatic Illumination system, used in Lyon’s “Fête des Lumières”. Together, they make up the musical duo "Crystal Machine".   The artists visit the Antiproton Decelerator. (Image: Django Manglunki.)   Their visit began with an introduction to CERN by their friend Django Manglunki, project leader for the ion injector chain, and an improvised discussion on the LHC extraction system with Roger Barlow, kicker magnet controls expert and progressive rock fan. This was followed by a quick trip to the CCC, the server room and the SPS RF amplifiers in BA3. Next on the itinerary was a tour of the AD and anti-hydrogen experiments led by Michael Doser, AEgIS Spokesperson. A leisurely lunch followed, in the company ...

  18. Characteristics of Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilford, J. P.

    One analysis of the creative process includes four steps: preparation; concentrated effort; withdrawal from the problem; insight or illumination; and verification, evaluation, and elaboration. The creative process is described elsewhere in four steps: openess, focusing, discipline, and closure. Research studies of highly creative adults have shown…

  19. The Creative Dancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrer, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the creative role of contemporary dancers within the choreographic process, and introduces the question of why their creative contribution is often overlooked? It highlights how different modes of creativity can be understood, and what impacts different choreographic processes have on the way dancers understand their creative…

  20. Grade Level and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alacapinar, Füsun G.

    2013-01-01

    Problem Statement: Creativity has been addressed by many scientists and thinkers. Among them, Guilfort regards creativity as the ability to generate new ideas, and relates it to intelligence. According to Thurstone, creativity must develop and be implemented within a theoretical framework, and a solution must result. Torrance thinks of creativity…

  1. Nurturing Creativity in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collard, Paul; Looney, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Across continents, creativity is a priority for education and is central to the discourse on 21st century learning. In this article, we explore how a greater focus on "everyday creativity" in schools changes the dynamics of teaching and learning. We look briefly at the main concepts in the literature on creativity in education. We then…

  2. Kaleidoscopic Thinking for Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, Catherine M., Ed.

    1991-01-01

    The most successful companies must be flexible and rapidly adaptable. This requires creative management and creative teamwork. Like a kaleidoscope, creative thinking is the ability to rearrange pieces to form a new reality, to see connections, and to think on a global scale. (SK)

  3. The Creative Dancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrer, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the creative role of contemporary dancers within the choreographic process, and introduces the question of why their creative contribution is often overlooked? It highlights how different modes of creativity can be understood, and what impacts different choreographic processes have on the way dancers understand their creative…

  4. The Creativity Crusade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shade, Rick; Shade, Patti Garrett

    2015-01-01

    Creativity has and always will be at the heart of American culture. It is evidenced in our daily lives thanks to the contributions of society's most revered icons. For decades, creativity has languished in the educational system. Creativity is not the norm in schools, and seems to only survive in classrooms or enrichment programs when highly…

  5. Creativity in Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Robert A., Ed.

    A collection of 20 essays on creative problem solving in advertising and sales promotion considers the relationship between client and agency and the degree of creativity that is necessary or desirable for each side to bring to their collaboration. The different essays are fully illustrated and specifically focus on such areas as creativity in…

  6. Creativity in Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jack C.

    2013-01-01

    One quality among the many that characterize effective teachers is the ability to bring a creative disposition to teaching. In second language teaching, creativity has also been linked to levels of attainment in language learning. Many of the language tasks favored by contemporary language teaching methods are believed to release creativity in…

  7. Creative Dramatics. Beginnings Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Julia; Sidlovskaya, Olga; Stotter, Ruth; Haugen, Kirsten; Leithold, Naomi

    2000-01-01

    Presents five articles on using creative dramatics in early childhood education: (1) "Drama: A Rehearsal for Life" (Julia Gabriel); (2) "Fairy Tales Enhance Imagination and Creative Thinking" (Olga Sidlovskaya); (3) "Starting with a Story" (Ruth Stotter); (4) "Using Creative Dramatics to Include All…

  8. Creativity: The Early Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shade, Rick; Shade, Patti Garrett

    2016-01-01

    There is a myth that some people are creative and others are not. However, all children are born creative. They love to explore, ask questions, and are incredibly imaginative. Parents are key in nurturing their child's creativity in the early years. This article offers resources and strategies parents can use at different ages and stages (newborn,…

  9. How to Kill Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Teresa M.

    1998-01-01

    Creativity is undermined unintentionally every day in work environments that were established to maximize business imperatives such as coordination, productivity, and control. Organizations must make a concerted effort to get rid of creativity killers and be truly innovative so that creativity not only survives but thrives. (Author/JOW)

  10. Creativity and Intuition Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollinger, Stephen J.; Palaskonis, Dimitra G.; Pearson, Jodi L.

    2004-01-01

    This study used the recently revised Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and a variety of validated creativity measures to replicate a classic finding--that sensing-intuition predicts creativity--and to evaluate whether the other MBTI scales add to the prediction of creativity. 94 undergraduates completed the MBTI (form M self-scorable) and…

  11. How to Kill Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Teresa M.

    1998-01-01

    Creativity is undermined unintentionally every day in work environments that were established to maximize business imperatives such as coordination, productivity, and control. Organizations must make a concerted effort to get rid of creativity killers and be truly innovative so that creativity not only survives but thrives. (Author/JOW)

  12. Creativity, Giftedness and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besançon, Maud

    2013-01-01

    In this article, conceptions of creativity in giftedness and their implications for education are reviewed. First, the definition of giftedness is examined taking into consideration the difference between intellectual giftedness and creative giftedness and the difference between potential and talent. Second, the nature of creativity based on the…

  13. The Creativity Crusade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shade, Rick; Shade, Patti Garrett

    2015-01-01

    Creativity has and always will be at the heart of American culture. It is evidenced in our daily lives thanks to the contributions of society's most revered icons. For decades, creativity has languished in the educational system. Creativity is not the norm in schools, and seems to only survive in classrooms or enrichment programs when highly…

  14. An interview-based study of professional creative activity with inter-domain comparisons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre; Botella, Marion; Bourgeois, Samira

    From a cultural psychology perspective, culture exists not only at the level of national units but also at the more basic level of communities within nations. Professional groups are a good example of cultural communities. Creativity “uses” culture to “produce” culture (Glăveanu, 2011). Artists......, designers and scientists represent distinctive professional cultures associated with recognized forms of creative activity because the expression of creativity appears to be culture-specific (Bhawuk, 2003; Lubart, 1999; Weiner, 2000). The research presented here explores the main factors required...

  15. The neural circuitry of visual artistic production and appreciation: A proposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambar Chakravarty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nondominant inferior parietal lobule is probably a major "store house" of artistic creativity. The ventromedial prefrontal lobe (VMPFL is supposed to be involved in creative cognition and the dorsolateral prefrontal lobe (DLPFL in creative output. The conceptual ventral and dorsal visual system pathways likely represent the inferior and superior longitudinal fasciculi. During artistic production, conceptualization is conceived in the VMPFL and the executive part is operated through the DLFPL. The latter transfers the concept to the visual brain through the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF, relaying on its path to the parietal cortex. The conceptualization at VMPFL is influenced by activity from the anterior temporal lobe through the uncinate fasciculus and limbic system pathways. The final visual image formed in the visual brain is subsequently transferred back to the DLPFL through the SLF and then handed over to the motor cortex for execution. During art appreciation, the image at the visual brain is transferred to the frontal lobe through the SLF and there it is matched with emotional and memory inputs from the anterior temporal lobe transmitted through the uncinate fasiculus. Beauty is perceived at the VMPFL and transferred through the uncinate fasciculus to the hippocampo-amygdaloid complex in the anterior temporal lobe. The limbic system (Papez circuit is activated and emotion of appreciation is evoked. It is postulated that in practice the entire circuitry is activated simultaneously.

  16. The neural circuitry of visual artistic production and appreciation: A proposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Ambar

    2012-04-01

    The nondominant inferior parietal lobule is probably a major "store house" of artistic creativity. The ventromedial prefrontal lobe (VMPFL) is supposed to be involved in creative cognition and the dorsolateral prefrontal lobe (DLPFL) in creative output. The conceptual ventral and dorsal visual system pathways likely represent the inferior and superior longitudinal fasciculi. During artistic production, conceptualization is conceived in the VMPFL and the executive part is operated through the DLFPL. The latter transfers the concept to the visual brain through the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), relaying on its path to the parietal cortex. The conceptualization at VMPFL is influenced by activity from the anterior temporal lobe through the uncinate fasciculus and limbic system pathways. The final visual image formed in the visual brain is subsequently transferred back to the DLPFL through the SLF and then handed over to the motor cortex for execution. During art appreciation, the image at the visual brain is transferred to the frontal lobe through the SLF and there it is matched with emotional and memory inputs from the anterior temporal lobe transmitted through the uncinate fasiculus. Beauty is perceived at the VMPFL and transferred through the uncinate fasciculus to the hippocampo-amygdaloid complex in the anterior temporal lobe. The limbic system (Papez circuit) is activated and emotion of appreciation is evoked. It is postulated that in practice the entire circuitry is activated simultaneously.

  17. Multidimensional Assessment of Giftedness: criterion Validity of Battery of Intelligence and Creativity Measures in Predicting Arts and Academic Talents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana de Cassia Nakano

    Full Text Available We test the utility of the Battery for Giftedness Assessment (BaAH/S in identifying differences in two groups of already known gifted students in the areas of academic and artistic talents. Four latent factors were assessed (a fluid intelligence, (b metaphor production (verbal creativity, (c figural fluency (figural creativity, and (d divergent thinking figural task quality (figural creativity. A sample of 987 children and adolescents, 464 boys and 523 girls, of ages ranging from 8 to 17 of two groups: regular students (N=866 and gifted students (N= 67 academic abilities, N=34 artistic abilities and N=20 no domain identified. Academic giftedness group of have higher reasoning, can produce more remote/original metaphors, high figural fluency and drawings rated as more original. Children in the group of artistic giftedness have higher reasoning, high figural fluency and drawings rated as more original. Reasoning abilities are relatively higher in academic giftedness group than artistic (r = .39 vs r =.14. Within artistic group figural fluency and ratings of originality are relatively more important than reasoning (r = .25 and r = .21 vs .14. We emphasizes the importance of assessing creativity in different domains in addition to intelligence to improve the understanding of giftedness and talent.

  18. Wording effects in moral judgments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross E. O'Hara

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available As the study of moral judgments grows, it becomes imperative to compare results across studies in order to create unified theories within the field. These efforts are potentially undermined, however, by variations in wording used by different researchers. The current study sought to determine whether, when, and how variations in wording influence moral judgments. Online participants responded to 15 different moral vignettes (e.g., the trolley problem using 1 of 4 adjectives: ``wrong'', ``inappropriate'', ``forbidden'', or ``blameworthy''. For half of the sample, these adjectives were preceded by the adverb ``morally''. Results indicated that people were more apt to judge an act as wrong or inappropriate than forbidden or blameworthy, and that disgusting acts were rated as more acceptable when ``morally'' was included. Although some wording differences emerged, effects sizes were small and suggest that studies of moral judgment with different wordings can legitimately be compared.

  19. AN ARTISTIC AND PSYCHOANALYTIC APPROACH OF LEONARDO DA VINCI’S PAINTINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina-Andreea STOLERIU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The starting point of the present paper is the work 'The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne', made by Leonardo da Vinci. The paper is based both on an artistic and psychoanalytic approach which opens new ways of interpretation due to the research of Sigmund Freud - 'Leonardo da Vinci and a Memory of His Childhood'. Freud claims that Leonardo had found the lost image of his mother in his works 'The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne' and 'Mona Lisa', thus justifying the artist’s direct attachment to these creations. Along with specific interpretations of the creative process, the psychoanalytic approach intends to explain and enrich the content of ideas of the present paper regarding one of the most valuable creations of Leonardo and also an artistic testament created towards the end of his life. Freud’s psychoanalytic approach brings specific interpretative content for the mentioned work of art. It is different from the artistic method, not contradicting various artistic studies, but complementing them in a harmonious way.

  20. AN ARTISTIC AND PSYCHOANALYTIC APPROACH OF LEONARDO DA VINCI’S PAINTINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina-Andreea STOLERIU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The starting point of the present paper is the work 'The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne', made by Leonardo da Vinci. The paper is based both on an artistic and psychoanalytic approach which opens new ways of interpretation due to the research of Sigmund Freud - 'Leonardo da Vinci and a Memory of His Childhood'. Freud claims that Leonardo had found the lost image of his mother in his works 'The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne' and 'Mona Lisa', thus justifying the artist’s direct attachment to these creations. Along with specific interpretations of the creative process, the psychoanalytic approach intends to explain and enrich the content of ideas of the present paper regarding one of the most valuable creations of Leonardo and also an artistic testament created towards the end of his life. Freud’s psychoanalytic approach brings specific interpretative content for the mentioned work of art. It is different from the artistic method, not contradicting various artistic studies, but complementing them in a harmonious way.